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Full text of "Memoirs Of Joseph Grimaldi"

308                        MEMOIRS OP JOSEPH GBIMALDI.

that the men who sustained the parts were at last obliged to be
dressed and put away in an obscure corner before the curtain
was raised, whence they were brought forward when wanted
upon the stage, and into which they were obliged to retreat
when they had no more to; do, and to remain there as quietly as
they could, until the pantomime was over, there being actually
no room to get them, out of their cases. The dresses-and
makings-up were very cumbrous and inconvenient; but as no
other mode of proceeding presented itself, the unfortunate
giants were obliged to make the best of a bad bargain, and to
remain in a great state of perspiration and fatigue until they
could be reduced to the level of ordinary men. Grrimaldi pitied
the poor fellows so much, that after the first night's performance
was over, he thought right to represent to them that no relief
could be afforded, and to ask whether they could make up their
minds to endure so much labour for the future.

"Well, then," said the spokesman of the party, "we have
talked it over together, and we have agreed to do it every night,
if your honour—long life to you!—will only promise to do one
thing for us; and that is, just to let us have a leetle noggin of
whisky after the green rag comes down." •

This moderate request was readily complied with, and the
giants behaved themselves exceedingly well, and never got
drunk.

The party stayed seven weeks at Dublin. Grimaldi made a
great deal of money by the trip, and realized by his benefit
alone, two hundred pounds.

Between September, 1820, when Covent Garden re-opened,
and Christmas, when the new pantomime was brought forward,
Grrimaldi frequently appeared as Kasrac in " Aladdin;" nor did
his increasing infirmities render his performance more painful
or wearisome than usual. The pantomime was called "Har-
lequin and Jriar Bacon," and was exceedingly successful, as it
was received with great approbation, and was repeated for fifty-.es this season at Sadler's Wells, had also a benefit on October Hth,