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LONG 1 SLAND 

FORUM 



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Shinnecocic Canaf in 1887, Showing Newly Constructed Railroad Bridge (Story Page 167) 



TABLE of CONTENTS 



HE KNEW PECONIC MILL 

A NASSAU COUNTY LANDMARK 

SHINNECOCK CANAL OF 1886 

SOME CENTURY OLD LETTERS 

PATCHOGUE IN 1812 

ANOTHER ATTIC TREASURE 

GRANDPA DID SOME BEACHCOMING 



Dr. Clarence Ashton Wood 

Robert R. Coles 

John H. Sutter 

Kate Wheeler Strong 

Mrs. Harry C. Hetzel 

Wilbur F. Howell 

Eva Gordon Slaterbeck 



LETTERS FROM FORUM READERS 



i^ 



nx 



SEPTEMBER 1954 



.00 a year by Mail; Single Copies 25c 



VOL. XVII, No. 9 



H. E. Swezey & Son, Inc. 

GENERAL TRUCKING 
Middle Country Rd., Eastport 

Telephones 
Riverhead 2350 Eaatport 250 



Louden-Knickerbocker 
Hall 

A Private Sanitarium for 
Nervous and Mental Diseases 

II Louden Av«. AmityTille 

AMityville 4-0053 



Farmingdale 
Individual Laundry 

Dry Cleaning - Laundering 
Rug Cleaning 

Broad Hollow Road F«rinined«le 

Phone FArmingdale 2-0300 



Chrysler - Plymouth 

Sales and Service 

MULLER 
Automobile Corp. 

Merrick Road and Broadway 

AMityville 4-2028 and 4-2029 



BRAKES RELINED 

on Passenger Cars and Truck* 

Power Brake Sales Service 
Suffolk County Brake Service 

314 Medford Avenue, Patchogue 
Tel. 1722 



FURNITURE 
S. B. HORTON CO. 

(Eatabliihcd 1862) 

821 Main St. Greenport 

Tel. 154 




SCHWARZ 

FLORIST 

PHONE 

FArmingdale 2-0816 



SUNRISE 

Division Household Fuel Corp 

'Blue Coal' 

Fuel Oil 

Amityville Farmingdale 
1060 12 

Lindenhurst 
178 



THE 

LcNS Island 

feCLIM 

Published Monthly at 
AMITYVILLE, N. Y. 

FOR LONG ISLANDERS EVERYWHERE 
Entered as Bccond-clasi matter May il. 1947, at the 
post office at Amityville, New York, under the Act of 
March 3, 1879. 

Paul Bailey, Publisher-Editor 

Contributing Editors 

Clarence A. Wood, LL.M., Ph.D. 

Malcolm M. Willey, Ph.D. 

John C. Huden, Ph.D. 

Julian Denton Smith, Nature 



Tel. AMityville 4-0554 



Woodhull Park, L. I. 

In connection with John Tooker's 
fine story on General Woodhull in 
the July Forum, it reminds me 
that there was a station named 
Woodhull Park on the LIRR in the 
1890's. It was the terminal of the 
"rapid traniSits" (later known as 
the local electric trains) from 
Flatbush avenue, Brooklyn. In 
those days the rapid transits were 
diminutive steam trains consisting 
of cne or two small cars with a 
tiny locomotive. 

Woodhull Park station was on or 
very near the site of the present- 
day Hillside station (earlier known 
as Rockaway Junction). It should 
not be confused with the first 
station in the area, known as Wil- 
low Tree, which was three or four 
blocks farther east. 

Felix E. Reifschneider 

Orlando, Florida 



Tallmadge Sisterless 

In the July Forum Mr. Clarence 
Comes writes "Mary Tallmadge, 
sister of Major Benjamin Tall- 
madge . . . married David Osborn 
of New Haven." Major Tallmadge 
had no sisters: see his Memoir, 
N. Y. 1904. 

Several Marias appear in the 
Tallmadge line: a daughter; his 
second wife, nee Maria Hallett; 
and a daughter-in-law, nee Maria 
C. Adams. 

Major Tallmadge had four 
brothers, and at his death left five 
sons and two daughters. One of 
his sons was Benjamin Jr. who 
became sailing master of the 
U.S.S. Constitution. 

Mr. Comes might look into their 
family lines for the Mary he men- 
tions. 

Chester G. Osborne 
Center Moriches 



Miss Strong Is Brief 

Miss Kate Wheeler Strong has 

the rare ability to say much in a 

few words. "An Old Slave's Fiddle" 

in the May issue again proved it. 

(Mrs.) Florence D. Lampe 

Levittown 



NICHOLS 
RUG CLEANING 

Freeport 

86 E. Sunrise Highway Tel. 8-1212 

Rug and Furniture Cleaning 



SWEZEY FUEL CO. 

Coal and Fuel Oils 

Patchogue 270 Port Jefferson 55."! 



Funeral Director 

Arthur W. Overton 

Day and Night Service 

172 Main St. Tel. 1085 Islip 



Loans on Bond and 
Mortgage 

Deposits Accepted by Mail 

First National Bank of Islip 

Member Fed. Deposit Insurance Corp. 



Work Clothes and Paints 

Building and Garden Tools 

Desks, Typewriters, Etc. 

Suffolk Surplus Sales 

Sunrise H'way, Massapcqua (East) 
MA 6-4220 C. A. Woehning 



Highest Grade 

MEATS 

South Side Meat Market 

Stephen Queirolo, Prop. 

At the Triangle Amityville 

AMityville 4-0212 



FURNITURE 

Frigidaire 
Home Appliances 

Englander & Simmons 
Sleep Products 

BROWN'S 

Storage Warehouse 

Your Furniture and Appliance Store 

186 Maple St. Phone 31 ISLIP. L. I. 

Established 1919 



LEIGH'S TAXICABS 

MOTOR VANS - STORING 
WAREHOUSE 

Auto Busses For Hire 
AMityville 4-0225 
Near Amityville Depot 



162 



SEPTEMBER 1954 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 



\}£e tCnew'T^econic Q!7lf[ill 



r 



TN 1906 there was taken 
-'■ down "on salvage shares" 
for its then owner Lewis H. 
Case to make room for a cot- 
tage development the rem- 
nant of a picturesque land- 
mark which had stood many 
years near the mouth of Gold- 
smith's Inlet in the town of 
Southold where the northerly 
end of Peconic Lane stops at 
the shore of Long Island 
Sound. 

It was a welcome relief to 
this writer in the late 1880's 
from routine daily tasks on 
the Howell, now the Donahue, 
farm at the head of Tucker's 
lane and the North Road 
north of Southold village, to 
ride with "Uncle" Eli Howell 
in the "schooner" wagon to 
the Peconic gristmill with 
wheat, corn and oats to be 
ground into flour, light and 
dark canaille, and meal for 
the kitchen, and bran and 
feed for the bam. 

About 1760 Amon Taber, 
the millwright of Orient (then 
called Oysterponds) , who in 
1803 built the present edifice 
of the Southold Presbyterian 
Church, erected the first tide- 
water-mill at the Inlet. 

The mill however failed to 
work satisfactorily. The nat- 
ural channel did not supply a 
sufficient stream of water to 
operate the undershot wheel. 
TTie mill was hence built over 
into a horse-mill such as Jere- 
miah Goldsmith had at his 
farm home at the corner of 
the Lane and the North Road. 

The horse-mill fell into dis- 
use after the Revolution as 
the money crop was then flax. 
As the farmers began again 
to raise wheat and corn there 
also again arose the need for 
a local mill. It was too long 
a drive to the tide-water-mill 
at Mattituck and also to the 
similar one at Tom's Creek 
at Ashamomoque where for a 
hundred years past the South 
Road which connects Southold 
and Greenport has crossed 
,the creek over a bridge. 



Dr. Glarence zAshton Wood 

Editor's Note 

This second story on. the Peconic 
mill, by one who knew it as a boy 
and saw it run and knew t;he in.il- 
ler, brings many additional facts 
to light. The author also gives 
further data on the mill's back- 
ground. Dr. Wood, our senior con- 
tributing editor, certainly has a 
fund of knowledge on all phases 
of Southold Town history. 

Joseph Hull Goldsmith, son 
of Zachariah, a lawyer, had 
in 1833 returned after a nine 
years absence in New York 
City with his wife to spend 
the remainder of their lives 
in the town of their birth. 
He was an ardent Spiritualist 
and member of the Southold 
Universalist Church. He pro- 
moted the extension of the 
railroad to the East End and 
later the establishment of 
the Southold Savings Bank, 
also of the Suffolk County 
Mutual Insurance Company. 
He had wanted the terminal 
of the railroad at Goldsmith's 
Inlet. ^ 

About 1839 he and Benja- 
min H. Palmer and others 
sponsored the building of an- 
other tide-water-mill at the 



Inlet. They met with many 
discouragements but were 
finally successful. The money 
for its construction was 
raised among the neighbors 
who felt the need for a mill in 
the vicinity. 

The Shareholders and others 
carted in their farm wagons 
the rocks for the construction 
of walls to narrow, restrict 
and control the water in the 
channel of the waterway. 

