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Full text of "Metallurgy Of Cast Iron"

CHAPTER XL
PLANS    AND    METHODS    OF    WORKING
BRICK AND IRON STOVES IN THE
CREATION OF HOT BLAST.
A knowledge of methods used in creating" hot blast at the blast furnace is valuable to the founder and moulder, as it presents good ideas for the benefit of those desiring to design appliances for the purpose of creating- warm or hot blast for any purposes.
The terms "iron stoves" and "brick stoves" are understood to mean, in the case of the former, that the cold air passes through iron pipes, while with the latter, in being heated to make hot blast, it passes through Hues or checkered work composed wholly of fire brick.
The iron stove is fast disappearing and being replaced by the brick stove, owing to the ability of the latter to create the highest temperatures in blast, which allows iron to be made more cheaply than where a temperature no higher than 1,100 degrees F. can be created, as with iron stoves. A further reason for this displacement is that the brick stove is less expensive, in matters pertaining to repairs and "shut-downs," to keep a furnace naming steadily, also in giving more K;IS for use under boilers, etc. than iron stoves.
The operations of brick and iron stoves differ in their methods of being "in blast." The brick stoves generally g"o out of blast every hour, whereas the ironred, by the blast, to the interior of a furnace per day by reason of the high humidity of air in summer months. Further comments on this subject can be found in Chapters IX. and XXXIX. using larger percentages than, ordinary, which may be called for by reason of having to use small, or what is thought to be inferior coke or fuel, and again in burdening a furnace with fuel in order to raise the silicon in the iron or guard against " scaffolding " or "slips" from the use of fine ores, etc. It may also beency                :|,