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Full text of "Memoirs Of Joseph Grimaldi"

Vi                                  UTTEODITCTOET  CHAPTEE.

white as tiby could be washed, and hands as clean as they would
come, were taken to behold the glories of, in fair daylight.

We feel again all the pride of standing in a body on the plat-
form, the observed of all observers in the crowd below, while
the junior usher pays away twenty-four ninepences to a stout
gentleman under a Gothic arch, with a hoop of variegated lamps
swinging over his head. Again we catch a glimpse (too brief,
alas I) of the lady with a green parasol in her hand, on the out-
side stage of the next show but one, who supports herself on
one foot, on the back of a majestic horse, blotting-paper co-
loured and white 5 and once again our eyes open wide with
wonder, and our hearts throb with emotion, as we deliver our
card-board check into the very hands of the Harlequin himself,
who, all glittering with spangles, and dazzling with many
colours, deigns to give us a word of encouragement and com-
mendation as we pass into the booth!                  *

But what was this—even this—to the glories of the inside,
where, amid the smell of saw-dust, and orange-peel, sweeter far
thaa violets to youthful noses, the first play being over, the
fevers united, fihe ghost appeased, the baron killed, and every-
thing made comfortable and pleasant,—the pantomime itself
Tjegsn! 'What words can describe the deep gloom of the
opening scene, where a crafty magician holding a young lady
tn bondage was discovered, studying an enchanted book to the
w& music of a gong!—or in what terms can we express the
l&riSesf ecstasy with which, his magic power opposed by su-
perior ait, we beheld the monster himself converted into Clown!
What mattered it that the stage was three yards wide, and four \
deep? we never saw it. We had no eyes, ears, or corporeal
Senses, butfeor the pantomime. And when its short career was
ran, and the baron previously slaughtered, coming forward
wiSiMshoad upon Ms heart, announced that for that favour
Mr. liAardson returned Ms most sincere thanks, and the per-
formances would commence again in a quarter of an hour, what