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Full text of "The New York times"

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VOL. XXM. ^O. 7815. 



FEW YORK, SUiq^DAY, OCTOBER 1, J87G.— TRIPLE SHEET. 



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THK CAMPAIGN OF 1876. 

A REPUBLICAN VICJORY EXPECTED 
IN JiOH'JM CAROLINA. 

WirrRAORDDrAItT CANVASS THROUGHOUT 

THE SFTATK sKTTL" GAINING AND VANCE 

X<(>8:ng G ;ouvd — rnK state votks 

SINCE 1863 — A CLOSE UU.VT AFTER THE 
VOTERS WHO HAVB NOT VOTED — TWO- 
THTiftn OF THKM BELIEVED TO BB BE- 

PUitl-TCAX. 

From rntr Own OtrrtmondenL 

Bauigh, Friday, Sept. ^, 1876. 
Tbe contest in tais State xa hotter and 
iQ'^re tborooj^b tbau an/ sii^ce 1840. Erery- 
b(i4y i« r»lkiDs polities. The air is full of 
•bouts lor Hayes and Settle, Tilden and Vance. 
Betore earering apoa a description of the oan- 
vasft. a fltatemeut of the rotine population and 
the votes polled, oomnif ncins with April, 136<, 
will Kiye some idea ot the political status ot the 
Staea : 
^ in AprlU 1863, the registered votawas 117,428 
wMtea. and 79,443 blacks : total. 196.876. The 
▼ftte tiorinit that iDontii for Governor was Rt^ 
pabiicau,92,i^ Deniocrahc,73,594; Republican, 
migority. 19.641. In November following Grant 
receivtnl 96,769, and Seymour S4.601 ; Kepublican 
o^iijohty. 12,16Sw It will be onsarved that the 
tofal vote in Apnl, 18C8, was 165.S29, beins 
31,047 leas than the rejristered vote. In Novem- 
ber oUowtnK the total vote •was 181,370, beinjj 
an increase of 15.541, ot which increase the Re- 
publicans obtiin»<l 4.534. and the Democrats 
11.007. making a Republican majority of 12.168. 
In 1S70 there wa? an election for Attorney 
General, Ck>ngresB. and members ot the Lesis- 
la;ure. During the latter pu:t ot 1863 the Ku- 
klox oommeneed their outrages and kept tbem 
up unrit. July, 1871. The election took place m 
Anspst, and the terror brouirht about by the 
Railnx was so great that 12,735 Republicans, 
as oomptired with the Presidential vote ot 
Novemlier, 1868, abstained from votin«;. which 
frave the State to the Democrats by the 
loUowine vote: Phillips, Reirablican, for 
Att< mej General, 84.034 ; Sbipp, Demoorat, 
89,0i9; Democratic majority. 4,995; total vote, 
173,06J, beins 8,307 less than the Presidential 
vote ot 1S68. It will be seen that Shinp'a vote 
ia 4,438 greater than Seymour's, and that Pliil- 
lipe' vote is 12,735 leas than Grant's, sbowint; 
:bat if the Kepubiicaos had polied Grant's vote 
Po^ilips woal.1 have been elected by 7,740 ma- 
jority. 

Tbft npjit year, 1871, the Democratic Legis- 
lature for ed the question of convention or no 
convendon upon the people. It was during 
this caoBoaijTu tbat the United States Ckinrt 

MBt twenty Kuklax to the Penitenliarj, which 
remoTed the terrorism which existed in 1870. 
Ibe Bepnblioans opposed the convention, and 

carried the State by the foUuwins: vote : No 
eoQv.nt on, 95.252 ; convention.86,007 ; m^ority 
inr no convention, 9,245; total vote. 181,259. 
ThisTuteia only 111 less Ihan the vote for 
President in ISS&. and shows tbat the Republi- 
raD« only lacked 1,044 of obtaining as many 
^ votes as Grant, and tbat tbe Democrats in- 
creased their vote 1,406 above that of Seymour, 
lu August, 1872, Caldwell, Eepublican, re- 
Oeived 98.630 votes, and Merrimon, Democrat, 
received 96.731 : Caldwell's maiontv 1,839. 1 o- 

, tai Tiite 195,361, a Sepub'icaQ increase oyer 
Grant's vote ot 1868 of 1,861, and a Democratic 
i£creas«i of the vote of Au,:ust, 1871, of 10.724. 

In 1874 the Civil Bights bill was the sale is- 
sue is this State. Demagogism and hutn- 
buggery were never more potent. The cam- 
Ttaign on the part of tbe Republicans was to- 
tally inefBcient, and. together with solits and 
drrisiins in several parts of the State, the 
Democrats swept tbe State by the following 
vote : Pool, Democrat, for Superintendent of 
Fnblio Instruction, 98.217, and Pumell, Kepub- 
i^ui. received 8-1,595; Pool's majority, 13,622; 
total vote, 183,812l Being a Democratic in- 
crease over Merrimon's vote in 1872, of 1.588, 
and a Republican loss on Caldwell's vote of 
1872, ol 14.035. Showing that if Pumell had re- 
ceived Caldwell's vote he would have been 
elected by 413 majority. 

In August, 1875, the Democrats forced the 
qnestion of convention or no convention upen 
the ;;tate again — that 's, they called a conven- 
tion, and to ma^e the issue square and plumb 
before the people the Repuulican candidates 
•nnuunoed tbat it they weree ected tbey would 
▼«>te lo adjourn sine <^e. without doing any- 
thing. The highest vote on either s de ssood 
Republiran, 100.817; Democratic, 94353; ma- 
joniy for firac^blican <-andiaaie8. 6,464; total 
vote, 195,170-JvDteinz 191 less than the Caldwell 
and ilerrimOnjjvote of 1872. So tbat upon ttie 
largfsc vote ejpr cast the Republicans carried 
^ 6iaDB-b#-fde>99 msyority. 

BECAPULATION. 
TOric^MGISTEEED VOTE EC XPEIL, 1868. 

^ST>lte» UT458 

ViaCiS 79 448 

Tutal 19^76 

TOTAL PHESrDENTIAI, VOTE. 1S68. 
6'»n« 'J6,7f9 

^vmour 84,001 

Gram's majoritv 12^ 

TOTAI, VOTE FOB ATTOEXET GXNERAL, 1870. 

Sh'pp. Democrat 89.029 

SoJil p«, ftapuilican 64.034 

Sbipp'u niajuTity Tm53 

TOTAL COSVEMION VOTE, 1871. 

So OOQTSll.lO:! 

r^r cojjTeu.joB.. ...I.'.'.' .'.'.'."! 

M^ority aKainst eouvemioD 

TOTAL VOTE rOE GOVEENOE, 1872. 

Sjldwell, EeOiiD.icon 

Vemmou, Democrat ,'.'. ..'..." 

C*l«*«"ii'» majurt y 



8C,007 
9,-.i45 



98,630 

._96J3l 

J.8D9 

*Ot*\ VOTE TUB StrPERIMENBENT OF PDBLIC 
HfSTHDCTIOS, 1874. 

Pool Democrat 98 217 

._8459j 

la, 023 



.100 817 
- ft4 :<53 

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PoTueil. Rispoblican 

Pool 'a ma j lity 

TOTAL COVENTION VOTE, 1875. 

y© Coav^nuoo 

for Coi.Teutloi> 

Majority agaiust Convention ! 

This table shows tbat out ot tbe sev«n con- 

teai6 which bave taken place since I8Cj, tbe 
Rfpuuiicans have caixied hve, and that the 
iiillu- noes which brought about daleat lu li70 

anu ltJ74 wern only temporary, and that in 
BVery lair contest the RcpuOiicaus havecaiTied 
the 6iate. 

CENSUS OP 1870. 
The census of 1870 sbows that the total vote 
Ji lUe biute was iil4.1 12. laking the vote lor 
jovtircor lu 1872, it will be noted that there are 
18.781 lueu wuo bave noi vmeii at eieitioua 
iim-o i»<0. Xuc-ae men boll the balance of 
?**wer; will tiiev vote at tne ni^xc elec- 
tion < IB the question. Ihere Las been 
e.)nio liitle imp^iiee in our population siuctj 
ls<0. Wuat ver uiat may be, e.iuu party will 
reoeive Its propoiiuia ot the nicrei.se. 'i liis 
wotiid not anci- ibepietent po iiicai utatns ot 
tbe &liȣc. Wuat are ibo autci'eUeuts oi ihe 
1&78I iu;'Q wuo liavf never v^ied ] A ooaipavi- 
jon ol the vole tor Gov> ruor in 18:2 witu tbe 
total vo e of tbe Scale accoiding Co ibe census 
01 IWO. shows ibat m tbe counties 
where the i.e^iroes have a iBajoricy. tue 
t>.lai vote i* nearly . quu to tbat cullea lor by 
6ho ceudu* Hi 18/0 anu m soms couuticst-xceeds 

t, wbiiciu tic counties where :lio pHpu atioa \a 
oearly ail v/jito tbb vote laas oft 175 m .very 
iboiu^ano ri'!;iiaiered voters. So tb;it the 18,781 
mtn wbo nave never voted, are nearly ill' in 
liic louutit's wbere tbe white i^opu ation lai'ge- 
ly proiiooiiuates. The or;janizu,tiou ot tiie 
Dc'UioCfa.ie party is such tbat ic may be safely 
preuicud tbat two-tbirda of tbe 18,781 men 
Ml)o have never voied are Repuolioans. Add 
tbis ituiuber (o Caldwell's vote ot 1372, and we 
Lave a total lt«;publioan vote of 111,210. 
Add ' the lemainmg third to Mem- 



PEIOB FIVE CENTa 



mon'a vote and -we have a total Democratic 

vote Of 103,021. It may be relied on with abso- 
lute certainly that the total vote m November 
next -will not exceed 205.000. Every negro will 
vote, and it the canvass m the white couniica 
is not wholly abortive, the Ei-publicans 
will increase their vote in every 
countv where the white yotors are in a 
majonty. There is great enthu'^iasm 
lor Vance as there was for Merrimon, but it 
comes Irom the same men who .shouted and 
voted for Merrimon. On the other hand, tho 
Republicans have never made such a canva>8 
as they are now makmr. The joint canvass of 
Siittle and Vance is doing eroat gooa for the 
Kepublicans. In every county where tbcy 
speak the Kepuolicans are eucouraaed. l\lany 
men nre astonished to find that the Repuu- 
lieun? have a loader who la able to cope wiLii 
Vaueo.- Tbo canvass is conhned to tliroo 
points: 

i'trsf.— Vance's war record. 

Second — Consti^mioir-il amendments. 

Third — liocord ol tbe last Lii;islaluie. 

Upon eiich of these quesiions the Republi- 
cans are way;ins an agureasive wartaro. l-'roiu 
aimost every couniy there is authentic news 
that Vance will uoc receive the party voce. 
Whether this lOHlina will aff.'et Vance or 
wbotbor it wiil affect tbe whole Demo- 
craiic State ticket is an open question. If 
luiliana anil Ohio give uiviued Repub- 
hoan tuiyontics next month, Vance will prove 
a uead weight to the wbi«ie ticket. The pro- 
posed amendments to the Constitucion ana the 
record of the last Ltfgislature put the Demo- 
crats at a very deciued disauvantajjc. Theso 
two subjects will be mure fully fliscussed when 
the canvass m each county comiueneeci, waiun 
will bo abuut the tirdt of next mouth. 

COMMITTEE WOKK. 

The Republican State Executive Committee, 
headed bv Col. Thomas B. Keogh, is doing 
splendid work. The daily and week.'y Consti- 
tution and tbe weekly Era, issued under aus- 
pices of t!"e committee, number 23,000 every 
week. These papers reach every township in 
The State, and means have been periected by 
which a pnp.r is placed in the bands of every 
doubtful voier. In a^idition ^o' this work of 
ihe committee, thousands ol documents, gotten 
up by the Republican Cmgressionai Committee, 
have been scattered broadcast all over the 
State, ll the people go asiray it will not bo 
because they have not had the means of in- 
forming themselves. 

THK CONGRI€SfIONAL DISTRICTS. 

The nominees in this district are D. M. Lind- 
se.y, Kcpublioan, and J. J. Yates, Democrat. 
Cobb, Republican, carried this district m 1872 
by Over fourteen hundred maionty. It was 
lost in 1874 by 1,571. This year the Repuo- 
lioans expect to elect Liudsey, but by a smaller 
maionty than tiiey got in 1872. Settle will 
gam on^Caldwell's vote. 

In the Second District it is only a question 
of majority. Caldwell caiTied the disirict m 
1872 by 8,31)0. It is expected that tbis majoriiy 
will be increased to 9.000. Gov. C. U. Ui0*deu 
18 the Republican candidate. 

In the I'bird Distinct the nominees are W. P. 
Cannaoy, Kepuo.ican, and A. M. WaJdeil, 
Democrat. Ibe Demucrats bave a majority in 
this district oi 500. Canuaiy mainiaius that 
there are more tuan five hundred ne^iriiea in 
tbis district who nave never voted. A tbor- 

oui^h canvass by lownshiiis is beiug made, aud 
every Rcpuolioan will be brought to the polls. 
VV'auiieil ijj unpopular in oomo parts of his dis- 
tnct, aud will not poll his party vote. Tbere 
are two Demooiatio papers wjioh have takoa 
grouud agaiu&t Wadaell. It now seems proba- 
b.e tuat Cauuady will be elected. 

In the iounn District the nominees are 
Isaac J. Young. Repuolican, and J. J. Davus, 
Democrat. Caiuweil earned this oistriot in 
18/a oy 525. In 1874 Davis wae eleoced b.y 
l,bi8. The district ia bemg thoroujjbly can- 
vassed with a uecided advautatre lO Youu^. 
Jobnston and Cbaiham Counties are the battle- 
grouna. ix tbe Repuohcans can uoid tae vote 
ot ibl)i, in these two counties Young will be 

eiecctsd. But il tbere should boa siampede in 
eitaer or both, Duvis wiil be elected. 

lu the Fiitb District the nommees are James 
E. Boyd, Repubiu-an, aud A. M. Scaiee, Demo- 
crat. IniS uistiict jja^e i.5d Democratic lua- 
jyriiy in 187:^. It laexpectod tuut ise. lie wul 
carry luis district, but tue cnaucea are against 

Boyd, for tbe reason thiit he tormerly beiou^eu 
LO tbe Ku Kiux. He was arrested by Gov. 
Holden iu ib/0, and made a co^jiesaion ei;jo8- 
uig tne K la n . Boyd is a native oi Aiamance 
County. He used all bis euer^jies 
lo secure amnesty to? his irieuUs 
who were iudiotv^d. and arrested, lie 
was elected to tue Legialature on tbe Re- 
puoiican ticket in 1874. tie made a splendid 
recora on the amnesty question again. In lo7o 
he was elected a ueieuate to tbe Convention. 
Aianiauce is usually a Uamocratio coumy. it 
was carried by Pool, Democrat, lu 18; 4, oy 198. 
Ic the Republicans LUroujjboUi, the disiricc sup- 
port lioyu. It IS possiole tnat be may Oe electca. 
In the Sixib iJLttrict Walter ii. Steele is tbe 
Democratic cauuiuate. Tue Repujlicaiia wiil 
nave no caudiuaie. The Dcmuuracic majority 

IS over 2,UiK). 

in tbe Seventh District T. J. Dula is the Re- 
publican cauuiuace, ana W. ii. Rtiboius Dcm»- 
uiatic canaiuate. Tne district is 1,000 Uemo- 
craiic. ine Kepuolicans will do exceeuin;;iy 
wed if they prevent a Democratic increase. 

In the E.gntu District R. li. Vauce is the 
Democratic candidate. The lienuulicaus have 
not nommaieu as yet. It is conhaently ex 
pectea tbat the Democratic majority will be 
rcuuced more tuan a lUousHnd in this aiscnct. 
Vance's majority in 187:i was 2,50U. 

it is too biui.y to speculate as to the Legisla- 
ture. Ii ludian.1 anu Uuio give Repuolican 
majorities tne Rcpuoiicaua wiil maK.e atcrnulo 
Obsiaugnt lor tne purpose oi electiBti a majority 
01 the. Legislature. Settje and Vaaoe have al- 
ready canvassed forty counties. They wdl 
speait in lU.rcy more oofore tue eiectiun. 



TES OPtOsnWN 20 BUTLER. 

JUDGB E. B. HOAR ASKED TO BUN AGAINST 

HIM, BUT HAS NOT YET? CONSENTED — 

CORKBSPONDE.XCE OS IHE SUBJECT. 

ilvec.al £)iii.alch to th» Xew-York Times. 

Boston, Sept. 30. — The opposition on the Re- 
poblioau sine to Qcu. Baaor la tbu Seventh Cun- 
gresdiooal Bistric. IS assuming shape. Jfor several 
days the following letter, asking Juuge Hoar to ac- 
cept an indepeodeai nomination and bead a Repub- 
lican bolt, has been iu circnlalion, and many promi- 
nent sigoatuies hdVa been bbtaioed to it : 
To Bon. a. Jiockuocd hoar, Concord. Mass.: 

Oeau aia : Xuc uuaer<iiKUBc,.vour tehow-citizeiis 
of lue sevenib Coagressiuual Disstiict. prolouu.ily 
iiiipressed wiiu a conviciiou mat the character aua 
political record ot Bcnj-iuiiu F. Butier m^iae him an 
unUi cauUiUate for Itepreaeutaave in G>u;ireaa, at a 
tmie when tne Kt-pubucjn P.ircv, uuuer toe leader- 
snip of Kaibeiioru B. H yes aad William A. 
Wiie»»ler, lit pieiieeU to a rad Cil relorm of tbe civil 
BffVice and a speeuv return to specie pavmeuts. re- 
Bpccifully ask vliat von w.ll allow your name to bs 
preseuteu bv ibein to lae voters of iha uiitiict ati a 
caudioaie lor tuac otUce. 

Juilge Hoar will not yet say that he will accept 
the iii\iiatiun. Uis manner indicates that ku is 
dccidedlr averse to it. Aleanwbile tUere art one 
or two others, pronjinent men in the district or 
oonnevtea with it. who wiil be importaned. it tbo 
Jutiee sboalJ flaallv decide not to run. There U 
no doubt ot tbo feeling, deep-seated and defiant, 
amuoz influential Bepobticans in tbo dis- 
iilui, against Geo. Butler, but ac the 
■amo time tbe tact caanot be di';gni«ed 
tbat tbe popularity of tbe General lu 
the district, in ibe dlies particularly, is ureal, 
and bis canvass is being managed with consummate 
sWiil aud ib(>rou:;baeaa and is appareniiy meetinii 
wiib mocb sucress. In view of the possioiliiy ot a 
bolt and tbe publication of the fact that thi.<i letter 
ot iuvit^tion to Judse Hoar is in circulation for sig- 
uslures, Gsn. Butler has cauaed to be publisbed in 
his organ heto the following »iguiiicant correspuud- 

euce: 

ASDOVEE, Mass., Sept. -20, 1876. 
DE.VE GESEEAL : Xiio ji.ojr muvomeut ij iiiani- 
fesc. liio p.iur.saical poll iciaus, vvi h eueii aa lol- 
Inw tbem iu ihu vicitii y, are nijiuiujia oriuied re- 
que.-*t 10 E. It. Hoar iisknig Him to run for Con- 
gr'-SH. T urs taiihfuiiy, . 

Geu. i.E.NJAMLit a'. i.lJTLEK, BnStOD. it 133. 

Boston. Sept. 30. 16T6. 

MyDeabPib: Six week* ag > u wd.s tbuu^iht 
very oij^ctiouaula to have prL^ieil fin;uli<ra pre- 
sented to the c tizcn.'i of the district tor .--iKnalurea 
iiakiuu lue to be u caudidaie. J uu;iH Huar in upuak- 
in;; ot it lO me, iu the prebcuce ol other ;;eQtluiuou, 
s.iiii tbat a UJiiLT ougat to bave been sent out at the 
bjme time a--ki.ii lor ihe signatures ot mose who 
Uia nut wauc me to he a taudiuale, ' I suppose be 
will adopt tbu iiielhod presciibed tor me ia bis owu 
case. Ii so I am cobtent. I am vurs truly. 

BEXJAMI2S F. BUi'LER. 

To , Esq.,. Anduvei, Mass. 

In tue muveuicut for Judge Hoar are many of tbe 

most nromment Benablioans of the Stats, but 



atraid of the irtinpnco or tbo power of Gen. But;ler, 

they are cautious about makin;; themselves known. 
It is undprstood that Gov. Rice favors ir, and that 
tbe Civil S^ivfce Reform Club, of this city, the onc- 
ce.^8or of theBristow Club, i.s active in engineering 
the bolt. 

f -^m- 

THE CONTEST /A- INDIANA. 
ENCOURAGING REPURHCAX RKPOUTS — 

GKEAT MKKTIXG.S I.N' ALL PARTS OF THE 
STATE— THK DEMOCKATS PHEPAR:NG 
TO INUNDATE TUB STATE WITH RE- 
PEATERS. 

Sp(Cial Dispatch to thf Xew-York Times. 
Terre Hautk, Sept. 30.— The last week 
but one of the campaign ends with eneourage- 
luent to the Republicans. To-day Gov. Noyea 
had a great meotinor in Posoy, and anything 
like a good Republican meeting in Pcsev has 
lor many years been a rarity. .Posey, Gibson, 
Vamldrburs. Warrick, Spencer— in fact, all of 
South-Westorn Indiana— Col. l5'oster says, will 
do better thhn ever before, and ho is good 
authority for that part of the State at least. 
Ben Harrison, at Franklin ; BrLstow, at Dan- 
ville ; Sehurz. at Washington ; Logan, at Val- 
parai-io ; Kilpatrick, at Lacraiige, and dozens of 
others at other places have had great meet- 
ings. Tbe Democrats had their great rally in 
tbis part of tbe State here to-night. Senator 
Bayard, of Delaware, beiug the chief attrac- 
tipn, and having an audience of about two 
thousand, Evidence of the purpose of the 
Democrats to inundate the S fate with repeat- 
ers under the guisa of the Soldiers' Convention 
at Indianapolis on Thursday is rapidly accu- 
mulating, and ihe Rspublican State Commit- 
tee expects before that day to place decisive 
facts before the •public. 



gea^d bepvblwan rally at cin- 
cin:)1ati. 

AN IMPOSING TORCtl-I.lGHT PARADE — GREAT 
MEETING IN CUSTOM-HOUSE SQUARE — 
SPKICHES BY 8EXA10R BLAIJS'E AND 

HON. WILLIAM P. FKTE. 

bpecial Dispatch to the New- Yorh Timet. 

Cincinnati, Sept. 30.— Hon. James G. 

Blame and William P. Prye addressed an im- 
mense audience here tbis evening on the issues 
of the campaign. Senator Morton, of Indiana, 
was -announced to apenk, but was recalled 
to Indiana this afternoon by a dispatch 
stating that his preset ce was necessary 
at once. The torch-light procession which 
paradad the streets betorc the meeting was ad- 
mitted by everybodg to have been the largest 
and finest that has been seen iu the city since 
the time ' of the W^ide-awakes iu 1860. It 
consisted of nearly five thousand voters, splen- 
didly uniformed, and was fully one hour pass- 
irg a given point, marching four abreast Tl:e 
procession w^as headed by Hon. Alexander C. 

SandSjOf the Times, mounted on an immense ele- 
phant, bearing a torch. The e'epbanf yas ga.yl.y 
caparisoned, the covering bearin gapprooriate 

mottoes. Nearly one-fourth of the procession was 
composed of colored voters, who carried torches, 
and with their expensive uniforms presented a 

fine appearance. The streets along the Una ol 

march w^ere lined w^ith spectators, aud the en- 
thusiasm rah higher than at any time for years. 

The procession was admitted by both parties 

to surpass, both in numbers and appearance, 
that of the opposing party ou Thursday 
night, when every effort was made for the 

gri^atest rally of the campaitni. A special 
feature of the parade was the entire absence of 
peisons not voters, the procession of tbe op- 
posing party beiug made up to a considerable 
extent of boys and persons utder age. Every 
man who carried a torch tq-nigbt wiil deposit 
a ballot ior the Republican nominees at the 
October and November elections. 

The speaking occurred on Custom-house 
square in front of the new Government build- 
ings, now in process of erection on Fiith street, 
adjoining Fountain square and the Esplanade. 
Tue large space was packed with an intelligent 
assembly of the voters of Cincinnatti and the 
adjoining towns, man.y having come in on the 
late trains to listen to James G. Blaine. Fully 
ten thousand persons were on the 
ground and tbe adioining streets, all leaning 
anxiously forward to catch the words of the 
great orator. The assemblage, oonsidering its 
size, was an extraordinary one. It was com- 
posed of the most intelligent and representa- 
tive portion of the citv's population, a vast 
amount of wealth and intellect of the city and 
adjoining country being represented. 

The speech of Mr. Blame, lully one and a half 
hours' long, was pronounced the most effective 
of the campaign thus far. Terse, dispassioned, 
and pointed, it dealt fairly and honestly with 
the issues of the campaign and the inevitable 
results of the return to jiower of the Democ- 
racy. A considerable portion of the ad- 
dress was devoted to a dissection of 
Tilden's record, and especially h's con- 
nection with Tweed and the New-York 
Democracy. The enure falsity of his claims to 
position or credit as a reformer, were clearly 
shown, and his record in relation to the New- 
Ycrk frauds especially held up before tbe au- 
dience. Special attention was given to his 
tax record, and the entirely unsatisfactory an- 
swer to the charges regarding his perjui'y and 
false income returns were delineated with 
great force. His letter of 18G8 was also read 
and commented upon with telling eftect The 
speech was remarkably free Irora that which 
the opposing party are pleased to teiTu 
" Bloody shirt oratory," and in its calm, clear, 
and impartial discussion of tbe question in 
hand was b.v far the most convincing to the 
more intelligent class present of any delivered 
here this season. 

Mr. Blaine was followed by Mr. Frye, mem- 
ber of Congress irom Maine, who spoke lor 
fully an hour to the vast audience. His ad- 
dress was marked, and great enthusiasm re- 
sulted among his hearers. Much disappoint- 
ment was felt among those present at the" 

lailure of Senator Morton to be pres- 
ent. An especial interest was lelt in 
Blaine's speech, it being the first delivered 
by that gentleman here, upon the battle ground 
of the late convention in which he so nearly 
obtained tbe position upon the ticket which 
Mr. Hayes now occupies. This point, although 
not directly referred to by Mr. Blaine, was 
made the more conspicuous in the minds 

of his audience by his brilliant eulogy 
of his sueeesslul opponent, whom be 
cbaractcrizi:d as a man ot pure character 
aud Of the highest honor aud eminently tit to 
lead the Bepiuficau Party to victory in this 
tbo Centennial year. Altogether tbe meeting 
was a great success, and even at tins late hour 
the streets are tiirouiied with people discussing 
tbe speech and tbo procession. 

CULVMBIA L'UUNIV ACTIVITY. 

A GREAT MEETING IN VALATIE — A HAYES 
AND WHEELER <!lUB ORGANIZED— A 
IHOROUGll CAMPAIGN OP-E.NED. 

t-peciaL Lnspatch to the New- York Times. 

HcDRON, Sept. 30. — The largest political meet- 

inc in Valatie since 1£60 was held last nitcbt by the 
Republicans, who formed a Haves and Wheeler 
Club, of whi6h Hon. Charles H. Houseman was 
made President. The town was filled with vielting 
deleeatiooB, Chatham sending the Ketcbam Miuate 
Alen, and other nlacea beinn reniesented bv larite 



nnmbers. The streets were ablaze with bonfir^f, 

and Ihe enthusiasm of tbe crowd was manifested 
in various demonstrations of appruval. The veternn 
Hon. John T. Hi)eeboom deliverad one of bis rincinc 
i addresses that wont to tbe bottom of the political 
questions before the people. Ho invited any one 
proaeut, Denjocrat or Kepublic.in, to come upon tbo 

piatform and interrogate him as to tbe record of 
the Republican Party, or any i^^suG of thoeampaiirn. 
The Valatie DiBtrict, ni.der the lead of that princa 
of organiziTS, Hon. Charles H. Houseman, is 
aroused aa it never was betore. Mr. Houseman has 
infaspJ info the canvass his own enerev and soirit. 
anil onensd an aggressive campaign that has foiled 
f ho plana of the local Democratic leaders and iu- 
sutcs a Republi:an pain in his district. 



HOMK IVORK. 



NOmiAAlIUJUS. 

Chicago, Sept. 30. — The Democrats of the 
Second CoDgressionil District to-day renominated 
Carter H. Harrison b|r acclamation. 

Tbe Demucrats of lbs Tbird Illinois Consression- 
al District tbis aftiruoun renominated J. V. Le- 
moyne by acclamation. 

In the Pirst I1I1q|>U District two sets of ofiBcors 

were nominated, and after considerable trouble, 
w hich came near endinc in personal encounters, the 
two factious adjourniad to different balls, wheu one 
unauimousiy nomlnited J. Ii. Uoxie, and tbe oiber 
reuoiuinated Bernarjl G. CaulHeUt bv acclamation. 
Mr. Cauliield will stite in a letter to be published 
tu-morrow that he positively declines to be a caHJi- 
daie uuder tbe circumstai.c'es. and while be thanks 
his friends for tbeir zeal in bis bebaU' be hopes tbac 
tbev will, in tbe interest of harmony in tbts party, 
accept this as an ultim.itum. 

Schenectady, Sept. 30.— Hon. W. T. L. S.^nders 
was lo-dav iiuminatod lor the Assembly by tbe 
Democrats of ibis county. 

THE WKATRER. 



SYNOPSIS AISD PiiOBABILITIES. 
Washington Oct. 1 — 1 A. M. — Tbe area of 
highest barometer continues in tbe Missoun 
Valley, and the barometer has very generally 
risen at all sta:ion8 east of the Rocky 
Mountains, with cooler north and west winds. 
Driak aud high nortbsrly winds have pre- 
vailed on tbe Texas coast with clondy weather. 
Clear weather prevails in the Eastern Gulf and 
South Atlantic States, bat rain is generally report- 
ed from the .^fiddle and Eastern States and lower 
lake recion. Partly clou ly and clearing weattier 
prevails in the Ohio Valley, upper lakes, and North- 
west. The rivers fell on S.ituiday at Cincinnati 
and Louisville, but lose al: Memphis. 
PH0BABI-ITIE8. 

For Sunday, in tbr Suutb Ailantic States, rising: 
barometer, cooler north-west winds, partly clsudy 
or clear weather. 

F><r the upper lakes. Upper Mississippi and 
E'jwer Missouri ValleyB, rising, followed by lalUuir, 
barometer, cooler n'orib-wosl bacliing to warmer 
Bouto-west and oonch-east winds, clear or partly 
cloudy weather. . 

i'ur tbe lower laks region,, rlslae barometer and 
cooler westerly wimts. bji;kiug to warmer souib- 
west, with partly cloudy weattier. 

For New-E^mlaua. north-west winds, rising ba- 
rotuettr, cooler, cioucly or partly cloudy weatacr. 

For the Aiiddle Attantie Utates. faliina, followed by 
ribing barometer, cooler north and west leinds, cloudy 
or partly cloudy weather. 

Tbe rivers will proOably fall. 

Cautionary signals are ordered for Gftlveston and 
Iudianol» 



The Sailors' Union of the Boys in Blue, of 
Newark, have elected Goorge T. Elsey Captain. , 

The German Hayes and Wheeler Vetcrim 
Battalion will meet to-morrow evening for the pur-N 

pose of making aiTangementa to parade with the 
3ov3 in Blue on the 3d inst. 

On Friday evening an enthusiastic mass- 
meeting was held at the Ropaliiican Wigwam in 

West Brighton, S;aiea Islana. Hon. Tompkini 
Wc8t<;rvelt and Gen. George A.. Palmer delivered 
adaresses. 

There was a grand mias-moeting of Republi- 
cans at Tbttenvllle. Staten Island, last evening. 
ArtdrpHsos were n»ade by dinringuished speakers, 
and much entbn>ilMsin was mauifested. Music was 
Iurni8h(;d by tbo Eicvemh ReKimeut Band. 

A ratification meeting was held by the Ger- 
man Republican As8ociali!)n of Yorkvillo on Fri- 
day evenine. There *as a large attendance, and 
Rtirriui: speeches wore made bv Hon. David S. Rid- 
dle, Au;fn-it N. Cazer, Ruins B. Cowing, James If. 
Thompson, aud othern. 

The Newark Republicans Friday night nom- 
inated Philip Mag.ir for Alderman, and Ezra Aitell 
for Freeholder, in the Tenth Ward j James L. Mar- 
vin for A!dernia;i, Horace Carter lor chosen Fie<>- 
holder ia tbe Eiiinih Ward, antl Charles M. Theber- 
atn for Alderman, Joseph L. Sntpben for chosen 
Freeholder in tbe Fittspntb Ward, 

A meeting of the Twentieth Ward Indepen- 
dent Hayes aud Wbeeler Club was held last even- 
ing at No. 408 Wesc Thirt.T-ssventh street, Benji- 

min P.itb. the PrQsifient, in the chair. Sneeches 
were mado by Capt. Robert Crowe ana oihorc, and 
committees were appomted to select nominees for 
Oougress, the Assembly, and the Board of Alder- 
men. ' ^ 

The Seventh Ward Republican Club will 

hold a ratification tneellng to-morrow evening at 

7:30 o'clock at their head-quarters, No. 184 East 
Broadway. There will also be a banner raising by 
tbe Soldiers and .Sailors' Club of tbe same distrio;. 
Hon. Isaac I. Hay*, Major Willard BuUard, Hon. 
Dudley F. Phelps, ^nd William H. Town ley, Esq., 
Trill address the meetinc. ana there will be sineiui; 
by the Geatenary Qiiartet. 

A large and entlljusiastic meeting of tbe Boys 

in B.ue, Company IB, of the Fifteenth Astiembly 
District, was held last night, at tbe head-quarters. 
No- 352 West Thirty-fifth street "Seventy-five 

members signed the roll. The following officers 
were elected : CaptiiBc, Col. George AI. Daseubprry; 
First Lieutenant, 'I'homas Sto\?urt; Second Lieu- 
tenant. John Herr^; Orderly Seraeant, (ieorge W. 
Slacierly : Second Serffeant, Oliver Davis ; Third 
Sserseaut, Eugene ;PettiKrcw ; Fourth Sergeaut, 

Joseph Whiteside J., Fifth S^rijeaat, James Mc- 
Dowale. I; 

ACTIVE WORK BY THK REPUBLICANS OF 

THE EIGHTKENTH ASSEMBLY DISTKICr. 

The Republicans of the Eighteenth Assembly 
District have done excellent worlc durinc the pro- 
eut cam:)aigii, and are determined to leave nothing 

nndone to secure a brilliant victcry in Novambi-r. 
Enthusiaatio meeting are held in the spaoioni 

head-qnaneri every Fndav evening, and eloquent 

epeakerd are always in attendance. Fonr compa- 
nies of Boys in Blue 1 meet nightly, and wA>k!y 

meetings, of the Jlx^<k aad Wheeler Can^aign 

Club are also held, tbejal^traotionB beinz sood speak 
ers and excellent sioBinsr. Last w^ek an Inde- 
pendent Young Mea'^ Assucuitlon ' w^s j^rean- 
izei on Second aveAiie, and fltine to! the 
breeze a hacdaomo jb&nner. The weefflyj^fceet- 
ings of this assoiJtWtien ar)! att^n^i^ by 

large nnmbsr of yoaiii| men, the majority of w^h'im 
will cast tbeir tijaidenttptu for Hayus anu Wlii^^ler. 
Hon. Barnard Bigliu aihil his co-worker.s in tHe'|dih-. 
trict have worked indafatiiiably in perfecting yhe" 
organization, and are ifonfiiioot of increasing ^e 
Republican maiority Uis year by from fou| hun- 
ored to six hundrea votfes. At tue meeting bf the 
Di.-^trict Association ^p last Frnia.v evening, the 
head-quarters were tnlliantiy illuminated, and so 
great was tbe stten4tuice that nearly one hun- 
dred were unable jio gam admitcanc. Al- 
derman Henry E. jnHowlaud prcsiiled, and 
eloquent addresses wipj delivered by Gtn. Joshua 
T. Oweu, Hon. OhristMiher Coleman, Col. Joseph T. 
Jar.iine, aud Charles ]*JSbaw. Some stirring cam- 
paign songs were Ruuj;'|iy tbe Rollins Glee Club, 
and the ciithuxiasin .^bibited tor the Repub- 
lican candidates wafd unbounded. The great 
feature of tbe ev iijing. however, was the 
appearance of the Mitire Liberal Repablican 
Association of tbe district, 117 stroui;, beaded 
bv rheir President, tj|io camo in and joined the 
R^pubiiuau associatiealin a body. The si^aiticance 
of tbis accession may pe judged from tbe tact tbat 
105 out of the 117 vot^id for Tilden two years aeo. 
The wanderers werdlwelcomed back to the told 
witn hearty applausei ;ljo which the President of tbo 
detnnct Liberal associ.a>nua replied by Dladging tbe 
heart.y support ot biihlself and his associates to the 
Republican Party . | i.[ 

TEE APPBOAoAlNG REQISTRAIIOd. 

A circular was ispiifed yesterday by Mr. D. 
B. Hasbroack, Chief l^f the Bureau of Elections, 
i;lving the usual inncrdctions to Inspectors of Eleo- 
tion. No person is eilltled to registration unless 
he fulfills each of the following requirements on 
election day : 

First — One year's residence in the State. 

Aeco/id— Four raontihs' residence in tbe county. 

27iird— Thirty days' residence in the election dis- 
trict, j 

Ihe days for registration are Oct. 10, 18, 27, and 
28, and the places of iregntrv will be open from 8 
A. M. to 9 P. M. on each day. 



LATEST JS^EWS BY CABLE. 

♦ — 

THE HOSTILITIES IN SKliVlA. 
PROBABILITY THAT PRINCK MILAN WILL BE 

CROWNED KING — THE REPORTED FIGIIT- 
t.NG ON THE MORAVA KIVEK INCORRECT. 

London, Sept. 30.— A Belgnide dispatch to 

the Daily News say* : "It is said that Prince Milan 
will leave Btlprada for Para'chiu early next week. 
This is regarded as proof of tho improbability of 
any peace arraniremonts beinu concluded. It is 
said to be highly pr:>bab.o that Prince Milan will 
he crowned Kinij as fcoon as he is removed from the 
restraints of Bclaraio. Thrco hundred and sixty 
Cossacks arrived in BelKraUe on Friday. Two hun- 
dred more are expected on Saturday and six hun- 
dred on Sunday." 

A disparcb to the Times from B3lKrado savs the 
movemont'? on tbe Morava River are compaiatively 
iusigiiibcant The Servians do not boast very 
loudly of Thursday's battle. Official Turk sh tele- 
grams claim a victory. The newspaper cirrespond- 
ents nearest the scene of onerations seem to agrae 
that the Tnrks bad the advaiitase. 

The correspondent ot tho Daily Telegraph at 
Alexmaiz iu a dispatch to that pi.oer, ■ cays tho 
Turks gained a great victory on Thursday, wh'ch 
thoy could have followed up with disastrous re- 
sults to tbe Servians were it not for tbo armistice, 
which tha Turkish commander still treats as 
valid. 

A dispatch from Raeusa says the Prince of Mon- 
tenegro has left Cetiiene to join his Army. 

A dispatch from Belgrade says ^he reported re- 
sumption of fighting on the Morava River yesterday 
was incorrect 

Gon. Komaroff has resigned bis post as Chief of 
Staft'of tbe Army of the Morava and returned to 
Russia. His aucueasor is not yet known. 

Gen. Ranko Olimpics has been reappointed cotn. 
mander of the Array of the Drina. L^schjanin will 
bold a subordinate command in tbe aaaio Army. 



DIPLOMATIC PHASES OF THE WAR. 

HON. ROBERT LOWE INSISTS ON THE CALL- 
ING OF THE BRITISH PARLIAMENT THE 

CZAR'S AUTOGRAPH LETTER IN TQK IN- 
TSRESTS OF PEACK — TUE PORT E'S RE- 
PLY TO THE POWRRg — DISPUTE BE- 
TWEEN PKINCE MILAN AND THE SERVIAN 
FOREIGN MINISTER. 

London, Sept. 30.— Right Hon. Robert Lowe 

publishes a letier iu tbo 'limes this morning on the 
Eastern question. He vebementlv insists upon tbe 
necessity of calling Parliament together to deter- 
mine whether the present policy of tne Ministry is 
to be pursued. 

The Times, in a leading article, says : *' The Czar 
is doubtless anxious to keep the contest witbln its 
present limits, and he is believed to bave given pa; 
cific assaracces to Emperor Francis Joseph in the 
antograph letter which iscxoiiing tbe cnnosity of 
tne Continent. But there is grave reason to tear 
that if h oslihlies are not iitopped immediately, the 
healing iuflaences of diplomacy will be baffled. A 
prominent S>. Petersburg newspaper is allowed to 

sav that Russia iji resolutely and irrevocably deter- 
mined to finish tne Eastern question. The Czar 
thanks tbe Town Council of Bicclaufi for tbeir 

warlike address, and no attempt h iua<:e to prevent 
the rush of soldiers to Servia. In fact tbe Bussian 
people are introducing the startling novelty of ap- 
plying tbe principle of limited liability to war. Rus- 
sia will mcnr a heavy responsibility it ahe does not 
endeavor to stop the present eiicitemeut. 

A Paris dispatch tu the limes says: "Information 

trom Vienna authorizes tho statement that the ob- 
ject of the Czar's autograph letter to Enaperor 

Francis Joseph is to induce Austria to enter into 

eommon action in tbe interests of peace." 

A ufspatch to liuuter's Telegram Company from 
Pans says the substance of tbo Porte's reply to tbe 
Powers has alroad.y reached the French Govern 
ment. It is saiJ to be of a natare to accelerate a 
pacific Bolntiou of thu Eistnrn question. The Porte 
only makes some reservations relative to the re- 
forms to be accomplished, and expre.saos tha wish 
tbat the provinces to be afiected by them shoald not 
be desi^ated by name. The Powers, on the other 
.band, desire to de!<ignate Bosnia, Bulgaria, and 
Herzegovina b.y name. 

A dispatch from Belgrade to Renter's Telegram 
Company, dated to-day, says: "There was 
a serious di.spute yesterday between Prince 
Milan and M. Ristics, tho Servian Min- 
ister for Foreign Aflairs. M. Ristics 
insisted upon the cuncluslon of an armistice, bnt 
Prince Milan would not listen to tbo orcposition. 
Ultimately tbe war party prevailed, and M. 
Ristics tendered bis resignation, which Princa 
Milan declined to receive. M. Riatics was 
witn difUcnlty persuaded to remain in 
office. England and Italy are greatly irritated at 
Servia for rejecting an armistice. Tbe British rep- 
resentative, speaking on behalf of the Earl of 
Derby, said ServH must no longer rely on England 
or.sympatbies which she no longer deserves. 



MISCELLANEOUS FOREIGN NOTES. 

THE REPOKTED CAPTURE OF THE EGYPTIAN 
CO.MMANDEB AND STAFF IN ABYSSINIA 
CONFIRMED — AN APPEAL TO ARMS CIR- 
CUL.\TING IN THE BASQUE PROVINCES 
AND NAVARRE. 

London, Sept. 30. — The correspondent di^^^e 
Times at Alexandria telegraphs that journal as fol- 
lows : "1 have reason to believe that thore Is truth 
in tbe report that Ratib Pasha, the Egyptian Com- 
mander m Chief, and his staf^ have been taken 
prisoners by the Abyssinians near Massowah." 

A dinpatoh to Renter's Telegram Company from 
Pamplona says an appeal to arms in defense of the 
Jueros, signed by B.iaque aud Navarrese commit- 
tees, is ciiculating iu Navarre aud the Basque 
Provinces. 

A dispatch to the Times from Madrid savs the 
decorations and illuminations which were prepared 
to greet ex-Queen Isabella's arrival here bave been 
removed, for fear of ( i-itnrbance. 



LOyDON BUSINESS MATTERS. 

CONSIDERABLE ACTIVITY IN THE STOCK EX- 
CHANGE DTRING THE WliEK — IMPROVE- 
MENT IN AMERICAN GOVERNMENT BONDS 
— THE MINCING LANE MARKETS. 

London, Sept. 30.— Notwithstanding atten- 
tion has been occupied b.y the settlement which was 
satisfactorily concluded yesterday, there has been 
at certain periods during tbo wesk^considerable 
activity at the Siook Ezcbaneo. On Wodnssday, 
Earl Derby's sneech on Eastern aff.iirs, together 

With a scarcity ot stock and satiifictorv traffic re- 
turna, caused a buoyancy in home railways, and 
numerous purchases were made. During tbe past 
two days all tbe markets have been de- 
pressed and there has been a general relapse 
in prices. This reaction docs not equal the previous 
advance except in foreiifn securities and Consols. 
Most of the Ea„:lish railways show an improve- 
ment on last week. Canadian issues are lower in 
consequence of a considerable dex;rease in the 
Grand Trunk traffic receipts. Alter being tolera- 
bly firm, foreign securities during the latter part 
of the week bave been declining; Egyptian, Hun- 
garian, and Rassian are 1 to 2, Argentine cf 1363 
3. Buenos Ayies II2 to S^s, and Paraguay and 
UrugUiiy 2 lower. English funds are flit, and Con- 
sols 716 lower. American Governments have 
maintained tbeir improvement in aomo cases, 
but Illinois shares are 3 lower. All 

the markets to-day are agaia flat and show a 

further decline. Iu discount, as usual on the last 
day of tbe quarter, there is rather more doing, and 
the rates are firm at the momi'nt at '^e to 1 for 
best three months' bills. The new United States 
Funded Loan closes at i>j to ^4 premium, being a 
decline of is- Fitty thousand pounds' v.orth of 
American eagles were withLirawn from the Bank ot 
England yesterday for sbipraeut to New-York. 

Business in the Mincing lane markets has been 
little affected during the past week by politicsl 
t. «aainbL as tha demand is oonfUted to cnrrent ra> i 



quirements; speculative operations are of a very 
partial character. A quiet feeling, however, has 
prevailed daring the last two days. Rice has been 
firm at the recent improvement. Many floating 

cargoes have Deen sold. Middling to fine coffee is 

again higher,- the supplies aresmalland decreasing. 
Foreign, excepting low qoaUties, is In better de. 
mand. There have been some further arrivals of 
tea, which have increased the heavy quantity now 
offering. The week's business was again moaeiate. 
The market generally remains quiet, bat importers 
are firm, as supplies may be expected to fall off. 
The sugar rawrket was dull at the close. Daring 
the week low brown sorts attracted more attention. 
Spices, though inactive, have not dectmed. 

A TEBRIBijE R URBICA NE. 
THE ISLAND OP PORTO RiCO DEVASTATED- 
MEAGRE ACCOUNTS OF A GREAT DES- 
TRUCTION OF PROPERTY — SEVERAL 
AMP^RICAN VESSELS WRECKED. 

Washington, Sept. 30.— The United States 
Consul at St. Jnan, Porto Rioo, reporto to tbe State 
Department that the Island was visited on the 
morning of the 13th inst. by a very violent hurri- 
cane, commencing at 4 A. M. and Uitiag until 
meridian of tbe same day. The Consnl writes that 
communication with the interior and sonth part of 
the Island is interrupted, the telegraph poles hav- 
ing been blown down, rivers swollen, and 
bridges carried away,- so that ijo In- 
formation has been received nor can 
any calculation .be (formed with regard 
lo the distress and amounf of damages f that mnst 
have been caused in other jparts of tho province by 
I ho harricane. At this p^t tbe Americiin schooner 
William ,7. Byrne,- of Philadelphia, ;w»s driven 
ashore. No lives were lost. A survey'was held on 
her, and sbe was reported a total wreck. Some 
eight coasting schooaers beloifginK here were also 
stranded, and a number of lives lost. Xbls capital 
has also suffered, and in the aarroanding district 
so tar as has been heard from there is hardly a 
house standing. With the rise of the rivers aid 
the hnrricaoe the catve-rice;; and coffee estates are 
all ruined (or the oomieg crop. 

From the consular agencies he sav» : "I have only 
heard from Arecibo and'Nagaabo. At Arecibo 
there was lortanatelymo American vessel, but from 
that port to Agnaoilla tjbe coast is strewn with 
wrecks. No Americati veisel is known to be among 
them. At Naguabu the Ajaaerican brig Valeocbt, of 
Boston, was driven ashore About 9 A. M. and became 
8 total wreck. The ci-ew were all s^ved. At or near 
the port of Tubacoa, District of X.ignabo, the Am- 
erican brig George Latimer was stranded and be- 
came a total wreck. iAll hands were saved. 

Mr. Haddock's Consalar'agent atl^angabo, writes 
that tbe hurricane lias done great damage in bis 
district, and from Vabacoato Fajardo there is not 
one estate or bnildij^g that h»ve not suffered. I 
have hopes, he says, that the sonthem parts of the 
islnnd may not bavoj, experienced tbe harricane 
with the force that the north parts has suffered, 
and trust I may not have to report the loss ot any 
more American vessels. I am obhged to make 
this dispaich hurriedjy, oar only eommnnioation 
witn tbe United Suitias »t tbis time being via H*.- 
vaua, aud ihe steamer leaves tbis morning. There 
will be no other oppidrtnnity, not even by sailing 
vessel, for two weeks.- The crews of tbe wrecked 
American vessels will ; be cared for and sent home 

as soon as possible. 



THE PHILADELPHIA STOCK MARKET. 



ANOTHER SCARE-gHEAVY FALL Df THE 

PRICE OF READING STOCK PRESIDENT 

GOWEN'S F0SITI0N«-AN INTERESTING 
FIGHT, 

From Our- Own Correspondent. 

PmLATELPHiA, Saturday, Sept. 30, 1876. 
Tha culminating point in the fall m the price 
of Reading railroad stock is believed to have been 

reached tO'day, when the lowest quotation known 

for years, 2438, was givsn as the price at which a 
large number of sbares were sold. The tumble 

commenced on Wedneaday last, when, the 

stock was selling^' at;^ 44, uid it w«it to 
33. aud to-day stlU lower. Tbe strttet is 
full of theories as to tbe catua, and the Wildest 
Sorts of rumors are afldai concernins the Beadias 
liailroad Company. It has passed three dividends 
on the atOQk tbis y«(|c, t4i:&»^ this reason the hold- 
era of ihe inter est-bearitig bonds begin to feel a 
little shaky, but it. H aald that ample pro- 
vision has been made to'iitaeet these demands, and' 
when tho company da^anltB ou one set of 
bonds, it will default on ^it. That means nothing 
more nor less than that tMy are ready for emergen- 
cies in that particular, ibibas already been noticed 
in Tub Times tbat Mr. B{|]|ie, the prominent stock- 
broker here, has been DnyS^g all the Reading stock 
tbat was offered, at good Azores, and now it is 
said tbat the CAUsij; of tbe break in 
the prices arises fjjdm the fact that the 
MoCalmonts, the LoDddn bankers, who were bol- 
stering the atoek to give; steadiness to the market 
withdrew their support, iand beuoe the taQ of (19 
per share. To-day it leikks out that it is a stock- 
jobbing dodge of tbe Mc04lmonts, who allowed tbe 
stock to depreciate,! I and are now buy- 
ing it up ac low; ii figures, knowing that 
as soon as tbe public dujcover this fact they will 
go in and bay, and in a dhort time good prices. wUl 
rule again. Ofconrse, :j^ the stock stands now, 
mmns throe dividends, i^ \n almost worthless as ^n 
investment, and will renlain so for at least a year. 
There were rumors of ;Mr. Gowen resigning the 
Presidency, bnt as that gentleman refused to see 
any newspaper representative, an authoritative 
denial Of the statement. (;.innot be giyen. It it is 
true, tbe company is tortsnate in the possession of 
able men, who can bonduct its aflairs witb, 
perbana, more success than Mr. Gowen. 
Witb the bursting of the coal combination, 
a fall of fid in the market value of the stock 
of his road, and no dividends or pronpect of any, 
Mr. Gowen la mote to be pitied than condemned, 
lie aspired to control the great coal trade of the 
United States, and has otterlr failed, being beaten 
on ever.v point. 

It is a ourioas history, that of the inside wot K- 
ings of tbe Reading Railroad Cosipany. An tbe 
story goes, and it comes from credible authority, a 
pool was formed of persons holding flfty'-one 
per cent, of tbe stock, and this stock was pooled and 
sealed in a iar as it wei^e. A solemn compact was 
entered into that the stock of any dn» 
ot tbe parties in the pool was not to bo sold for fii- 
teon years, and for that period those in tbe ring 
could bave exclusive control of tbe road, and elect 
the Board of Directors and officers, by the -stock 
vote of tbe pool. Franklin K Gowen was chosen 
as President of the road, and tae agreed 
for the period of fifteen years to -forsake 
his law and all other bnsinees, and devote his time 
and attention exclusively t« the Reading Railroad 
Compan y. He baa served aliont four years In his 
present position, and now that he lias got the 
company into a muddle it is hardly probable 
that he will resign, hut endeavor to get it out, 
which will be no easy matter, for the obstacles 
which surround btm^are numerous. Mr. Gowen is 
able and quick- vritted, bat the sympatbiss of the 
public are not with him in his pres- 
ent dilemma, and if something serious should 
happen to impair the credit of the road, be will re- 
ceive a fall share of condemnation from persons 
who bave pat too much faith in him. Indeed, 
there seems to be very little peace for 
the men who composed the late - com- 
bination, for now it leaks oat tbat there 
IS a light between Brio Pardes and Henry Swayze, 
President of the Wilkesbarre Coal and Iron Cfom- 
pauy and Judge Pacha, President of tbe Lebign 

Valley Railroad Compaiiy. Mestri. Pardee aud 
Swayze represented the Iiohigh operators in 
the great Coal Exchaa'go and also the 
Lnnigb Valley Railroad. Company. The trouble 
between them is a qaestiou of veracity, regard- 
ing some instructions which Judge Packer gave 
to his representatives relative to movements in the 
Excoange. and now the Judge denies ever giving 
sucbiustrnotious. In conversation witb a prominent 
operator, Mr. Pardee, said : " "We are the biggest 
liars in the country if we did not do as directed by 
Judgd Packer." As there are two to one against 
bim the Judge will be obiicfedto acknowledge 
his error. Mr. Pardee, J. Gillingham Fell, 
and Judge Packer are the three liurgest stockhold- 
ers m tho Lehigh Road, and if the tight sbonld 
cause a gap lu open Judge Packer might find tbe 
odds against him, as it is still an open question aa 
to wbtcn party Mr. Fell would ehng. 



TEE aX Y DEM OCRACY. 

DIFFICULTIES IN THE WAT OF A 

UNION OF TEE TWO FACTIONS, 

THE LOAVES AND FI8HX.S KOT KCMKBOOS 
ENOUGH FOB THK HUNORT MES WBO 
ABE READY TO GRASP THEM— PBOBABLB 
CANDIDATES FOR THE VARIOUS OrilCM 
TO BE FILLED IX HOVEMBKB. 
C The movement to unite Tamnutny and Aati- 
Tammany is likely to be ansaoceMfnL DiaMosioBS' 

Which are hourly iBcreaaing, exiat in both orKaalsa.| 

tions, and each is avowedly dtstmstfal of tbe oUmci 
All efforts to consolidate tb^m have reoulted ta tmU-i 
ores of a ludicroa« character. Tammany we«MJ 
like to swallow np An^-Tamtn«ny, and Aati-1 
many would fain devon'r Tammany at * aio^ i_ _ 
Tbe prime difficalty it owing to tbe fact that Ta 
many has comparatively only* few oiB«M to k»- 
stow. and they are of coarse insoffieient to mmtUtj 
her professional adhorenta. On tho other ha»4, 
Anti-Tammany has set too high a price on va&oa— 
a price -whteb, if paid, woiud render Ttammmaf, 
BO far aa ner patronage is concerned, • baak- 
rapt in place and utterly hel^leoa. To mU 
to this difficalty many of the regular Deouerata aa- 
■ert that if peace with anti-Xaipmaay mm ptrehaa. 
•d by an enormons aabsidr, it woold aBoost «• 
nothing. To -nse tbe common laniroage of (ka Taa , 
man> leaders, "Anti-Tammaay mar aeO oat, bak 
she can't deliver the goods." Thlalattiel 



ta 



most serioua complication ia tbe whole biutBaaa.: ' 
Mr. John Kelly would not perform the pan of •! 
negotiator for union with some of tbe leaden of 
Anti-Tammany if bo dreaaoad for one momairt tksk) 
nnioa would prove diaastroos to himantf Xvea iff 
tbe leaders ot both sectioaa of the DeKecn^l 
shoald join hands, thev woold only rnpTiirnt fham J 
aelvea. Almost everv member ot the Anti-Taanai^ 
ny organization i» disposed to find fault with Ht' 
Kelly's adminiitration, and tfaev have 
the overt act of denoanclng Mr. Kelly 
went to the St. Louis Conventitm to <m mi «U m»» ^j 
candidacy of Samuel J. Tilden for tlie Preaid«My. 

Shrewd potttacians assert that evea if XamMaay' 
and Anti-Tammany come to^etber tbe uaka vaalC 
reanlt in creating new factiooa, which wroaU irrit 
nally torn tfaeiv hands acainat Kelly felaMilC| 
These are the views of aome of tbe XaaaMay )«at>| 
era w bo are oppoeed to addinn to the recnlar TtoM ; 
ocratic family a number of outsiders, for wkoas th«r 
cannot make proper provisiov. Another. Mkol^i 
in tbe way is this : Tbe more promineat mag.— 1—1 
of Anti- Tammany aro^val candidatea Cor XMa-f 
many nominationt. 

IU leaders are at war with each other, aad that*. 
fore the ranJc and file ot Taxaasaay regard taea ^t 
powerloas. One of the leaders, Jodce ICoiraj, ia> 
in favor of one man for a nontlnatioD, while aaother ^ 
leader is opposed to him. Mfc O'Brien is aaid «• Ims • 
opposed to Seoatot Morrissey, and tbe ftfai', tti 
appears, is supported by Mc BeaJaaria Wood.! 
Xnik spectacle has led the regalar Deiaocratte %amA> f 

ers to assert tbat it will be necessarr for aBti-Iaa<r 
many to heal her own dissension* b^ore ahe caa 
ask Tammany to pnrcnase am oremoixatian ia -vkl^i 
•neb demoralization exists. Tbare fa 
question to be eonsidered in lafa 
the movement to unite these bodlea. ▲ ioir 
of the Antl-Tammanv men state that whUa ther am 
willing to place reliance on any promlaaa tWt Jaka 
KeUy may make to them with a view t» natty. . 
tbey cannot tmst his anbordinitoa, aad ttmatDra ' 
they believe tbat it woold be bettw far theaa t» 

have nothine -whatev^ to do -with Ta^w^ay. 
Xhey argue that Anti-Xammoay might Isee all her 
prestige by anch a anion. This faaiias kat beea 

strengthened by tbe apatfay that pcarraila ^m kot^ 
Sides. 

Straneeto tay, Mr. John Morriaaey WM m Imi^, 

ago the loudest in deauoncing the pn^oaed srilaHi 
but be torned an anaccoantat>le aomeraaalt abaat ' 
aweekaga His relations with Mr. Joka KaUj 
nave been bitterly hostile for tb^ past thro* 7«aa^ 
bat it appears that they bave both bariad t^; 
batcbet Mr. Kelly's objeet was aet menir ta * 
reconciled to Morrissey, bat to secure Tfwiiiaeej'i 
aid in carrying Anii- Tammany, body and aaal, late 
the mortgaged wigwam of th^ parry la FomtmUk. 
streets Mr. Morrissej-, though aettioj: hiaisrif ay ' 
as the pioneer of union, was eachnd aat «f tte 
Chairmanship of the very Coaferenoe Coaaadtfeaa i 
which ho had designed to effect it. The mode hf^' 
which the Anti- Tammany Seaater was I'liriaai 
vented was as follows - 

At the meeting of the Anti-Tammaay Czaoattva 
Committee, held last Monday evaniac ia Irviac: 
Hall, the plan to take Mr. Morrissey oat of tha flsM^ 
as an official negotiator was soooessfhOj' iisiiisd' 
ont. The committee, it will be remeatbacsd, a^ 
pointed a Conference Committee to oonaidai^kkB mbs 
Ject ol onion. Tbe latter held a seoret ■■■■iaB.n 
Mr. Morrlssey'a friends proposed bisa 
Chairmanship of tbe eomimttee^ bat 

member moved tbat WiUiam P. tfitehetl 
pointed. Tbis motion was adopted atter a 
debate, in. which Mr. Morrlasey's iiiends keealVi 
realized the demoralization that axisted xa thsir, 
own ranks. The proceedings of the Conlareaaa^ 
Committee, together with its diaseusions, r eache d ' 
the ears of some ol the Tammany leaders, aad it ia 
to be presomed that Mr. KeUy was infociMd tt 
them. In tbis condition of ihinga it ia £iic to yea* 
•ume that Tammany and Anti-Xsmcaaay will aot 
UDite. and that even if they shonid, the naina wtA 
not amount to anything because the leadeia at tba 
latter are at "dasgws pomt«." 

