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LONG I SLAND 

FORUM 



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"f fe>*^ iSfi'i'** '.%4^*s H*-,^ ^. tst* ^h™ 



St. John's Church, Oakdale, Second Oldest Church Building 
in Suffolk County. (Story Page 149) 



n 



TABLE of CONTENTS 



STARS OVER LONG ISLAND 

THE BATTLE OF ST. GEORGE'S MANOR 

ST. JOHN'S CHURCH, OAKDALE 

THE HOUSE THAT CAME DOWNHILL 

WHALER WILLIAM TELL DISASTER 



LETTERS FROM FORUM READERS 



Robert R. Coles 

Roland Lohse 

H. P. Horton 

Kate Wheeler Strong 

Wilson L. Glover 



AUGUST 1954 



.00 a year by Mail; Single Copies 25c 



VOL. XVII, No. 8 



H. E. Swezey & Son, Inc. 

GENERAL TRUCKING 
Middle Country Rd., Eartport 

Telephones 
Riverhead 2350 Eastport 250 



Louden-Knickerbocker 
Hall 

A Private Sanitarium for 
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AMityville 4-0053 



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Rug Cleaning 

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Phone FArmingdale 2-0300 



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Sal. s and Service 

MULLER 
Automobile Corp. 

Merrick Road and Broadway 
AMityville 4-:028 and 4-2029 



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on Passenger Cars and Trucks 

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Suffolk County Brake Service 

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Tel. 1722 



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(Establiihed 1862) 

821 Main St. Greenport 

Tel. 154 



ii^ SCHWARZ 

FLORIST 




PHONE 

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SUNRISE 

Division Household Fuel Corp 

'Blue Coal' 

Fuel Oil 

Amityville Farmingdale 
1060 12 

Lindenhurst 
178 



LcNG Island 

TCCLM 

Pablished Monthly at 
AMITYVILLE, N. Y. 

POR LONG ISLANDERS EVERYWHERE 
Entered aa sccand-clast matter May 31, 1947. at the 
post office at Amityville. New Yoric, under the Act of 
March i. 1879. 

Paul Bailey, Puilis/nr-EJiUr 

Contributing Editors 

Clarence A. Wood, LL.M., Ph.D. 

Malcolm M. Willey, Ph.D. 

John C. Huden, Ph.D. 

Julian Denton Smith, Nature 



Tel. AMityville 4-0554 



Whaler William Tell Disaster 

I thought perhaps the following 
might be of interest to Forum 
readers. If anyone doubts that the 
■whaling industry of a century ago 
was indeed big business, let him 
look at the record! 

The whaler William Tell, of 
which my grandfather Captain 
James Austin was captain on the 
ilWated voyage of 1S59, earned 
oil and whalebone revenue of 
$227,000 from five voyages. Now- 
adays we speak glibly in terms of 
billions, but I ven|ture to say that a 
quarter-million dollars was far 
from "hay" in that era. Entered 
for service with the Long Island 
fleet in 1843, the William Tell was 
successively skippered by Captains 
Glover, J. Madison Tabor and 
Smith. 

The 370-ton Tell, later to be 
lost off East Cape in 1859, sailed 
one September day in 1857 with 
Captain Austin, my grandfather, 
in command. He was born at Poxa- 
bogue, near Bridgehampton, in 
1825 and died in 1884. He secured 
his master's license at the age of 
21. Following retirement from 
whaling he carried on at farming. 
His children are now entirely 
gone with the exception of a 
daughter, my mother, now 88, and 
her brother, Emmett Austin of 
Cutchogue, 76. The late Lewis C. 
Austin, editor and publisher of the 
Riverhead News, was another of 
my mother's brothers. 

According to the journal of 
Captain Nathan P. Hand, long 
since gone, he was a crew mem- 
ber on the Wiliam Tell's voyage 
which ended in disaster. His jour- 
nal stated: 

"When 15 years of age, I sailed 
as cabinboy of the William Tell. I 
shipped for a voyage around tiie 
globe. It would take too long to 
describe all of my adventures. 
Merely let me say that after a 
severe drubbing in the Gulf 
Stream, we visited the Island of 
Ascension, St. Helena and Tristan, 
where I saw Governor Glass, a 
descendant of a mutineer. 

"We rounded Cape Good Hope, 
visited Amsterdam and St. Paul 
Island in the Indian Ocean, leav- 
ing New Zealand astern, we visited 
Contiimed on pag-e 148 



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142 



AUGUST 1954 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 



^he Rattle of jt- Qeorge's (fM.anor 



TN the autumn of 1780, an- 
-'• other opportunity to an- 
ji.oy the enemy on Long Island 
presented itself to Benjamin 
Tallmadge. The young major 
was attached to Co-lonel Elisha 
Sheldon's Second Light Dra- 
goons, who were stationed in 
Connecticut, and for two years 
he had been jabbing across 
the Sound at British and Tory 
strong points. 

There had ccaie into his 
hands from William Booth of 
Fireplace a rough plan of a 
fortification near Smith's 
Toint at Mastic on the south 
side of the island. It had been 
established by Sir Henry 
Clinton and was manned by 
refugee loyalists from Rhode 
Island under the command of 
a man named Hazard. Fort 
St. George, as it was called, 
was being used as a receiv- 
ing and distributing center 
rfor Suffolk, supplied by ships 
which came through a then- 
existent inlet in the barrier 
beach south of the point. 

The conscientious major 
checked his intelligence per- 
sonally. He had himself taken 
across one night and went 
down to have a look at the 
place. Local tradition has it 
that he disguised himself as 
a pack peddler. In later years 
his children talked him into 
writing a "Memoir", and he 
recalled "a triangular inclos- 
ure of several acres of ground, 
at two angles of which was a 
strong barricade house, and at 
the third, a fort, with a deep 
ditch and wall encircled by an 
abatis of sharpened pickets, 
projecting at an angle of 45 
degrees. The fort and houses 
were entirely connected by a 
strong stockade, quite high, 
and every post sharpened and 
fastened to each other by a 
transverse rail strc-ngly bolted 
to each." There were embraz- 
ures for six guns, but as yet 
4^ only two, and these on the 
■ water side, were mounted. 

The regular garrison consist- 
ed of about 50 mihtiamen, 



Roland Lohse 

Editor's Note 
The author, a native Nassau 
Countyite, is an engineer with 
Station WNEW, New York, and a 
commuter between there and 
Massapequa. Descended from sev- 
eral local colonial families,- a more 
recent descent was by parachute 
during the Second World War 
whose unsuccessful landing put him 
out of active service. Having lived 
most of his life on the island, he 
has a keen interest in its early 
history and counts the attendant 
research his chief hobby. 




--r^- 




who had their families with 
them. 

Back at Fairfield, Tall- 
madge wrote to Washington, 
telling him of the luscious 
plum and, knowing his caval- 
ry- c o n s c i o u s commander, 
clinched the matter by men- 
tion of a British forage col- 
lection point at Coram. It lay 
only a little off the route to 
Smith's Point. In a few days 
he had his answer. 

"Head-Quarters, 
Nov. 11th, 1780 

Sir: — I have received your 
letter of the 7th instant. The 
destruction of the forage col- 



lected for the use of the Brit- 
ish army at Coram upon Long 
Island, is of so much conse- 
quence, that I should advise 
the attempt to be made. I 
have written to Col. Shelden 
to furnish you a detachment 
of dismounted dragoons, and 
will commit the execution to 
you. If the party at Smith's 
house can be attempted with- 
out frustrating the other de- 
sign, or running too great a 
hazard, I have no objection. 
But you must remember that 
this is only a secondary ob- 
ject, and in all cases, you wiH 
take the most prudent means 
to secure a retreat. Confiding 
entirely in your prudence as 
well as enterprise, and wish- 
ing you success, 

I am your's &c., 
G. Washington" 
In 1780 Mount Sinai was 
known as Old Man's, because 
the land had once belonged to 
a Major Gutherson, who v/as 
old. It was here that Tall- 
madge landed. On a Tuesday 
afternoon, November 21st, the 
major mustered his two com- 
panies of dismounted dra- 
goons on the beach at Fair- 
field, Ct., along with some 
other men, boatmen and spe- 
cialists. They embarked at 4 
in eight whaleboats, reaching 
the grassy harbor of Old 
Man's five hours later. The 
boats were hauled out of the 
water and concealed in the 
woods, under guard of twenty 
disgruntled men. 

