(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Children's Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "World atlas of Christian missions [microform] ; containing a directory of missionary societies, a classified summary of statistics, an index of mission stations, and maps showing the location of mission stations throughout the world;"

TH E 

UNIVERSITY 

OF CHICAGO 

LIBRARY 




WORLD ATLAg, 
CHRISTIAN MISSIONS 



Containing a Directory of Missionary Societies, 
a Classified Summary of Statistics, an Index of 
Mission Stations, and Maps Showing the Loca- 
tion of Mission Stations Throughout the World 



EDITED BY 

JAMES S. DENNIS, D.D., HARLAN P. BEACH, M.A., F.R.G.S., 

CHARLES H. FAHS, B.A. 



MAPS BY 

JOHN G. BARTHOLOMEW, LL.D., F.R.G.S., 

of the Edinburgh Geographical Institute 



NEW YORK 

STUDENT VOLUNTEER MOVEMENT 

FOR FOREIGN MISSIONS 

1911 






It I.' I I 



. < 



. . 



- ' <, 



a ' 



'/ 



< 



k, 



c, 

*-._.'-'' 



^ 



COPYRIGHT, 1910, BV 

STUDENT VOLUNTEER MOVEMENT 

FOR FOREIGN MISSIONS 



COPYRIGHT, 1911, BY 

STUDENT VOLUNTEER MOVEMENT 

FOR FOREIGN MISSIONS 




i\ 
V\ 



344589 



CONTENTS 



FOLIO 
POLITICAL CHART OF THE WORLD Frontispiece 

PREFACE ON BEHALF OF THE STUDENT VOLUNTEER MOVEMENT 7 



INTRODUCTION 



9 



PART I. DIRECTORY OF MISSIONARY SOCIETIES 1178 



Explanatory Notes, 13 

American and Canadian Societies, 15 

Canada, 15 

United States, 16 
Australasian Societies, 30 

Australia, 30 

New Zealand, 31 

Tasmania, 32 
British and Irish Societies, 32 

England, 32 

Ireland, 43 

Scotland, 44 

Wales, 46 
Continental Societies, 47 

Austria-Hungary, 47 

Bulgaria, 47 

Denmark, 47 

Finland, 48 

France, 48 

Germany, 49 

Italy, 52 

The Netherlands, 53 

Norway, 54 

Roumania, 54 

Russia, 55 



Spain, 55 

Sweden, 55 

Switzerland, 56 
South African Societies, 57 
Societies in other sections of Africa, 59 
South American Societies, 60 

Argentine Republic, 60 

Brazil, 60 

Chile, 61 

Guiana (British), 61 

Guiana (Dutch), 61 

Central American and Mexican Societies, 61 
West Indian Societies, 62 ^ 
Societies in Asia, 63 

China, 63 

India and Ceylon, 66 

Japan, 70 

Korea, 72 

Siberia, 72 

Turkish Empire, 72 
Societies in Malaysia, 74 

Dutch East Indies, 74 

Philippine Islands, 74 
Societies Working among the Jews, 74 
Summary Statement of Societies and Incomes, 78 



PART II. STATISTICS OF MISSIONS 79130 



Explanatory Notes, 81 

General and Evangelistic Summaries, 83 

Educational Summaries, 83 

Medical Summaries, 84 

Philanthropic and Reformatory Summaries, 85 

Bible Societies, 85 

General and Evangelistic, 86 

Japan (with Formosa), 86 

Korea, 86 

Chinese Empire, 87 

Siam and French Indo-China, 88 

British Malaysia, 88 

Dutch East Indies, 88 

Philippine Islands, 89 

Australia, 89 

New Zealand, 89 

Melanesia, 89 

Micronesia, 89 

Polynesia, 90 

India, 90 

Ceylon, 91 

Persia, 91 

Turkish Empire (except Syria and Palestine), 92 

Syria and Palestine, 92 

Bulgaria, 93 

North-east Africa, 93 

North-west Africa, 93 

Western Africa, 93 

South-west Africa, 94 

South Africa, 94 

Southern Central Africa, 95 

East Africa, 95 

Madagascar and Mauritius, 96 

Cape Verde and Madeira Islands, 96 

Argentine Republic, 96 

Chile, 96 

Uruguay, 97 

Paraguay, 97 

Brazil, 97 

Bolivia, 97 

Peru, 97 

Ecuador, 97 

Dutch Guiana, 98 

British Guiana, 98 

Venezuela, 98 



Colombia, 98 

Central America (including Panama), 98 

Mexico, 99 

Lesser Antilles, 99 

Porto Rico, 99 

Haiti and Santo Domingo, 99 

Jamaica, 100 

Cuba, 100 

Bahama Islands, 100 

United States of America, including Alaska 
(Indians and Eskimos), 100 

United States of America, except Hawaiian 
Islands (Asiatic Immigrants), 101 

Hawaiian Islands (Hawaiians and Asiatic 
Immigrants), 101 

Canada and the Labrador (Indians and Es- 
kimos), 101 

Canada (Asiatic Immigrants), 102 

Greenland, 102 
Educational, 103 

Japan (with Formosa), 103 

Korea, 103 

Chinese Empire, 103 

Siam and French Indo-China, 104 

British Malaysia, 104 

Dutch East Indies, 104 

Philippine Islands, 105 

Australia, 105 

New Zealand, 105 

Melanesia, 105 

Micronesia, 105 

Polynesia, 105 

India, 106 

Ceylon, 107 

Persia, 107 

Turkish Empire (except Syria and Pales- 
tine), 107 

Syria and Palestine, 107 

Bulgaria, 108 

North-east Africa, 108 

North-west Africa, 108 

Western Africa, 108 

South-west Africa, 108 

South Africa, 109 

Southern Central Africa, 109 



D 



WORLD ATLAS OF CHRISTIAN MISSIONS 



East Africa, 110 

Madagascar and Mauritius, 110 

Cape Verde and Madeira Islands, 110 

Argentine Republic, 110 

Chile, 110 

Uruguay, 111 

Paraguay, 111 

Brazil, 111 

Bolivia, 111 

Peru, 111 

Ecuador, 111 

Dutch Guiana, 111 

British Guiana, 111 
. Venezuela, 111 

' Colombia, 111 

Central America (including Panama), 111 

Mexico, 112 

Lesser Antilles, 112 

Porto Rico, 112 

Haiti and Santo Domingo, 112 

Jamaica, 112 

Cuba, 113 

Bahama Islands, 113 

United States of America, including Alaska 
(Indians and Eskimos), 113 

United States of America, except Hawaiian 
Islands (Asiatic Immigrants), 113 

Hawaiian Islands (Hawaiians and Asiatic 
Immigrants), 113 

Canada and the Labrador (Indians and Es- 
kimos), 113 

Canada (Asiatic Immigrants), 114 

Greenland, 114 
Medical, 115 

Japan (with Formosa), 115 

Korea, 115 

Chinese Empire, 115 

Siam and French IndorChina, 115 

British Malaysia, 116 

Dutch East Indies, 116 

Philippine Islands, 116 

Australia, 116 

Melanesia, 116 

Micronesia, 116 

India, 116 

Ceylon, 117 

PART III. MISSIONS ATLAS AND STATION INDEX 

Explanatory Notes, 133 

Plate 1. World, showing Mission Stations 

Plate 2. Africa, General Map 

Insets of Eritrea and Abyssinia, 
of the Nile Valley, of Aden and 
environs, of Mauritius, and of 
Madeira 
Plate 3. West Africa 

Insets of Sierra Leone, of Part of 
Sierra Leone, of Lower Congo, of 
Part of Kamerun and Southern 
Nigeria, and of Tunis, Algeria, 
and Morocco 
Plate 4. East Central Africa and Madagascar 

Inset of Imerina 
Plate 5. South Africa 

Inset of Cape Town and environs 
Plate 6. Eastern South Africa 

Inset of Witwatersrand 

Plate 7. Northern Asia and Western China 
Plate 8. China 

Insets of Part of Fo-kien Prov- 
ince, and of Hong-Kong and 
Part of Kwang-tung Province 
Plate 9. Japan and Korea 

Inset of Bay of Tokio 
Plate 10. Farther India and East Indies 

Insets of Java, of British New 
Guinea, of Part of Sumatra, of 
Talaur Islands, of Sangi Islands, 
of North Halmaheira, and of 
Nias 



Persia, 117 

Turkish Empire (except Syria and Palestine), 117 

Syria and Palestine, 117 

North-east Africa, 118 

North-west Africa, 118 

Western Africa, 118 

South-west Africa, 118 

South Africa, 118 

Southern Central Africa, 119 

East Africa, 119 
i Madagascar and Mauritius, 119 

Chile, 119 

Brazil, 119 

Dutch Guiana, 119 

Central America, 119 

Mexico, 120 

Porto Rico, 120 

United States of America, including Alaska 
(Indians and Eskimos), 120 

Canada (American Indians), 120 
Philanthropic and Reformatory, 121 

Japan (with Formosa), 121 

Korea, 121 

Chinese Empire, 121 

Siam and French Indo-China, 121 

British Malaysia, 121 

Dutch East Indies, 122 

India, 122 

Ceylon, 122 

Turkish Empire (except Syria and Palestine), 122 

Syria and Palestine, 123 

North-east Africa, 123 

Western Africa, 123 

South-west Africa, 123 

South Africa, 123 

Southern Central Africa, 123 

East Africa, 123 

Madagascar and Mauritius, 124 

Argentine Republic, 124 

Dutch Guiana, 124 

Porto Rico, 124 
Mission Presses, 124 

Missions among the Jews throughout the world, 126 
Roman Catholic Missions among Non-Christians, 127 
Missions of the Russian Orthodox Church to Non- 
Christians, 129 



131156 



Plate 11. India, North-eastern Section 
Plate 12. India, North-western Section 
Plate 13. India, Southern Section, with Ceylon 
Plate 14. Western Asia 

Inset of Syria 

Plate 15. Oceania 

Insets of Hawaiian Islands, of 
Ponapi Island, and of Tahiti 

Plate 16. Australia 

Insets of Fiji Islands, of New 
Hebrides, of Samoa, and of 
New Zealand 

Plate 17. Dominion of Canada 

Insets of Alaska, of Vancouver 
Island, of Manitoba, and of 
Part of Ontario 

Plate 18. United States 

Inset of Part of Oklahoma 

Plate 19. Europe 
Plate 20. Western Europe 
Plate 20 A. Eastern Europe 

Plate 21. Mexico, Central America, and West 
Indies 

Plate 22. South America 

Plate 23. Roman Catholic and Greek Catholic 
Mission Stations in Non-Chris- 
tian Lands 

Alphabetical List of Missionary Society Initials, 135 
Index of Mission Stations, 137 



INDEX OF MISSIONARY SOCIETIES . . 157172 



PREFACE 

In 1902 the Student Volunteer Movement for Foreign Missions published "A Geography and Atlas of Protestant Mis- 
sions" which had been prepared by the Rev. Harlan P. Beach, M.A., F.R.G.S., at that time Educational Secretary of the 
Movement. Plans were under consideration for the revision of the Atlas when it was decided by Commission I, on "Carrying 
the Gospel to All the Non-Christian World," to present as a part of its report to the World Missionary Conference at Edin- 
burgh a "Statistical Atlas of Christian Missions." A conference of representatives of the Student Volunteer Movement and of 
Commission I led to an arrangement by which the Student Volunteer Movement assumed the financial responsibility for 
that Atlas, with the understanding that the material collected for the Report of Commission I could be used by the Student 
Volunteer Movement in preparing the material for the new Atlas which the Movement had under consideration. 

The Editors are preeminently qualified for the task. The Directory of Missionary Societies has been prepared by 
James S. Dennis, D.D., who is recognized as an authority on missions, through his monumental volumes, "Christian Missions 
and Social Progress," as well as through his work in preparing the "Centennial Survey of Foreign Missions," which was pre- 
sented to the Ecumenical Missionary Conference held in New York in 1900. Professor Harlan P. Beach, M.A., F.R.G.S., of 
Yale University, the author of a number of books on missions, his greatest contribution being "A Geography and Atlas of 
Protestant Missions," has supervised the location of mission stations on the maps and the preparation of the Station Index. 
The statistics were tabulated under the direction of Mr. Charles H. Fahs, B.A., who has had extensive experience in missionary 
investigation in connection with his duties as the Missionary Editor of the Board of Foreign Missions of the Methodist Epis- 
copal Church. 

On behalf of the Student Volunteer Movement, we would express our deepest obligations to Dr. Dennis, Professor Beach, 
and Mr. Fahs, who have so generously given their time and painstaking effort to the preparation of this work, and to John 
G. Bartholomew, LL.D., F.R.G.S., under whose careful supervision the maps were executed. 

FENNELL P. TURNER, 

General Secretary. 



INTRODUCTION 

The Atlas here presented is based on the material collected for the World Missionary Conference held at Edinburgh, 
June, 1910, by Commission I, on "Carrying the Gospel to All the Non-Christian World." In accordance with the arrangement 
between the Executive Committee of the World Missionary Conference and the Student Volunteer Movement, the Editors 
have availed themselves of the material then gathered for use in the Conference Atlas, and have made it available for the 
publication of a "World Atlas of Christian Missions," presenting a wider survey of missionary effort than came within the pur- 
view of the Conference. This Atlas, therefore, is differentiated from the edition issued at Edinburgh by the enlargement of 
its scope to include in its Directory, and also to some extent in its Statistical Tables, not only missions among non-Christians, 
but also all other foreign missionary effort. This has necessitated the inclusion of much material collected especially for this 
edition, and the increase of the number of map plates to twenty-five. 

It is the aim of this volume to present all existing foreign missionary effort which is evangelical in aim, wherever 
it is in operation throughout the world, and its data are obtainable. The Editors have acted upon the supposition that the 
Christian public desire, and would expect, in a professedly world-wide compilation of this kind that all dignified and worthy 
missionary service should be recorded and brought to light, as representing earnest and devout, though perhaps in some in- 
stances less conspicuous, efforts to teach the truth of the Gospel, and to minister in love, in humanitarian compassion, and 
in moral uplift, to humanity. This survey, however, is limited to foreign as distinguished from home missions, except in 
the case of Indians and Asiatic immigrants in the United States and Canada. 

This aim, it "will be observed, does not contemplate primarily an ideal classification and reduction to system of mission- 
ary operations along lines of theoretical, scientific arrangement, but has in view rather a presentation in the recorded data of the 
actual scope and status of universal missionary activities, though the data may seem to be bewilderingly complex, varied, 
and often very fragmentary. The endeavor has been made to ascertain what missions are actually doing in the world, whether 
through the large societies, or through smaller and less conspicuous missions, or through voluntary independent cooperation, 
including also, wherever possible to obtain the data, the work of indigenous missionary societies in the foreign fields, even 
though they represent but initial efforts of the missionary impulse. Statistics of missions among non-Christians conducted by 
the Roman Catholic Church, and those of the Russian Orthodox Church are presented separately, and are based upon the 
official publications of these Communions. 

In explanation of the terms foreign and home missions as understood in this connection, it may be said that they 
are primarily geographical, and to a certain extent also racial, in significance, and are understood and used in the United 
States to differentiate missions conducted outside of the national boundaries of the constituency supporting them, from missions 
which represent simply efforts at Church extension within the national environment. In the Atlas prepared for the Edinburgh 
Conference, and in this Atlas also, an exception to this classification has been made in the inclusion of the missionary 
efforts among Asiatic immigrants and aboriginal Indians, as representing a non-Christian population within the bounds of 
Christendom. 

It may be conceded that this distinction between missions home and foreign is not an ideal or final method of classi- 
fication, and it is confessedly from certain points of view open to criticism, but at the present time it stands for a recognized 
and established delimitation of missionary effort in a large section of Christendom. It cannot, therefore, be ignored, while 
its conformity to an existing status, and to a current nomenclature used in many important societies, especially in North 
America, seems to require its recognition, in order to avoid hopeless confusion, as well as defective tabulation, in any 
attempt at representative statistical returns. 

It may be possible at some future time to change or ignore this nomenclature in favor of some such term as World 
Missions, as distinguished from Church extension within national bounds, using the former as an inclusive designation to 
signify the all-embracing purpose of a united Christian Church to win the allegiance of all mankind to Christ and His 
saving Gospel. Under present conditions, however, it seems necessary, in an American Atlas at least, to attempt no change 
in the classification at present in use; although, in view of the project of international conformity in missionary statistics, 
it may eventually become desirable to devise some schedule of terminology and a system of tabulation which will relieve 
the present difficulties. 

In conclusion, no one, we are convinced, can look carefully into this vast and complicated realm of service without 
being impressed with the consecration and loyal devotion it even now reveals on the part of Christ's followers. At the 
same time, every discerning student must recognize what an immense increment of active service the Church could secure, 
were she really wholly in earnest to obey Christ's commands to disciple the nations, and could she fully enlist the immense 
resources, spiritual and material, at her service. If these were brought into vigorous action, they would easily make her 
more than ever a benign and invincible force for the uplifting of mankind. 

JAMES S. DENNIS, 
HARLAN P. BEACH, 
CHARLES H. FAHS, 

Board of Editors. 



PART I 



DIRECTORY OF MISSIONARY SOCIETIES 



11 



DIRECTORY OF MISSIONARY SOCIETIES! 

EXPLANATORY NOTES 



The Directory includes, so far as known, evangelical societies in all 
lands conducting missions among non-Christians and non-Protestants, 
except that in the sections referring to the United States and 'Canada 
missions among non-Protestant immigrants, or among Negroes, are not 
entered unless they are also engaged in work among Asiatic immigrants 
and American Indians. 

American and British societies working among non-Protestanta on the 
European Continent are entered in the Directory, but the missions of 
the Evangelical Churches on the Continent having their sphere of opera- 
tions in their immediate environment are not entered, unless their efforts 
extend to non-Protestant and non-Christian communities in other national 
divisions of the European Continent or in other lands. Societies working 
among the Jews are entered in a separate section of the Directory. 

Missionary agencies are divided into (1) Societies Appointing and Send- 
ing Missionaries, and (2) Cooperating and Collecting Societies, the latter 
designation being intended to apply to societies cooperating with other 
organizations, or simply aiding financially, or working in some specialized 
sphere in the general interests of foreign missions. 

Societies are further classified as to their nationality and ecclesiastical 
connection, and as to their status and relationship, whether independently 
conducted, or related as auxiliaries to principal societies, in which latter 
case they are entered in smaller type than the parent society. Only the 
important auxiliary and aid societies recognized and reported as such 
by the principal societies are entered in the Directory. There are thousands 
of minor auxiliaries which cannot be mentioned. Where a society is auxil- 
iary to a Sending Society it is entered in the Sending List in smaller type 
because of its relationship to the main society with which it is associated, 
but is not counted as a Sending Society in the summaries. It has been 
difficult in some of the countries, especially India, to determine definitely 
what societies should be listed as Sending, since the differentiation, while 
clearly indicated in Christendom, becomes vague and uncertain in the 
case of many Asiatic societies. Many of them are, strictly speaking, neither 
Sending nor Cooperating, since their missionaries are often sent to them 
by agencies outside of India, and in some instances from those without 
organization as societies; and, on the other hand, they cannot be listed as 
Cooperating Societies. 

So far as discovered, recent changes in the secretarial staff of societies 
have been entered. In dealing with income and disbursements each society 
has been credited with its total income, wherever it has been ascertained, 
and in case it is not all received for missions abroad, that portion of the 
total income which was disbursed for foreign missions, or for missions 
among non-Christian peoples within the bounds of Christendom, is desig- 
nated. In a few cases this distinction as to the use of funds has not been 
clearly indicated by the society, or has not been given in response to in- 
quiry. The funds thus left in doubt are not included in the summary 
of income received, unless information from some reliable source is suffi- 
ciently definite to justify their inclusion. 



The income designated as from the mission field seems to vary greatly 
in meaning in the returns of different societies. In some cases it indi- 
cates the sum which was received by the home treasury, and was available 
for disbursement from the headquarters of the society through its home 
treasury. More often it indicates money raised and disbursed on the 
field, including sometimes government grants. It has been the endeavor 
to give in each case the total income of the society, and then to designate 
the channels of disbursement. Where no income from foreign sources 
is mentioned the inference is justified that the entire amount is from 
the home constituency, or from endowments, or from interest on special 
funds. 

Wherever the income of a principal society is known to include that 
received from its auxiliaries, the fact is stated, and where the reverse is 
true it is also indicated. No universal rule, however, can be formulated 
which applies to the financial methods of all societies. Each society has 
its own special aim, and its own way of accomplishing its main purpose, 
as well as its individual plans for acknowledging and disbursing its funds. 
In many cases the statements in the Directory accompanying the income 
will throw light upon the financial system of a given society. The incomes 
recorded are usually those given in the reports published in 1908, but 
in the case of societies not entered in the Atlas presented at the Edinburgh 
Conference a more recent income, as reported in 1909 or 1910, has been 
entered. 

Missionary training schools are not entered as societies in the Di- 
rectory; an exception, however, has been made with reference to medi- 
cal training schools, which have been entered in the Directory of this 
volume. 

Historical notes giving facts of interest concerning the early formation, 
and subsequent changes of relationship, in the case of many societies, 
have been inserted. The scope of the society's sphere of service, and 
the special features of its activities, with facts pointing to its success and 
usefulness, have in many instances been recorded. These historical notes 
make the Directory much more than a mere list of societies, giving it an 
additional value as a collation of missionary history, which in the variety 
of its information, and the extent of its data, can hardly be found else- 
where in any single volume. 

The Editors desire to express their sincere thanks to the officials of 
missionary societies throughout the world for their kind cooperation, and 
to numerous statistical authorities in mission fields, who have placed 
painstaking and invaluable information in their hands. Special acknowl- 
edgments are due to the Rev. J. N. Lenker, D.D., the scholarly author 
of "Lutherans in All Lands," whose researches in the history of the Lutheran 
Church and its missions have yielded much generous and expert aid in the 
presentation of Lutheran Missions in the Atlas. 

The section of the Directory headed "Societies Working Among the 
Jews" was prepared by Rev. Louis Meyer, who has devoted special study 
to this department of missionary activity. 



13 



DIRECTORY 



AMERICAN AND CANADIAN SOCIETIES 



CANADA 

Societies Appointing and Sending Missionaries 

BAPTIST: 

BAPTIST FOREIGN MISSION BOARD OF THE MARITIME PROVINCES 

OF CANADA (1846). 

Secretary: Rev. W. E. Mclntyre, D.D., Box 229, St. John, New Brunswick. 
Object: The evangelization of 2,000,000 Telugus dwelling in the Madras 

Presidency, India. 

Income: $36,000. About $31,800 of this was raised in Canada, and of the 
Canadian portion $14,350 was from the United Baptist Woman's 
Missionary Union of the Maritime Provinces. 
Field: India. 

(NOTE: Foreign mission work was organized in 1846, and conducted for some years 
in connection with the American Baptist Missionary Union now the American 
Baptist Foreign Mission Society but in 1873 the independent Foreign Mission 
Board was organized. A union of the Baptist Foreign Mission Board of the Mar- 
itime Provinces, and that of the Baptist Convention of Ontario and Quebec is 
expected to take place at the close of 1911. The name of the united organization!) 
will be the Canadian Baptist Foreign Mission Board, and its headquarters will 
be at Toronto.) 

UNITED BAPTIST WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION OF THE MARITIME PROVINCES 

(1906). 

Corresponding Secretary: Miss M. E. Hume, Dartmouth, Nova Scotia. 
Object: To engage the efforts of Christian women in the evangelization of heathen 
women and children, to send out and maintain women missionaries and teachers, 
and to extend the mission cause. 

Income: $22,000. Of this amount $14,350 was administered by the Baptist Foreign 
Mission Board of the Maritime Provinces. 
"Tidings." 
India, Canada. 

(NOTE: The Union dates from 1906, but the Baptists of the Maritime Provinces 
organized the pioneer woman's missionary society of Canada as early aa 1870. 
The Woman's Baptist Missionary Union, organized in 1884. is now merged into 
the United Baptist Woman's Missionary Union.) 

HOME MISSION BOARD OF THE BAPTIST CONVENTION OF ONTARIO 

AND QUEBEC (1851). 
Superintendent: Rev. W. E. Norton, D.D., 625 Confederation Life Bldg., 

Toronto. Ontario. 
Object : The prosecution of mission work within the provinces of Ontario 

and Quebec, including the aid of weak churches. 
Income: $40,000. (Expenditure on work among Indians not given.) 
Organ: "The Home and Foreign Mission Bulletin." 



Field: Dominion of Canada (Ontario and Quebec). 

FOREIGN MISSION BOARD OF THE BAPTIST CONVENTION OF ON- 

TARIO AND QUEBEC (1866). 

Secretary: Rev. J. G. Brown, D.D., 626 Confederation Life Bldg., To- 
ronto, Ontario. 

Object : Evangelical missions in foreign lands. 
Income: $55,830. 

Organ: "The Home and Foreign Mission Bulletin." 
Fields: India, South America (Bolivia). 

(NOTE: This society was organized as an auxiliary of the American Baptist Missionary 
Union now the American Baptist Foreign Mission Society in 1866, but it be- 
came an independent organization in 1873. A union is soon to be consummated 
with the Baptist Foreign Mission Board of the Maritime Provinces, under the title 
of The Canadian Baptist Foreign Mission Board, with offices at Toronto.) 

WOMEN'S BAPTIST FOREIGN MISSIONARY SOCIETY OF EASTERN ONTARIO 

AND QUEBEC (1876). 

Corresponding Secretary: Mrs. P. B. Motley, Sunnyside Road, Westmount, Quebec. 
Object: The evangelization of the women of mission lands. 
Income: $2,131. 

Organ: "The Canadian Missionary Link." 
Fields: India, South America (Bolivia). 

WOMEN'S BAPTIST FOREIGN MISSIONARY SOCIETY OF ONTARIO [WEST] 

(1876). 

Foreign Secretary: Mrs. R. W. Angus, 42 Rowland Ave., Toronto, Ontario. 
Home Secretary: Mrs. H. H. LIoyoT, 396 Brunswick Ave., Toronto, Ontario 
Object: To give the Gospel to the women and children of India, chiefly to tnose 

among the Telugus. 
Income: $12,691. 

Organ: "The Canadian Missionary Link." 
Field: India. 

BAPTIST CONVENTION OF WESTERN CANADA (1907). 

Secretary: Rev. D. B. Harkness, 317 Portage Ave., Winnipeg, Manitoba. 
Object: To support mission work in India, through the Foreign Mission 

Board of the Baptist Convention of Ontario and Quebec, and to promote 

missions in needy sections of Western Canada. 
Income: $5,525. (Of this amount $1,275 was received from the Baptist 

Woman's Missionary Society of Western Canada.) 
Organ: "The Western Outlook." 
Fields: India, Western Canada. 

(NOTE: This Board is auxiliary in its foreign work to the Foreign Mission Board of the 
Baptist Convention of Ontario and Quebec. It is independent in its work in West- 
ern Canada.) 



"The Western Outlook." 

Fields: India, South America (Bolivia), Western Canada. 

(NOTE: The Baptist Woman's Missionary Society of Manitoba, Saskatchewan, and 
Alberta, organized in 1887, and the Baptist Woman's Missionary Society of 
British Columbia, were united in 1907 to form the Baptist Woman s Missionary 
Society of Western Canada. Besides work for European and Asiatic immigrants, 
and for American Indians in Western Canada, contributions are made toward 
the support of missionaries in India and Bolivia, through the Foreign Mission 
Board of the Baptist Convention of Ontario and Quebec.) 

BRETHREN: 

FOREIGN MISSION BOARD OF THE BRETHREN IN CHRIST OF THE 
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA AND CANADA [RIVER BRETH- 
REN] (1896). 
(See under United States.) 

CHURCH OF ENGLAND: 

MISSIONARY SOCIETY OF THE CHURCH OF ENGLAND IN CANADA 

(1883). 

General Secretary: Rev. Canon S. Gould, B.A., M.D., O.M. 
Assistant Secretary: R. A. Williams, Esq. 

Office Address: 627 Confederation Life Bldg., Toronto, Ontario. 
Object: To carry the Gospel to the foreigners in Canada, and also to the 

world. 

Income: $116,000. 
Organ: "The New Era." 
Fields: Japan, China, India, Persia, Palestine, North-east Africa (Egypt), 

East Africa (British), South America (Chile), Canada. 

(NOTE: Formerly known as the Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society of the 
Church of England in Canada. Its first foreign work was begun in 1888, in Japan. 
Many of the missionaries supported by the Missionary Society of the Church of 
England in Canada work under the supervision of other Church of England societies, 
such as the Church Missionary Society and the South American Missionary Society.) 

WOMAN'S AUXILIARY TO THE MISSIONARY SOCIETY OF THE CHURCH OF 
ENGLAND IN CANADA (i885). 

Corresponding Secretary: Miss Mary R. Bogert, 169 Stewart St., Ottawa. 

Object: To increase missionary activity. 

Income: $49,080. (This amount is one-third the total for three years. Of this 
total, $13,000 was expended for Canadian missions, apart from diocesan missions, 
910,000 for diocesan missions, $11,429 for foreign missions, including work for 
Asiatic immigrants in Canada, and the remainder for other missionary objects.) 

Organ: "The Letter Leaflet." 

Fields: Japan, Korea, China, India, Canada (including American Indians and 
Asiatic immigrants.) 

CANADIAN CHURCH MISSIONARY SOCIETY (1895). 

Secretary: Rev. Canon T. R. O'Meara, Th.D., Wycliffe College, Toronto, Ontario. 

Object: To select and train candidates for the Church Missionary Society and South 
American Missionary Society fields, and to work in conjunction with the Mis- 
sionary Society of the Church of England in Canada in the dissemination of 
literature, and the arousing of missionary interest. 

Income: About $5,000. (This income does not go to the foreign field.) 

Fields: Those of the societies with which the Canadian Church Missionary Society 
cooperates, by examining and recommending candidates. 

(NOTE: Wycliffe College, Toronto, formed a Missionary Association in 1888, which 
maintained men in Japan and in North-west Canada. In 1895 this gave place 
to a Canadian Church Missionary Association, afterwards called the Canadian 
Church Missionary Society, and the missionaries previously sent out by 
Wycliffe College were added to the Society's staff. The Canadian Church 
Missionary Society selects its own missionaries; but financially it is now an 
integral part of the Missionary Society of the Church of England in Canada.) 



MENNONITE: 

MENNONITE BRETHREN IN CHRIST 

(See under United States.) 

METHODIST: 



(1883) 



Object: ...... 

in the needy fields of Western Canada. 
Income: $7,758. (Of this amount $1,800 was expended for work among American 
Indians.) 



MISSIONARY SOCIETY OF THE METHODIST CHURCH, CANADA (1824). 

Secretary: Rev. T. E. Egerton Shore, M.A., B.D. 

Secretary of the Young People's Forward Movement: Rev. Frederick C. 
Stephenson, M.D. 

Office Address: 33 Richmond St. West, Toronto, Ontario. 

Object: The support and enlargement of the Indian, French, domestic, 
foreign, and other missions, which are carried on under the direction 
of the General Board of Missions and the Conferences of the Methodist 
Church in Canada. 

Income: $518,102. (This amount includes $6,878 contributed by the 
Indian missions. Of the total income, $86,687 was disbursed for 
foreign missions in Japan and China, $109,787 for Indian missions, and 
$8,769 for work among Chinese and Japanese in Canada. The 
remainder was expended in domestic missions. The income of the 
Woman's Missionary Society of the Methodist Church in Canada is not 
included.) 

Organ: "The Missionary Outlook." 

Fields: Japan, China, Bermuda, Canada. 

WOMAN'S MISSIONARY SOCIETY OF THE METHODIST CHURCH. CANADA (1881). 

Home Secretary: Mrs. N. A. Powell, 167 College St., Toronto, Ontario. 

Field Secretary: Mrs. E. S. Strachan, 52 Markland St., Hamilton, Ontario. 

Object: The evangelization of heathen women and children in home and foreign 
fields. 

Income: $97,802. Expended in foreign lands, $49,612; expended for work among 
American Indians, $17,386; for work among Asiatic immigrants, $2.487; for 
new building for Chinese work in British Columbia* $15,000. 

Organ: "The Missionary Outlook." 
i: Japan, China, Canada 



15 



16 



WORLD ATLAS OF CHRISTIAN MISSIONS 



Canada-United State? 



PRESBYTERIAN: 

FOREIGN MISSION COMMITTEE OF THE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 
IN CANADA (1844 and 1854). 

Secretary for Western Division: Rev. R. P. Mackay, D.D., 439 Confeder- 
ation Life Bldg., Toronto, Ontario. 

Secretary for Eastern Division: Rev. E. A. McCurdy, D.D., 108 Granville 
St., Halifax, Nova Scotia. 

Object: To give the Gospel to every creature. 

Income: $235,810. (This sum includes the income of the Woman's 
Foreign Missionary Society of the Presbyterian Church in Canada, 
together with that of the Eastern Division of the same Society.) 

Organ: "The Presbyterian Record." 

Fields: Japan (Formosa), Korea, China, Melanesia (New Hebrides), 
India, South America (British Guiana), Canada (among Indians, 
Chinese, and Jews). 

(NOTE: Eastern Division organized in 1844, and Western Division in 1S54.) 

WOMAN'S FOREIGN MISSIONARY SOCIETY OF THE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 
IN CANADA (1876). 

Corresponding Secretary: Miss Martin, 169 Dowling Ave., Toronto, Ontario. 

Office of Publication: Room 619, Confederation Life Bldg., Toronto, Ontario. 

Object: To aid the Foreign Mission Committee of the Presbyterian Church in 
Canada in the support of its work among heathen women and children; to 
interest the women and children of the Church in this work, and to call forth in 
a systematic way their prayers and free-will offerings in its behalf. 

Income: 870,955. 

Organ: "Foreign Missionary Tidings." 

Fields: Japan (Formosa), China, India, Canada (among Indians and Jews). 

WOMAN'S FOREIGN MISSIONARY SOCIETY OF THE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 

IN CANADA EASTERN DIVISION (1876). 

Secretary: Mjss M. Currie, Franc klyn St., Pine Hill, Halifax, Nova Scotia. 
Object: To aid the Foreign Missionary Committee by promoting its work in heathen 

lands. 

Income: $22,210. 
Organ: "The Message." 

Fields: Those of the Foreign Mission Committee of the Presbyterian Church in 
Canada. 

BOARD OF MANAGEMENT OF THE 6WALIOR PRESBYTERIAN MISSION 

(1904). 

Secretary: John Stenhouse, M.D., 175 Bloor St. East, Toronto, Ontario. 
Object: The evangelization of the people of Gwalior, and of those in 

neighboring districts. 
Income: $6,606. 

Organ: "The Journal of the Gwalior Presbyterian Mission." 
Field: India. 



SENDING SOCIETIES NOT DENOMINATIONAL: 

BRITISH AND FOREIGN BIBLE SOCIETY (1804). 

(See under England.) 

CANADIAN BIBLE SOCIETY (1904). 

Secretary: Rev. W. B. Cooper, M.A., 347 Yonne St., Toronto, Ontario. 

Object: To encourage the wider circulation throughout Canada and Newfoundland 

of the Bible, without note or comment, and to assist the British and Foreign Bible 

Society in its world-wide work. 
Income: $105,204. 
Organ: "The Bible in the World." 
Fields: Canada, Newfoundland, and the fields of the British and Foreign Bible 

Society. 

CHINA INLAND MISSION (1865). 
(See under England.) 

CHINA INLAND MISSION, COUNCIL FOR NORTH AMERICA (1888). 
Secretary: Mr. J. S. Helper, 507 Church St., Toronto, Ontario. 
Object: The evangelization of the inland provinces of China. 
Income: About $20,000. (Included in the income of the China Inland Mission.) 
Organ: "China's Millions" (North American Edition). 
Field: Chinese Empire. 

(NOTE: The_Council for North America is an integral part of the China Inland Mis- 
sion, but is independent in its own sphere of the United States and Canada. 
There are two mission centers, one at Toronto, and the other at Philadelphia.) 

REGIONS BEYOND MISSIONARY UNION (1899). 

(See under England.) 

NORTH AMERICAN AUXILIARY OF THE REGIONS BEYOND MISSIONARY UNION 

(1892). 

Secretary: Rev. George Smith, 210 Seaton St., Toronto, Ontario. 
Object: To aid the Regions Beyond Missionary Union in its work, especially that 

in South America. 
Income: 94,623. 

Organ: "The Neglected Continent." 

Fields: India, South-west Africa (Belgian Congo), South America (Argentine 
Republic, Peru). 

SUDAN INTERIOR MISSION (1901). 

Secretary: Rev. Rowland V. Bingham, 262 Delaware Ave., Toronto, 

Ontario. 

Object : To meet the spiritual destitution in the Sudan. 
Income: $7,994. 

Organ: "The Missionary Witness." 
Field: Western Africa (Northern Nigeria). 

(NOTE: The pioneer expedition of this Mission to the Sudan was in 1893, but the date 
of its regular organization is 1901. B. F. Babcock, Esq., 4 Water St., Liverpool, 
England, is the Honorary Secretary for Great Britain.) 

DOMINION COUNCIL OF THE YOUNG WOMEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIA- 
TIONS OF CANADA (1902). 

Secretary: Miss Susie Little, 480 Spadina Ave., Toronto, Ontario. 

Object : To organize and develop Young Women's Christian Associations 
in the cities, towns, and institutions of higher learning in Canada, and 
to send out and support secretaries in foreign mission fields, in co- 
operation with the World's Committee of Young Women's Christian 
Associations. 

Income: For work in Canada, $4,000; for work in Japan, $1,500. In 
addition, special funds for work in Japan, amounting to $5,700, were 
forwarded during 1907 and 1908. 

Organ: "The Young Women of Canada." 

Fields: Japan, India, Canada. 

(NOTE: The support of a foreign secretary in India was undertaken in 1909. For a 
statement regarding the relation of various national committees and councils of 
the Young Women's Christian Association to the foreign work of the organization, 
see note under World's Young Women's Christian Association as entered under 
England in this Directory.) 



Cooperating and Collecting Societies 

CONGREGATIONAL: 

CANADA CONGREGATIONAL FOREIGN MISSIONARY SOCIETY (1881). 
Secretary: Rev. R. G. Watt, 146 Suffolk Ave., Guelph, Ontario. 
Object: To spread the knowledge of the Gospel among the heathen and 

other unenlightened people. 
Income: $9,983. 

Organ: "The Canadian Congregationalist." 
Field:, South-west Africa (Angola). 

(NOTE: The Society works in cooperation with the American Board of Commissioners 
for Foreign Missions.) 

CANADA CONGREGATIONAL WOMAN'S BOARD OF MISSIONS (1886). 

Secretary: Miss L. M. Silcox, 4 Sussex Ave., Toronto, Ontario. 

Object: The cultivation of the missionary spirit, and the raising of funds for 
carrying on missionary work in home and foreign fields. 

Income: $3,527. 

Organ: "Monthly Leaflet." 

Fields: China, India, Ceylon, Turkish Empire, South-west Africa (Angola), South 
America (Brazil, Peru), Canada. 

(NOTE: Independent, but contributing to and cooperating with the Canada Con- 
gregational Foreign Missionary Society, and the Woman s Congregational Board 
of Missions, of Boston, Massachusetts.) 

CONGREGATIONAL WOMAN'S BOARD OF MISSIONS OF NOVA SCOTIA AND NEW 

BRUNSWICK (1897). 
Secretary: Miss Ida A. H. Barker, Sheffield Academy, Sunbury County, New 

Brunswick. 
Object: The cultivation of the missionary spirit among the churches, and the 

raising of funds for home and foreign missions. 

Income: $650. (Of this amount $275 was spent for foreign missions.) 
Fields: South-west Africa (Angola), South America (Bolivia), Canada. 
(NOTE: This Society coSperates with the Canadian Congregational Missionary 

Society and the Canadian Congregational Foreign Missionary Society.) 

COOPERATING SOCIETIES NOT DENOMINATIONAL; 

UPPER CANADA RELIGIOUS TRACT AND BOOK SOCIETY (1833). 
Secretary: Rev. H. R. Home, B.A., LL.B., 2 Richmond St. East, Toronto, 

Ontario. 

Object: To promote the circulation of religious literature in Canada. 
Income: $75,000. 
Organ: "On Inland Waters." 
Field: Canada. 
(NOTE: A grant of $625 was made to the Central China Religious Tract Society.) 

MISSION POPULAIRE EVANGELIQUE DE FRANCE [McALL MISSION] 

(1872). 
(See under France.) 

CANADIAN McALL ASSOCIATION (1886). 

Corresponding Secretary: Mrs. W. Hamilton, 28 Beaty Ave., Toronto, Ontario. 
Object: To aid in the work of the McAll Mission in France. 
Income: $2,511. 
Field: France, Corsica. 

(NOTE: The Association has nine auxiliaries.) 

CANADIAN COLLEGES' MISSION (1888). 

Secretary: W. Harley Smith, M.D., 57 Harboard St., Toronto, Ontario. 
Object: To promote interest in foreign missions among the colleges and 

high schools of Canada, and to raise money for missions. 
Income: $1,300. 

Organ: "The Canadian College Missionary." 
Field: Japan (among the Chinese students in Tokyo). 

(NOTE: The money raised by the Canadian Colleges' Mission is applied toward the 
support of missionaries under other societies. The Mission supports a secretary 
for the Chinese student work of the Young Men's Christian Association in Tokyo.) 

McKENZIE PRAYER CIRCLE FOR KOREA (1898). 

Secretary: Miss Sophia L. Robb. 239 St. Clair Ave., Toronto, Ontario. 

Object: To help to evangelize the women and children of Korea by sup- 
porting native Bible- women; also by paying the expenses of lady 
missionaries on special evangelistic trips, etc. 

Income: $300. 

Field: Korea. 

PENTECOSTAL MISSIONARY UNION OF CANADA (1909). 

Chairman: Mr. George E. Fisher, 51 Lippincott St., Toronto, Ontario. 

Secretary: Mr. A. G. Ward, Vineland, Ontario. 

Object: To cooperate in all possible ways with Pentecostal workers who 
may go to mission fields independently, or as representing local Pente- 
costal missions in Canada. 

Income: No statement at hand. 

Fields: Those to which Pentecostal workers may go. 



UNITED STATES 

Societies Appointing and Sending Missionaries 
ADVENTIST: 

SEVENTH-DAY ADVENTIST MISSION BOARD (1863). 

Secretary: Elder W. A. Spicer, Takoma Park Station, Washington, 
District of Columbia. 

Object: The proclamation of the Gospel. 

Income: $395,320. 

Organ: "The Advent Review and Sabbath Herald." 

Fields: Japan, Korea, China, British Malaysia, Dutch East Indies, Phil- 
ippine Islands, Australia, Polynesia (Fiji, Friendly, Samoa, Cook, and 
Society Islands), India, Turkish Empire, North-east Africa (Egypt, 
Egyptian Sudan), North-west Africa (Algeria), Western Africa (Sierra 
Leone), South Africa (Basutoland), Southern Central Africa (North- 
eastern Rhodesia, Nyasaland), East Africa (German, British), Mexico, 
Central America (Guatemala), South America (Argentine Republic, 
Bolivia, Peru), Europe (Belgium, France, Greece, Hungary, Italy, 
Portugal, Russia, Spain, Switzerland). 

AMERICAN ADVENT MISSION SOCIETY (1897). 
Secretary: Mr. Fim Murra, 160 Warren St., Boston, Massachusetts. 
Object: To promote the Gospel of Jesus Christ in non-Christian lands. 
Income: $20,000. 

Organ: "Prophetic and Mission Record." 
Fields: China, Cape Verde Islands., 



United States 



DIRECTORY OF MISSIONARY SOCIETIES 



17 



WOMAN'S HOME AND FOREIGN MISSION SOCIETY OF THE ADVENT CHRISTIAN 
DENOMINATION (1897). 

Business Manager: Mrs. Sarah K. Taylor, Rockland, Maine. 

Recording Secretary: Mrs. Susie B. Thompson, Friendship, Maine. 

Object: To engage and unite the efforts of Christian women of the Advent Christian 
Denomination in sending the Gospel of the kingdom throughout the world, to 
deepen the spiritual life among believers in Christ, and by organization to render 
more efficient the work of the women of our churches. 

Income: $15,000. 

Organ: "All Nations Monthly.'! 

Field: India. 

BAPTIST: 

AMERICAN BAPTIST FOREIGN MISSION SOCIETY (1814). 

Foreign Secretary: Rev. Thomas S. Barbour, D.D. 

Home Secretary: Rev. Fred P. Haggard., D.D. 

Office Address: Ford Building, 16 Ash'burton Place, Boston, Massachusetts. 

Object: To diffuse the knowledge of the religion of Jesus Christ by means 
of missions throughout the world. 

Income: From home sources, $692,550; received and used on the field, 
$20,145; total, $712,695. (Income of the Woman's Baptist Foreign 
Missionary Society and of the Woman's Baptist Foreign Missionary 
Society of the West not included.) Of the total receipts $37,530 was 
expended in Europe. 

Organ: "Missions." (An amalgamation, in 1910, of the "Baptist Mis- 
sionary Magazine," the "Baptist Home Mission Monthly," and "Good 
Work.") 

Fields: Japan, China, Siam, Philippine Islands, India, South-west Africa 
(Belgian Congo, Angola), Europe. 

(NoTE: This Society was known as the American Baptist Missionary Union until 1910. 
The Mennonites of South Russia support two missionaries of the American Baptist 
. Foreign Mission Society.) 

WOMAN'S BAPTIST FOREIGN MISSIONARY SOCIETY (1871). 

Corresponding Secretary, Foreign Department: Mrs. H. G. Safford, Ford Building. 

Boston, Massachusetts. 
Corresponding Secretary, Home Department: Mrs. Carrie A. Robinson, Ford Building, 

Boston, Massachusetts. 

Object: The christianization of women in foreign mission lands. 
Income: $120,282. (Of this amount $1,960 was appropriated for work in France.) 
Organ: "The Helping Hand." 
Fields: Japan, China, Philippine Islands, India, South-west Africa (Belgian Congo, 

Angola), France. 
(NOTE: Incorporated in 1874.) 

WOMAN'S BAPTIST FOREIGN MISSIONARY SOCIETY OF THE WEST (1871). 
Foreign Secretary: Miss Mary E. Adkins. 
Home Secretary: Miss Carrie E. Perrine. 
General Field Secretary: Miss Ella D. MacLaurin. 
Office Address: 88 East 30th St., Chicago, Illinois. 
Object: The elevation and christianization of the women and children in foreign 

mission lands. 

Income: $67,816, not including bequests. 
Organ: "The Helping Hand." 
Fields: Japan, China, Philippine Islands. India, South-west Africa (Belgian Congo). 

(NOTE: The Woman's Baptist Foreign Missionary Society of California and the 
Woman's Baptist Foreign Missionary Society of Oregon have been merged into 
the Woman's Baptist Foreign Missionary Society of the West.) 

AMERICAN BAPTIST HOME MISSION SOCIETY (1832). 

Corresponding Secretary : Rev. Henry L. Morehouse, D.D., LL.D., 23 East 
26th St., New York City, New York. 

Object: To promote the teaching of the Gospel in North America. 

Income: $904,798, including $27,015 from the women's societies. (Dis- 
bursements for work among Chinese, $6,379; among Japanese, $340; 
among American Indians, $20,039; among Jews, $300.) 

Organ: "Missions." 

Fields: Mexico, West Indies (Cuba, Porto Rico), United States, Canada. 

WOMAN'S AMERICAN BAPTIST HOME MISSION SOCIETY (1877). 

Secretary: Mrs. Katherine S. Westfall, 2969 Vemon Ave., Chicago, Illinois. 
Object: To aid in christianizing North America by means of evangelistic and 

educational work. 
Income: $189,000. 
Organ: "Tidings." 
Fields: Mexico, West Indies, United States (with Alaska), among the American 

Indian, Asiatic, Negro, and European races. 

(NOTE: In 1909 the Women's Baptist Home Mission Society, with headquarters 
in Chicago, Illinois, and the Woman's American Baptist Home Mission Society, 
with headquarters in Boston, Massachusetts, were consolidated, with head- 
quarters in Chicago.) 

GENERAL CONFERENCE OF FREE BAPTISTS '(1833). 

Corresponding Secretary: Rev. Henry Mead Ford, D.D., Hillsdale, 
Michigan. 

Object: Religious, missionary, educational, and charitable work. 

Income: $37,146, for foreign missions only. For foreign, home, and educa- 
tional missions, $53,987. 

Organ: "The Morning Star." 

Fields: India, Western Africa (Liberia). 

(NOTE: From 1833 to 1882 this organization was known as the Free Baptist Foreign 
Missionary Society, but at the latter date the title was changed to the General 
Conference of Free Baptists.) 

FREE BAPTIST WOMAN'S MISSIONARY SOCIETY (1873). 

Recording Secretary: Mrs. Alice M. Metcalf, Carolina, Rhode Island. 

Corresponding Secretary: Mrs. Minnie A. Milliken, 91 Summer St., Lawrence, 
Massachusetts. 

Object: To extend the Christian religion and its blessings, especially among women 
and_ children, by sending and supporting missionaries and teachers, and by estab- 
lishing schools and churches in the Free Baptist missionary fields. 

Income: $12,866 (included in the income of the General Conference of Free Baptists). 

Organ: "The Missionary Helper." 

Field: India. 

SEVENTH-DAY BAPTIST MISSIONARY SOCIETY (1842). 

Corresponding Secretary: Mr. E. B. Saunders, Ashaway, Rhode Island. 
Object: To promote the work of missions, both home and foreign. 
Income: From home sources, $13,734; expended on home field, $8,814; 

expended on foreign field, $4,920. In addition, there was raised and 

expended on the foreign field $2,170. 
Organ: "The Sabbath Recorder." 
Fields: China, Dutch East Indies, Western Africa (Gold Coast), Europe. 

(NOTE: The work in Java is supported by the Seventh-Day Baptist Church of Haar- 
lem, The Netherlands.) 

WOMAN'S EXECUTIVE BOARD, SEVENTH-DAY BAPTIST GENERAL CONFERENCE 

(1884).. 

Corresponding Secretary: Mrs. J. H. Babcock, Milton, Wisconsin. 
Object: To aid in the missionary work of the Seventh-Day Baptist Missionary 

Society, and that of the other benevolent boards of the denomination. 
Income: $1,972. (Of this amount about $1,000 is included in the income of the 

Seventh-Day Baptist Missionary Society.) 
Organ: A page in 'The Sabbath Recorder. 1 ; 
Fields: China, United States. 



FOREIGN MISSION BOARD OF THE SOUTHERN BAPTIST CONVENTION 

(1845). 

Corresponding Secretary: Rev. R. J. WiJlingham, D.D., 1103 Main St., 
Richmond, Virginia. 

Object : The propagation of the Gospel in f orteign mission fields. 

Income: $402,328. (This includes $87,515 for foreign missions from the 
Woman's Missionary Union. Disbursements for work in Mexico, 
South America, and Europe amount to $188,788.) 

Organ: "The Foreign Mission Journal." 

Fields: Japan, China, North-west Africa (Tunisia), Western Africa 
(Southern Nigeria), Mexico, South America (Brazil, Argentine Re- 
public), Europe (Italy). 

(NOTE: In January, 1910, the Bible Missionary Society became a part of the Foreign 
Mission Board of the Southern Baptist Convention.) 

WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION (1888). 

Secretary: Miss Edith C. Crane, 15 W. Franklin St., Baltimore, Maryland. 

Object: To stimulate the missionary spirit and grace of giving among the women 
and children of the churches, and to aid in collecting funds for missionary purposes, 
to be disbursed by the boards (Home, Foreign, and Sunday School) of the 
Southern Baptist Convention. 

Income: $210,742, of which $87,515 was for foreign missions, and $56,190 tor home 
missions. 

Organ: "Our Mission Fields." 

Fields: China, Japan, Western Africa (Southern Nigeria), Europe, Mexico, South 
America (Argentine Republic, Brazil, Panama), West Indies, United States. 

(NOTE: The Woman's Missionary Union is auxiliary to the Southern Baptist Con- 
vention, which operates with respect to foreign missions through its Foreign 
Mission Board, and with respect to h g ome missions through its Home Mission 
Board. The Woman's Missionary Union raises money for both of these boards, 
but is primarily auxiliary to the body which created them rather than to the 
boards themselves.) 

HOME MISSION BOARD OF THE SOUTHERN BAPTIST CONVENTION 

(1845). 

Secretary: Mr. B. D. Gray, Austell Building, Atlanta, Georgia. 
Object: Evangelistic missions among Indians, Negroes, and the white 

races, within the fields of the Southern Baptist Convention. 
Income: $265,895. (Of this amount $30,611 was disbursed for missions 

in Cuba, and among the Indians in the United States.) 
Organ: "Our Home Field." 
Fields: West Indies (Cuba), Panama, United States. 

FOREIGN MISSION BOARD OF THE NATIONAL BAPTIST CONVENTION 

(1880). 
Secretary: Rev. L. G. Jordan, D.D., 726 W. Walnut St., Louisville, 

Kentucky. 
Object: To give the Gospel to the non-Christian peoples in all the 

world, and especially to the Negro races. 
Income: $20,298. 
Organ: "The Mission Herald." 
Fields: Western Africa (Liberia), South Africa (Cape Colony, Natal), 

British East Africa, South America (British Guiana, Dutch Guiana), 

West Indies, Russia. 

WOMAN'S HOME AND FOREIGN MISSION BOARD (1900). 
Secretary: Miss N. H. Burroughs, Louisville, Kentucky. 
Object: To preach one Lord, one faith, one baptism. 
Income: $4,532. 
Organ: "The Mission Field." 

Fields: South Africa (Cape Colony), South America (British Guiana), West Indies, 
United States, Russia. 

GENERAL MISSION BOARD OF THE CHURCH OF THE BRETHREN 

(1884). 

Secretary: Mr. Galen B. Royer, Elgin. Illinois. 
Object: To send brethren to preach the Gospel; to assist in building 

houses of worship; to publish and distribute printed matter; to organize 

and build up churches; and to own and control the publishing interests 

of the Church. 
Income: For all purposes, $56,592. (Of this sum $22,041 was expended 

for work in India.) 
Organ: "The Missionary Visitor." 
Fields: China, India, Europe. 

(NOTE: Formerly known as the General Missionary and Tract Committee of the 
German Baptist Brethren Church [ Dunkards ]. The mission to China was begun 
in the latter- part of 1908.) 

SCANDINAVIAN INDEPENDENT BAPTIST DENOMINATION (1893). 

Secretary: Mr. John Edgren, Lock Box 116, Britt, Iowa. 

Object: To spread the Gospel, as taught by Christ and his Apostles, 
throughout the United States and foreign countries. 

Income: $4,380. The missionary income of the Scandinavian Inde- 
pendent Baptists is usually expended directly on their fields, and not 
sent to the affiliated Church in Sweden.) 

Organ: "Sonningens Van." 

Fields: South Africa (Natal), Sweden, Norway, Denmark, United States, 
Canada. 

(NOTE: Also designated as the Scandinavian Independent Baptist Union. It is asso- 
ciated with the Free Baptist denomination of Sweden, which see under Sweden.) 

FOREIGN MISSIONARY SOCIETY OF THE GENERAL ASSOCIATION OF 
GENERAL BAPTISTS IN THE UNITED STATES (1903). 

Secretary: Mr. James P. Cox, Owensville, Indiana. 

Object : To do mission work in foreign lands. 

Income : The Society is as yet engaged in securing endowment funds and 
preparing missionary students. There are permanent funds amount- 
ing to $2,500, and donations from home churches and individuals are 
being solicited. 

Organ: "The Messenger." 

Field: Not yet determined, probably India. 

BRETHREN: 

FOREIGN MISSION BOARD OF THE BRETHREN IN CHRIST OF THE 
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA AND CANADA [RIVER BRETH- 
REN] (1896). 

Chairman: Bishop J. R. Zook, Des Moines, Iowa. 

Foreign Mission Secretary: Mr. C. N. Hostetter, Washingtonboro, Penn- 
sylvania. 

Object: Mission work in foreign lands. 
Income: $4,623. 

Organ: "The Evangelical Visitor." 

Fields: India, Southern Central Africa (Southern Rhodesia, North- 
western Rhodesia). 

*' (NOTE: Work in India was authorized by the Foreign Mission Board of the Brethren 
in Christ in 1910.) 



18 



WORLD ATLAS OF CHRISTIAN MISSIONS 



United States 



HEPHZIBAH FAITH MISSIONARY ASSOCIATION (1896). 
Corresponding Secretary: Elchr L. B. Worcester, Tabor, Iowa. 
Object: The training and sending forth of missionaries, and the founding 

and maintaining of missions in foreign lands. 
Income: "$7,000. 
Organ: " Sent of God." 
Fields: Japan, China, India, South Africa (Natal), Mexico. 

FOREIGN MISSIONARY SOCIETY OF THE BRETHREN CHURCH (1900). 

Secretary: Rev. Louis 8. Bauman, Ashland, Ohio. 
Object: To promote the evangelization of the world. 
Income: $3,500. 
Fields: Persia, South America (Argentine Republic). ' 

(NOTE: There is a "Laymen's Missionary Movement of the Brethren Church," of which 
the General Secretary is Mr. Harry Bole, of Johnstown, Pennsylvania.) 

CHRISTIAN (Christian Connection): 

MISSION BOARD OF THE CHRISTIAN CHURCH (1878). 
Secretary of Foreign Missions: Rev. M. T. Morrill, A.M., Fifth and Ludlow 

Sts., Dayton, Ohio. 
Object: To diffuse the knowledge and religion of Jesus Christ by means 

of missions throughout the world. 
Income: $13,696. (Includes $2,149 from the Woman's Board for Foreign 

Missions.) 

Organ: "The Christian Missionary." 
Fields: Japan, West Indies (Porto Rico), United States. 

(NoTB: The Board was formerly known as the Missionary and Church Extension Depart- 
ment of the American Christian Convention. It should not be confused with the 
Foreign Christian Missionary Society of the Church of the Disciples.) 

WOMAN'S BOARD FOR FOREIGN MISSIONS OF THE CHRISTIAN CHURCH (1886). 

Secretary: Miss Annie Libby, Saco, Maine. 

Object: To raise money for mission work abroad. 

Income: $2,149. 

Organ: "The Christian Missionary." 

Fields: Japan, West Indies (Porto Rico). 

CHURCHES OF GOD: 

BOARD OF MISSIONS OF THE GENERAL ELDERSHIP OF THE 

CHURCHES OF GOD (1845). 
Secretary: Rev. J. L. Updegraph, Mount Pleasant, Pennsylvania. 

(NOTE: The foreign mission work of this denomination is in the hands of the Woman's 
General Missionary Society, subject to the control of the Board of Missions.) 

WOMAN'S GENERAL MISSIONARY SOCIETY OF THE CHURCHES OF GOD (1890). 

Secretary: Mrs. Clara M. Ritchie, Warrensburg, Illinois. 

Object: Foreign mission work. 

Income: $2,036. 

Organ: "The Church Advocate." 

Field: India. 

CONGREGATIONAL: 

AMERICAN BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS FOR FOREIGN MISSIONS 

(1810). 

Corresponding Secretaries: Rev. James L. Barton, D.D., Rev. Cornelius 
H. Patton, D.D. 

Assistant Secretaries: Rev. Enoch F. Bell, Rev. David Brewer Eddy. 

Editorial Secretaries: Rev. E. E. Strong, D.D. (Emeritus), Rev. William 
E. Strong. 

Office Address: Congregational House, 14 Beacon St., Boston, Massa- 
chusetts. 

Object: Foreign missions, with the aim of devising ways and means, 
and adopting and prosecuting measures, for promoting the spread of 
the Gospel in heathen lands. 

Income: From home sources, $837,999; received and spent on the 
mission fields, $253,956; total, $1,091,955. (Of the income from home 
sources, $54,992 was expended for work in Mexico, Spain, and Austria. 
The total income includes the income of the women's auxiliary societies.) 

Organ: "The Missionary Herald." 

Fields: Japan, China, Philippine Islands, Micronesia (Gilbert, Caroline, 
and Ladrone Islands), India, Ceylon, Turkish Empire, South-west 
Africa (Angola), South Africa (Natal, Transvaal), Southern Central 
Africa (Southern Rhodesia), Mexico, Europe (Spain, Austria, Bul- 
garia). 

WOMAN'S BOARD OF MISSIONS (1868). 
Home Secretary: Miss E. Harriet Stanwood. 
Foreign Secretary: Miss Kate G. Lamson. 

Office Address: 704 Congregational House, Boston, Massachusetts. 
Object: To collect, receive, and hold money to be exclusively expended in sending 

out, and for the support of, women missionaries, or native women helpers, in the 

missionary work. 

Income: $157,636. (Included in the income of the American Board.) 
Organ: "Life and Light for Woman." 
Fields: Japan, China, Micronesia (Caroline Islands), India, Ceylon, Turkish Empire, 

South-west Africa (Angola), South Africa (Natal, Transvaal), Southern Central 

Africa (Southern Rhodesia), Mexico, Europe (Spain, Austria). 

WOMAN'S BOARD OF MISSIONS OF THE INTERIOR (1868). 

Corresponding Secretary: Miss M. D. Wingate, 40 Dearborn St., Chicago, Illinois. 

Object: To engage the earnest, systematic cooperation of Christian women in send- 
ing out and supporting women as missionaries, natiye teachers, and Bible readers, 
to spread and maintain the principles of the Christian religion among women 
and children in foreign lands. 

Income: $101,824. (Included in the income of the American Board.) Of thia 
amount S3, 000 was expended for work in Mexico. 

Organ: "Life and Light for Woman." 

Fields: Japan, China, Micronesia (Caroline Islands), India, Turkish Empire, South 
Africa (Natal, Transvaal), Southern Central Africa (Southern Rhodesia). 

WOMAN'S BOARD OF MISSIONS FOR THE PACIFIC (1873). 

Home Secretary: Mrs. W. J. Wilcox, 576 East 14th St., Oakland, California. 
. Foreign Secretary: Mrs. E. R. Wagner, 355 Reed St., San Jose, California. 
Object: To engage Christian women in systematic effort to evangelize the women 

of heathen lands by supporting women missionaries, native teachers, and Bible 

readers, through the agency of the American Board. 
Income: $12,452. (Included in the income of the American Board.) 
Organ: "Life and Light for Woman." 
Fields: Japan, China, Micronesia (Caroline Islands), Turkish Empire, Southern 

Central Africa (Southern Rhodesia). 

BOARD OF THE HAWAIIAN EVANGELICAL ASSOCIATION (1823). 

Secretary: Rev. William Brewster Oleson, Honolulu, Hawaiian Islands, 
Territory of Hawaii. 

Object: Mutual counsel and assistance in the great work of propagating 
the Gospel, and entering into common measures for promoting knowl- 
edge and the Christian religion by sending missionaries abroad, by 
establishing churches and pastors in the islands, by aiding schools of 
different kinds, and by printing and circulating Bibles, tracts, and 
books of such kinds as shall, in the opinion of the Association, be 
adapted to promote its objects. 



Income: $56,017. $8,500 of this amount is in the form of a grant from 
the American Missionary Association. 

Organ: "The Friend" (with Hawaiian and Japanese editions). 

Field: Hawaiian Islands (missionary work among Hawaiians, Portu- 
guese, Chinese, and Japanese). No work outside the Hawaiian Islands. 

(N9TB: The Board of the Hawaiian Evangelical Association was founded in 1823, and 
incorporated in 1863.) 

WOMAN'S BOARD OF MISSIONS FOR THE PACIFIC ISLANDS (1871). 

Recording Secretary: Miss Margaretta L. Shepley, 707 Wyllie St., Honolulu, Hawaii. 

Object: The evangelization of the heathen in Hawaii, and rendering aid to mis- 
sionary work in South Africa and China. 

Income: $6,439 (not included in the income of the Hawaiian Evangelical Associa- 
tion). 

Fields: China, South Africa, Hawaii. 

(NOTE: In affiliation with the Hawaiian Evangelical Association, but raising and 
expending its funds independently.) 

CONGREGATIONAL HOME MISSIONARY SOCIETY (1826). 
Honorary Secretary: Rev. Joseph B. Clark, D.D. 
General Secretary: Rev. Hubert C. Herring, D.D. 
Office Address: Fourth Avenue and Twenty-second St., New York City, 

New York. 

Object: Evangelistic work in the United States. 
Income: $319,854. 
Organ: "The American Missionary." 
Field: United States. (In 1908 Cuba was also among the fields. See 

note following.) 

(NOTE: The original name of this Society at the time of its organization, in 1826, was 
the American Home Missionary Society. It was then interdenominational, _ but 
in 1896 the name was changed to the Congregational Home Missionary Society. 
Its work has been almost exclusively within the United States, but in 1899 the 
charter was amended to authorize the extension of its operations to "the West 
India Islands," and a mission was subsequently opened in Cuba, with a reported 
disbursement, in 1909, of $9,626. That mission has recently passed under the 
care of the Presbyterian Board of Home Missions. Home missionary work, except 
that for Indians and Asiatic immigrants, is not recorded in this Atlas, but in view 
of the fact that the work of the Society in Cuba was being conducted under its 
auspices at the time (1908) represented by the data of the other societies in thia 
volume, it is included in the Directory.) 

AMERICAN MISSIONARY ASSOCIATION (1846). 
Corresponding Secretaries: Rev. C. J. Ryder, D.D., Rev. H. P. Douglass, 

D.D., 287 Fourth Ave., New York City, New York. 
Object: To conduct Christian missions and educational operations, and 

to diffuse a knowledge of the Holy Scriptures in the United States, and 

in other countries which are destitute of them, or which present open 

and urgent fields of effort. 
Income: $387,728. (Expended for work among American Indians and 

Asiatic immigrants, $54,048.) 
Organ: "The American Missionary." 
Fields: West Indies (Porto Rico), United States (including Alaska and 

Hawaii). 

(NOTE: There is a Bureau of Woman's Work, formed in 1883, which aids the American 
Missionary Association. The Secretary of this Bureau is Miss D. E. Emerson, 
287 Fourth Ave., New York City, New York.) 

DISCIPLES, OR CHRISTIANS: 

CHRISTIAN WOMAN'S BOARD OF MISSIONS (1874). 

President: Mrs. Anna R. Atwater, Missionary Training School, Indian- 
apolis, Indiana. 

Corresponding Secretary: Mrs. M. E. Harlan, Missionary Training School, 
Indianapolis, Indiana. 

Object: To maintain preachers and teachers for religious instruction; 
to encourage and cultivate a missionary spirit and missionary effort 
in the churches; to disseminate missionary intelligence; and to secure 
systematic contributions for such purposes; also to establish and 
maintain schools and institutions for the education of both males and 
females. 

Income: $218,444, inclusive of gifts from Jamaica, Mexico, India, Canada, 
Porto Rico, and New Zealand, amounting to $8,804, but not inclusive 
of tuition fees, government grants, etc. (Expended for work among 
non-Christians outside of the United States, $49,690, and for work 
among Asiatic immigrants in the United States, $8,405.) 

Organ: "Missionary Tidings." 

Fields: New Zealand, India, Western Africa (Liberia), Mexico, South 
America (Argentine Republic), West Indies (Jamaica, Porto Rico), 
United States, Canada. 

FOREIGN CHRISTIAN MISSIONARY SOCIETY (1875). 

Secretaries: Rev. F. M. Rains, Rev. Stephen J. Corey, Rev. E. W. Allen. 

Office Address: Box 884. Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Object: To make disciples of all nations, and teach them to observe all 
things whatsoever Christ has commanded. 

Income: $274,324. (Expended for work in Europe, Cuba, and Hawaiian 
Islands, $36,523.) 

Organ: "The Missionary Intelligencer." 

Fields: Japan, Chinese Empire. Philippine Islands, India, Turkish Em- 
pire, Africa (Belgian Congo), Europe, West Indies (Cuba), United 
States (Hawaiian Islands). 

(NOTE: The Church of the Disciples began foreign mission work in 1849, but the Foreign 
Christian Missionary Society was not organized in its present form until 1875.) 

EVANGELICAL: 

MISSIONARY SOCIETY OF THE EVANGELICAL ASSOCIATION (1838): 
Corresponding Secretary: Rev. T. C. Meckel, 237 West llth St., Erie, 

Pennsylvania. 
General Secretary: Rev. George Johnson, 1903 Woodland Ave., Cleveland, 

Ohio. 

Object: The conducting of home and foreign missions. 
Income : $260,438, of which $28,323 was disbursed for work in Japan and 

China. 

Organs: "Evangelischer Missionsbote," "Missionary Messenger." 
Fields: Japan, China, Europe, United States, Canada. 
(NOTE: Home missions were begun in 1838, but the work in Japan was not opened 

until 1875.) 

WOMAN'S MISSIONARY SOCIETY OF THE EVANGELICAL ASSOCIATION (1880). 
Secretary: Mrs. J. S. Miller, 228 Tenth Ave., Hutchinson. Kansas. 
Object: To help to bring the world to Christ. 
Income: $18,702. 
Organ: "Missionary Messenger." 
Fields: Japan, China, United States. 



United States 



DIRECTORY OF MISSIONARY SOCIETIES 



19 



HOME AND FOREIGN MISSIONARY SOCIETY OF THE UNITED EVAN- 

GELICAL CHURCH (1891). 

Secretary: Rev. B. H. Niebel, Penbrook, Dauphin Co., Pennsylvania. 
Object: To collect funds to extend and prosecute missionary labors, in 

home and foreign fields, to disseminate missionary information, and 

to stimulate missionary enthusiasm. 
Income: $116,438. (Income of the woman's auxiliary included.) 

Disbursed for foreign work, $30,434. 
Organ: "The Evangelical." 
Fields: China, United States. 

(NOTE: In addition to the work carried on in China, a missionary and his wife, 
connected with the Sudan United Mission, are supported through this Society.) 

WOMAN'S HOME AND FOREIGN MISSIONARY SOCIETY OF THE UNITED EVAN- 

GELICAL CHURCH (1891). 

Secretary: Mrs. Ida M. Hacfole, 228 Hobbs Avc., Joliet, Illinois. 
Object: Home and foreign missions. 
Income: $27,457. 
Organ: "Missionary Tidings." 
Fields: China, United States. 

EVANGELISTIC ASSOCIATIONS: 

PENIEL MISSIONARY SOCIETY (1895). 
Secretaries: Rev. T. P. Ferguson and Mrs. M. P. Ferguson, 227 South 

Main St., Los Angeles, California. 

Object: Mission work, as God shall lead, and as means shall be provided. 
Income: No statement at hand. 
Organ: "Peniel Herald." 
Fields: India, North Africa (Egypt), Mexico, Central America (Guatemala), 

South America (Argentine Republic, Bolivia), West Indies (Porto 

Rico), Alaska, Hawaii. 

PENTECOST BANDS OF THE WORLD (1896). 
Secretary: Mr. George E. Bula, 223 North New Jersey St., Indianapolis, 

Indiana. 
Object: Spreading the Gospel throughout the world; rescuing famine 

children in India, and training them for God and a life of usefulness. 
Income: No statement at hand. 
Organ: "The Herald of Light." 
Fields: India, North Africa (Egypt), Europe. 

PENTECOSTAL MISSIONARY UNION IN THE UNITED STATES OF 
AMERICA (1909). 

(NOTE: The Pentecostal Missionary Union during 1910 ceased to exist aa a missionary 
organization, but the missionaries formerly sent out by it are continuing to work 
along the same lines as advocated by the Union.) 

FRIENDS: 

ASSOCIATED EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE OF FRIENDS [ORTHODOX] ON 
INDIAN AFFAIRS (1869). 

Chairman and Correspondent: Mr. Edward M. Wistar, 704 Provident 
Bldg., Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Object: To unify and strengthen the missionary and philanthropic efforts 
of many Friends in the various "Yearly Meetings"; also to act as an 
intermediary between Indian tribes and the Federal Government at 
Washington, D. C., for the improvement, education, and ohristiani- 
zation of the Indians. 

Income: $5,500. 

Field: United States (Oklahoma.) 

FOREIGN MISSIONARY ASSOCIATION OF FRIENDS OF PHILADELPHIA 

(1882). 
Corresponding Secretary: Mrs. Margaret W. Haines, Cheltenham, Penn- 

sylvania. 
Object: To promote the knowledge of the Gospel in heathen lands, espe- 

cially among women and children, and to assist in the Christian education 

of the people of those lands. 
Income: $11,039 from home sources. 
Organ: "Quarterly of the Foreign Missionary Association of Friends of 

Philadelphia." 
Field: Japan. Assistance given to missions in India, Palestine, and 

Syria, under the care of other Friends' Boards. 

(NOTE: Organized in 1882, as the Women's Foreign Missionary Association of Friends 
of Philadelphia. In 1889 men were admitted to membership, and the word "Wo- 
men's" was dropped from the title.) 

FRIENDS' FOREIGN MISSIONARY SOCIETY OF OHIO YEARLY MEETING 

(1890). 
Corresponding Secretary: Miss Rachel Pirn, 176 W. Oxford St., Alliance, 

Ohio. 

Recording Secretary: Rev. George E. Kent, 163 E. High St., Salem, Ohio. 
Object: To increase interest in the cause of missions, and to promote 

the evangelization and Christian education of the Chinese, especially 

among the women and girls, and also missionary work among the 

North American Indians. 
Income: $8,516. (All from home sources, and all used for the foreign 

field.) 
Fields: China, India. 

AMERICAN FRIENDS' BOARD OF FOREIGN MISSIONS (1894). 

Secretary: Mr. Charles E. Tebbetts, 800 National Ave., Richmond, Indiana. 
Object: To unify the mission work of the Friends in foreign fields, and to 

administer that work in behalf of the Church. 
Income: From home churches, $82,361; from the foreign fields, $10,055; 

total, $92,416. These sums include the income for missions of all the 

"Yearly Meetings," and are in excess of the amount administered by 

the American Friends' Board of Foreign Missions. 
Organ: "Friends' Missionary Advocate." 
Fields: Japan, China, India, Palestine, Syria, British East Africa, Mexico, 

Central America (Guatemala), West Indies, Alaska. 



WOMAN'S FOREIGN MISSIONARY UNION OF FRIENDS IN AMERICA (1887). 
Corresponding Secretary: Mrs. Sarah J. King, Carmel, Indiana. 
Object: To interest the home Church in world evangelization, and in raising funds 

for that work. 
Income: $51,929. 
Fields: Those of the American Friends' Board of Foreign Missions. 

GERMAN EVANGELICAL: 

FOREIGN MISSION BOARD OF THE GERMAN EVANGELICAL SYNOD OF 

NORTH AMERICA (1865). 
Recording Secretary: Rev. Paul A. Menzel, 1920 G St., N. W., Washington, 

District of Columbia. 
General Secretary: Rev. Ernest Schmidt, 97 Huntington Ave., Buffalo, 

New York. 

Object: The evangelization of heathen peoples. 
Income: $27,183. 

Organs: "Fliegende Missions-Blatter," "Deutscher Missions-Freund." 
Field: India. 

LUTHERAN [EVANGELICAL]: 

(ENGLISH OR PENNSYLVANIA GERMANS.) 

BOARD OF FOREIGN MISSIONS OF THE GENERAL SYNOD OF THE 
EVANGELICAL LUTHERAN CHURCH IN THE UNITED STATES 
OF AMERICA (1869). 
General Secretary: Rev. L. B. Wolf, D.D., 21 West Saratoga St., Balti- 

more, Maryland. 

Object: The support of Christian missions to heathen lands. 
Income: $82,300. (Inclusive of $22,400 received from the Woman's 

Home and Foreign Missionary Society.) 
Organ: "Lutheran Church Work." 
Fields: India, Western Africa (Liberia). 

(NOTE: Early organization in 1836, but no missionary was sent to the foreign field 
until 1841. Reorganized as a Board of the Church in 1869.) 

WOMAN'S HOME AND FOREIGN MISSIONARY SOCIETY OF THE GENERAL 
SYNOD OF THE EVANGELICAL LUTHERAN CHURCH IN THE UNITED 
STATES OF AMERICA (1879). 

Corresponding; Secretary: Miss Mary Hay Morris, Lutherville, Maryland. 
Object: To coQperate with the Boards of Home and Foreign Missions, and of Church 

Extension, of the Evangelical Lutheran Church of the General Synod. 
Income: $50,000. (Expended for foreign missions, $22,400.) 
Organ: "Lutheran Woman's Work." 
Fields: India, Western Africa (Liberia), South America, United States. 

BOARD OF HOME MISSIONS OF THE GENERAL SYNOD OF THE EVAN- 
GELICAL LUTHERAN CHURCH IN THE UNITED STATES 
(1869). 
General Secretary: Rev. A. Stewart Hartman, D.D., 914 North Carroll- 

ton Ave., Baltimore, Maryland. 
Object: The support of the Home Mission work of the General Synod of 

the Evangelical Lutheran Church of the United States. 
Income: $157,390. As the reports presented are biennial, this sum 

represents the income for two years. 
Organ: "Lutheran Church Work." 
Fields: South America (Argentine Republic), United States. 

BOARD OF FOREIGN MISSIONS OF THE GENERAL COUNCIL OF THE 
EVANGELICAL LUTHERAN CHURCH IN NORTH AMERICA 
(1869). 
General Secretary: Rev. George Drach, 1219 South 46th St., Philadelphia, 

Pennsylvania. 
Object: To preach the Gospel, and to establish the Church among the 

Telugus in India, and among other non-Christian people. 
Income: $33,500, of which about $1,500 is from the mission fields. 
Organs: "Missionsbote," "The Foreign Missionary." 
Fields: Japan, India. 

WOMAN'S HOME AND FOREIGN MISSIONARY SOCIETY OF THE EVANGELICAL 

LUTHERAN MINISTERIUM OF PENNSYLVANIA (1895). 
Corresponding Secretary: Mrs. W. D. C. Keiter, 218 West Broad St., Bethlehem, 

Pennsylvania. 
Object: To increase the missionary activity of the women of the Church, to promote 

the organization of missionary societies in all the congregations of the Minis- 

terium, and to aid in home and foreign mission work. 
Income: From home sources, $5,255. (Of this amount $2,398 was appropriated 

to foreign missions, and $461 to Porto Rico,) . 
Organs: 'T"he Lutheran Mission Worker," "The Home Missionary," "The Foreign 

Missionary." 
Fields: Japan, India, West Indies (Porto Rico), United States. 

WOMAN'S HOME AND FOREIGN MISSIONARY SOCIETY OF THE EVANGELICAL 

LUTHERAN SYNOD OF NEW YORK AND NEW ENGLAND (1897). 
Corresponding Secretary: Mrs. F. A. Kahler, 998 Main St., Buffalo, New York. 
Object: The spreading of the Gospel at home and abroad. 
Income: $1,824, of which $1,330 was sent to the foreign field. 



Organ: "The Lutheran Mission Worker." 
Fields: 



: The date of organization of the American Friends' Board of Foreign Missions 
is 1894. The. foreign mission work of the Friends, however, dates as far back as 
1871, when the Indiana Yearly Meeting sent two missi9rmries to Mexico. Until 
1902^ the missions of the Friends of America were organized into fourteen distinct 
and independent bodies, or "Yearly Meetings," but in that year all of these, except 
the Ohio, Philadelphia, and Canada Yearly Meetings, came into organic union with 
the American Friends' Board of Foreign Missions. This central Board now reports 
as a. matter of information the missionary operations of all the Yearly Meetings 
of the denomination of Friends, but it does not indicate as within its own returns 
the mission work which is administered independently by any of these various 
Yearly Meetings.) 



. 
Japan, India, West Indies (Porto Rico), United States. 

WOMEN'S AID AND MISSIONARY SOCIETY OF THE EVANGELICAL LUTHERAN 

DISTRICT SYNOD OF OHIO (1899). 

Secretary: Mrs. E. M. Potts, 1938 Superior St., Toledo, Ohio. 
Object: The support of home and foreign missions. 
Income: $678. 
Fields: India, West Indies (Porto Rico), United States. 

WOMAN'S HOME AND FOREIGN MISSIONARY SOCIETY OF THE CENTRAL 
CONFERENCE OF THE ENGLISH EVANGELICAL LUTHERAN SYNOD OF 
THE NORTHWEST (1905). 

Secretary: Mrs. L. F. Gruber, 2910 Lyndale Ave., North, Minneapolis, Minnesota. 
Object: To develop within the congregations represented greater interest in the 
mission work of the Lutheran Church, by organizing auxiliary societies, holding 
missionary conventions, circulating missionary literature, and assisting generally 
in the work of the Home and Foreign Mission Boards. 
Income: $275. 
Fields: Japan, India, West Indies (Porto Rico), United States. 

WOMAN'S MISSIONARY SOCIETY OF THE CHICAGO SYNOD OF THE EVAN- 

GELICAL LUTHERAN CHURCH (1908). 

Corresponding Secretary: Mrs. James Ackley, 262 Clark St., Aurora, Illinois. 
Object: To cultivate the missionary spirit, to promote missionary intelligence, 
and to enlarge and unite the efforts of _the Christian women_of the Chicago Synod 
in supporting missions and missionaries in home and foreign fields. 
Income: $200. ($100 devoted to home missions, and $100 to foreign missions.) 
Organ: "The Lutheran Mission Worker." 
Fields: Japan, India, West Indies (Porto Rico), United States. 

WOMAN'S MISSIONARY SOCIETY OF THE PITTSBURG SYNOD OF THE GENERAL 

COUNCIL OF THE EVANGELICAL LUTHERAN CHURCH (1909)- 
Corresponding Secretary: Miss Annie L. Sheafer, 1003 Bluff St., Pittsburg, Penn^ 

sylvania. 

Object: To create and develop in the members of the Society, and in the various 
congregational and conference societies, an earnest interest in all the missionary 
operations of the Lutheran Church. 

Income: No statement.as the Society was only recently organized. 
Fields: Japan, India, West Indies (Porto Rico), United States. 



20 



WORLD ATLAS OF CHRISTIAN MISSIONS 



United States 



BOARD OF FOREIGN MISSIONS OF THE UNITED SYNOD OF THE 
EVANGELICAL LUTHERAN CHURCH IN THE SOUTH (1892). 
President and General Secretary: Rev. Robert 0. Holland, D.D., Orange- 
burg, South Carolina. 
Object: Foreign Missions. 
Income: $15,000 (exclusive of a special amount of $25,000 contributed 

for a mission school in Japan). 
Organ: "Lutheran Church visitor." 
Field: Japan. 

(NOTE: The Board of Foreign Missions was incorporated in 1909. It was formerly 
designated as the "Board of Missions and Church Extension of the United Synod 
of the Evangelical Lutheran Church of the South," which began its foreign missionary 
work in 1892. There are four synodical organizations kno'wn as Woman's Home 
and Foreign Missionary Societies, which cooperate with the Southern Lutheran 
Board.) 

PORTO RICO MISSION BOARD OF THE GENERAL COUNCIL OF THE 
EVANGELICAL LUTHERAN CHURCH IN NORTH AMERICA 
(1898). 
Secretary: Rev. J. L. Smith, D.D., 6024 Station St., E. E., Pittsburg, 

Pennsylvania. 

Object: Lutheran missionary work in Porto Rico. 
Income: $13.116. The Treasurer's report represents the income of two 

years, and must be divided in half to obtain the annual income. 
Field: West Indies (Porto Rico). 

(NORWEGIAN AMERICANS.) 
SYNOD FOR THE NORWEGIAN EVANGELICAL LUTHERAN CHURCH 

IN AMERICA (1853). 

Secretary: Rev. D. C. Jordahl, Norway Lake, Minnesota. 
Object: The extension of the Gospel among non-Christian people. 
Income: Amount for work among Eskimos and American Indians not 

stated; $4,000 was contributed toward the work of the Norwegian 

Church, or "Schreuder" Mission, in South Africa. 
Organs: "Evangelisk Luthersk Kirketidende," "The Lutheran Herald," 

"Borneblad," "Our Friend." 
Fields: Alaska (among the Eskimos), United States (among the American 

Indians). 

(NOTE: The Norwegian Evangelical Lutheran Synod was organiied in 1853. It has 
no independent foreign missionary work. Its mission among the United States 
Indians began in 1889, and that among the Eskimos in 1895.) 

INDIAN HOME MISSION TO THE SANTHALS (1867) 
(See under India.) 

AMERICAN COMMITTEE OF THE INDIAN HOME MISSION TO THE SANTHALS 

(1891). 

Secretary: Prof. J. H. Blegen, Augsburg Seminary, Minneapolis, Minnesota. 
Object: To work for the extension of God's Kingdom, especially among the Santhals, 

and the various tribes scattered in their vicinity. 
Income: $6,393. 
Organ: "Santhalmissionaeren." 
Field: India (Santhal Parganas, in Bengal, and Assam). 

(NOTE: The American Committee cooperates with similar Committees in Norway 
and Denmark.) 

UNITED NORWEGIAN EVANGELICAL LUTHERAN CHURCH OF 

AMERICA (1890). 
Secretary: Rev. M. Saeterlie, 2512 Eleventh Ave., South, Minneapolis, 

Minnesota. 

Object: Foreign missions, home missions, and general church work. 
Income: For foreign missions, $58,000. 
Organs: "The United Lutheran," "Lutheraneren." 
Fields: China, Madagascar. 

WOMEN'S HEATHEN MISSIONARY SOCIETY OF THE UNITED NORWEGIAN 

EVANGELICAL LUTHERAN CHURCH OF AMERICA (1902). 
Secretary: Mrs. T. H. Dahl, 3117 Park Ave., Minneapolis, Minnesota. 
Object: To aid in developing the mission fields of the United Norwegian Evangel- 
ical Lutheran Church of America. 
Income: $10,000. 



irgans: "Lutheraneren," " 
ields: China, Madagascar. 



The United Lutheran." 



Fie: 

HAUGES NORWEGIAN EVANGELICAL LUTHERAN SYNOD OF AMERICA 

(1891). 

Secretary: Prof. N. J. Loehre, Jewell, Iowa. 
Object: The building up of God's Kingdom on earth, especially in America 

and China. 

Income: For foreign missions, $24,529. 
Organ: "Budbaereren." 
Fields: China, United States, Canada. 
(NOTE: The Synod was founded in 1846; mission work began in China in 1891.) 

BOARD OF MISSIONS OF THE NORWEGIAN EVANGELICAL LU- 
THERAN FREE CHURCH (1895). 
Secretary: Prof. Andreas Holland, Augsburg Seminary, Minneapolis, 

Minnesota. 

Object: To send missionaries to heathen lands. 
Income: $12,500 from home sources. 
Organ: "Gasseren." 
Field: Madagascar. 

(NOTE: From 1895 to 1898, simply a Committee on Foreign Mission Work of the Lu- 
theran Free Church, usually known as "Friends of Augsburg"; in the latter 
year incorporated, under the name used above. The home office is located in Augs- 
burg Seminary, Minneapolis, Minnesota. The leading spirit in the founding of the 
Board, and its first Secretary, as well as the first editor of its official organ, 
"Gasseren," Prof. George Sverdrup, died May. 3, 1907. Lutheran Board of 
Missions is the title used for this entry in the Statistical Tables.) 

MISSION BOARD OF THE EVANGELICAL LUTHERAN NORWEGIAN 

BRETHREN (1905). 

Secretary: Prof. E. M. Broen, Wahpeton, North Dakota. 
Object: The evangelization of non-Christian peoples. 
Income: $5,580. 
Organ: "Broderbaandet." 
Field: Central China. 

(SWEDISH AMERICANS.) 

SWEDISH EVANGELICAL MISSION COVENANT OF AMERICA (i88s). 
Secretary: Rev. E. G. Hjerpe, 81 South Clark St., Chicago, Illinois. 
Object: The work of evangelization, charity, and education. 
Income: $49,926. 
Organ: "Missionaren." 
Fields: China, Alaska. 



SCANDINAVIAN ALLIANCE MISSION OF NORTH AMERICA (1891). 
Secretary: Rev. C. T. Dyrness, 2814 McLean Ave.,. Chicago, Illinois. 
Object: To encourage churches, societies, and individuals to send out 

and support missionaries in various foreign fields. 
Income: $30,000. 
Organ: "Trosvittnet." 

Fields: Japan, China (Mongolia), India, South Africa (Transvaal), South 
America (Venezuela). 

(NOTE: Auxiliary to the China Inland Mission in its missionary work in China.) 

SCANDINAVIAN ALLIANCE MISSION, SWEDISH SECTION (1900). 
(See under Sweden.) 

SWEDISH EVANGELICAL FREE CHURCH OF THE UNITED TATES 
OF NORTH AMERICA (1895). 

Secretary: Rev. Gust. F. Johnson, 1712 East State St., Rockford, Illinois. 
Object: The promotion of the cause of Christ in South China. 
Income: No statement at hand. 
Field: China (Canton). 

(NOTE: Formerly designated as the Swedish Evangelical Free Mission in America, 
but in 1908 the name was changed to the Swedish Evangelical Free Church of the 
United States of North America.) 

CHINA MISSIONARY SOCIETY OF THE AUGUSTANA SYNOD OF THE 
EVANGELICAL LUTHERAN CHURCH OF NORTH AMERICA 

(1902). 

Secretary: Rev. A. F. Aimer, 495 North St., St. Paul, Minnesota. 
Object: The evangelization of China. 
Income: $19,630. 
Organ: "Kinamissionen." 
Fields: Central China, Persia. 

WOMAN'S HOME AND FOREIGN MISSIONARY SOCIETY OF THE AUGUSTANA 
SYNOD, EVANGELICAL LUTHERAN CHURCH OF NORTH AMERICA 

(1892). 

Secretary: Mrs. Carl Swensson, Lindsborg, Kansas. 
Object: To further the cause of missions, Doth home and foreign. 
Income: $9,600. 
Organ: "Missions Tidning." 
Fields: China, India, West Indies (Porto Rico). 

(DANISH AMERICANS.) 

MISSION BOARD OF THE UNITED DANISH EVANGELICAL LUTHERAN 

CHURCH IN AMERICA (1892). 

Secretary: Pastor N. Hanson, 2211 28th Ave. South, Minneapolis, Minne- 
sota. 

Object: The evangelization of non-Christian people". 
Income: $4,919. 

Organ: "Dansk luthersk Kirkeblad." 
Fields: Japan, United States (American Indians in Oklahoma). 

(GERMAN AMERICANS.) 

COMMITTEE FOR FOREIGN MISSIONS OF THE EVANGELICAL LU- 
THERAN SYNOD OF MISSOURI, OHIO, AND OTHER STATES 
(1892). 

President: Prof. Dr. F. Pieper, Concordia Seminary, St. Louis, Missouri. 
Secretary: Rev. R. Biedermann, Indianapolis, Indiana. 
Secretary of the Committee: Mr. F. Zucker, Concordia College, Fort 

Wayne, Indiana. 

Object: Foreign Missions, in addition to synodical work. 
Income: $15,914, from home sources, for foreign missions, besides about 

$225,000 for home missions. 
Organ: Articles in "Der Lutheraner." 
Field: India. 

(NOTE: The Committee for Foreign Missions was appointed in 1892. First missionary 
sent to India in 1894.) 

INDIAN COMMISSION OF THE GENERAL SYNOD OF WISCONSIN, 

MINNESOTA, MICHIGAN, AND OTHER STATES (1893). 
Secretary: Rev. Gustav E. Bergemann, 52 East First St., Fond du Lac, 

Wisconsin. 

Object: To christianize the Apache Indians. 
Income: $5,468. 

Organ: "Evangelisch-lutherisches Gemeindeblatt." 
Field: United States (Arizona). 

(INTERSYNODICAL AND INTERNATIONAL.) 
AMERICAN INTERSYNODICAL EVANGELICAL LUTHERAN ORIENT 

SOCIETY FOR MISSION WORE AMONG MOHAMMEDANS 

(1908). 

Secretary: Rev. John Telleen, D.D., Berwyn (near Chicago), Illinois. 
Object: Evangelical Lutheran mission work among Mohammedans. 
Income: No statement at hand. 
Organ: "The Kurdistan Missionary." 
Fields: Persia, Kurdistan. 
(NOTE: Started in 1908, and organization perfected 1910, at Chicago.) 

MENNONITE: 

BOARD OF FOREIGN MISSIONS OF THE GENERAL CONFERENCE OF 

THE MENNONITES OF NORTH AMERICA (1880). 
Secretary: Rev. A. B. Shelly, Quakertown, Pennsylvania. 
Object: Bringing the heathen to Christ, and ministering to their spiritual 

and physical needs. 
Income : $17,833, of which $5,667 was for work in India, and the remainder 

for work among the American Indians. 
Organ: "The Mennonite." 
Fields: India, United States. 

(NOTE: The General Conference of the Mennonites of North America was organized 
in 860. Its home missionary work was begun in 1880, and its foreign mission in 
India, in 1900. The Board has seven mission stations among the Indians of the 
United States.) 

MENNONITE BRETHREN IN CHRIST (1883). 
Secretaries: For names and addresses of Secretaries of the Conferences 

of the Mennonite Brethren in Christ, see note following. 
Object: The evangelization of the world. 
Income: $21,500. 
Organ: "Gospel Banner." 

Fields: Turkejr (Asia Minor), Tibet, Western Africa (Northern Nigeria), 
South America (Chile). 



United States 



DIRECTORY OF MISSIONARY SOCIETIES 



21 



(NOTE: The date 1883 represents the organization of the first Foreign Mission 
Board of the denomination, that of its Pennsylvania Conference. There are 
seven Conferences comprising the Mennonite Brethren in Christ, five in the 
United States and two in Canada. All of these Conference_s arc actively en- 
gaged in missionary work. Each Conference has its own Foreign Missi9n Board, 
ana, as far as organization and operation are concerned, each Board acts ind_epend- 
ently of the others. Most of these Boards also carry on missionary work in con- 
nection or in cooperation with other missionary societies, some supporting 
missionaries through the Christian and Missionary Alliance, while all are interested 
more or less in the United Orphanage and Alission operating in Turkey, Asia Minor. 
The Conferences are located as follows: 

1. Pennsylvania Conference: Secretary: Rev. C. H. Brunner, Bethlehem, Pennsyl- 
vania. Fields: South America (Chile), twelve missionaries^ Tibet, _tnree 
missionaries. These are in connection with the Christian and Missionary Alliance. 
Turkey, Asia Minor (Hadjin), one missionary. This Conference supports one 
missionary on the foreign field to every ninety members in the home churches, 
contributing an average of $4.40 per member annually for foreign missions 
alone. Organized in 1883. 

. 2. Ontario Conference: Secretary: Rev. Samuel Goudie, Stpuffville, Ontario, Canada. 
Fields: Western Africa (Nigeria), India, Turkey (Hadjin). 

3. Alberta Conference: Secretary: Rev. Henry Goudie, Castor, Alberta, Canada. 
Field: Turkey (Hadjin). 

4. Michigan Conference: Secretary: Rev. William G^aybiel, Port Huron, Michigan. 
Field: Turkey (Hadjin). 

5. Indiana and Ohio Conference: Secretary: Rev. A. B. Yoder, Bronson, Michigan, 
Field: Turkey (Hadjin). 

6. Pacific Conference: Secretary: Rev. J. G. Grout, Ferndale, Washington. Fields: 
Turkey (Hadjin), South America (Chile). 

. 7. Nebraska Conference: Secretary: Rev. Jacob Hygema, Trenton, Iowa. Field: 
South Africa (Natal).) 

MENNONITE BOARD OF MISSIONS AND CHARITIES (1899). 
Secretary: Bishop J. S. Shoemaker, Freeport, Illinois. 
Object: The establishment and support of home and foreign missions; 

also philanthropic work among the needy. 
Income: From home sources $95,000; from the foreign field, $3,000; 

total, $98,000. Of this amount $30,000 was expended for work in 

India. 

Organs: "The Gospel Herald," "The Christian Monitor." 
Fields: India, United States. 

(NOTE: The Mennonite Board of Missions and Charities was incorporated in 1006. 
The foreign mission in India was begun in 1899. The gifts for missions of the 
Amish Branch of the Mennonites are made through the Mennonite Board of Mission! 
and Charities.) 

METHODIST: 

BOARD OF FOREIGN MISSIONS OF THE METHODIST EPISCOPAL 
CHURCH (1819). 

Corresponding Secretary: Rev. Adna B. Leonard, LL.D. 

First Assistant Corresponding Secretary: Rev. Homer C. Stuntz, D.D. 

Office Address: 150 Fifth Ave., New York City, New York. 

Object: To diffuse more generally the blessings of Christianity, by the 
promotion and support of Christian missions and educational insti- 
tutions in foreign countries, and also in other places subject to the 
sovereignty of the United States which are not on the continent of 
North America, or on the islands adjacent thereto. 

Income: $1,357,336. (Not inclusive of the income of the Woman's 
Foreign Missionary Society.) Of this income, $308,913 was appro- 
priated for work in Mexico, South America, and Europe. 

Organ: "World-Wide Missions." 

Fields: Japan, Korea, China, British Malaysia, Dutch East Indies, Philip- 
pine Islands, India, North- west Africa (Tunis, Algeria, Madeira Islands), 
Western Africa (Liberia), South-west Africa (Angola), Southern Cen- 
tral Africa (Southern Rhodesia), Portuguese East Africa, Mexico, 
South America (Argentine Republic, Bolivia, Chile, Ecuador, Panama, 
Paraguay, Peru, Uruguay), Europe. 

(NOTE: Formerly known as the Missionary Society of the Methodist Episcopal Church- 
In 1904 the home work of the Missionary Society was transferred by the General 
Conference to the Board of Home Missions and Church Extension of the Methodist 
Episcopal Church, thereupon constituted by the merging of this home mission 
work with that of the Church Extension Society of the Methodist Episcopal Church. 
The Board of Foreign Missions began its work under the revised charter of incor- 
poration in 1906. A Laymen's Missionary Movement, in charge of Messrs. S. Earl 
Taylor and C. V. Vickrey as Secretaries, is active in connection with the Meth- 
odist Episcopal Church.) 

WOMAN'S FOREIGN MISSIONARY SOCIETY OF THE METHODIST EPISCOPAL 
CHURCH (1860). 

Secretary: Mrs. 0. W. Barnes, Postoria, Ohio. 

Office Secretary: Miss Elizabeth Bender, 150 Ftfth Ave., New York City, N. Y. 

Object: To send missionaries to the women in the foreign mission fields of the 
Methodist Episcopal Church. 

Income: $639,818. (Of this amount about $66,000 was expended for work in 
Mexico, South America, and Europe.) 

Organ: "Woman's Missionary Friend." 

Fields: Japan, Korea, China, British Malaysia, Philippine Islands, India, South-west 
Africa (Angola), Southern Central Africa (Southern Rhodesia), Mexico, South 
America (Argentine Republic, Peru, Uruguay), Europe (Bulgaria, Italy, Ger- 
many, Switzerland.) 

BOARD OF HOME MISSIONS AND CHURCH EXTENSION OF THE METHO- 
DIST EPISCOPAL CHURCH (1904). 
Corresponding Secretary: Rev. Robert Forbes, D.D. 
Assistant Corresponding Secretaries: Rev. Ward Platt, D.D., Rev. Charles 

M. Boswell, D.D. 

Office Address: 1026 Arch St., Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 
Object: The prosecution of missionary and church extension work in 

the United States, with its territories and insular possessions. 
Income: $1,072,885. (Of this amount $39,890 was appropriated for 

work among Asiatic immigrants, and $9,457 for work among American 

Indians. The income of the Woman's Home Missionary Society is not 

included in the total.) 
Organ: "The Christian Republic." 
Fields: The United States and its territories and insular possessions, also 

State of Sonora, Mexico. 

(NOTE: The Missionary Society of the Methodist Episcopal Church, organized in 1819, 
devoted its attention to missions in the United States until 1833, when its first 
foreign missionary was sent to Liberia. The Society continued to do both home 
and foreign work until 1904, when the home work was transferred to the Board 
of Home Missions and Church Extension then constituted by the General Conference. 
The Church Extension Society of the Methodist Episcopal Church was organized 
in 1865. The Board of Home Missions and Church Extension began its work as an 
incorporated society in 1906.) 

WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY SOCIETY OF THE METHODIST EPISCOPAL 

CHURCH (1880). 

Secretary: Mrs. Delia L. Williams, Delaware, Ohio. 
Object: To organize educational and missionary work in all sections of the United 

States. 
Income: $354,571. (Appropriations for work among Asiatic immigrants, $14,850; 

for work among Eskimos and American Indians, $15,835.) 
Organ: "Woman's Home Missions." 
Field: United States, inclusive of Alaska and Porto Rico. 

PRIMITIVE METHODIST MISSIONARY SOCIETY (1842)0 
(See under England.) 



AMERICAN AUXILIARY OF THE PRIMITIVE METHODIST FOREIGN MISSIONARY 

SOCIETY (1896). 

Secretary: Rev. S. T. Nicholls, 2537 West Lehigh Ave., Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 
Object: To codperate with the Primitive Methodist Church of England in the 

evangelizing of Africa. 
Income: $600. 
Field: Africa. 

PARENT HOME AND FOREIGN MISSIONARY SOCIETY OF THE AFRICAN 
METHODIST EPISCOPAL CHURCH (1844). 

Secretary: Rev. William Wesley Beckett, D.D., 61 Bible House, New 
York City, New York. 

Object: To disseminate the religion of the Lord Jesus Christ among non- 
Christians, and to foster Christian education at home and in foreign 
fields. 

Income: $35,000. The income of both women's auxiliaries is included 
in the total, also the sums for missions raised and disbursed within 
the bounds of the various conferences at home and abroad. 

Organ: "The Voice of Missions." 

Fields: Western Africa (Liberia, Sierra Leone. Gold Coast), South Africa 
(Cape Colony, Transvaal. Orange Free State, Basutoland), South 
America (British Guiana), West Indies, Bermudas, United States, 
Canada. 

WOMEN'S PARENT MITE MISSIONARY SOCIETY OF THE AFRICAN METHODIS1 

EPISCOPAL CHURCH (1872). 

Corresponding Secretary: Miss M. S. C. Beckett, Holmesburg, Pennsylvania. 
Object: To assist the Parent Home and Foreign Missionary Society in providing 

means for the support of the missionaries in the home and foreign fields. 
Income: $2,905. 

Organ: "The Women's Missionary Recorder." 
Fields: Those of the Parent Society. 

WOMEN'S HOME AND FOREIGN MISSIONARY SOCIETY OF THE AFRICAN METH- 
ODIST EPISCOPAL CHURCH (1892). 
President: Mrs. Laura Lemon Turner. 
Secretary: Mrs. Florence L. Hadley. 
Office Address: 30 Yonge St., Atlanta, Georgia. 
Object: To assist the Parent T3.ome and Foreign Missionary Society in providing 

means for the support of missionaries in the home and foreign fields. 
Income: $1,931. 

Organ: "The Women's Missionary Recorder." 
Fields: Those of the Parent Society. 

BOARD OF MISSIONS OF THE METHODIST EPISCOPAL CHURCH. 
SOUTH (1846). 

General Secretary: Rev. W. W. Pinson, D.D. 

Foreign Missions Secretaries: Rev. E. F. Cook, D.D., Mrs. J. B. Cobb. 

Home Missions Secretaries: Rev. J. M. Moore, D.D., Mrs. R. W. Mac- 
DonelL 

Educational Secretaries: Rev. E. H. Rawlings, D.D., Miss Mabel Head. 

Editorial Secretary: Mrs. A. L. Marshall. 

Office Address: 810 Broadway, Nashville, Tennessee. 

Object: Evangelistic, educational, and medical missions. 

Income: $766,716 (inclusive of $226,193 received through the Woman's 
Foreign Missionary Society). Of this total $727,730 came from home 
sources, and $38,986 was collected on the foreign fields. Appropriations 
for work in Mexico, Brazil, and Cuba amounted to $141,217. 

Organs: "Go Forward," "The Missionary Voice." 

Fields: Japan, Korea, China, South America (Brazil), Mexico, West 
Indies (Cuba), United States (including American Indians, Asiatic 
Immigrants, and Jews). 

(NOTE: The Woman's Foreign Missionary Society of the Methodist Episcopal Church, 
South, and also the Woman's Home Mission Society of that Church, have now, in 
connection with a recent organization of the Board of Missions, been merged into 
a Woman's Council, which acts as a constituent part of the eonsolidatecT Board, 
having a full and active share in its administration.) 

GENERAL MISSIONARY BOARD OF THE FREE METHODIST CHURCH 
OF NORTH AMERICA (1882). 

Secretary: Rev. B. Winget, 1132 Washington Boulevard, Chicago, 
Illinois. 

Object: Foreign and home missionary work. 

Income: $53,243. (Of this amount $33,703 was received from the Wo- 
man's Foreign Missionary Society.) Disbursements for work among 
non-Christians exceed $45,000. 

Organ: "The Free Methodist." 

Fields: Japan, China, India, Ceylon, South Africa (Cape Colony, Natal, 
Transvaal), Portuguese East Africa, West Indies (Santo Domingo), 
United States. 

WOMAN'S FOREIGN MISSIONARY SOCIETY OF THE FREE METHODIST CHURCH 
(1894). 

Corresponding Secretary: Mrs. Ella L. MacGeary, 31 Pleasant St., Bradford, Penn- 
sylvania. 

Object: To secure systematic contributions for foreign missions, to disseminate 
missionary intelligence, and to encourage missionary effort in the Free Methodist 
Church. 

Income: $39,002. 

Organ: "Missionary Tidings." 

Fields: Those of the General Missionary Board of the Free Methodist Church. 

BOARD OF FOREIGN MISSIONS OF THE METHODIST PROTESTANT 

CHURCH (1888). 

Secretary: Rev. Fred C. Klein, 316 N. Charles St., Baltimore, Maryland. 
Object: Foreign missionary work, both evangelistic and educational. 
Income: $23,889. 
Organ: "Methodist Recorder." 
Field: Japan. 

(NOTE: Foreign work was begun in 1880, under a combined Home and Foreign Board, 
but the Board of Foreign Missions was not organized until 1888.) 

WOMAN'S FOREIGN MISSIONARY SOCIETY OF THE METHODIST PROTESTANT 

CHURCH (1879). 

Secretary: Mrs. D. S. Stephens, 802 North Seventh St., Kansas City, Kansas. 
Object: To promote and extend the organized work of missions, and to aid in 

educating and christianizing heathen women and children. 
Income: $22,866. 

Organ: "The Woman's Missionary Record. 
Fields: Japan, China. 

MISSIONARY SOCIETY OF THE WESLEYAN METHODIST CONNECTION 

OF AMERICA (1889). 

Secretary: Rev. Eber Teter, Sheridan, Indiana (Home Address). 
Office Address: 316 East Onondaga St., Syracuse, New York. 
Object: To carry on the work of missions at home and abroad. 
Income: $15,000. 
Organ: "Wesleyan Methodist." ^ 

Fields: India, Western Africa (Sierra Leone), United States, Canada. 
(NOTE: The Church was organized in 1863, but foreign work was not begun until 1889.) 



22 



WORLD ATLAS OF CHRISTIAN MISSIONS 



United States 



MISSIONARY SOCIETY OF THE AFRICAN METHODIST EPISCOPAL 

ZION CHURCH (1892). 

Secretary: Rev. R. A. Morrisey, D.D., 420 South Eleventh St., Phila- 
delphia, Pennsylvania. 
Object: To aid in christianizing the people of America, and of foreign 

fields. 

Income: $18,000. 
Organ: "The Missionary Seer." 
Fields: Western Africa (Gold Coast), West Indies, United States. 

WOMAN'S HOME AND FOREIGN MISSIONARY SOCIETY, AFRICAN METHODIST 

EPISCOPAL ZION CHURCH (1880). 

Corresponding Secretary: Mrs. A. W. Blackwell, 624 South Sixteenth St., Phila- 
delphia, Pennsylvania. 

Object: To assist in raising the missionary funds of the denomination. 
Income: $1,200. 
Organ: "The Missionary Seer." 

Fields: Western Africa (Gold Coast), South America (British Guiana), West Indies, 
United States. 

(NOTE: There is also a Young Women's Home and Foreign Missionary Society, 
formed in 1908, of which Miss Victoria Richardson, Salisbury, North Carolina, ia 
Secretary.) 

DIRECTORS OF THE METHODIST PUBLISHING HOUSE IN CHINA 

(1904). 
Secretary of the Board of Directors: Rev. O. E. Brown, D.D., Nashville, 

Tennessee. 

Object: To further the interests of the Methodist Publishing House in 
China, located at Shanghai and Foochow, which represents the Meth- 
odist Episcopal Church and the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. 
Income: No statement at hand. 
Field: China. 

MORAVIAN: 

MISSION DER BRUDERGEMEINE [MORAVIAN MISSIONS] (1732). 
(See under Germany.) 

SOCIETY OF THE UNITED BRETHREN FOR PROPAGATING THE GOSPEL AMONG 
THE HEATHEN (1745). 

President: Bishop M. W. Leibert, D.D., 112 Lexington Ave., New York City, New 
York. 

Vice-president and Treasurer: Rev. Paul de Schweinitz, D.D., 20 Church St., Beth- 
lehem, Pennsylvania. 

Secretary: Bishop O. L. Moench, D.D., 20 Church St., Bethlehem, Pennsylvania. 

Object: Missions among the Indians of California and the Eskimos of Alaska, and 
cooperation in the support of Moravian Missions in general. 

Income: $14,000. (Of this amount about $9,000 is appropriated to Alaska; 
$3,000 to California, and the balance to general mission causes of the Moravian 
Church.) 

Organ: "The Moravian." 

Fields: United States (Alaska, California), and the fields of the Moravian Church, 

(NOTE: The name as given above is the corporate title of the Missionary Society 
of the Northern Province of the Moravian Church in America; organized 1745; 
reorganized 1787; incorporated under above title, 1788. In organic connection 
with the International Mission Board of the Moravian Church as a whole, having 
its office in Germany. See under Germany.) 

PENTECOSTAL CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE: 

GENERAL MISSIONARY BOARD OF THE PENTECOSTAL CHURCH OF 

THE NAZARENE (1897). 
General Missionary Secretary: Rev. H. F. Reynolds, 300 West Sixty-fifth 

St., Chicago, Illinois. 
Object : Foreign and home missions. 
Income: $16,000. 

Fields: Japan, India, South Africa (Natal), Cape Verde Islands, Mexico, 
United States, Canada. 

PRESBYTERIAN: 

BOARD OF HOME MISSIONS OF THE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH IN THE 

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA (1802). 
Secretary: Rev. Charles L. Thompson, D.D., LL.D. 
Associate Secretaries: Rev. John Dixon, D.D., Mr. Joseph Ernest McAfee. 
Office Address: 156 Fifth Ave., New York City, New York. 
Object: To establish churches and schools which shall spread the Gospel 

of Christ. 
Income: $991,230. (Includes the receipts of the Woman's Board of 

Home Missions. Disbursements for work among American Indians 

amounted in 1909 to $35,610.) 
Organ: "The Assembly Herald." 
Fields: West Indies (Cuba, Porto Rico), United States (including Alaska). 

WOMAN'S BOARD OF HOME MISSIONS OF THE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH IN 
THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA (1878). 

Secretary: Miss Julia Fraser, 156 Fifth Ave_., New York City, New York. 
Object: To establish churches and schools in the United States of America. 
Income: $479,664. Disbursements in 1909 for work among American Indians, 

Alaskans, Porto Ricans, and Cubans, $155,085. 
Organ: "Home Mission Monthly." 
Fields: West Indies (Cuba, Porto Rico), United States (including Alaska). 

BOARD OF FOREIGN MISSIONS OF THE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH IN 
THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA (1837). 

Secretaries: Robert E. Speer, M.A., D.D., Rev. Arthur J. Brown, D.D., 
Rev. A. Woodruff Halsey, D.D., Rev. Stanley White, D.D. 

Office Address: 156 Fifth Ave., New York City, New York. 

Object: The establishing and conducting of Christian missions among 
the unevangelized or pagan nations, and the general diffusion of 
Christianity. 

Income: $1,314,214. (Of this amount $379,563 was received through 
the women's boards, and the young people's societies. The dis- 
bursements for work in Mexico, Central America, and South America 
amounted to $174,219.) 

Organ: "The Assembly Herald." 

Fields: Japan, Korea, China, Siam and Laos, Philippine Islands, India, 
Persia, Syria, South-west Africa (Kamerun, Rio Muni, French 
Congo), Mexico, Central America (Guatemala), South America (Brazil, 
Chile, Colombia, Venezuela), Chinese, Japanese, and Koreans in the 
United States. 

(NOTE: This Board has six women's auxiliary societies whose object it is to aid the 
Board by promoting its work among the women and children of heathen lands, 
and for this purpose to organize and foster women's and young people's societies 
within that part 9f the United States regarded by each as its territory. These 
women's auxiliaries have as their mission fields those of the Board of Foreign 
Missions of the Presbyterian Church in the United States of America. They 
have a common organ, "Woman's Work." Accordingly, the names of the auxil- 
iaries, with the secretary, and the full income of each society, are given below, 
without duplicating the information concerning object, organ, or fields. The 



Cumberland Presbyterian Church united with the Presbyterian Church in the 
United States of America in 1905, and all of its foreign mission work has been 
transferred to the care of the Board of Foreign Missions of the Presbyterian 
Church in the United States of America, In the amount given above as income 
from the Women's Boards is an item of $4,200 from the Woman's Board of 
Missions of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church.) 

WOMAN'S FOREIGN MISSIONARY SOCIETY OF THE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 

(1870). 
Secretary: Mrs. William Watters, 601 Witherspoon Bldg., Walnut St., Philadelphia, 

Pennsylvania. 
Income: $189,162. ($170,030 disbursed through the Parent Board.) 

WOMAN'S PRESBYTERIAN BOARD OF MISSIONS OF THE NORTHWEST (1870). 

a, Illir ' 



Corresponding Secretary: Mrs. W. G. Craig, 328 Wabash Ave., Chicago, 
Income: $103,346. ($86,665 disbursed through the Parent Board.) 



Illinois. 



WOMEN'S BOARD OF FOREIGN MISSIONS OF THE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH, 

KW YORK (1870). 
Recording Secretary: Miss Mary L. Blakeman, 156 Fifth Ave., New York City, New 

York. 
Income: $79,306. ($76,197 disbursed through the Parent Board.) 

WOMAN'S OCCIDENTAL BOARD OF FOREIGN MISSIONS OF THE PRESBYTERIAN 

CHURCH, U. S. A. (1873)- 
Corresponding Secretary: Mrs. L. A. Kelley, 920 Sacramento St., San Francisco, 

California. 
Income: $18,816. ($16,646 disbursed through the Parent Board.) 

WOMAN'S PRESBYTERIAN BOARD OF FOREIGN MISSIONS OF THE SOUTHWEST 

(1877). 

Recording Secretary: Mrs. C. A. Rosebrough, 415 Locust St., St. Louis, Missouri. 
Income: $26,162. ($20,408 disbursed through the Parent Board.) 

WOMAN'S NORTH PACIFIC PRESBYTERIAN BOARD OF MISSIONS (1888). 
Recording Secretary: Mrs. Homer C. Campbell, 421 Carter St., Portland, Oregon. 
Income: $14,378. ($5,417 disbursed through the Parent Board.) 

BOARD OF FOREIGN MISSIONS OF THE SYNOD OF THE REFORMED 
PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH IN THE UNITED STATES OF AMERI- 
CA [COVENANTER] (1856). 
Secretary: Rev. R. M. Sommerville, D.D., 325 West Fifty-sixth St., New 

York City, New York. 
Object: The salvation of individual souls, and the reformation of society 

in non-Christian and in nominally Christian lands. 
Income: $42,928 from home sources. 
Organ: "Olive Trees." 
Fields: China, Turkish Empire (Northern Syria, Asia Minor, Cyprus). 

BOARD OF FOREIGN MISSIONS OF THE UNITED PRESBYTERIAN 

CHURCH OF NORTH AMERICA (1859). 
Corresponding Secretary: Rev. Charles R. Watson. D.D. 
Associate Secretary: Rev. William B. Anderson. 
Office Address: 200 N. Fifteenth St., Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 
Object: The prosecution of foreign missionary work among unevangel- 
ized people. 
Income: $306,197. 
Fields: India (Punjab), North Africa (Egypt, Egyptian Sudan). 

WOMEN'S GENERAL MISSIONARY SOCIETY OF THE UNITED PRESBYTERIAN 

CHURCH OF NORTH AMERICA (1883). 

Recording Secretary: Mrs. J. D. Sands, 123 Roup St., Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. 
Object: Missionary work in home and foreign lands. 

Income: $141,553. ($68,732, included in the income of Board of Foreign Missions. 
Disbursements for foreign missions, $75,035; for work among American Indians, 
$5,106). 

Organ: "Women's Missionary Magazine." 
Fields: India, North Africa (Egypt, Egyptian Sudan), United States. 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE OF FOREIGN MISSIONS OF THE PRESBY- 
TERIAN CHURCH IN THE UNITED STATES (1861). 
Corresponding Secretary: Rev. S. H. Chester, D.D., First National Bank 

Building, Nashville, Tennessee. 

Object: The dissemination and establishment of Christianity. 
Income: $323,878. Disbursements for work in Mexico, Brazil, and 

Cuba, $62,079. 
Organ: "The Missionary." 
Fields: Japan, Korea, China, South-west Africa (Belgian Congo), 

Mexico, South America (Brazil), West Indies (Cuba). 

(NOTE: Women's work in connection with this Committee of Foreign Missions is repre- 
sented by sixty-nine Women's Presbyterial Unions, which render efficient aid 
as auxiliaries to the missionary work of their Church.) 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE OF HOME MISSIONS OF THE PRESBYTERIAN 

CHURCH IN THE UNITED STATES (1861). 

Secretary: Rev. S. L. Morris, D.D., P. O. Drawer H, Atlanta, Georgia. 
Object: To assist the needier sections of the Presbyterian Church in the 

United States. 
Income: $71,133. (Disbursements for work among American Indians 

not separately stated.) 
Organ: "The Home Mission Herald." 
Field: United States. 

CENTRAL BOARD OF MISSIONS OF THE REFORMED PRESBYTERIAN 

CHURCH (1864). 

Secretary: Mr. A. C. Coulter, 331 Fourth Ave., Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. 
Object: To maintain missions among the Negroes, the American 

Indians, and Chinese immigrants. 
Income: For work among American Indians', $7,135; for work among 

Chinese immigrants, $1,046; for work among Negroes, $8,715; total, 

$16,896. 

Organ: "The Christian Nation." 
Field: United States. 

MISSIONARY SOCIETY OF THE CALVINISTIC METHODIST CHURCH 

IN THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA (1869). 
Secretary: Rev. Joshua T. Evans, 2002 Elliot Ave., Minneapolis, Minnesota. 
Object: Missionary work at home and abroad. 

Income: For foreign work, $4,327; for home work, $4,683; total, $9,010. 
Organ: "Y Cyfaill" (The Friend). 
Fields: India, United States, Canada. 



(NOTE: Organized in 1869; incorporated in 1895; and in cooperation with the For- 
eign Missions of the Welsh Calvinistic Methodists ' 



i until 1905.) 



BOARD OF FOREIGN MISSIONS OF THE ASSOCIATE REFORMED 

SYNOD OF THE SOUTH (1873). 

Secretary: Rev. G. G. Parkinson, Due West, South Carolina. 
Object: The extension of the Gospel in foreign mission lands. 
Income: $12,327. 

Organ: "The Associate Reformed Presbyterian." 
Fields: India, Mexico. 



United States 



DIRECTORY OF MISSIONARY SOCIETIES 



ASSOCIATE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH (1882). 
Clerk of Synod: Rev. H. A. Atchison, Albia, Iowa. 
Object: To assist in the mission work of the Synod of the United Original 

Secession Church of Scotland. 
Income: $641. 
Field: India. 

(NOTE: The Associate Presbyterian Church is an offshoot from the Associate Synod 
of North America. The Synod in 1858 became identified with the United Pres- 
byterian Church, but a few ministers connected with it were not favorable to this 
union, and separated themselves to continue the Associate Presbyterian Church. 
The foreign missionary work of this denomination is in cooperation with the United 
Original Secession Church of Scotland, which see under Scotland, to which contribu- 
tions were sent in 1908, amounting to 132, or $041.) 

PROTESTANT EPISCOPAL: 

DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN MISSIONARY SOCIETY OF THE PROTESTANT 
EPISCOPAL CHURCH IN THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA 

(1820). 

President of the Board of Missions: Rt. Rev. A. S. Lloyd, D.D. 

Secretaries: Mr. John W. Wood, Rev. H. L. Burleson. 

Associate Secretary: Rev. Joshua Kimber. 

Office Address: Church Missions House, 281 Fourth Ave., New York 
City, New York. 

Object: The conduct of general missionary operations in all lands. 

Income: From home sources, for foreign missions, $725,499; from the 
foreign field, $2,769: total, $728,268. Of this amount $98,283 was 
appropriated for work in Mexico, Brazil. Cuba, and Haiti. Income 
for domestic missions, $736,717, of which $77,651 was appropriated 
for work among American Indians, $4,370 for work among Asiatic im- 
migrants, and $23,227 for work among natives and Chinese in the 
Philippine Islands. 

Organ: "The Spirit of Missions." 

Fields: Japan, China, Philippine Islands, Western Africa (Liberia), 
Mexico, South America (Brazil), West Indies, the United States of 
America, and its outlying possessions. 

(NOTE: Founded in 1820; reorganized in 1835. The American Church Missionary 
Society transferred to the Board of Missions, in 1905, its work in Cuba and Brazil, 
and now confines its attention to domestic missions.) 

WOMAN'S AUXILIARY TO THE BOARD OF MISSIONS OF THE DOMESTIC AND 
FOREIGN MISSIONARY SOCIETY OF THE PROTESTANT EPISCOPAL 
CHURCH IN THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA (1871). 
Secretary: Miss Julia C. Emery, Church Missions House. 281 Fourth Ave., New 

York City, New York. 

Object: To aid the Board of Missions in all its departments. 

Income: $487,990. (This sum represents $300,849 which passed through the 
treasury of the parent board, and $187,141 in value of boxes forwarded by the 
Woman's Auxiliary to various fields, home and foreign ) 
Organ: A portion of "The Spirit of Missions." 

Fields: Those of the Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society of the Protestant 
Episcopal Church. 

CHURCH STUDENTS' MISSIONARY ASSOCIATION (1887). 

(NOTE: The former missionary operations of this Association are now conducted 
under the Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society of the Protestant Episcopal 
Church, as its student work. The previous organization has passed out of 
existence, and its line of service is under the charge of the Student Secretaries 
of the Board.) 

REFORMED: 

BOARD OF FOREIGN MISSIONS OF THE REFORMED CHURCH IN 

AMERICA [DUTCH] (1832). 
Secretaries: Rev. Wm. I. Chamberlain, Ph.D.; Western District, Rev 

Wm. J. Van Kersen, Holland, Michigan. 

Office Address: 25 East Twenty-second St., New York City, New York. 
Object: The extension of the Gospel in foreign lands. 
Income: $197,468. (Including $31,522 for the Arabian Mission.) 
Organs: "The Mission Field," "Neglected Arabia." 
Fields: Japan, China, India, Arabia. 

(NOTE: Reorganized as an independent Board of Missions in 1857. The branch called 
the Arabian JUission was organized in 1889, jind incorporated in 1891. In 1894, 
_ ^_i_- .. ,__ xv ..,.. . . "le Re- 

from 
for the Arabian Mission appear under Turkish" Empire i7f thl statistical tables.) 

WOMAITS^BOARD (^FOREIGN MISSIONS OF THE REFORMED CHURCH ra 

Corresponding Secretary: Miss O. H. Lawrence, 25 East Twenty-second St., New 

York Oity, New York. 
Object: Work among women and children in heathen lands, in cooperation with 

the foreign missions of the Reformed Church in America. 
Income: $63,103. (Of this sum $60,161 is included in receipts of the Foreign 

Board and the Arabian Mission.) 
Organ: "The Mission Gleaner." 
Fields: Japan, China, India, Arabia. 

BOARD OF DOMESTIC MISSIONS OF THE REFORMED CHURCH IN 

AMERICA [DUTCH] (1832). 
Secretary: Rev. J. Brownlee Voorhees, 25 East Twenty-second St., New 

York City, New York. 

Object: Missions in the United States and its territories. 
Income: $76,679, of which $8,626 was received from the Women's Ex- 

ecutive Committee. Disbursements for work among non-Christians 

not separately stated. 
Organ: "The Mission Field." 
Field: United States, including work for American Indians and Asiatic 

immigrants. 

WOMEN ! 3gWg^^jffi^f35&*88? MISSIONS 

Secretary: Mrs. John S. Allen, 25 East Twenty-second St., New York City, New 
Object: T9 aid the Board of Domestic Missions in the building of parsonages, in 

' 




. 
Field: United States, including work for American Indians and Asiatic immigrants. 

BOARD OF FOREIGN MISSIONS OF THE REFORMED CHURCH IN 

THE UNITED STATES [GERMAN] (1878). 
Secretary: Rev. Allen R. Bartholomew, D.D., Reformed Church Building, 

Fifteenth and Race Sts., Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 
Object: Evangelistic and educational foreign missionary work. 
Income: $98,000. Of this amount about $8,820 is from the Woman's 

Missionary Society. 

Organs: "The Outlook of Missions," "The Mission Helper," "Die Missions 
Bote." 



Fields: Japan, China. 

(NOTE : First organized in 1838, ns an auxiliary of the American Board of Commissioners 
for Foreign Missions. Formerly known as the Board of Commissioners for Foreign 
Missions of the Reformed Church in the United States.) 

WOMAN'S MISSIONARY SOCIETY OF THE REFORMED CHURCH IN THE UNITED 

STATES [GERMANJ (1887). 

Corresponding Secretary: Mrs. Emma R. Krammes, 104 Clinton Ave., Tiffin, Ohio. 
Object: To aid in the home and foreign missionary work of the Reformed Church 

in the United States. 

Income: $15,007. (For both home and foreign missions.) 
Organ: "The Outlook of Missions." 

Fields: Those of the Board of Foreign Missions and of the General Home Board of 
the Reformed Church in the United States. 

SHEBOYGAN CLASSIS OF THE REFORMED CHURCH IN THE UNITED 
STATES, BOARD FOR MISSIONS AMONG THE INDIANS (1878). 
Secretary: Rev. D. W. Vriesen, D.D., R. R. No. 3, Manitowoc, Wisconsin. 
Object: Mission among the Winnebago Indians in Wisconsin. 
Income: $1,600. 
Field: United States (Black River Falls, Wisconsin.) 

BOARD OF HEATHEN MISSIONS OF THE CHRISTIAN REFORMED 

CHURCH (1884). 

Secretary: Rev. M. Van Vessem, R. R. 8, Holland, Michigan. 
Object: To evangelize the Navajo and Zuni tribes of Indians in New 

Mexico. 

Income: $15,000. 
Organ: "The Banner." 

Field: United States (the Eastern part of the Navajo country, and the 
Zuni Reservation, both in New Mexico). 

REFORMED EPISCOPAL: 

BOARD OF FOREIGN MISSIONS OF THE REFORMED EPISCOPAL 

CHURCH (1894). 

Secretary: H. H. Sinnamon, Esq., 2067 East Cumberland St., Phila- 
delphia, Pennsylvania. 
Object: To support the foreign mission work of the Reformed Episcopal 

Church. 

Income: $7,750. (The income of the woman's auxiliary is included.) 
Organ: "The Episcopal Recorder." 
Field: India. 

WOMAN'S FOREIGN MISSIONARY SOCIETY OF THE REFORMED EPISCOPAL 
CHURCH (1889). 

Secretary: Mrs. Samuel B. Ray, 442 W. School Lane, Germantown, Philadelphia, 
Pennsylvania. 

Object: To assist in the mission work of the Board of Foreign Missions of the Re- 
formed Episcopal Church. 

Income: $3,783. (Included in the receipts of the Board of Foreign Missions of 
the Reformed Episcopal Church.) 

Field: India. 

(NOTE : Organized several years before the Board of Foreign Missions of the Re- 
formed Episcopal Church, but now auxiliary to it.) 

REV. D. M. STEARNS' CHURCH AND BIBLE CLASSES (1900). 
Secretary: Rev. D. M. Stearns, Pastor of the Church of the Atonement, 

Germantown, Pennsylvania. 
Object: To make Jesus known. 
Income: From all sources, about $50,000 a year. 
Organ: "Kingdom Tidings." 
Fields: Palestine, West Indies (Porto Rico). 

(NOTE: This is a Church with a circuit of weekly Bible classes in Brooklyn, New York, 
Newark, Elizabeth, Philadelphia, Baltimore, and Washington.) 

UNITED BRETHREN: 

FOREIGN MISSIONARY SOCIETY OF THE UNITED BRETHREN IN 
CHRIST (1853). 

General Secretary: Rev. S. S. Hough, D.D., Rooms 1002-4, United 
Brethren Bldg., Dayton, Ohio. 

Object: To give the Gospel of Jesus Christ to non-Christian lands, and to 
seek to establish self-supporting native Christian churches and insti- 
tutions. 

Income: From home sources, $91,856; from the foreign field, $7,712; 
total, $99,568. The income from home sources includes that of the 
Woman's Missionary Association, and of the home income $14,626 
was expended in Porto Rico. 

Organ: "The Missionary Advance." 

Fields: Japan, China, Philippine Islands, Western A'frica (Sierra Leone), 
West Indies (Porto Rico). 

(NOTE: Constituted as a distinctively Foreign Missionary Society in 1905,but previous 
to that year it was included in the organization entitled Home, Frontier, and 
Foreign Missionary Society of the United Brethren in Christ.) 

WOMAN'S MISSIONARY ASSOCIATION OF THE UNITED BRETHREN IN CHRIST 

(1875). 
General Secretary: Mrs. Alva Kauffman, Room 1103, United Brethren Bldg., 

Dayton, Ohio. 
Object: To give the Gospel of Jesus Christ to non-Christian lands, and to seek to 

establish self-supporting native Christian churches and institutions. 
Income: $39,049. 
Organ: "The Woman's Evangel." 
Fields: Those of the Foreign Missionary Society of the United Brethren in Christ. 

DOMESTIC, FRONTIER, AND FOREIGN MISSIONARY SOCIETY OF 
THE UNITED BRETHREN IN CHRIST [OLD CONSTITUTION] 
(1853-1891). 

Secretary: Rev. J. Howe, Huntington, Indiana. 
Object: To promote missionary operations in the home, frontier, and 

foreign field. 
Income: For domestic and frontier missions, $3,602; for foreign missions, 

$2,101; total, $5,703. 
Organ: "The Missionary Monthly." 

Fields: Western Africa (Sierra Leone), United States (Frontier States), 
Canada. 

(NOTE: This organization was formed by the section of the United Brethren in Christ 
which elected to remain with the "Old Constitution and Confession of Faith," at 
the time of the division in the Church, in 1889. The date of beginning mission work 
by the original organization before the division was 1853.) 

WOMAN'S MISSIONARY ASSOCIATION OF THE UNITED BRETHREN IN CHRIST 

[OLD CONSTITUTION] (1875-1891). 
Secretary: Mrs. Cora Loew, Huntington, Indiana. 
Object: To promote missionary operations in the Frontier States, and in foreign 

fields. 
Income: From home sources, $3,928. (Disbursed for work in Africa, $1,725; for 

Chinese Mission in Portland, Oregon, $698.) 
Organ: "The Missionary Monthly." 
Fields: Western Africa (Sierra Leone), United States. 

(NOTE: The reorganization, after the division of 1889, noted in connection with 
the parent society, occurred in 1891.) 



24 



WORLD ATLAS OF CHRISTIAN MISSIONS 



United States 



UNIVERSALIST: 

UNIVERSALIST GENERAL CONVENTION (1890). 
Secretary: Rev. I. M. Atwood, D.D., Rochester. New York. 
Object: The diffusion of Christian knowledge, by means of missionaries, 

publications, and other agencies. 
Income: $8,458. (Disbursed for work in Japan.) 
Organ: "The Universalist Leader." 
Fields: Japan, West Indies (Cuba), United States. 
(NOTE: Incorporated in 1866, but foreign missionary work was not begun until 1890.) 

WOMEN'S NATIONAL MISSIONARY ASSOCIATION OP THE UNIVERSALIST 

CHURCH (1869). 

Secretary: Mrs. Ella E. Manning, 6122 Monroe Ave., Chicago*. Illinois. 
Object: To assist in the missionary work of the Universalist Church. 
Income: $4,011. 
Fields: Japan, United States. 

WOMAN'S UNIVERSALIST MISSIONARY SOCIETY OP MASSACHUSETTS (1885). 
Secretary: Mrs. Virginia H. 8. Brown, 19 Wallace St., West Somerville, Massa- 
chusetts. 

Object: To assist in the missionary work of the Universalist Church. 
Income: $2,014. 
Fields: Japan, United States. 

SENDING SOCIETIES NOT DENOMINATIONAL: 

AMERICAN BIBLE SOCIETY (1816). 

Corresponding Secretaries: Rev. John Fox, D.D., Rev. William I. Haven, 
D.D. 

Recording Secretary: Rev. Henry O. D wight, LL.D. 

Office Address: 31 Bible House, Astor Place, New York City, New York. 

Object: To increase the circulation of the Holy Scriptures, without note 
or comment. 

Income: $499,729 for use at home and abroad. Of the total, $249,029 
was used in foreign mission work. Amount disbursed among non- 
Christians not separately stated. 

Organs: "Bible Society Record," "The Bible in Every Land." 

Fields: Japan. Korea, China, Siam, Philippine Islands, Turkish Empire, 
Bulgaria, North-east Africa (Egypt), Mexico, Central America (Costa 
Rica, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, Salvador), South America 
(Argentine Republic, Bolivia, BraziL Colombia, Chile, Ecuador, 
Paraguay, Peru, Uruguay), Panama, West Indies (Cuba, Porto Rico), 
United States. 

(NOTE: Founded in New York City by a convention of delegates from thirty-five 
State and County Bible Societies. Directed by a Board of thirty-six laymen, 
who meet once a month, and are chosen from different denominations. Supported 
by voluntary contributions of individuals and churches of various denominations. 
The Society is entered as appointing and sending missionaries because of its agents 
abroad, many of whom have already been in service under regular mission boards, 
and all of whom are regarded in all respects as part of the missionary propaganda 
in the countries where they serve. Twelve agencies direct the work of the Society 
in the countries named above. Besides these agencies the Society aids missions in 
Micronesia, South Africa, East Africa, West Africa, Arabia, Persia, Hawaii, and 
South India, with money or books.) 

WOMAN'S UNION MISSIONARY SOCIETY OF AMERICA FOR HEATHEN 

LANDS (1860). 

Secretary: Miss S. D.Doremus, 67 Bible House, New York City, N. Y. 
Object: The salvation and elevation of heathen women. 
Income: From home sources, $50,533; on foreign field, $14,536; total, 

$65,069. 

Organ: "The Missionary Link." 
Fields: Japan, China, India. 

(NOTE : This Society was organized in 1860, and incorporated in 1861. It is the pioneer 
among the women's foreign missionary societies of America.) 

WALDENSIAN CHURCH MISSIONS, COMMITTEE OF EVANGELIZATION 

(1860). 
(See under Italy.) 

AMERICAN WALDENSIAH AID SOCIETY (1906). 

General Secretary: Miss Leonora T. Kelso, 213 West 76th St., New York City, 
New York. 

Corresponding Secretary: Mrs. Richard A. Dorman, 28 West 69th St., New York 
City, New York. 

Ob;ect: To collect funds, and apply the same to the aid of the Waldensian Church 
in Italy, and elsewhere, in its evangelistic, institutional, and educational work, 
and to receive, hold, and invest money and property, both real and personal 
(with power to sell, transfer, and convey the same), and apply the net income 
thereof to the work aforesaid, and to arouse and maintain interest throughout 
the United States in the work of said Church, and otherwise to aid the said 
Waldensian Church. 

Income: $13,434. Including special gifts for earthquake relief work, and interest 
on endowment fund and deposit balance. 

Fields: Those of the Waldensian Missions. 

(NOTE: There are fourteen Branch Societies of the American Waldensian Aid So- 
ciety located at various cities in the United States.) 

TRUSTEES OF SYRIAN PROTESTANT COLLEGE, BEIRUT, SYRIA (1863). 
President of the Board: Rev. D. Stuart Dodge, D.D., 99 John Street, 

New York City, New York. 
Secretary: Rev. James S. Dennis, D.D., Presbyterian Board of Foreign 

Missions, 156 Fifth Ave, New York City, New York. 
Object: Christian education in Syria and adjacent countries. 
Income: $52,168 from the foreign field (college fees for the most part), 

and $29,590 from home sources. 
Fields: Syria, and adjacent regions of the Levant. 

(NOTE: The date given is the year of incorporation of the Board of Trustees. The 
foreign teachers receive appointment, and are sent out by the Board of Trustees. 
For further information in regard to Syrian Protestant College, see under Turkish 
Empire.) 

TRUSTEES OF ROBERT COLLEGE, CONSTANTINOPLE (1864). 
President of the Board: Cleveland H. Dodge, Esq., 99 John St., New York 

City, New York. 
Secretary: Rev. Edward B. Coe, D.D., 156 Fifth Ave., New York City, 

New York. 
Object : To aid the youth of the Turkish Empire, and of other countries, 

in obtaining a literary, scientific, or professional education. 
Income: From home sources, $13,292; from other sources, $65,613; total, 

$78,905. 

Field : Turkey-in-Europe. 
(NOTE: See entry for Robert College, under Turkish Empire.) 

CHINA INLAND MISSION (1865). 
(See under England.) 

CHINA INLAND MISSION, COUNCIL FOR NORTH AMERICA (1888). 
Home Director: Rev. Henry W. Frost. 
Secretary: Mr. F. H. Neale. 



Office Address: 1329 Walnut St., Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 
Object: The evangelization of the inland provinces of China. 
Income: $60,000. (Included in the income of the China Inland Mission.) 
Organ: "China's Millions" (North American Edition). 
Field: Chinese Empire. 

(NOTE: The Council for North America is an integral part of the China Inland 
Mission, but it is independent in its own sphere of the United States and Canada. 
There are two mission centers, one at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and the other at 
Toronto, Ontario. For the data concerning the Canadian center, see under Canada.) 

MISSION POPULAIRE EVANGELIQUE DE FRANCE [McALL MISSION] 

(1872). 
(See under France.) 

AMERICAN McALL ASSOCIATION (1877). 

General Secretary: Miss Harriet Harvey, 1710 Chestnut St., Philadelphia, Penn- 
sylvania. 

Representative Secretary: Rev. George T. Berry, 156 Fifth Ave., New York City, 
New York. 

Object: To aid in the support of the work of the McAH Mission in France. 

Income: _$58,396. Of this amount $27.964 was appropriated to the McAll Mission 
in Paris, and 818.364 was retained as balance in hand. 

Organ: "The American McAll Record." 

Fields: France, Corsica. 

TRUSTEES OF JAFFNA COLLEGE FUNDS (1877). 

Secretary: Rev. James L. Barton, D.D., 14 Beacon St., Boston, Massa- 
chusetts. 

Object: To collect and have the care of funds in the United States for 
the benefit of Jaffna College in Ceylon. 

Income: $9,707. 

Field: Ceylon (Jaffna). 

NATIONAL INDIAN ASSOCIATION (1879). 
Executive Secretary: Mr. John W. Clark, 156 Fifth Ave., New York City, 

New York. 
Object: To teach industry, and to give religious instruction to the Indians 

of the United States of America, thereby aiding in their civilization. 
Income : No statement at hand. 
Organ: "The Indian's Friend." 
Field: United States (among Indian tribes). 

(NOTE: Formerly called the Women's National Indian Association. It originated 
in 1879, was fully organized in 1881, and was incorporated in 1887. The policy 
of the Association is to transfer its missions, when well established, together with 
the property acquired, to_the permanent care of denominational mission boards. 
In all, more than fifty buildings have been erected connected with missions thus 
transferred. ' The religious work of the Association consists of the direct undenomi- 
national teaching of religi9us truths to tribes where, almost without exception, no 
Christian instruction is given by any other organization. The Association has 
done this pioneer missionary work among fifty-two Indian tribes. Other important 
service has been rendered, such as, helping to right political wrongs; gathering of 
Indian children into schools; and stimulating and preparing capable Indians so as to 
enable them to build homes, or to carry on business. It has also made loans to 
Indians for the purchase of implements of labor, or for stock needed to begin 
some useful and paying industry.) 

INDIA INDUSTRIAL EVANGELISTIC MISSION (1880). 
(See under India.) 

INDIA INDUSTRIAL EVANGELISTIC MISSION, COMMITTEE FOR THE UNITED 

STATES (1903). 

Honorary Secretary: Mrs. W. H. Dietz, 7402 Parnell Ave., Chicago, Illinois. 
Object: To raise funds in support of industrial mission work in India. 
Income: No statement at hand. 
Field: India. 

WORLD'S WOMAN'S CHRISTIAN TEMPERANCE UNION (1883). 

Secretary: Miss Anna Adams Gordon, Evanston, Illinois. 

Object: To promote temperance in all lands, and to organize local and 
national societies of the Woman's Christian Temperance Union. 

Income: $4,500. (Expended almost wholly in foreign fields. No sal- 
aries are paid to officers.) 

Organs: "Th& Union Signal," "The Crusader Monthly." 

Field: The world. 

(NOTE: Founded by Miss Frances E. Willard, p,nd haying official headquarters both in 
the United States and in England, with branches in foreign mission lands.) 

TRUSTEES OF THE CANTON CHRISTIAN COLLEGE (1886). 

Secretary: Mr. W. Henry Grant, 156 Fifth Ave, New York City, New 
York. 

Field Agent: Mr. Herbert E. House, 156 Fifth Ave., New York City, New 
York. 

Object: Education in a thorough manner, under Christian influence and 
discipline, of Chinese youth, with the view to their becoming Christian 
leaders, teachers, ministers, doctors, or business men, able to grapple 
with the problems which must necessarily fall to the trained men of the 
country to solve, and enabling them to lead in the spiritual and moral 
regeneration of China. ' 

Income: $24,075. (Inclusive of $13,165 paid by students for rent, 
tuition, board, and incidentals.) 

Fields: South China, and contiguous countries and islands where there are 
Cantonese and Hakka Colonies. 

(NOTE: Chartered December 13, 1893, by Regents of the University of the State oi: 
New York.) 

METLAKAHTLA CHRISTIAN MISSION (1887). 

Secretary: Mr. William Duncan, Metlakahtla, Alaska. 

Object: To establish a Christian civilization among the Indians of Alaska. 

Income: No income from outside sources. 

Field: Alaska (Metlakahtla). 

ORIENTAL SOCIETY FOR PROMOTING THE EDUCATION OF DEAF 
MUTES (1887). 

Secretary: Mrs. C. R. Mills, care of Board of Foreign Missions, Presby- 
terian Church, 156 Fifth Ave., New York City, New York. 

Object? To prove to the Chinese that the deaf can be educated and be- 
come useful members of society; to adapt the methods used in other 
countries for teaching the deaf, to the Chinese language; to train native, 
hearing teachers who may extend the work ; to give to the native Church, 
to the people generally, and to the Government, an example of true 
philanthropy, and an illustration of the love of Christ for the un- 
fortunate. 

