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Full text of "Modern Mechanical Engineering Vol-I"

THE   DETAIL  OFFICE

there is a different number for the material and for the classes of workman-
ship, but this leads to an enormous notation, which would not seem to give
commensurate results. To keep the cost number from being confused with

dimensions or " numbers off " it is usually ringed thus:

In the drawing proper, each part should have printed under it its dis-
tinctive name and " number off ", also the scale to which it is drawn, if
different scales are used in different parts of the same drawing.

All spare parts required should be marked on the working drawings, so
that they can be made at the same time as the working parts.

Finally, at the foot of the drawing, its well-known title, such as " piston-
rods " or " cylinders ", should be given, and the number of the job, draw-
ing number, date of drawing, and scales.

A characteristic title would be

ENGINES No. 783
CYLINDERS

SCALE: i J in. = i ft.

4 Sheets: Sheet No. i

Drawing No. 783/1

The table of particulars set out at foot would be something like the
following:

Cost No.
	Particulars of Part.
	No. off.
	Material.
	Ordered.
	Order Sheet.

H3
	Junk ring studs
	64
	Steel
	2I/II/2O
	P-63

114
	Junk rings
	8
	Steel
	23/11/20
	Drg. 783/11

Colour Work.—In some offices a considerable amount of colour work
is done, chiefly by juniors, generally to distinguish the classes of material
used. Very faint washes only should be used for these, and these should
be applied to black-and-white prints rather than to the tracing. There is
a fairly well-known convention for materials, such as neutral tint for cast-
iron, blue for steel, brown for copper, yellow for gunmetal, and light pink
for lead.
Sections are frequently hatched to show up more clearly and to indicate
unmistakably that they are sections.
Diiferent offices may have different conventions for colour schemes and
for hatchings, but those shown in diagram are those in most general use.