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Full text of "Memoirs Of Joseph Grimaldi"

MEMOIRS OE JOSEPH GEIMA1DI.

217

to come. Finding that if the existing arrangements were
adhered to, he could not be wanted for at least a week, he had
resolved to accept any good offer that might be made to him at
Birmingham, and therefore closed with Mr. Macready, without
hesitation. After breakfast they walked together to the theatre
to rehearse ; and here Gbrimaldi discovered a great lack of those
adjuncts of stage effect technically known as "properties:"
there were no tricks, nor indeed was there anything requisite for
pantomimic business. After vainly endeavouring to devise
some means by which the requisite articles could be dispensed
with, he mentioned his embarrassment to the manager.
. ""What! properties?" exclaimed that gentleman: "wonder-
ful-! you London stars require a hundred things, where we
country people are content with one: however, whatever you
want you shall have.—Here, Will, go down to the market and
buy a small pig, a goose, and two ducks. Mr. Grimaldi wants
some properties, and must have them."

The man grinned, took the money, and went away. After
some reflection Grimaldi decided in his own mind that the
manager's directions had been couched in some peculiar phrases
common to the theatre, and at once went about arranging six
pantomime scenes, with which the evening's entertainments
were to conclude. While he was thus engaged, a violent uproar
and loud shouts of laughter hailed the return of the messenger,
who, having fulfilled Ms commission to the very letter, pre-
sented him with a small pig, a goose, and two ducks, all alive,
and furthermore, with Mr. Macready's compliments, and he
deeply regretted to say that those were all the properties in the
house.

He accepted them with many thanks, and arranged a little busi-
ness accordingly He caused the old man in the pantomime and
his daughter to enter, immediately after the rising of the curtain,
as though they had just comeback frommarket, while he himself
as clown and their servant, followed, carrying their purchases.tone, on