Income: $2,500. 

Fields: Korea, China (including Manchuria). 

(NOTE: In April, 1910, this educational work for deaf mutes was taken tinder the 
care of the Board of Foreign Missions of the Presbyterian Church in the United 
States of America, 156 Fifth Ave., New York City, New York.) 

ALGIERS MISSION BAND (1888). 

(See under Africa.) 



United States 



DIRECTORY OF MISSIONARY SOCIETIES 



25 



WOMAN'S ALGERIAN MISSION BAND (190?). 

Secretary: Mrs. W. 0. Pearce, 318 North Normal Parkway, Chicago, Illinois. 
Object: To promote missionary work in Algiers, and among Mohammedana 

elsewhere. 

Income: $2,45<1 (This represents the receipts for a triennium.) 
Organ: "Newt; Letter," published occasionally by the American Auxiliary. 
Field: North .Africa (Algiers), 

FOREIGN DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERNATIONAL COMMITTEE 
OF YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATIONS OF NORTH 
AMERICA (1889). 

General Administration Secretary: John R. Mott, LL.D. 

Associate Secretaries: Mr. H. P. Andersen, Mr. E. T. Colton. 

Office Secretary: Mr. W. E. Holdren. 

Office Address: 124 East Twenty-eighth St., New York City, New York. 

Object: To organize and develop native, self-directing, self-supporting 
Young Men's Christian Associations in the foreign mission field, and 
to train and develop native Christian young men in the principles and 
methods of Association work. 

Income: $127,396 from home sources, for current expenses in non-Christian 
lands; $100,659 from home sources, for buildings in non-Christian lands; 
total income for work in non-Christian lands, $228,055. $29,421 from 
home sources, for current expenses in Latin America; $35,000 from 
home sources, for buildings in Latin America; $292,476, total income 
from home sources. For administration, $16,395. Total $308,870. 
Canadian contributions are included. 

Organ: "Foreign Mail." 

Fields: Japan, Korea, China, Philippine Islands, India, Ceylon, Turkish 
Empire, Mexico, South America (Brazil, Uruguay, Argentine Republic, 
Chile), West Indies, Oriental students in the United States and Canada, 
Russia. 

(NOTE: The International Committee, of which Mr. Richard C. Morse ia. General 
Secretary, was organized in 1866, and incorporated in 1883; the Foreign Depart- 
ment was organized in 1889. For a full statement concerning the foreign work 
of the Young Men's Christian Association, see under World's Committee of 
Young Men's Christian Associations, in the Switzerland section of this Directory.) 

CENTRAL AMERICAN MISSION (1890). 
Chairman: Mr. Luther Rees, Paris, Texas. 
Secretary: Rev. C. I. Scofield. Ashuelot, New Hampshire. 
Object: To preach the Gospel to the people of Central America. 
Income: $9,221. 

Organ: "The Central American Bulletin." 

Field: Central America (Costa Rica, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, 
Salvador). 

(NOTE: The total population of the republics of Central America is about fifty per cent, 
aboriginal Indian, and a large portion of the remaining half is of mixed Indian blood. 
The Central American Mission does not distinguish in its reports between its work 
for aborigines and that for others.) 

GOSPEL MISSIONARY UNION (1891). 
Secretary: Mr. George S. Fisher, Euclid and Seventh Sta., Kansas City, 

Missouri. 

Object: To give light to them that sit in darkness. 
Income: $9,423. 
Organ: "The Gospel Message." 
Fields: North Africa (Morocco), South America (Ecuador), United 

States (among the Navajo Indians). 

TRUSTEES OF MACKENZIE COLLEGE, sXo PAULO, BRAZIL (1892). 

President of Board of Trustees: Rev. George Alexander, D.D., 47 Uni- 
versity Place, New York City, New York. 

Secretary of Board of Trustees: Mr. William Dulles, 115 Broadway, New 
York City, New York. 

Object: To extend and perpetuate the type of Christian education com- 
menced by the Presbyterian Mission in 1870, when the school in Sao 
Paulo was opened, and to form an institution of learning of high grade 
for Brazilians. 

Income: $88,173. (Of this amount $5,186 was received from home 
sources, and $82,987 was earned through the College and schools.) 

Field: South America (the State of Sao Paulo, Brazil). 

(NOTE: The College was incorporated by the Board of Regents of the University of 
the State of New York in 1890, but was not opened until 1892. It is under the 
control of its Board of Trustees in New York.) 

MISSION AMONG THE HIGHER CLASSES IN CHINA (1894) 
(See under China.) 

AMERICAN COMMITTEE OF THE MISSION AMONG THE HIGHER CLASSES IN 

CHINA (1894). 
Honorary Secretary: William G. Low, Jr., Esq., 31 Nassau St., New York City, 

New York. 
Object: To receive , contributions for the Mission among the Higher Classes in 

China, and to bring its work to the attention of the American public. 
Incorae: No statement at hand. 
Field: China. 

NORTH INDIA SCHOOL OF MEDICINE FOR CHRISTIAN WOMEN (1894). 
(See under India.) 

SCHOOL OF MEDI - 



Secretary: Rev. Franklin B. Dwight. Convent Station, New Jersey. 

Object: To raise funds toward the maintenance of the North India School of Medicine 

for Christian Women. 
Income: $1,751. 
Field: India (Ludhiana). 

AMERICAN COUNCIL OF THE AFRICA INLAND MISSION (1895). 
Office Address: 3002 Susquehanna Ave., Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 
Object: Evangelization in the neglected districts of Africa. 
Income: $24,000, from home sources. 
Organ: "Hearing and Doing." 
Field: British and German East Africa. 

(NOTE: The secretarial representative in England of the Africa Inland Mission is 
Miss Elizabeth Parker-Brown, 116 Grosvenor Road, Highbury, New Park, London, N.) 

VANGUARD MISSIONARY ASSOCIATION (1895). 
Secretary: Miss Dora Evans, Marvin Camp, Wellston Station, St. Louis, 

Missouri. 

Object: To aid the children of India. 
Income: No statement at hand. 
Organ: ^'The Vanguard." 
Field: India. 

LEBANON HOSPITAL FOR THE INSANE (1896). 
(See under England, and under Turkish Empire.) 

LEBANON HOSPITAL FOR THE INSANE, AMERICAN COMMITTEE (igoo). 

Secretary: Mr. Robert B. Hainea, Jr., 701 Provident Bldg., Philadelphia, Pennsvl- 
, vania. 



Object: The care and treatment of the mentally afflicted in the East, without any 

distinction as to creed or nationality. 
Income: $1,360. 
Field: Syria. 

CHRISTIAN AND MISSIONARY ALLIANCE (1897). 

President and Superintendent: Rev. A. B. Simpson, 692 Eighth Ave., 
New York City, New York. 

General Secretary: Rev. A. E. Funk, Nyack, New York. 

Object: To bear witness to the Lord Jesus Christ in His fullness; to 
emphasize the baptism of the Holy Ghost; and to work for the evangel- 
ization of the neglected masses at home and abroad. 

Income: $155,391. (Of this amount $21,910 was disbursed for work in 
South America and the West Indies. In addition to the regular 
income, special gifts amounting to $46,177 were sent directly to the 
fields, for famine orphans, buildings, famine relief, native workers, etc.) 

Organ: "The Christian and Missionary Alliance Weekly." 

Fields: Japan, China, India, Philippine Islands, Palestine, Western 
Africa (Sierra Leone), South-west Africa (Belgian Congo), South 
America (Venezuela, Argentine Republic, Chile, Ecuador), West Indies. 

(NOTE: Developed from the International Missionary Alliance, which was formed in 
1887.) 

BOARD OF FOREIGN MISSIONS OF THE INTERNATIONAL APOSTOLIC 
HOLINESS UNION AND "THE REVIVALIST" (1900). 

Secretary: Mrs. M. G. Standley, 1810 Young St., Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Object: To receive and forward missionary offerings of the International 
Apostolic Holiness Union, and from the "Revivalist" readers and sub- 
scribers, to mission stations in Japan, Korea, China, and Africa. 

Income: $5,000. 

Organ: "God's Revivalist and Missionary Advocate." 

Fields: Japan, Korea, China, India, South Africa (Cape Colony), West 
Indies (Cuba). 

INTERNATIONAL UNION MISSION (1901). 
Secretary: Rev. C. B. Rutenber, 527 Fifth Ave., New York City, New 

York. 

Object : To carry the Gospel to regions where Christ has not been named. 
Income: $3,039. 
Organ: "The Messenger." 
Fields: China, India, British East Africa. 

(NOTE: The Lumbwa Industrial Mission of British East Africa ia now incorporated 
with the International Union Mission.) 

YALE FOREIGN MISSIONARY SOCIETY, INCORPORATED (1902). 

Executive Secretary: Mr. William H. Sallmon, Yale Station, New Haven, 
Connecticut. 

General Secretary: Prof essorHarlan P. Beach, 346 Willow St., New Haven, 
Connecticut. 

Object: To conduct an interdenominational institution of advanced 
grade, thoroughly Christian in its character and aims, in the Province 
of Hunan, China. It also undertakes, on behalf of the missionary so- 
cieties inviting the Society to do such work, to aid in the establishment of 
Christian schools of lower grades, such aid being mainly directed 
toward the formulation of policies, and the preparation of teachers. 

Income: $9,254. (Of this amount $1,400 was received from tuition and 
fees on the field.) 

Field: China (Hunan Province). 

GOSPEL MISSIONARY SOCIETY (1903). 
Secretary: Mr. L. H. Taylor, New Britain, Connecticut. 
Object: To promote the cause of missions, according to the last command 

of Jesus. 
Income: $5,508. 
Organ: "The Gospel Message." 
Fields: China, India, British East Africa, South America (Peru). 

(NOTE: The work of the Gospel Missionary Society is supported by the People's Church 
of Christ, in New Britain, Connecticut.) 

SUDAN UNITED MISSION (1904). 
(See under England.) 

SUDAN UNITED MISSION, AMERICAN COUNCIL (1906). 

Secretary Executive Committee: Mr. J. H. Creighton, 5849 Main St., Germantown, 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Object: The evangelization of the Sudan in this generation. 
Income: $2,500. 

Organ: "Sudan United Mission News." 
Field: North Africa (Sudan). 

FIRST NEW TESTAMENT CHURCH, LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA (1905). 

Secretary: Mr. William Bushell, 3818 Maple Avenue, Los Angeles, Cali- 
fornia. 

Object: Evangelical preaching and teaching, and pentecostal life and 
service. 

Income: $7,505, for the work abroad. 

Organ : "The Bulletin of the First New Testament Church of Los Angeles." 

Fields: China, Palestine, United States (California). 

KIUNGCHOW UNION MISSION (1905). 

(This Mission has been discontinued.) 

BOARD OF TRUSTEES OF THE UNIVERSITY MEDICAL SCHOOL, 

CANTON (1906). 
Secretary: Mr. Edward C. Wood, Howard Houston Hall, Philadelphia, 

Pennsylvania. 

Object: The support of the University Medical School in Canton. 
Income: $6,912. 

Organ: A section of "Character and Service." 
Field: South China (Canton). 

(NOTE: At the reguest of the South China Branch of the China Medical Missionary 
Society, which includes practically all the medical men of South China, the Univer- 
sity Medical School has consented to assume the responsibility of arranging for a 
post-graduate course for the physicians residing in Canton, Hongkong, and the 
surrounding districts. _The University Medical School in Canton is supported by 
the Christian Association of the University of Pennsylvania. See entry under 
China.) 

FOREIGN DEPARTMENT OF THE NATIONAL BOARD OF THE YOUNG 
WOMEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATIONS OF THE UNITED STATES 
OF AMERICA (1906). 

Secretary: Miss Harriet Taylor, 125 East Twenty-seventh St., New York 
City, New York. 



26 



WORLD ATLAS OF CHRISTIAN MISSIONS 



United States 



Object: To be a contributing agency toward the advancement of Asso- 
ciation work in mission countries; to share the experience which has 
made the movement in the home field effective; to bring young women 
to that knowledge of Jesus Christ which shall prepare them for leader- 
ship in various forms of Christian work; to provide experienced secre- 
taries, and to furnish them with adequate support. 

Income: $24,645. (Of this amount $22,926 was disbursed for work in 
Asia, and $1,719 for work in South America.) 

Organ : ' ' The Association Monthly. ' ' 

Fields: Japan, China, India, Ceylon, South America (Argentine Republic). 

(NOTE: See full statement of the relation of the various National Committees of 
the Young Women's Christian Association to the World's Committee, and to mission 
lands as given under "World's Young Women's Christian Association," noted under 
England in this Directory.) 

GRENFELL ASSOCIATION OF AMERICA, INCORPORATED (1907). 
President: Rev. Henry van Dyke, D.D., LL.D., Princeton, New Jersey. 
Secretary: Mr. Willis E. Lougee, 156 Fifth Ave., New York City, New 

York. 
Object: To promote the work of Wilfred T. Grenfell, C.M.G., M.D., 

among the deep-sea fishermen of Newfoundland and Labrador. 
Income: $40,093. 

Organ: "Among the Deep Sea Fishers." 
Fields: Newfoundland, Labrador. 

(NOTE: The work of Dr. Wilfred T. Grenfell originated under the auspices of the 
Royal National Mission to Deep Sea Fishermen, having its headquarters in Lon- 
don, which see under England. The special title by which it. is known in England is 
the Labrador Medical Mission, which was founded in 1892, and is regarded as a 
branch of the work for deep-sea fishermen. The Mission has developed rapidly 
in the extent and importance of its work. In 1907 the Grenfell Association of 
America was organized, to render financial_ assistance to Dr. Grenfell's missionary 
efforts, and since then other associations in aid of his work have been formed in 
New England, Canada, and Newfoundland. Pour hospitals, several steamers and 
launches, a staff of medical assistants and nurses, an undenominational school, 
an orphanage, and some phases of industrial missionary effort, including the in- 
troduction of reindeer into Labrador, and instruction in weaving, have given a 
broad philanthropic scope to Dr. Grenfell's labors. The most recent proposition of 
the Mission is the erection of a Fishermen's and Seamen's Institute at St. Johns, 
Newfoundland. The services of the Labrador Medical Mission are primarily dedi- 
cated to the welfare of the deep-sea fishermen of the Labrador Coast, but, inciden- 
tally, valuable humanitarian and medical ministrations are rendered, in a spirit of 
Christian charity, to the Eskimos in that vicinity.) 

FAITH AND LOVE MISSION (1909). 
Secretary: Mrs. Rose Potter Crist, Wilmore, Kentucky. 
Object: Evangelistic missions in the West Indies and South America. 
Income: No statement at hand. 
Fields: South America (British Guiana), West Indies. 

(NOTE: The leading evangelist of the Faith and Love Mission is the Rev. James M. 
Taylor, whose address on the field is Bridgetown, Barbados, British West Indies. 
He also acts as Treasurer, and his home address is 807 Deery St., Knoxville, 
Tennessee.) 

Cooperating and Collecting Societies 
BAPTIST: 

BAPTIST YOUNG PEOPLE'S UNION OF AMERICA (1891). 

Secretary: Rev. George T. Webb, D.D., 168 Wabash Ave., Chicago, 
Illinois. 

Object: To stimulate the spiritual life, especially by the educational 
method. To this end series of studies are prepared covering all phases 
of Christian life and work, participation in these studies being 
furthered by correspondence courses, with examinations. Special 
courses are devoted to the study of missions. 

Income: No income is sought, but the young people are urged to give 
through the regular channels of their home churches. 

Organ: "Service." 

Fields: Those occupied by Baptist Missions. 

CONGREGATIONAL: 

NATIONAL FEDERATION OF WOMAN'S CONGREGATIONAL HOME 

MISSIONARY STATE ORGANIZATIONS (1903). 
Secretary: Mrs. G. H. Schneider, 3437 Monroe St., Chicago, Illinois. 
Object: The unification of all state organizations of women that labor 

in any corporate way for the advancement of home missionary work 

in connection with Congregational churches. 
Income: $136. 

Organ: "The American Missionary." 
Fields: Those of the Congregational Home Missionary Societies, including 

their work among Indians and Asiatics. 

(NoTE: The Federation includes thirty-two state organizations, all working in the 
interests of Congregational Missions. They are known as Home Missionary Unions, 
and are represented in the Federation.) 

LUTHERAN: 

EVANGELICAL LUTHERAN JOINT SYNOD OF OHIO AND OTHER STATES 

[GERMAN-ENGLISHl (1818). 

Synodical Secretary: Rev. W. D. Ahl, Oshkosh, Wisconsin. 
Treasurer of Foreign Missions: Rev. A. W. Werder, Wheeling, West 

Virginia. 

Object: The dissemination and establishment of Christianity. 
Income: $6,974, for foreign missions. 
Organs: "Kirchenzeitung," "The Lutheran Standard." 
Fields: India, United States, Canada. 

(NOTE: Funds raised for foreign missions are sent to support W9rkers in India under 
the supervision of the Hermannsburg Evangelical Lutheran Missionary Society.) 

EVANGELICAL LUTHERAN SYtfOD OF IOWA AND OTHER STATES 

[GERMAN] (1854). 

Secretary: Rev. E. H. Caselmann, Charles City, Iowa. 
Object: To cooperate with the "Neuenclettelsau," the "Leipzig," and 

other societies having their headquarters in Germany. 
Income: $12,081 , for foreign missions. 
Organ: "Kirchenblatt." 
Fields: Those of the societies assisted. 

DANISH EVANGELICAL LUTHERAN CHURCH IN AMERICA (1872). 
Secretary: Rev. Aug. Faber, Newell, Iowa. 

Object: The salvation of the Danish people in America; also the further- 
ance of foreign missions through gifts forwarded. 



Income: No statement at hand. 

Organs: "Kirkelig Samler ; " "Dannevirke," "Ungdom," "Bocrnevennen." 
Fields : Those of the Danish Missionary Societies to which funds are sent 
for the support of their missionaries in various fields. 

FINNISH [SUOMI] EVANGELICAL LUTHERAN SYNOD (1889). 
President: Pastor J. K. Nikander, Hancock, Michigan. 
Object: To collect funds, which are forwarded to the foreign missionary 

societies in Finland. 
Income : No statement at hand. 
Organ: "Paimen Sanomia." 
Fields: Those of the Finnish missionary societies assisted. 

FOREIGN. MISSION COMMITTEE OF THE ICELANDIC EVANGELICAL 

LUTHERAN SYNOD IN AMERICA (1900). 
Secretary: Rev. K. K. Olafson, Gardar, North Dakota. 
Object: The support of foreign missions in India. 
Income: $366. 

Organ: Reports through the Icelandic Church papers of America. 
Field: India (through the Board of Foreign Missions of the General 
Council of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in North America). 

(INTERSYNODICAL AND INTERNATIONAL.) 

LUTHERANS IN ALL LANDS SOCIETY (1893). 

Secretary: Rev. J. N. Lenker, D.D., P. O. Box 253, Minneapolis, Min- 
nesota. 

Object: To awaken interest in the world's evangelization among the 
Evangelical Lutherans in all lands, by means of Diaspora, Papal, 
Heathen. Mohammedan, and Jewish Missions. 

Income: No funds are raised. 

Fields: Among Evangelical Lutherans in all lands. 

LUTHER LEAGUE OF AMERICA (1895). 

Secretary: Rev. Luther M. Kuhns, 2433 Franklin St., Omaha, Nebraska. 
Object: To stimulate various young people's societies to greater Christian 

activity. The cultivation of interest in missions is. an important 

feature of its programme. 
Income : No statement at hand. 
Organ: "Luther League Review." 
Field: United States. 

METHODIST: 

NEW YORK CITY CHURCH EXTENSION AND MISSIONARY SOCIETY 
OF THE METHODIST EPISCOPAL CHURCH (1866). 

Secretary: Rev. Frank Mason North, D.D., 150 Fifth Ave., New York 
City, New York. 

Object: To promote Sunday Schools and missions in the city of New York. 

Income: $47,138. (Of this amount $12,912 was received as a grant 
from the Board of Home Missions and Church Extension of the Meth- 
odist Episcopal Church. Work for Chinese, Japanese, and Jews was 
provided for through this grant.) 

Organ: "The Christian City." 

Field: United States (New York City). 

EPWORTH LEAGUE OF THE METHODIST EPISCOPAL CHURCH (1889). 
Secretary: Rev. Edwin M. Randall, D.D., 57 Washington St., Chicago, 

Illinois. 
Object: To promote vital and intelligent piety in the young people of the 

Church, and to train them in works of mercy and help. 
Income : No accurate returns of the contributions of the Epworth League 

to foreign missions can be reported, as they are expended through the 

Board of Foreign Missions of the denomination, but they constitute an 

important and increasing amount. 
Organ: "The Epworth Herald." 
Fields: The home and foreign mission fields of the Methodist Episcopal 

Church, to which local Epworth Leagues in the United States send 

gifts. The Epworth League is also organized extensively in some of 

these fields. 

EPWORTH LEAGUE OF THE METHODIST EPISCOPAL CHURCH, 
SOUTH (1889). 

General Secretary: Rev. H. M. Du Bose, D.D., Nashville, Tennessee. 

Object: The promotion of piety, and loyalty to the denomination, among 
the young people, their education in church history, and their encour- 
agement in works of grace and charity. 

Income : About $27,000, contributed through the regular channels of the 
denomination for mission work abroad. 

Organ: "The Epworth Era." 

Fields: Those of the Board of Missions of the Methodist Episcopal Church, 
South. Also, in many of those fields the Epworth League has become 
effective as an organization for work among young people. 

PRESBYTERIAN: 

BOARD OF FOREIGN MISSIONS OF THE REFORMED PRESBYTERIAN 

CHURCH IN NORTH AMERICA [GENERAL SYNOD] (1834). 
Secretary: Rev. James L. Chesnut, D.D., Coulterville, Illinois. 
Object: The support of missionary operations in India, which are entirely 

under native management. 
Income: $2,787. (From home sources, $2,237; from the foreign field, 

$550.) 

Organ: "The Reformed Presbyterian Witness." 
Field: India. 

PROTESTANT EPISCOPAL: 

BROTHERHOOD OF ST. ANDREW (1883). 

General Secretary: Mr. Hubert Carleton, Broad Exchange Building, 
83 Broad Street, Boston, Massachusetts. 

Object : The spread of Christ's kingdom among men. 

Income: $27,000. 

Organ: "St. Andrew's Cross." ' 

Fields: National Councils in United States, Canada, England, Scotland, 
Australia, West Indies, and Japan. Chapters in China, India, Africa, , 
and other mission lands. < 

ORDER OF THE DAUGHTERS OF THE KING (1885). 

Secretary: Miss Sara D. Bluxome, 281 Fourth Ave., New York City, New 

York. 
Object: To spread Christ's kingdom among women. 



United States 



DIBECTORY OF MISSIONARY SOCIETIES 



27 



Income: No statement at hand. 

Organ: "The Royal Cross." 

Fields: Societies are organized in various countries where the Protestant 
Episcopal Church is at work. Special contributions from these societies 
provide for the support of a missionary in China, under the Domestic 
and Foreign Missionary Society of the Protestant Episcopal Church. 

SCHWENKFELDER: 

HOME AND FOREIGN BOARD OF MISSIONS OF THE SCHWENKFELDER 
CHURCH OF AMERICA (1895). 

Secretary: Rev. George K. Meschter, M.D., Worcester, Montgomery 
County, Pennsylvania. 

Object: The establishment of churches, Sabbath Schools, meetings, and 
societies in the United States of America, and in foreign countries, 
for the worship of God and the propagation of the Gospel of Jesus Christ, 
according to the faith, tenets, doctrine, discipline, and usages of the 
Schwenkfelder Church. 

Income : No statement at hand. 

Organ: "The Schwenkfeldian." 

Fields: Those of societies through which mission funds are forwarded. 

(NOTE: This Board has no independent missionary work, but contributes toward 
foreign missions through other regular missionary societies.) 

COOPERATING SOCIETIES NOT DENOMINATIONAL: 

AMERICAN TRACT SOCIETY (1825). 

Secretary: Rev. Judson Swift, D.D.. 150 Nassau St., New Yprk City, 
New York. 

Object: To diffuse the knowledge of our Lord Jesus Christ by the circula- 
tion of religious tracts. 

Income: $344,794. 

Organ: "The American Messenger." 

Field: The world. 

(NOTE: Colportage work is conducted by the Society in the United States_, especially 
among immigrants, Asiatic and others; also in the West Indies. Publications are 
issued in 174 languages. Grants in aid to the extent of $5 300 were made in 1909- 
1910 for the support of foreign work in Europe, Africa, and Asia.) 

AMERICAN SEAMEN'S FRIEND SOCIETY (1828). 
Secretary: Rev. George McPherson Hunter, 76 Wall St., New York City, 

New York. 
Object: To evangelize the men of the sea; to aid the shipwrecked and 

destitute; and to provide loan libraries for vessels. 
Income: $25,126. In addition to this, a balance of $17,605 is credited 

to the Society's income for the year ending March 31, 1910, having 

been brought forward as cash balance from a previous year. 
Organ: "The Sailors' Magazine." 
Fields: South America, West Indies, United States, Canada, European, 

Asiatic, and African seaports, islands of the Pacific and Indian Oceans. 

(NOTE: The Society was founded in 1828, and incorporated in 1833. A new and spa- 
cious Sailors' Home and Institute was opened at 507 West St., New York, in Oc- 
tober, 1908. Bethels, Churches, Institutes, Homes, Reading Rooms, and Chap- 
lains are supported in many of the important seaports of the world.) 

AMERICAN AND FOREIGN CHRISTIAN UNION (1849). 
President: Rev. Leander T. Chamberlain, D.D., "The Chelsea," 222 West 

Twenty-third St., New York City, New York. 
Object: To diffuse and promote the principles of religious liberty, and a 

pure and evangelical Christianity, both at home and abroad. 
Income: $2,685. 
Field: France (Paris). 

(NOTE: The station of the American and Foreign Christian Union in Paris is the 
American Church, 21 Rue de Berri. Through its P_aris church the Union is in 
cooperation with the McAll Mission, and the other missionary societies of France.) 

EVANGELICAL ALLIANCE FOR THE UNITED STATES (1867). 

President: Rev. Leander T. Chamberlain, D.D., "The Chelsea," 222 West 
Twenty-third St., New York City, New York. 

Object: To manifest and strengthen Christian unity, to defend and pro- 
mote religious liberty, and to encourage cooperation in Christian 
work, without interfering with the internal affairs of the denominations. 

Income: $694. 

Fields: United States, and, in concert with the other Evangelical Al- 
liances of Christendom, the whole world. 

(NOTE: See also entries under England, France, and Japan.) 

BOARD OF TRUSTEES OF THE GOULD MEMORIAL HOME AND IN- 
DUSTRIAL SCHOOLS, ROME, ITALY (1875). 

Secretary: Mr. H. B. Barnes, Jr., 11 East Twenty-fourth St., New York 
City, New York. 

Object: The industrial education of Italian orphan boys, under evan- 
gelical influence and training, 

Income: $510. In addition, local subscriptions and donations amounting 
to about $2,417 were raised in Italy, making, with contributions from 
some other minor sources of income, a total of $3,346. 

Field: Italy (Rome). 

(NOTE: For entry of Gould Memorial Home and Industrial Schools, Rome, see under 
Italy.) 

INTERNATIONAL SUNDAY SCHOOL ASSOCIATION (1875). 

Secretary: Mr. Marion Lawrance, Hartford Building, 140 Dearborn St., 
Chicago, Illinois. 

Object: The promotion of Sunday School service, the preparation of an 
international uniform literature suitable for use in teaching, and the 
development of an ideal efficiency in Sunday School work. 

Income: $108,065, for three years. Average annual income, $39,022. 

Fields: Central America, Mexico, West Indies, United States, Canada. 

(NOTE: The first National Convention was held in 1832, the first International Con- 



. ...._ Sunday School Association." The Association was incorporated 

latter name "in 1907. The plan of uniform lessons was adopted in 1872, a custom 
which had been adopted in 1840 by the British Sunday School Union. The Inter- 
national Sunday School Association is turning its attention increasingly to awak- 
ening an interest in mission work through the medium of the Sunday School.) 

TRUSTEES OF CENTRAL TURKEY COLLEGE, AINTAB (1876). 
Secretary: Rev. Charles H. Daniels, D.D., South Framingham, Massa- 
chusetts. 



Object: The thorough education of pastors, preachers, and teachers; also 
the general advancement of science and civilization among all nation- 
alities throughout Asia Minor. Three departments, preparatory, col- 
legiate, and medical. 

Income : $20,000. (Of which $14,300 is from the field, $2,700 from invested 
funds, and $3,000 from the American Board of Commissioners for For- 
eign Missions.) 

Field: Turkey-in-Asia. 

(NOTE: The legal name of the Corporation of the Central Turkey College ia "The 
Trustees of Donations for Education in Turkey." In addition to the Board of 
Trustees in America, there is a local Board of Managers, native and American, 
appointed by the Cilicia Union. See also entry under Turkish Empire.) 

TRUSTEES OF EUPHRATES COLLEGE FUNDS (1878). 

Secretary: Rev. James L. Barton, D.D., 14 Beacon St., Boston, Massa- 
chusetts. 

Object: To collect and have the care of funds in the United States for the 
benefit of Euphrates College, at Harpoot. 

Income: $5,201. 

Field: Turkey-in-Asia (Harpoot). 

(NOTE: See entry for Euphrates College, under Turkish Empire.) 

FOREIGN SUNDAY SCHOOL ASSOCIATION OF THE UNITED STATES 
OF AMERICA (1878). 

President: Rev. Henry C. Woodruff, 164 Montague St., Brooklyn, New 
York. 

Recording Secretary: Mrs. Peter A. MacLean, 864 President St., Brook- 
lyn, New York. 

Object: To establish, improve, and assist Sunday or Bible schools in 
foreign lands, seeking thereby to promote the religious observance 
of the Sabbath, international and local intercourse among Christians 
of all denominations, a Scriptural faith, and zealous work in making 
that faith more general and effective. 

Income: $8,301. (Of this amount $5,000 represents the legacy of Mr. 
C. B. Davenport, "to be used in supporting and distributing copies 
of the Sunday School papers published by the Association in various 
languages.") 

Fields: Japan, Philippine Islands, Africa, Italy, Spain, Portugal, Bo- 
hemia, Belgium, South America (Brazil), Mexico. 

(NOTE: An important part of the service of the Foreign Sunday School Association 
is the publication and distribution of Sunday School papers, and other Christian 
literature, in various languages, among the children of the foreign lands in which 
work has been established.) 

INTERNATIONAL MEDICAL MISSIONARY SOCIETY (1881). 

Secretary: Rev. George H. Dowkontt, 1163 Sixty-ninth St., Brooklyn, 

New York. 
Object: To assist intending missionaries in securing an education in 

recognized medical colleges, and to maintain the Missionary Home at 

Mountain Rest, Goshen, Massachusetts. 
Income: $3,000. (Expended in the United States.) 
Field: United States. No missionaries or property in foreign lands. 

(NOTE: The Society was incorporated in 1886. A woman's branch of the International 
Medical Missionary Society was formed in 1889, of which Miss Lucy M. Green, New 
York City, New York, is the Corresponding Secretary.) 

UNITED SOCIETY OF CHRISTIAN ENDEAVOR (1881). 

President: Rev. Francis E. Clark, D.D., LL.D. 

General Secretary: Mr. William Shaw. 

Office Address: Tremont Temple, Boston, Massachusetts. 

Object: To win young people to the Christian life. 

Income: $450,000, contributed by local societies to the different denom- 
inational boards. This sum should not be included in any total of 
gifts, as it is reported by the various organizations receiving it. 

Organ: "The Christian Endeavor World." 

Fields: Those of the missionary societies to which contributions are sent. 

(NOTE: The first local Christian Endeavor Society was organized by Rev. Francis E. 
Clark, in the Williston Congregational Church of Portland, Maine, on- February 2, 
1881. The United Society of Christian Endeavor was incorporated in 1885. It 
does not send out missionaries, but has local societies in all parts of the world which 
help to support the missions of their own denominations. The World's Christian En- 
deavor Union includes all Christian Endeavor Societies. The United Society of 
Christian Endeavor includes only those of the North American Continent. In 
1908 there were 71,066 local societies, of which 46,324 were in the United States.) 

INTERNATIONAL MISSIONARY UNION (1883). 

Corresponding Secretary: Mrs. H. J. Bostwick, Clifton Springs, New York. 

(NOTE: This is an interdenominational yearly conference of retired missionaries, 
together with those on furlough and those under appointment.) 

INTERNATIONAL ORDER OF THE KING'S DAUGHTERS AND SONS 

(1886). 

General Secretary: Mrs. Mary Lowe Dickinson. 
Corresponding Secretary: Miss Clara Morehouse. 
Office Address: 156 Fifth Ave., New York City. New York. 
Object: The development of spiritual life, and the stimulation of Christian 

activities. 

Income: No statement at hand. 
Organ: "The Silver Cross." 
Fields: Jap^an, China, Philippine Islands, New Zealand, India, Palestine 

and Syria, Western Africa (Liberia), Central America (Nicaragua), 

West Indies. 

(NOTE: Circles of the Order have been established in the mission fields enumerated 
above. Each Circle may choose its own work. Many branches of activities are 
undertaken, including work of a religious character, and various forms of educational 
and philanthropic effort.) 

STUDENT VOLUNTEER MOVEMENT FOR FOREIGN MISSIONS (1886). 

General Secretary: Mr. Fennell P. Turner. 

Educational Secretary: Mr. J. Lovell Murray. 

Candidate Secretary: Mr. Wilbert B. Smith. 

Business Secretary: Mr. William P. McCulloch. 

Office Address: 125 East Twenty-seventh St., New York City, New York. 

Object: To cultivate missionary interest in the institutions of higher 
learning in the United States and Canada. 

Income: Administers funds only for expenses incurred in cultivating the 
missionary interests of educational institutions in the United States 
and Canada. No money sent to the foreign mission field. 

Organ: "The Intercollegian." 

Fields: United States, Canada. 



28 



WORLD ATLAS OF CHRISTIAN MISSIONS 



United States 



(NoTB: This Movement began in America in 1886. It unites those students in the 
higher institutions in Canada and the United States who have signed the declara- 
tion: "It is my purpose, if God permit, to become a foreign missionary." The ideal 
underlying the Movement, that of enlisting students for foreign mission service, 
has spread to other countries, and the organizations which have developed in those 
countries are given entries under their appropriate places in this Directory. Similar 
organizations are coming into being in mission lands, such as China, India, and 
Egypt, for the enlisting of students in the colleges for the future Christian leadership 
in those lands.) 

BOARD OF TRUSTEES OF ST. PAUL'S INSTITUTE (1887). 

Secretary: Rev. James L. Barton, D.D., 14 Beacon St., Boston, Massa- 
chusetts. 

Object: To make St. Paul's Institute eminently a thorough Christian 
academy, or college, and a training school of preachers and teach- 
ers for the leavening of Southern and Eastern Asia Minor. 

Income: $5,440. 

Field: Turkey-in-Asia (Tarsus). 

(NOTE: Undenominational and independent, but cooperating with the American 
Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions.) 

BROTHERHOOD OF ANDREW AND PHILIP (1888). 

Secretary: Rev. William H. Pheley, Ph.D., Fifteenth and Race Sts., 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Object: To spread Christ's kingdom among men, through personal work. 
Income: No statement at hand. 
Organ: "The Brotherhood Star." 
Fields: Those of the societies to which contributions are sent. 

(NOTE : Members contribute to missionary organizations connected with their individual 
denominations.) 

TRUSTEES OF PEKING UNIVERSITY (1888). 

Secretary: Rev. S. O. Benton, D.D., 150 Fifth Ave., New York City, New 
York. 

Object: To maintain in Peking, China, an educational institution which 
shall be founded and conducted upon strictly Christian and evan- 
gelical, but not sectarian, principles. 

Income: $35,750. 

Field: North China. 

WORLD'S SUNDAY SCHOOL ASSOCIATION (1889). 

General Secretary: Mr. Marion Lawrance, Hartford Building, 140 Dear- 
born St., Chicago, Illinois. 

Joint Secretary: Mr. W. N. Hartshorn, 85 Broad St., Boston, Massa- 
chusetts. 

Object: To promote the interests of Sunday Schools, and to increase their 
number in every land. 

Income: $68,169. This amount has been pledged for the Triennium, 
1910-1913, and the average annual income would therefore be $22,723. 

Organ: "The Sunday School Times." 

Fields: Malaysia, Australia, New Zealand, Africa, Asia, South America, 
Mexico, West Indies, North America, Great Britain, Europe. 

(NOTE: The Association is interdenominational in character, and cooperates with 
missionary organizations. It s_eeks to extend the work and increase the efficiency 
of Sunday Schools, especially in those regions of the world most in need of help. 
The World's Association cooperates with the International Sunday School Associa- 
tion and the Sunday School Union of Great Britain in a spirit of "allegiance," 
and in the loving relation of a child to its parent. Its first Convention was held in 
London in 1889. At the World's Sixth Sunday School Convention, held at Wash- 
ington, D. C., in 1910, a total for the world of 285,999 schools, and a total enroll- 
ment, including officers, teachers, and scholars, of 28,011,194 was reported.) 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF THE INTERNATIONAL INSTITUTE FOR 

GIRLS IN SPAIN (1892). 
Clerk of Board of Directors: Miss Caroline Borden, 382 Commonwealth 

Ave., Boston, Massachusetts. 

Object: To establish and maintain an institution for the Christian educa- 
tion of girls in Spain. 
Income: $19,595. This includes a balance brought forward from the 

previous year of $15,255. 
Field: Spain. 

(NOTE: The International Institute for Girls in Spain was founded by the late Mrs. 
Alice Gordon Gulick, in 1881, and incorporated under the laws of the Common- 
wealth of Massachusetts, in 1892. In 1903 the International Institute League was 
founded to enlist the aid, interest, and sympathy of the educated women of the 
United States, especially as represented by the students and graduates of colleges 
and schools. The plan was inaugurated_ by Mrs. Gulick, and has worked most 
successfully. The Secretaries of the National Committee of the League are, Miss 
Elizabeth Wood, B.A., Somerville, Massachusetts, and Miss Bertha C. Bidwell, 
M.A., Freeport, Illinois. For the year 1908-1909 the League contributed $3,120 
for the support of the academic work of the International Institute.) 

FOREIGN MISSIONS CONFERENCE OF NORTH AMERICA (1893). 
Secretary: Mr. W. Henry Grant, 156 Fifth Ave., New York City, New 

York. 

Object: To consider questions of administration pertaining to foreign 
missions. 

(NOTE : Formerly designated as the Conference of Mission Boards of the United States 
and Canada. An annual conference of secretaries of foreign boards is held, usually 
in January. A Standing Committee on Reference and Council makes it possible for 
these boards to cooperate as a unit on matters arising from time to time which require 
united action.) 

FRANCO-AMERICAN COMMITTEE (1893). 
Secretary: Rev. Alfred E. Myers, 1 West Twenty-ninth St., New York 

City, New York. 
Object: To aid the Reformed Churches of France in the evangelization 

of their own country. 
Income: $1,493. 

Organ: "The Huguenot Evangelist." 
Fields: France, Belgium. 

IRUSTEES OF ANATOLIA COLLEGE (1894). 

Secretary: Rev. James L. Barton, D.D., 14 Beacon St., Boston, Massa- 
chusetts. 

Object: The development and establishment of the character of young 
men who attend Anatolia College. 

Income: $10,000. 

Field: Turkish Empire. 

RATIONAL ARMENIA AND INDIA RELIEF ASSOCIATION FOR INDUS- 
TRIAL ORPHAN HOMES (1893). 

Secretary: Miss Emily Crosby Wheeler, 22 Sturges Ave., Mansfield, Ohio. 
Object: To support orphans in India and Turkey, and to give them first 
an industrial education, and later, if fitted for it, a training as nurses, 
doctors, teachers, foremen, or preachers. 
Income: $50,000. 
Organ: "The Helping Hand Series" (Quarterly). 



Fields: India, Turkish Empire. 

(NoTE: There is no missionary staff, either foreign or native, but the funds raised are 
committed to missionaries of various Boards. The Association is supporting 1,615 
regular orphans in 58 different orphanages in Turkey, and 31 in India. Aid is 
given for children who can still remain with their parents without entering any 
orphanage.) 

WORLD'S CHRISTIAN ENDEAVOR UNION (1895). 

President: Rev. Francis E. Clark, D.D., LL.D. 

Secretaries: John Willis Baer, LL.D., Mr. William Shaw. . 

Office Address: Tremont Temple, Boston, Massachusetts. 

Object: To unite in closer fellowship the Christian Endeavorers of the 
world, to promote the interests of the Christian Endeavor Movement, 
to reenforce the Christian Churches and missions in every land, and 
to cement the spiritual union of Christians the world around. 

Income: $8,000. (Received from individuals and Christian Endeavor 
Societies, and sent to Christian Endeavor Unions in mission lands, 
where it is expended, under the direction of their executive commit- 
tees, in the promotion of young people's work.) 

Organ: "The Christian Endeavor World." 

Field: Every country in the world that is open to Protestant Chris- 
tianity. 

(NOTE: Organized in 1895, and incorporated in 1901. The first local Christian En- 
deavor Society was organized February 2, 1881. The number of societies January 
1, 1911, exceeded 74,000. See also entry for United Society of Christian Endeavor, 
incorporated in 1885. There is a Christian Endeavor Union in Greclt Britain, 
to which all the_ various Christian Endeavor Societies stand related. The Secretary 
is Rev. W. Knight Chaplin, Williston, Leytonstone, London, N. E.) 

WORLD'S STUDENT CHRISTIAN FEDERATION (1895). 

General Secretary: John R. Mott, LL.D., 124 East Twenty-eighth St., 
New York City, New York. 

Object: To unite Student Christian Movements, or organizations, through- 
out the world, and promote mutual relations between them; to collect 
information regarding the religious condition of the students of all lands; 
and to promote the following lines of activity: (a) to lead students to 
become disciples of Jesus Christ as the only Saviour and as God; 
(b) to deepen the spiritual life of students ; and (c) to enlist students 
in the work of extending the kingdom of Christ throughout the whole 
world. 

Organ: "The Student World." 

Fields: All lands where there are institutions of higher learning. 

(NOTE : The following organizations compose the World's Student Christian Federation : 
American and Canadian Student Young Men's Christian Association; Australasian 
Student Christian Union; Student Christian Movement of Great Britain and 
Ireland; Student Young Men's Christian Association of China and Korea; Student 
Christian Movements of Belgium, France, Holland, and Switzerland; German 
Christian Students' Alliance; Intercollegiate Young Men's Christian Associations 
of India and Ceylon; Student Young Men's Christian Association of Japan; Scan- 
dinavian University Christian Movement; Students' Christian Association of South 
Africa; Student Christian Movement in Lands without National Organizations:) 

FREE KINDERGARTEN AND CHILDREN'S AID ASSOCIATION OF THE 

TERRITORY OF HAWAII (1895). 

Secretary: Mrs. F. G. Dillingham, Honolulu, Territory of Hawaii. 
Object: To supervise and maintain kindergartens, and to give such aid 
and assistance to children as may be deemed necessary from time to 
time. 
Income: $11,816. Of this amount $6,819 represents receipts for the 

kindergartens, and $4,897 receipts for the Castle Home. 
Field: Hawaiian Islands. 

(NOTE: The Kindergarten Training School is a branch of the work carried on by this 
Association, which also conducts six kindergartens, with a total of 843 pupils, 
representing nine nationalities, a large proportion of whom are Chinese and 
Japanese. The Castle Home for Children, opened in 1899, is another department of 
its work.) 

AMERICAN RAMABAI ASSOCIATION, IN AID OF THE MUKTI MIS- 
SION (1896). 

Secretary: Miss Clementine Butler, Newton Center, Massachusetts. 
Object: To promote and assist in the education of women in India. 
Income: $7,473. 
Organ: "Mukti Prayer Bell." 
Field: India (Poona District). 
(NOTE: See Mukti Mission, under India.) 

WORLD'S FAITH MISSIONARY ASSOCIATION (1896). 

Secretary: Rev. Fred Weiss, 307 Farnham Ave., Hhenandoah, Iowa. 

Object: To operate home and foreign missionary work, and to appoint, 
recommend, or approve suitable persons for every branch of ministerial 
work. 

Income: $3,000 for home work; $1,000 for the foreign field. 

Organ: "The Missionary World." 

Fields: The organization is simply a small cooperative, interdenomina- 
tional body of ministers, missionaries, evangelists, and Christian workers, 
most of whom also belong to some regular denominational work. 

CENTRAL COMMITTEE ON THE UNITED STUDY OF MISSIONS (1900). 

Secretary: Mrs. Henry W. Peabody, 15 Keswick St., Boston, Massa- 
chusetts. 

Object: To provide a uniform study of foreign missions for women's 
societies of all denominations. 

Income: From royalties and sale of supplementary material, pictures, 
libraries, maps, and "Junior Book," about $9,000 to $10,000, which is 
expended in summer schools, and the promotion of the work. 

Fields: United States, Canada. 

YOUNG PEOPLE'S MISSIONARY MOVEMENT OF THE UNITED STATES 
AND CANADA (1902). 

General Secretary: Mr. Harry Wade Hicks, 156 Fifth Ave., New York 
City, New York. 

Object: To aid the mission boards in flooding their churches with the 
spirit and knowledge of missions, through existing agencies, and to 
make each follower of Christ faithful in extending His kingdom through- 
out the world. 

Income : For administration expenses only. 

Fields: United States, Canada. 

(NOTE: All of the Movement's activities are under the direction of representatives of 
the missi9n boards of the United States and Canada. Each mission board 
cultivates its constituency, and secures the literature that it needs from the Move- 
ment. The Movement is a publishing house, selling its literature at wholesale to 
the mission boards, who, in turn, distribute it among the members of their 
denominations. Its summer conferences, and other field activities, are directed 
wholly to stimulate missionary education, and to train leaders for the various 
denominations.) 



United States 



DIRECTORY OF MISSIONARY SOCIETIES 



29 



TRUSTEES OF THE INTERNATIONAL COLLEGE OF SMYRNA, TURKEY 

(1903)- 

Secretary: Rev. James L. Barton, D.D., 14 Beacon St., Boston, Massa- 
chusetts. 

Object: To provide a thorough practical education for boys and young 
men in and around Smyrna, Turkey, on a distinctly Christian basis. 

Income: $13,000. 

Field: Turkish Empire. 

HARVARD MISSION (1904). 

Vice-Chairman: Mr. G. E. Huggins, 299 Broadway, New York City, New 
York. 

Object: To arouse, maintain, and increase among Harvard men an intel- 
ligent interest and participation in the work of missions. 

Income: $1,460 (covering period from July, 1905, to July, 1907). 

Organ: "The Harvard Mission" (issued biennially). 

Fields: Those where are located the Harvard men supported by the Har- 
vard Mission, through the societies with which these men are connected. 

(NOTE: The' Harvard Mission was founded in 1904, but its organization was modified 
in 1908, and the administration committed to a Board of Trustees and a Student 
Committee. The plans of the Mission include the support of Harvard representa- 
tives on foreign mission fields, and also the founding of the Harvard Medical 
School, at Shanghai, China. For this Medical School a special Board of .trustees 
has 'been formed, who hope to raise an ample endowment, for the institution For 
further particulars about this project address Dr. Martin R. Edwards, 14 Bird 
St., Dorchester, Massachusetts.) 

CONGO REFORM ASSOCIATION (1904). 

. (See under England.) 

CONGO REFORM ASSOCIATION AMERICAN BRANCH (1004)- , _ 

Corresponding Secretary: Rev. Herbert S. Johnson, 69 Bay State Road, Boston, 

Massachusetts. 
Object: To create public sentiment with regard to the treatment of natives in the 

Belgian Congo. . 

Income: Occasional contributions from individuals and organizations. 
Fields: United States, Canada. 

NEW ENGLAND CHINESE SUNDAY SCHOOL WORKERS' UNION (1904)- 

Founder: Mrs. H. E. Mitchell, 40 Wellington St., Worcester, Massachu- 
setts. 

Object: To awaken interest and sympathy for the Chinese, and to unite 
and increase the efficiency of those engaged in promoting the spiritual 
welfare of that people. 

Income: No statement at hand. 

Field: New England. 

COUNCIL OF WOMEN FOR HOME MISSIONS (1906). 

Corresponding Secretary: Mrs. Amos R. Wells, Auburndale, Massachu- 
setts. 

Object: To integrate the work of all home mission summer schools, or 
conferences; to provide interdenominational text-books for home 
mission study classes; to provide literature for interdenominational 
use; to arrange a service for an interdenominational day of prayer; 
to care for home mission interests in schools and colleges; and, in 
general, to promote interdenominational fellowship and cooperation 
among women's boards and societies. 

INTERNATIONAL REFORM BUREAU (1906). 

Secretary: Rev. Wilbur F. Crafts, PhJD., 206 Pennsylvania Ave., S. E., 

Washington, District of Columbia. 
Object: To create a better moral environment, especially for children at 

home, and child races abroad, by suppressing the vicious uses of opium 

and other intoxicants; also the prevention of gambling, impurity, and 

Sabbath breaking. 
Income: $40,000. 

Organ: "The Twentieth Century Quarterly." 
Fields: The United States, and various international stations. 

(NOTE: In connection with the International Reform Bureau, there are Councils in 
Great Britain, Canada, Australia, and Japan. The Rev. Edward W. Thwing, 
Tientsin, China, is the Oriental Secretary for the Bureau. For the Japan Council, 
see under Japan.) 

LAYMEN'S MISSIONARY MOVEMENT (1906). 

General Secretaries: Mr. J. Campbell White, Mr. William B. Millar. 

Executive Secretary: Mr. Charles A. Gunn. 

Field Secretaries: Mr. Charles H. Pratt, Mr. F. J. Michel, Mr. I. W. Baker, 
Mr. H. K. Caskey (Secretary in Canada). 

Office Address: 1 Madison Ave., New York City, New York. 

Object: To cooperate with the regular missionary agencies of the Churches 
in the enlargement of their work in foreign fields. 

Income: Administers funds only for payment of expenses of the Move- 
ment. 

Organ: "Men and Missions." 

Fields: Those of the Societies aided by members of the Movement. 

(NOTE: From the first the idea of the Laymen's Missionary Movement has been to 
cooperate with the regular missionary agencies of the Churches in the enlargement 
of their work. It does not divert missionary offerings from congregational or 
denominational channels, nor does it promote the organization of separate men's 
missionary societies within the congregations. The Movement itself has no 
organization apart from a General Committee, which meets twice a year, and an 
Executive Committee of twenty-one members, which meets every month. At 
least twelve denominational Laymen's Missionary Movements have already been 
organized. As a rule, these follow the practice of the general Movement, and consist 
merely of a series of committees. Ten secretaries of denominational Movements 
have been secured. As the Movement is "an inspiration, not an administration," 
it has been chiefly occupied with the presentation of an adequate missionary policy 
to influential groups of men, and also with the exploitation of methods of missionary 
finance, which have produced the best results. The Movement stands for investi- 
ga_tion, agitation, and organization; the investigation by laymen of an adequate 
missionary policy, and the organization of laymen to cooperate with the ministers 
and missionary boards in enlisting the whole Church in its supreme work of saving 
the world. Laymen's Missionary Movements have been organized in Great Britain, 
and on the Continent of Europe.) 

PRINCETON MISSION (1906). 

Secretary: Prof. Lucius H. Miller, Princeton University, Princeton, New 
Jersey. 



Object: The support of Princeton men who are at work in mission fields, 

under other organizations. 

Income: $5,600 for work in the Peking Young Men's Christian Association. 
Organs: Occasional "Bulletins" are published in the United States, and 

in Peking, a Chinese-English monthly, entitled "Peking Young Men." 
Field: North China. 

TRUSTEES OF THE ENDOWMENT FUND OF THE AMERICAN COLLEGE* 

MADURA. INDIA (1906). 
Secretary: Mr. Willis E. Lougee, 287 Fourth Ave., New York City, New 

York. 

Object: To educate young men in South India. 
Income: From all sources, $16,462. 
Field: India. 

"CHRISTIAN HERALD" MISSIONARY FUND (1907). 
Secretary: Mr. Theodore Waters, 92 Bible House, New York City, New 

York. 

Object: The support of missionary and relief work at home and abroad. 
Income: For missionary and relief work in foreign mission fields, $54,065; 

in home mission fields, $64,270; total, $118,335. 
Organ: "The Christian Herald." 
Fields: Japan, China, India, Africa, United States. 

(NOTE: A fund established by the late Dr. Louis Klopsch, Editor of "The Christian 
Herald." See entry of "Christian Herald" Orphanage Committee of China in the 
China section of Directory.) 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF THE APOSTOLIC INSTITUTE, KONIA 

(1907). 

Secretary Board of Directors: Mr. Martin Ralph, Jamaica, New York. 
Object: Benevolent, charitable, and missionary work, especially among 

orphans, and the conduct of educational work, at Konia, Asia Minor. 
Income: $5,107. 
Field: Turkish Empire (Konia). 

(NOTE: The late Rev. H. S. Jenanyan, D.D., was a native Armenian, who came to 
the United States in 1884, and completed his theological education at Union Theo- 
logical Seminary. He was connected for some years with St. Paul's Institute at 
Tarsus, Asia Minor. Later he founded the Apostolic Institute at Konia, and for 
many years was instrumental in securing its support, and accomplishing through it 
a useful and philanthropic service. After his death, in 1907, the management of 
the Institute was continued by a Board of Directors in the United States, of whom 
the Rev. David J. Burrell, D.D., is the President. It is a corporation organized 
under the laws of the State of New York, and is at present under the local super- 
vision of Dr. A. H. Haigazian. Further information may be obtained from Mrs. 
H. S. Jenanyan, 1301 Divinity Place, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.) 

TRUSTEES OF THE AMERICAN COLLEGE FOR GIRLS AT CONSTANTI- 
NOPLE IN TURKEY (1908). 
Secretary: Mr. Samuel C. Darling, 1001 Pemb'erton Building, Boston, 

Massachusetts. 
Object: To maintain a college for the education of girls, and a preparatory 

school in connection therewith. 
Income: From the foreign field, $14,607; from home sources, $10,915; 

total, $25,522. 
Field: Turkish Empire. 

(NOTE: The date here given represents the time when the second charter was granted, 
and the present Board of Trustees chosen. The first charter was granted in 1890, 
and the institution was founded as a high school in 1871. The new site of the 
College, on the west shores of the Bosporus, -will soon be occupied by an imposirlg 
group of buildings. See also entry for American College for Girls, under Turkish 
Empire.) 

CHINESE STUDENTS', CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION IN NORTH AMERICA 

(1909). 
General Secretary: Mr. Chengting T. Wang, Yale Station, New Haven, 

Connecticut. 
Object: To labor for the general welfare of the Chinese, both at home and 

abroad. 

Organ: "China's Young Men." 

Field: Chinese students in the higher institutions of the United States 
and Canada. 

(NOTE: The Association is sponsor for conferences of Chinese students held at inter- 
vals in various sections of the United States.) 

TRUSTEES OF FOOCHOW COLLEGE (1909). 

Secretary: Rev. James L. Barton, D.D., 14 Beacon St., Boston, Massa- 
chusetts. 

Object: To educate Chinese young men, and to train them in Christian 
character. 

Income: $7,000. 

Field: China (Fuhkien Province). 

TRUSTEES OF THE UNIVERSITY OF NANKING (1909). 
Secretary: Mr. Ralph E. Diffendorfer, 156 Fifth Ave., New York City, 

New York. 

Object: To further the interests of the University of Nanking. 
Income : No report of income is as yet available. 
Field: Central China. 

(NOTE: The University of Nanking is the outgrowth of a union movement among 
mission boards doing educational work at Nanking, China. They represent the 
Board of Foreign Missions of the Methodist Episcopal Church, the Disciples of 
Christ, and the Presbyterian Church of the United States of America. The Uni- 
versity of Nanking superseded Nanking University, which was an institution of 
the Board of Foreign Missions of the Methodist Episcopal Church. The Board of 
Trustees consists of nine members, three from each Church represented in the 
Union. On the field there is a Board of Managers, contesting of four members 
from each of the three Missions.) 

CONTINUATION COMMITTEE OF THE WORLD MISSIONARY CON- 
FERENCE, EDINBURGH (1910). 

Chairman: John R. Mott, LL.D., 124 East Twenty-eighth St., New York 
City, New York. 

(NOTE: The Continuation Committee is international in its personnel, having its 
Chairman in the United States, its Vice-Presidents, Dr. Eugene Stock and Dr. 
Julius Richter, in England and Germany, and its Secretary, Mr. J. H. Oldham, 
in Scotland. Its membership of thirty-five is drawn from the nations of Christen- 
dom and the Far East. For details see under Scotland.) 



30 



WORLD ATLAS OP CHRISTIAN MISSIONS 



Australia 



AUSTRALASIAN SOCIETIES 



AUSTRALIA 

Societies Appointing and Sending Missionaries 

BAPTIST: 

FURREEDPORE MISSIONARY SOCIETY, INCORPORATED (1882). 
Secretary: Rev. John G. Raws, High St., Unley Park, Adelaide, South 

Australia. 
Object: The evangelization of Furreedpore and Pubna Districts, East 

Bengal, India. 
Income: 1.888. 

Organs: !'The Southern Baptist," "Far and Near." 
Field: India (East Bengal). 

(NOTE: This Society was formerly known as the South Australian Baptist Missionary 
Society, and as such dates from 1864. The date given above (1882) is that of 
its incorporation under the title of Furreedpore Missionary Society. It is in con- 
nection with the South Australian Baptist Union. There is a women's society, 
named the Zenana Committee, which acts as an auxiliary to the Furreedpore 
Missionary Society. Mrs. Stow Smith, Fullarton Estate, Adelaide, is the Secretary.) 

BAPTIST FOREIGN MISSIONARY SOCIETY OF NEW SOUTH WALES 

(1884). 
Honorary Secretary: Rev. W. A. Southwell, 85 Victoria St., Petersham, 

Sydney, New South Wales. 

Object: To equip, send forth, and maintain missionaries to carry the Gos- 
pel to the people of India. 
Income: 537. 

Organ: A portion of "The Baptist." 
Field: India (East Bengal). 

(NOTE: This missionary work in India was originally a field of the Baptist Missionary 
Society of England. It was worked chiefly as a Zenana mission for ten years. 
There is a Ladies' Zenana Missionary Society auxiliary to the Baptist Foreign 
Missionary Society of New South Wales.) 

VICTORIAN BAPTIST FOREIGN MISSION (1885). 

Secretary: Rev. W. H. Holdsworth, M.A., 30 Edgevale Rd., Kew, Mel- 
bourne, Victoria. 

Object: The conversion of the pagan Garos, Hindus, and Moslems of 
India. 

Income: 3,064. (This amount is reported as all expended in India.) 

Organ: "Our Harvest Fields." 

Field: India (Bengal). 

(NOTE: A Baptist Women's Missionary Union, founded in 1895, is auxiliary to the 
Victorian Baptist Foreign Mission.) 

BAPTIST ASSOCIATION OF QUEENSLAND FOREIGN MISSION COM- 
MITTEE (1887). 

Secretary: Rev. William Higlett, Albion, Brisbane, Queensland. 
Object: To carry the Gospel to the people of India. 
Income: 300. 

Organ: "Queensland Baptist." 
Field: India (Eastern Bengal). 

BAPTIST UNION OF WEST AUSTRALIA (1896). 

Foreign Mission Secretary: Rev. N. L. Beurle, South Perth, West Aus- 
tralia. 

Object: The evangelization of the non-Christian people in Bengal. 

Income: No statement at hand. 

Fields: Australia (among the aborigines of West Australia), India 
(Bengal). 

CHURCH OF ENGLAND: 

CHURCH MISSIONARY SOCIETY FOR AFRICA AND THE EAST (1790). 
(See under England.) 

HEW SOUTH WALES CHURCH MISSIONARY ASSOCIATION (1825). 

General and Organizing Secretary: Rev. S. M. Johnstone, B.A., 133 The Strand, 
Pitt St., Sydney, New South Wales. 

Object: To correspond with the Church Missionary Society, and generally to act 
on its behalf in the Colony of New South Wales, and in any neighboring colony 
not possessing a similar organization. To send missionaries to the mission fields 
occupied by the Church Missionary Society; also, to engage in missionary work 
in such other fields not occupied by the Church Missionary Society, as the Provi- 
dence of God may direct. 

Income: 5,754. 

Organ: "The Church Missionary Gleaner" (New South Wales Edition). 

Fields: China, India, Palestine, N9rth Africa (Egypt), German East Africa, British 
East Africa, also among the Chinese in New South Wales. 

(NOTE: The New South Wales Church Missionary Auxiliary dates back to 1825, 
but was reconstituted in 1892 as the New South Wales Church Missionary Asso- 
ciation. The Association has a Ladies' Committee, reporting an income of 
818, the Honorary Secretary of which is Mrs. E. H. Sully, "Glynn," Wahroonga, 
New South Wales. There is also a Gleaners' Union, reporting 74 branches, 
and an income of 411, the Secretary of which is Miss M. Harper, Glencairn, 
Summer Hill, New South Wales. Miss Harper is also Honorary Central Secre- 
tary of the Young People's Union, which reports an income of 277. The 
three incomes mentioned are all included in the income returns of the New 
South Wales Church Missionary Association.) 

CHURCH MISSIONARY ASSOCIATION FOR VICTORIA (1892). 

Secretary: Rev. A. R. Ebbs, Church Missionary Association, Cathedral Buildings, 
Melbourne, Victoria. 

Lay Secretary: Mr. O. C. Thomas, Church Missionary Association, Cathedral 
Buildings, Melbourne, Victoria. 

Object: To correspond with the Church Missionary Society, and generally to act on 
its behalf in the State of Victoria, and in any neighboring state not possessing 
a similar organization; to send missionaries to the mission fields occupied by the 
Church Missionary Society, in connection with, and under the direction of, the 
Committee of that Society, and to be entirely responsible for their support; to 
engage in missionary work in such other fields not occupied by the Church Mission- 
ary Society, as the Providence of God may_ direct. 

Income: 5,787. (None received from foreign sources. The following amounts 
are reserved for home missions in Victoria: for work among aborigines, 72; 
for work among Chinese, 152. 1,004, given for pioneer work among the 
aborigines of North Australia, is included in the above 5,787.) 

Organ: "The Church Missionary Gleaner" (Melbourne Edition). 

Fields: China, Australia, India, Turkey-in-Asia, Palestine, Africa. 

(NOTE: The Church Missionary Associations of South and West Australia and 
Tasmania are combined with the Victoria Association. A Gleaners' Union, 
a Sowers' Band, and a Women's Missionary Council cooperate with the work 
of the Association.) 

MELANESIAN MISSION (1849). 

(See under New Zealand.) 

AUSTRALIAN BRANCH OF MELANESIAN MISSION ( ). 

Secretary: Rev. C. E. Curtis, 242 Pitt St., Sydney, New South Wales. 



Honorar 

i 
Ob; 



Object: To christianize the natives of the Melanesian Islands. 

Income: 2,546. 

Organ: "The Southern Cross Log." 

Field: Melanesia. 

AUSTRALIAN BOARD OF MISSIONS (1850). 
General Secretary: Ven. Archdeacon C. E. C. Lefroy. 
Assistant Secretary: Rev. C. E. Curtis, B.A. 
Office Address: 242 Pitt St., Sydney, New South Wales. 
Object : To evangelize the heathen races in Australia, Papua, and some ot 

the Melanesian Islands. 
Income: 8,000. 

Organs: "Missionary Notes," "The Australian Board of Missions Review." 
Fields: Australia, Melanesia. 

DIOCESE OF NEW GUINEA (1887). 

Bishop of the Diocese: Rt. Rev. G. Sharp, Samarai, Papua. 

Bishop's Commissary in England: Rev. H. C. Eden, Holy Innocents, 
Hammersmith, London, W. 

Object: The evangelization of the North-east Coast of Papua. 

Income: 3^507. (This represents the amount contributed by the New 
Guinea Mission Association in England. No statement is at hand as 
to the amount contributed by the Australian Board of Missions.) 

Field: Melanesia (British New Guinea, North-east Coast). 

(NOTE: The New Guinea Association, which acts as an auxiliary to the missions of 
the Diocese of New Guinea, was formed in 1898, in England, by Bishop Stone- Wigg. 
See in connection with the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel, under 
England.) > 

FRIENDS: 

FRIENDS' FOREIGN MISSION ASSOCIATION (1866). 
(See under England.) 

AUSTRALIAN AUXILIARY OF THE FRIENDS' FOREIGN MISSION. ASSOCIATION 

(1905)- 

>nqrary Secretary: Miss Margaret Pierce, care of Friends' Meeting House, Devon- 
shire St., Sydney, New South Wales. 

iject: To aid in the missionary work of the Friends' Foreign Mission Association of 
England. 
Income: 105. (included in income of the Friends' Foreign Mission Association, 

England.) 
Fields: Those of the Friends' Foreign Mission Association. 

(NOTE: There is also another auxiliary at Dunedin, New Zealand.) 

LUTHERAN: 

MISSIONARY COMMITTEE OF THE GERMAN EVANGELICAL LU- 
THERAN SYNOD OF AUSTRALIA (1878). 
Secretary: Name and address not at hand. 
Object: The evangelization of the natives of Australia. 
Income: 17,000 Mk. 

Organ: "Deutsche Kirchen- und Missionszeitung." 
Field: Australia. 

METHODIST: 

METHODIST MISSIONARY SOCIETY OF AUSTRALASIA (1855). 

Honorary Secretary: Rev. George Brown, D.D., F.R.S.S., Gordon, New 
South Wales. 

General Secretaries: Rev. B. Danks, Rev. John G. Wheen. 

Office Address: 139 Castlereagh St., Sydney, New South Wales. 

Object: The support and enlargement of the foreign missions under the 
direction of the General Conference of the Methodist Church of Aus- 
tralasia. 

Income: 38,010. The Report for the year ending December 31, 1909, 
gives this sum. It is largely made up by contributions from the Aux- 
iliaries of New South Wales (5,130), Victoria (5,719), South Aus- 
tralia (2,607), Queensland (722), New Zealand (2,332), Tasmania 
(1,455), and the astonishing sum of 10,900 from the Pacific Island 
Auxiliaries, representing Christian communities but recently rescued 
from heathenism. 

Organ: "The Missionary Review of the Methodist Church of Australasia." 

Fields: Australia (among the Chinese in Victoria). Melanesia (New 
Guinea, New Britain, Solomon Islands, Bismarck Archipelago), Poly- 
nesia (Samoa and Fiji Groups). 

(NOTE: The work was begun by the Wesleyan Missionary Society of England in 1835- 
In 1855 a separate Conference was established in Australia, when the South Sea 
Island work of the parent society passed into the hands of the Australasian Methodist 
Church. Its headquarters are located at Sydney, New South Wales, with auxiliaries 
in Queensland, Victoria, South Australia, West Australia, Tasmania, New Zealand, 
New Guinea, Samoa, Fiji, New Britain, and the Solomon Islands, with numerous 
women's auxiliaries assisting in the work. The General Conference of the Meth- 
odist Church of Australasia, united in 1902, passed a vote in 1910 favoring the 
constitution of New Zealand into an Independent Conference, under the name 
of "The Methodist Church of New Zealand," but for the present New Zealand will 
continue to support the Foreign Mission Fund of the Methodist Church of Aus- 
tralasia.) 

PRESBYTERIAN: 

NEW HEBRIDES MISSION (1848). 

Clerk of Mission Synod: Rev. William Watt, Tanna, New Hebrides. 
Object: The dissemination and establishment of Christianity in the New 

Hebrides. 

Income: 9,000 (approximately). 
Organ: "The New Hebrides Magazine." Published in Australia. Editor, 

Rev. F. H. L. Paton, B.D., 167 Collins St., Melbourne, Victoria. 
Field: Melanesia (New Hebrides). 

(NOTE: This organization was formerly called the "Dayspring" and New Hebrides 
Mission. The word "Dayspring" in the title referred to a mission vessel of that 
name. The Presbyterian Churches of Australia, in cooperation with the Presby- 
terian Church of Canada and the United Free Church of Scotland, join in the sup- 
port of the New Hebrides Mission. The John G. Paton Mission Fund, which 
see under Scotland, also was established especially for the support of this Mission, 
and contributes largely toward its maintenance.) 

PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH OF VICTORIA (1860). 

Secretary: Rev. Frank H. L. Paton, B.D., Assembly Hall, 167 Collins St., 

Melbourne, Victoria. 
Object: Foreign missionary work in the New Hebrides and Korea, and 

missions among the Chinese and aborigines in Victoria. 
Income: 8,881. 
Organ : "The Messenger. ' ' 
Fields: Korea, Australia, Melanesia (New Hebrides). 



Auatralia-New Zealand 



DIRECTORY OF MISSIONARY SOCIETIES 



31 



PRESBYTERIAN WOMEN'S MISSIONARY UNION OF VICTORIA (1890). 

Foreign Secretary: Mrs. 0. B. Anderson, 30 Adams St., South Yarra, Victoria. 

Home Secretary: Miss Annie Todd, "Konetta," Pakington St., Kew, Victoria. 

Object: The glory of God and the salvation of souls, in promoting the evangelization 
and Christian education of women in foreign mission lands, and also among tho 
Chinese women and children in Victoria. 

Income: 1,400, entirely from home sources. (About 1,100 expended on main- 
tenance of workers and schools in Korea.) 

Organ: "The Chronicle of the Presbyterian Women's Missionary Union of Victoria." 

Fields: Korea, Australia (among the Chinese and aborigines). 

(NoTB: Connected with the Union are 68 Young People's Mission Bands, and 201 
Branches.) 

PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH OF NEW SOUTH WALES (1865). 

Secretary: W. Wood, Esq., 23 York St., Sydney, New South Wales. 

Object: Missionary work in the New Hebrides, and among the Chinese 
in Sydney. 

Income: 2,197. 

Fields: Australia (among the Chinese in Sydney), Melanesia (New Heb- 
rides). 

(NOTE: There is a Women's Missionary Association in connection with the Presby- 
terian Church of New South Wales. The Organizing Secretary is Miss Jessie 
Heath, 23 York St., Sydney.) 

PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH OF SOUTH AUSTRALIA (1872). 
Convener of Foreign Missions Committee: Rev. George Davidson, D.D. 
General Agent and Financial Secretary: Rev. W. Gray. 
Office Address: 24 Davenport Chambers, Currie St., Adelaide, South 

Australia. 
Object: Missions in the New Hebrides, and to the aborigines of North 

Queensland. 
Income: 446. 

Organ: "The Presbyterian Banner." 
Fields: Australia (among the aborigines), Melanesia (New Hebrides). 

(NoTB: There is a Women's Missionary Union in connection with the Presbyterian 
Church of South Australia, of which Mrs. Rennie, Childers St., North Adelaide, 
is the Honorary Secretary.) 

PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH OF QUEENSLAND (1882). 
Secretary of Mission Committee: Rev. William C. Radcliffe, Church 

Offices, Creek St., Brisbane, Queensland. 
Object: To evangelize the aborigines of Australia. 
Income: 170. (Contributed to the North Queensland Mission of the 

Board of Foreign Missions of the Presbyterian Church of Australia.) 
Organ: "The Messenger." 
Field: Australia (among the aborigines). 

>RESBYTERIAN CHURCH OF WEST AUSTRALIA ( ). 

Conveners: Rev. E. G. Petherick, Rev. G. F. Pitchford. Mr. Pethericlc's 
address is Port Headland, West Australia. 

Object: Missions among the aborigines of West Australia. 

Income: 511. The income placed at the disposal of the Foreign and 
Aborigines Mission Committee of West Australia is largely contributed 
by the Presbyterian Churches of other Australian States. 

Field: Australia (among the aborigines). 

tOARD OF MISSIONS OF THE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH OF AUS- 
TRALIA (1901). 
Convener: Rev. Alexander Stewart, M.A., 32 Flower St., Essendon, 

Victoria. 

Secretary: Rev. W. M. M. Alexander, 7 Bath St., Abbotsford, Victoria. 
Object: Missionary work among the aborigines of North Queensland. 
Income: 1,056. 

Organ: "The Missionary Record." 
Field: Australia (among the aborigines of North Queensland). 

(NOTE: The income of this Mission is_provided by the Presbyterian Churches of the 
different states in Australia Victoria, New South Wales, South Australia, Queens- 
land, West Australia, and also by the Presbyterian Church in Tasmania. Their con- 
tributions for this purpose are not included in the amounts reported by them for 
their own missions. A Women's Missionary Association is auxiliary to this Board.) 



IENDING SOCIETIES NOT DENOMINATIONAL: 

,ONDON MISSIONARY SOCIETY (1795). 

(See. under England.) 

AUSTRALASIAN AUXILIARIES OF THE LONDON MISSIONARY SOCIETY (1877). 
Organizing Agent for Australasia: Hey. Joseph King. 
Assistant Agent: Rev. George J. Williams. 
Office Address: 315 Little Collins St., Melbourne, Victoria. 
Object: To spread the knowledge of Christ among the heathen. 
Income: 5,555. (This income is forwarded to the London Missionary Society, 

which includes the amount in its annual receipts.) 
Organ: "The Chronicle" (Australasian Edition). 
Fields: Those of the London Missionary Society. 

(NOTE: The Intercolonial Committee was first appointed in 1877, but contributions 
were sent to the London Missionary Society as early as 1825. There are ten 
Australasian Auxiliaries of the London Missionary Society, situated as follows: 
in Australia, the New South Wales, Victorian, South Australian, Queensland, 
and West Australian auxiliaries; in Tasmania, the Tasmanian Auxiliary; and, in 
New Zealand, _the Auckland, Wellington, Christchurch, and Otago auxiliaries. 
These auxiliaries all have their own organizations and staff of officers, with women's 
auxiliary societies aiding in the missionary work. A Watchers' Band, or Prayer 
Union, of the London Missionary Society, has been organized in Australasia.) 

HINA INLAND MISSION (1865). 
(See under England.) 

AUSTRALASIAN COUNCIL OF THE CHINA INLAND MISSION (1800). 
Secretary: Mr. J. H. Todd, 267 Collins St., Melbourne, Victoria. 
Object: The evangelization of the inland provinces of China. 
Income: 6,216. (This income is in large part forwarded to the Treasurer inShanghai 

of the China Inland Mission, and is included in the general report of the China 

Inland Mission, England.) 

Organ: "China's Millions" (Australasian Edition). 
Field: China. 

OUTH SEA EVANGELICAL MISSION (1886). 
Secretary: Miss Young, M.L.A. Buildings, Wynyard St., Sydney, New 

South Wales. 

Object: The evangelization of the South Sea Islands. 
Income: 1,299. 
Organ: "Monthly Letter." 
Field: Melanesia (Solomon Islands). 

(NOTE: The South Sea Evangelical Mission was formerly known as the Queensland 
Kanaka Mission.) 



POONA AND INDIAN VILLAGE MISSION (1893). 

(See under India.) 

AUSTRALASIAN COUNCIL OF THE POONA AND INDIAN VILLAGE MISSION (1893). 

(NOTE: Councils of the Poona and Indian Village Mission are established in New 
South Wales, South Australia, Victoria, New Zealand, and Tasmania.) 

SOUTH AFRICAN COMPOUNDS AND INTERIOR MISSION (1896). 
(See under South Africa.) 

AUSTRALIAN CENTRAL COUNCIL OF THE SOUTH AFRICAN COMPOUNDS AND 
INTERIOR MISSION (1900). 

Honorary Secretary : Mr. R. W. Johnston, 104 Queen St., Melbourne, Victoria. 

Object: To contribute toward the support of the South African Compounds and 
Interior Mission. 

Income: 25, sent to the treasury of the Mission in Johannesburg, South Africa. 

Organ: "Africa's Golden Harvests." 

Fields: South Africa (Transvaal, Natal), Portuguese East Africa, and British East 
Africa. 

(NOTE: The Central Council is at Melbourne, but there are also collecting agencies 
in Adelaide, Sydney, and Brisbane, Australia; at Dunedin, Christchurch, Wel- 
lington, and Auckland, New Zealand; and at Hobart and Launceston, Tasmania.) 

ABORIGINAL INLAND MISSION (1902). 

Directors: Mr. and Mrs. G. C. Smith, Aboriginal Inland Mission, Single- 
ton, New South Wales. 

Object: Work among the aborigines of the Manurka Mission, River 
Murray, South Australia. 

Income: No statement at hand. 

Field: Australia (New South Wales). 

NATIONAL COMMITTEE OF YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATIONS 

OF AUSTRALIA AND NEW ZEALAND (1906). 
Honorary National Secretary: Mr. John J. Virgo, Y. M. C. A. Building, 

Sydney, New South Wales. 

(NOTE: The National Committee of Young Men's Christian Associations of Australia 
and New Zealand was organized in 1906, but an organization called the Inter- 
colonial Committee existed for many years previous to that date. The National 
Committee has quite recently established a Foreign Department, by the appoint- 
ment of a Secretary whose services will be given to India. There are 22 Associa- 
tions connected with the National Committee.) 



Cooperating and Collecting Societies 

AUSTRALASIAN STUDENT CHRISTIAN UNION (1896). 
Secretary: Mr. S. S. Addison, 225 Collins St., Melbourne, Victoria. 
Object : To promote the study of missions among students, and to awaken 

missionary interest and consecration among them. 
Income: 761. 

Organ: "The Australasian Intercollegian." 
Field: The educational institutions of Australasia. 

NATIONAL YOUNG WOMEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION OF AUSTRAL- 
ASIA (1907). 

Honorary Secretary: Miss Annie E. Thomson, 163 Castlereagh St., Syd- 
ney, New South Wales. 

Object: The union, development, and extension of the Young Women's 
Christian Association in Australia and New Zealand. 

Income: 160. 

Organ: "Quarterly News Letter." 

Fields: Australia, New Zealand, and aid furnished to the fields of the 
China Inland Mission. 

(NOTE: There are 29 Associations connected with the National Young Women's 
Christian Assoeiati9n of Australasia. Thirty members of the Association are 
working under various missionary societies, and seven more are in training for 
similar service. A Foreign Department of the National Association was organ- 
ized in 1909, with Mrs. H. Pratt as Honorary Secretary.) 



NEW ZEALAND 

Societies Appointing and Sending Missionaries 
BAPTIST: 

NEW ZEALAND BAPTIST MISSIONARY SOCIETY (1883). 
Secretary: Rev. Ernest A. Kirwood, Grange Rd., Mt. Eden, Auckland. 
Object: To aid in the diffusion of the religion of Jesus Christ in India. 
Income: 2,060. (Practically the whole of this amount is raised in 

New Zealand.) 

Organ: "The New Zealand Baptist." 
Field: India. 

CHURCH OF ENGLAND: 

CHURCH MISSIONARY SOCIETY FOR AFRICA AND THE EAST (1799) 

(See under England.) 

NEW ZEALAND CHURCH MISSIONARY ASSOCIATION (1892). 

Secretary: Rev. Oliver J. Kimberley, New Zealand Church Missionary Association, 
Nelson. 

Object: To accept, train, and send forth candidates for missionary work in Church 
Missionary Society and other fields, and to be responsible for their support. 

Income: 2,034. 

Organ: "The New Zealand Church Gleaner." 

Fields: Japan, China, New Zealand, Melanesia, India, Western Africa (Southern 
Nigeria). 

(NOTE: The New Zealand Church Missionary Association not only maintains 
missionaries in connection with the Church Missionary Society, but also in con- 
nection with the Church of England Zenana Missionary Society, and the 
Melanesian Mission. In addition, it has its own work among the Maoris of 
New Zealand. It has as auxiliaries a Ladies' Committee, a Gleaners' Union, 
and a Sowers' Band.) 

MELANESIAN MISSION (1849). 
Bishop of New Zealand: Rt. Rev. Cecil Wilson, D.D., Norfolk Island, 

Melanesia, 

Secretary: Rev. W. G. Ivens, Wellington. 
Object: To christianize the New Hebrides, and the Banks, Santa Cruz, 

Solomon, and Torres Islands. 

Income: 16,811, of which 3,707 was contributed in New Zealand. 
Organ: "The Southern Cross Log." 
Field: Melanesia (Solomon, Santa Cruz, Torres, Banks, and Northern 

New Hebrides Groups.) 
(NOTE: See entries for auxiliaries of this Mission under Australia and England.) 



32 



WORLD ATLAS OF CHRISTIAN MISSIONS 



New Zealand-England 



NEW ZEALAND MAORI MISSION BOARD (1904). 

Secretary: The Bishop of the Diocese of Waiapu is the Rt. Rev. A. W. 
Averill, Taumata. Napier. 

Object: Constituted by the General Synod of New Zealand, to attend to 
the raising and distributing of the funds required for all the work of 
the Churcn of England among the Maori population. 

Income: 4,900. (Of this amount the Church Missionary Society pro- 
vides 600 in stipends to white clergy who joined the Mission before 
1882, and 1,400 comes from endowments in different dioceses, leaving 
2,900 as collections from the New Zealand Church.) 

Field: New Zealand (among the Maoris). 

(NOTE: The New Zealand Maori Mission Trust Board, established in 1882, still holds 
in trust properties handed over to it by the Church Missionary Society.) 

FRIENDS: 

FRIENDS' FOREIGN MISSION ASSOCIATION (1866). 
(See under England.) 

HEW ZEALAND AUXILIARY OF THE FRIENDS' FOREIGN MISSION ASSOCIATION 

(1905). 

Secretary: Mr. Charles W. White, 9 Dowling St., Dunedin. 
Object: To aid in the missionary work of the Friends' Foreign Mission Association 

of England. 

Income : 36. (Sent to treasury of the Friends' Foreign Mission Association.) 
Fields: Those of the Friends' Foreign Mission Association. 

METHODIST: 



METHODIST CHURCH OF NEW ZEALAND (1910). 

(NOTE: The General Conference of the Methodist Church of Australasia has adopted a 
"working scheme" for the constituting of New Zealand into an Independent Con- 
ference, under the name of the Methodist Church of New Zealand, but with the 
proviso that for the present the Methodist Churches in New Zealand should con- 
tinue to send their foreign mission contributions to the Methodist Missionary So- 
ciety of Australasia, which see under Australia. Subject to necessary legal enact- 
ments, the Methodist Church of New Zealand will become independent and 
self-governing on March 31, 1912. The Methodist work among the Maoris of New 
Zealand is conducted by the New Zealand Conference, and not by the Methodist 
Missionary Society of Australasia.) 

PRESBYTERIAN: 

FOREIGN MISSION COMMITTEE OF THE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 

OF NEW ZEALAND (1869). 

Secretary: Rev. Professor William Hewitson, B.A., Knox College, Dunedin. 
Object: The evangelization of non-Christian peoples, including educa- 
tional and medical missionary work. 
Income: 8,700. 
Organ: "The Outlook." 

Fields: China, New Zealand (Missions among the Maoris and the 
Chinese), Melanesia (New Hebrides). 

(NOTE: The Presbyterian Women's Missionary Union of New Zealand is auxiliary to 
the Foreign Mission Committee, The missionary returns from the Synod of the 
Presbyterian Church of Otago and Southland are included with those of the Pres- 
byterian Church of New Zealand.) 



SENDING SOCIETIES NOT DENOMINATIONAL: 

CHINA INLAND MISSION (1865). 
(See under England.) 

AUXILIARY COUNCIL FOR NEW ZEALAND OF THE CHINA INLAND MISSION 
Honorary Secretary: Mr. John Wilkinson, Dunedin. 

BOLIVIAN INDIAN MISSION (1907). 

Secretary: Mr. A. Irvine, 68 Royal Terrace, Dunedin. 

Object: Evangelistic and educational work among the Quechua In- 
dians in Bolivia. 

Income: 200. This sum represents only the amount reported by the 
English Council of the Mission. No statement of income received 
from the New Zealand headquarters. 

Organ: "The Bolivian Indian Mission News and Report." 

Field: South America (Bolivia). 

(NOTE: See under England for English Council of Bolivian Indian Mission. There 
is a Ladies' Auxiliary Council in connection with the Mission in New Zealand.) 



TASMANIA 

Societies Appointing and Sending Missionaries 
BAPTIST: 

TASMANIAN BAPTIST MISSIONARY SOCIETY (1884). 
Secretary: Miss M. H. Sidebottom, Launceston. 
Object: The evangelization of Eastern Bengal, India. 
Income : No statement at hand. 
Organ: "The Southern Baptist." 
Field: India (East Bengal). 

PRESBYTERIAN : 

PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH OF TASMANIA ( ). 
Convener of Foreign Missions Committee: Rev. J. Heyer, Hobart. 
Object: The christianization of the inhabitants of the New Hebrides. 
Income: 501. 
Field: Melanesia (New Hebrides). 

SENDING SOCIETY NOT DENOMINATIONAL: 

CHINA INLAND MISSION (1865). 
(See under England.) 

AUXILIARY COUNCIL FOR TASMANIA OF THE CHINA INLAND MISSION 
Office Address: 103 Macquane St., Hobart. 



BRITISH AND IRISH SOCIETIES 



ENGLAND 

Societies Appointing and Sending Missionaries 

BAPTIST: 

BAPTIST MISSIONARY SOCIETY (1792). 

General Secretary: Rev. C. E. Wilson, B.A. 

Home Secretary: Rev. J. B. Myers. 

Organizing Secretary: Rev. J. Cornish. 

Office Address: Baptist Mission House, 19 Furnival St., London, E. C. 

Object: The diffusion of the knowledge of the religion of Jesus Christ 
throughout the whole world, beyond the British Isles, by the preach- 
ing of the Gospel, the translation and publication of the Holy Scrip- 
tures, and the establishment of schools. 

Income: 93,982. (Appropriated of this amount for the work in the 
West Indies, France, and Italy, 5,089.) 

Organ: "The Missionary Herald of the Baptist Missionary Society." 

Fields: China, India, Ceylon, South-west Africa (Belgian Congo, Angola), 
Europe (France, Italy), West Indies. 

BIBLE TRANSLATION SOCIETY AUXILIARY OF THE BAPTIST MISSIONARY 
SOCIETY (1840). 

Secretary: Rev. J. R. M. Stephens, Baptist Mission House, 19 Furnival St., London, 
E. G. 

Object: To translate, print, and publish versions of the Sacred Scriptures in which 
the W9rds relating to baptism are accurately translated, for circulation in Bap- 
tist mission fields. 

Income: 2,303, of which 1,000 is included in the income of the Baptist Mis- 
sionary Society. 

Fields: Those of the Baptist Missionary Society. 

BAPTIST ZENANA MISSION (1867). 

Honorary Secretaries: Miss A. G. Angus, Miss E. A. Angus, Ellerdale, Hampstend, 
London, N. W. 

Home Secretary: Mrs. Kerry, Baptist Mission House, 19 Furnival St., London, 
E. C. 

Object: To impart a knowledge of the Gospel of the Lord Jesus Christ to the women 
of India and China, by selecting and sending out truly consecrated and well- 
educated women, and by the careful training and employment of native converts 
as Bible-women and _school-teachers. 

Income: 15,250 (not included in the income of the Baptist Missionary Society). 
In addition, 1,653 was received in India in fees, grants, donations, etc. 

Organ: "The Baptist Zenana Mission Magazine." 

Fields: China, India. 

MEDICAL MISSIONARY AUXILIARY OF THE BAPTIST MISSIONARY SOCIETY 
(1902), ' 

Secretary: Dr. R. Fletcher Moorshead, M.B., F.R.C.S., Baptist Mission House, 
19 Furnival St., London, E. C. 

Object: To promote interest in medical missions, and to provide support for the 
medical staff of the Baptist Missionary Society, and the Baptist Zenana Mission. 

Income: 9,522, of which 5,377 is included in the income of the Baptist Mis- 
sionary Society, and 2,916 in the income of the Baptist Zenana Mission. 

Organ: "The Medical Missionary." 

Fields: Those of the Baptist Missionary Society, and the Baptist Zenana Mission. 



STRICT BAPTIST MISSION (1860). 

Honorary Secretary: Pastor W. Chisnall, Epsom Road, Guildford, Surrey. 

Object: Evangelization in India. 

Income: 2,268. 

Organ: "The Strict Baptist Mission Herald." 

Field: South India. 

(NOTE: Incorporated in 1907.) 

LADIES' ZENANA AUXILIARY OF THE STRICT BAPTIST MISSION (1906). 
Honorary Secretary: Mrs. Silvester, 9 Gallia Road, Highbury, London, N. 
Object: To support lady missionaries and Bible-women for the making known of 

Christ by zenana visits; giving instruction to women in Bible knowledge and 

in the visitation of the sick. 
Income: 212. 

Organ: A portion of "The Strict Baptist Mission Herald." 
Field: South India. 

SOUTH INDIAN STRICT BAPTIST MISSIONARY SOCIETY (1897). 

Secretary: Pastor S. Gray, 65 Ferme Park Road, Stroud Green, London, N. 
Object: The proclamation of the Gospel among non-Christian peoples, 

and the formation of churches in accordance with the fundamental 

principles of the Society. 
Income: 3,158. (This includes subscriptions in India, Ceylon, and 

Australia, amounting to 678, for leper work, and also a grant of 350 

from the Mission to Lepers in India and the East.) 
Organ: "Rays from the East." 
Field: South India. 
(NOTE: Established in 1860, reorganized in 1897.) 



CHRISTIAN (Commonly called Brethren, or Open Brethren) : 

CHRISTIAN MISSIONS IN MANY LANDS (1836). 

Correspondents: In England: The editors of "Echoes of Service," W. H. 
Bennet and R. E. Sparks, 1 Widcombe Crescent, Bath. In Scotland' 
Mr. Charles P. Watson, 33 Renfield St., Glasgow, and the Editor of 
"The Witness," Publishing Office, Bothwell Circus, Glasgow. 

Object: The conversion of souls, and the edification of believers. 

Income: Through "Echoes of Service," 23,436 (of which 5,657 was ex- 
pended on work in Europe); through "The Witness," 1,582 (of which 
576 was expended on work in Europe). 

Organs: "Echoes of Service," "The Witness." 

Fields: Japan, Chinese Empire, French Indo-China, Siam, British Ma- 
laysia, India, Persia, North -west Africa (Tunis, Algeria, Morocco) 
South-west Africa (Belgian Congo, Angola), South Africa (Cape 
Colony, Natal, Transvaal), Southern Central Africa (North-eastern 
Rhodesia, North-western Rhodesia), and among Jews in London 
and Palestine. Also among Christians in Europe (Austria-Hungary 
Belgium, Denmark, France, Greece, Italy, Portugal, Roumania, Spain)' 
Iceland, Mexico. Central America (Guatemala), South America (Argen- 
tine Republic, British Guiana, Brazil, Uruguay, Venezuela), West 
Indies. 

(NOTE: The Mission to Garenganze, founded by Mr. F. S. Arnot, in 1881 is an im. 
portant branch of this service.) ' 



England 



DIRECTORY OF MISSIONARY SOCIETIES 



33 



CHURCH OF ENGLAND: 

NEW ENGLAND COMPANY (1649). 
Charter Clerk: Mr. C. Augustus Webb. 26 Bloomsbury Square, London, 

W. C. 
Object: The propagation of the Gospel among the Indians in British 

North America. 
Income: The income, about 5,000, is derived from the interest on 

charter funds, and two bequests. 
Field: Canada (Ontario, British Columbia). 

(NOTE: Incorporated by Royal Charter in 1662. Work in New England, 1649-1775; 
New Brunswick, Canada, 1786-1822: Ontario, Canada, 1833 to the present. This 
is the oldest Missionary Society in England.) 

SOCIETY FOR THE PROPAGATION OF THE GOSPEL IN FOREIGN 
PARTS (1701). 

Secretary: The Rt. Rev. Bishop Montgomery, D.D., 15 Tufton St., 
Westminster, London, S. W. 

Assistant Secretaries: Rev. E. P. Sketchley, M.A. (Candidates and Chap- 
laincies), Rev. Canon C. H. Robinson, D.D. (Editorial), Rev. W. E. 
Jackson, M. A. (Home Organization), Mr. C. F. Pascoe, Lay Secre- 
tary (Foreign). 

Object: To support work among English-speaking peoples in the col- 
onies, and in foreign countries, and to propagate the Gospel among 
the heathen. 

Income: General fund, 129,478; special funds, 75,188; total, 204,666. 

Organs: "The Mission Field," "The East and the West" (quarterly), 
"The King's Messengers," "The Church Abroad," "Home Workers' 
Gazette." 

Fields: Japan, Korea, Chinese Empire China, Manchuria), Siam, British 
Malaysia, Australia, Melanesia (British New Guinea, Norfolk Island), 
Polynesia (Fiji Islands), India, Ceylon, Palestine, North-east Africa 

gSgypt), North-west Africa (Algeria), Western Africa (French Guinea, 
old Coast), South Africa (Cape Colony, Natal, Orange Free State, 
Transvaal, Basutoland, Swaziland), Island of St. Helena, Southern 
Central Africa (Bechuanaland, Southern Rhodesia, North-eastern 
Rhodesia), Portuguese East Africa, Madagascar, Mauritius, South 
America (British Guiana), Central America, West Indies, Canada. 

(NOTE: The work conducted by the Society in Asia may be classed as foreign missions, 
and to a large extent that in Africa, Central America, South America, the West In- 
dies, and the Pacific Islands. In Australia, North America, and Europe it is almost 
entirely colonial missions. About one fourth of the Society's income is spent on 
Christian colonists, and the rest on work among native races. The Women's Mis- 
sion Association of the Society for the Propagation of the Gosjpel ceased to exist 
January 1, 1904. The work formerly carried on by this Association is now being 
conducted under the direction of a standing committee known as the Committee of 
Women's Work, consisting of women, with Miss Beatrice Gurney as .Secretary. 
There is also in connection with the Society a Committee of King's Messengers, 
a Medical Missions Department, with its own Secretary, Rov. E. A. Robertson, M.D., 
a Missionary Preparation Union, and a Laymen's Missionary Association.) 

WEST INDIAN AFRICAN MISSION (1855). 

Secretary: Dr. H. J. Wolseley, 14 Queen Anne Ave., Bromley, Kent. 
Object: The furtherance of the Gospel in Western Africa. 

Income: Home and other funds, 500; West Indian Church, 400; total, 900. 
Field: Western Africa (French Guinea). 

(NOTE: Also known as the Pongas Mission, and as the Rio Pongo Mission. The 
control of the Mission is in the hands of the English Committee, in consultation 
with the Barbados Board (West Indies), and the Bishop of Sierra Leone. The 
missionaries are African by descent, and, as far as possible, are drawn from the 
West Indies, and from Codrington College, Barbados. The Mission came into 
organic relationship with the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel in For- 
eign Parts in 1905. See also entry under West Indies.) 

ZULULAND MISSIONARY ASSOCIATION (1860). 

Secretary: Rev. T. S. Blofeld, Church House, Westminster, London, S. W. 
Object: To raise funds in aid of Church of England work in the Diocese of Zululand. 
Income: 3,158. 
Organ: "The Net." 

Field: South Africa (the Diocese of Zululand, which includes Swaziland, and parts 
of Natal and the Transvaal). 

ASSOCIATION IN AID OF THE DIOCESE OF CAPETOWN (1868). 
Honorary Secretary: Col. F. W. Nixon, 3 Ashburton Rd., Southsea. 
Object: To enable the Archbishop of Capetown to give grants toward stipend of 

clergy, catechists, etc., and toward the building of churches and schools in the 

Diocese. 
Income: 1,318. The income is raised in' England, and allocated by the Archbishop 

of Capetown. 

Organ: "The Cape Church Monthly." 
Field: South Africa (Diocese of Capetown). 

ST. JOHN'S [KAFFRARIA1 MISSIONARY ASSOCIATION (1873). 

Secretary: Arthur S. Gibs9n, Esq., Bracondale, Popeswood, Bracknell. 

Object: To raise funds in aid of Church of England work in the Diocese of St. John's, 

Kaffraria. 
Income: 912. 

Organ: "Kaffrarian Diocesan Quarterly." 
Field: South Africa (Diocese of St. John's, Kaffraria, in Cape Colony). 

CAMBRIDGE MISSION TO DELHI (1877). 

General Secretary: Miss M. B. Colt, 0. M. D. Office, Church House, Westminster, 
London, S. W. 

Cambridge Secretaries: G. M. Edwards, Esq., Sidney Sussex College, Cambridge; 
Rev. A. S. Duncan Jones, Gonville and Caius College, Cambridge. 

Object: Educational, evangelistic, and medical work in Delhi and the South Punjab, 
India. 

Income: Home Societies, 3,292; government and local grants, 1,768; fees 
(college and schools), 1,500; English subscriptions, 2,703; foreign subscrip- 
tions, etc., 819; from all sources, 10,082. 

Organ: "Delhi Mission News." 

Field: India (Delhi and the South Punjab). 

(NOTE: In close connection with the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel. 
The work of the Delhi Medical Mission to Women and Children is also included 
under this head.) 

MADAGASCAR CHURCH MISSION ASSOCIATION (1880). 

General Secretary: Miss Margaret A. King, Great Barton Place, Bury St. Edmunds, 
London. 

Object: To raise funds in aid of Church of England work in the Diocese of Mada- 
gascar. 

Income: 1,027. 

Organ: "Madagascar Church Mission Association Quarterly Paper." 

Field: Madagascar. 

(NOTE: The Madagascar Mission was organized in 1874, but the Association was 
not formed until 1880.) 

QU'APPELLE MISSION ASSOCIATION (1884). 

Secretary: Rev. F. V. Baker, B.A., Christ Church Vicarage, Dartford, Kent. 

Object: To raise funds in aid of Church of England work in the Diocese of Qu'Appelle. 

Income: 423, 

Organ: "The Occasional Paper of the Diocese of Qu'Appelle." 

Field: Canada (Diocese of Qu'Appelle). 

JAPAN GUILD OF ST. PAUL (1888). 

Secretary: Miss May Bickersteth, St. Paul's Guild, Church House, Dean's Yard, 

Westminster, London, S. W. 

Object: To provide aid for St. Andrew's and St. Hilda's Missions, in Tokyo. 
Income: 2,350. 
Organ: "Guild of St. Paul." 
Field: Japan (Diocese of South Tokyo;. 



work in the Diocese of 



KOREA MISSION ASSOCIATION (1889). 

Secretary: Rev. S. J. Childs-Clarke, 6 Amen Court, St. Paul's, London, E. C. . 

Object: To raise funds in aid <sf Church of England work in the Diocese of Korea. 

Income: 1,008. 

Organ: "The Morning Calm." 

Field: Korea. 

DUBLIN UNIVERSITY MISSION TO CHHOTA WAGPUR (1891). 

(See under Ireland.) 

MASHONALAND MISSION ASSOCIATION (1892). 

Honorary Secretary: Miss M. Upchcr, Hingham, Norfolk. 
Object: To raise funds in aid of Church of England 

Mashonaland. 
Income: 1,320. 
Organ: "Mashonaland." 
Fields: Southern Central Africa, East Africa (The Diocese of Mashonaland, which 

includes parts of Bechuanaland Protectorate, Southern Rhodesia, and Portu- 

guese East Africa). 

RANGOON DIOCESAN MISSION ASSOCIATION (1892). 

Secretary: Rev. P. H. Cooke, 66 Mt. Pleasant Lane, Clapton, London, N. E. 

Object: To raise funds in aid of Church of England work in the Diocese of Rangoon. 

Income: 1,114. 

Organ: "The Rangoon Quarterly." 

Field: India (Burma, which constitutes the Diocese of Rangoon). 

(NoTZx The Winchester Diocesan Branch of this Association supports a Winchester 
Mission at Mandalay, consisting of a number of clergy living in community. 
Branch income, 229.) 

LEBOMBO MISSION ASSOCIATION (1893). 

Secretary: Rev. W. H. C. Malton, 2 St. George's Road, St. Margaret's-on-Thames. 

Object: The development of the Church in the Diocese of Lebombo, which includes 
the district between the Indian Ocean on the east, the Lebombo Mountains on 
the west, Natal on the south, and the Sabi River on the north. 

Income: 2.304. 

Organ: "Lebombo Leaves." 

Field: Portuguese East Africa. 

SOUTH AFRICAN CHURCH RAILWAY MISSION (1894). 

Secretary: Miss Elise Astley, 88 St. George's Square, I/ondon, S. W. 

Object: To provide spiritual ministrations among the railway employees, farmers, 

storekeepers, police, and others, scattered along the 7,000 miles of railway in 

South Africa. 
Income: 1,339. 

Organ: "South African Church Railway Mission Quarterly Paper." 
Fields: South Africa, Southern Central Africa. 

(NOTE: See also entry under Africa.) 

ROCKHAMPTON MISSION ASSOCIATION (1897). 

Honorary Secretary: Miss E. D. James, Church House, Westminster, London, S. W. 
Object: To raise funds in aid of Church of England work in the Diocese of Rock- 

hampton, Queensland. 
Income: 805. 

Organ: "Australian Bush Leaves." 
Field: Australia (Central Queensland). 

NEW GUINEA MISSION ASSOCIATION (1898). 

Secretary: Miss E. Scarth, Church House, Westminster, London, S. W. 

Object: To raise funds in aid of Church of England work in the Diocese of New 

Guinea. 

Income: 3,507. 
Organ: "Quarterly Letter." 
Field: Melanesia (British New Guinea). 

ASSOCIATION OF THE DIOCESE OF POLYNESIA (1900). 

Secretary: Miss Boyd, 35 Fitzjames Ave., Kensington, London, W. 

Object: To raise funds in aid of Church of England work in the Diocese of Polynesia, 

Income : No statement at hand. 

Field: Polynesia. 

BROTHERHOOD OF THE GOOD SHEPHERD AUXILIARY, N. S. W. (1907). 
Secretary: Rev. F. H. Campion. West Grinstead Rectory, Horsham, Essex. 
Object: To raise funds in aid of Church of England work in the Diocese of Bath- 

hurst, New South Wales. 
Income: 680. 



Organ: "The Bush Brother." 
Field: Au 



Australia (New South Wales). 

(NOTE: The missionary work of the Brotherhood of the Good Shepherd was started 
in 1904, but its London Auxiliary was not organized until 1907.) 

CARPENTARIA ASSOCIATION (1908). 

Honorary Secretary: Miss Gascoigne, 9 Buckingham Palace Gardens, London, S. W. 

Object: To raise funds and awaken interest in England in the needs and work of 
the Diocese of Carpentaria, which includes missions to the aboriginals, to the 
South Sea Islanders, to the Japanese and Chinese, and to the lepers. 

Income: 237. 

Organs: "The Carpentarian," "News and Notes." 

Field: Australia (North Queensland, and the adjacent islands). 

NORTH QUEENSLAND AUXILIARY IN ENGLAND (1908). 

Secretary: Miss B. C. Gibson, Cranham Rectory, Upminster, Essex. 

Object: To raise funds in aid of Church of England work in the Diocese of North 

Queensland. 
Income: 573. 

Organ: "North Queensland Notes." 
Field: Australia (North Queensland). 

BORNEO MISSION ASSOCIATION (1909). 

Honorary Secretary: Miss Ruth Turner, Stainforth House, Clapton Common, London, 

N. E. 
Object: To raise funds in aid of Church of England work in the Diocese of Singa- 

pore, Labuan, and Sarawak. 
Income: No statement at hand. 
Organ: "The Chronicle of the Borneo Association." 
Field: British Malaysia. 

ARCHBISHOPS' WESTERN CANADA FUND (1910). 

Secretary: Rev. Canon Beal, 15 Tufton St., Westminster, London, S. W. 
Object: To further the work of the Church of England in Western Canada. 
Income: 34,000. This sum represents contributions in 1910, but can hardly be 

regarded as stated income since only a small proportion of this amount consists 

of annual subscriptions. 
Field: Western Canada. 

BRITISH COLUMBIA CHURCH AID SOCIETY (1910). 

General Secretary: Rev. Jocelyn Perkins, M.A., 4 Dean's Yard, Westminster, 
London, S. W. 

Object: To enable the Church of England to supply the religious needs of the grow- 
ing population in British Columbia and Yukon, through grants to pioneer mis- 
sions, bishopric endowment, etc., together with the development of purely mis- 
sionary work among the Indian tribes and Asiatic immigrants. 

Income: 4,273. (This represents only the income reported by the New West- 
minster and Kootenay Association, as recorded in the First Edition of the Atlas. 
See note below.) 

Field: Western Canada (British Columbia and Yukon). 

(NOTE: The New Westminster and Kootenay Missionary Association, organized 
in 1902, which was entered in the First Edition of this Atlas, hus federated itself 
with the British Columbia Church Aid Society, organized in 1910. This Society 
now includes the New Westminster Diocesan Committee, the Kooteuay Dio- 
cesan Committee, the Columbia Diocesan Committee, and the Caledonia Dio- 
cesan Committee.) 

CHURCH MISSIONARY SOCIETY FOR AFRICA AND THE EAST (1799) 
Honorary Clerical Secretary: Rev. Cyril C. B. Bardsley, M.A. 
Secretaries of the Foreign Department: Rev. B. Baring-Gould, M.A., 

Rev. F. Baylis, M.A., Rev. G. B. Durrant, M.A. 
Secretary of Candidates Department: Rev. D. IT. D. Wilkinson, M.A. 
Secretary of Home Organization Department: Rt. Rev. E. Graham 

Ingham, D.D. 

Secretary Editorial Department: Rev. G. Furness Smith, M,A. 
Lay Secretary: Herbert Lankester, M.D. 



34 



WORLD ATLAS OF CHRISTIAN MISSIONS 



England 



Office Address: Church Missionary House, Salisbury Square, London, 
E. C. 

Object: The evangelization of the heathen and Mohammedan world. 

Income: From home sources, 388,284; receipts in the missions, 4,011; 
total, 392,295. 

Organ: "The Church Missionary Review." (In addition, "The Church 
Missionary Gleaner," "The C. M. S. Gazette," "Awake," and "The 
Round World" are published.) 

Fields: Japan, Chinese Empire, India, Ceylon. Persia, Turkish Empire 
(Palestine, Turkish Arabia), North-east Africa (Egypt and Egyptian 
Sudan), Western Africa (Sierra Leone, Northern Nigeria, Southern 
Nigeria), British East Africa (including Uganda), German East Africa, 
East African Islands (Mauritius), North-west Canada (British Co- 
lumbia). 

(NOTE: The Gleaners' Union, Young People's Union, Clergy Union, Ladies' Union, 
and Laymen's Union are all integral parts of the Church Missionary Society.) 

MEDICAL MISSION AUXILIARY OF THE CHURCH MISSIONARY SOCIETY FOR 
AFRICA AND THE EAST (1891). 

Secretary: Rev. Robert Elliott, M.A., L.R.C.S.I., Church Missionary House, Salis- 
bury Square, London, E. C. 

Object: To preach the Gospel, and to heal the sick. 

Income: 36,201. (Included in the income of the Church Missionary Society for 
Africa and the East.) 

Organ: " Mercy and Truth." 

Fields: Those of the Church Missionary Society for Africa and the East. 

(NOTE: The Auxiliary is an integral part of the Church Missionary Society for 
Africa and the East, its special work being the carrying on of the Society's medi- 
cal missions. There is an Irish branch.) 

HIBERNIAN CHURCH MISSIONARY SOCIETY (1814). 
(See under Ireland.) 

HEW SOUTH WALES CHURCH MISSIONARY SOCIETY (1825). 
(See under Australasia.) 

DUBLIN UNIVERSITY MISSION TO FUH-KIEN (1885). 
(See under Ireland.) 

HEW ZEALAND CHURCH MISSIONARY ASSOCIATION (1893). 
(See under New Zealand.) 

CHURCH MISSIONARY ASSOCIATION FOR VICTORIA (1892). 
(See under Australia.) 

SOUTH AFRICA CHURCH MISSIONARY ASSOCIATION (1895). 
(See under South Africa.) 

CANADIAN CHURCH MISSIONARY SOCIETY (1895). 
(See under Canada.) 

WEST INDIES CHURCH MISSIONARY COUNCIL (1897). 
(See under West Indies.) 

CHURCH MISSIONARY SOCIETY ASSOCIATIONS IN SCOTLAND ( ). 

(See under Scotland.) 

SOUTH AMERICAN MISSIONARY SOCIETY (1844). 

Secretaries: Rev. E. P. Cachemaille, M.A., Rev. J. M. [Harris, M.A., 
20 John St., Bedford Row, London, W. C. 

Object: The making known of the Gospel of our Lord Jesus Christ by mis- 
sionary agency to the Indian tribes and other natives of South America, 
and to British subjects and other inhabitants of that continent. 

Income: Home, 13,098; foreign, 13,553; total, 26,651. 

Organ: "The South American Missionary Magazine." 

Field: South America (up to the region south of the Panama Canal, now 
under charge of the American Church, and omitting the Guianas). 

(NOTE: Organized, under the name of the Patagonian Missionary Society, in 1844. 
Incorporated in 1900. There is a Women's Auxiliary, organized in 1901; MissM. 
Hey, 1 Clifford's Inn, Fleet St., London, E. C., is Secretary.) 

IRISH AUXILIARY OF THE SOUTH AMERICAN MISSIONARY SOCIETY (1894). 
(See under Ireland.) 

MELANESIAN MISSION (1849). 
(See under New Zealand.) 

ENGLISH COMMITTEE OF THE MELANESIAN MISSION ( ). 

Secretary: Rev. A. E. Corner, Melanesian Mission, Church House, Westminster, 
London, S. W. 

Object: The evangelization of the Islands of the Pacific. 

Income: 9,216, of which 8,307 is included in the income of the Melanesian Mission. 

Organ: "The Southern Cross Log." 

Field: Melanesia (Solomon, Santa Cruz, Torres, Banks, and Northern New Hebri- 
des Groups). 

UNIVERSITIES' MISSION TO CENTRAL AFRICA (1858). 

Secretary: Rev. Duncan Trayers, 9 Dartmouth St., London, S. W. 

Object: To establish and maintain stations in Central Africa which may 
serve as centers of Christianity and civilization, for the promotion of 
true religion, and the ultimate extinction of the slave trade. 

Income: 22,500. 

Organ: "Central Africa." 

Fields: Southern Central Africa (Nyasaland), German East Africa, 
British East Africa (Islands of Zanzibar and Pemba). 

LADIES' ASSOCIATION OF THE UNIVERSITIES' MISSION TO CENTRAL AFRICA 

(1875). 

Secretary: Miss E. Mirehouse, 97 Onslow Square, London, S. W. 
Object: To help in the payment of the salaries of African women teachers; to pro- 
vide materials for schools in Africa; and_to help working parties in England, if 
necessary, with materials for making African garments. 
Income: From 100 to 120. 
Fields: Those of the Universities' Mission to Central Africa. 

SOCIETY OF ST. JOHN THE EVANGELIST (1865). 

(NOTE: The address of this Society is its Mission House, Cowley, St. John, Oxford. 
Its members are priests exclusively, who engage in mission work as tney have 
opportunity, at home and abroad. It is a private rather than a public organiza- 
tion, and its Superior seems reluctant to_ have the Society listed among missionary 
agencies. We, therefore, respect his wishes in the matter. Several missionary 
guilds and associations in South Africa and India are in affiliation with the Society 
of St. John the Evangelist.) 

BAAKLEEN MEDICAL MISSION TO THE DRUSES (1863). 

Honorary Secretary: Miss L. W. Burnett, 22 Albert Square, Clapham 

Road, London, S. W. 

Object: To maintain medical mission work in Palestine. 
Income: 584. 
Organ: "Open Doors." 
Field: Syria (Lebanon). 

(NOTE: Formerly called the Palestine and Lebanon Nurses' Mission, under which 
name it is entered in the statistical tables of this volume.) 

MISSIONARY LEAVES ASSOCIATION (1868.) 

Honorary Secretary: Mrs,, Maude, Pen Dyffryn, Overton-on-Dee, Elles- 

mere. 
Secretary: T. H. Baxter, Esq., 20 Compton Terrace, Upper St., Islington, 

London, N. 



Object: To assist the native clergy and missionaries in Africa and the 
East, and other parts of the mission field occupied by the Church Mis- 
sionary Society, by grants and gifts of articles not usually furnished 
by that Society, also by the support of catechists, Bible-women, and 
children. 

Income: Cash and value of goods forwarded, 9,902. 

Organ: "Missionary Leaves. 

Fields: Those of the Church Missionary Society for Africa and the East. 

(NOTE: Founded in 1868, but organized and constituted as an Association, with 
officers and committee, in 1870.) 

OXFORD MISSION TO CALCUTTA (1880). 
Secretary: Miss Edith Argles, The Vineyard, Peterborough. 
Object: To maintain in India a mission of students who shall direct their 

energies primarily to the christianization of the students of Bengal. 
Income: 4.210. 

Organs: "The Quarterly Paper," " The Epiphany " (published in India). 
Field: India (Bengal). 

CHURCH OF ENGLAND ZENANA MISSIONARY SOCIETY (1880). 
Clerical Secretary: Rev. C. H. Stileman, M.A. 
Home Organization Secretary: Miss Nash. 
Foreign and Candidates Secretary: Miss A. M. L. Smith. 
Lay Secretary: H. L. Hebbert, Esq. 

Office Address: Lonsdale Chambers, 27 Chancery Lane, London. W. C. 
Object: Evangelistic, medical, and educational work among the women 

of China, British Malaysia, India, and Ceylon. 
Income: 52,337. 

Organs: "India's Women and China's Daughters," "Daybreak." 
Fields: China, British Malaysia, India, Ceylon. 

(NOTE: Independent, though working in cooperation with the Church Missionary 
Society for Africa and the East. In connection with the Church of England Zenana 
Missionary Society, a work has been recently begun for the rescue of children about 
to be dedicated to life in the Temples of India. Miss Amy Wilson-Carmichael has 
established a Temple Children's Nursery at Dohnavur, South India, which is largely 
supported by special contributions from England. These 1 unfortunate little ones are 
rescued, if possible, wherever they are discovered, and sent to the Nursery at Doh- 
navur. A beautiful volume, entitled "Lotus Buds," has been published by Miss 
Wilson-Carmichael, giving an account of this deeply interesting work.) 

INDIAN WIDOWS' UNION (1889). 

Secretary: Mrs. H. Bruce Bqswell, 4 Queensborough Terrace, London, W. 

Object: To band the t Christian women of England together in a united effort to 

improve the condition of the Hindu and Mohammedan widows of India. 
Income: 131. 
Field: India. 

NORTH CHINA AND SHANTUNG MISSION (1880). 

Secretary: Rev. Mackwood Stevens, Aldington Rectory, Winslow, Bucks. 
Object: Evangelistic and medical missions among the Chinese in the 

Diocese of North China and Shantung. 
Income: 5,714. Of this amount 2,576 was provided by the English 

Association in aid of this Mission, and 3,138 by grants from the 

Society for the Propagation of the Gospel for the Dioceses of North 

China and Shantung. 
Organ: "The Land of Sinim." 
Field: China (North China, Shantung). 

(NOTE: The Society for the Propagation of the Gospel began the Mission in North 
China in 1874, but the Diocese of North China was not formed until 1880, and 
that of Shantung was formed in 1903. Hospitals are conducted by the Mission at 
Peking and Ping Yin.) 

COMMITTEE OF THE PAKHOI LEPER FUND, SOUTH CHINA (1883). 

Honorary Secretary: Mr. W. E. Hurcomb, 13 Devonshire St., Islington, 
London, N. 

Object: To minister bodily and spiritually to about 150 lepers, fed, clothed, 
and housed in leper compounds. 

Income: 726. (Of which 200 was a contribution to the Church Mis- 
sionary Society for Africa and the East, and is included in its income.) 

Field: China (Pakhoi and surrounding districts). 

(NOTE: Formerly called the "Pakhoi Leper and Medical Mission." The Fund is in 
connection with the Church Missionary Society, but in the report issued other 
work is mentioned as supported by the Committee of the Pakhoi Leper Fund.) 

ARCHBISHOP'S MISSION TO THE ASSYRIAN CHRISTIANS (1884). 
Organizing Secretary: Rev. F. N. Heazell, Church House, Westminster, 
London, S. W. 

(NOTE: The Archbishop's Mission has no proselyting aim, nor is its object to alter 
the ecclesiastical customs and traditions of the Assyrian Church, nor to bring over 
any of its members to the communion of the Church of England. It is rather a 
mission of encouragement to Assyrian Christians to better their religious condition, 
and to give vitality to their church life. The friends of the Mission, in view of its 
non-aggressive attitude, seem reluctant to have it entered as a missionary society, 
and it has simply been listed that this note of explanation might be attached to 
its title.) 

NORTH INDIA INDUSTRIAL HOME FOR CHRISTIAN BLIND (1887). 
Honorary Secretary: Miss Emily Sharp, Redhill, Surrey. 
Honorary Superintendent: Miss Frances Sharp, Dehra Dun, Rajpur, 

United Provinces, India. 

Object: The support and teaching of Indian Christian blind people. 
Income: From subscriptions in England, 195; in India, 221; total, 

416. This sum does not include government grants or receipts from 

Industries Department. 
Field: North India. 

JERUSALEM AND THE EAST MISSION FUND (1888). 

Secretary: Rev. William Sadler, Dembleby Rectory, Folkingham, Lin- 
colnshire. 

Object: The establishment and maintenance of mission work among 
the Jews in the Bible Lands (not excluding Moslems), and the further- 
ance of such work by the provision of Church privileges for English- 
speaking people resident in those lands. 

Income: 5,877 in England, and, in addition, about 4,600 local receipts 
in the Mission, including school fees. 

Organ: "Bible Lands." 

Fields: Palestine, Syria, Cyprus, North-east Africa (Egypt). 

(N9TE: See also entry of Jerusalem and the East Mission, under list of Societies Work- 
ing among the Jews.) 

SOCIETY OF THE SACRED MISSION (1893.) 

Directors: Rev. Herbert Kelly, Rev. David Jenks. 

Address: House of the Sacred Mission, Kelham, Newark-on-Trent. 

Object: To organize those who are ready to serve God's Church in com- 
mon, under the discipline of the religious life, free from personal ties, 
for such duties as the Church may commit to the Society. 

Income : No statement at hand. 



England 



DIRECTORY OF MISSIONARY SOCIETIES 



35 



Organ: "Society of the Sacred Mission Quarterly Paper." 
Fields: South Africa, East Africa. 

(NoTB: Members of the Society who go abroad work in connection with existing 
dioceses, some among colonists, and others among the natives.) 

PALESTINE VILLAGE MISSION (1895). 

Honorary Secretary: Miss A. H. Wilson, The Nook, Lathom Villas, Folk- 
stone. 

Object: To evangelize villages in Palestine. 
Income: From home sources, 200. 
Field: Palestine. 

COUNTESS OF HUNTINGDON'S CONNEXION: 

SIERRA LEONE MISSION (1853). 

Honorary Secretary: Rev. Joseph Bainton, Ashbourne, Derbyshire. 
Object: The spread of the Gospel in the Protectorate and Colony of Sierra 

Leone. 
Income: From English sources, 438; from Sierra Leone. 460; total, 

898. Of the amount from English sources 74 was from the Free 

Church of England. 
Organ: "Missionary News Sheet." 
Field: Western Africa (Sierra Leone). 

(NOTE: Supported by the Countess of Huntingdon's Connexion, and the Free Church 
of England. Also known as the Society for the Spread of the Gospel at Home 
and Abroad. The Sierra Leone Mission grew out of the removal_ of Negro Chris- 
tians, in 1792, from Nova Scotia to Sierra Leone. These Christians had formed 
part of the Countess of Huntingdon's Connexion in Nova Scotia, and in Sierra 
Leone continued to follow the forms of worship and church discipline with which 
they had been familiar. It was not until 1853, however, that the Connexion at 
home became responsible for the oversight and financial support of the work. Until 
1899 all the workers were natives of the colony. Since that date there has been an 
English missionary as Superintendent.) 

FRIENDS: 

FRIENDS' FOREIGN MISSION ASSOCIATION (1866). 

Secretary: Henry T. Hodgkin, M.A., M.B., 15 Devonshire St., Bishops- 
gate, London, E. C. 

Object: To aid the spread of the Gospel of our Lord Jesus Christ, and of 
mission work abroad, chiefly by assisting such members of the Society 
of Friends, or those in profession with them, as are believed to be called 
of the Lord to this service. 

Income: Home, 28,194; foreign, 4,159; total, 32,353. Of the home 
income, 1,635 was received from Ireland, and 1,324 was grants and 
contributions from other bodies. The receipts on the field include 
general contributions, school fees, government grants, etc. 

Organ: " Our Missions." 

Fields: China, India, Ceylon, Syria, Madagascar. 

MISSIONARY HELPERS' UNION (1883). 

Secretary: Miss Elizabeth J. Marriage, Friends' Foreign Mission Association, 15 

Devonshire St., Bishopsgate, London, E. C. 

Object: To promote union in prayer and work for the Friends' Foreign Missions. 
Income: 764 (included in the income of the Friends' Foreign Mission Association). 
Fields: Those of the Friends' Foreign Mission Association, also Japan, Turkish 
Empire (Constantinople), and British East Africa (Island of Pemba). 

IRISH AUXILIARY OF THE FRIENDS' FOREIGN MISSION ASSOCIATION (1869). 
(See under Ireland.) 

AUSTRALIAN AUXILIARY OF THE FRIENDS' FOREIGN MISSION ASSOCI- 
ATION (1905). 
(See under Australia.) 

NEW ZEALAND AUXILIARY OF THE FRIENDS' FOREIGN MISSION ASSOCI- 
ATION (1905). 
(See under New Zealand.) 

FRIENDS' ARMENIAN MISSION COMMITTEE (1882). 
Honorary Secretary: Mr. William Charles Braithwaite, 34 West Bar, 

Banbury, Oxon. 

Object : Evangelistic, educational, and industrial missions. 
Income: 760 (731 from home sources, and 29 from foreign), also 300 

from profits of industrial work. 
Field: Turkish Empire (Constantinople). 

(NOTE: About twenty-five per cent of those coming under the influence of the Mission 
are Mohammedans.) 

FRIENDS' ANTI-SLAVERY COMMITTEE (1896). 
Honorary Secretary: Mr. E. Wright Brooks, Duvals, Grays, Essex. 
Object: The abolition of slavery, and the christianization of the African 

people. 

Income: 1,865. 

Field: East Africa (Island of Pemba). 
(NOTE: Known in East Africa as the Friends' Industrial Mission to Pemba.) 

METHODIST: 

WESLEYAN METHODIST MISSIONARY SOCIETY (1813). 

General Secretaries: Rev. William Perkins, Rev. J. Milton Brown, Rev. 
Marshall Hartley, Rev. C. W. Andrews. 

Office Address: 17 Bishopsgate St. Within, London, E. C. 

Object: The evangelization of the world. 

Income: Home income, 152,580; foreign income, 196,913; total, 
349,493. Of these sums 135,366 from home sources and 156,044 
from foreign sources represent the income applied to work among 
non-Christians. Of the home income, 4,573 was received from Ireland. 

Organ: "The Foreign Field." 

Fields: China, India, Ceylon, Western Africa (Gambia, Sierra Leone, Gold 
Coast, Southern Nigeria), South Africa (Transvaal, Swaziland), South- 
ern Central Africa (Southern Rhodesia), South America (British 
Guiana), Central America (British and Spanish Honduras, Costa Rica, 
Panama), West Indies (Bahamas, Haiti and San Domingo, Jamaica, 
Leeward and Windward Islands), Europe (France, Italy, Portugal, 
Spain). 

(NOTE: The Society was founded _in 1813, but a number of missionaries were sent out 
before that date, the first mission party arriving in the West Indies in 1786.) 

WOMEN'S AUXILIARY, WESLEYAN METHODIST MISSIONARY SOCIETY (1858), 
Foreign Secretary: Mrs. Wiseman. 
Home Secretary: Miss A. M. Hellier. 

Office Address: Wesleyan Mission House, 17 Bishopsgate St. Within, London, E. C. 
Object: To cooperate with the Wesleyan Methodist Missionary Society by doing 

work among women and children at its stations where women missionaries are 

necessary for that special service. 
Income: About 20,000, from home sources only. (This income is not included in 

the income of the Wesleyan Methodist Missionary Society.) 
Organ: "Woman's Work on the Mission Field." 
Fields: China, India, Ceylon. Grants are also made to schools in Italy, Spain, and 

South Africa. 



LEEWARD ISLANDS DISTRICT AUXILIARY OF THE WESLEYAN METHODIST 

MISSIONARY SOCIETY (1786). 
(See under West Indies.) 

BARBADOS AND TRINIDAD AUXILIARY OF THE WESLEYAN METHODIST 

MISSIONARY SOCIETY (1787). 
(See under West Indies.) 

JAMAICA DISTRICT AUXILIARY OF THE WESLEYAN METHODIST MISSIONARY 

SOCIETY (1789). 
(See under West Indies.) 

HAITI AND SAN DOMINGO AUXILIARY OF THE WESLEYAN METHODIST 

MISSIONARY SOCIETY (1817). 
(See under West Indies.) 

BRITISH GUIANA DISTRICT AUXILIARY OF THE WESLEYAN METHODIST 

MISSIONARY SOCIETY (1853). 
(See under South America.) 

PRIMITIVE METHODIST MISSIONARY SOCIETY (r84a). 
Secretary: Rev. A. T. Guttery, 18 Ridge Road, Stroud Green, London, N. 
Object: The evangelization of the non-Christian world, including the 

conduct of medical missions, and industrial training. 
Income: 8,237. 
Organ: "The Herald." 

Fields: Western Africa (Southern Nigeria), South-west Africa (Fernando 
Po). 

(NOTE: Organized as a Home and Colonial Society in 1842, and a foreign department 
added in 1870.) 

AMERICAN AUXILIARY OF THE PRIMITIVE METHODIST MISSIONARY 

SOCIETY (1896). 
(See under United States.) 

UNITED METHODIST CHURCH MISSIONARY SOCIETY (1857). 

Secretary: Rev. Charles Stedeford, "Woodlands," Gravelly Hill, Birm- 
ingham. 

Object: Home and foreign missions. 

Income: 24,176. The foreign mission income from home was 15,095; 
from abroad, 2,250; total, 17,345. Practically all this was expended 
for work among non-Christians. 

Organ: "The Missionary Echo." 

Fields: China (North, South-east, South-west), Western Africa (Sierra 
Leone), British East Africa, West Indies (Jamaica). 

(NOTE: In 1907 the United Methodist Free Churches, the Methodist New Connexion, 
and the Bible Christian Church completed a union which amalgamated these three 
Churches under the name, "The United Methodist Church." The missionary work 
which was being carried on by the three denominations came under the direction 
of the United Methodist Church Missionary Society.) 

WOMEN'S MISSIONARY AUXILIARY OF THE UNITED METHODIST CHURCH 
(1891). 

Secretary: Mrs. Truscott Wood, Newport Villa, Launceston, Cornwall. 

Object: To further interest in missions among women at home, and to urge for- 
ward work among women at the foreign stations of the United Methodist 
Church. 

Income: From membership fees, 127; from contributions to the general mission 
fund, 921 (included in the income of the United Methodist Church Missionary 
Society). 

Organ: The Quarterly Messenger." 

Fields: Those of the United Methodist Church Missionary Society. 

(NOTE: The Women's Missionary Auxiliary is a combination of the three women's 
societies of the Churches which united, in 1907, to form the United Methodist 
Church. The date given [18911 is that of the organization of the Women's Aux- 
iliary of the Bible Christian Church. The Free Methodist branch was f9rmed 
in 1893, and the Methodist New Connexion auxiliary in 1900. The union of 
these three auxiliaries dates from 1907.) 

MORAVIAN: 

MISSION DER BRUDERGEMEINE [MORAVIAN MISSIONS] (1732)- 

(See under Germany.) 

BRETHREN'S SOCIETY FOR THE FURTHERANCE OF THE GOSPEL AMONG 

THE HEATHEN (1741)- 

Secretary: Rev. C. J. Klesel, 32 Fetter Lane, London, W. C. 
Object: To aid indirectly the General Mission Fund of the Moravian Church, and 

especially to provide for the support of the Mission in Labrador. 
Income: 89,870. 

Organs: "Periodical Accounts Relating to Moravian Missions," "Moravian [Mis- 
sions." 
Field: Labrador. 

(NOTE: The administration of the Moravian Missions is in Herrnhut, Saxony. The 
London Association in Aid of the Moravian Missions, which see under Cooper- 
ating and Collecting Societies, is an agency to promote in Great Britain and 
Ireland the interests of the foreign missions of the Moravian Church.) 

MORAVIAN JUVENDLE MISSIONARY ASSOCIATION (1867). 
Secretary: Rev. W. T. Titterington, Fulneck (near Leeds). 
Object: To arouse and sustain interest in Moravian foreign missions among the 

pupils in Moravian schools in Great Britain and Ireland. 
Income: 109. 
Fields: Moravian mission fields in general, with special grants for West Indian 

schools, a hospital cot in Labrador, etc. 

MITE ASSOCIATION [FUNFPFENNIG VEREIN] (1883). 
Secretary: Mrs. J. Mellowes, Kingswood, Bristol. 
Object: To gather small missionary contributions weekly from those who cannot 

give large sums. 
Income: 48. This was appropriated to Moravian Foreign Missions, Moravian 

Home Missions (British), and to the Moravian Mission in Bohemia. 
Organ: Particulars given in Moravian Church Almanac, annually. 
Fields: Those occupied by the Moravian Missions. 

PRESBYTERIAN: 

FOREIGN MISSIONS COMMITTEE OF THE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 
OF ENGLAND (1847). 

Secretary: Rev. William Dale, 7 East India Ave., London, E. C. 

Object: Foreign missions. The conduct and support of evangelistic, educa- 
tional, and medical work among men, women, and children. 

Income: Home, 23,896; contributions of native churches, 4,300; 
total, 28,196. The receipts (6,947) of the Women's Missionary 
Association are not included in this statement of income. 

Organ: "The Presbyterian Messenger." 

Fields: Japan (Formosa), China, British Malaysia, India, and work among 
Jews in London, and in Aleppo, Syria. 

WOMEN'S MISSIONARY ASSOCIATION OF THE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH OF 

ENGLAND (1878). 

Secretary: Miss Jane P. Craig, 275 Camden Road, London, N. 
Object: The conduct and support of evangelistic, educational, and medical work 

among men, women, and children of mission lands. 

Income: 6,947. Not mcljded in receipts of Foreign Missions Committee. 
Organ: "Our Sisters in Other Lands." 

Fields: Those of the Foreign Missions Committee of the Presbyterian Church of 
England. 



36 



WORLD ATLAS OF CHRISTIAN MISSIONS 



England 



WESTMINSTER COLLEGE MISSIONARY SOCIETY (1882). 

Secretary: Mr. Edward Band, B.A., Westminster College, Cambridge. 

Object: To foster the missionary spirit among students, and to raise funds for 
special enterprises, usually for some part of the mission work of the Presby- 
terian Church of England. 

Income: 350. 

Fields: Those of the Foreign Missions Committee of the Presbyterian Church of 
England. 

SENDING SOCIETIES NOT DENOMINATIONAL: 

LONDON MISSIONARY SOCIETY (1795). 

Foreign Secretaries: Rev. R. Wardlaw Thompson, D.D y Rev. G. Currie 
Martin, M.A., B.D. 

Home Secretary: Rev. A. N. Johnson, M.A. 

Assistant Home Secretary: Rev. Neville Jones. 

Lay Secretary: Mr. F. H. Hawkins, LL.B. 

Office Address: 16 New Bridge St., London ; E. C. 

Object: To spread the knowledge of Christ among heathen and other 
unenlightened nations, 

Income: 196,315. This income comes not only from England, but also, 
through cooperating committees, from Wales, Scotland, Ireland, Aus- 
tralia, Tasmania, New Zealand, etc. Of the total, 36,724 was re- 
ceived and appropriated at mission stations. 

Organ: "The Chronicle of the London Missionary Society." 

Fields: China, Melanesia (British New Guinea, Loyalty Islands), Poly- 
nesia (Ellice, Gilbert, Samoa, Tokelau and Cook Groups), India, South 
Africa (Cape Colony), Southern Central Africa (Bechuanaland, South- 
ern Rhodesia), Madagascar. 

(NOTE: The "fundamental principle" of the London Missionary Society makes it 
interdenominational in character, but the organization finds its support, for the 
most part, among Congregational churches.) 

WATCHERS' BAND (1892). 

Secretary: Miss M. Agnes Hill, London Missionary Society, 16 New Bridge St., 

-London, E. C. 

Object: United prayer for foreign missions. 

Income: 643 contributed to the London Missionary Society's general fund. 
Fields: Those of the London Missionary Society. 

(NOTE: The Watchers' Band, which is the Prayer Union of the London Missionary 
Society, has 1,101 branches in Great Britain, and 150 branches in Australasia, 
and various parts of the mission field.) 

AUSTRALASIAN AUXILIARIES OF THE LONDON MISSIONARY SOCIETY (1877). 
(See under Australia.) 

BRITISH AND FOREIGN BIBLE SOCIETY (1804). 

Secretaries: Rev. Arthur Taylor, M.A., Rev. John Holland Ritson, M.A. 

Office Address: 146 Queen Victoria St., London, E. C. 

Object: To encourage the wider circulation of the Holy Scriptures, with- 
out note or comment. 

Income: 240,106. Of this amount, 93,727 represents the receipts from 
sales of Bibles, Testaments, etc. The remainder was derived from con- 
tributions, legacies, etc., paid directly to the Society, or to its aux- 
iliaries, mainly in the British Isles or British Colonies. Of the total 
income, 75,500 was spent on work among non-Christians, not count- 
ing 6,565, which is the estimated due proportion of home organiza- 
tion expenditure chargeable to this work. 

Organ: "The Bible in the World." 

Fields: Japan, Korea, Chinese Empire, Siam, British Malaysia, Dutch 
East Indies, Philippine Islands, Australia, New Zealand, Melanesia, 
Polynesia, India, Ceylon, Persia, Turkish Empire, North-east Africa, 
North-west Africa, Western Africa, South-west Africa, South Africa, 
Southern Central Africa, East Africa, Madagascar, Mauritius, South 
America, Central America, West Indies, British America, Russia 
and Siberia, Balkan States, Europe (Greece, Italy, Spain, Portugal, 
Austria-Hungary, France, Belgium, German Empire), England and 
Wales. 

(NoTE :_ The _ British and Foreign Bible Society is entered as a society sending out 
missionaries^ because of its European agents in mission lands, who rank in every 
way as missionaries. Auxiliary and Branch Societies of the British and Foreign 
Bible Society number about 8,240, of which over 5,813 are in England and Wales. 
There are Associations in many of the large cities of Europe, and in the British 
Colonies, also at several important centers in mission fields which are not under 
the British flag. Certain of the more prominent of these Auxiliaries appear in this 
Directory under their various countries.) 



MISSIONS AMONG NON- 



PARIS SOCIETY FOR EVANGELICAL 

CHRISTIAN NATIONS (1822). 
(See under France.) 

LONDON COMMITTEE OF THE BAROTSI MISSION OF THE PARIS EVANGELICAL 
MISSIONARY SOCIETY (1898). 

Honorary Secretary: Miss C. W. Mackintosh, 5 Adamson Road, S. Hampstead, 
London, N. W. 

Object: To aid the Evangelical Missionary Society of Paris in evangelizing Barotsi- 
land. 

Income: 299. 

Organ: "News from Barotsi-land." 

Field: Southern Central Africa (Barotsi-land, North-western Rhodesia). 

(NOTE: There are also committees in Edinburgh and Glasgow, working as auxili- 
aries to the Paris Evangelical Society. These committees are interdenomina- 
tional in character, although the Paris Society is connected with the Reformed 
Church in France.) 

ZENANA BIBLE AND MEDICAL MISSION (1852). 

Secretary: Rev. A. R. Cavalier, King's Chambers, Portugal St., Kingsway, 

London, W. C. 

Object: The evangelization of the women of India. 

Income: 17,535 from home sources; and in India, 7,209; total, 24,744. 
Organ: "The Zenana." 
Field: India. 

(NOTE: The Zenana Bible and Medical_ Mission, which is known also as the Indian 
Female Normal School and Instruction Society, is aided by auxiliary committees 
in Edinburgh and Glasgow, Scotland, by numerous associations in England and 
Ireland, and by auxiliaries on the Continent of Europe, in Canada, and in Australia. 
There is_ also a Loving Service League and a Girls' Zenana Missionary Union, 
which aid in collecting funds. The Zenana Bible and Medical Mission is inde- 
pendent, but cooperates with the Church Missionary Society and other missions 
in India.) 

CHRISTIAN LITERATURE SOCIETY FOR INDIA (1858). 

Secretary: Rev. George Patterson, 35 John St., Bedford Row, London, 

W. C. 
Organizing Secretary for Scotland and Ireland: Rev. G. W. Jackson, 

12 Merchiston Bank Gardens, Edinburgh, Scotland. 
Object: The publication of educational and general Christian literature 

in the principal languages of India and Ceylon. 
Income: 12,372. 
Fields: India, Ceylon. 



(NOTE: Formerly called the "Christian Vernacular Education Society. The adminis- 
tration of the Society is conducted by a General Committee in London, composed 
of members of various denominations, assisted by Local Committees in India. Such 
Committees have been formed in Bombay, Madras, Ceylon, the Punjab, Bengal, 
United Provinces, Orissa, and Mysore, each having its own special officers and 
spheres of work. For these Branches, see under India. Considerable quantities 
of the publications of the Society go also to China, Persia, Syria, and Central Africa. 
There are important Auxiliary Committees of the Christian Literature Society for 
India in Edinburgh and Glasgow, Scotland.) 

WOMEN'S AUXILIARY OF CHRISTIAN LITERATURE SOCIETY FOR INDIA (1896). 
Honorary Secretary: Mrs. Patterson, 110 Southchurch Rd., Southend-on-Sea, 

Essex. 
Object: The evangelization of the women of India, and the raising of funds to be 

used for the publication and circulation of Christian literature suitable for zenana 

missions. 
Income: 100. 
Fields: India, Ceylon. 



EVANGELIZA- 



WALDENSIAN CHURCH MISSIONS, COMMITTEE OF 

TION (1860). 
(See under Italy.) 

CENTRAL COMMITTEE FOR ENGLAND IN AID OF THE FUNDS OF THE WAL- 

DENSIAN CHURCH MISSIONS IN ITALY (1868). 

Secretary: Mr. L. H. Nott, Laurel Bank, Upper Tooting Rprk, London, S. W. 
Object: To aid financially in the evangelistic work of the Waldensian Church. 
Income: 3,701. 
Organ: "Voices from Italy." 
Fields: North Africa (Egypt, Abyssinia), South Africa, South America, United 

States, Italy, Malta. 
(NOTE: There is a Ladies' Auxiliary to the Central Committee, which aids in the 

collection- of funds. The Honorary Secretaries of this Auxiliary are Miss Ruddle- 

Browne, 152 Earl's Court Road, London, S. W., and Miss Manton, 24 West- 

bourne Gardens, London, S. W.) 

BRITISH SYRIAN MISSION (1860). 

General Secretary: Miss Hutcheon, Grosvenor House, The Ridgway, Wim- 

bledon, London, S. W. 
Object: The evangelization of the women and girls of Syria by means of 

educational, Bible, and dispensary work. 
Income: From home sources, 4,182; from the foreign field, 1,218; 

total, 5,400. 

Organ: "Daughters of Syria." 
Field: Syria. 
(NOTE: Founded in 1860, by Mrs. Bowen Thompson. There is a Scottish Auxiliary 

Committee in Edinburgh, which aids in the collection of funds.) 

CHINA INLAND MISSION (1865). 

General Director: Mr. D. E. Hoste. 

Deputy Director in China: Mr. J. W. Stevenson. 

Secretary in China: Mr. James Stark. 

Home Director and Chairman: Mr. Theodore Howard. 

Assistant Home Director: Mr. W. B. Sloan. 

Secretary: Mr. F. Marcus Wood. 

Editorial Secretary: Mr. Marshall Broomhall, B.A. 

Office Address: Newington Green, Mildmay, London, N. 

Object: The evangelization of China. 

Income: 93,622. 

Organ: "China's Millions." 

Field: Chinese Empire. 

(NOTE: Under the name "China Inland Mission" are included organizations with 
home centers located in Europe, North America, and Australasia, and seven Asso- 
ciate Missions. The whole work is under one General Director; the home centers 
in Europe, North America, and Australasia are under separate home directors, with 
separate councils. All workers connected with these home centers are members 
of the Mission, and funds are united. Of the seven Associate Missions, each is under 
its own 'home organization, and its funds are transmitted to the workers on the 
field, who are there under the direct control of the General Director and the China 
Council, in connection with their Home Councils.) 

SVENSKA MISSIONEN I KINA [SWEDISH MISSION IN CHINA] (1887). 
(See under Sweden.) 

CHINA INLAND MISSION, COUNCIL FOR NORTH AMERICA (1888). 
(See under United States, also under Canada.) 

CHINA INLAND MISSION, AUXILIARY COUNCIL FOR SCOTLAND (1889). 

(See under Scotland.) 

DEUTSCHE CHINA-ALLIANZ-MISSION [GERMAN CHINA ALLIANCE MISSION] 
(1889). 

(See under Germany.) 

CHINA INLAND MISSION, COUNCIL FOR AUSTRALASIA (1890). 
(See under Australia.) 

FRIA MISSIONEN I FINLAND [FREE CHURCH MISSION IN FINLAND] (1890). 

(See under Finland.) 

NORSKE MISSIONEN I KINA [NORWEGIAN MISSION IN CHINA] (1890). 

(See under Norway.) 

HELGELSE-FORBUNDET I NERIKE [HOLINESS UNION IN NERIKE] (1890). 

(See under Sweden.) 

CHRISCHONAZWEIG DER CHINA-INLAND MISSION [CHRISCHONA BRANCH 
OF THE CHINA INLAND MISSION] (1895). 

(See under Switzerland.) 

LIEBENZELLER MISSION [LIEBENZELL MISSION] (1899). 

(See under Germany.) 
SKANDINAVISKA ALLIANSMISSIONENS [SCANDINAVIAN ALLIANCE MISSIONf 

(1900). 

(See in C9nnection with the Scandinavian Alliance Mission, under Sweden and 

the United States.) 
CHINA INLAND MISSION, AUXILIARY COUNCIL FOR NEW ZEALAND ( ). . 

(See under New Zealand.) 
CHINA INLAND MISSION, AUXILIARY COUNCIL FOR TASMANIA ( ). 

(See under Tasmania.) 

SALVATION ARMY (1865). 

General: General William Booth. 
Chief of Staff: Mr. W. Bramwell Booth. 
. Foreign Secretary: Commissioner T. Henry Howard. 
Office Address: 101 Queen Victoria St., London. E. C. 
Object: The evangelization of the world. 
Income: Spiritual work income, 179,122; social work income, 78,043; 

total, 257,165. 

