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Full text of "Medical Jurisprudence And Toxicology"

CArSE  OF DEATH

69

Table I showing the weights of the chief organs removed from the fresh

bodies of healthy Indians of the Uttar Pradesh, varying from

10 to 70 years of age, who died from violence

Males

Females

Organs

Weight in ounces

Weight in ounces

Min.    |   Max.   !  Average '    Mm.        Max.    : Average

Brain
	
	
	35              57
	47.34         30            48
	38.29

Right Lung
	
	
	i    7     ;    so
	18.15     I      6            20
	13.5

Left Lung
	
	
	5        !      30
	16 5S           5        1    18
	11.75

Heart
	
	
	3.5            13
	10                4              8
	6.5

Stomach.
	
	
	3            ;             9
	5.6             3.5           8
	5.75

Liver
	
	
	26        !      64
	43.78         30        i    50
	38.25

Spleen
	
	
	i      2.5     !      11
	6.03           2              9.5
	5.14

Bight Kidney
	
	
	2.5             6
	3.64           2              4
	3.08

Left Kidney
	
	
	1.5              6
	3.63           2        1      4
	2.95

Table II showing the weights of the organs removed from the bodies of

adult-males kept in a cool room of the mortuary of the

Grant Medical College, Bombay 10

Organs
	5
	
	Average weight in grammes
	Organs
	Average weight in grammes
 j

Brain Right Lung Left Lung Heart Liver Spleen
	
	
	1218.72 317.73 297.92 243.68 1122.96 144.76
	Kidneys Pancreas Pituitary Suprarenals Thyroid
	j 199.45 95.85 '                0.40 10.36
 1             10.25
 i
 i i

possible, but concise and clear ; it should be forwarded to the Superintendent
of Police as soon as possible, but not later than two days. Post-mortem
reports drawn up by Civil Assistant Surgeons (members of the Provincial
Medical Service in charge of dispensaries) have to be countersigned by Civil
Surgeons, but this appears to be unnecessary and meaningless, as responsi-
bility still rests with Civil Assistant Surgeons.

Some medical officers labour under a mistaken belief that they should
never be definite in their opinion as to the actual cause of death, and should,
therefore, qualify their opinion by using the word, " probably ", in their
post-mortem report. This dictum is sometimes carried so far that instead of
helping the Judge to come to a definite conclusion their opinion unneces-
sarily creates a bad impression on his mind. For instance, a Civil Surgeon
mentioned in a case where a man was murdered by the discharge of a gun
in the abdomen that in his opinion death was probably due to shock and
internal haemorrhage resulting probably from theTwouhd in the abdomen
which was probably caused by the discharge of a fire-arm. In cross-exami-
nation he had to admit that there was no possibility of any other cause of
death in the case, and he used the word, " probably ", so often in his report,
as it was customary to do so among medical officers. In connection with

10.   P. V. Gharpure and H. I. Jhala, Ind. Med. Gaz., Dec. 1949, t>. 541; Ind. Med* Gaz.,
Aug. 1950, p. 342 and Ind. Med. Gaz., Nov. 1952, p. 487.