At 10 the rest moved off on 
Pipe Stave Hollow Road. The 
dark trees were stirring with 
the rush of an approaching 
storm. The day had been gray, 
and warm for the season, but 
quiet. Now the wind was ris- 
ing, and by the time they had 
covered five miles a full- 
fledged sou'easter was upon 
them, driving bone-chilling 
horizontal -^sheets of rain in 
their faces. Following the road 
became difficult, and the flint- 
lock muskets ai.d rifles were 
wet and useless. Reluctantly, 



14.^ 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 



AUGUST 1954 



Tallmadge turned his men 
around. Putting their backs to 
the wind, they went back to 
the overturned boats and 
crawled wetly under them for 
shelter. 

All night, and into the early 
afternoon of the 22nd, the 
gale howled, the Continentals 
peering out impatiently, or 
sleeping the time away. In 
midafternoon the wind fell, 
the gray sky brightened to 
yellow and then was patched 
with blue. At nightfall, one 
historian says, "the troops 
were again put in motion." 

They marched quietly past 
a little group of houses in 
Pipe Stave Hollow, and then 
through uninhabited country- 
side until they reached Swezey 
Pond, where there was a small 
settlement. Then the raiders 
followed the River Road south 
on the east bank of the Con- 
necticut River, passing the 
dark, unlit home of Captain 
William Phillips and the two 
mills, Christopher Swezey's 
and Homan's, which gave its 
name to Millville, today's 
Yaphank. Carman's Mill, a 
squarish, gray-shingled, con- 
crete-based building, still 
stands beside the little river, 
as silent as it must have been 
when the Continentals swung 
past in the night. The dis- 
mounted horsemen were foot- 
sore, hungry and thirsty, but 
eager to get at their king-lov- 
ing cousins. 

Two miles from the fort, 
Tallmadge wrote, they "halt- 
ed for a short time to take a 
little refreshment". The uni- 
forms of the troopers; blue 
coats, buff breeches, white 
cross-belts; were muddy and 
stained from the rain and the 
long forced march. Their mus- 
cles ached, but they had four 
long years of war behind 
them, and this looked like a 
measure of revenge for many 
retreats. 

The major made his dispo- 
sitions for the attack, plac- 
ing "two small detachments 
under the command of sub- 
altern officers of high spirit". 
One of these was Benajah 
Strong; the other Thomas 
Tredwell Jackson. These two 

Continued on page 152 



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144 



AUGUST 1954 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 



jtars Over L^ong Island 



T^HIS August everyone on 
■*■ Long Island may enjoy 
the drama of the skies in all 
its vivid pageantry. Such a 
spectacle becomes increas- 
ingly impressive as we leave 
the haze and glow of metro- 
politan New York and travel 
through Nassau and Suffolk 
Counties toward Orient and 
Montauk. 

Little that we experience 
inspires greater wonder than 
a star-filled sky as seen from 
one of our Long Island 
beaches in mid-summer. Such 
a sight has a special meaning 
to the historian when he con- 
siders that the star patterns 
he observes are identical with 
those that shone overhead in 
the days of the Indians and 
that the light from some of 
the stars in tonight's sl-y 
began its long journey to the 
earth when the first Euro- 
pean settlers were building 
their homes on our shores. 

Since the constellations are 
one feature of our environ- 
ment that has changed hardly 
at all in recent centuries, 
they provide an ideal brid<re, 
joining the living present 
with the past. 

You will find it worthwhile 
to take a little time out frorn 
the mad scrambi'e of this 



Editor's Note 

The author, a native son of Glen 
Cove and descended from one of its 
founders of 1668, has been associ- 
ated with the American Museum 
of Natural History and beginninj? 
in 1936 with the Hayden Plane- 
tarium of which he became the 
head several years ago. He has 
led numerous astronomical expedi- 
tions and has delivered more than 
5,000 lectures on the subject as 
well as on general natural history 
at Columbia, West Point and other 
educational institutions. 

He is a Cantain (inactive) in the 
U. S. Air Force, a Fellow of the 
Royal Astronomical Society of 
London, a member of The Ameri- 
can Astronomical Society and of 
the Explorers Club. Mr. Coles 
wrote for Bailey's L. I. History, 
the only complete history of Glen 
Cove ever produced. He is avail- 
able as a speaker for Long Island 
groups. 



Robert R. Coles 

modern age and become ac- 
quainted with a few of the 
actors in this great sky drama 
who will be performing their 
role long centuries after our 
civilization has been forgot- 
ten. 

Now let us survey these 
summer skies over Long 
Island and see what they 
reveal. As we look into the 



heavens after sundown and 
watch the half light of even- 
ing blend into the full dark of 
night, it is like standing on 
the threshold of the infinite 
and peering into the mysteri- 
ous depths of space and time. 
Exactly what we see de- 
pends, of course, on the hour 
and season. In early August 
this year we shall discover 
our nearest celestial neighbor, 
the moon, a mere quarter of a 




Constellation of the Scorpion, with Star Antares in Heart 
American Muteum of Natural History Photo 



145 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 

million miles away. Farther 
out in space we shall also see 
the planets Venus, Saturn 
and Mars, moving slowly 
against the background of 
distant stars, which are ar- 
ranged in squares, rectangles, 
half-circles and other familiar 
geometrical figures that we 
recognize as the constella- 
tions. And if we look sharply 
in the late night sky of mid- 
August, we may discern a 
hazy blob of light in the con- 
stellation of Andromeda, that 
astronomers tell us is a so- 
called island universe bevond 
the farthest outposts of our 
own galaxy. 

These are a few of the 
actors in this season's drama 
of the skies. Let us see just 
how they fit into the sky 
picture. 

During the first two weeks 
of August we shall have an 
excellent opportunity to he- 
come acQuainted with the 
moon's behavior in the sum- 
mer sky. 

As you probably know, the 
moon travels around the earth 
from west to east against the 
background of distant stars 
in a little less than a calendar 
month, changing phase as it 
changes its angle to the sun. 
Its path is generally through 
the twelve constellations of 
the zodiac, which is also the 
highway of the planets. 

If the skies are clear on 
August first we shall discover 
a crescent moon hanging low 
above the western horizon 
and some distance above it 
will appear the beautiful 
p'anet Saturn. This brilliant 
world of mystery will domin- 
ate our early evening sides 
through the rest of the sum- 
mer and early autumn. It 
will reach its greatest bril- 
liancy on October eleventh 
and by the end of autumn 
will have shifted to the other 
side of the sun, to appear in 
the eastern sky before sun- 
rise next winter as morning 
star. 

As we look for the moon 
every evening after sunset we 
shall find that it has shifted 
somewhat farther east than 
at that time on the previous 



AUGUST 1954 



night and changed slightly in 
phase. Very conveniently, 
this eastward progress of the 
moon through the sky pro- 
vides us with an ideal means 
of identifying many of the 
interesting objects along its 
route. 

By evening twilight, on 
August second, the moon will 
have moved below Venus and 
be entering the constellation 
of Virgo, the Virgin. While 
important because it belongs 
to the Zodiac, this constella- 
tion is not particularly im- 
pressive and contains only one 
really bright star. This is 
called Spica, and you can spot 
it by the moon's position on 
the night of August fourth, 
when it will be seen passing 
just a short distance south 
of the star. The next con- 
spicuous object to the east of 
Spica is the planet Saturn, 
under which the moon wiM 
pass on the following night, 
August fifth. While admit- 
tedly beautiful, even through 
a small telescope, Saturn 
must take second place when 
compared with Venus and 
Mars, as observed with the 
naked-eye. 