Organs: "The War Cry," "All the World." 
Fields: Japan, Korea, Dutch East Indies, India, Ceylon, South Africa,' 

South America, West Indies. 
(NOTE: No information at hand indicating how much of the income is spent for work 

among non-Christians.) 

SPEZIA MISSION FOR ITALY AND THE LEVANT (1866). 
(See under Italy.) 

BRITISH COUNCIL OF THE SPEZIA MISSION ( ).. _ ,,,,. 
Honorary Corresponding Secretary: Mr. G. W. Dobson, 99 Maldon Road, Colcnestei. 
Object: To render aid to the Spezia Mission in Italy. 
Income: 2,466. 

Organ: "Occasional Paper of the Spezia Mission." 
Fields: Italy and the Levant. 



England 



DIRECTORY OP MISSIONARY SOCIETIES 



37 



CHILDREN'S SPECIAL SERVICE MISSION (1868). 

Honorary Secretary: Mr. T. B. Bishop. 

Secretary: Mr. H. Hankinson. 

Organizing Secretary: Mr. A. E. W. Gwyn. 

Office Address: 13a Warwick Lane, Paternoster Row, London, E. C. 

Object: To hold special evangelistic services for children and young peo- 
ple, and to lead the Church of Christ, and Sunday School teachers 
especially, to make more direct and earnest efforts for the present 
salvation of children. 

Income: General fund, 2,893; India fund, 469; foreign fund, 273; 
Scripture Union fund, 2,607; total, 6,242, of which 219 is from 
Scotland. The expenditure on work among non-Christians is upward 
of 1,000. 

Organ: "Our Own Magazine." 

Fields: Japan, Korea, India, Ceylon. (Workers, foreign or native, are 
supported in these countries. Grants of literature are made to many 
other countries, and to British colonies.) 

(NOTE: Entered as a society sending out missionaries because of foreign workers, but 
this organization is .primarily cooperative. The Scripture Union for Children and 
Young People is included in the Children's Special Service Mission.) 

ANGLO-INDIAN EVANGELIZATION SOCIETY (1870). 
(See under Scotland.) 

ANGLO-INDIAN LADIES' UNION (1885). 

Honorary Secretary: Mrs. Adolphus Orr, 12 Pembridge Place, Bayswater, Lon- 
don, W. 

Object: To aid in the work of the Anglo-Indian Evangelisation Society. 
Income: 63. 
Field: India. 

MISSION POPULAIRE fiVANGfiLIQUE DE FRANCE [McALL MISSION] 

(1872). 
(See under France.) 

ENGLISH AUXILIARY OF THE McALL MISSION (1880). 
Honorary Secretary: Mr. William Chater, Elmcote, Guildford. 
Object: To aid in the work of the McAll Mission in France. 
Income: 3,582. Total for England and Ireland, 2,573; total for Scotland, 

1,009. 

Organ: "The London McAll Record." 
Field: France, Corsica. 

BIRMINGHAM YOUNG MEN'S FOREIGN MISSION SOCIETY (1876). 
Secretary: Mr. Edwin A. Page, Young Men's Christian Association, 

Birmingham. 
Object: To assist in the support of the Rev. Samuel Aitchinson's Mission 

at Ikwezi Lamaci, South Africa. 
Income: 40. 
Field: South Africa (Ikwezi Lamaci, in Natal). 

(NOTE: The Young Men's Foreign Mission Society is in connection with the Birming- 
ham Young Meirs Christian Association. The Society has a Ladies' Committee whose 
income of 01 was also sent to the Ikwezi Lamaci Mission. See entry under Ikwezi 
Lamaci Mission in the South Africa section of Directory.) 

LUDHIANA ZENANA AND MEDICAL MISSION (1879). 
Secretary: Miss E. J. Smith, St. David's, Nether St., Finchley, London, N. 
Object: To educate, evangelize, and heal women and children in India. 
Income: 1,119 (home, 770, and foreign, 349). 
Organ: "News from Ludhiana." 
Field: India (Punjab). 
(NOTE: See also entry under India.) 

ROYAL NATIONAL MISSION TO DEEP SEA FISHERMEN (1881). 
Secretary: Mr, Francis H. Wood, Bridge House, 181 Queen Victoria St., 

London, E. C. 

Object : The spiritual and moral welfare of deep-sea fishermen. 
Income: 41,912. 
Organ: "Toilers of the Deep." 
Fields: The coasts of Great Britain, Labrador, and Newfoundland. 

(NOTE: The Labrador Medical Mission, organized in 1892, is a branch of the Royal 
National Mission to Deep Sea Fishermen, and has been made famous as the scene 
of the missionary labors of Wilfred T. Grenfell, C.M.G., M.D. See entry of the 
Grenfell Association of America under United States section of Directory.) 

NORTH AFRICA MISSION (1881). 
Honorary Secretary: Colonel G. Wingate, C.I.E. 
Acting Secretary: Mr. Milton H. Marshall. 
Office Address : 4 Highbury Crescent, London, N. 
Object : To carry the Gospel to the various races inhabiting North Africa, 

from the Red Sea to the Atlantic Ocean, and from the Mediterranean 

to the Sahara, including the Nile Delta of Egypt and the Barbary 

States. 

Income: 9,448, practically all from home sources. 
Organ: "North Africa." 
Fields: North-east Africa (Nile Delta of Egypt), North-west Africa 

(Tripoli, Tunisia, Algeria, Morocco). 

(NOT.E: The Mayor Mission at Moknda, which was carried on independently for several 
years by Mr. H. Mayor, a Swiss missionary, has now been taken over by the North 
Africa Mission.) 

WORLD'S WOMAN'S CHRISTIAN TEMPERANCE UNION (1883). 
Honorary Secretary: Miss Agnes E. Slack, Ripley, Derbyshire. 
(For complete data, see under United States.) 

DUFFERIN AND PROCTER MEMORIAL SCHOpLS (1886). 
Secretary: Miss Amy Procter, 7 Miles Road, Clifton. 
Object: To promote Christian education on Mount Lebanon. 
Income: 1,000. 
Field: Syria (Mount Lebanon). 

(NOTE: Formerly called Miss Procter's Mission and Schools. Entered among societies 
sending out missionaries because of two women missionaries, but primarily coopera- 
tive.) 

CHRISTIAN LITERATURE SOCIETY FOR CHINA, LONDON COMMITTEE 
(1887). 

Secretary: Rev. W. Gilbert Walshe, M.A., Pembury, Kent. 

Object: To promote Christianity among the Chinese people by aiding 
in the preparation and circulation among them in their own language 
of suitable publications of a distinctly religious character, of general 
literature written from a Christian standpoint, of scientific and other 
works suited for the more cultured classes, of school and other text-books, 
and of literature, chiefly religious, especially suited for Chinese women 
and children. 

Income: 1,009. 



Organ: "China." ( 

Fields: China, and wherever the Chinese are found. 

(NOTE: There is also a Liverpool Auxiliary, and ;i South Wales and Monmouthshire i 
Auxiliary, ^ee entries under Scotland and China.) 

SOUTH AFRICA GENERAL MISSION (1889). 

Secretary: Arthur Mercer. Esq., 17 Homefield Road, Wimbledon, London, 
S. W. 

Object : To evangelize non-Christians, to rouse the Christian Church to a i 
holier life, and to aid existing evangelical missions and churches in 
Africa. : 

Income: 11,805. Partof this income is expended on work among others 
than non-Christians, as the Society maintains a Soldiers' Home, a 
Sailors' Rest, etc. 

Organ: "The South African Pioneer." \ 

Fields: South Africa (Cape Colony, Natal, Transvaal, Basutoland, Swazi- 
land), Southern Central Africa (Nyasaland), Portuguese East Africa. , 

(NOTE: Formerly called the "Cape General Mission," but organized as the South I 
Africa General Mission in 1894. The Mission has a Council for North America, | 
with members in New York and in Toronto. See also entry under South Africa.) 

FOREIGN DEPARTMENT OF THE ENGLISH NATIONAL COUNCIL OF 

YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATIONS (1890). 
Secretary: Mr. Oliver H. McCowen, LL.B., 13 Russell Square. London, i 

W. C. 
Object: The winning of young men to Christ, and the development of 

Christian leadership. i 

Income: 2,515. ! 

Organ: "The British and Colonial Y. M. C. A. Review and Foreign! 

Letter." 
Fields: British Malaysia, India. 

(NoTE: For a statement regarding the relation of various national committees and 
councils of the Young Men's Christian Association to the foreign mission work of 
the organization, see note under World's Committee of Young Meu's Christian 
Associations, in the Switzerland section of this Directory.) 

KURKU AND CENTRAL INDIAN HILL MISSION (1890). 

Honorary Secretary: Mr. F. W. Howard Piper, LL.B., Beechwood, High- 
gate, London, N. i 

Secretary in India: Mr. Carl Wyder, Ellichpur, Berar, India. | 

Object : The spiritual, moral, and physical elevation of the people in the i 
Central Provinces, and Berar, India, through the preaching of the| 
Gospel, combined with such educational, industrial, philanthropic, and j 
medical effort as may be possible. 

Income: Home, 2,277; India, 351; total, 2,628. 
Organ: "Circular Leaflet" (issued at intervals). 

Field: India. 

CEYLON AND INDIA GENERAL MISSION (1892). 

Secretary and Treasurer: Mr. David Gardiner, 46 Beresford Road, High- 
bury, London, N. J? 

Director in India: Mr. B. Davidson, 4 Ulsoor Road, Bangalore, South] 
India. j 

Object: The evangelization of the unreached villages and towns in South- [ 
ern India and Ceylon. I 

Income: From home sources, 2,298; from the foreign field, 178; total, j 
2,476. \ 

Organ: "Darkness and Light." 

Fields: India, Ceylon. i| 

(NoTE: There are cooperating committees in Australia and New Zealand.) j 

ZAMBESI INDUSTRIAL MISSION (1892). i 

Secretary: Mr. Robert Caldwell, F.R.G.S., 6 Colonial Ave., Minories, : 

London, E. j 

Object: The evangelization of the districts in which the stations are i 

situated, chiefly through industrial, educational, and medical efforts, i 

and by means of industries, schools, and hospitals. j 

Income: Home, 807; African, derived from industries in Nyasaland, 

4,246; total, 5,053. 
Organ: "Zambesi Industrial Mission." 
Field: Southern Central Africa (Nyasaland). 

NYASSA INDUSTRIAL MISSION (1893). 

Secretary: Rev. Alfred Walker, Sandrock House, Sevenoaks, Kent. 

Object: The evangelization of the native races, with the districts occupied 
in the Nyassaland Protectorate, and in the Kapopo district of North- 
western Rhodesia; also, by training the natives in the industries of 
civilized life, to arouse them from their natural indolence, and thus to 
prepare their minds for the reception of spiritual truth. 

Income: 1,156 (home income only). 

Organ: "Tidings of the Nyassa Industrial Mission." 

Field: Southern Central Africa (North-western Rhodesia and Nyasea- 
land). 

(NOTE: The Mission was commenced in 1893, but was not organized until 1896. Its i 
title is entered as given in its Report Nyassa but Nyasa and Nyasaland seem [ 
now to be more generally the adopted spelling.) I 

NORTH INDIA SCHOOL OF MEDICINE FOR CHRISTIAN WOMEN (1894). 

(See under India.) i 

NORTH INDIA SCHOOL OF MEDICINE FOR CHRISTIAN WOMEN, LONDON AUX- i 
ILIARY COMMITTEE (1894). i 

Honorary Secretary: Miss Mabel W. Brown, 91 College Road, Bromley, Kent. 
Object: To collect funds in aid of the North India School of Medicine for Christian 

Women at Ludhiana. : 

Income: 380. 
Field: India (Punjab). 

MISSIONARY SETTLEMENT FOR UNIVERSITY WOMEN, BOMBAY 

(1895). ' 

Secretaries: Miss M. E. Longridge, B.A., Miss E. F. Crosthwaite, 74 Den- : 

ison House, VauxhallBridge Iload, London, S. W. ; 

Secretary in India: Miss A. M. R. Dobson, Girgaum, Bombay, India. \ 

Object: To preach the Gospel to the Parsis living in Bombay; to reach | 

the students of all classes in Bombay, and the educated non-Christians; ! 

and to interest students in Christian lands in the work of foreign mis- i 

sions, especially in that among the Parsis and the educated women in ! 

Bombay. I 

Income: 1,322, of which 300 is from India; the total expenditure in 

India is 1,000. 
Field: India (Bombay). 

(NOTE: There are Committees in New South Wales, Victoria, South Australia, Tas- 
mania, and New Zealand, which render aid to the Missionary Settlement for Uni- '. 
versity Women in Bombay.) 



38 



WORLD ATLAS OF CHRISTIAN MISSIONS 



England 



LEBANON HOSPITAL FOR THE INSANE (1896). 

Secretary: Miss A. M. Gooch, 35 Queen Victoria St., London, E. C. 

Object: The care and treatment of the mentally afflicted in the East, 
without any distinction as to creed or nationality. 

Income: 2,456, of which 867 is through the General Committee in 
England; 280 is through the American Committee; 28 is through 
the committees in Holland; 1,125 is from payments for patients. 

field: Syria. 

(NOTE: The General Committee in England was established in 1896, as was the Exec- 
utive Committee at Beirut, Syria, but hospital work was not begun until 1898. See 
entry under Turkish Empire.) 

LEBANON HOSPITAL FOR THE INSANE, AMERICAN COMMITTEE (1900). 
(See under United States.) 

LEBANON HOSPITAL FOR THE INSANE, HOLLAND COMMITTEES (1900). 
(See under The Netherlands.) 

LEBANON HOSPITAL FOR THE INSANE, SWISS COMMITTEES (1900). 

(See under Switzerland.) 

EGYPT GENERAL MISSION (1897). 

General Secretary: J. Martin Cleaver, B.A., 10 Drayton Park, Highbury, 

London, N. 

Field Secretary: J. Gordon Logan, Ezbet-el-Zeitoun, Cairo, Egypt. 
Object; The evangelization of Egypt and the Sudan. 
Income: From home sources, 2,089; from the field, including school 

fees, sales, etc., 762; total, 2.851. 
Organ: "Egypt General Mission News." 
Field: Lower Egypt. ' 

(NOTE: The Egypt General Mission, formerly known as the Egypt Mission Band, has 
councils in Scotland, Australia, and New Zealand.) 

SOUTH AMERICAN EVANGELICAL MISSION (1897). 

Secretary: Mr. P. Davenport Harding, 60 Mount Pleasant, Liverpool. 
Object: To take part in the evangelization of South America, through 

workers giving the whole or part of their time. Special attention is 

being given to the Indian tribes of Central Brazil. 
Income: At Home, 1,044; Brazil, 442; Argentine Republic, 22; 

total, 1,508. 

Organ: "The South American Messenger." 
Field: South America (Brazil, Argentine Republic). 

(NOTE: The South American Evangelical Mission of Toronto, Canada, united in 1900 
with the Regions Beyond Missionary Union of London. The English branch of 
the Mission, however, continues its independent existence.) 

INDIAN CHRISTIAN MISSION (1897). 
Honorary Secretary: Mr. Horace Jones, 3 Holly Lodge Villas, Highgate, 

London, N. 
Object : The evangelization of hitherto unreached parts of India, and the 

formation of self-controlling, self-supporting Indian churches. 
Income: 589, all but 13 of which was received from home sources. 
Fields: India, Ceylon. 

(NOTE: Known in India as the "Raj-i-Masih," and also designated as the Indian 
Christian Realm. See entry under India.) 

ANGOLA EVANGELICAL MISSION (1898). 

Founder and Superintendent: Mr. M. L. Stober, Cabinda, Angola, S. W. 

Africa. 
General Secretary: Mr. David Fisher, "Angola," 25 Derby Road, With- 

ington, Manchester. 
Object: To give the Gospel, as revealed in the New Testament, to the 

needy people of Angola, Portuguese South-west Africa. 
Income: 1,262. 

Organ: "The Angola Missionary Magazine." 
Field: Africa (Angola). 

(NOTE: The Angola Missionary Prayer Circle, the Honorary Secretary of which is 
Miss Flude, Glendale, Folkestone, acts as an auxiliary to the Angola Evangelical 
Mission.) 

REGIONS BEYOND MISSIONARY UNION (1899). 

Acting Director: H. Grattan Guinness, M.D., F.R.G.S., Harley House, 
Bow Rd., London, E. 

General Secretary: Rev. William Wilkes, Harley House, Bow Rd., Lon- 
don, E. 

Object: To train suitable men and women for foreign missionary service; 
and to promote missionary effort in many lands, with special reference 
to the regions beyond those already evangelized. 

Income: From home sources, 26,000, of which 18,000 is devoted to 
foreign missions. 

Organ: "Regions Beyond." 

Fields: India, South-west Africa (Upper Congo), South America (Peru, 
Argentine Republic). 

(NOTE: This interdenominational Union was formed to carry on the work begun by 
the East London Institute for Home and Foreign Missions, in 1872. It main- 
tains three missionary training institutions in East London Harley College, 
D9rip Lodge, and Bromley Hall and is responsible for the following foreign 
missions: the Congo Balblo Mission, established in 1889; the Peruvian Mission, 
affiliated in 1897; and the Argentine Mission, affiliated in 1899. The death of the 
Rev. H. Grattan Guinness, D.D., the eminent founder of the Regions Beyond 
Missionary Union, occurred June 21, 1910.) 

REGIONS BEYOND HELPERS' UNION (1892). 

Secretary: Rev. William Wilkes, Harley House, Bow Rd., London, E. 

Object: To unite Christians of all denominations in prayerful and earnest effort 

to promote by_ any and every Scriptural means the evangelization of the world 

in this generation. 

Income: 4,000 (included in the ineo.meof the Regions Beyond Missionary Union). 
Fields: Those of the Regions Beyond Missionary Union. 

(NOTE: Made auxiliary to the Regions Beyond Missionary Union in 1899.) 

NORTH AMERICAN AUXILIARY OF THE REGIONS BEYOND MISSIONARY 

UNION (1892). 
(See under Canada. There are also Councils in the United! States and in Australia.) 

SAN PEDRO MISSION TO THE INDIANS (1900). 
Director: Mr. John Linton, San Pedro, Jujuy, Argentine Republic. 
English Representative: Mr. B. F. Babcock, West Derby, Liverpool. 
Object: To reach the Indians of the Chaco of Argentine Republic, Bolivia, 

and Paraguay. 

Income: No statement at hand. 
Field: South America (the Indian Chaco of Argentine Republic, Bolivia, 

and Paraguay. 

(NOTE: The Mission is evangelical and unsectarian in character, and is dependent 
upon God for support, no salaries being guaranteed to the workers. No appeals 
are made for funds, and no accounts are published. The little farm surrounding 
the Mission House brings in a considerable amount toward the support of the work. 
Ine missionary efforts are chiefly among the Indians of different tribes from 
Argentine Republic and the Paraguayan Chaco, and from, Bolivia, who are work- 
ing on the extensive sugar plantations near San Pedro.) 



CENTRAL ASIAN MISSION (1902). 

Secretary: Mr. Harold F. Moppett, 2 and 4 Tudor St., London, E. C. 
Object: To carry the Gospel to Central Asia, including independent tribes 

beyond North-west Frontier India, Afghanistan, Kafiristan, Tibet, 

and Russian and Chinese Turkestan, etc. 
Income: 406 (323 from home sources; 83 from the foreign field; 

249 expended exclusively for foreign work). 
Organ: "Dawn in Central Asia." 
Field: India (North-west Frontier Province). 

SUDAN UNITED MISSION (1904). 

General Secretary: Dr. H. Karl Kumm, F.R.G.S. 

Organizing Secretary: Rev. John Bailey, B.A. 

Office Address: 16 New Bridge St., London, E. C. 

Object: To carry the Gospel message to the pagan tribes of the Sudan 
before they are led to embrace Islam. 

Income: 6,876. 

Organ: "The Lightbearer." 

Field: Western Africa (Northern Nigeria). The objective of the mis- 
sion is the larger sphere of the untouched Sudan, from the Niger to 
the Nile. 

(NOTE: The Sudan United Mission has two Councils in England (London and Mid- 
lands), also Councils in Scotland and Ireland. Those in the United States and 
South Africa are entered in this Directory as auxiliaries.) 

SUDAN UNITED MISSION, SOUTH AFRICAN COUNCIL (I0O4). 

(See under South Africa.) 

SUDAN UNITED MISSION, AMERICAN COUNCIL (1906). 
(See under United States.) 

LAKHER PIONEER MISSION (1905). 

Honorary Secretary: Miss M. G. Laidlaw, Cefn Bryn, Swanage, Dorset. 
Object: To evangelize the natives of Lakherland, and to spread the Gospel 

of Jesus Christ. 
Income: 138. 

Organ: "Notes from Lakherland." 
Field: India (Assam). 

NILE MISSION PRESS (1905). 

Secretary: John L. Oliver, Esq., 16 Southfield Road, Tunbridge Wells. 
Object: Producing, printing, and circulating Christian literature among 

the people of Egypt and adjacent countries, making a specialty of 

literature for Mohammedans. 
Income: 1,787. Of this amount 900 was received from home sources, 

and 887 from the foreign field. 
Organs: "Blessed be Egypt," "The Moslem World." 
Field: North Africa (Egypt). 

(NOTE: Literature is also sent to many parts of the Mohammedan 1 world for transla- 
tion into dialects. Books have gone into Arabia, Syria, Palestine, Asia Minor, 
North Africa, West Africa, China, and India. See entry under Africa.) 

FOREIGN DEPARTMENT OF THE BRITISH NATIONAL YOUNG 
WOMEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION (1906). 

Secretary: Miss Brown Douglas, Y. W. C. A., 26 George St., Hanover 
Square, London, W. 

Object: To promote the spiritual, social, intellectual, and physical well- 
being of young women in all lands. The British Foreign Department 
(organized in 1906) seeks to find and to maintain in foreign lands 
workers for the above purpose. This department also includes the 
support of missionaries and missionary work undertaken by local 
branches, but this contribution goes direct to the missionary societies, 
and not through the British National Committee. 

Income: About 3,000 for Young Women's Christian Association foreign 
work (including special gifts for buildings; etc.). About 7,000 is 
sent to foreign mission societies. 

Organ: "Glimpses of Other Lands." 

Fields: India, North Africa, West Africa, South Africa. 

(NOTE: See the full statement of the relation of the various national committees of 
the Young Women's Christian Association to the World's Committee and to mis- 
sion lands, as given under "World's Young Women's Christian Association," on 
page 42 of the Directory.) 

YOUNG WOMEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION, SCOTTISH DIVISION (1860). 

(See under Scotland.) 

BOLIVIAN INDIAN MISSION (1907). 
(See under New Zealand.) 

ENGLISH COUNCIL OF THE BOLIVIAN INDIAN MISSION (1907). 

Secretary: Rev. J. C. Dalrymple, "Dunoon," Portsmouth Rd., Thames Ditton, 

Surrey. 
Object: The conversion and education of the Quechua Indians, and other native 

tribes of Bolivia; also evangelistic preaching among the Spanish-speaking people 

of that country. 

Income: 200 (to December 1, 1909), from home sources. 
Organ: "The Bolivian Indian Mission News and Report." 
Field: South America (Bolivia). 

PENTECOSTAL MISSIONARY UNION OF GREAT BRITAIN AND 

IRELAND (1909). 
Secretary (pro tern.): T. H. Mundell, Esq., 30 Avondale Road, South 

Croyden. 

Object: To preach the Gospel to every creature. 
Income: 500 (of this about 120 was expended on the foreign field, and 

the remainder in the preparation of workers about to go forth). 
Organ: "Confidence." 
Fields: Chinese Empire (China, Tibet), India. 

BRAZILIAN INLAND MISSION, INCORPORATED (1910). 
Honorary Secretary: Mr. T. R. Brough, 84 Frithville Gardens, Shepherd's 

Bush, London, W. 
Object: Evangelistic work in Brazil, especially the distribution of the 

Scriptures. 

Income: The fiscal year not yet completed. 
Organ: The work is reported in "The Christian." 
Field: South America (Brazil). 

(NOTE: The Mission was formed August 29, 1910, for the purpose of taking over the 
work of the Rev. J. D. McEwen, at Orobo Grande, Bahia, and initiating a strong 
forward movement in Inland Brazil. _The Rev. J. D. McEwen is named as Hs 
Founder and General Director, and it is the purpose of the Mission to establish a 
chain of stations across Brazil to Peru, a distance of over 2,000 miles.) 



England 



DIRECTORY OF MISSIONARY SOCIETIES 



39 



Cooperating and Collecting Societies 

BAPTIST: 

GERMAN BAPTIST MISSION (1845). 

Honorary Secretary: Mr. William Sears Oncken, 34 Newland, Lincoln. 
Object: To assist the German Baptist Churches in their mission work 

carried on in Germany and the adjacent countries, especially in South 

Russia and Bulgaria. 
Income: 539. 

Organ: "Quarterly Reporter of the German Baptist Mission." 
Fields: Germany, Austria-Hungary, Russia, Bulgaria. 

(NOTE: The German Baptist Mission was founded by Pastor Johann Gerhard Oncken. 
of Hamburg, Germany.) 

BAPTIST COLONIAL SOCIETY (1910). 

Secretary: Rev. H. Lenton Staines, Room 10, Baptist Church House, 
Southampton Row, London, -W. C. 

Object: The furtherance of Baptist work throughout the British colonies 
and dependencies, and, especially, to assist in making religious pro- 
vision for the settlers in newly-opened and remote districts. 

Income: The Society is too recently organized to report any income. 

Organ: Notes on the work appear in the "Baptist Times and Freeman." 

Fields: Western Australia, Queensland, South Africa, North-west Canada. 

(NOTE: The Baptist South African Colonial and Missionary Aid .Society, organized 
in 1901, an entry of which appeared in the . first edition of this Atlas, was incor- 
porated with the Baptist Colonial Society in 1910. The income of the Baptist 
South African Colonial and Missionary Aid Society, as published in its 1908 Re- 
port, was 520, all raised in England, of which 210 was devoted to missions 
for non-Christians. The Baptist Colonial Society still continues to sustain mis- 
sionary enterprise in South Africa.) 

RUSSIAN EVANGELIZATIpN SOCIETY (1010). 
Secretary: Mr. Henry Philcox, 7 Trinity St., Borough, London, S. E. . 
Object: The preaching of the Gospel in Russia. 

Income: An effort is being made to raise 5,000 to erect a permanent 
home and center for Pastor Fetler's work. Of this amount 2,000 
has been raised. 
Field: Russia. 

(NOTE : This work was founded by Rev. W. Fetler, pastor of the Lettish and Russian 
Baptist Church at St. Petersburg, Russia.) 

CHURCH OF ENGLAND: 

SOCIETY FOR ADVANCING THE CHRISTIAN FAITH IN THE BRITISH 
WEST INDIA ISLANDS, AND ELSEWHERE, WITHIN THE 
DIOCESES OF MAURITIUS AND THE LEEWARD ISLANDS 

(1691). 
Secretary: Mr. Harry W. Lee, 1 The Sanctuary, Westminster, London, 

S. W. 

Object: The instruction of colored children. 
Income: 1,600 per annum. The Society does not invite subscriptions, 

and gives its income to various Bishops to be administered for the 

benefit of the Church schools for colored children. 
Fields: Mauritius, West Indies. 
(NOTE: Incorporated by Royal Charter in 1768.) 

SOCIETY FOR PROMOTING CHRISTIAN KNOWLEDGE (1698). 

Secretaries: Rev. G. L. Gosling, Rev. Edmund McClure, M.A., Northum- 
berland Ave., London, W. C. 

Object: The promotion of Christian knowledge. 

Income: General account, 46,920; bookselling account, 59,271; total, 
106,191. 

Fields: The United Kingdom and its Colonies, and the mission fields of 
the Church of England. 

(NOTE: Money grants are given for bishopric and clergy endowments, for church and 
school buildings, and for the conduct of educational and medical mission work; 
also grants of books for special purposes.) 

ASSOCIATES OF THE LATE REV. DR. BRAY (1733). 

Secretary: Rev. E. P. Sketchley, 15 Tufton St., Westminster, London, S. W. 

Object: To provide libraries for the clergy, at home and abroad, and to 
administer a trust fund for Negro schools. 

Income: 1,103 (apart from the trust fund for Negro schools in the West 
Indies, and the amount expended on English libraries). The amount 
spent on libraries abroad varies from year to year, and may be taken 
at about 150 spent on libraries for the clergy working in foreign 
mission fields. 

Fields: Japan, China, British Malaysia, Australia, New Zealand, Melanesia, 
India, South Africa, Southern Central Africa, Madagascar, Mauritius, 
South America (British Guiana), Central America (Honduras), West 
Indies, England, Wales, Scotland, Newfoundland, Canada. 

COLONIAL AND CONTINENTAL CHURCH SOCIETY (1823). 
Secretary: Rev. J. D. Mullins, M.A., 9 Serjeants' Inn, Fleet St., London, 

E. C. 
Object: To supply clergymen, lay evangelists, and schoolmasters to the 

colonies of Great Britain, and to British residents in other parts of the 

world. 

Income: 35,741. 

Organs: "The Greater Britain Messenger," "Colonial Notes." 
Fields: India, Australia, New Zealand, North-east Africa (Anglo-Egyptian 

Sudan), South Africa, British East Africa, Mauritius, West Indies, 

Newfoundland, Canada. 

(NOTE: Incorporated in 1887. _ Work among native races is a feature in the service of 
agents of the Society in various fields, but it is found impossible to estimate either 
what proportion of their time is thus occupied, or how much of the Society's 
income may be considered as expended for this purpose.) 

LADIES' ASSOCIATION IN CONNECTION WITH THE COLONIAL AND CONTINEN- 
TAL CHURCH SOCIETY (1895). 

Secretary: Miss M. C.Woolmer, 9 Serjeants' Inn, Fleet St., London, E. C. 
Object: To promote the work of the Colonial and Continental Church Society, 
principally at home, but with some small developments in the direction of 
women's work in the colonies. 
Income: 2,616. 

Organs: Sections of "The Greater Britain Messenger," and of "Colonial Notes." 
Fields: Those of the Colonial and Continental Church Society. 

CHURCH EXTENSION ASSOCIATION (1865). 
Honorary Secretary: Miss F. Ashdown, 27 Kilburn Park Road, London. 

N. W. 
Object: To promote Church extension at home and abroad, chiefly through 

educational, orphanage, and charitable work. 
Income: 41,675. For work among non-Christiana, 636. 



Organ: "Our Work." 

Fields: India, Australia, Tasmania, New Zealand, South Africa, Canada, 
England. 

(NOTE: The work abroad consists almost entirely of schools for Colonial and Eurasian 
girls. A Kaffir Training College and a School in South Africa are the only work 
of the Society among natives. Grants of church 'embroidery are also made to 
colonial and missionary churches in all parts of the world.) 

COLUMBIA MISSION FUND (1866). 

Secretary: Miss Perrin, 7 Carlingsford Road, Hampstead, London, N. W. ; 
Object: To augment the funds of the Diocese of Columbia by contri- 
butions from subscribers in England i 
Income: 306. 1 
Field: Western Canada (Vancouver Island and adjacent islands, which 
comprise the Diocese of Columbia). 

SPANISH AND PORTUGUESE CHURCH AID SOCIETY (1870). 

Secretary: Rev. Thomas J. Pulvertaft, M.A., Church House, West- 
minster, London, S. W. 

Object: To collect funds and enlist sympathy in behalf of the Reformed 
Spanish and Portuguese Episcopal Churches, with a view to their 
becoming self-supporting. 

Income: 4,288 (not including permanent funds of 2,396). In this 
amount a contribution of 483 from the branch in Ireland is included, 
and also subscriptions and donations designated as for special churches ' 
in Spain. I 

Organ: "Light and Truth." 

Fields: Spain, Portugal. 

(NOTE : There is an Irish Branch of the Spanish and Portuguese Church Aid Society, 
which see under Ireland.) 

INDIAN CHURCH AID ASSOCIATION (1880). ; 

Secretary: H. P. K. Skipton, Esq., Church House, Westminster, London, 

Object: To aid in the building up and strengthening of the Church in 
India, with primary reference to the needs of Europeans and Eurasians. 
Income: 3,000. 

Organ: "The Indian Church Magazine." 
Field: India. 

MARITZBURG MISSION ASSOCIATION (1880). 
Secretary: Mr. Henry V. Ellis, Church House, Dean's Yard, Westminster, 

London, S. W. 
Object: To raise funds in aid of the Church of England work in the f 

Diocese of Natal. 

Income: 800. J 

Organ: "Church News from Natal." i 

Field: South Africa (Natal). 

GRAHAMSTOWN ASSOCIATION (1884). 
Honorary Secretary: Miss F. A. S. Franks, 123 Victoria St., London, 

Organizing Secretary: Rev. J. H. Carter, Burcombe Vicarage, Salisbury. 
Object: To aid in the missions of the Diocese of Grahamstown, South 

Africa. 
Income: 574. The Association has also in hand a special fund of 

nearly 8,000, subscribed for the erection of a new nave to the 

Grahamstown Cathedral. 
Organ: "Grahamstown Occasional Paper." 
Field: South Africa (Eastern Cape Colony). 

ALGOMA ASSOCIATION IN ENGLAND (1892). ! 

Honorary Secretary: Miss Eda Green, l a Sheffield Terrace, Kensington, 

London, W. 
Object: To render aid to the Bishop of Algoma, in meeting the pressing 

needs of his large Diocese, in which there are 8,000 Red Indians, many \ 

of whom are still pagans. 

Income: 1,282. 
Organs: "The Algoma Missionary News" (published in Canada), "The I 

Algoma Association Paper" (Quarterly Supplement to "The Algoma i 

Missionary News.") 
Field: Canada (Algoma Diocese) . 

(NOTE: The Diocese of Algoma also receives grants in aid from the Colonial and Con- 
tinental Church Society, and the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel, but the 
contributions of the Algoma Association in England are given independently of 
those societies.) i 

JAMAICA CHURCH AID ASSOCIATION IN ENGLAND (1894). 
Honorary Secretary: Miss Florence Klein, 24 Belsize Park, Hampstead, 

London, N. W. 
Object: To awaken interest in the work of the Jamaica Church, and to 

supply financial help in aid of its mission work. ; 

Income: 589. | 

Organ: "Jamaica." i 

Field: West Indies (Jamaica). 

(NOTE: The Jamaica Church Aid Association has grown out of a former Ladies' Asso- 
ciation, which is now incorporated with it. Its funds are sent to the Archbishop of 
the West Indies, and are appropriated chiefly in aid of church work in the poorer 
parishes of Jamaica, and toward the support of a Home for Deaconesses, an Or- 
phanage, and a Theological College on that island.) 

WORK AMONG JAPANESE SEAMEN IN THE PORT OF LONDON (1898). 

Secretary: Miss Kennion, Trinity Cottage, Poplar, London, E. 

Object: To maintain a club for the benefit of Japanese sailors; to en- 
courage Christian sailors, and to give opportunities to non-Christians 
among them for learning the truths of the Christian religion. 

Income: 335. 

Organ: Reports of the work are occasionally given in "Word On the 
Waters," the organ of the Missions to Seamen, with which this work 
is closely connected. 

Field: The work is at present limited to Japanese sailors in the port of 
London. 

ANGLICAN AND FOREIGN CHURCH SOCIETY (1904). 
Honorary Secretary: Rev. H. J. White, King's College, Strand, London, 

Object: To diffuse knowledge of the history, polity, and principles of the 
Church of England, and of the Anglican Communion in general, in 
other lands. To interest members in the internal life and growth of ! 
foreign churches, and to assist by intercessory prayer, encouragement, |; 
sympathy, and advice, and occasionally by making grants of money. \ 



40 



WORLD ATLAS OF CHRISTIAN MISSIONS 



England 



Income: 287. 

Fields: Turkish Empire (Constantinople), Cyprus, Africa (Hgypt, the 

Sudan), Europe (Germany, Switzerland, Austria, Italy, Portugal, 

Holland, Russia). 
(NOTE: This Society was formerly designated as the Anglo-Continental Society, which 

was instituted in 1853. In 1904 it united with the Association for the Furtherance 

of Christianity in Egypt, dating from 1883, under the name of the Anglican and 

Foreign Church Society.) 

CONGREGATIONAL: 

COLONIAL MISSIONARY SOCIETY (1836). 

Secretary: Rev. D. Burford Hooke, 22 Memorial Hall, Farringdon St., 
London, E. C. 

Object: To promote evangelical religion among British and other Euro- 
pean settlers and their descendants, in the colonies and dependencies 
of Great Britain, and in other parts of the world, also among converts 
gathered into Christian Churches from heathenism; to assist in train- 
ing ministers and evangelists, and in contributing to their support; 
also, to aid in the erection of places of worship, ministers' houses, 
schools, and colleges. 

Income: 5,516 (about 500 for work among non-Christians). 

Organ: "The Evangelical British Missionary." 

Fields: Australia (West Australia, Queensland), New Zealand, South 
Africa (Cape Colony, Transvaal), Southern Central Africa (Rhodesia), 
West Indies (Jamaica), Newfoundland, Canada. 

(NOTE: Incorporated in 1897). 

LUTHERAN: 

SYNOD OF THE GERMAN EVANGELICAL CONGREGATIONS IN GREAT 
BRITAIN AND IRELAND [VERBAND DER DEUTSCHEN EVAN- 
GELISCHEN GEMEINDEN IN GROSSBRITANNIEN UND IRE- 
LAND] (1869). 

Secretary: Pastor Harms, German Seamen's Mission, Sunderland. 
Object: Missions to seamen, to German emigrants, and to non-Christian 

people. 

Income: 1,200 Mk. (for missions to non-Christians). 
Organ: "St. Georgsbote." 

Fields: Missions to seamen and German emigrants; and, also, to non- 
Christian people, through the Lutheran missionary societies of Ger- 
many and Scandinavia. 

(NOTE: In all, there are 120 German and Scandinavian churches and preaching sta- 
tions on the British Isles. The Committee for German Seamen was organized by 
Pastor Harms, which- prepared the way for the organization of the Synod.) 



COOPERATING SOCIETIES NOT DENOMINATIONAL: 

RELIGIOUS TRACT SOCIETY (1799). 

Secretaries: Rev. A. R. Buckland, M.A., James Bowden, Esq. 

Office Address: 65 St. Paul's Churchyard, London, E. C. 

Object: The publication at home and abroa'd of religious literature, in- 
cluding books, tracts, periodicals, maps, diagrams, and cartoons. 

Income: Benevolent income, 21,944; foreign missionary grants, 5,777, 
of which 1,887 was spent on the Continent of Europe. The Society 
is raising a special fund of 20,000 to be spent within five years, on the 
extension of its work in China. 

Organ: "Seed Time and Harvest." 

Field: The world. 

(NOTE: The Society was incorporated in 1899. Apart from its home work and 
its continental depots, it is the mainstay of the various tract societies in 
China, Japan, and _ India, through which it is producing Christian literature in 
great variety. It is assisting by way of grants in the production of literature 
of almost every type. It is also helping by way of grants in the publication of lit- 
erature by other societies or individuals. There is scarcely a mission field wholly 
untouched by its work. The societies and agencies associated with or helped by 
the Religious Tract S9ciety are as follows: India Bangalore Tract and Book So- 
ciety, Basel Mission in Mangalore, Bombay Book and Tract Society, Calcutta 
Christian Tract and Book Society, Ceylon Christian Literature and Religious Tract 
Society, Madras Religious Tract and Book Society, _ Malayalam Religious Tract 
Society, North India Christian Tract and Book Society, Orissa Baptist Mission 
Press, Punjab Religious Book Society, South Travancore Book and Tract Society; 
Turkish Empire American Press in Beirut; Chinese Empire Chinese Tract 
Society in Shanghai, Canton and Hongkong Religious Tract Society, Central China 
Religious Tract Society, National Bible Society of Scotland in Hapkow, West 
China Religious Tract Society, North China Religious Tract Society, North Fuhkien 
Religious Tract Society, South Fuhkien Religious Tract Society, Manchurian 
Tract Committee; Japan Japan Book and Tract Society. Most or these societies 
have an independent status, or are of such importance, because of the extent or 
type of the work carried on, that they are given directory or statistical entries of 
their own in this volume.) 

SUNDAY SCHOOL UNION (1803). 

General Secretary: Rev. Carey Bonner, 56 Old Bailey, London, E. C. 

Object: To promote the establishment of Sunday Schools, and increase 
their efficiency, and to supply stationery, books, and other requisites, 
to Sunday Schools at reduced prices. 

Income: 7,690. Of this amount 1,367 was spent on Continental Mis- 
sions, and 704 on India Sunday School Mission account. 

Organs: "Sunday School Chronicle," "Young England," "The Golden 
Rule," "Child's Own Magazine," "Children of Europe." 

Fields: China, India, South Africa, Europe (Norway, France, Italy, 
Netherlands, Germany, Bohemia, Spain, Portugal, Sweden, Russia). 

(NOTE: A Ladies' Sunday School Extension Committee acts as an auxiliary, of which 
Mrs. Witchell, 36 Sandbourne Road, Brockley, is Honorary Organizing Secretary.) 

INDIAN COMMITTEE OF THE SUNDAY SCHOOL UNION, LONDON (1876). 

Honorary Secretary: Rev. Frank James, 3 Raul Road, Peckham, London, S. E. 

Object: To aid Sunday School work among India's children, and to lead the children 
to Christ. 

Income: 703. 

Field: India. 

(NoTE: The Indian Committee of the Sunday School Union provides the salary 
for the Secretary of the India Sunday School Union and his wife. Also, through 
a grant from the Arthington Trust Fund, it sent out, in 1909, a missionary and 
his wife to work in South India, under the India Sunday School Union. The 
grant increases the income to about 1,300.) 

LONDON ASSOCIATION IN AID OF THE MORAVIAN MISSIONS (1817). 

Secretary: Rev. W. Wetton Cox, 7 New Court, Lincoln's Inn, London, 
W. C. 

Object: To collect money from the members of other Churches for carry- 
ing on the foreign missions of the Moravian Church. 

Income: 12,487 (included in the income of the Mission der Brtider- 
gemeine) . 



Organ: "The Moravian Quarterly of the London Association in aid of 
the Moravian Missions." 

Fields: Those of the Moravian Missions, viz., India (Punjab and Kash- 
mir), South Africa (Cape Colony), German East Africa, Australia 



(North Queensland), North America (Labrador, Alaska, California), 
Central America (Nicaragua), South America I 



Guiana), West Indies. 



(British Guiana, Dutch 



BRITISH AND FOREIGN SAILORS' SOCIETY (1818). 

Secretaries: Rev. Edward W. Matthews, Rev. Alexander Jeffrey. 

Office Address: Sailors' Palace, 680 Commercial Road, London, E. 

Object: The religious, intellectual, and social elevation of British and 
foreign seamen. 

Income: 32,319, of which about 4,000 was expended in efforts to reach 
non-Christian seamen. 

Organ: "Chart and Compass." 

Fields: The Society carries on work in 116 stations in Great Britain and 
the Colonies, and in foreign ports. It has missionaries laboring in most 
of the great seaports of the world, including India, the Mediterranean 
ports, Australia, New Zealand, Canada, and South America. 

(NOTE: The British and Foreign Sailors' Society is the oldest society in the world for 
the benefit of seamen.) 

LONDON SECRETARIES' ASSOCIATION (1819). 
Secretary: Rev. John H. Ritson, M.A., British and Foreign Bible Society, 

146 Queen Victoria St., London, E. C. 
Object: To afford intercourse among the secretaries of various foreign 

missionary societies with headquarters in London, and opportunity for 

interchange of ideas on mission problems. 

TRINITARIAN BIBLE SOCIETY (1831). 
Secretaries: Rev. Ethelbert W. Bullinger, D.D., Rev. F. Cecil Lovely, 

B.A., Rev. J. Christopher Smith. 

Office Address: 7 Bury St., Bloomsbury, London, W. C. 
Object: The free distribution of the Word of God. 
Income: 3,000. 
Organ: "The Quarterly Record." 

Fields: All parts of the world, but especially the Philippine Islands, 
Spain, Italy, and France (Brittany). 

PARIS CITY MISSION [COMITfi AUXILIARE D'EVANGELISATION DE 

PARIS] (1832). 
President: Lord Kinnaird. 
General Secretary: Rev. R. K. MacKay, F.R.G.S., 12 Stockwell Park 

Walk, London, S. W. 
Financial Secretary: Mr. H. E. Weylland, 24 Nicoll Road, Harlesden, 

London, N. W. 
Object: To act as an evangelical auxiliary to other Protestant Evangelical 

Societies and Churches in France. 
Income: 4,179. This represents the amounts received both in London 

and Paris, but includes special gifts for the extension of the Mission, 

amounting to 2,310, received just before closing the accounts for the 

last fiscal year. 
Field: France (Paris and its vicinity). 

(NOTE: The Mission was founded in 1832, by Mr. David Nasmyth, who has been called 
the "Father of City Missions." It was reorganized in 1878 by Lord Shaftesbury, 
Mr. L. M. Weylland, the Rev. Dr. McAll, and the Rev. Dr. Somerville. There are 
nine missionaries in connection with it at present, in Paris and vicinity. A new 
development in the work of the Mission is the employment of vans in what is called 
"Gospel Caravan Work," outside the walls of Paris, reaching thereby many thou- 
sands of the poorest people, and those who are wholly ignorant of the teachings of 
the Gospel. The Rev. S. H. Anderson, 37 Avenue de la Grande Armfe, is the Su- 
perintendent of the Mission in Paris.) 

FOREIGN AID SOCIETY FOR THE DIFFUSION OF THE GOSPEL ON 
THE CONTINENT (1840). 

Secretary: Rev. H. J. R. Marston, M.A., 22 Chapel St., Belgrave Square, 
London, S. W. 

Object : To collect funds in aid of the Evangelical Societies of France and 
Geneva, and such other institutions as may be formed on similar 
principles, within the limits of the French Protestant Churches, and 
generally to promote the religious principles of the Reformation be- 
yond those limits, on the Continent and the islands of Europe. 

Income: 825. 

Organ: "The Watchfire." 

Fields: France, Belgium, Switzerland (through the Societe" Centrale 
Protestante d'EVangelisation, the Soci6t6 Chre'tienne Protestante du 
Nord, the Soci6t6 Evangelique de France, the Socie'tS EVangglique 
de Geneve, the Soci6te fivang^lique Beige, and the Free Evangelical 
Churches of France). 

EVANGELICAL CONTINENTAL SOCIETY (1845). 

Secretary: Rev. George H. Giddins, 11 Memorial Hall, Farringdon St., 
London, E. C. 

Object: To aid existing evangelical churches and missions on the Con- 
tinent of Europe in their endeavors to propagate the Gospel. 

Income: 1,615. 

Fields: France, Belgium, Italy, Spain, Portugal, Austria-Hungary, Rus- 
sian Poland, Bohemia, Moravia, Bulgaria, and among the Basques 
in Biscaya. 

(NOTE: Among the Evangelical Agencies aided are the following: Home Mission of the 
Union of Free Evangelical Churches of France, the Evangelical Society of France, 
the Free Evangelical Missionary Church of Belgium, the Free Evangelical [Con- 
gregational] Churches of Austria-Hungary, the Reformed Evangelical Churches of 
Bohemia, and some individual churches in Spain, Italy, Russia, and Portugal.) 

EVANGELICAL ALLIANCE (1846). 

Secretary: Henry Martyn Gooch, Esq., Alliance House, 7 Adam St., 
Strand, London, W. C. 

Object: To enable Christians of both British and foreign nations to 
realize in themselves, and to manifest to others, that living and 
essential union which binds true believers together in the fellowship of - 
Christ. As a result of this union, the Alliance is active in the cause of 
religious liberty, the relief of persecuted Christians, the promotion of 
united prayer, the defense of evangelical truth, and various enter- 
prises of direct Gospel work. 

Income: 3,297. 

Organ: "The Evangelical Alliance Quarterly." 

Field: The world. 

(NOTE: The Alliance is auxiliary in its influence on foreign missions, and occasionally 
renders direct assistance, especially in dealing with foreign governments, but its 
income should be excluded from any missionary summation. See entries under 
United States, France, and Japan.) 



England 



DIRECTORY OF MISSIONARY SOCIETIES 



41 



BIBLE LANDS MISSIONS' AID SOCIETY (1854). 

Secretary: Rev. S. W. Gentle-Cackett, 7 Adam St., Strand, London, 
W. C. 

Object: To aid evangelical missions in Bible lands. 

Income: 2,300; also special relief funds, as in the case of famine, mas- 
sacres, etc. The massacre fund (1909) amounted to 2,600. 

Organ: "The Star in the East." 

Fields: Arabia, Turkish Empire (Palestine, Syria, Asia Minor, European 
Turkey), North-east Africa (Egypt), Europe (Greece, Bulgaria). 

(NOTE: Formerly called the "Turkish Missions' Aid Society.") 

MISSIONS TO SEAMEN (1856). 
Secretary: Stuart C. Knox, Esq., M.A., 11 Buckingham St., Strand, 

London, W. C. 

Object: The spiritual welfare of the seafaring classes at home and abroad. 
Income: 54,030. 

Organ: "The Word on the Waters." 
Field: Among seamen ashore and afloat in all parts of the world. 

(NOTE: The Missions to Seamen is served by a large number of local chaplains in 
ports' at home and in foreign lands, many of them being honorary workers. In 
addition, its Scripture-readers, lay helpers, ambulance instructors, and _lady 
workers, devote themselves to the welfare of seamen in nearly all the prominent 
ports of the world. The circulation of religious literature receives much _ atten- 
tion. There is. a Ladies' Working Union which cooperates with the Missions to 
Seamen.) 

ASSOCIATION FOR THE FREE DISTRIBUTION OF THE SCRIPTURES 

(1874). 
Honorary Secretary: Mrs. A. E. Pridham, Chesils, Christ Church Road, 

Hampstead, London, N. W. 
Object: To give the Word of God freely to those who are without it, and 

who would otherwise, either through ignorance, fanaticism, or poverty, 

never possess it. 
Income: About 1,000. The bulk is expended among non-Christians, 

but the percentage varies each year. 
Field: The world. 

SOCIETY FOR THE SUPPRESSION OF THE OPIUM TRADE (1874). 
Honorary Secretary: J. G. Alexander, Esq., LL.B. 
Secretary: Rev. G. A. Wilson, 181 Queen Victoria St., London, E. C. 
Object: The suppression of the opium trade between India and China, 

and the prohibition of the use of the drug for non-medicinal purposes 

throughout the British Empire. 
Income: 800. 

Organ: "The Friend of China." 
Fields: China, British Malaysia, Australia, New Zealand, India, South 

Africa, Canada. 

(NOTE: In addition, the following Associations for the Suppression of the Opium Traffic 
cooperate, working in harmony with the Society for the Suppression of the Opium 
Trade: 

1. Christian Union .for the Severance of the Connection of the British Empire with 

the Opium Traffic. Honorary Secretary: Mr. B. Broomhall, 2 Pyrland Road, 
Mildmay Park, London, N. 

2. Women's Anti-Opium Urgency Committee. Honorary Secretary: Miss R. 

Braithwaite, 312 Camden Road, London, N. 

3. Friends' Anti-Opium Committee, care of Mr. Isaac Sharp, 12 Bishopsgate St., 

London, E. C. 

4. Church of England Anti-Opium Committee. Honorary Secretary: Mrs. Dixon 

Davies, Beaconsfield, Bucks.) 

MEDICAL MISSIONARY ASSOCIATION, LONDON (1878). 

Secretary: James L. Maxwell, M.A., M.D., 49 Highbury Park, London, N. 

Object: To promote the spiritual welfare of medical students, and stim- 
ulate a deeper interest in medical missions; to aid suitable Christian 
men who desire to give themselves to medical mission work; to estab- 
lish medical missions, either independently, or in connection with 
other societies; to diffuse information by lectures and meetings, and 
especially by the publication of a medical missionary magazine; to 
select and send out men to work on the staif of the Union Medical 
College, Peking, and to act as intermediary to friends and supporters 
in this country. 

Income: 1,449, of which 345 was for the Union Medical College at 
Peking. 

Organ: "Medical Missions at Home and Abroad." 

Fields: Its special work being to assist men to full qualification as medical 
missionaries, in order that they may offer themselves to the organized 
missionary societies, the Medical Missionary Association does not plant 
any medical missions of its own in foreign lands. It has in the past 
assisted to plant several Home Medical Missions. 

ZENANA AND HOME MISSION MIDWIFERY TRAINING HOME (1880). 
Honorary Secretary: Dr. G. de G. Griffith, 9 Lupus St.. Westminster, 

London, S. W. 
Object: To give medical instruction to ladies intending to do mission 

work in those countries where women only are permitted to attend 

the women and children. 
Income: 320. 
Organ: "White Fields." 
Fields: The mission lands where women are kept in seclusion. 

(NOTE: Formerly designated as the Zenana Medical Mission College, and founded 
under that name in 1880). 

HELPING HANDS MISSIONARY ASSOCIATION (1884). 

Secretary: Address the Secretary of the Helping Hands Missionary 
Association, care of Zenana Bible and Medical Mission, King's Cham- 
bers, Portugal St., Kingsway, London, W. C. 

Object: To assist the missionary societies already working among the 
women of India, by raising the money required to supply the smaller 
needs incidental to missionary and medical work. 

Income: No report of income has come to hand, but 69 is acknowledged 
by the Zenana Bible and Medical Mission as having been received 
from the Helping Hands Missionary Association in 1909. 

Field: India. 

(NOTE: Owing to the absence in India of the Secretary, Mrs. Beynon, direct corre- 
spondence with a view to securing official data has been unsuccessful.) 

MINISTERING CHILDREN'S LEAGUE (1885). 

Organizing Secretary: Mrs. Arthur Philip, 83 Lancaster Gate, London, W. 
Object: To promote unselfishness among children, and to induce them 
. to work for and to serve others. 
Income: No statement at hand. 

Organ: "The Ministering Children s League Quarterly Magazine." 
Fields: Those of the societies through which gifts are forwarded. 



(NOTE: The Ministering Children's, League is composed of branches all over tho world. 
Each branch manages its own finances, and gives to whatever good work it pleases. 
Many of tho English branches contribute largely to missions^ through the Society 
for the Propagation of the Gospel, the Church Missionary Society, and cither socie- 
ties. American, Australian, Japanese, and other branches, are also doing foreign 
mission work.) 

BRETON EVANGELICAL MISSION [SOCIETfi EVANGELIOUE BRE- 

TONNE] (1885). 

Honorary Secretary of London Committee: Name and address not re- 
ceived. 
Object: To support and extend the missionary efforts of the Breton 

Evangelical Church at Tremel, C6tes-du-Nord, France. 
Income : No statement at hand. 
Field: France (Brittany). 

UNITED COMMITTEE FOR THE PREVENTION OF THE DEMORALIZA- 
TION OF THE NATIVE RACES BY THE LIQUOR TRAFFIC 

(1886). 

Honorary Secretary: Henry Gurney, Esq. 

Secretary: Mr. John Newton. 

Office Address: 177-8 Palace Chambers, 9 Bridge St., Westminster, 
London. j 

Object: To prevent the demoralization of the native races by the liquor 
traffic. ! 

Income: 728. 

Organ: Occasional pamphlets. < 

Fields: British Empire, and, also, in association with National Commit- 
tees, the Continents of Europe and America. 

(NOTE : Cooperating with the United Committee are an International Committee and ' 
a United Scottish Committee.) 

SCRIPTURE GIFT MISSION (1888). j 

Secretary: Mr. Francis Charles Brading, 15 Strand, London, W. C. _ i 

Object: The publication and dissemination of the Scriptures by free giftf 

and sale. .; 

Income: 8,100 (4,808 from sales) 

Organ: "The Word of Life." ' 

Field: The world. f 

(NOTE: The annual report of the Scripture Gift Mission shows a wide circulation of; 
pictorial Testaments, Gospels, and portions, sent to missionaries and Christian 
workers throughout Great Britain, Continental Europe, North and South America, 
and most of the mission lands of the non-Christian world.) i 

THONON EVANGELISTIC MISSION [MISSION EVANGELIOUE THONON, 
HAUTE SAVOIE, FRANCE] (1889). 

Honorary Deputation Secretary: Miss M. C. Rouse, 47 Berlin Road, Cat- 
ford, London, S. E. 

Secretary: Mr. R. L. Carter, 57 Old Broad St., London, E.-C. 

Object: To bring men, women, and children to the knowledge of the 
Saviour's love, and to minister socially and medically to the needy 
people of Haute Savoie, France. 

Income: 604. 

Field: France (Thonon-les-Bains, Haute Savoie, and the surrounding j 
villages). 

(NOTE: Mission work was commenced in 1889 by two ladies who were visiting at 
Lausanne, opposite Thonon, on Lake Geneva, and were told of the need of evan- 
gelistic efforts among the people of tha.t vicinity, but the English Committee in 
aid of the Mission was not organized until 1008.) ! . 

ALL NATIONS MISSIONARY UNION, PENCE ASSOCIATION, AND IN- 1 

FORMATION BUREAU (1892). ,1 

Secretary: Mr. Robert H. Parsons, 33 Henrietta St., Covent Garden, I 

London, W. C. 
Object: To promote the work of evangelizing the world, and to encourage 

systematic giving to the cause of missions. 
Income: 2,400. 
Organ: "All Nations." 
Field: The world. 

(NOTE: Societies, missions, and missionaries of all denominations have been aided by 
its funds, and also by the stimulus it has given to a practical, self-denying interest 
in the missions of the Churches. Over 40,000 has been collected. Pioneer mis- 
sionaries have been sent out and supported in hitherto unoccupied fields. Over 
7,500 has been raised for building leper asylums, and housing tainted and un- 
tainted children of lepers, and nearly 6,000 for Indian famine relief. The Mis- 
sionary Pence Association, organized in 1888, has been merged into the All 
Nations Missionary Union.) 

LIVINGSTON MEDICAL COLLEGE (1893). 

Director: Dr. Charles F. Harford, Livingston College, Leyton, London. 

Object: To give a medical training to missionaries for work in the tropics. 
Instruction is imparted in the elements of medicine, surgery, and 
hygiene, that they may be able to render service to each other and 
to natives. 

Income: 2,144. 

Fields: The mission fields of various societies. 

STUDENT VOLUNTEER MISSIONARY UNION (1893). 
Secretary: Rev. Tissington Tatlow, M.A., 93 Chancery Lane, London, 

W. C. 
Object: To lay before the students of the British Isles the claims of the 

foreign mission field as a sphere for a life work, and to enroll as mem- , 

bers those who are willing to sign the Declaration, "It is my purpose, 

if God permit, to become a foreign missionary." 
Income: 924. 

Organ: "The Student Movement." 
Fields: The universities and colleges of the British Isles. 

(NOTE: For a comprehensive statement concerning the Student Volunteer Movement !| 
for Foreign Missions, and allied organizations in various lands, see under United ' 
States. In Great Britain the Student Volunteer Missionary Union constitutes one 
Department of the Student Christian Movement of Great Britain and Ireland, the 
others being the General College Department and the Theological College De- 
partment. Up to March, 1909, the S. V. M. U. had enrolled 3,283 volunteers, of 
whom 1,385 had sailed, in connection with 45 different societies, while 1,201 were , 
still in preparation. The Union also aids missions by promoting missionary study 
among students, who thus become supporters of the cause.) .', 

MISSIONARIES' LITERATURE ASSOCIATION (1894). 
Honorary General Secretary and Founder: Mr. William Robert Dover, 

7 Albany Court Yard, Piccadilly, London, W. 
Object: To provide missionaries with useful periodicals; to establish i 

libraries in mission stations; and to make grants of the Scriptures, 

tracts, sermons, books, etc., for free distribution. 
Income: 30. The income of the Association is largely in the form of 

literature presented to be forwarded to the fields. 
Organ: "The Missionary Quarterly." 
Field: The world. 



42 



WORLD ATLAS OF CHRISTIAN MISSIONS 



England 



WORLD'S YOUNG WOMEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION (1894). 

General Secretary: Miss Clarissa Spencer. 

Corresponding Secretary: Miss Ethel Stevenson. 

Office Address: 26 George St., Hanover Square, London, W. 

Object: To promote the spiritual, intellectual, social, and physical wel- 
fare of young women. t . 

Income: For the work in mission lands, 9,940 (see note below); for 
the upkeep of the International Office, including the General Secretary's 
tours, etc., 2,203. 

Organ: "The World's Young Women's Christian Association Quarterly. 

Fields: Japan, China, British Malaysia, India, Turkish Empire, North 
Africa (Egypt, Tunis), Western Africa (Gold Coast, Southern Nigeria), 
South Africa (Cape Colony, Natal, Transvaal), British East Africa, 
South America (Argentine Republic. Brazil). There is also work in 
most of the countries of Europe, in Australasia, in Canada, and in the 
United States. 

(NOTE: The World's Young Women's Christian Association is primarily a federation 
of the various National Committees of the Young Women's Christian Association, 
together with Corresponding Members who represent countries in which the branches 
are not yet formed into national organizations. In non-Christian lands there are 
three National Committees, that of India. Burma, and Ceylon, that of China, and 
that of Japan. The Young Women's Christian Association work in those lands 
is under the immediate direction of their National Committees. The foreign secre- 
taries sent out to non-Christian lands are supported by their several home Na- 
tional Committees, and are recorded as secretaries of those committees. The 
only work for non-Christians which is under the immediate direction of the World s 
Committee is that in countries which have no foreign secretaries and no National 
Committees. Nearly all of such work is among college students. The income for 
foreign work of the World's Young Women's Christian Association represents, for 
the most part, the sum of gifts reported by the various National Committees which 
send secretaries to mission lands. In entering the statistics of Young Women's 
Christian Association work in this volume, European or North American secre- 
taries are credited to their home supporting constituencies, and all other data in 
each case are entered under the National Committee o^ the particular mission field. 
In the Turkish Empire no foreign secretaries are resident, nor is there a National 
Committee, so all work in that field is credited to the World's Young Women's 
Christian Association, which has supervision over it.) 

KESWICK CONVENTION MISSION COUNCIL (1896). 

Honorary Secretary: Rev. J. Stuart Holden, M.A., 66 Gloucester Place, 
London, W. 

Object: To send forth missioners to attend missionary conferences on 
the field, and to support foreign missionaries, through organized mis- 
sionary societies. 

Income: 1,527, applied toward the support of fifteen missionaries. 

Organ: "The Life of Faith." 

Fields: Japan, China, India, North Africa (Egypt), South Africa. 

FRIENDS OF ARMENIA (1897). 

Honorary Secretary: Mrs. Mary Hickson, % 47 Victoria St., Westminster, 
London, S. W. 

Object: To maintain Armenian children made orphans by massacre or 
disaster, and to help widows and destitute women to support them- 
selves. 

Income: 6,096. 

Organ: "The Friend of Armenia." 

Field: Asia Minor. 

(NOTE: Since the Friends of Armenia began vrork, in 1897, they have had the pleasure 
of forwarding over 60,000 to the distressed districts.) 

INDUSTRIAL MISSIONS AID SOCIETY (1897). 

Secretary: Mr. Joseph Starling, 84 Great Portland St., London, W. 

Object: To make it possible for native Christians to live without being 
pauperized, when they are otherwise boycotted; to make it possible 
for the sons and daughters of native Christians to be taught and trained, 
without engaging themselves to idolatrous employers; to lessen the 
cost of supporting famine orphans, child widows, and others, in homes 
and schools, in which they are enabled to devote some part of the day 
to remunerative work, according to their age and capabilities; and to 
dispose of the work thus produced. 

Income: Donations, 624; sales, 2,525; total, 3,149. 

Organ: "Industrial Missions." 

Field: The world. 

(NOTE: The Society receives and disposes of much of the embroidery, needlework, 
carved wood, carpets, rugs, etc., from over forty different mission stations in China, 
India, Palestine, Armenia, Africa, West Indies, etc.) 

HOME FOR HOMELESS AND FRIENDLESS INDIAN WOMEN, CAL- 
CUTTA (1899). 
(See under India.) 

COUNCIL IN ENGLAND FOR THE HOME FOR HOMELESS AND FRIENDLESS 

INDIAN WOMEN, CALCUTTA (1898). 

Honorary Secretary: Mrs. F. C. Church, Belmont, Baslow Road, Eastbourne. 
Object: To raise contributions for, and to arouse interest in, the Mission for desti- 
tute Indian women in Calcutta, under the care of Miss Editha Mulvany. 
Income: 330. The Council in England has also raised the sum of 1,700 to pay 

for a new building site for the institution. 
Field: India (Calcutta). 

SOCIETY FOR THE PROTECTION OF CHILDREN IN INDIA (1901). 
(See under India.) 

ENGLISH COMMITTEE OF THE SOCIETY FOR THE PROTECTION OF CHILDREN 

IN INDIA (1900). 
Honorary Secretary: Rev. J. P. Ashton, M.A., 7 Tillington Terrace, Clive Vale, 

Hastings, Sussex. 
Object: To cooperate with the Society for the Protection of Children in India by 

awakening interest, and by raising funds. 
Income: 129. 
Field: India (Bengal, United Provinces, Central Provinces). 

FOREIGN GOSPEL LITERATURE AND CORRESPONDENCE MISSION. 
OR PRESS AND POST MISSION (1903). 

Honorary Directors : Mrs. Charlotte Fenn, Dr. R. M. Fenn. 

Office Address: 7 Burlington Road, Withington, Manchester. 

Object: To evangelize the educated classes in foreign countries, espe- 
cially ^ those in Roman Catholic Spanish and French speaking com- 
munities. 

Income: 109. This income is spent entirely in printing booklets, and 
circulating them by post, and in correspondence. All home service is 
honorary. 

Fields: Central America (Guatemala). South America (Argentine Re- 
public, Uruguay), Mexico, Europe (Belgium, Spain), and other coun- 
tries, as means and opportunity allow. 

LONDON MISSIONARY SCHOOL OF MEDICINE (1903). 

Honorary Secretary: Edwin A. Neatby, M.D., 82 Wimpole St., Lon- 



Object: To impart to missionaries, going to regions beyond the reach 
of qualified medical aid, knowledge, which shall help them to preserve 
their own health, and to deal intelligently with common ailments 
arising among themselves or the natives. 

Income: 270. 

Organ: "The Ends of the Earth." 

Fields: Mission fields throughout the world. 

(NOTE: The London Missionary School of Medicine is operated In connection with 
the London Homoeopathic Hospital, Great Ormond St., Bloomsbury, W.O. The 
school does not compete with Medical Missionary Associations, nor do its students 
pose as medical missionaries, but it aims to impart a sufficient elementary training 
in medicine and surgery to its missionary students to enable them to safeguard 
their own health, and to render intelligent assistance in cases of common illness 
arising in regions where. regular medical aid is not obtainable. At the sixth annual 
meeting of the School it was reported that a total of 168 students, representin' 
24 societies, had received the full course of three terms' training.) 

NURSES' MISSIONARY LEAGUE (1903). 

Secretary: Miss H. Y. Richardson, Sloane Gardens House, 52 Lower 
Sloane St., London, S. W. 

Object: To unite as volunteer members all nurses, already fully trained, 
or in course of full training, who intend, if God permit, to beqome 
foreign missionaries; to unite as associate members all nurses, already 
fully trained, or in course of full training, who are interested in Chris- 
tian work at home and abroad; and to supply to members mutual help 
and encouragement in the Christian life and service. 

Income: 350. 

Organ: "Nurses Near and Far." 

Fields: Members of the League are in mission hospitals, in connection 
with various missionary societies all over the world. 

UGANDA COMPANY, LIMITED (1903). 

Secretary: Mr. E. F. Whaite, 15 Old Jewry Chambers, London, E. C. 
Object: The administration of commercial and industrial enterprise in 

Uganda. 
Income: As the Company is on a, commercial basis, its property and 

assets, and the subscriptions of its stockholders, cannot be classed as 

missionary contributions. 
Field: Africa (Uganda Protectorate). 

(NOTE: The Uganda Company, Limited, is an outgrowth of the industrial work for- 
merly carried on in connection with the mission of the Church Missionary Society 
in Uganda. The industries which were started and conducted by the Church Mis- 
sionary Society as part of their missionary; efforts were take_n over by the Uganda 
Company, Limited, in 1903 ; and have since been administered independently, 
along commercial lines, but in sympathetic relations with the Society's Mission in 
, Uganda_. The Genera^ Manager in Uganda is Mr. K. Borup. Like the Papuan 
Industries, Limited, it is a heritage of missions, and with its commercial enterprise 
is mingled a moral and practical purpose to lift industrial service to a high plane, 
and to help forward industrial progress along useful lines. In addition to this 
industrial effort in Uganda, there was also established at Kavirondo, in 1906, with 
similar aims, the East African Industries, Limited, the London office of which is 
1 and 2 George St., Mansion House, E. C. Its Superintendent in East Africa ia 
Mr. J. A. Bailey.) 

PAPUAN INDUSTRIES, LIMITED (1904). 

Secretary: Mr. Thomas Elson, 120 Colmore Row, Birmingham. 

Object: The material, moral, and spiritual uplifting of the natives of 
Papua (New Guinea), and the islands of the Torres Straits, by stimu- 
lating them to make efforts for their own improvement, through the 
cultivation of marketable products, and by other industrial pursuits. 

Income: The Balance Sheet of the Papuan Industries, June 30, 1910, 
reports property and assets at a valuation of 22,427-12-7. 

Organ: Occasional booklets, under various names. 

Fields: Papua (New Guinea), and the neighboring islands. 

(NOTE: The management of the Company is in the hands of a Board of Directors in 
England, the Chairman of which is Mr. H. F. Keep, of Birmingham. The Managing 
Director in Australia is Mr. F. H. Walker, Badu, Torres Straits. Mr. Walker was 
the prime mover in this industrial mission enterprise, and has had a long experience 
in New Guinea, both as a missionary and a trader. For eight years he worked in 
connection with the London Missionary Society, and he arrived at the conclusion 
that the evangelistic agency alone was not sufficient to uplift the degraded and 
savage races of New Guinea, and that a Christian industrial agency, supplementing 
the evangelistic work, was essential. The origin and aim of the Company are, 
therefore, essentially missionary, though it differs in important respects from the 
status and purpose of the organizations usually classed as missionary . It repre- 
sents a commercial agency dedicated in the spirit of its administration to mis- 
sionary effort. The_ assets of the Company have not been included in the summary 
of missionary contributions.) 

CONGO REFORM ASSOCIATION (1904). 

Honorary Secretary: Mr. E. D. Morel, "Granville House," Arundel St., 
Strand, London, W. C. 

Object: To secure for the natives inhabiting the Congo State territories 
the just and humane treatment which was guaranteed to them under 
the Berlin and Brussels Acts, by the restoration of their rights in land, 
and in the produce of the soil, of which preexisting rights they have 
been deprived by the legislation and procedure of the Congo State. 

Income: The Association is supported solely by voluntary contributions, 
and its income consequently varies; it may be given as from 1,500 
to 2,000. 

Organ: "The Official Organ of the Congo Reform Association." 

Field: Africa (Congo State). 

(NOTE: There are branches of the Congo Reform Association in the United States, 
Germany, Switzerland, and France, which see under their respective countries in 
this Directory.) 

WORLD-EVANGELIZATION LEAGUE (1905). 

Honorary Secretary and Founder: Mr. John H. Greene, Kingsdown, 

Chingford, London, N. E. 
Object: To encourage Christians to be soul-winners, in order that the 

evangelization of the world may be accelerated. 
Income: The income is nominal, nearly all the work being honorary. 
Organ: "Occasional Papers," in the form of booklets. 



Fields: Branches have _ been organized in _ Europe, India, Ceylon, and 
China, and, in a few instances, in the United States, Canada, and Aus- 
tralasia. 

ANTI-SLAVERY AND ABORIGINES PROTECTION SOCIETY (1909). 
Secretary: Mr. Travers Buxton, M.A., 51 Denison House, Vauxhall Bridge 

Road, London, S. W. 
Object: To abolish slavery and the slave trade, and to secure for ail 

native races justice, and the protection of their rights. 
Income: British and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society, 548; Aborigines 

Protection Society, 634; total for the two societies in 1908, 1,182. 
Organ: "The Anti-Slavery Reporter and Aborigines' Friend." _ 
Fields: Not restricted, but especially within the British Dominions. 

(NOTE: The Aborigines Protection Society (1837) and the British and Foreign Anti- 
Slave_ry Society (1839) were amalgamated in 1909, to form the Anti-Slavery and 
Aborigines Protection Society.) 



fitagland-Ireland 



DIRECTORY OF MISSIONARY SOCIETIES 



CHINA EMERGENCY APPEAL COMMITTEE (1909). 

President: Sir Robert Hart, Bart., G.C.M.G. 

Secretary: Rev. Edward T. Reed, 28 Victoria St., Westminster, London, 
8 -W. 

Object: To raise the sum of 100,000 to assist Christian Missions in China, 
in order to take advantage of the present unparalleled openings before 
they pass away from us, by the following means: the establishment of 
Union Medical Training Colleges for Chinese students; the founding 
of Normal Training and Theological Institutions for the education 
of Chinese Christian school-teachers and pastors; the translation and 
publication of the best Western literature for the use of the colleges; 
and rendering assistance to the Christian Literature and Tract Socie- 
ties already at work. 

Income: 14,021. 

Field: China. 

(NOTE: The China Emergency Appeal Committee, is likely to be only a temporary 
organization, as it was C9nstituted to aid existing missionary societies in China to 
make special efforts during the present remarkable opportunities for advance in 
Christian work in that land. After its object of raising "the sum of 100,000 for 
this emergency has been attained, it is possible the Committee may disband.) 



IRELAND 

Societies Appointing and Sending Missionaries 
CHURCH OF ENGLAND: 

SOCIETY FOR THE PROPAGATION OF THE GOSPEL IN FOREIGN 

PARTS (1701). 
(See under England.) 

DUBLIN UNIVERSITY MISSION TO CHHOTA NAGPUR (1801). 

Honorary Secretaries: Rev. N. J. D. White, D.D., 32 Kenifworth Square, Dublin; 
Rev. D. Allman t Dr. Stephen's Hospital, Dublin. 

Object: Evangelistic, educational, and medical work in India. 

Income: 2,509. 

Organ: "The Dublin University Missionary Magazine." 

Field: India (Chhota Nagpur). 

(NOTE: The Dublin University Mission to - Chhota > Nagpur cooperates with the 
Society for the Propagation of the Gospel in Foreign Parts by furnishing part ol 
the support for a certain number of S. P. G. missionaries, the remainder neces- 
sary for the support of these men being supplied by grant from the S. P. G.) 

LADIES' AUXILIARY OF THE DUBLIN UNIVERSITY MISSION TO CHHOTA 

NAGPUR (1891). 

Honorary Secretary: Miss Josephine Carson, 18 Fitzwilliam Place, Dublin. . 
Object: Evangelistic, educational, and medical work in India. 
Income: From home sources, 1,685; collected in India, 82; total, 1,767. 
Organ: "The Dublin University Missionary Magazine." 
Field: India (Chhota Nagpur). 

(NOTE: The Ladies' Auxiliary provides all the funds for the support of women's 
work in connection with the Dublin University Mission to Chhota Nagpur.) 

CHURCH MISSIONARY SOCIETY FOR AFRICA AND THE EAST (i799>* 

(See under England.) 

HIBERNIAN CHURCH MISSIONARY SOCIETY (1814). 

Secretary: Rev. A. S. Pike, M.A., 21 Molesworth St., Dublin. 

Object: To call forth and direct the zeal of the well-disposed persons in Ireland, 
and, more particularly, that of the members of the Church of Ireland, in sup- 
port of the plans and proceedings of the Church Missionary Society; and for 
this end constant attention shall be paid to the diffusion of information, the 
obtaining of contributions, and the securing of proper persona to be recom- 
mended as missionaries to the Church Missionary Society. 

Income: 21,556. 

Organ: "The Hibernian Church Missionary Gleaner." 

Fields: Those of the Church Missionary Society. 

(NOTE: This Society is auxiliary to the Church Missionary Society, through which 
organization it sends out its missionaries.) 

DUBLIN UNIVERSITY MISSION TO FUH-KIEN (1885). 

Honorary Secretary: Rev. R. M. Gwynn, B.D., F.T.C.D., 40 Trinity College, 
Dublin. 

Assistant Secretary: Rev. Henry Brodie Good, M.A., Trinity College, Dublin. 

Object: Educational, medical, and pastoral mission work in the Province of Fuh- 
Kien, China. 

Income: 2,537. 

Organ: "The Dublin University Missionary Magazine." 

Field: China (Fuh-Kien Province. Special districts being Fuh-ning, and St. 
Mark's College, Foochow, with detached workers in Kien-Nmg and Foochow). 

(NOTE: The Dublin University Mission to Fuh-Kien works as an auxiliary to the 
Church Missionary Society. There is a Ladies' Auxiliary in aid of the Mission, 
of which the Honorary Secretaries are Miss M. Connell, 97 St. Lawrence Road, 
Clontarf, and Miss A. Moses, Kilbride Tower, Bray, County Wicklow.) 

SOUTH AMERICAN MISSIONARY SOCIETY (1844). 
(See under England.) 

IRISH AUXILIARY OF THE SOUTH AMERICAN MISSIONARY SOCIETY (1894). 
Honorary Secretary: George De Butts, Esq. 
Secretary: Rev. Henry Mahony. 
Assistant Secretary: Rev. A. S. Woodward, M.A. 
Office Address: 8 Dawson St., Dublin. 

Object: To collect funds for, and to further the aims of, the parent society 
Income: 2,150. 

Organ: "The South American Crusader." 
Field: South America, except British Guiana. 

FRIENDS: 

FRIENDS' FOREIGN MISSION ASSOCIATION (1866) 

(See under England.) 

IRISH AUXILIARY OF THE FRIENDS' FOREIGN MISSION ASSOCIATION (1869). 
Honorary Secretary: Mr. Alfred E. Goodbody, 30 College Green, Dublin. 
Object: To aid the Friends'^ Foreign Mission Association. 

Income: 1,952 (included in the income of the Friends' Foreign Mission Asso- 
ciation). 
Fields: Those of the Friends' Foreign Mission Association. 

PRESBYTERIAN: 

FOREIGN MISSION OF THE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH IN IRELAND 

(1840). 
Conveners: Rev. John Irwin, M.A., The Manse, Windsor, Belfast; Rev. 

George Thompson, The Manse, Clifton St., Belfast. 
Secretary: Rev. William James Lowe, M.A., D.D., The Church House, 

Belfast. 
Object: The christianization of the natives in Indi\ and China, by the 

agency of foreign missionaries and the members of the native Church. 
Income: 16,211 (not including contributions on the mission field). 
Organ: "The Missionary Herald." 
Fields: Chinese Empire (Manchuria), India. 



WOMEN'S ASSOCIATION FOR FOREIGN MISSIONS (1874). . , 

Home Corresponding Secretary: Mrs. Barron, The Manse, Whitehouse, Belfast. 

Foreign Corresponding Secretary: Lady Crawford, Mount Randal, Belfast. 

Object: To promote the Christian education of women in the East, and to advance 
among them the kingdom of Christ. 

Income: 7,403, of which 6,867 was from home sources, and 536 from govern- 
ment grants for schools in India, and from local contributions to hospitals in 
India and Manchuria. This income ia not included in that of the Foreign Mis- 
sion of the Presbyterian Church in Ireland. 

Organ: "Woman's Work" (a Zenana Mission Quarterly). 

Fields: Chinese Empire (Manchuria), India (Gujarat and Kathiawar, Bombay 
Presidency). 

(NOTE: Known formerly as the Female Association for Promoting Christianity 
among the Women of the East.) 

JUNGLE TRIBES MISSION OF THE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH IN IRELAND 

(1890). 
Honorary Secretaries: Rev. H. Montgomery, 5 Lower Crescent, Belfast; Rev. R. K. 

Hanna, Whiteabbey, Belfast. 

Object: To evangelize the Jungle Tribes in Gujarat. 

Income: 1,487 (included in the income of the Foreign Mission of the Presby- 
terian Church of Ireland). 

Organ: "Jungle Tribes Mission Quarterly Paper." 
Field: India (Gujarat, Bombay Presidency). 

CONTINENTAL MISSION OF THE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH IN IRE- 
LAND (1846). 

Secretary: Rev. William James Lowe, D.D., Church House, Belfast. 
Object: To aid evangelical work on the Continent of Europe. 
Income: 3,573. Of this amount 2,101 represents a balance brought 

forward from the previous year. 
Organ: "The Missionary Herald." 
Fields: France, Italy, Belgium, Austria, Spain. 

(NOTE: In 1842 the Assembly appointed a Committee of Correspondence with the 
Reformed Churches of the Continent of Europe. In 1846 the first contribution 
was sent. In 1855 a Committee of Assembly was appointed to obtain money for 
the Waldenses. In 1856 the Assembly ordered a collection, which was to be annual, 
for the Colonial and Continental Mission. This arrangement continued for twenty- 
three years, and then the two missions were separated, and a collection was ordered 
to be taken for each, every alternate year. The Mission supports one foreign mis- 
sionary at Puerto Santa Maria, in Spain, with sixteen Spanish assistants as evan- 
gelists, and conducts at the same place a Theological Training School. There are 
also four elementary schools. Financial grants are made to Evangelical Churches 
in Austria, Belgium, France, and Italy.) 

FOREIGN MISSION OF THE REFORMED PRESBYTERIAN SYNOD OF 

IRELAND (1871). 
Foreign Mission Convener: Rev. 8. R. McNeilly, B.A., Bailiesmills Manse, 

LisDurn. 

Object: Evangelization in foreign lands. 
Income: From home sources, 1,285; from the foreign field, 71; total. 

1,356. 

Organ: "The Covenanter." 
Field: Syria. 

(NOTE: The Reformed Presbyterian Church in Scotland is associated with the 
Reformed Presbyterian Synod of Ireland in supporting this Syria Mission. See 
under Scotland. There are Women's < Missionary Associations in connection with 
Borne of the churches of this denomination, but their contributions are included 
in the income reported by the main society.) 



SENDING SOCIETIES NOT DENOMINATIONAL: 

QUA D30E MISSION (1887). 

Secretary: Mr. R. L. McKeown, 109 Scottish Provident Buildings, Belfast. 
Object: The evangelization of the tribes living in the vicinity of the Qua 

Iboe River, West Africa. 

Income: From home sources, 3,290; from the field, 176; total, 3,466. 
Organ: "Qua Iboe Mission Quarterly." 
Field: Western Africa (Southern Nigeria). 

(NOTE: The first missionary, Mr. S. A. Bill, went out in 1887, but the Mission CbunoU 
was not organized until 1891.) 

NORTH INDIA SCHOOL OF MEDICINE FOR CHRISTIAN WOMEN (i 
(See under India.) 

NORTH INDIA SCHOOL OF MEDICINE FOR CHRISTIAN WOMEN, DUBLIN 

ILIARY COMMITTEE (1901). 

Honorary Secretary: Miss G. P. Gulverwell, 41 Lower Leeson St., Dublin. 
Object: To collect funds in aid of the North India School of Medicine for 

Women in Ludhiana. 
Income: 50. 
Field: India. 



Cooperating and Collecting Society 

t 

CHURCH OF ENGLAND: 

SPANISH AND PORTUGUESE CHURCH AID SOCIETY (1870). 

(See under England.) 

IRISH BRANCH OF SPANISH AND PORTUGUESE CHURCH AID SOCIETY (1870). 
Honorary Secretaries: Rev. J. 0. Irwin, B.D., St. James' Vicarage, N. C. R. Dublinji 

Rev. J. M. Harden, B.D., The College, Kilkenny. 
Object: To collect funds and enlist sympathy on behalf of the Ref9rmed Spanish 

and Portuguese Episcopal Churches, and thereby to aid them until they become 

self-supporting. 
Income: 483. 
Field: Spain, Portugal. 

COOPERATING SOCIETY NOT DENOMINATIONAL: 

HIBERNIAN BIBLE SOCIETY (1806). 

Secretary: Rev. David Henry Hall, B.D., 10 Upper Sackville St., Dublin. 
Object: The circulation of the Holy Scriptures, first in Ireland, and theD 

elsewhere, through the British and Foreign Bible Society. 
Income: 3,292, of which 1,114 was disbursed through the British and 

Foreign Bible Society. 
Organ: "The Bible in the World." 
Fields: China, India, Ireland. 

(NOTE: The Hibernian Bible Society is an independent organization, but by rulj 
gives the surplus of its funds to the work of the British and Foreign Bible Society 
through which it supports eight colporteurs in China, and three colporteurs and I 
Bible-woman in India.) 




44 



WORLD ATLAS OF CHRISTIAN MISSIONS 



Scotland 



SCOTLAND 
Societies Appointing and Sending Missionaries 

BAPTIST: 

BAPTIST INDUSTRIAL MISSION OF SCOTLAND (1895). 
Secretary: Adam Nimmo, Esq. ; M.A., 21 Bothwell St., Glasgow. 
Object: To assist in introducing and spreading the Gospel in Central 

Africa, or elsewhere, by means of industrial missions on a self-supporting 

and self-extending basis. 
Income: 558. 

Organ: "The Baptist Industrial Missionary." 
Field: Southern Central Africa (Nyasaland). 

CHURCH OF ENGLAND: 

CHURCH MISSIONARY SOCIETY FOR AFRICA AND THE EAST (1799)- 
(See under England.) 

CHURCH MISSIONARY SOCIETY ASSOCIATIONS IN SCOTLAND ( ). 

Honorary Organizing Secretaries: Rev. Canon E. C. Dawson, M.A., 9 Ramsay 

Gardens, Edinburgh; Rev. Lord Blythswood, Blythswood, Renfrew. 
Object: To aid in the work of the Church Missionary Society. 
Income: 873. . 

Fields: Those of the Church Missionary Society. 



EPISCOPAL: 

REPRESENTATIVE COUNCIL OF THE EPISCOPAL CHURCH IN 

SCOTLAND (1871). 

Secretary: Mr. Robert T. Norfor, C.A., 13 Queen St., Edinburgh. 
Object: To raise funds from and for the Church in its corporate capacity, 

both for home needs and for missions abroad. For the latter the 

Council has its Board of Foreign Missions. 
Income: 4,935, not including the special sum of 5,718 raised in 1908 

toward the Pan-Anglican Congress Thank-Offering. 
Organ: "The Foreign Mission Chronicle." 
Fields: India (Chanda, in Central Provinces), South Africa (Diocese of 

St. John's, Kaffraria). 

(NOTE: The Representative Council is a canonical body, and is recognized as the agent 
of the Episcopal Church of Scotland in matters of finance. The Council, through 
its Board of Foreign Missions, receives and transmits subscriptions from Church 
of England people in Scotland in aid of any special mission purpose or missionary 
society connected with that Church, but its own separate fields arc those specified. 
To the Diocese of St. John's, Kaffraria, it sends a. block grant of 1,200 a year in 
aid of the Diocese, while the mission at Chanda is entirely dependent on the Scot- 
tish Episcopal Church.) 

PRESBYTERIAN: 

CHURCH OF SCOTLAND FOREIGN MISSION COMMITTEE (1829) 
Secretary: W. M. M'Lachlan, Esq., W.S., 22 Queen St., Edinburgh. 
Object: The propagation of the Gospel in foreign parts, especially India. 
Income: Home, 29,729; abroad, 10,165: total, 39,894 (exclusive of 

the income of the Women's Association for Foreign Missions) . 
Organ: "Life and Work." 

Fields: China, India, Southern Central Africa (Nyasaland), British East 
Africa. 

(NOTE: Ass9eiated with the work of this Committee are the Missionary Associations 
of the Universities of Edinburgh, Glasgow, Aberdeen, and St. Andrews; the Church 
of Scotland Young Men's Guild, and the Church of Scotland Woman's Guild. 
Alexander Duff, the first missionary of the Established Church, was sent out in 
1829. The earlier Scottish Missionary Society of Edinburgh, and the Glasgow 
Missionary Society, both organized in 1796, were absorbed in the Church of 
Scotland Missions. The East African Scottish Mission was transferred in 1907 to 
the care of the Church of Scotland Foreign Mission Committee, as trustees, and is 
now an integral part of the missions of that Church. For entry of Church of Scot- 
land Committee for Conversion of the Jews, see Societies Working Among the 
Jews.) 

CHURCH OF SCOTLAND WOMEN'S ASSOCIATION FOR FOREIGN MISSIONS 

(1837). 

Secretary: Miss Macpherson, 22 Queen St., Edinburgh. 
Object: The evangelization of women in non-Christian and Moslem lands. 
Income: From home sources, 20,231; from abroad, 2,569; total, 22,800 (in- 
come not included in that of the Church of Scotland Foreign Mission Committee). 
Organ: "The News of Female Missions." 
Fields: China, India, Southern Central Africa (Nyasaland). 

(NOTE: Independent, but cooperating with the Church of Scotland Foreign Mis- 
sion Committee. Previous to 1883, the Society was called the Scottish Ladies' 
Association for the Advancement of Female Education in India.) 

CHURCH OF SCOTLAND GUILD MISSION (1889). 

Secretary: Mr. George M' Alpine, 22 Queen St., Edinburgh. 

Object: To extend the kingdom of God in the Kalimpong and Doonrs Districts of 

Bengal, India, and to deepen the interest of members of the Guilds in mission 

work among non-Christians. 
Income: From the Young Men's Guild, 1,324; from the Woman's Guild, 1,078; 

total, 2,402 (included in the income of the Church of Scotland Foreign Mission 

Committee). 

Organ: "Guild Life and Work." 
Field: India (Kalimpong and Dooars Districts, Bengal). 

(NOTE: Supported jointly by the Young Men's Guild and the Woman's Guild of 
the Church of Scotland.') 

NEW HEBRIDES MISSION (1848). 

(See under Australia.) 

JOHN G. PATON MISSION FUND (1892). 

Honorary Secretary in Scotland: Mrs. James Paton, 10 Leslie Eoad, Pollokshields, 

Glasgow. 
Honorary Secretary for England: Mr. A. K. Langridge, "Aniwa," Westcliffe, South- 

end-on-Sea. 

Honorary Secretary f9r Ireland: W. Watson, Esq., Rosslyn, Knock, Belfast. 
Object: The evangelizing of the non-evangelized portions of the New Hebrides 

Islands. 

Income: 3,000. 

Organ: "Quarterly Jottings from the New Hebrides." 
Field: New Hebrides Islands. 

FOREIGN MISSION COMMITTEE OF THE REFORMED PRESBYTERIAN 

CHURCH OF SCOTLAND (1871). 

Secretary: Rev. John McKee, Reformed Presbyterian Manse, Wishaw. 
Object: To spread the Gospel of Christ. 
Income: 256. 



Organ: "The Reformed Presbyterian Witness." 
Field: Syria. 

(NOTE: This is a joint mission with that of the Reformed Presbyterian Synod in 
Ireland. See under Ireland.) 

UNITED ORIGINAL SECESSION CHURCH OF SCOTLAND. FOREIGN 

MISSION COMMITTEE (1872). 
Secretary: Rev. Alexander Smellie, D.D., Carluke. 

Object: Foreign missions, including evangelistic, zenana, medical, educa- 
tional, and orphanage work. 
Income: 1,751. 

Organ: "Original Secession Magazine." 
Field: India (Central Provinces). 

UNITED FREE CHURCH OF SCOTLAND'S FOREIGN MISSION COM- 
MITTEE (1900). 

Secretaries: Dr. George Smith, C.I.E., Rev. Frank Ashcroft, M.A., Rev. 
James Webster. 

Office Address: United Free Church of Scotland Offices, 119 George St., 
Edinburgh. 

Object: The extension of the Gospel in non-Christian lands. 

Income: Home, 120,761; on the field, 90,342; total, 211,103. 

Organ: "The Missionary Record." 

Fields: Chinese Empire (Manchuria), Melanesia (New Hebrides), India, 
South Arabia (statistics entered under Turkish Empire), Western 
Africa (Southern Nigeria), South Africa (Cape Colony, Natal), South- 
ern. Central Africa (Livingstonia, in Nyasaland, and North-eastern 
Rhodesia), West Indies (Jamaica, Trinidad). 

(NOTE: The United Free Church of Scotland was formed in 1900, by the union of the 
Free Church of Scotland and the United Presbyterian Church. The mission work 
of the original Church of Scotland began in 1829, but all of the missionaries of 
the Church of Scotland, including Duff and Wilson, cast in their lot with the Free 
Church at the Disruption in 1843, and the Free Church at that time organized its 
own Committees, and greatly extended its foreign missions. The mission work of 
the United Presbyterian Church was begun in 1835, by the Secession Church, 
which in 1847 united with the Relief Church to form the United Presbyterian 
Church.) 

LADIES' KAFFRARIAN SOCIETY FOR PROMOTING FEMALE EDUCATION IN 
KAFFRARIA (1839)- 

Honorary Secretary: Mrs. Bradock, 1 Southpark Terrace, W., Glasgow. 

Object: To give Kaffir girls a thorough normal training, fitting them to be'teachers 
in mission schools, and also, by practical lessons in cookery, laundry, and house- 
work, to raise the tone of their home life. 

Income: 2,234 (not included in the income of the United Free Church of Scot- 
land's Foreign Mission Committee). African proportion (fees, government 
grants, etc.), 1,864; home contributions, 370. 

Field: South Africa (Emgwali, in Cape Colony). 

(NOTE: The Society was originally formed, in 1839, as the Ladies' Auxiliary of the 
Glasgow Missionary Society, having its field in Africa.) 

LIVINGSTONIA MISSION (1875). 

Honorary Secretary: Rev. J. Fairley Daly, B.D., 232 Vincent St., Glasgow. 

Object: To spread the Gospel in Nyasaland, and to build up there a native Chris- 
tian Church. 

Income: From home sources, 9,785; native contributions, 853; total, 10,658. 
(Included in the income reported by the United Free Church of Scotland's For- 
eign Mission Committee.) 

Organ: "Livingstonia News." 

Field: Southern Central Africa (Nyasaland and North-eastern Rhodesia). 

UNITED FREE CHURCH OF SCOTLAND WOMEN'S FOREIGN MISSION COM- 
MITTEE (1909). 

Secretary: Rev. William Stevenson, M.A., United Free Church Offices, 119 George 
St., Edinburgh. 

Object: The evangelization of women in the foreign mission fields <of the 
Church. 

Income: From home sources, 24,086; from the foreign field, 15,248; total, 
39,334. (Included in the income of the Foreign Mission Committee.) 

Organ: "The Women's Missionary Magazine." 

Fields: Chinese Empire (Manchuria), India, Western Africa (Old Calabar), South 
Africa (Cape Colony), West Indies (Jamaica). 

(NOTE: Organized in 1900, by the union of the Women's Foreign Missionary So- 
ciety of the Free Church of Scotland, founded in 1843, and which was formerly 
called the "Ladies' Society for Female Education in India and Africa," dating 
from 1837, and the Zenana Mission of the United Presbyterian Church of Scot- 
land, founded in 1880.) 

COLONIAL, CONTINENTAL, AND JEWISH COMMITTEE OF THE 
UNITED FREE CHURCH OF SCOTLAND (1910). 

Convener: Rev. William Ewing, M.A. 

Secretary: Rev. George Milne Rae, D.D., United Free Church Offices, 
119 George St., Edinburgh. 

Object: Religious ministrations, in English, in the British Colonies, and 
at various Continental centers; evangelistic mission work among 
Continental people, and rendering aid to evangelical missions in Eu- 
rope; and also missions among the Jews. 

Income: The income of the Colonial Mission for 1907 was 3,516, but if 
the money raised abroad by agents of the Committee, and that paid 
by Government for military and naval services, and spent on the 
Committee's work be added, the income would amount to 5,172. 
The income of the Continental Committee for 1907 was 3,342, but if 
the money raised abroad, and expended on the Committee's work for 
the year, be added, the income would amount to 7,018. That of the 
Jewish Committee, for 1907, was 9,179, which includes the sums 
raised abroad as school fees, medical fees, and donations. The dis- 
bursements of the Jewish Committee were at Budapest, Constanti- 
nople, Safed, Hebron, and Tiberias. 

Fields: Colonies of Great Britain, Italy, France, Switzerland, Germany, 
Austria-Hungary, Spain, Portugal, Belgium, and Turkey and Pales- 
tine (among the Jews) . 

(NOTE: The Colonial Committee was instituted in 1836, and the Jewish in 1840. The 
Continental Committee was originally constituted in 1844, and was known as 
the Committee of Correspondence with Continental Churches. In 1848 it was 
merged with the Colonial Committee, and the amalgamated Committee was known 
as the Colonial and Continental Committee. Again, in 1868, the two were severed, 
and acted independently, until 1910, when an amalgamation was consummated 
of the Colonial, the Continental, and the Jewish Committees of the United Free 
Church, as above recorded. The different funds, however, are distinct, but under 
one administration. 

FREE CHURCH OF SCOTLAND FOREIGN MISSION (1907). 
Convener: Rev. Alexander Stewart, 2 Argyle Place, Edinburgh. 
Object : The evangelization of non-Christian people. 
Income: 1,110. 

Organ: Reports through the "Free Church of Scotland Record." 
Field: South Africa (Cape Colony). 

(NOTE: Beginning in 1900, the Free Church had no organized mission of its own until 
1907, when it resumed operations in Cape Colony. During the intervening years, 
however, the Church maintained a lady missionary, in connection with the foreign 
mission of the Original Secession Church, in Sconi, Centrnl Provinces, India, and 
contributed besides a sum averaging about 200 a year for the support of that 
Mission. This aid is still being given.) 



Scotland 



DIEECTORY OF MISSIONARY SOCIETIES 



45 



SENDING SOCIETIES NOT DENOMINATIONAL: 



MISSIONS AMONG NON- 



PARIS SOCIETY FOR EVANGELICAL 

CHRISTIAN NATIONS (1822). 
(See under France.) 

SCOTTISH COMMITTEE OF THE BAROTSI MISSION OF THE PARIS EVANGELI- 
CAL MISSIONARY SOCIETY (1898). 

Honorary Secretary: Richard H. Hunter, Esq., 57 Queen St., Glasgow. 
Object: To send the Gospel to the Barotsi nation. 
Income: 563. 

Organ: "News from Barotsi-land." 
Field: Southern Central Africa (North-western Rhodesia). 

EDINBURGH MEDICAL MISSIONARY SOCIETY (1841). 

Secretary: E. Sargood Fry, M.B., C.M., Mission House, 56 George Square, 
Edinburgh. 

Object: To promote in every possible way the consecration of the heal- 
ing art to the service of Christ, more especially in connection with 
missions to non-Christians abroad, and to train medical missionaries 
for the work. 

Income: 6,832. Of this amount, 3,770 was disbursed for foreign mis- 
sions, and 3,062 for home missions, including students' scholarships. 

Organ: "Quarterly Paper of the Edinburgh Medical Missionary Society." 

Fields: India, Palestine, and Syria, andj through its students who go 
forth for the various missionary societies, the world. 

INVALIDS' AUXILIARY TO THE EDINBURGH MEDICAL MISSIONARY SOCIETY 

Secretaries: Miss Cowan, Dun Edin, g Murrayfield, Edinburgh; Mias Sym, 21 Bel- 
grave Crescent, Edinburgh; Miss Lillie, Lynnwood, Bridge of Allan. _ 

Object: To stimulate in those laid aside by illness an interest in working for other 
sufferers, and to aid medical missions at home and abroad with funds, and also 
by earnest prayer for theae missions. 

Income: 150. 

Fields: Those of the medical missions aided. 

SPANISH EVANGELISATION SOCIETY (1855). 

(NOTE : According to a statement received from the Secretary, the Spanish Evangelisa- 
tion Society was likely to be discontinued at the end of the y_ear 1910. Part of its 
work will be under the charge of a local Committee in Seville, Spain, supported 
largely by funds from Scotland, with the addition of some contributions from 
friends in Seville 

NATIONAL BIBLE SOCIETY OF SCOTLAND (1861). 

Eastern Secretary: Rev. R. H. Falconer, 5 St. Andrew Square, Edinburgh. 

Western Secretary: W. J. Slowan, Esq., 224 West George St., Glasgow. 

Object: To unite the friends of Bible circulation in Scotland, and to 
promote, by every legitimate means, the diffusion, both at home and 
abroad, of the Holy Scriptures, without note or comment, and without 
the accompaniment of the books commonly called the "Apocrypha." 

Income: 32,948. 

Organ: "Quarterly Record." 

Fields: Japan, Korea, Chinese Empire (China, Manchuria), Australia, 
New Zealand, India, Ceylon, Turkish Empire, Western Africa, South- 
ern Central Africa, British East Africa, South America (Argentine 
Republic, Brazil), West Indies, Canada, Iceland, Europe (Austria- 
Hungary, Belgium, France, Germany, Italy). 

(NOTE: The work of this Society in non-Christian lands, especially China, is large and 
important, having amounted to the circulation of more than a million and a quar- 
ter copies of Bibles, Testaments, and portions of Scriptures, during the year 1908.) 

CHINA INLAND MISSION (1863). 
(See under England.) 

CHINA INLAND MISSION, AUXILIARY COUNCIL FOR SCOTLAND (1889). 
Secretary: Mr. George Graham Brown, 121 Bath St., Glasgow. 
Object: To hold non-administrative meetings with Scotch candidates; also to 

promote interest in Scotland in the China Inland Mission. 
Income: Not shown apart from London accounts. 
Field: Chinese Empire. 

INDIAN HOME MISSION TO THE SANTHALS (1867). 
(See under India.) 

SCOTTISH COMMITTEE IN AID OF INDIAN HOME MISSION TO THE SANTHALS 

(1876). 

Secretary: Mrs. Moncur, Rockfield, Dundee. 
Object: To aid in the Christian education of the Santhals. 
Income: 36. 
Field: India (Bengal). 

ANGLO-INDIAN EVANGELISATION SOCIETY (1870). 

General Secretary: Mr. W. Stewart Thompson, 26 Bridge St., Musselburgh. 
Secretary in India: Rev. Alex. S. Crichton, 13 Marine Lines, Bombay, 

India. 
Object: The maintenance of an unsectarian itinerant evangelical mission 

among the widely scattered groups of Europeans and Eurasians in 

India, otherwise destitute of Gospel ordinances, at railway stations, 

on tea estates, and elsewhere. 
Income: 1,786. 
Field: India. 

(NOTE: A continuation of the "Anglo-Indian Christian Union." It includes the 
"Assam Mission," founded by thejate Colonel Foquett, and the "Winter Mission," 
. suggested by the late Lady Kinnaird. It has auxiliary committees in England and 
in India. See Anglo-Indian Ladies' Union, under England.) 

MISSION TO MEDITERRANEAN GARRISONS (1883). 

Honorary Secretary and Treasurer: Mrs. Todd Osborne, Northfield, 

Whitecraigs, Giffnock, Glasgow. 

Organizing Secretary: Mr. David Dunbar, 45 Hope St., Glasgow. 
Object: Religious work among soldiers, sailors, and Spanish navvies. 
Income: 2,000. 

Organ: "Record of Missionary Life and Work." 
Fields: Egypt (Cairo), Gibraltar, Southern Spain, Scotland. 

(NOTE: The Mission maintains a Soldiers' and Sailors' Mission Home at Europa, 
Gibraltar, a Spanish Mission at Algeciras and La Linea, the Russell Soldiers' Home, 
and Gordon Hall at Cairo, and Soldiers' Homes at Perth and Inverness, Scotland.) 

GREEK EVANGELICAL UNION OF SMYRNA (1883), 
(See under Turkish Empire.) 

GREEK EVANGELICAL UNION OF SMYRNA, REFERENCE COUNCIL IN GREAT 

BRITAIN (1884). _ 

Secretary: J. R. van Milligen, Esq., Leewood, Dunblane. 
Object: To collect subscriptions in behalf of the evangelistic work of the Greek 

Evangelical Union of Smyrna. 
Income: 138. 
Field: Asia Minor (Smyrna and vicinity). 

CENTRAL MOROCCO MISSION (1886). 

Mission-Director: Dr. Robert Kerr, Rabat, Morocco. 
Secretary: Mr. James Easton, 18 Dunard St., Glasgow. 



Object: To carry the Gospel to the -Jews, Moors, Arabs, and Berbers, 
m Central Morocco; to supply the sick with medical advice and med- 
icine; and to teach and circulate the Scriptures and religious literature. 

Income: 583. 

Field: North Africa (Morocco). 



MISSION TO THE CHINESE BLIND AND ILLITERATE SIGHTED (1886). 




by a further adaptation of this system to the seeing, and by thia and 

other means to seek to lead them to Christ. 
Income: From 800 to 1,000. 
Field: China. 

PEKING LOCAL COMMITTEE OF MISSION TO THE CHINESE BLIND AND IL- 
LITERATE SIGHTED (1886). 
(See under China.) 

SOUTHERN MOROCCO MISSION (1888). 
Secretary: Mr. John Geddes, 64 Bothwell St., Glasgow. 
Object: To carry the Gospel to the Moors, Jews, Arabs, and Berbel 

tribes of South Morocco, and the regions beyond. 
Income: 1,915. 

Organ: "Southern Morocco Mission." 
Field: North Africa (Southern Morocco). 
(NOTE: There is a Ladies' Auxiliary.) 

HELP FOR BRAZIL (1892). 

Honorary Financial Secretary: Mr. John Stuart, 180 West Regent St., 

Glasgow. 

Object: The evangelization of Brazil. 

Income : 989. (Received from home friends of the Mission.) 
Organ: "Brazil." 
Field: South America (Brazil). Wholly among the Roman Catholic 

population. 

FOREIGN MISSION DEPARTMENT SCOTTISH NATIONAL COUNCIL OF 

YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATIONS (1901). 
General Secretary: Mr. James Mackenzie, National Council Office, 1 North 

St. Andrew St., Edinburgh. 
Object: The evangelizing and christianizing of the native students at the 

colleges of India; also work among Eurasian and European young men. 
Income: 573 (all raised from home sources.) 

Organs: "The Guide," "Quarterly Paper of the Scottish Y. M. C. A." 
Field: India (chiefly Lahore, but the sphere of work of the Scottish Young 

Men's Christian Association is the Punjab). 

(NOTE: For a statement regarding the relation of various national committees and 
councils of the Young Men's ' Christian Association to the foreign mission work of 
the organization, see note under World's Committee of Young Men's Christian 
Associations, in the Switzerland section of this Directory.) 

INLAND-SOUTH-AMERICA MISSIONARY UNION (1902). 
Honorary Secretary: Mrs. Margaret E. Hay, 62 Gilmore Place, Edinburgh. 
Object: To promote the evangelization of Inland South America. 
Income: 792. 

Organ: "South America's Indians." 
Fields: Paraguay, and Inland South America. 

FOREIGN DEPARTMENT OF THE BRITISH NATIONAL YOUNG 

WOMEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION (1906). 
(See under England.) 

YOUNG WOMEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION, SCOTTISH DIVISION (1860). 

Honorary Secretary: Mrs. W. M. Oatts, 19 Belmont Crescent, Glasgow. 

Divisional Secretary: Miss J. B. Gumming, 122 George St., Edinburgh. 

Object: The spiritual, moral, and social well-being of young women in Scotland, 
and throughout the world. 

Income: 180 for foreign work, applied through the British National Foreign De- 
partment of the Young Women s Christian Association. 

Organs: "Scottish Notes and News," published in "Our Outlook," and "The Nurses' 
Monthly Letter," issued by the Nurses' Union of the Scottish Division. 

Fields: Those of the British National Foreign Department of the Young Women'o 
Christian Association. 



Cooperating and Collecting Societies 

COOPERATING SOCIETIES NOT DENOMINATIONAL: 

TRACT AND COLPORTAGE SOCIETY OF SCOTLAND (1793), 

Honorary Secretary: R. C. Bell, Esq., W. S., 13 Hill St., Edinburgh. 

General Secretary: Mr. George Paterson, 99 George St., Edinburgh. 

Object: To promote the circulation, gratuitously and otherwise, of re- 
ligious tracts, books, and treatises, in foreign countries, as well as through 
the British Dominions, and to diffuse religious and wholesome literature 
among all classes. 

Income: 7,000. Literature is circulated on the foreign field to the 
value of 400, the only other foreign mission expenditure is 8 per 
annum in support of a colporteur in India. 

Fields: India, Western Africa (Southern Nigeria), West Indies. 

(NOTE: Formerly known as the Religious Tract and Book Society of Scotland. Began 
colportage mission work in 1854. Incorporated in 1908.) 

STIRLING TRACT ENTERPRISE (1848). 

Secretary: Rev. William Agnew, Drummond's Tract Depot, Stirling. 

Object: The advancement of the Gospel by the dissemination of evan- 
gelistic literature. 

Income: 8,254, of which about 40 is applied to work among non- 
Christians. 

Organ: "The British Messenger." 

Fields: India, Ceylon, Africa, South America, West Indies, and other 
lands. The countries included in the list of grants vary from year 
to year. 

(NOTE: Founded by the late Peter Drummond; known also as Drummond's Tract 
Depot, and carried on now by^trustees. The Monthly Tract Society of London 
was amalgamated with the Stirling Tract Enterprise in 1899.) 

TABEETHA MISSION SCHOOLS (1863). 

Honorary Secretaries: C. E. .W. Macpherson,- Esq., C.A., 6 North St. 
David St., Edinburgh; Miss E. Walker-Arnott, 24 St. Bernard's Cres- 
cent, Edinburgh. 

Object: To give girls a simple education in Arabic and English; to teach 
them the Word of God, and to train them in household work. 



46 



WORLD ATLAS OF CHRISTIAN MISSIONS 



Scotland-Wales 



Income: From home sources, 507; from pupils, etc., 157; total, 664. 
Field: Palestine (Jaffa). 

(NOTE: Founded by Miss Walker- Arnott as an independent enterprise. A special 
committee in aid of the work was formed in 1877, in Edinburgh. In connection 
with the school there is an industry in lace-work and embroidery which gives em- 
ployment to about five hundred women, who are thus, brought under Christian 
influence and teaching, but the work is done in the homes of the women.) 

ASSOCIATION FOR THE SUPPORT OF THE JESSIE TAYLOR MEMO- 
RIAL SCHOOL FOR MOSLEM AND DRUSE GIRLS (1868). 
Secretary: Mrs. Fraser, 5 Ravelston Place, Edinburgh. 
Object: The education, training, and conversion of Moslem and Druse 

girls and women. 
Income: 590. 
Field: Syria (Beirut). 
(NOTE: See entry under Turkish Empire.) 

MISSION TO LEPERS IN INDIA AND THE EAST (1874). 

Superintendent: Mr. Wellesley C. Bailey, 28 North Bridge, Edinburgh. 
Object : To minister to lepers, soul and body, and to save their untainted 

children from falling victims to the disease. 
Income: Home, 18,261; foreign, 8,951; total, 27,212. 
Organ: "Without the Camp." 

Fields : Japan, Korea, China, Siam, Dutch East Indies, Philippine Islands, 
India, Ceylon. 

(NOTE: The Mission to Lepers in India and the East works in close cooperation with 
a large number of missionary societies, British, American, German, and Swiss, the 
Mission providing funds and the help_ that an organization for such a special 
purpose can afford, while the missionaries give practical supervision and spiritual 
oversight to the work. There is a Helpers' Guild which collects funds for this 
Mission, and auxiliaries are established in London, Dublin, New York, Boston, 
and Toronto.) 

GOPALGUNGE EVANGELISTIC MISSION (1874). 

(See under India.) 

SCOTTISH COMMITTEE OF GOPALGUNGE EVANGELISTIC MISSION 1889). 
Honorary Treasurer: Mr. Alexander MacKelvie, C.A., 55 Queen St., Edinburgh. 
Object: The collection of funds to assist the Gopalgunge Evangelistic Mission. 
Income: 174. 
Field: India (Bengal). 

SOUL-WINNING AND PRAYER UNION (1881). 

Secretary: Mr. J. C. Smith, 7 Tay Terrace, Newport-on-Tay. 
Object: The winning of souls for Christ, at home and abroad. 
Income: Total income, 131; remitted to India, Syria, and Africa, 47. 
Organ: "The Soul- Winner." 

Fields: A few Bible-women are maintained abroad; also gifts are made 
to various foreign missions. 

FAITH MISSION (1886). 

Honorary Director and Treasurer: Mr. H. E. Govan, M.A., 16 Tower 
St., Rothesay. 

Object: The evangelization of the country districts of Scotland and Ire- 
land, and further afield, as God may lead. 

Income: 1,677. 

Organ: "Bright Words." 

Fields: Scotland, Ireland, and parts of England. 

(NOTE: The Mission has no foreign work of its own, but various of its workers have 
been transferred to different foreign missions. 638 have been remitted to foreign 
missions from the Mission's headquarters during the last ten years.) 

CHRISTIAN LITERATURE SOCIETY FOR CHINA, EDINBURGH AND 
GLASGOW COMMITTEE (1887). 

Honorary Secretaries: Alexander Walker, Esq., M.D., J.P., 1 Lauder 
Road, Edinburgh; Robert A. Moody, Esq., LL.B., 248 West George 
St., Glasgow. 

Object: To promote Christianity among the Chinese people by aiding 
in the preparation and circulation among them in their own language 
of suitable publications of a distinctly religious character, of general 
literature written from a Christian standpoint, of scientific and other 
works suited for the more cultured classes, of school and other text- 
books, and of literature, chiefly religious, especially suited for Chinese 
women and children. 

Income: 742. 

Organ: "China." 

Fields: China, and wherever the Chinese are found. 

(N9TE: Formerly known as the Chinese Book and Tract Society of Glasgow, founded 
in 1884. There is an Aberdeen Auxiliary. See entries under England and China.) 

LADIES' BRANCH OF THE CHRISTIAN LITERATURE SOCIETY FOR CHINA 

(1892). 

Secretary: Miss Harvie, 28 Buckingham Terrace, Glasgow. 

Object: To provide Christian and general literature for Chinese women and children. 
Income: 204, all of which was appropriated to the special work of the Branch, 
with the exception of 60 remitted to the general funds of the Christian Litera- 
ture Society for China. 
Fields: China, and wherever the Chinese are found. 

(NOTE: Founded in 1885, under the name of Ladies' Auxiliary of the Book and 
Tract Society of China, and reconstituted in 1892, under its present name.) 

TIBET PRAYER UNION (1890). 

Secretary: Miss E. B. Stirling, Missionaries' Rest, Largs, Ayrshire. 
Object: To promulgate information concerning all missionary societies 

working on the borders of Tibet, and to unite the members in prayer. 
Income: No statement at hand. 
Organ: "At the Threshold." 
Field: East, south, and west borders of Tibet. 



SCOTTISH MISSION INDUSTRIES COMPANY, LIMITED (1903). 
Secretary: Mr. Alexander MacKelvie, C.A., 65 Queen St., Edinburgh. 
Object: To furnish, on commercial lines, a means of employment and 

support for famine orphans and native Christians. 
Income: The Company is self-supporting. Established under the Home 

Companies Acts. No financial support received from any source. It 

is not strictly speaking a missionary society, though in sympathy with 

missions, and helpful as an adjunct to them. 
Field: India (Poona, Bombay Presidency; Ajmer, Rajputana). 

CONTINUATION COMMITTEE OF THE WORLD MISSIONARY CON- 
FERENCE, EDINBURGH (1010). 

Secretary: Mr. J. H. Oldham, Windsor Buildings, 100 Princes St., Edin- 
burgh. 

Object: To act as a body authorized to represent the Edinburgh Con- 
ference, to carry out its chief aims, to perpetuate its influence, and to 
continue the work of the Conference, as the future may present oppor- 
tunities, and call for further action along similar lines. Special atten- 
tion is to be directed to the formation, if possible, of some Central 
Advisory International Committee, and meanwhile to direct the 
efforts of the Committee promoting (1) The investigation and study 
of unoccupied fieldsj (2) The creation of a Board of Study for the 
training of missionaries; (3) The development of training schools for 
missionaries; (4) Christian education in the mission field; (5) Christian 
literature; (6) The securing of uniformity in statistical returns; (7) The 
appointment of an International Committee, composed in part of 
jurists, to draw up a brief statement of recognized principles under- 
lying the relations of Missions to Governments; (8) The best means 
of securing a larger place for missionary information in the secular 
press; (9) The advisability of publishing in whole, or in part, the evi- 
dence received by the Commission on the Missionary Message. 

Income : No report at present. 

Organ: Bulletins and reports of progress issued from time to time. 

Fields: Christendom, and Christian communities in all lands. 

(NOTE: The composition of the Committee is international, being representative of 
Christendom and the prominent nations of the Far East. See entry under United 
States.) 



WALES 

Societies Appointing and Sending Missionaries 
PRESBYTERIAN: 

WELSH CALVINISTIC METHODISTS' FOREIGN MISSIONS (1840). 
Secretary: Rev. R. J. Williams, 16 Falkner St., Liverpool, England. 
Object: The diffusion of the knowledge of the Gospel in foreign countries 

among those who are destitute of it. 
Income: 16,097 (of which 588 was expended for work in Brittany). 

A portion of the income is received from congregations in England. 
Organs: Mission news is published in the denominational papers, "Dry- 

sorfa," and "The Monthly Treasury." 
Fields: India (Assam), France (Brittany). 

(NOTE: While the headquarters of this Society are in England; its financial support 
is very largely derived from Wales. The Welsh Calvinistic Methodists are also 
called "Welsh Presbyterians.") 



SENDING SOCIETY NOT DENOMINATIONAL: 

MARANHAM CHRISTIAN MISSION (1903). 

General Honorary Secretary: Mr. Sidney Durk, 17 Morgan St., Swansea. 
Secretary for Scotland: Mr. George Cairns, 65 John Knox St., Glasgow. 
Object : The evangelization of the people of Maranham, and of the Indians 

in the neighboring state of Goyaz, Brazil. 

Income: From home sources, 901; native contributions, 14; total, 915. 
Organ: "News from the Field." 
Field: South America (States of Maranham and Goyaz, Brazil). 



Cooperating and Collecting Society 

BRITISH AND .AFRICAN INCORPORATED ASSOCIATION (1889). 

Founder and Director: Mr. W. Hughes, African Training Institute, Colwyn 
Bay. 

Object: To give religious and industrial education in Wales to the most 
promising of the African converts, and to assist for a few years indus- 
trial native missionary efforts in various African fields, until such 
become self-supporting, and to extend the same operations to other 
parts of Africa. 

Income: 1,800. 

Fields: Western Africa (Liberia, Gold Coast, Southern Nigeria), South- 
west Africa (Kamerun). 

(NOTE: Otherwise known as the African Training Institute, Colwyn Bay.) 



DIRECTORY OF MISSIONARY SOCIETIES 



47 



CONTINENTAL SOCIETIES 



(NOTE: The usual classification under denominational 
in the Continental Section of the Directory. The State 
tional in the ordinary meaning of that term. Even some 



headings, followed by "Societies Not Denominational," has not been attempted 
i Churches may be regarded as inclusive of several divisions, not, however, essentially denomina- 

ne of the ecclesiastical bodies which might perhaps be considered denominational in the ordinary 

sense, bear the stamp of the State Churches. Certain other communities are not regarded by Continental leaders as indigenous to those countries. 
Under the circumstances, no classification has been attempted except that of "Societies Appointing and Sending Missionaries" and "Cooperating and 
Collecting Societies.") 



AUSTRIA-HUNGARY 

(The crown of Austria-Hungary may be reckoned as equivalent to 20 cents 
United States currency, or xod. English money. The mark equals 24 cents.) 

Societies Appointing and Sending Missionaries 

UNGARISCHE ALLGEMEINE EVANGELISCH-KIRCHLICHE HILFS-AN- 
STALT [GENERAL EVANGELICAL CHURCH MISSION SOCIETY 
OF HUNGARY] (1843). 
Secretary: Pastor Bognar, Lovass-Patona. 

Object: Mission work in Roman Catholic communities, and in communi- 
ties of the Eastern Greek Church 
Income: 22,000 Mk. 

Field: Austria (Roman Catholic and Eastern Church communities in 
Hungary). 

VIENNA GUSTAV ADOLPH SOCIETY FOR AUSTRIA (1861). 
Secretary: Oberkirchenrat Dr. Molnar, Vienna. 
Object: Missions to Roman Catholic lands. 
Income: 87,786 Mk. 
Fields: Roman Catholic lands. 

HERMANNSTADT EVANGELISCHE VEREIN DER GUSTAV-ADOLF 
FUR TRANSYLVANIA, HUNGARY [HERMANNSTADT GUSTAV 
ADOLPH SOCIETY FOR TRANSYLVANIA, HUNGARY] (1861).' 

Address: Prof. Brandsch, Hermannstadt, Transylvania, Hungary. 

Object: Mission work in Roman Catholic lands. 

Income: 11,631 Mk. 

Fields: Hungary (Transylvania), Balkan States. 

AUSTRIAN EVANGELICAL SOCIETY FOR MISSIONS TO HOH- 

CHRISTIAN PEOPLES (1908). 
Secretary: Name and address not at hand. 
Object: The evangelization of India. 
Income: 10,000 Mk. 
Field: India. 

BULGARIA 

BULGARIAN EVANGELICAL SOCIETY ( ). 

Secretary: Mr. G. N. Popoff, Ludjene, Peshtersko. 

Object: To help in the support of evangelical churches, and to aid in the 

distribution of Christian literature. 
Income: $775. 
Fields: Bulgaria, Macedonia. 

(NOTE : There are a number of other Bulgarian missionary atid benevolent societies, 
such as the Woman's Benevolent Society of Samakov, and, in connection with the 
American Collegiate and Theological Institute and the Girls' Boarding School, 
there are smaller societies for Christian work of a religious a_nd philanthropic char- 
acter. There are eight of these organizations among Bulgarian Protestants, five of 
which are under student auspices.) 



DENMARK 

(The Danish krone may be reckoned as equivalent to 27 cents United States 
currency, or is. id. English money.) 

Societies Appointing and Sending Missionaries 

DANSKE EVANGELISK-LUTHERSKE STATS KIRKE [EVANGELICAL 

LUTHERAN STATE CHURCH OF DENMARK] (1721). 
Secretary: The Cultus Minister of the State of Denmark, Copenhagen. 
Object: The evangelization of the remaining heathen in Greenland. 
Income: 10,000 Kr. 

Field: Greenland (Angmagssalik, on the east coast, and Cape York, on 
the west coast, the farthest northern settlement, opened recently). 

(NOTE: The self-supporting work in Greenland is not included in this statement, but 
only the two recently organized stations. Hans Egede went as a missionary to 
Greenland in 1721, which, therefore, is the date of the first mission established by 
the Evangelical Lutheran State Church of Denmark.) 

EVANGELISK-LUTHERSKE GR5NLANDSKE KIRKE [EVANGELICAL 

LUTHERAN CHURCH OF GREENLAND] (1721). 
Address: Prof. C. W. S. Lorentzen, President Theological Seminary, 

Godhaab, West Greenland. 
Object: To evangelize the natives on the east coast, and in the far north, 

of Greenland. 

Income: No statement at hand. 

Field: Greenland (the east coast, and Cape York, in the far north, on the 
west coast). 

(NOTE : The mission on the east coast was founded by a native Eskimo catechist from 
the west coast.) 

MISSION DER BRUDERGEMEINE [MORAVIAN MISSIONS] ^732). 
(See under Germany.) 

NORDSCHLESWIGSCHE MISSIONSVEREIN [NORTH-SCHLESWIG MISSIONARY 

ASSOCIATION] (1843). 

Secretary: Rev. Frederick Hoy, Christiansfeld, North Schleswig. 
Object: To aid Moravian Missions in general. 
Income: 12,849 Mk. 

Organs: "Evangelisk Missionstidende," "Brodremenighedens danske Missionsblad." 
Fields: Denmark (Schleswig-Holstein), and those of the Moravian Missions. 

(NOTE: The work of this Association was originally limited to rendering aid to 
Moravian Missions in Danish colonies, but its object has now been extended to 
the support of Moravian Missions in general.) 

DANSKE MISSIONSSELSKAB [DANISH MISSIONARY SOCIETY] (1821). 
Secretary: Pastor Busch, Hellerup, Strandager vej 24, Copenhagen. 
Object: Foreign missions. 



Income: 255,922 Kr. The receipts from the mission fields are not taken 

into the principal account. 
Organ: "Dansk Missions-Blad." 
Fields: Chinese Empire (Manchuria), India. 

(NOTE: The Danish Lutheran State Church, under the patronage of King Frederick IV, 
and by his express < orders, established, at the opening of the eighteenth century, 
a missionary organization, subsequently controlled by a Mission-Collegium, located 
at Copenhagen. Its prospectus has been named "Pharus Missionis Evangelicae," 
from the opening words of its title; and in fulfillment of its purpose the missionaries 
Ziegenbalg and Plutschau were sent to Tranquebar, India, in 1705, where they 
opened the Tamil Mission. As many of the workers, as well as the administrative 
care of the Mission, came from Halle, Germany, it was named the "Danish-Halle 
Mission," but toward the close of the century this organization was gradually 
absorbed by other societies, chiefly the Leipzig Lutheran Missionary Society. The 
Danish Mission Church in Greenland has grown out of a mission established in 
Greenland by the Danish State Church early in 'the eighteenth century, when Hana 
Egede settled there. It subsequently grew to be the Lutheran Church of Green- 
land, served by Danish clergy, and also by native ministers, most of whom were 
educated and ordained at Copenhagen. In 1899 the Moravian Missionary Society, 
whose work in Greenland also dates from the early part of the eighteenth century, 
transferred its mission stations there to the care or the Danish Lutheran Church 
in that country. The Church of Greenland has the distinction of being the earliest 
independent mission Church which has resulted from the modern missionary move- 
ment. The entire west coast 9f Greenland, through the united labors for nearly 
two hundred years of the Danish Lutherans and the Moravians, has become pro- 
fessedly Christian, and good progress has also been made toward the evangelization 
of the east coast. The work of the Danish Missionary Society in Greenland began 
in 1821, which is given as the date of its founding.) 

INDISK HJEMMEMISSION BLANDT SANTHALERNE [INDIAN HOME 

MISSION TO THE SANTHALS] (1867). 
(See under India.) 

DANSKE KOMMITTE FOR INDISK HJEMMEMISSION BLANDT SANTHALERNE 
[DANISH COMMITTEE OF THE INDIAN HOME MISSION TO THE 
SANTHALS] (1877). 

President: Dean Edv. Paludan, Copenhagen. 

Secretary: Mr. Johannes Schroder, Larleistraede 10, Copenhagen, 

Object: To aid the Indian Home Mission to the Santhals. 

Income: 24,030 Kr. 

Organ: "Santhal-Posten." 

Field: India. 

LOVENTHAL'S MISSION (1872). 

President of the Danish Committee: Rev. T. Biemann, Faxe, Seeland. 
Object: Preaching the Gospel in South India. 
Income: 5,000 Kr. 
Organs: "Hojskolebladet," and a biennial publication, entitled, "From 

the Mission of Loventhal." 
Field: South India. 

DR. MARIE HOLST'S TELT MISSION [DR. MARIE HOLST'S TENT MIS- 
SION] (1896). 

Secretary: Chief Clerk Ronnenkamp-Holst, Norre-Volgade 8, Copenhagen. 
Object: The maintenance of an independent medical mission in India. 
Income: 12,000 Kr. 

Organ: "Fra Telt missionen; meddefelser fra Frk, Dr. med. Marie Hoist." 
Field: India. 

(NOTE: After service in India under an English Society, Dr. Marie Hoist severed her con- 
nection with that organization and founded an independent medical mission at 
Hoti, near Peshawar, Financial aid is rendered to Dr. Hoist and her assistant 
by the Danish Missionary Society.) 

OESTERLANDS MISSIONEN [EASTLAND MISSION] (1898). 
Chairman: Pastor Wilhelm S6rensen,'Husby, pr. Ejby, Fyn. 
Object: A mission in the East, among the Mohammedans and other non- 
Christian people. 
Income: 20,000 Kr. 

Organ: "Meddelelser fra Oesterlands Missionen." 
Field: Syria. 

DANSK KIRKE-MISSION I ARABIEN [DANISH CHURCH MISSION IN 

ARABIA] (1904). 

President: Pastor A. Levinsen, V. Karleby, Lolland. 
Secretary: Missionary P. Wissenberg, Mollegade 34, Copenhagen, N. 
Object : A mission among the Moslems of the Arabian Peninsula. 
Income: 8,741 Kr. 
Organ: "Fra Arabien." 
Field: Arabia. 

(NOTE: The date given, 1904, represents the time of the organization of the Mission, 
under the above title, but the Rev. Oluf Hoyer and his wife opened work for Mos- 
lems as early as 1897. The formation of a Committee in Denmark in support of 
their work took place in 1901, and the regular Society was organized in 1904T) 



Cooperating and Collecting Societies 

EVANGELISK-LUTHERSKE ISLANDSKE KIRKE [EVANGELICAL LU- 
THERAN CHURCH OF ICELAND] (1536). 

Address: Rev. H. Sveinson, Bishop of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland. 
Object: To collect funds for the Scandinavian Missionary Societies. 
Income: No statement at hand. 
Fields: Those of the Scandinavian missionary societies. 

UDVALGET FOR L.' P. LARSEN'S MISSION BLANDT INDISKE STU- 
DENTER [COMMITTEE FOR L. P. LARSEN'S MISSION AMONG 
STUDENTS IN INDIA] (1899). 

Chairman of the Danish Committee: Bishop P. Madsen, D.D., Norre- 
gade 11, Copenhagen. 

Secretary: Rev. Th. Lomholt Thomsen, Smallegade, 46a., Copenhagen. 

Object: To provide support for Rev. L. P. Larsen in his missionary work. 

Income: The amount varies from 7,000 to 8,000 Kr. annually. 

Organ: "Meddelelser om L. P. Larsen'a mission blandt indiske studenter." 

Field: India. 

(NOTE: Rev, L. P. Larson's Mission is among students in India, much of the time 
in connection with the student work of the Young Men's Christian Association in 
Madras. He is now one of the professors in the Union Theological Seminary at 
Bangalore.) 



48 



WORLD ATLAS OF CHRISTIAN MISSIONS 



Finland-France 



KVINDELIGE MISSIONS-ARBEJDERE [FEMALE MISSIONARY WORK- 
ERS] (1900). 

President : Miss Emsy Collet, Munstervej 3, Copenhagen. 
Object: The maintenance of Christian activities and philanthropic work 

IB Denmark, and in mission lands. 
Income: No statement at hand. 
Organ: "Bring Lys." 
Fields: Malaysia, India, Armenia, Syria. 



FINLAND 

(The Finnish mark may be reckoned as equivalent to 19 cents United States 
currency, or 9 i-2d. English money.) 

Societies Appointing and Sending Missionaries 

FINSKA MISSIONSSALLSKAPET [FINNISH MISSIONARY SOCIETY] 

(1859). 

President Board of Directors: Dr. Theol. Gummerus. 

Mission Director: Mr. Josef Mustakallio, Helsingfors. 

Secretary: Pastor Hannu Haahti, Helsingfors. 

Object: A mission to the heathen; also an inner or home mission; includ- 
ing the dissemination of the Scriptures; and a mission among the Jews. 

Income: 333,213 F. Mk. (including 59 F. Mk. from the foreign field). 
Expended exclusively for foreign missions, 189,063 F. Mk.; expended 
for mission schools, 32,975 F. Mk. 

Organ: "Missionstidning for Finland." 

Fields: China, German South-west Africa. 

CHINA INLAND MISSION (1865). 
(See under England.) 

FRIA MISSIONEN I FINLAND [FREE MISSION OF FINLAND] (1890). 

Secretary: Praedikant S. Salmensaari, Seutula, Dickursby. 

Object: A mission among the heathen; also evangelizing work at home. 

Income: 22,796 F. Mk. from home sources; expended for foreign missions, 13,498 

F. Mk. 

Organ: "Suomen Wiikk9lehtis," "Missionsbladet" (Swedish Edition of the same). 
Field: China (Kiangsi), in cooperation with the China Inland Mission. 

LUTHERSKA EVANGELIFORENINGEN I FINLAND [LUTHERAN EVAN- 
GELICAL SOCIETY IN FINLAND] (1873). 

Secretary for the Japanese Mission: Pastor W. Niinivaara, Helsingfors. 
Secretary for the Inner Mission : Pastor Lennart Byman, Fredriksgatan 42, 

Helsingfors. 

Object: Home and foreign missions, and the circulation of the Scriptures. 
Income: 261,217 F. Mk. (For the mission in Japan, 60,200 F. Mk.) 
Organ: "Hedningarnas Trost." 
Field: Japan (Nagano Ken). 

Cooperating and Collecting Society 

STUDENTS' MISSIONARY SOCIETY OF HELSINGFORS, FINLAND 

(1882). 

Secretary: Address The University, Helsingfors, Finland. 
Object: To stimulate missionary interest among the 'Students of Finland. 
Income: No statement at hand. 
Fields: Wherever Finnish students may go. 



FRANCE 

(The French franc may be reckoned as equivalent to 19 cents United States 
currency, or 9 i-zd. English money.) 

Societies Appointing and Sending Missionaries 

SOCIETE DES MISSIONS EVANGELIQUES CHEZ LES PEUPLES NON- 
CHRETIENS [PARIS SOCIETY FOR EVANGELICAL MISSIONS 
AMONG NON-CHRISTIAN NATIONS] (1822). 
Director: Rev. A. Boegner, D.D., Maison des Missions, 102 Boulevard 

Arago, Paris. 

Object : Mission work among non-Christian nations. 
Income: 795,410 Fr. This amount includes the incomes of auxiliaries. 
Organs: "Journal des Missions Evangeliques," "Le Petit Messager," 

"L'Ami des Missions." 

Fields: Melanesia (Loyalty Islands, New Caledonia), Polynesia (Tahiti), 
Western Africa (Senegal), South-west Africa (French Congo), South 
Africa (Basutoland), Southern Central Africa (North-western 
Rhodesia), Madagascar. 

(NOTE: There are twenty-six auxiliary committees of the Socie"te" des Missions l3van- 
gdliques in France, and there are three in Switzerland, and one in Alsace. There 
are also committees in aid in Great Britain, Canada, and the United States.) 

SOCIETE AUXILIAIRE DES DAMES DE PARIS [AUXILIARY SOCIETY OF THE 

LADIES OF PARIS] (1825).. 

Secretary: Mrs. A. Boegner, Maison des Missions, 102 Boulevard Arago, Paris. 
Object: To aid in the work of the Paris Missionary Society. 
Income: 22,252 Fr. (included in income of the Paris Society). 
Organ: "Lettre-Circulaire." 
Fields: Those of the Paris Missionary Society. 

MISSION fiVANGELIQUE DU HAUT-ZAMBEZE [[EVANGELICAL MISSION TO THE 
UPPER ZAMBESI] (1885). 

Director: Rev. A. Boegner, D.D., Maison des Missions, 102 Boulevard Arago, Paris. 

Object: The evangelization of the Barotsi tribe. 

Income: 102,525 Fr. Of this amount 85,912 Fr. were received from special appro- 
priations raised outside o_f France. 

Organ: "News from Barotsi-land." 

Field: South Africa (North-western Rhodesia). 

(NOTE: This Mission is under the general supervision of the Paris Society for Evan- 
gelical Missions, but it is mainly supported by funds collected by special com- 
mittees. These committees are located at Geneva, London, Edinburgh, and 
Glasgow.) 

COMITE AUXILIAIRE DE GENEVE [AUXILIARY COMMITTEE OF GENEVA] (1830). 

(Seo under Switzerland.) 

COMMISSION GENEVOISE DU ZAMBEZE [GENEVAN COMMITTEE FOR THE 
MISSION TO THE UPPER ZAMBESI] (1899). 
(See under Switzerland.) 



COMITE AUXILIAIRE D'EVANGELISATION DE PARIS [PARIS CITY 

MISSION] (1832). 

Superintendent: Rev. S. H. Anderson, 37 Avenue de la Grande Arme'e, 
Paris. 

(See entry under England.) 

NORSKE MISSIONSSELSKAB [NORWEGIAN MISSIONARY SOCIETY] 

(1842). 
(See under Norway.) 

COMITE AUXILIAIRE DE PARIS POUR LES MISSIONS LUTHERIEHNES A MADA- 
GASCAR [AUXILIARY COMMITTEE OF PARIS FOR THE LUTHERAN 
MISSIONS IN MADAGASCAR] (1896). 

Secretary: Pastor Buchsenschutz, 69 Rue Blomet, Paris. 

Object: The support of two Lutheran normal schools in Madagascar. 

Income : 10,000 Fr. 

Organ: "Bulletin du Comite" Auxiliaire des missions luthe'riennes a Madagascar." 

Field: Madagascar. 

MISSION POPULAIRE EVANGELIQUE DE FRANCE [McALL MISSION] 

(1872).. 

Secretary: Mr. E. J. Rpuilly, 36 rue Godot de Mauroy, Paris. 

Object: Evangelical missions to the French people. 

Income: 11,745 (293,630 Fr.). This amount ($57,198) is acknowledged 
for the year ending April 30, 1909, but a deficit balance of 1,338 
(33,461 Fr.) reduces it to $50,682. This includes contributions from 
supporters outside of France of, approximately, $42,500, of which 
4,944 ($24,077) is recorded as received from the United States. 

Organ: "Le Bon Messager." 

Fields: France, Corsica. 

(NOTE: The McAll Mission was founded in 1872, by the late Rev. R. W. McAll, D.D., 
F.L.S. The direction of its work is in the hands of the Paris Committee, the Sec- 
retary of which is Mr. E. J. Rouilly, whose address is given above. In addition to 
the income of $50,682, there are five hundred volunteer workers, only a small 
proportion (about one sixth) of the staff receiving any remuneration. Evan- 
gelistic work is conducted by means of two floating chapels, named, respectively, 
Le Bon Messager" and "La Bonne Nouvelle," and also by what are called 
Automobile and Caravan Missions. The latter consists of a movable hall called 
"La Semeuse." Two of these are already in use, and a third is in prospect. Per- 
manent halls to the number of 48 were in use in March. 1909, containing 6,483 
sittings. A total of 11,037 religious meetings was reported for the year 1908-1909 
(of this number 6,673 were for adults, and 4,364 for children), and 14,753 dom- 
iciliary visits were made, while literature, consisting largely of tracts, picture- 
cards, almanacs, and hymnbooks, with Scriptures, was distributed, to the extent 
of 175,799 copies. Therp are numerous auxiliaries to the McAll Mission, located in the 
United States, Canada, England, Scotland, and Ireland, while subscriptions and 
donations are received from Alsace, Germany, the Netherlands, and Switzerland.) 

MISSION PROTESTANTE FRANCAISE EN KABYLIE [FRENCH PROT- 
ESTANT MISSION IN KABYLIE] (1886). 

Secretary: Rev. Henri Guiton, 3 Rue Saint Dominique, Nfmes, (Gard). 
Object: To evangelize the Kabyle people of Algeria (Mohammedans) by 
tours, medical work, Bible classes for women and children, and a 
manual boarding school. 
Income: 11,600 Fr. Of this amount 1,000 Fr. are from French people in 

Algeria. 
Field: Africa (Algeria). 

(NOTE: This Mission is under the direction of the French Conference of the Wesleyan 
Methodists.) 

VEREINIGTEN GEMEINDEN DER DEUTSCHEN KIRCHEN A. C. IN 
PARIS [UNITED EVANGELICAL CHURCH OF THE AUGSBURG 
CONFESSION IN PARIS] (1909). 
Secretary: Name and address not at hand. 
Object: Missionary work in Algeria and the Desert of Sahara, also aid 

furnished to the evangelical orphanage in Dely Ibrahim, Algeria. 
Income: 5,000 Mk. 
Organ: "Gemeindeblatt der vereinigten Gemeinden der deutschen Kirchen 

A. C. [Augsburg Confession] in Paris." 
Fields: Africa (Algeria, and the Desert of Sahara). 



Cooperating and Collecting Societies 

SOCIETE ANTIESCLAVAGISTE DE FRANCE [ANTI-SLAVERY SOCIETY 
OF FRANCE] (1888). 

Secretary: Baron Joseph du Teil, Laur6at de 1'Institut, 2 quai Debilly, 
Paris, XVI arrondissement. 

Object: The abolition of slavery in Africa, more particularly in the 
territories under the influence of France, and those which do not de- 
pend on any other European power. 

Income: 15,000 Fr. to 20,000 Fr. 

Organ: "Bulletin de la Socie'te' Antiesclavagiste." 

Field: Africa. 

CONGO REFORM ASSOCIATION (1904). 

(See under Engand.) 

LIGUE FRANCAISE POUR LA DEFENSE DES INDIGENES DANS LE BASSIN CON- 
VENTIONNEL DU CONGO [CONGO REFORM ASSOCIATION, FRENCH 
BRANCH] (1908.) 

Honorary Secretary: Mr. Pierre Mille, 278 Boulevard Raspail, Paris. 
Object: To secure for the natives inhabiting the Congo State territories the just 
and humane treatment which was guaranteed to them under the Berlin and 
Brussels Acts. 

Income: No statement at hand. 
Field: Africa (Belgian Congo). 

COMMISSION COLONIALS DE LA LIGUE NATIONALS CONTRE 
L'ALCOOLISME [COLONIAL COMMISSION OF THE NATIONAL 
LEAGUE AGAINST ALCOHOLISM] (1909). 

Address : Baron Joseph du Teil, 2 Quai Debilly, Paris, XVI arrondissement. 
Object: The promotion of temperance in the French colonies, and espe- 
cially the protection of native races from the evil effects of alcoholic 
liquors. 

Income: No statement at hand. 
Fields: The French colonial possessions. 

(NOTE: A similar Committee in the interests of temperance, especially among native 
races, has been created in connection with the Anti-Slavery Society of Italy.) 

ALLIANCE EVANGELIQUE UNIVERSELLE, BRANCHE FRANCAISE 

[EVANGELICAL ALLIANCE, FRENCH BRANCH] ( ). 
President: Rev. A. Boegner, D.D., 102 Boulevard Arago, Paris. 
Object: To strengthen Christian unity among the Churches, and to pro- 
mote religious liberty throughout the world. 
Income : No statement at hand. 
Field: France. 



Germany 



DIRECTOEY OF MISSIONARY SOCIETIES 



49 



GERMANY 

(The German mark may be reckoned as equivalent to 24 cents, United States 
currency, or to is., English money.) 

Societies Appointing and Sending Missionaries 

MISSION DER BRUDERGEMEINE [MORAVIAN MISSIONS] (1732). 

Mission Directors: Bishop Paul O. Hennig, Bishop Benjamin La Trobe, 
Bishop J. Taylor Hamilton, D.D., Rev. Herman Kluge, Rev. Leon- 
hard Reichel. 

Office Address: Berthelsdorf bei Herrnhut. 

Object: Mission work in foreign fields. 

Income: From home sources, 933.909 Mk.; from the mission fields, 
863,501 Mk.; total, 1,797,410 Mk. 

Organ: "Missionsblatt der Brudergemeine." 

Fields: Australia, India, South Africa (Cape Colony), South America 
(Dutch Guiana. British Guiana), West Indies, Central America (Nic- 
aragua), United States, Alaska, Labrador. 