THE ](ATORAI.TT. 
Xamaiany has only a few oaadidataa fbr 
Mayoralty. Mr. Kelly favors iir. Augostus SekaB^ 
The "swallow-tails ' desire £Jward Cottar 
sncceed Wickham, but tbe "short-hairs " will ha' 
none of him, because he led a faetioa agaiast iCr. < 
Kelly in Tammany Hall on the night when be aad 
his noisy colleagnes refused to vote fbr a resoiatio^ 
of confidence in Tsmnijmy's boss. The oppoaaatatl 
of Mr. Schell have already tried to undermiae hioa. fj 
Xhey have cironlated a story that he is Mr. Kelly'a 
man, and if elected would control the offioaa ia'tba 
political interesu of hid patron. Mr. Sc bell's frieaaa- 
deuy these allegations. Jobn Morriaser is said 10 Ink 
bitterly opposed to M.T. Scheii as a eaadidate fi») 
the Mayoralty. A gentleman iaformod tae wittsrl 
tbat Air. Morrissey openly expressed Mmaelf «ia| 
ihesabjectin front of the Hoffnaa Soasaalsw^ 
nights ago; that he then stalei that he was xaadn 
to present the names of fifteen Demoorata to Mz^j 
Kelly as canaidaus tor tbe Mayoralty, aad to agrea) 
to nominate any one of t jeca la case Mr. Sohall waa. 
left out, Mr. Morrissey, nowever, auty hKt^ 
changed bis opinions since that time. Caatroll^ 
Green iyalso a candidate for the Mayoralty. Ba-' 
mor has it that he will be aoaUaatad 
by the _ Tax-payers' Associations, by va^ 



German organizations, aad 



ethock 



FORECLOSVRE SUIT AGAINST ARAILEOAB- 
Buffalo, Sept. 30, — A suit for the fore- 
closure ol a mortgage for 12,500,000 has been insti- 
tuted against tbe Buffalo aud Jamestown Railroad 
Company and everything pertsiiiiag ro It by the 
Parmcrs' Loan and Tmst Compaliyof New- York, 

representing tho holders of the bonds issued by tho 
company in tho year 1863. OSe milliou dollars of 
tho capital stock, paid up. Is ownel b.y tho City of 
Buffalo, and about ball a million by tbe towns 
through which the roSd passe^ and tho remainder 
by maivirtual stockholders in this city. It is repre- 
sented tbat on tne payment of the interest the 
bondholders would willingly withdraw the suit. 
The difficulty in tbe way i* that the city cannot 
contribute tbe necessary twenty per cent, without 
an enabling aaw which cannot be obtained until the 
meeting of tbe ijegislatajre. A Receiver of the road 
will nrnhablv be aonOloteCnext WOSl*- 



nous _ . 

bodies. His claims lur the ofiloe bave alaa baeai 
piesented by a large nnmber ot ooatmotots. X'har^' 
President of the Board ot Aldermen, Mr. Saamel' 1^ 
A. X<ewis, has also been mentioned ia eonDoeti 
with the Tammany nomination, and soaae maecia 
bare been held iu his behalf. Mr. Fre<lenek 

Conkling is also spoken of as a candidate, a , 

strongly urged b.y members of Ute Tamiaaay JUIl ,^ 

Geneial Committee. ^ 

THE SHRIBVAI.Tr. 
The general opinion ot the Taounaiiy laadoes to ' 
that Bernard Reilly will receive the nomiaation fbr 
Sheriff. Xhey say that be has the advaatsgeof ag*/ 
being opposed by John K«lly and of oeias aa 
tive worker of Tammany." and also sf being 4 
timate terms witb tbe men who will probably < 
stitute tbe uomiaating conveutioo. John MMnssea 
wants Tammany to give Joe Stuuinoa tbe nomJaaJ J 
Uon. Mr. Soannou was formerly G^erk of the Ooa>§^ 
mon Conned. While be is eagerly pressed ftir ^Mk^ 
Shrievalty by Mr. Morrissey, it is not at all It' 
that he will get the nominsuon. Senator Ol _^. 
is also said to uo a candidate fur the offioe, aad iaiu*- 
claims are being urged by some A.nti-Iaiw mtagf^ 
men. 



THE OOI75TT CLERKSHIP. 
It is eonsidered likely that CoL WilUaa X. Xab*' 
erts, ex-member of Congress, will reoeivo the Xa«<i ' 
many nomiaation for tbe Coiuty Clfttkahip. Thm 

fHendsof Police Joatloe Murray, of Aati-XaaMia- 
ny have mentioned bim as a candidate for the offiso 
ou'ibe Tammany tioket in case bath sectiona af u>a 
Democracy should be united. 

THE SCBBOOA'TBSHIP. 

Xhereare many candidates for tbe SartagatasMp. 
Ths present lucambeat, who was appohatad by tba . 
Aldermen, acting as aboard of Snpervlson, to Alt - 
tbe vacancy oanssd by the death of tho lata 8aire> 
gate Van Sohaick, would liks to retain his tuerativa 
position tbrongb tbe grace of Tarn maay hat Uia 
not yet knowu what will be done in his eaas. W^il- 
lism C. Traphagen. toimerly a law sartaeraf tha 
late James X. Dradiv ia lueased br bu friaads tm m 



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C|e"liaxryjom Cto^g, ^vtxm^, wxmB^iC 




(!bnpii'^35^i * >^^ 



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► ^c. 



DO«iip»Uoii. Police Jnstio© Batier H. Bixby !■ alio 
Mientioted •• » candidate lor the office by manT of 
the Auti-Xammaity leaders. If Tammany ana Anti- 
rammany were unitert Justlco Bliby would doub*- 
Uas be the caodldate uf both. 

TUE JUDICIART. 

Xjiigo Friedman, of the Suoenor Conrt, will 
probably be noiniDated by Tammany. The Jad^e- 
lliip of the Marine Court, now held by Mr. Sinnott, 
promia*« t« be a bone of contention. lAr. Sinnott is 
ai>^i6c6 of (riiv. Tilden, and ti»e GoTei-nor wanta 
Taaamany to eire him the Domination. XammaDy, 
bowvTor, la opposed to the dictation of the Gov- 
•ni0r and she would gladly elve the office to some 
^ti-Tammany man. in order to get Sinnott oat of. 
ih*irar- r 

Sm COROBBflSIOXAL TICKS'^ < 

Aeoordlnit to all accounts, Tammany intends to' 
KBominate »11 her preteni GonKreMmen in thia. 
KNmty exo«4>c 2kCr. Head. This eoarse has been. 
leented neoeasary la order to send men to 'Waah-^i 
logtOD who might b»a ■onroe of tzonble If they r»-^ 
SMUHed here. That bombastio mdiritlnal Mr., 
ttevict has broufht Tammany and Mi. Kelly Into' 
Ikheap of trouble by mareh4llo« a Corporal's Buard._^ 
»f attenuateU " Swallow-tails" against the 'Short- 
»air«." Jklr. Kelly has no love for Hewitt, but, as i 
theatoTjiioe^ ht) ta to Oe again selected for Con- 
ireaa, where bjs genius will be divertea irom. 
ixanlti on Tammany to a 8onil>-raca for the 
iWOAkwsbip. The report that Mr. Mead will b»i' 
MU of the race has resulted lu bringlnfc oat a 
■amber of candidates, among them Police Justice 
Socsn. Mr. Oliyer, a lawyer, and other*. AU these 
ir« working to obtaiu the XaBimaoy aomuuttion. 

THB ASSEafBI.T. 

Xtvtf Tammany AssembtymaB desires to be re- 
WMlnaftf. but th» more ambition* disciples of 
Anti Ta—nufy want t» make laws for the people, 
i therefore some of the old TaioamaJiy backs who 
a« Albany last WiBterwill b« saperaeded by 
••w men in order to compete witn the candidates 
•* ABti-Xammanv. The slate vol either taction of 
Uk« Democracy has not yet been filled, 
Uth««gh thev contain a vscore of namea. 
la (he ITirst District Michael Mnr- 
tbj^ Anti-Tammany, hopes t<» cross swords 
With Jim flejUv. Tammany. In^the Fourth Dis- 
»»i«» J. J. Biair, Tammany, udesires to run 
•KMBM Juhnny Galvia, Anti-lamaixuiy. In the 
Sixvk Ihatricl Matthe'w Patten, TamHflliny, is ready 
to have "the people'* 11 ecide his claim*, as against 
Plchael Healv, Aatl-Taaimany. In thaPouneenth 
Dotrio; P. R. Caribv, Anti-Tammanv, i* anxious to 
tab* the a«id against Laiio F. Cuzajna, Vho hopes 
to |«t the i'auimaiiy numination. Gen, Sjxinoia will 
piobabjT get ttie Tammany nomiiiation in the Six- 
tMOtk Siatrict, and George Y. W histon the Anti- 
TaauMBy soiumatioa. lu the SeTeateenfih Dls- 
triot Leon C. Dessar and James Connelly are .iitely 
aonot axainat each other. 

THE COnONKKSHIPS. 
There is a host of Tammany candidates for f^e 
tttfee Coroaersbipa whieh wilt become vacant at the 
jloa* of the year. The present incumbents have 

fosAd tb« offlca so Incrutive that they want to be 
retaiaeH ; but one ot thuin, Harry Woltman, is not 
lik<dy to l>e adected tor a second term. He is re- 
yarded M a "marked man" so far as Tarn- 
■aany ia concerned, because be is said to 
karre joined with a nnmbdr of "Swallow-tails " 
U the ikoihmmit Honae to nadermine Jolin Kelly and 
Tammany in the interest of TUUen. Among the 
»tb«r oasdiJaies are Nelson \7. Young, Bryan 
feetllr, and ex-Aldermau Gilon. Nick MoUer, Of 
the First 'liN'arU. is also a candidate, but it' he can't 
ret a curoaerahiu from Tammany, be will tnank- 
ntily accent a nn'mioaUan for Alderman at large, or 
'tor the Asserobiv. In the present aspect of things 
%*ia likely to ^t aotbing. 

THE AJLDEKHKN. 

- STasrlyitt to* present J^ermen are candidates 
. for rccoUtDatioi!, but the Tammany slate Is blank 
■p to the present time. The City Fathers get $4,000 
aaeh tor lesislaring for this City, and each baa filed 
in the finance Depanment » eiaim tor $2,000 more 
for cauvassinz the votes cast at an election and 
tormally aDprovinj the tax levy, both duties being 
perforatod ib their capacity of county officers, al- 
Umach the county has praotieallr ceased to exist 
loaxaco. _ 



•pecftorship. Mr. Cooper addressed the Chair, and 
•aid 1 that the -persons whose names had 
been V presented by bim bad been chosen 
by a^ majority ' of the General Committee 
ot bis district to serve as Inspectors. 
This brou^t Gen. Spinola again to the floor. In 
the remarks he made he did nnt deny that Mr. 
Cooper's stittemont was true, " but," said he, " the 
names were distasteful to a majority ot^tlre Demo- 
cratic voters in the distriot." 

The fight over the Inspectors for this district 
was most bittor, and showed that the i^emocrats in 
Mr. Tilden's vwn Assembly District are not as har- 
monious as he eeuld desire. Duriiag the very 
acrimonious debate over the reports from this dis- 
trict, the Chairman announced a ; communica- 
tion which he banded to the Secretary 
and requested him to read. This proved to be a 
piteous appeal trom ex-Civil Jaatiioe Alfred T. 
Ackert and ex- Assemblyman Nioholbs Haughtou, 
tirging the committee, tor the sako of karmuny, 
peace, and the success of the Democtatio Party in 
this district, in which the Demclcratic . candi- 
date lor the party resided. tK> poiir oil 
upon the troubled waters > and settle 
the matters in dispute without aliowSng any per- 
sonaliiies to enter into the discussion: upon them. 
This communication was placed on filib, A vote was 
then taken uoon a motion to reler the reports of 
Messrs. Cooper and Spinola tn the Chair- 
man, fJohn Kelly, I with power to ap- 
point tne three Inspectors for the district, 
and the motion was carried by a vote of 45 to 43. 
This was a downright victory for, Spinola, in the 
face of the fact, admitted on all icidi>«, that the 
names presented by Mr. Cooper wens regularly 
cboaen and regularly reported to tbe !Ex:ccacive 
Committee. Spmola's victory was also a triumph 
for "Boas" Kelly, who baanotfargo«t»-n the position 
taken by Mr. Cooper at St. Louis m. regard to the 
nomination of Uncle "Shammy." A similar bitter 
fight was had over the contCHt In tbe Twenty-first 
Assembly District, resulting in ibe same manner 
as that in the Sixteenth, ,namel y, giving ''Boss" 
Kelly power to appoint Imspectors there- 
in. In this contest the victory was 
\ron by Corporation .d.ttomey "William A. Boyd 
over ex-Senator Hugh fl. Moorr*, Boyd proseuting 
the names of Inspectors w ho were seleoted by a 
minoritv of the General CommlJttee offals district. 
Buyd is one of "Boss" KoHt'b favorites and waa 
placed m his present position by him. Mooro and 
Kelly for the past year have iK)C beea on good terms. 
A Committee ot Cunterenpe was apoointed to meet 
wiiu the similar committee of tho Anti-Tammany 
Party on Monday. The oommittee Sa as follows : 

Patrick G. Duffy, William P, Kirk, Owen Gava- 
nagh, Thomas Sheila, WilJiam Bennett, Timothy J. 
Camiibell. Peter B. Olne.v, £dwartL D. Gale, Johb J. 
Gorman, Louis C. Waehner, Mfinzo Diefondorf, 
William W. Cooke, Patrick Gibn^v, Peter Gillespie, 
George "W. McGlyun, Edward ^Hooper, Fredenclc 
Smyth, John Kelly, Thomas O'Callagban, William 
iJ. Quiocy, G. K. Ackerman, MJaiiaes J. Mooney, and 
Henry D. Purroy. 



THE YELLOW! F£ FEB, 



«at 



\ 



JBBVENTKBN INTERMENTS OB" TEIXQ-W FETER 
TICTTMS AT SAVAfTNAB — APPEAI- TO 
KNIGHTS OF PYTHI.^iS. ; 
Savaijkah, Sept. 30. — The' total number of 
intermenta to-day was twenuy-9ix, of which seven- 
teen were from yellow fever. .^Twelve of the burials 
were of colored persons. 

Macon, Sept. 30.— Felix (Joj-put, the Grand Chan- 
cellor of the Koights oC, Fyt.las ot Georgia, 
appeals to members of i that order through- 
out' the United States for assistance for 
members in Savannah.' who are suffering 
i"rom the yellow fever. Relief is needed immedi- 
gvely. The lodge in Savannah has exhausted its 
me aas and calls for, aid, from abroad. The Bufi°er- 
ing ii very great. 



THE MAYORALTY. 
ytrr contractors in favoe op the 

NOMINATION OF CONTBOLLEB ANDRBW 
H. OKEEN. 
ADOst ioflaential meeting of City contractors 
*«fl held last evening at the Grand Union Hotel, 
to ttie purpose of conslderiag the teaaibilify of 
WBCvrrlar in the nomination of Controller Andrew 
B. Qre«n for the Mayoralty. There was no doubt 
la the intention of tbe meetins. It took the stand 

< Ji tile first instance that it was divorced frora all 
Btate and national issnes, and on the Municipal 
^naatkm wis tinanimoas in its procedure. 
<Mr. Join W. Ambrose was appointed Chairman 

-|Uit Mr. Dovling Secretary. Mr. Ambrose stated 
the purpo^ for which the meeting had been con- 
vened. Having tbe welfare of the City sincerely 
at heart, and aesiring to see St ably and honestly 
Covarsetf, they cared not, he assumed, whether a 
ciadidate tat the responsible position of ita chief 
•xeentlTe Was a Damocrat or a RepuDlican. Their 

/^einre Was to rise . abovo political parti- 

^aansbip and advocate the election to the 
IMayoralty of a man whose claims upon tbe suf- 
nces of his fellow-citizens were founded, not upon 
his pslltieal faith in the cnamon acceptation of that 
tana, bat apon his qualifications to fearlessly and 
faithfully diaaharge tbe dutiea of tbe office to 
which be aspired. What, he asked, were 
CratroiLer Green's qualifications 1 On account 
mi tiMir almost daily business intercourse 
With bim lor years, tbe contractors of 
Ifew-Tork should, of all men, be able to answer this 
question. Was he not an official of proved integri- 
ty and executive nbiity? Had he not, as it were, 
been tried by fire^ And from each trial Iiad 
lie BOt come oac stronger, brighter than be- 
fore. 'When he took cbarge of the Con- 
troller's office oonfuflion relgiied supreme. Qnietlr, 
■yatematicaily, and with a courage challenging the 
admiration of every honest man Mr. Green went 
to w<sk. Everything that ingenuity could devise 
or raacUity execute was used ajcainat him to pre- 
Tent him from showing up tbe Department of 
IlBADce as it was then coDtrolled by tbe Bing 

'^ieve^ bat he- oroKa throngb every obstacle 
thrown ia his way. Honesty was his infloxible 
Tula of action ; and thi?, supported by 
an indomitable will and a thorongh 
knowledge of business matters, enabled him 
to triumph at last, and to bntld upon the rntns of 
corruption and fraud a Department of Finance 
Which la to-day the pride and the glory of the City. 

, Coutd thev, be a^ked. find a man more fit to be in- 
trusted vritb the daty of solectiOK the beads of tbe 

4epartmenia uf tbe City GoTeroment, and of seeing 

. that thev were properly managed? Had he not 

Bbown that he was a good Indge of men, and 

that he would not be likely to make any mistake in 

his appointments. Since Mr. Green's accession to 

«fficej in IsTl, he had made payments tor pubiio 

Imnrovements to tbe amount of |fi9,294,527 79. In 

bia presMut position bis infiuenca apou the 

' City Government was great, but it could 

, not be compared to what it would be 

If be were Mayor. In conclusion be 

asked tbeni to review Controller Green's long and 

laborioas lite and see how he had elevated evcrj- 

thing It hich his inHuence bad reached and then eay, 

if tb^ could, that be was not tbe man for Mayor 

of New-Vurk City. He asked them to unite in 

' ^apporcine kim for tbat bigb office. Tbe statement 

Of tae Cb.:irman was received with applause, and 
a oonmittee on resolutions was at once appointed 
whieh adopted tbe follawinK : 

Hf~kertai, It Is manifestly iadlspenaahle to the pros- 
perity 01 th« Qty ol Aew-xork that its Mayor shuuid 
be a man. not only ot i>owcr, hsnesty, aad executive 
aoihty, but firom expeneucu tamlliar with tbe proper 
anetbod off sncccftaltiliy adiuiniaieTlus tbe several 4le 
p<Ktmeut» of the City Govt^rnnient; and oi stcuring tb - 
eonsisient pjoxr^ss coutiuuajly deoianded oy tbe Liiye 
J that it may keep even i>ace with tbe wants of its citi. 
■eus: sud 

tyhtrtat, Piem. for years, almost dally basiness 
lDt*-Tcour«e with Coatroller Andrew II. Ureeu, the 
eontrucfors oi .\ew-York City are satisfied that hon- 
esty is bis inflexitiie rule <>t aetiou; tkat his exerutive 
•btlity 13 of tae bt^best order; that liom avtnal ex- 
penettie be Islntunateiy acquainted not ouiy with the 
janeral p inc. pies upuu wmch the sevfr.il deoart- 
mauts of the tity Uovemiueut eUouid be basedl but 

,Wltli detuita pertjluia^ to the clficlent niaitaeeiueiit or 
tfaese depariments and the Ixwh apoiicable to the 

■•ame, am that lib IS tlie nncomp.omisiug representa- 
tive uoii advocates of the coohisteut prugriM« dehiauded 

.»j the City in all ita pubUu worka and iiuproveiuuDtB; 
and 

Wlxeremt, In his deallogs wltb tbe contractors of 
Kew-Yotk t^lty, it is app irent that » ontrollr>r Andrew 

H. Ureen, in auuietiuies del.iying tbe piTuient of money 
)nsi<Iy due theiu. . uid to, uot from captiousueas or 
prejudice, but With iiie aole view ol ascertaiuln ; the 
■•.botLimi faits" in the renpuctiye cases and seeing 
that ail the parties loteicbCed ooiulaed exact Juaiicb ; 
there tore 

l.atoive(t. Tbaz we, the contractors of New-York City' 
tndeiienoently oi any auil all political pa-ties, do most 

• bearllly eoiienr In the uouiinalion ol Controller An- 
drew U. tireea lor ilie -Mayoralty recently made by 

' aome of our cltiie.us' associatiouB, and tiiat we will 
aau our iMfStsnaeaveis to secure bis eleeaun to that 
bigb i>fii;:e. 

The reaolntioDS were unanimously adopted. A 
committee was also appointed to confer with otfaer 
oiganizations having tbe same object In view, and a 
third bummitToe was seleoted v> convey tbs sentl- 
meobs 01 ifae meeting to Controller Gre«>u. This 
coiamtttee is to meet at v'sweeny's Hotel on Tues- 
«ay at 11 o'clock. I'lnally, the ergauizatioa whs 
made permanent, its meetings to be held every Sat- 
aiday evening. 

THE DEMOCRA lH HQUA BBLINO. 

'•KANGUNG OVER THE APPOINTMENT OF 
tJiSPECTORS OF ELRCTION—JOHN KEL- 
,T'8 ADHBREMT3 VIOTOBIOC8. 

The Tammany Hall Exeoutiyo Committee 
consumed four and a half hours of yesterday in 
wrangling over the appointment of Inspectors of 
Election. The names reported by all tbe districts 
and the Twenty-third and Twenty-fourth Wards, 
Vrith the exoeptloa of those reported from 
fka Sixteenth 'and Twenty-first Assembly Dis- 
iMats, were accepted. 'When the Sixteenth 
^assfably District was ealled. Gen. Spinola sprang 
Hk Mia feet aad to did Edward Geoper. Each of 
(hose aieiabers handed to the Secretary^ sup of 
aai'taialnai thca<a»aaaa« aC.flaadidatM ilB-taK 



i 



COJTXKIBUTIONS FOfR THE BRUNSWICK SUF- 
FERERS. 

Messrs. De Neul'viUe & Co., af No. 18 Ex- 
change place, bare rsoeived the following subscrip- 
tions for tbe safferera in Brunswick, Ga.: 
B.._ t, $liB. M. J $6 

caL - iJo " 

B.j._, ^ao 



H. 



B. T. WllsolSt Co.. 
A. B. — ........... 



-.3,343 



Totat — 

Preylojasl.v ad^nowludged 

Grand total $3,439 

According to a dispatch received b^ Messrs. Be 
Neufville yeaterday . afternoon, the fever is more 
deadly as the season advances. There are good 
phybicians and i nurses in town, bat more money is 
wanted. 

Tbe Maritimo Ercliango has also received the fol- 
lowing subscriptiuna for the relief of the sufferers 
ot^ianswick. 

Beth Low .♦- $10|G. Reusens 25 

Uomaine U Baitt.,. 20|Ca3h _ \ 

Preyiously acloiowledged „ 1,469 

Grand total-. .^ _ $1^625 

Mayor Schroedar, : of Brooklyn, yesterday pub- 
lished a letter asking aid from the citizens for the 
sufferers from yellow fever in tne cities of Savan- 
nah and Brunswick, Ga. 



TBEASUXiY STATISTICS. 

WASHnTGTOK, Sep«t 30.— The Treastirer toow 
holds (337,^42,300 m Ibonds to secure bank circula- 
tion, aad |18,828,000t to secure public deposits. 
United States bonds deposited for circnlatioa dur- 
ing the week endinig to-day, 12,165,000. United 
States bonds held for circulation withdrawn during 
the week ending to-d4iy, ?2, 129,100. National bank 
circulation ontstandfang: Currency no tSs, ^2S,754,. 
467 ; Gold notes, $2,099,190. 

The recefpts from /irrtemal' revenue to-day were 
fM.7.693 82, and from Customs, $315,453 77. Inter- 
nal revenue receipts for the month. {9,637,991. 

Beceipts of national bank notes for the week 
ending to-day, as compared with the corresponding 
week of last year : 

1875. 1876. 

Kew-Tork $1,077,000 $1,055,000 

Boston — 1,048,000 1,.565,000 

Philadelphia 139.000 856.000 

Chicago 105,000 84,000 

Clnciunati 56.0IH) 18,000 

JlUcellaaeons 862,00 1,02 2.000 

Total _.. $3,237,000 $4,585,000 



.$3,237,000 
Receipts to-day, 1606,748. 

Tbe shipments of currency for the week were 
11,306,392, ana of silver fl 1,144. 

The following is a sninmary of the operations of 
tbe National Bank Bedemption Agency for the 
three months ending this day, being the first qnar- 
ter of the current fiscal year, as compared with the 
corresponding period of last year : 

1875. 1876. 

Notes fit for circulation, as- 
sorted ana returned to 
biinks of issue $15,185,200 $34,789,200 

Notes nnht tor circulation, 
assorted and delivered tn 
the Controller of the Cur- 
reucy for destruction and 



reolacemeat with new 

notes . 

Kotes of failed, I1quidatin<:, 



. 21,427.755 16,862,600 



and reducing bynks depos- 
ited in the'treasury 



6,0.34 .700 8.20 9.800 

Total $41,647,655 $59,861,600 

Tbe increase in- the amount handled over last 
year is nearly forty-four per cent., while the force 
has been reduced during the year nearly thirty-one 
percent. 

The following is a statement of the TJnited States 

currency nutstandiug at this date : 
Did demaud notes 

Legal-tender notes, new i^sue 

Leial-teiider notes, series lbti9... 
Lenal-teuder notes, series 1874-., 
Leijal-tender uotes, series 1875-.. 
Ooe-vcar notes oi 1863 , 

Two-year uotes of 180:5 

Two-year coupon notes of 1803.. 

Compound interest notes 

Fractional currency, drat isaue... 

Fractional curl^ncy, second issue 

Fractional currency, third issne. 

Fractional uurrencs'. toarth issui; 
senes ■. 

Fructional currency, fourth issue, sec- 
ond senee 

Fractional currency, fourth iasue, third 
«f lies -■ 

Fractional currency, fifth issue 

Total $b98.840^34JT 

— 



$86,732 50 
.. 26,338,102 00 
-2l7.674,7o3 UO 

.- 69.050.421 00 

.. 64, 8;; 1.464 00 

60.015 tio 

18,550 00 

'.;4,b50 00 

323,24(1 00 

.- 4.'20.,74O 93 

S.llO.sT'-J 47 
3,006,301 Vi2 



4,023,127 55 
1,060,081 10 



lirst 



1,601,934 65 
12,696,356 70 



AMERICAN WORK Si Ey IN SCOTLAND. 



ONE HUNDRED AND MKIY MASONS INDUCED 
TO GO TO GREKXOCK— IHE TRADKS- 
U.NION PERSUADES THEM NOT TO UO TO 
WORK— AND THEY ARF, LIKF.LY TO SPEND 
TUE WINTER IN IDLKNEiSS. 

About a moath aga 1 JO masons emigrated 
from New-York to Greenock, in Seotland, where 
they wore to be eniployed in the erection of "new 
work-houses for a period of at least two years. 
Good wages were promised, their passage farea 
were deirayed by their employers, the contractors 
for Che construction ot tbe new buildings, and great 
things were expected trom this novel trade move- 
ment. The Bauguine hopes at the men have 
not been realized. Ic appears tliat tbe AHerioau 
masons were engaged to take tbe place of trades- 
union men who bad gone out un strike. When 
they arrived in Greenock the "union" men at once 
Interviewed the Americans, who lent a willing ear, 
and a great number of them rolused tu go to work. 
lu a week every mau who had croysed the Atlantic 
threw up bis job oa the prstensa tbat 
he did not bargain lu have his passage faco ueduct- 
ed from hia weekly wages by inatalloionts. There 
is a possibility, however, that tbe men have been 
Induced to take this step at the instigation of the 
Masons' Unina, and as trade ia by no means so good 
as was represented a month ago, it is possible that 
they will experience in Scotland tbe miseries of en- 
forced Idleness. They cannot expect mach help 
from the tuuds of the "union," not beiug oc embers 
^ereo& ' \ 



THE S OLID S OUTH, 

SPEECH OF ATIORNEY GENERAL 

TA FT. 
DISCUSSION OF THE SOUTHERN QUESTION — 
THE DANGERS THAT WOULD ATTEND 
THE ACCESSION OF THE DEMOCRATS TO 
POWER. 
Attorney General Taft delivered bis first 
speech In the Ohio campaign at Pike's Opera-house, 
Cincinnati, Thursday night. It was mainly de- 
voted to a discussion of the Southern situation, 
concerning wbich he, of course, has unequaled 
facilities for obtaining accnrato Information. We 
make the following extracts : 

t/I^M THE REFUBLICAN PARTT. 

The Republican Party sprang from the Declara- 
tion ot Independence. Slavery was not consistent 
with the announcement that " all men were born 
equal," and with " the In.ilionable rights of life, lib- 
erty, and the pursuit of happiness." When the 
slaveboldlng aristocracy had succeeded in obtaining 
from the Supremo Court a judgmeut establishing 
their right to carry slavery into all the Ter- 
ritories, and annulling all compromises which 
limited tbe territorial extension of the Insti- 
tution, the men who formed the Republican 
Party were inspired by the principles of 
the Declaration to resist the extension 
and to elect Abraham Lincoln to the Presidency. 
"Whom the gods would destroy they first make 
mad." The slave power would have been secure 
if it had remained loyal, but it defied the Govern- 
ment and forced a war. Heroin do we find the 
broad difference between the civilization of nn- 
tiqaity and that of the present d,iy. Then wars 
ended by making free men slaves ; now wars end 
by making slaves free men. The Kcpublican Party 
having thus been brought into eiistonce, led 
boldly on to victory — the victory of universal 
liberty. Hence the Thirteenth Amendment abolish- 
ing slavery. Bat " equality " was still wanting ; 
hence the fonrtoenth amendment, which gave civil 
egnality. Still political tichts were wanting, with- 
out which tbe full idea of thu Doclaralion of Inde- 
pendence could not be realized ; hence the fifteenth 
amendment, Kiving political equality witli the riu:ht 
to vote. The ideal of the " I)d<'laralion " thus be- 
came the fundamental law of the republic. This 
was the work of the Republicans, achieved against 
the persistent onposition of tbe Democracy. Tbe 
present leaders ot that party were the leaders in 
opposition to these great measures, when 
, their adoption was urged, and finally carried. In 
overthrowiug tbe reoellion vast indebtedness was 
incurred. The Confeaerate Demerracy now com- 
plain of our extravagant expenditure in persuading 
them to remain in the Union. We did not count 
the co-iit-. But Confederate Generals on Congression- 
al Gommiitees, peering into our archive,-* to find ma- 
terials for a report against the condactof the war 
in which they were conquered, is a grotesque affair. 
The clear and well-deflued policy of the Rtjpublican 
Part.y and its candidates is to preserve and not de- 
strey tbe fruits of the war against rebellion. It is 
to sustain and cause to bo recognized and acknowl- 
edged in every State tlie costly precedent that the 
Uoilert States is a Government Irora which no State 
can secede I It assumes that the blood and treaauro 
spent in maintaining the Union were not wastou, 
ana that the Government should be administered 
on that hypothesis. It seeks justice and pro- 
motes equality among all the citizens. All its 
objpcts are constitational and lawful, as well as just 
and humane.. Improvement and reform are essen- 
tial parts of its theory and praoiico ; not a pretext 
on which to get into power, but a living principle 
of action, to be re&arded whenever and wneiever 
the occasion may arise. Its history will show more 
and greater reforms in the civil service, and in the 
methods of conducting the affairs of the Govern- 
ment, than have been or can be shown to have hap- 
pened under Damocratioruie iu any equal time. Its 
grand purpose has been to make tne Kepublio per- 
petual, by elevating all its people to tbe highest 
and beat condition of human society. 

TUE DEMOCRATIC CANDIDATES. 
In the war, multitudes of the old Democratic or- 
ganiaation realized the absurdity and the wicked- 
ness of secession, and patriotieally went into the 
army, or sustained the Goveiament in other ways. 
The.y thus ceased to belong to tbe Democratic 
Party. £nt there never was wanting a nucleus of 
partisan Democratic politicians who sympathized 
with the rebellion, and who ' never ocnitted 
an opportunity to make a point against the 
Government in its contest with the ene- 
my. While many of the rank and file were 
bravely flighting for the Union, the Bourbons of the 
party were depreciating our victories, and striving 
to ntilize our defeats for tlieir political cue's, ifow, 
to this Bourbon class of political leaders belonged 
the candidates for President and Vice President, 
nominated at tjt. Douis. ITor this we owe that party 
thanks that they have given us typical men— men 
in no way ideutifled with the great struggle for the 
Union, except to oppose ii, ■ but men all the 
while Ideniifled with hostility to tbe Ad- 
ministration of Lincoln, and sympathizing 
with tbe slaveholders in their rebellion. 
It ia not difiQcult to understand the desire of the 
Democratic leaders to forget, and to have tiie conn- 
try forget, tile past, and their intolerance ot any 
reminibcences of ^ho war. There are some things 
which a brave and patriotic people can never forget. 
They can iorglve,"but cannot forget them. This 
fatal mistake, to CiUl it by no harsher name, of op- 
posing the patriotic sentiment of the country in a 
time of perilous war, and sympathizing with its en- 
emies, is one of those things which cannot be 
forgotten, it may, perhaps, be forgiven. 
But no maa wu^ made tbat great mistake 
and published it to the world, to the 
dismay of our friends and to the encuaragement of 
our enemies, can or ought to expect to be chosen 
President of the United States, ibuch a man should 
be content to enjoy the wealth he may have ac- 
quired by the fiuuBcial embarrassments of others 
caused by the war. The people are not likely to 
crown bira with Presidential honors. That Is a 
lesson which I believe will be so eflectually taught 
at the approaehittg election tbat the Democratic 
Party will never again disregard the patriotic senti- 
ment of the country by putting in nomioaiion for 
the highest honors of the nation a mau who, even 
b.y mistake, has taken tbe unpatriotic side iu such 
a war. 

THE BOAST OF A SOLID SOUTH. 
A solid South is what tbe Democratic leaders 
claim and boast of. Bnt a solid South for the De- 
inocrac.y implies fraud and intimidation in tliewoisT 
form. It is'well known that the States ot Alabama, 
Mississippi. LiHuisiaba, Souih Carolina, and ii'iorida 
have large KepuDlicau majorities if tuev vote. 
At lea»t there is a moral certainty that such is 
the case. The Republicau majority in Alisaisaippi 

uutil tbe late Bliot-can campaign was not Xcim than 

thirty thousand. In Suutu Carolina it has always 
been large ; so In Louisiaoa, and so in Florida. 
Tnero was a sadden change in Mississippi from a 
heavy Repuulican to a heavy Democratic majority, 
and the evidense of uui>arahelod frauds and intimi- 
dations is abundant. The frauds and intimidations 
were a snfiicient caasa for the change, and there is 
not shown to be any other. There is the same 
convincing proof of the fraud and Intlmidat'.on 
by which Alabama was carried. They 
have Deen too numerous for any de- 
tail. I will refer to but one instance, which 
has been broueht forcibly to my attention, it ia 
that of the murder of a yoang man whose father 
was a Kepublicau lawyer, and the father and s»n 
were both attending a Republican meeting. The 
fatber came to me, in company with a Sena; or from 

bis Slate, and exhibited inalctments which had 
been found against tbe murderers of his sou, and 
begged tbe privilege of aiisisting in their prosecu- 
tion. 

The following, from a letter of an intelligent gen- 
tleman to tbe President, may bo talieu as a sample 
of uaily communications to the Government Iroui 
tbo South : 

[A6«tract/roT» a letter to the President, dated Aug. 

19, ib;().] 

"In Soath Carolina, ^¥bel■o there is undoubtedly 
a Republican tuajom.y, rifle and sabre clubs are or- 
gacized to do ihe woi'k ot the Kuklux Klan, and by 
iutimidution iuteirupt and deioat all pohticiil 
lueotiuus. Hundieub of armed auil mounted Ineii 
assemble, crowd out the uegioee, aud claim half the 
lime for speaitiug. Should the llej)ubiicun8 make' 
any resistance to their demands, ijiood would ^e 
shod. Although the conn! y olilciaU are Rupiib- 
licaus, tueir Uuiids are virtUiill.v i,ied »<; dnst B^uoh 

force. Sneuld they make arrests, no luiy could 
convict; wituesaea stauil ready to pro/o an alil)i, 

and colored inen woulu testily at the risk of their 
lives, i^fouo but colored uieu would come lo the as- 
sistance of the uflici.ils. The Govcriior has no 
Militia except uegroL-s, and they are undisciuliued, 
untrainea. iguoraut of military duties, aud wuoll.y 
unequal to cope with the White Liners on iho 
oilier side. i\iHny of these leauing spirits were 
charged with Kuklusing iu 1870 aad 1671, and are 
more bitter to-day than they v.eio then, sinuil.y bo- 
cuBse they thiuii. the Gov^rumout wi;i not punish 
tliem now any uioro than it did them. The leniency 
and clemency of the .Naiioual Govurutueut had 
been mistaken for cowuiUice, aud the longer 
tiioy live the bolder aud more oacspokoa they 
grow. At the DeiuociMtic rauhoatiou meeting 
held iu Columbia, S. C, on llio 16th inst., some of 
the lipeakers openly advisjJ their htarers tu put 
out ol ttie way the white Kopublicans tirtir, tlieu 
the nioiatloes, and thou the utciues. i'iiey said 
tliey 'id not lea:- the United Slalaaaruiv ! they h^u 
uieii It once without iiietiching, and tney were re.idy 
to UO so a;;;ilu. Thev utre goiu:; lo carry this 
State at whaitver cost. Unless tiie Govoinmeut 
makes some t,ho»v of lorce. by seudiii;,; tiio nulilary 
to these injected counties as a suit ol iiionil sup- 
port lo the Repiibl.caus. it wilt not only bu useless to 
expect us to :;uiTy the election, bnt wbiie Repuoll- 
cans wjU not be permitted to live in peace and 
quiet aud express their political sentiments." 

Another gentleman ot undoubted reliability and 
oj cuuservative character was present at a lecent 
meeting at Hernando, J^liss. As th» speakiug was 
about beginning, a white maa commebced a dis- 
turbance by attacking a negro with a cudgel. Im- 
mediately tho whites opened fiie. Five negroes 
aud two whites were shot. Ho writes : 

SEl'T. 19, 1S"G. 

I myself witnessed the first blow and iho first 

shot at Hernando, yesterilay. They boih camo 
from the' whites, and I saw nothing to pmvoko tho 
blow, and the shet was certainly an unpardonable 

.brutality. 

; GEN. Gary's advice. 

I In a letter to the President, of the 14th insr., a 
gentleman of reliable character writes trom Edge- 

,5eld, S. C : 

It. ."Gen. Gacr is adviaine the rifle olnb« wbich hav% 



b^en formed by the old rebel Democracy to attack 
the United States soldiers pow stationed here, and 
run them away from [here. He says in alt 
Ills public speeches tjiat ho would not 
bositate to load a eoniparty of mon to attack 
them and kill tho last «>ue' of them. I tell >'OU, 
Mr. President, that the! same old rebel spirit 
is in these men \ 1 1, and iiotliing but the strong arm 
of your Government will brins them to feel that 
they must obey the law. Gen. Gary said, the other 
day, that ho Intended to catry the eleciiou, or he 
-wculd fill every street iu ilJgelield with deal 
netrrnos." 

Under the circumstances, this does not present 
a pleasant prospect to tbe negro voters of Edge- 
field County. This may bb bravailp in the General, 
liut the object is inahitost. Besides the almost 
inuuinerable indivniual * cases reported to 
tho Department of Justice, the District At- 
torneys of the United Sciies have lu sundry in- 
stances applied lor instruction in view of th« evi- 
dence which thoy give [of conspiracies already 
lornied and Inrming in the diflorent States to in- 
timldaiethe colored voters and suppre.is tbeir snf- 
fraiie. 0:ip, .a gentleman and a lawyer of high 
standing, states this case ^ " An intelligent colored 
Republican has been recently organizing, in one of 
the counties of Mississi||)pl, liepiiblican clubs — 
clubs for political discussnpu, open for everybody to 
attend. A leading ohjoct pf the cinbs hitherto has 
been to ascertain the bounjlaries of the precincts in 
which the negroes are reauired to cast their votes, 
a problem which, under the new State law, is not 
solved by the negroes Without considerable dif- 
ficulty." , ' 

This colored Republican was instructing his fel- 
low-liepubllcaus how to find their several proper 
votiiiti-ulaces, when his lite was llireaten^d if he 
rtil not desist. Js^'ot heeding the throat, beVas at- 
tacked and fired at on tlie stand when speaking. 
Beiuir more daring than the colored people have 
generally proved to be, be returned the fire, but 
without eflbct. Ue was seized, flnall.y, on a charffe 
of as-sault with intent to; kill, and it was appre- 
hended that the White Libers would get hira out of 
tbe jail and kill him. He 'was removed to another 
county, where his fa^e ia unknown. This 
statement was by a District Attorney, a gea- 
tlenien of great Intelligence as well as a 
lawyer of eminence, anijl conservative. He de- 
clares that there is undoubtedly toimed a conspir- 
acy to control the elections by intimidation and 
Iraud, and that an essential feature of the 
plot is to prevent by menaces and vio- 
leiico the assembling of Republicans for po- 
litical discussion, aud [ preparation for exor- 
cising the francbiso of suttiago. lie states 
that if suca violence and menacing can be punished 
or prevented by Federal power, a fair election can 
stiirbo seeureu, but if not) the intimidations will 
very soon have gone so tail that the colored Repnb- 
licans will not dare to rote. If the perpetrators of 
these wrongs arc respoDa|ibIe to Slate authorities 
only there can be no romeiy, and tho election must 
be abandoned. The Govetument has some able and 
patriotic legal officers in tbe Seuiberu States, but 
they are environed with difficulties. 

A GRAVE Question. 

In view of tho extraordiuary condition of political 
afl'airs ia the South, the quiustion isuew gravoly pre- 
sented whether the negriie' will be allowed to share 
in the eleciiou of the oittceirs who are to administer 
the Government or not;' or rather, whether the 
dumiuaut class, with property and very superior 
intellect, in the South shall be allowed to deprive 
them and us of their risrUt to v»te. Shall we give 
it up; or shall we iubist upon their right? 
There are other poor jieople, both lierth and 
South, who are also igborant. Shall they, too, 
be deprived of their suflrtige ? If we give it up in 
tbe South we create at ot^ce an aristocracy worse 
thau that which we had hoped was destroyed, for 
the slaveholders will have more political power 
than they had wnen they dwaed tiie negroes. ITivs 
slaves were counted iu tile sc.de of political power 
aii tbiea Ireeuien ; now they count as five, so 
that those masters will wield two-si lihs more power 
iu the Federal Government on account of tue ne- 
groes now than ihoy ditt before the war. The 
question for the people of tbe United Stales to de- 
lermine at the coming elsctioa la, shall the.Fitteeatn 
Ameudment be given up, yield_ed to intimidation 
and fraud ? If yes, then tne instructions to tho Mar- 
shals of the United Statea. to preserve the peace et 
the United Slates at the pijlls were wrong. If you 
think that poor men, if citi2ens, shall bu allowed to 
vote irrespective of race, cblor, or previous condition 
of servitude, and that it is the duty of the otbuera 
ot the United States te e4forcs the law in tbat be- 
lialt when possiljle, then the circulai of tbe Marshals 
was right and was nut uuiimelv. 

Geuileuien, we may fail ^ secure a free vtte to 
the colored citizens. Intiibidations may have gone 
too far. The colored men may have become de- 
moralized. Their experiences may have been too 
alarming. They may bi^ve Be»n or heard of too 
mau.y murders which hav^ gone uunoticed and un- 
punished to be willing tu risk their lives by going 
tu the polls aud attemptinj; to vole the Republican 
ticket. We may not succeed in preventing fraud 
and iritimidation. : f 

i'ellow-ciiizens, the safety and prosperity of the 
country require that th^; citizens of the United 
States should be free to vote according to the pro- 
visions of the ConstitutSbn, Whether they be of 
high or low estate. Peliow-citizens, the motives 
ot the Southern Douiocrats to make the 
South solid for the ' Democracy are great. 
They desire, not witliojat hope, to have the 
claims for rebel losses of property by tho late war, 
some time in the future, allowed aud paid. They de- 
sire to have provision made tor the rebel debt and 
also tor their loss of 8lave^.>, If any of these thiugs 
are to be accomplished at all tney well know that it 
must be throujili the agency of the Democratic 
Party. They know toat if the election is carried 
b.v a solid South they will oe a majorit.y of the 
Deuiocratio niujoricy, ant^ can ooniiol it. That 
sama alesperate purpose to< prevent tbe colored men 
fiomVoting at the pre8ent| election extends to the 
permanent control or eiclijifcon of votarsju tho lu- 
ture. With theDamocraiic i^^rty in power tuey might 
• hope for some or all of tUebis tuings. With the Re- 
pu oilcan Party ill power t|i,iey have no such hope. 
Tlie stake they have in Vdh result is great. They 
will not hesitate to resortito desperate measures 
to wiu it. 

Fellow-citizpns, are you r^ady to intrust 'the gov- 
ernment of this great coiiatry to such a combina- 
tion 1 Are you willing th^t a minority, by intimi- 
dation and Iraud, shall make tbe South solid for 
the Democracy against ajiiivlded Kortb, thereby 
enabling that minority of! raie South to rule botii 
tbe North and tbe South, aidji shape the deaiinies of 
thecountiy? This is the; great question we are to 
decide at tae coming electiM.i^. 

NAVAL INJEl^LIGENCE. 



ttl — 

Washington, Sept. 3().-t-The vessels of the 
Kortb Atlantic Station ar^ peginning to assemble 
in Hampton Roads, Ya., iuj liccordanoe with recent 
orders of the departmentj lor inspection and drill 

by Rear Admiral Irench^f^i commanding, pre^arav 
tory to their distribution jainong the West lodij^ 
for the Winter cruise, lljie Huron, Adams, Q^si- 
pee, Monengahela and l}|artford have already 
arrived there, and the Plypibuth, Shawmut/Essex 
and Swatara are expected t^iere soon. The vessels 

will remain in the Koads until tho disappearauce of 

yellow fever on the sonth'ern ooa8t,/aud in the 
meantime the crews willibe daily/eieroised in 
naval drill. i : 

Surgeon B. F. Kidder has been ordered to the 
Xaval Hospital at Philadelphia in place of Surgeon 
J. H. Finkham, detached frooi tbat hospital and 
placed on waiting orders. JCapt. A. A. Semmes, 
Lieuts. Hamilton Perkins^ William S. Cowles, and 
Edwin Longneoker, Master iilranois Winslow, En- 
sign Kathau Saro;eut, Midshipman John M. Boyer, 
Surgeon Michael Bntatey,iifa8sed Assistant Sur- 
geon R. A. Marmion/chaplkipi C. B. Van Meter, 
Chief Engineer John B. Cartienter, Assistant En- 
gineer C. P. Howell, Gunnel!^ Thomas P. Veuable, 
Caipenter E. Hi Hay, and siU-maker Alexander \V. 
Cassell are detached from lUei Alaska and placed on 
waiting or4ers. Midshipmit' John F. Parker and 

W. G. Re/nolds, latei.y detailied from duty in the 
Asiatic Station, have been placed ou waiting orders. 
Passed/ Assistant Eugineer i^ulius S. Og.len is or- 
dereti'to the New-York NaVjt'jyai d. 

Bids were opened iu theiiliuieau of Tards and 
Docks at tbe Navy Dupartiuiifbt to-day for the fol- 
lo^ving works of impioveireut at League Island, 
Penn.: The comstrnctiou of % brick building to be 
used tor the storage of dock sjg apparatus auu as a 
moid lolt. ComplotiBg ii[; brick building for 
a steam engiueenng stJoi-ehuuse. Oonstiuct- 
iug a crib wsrk and: if pile extension of 
the wharf now there, ;itnil fuiuishing and 
drivinu piles for a saw-miil Whd whai t. Tuo biddrrs 

were Hiram Walker, jyuhu Crump, I<a- 
thaiiiel AicKay, 8. |il. and J. U. 

Adams, Philip Qaieley & , Sons, i'eters & Bur- 
gel', J. M. Maya <fc Co.; W. W. Upp, The 
Aiuerican Drougiug Company, W. W. Taxis alid 
Joseph L. Atiiinaou, of llhiladelpliia ; Austin P. 
Brown, ol Washington, D. U'., and Josi^ph \\ escott 
&. Sun, of Alaiue. The bids kpr the mold loft buiid- 
lug raugodtrom $l:i.50U to[f29,3lJ; tor the steam 
eugineeriug sioru-house froiii $i3,3i;0 lo J-24.e'Jl : lor 
the crib and pile extension iiTom *17.101 to J31,934. 
and for the plies for the saw-mili irom |6 to t? >io 
pet pile. Bids were also ojfeued lor material aud 
labor for certain wharfage if.i the same place, and 
ranged from ^,757 lo $9,673.: ' The contracts wiU be 
awarded next week. I 



OBITVAUX 



Daniel H. Bromley, an old and prominont cit- 



izen of Rochester, died .yes 



Noms. 



fiiday afternoon. 



A (liapatoh from Lonilpn says that Mr. 
George Allred Lawrence, the English au'„hor, is 
oead. ', 

Key. Thomas Williamsj a graduate of Yale 
Colloge, of the Class of 1800 died in Provideuce on 
Friday. ^ 

Uon. Joseph Warren, of tho Buffalo Courier, 
and President of the Stato Associated Press, died 
at C:30 o'clock last evening of coucostion of the 
lungs. He was ouly taken ijick Friday evening. 



IMl'ROTEMEM IN lllE IXI'ORT TRADE. 
Yesterday four Bteaaiei's were dispatched by, 
the Anchor Line for dilf^r^nt ports iu Great Brit- 
ain, with full cargoes. Aiuong the goods shipped 
were one cargo of lumber, crom Michigan ; twelve 
hundred quarters of tresh beef, in refrigerator* ; a 
number or street oars and 'car horses, wheat, corn, 
fliiur, apples, hops, potatoes. » clover aud timothy 
seeds, wood and willow wire, furnitore, soup, can- 
dies, cotton duck, car wheels, hardware, bacon, .salt 
beet aud pork, lard, and a groat variety of other 
aj: tides. 



%^^^^^i^^&^^>ihdis. 



t «^-ii^fi7. ; '.%iiJi#S: 



.- ■■^^^gtgMm 



ajMa^iji^^ 



wMii 



CITY AND SUBURBAN NEWS. 

NEW- YORK. 

The Police during the past weok made 1,986 
arrests. 

The Post Office deposits for the past week 
amounted to 160.800. 

The amount received for Croton rents last 
week was $16,536 40. 

The foreign-bound steam-ships sailing yester- 
day took out mails consisting of 52,190 letters, 557 
registered letters, and 87 bags of newspapers. 

Thirty-two convicts were removed to Sing 
Sing last week. In charge of Deputy Sheriffs Daly 
and Coughlin. 

Tho clearance sale of remainders of editions 
of bQ0kvj{^ continued at Clinton Hall yesterday. 
The sale of stationery will begin on Mqnday morn- 
ing. 

Judge Joseph F. Daly will deliver the annual 
address at the opening of the session of tbe New- 
York Homeopathic Medical College on Tuesday 
evening. 

The steam-ship Britannic, wHich left Liver- 
pool on Sept. 21, and Qneenstownon Sept. 22, reached 

this port at an early hour yesterday morning with 
mail news later by three days. 

Leopold Nettel, the alleged Austrian forger, 

was yesterday placed in the custody of the Ans- 

trian Consul in this City, and during the day sailed 
for Europe in the eteam-sbip Rhein. 

The body of a dead ..child was yesterday 
found in the cellar of a house at the corner of 
Eightieth street'and Lexington avenue, owned by 
J. B. Moore. The Coroner was notified. 

Thomas Mannion, aged thirty-two, feh out 
of a second-jtory window of his residence. No. 342 
East Sixty-third street, yesterday, and received in- 
juries which it is leard may prove latal. 

John Dooley, aged twenty, of No. 36 Henry 
street, while at work yeaieruay in the soap factory 
No. 30 Catharine street, accidentally fell into a 
kettle of boiling soap, and was scalded to death. 

Several literary societies of New- York pro- 
pose to furnish a block of American marble to form 

a part of the monument shortly to be erected by 
suoscriptiou in England to the memory of Lorii 
Byron. 

There were reported at the Bureau of Vital 
Statistics daring the past week 459 deaths, 419 

births, and 143 marriages, showing a decrease of 28 
deaths aud 44 births, and an increase ot 8 marriages 
as compared with the preceuiog week. 

The City lecture courso of the American 
Literary Bureau will bet commenced on Monday 
evening, the 9th inst., at Chiokering Hall. Lectures 
Will be delivered on each succeeding Monday even- 
ing until Nov. 20, excepciog on Nov. C. 

Elisba Van Brunt, a veteran of the war of 

1812, was buried yesterday. The services, which 

'were held at his residence No. 225 Sullivan street, 
was largely attended. Gen. H. Ra.ymond, Col. 
Abram Dally, and Alexander Brady, former com- 
rades ot the deceased were present. 

The Excise Commissioners received 108 aj>- 
plications for licenses last week, and f4,U82 50 for 
license fees. The board yesterda.y addressed a let- 
ter to the Mayor replying to the charged made 
against it by the Grand Jury of the Couct of Gen- 
eral Sessions. 

Otto Beohter, a shoemaker, residing at No. 
113 Norfolk street, was arraigned before Justice 
Smith, at the Essex Market Police Court, yesterday, 
and committed in default of bail to answer tor hav- 
ing stabbed Charles Jacobs, of No. 243 Second street. 
With a pair of shears during a petty dispute. 

Commissioner Davenport, Chief Supervisor 
of Elections, will be at hia rooms on the fourth 
fioor of the Post OfiBoe Building on Monday, Tues- 
day, and Wednesday evenings of this week trom 
7:30 P. M. to 9:30 P. M. for the purpose of sweating 
in the Supervisuts oi Election recently appointed 
by Judge Johnson. 

Assistant District Attorney Horace Enssell, 
who went to Europe two months ago in conse- 
quence of impaired health, returned on the White 
Star steamer Britannic yesterday, and was received 
by a number of friends. Mr. Russell's health has 
been completely restored by the trip, and he will 
resume the active duties of his position to-morrow. 

James Sateley, who was Blabbed by an un- 
known Italian at No. 25 Marion street on Thursday/ 

night, died at Bellevue Hospital late on Friday 
ni;;bt. Coroner Woltman ordered Deputy Coroner 
Cushman to make a post-mortem examinaticm of 
the body. The Police of the Fourteenth Precinct 
have not yet been able to effect tbe arresVof the 
mnrderer. / ■^ 

Inquests rrere held yesterday and reralcta 

of accidental death were rendered In the following 
cases : Sebastian Zinke, who fell fro^ a ladder at 
No. 339 Broadway; Frederick Engef, a bo.y, who 
died trom injuriea received b.y lalliiig from a win- 
dow at No. 10 Clinton place; Jobh T. Keogh, aged 
five years, who died of eryaipela's caused by a fall ; 
and Frederick Fisher, aged seven years, run over 
by a Grand and Forty-second ^treet car. 

It was reported at the Central Office yester- 
day that John Qmglej, aged thirty-two, had been 
missing from his home s^ce Wednesday night, and 
it is supposed that some accident has befallen him. 
Quieley had been placed in charge of the residence 
ot Mr. iSamuel Keytser, No. 14 East Thirty-sixth 
street, during the Absence of the family at Long 
Branch, and lived/in the house with his wife. He 
went out on Wednesday last, and was last seen on 
that night at Twenty-fourih street and Third ave- 
nue, when he j{ot on board a car going down tbwn. 
The Police aye searching lor him. 




BROOKLYN. 
eeting ot the Board of Assessors yes- 
terday the district of assessment for tbe Kent 

Aveiiue Basin improvement was fixed. The amount 
tu/'be assessed is $201,465 59. 

/ The Court ot Sessions Qrand Jury, before 

being discharged yesterda.y, made a presentment 
condemning Raymond Street Jail as entirely inade- 
quate tor tbe purnoses lor which it is intended, and 
recommending the erection of a new aud more com- 
modious prison at an early date. 

The evening higb school will open on Mop- 
day, Oct. 9. Pupils may be registered during the 
coming week. 

Peter Pidgeon was committed for examina- 
tion by Justice Walsh, yesterday, on ^ charge of 

cutting Albert Bochtel, of No. 419 Fnlton street, 
on the arm with a razor. Bechtel was drunk and 
assaulted Pidgeon, who retaliated by using tbe 
razor. 

Mayor Sohroeder yesterday refused to sign 
the pay-roll of the employes at Police Head-quar- 
ters' ou tbe ground that tho Commissioners had 
illegally created clerkships aud transferred the 
money to pay the newly appointed clerks from other 
accounts. ' 1 he matter will be brought before tbe 
Board of Aldermen ou Monday. 

Superiu ton dent Campbell has issued a gen- 
eral order directing tho Police to arrest all persons 

building bonfires m the street without a permit, 
and all persons found breaking a&h-barrels or 
tences. The order is directed against those who, 
when election time is approaching, are in the habit 
of seizing on all sorts of loose prooerty that is 
comi»usiible with which to build bonfires. 

Robert Murra.y, who was arrested on Tliurs- 

day night tor assaulting a policeman on Adams 

street, and held in $1,000 bail by Justice Walsh, 
was yesterday indicted by the Grand Jury, jointly 
wiih a person iu whoso coinpaoy be was wnen ar- 
rested, lor assaulting a Air. L wsoii, who refused to 
peimit theiu to euier his house. Murray was also 
indicted for assaulting the othcer, and required to 
give j 1 000 bail on each indictment. 

Thomas Lynch, of No. 83 Dolancey street, 

New-Vork, pickud a ladj's pocket on f ulton street 

yesterday, but beiug observed by Detective Cur- 
ran, he nropped the pociiet iiook and fled. After a 

sharp clia.io no was cautured by thu Ueiective, and 
taken to iho First I'l ecinct Sta.iuu-house. Ou being 
searched a pockei uo;/k marked with the name of 
Miss Scoit, >i'i-wcastie, N'-vv South Wales, was 
luuud in his po-iseoaum. The lady, whose pocket 
was picked ou Fulton street, rec^.voied the proper- 
ty, but did uot go to ihu Btatiou-bjuse to make a 
compiaiut. 

'long island. 

The fifth anniversary ot Fiatbush Baptist 
Church, LjQg Island, occurs to-day. Exercises 
will take place at 10:30 A. M., 2:30 P. M., and 7:30 
in tbe evening. Prouiiuont speakers are expectid. 

The boily of an uukuowa man was washed 
ashore ou Thursday at Pot Cove, Astoria. It had 
been a long lime in the water, and was so much de- 
couiposed as to be uurecoguizablo. 

Tho Kutlblk County Sunday-school Associa- 
tion will lioid their next couvenlion at Sag Harbor 
on the 24: h and 25lh ol October. Rev. Dr. Duryea, 
of Brooklvn, aud iiev. Dr. John Cotlou Smith, of 
New-VorU, are to deliver addresses on tho first 
oveuing, and Rev. Dr. Sims, of Brooklyn, on the 
second eveuiDg. 

NEW-JERSEY. 
While some laborers were digging beneath 
J. A. Deninan's store building ou Broad street, 
Newark, Frida.y, they dSscovored a corner-stone 
bearing the date of 17o4. 

At a meeting ot the Newarii Board of Educa- 
tion, held on Friday evaninu, a motion to close the 
public schooU on the day of the approaching Sun- 
dav-8Chool parade was laid over by a vote of 13 
to 12. 

Some time ago a Delaware, Lackawanna and 
"Postern Railroad train ran into a SpringflelJ ave- 
nue oar at Newark. Mrs. Susan Coles, who was in 
t:£» la.ttac sustained iniuriaa fjrnm whinh sha ia still . 



aufferliig. She sued the company for damages In 
the Essex County Circuit Court, and on Friday 
evening secured judgment for $900. 

OflScer Nicholas noticed early yesterday 
morning that the grocery store of John Thomas, on 
Commerce street, Newark, had been broken Into. 
Hi* call rap tor assistance frightened three men 
out of the building. Pursuit was given and two 
were captured. They gave ;tbeir names respect- 
ively as Jamoa Lyon and John J. Dempsey. 

At the inquest hold Friday night in Bayonne 
over tho body of the woman found floating on the 
Newark Bay Shore, two weeks ago, County Phy- 
sician Converse tesiifiea that he found injuries on 
the head, cvifeuily ijiflicted before death with a 
blunt angular insirumeut^ and his opinion was that 
the woman had been first stunned by blows and 
then thrown into the ba.y, ,A verdict of death at 
the hands of unknown persons was rendered. All 
efl'orts to ascertain the identity of the woman have 
failed. 

A man named Brooks lies at the pomt of 

death, at his home on Goble street, Newark, In 

consequence cf injuries reoeivfed during an aff'-ay 
in Marauei's box factory, , in "Warren street, on 
Sept. 1. It seems tliat Brooks entered the factory 
while intoxicated, and quarreled with Jacob Hey, 
whom he seems to have regarded as instrumental 
in procuring his dismissal. Daring tbe altercaiion 
he was struck violently im the head, producing a 
concussion of the brain, from which he ia now 
Buffering. Hey was arrested late on Jriday night, 
and is held to await the result. 



DESERTING HEB HUSBAND, 



BY MAIL AND tMLEGBAPR. 



I. 



^i-^^'^-^^ 



X 



Alexander Bartlett was addidentallj drowned 
at South lioston Fr-.day niBhti,. 

Tho Quebec Legislature has baen snmmoned 
for the dispatch of business on the lOth of Novem- 
ber. 

Efforts are being made at ; Quebec t» start a 
subscription list tor tne safferers by yellow fever at 
Savannah. - ' 

Samuel S. Dunn, a well-to-do lumberman. 

comuiiiled suicide at BethriUiMe., yesterday, by 
hanging. Temporary insanity! is the alleged cause. 

John Martel, a lad flftee|i{ years of age, was 
held in $2,000 l>aii at Bosajji yesterday, on the 
charge of outraging Joanna ijtjbue, a widow, aged 
lorty years. i | = 

Thenumber of admi8BiiQS!t« tbe Centennial 
Exhibition yosterda'., the '3a*t of the half-free 
Kifturdnyv', was 103,204, and toiCbe live stock exhibi- 
tion, 1,287. \ !• 

John A. Jirdau, colored, '^\q killed aa nn- 

known tramp iu tho Buston Axv^ Albany Railroad 
depot at Boston ou .fuue 2GJ Was yesterday sen- 
tenced to two years' iuipri80itp|eut. 