By this time the moon will 
have just attained its first 
quarter phase and will be 
found low in the south at 
sunset. 

You will find it interesting 
to note how our satellite 
changes color from silver to 
gold as darkness sets in. This 
is but one of the many subtle 
and interesting color changes 
that occur in the heavens at 
nightfall. 

After passing Saturn the 
moon will cross through an- 
other very inconspicuous 
zodiacal group, called Libra, 
the Scales, and enter the con- 
stellation of Scorpius, the 
Scorpion, one of the most im- 
pressive star groups in the 
summer skies. This is shaped 
very much like a large baling 
hook, with the handle to the 
west and the long, curved 
hook just skirting the horizon 
to the east of it. Not far east 
of the handle, and well above 
the curved hook, is a very 

Continued on page 155 



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146 



AUGUST 1954 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 



# 



^he \}iouse Hohat Qame 'Dotunhill 



pEOPLE driving on the 
north shore of Long 
Island may have noticed at 
the foot of the hill leading 
into East ISetauket an old 
gray house, its end facing the 
road. Some may recognize it 
as one of the houses in Mr. 
William Mount's picture 
"Long Island Farm Houses." 
This is the old Brewster 
house. Tradition says that it 
was first built on top of the 
hill, opposite where the Meth- 
odist church now stands. 

I wonder if they did not 
build it in summer time when 
cooling breeizes made it a 
delightful spot. Then came 
winter and only in front of 
the great open fires could one 
keep warm. Even then their 
backs froze unless they were 
sitting on a high-backed 



K^te Wheeler ^trong 

settle. Can't you imagine 
them saying "We can't stand 
this another winter. Let's 
slide the house down the hill 
where the back at least will 
be protected from the icey 
winds." And so it seems they 
did, for from old records it 
appears people thought noth- 
ing of moving their houses in 
those days. 

If you stand in front of the 
house you will see that the 
front door is not in the middle 
of the house which is because 
at some later date a whole 
new end was added to it near- 
est the road. I have been told 
that the fashion of long slop- 
ing roofs started when there 
Vv^as a tax on windows. 

As you enter the house, the 
room on the right was where 
my great-grandfather Thomas 



S. Strong married Hannah 
Brewster Nov. 11, 1770. Miss 
Davis, last of the family to 
occupy the old house, showed 
me a tiny secret closet beside 
the mantle where they hid 
their silver. She also said 
that under some loose boards 
in the attic they found a place 
big enough to hide a trunk. 

In the stormy days of the 
Revolution the backdoor was 
fastened with a great bar 
across it. I never went up- 
stairs, but Miss Davis told 
me one of the tiny windows 
high up on the side of the 
house was in the loom room. 
There I suppose was spun the 
linen Miss Davis showed me 
with great pride. 

Another of her treasures 
was a very huge wooden 
spoon with which she had 
been told, they ladled out the 

Continued on page 153 



^ 




William S. Mount's "Long Island Landscape" 



147 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 



Reminders 



Pleasure Boat Insurance Specialist 

GEORGE C. EARTH 

n4A Broadway, next to Post Office 

AMityville 4-1688 (Res. 4-0855) 



Automotive Supplies 

E. Clayton Smith, jobber. Re- 
placement parts, tools and equip- 
ment. 218-220 East Main Street, 
Babylon. Tel. 551. 



Visitors Welcome 

The General Museum-Library of 
the Suffolk County Historical So- 
ciety, at Riverhead, is open daily 
(except Sundays and Holidays) 
from one to five P. M. 

Visitors always welcome (no 
charge) at this educational insti- 
tution where items connected with 
Long Island's history, culture and 
natural sciences are on display. 



Wines and Liquors 

Large assortment of Popular 
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William Tell Disaster 

Continued from page 148 

^^^ .Society Islands in the South 
f^<=^i<=:. Thence to the Sandwich 
(Hawaii) Islands and on to Alaska 
and the Arctic Ocean. * * * 

"We visited New Zealand again 
returning to the Arctic Ocean! 
where the ship was lost. All of the 
crew escaped. We lived in Eski- 
mos caves and ice huts for weeks. 
Finally rescued by the Hibernian. 
New Bedford, Gapt. Edwards, 
bound for Honolulu. There three 
moinths. Got chance to work my 
way home on the barque Midas 
Reached Sag Harbor safely" 

Captain Nathan P. Hand, quoted 
above, was later for many years a 
school janitor at Sag Harbor and 
greatly beloved and idolized by the 
schoolchildren. It was said that 
some pupils were prone to accept 
Capt. Hand's opinion on geogra- 
phical matters above that of their 
school^mistress. 

Wilson L. Glover 

Southold 



The Year 1872 



Reference to Babylon Town 
being set up in 1872 reminds me 
that that was the year the old life- 
saving service built their first sta- 
tions on the beach, and also the 
year that the Riverhead Savings 
Bank was founded. A great-uncle 
of mine was farming thereabouts 
then and he told me how he started 
an account in a Doctor's office in 
vrhich the bank first opened. He 
said that although Riverhead was 
the county seat it wasn't much of 
a village then. Greenport and Sag 
Harbor were both bigger. 

(Mrs.) Phyllis Snowden, 

Hicksville. 
Note: From a booklet issued by 
the bank in 1947, for its 75th anni- 
versary, we learn that Dr. Richard 
H. Benjamin was its first presi- 
dent, elected May 18, 1872. Hon 
John S. Marcy and Dr. Abraham 
B. Luce were the vice-presidents, 
Orville B. Ackerly secretary, 
James H. Tuthill attorney and 
counsel, and John R. Corwin, John 
Downs and Simeon S. Hawkins, 
finance committee. — Editor. 



AUGUST 1954 

Head Librarian Wanted 

For Amityville Free Library. 
Good working conditions. Full time 
assistant. One month vacation. 
New York State retirement. Over 
18,000 books. Over 40,000 circula- 
tion. Write or phone for appoint- 
ment Paul Bailey, President, Box 
805 Amityville. Tel. AM 4-0554 



#^ 



"Hindsights and Highlights", a 
history of the Cold Spring Harbor 
Fire Department, 1852-1952, by 
Estelle Valentine Newman, assisted 
m research by Leslie E. Peckham, 
l# ^ ^®'' executed achievement. 
Mrs. Newman's historical articles 
m the Forum have won much 
praise. Editor. 



Schrafel Motors, Inc. 

NASH Sales and Service 

NEW and USED CARS 

Merrick Road, West Amityville ' 

Leo F. Schrafel AM 4-23 06 



FAMILY HISTORY 

Start yours now with our Simpli- 
fied Worksheets and Directions . . . 
Complete Set, punched for three- 
ring binder, postpaid $1. . . . 



GIDEON STIVERS ^^ 

Box 382 Riverhead, L. I. W 



The Bowne House 
Historical Society 

Judge Charles S Colden, President 
presents 

The Bowne House 

Built 1661 

Bowne St. and Fox Lane 

FLUSHING, N. Y. 

A Shrine to Religion Freedom 

ADMISSION FREE 

Sundays, Tuesdays and Saturdays 1 to 6 P.M. 

Sponsored by 

HALLERAN AGENCY 

^«»'«°" Flushing, N. Y. 



Farmingdale Federal Savings 
and Loan Association 

312 CONKLIN STREET 

First Mortgage Loans Insured Savings 

21% Dividend 

Phone FArmingdale 2-2000 FARMINGDALE, N. Y. 



148 



I 



AUGUST 1954 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 



t 



jt. John's Qhurch, Gakdale^ 



m 



J£. T. jTorton 

CT. JOHN'S EPISCOPAL 
^ CHURCH at Oakdale, 
now being restored, was built 
in 1765 by William NicoU, 
grandson of Islip town's 
original patentee and great- 
grandson of Mathias NicoU, 
first secretary of the province 
of New York. It was dedi- 
cated as The Charlotte Church 
and its initial mass was said 
by the Rev. (Samuel Seabury, 
then rector at Jamaica and 
to be consecrated in 1784 
America's first Anglican 
Bishop, 

The earliest rector of the 
little church was the Rev. 
James Greaton who jour- 
neyed by horseback from his 
resident charge at Hunting- 
ton on infrequent occasions. 
During the last year of the 
Revolution, in 1783 he was 
succeeded by the Rev. Thomas 
Lambert Moore who came 
from St. George's in Hemp- 
stead to have charge of the 
Oakdale parish and that of 
Caroline Church at Setauket. 