FUNFPFENNIG VEREIN [MITE ASSOCIATION] (1877). 
Secretary: Rev. E. Schmidt, Herrnhut. 
Object: To gather regularly small sums weekly, in order to prevent deficiencies in 

the mission treasury. 
Income: 24,211 Mk. 

Organ: "Flugblatt des Punfpfennig Vereins." 
Fields: Germany, Switzerland, Netherlands, Sweden. 

BRETHREN'S SOCIETY FOR THE FURTHERANCE OF THE GOSPEL AMONG THE 

HEATHEN (1741). 
(See under England.) 

SOCIETY OF THE UNITED BRETHREN FOR PROPAGATING THE GOSPEL 

AMONG THE HEATHEN (i?45). 
(See under United States.) 

ZENDINGGENOOTSCHAP DER BROEDERGEMEENTE TE ZEIST [AUXILIARY 

MISSION SOCIETY OF THE MORAVIAN CHURCH AT ZEIST] (i?93). 
(See under the Netherlands.) 

LONDON ASSOCIATION IN AID OF THE MORAVIAN MISSIONS (1817). 
(See under England.) 

MAATSCHAPPIJ TER BEVORDERING VAN HET GODSDIENSTIG ONDERWIJS 
ONDER DE INLANDSCHE BEVOLKING IN DE KOLON1E SURTNAME 
[ASSOCIATION FOR PROMOTING RELIGIOUS EDUCATION AMONG THE 
NATIVES IN SURINAM] (1828). 
(See under the Netherlands). 

NORDSCHLESWIGSCHE MISSIONSVEREIN [NORTH-SCHLESWIG MISSIONARY 

ASSOCIATION] (1843). 
(See under Denmark.) 

MORAVIAN JUVENILE MISSIONARY ASSOCIATION (1867). 

(See under England.) 

AGENCE DE LA MISSION MORAVE POUR LA SUISSE FRANCAISE [MORAVIAN 
MISSION AGENCY FOR FRENCH SWITZERLAND] (1873). 

(See under Switzerland.) 

MITE ASSOCIATION (1883). 
(See under England.) 

SCHWEIZER HILFSVEREIN FUR DIE BRUDERMISSION [SWISS SOCIETY IN 

AID OF MORAVIAN MISSIONS (1904). 
(See under Switzerland.) 

EVANGELISCHE MISSIONSGESELLSCHAFT ZU BASEL [BASEL EVAN- 
GELICAL MISSIONARY SOCIETY] (1815). 
(See under Switzerland.) 

BERLINER MISSIONSGESELLSCHAFT [BERLIN MISSIONARY SOCIETY] 

(1824). 
Mission Director: D. Theol. M. Gensichen, Georgenkirchstrasse 70, Berlin, 

N. E. 43. 
Mission Inspectors: Rev. Karl Axenfeld, Rev. Mr. Griindler, Rev. H. 

Gluer, Rev. Mr. Wilde, Rev. Mr. Knak. 
Object: Sending out and maintaining missionaries among non-Christian 

peoples. 

Income: 1,127,305 Mk. 

Organs: "Berliner Missionsberichte," "Der Missionsfreund." 
Fields: China, South Africa (Cape Colony, Natal, Orange Free State, 

Transvaal), German East Africa. 

(NOTE: Formerly designated as the Gesellschaft zur Beforderung der evangeljschen 
Missionen unter den Heiden. The work of the Berlin Missionary Society in aid 
of Medical Missions is entered under Medical Missionary Associations of Germany.) 

JHEINISCHE MISSIONSGESELLSCHAFT [RHENISH MISSIONARY SO- 
CIETY] (1828). 
President: Kommerzienrat Heinrich Mittelsten Scheid, Diekerstrasse 62, 

Barmen. 

Mission Director: Rev. Johann Spiecker, Schonebeckerstrasse 7, Barmen. 
Mission Inspectors: Rev. E. Kriele, Rev. R. Wegner, Rev. K. Krafft, 

Lie. Theol. D. J. Warneck. 
Office Address: Missionshaus, Barmen. 
Object: Missions to non-Christian peoples. 
Income: 1,059.009 Mk. 
Organs: "Berichte der Rheinischen Missions-Gesellschaft," "Der Kleine 

Missionsfreund, ' ' "Missionsblatt. ' ' 
Fields: China, Dutch East Indies, Melanesia (New Guinea), South-west 

Africa (Angola, German South-west Africa), South Africa (Cape 

Colony). 

(NOTE: This organization is sometimes called the Barmen Foreign Missionary Society. 
For Medical Missionary Auxiliary of Rhenish Missionary Society, see under Med- 
ical Missionary Associations of Germany.) 

RHEINISCHER FRAUEN-MISSIONSBUND [RHENISH WOMEN'S MISSIONARY 

UNION] (1909). 

Mission Inspector: Lie. Theol. D. J. Warneck, Missionshaus, Barmen. 
Object: The support of the Rhenish Missionary Society in its work among women. 
Income: No separate account from that of the main society. 
Organ: "Des Meisters Ruf." 
Fields: Those of the Rhenish Missionary Society. 

VEREENIGING TOT BEVORDERING DER BELANGEN VAN HET RITNSCHE 
ZENDINGSGENOOTSCHAP [UNION FOR THE FURTHERANCE OF THE 
INTERESTS OF THE RHENISH MISSIONARY SOCIETY] (1884). 
(See under the Netherlands.) 

WIJVERDALSCHE ZENDINGSVEREENIGING [NIJVERDAL MISSION UNION] 

(1890). 
(See under the Netherlands.) 

5VANGELISCH-LUTHERISCHE MISSION ZU LEIPZIG [LEIPZIG EVAN- 
GELICAL LUTHERAN MISSION] (1836). 

Mission Director: Rev. C. von Schwartz, D.D., Carolinenstrasse 19, 
Leipzig. 



Mission Senior: Rev. R. Handmann, Kronprinzstrasse 54, Leipzig. 

Mission Inspector: Rev. Mr. Weishaupt, Carolinenstrasae 17, Leipzig. 

Mission Inspector: Rev. Mr. Bemmann, Windmuhlenweg 7, Leipzig. 

Object: Missions to non-Christian peoples. 

Income: 646,867 Mk. 

Organs: "Eyangelisch-Lutheriscb.es Missionsblatt." "Lydia." 

Fields: British Malaysia, India, Ceylon, East Africa (German, British). 

(NOTE: This Mission has entered into the inheritance of the old Danish-Halle 
Mission established at Tranquebar, India, in 1841. In South India and Ceylon it 
1ms a Swedish Diocese, where the work is in cooperation with the.Syenska Kyrknns 
Mission. Its Medical Auxjliaries are entered under Medical Missionary Associa- 
tions of Germany. There is a Leipzig Women's Missionary Association.) 

GOSSNERSCHE MISSIONSGESELLSCHAFT [GOSSNER MISSION SOCIETY] 
(1836). 

Mission Director: Rev. H. Kausch, Handjerystrasse 19-20, Friedenau- 
Berlin. 

Mission Inspectors: Rev. F. Zernick, Rev. F. F6rtsch ; Handjerystrasse 
19-20, Friedenau-Berlin. 

Object: Missions among non-Christian peoples. 

Income: 434,266 Mk. 

Organs: "Die Biene auf dem Missionsfelde," "Die Kleine Biene fur Jung 
und Alt," "Mitteilungen an den Freundeskreis." 

Field: India. 

(NoTE: For the Gossner Medical Missionary Auxiliary, see under Medical Missionary 
Associations of Germany.) 

NORDDEUTSCHE MISSIONSGESELLSCHAFT [NORTH GERMAN MIS- 
SIONARY SOCIETY] (1836). 
Mission Director: Rev. August Wilhelm Schreiber. 
Mission Inspector: Rev. Martin Schlunk. 
Office Address: Ellhornstrasse 39 Z Bremen. 
Object: Missions among non-Christian peoples. 
Income: From home sources, 200,459 Mk. 
Organs: "Monatsblatt der Norddeutschen Missionsgesellschaft," "Mis- 

sions-Kinderf reund . ' ' 
Field: Western Africa (Gold Coast, Togoland). 

(NOTE: Supported by a confederation of members of both the Lutheran and Re- 
formed Churches. See under Medical Missionary Associations of Germany for a 
statement of its work in aid of Medical Missions.) 

RHEINISCH-WESTFALISCHER DIAKONISSENVEREIN [RHENISH- 

WESTPHALIAN DEACONESSES' SOCIETY] (1836). 
Secretary: Rev. Mr. Disselhoff, Kaiserswerth-on-the-Rhine. 
Object: As a mission agency this Society has an extended work for female 

education and medical missions in Egypt, Palestine, Syria, and the 

Levant. 

Income: For foreign missions about 300,000 Mk. 
Organ: "Dank und Denk Blatter." 
Fields: Turkish Empire (including Syria and Palestine), North Africa 

(Egypt). 

(NOTE: Known also as the "Kaiserswerther Diakpnissen Mission" [Kaiserswerth 
Deaconesses' Mission]. The Society was formed in 1836, but foreign missionary 
work was not begun until 1851. There are 330 consecrated German deaconesses 
laboring in the foreign mission field. See entry under Turkish Empire.) 

EVANGELISCH-LUTHERISCHE MISSIONSANSTALT ZU HERMANNS- 
BURG [HERMANNSBURG EVANGELICAL LUTHERAN MIS- 
SIONARY SOCIETY] (1849). 
Foreign Director: Rev. Egmont Harms, Empangweni, P. O. Ennersdale, 

Natal, Africa. 
Home Director: Rev. Georg Haccius, D.D., Hermannsburg, Hannover 

Province. 

Secretary: Rev. W. Mancke, Hermannsburg, Hannover Province. 
Object: Missions to non-Christian peoples. 
Income: From Germany, 391,581 Mk.; from Continental Europe, other 

than Germany, 10,703 Mk.; from the United States of America, 34,149 

Mk.; from South Africa, 745 Mk.; from Australia, 1,614 Mk.; from 

the missions, 148,785 Mk.; total, 587,577 Mk. 
Organ: "Das Hermannsburger Missionsblatt." 
Fields: India, South Africa (Natal, Transvaal), Southern Central Africa 

(Bechuanaland Protectorate) . 

(NOTE: In connection with the above Society is a women's auxiliary having the title 
of Frauenmission in Indien, and reporting an income of 4,923 marks. 

BERLINER FRAUEN-MISSIONSVEREIN FUR CHINA [BERLIN WOMEN'S 

MISSIONARY SOCIETY FOR CHINA] (1850). 

President: Miss Julie von Buddenbrock, Schellingstrasse 12, Berlin, W. 
Mission Inspector: Rev. H. Gliier, Georgenkirchstr. 70, Berlin, N. E., 43. 
Object: The support of the female foundling asylum, "Bethesda," in 

Hongkong. 
Income: 28,493 Mk. 

Organ: "Mitteilungen des Berliner Frauenvereins fur China." 
Field: China (Hongkong). 

JERUSALEMS-VEREIN [JERUSALEM UNION] (1852). 

President: His Excellency Graf von Zieten-Schwerin, Wustrau (Kreis 

Ruppin). 

Secretary: Rev. Mr. Ulich, Wustrau (Kreis Ruppin). 
Object: A mission in the Holy Land, and the pastoral care of German 

immigrants in Syria and Palestine. 
Income: 109,005 Mk. 

Organ: "Neueste Nachrichten aus dem Morgenlande." 
Fields: Syria, Palestine. 

(NOTE: The headquarters of the Jerusalem Union are at Berlin, but there are numer- 
ous auxiliary branches at various cities throughout Germany. There is also an 
auxiliary in Sweden.) 

VEREIN FUR DAS SYRISCHE WAISENHAUS IN JERUSALEM [UNION 
FOR THE SYRIAN ORPHANAGE IN JERUSALEM] (1860). 

Secretary: Rev. Ludwig Schneller, D.D., Koln-on-the-Rhine. 

Object: The education of young people of both sexes, in Palestine, Syria, 
and Armenia. 

Income: 175,200 Mk. 

Organ: "Der Bote aus Zion." 

Field: Palestine. 

(NOTE: The Syrian Orphanage was for many years under the direction of Dr. 
Ludwig Schneller. It was opened in 1860, and was connected with the Pilger 
Mission of St. Chrischona, near Basel, until 1889, when the above Union was or- 
ganized. Its present connection is with the Prussian State Church, See also 
entry under Turkish Empire.) 



50 



WORLD ATLAS OF CHRISTIAN MISSIONS 



Germany 



CHINA INLAND MISSION (1865). 
(See under England). 

DEUTSCHE CHINA-ALLIANZ-MISSION IN BARMEN [GERMAN CHINA ALLIANCE 

MISSION, BARMEN] (1889). 
Secretary: Mr. O. Polnick, Seifenstrassc 5, Barmen. 
Object: The evangelization of China. 
Income: 46,178 Mk. 
Organ: "Der Ghina-Bote." 
Field: China (Province of Chekiang). 

CHRISCHONAZWEIG DER CHINA-INLAND MISSION [CHRISCHONA BRANCH OF 
THE CHINA INLAND MISSION] (1895). 
(See under Switzerland.) 

LIEBENZELLER MISSION [LIEBENZELL MISSION] (1800). 

Mission Inspector: Pastor Heinrich Coerper, Liobonzell, Wiirttemberg. 

Secretary: Rev. E. Kirrmann, Liebenzeu, Wtirttemberg. 

Object: Missions in China, and in German Micronesia. 

Income: 99,717 Mk. 

Organs: "Chinas Millionen," Der Missionsbote aus der Deutschen Sudsee." 

Fields: China, Micronesia (Fonapi and Truk Islands). 

(NOTE: Associate to the China Inland Mission in its work in China; but independent 
in Micronesia.) 

SCHLESWIG-HOLSTEINISCHE EVANGELISCH - LUTHERISCHE MIS- 
SIONS-GESELLSCHAFT ZU BREKLUM [SCHLESWIG-HOLSTEIN 
EVANGELICAL LUTHERAN MISSIONARY SOCIETY AT BREK- 
LUM] (1877). 

Mission Inspector: Rev. D. Bracker, Breklum, Schleswig-Holstein. 

Secretaries: JRev. E. Pohl, Rev. Mr. Lucht, Breklum, Schleswig-Holstein. 

Object: Missions to non-Christian peoples. 

Income: 201,412 Mk. 

Organs: "Schleswig-Holsteinisches Missionsblatt," "Frauen Missiona- 
blatt," "Vort Missionsblad" (in Danish). 

Field: India (Teluguland, Jeypur). 

(NOTE: Also known as the "Breklum Missionary Society.") 

NEUKIRCHENER MISSIONSANSTALT [NEUKIRCHEN MISSION INSTI- 
TUTE] (1882). 
Mission Inspectors: Prediger Schiefer, Pastor G. Paschen, Neukirchen, 

Kreis Moers, Rhine Province. 
Object: Training missionaries for home and foreign fields, and conducting 

missions among non-Christians and Mohammedans. 
Income: 176,600 Mk. Included in this sum are 37,513 Mk. from the 

Committee at Utrecht, and 36,321 Mk. for the hospital at Poerwodadi, 

both from the Netherlands. 
Organ: "Der Missions und Heidenbote." 
Fields: Dutch East Indies (Java), British East Africa. 
(NOTE: Sometimes called the Neukirchen Missionary Society.) 

KOMITEE TOT ONDERSTEUNDfG VAN DE ZENDELINGEN DER SALATIGA- 
ZENDING OP JAVA [COMMITTEE FOR THE SUPPORT OF THE MISSION- 
ARIES OF THE SALATIGA MISSION IN JAVA] (1889). 
(See under the Netherlands.) 

VEREENIGING PITOELOENGAN (PITOELOENGAN UNION] (1903). 
(See under the Netherlands.) 

ALLGEMEINER EVANGELISCH-PROTESTANTISCHER MISSIONSVEREIN 
[GENERAL UNION FOR EVANGELICAL PROTESTANT MIS- 
SIONS OF GERMANY] (1884). 

President: Rev. August Kind, D.D., Kronenstrasse 70, Berlin W. 8. 
Inspector: Rev. Mr. Witte, Lie. Theol., Schleiermacherstrasse 12, Berlin 

S.53. 
Object: In Japan, evangelistic and literary missionary work; in China, 

educational, literary, and medical missions. 

Income: From home sources, 98,299 Mk.; from England, 335 Mk.; from 
America, 134 Mk.; from the foreign field, 31,235 Mk.; total, 130,003 Mk. 
Organs: "Zeitschrift fur Missionskunde und Religionswissenschaft," "Mis- 
sionsblatt des Allgemeinen Evangelisch-Protestantischen Missions- 
verein." 
Fields: Japan, China. 

(NOTE: Lutheran and Reformed.) 

EVANGELISCHE MISSIONSGESELLSCHAFT FUR DEUTSCH-OSTAFRIKA 
[EVANGELICAL MISSIONARY SOCIETY FOR GERMAN EAST 
AFRICA] (1886). 

Mission Inspectors: Rev. W. Trittelvitz, Lie. Theol., Rev. Johann Held. 
Office Address: Bethel bei Bielefeld. 
Object: A mission to natives in German East Africa, including medical 

and educational work. 
Income: From home sources, 93,072 Mk.; from the foreign field, 4,337 Mk.; 

total, 97,409 Mk. 

Organ: "Nachrichten aus der Ostafrikanischen Mission." 
Field: German East Africa. 

(NOTE: Known also as the "Bielefelder Mission.") 

GESELLSCHAFTFURINNEREUNDAUSSERE MISSION IM SINNE DER 
LUTHERISCHEN KIRCHE [SOCIETY FOR HOME AND FOR- 
EIGN MISSIONS ACCORDING TO THE PRINCIPLES OF THE 
LUTHERAN CHURCH] (1886). 

Mission Inspector: Rev. Martin Deinzer, Neuendettelsau, Bavaria. 
Object: Home and foreign missions. 
Income: 109,513 Mk. 
Organ: "Kirchliche Mitteilungen aus und iiber Nordamerika, Australien, 

und Neu-Guinea." 
Fields: Australia, Melanesia (German New Guinea), South America 

(Brazil), North America. 

(NOTE: Known usually as the "Neuendettelsau Mission." Home Missions were begun 
in 1841, the friends of the work becoming united as a society in 1849. The date 
above given is that for the commencement of foreign missionary operations. In 
South America and the United States pastors are provided for German Lutheran 
colonists. Its medical work is entered under Medical Missionary Associations of 
Germany.) 

HILDESHEIMER VEREIN FUR DIE DEUTSCHE BLINDENMISSION IN 
CHINA [HILDESHEIM MISSIONARY SOCIETY FOR BLIND 
GIRLS IN CHINA] (1890). 
Secretary: Miss Luise Cooper, Sedanstrasse 33, Hildesheim. Frau Pastor 

Spitta, Kesslerstrasse 52, Hildesheim, Province Hannover. 
Object: The training and educating of blind girls in China. 
Income: From home sources, 15,593 Mk.; from China, 2,356 Mk.; total, 

17,949 Mk. 

Organ: "Tsau-Kwong." 
Field: China (Kowloon, Hongkong). 

(NOTE: The Mission was organized in Germany in 1890; the Asylum was opened in 
Hongkong in 1897.) 



MISSIONSGESELLSCHAFT DER DEUTSCHEN BAPTISTEN [MISSIONARY 
SOCIETY OF THE GERMAN BAPTISTS] (1890). 

Mission Inspector: Rev. Karl Mascher, Missionshaus, Filandastrasse 4, 
Steglitz bei Berlin. 

Object: Missions in Kamerun, South-west Africa. 

Income: From Germany, 49,818 Mk.; from Continental Europe, outside of 
Germany, 15,276 Mk.; from the United States of America, 27,892 Mk.; 
from Australia. 2,916 Mk.; from schobls and hospitals in the foreign 
field, 11,760 Mk.; from industrial work, 7,600 Mk.; from native Chris- 
tian contributors, 5,667 Mk.; total, 120,819 Mk. 

Organ: "Unsere Heidenmission." 

Field: South-west Africa (Kamerun). 

(NOTE: A Committee was formed in 1890, but the Society was not formally consti- 
tuted until 1898. There is an American Missions Committee of the .German Bap- 
tists, the Secretary of which is Mr. G. N. Schulte, West Hoboken, New Jersey. 
See also entry for German Baptists under England.) 

MISSION DER HANNOVERSCHEN EVANGELISCH-LUTHERISCHEN 
FREIEIRCHE [HANNOVER FREE EVANGELICAL LUTHERAN 
CHURCH MISSIONARY SOCIETY] (1892). 
President: Superintendent Heicke, Nettelkamp bei Wrestedt. 
Secretary: Rev. F. Wolff. Bleckmar bei Bergen (bei Celle). 
Object: Missions in South Africa. 
Income: From home sources, 31,207 Mk.; from the foreign field, 947 Mk.: 

total, 32,154 Mk. 
Organ: "Missionsblatt der Hannoverschen Evangelisch-Lutherischen 

Freikirche." 

Field: South Africa (Natal, Transvaal). 
(NOTE: Separated from the Hermannsburg Mission in 1892.) 

DEUTSCHE ORIENT MISSION [GERMAN ORIENT MISSION] (1895). 

President: Dr. Johannes Lepsms. 

Mission Director : Pastor Dr. Roemer. 

Office Address: Gr. Weinmeisterstrasse 50, Potsdam. 

Object: The maintenance of missions to Mohammedans in Turkey, 
Persia, and Bulgaria; among the Oriental Churches, work for orphans, 
a medical mission, and industrial training; also evangelical work in 
Russia (Stundist Movement). 

Income: 206,563 Mk. Of this amount, 24,877 "Mk. was the income re- 
ceived at the stations from industrial work, etc. 

Organ: "Der Christliche Orient." 

Fields: Turkey, Persia, Bulgaria, Russia. 

(NOTE: The Mission is also called the "German Aid Association for Armenia" 
[Deutscher Hulfsbund fur Armenien].) 

DEUTSCHER HULFSBUND FUR CHRISTLICHES LIEBESWERK IH 
ORIENT [GERMAN AID SOCIETY FOR CHRISTIAN CHARITY 
IN THE EAST] (1896). 

Secretary: Pastor Ernst Lohmann, Freienwalde, Oder Malche. 
Mission Director: F. Schuchardt, Fiirstenbergerstrasse 151, Frankfurt a. 

Main. 
Object: To educate and aid the Armenian race in Christian fellowship, 

and to carry the Gospel to the Moslems in Turkey. 
Income: 475, 740 Mk. 
Organ: "Sonnenaufgang." 
Field: Turkey (Asia Minor). 

KIELER CHINA MISSION [KIEL CHINA MISSION] (1896). 
Secretary: Rev. F. Witt, Missionshaus, Kiel. 
Object: The evangelization of China. 
Income: From home sources. 15,000 Mk.; from the foreign field, 50 Mk.; 

total, 15,050 Mk. 
Organ: "Erkommt." 
Field: China. 

SUDAN PIONIER MISSION [SUDAN PIONEER MISSION] (1900). 
President: Rev. Th. Ziemendorff, Emserstrasse 12, Wiesbaden. 
Object: Pioneer missions in the Egyptian Sudan and Nubia. 
Income: 24,882 Mk. 
Organ: "Der Sudan-Pionier." 
Field: North Africa (Egyptian Sudan). 

GESELLSCHAFT ZUR AUSBREITUNG DES EVANGELIUMS UNTER DEN 
KATHOLIKEN [SOCIETY TO SPREAD THE GOSPEL AMONG 
ROMAN CATHOLICS] (1900). 

Secretary: Pastor Dr. Busch, Gartenstrasse 71, Frankfurt. 

Object: The extension of the Gospel among Roman Catholics. 

Income: No statement at hand. 

Fields: Roman Catholic lands. 



Cooperating and Collecting Societies 

EVANGELISCHER OBERKIRCHENRAT, BERLIN [EVANGELICAL 
CHURCH COUNCIL, BERLIN] (1817). 

Vice-President: Oberhofprediger Dr. Dryander, Berlin. 

Object: Missions to seamen and German emigrants, and also among non- 
Christians. 

Income: 174,927 Mk. Of this amount 81,381 Mk. was for missions to 
non-Christians, 67,404 Mk. for the Gustav Adolph Society, and 26,142 
Mk. for Jewish Missions. 

Fields: South America, and the fields of the missionary societies of 
Germany. 

KONIGSBERGER EVANGELISCHE MISSIONSVEREIN [K5NIGSBERG 

MISSIONARY SOCIETY] (1822). 
Secretary: Schulrat Rohde, Konigsberg II, Prussia. 
Object: To promote general missionary interest in Eastern and Western 

Prussia, and to aid the "sending" missionary societies. 
Income: 25,295 Mk. This sum is contributed to different missionary 

societies, where it forms p^art of their regular income. 
Organ: "Konigsberger Missionsblatt." 
Field: Those of the societies assisted. 

EVANGELISCHE VEREIN DER GUSTAV-ADOLF-STIFTUNG [EVAN- 

GELICAL GUSTAV ADOLPH SOCIETY] (1832). 
Office Address: Gustav- Adolf Stiftung, Weststrasse 4, Leipzig. 
Object: To aid evangelical missions to Roman Catholic communities and 
countries. 



Germany 



DIRECTORY OF MISSIONARY SOCIETIES 



51 



Income: 1,798,203 Mk., of which amount 668,580 Mk. were given to aid 
missions in Austria-Hungary, 13,167 Mk. to aid missions in Bulgaria, 
Turkey, and Egypt, about 30,000 Mk. for missionary work in Africa, 
and 61,917 Mk. to aid missions in South America. 

Organ: "Gustav-Adolf Bote." 

Fields: All Roman Catholic lands, but especially Austria-Hungary and 
South America. 

FRAUENVEREINE DES 6USTAV-ADOLF VEREI5S [WOMEN'S SOCIETIES OF 

THE GUSTAV ADOLPH UHIONSL (1844). 
Office Address: Gustav-Adolf Stiftung, Weststrasse 4, Leipzig. 
Object: To aid the work of the Gustav-Adolph Society in Roman Catholic lands. 
Income: 315,678 Mk. 
Fields: Roman Catholic lands. 

08TFRIESISCHE MISSIONSGESELLSCHAFT [EAST FRIESLAND MIS- 
SIONARY SOCIETY] (1834). 

Secretary: Rev. Mr. Stokmann, Borsum, near Emden, East Friesland. 
Object: To aid financially other missionary societies. 
Income: 64,120 Mk. 
Fields: Those of the societies assisted. 

FRAUEN-VEREIN FUR CHRISTLICHE BILDUNG DES WEIBLICHEN 
GESCHLECHTS IM MORGENLANDE [WOMEN'S SOCIETY FOR 
CHRISTIAN FEMALE EDUCATION IN EASTERN COUNTRIES] 
(1842). 

President: Miss Julie von Buddenbrock, Schellingstrasse 12, Berlin W. 

Secretary: Miss L. yon Westphalen, Elsholzstrasse 91, Berlin. 

Object: The education of women in the Near and Far East. 

Income: 32,048 Mk. 

Organ: "Missionsblatt des Frauenvereins." 

Fields: China, India. 

(NOTE: Known also as the "Morgenlandischer Frauen-Verein" ["Women's Oriental 
Union"]. It is Lutheran in its ecclesiastical connection, and until recently it 
has been working partly in connection with the Church Missionary Society and 
the Kaiserswerth Deaconesses, in India and Palestine, .but this connection has 
now been dissolved, and a new connection established with the Berlin Missionary 
Society and the Gosaner Mission.) 

LUTHERISCHER GOTTESKASTEN [LUTHERAN LORD'S TREASURY] 

(1853). 

Secretary: Pastor J. Knappe, Hilpoltstein, Bavaria. 
Object: To aid Evangelical Lutheran missions in Roman Catholic lands. 
Income: 142,014 Mk. 
Organ: "Der Lutherische Gotteskasten." 

Fields: Roman Catholic lands, especially in Santa Catharina, Brazil, 
South America. 

EVANGELISCH-LUTHERISCHE KONSISTORIUM IN HANNOVER [EVAN- 
GELICAL LUTHERAN CONSISTORIUM OF HANNOVER] (1861). 
Office Address: Evangelisch-Lutherische Landes-Konsistorium in Han 

nover. 
Object: To aid directly German Evangelical Lutherans in British South 

Africa, and, through the Hermannsburg Society, to contribute toward 

work among non-Christians. 
Income: No statement at hand. 
Organ: "Kirchliches Amtsblatt fur den Bezirk des Koniglichen Landes- 

Konsistoriums in Hannover." 
Field: British South Africa. 

KONFERENZ DER VEREINIGTEN DEUTSCHEN KOMITEES FUR 
SPANIEN IN FRANKFURT A. M., BARMEN, BERLIN, BRE- 
MEN, STRASSBURG UND STUTTGART [CONFERENCE OF THE 
UNITED GERMAN COMMITTEES FOR SPAIN IN FRANK- 
FORT-ON-THE-MAIN, BARMEN, BERLIN, BREMEN, STRASS- 
BURG, AND STUTTGART] (1870). 

Office Address: Pastor Theodore Fliedner, Kaiserswerth a. Rh. 

Object: Evangelization work in Spain, and the development of a liter- 
ature for Spanish America. 

Income : No statement at hand. 

Organ: "Blatter aus Spanien." 

Fields: Spain, Portugal. 

FRAUENHILFE FUR SPANIEN [WOMEN'S AID SOCIETY FOR SPAIN] (1896). 
President: Frau Doye", Grunewaldstrasse, Steglitz bei Berlin. 
Vice-President: Frau Pastor Th. Fliedner, Calle Bailed 35, Madrid, Spain. 
Income: 1,030 Mk. 
Organ : "Blatter aus Spanien." 
Field: Spain. 

EVANGELISCHE GESELLSCHAFT FUR DIE PROTESTANTISCHEN 
DEUTSCHEN IN SUD-AMERIKA [EVANGELICAL SOCIETY 
FOR GERMAN PROTESTANTS IN SOUTH AMERICA] (1880). 
Secretary: Pastor M. Dedekind, Elberfeld, amtillenberg 2. 
Object: To supply missionaries, and to aid in establishing churches, 
schools, and institutions, under evangelical auspices, in South America. 
Income: 38,387 Mk. 
Organ: "Der Deutsche Ansiedler." 
Field: South America. 

(NOTE: The German Protestant Churches aided by this Society are themselves con- 
ducting missions among Roman Catholics.) 

SAXE- WEIMAR EVANGELISCHE LANDESKIRCHE [EVANGELICAL 

STATE CHURCH OF SAXE-WEIMAR] (1884). 
Superintendent: Dr. Braasch, Jena. 
Object: To aid colonial and missionary work in Tokyo and Yokohama, 

Japan, and Shanghai, China. 
Income: No statement at hand. 
Fields: Japan, China. 

(NOTE: Some of the leading German scholars and missionaries in Japan and China 
were aided by the Church of Saxe-Weimar.) 

SACHSISCHE LANDESKIRCHE [STATE CHURCH OF THE KINGDOM 

OF SAXONY] (1885). 

Office Address: Evangelisch-Lutherische Landes-Konsistorium zu Dres- 
den, Saxony. 

Object: To aid the missions to German emigrants, and those among sea- 
men, and to Roman Catholics, in Chile, South America. 
Income: No statement at hand. 
Field: South America (Chile). 

KOMITEE FUR DEUTSCHE EVANGELISCHE SEEMANNSMISSION IN 
BERLIN [BERLIN COMMITTEE FOR GERMAN EVANGELICAL 
MISSIONS TO SEAMEN] (1885). 
Secretary: Pastor W. Scheffen, Nollendorfstrasse 17, Berlin W. 30. 



Object: The temporal and spiritual care, under evangelical auspices, of 

German seamen in foreign harbors. 
Income: 100,000 Mk. 
Organ: "Seemannsmission." 
Fields: In connection with the Hannover Society, it labors in 180 harbors 

of the world. 

EVANGELISCHER BUND [EVANGELICAL LEAGUE] (1887). 
Office Address: Zentralvorstand Evangelischer Bund, 38 Albrechtstrasse, 

Halle a.d.s. 
Object: The advance of Protestantism ; by means of contributions of 

literature and money to German missionary work in South America. 
Income: 104,300 Mk., from 2,064 auxiliary societies. 
Organ: "Monats-Korrespondenz." 
Field: South America. 

EVANGELISCHER AFRIKA VEREIN [EVANGELICAL AFRICAN UNION] 

(1887). 

President: Oberconsistorialrat Steinhausen, Flottwellstrasse 3, Berlin W. 
Secretary: Rev. E. Otto, Koloniestrasse 3, Berlin N. 20. 
Object: To promote the welfare of the natives in the German colonies. 
Income: 28,000 Mk. 
Organ: "Afrika." 
Field: German East Africa. 

STUDENTENBUND FUR MISSION [STUDENTS' UNION FOR MISSIONS] 

(1896). 

Secretary: Rev. Mr. Beyer, Kupfergraben 6, Berlin c. 
Object: To arouse missionary interest among students, and to enroll 

student volunteers, 

Income: A small sum, used for printing expenses, etc. 
Field: The universities of Germany. 

MISSION DER DEUTSCHEN METHODISTEN [MISSION OF THE GERMAN 

METHODISTS] (1897). 
Organ: "Der Missionsbote." 

(NOTE: The German Methodists are connected with the Methodist Episcopal Church 
in the United States of America. They contribute annually to the mission treasury 
of that Church, and also aid in the support of an English Wesleyan Missionary in 
a German colony, but they have neither an independent board nor independent 
work.) 

FRAUENHILFE FURS AUSLAND [WOMEN'S MISSIONARY SOCIETY 

FOR FOREIGN LANDS] (1898). 
Secretary: Pastor Cremer. Mirbachstrasse 2, Potsdam. 
Object: The founding and supporting of a Deaconesses' Mother-House at 

Munster, in Westphalia, to educate deaconesses for work in foreign 

lands, especially in South America. 
Income: 10,000 Mk. 
Organs: "Frauenhilfe furs Ausland," "Gut Deutsch und Evangelisch 

Allerwege." 
Fields: South America, and the German Colonies. 

VEREIN ZUR PFLEGE DES DEUTSCHEN EVANGELISCHEN LEBENS IM 
AUSLANDE [SOCIETY TO DEVELOP GERMAN EVANGELICAL 
LIFE ABROAD] (1901). 

Secretary: Pastor Guhr, Marienstrasse 2, Breslau. 
Object: To provide evangelical pastors for Rio Grande do Sul, South 

America. 

Income: 6,951 Mk. 
Field: South America (Rio Grande do Sul). 

EVANGELISCHER VEREIN FUR DIE LA PLATA-STAATEN [EVANGELI- 
CAL SOCIETY FOR THE LA PLATA STATES] (1902). 
Secretary: Pastor G. Volkmann, Bremen. 
Object: To aid in planting evangelical churches, schools, and institutions 

in the La Plata States. 
Income: 4,725 Mk. 

Field: South America (La Plata States Argentine Republic, Paraguay, 
Uruguay). 

MISSION VEREIN FUR SUD-OST EUROPA [MISSION UNION FOR SOUTH- 
EASTERN EUROPE] (1903). 
Office Address: Hansdorf, Silesia. 

Object: Evangelical mission work in South-eastern Europe. 
Income: No statement at hand. 
Organ: "Mitteilung der Mission fur Siid-Ost Europa." 
Fields: Russia, Austria-Hungary and the Balkan States. 

DEUTSCHE EVANGELISCHE KIRCHENAUSSCHUSS [GERMAN EVAN- 
GELICAL CHURCH BOARD] (1903). 
Office Address: Oberhofprediger Dr. Dryander, Berlin. 
Object: To care, for German emigrants and seamen in South America 

and the German Colonies. 
Income: 65,000 Mk. 
Fields: South America, and the German colonies. 

CONGO REFORM ASSOCIATION (1904). 
(See under England.) 

DEUTSCHE KONGO-LIGA {GERMAN CONGO LEAGUE] (1910). 
President: Rev. A. W. Schreiber, Bremen. 

Secretary: Mr. Diedrich Westermann, Wilhelmstrasse 29, Berlin S. W., 48. 
Object: To secure just and humane treatment for the natives of the Congo State. 
Income: No statement at hand. 
Organ: "Koloniale Rundschau." 
Field: Africa (Belgian Congo). 

EVANGELISCHER HAUPTVEREIN FUR DEUTSCHE ANSEIDLER UND 
AUSWANDERER ZU WITZENHAUSEN AN DER WERRA 
[EVANGELICAL CENTRAL SOCIETY FOR GERMAN COLONISTS 
AND EMIGRANTS AT WITZENHAUSEN ON THE WERRA] (1907). 

Secretary: Pastor Grisebach, Witzenhausen, a. d. Werra. 

Object: Mission work among colonists and natives, in Eastern Europe, 
Asia Minor, and South America. 

Income: 9,127 Mk. 

Organ: "Der Deutsche Auswanderer." 

Fields: South America, Eastern Europe, Asia Minor. 

DIAKONISSEN MUTTERHAUS FURS AUSLAND IN MUNSTER, WEST- 
FALEN [DEACONESSES' MOTHERHOUSE TO TRAIN DEA- 
CONESSES FOR WORK IN FOREIGN LANDS, MUNSTER. 
WESTPHALIA] (1909). 
General Superintendent: Dr. Zollner, Munster, Westphalia. 



52 



WORLD ATLAS OF CHRISTIAN MISSIONS 



Germany-Italy 



Object: The training of deaconesses for work in foreign mission fields. 

Income: 50,000 Mk. 

Fields: South America, and the German Colonies. 

MISSIONSKONFERENZEN (MISSIONARY CONFERENCES). 

(NOTE: The Missionary Conferences comprise a group_ of important organizations which 
are characteristic of Germany, and call for special attention. There are twenty- 
two of these, most of them for clergymen. The Conferences are organized on the 
basis of provincial unions, and are perhaps the chief auxiliary agencies for arousing 
missionary interest in Germany. We have been favored with information concern- 
ing a number of these Conferences.) , 

MISSIONSKONFERENZ IN DER PROVINZ SACHSEN UND ANHALT [MISSION 

CONFERENCE IN THE PROVINCE OF SAXONY AND ANHALT] (1879). 
Secretary: Rev. Mr. Strumpfel, Sachsenburg bei Heldrungenr 

MISSIONSKONFERENZ IN DER PROVINZ BRANDENBURG [MISSION CONFER- 
ENCE IN THE PROVINCE OF BRANDENBURG] (1882). 
Secretary: Superintendent Gareia, Buch, Bez., Potsdam. 



MISSIONSKONFERENZ IM HERZOGTUM BRAUNSCHWEIG [MISSION CONFER- 

ENCE IN THE DUKEDOM OF BRUNSWICK] (1883). 
Secretary: Rev. Mr. Bosse, Oelber bei Baddeckenstedt, Braunschweig. 



MISSIONSKONFERENZ IN DER PROVINZ SCHLESIEN [MISSION CONFERENCE 

IN THE PROVINCE OF SILESIA] (1884). 
Secretary: Rev. Mr. Hischer, Rossplatz 24, Breslau. 

MISSIONSKONFERENZ IN DER PROVINZ SCHLESWIG-HOLSTEIN [MISSION 

CONFERENCE IN THE PROVINCE OF SCHLESWIG-HOLSTEIN] (1897). 
Secretary: Rev. Mr. Giese, Bordesholm. 

MISSIONSKONFERENZ DER KONSISTORIALBEZ. KASSEL [MISSION CONFER- 
ENCE OF THE CONSISTORIAL DISTRICT OF CASSEL] (1897). 
Secretary: Superintendent Hebel, Felsberg, Bez. Kassel. 

EISENACHER MISSIONSKONFERENZ [EISENACH MISSION CONFERENCE] (1897). 
Secretary: Superintendent Weise, Gehren. 

OSTFRIESISCHE MISSIONSKONFERENZ [EAST FRIESLAND MISSION CONFER- 
ENCE] (1898). 
Secretary: Rev. Mr. Bode, Detern, East Friesland. 

HORBER MISSIONSKONFERENZ IN WURTTEMBERG [HORBER MISSION CON- 
FERENCE IN WURTTEMBERG] (1900). 
Secretary: Dekan Haller, Tuttlingen. 

NIEDERRHEINISCHE MISSIONSKONFERENZ [LOWER RHINE MISSION CON- 
FERENCE] (19.04). 
Secretary: Rev. Heinrich Fliedner, Kaiserswerth-on-the-Rhine. 

HANSEATISCH-OLDENBURG MISSIONSKONFERENZ [HANSEATISCH-OLDEN- 

BURG MISSION CONFERENCE] (1903). 
Secretary: Rev. A. W. Schreiber, Ellhornstrasse 12, Bremen. 

MISSIONSKONFERENZ DER BRUDERGEMEINE [MISSION CONFERENCE OF 

THE MORAVIANS] (1904). 
Secretary: Rev. Mr. Bechler, Herrnhut. 

MECKLENBURG MISSIONSKONFERENZ [MECKLENBURG MISSION CONFER- 
ENCE] (1907). 
Secretary: Rev. Mr. Schliemann, Lanken bei Rom in Mecklenburg. 

MISSIONSARZTLICHE VEREINEN [MEDICAL MISSIONARY ASSOCIA- 
TIONS], 

(NOTE: A number of medical missionary associations are at work in Germany, these 
being, for the most part, of comparatively late origin. The recent erection of a 
medical institution at Tubingen, at the cost of 240,000 Mk., this amount having 
been raised as a free-will offering, shows the progress of interest in medical mis- 
sions. In connection with this institution, provision is being made also for the 
medical training of deaconesses. A periodical named "Die Arztliche Mission" is 
published as the organ of these associations.) 

MEDIZINISCHER MISSIONSVEREIN ZU STUTTGART [MEDICAL MISSIONARY 
UNION AT STUTTGART] (1899). 

Secretary: Principal S. Kammerer, Alte Weinsteige 26, Stuttgart. 

Society Connection: Especially the Basel Society. 

Object: To collect funds for the support of medical missions, especially those of 
the Basel Society; to aid medical missionaries in the field with donations of 
books and instruments; and to help young men to gain a medical education for 
service in mission fields. 

Income: 50,000 Mk. 

Field of Activity: Stuttgart. 

RHEINISCHER VEREIN FUR ARZTLICHE MISSION [RHENISH ASSOCIATION FOR 

MEDICAL MISSIONS] (1902). 

Secretary: Dr. med. Kupfernagel, Tannenhof, Luttringhausen (Rhld). 
Society Connection: Rhenish Missionary Society. 

Object: The support of the medical missions of the Rhenish Missionary Society. 
Income: 5,952 Mk. (included in the income of the Rhenish Missionary Society). 
Organ: "Mitteilungen des Rheinischen Vereins fur Arztliche Mission." 
Field of Activity: Germany. 

GOSSNERSCHER mLFSVEREIN FUR KRANKENPFLEGE AUF DEN MISSIONS 
STATIONEN [GOSSNER'S AUXILIARY ASSOCIATION FOR TENDING SICK 
PEOPLE AT THE MISSION STATIONS] (1906). 

Secretary: Rev. Mr. Kleine, Wiesbadenstrasse 23, Friedenau, bei Berlin. 
Society Connection: The Gossner Mission. 

Object: To assist the Gossner Mission in securing trained workers, and the necessary 
means for the instruction of these workers, and also their support when they 
reach the mission stations. 
Income: No statement at hand. 

Fields of Activity: Those portions from Germany from which the Gossner Mission 
draws its support. 

BAYERISCHER VEREIN FUR ARZTLICHE MISSION [BAVARIAN ASSOCIATION 
FOR MEDICAL MISSIONS] (1908). 

Secretary: Rev. Mr. Schumann, Erlangen. 

Society Connections: The Leipzig Evangelical Lutheran Mission, and the Society 
for Home and Foreign Missions According to the Principles of the Lutheran 
Church (Neuendettelsau Mission). 

Object: To enable the mission institutions assisted from Bavaria to instruct and 
appoint men and women physicians, deaconesses, nurses, and midwives for their 
mission fields, especially those in German colonies, territories, and spheres of 
interest; to promote the medical training of _ these missionaries, and to arouse 
and foster an appreciation of medical missions in the evangelical circles of 
Bavaria. 

Income: No statement at hand. 

Field of Activity: Bavaria. 

BERLINER VEREIN FUR ARZTLICHE MISSION [BERLIN ASSOCIATION FOR 
MEDICAL MISSIONS] (1908). 

Secretaries: Dr. med. Konig, Tegel bei Berlin; Dr. med. Seher, Steglitzerstrasse 30, 
Grosslichterfelde bei Berlin. 

Object: To create and foster an understanding of and love for medical missions, 
and to assist in the medical work of the Berlin Missionary Society in foreign lands, 
especially in the German Protectorates; to secure and instruct physicians for 
mission work, and to instruct missionaries in the art of medicine and sick 
attendance service; to instruct sisters and wives of missionaries to serve as 
nurses, midwives, and female assistants of the physician; to assist medical 
training institutions, especially that in Tiibingen; to raise the necessary means 
for sending out and equipping mission physicians and other medical workers, 
and for building and furnishing the necessary homes, hospitals, etc. 

Income: 10,000 Mk. 

Fields of Activity: Brandenburg, Province of Saxony, Pomerama, Posen, Silesia, 
East Prussia, West Prussia. 

HALLISCHER VEREIN FUR ARZTLICHE MISSION [HALLE ASSOCIATION FOR 

MEDICAL MISSIONS] (1908). 
Secretary: Pastor J. Hubner, Halle-on-the-Saal. 

Object: To enable the evangelical mission societies represented in Halle to send 
out physicians, both men and women, also nurses, deaconesses, and midwivea, 
especially to German colonies; to provide for the medical training of these mis- 
sionaries, and to promote an interest in medical missions elsewhere. 
Income: No statement at hand. 
Field of Activity: Province of Saxony. 



LEDPZIGER HAUPTVEREIN FUR ARZTLICHE MISSION [LEIPZIG PRINCIPAL 
ASSOCIATION FOR MEDICAL MISSIONS] (1908). 

Secretary: Dr. med. Patzki, Leipzig. 

Miaslon Inspector: Rev. Mr. Weishaupt, Leipzig. 

Society Connection: Evangelical Lutheran Mission at Leipzig. 

Object: To enable the Evangelical Lutheran Mission at Leipzig to appoint phy- 
sicians and medical assistants to its mission fields, and to rouse and foster in- 
terest in medical missions in those home districts upon the support of which 
the mission is dependent. 

Income: 3,230 Mk. 

Fields of Activity: Kingdom of Saxony, Thflringen. 

MISSIONS-ARZTLICHER HILFSVEREIN BRAUNSCHWEIG [MEDICAL MISSION- 
ARY AUXILIARY ASSOCIATION OF BRUNSWICK] (1908). 
Secretary: Dr. Von Schwartz, Braunschweig. 
Society Connection : Evangelical Lutheran Mission at Leipzig. 

Object: To enable the Leipzig Mission to appoint physicians and nurses to its 
mission fields, and to arouse and foster the interest in medical missionary ac- 
tivity in Germany. 
Income: 982 Mk. 
Fields of Activity: Brunswick, Hannover. 

BREMER VEREIN FUR ARZTLICHE MISSION [BREMEN ASSOCIATION FOR 
MEDICAL MISSIONS] (1909). 

Director: Dr. med. Stoevesandt, Bremen. 

Mission Director: Rev. A. W. Schreiber, Bremen. 

Society Connection: North German Missionary Society. 

Object: To arouse and foster the understanding and love of medical missions in 
the German colonies, especially those in the tropics; to promote the German 
Institute for Medical Missions at Tiibingen; to give assistance toward the in- 
struction of both men and women physicians, and other missionaries, including 
nurses and midwives, especially in the German Institute for Medical Missions at 
Ttibingen; to give assistance in sending out, equipping, and supporting mission 
physicians, and other medical workers; also to raise funds for hospitals and 
other health-promoting institutions. 

Income: No statement at hand. 

Fields of Activity: Oldenburg, Bremen, Schleswig-Holstein. 

HANNOVERSCHER VEREIN FUR ARZTLICHE MISSION [HANNOVER ASSOCIA- 
TION FOR MEDICAL MISSIONS] (1909). 
Secretary: Oberlehrer Th. Winkler, Hannover. 
Society Connection: Evangelical Lutheran Mission at Leipzig. 
Income: No statement at hand. 
Field of Activity: Hannover. 

SCHWERINERVEREIN FUR ARZTLICHE MISSION [SCHWERIN ASSOCIATION 

FOR MEDICAL MISSIONS] (1909). 

Secretary Sanitatsrat: Dr. Max John, Schwerin in Mecklenburg. 
Society Connection: Evangelical Lutheran Mission at Leipzig. 
Object: To enable the Evangelical Lutheran Mission at Leipzig to appoint phy- 
sicians and nurses to its mission fields, and to arouse and foster toe interest 
in medical missionary activities in Germany. 
Income: No statement at hand. 
Field of Activity: Mecklenburg-Schwerin. 

DEUTSCHES INSTITUT FUR ARZTLICHE MISSION, TUBINGEN, WURTTEMBERG 
[GERMAN INSTITUTE FOR MEDICAL MISSIONS, TUBINGEN, WURTEM- 
BERG1 (1900). 

Superintendent: Immanuel Kammerer, Alte Weinsteige 26, Stuttgart. 
Object: The training of medical missionaries for service in connection with German 
and other missionary societies. The training of women as medical missionary 
doctors and nurses. 

Income: As the Institute was started in the autumn of 1909, no stated income 
can be given as yet. In October, 1909, the premises in which the work is carried 
on were purchased by the donations of the friends of medical missions, at an 
expense of 380,000 Mk. 
Field of Activity: Tubingen. 

LEHRER MISSIONSBUNDE [TEACHERS' MISSIONARY ASSOCIATIONS]. 

(NOTE: Teachers' Missionary Associations have sprung up rapidly throughout Ger- 
many of late, so that they are no longer characteristic merely of North and South 
Germany, and German Switzerland. Since 1908 societies have been organized 
in Rhineland and Westphalia, which enroll altogether about 327 members. 
Throughout Germany and German Switzerland these associations have a total 
enrollment of over 2,500 members. They have become a new channel by which the 
missionary interests of Germany are aroused and fostered. No names of officers 
are at hand.) 

LEHRER MISSIONSBUND IM DIENSTE DER BERLINER MISSIONSGESELL- 
SCHAFT [TEACHERS' MISSIONARY ASSOCIATION IN CONNECTION WITH 
THE BERLIN MISSIONARY SOCIETY] (1902). 

NORDDEUTSCHER LEHRER MISSIONSBUND [NORTH GERMAN TEACHERS' 
MISSIONARY ASSOCIATION] (1906). 

LEHRER MISSIONSKONFERENZ IN DER PROVINZ SACHSEN {TEACHERS' MIS- 
SIONARY CONFERENCE IN THE PROVINCE OF SAXONY] (1907)- 

WESTDEUTSCHER LEHRER MISSIONSBUND [WEST GERMAN TEACHERS' 
MISSIONARY ASSOCIATION] (1908). 

THURINGER LEHRER MISSIONSBUND [TEACHERS' MISSIONARY ASSOCIATION 
IN THURINGEN] (1908). 

LEHRER MISSIONSBUND IN DER DEUTSCHEN SCHWEIZ [TEACHERS' MIS- 
SIONARY ASSOCIATION m GERMAN SWITZERLAND] (1908). 



ITALY 
Societies Appointing and Sending Missionaries 

WALDENSIAN CHURCH MISSIONS, COMMITTEE OF EVANGELIZATION 

(1860). 

President: Rev. Arturo Muston. 

Secretary: Rev. Antonio Rostan. 

Office Address: 107 Via Nazionale, Rome. 

Object: Evangelical missions in Italy, and among scattered communities 
of Waldenses in other lands, and, in cooperation with other missions, 
in Africa. 

Income: 17,124. Of this amount 2,786 was contributed in Italy, 
4,234 in England, 3,190 in Scotland, 2,597 in the United States, 
2,008 in Switzerland, and the remainder in Germany, the Nether- 
lands, Sweden, Ireland, France, Denmark, Austria, and South America. 

Organ: "La Luce." 

Fields: Italy, Egypt, Malta, South America, Africa, and among Italians 
in the United States. 

(NOTE: The Waldensian Church has represented Protestantism in Italy since the 
twelfth century. It is, therefore, the oldest protesting Church in the world, and 
has suffered much bitter and cruel persecution. Missionary work has been con- 
ducted since 1848, the time of the emancipation of Italy, but it was not until 1860 
that the Committee of Evangelization was instituted, and only since the estab- 
lishment of religious liberty, in 1870, that full freedom in evangelistic service and 
Bible distribution could be enjoyed throughout the land. For Committees in 
aid of Waldensian Church Missions, see under England and the United States. In 
South America, especially in Uruguay and Argentine Republic, there are nearly 
8 000 Waldenses, to whom pastors are sent by the Mother Waldensian Church 
In Abyssinia a Waldensian missionary works in connection with the Swedish 
Mission, and in South _ Africa seven Waldensian missionaries are working with 
the Socie'te' des Missions Evange'liques.) 



Italy-Netherlands 



DIRECTORY OF MISSIONARY SOCIETIES 



53 



SPEZIA MISSION FOR ITALY AND THE LEVANT (1866). 

Director: Rev. H. H. Pullen, Piazza Vittorio Emanuele 3, Spezia. 
Object: The evangelization of Italy, and the Italians in the Levant. 
Income: 3,017. 

Organs: "Occasional Paper of the Spezia Mission," "Seminatore." 
Fields: Italy and the Levant. 

Cooperating and Collecting Societies 

GOULD MEMORIAL HOME AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOLS, ROME (1871). 
President of Board of Managers: Rev. A. Mtiston, 107 Via Nazionale, Rome. 
Secretary of Board of Managers: Rev. B. Celli, 2 Via Marghera, Rome. 
Object: The maintenance of an evangelical, non-sectarian Home, and 

Industrial Schools, in Rome. 
Income: Lire 16,637. Of this amount Lire 2,590 ($510) was contributed 

from the United States. 
Field: Italy (Rome). 

(NOTE: The Home was founded in 1871, by Emily Bliss Gould, wife of Dr. James B. 
Gould, and was constituted as a Memorial to her after her death in 1875. There is a 
Board of Trustees in the United States, which see under that section. 

KONFERENZ DER DEUTSCHEN EVANGELISCHEN PFARRER ITALIENS 
[CONFERENCE OF THE GERMAN EVANGELICAL PASTORS IN 
ITALY] (1889). 

Secretary: Pastor Hoerstel, Genoa. 

Object: Mission work in Italy, and among non-Christians in foreign lands. 

Income : 1,000 Mk., for missions to non-Christians. 

Organ: "Paulus." 

Fields: Italy, and non-Christian lands, through the societies of Germany. 



THE NETHERLANDS 



(The florin or guilder of the Netherlands maj 
cents United States currency, or is. 8d. in Engfi 



be reckoned as equivalent to 40 
;h currency.) 



Societies Appointing and Sending Missionaries 

MISSION DER BRUDERGEMEINE [MORAVIAN MISSIONS] (1732). 
(See under Germany). 

ZENDINGGENOOTSCHAP DER BROEDERGEMEENTE TE ZEIST [AUXILIARY 

MISSION SOCIETY OF THE MORAVIAN CHURCH AT ZEIST] (i?93). 
Secretary: Rev. H. Weiss, Zeist. 

Object: To aid Moravian missions in the Dutch colony of Surinam, South America. 
Income: No statement at hand. 
Organ: "Berichten uit de Heiden-Wereld." 
Field: South America (Dutch Guiana). 

MAATSCHAPPIJ TER BEVORDERING VAN HET GODSDIENSTIG ONDERWIJS 
ONDER DE INLANDSCHE BEVOLKING IN DE KOLONIE SURINAME 
[ASSOCIATION FOR PROMOTING RELIGIOUS EDUCATION AMONG THE 
NATIVES IN SURINAM] (1828). 

Secretary: Baron G. C. van Asbeck, de Ruyterstraat 71, The Hague. 
Object: To support the schools of the Moravian Mission in Dutch Guiana, South 

America. 

Income: 1,500 FI. 
Field: South America (Dutch Guiana). 

NEDERLANDSCH ZENDELINGGENOOTSCHAP [NETHERLANDS MIS- 
SIONARY SOCIETY] (1797). 
Mission Director: Rev. J. W. Gunning. 
Foreign Secretary: Rev. Joh. Rauws. 
Office Address: Rechter Rottekade 63, Rotterdam. 
Object: A mission in the Dutch East Indies. 
Income: 127,586 Fl., received from home sources. 
Organ: "Maandberichten." 
Field: Dutch East Indies (Java, Celebes, Sumatra, Savu). 

(NOTE: Modeled at first after the London Missionary Society, upon an interdenomi- 
national basis. There is a personal union and close cooperation between the Nether- 
lands Missionary Society, the Utrecht Mission Union, and the Committee for the 
Mission to the Sangir and Talaut Islands. Rev. J. W. Gunning is the Home Secre- 
tary of these three societies, and Rev. Joh. Rauws is the Foreign Secretary.) 

RHEINISCHE MISSIONSGESELLSCHAFT [RHENISH MISSIONARY SO- 
CIETY] (1828). 
(See under Germany.) 

VEREENIGING TOT BEVORDERING DER BELANGEN VAN HET RITNSCHE 
ZENDINGSGENOOTSCHAP [UNION FOR THE FURTHERANCE OF THE 
INTERESTS OF THE RHENISHpIISSIONARY SOCIETY] (1884). 
Secretary: Rev. P. Groote, Amsterdam. 
Object: To aid the Rhenish Missionary Society in their mission in the Dutch East 

Indies. 

Income: 12,000 Fl. 
Organ: "De Rijnsche Zending." 
Fields: Those of the Rhenish Missionary Society. 

NIJVERDALSCHE ZENDINGSVEREENIGING [NIJVERDAL MISSION UNION] (1890). 
Secretary: Rev. Mr. Logchers, Nijverdal. 
Object: To support the missionaries of the Rhenish Missionary Society who come 

from Nijverdal. 
Income: 1.350 Fl. 

Organ: "Nijverdalsch Zendingsblad." 
Field: Dutch East Indies (Sumatra). 

DOOPSGEZINDE VEREENIGING TOT BEVORDERING DER EVAN- 
GELIEVERBREIDING IN DE NEDERLANDSCH OVERZEESCHE 
BEZITTINGEN [MENNONITE UNION FOR THE PROPAGATION 
OF THE GOSPEL IN THE ULTRAMARINE POSSESSIONS OF 
THE NETHERLANDS] (1847). 

Secretary: Rev. W. I. Leendertz, Keizersgracht 194, Amsterdam. 

Object: The propagation of the Christian religion in the Dutch East 
Indies. 

Income: 50.660 Fl. 

Organ: "De kleine Medearbeider." 

Field: Dutch East Indies (Java, Sumatra). 

JAVA COMITE TE AMSTERDAM [JAVA COMMITTEE AT AMSTERDAM] 

(1855). 

Secretary: Rev. L. Kupe"rus. Prinzensgracht 303, Amsterdam. 
Object: Missions to non-Christians and Mohammedans in the Dutch 

East Indies. 
Income: 16,085 Fl. 

Organ: "Het Geillustreerd Zendingsblad," "De Java-Cent." 
Field: Dutch East Indies (Java, Sumatra). 



NEDERLANDSCHE ZENDINGSVEREENIGING [NETHERLANDS MISSION- 
ARY UNION] (1858). 
President: Rev. H. J. Rooseboom. 
Secretary: Mr. C. G. A. Van Asch van Wijck. 
Office Address: Mission House, 345 Wertzeedyk, Rotterdam. 
Object: Missions to the Mohammedans and non-Christians in the Dutch 

East Indies. 
Income: 60,000 Fl. 

Organ: "Orgaan der Nederlandsche Zendingsvereeniging." 
Field: Dutch East Indies (West Java). 

UTRECHTSCHE ZENDINGSVEREENIGING [UTRECHT MISSION UNION] 

(1839). 

Mission Director: Rev. J. W. Gunning. 
Secretary: Rev. Joh. Rauws. 
Office Address: Rechter Rottekade 63, Rotterdam. 
Object: Missions in the Dutch East Indies. 
Income: 100,000 Fl. 

Organ: "Berichten van de Utrechtsche Zendingsvereeniging." 
Field: Dutch East Indies (including Dutch New Guinea). 

(NOTE: There is a personal union and close cooperation between the Netherlands 
Missionary Society, the Utrecht Mission Union, and the Committee of the Mission 
to the Sangir and Talaut Islands. Rev. J. W. Gunning is the Home Secretary of 
all these societies, and Rev. Joh. Rauws the Foreign Secretary.) 

NEDERLANDSCH LUTHERSCH GENOOTSCHAP VOOR IN-EN UITWEN- 
DIGE ZENDING [NETHERLANDS LUTHERAN SOCIETY FOR 
HOME AND FOREIGN MISSIONS] (1880). 
Secretaries: Mr. J. C. Schipper, Prinaengracht 418, Amsterdam; Rev 

C. F. Westermann, Nic. Witsenkade 20, Amsterdam. 
Object: Missions to the natives of the Dutch East Indies. 
Income: 46,929 Fl. Of this amount 13,860 Fl. were appropriated for 

foreign missions. 

Organ: "Een Vaste Burg is Onze God." 
Field: Dutch East Indies (Batu Islands). 

(NOTE: This Society was organized for home missions in 1852, and for foreign mis- 
sions in 1880, although its first missionaries were not sent out until 1882. In 
addition to the mission in the Dutch East Indies maintained by the above Society, 
the Evangelical Lutheran Church of Holland has conducted missionary operations 
for many years in Dutch Guiana, South America. Sufficient data, however, are 
not at hand to render it possible to give a separate entry in the Directory for this 
organization.) 

NEUKIRCHENER MISSIONSANSTALT [NEUKIRCHEN MISSION INSTI- 
TUTE! (1882). 
(See under Germany.) 

KOMITEE TOT ONDERSTEUNING VAN DE ZENDELINGEN DER SALATIGA-ZEND- 
ING OP JAVA [COMMITTEE FOR THE SUPPORT OF THE MISSIONARIES OF 
THE SALATIGA MISSION IN JAVA] (1889). 
Secretary: Mr. O. R. Ktihnen, Janskerknof, 18, Utrecht. 
Object: To aid the missionaries of the Neukirchen Mission working in Java 
Income: 24,443 Mk. 

Organ: "Van het Zendingsveld, Orgaan der Salatiga-Zending." 
Field: Dutch East Indies (Java). 

(NOTE: In connection with the Neukirchen Mission Institute in Germany, and 
supplying part of the funds for its missionaries in Java. This Committee was in- 
corporated by royal decree, March 31, 1891, Missionary labor in the Salatiga Dis- 
trict, Java, was begun by Mrs. le Jolle in 1854; her work has been since continued 
and extended by the Neukirchen Mission Institute, aided by the Committee for the 
Support of the Missionaries of the Salatiga Mission.) 

VEREENIGING PITOELOENGAN [PITOELOENGAN UNIONJ (1903). 
Secretary in Java: Rev. O. Heller, Poerwodadi, Java. 
Object: The support of a missionary hospital at Poerwodadi, Java. 
Income: 14,977 Mk. 
Field: Dutch East Indies (Java). 

VEREENIGING TOT UITBREIDING VAN HET EVANGELIE IN EGYPTE 
[UNION FOR THE PROPAGATION OF THE GOSPEL IN EGYPT] 
(1886). 

Secretary: Rev. J. J. van Noort, Nassaukade 82, Amsterdam. 

Object: Missionary work among Mohammedans and Copts in Egypt. 

Income: 7,898 Fl. 

Organ: "Berichten der Vereeniging tot Uitbreiding van het Evangelie in 
Egypte." 

Field: Egypt. 

(NOTE: Known also as the "Hollandsche Zending in Egypte.") 

ZENDING VAN DE GEREFORMEERDE KERKEN IN NEDERLAND 
ONDER HEIDENEN EN MOHAMMEDANEN [MISSION OF THE 
REFORMED CHURCHES IN THE NETHERLANDS TO THE 
PAGANS AND MOHAMMEDANS] (1892). 

Secretaries: Rev. H. Dijkstra, Smilde; Dr. J. Hania, Steenwiik. 
Object: Missions to the non-Christians and Mohammedans of the Dutch 

East Indies. 
Income: 100,000 Fl. 
Organs: "Het Zendingsblad der Gereformeerde Kerken," "De Mace- 

donier." 
Field: Dutch East Indies (Java, Sumba). 

(NOTE: A union of the Mission of the Christian Reformed Church, founded in 1854, 
and the Netherlands Reformed Mission Union, founded in 1859. 

LEBANON HOSPITAL FOR THE INSANE (1896). 

(See under England and under Turkish Empire.) 

LEBANON HOSPITAL FOR THE INSANE, COMMITTEES IN HOLLAND (1900). 
Central Secretary: Baroness van Heemstra, Doom, Utrecht. 
Object: The care and treatment of the mentally afflicted in the East, without any 

distinction as to creed or nationality. 
Income: 28. 
Field: Turkish Empire (Syria). 

(NOTE: There are Committees in aid of the Lebanon Hospital for the Insane at 
Amsterdam, The Hague, R.otterdam, and Utrecht.) 

Cooperating and Collecting Societies 

NEDERLANDSCH BIJBELGENOOTSCHAP [NETHERLANDS BIBLE SO- 
CIETY] (1814). 
Secretaries: Rev. C. F. Gronemeijer, Wilhelminapark 38, Utrecht; Mr. 

L. J. van Wijk, Heerengracht 366, Amsterdam. 
Object: Bible distribution in the Netherlands, and Bible translation and 

distribution in the languages of the Dutch East Indies. 
Income: 53,000 Fl. Of this amount about 12,000 Fl. were expended on 

the foreign field. 
Organ: "Zaaiing en Oogst." 
Fields: Dutch East Indies, the Netherlands, South America (Dutch 

Guiana), the Flemish parts of Belgium, and Germany (among Dutch 

workmen). 



54 



WORLD ATLAS OF CHRISTIAN MISSIONS 



Netherlands- Roumania 



ERMELOSCHE ZENDINGSGEMEENTE [ERMELO MISSIONARY ASSO- 
CIATION] (1856). 

(NOTE; This Church in Ermelo undertook, in past years, under the energetic leader- 
ship of Pastor Witteveen, a large responsibility for home and foreign missions. 
Its foreign missions, however, Have been discontinued, and the congregation 
is at present engaged.in helping other societies by its contributions, besides con- 
ducting some home mission work.) 

CENTRAAL-COMITE VOOR DE OPRICHTING EN DE INSTANDHOUDING 
VAN EEN SEMINARIE NABIJ BATAVIA [CENTRAL COM- 
MITTEE FOR THE FOUNDING AND SUPPORTING OF A SEM- 
INARY NEAR BATAVIA] (1873). 
Secretary: Mr. A. Bierens de Haan, Haarlem. 
Object: The training of natives from mission fields in the Dutch East 

Indies, as preachers, evangelists, and teachers. 
Income: No statement at hand. 
Field: Dutch East Indies (Depok, near Batavia, Java). 

COMITE VOOR DE ZEWDING OP DE SANGIR-EN TALAUT-EILANDEN 
[COMMITTEE FOR THE MISSION TO THE SANGIR AND TA- 
LAUT ISLANDS] (1886). 

Secretary: Rev. J. W. Gunning, Rechter Rottekade 63, Rotterdam. 

Object: To aid in the work of the Mission to the Sangir and Talaut Islands. 

Income: 20,851 Fl. 

Organ: "Mededeelingen vanwege het Sangir-en Talaut-Eilanden ComiteY' 

Field: Dutch East Indies (Sangir and Talaut Islands). 

(NOTE : See also under Malaysia.) 

VEREENIGING TOT OPRICHTING EN INSTANDHOUDING VAN HOS- 
PITALEN IN CHINA TEN DIENSTE DER MEDISCHE ZENDING 
[UNION FOR THE FOUNDING AND SUPPORTING OF HOS- 
PITALS IN CHINA IN CONNECTION WITH MEDICAL MISSIONS] 
(1896). . 

Secretary: Prof. H. M. van Nes, D.D., Leyden. 

Object: Evangelization by means of medical missions among Chinese 
women. 

Income: 6,000 Fl. 

Organ: "De Chinabode." 

Field: China (Amoy). 

(NOTE: The above Mission works in close connection with the Board of Foreign Mis- 
eions of the Reformed Church [Dutch] in America. It supports the Women's 
Hospital of that Society in Amoy.) 



NORWAY 

(The Norwegian krone may be reckoned as equivalent to 27 cents United 
States currency, or is. id. English money.) 

Societies Appointing and Sending Missionaries 

NORSKE MISSIONSSELSKAB [NORWEGIAN MISSIONARY SOCIETY] 

(1842). 

Secretary: Rev. Lars Dahle, Stayanger. 
Assistant Secretary: Pastor A. Riis, Stavanger. 
Object : Missions among non-Christian people. 
Income: 680,182 Kr. from home sources: from the foreign fields, 

35,000 Kr.; total, 715,182 Kr. 
Organ: "Norsk Missionstidende." 
Fields: China, South Africa (Natal), Madagascar. 

(NOTE: "Den Norske Laege Mission" [The Norwegian Medical Mission] is a Committee 
in Christiania which assists in the medical work of the Norwegian Missionary 
Society. The organ of the Medical Mission is "Laegemissionaeren.") 

COMITfi AUXH-IAIRE DE PARIS POUR LES MISSIONS LUTHfiRIENNES A MAD- 
AGASCAR [AUXILIARY COMMITTEE OF PARIS FOR THE LUTHERAN 
MISSIONS IN MADAGASCAR] (1896). 

(See under France.) 

CHINA INLAND MISSION (1865). 
(See under England.) 

NORSKE MISSION I KINA [NORWEGIAN MISSION IN CHINA] (1890). 
Secretary: Miss Christine Angvik, Randsfjord. 
Object: To support missionaries in China, in connection with the China Inland 

Mission. 

Income: 6,824 Kr. 
Field: China. 

INDISK HJEMMEMISSION BLANDT SANTHALERNE [INDIAN HOME 

MISSION TO THE SANTHALS] (1867). 
(See under India.) 

NORSKE KOMMITEER FOR INDISK HJEMMEMISSION BLANDT SANTHALERNE 
[NORWEGIAN COMMITTEES FOR INDIAN HOME MISSION TO THE SAN- 
THALS] (1888). 

Secretary of the Christiania Central Committee: Rev. Ivar Holsvik, Christiania. 
Object: To assist the Santhal Mission. 
Income: 48,286 Kr. 
Organ: "Santhalen." 
Field: India (Bengal, Assam). 

NORSKE KIRKES MISSION VED SCHREUDER [NORWEGIAN CHURCH 

MISSION ORGANIZED BY BISHOP SCHREUDER] (1873)- 
Secretary: Tredieprest P. V. Skaar { in Snarum (Stift Christiania). 
Object: Missions among non-Christian people. 
Income: 19,818 Kr. from home sources, $4,103 from America, 61 from 

South Africa; total, 36,236 Kr. 
Organ: "Zuluvennen." 
Field: South Africa (Natal). 

(NOTE: Bishop Schreuder withdrew from the Norwegian Missionary (Society, and 
began the independent management of the Norwegian Church Mission, in 1873. 
but the Central Committee in Norway for the Mission was not formally organized 
until 1877.) 

NORSKE MISSIONSFORBUND [NORWEGIAN MISSION UNION] (1889). 
Secretary: Mr. Johannes Christiansen, Bernt Ankers gate 4, Christiania. 
Object: Evangelical missions among non-Christians. 
Income: 15,375 Kr. 
Organ: "Talsmanden." 
Fields: China, South Africa (Natal), Lapland, Finland. 



NORSK LUTHERSKE KINAMISSIONSFORBUND [NORWEGIAN LU- 
THERAN CHINA MISSION ASSOCIATION] (1890). 
President: Cand. Johannes Brandtzaeg, Tramnos, Nordheimsund. 
Object: The evangelization of the Chinese. 
Income: 153,298 Kr.. from home sources. 
Organ: "Kineseren." 
Field: China. 

TSJILIMISSIONEN [CHI-LI MISSION] (1890). 
Secretary: Mr. L. Eriksen, Stabaek (near Christiania). 
Object: The support of native workers in the Province of Chi-li, China. 
Income : No statement at hand. 
Organ: "Missionsvennen." 
Field: China. 



Cooperating and Collecting Societies 

FORENIN6EN TIL EVAN6ELIETS FORKYNDELSE FOR SKANDINA- 
VISKE SOEMOEND I FREMMEDE HAVNE [SOCIETY FOR 
PREACHING THE GOSPEL TO SCANDINAVIAN SEAMEN IN 
FOREIGN PORTS] (1863). 
Office Address: Bergen, Norway. 

Object: To support evangelical missions among Scandinavian sailors in 
foreign ports, and also to aid missionary work among Roman Catholics 
and non-Christians. 
Income: 100,000 Kr. 
Organ: "Bud og Hilsen." 
Fields: The leading ports of the world. 

AKADEMISKE FRIVILLIGES MISSIONSFORBUND I DE NORDISKE 
LANDE, NORSKE LOKALAFDELING [NORWEGIAN BRANCH 
OF THE STUDENT VOLUNTEER MOVEMENT IN SCANDINA- 
VIAN COUNTRIES] (1896). 

President: Miss Anna Uchermann, Hpltegaden 14 iii, Christiania. 

Object: To win volunteers for missionary service, and to stimulate a 
missionary spirit among students. 

Income: No income is raised. 

Organ: "Excelsior." 

Fields: Wherever the student volunteers may go. 

ANNA CHENG'S MISSION (1899). 

Secretary: Miss Josefine Finholdt, Akersbakken, Christiania. 
Object: Mission work in China. 
Income: No statement at hand. 
Field: China. 

(NOTE: An independent Mission directed by Mrs. Anna Cheng, who, as Miss Anna 
Jacobsen, went as a missionary to China under the China Inland Mission. After 
her marriage to Mr. Cheng, a native Chinese, she withdrew from the 0. I. M., and 
began her separate Mission, which is aided by a Committee in Norway.) 

KVINDELIGE MISSIONS-ARBEIDERE [FEMALE MISSIONARY WORK- 
ERS] (1002). 

President: Miss Thora Wedel-Jarlsberg, Gabelsgade 43, Christiania. 
Object: The spread of the Gospel among women in mission lands. 
Income: 3,988 Kr. 
Organ: "K. M. A. Kvartalshilsen." 
Fields: Armenia, Lapland. 

LAERERINDERNES MISSIONSFORBUND [FEMALE TEACHERS' MIS- 

SIONARY UNION] (1902). 
President: Miss H. Dons, Christiania. 

Object: To promote missionary interest, and to collect funds for mis- 
sionary work. 
Income: 3,024 Kr. 
Organ: "Missionshilsen." 
Fields: Those of the societies aided. 

(NOTE: The Union is auxiliary to the Norwegian Missionary Society, and to the 
Female Missionary Workers.) 

NORGES KRISTELIGE UNGDOMS FORBUNDS MISSIONSKOMITE [MIS- 
SIONARY COMMITTEE OF NORWAY'S YOUNG PEOPLE'S CHRIS- 
TIAN FEDERATION] (1908). 
President: Rev. Kr. Mart. Eckhoff, Christiania. 
Object: To awaken interest in missions among the young people of 

Norway. 

Income: 4,313 Kr. 
Organ: "Den unges ven." 
Fields: Those of the societies aided. 

NORSKE INDREMISSION [HOME MISSIONS DEPARTMENT OF WORK 

AMONG THE LAPPS AND FINNS OF NORWAYJ ( ). 
Address: Secretary of the Norske Indremissionen, Christiania. 
Object: To provide missionaries, teachers, and literature for the Lapps 

and Finns of Norway, both of whom are Mongolian tribes. 
Income: No statement at hand. 
Fields: The far northern parts of Scandinavia. 



ROUMANIA 
Society Appointing and Sending Missionaries 

SYNODE DER DEUTSCHEN EVANGELISCHEN GEMEINDEN IM GEBIET 
DER UNTEREN DONAU [SYNOD OF THE GERMAN EVAN- 
GELICAL CONGREGATIONS IN THE BALKAN STATES] (1907). 
Secretary: Pastor R. Honigberger, Luteranastrasse 10, Bukarest, Rou- 

mania. 

Object: Missionary work in the Balkan States. 
Income: 3,000 Mk. 
Organ: "Bukarester Gemeindeblatt." 
Fields: The Balkan States, including Turkey-in-Europe. 



Russia-Sweden 



DIRECTORY OF MISSIONARY SOCIETIES 



55 



RUSSIA 
Societies Appointing and Sending Missionaries 

EVANGELISCH-LUTHERISCHE MISSION ZU LEIPZIG [LEIPZIG EVAN- 
GELICAL LUTHERAN MISSION] (1836). 
(See under Germany.) 

EVANGELICAL LUTHERAN CHURCH OF RUSSIA IN EUROPE AND ASIA, NOT 

INCLUDING FINLAND AND POLAND (1882). 
Secretary: Name and address not at hand. 

Object: To aid in the foreign missionary operations of the Leipzig Mission. 
Income: 120,000 Mk. 
Fields: South India, German East Africa (through the Leipzig Mission). 

UNTERSTUTZUNGSKASSE PUR EVANGELISCH-LUTHERISCHE GE- 
MEINDEN IN RUSSLAND [MISSION BOARD OF THE EVAN- 
GELICAL LUTHERAN CONGREGATIONS IN RUSSIA] (1859). 
Office Address: Kollegienrat Axel von Gernet, St. Petersburg. 
Object: Evangelical Lutheran mission work in Asiatic and European 

Russia. 

Income: 350,000 Mk. No apportionment of income stated. 
Fields: European Russia, Siberia, Caucasia, Russian Turkestan. 
(NOTE: All parts of the Lutheran Church in European Russia, Siberia, Caucasia, 
and Russian Turkestan, contribute to home and foreign missions.) 

FOREIGN MISSIONARY SOCIETY OF THE EVANGELICAL LUTHERAN 

CHURCH IN POLAND, RUSSIA (1891). 
Official Address: Pastor W. P. Angerstein, Lodz, Poland. 
Object: The evangelization of the natives of South Africa. 
Income: 14.000 Mk. 
Field: South Africa (in cooperation with the Hermannsburg Society). 



SPAIN 
Societies Appointing and Sending Missionaries 

DEUTSCHE EVANGELISATIONSWERK IN SPANIEN [GERMAN EVAN- 
GELIZATION WORK IN SPAIN] (1870). 
Secretary: Pastor Fliedner, Calatravastrasse 27, Madrid. 
Object: Evangelical missions in Spain and Morocco. Also to provide 

evangelical literature for Spanish America. 
Income: 16,000 Mk. 
Organ: "Blatter aus Spanien." 
Fields: North Africa (Morocco), Spain. 

FIGUERAS EVANGELISTIC MISSION (1877). 
Honorary Director: Rev. Lopez Rodriguez. 
Honorary Secretary: Madame Lopez Rodriguez. 
Office Address: Figueras, Province of Gerona, Spain. 
Honorary Treasurer in England: General Battersby, Lyncroft, Wey- 

bridge, England. 

Object: The spread of the Gospel among the people of Spain. 
Income: 1,813. 
Organ: "El Heraldo." 
Field: Spain (Province of Gerona). 

(NOTE: The Mission is chiefly supported by contributions from friends in Great 
Britain.) 

SPANISH RELIGIOUS TRACT AND BOOK SOCIETY ( ). 

Honorary Director: Rev. Lopez Rodriguez. 

Honorary Secretary: Madame Lopez Rodriguez. 

Office Address: Figueras, Province of Gerona, Spain. 

Honorary Treasurer hi England: General Battersby, Lyncroft, Weyb ridge, England. 

Object: To send Gospel literature to Spanish-speaking peoples. 

Income: 454. 

Organs: "El Heraldo," "Letters from Spain." 

Field: Spain (Province of Gerona). 

(NOTE: The total issues of the Spanish Religious Tract and Book Society in the 
year 1908-1909 amounted to 300,360 publications. Distribution of Bibles and 
other Christian literature was made in 2,346 places in Spain during that year.) 



SWEDEN 

(The Swedish krone may be reckoned as equivalent to 27 cents United States 
currency, or is. id. English money.) 

Societies Appointing and Sending Missionaries 

EVANGELISKA FOSTERLANDS-STIFTELSENS [EVANGELICAL NATIONAL 

SOCIETY IN SWEDEN] (1856). 

Secretary: Rev. J. Lindgren, Danderyd, near Stockholm. 
Object: Missions among non-Christians; evangelizing work at home; 

Bible and tract dissemination; a sailors' mission. 
Income: 739,796 Kr. Expended for foreign missions, including the 

sailors' mission, 628,740 Kr. 
Organs: "Missionstidning," "Sjomansvannen," "Budbiiraren," "Bar- 

nens van." 
Fields: India, North-east Africa (Eritrea, Abyssinia, Somaliland). 

(NOTE: Home mission work was begun in 1856, but foreign missions were not com- 
menced until 1861. The Evangelical National Society acts as the executive of 
many auxiliary Unions, usually called "Ansgarius Unions," contributing to its 
support. It has also several Unions conducted by women aiding in its work.) 

VANNER TILL ZENANA MISSIONEN [FRIENDS OF THE ZENANA MISSION] (1893). 
Secretary: Miss Elisabeth Lindberg, Malmskillnadsgata^ 32c., Stockholm 3. 
Object: To provide support for zenana women missionaries. 
Income: 3,077 Kr., included in the income of parent society. 
Field: India. 

UNGAS FORBUND [YOUNG PEOPLE'S UNION] (1902). 

Secretary: Rev. J. Montelius, Evangeliska Fosterlands Stiftelsens Expedition, 

Mastersamuelsgatan 42, Stockholm. 
Object: To unite Young People's Societies connected with the Evangelical National 

Society in Sweden. 

Income: 13,000 Kr., raised for the parent society. 
Organ: "De Ungas Tidning." 
Fields: Those ofthe parent society. 
(NOTE: The Union includes 255 Young People's Societies and 230 Sunday Schools. 

The Young People's Societies support 6 missionaries, and the Sunday Schools 

support 7 missionaries.) 



CHINA INLAND MISSION (1865). 
(See under England.) 

SVENSKA MISSIONEN I KINA [SWEDISH MISSION IN CHINA] (1887). 
Secretary: Mr. Josef Holmgren, Malmtorgsgatan 8, Stockholm. 
Object: Missions in China. 
Income: 91,422 Kr., from home sources. In addition, the sum of 7,322 Kr. was 

sent directly to the missionaries. 
Organ: "Sinims Land." 
Field: China (Shansi, Shensi, Honan). 

(NOTE: The Committee for the support of the Swedish Mission in China was founded 
in 1887, for the assistance of Missionary E. Folke, and hia colleagues. It is 
advisory, rather than managing, and stands in relation to the China ^nland 
Mission as one of its Associate Missions. The missionaries are essentially in 
accordance with the principles of the Free Church, and are not ordained.) 

FRI BAPTISTER [INDEPENDENT BAPTISTS] (1872). 
Secretary: Rev. Anders Hansspn, Hansjo, Orsa. 
Object: Evangelistic missions in South Africa and Sweden. 
Income: 8,364 Kr. (this represents the amount received for foreign mis- 
sions alone, without including the sum contributed for home missions). 
Organ: "Upplysningens Van." 
Fields: South Africa (Natal), Sweden. 

(NOTE: Associated with the Scandinavian Independent Baptist Denomination, which 
see under United States.) 

SVENSKA KYRKANS MISSION [SWEDISH CHURCH MISSION] (1874). 

Secretary: Rev. Axel Ihrmark, Upsala. 

Object: Foreign missions, seamen's missions, and pastoral ministry to 

Swedes in foreign countries. 
Income: 284,774 Kr. 
Organ: "Missionstidning under inseende af Svenska Kyrkans missions- 

styrelse." 
Fields: India, Ceylon, South Africa (Natal, Transvaal), Southern Central 

Africa (Southern Rhodesia). 

(NOTE: The Mission was founded in 1874, but the first mis_sionary was not sent out 
until 1876. In India and Ceylon it is in relationship with _ the Leipzig Missionary 
Society, which furnishes the statistics for the "Swedish Diocese.") 

SVENSKA KVINNORS MISSIONSFflRENING [MISSIONARY SOCIETY OF SWEDISH 

WOMEN] (1903). 

Secretary: Miss Ingeborg Wikander, Upsala. 
Object: To aid the Swedish Church Mission. 
Income: 1,965 Kr. 

Organ: "Meddelanden fran Svenska Kyrkans Mission." 
Fields: Those of the Swedish Church Mission. 

SVENSKA MISSIONSFORBUNDETS [SWEDISH MISSION UNION] (1878). 
Secretary: Mr. W. Sjoholm, Svenska Missionsforbundets Expedition, 

Drottninggatan 77, Stockholm. 

Object: Home missions, foreign missions, seamen's missions. 
Income: 763,924 Kr., all received in Sweden. For heathen missions and 

evangelization in foreign lands, the receipts amounted to 364,969 Kr. 
Organ: "Missionsforbundet." 
Fields: Chinese Empire (China proper and Chinese Turkestan), Persia, 

South-west Africa (Belgian Congo), Russia, Lapland. In North 

Africa (Algeria) work ceased with the death of Dr. Nystrom. 

(NOTE: Founded in 1878 for home mission work. In 1881 foreign mission work was 
started in the Congo, in connection with the Livingstone Congo Inland Mission. The 
Mission Union has been independent since 1886. The principles of the Free Church 
are adhered to, and its missionaries are not ordained.) 

SVENSKA BAPTISTERNAS MISSION UTOM LANDET [FOREIGN MIS- 
SION OF THE SWEDISH BAPTISTS] (1889). 
President: Rev. Fredrik Lindberg. 

Secretary: Rev. J. Bystrom, M.P., Dobelngatan 12, Stockholm. 
Object: The training and sending out of missionaries for work in mis- 
sion lands. 
Income: 49,838 Kr. (including over 16,000 Kr. received through the 

sale of Testaments). Expended for work in China, 22,643 Kr. 
Organs: "Baptistmissionens Arstryck," ^Wecko Posten." 
Fields: China, Russia, Spain. 

HELGELSE-FORBUNDET I NERIKE [HOLINESS UNION OF NERIKE] 

(1890). 

President: Landowner Hedin in Torp (Nerike). 
Secretary: Pastor Kihlstedt, Gotabro, Kumla (Nerike). 
Object: Evangelization at home, and among pagans. 
Income: 42,751 Kr. Proportion devoted to 'foreign missions, 38,78,"> Kr. 
Organ: "Trons Segrar." 

Fields: China (in connection with the China Inland Mission), South 
Africa (independent work in Natal). 

(NOTE. The Union was founded in 1885, for evangelistic work at home, and began in 
1890 to send out missionaries to foreign fields. The principles of the Free Church 
are adhered to, without emphasis on confession. Much use as made of women evan- 
gelists. It is sometimes called the "Sanctification Union.") 

SCANDINAVIAN ALLIANCE MISSION OF NORTH AMERICA (1891). 
(See under United States.) 

SKANDINAVISKA ALLIANSMISSIONENS, SVENSKA AFDELNING [SCANDINAVIAN 

ALLIANCE MISSION, SWEDISH BRANCH] (1900). 
Secretary: Mr. C. Nordling, Jonkopingj, Kapellgatan 27. 
Object: The evangelization of non-Christian landa. 
Income: 44,042 Kr., from home sources. 
Organ: "Trosvittnet." 
Fields: Japan, China, India, South Africa (Transvaal), South America. 

(NOTE: The Scandinavian Alliance Mission was founded in 1891, by the Rev. F. 
Franson, and has its headquarters in the United States, at Chicago. The Swedish 
Branch was organized in 1900, at Jonk6p_ing, and took charge of the support of 
the Swedish missionaries, who up to the time of the Boxer troubles had belonged 
to the Christian and Missionary Alliance. Free Church in principles. In China, 
where this Mission cooperates with the China Inland Mission, it is known as the 
Scandinavian China Alliance.) 

KVINNLIGA MISSIONS-ARBETARE [FEMALE MISSIONARY WORKERS] 

(1894). 

Secretary: Miss Anna Baeckman, Brunnsgatan 3, Stockholm. 
Object: The spread of the Gospel, and the winning of souls for Christ, 

especially among the women in non-Christian lands. 
Income: 23,611 Kr. 
Organ: " Nar och fjarran." 
Fields: China, India, Africa, Armenia, Russia, Sweden, Lapland. 

(NOTE: This Society represents the foreign work of a Union of the Young Women's 
Christian Associations of Sweden. Missionaries, native workers, and children in 
schools^ are supported in various mission fields in connection with other societies. 
In addition, the organization has its own mission in Lapland.) 



56 



WORLD ATLAS OF CHRISTIAN MISSIONS 



Sweden-Switzerland 



SVENSKA MONGOLMISSIONEN [SWEDISH MONGOL MISSION] (1897). 
President: Prince Oscar Bernadotte, Ostermalmsgatan 56, Stockholm. 
Secretary : Mr. John Regnell, Bank Official, Hornsgatan 33 b., Stockholm. 
Object: The evangelization of the Mongolians. 
Income: 4,290 Kr. 
Field: Chinese Empire (Mongolia). 

SWEDISH SOCIETY OF JERUSALEM (1904). 

Director: Dr. G. L. Ribbing, Bethlehem, Palestine. 
(See under Turkish Empire.) 

Cooperating and Collecting Societies 

BOARD OF FOREIGN MISSIONS OF THE METHODIST EPISCOPAL 
CHURCH fiSio). 
(See under United States.) 

METODISTKYRKANS I SVERIGE MISSIONSSALLSKAP [MISSIONARY SOCIETY 

OF THE METHODIST EPISCOPAL CHURCH IN SWEDEN] (1868). 
Secretary: Rev. K. A. Jansgon, D.D., 15 Vallingatan, Stockholm. 
Object: To diffuse information about missions, and to inspire the churches to 

give generous contributions for missionary work. 
Income: 22,843 Kr. 

Organ: Weekly Paper of the Swedish Annual Conference. 
Fields: China, Malaysia, India, Palestine (Jerusalem), Portuguese East Africa. 

GUSTAV-ADOLPH SOCIETY OF SWEDEN (1832). 
Secretary: Pastor Dr. Sterzel, Stockholm. 
Object: To aid evangelical missions in Roman Catholic lands. 
Income: 13,370 Mk. 
Fields: Roman Catholic lands. 

STUDENTMISSIONSFftRENINGENS I UPPSALA [STUDENTS' MISSION- 
ARY SOCIETY OF UPSALA] (1882). 
Office Address: The University, Upsala. 
Object: To stimulate missionary interest among students. 
Income : None raised. 
Fields: Wherever students may go. 

LARARINNORNAS MISSIONSFORENING [MISSIONARY SOCIETY OF 

WOMEN TEACHERS] (1899). 
President and Secretary: Mrs. Anna Peterson, Missionshotellet, Viktoria- 

gatan, 6, Goteborg. 
Object: The uniting of Christian women teachers in efforts to promote 

interest in missionary work, and to provide means for the support of 

women missionaries. 
Income: 13,271 Kr. 

Organ: "Meddelande till Lararinnornas Missionsforening." 
Fields: China, India, Africa, Lapland. 

(NOTE: In China this Society works in connection with the Swedish Mission in China, 
associated with the China Inland Mission; in India the relationship is with the 
Evangelical National Society in Sweden; and in Lapland it works in connection 
with the Female Missionary Workers.) 



SWITZERLAND 
Societies Appointing and Sending Missionaries 

MISSION DER BRUDERGEMEINE [MORAVIAN MISSIONS] (1732). 
(See under Germany.) 

A6ENCE DE LA MISSION MORAVE POUR LA SUISSE FRANCAISE [MORAVIAN 
MISSION AGENCY FOR FRENCH SWITZERLAND] 



Secretary: Rev. Aug. Brindeau, 38 Quai de Champ-Bougin, Neuchatel. 

Object: To collect funds in aid of Moravian Missions, and to hold conferences, in 

order to diffuse information about missionary work. 
Income: 74,948 Fr. 

Organ: "Journal de I'Unite' des Freres." 
Fields: Those of the Moravian Missions. 

(NOTE: The Moravian Church of the Canton of Neuch&tel was founded in the year 
1873, and probably began to send missionary collections of funds to the parent 
society soon after that date.) 

SCHWEIZER HILFSVEREIN FtiR DIE BRtJDERMISSION [SWISS SOCIETY IN AID 

OF MORAVIAN MISSIONS] (1904). 

Secretary: Herr Pfarrer Schaub, Regensdorf, Canton Zurich. 
Object: To support Moravian Missions. 
Income: 2,000 Fr. 
Fields: Those of the Moravian Missions. 

EVANGELISCHE MISSIONSGESELLSCHAFT ZU BASEL [BASEL EVAN- 

GELICAL MISSIONARY SOCIETY] (1815). 
Mission Director: Rev. Theodore Oehler, D.D. 
Home Secretary: Rev. H. Dipper. 
Office Address: Missionshaus, Basel, Switzerland. 
Object: Missionary work among non-Christians. 
Income: Of the general treasury, 1,879,641 Fr.; of the assistant treasuries, 

386,634 Fr.; from the foreign field, 363,478 Fr.; total, 2,629,753 Fr. 

Of the income of the general treasury, 264,887 Fr. was the amount 

received by the "Mission Store and Industry" Society. 
Organs: "Evangelische Missionsmagazin," "Le Missionaire," "Heiden- 

bote." 
Fields: China, British Malaysia (North Borneo), India, Western Africa 

(Gold Coast), South-west Africa (Kamerun). 

NOTE: The Basel Society cannot be regarded as wholly German or wholly Swiss, 
although its office is in Switzerland, and its accounts are rendered in francs. It is 
supported by the united efforts of the Lutheran and Reformed Churches in 
Southern Germany and Switzerland. The following more or less independent 
organizations are connected with the Society: the Basel Mission Store and In- 
dustry Society, founded in 1859; the Basel Medical Missionary Society, founded 
in 1898; the Basel Women's Mission founded in 1841; the Basel Collection So- 
ciety, founded in 1855; the Children's Education Commission, founded in 1853; 
and the Society for Evangelical Missions in Kamerun. founded in 1887. The 
Basel Society has a close connection with the Medical Missionary Union at Stutt- 
gart. See Medical Missionary Associations under Germany.) 

SOCIETE DES MISSIONS EVANGELIOUES CHEZ LES PEUPLES NON- 
CHRETIENS [PARIS SOCIETY FOR EVANGELICAL MISSIONS 
AMONG NON-CHRISTIAN NATIONS] (1822). 
(See under France.) 

COMITfi AUXILIAIRE DE GENEVE [AUXILIARY COMMITTEE OF GENEVA] 

(1830). 
President: Mr. Edouard Favre, 12 rue des Granges, Geneva. 



Secretary: Rev. Aug. Nayille, 7 rue dcs Falaises, Geneva. 

Object: To render financial aid to the Paris Evangelical Society, and to make its 

work known, by means of conferences. 
Income: 102,000 Fr. 
Fields: Those of the Paris Evangelical Society. 

(NOTE: There is, also, a Swiss Auxiliary Committee to the Paris Society at Neu- 
chatel, and another at Lausanne, named the Comite" Auxiliaire Vaudois.) 

COMMISSION GENEVOISE DU ZAMBEZE [GENEVAN COMMITTEE FOR THE 

MISSION TO THE UPPER ZAMBESI] (1899). 
President: Mr. Edouard Favre, 12 rue des Granges, Geneva. 
Secretary: Madame Fatio-Lombard, rue de la Cite" 22, Geneva. 
Object: To raise funds in aid of the Mission to the Upper Zambesi. 
Income: 10,000 Fr., transmitted through the "Bulletin du Sou du Zambeze," but 

many other large contributions are received, the exact statement of which is not 

at hand. 

Organs: "Nouvelles du Zambeze," "Bulletin du Sou du Zambeze." 
Field: Africa (Barotsiland). 

CHINA INLAND MISSION (1863). 

(See under England.) 

CHRISCHONAZWEIG DER CHINA-INLAND-MISSION [CHRISCHONA BRANCH 

OF THE CHINA INLAND MISSION] (1895). 

Mission Inspector: Mr. Friedrich Veiel, St. Chrischona Institute, Riehen, Basel. 
Object: Missions to China. 

Income: 14,543 Fr. Of this sum 9,864 Fr. were expended on the mission in China. 
The income of the Chrischonazweig der China Inland Mission is included in 
that of the Pilgrim Mission of St. Chrischona. 
Organ: "Der Glaubensbote." 
Field: China. 

(NOTE: Statistics of this organization are included with those of the China Inland 
Mission. The Chrjschonazweig is the foreign mission branch of the Pilgrim 
Mission of St. Chrischona.) 

MISSION DES EGLISES LIBRES DE LA SUISSE ROMANDE [MISSION 
BOARD OF THE FREE CHURCHES OF FRENCH SWITZER- 
LAND] (1875). 

Secretary: Rev. Arthur Grandjean, Chemin des Cedres, Lausanne. 
Object: The evangelization of the Tonga, and similar peoples, in South- 
east Africa. 

Income: 274,805 Fr., from home churches; 25,288 Fr., from the field 
(medical practice, grants in aid, etc.; native contributions are not in- 
cluded); total, 300,093 Fr. 
Organ: "Bulletin de la Mission Romande." 
Fields: South Africa (Transvaal), Portuguese East Africa. 

(NOTE: Known as the "Mission Romande," or "Swiss Mission." In the year 1875 the 
Synod of the Free Evangelical Churches of the Canton de Vaud began a mission 
in the North Transvaal, which they named the "Mission Vaudoise." The work 
continued under the care of the Synod until 1883, when the Synods of the Free 
Churches of Neuchatel and Geneva formed a federation with the Synod of Vaud, 
and the name of the organization was changed to its present title, as given above.) 

MISSION MAYOR A MOKNEA [MISSION OF REV. H. S. MAYOR, AT 
MOKNEA] (1883). 

(NOTE: This missionary work which was carried on independently, for a long period 
of years, by Mr. Mayor, with the aid of a Committee in Switzerland, has now been 
taken over by the North Africa Mission, which see under England.) 

LEBANON HOSPITAL FOR THE INSANE (1896). 
(See under England.) 

LEBANON HOSPITAL FOR THE INSANE, SWISS COMMITTEES (1900). 
Central Secretary: Herr Samuel Zurlinden, Zurich,. 
Object: The care and treatment of the mentally afflicted in the East, without any 

distinction as to creed or nationality. 
Income: 199. 
Field: Turkish Empire (Syria). 

(NOTE: There are Committees in aid of the Lebanon Hospital for the Insane at 
Berne, Lausanne, Geneva, and Zurich.) 

MISSION PHILAFRICAINE [PHILAFRICAN MISSION] (1897). 
General Secretary: Mr. A. Chatelain, Villa Belmont, Lausanne. 
Object: The evangelization of Angola. 
Income : No statement at hand. 
Field: Africa (Angola). 

(NOTE: The late Mr. He'll Chatelain was the founder of this Mission, which was for- 
merly known as the Philafrican Liberators' League, with headquarters in America. 
The work since 1901 has been directed by a Swiss interdenominational Committee, 
two members of which are British residents in Switzerland.) 



Cooperating and Collecting Societies 

SOCIETE NEITCHATELOISE DES MISSIONS [NEUCHATEL MISSIONARY 
SOCIETY] (1826). 

President: Mr. Paul de Coulon, faub. de 1'hopital 10, Neuchatel. 

Secretary: Mr. Armand Du Pasquin, Grande Rochette, Neuchatel. 

Object: To stimulate interest in missions to non-Christians, and to con- 
tribute toward their support. Also to assist young people who de- 
sire to consecrate themselves to missionary work, and to arrange for 
their preparation for this service. 

Income: 66,243 Fr. 

Organ: "Nouvelles de nos Missionaires." 

Fields: Those of the Basel Missionary Society, the Paris Missionary So- 
ciety, the Swiss Romande Mission, and the Moravian Missions. 

(NOTE : This Society acts as an auxiliary committee to the various missionary societies 
mentioned in connection with its fields.) 

PILGER-MISSION AUF ST. CHRISCHONA [PILGRIM MISSION OF ST. 

CHRISCHONA] (1840). 

Mission-Inspector : Mr. Friedrich Veiel, St. Chrischona, Riehen, Basel. 
Object: The training of evangelists at the St. Chrischona Institute for 

missionary work in home and foreign fields. 
Income: 256,126 Fr. (contributed principally from Switzerland, Germany, 

Austria, America, and England). Of this amount 14,543 Fr. was set 

apart for the China Mission, and is given as the income of the Chris- 

chonazweig der China Inland Mission. 

Organs: "Der Glaubensbote," "La Messagere de Chrischona." 
Fields: China, Switzerland, Germany, Austria, 

(NOTE: The Chrischona Institute was for many years under the efficient direction of 
the Rev. C. H. Rappard, who died in February, 1910, and has been succeeded by 
his son-in-law, Mission-Inspector Veiel. The mission work in China is represented 
by the Chrischonazweig der China Inland Mission.) 



Switzerland-South Africa 



DIRECTORY OF MISSIONARY SOCIETIES 



57 



WORLD'S COMMITTEE OF YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATIONS 

(1878). 

General Secretary: Mr. Charles Fermaud, Rue Ge"n<5ral-Dufour 3, Geneva. 
Object: To unite the Young Men's Christian Associations of all lands, 
chiefly through the various National and International Committees, 
and to promote the spiritual, intellectual, social, and physical welfare 
of young men. 
Organ: "Monthly News Circular." 

(NOTE: The World's Committee of Young Men's Christian Associations does not send 
out Association secretaries to work as missionaries among non-Christian peoples. 
The foreign secretaries in non-Christian lands are appointed and supported by the 
various national committees, whose secretaries_ they remain. The home com- 
mittees, however, place these secretaries at the disposal of the national committees 
and the local Young Men's Christian Associations on the field. These Committees and 
Associations become responsible for the development of the local work in the 
cities as well as of the national work as a whole. The World's Committee unifies 
and stimulates all these activities throughout the world, through the arranging 
of conventions, the distribution of literature, the gathering and circulation of 
statistics, and by correspondence. In entering the statistics of Young Men's 
Christian Association work in this volume, European and North American secre- 



taries are credited to their home supporting constituencies, and all other data in 
each non-Christian country where there are missionary statistics are entered under 
the national committee of that country. The total of Young Men's Christian Asso- 
ciations in all foreign mission lands, in January, 1910, was 366, with a member- 
ship of 28,909. These statistics exclude Australasia, South Africa, and Europe, 
with the exception of Turkey and Bulgaria, and, also, do not include the United 
States and Canada. The total for the world was reported at the above date to 
be 8,052 .Associations, with 860,340 members.) 

CONGO REFORM ASSOCIATION (1904). 
(See under England.) 

LIGUE SUISSE POUR LA DEFENSE DBS DTDIGETfES DAWS LE BASSIN CON- 
VENTIONNEL DU CONGO (PXERNATIONAL LEAGUE FOR THE DE- 
FENSE OF THE NATIVES OF THE CONVENTIONAL BASIN OF THE CONGO, 
SWISS BRANCH] (1908). 

President: Mr. Re"n(5 Claparede, Geneva. 

Secretary: Mr. Albert Wuarin, 63 rue du Stand, Geneva. 

Object: To secure just and humane treatment for the natives of the Congo State. 

Income: No statement at hand. 

Organ: "Bulletin Suisse du Congo.'! 

Field: Africa (Belgian Congo). 



SOUTH AFRICAN SOCIETIES 



Societies Appointing and Sending Missionaries 
BAPTIST: 

SOUTH AFRICAN BAPTIST MISSIONARY SOCIETY (1892). 

Secretary: Rev. Thomas Perry, 11 Albemarle St., Troyeville, Johannes- 
burg, Transvaal. 

Object: To evangelize the natives of South Africa. 

Income: From native sources, 189; from England, Tasmania, etc., 
140; from European Baptist Churches in South Africa, 1,322; 
total, 1,651. 

Organ: "The South African Baptist." 

Field: South Africa (Kaffraria, Tembuland, and Pondoland in Cape 
Colony). 

(NOTE: In connection with the Baptist Union of South Africa there is a Baptist Ladies' 
League, which acts as an auxiliary to the Society, and a Capetown Auxiliary, 
which also contributes toward its income.) 

CHURCH OF ENGLAND: 

SOCIETY FOR THE PROPAGATION OF THE GOSPEL IN FOREIGN 

PARTS (1701). 
(See under England.) 

SOUTH AFRICAN CHURCH RAILWAY MISSION (1894). 

Director: Rev. Henry B. Ellison, M.A., Auckland Park, Johannesburg, Transvaal. 
Object: To provide spiritual ministrations among the railway employees, farmers, 

storekeepers, police, and others, scattered along the more than seven thousand 

miles of South African railways. 
Income: 1,339 (received from English branch). Amount received from local 

sources not at hand. 
Organ: "Light for the Line." 
Fields: South Africa, Southern Central Africa. 

(NOTE: In connection with the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel. In 
1902 the staff of the Mission consisted of a single worker, the Rev. Douglas 
Ellison; to-day it numbers 12 priests, 1 layman, 3 lady workers, 4 nurses, and 
3 native catechists, and works in the dioceses of Grahamstown, Pretoria, Bloem- 
fontein, Natal, Mashonaland, and Northern Rhodesia. It receives financial 
support from the South African Church Railway Mission Committee in England, 
which see under English Section. The Mission was formerly called the Granams- 
town Diocesan Railway Mission.) 

CHURCH MISSIONARY SOCIETY FOR AFRICA AND THE EAST (1799). 

(See under England.) 

SOUTH AFRICAN CHURCH MISSIONARY ASSOCIATION (1895). 

Secretary: Rev. A. Daintree, M.A., St. Peter's Rectory, Mowbray, Gape Colony. 
Object: To support a number of missionaries of the Church Missionary Society as 

own missionaries." 
Income: 1,443. 
Fields: Those of the Church Missionary Society. 

(NOTE: In 1895 several parishes in Cape Colony which contributed to the Church 
Missionary Society formed themselves into a South African Ass9ciation. The 
Association is responsible for the support of fifteen Church Missionary Society 
missionaries, in the same Way as parishes or unions in the United Kingdom 
maintain "own missionaries." Candidates for missionary service are sent to 
England for training and acceptance. There is a Gleaners' Union in connection 
with this Association.) 

CHURCH OF THE PROVINCE OF SOUTH AFRICA (1870). 

(NOTE: The first Provincial Synod of the Church of South Africa was convened by the 
Metropolitan Bishop of Capetown* Dr. Gray, in the year 1870. There were then 
only five dioceses in the Province of South Africa, which have now been increased 
to ten. These dioceses all engage, some of them to a large extent, in missionary 
operations. A considerable proportion, in some instances much the largest share, 
of the funds devoted to missionary purposes is raised locally, but it is supplemented 
by substantial grants from the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel, the 
Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge, and the Colonial and Continental 
Church Society. For educational purposes colonial grants are also made. In 
some cases, aid is contributed by special associations in Great Britain, the ob- 
ject of which is to render assistance to the missionary work of the Church of South 
Africa. The following ten dioceses, arranged in chronological order, are identified 
with the Church of the Province of South Africa.) 

DIOCESE OF CAPETOWN (1847). 

Archbishop of Capetown: Most Rev. William Maryborough Carter, D.D., 

Bishopscourt, Capetown, Cape Colony. 
Coadjutor Bishop: Rt. Rev. William Mouat Cameron, D.D., Capetown, 

Cape Colony. 

Object: Foreign and colonial missions in the Diocese of Capetown. 
Income: 46,325. This represents the income of the Diocese from all 

sources. No definite statement is at hand as to what proportion of 

this amount is expended for missionary purposes. 
Organ: "The Cape Church Monthly." 
Field: South Africa (Western Division of Cape Colony). 

(NOTE: The Association in Aid of the Diocese of Capetown, which see under England, 
contributes toward the support of this Diocese, through the Society for the 
Propagation of the Gospel.) 

DIOCESE OF GRAHAMSTOWN (1853). 

Bishop of Diocese: Rt. Rev. Charles Edward Cornish, D.D., Bishops- 
bourne, Grahamstown, Cape Colony. 

Object: Colonial and foreign missions in the Diocese of Grahamstown. 
Income: 32,748. The work of the Diocese is largely missionary. 



Organ: "Grahamstown Occasional Paper." 

Field: South Africa (Eastern division of Cape Colony). 

(NOTE: The Grahamstown Association in England, which see under England, aids in 
thejvork of this Diocese, and the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel and the 
Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge also contribute largely. In the Native 
Reserves the clergy devote themselves almost exclusively to the conversion of the 
heathen, and the building up of a native Church. Educational work, both for 
natives and Europeans, is a prominent feature of the Diocese.) 

DIOCESE OF NATAL (1853). 
Bishop of Diocese: Rt. Rev. Frederick Samuel Baines, D.D., Bishop's 

House, Maritzburg, Natal. 
Superintendent of Native Missions: Canon Ernest Travers Burges, M.A., 

Bruton, Lidgetton, Natal. 
Superintendent of Indian Missions: Canon Arthur Halsted Smith, B.A., 

Maritzburg, Natal. 
Object: Missionary work in the Diocese of Natal. Much attention is 

given to missions among the natives and Indians in that Diocese. 
Income: 18,643. More than half of this amount is raised locally. 
Organ: "Church News from Natal." 
Field: Natal (not including Zululand). 

(NOTE: The Maritzburg Mission Association in England, which see under England, con- 
tributes to the support of the Diocese, as does also the Society for the Propagation 
of the Gosjjel. The Diocese is remarkable for its large Indian population, and 
special missions have been organized for work among that race. St. Aidan's Indian 
Mission, at Durban, under .the charge of the Rev. Arthur French, is the center of 
these efforts.) 

DIOCESE OF ST. HELENA (1859). 

Bishop of the Diocese: Rt. Rev. William Arthur Holbech, D.D., Bishops- 
holme, Island of St. Helena, South Atlantic. 

Object: Missions in the islands of St. Helena, Ascension, and Tristan da 
Cunha. 

Income: 585 from sources in England, and 300 from the foreign field; 
total, 885. 

Fields: The islands of St. Helena, Ascension, and Tristan da Cunha, in 
the South Atlantic Ocean. 

(NOTE: Assisted by grants from the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel, and 
contributions raised by a Diocesan Finance Board in England, of which the Yen. 
Archdeacon Elwes, Woolbeding Rectory, Midhurst, is the Bishop's Commissary.) 

DIOCESE OF BLOEMFONTEIN (1863). 
Bishop of Diocese: Rt. Rev. Arthur Chandler, D.D., Bloemfontein, Orange 

Free State. 
Object: Missions in Basutoland, British Bechuanaland, West Griqualand, 

and Orange Free State. 
Income: 4,510. 

Organ: "Bloemfontein Quarterly Paper." 
Field: South Africa (Basutoland, Orange Free State, together with West 

Griqualand and British Bechuanaland in Cape Colony). 

(NOTE: The missions to natives are largely assisted by the Society for the Propagation 
of the Gospel, and there is an Association in England which sends contributions, 
of which the Commissaries are the Rev. V. S. S. Coles, Pusey House, Oxford, and 
the Rev. R. Hudson, St. Mark's College, Chelsea.) 

DIOCESE OF ZULULAND (1870). 
Bishop of Diocese: Rt. Rev. Wilmot Lushington Vyvyan, D.D., Isandhl- 

wana, St. Augustine's Post Office, Zululand. 
Object: To minister to the English colonists, and to evangelize the native 

population. 
Income: 7,511. Of this amount 4,538 is received from England, and 

2,973 from local sources. 
Organ: "The Net." 
Field: South Africa (Zululand, Tongaland, Swaziland, Vryheid, and a 

portion of the Transvaal). 

(NOTE: The mission work of the Church of England began in Zululand in 1860, and 
the Diocese of Zululand was formed in 1870, as a Memorial to Bishop Mackenzie. 
There is a Zululand Missionary Association, which see under England, that raises 
funds for the Diocese.) 

DIOCESE OF ST. JOHN'S, KAFFRARIA (1873). 

Bishop of Diocese: Rt. Rev. Joseph Watkin Williams, D.D., Bishopsmead, 
Umtata, Kaffraria, Cape Colony. 

Object : Missions to colonists and natives in the Diocese. 

Income: 14,560. Of this income 8,402 is reported as contributed 
locally in the Diocese, 1,200 is from the Foreign Mission Board of the 
Episcopal Church of Scotland, 4,046 is from the Society for the 
Propagation of the Gospel, and 912 from the St. John's Missionary 
Association in England . 



Organ: "Kaffrarian Diocesan Quarterly." 
Field: South Africa (Diocese of St. John's, 



Kaffraria, in Cape Colony). 



(NOTE: The work of the Diocese is largely missionary, among the Hottentots and 
Griquas, and much attention is given to educational institutions for the training 
of native clergy, catechists, and teachers. There is also medical missionary work. 
The Diocese is supported by the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel, the 
Scottish Episcopal Church, the St. John's, Kaffraria, Missionary Association, 
which see under England, and by generous contributions raised within the Dio- 
cese.) 



58 



WORLD ATLAS OF CHRISTIAN MISSIONS 



South Africa 



DIOCESE OF PRETORIA (1878). 
Bishop of Diocese: Rt. Rev. Michael Bolton Furae, M.A., P. O. Box 734, 

Pretoria, Transvaal. 

Object : Missions among colonists and natives in the Transvaal. 
Income: 36,645. Of this amount 6,810 was received for missionary 

purposes, being 2,180 from England, and 4,630 from local sources. 
Field: South Africa (Transvaal). 

(NOTE: The Diocese of Pretoria receives an annual grant from the Society for the 
Propagation of the Gospel. There is an immense opening for missionary work 
among the native people in all parts of the Diocese. The first Bishop of Pretoria 
was consecrated in 1878, but, owing to the Zulu War, which was followed imme- 
diately by the first Boer War, the practical opening of the Diocese, at least in its 
missionary work, was delayed until 1883.) 

DIOCESE OF MASHONALAND (1891). 
Bishop of Diocese: Rt. Rev. Edmund Nathanael Powell, D.D., Salisbury, 

Rhodesia. 

Object: Missions, chiefly among the native population of the Diocese. 
Income: 4,627. Of this amount 1,650 was a grant from the Society 

for the Propagation of the Gospel, and 1,320 from the Mashonaland 

Association, in England. 
Organ: "Mashonaland." 
Fields: Southern Central Africa and East Africa (parts of Bechuanaland 

Protectorate, Southern Rhodesia, and Portuguese East Africa). 

(NOTE: The Mashonaland Association in England raises funds in aid of the missions 
of the Diocese of Mashonaland, for account of which see English Section.) 

DIOCESE OF LEBOMBO (1893). 
Bishop of Diocese: Rt. Rev. William Edmund Smyth, M.A., M.B., Box 

120, Lorenzo Marques, South-east Africa. 
Object: The planting and development of the Church in the district 

between the Indian Ocean and the Lebombo Mountains, and the 

border of Zululand and the Sabi River. 
Income: 3,000. 

Organs: "Lebombo Leaves" (Quarterly Paper), "South African News." 
Field: Portuguese East Africa. 

(NOTE: The Lebombo Mission Association, which see under England, raises funds in 
aid of the missions of the Diocese of Lebombo, and a grant is also received from 
the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel.) 

CONGREGATIONAL: 

CONGREGATIONAL UNION, CHURCH AID, AND MISSIONARY SOCIETY 
OF SOUTH AFRICA (1877). 

Secretary: Rev. William Angus, Uitenhage, Cape Colony. 

Object: To promote the interests of evangelical religion, through the 
establishment and support of churches and missions of the Congre- 
gational order, among the European and native populations of South 
Africa. 

Income: 1,150. Of this amount 671 was raised locally, 85 was a 
grant from the London Missionary Society, and 394 was a grant from 
the Colonial Missionary Society. 

Organ: "The Congregational Magazine." 

Field: South Africa (Cape Colony, Transvaal). 

(NOTE: The Congregational Union has in connection with it a considerable number 
of churches of colored people, originally connected with the London Missionary 
Society, many of which are helped by grants-in-aid for the maintenance of their 
European ministers.) 

METHODIST: 

SOUTH AFRICAN MISSIONARY SOCIETY (1886). 

Secretary: Rev. James Robb, Chalker House, Grahamstown, Cape Col- 
ony. 

Object: The sustentation and extension of church work among the Eng- 
lish, colored, native, and Indian peoples in South Africa. 

Income: Total income from all sources, 100,760. From English sub- 
scribers in South Africa, 4,521. Subtract amount appropriated for 
English work, 1,876, leaving balance for native work, etc., 2,645. 
From native subscribers, 5,513. From colored subscribers, 238. 
From Indian subscribers, 21. Given by native, colored, and Indian 
members and adherents in support of their own church organizations, 
23,265. Given by native, colored, and Indian members and ad- 
herents for the erection and maintenance of churches, schools, and 
other buildings, 10,276. Given by native, colored, and Indian 
members and adherents in aid of Sunday Schools, 214. Contributed 
by native, colored, and Indian members and adherents for miscel- 
laneous purposes, 997. Paid by natives, etc., in school fees, 16,584. 
Paid by natives in industrial institutional fees, 9,320. Total, 
69,073. Government grants to institutions and day schools, 31,687. 

Organ: "The Methodist Churchman." 

Field: South Africa (Cape Colony, Natal, Orange Free State). 

(NOTE: This Society is in connection with the Wesleyan Methodist Church of South 
Africa. Missionary work was begun in South Africa in 1814. The Wesleyan Churches 
in South Africa were formed into an affiliated Conference in 1883. The South African 
Missionary Society was constituted in 1886. There are Wesley Guilds in connection 
with this Society. Wesleyan Methodist mission work in the Transvaal and in 
Rhodesia is in connection with the Wesleyan Methodist Missionary Society of Great 
Britain, and not with the South African organization.) 

PRESBYTERIAN: 

MISSIONARY COMMITTEE OF THE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH OF 
SOUTH AFRICA (1897). 

Convener of Mission Committee: Rev. Dr. J. J. McClure, Park Villas, 
Upper Orange St., Capetown, Cape Colony. 

Secretary: Andrew Bryson, Esq., Board of Executors' Chambers, Wale 
St., Capetown, Cape Colony. 

Superintendent of Transvaal Native Mission: Rev. C. B. Hamilton, P. O. 
Box 4092, Johannesburg, Transvaal. 

Superintendent of Rhodesia Native Mission: Rev. S. S. Dorman, P. O. 
Box 510, Buluwayo, Rhodesia. 

Object: The evangelization of native races in South Africa. 

Income: 2,405. 

Organ: "The Churchman." 

Fields: South Africa (Cape Colony, Natal, Orange Free State, Trans- 
vaal), Southern Central Africa (Rhodesia). 

(NOTE: The Presbyterian Church of South Africa was constituted in 1897, by a union 
of all the Churches of Presbyterian faith and polity in South Africa. A_ Missionary 
Committee was formed soon afterward, having in view work for both white colonists 
and natives. The principal native missions supported by the Presbyterian Church 
of South Africa are situated in the Transvaal and Rhodesia. Other native missions 



associated with this Church, but financially supported by the United Free Church 
of Scotland, are located in Kaffraria, Cape Colony. There is a Women's Asso- 
ciation auxiliary to the Missionary Committee of the Presbyterian Church of South 
Africa, contributing, in 1909, 241 for native missions. The Secretary is Mrs. 
Marie Smith, 2 Lodge Road, Kimberley, Cape Colony.) 

REFORMED: 

DUTCH REFORMED CHURCH OF SOUTH AFRICA (1824). 

Chairman of General Mission Committee: Rev. Prof. J. Marais, D.D., 
Stellenbosch, Cape Colony. 

General Mission Secretary: Rev. A. C. Murray, B.A., Stellenbosch, Cape 
Colony. 

Object: The evangelization of native races within and without the bor- 
ders of Cape Colony. 

Income: 13,500 (average for three years). This amount, raised in Cape 
Colony alone, is expended exclusively in the fields mentioned below. 

Organs: "Almanak voor de Nederduitsch Gereformeerde Kerk" (pub- 
lished annually), "De Kerkbode." 

Fields: South Africa (Cape Colony, Transvaal), Southern Central Africa 
(Bechuanaland Protectorate, Southern Rhodesia, Nyasaland). 

(NOTE: The Dutch Reformed Church of South Africa officially entered upon mission 
work in 1824, in connection with the establishment of its first Synod. Its foreign 
mission work, that is, missions outside the bounds of Cape Colony, was organized 
in 1857. The following explanatory statements are made on the basis of informa- 
tion kindly forwarded by the Rev. J. du Plessis, B.D., formerly the Secretary of 
the Missions of the Synod of Oape Colony, and now Editor of its official organ, 
"De Kerkbode." The Synod of Cape Colony is known as the Dutch Reformed 
Church of South Africa. Its missionary operations are directed through a Gen- 
eral Mission Committee working by means of three Sub-Committees, that for 
Home Missions, that is, for colored people within Cape Colony, for Foreign Mis- 
sions south of the Zambesi River, and for Foreign Missions north of the Zambesi 
River, in Nyasaland. There are three auxiliaries, the Women's Missionary Union, 
the Men's Missionary Union, otherwise known as the Laymen's Movement, and, 
lastly, the Children s Missionary Circles. The Dutch Reformed Church of the 
Orange Free State, with separate Synod, directs its missionary operations through 
the Synodical Committee tot Home Missions, which provides for the native races 
within the Orange Free State, and a Synodical Mission Committee for Foreign 
Missions which functions with reference to the Nyasaland field. The auxiliaries 
are similar to those for the Synod of Cape Colony. The Dutch Reformed Church 
of the Transvaal directs its missionary operations through the Synodical Mis- 
sionary Committee, which controls the work both within and without the limits 
of the Transvaal. The same kinds of auxiliaries are active, as in the case of the other 
two Synods. The title "Dutch Reformed Church of South Africa" as applying to the 
Church of Cape Colony alone is sometimes a cause of misunderstanding. This 
name dates from a time anterior to the settlement of the territories now known as 
the Orange Free State and the Transvaal. The original Church retained the 
original name, never altering it to Dutch Reformed Church of Cape Colony. If 
this ia borne in mind, all difficulty vanishes.) 

WOMEN'S MISSIONARY UNION OF SOUTH AFRICA [VROUWEN ZENDING- 

BOND VAN ZtJID AFRIKA] (1888). 
. Secretary: Mrs. A. M. de Vos, Stellenbosch, Cape Colony. 
Object: The evangelization of native races, and work among lapsed masses. 
Income: 6,000. 
Organ: "Koningabode." 

Fields: South Africa (Cape Colony, Orange Free State, Transvaal), Southern Central 
Africa (Rhodesia, Nyasaland). 

(NOTE: Auxiliary to the General Mission Committee of the Dutch Reformed Church 
of South Africa.) 

DUTCH REFORMED CHURCH OF SOUTH AFRICA TRANSVAAL 

SYNOD (1853). 
Secretary of Mission Board: Rev. N. H. Theunissen, Standerton, 

Transvaal. 

Object: The evangelization of native races. 
Income: 2,500 (excluding amounts raised or received by the native 

congregations themselves). 

Organ: "Almanak voor de Nederduitsch Gereformeerde Kerk." 
Fields: South Africa (Transvaal), Southern Central Africa (Nyasaland), 

Portuguese East Africa. 

DUTCH REFORMED CHURCH OF SOUTH AFRICA SYNOD OF ORANGE 

FREE STATE (1865). 
Secretary of Mission Board: Rev. A. J. Malherbe, Dewetsdorp, Orange 

Free State. 

Object: The evangelization of native races. 
Income: 3,000 (the income only of the Mission Board). 
Organ: "Almanak voor de Nederduitsch Gereformeerde Kerk." 
Fields: South Africa (Orange Free State), Southern Central Africa 
(Rhodesia). 

(NOTE: By the new Constitution for United South Africa, the Orange River Colony 
becomes again the Orange Free State.) 

SENDING SOCIETIES NOT DENOMINATIONAL: 

BRITISH AND FOREIGN BIBLE SOCIETY (1804). 
(See under England.) 

BRITISH AND FOREIGN BIBLE SOCIETY, CAPE AUXILIARY (1823). 

Secretary: Rev. G. P. Van der Merwe, P. O. Box 215, Capetown, Cape Colony. 
Object: The circulation of the Scriptures in every written language, at a price 

which the poorest can afford. 
Income: From sales, 1,907; free contributions, 745; total, 2,652. All of this 

money is remitted to the London Committee of the British and Foreign Bible 

Society. 

Organ: "The Bible in the World." 
Fields: South Africa (Cape Colony), Southern Central Africa, German South-west 

Africa. 
(NOTE: The operations of this auxiliary extend throughout an area of 874,000 

square miles, with a population, native and foreign, of 2,731,000. Arrangements 

have been made whereby the Society's publications can be purchased in every 

country village, at South African catalogue prices. In 1898, 32,430 copies of the 

Scriptures were circulated, in 37 languages.) 

BRITISH AND FOREIGN BIBLE SOCIETY, CENTRAL SOUTH AFRICAN AGENCY 

(1903). 

Secretary: Rev. George Lowe, P. O. Box 639, Johannesburg, Transvaal. 
Object: The circulation of the Scriptures in numerous languages. 
Income: 450. This sum was remitted to the London Committee of the British 

and Foreign Bible Society, in 1908. 
Organ: "The Bible in the World." 
Fields: South Africa (Transvaal, Orange Free State), Southern Central Africa 

(Southern Rhodesia), Portuguese East Africa. 
(NOTE: There were 34,686 copies of the ^Scriptures, in 68 languages, circulated 

during 1907. The area reached by this agency equals 552,639 square miles, 

including a population, native and foreign, of 1,879,741.) 

BRITISH AND FOREIGN BIBLE SOCIETY, NATAL AGENCY (1904). 
Secretary: Rev. J. Baptist Rose, 157 West St., Durban, Natal. 
Object: The circulation of the Scriptures in various languages. 
Income: 170. This amount was forwarded to the London Committee of the 

British and Foreign Bible Society, in 1908. 
Organ: "The Bible in the World." 
Field: South Africa (Natal, Zululand). 

(NOTE : The area reached by this agency equals 35,300 square miles, and includes 
a popu|ation, native and foreign, of 1,097,000. About ten thousand copies of 
the Scriptures were circulated during 1907.) 



Africa 



DIRECTORY OF MISSIONARY SOCIETIES 



59 



BIRMINGHAM YOUNG MEN'S FOREIGN MISSION SOCIETY (1876). 
(See under England.) 

IKWEZI LAMACI MISSION (1876). 

Director in Africa: Rev. Samuel Aitcheson, Ikwczi Lamaci Mission, Harding, 

Alfred Co., Natal. 

Object: The evangelization of the Kaffirs. 
Income: 700. 
Field: South Africa (Natal). 

(NOTE: The Ikwezi Lamaci Mission is aided by contributions raised by the Young 
Men's Foreign Mission Society _ of Birmingham, England, which see under Eng- 
land, and by a Ladies' Committee in Birmingham. It also receives donations 
from friends in Natal, and some government school grants. The Mission was 
formerly s part of the Unsectarian Mission to Zulu Kaffirs, but in 1877 it was 
banded over to the Birmingham Y. M. C. A., and named the Ikwezi Lamaci, or 
"Morning Star to the Amaci," Mission.) 

SOUTH AFRICA GENERAL MISSION (1889). 
President: Rev. Andrew Murray, Wellington, Cape Colony. 
Secretary: Arthur Mercer, Esq., 17 Homefield Road. Wimbledon, London, 

S. W., England. 
Superintendent in South Africa: Mr. James Middlemiss, Box 988, Capetown, 

Cape Colony. 
Object: To evangelize the heathen, to rouse the Christian Church to a 

holier life, and to aid existing evangelical missions and churches. 
Income: 15,242. Balances amounting to 1,210 are carried forward 

from the previous year, and included. 
Organ: "South African Pioneer." 
Fields: South and Central Africa. 

(NOTE: Formerly called the Cape General Mission, but organized as the South Africa 
General Mission in 1894. See also insertion under English Section. In connec- 
tion with the Mission is the Praying Band of the South Africa General Mission, 
an undenominational union for prayer, Bible study, Christian fellowship, and 
work.) 

SOUTH AFRICAN COMPOUNDS AND INTERIOR MISSION (1896). 

Honorary Director: A. W. Baker, Esq., 43 Corrie St., Jeppestown, Johan- 
nesburg, Transvaal. 

Secretary: Mr. W. J. Kerr, Box 2815, Johannesburg, Transvaal. 

Object: The evangelization of native men employed at the Johannesburg 
Gold Mines, in order that they may carry the Gospel to their various 
tribes; and also the maintenance of evangelistic work in fields which 
are not already occupied. 

Income: 4,000. 

Organ: "Africa's Golden Harvests." 

Fields: South Africa (Transvaal, Natal), Portuguese East Africa, British 
East Africa. 

(NOTE: There is an Australian Central Council, which furnishes information in regard 
to this Mission, and acts as a collecting agency for it. See under Australian Section 
of Directory.) 

SUDAN UNITED MISSION (1904). 

(See under England, and under United States.) 

SOUTH AFRICAN COUNCIL OF THE SUDAN UNITED MISSION (1904). 

Honorary Joint Secretaries: Rev. C. T. Wood, M.A., Wellington, Cape Colony; 

Dr. R. H. Fallon, 87 Somerset Road, Capetown, Cape Colony. 
Object: The evangelization of Northern Nigeria, especially the Benue District. 
Income: 500. 
Organ: "The Lightbearer." 
Field: Western Africa (Northern Nigeria). 

Cooperating and Collecting Societies 
BAPTIST: 

JATAL BAPTIST ASSOCIATION (1899). 

Secretary: Mr. R. A. Barton, Southern Life Buildings, Durban, Natal. 
Object: To organize churches for European residents, and to create and 

direct native missions in South Africa. 
Income: Missionary income, 100 P er annum. 
Field: South Africa (Carey Mission in Durban, Natal). 

.UTHERAN: 

HERMAN EVANGELICAL LUTHERAN SYNOD OF BRITISH SOUTH 

AFRICA (1861). 

Secretary: Pastor G. W. Wagener, Capetown, Cape Colony. 
Object: To cooperate with and contribute to the foreign missionary 
societies of Germany. 



Income: 0,000 Mk. 

Organ: "Siidafrikanische Gemeindeblatt." 

Field: South Africa. 

GERMAN EVANGELICAL LUTHERAN CHURCH OF GERMAN SOUTH- 
WEST AFRICA (1901). 

Official Address: Pastor Hammer, Windhoek, German Southwest Africa. 
Object: Missions among German colonists and natives. 
Income: No statement at hand. 
Field: German South- West Africa. 

(NOTE: Fourteen German congregations and preaching stations have been founded 
since 1901. The work is growing, and interest in the natives is increasing.) 

GERMAN EVANGELICAL LUTHERAN CHURCH OF NATAL, SOUTH 

AFRICA ( ). 

Official Address: Pastor Gustav Asmus, Hermannsburg, Natal. 
Object: Mission work among German colonists and natives. 
Income: No statement at hand. 

Field: South Africa (Natal, Transvaal in the territory of the Hermanns- 
burg Missionary Society, where there are 12 German pastorates). 

COOPERATING SOCIETIES NOT DENOMINATIONAL: 

SOUTH AFRICAN TRACT AND BOOK SOCIETY (1840). 
Honorary Secretary: Mr. W. Watts, P. O. Box 215, Capetown, Cape 

Colony. 

Object: The dissemination of Christian literature in South Africa. 
Income: 300 (derived entirely from sales in Cape Colony). 
Field: South Africa (Cape Colony). 

(NOTE: Aided by the Religious Tract Society of London.) 

STUDENT VOLUNTEER MOVEMENT IN SOUTH AFRICA (1893). 
Chairman: Rev. Clinton T. Wood, M.A., Wellington, Cape Colony. 
Secretary: Mr. C. R. Kotze, Theological Seminary, Stellenbosch, Cape 

Colony. 
Object: To gain recruits for the^mission field; to encourage the study of 

missions; and to quicken the interest in missions among students in 

South Africa. 
Income: 340. (This is the income raised for the missionary work of 

the Students' Christian Association of South Africa.) 
Organ: "The Christian Student." 
Fields: Volunteers are working in South Africa, Central Africa, the Sudan, 

China, and Ceylon. The recruiting ground, where the real work of 

the Volunteer Movement is done, is limited to the schools and colleges 

of South Africa. 

(NOTE: The Students/ Christian Association, of which the Student Volunteer Move- 
ment in South Africa has been made the Missionary Department, supports a mis- 
sionary in Nyasaland, for which purpose it collected 250; in cooperation with 
other societies, it supports orphans in India, for which object it collected about 80; 
and it collected for general administration about 10. Total income of Missionary 
Department, 340. See Students' Christian Association of South Africa.) 

STUDENTS' CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION OF SOUTH AFRICA (1896). 
General Secretary: Rev. G. B. A. Gerdener, Stellenbosch, Cape Colony. 
Object: The development of the Christian life, and the quickening of 

interest in missions among the students of South Africa. 
Income: 340, contributed for missions. 
Organ: "The Christian Student." 
Fields: Those of the missionary societies to which contributions are sent. 

(NOTE: The Association supports thirty children in an orphanage of the Christian 
and Missionary Alliance at Kaira, Gujarat, India, and one ordained missionary in 
Nyasaland, Africa. The Student Volunteer Movement in South Africa has been 
constituted the Missionary Department of the Students' Christian Association 
of South Africa.) 

OHLANGE CHRISTIAN INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL (1899). 

Founder and Director: Mr. John L. Dube, Ohlange, Phoenix, Natal. 
Secretary: Mr. Charles L. Dube, Ohlange, Phoenix, Natal. 
Object: To train Christian leaders among the Zulu people. 
Income: 500 to 600 a year. 
Organ: "Ilanga Lase Natal." 
Field: South Africa (Natal). 



SOCIETIES IN OTHER SECTIONS OF AFRICA 



Societies Sending and Appointing Missionaries 
BAPTIST: 

IATIVE BAPTIST UNION OF WEST AFRICA (1899). 

Secretary: Rev. Mark C. Hayford, D.D., F.R.G.S., Baptist Mission 
House, Cape Coast Town, Gold Coast, West Africa. 

Object: To win Africa for Christ, through the preaching of the Gospel, 
and to improve the social and moral condition of her peoples, by means 
of education, intellectual, industrial, and moral. 

Income: 631. 

Organ: "The West African Christian Advocate." 

Field: Western Africa (Gold Coast, with its Hinterland, Yorubaland, 
Lagos Country, and Iboland, Southern Nigeria). 

(NOTE: The evangelistic mission work of the Native Baptist Church of West Africa 
was begun in 1888, by the Rev. Mojola Agbebi, D.D., the President of the Native 
Baptist Union of West Africa, at Lagos. The Native' Baptist Union was con- 
stituted in 1899.) 

:HURCH OF ENGLAND: 

IIERRA LEONE NATIVE PASTORATE AUXILIARY ASSOCIATION 
(1862). 

Honorary Association Secretary: Rev. D. J. Coker, M.A., L.Th., Water- 
loo, Sierra Leone. 

Honorary Corresponding Secretary: Rev. Canon M. Wilson, M.A., Free- 
town, Sierra Leone. 

Object: To raise funds for the general purposes of the Sierra Leone Native 
Pastorate. 

Income: 2,629. (The amount reported by the Sierra Leone Native 
Pastorate for 1907-08.) 



Field: West Africa. 

(NOTE: In connection with the Sierra Leone Native Church. The Sierra Leone Native 
Pastorate Auxiliary Association w_as formed to commemorate the transfer, in 1861, 
of the Churches of the Colony, hitherto supported by the Church Missionary So- 
ciety, to the Native Pastorate.) 

SIERRA LEONE CHURCH MISSIONS (1876). 

Secretary: Rev. Canon O. Moore, Freetown, Sierra Leone. 

Object: The support of pastors, churches, and schools, in connection with 

the Sierra Leone Church, and of missions to non-Christian Africans in 

the Bullom and Mendi countries. 
Income: 1,294, reported for the year 1906-07, as received in Africa for 

the Sierra Leone Church Missions. 
Field: Western Africa (Bullom and Mendi countries, and the Hinterland 

of Sierra Leone). 

(NOTE: In 1860 the Sierra Leone Church was organized on an independent basis, and 
undertook the support of its own pastors, churches, and schools, aided by a small 
grant from the Church Missionary Society, which ceased in 1890. In 1876 it took 
over the Church Missionary Society missions in the Bullom and Mendi countries, 
and in 1908 it assumed responsibility for work in the Hinterland.) 

LAGOS DISTRICT COUNCIL AND MISSIONS (1876). 
Secretary: Rt. Rev. Isaac Oluwole, D.D., Lagos, West Africa. 
Object: The evangelization of the non-Christian people of the Yoruba 

Country. 
Income: 8.057. This amount includes the contributions of the Lagos 

District Council, and also of the adjacent Councils of Abeokuta and 

Ibadan. 
Field: Western Africa (Yoruba, in Southern Nigeria). 

(NOTE: An outgrowth of the work of the Church Missionary Society, but now inde- 
pendently supported, by Africans. There are about 3,000 Christiana connected 
with the Lagos District Council, but this number is largely exceeded In their mis- 
sions in the Ijebu Country, where there are 9,000 baptized converts ) 



60 



WORLD ATLAS OF CHRISTIAN MISSIONS 



Africa-South America 



NIGER DELTA PASTORATE (1892). 
Secretary: Rev. J. A. Pratt, L.Th., Pastorate Station. St. Paul's. Opobo, 

W. C. Africa. 

Object: To evangelize the non-Christian people in Nigeria. 
Income: 2,335. 

Organ: "The Delta Pastorate Chronicle." 
Field: Western Africa (Southern Nigeria). 

(NOTE: An outgrowth of the work of the Church Missionary Society of England, but 
for twenty years the Pastorate has been self-supporting and self-governing, and it 
has recently taken up missionary work in Iboland, in the interior of the country. 
The operations of the Niger Delta Pastorate are carried on entirely by Africans, 
without assistance from English missionaries, except that rendered by occasional 
visits from the Bishop of the Diocese. There is a church of 3,200 baptized mem- 
bers, ministered to by seven African clergy.) 

SYNOD OF THE DIOCESE OF UGANDA (1909). 
Bishop of the Diocese: Rt. Rev. Alfred Robert Tucker, D.D., Mengo, 
Uganda, East Africa. 

(NOTE: In April, 1909, some forty clergy and two hundred and fifty lay delegates 
met in Synod at Mengo to adopt a Constitution for the Uganda Church. In con- 
nection with the adoption of the Constitution, there were established a Synod, a 
Diocesan Council, District Councils, Parochial Councils, a Central Women's Con- 
ference, District Women's Conferences, a Tribunal of Appeal, and a Tribunal of 
Reference, the electors being the communicants of the Church of Uganda, male 
and female, of whom there are eighteen thousand. In connection with the Diocesan 
Council, a Board of Missions has been formed, which reports to the Council. This 
action is too recent to allow of any data being collected, but we shall hope in some 
future edition of the Atlas to record the work of this new African Board of Missions.) 

CONGREGATIONAL: 

ISAN-EMIN-BOLANA KOMITY [MALAGASY MISSIONARY SOCIETY] 

(1869). 
Secretaries: Mr. J. Sims, Antananarivo, Madagascar; Pastor Rainitiaray, 

Amparibe, Antananarivo, Madagascar. 

Object: To send Malagasy evangelists to the people of the coast regions 
of Madagascar, and among the unevangelized tribes in the northern 
part of the island. 
Income: 440. 
Field: Madagascar. 

(NOTE: The income is almost entirely contributed by the Malagasy churches in con- 
nection with the Imerina Congregational Union of Madagascar, an exclusively 
native organization. The Isan^Einin-Bolana Komity is the largest native mis- 
sionary society in Madagascar, and sends out twelve evangelists. 

LUTHERAN: 

EVANGELICAL LUTHERAN CHURCH OF ALGERIA, NORTH AFRICA 

(1842). 

Official Address: Evangelical Lutheran Pastor, Algiers, North Africa. 
Object: Colonial and native missions in Algeria and the Sahara Desert, 

where 180 congregations and preaching stations are served. 
Income: No statement at hand. 
Fields: North Africa (Algeria and the Sahara Desert). 

GERMAN EVANGELICAL LUTHERAN CHURCH IN EGYPT (1856). 
Official Address: Pastor Dr. Kahle, Cairo, Egypt. 
Object: Missionary and charitable work among German colonists and 

natives. 

Income : No statement at hand. 

Organ: "Gemeindeblatt fur die evangelischen Gemeinden." 
Field: Egypt. 



GERMAN EVANGELICAL LUTHERAN CHURCH OF GERMAN EAS1 

AFRICA (1898). 

Official Address: Pastor Kriebel, Dar-es-Salam, German East Africa. 
Object: Missions to German colonists and natives. 
Income: No statement at hand. 
Field: German East Africa. 

(NoTH: Eight German congregations and preaching stations have been founded 
since 1885. They are growing, and their interest in the natives increasing.) 

SENDING SOCIETIES NOT DENOMINATIONAL: 

NORTH AFRICA MISSION (1881). 

(For information regarding this Mission, see under England.) 

ALGIERS MISSION BAND (1888). 

Secretary: Miss I. Lilias Trotter, 2 Rue du Croissant, Algiers, Algeria. 
Object: Evangelistic work among the Arabs. 
Income: 300. This represents the amount received from sources in 

England, but the expenses of the Mission are largely provided from 

the private incomes of the Committee on the field. 
Organ: A Journal for private circulation. 
Field: North-west Africa (Algeria). 

(NOTE: The organization of the Algiers Mission Band consists of a Committee in Algiers, 
made uj> of the three senior workers of the Mission, who are responsible from their 
private incomes for its expenses. The Woman's Algerian Mission Band, which sec 
under United States, aids the Algiers Mission Band.) 

MISSION TO SPANIARDS IN ALGERIA AND IVIZA (1889). 

Director: Mr. T. W. Speare, Maison Soler, Rue Cavalier de la Salle, Bab- 

el-Oued, Algiers, North Africa. 
Object: Evangelistic work among Spaniards in Algiers, and in Iviza, 

one of the Balearic Islands. 
Income: -Supported entirely by private funds. 
Fields: North Africa (Algiers), Balearic Islands (Iviza). 

EGYPT GENERAL MISSION (1897). 

(For information regarding this Mission, which was formerly called 
the Egypt Mission Band, see under England.) 

SUDAN PIONEER MISSION (1900). 

(For information regarding this Mission, see under Germany.) 

BETHEL ORPHANAGE FAITH MISSION (1901). 

Secretary: Miss Mary A. Lyons, Port Said, Egypt. 

American Secretary: Mrs. Marian A. Vansant, 720 South Broadway, Los 
Angeles, California. 

Object: To bring the Mohammedans to a saving knowledge of Christ, 
and to save the children from a life of vice and sin, training them, 
with God's help, to be missionaries and Bible-women among their 
own people, and giving them a thorough Arabic and English education. 

Income : $600, from the United States, England, and Egypt. 

Field: North-east Africa (Egypt). 

(NOTE : There is an American Board of Trustees for the Bethel Orphanage, which gives 
advice, and collects funds for the Mission.) 

NILE MISSION PRESS (1905). 

