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Full text of "Long_Island_Forum_Volume_17_"

r^ 



LONG I SLAND 

FORUM 



O 



^ 




General Woodhull's Grave at Mastic (Story Page 123) 



TABLE of CONTENTS 

GENERAL NATHANIEL WOODHULL'S DEATH 

BIRDS HAVE ANTICS TOO 

SOUTHOLD'S VERSATILE PHYSICIAN 

GLORIOUS FOURTH IN 1809 

WOODSBURGH INDIAN MONUMENT ^ . 

LETTERS FROM FORUM READERS 



John Tooker 

Julian Denton Smith 

Dr. Clarence Ashton Wood 

Kate Wheeler Strong 

Editor 



JULY 1954 



$2.00 a year by Mail; Single Copies 25c 



VOL. XVII, No. 7 



H. K Swezey & Son, Inc. 

GENERAL TRUCKING 
Middle Country Rd., Eastport 

Telephones 
Riverhead 2350 Eastport 250 



Louden-Knickerbocker 
Hall 

A Prirate Sanitarium for 
Nervous and Mental Diseaaea 

SI Louden Ave. AmityTille 

AMityville 4-0053 



Farmingdale 
Individual Laundry 

Dry Cleaning - Launderins 
Rug Cleaning 

BroKd Hnllnw Road Farmincdale 

Phone FArminerdale 2-0300 



Chrysler - Plymouth 

SalcS and Service 

MULLER 
Automobile Corp. 

Merrick Road and Broadway 
AMityville 4-2028 and 4-2029 



BRAKES RELINED 

on Passenger Cars and Truck* 

Power Brake Sales Service 
Suffolk County Brake Service 

314 Medford Avenue, Patchogue 
Tel. 1722 



FURNITURE 
S. B. HORTON CO. 

(Establiihed 1862) 

821 Main St. Greenport 

Tel. 154 




^ SCHWARZ 

FLORIST 

PHONE 

FArmingdale 2-0816 



SUNRISE 

Divition Household Fuel Corp 

'Blue Coal' 

Fuel Oil 

Amityville Farmingdale 
1060 12 

Lindenhurst 
178 



THE 

LCNG ISL/INE) 

Published Monthly at 
AMITYVILLE, N. Y. 

FOR LONG ISLANDERS EVERYWHERE 
Entered as iccond-clasi matter May 31. 1947. at the 
post office at Amityville, New York, under the Act of 
March 3, 1879. 

Paul Bailey, Publisher- Editor 

Contributing Editors 

Clarence A. Wood, LL.M., Ph.D. 

Malcolm M. Willey, Ph.D. 

John C. Huden, Ph.D. 

Julian Denton Smith, Nature 



Tel. AMityville 4-0554 



Liked Dosoris Story 

Mr. Carl Kohler's story on His- 
toric Dosoris in the April issue of 
the Forum was extremely inter- 
esting to me and many of my Glen 
Cove friends. 

Certainly there is no more in- 
teresting country in this part of 
Long Island than that which he 
describes in the article and the 
Forum has done a great service 
in making it possible to preserve 
some of the high-lights of the 
early happenings there. 

Mr. Kohler is particularly versed 
to tell us about old Dosoris because 
he was one of Mr. George Price's 
"boys". He enjoyed the rare privi- 
lege of exploring that part of north 
shore Long Island with that great 
gentleman in the days before Do- 
soris had changed so completely 
as it has today. 

Robert R. Coles, Director 

The Little Museum 

Glen Cove 

Note: Mr. Coles, an executive of 
the Hayden Planetarium for many 
years, is the author of a very in- 
teresting pamphlet entitled "The 
Long Island Indian", written pri- 
marily for young people. He also 
wrote the story of Glen Cove for 
Bailey's two volume Long Island 
History (1949). The pamphlet, 
which sells for %\ postpaid, may 
be obtained by addressing Mr. 
Coles as above. 



Lloyd's Neck Transfer 

How and why did Huntington 
Town, Suffolk County, take Lloyd's 
Neck from Oyster Bay Town in 
1878? T.S.H. Answer: By State 
legislation agreeable to Lloyd's 
Neck taxpayers. 



It seems to me the world is get- 
ting better. Up to about sixty years 
ago it was lawful to shoot as 
game birds, robins, meadowlarks, 
etc. (Mrs.) Nancy Woodruff, 
Franklin Square. 



When the gasoline oysterboat 
blew up at Greenport in 1902, a 
movement was started there to re- 
turn to sails, but it didn't take. 
George R. Flanders. 



NICHOLS 
RUG CLEANING 

Freeport 

86 E. Sunrise Hiehway Tel. 8-1212 

Rue and Furniture Cleaning 



SWEZEY FUEL CO. 

Coal and Fuel Oils 

Patchogue 270 Port Jefferson S.'S.'S 



Funeral Director 

Arthur W. Overton 

Day and Night Service 

172 Main St. Tel. 1086 Ulip 



Loans on Bond and 
Mortgage 

Dapoiita Aacapted by Mail 
First National Bank of Islip 

Member Fed. Deposit Insurance Corp. 



Work Clothes and Paints 

Building and Garden Tools 

Desks, Typewriters, Etc. 

Suffolk Surplus Sales 

Sunrise H'way, Massapequa (East) 
MA 6-4220 C. A. Woehning 



FURNITURE 

Frigidaire 
Home Appliances 

Englander & Simmons 
Sleep Products 

BROWN'S 

Storage Warehouse 

Your Furniture and Appliance Store 

186 Maple St. Phone 31 ISLIP, L. I. 
Established 1919 



Highest Grade 

MEATS 

South Side Meat Market 

Stephen Oueirolo, Prop. 

At the Triangle Amityville 

AMityville 4-0212 



LEIGH'S TAXICABS 

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WAREHOUSE 

Auto Busses For Hire 
AMityville 4-0225 

Near AmityviUt Depot 



122 



MMb 



JULY 1954 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 



r 



Qeneral j^thankl IjOoodhull's 'T)eath 



'T'HE Revolutionary War, 
•*• the stirring events of 
the Battle of Long Island, and 
the seven years of British 
occupatio'i of the Island are 
now so far back in the past 
that very little interest is dis- 
played in them except by those 
who have made history their 
study. The hardships endured, 
the fierce passions aroused in 
the breasts of patriots and 
Tories alike, are all but for- 
gotten by generations living 
amid comforts and conveni- 
ences that even the wealthy 
did not enjoy in those days. 
Today we can travel the length 
of Long Island in three or four 
hours where it took as many 
days in 1776, and we can com- 
municate with people from 
one end of the Island to the 
other in a matter of minutes. 

When we understand those 
differences we can appreciate 
to some extent the difficulties 
experienced by American offi- 
cers of the Revolution in car- 
rying out orders when 
mounted couriers were the 
only means of communication 
between them. 

When the war be^^an, Col. 
Nathaniel Woodhull of Mastic 
was President of The New 
York Provincial Congress, 
and being an experienced mil- 
itary man he left the presi- 
dential/ chair for the field, 
where he was made a Briga- 
dier-General. He seems to 
have worked under a conflict 
of authcrity, taking orders 
from both the Provincial 
Congress and General Wash- 
ington. 

The purpose of this story is 
to relate events in the life of 
Gen. Woodhull at that time 
which bring out one of the 
finest traits in the character 
of that native Long Island 
General, how he saved two 
American officers from the 
fate that he met with cour- 
age and devotion to the patriot 
cause. 

During the Revolution, and 
for many years after, the 



Jo An Tooker 

territory now known as the 
Borough of Brooklyn was 
made up of small villages and 
farms often widely separated 
from each other, and in one 
of those villages, that of Bed- 
ford, lived a brave little Dutch 
farmer named Lambert Suy- 
dam. 

The junction of three im- 
portant roads in the center of 
the village gave to the vicinity 
the name of Bedford Corners. 
Ihe Brooklyn and Jamaica 
Road from Fulton Ferry 
passed through the village 
and continued east to Jamaica. 
The Clove Road, so named be- 
cause it passed through a 
clove or cleft in the hills, ran 
south to Flatbush, and the 
Cripplebush Road ran north- 
east from Bedford Corners to 
Newtown. A map of 1766-67 
shows Suydam's farm on the 
north side of the Brooklyn 
and Jamaica Road and east of 
the Cripplebush Road. 