It may be well to preserve 
here a copy of a document 
dated a century ago addressed 
to property owners along the 
lane leading to the mill by 
the roadmaster of the time. 
It read : "Cutchogue, Dec. 4th, 
1852. Sir. There has been sev- 
eral complaints in relation to 
the Trees and bushes Stand- 
ing in the road usually called 
the Mill road running from 
the Main road to the Inlet 
Mill. 

"You will please clear that 
road without Delay of the 
Trees and Bushes so that 
Waggons can pass each other 
without any inconvenience. 
Yours, S. E. Horton." 

"Uncle" John Conklin Ap- 
pleby, grandfather of John 
Ellsworth Appleby, a "prince 




SWEZEY GRISTMILL, SWAN CREEK, PATCH06UE 
Sketched and etched by Jos. P. DiGemma 



16.^ 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 

among millers" who had 
ground grits at the tide- 
water-mill at the mouth o± 
Tom's or Mill Creek at Asha- 
momoque to the satisfaction 
of everybody, was induced to 
conduct the Peconic Mill threa 
days each week and devote 
the other three weekdays to 
the Ashamomoque mill. 

In those days there was not 
enough business to keep the 
miller busy all the while at 
either mill. The mill at Tom s 
Creek, it is said, may have 
ground a "leetle better be- 
cause of its "steady gait. 

In these tide-water-mills 
the rising tide swept into the 
rock-walled channel through 
the open gates. As the tide- 
water retreated the gates 
would close, storing the water 
in the creek for use when it 
flowed out, turning the big 
water wheel. 

When Appleby retired from 
the mill his place was taken 
by Richard Cox who had come 
east from Oyster Bay in 1821 
to erect and conduct the tide- 
water wheel at Mattituck 
Creek a few miles to the west 
of the Peconic mill. 

Cox in turn gave way to 
Gabriel Bennett, a miller 
from East Hampton who had 
run the Red Mill on Pme 
Neck, Southold, until it was 
removed about 1840 to Shel- 
ter Island. Later one Smith, 
an Englishman, bought out 
the other shareholders of the 
PecoT^ic Mill. After operating 
it a few years he sold out to 
Cox and his son John Cox. 
Their mill at Mattituck took 
so much of their time in 1872 
that the Coxes sold their hold- 
ings there to Capt. Joshua U. 
Terry who, after retiring 
from his seafaring life m 
1847, conducted the Mattituck 
mill for over twenty years. 

The next miller at the 
Peconic mill after Cox and 
his son was Edward H. Terry 
who conducted it until the 
growing infirmities of age 
compelled his retirement. He 
was succeeded by his brother 
Gilbert Terry who as the last 
miller there ran the Peconic 
mill for thirty-four years. He 

Continued on pagf. 172 



SEPTEMBER 1954 



Bank and Borrow ^ 

AT 

THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK 

AND TRUST COMPANY 

^^ BAY SHORE 



OPEN FRIDAY EVENINGS 6:30 TO 8 



128 West Main Street 

Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation 



Bay Shore, N. Y. 

Member Federal Reserve System 



Grumman Aircraft Engineering Corp n 

Bethpage, Long Island, N. Y. 



Designfers and Manufacturers of the 

Panther Albatross Mallard 



Airplanes for the U. S. Navy, the Air Force 
and Commercial Users 




B U I C K 

SALES SERVICE PARTS 

Suffolk County's Largest Selection of 
GUARANTEED USED CARS 

Ande-McEwan Motors, Inc. 

Tel B*y Shore 2 228 East Main St., Bay Shore 

WE BUY USED CARS FOR CASH 



WILLIAM A. NICHOLSON 
vice President 



JOHN E. NICHOLSON 

President 



Nicholson & Galloway 

Established 1849 
Roofing and Waterproofing 

Difficult commissions accepted to correct wall and roof 
leaks in schools, churches, banks, public buildings, etc. 



426 East 110th Street 

New York City 

LEhigh 4-2076 



Cedar Swamp Road 

Brookville, L. I. 
BRookville 5-0020 



164 



SEPTEMBER 1954 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 



c54. J^ssau Qounty Ljandmar\ 



\ MONG the few remaining 
-'*■ landmarks from the ear- 
liest days of Mosquito Cove is 
the homestead built in 1668 
by Robert Coles, one of the 
original settlers of the region 
and a direct ancestor of the 
writer. This stands today on 
the north side of the street 
called "The Place" and to the 
west of the large brick build- 
ing occupied by the Griscom 
Publications, within the City 
of Glen Cove. A high board 
fence and heavy foliage par- 
tially hide it from view of 
passers-by. 

While the old dwelling has 
undergone much renovation 
and extensive additions dur- 
ing the past two hundred 
eighty-six years, anyone fam- 
iliar with the architecture of 
this locality during the latter 
part of the seventeenth cen- 
tury can easily recognize the 
small wing to the right that 
was the original house. To- 
day this is overshadowed by 
two large additions of later 
construction and different 
style. By mentally erasing 
these, however, and concen- 
trating on the small east wing, 
one can get a fair idea of how 
the original homestead ap- 
peared. 

Many years a<^o there was 
an old well in the front yard 
and, until 1945, a large wea- 
ther-beaten black locust grew 
about fifteen feet to the 
southwest of the oriq-inal 
dwelling. This was said to 
have been one of a number of 
young locusts that were 
brought from Virginia during 
the late seventeenth or early 
eighteenth century by Cap- 
tain John IS and s of Cow Neck, 
(now Sands Point). Others 
were planted elsewhere on 
the north shore of Long 
Tslard at the same time and 
these are claimed to have 
been the first of this s'necies 
of locust on the islar^d. Today 
they are very plentiful on the 
north shore and elsewhere. 

The construction of this 



Robert R. Coles 

house was apparently much 
like that of the one built by 
Joseph Carpenter at about the 
same time. Carpenter was 
the leader of the small group 
that settled Mosquito Cove 
and built his home on the west 
side of the road now called 
Dickson Lane. Comparison 
of the east wing of the pre- 
sent structure with a sketch 
made of the old Carpenter 
home, in 1835, shows a strik- 
ing resemblance. In both, the 
front door is centrally posi- 
tioned and divided so that the 
upper and lower halves may 
be opened independently. Mod- 
erately large windows made 
up of several panes of glass 
are placed on either side of 
the door. In the old Coles 
homestead there are small 
wi- dows directly over these 
with the sill nearly at the 
second floor level and the top 
beneath the edge of the slop- 
ing roof. The sketch of the 
Carpenter home does not 
show these upstairs windows. 
A large chimney is built into 



the east side of the Coles 
dwelling, which accommodates 
a fireplace that was used for 
cooking and heating purposes 
during the colder months. 

Unfortunately the old Car- 
penter homestead was de- 
stroyed, probably over a cen- 
tury ago, and all that remains 
is a depression in the ground 
where it stood. This is now 
overgrown with briars and 
several large locust trees. 
Over thirty years ago the 
writer retrieved two or three 
old bricks from the excava- 
tion that may have been part 
of the foundation or chimney 
before the building was de- 
molished. 

Robert Coles died on April 
16, 1715, and was buried on a 
knoll almost directly across 
The Place from his home. His 
grave and about half a dozen 
others nearby were marked 
with crude field stones and in 
time the old cemetery be- 
came overgrown with weeds 
and briars. More than ten 
years ago I took a very good 
picture of his stone. It was 
of granite, and on it was 




Gravestone of Ancestor, Preserved by Aulhor 



165 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 

crudely carved the following 
inscription: "R C D S A P 16 
1715 ". Also buried in the 
same cemetery was Robert 
Coles' wife, Mercy (Wright) 
Coles, who died on October 
21, 1708. 

This spring the property 
where the cemetery stood was 
leveled by bulldozers to make 
way for a parking field for 
the Columbia Ribbon and 
Carbon Company which came 
into possession of it some 
years ago. I removed Robert 
Coles' stone to my home and 
shall someday set it in the 
ground, in the hope that it 
may stay unmolested for an- 
other two hundred thirty- 
nine years. 

Since the death of Robert 
and Mercy Coles the old home- 
stead has been occupied by 
many families. For some 
generations it was the home 
of his children and gra^^d- 
children. During the latter 
part of the nineteenth cen- 
tury and early in the twenti- 
eth it was the home of Mr. 
George W. Cocks, one of G^en 
Cove's most respected geneal- 
ogists and historians. He did 
a great deal of work in help- 
ing to get out the first volume 
of the Oyster Bay Town Rec- 
ords and prepared an histori- 
cal sketch on the Town that is 
included in that volume. Also, 
in collaboration with John 
Cox, Jr., he compiled the 
"Cock, Cocks, Cox Genealogy" 
which is filled with interest- 
ing historical data concerning 
Glen Cove, Oyster Bay and the 
surrounding region. 