The body of a young boy from tha Orphans' 

Home at WomeUdorl, Penn., Waa found taauifing to 
a lieo in the mountains neajr Lebauon .veslerday 
moruiag. It is tbougiit that bO; committad suicide. 

Tho Massachusetts St.at4 !:loan of $8,000,000 
for building too Usurers anid Worcester Lunatic 
Asylum has been awarded to! Me»8ra. Kidder. Pea- 
body & Co., al 113.VI7. The bonds have twenty 
years to run at five per cent. I 

The Coroner's jury 4' Columbus yes- 
fcrdMy re'.uihofi a verdict that the recent accident 
ou tiiB Pan-Handle Jtailroad was cau.sed br^the 
breaking of «n uxio on one ot ihe cars, aud thatttbe 
railroad company was not ' rosponaible for the 
casualty. ' 

Lemuel Parkinson, one q/ a hunting party, 
was instantly killed yesterday moruiag at E len- 
ville, U. star County, N. Y.. bf tho acci.ientai dis- 
charge of a doul)le-barroted jshot-gau, which was 
droppel on tbe sidrwalk. Ode ebarge pierced his 
leg .luo the other bis heart. [ 

ilis Esccllenc.y Lord i>ufferin, Governor 
Gi'ueial ot Canada, arriye.d 4t' Sail Lake City ou 
Fnday, spout the atte,inoon in Sithf^seting, and the 
evening with,Guy. Emery and Several other ueutle- 
men, at the residence of Hoki,, William Jennings, 
aud leti yesterday morning for the EiSt. 

Fishing vessels at Halifaixifro.'n the Grand 
Banks rc-iiort SLVere storms lher«. Several ves.seis 
lost dories and had their decks fewept. The schoon- 
er Gertie Lewis of Gloucester, lost both anchors 
ana cable*, dones, and all her flshihg gear, and put 
lu here lo repair. At Cape Bieipa the fisheries have 
improved of lute. ^ 

Thieo men fell from th* geaffolding of tlie 
Gore Scroet Momodiit Churcji -at Hamihou, Oi't.. 
yesterday. One ot theiu, oauied E. JloulUeu, was 
instantly killsJ, aud the othee two wore probably 
irttally injured. About the aape time a mi.n named 
E. McAla'hou fell trom the noiw Catlioiic church,* 

distance of fifty feel. Ho wilLprobalily die. ^ 

A roan giving his name ai "i'homaa Haggerty, 
a wagon painier ov trade, and! his residence as Sec- 
ond avenue, between Sixtietb^udSixty-fir.n streets, 
New- York, was found ou the' railroad track near 
Schodao Station, N. Y.,yestertiay, prostrated from 
the effects, of laudaoiim. Having neither employ 
meut, money, hoine^nor triends, be had attempted t<) 
take his life. - He is still lu a' orilical conditioa. 



.-v ^ ^ 




i SPORTS OF THE FIELD.^ 

intebnational biflb BHoomrih, 

CLOSE OF THE MATCHES AT WASHUTOTOK-- 



EAH THE Wniv 



FENTOW, BLADE, AND 
NKBS OF THE PRIZES. 

Washington, Sept 30.— This w»* the thW 
and last day of the loag-ranjce aboottnn •* Bm^ 
ning's range by the Irish, Scotch, AustraUta. and 
American rifle teams. The ahootluj waa at tlu 
1,000 yards range. Tne rain began faUiac at ai 
early hour, and continued at Interrals donac th« 
entire day. There was almost a dead ealin. and Uu 
shooting was much better than en the previoiu 
days. More Interest was manifested la to-daT*! 
shooting than on the prenona days, owlnx to th« 
desire to witness the firing of Milner, who ma4« 
tbe remarkable, score of fifteen sncceaelre ball'* 
eyes at Creedmoor during tbe shooting at the 1 000 
yards range, but the rain kept many persons at 
home wno wonld otherwise have been preeeDt and 
the attendance was small. The firing was by tw^ 
B quads of len men each, composed as toUows : 



EXTRAORDINARY CAREER OF A TOUNQ 
■WOMAN— MARRIED TO THREE HUS- 
BANDS. 
The fact was published ill yesterday's Times 
that Mr. David Kaefer, the proprietor of a lager- 
bier saloon at the comer of Twenty-sixth street 
and Third avenue had some six weeks ago married 
a young German girl who onEriday deserted him, 
taking with her ?960. The detectives yesterday, with 
the aid of a man named Buesslng, who knew the girl, 
succeeded in arresting her, jflist as she was stepping 
aboard tbe steam-ship Rheliif of the North German 
Lloyd line, at Hoboken. In tracine the woman's 
movements after she left Kaefer's house with tbe 
money, the aeteclives unearthed some extraordi- 
nary facts in oonnectioja with her esreer. 
There Is good reason .' to believe that 
within a few yeais s^e married at least 
three men, all of whom are living, and from each of 
whom she succeeded in taking oonsider^i/lo snms. 
of money. It is considered certain that she was 
married sme time ago to a man named Fisher, and 
it is believed tbat she also wedded a basket-maker 
in Brooklyn named Luntz. The Police believe 
from facts in their pessegSion that she has also 
married within a few years two other men. 
This much-married woman is but twenty-thtfee 
years of.aeeand rather good-looking. Her mar- 
riage wieh Kaefer was celebrated in the Prospect 
Avenue Methodist Episcdpal Church, and until 
she ran away with the money she lived banpily 
with her husband. Of tbe stolen money t600 was 
found in her possession. rThe remaining $350 
she spent on clothes, jevrelry, SuA a steerage 
ptssenuer's outfit, including bed, blankets, cooking 
utensils, <fco. When arrested yesterday, in Hobo- 
ken, she was taken before the Recorder ot ihat 
city, and agreed to come to Jlew-York State with- 
out a requisition. She bought her ticket yesterday 
morning in the name of Pauline Fisher, but when 
questioned by the detectives gave the name of 
Martha. Konig, Detectives Corwin and Butts- 
brought her and her effi.-cts to Brooklyn last night. 
This morning she will be 'taken before Justice 
Walsh. So far no positive proof has come into the 
hands of the Police that , tlie woman was legally 
married to any of her alleged husbands, with the 
exception of Kaefer ; and should they fail to olitain 
sucAi proof, it is improbable that she can beheld, 
as in the eye of the law she could not steal tiom 
her husband. 



First Squad. 
Menzies, Scotch team. 
Ooff. Insb team. 
Kathbone, American team. 
LuKe, hcotch team. 
Caufield. Americaa team. 
Rae, Scotch team. 
Bijidenburgh, American 

team. 
Anderson, Amraioaa toaii. 
Joynt, Irish team. 
Soyd, Scotch team. 

The first squad flred at the left Urget; 
second at tho right Tho Urgew wero 



. ai 



another 100 yards, and tbe marksmen Arod franl 
tl»« same positions aa on prerions days, direotly ttJ 
front of the grand stand. Tbe firing was begna -*' 
12:50. Each man was allowed fifteen sbou, 
highest possible score being 75. The scores ace 
loUows : 

FIRST SQUAD. 

I-ufc* 6 63&V!b445SS5S9 

Joynt 3 4656445S464ei 

Kae 3 5444445436636 

Blydenbnrgh 4 6464468688 2 68 

Menzies 4 6634334634366 

Boyd 6 4 2. 5 0463436666. 

Canfleld, _.2 4066364464646 S— (Ta 

Anderson, ..4 3436036635483 6-61 



6—64 
8-«J 
4-6] 
4— tiC 
6— 6<i 



Fenton.... 

Blade 

Milner 

Thynne... 

Lynch 

KiKby 

Thorbnrn 

Overbaugb 



TOtalJ 



UT-DOOB ^ORTS AT MOTT HA YEN. 

m ' :.' 
SEVENTH ANirUAL FALL GAMES OF THE NEW- 

TORK ATHLETIC CttJB — A i, BERLB3 OP 

/ 

BRILLIANT CONTESTS FOR THB CHAM- 
PI<iNSHIP. 

TT^ seventh annual Fall games of the New- 
York Athletic Club took piaea at Mott Haven yes- 
terday afternoon. Owing to the bad weather 
the attendance was smalL Ip the 100-yard trial 
heats, the first was won by Henry Lanterdach, of 
the College of tbe City of New-York, time 11^ 
seconds ; second by James G-.. Lathrop, of the ITnlon 
Athletic Club, of Boston, time 11 seconds ; third 
by R. La Montague, of this City, in 10^ seconds ; 
fourth by George H. Parker, of the ^ew- 
York Athletic Club, In U seconds. Ths one- 
mllo run was won by Harold Lamb, of tho Argo- 
naut Club, of Toronto, time IrSl^a-j the hurdle race, 
120 yards, trial heats, first; was won by James 
Pierson, of the Toronto LaK^Osse Clnb, by a walk 
over ; the second was won by :ti}eorga Hitchcock, of 
this City, in 20 seconds; the ^vA by O. L. Richard, 
New-York Athletic Club in 31) seconds. In the 100- 
yards second trfal heats, the nrst boat was won by 
Henry Lauterdach In 11 seconds : tbe second re- 
sulted in a dead heat between,i|F. C. Saportas and 
Geprge A. Parker; time, 10tjs*econd8. 

Tbe one mile dash was won by D. M. Stem of 
the New-York Athletio Clutf in 7:31. In the 440 
yards trial heats, the first resolted in a draw heat 
between W. J. Robertson, of jMontreal, and James 
Pierson.of the Toronto LaCrqsseCinb; time, SGigt.; 
the second heat was won hy E. ilerrltt, of the 
New-York Athletic Club in Seiss.; the third heat 
was won by J- Garrick, of the Sco;tish-Americau 
Athletio Clnb in 66J£8. '•% 

In (browiug the hammer,: fST. B. Curtis, of the 
New- York Athletic Club, wfisiithe winner, his dis- 
tance being 76 feet 4 inches, ^ijeorge A.JV'alker, of 
the Union Athletio Club,. I'poston, threw it 7-J 
feet 213 inches. For thii, seven-mile walk 
the following started : CnJEi^les Connor, Young 
Men's Christian Associatlbn Gymnasium, 1; 
K. C. Holske, Harlem Atbl^etio Club. 2 ; Thomas 
Buckley, Brooklyn, »; Thotdliii' H. Smith, Scottish- 
American Club, 4 ; W. J. IBrpwn. Brooklyn, ; F. 
E. Lenardson, Ne>»-York, Or'Q. W. Brace, ; John 
W. Killeen. ; AV. H. CorniSj^j ; T. H. Smith, 0; 
C. CnnDingtiam, 0. Connop won in SSm., 32i2<<.; 
tbe fastest time ever iuade:j}>y an amateur in this 
country. In the running high jump H. Edwards 
Ficken cleared 5 feet 5 inches, and wnn. fl. R. 
Buenneyer, Kew-Tork Athletic Ciub, put the shut 
34 teet 5 inches. In the rnnnme broad jump Josiau 
I'Vazior, of Yonkers, cleared 17 feet 4 incli»s. TLa 

hall-niile race was won jljy Harold Lambe in 
2m. lOo. In addition to tbe priaes oficreo the win- 
ners obtained the title ot amateur champions of 
America in the various sports aud contests. 



SECOND SQUAD. , 

.. — 6 e656'3 4666B444 4-41 

665484666S668 6— «7l 

... .6 4554 2 66664344 4-641 

3 4663643436865 6-«a! 

3 2560436634444 fr— 61' 

3 44466346644S8 6— ei; 

4 6468535803366 4— 5a 

^ 5 U 30 3 3 4J§a 4433 8--4a 

Goff retired after tbe fourth, Bathbone ^ter tko 
thirteenth, GreenhiU after the tenth, and Xrana 
after the fourteenth shot. The medal preaoaMd by 
the It lib citizens of Washington for the zaemhor of 
the Irish team making tbe highest score in th« 
three days' shooting was won oy Fenton. Bao won 
the Romington rifls presented by the Scotch oUt* 
zens for the member tusking the higtiMt Mor« la, 
the three days' shooting, and Slade the medal tae\ 
the Anstralian team, presented by tbe general ooaa-l 
raittee. The following are theeeores ofthe wmMiW 
for the three days, oat of a possible 200 : 

lards. Tarda. Tarda. 

8uo. euo. 1,000. 

Fenton 48 67 68 

Blade 45 68 67 

Eao 44 62 61 

Alter the shooting the priaes were presentod by 
representatives of the several commltteer to tne sum 
ceseinl contestants, who returned ttanka for tbq 
prizes and bospiialities received by tliem s'Jioe thel4 
arrival in Wa^nlngton. Tbe medal won br Ma)o2 
Fenton consists ot a beautiiul fire-oointed goiaea 
star. dei>ending from a pin in the form of an eacla 
with ontstretcbed wings. It weighs sixty i>eiuiy< 
weights. A diamond u imbedded in each point oi 
the star, and in ita centre is an engrarrng of tba 
Capitoi building, on one side or which are tbe flg. 
ures "1776," and on the other '• 1876." At tbe luwes 
part of the star is a black and white enameled tar^l 
with a diamond for a bnU's-eye. Crossed over tb« 
upper part of the star are two rlflee joined togethea 
at the top and seenred to the upper point uf tb« 
Star Dv a miniature ianrd wreath in gold, from 
tbe talons of the eagle, which is of solid geld, m 
bold reUe^ are the ^ Americaa and Irish. 
fi.tz8 In enameL It ' is rained at fSOO. 
The Australian medal has a ' pin in tba 
form of an eagle. The penAant is a aix pointed star. 
At the top ot tbe star is a view of tbe Capitol ia 
enamel. In the centre are the Axierioan aadj 
A-ustralian flags in enamel, and a target with ti 
diamond for the bull's-eye. Beqeath m^ two tiflaS 
crossed and the figures "1876." A golden ribbou 
runs through tbe six points of tho star ' aii4 ew 
circles the whole. 

JEROME FABK BACE8. 

F08TPO2TKD UTTTIIi TO-MOSROW— BETXIKa 0!f 

THE XVEHTS. 

The ijLolemeaey of the weatb«r yesterd^ 
bad th« effect of postponing the •pcBinc of tM 
Jerome Park races. It was a pity, bat tAmmt ^ 
necessity. The maset beaaties of the woods wvmH 
nst have shown to much adraataco with saol^ 
gloomy skies as those that lowered- yesterday, m»J 
under all the olrcnmstanoes It was better to wait fori 
the bright sunshine of those Antumn days. FasUenJ 
will appreciate the delay, and the interests of tto? 
turf will not suffer. Tbe postDonemeut, at sU/ 
events, is only till to-morrow, when they will tM 
suredly come o£ 

Pool-Belling on the races took place last ai^w 
The following is tbe betting : 

THE MAKHATTAlf HASDICAT. 



.$40 
. 89 



James A. ...... ._....» 

Mattie A ) 

Virginius 5 

luspiratioa. ..._..-.......... 10 

Dauntless..................... 7 

Hbadamanthos 8 

Invoice ............ 6 

Shylock .'. 4 

jsary. .....■-. -.^. .--... ....... 4 

Warlock -^ 3 

Grayfiun 8 

>ir3t Cbitnoe-... ..... 3 

Mediator .............. . 2 

hwect lips...... ........ ....... 3 

Field.. ..................... .. 

...... ...-._„.«T27 



•40 

-86 

U 
8 
9 
7 
6 
6 
2 
S 
S 
S 
2 

§134 



i| 



•100 
. 40 
. S5 
. iS 

. S5 



Total 

JEBOMX 6TAEES. 

HcDanlel :...$60 

ISelmont — 40 

Sunburst ... 15 

Bed Coat 10 

- Total $125 

KXTBSBBT STAKES. 

llcGrath... ....... .............. — ---- 

MrDaiilel --^ — ...... 

Pierre LurUifixd... ,........«.•. •••..,. 

riabauffh 1 

G. L. i..rillard (the Field 

Ijongstaa I 

Paryear ) 

Total.... f285 

THKEE-QTTABTER DASH. 

Freebooter.-. tlOO 

Madge -- - '' 

Khadamantbus. ........•••..•.. ••••«••• <o 

Cyclone. 1 < 

2^«re*5- , >. Field. 40 

LllUe belle. f 

Leamington, Second, J ___ 

Total '. — $286 

MILS AKS AS EIGHTH. 

Arc turns SlOO 

Willie Borke 40 

Partnership » *0 

Pera 

Auit>ush. 
New-Vork, 

Fleetwood, 

Sprioglet 

Crril, 

Etta Wottem. 

Total $265 



-1? 
$3«(| 



$100 
80 
10 
20 

•220 $§7* 



tlSd 

17S 

l.'S 

SI 



Field. 



sa 



00 



sa 

81 
73 

49 

i 

s 

8 

J 

$211^ 
m 
TEOTTISO AT SSA OOJT PARK. 
Boston, Sept. 30.— Tho following «r« thfl^ 
summaries of to-daj 's races at Beacon Park: 
FinsT Rack.— 2:29 class, for a parse of |1.000. 

B. B. Joe Riple.y... — ... — .......--...-.— .1 

Blk. s. Voune wilites ...........2 

("b. ui. Lizaie Keeler. a ,_ ^ 

G. e. Gr.i.y- S.ll 6 2 4, 

Cli. 8. Cissiu.- IMnce -4 B 5 

K. s. Alton Boy «» o «■ 

lime-2:-J9 i;:29, 2:29. 
> Second Rack.— i2:22 class, tor a purse of 11.500. ' 

B. IU. Ma.v Bird 2 1 4 2 B 

15. m. Belitt 1 o ? } T 

Ch. m. Annie Collins 3 ^ o o # 

B. m. -Nettie iiuritw x-v--,"* .» * ^ * 

Fiiiue— -:j7, 2:-.:j^. ^rJbS*, 2:-2a»a, '-^^7- j 

This race was postponed on acoounl of darkSMTf 
BASE-BALL. 

THE CHAMPION.-IIIP HKCOKD.' 

The season for professional base-ball plajlnA 

so far as itie leauno clubs are concerned, closed yak 
terday. From too appended table it will be seen 
ihal the Chicago Club are wall ahead, and tberaforsj 
«cin the chfiniDionship whip pennon so long and 
honorably held by the Boston Club. The St. Loaii 
Clubisaeconu on the list, with the Hartfords a] 

£.:od third. I 

^ __ _ 

if 

?*\ 

11 

13 

6tl 

a 

a 

■a 



s si 



.MljlullO... .. 

Boston 

tloicago 

Liniiiin.itt... 
Hart-ford 

LOUlSTlliS.... 

Mutu.il 

St. Louis 



Giimes lost . 



> 

5* 


OB 

5 


9 


2 









f 
i r- 


5* 


P 


? 






-1 


ff 


— 


.-_ 


— 


— 


— 


.. 


^ . -* 




1 


1 


5 


1 


s 


4 


*> 


u 




1 


8 


*2 


4 


8 


4 


t 


U 




lo 


4 


a 


7 


4 


3 










1 


•2 


1 


2 


J* 


e 


4 


« 




7 


3 


3 


6 


1 


1 


H 


1 




.6 


4 


a 


i! 


I 


7 


4 


3 


.. 


1 


H 


4 


6 


7 


6 


b 


(i 


-- 


45 


■27 


14 


51 


19 


s's 


34 


13 



A summary oJ the above shows the oinbs oooQpy< 
ing the following relative positieni : 

Won. Lost. ! Won. Los 



pyH 



Chicajto 50 

at. l.ouis. 43 

Haitford. 33 

Bootou..... 36 

Total 



J4{Lioai8ville, 

lft|.vliitual 

l«l.ithletic 

27|Cin>:inuati 

NOTES. 



SO 

ill 

....14 
9 



339 



NOTES. I 

The Hartfords dafeated tho St Leuis OlubJ 

at St. Louis, yesterday, by a ssore of 4 to 1. . 

ITie game played at Louisyille yesterdaj b*j 

t ween I lie Louisville and the Boston resnltod la ^ 

yiclorj fst the viaiiiui? olubt.)>v m jtt t tr » ttf A ts Si..^ 



'f- 






Second bqnad, 
Lvaeh. Australian r 
Thynne, Iriata trasL 
Siade, Australian team, 
Thorbum, ticotob teaot.' 
Fenton, Irish team. 
Oyerbaagh, iUnstlv* 

team. 
Kigby, Irish tsam. - A 

Milner, Irish team. > ff 
areeahili. Irish teaa. 
Evans, Iriab team 



i#l 



1 



1 






-^m 






•#: 




^•A'i 



^m 







!"Tr«iT"^ 



*^*f- 






Cfet S[xtir-|f0th S^xmrs, Sitntean, (Sttobtr 







h. 



-{MSMl LITERiTDKI 

TTTO SOyNETS, 

COMMONPLACES, 
{froa'bled In spiiic bv the aa rat lad wny» 

Wberewith perpetually I seemed to Tlew 

In r«(;aUr and familiar rstinue, 
ComioK and ffolne. tho processioual dayi, 
} yearned lo maj;^ with many a novel p h.ise 
Ti>i« round of dull moaotoniea that I kaew, 
And tToat life's oommonplaces, dreair of liaet 
Aa piiaotomt tbat thfi iotelleot acernly layx I 

Batwbereaoe'er my wanderinz feet raizht be. 
Like tome oeraisteot word tbat memory saith, 

Or hke » ship's own abadotv on wastes of eea, 
Or the Tery wiud'a inevitable breatb. 

Ifoand, among all changss fuIio«rin» me, ^ 

IbedMk abiqaitoua commoaplaoa of death I 

» THISTLE »OWK. 

Tbrowtli Sammer's graaaal death how sweet a sigt^t 

'The fiowerine thistle's tardy <team appears. 
Her thorny boa^hs Hke intricate chandeliers 

^^■hen lit for fosiivil with soft rosy light ! 

STei oiosener watahing her, to left and right ■ , 

You see the odoroa* beauty that she rears 
Girt with inunmerabu k^en emarald spears, 

Eacer the invading baoa to niarce or smite ! 

Sat when the Aatamnal trees in rain glow 
7oa meet her white ghost wauderioe to and fro 

Aerially noon the fltfal btast, 
i.n tboogb the soirit af this oroud blossom oama 
Co baant the world In expiatorr shame, 

Sooeatani of her oold imoerioas past ! 

EDG^AR rAWCEXT. 















,.".-«. r 






TME G. B. C. 

A TALE OF A TELEGRAIL 
BY JAMKS PAYN. 

I ao not as" a rale engage in comme-ci al 
epecolatioD ; but m; dear triend Jones insisted 
with sacb eloqueDoe apon the success that 
mast indubitably follow upon the establisii- 
ment of the Great Butter Company— an asso- 
eiation formed for the manufacture of that 
commodity oat of a material wbicb shall bo 
nameless, but which was by oo means so pre- 
carious and open to adulteration as oream. and 
the supply ot which was practically inexhaust- 
ible — tbat I 8}ififdred the name of Uartin ^ale to 
appear, for a consideration, on the list of di- 
rectors. 

It is a name well known in society, and was 
ap to tbat time untainted by oonnectioa with 

trade; unless, indeed, the swopping aud sale of 

nbargers — for which I will back myself against 
any cavalry offioer in her Majesty's sernoe — 

maj be considered by the pedantic as coming 

under tbat head. As for the city, I know noth- 
ing more about it than that it was a locality 
lying east of Cox's, the army agent's, which 
was the Lmit of my personal experience in that 
direction. I have always breathed quite an- 
other atmosphere — that of Pall .Mall; I wish I 
could say a purer one; but the fact is, that the 
atmosphere of the smokiQo;-rooms boih at " the 
Ba;;" and the " Junior" are, toward the small 
boors of the mornins;, when my own day is by 
no me ins finished, somethini; appalling. I had 
ttiree hundred a year for direotius the Butter 
Company ; and it was far easier work, I am 
bound to say, than were the old duties in 
my refdment, for whioh I was paid a precisely 
•imilar sum. Once a month the Chairmaa 
called for me in his brougham, and deposited 
me«t the offices in Comtiill, where, after an 
Bzoellent lonobeon, (of which our butter formed 
no ingredient,) I attached my auto^aph to 

oertain documents, a proceedine which, I be- 
lieve, is technically termed "pasaine the ao- 
Boonts." There were some persons of my 
acqnaintano* and profe^on — persons I 
have reason to believe who bad them 
Mlrea applied tor directorships, and failed 
»wbo did not Boruple to eall the Great Butter 
Company a slippery eonoem, and who affected 
to give ma friendly counsel t« get out of it ; 
^at I waa to* well accustomed to the system ot 
militarr exchanges not to perceive their drift — 
kbeir object was, of course, to be gazetted in 
mj itead. I Ustenad to their jokes about 
''Martiagalo the man of business" every time 
I ratnmed from an expedition to Gornbiii with 
^en more than my usual good noiture, for I 
liail twenty-five golden rsasons in my pocket — 
the directors were paid monthly — for stisking 
to the Batter. And I believe the Butter would 
have stnck to me had it not been or my own 
faatt — ^il 1 can call that a fault which was the 
most extraordinary piece of ill<fortane that 
ever befell a fellow, and solely through another 
fellow's being too clever by hal£ 

Well, I say the Gh B. C. — as we who belong 
to It were aooastomed to call it, as the Chair- 
man said, " oat of affection and enphony," bat 
«o far as I was concerned, for mere shortness — 
-waa a iittlo " talked about ;" it had its detract- 
ors, and even its enemies. People shook their 
keads at it, (especially when- they tasted the 
butter,) and prophesied we should nut last ; 
and it was necessary to advertise considerably 



■■■fe^ 



I am not a famil;f man, but I respect ravs.ll. I 
hope, as much as it I was ; and I wasn't cm i 
to oe blown to piecoa by an old rhin iceroa ii!:e 
that, iu a held ot swedes. My ditiicullv vras to 
tiuu au excuse ; for tlio other mous le'ueals— 
anil his own knowledge perliaos ot wbv 
they wouldn't come— had nixtle &low- 
coii^he ''touchy," and when I had hinted that I 
couldn't be quite sure ot being v.-ttU liim on tho 
first, he hau made au allusion to tbe little niat- 
toi- 01 busmess betweeu Ud, wiiick I felt to be 
equivalent to "piav or pay"— Come to Piou^jli- 
shire (for ho lived amoiij;"' the clodhoppers) or 
settle HIV aocount. 

At last 1 hit upon a plan. lie knew that 
I was conuecteu with the Giedt Cutter 
Company, and dad oiteii Bounded me as to 
its p^opects: hut 1 could never oersuade him 
to invest in it. "If U's tuch a real u^i'd thiug, 
yau had better stick to it vourself, iMartia^a.e, 
and let nobody else in." "t didu't like the re- 
mark about letting people in ; but 1 wua not lu 
a position to quarrel with Slowcomoe. He 
parted from mo on tUo last day out one of 8ju- 
temuer, telling me he wanted twenty-iour 
Hours lo get his guns ready, and impiesaiug 
uj;nn me che best tram by which to start lor 
ftoUiihshire on the morrow. The next moru- 
ina (the 30th) L wrote him tuis letcer liom the 
Ciut) : 

My Deae Slowcojibe: I am exceedingly sorrv 
to ui.-.4ii<poim you — aua still mure su to umapo inc 
myeeli — uui, I rojtret to say that my praposed visit 
to .\oa has bouu knocKeJ ou iho uoau. The in- 
clostjU leleeram wUl, oxpluiu itselr. iiothiug hut 
tne most uriient busineas would have pre- 
vexitea my keepiuc my ougaiiemtinr, ami i leel cju- 
hdeut, irum the loeas you have otteu expresaed to 
me resuectiug the ueceusily ot utieDdin,: stiictiy to 
the. ti. a. C, I need no lurtbtir apolojjy for mv ab- 
dfuco. ITuu wiiS, uoahtless, nave niaoy another 
gun with you, aud if the phrass ot "the moie the 
merrier" can t«<i applied to pueasunt-isbuouii;;, that 
of '• the fewtr ihe better cheer' id cortainiy still 
more to too puroose. A luiier has will, X hope, 
compeusate for the ab^fuce of yours, most laitli- 
luiiy. AlAKAlAUUKJi AiAKTlNGALE. 

Tnen leaving the euvoiope open I proceeded 
to cuuuoct the leieKram : 

Prom tne Sgoreisry ot tne Great Batter Company 
(Liuiiieii), 'Joi'uhiii, to Maruiauuke Martiuta e, - 
Jioq., Aiii/tai-y. Kaval, auU Miiiua Club. Jfall 
AiaH. — U^iiiicatious liave been aibcoveiea in tuo 

Compaiw's ucoouuts. I am tuorefoie oom,ieiled to 
summ.ou au exiiauiuiaarv' meetiuj; of toe Board .ot 
l>ire>;jorii tor VVoOuesday oexD, wuoa your prateuce 
wiji Ue mdispeuaaole. 

I gave this compoaition to the Club commis- 
sionaire, an active, inieiiijreut tedow whom I 
had uibeneuaplojeU, aud seuc him oS to the 
ueareat t^le^iraph oihce. 1 calculated that it 
would return to me — m teiej;raphic form — in 
aD.>uc a quarter ot an hour at^urthest. But as 
it UappeueU, it aid not. i uad au engagement 
tor that alieruoou at Hurlniguam, and waa 
Obliged to leave the Cluo hciore the arrival of 
the expected documeuc. However, aa 1 knew 
it uiusi come, and cuuid place the utuiusc cuu- 
lidence in tue porter, 1 lett my letter with him, 
lUScruutlU^ him to piacu the telegram inside it 
ad souu aa it c^mo lo hand, aud tuen to post it- 

L'liii next moniing 1 lound upou inquiry that 
this bad Ubea dObu, aud tuoughc uo ujore about 

'>b» inatcer. Tne day ali«r a note, as 1 liud 
exjieuied, arrived irum iSlowooaioe, the con- 

itiuis 01 wmoh, however, 1 did not expect: 

SiB: I am aatoniabea that you vhouiu have the 
aaauroiiua to aoaa ma obac t«lejiram trom your place 
m uuiiuiesa. Ii you ima^iine uecausb your S-cteiary 
has ■"boiiod," and lue "uiessoa couceru," (a« your 
Iriend .erms wnat I had nuUeracooU irom yoa to oe 
a bouud coaituorciai asj^uiaaou,) has "uu..-atup." 
mat 1 snail not ue diapooeil to preus for my hun- 
dred pouuaa, you are very much miotakeu. I havo 
plaoea tne matter lu lUe nanus of my solicitor, aud 
remaiu, youra obeUioatly, 

i'HOilAS SLOWCOilBB. 

Had I taken leave of my own senses, or had 
Slowcomne taken leave of un { "Bolted," 
" bui-ao up," •• blessed concern I" iso such 
words, 1 am sure, had ever beeu contained in my 
teitgraai. Wuat on earth uia it all meau { 1 
Old a vnmg wmoa 1 had never done betore, ei- 
cepv upon the hrsii Monday in every month— I 
hiJrried to our place ot business in tue city as 
la^t aa a hansom could ta^ce me, and lound the 
Shutters up. The othce oi tue (i. B. C. was 
closed — just as thouicu tho compauy uad been 
defunct. Upstairs, however, 1 louau the Chau"- 
mau loekiug ac a heap oi uiils and guawin;; his 
muicauad. 

" This is a pretty piece of work, Capt. Mar- 
tingale," said he, '• aud we have to thank you 
lor It." 

" To thank me ?" cried I. " What do you 
mean'} Is evei> body jjoue mad i 1 have ti one 
noiumg — uotaiug." 

" Jf ernaps you didn't send a leleirram to our 
Secreiary aoouc ' deiacaltious I' Have it is.'" 
And he cussed me over the message 1 iiad seat 
Irom the Secretary to injseit— trauspuaod. 
That respectaolw aud intelligent comm.aaionairu 
hau, it seemed, ta^eu it tor jjrautotl tuat 1 had 
made a mistake in sending a telegram to 
mjself, aud substituted the word ••tiom" tor 
"to," and "to" for "trom." He ihougut, 
douDtiess, he was doing a very clever tuiug, 
and one xor whicu 1 should bo muou indebted 
to mm. 

Tne secretary really had, it seems, " defal- 
cated'' in a small way, and getting uiy tele^jram 
(instead ot my geciiug his), ue thought all was 
discovered, so laid nis bauds on everything he 
cuuid, and decamped, it waa the Chairman 
hiinselt who had wued the news to me m luat 
lauiuiar style, which had so inceused Slow- 
comue: '"Our JSecietaiy has bolted, and lUc 
blessed concern nas burst ud." 

The Uroat Butter (Jompauy, in lact, was no- 
where, tuauks to my little device lor avoiding 
pneasant-auootiug. The oeci'etary would proo- 
auiy never nave fled, DdC only have gone on 
delalcatiug slowly, i)ut tor my alarming mes- 
sage; as it was, everything waa precipitated, 
including the compulsory payment ot my debt 
to iSlowuuoibe. It waa aiiogcther a miaeraule 
fiasco; and when I hear fellows talking about 
the splendid results of civilization, and " Look 
at tne eieccx-io teiegrapu, lor Example !' auu 
"the corps ot commissionaires 1" i say to my- 
self but never mmd what 1 8.t.y. 1 have 

told enough to make it ui derscood wuy 1 
Should not agree with them. — Balyravia. 



to get new customers. Our busmess lay rather 
with new ones than old ones, perhaps ; but it 
was trradnailv getting spread over the 
OCfont^— though thinly spread, like butter 
upon bread at school. 

iSo long as we were harmonious among our- 
■elvet, said the Chairman, or, at all events, 
washed our dirty linenat home-— did not attack 
one another in the papers, as so many^ boards 
of directors are wont to— we should be ail 
light ; but il once there should be mistrust of 
one another he would not answer for the conse- 
onenoes. " Let only the Great Butter Company 
loe true to itself," said he, during the peroration 
mi. the most powerlul speech 1 ever remember 
to have heard fiom any man $iUing, "^nd 1 d o 
s|ot hesitate to affirm that the days ot dairj'- 
nren are numbered." For though { am still 
under an obligation of secrecy as to the mate- 
rial of which oar butter was composed, 1 may 
sky It had nothing m common witb dairies — cx- 
cjept a little water. Enough, however, of com- 
mercial det<»lls. 

, [When playing at pool in tho earlv Autumn 
one night at the Club I had the misfortune to 
Ipsfr— neither my money nor my liie, for 1 am 
iUnaziugly careful of both, but^-my sell-pos- 
Mssion. and somehow or ether got inveigled 

a to a promise to go down toj old Slowcembe's 
■boot upon the first ot October. It waa a 
foolish thmg to do, lor blowoombe is a bore, 
mkn 1 happened to owe him a little money ; 
and when a man is both a bote aud 
a creditor it u intolerable to be under 
tiie same roof with him, more eaueeiuUy 
it it be his own. There were some exuuses lor 
ine, tor in the first place there were so lew men 
in town thai we were obliged to ask Slow 
oomlM to make up the pool, and secondly, wuen 
one owes a fellow money one la bound lu be 
civil CO him. We got talking of pheasants, and 
the old lellow as<ied me il 1 liked paeaaaut- 
ahooting, and wuen f said yes, ''Then come," 
^aid he, "aud have a shy at mine." 1 no more 
suspected Slowcomoe of having any pheasant- 
auuutmg to give away than uf keepmg a 
rouletie-table at Hampton Court races ; 
he was a stodgy-, pui1*y, plethoric old lellow, 
wtio had been in the yeomaux'y lor a day or 
twi>, (j>ut to get a quaiificatiou lor the Ciuo.) 
ai^d hud then rested on ms laurels. Still, when 
a man farms his own laud tnere is always a 
teinpcatioa to get 'sometuiug out ot it, aud it 
Mjuuieu he had grown pheasants. 1 uu^ht to 
lii^v« been more prudent, aud I will auuther 
tiiue, or my uaiuu is uvt Jdariiugale. 

i am, however, a mau oi my word, and I 
never thought ot breaking my prouuao to Siow- 
Buiuoe, until! neard Uiui asK unotuer man, aud 
men another, to coiiie down aud enjoy ihem- 
seives aiBOUg his covers, and both oi luem re- 
tused poiut-oiank. They aid uot owe him 
money, as 1 did ; but it struck me that they 
■weie more deciaed in their negatives than the 
occasion demauaed. 

•• WUv dou'fc you go down to poor eld Slow- 
eombe's \" said X to one of tuem, a man I 
BUuuid have liked as a companion in such au 
expedition > "he means well and is quite harm- 
less." 

" Hamlesa I By Jove I that is just what he 
Isn't,'' was the unexpected reply. •• Why, last 
year was the first, accerding to bis own cou- 
tesaion, that be ever took gnu in hand, and ue 
shot Brooks of aurs in the leg at fifteen yards 
Si. one of his own turnip-fields. You uou't 
mean to say you never heard Brooks tell the 

ecory about biia leg, and bow Sluwaoaabe made 
<rajne of it!" 

' i did not like to say that I myself bad prom- 
ised, to go down to Slowoombe's, but I made up 



Senguiak Gib-ts. — Dame Box, of Bosing- 
stoke, a zealous woman for the Church, showed 
her devotion to the Eatabliahmsnt by pre- 
senting that clerical firebrand Dri'Sacheverell 
with a dozeu of larks when she made her 
, yearly visit to town ; as singular a token ot 
appreciation as the gold snutt-box Mile. Biuay, 
a sweet girl-graduate, received trom the hands 
of Cardinal de Polignac, upon winning her 
doctor's degree at the University of Bologna. 
Possibly ths>-Cardinal believed that a lady, 
wu*. at the age of twenty-tw», held forth 
lor I aa hour aud a half in opposition to the 
Prdtessor ot Anatomy's contention that the 
boules of the human body had their accretion 
by jmeaiis of icertain juices, would in time 
devielop a prosessioaal capacity lor suuffiu^; 
oChijrwiBe, ho would *a^ soon have 
thought of giving a Quakeress a pair of 
his own siouSLiugs. ouuu l>ulton would 
have seen no impropriety in that, l Jiinkicg to 
please his good moiuer, wuo was accustomed 
to iiicase her leds iu honest homespun, coior- 
biii^d John brought her a beuutUul pair of 
SLOOimgs whio.. uad takun his fancy as they 
huug lu a suop window. Upou uuroujug thum, 
Daqie Ueburau lined up her hauua in astonisu- 
mcUt, then qaietiy oostrved, " Thou hast 
brouabt mu a pair of grand hosen, Johu; but 
wui^t maue thee fancy such a bright color! 1 
can|aever snow uiy self al meeting in them!'' 
John saw no reason why his gitt saould ofi'eui 
iriciuiy eyes, tor to his tue stOcKings ap^ieaied a 
veiy mue drab, and Brother Junacuun, ou Doing 
appealed to, deciai'cd himself ol the same 
op.uion ; a.thougu iVlis. Daltou persisted that 
tuey Were as rc;d as a cherry, and her neigu- 



fc'mnser tlian tho gold boy dohvtirod to Sir 
.johii IJowfiu;; by tho K.HiJ of S.ini's o-.rn 
hands; with special iiij.iiuotious as to ^^.uardiug 
it cjuctuily, since it held lb its ket'iiiii,^ a 
few lKiir;j ol tho sacred wliito eu'uijaut. 
TriiyeiiJb, besides seein;; iiiauy sir lugi-, ll!ir.:r.i. 
ail: liable tu have very bUMiL^o .iiid cuiJ.irras i- 
mg tokeas ot IViofl^luies.i prolfoied to them, 
luipossibio to accept, however risli^' it may bo 
to ofi"i!Ud 03- rctu.sai. An Alricau chict sent 
L.viuy;«toiie il hiiu isoini' }rii". ol'sixlci'u, iiud up- 
ou tho scaiidaiiZ'jd doctor. seuiliusi iK^r uaok wiUi 
an intimation liiac he could hoc aecep. a'.U'h a 
present, the well-nieiiiuiiii .suViigc, aUi»;)0»ii)i; 
tho iluumel sviis uot exai-Ciy to the tr.ivi'ler s 
tusif, lorwarded him a bi;^,';er uud piiiiuuur 
black beauty. When Sir ftewmiel IJaice" wai 
tuning Ills leave ot Kauirusi, Iviu^ of Uuyuro, 
the saiile Priuce liski-d him to loiivo L idy 
BaUor bcUiud, a request to winch tno liagiisi- 
iiiuu replied by tureatoniii;; to shoot Ins .Ma- 
jesty It he dared to repeat it, while the lady 
coueerued gave hiiu a bit of her miul in choice 
Araoic. tiUipnsed that his pioposal ehouid 
create such exeiteinent, Kiimra^.i suiJ, " Don't 
be angry ; I did not mean to olleud you by a?ic- 
lug lor your wue. I will give you 11, wife ii you 
want one, aud i thought you \\ould iuive u;) 
objection to give me yours. It is my cuatoui tu 
give my visuofd pretty w.vos, ;iad 1 tuought 
you imgi.t like to excauugc. L)ou't make a lass 
about it; it you dou't like it. there's au eud to 
it.' One of his hearers, uo doubt, ihuugat 
Kainrusi's custom anytuiug but a gooil one ; 
aud tao otlier niu.st have been iucuuod to iu- 
dorse Lady Maruey's dictum, that ot all silly 
tliiags iu tue world, tlis suliost is a gift tua^u 
not wuuted. — ^1^^ Ae i'car Moand. 




nrpi 



irTiaiM |(W tbit nuioaiu.Uuyi 4 vuoiiin'iiizu. J.iiiai« 



i4' "-iiil Xi. 



■ 



■^. ^'%^'.T 



bora^ waeu oaiiod iu to decide the quesliuu. 
pruuuduced tueoi " vera fine stuff, but uucom- 
mou BcarieHly." The Am^ricau Biole .Society 
once received, as a dou.uiou, a live bull, whieu 
tue Anonymous douer explained h^id been won 
in a|bet tuao Bjiacit JacK Lo^au would bo 
elected t« Cougiess by buy thousand majority. 
Ui course thocouiicalcoutribuliou ,vas cou verted 
into casu wit lout uoiay. A'ot so readily lurued 
to prouiablo auooum waa tue tract u^joo tne 
wieaedueos of giuttouy, lor warded to a Kansas 
tamme rel.cl committee by some ill-couuuioned 
wretcu, wuo miut uave been ovvaurotucrto luo 
bouevo.eut creaiure .vuu a»ut the suderors irom 
a Wiicousm praiii*; tiie a irameu photograjih «>f 
himaeil. i\ut much more serv.ceaole, although 
possiuiy the outcome ol u aiucero desira to aid 
lue iiuiortunale. was tue Ueiroit worthy's gut 
01 casi-oU clutmng. whieh elicited from one wuo 
beuenced by it lUe following aoauowledguieut : 
" bir. Cue commiti/jr-man giv me. amongst olner 
thiugs, wat he cai'cd a pare of pauts, and 
'twould make me pant aaui to wear 'em. 1 
found your name aud where you livod in oue ot 
the poii.ita. My wiie laded ao wuen 1 showed 
'em to her that 1 thot siie would hev a counip- 
shuu fit. She wants tu uo if there lives aud 
bretbes a mau who has legs no bigger than 
tuau She said if there was he orter be taKeu 
up for vagrancy, for havmg no visible 
means of support. I couluu't got 'eim 
on my eldcso boy, so 1 used 'em for 
gun-cases, if you hev anotaer pare to 
spare niv wile would like to get 'em to hani; 
up t»y the side of the lircjplace, to teep the 
tougS in." A catalOi^ue ot tao toiieua ot ro- 
speot. love, and ioj iiii,y presented at oue time 
and anotder to (c^ueau Vic tor. a, woulfl bo a 
work <ii lormidujio oiiucus.ous, and mauy 
us itiiiu^ Auiud be loaud lUcvoiu; out n^/uo 



I umbr.^lla in the itauddy 8t^ce^ wh 

; sLjod 1.^, Icmbli; «t a two s .'i l.nj; pisci',. ni d 

w;ni lor cl) ui_'e, t\i.'(\ a. I t'lf p;.ss<MUf>rs or ni- 

iii ; for.ViU'd to looiJiuiil the driv.r aiioutiui; to 

ll'.R lU.liO lO I f. 

" L.iolc alive, tneri?,!" 

1 '^K-X my clriuiitv— I have .'ilrcjidy recovered 
my umbrella— aii^li hmmd lo tha d iveuiont 
shore, out of tlio nuiddy river, alter narrowly 
rsjiii'ing a run ilosvp from a ilahs:uu, when, to 
my aunuvauce, I a'P i;ii:iin a g ov'. and — y.'.". 
tliuro it 111!.-, in th(i hi (lilt- ot ihc road, gr.niuJ 
into tlie niuil oy tile, il.tuso.u wlic.e:. 

O; coiirsi! I liU'e to go on, buv a nr'VJ p lir. 
and as 1 pay loii them, havin;^ ;:r i\vu c-ooi ni 
liic s!i;>[if-l luentallv .siy, '"1 wonder wiiat b.^- 
canie ol that lo.irpojny-niocp,'' aud mv hand 
iuvoliintarily goo-i lo the jiocket "r 1113' vest, 
ana — yes, tacro it is — I can leid it i>i.uul3' 
enough through tiicj Clotli. 

1 merely i^ay, wmepo was that little coin bc- 
tor.^} ■ ' :,. 

1 mentioned m3' Ibs^, .and that natiir.aily 
brings mo back to Igloves — a covi-riii^ lor the 
hands in wiiich I haViS lieeu nearly ruined. 

^\'itll my cu»toiu;ary practice ot iieaim^as, I 
doub e my gloves tioj^'etu*.'r. esp'jciall y ta.j while 
aud hiveuder knls^ which, be: wtron our^ilve.^, 
1 always make last t.S8 -lou,i a.s possiole, an(l 
then send ihem to ■bbclL-ant'd. Sow, the noiuo 
of m3- light kui gjluvos la in my lelt-hand tail 



r'rove Irom thfir ormntvy Bom:-. Ihousnnils of 
honest aud ribonous laiui.'ifig.^ ■Am\ led lo the 
t^a'rihic iu-urrt*ctjnn ot Ccvcnncs, etruck a blow 
.'it tlK' prosin-iif.y of l-'raacf, f;oin v.-ii;<-li Klie. 
wa.'? a-verv long tinu' m (•or-t)Vcriuz. 1 hii Prat- 
cs'Hnts (Ii'ivau Irani ti(!if liohifM v.-i"c icce:vj' I 
with 9ynii):ttliy in Larliud, Uo. land, and Goi- 
niany, to wliijh cauatrios the.v tians'erred their 
indiwrry. 'iho numlicr of eraigrantH i.s esti- 
Tniited at riO),') iI), ami thn cniii rhcy look with 
t''o:n at .si:: 3' niiilioa Irancs. — Gali-jn i^ii's 



'^r^^T^th^i^mm 



THE HA WIS I ED MAN. 

In a whisper, mind — in the gentlest, the 
most sighing of whispers— I tell you this. In 
fear and trembling, too, all the time, for it 
might hear me. 

You observe, I say it ; for I cannot apply ac- 
tual distinction to the weird little «ntit\- that 
torments me. At the same timo, though, I 
find that I have often called it him, aud, in a 
misty, wandering way, associated tho thing 
with the trickay-looking sprite who stands 
witli his bauds upon his hips in the Landseer 
picture of " Midsummar Night's Dream." 

The fact is, I have been haunted for the past 
five years — I, the simple-minded, calmly^lving, 
seventh-rate'' literary man who pens these 
lines; and my innocent bachelor life has been 
made a torment to me by something, of which, 
as you see, I only dare speak in a whisper. 

You are shaking your head! Dou't say you 
are not, tor I can feel it mentally ; and my per- 
ceptions are now thoae of the nio-st acute. Lot , 

me hasten, tUen, to reassure you— to enlighten 

you upon the point you are. quietly discussing. 

No : there has not been the slightest mani- 
festation of insanity in my family. 

Again : my pulse gives with calm regularity' 
the proper number of beats to the minute. 

My blood is of the normal temperature. 

It is not inciuient drlirium tremens, for I was 
never inebriated but oneo jn my life, and then 
I was 80 drcadfnlly ill the next day that I 
made a vow, which I have religiously kept, 
and am always considered an abstemiou? man. 

So, once more, in a calm whisper, I declare 
to you that I am haunted — bewitched — ill- 
wished — evil-eyed — overlooked — or in some way 
Buffering from a spell. In fact, there must be 
something in the matter not hitherto dreamed 
of in my phiiosophy, and I tremble lost ill 
should come of it. 

But lot mo explain— let me give you a sample 
of the kind of annoyance to whieh I am sub- 
jected, and during which it always seems to 
me that I can hear the silvery tinkle of a very 
small kind of laughter flnatins about the room. 

It was only yesterday that' I required my 
daily remembrancer — tho diary in which I re- 
cord the trifles of my lirfe and note my engage- 
ments. It was gone. 

That book lies on my study table, and I waa 
put out 'by its loss. 1 searched book-oase, 
drawers, in tolios, among papers, turned out 
my desk, got into a violent perspiration, went 
and bullied the eervant, rose into a towering 
rage ; and at last, quite exhausted, and fuming 
with annoyance, I threw myself into my chair — 
and found that diary I 1 

Where did 1 find it i 

I'll teil you : that little book lay in its usual 
place upon the study table. 

Now. you may argue for a week, and you will 
uot convince me that some sjirite had uot hid- 
den that book away until it was tired of laugh- 
iug at mo, wuen the book was r^'pacert. 
Another specimen. 

1 have a custom, drilled inbo me in childhood, 
of carettdly folding my clothes before retiring 
to rest. I never kick one thing here and 
another thure, alter the habitude of tlia 
reckless, but place each trarnient rea ly 
to to donned in the morning. Now, I am ready 
to make afiidavit that those things are ail 
right at night ; but when I have left rising till 
the last moment, just leaving myself suflicient 
time to dress and catch tue train by wnich I 
am going with a friend, there fs invariably 
something wrong. Now it is a button otf my 
trousers. If Igettheu; ou, and find them all 
right, the tongue is gouefrom my brace buckle. 
Or it may be a stud dropped from my shirt; ; 
the button-hole split of my collar ; or, more 
likely, a button grown ovet-ripe aud ready to 
drop, swinging only by one thread from the 
most preminent portion of my coat. 

Atauotuer tune I hear the scrvitut come up 
with my boots, as I lii iu bdd. Slie bumps thciu 
down, a.'j servauis will bump boot.^ down, aud, 
ill that pleasant, seiul-unconscious way in which 
one lies of a moruiug before rising, 1 seoni to 
see those boots, and 1 wonder wUe:lier they 
have beeu eareluUy dried, fur the ur,;vious day 
was wet, aud 1 nave had a horror of -damp 
boots ever pince 1 road somewhere that they, 
were a proline eause of catarrh. I'heh 1 w.m- 
der.'too, wliyit is that servants have such pe- 
culiar notions respscting the aaatoiii3' of the 
human foot m?;8euune, and credit it with ab- 
uormiilly turned-out loea. Iroiii the way in 
Which they always reverse male boots — the 
right ou the left side, the left upi'ii the right. 
They never do so with boots femiuiue. 1 lie, 
then, seciug those misplaced boots there; aud 
wuen 1 have made my piiiugb out, done my 
tubbing, aud hav.e arrived at ti^e stage wheu I 
want those boots, I open tho dobr to get Iheiu,. 
aud they are not there! 1 

Now, 1 am cercaiu that they- were there ; I 
heard the girl bring them; but ail the •ja me, 
alter a Jew minutes' i;!tefval, I ring sharply, 
and the maid comes aad knocks.! 

".'dy bojtb! — I'm waitiusi tor tliem." I say. 
"Piee, Sir, they're out here," siiys tne girl, in 
an ill-used tone. 1' ' 

Whereupon 1 go indignatly to the door, With 
a bruah lu oue hand, into wuidi 1 have savage- 
ly driven the leilow brush, 'so ihlit they aatheio 
togctucr, aud my hair all down lover my lore- 
head. ' 

Yes, there are the boots ; and! put wrong a& 
to rignts aud lelts, as a niactdr ol course. 

iS'ow, how did these ooota get away, and 
how did they come baek { For I'm sure tue 
girl did not oriug them back this time. 

I told you how particular I am about folding 
my elolues ut nijiht. 1 uis exteudato garmeuta 
that I do uot Wear every day — dreas eoat, lor 
iusiaucc, lelt m the drawer dufing a tour or 
Hiiuotiug expedition. 1 \ 

iSow, it won't leave those gaijmcnts alone ; 
and whenever i take them out atter absence, 
tiit^y invariably look as if lUey had beeu used 
for tho raising 01 money, auu sudlered trom tne 
pawuDroiici's roll, So evideut loii olteu in the 
iJriLisu workman's SuuJay coat, waiou is 
craaaed from lop to bottom. 

Tuerc is another way. 111 which I am terribly 
aunoyed. Bcjing a regular 'bus man— of cou.se, 
1 don't ine.iu a, driver or a coiiauctor, but a 
travear by oiunUun— troai in iiives of ecoa.)- 
my, 1 have iKticedihe nmsance thi.' the fair 
8i:X — e.spjcialiy llio live litir aex, wliieh never 
travels Nvr.hout a large bunaie, which ihuy 
piauL ou somjboUv's kuea wh«u outering — ' 
la lo cunduclor, driver, and lellow pasaaii- 
gers, by keeinug tlie vehieio waiting while 
moucy is dislodged trom a poeivec some- 
where ia tlie rwgiou of loids, or from the corner 
of a uaudiierchiol, in whioa it is Tightly tied in 
a iiuot wliicii won't come unaoue ; while one 
lady always produces her eash wet — out of her 
mouth. 1 have noticed all this, 1 say, aud in 
coujequouce 1 provide mysalt wii.h a three- 
penny piece, a lourpeiiuy, or six pence, 
and place it in my waistcoat pocket ready for 
aligutiug and paying without requirmg change. 
Do you thiuk luat 1 can hud laat oum when 
I require it 1 It you do you are mistaken. 
1 grope tor it with my glove on,; I hunt lor it 
wild my glove oil ; 1 dodge hrat in one 
corner, tucu lu the otuer, aud each 
time along the intermediate chaanal ; but uo — 
there ia no coin, and the conductor u-onicaily 
asks me if I vraut to keep the 'uus all day. 

Of course 1 d.m't, and I toei very muca pro- 
voked a«i i>rouU'.-o my uoriu-munuaie. drop uu 



coat pocket, and 1 tijh them out just as 1 am 
iioing iiito theacrei^r "at home; ' and this is 
ulway-s lh(^ case: 1 put ou oae. get it biittono:i, 
aud am about to putCo i its tcUow. when 1 thid 
that if it is a whitcifilove o)i my li'ind, 1 hold a 
lavender kid iit. iHV;!^aiid, or vice versd. They 
are sure to be odd|"onps, aud I am cfertain that 
1 put them away ip flkiirs. 

VVli., don't I look ii^iore 1 start, you will say. 
Because 1 don't iliib^to look, and oue doi s uot 
feel it necessary laiiker re.iiular precautions. 
Aud agaiu I say, llbw. is this ? 

If it oe not iho wdrkiu^s of some sprite full 
ofmischiet, what is it'f 

Again, I tind myiseilf putting chlorodyne on 
my handkerchief, ; tKJcause the bottles have 
been ciiiiuged; anil wucu, in a fit ot pussipu, 1 
dash dosvn the nasty, ethory, peppurminty 
pain-eaaer, tako a clean pocket haudnerchief. 
aud scent that, 1 find 1 am aoiug it wit. 1 the 
tincture of niynb, or the gumaiy stuff tha lel- 
low bored me into buying when last my hair 
was our. 

Only a week ago I had my breakfast spoiled 
by a letter which cania by post. It wa.s as loi- 
lows, and there waa au iiiclasure: 

No. 12,jKftMYN STUi<;ET, Friday. 

Sir: 1 am at a lossto uuderatand the mean- 
ing ot this note, and I should be glad if vou 
would explain, for I am a man who in.akes it 
his rule neither to biorrow nor lend money. If 
you had any ideas ql the latter kind m sending 
It, believe me that a frank rcqueat would have 
been better. I am your obed.enr servant, 

I = J. WiiLLSBT PURNOW. 

To T. WooLLT, E^q. 

I was auiazbd, and sat -vritb the note in my 

hand, unable to coiupreiieud it. I had asked 
Pumow to couio aukl dine wilb me ul the Cu- 

raeoa Club, aud woifldu'l have adki<d him lor 
money lor the worijj. Besides, I didn't waut 
any- just then. j 

At last, by way jof solving the mystery, I 
took up th^ inclosure, to read, in my own 
hand: \ ■ ; 

No. 14a Bye Street, Monday. 

De.ve Old Boy:! Let mo have that ten 
pounds, there's a good fellow. You promised 
it beiore Christmas, land it's now May. Thine, 
I ; T. Woolly. 

Yoa, I wrote that, ibut it was to Jack Saorter, 
who owes me noendlof borrowed mouey, wuich 
I get back a little; at a time. But iiow did 
Purnow get it 1 ,Sfop — no — yes — no — 10 be 
sure I did: I wrote to both at the same time, 
and the notes must' have been put — yes, 1 de- 
liberately say, in a whisper, vaiaii—put into the 
wrong envelopes I j j 

1 was aghast tor a! tilne— it seemed so horri- 
ble ; but at last 1 redovfersd my.selfisutficiently 
to take my hat and go lo the tclegrapu othce, 
to send a message toj; Purnow, tolling him it 
Vi'as a mistake, and that he must come directly, 
for I had ordered a Capital dinner^it the club. 

1 got that message: very cleverly within twen- 
ty words, got out a . slanting, and was just go- 
ing to baud both- 1 to the pleasing-iooking 
voung telegraph clei-ikcss. When Ja horrible 
thought ran througjl toe like a bhiil, and I 
stood as if transfixca. j: Jack Shorter had got 
Purnow's note, aud Ae Would com^ to the club 
to dinner I AVorae stili*, to me, as wo sat to- 
gether with coffee aud cigars, he would borrow 
another ten-pound ioie of me, or perhaps be 
kind enough to takoliD,±u two fives. , 

What was 1 to do 11 |; dare not bring those 
two men together. I did not want Jack. Oii! 
it waa dreadful. Bub Hie dinner was ordered, 
aud niight just as jwoH bo eaten; si^ I went 
away — making the pleasing-looKiug young tele- 
graph clerkesa lookjupou me as very strange 
m my ways — and wrote au expiana.tory letter 
to Purnow, appointiag another day tor tue din- 
ner ; but he decliueilj , to come, aud i led "sure 
he believed my note was a try-on for money. 

But Jack Shorter qome, and ate my dinner ; 
and as 1 said, so ho dld-Hhe borrowed two fives 
over our coffee, whicijiiSum ho will never pay. 

It's an awful po.^iiiOjajior a man topjlje lu. and 
I aulier ftom it at ever.yturn. I have round my 
gun unaccountably rusty ; my li.shing liUfS hor- 
ribly tangled, aud i|iy;tio:) joints brokeu. i 
have fouud my ehoicia' cigars moidyj 013 soda- 
water without a fizz leifi lu the batCle, my tea 
disappear; aud the uhijaber ot uiuijjrcllas that 
have deliberately goii*) awa3' Idare nptouumer- 
ate. for my sake — uotlyuurs. | 

Enough. 1 am thfc ilaunted Ma^, and my 
sprue wiil uot leave !me. Uo jiuts jtucl in u*iy 
pockets, rubs my halt nap tho wrong way, 
blunts the e igea of mir>razors, breaks the teeth 
out of my comb, and liu one wa3' aiiji another 
reduces me into tho sja^e 01 a hypocliondriacal 
d3-8peptie. As beloP^.4aal, I teii it youm a 
whisper, lest evil aiioijdii come upou inc soveu- 
told ; for mine is a kuiliguant sprite, audio 
you, good reader, I wikh' a aappier la!|;e. 

Hal ha! By Jove, w^hat fun ! I've ji^st turned 
this out oi my desk,|Whero it's laf^ lor six 
months. I meant to send it to a magiizino, and 
here it goes at last, jf any oue wilt nave it. 
But, 1 say, the spirii'is exorcised; gpno, vin- 
istied — everything's iij its plaei^ and Itucre'a a 
place tor evcrythiug. lAppie-pie oracriaud sun- 
sh'.ue; unity,' peace, aba coucord. JiplnriOus 
unitm — hJoni soil qiUUt/ial y pjuac—UJecua et 
tulaiiicn! Excuse ijy Migu api.-ito; itls aU due 
to St. Lydia, who tookvipity d;jim my for.ura 
lot and mairied mo, orly ug .ill siiritcaliway. 

I say. IhoUiiU, ouiy tiii'uii! Jaeii Snorter uus 
come in for a pium, aii.jl no sooner did he hour 
that I Wua going to oe ih^rried tuau ht^clap.r»ed 
a clieck for a cool tiUudied laio iiiy iiaua, 
saying that he didu't 1 :|i<)W Ijow «e s^oad, but 
we'd cry quits, and ihaij wouiU pay tuejiri \ 
' ^Ja iV 



This comes unkuowu 



to St. L. — Once 



i/eek. 



