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Full text of "Musical Instruments"

Guitar Pickup Winder 



MakejProjects 



Guitar Pickup Winder 

Written By: Clyde 



SUMMARY 

Guitar pickup making is difficult because, since the wire is as fine as a human hair, it tends 
to break very easily. Problem solved by using a 9-volt DC toy motor run at 6 volts. 



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Guitar Pickup Winder 



Step 1 — Guitar Pickup Winder 




• Guitar pickup winder (UPDATED)... The bobbin is turned by a DC toy motor running on 6 
volts instead of 9. Reducing the voltage of the DC motor reduces its speed, but more 
importantly reduces its torque to the point where the wire won't break even if you hold the 
wire so it can't move. 

• The wire spool is held by a wood dowel that hangs on a wood support. A 3/4-inch diameter 
ball bearing sits in a 3/4-inch hole that goes halfway through the support. The remaining 
half of the hole's depth is 1/4" in diameter. A screw goes through the center of the bearing 
and the hole and screws into the end of the dowel in the center. The other end of the dowel 
has a small screw to keep the wire spool from falling off. The whole assembly allows the 
wire spool to turn very freely without wobble. 

• The bobbin holder has a 1-inch dowel 1/2 inch in length. A 1x2-inch piece of 1/8-inch hobby 
plywood is attached as the platform for the bobbin. On the dowel there is an aluminum 
sheet metal piece attached which trips a counter switch (Radio Shack) that counts each 
turn of the bobbin. The counter is a 6-volt impulse counter that is non-resettable (available 
at mpja.com for about $5). This counts the turns of the bobbin. You will need to determine 
how many winds you want, then add that number to what the counter displays to get the 
stopping point for the counter. 



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Guitar Pickup Winder 



Step 2 




The guide for the wire is made from a piece of wood with a notch on one end. A 3/8" 
square iron tube (hardware store) about 3 inches long is attached with machine screws 
into the wood. It uses springs on the screws so you can adjust its angle in relation to the 
bobbin. "U" shaped wood blocks ride on the tube and are adjustable so you can set the 
stop point at the sides of the bobbin so the wire will not ride off the bobbin. 



Step 3 




This is my fastest winder so far. It is smoking hot. At 850 rpm, I can wind a single coil to 
16,000 turns using 43-gauge wire in about 15 minutes. No hangups, no problems. 
To see the winder in action go to: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L75-qBUkO... 



st generated on 2012-11-03 04:22:01 AM. 



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