Much that we know today 
concerning the early history 
of Mosquito Cove has come 
from the pages of a quaint, 
old parchment bound volume 
known as the Mosquito Cove 
Proprietors' Book." This 
measures 141/2 x 914 inches 
and is now in the possession 
of the writer. While never 
actually part of the Oyster 
Bay Town Records, most of 
the information froni this 
volume is now included in Vol. 
I of that publication. It was 
be'Tun by Robert Coles, in 
1668, and contains many in- 
teresting entries, including 
land records, family records 



SEPTEMBER 1954 



of the Coles, Carpenter and 
Thornycraft families, two 
wills written by Robert Coles, 
one before and the other after 
the death of his wife, mis- 
cellaneous merchants' ac- 
counts and much other valu- 
able data. It survives today 
as one of the few relics of the 
first days of Mosquito Cove. 
Robert Coles was one of 
five men known as the "Pro- 
prietors of the Mosquito Cove 
Plantation". As previously 
mentioned, Joseph Carpenter, 
originailv from Warwick, 
Rhode Island, was the leader 
of this little band of pioneers. 
The others were Daniel and 
Nathaniel Coles, older bro- 
thers of Robert, and Nicholas 
Simokins. 

Simpkins had lived at Oy- 
ster Bay, having apparently 
been on hand at the time of 
its settlement, in 1653. Also 
it seems that Nathaniel Coles 
lived there and never occupied 
his holdings at Mosquito 
Cove. , ^, 

The three Coles brothers 
were sons of the first Robert 
Coles in America, who came 
from England on the Winth- 
ron Fleet, in 1630. 

Some years previous to 1668 
Joseph Carpenter had ex- 
plored the resrion in the vicin- 
ity of Mosquito Cove in search 
for a favorable site on which 
to erect saw and grist mills. 
In the stream that ran 
through the vallev at Mos- 
nnito Cove, emptying into 
Hemnstead Harbor, he found 
exactly what he desired and 
soon beran negotiations with 
the Matinecock Indians for 
its purchase. 

After obtaining permission 
from Governor Nichols, he 
purchased the land from the 
Indians on May 24, 1668. Six 
months later, November 24, 
he received as equal share- 
holders Abia Carpenter, (his 
brother - in - law), Thomas 
Townsend, Nathaniel Coles 
and Robert Coles. Shortly 
afterward, however, Thomas 
Townsend transferred his in- 
terests to Nicholas Simpkins 
and Abia Carpenter trans- 
ferred his to Daniel Coles. 
According to mutual agree- 

Continued on page 175 



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INTERIOR DECOR, and DISPLAY 

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Active Free Placement Bureau. 
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REGISTER h40W! Our Graduates in Demand! 
Traphagen, 1680 B'way (52 St.) N. Y. 19 



FIRST SUFFOLK 
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For Every Banking Service 
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Open Friday Evenines 6:'0 to 8:00 
Memher of F D I C 



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201 Bway., AMityville 4-0033 



166 



SEPTEMBER 1954 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 



f 



jhinnecock Qanal of 1886 



# 



# 



XTERE is some first-hand 
-'-*• information about the 
Shinnecock Canal at Canoe 
Place, as most of it was told 
to me by the late Colonel 
(honorary) Ellsworth How- 
land, who worked on the canal 
when it was first made navig- 
able by the State of New 
York in 1886. 

The Colonel was given the 
honor of throwing the first 
shovel of sand into Captain 
Bill Phillips' wagon whose 
first load was dumped just 
north of where the Cruiser 
Club now has its headquar- 
ters. 

Ever since the coming of 
the white men to Southamp- 
ton town in 1640 there had 
been a narrow natural drain 
here flanked by a path where 
the Indians dragged or port- 
aged their dugouts between 
Peconic and Shinnecock Bays. 
That is how Canoe Place got 
its name. Only during very 
high tides was there any flow 
of water through the drain. 

When the (State tackled the 
project of widening and 
deepening the old drain in 
1886, it installed tidal gates 
just north of the Montauk 
highway. An engineer named 
Rumbleeamp came down from 
Albany to superintendent the 
work and when he learned 
that Colonel Rowland was a 
former railroader he got him 
to lay tracks to the dump and 
a small locomotive and gon- 
dola car were procured from 
the LIRR to move the sand. 
It took six years to complete 
the job. 

An Albany man named Par- 
rott was in charge of the 
dredge which was broue-ht to 
Peconic bay bv a tuar. When 
warned that the craft lay in 
an exposed position in case an 
easterly storm should blow 
up, he remarked that "a little 
Dond like the Peconic wouldn't 
hurt the outfit" which had 
encountered many a stiff gale 
on the Hudson. But shortlv 
thereafter a real old-fashioned 



Jo/in H. Sutter 

easter set in. The tug was 
driven ashore and smashed to 
pieces and the dredge was 
sunk, but was later raised, 
pumped out and used. 

The LIRR had a track gang 
housed in a caboose. These 
men were paid $1.25 a day 
and had to pay 18 cents a day 
for board. Their principal 
meal was a loaf of Italian 
bread hollowed out and 
stuffed with garlic and other 
vesgetables. They worked 
under the padro3ie system, the 
padrone having brought them 
over from Italy and hired 
them out in a body to the 
contractor. The padrone was 
paid for their services and 
gave the laborers what was 
left after deducting living 
costs and other expenses. The 
system has long since been 
banned in this country. 

Colo"^el Rowland was ap- 
pointed watchman during 
building operations, receiving 
1.35 a day. He was also re- 
tained after the railroad 
bridge was built across the 
canal and was instructed to 
see that freight trains must 
proceed over the span no fas- 
ter than five miles an hour. 
Canoe Place Inn at that time 
was operated by one Charlie 



Conklin who had come from 
Jamesport. It was during the 
building of the canal with its 
tidal gates, a vehicular bridge 
on Montauk highway and the 
railroad trestle further to the 
north that the gigantic bust 
of Hercules, which had been 
the figurehead of the U. S. 
frigate Ohio, was purchased 
by the inn-keeper and 
mounted across from the old 
hostelry on the highway 
which was then known as the 
Country Road. 

Among those who worked 
on the canal project besides 
the gang of Italians were 
Shinnecock Indians who in 
1703 had had their tribal 
reservation removed from 
just west of the canal site to 
the east. A number, how- 
ever, still lived in Canoe Place 
and in Hampton Bays, among 
them descendants of the 
Indian missionary Paul Cuf- 
fee whose fenced-in grave 
may still be seen between the 
junction of the highway and 
the railroad, west of the 
canal. 

Just how Ellsworth How- 
land acquired the title of 
Colonel I learned from him. 
It seems that it was bestowed 
upon him by one Joshua 
Conklin who had difficulty in 

Continued on page 177 




Shinnecock Canal in 1900. Phcto by Hal B. Fullerton 



167 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 



SEPTEMBER 1954 



Reminders 



Pleasure Boat Insurance Specialist 

GEORGE C. BAKTH 

134 A Broadway, next to Post Office 

AMltyville 4-1688 (Res. 4-0855) 



E. CLAYTON SMITH 

Established 1913 

Jobber-Replacement Parts 

Tacls - Equipment 

218-220 East Main St. 

Babylon Tel. 6-0551 



Visitors Welcome 

The General Museum-Library of 
the Suffolk County Historical So- 
ciety, at Riverhead, is open daily 
(except Sundays and Holidays) 
from one to five P. M. 

Visitors always welcome (no 
charge) at this educational insti- 
tution where items connected with 
Long Island's history, culture and 
natural sciences are on display. 



Wines and Liquors 

Large assortment of Popular 
Brands at the Lowest Possible 
Prices and in various size con- 
tainers to suit your needs. Losi's 
Liquor Store, 170 Park Ave., Amity- 
viile. 



CtJans 

AMITYVILLE DAIRY, INC. 

AMITYVILLE 

ROCKVILLE CENTRE 

BLUE POINT 



STILL B. CALSO 

GASOLINE — FUEL OIL 

DISTRIBUTOR 
Tel. SElden 2-3512 



Birds in a Hurricane 

"The Hurricane of 1938, — in 
Retrospect" by William T. Hel- 
muth 3rd, describes the havoc 
played by that holocaust on the 
bird life of the east end. It is 
issued as the 8th pamphlet in the 
series entitled Birds of Long 
iF-land initiated in 1939 by The 
Bird Club of Long Island Inc. 

Fcr our copy we are indebted to 
Dr. John T. Nichols, who is editor, 
i nd is associated with the Ameri- 
can Museum of Natural History. 
Dr. Helmuth who resided in East 
Hampton took first hand notes on 
the effects of the hurricane on the 
wild birds in that vicinity and 
included in this interesting account 
a li=;t of the 54 species of birds 
which were fcund dead from the 
storm. 

Dr. Helmuth died while publica- 
tion of the pamphlet was pending 
and Dr. Nichols was obliged to 
rr.ake the final revision and carry 
the work to completion. It is a 
valuable contribution to the 
irlanu's ornithological data. 



Cash and Carry 

Service 159* Off 

UNQUA LAUNDRIES 

AMityville 4-1348 
Dixon Avenue Copiagrue 



Malverne's Village Flag 

The municipality of Malverne 
in Nassau County is the first in 
the State to adopt a village flag. 
We are indebted to Malverne His- 
torian George R. Van Allen for 
one of the handsome silk emblems 
in blup, white and orange, colors 
Eymbolic of the Dutch West India 
Company which founded New 
Netherland of which Long Island 
wa« a part. , 

It carries the Malverne coat-of- 
arms, a shield topped by a spray 
of oakleaves and acorns with the 
inscription "Oaks from Acorns". 
Also included are a chipmumk, a 
dinky, an open clamshell, a Bible 
and quill pen, a baseball, liberty 
bfll, an artist's palette with 
brushes, and two masks — all 
typifying the past, present and 
future of the village. 



tion, Cooperstown, lists from the 
Long Island Forum "Jchn Leayard 
the Traveler" by Dr. Clarence 
Ashton Wood and "Big Manuel, 
Whaling Captain" by Andrus T. 
Valentine. 