Lambert Suydam was cap- 
tain of a cavalry troop called 
the Kings County Horse which 
had been organized in Bed- 
ford, and had two other Suy- 
dams on the roster, probably 



relatives of the captain. 
Hendrick Suydam was clerk 
of the troop, and Jacob Suy- 
dam was a private. The short, 
compact, frame of Capt. Suy- 
dam did not make a very im- 
posing figure on horseback, 
but what he lacked as an im- 
pressive military man was 
more than made up by his 
courage and honesty. 

His firey, resolute charac- 
ter that permitted no insults 
to his dignity, or encroach- 
ments on what he considered 
his rights, would have de- 
lighted Petrus Stuyvesant if 
he had lived in his time. Capt. 
Suydam took great pride in 
mounting a big farm-horse, 
and at the head of his troop 
patrolling the Clove Road to 
Flatbush, the Bedford Road to 
Jamaica, or scouting along 
the Kings Highway to dis- 
cover signs of the enemy 
advance. 

General Washington was 
anxious to get all the cattle in 
Kings and Queens Counties 
out of reach of the British, 
and assigned that task to Gen. 
Woodhull. Capt. Suydam with 
his troop assisted Gen. Wood- 
hull in that foray and, leaving 



^^*^Jb 






"'i'Siiil;' '" " " - 



j^iliWMtmniBi" 4b<4$^<-t- 



Woodhull's Capture (From an old print) 



12-^ 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 



JULY 1954 



only one cow to a family, they 
gathered up all the others and 
drove them to the Hempstead 
Plains where they had diffi- 
culty in finding water for so 
many. That raid did not make 
any friends for the General 
and Captain among the Flat- 
lands and Jamaica farmers. 

One of Gen. WoodhuU's last 
orders, issued while the Battle 
of Long Island was raging to 
the westward, was to detach 
Capt. Suydam from guard 
duty at Jamaica and send him 
eastward, for he would not 
permit any American officer 
to share the danger in which 
he found himself. 

Capt. Suydam met Col. Pot- 
ter of the Suffolk County Mili- 
tia near Hempstead and that 
officer, yielding to the panic 
that gripped so many at that 
time, ordered Capt. Suydam 
and his men to leave the 
island. Although he doubted 
the wisdom of the order, Capt. 
Suydam obeyed it, abandoned 
his horses, and he and his men 
crossed the [Sound to West- 
chester. By October they were 
in a destitute condition, and 
the New York Provincial Con- 
gress, to which they had ap- 
pealed, granted them pay as 
on active service. 

It is not known if Capt. Suy- 
dam acted as a spy for Gen- 
eral Washington, but the fact 
that he paid several visits to 
Bedford while the British 
were occupying his premises 
leads one to suspect that he 
may have done so. On one of 
his visits the British sur- 
rounded his house, but 
through the efforts of Mrs. 
Suydam he managed to elude 
them and escape. After a year 
of exile he signed the submis- 
sion and was permitted to 
return to his home. A few 
years later some of his 
troopers were captured by the 
British in New Jersey and 
brought back to Long Island 
as prisoners. 

The other American officer 
saved by Gen. WoodhuU from 
capture and imprisonment was 
Col. Joseph Robinson, of 
Scotch descent, and born at 
St. Croix in the Danish West 

Continued on page 133 



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124 



JULY 1954 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 



^irds \}\xxve ^Antics HSoo 



IV/I ANY of us delight in 
^^'^ watching birds, in provid- 
ing food for them when neces- 
sary, and in making friends 
with them. Bird antics often 
fascinate us and perhaps the 
retelling of some observations 
of local bird behavior will re- 
call similar experiences to our 
readers. 

Catbirds are friendly crea- 
tures and their black beady 
eyes seldom let you out of 
sight for long. They do not 
like to bother with feeding 
stations — would much rather 
come right up ta the back 
door and wait for your per- 
sonal attention. With some 
care and a bit of bird talk on 
your part catbirds will fly to 
your outstretched hand for 
raisins. They may have many 
misgivings, entrances and 
exits, but finally will end up 
sitting on your fingers as 
they go to work on the raisins. 

A Blue Jay in a single frugal 
act broke two admonitions of 
the Bible. I saw one eat bread 
crumbs until completely filled. 
He tried to hide a final crust 
from squirrels which are al- 
ways around. The jay dragged 
a dead oak leaf to the food 
and covered the crust with the 
leaf. The Bible suggests we 
should not lay up treasures 
nor take much thought for the 
morrow, what we should eat! 

I fully expect to be bird- 
handled on the head by en- 
raged terns. During their 
nesting season they want no 
foreign element near their 
nests. They become suspicious 
of persons a good quarter of a 
mile away. Their screaming 
and diving is more purposeful 
the closer one approaches. 
Then the bombings commence 
with more or less accuracy, 
and the shots improve with 
practice. By the time the 
visitor is within sight of the 
eggs or young the terns are 
beside themselves and their 
divings terminate inches from 



Julian Denton Smith 

Secretary Nassau County Historical 

Society 

one's hair. One day they will 
become mad enough to end 
a dive in a head-on collision. 

Have you ever noticed hovv 
busy the gulls are on Jones 
Beach between the time the 
crowds go home at the end of 
the day and the arrival of the 
tractor-trains to clear the re- 
fuse baskets? The gulls have 
found the baskets contain 
eatables of infinite variety. 



They settle on and in the bas- 
kets clawing over the con- 
tents. Some birds have learn- 
ed to combine their weight 
and effort to tip over the bas- 
kets which facilitates the 
hunt for food. There is usually 
enough discarded menu in 
one basket to feed several 
gulls. 

Redwing Blackbirds are al- 
ways very much at home in 
plume grass. They appear to 
delight in clutching a cane 
and swaying in the breeze. On 
still days I have seen them 




Canada Goose (From a woodcut by the late Loring M. Turrell, M. D.) 



125 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 



JULY 1954 



speed into a brake and sway 
back and forth as long as there 
is any pedulum-like response 
in the cane. 

A Sparrow Hawk is almost 
dainty in the way he comes to 
rest on a pine tree. They like 
pines, especially the very tip- 
top, — they are never "Satisfied 
wich a lower place. The needles 
of the top shoot incline 
slightly to the sides leaving a 
sort of open basket around 
the leading bud. There is only 
one way for a bird to settle 
into such a basket and that h 
to drop right in. The Sparrow 
Hawk does just that. He hov- 
ers above the basket, gradual- 
ly losing altitude and finally 
drops in. If the tip-top is mov- 
ing in the wind, the hawk 
seems to become synchronized 
with the motion. Whenever 
he misses his aim, the needles 
do more than tickle! 

During the fall migration 
of loons the weaker and dis- 
abled frequently come ashore 
and hitch themselves across 
the beach and up to- the top 
of a first line dune. The tracks 
in the sand look as tho made 
by a giant zipper. The loons 
rest quietly all day and in the 
dusk take off by leaping di- 
rectly into the air from the 
dune top — a take-off without 
benefit of water. They usually 
let a person get near enough 
to them to see their unusual 
feet before becoming too ner- 
vous and complaining. 

One day last summer all the 
birds in the neighborhood 
seemed to gather in my back- 
yard ar.d set up an unearthly 
clatter and commotion. Jays 
were mixed with robins, vireos 
and sparrows, warblers and a 
tanager — all yelling like crazy. 
Their attentions seemed di- 
rected under the grapevines. 
I found a two-foot garter 
snake stretched beneath the 
vines waiting patiently for 
ROTnething to distract the 
birds from their attack on 
him. TTie whole affair seemed 
the rallying of aerial forces 
against a common enemy. 

An easy vray to recognize a 
Marsh Hawk is by its habit of 
flying beneath the horizon. In 
its search for mice, frogs and 
so forth it holds so close to the 



ground that it appears be- 
neath the eye level. Marsh 
Hawks are not overly accur- 
ate in pouncing upon a target. 
They do well to maintain a 
50-50 average as their reac- 
tions are all a bit slow. 

Several years ago we had a 
total eclipse of the sun. As the 
moon blotted out the light 
our chickens went up on their 
roosts. At the height of the 
weird, gray light a Whippoor- 
will announced himself rather 
doubtfully and discreetly. It 
seemed he might be wonder- 
ing what in the world he was 
talking about. 