One of Mr. Moore's, earliest 
tasks was to see that The 
Charlotte Church building 
was purged of the effects of 
the war and seven years of 
enemy occupation. At the 
same time it was enlarged 
and on October 21, 1784 was 
rededicated as St. John's of 
Islip. Four years later it was 
admitted into the Diocese of 
New York and in 1806 its title 
passed from the NicoU family 
to corporate ownership. 

From 1816 to 1842 the Rev. 
Charles Seabury, the Bishop's 
son, was in charge of St. 
John's of Islip as well as of 
the Setauket parish. He was 
succeeded by the Rev. D. F. 
M. Johnson who served five 
years and during whose rsas- 
torate the Oakdale building 
was enlarged in 1843 to its 




Rear View, Showing Old Gravestones 



present capacity. As in the 
case of the enlargement of 
1783, however, the original 
structure was preserved as it 
is today. It is therefore the 
oldest church building still in 
use as such anywhere along 
the south side. It is also the 
second oldest in the County 
of Suffolk, being antedated 
only by Setauket's Caroline. 
The first step in the restor- 
ation project is to strengthen 
the roof and restore its ori- 
ginal character with old-style 
hand-hewn shingles. The pro- 
ject includes a complete re- 
storation of the building's 
interior, the entire work be- 



ing in the hands of Nicholson 
& Galloway of New York and 
Brookville, Nassau County. 

It is possible that some 
readers do not know that St. 
John's of Islip, standing on 
Montauk highway in Oakdale, 
is the parent church of St. 
Paul's, Patchogue ; St. Mark's, 
Islip; St. Ann's, SayviUe, and 
Emanuel, Great River. Among 
the eighty marked graves in 
its churchyard is that of 
Rear-Admiral NicoU Ludlow, 
a native of Islip who with his 
brother Edwin beques ted sub- 
stantial sums to the support 
and maintenance of this truly 
historic church. 




149 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 



AUGUST 1954 



Leading Real Estate Brokers of 



Sayville 



Lillian H. Robinson, Realtor 

Real Estate, Insurance, 

Furnished Cottages 

Farms - Homes - Acreage 

169 W. Main St. SAyville 4-1900 

Member of L. I. Real Estate Board 



Munsey Park 



See Wile for 

Worth While Real Estate 

General Brokerage 

Manhasset and vicinity 

DAVID T. WILE JR. & CO. 

8393 Northern Blvd. Manhasset 667 



Mineola 



J. ALFRED VALENTINE 

Real Estate - Insurance 
148 Mineola Boulevard 
Phone Garden City 7-7200 



Hicksville 



SEAMAN & EISEMANN, Inc. 

Real Estate - Insurance 
M Broadway Tel. Hicksville 600 



Riverhcad 



DUGAN REALTY COMPANY 

Eastern Long Island Country 
Places along Ocean, Sound, 
Peconic, Shinnecock Bays. 



Northport 



EDWARD BIALLA 

ALBERT M. ZILLIAN 

EDWIN N. ROWLEY, INC. 

Real Estate — Insurance 

Appraisals 

74 Main Street 

NOrthport 3-0108 and 2272 

Members L. I. Real Estate Board 



Latest Dividend Declared 
at the rate of 

21/2 % 
per annum 

Savings Accounts opened 
and Banking-by-Mail 

The Union Savings Bank 

of Patchogue, New York 

The only Savings Bank in 

Western Suffolk County 

Member Federal Depoiit 

Iniurance Corporation 



Ketcham & Golyer, Inc. 
INSURANCE 

Geortce S. Colyer, Seejr. 
Broadway and Park Ave. 

AMityville 4-0198 



Claudius Smith, N. G. 

No name among Long Islanders 
is more illustrious than that of 
Smith, of which there are several 
distinct lines — Bull. Rock, Tan- 
gier and others. But Claudius 
Smith, born on Long Island, was 
hanged at Goshen on January 22, 
1779, as a convicted outlaw, after 
which his severed skull was bricked 
into the keystone of a doorway in 
the Goshen courthouse. Years 
later, when the building was de- 
molished, the skull being found 
intact, it was broken up and the 
many small pieces became sou- 
venirs. 

Claudius, whose crimes ran the 
gamut to include several murders, 
had three sons, who followed in 
his wild footsteps. Richard aiid 
James were also hanged and Wil- 
liam was shot to death as a fugi- 
tive on Schunemunk mountain in 
the Ramapos. The two caves used 
as hideouts by Claudius and his 
gang which included the three sons 
were located in the Ramapos and 
are still shown as local points of 
interest in the Revolutionary era. 

According to Albert B. Brusha- 
ber writing in the December 1943 
issue of the Appalachia, Claudius 
was born at Brookhaven. I have 
never heard of any Long Island 
Smith claim descent from this in- 
famous "Cowboy of the Ramapos" 
as he was called. 

Aaron R. Smith 
(no descendant) 
, Richmond HUl 

Farmingdale 

GREGORY SOSA AGENCY, Inc. 
Real Estate and Insurance 

Serving The Community Since 1921 
FArmingdale 2-0321—2-1286 



Hubbell, Klapper 6- Hubbell 


LONG ISLAND REAL ESTATE 


65 Hilloti Avenue 


Garden City, N. Y. 



REAL ESTATE 


Insurance 


Mortgages 


JOHN T. 


PULIS 


101 Richmond Ave 


, Amityville 


AMiiyville 4-1489 1 



EASTPORT 

Edward B. Bristow 

Real Estate and Insurance 
Main Street EAstport S-0164 



Port Washington 



Howard C. Hegeman Agency, Inc. 

Real Estate and Insurance 

185 Main Street 
Tel. POrt Washington 7-3124 



4t> 



Commack 



JOHN W. NOTT 

Established 1925 
Wanted: Large flat wooded acre- 
age eastern L. I. to Riverhead. 
Jericho Tpk. FOrest 8-932Z 



Huntington 



HENRY A. MURPHY 
INSURING AGENCY, Inc. 

Real Estate, Insurance, Mortgagre 

Loans, Appraisals 

Steamship Tickets 

Cornelius L. Murphy Tel. Hunt. 176 



Wyandanch 



HAROLD S. ISHAM 

All Lines of Insurance 

Real Estate 

Straight Path, Wyandanch 

Tel. Midland 7755 



Mastic 



Realtor — Insurer 
BENJAMIN G. HERRLEY 

MONTAUK HIGHWAY 
Phone ATlantic~l-8110 



Glen Head 



M, O. HOWELL 

Real Estate - Insurance 

25 Glen Head Road 

Telephone GLen Cove 4-0491 



Bay Shore 



Auto and Other Insurance 

— Real Estate — 

HENNING AGENCY, Realtor 

86 E.Main BayShore 7-0876 & 0877 



Central Islip 



ROBERT E. O'DONOHUE 

Carleton Ave. Tel. 6317 Central Talip 
Real Estate - Insurance 

Established 1911 



Hampton Bays 



JOHN H. SUTTER 
Licensed Real Estate Broker 

1 East Main Street 
HAMPTON BAYS 2-0420 





Tel. BAbylon 6-0266 




w. 


E. MAGEE, 
APPRAISER 


Inc. 


Real 


Estate and insurance || 




Brokers 






Babylon. N. T. 





#^, 



150 



J 



AUGUST 1954 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 



Long Island's Suburban Homeland 



Uniondale 



PETER P. ROCCHIO 

The Town Agency For 

Real Estate and Insurance 

889 Nassau Road, Uniondale 

Phone HEmpstead 2-6858 



Patchogue 



Realtors — Insurers 
JOHN J. ROE & SON 

125 E. Main St. Patchogue 2300 



Glen Cove 



HAROLD A. JACKSON CO. 
Insurance and Real Estate 

7 W. Glen Street Telephone 4-1500 



Westbury 



HAMILTON R. HILL 

Insurance - Real Estate 

WEstbury 7-0108 249 Post Ave. 