Superintendent: Mr. Arthur T. Upson, Boulac Road, Cairo, Egypt. 

(NOTE: For full entry of Nile Mission Press, see under England. The average annual 
circulation of books and tracts by this Press during the four years from 1905 to 
1908, inclusive, was about 20,000. The total circulation up to the end of 1908 
was 78,852 volumes, large and small.) 



SOUTH AMERICAN SOCIETIES 



ARGENTINE REPUBLIC 
Society Appointing and Sending Missionaries 

LUTHERAN: 

SYNODE DER DEUTSCHEN EVANGELISCHEN GEMEINDEN IN DEN 
LA PLATA-STAATEN [SYNOD OF THE GERMAN EVANGELICAL 
CONGREGATIONS OF THE REPUBLICS OF THE LA PLATA 
RIVER] (1903). 

Secretary: Pastor C. Kruger, Esperanza de Santa Fe\ 

Object: Mission work among seamen, German immigrants, Roman 
Catholics, and non-Christian peoples. 

Income: 2,000 Mk. 

Organ: "Evangelische Gemeindeblatt fur die La Plata Staaten." 

Field: South America (Argentine Republic, Uruguay, Paraguay). 

SENDING SOCIETY NOT DENOMINATIONAL: 

MISION EVANGELICA, BUENOS AYRES, ARGENTINE REPUBLIC (1897). 
Director: Rev. F. Lister Newton, Buenos Ayres. 
Honorary Treasurer and Representative in England: Mr. George A. Angus, 

99 Balfour Road Highbury, New Park, London, N. 
Object: Evangelistic work in Argentine Republic. 
Income : No statement at hand. 
Field: South America (Argentine Republic). 

BRAZIL 
Societies Appointing and Sending Missionaries 

LUTHERAN: 

MISSIONARY SOCIETY OF THE GERMAN EVANGELICAL GENERAL 

SYNOD OF RIO GRANDE DO SUL (1907). 
Official Address: Pastor Lechler, Santa Cruz. 
Object: The evangelization of the natives of Brazil. 
Income: 4,000 Mk. 
Organ: "Missionsfreund." 
Field: South America (Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil). 



GUSTAV ADOLPH SOCIETY OF RIO GRANDE DO SUL (1908). 

President: Dr. Rotermund, Sao Leopoldo. 

Object: Evangelical missionary work in Rio Grande do Sul. 

Income: No statement at hand. 

Field: South America (Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil). 

(NOTE: There are eight German Evangelical Lutheran Synods in Brazil, and one which 
includes the Republics of the La Plata River, and another in Chile. In all, there 
are 170 Lutheran missionaries, 464 churches and preaching stations, and 589 pa- 
rochial schools, conducted by German, Scandinavian, and English Lutherans, in 
South America. The three Synods of Rio Grande do Sul unite in conducting 
a college, a seminary to educate teachers, _a ladies' seminary, a Home for the 
Aged, an orphanage, a Gustav Adolph Society, a recently organized missionary 
society, and a Mother-House for Deaconesses. There are also orphanages under 
the care of the La Plata and Chile Synods. The 770,000 German and Scandinavian 
Lutherans in South America have established eight Church papers, three publishing 
houses, and many libraries.) 

PRESBYTERIAN: 

GENERAL ASSEMBLY OF THE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH OF BRAZIL 

(1910). 

Moderator: Rev. Alvaro Reis, Rio de Janeiro. 

Object: The advancement of evangelical religion in Brazil, and the pro- 
motion of the growth of a national Presbyterian Church. 

Income: No income is as yet reported. The average annual contribu- 
tions of the churches of the Synod, from 1904 to 1906, which repre- 
sents church support largely, but was also in part for missions, was 
about $33,000 (U. S. gold). 

Field: South America (Brazil). 

(NOTE: The Presbyterian Synod of Brazil was formed in 1888. For greater efficiency 
and convenience of administration, it was divided recently into a Synod of the 
South of Brazil, and a Synod of the North of Brazil. A General Assembly repre- 
senting the two Synods met at Rio de Janeiro, in January, 1910, In 1-903, wnen 
the Presbyterian Synod of Brazil was as yet not divided into North and South, 
a divergence of opinion arose on certain questions of organization and method, 
especially as to the attitude the Synod should take toward Free Masonry, which 
resulted in the withdrawal of a group of ministers and elders, who favored a resolu- 
tion condemning Free Masonry as incompatible with Christian loyalty, a deliverance 
which the Synod declined to adopt, preferring to leave the question to the decision 
of each individual conscience. This withdrawal resulted in the formation of the 
Independent Presbyterian Church of Brazil, with a Synod of its own. This latter 
reports three presbyteries, fourteen ordained ministers, sixty-one churches, and 
about five thousand communicants. The General Assembly reports two synods, 
seven presbyteries, fifty ordained ministers, ninety churches, and about ten thou- 
sand communicants. The old Synod of Brazil did much missionary service, which 
of late has been assumed by the presbyteries. The General Assembly of the Pres- 
byterian Church of Brazil will no doubt perfect its plans for continued activity 
in missionary endeavor.) 



South America-Central America 



DIRECTORY OF MISSIONARY SOCIETIES 



61 



Cooperating and Collecting Societies 

LUTHERAN: 

DIAKONISSENMUTTERHAUS FUR RIO GRANDE DO SUL [DEACON- 
ESSES' MOTHER-HOUSE FOR RIO GRANDE DO SUL] (1910). 
Official Address: Dr. Pechmann, Hamburger Berg, Rio Grande do Sul. 
Object: To train deaconesses for German missionary work in South 

America. 

Income: No statement at hand. 
Field: South America (Rio Grande do Sul and Santa Catharina, Brazil). 

DEUTSCHE SYNODALSCHULE IN SANTA CRUZ [GERMAN SYNODICAL 

COLLEGE OF SANTA CRUZ] ( ). 
President: Pastor Sellins, Santa Cruz, Rio Grande do Sul. 
Object: To educate pastors and missionaries for German missionary 

work in South America. 
Income : No statement, at hand. 
Field: South America (Brazil). 

COOPERATING SOCIETIES NOT DENOMINATIONAL: 

MACKENZIE COLLEGE, SAO PAULO, BRAZIL (1892). 
President: Horace M. Lane, M.D., LL.D., SSo Paulo. 
Object: To provide a high grade educational institution for Brazilians, 

and to prepare young men for the study of theology, with a view to 

their serving as ministers of the Gospel, and, also, to train young 

women to be Christian teachers. 
Income: $88,173. Of this amount $5,186 was received from the United 

States, and $82,987 was earned through the College and schools. 
Field: South America (State of SSo Paulo, Brazil). 

(NOTE: The College was incorporated by the Board of Regents of the University of 
the State of New York, in 1890, but was not opened until 1892. It is under the 
control of a Board of Trustees in New York, for entry of which see under the United 
States. Protestant educational institutions are growing rapidly in efficjency and 
influence in Brazil. All the missi9ns are giving special attention to this important 
department of missionary operations. The Methodists stand in the front rank 
of this line of work. Mackenzie College occupies a leading position, and represents 
the pioneer efforts of the Presbyterian Board of Foreign Missions, which have been 
ably followed up and developed, under the fostering care of Dr. Lane.) 

SEAMAN'S MISSION (1906). 

Superintendent: Rev. C. H. Tucker, Caixa 454, Rio de Janeiro. 

Object: To promote the religious, moral, and social welfare of sailors 
arriving at the port of Rio de Janeiro. 

Income: $2,317. This amount was received in part from the American 
Seamen's Friend Society, of New York, and in part from local con- 
tributions. The Chaplain, Rev. Joseph Parkin, is supported by the 
Methodist Board of Missions of the South. In addition to the above 
income, a special sum of $777 was subscribed for a motor launch. 

Field: South America (Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, and its harbor). 



Object: The support of missions to the Indian tribes within the Colony 
of British Guiana, and the propagation of the Gospel among the East 
Indian and other Asiatic immigrants. Also, to aid in the religious, 
educational, and philanthropic work of the Diocese of Guiana. 

Income: $4,391 (gold). Of this amount $382 represents the grant of the 
Society toward the,, missions to Indian tribes, and to East Indian and 
other immigrants within the Colony. 

Field: South America (Diocese of Guiana). 

(NOTE: A special Committee of the Diocesan Church Society, called the East Indian 
Committee, administers the funds of the British Guiana Missions to East Indian 
and Chinese Immigrants. The population of British Guiana is estimated as approx- 
imately 300,000. Of this number about 115,000 are of African descent, 106,000 
are East Indians, and, in addition, there are 4,000 Chinese, and 8,000 aboriginal 
Indians. The remainder are of European and mixed races. The Diocese of Guiana 
is, therefore, largely missionary.) 

BRITISH GUIANA MISSIONS TO EAST INDIAN AND CHINESE IMMIGRANTS (1873). 
Secretary: The Very Rev. E. Sloman, Dean of Georgetown, Demerara, British 

Guiana. 
Object: To train catechists, to maintain missionaries and catechists, and to supply 

suitable books for the Missions to East Indian and Chinese Immigrants. 
Income: $6.352 (gold). 
Field: South America (Diocese .of Guiana). 

(NOTE: As the Missions to East Indian and Chinese Immigrants have now been 
taken over by the Synod of Guiana, the proper official to address in the future 
will probably be the Synod Secretary, Church House, Georgetown, Demerara, 
British Guiana.) 

LUTHERAN: 

EVANGELICAL LUTHERAN CHURCH OF BRITISH GUIANA (1743). 
Official Address: Pastor John R. Mittelholzer, New Amsterdam. 
Object: Mission work among the colonists and aboriginal Indians (the 

Arawaks and Acawaios). 
Income: No statement at hand. 
Field: South America (British Guiana). 

(NOTE: The date 1743 represents the time when Lutherans from the Netherlands 
began this missionary service for colonists and natives. Since Pastor Mittelholzer, 
of Dutch Guiana, took charge, in 1878, the work has developed, and now reports 
six stations, and five hundred baptized church members. The Mission is in affilia- 
tion with the General Synod of the Lutheran Church in North America.) 

METHODIST: 

WESLEYAN METHODIST MISSIONARY SOCIETY (1813). 

(See under England.) 

BRITISH GUIANA DISTRICT AUXILIARY OF THE WESLEYAN METHODIST 

MISSIONARY SOCIETY (1853). 

Chairman and General Superintendent: Rev. E. Donald Jones, Georgetown. 
Object: The furtherance of evangelistic missions, not only among the colonists and 
the Negroes, but also among East Indian coolies, and South American Indians. 
Income: 7,325. (From home sources 259; from local contributions 7,066.) 
Field: South America (British Guiana). 

Cooperating and Collecting Society 



INSTITUTO CENTRAL DO POVO [PEOPLE'S CENTRAL INSTITUTE] CONGREGATIONAL* 

Director: Rev. E. E. Vann, 21 Rua do Acre, Rio de Janeiro. 

Object: Evangelistic, educational, medical, and philanthropic service. 

Income: $7,186. 

Field: South America (Rio de Janeiro and vicinity). 



CONGREGATIONAL UNION OF BRITISH GUIANA (1883). 
Secretary: Rev. H. Algernon, Ithaca, Berbice. 
Object: To aid the Congregational Churches of British Guiana in their 

missionary work. 
Income: No statement at hand. 
Field: South America (British Guiana). 



CHILE 
Society Appointing and Sending Missionaries 

LUTHERAN: 

DEUTSCHE EVANGELISCHE SYNODE VON CHILE [GERMAN EVAN- 
GELICAL SYNOD OF CHILE] (1906). 
Secretary: Pastor Mehl, Concepcion. 
Object: Missionary work among seamen, German immigrants, Roman 

Catholics, and non-Christians, in Chile. 
Income: $1,500. 

Organ: "Deutsch-Evangelisch in Chile." 
Field: South America (Chile). 

GUIANA (BRITISH) 
Societies Appointing and Sending Missionaries 
CHURCH OF ENGLAND: 

GUIANA DIOCESAN CHURCH SOCIETY (1852). 
Honorary Secretary: Rev. A. M. Hale, B.A., Met-en-Meerzorg, Demerara. 



GUIANA (DUTCH) 
Society Appointing and Sending Missionaries 
LUTHERAN: 

EVANGELICAL LUTHERAN CHURCH OF DUTCH GUIANA (1742). 
Official Address: Pastor C. Haekstra, Paramaribo. 
Object: Mission work among colonists and natives in Dutch Guiana. 
Income: No statement at hand. 
Field: South America (Dutch Guiana). 

(NOTE: Evangelistic work was begun when the first sermon was preached there by the 
Bev. John Pfaff, on November 18, 1742. A prosperous orphanage, and other Inner 
Mission work are maintained in Paramaribo. There are three thousand bap- 
tized members.) 

MISSIONARY WORK OF THE SOUTH AMERICAN CHURCHES. 

(NOTE: The work of the principal missionary societies serving in South America has 
been fruitful in establishing indigenous churches, which in several instances have 
been organized into assemblies, synods, presbyteries, conferences, conventions, and 
dioceses. These churches are engaged in missionary work, and conduct operations 
upon a considerable scale. Their missionary efforts, however, are not sufficiently 
organized to enable us to list them in the Directory. They are worthy of all 
commendation, and reveal a missionary spirit of much earnestness and sacrificial 
devotion.) 



CENTRAL AMERICAN AND MEXICAN SOCIETIES 



Societies Appointing and Sending Missionaries 



CHURCH OF ENGLAND : 



(NOTE: The population of the Colony of British Honduras is 42,406, and that of 
Central America over 4,400,000, consisting of representatives from almost every 
country in the world. The Indians number about 2,000,000, and there are also 
immigrants from Africa, India, and China. The Colony is divided into eistht mis- 
sion parishes, and scattered through Central America are about ten mission centers.) 



BRITISH HONDURAS AND CENTRAL AMERICAN CHURCH MISSION PRESBYTERIAN' 

(1883). 
Bishop of Diocese: Rt. Rev. Herbert Bury, D.D., Bishop's House, Belize, 

Honduras. 
Object: The propagation of the Gospel in the Diocese of British Honduras 

and Central America. 
Income: The Society for the Propagation of the Gospel reports in 1908 

a grant of 490 for missions in Honduras, and also a special gift of 

100 from the Marriott Bequest, for church building. No further 

information at hand. 
Field: Central America (Diocese of British Honduras and Central 

America). 



JUNTA MISSIONERA MEXICANA [MEXICAN HOME MISSION BOARD] 

(1890). 

Address: Rev. Arcadio Morales, Mexico City, Mexico. 
Object: The evangelization of Mexico. 
Income: No statement at hand. 
Field: Mexico. 



(NOTE: Official data concerning the work of the Mexican Home Mission Board have 
not been received, but the Christian Endeavor Society of the Church of Divino 
Salvador, of which the Rev. Mr. Morales is pastor, gave, in 1908, $6,611 [Mexican], 
equal to $3,305 gold, for the erection of Immanuel Chapel, in Mexico City.) 



62 



WORLD ATLAS OF CHRISTIAN MISSIONS 



West Indies 



WEST INDIAN SOCIETIES 



Societies Appointing and Sending Missionaries 

BAPTIST: 

BETHEL NATIVE BAPTIST CHURCH (1803). 

Pastor: Rev. C. A. Poitier, Nassau, N. P., Bahama Islands. 
Object: The support of a church, and the conduct of missions. 
Income: $350. 
Field: Bahama Islands (Nassau, New Providence). 

ST. JOHN'S NATIVE BAPTIST SOCIETY (1813). 
Superintendent: Rev. James W. Roberts, Nassau, N. P., Bahama Islands. 
Object: Evangelical missions, and the establishment of churches in the 

Bahamas. 
Income: $500. 
Field: Bahama Islands. 

(NoTB: St. John's Church was an offshoot from the Bethel Native Baptist Church" 
about 1813. It is self-supporting.) 

BAHAMAS BAPTIST MISSION (1833). 

Superintendent: Rev. C. A. Dann, East St., Nassau, N. P., Bahama 

Islands. 

Object: Evangelistic and church work in the Bahamas. 
Income: $1,500. 
Field: Bahama Islands. 

(NOTE: The Bahamas Baptist Mission was founded by the Baptist Missionary So- 
ciety of England, in 1833, but has now become independent and self-supporting. 
It is still in affiliated relationship with the English Society, and its stations and 
staff are entered in the Annual Report of the English Baptist Society. It represents 
a Christian community oi 6,420.) 

JAMAICA BAPTIST MISSIONARY SOCIETY (1855). 
Secretary: Rev. Ellis Fray, Duncans, Jamaica. 
Object: To preach the Gospel in the West Indies and Central America, 

and also to assist the English Baptist Society in its missions in Africa. 
Income: 1,500. 

Organ: "The Jamaica Baptist Reporter." 
Fields: Central America (Costa Rica), West Indies (Jamaica, Haiti, 

Cayman Islands), Bocas-del-Toro. 

CHURCH OF ENGLAND: 

SOCIETY FOR THE PROPAGATION OF THE GOSPEL IN FOREIGN 

PARTS (1701). 
(See under England.) 

WEST INDIAN AFRICAN MISSION (1855). 

Secretary: Rev. John S. Hughes, Saint Matthias Vicarage, Hastings, Barbados, 

British West Indies. 

Object: The furtherance of the Gospel in Western Africa. 
Income: From the West Indian Church, 400; from sources in England, 500; total, 

000. 
Field: West Africa (Rio Pongo). 

(NOTE: This Mission is also designated as the Pongas Mission. The responsibility 
of its management and maintenance devolved, in 1886, upon its English Com- 
mittee, and in 1905 the Mission came into organic relationship with the Society 
for the Propagation of the Gospel. See entry, under that Society in English 
Section of the Directory. The African work is under the supervision of the 
Bishop of Sierra Leone.) 

CHURCH MISSIONARY SOCIETY FOR AFRICA AND THE EAST (1799). 
(See under England.) 

WEST INDIES CHURCH MISSIONARY COUNCIL (1896). 
Secretary: Rev. F. H. Perkins, Stony Hill, Jamaica. 
Object: To select and train West Indian missionary agents for service in Nigeria, 

West Africa. 

Income: No statement at hand. 
Organ: "The Jamaica Churchman." 
Field: West Africa. 
(NOTE: The West Indian Council is not responsible for the support of the agents 

it selects for service in West Africa.) 

JAMAICA CHURCH OF ENGLAND HOME AND FOREIGN MISSIONARY 
SOCIETY (1861). 

Honorary Secretary: Rev. Canon Wortley, The Rectory, Half Way Tree, 
Jamaica. 

Secretary: I. R. Latreille, Esq., 3 Duke St., Kingston, Jamaica. 

Object: The religious instruction of such English people as are living 
in the outlying districts of Jamaica, where no church services or schools 
have hitherto existed; the religious instruction of the numerous 
heathen immigrants; and the support of Church of England Foreign 
Missions, especially those established on the West Coast of Africa. 

Income: 4,552. 

Organ: "Jamaica Churchman." 

Fields: Africa, West Indies (Jamaica). 

TRINIDAD DIOCESAN HOME AND FOREIGN MISSIONARY ASSOCIA- 
TION (1897). 
Bishop of Diocese: Rt. Rev. John F. Welsh, Hayes Court, Port of Spain, 

Trinidad. 
Superintendent of East Indian Work: Rev. C. B. Ragbir, St. Joseph, 

Trinidad. 
Object: To promote mission work among the East Indians and Chinese 

in Trinidad and Tobago. 
Income: No statement at hand. 
Fields: West Indies (Trinidad, Tobago), South America (Venezuela). 

(NOTE: There are 110,000 East Indians and Chinese in the Diocese of Trinidad. The 
East Indians are nearly all non-Christians. A forward movement has lately been 
begun in the work of the Church of England among the East Indians. The re- 
maining dioceses of the West Indies, namely, Antigua, Barbados, the Windward 
Islands, and Nassau, do not seem to distinguish clearly between church service 
in general and missionary effort in its more special and restricted sense. There 
is much work done in these dioceses which is missionary in spirit and aim, but no 
separate statistics are at hand. Missionary grants are made by the Society for 
the Propagation of the Gospel, and other societies in Great Britain, and additional 
grants in several instances are made by the Government. A number of educa- 
tional institutions, missionary in character, are conducted, especially Codrington 
College, in Barbados, which is in affiliation with Durham University.) 

METHODIST: 

WESLEYAN METHODIST MISSIONARY SOCIETY (1813). 
(See under England.) 

LEEWARD ISLANDS DISTRICT AUXILIARY OF THE WESLEYAN METHODIST 

MISSIONARY SOCIETY (1786). 

Chairman and General Superintendent: Rev. William Say well, St. Kitts, British 
West Indies. 



Object: The furtherance of evangelistic missions. 

Income: 7,121. (From home sources, 842; from local contributions, 6,279.) 
Fields: West Indies (Antigua, Dominica, Montserrat, St. Kitts, Nevis, St. Eustatius, 
St. Earth's, St. Martin, Anguilla, Tortola, St. Thomas). 

BARBADOS AND TRINIDAD AUXILIARY OF THE WESLEYAN METHODIST 

MISSIONARY SOCIETY (1787). 

Chairman and General Superintendent: Rev. W. J. Maund, Port of Spain, Trinidad. 
Object: The furtherance of evangelistic missions. 
Income: 13,938. 
Fields: West Indies (Barbados, Trinidad). 

JAMAICA DISTRICT AUXILIARY OF THE WESLEYAN METHODIST MISSIONARY 

SOCIETY (1789). 
Chairman and General Superintendent: Rev. W. J. Williams, Kingston P. O., 

Jamaica. 
Secretary of the District: Rev. J. Kissock Braham, B.D., Browns Town P. O., 

Jamaica. 
Object: To bring the Gospel message to bear on individual lives, and to conduct 

missionary operations in adjacent fields. 
Income: 25,889. (From home sources, 2,250; from local contributions, 

23,639.) 
Fields: West Indies (Jamaica, Bahama Islands), Panama, Canal Zone, Costa 

Rica. 

(NOTE: The Wesleyan Methodist Church in the Jamaica District has a membership 
of 21,932, with 1,439 on trial for membership.) 

HAITI AND SAN DOMINGO AUXILIARY OF THE WESLEYAN METHODIST MIS- 

SIONARY SOCIETY (1817). 
Chairman and General Superintendent: Rev. Thomas R. Picot, Port au Prince, 

Haiti. 

Object: The furtherance of evangelistic missions. 

Income: 3,149. (From home sources, 717; local contributions, 2,432.) 
Fields: West Indies (Haiti and San Domingo). 

(NOTE: Wesleyan Methodist missionaries from England settled in the West 
Indies as early as 1786. The entrance of the Society was at first bitterly op- 
posed by the white population, but the -work prospered in spite of persecution. 
Since the emancipation of the British slaves, in 1834, the work of the Mission 
has been continued with much success. In 1885 two independent conferences 
were formed, named, respectively, the Western Conference (Jamaica and Haiti 
Districts), and the Eastern Conference (Leeward Islands, Barbados and Trinidad, 
and British Guiana Districts). The Bahamas and Honduras remained under 
the control of the parent missionary society. In 1904 the Western and Eastern 
Conferences dissolved themselves, and restored the work to the control of the 
British Conference. The statistics, therefore, of Wesleyan Methodist Missions in 
the West Indies are included in the returns of the Wesleyan Methodist Missionary 
Society of Great Britain.) 

PRESBYTERIAN: 

PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH OF JAMAICA (1824). 

Secretary: Rev. Douglas A. Rothnie, M.A., Lucea, Jamaica. 

Object: To preach the Gospel, and to educate children, in Jamaica and 

Grand Cayman. 
Income: 12,653. 
Organ: "The Presbyterian." 
Fields: West Indies (Jamaica and Grand Cayman). Mission to the East 

Indians in Jamaica. 

(NOTE: In federal relation with the United Free Church of Scotland. The special 
foreign missionary work of the Presbyterian Church in Jamaica is its Mission to 
the East Indians in Jamaica, which' was organized in 1894, and of which the Rev. 
John F. Gartshore, M.A., 128 Duke St., Kingston, Jamaica, is the Superintendent. 
The statistics of this work are entered under Jamaica in the tables of this Atlas, 
but in connection with the name of the United Free Church of Scotland. 
There is a Women's Missionary Society auxiliary to the Mission Committee of the 
Presbyterian Church of Jamaica.) 

Cooperating and Collecting Societies 

BAPTIST: 

JAMAICA BAPTIST UNION (1849). 

Secretary: Rev. Philip Williams, Bethel Town P. O., Jamaica. 
Object: To strengthen and extend the work of the Baptist Churches in 

Jamaica. 
Income: 130. 

Organ: "The Jamaica Baptist Reporter." 

Fields: Jamaica, and the fields in which the Jamaica Baptist Mission- 
ary Society is at work. 

BAHAMAS BAPTIST UNION (1892). 

Superintendent: Rev. D. Wilshere, Nassau, N. P., Bahama Islands. 
Object: The extension of Christianity, and the founding of churches in 

the Bahamas. 

Income: $1,000, all from local sources. 
Field: Bahama Islands. 

(NOTE: The Bahamas Baptist Union is an independent and self-supporting mission, 
formed as an offshoot from the Bahamas Baptist Mission, in 1892. It reports a 
total communicant membership of 2,372, and a Christian community of 4,615.) 

CHRISTIAN: 

JAMAICA ASSOCIATION OF CHRISTIAN CHURCHES (1876). 
Secretary: Rev. J. E. Randall, Kingston, Jamaica. 

(NOTE: The Jamaica Association of Christian Churches is aided in its mission work 
by the Christian Woman's Board of Missions of the United States. The Christian 
Churches of Jamaica also contribute liberally toward their missionary operations. 
There are twenty-three churches connected with the Association, with a member- 
ship of nearly f9ur thousand. The date 1876 is given as representing the renewal 
of a mission which had previously been established, and seems to have been aban- 
doned, but the Christian Woman's Board of Missions decided to revive it.) 

CONGREGATIONAL : 

CONGREGATIONAL UNION OF JAMAICA (1876). 

Secretary: Rev. William Priestnal, Kingston, Jamaica. 

Object: To promote fraternal intercourse among the members of the 
Associated Churches; to extend evangelical religion in Jamaica; 
to increase the number of efficiently trained native pastors; to pro- 
mote Christian unity and cooperation with the other Churches. 

Income: 1,745. Of this amount about 300 was received in grants to 
ministers from the Colonial Missionary Society, and 11 was con- 
tributed to foreign missions. 

Field: Jamaica. 

(NOTE: The Congregational Union was organized in 1876, but the churches composing 
it were established by agents of the London Missionary Society, which entered 
Jamaica in 1834. The Union is therefore the direct result of missions, and is at 
present in connection with the Colonial Missionary Society of London.) 



West Indies-China 



DIRECTORY OF MISSIONARY SOCIETIES 



63 



METHODIST: 

UNITED METHODIST CHURCH IN JAMAICA (1907). 
District Secretary: Rev. G. L. Young, Bartons P. O., Jamaica. 

(Norn: The United Methodist Church was formed by a union of the United Methodist 
Free Church, the Methodiat New Connexion, and the Bible Christian Methodist 
Church, which was consummated at Wesley Chapel, City Road, London, England, 
on September 17, 1907. The Churches forming this Union have been long m ex- 
istence, one of them, the Methodist New Connexion, having held its first Conference 
in Leeds. England, in 1797. Another, the Bible Christian Methodist Church, dates 
from 1818; while the United Methodist Free Church was formed in 1867, by a 
union of the Wesleyan Association (1835) and the Wesleyan Reformers (1849). 
The Jamaica Mission of the United Church consists of fifty-two individual churches 
and mission stations.) 

PRESBYTERIAN: 

CHURCH OF SCOTLAND IN JAMAICA (1890). 
Address: Rev. W. Graham, Kingston, Jamaica. 

(NOTE: The Church of Scotland in Jamaica was formed into an independent presby- 
tery in 1890. Missionary operations had been conducted on the island by the 



Church of Scotland for nearly a century. The missionary efforts of the Church of 
Scotland in Jamaica form part of the activities of the churches of vhe above men- 
tioned presbytery, but no report of the work is at hand.) 

COOPERATING SOCIETY NOT DENOMINATIONAL: 

MICO TRAINING COLLEGE (1834). 

Secretary Board of Directors: Rev. W. Griffith, Kingston, Jamaica. 
Object: To conduct a normal training college for colored men in 

Jamaica. 
Income: The income is derived chiefly from the Lady Mico Charity Fund 

in England, and also from local government grants. 
Field: Jamaica. 

OTHER THAN LOCAL MISSIONS IN JAMAICA. 

(Nora: There is mission work in Jamaica by the Moravians, the Friends, the Salva- 
tion Army, the Seventh-Day Adventists, and the African Methodist Episcopal 
Church, but these missionary efforts are represented in the reports of societies 
outside of Jamaica, in connection with which the data are recorded.) 



SOCIETIES IN ASIA 



(NOTE: The miscellaneous character of the societies which are engaged in missionary work on the Continent of Asia, and the incompleteness of 
the data available, make it undesirable to attempt the classification which has been adopted in previous sections of the Directory. They are therefore 
arranged in chronological order, the geographical divisions being named in alphabetical succession. There are a number of small missions in various 
parts of Asia, concerning which definite information has not been obtainable. Most of these smaller unconnected missions were solicited for statistical 
returns and for data for the Directory. In several cases no replies were received, or the returns were unsatisfactory. Where available returns were 
received^ these have been presented. Some independently conducted educational and medical missionary institutions are also listed.) 



CHINA 

(The Mexican dollar fa equivalent to about fifty cents in United States currency) 

CANTON MEDICAL MISSIONARY SOCIETY (1838). 
Secretary of the Board of Managers: A. G. Wilson, Esq., Canton. 
Secretary of the Society: Dr. John Kirk, Canton. 
Object: To demonstrate the practical value of Christianity, combining 

the healing of the body with the preaching of the Gospel, and to assist 

in establishing Western medical science in China. 
Income: $30,000 (Mexican), equivalent to about $15,000 U. S. gold, 

from voluntary contributions made locally, and small charges from 

those who are able to pay for treatment. 
Field: China. 

(NOTE: The Hospital of the Society is located at Canton, South China, but patient! 
come from many provinces of the Chinese Empire. In 1909 there were 2,121 in- 
patients received, 2,648 surgical operations performed, and ,20,415 put-patients 
treated. In connection with the Hospital is the South China Medical College, 
under the control of the Canton Medical Missionary Society. The College is self- 
supporting, has thirty-three students enrolled, and graduated a class of seven in 
1909. A. G. Wilson, Esq., is Secretary and Treasurer. A union of the Col- 
lege with the University Medical School, Canton, is proposed, and may soon be 
consummated, under the title of the "University Union Medical College. Consult 
the entry of the University Medical School, Canton, in this section, and also under 
the United States.) 

CANTON AND HONG-KONG RELIGIOUS TRACT SOCIETY (1855). 
Honorary Secretary: Rev. Johannes Muller, Hong-kong. 
Secretary: Rev. T. W. Pearce, London Missionary Society, Hong-kong. 
Superintendent: Rev. J. Bosshard, 6 D'Aguilar St., Hong-kong. 
Object: The issuing of religious books and tracts for the Chinese. 
Income: No statement at hand. 
Field: China. 



Tract Societies were originally separate, but they 
a joint catalogue. The united societies report in 



(NOTE: The Canton and Hong-kq 

now work in unison, and publii . ._,____ _. 

the "China Mission Year Book" of 1910 a combined output amounting to 74,430 
issues during the last reported year. An annual grant from the Religious Tract 
Society of London is received.) 



CENTRAL CHINA RELIGIOUS TRACT SOCIETY (1876). 

Honorary Secretary: Rev. G. A. Clayton, Central China Religious Tract 
Society, Poyang Road, Han-kau. 

Object: To provide sound Christian literature for the Chinese masses. 

Income: 750. The Society is dependent for its income upon voluntary 
subscriptions and grants. The Religious Tract Society of London 
grants 450 per annum, the Upper Canada Tract Society grants $500 
gold per annum, and the Arthington Trust Fund is granting 100 per 
annum for five years. 

Organ: "The Central China Monthly." 

Field: Chinese Empire. Much literature has also been sent to Jamaica, 
Canada, the United States, South Africa, the Straits Settlements, 
and other places to which the Chinese have emigrated in large numbers. 

(NOTE: The Society was founded by the Rev. Griffith John, D.D., who has been its 
President from the date of foundation. A special building for the uses of the So- 
ciety, to be known as the "Griffith John Jubilee Building, is about to be erected 
at Han-kau. The Society has issued since it was established nearly thirty million 
treatises dealing with social, ethical, and religious truths. The distinctly religious 
publications are sold at under cost price.) 

CHINESE TRACT SOCIETY (i8~3). 
Recording Secretary: Rev. C. J. F. Symons, B.A., Shanghai. 
Office Secretary: Mr. Zee Vee-Wai, Y. M. C. A. Bldg., 119a Szechuen 

Road, Shanghai. 

Object: The dissemination of Christian literature among the Chinese. 
Income: Reported in 1910, $27,617 (Mexican), equivalent to about 

$13,808 U. S. gold. 
Organs: "The Chinese Illustrated News," "The Sunday School Child's 

Paper." 
Fields: China, and among the Chinese in other parts of the world. 

(NOTE: This Society stands at the head of the Chinese Tract Societies in the production 
of definitely Christian literature. It receives an annual grant from the Religious 
Tract Society of London. The average number of volumes and tracts issued an- 
nually, from 1898 to 1908, was 551,085. The total issue of volumes and tracts 
from the date of organization is 18,147,333. The East China Religious Tract 
Society, founded in 1844, was united with the Chinese Tract Society in 1894.) 

NORTH CHINA TRACT SOCIETY (1882). 

Corresponding Secretary and General Agent: Mr. A. C. Grimes, Peking. 
Recording Secretary: Rev. William H. Gleysteen, Peking. 
Object: The publication and distribution of Christian literature in North 
China, Manchuria, and Mongolia. 



Income: $20,025 (Mexican), equivalent to about $10,012 U. S. gold. 

This amount was contributed on the field. In addition, the American 

Tract Society donated $200 (gold). 
Fields: North China, Manchuria, Mongolia. 

(NOTE: The Annual Report for 1909 of the Society states that its total issues for the 
year were 215,386 copies, representing 5,395,702 pages. The total issues from date 
of organization are about 5,200,000 copies, representing, approximately, 100,000,000 
pages. A Sunday School Lesson Quarterly is issued, with an annual circulation of 
about 20,000, which is included in the above figures.) 

CHINA MEDICAL MISSIONARY ASSOCIATION (1886). 
President: Dr. Philip B. Cousland, M.B. 
Secretary: Dr. C. J. Davenport, F.R.C.S. 
Office Address: 4 Shantung Road, Shanghai. 
Object: To bring the medical practitioners throughout China into touch 

with one another, and to promote the cause of medical missions among 

the Chinese people. 
Income: The statistical returns of this Association are made up triennially, 

and will not be available before March, 1911. 
Organ: "The China Medical Journal." 
Fields: Korea, China. 

(NOTE: A recent development of practical importance in the activities of the China 
Medical Missionary Association is the appointment of a Committee of Research, 
under the direction of Dr. J. L. Maxwell,- of Tainan, Formosa, the object being 
to enter upon research work, and to investigate some of the obscure diseases 
indigenous to China. Much light has already been thrown upon the existence of 
certain intestinal parasites, whose ravages are the cause of much suffering through- 
out China. Through its Publication Committee, the best standard works on medi- 
cine and surgery are being published in Chinese by the Association, year by year. 
There is a South China Branch of the China Medical Missionary Association, which 
is actively at work.) 

MISSION TO THE CHINESE BLIND AND ILLITERATE SIGHTED (1886). 
(See under Scotland.) 

PEKING LOCAL COMMITTEEJPF MISSION TO THE CHINESE BLIND AND ILLIT- 
ERATE SIGHTED (1886). 

Secretary: Rev. W. Hopkyn Rees, London Missionary Society, Peking. 
Object: To teach the blind to read by the Braille System, adapted by the Rev. W. 
H. Murray to the Chinese language, and the illiterate sighted by a further adap- 
tation of this system to the seeing, and by this and other means to seek to lead 
them to Christ. 

Income: No statement of local contributions at hand. 
Field: China. 

(NOTE: An institution for the instruction of the blind is located at Peking, under 
the charge of the Rev. W. H. Murray. There were 44 pupils in residence in 
1908, ranging from twelve to thirty years of age. Miss C. F. Gordon-Gumming, 
College House, Crieff, Scotland, is deeply interested in Mr. Murray's work for 
the blind, and has published a book giving the history and full description of 
this Mission.) 

CHRISTIAN LITERATURE SOCIETY FOR CHINA (1887). 

Honorary General Secretary: Rev. Timothy Richard, D.D., Litt.D., 
143 North Szechuen Road, Shanghai. 

Object: The publication and circulation of literature based on Christian 
principles, throughout China, her colonies, dependencies, and wherever 
Chinese are found, especially periodical literature adapted for all 
classes. 

Income: $54,186 (Mexican), equivalent to about $27,093 U. S. gold. 
This total includes income from sales, subscriptions, and grants, and 
also that portion of the contributions to the building fund which was 
received during the year ending September 30, 1909. 

Organs: "Chung Si Chiao Hui Pao' f [Chinese Christian Review], "Ta 
Tung Pao" [Magazine of Broad Principles]. 

Fields: China, and throughout the world wherever Chinese are found. 

(NOTE: Formerly known in China as "The Society for the Diffusion of Christian and 
General Knowledge Amongthe Chinese." In 1877 the China Missionary Conference 
appointed the School and Text Book Committee. Its Secretary, Rev. A. William- 
son, LL.D., organized, in 1884, the Chinese Book and Tract Society in Glasgow, 
and founded in connection with that Society, in 1887, in China, the Society for the 
Diffusion of Christian and General Knowledge Among the Chinese. In 1892 the 
Chinese Book and Tract Society of Glasgow was succeeded by the Christian Litera- 
ture Society for China. In 1906 the name in China was altered to the Christian 
Literature Society for China, in consonance with the Scotch name. For further 

articulars in regard to committees in aid of this organization see entries under 
cotland and England.) 

ORIENTAL SOCIETY FOR PROMOTING THE EDUCATION OF DEAF 

MUTES (1887). 

Founder and Superintendent: Mrs. C. R. Mills, Chefoo. 
Assistant: Miss Anita E. Carter, Chefoo. 
Object: The education of the deal in China and Korea. 
Income: $2,500 (U. S. gold). 
Fields: Korea, China (including Manchuria). 



64 



WORLD ATLAS OF CHRISTIAN MISSIONS 



China 



(NOTE: The school was first opened at Teng-chow, Shantung, in the home of the late 
Rev. Charles Rogers Mills. D.D., American Presbyterian Mission. It is supported by 
voluntary gifts, largely received from the deaf in Christian lands, and their friends. 
Mrs. Mills is endeavoring to raise an endowment of 860,000, toward which 814,000 
has been received. A department for girls was opened in 1907. A branch school 
has been opened at Pyeng-yang, Korea, by a Korean teacher who received 
his training at Chefoo. In April, 1910, this work was taken under the care of the 
Board of Presbyterian Missions in the United States of America. See entry under 
United States.) 

EDUCATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF CHINA (1890). 
President: Rt. Rev. F. L. Hawks-Pott, D.D., Shanghai. 
Secretary: Rev. J. A. Silsby, Shanghai. 

Object: The' promotion of educational interests in China, and the fra- 
ternal cooperation of all those engaged in teaching. 
Income: $14,317 (Mexican), equivalent to about $7,158 U. S. gold. 
Organ: "The Educational Review." 
Field: China. 

(NOTE: In 1877, at the first National Missionary Conference in China, a School and 
Text Book Committee was appointed to secure the preparation and publication 
of a series of books for use in the Christian educational institutions in China. _At 
the second National Missionary Conference, in 1890, the Educational Association 
of China was organized, with thirty-five charter members. The membership 
has increased to five hundred. The Association meets once in three years to discuss 
the educational interests of China, and to make plans for their betterment.) 

NORTH FUHKIEN RELIGIOUS TRACT SOCIETY (1891). 

Secretary: Rev. Llewellyn Lloyd, Church Missionary Society, Foochow. 
Object: To print and circulate Christian literature in Fuhkien [Fo-kien] 

Province, China. 

Income: $3,039 (Mexican), equivalent to about $1,519 U. S. gold. 
Field: China (Fuhkien Province). 

(NOTE: The total issues of the Society during the year 1909 were 119,676 copies, 
including books, leaflets, and calendars. An annual grant is received from the 
Religious Tract Society of London.) 

GOSPEL BAPTIST MISSION (1892). 

Member of Mission: Rev. G. P. Bostick, Gospel Mission, Poh Cheo, 

Ngan-hwei. 

Object: To preach the Gospel to the Chinese. 
Income: No statement at hand. 
Field: North China. 

(NOTE: The Mission is Baptist in its ecclesiastical connection, although not under the 
supervision of any regular organization, being C9mposed of missionaries laboring 
independently, and supported by_ individual Baptist churches in the United States. 
The original members of the Mission were connected with_the American Baptist 
Missionary Union, now known as the American Baptist Foreign Mission Society.) 

UNITED SOCIETY OF CHRISTIAN ENDEAVOR FOR CHINA (1893). 

President: Rev. G. F. Fitch, D.D., Shanghai. 

General Secretaries: Mr. and Mrs. Edgar E. Strother, Shanghai. 

Object: To prepare and circulate Christian Endeavor literature; to ar- 
range for Christian Endeavor conventions in various sections of the 
Chinese Empire; and to promote the Christian Endeavor cause gen- 
erally. 

Income : No statement at hand. 

Organ: "The Chinese Illustrated News." 

Field: China. 

(NOTE: The first local Christian Endeavor Society in China was organized at Foochow, 
in 1885. Over four hundred societies have since been formed in various parts of 
the Empire.) 

MISSION AMONG THE HIGHER CLASSES IN CHINA (1894). 

Director-in-Chief : Rev. Gilbert Reid, M.A., D.D., Shanghpi. 

Object: To advance harmony between the Chinese and foreigners, and be- 
tween Christians and non-Christians in China; to reach the people 
through the influence and aid of the higher classes; to promote truth, 
righteousness, and enlightenment; and to be a benefit to China and the 
Chinese people. 

Income: $5,000 (U. S. gold). Nearly all of this amount was received 
from Chinese and foreigners in China. 

Organ: "The Institute Record." 

Field: China. 

(NOTE: Incorporated in 1905, under the name of the International Institute of China, 
There is an International Advisory Council in China, and a General Committee, 
also international in character. There is an American Committee, which see under 
United States; also there are committees in Great Britain, Germany, and the 
Netherlands. The Institute is interdenominational in character, and receives no 
support from missionary societies.) 

CHEFOO INDUSTRIAL MISSION (1895). 

Director: Mr. James McMullan, Chefoo [Chi-fu]. 

Object: The evangelization of the Chinese; the building up of the Church 
of Christ in China; the fostering of unity, and a demonstration of the pos- 
sibility of self-supporting missions, which will enable Chinese Christians 
to earn their living under conditions that will promote the growth 
of strong Christian character, and encourage them to witness for Christ. 

Income: $3,094 (Mexican), equivalent to about $1,547 U. S. gold. No 
part of the income received from sources outside China. 

Organ: "The Morning Star." 

Fields: Korea, China (Hong-kong). 

(NOTE: The Mission is evangelical and interdenominational, its desire being to help 
in the work of other missionary societies. The work of Mr. and Mrs. McMullan is 
honorary.) 

GENERAL COMMITTEE OF THE YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIA- 
TIONS OF CHINA AND KOREA (1896). 

General Secretary: Mr. F. S. Brockman, B.A., 120 Szechuen Road, Shang- 
hai. 

Object: To promote the organization and development of Young Men's 
Christian Associations in China, Korea, and Hong-kong, and to pro- 
mote the evangelization of the young men of those countries. 

Income: $6,581 (Mexican), which equals approximately $3,290 gold. 

Organ: "China's Young Men." 

Fields: Korea, China (Hong-kong). 

(NOTE: Chinese Young Men's Christian Associations have been established in 17 cities 
of the empire. There are at present 70 Student Young Men's Christian Associations 
in China.) 

SOUTH CHIH-LI MISSION (1896). 

General Director: Rev. Horace W. Houlding, Taimingfu, Chihli Province, 
North China. 

Secretary: Miss B. Z. Schrack, Taimingfu, Chihli Province, North China. 

Object: "To bring the knowledge of Jesus ... for spirit, soul, and 
body ... in the baptism of the Holy Ghost, and in the hope of His 
coming ... by itinerating evangelism; by training schools . . . ; 
work for the sick . . . ; printing . . . ; distribution of Scriptures and 
tracts; or by any other means whatsoever that God may give." 



Income: $10.969 (U. S. gold). 
Organ: "Fu Yin Zao" (Gospel News). 
Field: China (Chih-li, Ho-nan, Shan-tung). 

(NOTE: The South Chih-li Mission was incorporated in 1901. Its organization is wholly 
in China, with no headquarters in the United States, from which country its workers 
are mainly recruited. It has fifteen regular native evangelists at work, and eighteen 
others on the field under instruction.) 

JOHN G. KERR REFUGE FOR THE INSANE, CANTON (1898). 
Superintendent and Physician -in-Charge: Charles C. Selden, Ph.D., M.D., 

Canton. 
Object; To provide a Refuge and special medical treatment for the insane' 

among the Chinese. 
Income: $12,665 (Mexican), equivalent to about $6,332 U. S. gold. This 

amount represents largely the fees received from patients. 
Field: China (Canton). 

(NOTE: The Refuge was founded by John G. Kerr, M.D., LL.D., who for forty-seven 
years was medical missionary to the Chinese in Canton, under the American Presby- 
terian Board. Since the death of Dr. Kerr, in 1901, the work has been greatly 
favored by the voluntary and honorary services of Charles C. Selden, Ph.D.,M.D., 
with whom are associated Dr. J. Allen Hofmann and Dr. Lok Lun Teng. The 
number of patients, entered during the year 1908 was 249. This is the only insti- 
tution of the kind in China. It is steadily gaining in popular favor, and has proved 
to the Chinese that it is possible to treat successfully those whom they had always 
supposed were irremediably given over to the ctomination of evil spirits. There is 
a resident Board of Trustees at Canton, and suitable buildings have been erected 
for the Refuge.) 

CHINA BAPTIST PUBLICATION SOCIETY (1899). 

General Secretary: Rev. R. E. Chambers, D.D., Canton. 

Object: To print and circulate the Scriptures, and general Christian litera- 
ture, for the Chinese race. 

Income: $39,233 Mexican ($19,616 U. S. gold). The Society conducts a 
large publishing and printing business, and the income includes its 
commercial accounts. 

Organ: "The True Light Monthly." 

Fields: China, and throughout the world among Chinese immigrants. 

(NOTE: The work of this Society is about to be taken over by the American Baptist 
Foreign Mission Society, and the Foreign Mission Board of the Southern Baptist 
Convention, who will become jointly responsible for its maintenance ) 

WEST CHINA RELIGIOUS TRACT SOCIETY (1899). 
Honorary Secretary: Mr. W. E. Souter, Chengtu. 
Secretary: Mr. George M. Franck, Chengtu. 
Object: The publication and circulation of Christian literature in Chinese, 

Tibetan, and the languages of the aboriginal tribes of West China. 
Income: $1,085 (Mexican), from home; $2,910 (Mexican), from native 

contributions and sales; total, $3,995 (Mexican), equivalent to about 

$1,997 U. S. gold. 
Organs: "The Chinese Church Monthly Magazine," "The West China 

Christian Magazine." 
Fields: China (Provinces of Szechwan, Yun-nan, Kwei-chau, Kan-su), 

Tibet. 

(NOTE: The headquarters of the West China Religious Tract Society are at Chungking 
and Chengtu, and there are distributing agencies at Mien-chau, Ya-chow-fu, and 
Ghao-tung-fu.) 

YOUNG WOMEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION OF CHINA (1899). 
National Secretary: Miss A. Estella Paddock, 120 Szechuen Road, 

Shanghai. 

General Secretary: Miss Grace L. Coppock, Shanghai. 
Object: To unite the Christian young women of China, developing their 

power for service, training them for efficient evangelistic effort, and 

thus supplementing the Church in its work of winning them to Christ. 
Income: $1,800 (Mexican), equivalent to about $900 U. S. gold, raised 

and used locally by the Shanghai Association. 

Organ: "World's Young Women's Christian Association Quarterly." 
Field: China (Shanghai, and among Christian and non-Christian schools 

of the empire). 

(NOTE: In connection with the World's Young Women's Christian Association thir- 
teen Student Branches have been organized in China, and the principal branch, 
in Shanghai, has its own Home.) 

"DOOR OF HOPE" MISSION (1901). 
Secretary: Mrs. E. F. Tatum, Shanghai. 

Treasurer: Mrs. A. G. Parrott, 31 North Szechuen Road, Shanghai. 
Object: The rescue of Chinese women and girls from lives of prostitution, 

and the rescue of Chinese children from the danger of such a life. 
Income: $22,050 (Mexican), received in 1910, equals $11,025 U. S. gold. 
Field: China. 

GRACE MISSION (1902). 

Resident Missionary: Rev. A. Kennedy, Tang-si, via Shanghai. 
Object: To preach the Gospel to the Chinese. 

Income: $1,035 (U. S. gold). Of this amount the native Church con- 
tributes about $135. 
Field: China (Tang-si and adjacent villages). 

BIBLE MISSION SOCIETY (1904)- 

Senior Missionary: Rev. S. C. Todd, Macao. 
Object: Evangelistic work in China. 
Income : No statement at hand. 
Field: China (Macao). 

SHANTUNG CHRISTIAN UNIVERSITY, WEI-HSIEN (1904). 

Acting President: Rev. Paul D. Bergen, D.D., Wei-hsien, Shantung. 

Object: The establishment of a higher educational institution, based 
upon the cooperation of Baptist and Presbyterian missions in Shantung. 

Income: From the American Presbyterian Board, $7,032 (U. S. gold). 
A grant of 4,000 has been made by the Arthington Trust Fund of the 
Baptist Missionary Society for the Medical College at Tsinatifu. No 
statement at hand of income derived from educational fees. 

Field: China (Shan-tung). 

(NOTE: The Shantung Christian University is composed of Arts, Theological, and 
Medical colleges, located, respectively, at Wei-hsien, Tsing-chau-fu, and Tsi-nan-fu, 
under the united supervision of the English Baptist Missionary Society and the 
American Presbyterian Board of Foreign Missions. The general management of 
the University is in the hands of a University Council, or Field Board of Directors, 
elected by the united missions. The actions of this Field Board are subject to 
the review and control of the home boards. An Advisory Committee has been 
formed in the United States to foster the interests of the University, with John H. 
Finley, LL.D., as Chairman, and the Rev. Arthur J. Brown, D.D., as Recording 
Secretary. The institution was founded as a college by the late Rev. C. W. Mateer, 
D.D., in 1864, in the city of Tengchow, but it did not attain to university rank 
until 1904.) ' 



China 



DIRECTORY OF MISSIONARY SOCIETIES 



65 



ANTI-OPIUM LEAGUE (1906). 

Secretary of National Executive Committee: Prof. R. D. Smart, Soochow. 
Object: The suppression of the opium habit throughout the Chinese 

Empire. 

Income: No statement at hand. 
Field: China. 

(NOTB: The Anti-Opium League has sustained a great loss in the recent death of Dr. 
Hampden O. Du Bose, its former President. The Chinese Government has token 



SOUTH FUHKIEN RELIGIOUS TRACT SOCIETY (1908). 
Secretary: Rev. G. M. Wales, Amoy. 
Object: The publication and circulation of books and tracts, prepared on 

the same principles as those of the Religious Tract Society of London, 

and the American Tract Society. 
Income: For 1908, $3,030 (Mexican), equivalent to about $1,515 (U. S. 

gold). 

Organs: "The Church Messenger," "The Amoy Church News." 
Field: China (South Fuhkien). 



and that, compared with three years ago, the opium smokers are now sixty-five 
per cent leas than formerly. The cultivation of the poppy, and the revenue from 
opium, has been decreased by half. A reconstruction of the League in China, 
with a view to broadening its basis, is now under discussion. The anti-opium 
movement in China was initiated by a Memorial signed by missionaries of all na- 
tionalities, which the Governor-General of the River Provinces, H. E. Chou Fu, 
forwarded to the _ throne in 1906. This resulted in a decree, issued in September 
of g that year, which was the beginning of the present government campaign _in 
China against opium. A general closing of opium dens in many important cities 
of China has followed. In February, 1909, an International Opium Commission 
convened in _ Shanghai, at which convention thirteen of the great nations of the 
world participated. Just as these pages are going to press we find a paragraph 
in the "Chinese Recorder" for February, 1911, which refers to the "Chinese National 
Anti-Opium Society," at Peking, with the Rev. K. W. Thwing as its Secretary. 
This appears to be an entirely new organization, but it is possible that it may 
represent the reconstruction of the Anti-Opium League, to which reference baa 
been made.) 

"BROADCAST" TRACT PRESS (1906). 

Director: Mr. Allen N. Cameron, Chang-sha-fu, Hu-nan. 

Object: To print Gospel leaflets, mostly in the Mandarin dialect, to be 

sold at cost price. 
Income: No statement at hand. 
Field: China (Hu-nan). 

(NOTE: The work of the "Broadcast" Tract PreSa was begun as early as 1896, but 
1906 is the date of its regular establishment at Ohang^ha-f u. The reported issues 
for 1909 were 390,000 copies, and from date of organization the total issues have 
been about 3,000,000 tracts. Orders are received from all over China. .The "Broad- 
cast" Press is an independent organization maintained in connection with the 
China Mission of the "Galilee" Baptist Church of Denver, Colorado, U. S. A.) 

CHRISTIAN EDUCATIONAL UNION OF WEST CHINA (1906). 

Secretary: Mr. R. J. Davidson, Cheng-tu-fu, West China. 

Object: To promote the unification and centralization of Primary Edu- 
cational Institutions for boys and girls, by means of a uniform course 
of study, similar text-books, and common examinations; to promote 
the organization of a Union Christian University, and to further its 
interests. 

Income: $175 (U. S. gold), received on the field. 

Organ: "West China Missionary News." 

Field: West China. 

(NOTE: The Christian Educational Union of West China consists of the representatives 
of eight missionary bodies engaged in work in West China. .It was instituted to 
promote educational plans for West China, and especially to initiate the organiza- 
tion of a Union Christian University, which it is proposed to locate at Cheng-tu-fu,. 
West China. The different missi9ns will participate by founding and maintaining 
colleges, to be affiliated to the University, each one to provide a staff for the college 
which it maintains.) 

UNIVERSITY MEDICAL SCHOOL, CANTON (1906). 
Physician-in-Charge: Josiah C. McCracken, M.D., Canton Christian Col- 
lege, Canton. 

Object: Medical education in China, under Christian auspices. 
Income: $6.000 (U. S. gold). 
Field: China. 

(NOTE: The University Medical School of Canton is the foreign mission work of the 
Christian Association of the University of Pennsylvania. For several years previous 
to the formal establishment of the University Medical School, by the appointment 
of the Board of Trustees, in 1906, the Christian Association above referred to had 
been rendering financial aid by the partial support of the Medical Department of 
the Canton Christian College, but it is now responsible for the founding and main- 
tenance of an independent medical school, to be affiliated with the Canton Christian 
College. A Board of Trustees has been appointed by this Christian Association, of 
which George Wharton Pepper, LL.D., is the Chairman, and Mr. Edward C. Wood 
is Secretary and Treasurer. See entry of the Board of Trustees under United States.) 

BIBLE STUDY COMMITTEE (1907). 
Secretary: Mr. A. E. Cory. Nanking. 
Object: To stimulate Bible study in China, to found Bible Institutes, 

and to coordinate all Bible study movements throughout China. 
Income: No statement at hand. 
Field: China. 

(NOTE: The Pocket Testament League, which originated in Birmingham, England, 
some years ago, under the direction of Mrs. Charles M. Alexander, and has since 
become widely distributed, has been inaugurated in China, under the auspices of 
the Bible Study Committee, and has found a cordial welcome among many Chris- 
tian Chinese. Its simple pledge is as follows: "I hereby accept membership in the 
Pocket Testament League by making it a rule of my life to read at least one 
chapter in the Bible each day, and to carry a Testament or Bible with me wher- 
ever I go.") 

EVANGELISTIC ASSOCIATION OF CHINA (1907). 
President: Rev. Cheng Ching-Yi, Peking. 
Object: The promotion of evangelistic effort throughout China. 
Income: No statement at hand. 
Field: China. 

(NOTE: At the first Triennial Conference, held at Han-kau in December, 1910, there 
was an attendance of 77 foreign missionaries, and 158 Chinese. Overflowing evan- 
gelistic services were held in various churches and chapels every night, with a 
reported aggregate attendance of nearly ten thousand.) 

MANCHURIAN RELIGIOUS TRACT SOCIETY COMMITTEE (1908). 
Honorary Secretary: Mr. R. T. Turley, F.R.G.S., Mukden, Manchuria. 
Object: The publication and distribution of Christian literature in 

Manchuria. 
Income: No statement at hand, except that the Religious Tract Society, . 

London, made a grant of 45. 
Field: Manchuria. 
(NOTE: This Committee is an auxiliary of the Religious Tract Society of London. 

It prints annually about 20,000 copies, and purchases literature from other Chinese 

tract societies for circulation.) 

"CHRISTIAN HERALD" ORPHANAGE COMMITTEE OF CHINA (1908). 

Secretary: Lilburn Merrill, M.D., Chinkiang, Kiang-su Province. 

Object: The administration of orphanage funds forwarded by the "Chris- 
tian Herald," of New York. 

Income: The amount depends upon the circumstances and the need. 
The sum forwarded from July 1, 1907, to June 30, 1908, was $4,911, 
and the amount sent from July 1, 1908, to June 30, 1909, was $16,000. 

Field: China. 

(NoTE; See entry of "Christian Herald" Missionary Fund, under United States.) 



many years previous to 1908 tract society work was carried on in this 
district by the Religious Tract Society of London, through a local committee, and 
by the American Tract Society, through the American Reformed Church Mission. 
In 1908 the whole work was united in the South Fuhkien Religious Tract So- 
ciety. The Amoy Tract Society, which dated from 1850, has been merged into 
the South Fuhkien Religious Tract Society. During the year 1909, 85,068 books 
and tracts were printed. 

SUNDAY SCHOOL UNION FOR CHINA (1908). 

Secretary of the Executive Committee: Rev. W. N. Bitton, Shanghai. 
Organizing Secretary: Rev. Elwood G. Tewkesbury, D.D., Shanghai. 
Object: The promotion of Sunday Schools throughout China. 
Income: No statement at hand. Financial aid which will in part meet 

the need is expected from the British Sunday School Union. 
Field: China. 

(NOTE: A large and representative Committee to organize this Union was appointed 
by the Centenary Conference of 1907, at Shanghai, of which Committee Mr. Bitton 
was Secretary.) 

CANTON EDUCATIONAL ASSOCIATION (1909). 
Secretary: Rev. H. B. Graybill, Canton Christian College, Canton. 
Object :_ The advancement of Christian educational opportunities in 

Fuhkien (Fo-kien) and Kwangtung Provinces. 
Income: No statement at hand. 
Field: China (Fuhkien (Fo-kien) and Kwangtung Provinces). 

HWA HSI HSIOH TANG [WEST CHINA UNION UNIVERSITY] (1909). 

Acting Secretary on the Field: Rev. C. R. Carscallen, Cheng-tu-fu, West 
China. 

Acting Secretary for Home Commission: Mr. G. B. Huntington, American 
Baptist Foreign Mission Society, Boston, Massachusetts. 

Object: The higher education of Chinese men and women, under Christian 
auspices. 

Income : Derived from appropriations from the missionary societies uniting 
in the Union; American Baptist Foreign Mission Society, Boston; Mis- 
sionary Society of the Methodist Church, Canada; English Friends' 
Foreign Mission Association, London; Board of Foreign Missions 
of the Methodist Episcopal Church, New York. No amount stated. 

Field: China (Cheng-tu-fu, and other points in West China, Province of 
Szechwan, where associated colleges may be located). 

(NOTE: The University comprises four colleges American Baptist, Canadian Meth- 
odist, English Friends, and Methodist Episcopal. It will also have three theological 
schools affiliated in the near future, and include a normal school and medical college. 
This enterprise has been fostered by the Christian Educational Union of West 
China, previously entered.) 

UNIVERSITY OF NANKING (1909). 

President: Rev. Arthur J. Bowen, Nanking. 

Object: The establishment of a higher educational institution based upon 
the cooperation of the missions of the Board of Foreign Missions of 
the Presbyterian Church in the U. S. A., the Board of Foreign Missions 
of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and the Foreign Christian Mis- 
sionary Society. 

Income: Too recently organized to report income. The University has 
been established by generous contributions of land, buildings, and 
equipment from the Missions participating in its formation. Fees 
from students will amount, approximately, to $23,000 (Mexican), 
while each Mission makes an annual grant of $2,400 (gold), and the sal- 
aries of nine professors are provided from the same sources. Special 
gifts amounting to about $1,500 (gold) have been received. 

Organ: "The University of Nanking Bulletin." 

Field: Central China. 

(NOTE: Nanking University was originally founded in 1888, as an institution of the 
Board of Foreign Missions of the Methodist Episcopal Church, but this union of 
higher educational activities in Nanking was accomplished in December, 1909. 
A Board of Trustees, with headquarters m the United States, has been appointed, 
and articles of incorporation are to be obtained. See entry under the United States 
in this Directory.) 

SCANDINAVIAN EVANGELICAL FREE MISSION IN CANTON (1910). 
Director: Rev. H. J. von Qualen, Canton. 
Object: Evangelical missionary work among the Chinese. 
Income: The Mission is conducted on an independent basis. 
Field: China (Canton and vicinity). 

(NOTE: The Mission is sometimes locally designated as the Scandinavian American 
Christian Free Mission, but it is Lutheran in its denominational affiliation, and 
its correct title is as given above.) 

STUDENT VOLUNTEER MOVEMENT OF CHINA (1910). 

Address: Arthur Hugh, B.A., National Secretary of the Young Men's 

Christian Association, Shanghai. 
Object: To promote an interest in Christian service among the students 

of China, and, especially, to induce them to enter the ministry. 
Income: No statement at hand. 
Field: China. 

(NOTE: The formation of the Student Volunteer Movement of China is an outgrowth 
of the work of the Student Young Men's Christian Association. The response of 
Christian students in several of the mission colleges in China has been of surprising 
interest and impressiveness. The number of Student Volunteers already enrolled 
is nearly four hundred. The services of Pastor Ding Lee May, known as "The 
Apostle of Shantung," in visiting various missionary institutions, and enlisting 
volunteers, have been most successful.) 

CHINESE MISSIONARY SOCIETIES. 

(NOTE: Chinese Christians have founded a goodly number of missionary societies for 
evangelistic effort among their own countrymen, sending out cateohists and evan- 
gelists, and income instances founding churches. The excellent reflex influence of 
these home missionary endeavors is apparent in the churches which support them. 
The ten home missionary societies reported as active in South China are said to 
be in connection with the most earnest and spiritually progressive churches in that 
part of the empire. We regret that we have not been able to secure sufficient in- 
formation and the special data, which would enable us :*> make detailed mention 
of these initial native missionary efforts in China. We are glad to have been some- 
what more favored by the data returns from India and Japan.) 



WORLD ATLAS OF CHRISTIAN MISSIONS 



India and Ceylon 



MISSIONARY ASSOCIATIONS IN CHINA. 

(NOTE: The missionaries residing in different parts of China have, in many instances, 
organized themselves into associations for mutual helpfulness and general discus- 
sion of their difficulties and problems, and to insure united action and harmonious 
views concerning missionary policy. It has not seemed advisable to give a separate 
entry in the pirect9ry to each of these missionary associations, as they are not, 
strictly speaking, missionary in their aims, but are designed rather for mutual sup- 
port and guidance, and the devotional culture of the missionaries themselves. It 
will suffice for present purposes if this brief reference is made to their existence. 
These missionary associations are to be found at Peking, Tientsin, Shanghai, Nan- 
king, Han-kau, which represents the missionaries of Wuchang, Hanyang, and 
Han-kau, and, also, at Foochow and Hong-kong. It is possible that others may 
exist of which information baa not been obtained.) 



INDIA AND CEYLON 

(The Indian rupee may be reckoned as equivalent to 33J cents in United States currency 
or to Is. 4d. English currency, being 16 rupees to the pound sterling.) 

RELIGIOUS TRACT SOCIETY (1799). 

(See under England.) 

(NoTB: The following societies and agencies in India cooperate with, or are helped by. 
the Religious Tract Society of London.) 

MADRAS RELIGIOUS TRACT AND BOOK SOCIETY (1818). 
Honorary General Secretary: Rev. Joseph Passmore. 
Honorary Editorial Secretary: Rev. J. Lazarus, B.A. 
Honorary Business Manager: Mr. Charles Street. 
Office Address: Memorial Hall Compound, Madras. 

Object: The circulation of distinctively Christian literature, especially tracts. 
Income: From sources in England, Rupees 2,000, or $667; from India, Rupees 

1,063, or $354. 
Field: South India. 



Object: To publish and to supply the public with such religious books and tracts, 

snail 



: Aided by a grant from the Religious Tract Society of London. The Society 
is administered entirely by unpaid workers. The number of volumes issued 
during 1908 was 812,523, and of tracts issued during the same year, 120,000. 
The total issue of volumes and tracts from date of organization is 23,126,220, 
in five different languages.) 

CALCUTTA CHRISTIAN TRACT AND BOOK SOCIETY (1823). 

Honorary Secretary: Rev. J. M. B. Duncan, B.D., 23 Chowringhee Road, Calcutta. 

Object: To supply, in various languages, tracts for distribution among the heathen, 
Mohammedans, and others, and books of Christian instruction for schools, and 
for the spiritual good of professing Christians. 

Income: The entire assets of the Society, including its property, stock-in-hand, 
and investment account, amount to Rupees 57,538, equivalent to about $19,- 
179 U. S. gold. Subscriptions and donations received locally during 1908 
Rupees 609 ($203 U. S. gold). The income from sales in 1908 is reported as 
Rupees 16,921, or $5,640 U. S. gold. 

Field: India (Eastern Bengal, and Assam). 

(NOTE: This Society is independent, but receives occasional grants from the Re- 
ligious Tract Society of London, with which it cooperates in its work The 
average number of volumes issued annually, from 1898 to 1908, was 61,320, 
and of tracts, annually, during the same period, 974,705. The number of vol- 
umes issued in 1908 were 62,150, and of tracts, 944,222, in thirteen different 
languages.) 

BANGALORE TRACT AND BOOK SOCIETY (1825). 
Honorary General Secretary: Rev. F. Goodwill. 
Honorary Editorial Secretary: Rev. H. Gulliford. 
Office Address: Bangalore Tract and Book Society, Bangalore, Mysore. 
Object: The preparation and publication of Christian literature, mainly in Kanarese 

and English. 

Income: Rupees 33,597, equivalent to about $11,199 U. S. cold 
Organ: "Vrittanta Patrika." 
Field: India (Mysore). 

(NOTE: The Bangalore Society cooperates with the Religious Tract Society of 
London, and receives from it a grant-in-aid. The average number of volumes 
issued annually, from 1898 to 1908, was 16,877, and of tracts, annually, during 
the same period, 62,123. The number of volumes issued during 1908 is reported 
as 28,537, and of tracts during the same year, 49,842. The total issue of vol- 
umes and tracts from date of organization is reported as 4,501,545.) 

BOMBAY TRACT AND BOOK SOCIETY (1827). 

Secretary: Mr. John Henry Gilmore, Young Men's Christian Association, Bombay 

Object: The printing, publishing, and circulating of Christian literature in the 
vernacular. Also the importation and circulation of the publications of the 
Religious Tract Society of London. 

Income: Rupees 56,000, equivalent to about $18,667 U. S. gold. 

Field: India (among the Marathi and Gujarati communities of Western India). 

(NOTE: This Society receives grants from the Religious Tract Society of London 
and cooperates with it in its work. The average number of volumes, tracts, 
periodicals, and leaflets issued annually, from 1898 to 1908, was 708,005 The 
volumes and tracts issued in 1908 amounted to 115,000. The issues from date 
of organization are approximately 25,000,000, in four languages.) 

NORTH INDIA CHRISTIAN TRACT AND BOOK SOCIETY, ALLAHABAD (1840). 
Honorary Secretary: Rev. J. J. Lucas, D.D., American Presbyterian Mission, 

Allahabad. 
Object: To supply religious tracts and books, in various languages, for sale and 

free distribution among Hindus, Mohammedans, and Christians 
Income: Sale proceeds, Rupees 18,502, equivalent to about 86,167 U S gold- 

subscriptions and donations, Rupees 2,023 (S674 U. S. gold) 
Fields: India (United Provinces of Agra and Oudh, Rajputana, Central Provinces, 

and Central India). 

(Nora: Formerly designated as the "Agra Tract Society," but the present name 
was adopted in 1858. It works in cooperation with the Religious Tract Society 
of London, from which it receives grants-in-aid. The average number of vol- 
umes and tracts issued annually, from 1898 to 1908, was 59,549. The number 
2L v P,. lume3 S3ue 1 d in 19 8 wa3 113,865, and of tracts during the same year, 
631,540, in three languages.) 



ission House, Wadhwan Camp, Bombay 



GUJARAT TRACT AND BOOK SOCIETY (1853). 

Secretary: Rev. Hamilton Martin, B.A., Mission 
Presidency. 

Object: The providing of evangelistic literature for non-Christians, and of suitable 
religious books for Christian students and general readers 

Income: For the year 1908, from sales of publications, Rupees 1,205; from sub- 
scriptions and other sources, Rupees 672; total, Rupees 1,877, equivalent to 
about $626 U. S. gold. 

Organ: "The Dawn of Truth." 

Field: India (Gujarat and Kathiawar). 

(NOTE: The 4 General Committee of this Society consists of members of the Irish 
Presbyterian Mission Council, and it receives considerable aid from a "Publica- 
tion Fund, collected by friends in Ireland. Grants are also received from the 
Religious Tract Society, London, and the Surat Mission Press. The total issues 
for 1908 were 35,857 copies of books, periodicals, and tracts.) 

SOUTH TRAVANCORE TRACT AND BOOK SOCIETY (1856). 
Honorary Secretary: Rev. I. H. Hacker, Martandam, Travancore. 
Object: The circulation of religious literature among the non-Christian population 

of South India. 

Income: Rupees 1,400, equivalent to about 8467 U. S. gold. 
Organs: The Christian Messenger," "The Missionary Gleaner," "The Temperance 

Herald. 
Field: India (South Travancore). 

(NOTE: A native Tract Society was formed at Nagercoil as early as 1824, and the 
?u ut Trava . n cre Tract and Book Society was formed in 1856, by the union of 
tne Wagercoil and Neyoor Tract Societies. This organization is in connection 
with the London Missionary Society in Travancore. It receives an annual grant 
91 money and paper from the Religious Tract Society of London. The total 
issues since organization have been 15,930,800, consisting of periodicals, tracts, 
books, and leaflets.) 

PUNJAB RELIGIOUS BOOK SOCIETY (1863). 

Honorary Secretary: Rev. J. Anthony Wood, M.A., Church Missionary Society, 
Lianoro. 



in various languages, as snail be calculated to promote godliness, care being 
taken that such works accord with the principles held in common by the sev- 
eral bodies of Christians who codperate with the Religious Tract Society in 
London; and also to offer for sale such other books and goods approved by the 
Society as are usually kept by booksellers and stationers. 

Income: Subscriptions and donations, Rupees 1,003; grant (1907) from Religious 
Tract Society, London, Rupees, 1,125; total, Rupees 2,128, equivalent to about 
$709 U. S. gold. 

Organ: "Masihi Tajalli." 

Field: India (Punjab, North- West Frontier Province, and Sindh). 

(NOTE: This organization cooperates with the Religious Tract Society of London, 
from which it receives a grant. It was established in 1863, and reorganized in 
1907. The average number of volumes issued annually, from 1898 to 1908, was 
49,200; of tracts issued annually during the same period, 567,000. There were 
issued during 1907, 79,533 volumes, and 386,000 tracts. The total of volumes 
and tracts issued since organization amounts to 10,311,124.) 

MALAYALAM RELIGIOUS TRACT SOCIETY (1893). 

Honorary Secretary: Rev. W. D. Osborne, London Missionary Society, Attingal, 

Travancore. 
Object: The preparation, production, and distribution of Christian literature ' 

books, tracts, and handbills (leaflets), for the education and spiritual growth of 

Christians, and for use in missionary work among non-Christians. 
Income: 158, all of which is expended locally. 
Organ: "The Malayalam Bookman." 
Field: India (Malayalam area, including Cochin, and parts of Travancore and Mala- 

bar. Population approximately six millions.) 

(NOTE: Founded in 1895, as a separate Society, but previous to that date it was 
designated as the Malayalam Sub-Committee of the Madras Religious Tract 
Society. It cooperates in the work of the London Religious_ Tract Society, from 
which it receives a grant. A Malayalam Language or Literature Committee 
has been formed for the purpose of uniting the various societies and individuals 
engaged in producing Christian literature in the Malayalam language, and of 
developing cooperation among them for distribution of this literature as well as 
for its production. The societies thus engaged are the Church Missionary So- 
ciety, the London Missionary Society, and the Basel Mission. The average 
number of volumes issued annually, from 1898 to 1908, was 9,180, and of tracts 
and leaflets issued annually during the same period, 93,786. The number of 
volumes issued in 1908 was 10,500, and of tracts and leaflets, 60,000. The total 
issued from date of organization is reported aa 1,700,000 volumes and tracts.) 

BRITISH AND FOREIGN BIBLE SOCIETY (1804). 

(See under England.) 

(NOTE : The total circulation of Scriptures by the following Indian Auxiliaries of the 
British and Foreign Bible Society, for the year 1908, including Bibles, Testaments, 
and Portions, was as follows: Calcutta Auxiliary, 108,284; Ceylon Auxiliary, 32,460; 
Bombay Auxiliary, 118,575; Madras Auxiliary, 190,255; Bangalore Auxiliary, 
28,088; North India Auxiliary, 152,907; Punjab Auxiliary, 47,946. The average 
number of Portions would be equivalent to about nine tenths of these totals, the 
remaining tenth representing entire Bibles and Testaments.) 

CALCUTTA AUXILIARY BIBLE SOCIETY (1811). 

Secretary: Rev. A. Willifer Young, 23 Chowringhee Road, Calcutta. 
Object: The circulation of the Scriptures throughout the Bengal Presidency. 
Income: Rupees 39,478 ($13,159, or 2,498). 
Field: India (Bengal Presidency). 

CEYLON AUXILIARY BIBLE SOCIETY, COLOMBO (1812). 

Secretary: Thomas Gracie, Esq., Bible House, Union Place, Colombo, Ceylon. 

Object: The circulation of the Scriptures throughout Ceylon. 

Income: Rupees 18,277 ($6,092, or 1,218). Of this amount 6,835 Rupee? were 

received through sales and subscriptions in India. 
Field: Ceylon. 
(NOTE: The Kandy and the Jaffna Auxiliaries of the British and Foreign Bible 

Society have been discontinued, and have been absorbed by the one Auxiliary 

for Ceylon, as given above.) 

BOMBAY AUXILIARY BIBLE SOCIETY (1817). 

Secretary: Mr. Robert A. Adams, British and Foreign Bible Society, Bombay. 
Object: The circulation of the Scriptures throughout the Bombay Presidency. 
Income: Rupees 33,440 ($11,147, or 2,229). Of this amount Rupees 5,654 were 

received from local sources, and Rupees 5,199 were realized from sales. 
Field: India (Bombay Presidency). 

MADRAS AUXILIARY BIBLE SOCIETY (1819). 

Secretary: Rev. W. E. H. Organe, B.A., B.D., Memorial Hall, Madras. 
Object: The circulation of the Scriptures throughout the Madras Presidency. 
Income: Rupees 51,797 ($17,266, or 3,453). Of this sum Rupees 12,091 were 

received from local contributions, and Rupees 10,494 from sales. 
Field: India (Madras Presidency). 

BANGALORE AUXILIARY BIBLE SOCIETY (1825). 

Honorary Secretary: Rev. E. P. Rice, B.A., Cubbon Road, Bangalore. 

Object: To provide the Kanarese population with the Christian Scriptures in an 

acceptable form, and to circulate the Scriptures in all languages required through- 

out the Mysore Province. 
Income: Rupees 4,943 ($1,648, or 329). Of this amount Rupees 968 were local 

contributions. 
Field: India (Mysore Province, and the Kanarese portions of other provinces.) 

NORTH INDIA AUXILIARY BIBLE SOCIETY, ALLAHABAD (1845). 

Secretary: Rev. T. S. Wynkoop,M.A.,18 Olive Road, Allahabad, United Provinces. 
Object: To carry on the local work of the British and Foreign Bible Society. 
Income: Rupees 30,476 ($10,159, or 2,032), of which Rupees 5,194 represent the 

proceeds of sales, and Rupees 7,955 were raised in India by subscription, etc. 
Field: India (including the United Provinces of Agra and Oudh, Rajputana, the 

Central India Agency, and those districts of the Central Provinces in which the 

Hindi language is the leading vernacular.) 

PUNJAB AUXILIARY BIBLE SOCIETY (1863). 

Secretary: A. E. Butler, Esq., Lahore, Punjab. 

Object: To cooperate with the British and Foreign Bible Society in the preparation 
and circulation of the Holy Scriptures in the languages and dialects current in 
the Punjab and North- West Frontier Province, and vicinity. 

Income: Rupees 24,477 ($8,159, or 1,632). Of this amount Rupees 11,727 were 
received from sales and local subscriptions. 

Field: India (the Punjab Province, and circumjacent regions). 

CHRISTIAN MISSIONS IN MANY LANDS (1827). 
(See under England.) 

(NOTE: The "Brethren" missionaries are usually classed as Independent Workers. 
The following are Missions in India, maintained by members of this body: Tibet 
Border Mission, Santal Country Mission, South Marathi Country Mission, Godavari 
Delta Mission, Kanarese District Mission. Malabar Coast Mission, and the Tinne- 
velli District Mission, South India. The data of these Missions, so far as obtained, 
have been included under Christian Missions in Many Lands, in the statistical 
tables.) 

JAFFNA NATIVE EVANGELICAL SOCIETY (1832). 
Secretary: Mr. J. K. Sumatamby, B.A., Pandeterippu, Ceylon. 
Object: The evangelization of the islands in the vicinity of Ceylon. 
Income: Rupees 2,022, equivalent to about $674 U. S. gold. 
Field: The small islands (population, 15,000) lying southwest of Jaffna, 
at the northern extremity of Ceylon. 

JAFFNA WOMEN'S FOREIGN MISSIONARY SOCIETY ( ). 

Secretary: Mrs. A. Chilliehpillai, Manepay P. O., Ceylon. 

Object: To unite the Christian women of the American Board Churches in Ceylon 

in home and foreign mission work. 

Income: Rupees 500, equivalent to about $167 U. S. gold. 
Field: India (the tract about Tondi, on the east coast of India, and the small islands 

at the northern extremity of Ceylon). 

JAFFNA STUDENT FOREIGN MISSIONARY SOCIETY (1900). 
Secretary: Mr. L. V. Clarence, Valvedditturai P. O., Ceylon. 
Object: To send the Gospel to Tamil-speaking people in the neglected districts of 

other lands. 

Income: Rupees 480, equivalent to about $160 U. S. gold. 
Field: India (a tract about Tondi, on the east coast of India)- 
(NOTE: Formed by students of Jaffna College.) 



India and Ceylon 



DIRECTORY OF MISSIONARY SOCIETIES 



67 



ORISSA BAPTIST MISSION PRESS (1838). 
Superintendent: Rev. R. J. Grundy, Cuttack. Orissa. 
Object: The publication and circulation of Christian tracts and books for 

the evangelization of non-Christians. 
Income: No statement at hand. 
Organ: "The Morning Star." 
Field: India (Orissa District, Bengal). 

(NOTE: Baptist in its ecclesiastical connection, but receiving an annual grant from 
the Religious Tract Society of London. The issues of this Press, in 1908, amounted 
to 157,000 volumes and 177,000 tracts. Printing was done for the Calcutta Tract 
Society, the Orissa Christian Literature Society, and the Orissa Tract Society.) 

RANGOON KAREN HOME MISSION SOCIETY (1853). 
Secretary: Rev. T. Thanbyah, M.A., American Baptist Sgaw Karen 

Mission. Ahlone, Rangoon, Burma. 

Object: Mission work among the Karens in Burma and Siam. 
Income: Rupees 11,580, equivalent to about $3,860 U. S. gold. 
Fields: Lower Burma and Northern Siam. 

(NoTB: In connection with the American Baptist Foreign Mission Society, but the 
funds raised and the work supported by this organization are not included in the 
report of the American Society.) 

KANDY INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL (1854). 

Secretary: Rev. E. E. Taylor, M.A., The Vicarage, Kandy, Ceylon. 

Object: Providing a home for destitute boys, training them in various 
industries, and giving them a general education. 

Income: Total income for the year 1908, Rupees 15,463 (equivalent 
to about $5,154 U. S. gold), made up as follows: subscriptions, Ru- 
pees 579, of which Rupees 179 were from England; tuition fees, Rupees 
2,275; government grant ( Rupees 2,499; educational grant, Ru- 
pees 655; profit on industries, Rupees 9,452. 

(NOTE: Independent, but aided by government grants.) 

MADURA HOME MISSIONARY SOCIETY (1854). 

Secretary: Mr. V. Santiago, Battalagundu, Madura District. 

Object: To promote the propagation of the Gospel of Christ in the Madura 
District by the Christians themselves, and to help the churches in 
connection with the American Madura Mission until they become self- 
supporting, and, also, to form new churches. 

Income: Rupees 2,200, equivalent to about $733 U. S. gold. 

Field: India (Madura and Konganadu). 

(NOTE: Formerly called the "Native Evangelical Society of Madura," but changed 
to its present name in 1908. It is the Home Missionary Society of all the Indian 
Christians of the Madura Mission, in connection with the American Board of For- 
eign Missions.) 

CHRISTIAN LITERATURE SOCIETY FOR INDIA (1858). 
(See under England.) 

MARATHI BRANCH OF THE CHRISTIAN LITERATURE SOCIETY FOR INDIA 

(1858). 

Honorary Secretary: Rev. N. Macnicol, M.A., Poona, Bombay Presidency. 
Object: To print and disseminate Marathi Christian literature. 
Income; 51. The income is obtained from sales, and also by grants from the Parent 

Society for new books, in accordance with rules laid down by the Society. 
Organ: "Marathi Christian Literature Bulletin." 
Field: India (the whole area within which the Marathi language is used. It is 

spoken by eighteen millions of people in the Bombay Presidency, the Nizam's 

Dominions, and the Central Provinces). 

BENGAL BRANCH OF THE CHRISTIAN LITERATURE SOCIETY FOR INDIA 

(1859). 

Honorary Secretary and Manager: Rev. W. Goldsack, D.D., Pubna, East Bengal. 
Object: The circulation and sale of Christian literature in Bengal. 
Income: 128. 
Field: India (Bengal Presidency). 

MADRAS BRANCH OF THE CHRISTIAN LITERATURE SOCIETY FOR INDIA 

(1859). 

Secretary: Rev. Joseph Passmore, Memorial Hall Compound, Madras. 
Object: To provide Christian literature for Christian and non-Christian readers in 

English and the vernaculars. 

Income: 4,724. This includes sales, subscriptions, and sundries. 
Organs: "Matharpothini," "Mission School Magazine," "Preachers' Magazine." 
Field: India (Madras Presidency). 

CEYLON BRANCH OF THE CHRISTIAN LITERATURE SOCIETY FOR INDIA 

(1860). 

Honorary Secretary: Rev. P. M. Brumwell, Colombo, Ceylon. 
Object: Publishing and circulating school-books, and general Christian literature, 

in Ceylon. 
Income: 3,472. 
Field: Ceylon. 

BURMA TRACT AND CHRISTIAN LITERATURE SOCIETY (1861). 

Honorary Secretary: Rev. Harry E.LSafford. M.A., Baptist College, Rangoon, 

Burma. 
Object: To provide for the publication and circulation of tracts and other religious 

books in the languages of Burma. 
Income: Rupees 395 ($131, or 26). Of this amount Rupees 345 were from the 

sale of books, and from contributions received on the foreign field. 
Field: Burma. 

(NOTE: Formerly an interdenominational and independent organization, called the 
Burma Bible and Tract Society. The name was changed to the Burma Tract and 
Christian Literature Society, and it has recently become affiliated to the Christian 
Literature Society for India. The average number of volumes issued annually, 
from 1898 to 1908, was 1,500, and of tracts issued annually during the same period, 
134,161. The total issue of volumes and tracts from the date of its organization, 
in eleven different languages, is, approximately, 2,975,000. It is also largely en- 
gaged in Bible distribution.) 

UNITED PROVINCES BRANCH OF THE CHRISTIAN LITERATURE SOCIETY FOR 
INDIA (1864). 

Honorary Secretary: Rev. J. J. Lucas, p.p., Allahabad, India. 

Object: The circulation and sale of Christian literature. 

Income: 250. 

Crgan: "Makhzan-i-Masihi." 

Field: India (United Provinces). 

(NOTE: Organized in 1864, under the name of the North India Branch of the Chris- 
tian Literature Society for India, which name was afterward changed to the 
North-West Provinces and Oudh Branch, and, later, to its present name.) 

PUNJAB BRANCH OF THE CHRISTIAN LITERATURE SOCIETY FOR INDIA 

(1881). 
Honorary Secretary and Superintendent: Rev. E. M. Wherry, D.D., Ludhiana, 

Punjab. 
Object: The publication of a pure literature, _religious and secular, especially for 

the educated young men and women of India. 
Income: 31. 

Organ; "Nur Afshan" (an Urdu newspaper). 
Field: India (the Punjab and adjacent regions). 
(NOTE: Connected with the Punjab Religious Book Society of Lahore in 1881, but 

established independently, at Ludhiana, in 1899.) 

MYSORE BRANCH OF THE CHRISTIAN LITERATURE SOCIETY FOR INDIA 

(1899). 

Honorary Secretary: Mr. T. Gould, Mysore City, Mysore. 
Object: To provide Christian literature for the Kanarese people. 
Income: 698, for year ending March 31, 1909. 
Organ: "Mahilasakhi" (a magazine for women and girls). 
Field: India (Mysore Province and Kanarese portions of other provinces). 



ORISSA BRANCH OF THE CHRISTIAN LITERATURE SOCIETY FOR INDIA (i 
Honorary Secretary: Rev. Gordon S. Wilkins, M.A., Baptist Mission Press, Cut 
Object: The circulation and sale of Christian literature in the Onya language. 
Income: 11. 
Field: India (Orissa). 

BURMA BAPTIST MISSIONARY CONVENTION (1865). 

Secretary: Rev. T. Thanbyah, M.A., A.B., Sgaw Karen Mission, Ahlone, 

Rangoon, Burma. 
Object: Evangelistic and educational work for Burma and adjacent 

countries. 

Income: Rupees 5,108, equivalent to about $1,702 U. S. gold. 
Fields: Burma, Siam (among the Talains, Karens, Shans, Chins, Kachins, 

and Burmese). 

(NOTB: In connection with the American Baptist Foreign Mission Society, but the 
funds raised and the work supported by this Convention are not reported by the 
American Society.) 

STRICT BAPTIST MISSION, SOUTH INDIA (1866). 
Treasurer: Rev. Ernest A. Booth, Kilpauk, Madras. 
Object: Preaching the Gospel. 

Income: Rupees 1,000, equivalent to about $333 U. S. gold. 
Field: South India (Tinnevelli). 

INDIAN HOME MISSION TO THE SANTHALS (1867). 

Secretary: Rev. P. O. Bodding, Mohulpahari, via Rampur Hat, E. I. 

Ry., Bengal. 
Object: Gospel missions among the Santhals, and other tribes, in the 

Santhal Parganas, and the Santhal Christian Colony in Assam. 
Income: Rupees 119,491 ($39,830, or 7,966). Of this amount Rupees 

74,036 were received from European and American sources. 
Organs: "Santalen," "Hor Hopasoen." 
Field: India (Santhal Parganas, Assam, Dinaipur, and Maldah District). 

(NOTE: This Mission was founded in 1867, by'the missionaries Borresen and Skrefsrud. 
It was under the direction of Rev. L. O. Skrefsrud, as sole remaining trustee and 
manager, until his death, in December, 1910. Financial aid is given by com- 
mittees in Scotland, Denmark, Norway, and the United States, which see under 
their respective countries. The Bethel Santhal Mission, founded by Pastor A. Hae- 
gert, in 1875, was merged into the Indian Home Mission to the Santhals, in 1905.) 

PANCH HOWDS MISSION, POONA (1870). 
Secretary: Rev. H. S. Moore, M.A., Poona. 
Object: To make Christianity a vital power to the people of India by 

supporting Christian education, and industrial and medical work 

among them. 

Income: No statement at hand. 
Field: India (Poona and vicinity). 

(NOTB: Conducted by the Society of St. John the Evangelist, of Cowley, the Sister- 
hood of All Saints, and the Community of St. Mar'y the Virgin, of Wantage, Eng- 
land. Statistics of this Mission were solicited, but were not received.) 

GOPALGUNGE EVANGELISTIC MISSION (1874). 
Secretary: Rev. John Watt, M.A., United Free Church of Scotland Mis- 

sion, 2 Cornwallis Square, Calcutta, Bengal. 
Object: The evangelization of the Chandars, and the building up of a 

Christian community. 
Income: 174, received from Scottish Committee, and Rupees 5,600 

collected in India. Total income equal to $2,714 in U. S. gold. 
Field: India (Bengal). 

(NOTE: This Mission was begun in 1874, by the late Rev. Mathura Nath Base, B.A., 
B.L., one of Dr. Duff's converts, and is now successfully carried on by a staff of 
Indian missionaries. It is sometimes designated as the Bengal Evangelistic Mis- 
sion. See entry under Scotland for Scotch Committee.) 

MADRAS TAMIL MISSION ORPHAN HOME (1874). 
Secretary: Mr. Gnanamutthee Joseph Israel, Orphan Home, Madras, 

North-east. 

Object : Evangelistic and philanthropic work. 
Income: Supported by voluntary contributions. Amount received not 

stated. 
Field: India (Madras). 

INDIA SUNDAY SCHOOL UNION (1876). 

General Secretary: Rev. Richard Surges, Hibbert House, Jubbulpore, 
Central Provinces. 

Object: To emphasize the spiritual character of Sunday School teaching; 
to consolidate and extend Sunday School work; to educate teachers in 
the best principles and methods of Bible study and teaching; to pro- 
duce and foster the growth of English and vernacular literature for 
teachers and scholars; to encourage special services among young 
people; to focus the attention of the Christian Church upon the child, 
as the most valuable asset; to unite, for mutual help, the Sunday 
Schools in Southern Asia. 

Income: Rupees 15,710, equivalent to about $5,236 U. S. gold. (This 
income was reported in 1909, and includes a balance brought forward 
of Rupees 3,135.) 

Organ: "The India Sunday School Journal." 

Fields: India, Ceylon, Straits Settlements. 



Twenty-three auxiliaries of the India Sunday School Union are located at 
important centers in India, Burma, and Ceylon. There is an Indian Committee of 
the Sunday School Union in London, which renders aid to this work. See under 
England.) 

AHMEDNAGAR THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY (1878). 

Principal and Dean: Rev. R. A. Hume, D.D. Ahmednagar. 
Honorary Secretary: A. M. Sangle, Esq., Ahmednagar, India. 
Object: To train Indian Christian pastors, preachers, and leaders. 
Income: $800. 
Field: Western India (in the Marathi-speaking districts). 

(NOTE: In connection with the Marathi Mission of the American Board, but con- 
ducted by a Board of Trustees in India, of which the Rev. E. Fairbank, M.A., is 
the Secretary.) 

LUDHIANA ZENANA AND MEDICAL MISSION (1879). 
Superintendent: Miss M. Rose Greenfield, Ludhiana, Punjab. 
Object: To educate, evangelize, and heal Indian women and children. 
Income: 1,119. Of this amount 770 was from English sources, and 

349 was raised on the field. 
Organ: "News from Ludhiana." 
Field: India (Ludhiana and neighboring towns, Punjab). 

(NOTE: This Society has its origin in the invitation given by the American Presby- 
terian Mission, Ludhiana, to the English Society for the Promotion of Female 
Education in India and the East to take up zenana work in Ludhiana. It was 
organized under the auspices of that Society in 1879, by Miss M. Rose Greenfield, 
and became independent in 1899, when the Society for the Promotion of Female 
Education in India and the_ East, ceased to exist. The Mission reports 10,913 indi- 
vidual patients treated during 1908. A class for nurses is conducted, and many 
zenanas art? visited. See entry under England.) 



WORLD ATLAS OF CHRISTIAN MISSIONS 



India and Ceylon 



TRANQUEBAR TAMIL BIBLE SOCIETY (1883). 
Manager: Rev. H. Beisenherz, Tranquebar, Madras Presidency. 
Object: The publication and circulation of the Scriptures in the Tamil 

Income: No statement at hand. 

Field: India (among the Tamil-speaking population). 

(NOTE: The Tranquebar Tamil Bible Society is in connection with the Leipzig Evan- 
gelical Lutheran Mission. It reports since its organization the distribution of 
14,008 Bibles, Testaments, and portions of Scripture.) 

MADRAS NATIVE CHRISTIAN PROVIDENT FUND (1885). 

Honorary Secretary: Rev. Arthur Theophilus, Memorial Hall, Madras. 
Object: To promote the welfare of the native Christian community, and 

to extend its benefits, in certain proportion, to non-Christians also. 
Income: No statement at hand. 
Organ: "The Christian Patriot." 
Field: India (Madras Presidency). 

(NOTE: The membership is now 647. Since its establishment about 125,000 Rupees 
[$41,666 U. S. gold] have been distributed as bonuses to widows and orphans.) 

INDIAN CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION, MADRAS (1887). 
Honorary Secretaries: Mr. M. D. Devadoss, B.A., B.L., Mr. S. E. 

Runganadhan, M.A., Madras. 

Object: To promote the welfare of the Indian Christian community. 
Income: Rupees 300, equivalent to about $100 U. S. gold. 
Organ: "The Christian Patriot." 
Field: India (Madras Presidency). 

(Norn: The Association aims to promote the general welfare of the Christian com- 
munity, and is without any special denominational affiliation. Jt has raised 
Rupees 3,500 toward an Indian Christian Association Hall. Other similar Asso- 
ciations have been established in at least eight centers in India.) 

GODAVARI BAPTIST SWADESHA SUVARTAVYAPAKA SOCIETY (1888). 

Secretary: Mr. T. Solomon Raju, Headmaster Canadian Baptist Mission 
Training School ? Samalkot, Madras Presidency. 

Object: The diffusion of the truths of Christianity among the people of 
India, especially in the districts of Vizagapatam, Godavari, and Kistna, 
in the Madras Presidency; the encouragement of the spread of educa- 
tion among members of the Christian community, and others, by ac- 
quiring school sites, and by helping in the erection of schoolhouses. 

Income: For land and building, Rupees 116; for evangelist, Rupees 262; 
total, Rupees 378, equivalent to about $126 U. S. gold. Nothing re- 
ceived from abroad. 

Field: India (Madras Presidency). 

(NOTE: An evangelist is placed at Yellamanchili, and works under the supervision of 
the Canadian Baptist missionary there.) 

KURKU AND CENTRAL INDIAN HILL MISSION (1890). 
Secretary in India: Mr. Carl Wyder, Ellichpur, Berar. 
(See under England.) 

CHURCH OF GOD FAITH MISSION OF INDIA (1891). 
Superintendent: Mr. Thaddeus Neff, Lahore, Punjab. 
Object: Evangelistic, industrial, and philanthropic missions in India. 
Income: No statement received, except that the Mission is supported 

by freewill offerings. 
Organ: "Light from the Orient." 
Field: India (Punjab, Bengal, Orissa, Assam, South India, Bombay City). 

JUNGLE TRIBES MISSION, NILGIRI HILLS, COONOOR, SOUTH INDIA 

(1891). 

Secretary: Rev. R. Samuel. "Ashley Lodge," Coonoor, South India. 
Object: To evangelize the Jungle Tribes of South India. 
Income: Rupees 921 (received on the field), equivalent to about $307 

U. S. gold. 

Field: South India (Nilgiri and Coimbatore Hills). 
(NOTE: This organization is also designated as the Nilgiri Evangelistic Mission.) 

NATIONAL COUNCIL OF YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATIONS 

OF INDIA AND CEYLON (1891). 

General Secretary: Mr. A. C. Harte, 86 College St., Calcutta. 
Object: To promote the organization and development of Young Men's 
Christian Associations in India and Ceylon, and to assist in the evan- 
gelization of the young men of India and Ceylon. 
Income: Rupees 29,620, or $9,873. 
Organs: "The Young Men of India," "Ceylon Men." 
Fields: India, Ceylon. 

(NOTE: The Report of 1909 gives the number of Associations in connection with the 
National Council of India and Ceylon as 158, with a total membership of 11,430.) 

ST. THOMAS SYRIAN CHRISTIAN EVANGELISTIC ASSOCIATION (1891). 

Secretary: Rev. C. P. Philipose Kasessa, Syrian Christian Seminary, 
Tiruwella, Travancore, South India. 

Object: The spread of the Gospel among non-Christians, and the deepen- 
ing of the spiritual life among Christians. 

Income: Subscriptions and donations to the general fund, Rupees 19,186; 
Syrian Christian Seminary High School fees, etc., Rupees 4,925; grant- 
in-aid from the Government, Rupees 1.630; boarding fees, etc., to the 
hostel attached to the above high school, Rupees 2,088; miscellaneous, 
Rupees 61; total, Rupees 27,890, equivalent to about $9,296 U. S. gold. 

Field: India (Malabar, Cochin, Travancore). 

(NOTE: The Association is the missionary body of the St. Thomas Syrian Christians 
of Malabar, and ia owned and conducted by that community. It is supported 
mostly by voluntary subscriptions and donations.) 

TINNEVELLY CHILDREN'S MISSION (1891). 
Secretary: Mr. G. J. Arthur, Palamcotta, India. 
Object: To unite the children of the Tinnevelly District in bands for 

prayer and regular Bible reading; to lead them to definitely accept 

Jesus as their personal Saviour; to guard them from contracting vices; 

to train them in godly ways; and to encourage them in the spirit of 

giving for the Lord s work. 

Income: Rupees 5,452, equivalent to about $1,817 U. S. gold. 
Organ: "The Children's Friend." 
Field: India (Tinnevelly District). 

(NOTE: Originally called the "Tinnevelly Band of Hope.") 

CEYLON AND INDIA GENERAL MISSION (1892). 
Director: Mr. B. Davidson, 4 Ulsoor Road, Bangalore, South India. 
(See entry under England.) 



BALAGHAT MISSION (1893). 

(NOTE: This Mission was conducted independently, until Its recent incorporation with 
the Board of Foreign Missions of the Methodist Episcopal Church. It was formerly 
under the special charge of the Rev. J. Lampard, a missionary of that Church, 
who has been transferred to Bombay. It is now under the care of Rev. and Mrs. 
Robert Barrow, of the Methodist Episcopal Mission. Its Honorary Secretary 
in England is Miss Lampard, 114 Clapton Common, London. N. The organ of 
the Mission is "Jungle Jottings," published occasionally.) 

POONA AND INDIAN VILLAGE MISSION (1893). 

Director and Founder: Mr. Charles F. Reeve, Nasrapur, Poona District. 

Secretary: Mr. John W. Stothard, Nasrapur, Poona District. 

Object: Preaching the Gospel in unevangelized villages, also medical, 
orphanage, and school work. 

Income: Average annual income for past ten years, 6,000 from home 
sources, and 100 from the foreign field. 

Organ: "White Already to the Harvest." 

Field: India (headquarters at Nasrapur, Poona District. Work con- 
ducted at four outstations). 

(NOTE: There are several Australasian Councils of the Poona and Indian Village Mis- 
sion, which see under Australia.) 

RANAGHAT MEDICAL MISSION (1893)- 

(NOTE: Founded by James Monro, Esq., C.B., and conducted independently, until 
its affiliation with the Church Missionary Society, in 1906.) 

NORTH INDIA SCHOOL OF MEDICINE FOR CHRISTIAN WOMEN (1894) 
Honorary Secretary for India: Miss McKellar, M.D., Neemuch. 
Object: To train native and Eurasian Christian women to be medical 
missionaries (nurses or compounders), to work among their own country- 
women. 

(including a legacy of over 400). 



Income: 1,300, apj 

Field: India (Ludhiana, Punjab 

(NOTE: The students come from many different parts of India, and when trained are 
scattered over a wide area so that the influence of the school is very far-reaching. 
There are Committees which raise funds for the support of the North India School 
of Medicine, in England, Ireland, and the United States. See entries under these 
countries, respectively.) 

ASSOCIATION OF THE DAUGHTERS OF INDIA (1895). 
Founder and Secretary: Miss Shorat Chuckerbutty, M.A., 6 Katra Road, 

Allahabad. 
Object: The maintenance of the Victoria Girls' Home, established at 

Allahabad for the care of famine-suffering girls. 
Income: No statement at hand, but the Association receives voluntary 

subscriptions from Indian Christians. 
Field: India (United Provinces). 

HENARATGODA VILLAGE MISSION (1895). 

Treasurer: Miss H. M. Harris, Elephant Nook, Nuwara Eliya, Ceylon. 
Object: The evangelization of the natives of Ceylon. 
Income : No statement at hand. 
Field: Ceylon. 

(NOTE: The Mission center is at Henaratgoda, near Colombo. It was founded by the 
late Rev. J. Gilson Oregson.) 

TELUGU BAPTIST PUBLICATION SOCIETY (1893). 
Secretary: Rev. F. Kurtz, Madira, Deccan. 
Object: To provide Christian literature for the Telugus. 
Income: Rupees 1,992 (about $664). 
Organ: "The Telugu Baptist." 
Fields: India, South Africa, Burma (among the Telugu-speaking people). 



(NOTE: The Society publishes, besides the monthly parjer, about 40,000 copies of 
books and pamphlets. It is maintained by the 136 < ' " " 



of the American Baptist Foreign Mission Society.) 



churches of the Telugu field 



COLOMBO INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL (1896). 

Honorary Secretary: Mrs. E. Human, Rosmead Place, Colombo, Ceylon. 

Object: To provide elementary education in English and Singhalese, and 
the teaching of a trade, to any needy child, irrespective of class or 
creed. 

Income: Rupees 8,880 ($2,960 or 592). _ Of this amount 40 was re- 
ceived from the Wesleyan Missionary Society. 

Field: Ceylon (Colombo). 

MUKTI MISSION (1896). 

Founder and Superintendent: Pandita Ramabai, Kedgaon, Poona Dis- 
trict, Bombay Presidency. 

Secretary: Manoramabai Medhavi, Kedgaon, Poona District, Bombay 
Presidency. 

Object: To reach and help high-caste Hindu widows, deserted wives, and 
orphans, from all parts of India; to train the young women and girls 
sheltered in the Mukti Home, mentally, morally, and spiritually, so 
that they may go out as teachers and Bible-women to work in the 
different missions. 

Income: Average income, 6,245 yearly, received chiefly from Europe, 
America, and Australasia. 

Organ: "Mukti Prayer Bell." 

Field: India (Poona District). 

(NOTE; The missionary work of the Fandita Ramabai was begun in 1887, but the 
organization of the Mukti Mission dates from 1896. There is an American 
Ramabai Association in aid of the Mukti Mission, which see under United States. 
Contributions are also received from Europe and Australasia. An Indian Women's 
Industrial Rescue Mission, originally opened by Pandita Ramabai, is conducted by 
Mrs. J. E. Clark and Miss R. Rodebaugn, at Dodballapur, Mysore State.) 

NATIONAL YOUNG WOMEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION OF INDIA, 
BURMA, AND CEYLON (1896). 

National General Secretary: Miss Ethel Hunter, 1 Procter Road, Girgaum, 
Bombay. 

Secretary for North India: Miss Agnes G. Hill, Y. W. C. A., Lahore. 

Vernacular Secretary: Miss Maya Das, Girgaum, Bombay. 

Object: To bring young women into the knowledge of Christ, and to 
enlist all such who love Him in service for Him. 

Income: Rupees 115,081 or 7,672 (received from India alone), equiv- 
alent to about $38,360 U. S. gold. 

Organ: "The Young Women of India and Ceylon." 

Fields: India, Ceylon. (Work among the women, including those o! 
foreign parentage, and the native Christian women, and with special 
classes for non-Christian women.) 



130, with a membership of 8,500. A University Settlement for Women is conducted 
at Bombay, for entry of which see undjr England.) 



India and Ceylon 



DIRECTORY OF MISSIONARY SOCIETIES 



STUDENT VOLUNTEER MOVEMENT OF INDIA AND CEYLON (1896). 
General Student Secretary: Mr. ,1. N. Farquhar, M.A., 86 College St., 

Calcutta, Bengal. 
Object: To cooperate with the Young Men's Christian Association in 

caring for the spiritual welfare and the comfort of students in India. 
Income: No statement at hand. 
Organ: "Young Men of India." 
Fields: India, Ceylon. 

INDIA CHRISTIAN ENDEAVOR UNION (1897). 

Honorary Secretary: Rev. William Huntly, M.A., M.D., B.Sc., Agra. 

General Secretary: Rev. Herbert Halliwell, Christian Endeavor Office, 
Bangalore. 

Assistant Secretary: Mr. Thomas Barrow, C. E. Office, Bangalore. 

Object: To foster the growth and unify the work of Christian En- 
deavor in India. 

Income: Rupees 10,'000, equivalent to about $3,333 U. S. gold. Most of 
this income is received from Great Britain and America. 

Organ: "The India Christian Endeavor." 

Fields: India, Ceylon. 

(NOTE: The fourth World's Christian Endeavor Convention was held in the city of 
Agra, in November, 1909. At one of the meetings of the Convention sufficient 
funds were_ promised to carry on extension work throughout the length and breadth 
of the Indian Empire. Twenty District Secretaries have been thus provided for, 
and steps are being taken to begin this work at once. At the same Convention 
funds were collected, or promised, to engage an Indian Associate Secretary to 
cooperate in the work of organizing the new societies.) 

INDIAN CHRISTIAN MISSION (1897). 

Director and Founder: Mr. A. S. Paynter, Nuwara Eliya, Ceylon. 
Object: To present a pure Gospel in some of the unevangelized portions 
of India and Ceylon j to promote sobriety, and encourage simplicity of 
living; and to establish self-supporting churches in India. 
Income: 589. (Received almost entirely from Great Britain.) 
Fields: India, Ceylon. 

(NOTE: This Mission is known in India as Raj-i-Masih, and is also designated aa the 
Indian Christian Realm. See entry under England.) 

NEPAL MISSION (1897). 
Honorary Secretary: Mr. J. W. Innes Wright, Sukhia Pokhri P. O., 

Darjeeling. 
. Object: To reach with the Gospel some of the three million people living 

in Nepal. The agencies employed are evangelistic and medical. 
Income: No statement at hand. 
Field: India (Nepal, and the western side of British Sikkim). 

(NOTE: This is an independent Mission, founded and conducted by Mr. and Mrs. J. W. 
Innes Wright, whose services are rendered without salary.) 

SOUTH INDIA MISSIONARY ASSOCIATION (1897). 

Honorary Secretary: Rev. J. H. Maclean, B.D., Conjeeveram, South 
India. 

Object: To promote among missionaries fraternal feeling and inter- 
change of information and views regarding mission work; to pro- 
vide opportunity for united action when occasion requires. 

Income: Rupees 350 (equivalent to about $116 U. S. gold), derived 
from annual subscriptions of members. Membership, 456. 

Field: India (Madras Presidency, with associated Native States). 

(NOTE: Several similar Associations exist in other sections of India. See note on 
Missionary Associations, or Conferences, at end of the India Section.) 

TELUGU BAPTIST HOME MISSION SOCIETY (1897). 

Secretary: Mr. Mallela Pitchiah, Kanigiri. Nellore District. 

Object: The evangelization of aboriginal tribes in the Telugu-speaking 
section of India; work in Natal, South Africa, among the Telugu emi- 
grants; the aiding of weak Telugu churches. 

Income: Rupees 1,350 (approximately $450). 

Organ: "The Telugu Baptist." 

Fields: South India, Natal. 

(NOTE: An independent organization maintained by the 136 churches of the Telugu 
field of the American Baptist Foreign Mission Society. Four unordained men 
working in India, and one ordained man in South Africa are supported.) 

HOME FOR HOMELESS AND FRIENDLESS INDIAN WOMEN. CAL- 
CUTTA (1899). 

Honorary Superintendent and Founder: Miss Editha F. Mulvany, Church 
Corrie's Lane, Amherst St., Calcutta. 

Object: To provide a shelter and Home for Indian women who are friend- 
less, and need protection, more particularly for young widows. Christian 
instruction to the inmates of the Home receives special attention. 

Income: Rupees 4,950, equivalent to about $1,650 U. S. gold. There is 
also being raised a special sum to erect new buildings for the institu- 
tion, and to purchase a plot of land for the building site. The Calcutta 
Committee is pledged to pay the cost of the buildings, and the Council 
in England has undertaken to pay the price of the land. 

Field: India (Calcutta). 

(NOTE: The foundation stone of a new building for the Home for Homeless and Friend- 
less Indian Women, Calcutta, was laid on February 22, 1910. The name of the 
new institution is to be the "Mulvany Home for Indian Women," and it was ex- 
pected to be opened in December, 1910. Two hundred and fifty destitute Indian 
women have been inmates of the Home. They have come from many parts of 
India, sent principally by the various missionary associations. In addition to the 
above-mentioned Home, there are several other similar institutions in different 
sections of India. Among them may be noted the "Jubilee Home." at Bangalore, 
under the direction of Miss Rose White; the "Grennie's Home," at Nagpur, in 
charge of Miss Henderson, M.D. ; the "Women's Home," at Fatehpur-Haswa, 
United Provinces, under the supervision of Miss Ellen Todd; the "Helen E. Moses 
Home," at Kulpahar, Hamirpur District, United Provinces, under the direction 
of Miss Rosa Lee Oxer, M.D., and the "Industrial Home," at Dodballapur, Mysore, 
supervised by Mrs. J. E. Clark and Miss R. Rodebaugh.) 

INDIAN BAPTIST MISSIONARY SOCIETY (1899). 
Secretary: Rev. B. Das, B.A., Cuttack, Orissa, Bengal. 
Object: To evangelize the people by native evangelists, independently 

of foreign funds and foreign control. 
Income: No statement at hand. 
Field: India (Bengal, United Provinces). 

KESKAR'S CHRISTIAN MISSION AT SHOLAPUR (1899). 
Secretary: Rev. P. B, Keskar, M.D., Sholapur, Bombay Presidency. 
Object: Evangelistic, educational, and medical work for the natives of 

India. 

Income: Rupees 7,038, equivalent to about $2,346 U. S. gold. 
Field: India (Sholapur). 

(NOTE: Dr. Keskar is a native of India, and his mission is on an independent basis. 
He has charge of a lepei 1 asylum, two dispensaries, and four schools.) 



"BOYS' CHRISTIAN HOME" MISSION (1900). 
Secretary: Mr. D. S. Mahaffey, Dhond, Poona District. 
Object: The evangelization of the people of India. 
Income: Rupees 27,000, or $9,000. This is all expended for foreign 

missions. 
Field: India (Bhimtodi and Indapur Taluqa of Poona District, Fyzabad 

and Bahraich Districts, of United Provinces, and Nepal). 

SOUTH TRAVANCORE NATIVE EVANGELISTIC SOCIETY (1901). 

Secretary: Rev. C. Sathianathan. Nagercoil, Travancore State. 

Object: To preach the Gospel in the unevangelized parts of Travancore, to 
form churches where necessary, and to maintain them by the contri- 
butions of the native Christians. 

Income: Rupees 463, equivalent to about $154 U. S. gold. 

Field: South India (Malayalam, and Tamil Districts). 

SOCIETY FOR THE PROTECTION OF CHILDREN IN INDIA (1901). 

Secretary: Capt. W. J. Clifford, 20 Canal St., Entally, Calcutta. 

Object: To prevent the public and private wrongs of children, and the 
corruption of their morals; to take action for the enforcement of laws 
for their protection, and, when desirable, to have the laws on the mat- 
ter amended. 

Income: Subscriptions, 261; grants-in-aid, 100; from England, 100; 
total, 461. 

Field: India (Bengal, United Provinces, and Central Provinces). 

(NOTE: Similar societies have been recently organized in Western and Southern India.) 

ENGLISH COMMITTEE OF THE SOCIETY FOR THE PROTECTION OF CHILDREN 

IN INDIA (1900). 
(See under England.) 

LEE MEMORIAL BENGALI MISSION (1901). 

Superintendents: Rev. D. H. Lee, Mrs. Ada Lee, 13 Wellington Square, 
Calcutta. 

Honorary Secretary: Rev. D. M. Stearns, D.D., Germantown, Phila- 
delphia, U. S. A. 

Home Secretary: Mrs. Fannie L. Sperry, Mountain Lake Park, Maryland, 
U. S. A. 

Object : Evangelistic and educational work in Bengal. 

Income : No statement at hand. 

Field: India (Bengal). 

(NOTE: The date given is that of the formation of the Lee Memorial. The missionary 
work of Mr. and Mrs. Lee in Calcutta began many years before. Rev. D. H. and 
Mrs. Lee are missionaries of the American Methodist Episcopal Church, but con- 
duct this Mission independently, which is supported from sources outside of the 
treasury of the Methodist Board. Special attention is given to the normal trainir 

of Bei ~ 

in the 



. ,li girls. The Mission is a Memorial to their six children who were killeo 
Jarjeeling disaster of 1899.) 



INDIAN MISSIONARY SOCIETY OF TINNEVELLY (1903). 

Secretary: Mr. J. Anbudaiyan, B.A., Palamcotta, South India. 

Object: To develop by an indigenous organization the missionary spirit 
of the native Church, in order to spread the Gospel in India or other 
lands. 

Income: From the home constituency, Rupees 7,904; receipts in the 
field, Rupees 350; total, Rupees 8,254, equivalent to about $2,751 
U. S. gold. Amount spent for missions, exclusive of office expenses, 
magazines, reports, etc., Rupees 7,929, or $2,643. 

Organ: "The Missionary Intelligencer." 

Field: India (Manukota Taluq, in the Nizam's Dominions; the hills be- 
tween Travancore and Tinnevelly). 

INDIA INDUSTRIAL EVANGELISTIC MISSION (1903). 
Superintendent: Pastor J. C. Lawson, Pilibhit, United Provinces. 
Object: ^Evangelistic work, accompanied by famine rescue service, and 

the establishment of orphanages and industrial establishments. 
Income: No statement at hand. 

Organ: "The Industrial Evangelistic Mission Herald." 
Field: India (Pilibhit, Dehra Dun, and Allahabad, in the United 
Provinces). 

(NOTE: Incorporated in 1907. For entry of Aid Committee for the India Industrial 
Evangelistic Mission, see under United States. There are other aid committees 
in Great Britain, Canada, and Australia.) 

MADRAS CHRISTIAN BENEFIT FUND (1903). 
Secretary: Mr. Joseph Satya Nadar, Pursewalkum, Madras. 
Object: A Provident Loan Society, open to Christians and non-Christians. 
Income: The capital is given as Rupees 126,000 ($42,000 U. S. gold). 
Organ: "The Christian Patriot." 
Field: India (Madras Presidency). 

NAZARETH CHILDREN'S MISSION (1903). 

Honorary Secretary: Mr. S. D. Lazarus, Nazareth. 

Object: To create in the minds of the members of the Mission a desire to 
read the Holy Scriptures, and to give instruction in the Church Cate- 
chism. 

Income: Rupees 450, equivalent to about $150 U. S. gold. 

Organ: "The Children's Herald." 

Field: India (among the children of the Church of England congrega- 
tions of Tinnevelly). 

(NOTE: Entirely a voluntary organization, which receives no aid from foreign sources.) 

HOME MISSIONARY SOCIETY OF INDIA (1905). 

Honorary Secretary: Miss T. M. Mergler, B.A. Chittoor, North Arcot, 
,. Madras Presidency. 

Object: To rouse the Anglo-Indian and Eurasian communities to a direct 
and responsible share in the evangelization of India, a work hitherto 
left almost entirely to foreign missionary agencies. 

Income: Rupees 2,800, equivalent to about $933 U. S. gold. 

Organ: "Home Missionary Society of India Quarterly." 

Field: India (assisting young women who are training for missionary 
service; making financial grants toward the salary of native Bible- 
women; and ministering to neglected local communities). 

(NOTE: The name given above has been adopted since July, 1909. The Society when 
first organized, in June, 1905, was known as the Women's Home Missionary So- 
ciety of India. It is not connected with the National Missionary Society of India, 
since it represents the efforts of the Eurasian and Anglo-Indian, or European com- 
munities of India, to engage in local mission work.) 

MEDICAL MISSIONARY ASSOCIATION OF INDIA (1905). 

Secretary: A. Lankester, M.D., Peshawar. 

Object: The extension of medical missions in India as a means of evan- 
gelization. 



70 



WORLD ATLAS OF CHRISTIAN MISSIONS 



India-Japan 



Income: Rupees 1,015, equivalent to about $338 U. S. gold. 
Organ: "Medical Missions in India." 
Field: India. 



: Two hundred and twenty-one medical missionaries in India are represented 
in the membership of the Medical Missionary Association.) 

NATIONAL MISSIONARY SOCIETY OF INDIA (1905). 
President: Rajah Sir Harnam Singh, K.C.I.E. 
Secretary: Mr. K. T. Paul, B.A., L.T. 

Office Address: National Missionary Society Office, Madras, E. 
Object: To evangelize unoccupied fields in India and adjacent countries, 

and to lay upon Indian Christians the burden of responsibility for the 

evangelization of their own country, and neighboring lands. 
Income: Rupees 6,500, equivalent to about $2,166 U.' S. gold. 
Organs: "The National Missionary Intelligencer" (English), "The Qasid" 

(Persian-Urdu)," "The N. M. S. Ka' Akhbar" (Roman-Urdu), "The 

Patrika" (Hindi), "The Deepika" (Tamil). 
Field: India (Montgomery District, in the Punjab; Nukkar Tehsil, in 

the United Provinces; Karjat and Karumala Taluqs, in Bombay 

Presidency). 



fully developed.) 

BOARD FOR TAMIL CHRISTIAN LITERATURE (1906). 
Secretary: Rev. A. C. Clayton, Kpdaikanal. 
Object: The preparation of Christian literature for the Tamils. 
Income: No statement at hand. 
Organ: "The Tamil Bookman." 
Fields: India, Ceylon (among the Tamils). 



(NOTE: The Board for Tamil Christian Literature represents a Union of fifteen mis- 
sions and societies working in the Tamil field. The Rev. A. C. Clayton, of the 
Wesleyan Missionary Society, has been set apart for the service of tne Board in 



the production of Tamil Christian Literature. The Tamil-speaking people number 
16,600,000.) 

LEIPZIG MISSION AMONG THE TAMILS OF BURMA AND THE MALAY 

PENINSULA (1907). 

Secretary: Name and address not at hand. 
Object: To gather into congregations Tamil Christians who emigrate to 

Burma and the Malay Peninsula. 
Income: 10,000 Mk. ($2,400 in U. S. gold). 
Fields: Burma, Malay Peninsula. 

SEAMEN'S MISSION, KARACHI (1908). 
Honorary Secretary: Rev. T. E. F. Morton, The Home, Karachi. 
Object: Missionary work among European and Lascar seamen at the 

port of Keamari, Karachi, India. 
Income : No statement at hand. 
Field: India. 

BURNING BUSH MISSION (1909). 

Superintendent: Rev. A. E. Mokstad, Allahabad. 
Object: The evangelization of the people of India. 
Income: No statement at hand. 
Field: India (Allahabad and vicinity). 

INDIAN CHRISTIAN BAJANA SABAH (1909). 
Secretary: Mr. Ragland David, 16 Royapetta High Road, Madras 
Object: Evangelistic service. 
Income : No statement at hand. 
Field: India (Madras and vicinity). 

(NOTE: An Indian Society which has organized itself into an evangelistic band for 
work among the depressed classes, and to provide Christian musical entertain- 
ments, free from objectionable features, at weddings and other festal occasions. 
Its forty members are chiefly young men connected with the Church of England, 
who have been under the influence of the Young Men's Christian Association.) 

CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION FOR THE EDUCATION OF THE BLIND IN 

SOUTH INDIA ( ). 

Honorary Secretary: Miss Forbes, 14 Narasinga-puram Road, Madras. 
Object: The education and industrial training of the blind in Soutl 

India. 

Income: Rupees 3,898, equivalent to about $1,299 U. S. gold. This in- 
come is derived from the contributions of friends, the sales of indus- 
trial products, and a government grant. 
Field: South India. 

(NOTE: The blind are received without distinction of caste_or creed. A certain pro- 
portion of the training is educational, and the remainder industrial.) 

TEHRI BORDER VILLAGE MISSION ( ). 

Founder : Mr. William Greet, Landour, North India. 

Object: The translation of the Scriptures into a standardized language 

which will be intelligible to the people of Tehri and British Garhwal. 
Income: No statement at hand. 
Field: India (Tehri and British Garhwal). 

WOMEN'S CHRISTIAN TEMPERANCE UNION OF INDIA ( ). 

Honorary Corresponding Secretary: Mrs. M. B. Denning, Muzuffarpur, 

Bengal. 

Object: The promotion of temperance throughout India. 
Income: No statement at hand. 
Field: India. 

ZENANA TRAINING HOME, POONA ( ). 

Superintendent: Miss Soonderbai H. Powar, Poona, Bombay. 

Object: The training of Indian mission workers to serve as teachers, 

preachers, Bible-women, and helpers to missionaries in different parts 

of India. 
Income: Rupees 6,384 (equivalent to about $2,128 U. S. gold). This 

income is supplied by contributions from England, Scotland, America, 

Australia, and India. 
Field: India. 

(NOTE: Miss Powar's work is not supported by any missionary society, but receives 
help from the contributions of friends. She has educated many trained workers, 
who are doing excellent service in various missions.) 

MISSIONARY ASSOCIATIONS, OR CONFERENCES, IN INDIA. 

(NOTE: The missionaries residing in various parts of India have, in many instances, 
organized themselves into associations, or conferences, for mutual helpfulness, and 
the general discussion of their difficulties and problems, and to insure united action 
and harmonious views concerning missionary policy. It has not seemed advisable 
to give a separate entry in the Directory to each of these associations, as they are 



not, strictly speaking, missionary in their aims, but are designed rather for mutual 
support and guidance, and the devotional culture of the missionaries themselves. 
It will suffice for present purposes if this brief reference is made to their existence. 
These missionary associations, or conferences, have been formed at Calcutta, Bom- 
bay, Lucknow, Agra, Madras, and several other cities in India, and there are also 
the South India Missionary Association and the Mid-India Missionary Association.) 

MISSIONS CONCERNING WHICH FULL INFORMATION HAS NOT BEEN 
OBTAINED. 

(NOTE: In the "Protestant Missionary Directory of India for 1910-11," compiled by 
James Inch's, Esq., is found mention of several smaller missions in India, con- 
cerning the operations of which sufficient data are not at hand for regular entry . 
in this Directory. Among these may be included the Pentecostal Mission, the 
Lohagat Tanakpur Medical Mission, the Tibetan Mission, the Simla Evangelistic 
Mission, and the Railway Mission. There are also several independent orphanages, 
industrial missions, training homes and schools, rescue homes, convert homes 
for females, and hostels, not connected with the regular missionary boards or 
societies outside of India, which can merely be mentioned in this general way. 
There are, moreover, a considerable number of independent and unattached mis- 
sionaries concerning whose work it is not possible in this connection to give ade- 
quate information. Application for data has not been successful in the case of _the 
following societies: Scripture Union for Bengal, Calcutta: Lord's Day Union, 
Calcutta; Voluntary Medical Missionary Society, Calcutta; Chinsurah and Hooghly 
Zenana Mission; Premananda Faith Missionary Association, Raghunathpur, Madras 
Presidency; Young Liberals' League, Madras; and the Indian Missionary Society 
of Trichinopoli. ft is much to be regretted, also, that in the case of a number of 
missions in India, efforts to obtain a statement of income have proved fruitless.) 



JAPAN 

The silver yen is equivalent to fifty cents U. S. currency. The gold yen equals one dollar) 

DOSHISHA COLLEGE (1875). 

President: Rev. Tasuka Harada, B.A., LL.D., Kyoto. 

Object: To provide Christian educational opportunities for Japanese 

young men. 

Income : No statement at hand. 
Field: Japan. 

(NOTE: The Doshisha was founded by Dr. J. H. Neesima, beginning as an academy, 
with a theological department, as early as 1875, and from its inception was a Jap- 
anese institution.) 

NIPPON DENDO GWAISHA [JAPAN MISSIONARY SOCIETY] (1879). 

Secretary: Address Secretary Nippon Dendp Gwaisha, Osaka. 

Object: Evangelistic, being the home missionary society of the Kumiai 
Churches. 

Income: The Home Missionary Society of the Kumiai Churches reports 
in the issue for 1910 of the "Christian Movement in Japan" the sum 
of 11,278 Yen ($5,639) as contributed for missionary purposes. The 
total contributions of the native Christians of the Kumiai Churches 
for all church purposes amounted, in 1910, to Yen 97,351 ($48,675 in 
U. S. Gold). 

Organs: "Shinjin," "Kirisutokyo Sekai.'' 

Field: Japan (a number of Japanese cities and towns). 

(NOTE: Independent, but ecclesiastically connected with the Kumiai [Congregational] 
Churches of Japan.) 

FUKUIN DOMEI KWAI [EVANGELICAL ALLIANCE OF JAPAN] (1880). 
Secretary: Address Secretary of Evangelical Alliance of Japan, care of 

Young Men's Christian Association, Tokyo. 
Object: To promote evangelical unity, and further the interests of the 

Gospel in Japan. 
Income : No statement at hand. 
Field: Japan. 

(NOTE: The Japan branch of the Evangelical Alliance, composed of a representative 
group of Japanese Church leaders, has been doing effective work for many years. 
It seems likely, however, in response to a resolution adopted by the Semi -Centen- 
nial Christian Conference, Tokyo, October, 1909, that the Alliance will give place in 
the near future to a "Federation of Churches" in Japan.) 

HOME FOR RELEASED PRISONERS (1883). 
Superintendent: Mr. T. Hara, Tokyo. 
Object: To aid ex-convicts, both men and women. 
Income: No statement at hand. 
Field: Japan. 

SEISHO NO TOMO [SCRIPTURE UNION OF JAPAN] (1883). 

Secretary: W. Norton Whitney, M.D., 17 Hikawacho, Akasaka, Tokyo. 

Object : To encourage the reading and circulation of the Holy Scriptures. 

Income: No statement at hand. 

Organ: "Seisho no Tomo." 

Field: Japan. 

(NOTE: Interdenominational and independent.) 

AKASAKA HOSPITAL (1886). 

Superintendent: W. Norton Whitney, M.D., 17 Hikawacho, Akasaka, 

Tokyo. 

Object: To heal the sick, and to preach the Gospel. 
Income: Yen 9,600 ($4,800 in U. S. gold). Of this amount about $1,250 

was received from abroad, and $3,550 from local contributions and 

fees. 
Field: Japan (Tokyo and vicinity). 

(NOTE: Interdenominational and independent. The dispensary connected with this 
hospital was organized in 1884.) 

OKAYAMA ORPHAN ASYLUM (1887). 

Superintendent: Mr. J. Ishii, Okayama Orphanage, Okayama. 

Object: To care for homeless children. 

Income: Yen 48,675 ($24,337 in U. S. gold). 

Organ: "The Asylum Record." 

Field : Japan. Orphans are received from all parts of the country. 

(NOTE: Interdenominational and independent, but specially in affiliation with the 
Kumiai [Congregational] Churches of Japan.) 

ST. ANDREW'S UNIVERSITY MISSION, TOKYO (1887). 
ST. HILDA'S MISSION, TOKYO (1887). 

(NOTE: The above Missions are supported by the Japan Guild of St. Paul, London, 
in connection with the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel.) 

BIBLE SOCIETIES' COMMITTEE FOR JAPAN (1890). 

United States Agent: Rev. Henry Loomis, D.D., American Bible Society, 

Yokohama. 

British Agent: Mr. Frederick Parrott, Bible House, 95 Yedomachi, Kobe. 
Object: Publishing and circulating the Scriptures in Japan. 



Japan 



DIRECTORY OF MISSIONARY SOCIETIES 



71 



Income: The Bible Societies provided grants, as follows: American Bible 
Society, $16,000; British and Foreign Bible Society, 2,150; and the 
National Bible Society of Scotland, 1,108. No statement at hand 
in regard to receipts from local sources. 

Field: Japan. 

(NOTE: The Bible Societies opened work in Japan in 1874, but in 1890 a union of 
Bible Society activities there was consummated by the American Bible Society, 
the British and Foreign Bible Society, and the National Bible Society of Scotland.) 

POST AND TELEGRAPH MISSION (1892). 

Secretary: Address Secretary Post and Telegraph Mission, care of W. 
Norton Whitney, M.D., 17 Hikawacho, Akasaka, Tokyo. 

Object: Missions among the employees of the postal and telegraph organi- 
zations in Japan. 

Income : No statement at hand. 

Field: Japan. 

(NOTE: The Mission is closely allied to, and working with, the Scripture Union of 
Japan.) 

RAILWAY AND POLICE MISSION (1892). 

Secretary: Address Secretary Railway and Police Mission, care of W. 

Norton Whitney, M.D., 17 Hikawacho, Akasaka, Tokyo. 
Object : Missions among the railway men and the police force in Japan. 
Income: No statement at hand. 
Organ: "Tetsudo Semen." 
Field: Japan. 

(NOTE: The Mission is closely allied to, and working with, the Scripture Union of 
Japan.) 

YOUNG PEOPLE'S SOCIETY OF CHRISTIAN ENDEAVOR (1892). 
General Secretary: Mr. T. Sawaya, Tonodan, Kyoto. 
Object: To train children and young people in the art of Christian living 

and personal service for Christ. 
Income: The work is sustained by an annual grant o Yen 2,000 ($1,000 

in U. S. gold) from the World's Christian Endeavor Union, and through 

fees and voluntary contributions from local sources. 
Organ: "Kwas-sekai" ("The Endeavor World"). 
Field: Japan. 

IHAI BYOIN [LEPER HOSPITAL] (1893). 

Address: Superintendent of the Ihai Byoin, Meguro, near Tokyo. 
Object: To care for lepers. 
Income : No statement at hand. 
Field: Japan. 

(NOTE: In connection with the Church of Christ in Japan, and formerly under the 
supervision of the late Miss K. M. Youngman.) 

NIHON KIRISUTO KYOKWAI DENDO KYOKU [BOARD OF MISSIONS 
OF THE CHURCH OF CHRIST IN JAPAN] (1894). 

Secretary: Rev. K. Kiyama. The Secretary (1909) of the Council of 
Missions cooperating with the Church of Christ in Japan is the Rev. 
Harvey Brokaw, Kure. 

Object: Home and foreign missions. 

Income: Yen 83,000 ($41,500 in U. S. gold). This represents the native 
contributions to the Dendo Kyoku for 1910, as reported in the eighth 
edition of the "Christian Movement in Japan." The contributions of 
native Christians of the Church of Christ in Japan for all church pur- 
poses amounted, in 1910, to Yen 103,483 ($51,741 in U. S. gold). 

Organs of the Church of Christ: "Fukuin Shimpo," "Kirisutokyo Shimpo," 
"Tohoku Kyokwai Jihp," "Yako," "Fukuin Geppo." 

Fields: Japan, Korea, Chinese Empire (Manchuria and China). 

(NOTE: Working in connection with the churches and preaching places of the Church 
of Christ in Japan. Home missions were commenced in 1880. Foreign work for 
Japanese in Korea began in 1907, and later it was extended to the Japanese in 
Manchuria. The Dendo Kyoku now purposes to conduct foreign mission work 
among the Chinese in China, and has already sent a missionary to Peking. A 
Japanese gave Yen 300 to start the enterprise, and a native church has guaranteed 
the salary of a missionary. There is also in connection with the Nihon Kirisuto 
Kyokwai a Church Building Society, which see listed under the title of Presby- 
terian and Reformed Church Building Association.) 

KAISHUN BYOIN [KUMAMOTO LEPER HOSPITAL] (1895). 
Address: Superintendent of the Kaishun Byoin, Kumamoto. 
Object: The care and medical treatment of lepers. 
Income : No statement at hand. 
Field: Japan. 

(NOTE: In affiliation with the Church of England. Founded and directed by Miss 
H. Riddell.) 

WOMAN'S CHRISTIAN TEMPERANCE UNION OF JAPAN (1896). 

President: Mrs. K. Yajima, Woman's Christian Temperance Union, Tokyo. 

Object: The promotion of temperance principles in Japan. 

Income: No statement at hand. 

Organs: "Shonen Shimpo," "Kyofukwai," "Kinshu no Tomo." 

Field: Japan. 

(NOTE: The Japanese Union cooperates effectively with the foreign auxiliary, whose 
President is Miss I. M. Hargrave, 8 Toriizaka, Azabu, Tokyo.) 

JAPAN BOOK AND TRACT SOCIETY (1898). 

Treasurer: Mr. George Braithwaite, 5 Hikawa-Cho, Akasaka, Tokyo. 
Object: The publication and circulation of Christian tracts and books. 
Income: Yen 1,100 ($550 in U. S. gold). This represents only the grant 
of the Religious Tract Society. No report of income from local sources. 
Field: Japan. 

(NOTE: Interdenominational and independent. The American Tract Society made 
its first grant of $200 to aid in the creation of a Christian literature in Japan in the 
year 1874. Committees representing the British and American societies were 
formed, and united in 1891. In 1898 the above Society was organized. In 1909 
the Japan Book and Tract Society put into circulation 20,486 books, 467,495 tracts, 
and 108,325 cards, making a total of 596,306 ipublications. There are other im- 
portant Christian literary agencies in Japan which might be mentioned, but they 
are usually connected with the large missionary societies of Christendom having 
work in the Empire. The Methodist Publishing House, Tokyo, the Publication 
Houses and Presses of the Kumiai Churches, the Kaneko Memorial Press at Sendai, 
and the Publishing Houses and Book Depots of the Anglican Communion, at Kobe 
and Tokyo, under the direction of the Japan Church Literature Fund, might be 
enumerated as examples. A "Committee on Christian Literature," representing 
the Standing Committee of Cooperating Christian Missions, and a "Publication 
Committee" of the Council of Missions, give careful attention to the whole subject 
of literature.) 

KATEI GAKKO [REFORM SCHOOL] (1898). 
Superintendent: Rev. K. Tomeoka, Sugamo, Tokyo. 
Object: The reformation of wayward boys. 
Income: No statement at hand. The Government has awarded a grant- 

in-aid for endowment purposes. 
Field: Japan. 



NATIONAL TEMPERANCE LEAGUE OF JAPAN (1899). 
Secretary: Rev. T. Ukai, 20 Nishikonya-cho, Kyobashi-ku, Tokyo. 
Object: To promote the cause of temperance in Japan, and among Jap- 
anese people in other countries. 
Income: No statement at hand. 
Organ: "Kuni no Hikari." 
Field: Japan, Formosa, Korea, Manchuria, Hawaii, United States. 

(NOTE: There are 103 Japanese temperance societies affiliated with the National 
Temperance League. In this way all the societies keep in close touch with each 
other, and, under the direction of the League, are pushing forward toward the 
same object.) 

NATIONAL COMMITTEE OF YOUNG WOMEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIA- 
TIONS OF JAPAN (1900). 
National Secretary: Miss A. Caroline Macdonald, 41 Sanbancho, Koji- 

machi, Tokyo. 
Object: To organize and develop Young Women's Christian Associations 

in the cities, towns, and institutions of higher learning in Japan. 
Income: $3,200. 

Organ: "Meiji no Joshi" ("The Young Women of Japan"). 
Field: Japan. 

(NOTE: In connection with the Japan National Committee there are three Foreign 
Secretaries, and fourteen Associations.) 

STANDING COMMITTEE OF COOPERATING CHRISTIAN MISSIONS IN 

JAPAN (1901). 
Secretary: Prof. M. N. Wyckoff, Sc.D., 77 Imazato-cho, Shirokane, 

Shiba, Tokyo. 
Object: To promote cooperation, and further the common aims of the 

Churches in Japan. 

Income: Yen 811 ($405 in U. S. gold). 
Organ: "The Christian Movement in Japan" (annual issue) 
Field: Japan. 

(NOTE: The Standing Committee of Cooperating Christian Missions is formed by a 
union of twenty-two of the leading missionary societies doing work in Japan.) 

TOYO SENKYOKWAI [ORIENTAL MISSIONARY SOCIETY] (1901). 
Director of the Bible School: Rev. C. E. Cowman, Kashiwagi, Yodobashi- 

machi, Tokyo-fuka. 

Object : To train a native ministry, and efficient Christian workers. 
Income: Yen 50,000 ($25,000 in U. S. gold). This income was reported 

in 1909 as received largely from abroad. An additional gift of Yen 

8,000 is held in trust for the Korean Bible School. 
Organs: "Hono no Shita," "Electric Messages." 
Fields: Japan, Korea. 

YOTSUYA CHRISTIAN CHURCH MISSION (1901). 

Director and Pastor: Rev. W. D. Cunningham, Yotsuya, Tokyo. 

Object: Evangelistic work in the Yotsuya section of Tokyo. 

Income: No statement at hand. The church is largely self-supporting, 

but is aided by contributions from abroad. 
Organ: "Tokyo Christian." 
Field: Japan. 

(NOTE: The Mission is independent, and has been for several years under the charge 
of Rev. W. D. Cunningham, aided by Mrs. Cunningham, Miss Alice Miller, and 
twelve Japanese assistants, all supported by special contributions from friends.) 

JAPAN EVANGELISTIC BAND (1903). 

Address: Mr. A. L. Dyer, 1202 Okuhirano-mura, Kobe. 
Object: Evangelistic effort in Japan. 
Income: No statement at hand. 
Field: Japan. 

JAPANESE YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION NATIONAL 

UNION (1903). 
National General Secretary: Mr. T. Komatsu, 3 Sanchome Mitoshirocho, 

Kanda, Tokyo. 
Object: To promote the organization and development of Young Men's 

Christian Associations in Japan, and to promote the evangelization 

of Japanese young men. 
Income: $20,000 gold. 
Organ: "Kaitakusha" ("The Pioneer"). 
Fields: Japan, and the Japanese in Korea and Manchuria. 

(NOTE: In connection with the Union there are seven Foreign Secretaries and seventy- 
five Associations.) 

HANABATAKE SEI-KYO-IN [HANABATAKE CHARITY HOSPITAL] 

(1905). 

Superintendent: Mr. Kodama, Hanabatake, Okayama. 
Object: To heal the sick, under Christian influences. 
Income: Yen 982 ($491 in U. S. gold). The Government has given it 

recognition through a grant-in-aid for endowment purposes. 
Field: Japan (Okayama and vicinity). 

HAKUAI SHOKKO GAKKWAI [HOME FOR DISCHARGED PRISONERS] 

(1906). 

Superintendent: Mr. Katsuji Aikawa, Osaka. 

Object: To provide a home for discharged prisoners, and to render gen- 
eral assistance to them. 
Income: Yen 3,815 ($1,907 in U. S. gold). 
Field: Japan. 

(NOTE: The land for this institution is loaned by the Government.) 

INTERNATIONAL REFORM BUREAU (1906). 
(See under United States.) 

JAPAN COUNCIL OF THE INTERNATIONAL REFORM BUREAU (1908). 

Secretary: Prof. E. W. Clement, 29 Sanaizaka, Ichigaya, Tokyo. 

Object: To create a better moral environment, especially among the young, in 

Japan. 

Income: No statement at hand. 
Field: Japan. 

(NOTE: The Rev. E. W. Thwing, Special Secretary for Eastern Asia of the Inter- 
national Reform Bureau, is giving a portion of his time to furthering the 
work of the Japan Council.) 

KINDERGARTEN UNION OF JAPAN (1906). 

Address: Miss Margaret M. Cook, Kami-Nagarekawa-cho, Hiroshima. 
Object: The establishment and supervision of kindergartens in Japan. 
Income: No statement at hand. 



72 



WORLD ATLAS OF CHRISTIAN MISSIONS 



Japan-Turkish Empire 



Organ: "Kindergarten Teacher's Manual." 
Field: Japan. 

(NOTE: The Kindergarten Union includes five Draining schools, two of which have full 
government recognition, and fifty-five kindergartens, representing the work of 
eleven mission boards. A number of kindergartens, privately conducted by Jap- 
anese Christians, are not in the Union. Kindergartens are also in a few government 
schools, and are rapidly increasing in number and efficiency throughout the country. 
Christian training-schools to meet the demand for training Japanese kindergartnera 
are consequently a great need.) 

PRESBYTERIAN AND REFORMED CHURCH BUILDING ASSOCIATION 

(1906). 

Secretary: Rev. W. G. Seiple, Ph.D., 78 Higashi Samban-cho, Sendai. 
Object: To aid in the building and repairing of Japanese churches. 
Income: Yen 1,563 ($781 in U. S. gold). 
Fields: Japan, Formosa. 

(NOTE: The Church Building Association has helped in four years about twenty-three 
churches to erect buildings in various parts of Japan, including Formosa. This 
Society was formed in Japan, and is supported by missionaries with their own 
personal gifts. About Yen 7,000 has been collected and expended by it, averaging 
Yen 300 per church building. Some of these buildings, with grounds, are worth 
Yen 6,000 to Yen 10,000. This serves to indicate how the Japanese contribute in 
their own way toward church buildings. They have a society of their own, which 
also aids in church building enterprises.) 

JAPANESE BAPTIST MISSIONARY SOCIETY (1907). 
Address: Secretary of Japanese Baptist Missionary Society, Nagoya. 
Object: Evangelistic work in Nagoya and vicinity. 
Income: Yen 1,002 ($501 in U. S. gold). 
Field: Japan (Nagoya and vicinity). 

NATIONAL SUNDAY SCHOOL ASSOCIATION OF JAPAN (1907). 

Secretary: Rev. Takeshi Ukai, 2 Nishimachi, Nihonenoki, Tokyo. 

Object: To furnish better training and equipment for Sunday School 
work. 

Income: Yen 3,750 ($1,875 in U. S. gold). Of this amount the Inter- 
national Sunday School Association contributed Yen 2,000 ($1,000), 
and the remaining Yen 1,750 ($875) was derived from local sources. 

Organ: "The Sunday School News." 

Field: Japan. 