From the Journal of the Nas- 
sau County Historical Society Mr. 
Dunn lists: 'Tae Story of Oyster 
Bay" by Paul Bailey, "Thomas 
Dongan and the Charter of Liber- 
ties" by Jesse Merritt, anJ "The 
Gardens of My Great-Grandmoth- 
ers" by Julian Denton Smith. 

Head Librarian Wanted 

For Amityville Free Library. 
Good working conditions. Full time 
assistant. One month vacation. 
New York State retirement. Over 
18,000 books. Over 40,000 circula- 
tion. Write or phone for appoint- 
ment. Paul Bailey, President, Box 
805 Amityville. Tel. AM 4-0554. 



L. I. Articles Cited 

In his list of "Outstanding Arti- 
cles" published on historical sub- 
jects during the first quarter of 
1954, James Taylor Dunn, Librar- 
ian of the State Historical Associa- 



Schrafel Motors, Inc. 

NASH Sales and Service 

NEW and USED C.\RS 

Merrick Road, West Amityville 

Leo F. Schrafel AM 4-2i»* 



FAMILY HISTORY 

Start yours now with our Simpli- 
fied Worksheets and Directions . . . 
Complete Set, punched for three- 
ring binder, postpaid $1. . . . 

GIDEON STIVERS 

Box 382 Riverhead, L. 1. 

The Bowne House 
Historical Society 

Judge Charles S Golden, President 
presents 

The Bowne House 

Built 1661 

Bowne St. and Fox Lane 

FLUSHING, N. Y. 

A Shrine to Religion Freedom 

ADMISSION FREE 

Sundays, Tuesdays and Saturdays 1 to 6 P.M. 

Sponsored by 

HALLERAN AGENCY 

Realtor* Flushing, N. Y. 



Farmingdale Federal Savings 
and Loan Association 

312 CONKLIN STREET 

First Mortgage Loans Insured Savings 

21% Dividend 



Phone FArmingdale 2-2000 



FARMINGDALE, N. Y. 



168 



SEPTEMBER 1954 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 



^ 



jome Qentury &ld L^etters 



f 



m 



TLDST a bundle of letters, 
•^ yellow and brittle with 
age, but they carry us back 
into the past and show us the 
thoughts and doings of some 
of the people over 100 years 
ago. Such a bundle of letters 
has just been given me by 
my cousin Mr. Arthur T. 
Strong. Letters he had inher- 
ited from his father, my 
Uncle Charles. Now to the 
letters. 

From Hempstead June 21st 
1838, came a letter to my 
grandfather. Judge Selah B. 
Strong, from Dr. Benjamin 
F. Thompson. The first part 
was a general printed letter, 
telling that as Silas Wood's 
History was out of print, he 
had been urged to write a 
longer and fuller history. 

He gave a list of some of the 
items he wished to include, 
early settlements, churches, 
schools, agriculture, industry, 
etc. and "the number of pau- 
pers and. the mode and ex- 
pense of their maintenance." 
Followed a personal note to 
my grandfather asking for in- 
formation about the Strongs, 
the Brewsters, and the real 
facts about the Nicoll Patent. 

A letter to Grandfather 
from Richard Smith of Smith- 
town, October 31st 1819, fol- 
lows: 

Dear Sir: Previously to the 
receipt of your favor of the 
24th Inst, notice of the con- 
templated exhibition of the 
Suffolk Co. Agricultural Soci- 
ety had been sent to the Long 
Island Star, and Sag Harbor 
Eagle. Mr. Smith is worried 
about two things : the idea had 
been put forth so recently 
that there was little time to 
prepare and secondly it had 
been the worst season (prob- 
ably since 1816.) 

He adds that yet without a 
beginning, the object, laud- 
able as it is, can never pro- 
gress. "Therefore under these 
disadvantages we will do 
enough to make it appear well 
on paper afterwards." He 



K^fe Wheeler (§trong 

feels that this may draw to 
the farmers' attention the 
benefits of belonging to the 
Society. (I confess that "on 
paper" tickled me, they would 
see to it they got a decent 
writeup anyway!) 

The next letter I drew from 
the bundle is from the earlier 
historian Silas Wood. He 
wrote from Washington on 
January 18th, 1827. It seems 
that the lighthouse keeper at 




Historian and Congressman Silas Wood 

Old Point had died. A Mr. 
Smith and a Mr. Jayne both 
wanted the job, and he had 
many letters from people, 
some urging one and some the 
other. All these he had turned 
over to the proper authority 
from whom he had learned 
that the keeper's Widow had 
also made application and had 
been promised the job until 
March. I wonder if the Jaynes 
got it. I know they had it 
years later when they used to 
let me climb the tower. 

He mentions the two im- 
portant issues before Con- 
gress: a treaty with the Brit- 
ish, framing of which, he 
states, is puzzling the "wise 



men." The other is the Bank- 
rupt Bill which he thinks will 
go down to defeat as Virginia 
is against it. 

In another letter, dated 
February 19th, 1827, Mr. 
Wood tells my grandfather of 
his plan to write a history of 
the early Towns on Long 
Island. At the time he was 
working on the early history 
of the Brewster Family, and 
had written to a Capt. Henry 
Brewster of Blooming Grove 
also to Brewsters in Dan- 
bury, Conn., and to a Brew- 
ster in New Hampshire. 

Grandfather's uncle Joseph 
Strong had taken Mr. Wood 
to the family graveyard here 
on the Neck and he had copied 
some of the inscriptions. He 
asked grandfather to give as 
many facts as possible. 

There are many more let- 
ters in that old bundle, but I 
think I have puzzled long 
enough over the faded writ- 
ing for this time. 



Monument Rescuers 

The men who saved the Culluloo 
monument from destruction and 
had it restored and relocated were 
the late William S. Pettit and 
Smith N. Durlamd, who were as- 
sisted by others. 

R.P.S. 



Mr. Robert Jonas was right in 
thinking I'd find something to 
inferest me in the Long Island 
Forum. Lawrence Conant, Garden 
City. (Note: Mr. Jonas and Mr. 
Conant are charter members of the 
Nassau Archeological Society Inc. 
Editor.) 



Seven in One 



At our Neighborhood Circle I 
showed my L. I. Forums and en- 
close seven subscriptions from 
members who saw it for the first 
time. Why don't you circularize it 
more? 

(Mrs.) Marilyn Metz 

East Meadow 



Having enjoyed the Forum as a 
gift from the Union Savings Bank 
(anniversary souvenir) for the 
past year, I would like to continue 
as a subscriber. Helen C. Wood- 
hull, Patchogue. 



16^ 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 



SEPTEMBER 1954 



Leading Real Estate Brokers of 



Sayville 



LiDian H. Robinson, Realtor 

Real Estate, Insurance, 

Furnished Cottages 

Farms - Homes - Acreage 

169 W. Main St. SAyville 4-190O 

Menibt r of L. I. Real Estate Board 



Munsey Park 



See Wile for 

Worth While Real Estate 

General Brokerage 

Manhasset and vicinity 

DAVID T. WILE JR. & CO. 

3393 Northern Blvd. Manhasset 667 



Mineola 



J. ALFRED VALENTINE 

Real Estate - Insurance 

148 Mineola Boulevard 

Phone Garden City 7-7200 



Hicksville 



SEAMAN & EISEMANN, Inc. 

Real Estate - Insurance 

fO Broadway Tel. Hicksville 600 



Rirerhead 



DUGAN REALTY COMPANY 

Eastern Long Island Country 
Places along Ocean, Sound, 
Peconic, Shinnecock Bays. 



North port 



EDWARD BIALLA 

ALBERT M. ZILLIAN 

EDWIN N. ROWLEY, INC. 

Real Estate — Insurance 

Appraisals 

74 Main Street 

NOrthport 3-0108 and 2272 

Members L. I. Real Estate Board 



Latest Dividend Declared 
at the rate of 

2V2 % 
per annum 

Savings Accounts opened 
and Banking- by-Mail 

The Union Savings Bank 

of Patchogue, New York 

The only Savings Bank in 

Western Suilolk County 

Member Federal Deposit 

Insurance Corporation 



Ketcham & Colyer, Inc. 
INSURANCE 

Georse S. Colyer, Secy. 
Broadway and Faric Ava. 

AMityville 4-0198 



Grandpa Did Some Beachcombing 

I was much interested in the 
article by Clarence Russell Comes 
entitled Peconic's Old Mill in the 
June issue. It takes me back to the 
time when Uncle William Austin 
Haynes drove his bags of wheat to 
the mill when Gilbert Terry was 
the miller. I sat on the wheat for 
a ride to the mill and rode back 
with the newly ground flour, 
golden hue, sweet to the taste. 
There was also Cornell flour for 
(Our pancakes served with ooir 
own home-cured ham. 