The Edict of NA;<|ti«cb.— .M. Da j|farc5re, 
in his spiecch at Domtro4ti speaking of iteii.iioii3 
intersats, made au all jSjoia to tue dis^doacBS 
which had been mauilot ttVdi oa the oeclision of 
the law ooneerning the 'granting ot ua|vcr3;ty 
d.'greos. Ho said that jihe pjuienc of coiapro- 
mises and arrangement jp.id arrived, and that, 
wh le he was spe.ikiuj;,; s\,'na'.v edict ouNantcs 
was being signed. Uu|ief the abjve jnaiue is 



hi 



known a decree of paci jjja-tioa ia favorjof the 



Protestants, sigueit by 11 
th» loth April, ld93. Thp 



enri IV'., at N.ifiies, ou 
t do.nioieat putau cud 
ofjtua sixteeata ceutury. 
d the rigats auUguar- 
llUijdonots by [ioruiar 
'i thosa which tlia sumo 
feujcessively Un loJiJ 



to tho religious wars 

It coutlrmod aud oxtendji^i 

antees granted to tiia \ 

edicts and trea:ies, mmol 

monarch had published 

aud 1591, aud whicu w'f^no: far trom qaimiag 

the distrust of tho meih|iiers of the Ite^tormed 

faith, who reckoned but, J! ttie on tho woifds and 

promises of a Prince wlij,: alter haviujj mauy 

limes sworn never to ab.l »doa the rcli|iou in 

Whieu ae was bora, h4 t however eiubracod 

Catholicism. Theieiorcj ^ oracr to cakni iiio 

Hiariu aud agitation of j(l3; lonuer cor|ligioii- 



isls, lleari IV. 



ut 



dale, published the. cele irited edict 141 .lues- 



nou. It, contained a lu 

the tjast, una the ireo exef' 

laita tar tho lutare. V 

braied in the towus am 

bji.a orgauize^l oy pieot^ijiuu decree.-,. 



aaditioii, the lIu^UL-noL.i 
or uuud ciiauc.s in tne 
and tuobe oi wnich lhti3' 
were to oe restored to Ih 



ije HUave-meBlionc, 



I'M I 



miu cutucammfsiy lar 

lae of lac lioi oraioii 

I'fjdip luiglit he ceie- 

i>iaees w.icre it had 

lad, 111 

lO rent 

10 V, u>, 

.Uil 



lUej'o i>i.raiilLea 
lau.joui'g.s 01 
h;aa Moi-a ui.'ipols 
I'lil. l-'car iiaiv 



Tin: SLAF A.^D THE TUIiK. 

I. 

'Tis not the lon'.ly Crescout thit stirs onr e lu'a to 

Altlioniih in E.iropp's storv it reddens many a 

Not .Mekita's fervirl uospe', tbou;»h olt its votaries 

|):>ar''! 
Oa phuldeiini Chiisii.iu valleys tho stcrin of fire 

an'i swiir.l ; 
'Tis not :or a.s :ipon that I'aitti to fix a felon stiip, 
^Vtlot^e ch.iin lioua br^ai^ht a< l.i;<-, and Mulit, and 

an I aroaga eoiiQiJoriid Sp:iln ; ^ 

From Arab tchnol.'* aud Araj skill wo've'gaiaeJ too 

inaoh to (l.Tun 
"With Ciihoiiu anathema the children of Islam! 

II. 

Kg ! 'lis tho horde from Osas poureS which set the 

bauetal rulo 
Of a suuleai, baie, and bloody race in the bright 

laajs ;if Siarin rt ; 
The race that o.iasts wner'e'er its hosts of savace 

c >nq,i»r.ir-( tioti 
No grass (.i.u limw, no blosiom show the fosterinc 

iireath ol (jrjd. 
Tne Cr •.s'-outll.i- on high they fl ;unr, the gilt 

Ji'O d 1 ■ ;ie>' kL-^.s : 

They laay a, CLiimiug Arab chaunt ; no fast or feast 

they iijiSs ; 
But naught oau cleanse their bosoms I'rum the toul, 

<i .ik 1)1 )(id thnt r.iu 

la the veins of ih^ir sava^'e fathers from the wastes 
of wild Tuiai. 

iir. 

'Mid gqualiblinz in our haciosteaa. thov came in 

Ijio >(i auJ fl:e ; 
Tliroui'h :..q.i.ihljhni in our homeataad they stayed, 

a inooeiice dire ; 
Now Xdifai-, a>valii.iii, knooss atthelr robber gate. 
Bu,; rqii.iy'oliag lu our hamBiiteaf anils to stay 

lauir tare. 
We fi)rm a Hiu;^le homestead, we Celt, and Slav, and 

(xr«>eif, 
Latiu, ami Goth, together,— why, matual hurt to 

wreak, 
Sbonid dynasties or statesmen goad on g)od Ciiris- 

(lan lulk. 
When Chrisiian kin ara straggl:ng to break the 

Tatar yoiie? 

IV. 
What recks it if our kinB/nRn in iinoranoe be unnk. 
Like iliat ifi whtcU their masters have lam for ages 

•irunk } 
Thouih uoeds of blood defile them, still shall we 

di'eiu the same 
Oi'seris by wron;: emulated and lords whom naught 

Ciiii tame ' 
Ages ot" power and splendor on these have failed 

to tell; 

Now comos the hanr of Vonsoauce,— who dares for- 
bid lis knell ? 

Up, Chriaiians 1 strike for Freedom ! God's curse 
uaoa the work 

Of vUl in AiaiesmeD plotting to save the raffian 

Turk ! 
—The Spectator. M. K. Y. 



;riKit!w< 
Yverc accorded tuem — ai.Ldoutauuau, ^ idoat- 
pelier, iSedau, aud rfauun^rl Piuaii>, fo| tiieir 
judicial guarantee, a p^i'dicalar branch|wa3 to 
bo created in tue Pariiipleuts ot Pails and 
Kmeii, to bo called tui j-iJaamjer (|f la» 
tdict," to decide in auUS beiwccu Cajhalics 
aail Protestants, buch irjo tua oases til that 
I.imous decree, in tue dr^w.ug up ol'lwuicu 
woriied during nearly l»; '3'ear aasi»i^rd du 
tjoaomberg, tho Prosidenij: Jeaniiain, ta^ histo- 
riau de Taoa, Dominique Ide Vic, Gavccuor of 
Calais, aud hotfreui de Ccjliguou. The ^mety- 
two articles of which it itj'euiuposed wo,re, be- 
sides, discussed one by o^ej botore theiir deii- 
nite adoption, by a comiri.at^e composed uf liu- 
guenot oelexatea. Henri fS'., iu so aciitiz, db- 
sired to remove from thodB|liitter the Jca!^t ro:a- 
uaniof suspicibU. It wa;i riigiatered tu« ia of 
Feoruarv, ioJ^, by the PauJukmeut of Paiia, tho 
3lBt Maron at the Court ^ , Accouuts, abrf the 
30th August at the Cour ai|si Aides. It sUDsist- 
ed down to October, ib85, ^ len ic wasrdvoked 
bv Luuis 2l.IV.: uud that ^|i uf tati iiiag.| wiuch 



n 



m^^iM 




''\ 






iiiiiiilililiiiiilji 



INDIAN 



TEA. 



Only half a ceutury ago it was commonly 
believed that the " Camel li.a tbeifera." or te^- 
plant, was confined to a belt of land -within the 
Chinese Empire, lying oetweea twenty-five and 
thirf3--three degriies of north latitude. It 
chanced, however, that in the year 1823 an 
enterprising Scottish trader, named Robert 
Bruce, conve3-od a cargo of miscellaneous arti- 
cles up the rivers of Assam to the town of 
Rungpore. nt that time the most important col- 
lection of huts in those parts. This 3Ir. Bruce 
being something of a botanist, discovered, 
to his great surprise, that the lofty trees 
beneath whose grateful shade he waa odo 
day reposing were of the same genus, and 
even species, as the lowly tea-producing shrubs 
of China. Many of these trees exceeded forty 
feet iu height, while not a few attained to six- 
ty feet, though they seldom measured mere 
than a yard in circumference. In answer to 
his inquirlep, he learned that a decoction of 
tea-leaves had long been a favorite beverage 
of the Singohos, the tnha inhabiting that dis- 
trict, and that the plant was indigenous to all 
that portion of Assam which is included be- 
tween twouty-seven and twenty-eight degrees 
north. Convinced of the u>ift!ulue83 of his dis- 
covery, -Mr. Bruce orevuiled upou the 
Singpuo chief to enter into an ea- 
gagoinent to supply a csrtiin num- 
ber of plants at a proper period of the 
ensuinsryear. Inthe meantime, however, the 
first Burmese war broke out, in the course of 
which Mr. C. A. Bruce, in command of some 
gun-boats, penetrated as hich as Sadiya. where 
he was shown the agreement made with his 
brother. On the conclusion of hostilities. Mr. 
C. A. Bruce conveyed to Calcutta some plants 
and seed from Uoper Assam; and in acknowl- 
od.rmont of his services he received a medal 
from the London Society of Arts. The incident 
was fruitless of further consequcncts, but iu 
1832 Lord William Bentinck's attention was 
drawn to tho sirailiaritv of Assam, in soil aud 
ci'.inate, to the tea-growing districts of China. 
Two3'ear3 later, a committee was appointed to 
take into consideration the beat mcii.ia of iiiiro- 
ducing tea cultivation luto the territories of the 
East India Comoaiiy. Tho existence of the 
indi'^onoiis plant was (hn.s once more brought 
to ligiit. iind Mr. C. A. Bruce was selected to 
Kurjcrintccil the first Governmeut nurseries, 
v.hile Boods. seedliuaa, and experienced tea- 
growers and manufacturers were imuorted 
from China. Alter oue or two failures some 
saninh fl were produced of such excellent quali- 
ty fiiat in l^i39 a company was formed in Lon- 
don under thoatyleof the Aa^amTea Company, 
with a capiralof half a hiillion, in iO.OaO 
shares ol £J0 each. To this iirivate asso- 
ciation tho Go^oiumeiic tran.sferred two- 
thirds of their plantations— the rcm.aiiiing 
portion being sold to a Chinaman in 1S49, lor 
oometiiing le'sa ihau oue hunarei pounds. Tho 
first operations or the Ass im lea Compauy 
were eminently uu.'^uocesslul,- b-'ing conducted 
in the most extravag.int 'manner, and without 
the aligatest practical knowledge, iris there- 
fore not vcrv surprising that by 18;(5-7, the 
snares on -.shi^h tweniy pounds had been paid; 
were practically UiisaUibie, while a lew arc 
said U) have cbauged owners at the 
nominal price of liaif a crown. This 
period of depress. ou las.'ed for sev- 
eral years ; but in 1S5\J a cb.mge 
for the bntter set in, and since then the com- 
pany has cnjoyeu a career of triuaiphaut suc- 
ce.se"; At that date, five or six private gardens 
und beeu estaldishcd at difi'crcut poiuis, and 
by 1859 no fewer than filvy-ono i)Lania;ioua 
were being worked by private iudividuals. 
Most of the;-ia were fairly saccissiul ; aud up 
to the year ISC') tho prospects of the tea indus- 
try Were, a. least, higaiy sati6lac;or3-. Uii- 
loitaui-tely, just then a sjuxit of will epeeul.i,- 
lition toDv p*as<ossiaa ol the Calcutta comain- 
nitv, aud bubble succeeded to bubble witu daz- 
zaug rapidity. . , , , 

With the coliap.-ie of the bubble compaaies a 
new era was instuuted, aud irom I hat tune tue 
cultivation of the tea-pUuii has been oondiicsel 
ou Tbo same priuciples as any other a.;riciuturi;l 
mdu.-^try. ana with a degree ot success which 
juGlitic-T 8.i.u^ui'ao expec. alioas tor tiic iuiurc. 
'The chief dilhcultv hitherto enooiintored, and 
now at last in 11 tair way to be overcome, has 
beeu U) oiitain a coutaiuaus supply ol r.sciul 
laaor at reasuuable raie.-j. The A.ssamose them- 
scivea will accept work iu teagaraens only 
When U I'Uits theai8eivc<, aud lor fi,- 
lu! periods of service, deeraiUK it beneath 
as landed proprietors— alter the 



tiieir aiguii.v 



bind tlieai- 
ll bc-came 



manner ot Ficneii peasauts--io 
selves by regular engagements. 
Tiecessary, iher:,lorc, to itnyort laoarers iroiii 
Bengal, aud uai.ii quiio reccutly me ilcugal 
caoi7o ic;iirdcd Assaai as a wilil and savage 
luml. peopled bv crael aad even monstrous lu- 
hii Jiiauts. .Vnd iu adailiou to ideal prejudice:;, 
a Uii.doo, huAcva. lie.tii'ai'.e he may be, cluii^s 
1.1 ihc aucesiral villago and lae rural gous ot 
his lorciaiUeis; nor at first could any 
]>50vis'0ii be mauo * lor the impona- 
tu)i< of wives and hittiiiies. li.-.-u 

a, ii.vj ta:r!ir8t immigiauts for lao lu: st part 
hc.ungod lo the B. 'liiy, had-starvea, uae.u- 
ploved, ridundant poiiulaliou. the siidaeu 
chJmze from a seunty tu a sullioieiit diet, to- 
gelhe~r wua ihe deuso crowding tOi^ciher on 
board the river boats, and the madciqaale prep- 
arations made tor lueir reception on their ar- 
rival at tueir respective pi.iutaiious, induced 
a mortality that waa really appalling, llanpily, 
a Very ditfjrent stale of things may now ue m- 
cordJd, daiinj^ iroai 18'36, tne lust period ol de- 
pression lu lue tea industry. Tue cooiiea are 
now leoruite i- by native loremen. wJio have had 
practical experience of tea cultivation, wuo 
Kuow the sort of men best adapted tor the 
peculiar kiud of work, and who are rcbponsi- 
bie lor tho recruits taey enlist. As far as is 
po.>*3iblc, married men are euooiirased 10 lake 
witu ihcin ihciv Wives aud little cuildren, so 
to lorui a home, aud revive, as it were, 

loved iina-e oi lae old Bengal village. 
Al the plantaiiona they find couvemont huts, 
with bus of garden ground, situated on a 
healthv spot, and arrantted like J' the lines" of 
a native retimout. Tueir wages are consider _ 



as 

tiie 



ably lii:;her than th^ conid have earned in 
BiiiiTiii, and their occj&ation, never excessive- 
ly^aiiiiuing, lasts all vthe year round. 

.So i:ir as the Cojjl&a iheiusolves are con- 

ooracd, the labor quqfition may be said to be at 

insr saii.-.tactorily hdlvM ; but on the side of 
llie planters there stbl remains something to 
IIP desired. Among ?iny numerous body of. 
working men there is Wways to be lound a not 
incDusiderable percen^go of idlers, nialinger- 
iT.a, and di.sconteaicdtvagabonda. The Cooiiea 
employed in Assam ^ipfcno exception to the 
niie, and ever and agaiij, generalfv, of course. 
at the liiisiost season, t)ie plnnter mioses a cer- 
;aii! nuiiia.-r of haudti,';iWhosc absence entails a 
61.' noils loss. ■•!" 

l"he 111 1^1 8ucces.?fiilli6.T,- plantations are those 
sitiialOil on low, uiniulating slopes. To insure 
a constant aud rapi l;§jif-ce.-<siou ol leaves, both 
lie it I'.iid moi.smio HrG>||udi.'3;>eu8able ; but the 
latter must be derived ilroin rununig streams, 
.anil uot Irt^in atagUHUl^ Jioole. Above all things 
is il necessary thdti'.'lhe gardens should be 
Jibove ail ilaager of luuijdation, for water Lodg- 
iUi.' aooat the- roots itirus the leaves Vfillo'v, 
aiit ;;eiie:':iliv ■wealt^^". th..- pla.nt. Of la:e 
years greater attPd||o7i h.is oeeii paid 
to tho «uhj?ct ot iH.4)iure, now that tho 
iM.ii i.<i no lougpt ^i^^ched by the aecayiag 
vegetatiou of the piiiiieval forist.-;. trees, 
in>l;-ed, aro still leitjiicre and there, lor the 
iv.o lold purpose ol smelling the sjedlin^s and 
ot retaining moisture ib; tne soil ; but the ma- 
ture plant n quires si^shmc tor tlie healthy 
development of its ioaTOs. In tho early days 
Ol tne iudus ry plaatisrs were content with 
three gatherings iu the|1fear, of winch the first, 
aud 'best, took pla^'C infA.irii, wiieu the young 
leai-biius weru still c^^ered with a whitisu 
dowu. The second ffiarvcst, so to speak, 
oame off iu Jane, wh»i4 the leaves were ol 
a dull arceu hue, an'^l less delicate In 
flavor; and the ti»ird ■ in J my, wheu 
ihe leaves were dark 'green, and altogether 
coarser. Liperieuce, however, has shown tuat 
the tea-pliiu!. cau put forth eight or nine 
••liushco" of leaves iu 4he course of the year 
Wllhout being sensibiy injured; nor is tni-re 
iinv very appreciable diJScreuce in the quality 
ot the various pliickiliviS. In Assam, olaci£ 
aud grecu teas are maue irom the same piaut, 
tiiougu the best g.-ceu implies superior culim-;.-, 
and 18 also ditlerjuiiy. p^ejiared. Tue Chineaa 
Beidom allow tne siuubito exceed three leet m 
height, 60 1 hat it is icontiuually •puttmg torih 
licsii oiaachea; while the gatherers can squat 
on the ground and b<5 aided b3" their chiiureu. 
ixi iFidia, however, the ^laat is commonly eut- 
fered lo i^row as high aS sij: aud even eignt feet. 
Seedlin^iS will yield a small crop in tho third 
year, out uhe plant aotJa* not aitaia maturity 
beiore the sixth, aiiid ;,wiU bear lor at least 
forty years if properl-y .managed, i'he most 
genial soil is a light pdrbus yellow loam, oe- 
.ongmg to the ciay-siatOv lormation, leniiizdd 
oy decaying matter or^^'cattle manure. ISince 
tne great extensioa ot fra cuitiTaliou, diitiua 
from i6od, either iudigcadus or hybrid seed has 

uceu almost exciiisivtiiy , used, ihough provi- 

oua.y the prelei-euee seems to have ueen ^iven 
to Caiu^i boed, especially in Caehar, Uaijeeiiu^i, 
aud ihe Upper Provinces.' " I'lie character of 
the tea made Irom those varieties", has been 
desciibod by a recent wnteruppu this subject as 
" rougn, pungent, and brisk, with a rich, maity 
liavur ; wuua that iroin the Cbiua plane is 
much milderiu ail respects. In Assam tuese 
qualities are obtained iui the hijthesi dejtree ; m 
Caeaar they are siigUCly mouihed ; and in 
Ddijeoiing, e8])ecially oi cbe higher ranges, the 
puu^ene\ aud rich malt^ liavor are somewhat ' 
wantmg, though compeiisation may be lound in 
superior aroma and uolipacy. Ihe nearer the 
ludian teas approach tllijicorrespundiug Cuiita 
varieties, tho lOWer iS: their uiarkct value, 
while the moat estetSfofcd aro tne kiuus 
which possess in ibfw .highest degree the 
essential attributes '.o£} the Assam type. 
Ihe strong, pungent Awani leaf is at pres- 
ent chiefiy .employe^;, for mixing with 
China leas of low quaaitef^^^nd nnce, to enable 
retail dealers to rea,uze Rirger prontu tuan tuoy 
could possibly ooiaiu ■iv^v$. uum.ied leas." ivo 
aduiteraiiou ot any kiiillii is ever practiced in 
Inula. The genuine article is careruily packed 
up and dispatched to vJ^llncing I'tine, where 
It Id oispoged of, :. 'ktill uncampered 
vnth, to wholesale d€ial«j];s, who pass it 
ou iu the same coiiid^'Cion to tue re- 
tail vendora, -syboae UOi^^^ are too olteu 
snrouded in mystery. 3!;;, 

Originally it was found necessary to employ 
Chinese laborers largeli'jjai: every stage lr«m 
plucking lo packiug, aud rhey aro stili valued 
as superintendents and u /the nicer operations, 
where their delicacy of fducti is unrivaled. Of 
late years, however, matuiUery bas been very 
generally introduced ibi riijiliug andsortmg, 
ciud will, iii> doubt, gradually supp..ant Uauu- 
labor as it becomes more iierfecteu. 

'Iho tea cultivatiou cbiem- nourishes in five 
divisions ot tne liengal Pr|o^lnoes — Assam (now 
a caief commissiouershigl) Dacca, Koooh 
Behar, Chitiagoug, a^d, i;Chota Nagpore. 
IL may be added that tbeiieliyeries for the first 
quar.er of the present year 'ire at the rale of 
;;Ki,bUO,oUd pounus per aniauai. This, however, 
IS but the prelude t» an ejiorhious extension or 
an indusirv which, iui tile iiipse 01 years, is 
probably destined to i^iuleci EugUmd wholly 
maepeudeut ot Coma ipr tile supply 01 this 
wholesome beverage. The cafpitai required lor 
a plauiation suthciently . lar^ to mamtain a 
lamiiy in comtort iS: ' <(oi|ijiputed at about 
three thousan* pounds, Lias no returns 
can bo expected beiore i|ie fourth year. 
Living, however, is -jchSap enough it 
the setticr is c(i|nte^ to dispense 
wiih luxuiies. He rearst'bid'i own mutton and 
poultry; fish and gaiiia i ar0 aoundant and 
easily procurable; his .1|§.>P und commodious 
bungalow costs liitle to diect ; his cl»thing is 
simple and inexpensive ; at^l lyfe occupation lor a 
cousidcrabic period ot thu jf'eair light aud agree- 
able, iaere is not. perUaiis, ihucli social jutcr- 
coiirae, lor his neighbors ai*e few and lar apart; 
but tuis will improve as.trieatti lands are taken 
uo, aud communication, ivatiiii Calcutta is now 
both regular aud troqueiitl ; Tl^e greatest draw- 
back IS the liability to f^vei':{ but as cultiva- 
tion spreads, the maiuridak: districts wdi natur- 
ally lose much of r.heir Tirt|lende, and wiU grad' 
uaily be iiic\Aim\nt— All th£.Yi^r Hound 



^iar 



An Excursio.n' to -i^ YI^lley ai" Kan- 
Kocii.— A journey to the sisot^h Higlibauds in 
the olden time must have f^ea a very formid- 
able undertaking, even | Wbenij the object was 
uot aimply enjoyment j i^l ; ij^e picturesque, 
among wild glens and li4iun t||iiis piled up of 
primeval rocks in accunjmatijiil masses to the 
clouds. But now that, ifte "iiron horse " has 
learned to uri;e his rapidipaotf into >he very 
h.art of the most romauticjfceu|ry in the three 
kingdoms, it does aecm^ :fjir;)i|sing that uot 
more of our southern S^bi|rite| should prefer 
the exhilarating niountaiiltbrbt^s and biacing 
air of the home of the rudjdtor{|co tho enervat- 
ing charms ot Torquay or tjiti'ai^ificial pleasure 
of gregarious Brighton. ;ijj;t|e leafy mouth 
of June, betore the spttrtsifian Sf conrentioual 
tourist has left the mimiojs, itf*"'*! scenes of the 
metropolitan parks, aud sti iliin|er3 among the 
loungers and whirling cat'ljiee^ of the most 
garush ot the latter, we :aV']aile| ourselves of 
one of those luxurious cai 
most of the trains for ihj 
morning were rapidly leav(l 
enveloped in a dense fog. 111 
ually losing sight of its wbl 
rlsiug 1 ko islets above the 



noiy^ attaciiod to 
Ntfifth, .ind next 
|igth| lake district, 
ihind; us, and grad- 
(cled ibonn^aih-tops, 
Vists'bf the valleys. 




tdl 



At suuriae the undulating ifscenj^ry of Lanark- 
saire appeared ; tuen cathii Iha famous field 
ot Baiiiiockourn, creslioi Stirling, and 
l>uublane with its laiioient abbey- 
church, until at lengtM we. approached 
••thu lair city "on tho NyMidiUjI Tay. Here, 
ch'au'niijj .raius, we soon sij ed d^ay. catching 
..umnses ot Uuakeid, Birnjiii i W|o;l. and other 
B.eues famil.arizco by the ge »iu.j$f the greatest 
ot dranuiiiBis; aud theni juiitei|ng a wilder 
region, dashed along giddi': ieig!|ts, with - the 
torreui's awliil voice beiow ; ^ piangcd through 
cutting's narrowing the v.ii W, l*it clothed in 
yellow broom, so dazzling ; a tti| bngho sun- 
shine that, by an efibrt o "i Jmlkguialion, we 
might have beeu supported; tU bo;ll invading 
tioiuiiia'.u.s ot bomj -gnome 
view would espjiid, tb 
bcs of Ibltier hti.'.htj,, 

euDwa OI WiMter i;|i&tdil! lingered. 

Al ihrt historic and grand ptiKi} ofiiKilliecraujiie 
we left tue train aud took thli ro*d loading to 
Blair Athol, where tne bauk^evto so far on in 
the year, lire sldl cnameledr mnilho hyacinth, 
pnmrose, and other lavorlt >8. of the Spring, 
while over the " auid fiul d, kesf the shaggy 
little Hi-'hiaud cattle stand t > gajpe with a shy 
furiosit" Trom Blair Ath »1 t«i Struan the 
^ceneIy for a While is less {in iuri^que ; but on 
approaching the latter stall iji i| resumes its 
wonied aspect. Struan id a jfe-etty stHtioU 
among trees, aud close to its lartt tUe falls ot 
the Garry. Here, taking a ^arr^ge, we com- 
menced the iournoy ot aUoutjuine or ten 
miles, by a road uot the i (fa^oflltbest, to tho 
vil.a^'e of Kinloek Banuodbitt atii the eastern 
extremity of the beautiiul lodi, «|ioh has been 
BO happily delineated aud cotnnpuded to, the 
lovers 01 the beautiful by a w4ll-kuowu chromo- 
iitbograpb. As we proceedfHl, tlse mountams 

became loftier and the lUoorrfiwiWer. Clumps 
of weepiug-buch at intervals jweiti waving over 
rocky strcsams ; but there were b^ lew signs of 
lite except the flocks uibbliha ihe pasturage ot 
tiia unlaudfl wuhiu iar-strett*JMJa^ uray oykea. 



or the " hoodie craw " flappinif iti sable wing*. 
A ear Trinafour, six miles from Struan, the r..ad 
takes a bend, and is carried by a picturesque 
stone bridge, -shaded by lofty larches and firs, 
oyer the wild cataract of the'Erichdie. To th« 
right are the Glengarry Mountains, and ia 
continuatien of them rises Beinn-a-Chvallaich 
to an altitude of nearly three thousand feet» 
With its spurs forming the northern boundarv 
of the Vaie of Rannoch. A little bevond thit 
point the road bilurcates. that to the right be- 
ing considerably tihov;er and.beiler; bu., it u 
priraie. having be.:n made at the sole expeusa 
of the enterprising proprietor of Duoaioaiair, 
and can only be used by previous applicitiou - 
to the station master at S'ruan lor a puss. Tao n 
scene now assumes another aMi-ect as wo enter 
upon au amphitheatre of luouutains dom'maled 
by the Riii:;ulqrly imiiosing quartz p;-ak: <tf 
Schichalbon {A,oi2, lect above tac levoi of thj 
sea,) and inclo.sing ihe cii!irmiiij:!y wooded, 
valley aud cultivated helds of th"; Valley at 
Kannoch, bounded on the w<»st by lis beaaatul ,■; 
lake, from which flows the rivcr i'uaitae.i «•"* 
ward Loch Tummei, <at the •e'iWitern e.ttrjaiijv 
of the valley, wliere its course is iiroiien oy wuj ' 
cataracts among the wooded gic:i» ot i)uuAl- 
astair and Crossmount. It ic uoi too muux to 
say that this vailev presents some of th:> m3ai^' ', 
romantic scenery of oae 01 tii; aiusi i>iw-iiu'»5.jqa.! ' 
districts in bcotiaud ; and to :ue geoiug.^t nai -; k 
features of great -.ntcrest, while tlie t>ot.iausr ' ■' 
finds ample occupation as well as tne i-u'oaiiij • ■ '" 
gist, lor some very rare fliea u.sei oy auge.'i' .1 
arc oatained trom tnese parts, an.i have evca*,;,^-:; 
London celebrity. — LondAta doc.Lkj. ■ :' 'if 

The Vv'o.me>' ix a Tu.-tuiPU ri.<.KKM. 
trying lo study tho inner lives ot cue «.»y4ip^ - 
girls with wiiom I ctme into couioct t w .a .<:? 
struck by the coostant r.^p"e8S'oni)i adoat^-ara' ".4 
feeling m the prasa^nce of tlie in.su'es*. > a..w S 
could assume so guarded an a- jbc: — cyai-j. i-%- 
ercise such control over the facial aiuj-.;r.«.4,.iB|i'.: 

peel lily over the eipressioa of t'jc piiiil A th"».,'^ 
eye — that it w.is at iiinea irapo«iola t.> rouAt 
■what might be pas.s:ag in tus^r loiiiu.s — v&'iJ^Sj 
guard against misunderstanding w'..;ca cirC:i:»^ 
Blancea seemed to juatily inec;i.uu ca oj. O.»oj 
out of the range ot the mistre»*'« eye, su - 
rounded only by tho.s3 she can tr a.^t, the slavj 
casts off the habituall.y assumed ind d'TeU're <»: 
manner, and gives free play to b.er natiiri: 
styie, made ot speech and characteri.^ti;; ge+ 
tares. Thus tho same individaa! v.-as cjntla- 
ually coming under my ob.siTvaiioa at, «'dQi.-val 
hours of the da\' in diverse piiases of tcmp-ir an^ 
behavior, and sometimes sii-j wao :ia lap .eafcl. 

in the presence ol the Khanum Eileud", to at 
most lossy and careful abouc tr.Uis. w-uitd, 

when off duty, laugh the loudcsi and give tt8»- 

gelt up to gossip andmoiTV-makmi. art<*cly dis- 
regarding the duties sbe ought to have been a> 

tending to when tho youuger slave!, (wlio were 

under her orders and really aaxioua about ihcir 
e.-pecial functions being duly neidormea,) wodld 
timidly press her for directioii;i. As to the tf»i» 
■which prevails in the harem, ftiquefte rp, -ms -a 
a great measure to regulate that; buc in puiac 
of lact a quiet, sedate demeanor, aotie .iv.- uf 
hurry, resLuiluesii, form rather a f^art o»' ihei." 
moral obligations, for the boi.v la-ast be main- 
tained in a state of qmetade that; rue 
mmd may be in psriect^ eqaidurium. 
A ■well instructed, " o.-thtxiox" Mussul- 
man woman admits to hPt'seii alt this and more; 
she recognizes toe reswruu uf her secliuiod 
within the sheltering ivitiis ot the hai'jia 10 ba 
cue to a tender solicitude that sLie m.iT »a 
shielded from tho cflTects of dijturbiug icfla- 
ences in the worlil without, and may loilo'w Wi« 
bent 'which one mascuiiue niiud- omy uoposei 
on uer. ihero is a AlohammedikU home iu Tur- 
key in which 1 have seen thisiceliBg toaouLuglj 
exemplified. The master ot the i^ouee, Aiimei 
Wetii.Effcndi. is known t.» all the lii^st csassei 
ot European society m Constantinopicnat on<3 
as a "good old ' Turitish ' geutleman" of mo>i 
urbane manners, hospitable disposition, ans 
thorough upriabtnesa of chararcler, oa» as • 
m.in ol ioarning, of sterliufj kn(|W.cdge, aud «j1 
devotion to books, mi -which he nossessee in h'a 
home, on the European bank of tha Bo3p;iorru 
at Itoumeli Hissah, a -wnole Ubrary luil, c^'ai- 
prising the choicest yoiuipes iu lutiish, Per- 
sian, Arabic, English, Preach, ijern. an, itaiiaa. 
Spanish, aud Pertuguese — all of 'Wi-a.ca la:i» 
guages he understands aud can. I {Kdiev ;, con- 
verse in. 1 ufn not sure it be also uaderstiiuls 
Hindustani, out I have an idea tuat ne luiovvii 
something ot it. Ahmed Werlk Effendi pre- 
sent* the auomaly ot a thurougu uook-Worui 
■who is most genial, coortooas, aud pleasant Ui 
the many European visitoi'* who come to d i st i W l 
the quiet of his chosen retreat, aai 
who count it a great privilegoj t« 
obtam au introduction to him. TUe ElJfsBili 
18 certainly a man of 'Sound lu-ljiUtuaL. 
much exact knowledge, and. groat proUiiy, attJ 
yet 18, in most ihmgs, as I sitid, a thor jugu 

Turk of tne old echool, -w.th prejudices and iili- 
' ings and dislikmgs to boot. Ayropos.of I'urtc- 
isn abuses, 1 remember a story which was lohl 
mo of the Ed'oadi's way of cutting tho Gordma 
knot ol opproosiou aud misruie. Wiieu no w»i 
Governor in a vilayet or province (wniahaver.H 
might be), a poor man bad camii-aiued t j hi:u 
that ho was unable, after many oou.ications, to 
obtain the liamdaiion of a deotdae to him troiu 
H rich Paaua oX the neighboroood- 'I'ue EtfeotU 
uudertooii to settle the maticr. ile iuv)t«;d lus 
Pasha to break£ist, which was served, wito 
much punctilious respect, and tiie tUestWaseu- 
tertaiued with an unfailing fiow ot convcr^atiai] 
and anecdote. When the tmie c.tmelor th< 
Pasha to take leave, he ordered his slaves ta 
have the ca«Tiiij4e brought ro«iacL Buc o«iOi.'« 
tue attendants coulu withdraw the Edendi 
spoke. '"Pasha, I am airaid you canuoi hav* 
your carriage ou thi» occasion," he eaid, as po- 
litely as ever; "it is not at your disposal." 
"Howl" exclaimed the ustouished Pa«tia; 
•' have uot my doga ot seivanio awaibcd mf 
pleasure/" " Pasha Elleadi,' ..'opbeu tu* G«v. 
cruor, "it is uot that your eerv-auts are lit tauu, 
but that 1 •raered your carnage and horses ta 
oe sold oy puolio auction, to pay a liule bill 
jou have owed lor some time ; for, as yoa woa.d 
not attend to it, the matter came to m.< lor de- 
cision. 1 am sorry you will nave i.>A^»1k hoaie.-^ 
a Ac CornliiU Jlagazin*. 



^f: 






Ax iNfERKsriNG Kfxic. — I read that a 
relic of the great fire of London has been Joaad 
at Eastcheap. The fire of liioG is said to hava 
begun iu Pudding lane and ended at Pie corner, .. 
and the identical spot where tae confiagracioa • 
originated la pointed out by an luacnptupu «ia 
au old stone recently anearthed in the cellars o| 
a warehouse in Pudding lane. The iusoriotioa 
runs as follows: "Here by ye Permissiiou of 
Heaven Hell broke loose upon this Protejgtwifi 1 
Citye from tlio malicious hearts of ye barbJu-ouj ; 
p.ipists by ye hand of tUeir agent Hubert., wu*v 
confessed and on ye Kuiues otthis place deolaraJ. 
\e Pact for wbich he waa hanged (v:3c,) •'•Tn*B ; 
here began that Dreadful Pire which is descriiw-J 
and perpetuated on and by the neighooonug 
Pillar.' Erected Anno IfiSI m the Mayoritie •-! 
bir Patience Word, Kt." The atone wao fpuu 1 
lace downward — a proof that it uad reauiaea , 
uudisfarbed for two centuiies. Some coins 
were near the stone, and probably Hubert s 
ekeieion is uot lar off. The priiar reierredlloio, 
of course, the monument ou i-ish bireet !ilu». 
on which the inscription accusing tho Koui.ia 
Catholics, after being erased and resiorec:, Wiu 
huallT ettaced m I»-cJf. 'luis stoje., alihiu.;:^ 
now brokeu m hall, is of conaideraJie u.sto..j - 
interesr, aud is certainly wortuy 01 iiroa*rv.*» 
tion. — Once a Weeli. 

Faggixg at Wk8tm;n8tb:r Sixiy YEARa 
Ago.— The fagging system was tuen in lUU; . 
vogue. My first fag nmstei^I have reakouj 
for suppressing his name, lor though a tiusmAU 
ol my own. he was " less than Kind "—was a- ' 
good-looking fellow, who left VVestmmstcr tor 
the Peninsula, and served afterward at Watci- 
loo. For the edification of a more luxuiious 
aud less oppressed fieneratiou of fags iet mo 
give a sample ef a day's work during this my 
period of servitude. 1 rose as liic day broke, 
bullied on my clothes, brushed those of my 
master, cieaue.l aeveral pairs 01 his auoco, 
wcutno the pump in Great l>eau8 yai'a ;ot 
hard water lor Uis teeth, and to toe cistern at 
Mother Grant's lor sort water lor hia handa and 
lace, passed the rest of the tmie till eigi-t in mv 
own hasty ablutions, or in 00^ mng over 
my moraine school lesion. Eight U> niae : 
In school. Kme to te^ : Uat for my 
breakfast, or rather for miy master's breakiasJ 
—I had to bring up his tea things, to mate bia 
toast &.C. — ^my own meal was a very haajv ai- 
lair. 'len to twelve: In scuooi. Tweiv* tu 
one: lu the usher's correotmg room prwparmg 
for afternoon lessons. One to two : I»iu«er 
in tao hall, (a sort of roil-^jali,) absence a pun- 
ishable ottense, the leod execrable. Two to 
five : Evening sohool. JTive to six : BuyifiS 
broad, outier, uuik, and •Uga lor tho gr«a8 
man's tea, aud preparing that meal. isi^Mtaa 
toliowiDg morning: Looked up ai .UotUec 
Grant's till bed -time : lagging of a miscedaue- 
ouB character. I had borne tms aesonption ol 
drudgery for about a rortuighr, whou, witnoui 
weio^hing the couse.iuences— remember, reader, 
i was not niuf iraara oid— i deterxaJied W auUi* 







mm^m^^iFm^m^&ffi^ 



wjrk. iBStwid, theref»re, of prt«parinff tea «« 
uxoaL I slinped behi.nil one ot tL» maiila into the 
•tMt-oeUar.'^nd theve lay ptrdu for a eoupte of 
hours. I was At les^th dragced cat <>^ my 
hidine plase, and handed OTer to tb« fujry of 
■IT tea-le>8a mastor. Ue made me staad at at- 
tMXdon, with my little diieera on the seama of 
mj trousers, like » ioldier at drill- He then 
feUed me to the jfround by a swinffing buck-horse 
(a blow on the cheek with the open hand) on 
jaj right cheek. I rose up stupefied, and waa 
made to resume my former uoaition, and re- 
o*iT«d a second floorer. I know not how olten 
I aadarwent thin ordeal, but I remember eoing 
to bed with a racking headache, and beiu;; un- 
able to put in am a^ipearauco at school naxc 
atoralng.— Zord Albemari^s HecoUeelions. 

IS SELFISHIfESS POLICY t 

("Ova dirty at this orltical moment is to 
pamtam the Empire ot £aglaad."^£p«<cA of Mr. 
Sitrmeii, Aitg. 11, 1878.] 
XagUad speaks and Buopo . listsns— what doth- 

Eazland say t 
7r«m the rery shrine of Prsedom somes a roiee to- 

oay— 
CsBMS a voiee ffosn Christian Kngland. bids them 

apaio or slar- 
Is it death, or is It Ufa t : "What doth Bagland say f 

'^^Shall a brother help a-, brother, if the waves r«n 

hifihf 
Shall a uatien sare a nation, if It lose thereby Y 
JCeep the praoe, endure oppression, trade and 

gather pelf, 
Xaclaaa's mis<ioa— (hear itt.hoaTenI)— Is to save 

harsaur . 

Sath he said, and shatr'the world ^say, " This Is 

£nxland'* cboloe!" 
Xfaj, bat this is tne sapplaater, : this is Jacob's 

Toics. 
Shall ha roa as of onr : birthright, rlffht to free the 

•laT«, *■ 

Sight to comfort the afSloted, , right to hear and 

MVSt 

> 

Shall th« DaaTibe'barry seaward, red ^ witn Chris- 
tian blood. - ^ 

Outraged maids 4nd rlpped-np mother* rolling 
down the flood I 

Shalt th» myikge last of Islnm hold Its rerel thera. 

And the palrid brejkth of oorpsos lada the sluggish 
airt '' 

Oh, for Ulltan's roiling thnndar, Cromwell's flary 
coal for Govi ; 

Then should £ai[land rite to Tengeanoa, tread the 
path that ouoe she trod. 

Onoe a jain for saored freedom shonld her hosts go 
forth ta flsbt, 
i the battle-cry of England should be, "God de- 
fend the ilfutt" —Onoe a Week. 



MI STARLiya. 



I fb»l rery lonely now since my starling 
iefone. I coold not bear to look upon bis 
•mptr cage, hia bath and playthimgs, so I have 
bad them all stowed away ; but the bird will 
dwell in my memory for many a day. The 
-way in whioh that starling managed to insinu- 
ate Itself into my heart ' and entwine its affec- 
tions with mine, I can never rightly tell ; and 
it ia only now when it is gone that I really 
Icnow how much i it is possible for a human 
feeing to lore a little bird. The creature was 
nearly always with me, talking to me, whist- 
ling to me, or even doing mischief in a small 
way, to amuse me ; and. it w'as often the very 
liest relaxation I could have had to throw 
down my pen, straighten my hack, and hare a 
romp with Diok. 

the rearing of a nest iff starlings is always a 
Tcry difScnlt task, aad^ found it peculiarly so. 
1m. (aat, one young starling would require half 
» dosen serrants at least to atteud it. I was 
not master of those starlmgs, not a bit of it ^ . 
Omj were masters of me. I had to get out of 
bod and stuff them with grub at 3 o'clock 
•▼err momnrg. They lived In a band-box in a 
oloM^jtf^my bedroom. \. I had to get up again 
mt 4 Vdook to feed them, again at 5, and again 
at 6;* in face I saw more sunrise during the 
inianey of that neat of starlingi than ever I did 
iMforo or sense. . By da:(, and all day long, I 
staffed thorn, and at intervals the servant re- 
lioTod me of that duty. « In fact it was pretty 
nearly all stuffing; (but ^ even then they 
were not satisfied, and made several ineffeetual 
attempts to swallow my finger as well. At 
length — and how happy I feltl — they oould both 
iiwd themselves and fly. ~ This last accom- 
plishment was anvthing but agreeable to me, 
for no sooner did I open their door than out 
tliey would all fly, one after the other, and 
■eat themselves on my head and shoulders, 
each one trying to make more noise than all 
the rest and outdo his brothers, 
t I got BO tired ot this sort of thing at last that 
one day I determined to set them all at liberty. 
I accordingly hung their oage outsid e the window 
and opened tiieir door, and they all flew, bat 
haok they came into the room again, and set- 
'tlod on me as usuaL " Then," said I, " I'm 
going gardening." ■ By the way they olcmg to 
me it waa evident their answer was: " And so 
are we." And so they did. . And as soon as I 
eommeneed operations ' with the spade, they 
commenced operations, too, by searching for 
and eating every worm I turned up, evidently 
thinking I was merely working for their bene- 
iit and pleasure..!. I got. tired of this, i- "O 
hother yen all T' I cried; " I'm sick of you !" 
J threw down my spa^e in - disgust, and before 
ithey eonld divine my intention, I had leaped 
tthe fence, a^d disappeared , in . the plantation 
iMyond. 

'Kow," said I to myself as I entered the gar- 

len that evening alter my return, and oould 

no sisiis of starlings. "I'm rid of you 

Siiagnes at lost." and I smiled with satisfaotion. 
t was short-lived, for just at that moment 
"Skraigh, skraigh, skraigh," sounded from the 
(trees adjoining, and before I could turn loot 
niy tormentors, setxningly mad with joy, were 
«11 sitting on me as usual. Two of them died 
iabout a week after this, and the , others, being 
cock and hen, I resolved to keep. 
' Both Dick and his wife book grew to be very 
ifine birds.' I procured them a large, roomy 

cage, with plenty of sand and a layer of straw 

in the bottom of it, a dish or two, a bath, a 
«lrinking fountain, and always a suppiv of 
Ifreoh green weeds ^ on the roof of their 
domicile. Besides their utnal \ food of 
'soaked bread, 6cc., tbav had sluifs ocoasion- 
ally, and flies and earthworms. Once a day 
the cage door was thrown open, and out they 
"both wonld fly with joyful skraigb, to enjoy the 
Inzory of a bath on the kitchen floor. One 
would, have imagined that bemg only two, they 
would not ' have stood on the order of their 
gomg ; but they did, at least Dick did, fur be 
insisted upon using the bath first, and bis wife 
liad to wait patiently until his lordship bad 
finished. This was part of Dick's domestic dis- 
cipline. When they were both choroughlr wet 
and draggled, and everything within a radius 
of two yards waa ia the same condition, their 
next move was to hop on to the fender, 
and flutter and gaze pensively into the 
Hre ; and two more melancholy ic o xiag, rag- 
ged wretches you never saw. When they be- 
gan to dry, then they began to dress ; and in a 
tew minutes Richard W<*s himself agaia, and 
•o was his wife. 

Starlings have their own natural song, and a 
•trange noise they make too. Their great 
faoulty. however. Is the gift of imitation, 
which they have in a woodeiiul degree of per- 
leotion. ihe hrst thing that Dick learned te 
imitate was the rumbling of earts and carriagea 
on the street, and very proud he waa ot the 
accomplishment. Then he learned to pro- 
nounce his own name, with the prefix "Pretty," 
whioh he never omittea, and to which he waa 
Justly entitled. Except when sitting on their 
peroh singing or piping, these two little pets 
Were never tired engineering about their cage, 
and everythmg was minutely examined. They 
were peneot adepts at boring boles ; by iaseri- 
ing the bill closed, and opening it like a pair of 
Boisjors, lo ! the thing was done. Dick's rule 
of conduct was that he hiiCseif shuuid have 
the first Of everything, and be allowed to ex- 
amine first into everything, to have the highest 
Veron and all the tit-bits ; in a word, te rule, 
Jung and priest, in his own cage. 1 don't sup- 
jiose ho hated his wife,- but he kept her ia a 
•tare of in/lorieus subjection to his re^-al will 
amd pleasure. " Hezekiah" was the name he 
j;ave his wife; I don't know why, but i am 
•are no one taught him this, lor he first used 
the name himself, and then, it was only to cor- 
reet his pronuuclation. 

i Someiimes Disk would ' sit himself down to 
•ing a song, and presently his wite would join 
lln %ith a few simple notes of melody, upou 
iwhleh Dick would step singing instantly and 
look round at her with indignation. *■ Hcze- 
Iciahl HezekiahlF' he would say, which being 
jinterpreted clearly meant. " Hezekiah, my 
dear, how can you so far forget yourselt as to 
presume to interrupt your lord and matiter 
with that eraoked and quavering voice ol' 
yours 1" Then he would commence anew, and 
jtiesekiab, being so good-natured, would soon 
forget her seolding and again join m. This was 
too much focDiok's teraoer. and Hezekiah waaJLas ^^t Beaekiah oould not .live 






ae^rdinijly chased round aad round tlio 
Ciigo and soundly thrusiied. llis conduct 
altogether as a husband, I um sorry 
to may, was very far Iroui satisUictory. 1 
have Baul he always retuuieil tue hiuliest 
perch tor himselt; but souictiiiiea lie would 
turn ono e> o downward, and Reciug lli'zekiah 
sittiug so cosily and couteutedlv on her humhio 
perch, would at once conclude tliac her seat 
was mure comtortablo thiiu bis; so down lio 
would hop aud send her off at euc«. 

It was Dick's orders th«»t ilezckiah should 
only eat at m»al-tiuies; that meaut at all tiuioa 
when he choso to teeil, alter he WiW done. But 
1 supposa his poor wite was often a lituc him- 
nry ju the interim, for she wauid watcu ti i she 
got Dick lairly iutf) the middle of a 
song, and quite oblivious ot Burrouudin.Ef 
eircumstauces, then she would hop dowii 
and snatch a meal on the sU. But dire was 
the punisaiaent for the dcceit'if Dick found lier 
out. Sometimes I think sbe used to louj: tor a 
little lovo aud aHecliom, aud at such tmies she 
would jump up en the perch beside her hus- 
band, and with a loud cry sidle closo to him. 

"Hezekiah! Uozeiaah!" he wguid exciaim ; 
and if sue didut take that hint, she w:ia soou 
knocked to the bottom ol the cajiO. In laci, 
Diok was a domestio tyrant, but in all other lo- 
spe«8 a dear afi'ectiouaie lutle pet. 

Ono morumg Diok got out ot his cage by un- 
doing the fastening, and flow through tne opun 
wiuduw, determined to see what the world was 
like, leaving Hezekiah to aioui u. It was before 
5 on a iSummer'a morning that Ue escaped ; 
and I saw no more of him until, com- 
ing out of chui'oh that day, the people 
Wiite greatly astouishcd to see a bud fly 
UbwUj froia the sceepJe and alight ujion my 
shoulder. Ue retained hia perch all the way 
houi& He get so well up to opeuiag the tastening 
ot his cage-door that 1 had to cet a small s.>rin^ 
padlock, which defied him, althouiih he stumied 
it for mouths, and liaally gave ic up, as bumg 
one' of those tkings wnicu no fellow oeuld 
unde: stand. 

Diok soon began to talk, aud bo ere long 
had quite a large vocabulary ot words, which 
he WHS never tired using. As ho ^few very 
tame, he was allowed to live either out ol his 
cage or ia it ull day long aa he pieascd. Oiten 
he would be out in the garden ull alono tor 
hours toeethor. running about cy.lckin^ liies, or 
Bitting up in a tree repeating his le.>sons to 
himself, both v^bal aud miuicul. Tho cat 
and her kitteus were hia espeefal farerites. 
although be used to piay with the dogs as well, 
and often go to aiaep oa their backs. He 
took his lessons with great regularity, was an 
arduous student, and soon learue<i to i>ip& 
'• Duncan Gray" and •'The Spiig of Shillelah" 
without a single wroag note. I u^ed to whistle 
these tunes ever to htm, and it was quite 
amusing to mark his air of rant attention as 
he crouched dowu to listen. Wneu 1 had 
finished, he did not at ouoo begin to try the 
tune himself, but sat quiet and still for some 
time, evidently thinking it over in his own 
mind. In piping it, it he iorgot a part of 
the air, he would cry : " Doctor, doctor I " and 
repeat the last note once or twice, as much as 
to say: "What comes attar that?'' uud 1 
would finish the tune ler him. 

" Tse ! tse 1 tse !" was a tavorite exclamation of 
his, indicative of surprise. When 1 played a tune 
on the fiddle to him, he would crouch dowu 
with breathless attention, bomeiimes when he 
saw me take up the fiddle, he would go at once 
and peck at Hezekiah. 1 don't know wny he 
did so, unless 10 secure her keepin:; quiet. As 
soon us i had tiuished he would say " liravol" 
with three distinct intonatiuuB of the word, 
thus : " Bravo 1 doctor ; br-r-ravo ! bravo !" 

Diok wad extreineiy inquisitive and must see 
into everything. He used to anuoy the cat 
very muon by opening out her toes, or oven her 
nostrils, to examine ; and at times uu^sy used 
to lose patience, and pat hiui on lue back. 

'•EuC he would say. " What ia it? You 
r;»3i)al!" If two people were talking tojiether 
iiuderueath his cage, he would cock his head, 
'lengthen his neck, aud looking down quizzing- 
ly, say: "Kkl What is it< What do ^-ou 
say 1" 

He frequently began a sentence with the verb 
''la," putiiug great emphaaitt on iL "Isi" he 
would say musingly. 

" Is what, Dick V/ I would aak. 

"Is" he would repeat — "Is the darling star- 
ling a pretty pot i" 

" No question about it," I would answer. 

He certainly made the best ot his vocabu- 
lary, for he trotted out all his nouns and all his 
aUiectives time about iu pairs, and lormed a 
hundred curious eombinatieus. 

"ia," be asked one day, " tho darling doctor 
a rascal V' 

" Juat as you think," I replied. 

" Tse 1 tso 1 tse 1 Wljcwl whew I whew 1" 
said Dick ; and finishou off with " Duncan 
tiray" and tho fliac half of tne "Sprig of 
Shilielab." 

" Love is the aoul of a uate Irishman," ha 
had been taught to say ; but it was as fre- 
quently, " Love is the aoul ot a nate Iri^h star- 
iiug ; or, "Is love the soul of a darling pretty 
Dick i" and so on. 

One ctti'ioua thing is worth noting ; he never 
pronounced my dog's name — i'heodore Nero— 
once while ftwake ; Dut he often startled us at 
night by oaaling the dug iu clear riu;;iug tonus 
talking in ilis sleep. He used to be chattcriuj; 
and eingiu^ without inteimissioa all day loiig ; 
and if evoT he was silent then I knev.' he was 
doing qnschief; auct ii I went quiet. y 
into tjfe kitohen, I was sure to^ find 
him euher tracing patterns on a bar of 
soap, or examining and tearmg to pieces a par- 
cel of newiy-arrived groceries. He was very 
toud of wine and spirits, but knew when he 
had enough. He was not permitted to coiae 
mto tiie parlor without his ca^e ; but some- 
times at dinner, it the door were left ajar, he 
would silently enter like A little tiiief; when 
OBce fairly in, he would fiy on to the table, 
acreaai, aad defy me. He was very fond of a 
pretty ehiid that used to come to see me. If 
Matty was lying »on the sofa reading, Dijk 
would cewe and sing ou her head : tufu ho 
woiUd: go through all the motions of washing; 
and baihiag «u Matty's bonaie hair; whiou 
was, 1 thought, paying her a very pretty eom- 
pliment. 

When the sun shone in at my study window, 
I uaed to hang Dick's ea^o there, a-i a treat to 
bias. Dick would remain quiet lor perhaps 
twenty minutes, then the stiiiuess would loial 
irksome to hian, and presently ho would stretch 
hia head down toward me m a confiduntiai sort 
of way, and begin to pester we wuh his silly 
questions. 

" Dootor," he would commence, " is it, is it a 

Bate Iriah pet i" 

" SUence, and go asleep," I would make 
answer. •' I "want to write." 

" Ear be would say. " What is it I What 
d'ye say ?" 

ihen, if Z didn't answer : 

"Js it sugar — snails — sugar, snails, and 
brandy I" Then : " Doctor, Decter !" 

" Well, Dickie, what is it now <" i would an- 
swer. 

" Doctor— whew." ■ That meant I was to 
whistle to him. 

" isban'i," 1 would say sulkily. 

" Tse 1 tse 1 tso!" Uieiiio would say, and 
oooticue : "Doctor, wnl you go a-eliuiiiBu i" 
1 never oould resist that. Going a-ouuKiag 
meant going fiy-hawjiinj;. DicK always oalioa 
a fiy a ciiuk ; aud tms luvitaiiuu I wouii re- 
ceive a dozen times a day, ana bclaom reiused. 
I Would open lue cage aoor, auu Dici wouid 
perau himsuit ou my nut;er, aud 1 wouid curry 
him round the room, homing mm up to ine 
fiiea on the piciure irames. Aud ue never 
missed one. 

Oeee Dick iell into a bucket of watar, and 
called lustdy tor tho " doctor ;" and 1 was ouiy 
just in time to jSave him irum a watery grate, 
VVUeu 1 got him out, ho din not speaii a wora 
until he had gone to the lire aad opened .his 
wmtjs and leathen out to dry, lueu he said : 
" Brave I B-r-ravo I" several iimcs, aud went 
iorthwith auU attacked Hezakiau. 

Diok had a little traveling caj;e, for he often 
had to go with me by tram ; and no sooner 
did the train start ihau Diek used to coufiueuoe 
to talk oua whistle, very muun to tue aaiou- 
ishmeut oi the pasiieagers, iior the bird was u|) 
in the umureUa racK. LveirybodY wus at oiico 
made uware of beta my protedsiou unu charac- 
ter, for the jolting of lue carria,ie not pleas. ug 
him, he luud always to preiuau nis pciorni- 
once witu: "DooLor, doctor, you r-r-raseaJ. 
What t»it, en i" Asl-lick got oiu«r, i am sorry, 
as his biographer, to bo couij»eUnd to say ne 
grew more aud more unkind to his wue— at- 
tacked her regularly every mi)ruiug and the 
last tniug at ni^iht, aae nali-siarved her hu- 
Bides. I'oor lluzekiaii! .She eoiiiu do notuinjj 
in the world lo piease bun. soineiuies new, 
she used to peui^ mm back agaiu ; stib Wiis 
erivea to it. 1 Nvas sorry lor iieZii»tiau, auil 
dclerminod to piay pretty Dici a iinie 
trick. iSo ono day, wneu no iiad ueea ball^iuit 
her worse than en»r, i took HezeKiah out oi tue 
ca^e, aud tastcuem a small pm to iiwr mil, so as 
to protrude just a very UttiO way, and retaruod 
her. Dick walked up to uerat. once. " What." 
he wanted to know, "did she mean by going on 
shore without l-juve i" ll«zeiiiah dion't an- 
swer, and aeeorUiugiy receivad a dig iu the 
back, then auotner, tUeu a third ; and then 
Hezekiah turned and let him have oue shurp 
attack. It was very aumsing to see aovv IJici 
jumped, and his look of us.ouistiaaeQt as ko 
said: "Eui Wftalu'yonayl lleisoiiiali I Heze- 
iiiabl" % 

Hezekiah followed up her advantage. It was 
quite a now sensatiuu lur her to Ul^vo tnei^ppvr 
hand, aud so ahe courageously chased mm 
roimd aud round the cage, untu I opened tho 
aoor aud let Diok out 

alwaj/i_with •, 



pin tied to her bill ; no, tor peace sake, I gave 
lier away to a Ineud, and Dick was left alono 
m his glory. 

Poor Dickie I One day he wns shelling pcaa 
to Liuiself m the garden, when some boys 
st.irtled him, and he fl!>w awuy. I suppose he 
lost himself, and couldn't iind bis w.iy back. 
At ail events I only saw hmi onee again. I 
was going down through an avenue of trees 
about a mile from the lioiiaa, when a vaic ^ 
aoove.iu a treo hailed ma: "Doctor! doctor! 
whatt!sit."' That was Dick; but a crow llew 
past and scared him a;;ain, and away he tlow — 
lor ever. 

Dear littlo follow ! he' may well have asked 
" What IS it T' lor nil things mujit have ap- 
peared very now and strautie to hirn. 