For Westbury and Vicinity 



Floral Park 



EDMUND D. PURCELL 

REALTOR 

Sales - Appraisals - Insuranc* 

111 Tyson Ave. FLoral Park 4-0333 

Lake Ronkonkoma 

CLIFFORD R. YERK 

Lots, Farms, Shore Frontage 

Homes Acreage 

Rosedale Ave. and Richmond Blvd. 

Telephones Ronkonkoma 8543 and 8859 

East Norwich 

RICHARD DOWNING & SONS 

Real Estate & Insurance Brokers 

North Hempstead Turnpike 

Tel. OYster Bay 6-0592 



Real Estate Insurance 
East Tetauket 

Lond island. New York 
■ miOl SoUuket ■ 



Unqua Agency, Inc. 

General Insurance 

Real Estate 

GORDON W. FRA.SER, Mgr. 

199-A Broadway AMityvillc 4-0876 



That Walk to Plum Island 

How many years ago could one 
walk from Orient Point to Plum 
Island at low tide ? I read this in 
the Forum, I think by Ezra Hal- 
lock Young of Orient. Is that 
right? This will be interesting to 
know about and this subscriber 
will watch for the answer in the 
Forum. 

K. L., Brooklyn 

Note: Mr. Young gave it as 
handed-down hearsay, but did not 
vouch for its accuracy. Dr. Wood, 
our senior contributing editor, 
once told of his ancestor Squire 
Chase while lighthouse-keeper on 
Little Gull Island hiking from 
there to Shelter Island on the ice. 
Can some reader supply further 
data on the Plum Island walk? 
Editor. 



Franklin; Not Frank 

Dr. Clarence Ashton Wood sent 
word, too late to appear in his 
story in the July number, "South- 
old's Versatile Physician", that his 
full name was Franklin Charles 
Tuthill. However, he was best 
known as Dr. Frank. 



The Forum is as good as ever. 
J. Robert Bailey Jr., Patchogue. 

Miller Place 

ALFRED E. BEYER 

Licensed Real Estate Broker 

Member, Suffolk Real Estate Board 

North Country Road Miller Place 

Tel. POrt Jefferson 8-1204 

Massapequa 

TOM ABBOTT 

Massapequa 

Cor. Merrick Rd. and Ocean Ave. 
Massapequa, N. Y. 



BELLPORT 

Ed*vard B. Bristow 

Real Estate and Insurance 
Main Street BEIIport 7-0143 



Robert A. Dodd 

General Insurance 
Real Estate 


RAYMOND A. 

66 Merrick Rd.. Copiajue 


SWEENEY 

AMityviUe 4-1951 



Real Estate Insurance 

EDWARD F. COOK 

East Hampton 

Telephone 4-1440 



East Quogue 



GEO. H. JONES 
Real Estate and Insurance 

Montauk Highway 
Telephone East Quogue 960 



Wantagh 



W. J. JORGENSEN 
Realtor — Appraisals 

Tel. Wantagh 2210 



Babylon 



CHARLES F. PFEIFLE 

Licensed Real Estate Broker 

Lots - Plots - Acreage 

W. Main St., nr. Lake Babylon 644 



Wading River 



WM. L. MILLER & SON 
Real Estate and Insurance 
Phone: Wading River 4323 



Great Neck 



Qfj /lL>cf^ 



LONG ISLAND 
REAL ESTATE 

City line to Montauk Point. List- 
ings wanted all over Long Island. 
Sales offices at 740 Northern Blvd., 
Great Neck, and Route 25 Matti- 
tuck. Tels. GReat Neck 2-6614 and 
Mattituck 9-8434. 

Garden City 



RlLLKLEY^H pRTON fO. 

^^ Brooklyn and Long Island't Largest 

Real Estate Organization" 

721 Franklin Ave. Tel. Garden City 7-6400 



Save at Southold 

BANK BY MAIL 
Current Dividend 

The Oldest Savings Bank in Suf- 
folk County. Incorporated 1858. 

Southold Savings Bank 

Southold, New York 

Member Federal Deposit Insurance 

Corporation 



151 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 
Battle of St. George's 

Continued from page 144 

groups were each to go 
against a side of the triangu- 
lar stockade, while Tallmadge 
led the rest against the 
main gate, preceded by Caleb 
Brewster and some pioneers, 
who were to make the breach. 
Complete silence was to be 
observed while the enemy 
gave the alarm, and the ma- 
jor made sure of it by order- 
ing all guns left unloaded. 

They moved off in this 
fashion, and a Tory picket 
outside the fort did give the 
alarm, with immediately dis- 
astrous results for himself. 
Brewster's men had got past 
him unno-ticed when the un- 
fortunate sentry heard the 
rustle of Tallmadge's section 
in the brush. He cried, "Who 
comes there?", hesitated ner- 
vously, and then fired wildly 
into the darkness. Tallmadge 
himself was only a few steps 
away, and a sergeant at his 



side lunged forward and bay- 
oneted the Tory to a sudden 
death. Discarding silence, the 
Continentals rushed the 
stockade. The pioneers' axes, 
wielded lustily, cut a way 
through the gate, and Tall- 
madge led straight across the 
"Grand Parade" against the 
main building, leaving a pla- 
toon at the breach to prevent 
any escape from the trap. 
Similarly, the two smaller 
groups had come over the 
stockade on their assigned 
sides, and each immediately 
surrounded one of the houses 
at the triangle's corners. The 
assault against the first ob- 
jective went quickly and suc- 
cessfully, the Americans, 
guns still empty, climbing 
through the ditch and abatis. 
In ten minutes the building 
was taken, at bayonet point. 

The captives were herded 
out onto the Grand Parade 
and jubilantly two young of- 
ficers clambered to the top of 



AUGUST 1954 

the stockade shouting the 
watchword, "Washington and 
Glory!" Into their elation 
crashed a volley from one of 
the still untaken corner 
houses. The standard of Fort 
St. George, which had flown 
over the main building was 
down, and this subsequent re- 
resistance was completely 
against the rules of warfare, 
according to which the house's 
occupants had forfeited their 
lives. The tough dragoons, 
with this in mind, loaded 
their guns, and returned the 
fire with a will while the 
axes again forced an entry. 

Inside, the fighting was 
hand-to-hand, the "confusion 
and conflict" great. The de- 
fenders were driven to the 
second floor where the Con- 
tinentals, when they got to 
them, began hurling them out 
of the windows. This was all 
permissible, and by the rule- 
book, but Tallmadge, shouting 
over the uproar, put a stop to 



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HOME OWNERS 



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or to purchase and /or renovate homes 



INDIVIDUAL MORTGAGE HOLDERS 

Existing mortgages purchased or refinanced 

RIVERHEAD SAVINGS BANK 



RIVERHEAD. N. Y. 



RIVERHEAD 8-3600 



#^ 



^^ 



152 



AUGUST 1954 



it. When this struggle had 
quieted, there was a further 
^ burst of excitement. A cry 
It arose fhat the supply ships 
under the waterside wall were 
preparing to make a run for it. 
Brewster, an ex-artilleryman, 
led the rush to the Tory can- 
non, which were quickly run 
out, and the intention made 

The ships were secured as 
the sun rose pleasantly (for 
the Am.ericans) and the job 
of destroying the works got 
under way. While it went up 
in flames, the prisoners were 
pinioned in pairs, loaded with 
"some valuable dry goods", 
and set to the m.arch north 
across fhe island. Captain 
Edgar was in command of 
their escort, which consisted 
of most of the Americans. 

