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Full text of "Memoirs Of Joseph Grimaldi"

38                         MEMOIES 03? JOSEPH GBIMAZDI,                  «

*               his feelings; and with this view he had considered of a good

'°>l                 many very smart ones, but somehow or other, the young lady

no sooner opened her lips in speech, than Grrimalcli opened his in
admiration, and out flew all the compliments in empty breath,
without producing the slightest sound. He turned very red,
looked very funny, and felt very foolish. At length he made an
awkward bow, and turned to leave the room.

It was six o'clock, and the lady performers just then came in.
As he was always somewhat of a favourite among them, a few of
the more volatile and giddy—for there are a few such, in almost
all companies, theatrical or otherwise,—began first to praise his
acting, and then to rally him upon another subject.

"[Now Joe has become such a favourite," said one, " he ought
to look out for a sweetheart."

Here Joe just glanced at Miss Hughes, and turned a deeper
red than ever.

" Certainly he ought," said another. " Will any of us do,
Joel"

"Upon this Joe exhibited fresh symptoms of being uncomfort-
able, which were hailed by a general burst of laughter.

"I'll tell you what, ladies," said Mrs. Lewis, "if I'm not
greatly mistaken, Joe has got a sweetheart already."

Another lady said, that to her certain knowledge he had two,
and another that he had three, and so on: he standing among
than the whole time, with his eyes fixed ttpon the ground, vexed
to death to think that Miss Hughes should hear these libels,
aad frightened out of his wits lest she should be disposed to
Mieve them.

At length he made his escape, and being induced, by the con-
versation which had just passed, to ponder upon the matter, he
Was soon led to the conclusion that the fair daughter of Mr.
Hughes had made an impression on his heart, and that, unless
he could marry her, he would marry nobody, and must be for
ever miserable, with other like deductions which young men areneatly turned