No such thing as a code of 
ethics exists among our 
feathered friends. Watch a 
sea gull drop a clam on the 
sand or parkway to open it. 
He loses no time in descending 
upon it and frequently gets 
there a mere bird's length 
ahead of another of his kind 
that had swooped in for an 
unearned feed. Sometimes one 
will yank the food out of an- 
other's mouth in midair. 

A Junco came into the 
house last winter. In his 
fright and frenzy to get out, 
he flew against window panes 
until he knocked himself al- 
most unconsc'ous. I picked 
him up and found his heart 
beating at a great rate. That 
speedy heart-beat is a normal 
condition with birds, the same 
as a body temperature of 105 
to 115 degrees is common and 
customary. I let the bird leave 
my hand at the front door 
and he did exactly as do so 
many crippled and iniured 
birds — headed into a thic\ 
blue spruce to hide. Birds 
never leave such protection 
until completely able to care 
for themselves. 

White seems to have an es- 
pecial appeal to birds when 
building rests. A neighbor 
hung out small pieces of rib- 
bon and cloth one spring. The 
white pieces went immediate- 
ly into the nests and some- 
times colored pieces were 
never carried away, particu- 
larly reds. Nests show pieces 
of newspaper, white feathers, 
white shells, white hair and 

Continued on page 13 5 



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126 



JULY 1954 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 



jouthold's IJersatile T^hysician 



# 



A CTIVITY and versatility 
■*^ packed the short forty- 
three-year life of Franklin 
Tuthill, scion of Southold's 
Henry Tuthill, progenitor of 
the numerous Tuthills and 
Tuttles of Long Island. He 
was bom at Wading River in 
1822, the second son of Cap- 
tain Nathaniel Tuthill, mari- 
ner and shipbuilder, and Cla- 
rissa, the daughter of Nathan- 
iel and Martha Miller of Miller 
Place. 

When Franklin was fifteen, 
his parents moved to Green- 
port where the Captain estab- 
lished a shipyard at the foot 
of Tuthill street, now Central 
avenue, which he later sold to 
Hiram Bishop. Franklin's 
brother Ellsworth became a 
fish factory owner at the east 
end. Another brother, George 
Miller Tuthill, became a prom- 
inent clergyman in Chicago 
and still anc-ther brother, 
James Harvey Tuthill, served 
as State Senator and for 
some twenty years as Surro- 
gate of Suffolk County. Their 
sister Sarah, a graduate of Mt. 
Holyoke, taught school at 
Southold and at Farmington, 
Ct., and became an accom- 
plished artist. 

Franklin Tuthill entered 
Amherst College at the age of 
fourteen, graduating four 
years later and in 1844 com- 
pleting a medical course at 
the University of the City of 
New York. The same year he 
began practising at Southold 
and two years later married 
Emma Harriet Horton, daugh- 
ter of Salter Storrs Horton 
and Harriet Case Horton, Hor- 
ton, who died prior to the mar- 
riage of his daughter, had 
served Southold as post- 
master, librarian and car- 
penter. In the latter capacity 
in 1836 he had built a parson- 
age for the Old First Church. 
Dr. Tuthill succeeded his late 
father-in-law as postmaster. 



Dr. Glarence vyishton Wood 

In the fall of 1850 when 
Southold belatedly celebrated 
its bicentennial, among the 
sponsors of the occasion were 
the local minister, Rev. George 

F. Wiswell; David Philander 
Horton, a budding music 
teacher destined to gain re- 
nown in that field, and Dr. 
Tuthill. Among the toasts 
proposed at the celebration 
was one to "the medical facul- 
ty" of the community which 
included besides young Tut- 
hill, Drs. Seth H. Tuthill, David 
Van Scoy and Ira Corwin. 

The singing on the program 
was led by Dr. Tuthill's close 
friend. Prof. Horton, who 
taught vocal classes in the 
local Presbyterian lecture 
hall, known as the Prayer 
Room, and called by the 
younger set of that day the 
Eel Pot because of its sugges- 
tive contour. It was the Pro- 
fessor who requested the 
young Doctor to stand beside 
one elderly, unmusical singer 
and to poke him in the ribs 
each time he emitted a dis- 
cord. According to Edward 

G. Huntting, the old gentle- 
man, as a result of Dr. Tut- 



hill's constant prodding, was 
"black and blue from hip to 
top-rib". 

In 1851 the young physi- 
cian was nominated for Mem- 
ber of Assembly by the 
Whigs, at which the local 
non-Whig weekly editorialized 
that "We can say nothing 
against our friend, the Doctor, 
only that he is a Whig. We 
cannot, however, inform our 
Whig readers whether he be- 
longs to the Seward or Fill- 
more wing of his party". But 
Tuthill was elected and suc- 
ceeded to the Assembly seat 
of his wife's uncle, Silas Hor- 
ton of Hog Neck, Southold. 

At Albany the Doctor be- 
came intimately associated 
with Henry J. Raymond, who 
had been elected Assembly- 
man from the 9th Ward, Man- 
hattan, while employed on the 
editorial staff of the New 
York Courier & Enquirer. 
When The New York Times 
first appeared on September 
18, 1851, Raymond was its 
first editor as well as part- 
owner. Later he became 
Speaker o-f the Assembly, 
Lieutenant Governor and 
Congressman. 

Continued on page 137 




Southold's Old First Church (From pencil sketch by Cyril A. Lewis) 



127 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 



= "Tales of the Immortals" 



Reminders 



Pleasure Boat Insurance Specialist 
GEORGE C. EARTH 

134A Broadway, next to Post Office 
AMityville -4-1688 (Res. 4-0855) 



Automotive Supplies 

E. Clayton Smith, jobber. Re- 
placement parts, tools and equip- 
ment. 218-220 East Main Street, 
Babylon. Tel. 551. 



Visitors Welcome 

The General Museum-Library of 
the Suffolk County Historical So- 
ciety, at Riverhead, is open daily 
(except Sundays and Holidays) 
from one to five P. M. 

Visitors always welcome (no 
charge) at this educational insti- 
tution where items connected with 
Long Island's history, culture and 
natural sciences are on display. 



Wines and Liquors 
Large assortment of Popular 
Brands at the Lowest Possible 
Prices and in various size con- 
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Liquor Store, 170 Park Ave., Amity- 
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€tjan0 

AMITYVILLE DAIRY, INC. 

AMITYVILLE 

ROCKVILLE CENTRE 

BLUE POINT 



Under the above caption Eliza- 
beth Rorty and Frances H. Wallace 
have compiled an illustrated 
pamphlet on The Hall of Fame of 
the Trotter, maintained at Goshen, 
N. Y. The pamphlet tells briefly 
the story of the seven progenitors 
of the modern trotter and pacer 
recently elected to The Hall as 
"Immortals" in the equine world. 

Naturally, the great Hambleton- 
ian of Long Island lineage, whose 
story has been told in the Forum 
leads the "immortal" seveo. The 
statue of his great-grandsire Mes- 
senger stands at Locust Valley. 
World Champions Lady Suffolk of 
Smithtown and Rarus of Southold 
town were also descended from 
Messenger. 

The pamphlet is sold at 50c by 
The Independent; Press, Goshen. 



STILL £ CALSO 

GASOLINE — FUEL OIL 

DISTRIBUTOR 

Tel. SElden 2-3512 



Cash and Carry 

Service 15 ^ Off 

UNQUA LAUNDRIES 

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Dixon Avenue Copiegue 



JULY 1954 

The Long Island Naturalist 

The third number of The Long 
Island Naturalist, published by the 
Baldwin Bird Club and edited by 
the famous nature author Edwin 
Way Teale, is now available by 
addressing 19 Parkwood Road, 
Rockville Centre. Price postpaid 
50 cents. 



Dr. Wood Writes On 

"Bunkers and Other Fish" by Dr. 
Clarence Ashtcn Wood in your 
May number gave a lot of us 
amateur fishermen some pretty 
fine old time records to equal. 
Thanks. 

David R. Priest 
'The Surf Club" 



The Lewis Map 

That Long Island map by Artist 
Lewis in your June issue was in^ 
deed worth preserving. Why don't 
you get some up for framing? 
R.R. Pettingil, Jamaica. 