Gilbert Terry was the only resi- 
dent at the Injet then. He had a 
cute grey house with a big peach 
orchard behind it and kept a beau- 
tiful light brown horse, fat as 
meal from the mill could make her, 
for his daughter to drive. Later 
Artist Fitz built a cottage on the 
Inlet. Next the Dr. Wilsons built 
a summer place on the Sound 
bluff. 

Where the Inlet flows into the 
Sound folks said there was quick- 
sand, but I never heard of a 
drowning there. It was great to sit 
on the bridge and watch the mill- 
wheel revolve while meditating on 
your sins or, perhaps, your good 
qualities. The one thing that 
marred the summer day was the 
buzz of the mosquito, for there 
was no DDT then. 

My grandfather Halsey Haynes' 

farm of 110 acres, partly wooded, 

ran to the Sound, and by the unr 

written law of which Dr. Wood 

Continued next page 

Farmingdale 

GREGORY SOSA AGENCY. Inc. 

Real Estate and Insurance 

Serving The Community Since 1921 
FArmingdale 2-0321—2-1286 



Mubbell, Klapper &. Hubbell 


LONG ISLAND REAL ESTATE 


65 Hilton Avenue 


Garden City, N. Y. 



REAL ESTATE 

Insurance Mortgages 

JOHN T. PULIS 

101 Rictimond Ave , Amityville 

AMityville 4-1489 



EASTPORT 

Edward B. Bristow 

Real Estate and Insurance 
Main Street EAstport 5-0164 



Port Washington 



Howard C. Hegeman Agency, Inc. 

Real Estate and Insurance 

185 Main Street 

Tel. POrt Washington 7-3124 



Commack 



JOHN W. NOTT 

Established 1925 
Wanted: Large flat wooded acre- 
age eastern L. I, to Riverhead. 
Jericho Tpk. FOrest 8-9322 



Huntington 



HENR\ A. MURPHY 
INSURING AGENCY, Inc. 

Real Estate, Insurance, Mortgag* 

Loans, Appraisals 

Steamship Tickets 

Cornelius L. Murphy Tel. Hunt. 176 



Wyandanch 



HAROLD S. ISHAM 

All Lines of Insurance 

Real Estate 

Straight Path, Wvandanch 

Tel. Midland 7755 



Mastic 



Realtor — Insurer 
BENJAMIN G. HERRLEY 

MONTAUK HIGHWAY 
Phone ATlantic— 1-8110 



Glen Head 



M. O. HOWELL 

Real Estate - Insurance 

25 Glen Head Road 

Telephone GLen Cove 4-0491 



Bay Shore 



Auto and Other Insurance 

— Real Estate — 

HENNING AGENCY, Realtor 

86 E.Main BayShore 7-0876 & 0877 



Central Islip 



ROBERT E. O'DONOHUE 

Carleton Ave. Tel. 6317 Central lalip 
Real Estate - Insurance 

Established 1911 



Hampton Bays 



JOHN H. SUTTER 
Licensed Real Estate Broker 

1 East Main Street 
HAMPTON BAYS 2-0420 





Tel. BAbylon 6-0265 




w. 


E. MAGEE, 

APPRAISER 


Inc. 


Real Estate and Insurance || 




Brokers 






Babylon. N. Y. 





<r 



170 



SEPTEMBER 1954 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 



^ 



<m 



% 



Long Island's Suburban Homeland 



Uniondale 



PETER P. ROCCHIO 

The Town Agency For 

Real Estate and Insurance 

889 Nassau Road, Uniondale 

Phone HEmpstead 2-6858 



Patchogue 



Realtors — Insurers 
JOHN J. ROE & SON 

125 E. Main St. Patchogue 2300 



Glen Cove 



HAROLD A. JACKSON CO. 
Insurance and Real Estate 

7 W. Glen Street Telephone 4-1500 



Westbury 



HAMILTON R. HILL 

Insurance - Real Estate 

WEstbury 7-0108 249 Post Ave. 

For Westbury and Vicinity 



Floral Park 



EDMUND D. PURCELL 

REALTOR 

Sales - Appraisals - Insurance 

ill Tyson Ave. FLoral Park 4-0333 

Lake Ronkonkoma 

CLIFFORD R. YERK 

Lots, Farms, Shore Frontage 
Homes Acreage 

Rosedale Ave. and Richmond Blvd. 
Telephones Ronkonkoma 8543 and 8859 



East Norwich 



RICHARD DOWNING & SONS 

Real Estate & Insurance Brokers 

North Hempstead Turnpike 

Tel. OYster Bay 6-0692 



"BehiTWe/t 

Real Estate 'Insurance 
East Tetauket 

Lond Island. N«w York 
■ TeMOISoUuket | 



Unqua Agency, Inc. 

General Insurance 

Real Estate 

GORDON W. FRASER. Mer. 

199-A Broadway AMityville 4>0376 



once wrote in the Forum, every- 
thing that came ashore fronting 
his farm belonged to Grandpa. And 
good Presbyterian though he was, 
Sunday or weekday he paced the 
beach for trophies. Thus on 
December 26, 1866, he saw the 
wreck of the steamer Commodore 
with 100 passengers and a variety 
of merchandise. A beautiful purple 
and gold carpet came ashore which 
later adorned the new home which 
Grandpa Halsey was building 
across the street. 

The heavy front-door of this new 
domicile also came from the Com- 
modore's remains, and also a very 
beautiful mahogany stair-railing. 
The door had a massive lock and 
key and we used to hide the key 
under the door-mat when we went 
to a neighbor's to play dominoes. 
The lock reminded me of the one 
Jack of the Beanstalk hid in. 

Of a number of articles in the 
Haynes farmhouse it could be said: 
No one knows whence it came 
Bat I am sure 'twas of Commodore 
fame. , 

Eva Gordon Slaterbeck 
1487 East 14th Street 

Brooklyn 

Miller Place 

ALFRED E. BEYER 

Licensed Real Estate Broker 

Member, Suffolk Real Estate Board 

North Country Road Miller Place 

Tel. POrt Jefferson 8-1204 

Massapequa 

TOM ABBOTT 
Massapequa 

Cor. Merrick Rd. and Ocean Ave. 
Massapequa, N. Y. 



BELLPORT 

Edward B. Bristow 

Real Estate and Insurance 

Main Street BEUport 7-0143 



Robert A. 


Dodd 


General Insurance 


Real Estate 


RAYMOND A. 


SWEENEY 


66 Merrick Rd., Copiasue 


AMityville 4-1961 



Real Estate Insurance 

EDWARD F. COOK 
East Hampton 

Telephone 4-1440 



East Quogue 



GEO. H. JONES 
Real Estate and Insurance 

Montauk Highway 
Telephone East Quogue 960 



Wantagh 



W. J. JORGENSEN 

Realtor — Appraisals 

Tel. Wantagh 2210 



Babylon 



W, 



CHARLES F. PFEIFLE 

Licensed Real Estate Broker 

Lots - Plots - Acreai:e 
Main St., nr. Lake Babylon 644 



Wading River 



WM. L. MILLER & SON 
Real Estate and Insurance 
Phone: Wading River 4323 

Great Neck 



Of Mocr^ 



LONG ISLAND 
REAL ESTATE 

City line to Montauk Point. List- 
ings wanted all over Long Island. 
Sales offices at 740 Northern Blvd., 
Great Neck, and Route 25 Matti- 
tuck. Tels. GReat Neck 2-5614 and 
Mattituck 9-8434. 

Garden City 



^^ Brooklyn and Lang Island's Largest 

Real Estate Organization" 

721 Franklin Ave. Tel. Garden City 7-6400 



Save at Southold 

BANK BY MAIL 

Latest Dividend 

2'/2^ 
Plus '/2% extra per annum 
The Oldest Savings Bank in Suf- 
folk County. Incorporated 1858. 

Southold Savings Bank 

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Member Federal Deposit Insurance 
Ck>rporation 



171 




LONG ISLAND FORUM 

Peconic Mill 

Continued from page 164- 

gave up milling in 1902, and 
thereafter lived at Orient 
with his niece Mrs. Wilson L. 
Petty. 

Gilbert Terry married Al- 
meda V. Robinson. They had 
a daughter Ella who as Mrs. 
George Billard lived or lives 
at Cutchogue. Joshua U. 
Terry who ran the Mattituck 
mill for over twenty years, 
dying about 1900, was a 
brother of Gilbert Terry. 

During his ownership of the 
Peconic mill, Gilbert Terry 
enlarged and improved it in 
the early 1870's by adding an 
extension on the north side 
and putting a windmill wheel 
atop a tower. The windmill 
much increased the efficiency 
of the plant as the tide- wheel 
would only operate during 
part of the rise and part of 
the fall of the tide, or some 
ten hours a day at most. 



With the second set of 
stones installed, Terry ground 
over 200 bushels per day on 
numerous occasions. H i s 
largest grind was 300 bushels, 
when he worked a greater 
part of twenty-four hours. 

Ernest M. Robinson, cura- 
tor of the Suffolk County His- 
torical Society at Riverhead 
and a nephew of Mrs. Gilbert 
Terry, recalls that while vis- 
iting the Terrys during the 
1880's the miller told him 
"We are grinding a bushel a 
minute, using both tide and 
windmill." It is my notion 
that Robinson and I first met 
in the noisy mill in that long 
ago. 