(NOTE: This Association has issued a Teachers' Training Course, comprising six vol- 
umes, which five hundred teachers are systematically studying. It has also pro- 
jected a series of graded lessons .covering eleven years, the courses for seven years 
having been published for immediate useT) 

SHIONKWAI CHRISTIAN DISPENSARY (1908). 
Superintendent: Rev. N. Yamanouchi, Shionkwai, Kumamoto. 
Object: To heal the sick, and to spread Christian truth. 
Income: Yen 250 ($125 in U. S. gold). 
Field: Japan (Kumamoto and vicinity). 
(NOTE: Supported by Christian churches in Kumamoto.) 

TELEGRAPHERS' CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION (1908). 

Address: Secretary of Telegraphers' Christian Association, care of Rev. C. 

E. Cowman, Kashiwagi, Yodobashi-machi, Tokyo-fuka. 
Object: Evangelistic work among telegraphers in Japan. 
Income: No statement at hand. 
Organ: "Denshi." 
Field: Japan. 

(NOTE: The Association has an evangelist visiting the various telegraph offices of 
Japan, and holding special meetings for telegraphers.) 

CHRISTIAN EDUCATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF TOKYO (1909). 
President: Dr. K. Ibuka, Meiji Gakuin, Tokyo. 

Secretary: Rev. H. B. Benninghoff, 110 Zoshigaya, Koishikawa, Tokyo. 
Object: To study the problem of Christian education with a view to 

mutual understanding and possible cooperation. 
Income: No statement at hand. 
Field: Japan (Tokyo and vicinity). 

AIRIN KWAN [HOME FOR DISCHARGED PRISONERS] ( ). 
Superintendent: Mr. A. Muramatsu, Okuhirano, Kobe. 
Object: To render assistance to discharged prisoners. 
Income: Yen 1,475 ($737 in U. S. gold). 
Field: Japan. 

(NOTE: Considerable work for discharged prisoners is also conducted by the Salvation 
Army in Japan.) 

HOME MISSIONARY SOCIETY, JAPAN METHODIST CHURCH ( ). 

Address: Bishop Yoitsu Honda, D.D., Aoyama, Tokyo. 

Object: Evangelistic work in connection with the Japan Methodist 

Church. 

Income: Yen 1,470 ($735 in U. S. gold). 
Field: Japan. 

INDUSTRIAL HOME, TOKYO ( ). 

Superintendent: Rev. N. Tamura, Tokyo. 

Object: Industrial training. 

Income: No statement at hand. The value of its plant is from Yen 

30,000 to Yen 50,000 ($15,000 to $25,000 in U. S. gold) 
Field: Japan (Tokyo and vicinity). 

SCHOOL FOR NURSES, TOKYO ( ). 
Superintendent: Dr. Okami, Shinjiku, Tokyo. 
Object: The training of nurses. 
Income: No statement at hand. The plant is valued at Yen 50,000 

($25,000 in U. S. gold). 
Field: Japan. 

(NOTE: The school is affiliated with the Church of Christ in Japan, and was founded 
by Mrs. M. T. True.) 

INDEPENDENT MISSIONS IN JAPAN. 

(NOTE: There are several independent missions in Japan, most of which are under 
the direction of some individual missionary, whose work is generally supported by 
special contributions from friends, and whose services are not recorded in the re- 
turns of the larger missionary boards and societies. It has not been possible to 
enter all of these independent missions in the regular list, owing to lack of sufficient 
data concerning them.) 

CHARITABLE INSTITUTIONS IN JAPAN. 

(NOTE: "The Christian Movement in Japan" (Seventh Issue, 1909, pp. 594-599) 
gives an interesting list of numerous philanthropic efforts, many of which seem 
to be under Japanese auspices. This list includes charity hospitals, day nurseries, 
schools for the blind, orphanages, schools for the poor, reform schools, homes 
for released prisoners, homes of refuge, and leper asylums. Some of these it 
has been possible to enter in the Japanese section of the Directory, but the ma- 



jority were necessarily omitted, as insufficient information was given to permit of 
their entry. Through the kindness of the Rev. H. M. Landis, D.D., of the Meiji 
Gakuin, Tokyo, a supplemental list, in addition to those mentioned in the "Chris- 
tian Movement,/' referred to above, has been forwarded to the Committee. This 
additional list includes five hospitals, an orphanage, a girls' industrial school, a 
night school, and a school for nurses, besides some schools devoted to Christian 
education.) 

KOREA 

KOREAN ITINERANT MISSION (1889). 
Director: Pastor M. C. Fenwick, Wonsan. 
Object: The evangelization of the Koreans. 

Income: The amount of local contributions reported is $917. No state- 
ment of income received from home sources has come to hand. 
Field: Korea. 

MISSION OF THE CHURCH OF ENGLAND, DIOCESE OF KOREA (1889). 

Bishop of Diocese : The recent death of Bishop Turner leaves a vacancy. 

Object: Evangelistic, medical, and philanthropic work throughout the 
Diocese. 

Income: 1,008, received from the Korea Mission Association in Eng- 
land. An annual grant of 1,500 is also received from the Society for 
the Propagation of the Gospel, and a grant of 100 for hospital work 
is received from the Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge. 

Organ: "The Morning Calm." 

Field: The Diocese of Korea. 

(NOTE: The Mission was founded by Archbishop Benson, and the first Bishop was the 

Rt. Rev. Charles John Corfe, who was consecrated in 1889. The members of the 

mission staff, for the most part, receive no salary beyond what is required for 

actual maintenance. The Community of St. Peter, Kilburn, has charge of the 

women's work in the diocese.) 

KOREAN RELIGIOUS TRACT SOCIETY (1890). 
Manager: Mr. Gerald Bonwick, Seoul. 

Object: The publication and distribution of Christian literature in Korea. 
Income: No statement at hand. 
Field: Korea. 

BRITISH EVANGELISTIC MISSION [MISSION OF THE KESWICK 
SOCIETY, ENGLAND, CONDUCTED BY MISS PERRY AND 
MISS PASH] (1891). 

Honorary Directors: Miss Jean Perry, Miss Ellen Pash, Seoul. 
Object: Evangelistic, educational, and philanthropic work, in connection 

with an orphanage in Seoul. 
Income : No statement at hand. 
Field: Korea. 

(NOTE: The two missionaries who direct the Mission provide their own support, but 
receive funds in aid of their work from the Keswick Society, England.) 

GENERAL COMMITTEE OF THE YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIA- 
TIONS OF CHINA AND KOREA (1896). 
(See under China.) 

EVANGELISTIC WORK OF KOREAN CHRISTIANS. 

(NOTE: The readiness of the Korean Christians to enter evangelistic service haj been 
phenomenal, but it has been rather on the basis of individual effort and broadcast 
personal appeals than through regular missionary agencies. A native missionary 
society was organized at Pyeng Yang in 1901, and was active, chiefly in Northern 
Korea, for several years. When, however, a presbytery was established, in 1907, 
the work of the society was transferred to the Presbyterian Committee of Mis- 
sions. Other local societies sprang up, but did not come into any prominence as 
missionary organizations, although their work was faithfully prosecuted. The 
Presbytery's Committee has sent missionaries to the island of Quelpart, and has 
also its missionary in Siberia, to minister to Koreans who reside there. Other na- 
tive agents have been sent among the Koreans in Manchuria, Japan, and Mexico.) 

SIBERIA 

EVANGELISCH-LUTHERISCHE MISSION ZU LEIPZIG [LEIPZIG EVAN- 
GELICAL LUTHERAN MISSION] (1836). 

(See under Germany.) 

GERMAN AND FINNISH EVANGELICAL LUTHERAN CHURCHES IN SIBERIA, 

RUSSIAN ASIA (1751). 

Secretary: The Evangelical Lutheran Pastor, Tomsk, Siberia. 
Object: To aid in the foreign missionary work of the Leipzig Mission. 
Income: 2,000 Mk. ($480 U. S. gold). 

Fields: The Indian and African fields of the Leipzig Mission. 
(NOTE: The Barnaul congregation of the Lutheran Church dates from 1751.) 

GERMAN EVANGELICAL CHURCH OF CAUCASIA, RUSSIAN ASIA 

( > 
Secretary: The Pastor of the German Evangelical Lutheran Church, 

Tiflis, Russia-in-Asia. 
Object: To aid in the missions of the Leipzig Mission, and those of other 

German foreign missionary societies. 
Income: 1,000 Mk. ($240 U. S. gold). 
Fields: South India, German East Africa (through the 

missionary societies). 



German foreign 



TURKISH EMPIRE 

(NOTE: There are many higher educational institutions under missionary 
auspices in the Turkish Empire, but for the most part they are an in- 
tegral part of the work of the missionary societies engaged there, and 
are included in the data given for their respective societies. Only those 
having an independent board of trustees, and administered apart from 
the control of missionary societies, are inserted here. In most of the 
stations of the American Missions in Turkey there are missionary socie- 
ties in connection with the native churches, the educational institutions, 
the Young Men's Christian Associations, or the Christian Endeavor 
organizations. In the Mardin field, for example, the Rev. A. N. Andrus 
reports fourteen such societies, with a total income of 43 Turkish pounds. 
One of these societies, located at Mardin, and named the "Society of 
Love," has been in operation for fifty years. It is engaged in home and 
foreign missions, and has been instrumental during its existence in dis- 
tributing over a thousand Turkish pounds. At Sivas four similar socie- 
ties are reported, engaged either in evangelistic work or benevolent 
relief. This list could be still further enlarged by including missionary 
societies at Adabazar, Bardezag, and Nicomedia, and no doubt at many 
other stations there are such indigenous missionary efforts, which may 
surely be regarded as the leaven of the missionary spirit, which will in 
time develop into larger and more productive organizations.) 



Turkish Empire 



DIRECTORY OF MISSIONARY SOCIETIES 



73 



KAISERSWERTH DEACONESSES' MISSION (1836). 

(NOTE: Educational and medical work at several centers in Turkey, Syria, Palestine, 
and Egypt. See Rheinisch-Weatfaliaoher Diakonissenverein, under Germany.) 

DEUTSCH EVANGELISCHE KIRCHE IN TURKEI [GERMAN EVANGEL- 
ICAL CHURCH IN TURKEY] (1843). 
Official Address: Pastor Graf von Luttichau, Constantinople. 
Object: Evangelistic work among German residents, and the native popu- 
lation of the Turkish Empire. 
Income: 300 Mk., equal to $72 (sent to German foreign missionary 

societies). 
Fields: Turkish Empire, German foreign mission fields. 

(NOTE: The German Evangelical Church, in Constantinople, and the German College, 
are centers of missionary work for Turkey in Europe and Asia Minor.) 

BRITISH SYRIAN MISSION (1860). 

(NOTE: Educational work at various stations in Syria. See under England.) 

SYRISCHE WAISENHAUS, JERUSALEM [SYRIAN ORPHANAGE, JERU- 
SALEM] (1860). 

Secretary: Pastor Schneller, Syrian Orphanage, Jerusalem. 
Object: Evangelical mission work among Armenians and Syrians. 
Income: 200,000 Mk. ($48,000 in U. S. gold). 
Organ: "Der Bote aus Zion." 
Field: Palestine (Jerusalem and the Bir-Salem colony near Jaffa). 

(NOTE: There is a Union for the Syrian Orphanage in Jerusalem, with headquarters 
at Koln on the Rhine, which see under Germany.) 

SYRIAN PROTESTANT COLLEGE, BEIRUT (1863). 

President Emeritus: Rev. Daniel Bliss, D.D., Beirut, Syria. 

President: Rev. Howard S. Bliss, D.D., Beirut, Syria. 

Superintendent of the Maria De Witt Jesup Hospitals and School for 

Nurses: Mrs. Mary B. Dale, Beirut, Syria. 
Organ: "Al-Kulleyeh." 

(Nora: The Syrian Protestant College ia fast approaching the university status. It 
was founded as an independent educational institution, and has its Board of Trus- 
tees in the United States. It has Preparatory, Academic, Pharmaceutical, Medical, 
Dental, and Commercial Departments, and also a Training School for Nurses, con- 
nected with the Maria De Witt Jesup Hospital Foundation. The Medical Faculty 
serve the Johanniter Hospital of the Knights of St. John, and also the Hospital for 
Women, the Hospital for Children, and the Eye and Ear Hospital. Those for 
women and children are connected with the Maria De Witt Jesup Foundation. 
The corps of instruction and administration in the College numbers 72. The enroll- 
ment of students for 1909-1910 reached 839, including 19 in the Training School 
for Nurses. For entry concerning Trustees of Syrian Protestant College, see under 
United States.) 

ROBERT COLLEGE, CONSTANTINOPLE (1864). 
President: Rev. C. F. Gates, D.D., Roumeli Hissar, Constantinople. 

(NOTE: Robert College was founded by_ Christopher R. 4 Robert and Cyrus Hamlin, 
D.D. It is an independent institution, with Collegiate, Preparatory, and Sub- 
Preparatory Departments. Its enrolled students in all departments number 446, 
including 13 nationalities. For further information, see Trustees of Robert College, 
entered under United States.) 

JESSIE TAYLOR MEMORIAL SCHOOL FOR MOSLEM AND DRUSE 

GIRLS, BEIRUT (1868). 
Principal: Miss Turner, Jessie Taylor Memorial School, Beirut, Syria. 

(NOTE: The School was founded by the late Miss Jessie Taylor, and has its own 
Board of Trustees in Scotland. See under Scotland. Miss Taylor was a devoted 
pioneer in the educational work for Moslem and Druae girls. When the enterprise 
was begun it was no easy task to inaugurate a work of this kind. Miss Taylor 
and her pupils faced many embarrassments, and some perils, but by tact and cour- 
age she won her way, and enlisted the sympathy and gratitude of influential 
patrons, until her school now occupies an established and firmly entrenched status, 
with the friendly endorsement of a supporting public opinion. Miss Taylor's fore- 
sight anticipated the new era which has dawned in Turkey.) 

ORIENTAL ORPHANAGE, BROUSSA (1875). 

Founder and Director: Mr. G. Baghdasarian, Broussa, Turkey-in-Asia. 
Object: The education and training of orphan boys and girls. 
Income: No statement at hand. Supported by voluntary contributions, 

and the sale of industrial productions. 
Field: Turkey-in-Asia. 

(NOTE: More than one thousand boys and girls have been received and trained in 
industrial work.) 

CENTRAL TURKEY COLLEGE, AINTAB (1876). 
President: John E. Merrill, Ph.D., Aintab, Turkey-in-Asia. 

(NOTE: The Central Turkey College was authorized formally by the Turkish Govern- 
ment in 1878. It has its Board of Trustees in the United States, of which Mr. 
Elbridge Torrey is President and the Rev. C. H. Daniels, D.D. , South Framingham, 
Massachusetts, is Secretary. The legal name of the Corporation of the Central 
Turkey College is "The Trustees of Donations for Education in Turkey." See 
entry under United States. The present number of students, including the Col- 
legiate and Preparatory Departments, is 157. Its organ is the "Bulletin of Central 
Turkey College.") 

EUPHRATES COLLEGE, HARPOOT [KHARPOOT] (1878). 
President: Rev. Ernest W. Riggs, Harpoot, Turkey-in-Asia. 

(NOTE: The Euphrates College has its Board of Trustees in the United States, of 
which Col. Charles A. Hopkins, Brookline, Massachusetts, is President, and the 
Rev. James L. Barton D.D.. 14 Beacon St., Boston, Massachusetts, is Secretary. 
The founder and first President was the Rev. Crosby H. Wheeler, D.D. The en- 
rollment in the year 1907-1908 was 863, including all departments.) 

JAFFA MEDICAL MISSION (1878). 

(NOTE: The Jaffa Medical Mission was founded by Miss Morgan, an English lady, 
under whose care a hospital was built, in 1S82. Miss Newton continued the work 
after the death of Miss Morgan, largely at her own expense. Since Miss Newton's 
death, in 1908, the hospital with its equipment has come under the charge of the 
Church Missionary Society, which now conducts the work.) 

GREEK EVANGELICAL UNION OF SMYRNA (1883). 

Honorary Foreign Secretary: Miss E. Cairns, care of British Post Office, 
Smyrna, Asia Minor. 

Object: To group together the various Greek Evangelical Churches scat- 
tered about in Asia Minor, to provide for their spiritual wants, and 
to carry on evangelistic work among their Greek brethren, witn the 
view of uplifting them, and of reforming the Orthodox Churches. 

Income: 656. (Of this amount 339 was contributed on the field, 179 
was received from the American Board of Commissioners for Foreign 
Missions and 138 from Great Britain.) The total of 656 equals 
$3,195. 

Organ: "Zornitza." 

Field: Asia Minor (Smyrna, Ordoo, Semen, Magnesia, Thyatira). 

(NOTE: In addition, there is reported from Smyrna the Society of the King's 
Daughters, in the Girls' Collegiate Institute, which contributed the sum of $460 
to missionary work in India and China, and to home mission efforts at Van. The 
Protestant Armenian Church of Smyrna is also engaged to a considerable extent 
in home mission work. There is a Reference Council of the Greek Evangelical 
Union in Great Britain, for entry of which see under Scotland.) - 



AMERICAN COLLEGE FOR GIRLS, CONSTANTINOPLE (1890). 
President: Mary Mills Patrick, A.M., Ph.D., British Post Office, Con- 
stantinople. 

(NOTE: The American College for Girls was for many years connected with the Con- 
gregational Woman's Board of Missions in Boston, but now has its own Board of 
Trustees in the United States, for further information concerning which see Trus- 
tees of the American College for Girls at Constantinople, under United States. It 
was founded as a high school in 1871, and obtained its first charter as the American 
College for Girls, under the Congregational Woman's Board, in 1890, The second 
charter for the present Board of Trustees was obtained in 1908. The Coljege is 
soon to be removed to a sightly location on the Bosporus, where new ouilclings 
will be erected for its use. The present faculty numbers 30, and the total enroll- 
ment of students, including "91 in the College and 96 in the Preparatory Depart- 
ments, is 187. In connection with the College there are a Christian Association, a 
Philanthropic Society, and an Armenian National Society, all devoting their con- 
tributions to benevolent and missionary work, chiefly for famine relief and the 
support of [orphans in both Turkey and Japan. The College is prominent among 
the pioneer agencies for the higher education of girls in the Turkish Empire, and 
as such will have an expanding and uplifting influence in the new era which has 
come in the Nearer East.) 

APOSTOLIC INSTITUTE, KONIA (1892). 

Director: Dr. A. H. Haigazian, Apostolic Institute, Konia, Asia Minor. 
Object: The Christian education of boys and girls, and also the aiding of 

destitute widows and children, irrespective of creed or faith, 
Income: $7,826. (Of this amount $2,796 was received on the field, from 

board and tuition fees of students, the sale of garden products, etc.) 
Field: Turkish Empire (Konia). 

(NOTE: The Apostolic Institute was founded by the late Rev. H. S. Jenanyan, D.D., 
and was successfully directed by him for a long period of years. After his death, 
in 1907, the management of the Institute was entrusted to a Board of Directors 
in the United States. See entry under United States section.) 

LEBANON HOSPITAL FOR THE INSANE (1896). 
Founder and Superintendent: Mr. Theophilus Waldmeier, Asfuriyeh, near 
Beirut, Syria. 

(NOTE: A local Executive Committee has been formed at Beirut, of which the Chairman 
is Rev. C. A. Webster, B.A., M.D. The Hospital has committees-in-aid in England, 
the Netherlands, Switzerland, and the United States, which see under their respec- 
tive sections.) 

AMERICAN CHRISTIAN HOSPITAL, CESAREA (1898). 
Physicians in Charge: William S. Dodd, M.D., Wilfred M. Post, M.D., 

Talas-Cesarea, Asia Minor. 

Superintendent: Miss Emma D. Cushman, Talas-Cesarea, Asia Minor. 
Object: Medical, surgical, and evangelistic services to those of all races 

and creeds who may come within range of its ministry. 
Income: $13,447. This amount is made up of contributions from friends 

($3,047), and income on the field, from fees, board, and sale of drugs. 
Field: Turkey (Cesarea and vicinity, covering a large part of the 

Western Turkey Mission of the American Board) 

(NOTE: In-patients, in 1909, numbered 460; out-patients, 3,433; treatments, 8,000 
and surgical cases, 750. _The Hospital, while affiliated with the American Board, 
is independent, and has its own Board of Trustees in the United States, raising 
its support from contributors and income. The President of the Board is Mr. 
Allison Dodd, and the Secretary is Mr. Charles E. Manierre, 31 Nassau Street, New 
York. As the physicians are supplied by the American Board, the medical statis- 
tics have been reported in those which that Board forwarded. The plant of the 
American Christian Hospital has been recently purchased by the American Board, 
and the plan of removing the hospital staff and work to Konia is about to be carried 
out. Konia is an unoccupied field some distance to the southwest of Cesarea, and 
the opening for a medical mission is attractive and urgent. An entirely new plant 
is to be built there, and those responsible for this forward movement find much 
encouragement in the outlook. Medical missionary work at Cesarea will continue 
to be carried on by the American Board.) 

ENGLISH MISSION, LYDDA, PALESTINE (1898). 
Secretary: Miss Leishman, English Mission, Lydda, Palestine. 
Object: To evangelize Palestine villages. 
Income: 125 ($609). 

Field: Palestine (Lydda and surrounding villages). 
(NOTE: Church of England in its connection.) 

MARSOVAN MISSIONARY SOCIETY (1899). 
Secretary: Prof. A. G. Sivaslian, Ph.D., Marsovan. 
Object: Evangelistic work throughout the Marsovan field. 
Income: 165 $804). 
Field: Turkey (in the vicinity of Marsovan). 

SWEDISH SOCIETY OF JERUSALEM (1904). 
Director: Dr. G. L. Ribbing, Bethlehem, Palestine. 
Object: Medical and educational work in Palestine. 
Income: No statement at hand. 
Field: Palestine (Jerusalem, Bethlehem). 

KONFERENZ (SYNODE) DER DEUTSCH-EVANGELISCHEN GEMEIN- 
DEN DBS ORIENTS [CONFERENCE (SYNOD) OF THE GERMAN 
EVANGELICAL CONGREGATIONS IN THE ORIENT] (1908). 

Official Address: Pastor Horst, German Church, Jerusalem. 

Object: Mission work among the German colonists and the natives. 

Income: No statement at hand. 

Organ: fl Gemeindeblatt fur die evangelischen Gemeinden des Orients." 

Field: Asia Minor, Palestine. 

(NOTE: The medical, educational, and orphanage work of the Kaiserswerth Deacon- 
esses, in Jerusalem, Beirut, and Smyrna, and, in addition to their service, an Ar- 
menian Orphanage at Bethlehem, are all within the bounds of this Conference, 
and have given to it a strong missionary character.) 

NATIVE MEDICAL MISSION, SIDON ( ). 
Superintendent: Mrs. Helaine Noufal, Sidon, Syria. 
Object: Medical work among Moslems, Mutawilis, and Jews. 
Income: 231. 
Field: Syria. 

(NOTE: There is a Committee in England which contributes toward the support of 
this Mission, of which the Honorary Secretary is Miss C. V. Smith, Bramcote Hall, 

Nottingham.) 

INDEPENDENT EVANGELISTIC EFFORTS. 

(NOTE: The Church and Bible Classes of the Rev. D. M. Stearns, D.D., 1167 West Chel- 
ten Ave., German-town, Pa., support missionary work, chiefly among Moslems, 
in Safid, Galilee, and the Hauran, under the charge of Miss Mary T. Maxwell Ford 
See entry of Dr. Stearns" Classes under United States. Miss Appia'a work at Kefr 
Shima is also an independent evangelistic effort among Druses, Moslems, and Jews, 
and Mrs. Newman conducts an educational and evangelistic mission at Jerusalem. 
Miss C. M. Holmes, under the title of Jebail Settlement, has an independent edu- 
cational, evangelistic, and industrial work at Jebail, near Beirut Dr Mary P 
Eddy has recently established a Tuberculosis Sanitarium at Maamiltain, a short 
distance north of Beirut, which has, however, been taken under the care of the 
Presbyterian Board of Foreign Missions as part of its regular work.) 



74 



WORLD ATLAS OF CHRISTIAN MISSIONS 



Malaysia 



SOCIETIES IN MALAYSIA 



(Including the Philippines) 



DUTCH EAST INDIES 



GENOOTSCHAP VOOR IN-EN UITWENDIGE ZENDING TE BATAVIA 
[SOCIETY FOR HOME AND FOREIGN MISSIONS AT BATAVIA] 

(1851). 

Secretary: Name and address not at hand. 
Object: Tb act as an agency for several Netherlands missionary societies 

working in the Dutch East Indies. 
Income: No income of this organization can be reported, as it acts as 

an agency only. 
Field: Dutch East Indies. 
(NOTE: This organization, although located in the East Indies, acts for home societies.) 

ZENDING OP DE SANGIR-EN TALAUT-EILANDEN [MISSION TO THE 

SANGIR AND TALAUT ISLANDS] (1859). 
Resident Missionary: Pastor Paul Kelling, Oeloe, Siauw, Sangi-Eilanden 

(Sangir Islands). 

Object: Mission work in the Sangir and Talaut groups of islands. 
Income: 20,851 Fl. ($8,340). 
Fields: Sangir and Talaut Islands. 

(NOTE: In a historical sketch of mission effort in Sangir the statement is made that 
Van de Velden van Capellan went there under the auspices of the Netherlands 
Missionary Society, on a visit of observation, in 1855, and initiated with much 
promise large missionary plans. A Committee in the Netherlands renders financial 
aid. Its Secretary is Rev. J. W. Gunning, Rechter-Rottekade 63, Rotterdam.) 

NEDERLANDSCH INDISCHE ZENDINGBOND [NETHERLANDS INDIAN 

MISSION LEAGUE] (1881). 
Secretary: Name and address not at hand. 

Object: A League of missionaries of the different societies or associations 
laboring in the Dutch East Indies, organized to promote missions, 
according to the Word of God. 
Income: No statement at hand. 
Field: Dutch East Indies. 

NEUKIRCHENER MISSIONSANSTALT [NEUKIRCHEN MISSION INSTI- 
TUTE] (1882). 

VEREENIGING PITOELOEffGAW (1903). 

Secretary: Rev. O. Heller, Poerwodadi, Java. 

Object: The support of a missionary hospital at Poerwodadi, Java. 

Income: 14,977 Mk. ($3,594). 

Field: Java. 

(NOTE: See entry under the Netherlands.) 

SALATIGA-ZENDING OP JAVA [SALATIGA MISSION IN JAVA] (1887). 
Resident Missionaries: Pastor Kamp, Pastor Gericke, Salatiga, Java. 
Object: Evangelistic missionary work in Salatiga, Java. 
Income: 37,513 Mk. ($9,003). 
Organ: "Heidenboten." 
Field: Middle Java. 



(NOTE: The Mission was commenced in 1864, byMra. le Jolle, in connection with the 
Netherlands Missionary Society, but the present organization dates from 1887. 
It is supported by funds sent by the Komitee tot Ondersteuning van de Zendelingen 
der Salatiga-Zending op Java, a branch of the Neukirchen Society. See Nether- 
lands Section of this Directory.) 



ha 



BATAK MISSIONARY SOCIETY ( 

Secretary: Name and address not at hand. 

Object: Pioneer work among savage tribes along the northern and eastern 

shores of Lake Toba, Sumatra. 
Income: No statement at hand. 
Field: Sumatra (vicinity of Lake Toba). 

(NOTE: This Society was founded by the Christian natives of Sumatra.) 

GEREFORMEERDE KERK IN NEDERLANDSCH-INDIE [REFORMED 
CHURCH OF THE NETHERLANDS IN THE EAST INDIES] 
( ). 

(NOTE: In addition to the work done by the Dutch missionary societies in the East 
Indies, the Reformed Church of the Dutch East Indies conducts missionary opera- 
tions, with the assistance of the Government, which supports the missionaries em- 
ployed. These missions are located chiefly in the Molucca Islands, and in Menado, 
North Celebes. There are 23 missionaries, aided by some 80 native preachers. The 
official title of these missionaries is "Hulppredikers," or assistant preachers. The 
number of native Christians under their care is 274,135. This large group of native 
converts does not appear in the reports of any of the Dutch missionary societies, 
but they are entered in the statistical returns of the Dutch East Indies.) 



PHILIPPINE ISLANDS 

EVANGELICAL UNION OF THE PHILIPPINE ISLANDS (1901). 
Secretary: Rev. James Rodgers, D.D., Manila. 
Object: To unite all the evangelical forces in the Philippine Islands for 

the purpose of securing comity and effectiveness in their missionary 

operations. 

Income : None received. 
Field: Philippine Islands. 

WOMAN'S AUXILIARY TO THE BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF THE 
UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL, MANILA, PHILIPPINE ISLANDS 

Secretary: Mrs. G. A. Main, 230 Calle Nozaleda, Manila. 

Object: To aid the Hospital by keeping in touch with its operations and 

needs, and by raising funds for the maintenance of its work. 
Income: $2,000. 
Field: Philippine Islands (Manila). 

(NOTE: The Hospital is under the direction of the Domestic and Foreign Missionary 
Society of the Protestant Episcopal Church, which see under United States.) 



SOCIETIES WORKING AMONG THE JEWS 



CANADA 



PRESBYTERIAN: 



MISSION TO THE JEWS IN CONNECTION WITH THE PRESBYTERIAN 

CHURCH IN CANADA (1908). 

Convener: Rev. J. McP. Scott, 20 Simpson Ave., Toronto. 
Income: $3,600. 
Field: Toronto, Ontario. 

SOCIETIES NOT DENOMINATIONAL: 

TORONTO JEWISH MISSION (1894). 

Missionary: Mr. Henry Singer, 714 Bloor St., Toronto. 

Income: $1,820. 

Field: Toronto, Ontario. 

UNITED MISSION TO ISRAEL IN CANADA (1908). 

Missionary: Mr. Stanley Barker, 1738 Esplanade Ave., Montreal. 
Field: Montreal. 



UNITED STATES 
BAPTIST: 

NEWARK (NEW JERSEY) CHRISTIAN MISSION TO THE JEWS (1903). 

(NOTE: The Society was in existence in 1908, and, accordingly, the statistical tables 
show data, but the organization is now suspended.) 

SCANDINAVIAN AMERICAN MISSIONARY SOCIETY TO THE JEWS 

(1906). 

Secretary: Rev. Israel Marcus, 4720 Dover St., Chicago, Illinois. 
Field: Chicago, Illinois. 

LUTHERAN: 

ZION'S SOCIETY FOR ISRAEL OF THE NORWEGIAN LUTHERANS IN 

AMERICA (1.878). 

Secretary: Prof. J. H. Blegen, Augsburg Theological Seminary, Minne- 
apolis, Minnesota. 
Income: $5,261. 
Fields: United States (Chicago), Russia (Minsk). 

JEWISH MISSION OF THE EVANGELICAL LUTHERAN SYNOD OF 

MISSOURI, OHIO, AND OTHER STATES (1883). 
Missionary: Rev. Nathaniel Friedmann, 342 East Eighty-seventh St., 

New York City, New York. 
Income: $2,000. 
Field: New York City. 



CHRIST'S MISSION TO THE JEWS, PITTSBURG SYNOD OF THE 
GENERAL COUNCIL OF THE EVANGELICAL LUTHERAN 
CHURCH (1906). 

Missionary: Rev. John Legum, 1105 Wylie Ave., Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. 
Organ: "The Missionary's Voice." 
Field: Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. 

METHODIST: 

METHODIST EPISCOPAL MISSION TO THE HEBREWS, NEW YORK 

CITY CHURCH EXTENSION AND MISSIONARY SOCIETY (1892). 

Missionary: H. Zeckhausen, M.D., 9 Second Ave., New York City, New 

York. 

Organ: "The Christian City." 
Field: New York City. 
(NOTE: The New York Hebrew Christian Association is auxiliary to this work.) 

HEBREW MISSION OF THE METHODIST EPISCOPAL CHURCH, SOUTH 

(1904). 

Missionary: Rev. Julius Magath, Oxford, Georgia. 
Income: $1,500. 
Field: United States. 

WICKER PARK METHODIST EPISCOPAL CHURCH, CHICAGO, JEWISH 
DEPARTMENT (1908). 

(NOTE: Out of existence. The work is now in "Marcy Home," Maxwell St.) 

PRESBYTERIAN: 

JEWISH MISSION, REFORMED PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH (1894). 
Secretary: Rev. J. C. McFeeters, D.D., Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 
Income: $1,607. 
Organ: "Hebrew Messenger." 
Field: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

NINTH PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH OF CHICAGO, JEWISH WORK (1907). 

(NOTE: The Society was in existence in 1908, and, accordingly, the statistical tables 
show data, but the organization is now suspended.) 

BOARD OF HOME MISSIONS OF THE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH IN THE 

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, JEWISH WORK (1908). 
Field Secretary: Rev. Louis Meyer, 156 Fifth Ave., New York City, New 

York. 
Field: United States. 

PROTESTANT EPISCOPAL: 

JEWISH COMMITTEE OF THE DIOCESE OF PENNSYLVANIA (1904). 
Missionary: Max Green M.D., 1333 South Fourth St., Philadelphia, 

Pennsylvania. 
Income: $1,300. 
Field: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 



Missions tor Jews 



DIRECTORY OF MISSIONARY SOCIETIES 



75 



MISSION WORK AMONG THE JEWS (1905). 

Secretary: Mr. William G. Davis, 32 Nassau St., New York City, New York. 
Field: New York City, New York. 

SOCIETIES NOT DENOMINATIONAL: 

ANGLO-AMERICAN BOARD OF MISSIONS TO THE JEWS (1878). 
Secretary: Mr. Wm. Cowper Conant, 466 W. 151st St., New York City, 

New York. 
Field: United States. 

HEBREW CHRISTIAN MISSION, NEW YORK CITY MISSION AND 

TRACT SOCIETY (1878). 
President: Dr. A. F. Schauffler, 287 Fourth Ave., New York City, New 

York. 

Income: $1.300. 
Field: New York City, New York. 

CHICAGO HEBREW MISSION (1887). 
Superintendent: Mrs. T. C. Rounds. 
Secretary: Rev. Louis Meyer. 
Office Address: 1425 Solon PI., Chicago, Illinois. 
Income: $12,120. 
Organ: "Jewish Era." 
Field: Chicago, Illinois. 

(NOTE: The Jewish Committee of the Christian Reformed Church, formed in 1889, 
and having an income of $3,000, and the Jewish Committee of the Particular Synod 
of Chicago of the {Dutch] Reformed Church, formed in 1905, and having an income 
of $1,500, are auxiliaries of the Chicago Hebrew Mission.) 

HEBREW MESSIANIC COUNCIL (1888). 

Secretary: Dr. Edward S. Niles, 79 Newberry St., Boston, Massachusetts. 
Field: New England. 

BROOKLYN CHRISTIAN MISSION TO THE JEWS (1892). 

Missionary: Mr. Philip Spievacque, 176 Penn St., Brooklyn, New York. 

Income: $2,036. 

Organ: "The Jewish Evangelist." 

Field: Brooklyn, New York. 

BROWNSVILLE AND WILLIAMSBURG MISSION TO THE JEWS (1894). 
Secretary: Rev. Leopold Cohn, 201 Van Buren St., Brooklyn, New York. 
Income: $25,426. 
Organ: "The Chosen People." 
Field: Brooklyn, New York. 

SAN FRANCISCO HEBREW MISSION (1896). 

(NOTE: The Society was in existence in 1908, and, accordingly, the statistical tables 
show data, but the organization is now defunct.) 

JEWISH BIBLE HOUSE (1898). 

Secretary: Mr. T. Wistar Brown, Ocean City, New Jersey. 
Income: $1,100. 
Field: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

NEW COVENANT MISSION TO JEWS AND GENTILES (1898). 
Superintendent: Rev. M. Ruben. 
Secretary: Mr. W. J. Brown. 

Office Address: 333 Forty-second St., Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. 
Income: $5,000. 
Organ: "The Glory of Israel." 
Field: Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. 

ST. LOUIS JEWISH CHRISTIAN MISSION (1898). 
Superintendent: Rev. A. Lichtenstein, 3327 Pine St., St. Louis, Missouri. 
Income: $4,000. 
Organ: "Hebrew Christian." 
Field: St. Louis, Missouri. 

CHICAGO POSTAL MISSION TO THE JEWS (1903). 
Secretary: Mrs. A. M. Utley, 1425 Solon PL, Chicago, Illinois. 
Field: The world, through the distribution of literature. 

CLEVELAND HEBREW EVANGELIZATION SOCIETY (1904). 
Secretary: Miss Zella Broughton, 4223 Cedar Ave., Cleveland, Ohio. 
Field: Cleveland, Ohio. 

HEBREW GOSPEL MISSION OF NEWARK, NEW JERSEY (1904). 
Secretary: Rev. S. K. Braun, 125 Barkley St., Newark, New Jersey. 
Income: $1,265. 
Field: Newark, New Jersey. 

WOMAN'S BRANCH OF BROOKLYN CITY MISSIONS (1904). 
Missionary: Miss Caroline Raphael, 190 Glenmore Ave., Brooklyn, New 

York. 

Income: $750. 
Field: Brooklyn, New York. 

EMANUEL CHRISTIAN MISSION TO THE JEWS (1905). 

Missionary: Mr. Philip Sidersky, 300 N. Eden St., Baltimore, Maryland. 

Income: $1,200. 

Field: Baltimore, Maryland. ' 

HEBREW CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION, ATLANTA, GEORGIA (1905). 
Secretary: Mrs. W. F. Clark, 220 N. Boulevard, Atlanta, Georgia. 
Field: Atlanta, Georgia. 

ISRAEL'S MISSIONARY SOCIETY OF SAN FRANCISCO (1906). 

Secretary: Miss Jeannette Gedalius, 1824 Eddy St., San Francisco, Cali- 
fornia. 
Field: San Francisco, California. 

BUFFALO FRIENDS OF ISRAEL MISSION (1906). 
Secretary: Mrs. M. Abbott, 143 W. Ferry St., Buffalo, New York. 
Field: Buffalo, New York. 

GOOD TIDINGS OF THE MESSIAH MISSION (1906). 
Missionary: Rev. F. C. Gilbert, Concord, Massachusetts. 
Organ: "Tidings of the Messiah." 
Field: Boston, Massachusetts. 



SOCIETY FOR THE PROPAGATION OF THE GOSPEL AMONG THE JEWS 

IN THE TWIN CITIES (1907). 
(NOTE: Ceased operations in January, 1910.) 

BIBLE INSTITUTE OF LOS ANGELES, JEWISH WORK (1908). 

Secretary: Rev. A. B. Prichard, 1329 West Fourth St., Los Angeles, 

California. 
Field: Los Angeles, California. 

BROOKLYN CITY MISSION AND TRACT SOCIETY, JEWISH WORK 

(1908). 

Secretary: Dr. Hendrickson, 215 Montague St., Brooklyn, New York. 
Field: Brooklyn, New York. 

DULUTH FRIENDS OF ISRAEL SOCIETY (1908). 

Missionary: Rev. Theodore W. Gulick, 246 Lake Ave., South, Duluth, 

Minnesota. 
Field: Duluth, Minnesota. 

LOUISVILLE JEWISH MISSIONARY SOCIETY (1908). 
Secretary: Mrs. J. D. Mitchell, 1127 Second St., Louisville, Kentucky. 
Field: Louisville, Kentucky. 

IMMANUEL'S WITNESS POSTAL MISSION OF SEATTLE (1908). 
Secretary: Mr. Mark Lev, 1624 Fifteenth Ave., Seattle, Washington. 
Income: $500. 

Organ: "Immanuel's Witness." 
Field: Seattle, Washington. 
(NOTE: Transferred to 703 W. Temple St., Los Angeles, California, in 1910.) 

NEW YORK EVANGELIZATION SOCIETY (1908). 
Director: Rev. T. M. Chalmers, 63 Central PI., Brooklyn, New York. 
Field: New York City. 



AUSTRALIA 

AUSTRALASIAN MISSION TO THE JEWS (1896). 
Office: 267 Collins St., Melbourne. 
Income: 193. 

Organ: "Friend of Israel" (Australasian Edition). 
Field: Australia (Melbourne). 



NEW ZEALAND 

MISSION TO THE JEWS IN WELLINGTON (1908). 
(NOTE: Now out of existence.) . 



ENGLAND 



BRETHREN: 



LONDON GOSPEL MISSION TO THE JEWS (1902). 
Missionary: Mr. Henry Barnett, 832 Romford Rd., Manor Park, Lon- 
don, E. 
Income: 350. 
Organ: "Gospel Tidings." 
Field: London. 

(NOTE: Working in affiliation with the Gospel and Medical Mission to the Jews at 
Haifa, Palestine, which see under Asia.) 

CHURCH OF ENGLAND: 

LONDON SOCIETY FOR PROMOTING CHRISTIANITY AMONGST THE 

JEWS (1809). 
Secretary: Rev. F. L. Denman, M.A., 16 Lincoln's Inn Fields, London, 

W. C. 

Object: The evangelization of the Jews at home and abroad. 
Income: 48,555. 

Organs: "Jewish Missionary Intelligence," "Advocate." 
Fields: England, Ireland, Europe, Asia, Africa, Canada. 

(NOTE: There is a Church of Ireland auxiliary to the London Society for Promoting 
Christianity amongst the Jews, which was organized in 1818, also a Canadian 
auxiliary, which contributed $5,500.) 

OPERATIVE JEWISH CONVERTS' INSTITUTION (1829). 
Address: 58 Bodney Road, Hackney, London, N. E. 
Income: 689. 
Field: London. 

(NOTE: Supports an Industrial Home for Jewish Converts, and is a cooperating agency.) 

PAROCHIAL MISSION TO THE JEWS, AT HOME AND ABROAD (1875). 
Secretary: Dr. W. O. E. Oesterley, 14 Great Smith St., London, S. W. 
Organ: "Church and Synagogue." 
Fields: India, England. 

EAST LONDON FUND FOR THE JEWS (1877). 
Secretary: Rev. H. Heathcote, 71 Hamilton House St., Bishopsgate St. 

Without, London, E. C. 
Income: 2,475. 
Field: London. 

JERUSALEM AND THE EAST MISSION (1888). 

Secretary: Rev. W. Sadler, Dembleby Rectory, Folkingham, Lincoln- 
shire. 

Bishop in Charge: The Rt. Rev. G. F. P. Blyth, D.D., Jerusalem, Pales- 
tine. 

Income: 11,000. 

Fields: Europe, Asia, Africa. 

(NOTE: For entry of the Jerusalem and the East Mission Fund see page 34.) 

BIRMINGHAM CHURCH MEDICAL MISSION FOR JEWISH WOMEN 

AND CHILDREN (1894). 
Secretary: Miss J. M. Werfel, Birmingham. 
Income: 268. 
Field: Birmingham, England. 



76 



WORLD ATLAS OF CHRISTIAN MISSIONS 



Missions for Jews 



HEBREW CHRISTIAN MESSAGE TO ISRAEL (1898). 
Secretary: Rev. A. E. Abrahamson, 28 Farleigh Rd., Stoke Newington, 

London. 
Field: London. 

PRESBYTERIAN: 

PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH OF ENGLAND, JEWISH MISSION COMMITTEE 

(1871). 

Convener: Rev. John G. Train, The Park, Hull. 
Object: The evangelization of the Jews, and the Christian education of 

their children, as well as the healing of their sick. 
Income: 2,790. 
Fields: Syria (Aleppo), England (London). 

(NOTE: The Women's Jewish Missionary Association is an active auxiliary, and collected 
600 in addition to the 2,790.) 



CHURCH OF IRELAND AUXILIARY TO THE LONDON SOCIETY FOR PROMOTING 

CHRISTIANITY AMONGST THE JEWS (1818). 
Secretary: Rev. William J. Mayne, 45 Molesworth St., Dublin. 
Income: 4,225, in addition to 2,704 reported under the London Society. 
Organ: "Church of Ireland Messenger." 
Field: Ireland. 

PRESBYTERIAN: 

JEWISH MISSION OF THE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH IN IRELAND 

(1841). 

Honorary Convener: Rev. John Stewart, B.A., Rathgar. Dublin. 
General Church Secretary: Rev. William James Lowe, M.A., D.D., The 

Church House, Belfast. 
Object: The conversion of the Jews. 
Income: 4.722. 
Fields: Turkish Empire (Syria), Germany. 



SOCIETIES NOT DENOMINATIONAL: 

BRITISH SOCIETY FOR THE PROPAGATION OF THE GOSPEL AMONG 

THE JEWS (1842). 
Secretary: Rev. Isaac Levinson, 9 Great James Street, Bedford Row, 

London, W. C. 

Object: General mission work among the Jews at home and abroad. 
Income: 9,023. 

Organ: "Jewish Missionary Herald." 
Fields: Great Britain and Ireland, Germany, Russia. Italy, Austria, and 

Hungary. The Society also has a station at Adrianople in Turkey, 

but it is now vacant. 

LONDON CITY MISSION, JEWISH BRANCH (1874). 
Secretary: Rev. T. S. Hutchinson, 3 Bridewell Place, London, E. C. 
Income: 344. 
Field: London. 

WILD OLIVE GRAFT MISSION (1874). 

Secretary: Mr. Colin Young, Friends' Farm, Great Wakering, Essex. 
Organ: "Wild Olive Graft." 
Field: England (Essex). 

MILDMAY MISSION TO THE JEWS (1876). 

Director: Rev. Samuel Hinds Wilkinson, Central Hall, Philpot St., 

Whitechapel, London, E. 
Object: The evangelization of the Jews in London; the circulation of the 

Scriptures and tracts; the maintenance of Bible depots and mission 

centers in Russia and elsewhere. 
Income: 12,369. 
Organ: "Trusting and Toiling." 
Fields: Russia, Germany, England (London), Morocco. 

BARBICAN MISSION TO THE JEWS (1879). 

Secretary: Rev. C. T.'Lipshytz, Gorringe Park House, Mitcham, Surrey. 
Object: To proclaim the Gospel of Christ to the Jews. 
Income: 4,500. 
Organ: "ImmanuePs Witness." 
Fields: England, Germany, Armenia. 

PRAYER UNION FOR ISRAEL (1880). 

Secretary: Hon. Alfred Phibbs, Pensax, Chesham Bois, Buckshire. 
Income: 125. 
Organ: "Friend of Israel." 
Field: London. 
(NOTE: Practically only an auxiliary to all Jewish Missions.) 

EAST END MISSION TO THE JEWS (1881). 
Secretary: Mr. David Oppenheim, 119 Leman St., London, E. 
Income: 900. 
Field: London. 

HEBREW CHRISTIAN TESTIMONY TO ISRAEL (1893). 
Director: Mr. David Baron, Northfield, Chorley Wood, Hartshire. 
Income: 11,000. 
Organ: "Scattered Nation." 
Fields: England, Hungary, Germany. 

GOSPEL WORK AMONG FOREIGN JEWS (1895). 
Missionary: Mr. J. J. A. Rappaport, 21 Lee Terrace, Blackheath, London. 
Income: 400. 
Field: London. 

HEBREW CHRISTIAN ALLIANCE AND PRAYER UNION (1901). 
Secretary: Rev. J. S. Carlton, 6 Fletching Rd., Clapton, London, N. E. 
Field: London. 

(NOTE: Not a missionary society in the ordinary sense of the word, but a co6perat- 
ing agency.) 

HEBREW CHRISTIAN RALLY (1901). 
Field: London. 

(NOTE: Connected to some extent with the Mildmay Mission to the Jews. Not a mis- 
sionary society in the ordinary sense of the word, but a cooperating agency.) 

CHRISTIAN CHIEF CORNER-STONE MISSION TO THE JEWS (1902). 
Secretary: Mr. Joseph Davidson, London, England. 
Field: London. 

INDUSTRIAL MISSION TO THE JEWS (1903). 

Secretary: Rev. J. S. Carlton, 6 Fletching Rd., Clapton, London, N. E. 
Field: London. 

(NOTE: Now called the Bethesda Mission to the Jews. Office Address: 262 Commer- 
cial Road, London, E.) 



SCOTLAND 



PRESBYTERIAN: 



CHURCH OF SCOTLAND COMMITTEE FOR THE CONVERSION OF THE 
JEWS (1840). 

Secretary: John A. Trail, LL.D., W.S., 28 Rutland Square, Edinburgh. 

Object: The evangelization of the Jews. 

Fields: Those of the parent Society. 

Income: About 5,000 yearly from churches, chapes, associations, and 
individuals in Scotland. The local income derived from school fees, 
medical fees, and private contributions at the stations of the Mission 
amounts to about 2,000, and is expended directly upon the work, 
being only reported to the committee at home. 

Fields: Turkish Empire (including Syria), Egypt. A mission was carried 
on for some years among the Jews of Glasgow, but it is at present in 
abeyance. 

CHURCH OP SCOTLAND WOMEN'S ASSOCIATION FOR THE CHRISTIAN EDUCA- 
TION OF JEWESSES (1845). 

Secretary: Miss Annie Kidley, 22 Queen St., Edinburgh. 

Object: The evangelization and education of Jewish women and girls in the Levant. 
Income: By subscriptions, 1,054; by legacies, 804; total, 1,858. 
Fields: Those of the Church of Scotland Committee for the Conversion of the Jewa. 

COMMITTEE ON THE CONVERSION OF THE JEWS OF THE UNITED 
FREE CHURCH OF SCOTLAND (1843). 

(NOTE: This Committee has been amalgamated with the Colonial Committee and the 
Continental Committee of the United Free Church of Scotland, under the name 
of the Colonial, Continental, and Jewish Committee of the United Free Church of 
Scotland, which see under Scotland.) 

UNITED FREE CHURCH OF SCOTLAND, WOMEN'S JEWISH MISSIONARY 

ASSOCIATION (1843). 

Secretary: Rev. George Milne Rae, D.D., 119 George St., Edinburgh. 
Object: To evangelize Jewish women and children at the stations occupied by the 

Jewish Committee. 

Income: 995. (Exclusive of 700 contributed by the Jewish Committee.) 
Fields: Those of the parent Society. 

NOTE: The work among the Jewish women and children at the stations of the Jewish 
Missions of the United Free Church is carried on by the Women's Jewish Mission- 
ary Association, which is affiliated with the Colonial, Continental, and Jewish 
Committee of that Church.) 

CHURCH OF SCOTLAND MISSION TO JEWS (1904). 
Secretary: Mr. Moritz Michaelis, 21 Apsley PI., Glasgow. 
Field: Glasgow. 

McCHEYNE MISSION TO THE JEWS OF THE FREE CHURCH OF 

SCOTLAND (1904). 

Secretary: Rev. A. A. Braude, 6 Marshall St., Edinburgh. 
Income: 220. 
Field: Edinburgh. 

SOCIETIES NOT DENOMINATIONAL: 

BONAR MEMORIAL MISSION TO THE JEWS [GLASGOW UNITED 
EVANGELISTIC ASSOCIATION] (1893). 

(NOTE: This Mission has been amalgamated with the Colonial, Continental, and Jew- 
ish Committee of the United Free Church of Scotland, which see under. Scotland.) 

GLASGOW JEWISH EVANGELICAL MISSION (1893). 

(NoTE : This Mission has been amalgamated with the Colonial, Continental, and Jew- 
ish Committee of the United Free Church of Scotland, which see under Scotland.) 

JEWISH MEDICAL MISSION IN EDINBURGH (1900). 
Secretary: Mr. Leo Levinson, 8 Albert Terrace, Edinburgh. 
Income: 300. 
Field: Edinburgh. 

GLASGOW JEWISH MEDICAL MISSION (1903). 
Secretary: Dr. Muir Kelly, 11 Eglinton St., Glasgow. 
Income: 138. 
Organ: "Healing Wings." 
Field: Glasgow. 

DENMARK 

DANSKE ISRAELSMISSION [DANISH JEWISH MISSION] (1885). 
Secretary: Rev. Jes. Seidelin, Kapellan v. Klosterkirken, Horsens. 
Income: 18,000 Kr. 
Organ: "Israelsmissionen." 
Fields: Russia, Galicia, Denmark. 



IRELAND 

CHURCH OF ENGLAND: 

LONDON SOCIETY FOR PROMOTING CHRISTIANITY AMONGST THE 
JEWS (1809). 
(See under England.) 



FINLAND 

FINSKA MISSIONSSXLLSKAPET [JEWISH WORK OF THE FINNISH 

MISSIONARY SOCIETY] (1863). 
Office Address: Finska Missionssallskapet, Helsingfors. 
Income: 4,962 F. Mk. 
(NOTE: Active work suspended for the present.) 



Missions for Jews 



DIRECTORY OF MISSIONARY SOCIETIES 



77 



FRANCE 

SOCIETE FRANCAISE POUR L'EVANGELISATION D'ISRAEL [FRENCH 
SOCIETY FOR THE EVANGELIZATION OF THE JEWS] (1888). 

Secretary: Pasteur Gustav A. Kruger, Gauber par Orgeres, Eure et 
Loire. 

Object: To promote the evangelization of Israel, by means of general 
workers, missionaries, colporteurs, etc.; also to stimulate the zealous- 
ness of the ministers located in centers where Jews are to be found. 

Income: About 4,000 Fr., of which 1,200 Fr. were received from Swit- 
zerland. 

Field: Paris. 

GERMANY 

EHEMALS EDZARDSCHE PROSELYTENKASSE [ESDRAS EDZARD 

FUND] (1667). 

Secretary: The Mayor of Hamburg. 
Field: Hamburg. 

6ESELLSCHAFT ZUR BEFORDERUNG DES CHRISTENTUMS UNTER 
DEN JUDEN [SOCIETY FOR PROMOTING CHRISTIANITY 
AMONG THE JEWS] (1822). 

Director: Mr. R. Bieling, 22 Kastanien Alice, Berlin N. 37. 

Income: 36,888 Mk. 

Organ: "Messiasbote." 

Fields: Europe, Asia. 

(NOTE : The Society for the Christian Care of Proseltyea, organized in 1830, ia an auxili- 
ary agency, having an income of 4,000 Mk.) 

STRASSBURG SOCIETY OF THE FRIENDS OF ISRAEL (1835). 

(NOTE: No information at hand.) 

WESTDEUTSCHER VEREIN FUR ISRAEL IN KOLN [WEST GERMAN 

ASSOCIATION FOR ISRAEL, IN COLOGNE] (x843). 
Secretary: Pastor Karl Wagner, Moltkestrasse 80, Cologne. 
Income: 31,666 Mk. 
Organ: "Missions Blatt." 
Field: Germany. 

LUEBECK SOCIETY OF THE FRIENDS OF ISRAEL (1844). 

(NOTE: No information at hand.) 

EVANGELISCH-LUTHERISCHER ZENTRALVEREIN FUR MISSION 
UNTER ISRAEL, IN LEIPZIG [CENTRAL ORGANIZATION OF 
THE EVANGELICAL LUTHERAN CHURCH FOR WORK 
AMONG ISRAEL, IN LEIPZIG] (1869). 

Secretary: Pastor von Harling, Markt 2iii., Leipzig. 

Income 21,629 Mk. 

Organs: "Saat auf Hoffnung," "Friede xiber Israel." 

Fields: Germany, Russia. 

(NOTE: The following societies are auxiliary to the Central Organization of theKvan- 
gelical Lutheran Church for Work among Israel, in Leipzig, with the income of each: 

1. Chief Mission Society of Evangelical Lutherans in Saxony, 6,000 Mk. 

2. Bavarian Mission Association for Jewish work, 1,500 Mk. 

3. Hannover Jewish Mission, 3,000 Mk. 

4. Mecklenburg-Schwerin Jewish Mission, 375 Mk. 

5. Mecklenburg-Strelitz Jewish Mission, 350 Mk. 

6. Jewish Missionary Society of Reuss, 180 Mk. 

7. Upper Hessian Jewish Missionary Society, 230 Mk. 

8. Wurttemberg Jewish Missionary Society, 287 Mk. 

9. Jewish Missionary Society of Sehleswig-Holstein, 2,033 Mk. 
10. Danish Society for Mission among Israel, 75 Mk.) 

INSTITUTUM JUDAICUM DELITZSCHIANUM (1880). 
Secretary: Pastor von Harling, Markt 2 iii., Leipzig. 
Field: Leipzig. 

INSTITUTUM JUDAICUM STRACKIANUM (1883). 
Secretary: Prof. H. L. Strack, D.D., Ringatrasse 73, Gross Lichterfelde 

W. bei Berlin. 
Organ: "Nathaniel." 
Field: Berlin. 

AMMIEL [DUSSELDORF] (1904). 
Secretary: Prof. Stroeter, Blankenburg, a.H. 
Field: Palestine. 

(NOTE: Not a missionary society in the accepted sense of that term, yet its purpose ia 
the furtherance of the preaching of the Gospel to the Jews.) 



THE NETHERLANDS 

NEDERLANDSCHE VEREENIGING TOT MEDEMERKING AAN DE 
MITBREIDING VAN HET CHRISTENDOM ONDER DE JODEN 
[NETHERLANDS SOCIETY FOR PROMOTING CHRISTIANITY 
AMONG THE JEWS] (1843). 

(NOTE: Auxiliary to the London Society for Promoting Christianity Amongst the 
Jews.) 

NEDERLANDSCHE VEREENIGING VOOR ISRAEL [NETHERLANDS SO- 
CIETY FOR ISRAEL] (1861). 

Secretary: Mr. F. W. A. Korff, Frans Hals Straat, Amsterdam. 
Income: 6,840 Fl. 
Organ: "De Hope Israels." 
Field: Amsterdam. 
(NOTE: The Society was reorganized in 1876.) 

ZENDING VAN DER GEREFORMEERDE KERKEN IN NEDERLAND 
[MISSION OF THE REFORMED CHURCHES IN THE NETHER- 
LANDS] (1875). 
(NOTE: Now defunct as regards organized work among the Jews.) 

FRIENDS OF ISRAEL IN THE HAGUE (1908) 

(NOTE: Work now suspended.) 



NORWAY 

NORSKE CENTRAL-KOMITE FOR ISRAELSMISSIONEN [NORWEGIAN 

CENTRAL COMMITTEE FOR JEWISH MISSIONS] (1865). 
Secretary: Dr. Chr. Ihlen, Middelthums Gade 11, Christiania. 
Income: 32,000 Kr. 
Organ: "Missionsblad for Israel." 
Fields: Norway, Roumania. 

RUSSIA 

ASYLUM FOR JEWISH GIRLS, ST. PETERSBURG (1864) 
Field: (Russia). St. Petersburg. 
(NOTE: Works exclusively among the inmates of the Asylum.) 

JEWISH MISSION OF THE BALTIC LUTHERAN CHURCH (1865). 
Income 600 Rbs. 
Field: Russia. 

JEWISH MISSION OF THE LUTHERAN CHURCH OF POLAND (1908). 
Field: (Poland). Lodz. 

(NOTE: Works in conjunction with the Leipzig Central Organization, which see 
under Germany.) 



SWEDEN 

FORENINGEN FOR ISRAELSMISSION [SOCIETY FOR MISSION TO 

ISRAEL] (1875). 

Secretary: Pastor Theo. Lindhagen, Stockholm 7. 
Income: 50,000 Kr. 
Organ: "Missionstidning for Israel." 
Fields: Sweden, Russia, Roumania. 

(NOTE: The Hebrew Christian Association of Stockholm, founded in 1002, is an 
auxiliary to this Society.) 



SWITZERLAND 

VEREIN DER FREUNDE ISRAELS IN BASEL [SOCIETY OF THE FRIENDS 

OF ISRAEL, IN BASEL] (1830). 
Secretary: Prof. Heman, Sommergasse 48, Basel. 
Income: 54,937 Fr. 
Organ: "Freunde Israels." 
Field: Europe. 

COMITE GENEVOIS DU SOU ISRAELITE [PENNY COLLECTION FOR 

ISRAEL IN GENEVA] (1889). 

Secretary: Mile. Caroline Broucher, 54 Boulevard des Franch6es, Geneva. 
Income: 4,754 Fr. 
Organ: "Sou Israelite." 
Field: Algiers. 

AFRICA 

ASILE RUDOLPH [ASYLUM RUDOLPH] (1880). 
Secretary: Rev. Peter Rudolph, Alexandria, Egypt. 

MISSION TO ISRAEL OF THE DUTCH REFORMED CHURCH OF THE 

TRANSVAAL (1903). 
Missionary: Mr. Philip Cohen, Third Ave., Melville, Johannesburg, South 

Africa. 
Field: Transvaal. 

HEBREW CHRISTIAN PRAYER UNION (1906). 
Field: Capetown, South Africa. 



ASIA 

BOMBAY JEWISH MISSION (1895). 
Secretary: Mrs. Cutler, Mrs. Richardson's Home, Tardeo, Bombay. 

GOSPEL AND MEDICAL MISSION TO THE JEWS AT HAIFA, PALESTINE 

(1904). 

Missionary: Mr. D. C. Ji-eeph, Haifa, Palestine. 
Income: 120. 
Organ: "Gospel Tidings." 
Field: Haifa, Palestine. 

(NOTE: Working in affiliation with the London Gospel Mission to the Jews, which see 
under England.) 

HOME FOR JEWS [PALESTINE] (1904). 
Correspondent: Miss Dunn, Bethlehem, Palestine. 

BOARDING SCHOOL FOR JEWISH GIRLS ( ). 

Correspondent: Miss H. Lovell, Jerusalem, Palestine. 

OLD CHURCH CALCUTTA HEBREW MISSION ( ). 
Secretary: Miss S. Mulvany, 11 Mission Row, Calcutta. 
Field: Calcutta, India. 

(NOTE: The following Missionary Societies pay special attention to work for the Jews, 
but are reported elsewhere in this Directory: British Syrian Mission [Jewish women 
at Beirut]; Church Missionary Society [Malabar and Cochin Jews]; Church of Eng- 
land Zenana Missionary Society [Jewesses in Calcutta]; Zenana Bible and Medical 
Mission [3 schools among Black Jews in Bombay); Tabeetha Mission Schools [Jaffa; 
Palestine].) 



78 



WORLD ATLAS OF CHRISTIAN MISSIONS 



SUMMARY OF SOCIETIES AND INCOMES 



In the section of the following summary referring to societies an attempt 
has been made at a tentative classification based upon the standing, pur- 
pose, and mutual relationship of missionary organizations. Principal 
societies organized for aggressive and responsible missionary leadership are 
entered as "Appointing and Sending Societies." Auxiliaries of "Appoint- 
ing and Sending Societies," when of the first rank, and officially recognized, 
follow in a column by themselves. Supplementing these auxiliary agencies 
is a third class, composed of branch or associate missions, or committees 
in aid, located in other lands from those of the society so aided, and to 
these a third column has been assigned. 

The three classes mentioned form a distinct group, which is then fol- 
lowed by another group, entitled "Cooperating and Collecting Societies." 
This group includes organizations which aid or serve the missionary propa- 
ganda in some specialized or limited sphere of service, as literary, educa- 
tional, medical, or industrial, or collect funds for the support of other 
societies, or whose aim is to awaken interest, and contribute, usually in 
the home land, to the progress and success of the missionary cause. In 
connection with "Cooperating and Collecting Societies" there are a few 
auxiliaries, which have been placed in a separate column, and to these 
have been added in a sixth column, as a class by themselves, certain un- 
attached missions, conducted independently of any organized home base, 
and usually under the direction of individual missionaries deriving their 
support from private sources, or serving at their own charges. 

These six classes of missionary agencies are confessedly in some instances 
somewhat vaguely differentiated, and the judgment wavers at times, 
especially in connection with agencies in mission fields, as to the column 
in which they should be listed. This much can be said, that no single 
society has been entered in any two columns. Its designation, whether 
rightly or wrongly, has been fixed, as seemed most in accord with facts, 
and no other entry of it has been made, so that in this table of summaries 
no duplicate enrollment of any society has been made. 

Missionary funds only are included, and of these only such as are de- 
voted, outside the sphere of home missionary effort, to the christianization, 
under evangelical auspices, of those, of whatever race or nation or ecclesi- 
astical connection, who are in need of a vital union with Christ, and a 
saving knowledge of His Gospel. 

The proper crediting of income in the summaries, and its geographical 
distribution, has often proved perplexing. Scrupulous care has been taken 
not to enter the same funds twice. There are, it will be noted, a number 
of societies receiving generous contributions from other lands, through 
committees in aid or associate missions, which contributions are acknowl- 
edged as part of the regular income of those societies. In making up the 



summaries it would clearly be duplicating receipts if such contributions 
from outside sources were credited also to the societies sending them. 
They are, therefore, included but once, and credited to the principal 
societies which receive and administer them. This statement, however, 
applies only to the make-up of the totals, as in the Directory each society 
is credited with the income which it receives. 

In the case of colonial dioceses and other agencies in mission fields, 
grants in aid from the home land, and money sent by aid associations are 
not credited in these totals to the recipient, whenever they are already 
acknowledged elsewhere. All government grants, and the proceeds of 
sales of literature in the case of Bible and Tract Societies, are everywhere 
eliminated, and only local subscriptions and contributions not already 
reported elsewhere are included in these summary totals. Independent 
educational institutions having no direct connection with missionary 
societies, but governed and administered by boards of trustees in the 
home land, are credited in these summaries with whatever local income 
they report, and this income is assigned to the countries where they are 
located, while the income which is received by the board of trustees from 
home sources is credited directly to the country which provides it. We 
have examples of this in the local income credited to such institutions as 
the Mackenzie College, in Brazil, and the Syrian Protestant College, at 
Beirut, and other institutions similarly administered. 

Contributions from Christendom intended for the support of Protes- 
tantism in the colonial churches, or for Church extension in colonial com- 
munities, or for Protestant emigrants, whether in America, Australasia, or 
elsewhere, are eliminated. Missions to the Jews are not included in these 
summaries. 

The totals which the following summaries yield will be found to be larger 
than those published in the Atlas presented at the Edinburgh Conference. 
This is due partly to more complete and officially distributed returns, 
partly to the inclusion of evangelical missionary efforts among non- 
Protestants, partly to freshly ascertained information concerning the 
amount of local incomes in mission fields, and also to the discovery of 
additional societies not entered in the Conference volume, yet clearly 
entitled to representation in a World Atlas of Missions. 

In transferring American currency into pounds sterling the standard 
valuation of $4.8665 to the pound is used, and the same valuation is util- 
ized for the reverse process. The values used to reduce Continental cur- 
rency to the pound sterling are taken from the Statesman's Year Book as 
follows: Francs, Lire : and Finnish Marks, 25.225; Marks, 20.43; Kroner, 
18; Florins, 12. Having reduced Continental currency to pounds sterling, 
these in turn were reduced to dollars, at the standard valuation above given. 



COUNTRIES 


SOCIETIES 


INCOME AND CONTRIBUTIONS 


Principal Societies 
Appointing and Sending 


Auxiliaries to 
Principal Societies 


Committees in Aid of 
Societies in Other Lands 


s 

.2 


.H*> 

3 .S 

oj t5 

P. <u 

to 3 

66 


Auxiliaries to 
Cooperating Societies 


Independent and 
Unconnected Missions 


Total of Societies 


Income in 
American Dollars 


Income in 
Pounds Sterling 


Income in 
National Currency 


AMERICAN AND CANADIAN SOCIETIES 
Canada 


1 

11 
103 

19 
5 
2 

58 
4 
18 
2 

4 

7 
2 
4 
24 
2 
8 
5 
1 
1 
2 
8 
3 

19 
13 

2 
3 
1 
2 
1 

1 

7 

2 
17 
6 
2 

5 
3 
377 


2 

8 
50 

11 
2 

40 
3 
6 

2 
2 

1 
3 

1 
1 

5 

27 

1 
163 


3 

5 
21 

8 
3 
1 

13 

7 
10 

2 
1 
2 
4 

7 
2 

2 

3 

7 

7 

1 

6 

1 

1 
1 
2 

117 


4 

5 

56 

2 

57 
1 
9 

1 
3 
1 
3 

34 
2 
4 
7 

3 
3 

8 

~5 
1 

7 

25 
26 
29 
1 

*4 

3 

2 

303 


5 
2 

8 
1 

2 

13 


6 

4 
15 
2 
1 

22 


7 

31 

230 

40 
10 
3 

176 
15 
44 
3 

4 
1 
12 
4 
11 
66 
4 
19 
14 
1 
3 
3 
17 
13 

35 
13 

2 
8 
1 
5 
1 

1 
20 

37 
85 
38 
5 
2 
9 

7 
2 

995 


8 

$824 127 
12122303 

429 824 
164 909 
2437 

9582596 
145 547 
1 759 078 
91548 

31304 
775 
86424 
54472 
213 530 
1 958 208 
100727 
208 829 
249 835 
715 

14843 
369 129 
565 349 

557 263 
76934 

480 
91133 
1000 
41836 

64973 

81373 
162582 
129 783 
917 

180047 

11509 
2000 

S30 378 489 


9 

169347 
2490969 

88323 
33905 
501 

1969094 
29908 
361 467 
18812 

6433 
159 
17759 
11193 
43878 
402385 
20698 
42912 
51338 
147 

3050 
75851 
116 172 

114 510 
15809 

99 
18726 
205 
8597 

13351 

16721 
33408 
26669 
188 

36997 

2377 
411 

6242369 


10 

Mk. 131 417 
Fr. 4016 
Kr. 319663 
F.Mk. 282238 
Fr. 1 106 812 
Mk. 8 220 733 
Lire 522 107 
Fl. 514940 
Kr. 924 079 
Mk. 3000 

Fr. 76940 
Kr. 1 365 322 
Fr. 2 929 846 

h 


United States 


AUSTRALASIAN SOCIETIES 
Australia 


New Zealand 


Tasmania 7r. . 


BRITISH AND IRISH SOCIETIES 
England 


Ireland 


Scotland 


Wales 


CONTINENTAL SOCIETIES 
Austria-Hungary 


Bulgaria 


Denmark 


Finland 


France 


Germany* 


Italy 


Netherlands 


Norway 


Roumania 


Russia 1 * 


Spain 


Sweden 


Switzerland 


SOUTH AFRICAN SOCIETIES 


OTHER AFRICAN SOCIETIES 


SOUTH AMERICAN. SOCIETIES 
Argentine Republic 


Brazil 


Chile 


British Guiana 




CENTRAL AMERICAN AND MEXICAN SOCIETIES' 1 .... 
WEST INDIAN SOCIETIES 


SOCIETIES IN ASIA 
China 


India and Ceylon 


Japan 


Korea 


Siberia 8 


Turkish Empire" 


SOCIETIES IN MALAYSIA 
Dutch East Indies 


Philippine Islands . . . ... .... 


Totals 





u The transfer, by special request, of the Basel Society into the Swiss Section accounts for the diminution in the income reported from Germany. b The income returns from 
Russia were too indefinitely distributed to justify their inclusion in these summaries. Includes the local incomes of educational institutions independently administered. d No 
statement of income received. Incomes omitted to avoid duplication. 



PART II 



STATISTICS OF MISSIONS 



STATISTICS OF MISSIONS 



EXPLANATORY NOTES 



The plan followed in these tables is to record the statistics of Protestant 
missionary operations in each country, enumerating the societies engaged 
therein, and the results of their work, so far as pertains to that country only. 
The totals reveal the status of missions as conducted in that particular field. 
The statistics of the various mission lands are thus presented in succession 
in this tabulated form, and the various phases of operations whether 
General and Evangelistic, Educational, Medical, Philanthropic and Re- 
formatory, or pertaining to Mission Presses and Bible distribution are 
recorded in tables dealing with each of these departments. Special and 
separate tables are devoted to missions among Jews, and also to missions 
of the Roman Catholic and Russian Orthodox Churches among non- 
Christians. 

It will be noticed that in the column set apart for "Principal Stations" 
there is an inevitable duplication in the list given for each country, since 
different societies often occupy the ame station, and each society rep- 
resented in that station reports it. The totals of "Principal Stations" 
should, therefore, be reduced, and this has been done in the final sum- 
maries, on the basis of the Station Index. A column for "Baptized Chris- 
tians" has been inserted in the General and Evangelistic Tables, since 
the missionary societies of the Continent of Europe regard this entry as a 
very important and decisive indication of the progress of missionary work. 
On the other hand, many American and British societies do not record 
this class as separated from communicants. Accordingly, the returns 
under this heading have not been available in numerous cases. In such 
instances the number of communicants has been inserted, as indicating 
those who without doubt have been baptized. In the case of missionaries 
whose ecclesiastical affiliation is with bodies which do not offer ordination, 
they are nevertheless usually entered as ordained, rather than as lay mis- 
sionaries, where their services and status place them among the ordained, 
rather than among the lay workers. Moreover entries have been made 
under " Communicants " and " Baptized Christians " in a few cases where 
these rubrics are not entirely appropriate, owing to the attitude of the 
bodies concerned toward these ordinances. These entries, however, seemed 
to be the only way to give certain societies full credit for the results of 
their labors. 

7 The column entitled "Native Christian Community" can only be given 
as approximately accurate. In some regions, owing to the rigidity of social 
conditions, and the opposition of political or religious forces, the Christian 
community consists, of few except those avowedly and formally related 
to the Christian nucleus. In other regions the influence of the Gospel has 
been so far-reaching that the number of adherents must include a multi- 
tude of family groups, and even whole communities. In soliciting statistics 
the Committee asked the societies to provide estimates of their Christian 
constituency for this column, and wherever a society has supplied these 
figures they have been watered. When a society has not provided such 
data an estimate has been entered based on the best sources available. In 
most instances every communicant has been regarded as standing for 
three additional members of a Christian community, including adults 
nd children. 

Excepting in a few instances where the women's societies are entirely 
independent in administration, or in respect to some particular phase of 
service or field of work, the statistics of such societies have been included 
in the returns of the principal societies with which they are con- 
nected as auxiliaries. The status and financial relationship of each 



society, where these have been ascertained, are indicated in the Directory, 
forming Part I of this volume. 

In the educational statistics an earnest attempt has been made to indi- 
cate the number of students legitimately entitled to be entered as of college 
grade. Special letters were sent to the missionary institutions throughout the 
world, with titles which seemed to indicate that they were in the rank of col- 
leges. More than four fifths of the institutions responded, in each case giving 
a classification of its enrollment. In the statistical tables, therefore, the 
student entries under the head of Universities and Colleges indicate only 
pupils of college grade. Where an institution enrolls students of both 
college and high school grades, or, as in some cases, pupils of primary grade 
in addition, credit has been given in each case, in the proper columns, for 
the pupils of lower grade. Thus, if an institution listed 20 students of 
college grade, 75 pupils of high school grade, and 100 pupils of primary 
grade, it has been credited as a college, a high school, and a primary school, 
with its enrollment in each grade. 

Painstaking efforts were made to verify and complete the statistics 
of the medical returns in each country. Mission hospitals and dispensaries 
were written to in all the mission fields, to obtain supplementary data, 
where the information from the home offices was insufficient. The same 
statement is true of the returns of philanthropic and reformatory work. 

In almost every instance] the data concerning Mission Presses were 
received direct from the fields, but the method of reporting has been so 
varied and entangling, and in many important items the information 
desired has so often been only partially furnished, or omitted altogether, 
that it has proved impossible to classify and reduce the returns to any 
satisfactory systematic tabulation. All that, under the circumstances, 
seemed practicable, was to record a list of the presses in mission fields, 
giving location, and indicating their status, whether in connection with 
some society, or independently conducted. As regards the literary output 
of publishing houses, tract societies, and other distributing agencies of Chris- 
tian literature, facts and statistics, so far as available, will be found in the 
Directory, wherever societies representing literary activities are entered. 

Had it been practicable to keep a clear division between statistics of v 
work for non-Christians and that for other classes in the fields where both 
types of work exist, that plan would manifestly have proved advantageous 
in meeting the needs of those students who, while granting the necessity 
and importance of both kinds of endeavor, yet desire to see them presented 
separately in the statistical tables. But many Protestant missionary 
societies do not report separately for each of these types of work; indeed 
in many cases the same workers seek to reach both nominal or lapsed 
Christians and non-Christians. Often representatives of two or more races 
(each race differently related to historical Christianity), along with half- 
castes, share the privileges of given mission stations or institutions. This 
is especially true of Latin America and the Near East. While further 
research and the development of statistical methods may in the future 
make possible a more satisfactory scientific classification of returns for the 
fields where Protestantism deals with a racial complexus already more or 
less influenced by other forms of Christianity, yet for the present volume 
it has not been found practicable to present more than one statistical study, 
for each field under survey. 

The statistics of Missions to the Jews were prepared by the Rev. Louis 
Meyer, who has given special attention to this department of missionary 
activity. 



81 



STATISTICAL TABLES 



83 



GENERAL AND EVANGELISTIC SUMMARIES 



COUNTRIES AND SOCIETIES 


FOHEION MISSIONARIES 


NATIVE WORKERS 


STATIONS 


CHRISTIAN COMMUNITY AND CONTRIBUTIONS 


a 
o 


Phyeiciani 


Lay Missionaries not 
Physicians (Men) 


Married Women 
not Physicians 


Unmarried Women 
not Physicians 


Total of Foreign 
Missionaries 


Ordained Natives 


Unordained Natives, Preach- 
ers, Teachers, Bible-women, 
and Other Workers 


Total of Ordained and 
Unordained Native 
Workers 


.0 

i 
1 

s 


All Other Sub-Stations 


1 


Communicants Added 
During the Last Year 


Total Number of 
Communicants 


Total Number of 
Baptized Christians 


Total of Native Christian 
Adherents, incl. Baptized 
and Unbaptized, All Ages 


Sunday Schools 


Total Sunday School 
Membership, Including 
Teachers and Scholars 


( / / 
Total of Native Contri- 
butions in U. S. Gold / 


* 


It 


Japan (with Formosa) 


2 

^305 

3>-920 
30 
35 
212 
62 
17 
16 
132 
12 
. 38 
) 1 358 
62 
26 
70 
52 
9 
49 
21 
.195 
'338 
>649 
124 
197 
88 
5 
39 
27 
4 

76 
3 
14 
7 
33 
55 
6 
4 
71 
87 
142 
54 
10 
179 
50 
35 
173 
20 
30 
111 
4 
2 
132 

6388 


3 

10 
-24 
-251 
13 

~9 
14 

7 
1 

-115 
1 
12 
17 
-23 

12 
6 
10 
20 
6 
22 
14 
4 

2 
2 

4 
1 

2 
10 
1 
3 

1 

6 
5 

-39 
667 


4 

1 

r- 12 
^-114 

1 
1 

1 

-163 
4 
-9 
1 

* 3 

4 
2 
2 
3 
1 
3 
4 

1 

2 
1 
2 

1 
1 

1 

--~9 
348 


6 

54 
12 
-683 
7 
22 
34 
6 
10 

36 
1 
11 
-358 
19 
10 
38 
62 
1 
58 
24 
88 
102 
282 
-118 
116 
29 
1 
56 
15 
8 
15 
28 
4 
7 
4 
18 
9 
4 

10 
30 
7 
2 
2 
15 
12 

41 
8 
5 
50 
4 

-296 
2733 


6 

309 
94 
-1265 
41 
26 
194 
60 
11 
3 
78 
10 
37 
-1279 
44 
35 
86 
69 
6 
68 
39 
125 
-219 
464 
97 
193 
100 
4 
69 
32 
7 
5 
78 
7 
18 
5 
44 
16 
7 
3 
35 
88 
30 
43 
3 
52 
39 
1 
125 
11 
3 
105 
3 

149 
5934 


7 

-353 
71 
-1093 
9 
30 
41 
27 
10 
2 
30 
9 
17 
-1417 
134 
27 
145 
-195 
6 
106 
64 
92 
83 
187 
45 
125 
49 
1 
33 
27 
7 
1 
58 
1 
6 
3 
7 
1 
2 
3 
14 
79 
5 
63 

11 

44 

147 
61 
27 
69 
6 

-334 
5377 


8 

-1029 
307 
4197 
96 
114 
490 
167 
48 
21 
280 
32 
105 
4635 
263 
119 
354 
397 
22 
296 
155 
518 
664 
1589 
403 
648 
269 
11 
199 
97 
27 
22 
244 
. 16 
45 
19 
102 
81 
19 
10 
131 
294 
186 
167 
17 
257 
142 
37 
492 
100 
65 
338 
17 
2 
- 952 
/ 
21307 


9 

-474 
34 
-513 
6 
13 
HI 
37 
1 
49 
193 
28 
328 
-1270 
109 
43 
91 
28 
25 
54 
1 
261 
68 
-401 
16 
62 
-688 
1 
21 
17 
6 
2 
121 
1 
4 

5 
23 
1 

10 
130 
65 
22 
21 
108 
52 
33 
158 
19 
63 
11 

5799 


10. 

1664 
1897 
-11595 
171 
329 
3022 
843 
37 
176 
2877 
102 
-4114 
34084 
2680 
262 
1355 
730 
45 
764 
27 
2277 
2149 
-8279 
3077 
2900 
-5450 
10 
168 
117 
21 
16 
243 
2 
78 
4 
425 
504 
9 

294 
399 
912 
123 
118 
1744 
85 
233 
312 
85 
89 
270 
15 
2 

97184 


11 

2138 
1931 
12 108 
177 
342 
"3136 
880 
39 
225 
3070 
130 
4 460 
35354 
2789 
305 
1446 
758 
70 
818 
28 
2538 
2217 
-8680 
3093 
2962 
- 6 138 
11 
189 
134 
27 
18 
364 
3 
82 
5 
430 
527 
10 
6 
304 
529 
977 
200 
139 
1852 
137 
266 
470 
104 
152 
281 
15 
2 

103 066 


12 

97 
23 
527 
13 
23 
-163 
26 
9 
7 
76 
13 
39 
-783 
40 
12 
46 
48 
4 
39 
29 
112 
130 
408 
103 
157 
60 
3 
29 
19 
8 
6 
45 
4 
6 
6 
20 
15 
5 
3 
37 
43 
51 
34 
7 
46 
39 
10 
-180 
16 
9 
131 
10 
2 
d 67 

3838 


13 

1146 
-1542 
4350 
75 
51 
817 
311 
26 
277 
450 
67 
31 
-10217 
483 
78 
304 
122 
45 
198 
12 
-1807 
1276 
-4790 
850 
1065 
1204 
3 
42 
57 
26 
8 
291 
3 
4 
1 
63 
134 

149 
520 
189 
274 
41 
426 
176 
134 
332 
34 
140 
49 
8 

21 
34719 


14 

012 
462 
-2027 
32 
57 
444 
238 
11 
48 
494 
35 
-938 
-4088 
388 
38 
185 
42 
28 
70 
4 
470 
456 
-3928 
150 
218 
-1126 
3 
68 
55 
12 
6 
328 
5 
12 
2 
3 
24 

3 
30 
331 
104 
120 
4 
384 
118 
1 
534 
52 
143 
24 
9 

18964 


15 

8639 
-20053 
-15521 
469 
383 
7839 
7891 
47 
83 
177 
711 
849 
-35452 
783 
265 
588 
234 
127 
1329 
26 
3751 
4792 
-19330 
1992 
3974 
734 
22 
63 
157 

2055 

54 
83 

64 
211 

942 
1696 
852 
67 
-12819 
1003 

793 
336 
1397 
398 
41 

222 
159 314 


16 

67024 
57415 
-177 774 
4475 
4782 
-347759 
36571 
634 
3225 
23965 
7192 
61892 
-522349 
16388 
4210 
16031 
.4874 
1196 
10619 
184 
78334 
33389 
322 673 
20641 
30395 
70258 
115 
4800 
5616 
925 
147 
28903 
54 
572 
61 
7414 
27523 
114 
125 
8240 
24771 
80787 
9692 
2706 
-138333 
9173 
19182 
28406 
3687 
9527 
10678 
286 

2346086 


17 

82196 
89609 
-214642 
4509 
9078 
403005 
3657! 
680 
3225 
34024 
7192 
61902 
-916 773 


18 

97117 
178 686 
470184 
17184 


19 

1389 
1291 


20 

87 283 
-110865 
65482 
3437 
1985 
24204 


21 

171 694 
109 460 
- 213 259 
2832 
4694 
22864 
37137 
292 
2654 
10682 
8531 
43026 
-573454 
26651 
823 
128307 
75125 
6301 
160713 
92 
-193 499 
26730 
-688434 
17818 
13616 
42114 
46 
54965 
19941 
6740 
2259 
93095 

1385 
91 
10406 
37890 

935 
8992 
103 292 
79193 
3777 
1635 
-174 057 
22485 
4622 
1740 
24715 
5184 
8470 

246 717 


Korea 


Chinese Empire 


1859 
53 
48 
22 
13| 

i 
612 
49 
1468 
-10872 
606 
77 
330 
91 


Siam and French Indo-China., . 


British Malaysia 


16674 


Dutch East Indies 


515 660 
75955 
1480 
25888 
111 415 
17760 
146500 
1 471 727 
50196 
10446 
58616 
18374 
5171 
37726 
427 
248 702 
103 201 
1 145 326 
92583 
118 107 
286 702 
174 
15296 
20264 
2441 
379 
115 593 
194 
1306 
121 
31959 
82416 
303 
500 
33687 
92156 
386225 
30732 
10671 
461309 
36850 
41476 
68143 
4252 
22000 
44218 
424 
11800 
1040 

6837736 


Philippine Islands 


7932 
131 
70 
20517 
1851 
40207 
- 422 135 
27885 
4468 
32274 
8989 
2936 
15024 
793 
47357 
20968 
-88254 
58803 
8932 
52408 
103 
4215 
3863 
812 
313 
9081 
90 
630 
158 
1751 
16582 

130 
5421 
15068 
50579 
9202 
1478 
-82078 
7535 
15655 
16997 
959 
10938 
860 
11 

2345 
412 044 


Australia (Aborigines and Chinese) 


New Zealand (Maoris and Chinese) 


Melanesia (except Dutch New Guinea) 


Micronesia 


Polynesia (except Hawaiian Islands) 






26101 
8609 
17417 
6638 
1296 
11550 
184 
122580 
45060 
-622098 
29238 
83202 
120 460 
115 
4819 
5616 
925 
147 
29164 
56 
582 
67 
31483 
28510 
114 
125 
12923 
25046 
90247 
9692 
2761 
140830 
9529 
20200 
28860 
3687 
10931 
21433 
289 
11800 

3447790 


Persia ~ 


Turkish Empire (except Syria and Palestine) 1. 


Syria and Palestine 


Bulgaria 


40 
211 
19 

623 
331 
1826 
653 
225 
- 1 53< 

t 

95 
82 
13 


North-east Africa (Egypt to Somaliland) X 


North-west Africa (Tripoli to Morocco) 


Western Africa (Senegal to Nigeria) 7 . 


South-west Africa (Kamerun to German South-west Africa); 
South Africa (British Union, with Basutoland and Swaziland) 
Southern Central Africa (Five British Protectorates) ; 


East Africa (Portuguese, German, British) ~i 


Madagascar and Mauritius - 


Cape Verde and Madeira Islands 


Argentine Republic 


Chfle 






22! 
i 
a 

19 
6 
14 
70 

78 
342 
295 
160 
26 
-221] 
145 
247 
309 
36 
143 
18 
1 
2 
33 

28957 


Brazil X 




Peru .... 






British Guiana 




Colombia 


Central America, including Panama 


Mexico 


Lesser Antilles 


Porto Rico 


Haiti and Santo Domingo 




Cuba 


Bahama Islands 


United States, including Alaska (Indians and Eskimos) 
United States, except Hawaiian Is. (Asiatic Immigrants) . . 
Hawaiian Islands (Hawaiians and Asiatic Immigrants) .. . . J . 


Canada (Asiiitie Immigrants) 


Greenland ... 


Jews in all the world r 


Grand Totals. ... 





Physicians who are ordained are_ entered in both columns 2 and 3. Accordingly, the total of missionaries does not necessarily equal the total of columns of 2 and 7. 

b Owing to inevitable duplication in the enumeration of stations by the various societies, the totals in column 12 in the succeeding tables are in the excess of the total number of cities occupied. In this table 
of summaries duplicate stations are eliminated. 

c Includes certain workers not distributed in Society reports as between ordained and Unordained. 
d Stations in which no other than work for Jews is conducted. 



EDUCATIONAL SUMMARIES 



COUNTRIES AND SOCIETIES 


UNIVERSITIES AND 
COLLEGES 


THEOLOGICAL AND 
NORMAL SCHOOLS AND 
TRAINING CLASSES 


BOARDING AND HIGH 
SCHOOLS * 

_ ^ > 


INDUSTRIAL TRAINING 
INSTITUTIONS AND 
CLASSES 


ELEMENTARY AND VILLAGE 
SCHOOLS 


KINDERGARTENS 


i 
1 


Students 


Institutions and Classes 


Students 


Institutions 


^ Tupils 


Institutions and Classes 


Pupils 


t m 
OT 


Pupils 


Schools and Classes 


Pupils 


03 

1 


Females 


a 
1 


JS 

j 


& 


"rt 

1 


m 
<u 


to 
qj 

, w 
fe 


a 
1 


tn 


Females 


"S 
I 


8 

i 


1 
fa 


1 


m 


Females 


"3 

I 


Japan (with Formosa) 


i 

7 
1 
18 

37 
3 

9 
2 
1 
1 

-3 
1 


2 

400 
23 
-896 

4922 
15 

-811 
-397 
80 
155 

23 
10 


3 

94 
-23 

-60 
211 

1 


4 

-494 
23 
-919 

4982 
15 

-1022 
397 
80 
155 

24 
10 


5 

-32 
10 
(29 
3 
2 
12 
6 

1 
2 

3 
141 
7 
1 
6 
5 
1 
2 

18 
11 

-41 
9 
~22 
13 


6 

404 
-710 
{1 376) 

(364) 
(177) 

77 

(105) 
(2350) 
(29) 

(1 J 

12 
(322) 
(286) 

-<667) 
392 
(256) 


7 

-215 
-150 
-(928) 

6 
(65) 

14 

237 
(33) 

1 

11 

(15) 
(29) 
-(219) 
(66) 


8 

-619 
-860 
-2544 
55 
13 
413 
254 

91 

249 
-3755 
68 

58 
115 

1 
23 

381 
335 

964 
392 
339 
313 


9 

-70 
36 
-438 
8 
17 
2 
2 
1 
2 
6 
3 
14 
-576 
44 
14 
-55 
30 
2 
30 

-71 
29 

43 
41 
22 
16 


10 

(5388) 
(1 840) 
(11 773) 
472 
3196 

(276) 
(40) 
(661) 
(55 937) 
(675) 
839 
(821) 
(1266) 

2472 
(2354) 
(1 163) 

(2912) 
(1 462) 
(801 
1224 


11 

(4 167) 
(669) 
(6 547) 
346 
534 

27 

(66) 
(296) 
(15 110) 

(i ii 

(665) 
(642) 

3173 
(689) 
(210) 

(1 944) 
(337 
(175) 
870 


12 

-11 91? 
2609 
-20866 
818 
3730 
45 
29 
20 
27 
376 
204 
1137 
-77400 
4807 
1362 
4496 
2088 
111 
-5645 

4074 
1646 
-5433 


13 
6 
5 

6 
2 
4 

1 

3 

148 
6 

1 

2 

3 
5 
-13 

8 
-16 


14 
16 
16 

59 
642 
90 

18 
(5042) 
322 

45 

24 
10 
(363) 

55 

(549) 
(214) 
65 
46 


15 
175 
144 

(3 925) 
212 

46 

35 
53 
(196) 

116 
(264) 
8 


16 
191 

160 

59 
642 
90 

78 

18 
-8999 
534 

91 
30 
59 
63 
-718 

171 

-1137 
- 1 218 

73 
46 


17 

98 
802 
2538 
29 
25 
1031 
11 
19 
1 
911 
96 
-1511 
-11 503 
871 
109 
306 
255 
10 
226 

903 
-1353 

3029 
1210 
715 
835 


18 

(1 015) 
(12 087) 
(21 545) 
(217) 
(604) 
(35 000) 

(31) 
(692) 

(12 019) 
(159 045) 
(20 941) 
(1 727) 
(1 330) 
(5 469) 

(10899) 
(18 551) 
(21 610) 

(55 405) 
(25 358) 
(33 805) 
(15 142) 


19 

(857) 
(3 075) 
(8 452) 
(76 
(47 
(13 258) 

(129) 
(426) 

(8957) 
(76 029) 
(9 062) 
(852) 
(966 
(5681) 

(2354) 
(6 873) 
(10319) 

(50 054) 
(13 121) 
(24 088) 
(10 100) 


20 

6582 
19077 
55097 
843 
1604 
60294 
321 
735 

24674 
1886 
42181 
-361 726 
-62990 
2889 
20499 
13122 
320 
13478 

46185 
45719 

-168213 
-70327 
-61 160 
42114 


21 

-32 
-13 

-27 

8 
1 
1 

2 
15 

1 
1 
1 


22 

(252) 
(133) 

(397) 
34 
374 

9 
10 


23 

(272) 
(96) 

(466) 

32 

100 
353 

10 
10 


24 

-1802 
367 

-972 

357 
66 
130 

100 
-727 

25 
19 
20 


Korea . . 


Chinese Empire 


Siam and French indo-China 


British Malaysia 


Dutch East Indies 


Philippine Islands 


Australia (Aborigines and Chinese) 


New Zealand (Maoris and Chinese) 


Melanesia (except Dutch New Guinea) 


Micronesia 


Polynesia (except Hawaiian Islands) 


India 


Ceylon 


Persia 


Turkish Empire (except Syria and Palestine)... T 
Syria and Palestine 7 


Bulgaria 


North-east Africa (Egypt to Somaliland) 


North-west Africa (Tripoli to Morocco) 


Western Africa (Senegal to Nigeria) T 


bouth-west Africa (Kamerun to German South- 
west Africa) . 


South Africa (British Union, with BasutoJand 
and Swaziland) ... 


Southern Cent. Africa (Five British Protectorates) 
Mat Africa (Portuguese. German, British) r 


2392 
995 
2094 


JO 
-14 
1 


Madagascar and Mauritius . . . 





84 



WORLD ATLAS OF CHRISTIAN MISSIONS 



EDUCATIONAL SUMMARIES Continued 



COUNTRIES AND SOCIETIES 


UNIVERSITIES AND 
COLLEGES 


THEOLOGICAL AND 
NORMAL SCHOOLS AND 
TRAINING CLASSES 


BOARDINO AND HlQH 

SCHOOLS 


INDUSTRIAL TRAINING 
INSTITUTIONS AND 

CLASSES 


ELBMHNTARY AND VILLAOB 
SCHOOLS 


KlNDBRQABTMta 


I 


Students 


1 
1 


Students 


1 


Pupils 


T) 

S 


Pupils 


, 


Pupils 


1 


Pupil* 


m 


! 

fct 





| 





3 



1 


f*t 


I 


( 


j 





1 


3 


I 


| 


PH 


, 




1 


2 


3 


4 


6 


6 


7 


e 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


16 


16 


17 

3( 
13 

1 
6 

1 

32 
141 
1 

28 
139 
418 
19 
18 
503 
27 
30 

41 
55 

8 
117 
2 
22 
70 

30185 


18 

MV 

(166) 

(1826] 
(60S) 

(4 677) 
f80) 
(147) 

(70) 
(175) 

1635 
(466 667) 


19 

(37) 

(20) 
(167) 

(147!) 
(442) 

(18) 

(628) 
(4968) 
(655) 
(148) 
(4 152) 

(39) 
1628 
(259 639) 


20 

127 
6329 
616 

98 
2060 

292 
12 
3319 

17568 
15 

1757 
7640 
52598 
1721 
851 
66218 
1321 
1500 

1046 
3172 

3263 

1060 
5838 

1290357 


21 


22 

^ 


23 


24 


Argentine Republic 




-469 





-507 


1 
i 

5 
4 
1 
1 


9 
12 

33 
6 

37 


30 
13 


9 
12 

63 
19 
3 
37 


3 
8 
2 
2 
8 
2 
4 


70 
291 


64 
425 


124 
1600 
250 
293 
716 
220 
107 


2 
2 


16 


18 


34 
84( 


20 
"992 

6697 


Chile 


1 







BrawS Uay - 


-38 








Bolivia 





Peru 

























1 
2 


10 
5 





10 
5 





























Colombia 
Central America, Including Panama 


86 


8201 


427 


8628 


2 
6 
3 
2 

4 
2 

1 
1 
3 

1 
1 

1 

522 


62 
(8) 
2 

23 
3 

348 
46 
20 


1 
(ID 
6 

21 

12 
30 


66 
33 
8 

44 
3 

130 
360 
76 
20 


4 
1 
24 
9 

7 

10 
4 
5 

29 


10 


(871) 

(80) 
(34) 

(87) 

220 
202 


(2846) 

25 
101 

(50) 
(41) 

(42) 

230 
213 


181 
65 
4042 
605 
25 
101 
725 
354 
199 

1654 

450 
415 


1 

4 

1 
1 


243 


222 


465 
18 


2 
-11 

15 


(345) 
1554) 


(412) 
1751) 








Haiti and Santo Domingo 


Jamaica 


Cuba 


Bahama Islands. 


United States, including Alaska (Indiana and 
Eskimos) 


United States, except Hawaiian Islands (Asiatic 
Immigrants) 


Hawaiian Islands (Hawaiians and Asiatic Im- 
migrants) 


Canada and the Labrador (Indians and Eskimos) 
Canada (Asiatic Immigrants) 




Jews in all the world 7 


20 
(8 457) 


(3 256) 


20 
12761 


1714 


(97 407) 


(41313) 


166 447 


22 
tSf 


(7835) 


(5414) 


-1058 
16292 


Grand Totals 







In many cases the returns received from Societies indicated only total enrollment under each class of Institutions. It was thought desirable, where possible, to indicate even partial returns by sexes, in order to 
give some indication of the relative number of males and females under instruction. Where the division ia incomplete this fact is indicated by parentheses. 

TOTAL UNDER INSTRUCTION IN FOREIGN MISSIONARY INSTITUTIONS: Universities and Colleges, 8628; Theological and Normal Schools and Training Classes, 12761; Boarding and High Schools, 166447: In- 
dustrial Training Institutions and Classes, 16292: Elementary and Village Schools, 1 290357; Kindergartens, 5597; Medical Schools and Classes, 830; Schools and Classes for Nurses, 663; Orphanages, 20383; 
Institutions for the Blind and for Deaf Mutes, 844; Grand Total for all Institutions, 1 522 802. 



MEDICAL SUMMARIES 



COUNTRIES AND SOCIETIES 


HOSPITALS, DISPENSARIES, AND PATIENTS 


SURGICAL 
OPERATIONS 
DURING: 
THE YEAR 


MEDICAL SCHOOLS AND CLASSES 


SCHOOLS AND CLASSES roa 
NURSES 


3 
I 


j 


Hospital In-Patients 
Received during Year 


Dispensary Treat- 
ments during Year 


Outside Patients 
Visited during Year 


Total Individual 
Patients 


a 




1 


1 


Number of 
Institutions 
and Classes 


STUDENTS 


Number of Schools 
and Classes 


STUDENTS 


, 


J 


j 


,. 


J 


f- 


Japan (with Formosa) 


1 

10 
13 
207 
9 
1 
18 
4 

6 

170 
3 
9 
18 
17 
9 
1 
6 
14 
5 
18 
12 
5 
2 

3 
2 
6 
2 
6 

676 


2 

9 

18 
-292 
11 
1 
31 
r i 
2 
11 
2 
-355 
7 
20 
16 
28 
18 
7 
40 
40 
9 
"47 
42 
5 
2 
1 
1 
1 
5 
4 
7 
2 
36 

1077 


3 

5633 
2186 
58757 
890 

1853 
824 

61612 
2021 
2832 
2587 
3644 
12624 
298 
635 
1313 
400 
1604 
3235 
.409 

720 

326 
348 

164 751 


4 

94388 
87217 
1 123 807 
17777 

84364 
39858 

186 

2072537 
9231 
54729 
37519 
88801 
72599 
56000 
28383 
133 158 
8634 
97945 
78290 
7512 
1740 

200 
34980 
1200 

4320 
4235375 


6 

7633 
3186 
34999 
1377 

8952 
907 

44020 
224 
15056 
1678 
11498 
6044 
1600 
1771 
2038 
7 
293 
2127 
970 
180 

1385 
146 945 


6 

107586 
70968 
1 065 406 
17541 

43739 
40349 

2186 

1943464 
11476 
59102 
77201 
120 261 
128608 
51304 
29413 
141 499 
9244 
112 842 
89016 
18720 
1920 
311 

200 
43085 
1200 
326 
4668 
125 429 

4317064 


7 

166 997 
113783 
-1748491 
40382 

144 084 
63050 

2186 
500 
-3 605 597 
17591 
151 895 
-251 257 
-183 403 
142099 
57800 
50695 
180 211 
14855 
149 647 
-225 205 
24142 
1920 
311 

200 
65418 
46200 
326 
5268 
125 429 

7 678 942 


8 

1633 
2616 
40387 
431 

348 
286 

200 
300 
57506 
542 
2507 
3326 
3558 
2963 
600 
1109 
429 
89 
334 
721 
43 
15 

398 

90 
50 

120 481 


9 

540 
920 
10754 
295 

1 

15156 
53 
1722 
2299 
1723 
1027 
1558 
228 
47 
30 
25 
373 
31 

71 
36 
36897 


10 

4 
6 
55 
3 

~1 

26 
5 
1 

1 
1 

6 
2 

111 


11 

28 
45 

<29 i 
10 

106 
25 
108 

1 

2 

16 
18 

(677) 


12 

1 

(87) 

1 

44 
1 

(136) 


13 

26 
48 
401 
23 

11 

150 
26 
108 

1 

2 

16 
18 

830 


14 

2 
26 

1 

3 
2 

42 

2 

1 

1 

4 
4 

2 

1 
2 

98 


IB 

43 
6 

(13) 

1 
3 
(4) 

2 
(74) 


16 

11 
113 

3 

18 

(27 

14 
6 

1 

(4) 
32 

16 
19 

(515) 


17 

26 
11 
156 
6 

3 
18 

316 

14 
6 

11 
3 
24 

34 
16 
19 

663 


Korea 




Siam and French Indo-China 


British Malaysia 


Dutch East Indies 


Philippine Islands 


Australia (Aborigines and Chinese) 


Melanesia (except Dutch New Guinea) . ... 


Micronesia (except Hawaiian Islands) 


India 


Ceylon 


Persia .... , 


Turkish Empire (except Syria and Palestine) 


Syjria and Palestine 


North-east Africa (Egypt to Somaliland) ... 


North-west Africa (Tripoli to Morocco) 


Western Africa (Senegal to Nigeria) 


South-west Africa (Kamerun to German S. W. Africa) 


South Africa (British Union with Basutoland and Swaziland) 
Southern Central Africa (Five British Protectorates) 


East Africa (Portuguese, German, British) 


Madagascar and Mauritius 


Chile 


Brazil 


Dutch Guiana 


Central America 


Mexico 


PortoRico 


United States, including Alaska (Indians and Eskimos) 
Canada and the Labrador (Indians and Eskimos) 


Jewo in all the world 


Grand To tals 





In many cases the returns received from Societies indicated only total enrollment under each class of institutions. It was thought desirable, where possible, to Indicate even partial returns by sexes, in order to 
give some indication of the relative number of males and females under instruction. Where the division is incomplete this fact Is indicated by parentheses. 



STATISTICAL TABLES 



85 



PHILANTHROPIC AND REFORMATORY SUMMARIES 



COUNTRIES AND SOCIETIES 


, 


Number of Inmates 


Leper Hospitals and Asylums 


Total Inmates 


3 


Homes for Untainted 
Children of Lepers 


3 



ji 


Institutions for the Blind, 
and for Deaf Uutes 


Pupils 


Rescue Homes 


a 


1 
I 


A 


Homes for Widows 


f 


Industrial Homes 


! 


3 


& 


1" 


3 


m 

P=) 


I 


span (with Formosa) 


i 

21 
1 
14 

1 
4 
180 
1 
17 
6 
3 
1 
2 
4 

2 
6 
1 

4 
271 


2 

(120) 
(211) 

13 

(16) 
(4761) 


3 

n 

(407) 

29 
(39) 
(7622) 


4 

2351 
7( 
867 

42 
105 
13400 


5 
4 

16 
1 


6 

207 

1473 
8 


7 

40 

266 
2 


8 

3 


9 

107 


10 

17 


11 

I 
1 
11 


12 
(9) 

(120) 


13 
(12, 

(222) 


14 

66 
11 

386 


15 

i 

5 


16 

18 
415 


17 

100 


18 

2466 


19 


20 


21 
1 

2 


22 
40 
195 


[orea.. ' ... 


liineMEn>pip>..., 
































1 
1 
19 


15 

300 
1134 


utoh East Indies 


r 

59 


163 
4815 


112 

2508 


18 


460 


339 


1 


136 


204 


340 


1 

8 


12 
360 








15 


410 


idia 
eylon '. , 


urkish Empire (except Syria and Palestine) 
yria and Palestine 


(763) 
334 
(58) 

30 
36 

~6 
62 

6410) 


a 
(i i 

53 
45 

~7 
154 

(10018) 


2258 
525 

194 

96 
83 
81 

13 
21< 
10 

72 
20383 


1 


50 














1 


17 


7 


24 


~ 

























Western Africa (Senegal to Nigeria) 


1 














__ 














2 


22 




















outh-west Africa (Kamerun to German S. W. Africa) 
outh Africa (British Union with Basutoland and Swaziland 
outhero Central Africa (Five British Protectorates) 


1 
1 


13 
40 


11 
17 


. 





~~ 


1 


12 


5 


17 


2 
1 


17 
12 


3 


82 








4 


105 


ast Africa (Portuguese. German, British) 






































1 








































































rand Totals 


88 


6769 


2966 


21 


667 


356 


25 


(294) 


(461) 


844 


21 


856 


103 


2548 


16 


410 


28 


1789 





In many cases the returns received from Societies indicated only total enrollment under each class of institutions. It was thought desirable, where possible, to indicate even partial returns by want, in order 
> give some indication of the relative number of males and females under instruction. Where the division ia incomplete this fact is indicated by parentheses. 



BIBLE SOCIETIES 



COUNTRIES 


S 


S 


i 


1 


COUNTRIES 


1 


3 
EH 


1 


| 


AMERICAN BIBLE SOCIETY* 


5571 
315 
6118 
65 

886 
9999 
4915 
117 

4366 
3587 
7374 
1837 
802 
35 

(27 611) 


36400 
18345 
24889 
122 

803 
12601 
7147 
92 
900 

10492 
3592 
9929 
2954 
1327 
751 

(102060) 


43129 
26415 
460271 
46225 

1618 
26823 
83446 

225 

22755 
7669 
10002 
14277 
3S53 
7 

(638 161) 


86100 
45075 
491 280 
46402 
102999 
2807 
49423 
45508 
209 
1125 
40965 
37613 
14846 
27305 
19068 
5682 
793 

870721 


North-east Africa (Egypt to Somaliland) 11 


8440 
614 
100 
1046 
26721 
14979 
678 
4172 
5935 
6754 
8908 

1261 
(113348) 


4300 
1940 
950 
134 
4977 
14597 
8332 
8548 
8073 
18681 
5793 

1615 
(207069) 


26800 
17925 
1147 
100 
1122 
5110 
8122 
5012 
17295 
29363 
20401 

5666 
(2102495) 


84540 
20470 
2197 
1280 
32820 
84686 
7032 
17732 
31303 
54798 
30102 
602 
8745 
50653 
1500 

2429824 


North-west Africa (Tripoli to Morocco) 


Western Africa (Senegal to Nigeria) 


orea. 


South-west Africa (Kamerun to German South-west Africa). . . 
South Africa 1 






Southern Central Africa (Five British Protectorates) 


illippine Islands' 1 


East Africa (Portuguese, German, British) 


jrsla 


Madagascar and Mauritius . 


iirkish Empire" 


Argentine Republic, Paraguay, and Uruguay 


Drth-east Africa (Egypt to Somaliland) 


Brazil 




Peru, Colombia Ecuador, Chile, and Bolivia 






>uth America, except Brazil* 3 . . 




azil , 


West Indies'" 




America (Indians)' 1 


exico..... 


Total* ... 


iba ... 


)rto Rico 




sited States of America, including Alaska (Indians and Eskimos) 11 
>tala 


NATIONAL DLBLE SOCIETY OF SCOTLAND! 


2548 
192 
1254 
8288 
153 
830 
461 
72 

663 
8298 


22278 
5065 
12098 
4756 
47 
595 
203 
278 
224 
1919 

45644 


46858 
20197 
895815 
216014 
3548 
1454 
539 
294 
68 
1168 

1 184 887 


71684 
25454 
900167 
224958 
2748 
2870 
1203 
644 
292 
3750 

1238620 






BRITISH AND FOREIGN BIBLE SOCIETY' 


3655 
288 
15957 
2665 
400 
327 
815 

26328 
2644 
"1240 
0819 
660 


35074 
21820 
40890 
3730 
800 
3119 
12401 

32355 
1889 
428 
15585 
700 


90899 
38384 
1143224 
12261 
18053 
51604 
12855 

597 518 
28760 
6518 
37781 
4300 


129628 
60492 
1200071 
18656 
19253 
55050 
26071 
5212 
656 201 
32793 
8186 
60185 
5560 




India 


Ceylon 


orea 


Turkish Empire (except Syria and Palestine) 


linese Empire 




am and French Indo-China 




itish Malaysia' 


Southern Central Africa (Five British Protectorates) 


itch East Indies' 
lilippine Islands 


Totals 


:eania b 
dla. 




ylon 


NEDERLANDSCH BIJBELGENOOTSCHAP* 


36 


3542 


6004 


0582 


rsia 


irkish Empire (except Syria and Palestine) 


Tia and Palestine' 1 







Estimated. 

Total issues for all the -world: Bibles, 262 518; Testaments, 460 397; Portions, 1 173 026; total, 

1 895 941. 
b Impossible to divide between Bibles. Testaments, and Portions. 

Impossible to separate the distribution in Syria and Palestine. 
d Probably only a partial report. 

The American Bible Society and the British and Foreign Bible Society have not reported for 
rtain countries, except as to total circulation. Accordingly, the totals for the first three cojumna 
each of the two tables concerned are put in parenthesis, their sum being less than the total in the 
urth column. \ 

NOTE: There are also large and important Bible Societies on the European Continent, over fifty in number, chiefly in Germany, France, Switzerland, Denmark, Norway, Sweden, Finland, and Russia, but 
ey report little work at the present time in mission fields. In the past they have printed the Bible in the various dialects of Eastern Europe, and four are m Iceland and Greenland. Their circulation of Biblei 
a portions on the Continent of Europe has been very large and continuous during most of the past century. 



' Total issues for all the world: Bibles, 864 247; TestameiU, 1 186 595; Fortloni, 8 087 569; total, 
6688381. 

Division approximated from the report of the South Malaysia agency. 

* Division approximated from the report of the Egyptian agency. 

1 Natal agency not reported. Includes many volumes sold to white people. 

Total issues for all the world: Biblei, 91671; Testaments, 146178; Fortloni, 1400042; total, 

1 637 889. 

k Total issues for all the world: Bibles, 87624; Testaments, 18789; Fortloni, 10748; total, 
67111. 



WORLD ATLAS OF CHRISTIAN MISSIONS 



GENERAL AND EVANGELISTIC 



COUNTRIES AND SOCIETIES 


DATE 


FOREIGN MISSIONARIES 


NATIVE WORKERS 


STATIONS 


CHRISTIAN COMMUNITY AND CONTRIBUTIONS ' 


I 

'o.B 


8 

"B 
o 


Physicians 


43 

o 

fl 

*i * 

_O BQ 

3 "'3 
*f3 

s! 


ii 

fe 'S 

si 

CPn 
Jl 


1 

o m 

tj'5 
|l> 


3 
u-4 rt 


m 
I 
1 

s 


*!. 

I'th 

S S 


It 

i 

OS 

"'M 

JJI 


1 
1 

U 

1 


1 

1 

I 


o 

1 


1 


s 

83 
a P 

11 

73 1 

sJ 


t. 23 
53 C 

l! 


a-8 8 

ili 
5 If 


i 


M 

|l| 

CQ o S 

||| 


ll 
3 

*^t3 

g| 


a 


1 


JAPAN (with Formosa) 

American and Canadian Societies 

American Baptist Foreign Mission Society 


1 

1872 
1876 
1869 
1907 
1908 
1873 
1880 
1859 
1859 
1879 
1892 
1886 
1887 
1859 
1902 
1885 
1883 
1889 
1904 
1885 
1895 
1889 
1872 
1895 
1908 
1896 
1876 
1873 
1887 
1891 
1896 

1890 
1879 
1882 
1871 

1859 

1888 
1869 
1865 
1875 
1873 

1885 
1900 

1875 
1874 
1897 
1900 
1887 
1901 

1895 
1908 

1903 

1883 
1877 
1907 
1887 


2 

23 
1 
23 

1 

22 
6 
22 
8 
9 
4 
14 
2 
24 

13 
11 
2 

3 
3 
9 
4 
5 
2 
2 
2 
10 
5 
3 
2 
1 
4 

240 

29 
6 

18 
53 

3 
4 

1 


3 

1 
1 

2 

1 

1 
1 

1 
3 

~4 


4 

1 
1 


6 

1 

1 

4 

2 

3 
1 

2 

4 
2 

2 
3 

6 

30 

2 
2 
3 

3 
10 

2 
2 

2 


6 

23 
1 

X 
4 
1 
22 
6 
22 
10 
10 
2 
13 
2 
20 

12 
10 
5 

3 
3 
9 
4 
5 
1 
2 
2 
10 
4 
5 
6 

2 

243 

2 

2 
26 
5 

8 
43 

3 
3 
6 

1 


7 

17 

25 
3 

42 

26 
8 
5 

9 
3 
23 
1 
9 
9 
1 
1 
3 

2 
1 
3 
3 
4 
20 
1 

2 
5 
23 
5 
254 

64 
4 

23 
81 

3 
3 

1 


8 

64 
2 
72 
11 
2 
88 
12 
70 
29 
25 
6 
36 
7 
71 

34 
31 
12 

Ml 
6 
18 
10 
11 
6 
7 
8 
40 
10 
10 
12 
2 
13 
5 
23 
5 
771 

4 

4 
110 
21 

52 
191 

6 
9 
15 

3 
2 


9 
15 

10 
2 

23 

8 
4 
5 
1 

16 

7 
5 
2 

4 
102 

5 
6 

3 
3 


10 

176 
40 

6 
15 

6 
10 

45 

42 
16 
14 
65 
26 

~7 
27 

20 
7 
16 

5 
30 

6 
578 

60 
3 

75 
22 

160 

11 
4 
15 

36 
16 


11 

190 
4( 

6 
25 

8 
10 

68 

42 
24 
18 
70 
27 

7 
43 

27 
12 

18 

9 
30 

6 
680 

60 
3 

80 
22 

165 

14 
4 
18 

36 
16 


12 

12 
1 
12 
2 
1 
12 

15 
7 
3 
3 
8 
3 
16 
1 
8 
6 
5 
1 
2 
2 
6 

3 

3 
1 
8 
4 
4 
2 
1 
2 
3 
5 
1 
168 

2 

1 

26 
3 

10 
42 

2 
3 
5 

1 
1 


13 

106 

27 

8 
4 

24 

4 
27 
3 
73 
10 

14 
30 

20 
11 
5 

4 
7 

377 

84 
84 

4 
3 

19 
12 
1 
37 
69 

35 


14 
31 

11 

3 
2 

19 

6 
13 
7 
4 
2 

~2 
14 

10 
5 
4 

1 
137 

39 
39 

6 
1 
7 

29 
29 

28 
28 

120 
68 
85 
99 
372 

612 


15 
389 

183 

12 

49 

224 

46 
75 
60 
93 
133 

107 

123 
23 

1 
1626 

381 
381 

23 
5 
28 

1926 
1923 
1231 
1624 
6704 

8639 


16 

2608 
25 
1114 

360 
132 

1620 

622 
381 
339 
2130 
684 

210 
992 

657 
424 
140 

219 
12657 

3253 
3263 

210 
22 
232 

15687 
17017 
11153 
7025 
50882 

67024 


17 

2608 
25 
1226 

400 
157 

1620 

622 

339 
2811 

'684 

210 
! 992 

657 
424 
140 

! 219 
13515 

5911 
6911 

350 
22 
372 

16779 
18969 
13265 
13385 
62398 

82196 


18 

2665 
*100 
1226 

800 
347 

*5480 

2729 
1143 
*1356 
3561 
710 

*840 
1074 

*2600 
*1690 
140 

519 
26980 

6271 
6271 

400 
30 
430 

16779 
18969 
13265 
14423 
63436 

97117 


19 
127 

32 

10 
9 

40 

19 
21 
12 
40 
14 

22 
51 

24 

9 

e 

6 
441 

20 
20 

11 
6 
17 

1 

39 
40 

31 
31 

3 

150 
200 
253 
234 
837 

1389 


20 
8176 

2470 

217 
900 

2417 

1863 
935 
666 
600 
566 

1000 
1844 

1865 
250 
84 

238 
24091 

225 
250 
475 

35 

3000 
3035 

900 
900 

160 

10100 
11925 
23220 
13387 
68632 

87283 


21 

S3 433 

1351 

150 
134 

1944 

210 
811 
487 
2639 
509 

1064 

407 
74 
1170 

52 
14436 

5803 
6803 

99 
99 

20000 
20000 

48853 
51328 
mia 144 

19032 
131367 

171 694 


American Bible Society 


American Board of Commissioners for For. Miss.* 
Apostolic Faith Movement 1 * 


Board of For. Miss., Gen. Council Evan. Luth. Church. 
Board of For. Miss., Methodist Episcopal Church 
Board of For. Miss., Methodist Protestant Church d ,. . 
Board of For. Miss., Presbyterian Church in U. S. A. 
Board of For. Miss., Reformed Church (Dutch)* '... . 
Board of For. Miss., Reformed Church In U. S.. . . . 
Board of For. Miss., United Synod, Evan. Luth. Ch. . 
Board of Miss., Methodist Episcopal Church, South . . 
Christian and Missionary Alliance 


Dom. and For. Miss. Soc., Protestant Episcopal Ch.. 
Dominion Council of the Y. W. C. A. of Canada 
Exec. Com. of For. Miss., Presbyterian Ch. (South)". 
Foreign Christian Missionary Society 


For. Dept., International Committee, Y. M. C. A 
For. Dept., National Board, Y. W. C. A., U. S. A 
Foreign Miss. Association of Friends of Philadelphia.. 
For. Miss. Soc. of the United Brethren in Christ 


For. Miss. Board of the Southern Baptist Convention. 
For. Miss. Com., Presbyterian Church in Canada 


General Miss. Board, Free Methodist Church 


Qen. Miss. Board, Pentecostal Church, Nazarene 


rlephzibah Faith Missionary Association 


Missionary Society of the Evangelical Association 
Missionary Society of the Methodist Church, Canada d 
Mission Board of the Christian Church 


Scandinavian Alliance Mission 


Seventh-Day Adventist Mission Board.. . 


United Danish Evangelical Lutheran Church 


Jniversalist General Convention 


Roman's For. Miss. Soc., Methodist Protestant Ch.. . 
Roman's Miss. Society, Methodist Church, Canada.. . 
Voman's Union Missionary Society of America 


[totals, 36 American and Canadian Societies 


British Societies 

British and Foreign Bible Society 


Children's Special Service Mission 


Christian Missions in Many Lands 


Dhurch Missionary Society * ... 


Tor. Miss. Com., Presbyterian Church of England 
National Bible Society of Scotland 


3ociety for the Propagation of the Gospels 


totals, 7 British Societies 


Continental Societies 
Ulg. evangelisch-protestantischer Missionsverein 


jutherska Evangeliforeningen i Finland 


totals, 2 Continental Societies 


Japan Societies 

Doshisha College 


apan Book and Tract Society 


Fapanese Y. M. C. A., National Union 


National Committee of the Y. W. C. A. of Japan 
)kayama Orphan Asylum 


3 
4 

305 


10 


1 


1 
3 

9 
1 

54 


4 
6 

9 
9 

3 

309 


1 
2 

7 
2 
9 

4 

353 


9 
14 

25 
2 
27 

11 

1029 


9 
9 

90 
89 
101 
75 
355 

474 


3 
42 
97 

106 
106 

10 

66 
209 
213 
210 
698 

1664 


3 
51 
106 

106 
106 

10 

156 
298 
314 
285 
1053 

2138 


2 
4 

3 
2 
6 

2 

226 


Mental Missionary Society 


totals, 6 Japan Societies 


International Societies 


World's Woman's Christian Temperance Union 




35 

65 
278 
110 
121 
674 

1146 


Independent Society 
'apan Evangelistic Band 


Indigenous Societies' 1 
Cumial KyokwaiJ '. 


Mhon Kirisuto Kyokwai h , 




Nippon Seikokwai" 




irand Totals, 58 Societies 




KOREA 
American and Canadian Societies 
Lmerican Bible Society 


1882 
1885 
1884 
1897 
1892 
1901 
1898 
1904 

1889 

1883 
1891 
1908 
1889 


16 
36 
11 
12 

6 
2 
83 

4 

1 


1 

9 
5 
4 

1 
21 

1 


5 
4 
1 
1 

1 
12 


1 
3 

4 
8 

1 


14 
37 
9 
11 
1 
4 
3 
79 

4 

2 


15 
14 
11 

8 

3 
2 
63 

4 

2 
6 


s? 

103 
37 
36 
6 
14 
8 
25* 

12 

04 
2 

6 


6 
6 
4 
2 

6 
2 
f 26 


40 
214 
1178 
91 
100 

41 
11 
1676 

60 

64 
1 


40 
220 
1184 
95 
102 

47 
13 
1701 

60 

64 
1 


6 
8 
3 
4 
1 
3 
1 
26 

3 

1 
1 

2 


20 
971 
178 
169 

53 
1391 

23 


30 
57 
110 
206 

3 
406 

3 


10664 
6528 
853 
1362 

206 
19613 

150 


23455 
25010 
1973 
3362 

932 
155 
64887 

385 


"23455 
51458 
4998 
5284 

1320 
155 
86670 

476 


39613 
96443 
7811 
20396 

4632 
155 
169 050 

1146 


153 
942 
33 
105 

45 
8 
1286 

6 


12333 
87177 
1881 
5784 

3034 
200 
110409 

456 


$- 

13508 
81075 
4384 
5328 

2637 
66 
106898 

7B4 


loard of For. Miss., Methodist Episcopal Church 
ioard of For. Miss., Presbyterian Church in U. S. A. ... 
ioard of Missions, Methodist Episcopal Church, 'South 
3xec. Com. of For. Miss., Presbyterian Ch. (South) b . . . 
tor. Dept., International Committee, Y. M. C. A 


tor. Miss. Com., Presbyterian Church in Canada 
eventh-Day Adventist Mission Board 


totals, 8 American and Canadian Societies 


Australasian Society 


British Societies 
irltish and Foreign Bible Society 


iritish Evangelistic Mission . . 


hildren's Special Service Mission 


ommunity of St. Peter 11 


(Continued on next page) 



JAPAN 

Data for the Japanese Church included under Kumiai Kyokwai. 
b Data from The Christian Movement in Japan, 1909. 

Data for the Japanese Church included under the Nippon Methodist Kyokwai. 
d Data for Woman's Board not included. 

8 Data for the Japanese Church included under the Nihon Kirisuto Kyokwai. 
' Data for Woman's Foreign Missionary Society included. 

* Data for the Japanese Church included under the Nippon Seikokwai. 
11 Includes one man and wife supported by the Ohio Yearly Meeting. 

1 No report for Baptized Christians other than the number of Communicants. 

' The American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions is associated with the Kumiai Kyokwai. 

k The Presbyterians in the U. S. A., the Presbyterians in the U. S. (South), the Reformed Church 
in America (Dutch), the Reformed Church in the U. S. (German), and the Woman's Mis- 
sionary Union are associated with the Nihon Kirisuto Kyokwai. 



1 The Methodist Episcopal Church, the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, the Methodist Church. 

Canada, are associated with the Nippon Methodist Kyokwai. 
m Partial report only. 
The Church of England and the Protestant Episcopal Church are associated with the Nippon 

Seikokwai. 

KOREA 

* No report for Baptized Christians other than the number of Communicants. 

b Statistics provided by the Rev. J. S. Gale, D.D., of Korea. 

The Foreign Staff of the British and Foreign Bible Society in Korea supervise the work of the 

American Bible Society and of the National Bible Society of Scotland. 
d Work in connection with the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel. 



* Estimate. Except in column 18, all estimates are from the societies. 

t Physicians who are ordained are entered in both columns 2 and 3. Accordingly, the total of missionaries does not necessarily equal the total of columns 2 to 7. 
I Owing to inevitable duplication in the enumeration of stations by the various societies, the totals in column 12 are in excess of the total number of cities occupied. 
iBge, duplicates ure eliminated. 



In the tables of summaries on another 



STATISTICAL TABLES 

GENERAL AND EVANGELISTIC Continued 



87 



COUNTRIES AND SOCIETIES 


DATE 


FOREIGN MISSIONARIES 


NATIVE WORKERS 


STATIONS 


CHRISTIAN COMMUNITT AND CONTRIBUTIONS 


i 

*s 
><3 


] 


Physicians 




a m 

0.2 
t> ^ 
&-B 

TJ P*> 
*PM 


1 

o m 

*J 

a cj 
.SV 

W 

ll 


a 

2 m 

si 

'53 

Q jH 

HH 


13 

sS 
8 

6 


III 

iv 

lj 

M a 

12#c 
JzTi 

P U 09 


1 

Se 

S3 

S,* 

;r2' Z ' 

^0 

o 

3 a"o 
& 


m 

1 

1 
73 

f 
1 


m 

O 

l 
1 

CO 
t-t 

S 


1 

a 

I 


3,8 

3* 

U 

8 > 

a-g 
la 

cSl 


s 

jj| 
3 

Is, 


|i 
[H; <s 

^>"Si 

^ a 



m 

.Is 

ow . 

ffl 

jSjfS 

"SB! 
a| p 
iSlj 
H-<! a 


J 
1 

| 


W) 

^! 
?-55 

if a 

Jg 
!H 


h 

60 

>o5 

IP 

.9 

a 
%a 

, es 
EH* 


i 


1 


4J 



IS 

IB 

O tn 

$.3 

!S "v 

&I 
3 


KOKEA-Concluded- 
British Societies Concluded 
National Bible Society of Scotland 


i 
1 

1881 
1889 

1908 

1901 
1889 


2 

8 
9 

1 
1 

97 


3 

2 
2 

24 


4 
12 


5 

1 
3 

12 


6 

5 
7 

3 

1 
94 


7 

3 
11 

3 
71 


8 

18 
30 

9 

2 
2 

S II 

307 


9 

6 
6 

2 
2 

- 34 


10 

16 
30 
111 

2 

3 
56 
69 

1897 


11 

16 
36 
117 

2 

3 
58 
61 

1931 


12 

5 
9 

2 

1 
1 

41 


13 

28 
28 

100 
100 

1542 


14 

7 
7 

46 
46 

462 


16 

290 
290 

20053 


16 

735 
736 

"1408 
1408 

57415 


17 

1055 
1055 

1408 
1408 

89609 


18 

5490 
6490 

3000 
3000 

178 686 


19 
1291 


20 
110865 


21 

f 89l 
691 

917 
917 

109460 


Society for the Propagation of the Gospel 


Totals, 6 British Societies 


International Society 


Korea Societies 

3eneral Committee, Y. M. C. A. of China and Korea. . 
Korean Itinerant Mission 


totals, 2 Korea Societies 


3rand Totals, 18 Societies 




CHINESE EMPIRE 

American and Canadian Societies 

American Advent Mission Society 


1897 
1836 
1876 
1847 
1902 
1904 
1847 
1846 
1842 
1899 
1898 
1848 
1887 
1835 
1867 
1907 
1886 
1896 
1903 
1889 
1845 
1888 
1890 
1904 
1908 
1891 
1899 
1904 
1890 
1895 
1895 
1901 
1850 
1895 
1891 
1886 
1905 
1899 
1893 
1869 
1902 

1901 

1877 
1809 
1887 
1885 
1844 
1884 
1878 
1888 
1869 
1847 
1886 
1807 
1886 
1863 
1874 
1875 
1859 
1852 

1899 
1850 
1867 
1896 
1846 
1903 
1890 
1896 
1902 
1893 
1847 

1891 
1898 


( 

44 


10 
9 

17 
27 

ft 
ft 

3 
1 
1 

9 
6 

6 
2 

1 

8 
6 
1 

2 

1 
11 

2 

1 
1 
1 
1 

1 
130 

1 

10 

2 
16 

2 

5 
9 
2 
21 

1 
5 
6 
10 
89 

2 

2 
2 
1 

1 
2 

10 


t 


.. 


i 

4< 

31 

t 

68 
96 
5 

8 

I 

2! 
28 
27 
35 
1 
18 
23 

f 

4( 
19 

5 

r 

5 
5 
4 
35 

( 
ft 

4 
12 

r 
i. 

r 

1 
8 
1 

1 
687 

3 

27 
13 

24 
75 

5 

10 
21 
11 
55 
1 
5 
7 
10 
22 
33 
319 

2 

19 
8 
24 
2 

2 
6 
8 
17 
3 
15 
1 
107 


t 

2 
31 


13 
123 
14 

11; 

i 

241 
274 
26 
24 


14 
27 

165 
42 

i: 

24 

28 
10 

o 


30 
312 
"174 
565 

1487 
1019 
94 
21 
6 
105 
100 
274 
98 
5 
105 

19 
137 
70 
37 
9 

82 
l i 

55 
26 

13 

20 
6 

45 

12 
12 
5 
4963 

15 

267 
"310 
15 
6 
952 
103 
145 
6 
209 
340 
82 
454 
3 
317 
34 
281 
422 
153 
4099 

12 
1 
279 
8 
213 
40 
6 
14 

24 
78 
11 
49 

735 


.30 
326 
174 
592 

1652 
1061 
107 
22 
6 
129 
100 
302 
108 
8 
128 

20 
151 
70 
38 
9 

82 
14 


58 
26 

13 

20 
6 
45 

12 
12 
5 
5329 

15 

267 
310 
15 
6 
989 
103 
145 
6 
213 
374 
82 
466 
3 
317 
34 
285 
434 
159 
4208 

13 
1 
285 
9 
220 
40 
6 
14 

24 
79 
11 
49 

751 


i 

17 
6 

i: 

i 

2< 
26 

i 

t 

] 
5 
26 
11 
12 
1 
8 
10 
1 

( 

17 
5 

t 
ft 

4 
1 

4 

] 
7 
1 
2 
7 
2 
1 
4 
1 
5 
1 
3 
1 
1 
252 

1 

11 
11 
1 

18 
53 
13 
2 
1 
10 
8 
5 
20 
1 
5 
9 
8 
10 
21 
207 

1 
1 
13 
6 
15 
2 
1 
2 
4 
8 
7 
2 
7 
1 
70 


201 


6 
125 

104 


30 
479 

1012 

1231 
1936 
139 

24 
307 
89 
299 
286 

92 

571 
273 
20 

150 
30 

138 
7106 

451 

323 

927 
570 
42 

k 

59 
87 
2007 
197 
4663 

27 

65 
834 

926 


520 
5215 

11000 


520 
5215 

bllOOO 

38 
b 30191 
21309 
2730 

b!05 

t>75 
>>2190 
731 
6285 
<>1395 
168 
714 


1370 
13828 

13927 

38 
53312 
*67 939 
3524 
200 
*300 
*8000 
1031 


1 

157 
72 

516 
212 
52 

* 

53 

86 
50 

1 

si 

5 

* 

j 
< 

1 
1304 

139 
1 

10 
160 

k_ 
10 
13 

13 
32 
*140 
29 
647 

~2 
1 


*800 
3336 

2326 

18420 
10213 
"2730 
100 

2750 
697 


$100 
7820 

16255 

70 
39226 
25421 
5430 

4320 
2339 
5301 
8000 

4043 

473 
7030 
1638 
456 
7 

212 

1603 
450 

5881 
1400 
132476 

1892 

10774 
88 

6715 
14209 
603 
13222 

sis 

4686 

3567 
66672 

6528 
109 
0484 

71 

38 

1425 
322 
13977 


American Baptist Foreign Mission Society 


American Bible Society 


1 
31 

] 

5( 
8( 
'i 
"i 
6 
21 
33 
27 
31 
1 
16 
6 

38 
17 
3 
2 
2 
5 
6 
4 
26 
2 
4 
7 
3 
1 
7 

7 

3 
517 

2 

37 

4 

66 
2 

11 
19 

43 
1 
5 
15 
15 
17 
43 
278 

3 
1 
22 
11 
32 
8 

2 
9 

14 

4 

1 
107 


6 
21 

i: 

t 

i 

j 
> 

i. 

1 

r 



ft 

3 

r 
& 

l 

2 
4 
1 
73 

4 

3 
3 
2 

5 
6 
1 
6 

1 
7 
1 

39 

1 
1 


6 

i: 

c 
t 

i 
1 

8 
13 

t 

21 

( 

] 

4 

1 
1 

K 
*. 

6 

4 
10 
2 

109 

9 

26 
24 

1 

3 
9 
3 

1 
1 
1 
2 
2 
82 

2 
2 

1 
2 
10 
4 

22 
43 


299 

228 
658 

51 

2: 
6 

78 
41 

< 

20 

8 
105 

28 
1 

3! 

57 

8 

10 
30 
4 

1923 

1 

328 
1 

k 
k 

127 
204 
36 
300 

2 
92 
58 
87 
1235 

2 

198 
6 
97 
24 
1 
3 
14 

20 
7 
25 

397 


American Board of Commissioners for For Mias 


iugustana Synod, Evangelical Lutheran Church 




267 
129 
14 


Bible Mission Society 


5oard of For. Miss., Methodist Episcopal Church 
Board of For. Miss., Presbyterian Church In U. S. A... 
3oard of For. Miss , Reformed Church (Dutch) 


73 
47 
12 

1 

2\ 
20 
27 
19 

8 

1 
i 

i 
1 

25 
8 
5 
3 
1 
5 

( 
6 

13 

. 

l 

i 
1 

4 
4 

9 

11 
: 

] 

404 
2 

14 

1 
21 
102 
45 

7 
2 
22 
4 
27 

7 
7 
6 
12 
277 

2 

4 
5 
5 
2 
7 
4 
1 
5 
5 
4 
2 
13 

59 


30191 
20041 
1714 


3oard of For. Miss., Reformed Church in U. S. 


Z 

23 
16 

10 

i 
44 

t 
ft 
t 

\ 

t 
I 

6 

t 
t 
ft 

i 
802 

*107 

k 
k 

*20 
87 
5 

k 

17 
22 
141 
115 
514 

7 
104 
3 

3 

10 
20 

~7 
154 


105 
75 
2190 
731 
1961 
1395 

714 


Joard of For. Miss., Ref. Presby. Ch. (Covenanter). . 
loard of Miss., Methodist Episcopal Church, South' 1 . . 
Christian and Missionary Alliance . . . 


16 
71 
89 
116 
93 

( 

4! 
53 

t 
i. 

12 
112 
51 
11 
14 

C 

i 

18 
14 

8 
9! 

i 

8 
32 
8 
5 
19 
12 
27 
2 
13 
7 
7 
1812 

8 

92 
26 
1 
73 
283 
48 
12 
7 
33 
80 
27 
155 
2 
11 
32 
40 
53 
90 
1065 

8 
5 
48 
26 
62 
18 
4 
6 
24 
23 
41 
9 
50 
2 
326 


)om. and For. Miss. Soc., Protestant Episcopal Ch. . . 
jxec. Com. of For. Miss., Presbyterian Ch. (South).. . 
""irst New Testament Church, Los Angeles 


6285 
*5500 
671 
*2800 

377 
22187 
*5200 
892 
140 

*2200 
*450 
*20 
1523 
*20( 
50 
177 
250 

*1700 
1432 

216623 
252 

*22024 

*160 
2057S 

2285 

11473 
*25000 
2063 
23190 

1581 
10615 
21096 
9629 
149 694 

*300 
7714 
*450 
9870 
*400 
*200 
200 
257 
*1192 
2736 
*800 
*2500 

26619 


3193 
200 

650 

129 
2389 

289 
32 

1150 

27: 

507 
*490 

214 


"foreign Christian Missionary Society .. ....... ... 


23 

1'. 
1 

366 

37 

4 
34 

12 

4 
12 
6 
109 

1 

6 
1 
7 

1 
16 


"'or. Dept., International Committee, Y. M. C. A.. . 
'or. Dept., National Board, Y. W. C. A., U. S. A 
\>r. Miss. Soc., United Brethren in Christ d 


377 
5594 
1346 
177 

567 
70 
5 
480 
50 

177 
66 

446 
542 

85749 
102 

5506 

41 
7629 

480 

1969 
6223 
'144 
13083 

761 
5744 
11253 
4401 
57234 

5700 
89 
6440 
100 

95 
134 
298 
1299 
227 
696 

15078 


b377 
5594 
1346 
177 

567 
120 

b 5 
"480 
58 

177 
66 

b446 
>>542 

92621 
1>102 

5506 

41 
17757 

2285 

9057 
9959 
U44 
13083 

1291 
7937 
11910 
b 4401 
83371 

141 
>>5700 
273 
9190 
100 
69 
103 
257 
348 
1833 
227 
696 

18937 


\>r. Miss. Board, Southern Baptist Convention e . ... 


'or. Miss. Com., Presbyterian Church in Canada 
'riends' For. Miss. Soc., Ohio Yearly Meeting . . . 


eneral Miss. Board of the Free Methodist Church. . . 
icneral Miss. Board, Church of the Brethren 


lauges Synod China Mission 


lome and For. Miss. Soc., United Evan. Church 


Ussionary Society of the Evangelical Association 
Ussionary Society of the Methodist Church, Canada*., 
fission Board, Evan. Luth. Norwegian Brethren 
candinavian Alliance Mission (Mongolia) 


leventh-Day Adventist Mission Board 


fcventh-Day Baptist Missionary Society 


140 

61026 

1484 
80 

402 
4237 

624 
1048 

288 
2895 
2;200 

788 
14046 

60 
60 


wedish Evangefical Free Church 


wedish Evangelical Mission Covenant of America 
Vustees of Canton Christian College 


failed Norwegian Lutheran Church of America 


Iniversity Medical School in Canton 


Roman's Miss. Society, Methodist Church, Canada... . 
Vbman's Union Missionary Society of America 


fate Foreign Missionary Society E 


'otals, 41 American and Canadian Societies 


Australasian Society 
'resbyterian Church of New Zealand 


British Societies 

iaptist Missionary Society 11 


Titian and Foreign Bible Society 


hristtan Literature Society for China 


hristian Missions in Many Lands' 


hurch Missionary Society' 


hurch of England Zenana Missionary Society . 


hurch of Scotland Foreign Missionary Committee'. . . 
hurch of Scotland Women's Assoc. for For. Miss 
'oreign Missions, Presbyterian Church of Ireland 11 
'or. Miss. Com., Presbyterian Church of England 


'riends' Foreign Mission Association 


Condon Missionary Society 


fission to the Chinese Blind and Illiterate Sighted. . . 
lational Bible Society of Scotland 


ociety for the Propagation of the Gospel 


nited Free Church of Scotland's For. Miss. Com. d . . . . 
Inited Methodist Church Missionary Society 


fesleyan Methodist Missionary Society* 


otals, 18 British Societies 


Continental Societies 

llg. e vangelisch-protestantischer Missionsverein 


eriiner Frauen-Missionsverein fiir China 


erliner Missionsgesellschaft 


'anske Mlesionsselskab 


jvangelische Missionsgesellschaft zu Basel 


inska Missionssallskapet 


ildesheimer Ver. fiir die Bh'ndenmission in China 
[ieler China Mission 


orske Missionsselskab 


orsk lutherske Kinamissionsforbund 


heinische Missionsgesellschaft 


venska Baptisternas Mission 


venska Missionsforbundet 


venska Mongolmissionen 


otals, 14 Continental Societies 





KOREA 

This is the number recorded as "True Believers." 

CHINA 

Colporteurs directly supervised by the Bible Society. 

b No report for Baptized Christians other than the number of Communicants. 

c Each church or chapel has a Bible School on Sunday. 

d Includes data for Women's Society. 



e Includes the work of the Bible Missionary Society. Amalgamated January, 1910. 

* Does not include work of the Women's Board. 

B Does only educational work. Christian students are members of churches of their own mission!. 

h Includes the data for the Baptist Zenana Mission. 

s Church statistics reported by the Lao-ho-kou station only. 

i Includes data of Medical Mission Auxiliary. 

k No data reported. 

1 Members in good standing. 



* Estimate. Except in column 18, all estimates are from the societies. 

t Physicians who are ordained are entered in both columns 2 and 3. Accordingly, the total of missionaries does not necessarily equal the total of columns 2 to 7. 
4 Owing to inevitable duplication in the enumeration of stations by the various societies, the totals in column 12 are in excess of the total number of cities occupied, 
age, duplicates are eliminated. 



In the tables of summaries on another 



WORLD ATLAS OF CHRISTIAN MISSIONS 



GENERAL AND EVANGELISTIC Continued 



COUNTRIES AND SOCIETIES 


DATE 


FOREIGN MISSIONARIES 


NATIVE WORKERS 


STATIONS 


CHRISTIAN COMMUNITY AND CONTRIBUTIONS 


Year of First Work 
in this Field 


m 

1 

6 


Physicians 


Lay Missionaries not 
Physicians (Men) 


Married Women 
not Physicians 


Unmarried Women 
not Physicians 


Total of Foreign 
Missionaries 


Ordained Natives 


Unordained Natives, Preach- 
ers, Teachers, Bible-women, 
and Other Workers 


Total of Ordained and 
Unordained Native 
Workers 


Principal Stations 


All Other Sub-Stations 


Church Organizations 


nnmmnniVanta ArMed 


During the Last Year 


Total Number of 
Communicants 


Total Number of 
Baptized Christians 


Total of Native Christian 
Adherents, mcl. Baptized 
and Unbaptized, All Ages 


| 


Total Sunday School 
Membership, Including 
Teachers and Pupils 


Total of Native Contri- 
butions in 17. & Gold 


1 


a 
1 


CHINESE EMPIRE Concluded 

China Societies 

Broadcast Tract Press 


1 

1896 
1838 
1876 
1895 
1899 
1893 
1900 
1896 
1892 
1902 
1894 

1887 
1896 
1899 

1865 
190$ 


2 

1 

1 
1 
1 

5 
16 

1 

920 


3 
1 

2 

3 
18 

251 


4 

1 
114 


6 

1 
1 

1 
1 

1 
4 
9 

"339 

1 

583 


6 

1 
1 

1 

1 

6 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
3 

18 
230 

1 

1265 


7 

1 
1 
11 

a 

3 

1 

1 

14 

40 
311 

1093 


8 

2 
4 
1 
i 
2 
11 
8 

16 
3 
2 
3 
2 
2 
26 

85 
898 

3 
4197 


9 
1 

1 

2 
1 

18 
513 


10 

4 
5 
9 

13 

a 

6 

5 
45 

lOf 
1677 

11595 


11 

5 

e 

9 

13 
20 

7 

~5 
45 
1 
110 

1695 
12108 


12 

1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 

_ 

3 
1 
1 
1 

] 
1 
6 

21 
205 

1 
757 


13 

7 
6 

m 
12 
25 

769 
4350 


14 

4 

7 
11 

646 
2027 


15 

22 

22 
2804 

15521 


16 

273 

289 
562 

19049 
177774 


17 

b273 

t>289 
562 

*>19049 
214642 


18 

800 

*1100 
1900 

76196 
470 184 


19 

1 

5 

6 

k_ 

1859 


20 

150 
200 

350 

k_ 

65482 


21 
I- 

9750 
135 

111 

000 
10896 

338 
213259 




Central China Religious Tract Society 




China Baptist Publication Society 




"Door of Hope" Mission 


General Committee, Y. M. C. A. of China and Korea. . 