Wanted to Buy 

A copy of the Hallock Family 
Genealogy. In replying please state 
condition and lowest cash price. 
Mrs. Willard J. Davies, 290 Hemp- 
stead Avenue, Rockville Centre. 
Telephone R.C. 6-0646. (Jy) 



Old Picture Postcards 

Will buy picture postcards over 
25 years old, used or unused. 
Please write Felix Reifschneider, 
Box 774, Orlando, Florida 



Wanted 



Lineage of Jonathan Smith 
(born 1718, came to Orange 
County 1770), and wife Deborah. 
Harry Hawkins Smith, 184 North 
Church St., Goshen, N. Y. 



Schrafel Motors, Inc. 

NASH Sales and Service 

NEW and USED CARS 

Merrick Road, West Amityville 

Leo F, Schrafel AM 4-23 06 



FAMILY HISTORY 

Start yours now with our Simpli- 
fied Worksheets and Directions . . . 
Complete Set, punched for three- 
ring binder, postpaid $1. . . . 



GIDEON STIVERS 

Box 382 Riverhead, L. I. 



The Bowne House 
Historical Society 

Judge Charles S Colden, President 
presents 

The Bowne House 

Built 1661 

Bowne St. and Fox Lane 

FLUSHING, N. Y. 

A Shrine to Religion Freedom 

ADMISSION FEEE 

Sundays, Tuesdays and Saturdays I to 5 P.M. 

Sponsored by 

HALLERAN AGENCY 

Realtors Flushing, N. Y. 



Farmingdale Federal Savings 
and Loan Association 

312 CONKLIN STREET 

First Mortgage Loans Insured Savings 

21% Dividend 



Phone FArmingdale 2-20(10 



FARMINGDALE, N. Y. 



^^ 



128 



JULY 1954 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 



m 



Qlorious 'fourth in l8og 



# 



TT must have been a day of 
wild excitement at Setau- 
ket'; fun for all boys, lig and 
little, starting with the joyful 
pealing of Caroline Church 
bell at sunrise. At 10 A.M. 
came the grand gathering ou 
Meeting He-use Green. Cap- 
tain James Smith, Captain of 
Artillery, and Captain George 
Hallock, Lieutenant for the 
occasion, had seen that the 
brass cannon was rolled onto 
the Green from the gun-ho.ise 
there, which was its home 
until, alas, years later it was 
borrowed by some south side 
village and never heard of 
more. 

But on this day it came 
forth in all its glory, and 
small boys loved to hear how 
it had been captured in 
mighty battle o-n the Heights 
of Abraham, and how Uncle 
Sam had kindly loaned it to 
his loyal people. Two casks of 
cannon powder were provided 
and the noise was such that a 
poet. Captain Lewis Davis, 
some years later wrote: 
Whose each discharge the 

ground made shake 
And echoes boom o'er vale 

and hill, 
The water dance in Satterly's 

lake, 
The glass to crack in church 

and mill. 
Captain John Van Brunt 
led the militia; the oration 
was delivered by John Wood- 
hull, and John R. Satterly 
read the Declaration of Inde- 
pendence. The committee of 
three to plan the toasts to be 
drunk that day consisted of 
Captain James Smith, William 
Jayne and my great-grand- 
father Thomas Strong. I have 
no account of those toasts, but 
I think an old paper of toasts 
for a Fourth of July celebra- 
tion would give some idea of 
what the toasts of that time 
were like. They certainly 
were frank in giving their 
opinions. 

"The day We celebrate — 



f^fe li'heeler ^trong 

it delivered us from British 
taxation, may it never be for- 
gotten." 

"General Washington — his 
virtues the salvation; his tri- 
umphs the boast; his princi- 
ples the guide; his name the 
watchword of his country." 

"The President of the Uni- 
ted States — fallible from 
necessity : virtuous frOxH 
choice." 

"Governor State of Con- 
necticut — his friends and 
foes both know many better 
and many worse men." 

"The departed heroes of 
America — although no sta- 
tues of trap or marble re- 
mind us of their forms, free- 
dom at home and respect 
abroad remind us of their 
deeds." 

"Our rulers of every grade 
^-especially those who serve 
their country for their coun- 
try's good." 



"The Army— a kind-hearted 
friend but a relentless foe." 

"The Navy — America's 
pride and glory ; the youngest 
but most favored child of 
Neptune: the blaze of its stars 
shone conspicuous while the 
cross of Albion and the cres- 
cent of Algiers sunk beneath 
the waves." 

"The union of the States- 
may it never be severed while 
the earth bears a plant or the 
sea rolls a wave." 

"The American Fair — may 
their smiles light us to virtue 
in time of peace, and acts of 
bravery in war." 

"Independent Agricultural 
Society— may the plowshare 
of public inquiry and the har- 
row of independent censure 
keep grubworms of faction 
from the roots of our Liberty 
Tree." 

As the people of Setauket 
heard the Declaration of In- 

Continued on page 138 



fiAty"^ J 




c/LMJ-^. J^\J' 



.^lyt^t 



Rev. Zachariah Greene (From sketch by William S. Mount 



129 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 



JULY 1954 



Leading Real Estate Brokers of 



Sayville 



Lillian H. Robinson, Realtor 

Real Estate, Insurance, 

Furnished Cottages 

Farms - Homes - Acreage 

169 W. Main St. SAyville 4-1900 
Member of L. I. Real Estate Board 



Munsey Park 



See Wile for 

Worth While Real Estate 

General Brokerage 

Manhasset and vicinity 

DAVID T. WILE JR. & CO. 

3393 Northern Blvd. Manhasset 667 



Mineola 



J. ALFRED VALENTINE 

Real Estate - Insurance 

148 Mineola Boulevard 

Phone Garden City 7-7200 



Hicksville 



SEAMAN & EISEMANN, Inc. 

Real Estate - Insurance 

»0 Broadway Tel. Hicksville 600 



Riverhead 



DUGAN REALTY COMPANY 

Eastern Long Island Country 
Places along Ocean, Sound, 
Peconic, Shinnacock Bays. 



Northport 



EDWARD BIALLA 

ALBERT M. ZILLIAN 

EDWIN N. ROWLEY, INC. 

Real Estate — Insurance 

Appraisals 

74 Main Street 

NOrthport 3-0108 and 2272 

Members L. I. Real Estate Board 



Latest Dividend Declared 
at the rate of 

2'/2 % 
per annum 

Savings Accounts opened 
and Banking-by-Mail 

The Union Savings Bank 

of Patchogue, New York 

The only Savings Bank in 

Western Suffollc County 

Member Federal Deposit 

Inaurance Corporation 



Ketcham & Colyer, Inc. 
INSURANCE 

George S. Colyer, Secy. 
Broadway and Park Ava. 

AMityville 4-0198 



"Longest Haired Lady" Excelled 

Since writing the short sketch 
of "The Longest Haired Lady" 
(Nov. Forum) I have learned of 
another L. I. woman whose hair 
equalled or exceeded that of Mrs. 
Petty, in length. Recently a friend, 
Mrs. Halsey Dickenson of Water 
Mill, showed me a photo of an 
aunt with the exceptional long 
hair. I of course was surprised, 
having always thought Mrs. Petty 
was "Long Island's One and Only" 
But I was pleased to learn that 
L. I. can boast of two exceptional 
women in that respect. I feel that 
the following information should 
be given, to keep the record 
straight. 

Fortunately I have been able to 
contact the lady, my letter being 
very graciously answered by her 
daughter whose letter follows: 

"In regard to biographic back- 
ground of my mother, Mrs. Han- 
nah T. Moore living at Lyn Oaks, 
Morris Plains, N. J., she is the 
daughter of the late Abel Corwin 
and Helen Woodhull of Wading 
River. She is a direct descendant 
of Elizabeth Hopkins who came to 
this country on the Mayflower. 

"On her mother's side, she is a 
direct descendant of General 
WoodbuU of Revolutionary War 
fame. Her grandfather, Joshua 
Woodhull and his brothers built 
the famous Horn Tavern Inn where 
the stage coaches from New York 
stopped years ago. On her father's 
side she is a descendant of Mat- 
Continued on next page 

Farmingdale 

GREGORY SOSA AGENCY, Inc. 
Real Estate and Insurance 

Serving The Community Since 1921 
FArmingdale 2-0321—2-1286 



Hubbell, Klapper 6- Mubbell 

LONG ISLAND REAL ESTATE 

65 Hilton Avenue 

Garden City, N. Y. 