The first windmill head had 
the conventional four arms 
equipped with canvas sails 
which had to be renewed sev- 
eral times a year. The head 
was changed from the sail 
type to a new folding vane 
type after the Civil War. The 
latter type was built in sec- 



SEPTEMBER 1954 

tions and the outer part of the 
wheel could be folded to stand 
at right angles to the vane 
and thus acted as a brake 
against the remaining part of 
the wheel. This kind of wheel 
could weather an average 
gale. 

The Inlet windmill was 
destroyed during a great 
storm on November 26 and 
27, 1898. The wheel of the 
mill was blown to pieces and 
the wreckage left hanging. 
Ore by one the few remaining 
sticks dropped before the 
wind until the standard stood 
alone. On that occasion in 
1898 a three-masted barge 
was blown upon the Sound 
shore just west of the mill. 

By this time farmers had 
found it more profitable to 
grow potatoes and cauliflower 
than grain. Consequently the 
amount of work brought to 
the mill rapidly decreased un- 
til finally the water-wheel 

Continued on next pagre 



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HOME OWNERS 



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or to purchase and /or renovate homes 



INDIVIDUAL MORTGAGE HOLDERS 

Existing mortgages purchased or refinanced 

RIVERHEAD SAVINGS BANK 



RIVERHEAD. N. Y. 



RIVERHEAD 8-3600 



172 



SEPTEMBER 1954 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 



m 



m 



Patchogue in 1812 

From a Sanford, Florida, sub- 
scriber, Mrs. iiarry C. Hetzel (for- 
merly Miss Geraiaine Ne-wind of 
Pattaogue) comes a time-worn 
maii.ui,cript written by one Andrew 
Jaciuun famitn, entitled "Patchogue 
In 1812." The writer's name sug- 
gests mat he was born not much 
later than 1828 when Anarew J ack- 
son was eiectea Presiaent and pos- 
sibly as early as a aecaue before 
as Jackson became a national hero 
M 1614 for His victory over the 
British at New Orleans. 

Perhaps some Patchogue reader 
may know of Andrew Jackson 
timith and when he lived. From his 
manuseiipt we learn that in 1812 
there were but 75 inhabitants in 
Patchogue and only two roads or 
paths as they were called: Main 
street and Oceam avenue (the 
Lane). There were but five houses 
on the Lane, all on the east side, 
namely : Moses Wicks, Robert Mills, 
Jacob Baker, William Baker and, 
ne..r the site of Carman avenue, 
Daniel Smith, grandfather of the 
writer. 

About a quarter-mile from the 
bay a pair of bars crossed the Lane, 
and at Main street there was a 
gate. Between this gate and the 
bars, cattle roamed at large. 

On the south side of Ma^n street 
(now Montauk highway), between 
(Dcean avenue and Swan Creek, was 
only one house, that of Squire 
Beale. On the north side, there was 
a small mill-house near the creeK. 
To the west near Medford avemue 
stocd the home of John Charlick, 
father of Oliver ivho became presi- 
dent of the LIRR. To the west lived 
Jesse Howell and west of that was 
the home of Phineas Rose, grand- 
father of Charles E. Rose. 

Between the site of North Ocean 
avenue (then overgrown with 
pines) and "Patchogue pond" to 
the west were the Lamed and Ack- 
erly homes. Oin the south side of 
Main street, west of Ocean avenue, 
lived Smith Hammond, village cob- 
bler, near the creek, and Smith 
Conklin. "It was here," writes the 
narrator, "that the soldiers of 1812 
stepped overnight while on their 
tramp from Brooklyn to Sag Har- 
bor, where they had been ordered 
to prevent the British from land- 
ing." Michael Smith, Peter Smith, 
Jonathan Baker and several others 
were drafted to accompany the sol- 
diers to Sag Harbor. 

The writer goes on to .~ay that 
the only other house thereabouts 
wai that of Mr. Mulford, Patch- 
f- "lip's la'-nfest landowner, on the 
site of Lo'see's hotel. "Situated 
f.wgy from the settlement was the 
homestead of Joshua Smith, on 
whi't is now Bay avenue, about 
where Hiram Newins now lives." 

Wrote Andrew Jackson Smith: 
"In 1808 the ocean broke through 
the beach at Smith's Point, iniuring 
the oysters so that, they all died. 
In 1814 the beacli again closed. 
During 1816 the bay yielded an 
extra abundance of hard clams. 



* * * They sold for six cents per 
100." He added that oysters sold 
for 20' cents a bushel and that Capt. 
Samuel Tooker planted the first 
Virginia oysters m South Bay, at 
Howell's Point. 

In 1812, wrote Mr. Smith, mail 
was carried on horseback once a 
week between Patchogue and New 
York, the ride being made in eight 
hours. He also told of three British 
soldiers deserting from a landing 
party at Sag Harbor, going to 
Patchogue and "lived the remainder 
of their days here. One of the fugi- 
tives, Deyuril by name, or Devil as 
he was nicknamed, was finally the 
village pedagogue. The writer was 
one of his pupils." 



Peconic Mill 

Continued from page 172 

vras stopped, to turn no more. 
The ^ates were no longer used 
to hold the tide, the inlet be- 
p-SLTx to fill with seaweed and 
the channel with mussel 
shoals. The nejrlected build- 
ing gradually fell a prey to 
storms and decay. 

On the wall of my library 
I have a framed picture of the 



Goldsmith Inlet mill taken in 
its heyday beside a framed 
picture of the four yoke of 
oxen and cart taken in the 
Sage brickyard at Ashamo- 
moque as they in July 1890 
were about to join the parade 
in the celebration of South- 
old's 250th anniversary of its 
settlement. The oxen were 
driven by Peter Gaffaga with 
Mrs. Williamson Albertson 
and children in the cart. The 
following September I became 
the teacher at Quogue's little 
old district school. 

I append a poem about the 
old mill which was written by 
the Rev. Daniel H. Overton, a 
native of Southold who mar- 
ried Carrie C. Terry, daugh- 
ter of Jonathan Barnes Terry, 
one time president of the 
Southold Savings Bank, and 
Martha Jane (Corey) Terry, 
granddaughter of Major Gil- 
bert Horton of local Revolu- 
tionary renown. 

On Swan River in eastern 




View of Patchogue in Brox^knaven, Long Island. 

From a Very Old Sketch 




rl'MbW 



JJiiO^IjSvJ/kZ^^ 



173 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 



SEPTEMBER 1954 



Patchogue there was also an 
old mill operated for many 
years by "Gil" Swezey of an- 
other old Long Island family. 
Edward H. Terry, brother of 
Gilbert Terry, the last miller 
at Peconic, had until about 
1892 run the Mattituck mill 
in which he acquired an inter- 
est in 1858. After 1892 he not 
only ground grain at Patch- 
ogue by day but also ran a 
dynamo at night. He intro- 
duced that system of lighting 
the streets of the village. 
Friend Robinson, the curator 
at Riverhead, he who visited 
the Peconic mill as a boy when 
conducted by his uncle Gilbert 
Terry, also helped his great 
uncle Edward H. Terry at the 
Patchogue mill. 

Joshua U. Terry, also men- 
tioned above as having run 
the Mattituck mill for over 
two decades, was a son of 
Joshua Terry who was a son 
of Brewster Terry of Coram, 
an uncle of Gilbert Terry of 
the Peconic mill. These Terry 
millers all sprang from Walter 
Franklin Terry, an earlier mil- 
ler born Oct. 12, 1804 who 
died March 24, 1871. Brews- 
ter Terry had a daughter who 
married Nathaniel 0. Swezey, 
a prominent bayman at Patch- 
ogue who was born there Feb. 
26, 1845 and died at the same 
place Jan. 18, 1879. 

Nathaniel 0. Swezey had a 
nephew who in the mid-80's 
was a boyhood pal of this 



^£NJTH 



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HEARING AID 

In Stock: Batteries for all 
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PICKUP & BROWN 

GUILD OPTICIANS 

18 Deer Park Ave. Babylon 

Tel. Babylon 927 



writer at Southold. Arthur 
Dwight Swezey was then a 
chore boy on the farm of S. 
Wells Phillips at Pine Neck 
while yours truly filled that 
humble position on the North 
Road farm of ex-Captain Eli 
Woodhull Howell. Dwight's 
father William Swezey and 
my father John Oakley Wood 
had been drowned at sea. 
Likely the O in the name of 
Dwight's grandfather stood 
for Oakley. 

More than a half century 
later both Dwight and I re- 
turned ard lived for a while 
as near neighbors in the heart 
of Southold. He died a few 
years ago at that village and 
this other erstwhile chore 
boy, now an octogenarian, as 
stated by the editor in the 
July Forum, "writes on." 



The Old Tide Mill 

The old tide mill is ruined now 
Down by the surging Sound, 

Where day by day for many years 
The fanner's grain was ground. 

The great wind wheel that o'er the 
mill 
Stretched out each mighty arm 
And spread its wings to every 
breeze, 
And to the scene lent charm 

Is ruined by the very wind 

That swept it round and round, 

And gave it power to turn the 
stones 
By which the grists were ground. 

In one great storm of fearful force 
This old windmill was blown 

From off its place, and all its 
wings 
Upon the sands were strewn. 