Grace Mission 




John G. Kerr Refuge for Insane 


North China Tract Society 


Oriental Society for Education of Deaf Mutes 


South Chih-li Mission ; 


Y. W. C. A. of China 


Totals, 16 China Societies . . 


Internationa] Society 
China Inland Mission 


Union Society 
Methodist Publishing HouseP 


Grand Totals, 92 Societies 




SIAM AND FRENCH INDO-CHINA 
American Societies 


1833 
1890 
1840 

1892 


1 

1 
27 
29 

1 
1 

30 


1 

12 
13 

13 





1 

1 
5 

6 
7 


1 
1 
34 
36 

1 
4 

6 
41 


9 
9 

9 


2 
2 
80 
84 

2 
9 

12 
96 


6 
6 

6 


6 
-8 
155 
169 

2 

1 
171 


6 
8 
161 
175 

2 

~Z 
177 


1 
1 
15 
17 

1 
2 
1 
4 

21 


75 
75 

75 


4 

28 
32 

32 


23 

446 
469 

469 


138 

4337 
4475 

4475 


138 

4371 
4509 

4509 


138 

17046 
17184 

17184 


1 

52 
63 

63 


37 

3400 
3437 

3437 


$80 

2752 
2832 

2832 


American Bible Society 


Board of For. Miss., Presbyterian Church in U. S. A. . 


British Societies 
British and Foreign Bible Society 


Christian Missions in Many Lands 


Society for the Propagation of the Gospel 


Totals, 3 British Societies 


Grand Totals, 6 Societies 




BRITISH MALAYSIA 
American Societies 
Board of For. Miss., Methodist Episcopal Church" 


1885 
1894 

1813 
1866 
1900 
1902 
1857 
1855 

1907 
1904 


13 
5 
18 

1 

2 
12 
15 

1 
1 
2 

35 





1 
1 

1 


2 
2 

4 
12 

2 

2 
20 

22 


11 
3 
14 

2 
9 

1 
12 

26 


10 
2 
12 

9 
3 

1 
5 
18 

30 


36 
10 
46 

7 
30 
3 
2 
4 
20 
66 

1 
1 
2 

114 


3 
1 

1 
6 
7 

1 
1 
2 

13 


183 
7 
190 

"17 

8 

21 
76 
122 

11 
6 
17 

329 


186 
8 
194 

17 

d 

8 

22 
82 
129 

12 
19 
342 


8 
1 
9 

5 
5 
1 

1 
8 
20 

1 
1 
2 

31 


13 
13 

< 

10 
10 
23 

1( 

n 
si 


32 
1 
33 

d 

6 
17 
23 

1 
1 
57 


123 
123 

d_ 

9 
251 
260 

383 


1870 
41 
1911 

d_ 

327 
1914 
2241 

304 
326 
630 

4782 


U870 
41 
1911 

d_ 

551 
5411 
5962 

516 
689 
1205 

9078 


*7480 
*164 
7644 

1308 
6500 
7808 

516 
706 
1222 

16674 


35 
1 
36 

11 
11 

1 
~1 
48 


1074 
61 
1135 

812 
612 

38 
38 
1985 


$2520 
836 
3356 

1338 
7338 

4694 


Totals, 2 American Societies 


British Societies 

British and Foreign Bible Society 




Church of England Zenana Missionary Society 


English National Council, For. Dept., Y. M. C. A. . . 
For. Miss. Com., Presbyterian Church of England".... 
Society for the Propagation of the Gospel 


Totals, 6 British Societies 


Continental Societies 
Evangelisch-Lutherische Mission zu Leipzig 




Totals, 2 Continental Societies 


Grand Totals, 10 Societies 


DUTCH EAST INDIES 
American Societies 
Board of For. Miss., Methodist Episcopal Church* 


1903 
1900 

1878 
1859 
1847 
1855 
1814 
1889 
1899 
1862 
1884 
1836 
1859 
1860 

1894 


3 
2 
6 

1 
10 
8 
6 

2 
13 
14 
13 
92 
15 
10 
184 

23 
212 


1 

1 
1 

2 

3 
8 

1 
9 


1 
1 

1 


2 
2 

1 
1 

1 

1 
7 

3 

2 
16 

16 
34 


2 
3 
6 

1 

11 
8 
6 
1 
2 
9 
17 
14 
85 
15 
10 
179 

10 
194 


2 
2 

1 
1 

4 
4 
2 
14 

26 

13 
41 


5 
9 
14 

4 
23 
17 
12 
2 
4 
27 
44 
29 
196 
30 
25 
413 

23 

d4fl 
490 


31 
31 
80 

111 


7 
~7 

267 
25 

64 
94 
81 
2248 
90 
70 
2939 

76 
3022 


7 
7 

267 
25 

3 
64 
94 
81 
2279 
90 
70 
2973 

80 

76 
3136 


3 
2 
5 

1 
8 
6 
5 
1 
2 
10 
14 
11 
72 
12 
8 
150 

12 
167 


8 
~8 

107 
9 
16 

14 
80 
31 
407 
86 
39 
789 

20 
817 


12 
1 
13 

24 
407 
431 

444 


350 
350 

96 
215 

7178 
7489 

7839 


64S 
65G 

12239 
456 
569 

400 
1163 
13235 
967 
43290 

656 
72969 

274 135 
347759 


b&4 
65C 

M2239 
456 
>>563 

MOO 
2314 
15400 
1482 
94705 

1=656 
128215 

1=274 135 
403 005 


692 
6 
698 

63739 
*1800 
1882 

*1600 
*9000 
*52000 
1979 
107154 

1673 
240827 

274 135 
515 660 


* 

fi 

1 
3 

9 
~9 

10 
22 


22 
10 
32 

194 
23950 

24144 

28 
24204 


$30 
160 
190 

22m 

22674 
22864 




Continental Societies 


Domit^ voor Sangir- en Talaut- eilanden 






















Petals 12 Continental Societies 


Dutch East Indies Society 

Protestant Church of the Netherlands East Indies 

International Society 


3rand Totals, 16 Societies 





CHINA 

m Preaching at least occasionally in 110 towns. 

n Data includes that for the following associate missions: (1) Scandinavian China Alliance, (2) Swedish 
Mission in China, (3) Swedish Holiness Union, (4) Norwegian Mission in China, (5) German China 
Alliance, (6) Liebenzell Mission, (7) Free Church Mission of Finland. 

While the China Inland Mission has one Church of England bishop and some workers with Church of 
England orders and others with the orders of the Presbyterian, Baptist, and other Churches recog- 
nized in the home countries, the total figures are given under one head without differentiating, 
The custom of the C. I. M. is to recognize all workers as probationers for two years, when if ap- 
proved they are received as junior missionaries, and at the close of a total of five years' service, 
if the language tests have been passed and proof of fitness has been shown, they are definitely 
appointed with parchments as senior missionaries with power to take full pastoral charge of mis- 
sion stations. 

P Union of Methodist Episcopal Church and Methodist Episcopal Church, South. 



SIAM AND FRENCH INDO-CHINA 

Colporteurs directly under the supervision of the Bible Society. 

BRITISH MALAYSIA 

a Includes the data from the Women's Society. 

b No report for Baptized Christians other than the number of Communicants. 

Colporteurs under the immediate direction of the Bible Society. 

d Not reported. 

e Chinese work. In printed report Included under China Mission. 

DUTCH EAST INDIES 

Includes data from the Woman's Society. 

b No report for Baptized Christians other than the number of Communicants. 

Data from Dr. J. W. Gunning. d Commissioned officers. 



* Estimate. Except in column 18, all estimates are from the societies. 

t Physicians who are ordained are entered in both columns 2 and 3. Accordingly, the total of missionaries does not necessarily equal the total of columns 2 to 7. 
j Owing to inevitable duplication in the enumeration of stations by the various societies, the totals in column 12 are in excess of the total number of cities occupied, 
page, duplicates arc eliminated. 



In the tables of summaries on another 



STATISTICAL TABLES 



89 



GENERAL AND EVANGELISTIC Continued 



COUNTRIES AND SOCIETIES 


DATA 


FOREIGN MISSIONARIES 


NATIVE WORKERS 


STATIONS 


CHRISTIAN COMMUNITY AND CONTRIBUTIONS 


Year of First Work 
in this Field 


t o 

S 


Physicians 




Married Women 
not Physicians 


Unmarried Women 
not Physicians 


Total of Foreign 
Missionaries 


Ordained Natives 


Unordained Natives, Preach- 
ers, Teachers, Bible-women, 

anrl Other Wnrtprs 


Total of Ordained and 
Unordained Native 
Workers 


n 

I 
I 


I 

S 


i 
1 


Communicants Added 
During the Last Year 


Total Number of 
Communicants 


Total Number of 
Baptized Christians 


Total of Native Christian 
Adherents, incl. Baptized 
and Unbaptized, All Ages 


Sunday Schools 


Total Sunday School 
Membership, Including 
Teachers and Pupils 


Total of Native Contri- 
butions in U. a Gold 


1 


a 

1 


Lay Missionaries not 
Physicians (Men) 


PHHJPPINE ISLANDS 

American Societies 
merican Baptist Foreign Mission Society 


1 

1900 
1899 
1902 
1899 
1899 
1902 
1901 
1901 
1901 

1813 


2 

12 
1 
1 
14 
14 
1 
9 
6 
4 
62 

62 


3 

3 
1 

4 

1 
2 

14 
14 


4 

1 

1 
1 


B' 

1 

3 

1 
1 
1 

5 

1 
6 


6 

10 
1 

2 
12 
18 
1 


4 
59 

1 
60 


7 

4 

_ 

8 
2 

U 

2 

27 
27 


8 

27 
3 
4 
35 
39 
3 
30 
16 
8 
165 

2 
167 


9 

6 
f 

21 
37 

37 


10 

41 

1 
455 
141 
8 
5 
151 
32 
834 

843 


11 

47 

1 

461 
145 
8 
5 
172 
32 
871 

9 
880 


12 

3 
1 
1 
10 
8 
1 
5 
4 
4 
37 

1 

38 


13 

40 

6 
101 
71 

~7 
58 
28 
311 

311 


14 

38 

118 
33 

36 
13 
238 

238 


15 

395 

4544 
2100 

240 
287 
325 
7891 

7891 


16 

3177 

12 
20677 
8500 
40 
590 
2933 
642 
36671 

36 67.1 


17 

b 20675 

b 4C 
b 59C 

36671 
36571 


18 

16677 

132 
31446 
*17600 
90 
*2360 
*6000 
2250 
75955 

75955 


19 

20 

2 
81 

6 
22 
2 
133 

133 


20 

200 

66 
4125 

2808 

221 
395 
117 
7932 

7932 


21 

$250 

19090 
12218 

3423 
2108 
60 
37137 

37 137 


merican Bible Society 


merican Board of Commissioners for For. Miss 


oard of For. Miss., Methodist Episcopal Church . . . . 
oard of For. Miss., Presbyterian Church In U. S. A. . 
iristlan and Missionary Alliance 


om. and For. Miss. Soc., Protestant Episcopal Ch. . . 
jreign Christian Missionary Society 


jr. Miss. Society of the United Brethren In Christ . . 
jtals, 9 American Societies 


British Society 
ritish and Foreign Bible Society 


rand Totals, 10 Societies 




AUSTRALIA 

(Aborigines and Chinese) 

Continental Society 
ss. fur innere und aussere Miss. Luth. Kirche 


1886 

1892 
1875 

1878 
1860 

1890 


2 

2 
3 

4 
3 

12 

3 
17 








6 
2 

2 
10 

10 


t 

3 

t 
i 

6 

3 
11 


4 

04 

1 
9 

1 
10 


4 

15 
8 

6 
7 

1 
37 

7 
48 


1 
1 
1 


1 

15 
6 
4 

4 

6 
35 

1 
37 


1 

15 
6 
5 

1 
1 
6 
37 

1 

39 


1 

3 
3 

2 
4 
1 

14 

3 
18 


11 
3 

1 

2 
8 
25 

1 

26 


4 

4 
8 

3 
11 


32 

32 

15 
47 


55 

176 
63 

110 
122 

63 
534 

45 
634 


56 

176 
63 

130 
122 

63 
554 

71 
680 


73 

373 
240 

488 

233 
1334 

73 
1480 


2 
2 


131 
131 


$- 

292 
292 

292 


Australian Societies 
istralian Board of Missions 


lurch Missionary Association for Victoria 


urch Missionary Association of New South Wales' 1 . . 
;rman Immanuel Evan.. Luth. Synod in S. Australia . . 
esbyterian Church of Australia 




esbyterian Church of Victoria 1 ' 


tals, 1 Australian Societies 


International Society 


and Totals, 9 Societies 




NEW ZEALAND 

(Maoris and Chinese) 
British Society 
itish and Foreign Bible Society 


1871 


1 

4 
11 

15 
16 











3 

3 
3 


2 

2 
2 


1 

9 
11 

20 
21 


41 
8 
49 

49 


2 
174 

176 
176 


2 
215 
8 
225 

225 


1 

1 
9 

10 
11 


16 
99 
162 
277 

277 


48 
48 
48 


83 
83 
83 


22 
1400 
1803 
3225 

3225 


b !803 
3225 

3225 


318 
17700 
7870 
25888 

25888 


5 

5 
6 


70 

70 
70 


5 

2654 
2654 
2654 


New Zealand Societies 

r. Miss. Com., Presbyterian Ch. of New Zealand .... 
tori Mission Board" 


w Zealand Methodist Conference 


tals, 3 New Zealand Societies . ; 


ind Totals, 4 Societies 




MELANESIA 

(Except Dutch New Guinea) 
Australian Societies 


1849 
1875 

1869 
1862 

1892 
1843 
1849 
1841 
1876 

1843 

1886 
1887 
1891 


33 
11 
1 
6 
1 
1 
6 
59 

5 
15 
12 
1 
2 
35 

3 

22 
10 
3 
35 

132 


1 
1 
1 

1 
4 

2 

1 
3 

7 


1 

1 
1 


14 

7 

21 

2 

2 
1 

9 
3 

12 
36 


7 
14 
2 
4 

1 
3 
31 

6 
12 
2 

2 
22 

4 

11 
7 
3 
21 

78 


19 
8 

1 
28 

1 
1 

1 

1 
30 


73 
40 
4 
11 
2 
2 
10 
142 

13 
27 
14 
2 
4 
60 

8 

44 
20 
6 
70 

280 


8 

8 

162 
22 

1 
185 

193 


711 
611 

105 
40 
36 
189 
1692 

130 
"268 
661 

49 
1108 

13 
8 
56 
77 

2877 


711 
619 

105 
40 
36 
189 
1700 

130 
430 
683 

50 
1293 

13 
8 
56 
77 

3070 


21 
16 
1 
5 
1 
1 

48 3 

5 
15 
12 
1 
2 
35 

3 

13 
5 
2 
20 

106 


64 

2 
30 
16 
200 
312 

31 

15 
46 

6 
1 
85 
92 

450 


255 

1 
1 
229 
486 

4 
4 

3 

1 
1 
494 


50 
50 

14 
14 

113 
177 


3615 
5441 

1193 
308 
400 
2000 
12957 

"4500 
3047 

236 
7783 

600 

1277 
38 
1310 
2625 

23965 


3615 
5441 

1193 
308 
"400 
2000 
12957 

4500 
12694 

641 
17835 

600 

1277 
45 
1310 
2632 

34024 


21309 
47870 

2293 
*1200 
*1600 
8509 
82781 

6302 
16041 

687 
23030 

*2400 

1637 
147 
1420 
3204 

111415 


260 

237 
497 

110 

5 
115 

d_ 
d_ 

612 


10507 

5544 
16051 

4311 

155 
4466 

A 
d 

20517 


$- 

4OT 
165 
1557 
2209 

5957 
837 

633 
7427 

1000 

46 
46 
10682 


thodist Missionary Society of Australasia 


isbyterian Church" of New South Wales' 1 


jsbyterlan Church of New Zealand 11 


sbyterian Church of South Australia 11 


'sbyterian Church of Tasmania 11 


'sbyterian Church of Victoria 11 


tals, ^ Australian Societies 


British Societies 

in G. Paton Mission Fund b 


udon Missionary Society 


lanesian Mission 


'iety for the Propagation of the Gospel 


ited Free Church of Scotland's For. Miss. Com 
tals, 5 British Societies 


Canadian Society 

r. Miss. Com., Presbyterian Church in Canada b 

Continental Societies 

3. fur Innere und aussere Miss. Luth Kirche 


einische Missionsgesellschaf t 


iete 1 des Missions (Svangdliquea 


tals, 3 Continental Societies 


ind Totals, 16 Societies 




MICRONESIA 

American Society 
lerican Board of Commissioners for For. Miss 


1852 
1872 
1907 


6 

1 

5 
12 


1 

1 





1 
1 


5 
1 

4 
10 


6 

3 
9 


17 

2 

13 
32 


20 
6 

2 
28 


74 

28 
102 


94 
6 

30 
130 


7 

1 

4 
12 


37 

30 
67 


35 

b 

35 


711 
711 


5061 
2131 

7192 


5061 
2131 

7192 


9760 
*8000 

17760 


49 
49 


1851 
1851 


$6351 
2180 

8631 


British Society 
adon Missionary Society 


Continental Society 


wd Totals, 3 Societies . 





PHILffPINE ISLANDS 

Regular meeting places, 

b No report for Baptized Christians other than the number of Communicants. 

Includes data for the Women's Foreign Missionary Society. 

d Colporteurs under the immediate direction of the Bible Society. 

AUSTRALIA 

" No report for Baptized Christians other than the number of Communicanta 

b Work entirely for Chinese. 

" Number of married women not given. 



NEW ZEALAND 

Data from the Church of England Year Book, 1909, and the Churchmen's Missionary Atlas, 1908. 
b No report for Baptized Christians other than the number of Communicants. 

MELANESIA 

No report for Baptized Christians other than the number of Communicants. 

b Work in connection with the New Hebrides Mission Synod. No statistics were received from the 
Synod direct. Partial returns. d Not reported. 

MICRONESIA 

No report for Baptized Christians other than the number of Communicants. b Not reported. 
In 1908 work in Caroline Islands was in process of transfer from the American Board. 



* Estimate. Except in column 18, all estimates are from the societies. 

t Physicians who are ordained are entered in both columns 2 and 3. Accordingly, the total of missionaries does not necessarily equal the total of columns 2 to 7. 

? Owing to inevitable duplication in the enumeration of stations by the various societies, the totals in column 12 are in excess of the total number of cities occupied In the tables of summaries on another 
B, duplicates are eliminated. 



90 



WORLD ATLAS OF CHRISTIAN MISSIONS 



GENERAL AND EVANGELISTIC Continued 



COUNTRIES AND SOCIETIES 


DATE 


FOREIGN MISSIONARIES 


NATIVE WORKERS 


STATIONS 


CHRISTIAN COMMUNITY AND CONTRIBUTIONS 


I 

1 
fi 


j 


Physicians 


1 
ll 

gc 

.2 9 
'w 9 

si 
* 


o> m 
S C3 

O 

*i 

a *>> 
ffi 

11 


O m 

^1 
T3 C 

.S'ES 
EJ? 

CflFH 

(1 


S 8 

o a 
-3.2 

co 53 

+* CO 

O;g 


1 

s 

6 


Is 

ill 

|Sl 
TgS* 

|-s fc 

"B^S 
jfg 
t=S 


s. 

li 
15 

O w 

sll 

-a TJ M 
111 


% 
.2 
"S 
a 

1 

s 

1 


1 
1 

1 
O 

3 


1 
'S 

<3 
1 


$5 

!j 

<D 

a 3 

a M 
Qjft 


8 

jif 

a 

|Z| g 

31 
<3 


O '3 
M * 

.85 

|0 

^ <u 
3B 
n & 




iij 
"*iii 

MI 

o | a 

3 S p 
SJ-o 

sis 


o 

s 

1 


bo 

'u'v & 

t r^ 

t-fl 
y_a ^ 

P S2 tn 
TJ-jjl 

sl 


.i 

J3TS 
S3 

goi 

SP' 

2 

o 2 

ll 


a 

V 

S 


I 

r 


POLYNESIA 

(Except Hawaiian Islands) 
American Society 
Seventh-Day Adventiat Mission Board 


1 

1892 
1835 

1821 
1908 

1863 


2 

3 
17 

11 
3 
14 

4 

38 


3 


4 


5 

6 
1 

1 
1 
2 

2 
11 


6 

4 
16 

11 
11 

6 
37 


7 

2 
7 

4 
4 

4 
17 


8 

15 
41 

27 

t 


9 

1 

85 

242 
242 

328 


10 

2 
3243 

869 
869 

4114 


11 

3 
3328 

1111 
1111 

18 
4460 


12 

6 
20 

9 
3 
12 

6 
43 


13 

31 
31 


14 

19 
919 

b_ 
b_ 

938 


15 

717 
7T7 

132 
849 


16 

360 
42358 

15095 
15095 

4079 
61892 


17 

370 
42 358 

15095 
15095 

"4079 
61902 


18 

370 
92193 

49630 
49630 

4307 
146600 


19 

41 

1166 

261 
261 

b_ 

1468 


20 

620 
27032 

12555 
12555 

b_ 

40207 


21 

$2600 

40426 
40426 

43026 


Australasian Society 

Methodist Missionary Society of Australasia 

British Societies 

London Missionary Society 


Society for the Propagation of the Gospel 


Totals, 2 British Societies 


31 

18 
105 


Continental Society 

Socidte des Missions e 1 vang&iques 


Grand Totals, 5 Societies 




INDIA 
American and Canadian Societies 

American Baptist Foreign Mission Society 11 


1814 
1813 
1873 
1900 
1869 
1842 
1865 
1856 
1834 
1853 
1894 
1837 
1855 
1904 
1887 
1882 
1895 
1882 
1889 
1894 
1866 
1873 
1896 
1836 
1895 
1885 
1897 
1898 

1899 
1869 
1897 
1896 
1892 
1895 
1895 
1898 
1896 
1863 

1885 
1885 
1882 
1891 

1883 

1794 
1807 
1902 
1893 

1858 
1836 
1813 
1880 
1829 
1837 
1885 

1840 
1862 
1866 
1890 
1905 
1817 
1879 
1895 

1887 
1880 
1901 
1871 
1903 

1814 
1860 
1860 
1823 
1872 
1840 
1817 
1896 
1852 


131 
28 
10 
4 
9 
11 
8 
98 
48 


A 

22 
1 
22 
7 
8 
11 
5 

16 
15 

11 
11 

4 

t! 

2 
2 
4 
1 

5 
3 
12 

2 
527 

1 
1 
2 
1 

1 
4 
10 

67 
4 
1 

2 
159 
22 
1 

15 

1 

55 

10 
5 
2 

96 
4 
3 
56 
1 
16 
76 

596 


13 
i 

i 

*l 
't 
1 
1 

1 

f 

ft 

i 
f 

1 

4 
1 
47 

1 
1 

2 

2 

19 

4 

1 

1 
2 
1 

5 

1 

17 
3 

56 


{ 

i 
1 

i 
i 
Q 
i 

f i 
9 
4 

r 

5 
3 

3 
5 
1 
1 

1 
1 

2 

4 
71 

1 
1 

5 

9 
13 
3 
6 

4 
1 

3 
2 

1 
1 

8 

11 
1 

8 

10 
86 


5 

'. 

1 

E 
L 

4 
2 

2 

7 

9 

1 

1 
1 

2 

4 
9 
2 
1 

59 

6 
2 
2 
12 
1 
1 
55 
27 

2 

3 
5 
2 
8 
8 
1 
2 

4 

3 

4 
1 

16 
4 
169 


131 
33 
8 

< 
t 

8 
8 
5 
86 
42 
11 

r 
& 

23 
1 
28 

E 
c 

8 
12 
11 

12 
15 

11 

11 
5 

E 
t, 

2 
1 
5 
1 
2 
2 
3 
11 
1 

1 
513 

1 
1 
2 
1 
1 
1 
7 

60 
6 
1 
5 

43 
132 

16 

1 
1 
17 
2 
6 
9 
1 
52 

4 
1 
1 
2 
16 
4 
2 
46 
1 
14 
57 

500 


83 
21 
16 

( 
t 
t 
i 

12 

( 

9S 
36 
5 

35 
1 
29 
18 

C 

t, 

6 
15 
12 
5 
5 
4 

8 
* 

4 
3 
4 

3 
7 
9 
4 
4 
3 
14 
480 

1 

4 
3 
1 
5 
14 

5 

7 

3 
36 
88 
140 
7 
41 

13 
2 
12 
7 

36 
10 
4 

2 
10 
5 
2 

1 
72 
1 
1 
60 
1 
6 
45 
15 
140 
772 


361 
91 
35 
1 
23 
34 
16 
295 
146 
31 
t 

86 

* 

8( 
35 
16 
34 
25 
6 
46 
5( 
6 
28 
26 
18 
13 
8 
8 

14 

i 

i 

4 
10 
17 
44 
7 
5 
6 
18 
1667 

3 
2 
8 
5 
3 
11 
32 

143 
12 
4 
24 
1 
6 
134 
432 
153 
54 
47 
3 
4 
55 
9 
28 
24 
2 
153 
12 
4 

3 
25 
14 
5 
4 
3 
197 
10 
6 
193 
4 
37 
190 
15 
150 
2160 


287 
59 

1 

199 
53 
14 

t 

2i 

16 
( 

( 

12 
1 

( 

3 

686 

3 
1 

2 

3 
9 

39 

178 
13 

5 

1 

43 

136 
4 

13 
1 
21 
42 

496 


3384 
1078 
100 
10 
308 
614 
151 
4746 
750 
374 
11 
23 
596 
22 
124 
136 
2 
124 

307 
109 
18 
317 
47 
11 
12 

34 
52 
5 
7 
15 
3 
19 

40 
20 
150 
13746 

2 
12 
24 
20 

17 
75 

1016 
'535 
3 
52 
4 
191 
85 
3288 
849 
315 
201 

462 
5 
97 
24 

1991 
17 

*235 
1 

16 
20 

1682 
65 
44 
1391 
18 
485 
1944 

256 
15292 


3671 


73 
18 

1 

1 
6 
66 
27 
8 

i 

12 
1 
19 
10 

E 

t 

6 

E 

t 

i 

12 

( 

] 
i 

10 
. 3 
4 
1 

] 



1 
1 
3 
4 
8 
3 
3 
2 
5 
350 

1 
1 
2 
2 
1 
3 
10 

38 
6 
1 
7 
1 
2 
29 
223 
47 
18 
12 
1 
2 
14 
2 
8 
6 
1 
30 
3 
1 

1 

5 
4 
1 
2 
1 
42 
4 
2 
29 
1 
15 
44 
10 
25 
638 


1893 
537 
17 

413 
498 
43 
200 
120 
172 

i 

33J 

E 

i 

20 
8 

161 
19 
1 
10 
25 

1 
6 
4 
1 

2 
1 

1 
7 
11 
4611 

1 
2 
9 
3 

15 

118 

11 

e39 
67 

C . 

11 

C 

54 
1 
5 
2 

820 
1 

11 

4 

77 
28 
14 
101 
6 
312 
377 

15 
2074 


1091 


8558 
691 

10: 

*100( 
218 
100 
11282 
1281 
238 

15 

1487 
55 

42 
162 

531 
141 

166 
45 
11 

60 

26186 

11 

53 
64 

1158 
21 

78 
1151 

187 

119 

14 
20 

1291 
9 

2128 
71 
10 
350 
10 
827 
520 

7964 


127963 
13165 
544 
42 
7521 
13281 
2002 
122986 
7418 
2997 

549 
14202 
145 
1000 
682 

852 

5093 
1031 
60 
1368 

787 
40 

451 
9 

221 

60 
25 

324494 

28 
59 
42 

800 
929 

9572 
184 

1244 
45468 

2698 

1131 
14 
U73 
175 

14175 

*30 
22 

38865 
768 
56 
3738 
73 
9316 
15525 

143 227 


127963 
b!3 165 
544 
42 
14871 
37255 
3208 
178 943 
*10 465 
4725 

725 
14202 
787 
1000 
682 
131 
852 

5093 

b!031 

60 
1368 
800 
56 

492 
9 

221 

60 
25 

418 776 

11 

52 
59 
42 

800 
964 

9572 
196 

1244 
158 869 

12183 

4237 
30 
U73 
277 

>>14 175 

53 
22 

100 068 
1500 
56 
9307 
157 
25114 
t>15 525 

352 758 


347052 
46282 
*2100 
42 
16866 
44-008 
*4000 
181049 
18669 
9757 

2076 
26122 
787 
1600 
*2600 
*400 
*3200 

9700 
*4000 
310 
2375 
1064 
180 

600 
*36 

221 

*200 
25 

725321 

11 
116 
100 

77 

*3000 
3304 

*35000 

20 
335 

5710 
177 816 

*14000 

5197 
*56 
1118 
550 

110065 

58 
150 

114 879 
2850 
*200 
10622 
169 
28437 
46938 

554 170 


1115 
479 

2! 

9i 
294 
8 
3523 
277 
18! 

( 
151 

'. 

31 

275 
33 

r 

112 

34 

r 

4 

12 
17 

12 

14 
3 
27 
6744 

3 
3 

4 

26 
36 

320 
22 
10 

C 

153 

100 

33 
9 

602 

1 

9 

777 
32 
16 
120 
5 
354 
534 

3097 


36293 
13165 
630 
150 
2781 
17506 
1198 
148 591 
9903 
6715 
78 
82 
7320 
80 

2036 

5300 
1572 
140 
4544 
1004 
220 

600 
555 

225 

1200 
50 

261 938 

106 
375 
114 

831 
1426 

11020 
512 
233 



9208 

4381 

1947 
387 

21996 
*60 

32562 
889 
750 
8352 
186 
21290 
19765 

133 638 


S102475 
14424 

1500 
3725 



113852 
35957 
2830 

550 
12792 
100 

2149 

1350 
942 
10 
536 
192 
60 

28 

4182 

3301 
300 955 

118 
336 

454 
9373 
39 

128 
52215 

1732 

1970 

297 
40 

15758 
3 

24723 
'827 
545 
4959 

8684 
9572 

130865 


American Board of Commissioners for For. Miss. 


1137 
100 
10 
310 
616 
151 
4945 
803 
388 
11 
26 
621 
22 
124 
136 
29 
140 

313 
111 
18 
329 
48 
11 
14 

34 
52 

{ 

ll 

i 

22 

40 
20 
150 
14432 

5 
13 
24 
22 

20 
84 

1055 
535 

52 
4 
191 
85 
3466 
849 
328 
201 

467 
5 
97 
25 

2034 
17 

235 
1 

16 
20 

1818 
69 
44 
1404 
19 
506 
1986 

256 
15788 


91 

I 

251 
497 
35 
282 
61 
19 

6 
33 
4 

10 
8 

45 
9 
1 
19 
4 
1 

4 
2 

4 

1 
1 

2488 

2 
2 
2 

6 

*52 
7 
12 

C 
C 

25 

7 
8 

1 

4 
1 

234 
4 
2 
36 

360 
753 


Baptist For. Miss. Board, Maritime Provinces 


Board of For. Miss., General Conference Mennonites. . 
Board of For. Miss., Gen. Council Evan. Luth. Ch 
Board of For. Miss., Gen. Synod, Evan. Lutheran Ch. . 
Board of For. Miss., German Evangelical Synod 


Board of For. Miss., Methodist Episcopal Church" ''.. . 
Board of For. Miss., Presbyterian Church in U. S. A. . 
Board of For. Miss., Reformed Church (Dutch)" 


Board of For. Miss., Reformed Episcopal Church". . . . 
Board of For. Miss., Reformed Presbyterian Church. . 
Board of For. Miss., United Presbyterian Church". . . . 
Board of Management, Gwalior Presbyterian Mission. 
Christian and Missionary Alliance 


Christian Woman's Board of Missions 


Evan. Lutheran Synod of Mo., 0., and Other States. . 
Foreign Christian Missionary Society 


For. Sept., International Committee, Y. M. C. A 


For. Dept., National Board, Y. W. C. A., U. S. A 
For. Miss. Board, Baptist Conv., Ontario and Quebec . 
For. Miss. Com., Presbyterian Church in Canada 


Friends' For. Miss. Soc Ohio Yearly Meeting 


General Conference of Free Baptists ... 


General Miss. Board, Church of the Brethren. .' 
General Miss. Board of the Free Methodist Church .... 
Gen. Miss. Board, Pentecostal Church, Nazarcne 
Hephzibah Faith Missionary Association 


Lee Memorial Bengali Mission*^ 


Mennonite Board of Missions and Charities ' 


Missionary Society, Calvinistic Church in U. S. A. . . . 
Peniel Missionary Society 


Pentecost Bands of the World 


Scandinavian Alliance Mission 


Seventh-Day Adventisfc Mission Board 


Vanguard Missionary Association 


Woman's Home and For. Miss. Soc., Advent Christian 
Woman's Gen. Miss. Soc., Churches of God 


Woman's Union Missionary Society of America 


Australasian Societies 

Baptist Association of Queensland For. Miss. Com 
Baptist For. Miss. Soc. of New South Wales 


Furreedpore Missionary Society 


New Zealand Baptist Missionary Society 


Tasmanian Baptist Missionary Society . 


Victorian Baptist Foreign Mission 


Totals, 6 Australasian Societies 


British Societies 

Baptist Missionary Society 8 


British and Foreign Bible Society 


Central Asian Mission 


Ceylon and India General Mission 


Children's Special Service Mission 


Christian Literature Society for India 


Christian Missions in Many Lands' 1 


Church Missionary Society 


Church of England Zenana Missionary Society 


Church of Scotland Foreign Mission Committee 


Church of Scotland Women's Assoc. for For. Miss 


Edinburgh Medical Missionary Society . 


English National Council, Y. M. C. A., For. Dopt 
For. Mission Presbyterian Church of Ireland* . .. 


For. Miss. Com., Presbyterian Church of England 
Friends' Foreign Mission Association 


Kurku and Central Indian Hill Mission 


Lakher Pioneer Mission 


London Missionary Society 


Ludhiana Zenana and Medical Mission . 


Missionary Settlement for University Women . 


National Bible Society of Scotland 


North India Industrial Home for Christian Blind. . . . 
Oxford Mission to Calcutta 


Regions Beyond Missionary Union ... 


Repr. Coun. Epis. Ch. in Scotland For. Miss. Board . . . 
Scottish Mission Industries Co., Ltd 


Scottish Nat'l Council, Y. M. C. A., For. Miss. Dept. . 
Society for the Propagation of Gospel* 1 


South Indian Strict Baptist Missionary Society 


Strict Baptist Mission . . 


United Free Church of Scotland's For. Miss. Com.".. . 
United Original Seces. Ch. Scotland's For. Miss. Com. 
Welsh Calvinistic Methodists Foreign Mission 


Wesleyan Methodist Missionary Society" 


Y. W. C. A., British National Foreign Department. . . 
Zenana Bible and Medical Mission 


Totals, 37 British Societies 





POLYNESIA 

" No report for Baptized Christians other than the number of Communicants. 

INDIA 

Includes data for the Woman's Society. 
b No report for Baptized Christiana other than the number of Communicants. 



b Not reported. 



Not reported. 



Includes data for the Baptist Zenana Mission. 

* Colporteurs under the direct supervision of the Bible Society, 
e Includes six publishing branches and thirty-five sales depots. 
'' Church statistics reported by only seven missions. 

1 Includes data for the Jungle Tribes Mission formerly conducted by the Presbyterian Church in Ireland. 
' Church members in good standing. 

k It has not been possible to be certain that this data includes no work for whites. 
' Includes a government school grant. 

* Estimate. Except in column 18, all estimates are from the societies. 

t Physicians who ure ordained are entered in both columns 2 and 3. Accordingly, the total of missionaries does not necessarily equal the total of columns 2 to 7. 

j Owing to inevitable duplication in the enumeration of stations by the various societies, the totals In column 12 are in excess of the total number of cities occupied. In the tables of summaries on another 
page, duplicates are eliminated. 



d Rev. and Mrs. D. H. Lee are missionaries of the Methodist Episcopal Church, but are reported with 
the Lee Memorial Bengali Mission. 



STATISTICAL TABLES 



91 



GENERAL AND EVANGELISTIC Continued 



COUNTRIES AND SOCIETIES 


DATE 


FOREIGN MISSIONARIES 


NATTVB WORKERS 


STATIONS 


CHRISTIAN COMMUNITY AND CONTRIBUTIONS 


Year of First Work 
in this Field 


m 

a 

13 
d> 

O 


Physicians 


Lay Missionaries not 
Physicians (Men) 


Married Women 
not Physicians 


Unmarried Women 
not Physicians 


Total of Foreign 
Missionaries 


Ordained Natives 


Unordained Natives, Preach- 
ers, Teachers, Bible-women, 
and Other Workers 


Total of Ordained and 
Unordained Native 
Workers 


Principal Stations 


All Other Sub-Stations 


3 
.2 

1 

s 
1 


Communicants Added 
During the Last Year 




Total Number of 
Communicants 


Total Number of 
Baptized Christians 


Total of Native Christian 
Adherents, incl. Baptized 
and Unbaptized, All Ages 


Sunday Schools 


Total Sunday School 
Membership, Including 
Teachers and Pupils 


Total of Native Contri- 
butions in U. S. Gold 


1 


8 
s 

1 


INDIA Concluded 
Ceylon Societies 
Jaffna Student Foreign Missionary Society 


1 

1900 
1900 

1706 
1834 
1878 
1803 
1842 
1872 

1866 
1877 

1897 
1876 
1867 
1889 
1896 

1875 
1853 

1882 

1889 
1880 
1894 
1893 
1880 

1900 
1875 
1888 
1903 
1891 
1899 

1896 
1905 
1891 
1901 
1891 


2 

34 
60 
17 
13 
44 
1 
1 
13 
20 

203 

1 
1 
6 

8 

1 

8 

9 

3 

1 
1 
5 

7358 


3 

1 
2 
2 
1 

6 

4 
4 

115 


4 

3 
1 

4 

1 

1 
163 


5 

24 

4 

6 

1 

1 
1 
37 

3 
8 

11 

1 
66 
67 

9 
9 

5 

1 

6 
358 


6 

32 
67 
'18 
9 
36 
1 

10 
14 

187 

4 
4 

1 
8 
44 
63 

2 

7 
1 
1 
11 

2 

2 

4 
1279 


7 

17 
11 

18 
6 
6 

2 
4 

64 

2 
2 

4 
36 
40 

4 
2 
20 

26 

3 
1 

15 

19 
7417 


8 

83 
164 
57 
28 
92 
2 
1 
26 
39 
1 
493 

1 
1 
15 

8 

25 

2 
21 
150 
173 

9 
5 
37 
2 
2 
65 

10 
1 

19 

30 
4635 


9 

( 

2 

17 

26 

1 
19 

2 
65 

5 
5 

1 

1 
1 

2 
1 
1 

1 

5 
1270 


10 

1 
1 

605 
841 
103 
79 
335 
5 

157 
240 

2365 

2 

258 
21 
10 
291 

1 
24 
1901 
1926 

24 

24 
20 

68 

20 

1 

20 
2 
25 
26 
154 
9 
50 
9 
4 
320 

34084 


11 

'. 

I 

622 
867 
103 
80 
354 
5 

159 
240 

2430 

2 

263 
21 
10 
296 

1 
24 
1901 
1926 

25 

24 
21 

70 

20 

1 

22 
3 
26 
26 
154 
10 
50 
9 
4 
325 

35354 


12 

31 
25 
11 
8 
57 
1 
1 
10 
9 
1 
154 

1 
1 
5 
8 

15 

1 
5 
23 
29 

3 
1 
5 
1 
1 
11 

3 
1 

2 

6 
1213 


13 

1 
1 
2 

209 
114 

14 

460 

37 

44 

878 

25 
72 
131 
228 

3 
2424 
2427 

2 
2 
11 

15 

2 

1 
29 
2 
1 

9 
15 
4 
4 
67 

10217 


14 

237 

87 
11 
8 
382 

47 
772 

~7 
1 

1 
6 

~7 

5 
8 

13 

14 
1 
1 

1 

25 

42 
4088 


15 

437 
459 

93 
237 

1226 

C 

2 
2 

~7 
1 
2 

10 
35452 


16 

9671 
9964 
653 
455 
25642 

2680 
2274 

' 51339 

C 

5 
56 

61 

24 
105 

129 
51 

56 
8 
55 

1248 
125 
620 
7 

2170 
522 349 


17 

21162 
17767 
1241 
1139 
70865 

3392 
9712 

125 278 

14990 
14990 

b5 

125 
130 

24 
105 

129 
"=51 
167 

b8 

60 

1248 
360 
1800 
55 

3749 
916773 


18 

21295 
18206 
*2500 
*1550 
91771 
20 

4392 
12577 

152 311 

*30000 
30000 

20 
160 

180 

47 
285 

332 

222 

906 
13 
103 

1530 
*500 
2381 
454 

6109 
1471727 


19 

t 
i 

Z 

52 
8 
8 
443 

5 

sle 

C 

2 
411 
413 

23 
5 

28 

1 

4 
~7 

20 
4 

36 
10872 


20 

2537 
543 
347 
7114 

460 
11001 



37 
10332 
10369 

1175 
130 

1305 

293 
1377 

658 
230 

2558 
422 135 


21 

$160 
167 
327 

14263 

7857 
85 
1964 
7291 

207 
500 

32167 

61 010 
36728 
97738 

30 
30 

23 
23 

110 
113 

1956 

2167 
6395 
154 

10895 
573 454 


Jaffna Women's Foreign Missionary Society 


Totals, 2 Ceylon Societies 


Continental Societies 

Evangeliech-Lutherische Mission zu Leipzig 


Evangelische Mfssionsgesellschaft zu Basel 


Evangeliska Fosterlands-Stiftelsen 


Danske Missionsselskab 


Goesnersche Missionsgesellschaft 


Lo venthals Mission 


L. P. Larsen Missionary Society ". . , 


Missionsanstalt zu Hcrmannpburg 


Sehleswig-Holsteinische Missionsgesellschaft 


South German Young Men's Christian Association 
Totals, 10 Continental Societies 


India Societies 

Indian Christian Endeavor Union 


India Sunday School Union" 


Indian Home Mission to the Santhals 


National Council, Y. M. C. A. of India and Ceylon 
National Y. W. C. A. of India, Burma, and Ceylon. . . 
Totals, 5 India Societies 


International Societies 

China Inland Mission 


Mission der Briidergemeine 


Salvation Army 


Totals, 3 International Societies 


Independent Societies 

Bengal Evangelistic Mission 


Industrial and Evangelistic Mission of India 


North India School of Medicine for Christian Women . 


Strict Baptist Mission, South India 


Tehri Border Village Mission 


Totals, 6 Independent Societies]'. 


Indigenous Societies 

Boys' Christian Home Mission 


Chinsurah and Hooghly Zenana Mission 


Godavari Baptist Swadesha Suvartavyapaka Society. . 
Indian Missionary Society of Tinnevelly 


Jungle Tribes Mission 


Keskar's Christian Mission at Sholapur 




Mukti Mission 


National Missionary Society of India 


St. Thomas Syrian Christian Evangelistic Association. 


Tinnevelly Children's Mission 


Totals, 12 Indigenous Societies. 


Grand Totals, 120 Societies 




CEYLON 
American Societies 

American Board of Commissioners for For. Miss 


1816 
1896 
1906 
1824 

1812 
1810 

1858 

1818 
1889 
1896 
1903 
1840 
1814 
1897 

1896 
1S95 
1896 

1903 
1882 
1832 


3 

1 
4 

4 

20 

4 
22 

50 

8 
62 


1 
1 

1 


2 
2 

2 
2 

4 


1 
1 

2 
4 

1 

1 
1 
4 

5 
1 

2 
15 

19 


3 

3 

2 
1 

1 

1 
15 

5 
1 

10 
36 

5 

44 


4 
1 
5 

63 

23 
8 
2 
1 

20 
2 
119 

5 
5 

5 
134 


13 
1 
1 
3 
18 

69 
2 

2 
2 
62 
8 
12 
3 
4 
56 
2 
222 

5 
6 

18 
263 


13 

13 

20 

21 

2 
50 

93 
1 
1 
1 

1 
109 


396 

396 

110 
d 91 
1 
45 

760 
28 
56 
27 
109 
854 

2081 

20 
18 
6 
44 

157 

2 
2680 


409 

409 

130 
91 
1 
45 

781 
28 
56 
27 
111 
904 

2174 

21 

18 
6 
45 

1 
157 

3 
2789 


6 
1 
1 
1 
9 

2 
1 

1 
1 
23 
2 
4 
2 
4 
14 
1 
55 

1 
1 

1 
3 

69 


23 

23 

55 
4 

C 

16 
16 
5 
213 

309 

20 
128 

3 
483 


19 

19 

*19 



16 
9 
325 

369 
388 


121 

121 

48 

9 
'162 

285 
43 
112 

659 

2 

1 
783 


1973 

1973 

1057 

28 
4158 

512 
802 
7437 

13994 

*300 
300 

90 

31 
16388 


1973 

1973 

1057 

30 
11272 

982 
2803 
7437 

23581 

*300 
300 

205 

42 
26101 


4418 

4418 

*4200 

70 
11613 

129 
1650 
2846 
24005 

44513 

*1000 
1000 

205 

60 
50196 


72 

72 

123 

2 



22 
16 
29 
337 

529 

1 

4 
606 


3818 

3818 
1575 

90 

C 

895 
220 
3850 
17137 

23767 

50 

250 
27885 


18758 
8758 

8309 

292 
63 
1592 
4676 

14932 
2287 
2287 

674 
26651 


For. Dept., International Committee, Y. M. C. A 
For. Dept., National Board, Y. W. C. A., U. S. A 


Trustees of Jaffna College Funds 




British Societies 


British and Foreign Bible Society 


Children's Special Service Mission 


Christian Literature Society for India 




Church Missionary Society 


Church of England Zenana Missionary Society 


Friends' Foreign Mission Association 


Indian Christian Realm Mission 




Wesleyan Methodist Missionary Society^ 


Y.W.C.A., British National Foreign Department 
Totals, 12 British Societies 


Ceylon Societies 

Colombo Industrial School 


Henaratgoda Village Mission 


National Ccuncil, Y. M. C. A. of India and Ceylon 


Totals, 3 Ceylon Societies 


Continental Society 

Evangelisch-Lutherische Mission zu Leipzig' 1 


International Society 
Salvation Army 


Indigenous Society 

Jaffna Native Evangelical Society 


Grand Totals, 21 Societies 




PERSIA 
American Societies 

Augustana Synod, Evangelical Lutheran Church 
Board of For. Miss., Presbyterian Church in U. S. A. . 
Foreign Missionary Society of the Brethren Church . . . 


1888 
1835 
1903 


2 
17 
1 
20 


7 
1 
8 


5 
6 


1 

1 
2 


21 
1 
22 


11 
11 


3 
61 
4 
68 


40 
40 


209 
209 


249 
249 


2 
9 
1 
12 


1 

73 

74 


38 
38 


235 
235 


150 
3446 
25 
3621 


300 
7492 
25 
7817 


*aoo 

8185 
*100 
8885 


76 
77 


4443 
25 
4468 


8- 

705 

705 





INDIA 

b No report for Baptized Christians other than the number of Communicant Not reported. 
m Includes data of the Swedish Diocese, which is a mission of the Svenska Kyrkans Mission. 
n Federates denominational Sunday School work. No independent statistics. 

CEYLON 

a No report for Baptized Christians other than the number of Communicants. 
b Includes data for the Baptist Zenana Missionary Society. 



Not reported. 

d Colporteurs under the immediate supervision of the Bible Society. 

Sales depots. 

' Net increase. 

e Includes data for Women's Society. 

h Partial data of the Swedish Diocese, which is a mission of the Svenska Kyrkans Mission. 



* Estimate. Except in column 18, all estimates are from the societies. 

t Physicians who are ordained arc entered in both columns 2 and 3. Accordingly, the total of missionaries does not necessarily equal the total of columns 2 to 7. 

I Owing to inevitable duplication in the enumeration of stations by the various societies, the totals in column 12 are in excess of the total number of cities occupied. In the tables of summaries on another page, 
duplicates are eliminated. 



92 



WORLD ATLAS OF CHRISTIAN MISSIONS 



GENERAL AND EVANGELISTIC Continued 



COUNTRIES AND SOCIETIES 


DATE 


FOREIGN MISSIONARIES 


NATIVE WORKERS 


STATIONS 


CimisTiAN COMMUNITY AND CONTRIBUTIONS 


Year of First Work 
in this Field 


Ordained Missionaries 


Physicians 


Lay Missionaries not 
Physicians (Men) 


Married Women 
not Physicians 


Unmarried Women 
not Physicians 


Total of Foreign 
Missionaries 


Ordained Natives 


Unordained Natives, Preach- 
ers, Teachers, Bible-women, 
and Other Wnrtfirs 


Total of Ordained and 
Unordained Native 
Workers 


n 

a 
_o 

55 

1 


1 

S 

IH 

s 


Church Organizations 


Communicants Added 
During the Last Year 


Total Number of 
Communicants 


Total Number of 
Baptized Christians 


Total of Native Christian 
Adherents, incl. Baptized 
and Unbaptized, All Ages 


02 


Total Sunday School 
Membership, Including 
Teachers and Pupils 


Total of Native Contri- 
butions in U. S. Gold 


1 


1 


PERSIA Concluded 
British Societies 
British and Foreign Bible Society 


1 

1815 
1875 

1880 
1887 


2 

6 
6 

26 


3 

4 
4 

12 


4 

4 
4 

9 


5 

1 
2 
3 
6 

1 

1 
2 

10 


6 

1 

1 
11 
13 

35 


7 

13 
13 

2 

1 
3 

27 


8 

2 
3 
41 
46 

3 

2 
6 

119 


9 

1 

1 

2 
2 
43 


10 

10 
2 
37 
49 

3 
1 

1 
262 


11 

10 
2 
38 
50 

3 
3 

~l 
305 


12 

1 
2 
5 
8 

2 

2 
4 

24 


13 

2 

b_ 

2 

2 
2 
78 


14 
38 


15 

30 
30 

265 


16 

189 
189 

40C 
400 
4*210 


17 

392 
392 

J400 
400 
8609 


18 

442 
442 

11 16 
1119 
10446 


19 

b_ 

77 


20 

b_ 

4468 


21- 

$ 

118 
118 

823 


Christian Missions In Many Lands 


Church Missionary Society 


Totals, 3 British Societies 


Continental Societies 

Deutsche Orient Mission 


Misslonsanstalt zu Hermannsburg c 




Totals, 3 Continental Societies 


Grand Totals, 8 Societies 




TURKISH EMPIRE 

(Except Syria and Palestine) 

American Societies 

American Bible Society 


1836 
1819 
1894 
1889 
1883 
1891 
1863 

1807 
1882 
1882 

1886 

1897 
1896 
1897 

1883 


1 
44 

1 
2 
3 
5 
62 

1 

1 

1 
2 
6 

1 
2 

3 
70 


5 

4 
1 

1 
11 

2 

2 
4 

1 

1 

2 
17 


1 
1 

1 


3 
1 

~4 
18 
26 

8 
4 

12 
38 


1 
51 

6 
2 
4 
8 
72 

1 
2 

3 

1 

10 

11 
86 


65 

4 
2 
2 
2 
75 

3 
6 

9 

28 
2 
30 
61 

145 


2 

168 

23 
7 
13 
33 
246 

2 

8 
6 
1 
2 
19 

8 
49 
7 
30 
89 

354 


73 
6 

3 
81 

6 
1 

~7 

3 
91 


1017 
18 
24 
15 
5 
21 
1100 

b!3 
12 
15 
*>3 
5 
48 

191 
5 

196 

11 
1355 


1090 
23 
24 
15 
8 
21 
1181 

13 
12 
15 
3 
5 
48 

197 
6 

203 

14 
1446 


1 
19 

3 
1 

6 

31 

1 
2 
1 
1 

6 

1 
4 
2 
2 
9 

3 

49 


283 

4 
2 

>' 289 

_- 

10 
10 
3 

2 
304 


158 
1 

21 
180 

5 
185 


B44 

644 
28 
28 

16 
588 


14918 
95 

64 
321 

15398 

83 
83 

650 
16031 


14918 
250 

64 
321 

15653 

207 

6 
213 

791 
791 

860 
17417 


51705 
395 

*256 
*1284 

.63640 

*828 
100 

*24 
952 

3164 
3164 

860 
58 616 


28! 
{ 
14 
313 

"I 
1 

9 
9 

6 
330 


30623 
500 
12< 

207 
31454 



400 
400 

C. 

420 
32274 


$ 

122007 
2500 
311 

853 
125671 

120 
141 

261 

2375 
128307 


American Board of Commissioners for For. Miss 


Apostolic Institute 


Board of For. Miss., Reformed Church (Dutch) 


Board of For. Miss., Ret. Presby. Ch. (Covenanter). . 
Seventh-Day Adventist Mission Board 


Trustees of Robert College 




British Societies 
British and Foreign Bible Society 


Church Missionary Society 


Friends' Armenian Mission Committee 


National Bible Society of Scotland 


United Free Church of Scotland's For. Miss. Com 
Totals, 5 British Societies 


Continental Societies 

Dansk Kirke-Mission i Arabien d 


Deut. Hiilfabund fur christliches Liebeswerk im Orient 
Deutsche Orient Mission 


Hheinisch Westfalischer Diakonissen Verein 


Totals, 4 Continental Societies 


International Society 

World's Young Women's Christian Association 


Indigenous Society 
Greek Evangelical Union 


Grand Totals, 18 Societies 




SYRIA AND PALESTINE 

American Societies 

American Friends' Board of Foreign Missions" 
Board of Directors, Jebail Settlement 


1888 
1905 
1822 
1856 
1890 
1900 
1863 

1860 
1851 
1886 
1861 
1869 
1887 
1868 
1896 

1894 
1895 
1871 
1863 

1852 
1903 
1851 
1860 

1898 


1 

13 
5 
3 

7 
29 

7 
9 

2 
18 

2 

1 

2 
6 

62 


1 
3 

6 
10 

5 

1 
1 
1 

1 

1 
12 

1 
1 

23 


1 

1 

1 
1 

1 
3 


1 
~1 

26 
28 

4 

3 
3 
5 

2 

17 

3 

13 
16 

1 
1 

62 


1 

14 
6 
3 

15 
39 

11 

2 
4 
2 

1 

2 
22 

2 

6 
8 

69 


1 

8 
4 
6 
1 
3 
24 

21 
31 
2 
5 
5 
11 
4 
1 

5 
8 
2 
4 
99 

2 
2 
57 
4 
65 

5 
1 

2 
195 


4 
1 
38 
16 
12 
1 
55 
127, 

21 
57 
2 
13 
13 
29 
4 
5 

5 
8 
6 
4 
167 

7 
6 
57 
25 
95 

6 
6 

2 
397 


11 
1 

1 
13 

9 
1 

2 

12 
2 

1 
3 

28 


19 
4 
183 
23 
6 
13 
29 
277 

100 
120 
18 
8 
76 
18 
3 
15 

d4 

3 
4 
15 
10 
394 

21 
17 

19 
57 

2 
730 


19 
4 

194 

24 
6 
14 
29 
290 

100 
129 
19 
8 
76 
20 
3 
15 
4 
3 
4 
15 
10 
406 

23 
17 

20 
60 

2 
758 


1 
1 
5 
4 
3 
v l 

16* 

9 
15 
1 
2 
2 
5 
1 
1 

1 
2 
2 
1 
42 

2 
2 
4 
1 
9 

1 
1 

1 
67 


3 

40 
( 
2 
6 

60 
27 

O 

6 
8 
1 

1 
2 

45 

3 
3 

2 
8 

~9 
9 

122 


1 
34 

1 
36 

2 

3 
1 

1 
1 

42 


6 
151 

157 

72 
5 

77 
234 


46 
15 
2819 
295 
40 
150 

3365 

823 
60 

87 

66 
1036 

250 
51 

172 
473 

4874 


N6 
2J 
b 2819 
>>295 
NO 
"150 

3373 

2323 
180 

i>87 

>>o6 

2656 

340 
97 

b!72 
609 

6638 


171 
*92 
*11276 
*11 080 
60 
*300 

13079 

*3292 
200 

348 

89 
3929 

*500 
401 

465 
1366 

18374 


* 
1 

5 
1 
14 

48 

C 

4 
14 

2 
2 
3 
2 
75 

1 
1 

1 
91 


300 
60 
3605 

.300 
6265 

1509 



220 
530 
110 

151 
40 

114 
2674 

50 
8989 


$1785 
675 
52974 

55434 

13432 
73 

83 

195 
5475 

433 
19691 

75125 


Board of For. Miss., Presbyterian Church in U. S. A. . 
Board of For. Miss., Ref. Presby. Ch. (Covenanter) . 
Christian and Missionary Alliance 


Stearns' Church and Bible Classes 


Syrian Protestant College 


Totals, 7 American Societies 


British Societies 

British Syrian Mission 


Church Missionary Society 


Dufferln and Procter Memorial Schools 


Edinburgh Medical Missionary Society ... 


Friends' Foreign Mission Association 




Jessie Taylor Memorial School 


Lebanon Hospital for the Insane 


National Bible Society of Scotland 


Palestine and Lebanon Nurses' Mission 


Palestine Village Mission 


Reformed Presbyterian Synod of Ireland For. Miss.. . 


Totals, 13 British Societies 


Continental Societies 


Oesterlands Missionen (Danish Eastland Mission) 
Rheinisch Westfalischer Diakonissen Verein 


Verein f tir das Syrische Waisenhaus in Jerusalem 


Totals, 4 Continental Societies 


International Societies 

Mission der Briidergemeine 


World's Young Women's Christian Association 


Totals, 2 International Societies 


Independent Society 


Grand Totals, 27 Societies 





PERSIA 

Colporteurs under the immediate supervision of the Bible Society. 

b Not reported. 

Data from Dr. Richter's "History of Protestant Missions in the Near East." 

d No record for Baptized Christians other than the number of Communicants, 



SYRIA AND PALESTINE 

This mission is sustained by the New England Yearly Meeting. 

b No report for Baptized Christians other than the number of Communicants, 

c Not reported. 

d Colporteurs under the immediate ^supervision of the Bible Society. 



TURKISH EMPIRE 

No record for Baptized Christians other than the number of Communicants. 

" Colporteurs under tbe immediate direction of the Bible Society. 

o Not reported. 

d Data furnished by Dr. S. M. Zwemer. 



* Estimate. Except in column 18, all estimates are from the societies. 

t Physicians who are ordained arc entered in both columns 2 and 3. Accordingly, the total of missionaries does not necessarily equal the total of columns 2 to 7. 
t Owing to Inevitable duplication in the enumeration of stations by the various societies, the totals in column 12 are in excess of the total number of cities occupied. 
page, duplicates are eliminated. 



In the tables of summaries on another 



STATISTICAL TABLES 



93 



GENERAL AND EVANGELISTIC Continued 



COUNTRIES AND SOCIETIES 


DATE 


FOREIGN MISSIONARIES 


NATIVE WORKERS 


STATIONS 


CHRISTIAN COMMUNITT AND CONTRIBUTIONS 


Year of First Work 
in this Field 


Ordained Missionaries 


Physicians 




Married Women 
not Physicians 


Unmarried Women 
not Physicians 


Total of Foreign 
Missionaries 


Ordained Natives 


Unordained Natives, Preach- 
ers, Teachers, Bible-women, 

and Ottlpr Wnrtpra 




Total of Ordained and 
Unordained Native 
Workers 


Frincipal Stations 


All Other Sub-Stations 


Church Organizations 


Communicants Added 
During the Last Year 


Total Number of 
Communicants 


Total Number of 
Baptized Christians 


Total of Native Christian 
Adherents, incl. Baptized 
and Unbaptized, All Ages 


Sunday Schools 


Total Sunday School 
Membership, Including 
Teachers and Pupils 


Total of Native Contri- 
butions in U. S. Gold 


i 


Women 


Lay Missionaries not 
Physicians (Men) 


BULGARIA 

American Societies 
American Board of Commissioners for For. Miss 
Board of For. Miss., Methodist Episcopal Church. . . 
Totals, 2 American Societies 


1 

1859 
1857 


2 

6 

J 
< 

2 
9 


3 


4 


6 

1 
1 


6 

5 
1 
6 

6 


7 

4 
2 


6 


8 

U 

4 
19 

3 
22 


9 

10 
15 
25 

25 


10 

31 
1< 

45 

4G 


11 

41 
21 
70 

70 


12 

S 
2 



1 

6 


13 

3C 
15 
4G 

4B 


14 

11 
17 
2 

28 


15 

2! 
IOC 
127 

127 


16 

664 
532 
1196 

1196 


17 

"664 
532 
1196 

100 
1296 


18 

3475 
1296 
4771 

*400 
5171 


19 

24 
16 
40 

40 


20 

2416 
620 
2936 

2936 


21 

$5020 
1281 
6301 

6301 


Continental Society 
Deutsche Orient Mission . 


Grand Totals, 3 Societies 




NORTH-EAST AFRICA 

(Egypt to Somaliland) 

American Societies 
Bethel Orphanage Faith Mission 


1901 
1854 
1895 
1905 
1902 

1812 
1882 
1897 
1890 
1905 
1892 
1902 

1867 

1900 
1886 


22 
2 
24 

~6 
3 
2 
10 

11 

2 
2 
15 

49 


9 
9 

1 

1 

1 
1 
1 
12 


4 
~4 

4 


27 

3 
30 

3 

4 
7 
4 
2 
1 

21 

7 

7 

58 


28 

2 
i 
33 

2 
5 
5 

2 
14 

18 

1 
2 
21 

68 


1 

34 
3 
4 
1 
43 

17 
7 
1 

3 
2 
30 

1 

30 
2 

33 
106 


12; 

i 

8 

> 

14; 


46 

~2 
48 

3 
3 

3 

3 
54 


526 
6 
6 
3 
541 

<>53 
39 
19 

25 

8 

144 

68 

3 
8 
79 

764 


572 
6 
6 
5 
589 

53 
39 
19 

25 
11 

147 

71 

3 
8 
82 

818 


1 
12 
1 
2 
4 
20 

2 

6 
3 
1 
3 
1 
23 

10 
2 
2 
1 
15 

58 


189 
2 
191 

d_ 
1 

3 
1 

2 

1 
3 

198 


61 

1 
62 

8 

1 
70 


1122 
1122 

20 

20 

184 

3 
187 

1329 


9939 

10 
9949 

81 
*50 
131 
502 

37 
539 

10619 


"9939 

"10 
9949 

170 
"50 
220 
1261 

120 
1381 

11550 


35144 

*40 
35184 

174 
*200 
374 
*2008 

160 
2168 

37726 


203 

3 
206 

d 

2 
1 

1 

1 
1 
3 

211 


14678 

16 
14694 

d_ 

165 
165 

40 

125 
165 

15024 


159 179 

428 
159 607 

156 

156 

20 

930 
950 

160713 


Board of For. Miss., United Presbyterian Church 
Peniel Missionary Society 


Pentecost Bands of the World 


Seventh-Day Adventist Mission Board b 


Totals, 5 American Societies ... . . 


British Societies 
British and Foreign Bible Society 


31 
20 

8 

C 

4 

8 

r 

76 

37 
30 

e 

Tl 
296 


Church Missionary Society 


Egypt General Mission 


Jerusalem and the East Mission 


Nile Mission Press 


North Africa Mission 


Y. W. C. A., British National Foreign Department. . . 
Totals, 7 British Societies 


Continental Societies 
Evangellska Fosterlands-Stiftelsen 


Rheinisch Westfalischer Diakonissen Verein 


Sudan Pionler Mission 


Ver. tot Uitbreldlng v. het Evangelie in Egypte 


Totals, 4 Continental Societies 


Grand Totals, 16 Societies 




NORTH-WEST AFRICA 

(Tripoli to Morocco) 

American Societies 

Board of For. Miss., Methodist Episcopal Church 
For. Miss. Board, Southern Baptist Convention 


1908 

1824 
1886 
1883 
1882 
1888 

1883 
1886 

1888 
1889 


2 

3 
6 

"13 
13 

1 
2 
3 

21 


~2 

1 
1 
5 

1 
1 

6 


1 
1 
2 

2 


1 
1 

3 

~7 
2 
5 
17 

"I 

2 
3 
5 

24 


2 

2 
4 

3 

5 
16 
5 
29 

1 

2 
3 

2 
1 
3 

39 


4 

1 

2 
40 
6 
48 

1 
1 

8 
8 
64 


9 

"s 

17 

6 
3 
14 
74 
17 
114 

2 
6 
8 

12 
4 
16 

15S 


1 
1 

1 


5 

21 
26 

1 

1 
27 


1 

"i 

5 

21 
26 

1 

1 
28 


1 

3 
4 

3 
2 
6 
15 
4 
30 

1 
1 
2 

1 
2 
3 

39 


1 
7 

2 

3 
2 
6 

2 
2 
4 

12 


1 
1 

1 
1 

2 
1 
4 


26 
26 

26 


72 
72 

50 
50 

6 
6 

56 
56 

184 


72 
72 

t>60 
60 

6 

56 
184 


97 
97 

*200 
200 

*24 
24 

106 
106 

427 


1 

9 
9 

~7 

2 
2 
19 


70 
70 

375 
375 

320 
320 

28 
28 
793 


$- 

92 
92 

92 


Gospel Missionary Union 


Totals, 3 American Societies 


British Societies 
British and Foreign Bible Society 


Central Morocco Mission 


Christian Missions in Many Lands 


North Africa Mission 




Totals, 5 British Societies 


Continental Societies 
Mission Mayor a. Mokne'a d 


Miss. Protestante Francaise en Kabylie 


Totals, 2 Continental Societies 


Independent Societies 


Mission to Spaniards in Algeria and Iviza 


Totals, 2 Independent Societies 


Grand Totals, 12 Societies 




WESTERN AFRICA 

(Senegal to Nigeria) 

American and Canadian Societies 

Board of For. Miss., Gen. Synod, Evan. Luth. Ch 
Board of For. Miss., Methodist Episcopal Church*. . . . 


1860 
1833 
1890 
1907 
1835 
1891 
1888 
1850 
1855 
1900 

1899 
1893 
1894 
1892 

1816 
1870 
1887 
1852 
1792 


4 
6 
4 
1 
1 
1 
7 
4 
5 
2 

~2 
2 
26 
1 

66 

24 
6 

~7 
1 


2 

1 
3 

2 


1 

1 
1 


2 
1 

2 
5 

2 

2 

1 

8 
23 

9 

10 
1 


1 
6 
2 

1 
2 
2 

7 
4 

2 
2 
3 
2 
2 
36 

14 

3 
4 


3 
2 
3 

2 
1 
3 

6 

5 
3 

1 
29 

25 
4 
2 
2 


8 
16 
10 
1 
4 
6 
17 
13 
18 
2 
6 
4 
11 
32 
4 
12 
164 

75 
13 
16 
10 
1 


2 
31 

25 

1 
2 

4 

4 

8 
1 

78 

79 
1 

3 
1 


23 
84 
6 

108 
4 
8 
29 
54 

8 
5 
4 
12 

345 

434 
13 
35 
6 
86 


25 
115 

6 

133 
4 
9 
31 

58 

12 
5 
12 
13 

423 

513 
14 
35 
9 
87 


1 
5 
4 
1 
2 
2 
3 
5 
6 
1 
2 
2 
1 
6 
1 
4 
46 

23 
6 
5 
5 
1 


20 
44 
2 

54 
4 
13 
19 
68 

3 
3 
18 

248 

e 

10 
42 
12 
28 


48 

14 
2 
3 
18 
13 

11 
1 
30 
1 

141 



7 
5 
13 


600 

3 
189 
. 20 
3 
116 
116 

92 
1139 

d !43 
25 
245 

88 


150 
3990 
30 
4 
2434 
50 
241 
886 
705 

349 
50 
611 
60 

9560 

14078 
150 
1170 
489 
607 


150 
3990 
3C 

275J 
>>50 
241 
886 
705 

631 
i>50 
901 
60 

10451 

43707 
150 
1250 
1397 
1205 


*600 
*15000 
80 
*16 
4350 
150 
*900 
*3544 
2858 
10 

717 
*200 
1400 
60 
20 
29905 

43707 
400 
*5000 
1859 
*2414 


3 
62 

42 
2 
8 
22 
15 

7 
5 
14 
.3 
2 
185 



31 

45 
4 
10 


150 
3510 

2367 
100 
137 
445 
818 

682 

580 
55 

8844 

1000 
2050 
438 
663 


10786 

12236 
150 
54 
1579 
3226 

363 

2000 
263 

30657 

83144 
1460 
2234 


Christian Woman's Board of Missions 


Dom. and For. Miss. Soc., Protestant Episcopal Church 
Dom,, Frontier, and For. Miss. Soc., United Brethren 
For. Miss. Board National Baptist Convention* . . 


For. Miss. Board, Southern Baptist Convention* 


For. Miss. Society United Brethren in Christ* 


General Conference of Free Baptists 


Mennonite Brethren in Christ Missionary Society 
Miss. Soc., African Methodist Episcopal Zion Church. 
Miss. Soc. of the Wesleyan Methodists of America 
Parent Miss. Soc., African Methodist Episcopal Church. 
Seventh-Day Adventist Mission Board 


Sudan Interior Mission 


Totals, 16 American Societies 


British Societies 
Church Missionary Society 


Primitive Methodist Missionary Society 


Qua Iboe Mission 


Society for the Propagation of the Gospel 


Society for the Spread of the Gospel f 


(Continued on next page) 



BULGARIA 

" No report for Baptized Christians other than the number of Communicants. 

NORTH-EAST AFRICA 

No report for Baptized Christians other than the number of Communicants. 
b Includes some work in Algeria. 

Colporteurs under the immediate direction of the Bible Society. 
" Not reported. 

NORTH-WEST AFRICA 

Colporteurs under the Immediate direction of the Bible Society. 

b No report for Baptized Christians other than the number of Communicants. 



The society is not denominational, and the exact number of missionaries who arc ordained is not 

positively known. 
d This work has been taken over by the North Africa Mission since the date of these statistics. 

WESTERN AFRICA 

Includes data for Woman's Society. 

b No record for Baptized Christians other than the number of Communicants. 
Not reported. 
d Net increase. 

Includes the West Indian African Mission at Rio Pongo. 

Commonly known as the Sierre Leone Mission of the Countess of Huntingdon's Connexion. 



* Estimate. Except in column 18, all estimates are from the societies. 

t Physicians who are ordained are entered in both columns 2 and 3. Accordingly, the total of missionaries does not necessarily equal the total ot columns & to 7. 
I Owing to inevitable duplication in the enumeration of stations by the various societies, the totals In column 12 are in excess of the total number of cities occupied, 
page, duplicates are eliminated, 



In the tables of summaries on another 



94 



WORLD ATLAS OF CHRISTIAN MISSIONS 



GENERAL AND EVANGELISTIC Continued 



COUNTRIES AND SOCIETIES 


DATE 


FOREIGN MISSIONARIES 


NATIVE WOHKBHS 


STATIONS 


CHMSTIAN COMMUNITY AND CONTRIBUTIONS 


i 

fl^ iA 

O en 

(HJ3 


8 


Physicians 


*W 

^ 
g'g 

5 

*3 '3 

fri g> 

rt>-M 


II 

'C P-i 

i3 "o 


t m 

T3 '8 

.' H 

H-& 
Cq n . 

t1 


g, 
l. 
*i 

S ft 

O J"1 

r^?H 


1 
d 

a> 

o 


Unordained Natives, Preach- 
ers, Teachers, Bible-women, 
and Other Workers 


1 
a, 



S i 
S* 5 
6*8 

*** '9 V* 
J3 a 

3 s-S 

III 


n 
g 

1 

! 


la 

& 

1 
O 

3 


1 

o 

1 


T3 *4 
nj nj 

3 3> 

3^ 

<!.u 
"I 

4> 

a 3 
O 

<s! 


*J 

O 


fci 

a i 

5 

HO 


m 
O I3 

S3 *n 

J2J <U 

if 

O rt 

Hffl 


Total of Native Christian 
Adherents, mcl. Baptized 
and Unbaptized, All Ages 


I 


Total Sunday School 
Membership, Including 
Teachers and Pupils 


j! 

goJ 

'%& 
fc.9 

s| 

al 

S5 


i 

1 


I 


WESTERN AFRICA Concluded 
(Senegal to Nigeria) 

British Societies Concluded 
United Free Church of Scotland's For. Miss. Com 
United Methodist Church Missionary Society 


1 

1846 
1859 
1811 

1828 
1847 
1863 

1904 
1899 


2 

8 
1 
23 
70 

29 
23 
2 
54 

6 
195 


3 

1 
3 
1 
1 
3 

10 


4 
1 

2 


5 

8 

2 
30 

21 
3 
1 
25 

10 
88 


6 

10 
1 
12 
44 

25 
16 
3 
44 

1 
125 


7 

11 

1 
62 

3 

8 

11 

92 


8 

38 
2 
45 
200 

79 
50 
6 
135 

19 
518 


9 

2 
7 
65 
158 

21 
2 

23 

2 
261 


10 

80 
112 
660 
1426 

238 
166 
1 
405 

1 

100 
2277 


82 
119 
725 
1584 

259 
168 
1 
428 

1 

102 
2538 


12 

9 
1 
18 
68 

11 

8 
1 
20 

7 
141 


13 

31 
16 
1105 
1244 

183 
115 

298 
2 

15 
1807 


14 

14 
20 
53 
112 

113 

89 

202 

15 
470 


15 

295 

- 

588 
1384 

855 
329 

1184 

44 
3751 


16 

1465 
2545 
30991 
51495 

9971 
7007 
15 
16993 

1 

285 
78334 


17 

1698 
i>2545 
i>30991 
82941 

21663 
1-7007 

b!5 

28685 
1 

502 
122 580 


18 

3820 
3979 
120629 
181 808 

22213 
*13072 
115 
35400 

4 

1585 
248 702 


19 

35 
18 
269 
412 

8 
8 
6 

13 
623 


20 

2228 
1546 
29521 
37446 

457 
457 

_ 

610 
47357 


21 

J7030 
9957 
17242 
121 667 

828902 
9202 

38104 

3071 
193499 


Wosleyan Methodist Missionary Society 


Totals, 8 British Societies 


Continental Societies 

Evangelische Missionsgesellschaft zu Basel 


Norddeutsche Missionsgesellschaf t 


Socie'te' des Missions eVangdliques 


Totals, 3 Continental Societies 


International Society 
Sudan United Mission 


Indigenous Society 
Native Baptist Union of West Africa 


Grand Totals, 29 Societies 




SOUTH-WEST AFRICA 

(Kamerun to German South-West Africa) 

American Societies 
American Baptist Foreign Mission Society 


1884 
1880 
1885 
1842 
1887 
1891 
1899 

1898 
1879 
1881 
1870 
1889 
1859 

1886 
1870 
1897 
1892 
1842 
1892 
1881 


17 
8 
7 

g 
g 

10 
3 
63 

34 

4 
14 
5 
57 

38 
17 
2 
12 
36 
13 

118 
238 


3 

2 

6 

1 
3 
15 

2 
2 

4 
1 

1 
20 


1 

1 

2 

1 

1 
3 


1 
7 
2 
1 

11 

6 
3 
23 

6 
38 

15 

3 
8 
4 
23 
53 

102 


14 
7 
3 
19 
10 
3 
4 
60 

2 
24 
15 
2 
11 
1 
55 

27 
16 
1 
10 
27 
11 
12 
104 

219 


1 
8 
6 
1 
5 
3 
1 
25 

8 
1 
11 

1 
7 

28 

3 
3 

3 
4 
2 
15 
30 

83 


36 
25 
17 
42 
26 
18 
11 
175 

16 
64 
51 
7 
38 
6 
182 

84 
37 
3 
28 
75 
30 
50 
307 

664 


9 

4 

52 
65 

1 
1 
1 
1 

2 
68 


373 
88 
23 
70 
80 
178 
20 
832 

631 
30 
3 
44 

voi 

234 
35 

49 
112 
79 
100 
609 

2149 


382 
88 
23 
74 
80 
178 
72 
897 

631 
30 
4 

44 

709 

235 
35 

50 
112 
79 
100 
611 

2217 


10 
5 
4 
7 
9 
2 
1 
38 

5 
12 
11 
5 
6 
5 
44 

12 
8 
1 
5 
26 
4 
7 
63 

145 


"264 
18 
7 
42 
2 
10 
16 
359 

1 

390 
11 
3 
35 

440 

256 
15 

57 
12 
48 
89 
477 

1276 


33 
3 
11 
U 

1 
1 
62 

*12S 
12 

6 
5 
151 

204 

7 

7 
12 

13 
243 

456 


715 
129 
17 
138 
34 
796 
216 
2045 

832 

15 
847 

1000 

111 

105 
684 

1900 
4792 


4772 
304 
205 
1825 
283 
6638 
451 
14478 

3117 
250 
250 
166 
560 
4343 

4562 
768 

1587 
4654 
1369 
1628 
14568 

33389 


4772 
"304 
"205 
"1825 
283 
"6638 
451 
14478 

3117 
250 
250 
166 
2600 
6383 

7080 
1772 

1587 
10763 
"1369 
1628 
24199 

45060 


11272 
3454 
240 
*7200 
483 
*26 500 
*1800 
50949 

*12468 
*1000 
500 
3000 
2945 
19913 

9171 
2529 

3737 
13096 
3806 

32339 
103 201 


91 
4 
10 

g 

15 
15 
144 

*135 
24 
4 

7 
170 

1 

10 

6 
17 

331 


6875 
1222 
505 
2906 

4200 
1500 
16208 

*1503 
250 

470 
2223 

683 
1180 

e 

674 
2537 

20968 


$1446 
34 
131 
1499 

1200 
860 
5170 

2336 
1621 

1460 
5417 

4296 
*670 

852 
9188 
280 
857 
16143 

26730 


American Board of Commissioners for For. Miss> 
Board of For. Miss., Methodist Episcopal Church d . . . 
Board of For. Miss., Presbyterian Church in U. S. A. . 
Christian and Missionary Alliance 


Exec. Com. of For. Miss., Presbyterian Ch. (South). . 
Foreign Christian Missionary Society 


Totals, 7 American Societies 


British Societies 
Angola Evangelical Mission 


Baptist Missionary Society* 1 


Christian Missions in Many Lands 




Regions Beyond Missionary Union 




Totals, 6 British Societies 


Continental Societies 

Evangelische Missionsgesellschaft zu Basel 




Mission Philaf ricaine 


Missionsgesellschaft der Deutschen Baptisten 


Rhelnische Missionsgesellschaft 


Socie'te' des Missions eVangeMiques 


Svenska Missionsforbundet 


Totals, 7 Continental Societies 


Grand Totals, 20 Societies 




SOUTH AFRICA 

(The British Union, with Basutoland and Swaziland) 
American Societies 
American Board of Commissioners for For. Miss. 


1835 
1900 
1898 
1891 
1885 
1908 
1896 
1897 
1892 
1899 

1877 
1810 
1884 
1907 
1799 
1872 
1825 
1867 
1900 

1834 
1891 
1892 
1875 
1854 
1899 
1873 
1844 
1830 
1833 
1892 
1878 


10 
4 
4 
16 
8 
1 
4 
4 
2 
2 
55 

2 
2 

1 

8 
3 
30 
28 


1 

1 

1 





1 
3 

11 
3 

1 

1 
1 
21 

2 
1 
5 

25 


11 
7 
4 
9 
7 
1 
4 
4 
2 
3 
52 

2 
3 
5 

8 
3 
42 
16 


7 
5 
3 
2 

5 
22 

1 
1 

25 

7 


30 
19 
11 
38 
18 
2 
9 
8 
10 
6 
151 

6 
6 
11 
1 
17 
6 
123 

44 

7 


9 
5 

126 

6 
146 

2 

2 
13 
24 


539 
4 
7 
38 
26 

20 
132 
70 
56 
892 

14 

10 
84 
6 
843 
169 


548 
4 
7 
43 
26 

20 
258 
70 
62 
1038 

14 

12 
84 
8 
856 
193 


12 
2 
4 
12 
6 
1 
3 
2 
2 
2 
46 

1 

2 
4 
2 
8 
1 
28 
23 


22 
16 
J 

26 

28 

1 
141 

237 
9 

20 
99 
30 
509 
840 


25 

12 
6 

142 

2 
187 

1 

d 

d_ 

40 
256 


534 

74 
90 

463 
1161 

20 
1083 
1142 


5374 

106 
2274 
329 

40 
4000 
350 
31 
12504 

900 
3899 
1820 
15994 
21233 

43846 

23927 
660 
5110 
770 
21647 
42 
761 
2231 
8304 
17160 
122 
1281 
82015 


"5374 

106 
"2274 
329 

40 
5860 
350 
31 
14364 

"900 
"3899 
"1820 
19411 
"21 233 

47263 

48360 
660 
5110 
770 
66138 
42 
1845 
3842 
19278 
17160 
122 
2735 
166 062 


18253 

266 
*9000 
2120 

*160 
11000 
945 
31 
41775 

*3500 
7205 
2820 
35039 
84110 

132674 

48512 
1520 
*20000 
1620 
*86 588 
71 
*2800 
5089 
19612 
24460 
160 
5124 
215556 


48 
5 

12 

7 

240 

d 

26 
338 

43 
10 
110 
192 

355 

4 
d 

d 

d_ 

4 


2775 

145 
450 

8000 

596 
11966 

1549 
1500 
3991 
10750 

17790 

d_ 
203 

d_ 

2025 

d_ 

2228 


$9377 

1024 
722 

4970 

203 
16296 

5923 
1460 
17894 

25277 

89059 

225 
3069 
12603 

295 
590 
16290 
109 629 

1090 
232850 


Board of For. Miss., Internat'l Apostolic Holiness Union 
For Miss Board of the Brethren in Christ 


For. Miss. Board, National Baptist Convention 1 " 


General Miss. Board of the Free Methodist Church. . . 
Gen Miss Board, Pentecostal Church, Nazarene. 


Hephzibah Faith Missionary Association 


Parent Miss. Soc., African Methodist Episcopal Church 




Totals, 10 American Societies 


British Societies 

Birmingham Young Men's Foreign Mission Society . . 
British and Foreign Bible Society 


Christian Missions in Many Lands 


Free Church of Scotland Foreign Mission 
London Missionary Society 




United Free Church of Scotland's For. Miss. Com. . . . 


Wesleyan Methodist Missionary Society^ 3 


Y. W. 0. A., British National Foreign Department. . . 
Totals 9 British Societies 


74 

67 

9 
11 
53 
2 
5 
15 
14 
16 
4 
10 
206 


1 
1 

1 





33 

4 
10 

4 

2 

2 
4 

26 


79 

65 
7 
8 
13 
50 
1 
5 
11 
12 
20 
3 
8 
203 


34 

31 
2 

11 

2 
7 
5 
3 
3 
2 
10 
76 


221 

167 
19 
17 
40 
103 
5 
19 
31 
31 
43 
9 
28 
512 


41 

14 

3 

13 

1 
31 


1126 

890 
31 
55 
38 
512 
2 
26 
58 
154 
432 
3 
81 
2282 


1167 

904 
31 
55 
38 
512 
2 
29 
58 
154 
445 
3 
82 
2313 


73 

55 
8 
9 
7 
45 
1 
5 
12 
11 
15 
2 
6 
176 


1507 

566 
21 
34 
25 
130 

31 
63 
11 
210 
8 
60 
1159 


297 

304 
8 
43 
6 
175 

5 
*35 
11 

d 

7 
594 


2245 

993 

90 
914 

*200 
180 
1101 

3478 


Continental Societies 


Helgelseforbundet i Nerike 


Miss., Hannoverschen evangclisch-luth. Freikirche . . . . 
Mission Romande 




Norske frie Missionsforbund 








Sode'te' des Missions dvange'liques 











WESTERN AFRICA 

b No report for Baptized Christians other than the number of Communicants, 
s Includes estimated value of labor given. 

SOUTH-WEST AFRICA 

Regular meeting places. 

b Includes data for the Canadian Congregational Foreign Missionary Society. 
No record for Baptized Christians other than the number of Communicants. 
d Includes data for the Women's Society. 

Not reported. 

SOUTH AFRICA 

No report for Baptized Christians other than the number of Communicants. 
b Includes data for Women's Society. 



Commonly known as the Ikwezi Lamaci Mission. 
d Not reported. 

Includes Pastor Norgaard of Biyela, not technically a member of the Schreuder Mission. 

1 Data from "The Kingdom of God in South Africa." 



* Estimate. Except in column 18, all estimates are from the societies. 

t Physicians who arc ordained are entered in both columns 2 and 3. Accordingly, the total of missionaries docs not necessarily equal the total of columns 2 to 7. 

j Owing to inevitable duplication in the enumeration of stations by the various societies, the totals in column 12 are in excess of the total number of cities occupied. 

i, duplicates arc eliminated. 



In the tables of summaries on another 



STATISTICAL TABLES 



95 



GENERAL AND EVANGELISTIC Continued 



COUNTRIES AND SOCIETIES 


DATE 


FOREIGN MISSIONARIES 


NATIVE WORKERS 


STATIONS 


CHRISTIAN COMMUNITY AND CONTRIBUTIONS 


Year of First Work 
in this Field 


] 


Physician! 




Married Women 
not Physicians 


Unmarried Women 
not Physicians 


Total of Foreign 
Missionaries 


Ordained Natives 


Unordained Natives, Preach- 
ers, Teachers, Bible-women, 
and Other Workers 


Total of Ordained and 
Unordained Native 
Workers 


Principal Stations 


All Other Sub-Stations 


Church Organizations 


Communicants Added 
During the Last Year 


Total Number of 
Communicants 


Total Number of 
Baptized Christians 


Total of Native Christian 
Adherents, bcl. Baptized 
and Unbaptized, All Ages 


1 

02 

! 
i 


Total Sunday School 
Membership, Including 
Teachers and Pupils 


Total of Native Contri- 
butions in U. S. Gold 


1 


I 




Lay Missionaries not 
Physicians (Men) 


SOUTH AFRICA Concluded 
(The British Union, with Bosutoland and Swaziland) 
India Society 
Telugu Baptist Home Mission 


1 
1903 

1863 
1820 
1853 
1853 
1878 
1873 
1860 
1877 
1824 
1899 
1853 
1899 
1900 
1904 
1889 
1892 
1886 

1736 
1883 

1896 


2 

13 
32 
10 
8 
14 
28 
18 
33 
61 
4 
11 

1 
9 
4 
31 
277 

36 
36 

1 

649 


3 

1 
1 

1 
1 

6 


4 

1 

1 

1 


6 

2 

1 
2 

U40 
1 

17 
1 
1 
165 

8 
14 
22 

15 
282 


6 

1 
1 

13 
5 

20 
3 
26 
69 

41 
13 
64 

7 

464 


7 

4 
3 
2 
9 
. 7 
1 
6 

2 

14 
3 

51 

4 
4 

187 


8 

20 
35 
12 
19 
22 
29 
40 
33 
201 
13 
11 

1 
61 
11 
58 
566 

89 
27 
116 

23 
1589 


9 
6 

2 

9 
8 
13 
17 
9 
10 
1 

1 

7 

95 
172 

5 
5 

401 


10 
9 

71 

4 

400 
250 
127 
i>32 
183 
230 
43 
1 
18 
324 
57 
5 
1585 
3330 

508 
86 
594 

46 
8279 


11 
15 

73 
4 
9 
8 
413 
267 
136 
42 
184 
230 
43 
1 
19 
331 
57 
5 
1680 
3602 

513 
86 
699 

46 
8680 


12 

13 
29 
10 
7 
12 
45 
18 

70 
5 

1 

25 
4 
30 
269 

23 
9 
32 

14 
610 


13 
8 

214 

87 

1 

55 

1 
1 
246 
50 
28 
1015 
1698 

139 
19 
158 

23 
4790 


14 
6 

12 
27 
16 
6 
230 
24 
110 

60 

22 

2272 
2778 

23 
19 
42 

24 
3928 


15 
218 

623 
2155 
695 
332 
954 
1346 
2358 

J585 

10 
1014 

d 

1925 
11997 

231 
231 

19330 


16 

5165 
9267 
3867 
2558 
5485 
12540 
4521 
17351 
19194 
5617 
6459 
30 

8094 
948 
625 
75256 
176977 

6331 
6331 

1000 
322673 


17 
218 

19045 
45463 
13599 
7341 
21000 
36811 
12800 
17351 
19194 
"5617 
6459 
30 

8094 
1254 
625 
158 720 
373403 

19338 
19338 

*1450 
622098 


18 

*400 

41025 
46675 
19681 
9576 
24000 
50544 
15000 
68139 
92694 
*22468 
22133 
150 

*32400 
*5000 
2795 
277496 
729 776 

21595 
21595 

3550 
1145326 


19 

~5 
9 
24 
48 
199 

144 
71 

d_ 

7 
604 
1111 

18 
18 

1826 


20 

831 
819 
1335 
1485 
10212 

10227 
108 

d_ 

272 
30 201 
55490 

780 
780 

88254 


21 

81217 

14818 
5592 

29000 
4755 
3655 
97 

3854 
813 
920 
335 925 
400 646 

11652 
11652 

1713 
688434 


South African Societies 
Church of England Province of South Africas 
Diocese of Bloemfontein (in part) 




Diocese of Grahamstown 


Diocese of Natal 


Diocese of Pretoria 


Diocese of St. John's, Kaffraria 


Diocese of Zululand 


Congregational Union of South Africa 


Dutch Reformed Ch. of South Africa Gen. Miss. Com. . 
Dutch Reformed Ch .of South Africa, Orange Free State 
Dutch Reformed Ch,, So. Africa, Transvaal Synod'... 
Natal Baptist Association 


Ohlange Christian Industrial School 


Presbyterian Church of South Africa, Native Mission . . 
South African General Mission 


South African Baptist Missionary Society 


South African (Wesleyan) Missionary Society 


Totals, 17 South African Societies 


International Societies 

Mission der Briidergemeine 




Totals, 2 International Societies 


Independent Society 

South African Compounds and Interior Mission 


Grand Totals, 62 Societies 




SOUTHERN CENTRAL AFRICA 

(Five British Protectorates) 
American Societies 

American Board of Commissioners for For. Miss 
Board of For. Miss,, Methodist Episcopal Church b . . . 
For Miss Board, National Baptist Convention 


1893 
1899 
1899 
1894 

1895 
1810 
1882 
1875 
1884 
1860 
1896 
1885 
1891 
1875 
1880 
1891 
1892 

1857 
1885 
1878 

1889 
1908 


2 
7 
3 
3 
16 

1 
1 

4 
21 

6 
9 
12 

16 
9 

79 

2 
10 
2 
14 

14 
2 
16 

124 


2 
~2 

2 
3 

8 
1 

1 
15 

3 
3 

2 
1 
22 


2 

1 
1 

3 


2 
3 
5 
10 

1 
1 
4 
13 

6 

1 
7 
11 

18 
64 

4 
4 

'40 
40 
118 


5 
7 
2 
6 
20 

2 
2 
1 

7 

16 
6 
14 

4 
9 
62 

2 
12 
1 
15 

97 


2 
2 
1 
2 
7 

8 
1 

5 

17 

4 
35 

3 
3 

45 


11 
18 
9 
16 
54 

4 
4 
6 
28 
8 
41 
7 
12 
12 
41 
45 
13 
32 
252 

4 
32 
3 
39 

56 
2 
58 

403 


1 
4 
5 

6 
5 

ri 

16 


12 
47 
35 
41 
135 

42 
"2 

191 

190 
26 
6 
18 
1260 
114 
23 
140 
2012 

13 
13 

912 
5 
917 

3077 


12 
47 
36 
45 
140 

42 
2 

191 

190 
26 
6 
18 
1260 
120 
28 
140 
2023 

13 
13 

912 
5 
917 

3093 


3 
3 

1 
2 
9 

1 
1 
1 
4 
4 
12 
3 
4 
7 
8 
9 
8 
7 
69 

2 
8 
1 
11 

13 
2 
15 

104 


5 
14 

7 

26 

20 

d_ 

44 
11 

5 

436 
93 
123 
65 
797 

2 

21 
23 

1 

3 

850 


2 
20 

3 
25 

21 

d_ 

2 

6 
9 

7 
72 
117 

4 

1 
5 

3 
3 

150 


27 
881 

908 

260 
31 
69 

448 

48 
205 
1061 

11 
11 

12 
12 

1992 


158 
1245 
204 
133 
1740 

393 

1614 

1766 
180 
30 
119 
3899 
4389 
1987 
819 
15196 

1265 

200 
1465 

2010 
230 
2240 

20641 


158 
1245 
204 
133 
1740 

393 

2465 

1766 
180 
30 
275 
7513 
7094 
"1987 
819 
22522 

2173 

419 
2592 

2010 
374 
2384 

29238 


1458 
6498 
800 
133 
8889 

*1570 

*6400 

10205 
*3000 
130 
1045 
13035 
16146 
14276 
2652 
68459 

6265 

800 
7065 

7170 
*1000 
8170 

92583 


4 
18 
4 
6 
32 

1 

89 

86 
14 
6 

30 
104 
6 
72 
408 

212 
1 
213 

653 


170 
1805 
36 
233 
2244 

100 

3483 

10825 
1063 
250 

12237 
5359 
355 
2910 
36582 

19927 
50 
19977 

58803 


l- 

4732 
13 
874 
5619 

745 
7628 

d 

1817 

10188 

259 
269 

487 
1265 
1752 

17818 




Totals, 4 American Societies 


British Societies 

Baptist Industrial Mission of Scotland 


British and Foreign Bible Society 


Christian Missions in Many Lands 


Church of Scotland Foreign Mission Committee 


Church of Scotland Women's Assoc, for For. Miss. . . . 




Nyassa Industrial Mission 




Society for the Propagation of the Gospel 


United Free Church of Scotland's For. Miss. Com 


Wesleyan Methodist Missionary Society 




Totals, 13 British Societies 


Continental Societies 




Svenska Kyrkans Mission 


Totals, 3 Continental Societies 


South .African Societies 

Dutch Reformed Ch. of South Africa, Gen. Miss. Com. 
Presbyterian Church of South Africa, Native Mission. 
Totals, 2 South African Societies 


Grand Totals, 22 Societies 




EAST AFRICA 

(Portuguese, German, British) 

American Societies 


1902 
1894 
1885 
1906 

1817 
1844 
1898 
1896 
1893 
1861 
1864 


2 
2 
2 
3 
9 

47 
1 

10 
2 
19 
79 


1 
1 

6 
2 

1 
9 


1 
1 
1 

3 


1 

5 
6 

2 
23 

1 
3 
3 
16 
50 


4 
2 
2 
4 
12 

1 

45 
2 
2 
1 
2 
1 
54 


1 
1 
2 

48 

2 
5 

36 
91 


9 
4 
5 
12 
30 

3 
170 
6 
8 
19 
7 
73 
286 


i 

3 
2 
6 

33 

~2 
4 
17 
56 


3 
51 
53 
24 
131 

d4 
2126 
10 
3 
30 
25 
143 
2341 


3 
52 
56 
26 
137 

4 
2159 
10 
3 
32 
29 
160 
2397 


3 
1 
1 
4 
9 

2 
64 
1 
2 
8 
3 
11 
91 


3 

47 
24 

74 

e 

1 

31 
13 
126 
171 


47 
3 
6 
56 

6 

8 
2 

10 


452 
63 

515 

2807 

69 
34 

2910 


1377 
276 
24 
1677 

19138 

600 
466 
4240 
24444 


"1377 
276 
24 
1677 

68251 
1 

1700 
466 
4574 
74992 


2000 
12673 
1000 
24 
15697 

68251 
1 
80 
2202 
3100 
16161 
89795 


47 
1 
6 
54 

e 

11 

16 
134 
161 


1394 
50 
530 
1974 

600 
460 
5521 
6581 


s 

547 
50 
432 
1029 

7219 

97 
97 

7413 


Board of For. Miss., Methodist Episcopal ChurchX. . 
General Miss. Board of the Free Methodist Church. . 
Seventh-Day Adventist Mission Board 


Totals, 4 American Societies 


British Societies 

British and Foreign Bible Society 




Church of Scotland Foreign Mission Committee 


Friends' Anti-Slavery Committee' 


Society for the Propagation of the Gospel 


United Methodist Church Missionary Society 




Totals, 7 British Societies 





SOUTH AFRICA 

No report for Baptized Christiana other than the number of Communicants. d Not reported. 

Data from "The Kingdom of God in South Africa." 

e Church of England work in British South Africa is supported in part by the Society for the Propaga- 
tion of the Gospel, in part by special Associations in England not reporting through the Society 
for Propagation of the Gospel, and in part by funds raised locally. It is therefore reported by 
dioceses. The data in several instances is unsatisfactory, as there was no means of dividing with 
accuracy between work for whites and that for the non-Christian races. Full statistics were re- 
ceived from the dioceses of Pretoria and Zululand, for educational work in the diocese of Natal, 
and for work in Basutoland in the diocese of Bloemfontein. Only that portion of the diocese or 
Bloemfontein which is within the British South Africa section is reported under that diocese. 

h Evangelists. 

1 Includes both men and women. 

Number of adults baptized. 

SOUTHERN CENTRAL AFRICA 

No report for Baptized Christians other than the number of Communicants. 



b Includes data for the Women's Society. 

Colporteurs under the immediate direction of the Bible Society. 

d Not reported. 

Principally gifts in kind. 

' Includes both men and women. 

EAST AFRICA 

This work is supported by the Friends' African Industrial Mission, which is affiliated with the American 

Friends' Board of Foreign Missions. 
b Includes data of the Women's Board. 

No report for Baptized Christians other than the number of Communicants. 
d Colporteurs directly supervised by the Bible Society. 

Not reported. 

Commonly known as the Industrial Mission to Pemba. 



* Estimate. Except in column 18, all estimates are from the societies. 

t Physicians who are ordained are entered in both columns 2 and 3. Accordingly, the total of missionaries does not necessarily equal the total of columns 2 to 7. 
t Owing to inevitable duplication in the enumeration of stations by the various societies, the totals in column 12 are in excess of the total number of cities occupied, 
page, duplicates are eliminated. 



In the tables of summaries on another 



96 



WORLD ATLAS OF CHRISTIAN MISSIONS 



GENERAL AND EVANGELISTIC Continued 



COUNTRIES AND SOCIETIES 


DATE 


FOREIGN MISSIONARIES 


NATIVE WORKERS 


STATIONS 


CHRISTIAN COMMTINITT ANO CONTRIBUTIONS 


Year of First Work 
in this Field 


| 


Physicians 


Lay Missionaries not 
Physicians (Men) 


Married Women 
not Physicians 


Unmarried Women 
not Physicians 


Total of Foreign 
Missionaries 


Ordained Natives 


Unordained Natives, Preach- 
ers, Teachers, Bible-women, 
and Other Workers 


Total of Ordained and 
Unordained Native 
Workers 


Principal Stations 


All Other Sub-Stations 


6hurch Organizations 


Communicants Added 
During the Last Year 


Total Number of 
Communicants 




Total Number of 
Baptized Christians 


Total of Native Christian 
Adherents, incl. Baptized 
and Unbaptized, All Ages 


co- 
ca 


Total Sunday School 
Membership, Including 
Teachers and Pupils 


Total of Native Contn- 
butionsinU. S. Gold . 


1 


1' 


EAST AFRICA Conduced 
(Portuguese, German, British) 

Continental Societies 
Berliner MlssIonBgesellschaft 


1 

1887 
1893 
1897 
1886 
1887 
1887 

1895 
1890 

1896 


2 

22 
24 
J 
14 
12 
8 
83 

4 
22 
26 

197 


3 

1 
2 

1 
14 


4 

1 
1 

4 


5 

13 
5 
1 
11 
2 

32 

19 
7 
26 

2 
116 


6 

27 
18 
4 
21 
8 
7 
85 

20 
22 
42 

193 


7 

2 
1 

2 
9 

14 

14 
4 
18 

125 


8 

64 
48 
8 
48 
33 
15 
216 

59 
55 
114 

2 
648 


9 
62 


10 

126 
44 
1 
56 
43 
29 
299 

8 
77 
85 

44 
2900 


11 

126 
44 
1 
56 
43 
29 
299 

8 
77 
85 

44 
2962 


12 

17 
13 
1 
12 
7 
4 
54 

9 
14 
23 

2 
179 


13 

149 
45 
1 
28 
40 
11 
274 

531 
631 

15 
1065 


14 

61 
43 

19 
6 

129 

1 
14 
15 

8 
218 


16 

182 
125 
5 
75 
3 

390 

3 
105 
108 

*51 
3974 


16 

837 
540 
10 
729 
1222 
385 
3723 

31 
320 
351 

200 
30395 


17 

1668 
1052 
15 
1109 
1222 
385 
6451 

31 
701 
732 

*359 
83202 


18 

*3348 
1273 
*40 
1432 
2842 
979 
9914 

*120 
1881 
2001 

700 
118 107 


19 

7 
~7 

1 
2 
3 

225 


20 

176 
176 

75 
126 
201 

8932 


21 

$2405 
556 

329 
1408 

4698 

17 

118 
135 

341 
13616 


Evangelisch-Lutherlsche Mission zu Leipzig 


Evangeliska Fostcrlands-Stif telsen ... . 


Evan. MissionsgeseUschaft fur Deutsch-Ostafrikae 
Mission Romandc 


Neukirchener MisBionsanstalt. 


Totals, 6 Continental Societies 


International Societies 


Mission der Briidergemeine 


Totals, 2 International Societies 


Independent Society 
South African Compounds and Interior Mission 


Grand Totals, 20 Societies 




MADAGASCAR AND MAURITIUS 

American Societies 

Lutheran Board of Missions 


1895 
1893 

1856 
1867 
1820 
1836 

1866 
1897 

1869 


3 
8 
11 

3 

14 
5 
22 

41 
14 
55 

88 


1 
1 

1 
1 

2 

1 
1 

4 





1 
1 

9 
5 
1 
16 

4 
9 
13 

29 


3 
8 
11 

1 
9 
20 
2 
32 

37 
20 
67 

100 


4 
4 
8 

6 
6 
4 
6 
22 

15 
4 
19 

49 


10 
21 
31 

10 
25 
44 
14 
93 

98 
47 
145 

269 


3 
3 

5 

508 
9 
622 

80 
71 
151 

12 
688 


35 
55 
90 

58 
682 
2698 
40 
3478 

1'640 
208 
1848 

34 
6450 


38 
55 
93 

63 
682 
3206 
49 
4000 

1720 
279 
1999 

46 
6138 


3 
6 
9 

6 
7 
12 
4 
29 

30 
12 
42 

80 


39 
47 
86 

b_ 
182 
613 
37 
832 

286 
286 

1204 


4 
1 

b_ 
182 

b 

42 
224 

850 

b 

850 

48 
1126 


41 
41 

114 
359 

220 
693 

b_ 

734 


400 
574 
974 

451 
"2523 
30370 
966 
34310 

24840 
9048 
33888 

1086 
70258 


620 
574 
1194 

1566 
"2523 
30370 
2972 
37431 

71701 
9048 
80749 

1086 
120460 


850 
1661 
2511 

1593 
18165 
147346 
4038 
171 142 

71701 
37048 
108749 

*4300 
286702 


b 

143 
554 
40 
737 

766 

b 

766 

31 
1534 


b 

4879 
23583 
1435 
29897 

21070 

b 

21070 

1441 
52408 


$100 
100 

328 
2824 
23612 
569 
27333 

6646 
8035 
14681 

42114 


United Norwegian Lutheran Church of America 


Totals, 2 American Societies 


British Societies 


Friends' Foreign Mission Association 




Society for the Propagation of the Gospel 


Totals, 4 British Societies 


Continental Societies 


Socle'te' des Missions vange'liques 


Totals, 2 Continental Societies 


Indigenous Society 


Grand Totals, 9 Societies 




CAPE VERDE AND MADEIRA ISLANDS 

American Societies 

American Advent Mission Society 


1900 
1898 
1900 


4 
1 
5 








1 
1 


3 
1 


1 
1 


~7 
4 
11 


1 
1 


2 

8 

10 


3 

8 

11 


1 
1 


3 
3 


3 
3 


22 
22 


115 
115 


115 
115 


174 
174 


3 
4 


103 
103 


$- 

40 

46 


Board of For. Miss., Methodist Episcopal Church 
Gen. Miss. Board, Pentecostal Church, Nazarene 
Totals, 3 American Societies '. 




ARGENTINE REPUBLIC 
American Societies 


1836 
1908 
1895 
1905 
1901 
1906 
1909 
1903 
1907 
1894 

1807 

1897 
1899 
1900 
1895 
1898 

1889 


3 
8 
1 
3 
1 

1 

4 

2 
23 

1 

1 

8 

6 
16 

39 


1 
1 

1 

1 
2 





1 

4 
1 

1 
3 
11 

3 
20 

1 
4 

28 

17 

56 


3 
8 
1 
3 
1 
4 

1 

4 

3 
28 

2 
13 
1 
8 
1 
3 
6 
34 

7 
69 


5 

4 

1 
1 

11 

4 

4 
1 
2 
8 
19 

3 
33 


6 
22 
2 
11 
2 
8 
1 
4 
8 
1 
9 
74 

6 
38 
2 
20 
3 
9 
20 
98 

27 

199 


19 

2 
21 

21 


132 
5 
1 

2 

12 
152 

9 

2 

2 
3 
16 

168 


151 
5 
1 

2 

14 
173 

9 

2 

2 
3 
16 

189 


3 
5 
1 
4 
1 
1 
1 
1 
3 
1 

21 

7 
1 
6 
1 
1 
7 
23 

7 

61 


24 

6 
30 

2 

1 
9 
12 

42 


42 

4 

16 
62 

6 
6 

68 


5 

58 
63 

63 


3817 

125 
9 

5 
117 

472 
4545 

185 
70 
255 

4800 


3817 
125 

5 
117 

500 
4564 

185 
70 
255 

4819 


11829 

175 
*36 

*20 
*468 

*1888 
14416 

600 
*280 
880 

15296 


53 
'2 

1 
3 

30 
89 

6 
~6 

95 


3494 
100 

25 
65 

531 
4215 

4215 


S 
51137 

3828 
54965 

54965 


Board of For. Miss., Methodist Episcopal Church. . . . 


Board of Home Missions, Gen. Synod, Evan. Luth Ch. 
Christian and Missionary Alliance 


Christian Woman's Board of Missions 


For. Dept., International Committee, Y. M. C. A 
For. Dept., National Board, Y. W. C. A., U. S. A 
Foreign Missionary Society of the Brethren Church . . . 
For. Miss. Board, Southern Baptist Convention 


Seventh-Day Adventist Mission Board 




British Societies 
















International Society 


Grand Totals 19 Societies 




CHILE 
American Societies 


1877 
1873 
1895 
1907 

1894 


1 
11 
7 
2 
2 
23 

4 
27 


1 

1 

1 
2 





4 

6 
1 
11 

4 
15 


1 
12 
7 
6 

26 

6 
32 


16 

1 
1 

18 

9 
27 


2 
43 
15 
15 

7B 3 

19 
97 


8 

2 
17 

17 


59 
32 
6 
10 
107 

10 
117 


67 
39 
6 
12 
124 

10 
134 


1 
6 
4 
6 

17 

6 
23 


22 
27 

49 

8 
57 


31 
15 

9 
55 

55 


157 
157 

167 


3623 
803 
900 
290 
6616 

6616 


"3623 
"803 
900 
290 
5616 

5616 


*14492 
*3212 
1400 
*1160 
20264 

20264 


51 

25 
76 

6 
82 


3563 

300 
3863 

3863 


S- 

7246 
12695 

19941 
19941 


Board of For Miss Methodist Episcopal Church .... 


Board of For. Miss., Presbyterian Church in U. S. A.. . 






British Society 







EAST AFRICA 

Not reported. 

Includes data for the work centering at Lutindl supported by the Evangeliacher Africa Vereln. 

MADAGASCAR AND MAURITIUS 

No report for Baptized Christiana other than the number of Communicants. 
b Not reported. 

Members in good standing, 



CAPE VERDE AND MADEIRA ISLANDS 

o No report for Baptized Christiana other than the number of Communicants. 

ARGENTINE REPUBLIC 

No report for Baptized Christians other than the number of Communicants. 

CHILE 

No report for Baptized Christians other than the number of Communicants. 



* Estimate. Except in column 18, all estimates nre from the societies. 

t Physicians who are ordained are entered in both columns 2 and 3. Accordingly, the total of missionaries does not necessarily equal the total of columns 2 to 7. 

j Owing to inevitable duplication in the enumeration of stations by the various societies, the totals in column 12 are in excess of the total number of cities occupied. In the tables of summaries on another 
page, duplicates aie eliminated. 



STATISTICAL TABLES 



97 



GENERAL AND EVANGELISTIC Continued 



COUNTRIES AND SOCIETIES 


DATE 


FOREIGN MISSIONARIES 


NATIVE WORKERS 


STATIONS 


CHRISTIAN COMMUNITY AND CONTRIBUTIONS 


Year of First Work 
in this Field 


s 

6 


Physicians 




Married Women 
not Physicians 


Unmarried Women 
not Fhysiciana 



Total of Foreign 
Missionaries 


Ordained Natives 


Unordained Natives, Preach- 
ers, Teachers Bible-women, 

JwiH Other Workers! 


Total of Ordained and 
Unordained Native 
Workers 


Principal Stations 


AU Other Sub-Stations 


o 


Communicants Added 
During the Last Year 


Total Number of 
Communicants 


Total Number of 
Baptized Christians 


Total of Native Christian 
Adherents, incl Baptized 
and Unbaptized, All Ages 


Sunday Schools 

9 


Total Sunday School 
Membership, Including 
Teachers and Pupils 


Total of Native Contri- 
butions in U.S. Gold 


d 



a 
I 
! 


Lay Missionaries not 
Physicians (Men) 


URUGUAY 
American Societies 


1 

1841 
1908 

1866 


2 

2 
3 

1 
1 

4 


3 


4 

1 
1 


5 

1 
1 

4 
1 

3 

8 


6 

2 
1 

2 
1 
3 

2 
7 


7 

4 
~4 

3 
~3 

7 


8 
1 

g 

i 
11 

9 
2 
11 

5 
27 


9 

( 
I 

6 


10 

2) 
21 

21 


11 

27 
27 

27 


12 

1 

1 
I 
3 

3 
I 

2 
9 


13 

9 
~9 

17 
17 

26 


14 

12 
12 

12 


16 


16 

925 
925 

925 


17 

925 
925 

925 


18 

2441 
2441 

2441 


19 

13 
H 

13 


20 

812 
812 

812 


21 

6740 
6740 

6740 


Board of For. Miss. , Methodist Episcopal Church 
For. Dept., International Committee, Y. M. C. A 


British Societies 
Christian Missions in Many Lands 




1 


Totals, 2 British Societies 


International Society 


Grand Totals, 6 Societies 




PARAGUAY 
American Society 
Board of For. Miss. t Methodist Episcopal Church 


1887 

1902 

1888 


1 
1 








7 
8 
15 

15 


1 
4 
6 

5 


1 
1 


U 
22 

22 


2 
2 


16 


18 


4 
t 

C 

7 
7 


5 
3 

T 
* 

8 


6 





147 


147 
147 


379 
379 


9 

9 


313 
313 


$2259 
2259 


British Societies 










18 


6 


Totals 2 British Societies 


Grand Totals, 3 Societies 


16 


147 




BRAZIL 
American Societies 


1876 

1859 
1874 
1907 
1869 
1891 
1882 
1908 
1906 

1817 

1892 
1903 

1898 
1871 

1907 


1 

l\ 

K 

<L 

11 

20 
1 

el 

6 
6 


1 

1 
1 
4 





~6 

8 
2 
15 

1 

1 

1 

8 
1 
12 


1 

r i 
16 
5 
11 

4 
K 
1 
1 
65 

1 
1 
5 
1 

4 
1 
13 


~5 

2! 

K 

~4 
J 

51 

2 
1 

4 
7 




A 

20 
65 
11 
32 

K 
20 
12 
204 

2 
2 
13 
3 

16 
2 
38 


~1 

54 
17 
8 
11 

26 
1 
2 
120 

1 
1 


15 
61 

8 
4 
4 
48 
41 
21 
202 

26 
5 

5 
5 

41 


If 

4 

16 
15 

t 
74 
42 

a 

26 
6 
~5 

K 

C 

42 


1 

10 
1( 

4 
8 

^ 
t 

4 
50 

1 
1 

7 
1 

5 
1 
16 


8 

t 
& 
t 

2 

30 
25 

198 
265 

20 

6 
26 


~2 
23 
44 

13 

84 

37 
203 

1 
9 
10 

115 
115 
328 


182 
307 

477 
1087 

2053 

2 
2 

2055 


53 
1100 
5368 
1036 
2700 

5016 

1175 
16448 

1000 
15 

240 
1255 

11200 
11200 
28903 


=53 
"1100 
"5368 
"1036 
"2700 

5016 

1429 
16702 

"1000 
22 

240 
1262 

11200 
11 200 
29164 


*212 
*4400 
*21 472 
*4144 
*10800 

*20064 

*4700 
65792 

*4000 
41 

*960 
5001 

*44800 
44800 
115 593 


1 
73 
14 

. 67 
1 
73 
229 

229 


50 
609 
3120 
900 
368 

2219 
201 
1613 
9081 

9081 


ft .r 

49500 
11854 
5000 
8113 

18565 
93032 

63 
63 

93095 


Board of For. Miss., Methodist Episcopal Church .... 
Board of For. Miss., Presbyterian Church in U. S. A. 
Board of Miss., Methodist Episcopal Church, South. . 
Dora, and For. Miss. Soc., Protestant Episcopal Ch . . 
Exec. Com. of For. Miss., Presbyterian Ch. (South).. 
For. Dept., International Committee, Y. M. C. A.. . . . 
For. Miss. Board of the Southern Baptist Convention 




Totals, 10 American Societies 


British Societies 
British and Foreign Bible Society 










South American Evangelical Mission 






Brazil Societies 


German Evangelical Synod of Rio do Sul 


1 
1 

76 


4 





1 
1 

28 


78 


58 


2 
2 

244 


121 


243 


364 


1 

1 

67 


291 


Totals, 2 Brazil Societies 


Grand Totals, 19 Societies 




BOLIVIA 

American and Canadian Societies 
American Bible Society 


1877 
1898 
1906 
1907 

1907 


1 
2 

3 
3 


1 

1 

1 





4 
4 


1 

2 

3 

4 
7 


1 
1 


2 

4 
1 

~7 

9 
16 


1 
1 

1 


1 

1 
2 

2 


1 

2 
3 

3 


1 

2 
1 

1 

1 

5 


3 
3 

3 


3 
2 

~5 
5 





34 
20 

54 
54 


34 
"20 

2 
56 

56 


*136 
50 

*8 
194 

194 


3 
3 

3 


90 
90 

90 


S- 


Board of For. Miss., Methodist Episcopal Church 
For. Miss. Board, Baptist Conv., Ontario and Quebec. 
Peniel Missionary Society 




Totals, 5 American and Canadian Societies 


Australasian Society 






PERU 

American Societies 

American ^lW fi Snronty -,....,,,.,,,.,-.,,...,.,, 


1877 
1906 

1812 
1897 


1 
2 
2 
5 

9 
9 

14 








3 
3 

3 
1 
4 

7 


1 

5 

1 

3 
9 
12 

18 


2 
2 

4 
4 

6 


2 
12 
2 
16 

6 
23 
29 

45 


4 
4 

4 


45 
3 
48 

23 
7 
30 

78 


49 
3 
52 

23 
7 
30 

82 


1 
3 

4 

4 
4 

8 


3 
3 

1 
1 

4 


8 
1 
9 

3 
3 

12 





463 
19 
482 

90 
90 

572 


463 
29 
492 

"90 
90 

582 


680 
*76 
756 

550 
550 

1306 


11 
4 
15 

4 
4 

19 


593 
37 
630 

630 


8- 

1385 

1385 
1385 


Board of For. Miss., Methodist Episcopal Church 
Seventh-Day Adventist Mission Board 


Totals, 3 American Societies 


British Societies 
British and Foreign Bible Society 1 " 


Regions Beyond Missionary Union 


Totals, 2 British Societies 






ECUADOR 

American Societies 
Board of For. Miss., Methodist Episcopal Church 


1900 
1895 

1904 


1 
2 
4 

~7 








1 

3 
4 


1 

2 
2 

~6 


3 
3 


2 
5 
9 
3 
19 


1 
1 


1 

2 

1 
4 


2 
2 

1 
5 


1 
1 
4 

6 


1 
1 


2 
2 





51 
10 

61 


51 
"10 

6 
67 


96 
25 

121 


2 
2 

2 
6 


58 
80 

20 
158 


$81 
10 
91 


Gospel Missionary Union 


Seventh-Day Adventist Mission Board 


Totals, 4 American Societies 





URUGUAY 

No report for Baptized Christians other than the number of Communicants. 

PARAGUAY 

No report for Baptized Christiana other than the number of Communicants. 

BRAZIL 

No report for Baptized Christians other than the number of Communicants. 

*> For a full statement of the organization of Presbyterian work in Brazil, see Directory, under South 
American Societies. The church _statistics here given are for congregations not immediately 
under the supervision of the missionaries of one or the other American Presbyterian societies 
at work in Brazil. 



BOLIVIA 

No report for Baptized Christians other than the number of Communicants. 

PERU 

No report for Baptized Christians other than the number of Communicants. 

b The Agency for the Republics of the Andes, along the Pacific slope, includes Peru, Colombia, Ecua- 
dor, Chile, and Bolivia. The agency headquarters are at Callao, Peru. 

ECUADOR 

No report for Baptized Christians other than the number of Communicants. 

* Estimate. Except in cojumn 18, all estimates are from the societies. 

t Physicians who are ordained are entered in both columns 2 and 3. Accordingly, the total of missionaries does not necessarily equal the total of columns 2 to 7. 

t Owing to inevitable duplication in the enumeration of stations by the various societies, the totals in column 12 are in emcees, of the total number of cities occupied. In the tables of summaries on anothw 
page, duplicates are eliminated. 



98 



WORLD ATLAS OF CHRISTIAN MISSIONS 



GENERAL AND EVANGELISTIC Continued 



COUNTRIES AND SOCIETIES 


DATA 


FOREIGN MISSIONARIES 


NATIVE WORKERS 


STATIONS 


" 
CHRISTIAN COMMUNITY AND CONTRIBUTIONS 


Tear of First Work 
in this Field 


I 
o 


Physicians 


!<3 

IB 

.0 g 

| ; e 


Married Women 
not Physicians 


Unmarried Women 
not Physicians 


Total of Foreign 
Missionaries 


Ordained Natives 


Unordained Natives, Preach- 
ers, Teachers, Bible-women, 
and Other Workers 


Total of Ordained and 
Unordained Native 
Workers 


Principal Stations 


AH Other Sub-Stations 


| 
1 


Communicants Added 
Duriag the last Year 


Total Number of 
Communicants 


Total Number of 
Baptized Christians 


Total of Native Christian 
Adherents, incl. Baptized 
and Unbaptized, All Ages 


Sunday Schools 


Total Sunday School 
Membership, Including 
Teachers and Pupils 


Total of Native Contri- 
butions in U. S. Gold 


i 


1 


DUTCH GUIANA 
American Society 
For. Miss. Board, National Baptist Convention 


1 

1898 
1742 
1738 


2 

1 
1 

31 
33 


3 


4 


6 

18 
18 


6 

1 

1 

42 
44 


7 

7 
7 


8 

2 
2 

98 
102 


9 
1 

4 
5 


10 
14 

411 
425 


11 

15 

415 
430 


12 

1 
1 

22 
24 


13 

4 
2 

57 
63 


14 

3 

3 


15 

54 
54 


16 
71 

7343 
7414 


17 

71 

3400 

28012 
31483 


18 

*284 
3400 

28275 
31959 


19 


20 

27 

450 

1274 
1751 


21 

S9 

10397 
10406 


Continental Society 


3 

11 

14 


International Society 






BRITISH GUIANA 
American and Canadian Societies 
For. Miss. Board, National Baptist Convention 


1899 
1896 

1875 

1908 
1880 
1906 

1886 
1815 

1878 
1883 


2 
3 
1 
1 

2 
9 

1 

4 
5 

35 
6 
41 

65 








4 
1 

3 
3 

2 
2 

9 


2 
2 
1 

1 
6 

4 
1 
3 
8 

2 
2 

16 


1 
1 

1 


4 
5 
2 
1 

3 
16 

9 
2 
7 
18 

5 
5 

35 
8 
43 

81 


2 

2 
4 
1 
9 

6 
6 

3 
3 

5 
6 
23 


44 

28 

5 
6 
5 
88 

141 
141 

27 
27 

121 
127 
248 

504 


46 
28 

7 
10 
6 
97 

147 
147 

30 
30 

126 
127 
253 

627 


2 
2 
1 
1 
2 

1 

4 

4 
9 

2 
2 
4 

7 
28 


2 
29 
5 

4 
6 

46 

42 
42 

1 
1 

45 
45 

134 


3 

6 

4 

11 
24 

24 


40 

35 
75 

8 
8 

83 


338 
267 
250 

350 
350 
1555 

4827 
4827 

477 
477 

d !6 164 
4500 
20664 

27523 


338 
267 
500 

350 
375 
1830 

4827 
4827 

1189 
1189 

16 164 
4500 
20664 

28510 


2400 
*1068 
500 

1000 
*1000 
6968 

17207 
17207 

1241 
1241 

*40000 
*18000 
58000 

82416 


8 
6 

~6 
14 
34 

33 
33 

3 
~3 

70 


179 
414 
25C 

150 
242 
1235 

3129 
3129 

637 
637 

7013 
4668 
11681 

16682 


$209 

362 
571 

1037 
1037 

36282 
36282 
37890 


For. Miss. Com., Presbyterian Church in Canada 


Gen. Synod, Evangelical Lutheran Church in U. S. b . . 
Miss. Soc., African Methodist Episcopal Zion Church. . 
Mission Board of the Christian Church 


Parent Home and For. Miss. Soc., African M. E. Ch. . . 
Seventh-Day Adventist Mission Board 




British Societies 


London Missionary Society 






International Societies 
Mission der Briidergemeine 






British Guiana Society 
Church of England Diocese of Guiana 


Congregational Union of British Guiana 








VENEZUELA 

American Societies 


1897 
1890 


1 
I 
1 
2 
6 

1 
6 








1 
1 

3 
4 


1 
1 
1 
2 
6 

2 
7 


1 
1 

1 

2 


2 
2 
4 
4 
12 

6 

1 
19 


1 
1 


3 

5 
1 
9 

9 


3 
~5 
9 

1 
10 


1 
1 
3 
1 
6 

2 
8 











83 
83 

31 
114 


83 
83 

31 
114 


103 
103 

200 
303 








$- 


Board of For. Miss., Presbyterian Church in U. S. A. . 


Scandinavian AUance Mission of North America 




British Societies 


West Indies Society 
Church of England Diocese of Trinidad 






COLOMBIA 

American Societies 
Board of For. Miss., Presbyterian Church in U. S. A. . 
Gospel Missionary Union 


1856 


3 
4 











3 
3 


3 
3 


9 
1 
10 








6 
6 


2 
1 
3 





3 
3 


64 
64 


125 
125 


125 
125 


*500 
500 





130 
130 


8935 
935 






CENTRAL AMERICA, INCLUDING 
PANAMA 

American Societies 


1892 
1905 
1905 
1882 
1891 
1905 
1907 
1891 

1811 
1900 
1865 
1825 

1849 


1 
1 
1 
2 
9 
3 

1 
18 

1 

9 
10 

15 
15 

24 
4 
28 

71 


1 
1 

2 
2 





1 
1 

2 
3 

1 
1 

1 
1 
2 

10 


1 
1 
1 
2 
9 
2 

2 
18 

1 
1 

2 

15 
15 

35 


1 

5 

2 
1 
12 

1 
1 
2 

14 


2 
7 
3 
5 
23 
7 
2 
7 
56 

2 

2 

9 
13 

32 
2 
34 

24 
4 
28 

131 


1 
3 
4 

6 
~6 

10 


24 
4 
2 

27 

3 
60 

5 
2 
5 
46 
58 

104 
104 

57 
15 
72 

294 


24 
4 
2 

27 

3 
60 

5 
2 
6 
49 
62 

110 
110 

57 
15 
72 

304 


1 
1 
1 
2 
12 
3 
1 

21 

1 
1 

7 
9 

16 
1 
17 

4 
4 

51 


6 

1 
36 

7 

50 

~7 
2 
61 
70 

17 
17 

12 
12 

149 


1 
2 
2 

10 

7 
22 

8 
8 

30 


10 

10 

133 
133 

68 
68 

211 


55 
16 
20 
1066 

183 
1340 

300 
3098 
3398 

1231 
1231 

1660 
611 
2271 

8240 


"55 

20 
1066 

333 
1490 

40 
300 
"3098 
3438 

5724 
5724 

1660 
"611 
2271 

12923 


*220 
101 
*80 
2816 

*732 
3949 

*160 
333 
9900 
22080 

5929 
5929 

12020 
1396 
1729 

33687 


1 
1 

10 
12 

39 
39 

21 
21 

6 
6 

78 


15 
20 

312 
347 

2896 
2896 

1763 
1763 

415 
415 

5421 


J- 

143 
36 

179 

1256 
1256 

7557 
7657 

8992 


American Friends' Board of Foreign Missions 


Board of For. Miss. , Methodist Episcopal Church 
Board of For. Miss., Presbyterian Church in U. S. A. . 


Home Mission Board, Southern Baptist Convention. . . 






British Societies 










International Societies 






Jamaica Society 






Grand Totals, 16 Societies 





DUTCH GUIANA 

No report for Baptized Christians other than the number of Communicants. 

BRITISH GUIANA 

No report for Baptized Christians other than the number of Communicants. 

b Work not administered by the Board of Foreign Missions, but consists of a station of the East Penn- 
sylvania Synod of the General Synod. Evangelical Lutheran work was first begun in British 
Guiana in 1743, but the work as now constituted was opened in 1875 from Dutch Guiana. 

Represents work organized by individual members of the American Christian Convention, and ad- 

hering to the polity of that denomination, but the mission is not under the direct administration 
of the Mission Board. 



d Estimated church membership as given in the Church of England Year Book for 1909. Work for 
Indians and Asiatic immigrants included. 

VENEZUELA 

* No report for Baptized Christians other than the number of Communicants. 

COLOMBIA 

" No report for Baptized Christians other than the number of Communicants. 

CENTRAL AMERICA 

No report for Baptized Christians other than the number of Communicants. 



* Estimate. Except in folumn 18, 11 estimates are from the societies. 

t Physicians who are ordained arc entered in both columns 2 and 3. Accordingly, the total of missionaries doss not necessarily equal the total of columns 2 to 7. 

j Owing to inevitable duplication in the enumeration of stations by the various societies, tho totals in column 12 are in excess of the total number of cities occupied. In the tables of bummaries on another 
page, duplicates are eliminated. 



STATISTICAL, TABLES 



99 



GENERAL AND EVANGELISTIC Continued 



COUNTRIES AND SOCIETIES 


DATE 


FOREIGN MISSIONARIES 


NAMVB WORKERS 


STATIONS 


CHRISTIAN COMMUNITY AND CONTRIBUTIONS 


Year of First Work 
in this Field 


O 


Physicians 




Married Women 
not Physicians 


Unmarried Women 
not Physicians 


Total of Foreign 
Missionaries 


Ordained Natives 


Unordained Natives, Preach- 
ers, Teachers, Bible-women, 
and Other Workers 


Total of Ordained and 
Unordained Native 
Workers 


Principal Stations 


AU Other Sub-Stationa 


o 


Communicants Added 
During the Last Year 


Total Number of 
Communicants 


Total Number of 
Baptized Christiana 


Total of Native Christian 
Adherents, incl. Baptized 
and Unbaptized, AU Ages 


Sunday Schools 


Total Sunday School 
Membership, Including 
Teachers and Pupils 


Total of Native Contri- 
butions in U. S. Gold 


S 
a 





Lay Missionaries not 
Physicians (Men) 


MEXICO 

American and Canadian Societies 

American Baptist Home Mission Society 


1 

1870 
1878 
1872 
1871 
1873 
1872 

1873 
1895 
1904 
1874 
1902 
1880 
1906 
1908 
1906 
1893 
1885 

1890 


2 

4 

5 
3 
11 
9 
1 
18 
4 
10 
3 

12 
4 
1 

~i 

87 
87 


3 

1 

1 
1 

1 
1 

~6 
10 

10 


4 

1 

1 
~2 

2 


6 

( 

i 

t 
& 

12 

8 

2 
26 

4 
30 


6 

4 

5 
3 
10 
t 

17 
5 
6 
2 
6 
12 
5 

~1 
1 

86 

2 
88 


7 

~i 

5 

; 

10 

7 

19 
6 
11 
4 

4 
2 

1 

3 
79 

79 


8 

9 
i 
15 
15 
31 
2( 
] 
55 
IS 
39 
J 
14 
28 
12 

f 
& 

3 
J 


288 

6 

294 


9 

13 

6 
6 
26 

45 

12 
5 

17 

130 
130 


10 

14 

40 
23 
23 
204 

16 
25 
11 
2 
21 

15 
5 
399 

399 


11 

27 
40 
29 
29 
230 

45 
16 
37 
16 

f 
& 

3! 

15 
5 
529 

629 


12 

4 
1 

4 
3 
6 
9 

~8 
3 
8 
4 
3 
10 
4 
1 
1 

3 
72 

3 
75 


13 

28 
12 
53 
8 
46 
222 

21 
44 
21 

63 

2 
520 


14 

22 

24 
6 
58 
50 

108 
11 

10 
40 

2 
331 

331 


16 

60 
21 

TO 

410 
152 

27 
202 

942 


16 

1202 

1540 
670 
5651 
5014 
12 
6815 
596 
1052 
721 

1428 

70 
24771 


17 

1202 

1540 
873 
5651 
5014 
12 
6815 
596 
1052 
721 

1428 

142 
25046 

25046 


18 

*4808 

5985 
1090 
17461 
*20056 
*48 
*27 260 
*2384 
*4208 
*2884 

*5712 

*280 
92156 

92156 


19 

30 

37 
9 
71 

2 
136 

11 

37 
3 

6 
342 

342 


20 

1375 

1557 
627 
3668 
335 
42 
5621 

250 
404 

1046 

143 
15068 


21 

91912 
12494 

59489 
14641 

6506 
2746 
750 
2598 

2153 

103 292 
103292 


American Bible Society 


American Board of Commissioners for For. Miss 
American Friends' Board of Foreign Missions 


Board of For. Miss., Methodist Episcopal Church 
Board of For. Miss., Presbyterian Church in U S. A. . 
Board of Home Miss., Methodist Episcopal Church. . . . 
Board of Misa., Methodist Episcopal Church, South. . . 
Christian Woman's Board of Missions 


Dom. and For. Miss. Soc., Protestant Episcopal Ch. . . 
Exec. Com. of For. Miss., Presbyterian Ch. (South) . . 
For. Dept., International Committee. Y. M. C. A 


For. Miss. Board, Southern Baptist Convention 


Gen. Miss. Board, Pentecostal Church, Nazarene 


Hephzibah Faith Missionary Association 


Peniel Missionary Society 


Seventh-Day Adventist Mission Board 


Woman's American Baptist Home Mission Society.... 
Totals, 18 American and Canadian Societies 


British Society 


Grand Totals, 19 Societies 


520 


942 


24771 


15068 




LESSER ANTILLES 

American and Canadian Societies 
For Miss. Board, National Baptist Convention 


1901 

1867 
1908 
1880 
1903 

1836 
1780 

1600 
1732 


2 
5 

~2 
3 
12 

3 
12 
16 

3 

15 
16 

15 

48 
34 
97 

142 


1 

1 


~i 

1 


2 
2 

3 
1 

2 
2 

7 


2 
3 

2 
2 
9 

3 
J 

1 

13 
2 
15 

30 


~2 

2 
3 
~3 

5 


4 
10 

1 
9 
27 

9 
6 
12 
27 

3 

28 
4 
32 

15 
48 
34 
97 

186 


1 

2 
1 
1 
2 

1 
30 
31 

12 
12 

15 

15 
65 


36 
61 

2 
22 
121 

~4 
264 
268 

1 

424 
424 

24 
41 
33 
98 

912 


37 
63 
1 
3 
24 
128 

5 
294 
299 

1 

436 
436 

39 
41 
33 
113 

977 


2 
4 

2 
1 

2 
2 
7 
11 

3 

31 
32 

54 


12 
3 

1 

16 

6 
137 
143 

1 

29 
29 

189 


~1 

S 
15 
25 

~5 
6 

31 
31 

43 

43 
104 


83 
21 
104 

68 
659 
717 

875 
875 

1696 


203 
1182 

253 
469 
2107 

860 
19861 
20721 

9506 
9506 

10565 
21888 
16000 
48453 

80787 


203 
1182 

253 
72C 
2358 

860 
19 861 
20721 

5200 

13515 
13615 

10565 
21888 
16000 
48453 

90247 


*812 
4500 

456 
*720 
6488 

1912 
44943 
46855 

*5200 

25728 
25728 

55415 
156539 
90000 
301 954 

386225 


76 

2 
29 
107 

129 
129 

59 
59 

295 


3891 

115 
697 
4703 

690 
14814 
16504 

12011 
12011 

7262 
6265 
4834 
18361 

50579 


$50 
6792 

330 
7178 

13665 
13665 

24350 
34000 

58350 
79193 


For. Miss. Com., Presbyterian Church in Canada 
Mission Board of the Christian Church b 


Parent Home and For. Miss. Soc., African M. E. Ch. . 
Seventh-Day Adventist Mission Board 


Totals, 5 American and Canadian Societies 


British Societies 
Christian Missions in Many Lands 


United Free Church of Scotland's For. Miss. Com 
Wesleyan Methodist Missionary Society 




Continental Society 
Danske evangelisk lutherske Stats Kirke 


International Societies 






West Indies Societies 
Church of England Diocese of Antigua 


Church of England Barbados and Windward Islands. 
Church of England Diocese of Trinidad 




Grand Totals, 14 Societies 




PORTO RICO 

American Societies 
American Baptist Home Mission Society 


1899 
1898 
1898 

li9 
1902 
1900 
1901 
1899 
1901 
1900 
1899 
1907 
1899 
1898 


5 

3 
13 
11 
2 
1 
8 
4 
2 

~2 
2 

1 
64 


2 
1 

3 


2 
2 


1 
1 

2 


2 

1 
13 
13 

3 
1 

4 
2 

1 
1 

43 


10 

8 
4 
22 

3 
4 
1 
1 
2 
3 

5 
63 


17 

14 
30 
50 
3 
9 
13 
9 
5 
2 
6 
3 
5 
1 
167 


14 
1 

2 
2 

1 

2 
22 


7 
9 

8 

38 
12 
7 
8 
9 
5 
2 
3 
2 
1 
12 
123 


21 
10 
8 
55 
40 
12 
7 
8 
11 
5 
2 
3 
3 
1 
14 
200 


6 

4 
9 
10 
3 
1 
5 
4 
2 
1 
2 

3 
2 
62 


77 
1 
SO 

81 

4 
3 
31 
15 

4 

8 
274 


28 

8 
24 
25 
8 
4 

14 
5 

2 

2 
120 


242 
77 
239 
76 

153 
22 

43 
852 


1594 

607 
2524 
2415 
404 
251 
320 
642 
169 

146 
20 

600 
9692 


1594 

607 
2524 
2415 
404 
251 
320 
642 
169 

146 
20 

600 
9692 


*6376 

*2428 
4798 
*9660 
704 
*1004 
*1280 
2142 
*676 

*584 
*80 

1000 
30732 


35 

1 
40 
26 

4 
8 
14 
10 

8 
4 

3 
160 


1500 

477 
2290 
2353 

195 
508 
866 
438 

550 
25 

9202 


$30 
547 

864 

1395 
812 
129 

377? 






Board of Home Miss., Methodist Episcopal Church. . . 
Board of Home Missions, Presbyterian Ch. in U. S. A . . 




Dom. and For. Miss. Soc., Protestant Episcopal Ch. . . 
For Miss Soc of the United Brethren in Christ 


Mission Board of the Christian Church 


Peniel Missionary Society 


Porto Rico Miss. B'd, Gen. Council, Evan. Luth. Ch. . 


Woman's American Baptist Home Mission Society .... 
Stearns' Church and Bible Classes 






HAITI AND SANTO DOMINGO 
American Societies 


1890 
1861 
1845 
1893 

1846 
1904 

1817 


1 
~1 

~1 
2 
1 
6 

4 
10 








1 
1 

1 
2 


1 

2 
3 

3 


2 


2 

2 
3 

4 
1 
13 

4 
17 


15 
3 

18 
2 

1 
21 


78 
15 

1 
3 
101 

17 
118 


93 
18 

5 
3 
119 

19 

1 
139 


1 
11 
1 
2 
1 
2 

18 
3 

21 


10 
2 

2 
3 

17 
21 

3 
41 


2 
3 

1 
4 


13 
13 

64 
67 


47 
711 
300 

320 
40 
1418 

1091 

197 
2706 


47 
"711 
300 

320 
95 
1473 

1091 

197 
2761 


117 

*2844 
*1200 

640 
4801 

5600 

270 
10671 


2 
8 
10 

14 

2 
26 


365 

155 
80 
600 

831 

47 
1478 


t- 

1263 
36 

336 
1635 

1635 


Dom. and For. Miss. Soc., Protestant Episcopal Ch. . . 
For Miss. Board National Baptist Convention 


General Miss. Board of the Free Methodist Church .... 
Miss. Soc., African Methodist Episcopal Zion Church. . 
Parent Home and For. Miss.^Soc.. African M. E. Ch. . . 




British Society 


Jamaica Society 







MEXICO 

No report for Baptized Christians other than the number of Communicanta 

LESSER ANTILLES 

* No report for Baptized Christians other than the number of Communicants. 

b Represents work organized by individual members of the American Christian Convention, and ad- 
hering to the polity of that denomination, but the mission is not under the direct administration 
of the Mission Board. 



That part of the work of the Diocese of Trinidad which is in Venezuela has been excluded. The 
work for Asiatic immigrants in Trinidad has been included. 

PORTO RICO 

No report for Baptized Christians other than the number of Communicants, 

HAITI AND SANTO DOMINGO 

No report for Baptized Christians other than the number of Communicants. 



* Estimate. Except in column 18, all estimates are from the societies. 

t Physicians who are ordained nre entered in both columns 2 and 3. Accordingly, the total of missionaries does not necessarily equal the total of columns 2 to 7. 

t Owing to inevitable duplication in the enumeration of stations by the various societies, the totals in column 12 are in excess of the total number of cities occupied, In the tables of summaries on anqthft 
page, duplicates arc eliminated. 



100 



WOULD ATLAS OF CHBISTIAN MISSIONS 



GENERAL AND EVANGELISTIC Continued 



COUNTRIES AND SOCIETIES 


DATE 


FOREIGN MISSIONARIES 


NATIVE WORKERS 


STATIONS 


CHMSTIAN COMMUNITY Ann CONTRIBUTIONS 


Year of First Work 
in this Field 


a 

a) 


Physicians 


Lay Missionaries not 
Physicians (Men) 


Married Women 
not Physicians 


Unmarried Women 
not Physicians 


Total of Foreign 
Missionaries 


Ordained Natives 


Uncrowned Natives, Preach- 
ers, Teachers, Bible-women, 
and Other Workers 


Total of Ordained and 
Unordained Native 
Workers 


Principal Stations 


AU Other Sub-Stations 


Church Organizations 


Communicants Added 
During the Last Year 


Total Number of 
Communicants 


Totrl Number of 
Baptized Christians 


Total of Native Christian 
Adherents, incl. Baptized 
and Unbaptized, All Ages 


! 

ca 


Total Sunday School 
Membership, Including 
Teachers and Pupils 


Total of Native Contri- 
buttons in U. S. Gold 


1 


1 



JAMAICA 

American Societies 
American Friends' Board of Foreign Missions 


1 

1882 
1900 
1896 
1793 
1880 
1903 

1818 
1810 

1824 
1857 
1789 

1754 
1883 

1876 
1850 


2 

6 
1 

4 

1 
12 

1 
1 

19 
3 
7 
31 

11 

Ti 

"96 
4 
6 
19 
125 

179 


3 

1 
1 

1 


4 


5 

1 
1 

3 
3 

~7 
7 

3 
1 

4 
15 


6 

2 
1 
3 

J 

1 
1 
3 
15 
3 

23 

11 
5 
16 

6 
6 
52 


7 

6 
1 

~7 

3 
3 

1 
1 

11 


8 

14 
S 

8 

2 
27 

2 
2 
9 
34 
6 
7 
60 

22 
13 
35 

98 
7 
13 
19 
135 

257 


9 

2 

6 
1 
1 
4 
14 

15 
7 
30 
52 

5 
5 

2 
35 
37 

108 


10 

19 

8 
33 
1 
11 
72 

3 

107 
97 
167 
374 

413 
413 

299 

71 
515 
885 

1744 


11 

21 

14 
34 
2 
15 
86 

3 

122 
104 
197 
426 

418 
418 

299 

73 
550 
922 

1852 


12 

4 
1 
4 
1 

10 

1 
1 
3 
18 
9 
5 
37 

20 
2 
22 

4 
6 
198 
208 

277 


13 

19 

19 
14 
2 

54 

83 
24 
169 
276 

10 
10 

8 
38 
40 
86 

426 


14 

7 
23 

1 
29 
60 

66 
66 

20 
20 

12 
28 
198 
238 

384 


15 

91 

493 
3 
587 

854 

1268 
2122 

516 
516 

352 
9242 
9594 

12819 


16 

1136 
168 
3628 
900 
56 
1385 
7273 

12785 
3969 
22586 
39340 

6757 
6757 

40000 
2400 
3821 
38742 
84963 

138 333 


17 

1136 
168 
"3628 
"900 
-56 
1968 
7866 

12785 
"3969 
"22 586 
39340 

8671 
8671 

"40000 
"2400 
"3821 
"38742 
84963 

140 830 


18 

1500 
268 
*7256 
3000 
118 
*2500 
14642 

21500 
4423 
63279 
289 202 

14181 
14181 

*200000 
8000 
15284 
120000 
343 284 

461 309 


19 

15 
21 

1 
54 
91 

108 

82 
190 

31 
31 

1678 
10 
37 
174 
1899 

2211 


20 

1206 
1661 

40 
1814 
4721 

11403 

13953 
25356 

6462 
6462 

15433 
1200 
1818 
27088 
45539 

82078 


21 

V ~" 

5092 
38 
5130 

25337 
25337 

14560 
14560 

121993 
7037 
129 030 
174057 


Christian and Missionary Alliance 


Christian Woman's Board of Missions 


For. Miss, Board, National Baptist Convention 


Parent Home and For. Soc., African M. E. Church 
Seventh-Day Adventist Mission Board 


Totals, 6 American Societies 


British Societies 
Baptist Missionary Society 


British and Foreign Bible Society b 


Christian Missions in Many Lands 


United Free Church of Scotland's For. Miss. Com 
United Methodist Church Missionary Society 


Wesleyan Methodist Missionary Society 


Totals, 6 British Societies 


International Societies 
Mission der Briidergemeine 




Totals, 2 International Societies 


Jamaica Societies 
Church of England Diocese of Jamaica 


Church of Scotland in Jamaica 


Congregational Union of Jamaica 


Jamaica Baptist Union 


Totals, 4 Jamaica Societies 


Grand Totals, 18 Societies ; 




CUBA 
American Societies 
American Baptist Home Mission Society 


1899 
1882 
1900 
1908 
1901 
1898 
1899 
1904 
1899 
1899 
1904 
1886 
1900 
1905 
1905 
1900 


6 
1 
5 

4 
14 
2 
9 
3 
2 

2 

1 
1 

50 





1 

1 


1 

2 

3 
1 

2 
3 
12 


5 
1 
5 

4 
10 
2 
2 
3 
2 
1 
2 

1 
1 

39 


4 
3 

8 
6 

10 
4 
1 

3 

2 
3 
44 


16 
2 
16 

12 
30 
4 
24 
11 
5 
3 
7 

5 
4 
3 
142 


11 

1 
5 
11 
4 

8 

11 
1 

52 


21 
6 
15 

4 

11 

4 
3 

15 
2 

4 
85 


32 
6 
15 
1 
9 
11 
4 
19 
4 
3 

26 
1 
2 

4 
137 


5 
1 
5 

6 
12 
2 
6 
4 
2 
1 
2 

1 
3 
50 


56 
11 
24 

4 
30 
4 
2 

41 
1 

3 
176 


35 

5 
1 
11 
37 
6 

2 

18 
1 
2 

118 


180 

18 

90 
482 
124 

62 
44 

3 
1003 


1724 
161 

719 
2847 
866 
1172 
319 
179 

1078 
80 
28 

9173 


2066 
"161 

"719 
"2847 
"866 
"1172 
"319 
"179 

"1078 
"80 
"42 

9529 


*6896 
962 

*2876 
*11 388 
*3464 
*4688 
*1276 
*716 

*4312 
160 
*112 

36850 


30 

11 
1 
24 
44 
6 

5 
2 

16 
1 
3 

143 


1300 
533 

958 
3023 
592 
632 
290 
171 

12 
24 

7535 


$85 

11925 
2185 
7475 
622 
193 

22485 


American Bible Society 


American Friends' Board of Foreign Missions 


Board of For. Miss., Int'l Apostolic Holiness Union. . . 
Board of Home Missions, Presbyterian Ch. in U. S. A . 
Board of Miss., Methodist Episcopal Church, South. . . 