REAL ESTATE 

Insurance Mortgages 

JOHN T. PULIS 

101 Richmond Ave , Amityville 
AMiiyville 4-1489 



EASTPORT 

Edward B. Bristow 

Real Estate and Insurance 

Main Street EAstport 5-0164 



Port Washington 



Howard C. Hegeinan Agency, Inc. 

Real Estate and Insurance 

185 Main Street 
Tel. POrt Washington 7-3124 



Commack 



JOHN W. NOTT 

Established 1925 
Wanted: Large flat wooded acre- 
age eastern L. I. to Riverhead. 
Jericho Tpk. FOrest 8-9322 



Huntington 



HENRY A. MURPHY 
INSURING AGENCY, Inc. 

Real Estate, Insurance, Mortgage 

Loans, Appraisals 

Steamship Tickets 

Cornelius L. Murphy Tel. Hunt. 178 



Wyandanch 



HAROLD S. ISHAM 

All Lines of Insurance 

Real Estate 

Straight Path, Wyandanch 

Tel. Midland 7755 



Mastic 



Realtor — Insuror 
BENJAMIN G. HERRLEY 

MONTAUK HIGHWAY 
Phone ATlantic— 1-8110 



Glen Head 



M. O. HOWELL 

Real Estate - Insurance 

25 Glen Head Road 

Telephone GLen Cove 4-0491 



Bay Shore 



Auto and Other Insurance 

— Real Estate — 

HENNING AGENCY, Realtor 

86 E.Main BayShore 7-0876 & 0877 



Central Islip 



ROBERT E. O'DONOHUE 

CarletonAve. Tel. 6317 Central Islip 
Real Estate - Insurance 

Established 1911 



Hampton Bays 



JOHN H. SUTTER 
Licensed Real Estate Broker 

1 East Main Street 
HAMPTON BAYS 2-0420 





Tel. BAbylon 6-0265 




w. 


E. MAGEE, 

APPRAISER 


Inc. 


Real 


Estate and Insurance || 




Brokers 






Babylon. N. Y. 






130 



JULY 1954 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 



f^ 



% 



Long Island's Suburban Homeland 



Uniondale 



PETER P. ROCCHIO 

The Town Agency For 

Real Estate and Insurance 

889 Nassau Road, Uniondale 

Phone HEmpstead 2-6858 



Patchogue 



Realtors — Insurors 
JOHN J. ROE & SON 

125 E. Main St. Patchogue 2300 



Glen CoT« 



HAROLD A> JACKSON CO. 
Insurance and Real Estate 

7 W. Glen Street Telephone 4-1500 



Westbury 



HAMILTON R. HILL 

Insurance - Real Estate 

WEstbury 7-0108 249 Post Ave. 

For Westbury and Vicinity 



Floral Park 



EDMUND D. PURCELL 

REALTOR 

Sales - Appraisals - Insurance 

111 Tyson Ave. FLoral Park 4-0333 

Lake Ronkonkoma 

CLIFFORD R. YERK 

Lots, Farms, Shore Frontage 

Homes Acreage 

Rosedale Ave. and Richmond Blvd. 

Telephones Ronkonkoma 8543 and 8859 

East Norwich 

Richard Downing & Sons 

GENERAL INSURANCE 

Licensed Real Estate Broker 

Tel. Oyster Bay 592 
North Hempstead Turnpike 



Heal Estate Insurance 
East yETAUKET 

Lond Island. New York 
■ Tel. 101 Sotauket ■ 



Unqua Agency, Inc. 

General Insurance 

Real Estate 

GORDON W. FRASER, Mgr. 

199-A Broadway AMityville 4-0376 



Longest Haired Lady 

Continued from page 130 

thias Corwin, who was one of the 
first settlers of Southold L. I. in 
1640. 

"Your statement about the 
Sutherland Sisters, I am afraid is 
incorrect; there were seven sisters 
bom in Lock Port, N. Y., daugh- 
ters of Rev. Fletcher Sutherland. 
At the time my mother was travel- 
ing with the S'isters, her hair was 
the finest and longest ever known 
and golden brown in color. 

"Thank you for the copy of the 
L. I. Forum which we found most 
interesting, and I hope the above 
information may be of help to you. 
"Cora C. Hildebrant" 
I might add that in Sag Harbor 
I was shown a strand of Mrs. 
Moore's auburn hair, notation on 
the envelope reading: "6 ft. 5 in. 
Jan. 1, 1896." 

So my Mrs. Petty seems to be 
relegated to second place. 

Elizabeth Chase Hawkins 

Southampton 
Editor's Note: Perhaps other 
Forum readers know of other 
Long Islanders of the past worthy 
of note. Barnum's greatest walker, 
Steven Talfchouse, was a Montauk 
Indian. 

Miller Place 

ALFRED E. BEYER 

Licensed Real Estate Broker 

Member, Suffolk Real Estate Board 

North Country Road Miller Place 

Tel. POrt Jefferson 8-1204 

Massapequa 

TOM ABBOTT 

Massapequa 

Cor. Merrick Rd. and Ocean Ave. 
Massapequa, N. Y. 



BELLPORT 

Edtvard B. Bristow 

Real Estate and Insurance 
Main Street BEIIport 7-0143 



Robert A. Dodd 

General Insurance 
Real Estate 


RAYMOND A. 

66 Merrick Rd.. Copiague 


SWEENEY 

AMityville +-1961 



Real Estate Insurance 

EDWARD F. COOK 

East Hampton 

Telephone 4-1440 



East Quogue 



GEO. H, JONES 
Real Estate and Insurance 

Montauk Highway 
Telephone East Quogue 960 



Wantagh 



W. J. JORGENSEN 
Realtor — Appraisals 

Tel. Wanta«h 2210 



Babylon 



CHARLES F. PFEIFLE 

Licensed Real Estate Broker 

Lots - Plots - Acreage 

W. Main St., nr. Lake Babylon 644 



Wading River 



WM. L. MILLER & SON 
Real Estate and Insurance 
Phone: Wading River 4323 



Great Neck 



Qf/ Miiwf^ 



LONG ISLAND 
REAL ESTATE 

City line to Montauk Point. List- 
ings wanted all over Long Island. 
Sales offices at 740 Northern Blvd., 
Great Neck, and Route 25 Matti- 
tuck. Tels. GReat Neck 2-5614 and 
Mattituck 9-8434. 

Garden City 



BPKLEYgH ORTON fO> 

(7 Oe-FI.'K!S) ' V^ 

'^Brooklyn and Long Is land ^s Largest 

Real Estate Organization" 

721 Franklin Ave. Tel. Garden City 7-6400 



Save at Southold 

BANK BY MAIL 
Current Dividend 

The Oldest Savings Bank in Suf- 
folk County. Incorporated 1858. 

Southold Savings Bank 

Southold, New York 

Member Federal Deposit Insurance 
Corporation 



lil 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 

Greenport Monument, 1890's 

An inquiry in the April Forum 
as"to the identity of the monument 
shown has brought the following 
replies which would seem to place 
the locale at Greenport. The monu- 
ment, photographed back in the 
1890's by Marshall Woodman, late 
of Amityville, bears the following 
inscription: "1883. In Memory of 
Our Fallen Heroes" below the 
names of Henry M. Wiggins, Chat- 
ham Corwin and William S. E. 
Stratton. 

Writes Mrs. Josenh A. Wells of 
Upper Montclair, N. J.: "I know 
that Chatham Crrwin was bom in 
Greenport and died in the Civil 
War. Wiggins is also a Greenport 
name and I would expect that ihe 
monument is in a cemetery there. 
Chatham Cotwln was the youngest 
of the ten children of Mathias and 
Mary Corwin and my husband's 
mother was one of his sisters." 

Writes Hilary Corwin, counselor 
at law, of Huntington: "It is my 
thought that the photo is of the 
Civil War memorial on Broad street 
in Greenport. * * * The part of the 
house shown on the light-ha'rl 
side of the picture was my birth- 
place, now tom down. 



That was a fine picture of the 
Rayncr house at Westhampton on 
the May cover and an interesting 



JULY 1954 

description by the venerable owner, 
Thurston H. Rayncr. G. L. Ames, 

Amityville. 