Is it any wondor I mi.ss my dear little birdf 
— Chambers's Jour)ia'. 




tljt |tffo-j|0rK gptmcs, ^imtraiy, j^tmaa^, isre, — gPrigUr S||ttt 



Cadiz Harbok axu its Ijjat.mxn. — There 
is no place in the world more clioerful than 
Cadiz, Irom the brightness of its b!ue sea, its 
sky never flecked by a clouillot passing;, the 
snowy white'iess of its bouses, the beauty of its 
sqiiaree, with all their wealth of tropical trees 
aud flowers. Trup, Madi-id or Sevilla lia.s more 
dicerlissonciits of theatre and the like, but the 
climate of tho fii-st is simply abominable, and 
tho heat of tho second in Summer aud its cold 
in Winter simply unbearable. Neither ^Madrid 
nor Sevilla can be called truly healthy. But at 
Cadiz one breathea health at every step ; even 
to an invalid spirits and appetite never flag at 
Cadiz ; colds and coughs tiro uaheard of; one 

lives iu a perpetual primavero, or Spring. When 
the stranger in C.iiliz tires of its tropical 
squares, of its beautilul paseos, or soa walks, of 
which Las Delicias boars oflf tho palm, eom- 
manding as it does a wide view of t'no blue 
ocean, ho need only saunter down tho Calle San 
Francisco, pass through the Puerta del Alar, or 
Sea-gate, on to the wharves and fish and fruit 
markets, and he will find himself in a new 
world. It is mii-day. we will say, and a slight 
levante, or east wind, blowing ; the sea is bluer 
than the sky; in front of him, stretching from 
the edge of tho wharf to about half a mile out 
into the harbor, lie at anchor about four hun- 
dred boats, all heaving up and) down in 
the briirht sunlight, and all painted ot 
the gayest colors, rel, white, yellow, blue, 
striped ; those are the pa3sen:jer or smallest 
boars, each of which carries two men as crew, 
aud has a small lateen sail ; they are dsed to 
take passengers olf to the larger Viisssls lying 
further out to sea. Whan a stiff leoante is 

blowing, the noise and motion of this little 
painted flotilla tortn a most varied and plcasintr 
spectacle. ThesA little cratt are ca'.led "■botes," 
and it is marvelous what an am.mnt ot eea 
they will stand. The other classes of boats 
and ships are mostly lor trading purposes. The 
trade of Cadiz is of throe kinds. First, the 
lar^e Frencli. English, >and Portuguese pack- 
ets which bring passengers and cargo, and de- 
part with lull cargoes of lead Irom the Surra, 
oranges trom tho Camyo, and wine from uhe 
vineyarda of Jerez and Port St. Mary. Then 
Ihero are the sailing vessels from America aud 
RusSa, which come m ballast to load with salt 
iroai the salt-fields of Sau Fernando ; this salt 
is the liueat in the known wer:d for salting 
fish in Norway, Kussia, Xewioundiand ; the 
salt is nearly always stowed in bulk, and I'ocms 
a heavy and very dangerous shitting load. 
Then, as regards larger vessoU oi the ateauur 
class, there aro ever coming and goius tho Ha- 
vana pacKcts, carrying mails, pass lingers, an J 
eargo to the Havana. It is a picturesque sight 
sometimes, in crossing the harbor m the gray 
of early dawn, to see two or three faiucas, 
crowded with Cuban volunteers, in their 
Ught-hluo cheeked shirts, shouting and hur- 
rahing most vociferoualy, standing out in 
harbor for the Havana packet. These yolun- 
tears are great rascals. Tuo.y receive as bounty 
tiity dollar.^, spend it lu debauctiery in Cadiz, 
get invalitied or Oesert, and come ba^k, aud lu 
a low months ckauge their aauau, get auwther 
bounty, and go oli to the Havana again. Ndxt 
in order to these larger vessels cenie the laoul, 
Iko mistico, and miatico de gallela. Tnoae are 
large, heavy cralt, buiit to stand any amount 
of sea, and two-masted. They are employed in 
the coasimg trade, brin-;ing leotatoea irom Va- 
lencia, wine from JVialag.i, oranges fi-oin Se- 
ville, timber trom the iiorih of Spaiu. Thoy 
vary iu touaagc from forty te eighty tons, 
ihe laoul nas one mast amidsl.ips and one 
iu the stern, aud carries enormous lateeu 
sails.. The mistico has tvt'O masts amidsuip.-i, 
carrying two lateen sails and a jib. These 
boats carry as crow fr«Ba fivo to nine nicu 
aud the patron, or Captain; tLo owner has 
aiwa^s eue-nalt of the pronts ot the voyage; 
aad, of tue other half, tlio patron has two- 
thirda, tho r«st being divided amou^ t;ie sailors, 
'ihe trade ot Cadiz is laat gomgaowu; the poor 
boatmen can scarcely p>ci up a liveiiUottd ; 
nearly ali tue large tradiug craii; 
now go up the river tj Sevilla. 
But still, there they are, these bronzed, ciaver, 
reckless sons ot tue haruox, always sutfering 
trom hunger aud want of clochiu;:, yet ever 
C'^utemed and warm-hoaried. There is plenty 
Ol Wit ou a Cadiz wharf, plenty ot ueep patuos, 
plentv Ot fatalism, plenty ot a strange Kiuil of 
aemi-Chriatiau morality, cxcaapliued lu the aay- 
iniis and doings ot tiieso miU, Hare is the 
boatman's favorite proverb, one forever ou his 
lips : " Weil, but do you not consider ma your 

tiiend {" '•Varajo" (i. c, it,) ^-no: no 

hay mas aniii/o que JJios, y un dui'o en la 
buisiUa." (fuere la no friend hut (jod, aud a 
dollar in pockoL !) He has a supr.^me, aay, tho 
Buprsmcal, contempt for tue rich a»id lUe out- 
wardly religiuiis. For himself he woara a 
charm, blessed bv some priest, round his neck; 
but there ail outward religion cuds for him. 
"Talk about rioa men; caramba, man; why, 
they go to church, yea, to please their wives 
whoa they are young; but one-halt of tham 
have very poor relations wanting for a little 
help, una they won't give it them, and then 
dare to say their prayers! Carajo, loa rieoi, 
t/csu, que Sun animates.'" (Curse the rich, 
what brutes they are!) These two last sayiugs 
aro, Siirely, replete with truth; indeed, is not 
tho last tho very echo of the Scriptural 
definition of "pure religion ond umle- 
filedJ" No one must blame the boat- 
man for his constajitly having on hia 
lipa tho word "tTesu," (Jesus;) it is na more 

than lor an Easlislimau to say '"GooA Lord," 

or "Lord bless me." Straniiely enough, no 
Andaiusian man or woman oi the lov7er elasa 
will sneeze or hear another eneczo without say- 
ing "Jeiu," and why, they know not; but to 
OBiit It, they say, is UHiu«ky. 1 havo tairly 
laughed outright, having sneezed in oomfiauy 
with eight or nine peasants to hear as many 
"Jesus" uttered, in a tone of absolute alarm. 
It you aro out in a rough sea with tho Cadiz 
boatman, he has only two phraaO:* to reassure 
you : iVo hace da>lo and Ao tenya listed cuiaado 
— that is, there is no danger, aal Do not 
trouble yourseii. It ho sayH ihia, you may teel 
ea.e; but if ho saya " Una, cosa muu feu," (:in 
ugly look,) then be sure there is nnscuief brew- 
ing; when the ponientc, or west wind, suddenly 
rises. It tuiabies a learlul sea into the 'oay, 
while the east wind, meotmg the tide, uiao 
raises a ua~ty, tlioUiih less daugeri.us, sea. 
Tao boatman's greeting to a stranger, or on en- 
tering a suop cr siail to buy or sell, is always, 
" Aiavado ae' iJios," (Praised be tiod!) to wmch 
tlie correct answer is "For sicinprc," (For. 
ever!) A more lormal answer is " Por nUin^fre 
aiavado 1/ bciidilo." ll.s speeeu is iureriarded, 
as U that el every Anuaiusian. wit.i oatlia 
(wh'.eh, however, Uavo long aitieo lost all sie- 
nih.auce and putcac^) and ieii,jiou8 phrases. 
Ho eays, Caramba, Carajo, Muldito ser, a-* omUiS, 
and w.th tueiu intermuvif-a the words liendito 
JJios, (oleaseii be Uo*;) JJios niio, mi aim*, 
(my Cod, my soul;) danta Barbara, (a great 
puirouess among the Aeumen;) Jesu. Jt.su, aud 
6anto vrislo. f he boatman';* lare is ver; eiiuple ; 
at' lour oi maruiii;^ iignt ho taiitis his cup of 
cofiee aud aijuardtcate, or, ad mat spirit ia 
calicd ou Cau.z vvnuri, caraina)ichei, with a bis- 
euit; at eicven he braaulasts o.i bread aud 
Iruit ; at SIX ue sits down iu his little painted 
house ouisi.ie the Laad-^at-.-, wuli uii wile and 
tamily, to nis savory stew au.i Ihe little ration 
01 ba';o!i, wa.-ihed d»wn wita rod wiua, eituer 
Catalan or Val de Po.ias. — Temijte liar. 



THE WHEELER eIkpEDITION. 



FROM CARSON CITY \\p LAKE TABOE. 

GLENBltOOK AND ITS djlAUACTKniS IICS — 
GRKAT EXTEXT OF filE tU.MBSK TRADK 
— THK Or,D PLACKRViMlE RjOAD AKD ITS 
GEOLOGY — A POKTui|llr 0>f,'TnE ROCKS. 
J<rom Oitr Own oifk^esBan^eni. 

C.\:\rp AT GLENDfiod^. L.vicE Taiioe, 
Nevada, Tuesda^ijj! feept, U9, 18r6. 
There ia no greater ojiiriosiity in atn ex- 
plorer's lite thafu a yietuyasqao; and healthy 
camping-jrouad by w-iioitltho trying bitter- 
ness of army bacon and th*;^ pulpiness of camp 
breaa aro made tolerablOj|; Sutth a caraping- 
grouud our divisian of th^fWueeier expedition 
has had since leaving: Car^ii CitV laat Thurs- 
dav. Our tents aro pitcUed oh a gentle in- 
cline, with a (ltv,skj growp of ;pia"3 aud firs 
behinil u.s and on each sii M In ■ froat of -is is 
a broad roach of roHirh, iij||i3 Wi^iter, confined 
on the further side by a rf|iijje oS snowy oaalts, 
extensions of the Sierra N^wa la. : Those peaks 
would seem not mors tha.! \ four miles distant 
to a person unfamiliar wit|fi I the ideliisive clear- 
ness of the Western air, bjifti in reality they aro 
about ten miles away, thujitji being tha breadth 
ot the water. The water || onornuusly dosp, 
and while it never free)*!-^ if ' la cold in all 
.sea.sons. According to a Jttpular legend, soins 
Washoe Indiana cama u|(iju it ■ years a;io and 
exclaimed "Tahoe," whieJi translated means 
Krrat water or ocean, auBiliiis isithe naiu'e th;it 
now attaches to it, Tiii^'ifirat | white eettiors, 
however, fastened the naisle of a f.ivorito Cali- 
fornia politician to it, andit is less euphoniously 
designated on some laap^as Lake Bigler. A 
string of frame build]iigs,:r|iaoluding s.iW-mills, 
dwellings, a restaurant, ai^ store, and a hotel, 
skirts tho shore near our pjiimp, land these com- 
prise the town of Gleabreftk. the largest settle- 
ment on the lake, w'nica ignds prosperity both 
aa a Summ6r resort an|i|i aa a lumber depot. 
Xearly all the land ini|the npighborhood is 
owned by ono man, and (Senbraok takes an ex- 
ceptional position among iV'e.? tern town* on ac- 
count of tha auitere anidfresolUte antagonism 
of the proprietor to th^ iAt of wki«ky oa any 



part of his prsmises. Theiepicacy ot prohi'oition 
IS demonstrated in thii x^nstance by the ap- 
parent result. Tlio bla^p^ouioua loafer ia an 



ALLBMEU liCa^iOUiiLiilAS TRKATT. 
Tho I'arisian journal La Ji'run-je pubushei 
on Sept. 14 raih<:r lilariu.iig iHteiugt):ice. It. pur- 
ported to civB tlio tuil text of a proUminary otl'c-'n- 
sivoaud deloDsivd treaty, cjntaiuiut; la» claaat-s, 
which it alle^jos lo h.tvd b.'uii couchuiad la iSdrlin 
ou the Hth of June, 1870, by Trince 
Bismarok ana Prince Gortschiknff, and which it 
uihims ta be au ueutia Acuurdiug to this ducu- 
muiil Gircaaoy au<l Kussi.* under;al>'t< not to act 
in tlio ii^istera qiiestiuu wltlionC ur(9V.oa.i airi'<»^- 
meut. Xuov guiirauioo ina itaftw quo «it burvia in 
ihe event of tuai country ueiux uoieaietl, and obey 
proaii^e to suiumon a cougress shouhl itia Se.vluiis 
be vietoriou.'i, upon the basis of the entirn inJoi»on- 
iieucBoi all Soiarouio eouuiries. Tuey woulii pro- 
Do.-io lo the i'owors ;o req.Jcat the Sultan to trannior 
ins resiileace to Ama, ana will occapy Coustautluo. 
pit) and the Bospuorus until the eilualiou is othor- 
wise (tetormined. SlitfuM u dlsasreeuent uriso at 
tha congresa^ iCassiau and G-arman troops woald 
occupy Europeau Xarkoy. Tho puidioacion of this 
news caused ao lltU* '<vau«'ti»u oatuo Paris 



iinoomMon occurrence. Qha geatcfully misse* 
the dismal bar, with its jSiendiir equipment of 
glasses, demijohns, and gj4iidv i^jiiats. ^Va had 
not been in town more tikan. ajk hourwhau a 
fresh young scliool-naistpBas cajmo seamperin;? 
down from a little red 8(||ip»l-hij)us3 on the hill, 
dragging a laughing, acroifuing ;&rowd of ciiil- 
di'cn after her, aud that .ieismol|r to indicate in 
some degree tho domeajt^c happiness of Glen- 
breoii. i! * 

Tiae lumber trade ijis inhmenaa. The 
wood is towed from | iflumea at different 
points of the lakil; in rafts that 
sometimes measure ^6. feet in- width 
and lol) feat m lenkth. At G^enlireok 
it ia loaded en a MarriJW-Biji.ug6 railway, exolu- 
aiveiy used tor the puip>)ah, by which it is con- 
veyeti nine miles t» the siifuinit of tho divide ; 
thocce it is floated in jjlumes to Carbon City, 
and thence carried agaji ii by railway to tlio 
Virginia mme^. Tae m|: .^ aro iroiug all day 
loug, and the sraoke of iheir chimneys hangs 
constantly aaiong the p i ije-iopa over our camp. 
Labor is in such deia.ui 1|| that myjhanica are 
paid $5 a ilay, sawyerki i^OO a month, auti un- 
skilled hands from $6J \'^ $80 a month, with 
board. ■ ji . 

There are two roads f •plm Carson to the lake, 
oneiollowiug Clear Crek k, and the other as- 
cending Kiug's Cahon, ^mt ot the city, aud 
ioiuiug ciie Clear C:-euk rjiadab'Ut three allies 
from Clenbroek. Tho h iter, aa measured by 
our odometer, is a fraction over fifteen miles lu 
length, autlia much use>. jby teams, though the 
grade is verv heavy. Itj rtFimi^ round tho face 
Ol the mountains by tei'i||ck'S eut iu the solid 
rock, the outlook irom 'ji'Hicu coinpreheads vast 
raugaa ol gray ^aakd strel'ilvod with gnow, and 
low roaahes of nianatonous pi.aiu seined with 
narrow watsr-ceuriiifa. j(|)rJcasioaa ly you oateh 
a distaritngliwuse of ajwhita- Object ritahing 
down the uiouutaia 8iae|.j and' unless you are 
familiar with tha cottati|o}ro»ably you mistake 
it for game, and cock .vojij: gua. Then you dis- 
ceror tuat it is a log ila;>|tling dotvn one of the 
tlumes, which are cariiiyd down nearly every 
mountaia-side and aKros^juearly every valley. 
Sigus 01 the grao wM uest [fiction of the lorests ap- 
pearat everv turning. 1 libtweive-mule wagons 
tuat pass on the road ar ij loaded with timoer, 
and ginrat stack* of lo^fe ittre found at various 
puiuLs or tho road Wiiitit ji tor removal. i<ow 
and then jfou uiscover a ijiUBiy'kut, the shelter 
ot a gang employed iu f^luag tue wood, or a 
mill lu a ye low daio;'pof sawdust. Wator- 
eoui'sea have been diver , >d aud subsrdinateato 
the same purjjoacs. VVtitrevet the timber has 
been accessible, in fat f. it has been hewn 
down, and ihe few treed that remaiu standing 
among the stumps and ^dlleu trauka hoar wit- 
ness to the g.ory of thcit jiipecies. The real is 
80 narrow uud verges i oj cleaely on the preci- 
pices below that tho hfliivy teams roliiug in 
the duaty ruts aediki to be in cou- 
siant «lan.;;er of tilling over. fceveral 
cascades break dowin from the cliffs 
above, and the resihious exhalations of 
tee piuea become almtii^t sickening iu tbcir 
Strength. Among the gi^^sy patches irri;iated 
by tile atreaialets, and near the low growtus of 
chestnuts, are spriuklnigs of fhistles and blue- 
bells, and u» dower resjijhioling the hrauiuih, 
'Ihu eiids are scarce, miim of them haviu" aai- 
grated southward all^t; tho lirst snow-fall. 
About aiiio miles irom Carson we pass Swilt's 
Station, and thou, utter xoundnig several pro- 
jaciing rocks, from eacii[6f which the prospect 
grows wider aad wildeHiwe attain the suutiiiic 
of the ilivido whore tij,e' narrow-gauge railway 
basics toriainu'*, autl Itjliie King s 'Canon road 
loins that trom Clear Crljeti. idere, too, we ob- 
tain a tii'st gliaapse of' tao lak* and the cold 
gray mountains ari>a;iil;:,it. 

Tue road now gradiialiy descends into a 

dee)B eauou, and the; tiaioar bee^nies much 

thicker. idany ut taiq. piuoa are 1*5 feet 
Ltgb, and their djirk .green priciiy 

loliuga ia contraatert. feith tUe liirhtcr hue 
of some asDcua aa ui coiton-woode. Mr. 
Henauaw, the uaturaujt, aad 1 redo a lew 
uiiles ahead of the pae tijtraiu to select a suita- 
bia CHUip, and ati we rtaetied au opca space a 
largo bird Blade itseli l^uspieuoui bv ua e.x:- 
ccoain»ly graceiul movi|*icnts. ic circled high 
in the air, and poised itafeii over the very tip ot 
a burroii jjina witho t tiae least visible stir ot 
Its outspread wiu,;^s |i Tmis it rem.tiucd, 
per.ecay monoalts.^, ijnd evidently searcuin^ 
lUo landsea.^e cloaeiy jjlfor several minutes, 
wuuu It swooped dijflijtiy over our noaals. 
'iho naturalis,.'a guu iiw-as unstrapped irom 
lud saudle, aimei, a I'ji tired m a moment, 
iuo Bird tiiiilerej .•lutjt desci-uded aoiuii dis- 
tance, aud a i«\v IcatlitSijs fio^ited lightly dawn 
out of us wi.«gs. Aa|i,exprdss)0u ut elation 
p«)ijso*sed Heusuaw's iiifce, out ic was suceeenled 
by mortilieaiiea. ihcj bird recoverou itsoit, 
lljw Ucavily aivay to ajtree, where ic lestod a 
moment beioro reoumipg us dighc across a 
cuasiu. A second suall'prouid nave oacn usoiess, 
uiiU the orniiaui.)»;i .c hvjat ou nis u-ay lai^uent- 
iiig tho loic o.jportunicjylui haviu.; hia Tiatiuized 
name altacued to a ue^f' 3pe..ies ol tue hawii. 

tsoiae lUceieoLiu^ H'e.jjlbg.oal la.uures pr. sent 
theaisdlvcs on lae Iviuii'a CitUon Kod-d, a r«(eou- 
noissauco ot Wuich WiiJa maao oy iiv. CauAUUg, 
luo ^ieoiegisc ot tne pali'ty. Soou Klter leaviu;; 
Carson we reached tnii well-K-oovvu ;jray giaaito 

wuicn lurms tao 4''^'li'^"i'^ **' ^"* f'lbS^ 
sepaiating tuac citjy lioui Lake Taiue, 
and luriuer ou a belt of tim same ro^k 
Was loUiid traversed Witii many voms ot iel- 
spur. iJiiies ol Oiu;iti| baisait also appeared at 
intervals in the jjraiiiip Irau^e, and a mas-j of 
gray gn«!is-i, muoa itecullD|jo^ed ou the suriace, 
eccura near tu« to.i-j,{rtU, about twetve miles 
Iroui CaiBon. The sout lu the roaiUwiy ii caiet- 
ly fleeoin|)i*sed grjiaiic, and irom lua coil-houso 
to «jriea»roon t^a rocjtf U ;;riinitB allOijetuor, a 
light brown veiu uearitlie town liavi.u liexag- 
onai cry.-ia.s ot b;acu Inica .sctttoicil taroaj^u if. 
Ou luo boiiiheru aide ot cue r«a I, overiooiiing 
tuo lOWU, i-j an imineiise bind— ave or s.x nuu- 
dred leet higu— oi-ariiig t>iu name ot .Miako- 
sjieare's liocK, wnica Hamc ia derived from a 
prouie oi tue poet's Ueiid luipriuied in paie yel- 
iow lichen en tbe jiarrlieiii lr»ut. >io edoit 
of the imagination is neBOsaaiy to niacovor liio 
likouess. Ihe bent uead, tue handsome brow, 
the peaked beard, and the low ring of curls 
-above Che neuk, as tiiey appear m the Siraliord 
bust, are uuplicaiod witu marvelous udolity. 
Tiie townspeople lulormoit us that ic was a mass 
ot quartz, hut an a9c*;nt made by L;out. Ma- 
couio, Mr. Couklin;^, and the writer praved it 
10 be lichen, several brightly-colored varieties 
of vv'hieh Cling to tUocutt and mofile it vvitii 
crimson, greua, and 3"ollow. Wo loilowed a 
humo lor some distaiice, alterward turning otf 
to tue lett through a toreat ot piues and hro, oy 
which eourse wa sooii attained a pile of loose 
blocks ot bluish-black basalt. 1 he same rock 
in what is teohaicaliy oaUed prismatic columns 
forms (he rear . oficarj>ment of . the . oliU'. - Bat 



that phrnoe will not convey to tho general 
reader an ideaof the really wonderful structure. 
Tlin blocks are nearly all of one size, aud are 
laid in regular lines, which curve upward to- 
ward the end ifllo a beautiful iandike shape, 
while a few bushes and dwarf^ilnesgrow out of 
tne crevices. Our path was over the detritus, 
which stood up on end and at every possible 
angle, making the use of both hands necessary 
to secure a foothold ; but the ascent was com 
paralively easy, and what little trouble we had 
was tully repaid by the view from the top. 
The entire lake, except tlie southern part, 
opened out before us, a broad reach of blue re- 
flecting ou Its rippling surface the mountains 
surrounding it and tho gray clouds that came 
hurryiBg out of tho west with threats of 
Storm. Immediately below us was a awayiug, 
moaning net of pines, a«d a lew miles lo tho 
southward a massive, dome-shaped rosk stood 
out irem the 8h<>re. On one peak a bolt of 
enow extended downward almost to the water's 
eilge, and occasional streaks and wreaths of 
w^hite lay on mast of the other 8umaaitf>. The 
largest mi>iiatain in view wa% Job's Peak, to 
the aoutli-west, and this, with ijts neignbors, 
loomed up to a height of irom 8,000 to lii,000 
leet. Our aneroid showed an approximate 
altitude ot 7,000 leet, and hero we paused tor 
an hour to refresh our exhausted lungs. W here, 
1 wauuer, can tho ex.alorer of to-day find how 
grouud i lu titte crevices of the rock wo dis- 
covered several slips ot wood on which were 
written the names of laen who had been on the 
peak before us. One had hailed from Calcutta, 
another from Houg Kong, -another trom Chey- 
enne, another from ^lewpastle-en-Tyne, and 
another from Laramie City. What a strange 
rendezvous ler travelers was this, and from 
what distant pans of the world tho pilci'ims 

had come! Whilo the Lieutenant waa sketch- 
ing and the geologist was examining the" rooks 
tor tes.imouy, whistled scraps trom "Lohen- 
grin,'' " .Mlgnon," and " Aladame Augot" min- 
gled with the sighing of the pines aud the beat 
Ol the w.iter on the shore beiow. 

Lake Tahoe ia> quite u popular Summer re- 
sort of Californiaiitf, aud may De reached either 
by stage Irom Carson, where connections ure 
made wita tue Virginia aud Truekeo Kail way, 
or by Stage irom iruckee, where connections 
are made w:th the Central Pacific. A queer- 
looking little side-wheel steamer plys between 
Tahoe City and Gienbrook, aud makes excur- 
sions around, the lai^e, tho fare oei&g about 
eighteeu cents a mile. Several small tu,;-ooat8 
are ulsou used in the lumber trade, and tue 
ireight is carried by a schooutu- called 
thelrenDuke. The model on wuich these ves- 
sels aro built ia ef the nondescript order, and 
wo can easily imaxiue the prelouud contempt 
and astonishment it would excite in an old 
salt-water tar. Th* lake itself is about twen- 
ty-two mica long and ten miles wide. Oue- 
lourch ot It ia lu Nevada and three-fourths in 
Calilornia. The water is exquisitely clear aud 
cuid, aud has been autuide., it ia said, to a 
depth oi l,t>45. Tho lumber on the surround- 
ing ahore coneiats of the sugar pine, the yellow 
pine, tao " euli" pine, and the white aud r^d 
hr. The sugar pine is tho must valuable, and 
the yellow pine comes next. The " oull" pme 
semetimsis reaches a diameter of 15 and a 
height of 200 leet, and ia much valued ler its 
strength. 

Our camp has been exceedingly basy 
of Tate. The topographical corps, under 
Mr. Frank Carpenter, made during las 
week a rapid detour BoriU of the Pacide 
■ liailway, traveling over a circuit ef 175 
miles, their objective point being Spanish Peak, 
which was occupied as a main inangulatiou 
station. Much new country was observed and 
sketched, and roada and traiia hitherto uu- 
• known were followed aud traced preliminary 
to the delineation upon the man. Long Valley 
Creeii, which rises lu the mountains above Vir- 
ginia City, was surveyed, aud a barometric 
jrohte ol us course shows the possibility oi a 
railway irom tho mines ot Virginia direet to 
the iruckee Itirer, where it mtgut be made 
tributary to the Central Paciiic liailway. 
llio construction of siica a road is con- 
templated by Mr. Sutro en the comple- 
tion ot the tunnel bearing hia name. The bait 
of couatry surveyed i>y Mr. Carpenter lies 
along tne eastern base of too Sierra A'ovada, 
extending troai tlie fertile valleys uader tuose 
mouutaiua eastward into the and desert. Ou 
tho outward trip the outiino* of VVasnoa Lake 
aud their extent were observed. iho Big 
Meadows ot the Truckee liiver were skirteu, 
aud the aasert region of Sierra V'a.iey was 
lollowed as far as tao Spaniah opriags, wuero a 
green oasia and au aoundant tiow of water 
were found. Thouce the route lay across a 
plateau of lava bada to Cottonwood Creek, 
Irom which point the' ascent of tho mountain 
was made. Lieut. .Macomb, Mr. Carpenter, 
Mr. L>u Boie, and otaer iuemoei-5,ot tho party 
will Start on another side trip to-morrow. Mr, 
CtmkliHg, tho geologist, lolD camy on Monday 
tor a circmt ot tUo lake, with orders to esiao- 
lish topographical stations a short distauce 
apart, oho chjocc being to triangulate uae make 
a tnorough survey of tie lake. Mr. Hcnsiiaw, 
the ornicnologisi, has made extensive collec- 
tiana "n natural history, and haa disoovored 
aoverai new species ot liaii in the streama bui- 
reunumg Caraon. 



LONDON SOCIA]E TOPICS. 



Gekmax liuLE XX ALSACic.^Aa gooi- 
iuok would have it, wneu we loft for Biilo we 
had for sole fellow-craveier as far as Mulhouse 
am elderly Alsatian laiy, a Scrasburger by 
birth, now estai»iiahed on the Boltort territory. 
I asked her how far Alsace was becomiag ac- 
customed to German rule. " Less and less," 
was her reply. And then she pourel forth to 
us, im language that once almost -bro tight \eara 
to not very watery eyes, tho tale ef Alsao^'a 
wronga. She had bsen tuo owner of a large 
house in Strasaurg, which had been burned te 
the ground by shells during the siege. And 
yet on her return (she haa taken refuge in 
Switzerland) she did not soom to feel the loss 
of everything that had been hers ; she cauld 
only think of having lost her country. The 
destruction wrought by tlio Germans during 
the siege hal bseu such that it had givan many 
persans a false seua» of soturity; " thuy can- 
not surely msau to annex u-i, or they Avould 
not ha doing so much miashief to our 
city." She did not wiah tor war, she 
said, but Croi aould aot allow sush an 
iniquity to subsist. The Garsiaus had been 
80 " luulatlroils." They had taken away irom 
them all they o red tor. fhey interterad in ev- 
erything. Alsace (this I was aware ot) was re- 
markable tor ttie number ol us private sckools, 

whiah, under French rule, were inspected once 
a quarter, aud ttajsn only to 8o» that inatrucuon 
waa properly given. Now inspectors came 
every week, "and imposed all aiauuer of changes, 
tjuou aiess»n was to be givou at another hour, 
or gi?en up ; suon a class man no longer he 
taught fa iYeuca. Lveu knitting must be 
tauuht in the PruaSiaa luahion, all tue girls lilt- 
ing their arms aud drawing them ba^k at the 
Sams mo.nent, to a particular time. All friend- 
ly relations between Alsatians and Germans 
were at au end. A respeota.bl'J vouug G.u-mau, 
who had been litteeu years in tho couatry, 
c mid no longer aud a dooeiit gin to m.trry 
him. Suj herself had been ionl ot Genuaa lit- 
erature, and used to tra often to Germany. 
jSow ■ she could not bring herselt to opes 
a Germau book, aud had not crossed 
the iihiNo einco the war. Paaiiilies, even 
whero Geriuivn was etiil spoken, ^ read 
now nethuig biK French books and French 
nex^spapers. Tae German char lOter apueared 
to her to h.'.ve deiteriorated. There aeemud to 
be nothing elevated, uothiug s.'riou* left in it. 
It is true chat oniy tno worst apecimeui came 
to Alsace ; the fe\v respectable men who had 
been sent there at lirst louai tbair positian so 
iiitolerab e that tney coiUd nut rcmaia. The 
University J It was ouiy utteeded ov German 
students, and ic was a good place lor tuem to 
work iH. as tuey were reeeivert nownere. Was 
trade fiounshiiigJ Its cuaiacter wa* dete- 
riorating. Tne taate ot Alsaee wa^ lor what is 
solid aud good, the Gormaas ouiy carud lor 
wuat was snowy. Ttie laigcst suops had had 
greatly to change the character of their gooiis. 
'luen, owing to the reatiictiona put upou tho.so 
Al.'<atiaua wuo had elected to remaiu French 
KUjjeets— tuey c:iunot remain in Alsace more 
tUuii two mouths at a time — botu trade and 
mauu'.actures were carried on at a great disad- 
vant.t^t^. Many meiciiaets aud mill-awnern 
now ii'ved ia iiale, auu eauie every day bv tram 
to tUeir worii. to leave at nijiiit. Hui would 
not the miliiary service at young AlsatiuMS 
{five laem tue Gerinau saldier's esprit d-; cnr/jKf 
it (lid not «eeiu so. Tiio brutal way in wuieh 
l'ru.sdia;i.H treat their suisordiuates waa always 
ittoat reput.sive ta them. Was there any ditl'er- 
euco betvveon Pro'e»lant:i and Catholics iu 
tiieir loeliiigs tow.ird the Germans { ^'onc. 
The Proresiaiits, Wi.o betore the war were in 
intimate leiacioai with thair Oarman co-ro- 
h^'iouista, were at first dispo.sod to hope more 
from them. But a pasteur's wife had lold her 
only the other uav (tlie speaker was evmentiy 
a Itoinan Cainolie) tiiat tuey ielt tuey had been 
deceived in their hopes, aad that all inter- 
course with the Germaea was at au end. lu 
short, " Sous HE vivons que par La France." 1 
u<>kcd her wBar soaie oiua dowers were by tha 
railway side; they turned out to be those ol 
tue wild cniccory. Iheae flowers had been ex- 
traordinarily abundant this Sumjoer, and 
mixed with poppies and ox-eye daisies, all the 
corn-fields had seemed bordered with tho for- 
bidden triooior.— ZfOneion /SiXC<«»<»ri ■ 



AN OBSEBVJSB IX TBp, SILLY SEA- 
SOX. ]'i ' 

TUINGS SEEN AXD HEAftDji^lt AXD OUT OF 
SOCIETY — LOXDO>f AT; BflGHT A.ND IN" 
THE TUKATRES — r' A : JWITTY PLAY- 

WHITER'3 successes ^i|0 FAILCUES. 

From a special CorrftMnritnt. 

London, SundWJ Sept. 17, 1S76. 
Have yon ever been in Ljdodon during the 
silly season? This ia the iMJly season. Tho 
papers print foolish letters iwd ohronicle Bm.all 
beer. Everybody who is aJBybody is out of 
town. It you are m societyiu;] is social death 
to be in town. You are suptjAaied to be abroad, 
or shooting on tho moors <^'in the stubbles, 
Yqjur house ia wrapped m" otitieo. Your club ia 
b^ag redecorated. Your trif^eamen are at the 
iea-side. Aad the middl«-ciw piovineial is in 
London doing the Ab\joy, t\si] Tower, the mu- 
seums, and bemg done b.yipe publicans, and, 
mere especially by the sh<JDk'ebpei'3, who are 
getting ofif their damaged gfl^ds. But if you 
have the courage to speud:|your vacation in 
London, there is no time so |)iiasant aa Septem- 
ber. The parks are at tb£^ best, the mad 
bustle of tho streets is ovpr,JMidi there arc little 
excursions to be made dowftlthe Thames and 
about the suburbs which'; apel delicious beyond 
description. Moreover, it !i|igpleasant to talk 
with oouatrymen in village J||in8. I met a gar- 
dener at Chiswick the otnjir dav who had 
worked there with the late «r Joseph Paxton, 
who died the bosom friend m a Duke and the 
designer of tho first Crystal Sfolaee. Whoa my 
rural friend knew him, Sir JqiJ^pU was receiving 
$1 a week. 'The late Duke'oj? Devonshire used 
te be a frequent visitor at t4e Chiswiok gardens, 
and noticed Paiton, who w'a^ah intslligent and 
industrious man. " Would y&i like to ba a gar- 



" hooking seats" at a theatre ia advaaoe. 8omo 
times tho chaigo is resentea. It was JJvroft 
who, as tho fepectator of a considerable row 

with an ellcrly centleman and his family from 
the country. s.^iiled as tliey left and m a tragio 
atiituda exclaimed, "So much lor Bookiag- 
'cm !" 



U ' 



doner at Chatsworthl" as 



the Duke one 



day. "Yes, your Grace, I ifloald" Not many 
Tears afterward Chatswoaui had the finest 
conservatory in the world,j4Bd Joaenh Paitou 
was knighted by the Queoiii', Hia residence in 
Chatsworth Park was a i flSace. It was this 
tamoua gardener who mat b tho grand Ameri- 
caa lily, now sailed the Vi<fbria Rogina, grow 
in the hot-houses of Ciiats'Mirth &..Kew. An- 
other day, sauntering throittfa Epping Forest, 
I discovered the humble stiMio ot the late Ben 
.Herring, whose pictures':©! t arses are known on 
both sides of t he Atlantic^ ffltil was a " wooden 
shanty" built iu the gardeh jof bis cottage, 
and for the amusemeUfi of m* Ireiaure hours he 
had constructed a mittiatiire jrailway with a 
painted panoramic ba«jskgr|i)!inij.-' There were 
stoitions, points, switch|s, It^t^ |tll the mechani- 
cal contrivances nenessary toi'make traveling 
dangerous, and ocoaaioiaUJii.thje animal painter 
contrived a collision 'wfhiciiii gave him intense 
satisfaction. His greate^jt ^orks were the 
"Horse Fair" and the two! Jw6ll-known prints 
of racers and hunters, j , JR :> 

His father x)ainted the tlJrfeeifamous heada at 
the trough. It was ef thiil firthitt that the bank- 
ing story ia told. Ha w;ejh.t to cash a largo 
check at the Bank of Englk^di' " Are you Mr. 
Herring?" a«ked tho Cashaier,; who happened 
to be a great admirer of] Jlie lartiat. "lam." 
The Cashier looked dojibtiT^ly at him. " That 
is my signature," said Biifrmg. "I possess 
one of your pictures, |Sir|," ! saiid the Caahier, 
" and love it — if you are !ftr.i Herring." The 
artist took the check and junderneata his in- 
dorfement sketched vi[ith| i\taw rapid touches 
the well-known ''Thlrea; Q-rases." '"Perhaps 
that signature will conviiiisti you." The Cashier 
beamed his recognitioh of' Mie:work, paid ttie 
check, and became one of ^Jerrmg's most inti- 
mate friends. I. |f , 

Then London at nighty ijiinhg the silly sea- 
son, IB aa pleasant as you I^e to m,^ke it. Xhs 
theatres are not all closed jfand every tavern is 
.open, including the |old jlTitiet street houaes 
where Dr. Johnson, Boi'i*-ell, Garrick, and 
Goldsmith eipoed their; t^ddy. But the rea- 
taurant ef modern dajra ii i; gradually crowding 
the. old tavern out of i < li^ietence. Paris an<l 
New-York are teachmg tiij? how to build big 
hotels or furnish luxumju'icafds. If we have 
nothing equal to Deimonlid's wo have at least 
many restaurants /wherejliyou ean dine and 



:$id taverns near the 
*' the stage ia go- 



feast the eye, too. At tab 
theatres you will learn tljiiiri 
ing to the devil ;" at thepsw bars and under 
the painted ceilings of the newer dining 
saloons you will be toll that iho drama is 
" leokmg u». Sir ; the le j timate is being re- 
vived, aud Shakespeare ^ acted as he waa 
never acted before." Drury Lane and the 
Queen's aro leading thehvay; whi;e the Lv- 
ceum will coma on agiin in October. But 
generally the Autumn sotjaon ia not going to 
open with brilliant prpppects. Ihe "hard 
times" are still heavy upoh da. Tarks,Egyptians, 
Argentines, Honduras, an|ij other bonds have 
swallowed up our moh^y. Add to this the 
stagnation of trade antt th$ fact that America 
is manufacturing her ; owf«< iron aud sending 
printed cottons into Mancjhiester, and it will bo 
seon that wo have not [t^o much money to 
spend in amusements. ^* Our Boys " still was 
at the Vaudeville, wherjej Messrs. James & 
Thome (a few years ago fwb ordinary burlesque 
actors earning £o a weekliiiiave made a lortuuo. 
The Gaiety Theatre is nojw entirely under tho 
management of Mr. Hoilmisihead. His late part- 
ner, .^Ir. Lawgon, ot tlio Teleffrajth, is now only his 

landlord. Mr, Lawsoa gi^^ £7,000 a year for 

this building; tho rent ef H^he tkeatro is £4,000 
a year, and the restaoraHti^ias just oeen let to 
a new tenant lor £3,000. 1 lit tha Olympic Mr. 

Henry Neville still ivighi, his irioud. Lord 
Lunaesborougu, having renewed tuo loaae. 
Mr. Nenl.o is going tii pioduce a round of old 
piftcea, aud Miss Fowlei baa married au 
oiiieor ot the Paduingliii Wark-bouse aad 
gone to the Queen's. ; Mr. Jouu Coleniuii 
tho new leasej went to Jlaris to find a pretty 
ttiii Clover actress to, pjoly tho Princess lu 
" flenrv V.," but he prOBiOUinced his Soareh a 
failure, auil came homejiaad engaged idiss 
Fowler. Tue St. Jamesl rfie^tie ia to fco opened 
by Mrs. John Wjod, and Mr. Clarke, tin Ameri- 
can Jaune premier, is lo ibe her leaUins man. 
But uothiug aurcoeds at th« ,SU James' except 
French piavs, and oven M.!^$.jl*diu V'l'oed will, 1 
fear, fied late aeainst hdr: in spite oi a re- 
decorated house ana an ulf^traetive programme. 
Mra. and Mr. Kendall , are; to leave t.-e Court 
for tho Pr.nce of Wa-eS' Thealre, oud Mr. 
Coghlan has already gonejtio that Li f)oiado of 
the stage, New-l'ork, where ha ia auie to be 
successiul as a raoust; jmanly, and schoiariy 
actor. .«r. Heurv Iryin,^ wul pioOab.y TisU 
Aiuerica ntxi y«-ar, and negotiations nave beea 
opened witu Jiiss Ada CaSeUdisa, who u ou a 
staiTini lour iu t'ao urovtnces. Lendon is stdl 
waiting for •' the com. ug dramatist," aud is in 
oesuair about actresses. Tno stage was ncv\er 
oc«upied by such a crowjl of haadaome nou- 
entiues as st the present time. 

Jilr. fleury J. Bvrou, "Whoee recent lailurea in 
ceuicdT and larca arc theThik and wouuer of 
lileiary sooiaty, is the most prolifio of our 
dram.ttists aua tha brighljoa^ coaversatioualist 
01 his day. He is ameititjus t« wrue a comwd.y- 
dr.inia, aiid success outside that ambit. ou has 
evidently led mm into taj belief tuat ho can 
throw ok larcieal comedy by tho vard. ihe hit 
maao l»v " Our Boys" dsiouisaetl him more 
tsan the failure of " VVHi|nl£ic«." He regarued 
that most dismal oomodfM l*e best oi all uis 
worus. "Our Boys' wha u iridi' which he 
cauid write la a week. 11 " Our liovs" was tne 
sort of stud tho publie; liked, however, ih.-y 
should nave it ; anvi ho gave them " iae Buu 
by^ ihe ilorus," done in a very sUort time aud 
aime under oressure, but uot worthy of a 
novice lu tha art of dramatic comp.-eition. Mr. 
Bvron, and tho sooner you realize the fact that 
neither lorces nor comediies can be wnttea at a 
sitting, the sooner yen will get back to your old 
form, f his 18 not only tie verdict ot tae preaa 
but tho voice of the puoiio. Mr. Byron talks 
as we'll as he writes-^ometimes far better. 
Tuere aro many illustrations of his brightness 
uud numor fioating about the gossip ot clubs 
aud tueatrical society. One of his lotest viets 
marked the death of Poole, the famous tailor, 
••i'ooio is dead," said a olubcompaaion, leak- 
ing up from the pages of An oveniug paoer, 
•aitia in a tit." "Iu a .fit !' exclaimed Byron, 
"a tailor die m a fit— he,Bhonld have died in a 
V miailta'^ In^ J£nirl»a4, .#.«lUM^£Q J«f IOMIMQC;. 



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Su.MMKR Days i.\ Gkkexla^d.— We, ', 

mean the ladies of the Colony ot Gk>dtha&b 
were very lond of our little private gatherings, 
or afternoon parties. In Suuidjer they gener; 
ally came ofi' in the op an air, on tha hills, or in [ 
our garden, which was the largest in ths place. 
In Winter we, of coarse, held our parties in- 
doors. Tho house which we inha'^ited was 
spacious aud comfortable, facing a largo ii^ 
closure called the garden. This was by nc 
means analogous to European gardens, bnt, 
nevertheless, it was a moat delightful plaae ao- 
eording to our Greenland idea.?. The fenoe coa- 
siatcd of rather a high wall of stones aad turf, 
on tho top of which wa-i a red wooden railing. 
A broad gravel pat'a divided the inclosed spase 
into two parts, ose containing rows of radishes, 
cabbagee, carrots, and other vegetables ; while 
the other couiisted o.' a nici gresn expanse radi- 
ant with dandelions and little white flowers. In 
a corner of the Litter half we ha 1 a grassy seat, . 
and at the south end there stood a small greea- , 
bouse for the cultivation of Earopean flo wen 
and strawberries, lu a sort of porch a table " 
an«l several rustic chairs wora arraaief, and- 

tbitber we often broii.rh!; our needle-work, dis- 
cussing, over a cup of early tea, tha aST^ir^ of 
the town witti mu-^h spirit; at the same time 
catching ghmpsaa of thi hoin'.;ly roses aud e«- 
joying their delicious scent. We seldom pro- 
ferred the closed room tn the fre^h air oat3i.do, 
where we encamped amang snailinj daisies or 
on the grassy Seat. There many a stitja ha» 
been made, either in sawing, crochc^ ar 
knitting, while we merrily chatted Bat per^ 
hafts we oi'teuer went to lower bill-tops th^n tt 
tho gar.'len. 'There we also brought our needl» 
work and a book, our tresn-made eake*, 
the small tlack tea-kettle, and our detoctiva 
tea-things. Wo did not like to bring a gooj . 
set, lest we snould nave to take too much caro 
of chem. Wa had bo difiicjlty iu nodmg a 
sheltered nouk commanding a view of th;* eea. . 
A." to our reading, we might hive baen bett.-r , 
off in the garden, as we were here verv o!t«a 
distui-bed by cuauce interruptions. But then 
we did not ramd mash, a^ w,^ never ^acxod 
converaatioa'. whics Vids oas-.ly kept up to tot 
merry music ot iho tatterals, wnica whirled 
across the bav beaeiith us in Ijirge d.>eks. 
Sametimes our goats would par us ao uuex- 
pected visit, or we haai to turu our beads at 
the chirping sound ot a iif.Je sno.i-bird. Last- 
ly, some Greenland maid or ixiy wouUl steal 
UBOB us, and shyly ofier their meat aaJ ttahof • 
other trifies oi industry, and so our neodli- 
work mignt lor a, good ioug wlulo 
he untouched in our laps, la truth 
these excurjioos were hfiurs of idie- 
iivsa exccptm^r aa regards onr eyw4|» 
which almost incesaoutly w:iuuered in the di- 
rection of the opposite shore to cue i^nnny hilio 
ol low " Northland,"' across the still bioe sor- 
iooe of the waters. Our roodings were oaqaes- 
tionably more successful ia lot carUen, ai- ' 
though we weretiieie surrounded by tii* merry , 
iiational iiie, roars ot laughter Ircm noisy chii- ' 
dreu, chatting sound ot the young giris' talk, 
wao, holoiui eacu other's h.:n(ls, or with an arui 
round eauh other's aeCKS, went sirolling up . nd 
down tho Ung colony road. Tois rjai was 
called "Lanaelinie,'' m meiuory of our beauti- 
ful sea promenade at Coi>euhagen. Later ia 
the atteruoou «ere beard the exuiting an.swero 
Ot the women when shouted at to make tnem- 

selvesreody torfiensiug. ontbeir husbaadabeins 
observed irom tne distance, towing noioe seal*. -- 
1 nesa sounds were aiwavs ringing in our ears = 
trom witboui,'btat we did uot besa them, being . 
quite aoaorbed by Ernest Muitraeers, IJet- 
crtxijc. or Eugene Aram in tie year wUoa V 
Beiwer was our iavorite autnor — later, o(;, 
I'ourac, suct>cedad by otiibrs. it was noi uatU • 

the ever-mcuiorabie crv", " Posts! poBtal" was 
aaouted ail over the colony ihat wo were in- 
duced to leave tne t-ncv world of our bo3k tor 
the real one. On, that mo^t pioasaut reality i '• 
Now ail eyes tura to tue tanK to the trauittiii 
blue anrlace oi Gedt.naab Fjord, ana we strove 
t'j outdo each otuer m iracicg and uoiucmg oirt 
the aubjeets ot our hopes and lears : the two 
poatmeu, in lueir K.;:yaka, makmg tiit«r^ 
way among piecca ot doe-ice. At last 
tuey get sale m among toe tooa , 
on the beach. Ac me sauto time- •. 
tnere has been much luuning to &u<i iro ana a 
pieuaani siir among the Greenlaneers, who 
have nearly ali coiieeted on the oeoch lo hcsr 
tue neW4. The sirangers are of more or le^ 
interest to every pcisou, tor those v> tao no nut 
get letters ikema.;ivca (among tue Gi^.rniaudeva . 
01 the preseut oay ietter-wiiting u quivc a 
usual thicg; are no lOSS auxiuLs to haai' liom 
reiatirea unu fr.euda at ut.ier biaUun^ and ap- 
piy ior Verbal u^wa tru<u tm) postuieu. O-uetS' 
ore cloaely rotated tu the po;>imen tucmaeiVco, 
ana so It 13 no wonder tuat evdsryoouy uurr>c« 
down iu great exjjoctatiuu. bumo old Women 
lorm au exceptiou to the i-eat, aau wait lu Ui^^ 
uoorivaya .or oa tiie top ot the lOW itMi^ 
where lUey mu^^t be contented to gean tao 
iutcwiueuce b>aciap8 Irom u pa»?mg ciiu.i or a 
caieiOiS gu-1. Ino u»u.ii inquiries moda oy 
ourse.ves (v.z.. tho U.-na*) aro as imlowe: 
•• VV here does ihe post come iram 1 F.om Suk- ' 
kertoppen, trom Frccerikauauo, orwa.> kbow*: 
|ierhaps even from the tor-od' Julianea»ab! 
Ou, oiit it they be even irom toe siJii moi-e oi* 
taut Europe, our deiigut is perieci .' 1 ms lost 
alieruati've the kayaks eievfr;y know kow CO 
aanouace at a guua uiaianee irum the shore bj 
pointing their oar in lue air, ia imitat-on ol" a 
mast, to indicate that the sbipiroiu Em-opeuat 
landed the moii at some uiUcr eeiouy. ii oo, 
the gleeiul, joyous shouts, " Lmiurmi — it'" 
(" Ship. 6h»p. ah. tne ahip! ') will oeVuiaosa. I 
iiavo known a lew nerroos wi etches who eonUl 
not stand our reoouuLimg cuerua, out no paa 
lemdcd their coirpiam.B, wnioh were diare- 
gaided in tho oiuerw.se uniform harmoay. AU 
were aliico ha^py, thouguU<isa. b'>pofai. aotil 
the Governor had oooneu tho pos:-bag. aad ii« 
coutedta might tiien, pt-hapa, lor a time, at' 
least diaperea the oomaion interest. A po>t, of 
cour&e, can arri\e ai oaj time ui tiie cuy. bat I 
think they icost Irequeuuv did arnva at ibe 
time When the Xonhiand is in its glow and ■ 

glory, and I know tuat a sci^ne of inis iieiivrip- 
t ion bos pasilively often iutorrupt^d onr at"u;r- 

uuoa pai'ties lu tuo gtudeu, and brought latn 

to a close ; otherwi*o wc were not ctsturbod 
but lor our oxtx ohdareu (1 eiiaii al- 
ways epeak of the Lmopeaa ohiidrea 
in general) putUMg lu ihcir heads aorooa 

tue red railing and snauCin.;, " Pieus«s 
^uaanua is goiijg to eveniu.; pravers at tue 
Mora viaas, I want to go With tier." " Wed, 
you may go, doail ' And—" Wul you aiiour 
two little Grccniaud fnou.is. Aruak auu Kijit^Ui, 
to coiue to ta * la tae evouiug <" or, " .uigot 
they make a party w^th aome utuer «aiidrcu oa 
Bu cxcursiuu to luo uoai-eat bins V' to wuiea 
qutiSLion a weleomo •' ^aruugna". wao tOc usaai 
leoiy. Gar chUuroa, waeu post a o.rtam »*ge, 
wero at lii/erty to go auvwaere ther liked, aua ■* 
keep comp.iuy wi.n whom tuey chose, bus • 
when tliwy wa.ited to go oeyoud the oauaaia ot" 
tue main oo.ouy tuoy uati to usi .cavo. My 
owu.ouugute;-, wiiu is by this tiajo a grown-up 
gin. 18 oitting Pes.uo mo now, aua wj o.tea 
8p'.;ak ef tuo.»o by,.;aUo d.iya, anf lulty a;roo 
taat those were iimjs of romauj*.— -urcso^iMjjJk" 
icat Magazine. ^ , 

IERi.Ali::>i^I> iJi.jll.\£ JS C/r/.V.!. 
Aocordiug to the Lugiiih uewspaiwra, tho 
cor.n ut Cuiiia la ilir«9<kiuje,l miti a i.km.ue, ui 
TTQicQ it is UilB.'a:t ai yai to (orssao the iuteaaity. 
The greaier uarc ot CJiiai aud a Urija pora./U of 
Shdu-iuus are uoiaally naftjriag from ddartti, aaA 
lUe Aaiuuiu traps saa.A Do.je.o»sly io<t. M.S'<ioa- 
anws i:iva & i.ar'0>riui: tiaaaiiptiu u . ut lai Uiitroae 
>\liicu lo t)icv.ti.iug m »o.ij uij,,ii.iu ol iJu iavwot 
p.uviuce. lua ^oopic b<ive tXJ.tu<isd ull (ueu 
ut, le Bloro ot u.aiu »au pa.tuaa lueir v«ry 
iiupienicuis. 'fliJ pa.»u»h.'P« are ia t4Mt 
c.ioii.f.1, »ud iiiair lU .as pXh.iualoil. Kuiii- 
nii rom&iua tor tin) uiajjniy ut rbe ii • 
liajitauia oat to Starve or pmuaar, a^d 
i. CAiiujt oe iluu'jLoJ thai LUis Utter at raauro wid 
au ll.'kC iricd. I'lia M.tudaiia* ore qui. a iuc;ap.ie>e 
ul at.iUuc tvun me euidi jtnnuj; in,3« , x,jauo a 'lOO 
litclo luxuev lu imporl.uj; gi-uin. but luoic are ao 
kdaiiuae lucaos oV ii'uaap.iritu,: it to iii« iutetiur, 
au. peop.e aiu auirviag iwa Bunurea ui la* iuulU.I, 
wliiio wufai. IS elieap iu tue liorl ol C'leioo. I'liey 
mirc Ull eap icUy lar oitaH.z .lion, aud, oia-.ikicur 
itie Tory tiaine af tree cuunBOuiuadaii, ut> uot 
dream at cni,iiov]ug tae paopU to iii.»Ke roods, 
and thus laruiak thom wita reaunsruUTo oui-° 
pUiyment ac ihw same tima lOit iner creuto ' 
means of carriage to the sullpring dinneia. 
Larso quantities af trram era bemg also impurtel 
at Tienkitu. but the eame dittioslUtss ei traaepart 
exist, aud disturbsnees are feareU in the mt^unor ef 
tho province. Thd Eapi^ror aud the ehiof iCaa- 
Oarina have beea pr*> lag caBSiantlv ■ for rem, aatf 
at last, on vhe 8th uist.. heaw rain feU at tue capi- 
tal, but too late, it is tearod. to save the. Aatuuin 
crops, naless ia tho neiguborhood oi rlrora wliere a 
little moisture has oroiierTeti them Item eoeioteto 
destmoiiJu. It will, hovravcr, halp to<>jrcil!Bj taa 
^roQud again lor tutnie aowiass. The IrcaaeaS 
arongbth to which iho north ot Chine is auvjocl 
offer ao interesting field of iaqairy. Is the (le«t^ 
CAtioa of Central Asia, whiah is aUeiod to h*v« 
baen going on within htstorio times, ti-eadiitii 
sottthward and-jjeginuisg to aflhet the tila|as oi 
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ASSIONli^NT OV ^ JUSOES — CASKS ^ OX 

THK CALENDARS. 

With to-day th« long Sammor ViSoation in 
Ae noarta ends, and to-morrow the Octob<»r teria 
jommences. The tMaoa about to open promUos to 
be a busy one, as an examination of tha calendars 
iriU sboir, tht namber of oases haTtng inoreue^d in 
lomo of the ooorti fifty per cent, since their 
idlonnunect In Jane and July la«t- DuriuK that 
serlod ImproTemeBts have been jfoing -^ti in the 
room* altottod to the different branota^ oy th« 
Supreme Court, and members of the rggilv pro- 
Teaalon who hare not of late visited the bmldinK 
will b« pleased to learn that in Chambers and the 
Special Term rooms TentUation has been very much 
^proTod. It will be remembered that In these 
rooBM the benches were between the windows and 
thooo oonld not be opened in cool weather withoat 
anob annoyance to both indge and coonsel. The 
iHoncbes have now been translerred to the side of 
the apartment and the cooscqaeoce is there is both 
improved ventilation and. ligut. Nearly ail of the 
rooma_have been newly ctrpeted and better tar- 
nished with cbaira and writinK materials than ever 
before, and altogether the place woara a cheerlal 
and iuvitinc asiiect. Must of the court rooms look 
BMit In their new attire, bot the gandy carpets in 
Chambers and the General Term detract somewhat 
from rheir appearance. 

I)arlnK the month of October Chambers of the Sn- 
preme Court will be held by Judge Barrett, while 
the General Term will be prestded over bv Chief 
jQstlce Davis and Jadeea Brady and DauieU. 
Judge Van Torst will sit in Special Term and Cir- 
ooiL Farts I., II*, and IIL, will be respectively held 
by Jadgea Donohae, Lawrence, and Lanemore. 
The General Term of the Superior Court will bo 
presided over by Judeea Sedgwick and Spier, the 
special Term br Judse Curiis, and Trial Term, 
Part I. bv Judge Sanford. Trial Term. Part IL, 
loe« not meet until the first Monday in November. 
Xhere will be no Greneral Term of the CourtotCom- 
Bon Pleas nniii November. The Equity Term of 
this court will be presided over by J udgo Kobinson; 
Trial Term. Part 1.. by Chief Justice Charles P. 
Daly; Part U, by Judge Van Brunt, and Part IIL 
t>T Jndxe J. F. Ualy. In the Marine Court, Trial 
Terms, Parts I., IL. and IIL. will bo 
held by Judges Alter, Goepp, and Sianott^ 
and Chambers by Judse Sheridan. ^Efforts bave 
ot late b«en made to secure another room m order 
that ftoottaer pare of Ibe court could also be held, 
and someoF.the nnmeruus cases no\r on the oalenditr 
•Uapoaea of, but thus far tbey have proved uosuc- 
oeaaiiil, ana there !ia little probability that a roum 
will be secnred belc-e November. Judge MoAdam 
has been assisned to preside at this part. 

A.xuon£ the casea on the c£ileudars of'the different 
cooria are many ot ab interesting natur«, and stiil j 
more of public importance, but it caunot be stated { 
with any great dearee of certainty whetner or not j 
any of tnem will be tried durini; the cumins month, j 
Xnere are oa the motion calendar in Supreme | 
Coart, Coambprs. which will be called at 1*3 o'clocli j 
to-morrow, 206 motious. On the General Term ! 
ealoidaT theie are in all 385 cases, tne ! 
BKMi prominent among them beinf that of tbo ■ 
people, ^c aeainat William M. Tweed, which will 
not be reached for somo time. The Special Term 
GalMidar for to-morrow contains thirty-six de- 
marreia, several of which are in suits against the 
Cit7, bosides sixt^-two issues of Isiw and fact. On 
Che oalendar of this court for October there are also 
1520 adaed causes. Xn Supreme Court CiicuU, Part 
1^ fifty cases will be on the calendar each day, and 
tho G«iieral Circuit Caleauar contains many new 
osaaelt In the General Term of the Superior Court 
&ft«en eanaea. on the Keneral calendar will be called 

d«y i there ant forty-two cases on this oalen- 



Tn£ BOT ACROBATS. 
ffHX BKARINa SETORK THB RSfEREZ RE- 

SDUKC, ASD FCBTHES TESTI3rIOX7 AI>~ 

, DOCKS RELATIVE TO THEIR TREATMENT. 

liie hearinz in the case of the three boy 
acrokiats who were taken from a circns at Poueh- 
ka^no by the officers of the Society for the Pre- 
>«oti«ii of Cnielty to Children, a short time ago, and 
whoeo castody is sought by Alfred Smith alias 
IjOoii, was reanmed yesterday in the Supreme 
Goaii before the Seferee, Ur. 'William Sinclair. 
Mr. DelaflelO, the coonsel fox the society, objected 
to tho taking of testimony on ihe facts. The Ref- 

ere«i however, overruled the objection, and the tes- 
timonv was taken under the exception ot coacsel. 

The first witueas called to the staad, Mr. John H. 
Itiuzay, the circna proprietor, testified t^ 
th« good treatment the boyt bad re- 
cetTOd at the bands of Mr- Smith, and 
aaid utat dnring their pertonnances -iu the rinj; 
they were eacireJy oat ot danger. i>nring their 
tnrols with the circus tbey were not overworked, 
■Bd Smith esercised^bem bit comparatively llitle. 
T^ey had been already taught to posture, and some- 
times obtained leave to drop from th» trapeze to a 
sbeot soapended beneath them. Several other wit- 
were also examined with a view of estibiish- 



iac the fact that the boys were always kindly 
tnrated, and the oldest ot them, Joseph Donahue, 
wma himaelf placed upon the stand. Mr. Smith and 
his wife he said had at all times treated himself and 
bis companions well, and he was desirous ot retnrn- 
lag to hu chartre. lie complained of the treatment 
ho reeelved in the Catholic Pro'eotory, and said that 
aboat ten days ago one of the ChrisUan Brothers in 
that institation struck bim a blow on the thigh with 
astiek,'tbe marks of wblcb coold still be seen. 
Aeeompanied by the counsel, the boy retired 
b«hlad the bench and exhibited the marks 
osMle by the stick which were noticeable, bat faint. 
He said, > hen the examination had been resumed. 
that he frequently got money from Mr. Smith, and 
Mat asiall sama to his mother in England, to whom 
bo freqaently wrote letters. £. Pellows Jenkins, 
the Secretary and Snoeiintendeat of the society, 
was also exSmioed at length with regard to the 
daties of himself and bis superiors and 8ut>or- 
dlasses, and as to the mode of disposing of ohil- 
dren, alter which the hearing was farther adjoomed 
■atil Xhmrsday next. 



COURT 2foms. 



Jftmes McErary, of No. 271 Grand street, was 

/osterday committed in default of bail at tbe Essex 

)£arket Police Coart, to answer for diiviii; a truck 
over Peter L. Worth, a boy residing at So. 83 East 
Broadway. 

William Niebuhr and "William F. Niebuhr, 
aharged with ranning an illicit still in One Enn- 
drod and Twenty-first street, furnished bail yester- 
<teT before UDlted States Commissioner Qsboro, the 
former in fS.OCO, and the latter in {3.000. 

▲ motion for the taxation of eosts in the mat- 
tar of the City's acquiring a title to lands for the 

MBttnietJon of a suspension bridge over the Harlem 
filTerata point above High Bridge, was further 
adlonmed yesterdiiv by Judge Dunobue, holding 
Baprsms Coart, Chambers. 

Thomas Qannon was arrested and arraigned 
%ef«ro Jostteo Wandell, of the XorkviUs Police 
Conrt, yesterday, charged with stealing a hnrse 
▼alooa at t250 from Mr. Hall J. Baldwin, of Yon. 
kors. When found, he was attempting to sell tbe 
Mlwsl at the horse market in Seventy-fourtn street. 
Ho wss held fsr examination. 

Emanael M. Obright, of the firm of Obright 

A Well, was arrested yesterday an a charge of 
triadulent bankruptcy. He is eharged with con 
Boattng tbs property of tbe Irm and disposing of the- 
,ea«ae to prevent its passing Into the bands of D. A. 
:D«Tla, the aaelimee In bankruptcy. The accosad 
;watv«4 an vxaminailon before United States Com- 
jtolntenr OsborL, and gave bail in therom of |5,C00, 
I to await the action of the Grand Jury. 
I B amn e l Harlem, of the slothing firm of 
pbrUm 4 Co., No. 13 Lispenard street, who was 
larrested on Priday night on the charge of attemot- 
tng to swiadle tbe insurance cumpaniea by whom 
ks wasmsnred in giving fraudulent losses of a (lie 
b fela pr«mis«s oa July 5, was taken to the Disitict 
Aitomey's office yesterdav. Bail was fixed lu 
|3i,0O0, which was famished by Isaac Hsrlam, 
toother of tbe aeoassd, and Solomon Jacobs, of No. 
839 Pearl sUeet. 

On Priday last Mr. Heyman Weio, a jeweler, 
at Ho. 1$ Walker street, was taken before Justice 
Duffy, at the Tombs Polioe Courts ofiarped with re- 
Dstvlog stolen goods, waived an examination, and 
sail waa fixed at fl,500. When the bond was flnali y 
P*oao»to* tor acceptance Justice Duffy refosed to 
fMeopt it and tbs accused was committed. Yester- 
day his oounsel appeared before Judge Donobue. iu 
Baprbms Court, Cham tiers, and stated the above 
'■ots£ aad the court made an order directing the 
■Mglstrate to complete the examination at once. 
XUs was dsns ana Mr. Wein was admitted to bail. 



brought snit In the Supreme Court for the appoint- 
ment of a Receiver, the two other Executors being 
made the defendants. Ou the part of the plaintiff, 
and as a gronnd for the action, tneir insolvency was 
allegoil, and he also charged thera with general mi«- 
rnannij'oaient of the estate. On March 2S last Josejih 
,r. o l>onohne. Park Commissioner, wns appointed 
Keceiver by Judge Donahue, the defendautu allege, 
without givintr them any opportunity to bo heard. 
Tboy apoenrml bv counsel in Suoreiuo Court, Cham- 
bers, yesterday, and made a motion fur a robeariug 
and fur the removal of th-? Receiver, clainiing to be 
able to show by Gano's o^vn allidavits and nl.io by 

his accounting before tha Surrogate that tMeir luau- 
asement of the affairs of the deceased was beuuticlal 
to the estate, and that the Receiver's accounts show 
that covering the same period of time the Trustees 
who were removed collected from the estate nearly 
three thousand dollari In rents more than ho him- 
self succeeded in doing. The hearing of the argu- 
ment on the motion was adjonrucd uutil to-iuorrovy. 



Kiasa OOVltTT bvhsoqate-s OOURT. 

