(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Memoirs Of Joseph Grimaldi"

MEMOIRS OF JOSEPH GKIMALDI.

43

""Who is the lady?" asked Miss Hughes, inspecting some
object that lay near her with every appearance of unconcern.

" That's a secret," said Mrs. Lewis; " I know her name ; she
does not know he is in love with her yet; but I am going to give
her a letter to-morrow night, telling her all about it."

" I should like to know her name," said Miss Hughes.

"Why," returned Mrs. Lewis, "you see I promised Joe not
to tell; but as you are so very anxioxis to know, I can let you
into the secret without breaking my word: you shall see the
direction of the letter."

Miss Hughes was quite delighted with the idea, and left the
room, after making an appointment for the ensuing evening for
that purpose.

Such was Mrs. Lewis's tale in brief; after hearing which,
Grimaldi, who, not being so well acquainted with the subject,
was not so sanguine, went home to bed, but not to sleep : his
thoughts wavering between Ms friend's communication, and the
love-letter, of which he could not help thinking that he could
still polish ixp a sentence or two with considerable advantage.

The next morning was one of great agitation, and when Mrs,
Lewis posted off to the theatre with the important epistle in her
pocket, the lover fell into such a tremor of anxiety and suspense,
that he was quite unconscious how the day passed: he could
stay away from the theatre no longer than five o'clock, at which
time he hurried down to ascertain the fate of his letter.

" I have not been able to give it yet," said Mrs. Lewis, softly,
" but do you just go to the dressing-room; she is there:—only
look at her, and guess whether she cares for you or not."

He went, and saw Miss Hughes looking very pale, with traces
of tears on her face. Six o'clock soon came, and the young lady,
hurrying to the room of the confidante, eagerly inquired whether
she had got Joe's letter.

" I have," said Mrs. Lewis, looking very sly.

"Oh! pray let me see it," said Miss Hughes: "I am sotate."neatly turned