Tallmadge picked a dozen 
men for the Coram ra:d, 
among, them Brewster and 
Jackson. They were mounted 
on horses captured in the 
fort, and rode off ahead of the 
prisoner caravan. They turned 
away from the River Road at 

tMillville, riding through the 
heavy oak and pine forest 
that covered the middle of the 
island. Galloping through the 
thin November sunlight into 
Coram, they quickly put to 
rout the small forage guard. 
The 300 tons of hay and corn- 
stalks made a fine, if smoky, 
blaze and they went happily 
on to the rendezvous at Old 
Man's, reaching it in about an 
hour and a half. 

The timing was perfect. 
Captain Edgar's column was 
just arriving, and "all sat 
down for nearly an hour and 
refreshed." There was time 
to waste, as they were ahead 
of Major Tallmadge's careful 
timetable, which caPed for 
another right crossing. In 
daylight, even eight heavily 
armed whaleboats were by 
no means a safe convoy. 
Heavy British warships in- 
fested the Sound. By 4 P.M. 
all were at the boats, and at 
sunset they were afloat. They 
slipped away into the twilight, 
^ passing through an opening at 
" the east end of Old Man's 
Harbor which has long since 
filled in. In the dark on the 



Sound, the boats were sep- 
arated, but one by one they 
straggled up to the beach at 
Fairfield, the first at 11, the 
last two hours later. In a little 
over thirty hours, the expe- 
dition had covered, with no 
sleep, about forty miles on 
land and tv.enty on water. 

An engagement had been 
fought, a magazine destroyed, 
and over most of the distance 
they'd been hampered by a 
body of prisoners nearly as 
numerous as themselves. No 
Continental was lost, and only 
one seriously wounded. Jack- 
son wrote that the prisoners 
were, "1 Lt. Coin, ard 1 Capt, 
half pay. One lieutenant and 
50 rank and file." iSome of 
these were quickly paroled, 
and on Monday, the 27th, 
Jackson took about 40 off to 
West Point for incarceration. 
Washington wrote to Tall- 
madge : 
"Morristown, Nov. 28, 1780 
Dear Sir-^I have received 
with much pleasure the re- 
port of your successful en- 
terprise upon Fort George, 
and the vessels with stores in 
the bav, and was particularly 
well pleased with the destruc- 
tion of the hay at Coram, 
which must, I conceive, be se- 
verely felt by the enemy at 
this time. I beg you to accept 
my thanks for your judicious 
planning and spirited execu- 
tion of this business, and that 
you will offer them to the 
officers and men who shared 
the honors of the enterprise 
with you. . . . 

Yours, &c. 

G. Washington" 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 

House Downhill 

Continued from page 147 

soup for the slaves. One 
spoonful would certainly have 
filled a good-size bowl. 

Mr. John Mount wrote for 
the Port Jefferson Times 
years ago an account of some- 
thing that happened at the 
old house in Revolutionary 
times. While Mr. Joseph 
Brewster secretly contributed 
to the American cause, he 
found it wiser to keep on 
friendly terms with the Brit- 
ish who occupied most of the 
Island at that time. 

One day when Mr. Brews- 
ter and his son John were 
cutting wood for the fire- 
places, a number of Col. Hew- 
lett's troopers came into the 
yard. Son John, having no 
love for the redcoats and not 
realizing the danger, jokingly 
remarked, "Father, see that 
nice tall straight tree oyer 
there; it would make a fine 
liberty pole." His father, see- 
ing the angry looks of the 
troopers, replied sternly, "We 
have no room for liberty poles 
round here. Cut it down and 
saw it up for firewood." So all 
passed off peacefully. Mr. 
John Mount's grandfather, 
the John Brewster of this 
tale, told him of this incident 
many years later. 

The old house has passed 
out of the family, but kindly 
hands saved it from being 
turned into a gas station or 
something of that sort. We 
hope some day its old front 
door may swing open in wel- 
come, as it did in the days 




M^'^^U .. JUv WvU/. kv, 



jMv*w*h«'^^><'^ ^'^■^^■ 



153 



LONG ISLAND FOEUM 

when Mr. William Mount 
parked his studio there and 
enjoyed the friendship and 
the delicious food within its 
hospitable doors. 



The Past 65 Years 

The Forum's collection of histori- 
cal booklets has been augmented 
by one recently issued by the 
Columbia Savings and Loan Asso- 
ciation of Woodhaven to commem- 
orate the bank's 65th anniversary 
and the dedication of its new edi- 
fice at 93-22 Jamaica avenue. It is 
more than the story of an institu- 
tion's growth from its humble 
inception in the then city of 
Brooklyn in 1889, its removal to 
Woodhaven a decade later, its 
steady growth in spite of national 
financial panics and the great 
depression, through wars and poli- 
tical upheavals, to its present 
pinnacle. 

This really is the story, briefly 
told, of the age through which the 
institution grew. "With a fine 
sense of things historic, the author 
(unfortunately without byline) 
lists those outstanding events that 
were contemporary with the bank's 
year-by-year progress. Thus the 
h.ist;ory of a bank, which could 
have been only a compilation of 
bigger and better annual reports, 
becomes an interesting narrative 
of the past 65 years which most 
anyone would enioy reading. 

We take the liberty of quoting 
the general data from one year, 
that of 1937, the year the Forum 
was first printed, and Columbia's 
present president, Mr. Harry L. 
R. Clapp, was first elected: 

"President Roosevelt began his 
seconid term. There were more 
sit-down strikes: industry fell off 
again. This was the year that 
r. D. R. battled the nine old men 
on the Supreme Court. He tried 
to enlarge the court to fifteen 
Justices but the 'packing plan' 



^eHjxtL 



STOP in and let us 
demonstrate the 

NEW ZENITH 



very 

V small 
model 



(very \ 
small I 
model / 

HEARING AID 

In Stock: Batteries for all 
Types of Aids 



PICKUP & BROWN 

GUILD OPTICIANS 
18 Deer Park Ave. Babylon 

Tel. Babylon 927 



was beaten. Spain was in the 
midst of civil war; Japan was 
attacking China; Hitler repudiated 
the Versailles Treaty. The Duke 
of Windsor married Wallis Simp- 
son. A DuPont chemist patented 
nylon. Charlie McCarthy appeared 
on radio. Youngsters were dancing 
'The Big Apple'. The Lincoln Tun- 
nel opened, an,d there was a mad- 
ness for candid cameras." 

Which is just a sample of a job 
very well done. 



AUGUST 1954 

Yes, Greenport, Southold Town 

The sketch "Sterling Creek, 
Southold", in t,he March issue, looks 
to me very much like what used to 
be Ketcham's boatshop on Sterling 
Creek to be sure, but that is in 
Greenport, next to the Presbyter- 
ian Church. Am I right? 

Mrs. C, Brooklyn. 



Frank and Seth Cwrwin 

Your April Forum enjoyed as 
per usual, especially the letter from 
Frank W. Corwin, Esq. (of Sag 
Harbor). I would gather therefrom 
that his father was captain of a 
sea-going vessel in 1854. Allowing 
for the fact that he made this 
grade at the tender age of 30, he 
must have been born around 1824. 
My father, Seth, was born in 1827. 
Virile men, them Corwins. 

Hilary Corwin 
Counselor at Law 

Huntington 



GLEN COVE'S 
Largest 

Ethical Prescription 

PHARMACY 

Economy Drug Co. 

1 School Street 

Tel. GLen Cove 4-1616 



DRY CLEANING 



FUR STORAGE 



JiMMeJikMiV' 



RUG CLEANING 



AMITYVILLE 4-3200 



''The Long Island Indian" 

By Robert R. Coles 

With 20 Line Drawings 

How our Indians looked and lived. The names and distribu- 
tion of their chieftaincies. Their contribution to our civilizatoin 
and many other interesting facts about those first Long Islanders. 