The old tide-mill is ruined now, 
The miller's moved away, 

The farmer's greater grist is 
ground 
By other power today. 



LONG ISLAND'S 

Greatest and Biggest Civic Event 

MINEOLA FAIR 

and 

Industrial Exhibition 

at the 

ROOSEVELT RACEWAY 

WESTBURY, L. L, N. Y. 

Oct. 9-10-11-12-13-14-15-16 & 17, 1954 

with 

The George A. Hamid BIG CIRCUS 

Grand Stand Seats Included in Admission 

Adults 50c — Children UNDER 12 Years 25c 

The Miracles of Industry Blended with all the Picturesque 
Features of New York's Oldest County Fair 



DRY GLEANING 



FUR STORAGE 



cMlfviikJkMu^ 



RUG CLEANING 



AMiTYVILLE 4-3200 



1^^ 



174 



SEPTEMBER 1954 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 



• 



Nassau Landmark 

Continued from page 166 

ment the land was appor- 
tioned so that each of the 
proprietors received a so- 
called "Home Lott" on or near 
the highway known as The 
Place, and equal areas of 
woodland, pastureland, etc., 
throughout the remainder of 
the tract. 

According to the Patent 
this entire area, as purchased 
from the Indians, was said to 
comprise some seventeen 
hundred acres. It is interest- 
ing to note, however, that a 
list of the land-owners, made 
in 1786, giving the amount of 
property that each held, to- 
taled three thousand six hun- 
dred and seventy-eight acres. 
Apparently the poor Indians 
were not completely versed in 
the technique of land survey- 



ing and never knew what they 
had bargained for. 

The Indians that welcomed 
Joseph Carpenter and his fol- 
lowers to Mosquito Cove on 
that spring day of 1668 have 
long since departed for the 
Happy Hunting Ground. If 
they and the white pioneers 
of that far-off era could re- 
turn today it is doubtful if 
they would find anything 
familiar in the land that they 
knew and loved nearly three 
centuries ago. 

Enormous factories have 
sprung up on the la^^d once 
occupied by the Matinecock 
v/igwams and the blue ribbons 
of smoke that rose from their 
campfires have been replaced 
by the be'ching smoke of 
industry. Time and change 
have erased almost every- 
thing that belonged to their 
world. Yet, here and there 




Old Buildings at Glen Cove. Pholo by Carl Kohler 



# 




ESTABLISHED 1887 

SOUTH SIDE 
BANK 

BRENTWOOD BAY SHORE 

Suffolk <&• 4th Main &> Bay Shore Av. 

Phone BR 3-45 1 1 Phone BA 7-7 1 00 

Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation 



we still find a few cherished 
landmarks to remind us of 
those days of long ago. 



Historian's Comment 

I would miss the Forum! It is 
so interesting and helpful to me in 
my D. A. R. historical work. Mrs. 
W. Carl Crittenden, Freeport. 
Note: Mrs. Crittenden is State 
Historian of the D. A. R. 



Ship's Identity 



Ross & Pelletreau's L.I. History 
stranded four-masted bark which 
resembles the Galbraith, stranded 
at Water Mill in July 1916. It is 
probably not the same ship. Could 
some reader identify it? 

H. B. S„ care L.I. Forum 



Rare Long Island Boaks 

Personal Reminiscences of Men 
and Things on Long Island, by 
Daniel M. Tredwell, in two vol- 
umes. 

'■A Sketch of the First Settle- 
ment of the Several Towns on 
Long Island" by Silas Wood. 
Printed by Alden Spooner, Brook- 
lyn, in 182'8. 

For particulars write Long 
Island Forum, Amityville. 



I enjoy the Forum very much. 
G. Burchard Smith, Freeport. 
(Note: Mr. Smith, County At- 
torney of Nassau County, is a 
descendant of Smithtown's founder, 
Richard Smith.) 



Paumanok School 

As a result of the very informa- 
tive material which you gave me 
some time ago including the refer- 
ence to Walt Whitman's "Leaves 
of Grass", our school board de- 
cided to call the new school which 
is beins: erected on Udall Roa*! 
(West Islip) "Paumanok School." 

We all feel very much indebted 
to you for an excellent solution of 
a rather difficult problem and the 
Board asked me to express its 
appreciation and to thank you for 
your kind help. 

Livingston S. Jennings 
Vice-President 



Village House 

Arts, Crafts, Americana 

Museum of the 
Oysterponds Historical 
Society at Orient, L. I. 

Open July 1 to October 31 
Tuesdays. Thursdays, 
Saturdays and Sundays 



2 to 5 P. M. 



Free Admission 



175 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 




SEPTEMBER 1954 

for good taste and suitability of 
design by Fashon Digest Maga- 
zine. 

The dress modeled here by a 
classmate, Doris Arden, depends on 
line and color for its glamour. 
Black nylon met over cafe au lait 
taffeta, and a garland of golden- 
brown-cast roses carry out the new 
season's concept of the bouffant 
gown with diminished petticoats. 
A black net stole provides optional 
cover-up of the decolletage, aind 
pale beige suede gloves comple- 
ment the colors of the gown. This 
young man deviated from the usual 
procedure of making a sketch 
first, as taught in the school's Art 
Department — instead he draped 
his design in muslin. , 

Mr. Podosek, who is the son of 
Mr. and Mrs. Stanley Podosek of 
27 First Street, Syosset, Long 
Island, will return to Traphagen 
for the fall term to continue his 
studies in draping, design, clothing 
construction and patternmaking. 
Other courses also opening at 
the Traphagen School the first 
week of October include Costume 
Design and Illustration, Styling, 
Life Drawing and Fashion Sketch- 
ing, Interior Decoration and Win- 
dow Display. Eveming as well as 
regular full day classes are 
scheduled. 



Prize Gown Designed By 
Long Islander 

A gown for the gramd occasions 
that come in with the fall season, 
this dress is a prize winner, de- 
signed and made by Edward Pod- 
osek, student at the Traphagen 
School of Fashion. He presented 



I saw my first Forum in a neigh- 
bor's house. Enclosed find check 
for two years, beginning, if you 
will, with January 1953. (Mrs.) P. 
0. Averill, Levittown. 



My daughter and 1 enjoy the 
Forum and look forward to each 
issue. Mrs. F. S. Leslie, Cutchogue. 



We enjoy the Forum very much. 
Edward F. Cook, East Hampton. 



his design in a recent style show 
given in the assembly hall at the 
school, 1680 Broadway (52nd 
Street), New York, and was the 
recipient of first prize awarded 



Nassau Archeological Society 

Archeologists of Nassaia County 
have organized and imcorporated 
and have already launched a pro- 
gram of excavating with excellent 
results. The mailing address, 
where particulars may be ob- 
tained, is Box 1026 Sea Cliff. 



Anniversary Gifts 

IN CHINA 

Minion Bone, Spode, Doulton 

Syracuse, Lenox 

IN STERLING 

TowIe 3orham 

IN GLASS 

Foitoria Tiffin Duncan 

And in Other Quality Lines 

TOOMEY'S GIFTS 

85 Main St. BAY SHORE 

253 W. Main St. Smithtown Branch 




COLUMBIA SAVINGS 

AND LOAN ASSOCIATION 

93-22 JAMAICA AVENUE 
WOODHAVEN 21, N. Y. 

VIRGINIA 7-7041 



FOREST HILLS OFFICE 

15 Station Square - at Forest Hills Inn 



CHARTERED 188 



SAVINGS ACCOUNTS 
MORTGAGE LOANS SAFE DEPOSIT BOXES 

Safety of your Savings Insured up to $10,000 



176 



SEPTEMBER 1954 



LONG ISLAND FORUM 



# 



Shinnecock Canal 

Continued from page 167 

pronouncing the name Ells- 
worth. And I might add that 
Ellsworth Rowland was still 
wearing the title with com- 
mendable dignity at the age 
of 89 when he passed the 
above information on to me. 



Cooper at Sag Harbor 

Sag Harbor has never laid claim 
to James Fenimore Cooper as a 
native son. The author of The 
Leather Stocking Tales belongs to 
Cooperstown, N. Y., and is buried 
there. He did, however, reside in 
Sag Harbor shortly after t,he War 
of 1812 and invested in at least 
one whaling voyage, that of the 
ship Union in 1810. 

It has been said too that Cooper 
obtained material for his first book 
"Precaution" at Sag Harbor, and 
began his writing career there. In 
his novel "Sea Lions" Cooper 
evidently used his knowledge of 
Sag Harbor in describing a "small 
seaport town, where the -whole in- 
dustry of the place was connected 
with ships and shipping." 



I recall that when the ice in 
Great South Bay broke up during 
a heavy storm on December 31, 
1902, ice piled up along sihore more 
than two dozen feet in height and 
much damage was done to boats 
and buildings. 

J. R. James, Jamaica 



Clje 
l5mk of amitptJille 

Incorporated 1891 

29^ on Special Interest 

Accounts Compounded 

Quarterly 

Hours: 9 to 3 except Saturday 
Friday Evening, 6:30 to 8:30 

Member Federal Deposit 
Insurance Corp. 



