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Full text of "Medical Jurisprudence And Toxicology"

WOUNDS

211

A curved weapon, such as a scythe or sickle, first produces a stab or
puncture and then an incised wound ; sometimes the intervening skin mav
be left intact.                                                                                           *

describing an incised wound it is always necessary to note its
direction. The commencement of the wound is deeper, and it gradually
becomes shallower and tails off towards the end, but no direction is notice-
able when the weapon has not been drawn while inflicting a wound.

Haemorrhage hi the case of incised wounds is usually much more than
in the 'case of other wounds, and it may be so severe as to cause death,
especially if a main artery has been cut.

2. Punctured Wounds. These are popularly called stabs and are
termed, penetrating wounds, when passing through the tissues they enter a
cavity of the body, such as
the thorax or abdomen.
Thfisfi-jwounds are produced
by a piercing or stabbing
instrument, such as a pin,
needle, knife, scissors, bayo-
net, spear, dagger, pick-axe,
arrow, etc. The point of the
instrument may be sharp or
blunt.

A punctured wound caus-
ed*T55f9"*a~ sharp-pointed and
cutting instrument has
clean-cut edges which are
almost parallel but slightly
curved to each other and
have sharp angles at the
two extremities. This is
commonly the case if the
instrument has two cutting
edges, and may be so with
an instrument having one
cutting and one blunt edgre.
The wound is generally
wedge-shaped, if it is pro-
duced by an instrument
with a thick, broad back
and only one cutting edge,

A sharp-pointed and cy-
lindrical or conical instru-
ment produces a wound
having a slit-like open ing.
A blunt-pointed instrument
requires considerable force
to picture the skin and
penetrate the soft tissues.
It causes a punctured
wound with lacerated edges,

Tteap^rture of a puric-
ti^S**wound in the skin is
usually a little smaller iii length than the breadth of the

f     "                      ""         V V    m*"*"^3r                     "                                                                      *      t       tr

Fig. 5r-~Iodsed wounds inflicted with a
knife.

Note also teeth-bites on face