Send $1 to Robert R. Coles, 7 The Place, Glen Cove, N. Y. 



f^ 



if^^ 



"Long Island Whalers" 

By Paul Bailey 

The history of whaling by L. I. ships and men for 
more than 200 years, briefly told. Showing the begin- 
ning, the rise, the peak and the decline and finish of 
the industry between the 1640's and 1870's. Well illus- 
trated. Postpaid $1. 
Address LONG ISLAND FORUM, Box 805, Amityville 



154 



AUGUST 1954 



• 



Stars Over Long Island 

Continued from page 146 

briffht red star, called Ant- 
ares. On the night of August 
eighth the moon will be pass- 
ing just north of Antares. 

Two nights later, on August 
tenth, our satellite will have 
entered the zodiacal constella- 
tion of Sagittarius, the 
Archer, and have passed to 
the north of Mars, which will 
then be sojourning m that 
part of the sky. To many, 
Sagittarius resembles an oia 
fashioned tea kettle more 
closely than an archer. An 
asterism of four stars to the 
east forms the handle, and a 
group of three to the west is 
the spout. 

Mars will appear low m the 
southeast at twilight during 
early August and be seen to 
move slowly westward 
through the southern sky 
during the night as the earth 
rotates on its axis. If /ou 
watch it carefully from night 
to night you will discover that 
it is also slowly shifting east- 
ward among the stars of Sag- 
ittarius, as it follows its orbit 
around the sun. 

On August fourteenth a 
full moon will rise in the east 
about sunset and by the 
twenty-first it will have at- 
tained first quarter phase and 
appear among the wmter con- 
stellations. 

As a resutt of the earth's 
orbital motion around the sun 
the constellations change 
slowly in reference to the 
horizon from night to night. 
Each star rises about four 
minutes earlier on any given 
night than the night before, 
about 28 minutes earlier after 



a week, and nearly two hours 

earlier at the end of a month. 
This changes the sky picture 
greatly from season to sea- 
son. 

If you would like to enjoy 
a preview of the autumn skies 
in mid-summer it is merely 
necessary to search the east- 
ern heavens at about 10 p.m. 
in the middle of August. At 
that time you will see the 
familiar Autumn Constella- 
tions high above the horizon. 
One of the most famous ot 
these is the constellation of 
Pegasus, the Winged Horse. 
The most conspicuous part ol 
this is a large and almost per- 
fect square of stars that is 
known as the Great Square of 
Pegasus. A double chain of 
stars that extends across the 
sky from the northeast cor- 
ner of this square forms the 
principal part of the constel- 
lation of Andromeda, the 
Chained Lady. While not an 
impressive constellation, this 
is of special interest because 
there exists within its area 
one of the most amazing ob- 
jects visible to the unaided 
eye. This is a hazy and 
rather indistinct little patch 
of light a short distance to 
the west of the double chain 
of stars and about half way 
of its length. Astronomers 
call this the Great Nebula in 
Andromeda and tell us that it 
is the most distant object 
that we can observe with the 
naked-eye. Our great tele- 
scopes reveal it to be another 
galaxy of stars, with billions 
of suns like those in our own 
Milky Way system. Its dis- 
tance has recently been deter- 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 

mined as in the order of 
1,500,000 light-years. In other 
words, the light reaching us 
from that island universe to- 
night began its long journey 
through space long before 
man inhabited the earth and 
we see it as it existed count- 
less millenia before the dawn 
of human history. 

Here we have mentioned 
but a few of the many won- 
ders that adorn our summer 
skies over Long Island. Their 
number may b© multiplied 
almost without end. 

In the northern sky there 
is the interesting circumpolar 
wheel that turns about the 
celestial pole, reflecting the 
earth's rotation. Overhead 
during these August nights 
are such splendid sights as 
the famous constellation of 
Cygnus, the Swan, the blue- 
white star Vega, in the con- 
stellation of Lyra, the Harp, 
and the magnificent arch of 
the Milky Way. 

Perhaps you would like to 
explore these skies on your 
own with the aid of a good 
star chart and learn the thrill 
of discovering these wonders 
of the summer night. The 
stars belong to all who can 
enjoy and appreciate them. 

L. I. Limericks 

I recall that about a dozen years 
ago the Forum had its readers 
sending in four-line stanzas on 
Why Do I Love Long Island So. 
Why not get them started on lim- 
ericks. Here's one: 
There was an old man m Moriches 
Who suffered the seven-year itches. 

He scratched and he tore 

Till he finally wore 
A hole in his corduroy britches. 
C.F.D., Queens. 




• 



Village House 

Arts, Crafts, Americana 

Museum of the 
Oysterponds Historical 
Society at Orient, L. I. 

Open July 1 to October 31 
Tuesdays. Thursdays, 
Saturdays and Sundays 

2 to 5 P. M. Free Admission 



ESTABLISHED 1887 

SOUTH SIDE 
BANK 



BRENTWOOD 

Suffolk 6- 4th 
Phone BR 3-45 1 1 



BAY SHORE 

Mam <&• Bay Shore Av. 
Phone BA 7-7100 



Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation 



155 



AUGUST 1954 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 




The Making of a Mode 

How colors from past eras 
influence today's mode is shown 
most vividly in this exhibit in the 
reception room at the Traphagen 
School of Fashion, 1680 Broadway, 
New York. The display illustrates 
how the rich shades of moyen age 
costume were chosen and drama- 
tized by the Forstmann Woolen 
Compan,y in a successful style 
promotion. Tod Draz was the 
artist selected by them to execute 
this outstanding series of period 
murals — a few of the finished 
paintings are shown in the illus- 
tration here. 



Draz, who has been called by 
the press "the aristocrat of illus- 
trators," is a graduate of Trap- 
hagen. He went back to his alma 
mater to borrow the authentically 
created costumes seen m the pic- 
tures. These gowns were made at 
Traphagen after months of re- 
search by the students ^ the 
costume library of over 15.flOO 
volumes on the history of fashion. 
From sketches made by the art 
students, the theatrical class, thus 
prepared, combined forces witti 
the clothing construction depart- 
ment in the art of pattern cutting 
and draping for the making of this 
extraordinary collection. The artist 



also used the school's "Ladies of 
History" dolls — the one on the 
table is the Traphagen trade 
mark, the li5th century lady.. 
Beside this miniature manikin lies 
the textile manufacturer s flnishea 
color book, filled with swatches of 
fabrics keyed to the new — old 
colors and reproducing the Draz. 
paintings. , 

The exhibit thus points up the 
practical tie-up of all the different 
fields of art and fashion that enter 
into the making of the 20th cen- 
tury mode, and an exquisite vol- 
ume that America may well be 
proud of as an example of art 
wedded to industry. 



^ 



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156 



AUGUST 1954 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 



• 



"Shrine to Religious Freedom" 

Long Island is known in many- 
faraway places chiefly as the 
locale of The Bowne House, People 
have come from abroad to see and 
enter this monument to men and 
wwnen of 300 years ago who 
helped to make religious worship 
free to all faiths in the New 
World. Surely every Long Islander 
Fhould visit this venerable one- 
time home of Quakers John and 
Hannah Feake Bowne which 
stands at Bowne street and Fox 
lane in historic Flushing. 

The Bowne House, built in 1661, 
is open Sundays, Tuesdays and 
Saturdays from one to five p.m. 
and no admission fee is charged. 
It is an easy drive by way of the 
Northern State Parkway. The 
Bowne House Historical Society, 
headed by Supreme Court Justice 
Charles S. Colden, is making a 
tremendous contribution to the 
great cause of religious and racial 
tolerance, by having acquired and 
preserved this simple structure 
whose place in American history is 
not surpassed by any building 
anywhere in the land. 

Long Islanders especially owe 
much to Judge Colden and his fel- 
low officoT-s who are: Vice-Presi- 
dents LeRoy T. Stratton and 
Laurence B. Halleran, Treasurer 
Franklin F. Regan, Secretary Mrs. 
Edward J. Streator and Historian 
Miss Margaret L. Carmen. 

Best wishes for the continued 
success of your publication. 
Charles Huguenin, New York 
(author of "General Emory Up- 
ton"). 



TBanb of amitptJille 

Incorporated 1891 

2% on Special Interest 

Accounts Compounded 

Quarterly 

Hours: 9 to 3 except Saturday 
Friday Evening, 6:30 to 8:30 

Member Federal Deposit 
Insurance Corp. 