Dora, and For. Miss. Soc., Protestant Episcopal Ch . . . 
Exec. Com. of For. Miss., Presbyterian Ch. (South) . . 
Foreign Christian Missionary Society 


For. Dept., International Committee, Y. M. C. A 
Home Mission Board, Southern Baptist Convention. . 
Parent Home and For. Miss. Soc., African M. E. Ch. . 
Seventh-Day Adventist Mission Board 


Universalist General Convention 


Woman's American Baptist Home Mission Society .... 
Totals, 16 American Societies 




BAHAMA ISLANDS 
British Societies 
Christian Missions in Many Lands 


1800 

1833 
1892 

1803 
1813 


13 
13 

1 
1 
2 

20 
20 
35 








1 
1 

1 


1 
1 

1 





2 
13 
15 

1 
1 
2 

20 
20 
37 


1 

1 

18 
2 
20 

1 
1 
10 
12 

33 


8 
8 

65 
65 

1 
121 
38 
160 

233 


9 
9 

83 
2 
85 

2 
122 
48 
172 

266 


1 

7 
8 

1 
1 
2 

10 


31 
31 

72 
28 
100 

3 

3 
134 


1 

1 

1 





3694 
3694 

3652 
2372 
6024 

350 
5114 
4000 
9464 

19182 


3694 
"3694 

4350 
"2372 
6722 

420 
"5114 
4250 
9784 

20200 


10460 
10460 

6420 
4615 
11035 

680 
14061 
5240 
19981 

41476 


31 
31 

70 
29 
99 

3 
74 
40 
117 

247 


3643 
3643 

3282 
2400 
5682 

210 
3900 
2220 
6330 

15655 


*- 

1500 
1500 

350 
2532 
240 
3122 

4622 




Totals, 2 British Societies 


Independent Societies 
Bahamas Baptist Mission 




Totals, 2 Independent Societies 


Bahama Islands Societies 
Bethel Native Baptist Church 


Church of England Diocese of Nassau 


Saint John's Native Baptist Society 


Totals, 3 Bahama Islands Societies 


Grand Totals, 7 Societies 




UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, 
INCLUDING ALASKA 

(Indians and Eskimos) 

American Societies 


1865 
1886 
1852 
1869 
1880 
1884 
1814 
1865 

1861 

1894 
1887 


13 

2 
"9 

blO 

8 
2 
25 
39 
1 
17 
4 
1 
3 
4 
1 

1 


1 

1 
2 

1 
1 


1 


4 
1 

1 
1 
17 

4 
3 


9 

5 
4 
10 
8 
3 
9 
37 

4 

1 
2 
2 
2 


1 

3 
3 
6 
11 
55 
4 
25 

2 
3 

7 


22 
12 
14 
23 
19 
13 
47 
151 
5 
51 
4 
4 
5 
9 
6 
7 
1 


37 
1 
2 

10 
34 

30 
8 


5 
23 
4 
3 
3 
11 
50 

64 

2 
3 
20 
1 


37 
6 
25 
4 
3 
3 
21 
84 

94 
8 

2 
3 

20 

1 


13 
6 
7 
10 
7 
3 
35 
47 
1 
17 
4 
1 
1 
3 

6 
1 


4 

45 
5 
3 

114 
2 
94 
9 

14 


102 
6 
21 
9 
5 
1 
42 
114 
1 
105 
20 

2 
2 
1 

1 


106 
45 
38 

390 
47 


4269 
1350 
1492 
"550 
162 
75 
2112 
7548 
104 
4559 
655 

107 
14 
150 

43 


4269 
1350 
1492 
550 
162 
92 
'2112 
7548 
f !04 
'4559 
700 

107 
28 
150 

43 


8156 
1650 
3000 
2250 
1362 
1000 
5000 
18108 
350 
12900 
1130 

500 
744 
500 
176 
*172 


68 
7 
20 
10 
2 
3 
44 
<i85 
3 

13 

2 
3 
2 
2 


2832 
150 
1452 
769 
200 
200 
1597 
6431 
60 

585 

160 
380 

noo 

50 


464 
154 
30 

872 
54 


American Friends' Board of Foreign Missions 




Associated Executive Com. of Friends on Indian Miss. 
Board of For. Miss., General Conference Mennonites. . 
Board of Heathen Miss., Christian Reformed Church. 
Board of Home Missions, Methodist Episcopal Church 6 
Board of Home Missions, Presbyterian Ch. in U. S. A . 
Central B'd of Miss., Reformed Presbyterian Church . 
Dom. and For. Miss. Soc., Protestant Episcopal Church 
Executive Com. of Home Miss., Presby. Ch. (South) . . 
Gospel Missionary Union 


Home Mission Board, Southern Baptist Convention . . 
Joint Lutheran Synod of Wis., and other States 


National Indian Association 




(Continued on next page) 



JAMAICA 

No report for Baptized Christians other than the number of Communicants. 

b The West Indies and Central America agency includes the British, Danish, and French West Indian 
Islands, the British, Dutch, and French Guianas, the Republics of Haiti and Santo Domingo, 
and the Republic of Central America with British Honduras. The headquarters of the agency 
are in Jamaica. 

The reports at hand do not indicate how many of the ordained Church of England workers in Jamaica 
are Negroes. 

CUBA 

* No report for Baptized Christians other than the number of Communicants. 

b This work was transferred to the Board of Home Missions of the Presbyterian Church in the U. S. A. 
in February, 1909. 



BAHAMA ISLANDS 

B No report for Baptized Christians other than the number of Communicants. 

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, INCLUDING ALASKA 

Includes one ordained woman. 

b Not technically ordained, but performing the same duties as ordained ministers in other denominations. 

Members in good standing. 

d Data for the United States only. 

e Includes data for the Woman's Home Missionary Society. 

' No report for Baptized Christians other than the number of Communicants. 



* Estimate. Except in column 18, all estimates are from the societies, 

t Physicians who are ordained are entered in both columns 2 and 3. Accordingly, the total of missionaries doea not necessarily equal the total of columns 2 to 7. 
1 Owing to inevitable duplication in the enumeration of stations by the various societies, the totals in column 12 are in excess of the total number of cities occupied, 
duplicates are eliminated. 



In the tables of summaries on another 



STATISTICAL TABLES 



101 



GENERAL AND EVANGELISTIC Continued 



COUNTRIES AND SOCIETIES 


DATE 


FOREIGN MISSIONAIUES 


NATIVE WOBKEBS 


STATIONS 


CHRISTIAN COMMUNITY AND CONTRIBUTIONS 


Year of First Work 
in this Field 


O 


Physicians 


Lay Missionaries not 
Physicians (Men) 


Married Women 
not Physicians 


Unmarried Women 
not Physicians 


Total of Foreign 
Missionaries 


Ordained Natives 


Unordained Natives, Preach- 
ers, Teachers, Bible-women, 
and Other Workers 


Total of Ordained and 
Unordained Native 
Workers 


Principal Stations 


All Other Sub-Stations 


1 

o 
6 


Communicants Added 
During the Last Year 


Total Number of 
Communicants 


Total Number of 
Baptized Christians 


Total of Native Christian 
Adherents, incl. Baptized 
and Unbaptized, All Ages 


Sunday Schools 


Total Sunday School 
Membership, Including 
Teachers and Pupils 


Total of Native Contri- 
butions in U. S. Gold 


1 


1 


URIIED STATES OF AMERICA, IN- 
CLUDING ALASKA Concluded 
(Indiana and Eskimos') 

American Societies Concluded 
Sheboygsn Classls, Reformed Church In U. S 


1 

1878 
1889 
1889 

1885 
1894 

1885 


2 

1 
2 
2 
2 
4 

1 
6 
3 
163 

10 
10 
173 


3 

1 
6 


4 

~1 

1 


5 

3 
2 

36 

2 
3 
5 

41 


6 

3 
2 
2 
1 

~4 
3 
3 
114 

10 
1 
11 

125 


7 

2 

1 
2 

12 
4 

146 

1 
2 
147 


8 

1 
10 
7 
6 
5 
12 
12 
8 
10 
464 

23 
6 
28 

492 


9 

1 
32 

165 

1 
3 

158 


10 

1 
3 

3 
1 
1 
101 

300 

12 
12 
312 


11 

1 

3 

3 
1 
2 
133 

455 

12 
3 
15 

470 


12 

1 
3 
2 
1 
2 
11 
1 

2 
190 

6 
2 
8 

198 


13 

4 
3 

3 

1 
301 

25 
6 
31 

332 


14 

3 

~2 

~6 

83 

528 

6 
1 
534 


15 

92 

7 
725 

68 
613 
793 


16 

64 

600 
100 

9 

588 
3310 
75 
27936 

470 
470 
28406 


17 

'64 
'600 
100 

ty 

'588 
'3310 
75 
28012 

848 
848 
28860 


18 

106 
*2400 
200 

744 

1200 
5000 
280 
66928 

1215 
1215 
68143 


19 

1 

1 

~6 
28 
2 
303 

6 
6 
309 


20 

32 

880 

472 
684 
97 
16631 

866 
366 
16997 


21 



12 
1686 

154 
164 
1740 


Swedish Evangelical Mission Covenant of America .. . 
Synod for Norwegian Evangelical Lutheran Church... 
United Danish Evangelical Lutheran Church 


'United German Synod (Lutheran) 


Woman's American Baptist Home Mission Society. . . 
Woman's Er. Com., B'd of Dom. Miss., Ref. Ch.(Dutch) 
Woman's For. Miss. Soc., M. E. Church, South 


Women's Gen. Miss. Soo., United Presbyterian Church 
Totals, 26 American Societies 


International Societies 
Mission der Briidergemeine 




Totals, 2 International Societies 


Grand Totals, 28 Societies 




DOTTED STATES OF AMERICA, 
EXCEPT HAWAIIAN ISLANDS 

(Asiatic Immigrants) 
American Societies 


1869 
1852 
1866 
1852 

1891 
1901 
1884 
1908 
1906 


8 
1 
2 
4 

3 

1 

20 

20 


_ 


_ 


1 
1 

~5 
1 

~8 
8 


1 

4 
1 
2 

2 

ii 
11 


5 
25 
3 
1 

14 
1 
10 

69 

2 
61 


14 
27 

< 

9 
2 
24 

t 
fi 

10 
5 
98 

2 
100 


1 
12 
2 

2 

1 
1 
19 

19 


6 
18 
22 
15 

20 

"I 
3 

85 
85 


6 
19 
34 
17 

20 
2 

1 

4 

104 
104 


7 
13 
6 
5 

4 
2 
6 

1 
47 

1 

48 


11 
10 
6 

3 

] 

t 
t 

Z' 
34 


29 
16 

1 
2 

2 
52 

62 


164 
111 

38 
6 

11 
6 
336 

336 


350 
1756 
1347 

103 
35 

90 
6 
3687 

3687 


350 
1756 
1347 

103 
35 

90 
6 
3687 

3687 


500 
*2000 
1347 

103 
120 

90 
92 
4252 

4252 


28 
3 

2 
J 

~1 

36 

36 


736 
95 

36 

92 
959 

959 


$15007 
0708 

24715 
24716 




Board of Home Miss., Methodist Episcopal Church .... 
Board of For. Miss., Presbyterian Church in U. S. A. . . 
Central Board of Miss.', Reformed Presbyterian Church 


Dom. and For. Miss. Soc., Protestant Episcopal Church 
Woman 's American Baptist Home Mission Society 
Women's Ex. Com., B'd of Dom. Miss., Ref. Ch.(Dutch) 
Woman's Home Miss. Soo., Moth. Epis. Ch., South. . . 
Woman's Miss. Association, United Brethren in Christ 
Totals, 11 American Societies 


British Society 


Grand Totals, 12 Societies 




HAWAIIAN ISLANDS 

(Hawaiian! and Asiatic Immigrants) 

American Societies 1 
Board of Hawaiian Evangelical Association 


1823 


20 
1 
9 
30 








1 
1 
3 
5 


2 
1 
3 


1 
3 
23 
27 


22 
7 
36 
65 


55 
4 
4 
63 


59 
22 
8 
89 


114 

26 
12 
152 


8 
1 
5 
14 


79 
45 
16 
140 


100 
23 
20 
143 


988 
322 
87 
1397 


7189 
1143 
1195 
9627 


"7189 
bl!43 
2599 
10931 


*17000 
*2000 
*3000 
22000 


112 
31 

143 


8763 
1283 
892 
10938 


$4729 

456 

6184 


Board of Home Miss., Methodist Episcopal Church . . . 
Dom. and For._Miss. Soc., Protestant Episcopal Ch. . . 




CANADA AND THE LABRADOR 

(Indians and Eskimos) 

British Societies 


1822 
1833 

1888 

1866 
1851 
1824 
1881 


46 
4 
3 
3 
66 

1 


1 


1 
~1 


1 
2 
3 

~6 
1 


30 
1 
2 

33 
1 


3 
3 


81 
7 
S 
3 
99 

4 


4 
1 
6 


84 

12 
2 
98 


88 

13 
2 
103 


41 
4 
1 
3 
49 

1 


6 
7 

2 
12 
20 

34 

8 
8 

49 


1 

8 

10 

2 

1 

4 

1 

7 
~7 
24 


251 
5 
20 

276 

65 
65 

4 
53 
67 

398 


2757 
97 
250 
38 
3142 

64 

241 
457 
5309 

6071 

460 
1005 
1465 

10678 


11216 
200 
*1530 
162 
13108 

64 

o241 
*457 
"5309 

6071 

1249 
"1005 
2254 

21433 


14716 
283 
1600 
1841 
18440 

75 
3771 
1615 
1032 
16776 

23269 

1309 
*1200 
2509 

44218 


1 

6 

~7 

5 
~6 

6 
6 

18 


36 
250 

286 

272 
272 

302 
302 

860 


$4653 
200 
*600 

6463 
131 
400 
631 

2486 
2486 

8470 






Society For the Propagation of the Gospel 




Canadian Societies 




For. Miss Com., Presbyterian Church in Canada. . . 


9 
3 
30 

43 

12 
12 
111 


1 

3 
1 

6 


1 


6 
23 
30 

5 
9 
14 

50 


2 
3 

47 

63 

14 

5 

19 

105 


40 

21 
4 
65 

1 
~1 

69 


58 
6 
121 
4 
193 

32 
14 
46 

338 


6 
~6 

11 


1 

2 
24 

27 

44 
101 
145 

270 


1 
2 
30 

33 

44 
101 
145 

281 


21 
3 
59 
4 
88 

7 
5 
12 

149 


Home Miss. Board, Baptist Conv. of Ont. and Quebec. 
Missionary Society of the Methodist Church, Canada. . 
Woman's Miss. Society, Methodist Church, Canada.. . . 


International Societies 






Grand Totals, 11 Societies 





UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, INCLUDING ALASKA 

* No report for Baptized Christians other than the number of Communicants. 

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, EXCEPT HAWAIIAN ISLANDS 

* No report for Baptized Christians other than the number of Communicants. 

HAWAIIAN ISLANDS 

Of the societies here presented those for the Methodist Board represent work among Asiatic Immi- 
grants, those for the Hawaiian Evangelical Association represent both the wort for Hawaiians 
and that for Asiatic Immigrants, while the Protestant Episcopal statistics include t not only 
work for Hawaiians and Asiatic Immigrants, but also some work for the white population which 
could not be eliminated on the basis of available sources of information. 
b No report for Baptized Christians other than the number of Communicants. 



d Of Church of England societies at work among Indiana in Canada, only the Church Missionary So- 
ciety presents adequate statistics in its reports. The Society for the Propagation of the Gospel 
and the Colonial and Continental Church Society grant subsidies for Diocesan work, along with 
certain special grants for Indian work, while in several dioceses, notably those within Ontario, 
there are numbers of Indian Churches no longer counted as distinctly missionary in character. 
The total of native Christian adherents, given in connection with the Church of England in 
Canada, represents the total Indian Christians of Ontario reported as Anglicans by the Depart- 
ment of Indian Affairs of Canada (Report for 1909), less the number of Indian Christians for 
Ontario reported by the New England Company and the Colonial and Continental Church 
Society. 

Includes data for work among the Eskimos on the Labrador. 



CANADA AND THE LABRADOR 

"Not reported. 

b Church statistics for this organization are Incomplete. 

No report for Baptized Christians other than the number of Communicants. 



* Estimate. Except in column 18, all estimates are from the societies. 

t Physicians who are ordained are entered in both columns 2 and 3. Accordingly, the total of missionaries does not necessarily equal the total of columns 2 to 7. 

t Owing to inevitable duplication in the enumeration of stations by the various societies, the totals in column 12 are in excess of the total number of cities occupied. In the tables of summaries on another 
page duplicates are eliminated. 



102 



WORLD ATLAS OF CHRISTIAN MISSIONS 



GENERAL AND EVANGELISTIC Continued 





DATE 


FOREIGN MISSIONARIES 


NATIVE WORKERS 


STATIONS 


CHRISTIAN COMMUNITY AND CONTRIBUTIONS 








Physician* 














, - 












































c3 (U 
















oj & 
















tn 


















MH o 


*3 




O 




^ M 






B.a<j 




H' 


'Frt 




44 













a 






of i g 


u 


H- 


^ 


ft 
O 


T3 g 




3 


lag 




1^:3 


"1*0 


COUNTItlES AND SOCIETIES 


1 


,1 






1 

C 


I 


Is 


tS m 


1 


1 


|1| 


11 

3* 


I 




i 


ili 


s 

Si 


si 

si 


o . 
g-a'S 

.1 -a 


1 


flj 


!? 




><!a 


Ordained M 


i- 

1 


1 


C 

'E 



i 
J 


Physicians 


Married Wo 
not Physici. 


Unmarried 
not Physicii 


o S3 

i! 


& 
o 


Unordained 
ers, Teacher 
and Other 1 


Total of On 
Unordained 
Workers 


3 


AU Other S 


J 


Communica 
During the 


Total Numl 
Communica 


Total Numl 
Baptized Cl 


Total of Na 
Adherents, 
and Unbap 


CO 


Total Sundi 
Membershij 
Teachers an 


Total of Na 
butions in 1 




! 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


CANADA 














































(Asiatic Immigrant*) 














































British Society 














































Society for the Propagation of the Gospel 


1899 


1 










1 








2 





1 


1 


2 








7 








*115 













Canadian Societies 














































For. Miss. Com., Presbyterian Church in Canada 


1891 


2 









3 


3 


_ 


8 





3 


3 


3 


^ __ 


, 


._ 


^ 






_ 




_ 


Missionary Society of the Methodist Church, Canada. 


1883 


1 














1 


2 





9 


9 


2 


8 


9 


34 


286 


286 


286 








_ 


Woman's Aux. Miss. Soc., Church of England in Canada 
Woman's Miss. Society, Methodist Church, Canada... . 
Totals, 6 Canadian Societies 


1887 


3 


- 







3 


3 


1 
4 
fi 


1 
4 
15 


= 


2 
14 


2 
14 


1 
2 
8 


8 


9 


34 


286 


289 


20 
309 


1 


11 


= 


Grand Totals, 6 Societies 




4 








4 


3 


6 


17 




15 


15 


10 


8 


9 


41 


286 


289 


424 


1 


11 


















































GREENLAND* 













































Continental Society 










































Greenland Mission, Evan. Luth. Ch. of Denmark 





2 














2 


~~ 


2 


2 


2 














11800 


11800 


2 





~ 



CANADA 

No report for Baptized Christians other than the number of Communicants. 

GREENLAND 

The data for Baptized Christians represent the total number of Christianized Eskimos in Greenland. 



Fourteen Danish pastors and four Eskimo pastors of the native church are not here entered. 
The two ordained pastors represent work among the heathen Eskimos on the East Coast and at 
Cape York on the Northwest Coast. Data furnished by the Rev. J. N. Lenker, D.D., of 
Minneapolis. 



* Estimate. Except in column 18, all estimates are from the societies. 

t Physicians who are ordained are entered in both columns 2 and 3. Accordingly, the total of missionaries doea not necessarily equal the total of columns 2 to 7. 

J Owing to inevitable duplication in the enumeration of stations by the various societies, the totals in column 12 are in excess of the total number of cities occupied. In the tables of summaries on another 
page, duplicates are elimninated. 



STATISTICAL TABLES 



103 



EDUCATIONAL 



COUNTRIES AND SOCIETIES 


UNIVERSITIES JWD 
COLLEGE^ 


THEOLOGICAL AND 
NORMAL SCHOOLS AND 
TRAINING CLASSES 


BOARDING AND HIGH 
SCHOOLS 


INDUSTRIAL TRAINING 
INSTITUTIONS AND 
CLASSES 


ELHMBNTART AND VILLAGE 
SCHOOLS 


KINDERGARTENS 


j 


Students 


Institutions and Classes 


Students 


j 


Pupils 


Institutions and Classes 


Pupils 


3 


Pupils 


j 


Pupils 


i 


<U 


a 


I 


Females 


I 


i 


Females 


1 


i 


| 


3 
5 


M 


, 


3 


i 


1 


J 


JAPAN 

(With Formosa) 
American and Canadian Societies 

American Baptist Foreign Mission Society 


1 

f 
4 

1 
1 
1 


2 

179 

30 
S 
104 


3 

68 


4 

247 

30 
8 
104 


6 

1 
1 



<] 

1 

2 
1 

2 

1 
1 
2 
2 


6 

20 
33 

51 
19 

16 
8 

17 

10 
13 
21 
7 


7 

14 
29 
20 

15 
16 

~7 
24 


8 

14 
20 
62 

71 
19 

31 

8 

33 

10 
13 
28 
31 


9 

6 
5 

10 
03 

7 
4 
<2 
1 
3 

1 
2 

1 
1 


10 

72 

904 
600 
375 
179 
310 
80 

640 


11 

354 

1114 

831 
294 
209 

97 
36 


12 

426 
1056 

2018 
600 
1206 
473 
519 
80 
1278 

640 
28 

97 
36 


13 

1 
2 


14 

16 


15 

125 
15 


16 

125 
31 


17 

7 
12 
1 


A 

~7 
1 
17 

3 
1 


18 

190 

220 
(145) 

(77) 


19 

206 
(160) 

(16) 


20 

396 
596 
40 
1085 
220 
305 

534 
42 
1124 

291 
7 

594 

75 
83 
450 

5842 

112 
255 
308 
675 

65 
6582 


21 

5 
8 

1 

2 
3 

1 

2 
9 
1 
32 

32 


22 

252 

(252) 
(262) 


23 

232 
40 

(272) 
(272) 


24 

368 
484 

40 

40 
225 

80 

162 
403 

1802 
1802 


American Board of Commissioners for For. Miss. . . . 
Apostolic Faith Movement 


Board of For. Miss., Methodist Episcopal Church. . . 
Board of For. Miss., Methodist Protestant Church b . . . 
Board of For. Miss., Presbyterian Church in U. S. A. d 
Board of For. Miss., Reformed Church (Dutch)' .... 
Board of For. Miss., Reformed Church in U S 


Board of For. Miss., United Synod, Evan. Luth. Ch. 
Board of Miss., Methodist Episcopal Church, South. 
Christian and Missionary Alliance 


Dom. and For. Miss. Soc., Protestant Episcopal Ch. . 
Exec. Com. of For. Miss., Presbyterian Ch. (South) . 
Foreign Christian Missionary Society 


For. Miss. Association of Friends of Philadelphia. . . . 
For. Miss. Board of the Southern Baptist Convention 
For. Miss. Com., Presbyterian Church in Canada 8 . . 


Missionary Society of the Evangelical Association. . 
Missionary Society of the Methodist Church, Canada 
Mission Board of the Christian Church 








































6 

2 
2 
5 

75 

4 
9 
8 
21 

2 


(632) 

51 
180 
87 
318 

65 


(118) 
(500) 

61 
75 
221 
367 














1 


6 





6 


1 





15 


15 











x 






































Woman's For. Miss. Soc., Methodist Protestant Ch. . 
Woman's Miss. Society, Methodist Church, Canada . . 
Woman's Union Missionary Society of America 
Totals, 26 American and Canadian Societies. 


6 

1 
1 

1 
7 


321 

47 
47 

32 
400 


68 

26 
26 

94 


389 

73 
73 

32 
494 


1 
22 

2 
2 

~4 
1 

1 
2 
1 

1 

1 

32 


221 

16 
23 

39 
4 

50 

40 
90 

12 
9 

29 

404 


60 
185 

7 
6 

13 

17 
17 

215 


60 
406 

23 

29 

62 
4 

50 

57 
107 

12 
9 

29 
619 


1 
3 

61 

2 
2 
7 
11 

1 

6 


(3060) 

450 
61 
34 
645 

603 
840 


75 
479 
124 
(3628) 

210 
60 
135 
405 

134 


75 
479 
124 
9050 

660 
121 
169 
950 

737 
840 


2 
1 
6 


16 


35 
175 


35 
191 


British Societies 

Church Missionary Society 


For. Miss. Com., Presbyterian Church of England^ . . . 
Society for the Propagation of the Gospel 


Totals, 3 British Societies 


Continental Society 

Allg. evangelisch-protestantischer Missionsverein.. . . 

Japan Societies 

Doshisha College 


Japanese Y. M. C. A., National Union 




Totals, 3 Japan Societies 


7 


1443 


134 


1677 


_ 





"*"" 


"" 





__ 


^~ 


International Society 


Independent Society 


1 
70 


340 

(5388) 


4167) 


340 
11917 


6 


16 


175 


191 


98 


(1 015) 


(857) 


Union Society 
Meiji Gakuin h 


Grand Totals, 36 Societies 





KOREA 

American and Canadian Societies 

Board of For. Miss., Methodist Episcopal Church.. . 
Board of For. Miss., Presbyterian Church in U. S. A 
Board of Miss., Methodist Episcopal Church, South. 
Exec. Com. of For. Miss., Presbyterian Ch. (South) b 
For. Miss. Com., Presbyterian Church in Canada.. . 
Seventh-Day Adventist Mission Board 


1 
1 


23 
23 





23 
23 


2 
"6 

1 
1 

10 


124 
570 

8 
8 

710 


150 
150 


124 

720 

8 
8 

860 


4 
15 
6 
4 
3 
1 
33 

1 
1 

1 


240 
912 
246 
146 
48 

(1 592) 
7 

241 


265 
233 
120 
30 

(648) 
21 


505 
1145 
366 
176 
48 
100 
2340 

7 
21 

241 














103 
591 
7 
57 
20 
2 
780 

7 
15 


10916 

82 
766 
237 

(12 001) 
86 

(12 087) 


2511 
150 
87 
147 

(2 895) 
180 

(3 075) 


3538 
13427 
232 
853 
384 
75 
18509 

302 
266 

19077 














Totals, 6 American and Canadian Societies 


Australasian Society 


British Society 
Society for the Propagation of the Gospel 


Korea Societies 

General Committee, Y. M. C. A. of China and Korea 


Totals, 2 Korea Societies 


1 


23 





23 


10 


710 


150 


860 


1 
36 


241 

(t 840) 


(669) 


241 
2609 














802 


Grand Totals, 10 Societies 




CHINESE EMPIRE 

American and Canadian Societies 

American Advent Mission Society 


2 
3 
1 

2 

E2 


42 
98 
45 

45 
150 


15 


57 
98 
45 

45 
150 


4 
3 
29 
20 

e 

2 
1 
7 
2 
3 
1 
1 
2 


70 
27 
197 
204 

5 
76 

16 
19 
22 
4 
55 


40 

480 
190 

11 


110 
27 
677 
394 

16 
76 
150 
16 
19 
22 
4 
55 
30 


2 

26 
41 
50 
7 
4 
2 
13 

13 
11 
3 
2 
8 

2 


19 

(223) 
2412 
1137 
97 
85 
32 
415 

(467) 
206 


35 

(46) 
1421 
851 
247 
46 
22 
420 

113 


54 

1176 
3833 
1988 
344 
131 
54 
835 

811 
319 
181 
47 
480 
254 
82 


1 


16 





16 


11 

72 
155 
347 
272 
29 

25 
15 
73 
5 
21 
5 
94 

4 
1 


1070 

3067 
724 

293 
128 

34 


226 

1684 
58 

337 
26 

16 


327 
1296 
2924 
6705 
4751 
782 

630 
300 
1992 
154 
498 
227 
2113 
176 
77 
50 
(1100 


4 

4 


75 


57 


138 
132 


American Baptist Foreign Mission Society 


American Board of Commissioners for For. Miss.". . . 
Board of For. Miss., Methodist Episcopal Church" b . 
Board of For. Miss., Presbyterian Ch., U. S. A. a " d .. 
Board of For. Miss., Reformed Church (Dutch) 
Board of For. Miss., Reformed Church in U. S 
Board of For. Misa, Ref. Presby. Ch. (Covenanter) 
Board of Miss., Methodist Episcopal Church, South. 
Christian and Missionary Alliance 


Dom. and For. Miss. Soc., Protestant Episcopal Ch. 
Exec. Com., For. Miss., Presbyterian Ch. (South).. . 
Foreign Christian Missionary Society 11 


For. Miss. Soc , United Brethren in Christ 


For. Miss. Board of the Southern Baptist Convention 
For. Miss. Com., Presbyterian Church in Canada.. . 
Friends' For . Miss Soc., Ohio Yearly Meeting 


General Miss. Board of the Free Methodist Church. . 














1 








30 


















(Continued on next page) 

























JAPAN 

* Does not include statistics for the Doshisha, which is entered under Japan Societies. 

b Nagoya College entered under High Schools, since there are no students of full college grade. 

Includes Yokahama Night School, with 200 students. 

d College work in union with Board of For. Miss, of the Reformed Church in America entered under 
Meiji Gakuin. 

6 College and theological work in union with the Board of For. Miss, of the Presbyterian Church in 
U. S. A., entered under Meiji Gakuin. 

* Includes Industrial Department of Tohoku Gakuin, which has 60 students. 
8 All in Formosa. 

h Union educational work of the Board of For. Miss, of the Presbyterian Church in U. S. A. and 
Board of For. Miss, of the Reformed Church in America (Dutch). 



KOREA 

There are also 743 training classes, with 31,499 men and 11,313 women registered. 
*> Statistics provided by the Rev. J. S. Gale, D.D., of Korea. 

CHINESE EMPIRE 

* Data for North China Educational Union under separate entry. 

b Data for Peking University under separate entry. 

Data for Shantung Christian University under separate entry. 

d Data for the Union Christian College at Nanking under separate entry. 

" Data for Union Theological School at Amoy under separate entry. 

f Data for Union Middle School at Amoy under separate entry. 

E Does not include 10 theological students who are also college students. 



In many cases the returns received indicate only total enrollment under each class of institutions. It was thought desirable, where possible, to indicate even partial returns by sexes, in order to give some indi- 
cation of the relative number of males and females under instruction. Where the division is incomplete this fact is indicated by parentheses. 



104 



WORLD ATLAS OF CHRISTIAN MISSIONS 



EDUCATIONAL Continued 



COUNTRIES AND SOCIETIES 


UNIVERSITIES AND 
COLLEGES 


THEOLOGICAL AND 
NORMAL SCHOOLS, AND 
TRAINING CLASSES 


HOARDING AND HIGH 
SCHOOLS 


INDUSTRIAL TRAINING 
INSTITUTIONS AND 
CLASSES 


ELEMENTARY AND VILLAGE 
SCHOOLS 


KINDERGARTENS 


j 


Students 


Institutions and Classes 


Students 


I 


Students 


Institutions and Classes 


Students 


3 


Pupils 


n 
1 


Pupils 


1 


fa 


I 


I 


f 




a 
1 


i 


PH 


3 
& 


i 


PH 


I 


tn 





a 
S 


i 


m 

0> 




J 


CHINESE EMPIRE Concluded 
American and Canadian Societies Condudet 

Home and For. Miss. Soc., United Evan. Church. 
Missionary Society of the Evangelical Association. . 
Missionary Society of the Methodist Church, Canada 
Mission Board, Evan. Luth. Norwegian Brethren.. .. 
Peking University 11 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 

2 


6 

6 


7 

23 


8 

29 


9 
1 


10 


11 

25 


12 

25 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 

< 


18 

39 


19 


20 

39 


21 


22 


23 


24 


1 


68 





68 














14 
15 

o 


"~~ 





360 
250 





L 





. . A 


1 


71 





71 


1 


26 





26 


1 


357 





357 

























































138 
96 

32 
331 

79 
75 

25552 
128 

1810 


1 
9 


(75) 


(57) 


270 


Seventh-Day Baptist Missionary Society 


1 
12 


454 


15 


i 
469 


1 

1 
81 


(727) 


6 
(750) 


30 

6 
1717 


2 
1 
1 

1 
3 
1 
1 
197 


46 
149 
112 

34 
(5859) 


22 
24 
4 

109 
40 

(3425) 


68 
24 
153 

112 
109 
. 40 
34 
11679 


1 
2 


16 





16 


3 

1 
11 

3 

6 

1187 
a 


67 
32 

(6454) 


29 

75 
(2451) 


Swedish Evangelical Mission Covenant of America. . 
Trustees of Canton Christian College 


United Norwegian Lutheran Church of America 
West China Union University 


Woman's Miss. Society, Methodist Church, Canada . 
Woman's Union Missionary Society of America 


Yale Foreign Missionary Society 


Totals, 34 American and Canadian Societies 


Australasian Society 


British Societies 

Baptist Missionary Society" 














21 

1 
1 


107 
11 


143 
16 


250 

11 
16 


19 
4 
39 
10 
1 
1 


1413 


206 


1619 


, 


__, 








162 


1514 


296 




Church Missionary Society 


895 
40 


794 
338 

65 


1689 
338 
40 
65 


1 

1 





16 

48 


16 

48 


170 

26 

3 
84 
135 
23 
150 
13 
77 
104 
49 
1003 

4 
1 
57 
25 
54 
11 
1 

6 

7 


2211 
112 

1743 
468 
3051 
119 
872 
(757) 
(404) 
(11251) 

90 
920 
1186 

150 


1315 
325 
11 
279 

832 
147 
980 
2 
472 
(35) 
(285) 
(4979) 

42 
262 
96 

42 
36 


3526 
325 
123 
279 
1512 
2575 
615 
4031 
121 
1344 
4259 
1040 
21560 

132 
141 
1182 
1114 
1282 
150 
42 
186 
180 
108 
642 
55 
355 
6569 

25 

25 
2207 

26 


1 

1 
2 

1 

1 
1 

1 


40 
40 
18 

18 


6 
1 

18 

18 
15 

15 


40 

6 
46 

36 

36 
15 

16 


Church of England Zenana Missionary Society 


Church of Scotland Foreign Mission Committee 
Church of Scotland Women's Assoc. for For. Miss. . 
Foreign Missions, Presbyterian Church of Ireland 1 . . 
For. Miss. Com., Presbyterian Church of England. . . 
Friends' Foreign Mission Association 


1 
1 


40 
40 





40 
40 


"2 
1 
"3 

1 

2 
1 
33 


44 
8 
19 

12 
22 
14 
237 


7 
166 


44 
8 
26 

12 
22 
14 
403 


14 
4 
9 
8 
2 
8 
1 
120 

1 


319 
57 
188 
102 
50 
(134) 
124 
(3322) 

60 


400 
22 
106 
65 

(82) 
(2 078) 


719 
79 
294 
167 
50 
316 
124 
5500 

60 


~2 





64 


64 


London Missionary Society" 


Society for the Propagation of the Gospel 


United Free Church of Scotland's For. Miss. Com. 1 . 
United Methodist Church Missionary Society 


Wesleyan Methodist Missionary Society 


Totals, 14 British Societies 


Continental Societies 

Allg. evangelisch-protestantischer Missionsverein 
















2 


54 





54 


4 








111 





















_ 








2 


100 





100 


18 
1 


591 


157 


748 
40 














Finska MissionssaUskapet 


Hildesheimer Ver. fur die Blindenmission in China. . 


i 











1 
2 
1 











2 


11 


20 


31 


















18 
8 


12 


30 

8 


2 


65 





65 














7 
28 
5 
14 
220 

1 

1 
119 
1 


73 
569 

(2 988) 
25 

25 
1797 


35 
73 

(586) 

410 

26 




















1 
9 


6 
186 


12 


6 
198 


28 


(727) 


(177) 


1055 


1 
1 





80 
80 


80 
80 


Totals, 13 Continental Societies 


China Societies 


General Committee, Y. M. C. A. of China and Korea. 


2 
1 
1 
1 

5 
18 


65 
"295 
30 
12 

402 
896 


8 

8 
23 


73 
295 
30 
12 

410 
919 


1 
1 

2 

1 
1 

1 
3 

129 


30 
30 

20 

26 
113 

37 
176 

(1 376) 


(928) 


30 
30 

20 

26 
113 

37 
176 

2544 


4 
1 
2 
7 

82 
1 


1852 
105 
160 
1117 

631 


40 
40 

760 

67 


852 
105 
200 
1157 

1391 

67 


South Chih-li Mission 


Totals, 4 China Societies 


International Society 


Union Societies 
North China Educational Union 1 * 




Union Christian College 11 


1 
Pl 
1 


40 
17 
60 





40 
17 
60 














1 


30 





30 











1 








Totals, 6 Union Societies 


4 
438 


117 

(11773) 


67 

(6547) 


184 
20866 


5 


16 


144 


160 


2 
2538 


30 

(21 545) 


26 

(8 452) 


56 
55097 


13 


(133) 


(96) 


367 


Grand Totals, 73 Societies 




SIAM AND FRENCH INDO-CHINA 
American Society 

Board of For. Miss., Presbyterian Church to U. 8. A. 














3 








55 


8 


472 


346 


818 














29 


(217) 


(76) 


843 














BRITISH MALAYSIA 

American Society 
Board of For. Miss., Methodist Episcopal Church.. . 

British Societies 














2 


7 


6 


13 


9 


2960 


451 


3411 














13 

1 

3 
5 
9 

3 
25 


20 
546 
(566) 

38 

(604) 


15 
12 
(27) 

20 

(47) 


913 

40 

35 
558 
633 

58 
1604 











^ 


Christian Missions in Many Lands 
Church of England Zenana Missionary Society 
For. Miss. Com., Presbyterian Church of England... 


























1 





65 


65 






































7 
8 


236 
236 


18 
83 


254 
319 














Totals 4 British Societies 


Continental Society 
















2 


7 


6 


13 


17 


3196 


534 


3730 
















DUTCH EAST INDIES 

American Societies 
Board of For. Miss., Methodist Episcopal Church.. . 


































4 
1 








177 
177 




















~~ 








__ 








1 
1 








20 
20 



















CHINESE EMPIRE 

For notes, ft , e , f , see previous page, 
h Data for 1909. That for 1908 not reported. 
1 Data for Union College at Moukden under separate entry. 
1 Includes 518 students in night schools. 
k Union of American Board, London Missionary Society, Board of For. Miss, of the Presbyterian 

Church in U. S. A., and Woman's For. Miss. Soc. of the Methodist Episcopal Church. 
1 Union of Board of For. Miss, of the Presbyterian in U. S. A. and Baptist Missionary Society. 
m Includes 40 special students. 



* Union of the Foreign Christian Miss. Soc. and Board of For. Miss, of the Presbyterian in U. S. A. 
In December, 1909, united with Nanking University of the Board of For. Miss, of the Meth- 
odist Episcopal Church under the name of University of Nanking. 

Union of For. Miss, of the Presbyterian Church of Ireland and United Free Church of Scotland 

For. Miss. Com. 
P Discontinued in 1909. Middle schools of the two missions now conduct the preparatory work. 

1 Union of Board of For. Miss, of the Reformed Church (Dutch), For. Miss. Com. of the Presby- 

terian Church of England, and London Missionary Society. 



In many cases the returns received indicate only total enrollment under each class of institutions. It was thought desirable, where possible, to indicate even partial returns by sexes, in order to give some indi- 
cation of the relative number of males and females under instruction. Where the division is incomplete this fact is indicated by parentheses. 



STATISTICAL TABLES 



105 



EDUCATIONAL Continued 



COUNTRIES AND SOCIETIES 


UNmrasrriES AND 
COLLEGES 


THEOLOGICAL AND 
NORMAL SCHOOLS AND 
TRAINING CLASSES 


BOARDING AND HIGH 
SCHOOLS 


INDUSTRIAL TRAINING 
INSTITUTIONS AND 

CLASSES 


ELHMBNTART AND VILLAGE 
SCHOOLS 


KINDERGARTENS 


j 


Students 


Institutions and Classes 


Students 


| 


Pupils 


Institutions and Classes 


Pupils 


! 


Pupils 


1 


Pupils 


i 


saretna.j 


1 


1 


07 

to 


I 


1 


2 


I 


i 


& 


3 



m 


8 


| 


1 


1 
ft 


3 


DUTCH EAST INDIES Condvded 
Continental Societies 


1 


2 


3 


4 


6 
1 


6 

44 


7 


8 
44 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 

7788 
468 
562 
141 
20600 
1767 
1201 
24228 
2300 
985 
69940 

177 
60294 


21 


22 


23 


24 




















102 
4 
19 
2 
240 
39 
26 
489 
83 
29 
1023 

4 
1031 


471 

13000 
1260 
1065 
19204 

(35000) 
(35 000) 


91 

7600 
507 
136 
5024 

(13 258) 
(13 258) 



























1 






25 

















































Nederlandsch Zendellnggenootschap 














2 
1 


59 
35 


. 


59 
35 














4 











Nederlandsche Zendingsvereenfging. . ; 




Rheinische Mlsslonsgesellschaf t 














4 
1 
2 
11 

1 

12 


226 
(384) 

(364) 





226 

44 
408 

6 
413 


1 
2 








26 
45 


1 
1 

1 
6 


46 
13 

69 
59 





46 
13 

69 
69 


Utrechtsche Zendingsvereeniging 


Zendlng v. d. Geref. Kerken in Nederland . . . . 


Totals, 11 Continental Societies 


International Society 


Grand Totals, 14 Societies 




PHILIPPINE ISLANDS 

American Societies 

American Baptist Foreign Mission Society 










1 


100 




100 










1 


190 




190 


1 
2 

5 
3 
11 








70 
40 

201 
10 
321 














American Board of Commissioners for For. Miss. . . . 
Board of For. Miss., Methodist Episcopal Church.. . 
Board of For. Miss., Presbyterian Church in U. S. A. 
Dom. and For. Miss. Soc., Protestant Episcopal Ch.. 














2 
2 


40 
37 


35 
30 


75 
67 














1 


452 





452 


~~~ 


^ 








1 
6 


(177) 


(66) 


12 
264 


2 
2 








29 
29 


2 


642 





642 


Totals, 6 American Societies 




AUSTRALIA 

(Aborigines and Chinese) 

Continental Society 

Ges. fur innere und aussere Miss., Luth. Kirche 

Australian Societies 


































1 

3 
3 
2 
3 
6 
17 

2 
19 


31 

(31) 


46 

(46) 

83 
(129) 


30 

185 
46 
30 
180 
150 
591 

114 

735 








^~ 


"~ 


. 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


1 


_ 


_ 


20 


1 


90 





90 




German Immanuel Evan. Luth. Synod in 8. Australia 




























































































Totals, 5 Australian Societies 








~ 


- 





_. 


"~~ 





1 





~~ 


20 


4 


90 





90 


International Society 


Grand Totals, 7 Societies 


























1 








20 


4 


90 





90 




NEW ZEALAND 

(Maoris) 

New Zealand Society 














1 











1 
2 





27 
27 


27 
27 














1 























Presbyterian Church of New Zealand 
Totals, 2 New Zealand Societies 




MELANESIA 
(Except Dutch New Guinea) 

Australasian Societies 


































24 
263 
18 
200 
505 

82 
254 
10 
346 

6 
6 
49 
60 

911 


(221) 

120 
(341) 

179 
172 

(351) 
(692) 


(191) 
(191) 

140 
95 

(235) 
(426) 


1380 
9563 
700 
7000 
18643 

3011 

120 
3131 

319 
267 
2314 
2900 

24674 








































1 








78 










































1 
1 


70 
70 


14 
14 


84 
84 














1 








78 




British Societies 




































United Free Church of Scotland's For. Miss. Com . . 


































































Canadian Society 
For. Miss, Com., Presbyterian Church in Canada. . . 

Continental Societies 

Ges. fur innere und aussere Miss., Luth. Kirche 
























71 

305 

















__. , 


._,._ 


_ 


1 


7 


__ 


7 


6 


276 


29 




































Totals, 3 Continental Societies 














1 
2 


7 
77 


14 


7 

91 


6 
6 


276 

(276) 


29 

(29) 


305 
376 


1 








78 


Grand Totals, 11 Societies 




MICRONESIA 

American Society 

American Board of Commissioners for For. Miss... 

Continental Society 


























1 

2 
3 


40 
(40) 


66 

(66) 


98 

106 
204 














70 

26 
96 








998 

888 
1886 














Grand Totals, 2 Societiess . . 




POLYNESIA 

(Except Hawaiian Islands) 

American Societies 














2 
1 


106 


44 


100 
149 


3 
2 
9 


127 
634 


140 
156 


180 
267 
690 


2 
1 


18 





18 


6 
1096 
264 

145 
1511( 


6338 

5681 
12 019) 


5648 

3309 
(8 957) 


112 
21093 
11986 

8990 
42181 














Australasian Society 


British Society 


Continental Society 


Socie'te' des Missions eVangeiiques 
Grand Totals 4 Societies 














3 


(106> 


(44) 


249 


14 


(661) 


(296) 


1137 


3 


18 





18 





In many cases the returns received indicate only total enrollment under each class of institutions. It was thought desirable, where possible, to indicate even partial returns by sexes, in order to give some indi- 
cation of the relative number of males and females under instruction. Where the division is incomplete this fact is indicated by parentheses. 



106 



WORLD ATLAS OF CHRISTIAN MISSIONS 



EDUCATIONAL Continued 



COUNTRIES AND SOCIETIES 


UNIVERSITIES AND 
COLLEGES 


THEOLOGICAL AND 
NORMAL SCHOOLS AND 
TIIAININO CLASSES 


BOARDING AND HIGH 
SCHOOLS 


INDUSTRIAL TRAINING 
INSTITUTIONS AND 

CLASSES 


ELEMENTARY AND VILLAGE 
SCHOOLS 


KINDERGARTENS 


Institutions 


Students 


T3 


OH 

1 


Students 


| 


Pupils 


m 

1 

3 
.g 


Pupils 


, 


Pupils 


n 

! 


Pupils 


S 


PH 


3 



1 


Females 


I 


8 


P* 


3 

S 


1 


iS 





1 


m 




I 


1 


Females 


1 


INDIA 
American and Canadian Societies 


1 


2 

70 
33 


3 

1 


4 

7 
33 


5 

i: 


6 

65 
6 


7 

145 


8 

80 
6 


9 

67 
19 
1 


10 

675 
237 


11 

2807 


12 

0563 
2641 
237 
67 


13 


14 


16 


16 


17 

135 

38 

2 

171 
292 
42 
1441 
140 

16; 

161 

i 
26 
18 
24 
110 

131 
o 


18 

(10236) 

873 
742 
32 
(3492; 
5732 

1829 
31 

3813 
12 

1401 

2584 
20 


19 

(4226 

199 
24 
(1869 
291< 

1294 
47 

1220 
23 

932 

1454 
80 


20 

33204 
1358 
87 
94 
5 
573 
864 
170 
3014 
3123 
6394 
78 
94 
5033 
35 
1200 
1423 
835 
1573 
2333 
944 
50 
4038 

100 

600 
410 
25 
250 

1200 
60 
475 
126 154 

127 
187 
171 
556 
1041 

12598 
341 
898 
981 
22707 
9415 
9208 
3801 
5667 
48 
1320 
40 
36775 

555 
100 
31056 
990 
750 
15586 
570 
10163 
31439 
1837 
196845 

10663 
10417 

67 
3750 
1474 
1541 
27912 

96 
9262 
9358 

40 
137 
177 

100 
138 
237 

618 
146 
1239 

361 726 


21 

\ 

1 
9 

1 

7 
9 
16 

1 

1 

27 


22 

110 
(110) 

115 
169 
284 

3 

3 
(397) 


23 

163 
(163 

116 
170 
286 

17 

17 

(466) 


24 

109 

273 
382 

231 
339 
670 

20 

20 
972 


American Board of Commissioners for For. Miss. . . 


Baptist For. Miss. Board ( Maritime Provinces 


Board of For. Miss., General Conference Mennonite 
Board of For. Miss., Gen. Council Evan. Luth. Ch 
Board of For. Miss., Gen. Synod Evan. Luth. Ch." 
Board of For. Miss.. German Evangelical Synod. 
Board of For. Miss., Methodist Episcopal Church . 
Board of For. Miss., Presbyterian Church in U. S. A 
Board of For. Miss., Reformed Church (Dutch). 
Board of For. Miss., Reformed Episcopal Church . 
Board of For. Miss., Reformed Presbyterian Churcl 
Board of For. Miss., United Presbyterian Church.. 
Board of Management, Gwalior Presbyterian Mission 
Christian and Missionary Alliance 



























28 

146 
606 
18 


27 
2 


28 

17 
608 
18 


2< 


44 
1 
46 
145 
2 


17 
21 

381 
24 
14 


17 
6 
14 

847 
169 
35 


3 
6 

47 
22 
9 


4S5 
390 

4233 
(3892 
281 


137 
22 

2414 
(674 
216 


622 
611 

6647 
4827 
497 


1 


723 
20 
51 


140 

200 
30 


140 
32 

923 
20 
81 


































Z 


90 


E 


90 




13 
10 
20 


37 


13 
10 
67 


5 


4359 


101 


4460 


j 


11; 

\ 


136 


251 




Evan. Lutheran Synod of Mo., 0., and other State 
Foreign Christian Missionary Society ............ 





































110 


__ 


110 


: 


28 
32 


28 


56 
32 
10 


1 
7 


210 
237 


170 


210 
407 
348 

136 


I 

4 


75 
21 

90 


5 
18 

46 


75 

26 
111 
30 
98 


For. Miss. Board, Baptist Conv., Ontario and Quebec 
For. Miss. Com., Presbyterian Church in Canada. . . 
Friends' For. Miss. Soc. of Ohio Yearly Meeting . . . 





















12 
12 


-r 


136 





General Miss. Board, Church of the Brethren 


12 


30 
52 


General Miss. Board of the Free Methodist Church. . 
General Miss. Board, Pentecostal Church, Nazarene 
Hephzibah Faith Missionary Association . . 


























































Lee Memorial Bengali Mission 

















1 


15 


22 


1 

i 


204 


200 
75 


200 
279 














12 

8 

] 


300 


110 
25 


Mennonite Board of Missions and Charities 


Missionary Society, Calvinistic Church in U. S. A. 


































Scandinavian Alliance Mission. . 


































~ 






Woman's Home and For. Miss. Soe.,AdventChristiat 
Woman's Gen. Miss. Soc., Churches of God 


























rt 








18 

n 


' 


' 


12 


1101 


30 


1131 


61 
















* 








Woman's Union Missionary Society of America. . . 
Totals, 35 American and Canadian Societies 

Australasian Societies 

Baptist For Miss. Soc of New South Wales 


(1644 


34 
(716 


34 
2270 


1 
192 


(21420 


40 
(7055 


40 
31792 


2! 


(1182) 


(575 


1789 


29 
4597 

o 
i 

t 

11 
25 
43 

363 
15 
27 
">40 
1287 
187 
153 
43 
127 
2 
20 
1 
862 


(31 097) 

104 
150 
82 
216 
652 

7420 
227 
898 
910 
19442 

8498 

40 
1010 

25022 


475 
(14892) 

23 
37 
89 
340 
489 

5178 
114 

71 
3265 
9415 
710 
3801 

8 
310 

11753 


Furreedpore Missionary Society . 



























' 


12 





12 


New Zealand Baptist Missionary Society 
























Victorian Baptist Foreign Mission 














5 


166 


76 


242 


23 


656 


43 
43 


43 
43 

1170 


t 


12 


137 


12 
137 


Totals, 4 Australasian Societies 


British Societies 
Baptist Missionary Society 


514 




Christian Literature Society for India 


































Christian Missions in Many Lands 


































Church Missionary Society 


6 

f. 


457 
733 


5 


462 
733 


20 
9 


196 


69 
71 


265 
71 


120 
9 
2 


18502 
249 


3012 
276 


21514 
276 
249 


12 
11 


287 


179 
314 


466 
314 


Church of England Zenana Missionary Society 


Church of Scotland Foreign Mission Committee 
Church of Scotland Women's Assoc. for For. Miss. . 
Foreign Mission, Presbyterian Church of Ireland 
For. Mis* Oam., Presbyterian Church of England. . 
Friends' Foreign Mission Association 


4 


159 





159 


c 
1 

K 

ti 


25 
4 
49 


9 
20 


34 
6 
69 


7 
1 
3 
2 
19 


581 

66 
22 
2846 


92 
40 
239 
20 
491 


673 
40 
305 
42 
3337 


1 
1 

4 


40 
28 


69 


40 
28 
69 


Kurku and Central Indian Hill Mission 






Oxford Mission to Calcutta 


























5 








270 
























Repr. Coun., Epis. Ch. in Scotland, For. Miss. Board 
Society for the Propagation of the Gospel 


































o 






4 


514 


2 


516 


1 


5 





5 


93 
2 


2675 
29 


1528 
25 


4203 
54 


r 
& 


45 


28 


73 


779 
36 
16 
375 
3 
407 
791 
42 
6590 

285 
162 

4 
176 
44 
60 
731 

26 
26 

6 
458 
464 

1 
5 
6 

2 
9 
6 
5 

20 
4 
46 

11503 


24653 
903 

8219 
495 
6503 
(531) 

104771) 

7913 
8112 

3403 
1182 
1013 
21 623) 

85 
(85) 

30 
128 
168 

100 
125 

417 
117 
(759) 

159045) 


6403 
87 

7367 
75 
3660 

1837 
(64 054) 

2750 
2305 

347 
292 
528 
(6 222) 

11 
(ll) 

10 
9 
19 

112 

201 
29 
(342) 

76 029) 


South Indian Strict Baptist Missionary Society 


United Free Church of Scotland's For. Miss. Com. .. 
United Orig. Secession Ch. of Scotland For. Miss. Com 
Welsh Calvinistic Methodist Foreign Mission 


4 

4 
25 


1725 

233 
3821 


23 
30 


1748 

233 
3851 


2 

1 
4 

1 
52 

2 
6 


52 
4 
70 

571 

76 
61 


8 
30 

15 
300 

14 


60 
4 
100 

15 
871 

76 
75 


16 
1 
3 
12 
7 
325 

13 


3562 
60 
300 
(542) 

(30090) 
2179 


230 
150 

638 
7255 

257 


3792 
60 
450 
3308 
638 
40381 

2436 

1327 
642 
39 
4444 


1 
1 

2 
37 

1 
16 
2 
1 

1 
1 
22 


235 
15 

650 

2721 
48 
14 

17 
10 
2810 


324 

40 
1091 

732 
45 

777 


559 
15 

40 
1741 

3453 
93 
14 

17 
10 
3687 


Wesleyan Methodist Missionary Society 


Zenana Bible and Medical Mission" 1 


Totals, 25 British Societies : . 


Continental Societies 

Evangelisch-Lutherische Mission zu Leipzig. 


Evangelische Missionsgesellschaft zu Basel 




























Gossnersche Missionsgesellschaft 














2 
1 
1 
12 


39 
15 
33 
224 


14 


39 
15 
33 
238 


20 
5 
2 
40 


969 
522 
24 
3694 


358 
120 
15 
750 


Missionsanstatt zu Hermannsburg 


Schleswig-Holsteinische Missionsgesellschaft 


Totals, 7 Continental Societies 


India Societies 


National Council, Y. M. C. A. of India and Ceylon. . 
National Y. W. C. A of India, Burma, and Ceylon . 
Totals, 3 India Societies 


























16 


421 





421 
421 


36 
36 





250 
250 


250 
250 

























16 


421 


" 


International Societies 


Salvation Army 














12 
12 








158 
168 














12 
12 


343 
343 


298 
298 


641 
641 


Totals, 2 International Societies 


Independent Societies 


Strict Baptist Mission of South India 




































































Indigenous Societies 


































Indian Missionary Society of Tihnevelly 














1 


11 


8 


19 


2 


12 


7 


19 


1 















































Mukti Mission 














2 





199 


199 


1 


300 





300 


10 


45 


934 


979 


St. Thomas Syrian Christian Evangelistic Assoc 
South Travancore Native Evangelistic Society. 
Totals, 7 Indigenous Societies 


37 


4922 


60 


4982 


3 
41 


11 

2350) 


207 
237) 


218 
3755 


3 

576 


312 
55937) 


7 

15110) 


319 
77400 


11 
148 


45 
6042) 


934 

(3925) 


979 
8999 


Grand Totals, 85 Societies 





INDIA 

Data for 1908-1909. 

b Reports received from only seven missions. 



The General Assembly's College and Duff College were amalgamated in 1908, subsequent to the 

date of these statistics. 
d This society reports 3,992 Zenana pupils not recorded under schools. 



In many cases the returns received indicate only total enrollment under each class of institutions. It was thought desirable, where possible, to indicate even partial returns by sexes, in order to give some indi- 
cation of the relative number of males and females under instruction. Where the division is incomplete this fact is indicated by parentheses. 



STATISTICAL TABLES 



107 



EDUCATIONALContinued 



COUNTRIES AND SOCIETIES 


UNIVERSITIES AND 
COLLEGES 


THEOMKJICAt, AND 

NORMAL SCHOOLS AND 
TBAININO CLASSES 


BOARDING AND HIGH 
SCHOOLS 


INDUSTRIAL TRAINING 
INSTIT/OTIONS AND 

CLASSES 


ELBMENTABr AND VILLAGE 
SCHOOLS 


KINDERGARTENS 


, 


Students 


Institutions and Classes 


Students 


Institutions 


Pupils 


Institutions and Classes 


Pupils 


, 


Pupils 


M 

CJ 

1 

ra 


Pupils 


I 


r 
P"H 


I 


i 


Females 


I 


i 


m 




. 


1 


Females 


1 


m 


,*> 
fr< 


I 


S 


1 


3 
S 


CEYLON 

American and Canadian Societies 

American Board of Commissioners for For. Miss. . . 
Trustees of Jaffna College Funds. ,, 


1 

1 
1 

1 


2 

5 
6 

8 


3 


4 

5 
6 

8 


6 
5 


6 

29 


7 

33 


8 

62 


9 

2 
1 
3 

1 

14 
1 

1 


10 

176 
(176) 

389 


11 

61 

45 
20 


12 

324 
176 
500 

61 
389 
45 
20 


13 
4 


14 

153 


15 

100 


16 

253 


17 

121 
121 

12 
315 
14 
25 
11 
29 
327 
733 

17 
871 


18 

975 
16106 

932 
99 
2829 

(20941) 
(20941) 


19 

450 
6817 
581 
307 
26 
881 

(9 062) 
(9 062) 


20 

9863 
9863 

1425 
22923 
581 
1239 
125 
3710 
22427 
52430 

697 
62990 


21 


21 


23 


24 




British Societies 

Baptist Missionary Society 


Church Missionary Society 


Church of England Zenana Missionary Society. 
Friends' Foreign Mission Association 




Society for the Propagation of the Gospel 


1 
2 


2 
10 





2 
10 


~fi 


29 


33 


62 


2 
21 
40 


110 
(499) 


30 
(166) 


140 
3652 
4307 


~4 

1 
I 

2 
6 


153 

104 
65 

169 
322 


100 
112 
112 

212 


253 

216 
65 

281 
534 


Wesleyan Methodist Missionary Society 


Totals, 7 British Societies 


Ceylon Societies 




























National Council, Y. M. C. A. of India and Ceylon. . 
Totals, 3 Ceylon Societies 


3 


16 





15 


2 
7 


(29) 


(33) 


6 
68 


1 
44 


(675) 


(156) 


4807 


International Society 
Salvation Army 


Grand Totals, 13 Societies 




PERSIA 

American Society 
Board of For. Miss., Presbyterian Church in U. 8. A. 
British Society 














1 


1 





1 


11 
3 


694 
145 


423 
100 


1117 
245 














97 
6 

2 
4 
6 

109 


1601 
126 

(1727) 


800 
52 

(852) 


2401 
178 

120 
190 
310 

2889 














Continental Societies 






































































Grand Totals, 4 Societies 














1 


1 





1 


14 


839 


523 


1362 
















TURKISH EMPIRE 

(Except Syria and Palestine) 

American Societies 

American Board of Commissioners for For. Miss. a . . . 


5 
1 


419 
50 


135 


554 
50 


5 


(4) 




36 


49 
1 


(316) 
163 


(587) 


3843 
163 


1 








265 
4 
4 
3 

1 
1 
278, 

1 

2 
17 
4 
23 

4 

306 


(223) 

211 
236 
(670) 

525 
(625) 

135 
(1 330) 


(258) 

171 
(429) 

442 
(44"2) 

95 
(966) 


17338 
232 
121 

258 

382 
236 
18567 

100 

300 
967 
335 
1602 

230 
20499 


i* 

1 
1 

7 
~7 

8 








57 
67 

300 
300 

367 


Board of For. Miss,, Reformed Church (Dutch) 
Board of For. Miss., Ref. Presby. Ch. (Covenanter) 
Trustees of Donations for Education in Turkey b . . . 


1 
1 

1 
9 


107 
157 
78 
811 


76 
211 


107 
233 
78 
1022 


6 


(4) 





36 


2 

1 

1 
65 


89 
113 
140 
(821) 


78 
(665) 


70 
89 
191 
140 
4496 


1 











Trustees of Robert College 


Totals, 7 American Societies 


British Society 


Continental Societies 


































Deutscher Hiilfsbund fur christliches Liebeswerk. . . 














1 


13 


9 


22 


























Totals 3 Continental Societies . . 


"~* 





~~ 





1 


13 


9 


22 


























Indigenous Society 


Grand Totals, 12 Societies 


9 


811 


211 


1022 


6 


(17) 


(9) 


58 


65 


(821) 


(665) 


4496 


1 













SYRIA AND PALESTINE 

American Societies 














1 

2 


10 


19 
20 


19 
30 


2 

1 
7 
2 


442 


23 
162 


76 
23 
604 
104 


1 
1 


18 
27 


46 


64 

27 


6 
2 
92 
8 
3 
7 

118 

39 
45 
2 
14 

2 
2 
2 
3 
2 
111 

8 
10 
4 
2 
24 

2 
255 


18 
3234 

205 
(3457) 

365 
941 
35 
539 

12 
(1 892) 

85 
(85) 

35 

(5 469) 


23 
1205 

195 
(1 423) 

2174 
1395 
30 
255 

70 
100 

180 
(4 204) 

19 
(19) 

35 
(6 681) 


225 
41 
4439 
364 
100 
400 

5569 

2539 
2336 
65 
794 

82 

100 
316 
180 
6412 

360 
314 
293 
104 
1071 

70 
13122 


1 
1 

1 


34 
34 

34 





66 
66 

66 


Board of Directors, Jebail Settlement , 


Board of For. Miss., Fresbyterian Church in U. S. A. 
Board of For. Miss., Ref. Presb. Ch. (Covenanter). . . 






1 
1 

1 


376 
376 

21 





376 
376 

21 


1 
1 


. 10 


39 

47 


49 

47 


1 
13, 

2 
3 

2 
2 
6 
1 


449 
(891) 

109 
182 
84 


(185) 

119 
45 
132 
61 

54 


449 
1256 

119 
154 
314 
145 

54 


2 


45 


46 


91 




British Societies 
British Syrian Mission 








32 
32 

32 








Pftlpntirm Villa PA Afifldinn 


































Reformed Presbyterian Synod of Ireland For. Miss. 


































1 


21 





21 


1 





47 


47 


1 
17 


375 


46 
457 


46 
832 














Totals, 10 British Societies , 


Continental Societies 


Oesterlands Missionen (Danish Eastland Mission).. . 


































































Verein fur das Syrische Waisenhaus in Jerusalem. . . 














1 

1 


17 
17 


2 
2 


19 
19 


























Syria Society 


Grand Totals 22 Societies 


2 


397 


% 


397 


6 


27 


88 


115 


30 


(1 266) 


(642) 


2088 


2 


45 


46 


91 





TURKISH EMPIRE 

Doea not include data for Central Turkey College or for Euphrates College, which are independent 
institutions and are recorded i'n separate entries. 



b Commonly known as the Central Turkey College or Alntab College. 



cation 



In many cases the returns received indicate only total enrollment under each class of institutions. It was thought desirable, where possible, to indicate even partial returns by sexes, in 
)ion of the relative number of males and females under instruction. Where the division is incomplete this fact is indicated by parentheses. 



order to give some indi- 



108 



WORLD ATLAS OF CHRISTIAN MISSIONS 



EDUCATIONAL Continued 



COUNTRIES AND SOCIETIES 


UNIVERSITIES AND 
COLLEGES 


THEOLOGICAL AND 
NORMAL SCHOOLS AND 
TRAINING CLASSES 


BOARDING AND HIGH 
SCHOOLS 


INDUSTRIAL TBAININO 
INSTITUTIONS AND 
CLASSES 


ELEMENTARY AND VILLAGE 
SCHOOLS 


KINDERGARTENS 


Institutions 


Students 


Institutions and Classes 


Students 


j 


Pupils 


Institutions and Classes 


Pupils 


J 


Pupils 


Schools and Classes 


Pupils 


3 


Ft 


1 


I 


3 


1 


1 


8 


| 


S 


Ft 


1 


J 


Ft 


, 


i 


1 

Ft 


, 


BULGARIA 

American Societies 

American Board of Commissioners for For. Miss 
Board of Foreign Missions, Methodist Episcopal Ch. 
Totals, 2 American Societies 


1 

1 
1 


2 

80 
80 


3 


4 

80 
80 


5 

1 
1 


6 

1 
1 


7 


8 

1 
1 


9 

1 

] 
2 


10 


11 

75 
36 
111 


12 

75 
36 
111 


13 

1 
1 


14 


15 


16 

30 
30 


17 

8 
1 
9 

1 
10 


18 


19 


20 

298 
22 
320 

320 


21 

1 
1 

1 


22 


23 


24 

130 
130 

130 


Continental Society 


Grand Totals, 3 Societies 


1 


80 





80 


1 


1 





1 


2 





111 


111 


1 








30 




NORTH-EAST AFRICA 

(Egypt to Somaliland) 

American Societies 
Board of For. Miss., United Presbyterian Church.. . 


1 


155 




155 


1 


12 




12 


25 


2342 


3063 


5405 


1 


20 




20 


163 
164 

7 
6 

3 
16 

42 
1 
1 
2 
46 

226 


0878 
9878 

200 

70 
270 

666 

10 
75 
(751) 

(10899) 


1444 
200 
1644 

306 
100 

120 
626 

284 

60 
30 
(384) 

(2364) 


11322 
200 
11622 

306 
300 

190 
796 

960 
25 
70 
105 
1160 

13478 














Totals, 2 American Societies 


1 


155 




155 


1 
1 


12 


11 


12 
11 


25 
3 


2342 

130 


3063 
110 


6405 
240 


1 


20 




20 


British Societies 
Church Missionary Society 




Jerusalem and the East Mission 


























2 











1 
1 





35 


35 


North Africa Mission 


Totals, 4 British Societies 







""" 





1 


""* 


11 


11 


6 


130 


110 


240 


Continental Societies 






































































Ver. tot. Uitbrelding v. het Evangelie in Egypte . . . 

Tntftlfi 4 fVmtinpntn.1 RnninHpa 


























































1 

3 


4 
24 


35 


4 
59 


Grand Totals, 10 Societies 


1 


155 





155 


2 


12 


11 


23 


30 


2472 


3173 


5645 




NORTH-WEST AFRICA 

(Tripoli to Morocco) 
British Society 


























2 
1 

2 
6 


4 

6 
10 


35 

18 
63 


35 
4 

24 
63 








; 


; 


2 
2 


: 


100 
100 


100 
100 


Continental Society 
Miss. Protestants Franchise en Kabylie 

















- 




















Independent Society 
















' 






































WESTERN AFRICA 

(Senegal to Nigeria) 
American and Canadian 'Societies 

Board of For. Miss., Gen. Synod, Evan. Luth. Ch. . . 
Board of For. Miss., Methodist Episcopal Church.. . 
Christian and Missionary Alliance 


1 





1 


1 


1 
1 








14 

30 


2 
1 


77 
16 


35 
6 


112 
22 


1 

2 








90 
69 


8 
17 
4 
1 
30 
2 
3 
23 
1 
3 
2 
12 
1 
4 
111 

233 
12 
45 

10 
37 
3 
191 
631 

138 
110 
2 
250 

6 

6 
903 


116 

43 

35 
159 
30 
376 

(769) 
8835 

2473 
62 

[11 370) 

3929 
2273 

(6 202) 

220 
18 551) 


74 

23 

10 
16 
20 
412 

(555) 
3444 

500 
35 

(3979) 

1627 

587 

(2214) 

125 
(6873) 


190 
853 
300 
39 
1186 
80 
66 
855 
45 
175 
5C 
788 
75 

4702 

12279 
300 
3300 

532 
2973 
97 
13061 
32542 

5556 
2860 
80 
8496 

MOO 

345 
46185 


7 
3 

10 

5 
15 


153 
146 

299 

75 
374 


153 
150 

303 

50 
353 


306 
296 

602 

125 
727 




Dom. and For. Miss. Soc., Protestant Episcopal Ch. 
Dom., Frontier, and For. Miss. Soc., United Brethren 
For. Miss. Board, National Baptist Convention 
For. Miss. Society, United Brethren in Christ 


























26 
5 


57 


68 


565 
125 


5 
1 


182 
23 


21 
20 


203 
43 


























1 


171 





171 


Miss. Soc., African Methodist Episcopal Zion Church 
Miss. Soc. of the Wesleyan Methodists of America. . 
Parent Miss. Soc., African Methodist Episcopal Ch. . 


























































































2 


60 


39 


99 


















































1 
1 


16 


1 


1 

16 


2 

7 
2 
1 


105 
50 
10 


15 


44 

105 
65 
10 


37 

5 

1 
1 


(381) 
350 
30 


(148) 

201 

9 
4 


(1 094) 

551 

9 
34 


9 
1 


(205) 
~7 


(41) 


405 

~7 


British Societies 


Primitive Methodist Missionary Society 








United Free Church of Scotland's For. Miss. Com.. . 


1 


7 





7 














1 


18 





18 


1 


70 


25 


95 




2 


23 





23 


10 

4 
2 


165 

110 

47 


15 


180 

110 

47 


6 
14 

9 
11 


(398) 

538 
1037 


(214) 

61 
266 


466 
1078 

599 
1303 


2 

1 


77 

29 


25 


102 
29 


Totals, 8 British Societies 


Continental Societies 






Totals, 3 Continental Societies 





~~~ 


_ 


_ 


6 


157 


~* 


157 


20 


1575 


327 


1902 


1 
"1 


29 
52 


130 


29 
182 


International Society 


Indigenous Society 


























Grand Totals, 27 Societies 


3 


23 


1 


24 


18 


(322) 


(15) 


381 


71 


(2 354) 


(689) 


4074 


13 


(363) 


(196) 


718 





SOUTH-WEST AFRICA 


















































(Kamerun to German South-west Africa) 


















































American Societies 


























































_ 


__ 


1 


17 





17 





_ 


_ 


_ 








__ 


^_ 


265 


4452 


3653 


8105 








_ 


J 




































00 






1 017 


















































046 




























































Board of For. Miss., Presbyterian Church in U. S. A. 


























6 


(741) 


(84) 


1075 


4 


4 





4 


32 


(416) 


(328) 


1134 











_ 


Christian and Missionary Alliance 





_ 








1 


15 





15 


_ 


__ 










__ 





_ 


e 







1000 





w. 





^_ 




































9t 






9 wn 










Foreign Christian Missionary Society 










1 


50 


15 


65 


1 





. 


23 




_ 






13 





. 


1075 


1 





ll 


?5 
















3 


82 


15 


97 


7 


(741) 


(84) 


1098 


4 


4 





4 


373 


(4 868) 


(3981) 


16079 


1 


_ 


_ 


?H 





















































WESTERN AFRICA 

In connection with the Lucy Memorial Home for Freed Slaves. 
b Estimate by the Society. 



In many cases the returns received indicate only total enrollment under each class of institutions. It was thought desirable, where possible, to indicate even partial returns by sexes, in order to give some indi- 
cation of the relative number of males and females under instruction. Where the division is incomplete this fact is indicated by parentheses. 



STATISTICAL TABLES 



109 



EDUCATIONAL Continued 



COUNTRIES AKD SOCIETIES 


UNIVBRSITIES AND 
COLLEGES 


THEOLOGICAL AND 
NORMAL SCHOOLS AND 
TRAINING CLASSES 


BOARDING AND HIGH 
SCHOOLS 


INDUSTRIAL TRAINING 
INSTITUTIONS AND 

CLASSES 


ELEMENTARY AND VILLAGE 
SCHOOLS 


KINDERGARTENS 


Institutions 


Students 


Institutions and Classes 


Students 


1 

(-H 


Pupils 


Institutions and Classes 


Pupils 


m 
1 


Pupils 


ra 
1 


Pupils 


f 


Femalea 


3 
& 


1 


PH 


I 


1 


Females 


I 


m 


S" 
PH 


a 
1 


w 

<L> 

1 


r 
ft 


3 



i 


ft 


| 


SOUTH-WEST AFRICA-Concfoded 
(Kamerun to German South-west Africa) 

British Societies 

Baptist Missionary Society 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 
2 


6 

(19) 


7 

(14) 


8 

53 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 

402 
24 
57 
7 
490 

227 
23 
49 
1 
42 
25 
123 
490 

1353 


18 

5951 

207 
(6 158) 

7736 
1546 
1302 

(10 584) 
(21 610) 


19 

3053 

200 
(3253) 

888 
75 
2122 

(3085) 
(10319) 


20 

9004 

1558 
407 
10969 

8624 
1239 
1621 

3424 
383 
3380 
18671 

45719 


21 

1 


22 


23 


24 
25 








































































Totals, 4 British Societies 










2 
1 


(19) 
38 


(14) 


53 

38 


10 


410 


126 


536 


1 


26 




26 


Continental Societies 

Evangelische Mfssfonsgeaellschaft zu Basel 




Missionsgesellschaft der Deutschen Baptisten 














3 


110 





110 


1 


12 





12 


1 





90 


go 






































Socie'te' des Missions e'vange'liques 


: 


= 


= 


= 


1 
1 
6 

11 


12 
25 
185 

(286) 


(29) 


12 
25 
185 

335 


5 
6 
22 

29 


422 
(1 163) 


126 

(210) 


648 
1646 


2 
4 

8 


25 
61 

65 


26 
116 

116 


51 
167 

171 


Svenska Misslonsfb'rbundet 


Totals, 7 Continental Societies 


Grand Totals, 18 Societies 





SOUTH AFRICA 

(The British Union with Basutoland and Swaziland) 

American Societies 

American Board of Commissioners for For. Miss. . . 
B'd of For. Miss., Internat'l Apostolic Holiness U'n 
Foreign Missionary Board of the Brethren in Christ 
For. Miss. Board, National Baptist Convention 
General Miss. Board of the Free Methodist Church. 










1 














397 










68 
1 
6 
12 
13 
2 


20 

109 
490 


101 

239 


4359 
20 
250 
210 
72! 
70 
1277 
285 
59 
7259 

180 
1508 
150 
19887 
3715 
25440 

7879 
600 
783 
1076 
7161 
610 
852 
2794 
10776 
130 
896 
33557 

490 
342 
1234 
1420 
9911 
1998 
8669 
8528 
8120 
1375 

7400 
659 
45560 
95706 

3962 
439 
4401 

1850 
168 213 


1 
1 

1 


9 
1 

9 


10 
10 

10 


19 
19 

19 













































3 


35 


11 


46 


( 


40 


16 


56 


1 
1 


30 


22 
63 


52 
63 
























Parent Miss. Soc., African Methodist Episcopal Ch . 













2 


39 


42 


81 

























4! 


585 


692 




































7 
154 

4 
36 
4 
408 
85 
537 

157 
14 

24 
33 
176 
21 
38 
18 
237 


(1204) 

14117 
(14 117) 

3612 

570 
3036 

1232 
5608 


(1 032) 

5770 
(5770) 

4267 

506 
4125 

1562 
5168 




~"~" 


"~~ 





. 


6 


74 


63 


127 


6 


(40) 


(16) 


453 


2 


30 


85 


115 


British Societies 

Birmingham Young Men's Foreign Mission Society. 



































Primitive Methodist Missionary Society 








- 





1 
3 

4 

6 


10 
274 

284 

62 


110 
110 


10 
384 

394 
62 


~7 
1 
8 

1 


634 
(634) 

33 


902 
(902) 


1536 
180 
1716 

33 


1 
2 

3 
3 


30 
156 

186 


51 
51 

24 


30 
207 

237 

24 


United Free Church of Scotland's For. Miss. Com.. . 


Totals, 5 British Societies 


Continental Societies 
Berliner Mlssionsgesellschaft 




Miss., Hannoverschen evangelisch-luth. Freikirche.. 














































1 
2 
1 


14 

A 





14 

A 








































1 
























Rheinische Missionsgesellschaft 














2 


17 





17 


3 


300 





300 














Soci&e' des Missions vangeliques 






















4 
















41 
759 

5 
3 
6 
17 

44 
193 
75 

122 
60 


345 
(14 403) 

934 
747 


551 
(16 179) 

300 
1251 


Totals, 11 Continental Societies 










13 


97 




97 


8 


333 




333 


3 

1 
1 

4 


200 


24 

22 

57 


24 

22 
324 

257 


South Africa Societies 

Church of England Province of South Africa: 
















1 
1 
2 
3 
1 
2 


22 

12 
35 
11 
20 


6 
50 


22 
71 
18 
35 
11 
70 


1 
1 
5 
1 

1 


187 
214 


154 
82 
53 
30 
30 


341 

82 
267 
30 
30 






Diocese of Pretoria . . 


Diocese of St. John's, Kaffraria 




Congregational Union of South Africa 
Dutch Reformed Ch. of South Africa, Gen. Miss. Com. 
Dutch Reformed Ch., South Africa, Orange Free State 
Dutch Reformed Ch., South Africa, Transvaal Synod 














1 


29 





29 
















































































1 


120 


25 


145 


135 
22 
788 
1470 

65 
13 
78 

31 

3029 


21931 
(23 612) 

2069 
(2 069) 

(55405) 


23629 
(25 180) 

1893 
(1 893) 

(50 054) 


Presbyterian Church of South Africa, Native Mission 
























































South African (Wesleyan) Missionary Society 
Totals, 15 South African Societies 














12 

2 
3 
5 

1 
41 


13 
(142) 

51 

(5lj 

19 
(667) 


(56) 
(219) 


13 
269 

51 
7 
68 

19 
964 


13 
22 

43 


1504 
1905 

2912) 


677 
1026 

1944) 


2181 
2931 

5433 


1 

1 
16 


(320) 

13 

(549) 


(104) 
(264) 


748 

13 
1137 


International Societies 
Mission der Brudergemeine 


Salvation Army 


Totals, 2 International Societies 


Independent Society 

South African Compounds and Interior Mission. . . . 

Grand Totals, 43 Societies 1 




SOUTHERN CENTRAL AFRICA 

(Five British Protectorates) 
American Societies 

American Board of Commissioners for For. Miss. . . 
Board of For. Miss., Methodist Episcopal Church. . 
For. Miss. Board, National Baptist Convention 


















3 






167 


1 


114 





114 


1 
19 
2 
15 
37 

21 
89 
93 
14 
6 

542 
72 
20 
72 
929 


100 
(100) 

500 
2830 

19387 
2298 

(25 015) 


40 
(40) 

600 
653 

10000 
1468 

(12721) 


42 
1401 
140 
374 
1957 

1100 
3483 
2599 
1063 
200 

29387 
3766 
1073 
2770 
45441 




































































Totals, 4 American Societies 














1 
1 


25 
2 





25 
'2 


3 

1 








167 

426 


1 


114 





114 


British Societies 

Baptist Industrial Mission of Scotland 


Church of Scotland Foreign Mission Committee 


Nyasaa Industrial Mission 














1 


50 





50 




























Society for the Propagation of the Gospel 











___ 


1 

1 


76 
50 





76 
50 


3 
1 
32 


206 
1256 


337 


206 
1593 


1 


100 


, 


100 


United Free Church of Scotland's For. Miss. Com. . 
Universities 1 Mission to Central Africa 




Zambesi Industrial Mission 





= 








1 
6 


54 
257 





54 
257 


37 


(1 462) 


(337) 


2225 


7 
8 


(100) 





"1004 
1104 


Totals, 10 British Societies 





SOUTH-WEST AFRICA 

Normal schools. 

SOUTH AFRICA 

The government report of Native and Coloured Schools for the year 1908, as far as classification 
on the results of examination showed, was as follows: Matriculation, 0; University School 



Higher, 3; Standard VII, 6; Standard VI, 953; Standard V, 1,949; Standard IV. 4,327; 
Standard III, 7,201; Standard II, 10.718; Standard I, 12,293; Sub-Standards, 50,857. 

SOUTHERN CENTRAL AFRICA 

" This is the monthly average of those employed in the industrial undertakings. 

. In many cases the returns received indicate only total enrollment under each class of institutions. It was thought desirable, where possible, to indicate even partial returns by sexes, in order to give some indi- 
cation of the relative number of males and females under instruction. Where the division is incomplete this fact is indicated by parentheses. 



110 



WORLD ATLAS OF CHRISTIAN MISSIONS 



EDUCATIONAL Continued 



COUNTRIES AND SOCIETIES 


UNIVERSITIES AMD 
COLLEGES 


THEOLOGICAL AND 
NORMAL SCHOOLS AND 
TRAINING CLASSES 


BOARDING AND Hian 
SCHOOLS 


INDUSTRIAL TRAINING 
INSTITUTIONS AND 
CLASSES 


ELBMENTABT AND VILLAGE 
SCHOOLS 


KINDERGARTENS 


Institutions 


Students 


Institutions and Classes 


Students 


Institutiona 


.Pupils 


m 
1 

CO 

a 


Pupils 


3 


Pupils 


m 

1 
1 


Pupils 


i 


03 

1 



I 


i 


m 

P 


*rt 

S 


i 


3 




3 
& 


1 


Females 


, 


1 


, 


I 


1 


Ft 


I 


SOUTHERN CENTRAL AFRICA-Concluded 
(Five British Protectorates) 

Continental Societies 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


16 


16 


17 

8 
B 


18 

163 
(183) 

80 
(80) 

(25358) 


19 

294 
(294) 

66 
(66) 

(13 121) 


20 

> 

457 
600 

1067 

21726 
146 
21872 

70327 


21 


22 


23 


24 


Socie'te' des Missions e*vange1iques 














1 











1 











1 













Totals, 3 Continental Societies 










1 

2 


135 




135 


1 








1 








17 

224 
3 
227 

1210 


South Africa Societies 

Dutch Reformed Ch. of South Africa, Gen Miss. Com. 
Presbyterian Church of South Africa, Native Mission 














2 

9 


136 
392 





135 
392 


41 


(1 462) 


(337) 


2392 


10 


(214) 





1218 


Grand Totals, 19 Societies 




EAST AFRICA 

(Portuguese, German, British) 

American Societies 


































4 
47 
26 
6 
82 

187 

15 
113 
316 

42 
60 
2 
45 
51 
14 
204 

9 
62 
71 

43 
716 


200 
(200) 

21243 

4569 
26812) 

1108 
1665 
50 
1478 
705 
301 
S307 

174 
2312 
2486 

(33 805) 


100 
(100) 

18694 

192 
(18886) 

464 
1176 

348 
687 
144 
2819 

21 
2262 
2283 

(24 088) 


120 
1084 
300 
413 
1917 

89937 

500 
4761 
46198 

1572 
2841 
50 
1826 
1392 
445 
8126 

195 
4574 
4769 

1150 
61160 


1 
1 

1 


10 
10 

10 


10 
10 

10 


i 

20 
20 

20 


Board of For. Miss., Methodist Episcopal Church. . 
General Miss. Board of the Free Methodist Church. . 


























1 





25 


25 













































Totals, 4 American Societies 














11 
2 
1 
3 
17 


Ill 
31 
4 
68 
214 

20 


66 
66 


177 
31 

4 
68 
280 

11 

20 


1 

4 
4 

11 
19 

1 


257 
150 

375 
7B2 


26 

65 
60 

35 
160 


26 

322 
200 

410 
932 

19 


1 
1 


15 
16 





15 
16 


British Societies 
Church Missionary Society 


Society for the Propagation of the Gospel . . 


United Methodist Church Missionary Society 




Totals, 4 British Societies 


Continental Societies 
Berliner Misslonsgesellschaft 


Evangelisch-Lutherische Mission zu Leipzig. 




Evan. Missionsgesellschaft fur Deutsch-Ostafrika.. . 
Mission Romande 














6 


8 
14 

(42) 





8 
14 
6 
69 


1 
2 


19 
(19) 





19 
38 


10 
10 
3 


60 
60 


8 
8 


58 
68 


Neukirchener Missionsanstalt 


Totals, 6 Continental Societies 


International Societies 






















































3 


_ 


*~~ 


^"~ 


Independent Society 
South African Compounds and Interior Mission 

Grand Totals, 17 Societies 






































22 


(256) 


(66) 


339 


22 


(801) 


(176) 


996 


14 


66 


8 


73 




MADAGASCAR AND MAURITIUS 
American Societies 


1 
1 


10 
10 





10 
10 


1 
1 
2 

4 
1 
6 

4 
2 
6 


12 
(12) 

130 
20 
160 

71 
(71) 





12 
50 
62 

130 
20 
160 

30 
71 
101 


















. 20 






1300 
1300 

2801 
12870 
609 
16340 

15424 
8990 
24414 

60 
42114 














United Norwegian Lutheran Church of America 
Totals, 2 American Societies 


7 
3 
1 
11 

5 
6 


694 
530 

1224 


432 
350 
88 
870 


1126 
880 
88 
2094 


1 
1 


46 
46 





46 
46 


20 

72 
224 
15 
311 

358 
145 
603 

1 

836 


1859 
7213 
(389) 
(9 461) 

5681 
(6 681) 

(16 142) 


942 
5657 
(192) 
(6 791) 

3309 
(3 309) 

(10 100) 


British Societies 

Friends' Foreign Mission Association 


London Missionary Society 


Society for the Propagation of the Gospel 


Totals 3 British Societies 


Continental Societies 

Norske Missionsselskab 


Socie'te' des Missions e'vange'liques. . . J 


Totals, 2 Continental Societies 


Indigenous Society 


Grand Totals, 8 Societies 


1 


10 





10 


13 


(233) 





313 


16 


1224 


870 


2094 


1 


46 





46 




CAPE VERDE AND MADEIRA ISLANDS 
American Societies 


































1 
3 
4 








75 
52 
127 














Board of For. Miss., Methodist Episcopal Church. . . 




































































































ARGENTINE REPUBLIC 

American Societies 
Board of For. Miss., Methodist Episcopal Church. . . 










1 


9 




9 


3 


70 


54 


124 










12 
1 
13 

1 
16 
17 

30 








1117 
16 
1133 

15 
5181 
5196 

6329 








, 





Totals, 2 American Societies 





_ 








1 


9 


~~ 


9 


3 


70 


64 


124 


~~" 


_ 


__ 





British Societies 






































































Grand Totals, 4 Societies 














1 


9 





9 


3 


70 


54 


124 
















CHILE 

American Societies 
Board of For. Miss., Methodist Episcopal Church . . . 
Board of For. Miss., Presbyterian Church in U. S. A. 


___ 


_ 





_ 


3 


12 





12 


6 
2 








1100 
500 














5 

4 
9 

4 
13 


166 

(166) 


37 

(37) 


213 

100 
313 

203 
516 














Christian and Missionary Alliance 
Totals, 3 American Societies 





_ 


~~ 


__ 


3 


12 


~~~ 


12 


8 


~ _ 


~~" 


1600 


~~ 


~~ 







British Society 


South American Missionary Society 














3 


12 





12 


8 








1600 

















In many cases the returns received indicate only total enrollment under each class of institutions. It was thought desirable, where possible, to indicate even partial returns by sexes, in order to give some indi- 
cation of the relative number of males and females under instruction. Where the division is incomplete this fact is indicated by parentheses. 



STATISTICAL TABLES 



111 



EDUCATIONAL Continued 



COUNTRIES AND SOCIETIES 


UNmmsnTBB AND 
COLLEGES 


THEOLOGICAL AND 
NORMAL SCHOOLS AND 
TRAINING CLASSES 


BOARDING AND HIGH 
SCHOOLS 


INDUSTRIAL TRAINING 
INSTITUTIONS AND 
CLASSES 


ELEMENTART AND VILLAGE 
SCHOOLS 


KINDERGARTENS 


Institutions 


Students 


Institutions and Classes 


Students 


I 


Pupils 


Institutions and Classes 


Pupils 


.a 

1 


Pupils 


Schools and Classes 


Pupils 


i 


Females 


3 


1 


Females 


1 


S. 


Females 


I 


1 


m 

! 


1 


J 


Females 


a 
1 


8 


, 


3 


URUGUAY 
American Society 

Board of For. Miss., Methodist Episcopal Church. . . 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 

1 


10 




11 


12 
250 


13 




14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


PARAGUAY 
American Society 

Board of For. Miss., Methodist Episcopal Church. . . 
British Society 
South American Missionary Society 














1 

4 

5 


3 

30 
33 


30 
30 


3 

60 
63 


2 
2 







293 
293 


2 
2 


16 
16 


18 
18 


34 
34 


2 

1 
3 


20 
(20) 


20 
(20) 


58 

40 
98 














Grand Totals, 2, Societies i 




BRAZIL 

American Societies 

Board of For. Miss., Presbyterian Church in U. S. A. 
Board of Miss., Methodist Episcopal Church, South. 
Dom. and For. Miss. Soc., Protestant Episcopal Ch. 
Exec. Com. of For. Miss., Presbyterian Ch.' (South) . 
For. Miss. Board of the Southern Baptist Convention . 
Mackenzie College, Sao Paulo 


































"20 
6 
1 
3 
10 
3 
11 
54 

4 
1 
5 

59 


131 

78 
(209) 

(209) 


110 
57 
(167) 

(167) 


708 
225 
8 
241 
413 
135 
175 
1^905 

140 
15 
155 

2060 














1 


291 





291 














5 





225 


225 














1 
1 


50 
128 


38 


50 
166 


2 
1 
1 


3 
3 


13 


3 
3 
13 


1 
2 


8 
283 


60 
140 


68 
423 


2 


E 





340 




Totals, 7 American Societies 


3 


469 


38 


507 


4 


6 


13 


19 


8 


(291) 


(425) 


716 


2 


_ 





340 


British Societies 
Help for Brazil 






































































Grand Totals, 9 Societies 


3 


469 


38 


507 


4 


6 


13 


19 


8 


291 


425 


716 


2 








340 




BOLIVIA 

American Society 
Board of For. Miss., Methodist Episcopal Church. . . 














1 








3 


2 








220 






































PERU 
American Societies 

Board of For. Miss., Methodist Episcopal Church. . . 










1 


37 




37 


4 






107 










6 
1 
7 








273 
19 
292 











Totals, 2 American Societies 














1 


37 





37 


4 








107 











r 




ECUADOR 
American Society 


































1 








12 
















































DUTCH GUIANA 
American Society 

For. Miss. Board, National Baptist Convention. . . . 
International Society 


































1 

31 
32 


1826 
(1826) 


1471 
(1 471) 


22 

3297 
3319 




















, 


. 


1 
1 


10 
10 





10 
10 


























Grand Totals, 2 Societies 




. BRITISH GUIANA 
American and Canadian Societies 

For. Miss. Board, National Baptist Convention 
For. Miss. Com., Presbyterian Church in Canada. . . 
Miss. Soc., African Methodist Episcopal Zion Ch. . . 
Parent Home and For. Miss. Soc., African M. E. Ch., 
Seventh-Day Adventist Mission Board 



































2 
13 
1 
3 
2 
21 

30 
30 

3 

87 
141 


277 
58 
(335) 

273 

(608) 


102 
125 
(227) 

215 

(442) 


80 
379 
200 
183 
47 
889 

4380 
4380 

488 

11811 
17568 


























1 


3 





3 























Totals, 5 American and Canadian Societies 


British Societies 

London Missionary Society 




Totals, 2 British Societies 








' 


- 


1 


3 





3 




















~~ 


" 


International Society 


British Guiana Society 
Church of England Diocese of Guiana 














1 
2 


2 
5 





2 
5 











, 














Grand Totals, 9 Societies 




VENEZUELA 
American Society 


































1 








15 
















































COLOMBIA 

American Society 
Board of For. Miss., Presbyterian Church in U. S. A. 





, 




















4 





_ 


181 
































. 


__ 


CENTRAL AMERICA, INCLUDING 
PANAMA 

American Societies 

Board of For. Miss., Methodist Episcopal Church. . . 
Board of For. Miss., Presbyterian Church in U. S. A. 


































1 

5 
6 








45 

115 
160 


i 



































1 








65 














lotals, 3 American Societies 


























1 








65 








_ 








BRAZIL 

* The educational statistics for this society are incomplete and inadequately classified. The statistics include some work above the elementary grade. 



In many cases the returns received indicate only total enrollment under each class of institutions. It was thought desirable, where possible, to indicate even partial returns by sexes, in order to give some in- 
uication of the relative number of males and females under instruction. Where the division ia incomplete this fact is indicated by parentheses. 



112 



WORLD ATLAS OP CHRISTIAN MISSIONS 



EDUCATIONAL Continued 



COUNTRIES AND SOCIETIES 


UNIVERSITIES AMD 
COLLEGES 


THEOLOGICAL AND 
NORMAL SCHOOLS AND 
TRAINING CLASSES 


BOARDING AND HIGH 
SCHOOLS 


INDUSTRIAL TRAINING 
INSTITUTIONS AND 
CLASSES 


ELEMENTARY AND VILLAGE 
SCHOOLS 


KINDERGARTENS 


| 


Students 


a 


1 
1 


Students 


*a 


Pupils 


Institutions and Classes 


Pupils 


, 


Pupils 


1 


Pupils 


j 


& 


I 


1 


Females 


H 


1 


Females 


I 


1 


Females 


I 


1 








i 


ta 


a 


CENTRAL AMERICA, INCLUDING 

PANAMA-Conduded 

British Society 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 

21 
1 


18 
24 


19 

18 
(18) 


20 

1655 
42 

1757 


21 


22 


23 


24 


International Society 


































Central America Society 














2 
2 
























Grand Totals, 6 Societies 











1 








65 














28 


(24) 




MEXICO 
American and Canadian Societies 

American Baptist Home Mission Society . . . 














1 
1 

1 


10 
10 


4 


10 
10 

4 


3 
4 
6 


140 
215 


161 
1265 


301 
325 
1480 














~6 
7 
57 
33 
9 
3 
5 
6 
8 
3 
3 
139 


168 

125 
(293) 


197 

81 

350 
(628) 


365 
236 
4234 
670 
691 
370 
152 
206 
366 

350 
7640 














American Board of Commissioners for For. Miss. . . 
Amsrican Friends' Board of Foreign Missions 


Board of For. Miss., Methodist Episcopal Church. . . 
Bord of For. Miss., Presbyterian Church in U. S. A. . 
Board of Miss., Methodist Episcopal Church, South. . 
Christian Woman's Board of Missions 
Dom. and For. Miss. Soc., Protestant Episcopal Ch. 
Exec. Com. of For. Miss., Presbyterian Ch. (South) . 
For. Mission Board, Southern Baptist Convention . . . 
Gen, Miss. Board, Pentecostal Church, Nazarene 
Woman's American Baptist Home Mission Society . . 
Totals, 12 American and Canadian Societies 














1 


19 





19 


9 


466 


1300 


1766 


























































1 

1 


3 
20 





3 

20 


1 
1 


50 


120 


120 
50 


























































6 


62 


4 


66 


24 


(871) 


(2846) 


4042 
















LESSER ANTILLES 
American and Canadian Societies 

For. Miss. Board, National Baptist Convention 
For. Miss. Com., Presbyterian Church in Canada. . . 
Parent Home and For. Miss. Soc., African M. E. Ch. 


































2 
93 
1 
4 
100 

86 
4 
66 

41 

131 
172 

418 


60 
(60) 

4617 

(4677) 


120 
(120) 

4848 

(4968) 


85 

gose 

180 
100 
10321 

14977 
400 
9465 

6500 

10935 
17435 

62598 





































1 








25 














































Totals, 4 American and Canadian Societies 


"7" 





*~ 







"~~ 


" 


~ 


1 


~~ 





25 


*~~ 


" 








British Society 


Continental Society 


































International Society 
Mission dor Briidergemeine 














2 

1 
1 

3 


8 

(8) 


11 

(") 


19 

14 
14 

33 


3 

5 
8 

9 








80 

500 
580 

605 














West Indies Societies 

Church of England Diocese of Antigua 


Church of England Diocese of Barbados and 
Windward Islands 


Totals, 2 West Indies Societies 


Grand Totals, 9 Societies 




PORTO RICO 

American Societies 
American Baptist Home Mission Society 


















1 




25 


25 










1 
1 
2 

8 
2 
4 


398 


175 
455 


100 
112 
175 
853 
50 
406 

25 
1721 
















Board of Home Missions, Methodist Episcopal Ch. . 
Board of Home Missions, Presbyterian Ch. in U. S. A. 














1 





6 


6 


6 











1 











































Dom. and For. Miss. Soc., Protestant Episcopal Ch. . 
Porto Rico Miss. B'd., Gen. Coun. Evan. Luth Ch. . 
Woman's American Baptist Home Mission Society . . 
Totals 8 American Societies 














































1 


2 





2 


































1 
19 


(398) 


25 
(655) 














2 


2 


6 


8 


7 





25 


25 


1 













HAITI AND SANTO DOMINGO 
American Societies 

Dom. and For. Miss. Soc., Protestant Episcopal Ch . . 
For. Miss. Board, National Baptist Convention 
Parent Home and For. Miss. Soc., African M. E. Ch . . 


































11 
1 
2 
14 

4 

18 


80 
(80) 

(80) 


146 
(146) 

(146) 


275 
25 
226 
526 

325 
851 














































































































British Society 

















. 








1 
1 





101 
101 


101 
101 


















JAMAICA* 
American Societies 


















1 






25 










4 
1 
8 
2 
1 
4 
20 

70 
10 
82 
162 

58 


10 
(10) 

3827 


25 
(25) 

4127 


425 
250 
763 
250 
35 
150 
1873 

7339 
620 
10963 
18922 

7964 


















































For. Miss. Board, National Baptist Convention 
Parent Home and For. Miss. Soc., African M. E. Ch . . 


































































































Seventh-Day Adventist Board 










1 


4 




4 


1 






25 










British Societies 

United Free Church of Scotland's For. Miss. Com. . . 


United Methodist Church Missionary Society 


































Totals, 3 British Societies 








_ 


_ 


1 

1 


4 


21 


4 
21 




















_ 


_ 


International Society 
Mission der Briidergemeine 





MEXICO 

The educational statistics for this society are incomplete and inadequately classified. The statis- 

tics include some work above the elementary grade. 

JAMAICA 

In Jamaica the elementary schools, even when under church supervision, are, for the most part, 

supported by the Government. In the statistics here presented all elementary school work 
reported by the various denominations has been entered, whatever the source of support. 



cation 



In many cases the returns received indicate only total enrollment under each class of institutions. It was thought desirable, where possible, to indicate even partial returns by sexes, in order to give some indi- 
ion of the relative number of males and females under instruction. Where the division is incomplete this fact is indicated by parentheses. 



STATISTICAL TABLES 



113 



EDUCATIONAL Continued 



COUNTRIES AND SOCIETIES 


UNIVERSITIES AND 
COLLKGBS 


THEOLOGICAL AND 
NORMAL SCHOOLS AND 
TRAINING CLASSES 


BOABDINO AND HIGH 
SCHOOLS 


INDUSTRIAL TRAINING 
iNSTrnrnoNs AND 
CLASSES 


ELEMENTARY AND VlLLAQB 
SCHOOLS 


KINDERGARTENS 


j 


Students 


Institutions and Classes 


Students 


j 


Pupils 


Institutions and Classes 


Pupils 


j 


Pupils 


1 


Pupils 


| 


& 


I 


| 


PH 


1 


| 


CH 


, 


| 


PH 


1 


| 


Pt 





| 


PH 


I 


- JAMAICA Concluded 
Jamaica Societies 


1 


2 


3 


4 


6 

1 


6 
11 


7 


8 

11 


9 

9 


10 


11 


12 

700 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 

228 
10 
25 


18 


19 


20 

24827 
2642 


21 


22 


23 


24 




















































! 

2 
4 


8 
19 

23 


21 


8 
19 

44 


















Totals, 4 Jamaica Societies 


9 
10 


: 


: 


700 
726 


: 











263 
603 


(3837) 


(4 152) 


27469 
66218 














Grand Totals, 14 Societies 




CUBA 
American Societies 

American Baptist Home Mission Society 


















2 






173 










~4 
4 
7 

1 
2 
2 
27 


147 
(147) 


192 

300 
(492) 


174 
339 
120 
364 

24 

300 
1321 
















Board of Home Missions, Presbyterian Ch. in U. S. A, 
Board of Miss., Methodist Episcopal Church, South. . 
Dom. and For. Miss. Soc., Protestant Episcopal Ch. . 
Exec. Com. of For. Miss., Presbyterian Ch. (South). 














































































































1 


3 





3 


1 


60 


50 


110 














Home Mission Board, Southern Baptist Convention. 
Woman's American Baptist Home Mission Society . . 
Totals, 9 American Societies. . 














1 











1 








71 


























2 


3 





3 


4 


(60) 


(60) 


354 
















BAHAMA ISLANDS 
British Society 

Wesleyan Methodist Missionary Society 


























2 

3 
6 


(34) 
(34) 


(41) 
(41) 


119 

80 
199 














30 
30 








1600 
1600 














Bahama Islands Society 
Church of England Diocese of Nassau 


Grand Totals, 2 Societies 




UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, 
INCLUDING ALASKA 

(Indians and Eskimos) 

American Societies 

American Baptist Home Mission Society 


















1 


87 


42 


129 










5 

1 
4 

13 


16 
12 


4 
10 


50 
90 

16 

500 
20 

130 
22 
22 

13 
41 
25 

50 
979 

67 
1046 








__ 





American Friends Board of Foreign Missions 
American Missionary Association" 


__ 








*~ 


1 


_ 


" 


130 


1 
1 
1 
12 
1 
2 
1 








21 
28 
14 
765 
59 
128 
200 


4 





; 


~~ 


Board of Heathen Miss., Christian Reformed Ch 
Board of Home Miss., Methodist Episcopal Church. 
Board of Home Miss., Presbyterian Church in U.S.A. 
Central Board of Miss., Ref. Presbyterian Ch. in N.A. 
Dom. and For. Miss. Soc., Protestant Episcopal Ch. 
Exec. Com. of Home Miss., Presbyterian Ch. (South) 
Joint Lutheran Synod of Wis. and other States 
Home Miss. Board of Southern Baptist Convention . 
Metlakahtla Christian Mission ' 






































































































































Synod for Norwegian Evangelical Lutheran Church . 


























3 








125 














Woman's American Baptist Home Mission Society . . 
Woman's For. Miss. Soc., M. E. Church, South 
Woman's Home Miss. Soc., Methodist Episcopal Ch. 
Women's Gen. Miss. Soc., United Presbyterian Ch. . 
Totals, 20 American Societies 


























































M 
5 








69 
116 














1 

1 
37 

4 
41 


(zi) 

42 

(70) 


(14) 

26 
(39) 


^~ 


"~~ 


~~" 


. 


1 


~~ 





130 


29 


(87) 


(42) 


1654 


4 


"" 





~~ 


International Society 


Grand Totals, 21 Societies 














1 








130 


29 


(87) 


(42) 


1664 


4 













UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, 
EXCEPT HAWAIIAN ISLANDS 

(Asiatic Immigrants) 
American Societies 


































3 

26 
10 
8 

a 

4 
1 
55 


175 
(175) 





200 
2168 
250 
213 
175 
74 
92 
3172 


1 

1 
2 








20 
20 




































Board of Home Miss., Methodist Episcopal Church . . 
Board of For. Miss. , Presbyterian Church in U. S. A . . 














1 


348 


12 


360 


























































Woman's Home. Miss. Soc., Meth. Epis. Ch., South. . 
Woman's Miss. Aasociat'n, United Brethren in Christ 
Totals, 7 American Societies 














































































1 


348 


12 


360 




























HAWAIIAN ISLANDS 

(Hawaiians and Asiatic Immigrants) 
American Societies 
Board of Hawaiian Evangelical Association 














2 

1 
3 


46 
46 


25 

~5 
30 


71 

5 
76 


6 


220 


230 


450 


















5 






235 


Board of Home Miss., Methodist Episcopal Church. 
Dom. and For. Miss. Soc., Protestant Episcopal Ch. 
Free Kindergarten and Children's Aid Association . . 
Totals, 4 American Societies 


3 























8 











6 
11 


345 
(346) 


412 
(412) 


757 
992 


9 


220 


230 


460 














8 










CANADA AND THE LABRADOR 

(Indians and Eskimos) 

British Societies 
Church Missionary Society 


















1 


41 


28 


69 


1 


30 




30 


63 
1 

64 


799 
18 

817 


826 
12 

838 


1625 
30 

1666 










































2 
3 


85 
116 


67 
67 


152 
182 


Totals, 3 British Societies 


























1 


41 


28 


69 





JAMAICA 

b Calabar Institution is supported in part by the Baptist Missionary Society of Great Britain. 



UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, INCLUDING ALASKA 

* There are also 250 students in correspondent courses. 
b This school was disbanded in 1909. 



In many cases the returns received indicate only total enrollment under each class of institutions. It was thought desirable, where possible, to indi 
uication of the relative number of males and females under instruction. Where the division is incomplete (his fact is indicated by parentheses. 



indicate even partial returns by sexes, in order to give some in,- 



114 



WORLD ATLAS OF CHRISTIAN MISSIONS 



EDUCATIONAL Continued 



COUNTRIES AND SOCIETIES 


UNIVERSITIES AND 
COLLEGES 


THEOLOGICAL AND 
NonMAL SCHOOLS AND 
IIIA/NINQ CLASSES 


BOARDING AND HIGH 
SCHOOLS 


INDUSTRIAL TRAINING 
INSTITUTIONS AND 
CLASSES 


ELEMENTARY AND VILLAGE 
SCHOOLS 


KINDERGARTENS 


Institutions 


Students 


Institutions and Classes 


Students 


Institutions 


Pupils 


Institutions and Classes 


Pupils 


, 


Pupils 


00 

1 

1 


Pupils 


1 


j 


I 


1 


Females 


3 
S 


j 


& 





i 


& 


I 


I 


& 





I 


PH 


' 

i 


CANADA AND THE LABRADOR Concluded 

(Indians and Eskimos) 

Canadian Societies 9 
Presbyterian Church in Canada 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 

6 
4 
10 


10 

126 
76 
202 


11 

117 
96 
213 


12 

243 
172 
415 


13 

1 
4 
5 


14 

50 
193 
243 


15 

29 
193 
222 


16 

79 
386 
465 


17 

7 
36 
43 

8 
2 
10 

117 


18 

66 
643 
699 

99 
20 
119 

1635 


19 

65 
605 
660 

105 
25 
130 

1628 


20 

111 
1248 
1359 

204 
45 
249 

3263 


21 


22 


23 


2 




Totals, 2 Canadian Churches 


International Societies 






































































Grand Totals, 7 Societies 


























10 


202 


213 


415 


5 


243 


222 


465 




CANADA 

(Asiatic Immigrants) 

Canadian Societies 

Missionary Society of the Methodist Church, Canada 
Woman's Aux. Miss. Soc., Ch. of England in Canada 
Woman's Miss. Society, Methodist Church, Canada. . 
Totals, 3 Canadian Societies 


































2 


























~ 





1 


20 





20 


























1 
1 








18 
18 


2 


"~ 


~~ 








' ' 





1 


20 





20 
















GREENLAND 

Continental Society 
Greenland Mission, Evan. Luth. Ch. of Denmark . . 














1 



































22 








1060 














CANADA AND THE LABRADOR 

The educational statistics for Canada furnished by the Missionary Societies are fragmentary. The 
statistics for the Canadian Churches and also for the Salvation Army are from the Report of 
the Department of Indian Affairs, Dominion of Canada, 1909. 



GREENLAND 

' Statistics furnished by the Rev. J. N. Lenker, D.D., of Minneapolis. 



In many cases the returns received indicate only total enrollment under each class of institutions. It was thought desirable, where possible, to indicate even partial returns by sexes, in order to give some ini 
cation of the relative number of males and females under instruction. Where the division is incomplete this fact is indicated by parentheses. 



STATISTICAL TABLES 



115 



MEDICAL 



COUNTRIES AND SOCIETIES 


HOSPITALS, DISPENSARIES, AND PATIENTS 


SURGICAL 
OPERATIONS 

DURING 

THE YEAR 


MEDICAL SCHOOLS AND CLASSES 


SCHOOLS AND CLASSES FOR 
NURSES 


Hospitals 


i 


Hospital In-Patients 
Received during Year 


Dispensary Treat- 
ments during Year 


Outside Patients 
Visited during Year 


Total Individual 
.Patients 


Total Treatments 


1 


, 


Number of 
Institutions 
and Classes 


STUDENTS 


3 

i 

a 

fOQ 

!" 


STUDENTS 


, 


| 


I 


, 


J 


1 


JAPAN 

(With Formosa) 

American and Canadian Societies 
American Board of Commissioners for For. Miss 


1 

1 
2 

1 

! 

3 
1 
4 

1 
10 


2 

1 
2 

1 
4 

3 

1 
4 

1 
9 


3 

350 
1911 
201 
200 
2662 

2914 
57 
2971 

6633 


4 

4500 
70511 
3606 
800 
79417 

14365 
606 
14971 

94388 


5 

0781 
112 

6893 

740 
740 

7633 


6 

4850 
79203 
3919 
1000 
88972 

17951 
663 
18614 

107686 


7 

20350 
79203 
13662 
1000 
114216 

35375 
2407 
37782 

15000 
166 997 


8 

100 

100 

1503 
30 
1633 

1633 


9 

10 

10 

528 
2 
630 

640 


10 
1 

3 

1 

4 


11 

9 
9 

17 
V7 

26 


12 


13 

9 
9 

17 
17 

26 


14 

1 
1 

1 


15 


16 


17 

26 
26 

26 


Dom. and For. Miss. Soc., Protestant Episcopal Ch. . . 
Foreign Mission Com., Presbyterian Church in Canada. . 
Seventh-Day Adventist Mission Board 


Totals, 4 American Societies 


British Societies 
For. Miss. Com., Presbyterian Church of England 


Church Missionary Society 


Totals, 2 British Societies 


Independent Society 


Grand Totals 7 Societies" 




KOREA 
American and Canadian Societies 

Board of For. Miss., Methodist Episcopal Church 
Board of For. Miss., Presbyterian Church in U. S. A. . 
Board of Miss., Methodist Episcopal Church, South. . 
Exec. Com. of For. Miss., Presbyterian Church (South) 
For. Miss. Com., Presbyterian Church in Canada 


3 
t 

2 

1 

12 

1 
13 


4 
7 
! 

It 
18 


237 
1832 

2069 

117 

2186 


12192 
54273 
2063 
16833 

85361 

1866 
87217 


683 
2174 
329 

3186 
3186 


13064 
30706 
2392 
16833 

68995 

1973 
70968 


22158 
64320 
3729 
16833 
1000 

108040 

5743 
113783 


669 
1565 

382 
2616 

2616 


599 
200 

799 

121 
920 


2 
4 

6 
6 


45 
46 
45 


3 

1 
3 


8 

45 

48 
48 


1 
1 

2 
2 





5 
6 

Ti 
11 


5 


11 
11 




British Society 
Society for the Propagation of the Gospel 


Grand Totals, 7 Societies 




CHINESE EMPIRE 
American and Canadian Societies 


fj 
( 

8 
22 
25 
2 

3 

1 

t 

j 

I 
4 

e 
6 

4 
1 

1 
1 

95 

4 
19 
5 
1 
10 
7 
1 
17 
3 
6 
6 
9 
88 

2 
1 
1 
3 

~2 
1 
2 
12 

1 
2 

10 
207 


5 
11 
27 
35 

1 

t 
ft 

8 

e 

8 

t 

\ 
e 
i 

i 

2 
1 
1 
1 
1 
127 

8 
28 
10 

11 

7 

13 
4 
9 
6 
9 
110 

2 
1 

3 
1 

2 
12 

1 
1 

42 

292 


1397 
1261 
7828 
3778 
1420 

1019 
2410 
1756 
27i 

576 
214 

226 

73 
741 
40 
23012 

647 
7872 
726 
449 
7999 
1227 
19 
3734 
221 
1549 
1903 
2401 
28747 

1103 
462 

595 
2160 

2129 
404 
2533 

2305 
58757 


fl4407 
44196 
129267 
133852 
344' 

24906 
77240 
56667 
7543 

18980 
16493 

4168 

5484 
4216 

3200 
1642 
49739 
1229 
698 673 

39362 
61007 
7489 
16940 
21905 
15373 
1051 
111 302 
8919 
59321 
28646 
37427 
408742 

12442 

4595 
16102 

4585 
37724 

21281 
21281 

>>59387 
1123807 


f!099 

7965 
208! 
1231 

851 
33K 

1190 

360 
734 

54 
2 

15 
54 
246 
283 
19489 

364 
968 
341 
350 
2873 
194 
26 
502 
507 
396 
5971 
572 
13064 

51 
181 

32 
264 

500 
600 

1682 
34999 


fl5 626 
45457 
147 980 
127774 
6095 
1150 
105 
26776 
82966 
58423 
12572 

17429 
1200 
5 IK 
2 IOC 
371c 
4444 

1500 
1769 
30859 
1552 
694 606 

40373 
69847 
8556 
8013 
33321 
8381 
446 
61 7,76 
8126 
61266 
27244 
23759 
351 108 

13545 

4646 
7306 
1058 
5655 
5212 

37422 

23910 
404 
24314 

57956 
1 065 406 


t34029 
65714 
215 394 
220599 
132W 
1150 
105 
32069 
82966 
58423 
33903 
4392 
18980 
17429 
1200 
22961 
2100 
5538 
4444 

3215 
5722 
5072J 
1552 
895811 

40373 
180512 
8556 
17290 
84192 
31576 
5323 
165590 
16175 
62108 
36520 
25539 
673 754 

13545 
3402 
14142 
16745 
1058 
5655 
13458 
7523 
75528 

23910 
404 
24314 

79084 
1748491 


t802 
2495 
t3541 
3563 
42! 

663 
f67 

662 

102 

99 

*100 
148 

48 
12713 

2385 

4351 
994 

1737 
2463 
9457 
190 
989 
22566 

200 
1119 

978 
2297 

944 
944 

1867 

40387 


t243 
212 
t941 


10 
5 

1 

1 
1 

"I 

1 
21 

1 
2 
1 

10 

2 

7 
1 

2 
26 

1 

1 

1 
1 

S 

1 

65 


27 

I 

11 

i 

1 

i 

2 
68 

8 
9 

so- 
il 

(43) 
6 

34 
(156) 

4 

4 

8 
8 

16 

45 
(297) 


2 
3( 

i 
< 

69 

1 

10 
4 

r 

0) 
(18) 

(87) 


5 
4 

|| 

1 
1 

t 

t 

13^ 

i 

9 

1 

60 
15 

t 

61 
6 

34 
191 

4 

4 

8 
8 

16 

45 
401 


1 

1 

1 
17 

r 

] 

r 
c 
e 

9 
26 


2 

29 

14 
14 

43 


42 
8 

( 

8 

6 
66 

8 
4 

16 
15 

4 
47 

113 


67 
10 

~4 

1 

6 
95 

8 

4 

16 
15 

18 
61 

156 


American Board of Commissioners for For. Miss 


Board of For. Miss., Methodist Episcopal Church 


Board of For. Miss,, Presbyterian Church in U. S. A ... 
Board of For. Miss., Reformed Church (Dutch) 


970 
197 

t423 
03 

74 
79 
6 
3206 

715 

123 
367 
657 

2072 
113 

1018 
733 
5798 

140 
193 

333 

1271 
1271 

144 

10754 


Board of For. Miss., Reformed Church in U. S. A 
Board of For. Miss., Ret. Presby. Ch. (Covenanter). . . 
Board of Miss., Methodist Episcopal Church, South. . . 
Dom. and For. Miss. Soc., Protestant Episcopal Ch. . . 


For. Miss. Board of the Southern Baptist Convention.. 
For. Miss. Com., Presbyterian Church in Canada 


For Miss Society, United Brethren in Christ 


Friends' For. Miss. Soc., Ohio Yearly Meeting 


Missionary Society of the Evangelical Association 
Missionary Society of the Methodist Church, Canada. . 
Seventh-Day Adventist Mission Board 


Seventh-Day Baptist Missionary Society 


Swedish Evangelical Mission Covenant of America 


University Medical School in Canton 


Woman's Miss. Society, Methodist Church, Canada 
Woman's Union Missionary Society of America. ..... 


Yale Foreign Missionary Society : 




British Societies 






Church of Scotland Foreign Mission Committee 


For. Miss. Committee, Presbyterian Church of England 


Friends' Foreign Mission Association 


London Missionary Society 


Society for the Propagation of the Gospel 


United Free Church of Scotland's For. Miss. Com 




Wesleyan Methodist Missionary Society 


Totals, 12 British Societies 


Continental Societies 






Evangelische Missionsgesellschaft zu Basel 










Totals, 8 Continental Societies .' 


China Society 
Canton Medical Missionary Society 




Totals, 2 China Societies 


International Society 


Union Society 


Grand Totals, 48 Societies 




SIAM AND FRENCH INDO-CHINA 
American Society 
Board of For. Miss., Presbyterian Church in U. S. A. . . 


9 


11 


890 


17777 


1377 


17541 


40382 


431 


295 


3 


23 





23 


1 


6 





6 



JAPAN 

1 In addition to the above listed hospitals there are several others which are largely independent 
of missionary societies, and from which no returns were received. 



CHINA 

The Vereeniging tot oprichting en Instandhouding van Hospitalen in China Ten Dien te der 
Medische Zending contributes to the support of the woman's hospital at Amoy. 

b Only 30 of the 42 dispensaries reported the number of patients treated. 

This college is a union of the medical colleges of Peking University and the North China Edu- 
cational Union. 



* Estimated by the society. t Statistics incomplete. 

Wherever the total treatments (column 7) was not reported by the society, the total individual patients (column 6) has been repeated in the column for total treatments. Wherever tlie society hag not 
divided between major and minor operations, the total of operations has been put in the column for minor operations. Where (he total enrollment of students is incompletely divided between maleg and females, 
the incomplete figures are put in parentheses. 



116 



WORLD ATLAS OP CHRISTIAN MISSIONS 



MEDICAL Continued 



COUNTRIES AND SOCIETIES 


HOSPITALS, DISPENSARIES, AND PATENTS 


SUROICAL 
OPERATIONS 

DURING 

THE YEAR 


MEDICAL SCHOOLS AND CLASSES 


SCHOOLS AMD CLASSES FOB 
NURSES 


1 
1 


J 


Hospital In-Patients 
Received during Year 


Dispensary Treat- 
ments during Year 


Outside Patients 
Visited during Year 


Total Individual 
Patients 


S 

I 


I 


8 
if 


Number of 
Institutions 
and Classes 


STUDENTS 


Number of Schoola 
and Classes 


STUDENTS 


1 


Femalei 


I 


, 


Females 


1 


BRITISH MALAYSIA 
British Society 
Society for the Propagation of the Gospel 


1 


2 
1 


3 


4 


6 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 




DUTCH BAST INDIES 
Continental Societies 


3 

2 
3 
4 
3 
1 
1 
1 
18 


3 
2 

8 

IS 

1 

31 


400 

144 

939 
370 

1853 


58579 

0475 

6509 

4367 

5434 
84364 


8688 
264 

8952 


6667 
1882 

0619 

16136 
5001 

5434 
43739 


58979 
1882 

16931 

32754 
28104 

5434 
144 084 


348 
348 





"I 
1 


10 
10 


1 
1 


11 
11 


2 
1 

3 





3 
~3 


3 
3 


Java Comit^ 




Nederlandsch Zendelinggenootschap 




Neukirchener Missionsanstalt 


Rheinische Missionsgesellschaf t 


Utrechtsche Zendingsvereeniging 


Zcnding v. d. Geref. Kerken in Nederland 


Totals, 9 Continental Societies 




PHILIPPINE ISLANDS 

American Societies 
American Baptist Foreign Mission Society ... 


1 
1 

1 
1 
4 


1 
1 
1 
2 
1 
I 


193 
332 
277 
22 
824 


f2048 
300 
8000 
12140 
8146 
9224 
39858 


f396 
511 

907 


fl204 
300 
8704 
12472 
8423 
9246 
40349 


f2444 
300 
10548 
12472 
28040 
9246 
63050 


f280 
6 

2136 


7 
2 

9 














1 
1 

~2 





10 
1 
18 


10 
8 
18 


American Board of Commissioners for For. Miss 


Board of For. Miss., Methodist Episcopal Church 


Board of For. Miss., Presbyterian Church in U. S. A. . . 
Dom. and For. Miss. Soc., Protestant Episcopal Ch. . . . 
Foreign Christian Missionary Society 


Totals, 6 American Societies 




AUSTRALIA 

(Aborigines and Chinese) 

Australian Society 
Australian Board of Missions 




2 


































MELANESIA 

(Except Dutch New Guinea) 

Australasian Societies 
Australian Board of Missions 


1 
3 

3 
6 


2 
1 
8 
11 

11 





186 
186 

186 





186 
186 

*2000 
2186 


186 
186 

2000 
2186 


200 
200 





























Presbyterian Church of New Zealand 


Presbyterian Church of Victoria 


Totals, 3 Australasian Societies 


Britisb Society 
John Q. Paton Mission Fund 


Grand Totals, 4 Societies 




MICRONESIA 

(Except Hawaiian Islands) 

American Society 
American Board of Commissioners for For. Miss 




2 










600 


300 






















INDIA 

American and Canadian Societies 

American Baptist Foreign Mission Society 


9 

K 

*j 

1 

1 
1 
6 
8 
2 
1 
2 

4 
3 
5 
3 

1 

2 
2 
1 
57 

1 
1 

5 

1 

14 
19 
2 
4 

1 
2 


17 

7 

2 
1 
3 
4 
10 
14 
2 
1 
7 
4 
20 
3 
5 
11 
1 
3 
"3 
3 
1 
2 

3 
127 

1 
2 
3 

16 
1 
1 
32 
37 

5 
1 
1 
6 
6 
1 


451 
3398 

740 
18 
650 
3773 
2062 

865 

638 
296 

200 

319 
13410 

10 
203 
213 

908 

108 
8535 
4583 
1292 
1225 

142 
656 


131090 
80254 

3000 
20112 
7207 

26729 
143 172 
13840 
16337 
44322 
16425 

50936 
15307 

2615 
13825 
6625 
10120 

900 

12424 
615 240 

19000 
12432 
31432 

101 439 
2000 
8042 
215 963 
277830 
58819 
17365 
6714 
9514 
22585 
4070 


11941 

3 

438 

1554 
788 
631 

140 

95 

347 
35 
*100 

240 
6.312 

100 
98 
198 

3,958 
200 

4501 
7280 
1646 
191 

38 
663 
20 


f21713 
83652 
2082 
2400 
20112 
8385 

28933 
132 567 
16533 
16337 
96999 
16425 
46867 
51574 
14860 

2710 
10860 
3485 
10220 

1100 

4723 
692 537 

10000 
12733 
22733 

106305 
2200 
8150 
228 999 
247995 
59257 
18781 
6714 
9627 
13736 
3441 


f44466 
83652 
8537 
3300 
20112 
16614 
15834 
66153 
249 319 
59260 
58749 
96999 
16425 
46867 
51574 
25357 
*30000 
2710 
14172 
6655 
17300 

1100 

12983 
948 138 

19200 
17710 
36910 

167028 
2200 
8150 
532466 
345987 
81217 
40497 
*16702 
15395 
60881 
6506 


t!063 
830 

30 
294 
597 
53 
531 
4376 
1651 

889 

137 

236 
7 

147 
10841 

50 
102 
162 

1217 

15914 
2323 
1473 
611 

253 
611 
6 


I 24 
1442 

35 
180 
8 
102 
2095 
431 

134 

998 

' 3 
5453 

20 
133 
153 

189 

4572 
380 
388 
159 

28 
101 


2 

1 
3 

1 
4 

1 
1 


17 

2 
19 

6 

22 

12 
3 





17 

2 
19 

6 
22 

12 
3 


1 

3 
3 

2 

1 
10 

2 
4 

1 
1 


4 


11 

11 
15 

10 
(47) 

4 
22 

n 

~6 


11 

11 
15 

32 

10 
79 

8 
22 

11 
6 


American Board of Commissioners for For Miss 


Baptist For. Miss. Board, Maritime Provinces 


Board of For. Miss., General Conference, Mennonites . 
Board of For. Miss., Gen. Council, Evan. Luth. Ch... . 
Board of For. Miss., Gen. Synod, Evan. Luth. Ch. . . . 
Board of For. Miss., German Evangelical Synod 


Board of For. Miss., Methodist Episcopal Church. . . . 
Board of For. Miss., Presbyterian Church in U. S. A. . 
Board of For. Miss, of the Reformed Church (Dutch) . . 
Board of For. Miss, of the Reformed Episcopal Church. . 
Board of For Miss , United Presbyterian Church 


Board of Management, Gwalior Presbyterian Mission. . 
Christian Woman's Board of Missions 


Foreign Christian Missionary Society 


For. Miss. Board, Baptist Conv., Ontario and Quebec . . 
For. Miss. Com. of the Presbyterian Church in Canada.. 
Friends' Foreign Miss. Soc. of Ohio Yearly Meeting .... 
General Conference of Free Baptists 


General Mission Board, Church of the Brethren 


Mennonite Board of Missions and Charities 


Missionary Society, Cal vinistic Church in U. S. A 


Seventh-Day Adventist Mission Board . 


Woman's Home and For. Miss. Soc., Advent Christian. . 
Woman's Union Missionary Society of America 


Totals, 25 American and Canadian Societies 


Australasian Societies 

Furreedpore Missionary Society 


New Zealand Baptist Missionary Society 


Totals, 2 Australasian Societies 


British Societies 
Baptist Missionary Society 


Central Asian Mission . . 


Christian Missions in Many Lands 


Church Missionary Society 


Church of England Zenana Missionary Society 1 * 


Church of Scotland Foreign Mission Committee 


Church of Scotland Women's Assoc. for For. Miss 
Edinburgh Medical Missionary Society .... 


For. Miss. Com., Presbyterian Church of England 
For. Miss, of the Presbyterian Church of Ireland .... 


Friends' Foreign Mission Association 


Lakher Pioneer Mission 


(Continued on next page) 



INDIA 

1 Report for only two of the three dispensaries. 



b Operations reported by only four of the nine hospitals. 



* Estimated by the society. t Statistics incomplete. 

Wherever the total treatments (column 7) was not reported by the society, the total individual patients (column 6) has been repeated in the column for total treatments. Wherever the society has not 
divided between major and minor operations, the total of operations has been put in the column for minor operations. Where the total enrollment of students is incompletely divided between males and females, 
(he incomplete figures are put in parentheses. 



STATISTICAL TABLES 

MEDICAL Continued 



117 



COUNTRIES AND SOCIETIES 


HOSPITALS, DisraNSAine, AND PATUKTB 


SUWICAL 

OPMATIOHB 

DURING 
THI YlAK 


MBDIOAI. SCHOOLS AMD CLASBM 


SCHOOLS AND CLASSIS ro 
NUBBBS 


W 


j 


Hospital In-Patienta 
Received during Year 


Diapenaary Treat- 
ments during Year 


Outaide Patienta 
Visited during Year 


Total Individual 
Patients 


Total Treatments 


, 


S 




Number of 
Inatitutiona 
andClaaaei 


STUDENTS 


Number of Schools 
and Classes 


ntTDIMTB 


| 


A 


I 


, 


| 


1 


INDIA Concluded 
British Societies Concluded 
London Missionary Society 


1 

1G 

1 

10 
15 

J 
5 
87 

4 

3 

1 
8 

1 
I 

1 
1 
2 

1 
1 

170 


2 

15 

3 
< 
15 
26 
1 
8 
t 
1C 
167 

3 
4 
3 
9 
1 
20 

1 

e 

3 
3 
6 

2 
1 
3 

365 


3 

3997 
571 

4258 
4602 

84 
1291 
1881 
34133 

596 
10 
606 

749 
749 

1355 
24 
1379 

11122 
11122 

61612 


4 

130220 
10131 

117047 
295027 
3375 
6527 
10189 
29702 
1326659 

20880 
66202 

50000 
3374 
140457 

17580 
17680 

23451 
1862 
25313 

3481 
12475 
15966 

2072637 


5 

3965 
211 

4961 
2060 
91 
610 
538 
429 
31362 

505 

10 
615 

298 
298 

450 
8 
458 

30 
4847 
4877 

44020 


6 

128905 
10913 
32464 
110559 
115736 
3466 
7137 
12018 
32162 
1 158.665 

20880 
22470 

50010 
3384 
96.744 

18627 
18627 

25256 
1894 
27150 

3511 
23597 
27108 

1943464 


7 

230376 
31153 
32464 
151737 
432292 
14013 
10930 
40326 
90409 
2311629 

20880 
67304 
11313 
50010 
6184 
155691 

38869 
38869 

74897 
3892 
78789 

7127 
28444 
35571 

3605697 


8 

0015 
149 

2046 
8109 
75 
118 
499 
797 
43216 

1019 

74 
1093 

1496 
1496 

369 
110 
479 

229 
229 

67606 


9 

785 
178 

"90 
1788 

22 
66 
336 
9082 

34 

6 
40 

105 
105 

320 
3 
323 

15156 


10 

1 

2 
5 

3 

1 

19 

3 
3 

1 
1 

26 


11 

10 
12 

12 
77 

10 
10 

106 


12 

5 

6 
11 

33 
33 

44 


13 

10 
17 

12 
6 

88 

10 
10 

33 
33 

150 


14 

2 
1 

1 

8 

4 
4 
28 

2 
2 

1 
1 

1 
1 

42 


15 
9 

13 
(13) 


16 

11 

12 
15 

12 
44 
144 

10 
10 

40 
40 

30 
30 

(271) 


17 

20 
7 

12 
15 

12 
44 
167 

10 
10 

40 
40 

30 
30 

316 


Ludhiana Zenana and Medical Mission 


Regions Beyond Missionary Union 


Society for the Propagation of the Gospel 


United Free Church of Scotland's For. Miss. Com 
United Orig. Secession Ch. of Scotland For. Miss. Com. 
Welsh Calvinistic Methodists Foreign Mission 


Wesleyan Methodist Missionary Society 


Zenana Bible and Medical Mission 


Totals, 21 British Societies 


Continental Societies 
Evangelisch Lutherische Mission zu Leipzig 
Evangelische Mlssionsgesellschaf t zu Basel 


Evangeliska Fosterlands-Stiftelsen 


Schleswig-Holsteinische Missionsgesellschaft 
Svenska Kyrkans Mission 


Totals, 5 Continental Societies 


International Societies 
Mission der Briidergemeine 


Salvation Army 


Totals, 2 International Societies 


Independent Societies 
North India School of Medicine for Christian Women. . 
Poona and Indian Village Mission 


Totals, 2 Independent Societies 


Indigenous Societies 

Keakar's Christian Mission at Sholapur 


Mukti Mission 


Totals, 2 Indigenous Societies 


Grand Totals, 59 Societies 




CEYLON 

American Societies 

American Board of Commissioners for For. Mlas. ..... 


2 

1 
1 

3 


3 

2 
2 
4 

7 


1840 

181 
181 

2021 


4802 

805 
3624 
4429 

9231 


5 
219 
224 

224 


6642 

810 
4024 
4834 

11476 


12757 

810 
4024 
4834 

17691 


629 

13 
13 

542 


63 
53 


























British Societies 

Friends' Foreign Mission Association 


Wesleyan Methodist Missionary Society 


Totals, 2 British Societies 


Grand Totals, 3 Societies 




PERSIA 
American Society 
Board of For. Miss., Presbyterian Church In U. S. A. . . 
British Society 
Church Missionary Society 


4 

6 
9 


11 

9 
20 


642 

2190 
2832 


22361 

32378 
64729 


10079 

4977 
15056 


19557 

39645 
69102 


77529 

74366 
161896 


467 

2040 
2607 


418 

1304 
1722 


4 

1 
6 


18 

7 
25 


1 
1 


19 

7 
26 














Grand Totals 2 Societies 




TURKISH EMPIRE 

(Except Syria and Palestine) 

American Societies 

American Board of Commissioners for For. Miss 


9 
2 
11 

2 
1 
3 

1 

2 
1 
4 

18 


8 
2 
10 

2 
1 
3 

1 
1 
1 
3 

16 


1930 
1930 

226 
271 
497 

160 
160 
2587 


19852 
19852 

5644 
8456 
14100 

3567 
3567 
37519 


1515 
163 
1678 

1678 


21782 
29412 
61194 

7385 
8890 
16275 

4600 
3727 
1405 
9732 

77201 


133783 
54280 
188063 

20115 
33347 
63462 

4600 
3727 
1405 
9732 

251 257 


1442 
186 
1628 

330 
624 
954 

744 
744 
3326 


1658 
210 
1868 

218 
213 
431 

2299 














2 

2 
2 





14 

14 
14 


14 

14 
14 






British Societies 


. United Free Church of Scotland's For. Miss. Com 
Totals, 2 British Societies 


Continental Societies 

Deutscher Hiilfsbund fur christliches Liebeswerk 


Deutsche Orient Mission 


Rheinisch Westf alischer Diakonissen Verein 


Totals, 3 Continental Societies 


Grand Totals, 7 Societies 




SYRIA AND PALESTINE 

American Societies 
Board of For. Miss., Presbyterian Church in U S. A. . . 
B'd of For. Miss., Reformed Presby. Ch. (Covenanter). 


1 

1 
2 
4 

3 
2 
1 
1 

1 
1 

9 
1 


1 
1 

3 
6 
2 
2 
2 
1 

1 

2 

20 

1 
1 


111 

220 
331 

1355 
523 
129 
283 

15 
2305 
813 


5498 
5498 

6704 
20932 
7751 
2835 
8896 
*1000 

1907 
3500 

53525 

14157 
7621 


288 
288 

5556 
2375 
762 

417 
100 

900 
10110 


5786 
5107 
220 
11113 

12260 
24662 
9036 
2964 
9596 
1100 
187 
1922 
4400 

66127 

14970 
7621 


14322 
5107 
220 
19649 

12260 
66032 
22272 
2964 
9596 
1100 
187 
1922 
4400 

120733 

14970 
7621 


202 

200 
402 

1621 

1068 

135 
112 
22936 

70 


183 
183 

847 
679 

4 
1630 


1 
1 


108 
108 





108 
108 


1 
1 





6 
6 


6 
6 




British Societies 


Church Missionary Society 


Edinburgh Medical Missionary Society 






Jessie Taylor Memorial School 




Palestine and Lebanon Nurses' Mission 


Palestine Village Mission 


Reformed Presbyterian Synod of Ireland For. Miss 
Totals, 10 British Societies 


Continental Societies 
Johannlter Hospital (German Order of St. John) b 


(Continued on next page) 



INDIA 

Major operations separately reported by only three of the ten hospitals. Data entirely lacking 



for one hospital and three dispensaries. 



SYRIA AND PALESTINE 

The Jbhannlter Hospital is given a separate entry. 

b This hospital is supported by the German Order of St. John, is attended by the medical faculty 
of the Syrian Protestant College, and the nurses are supplied by the Rheinisch Westfiilischor 

Diaconessen Verein. 

* Estimated by the society. t Statistics incomplete. 

Wherever the total treatments (column 7) was not reported by the society, the total Individual patients (column 6) has been repeated in the column for total treatments. Wherever the society has not 
divided between major and minor operations, the total of operations has been put in the column for minor operations. Where the total enrollment of students is incompletely divided between males ana females, 
the incomplete figures are put in parentheses. 



118 



WORLD ATLAS OF CHRISTIAN MISSIONS 

MEDICAL Continued 



COUNTRIES AND SOCIETIES 


HOBMTAU, DlaPBNBABIM, HID PATENTS 


SURGICAL 
OPERATIONS 

DURIIfO 

THI YDSH 


MEDICAL SCHOOLS AND CLASSES 


SCHOOLS AND CLASSES FOR 

NORMS 


Hospital! 


| 


Hospital In-PatienU 
Received during Year 


Dispensary Treat- 
ments during Year 


Outside Patients 
Visited during Year 


Total Individual 
Patiento 


Total Traatments 


| 


j 


Number of 
Institutions 
and Classes 


TUDMlfn 


Number of Schools 
and Classes 


BTDDINH 


, 


& 


H 


, 


& 


1 


SYRIA AND PALESTINE-ConcZuded 

Continental Societies Concluded 
Rheinlsch Westfalischer Diakonissen Verein 


1 

J 
1 

1 
17 


2 

1 
3 

2 
1 

1 

28 


3 

813 
IS 

180 
3644 


4 

21778 
3000 
2000 

3000 
88801 


5 

1000 

100 
11498 


6 

11135 
33726 

4015 
2000 

3280 
120 261 


7 

11135 
33726 

4015 
2000 

3280 
183 403 


8 

70 
150 

3558 


9 
10 
1723 


10 
1 


11 

108 


12 


13 
108 


14 
1 


16 


16 
6 


17 
6 


Totals, 3 Continental Societies ' 


Syrian Society 
Friends' Medical Mission 


Independent Society 


Indigenous Society 
Native Medical Mission, Sidon 


Grand Totals, 19 Societies 




NORTH-EAST AFRICA 

(Egypt to Somaliland) 

American Society 
Board of For. Miss., United Presbyterian Church 
British Society 
Church Missionary Society 


2 
4 

2 
1 
Z 

9 


9 
6 

2 
2 

18 


2914 
3115 

8595 
6595 
12624 


48041 
14814 

9744 
9744 

72599 


6521 
446 

77 
77 

6044 


66476 
18375 

43936 
9821 
63757 

128608 


66476 
31866 

43938 
9821 
63757 

142 099 


1253 
1710 

2963 


250 
777 

1027 


























Continental Societies 
Rheinlsch Westfalischer Diakonissen Verein 


Totals, 2 Continental Societies 


Grand Totals, 4 Societies 




NORTH-WEST AFRICA 

(Tripoli to Morocco) 
British Societies 


1 
1 

1 


2 
4 

6 

1 
7 


98 
98 

200 
298 


16000 
36000 
61000 

6000 
66000 


1600 
1600 

100 
1600 


10004 
36000 
46004 

6300 
51304 


16500 
36000 
52600 

6300 
57800 


600 
600 

100 
600 


1358 
1358 

200 
1668 


v 


^ 











; 










Totals 2 British Societies 


Continental Society 
Mission Protestante Francaise en Kabylle 


Grand Totals, 3 Societies 




WESTERN AFRICA 

(Senegal to Nigeria) 
American Societies 
For. Misa. Board of the Southern Baptist Convention . . 
For. Miss. Society of the United Brethren in Christ 
Totals, 2 American Societies 


3 
1 
6 

1 
1 

6 


1 


3 
6 

e 

4 
19 

8 
9 

4 

2 

40 


453 

96 
649 

86 
86 

635 


2150 
2624 
4774 

7899 
8500 
1250 
1304 
18953 

4406 
4406 

250 
28383 


47 

47 

1674 
1674 

60 
1771 


2150 
2624 
4774 

8399 
8500 
*1250 
1400 
19649