Following is a record ol the business trans- 
setod daring the past week In the Kings County 
Bncracats's Ceurt before "William D. Veeder, Snr- 
rogato: Wills proved— Thomas Lyons, of the 
town- Of Now-LfjtSi Stephen James. Abigail Bplk- 
Uri, XJUabeth Btainerd, Louisa Chew, Eulet S. 
Van Cleef, EUsabeth 8traw»on, and Terence Mc- 
CoT, all of the City of Brooklyn. 

Lettsxs of admiaistratioo were granted on th« 
sstatss of the tolIowlng-Bamed deceased persons, 
vlsj Henry Bottort, of the town of New-Lots ; 
Jennie B. Ashtsn, Patrick Carney, Stephen James! 
iSiartln fieerllns, William Cooper, George T. Pal- 
aec, Poler Thi«|lkeL and Leonard A. Atwater, all of 
the CHy of Brooklyn. Letters ot guardianship af 
the person and estate of Evelina E. Corbeit were 
granted to Darid M. Corbett, her father ; of Jane 
Johnston to James McEwan, in place of .foseph 
Masaoni ef Michael E.ebl to Margaret K«bl, lu 
plaeeof John Pfeiter, all of tbe County of Kings- 
ofBobertN. Bbbs to William Gilpin, of tbe City of 
Sfewport, Sk. L; of Miobael Tries. Barbara Tries. 
John Trios, and Annls Tries to Joseph Seiis, all of 
ths City of Brooklyn, 

♦ 
TBS XBTATS OW THS IjA.IB JVDQE MeOUyjf. 

Ono of the Ezeontors of the estate of the late 
Jadgo MeCann was his brother-in-law, Jai^es M. 
Chmob tlM other two bsing his wife, Jane H. 
MoCtum. aad his brothsr. Xbomas MoCnnn. The 
win of tbo doeeasod Isf t the balk of his property to 
MAWtfa - -- - 



OuAKvliaJLZho 



UNI§^D STATES SVrBEME COVBT. 
JUDicuii *180Hktion;--the suit against 

THE 8TEA>r-BOAT D. Vy. MARTIN DIS- 
MISSED — THE LIABILITY OF COBPORA- 
TION ST0CICn0UDEl?S — RIGHTS OF A 
MORTGAGOR IN POSSESSION. 
Washington, Sept. 30.— Tho following deci- 
sions have been rendered : 

No. 553.— ff. Coykendall, garnishee, plaintif in 
error, vs. The JUinois and Mississippi Telegraph 
Company. —la error to the Circuit Court for the 
District of Iowa.— On tho 24th ol May, 1872, the 
telegraph company recovered iu the Circuit Court 
of the United States for the District of Iowa a 
lodgment lor the sum of J23,734 04 and costs. On 
the 13th of June following execution was issued. 
Tho Marshal to whom the process was directed, on 
the ICth ot that month served it by attachins as 
garnisbecs several persons, one of whom was Coy- 
kendall, the plaintiff in error. On the 27th of Oc- 
tober, 1373, he filed his answer, and ou the 27th of 
October, 1874, he tiled a further answer. By tho 
lirst answer he admitted that since he was gar- 
liisheed he had received for and paid over to 
the railroad company more than $37,000. Iu his 
second answer he set forth that he was the agent of 
the railroad company at Des Moineo, and that his 
duties were to sell tickets and receive and ship 
freiaht, and to recfuvo the chargfs upon such 
freight. For the moneys received both for tickets 
and treifht » laree prouortion belonsed other com- 
panies, liut how much ho did not know. All the 
moneys he receiveu were roguUrly transmitted to 
the Assistant Treasurer of the Des iloines company. 
The proper apportionment of the moneys was made 
by the officers of the company at Keokuk, 

and the Ues Moines compuDy was accountable 
to the other companies for what belonged to them. 

He was not la the employ of any other compiiny nr 
person during the time mentioned, and was not re- 
spousible to au.v other company or person lor the 
moneys which he received as above Btatoil. The 
gtoss araouBt received by him between tbe time he 
was garuisheed and the appointnientof tho Kei'eiver 
who took possesaion of tho road was ^^7,000. 
The case was submitted . and argued by the 
counsel upon both sides. The next day it was 
I stated to the court by tho counsel for tha defeiid- 
i ant that proof could be adduced ot the proportion 
J of the moneys in question which belonged to otber 
i companies, and time was asked to procure it. The 
j application was overruled, and the court gave judg- 
ment for $27,000 and coats. Tho carniabee there- 
upon excepted to the ruling of tbe court refusing 
i further time. The case having been submitted to 
', the eourt and argued by tue conusol of both par- 
■ lies, tbe garnishee not asking for a jtiiy, 
i the record iu this respect shows no error. 
; It is to be taken that both parties WLUved a trial by 
' juiy, and they are bound accordingly. (Phill:p8 va. 
' J-'restou, 5 How., 278; Campbell vs. ISoyreau, 21 

How., 2:J4; Kelsey VS. Forsythe, Id., 66.) The pro- 
ceeding not having J)een according to the act ot ' 
March 3, 1865, this conrt has uo power to examine 
any ruling of the court below excepted to durin.; 
the progress of the trial. (Campbell vs. Boyreau, 
supra ; Guild and others vs. Pouton, 18 How., 135 ; 
Kearney vs. Case, 12 Wall., 275; Deckeuson 
vs. the Planters'l Bank. 16 Id., 251.) The 
only point attempted to be presented by 
the. bill of exueolions was the refusal 
of the conrt to give time for the production 
of further evidence. i.t this subject was beiore us 
in such a shape that we could consider it, it would 
be a conclusive answer that the matter was cue 
resting m tbe discretion 01 tbe court. Its determi- 
natieu, tberetore, eould not be reviewed by this 
tribunal. AUirmed, Mr. Jusuce Swayae Ueliv- 
erud the opiLion. 

Ko. 576.— DatJid F. Barney, avpellant, vs. Ihe 
Steam-boat 1>. Jf. Martin, her tuckCe, t&c. — Appeal 
from the Circuit Court for ino Eastern District of 
2s'ew-York. — Tnis suit was brought by Barney, the 
libelant, to recover damages for his wrongiul 
eviction from the steamboat D. K. Martin. He 
' d.-manded in his libel 125,000 UamMges, but in tbe 
I District Court recovered only ioOO. From this 
j decree tbe clai>maut appealed. Barney did not ap- 
1 peaU Tho Circuit Court reversed the decree 
i of tbe District Court * and dismissed the 
libel. From this decree of the C;tcuic Court 
Barney has appealed to this court. The claiuiaut 
now movL-3 to dismiss the appeal because " tho mat- 
ter In dispute" dots not exceed $2,000, This motion 
mu£t be granted. Baxney havin:^ failed to appeal 
frutu the decree of the District Court, is concluded 
by ihe amuunt there found iu his tavor. He ap- 
pears upoc the record as satistied with what was 
done by that Court. In tbe l/ircuit Court the mat- 
ter in controversy was his right to recover the sum 
which had been awarded biiu as damages. If this 
court had decided against the claimant, he could not 
have asked an increase of his camagej, (Stratton 
vs. Jarv;B, 8 Pet., 9, 10 ; Houseman vs. Scuoouer, 
Korth Carolina, 15 Pet,, 50.) The matter iu dispu.e 
here is tbat which was in dispute in tbe Ciicuit 
Court, and aa thj matter iu uisoute here cannot 
exceed what was in dispute there, it toilows that 
the amount iu controversy between the parties in 
the present state of tbe proceediuga is not eulli- 
ciaut to give os jurisdiction, (Gordon vs. Oiiden, 3 
Pet., 34; Smith vs. Honey, 3 Pet., 469; Waiker vs, 
United States, 4 Wail., 164.) Dismissed. Tbe Chief 
Jusuce delivered the opinion. v 

No. 194.— Harvey lerry, appellant, vs. the Com 
mtrcial Hank of t^labaina. — .flppeal Irom t;ie Cir- 
cuit Court lor Van St-atheru District of A abama. — 
The defendant, tbe Cummurcial Biuk oi Aiaaama, 
was a banking corporation ar,;anized under the laws 
of that State, and had become insjlvent. i.ne appel- 
lant, a citizen of tue 6tate oi South Carolina, 
biought a buiu in the District Court lor the Aliaule 
Distr.ct of Alabama, a( that time exerci.siug Circtiic 
Co.vrt powers, to ^lyd up tue uauK under the piu- 
vialons of the tweu y tiist sect.oj o. lis career. 
Plaiutid' alleged and proved tiiat ue was tho owner 
ot about i{M,UoU Oi the notes ot the oauk, uu whicu 
he had dcojauded payment and h..d b en reiusud. 
The bank admitted its lusolveuey i.ud a E.ceiver 
was appointed by consent, to wind up its alfairs, 
audpuolicaiion made tor all creuicors to come lu 
and prove their claims. 'Ihe Keceiver maue ins 
report, which was referred to a Musicr, who aUo 
reported. These le.Kirts unu sjveial sup- 
plemental repuris wire all ctnlirmed without 
exceptions, and a tinal oider of Oisiiioution made 
aiuang those who had proved their cl.iims, allowing 
first tne costs ot the Drocet-ding, iucludiug attor- 
ney's tees and other ci.s.sot suit. All of these 
were reterred to a Master, who reported, and lo 
wnosu report uo exceptions werw talteu. Alter all 
this was uone, the appellant here aud the piaintiii 
below appeared in person aud hied numerous peti- 
t.ona auu atlidavits signed bv himself asking t«> set 
aside the aeoree, excepiing to the reporiit, and sug- 
gesting many otber matters and things in if hich be 
sougiit to modily or coi-rect the decree, ihe touuda- 
liiiu ot all this ^eema to be the charge that his coun- 
sel ueaurteu bis interest, tailed to excepc lo tne re- 
ports, aud consented to the decree because they re- 
ceived what he ualied an exorbitant allowancu tor 
their services out oi the fund whioh should have 
gone to the creditors of the bank, thereby diminish- 
ing tbe amount of his dividend. To all this it is 
sutdeient to say tbat these motious cannot be coii- 
siuered here. They are mainly adurea.ted to tne 
discretion of the court, coming as they do after a 
dual decree ou tbe merits. Ii appellant desired to 
place the case iu a position where this court 
could review the acuou of tho court on that 
class of ^ntstions, he should have filed 
bis bill ot review aud made the proper 
issaes, and supported it by depositions. As it now 
stands his motions are nnauppor.ed by anything 
but his own atUaavit. So as to tho errars alleged lu 
tne Maater'a reports. There were no excou;ionai 
Uiwd lo tueae reports until atter tbey were cuu- 
tirmcd aud a dnal order ot diitribatiou mane. This 
court cannot review those reports ou exceptions 
taken atter that, aud urged upon us now ou appe .1. 
ir, aa apuellahl alleges, be has been deliaudrd 
by his couuaei, ho mu«( sue them tor what he 
has loot by the Iraud. If hu desire to si't 
aside tbd Uccree becauso it was obtained by 
li..ud, hiH rciucuy is by bill of levisw. JBut ha com- 

liiaiuB Oi Oho trior lu tho Uccieo which id ahuwu ou 

' ihe lUOii ut the prk.ceauin;;:d, aud as to whicu hu isa, 
we ihiulc, en'.itlcd to luvo it. reveiued. It anpeaia 
that the creditors Of the bank have not Ucou paid 
in lull the amount ot their claims, as alloned by the 
Master and conilrmed by tne couit. By tne law cl 
iho charter the atoekholuera are liable to be called 
ou lor cBUtributiou to miilie up this deheit. Tiiey 
have not been made parties to this proceeding. JSo 
rule or process has been sci-ved on them, nor 
any motion or petition or i)iaver filed 
to 8U»ject them to liabiJiiy. The decree, 
however, orders 'Ih.'vt the said ComniBrcial Bank 
of Alabama, Its oUicors aud stockhnlacis, be, and 
they are hereby forever discharged from any liabil- 
ity lor an account, of auyucut, a-c, now or hereafter 
aubsistiug ag'.nust tbo bank aiid (ilhcura or aiojlv- 
holders I hereof." It is taid lliut tho liability of 
the atockuolders has not been put iu issue iu thu 
case, and that white for this leusan, that part of 
the decree may be voni, it is still thoucbt tbe ap- 
pellant has the iit:ht to have it removed out ot the 
way of hia proceeding against the shareholders if ho 
should desire to do so. Decree lo be modified in this 
respect, and when so modified, afliuied. Mr. Justice 
Miller delivered the oxiioion. 

Xo. 557. — W. A', iiilinan et at. vs. Telegraph Com- 
pany el ul. — Krror lO'tlie Ciicuit Court lor iowa. — 
ibo biU was filed to prevent by iujunctiuu the col- 
lection of the moneys upju which the jadgiueut iu 
favor of the tclegrapu companies was founded. 
There Is no controversy between tho parlies as to 
the lacis. Oh the 16th ot February, ldo7, tne rail- 
road company, by its then corporate name, 
executed a mori;iai20, and on the lat of 
October, 136tj, by its corporate name, as 
altered, executed anotlier. Both wero given to 
secure the payment of ita bjnda aa set forth. A 
part of the premises described and pie lifed tiy boiu 
uiortcages. beaiues the road, wai its iiicouif. Iu 
Ciue ot detaulti in the payment of intt rest or prin- 
cipal the mortgagees were aaihorized .o la^e pos- 
session, and collect and receive the income ana 
earuiUiiCS ef tbe road and apply them to ihe debts 
secured, and apoa the request ot oue-thud of the 
boadboldsrs ^o sell the mortgaged premises 



broken, the mortgagees In tbe second mnrltraere 
filed their bill of foreclosure In the Circuit 
Court of Polk Cotmty, in the State of Iowa. 
Tbe morteaeoos in the second mortgage, various 
Judgment and lien creditors, anioiiK the tormer tbe 
telegraph ootnp.iny, were made ("efendante. llu tho 
3l8t i>f May, 1B73, a decree of foreclosure and sale 
"STas rendered. It fixed the priorities of the several 
parties, and held that the.iudgmont of tho tolegiaph 
company was a lien Bubjpci, to the niortcaae in suit 
aud other specitiad liens. It ordered a sale of the 
niort^auel property, The riiaii wiis .'itill iu 
poaaei-..«iou of tho company. The decree made 
-no provision for disturijiuif their possession, 
and nouo whatever as to the income of the 

road between Itio time of the decree and 
tbe time ot the sale. Tlie telesranh company pro- 
ceeded, as we have stated, iu diapoainii of tho c^iho 
at law. Oil the iOtb of June, laTi. the appoUauts, 
who are the Tiustees in tho two mortsaKes, filed 
this bill. On tho 9th of September, 1873, alter the 
Sheriff had advertised the mortgaged premises for 
sale, the decree in the State court was amended by 
ptoviding tor tho appointment of "a special Re- 
ceiver ot all the income and earnings of the road," 
between the, date of tbo decree and the 
time fixed by the Sheriff for the sale to 
be maoo by him. This was done with a 
saving of tlie rights of the telegraph company. 
Tho special E;>ceiver took possession ou the 15th of 
September, 1S73 ; the sale by the Sheriff' was made 
ou ibe 17. h of October, 1873 ; the road waa operated 
by ihe company up lo tbe time when the liecoiver 
took posaessiou. During this period tho fund was 
receiveil for which iudgmeut was aiven againat 
Covkeudall. The proceedings in the case at law 
baving been held valid, iho teloaraph company is 
eutillod to the fund iu controversy, unleas the ap- 
pellants have shown a better riyht to it. Tbe ques- 
tion arises upoiT tho mortgages. The civil 
la« is the apiing-iiead of th" English 
jurisprudence upon the aubject of these securi- 
ties. Originally, according to thai jurisprudence, 
morteages of the clasi to which tho.ne here in 
question belong, vested the fee, subject to be di- 
vested by the discharge of the debt at tho day lim- 
ited for ita payment. If default was then made, 
tho premises were finally lost to tbe debtor. In 
the progress of time tnore liberal views prevailed, 
and the debt came to b& considered as tho princi- 
pal thiuE, and the mtn-tgaeo only an Incident and 
security. In tho present adato of the law, where 
there is no prohibiiion by statute, it is competent 
for the morgagee to pursue three remedies at the 
same time. He may sue ou the note or obliea- 
tion, he may bring an actum of ejectment, 
^ud he may file a bill for loroclosure and sale. 
(I Hilliard on Mort.. 9, 62 ; ib., 104. Ill ; Andrews 
vs. Sutton, 2 Bland, 6C5.) The remedy last men- 
tioned Wis resorted to in the State court by the 
mortKiagees in tho second mortga»;e, those in the 
tirat having been made parties, and that mortgaee 
thus brought before the court. That court, tbere- 
foie, had full jurisdiction as to the richta of all tbe 
par.ies touching botli instruments. It would 
iiavo been competent for the court in 

limine, upon a proper showinjr, to ap- 
point a Keceiver and clothe him with the 

duty of taklug charge of tho road and receiving its 
earnings, with such limit o( time aa it mitrbt see fit 
to Diescribe. It initcht have doue the Suine thiug 
subsequently during the progress of the suit. 
When the final decree was made, a Receiver might 
have been appointed aud required to receive all tho 
income aud earuin^s until the sale was made and 
confirmed, and possession delivered over to tbe 
veudee. JS'othing of this kind was done, aLd noth- 
ing is left for esammation but the effect of 
the murtjiases. On this point It is said 
that a mortgagor m posse.'ision is liable 
for interest and not for rent. The railroad com- 
pany waa in possession, and posiseaaion draws after 
it the right to receive and apply tbe income, and 
the amount to be applied in th o operation of the road 
was in the discretion of the company; so was the 
surplus in the discretion of the company aa to what 
should be done with it. The road was. theretora, 
lltblo to the creditors of the company, as if tho 
mortgages did not exist. Tho mortgajrees did uoth- 
ini to protect the.nselves, and the Trustees, the 
appellants, have no risht to the fund in contro- 
versy. Affirmed. Mr. Justice Swayne delivered 
the opinion. 

decisions. 
burbogate's court. 

By Surrogate Calviti. 

Estate Theodor* Brooks. — Petition filed for 
letltrs testamentary upon the will ot Theodore 
Brooks, deceased, upon the production of a duly t.x- 
etuplitied copy thereof, same having been admitted 
to probate in the Kepublic of France. Order en- 
tered admitting said will to probate as a will of per- 
sonal property, and that letters testamentary issue 
to the executors residine in the Stae of New-Tork. 

Estate Henry L. Allison. — Order entered assiGrniuK 
the official bond of tbe administratrix for prosecu- 
tion. 

Estate Harriet Lewis. — Order entered dismissing 
all proceedings herein upon the cocaent of the par- 
ties in Interest without coats, allowance, or expenses 
to either party. 

Estate Henry Bruncr. — Accounts settled and al- 
lowed ana decree signed. Held that it is proper 
tor the Surrogate to pass upon claims aeainat the 
executors tor services rendered to them in the ad- 
ministration of the estate; that such claims are 
not contests and claims within the meaning of tho 
statute. See opinion. 

BtlPKEME COURT— CHAMBERS. 

By Jxi^ge Westbrook. 

Errico et al. vs. Brand. — Order granted. 
Teale vs. leale. — Fariios must submit issue. 
'Ihe MetropoUtan Medicine Company vs. He Qrath 
etal. — Motion denied. See memorandum. 

8UPEIUOE COURT — SPECIAL TEEM. 

By Judge Van Vorst 

TJie Hopkins t£ Dickinson Manufacturing Company 
vs. The JiusUan-American Manufacturing Company. 
— Motion granted and cause setuowu tor fast Iriday 
ot October. 

Keiley, <£:., vs. Busenbury, dec. — Defendants' de- 
fault excused if be appears and submits to examina- 
tion on Monday, Oct. 2, at II o'clock A. M., paying 
$10 costs of motion. 

Dyer vs. Beard. — Undertaking approved. 

McKenna vs. Crosby et al. — ^Exira allowanoe of 
five per cent. Kranteii to defendant. 

Andres vs. Burst. — Undertaking approved. 

Johnson vs. Sauerland. — Motion denied. 

Bv Judge Savfcrd. 

The People, die. vs. Starkweather Judgment 

ordered iu tavor of plaintiff. See memorandum. 

Jn the matter of the petition of Southwick Hebberd 
to be discharged from imprisonment, (6e. — Order set- 
tled, and AssiKUee apuoiuted. 

King vs. Eppeleet aL — See Memorandum. 
By Judge Sedgwick. 

Veston vs. The New-York Elevated Railroad Com- 
paiiy. — Alolien denied, with $10 coats, on two 
grounda. First, the defendanta went to trial vol- 
untarily without suamitiing to the Conrt the facts 
in regard lo Van Oildus' absence. Second, the 
proposed testimony is not of sufficient weight to call 
10 r a new trial. 

MABIXE COURT — CHAMBERS. 
By Judge Sinnott. 

Fremsen vs. Horritz. — Motion to open default 
(jrante.i on payment of 810 costs ; c^^n.'^o to ho re- 
stored to calendar of Part I. for trial Oct. 9, 1876. 

Arango vs. Quialey. — Motion to strike out para- 
graph 3 of answer ttud tor judgment granted, with 
810 costs. 

Wehler vs. Hall. — Defendant is entitled to the or- 
der prayed tor, Sco. 

Mead vs. Hyland. — Motion for attachment granted. 

jLngler vs. Eaver. — Motion to puniah tor contempt 
denied, without cost.s. 

Whitney vs. Moore. — Motion to advance cause 
granted, without costs ; case to be set down for sec- 
ond Monday Ootohcr, Part IIL 

O'Tiwyervs. Macarthur. — Motion requiring a new 
bond to beexA;uied in accordance with order is 
hereby eranted, with $10 costs. 

Loy vs. kix Fenny Savings Bank. — Motion to set 
aside. luilnment ttranted. 

Thrall vs. The Church Union Publishing Company. 
— Motion denied, without costs; order heretofore 
made must stand. 

Bellows vs. Holly. — Motion to open default denied, 
with $10 costs, wiinout prejudice to renewal. 

Jones VS. Brilliant. — Motion to vacate attachment 
denied. 

Qensburg vs. BJair.— Motion granted ; order of ar- 
rest vacated, with $10 coats. 

Koelker vs. .Sidney.— Motion to dismiss action 
granted. 

Harrison vs. Moore. — J. K. Furlone. Keceiver. 

Motions Granted. — W"orn vs. Karen ; Uarria vs. 
Isaacs; Molier vs. Van Sauu ; North River Sugar 
Itetining Company vs. Vau,Saua; BoUea vs. 
Smith ; Asher *8. Freeman. 

Williams vs. Duryea. — Motion to strike out answer 
as sh.iwu granted. 

Motions to Diamiss Actions Granted.— Iloing vs. 
Brown ; Briiiiis vs. Bo'etmau. 

Orders Granted. — Williams vs. Maurer: Miller vs. 
IVieduerg ; ."■iciilt-e vs. Scliilier Lodge ; Foster va. 
FriBbie ; Detirielf vs. iianker; Scliuttecht vs. 
E mesteel ; Toupee vs. Ferris; Schnltz vs. Pariser ; 
lla.'l v«i Meyer ; Molier vs. Vau tiauh ; livans vs. 
Carlin; isewcoinlie vs. Mack; Clark vs. Johnson. 

Wulfvs. Abrahams. — Motion granted; attachment 
vacated with jlO costs. 



A LIBELOUS STATEMENT RETRACTED. 

Oswald Otlendorfer, the editor of tbe 
Staats Ztitung, yesterday appeared before Justice 
Bixby, ut the Washington Place Police Court, aud 
charged 'Wilhelm Hermanspanu, editor of 
the JVeio-Torfcer Deutchers Tolkshlat, with 
having published ou the 23J ult., the 
following libelous statement : " The staats iml- 
ace of the New-York Steals Ze.itunj, published 
by Oswald Ottendorfer, has been built from the 

biibe moneys received from Tweed." Mr. Iler- 
mauspann also appeared before Justice Btxby fcud 
signed a retraction, statinij that the article in ques- 
tion waa copied from tho Tribune, a Uermau p.-iper 
published in Washincton, and that lie believed it to 
bo a groundless calumny, invented for election pur- 
poses, and that be regretted havinK given It any lo- 
cal iiromineiiCe. Mr. Oltendorlor tnou withdrew 
his oomplaiut. 



aMtdlilui! at it»th^ 



DAMA OESAOAINST THE ELEVATED ROAD. 

Last Winter lioaloy U. Weston, while walk- 
ing on the platform of tbe Kew-York Elevated 
Kailroad at tbe lower end of Greenwich street, fell 
on the ice and broke his leg. He brought suit 
against tbe company, damages being laid at S9,C00 
aud a verdict waa roodered iu bis tavor. Then the 

detendanta, claiming to have discovered new and 
important evidence, moved in the Superior Court, 
before Jadge Sedgwick, for a new trial. A de- 
cision was yesterday rendered denyinz the motion 
on tbe ground that the defendants bad voluntarily 
enteiediato the suit and tbat the evideoee waa nu't. 
r^oa^M iUTlajt bean. 1 »afflffitnt aaoa wiiloh to ox<l*r « n«w izii^ 



FOREIGiN notes: 

M. Barbr^, the publielier in Paris of the 
cheap editions of dramatio works whioh were to 
popular, died recently. • 

M. Merniot, the composor of "Iloland h Ron- 

ccvaux " and "Joanuo d'xVrc," baa been very ill. 
lie is now, however, cilnaidered out ot danger. 

M. Gatnbetta has entirely recovered Iroin his 

lata illness, and will now visit England. The work- 
iuK iMcu of lijudou a^-o to receive him iu grand 
Style. • 

A nmnber of arrests of persons charged with 

croeltv to animals wero lately made in Paris. The 
Prefect of Police has j|iat iaausd strict orders upon 
this subject. \ 

Ono of the Prussian) Provincial Governments 
has prohibited pigeou-sbooting matches on tbe 

ground that tbey come nnder tho dednicion of cru- 
elty to animals. |j' 

M. Alpha;nd, Direqtor of Public Works in 
Paris, has assumed the charge of the promenades, 
gardens, and plantation^ .of trees to be made in and 
about the exhibition grojdnda for 1878. 

The Parisian Jardml ^'Acolimatation has just 

received from Busala ajpair of changeable bares. 

In tho Winter they ari; White as snow, but from 
February until November ithey become brown. 

A vistfbr is to arrivej iii Paris shortly who will 
attract considerable atteAtlon — King Ko. The par- 
ty in queation reigns oybr a portion of the LiKind 
of Borneo. Ho is accompanied by a numerous suite. 

The Bubacriptions being taken up in Paris for 

the purpose of erectiuK* tomb to F61ic!en David 

have reached a large fliure, and it is evident that 
ami^le means will be received to erect a splendid 
monument to his memory, 

The dog census in Paris makes known that 

taxes are paid on 11-2,000 of those animals. It is 

computed that there are at least 40.000 dogs unpaid 
for, making a total of over 150,000 does in the city — 
one to every dozen inhabitants. 

A telegram from Sicily states that a strong 

shock of earth quake wks felt in the island on the 

morning of the 13tb, lasting about thirty seconds. 
Great alarm prevailed at Messina, but no persons 
were hurt. Some damage waa done to houses at 
Bet;gio. 

Iu tho plain s ol St. Denis working men are 

now commencin g the first section of the Railway 

de Grande Cemture, which is to encircle Paris so as 

to connect the outer forts and fortifications now be- 
ing; and to be constructed. The work wiil be pushed 
forward rapidly. 

As tlie troops stationed in Paris ean no longer 

drill upon the Champs do Mars, where the works 
for the Exhibition of 1678 are proceeding, the plain 

of Bagatelle, at the Bois do Boulogne, has been 
placed at the disposal of the Minister of War bv 
the city authorities. 

It is announced that M. Boucicaut, the 
owner of the Ban March 6 Stores, In Paiis, haa pur- 
chased the C bateau de Chamarande, formerly the 
property of the Duke de Persigny. At bis death 
M. Arnous-Eivi^re bought the place. He has just 
sold it to M. Boucicaut. 

M. Leverrier, the famojiis French astronomer, 
has resnmed his soirees at the Observatoire. On 
these occcsions all tbe savants meet, and inatters of 
Sreat importance are diacusssd. M. Leverrier has 
also resuMod the coarse of hi* scieutilic lectures ; 
they are always crowded. 

A journal of Nimos i(^ard) states that the 
residence of M. !N^uma iunsset, wine merchant 

there was burglariooaly edtered dnrine the absence 
of tho family in the counti'yi and property consist- 
in e of monev, jewels, or k,e«uritles for a sum of 
200,000 francs, was stolen. ' I ; 

Each year the University of France sends to 
the committees who have for object the assistance 

ol! Alsatians and Lorralnii jwho voted to remain 
French sums of money culleoted in its principal 
establishments. This year jthe subscriptions of tbe 
university are 14.000 francs.' i 

The works lor the Exposition in the Champ 
de Mars are being pushed fbirward with great activ- 
ity. Tbe ground iaalmest iqolosed, and the railings 
along the Avenues de Sudi^ii, de la B3urdonnaye, 
and de la ftlotto-Piquet, as ifM as in the Bues l)e- 
ftaixand £i6ber, have been ^xed. 

M. Victor Hugo has wrftten a letter to the 

committee who raise suDscrjptions for the purpose 

ot assisting the families of ^hp men transported for 
havini! taken a part iu the Commune, announcing 
th.st he makes over to tbemjtbo annual paniiou ot 
450 fVancs allowed him by th^. Society of Aathors. 

The proprietors and t<|iiant.3 of the houses 
which ate to be torn down tij'make way for the new 
Avenue de I'Ocera, in Paris,] have received notice to 
vacate the premises before' the 15th of October, at 
which date the work of destruction will commence. 
It, is understood that the entire avenue, from the 
Place de TOtora to tlJe Piade du Th^dore-Frau9*i.s, 
will be built up before 1678. 

About BIX years ago a! Frenchman, of the 
name of Vrain-Lucas, was sefltenoed to two yeara' 
imprisonment for having palmed off noon tbe late 
M. Chaglea a nambei of forged autographs ; among 
them, aa it may be remembered, being several sup- 
poaod letter* of Pascal, which M. Chasles submitted 
with great pride to the Academie des Sciences. 
The two years' imprisonment does not appear to 
have had a sobering effect upon Vrain-Lncas, for he 
has again been tried, and this time condemned to 
four years' imprisonment, fur trading upon the con- 
fidence of "collectors " and sellers of old books. 

As is known, the celebrated painter L6opold 
Robert, the author of the Moissonneurt, was born 
at Neuchdtel, in Switzerland, and died at Venice. 
Hia fellow-oountrymea opened a aubsciiption to 
erect a monnment to his memory, and it produced 

2,500 francs. That memorial, which will be erected 
ill the Cemetery of the Lido, at "Venice, is thus 
composed: A pyramid, fixed azaiust the wall of 
the burial-ground, is in the granite of Berne, tray, 
red, green, and black. The faces of the upper part 
are sliebtly curved, and on the front one is on- 
crusted a fine bronze medallion fr«ra tbe graver of 
M. Fritz Landry, of Neuchdre!. The base will beti 
the simple inscription, '' A Lfiopold Kouert aes 
amis ;" and belew. the two dates of hia birth aud 
oeceaae, 1794—1835. - *- 

Count Anton Auersperg, (Anastasiua Griin,) 
who died on ',hel-2th ult., was piobaoly the most gifted 
of con temporal y German poet 1. His mo.st popalar 
worlts are Der Ictzte Ritter, Schutt, and Die Spazier- 
gange eines Wiener Poeten. At the time of his 
death he wa? eng.iged in correcting tiio proof sbcets 
of a new w»rk, which it is expected will shortly 
leave the press. Tho deceased w.is an Anstriau 
Privy Councilor, ampmborot the Austrian Upper 
House, and of the Austrian Imperial AcTdemv, &g. 
He was born, at Laibach in 1806, and married in 
lb39 the CoMuteBa Marv of Attema, by whom he 
leaves a aon. The recent seventieth anniveraary of 
his birth was celebrated all through Austria aa a na- 
tional I6te, and from all parts of Germany tokens of 
eympaihy were sent to hita. 

MR. GLADSTONES "ANCESTORS." 
To the Editor of the New- York I'imes : 

Sm : Tour contemporary the World haa 
been lately so engrossed in the preparation of gas- 
tronomic " literatoor" of tne Jtitchen that it has in- 
cautiously referred to Mr. Gladstone's "ancestors" 
wiihout consultins; its dog-eared copy of The Eng- 
lish Landed Gentry. In a neat editorial crumb in 
yesterday's issue it makes the followicg state- 
ment: — The Buddeu reappearance pf Mr. tilad- 
Btone in the political arena as the leader of a great 
popular movement Against tbe Eastern iiolicy of 
Lord Beaci>nsflold, give'< timeliness and point to the 
oharmiug account which wo elsewhere give of hia 
beautiful home at Hawarden, the seat of his an- 
cestors, the Glyns." 

I have hitherto been under the impression that 
Eiirht lion. William Ewart Gladstone wai the son 
ol John Glad.stoue. Esq., a Liverpool merchant, an* 
a Scotchman by birth ; that his mother was a daPEh- 
terot Andrew Iliberlson, at ono tune Sheriff of 
Dingwall, aud that tho estate of Jfawardeu came to 
hira"tliroui:h hia marriasre into the GIvn farailv. 1 
am veur.., &c., SCOTUS IGNORA.MUS. 

TiiunsuAy, Sept. 21, l^Tti. 



I<1'.I>1AJ.KS. 
i^llE'lJlVrOW.'H OFFICii OF THK TlirUiS. 



The uptown office of THK TIMK.S H Inoatadi!; 

No. y,'i&t Broad^vay, bei.SJstand ;{'id sti. 

Open daily, Stmdays iiicluvled, Iroin 4 AM. to 9 P. .M. 
Kubscriptious lecelved. and copies of TUB TlMUSifjr 

AHVKRTISRMK.N'TS [tKCKIVF.D I'.VTIL I». .Nf. 

/iHAK-WO.HArt.-lJy A FlKST-i.bASS L AUNj 
V^ilresu; will be wiilinu to co as coek if required i^^^aj 
i 11 the liauit of doina up clolhea In firat-claaa stylte, 
i:all nt 1^11. 1)7 VVcjt iloustou at. .^ ^ 



/ lH.\.>IBKil-.>lAll>. &C.-i3Y A UUSf'KCTApLli 
v^youtig ijirl aa chainbcr-iii ii<l and w.iitreas, or to do 
Chamber- work and plain sewing ; two yeara and a half 
Ur.-t-c!ass reteienco. Call or aduiesa No. 133 West 
both at 

C^H-\:HBb:K-.M.^ll>.— :JV A VOU.SG WO.MA.V An 
^cbaniber-m.iid aod to do fine washins : willing ti 
HBai-st with waitiniit or wcnld take care of cuildren ;-h;i8 
nc(^lleiu I'ity relerence ir^im l.ist pUce. Call oi ao- 
dri-.sa ou Monday, No. '26 Wri^t 44lh st. 



C^IlA.H.iKli-.UAlU AM) NtKSE.— BY .4iN AC- 
y'tive yoiiui: woman ; Of would wait ou a lady ; three 
yi-arc' iitv refeience. Call at No. l,25i) Broadway, 
betweeu iHlst aud 'A'ii sts. 

CfIA:*IBEK-.tIAID.-BY A FRE.NXH PARlSIAJf 
;adv as chamber-maid and se^^er lor childrnu. Ad- 
dross V B.. Bjx No. 253 TUMc,6 L'i»-TOWx\ OFFICE, 
No. 1.257 Btt >AD>VAi. 

C1HA.»lBli:K-.UAJ».— BY A NICE, TIOY YOLNU 
/colored girl aa ohamber-mald and waitreiss; re- 
fers to some of the flrat families m the City. Address 
Mangle, No. 214 East "ivid at. 

riHAl«BEH-SlAIU.-VY A EE3PKCTABLE HEuT- 
vyeatant gill as chambermaid : would do flue wash* 
t,iui[. Call <ox two dara at lio. ^9 liaat 2eth •» 



SITUATIO^SJW^Al^TED. 

FE3IALES. 

CKIOIi— BUTLKK.— BY A FiaST-CLASS FRKNCH 
Uook (cordon bleu ; ) husband as first-class butler ; 
in a private f.tmily ; live years' best City reference. Aa« 
dress John, ijux. No. 304 TIMKS DP-TOWW OFFICE, 
NO. 1,-J57 fJRO.lPtVAY. 

C^ODU— CHA.MBKK-.TIAIH, A'C— Bi TWO RK- 
-'speetahie girls; one as nood (Oolv, washer, aud 
iror.ei', the other as chamoer-maid and waitress, In a 
private family: pood City iclVroiice. Address or call 
at No. 3J4 Kast -jlith Bt. , 

r^OOR-l I'-STAIKS WOKK.-DY A. .MOTIIKR 
V'aiid danchter; the mother to cook, wash, and Iron, 
the d.iUitht'T to do up-ataiia work ; goo<l retereuce ; 
City or country. Call at No. 213 59th St., near 3d av.,, 
iu the store. 

/^^()OK-CHA.UBER..llAII>, &C.-BY A FlRSf- 
VViluss Knglish cuoU ; thoruuithly understands her 
business io all it.s branches ; aUo » chamber-maid anl 
wiitreaa; cood City reference. Call or address No. 
'_'04 West 27tb st. 

C1<»<»K.— bY A PKOTBSTANT WOMAN AS COOK 
>and ausist in washiiii; and Ironing ; hrst-class ref- 
ereuci'. Call at No. C9 Madison av. 

/mOK.— BY A NOtWBUIAN GIUL; 13 FIRST- 
\.yclass ; best City reference from last place. Call at 
No. 123 West 25tli St. 

ltESiirS..»IAKKIt AND S^A.^MTREWS*.— 3Y 

a resDoctable woman ; flrst-clasa operator; under- 

stands cuttiac and fittinjf; good City reference; no 

oiijcction.s to taking care of cnildren. Call at No, 38 

BleecUer st. 

lltiSS-.'WAIifiU.— .diss BAKBEg IS EEAUY 
for Fall dress-makiug at home, or at ladies' resi- 
dences. Call at .So. 745 Gth av., near 42d st. 

RUS»..>l.\KKK-01lMlR!!:S ENGAGli.MENTS BY 
day or week in famili«8; terms moderate. Caller 
address .No. 7G3 3d av.. third bell. 

(tUSEKEEPEtt.— 1!V A THOROUGHLY-DOMES- 
ticated, miilille-aged American woman; eco- 
ijomicai, kind, and obliginz; pooil care-taker of liouse, 
invalid, or sewlne; wuuid be useful to good parties for 
small conipensatior. : best reference. Address Trust- 
worthy, Box No. 263 TlilES Ul'-TOVVN OFFICE, No. 
l,'2o7 BROADWAY . 

HOi;.SEKEEPEK.— liY A YOUNG AAIKRICAS 
lady, or any pusitioii of trust; willing to do any- 
thiiiy; where she can have a home for herself and child 
three years ola ; wages no ooject: a frood home de- 
sired, (all or aadresB M. C. ii.. No. 58 W'aBhtngtoc 
place, for two days. 

OUSEKEKPlili.— BY A YOU.sG WIDOW OF 

tultuie aud reflnement. bcini; a thoroush houBO- 

Kreper, or any positlou not meai.il ; country preferred ; 

lilSh<-8t referenc(>8. Address M. E. L., Box No. 30y 

Tt.MES Ul'-TUWN OFFICE, NO. 1,257 BROADWAY. 

HdUfSE-WOKK.— liY A RE6PliCTABf,H: WOMAN 
to iio lifiht homse-work ; food reference. Call at 
No. 09 Charlto.'i st. 

LAIIV'J^ MAII).— BY A RKLIOIuU,S FEilALH, 
(speaks French, German, and Ensllsb.) Co travel or 
he with a sick lidy ; retorenoe can be eiven. Address 
F. Z , Box Mo. 281 TI.VIE3 UP-TO WN OFFICE, NO. 1,257 
BKOAUWAY. 

LADI'lS .ViAin.— lY AN K.NULIoH MAID U'ITU 
a lady ; uiiderstaorts <ires3-makinK and hair-dress 
iaif; no objctionto traveliaK, Address 11. S., Boi No. 
281 Tl.Mi-,S LP-TOWN OKFICH, 1,257 BROADWAY. 



SITUATlJOTajW-AKTED. 

AlALifiis. 

C^lOACH.nAN.— BtT'cOLORED srNQLB TOUNO 
>'man as coachman; best City reference. Call or 
address L. Orahani, No. l.'52;Weit 18lh st. 

0«»K.— BY A FRENUIIMAN A8 GOOO COOK AND 
pastry cook in a private family; best City refer- 
ence. Address h, B., No. 2I!6 West 86th St. 

DRIVEIl.— A YOUNG Man TVXESTT-ONE YEARS 
of age, to drive for a piivato famify or doctor; has 
heen with a physiciau in West 4(Jth st. elsht years; aa 
to' hoceaiy. he can refer to late employer. Address 
Rudolph. Bor No 310TI.ME3 UP-TOWN OFFICE, NO. 
1,257 BROADWAY. i 

EAII tJARI>K.NEK.r-Br A RESPECTABLE 
man who thoroughly uaderatands his buainesa lu 

all its branches ; beat referetiee given. Address J. D. , 

Seed Store. No. 12 Cortlandt at. 

\RDEMKR.— bY A , SWEDI.SU GARDENER, 
ajjed thirty-one, (a!nelp,Vwno has for the further 
Improvement of knowledge in bla business been work- 
ins: In nurseries in Kdinburih, London, Paris; under- 
stands drawing and the tr^le thorouRbly ; thirteen 
years' reference; no great- pretensions. Address 
Bjorklund, Na 4,424 Beueo^ st. West Philadelphia, 
Penii. ,; 



IAIJV'!S 3l.\II).— UY A SCOTCH GIRL; GOOD 
Jhair-dioaser and SLiamsiress ; uo objection to trav- 
clinsz: City rtfreuce. Address A. H., Box No. 2a5 
TIMES UP-TOW.S Ol'FICK, NO. 1,257 BROADWAY. 

LALNDRsi>i(S-CHA.nUER-M.*10.-BY TWO 
bwi'disb Riria in a private family f one aa laundress, 
the other as chamber-uiaid j best references. Call on 
or address I. &. A., No. 223 13th st.. .-^outli Brooklyn. 



TW-URSE.— BY A EHai^.-CTABLB GIRL; FULLY 

Xl competent to takd entire eharse of a baby ; good 
plain seamstrcia ; best Citv reference. Addroes two 
duva, r. Jd.. Box No. 307 TlidKS UF-TOWN OFFICE, 
NO. 1.257 BROADWAY. 

"1\JUK^E AND SEAMSTREsitS.-BY A RKSPIiCT- 
V\ ablndirl to do taioily sewiustfend assist with dress- 
makinjr and chamber work ;. operates oa different ma- 
chines. Address Nurse, Up-town Advertisement Offlce, 
No. 554 3d ay. 

lIltSiE. — BY MIDDLE-AGED FRENCH-SWISS 

woman as nurse tor young children ; la a good 

sewer; no obj otion to help around the bousp; good 

( ity reference from last place. Call at No. 232 West 

41st St. 

■ — ■ . — . , 

"|\r{JRf<E, drc— BY A L.1,DY FOR A QERMA.V GIRL 
JL^ as nurse, or to wait on a lady, with ,1 family going 
to Europe ; apeaka English. Apply at present employ- 
ei's, No. 45 West 46th St., Monday and Tuesday, be- 
tween 10 and 1. 



NURSE ANtt CHA.MBKR-.'WAIIl.-Br A RE- 
srectable Prote-taut vounjt girl ; first-class City 
reference. Call at Nn. 641 ' tli av., in the fancy store. 



NURSE— (JHAinBER-.^lAID.— BY TWO TOONG 
.Scotch girls, one as nurse, other as chimbcr-mald. 
Address or jjpply, Al. C, 10 Maitjer St., Williamsburg. 



NORSE.— BY A PKOTEsTANT WO.MAN AS NOR>K; 
has BtV'ral years' reference. Can be seen at No. 
113 West 46th St., near 6th a V. 



SEAiVIS'lUE.'SS.— BY A YOU.VG GIRL AS 8EAM- 
streas and assist with chamber-work : is a good 
op»rator and haa knowledgf^ of dress-mating; best 
(ity roferenec. Can be seen at present employer's. 
No. 10 W.-st48thst. 



SEAJIWTliESS.— BY A LADY, .'^UDDKNLY DE- 
oriredof h?r means, aa seamstcss in a private fam- 
ily; money uo oliject; reterence giveo. \ Address 
Elise, Por No. '211 TlilES UP-TOWN OFFfCE, NO. 
1,257 BROADW.iY. 



SEAiWSTRES.S.— BY A RE8i'ECTABLr< GIRL; UN- 
derstanila dn-os-makinii and Wheeler & Wilsou'a 
machine ; best of Citr reference can be giyen. Call at 
No. 316 East 31 at st. 



WAITRESS.— BY A TOU.VG WOMAN AS PIRST- 
elass waitress iu a private family; thoroughly 
uiidcrstanda the duties of the situation; can take a 
man's place : h«a uneiceptionabie City reterence. Call 
at or addi-esa 640 2d av.. rear 35th st., for two days. 



W.\iSTKD— BY A HESPRrTAHl.E' COLORED 
woman, famiilfs' and gentlemen's washing ; from 
50c. to $1 per dozen. Call at .No. 118 Woat 26th at. 



WASHIN<r.— liY A RESPRCTABLE WOMAN TO 
gHt Bome ladips' or gentlemen'a washing to take 
home, or would go out oy the day ; haa the beet of 
refeence. Call at No. 319 East 37th at, two pair of 
stairs, back room. 



WAS HI NU.- A RESPECTABLE WOMAN WANTS 
taniilv or cntlemea'a wiisliing; sixty cents ft 
dozen puffing, fluting, and polishing. Cal or address 
Mrs. Sulhvan, No. 420 East 16th St., third floor, back 



WASHING.-BT AN EXCELLENT LACNDREh'', 
to do in her owu bouse : fluting, puffing and pol- 
ishing done neatly ; beat City relereuco. Call, for two 
days, at No. 304 East 3 Jd at., in the fancy store. 

ASH I.\<>.—ACO«PE PENT LAUNURi.sS WANTS 

gentlemen's or famides' washing, on reasonable 

terms; will ;;'i out t)v d;<y ; fliitiugaud po ishiug done': 

best rele'eiice. Call at No. 340 East 37t:i St., top floor. 

VVA.-'HiNG.— Ill' A UEsl'Ei.TABLE WiliOvV 
?t w.iman to go out wa^biu:; and ironing or hot se- 
ek aninjs haa eoi d City reference. Call at No. 308 
West 41st St.. Room No. 9. 

ASm.Nft.-FAdll.Y WASHING HY THE MONTH 
or b.v the diizt-n ; ratafactiou will be given on 

reasonubic teriu.i. tall at No. 214 Weot 29th St.. flist 

flooi, b^ck room. 



WJ'.tSf^llNG.— BV A CO!.ORi:o LAU.«^DRt;ss, THE 

Tt wabbiiig of flrsl-class families, lailiefi. or gentle- 

rien; nudeiatnnds her im.>iiie!>8 thoroughly. Call at 

No. 109 West 3;itli St., between 6th av. aud Broadway 

WrASHI.Mi.— UY .1 KEiPECTADLK WO.MA.S, La- 
tT dioj' or gentlemen'a wnahing to do at her own 
huiise, or would no oat by the day. Call at No. 340 
East 23d st., top fl lOr back. 

A.SUlXi.— DV A WO.\lAN TO GO OUT BY 
thediiytodo waaiiing and ironihg: 13 capable of. 

doing any kini of wOrk. Call at or address No. 458 

West 17tli at. 

MALiE."!. 

rT^x^ERnTNUED^lim^^ 

willim: to make fayotable terms with pirtiea wiali- 
liig anything dune in ahoye lino; country no oijec- 
tioii : board taken iu part payment ; good retetences. 
Address Paiuter. No. Ml ;i<l av. 

COACHiWAN A.NO GRO(».>l.— BY A COUPE- 
tent sinirle man having a first-class knowledge of 
hisbusiie3<: experienced eroom; careful City driver: 
williuj; and obliging; recommended by present em- 
pljyers in City lit present ; t'l-y or country. Call or 
address O. 8., at J. B. Brcwstoi's ware-rooms; No. 145 
6th av. 

/KJACH.UAN AM) GRO(»»l.-BY A kF 

V_.'spectable young man; single; useful man; under- 
stands the ])ropcr cure and treatment of horse and 
cMrnaj^es; is a good groom aud a carelul driver; mud- 
er.ite wiigPH ; relere'ici'. Aildros.'i J. J., Box No. 302 
T1.MHS Ul'-Tl»WN OFFICE, NO. 1,257 BROADWAY. 

/ AOACil.MAN ASH (JllOOiH.— A GE.NTLh:,MAN 
\^l)reaUiMe u!< his cstahlisiueiit wishes to procure a 
situition fir hia c aihman. who lr<s Uved in his pres- 
ent plac! eleven yeara, and wlioin be ciii highly reo- 
omiucu'l. Address Elliot Smith, Martin t Smith, No. 
50 »Vall St. 

C~ 10A( H.>1A.N ANIJ (iROO.^l.-BYA YOUNG *OL- 
;orbdmnn; sinirle; ij agood icliablo driv-'t and un- 

dirat;iiuls lifi busiiiriSi is williuj; and o'jliging ; h.is 
bc-sl of lily relercnc from last place. Addri-ns D. J., 
Box; No. 317 T1.MKS UP-TOvVN OFFICE. NO. 1,257 
BKOADWAi. 

C^OACH.hVn AM) UROOW.-BY A ( OMPb- 
^teut man iiB enncbman aud jsioom : has lived eight 
yeara With last employer; is temperate, willing, and 
obliging ; uuder-stauoa his business tlmrou 'hly. Call 
or nddroBs M. C No. 132 W<^8t 49to at., private 
stable, lor two days. 

CIOACH.'VIAN.-BY A GENTLKJUAX FOR !113 
ycoachinan, whom be can recommend as a tirst-clasa 
man in every resiiect; diseiijtaged on aceouni of giv- 
iutr up liorsfs. Call or addre.>s lor two da;s, J. F., No. 
317 East 43(1 St. 

C1(»A(:U »IAN.— bY A IJAK.tlKD MA.S AS FlttST- 
;< lasa I'O.icbinun; unuerstan is hia buaiuess iu all 
. its jjranchi-s ; lirst-clas.s refcreuce ; aobir, honest, aud 
^liiiiSiatni^a. Call or address lor two days, J. 1)., No. 

15| Ea3F';!:)tli St. 

i-fOACU.HAN <)H <aiO<);V|.-dY A MARUIKD 
Ajman; nnd-ritands horsus; is \Ti!iinp ana oblic- 
ing ; can teuo hres ; is a good pliiii gaideuer ; has two 
yi^firb' City reference from las'. maB'.i-r. Call or ad- 
'^ 's-a for two dava. No. 1,003 3d av. 



1^ 



^lO.\l.'H.nA.N.-BY A YOUNG SINGLE COLORED 
_i.,'inaii in a private fainii.^ ; City or country; Bouer, 
bU(i un;U rstauds hie bua.ueas ; good cit.T reference 
f;oin lin late employer. Addreas W., .Boi No. 244 
Times oflico. 



/1S)A<;H.^I.VN.-bY A CoLUKKD .MAN, IN A 
"Obiu.ill laniily ; thornughly uuderstands thn bu<ii- 
iie-s; best City reterence. Call or adureas for two 
ilavB 1'. t'.. No. 161 West 20th Bt. 

/^i)A(.'II.>IA.\. -THOROUGHLY EXPERIENCED ; 
\^'t,tiiclly timpciitc i aued 30 years; will go on trial; 
eleven years' binhe.^t reference, .\ddress James Alex- 
ander, l>o. y2^ lal av., tliiril floor. 

V'lOACn.llA.N BY A MNULE MAN; UNUER- 

Vyai.auda tbe business thoroughly j will ra.ike himself 
peucrall.v useful; very best reiereuces given. Address 
G. G.. Box .So. 243 i'tmes Ofllce. 

COACH.'HAN.— tiY A FIRST-CLASS MAN; SKVEH 
years' best City reterjnce. CaU or addresa Coaoh- 
i man. ocivMa staula. «o. 123 Wuc fiUtli afr 



a 



G 



CiARDENER — BY A TqoKOUGHLY PRACTICAL 
^German gardener, of lonyi {experience in Europe and 
this country. For referencie, toe., addreas German 
Gardener, Box No. 70, PostI Office, Hye, Westchester 

County. N.Y. H' 

/ZJ. ROO.tl.— BY A COMPB'ilENr YOUNG MAN j IS 
vTwiIling and obliging, andinot afraid to work ; good 
City refer, nee. Call on or address O. K.. 144 5th av. 

ROOM.— BY A EESPEUTABIiK YOUNG MAN A8 
room. Call at No. 1 45 WpBt 33d St. 

TUE UNDERSIGN EU SEERS OCTUPA- 
tiou on a farm wbi>re be can And n&e of book- 
keeping, and correspondence also, if necessary; he 
seeks deviation from a sedentary City life : salary not 
much of an oblection ; reapectable partiea, with small 
licmsehold preferred, ara only soUcited. Address 
11. K. D., No. .50 East 34th st. 

SEFUl. iVIAN.— BT AYOUSG SWEDISH MAN X'H 
a family or boarding-house ;. willing to do any kind 
of workj very best of City reference. Call at or ad- 
oreas for two days. No. 321 East 64th St.. lear house. 

AITiSR.- BY A FlB-iT-CLA88 WAITER-MAN. 

who has lived in tbe best 'lamliica; can produce 
first-claas testlmonl Is aa regftrds capacity, honoftv. 
and sobriety ; thoroughly understands his duties. 
Addresafor twodays J. H.. Box No. 299 TIMES DP- 
TOWN OFFICE, NO. 1,257 BROADWAY. 

W7AITKK.— BY A CAPA^LB FRENCH WAITER 
T T as butler ; ha.^ great experience in serving the 
table and taking care of the silverware; bent refer- 
ence from last nlace. Please call or addreai N. N., at 
Mr. Sch wargerl's No. 255 West 35th at. , for two days. 

AITEK.— BV A FlHSr-CLASS FRENCH WAITKB 
in a private laroiij ; can speak good Knslisb ; best 
City reference. Address G. C Box No. 264 TIMES UP- 
TOWN OFFICE, NO. 1.257 BROADWAY. 



- -""ii 



FmAJJOIAL. 



WAITER.— BY A COLORED MAN, WHO CA V GIVE 
perfect sutistactlon as to capability, honesty, and 
sobriety. Call on or address for two days, D. Q., Na 
132 West 15lh St. 

AUV.R.— IIYA FRESIJ1I.MAN, HAVING GOOD 
reterences, in a restaurant or private family as 

waiter, or to do anything to make himaelf useful. Ad- 

dre."s No. 876 6th av.. top floor. 



W AITEK.— BT A YOUNG MAN AS FIttoT-CLASS 
waiter iu a private .famil.v; City or country ; best 
City reference. Adilress M. W., boi No. Vi)l °TIMIiS 
UP-TOWN OFFICE, NO. 1.2.') 7 BRO ADWAY. 

WAIT£R.— Bt A YOUNG MAN, (HOLLANDER,)" 
aged twenty-three ; apeaka Engliah, aa waiter In 
private tamily : best of City references. Address^A. P. 
L.. Box No. 235 Times Office. 



WAlrER.-BY A CO.\iPETENT WAITPE IS A 
private lamilv, club, orfiotel; tbe beat of refer- 
ences for honesty, sobriety, and capalilijtv Irom the 
best of lanillies. Addreas J. B.. Box 237 2\;n«4 Office. 



WAITER OR DRIVER.-BT A TODND OOL- 
ored man as waiter or driver ; best City reference. 
Call or adilresa C. ii.. No. 215 West 27th st. 



WAITKIJ-INAPKIVATK FAMILY; FOUR YEARS' 
goon refeteneen. Address D. R., Bor No. 266 
II.MES UPTOWN OFFICE. NO. 1. 2.57 BROADWAT. 



WAITER.— BY A COLOSEb MAN ^8 WAITER IS 
private family or boarding-house. Apply at No. 86 
5th av. 

AtTER.— IN A PRIVATE F.^MILT; CAN QITE 

flrsi-claas reference. Call or address T. Johnson, 

No. 226 West 30th fl t ^ .:, 

AT BONGRAM)'S KRBNCH OF*'ICB Is 
daily found, as in th3 post, t^e most seleet help of 
all natibnalitiea for all siluutiona. 51 West Slat at. 

FA.1HL.1ES RETU^NiNti TO 

tbe City and till othera caa find every ilnd of Protest- 
aut and Catholic servanta, Qcarmau. dwediah, Scotch, 
English. &c., at Carpenter's Agency, No. 108 6ih av., 
near 9ih St., (late of 11th St.) 1 

mVVO llIOHIiY RESPECTABLE SWEDISH 
JL ladies want situations in an American family; one 
to take care ot two children ; can teach music if re- 
quited : the other as first-claas sbaiiistrega-. refer- 
ences given. Address, for three days, Ka 435 Atlantic 
av., Brooklyn. 



HEI^^ WAITED. 

A. T, STEWART & CO. 

WANT* 
First-cIasB Dress>inakcrs« ' 
First-class Cloab-inikers, 
First>class Embroiderers !XS FLANNELS. 
First-class Lace- workers, ALSO -^ 

First-class Operators on WHEELER U. WlLSONi'S 
machines run by power. 
Apply at tbe 9th st. entrance before 9 o'clock A. K., 
Broad^vay and 9th at. 

OR W>UCl)M-E.\ BRYANT*.^ NEW WOEK- 
tSuoerior canvassers wanted by FORD k CO., Bo. 27 
Parte place. 

■rirANTED— A FIRST-CLASS QEBMA.'* COOK. WHO 
*T underatanda cooking in all Ita branches; moat 
apeak Englian and be well recommeiided. Call, with 
references, at No. 16 West 62d at. Monday morniac. 
from 9 to 11 o'clock. 

Y\rANTEl)— A NURSERY GOVhRNKSSS. OR QOV- 
T Y emeaa, Kngliali, German, or French, for two chil- 
dren under eight years. .\ddreaB tot three days, QOV- 
ERNlisS. FoBt Office Box Ko. 162. 



AUCTIO^AXES. 

Edward Fchenck. Auctioneer. 

ASJ^lGNEE's .OAL.E OF THE ELEGANT 
ST 'I K OF FRtiNCH. CHINA. A.Vl> GLAl»3 WABB, 
bv order or Mr. E. P. FABURI, Assignee of Messrs. 
i'OHS. VOGT Si CO., atTURIR STORE, NOS. 35 AiVD 
37 P.ARK PLACE, near Church, tbe first asle of which 
will take place 

ON WEDNESDAY," THC&SDAT, AND FRIDAY, 
Oct 4, 5, and 6, 
at 10:30 o'clock each day. 
This sale will be strictly peremptory and without 
anv reserve. The stock consiats in part of elegant 
dinner and tea seta, t£io-^-t6tes, Pariauecnrated China 
va«e9. toilet and coloi^ne seta, Bisque, Parian, and 
lava griiuo i and fl?urea, card tables, jardinieres, ele- 
eant cut and engraved table giasi sets and fruit 
bowls, chamber sets, raagnlflceiit Bohemian glass- 
ware, in every variety ; deasert seta anu an end- 
less aRBortment of every descnptlou of China and 
Slnsa ware. The stock will bo oa exhibition on MON- 
AY, 2 d inat. 

A A. A* 

• B. DiNOEE, Auctioneer. 

By F. H. STEWART, 

Auction and Commission Morchant, 
TUESDAY, Oct. 3, at 10:30 o'clock A. SL. 
At the Metropolitan Sales-room, 
Nos. 337, 339, and 341 4tb av., corner 25tb st 
Great cleaiing-out aale of the furniture, carpeta, bed- 
ding, piano, pier and mantel n'lrrors, chandeliera, gaa 
fixtures, silver plated and glttss ware, bar fixtures 

and kitchen utenalls. bed and table likes, hotel lamps, 
Btovoa, raugee, aafe, &.O., being the entire oontenta of • 
flrsr-claaa City hotel, (eighty rooms ) topethor with the 
lurniture, carpeta, bedding, &c , ol a private dwelling. 

1 ha whole of above on exhibition on MOSD.aY. 

Catalogues on morning of aale. Dealers invited. 

Edward Pchknxk, Auctioneer. 
PEREMPTORY SALE OF TBE WELL- 
KNOWN STOCK OP 

I. 8. COLBY. No. 98 4TH AV.. 

who is rctliiug from business, couslstiag; of ladies' and 
childreua' imported and dome-tic nnder-narments, 
corsota. infanra' outftta, Hamonrg embroiderie*. bcotch 
b'lud-work emuroidorio^. and a largo variety of every- 
thing aupertainiog to ladies' aud childrent' wear, will 

be sold ^^ AUCTION, ON TUESDAY, OCT. 3, 
at his atoro, No. 9(J 4tb av.. at 10:30 o'clock. 

Ladiea are particularly Invited to examine the atock. 
which Will bt- on exhlbttou on-Alouday. 

The tiiturea and ahow c laes will be sold after atpek. 

F. CoLTox, .^uctiollee^. 

ELEGANT HOU-MKllOLii FURNITURE, 
rosewood piano, damaak. and laoe curtains, velvet 
anlBrufflilacaipets, kc. Sic. On MONDAY, Oct. 2. 
at 11 o'clock, at the private residence No. 14a we»t 
llith st , between Cth and 7ih'aya., the entire rich ftu- 
niture throughout ibe houae. N. B.— The sale is large, 
and will offer inducements to thoae iu wanu Catu- 
loguea early. . 