^ 




The Monument (Front photo by Marshall A. Woodman) 



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HOME OWNERS 



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INDIVIDUAL MORTGAGE HOLDERS 

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RIVERHEAD SAVINGSJBANK 



RIVERHEAD. N. Y. 



RIVERHEAD 8-3600 



.<> 



132 



JULY 1954 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 



^ 



^ 



# 



WoodhuU's Death 

Continued from page 124 

Indies in 1742. He came to 
New York in 1760 and mar- 
ried the daughter of James 
Cebra of Jamaica, L. I., by 
whom he had five children, all 
daughters. When the Revolu- 
tionary War began he was 
made colonel of a regiment of 
Provincial Militia under the 
command of Gen. Woodhull. 
Col. Robinson spent the 
night of August 27, 1776 at 
the home of Mrs. Cebra, his 
wife's mother, in Jamaica, and 
the next day he mounted his 
horse and accompanied Gen. 
Woodhull to the inn of In- 
crease Carpenter at East 
Jamaica (now Hollis) . He left 
this inn shortly before Gen. 
Woodhull was captured. 

Col. Robinson managed to 
get his family safely within 
the American lines at Wood- 
bury, Conn., and at the end 
of the war in 1783 he returned 
to Jamaica, where he became 
Surrogate of Queens County 
in 1787 holding that office 
until his death on Sept. 17, 
1815. Joseph Robinson was 
of good education and man- 
ners, and enjoyed the confi- 
dence of all who knew him as 
a man of integrity and a 
patriot. 

The inn of Increase Carpen- 
ter was built like most Dutch 
inns of that period with a cen- 
ter hall leading from the front 
to the back door, which 
opered on an enclosure. Gen- 
eral Woodhull, seated in one 
of the rooms during a heavy 
thunder storm, failed to hear 
the hoofbeats of approaching 
cavalry, and they were at the 
front door before he realized 
his peril. He ran through the 
hall to the back door, fumbled 
with the heavy wooden lock, 
and v/ith the troopers at his 
heels reached his horse, tied 
to the enclosure fence. 

There is considerable con- 
fusion as to what followed, 
but when Gen. Woodhull 
offered his sword in token of 
surrender an officer struck 
him down. The General threv/ 
up his haTid to cover his head 
and received several blows 



from a broadsword, nearly 
severing his arm. It is said 
that Capt. De Lancey, who 
commanded the British troops 
finally restrained the officer. 
The wounded man was picked 
up, mounted behind a trooper, 
and taken to the Jamaica tav- 
ern of Robert Hinchman who 
had himself been wounded by 
British troopers taking him 
for General Woodhull. Drs. 
Jacob Ogden and Daniel Min- 
ema of Jamaica came to the 
tavern to dress WoodhuU's 
wounds, but their offer was 
refused and a British surgeon 
attended him. Dr. Ogden was 
especially skilled and might 
have saved the patient. 

Miss Cebra, a sister of Col. 
Robinson's wife, visited the 
sorely wounded man and re- 




Woodhull's Church at South Haven 
Still Stands 



tained his hat for many years 
as a cherished memento. 
When Woodhull told Robert 
Hinchman's wife that he 
dreaded being left alone that 
night, she assured him to 
"have no anxiety on that 
score, General, for I will not 
sleep tonight." 

Some time during the night 
he was removed to the stone 
church which stood in the 
middle of the road at the head 
of the street now called 
Union Hall, and which was 
used as a prison by the Brit- 
ish. On the morning of 
August 20th he was taken to 
Gravesend. Whitehead Hicks, 
Mayor of New York City from 
1766 to 1776, a prominent 
loyahst and resident o f 
Jamaica, offered his carriage 
but Sir Wilham Erskine 
ordered him carried on a litter. 

General Woodhull was first 
taken to the Dutch Church at 
New Utrecht and from there 
placed aboard a filthy cattle 
transport in Gravesend Bay. 
Later he was removed to the 
home of Nicassius DeSille and 
placed on a cot beside one of 
its spacious fireplaces. It 
was from here that he sent 
word to his wife Ruth, a sister 
of the Signer William Floyd, 
to bring him what money and 
provisions she could spare 
which he had her distribute 
among his fellow prisoners. 
She remained with him until 
he died on September 20, 
1776, about three weeks after 
his capture. His body, minus 
the wounded arm whose am- 
putation had failed to save 
him, was prepared for burial 




133 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 

by the British, after which, 
accompanied by the sorrow- 
ing- widow, it was driven the 
seventy miles to his home at 
Mastic, arriving there on the 
23d. 

A resident of Islip later re- 
ported having seen the mourn- 
ful procession pass his home. 
It is an accepted tradition that 
Ruth herself drove the team 
of mules which drew the 
farm-wagon bearing her hus- 
band's hallowed remains. She 
was accompanied by several 
of the General's slaves. We 
have no record of the obse- 
quies, but interment was no 
doubt in accordance with local 
custom. The writer's father 
as late as 1876 built the coffin 
for one of the Tangier 
Stoith's, his employer, laid 
the body therein and dug and 
filled the grave. 

General Wo-odhuU's grave 
v^as marked by a rude field- 
stone until 1820 when his de- 
scendants erected the white 
marble headstone that now 
marks his last resting place. 
Ruth Woodhull survived her 
husband 29 years, dying in 
1805. 

The inn of Increase Carpen- 
ter, famous as a patriot meet- 
ing place long before the Gen- 
eral sought refuge there, was 
still standing well into the 
20th century. It was a favorite 
stonping place for farmers an 
their way to and from city 
markets. The writer saw it 
many times, but did not know 



that it was the scene of Gen. 
WoodhuU's capture, until af- 
ter it was demoUshed. 

There are several memorials 
at HoUis in the vicinity of the 
site of the famous old inn, 
among them a cannon mount- 
ed on a granite base and suit- 
ably inscribed which stands in 
a schoolyard at 192d street 
north of Jamaica Avenue. A 
State marker is on Jamaica 
Avenue at 196th Street, near 
St. Gabriel's Church, and the 
Woodhull Day School of St. 
Gabriel's Church stands on 
the south side of Woodhull 
Avenue. On the Union Hall 
street corner of The Bank of 
Manhattan Building in Ja- 
maica is a bronze plaque indi- 
cating the site of the old stone 
church and its use as a prison 
by the British during the 
Revolution. 



•to. U &■ Mt OiK 

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18 Deer Park Ave. Babylon 

Tel. Babylon 927 



JULY 1954 

More About Major Andre 

Interest never ceases in that 
loyal British subject Major Andre, 
who met such an ignominious fate. 
New items about him appear in 
print frequently. About the year 
1886 the granite monument at the 
site of his execution was blown to 
pieces by an explosion set off by 
persons of warped mentality. The 
news from Tappan spread around 
the countryside and many people 
within horse and buggy distance 
went to see the wreckage. 

The place was about four miles 
from my childhood summer home 
in Pearl River and we had one of 
the chunks of granite as a souvenir 
under a whatnot in our parlor, 
rncidentally, Mary Tallmadge, 
sister of Majcr Benjamin Tall- 
madge, who had charge of Major 
Andre during his imprisonment, 
married David Osborn of New 
Haven and became my great-great- 
grandmother. 

Clarence Russell Comes 

Cutchogue 



DRY CLEANING 



FUR STORAGE 



MiiviikJkM^ 



RUG CLEANING 



AMITY VILLE 4-3200 



"The Long Island Indian" 

By Robert R. Coles 

With 20 Line Drawings 

How our Indians looked and lived. The names and distribu- 
tion of their chieftaincies. Their contribution to our civilizatoin 
and many other interesting facts about those first Long Islanders. 

Send $1 to Robert R. Coles, 7 The Place, Glen Cove, N. Y. 



U 



Long Island W halers" 

By Paul Bailey 

The history of whalinsf by L. I. ships and men for 
more than 200 years, briefly told. Showing the begin- 
ning, the rise, the peak and the decline and finish of 
the industry between the 1640's and 1870's. Well illus- 
trated. Postpaid $1. 
Address LONG ISLAND FORUM, Box 805, Amityville 



!^ 



^ 



134 



JULY 1954 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 



t 



Bird Antics 

Continued from Page 126 

white cloth. To a bird there is 
something most attractive 
about white. 