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Wide Selection of 

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For Quality Service on TV 

On the Triangle AMityville4-1177 




The Bowne House, from old print in Phelps Stokes Collection 



J. C. DODGE & SON, Inc. 

Glen Cove's Oldest Furniture House 

Established in 1835 when Andrew Jackson was President. 
99 GLEN COVE STREET 



GLen Cove 4-0242 



LONG ISLAND 

is located advantageously for light industry. 

Its suburban and rural areas offer ideal living 
conditions. 

Independent Textile Dyeing Co., Inc. 

FARMJNGDALE, N. Y. 



%\)t X80\ House 

FINE FURNITURE 

Interior Decorating BAbylon 6-1801 

173 West Merrick Road, Babylon 

The Southard Mill, which stood on Southard pond 75 years 
ago, to the north of Argyle Lake, was famous for its fine 
flour. It was owned by brothers George J. and James South- 
ard. 



1S7 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 

Dr. Murphy's Daisy 

Your concise history of "Long 
Island Whalers" in its last chap- 
ter on the decline of L. I. whaling 
makes note of a last L. I. whale- 
ship, the brig Myra, operating 
until 1'871. 

It called to mind a brig built 
on Long Island in 1872 that was 
engaged in whaling from 1907 to 
1914 This vessel is interestingly 
described by Dr. Robert Cushman 
Murphy of Crystal Brook, LI. Dr. 
Murphy is chairman of the Depart- 
ment of Birds of the American 
Museum of Natural History and 
in 1947 published his fascinating 
book ''Log Book for Grace 
describing his voyage m 1911-16 
on the whaling brig Daisy to 
South Georgia Island. 

"The brig Daisy," writes Ur. 
Murphy, "was built at Setauket 
Harbor and launched in October 
1872. Nehemiah Hand, with whose 
descendants I used to play, was 
her builder. She was the twenty- 
sixth, and seventh from the 
largest, of the thirty-two staunch 
wooden hulls that came off his 
Continued on back cover 



AUGUST 1954 



Telephone AMityville 4-2126 

FIRESTONE 

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Sales and Service 



Martin Firestone Merrick Road 
Just West of Amityville 



Over 100 Years 

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SERVICE 

TO 

LONG ISLANDERS 







Hemaphrodite Brig D.isy, photographed 1912 in Sargosso Sea by Dr. Murphy 



FORUMS, PRIOR TO 1950 

One dozen scattered numbers. At 
least 50 stories on island history. 
Sent postpaid for ^1.50. Address 
L. I. FORUM, AMITYVILLE 



AMITY AUTO SALES 
Chevrolet Agency 

For Sales and Service 

Parts and Accessories 

Merrick and County Line Roads 

Tel. AMityville 4-0909-4-091 • 




PETERS 
Delicatessen 

Tel. Amityville 4-1350 

176 Park Ave. Amityville 




POWELL 

Funeral Home, Inc. 

67 Broadway 
Amityville, New York 

AMityville 4-0172 

Monumental Work 



"The Fame Behind the Name" 

HARDER 

Extermination Service, Inc. 
Termite Control, Mothproof- 
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Plione Nearest Office 
PAtcho^ue 3-2100 HUntinKton 4-ai04 
Rlverhcad 8-2943 HEmpstead 2-3£e6 
BAbylon 6-2020 Southampton 1-0346 
BEllport 7-0604 STony Brook 7-0917 

F. Kenneth Harder Robert Troup 
President Vice-President 



Auto Radiators Repaired, Recored and Boiled Out 
Electric Motors— Rewinding and Rebuilding 

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For Luncheons and Dinners 

The Patchogue Hotel 

Centrally located on the 
South Shore for Banquets 

and other functions 
Modern Rooms and Suites 

Montauk Highway 

Phones Patchogue 1234 and 800 



Wining and Dining 

in the Continental Tradition, 
superb, leisurely, inexpensive, 
will be yours to enjoy, at the 
entirely new 

RENDEZVOUS 

Restaurant 

292 Merrick Rd. Amilyville 
Phone AMityville 4-9768 



J 



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^ 



For the Sea Food 
Connoisseur It's 

SNAPPER 

INN 

on Connetquot River 
OAKDALE 

Phone SAyville 4-0248 
CLOSED MONDAYS 

STERN'S 

Pickle Products, Inc. 

Farmingdale, N. Y. 

Tela. 248 ; Night 891 

Complete Line of Condiments for the 

Hotel and Restaurant Trade 

Prompt Deliveries Quality Since 1890 

Factory conveniently located at 

Farmingdale 



Dr. Murphy's Daisy 

Continued from page 158 
ways between 1836 and 1882. 
Technically the Daisy is a half- 
brig of 384 gross tons, 123 feet 
overall length, two-decked, framed 
with oak and chestnut, planked 
with yellow pine, and copper 
f a,stGii6cl " 

"Having been sailed in merchant 
service for 35 years," continues 
Dr. Murphy, "the Daisy was 
bought by a New Bedford group. 
She was then refitted as a whaler, 
with accommodations for a crew 
four or five times as large as that 
of a merchant vessel of her ton- 
nage, and the Old Man (Captain 
Benjamin Cleveland) has taken her 
on several voyages in the southern 
oceans, including expeditions for 
sea-elephant oil to Kergueleu 
Island and South Georgia." 

In the preface to his book Dr. 
Murphy writes the epitaph of the 
44-year old Daisy: "During the 
first World War the old brig was 
restored to merchant service. 
Laden with beans for Europe, she 
sprang a leak in the eastern 
Atlantic on October 29th, 1916. 
The ocean water caused such an 
incontinent swelling of her cargo 
that the decks bulged and the 
planking was sprung. Her hull was 
vetrily rent asunder by expansion 
of beans, and she sank." 

Meade C. Dobson 
Kew Gardens, L. I. 
Note: Dr. Murphy's fine book 
was reviewed in the Forum of July 
1947 by Walter K. Earle, curator 
of the Cold Spring Harbor Wlial- 
ing Museum. The Daisy was a 
merchant vessel. Converted to 
whaling by New England owners, 
she never sailed as a Long Island 
whaleship, as Dr. Murphy makes 
clear in his book. The brig Myra 
which cleared Sag Harbor in 1871, 
never returned as she was con- 
demned at Barbadoes on Decem- 
ber 14, 1874, and officially 
destroyed. She was indeed Long 
Island's last whaleship — Editor. 

Peconic's Old Gristmill 

I have enjoyed the Forum so 
very much in the short time I 
have been a subscriber. After only 
two issues it was interesting to 
note (in June number) that my 
great-grandfather Martin Gold- 
smith was one of the shareholders 
of the old gristmill at Peconic. 
Mrs. Foster F. Kobin 

Comstock Hill 
Norwalk, Ct. 



DINE AT 

FRANK FRIEDE'S 

Riverside Inn 

Table d'Hote and a la Carte 

On Jericho Turnpike 
Route 25 

SMITHTOWN. L. I., N. Y. 



"Willie and Herman's" 

La Grange 

Montauk Highway East of Babylon 

Luncheons - Dinners 

Large New Banquet Hall 

Tel. Babylon 480 



Enroute to the Hamptons 

on Montauk Highway 
visit C ASA BASSO »nd 

Enjoy the Best 
Luncheon and Dinner 

Westhampton 4-1841 
Closed on Mondays 



The Shoreham 

"0« The Great South Bay'' 

Since 1903 

Specializing in SEA FOOD 

Special Luncheons Daily 

Foot of Foster Ave. SayviUe 

Tel. SAyville 4-««6« 

CLOSED MONDAYS 



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LUNCHEON - DINNER (or SNACK) 

in the restful comfort of 

^he hospitality Shoppe 

where excellent food, skillfully prepared and promptly served, 
is primed to meet the better taste. 

123 Louden Avenue Tel. AMityville 4-4000 Amityville, L. I. 

"ASK YOUR FRIENDS WHO'VE TRIED IT"