MO.NIiY ON l)lAi>10.\i>!«, FUttS, &c — DJA- 
moniia, watches, jetvelry, silver-ware, camel's- 
hnir, seal aacquea, ailk, &c. buught.^ana sold bacic 
at 11 very "small advance. GuOhtrB C. ALL8N, Jew- 
eler, No. 1,190 Broa dway, near 20tb at. 

ATt HUSJ A.>U JKWJiLRY REPAIRED, 

by lirst-class workmen. OEORGK C. AliLKN, 
Jeweler, No. I,i90 Bioadway, near 29th at. 



COPAETMRSHIP NOTICES. 

""^ "^ HAELKJf, N. Y., Sept. .W, 1376. 

riUIK COPARTNKRSHIP UERBTOFUKE 

X exl.-itinc between tbe uiideraiened Uuder the firm 

nam.' 01 vV.M. U. FAY.NE t CO. is this dav dissolved by 

mutual consent Wm. U. Payne will 8i«n in liquidation. 

"igncd. wm: H. PAYNE, 

Witness, Jas. H. Hopphr. 

P 8 —The business WjU be continued by tbe nnder- 
aigned. ' WM. H. PAYNit. 

^____iniOP08ALSj___ 

PKOPOfSALWVVlLL UK RKCKjlVED UP TO 
Dec. 1, IsTti, by the 1 rustft a ol tbe New- York and 
liiooklvti Bridge, at their (Ifice, .fo. 21 Water at.. 
BrooJtl.yn, N. Y., for the mauuiacture land delivery 01 
3 400 iiet tons of No. 8 galvaniz.nl steel cable wire, to 
be uaed lu tbe ooiuitructi<m of the main cables of tbe 
East River Suapentum Brid-je. . . , __ ^ ^ 

Printed speviflcatlona contalnin|; xuU lafontt»Boa 
irill ba foriai^ed upon appduatlon to tUlfe offlee. j^ 

•mil DO iuiu»«cu ^ ^ ioKaULSU. CiUst BngJTi— » 



VEBMILTE 



&C0. 

BANKERS 



•^ 



■i -■ 



1« and is Massan st« Ne^r-Y«rlr 

D1ULEB8 IS AIX ISSUER OP OOTBUtlUn 

SECUHITIKS. .- 

SKW-TORK CITT , , ! ;.<, 

AND BBOOKLYM BONDS, 
BUT AND SELL CM COMUMIO^ 
KAU.WAY BTOCK H, B ONJ». AN» -«OLO|( 

fNTERES-f OM 0KPO8TTA. .1 - 

DORALD MiilKAt 

lathau a. pish 



WA.SH'fr B. VERMILYt 
JAS. A. TBOWBEUDQX 



JAMES T. BATES & CO. 

BANKERS AK) BUOKEBS, 

^0. 11 WALL ST.. NEW-YORR. 

UB8CBEBS or TBS STOCK Ajro QULD EXCHAKOet 
INTEBEST ALLOWED OA DEFOSTA 
We draw on— • , x-y* 

LONDON JOIST STOCK BAIHC, »' ':■•■• 

Pau. Mass, BajuroB, (69.) T i wra sst 
BOCIKTE OBNBBALE, 

EjiautH AXD AxxRtCAX Bkavoh 

' Ka 4 Pi:.AOx d> i.'OnmA, Pass 

JAMES T. BATES & CO, 

PLACE BEL AIR, GENEVi. 

Travelera will And our correaoondenta ceataSy lo- 
cated, and ean obtain ttom theia iaix» on tli. ottw 
cities and Conntriea. 

KOUNTZE BROTHERS, 

Bankers, 12 Wall St., New Y&rk, 
draw Bills on England., Franet 
arid Gerinany; issice Letters qf 

Credit avaitmle throughcmt tnt 
United States and Europe, and 

make transfers of money by 

telegraph and cable. InvestmeTU 
orders executed in the Ea>ckange9 
of New York, Philadelphia^ 
Boston and San Francisco: 
Approved Securities for sdle^ 

ROCHESTER CITY 7S, 

DOB IN 1905. 

OSWEGO CITY 78, 



DUE IS 182& 



FOB SAIiB BT 



DANIEL A. MORAN, 

KO. 40 WALL ST.. KEW-TOMC 

infoniwsbii 

NO. 3 NASSAU STREET, 
DBALEB8 tS GOVZ&SHbTUT BONDS aJTO OTSil < 

INTESTMBNT SECtTarTIBS. 

STOCKS, BONOS, AND GObD BOPGHT AJTD 80LB . 

ON COUMIS'ION. 

BANKING TRASSAC TBD 15 ALL SBAyCHgS. 

EXpENSESjF LIVINC. 

Peraons Seektng to ccohomtte art Invited to «xWiUil 
the results achieved by the -ClTIZE-VB' 8CPPUI AS- 
SOCIATION," whoae membera. witbout liabnity or 
riek, are saving ten to thirty per cent in thepgr ctia ee 
of all family aupplies. The Membera. all leading bitti- 
ness men. will cueerfnlly c.mfet with responsible piw- 
Bonawlahing to loin. Apply, personally or by letter, 
with name and reeldenc*, to 8. BiEVBSd^ Muacez, 
No. 448 6th ar., near 37th at. , 

BONUHOLOEKS^ OF THE BLEBCHBK 
STBREX RAILROAD.— Tbe Bleecker Street an4 
Fulton Ferrr Eallroad Company Uavw made aRaa^' 
menl with the T<renty-thUd Street Railwav COBpaar 
to hereafter pay ibe interwt on their boncta, •*" 
jf the 



.Ja 



ids. -t* w 
dvBbM 



bondholoera of tTie Blrecker Street B.aittoad wl 

tiot al<«ady delivered their bonds are i^aestedl -^ 

without fnrthr-r delay to the Stuyvesant Safe UepOM^ 
Company, comer of 7th et. anc 3d av., ■»'■ 'te »» 
pose of receivijaE the additional coupons and vartMl- 
bating in the a^Utional secnrity. 

GEOKOE INGKRSOL. Secretary. 

TBE MAail'OSA UkSit A.NO HLNING COflfc 
PANY OF CALIFOHNIA, 

Ex«ctmv* Ojfick. No*. 9 asd 11 Niss&tr •«., I 
New- York, bept 28. 1878. > 
The TRUSTEES of this company have levied AS AS- 
iBESSMENT of 81 p< r share on the preferren airf com- 
mon stock, payable at tiiis office ON OR BfcJOM OCi. 
9. After that dat« it wiil be delinquent, and Ukble t« 
h charge of $3 e«eb certtfieaie for adrerrlslBg MM. 
MORRIS H. HMI TH, Aaaistant Be rrWIar jT. 

cmoa o» SotTvat FKaav Bjulwat Covp^urr, i 

No. 2U n'UITKBALL ST., > 

Nkw-Tork, t^ept. aa. !«76.) 

AMEETINB OF -THE STOCK.BO|jOI£st8 
of tbe SOU?H PERRY RAIL WAT .COMPAST MH Iw 
held at the office of the company, N». 20 WhttetajH 
St., on TUESDAY. Oct. 3, 1876, at 12 e'cloek M-. ft* 
the puiDose of elactlwt Directors, and alsnIaiMcvm 
of Election tor tne ensuing ye**- JT^U^ "P«" '*?™ ^ 
M. to 1 P^M^ D. IX CONOYKR. BecietMry. 

CArnflA RaIlvat Cmwakt, ) 

NOTltii IM HEREBY «IVK.N l-HA* A?» 
annual meeting of tbe atocKholders of this coia- 
panv for the nurwse of electi.ig Directors tor tHe en- 
euinjf vaar, wOl be held at tlie office of tne company, 
No^6 Wall St.. on the 10th day of Octooer, ItSTO, 
Btl'i.M. JAMES STILL MAR, secretary. ^ 

Horcnuiss & BUHNHAn, 

(Membera New-York Stock Eichansa,)' i '? -ri' 
COillUSSION STOCK J3BOKt.c8. > ^^ 

Ka 38 Broad at., New- York, htoc^a, Bonds, aM ««■ 
bouKht and sold on mitgin or for cash. Brueb omOM 
in Fifth Avenne and W indsor ..otths vonwMtM by ottr 
private tel^traph Unee. Acconins solicited. 



tSTAxa OP MiCHittAN, Stats TRBAsraBo's 0»jk;«, J 
LASStsro. Ang. 10, VSTB. j 

ALL SIX TKU CENT. Sl'Al'K BONDS DOB 
in 187.-^, 1S79, and 1883, wid be redeemed at p^ 
had acerued Intrrest attor this date at the AmailoaB 
Excbanee ^ational Bank, .\ew-Yort, 
^^^^^ WJL a McOB -:BbY, state Ti»a«Brer. 

ANTED-«IO.OOO-A KlhANClAL FTUESB 
that will lojn a gentleman aboye amonnt. fot 
three years, amply eecnred. at seven per ^n& interest, 
payable quarterly m advance, in an esjabUsbed *nM- 
Le^ Addreaa 8TEELI.NG. Box No a77 TlMliB LP- 
TO W K OFFICE, no. l.-^57 BROADWAY. 

"a r JU£AS«1NABLE liATES-MOSEY 0« Uf!g 

Aund Endowment Insurance Policies Mortgage. MM 
other securttiea ; Insnrance ,«f,"" Ji'S**^tf'f5^''^ 
bes. companies •*• "'• st.\l9 8.t^2;iy. 

EW-ORLEANN JADRSON AN» OKKAf 

NORTHERS RAILKOAU Second Mortgage eouj^na, 
one Oct. 1. 1876, will be boasHt at P" »iteT tb«, flats 
by KKLLEX t aIlSXANOKB. i)oa. «J8 aod 70 WU- 

bam St. _______—— ^—— 

TO tAPlTAMST^. QCARRy.nKN, CO.^f- 
TRACroRS. A.SU oTHiiit.^.— Att«nU«i ts r» 
ouested to advertisement in the S*":!"*^*?^ U 
Sept. -J^^and Oct 1 ot sale of the Worthlniten Qwr- 
riea in Obi o aud Michigan. 

MONKY ON I^IKK A.NO K.MJUJ^MJtlur « 
SURANCB POLICIES.— Sama V^rchuMO; tanu 
favorable. LIFE AND LOAN ASSOCUTION, Sb. IM 
Broad way. 1 

GJXO.UUUoroved ne.»r bv property? valoe over 
three lines the amount; lig:ht tsuce* Adorei* vox 

So. 162 rimes Office. . ■ - 

BKO^V.N JBK«kTHt£lC«S <fc CO., 

NO. 69 W.iLb SI-.. „.,^.«. 

B8SUB COMMfiEt'UL and laAViiLSBS C^SDfTS 
AVAILABLE in aHPAdTtS of tbe WORLa 



DIVIDENDS. 



1- ■"•■ 



Nbw-York, .•'opt. '^9, 1876. 

NOTICB.-THE COCPONS OI- THE tX>ia-OWlN9 
bonds, matuting Oct. 1. 187G, wiU be p^i onawd 
atter Oct. *2 at the olHce of Messie. M. K. jBBur, 
P\TON k CO.. No. 62 William St., Sew-Yorkt 
Cbicaeo and Alto^h income. ^^ 

Bt. bonis, Jacksonville aud Chica|ro first morteaca. 
Charlotte, Columbia and Atiguata second mortgan* 

OypicB OF THB HocsToa asd T-kxas CsNTaAfc > 

Kailwat COMPAJty. No. 5a WAttsr., > 

KEW-YORK. Siut. i9. 1S76.^ 

THE COUPONS OF THK CONSOLlDATKB 
S per cent, currency Bonds of this company,^. 
tu^g^oct. i, 1876. wili^P»l^,y^_t;^„,gg^t°^C^^- 

CoK."«BR Wall a.««0 Bsoai) fTi., l 
.Nirw-loRK, Sept. 28, 1»7«. 1 

LOi:iSVILl.E AND NASHVILJ.K KA1L» 
mo CO^BOLIDATp MOKl-QAQS BONDS. 

Coupons irom above bonds dne Oct 1, prox., i™' "■ 
gaid upon presentation at oi^^o^fflc^e '^^-fj-^'-^^* 

T"nd.^" the CENTrIl PACIFIC KAILUOAD W«- 
PANY, (San Joaquin Vailey Branch,} and ot tbe ■«« 
bondV.due OctTl, 1876, will be paid at the offloa ol 

Fisk t Hatch, No. 6 Hanan at. . 

'" • c. P. HO.N fINQTOW, Ttea Prealdart. 

A I'LAMIC A.\U PAClifIC KAlLKOiWB 

AcOJlP.ANY.- The coupons due Oct 1. imtbel^a 
Dentures of the Atlantic and P*;:*fij.,«fi?"«* °SI 
nauy will be paid at our oflne on MONDAY next^ UM 
S d prokima TRASK t STONE. >'o. 7 New St., S. Y. 

rnHlj: f'OUPONrt OF THE FlUST ilORTQaQB 

T"mU of tbeVoCTHERN PACIFIC RAILROAD COJJ. 
PA>Y, (Of cabforia,) uu« Oct. 1. 1870, will be P^^ 
the oiee of tne Company. No. d K»»smi st. and®*. 11 
Pine at, New- York. C. P. HUNTlNgTUH. 

WAY 0OS«»ANY.-n«e oiotipons d«e Oot. 1. Irfja 
of aUboada^ttisoottPWjWUi »• P!^„*£f« «^ 
4ata M U» TixtMx ^'^J^^^j^^ KSLS-. 



.•/. 



.,/■- 



"m 






'^^^.7. '. 






'?;^'rw^ 



9 




i ^p» aiP »j »>'»^T- 




jl^^ •' ' '-fr^^^tr; » -.*>:|,'ir "t'' f ' ' ^^'^^^^'/J^^S^f^FT^-z-lpw^--^, 



wMi 






WJgB |fct0 gfltfe STimcs. 

TRIPLE SHEET. 



K£W-YOSK. SUNDAY, OCT. 1. 1876. 



m BEPUBUCAN NOMINATMS. 



■h 



rOR PRUSIDKAT, 

CfiS, BUTHEEEOKD B.HAYES 



OP oHia 



JVB . VICE PBJSSIDENT, 

WimiM A. WHEELER. 



,5:' 
\4 ■•'/'-. 



OK NEW-YORK. 



TBE NSW-IOXK TIiUi& 
Tax New-Tobx Ti3iE8 is tliobest family pa- 
lter TrabHshed i it oonlains tha Uiesc novrs and cor- 
ceapondeaoe. It la f^eo from all obteotionable adver- 
tisenenta and reports, and may bd tafely admitted 
'lceT<»ry domestic circle. The diazraceful annoano»- 
icenta of qtiacks and medical pretenders, which pol- 
hite M manyneTspapersor the day, are not admitted 
bto the <^hunDa of Thx Timks on any term«. 

TERMS TO ICAIL 8CBSCRIBERS. 

Ptmagt viU 6« prepaid by the PvUUhfrt on all Xdi- 
Homt^lHit Tuus tent U> Subteriber^^ in the United 
Btatt*. 
Xhc HjkiLt Twn, per annnm, tncladinz tlia {mnday 

Edition.. : «13 

HeSAHxTiVB*, per aouam. exciiulveor the Sao- 

' «Uy Edition 10 

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llie Ikmi-Wbbki.t Times, per aunam : 3 

uie Waanx Tutss, per'annam ^ 

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Tuuitu ttafl getter-np oi tlu da x 

▲ddx«b!-- THli NEW- YORK Tnrea 

New-Yorlc City 



' IMs mmmmsTuK Dailt Times eontUU of 
iTwviLTa f Aoxs. Jhery neua-deaUr it hound to 
tkiherthe paper in its eompltte form, and any 
ymihire tod»m> thould he reported at the }m&2t«a- 
Hon^jtte.' 

There are several thoasand Kepnblican 
.■voters from the States of Ohio and Indiana 
p,t the CentenniaL They are having a 
'food time, but we heg to advise them to 
go to their homes in time to vote next 
Tsesday week, for if the Democratic ticket 
should be elected, in either of these States 
on that day, the "anbseqnent proceed- 
lings " at Philadelphia " tvonld interest them 
^o morei.'' They should leave not later than 
Vtiday oicht. 



<3en. Dix will address the people of New- 
iTork on Tuesday evening next at the Cooper 
fCTniim oa tho issues of the current canvass. 
/We xteed not urge oiir readers to attend th e 
meeting. The hearty and deep-seated re- 
jiipeet which is felt for Gen. Dix in New- 
iYfnk, and which is the natural result of his 
jgreat and long-continued services t<r the 
vonntry, will secure him an ample audience. 
>He is one of the many men whom our State 
lias contributed to public life who have 
Ixune au honorable part in the history of the 
Boontiy, and whose worth New-Yoi^ has 
Mlways been eager to acknowledge. In his 
mind dignity and impartiality are not in- 
jBompatible with strength of conviction and 
eamestiMss of purpose. He never learned 
to love his country as a "confederated 
Union," tempered by the reserved right in 
eaoh State to ''snap t^e tie of confederation 
)B8 a nation might break a treaty." He did 
detennine his patriotism by the loca- 
m of a eomma, and when the rebellion 
t>roke out, the question of its snppression 

{Was not to Mm one of "propriety." la a 
word, there are many points of difference 
between him and the wily demagogue at 
the head of the Democratic ticket, all of 
.whieh ate beet indicated by the test he 
lumself jmipoted when he asked where the 
teountry would have been now if all our cit- 
^Mns had felt and acted as Mr. TiiJ>KN did 
In 186L We may add, it would have been 
In a very different position to that in which 
the derotioa of such men as Gov. Dix has 
placed it ' 

^ How doeely Mr. Tildkn is affiliated in 
principle with the Southern Democrats of 
j^te Cidhooii school, his letter to Mr. 
tX^ST, written on the eve of the rebellion, 
leiearly shows. This document, which we 
pue g^ad to see has been republished for use 
I the present campaign, a£SLrms the abso- 
ite sovereignty of the State, and the fra- 
gile ant^^rity of the Union, m terms which 
taioat have delighted the hearts of Jrff. 
JDaTU and his fellow-traitors. The States, 
pe asserts, have "complete Governments, 
holding the purse and wielding the sword. 
lEhey are held together," he adds, " only by 
m compact of confederation." What this 
^Bompaot amounts to, in Mr. Tilden's 
ppinion, he is candid enough to ex- 
plain. It is "the single, slender, conven- 
tional tie which holds States in confedera - 
fcion," having no strength compared with 
^hat posaessed by States, which are at lib- 
erty *♦ to snap the tie of confederation" 
wheaever public opinion within their boun- 
|EUuiea demands the proceeding. True, he 
Aesigaates this right on the part of States 
as "ioTolutioB organized," as distinguished 
jfrom "constitutional secession," but the 
distinotion implies no essontial difference, 
since, according to Mr. Tildex, the Uaion 
piad neither the right nor the power to re- 
taia the States as parties to the V compact" 
■gannst their wilL Why T Bacaose, he ex- 
pl«doa, in " a compact of confederatloa be- 
tY/^een the States" "there can be 
3KO eonunon arbiter, invested with aa- 
. ffchorities and powers equally capable 
with those which courts possess 
between individuals, for determining and 
enforcing a just construction and execution 
of the instrument." la other words, each 
iBtate, being the sole judge in its own be- 
lialf in. a dispute turning upon the constrac- 
,tioa to be put upon the Constitution, might 
" anap the tie" at any moment, and the Fed- 
eral power could not rightfally object. Such 

iMing Mr. Tilden's reudering of the Consti- 
tution and the Union, his Kent letter was a 
Texy important contribution to the litera- 
tore of the rebellion. It was one of those 
formal expressions of Northern Democratic 
opinion which encouraged the secessionists 
to take the decisive step, and which deluded 
them into the belief that the North would 
Quietly submit to the dismsmberment ol the 
Crnion. . 



in the present contest. They show not only 
that he sustained the pretensions of the se- 
cessionists and aided them as far as he 
could without joopardizing himself, bat that 
the reverence he now affects for tho Consti- 
tution must be interpreted in the light of 
the meaning which he attaches to that in- 
strument. Much that is suggestive in this 
respect is apparent in the speeches deliv- 
ered during tho last tew weeks by promi- 
nent ox-rebels in Ihs Southern States. 

From Bkx. Hill upward — or down- 
ward — they insist that the South has 
always been faithful to the' Constitution, 
and that the North alone is chargeable with 
its infraction. Following out this idea, 
they contend that, in common with the 
Northern Democrats, they are now fighting 

for a restoration of constitutional authority 
at Washington, for a return to what they 
declare to be the original meaning of the 
Constitution as the South understood it, 
and as the renowned Tildeji expounded it. 
Not that there is the slightest disposition 
in any quarter to renew the experiment of 
secession. We give the South credit for 
sense sufficient to make sure of the ac- 
ceptance of the situatioQ so far as the 
futility of attempting the disruption of the 
Union is concerned. Nevertheless, there is 

room for dangerous controversy in the oppo- 
site views of the two parties with reference 
to the binding force of legislation enacted 
under a rendering of tho Constitution 
which Mr. Tildkn and the South repudiate, 
as well as of the constitutional amend- 
ments, whose validity depeYids upon the 
efficacy of ratifying acta which the State- 
rights Democrats at the time declared not 
to be binding. Let Mr. Tildkx be elected, 
and let there be a Democratic Congress to 
uphold him, and the old State-rights issues 
must be revived in full force. 



It must be pleasing to the Centennial 
Commissioners that they have succeeded in 
giving the greatest possible amount of 
pleasure to so many worthy people by their 
system of awards. Instead of the beggarly 
few who could, in former years, have the 
luxury of quarreling over the question 
of superiority of merit, as attested in 
a competition with the world, this for- 
tunate class is now counted by thou- 
sands. The advertising columns already 
have evidence of the extent to which the 
Centennial awards have carried a sense of 
triumph to the h^sJ^ts of exhibitors. We 
read, for instance, in one paragraph, that 



' Messrs. 



& 



of 



received the 



highest honors at the Exposition for " (let 
us say) hand-organs. In tho next we learn 
that " It is the indisputable fact that the 
highest award for the best " hand-organs 
" at the Centennial Exhibition has been 

accorded to Messrs. & ." A third 

gentleman somewhat dubiously remarks 
that " no impetus of 'awards' was needed 
to enhance his reputation," while a fourth 
firm states bluntly that " the awards are 
all of the same grade, and no exhibit is 
pronounced the best of its class," and con- 
tents itself with the reflection that it has 
itself " taken all the honors obtainable." 
This delightful variety will be enhanced 
when extracts from the judges' reports can 
be made. 



There is talk of a bolt m Butlkr's dis- 
trict, and of running Judge Hoar against 
the "regular" candidate. We hope that 
the bolt will be made, though a man of 
sterner stuff than Judge Hoar would be 
more likely to lead it successhiUy. There 
is no virtue in regularity in Butler's case. 
A process, however unimpeachable in its 
management, which turns out a candidate 
who is not a Republican can have no claim 
on the support of Republicans. It is incon- 
ceivable that any rules of party obliga- 
tion can require a Republican to vote for 
an inflationist and an enemy of reform . 
The substance is more than the form, and 
nothing could be more genuinely Republi- 
can than opposition to Butler. 



Theae eyidenees of Mr. Tildbn's opinion 
,4rith rcigard to the scope and intent of the 
Cooilfttation, and the rights of the States in 
^MLatAoato tha Union., have a daablajvaltta 



mmm 





'M^^jt^ii 



GOV. SEYMOUR'S SPEECH. 

Apart from the considerations arising out 
of the condition of his health, it is now 
evident that ex-Go V. Seymour had excel- 
lent reasons for refusing the nomination 
which the Saratoga Convention lately at- 
tempted to thrust upon him. He had al- 
ready made plain his lack of admiration for 
Mr. TiLDEX. His sense ot the decencies of 
public position had been shocked by the 
low arts employed by Mr. Tilden to influ- 
ence the choice at St. Louis, and he natu- 
rally resented in his quiet way the war 
which Mr. Tilden waged against promi- 
nent Democrats who seemed to stand in his 
way in the matter of the Governorship. 
We now learn that Mr. Seymour sympa- 
thizes as little with the spirit, purposes, 
and tactics of the Democratic Party as with 
the character and methods of its candidate 
for the Presidency. Upon this point his 
speech at Utica, on Friday eveuing is con- 
clusive. He delivered it in the capacity of 
Chairman of a Democratic meeting, and wo 
are told that it " aroused frequent hearty 
applause." The only conceivable explana- 
tion of the latter circumstance is that there 
was a plentiful sprinkling of strong-lunged 
Republicans in the audience, and that they 
appreciated, as well they might, the reiter- 
ated expressions of want of confidence in 
the Democratic Party which fell from tho 
lips of the distinguished speaker. 

From the beginning of the present cam- 
paign, Mr. Tilden's supporters have inter- 
preted everything in the light of partisan- 
ship. Every ill that afflicts the American 
people they have ascribed to Republican 
rule. Mr. Tilden conjured up his doleful 
vision ef the wolf, " gaunt and hungry," to 
exemplify the miseries brought upon the 
country by the Republicans. Messrs. 
Hewitt and Kklly vie with each other on 
all occasions in ascribing the hard times to 
a Republican Administration, and in pre- 
dicting immediate prosperity as one of tho 
consequences of a Democratic victory in No- 
vember. No less a personage than Mr. Bay- 
arc presumes upon the ignorance of bis audi- 

ecces by the free use of similar decla- 
rations. Debt and taxation, national, State, 
and municipal, business and industrial de- 
pression, waste in all its forms and waut 
with all its pangs, mast be attributed, 
according to the theory of the Senator from 
Delaware, to the blighting iullueuco of Re- 
publicans in power. As for tho remedy, the 
same partisan physician is content to copy 
the prescription of JoHX Kelly : " Itedtoro 
the Democrats to power, and all will at 
once be well." For this stuff Mr. SkYmour 
cherishes nothing but disgust. Ho does not 
exactly tell Messrs. Tiij>en and Hcwirr 






opie 
itius 

egi\ 



and Kelly and Bayard that they are 
mere demagos^ues, but that part of his 
address which deah with the condition of 
tho country suggests tlie inference that, in 
his opinion, they are blind loaders of the 
blind, who attribute to errors in Govern- 
ment what is traceable, in part, " to a low 
standard of morals iu all that relates to 
public affairs," and tor which Democrats 
are quite as responsible as Republicans. 
Partisanship, ho in.sists, truly enough, can- 
not explain or cure " moral disorders and 
material distress." On the question of in- 
debtedness he joins issue with Mr. Bay- 
ard. "I admit," he say.s, "that the 
same spirit of extravagance which marks" 
expenditures for which Democratic orators 
assail the Republican Party " has been 
shown by every State and municipal Gov- 
ernment, without regard to the party which 

'controlled them, since the close of the war." 
As a matter of fact he might have gone 
further. Ho might have reminded his hear- 
ers that the Governments, State and muni- 
cipal, which have most recklessly incurred 
debt, have been controlled by Democrats, 
and that the States which have applied 
themselves zealously to tho reduction of 
their indebtedness are States in which Re- 
publican control has been sustained and 
complete. He does not, indeed, conceal 
his contempt for the toadies who 
talk of reform as a process in- 
vented and patented by Mr. Tilden. 
Mr. Seymour pooh-poohs the idea that any 
man can by the exorcise of governmental 
authority correct the abuses and evils which 
wide-spread demoralization has fostered. 
"We cannot correct the evils," are his 
words ; "we cannot get back our people 
upon a higher plane of morals and haft 
by partisan abuse. Reform must begif 
with each man in his habits and those of 
his family." Imagine a Tammany Sachem 
preaching this doctrine to the roughs and 
ruffians of every degree who constitute the 
backbone of the Tilden party of reform iu 
the City of New-York! 

Warming with Lis theme, Mr. Srymour 
proceeded to pronounce the Democratic 
Party unfit to be tinsted with the absolute 
control of the Government. Of course he 
did not declare in so many words that Mr. 
TiLDBN ought not to be installed in the 
Presidency. But he did insist very emphat- 
ically that the interests of the country re- 
quire a Democratic President to be held in 
check by a Republican Senate. We quote 
Uterally from the report which wo find in 
the only live Democratic newspaper, the 
Sun:\ 

"Ou onr part we ask for the election of a Demo- 
cratic President and Eonae of Bepreaeatatives. 
This will give each party a voico in the cooduot of 
affair*. It will make no violent changes in our 
laws, for none can be pissed or repealed withoat 
tLeasseutof a Republican Sunate. It will lead to 
what the public interest in morals demands — a 
sharp diacaasion of all the details of public aff.kirs. 
It will lead to thusa investlgationa which will not 
only panisb, but that will prevent frauds. * * * 
"We must to arrange tho machinery ot the Govern- 
ment, under the workings of the two parties, that 
its action will tend to retrench and reform. That 
was the very design of the toundcFS of our Govern- 
ment when they made its difierenfbranchei repre- 
sentinz different coastitaenciea, and elected upon 
different principles. They sought to give the minor- 
ity a control in certain branches. One qaarter of 
the people elect a majority of the United States 
Senate. If yoa elect a Democratic President and 
House of Bepresentativoa, and leave a Bepublioan 
Senate, you make the very state of things tbat our 
fathers aimed at In onr Cdnstitulion." 

We will.not pause to argue with Mr. Sey- 
Mouit the soundness of the interpretation 
thus put upon certain clauses of the Con- 
stitution. It is a novel interpretation, and 
may be designed to meet an exigency which 
Mr. Seymour contemplates as a result of 
the election of Mr. Tilden. As a devoted 
Democrat, Mr. Seymour cannot " bolt " 
the St. Louis nomination. Nor can he with- 
hold his support from Congressional nomin- 
ations made in the name of his party in 
obedience to orders from the Gubernatorial 
Mansion. Therefore he proposes that Mr. 
Tilden, if he happen to become President, 
shall be made harmless as a sucking dove. 
Being entitled to veiy limited couli- 
dence, he must be hold in 
check by a Senate in which his 
political opponents preponderate. In this 
manner, the bargains entered into in his be- 
halt will come to naught. He will not be 
able to gather around him rebel advisers, 
or to intrust the country's interests abroad 
to the keeping of men who would have de- 
stroyed tho country if they could. Iu a 
word, Mr. Seymoi.r's advocacy of Mr. Til- 
den as a candidate for the Presidency is 
conditional upon his capacity for mischief 
being minimized by the continuance of a 
Republican majority in the Senate. Mr. 
Seymour's distrust extends to the Demo- 
cratic House of Representatives. He has 
no faith in its sagacity, integrity, or 
in its professions in regard to re- 
form. He contends that it cannot 
safely be trusted with more than 
a very limited measure of power. The 
country's safety, m his opinion, requires 
that a Democratic House, as well as a Demo- 
cratic President, shall be kept in order by a 
Itepublican Senate. For once, we cordially 
agree with Mr. Seymour. If there were no 
escape from a Democratic President and a 
Democratic House, their inherent badness 
would be a calamity which only wise, honest, 
and courageous Republican Senators could 
render endurable. 

One thought may possibly occur to unde- 
cided persons when they read Mr. Sky- 
mour's declaration of want of confidence 
in Mr. Tjldkn and Democratic Representa- 
tives. If they are unworthy of implicit 
trust, how can Mr. Seymour reconcile to 

his conscience even his qualified support of 
them? And if the superiority of tho Re- 
publicans is so marked that they only are 
fitted to act as tho balance-wheel of tlie 
Government, would it not be better to make 
the Government Republican altogether. 



INFLAT102i AD AESURDVM. 
The Wisconsin gentlemen who addressed 
a petition to Congress last Winter, praying 
tbat ten dollars a >veek in greenbacks might 

be paid out of tho public Treasury to every 

man and vroiuau iu the United States, 
showed tbat they had mastered the true- 
principles of tho inflatiou school of finance. 
If tho currency is to be inflated for tho pur- 
pose of relieving the necessities of the iui- 
pecuuious, they doubtless argued there 
should be a fair deal all aroiiud ; and wh:it 
could be fairer than that each person should 
receive tho safue weekly allovvauce ? The 
doctrine so often expressed in soft-money 
platforms that the currency should be dis- 
tributed ratably among tho several States, 
in urooortiou to population, hua been car- 



mmtm^ 



ried out by these petitioners to its logical 
result, and has been set forth in precise and 
tangible form. Their plan of paving the 
st-ipoiid through tho Post Oriice lia.9 tho 
merit of simplicity and economy, and was 
evidently designed to circumvent those 
grasping and unjust monopolies — the banks. 
A few years ago the inflationists were 
clamorous for free banking, in order that 
the West and South might have a fair 
share of the banking capital, which they 

complained had been monopolized by the 
money kings of the East. But when the 
limitations on tho bank circulation were re- 
moved, they tound to their astonishment 
that the East again seized tho lion's 
share of the increase, and that banks, in- 
stead of creating capital, required a pretty 
substantial foundation of capital before 
they could be started. The impecunious in- 
flationist, who had been shouting himself 
hoarse for more banks, found that the bank, 
when started, had an inconvenient habit of 
lequu-ing security for its loans, and that 
unless he could ofter some assurance of re- 
payment, a hank next door was of no more 
benefit to him than if it were on Wall 
street. The currency issued by the bank 

did not go into his pocket at all, but ob- 
stinately flowed aTvay to the money centres, 
leaving him no better off than before. The 
next device was a circulation issued exclu- 
sively by the Government. . This, although 
it seemed satistactory so far as circumvent- 
ing the banks went, still failed to provide a 
means of getting the currency into the wal- 
lets of those most in need of it. It re- 
mained for the petitioners of Wisconsin to 
solve tho problem, and the solution does 
credit alike to their intelligence and, their 
ingenuity. They have not only mastered 
the teachings of Landers and Kkllky, but 
they have made a logical application of 
those teachings from which their distin- 
guished instructors shrank. '' . 

In one particular, however, the petition 
lacks that comprehensiveness which dis- 
tinguishes it iu other respects. For some 
unaccountable reason the petitioners wish 
to limit the issue of greenbacks under their 
scheme to five thousand million dollars. 
Just here they show a distrust of their plan 
which mars its completeness. Why stop at 
five thousand millions t If an increase of 
greenbacks increases wealth, why not con- 
tinue the issue until every man becomes a 
Rothschild or au Astor ? JWhy limit the 
issue to each person to a piltry ten dollars 
a week, when, for an expense of a few cents 
more, a hundred or a thousand dollars might 
be printed? Why not ke^ the printing 
presses running day and ni]^t until, by the 
cheap device of unlimited greenbacks, every 
man's wildest desire is satisfied, and the 
primal curse of labor nullified ? 

A majority of the inflationists would 
probably shrink from carrying their 
doctrines to the length^ to which 
their Wisconsin brethren j have gone, 
but in truth tho demands of the 
petitioners are but a logical extension of 
the inflation scheme. ' The arguments of tho 
inflationists, when analyzed, [are found to 
rest ultimately on the notion that the 
wealth and capital of the icoantry may be 
increased by issues of inconvertible paper. 
Of course, the doctrine is rarely stated in 
this blunt form, but it may.be found lurk- 
ing at the bottom of most of;their reasoning. 
Inflation of the currency is demanded in the 
expectation that by some unexiilained sort 
of jugglery money will get Idto the pockets 
of the needy without the trqU|ble fef working 
for it. Reduced to this 8|ihple form, the 
fallacy of the inflation argumjent becomes so 
evident as scarcely to require serious refu- 
tation. It is only necessarys^o pcint to the 
fact that the wealth of ajj^untryat any 
time is a definite quantity, 'flamitpd strictly 
by the objects of value whieh it possesses. 
These remain the same whether much or lit- 
tle paper be in circulation. The larger the 
amount of paper, the greater the nominal 
prices of commodities will be, but the com- 
modities themselves,, which are the essen- 
tial things, and which alone constitute the 
wealth of the country, remain the same. 
If the currency were doubled in vol- 
ume, the apparent price of every- 
thing would be • : doubled, and the 
wealth of the coubtry, when computed 
in this depreciated currency, would be in- 
creased in like proportion. Bat no man 
would have any mor^ of the objects of de- 
sire, of the things whish minister to his 
wants, and if these be not increased, it is 
plain that there cj|(U be no increase of 
wealth. The effect |f such an iucr-mse of 
currency would be rib more substantial than 
if Congress should ienact that heuceforth 
fifty cents should cojEistitute a dollar. The 
■•wealth of the country and the price of every 
article would be tbckoned in twice the 
number of dollars, but each dollar would be 
worth only half as lOluch as before. After 
all, there is no escajuie from tho specie stand- 
ard. We may delujge the land with floods 
of irredeemable papier, and drive the last 
dollar of coined mofiiey beyond our borders, 
but when we wish to compute the real 
value of any articlp, or even ot our debased 
currency itself, wo yrill inevitablv measure 
it by what all human experience has proved 
to be the only safel and staple standard of 
value. I 



PROF. HUXLEY Ayn THE BIBLE. 

To many mindq. Prof. Huxlky's tone in 
regard to the Biblical account of the crea- 
tion, and his arguments against it, in his 
recent lectures, have seemed subversive of 
religious faith. We believe, on the other 
hand, to sound J3iblical scholars, even when 
thoroughly imbued with modern science, 
this narrative offers no difliculties, and, on 
the contrary, strengthens faith. A cosmog- 
ony canuot in the, nature of things be what 
Mr. Huxley called "testimonial evidence.?' 
Moses or whoever was the author of the 
first two chapters of Genesis, was not 
present at tho occiirronco of the events he 
describes. He merely gives broad pictures 
or visions of certain great changes in the 

present order of things. 

If our readers will compare any other cos- 
niocony of the Semitic tribes, or will take 
up those of the Aryan, tho Hindoo, or the 
Persian race, or those believed in by the 
hali'-civilized nations of this continent, he 
will see the immeasurable superiority of the 
Jewish account. Opposed to the notion of 
accident or chance among tho Greeks, or 

• that of the eternity of matter so common in 
tho Orient, or the superstitions of mauy gods 
and struggling spirits, tho Hebrew narra- 
tive gives us the sublime truth of the whole 
present order of ..things having sprnng 

1 frona ajx lutelliseuti and auoremd will. TUe 




date of the first creation it leaves behind in 
an immeasurable past. It only finds in the 
beginning chaos, and the first germ of the 
organic or inorganic world called forth by a 
Supremo Force. This certainly is in 
harmony with the very latest re- 
searches of science, and is at 
the basis of whatever may be called re- 
ligion in the world. So long as man be- 
lieves in an order of things which did not 
come by chance or accident, tiut whicli de- 
rived its forces from the original and intel- 
ligent Force, he is no longer a materialist, 
hut is bonnd by unseen ties to tho world in- 
visible. This grand truth the Hebrew rec- 
ord teaches above all others, and with a sim- 
plicity and dignity unsurpassed in the re- 
ligious traditions of any other race. The 
philosopher believing this has an anchor 
against all tides of skepticism. If the 

Bible had transmitted no other truth but 
this to mankind, it would deserve eternal 
reverence. 

The remaining visions or pictures in the 
narrative of Moses are obviously not in- 
tended to be translated literally. They are 
extremely dramatic and poetic in form, 
though of severe simplicity. Mr." Huxley 
sneers at the varions interpretations, 

and especially of the word " day." But it 
is in tho, nature of such poetic narratives 
or visions tbat they should be susceptible 
of broad differences of rendering. No 

scholar need he told that the word "day" 

changes in all languages according to the 
context. Certainly the interpretations of 
even such vague terms as poetic expressions 
are not half so varied as of what are sup- 
posed to be the definite facts in geology. 
Exegesis has quite as firm a foundation as 
reasoning from fossililerous strata. The 
" testimony of the rocks" changes under 
each interpreter even more than the testi- 
mony of Scripture. 

There is nothing in any reasonable inter- 
pretation of the first chapters of Genesis 
to prevent accepting the doctrine of evolu- 
tion, for the Divine Creator can as easily 
work through links of inheritance and va- 
riation as by direct and special acts of crea- 
tion. Creation, if it originated "three or 
four kingdoms of life," as Darwin expresses 
it, would be as truly creation as if every 
germ in each individual were specially 
made. The language of a poetic cosmogony 
must of hecessity be the language of ap- 
pearance. Human vocabulary has no 
terms or even powers of comprehension for 
the evolving of things from nothing for 
Creation. 

As to the sequence of creation or appear- 
ance of different orders of living things, it 
is doubtfnl if Mr. Huxley himself is thus 
far in a condition to affirm or deny, and 
certainly the interpretation of the' Hebrew 
record is equally doubtful with the con- 
clusions of geology. What Mr. Huxley 
called "great whales" may mean many 
other monsters of sea or land, and as he 
himself has fallen back ou '"the imperfec- 
tion of the geological record" to explain 
obvious gaps in the evidence, the Biblical 
scholar may do the same. When 
Mr. Huxley has explained tho exist- 
ence of the Eozoon iu the Laurentian, or 
of trilobites in ancient formations, or of 
other forms of life quite out of the range 
where, under evolution, they should have 
appeared, the Biblical scholar may explain 
tho Mosaic order of creation. Tho sequence, 
in broad, seems harmonious with moderu 
theories : First, matter without order ; then 
light, then aggregation into systems, then 
the lowest vegetable and animal life, then 
higher orders of life, and finally man. Still, 
the devout and consistent believer in the 
Scrii)tures will not look for or expect exact 

scientific accuracy in a narrative whose ob- 
vious purpose is to establish divine crea- 
tion as opposed to chance, or to the idea of 
opposing spirits, or to the belief in the eter- 
nity of matter. 

The " Miltonic interpretation "of the record 
was that of an age which knew little or 
nothing of modern science. Just as the 
views of scholars in regard to the chronol- 
ogy of the world have changed, or in re- 
gard to the antiquitY of the rocks, or the 
astronomy of tho universe, and iu like 
manner, the interpretation of the Bible, 
yet without affecting its spiritual author- 
ity, so the belief in the mode and sequence 
of creation may chauire, and yec the Bible 
narrative be tound consistent and its groat 
religious value undiminished. 



BISHOP POTIEIVS ADDRESS. 

The annual address of Bishop Potter at 
the Episcopal Diocesan Convention showed 
the same practical good sense as the re- 
cent remarks of his sou ou free pews. Ho 
deprecates expensive churches, except here 
and there a grand and imposing, church for 
the people like Westminster Abbey, and 
would have tho means of the parishes ap- 
plied to practical schemes of benevolence. 
He comments ou the fact that there are a 
gi-eat multitude of young men in this City 
who have no comfortable and agreeable 
place to visit in tho evening, living in 
tenement-houses or poor boarding places, 
and in consequence are led away to drink- 
ing and gambling resorts. Ho justly be- 
lieves this condition of things the cause of 
much crime, dissipation, and practical irre- 
ligion. The remedy suggested by the 
Bishop is practical and ^simple : that the 
churches should open free reading-rooms 
and places of innocent social resort in the 
various districts of the City, as a kind of 
competing influence with the drinking- 
collars. He notes that there are fifty giu- 

shops to every half a mile square, and sug- 
gests that there might be at least one free 
reading-room for the same space. 

Very few ot our readers in comfortable 
circumstances can have an idea of the difii- 
culty with a young mau of character, living 

in a tenoment-houso or cheap lodgings, iu 
spending a Sanday, especially iu Winter, 
properly. Mis small room is cold and disa- 
greeable; ho has attended some free mission 

service as often as is suitable ; he has no 

,acquaintauces who expect visits on that 
day, and ho is absolutely driven to tho 
street. In wandering about the poorer 
quarters, what wonder that the warm, 
cheerful drinking saloons tempt him in and 
soon furnish his society ? Still worse is it 
with the yoir.i:; mau who has not been 
trained iu good habits, and is only too roady 
for bad resorts. For him, tho temptations 
are nearly irresistible toward the places ot 
vice and indulgence. The Sunday iu New- 
York is juolific with sources of ruiu aud do- 
basement lor young men. 

One of the blessings of the revival exer- 
cises uuder Medsra. Moodv and Sakkey. 



last Winter, was that they attracted in on 
Sundays, that large floating class of young 
men who know not whore to spend the 
day. But the temptation is not confined to 
the Sundays. Every evening, after a hard 
day's work, the young man seeks naturally 
some place of social resort or some haunt - 
where he can read the papers or hear oi 
public affairs. In most wards, of the City^ 

the only possible resort ot this kind is the 
dnnking-saloon. Various private associa- 
tions have attempted to remedy this evil in 
the mode suggested by Bishop Pottkr. In 

the First Ward, among the sailors and 
yonng men, the Lord Free Reading-room 
has been opened by the benevolent mer- 
chants iu that quarter. - In the eastern 
German quarter, the Missionary Society 
have furnished a few such rooms, and the 
Children's Aid Society have opened others. 

All these have been successful. Still they 
are only few in number and limited in iu- 
fluence. What is needed is some such move- 
ment as the Bishop has practically sketched. 
Every church, in whatever denomination, 
should cousidcwr it as much a part of 
its duty to have a free reading-room for the 
poor as handsome pews for the rich. The 
expense need bs but. trifling — the good 
worked out will be incalculable. Each 
church will then become a centre of reform- 
ing influences among the lowest classes. 
Protestantism ; will fall behind* its great 
rival in influence over the masses unless 

some efforts of this kind be inaugurated. 
Rich religious " club-hou3«8 " are not what 
is most needed now, but labor and ingeni- 
ous effort among the poorest classes. We 
hope for the time whea each wealthy 
and powerful Protestant church will 
be known, not for its costly archi- 
tecture and expensive decoration and 
luxuiious accommodations, but for all 
kinds of judicious enterprises for the 
good of the masses. Then a church like 
Dr. Hall's or Trinity will be best known 
by its industrial schools, its missions, its 
free reading-rooms, and its model lodging- 
houses. We doubt If a parish could accom- 
plish more for the welfare of the City than 
by demonstrating to landlords that a cheer- 
ful, healthful tenement-house, under good 
moral supervision, attached • to a' place of 
worship, was as retnunerative as. the pres- 
ent poisonous and immoral structures. 
Some of the old parish churches m the "City " 
of London are proving this ■i|jfry truth, and 
acquiring a great influence over me masses. 
Our Protestant sects must awake to the 
new duties laid noon them by the condi- 
tions of large cities, or their hold over the 
poor and ignorant aud tempted will begone. 

SCENERY AisD HABIT. 

We heard it recently baid that lakes were 
inane, and the likibg for them pueriU. The 
remark was frank, but not iu the least pro- 
fane. Au expression of an opiniju with re- 
gard to a particular sort of scenery, is merely 
the confession of one's own experience. 
The man who offers his judgment upon the 
lakes, or tha valleys and mountains, does 
not settle the business so far' as they are 
concerned. The mountains were there be- 
fore he came, and will remain after he is 
gone. He merely defines the impression 
they make upon hlin. Ther^ can be no 
sacrilege in telling the truth: with regard 
to such impressions, and there can t>e no 
advantage in withholding the trulh or in 
deceiving ourselves with !ra?ard to it. 
WhenMme. DkStael says th^ljshe likes no 
kind of scenery, we may dai^bt if she ever 
gave herself an opportunity|t6 admire na- 
ture, but we must respect her tiruthfulness. ' 
Had she spoken otherwise, sttaj would have 
l>Ben just as wanting in 8aj|<^ptibility to- 

this source of pleasure as befdrt, and would 
have lost her iudapendeac^; and told a fib 
into the bargain. - "^ 

It is certainly true that, while scarcely 
any mind is absolutely blank to imprassioas 
from the external world, lovers of nature 
prefer different and various scenes, i Oue 
likes mountains — auothpr the ssa; one likes 
a harvest country — a country of corn, rye, 
and clover ; another likes a region of grass 
and woodland. Perha,ps it ought not to be 
so. Tue mind should! be open to any kind 
of natural beauty. Ai^d no doubt most 
minds are open, to {^degree, to any kind 
of natural beauty. Bat some kinds of 
scenery will delight us more than others. 
The delight which is: {wanting by the sea- 
shore will be present atU'>ng the mountains. 
Sunset over a harvestj country will charm 
and soften; while suiisat in some stonv, 
unfruitful region willi j only surprise. Wo 
are sure that use has| a great deal to do 
with this. To the quei^iion, " What scenery 
do men most admiral' it mi^hfc be an 
swered, "That which |they admired in their 
youth." A boy reared j by tho side of Gras- 
mf re or Loch Lomond would wonder that a 
lake should be called jjiaae, and the liking 
for it puerile. Wibli regard to lakes, 
indeed, the taste \ lip not solely one 
of education. There isfi charm in the lake * 
of Wales and Scotland' tyhich ours have not. 
A coutrast is offered ||» the mind between 
those hoary monntaib^'and the handful of 
sweet waters which; It^iey hold apart froai 
the surrounding ssaJiJ In pronouncing one 
of his own lakes au iiif nity and a puerility, 
the American 8impl^|(faisant, however, that 
he had never received from it aa impression 
such as he had received from other natural 
objects. " It is a preitity accident," ha said, 
" by which people ij*ay enjoy hill and in- 
land air, and at the jSama time have some- 
thing to paddle on; By all means let us 
have the lake. How greatly Would our 
opportunities for amusing ourselves be cur- 
tailed if we did not have oue. We bathe in 
it; we fish iu it, and; in the marsh below 
there is a snipe or two which we may no w 
and then have a shot it. W« may row and 
sail upon it. In shortj the lake, though an 
accident, and I insist^ au anomaly, is a for- 
tunate oue. Moreover, it is pretty. These 
clear cool moorings, hdw the myriad ripples 
of its pure basin glitter at the foot of tho 
green wooded hills.! But, nevertheless, it 
gives ine no profound impressions, such as 
I gftt from ariver,which is a natural feature 
of the scenery of this mountain couutry." 
This critic meant that while ha had been 
strongly affected and delighted by certain 
landscapes, the sight of a lake had been 
never more than plejising to him. The 
reader wliosc boyhood V*^ ^®°^ passed upon 
the banks of the smaller lak^s of Western 
Ncv.-York will, no doiibt, think differently. 

We say that it is use! and habit which .ire 
to explain the preferehccs of men for espe- 
cial kinds of scenery, fit is not the excep- 
tional aud extraordiaary in nature which 
afficts us : it is rathjW that which wa Hava 



seen oftend||t and know bast Wlij U It 
that oar f«^ at sonset turn this evening t* 
the saW road we traversed yesterd.iyf * ! 
W^y isyft that the same line of hUls. wh«tt 
once found the point of view which 
Iffires them harmony, continues day after 
day Jo attract and hold us t Certain it is 
that custom is a far greater element bf do- 
light in scenery than novelty. We love tha 
•ernes among which we were born, aud 
again we love the seenes which first opened 
to us most strongly the power of nature. 
It is possibly true that such liking* may b« 
transmitted in thehlood, aud be receivel by 
the di^^^^^sdants of sires whose homas wert 
by tfaf «ea or on the mountains. There are 
in this country, within a comparatively 
small space, very dissimilar kinds of scmsry. 
There are changes from North to South, and 
from East to West. These variations are 
made more distinct by the sublime ricijM- 
tudes of our climate. la New-EagUnd, 
from the very broken character of ths 
country, we have a region full of nooks, 
each with a brook, and each about big 
enough to contain and shut Id from 
the world a college tutor and his 
sweetheart. The mountains of Vermont 
and New-Hampshire have the hoary, 

aged aspect of the North. The slop-is 
of the Alleghany as they appear iu Virginia 
and Pennsylvania have the softer, deeper 
verdure which belongs to a clinaite mors 
mild and a soil more liberal. Tb) oecnpv 
tions to which the nature of the various 
regions compel the indastry of men of 
themselves modify the landscao^ Parts of 
New-England and many regions of the 
other States are grazing rather ^lao farming 
regions. The green and rocky earth, with 
orchards upou the hillside<<, and the highest 
eminences corered with the brush and tha 
forest, can hardly show a single field of 
grain. From such a country hbw graat 
the change to ' a landscao© like the 
Cove Valley of Penusylvani* There, 
in a great plain twelve mile? across 
and surrounded by a circle of blue moin- 
tains, one -vast harvest-fiald waves in tlM 
midday sun. The man whose youth has 
been passed in the Valley of the Mi«si%sippi 
will rememijer with the most wonder tho 
woodlands of bis native country. Th«y 
are unlike any which are seen in the E ist, 
because of the absence of utderbnn^ 
Those glades, sown not too thickly with the 
trunks of mighty trees, the bine (^ass. nn- 
choked except by the May-apple anl the 
mushroom, recall that £abled time when 
the world was happy and still knew of god3 
and goddesses. The depths of the blue 
srass would have presented indeed a ten* 
der carpet to the foot of Diana. 

We are glad to see that poets who were 
Hoosier and Buckeye boys twenty years 
ago have not forgotten the pawpaw and the 
May-apple. In our widely-various climates 
and descriptions ot scenery we have, at 
least, one inevitable source of direrntr. 
We, who are moving so plainly toT^rd the 
vast homogeneous democracy of the fntoxe, 
should value this. 



i^OTES OF TBE CAMPAIGN. " 



v,y:-L 



^s^^u^itsmMmiim^u^mim 



The Republicanti of the Fif:b IMstrict of V» 
siiiia have nominitei B. Sbeffey Lewis, of Daa 
ville, son of Bon. J. F. Lewis, tor Cnnzress. 

The Eepublican Convection of the Ei^teend 
Consreasional District a; Platfsbarz last week nom 
inated Hon. Ajidrew Wilhams by aeelaaatioa fiX 
re-election. 

The Boston Journal says that the nambCT vr. 
Demivrata In Ma-rsaehaxotta who woo't Tot« Ck 
\lr. Adams, and who don't faetiut* to tay mt, fi 
rapidly increasios. 

Over two bnndrei Hayes and Wheeler Clabs 
and 180 comoanles tor torch-Iisbt parade hav* bea 
urKaiiized in Ma*sachneei ts already. Aad tbeyaxi 
well distrihated aa to locality. 

Tilden's Albany Argus has already get fkr 
•monsh in pympatby wi h the **aalid Sonih" T» b« 
able to say: ''The Vx rebels' are not all o:i OM 
«ide. TDe meanest of ihen are B«oab:ioMis.^ 

The Rochester Exmts$ says tbat a eohned 
'•reformer" who sp^Ke in bebalf of T*iden is ktt 
Citv last week first came into pablic aotioe in Boek- 
ester, where ha resides, as a borclar, by br«aklat 
into a store. 

Gen. Georsre Manev announces That he is a 
candidate Tor Qnvernor ot Tennrases, aad mts rb«t 
he is aincerelv devoted to ths Kational Unity, sad 
ntterly reconciled to nU lesitlMat* rMOUa of ths 
late civil whr. 

Congressman Seelye expressed the opinion iz 
a recent speech at a HassacbosMts azrkcaltnrJ fab 
that I here is less onttoarion now than ever befon, 
and tbA cress 14 throwing more tifht oa official aou 
than ^ver before. 

A Southern paper represents Gov. Chambar* 
lain ot South Carolina as aavinr rhat h« fo«l8 oa»- 
tldent of his re-election by 25 000 malority. Ala% 
that as thiuk? the civil power wUl besoffi-ieot to 
prcseiTe order throngnoat the Srate oa the day of 
the election. 

AcorreBponden^ oftbe Charleston (S. C) il^HM 
calls upon the whit'es to refase to pavranis- any 
batcher who does not b'<lst oyvr bis stall the fla : of 
Tdden ana Hampton. He says : "T be cards arsis 
oar hands ; let ns plav tbem." And he signs kit 
communicstlon •'Reform." 

Congressman Erastus Wells has acoepted the 
nominatioo tendered him br h;8 part of tba Dsaio- 
cratio Convention in tbn Second Dlstnet of Mi* 
souri. So he and A. W. SlaybiteK are boh ranaiac. 
each claimias to be the only fenoine, reKnlar, as4 
reliable Democratic candidate. 

The New-Oileans Repuhliean says that the 
Democrats of Looisiana h v j nledeed themselves 
to peace and gooA behavior, and it predicts ttta^ 
with perfect freedom for every man in the S a • to 
vote precisely as be thinks proper, there will be s 
Bepabllcan majority for Hayes ani Packard of from 
twenty thousand to twenty-fire th3;:»and. 

Some of the Republicans in Orleans County 
■re diasatijfled with the action o» the R jpubiioaa 
C niresslonal Conventaon. Their dcleeates qiadea 
formal claim for the loc«Uon of the candida^e^ aad 
voted steadily tor Mr. E. L. Pttta. bnt their nlida 
was deoif-d bv Monroe Coanty. and the Orleans del 
egites refused to concur in the noiBinatiaai maif 
by the convention. 

The Staunton VaUeu Virginian anys Of J. 
Randolph Tucker: " He ie tho William I.. Yancey 
Ol tne Sonth, and will preach to yon the Doion tin- 
der the ' Federal Citnsti'ation ' with its ' rbktsrred 
principles restored to their OTidnal yieor and in- 
teerity.' while tbeverv duguias ho T>T>oolsiiB« wiU 
lead yoa into trunbles, fhe bare tbouzt^t of w^ics 
ahonld make the atontest bsart shrink t>ack." 

Some oftbe Southern politit^ians are crodi!e< 
with a wiilioenesa to trade votes in behalf of tbeit 

Statfl candidates, eepedally In Laolsi ma and iootfc 
Carolina, bemc comp.i ativsly lnd:ir.<reot t« th« 
suoccsa of Tilden on the natioosl ticket, bat v«ri 

earnest for tho election of tbeir candidates for G«^ 
emor. Indeed, so far as national pojltloa go, tbej 
prefer that tho war is'ues should remain sei'led, ai 
they would t|s by the election of O v. ELiyas.' 

Gon. Tboroaa Ewing Js reported to hav* 
talked nngu rdodly with .i po itioa! friend oa boort 
en Onio River st(>anier, and to nave been overheard 
to say that he realizes tnat tUe Dimc-crats mad* i 
fatal mistake m not conuuciiuic »be canpslea oi 
the Ereen back plfttfotTB; that success tor tb^m it 
Ohio iiDd Indlioa is now hopeless, and that l^ilnei 
Is "a deceit and a fraod." whom the people of the 
North wiU not tolerate This Is interostinK; bnt 
it masi be oonTessed that it dees nut «oiim in the 
-~«t •fttiataotocy way Doasibi^ . , - 



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RUSSIA AND GERMANY. 

Ay ALLUQED L ASTERN TBEATY. 
cxcitkmenr ox ihk pakisiax boubse— 
text of thk stipdlations — how thb 
documkn: rkacued thb newspaper 

—A PK iBAIlLE POKGKRY. 
^ iVow Our Oto» CorretpondtnU 

P.uas, Mondiiy, Sept. 18, 1S76. 
The sensation of the day is the treaty be- 
tween Kuss-aand Germany respecting Ottoman 
kffairs. just pubiiahed by La France, the journal 
Di£jailede6>rardin. Great excitonientUaa been 
Rtosed bei-e fey it, and for two days the Bourse 
bas been unusually agitated. This alleged 
"Preliniinf^ry Trcary" begins by sayinK that 

tbe war io the Euut may compromiso the tran- 
quillity of Europe, and to urcveuc that the Em- 
peion of Itusaia and Germany enter into 
the foUovrinz agrcoment: The firat ar- 
■ ttoW Stipulates thiit neither of the 
g^'^two Euiperorsi shall take any steps con- 
' ■ temins Turkish affairs, ^irher diplomatically 
' tor otherwise, without having fi;3t consulted the 
other. ,Artii-h< second stipulates ttat in case ot 
' i a defefit ot tho Strvians by the Turks the two 
£mperors would intertere in favor of tbo tor- 
toer for tho puruoso of maintaminfr tho status 
S««o fixed by tbo Tniaty of Fai'is. Artio e third 
tea -rves for each monarch the right of insi'>tins 
^ presence of the Sultan and his Government 
Upon the rotorras necessary for the wel-bo nj 
«nd safetv of h s C;iriatian subjects. Artie. e 
fourth specitifs that iu case tho Sorvia^is are 
BOoeeMiful the EmperoV of Gnnu;inv and the 
Emperor of all the Kussias ahall accept the in- j 
dep«ndonce of tho Sclavs, including thcss of i 
Moldavia and Wailairhia, and thev ahall then 
call a cOTigresd lo derermiae the beat organiza- 
tioB tor this new nation ani a political stains 
in conformity with the situation. T.ifc 8U3ceed- 
in;j paraeiapbs I must translate literally: 

Art. V. By rbis tact, tho ''iry «t CoustaatmoDlw 
oVtMiiifl Cu b- the' raui.ai im Ear ipeao Turkey, their 
^(ujeaties tn ■ Ejip ror of (ienuaDV au i K nir "t 
'Pruasia an i th^ Einpi ror ot hII ;lie R isai.^.v will 
pnip<me (0 toe <reai powi-ri o iuvfto hu Mujo^ y 
tae bnltun to tranater iii:i resid-.iice co liis territii- 
. Tiw tu As*a, auu tu i>utu tXf B 8ubiiru-< and tlie 
city to lr«H) uoiiiiuurcfl, ziriaa rU'-in ioiiiic-di.ite 
frauctiixrs a:idi'r ihu icuaraut e .>f ail the k^r^'ai Eii- 
Tupean S.^'t-a. I'hu hixh voucracb<ui; par.ios wid 
liece STily lccuiiv tlia B ajb< rns atxl the City ot 
Con-<'.autiuoirio wi'ii tiieir laiid aua sea force*, 
eaaruiDK Uj«iu uu.il their fiita h,is be n Uuter- 

AbT TI. If if. sboniti happen that, throuah dif- 
fetvuveaot Dill. on. an ace ra cannot i>«< e~tai' i.hed 
f>e jweoii the ai-e.it w>-"rH<>t in>tr MJcsuea the 
S>i>p>;ror ot ■i-ruiiiiy. ECia>: ot Prns?»ii, aua tue 
Jbuii^nir oi all tao Ka4'i > , uu>D ibe iMaia euuu- 
cUled alnivd lu ..rtiu.us 3, 4. -iia a, and tbar ail bo)>e 
of au aiidorsit Ouid ^ u:k>.j ibii vauj^'ct ahould be- 
c-ma iui <>»biu •*, Iti - b'.:b ut.uiraciiut! paTti:;s win 
Msua ih ir u> i ts t u<»'Pn (o uccuuy together ihe 
l«mtoi-y ot lur beiiicereuts, »» us to i;ive to tbe 
atonawii i cuau.rwa •■vei-y t'aci ity destrui lor cbooij- 
lux auii ailo (lu^ suuU a toiui ul guveriiuieuc ua 
■ll>'ll auiT ta-iii otst. 