Birds seems to have un- 
limited power to provide eggs. 
As yoangsters we once re- 
moved all the eggs from a 
robin's nest except one. We 
promptly lost interest and did 
not look in the nest again but 
when the young appeared, 
there were four baby robins. 
The classic account of such 
procedure credits a mo:her 
bird with laying 73 eggs in 71 
days as day after day an egg 
was removed to leave only one 
i 1 the nest. The report records 
the bird was bewildered and 
bafflei but maintained unin- 
terrupted production. 

The story is told of an ex- 
periment to find how much 
birds respond to the magnetic 
north and south lines. Seven 
swallov/s were caught in 
Bremen, Germany, and imme- 
diately flown by plane to 
London, England. A spot of 
red paint was daubed on each 
bird when released from the 
cage in London. The next 
morning five cf the seven 
were back at their nests in 
Bremen. Figure that out! 

We call such bird behavior- 
ism "antics." Could it be the 
normal. 



Fanny Bartlett Station 

Please thank Mrs. Arnold Rat- 
tray for telling us (in the May 
number) where Fanny Bartlett 
station was and when. I always 
thought Fanny was a person. 
Clarence W. Mathews 

Islip Terrace 



Village House 

Arts, Crafts, Americana 

Museum of the 
Oysterponds Historical 
Society at Orient, L. I. 

Open July 1 to October 31 
Tuesdays. Thursdays, 
Saturdays and Sundays 

2 to 5 P. M. Free Admission 



A Majestic Chestnut 

The photograph, shown here was 
taken durieg the 1890's by the late 
Marshall Woodman of Amityville 
somewhere on Long Island. We con- 
sulted George H. Peters, president 
of the L.L Horticultural Society, 
and author of "The Trees of Long 
Island," who writes as follows: 

"At least eight good tree men 
examined the photograph and all 
agree that it is quite definitely a 
Chestnut (Cast.anea dentata). Mr. 



Ed. Costich, manager of Hicks 
Nursery, Westbury, states that he 
personally knew of a Chestnut as 
big as this one near Wyandanch. 

"I am sorry Mr. Henry Hicks 
couldn't pinpoint the location of 
the tree but because of the many 
red cedars in the background we 
feel it may have stood in the Hunt- 
ington to Wading River area." 

Perhaps some reader will recog- 
nize the tree and, if so, give us its 
exact location. 




i>3i^*t:-^-"-^'t$ 



This Tree Grew on Long Island (from an old photo b/ Marshall A. Woodman 




ESTABLISHED 1887 

SOUTH SIDE 
BANK 

BRENTWOOD BAY SHORE 

Suffolk 6- 4th Main &■ Bay Shore Av. 

Phone BR 3-45 1 1 Phone BA 7-7 1 00 

Member Federal DeposH Insurance Corporation 



135 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 



JULY 1954 



Twins Dramatize Right and 
Wrong in Fashion 

The Fashion Clinic at the Trap- 
hagen School of Fashion found a 
wonderful opportunity to drama- 
tize the roles of good taste and 
good grooming in creating not only 
an attractive appearance ... but a 
successful life. As illustrated 
here, twin students, Suzanne and 
Jean Pacholek, agreed to appear as 
"Miss Smart" and "Miss Careless." 
In the photograph, these identical 
twins wear identical suits. 

Good sport Jean played the part 
of the girl who buys nothing to 
match anything else she has, and 
looks as if she dressed m the dark 
and never took a peek in the mir- 
ror. She had to wear, in the part 
she plays, black dress sandals with 
a gray wool suit and carry a lug- 
gage tan shoulder-strap bag, be- 
cause she didn't use good sense or 
good taste in shopping. After 
checking hair, hat, blouse, lapel 
pin and gloves . . . and the way 
the clothes were worn, including 
the posture of the wearer, the 
students at Traphagen voted a 
hundred per cent for the neat, well- 
dressed look of her sister who de- 
picts "Miss Smart." 

The Fashion Clinic at Traphagen 
School is one of the unique annual 
features in the courses in costume 
design and clothing construction. 
Guest speakers lecture and dem- 
onstrate to show the students 
what; every type of woman should 
wear to appear at her best. How- 
ever, an overall theme is — it is 
not money that makes the differ- 
ence, it is taste and planning. 

Louis Phillippe Roses 

When and where did the wreck 
occur from which were salvaged 
rose bushes that; were named for 
the ship? A.R.B. Answer: The 
French ship Louis Philippe, 
stranded a% Mecox, East Hampton 
town, in 1842. 



I see that the New York State 
Historical Association, is to hold 
its annual meeting this year on 
Long Island, September 2, 3 and 4 
at Stony Brook, a very appropriate 
place. (Mrs.) Grace L. Trebor, 
Valley Stream. 



Gifts For Everyone 

IN CHINA 

Minton Bone, Spode, Doulton 

Syracuse, Lenox 

IN STERLING 

Towie Gorham 

IN GLASS 

Fostoria Tiffin Duncan 

And in Other Quality Lines 

TOOMEY'S GIFTS 

85 Main St. BAY SHORE 

253 W. Main St. Smithtown Branch 




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CI)e 1801 J^ouse 

FINE FURNITURE 

Interior Decorating BAbylon 6-1801 

173 West Merrick Road, Babylon 



August Belmont Sr. in 1864 founded the countir's leading 
horse breeding and training farm at North Babylon, which 
remained active for some 30 years. 



f^ 



J 



136 



# 



JULY 1954 

Southold Physician 

Continued from page 127 

As Assemblyman, Tuthill 
also occasionally served as 
Speaker, and upon completion 
01 his term took up residence 
in New York City, subse- 
quently locating on Franklin 
Street, Brooklyn. In Augustus 
Maverick's book of 1870, 
"Henry J. Raymond and The 
New York Press", the author 
states that Dr. Tuthill 
"amused his leisure by writ- 
ing quaint papers on rural and 
domestic topics for The 
Times" and that "the vein of 
quiet humor and the uniform 
good sense" of the Doctor's 
writings especially attracted 
Raymond's attention. 

'I'uthill finally accepted a 
position in the office of The 
Times and remained in its 
service several years. Prof. 
Horton once stated that the 
united efforts of Raymond 
and Tuthill "established The 
New York Times". In 1857 the 
Doctor was again elected to 
the Assembly, this time from 
the 7th District of Kings 
County. Among the things he 
advocated was the registra- 
tion of vital statistics, as 
shown in a pamphlet on the 
subject which he issued. He 
was also in demand as a pub- 
lic speaker on educational 
subjects. 

In 1859 he and his family 
journeyed to California where 
his brother - in - law Salter 
Storrs Horton Jr. had located 
during the Gold Rush. The 
latter was one of the group 
from eastern Long Island who 
rounded Cape Horn enroute 
to the West Coast on the 



# 



Cfte 
T5anb of amitptJille 

Incorporated 18dl 

2% on Special Interest 

Accounts Compounded 

Quarterly 

Hours: 9 to 3 except Saturday 
Friday Evening, 6:30 to 8:30 

Member Federal Deposit 
Insurance Corp. 



former whaleship Sabina 
manned by a crew of retired 
sea captains. Horton later re- 
turned to Southold and there 
served as postmaster and 
town clerk as had his father 
and Dr. Tuthill some years 
before. 

In San Francisco Dr. Tut- 
hill assumed charge of the 
Bulletin and later became its 
part - owner and publisher. 
After several years, ill health 
compelled him to relinquish 
these activities, but while re- 
siding in California he wrote 
a history of the state, the pre- 
face to which he completed 
just prior to his death. Mrs. 
Tuthill's mother, while en- 
route for California in 1862, 
perished in the burning of the 
steamer Golden Gate in San 
Francisco Bay on July 27th 
of that year. 

In 1864 Dr. Tuthill spent 
some time in southern Europe 
after which he visited in 
Brooklyn where he died Aug- 
ust 27, 1864 at the age of only 
forty-three. Three weeks be- 
fore his death, while visiting 
Southold, at the Old First 
Church there, in the words of 
Prof. Horton, many friends 
"greeted him as one whom 
they loved and honored." 

