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Full text of "Memoirs Of Joseph Grimaldi"

216

MEMOIRS OP JOSEPH GKIMA1DI.

his road to town from his own house at Totteridge, which was
only two miles distant from Gfrimaldi's, and asked Grrimaldi to
play for his henefit, then close at hand: this he most willingly
promised to do.

"Ah," said Fawcett, "Tbtit understand I don't want you to
play clown or anything1 of that sort: I want you to do Brocket
in the ' Son-in-Law.'"

Grimaldi demurred a little to this proposition, considering
that as he had made a great hit in one branch of his profession,
he could not do better than retain his standing in it, without
attempting some new line in which, by failure, he might injure
his reputation. Not wishing to disoblige Mr. Fawcett if he
could possibly help it, he replied that he must decline giving
an answer at that moment, but that in the course of a day or
two he would write. Haying consulted his friends in the mean
time, and being strongly advised by them not to appear in the
character Mr. Fawcett had mentioned, he wrote, declining in
respectful terms to do so, and stating the grounds of his objec-
tion. Odd as it may appear, the little circumstance angered
him much: he never afterwards behaved towards him with
any cordiality, and for the three years immediately following,
never so much as spoke to or noticed him, whenever they
chanced to meet.

On the 14th, he received permission from Mr. Eemble to play
for his sister-in-law's benefit at the Birmingham theatre, which
was then under the management of Mr. Macready, the father
of the great tragedian. Immediately upon his arrival, Grrimaldi
repaired to his hotel, and was welcomed by Mr. Macready with
much cordiality and politeness, proposing that he should remain
in Birmingham two, or, if possible, three nights after the benefit
at which he was announced to perform, and offering terms of
the most liberal description. Anticipating a proposal of this
nature, Grrimaldi had, before he left town inquired what the
performances were likely to be at Covent G-arden for some daysventh and eighth mile stone, on