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Full text of "Medical Jurisprudence And Toxicology"

58                                                 MEDICAL  JURISPRUDENCE

16.   TRICKS OF MANNER AND HABIT

These are not infrequently found to "be hereditary; as an example left-
handedness may be cited.

17. MENTAL POWER, MEMORY AND EDUCATION

The consideration of these points for the identification of an individual is
of great importance, especially in cases of imposture, as in the well-known
Tichborne case.

18.   Dr. SREENIVAS'S NEW METHOD OF IDENTIFICATION

Dr. SreenivasG0 of Patna has found a new method of identification of
the individual. It is based on electro-cardiogram and vector-cardiogram.
He therefore calls it system " E. V." method of identification. He suggests
that no two cardiograms are alike. This may be an academic truth, but this
is not likely to be popular with doctors, or with police, inasmuch as in small
towns and villages it is not possible to obtain electro-cardiograms, and it is
not also possible to send a man to the sadar hospital in every case. I believe
that in India, there are not many sadar hospitals where such facilities exist.

19.   AMOUNT OF ILLUMINATION REQUIRED FOR
IDENTIFICATION

In questions regarding the amount of light sufficient for recognition of
the features for subsequent identification of the individual the following
points should be borne in mind : 

1.   A flash of lightning produces sufficient illumination for the identi-
fication of an individual.

A lady, on her passage home from India, was awakened one dark night by someone
moving about in her cabin. A sudden flash of lightning enabled her to see a man bend-
ing over one of her trunks, and his features appeared so distinct that she was able next
day to recognize him. The stolen articles were found upon him and he acknowledged
the theft.

2.    According to Tidy, the best known person cannot be recognized in
the clearest moonlight beyond a distance of seventeen yards.    Colonel Barry,
I.M.S., is of opinion that at distances greater than 12 yards the stature or
outline of the figure alone is available as a means of identification.71    To
define the features even at a shorter distance is practically impossible by
moonlight.

3.    No definite statement can be made about artificial light.    The best
thing is to make actual experiments with the class of light used before an
opinion is given.

4.   In the absence of any other light the identification of a person is
possible with the flash of light produced by a firearm if the person is stand-
ing in close proximity of five to twenty paces on one side of the line of fire
and if the powder is at the same time smokeless, though it is not possible
to mark the 'different characters of the features beyond three paces.   In
such cases an experiment should be tried with the weapon and powder used
before an opinion is given.

69.    Indian Nation, Patna, Jan. 7, 1953.

70.   Montgomery, Ci/elopoedia of Practical Med.; Peterson, Haines and Webster   Leg.
Med. and Toxic., Ed. n, Vol. I, p. 166.                                                                       '

71.    Legal Medicine, Vol. I, p. 572.                                           *'<