His remains were interred 
in the cemetery adjoining the 
church, with Rev. Epher 
Whitaker and the Rev. George 
Wiswell officiating. His widow 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 

later resided at Washington 
with their only daughter who 
had married William Redin 
Woodward, an attorney-at- 
law. In 1889 Mrs. Tuthill 
returned to Southold and pur- 
chased the one time home of 
Joseph Hull Goldsmith. Here 
she spent her final years, 
sharing the home with her 
younger sister Jerusha. The 
latter, known as Aunt Rushie 
to local people, lived to be 92. 
In the Southold cemetery 
stands a modest granite shaft 
marking the last resting place 
of Franklin Tuthill, physician, 
legislator, journalist, author 
and postmaster. "His life," 
wrote Prof. Horton in 1890, 
"might be studied with great 
profit by many youthful 
journalists of the present 
time", and added: "A brighter, 
more beloved and capable per- 
son never labored and dwelt 
in Southold." 



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For Quality Service on TV 

On the Triangle AMityville4-1177 



LONG ISLAND 

is located advantageously for light industry. 

Its suburban and rural areas offer ideal living 
conditions. 

Independent Textile Dyeing Co., Inc. 

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137 



LONG ISLAND FOEUM 

Glorious Fourth 

Continued from page 129 

dependence read, how their 
thoughts must have turned to 
the tale their pastor, the 
Rev. Zachariah Greene, had 
often told them. How his 
brigade with colors flying had 
marched from north erf Canal 
street in lower Manhattan to 
the Battery and there fonned 
in a hollow square with Gen- 
eral Washington in the cen- 
tre Here with the reader fac- 
ing the General, the Declara- 
tion was first read in public. 
When the closing paragraph 
was read there was a shout 
from all the people. ''United 
we stand; divided we fajl. We 
must, we shall be free.' And 
Parson Greene, in describing 
this event, would always add: 
"Take care of the Union! Do 
ro harm to the Union! 

So passed the Fourth of 
July 1809 in Setauket, and 
many a youngster went to bed 
that night with his thoughts 
full of cannon and the glory 
of artillery and militia, but 
perhaps bits of the stately 
Declaration of Independence 
stayed in his mind, and tie 
resolved to be a good citizen 
of this Republic when he grew 
to manhood. 

My account of the day was 
taken from the plans of The 
Washington Benevolent Soci- 
ety, June 17, 1809. 



JULY 1954 



FORUMS, PRIOR TO 1950 

One dozen scattered numbers. At 
least 50 stories on island history. 
Sent postpaid for ;^1.50. Address 
L. I. FORUM, AMITYVILLE 



Over 100 Years 

of 

DEPENDABLE 







AMITY AUTO SALES 
Chevrolet Agency 

For Sales and Service 

Parts and Accessories 

Merrick and County Line Roads 

Tel. AMityviUe 4-0W9-4-09U 




PETERS 
Delicatessen 

Tel. Amity villa 4-1350 

176 Park Ave. Amityville 



POWELL 

Funeral Home, Inc. 

67 Broadway 
Amityville, New York 

AMityville 4-0172 

Monumental Work 






"The Fame Behind the Name" 

HARDER 

Extermination Service, Inc. 
Termite Control, Mothproof- 
ing and all other services 

Phone Nearest Office 

PAtchogue 3-2100 HUntingtcn 4-2304 
Elverhead 8-2943 HEmpstead 2- 3166 
BAby Ion 6-2020 Southampton 1-0346 
Blillport 7-06C4 STony Brook 7-0917 



F. Kenneth Harder 
President 



Robert Troup 
Vice-President 



Bailey s Long Island History 



A limited number of sets of 
the Long Island History, com- 
piled by Paul Bailey and pub- 
lished last year by the Lewis 
Historical Publishing Com- 
pany of New York, has been 
made available through the 
Long Island Forum at one- 
third off the publishers' price. 
This drastic reduction from 
the original price of $46.50 is 
made possible by eliminating 
volume 3 which consists en- 
tirely of biographical sketches. 
Volumes 1 and 2 comprise 
the complete History as com- 
piled by Editor Bailey a^d 
written by leading authorities 
in every field, consisting of 
more than 1000 pages, 43 
chapters and 200 illustrations. 
These handsomely printed 
and bourd deluxe I ooks (size 
8x10% inches) will be sent, 
while they last, in the same 
order that ar^plications are re- 
ceived. Price $30. 

Besides the complete history 
of the island, from its discov- 
ery, including chapters on geo- 
Address: LONG 



logy and archaeology, there 
are separate chapters on each 
of the towns in Nassau and 
Suffolk Counties, the history 
of the leading church denom- 
irations, whaling, fishing, 
shel fisheries, agriculture, 
medicine, banking, education, 
aviation and many other sub- 
jects. 

Long Island Birdlife is com- 
piled by Edwin Way Teale, 
rationally known authority; 
the island's mammals, by Dr. 
W. J. Hamilton, Cornell zoolo- 
gist. The most extensive cov- 
erage of the island's Indians 
ever printed was prepared fcy 
John H. Morice. Among th(! 
authors represented are J. 
Russel Sprague, Dr. Oscar G. 
Darlington, Dr. Clarence Ash- 
ton Wood. Miss Jacoueline 
Overton. Rev. John K Sharp, 
Chester R. R'akelock, Osborn 
Shaw, Herbert F. Ricard, 
Preston R. Bassett, Robert R. 
Coles. Halsey B. Knapn, 
Nancy Boyd Willey, Mary E. 
Bell — in all more than forty 
such authorities. 
ISLAND FORUM 



# 



f 



138 



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For Luncheons and Dinners 

The Patchogue Hotel 

Centrally located on the 

South Shore for Banquets 

and other functions 

Modern Rooms and Suites 

Montauk Highway 

Phones Patchogue 1234 and 800 



Wining and Dining 

in the Continental Tradition, 
superb, leisurely, inexpensive, 
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entirely new 

RENDEZVOUS 

Restaurant 

292 Merricli Rd. Amityvllle 
Phone AMityville 4-9768 



For the Sea Food 
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SNAPPER 

INN 

on Connetquot River 
OAKDALE 

Phone SAyville 4-0248 

CLOSED MONDAYS 



STERN'S 

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TeU. 248: Night 891 

Complete Line of Condiments for the 

Hotel and Restaurant Trade 

Prompt Deliveries Quality Since 1890 

Factory conveniently located at 

Farminerdale 




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Woodsburgh Indian Memorial 

The 12-foot stone standing at the 
intersection of Wood and Keene 
lanes in Woodsiburgh (part of 
Woodmere), Nassau County, bears 
the following insciiption: 

"Here lived and died Culluloo 
Telewana, A.D. 1818, last of the 
Rockaway Iroquois Indians, who 
was personally known to me in my 
boyhood. I owning the land, have 
erected the monument to him and 
his tribe. Abraham Hewlett." 

Culluloo (a Rockaway) is said to 
have been the last survivor of his 
tribe which originally occupied the 
Rockaway peninsula. The monu- 
ment first stood on the east side of 
what became Broadway, at Linden 
street, in Woodmere. In 1901, how- 
ever, it was removed by a develop- 
ing company and for thirty years 
lay abandoned in a nearby lot. 
Hempstead Town Historian Charles 
A. Hewlett and other public citi- 
zens had the monument mounted 
in its present location. 



"Ballyhoo at Cold Spring" 

Estelle Valentine Newman's ac- 
count, of the celebration at Cold 
Spring Harbor back in the good 
old days gave our family a vivid 
idea cf what life on Long Island 
was then. 

(Miss) Nora B. Rodney 

Long Beach 



DINE AT 



FRANK FRIEDE'S 

Riverside Inn 



Table d'Hote and a la Carte 

On Jericho Turnpike 
Route 25 

SMITHTOWN, L. L, N. Y. 



"Willie and Herman's" 

La Grange 

Montauk Highway East of Babylon 

Luncheons - Dinners 

Large New Banquet Hall 

Tel. Babylon 480 



Enroute to the Hamptons 
on Montauk Highway 

i!2itCASA BASSO -d 

Enjoy the Best 
Luncheon and Dinner 

Westhampton 4-1841 
Closed on Mondays 



The Shoreham 

"On The Great South Bay'' 

Since 1903 

S pecializing in SEA FOOD 

Special Luncheons Daily 

Foot of Foster Ave. Sayville 

Tel. SAyville 4-0050 

CLOSED MONDAYS 



YOU'LL BE GLAD YOU TRIED 

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