RECORDS 

RCA -Columbia- Decca 

wide Selection of 

POPULAR 

CLASSICAL 

CHILDREN'S 

in all the speeds 

AMITY RADIO 

For Quality Service on TV 

On the Triangle AMityville4-1177 




The Forum is such a splendid 
magazine I wish there was one 
like it in this section of the State. 
I have given all my copies to our 
local library. Mrs. Chester G. 
Allen, Wellsville, N. Y. 



Naphtha Launch on Shinnecock Canal, 1900 

Fashion Articles 

Those illustrated fashion articles 
about Traphagen pupils have been 
very favorably discussed at our 
club on several occasions. (Miss) 
Olga Danes, Levittown. 



J. G. DODGE & SON, Inc. 

Glen Cove's Oldest Furniture House 

Established in 1835 when Andrew Jackson was President. 



99 GLEN STREET 



GLen Cove 4-0242 



LONG ISLAND 

is located advantageously for light industry. 

Its suburban and rural areas offer ideal living 
conditions. 

Independent Textile Dyeing Co., Inc. 

FARMJNGDALE, N. Y. 



Clie I80t House 

FINE FURNITURE 

Interior Decorating BAbyion 6-1601 

173 West Merrick Road, Babylon 

In August 1882 Oscar Wilde, famous English author of his 
day, dined in Babylon at the old Argyle Hotel as the gues^ of 
Robert B. Roosevelt, uncle of T. R. 



177 




LONG ISLAND FORUM 

Another Attic Treasure 

LoDig Island has not yet discov- 
ered the hiding place of Captain 
Kidd's treasure, but last year the 
attic of an old Mattituek house 
yielded up a box handsome einough 
to hold pieces of eight — indeed 
one of the papers found in it men- 
tions "halfe pieces of eight." This 
document box, leather covered, 
domed lid, with hand wrought 
hinges, lock and studding nails, 
was old in l!793 when it was com- 
pletely relined with a newspaper 
of that date. 

It guarded a treasure of hun- 
dreds of even older papers of the 
Howell (Southold) family, dating 
from 1678 to 1875, covering the 
first five generations, of one 
branch of the Southold Howell 
family — Richard (1) circa 1650/ 
1709, John (2) circa 1670/1734, 
Joniathan (3) 1720/1804, John. (4) 
1756/1837 and Sylvester (5) 1799/ 
1875, and also Jonathan (4), died 
1791, the son of Jonatham (3), and 
Jonathan (5) 1770/1832, the son 
of Jonathan (4). It is seldom in- 
deed that family records are kept 
in one piece for five generations. 
The box, now repaired, its cor- 
dovan covering polished to a lustre 
attainable only in old leather, now 
reposes in the Suffolk Counity His- 
torical Society, Riverhead, to 
which it and its contents were 
presented by Chauncey Howell 
Downs, eighth generation descend- 
ent of Richard (1), to be known as 
the "Chauncey Perkins Howell 
Collection" in honor of his grand- 
father, the sixth of the Howell 
line. These records were found in 
the attic of the second homestead 
built on the farm deeded to Richard 
(1) by his father-Jn-law in 1676. 
The house is on the North Road 

Continued on back cover 



Over 100 Years 

of 

DEPENDABLE 

SERVICE 

TO 

LONG ISLANDERS 

Everything for Building 



TlaA^au Suffolk 

LUMBCR A SUPPLY IfV COQP 



AMITYVILLE ROSLYN 

HUNTINGTON SMITHTOWN 
WESTBURY WANTAGH 

LOCUST VALLEY 



SEPTEMBER 1954 




MATTITUCK TODAY 

FORUMS, PRIOR TO 1950 

One dozen scattered numbers. At 
least 50 stories on island history. 
Sent postpaid for ;gl.50. Address 
L. I. FORUM, AMITYVILLE 



From Wat«rcolorby Cyril A. Lawi< 



AMITY AUTO SALES 
Chevrolet Agency 

For Sales and Service 

Parts and Accessories 

Merrick and County Line Roads 

Tel. AMityville 4-0909-4-0910 



Telephone AMityville 4-2126 

FIRESTONE 

Motor Sales, Inc. 

De Soto Plymouth Austin 

Sales and Service 

Martin Firestone Merrick Road 
Just West of Amityville 



POWELL 

Funeral Home, Inc. 

67 Broadway 
Amityville, New York 

AMityville 4-0172 

Monumental Work 



"The Fame Behind the Name" 

HARDER 

Extermination Service, Inc. 
Termite Control, Mothproof- 
ing and all other services 

Phone Nearest Office 
PAtchogue 3-2100 HUnting-ton 4-2304 
Riverhead 8-2943 HEmpstead 2-3866 
BAbylon 6-2020 Southampton 1-0346 
BEUport 7-0W4 STony Brook 70917 
F. Kenneth Harder Robert Troup 
President Vice-President 



Auto Radiators Repaired, Recored and Boiled Out 
Electric Motors— Rewinding and Rebuilding 

AMITYVILLE BATTERY & IGNITION SERVICE, Inc. 

Broadway and Avon Place Phones 1174 - 2095 Amityville 



178 



Q^ 





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JOIN THE SWlNe TO CAREFREE, ECONOMICAL 

AUTOMATIC GAS WATER HEATING 

Get details at our nearest office without cost or obligation. 

LONG ISLAND LIGHTING COMPANY 



Hgffi 
oa JB •' 

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For Luncheons and Dinners 

The Patchogue Hotel 

Centrally located on the 

South Shore for Banquets 

and other functions 

Modern Rooms and Suites 

Montauk Highway 

Phones Patchogue 1234 and 800 



Wining and Dining 

in the Continental Tradition, 
superb, leisurely, inexpensive, 
will be yours to enjoy, at the 
entirely new 

RENDEZVOUS 

Restaurant 

292 M.rrick Rd. Amilyvill* 
Phone AMityville 4-9768 



For the Sea Food 
Connoisseur It's 

SNAPPER 

INN ■ 

on Connetquot River 
OAKDALE 

Phone SAyville 4-0248 
CLOSED MONDAYS 



STERN'S 

Pickle Products, Inc. 

Farmingdale, N. Y. 

TeU. 248; Night 891 

CoBipleta Line of Condiments for the 

Hotel and Restaurant Trade 

Prompt Deliveries Quality Since 1890 

Factory conveniently located at 

Farminedale 



Another Attic Treasure 

Continued from page 178 

just west of the Southold-River- 
head dividing line, and it ties back 
to the original house because por- 
tions of the letter were incorpor- 
ated into it when it was built. The 
house was occupied by Miss Eliza- 
beth Howell (7), the last direct 
descendent of this branch until her 
death in 1951 after which the house 
and its 64 acres (a small part of 
the original which extended from 
Bay to Sound) were sold out of 
the family, who had possessed it 
for 276 years. 

The writer, who is a direct 
descendent of Richard (1) through 
another son, had the interesting 
task of mending, sorting, trans- 
cribing and mounting these family 
papers an^d found them not only 
valuable to family genealogical 
research, but of great importaTice 
as a reference work, particularly 
because they cover such a variety 
of subjects that they present a 
mirror of the history, economics, 
and customs of the periods in 
which they were written, as full 
list will illustrate the wide range 
of interests covered: Family shop- 
ping lists, wills, deeds, receipts for 
expenses from false teeth and 
stays to tombstones, tax lists, in- 
dentures of boys to learn trades, 
slaves, settlement of estates, to 
personal letters which range from 
a dignified appeal of Richard (1) 
of Southold to Col. Howell of 
Southampton to send home Rich- 
ard's (1) son Richard who was en- 
joying himself on the south side, 
to a school girl's letter about 
beans and parties. , 

Also among the papers are many 
undated fragments obviously of 
the 1600's or early 1700's which 
merit further study, and a good 
knowledge of handwriting for ac- 
curate classification. 

Truly, this is an impressive dis- 
covery, which can be made even 
more valuable by such further 
study and gifts of related family 
records. 

Wilbur F. Howell 

New York 



New Jersey Forumites 

We enjoy the Forum as does 
Ray Patterson, a Madison friend 
of ours who was bom down at 
East Marion. I met another 
reader the other day — you evi- 
dently have a good Jersey follow- 
ing. 

Charles J. McDermott 
Morristown., N. J. 



"Willie and Herman's" 

La Grange 

Montauk Highway East of Babylon 

Luncheons - Dinners 

Large New Banquet Hall 

Tel. Babylon 480 



Enroute to the Hamptons 
on Montauk Highway 

112!! C ASA BASSO 2£d 

Enjoy the Best 
Luncheon and Dinner 

Westhampton 4-1841 
Closed on Mondays 



The Shoreham 

"On The Great South Bay" 

Since 1903 

Specializing in SEA FOOD 

Special Luncheons Daily 

Foot of Foster Ave. Sayville 

Tel. SAyville 4-(ie6« 

CLOSED MONDAYS 



_l 



PETERS 
Delicatessen 

Tel. Amityville 4-1350 

176 Park Ave. Amityville 



YOU'LL BE GLAD YOU TRIED 

LUNCHEON - DINNER (or SNACK) 

in the restful comfort oif 

^/le hospitality Shoppe 

where excellent food, skillfully prepared and promptly served, 
is primed to meet the better taste. 

123 Louden Avenue Tel. AMityville 4-4000 Amityville, L I 

"ASK YOUR FRIENDS WHO'VE TRIED IT" 



.