AST. Vll. Tunr M.-iJesties tbe Emp'=ri>r of Ger- 
maoy. Kiii^ oi Pruajio. uiiil ilie £)jupeiur of ail tbe 
tbf Kasoi..', IU oi'..er lo t>t« preDiirou tur any eveufa- 
alit; cuucci'uiui; a ;:rLier,.l cui.d.i<rati<>u iu E^rup - 
riMiaitm.^ tioiu woiiij lu ib:- E lat, ai^reD to uui.e 
the r tiiud au l lea I. rceatcr iho purpose of rt-pu'siua: 
ail a](trre<i4.nii« o 1 lii.' uari ot tme or niuru puwuiii 
}n>tu wu (o\ ur dircc:iou ihey may cum.^. 

.AJir. VliL I'uo ooa !ier.i(i >u, ilio force of the 
War veaceia, aiiU ho umu .tjr <if troop? to be detur- 
aiiotd »i.l ue tue »ue<-iai^ uLJ'ct of uu alterior cuu- 
Teuiion, wUicn ^-u.iii im aDu> xoo to tuu dcdnrte ot- 
teiiKive auU .inttu^ive irtfuiy. au t it, bhaii tijve thx 
laiue turoe au<i Vuiuo a« if lui-uiiu,: an ia.etirai part 
3t ttaat treaty. 

AJtT iX — The or^nlng of the n^potiatloDS for 
th« ueQui.o ott°eu»iyj ikud delensvo treaty, to oe 
coocluUeti uiH>u ibtt pi'catrnt proliiuiuary t>ades. will 
b« a<*l>i at i>. r.iu wi bin iWo niouinci oi cQe dai,u of 
tbe raiinraiiuu of tue pteseni. try cbcir ^ajcatirs 
the Kiupirot' ui G imauv. Ki.ojs oi ii'rU'fsi >, a.iU Lh« 
2^iDu«.ur Kt all t^e Kuoaiajs uraUwincc, it it cau be 
. \iiuu*. 

ABT. X. — Tha ;Tf aent shall be iimnediately snb- 
ntitiva lur .I'uL.ficatiOU lu tbt-ir MjJcs ics tUe £ u? 
licfor nl Uei'oiiaiiy, )L.ni ut Pi'uaaid, uud tuc E'ji- 
p«rur ut kii .11" iiu4oia3. 

.lu tat;b ut watuii lUa uaderiiiirDed bavs aSixdd 
tbrlr alitu.* auu soals to luo oieaeut prelluj.Uuiy 
txeuir. ^autt at li^ihn the el<-veu:b Uay of the 
lUuUih ul ,iuue, Oi<e luoaaaud fijihi liiiixired aud 
MtTcu.y-dix. Bi-> .iAE-_K. I 

(jOIirdoia.dKOFr. 

A certified copy.— CimteADiiUJKao. I 

Jfo one cau lull tDobst^rvo that this is a very 
inportuut Uoeuiueuc, ii Kenuine, aua tbe quoii- j 
tiwu nattti-aiiy uriao^ bow -it camo to be pub-< ; 
lisaed in tav culum iS of La irancet I EC^ve ■ 
the avory counecUid ' with it: About two | 
months ago, wbtu the. King of Greece left ; 
Paris hastify lor Eaglaad, as 1 noted in one of i 
my previous lettcra, tue Cj^rc of Uuasia. wish- i 
isx'i to arm tbe KIl^ against the soliciiatwns of i 
the Ea^iish Gof^rumeat, in a B>jnse more iavor ' 
"mble to Turkey, bad Count Ada! berg writ*? a j 

letter in liussian to Count Suouvului to ao- I 

couipauy a copy of the pro'»ent treaty. In tbia 
letter be was asked to communicate secretly to 
the Kins tbe lact oi an jiuderstanding between 
Husaia and Germauy. After baviu^ boeu read 

to tbe Ki£K> tbis document was deposited m 
the arcbivea of the Uu<iaiau embassy at Lou- 
don, and aostrai^tea by the present Premier. 
As thive different attempts had beeii made to 

lireak lutu bia buu~e to uet po^^SBsaioa ot the ^ 
treaty, tie bad ic piiotograubeJ. it Wiis i>ua of t 
thj pboto^raphio copies that be showed, but I 
tbo wriifinai was for aaii*. It came into ibe pos- ' 
S4-aaiim of .U. Eaiil Do Glrardm, ana ne iiivitca 
all the editors wuo douat its autlieaticlty to 
come to Uis pr.vate reaideuce iiud verity the 
n^natore ol Cimut Adeloei-;:. borne weut and 
wore suii.-ned ; tat- pupar wore an otUodal air 
that made an impres«i;ou; it was evident. y tho 
pa)>er ol too Czar's pr.vate Cabinet ; tbe iiaujo 
ot Count Aueloer^ was writteu out there in 
lull; butanuuji>cr ret used to go lor the ver^- i 
goi.d reason tuat they knew nothiuic at a;l i 
about tue haudwr^tm,; ot Count Adfcioer;;, and 
Were lucompeteuc to loll wbetuer or not it was 
genuine. 

But there is no doubt in tbe world that the 
"preiiminary treaty' is a lorKery, ana raibor 
elumsily ej:ccuied at iliat. Souietiuic ago 1 
was visitec by an individual who proposed to 
sell me a doeunjeut ol tbe k>nd lor the bum ot 
SilU.UOO. auii 1 atterward learned that the luau's 
offer Lad been made to all Ibo correspondeuts 
OI tlae iea.iiiig iouruals or the worlo rcsiuiu!; lu 
Parid. It was first otiered lO tbe eorrejiooiidcut 
ot ibe Loi.dwn Xinie« lor lOO.uOO iraiics. lie 
aid not wish ro pujchai>e, ana recommended 
the uiaivtuual to go to l;i« Ottoman Amoassa- 
SadyK-PaTsiia if'uucod over ilio two ur»t 



they would steal a copy ol it for 150,000 francs, 
enough for thom to lenve the country and live 
abroad, tierr Von Kendeli struck a barfcam 
ai>d paid this sum torn codv of the bull. It 
bad every appearance of beiuu; genuine, and it 
bad attaehea~^o it perfect imitatioun ot the 
si^naturi'9 of tbe Popo and of the Cardi- 
nal Sscretary. The bnll created a pro- 
lound .SBUSaiion, but on examinias into 
it a few weeks later it was found to be 
a transcript ot a Poll tiflcal bull issu^^d over a 
ct'iiturv a,;o by ouc of the predecessors of Pius 
IX. it was genuine, thorelore, all but the 
BUiiatiircs, and naturally tho ideas in it were, 
ao the Ktisiian journals muintained. a century 
behind t e times. The predout treaty is prob- 
ab.y the work of a more vulgar tor^^er, since 
many erro:\s are easily dec. cted ia it, and 
jiorten up with the so.e iutsution of gettiug 
money out of one of the great journals of 
Eujflaud or America. 



TMi; WAY AWARDS iVERE MADE. 



THE ORIGINAL /.WARD OF MEDALS IN THE 
ART DHPARTMEXI — A.ND UOW AN IN- 
CKE.\SE WAS MAXCEUVKKD— THE SUP- 

PLKSIKKIAL LIST. 
To the Editcn- of the Sew- York Timesr 

Cue of your correspondents at Philadelphia 
has iodicated i-ometbini: of thedissatislaction which 
is felt over tbo svsitm ot awards for snperiority iu 
different department a. Will you permit one who is 
iu some measure behind the soenes, and wh^) can 
vouch for the greater part of his sfatements from 
persooat knowleafre, to toll through tbo medium of 
your great paoer the true inwardness of some of the 
awards iu the Art Department. The awards were 
niadu by- th:> juages of all the nations early in the 
Ceutenni.il season. S >nje of the foreijjn ju Iges 
complainea at that time that they were rather hur- 
ried by the Euy:lish and American judges, who 
preyed lhiu2s forward somewhat more rapidly 
tnau, BS ihey thonabt, clue rojard to jastico de- 
manded. But, upon tbe whole, the result, tlioogh 
more fhvorable to oije or two countries than it 
wou.d have been had more time been given, was in 
the main Ju!>t. That award was as follows : 

PicturpS.Aw'dp.| Pictures Aw'd". 
l:-t -Austria i'i'^ 



33 .ti.l.y 

13;!w^-dou 

ii('l<ussia. 

G Norw.iy 

6 Mijiicci 

9,'Jii.z-.l 



.119 


4 


.. OS 


'2 


.. 63 


4 


.. 6v5 


3 


.. :^o 





.. 10 






t'nlt'Ki^tati-8..t;o7 

Fiance v;ad 

bugl.kod V3'i 

£eiu:iaiii 173 

iVeihe laa.is 16 ' 

S n.n 148 

O'erujauy 14j 

This was the re^u^t of the labors of the eutfrebody 
ot Jud es. That, in consequence ot the want oi 
graduation in tne Cjnteuniai system of awards, the 
thin^ was aa absolute tares was manifest enough. 
This was specially deroonstrated In the bieh art 
grouD. Here on. y eicht medals wpre given, of which 
Francs toi.k one with thii picture by George Becuer, 
Eusland took twn w.tn pictures oy Frederick Leieh- 
lon and Altua Tadema; Austria took one with Hans 
Makai't's magniacent picture of " Catherine Cor- 
nalt's Triumph," and Spain took tour. Naturally, 
from the true point of view, the great success of tbe 
art dioplay fell to the Spanish lot, but in conse- 
qaence »f tho bnngl'Ug system it is impossibli- 

to discriminate, and number* count instead 

of values. In fact puppies became as v.iln- 
able as young lions ia snite of M op. 
Belgium and the XetberUnds were greatly 
irritated at' the result,, and ibt) B.dgian jndse de- 
parted occlaring that ho would not accdpt the 
noedaU. Oilier jud-jes also returned home, tho E-iij- 
lish. French, Swedish, and m..ny others. So soouer 
ba 1 a majoiitv ot tbe judgiag body left iu the full 
belief ihatali bal beeu defi.jitelv settled, when two 
of tbe United S.ates jud;;es and the Nether ands 
juflge laid piaus for a new series of uw.irds to suu- 
pleuient the fi st. Tao Geriuan judge, who re- 
mained, Was asked to take a baud, and auo the 
Spanish judge. Count Donadio. Both refused with 
much luuizuatiou. The three inentioued then weuf 
througb'tbe farce of another examination and sent 
iu to the Chief ot the Bar- au of Awari a new list oi 
names for m*^aIl.zatiou wuica was approved. Tbe 
new deal was as follows : 



United St ites..., 

trduue 

I u;iaua 

Eel'riu 11 

iNe.berlauud 

.■^' p 1111 

Ob mm 

iiustia 

bwl-d u 

l,u ail 

Korway -, 

.uvxico 

Lr^zi 

The^e U^jures have been ;iivea lo me noon such 
authority a?> I cannot for a moiueui aonbt. I will 
not comment apiu them, for they speak for tbem- 
bPlves. All 1 have to say is thii: That tho flrsi 
award is the oaly cue that is \vortby of coasider- 
sliun, and the preseut one, wbi^h bas been pub- 
lished, is tbe result of tbn mancBivras I have 
retated. BEHIND THE bCENES. 



First 


Supp'e- 




Aw-ru. meaiary. 


I'l. 


la 


•2a 


41 


Itj 


Id 


bo 


IJ 


10 


2.-, 


i 


13 


\o 


6 


24 


3" 


6 


2 


8 


y 


12 

7 


21 


j7 


14 


2 





•> 


4 


3 


7 


3 





3 





^ 


2 





i 


1 



IvEvrToEK. Sarurday. sj yt. 30, lb76. 



LUSSEc, JiY FIJRE. 



dor. 

ariicl«8 anu uetecieu two errors thai no slaies- 
man or dipiouiat woulo have uiaue. Ue gave 
back tue copy, aud tueu n was nawtied aaoiii; 
. Paris tor souie iiiue ueiore it oaoie into the 
hanas ot Ai. De G.iaid.n. One ot the journaia 
rery juativ remarked m.it if be paid over i? 50 
lor 11 he laiitsu lo gel tliK wuriu ol bis money. 
, M. l>e Giraruiu sioui;y uiaintains bis own 
good laita auu uis beiiei iu tue autueuticity ot 
this treaty. liut ii cuiuaius luterual proois ot 
lalsity. m tbe lirst place, a di|iioiiiaiiu usa^je 
has been violated il tuis is reaily a copy oi^a 
treaty, lor lUe cupy icuiaiuiog lu a cJicuctliene 
ot a btauj ougiil lo bear lue si^uaiuiu oi itio 
Coauueiior ui ibal iStale Uist. Tliis purpuns 
'to be a copy ol' tbe Uusaiao copy, mane by the 
ISmper r's Chjl ae Cao.uet lor iho Kiug oi 
Gieoce, and yei i'r.nce Uismarck's uame .s 
aigueu first, laeuoudiy, aervia is spokeu oi as 
a "suzexaiu" uisteaa of a "vassai" Siate. 
MoiUaVia and Wajiaobia are speciadv named 
rp speaking of tho bolavs, and not a wora is 
Said aboat ib<J8e of Greece. And tbo Uussiau 
Cbauceiioi-'s iiame is speUed " Gortoba;£(>U." 
wuiie he bimseii wnies ii •• OoricUaiiovv," lu 
tbo Uosaiau ^ly.e. ijastly, I may note tue tact 
that tue pi-eliu'iiiiu-y treaty pui'pol'ls lo have 

beeu s gnod at iJc.un ou the liiu ot June, and 
t'ruice GortCiaaKuli a.nd all iiis Cabinet weio at 
tuia uu idai uuy. 

lu auuicioii to all thi^, We may be surs that 
a docuujuut oi this iiul woUiU i>e more se- 
eoreiy tiUarded, aad the mau wuo stole it, bad 
It. oeen liLUdiuc, would uaVo t>een arresiod 
here immediuieiy auter tiaviug olt-.-red it to the 
flL-Wspaper eone<-poudo..ils tor salu. M. Do 
r biraraiii may luiuii. luo ucaty gwiuiue tor all 
1 know — ..nu ceriainiy it is rraw(twii*/ai/e— but 
i my luipressiou is mat ho tooa luo documeut 
WibboUl Vci-y eiuoio s,.rdtiuy, wislnug to 
jive a littio life lo tuo ramer souinolcuc 
journal tuat he edits. Aii this romiuua 
a<» OI a Sim lar aitau- two years or so ago, when 
, a Prusauui jouruui came out witu a Pa^jal ouii 
to toilow tdo ayi.uuus. i no object was to show 
that toe ideas of the present I'oniitt wero not 
in acourd with those of nis tituo — .u other 
worua, mat 1*108 LiL was a CBUiury bouiud ius 
■ , ^o, A Very stronc case was made out, io 
, ; must be Cwuicssed,'ii tue iiull was ;;i.-uuiue. Ic 
wa» soon prvLioaueed a lOrgery. iJa: the jour- 
. Uai siouiay uiaiolaiued its authenticity, saymg 
tbui it bad Lcou odi,:iaiiy commauioaied 
'it auu leceiveu from .vi. i/a hLcndell, tUo German 
.'- H AmbaasaLiwr at Home. Uuo day curing tue rc- 
■L\ ligious exciiem,ui two meucaimui,; to be em- 
■'^\y plo/esiu tbe Vaucan, iu the Gauinei of Cardi- 
nal Auioncili, stilted that u uioustrous bud 
was tm tM iaausu IB. m. lew weeJu. and. tUat i 



The Mil burn Wagoa Company, of Toledo, 

whose yorks were dealroveu by tire on Friday 
nigbt, were insured in iho tollowiug coDipaniea : 
.ilercantiie. ot Cleveland, J1.650; Traders', of Chi- 
cago. $1,350; Aclamic. of Xew-Tort, $1,500; Fau- 
eail Hail, of boa <iU, ijl4j0; Lycoming, of P>nu- 
s', ivauia, ?l,2aJ: Fiaukiiu, of >V'heeling. West V4.; 
$1,2S0; Aiuieiia, of Pinaburg, SI, 280; TraJe. 
01 New-Jersey, ?l.a£0 ; Gei°ui,ui Amer- 

ican, ol Pittsbiirt:. 41,230; Citizens', of 
S.Louis, $2,4.5; Patcp-tou. 01 Xew- Jersey, S2 4i5; 
iia iiior, ol JiijiUi", ?f8j5; Girar'l. ot Pniladeipnia, 
41000; Ui mi-, oi New V.ik, »2,475; Nor li America. 
(•ti.'SJj; F aiikliti, 4i,41j; Liaoaooir-, 42.475; Pruii- 
syivauia. i-i.yii: aco'/ii.->h Comiuercini. $2,475; 
iiome, ot C .. iiuba-. $2.3J0; Flremau's. lir-J.35U; 
Laiieaiiter, t2.i>50; &r.. T,uuis, f^..350; Presoir, 
t2,o5j'; Slanuai , J|,2.o50; GioOe, ot liostou, $1,105; 
iluiUL, ot X'-warn, .S. d.. 41.105; National, of J>fj.v- 
york, Sl.lUo; L .Mdju A^ouraneo CoroiTariou, 
il,105: Uoaerwiiicra', of New-? .rk. t3 3j5; Fire- 
m lu's iuud, ol Califoinid, $2,256; A.uencau, of 
PuiladHlpuui, SI, 1:28; Star, ot JNew York, {fl,12S; 
GuaraulOif, or No .>-i''oik. %1,123; Aiichigan State, 01 
AJi'au, ilieh., 41.l2i; L^r.-iafd, (-1 New-Y rk, 
^1,100; Arkis, ot lluritord, 42,210; Imperial 
aiiii JSormcru, ol E.itlKud, (p2,bjU; i^iverpuol and 
Li'nd.'U au'i G-o.^e, »-.J,50U; Biiiisli Aiueiiewi. of 
Toroulo, S2.500; 'loieuo Jb'iro aurt Atariue, tii 475 ; 
Pae.bu. 1^2 o50. Tbe r<-pori giined ere leuoc uar 
seve:i rue.i nad perished in the rtiius, out tiiero was 
only ouo. Col. E iwiu Al. Il.il.iurd, tbo lamjer clerk 
ot thw couiIj.lU.v, wuo Wjji smothered to dealli 
iu tue tilth s^. ry. uud wi.eu the fli-irs g.ivo way 
Was earned down to the seounu fljur, wnero tho re- 

maiun were found rbis nioruiug. Tud of&jers ottbe 
coUipaUT e :timaie tne loss ac <51J0,U0J, wito iho 111- 
surauo. 8 aireauy given. Xuo com,jany will com- 
mence reuiiiluiD^ ao ouce. 

The loss by the burning of Thompson &. Wil- 
liam..<' lljuriu.4 lui.i at Laucsooro, oJin..., on Friday 
IS between dlty and oixly tuousaua Oollarx. The 
am<iuut ol tho i.isuraiioe is uukiiowu. Tbcea huu- 
ored oarreis <'f & .ur and aome six or eiebc lbou>aui 
bushels of wheav Were uuri.ed. The Uro oiiginaied 
lu the smuiier. 



THE SPECIAL POSI'AL COMMISSION: 
CisciSNATi, Sept. 3J.— The Special Postal 
Kailw.ty Comuiis.^iun, at its sessiou here to-day, ex- 
aaiined the ollicers of tbe loading railwavs termin- 
ating in Ciucinuati in regard to the trans- 
portation of malls over their lontes, and 
merchants and business men in regard to 
ths accommodations furuisbad while the 
Fust Mail train was in operation, and also as to 
tbe present arrungemeuts. The railway managers 
were of the oiiaion that tbo compensation for the 
cari'iage of mails now transported in pooches, 
without any clerk or asem, was at a v«ry ranch 
higher ratio ihau any other a^rricc, and was pro- 
porriiinately too bi;.'h ; that what was needed was a 
more thorough service by postiil cars tbr ughout 
the States ot Ohio and EentucUy, ai that would ac- 
commodate the local mail, which was of much 
gi-eater imp »rtanco than the throneh mail. There 
was a conflict of testimony amoui: the merchants. 

bankers, and pub;ishersof newspapers, gome testify, 
ins: that they were aj w ■•' .;■■■■ d ^.v qa wheo the 
Fini Mail wan in operu ton; and others, t lat there 
Was a delay since the tuo .,...„ .^...^^o^.oi twentv- 
four hours in remittances uud currospondence be- 
tween Nww-Y'irk and CmcinnatL Tho commission 
lexi t'u-nighi for LooisviUe. 



OEiY. liXJiCUCK ACQUITTED. 
WASmsoToJi, Sept. 30. — Tue safe burglary 
conspiracy case, iu which Gen. Baococa 
and Thomas P. S imervllle were the de- 
fendants, which Las been on trial for 
the past two weeks in the Criminal C mrt, was coh- 
claded this evening, the jury roiuruing a verdict of 
not gailty In oacb case. Thejtirywas out for two 
hours, anil returo'jd to court about 6 o'clock. A 
Damon ot peisous were ^re^ent, and expressed 
th.-ir gratifieaiion at the result by cheers and other 
dbuionstralious ol appl iu»e. 



SMALLPOX /.V ilOJSTUBAL. 
MoKTEZAL, Sept. 30. — The citizens held a 
meeting last utgut to lake steps to prevent the 
spread of small.pox, and passed resolntion^ aivocat- 
lug oompuisorv VucomaUoa ana ttv» •wt«rooment of 
^bjA OQjQtal olaus^ 



AMUSEMENTS. 



GENERAL MENTION. 

"Bab.a" is announced for nightly perform- 
ance at Niblo's Theatre. 

"A Flash of Lightnine" will bo ropresonted 

this week at Wood's Museum. 

"The Original Jubiloe Singers" give a con- 
cert at Chicksring Hall this eventne. 

Miss Rose Eytinge has returaed to Xew-Tork 
after a successtui sojuorn in Ualiforiii.i. 

The San Francis. 'O Alinstrels hold their regu- 
lar levees at their up-town opera-h.iuso. 

The drama called ''False Lights" is the 
pilce de resistance at the Olympic Tiio.itre this week. 

The nightly repetition of '• Sardinapalus is 
still the thotne of auoonncoaiont at Booth's Theatre. 

" Sir Dan O'Pallas " is atill the principal at- 
traction at Kelly & Loou's Twenty-third Street 
Opera-houpe. 

Mr. John T. Kavmond acts at the Walnut 
Street Thea'ie, in Philadelphia, this week. Mrs. 
Raymond is also m Philadelphia. 

No change is to bo recorded in the announco- 
mentaot the Park Theatre, and "Clouds" will be 
represented there throntihoiit tliia week. 

Mrs. G. C. Howard, a dra.iiatio troupe and a 
chiirus of colored men will a'jpear in " Undo Tom's 
Cabin" at tho tiranrt Opera-hnus?, tins woelc. 

Mr. Emil Mollenhauer, the well known and 
capable violinist and pianist, has quitted Tiiomas' 
orches;ra, and intends to dwell permanently in this 
City. 

Mr. George Fawcott Rowe has just brought 
to a close a prosperous engagement at the Gra id 
Goera-housfl, in Cincinnati. To-morrow he acts at 
iltVicker's Tliea're, iu Chicago. 

At the first Philharmonic eoncert on Nov. 4 
the first act of '" Die Walkil e," wtih M.me. Pip- 
ponbeim and Mr. Bisohofi a.s the leading vocilists, 
and Bsethoven's "Fifth Symphony" will be in- 
terpreted. 

Measra. Delehanty and Cnmminga, and Miss 
Louise Franklin, are to appear at the Theatre 
Comiqae this wesk, together with Messrs. Harriiran 
and Hart, who will flgare in some oi their best 
sketches. 

The opera bouflfe season at the Lyceum 
Theatre ended last evening. "La Timhale d'Ar- 
eent" was sung. Tomirrow Mile. Aim69 and her 
coropanv appear at the Arch Street Theatre, in 
Philadelphia. 

" Norma " will be sung at the Academy of 
Music on Monday evening; "S-miramide '' will be 
given on Tuesday; "La Favorita" is to be the 
opera on Wednesday, and for Thursday the ever 
young and ever blooming ""ajovatore" is promised. 

Mr. Alfred Joel, Mr. Carlbcrg'a busines.? 
manager, has arransed for perform mees throughout 
the country by the latter gentlemin'!* Italian opsri 
ironpe, until Febtnarv. Tne New- York representa- 
tions take place during the second week in Jan- 
aaiy. 

" Life" 13 now represented with all desirable 
sraoothnnss at the Fifth Avenue Theatre. The at- 
tractiveness of the peace Is not to be questioned, 
for the honse i« filled in every part nigatly. 'No 
changes of programme will ba thought of, we should 
sav, for some weeks to come. 

Mr. Whitney and Mme. Schiller are the 
soloists in Mr. Tnoman' first concert of the two 
weeks' series to commence at Steinway Hall, on 
Wednesday. Beethoven's Fif^h S.ymphony and a 
piano concerto by Chopin are among the selections 
tor Thursdav. and a new suite by B zet is in re- 
serve lor Friday. 

The first of a soriea of Sunday concerts at 
Booth's Theatre is annoancel fir O -t. 8. under the 
management of Messrs. Maretz'^k ana Trver. Next 
Sunday Mme. Pappenheim. M-. Cas I", ilr. Sohst. 
the Swedish Lidies' V.jcal Q lartet, and air. Gustav 
Salter will be the artists, with tne co-operation of 
an orchestra under Mr. M.iretzok.'s direction. 

Mr. Charles A. Chizzola sailed for Europe by 
iho City of Richmond yesterday. Ho will return in 
October with Miss Soldene and a coniplelo Engll.sli 
opera bouflfe tronpe. They will bring out, it is ex- 
uecteJ, several new works, which, we fear, there 
will be no opportunity of hearug in this City nn;il 
a long tour through the Stares bas terminated. 

A " sacred concert " will be given by Mr. 
Gilmo.'e's band at the Girden, to-night. To-morrow 
evening tbe programme rendered on tho occasion ol 
.Mr. Gilmure's benefit, yesterday, will be inter- 
pieted anew, and, «tp Oct. 9, the Garden will be 
yielded np lo Mr. P. T. Birnum's menagerie, mu- 
seum and circu.S. Tne anaoanoe.nents in relation 
to the wonders of these last-named exhibitions are 
full of promise. 

The career of "The Mighty Dollar" at 
Wallace's Theatre cime to an end last evening. 
Monilav the boose will be closed, and Tuesd.iy tha 
regular season will be entered opon. During the 
Winter the mana?em mt will, as usual, occupy it- 
self with tbe production of dramatic w.irks appeal- 
ing to the taste of the most refijed class ot plav- 
eoers. Sensational and speoracular pieces will 
therefore be shunned, and pieces of positive artistic 
worth made known. The tamiliar programme, 
then, will be adherad to. On Tuesday Mr. Bouci- 
cauU's "Forbidden Emit," a comedy which is un- 
derstood to be near of km to tho now inevitable 
"ProtSs Veauradieus'," will bo acted. Messrs. Moa- 
taciue and Beckett, and Misses Dyas aad Germon, 
with Mme. Pontsi, bjing included in the distrihn- 
lion ot r61es. A revival of the "The Shaughrauu" 
will be effected later on. 

The last performance of "The Two Men of 

Sandy Bar" occurred at tho XJuioa Square Tueatre 
yesterday evening. luspiteof the novel aad iuge- 
uijtis advertising methods intended to commend 
the drama to public notice, its impressiou has 
Oeen that of a mediocre and ill-sh.toen work. The 
even's of the regular season, which is to set in to- 
morrow, will eilace, we trust, tht recollection ol this 
unfortunate venture, and of its still more unfortu- 
nate accessory incldens. The season will bd in- 
auuuraten by the renroductiou of " The Two 
Orphans." Messrs. Thome and Par.-;elle, Mrs. 
Wilkins, ami Mi se.^ CUixlon, Moraut, aa i Vciiiun 
are to sustain their original id.es in the revival, but 
the drama ia also to iairoduce, as Pierre, Mr. James 
O'Neill, a fresh candidate for metropolitan honors, 
and Miss Sara Jewett will be Uenriette, and Mr. 
Frederic Robiosoa ./agass. The progtam.ne for the 
Union Square Theatre for the ea3uin.i months ii a 
britfbt oao ; among tne proiiMsnd iiovoUios is tho 
French drama called " Les Danicheff " 

M. le Commandeur Cazeneuve, a French 
prestidigitateur of ereat reput^e, nnvo an entertain 
meat at Cf ijkciiug Eall, last evening. Tne fact 
that M. Cazsneuve is not familiar witn the Eaghah 
language, detracts somewhat Irom the interest of 
his performance, but as most; of his feats address 
themselves parnculurly to the eye. their effect is 
not lost. His mastery of sleight; of hand is quite 
marvelous, and the closest scnitiny of hisiuanipula- 
tionof the cards isfruitlossso far as a detection of his 
movemoutfl is concerne.l. A uumbor of card tricks, 
last night, ofi'ered the stroncest proof of his clever- 
ness in this departmeut of his art, atid. later on, 
some wonder-working with mechanical contrivances 
all'orded even livelier graiifiuation. Among the most 
astonishing incidents of the eveuin,; were M. C.ize- 
neuve's feats of memory. He glances at a printed 
page and forthwith lecites its contents verbatim. 
He distributes a pack of cards, a dozf n dice, and a 
score of numbers among th) audience, and at once 
assigns to each spectator his card, his die, or his 
number. A large audience was gathered at-Chick- 
ering Hall, last eveninc. and the aclilevonients of 
tbe 2'reatidigitateur were applauded to the echo. M. 
Cazeueave, we are glad to see, gives four entertain. 
men s this week ; they will bo the more attractive 
inasmuch aa he bas now had an opportaulty of 
t«8 i g the likes and dislikes of an American 
audie nee. 

o 

NEWS FKUM AIHOAP. 

The Th6;Xtre-Fran(;ii8 is now rehearsing 
" Chattorton," by Alfred D* Viguv. Toe quMiiju 
Is alto under oorslderatiou of reproducing Pierre 

L*bmn'R " Msrie Scairi." The tame hoa'e has en- 
gatrea Mile. Dulait, first prize at ihe Conservatoire 
ol iirusaels, to play iu .M. Parodi'a " Kom* V,iiiicao" 
I he p.irt intended fur Mile. Tholer, wh« it cuioe to 
Russia. 

Aji adaptatien of Oaida's "Strathinora" has 
Just been praduced at the Caurt Tneatre, ia Liu- 
doa. The l'ini.«i says if it: "Djspite the re.iuUiva 
and unreal nature of the sUry, 'Strtthmoro' wa» 
not lacking in a certain amount of p^wer, which, 
grotesque aad ofte i ill-directtd as it was, is discern- 
ibie iu most of Ouida's woika. But this power is 
aoseut trom the plav. The story has bodn i oualily 
bewn out of the book and not well shaped for thu 
Stage. PorteBCue. the well-meHning bn' ill-starred 
friend. !.> uiuraered iu the fii'^t aci, and from mat 
- itolut tba Interest of tlie aturv ■t.a.^.iiiiT. but Murelr. 



declines, and Is frittered awafy in paisages of high- 
sounilioT but n >m 'What vapitt rak. There is not, 
moreover, very much to be t«dd in favor ot the act- 

inir." ';■ 

The production of a new;piece in Pari.s is. of 

course, attended with very grieat expon.se. "E^telle 
et N6mnrin," at th? O.^era-Boiutte, cost 33,000 francs 

for simply the scenery, dreiJes. decoration?, and 
cost of rehe.irsals. This isf.bHsides the piiyineiit 
mido to the autnor, which, iililhis c.ise, as the com- 
p.i8«r (M. iierv6) i« his oiffn entrepreneur, is, of 
course, not reckoned at all. | '> 

The toUowing is a complt)te list of tho troupe 

collected bv M. Csrvatojifor the Paris O. era 

Comiqao : MM. Fanre, 4iarr6, Valdojo, Giraudat, 

Nicot, St6i)hane, Poncharrl,! ibufriche, Furch, Diir- 
varr, Quculain, Barnoit. Bytrnard. Thierry, Natli in, 
L'Mdvie. and Duvernoy ; Mesdames Gilii-Maii6, 
Biuuet-Lafirtur, Djrval, L6vy, Bilapge. Bucasso, 
Chevalier, Nadand. C arc, Viual, and Franck. M. 
Fanre will make his d6bnt iu " Lo Pardon de Ploor- 
uiel." ,-■ 

Tho Paris correspondoni; of the London .S'/anrf- 
ard writes to that joariial ; I ''M. Emlle Perrin, tho 
manager of the Thfiicre Frii|9 lis. has come forward, 
perhapB unnecessarily, in | defence of MM. Erck- 
mannChatrian, whose piece, "L'Ami Frirz," he is 
about to brine ont shortly, tiave already explained 
the interested po.ltical onfery got np by the Bma- 
partists against tbesn populir authors. M. Perrin 
tackles tbe non-conimissioded civ.alry offiaor who 

has left the barrack room and ta'icen to writing in 
the Fiijaro uudisr the noin d* pldin«of Saint-Geuost. 
M. P»:rin assures us, contrtdry to wnat il. Saint-Ge- 
uest pretended wiih')ut ttivini seen so much 
as aline if the mauuscrjpt, that the piece ooei 
nit contain anything pollitical. 'It is a charm- 
ing Work.' says the luai^ilrer of th;i Fran^ii.^. 
■full ot sweet anil sincere eino.ioo, itmued with iho 
best and highest 8entimMitis| la;. d will give tho most 
formal tie to the rtuti-iiatrioii|ib seatim -uf> wtiich .M. 
Saint-tTen«st bas attrilmtjJ.l to MM. Erckmaun^ 
Chatri<in.' M. Perrin thenidbals som > vi-ry he.ivv 
blow^ on the head of tbb icavalry chrcuioier of 
Fiyuro for trying to lynch tb.e ni'ce by appealing to 
"Lhe ojtra^od Army, rhij ib.sulted iiibi.icy, and 
the b.Tra.\od nation.' He irfircasiically informs .M. 
S.iiDt-Ge.iest that the maiaairers ot the Frangiis 
have, at least, as much refipoct fir the feeiinirs of 
the yublio as wrKors lilte'tilui civalry cUrouicler 
may po.-seis, aud that liq,.;M. Petrin, has perfect 
ti.iih in the impartiality of his audiences who will 
see lhe piece." ' | 

The critic of the London Daily Kews writes 
as fillows apropos of too nfew play at the Uavmar- 
ket Theatre: Mr. Gilbert's jdrama entitled "Dan'l 
Druce," which was receiveiljiwitli so much fivor by 
the audience assembled tjj witness it"! first per- 
lormanco, Is stated in the pA^yoill to owe the siig- 
gesjion of "an incident In jtije first act to Geor^'e 
Eliot's Silts Murner." i fihe ontliaes of that 
story are certainly traceable la it to a greater ex- . 
tent than might be inferreili from this admis.ii n. 
The writer procsrds : ^\ las Murner, l.i, after 
all, not a play but a W( tk of nairative fiction, 
which is a widely diffjrentj ;lii ig. Mr. Gilbert has 
not only civen it draujatic jform, bo: eii.lowed it 
with dramatic character, illle has imazined situa- 
tions not to be found in thf [stiirr ; and, abova all, 
he has exchanged the somuwhat depresinsr 
fllelity of Geir-e EUot'si pictures of humiile life 
and runil manners forau ifljfjdgrice which detracts 
in no wise troin lUe imorebyon nf reality, while it 
constiTuci'S tlia chioit chair n oi the plav. A mure 
striking evidence of draii liatic renius. pprhap.J, 
could hurdiv be eiven thad jthe mode in wuicn the 
anthor of • Dau'i Druce' ^as been able lo trans, 
mule the dull gray lono oiijilhe scenes between I Jle 
aud .>1 aron into the pare land tender lights ot i. re 
love pass.ig03 between niVporoHiy miA. her sailor 
love in his second act. Biipharacers are .skeiciied 
with a tirmuess and at ,.^1* same Ume with a deli- 
cacy 01 outline wnich are ajljtjoietner his own; aud in 
his dialonae, which is tulliof truihlul tou'-nes and 
hapov revblatiuns ot charjjdtier, he is in like manner 
indebted o ly ro his owji; jpowers. Tue es-ouiial 
features ot the story are i)<>t mneh aff -cted bv the 
Drau.ieience ot the scene ti> the puriod of tbe Com- 
monwealth and the Rjstorii&ion." A bri f refereiico 
to the i.adim; iuciueuit hi) the piece foiiow.<, auU 
the critic 'Couclu les bv praisinsr Mr. Hermann 
Veziu's perfo. wanes of an aged man. 



SEWING-MACHING HOXOIiS. 

TWO .MEDALS OF MKIiir, TWO DIPLOMAS OP 
HONOR, AND OXK GRAND COMPI.I- 

MENTADY MEDAL THK " SINGER " 

AHEAD AT THE CKNTENNIAL OVBB THE 
WORLD. 

The only sewing-machine company which has 
its own pavilion in tho E^posiiioa groun'ds is the 
Siuirer Manufacturing C imoany. The company 
which oriiriuatod the series of Centennial excnr- 
fions, the only company in tho world which sent 
4.000 of its work-p?ople to the Cant^innial, was the 
Sincer Mannfacmring Company. And now, natu- 
rally enouirh, the news reaches us that three metals 
and two diplomas * * * have been nnani- 
monsly awarded by the Centennial Commission to 
the Singer MauuCicruiiag Cimpaoy, aad simply 

because the Singer Sewing-maobine Is the 
best manulacturintr and the besi family 

machine in the world. Tho new family Singer 
Sewing-machine, with attachment for pll 
kinds ot work, 13 fast winiiiig (avor, a* is shown 
I'V the fact that it sells botrer than all the other 
scwine-niachine.'i in tbe world c imbined — 1.50.010 
in.iciiin s ah vo .nnv other competitor. — Commercial 
Advertiser, i>atiirdai/. S'pt. 30. 



A HAND-BOOK OF LAfJlf^fJfBAN COMilERCE. 

Mr. George Sauer h!4^ prepared, and Samp- 
son Low, Moi'ston Searle !ic Kivmgton, of London, 
have published, a, Hand-biiiak of ±.uropean Commerce 
Its purpose Is to luidcatoitpr the benefit of business 
men and others what to bpy in Europe, and where 
it should be bought, and: j is a practical key to 
European manufactures. ! It also includes a eatis- 
tactory cnlde for travel (ifi to the nianulacturing 
towns and -cities, gives, t^e cost ot travel to and 
from diff-rent poms, ai^(|; de^c^bes tlia several 
routis open to travel erH,! besides a variety or iu- 
tormarion which is of tjlie utmost importance to 



touiists. 



TEE EEDVOTIOS |4^V CASAL TOLLS. 

Albany, Sept. 30. — jliie receipts irom tho 
tolls on the canals ontiolije to sutfar from the se- 
vere reductions noied pre|y{iously. During the sec- 
ond week in September ^hev are reported at tbe 
Canal Auditor'^ cflije atifpi6,ei7 fij, against 4C7 462 70 
during the satte week las Lyear, a reduction in orie 
week of 130.645 05, aud inUho tliird week J50,974 53. 
against «.')7.I87 13 larini I the same week last veir, 
a total of t4'J,5v8 21 re.lnbtiou upon tho recip.'s 
during tht tii»t three weeks oi the same mouth lasi 
vear. 

Buffalo, S'•n^ 30— Tb« monthly report trom the 
Canai C.>iicctor's olfiue is $s >o!lo ws : 
Amount ot toils for September, 187> S'127 000 00 



Amount of tolls for S(;pteiuoer, ltj7t) 

Decrease io 1876 ^ 

Total clearances for Si^telIll>e^, IS,.) 

iotal clearances tor tiepieiuber. 1S76 

. Decrease in 187C 

Total am mut of tolls to Oct. 1 , 1H7 /.... 
Total amount of colls to t-ct. 1, lS7d 

Decrease in 187d 

Number ol cl aniiiees t.i Oct. I, 187,'i 

.Nuoiberot clearauues Co Oct. 1, 1876 '. 

Decrease in J 8 76 

FIANO AWAtiDS. 



ii.i.imo 00 



. 43 .00(1 00 

1.03,> 

_7a2 

~298 

*647,..23 OO 
. 41.,.7rf(> 74 

.aiJr.fiaTs 

4,4i;6 

^jL-^^ 

1,012 



webhr, OF N!':w-yoi;k:, keckivesthe iiigh- 

F,8T AWARD AT THE CENTEJSNIAl KXHI 
BlUOX. ' 

Philadelphia, Sept; 27, 1876.— In no depart- 
ment oitha Eihibitiou has thj competition oeen 
greater than among thi j)iatio makers, and while 
the contest soon narrowed down to but few housos, 
it seems undisputed that Weber has distanced all 
comnetition and must bei tii-day recoirmzoJ as the 
piano-maker par excel e|ttC3 of the world, and the 
iuu)iical jury ha^ but s'arhped the seal of tho Amer- 
ican Centennial Exhibijtliin upon the generally 
awardoa veraiot ot every ;VjC:iIist and nuisician by 
the award which gives tjie medal to A. Wobor, of 
New-York, for " symp.UiietK, pure, aud rica tone, 
couihined with greatest power, a< sh.iwu in tho 
three stylos, >Jr.ia I. Sqaiiro, a:id IJ.iri^br, Pianos 
whii^h show int-lligenco and solidity in thmr coii- 
ttrucfton, a pliant ana' eas.v touch which at the 
same timo answers pronjiptly to its req liremants, 
together with excedeucs 'Of w.irktn vn jh.;i." 

While the Judges aco^tjdit to Weber's comoeii- 
tors "larger volume, iiUrity, and duration of 
tones" — mere meciiatiici:il, qualities — to Weber 
alone are accrelitod the highest possible musical 
qualities : i ! 

Sympathetic, pore, and rich tone, wish greatest 
power. 

It Is the. svmpathstic hnl rich qnatity of tone 
which (has mAde tne WeH^er piano the favorite of 
every isinger ai well as; the pablic. It is these 
special qualities which, oooibined with purity and 
greatest now r, iu a voice make thi greatest singer, 
and which in an ins rumi^ut make it the peer of its 
compolitors. Puiitv, po^jver, and diiratiou aro but 
cold exponents of mechfuiicil feicollence. Add to 
these qualities, as the judges S'ly are contained in 
the Weber; sympathy and richness of tone, and yoil 
bnatlie in:o it warmth and lil'e, and you hava the 
ne plus ultra ot a piano. ' 

This Weber has done at the Centennial, and 
when the judjros commend his instruments also for 
their solidity ot constrpctiou and exoalleuco of 
workmanship, they tell !tho public that the Weoer 
piano is the best in the world. — Vlvcning Post. 



TUnKlSIl BATHS. 
The devotees of tljii dolightfnl luxury •will 

bB triad to learn tliar a new and charming place lor 
its enjivment was thrown open to thom this inorn- 
ine. The. Impoiial Batii Company, on West Twen- 
tv-fonrth stre t, thr>e do'Ts trom Bioadwav, has 
pitiansted the resources of architectural skill and 
scieiiiinc and niechiiiiical aopllances in fitting np 
a"Uaminara" that is a pi^rlect gem in its way. 
Ho' rooms, heated and ventilated npnn the mo*t iip- 
nr ived piiiiciplcs. |Pnil furni.shed in exquisite ta8t« ; 
ppncious marble slumipooing room< replete with 
various siiowr.s, ami th" needl"-bafh with its 
mynaa crvs al Htrearns of filtered Croton ; dressing 
and cooltnir rooms all richly nu shed, the whole, 
cbeorluily lUiimi'iared by moans of abundant sky- 
light, nnl'e to make the Vi'tablisbment everything 
that can be d 's red by tbe thousands of ladies and 
eentlaiuon who have learned, at h^mie or abroad, 
the pleasu'es of this h^althtul oriental luxnrj'. — 
Evening Mail. 

THE OENTESNIA L A WA RDS~" EOOLISH 
MOMRASr." 
There is positively no ground whatever for 
the rldiculi ns and contradictory claims put forth 
bv some of the sewing-machine Companies that 
their particular machines have received higher 
honors than others. Tha awards are all of the 
same grade, and no exhibii, ii pronounced best of 
its class. The Judges' reports, not yet published, 
will give the special merits of each exhibit. The 
WillcOx & Gibbs new automatic machine has taken 
all tho honors obtainable. — Exchange. 

THE PIANO AW.lItD AT TH E GEWEtiNIAL. 
THE HIGHE.ST PRIZE FOR KRAXICH & EACH. 

Philadelphia, Sept. 2'J.— It is an indisputa- 
ble tact that toe iiieni'st. award for the best tr nl, 
sqtiaie, and upiighr piaios at the (Centennial Erhi- 
biiion has been accorled to Messrs. Kranich 4^ 
Bach. — Evening lelegram. 



The K.viCKERnocjiER, VVallack, and Eko- 

Llsil Walklng Hats .Jr" tne tea ,iug Kail «iyies for 
jeutlemeu ; prico t3 50 and S4i Tbe finest siik 
hat manufactured i7. .-'IIAY.NE, Broadwr<y. corner 
of 13ih St., near Waliack's Vm'^lri'.—Lxchange. 

'■ m m 

Strangers throng tho famous retail ware- 
rooms oi iJaiowui, tlie ciot.iiier. Mr. Baldwin shows 
them every attoniio I. — Exchanj;. 



School Suits.— La' go stock at greatly re- 
duced prices. ijnoK.AW liKOTHiius. Fourth avenue, 
opposite Cooper ius.itiite. — Jbxchange. 

The lears of c lO Anerels. 

Poets have a|)p;ied this term to dla no ids on nccount 
oftlicir Orijjutuea. a.jU pur ty, which, h.ive ever bjea 
eoosidei'id nuequaicd. and were so uutil thi< discovcr.y 
of tife chetnic'ii proceis liv which the Parisian Dia- 
MO.NDs are made. I'liese beautiful imitations eoual in 
biihiMUcy ot appeiirance a id iu their iu lestruccibliitv 
— in .evervthi ■;» out luLriiiji^c Viilue — the Cfniiine cems 
o; Goli-onda and Ispadau. 'lad dify deiec.iou by day 
or night, lall and see tlieiu, of all varieties and in 
exquisite fO'.ia irn d settimrj, at the sole, oeenc.y, 
KiCHAUD UoMPUREYs' j Wflry ejtabiiBhnieiit,' JSo. 779 
nioad.va.v, Oiipuaiie .-tew.ir.-s. — AaveiUement 



CONTUARY TO THE .= L'GGESTI0?JS of mftnv clothing 
houses, who eauiiuu h ir uuiuerous f^,euda and toe 
esteemed jmiilic in general not to i:0 n ywhere else 
■ .lore pnichii,:,mi thi.ir elo hes, A. Katmond t Co.. 
corner of julioii anl Na.-s usts, jusi. advise our- 
cu iM rs 10 fry cverywn re else b.fore cailiuji on them, 
iu ord^ r tu be coiiviace I wliit suueriur advantages 
they are aLile to i-ffj . — Adverziseinent. 



A Uatlier Odd Water 

was made by John a. Eougax, the atvl'sh Hatter, 
No. 102 .Sass u St.. yest.. day, viz : He olligites him- 
»flti ill llie evcni umt i'etec Ciol/iir {s e ected as fresi- 
i.ent, to swallow a hai lulot i eter'a glue. Ue will 
sticii to it u alxiciL.— Adveriiifmeiit. 



The Highest Award granted anv exhibitor bv 
Cenreiiniui . xi)06iti.^u has liee.i irivnthe Elastic Truss 
ComDan\ for jSilk .i L.isric Tkossks. Sold at^a (jS3 
l:>roaaway. — AdverLisetiiciU. 



Any one can see at a r lance thatPcMEEOT's Elas- 
tic I'KCss IS the best. Price $4. No. 74ti »>roa<lway.— 
AdvC'tioeinent. ^ ' 

Frkxch Dyki.ng and I 'LE/V.\ING —Lord's, No. 860 
Bro.viiWiiy, corner o. 1 Tth ot.; No. 701 Oth av., corner 
01 40th St. — Advtrtmmient. 



A Tonic Without Alcohol. 

The PFI?UVI.\.S bYRUP is a p otected solution of 
the protoxlileut iron, -which vi nlizes. puriiies. au<l eu- 

richea th.i blood Dys cptii's aud those builerlug from 
curoiiie diseases, read the f.diowin<r: 
Ji'rom /Jen John Grrg irij, I'astor of thi Wesleyan Melho- 
dift Church, ai i'itiatvii,. Liuerne Voitntu, feniu: 
My UEAK.Liia : llaviug at various times, personally. 
and io my owu nd other families, tested the gre.it 
vaiueo. lhe mediein ■ called i'i_BOVlA > SIRUP, Oil 
P taTKCTbD SOi.UTlO.M oT PUUTuXIDE OF IRON, I 
most cheerl'u'l.v reouuuen 1 it. eapec.ally to those who 
pio butferiiig fiom dyspeptic and nervou.i dis.irders. As 
a reliable aud poweriui alterative, it is, I think, unsur- 
passed ; and as a tonie. tree Irom all tho oiiject.ou.ible 
features ol'ulcoiiohc reniediea, it isuin.ist cUlcient aux- 
iliary to the temperance cause. One ot the gioatest 
hindrances to the temperance reform a t oreseut is, ns 
I ilunk. tlio iiicdic<i u.-e of alcoholic st Inula. its. What- 
e . er uiay be ar;i'ied as to tli.-if uecea^itv in certain 
cases, we have, in the fKilUVIA.* tiYKuP, a safe and 
ellicieut suostH.ulc f.d' those dangerous remedies. '1 his 
t btimouy is given uuol cited, with tho hope that 
some wbii are iiOl yr-t aequuiaied with tne valuable 
piojierties ot tue niedicLic may be Induced to save ic a 
tiial. Yours truly, JOil.y GUEGOiV. 

ACTio.v.— Be bur.i you get the I'liltUVl.v.N .-iVllUP, 
(not I'oruvian 3. rn.i iSjld bv dealers generall.v. A 
thirty-two piTe painpliici, co.itainiug a treatise on 
iri<i» HS a medical H.;e!it, aud other valuable paiiers, 
tesl.imo".:iai3 from diatinn.iished pnysiciaus, clergymen, 
and other.-, «ld be .cut fr e to any address. 

bliTll W. Fot^LE Ai cO.SS. Proprietors, 
No. SO llarrisuu uv., lioscun. 



FIASO AiVARD. 



KSABE VICTORY — U.NA.M.MOUS AW.\RD OK 

HIGHEST HONORS TO WILLIAM KNABK 

& CO. /' 

PUJLADKLI'IIIA, Sept. 30. 1876. 

The Commission of the Centemital Exhibi- 
tion h.i8 passed npon thelabors of the jury on mu- 
sical instruments, anuodacing iu the list of aNVards 
lo exhibitors the name df William Knabe &. Co. 

Tbe bvstom of aw.irds' Adopted at our Interna- 
tional E:cblhition is an eit lit ely novel one. It (lives 
the same medal lo a nuiuber of exhibitors of the, 
same class. The truis tijst of Buporioiicy lies in tha 
special reports civen w|tb tho medal. 

In terms unambiguous,' and by unanimous report, 

Wm. Knabe <£ Vo. are reoipients of the highest honors 

/or ail the different stvlis of their grand, of th-ir 

uprights, and square pianos, which places them the 

first unthe list. — Kaltimorf American. 

— — ^ 

We take pleasure! iu iulormiug the public 
th,it F. Bjoss tfc Dr.»., the celeora el rumors of No. 
449 B oauway, nave reCeivod the tiigbeso award at 
tue Ceuisuutal ExoibijtiOu for the un.4nrp<s..iod cx- 
ceileuce of ibeif good-ii i Their seal 8ai,i!a«d r^coivo 
special meauon. — Jixohit^w 



Uolmnn's Asns and Liver Pad. 

M THCEX. Mass.. June ;i't, 1378. 
W. F. Kidder <t Co.. No. .•>.< John at.. New-York: 

Dkar . IKS: Ple.'ise -end lue another one of HOD- 
MAiN'6 AGL'ii P.iD-. The one I g.jt uciorc works iilie 
a cuarm. Ui bpectfully .v>'Urs, 

A. H. COGSWELL. 



Dyeing and Cleaning. -The EMPIRB DYIil.NG 

A.Mj CLili.V.sl.Ml t'U. i-aii i,ir nun tiehvtr (roods. Work 
surpassed b.y none. (..Clces— .N. . 93d Broadwav. near 
2;;d St.; .NO. iidj lith nv., near 14' h st.; .no. 276 8th av., 
near '<>4th at.; Roesmore lintel, l>rou.dwa.y ana 42d st. 

For Kuplure, tho Victor I rass is Worth Its 

weigh' 111 i;ol i. \ yert.-ct a id com.oriablo reiueoy. 
No iiiiiin,' undersrrap. t'a.isfact.un guarateed. No. 

3 Visey st. 

Singer's prepared bird seed, best food lor 

eanun » ; soil u> al urnii^.ts auO bird dealer,. 
biNGKii UkaVEL 1'aP.^R uO.UFa.VY, Manufacturers, 
No. 582 Uudsou St. 



Don-t Lose Your lia»r.-CHEV\LIER'.S LIFE 

F.iit T.iE llAlil restores »;iay iiair perl'ocil.v. stops its 
lalliiiK out at once, luc o.ises Us growth rapidlj', aud 
uiaues tbe liair ueaui.ir'ul. bold by u.l drusKi'ta. 

Rupture cured by L>r. I>Iursh's treatment. 

Forl.v J ears' ei^lel■leIlC.. No. 2 Vesey si., .\ator uouse. 
Up-tuwu Urauub. 

A IWcdnl wan not awarded ALEKETH-. 

Rid'TA, 8 this new tu . o- ieiuus pr. piration ot Cho 
culate noes not ueed it- .\s'.v your grocer fo, a sample, 



Great reductiouis in prices of Carpets. Oi! 

CL. )L iO, 'VI., ..t ll.,.l •! . ^Ull.^SO.'l'!> au.V, NO. '6^'. 

8th nv. , thiru dojr bolow _7tli st. 



3,54 



nnrkc'a Fal ^^ty e< «.ciitlemen'a Dress Hats 

read.v. at popular prices. .>o. ai* i^roadw^y, Pur.t 
bank budding. 

Holmes' Itarelac .4.1ar;n relosrraph. No. 371 

broad way. No laaiii.v cm itdjrd to oe without it. 



To Hotbcis.— .>lr.>t. U msloiv'sSooihinff Syrnp 

!o; elilMren leetliiii i softens rne .;u<ns. reiluces limaiu- 
maliou. allays all pam, aud cuies wind cohc. 

ORLSWOLD— WIUtialUY— Sept. 28, at St. Luke's 
Church, Catskill. uy Kev. Rnoer Weeks, tj. N. Gkis. 
woLii, < f .vew-York. lo .!t;LH Coknelia, eldest duuKUCar 
of ». Wid^e y. fclx. t;>r, n .(jlimt. .No cards. 

vVKST— lidii.-tY.— On We uie.-d ly. tiept '27, 1876. at 
the residrnie oi the bride's p:ireui8, by Rev. l)r. J. O. 
lieir, Me.nut i^i.A.\ W ST lo .Uaat Ada, ouly child of 
j. osboxu limery, ali ot ihis City. 



ALLEN'-— At Manhasset. Long Island, Sept, 29, Dis- 
iKi. K. .\LLKX. iu his 8ti h .year. 

Kuuerai ..t Christ \ iiurc i oa 'Sunday at 1 P. M. Car- 
riages at Maiu .street Depot, FiUshiug, to meet 10:3d 
trai.i iVom lluuter's I'o^m. 

Ai.Lic, N.— >m !> !u;.lay. Sent. 30. Lilly Sskckkkr, 
youniie' t eh. 1.1 o! Ea.;ar S. aud Maria L. Alliuu, la the 
Otli >ear id' her iwe. 

I lie relaiivet und friends of the family are respect- 
fuUv invited to at e.id ibo luueial trom bt. Ann's 
Cuurcb, loth St.. near Oih av., uu Uunday, Oct. 2, ot 'i 
o'cl ck . . Jl. 

disEliri. — On Saturd^iy, Kept. SO, of membranous 
croup. hi.LiuT 'jOkuis, I'U'.y euild of .Mari.i Lou.se uud 
Dr. . larence K. Be w, gel iO uout » 

&;,>tii>u ut luuu^al ucical.ki^ 



^'^ARMAN.- On Friday morning^ (Ikablks E. Carmaw, 
of this City. 5 T - 

Noti e of funeral hereafter. i I! 
PcIANlTS. — On Sept. 28, RoBic# Fkahcis, azed 62 

.ve-rs. " .ifr ^ " 

The funeral service will b» lield at hU late resi- 
dence No. 481 Heuiyst., Br3ok|f». on Monday, Oct. 
1, at 2 ocloek p. M. ;' | fj 

GAUKlBO >.— Sudaomy, Sept. ^.iMAKr Notb, wife ot 
Coriifclins K. Garris n. i j 

Tne nl.itives and friends of thb famQv are invited to 
Btrend the funeral servio<-s, at' tbe UnlTerBlty Place 
Pre8t)yterl<n Church, corner iDtS St.. (Rev. Rob rt 
Russell Booth, D. D.,) on Mbndajf^Uct. 2, at al o'ciooi 

Al ill* j| I .' i 

^•^-)'T,'^'<^--On Fri.la.y. 29th ^Aferaber. Horacb J., 
son Ot Coi. 6. D. Hunting, in ihel4llOlh year of nls see. 

Kelatives ana friends are iuvii'ted to attend the 
funeral on Tu.iadav. Oct. 3. froni':iiis late residence, 
Madison. N. .1 , on arrival ot 12- o'clock train frnni 
New-York, Delaware, EackawaaBS aud Westera-Rall- 
road. Tj ■ j '^ 

L ICICWOOD.— On the .30th In^is. Elizabkth. wife of 
William U. Lock wood, aged 64 .tears, 8 mouths, and 1 
u^y. ; ^ 

lhe relatives and friends of thH tam'ly a^e respect- 
lul.yinvit d to attend the fu leraj from hi-r late resi- 
daace, .No. 141 West 5tiih st.. oirjilond.u', the v:d tust, 
lit 1 o'clock. Ucrremjius will be taken to Woodlawa 
for iuterment. ! ,' , 

M(iK<jA.N-._<-)n Sent. 29, WilijAim Wbaoiw. 

Funeral ser^ieet Monday, 2: .{J ll'. M.. from his late 
resineuce, .no 59 south 8th.8l„|Bi-0(jklyu; Intermenc 
Tuesday, Hi A. M. ir ' 

St. .l6iI.N-._l.riday. 29th iratij 'Newtox St. Johs, 
late of .Mobile. Ala. 'Ij '■ 

Kuneral Imm No. ir>3 MadisoHlaV., on Monday after- 
'*°"'';,?* '^ o'clock. Knends of the family are invited. 

bTUilGI >.— Suddenly, oa ,?a(!i4f^av m'lrnin?, Sent. 
dO, Ja.vb I>., wif" of William StUirru, and dauabter of 
the lite Dr. J H. IVlcChe"ney. ojIPOrsIam, .V. i. 

I'nen t Ol the family ae mv^iled to thfl funeral ser- 
vices on Monila.y aftem.'on, at:4, WclDck, from her late 
re-iiiliiiee. No. S) Hast 4dth st. : j ' i 

tiTnvVa;.SANr.-At Can-'n Isigda, «. Y., on Wednes- 
day, (Sept. 27. NiCHOLAs.WiLi.iAMi,!Soo of the late Joseph 
B. Stii.yvesant. '; i i ' 

Funeral nt .''t^ Mark's Church,! 2d av. anl 10th et, 
on Monday, tict. J, at 4 P. M. fiijlatives aud friends of 
the family Inviieil to attend. #1; i i '; 

WACKb.KHAGli.\.— On Sept. ;2d, AuotrsTDS Wackkk- 

HAGEN. .ill, 

o'uucral at Kingston. -N. Y., Monday, Oct. 2, at 1 P. M. 



OBITtTAET ACai^lC. 

"Ed's deod"— I've lost my bosOhi friend naught can 
restore. i'l 

Do thiee small words Imp'y solmuch? They do, and 
more. , r 

Whole hosts of friends his geiaial way to him would 

draw : t 

In every w Ik of life aU (rlidlv V^lcbmed him. 
Now aU will mibs tbose once bright eyes Jorever dim. 

Sad is the mother's loss — her eldjer son it gone; 

The brother, too, is lelt lii^ p-bihi4ed guide to mourn. 

Oh, D^ath 1 'lis hard, that aWer bim thy mantle's 

flu g — ■ ! ! 

Rnhust.in irnrai, of noble mlei>; So fair and youn-r; 
Kichlv endowed with all that m^de this lire so dear- 
Superior mind, devoted frieadi^, and worldly cheer. 

Deprived are now tbe poor lot one who furnished 
bread— if,: 

Kaeh hand gave oft not know^i wh m the other teil. 

Were ali the kin dy djeds that marked his brief ca- 
reer . I ; • 

Inscribed on earthly paore ns tb^v on high appear. 

No one Nvould weeping doubt -■ ■ 
C4 • e — 

Gone to that peaceful bom^' 
f ai r. .; -| 

Bom Jan. 3, 1849. Died SeptiJ22, 1876. 



ithat ho is treed from 

yhere all is bright and 

i' 



SPECIAL :t^B) iTCES. 

LUW PKiqE^. 



M2RINOES AND 



!i|lak5 



SEL 



UNDER- WiBAfl, 
' i .' 
SHIRTS AND oikwERS, 

60c,. 60.'., 75c., 90n, $1, $1 ^H BACH and UPWAED, 

J. W. .lOVliiip^OS, 

NO. 260 GRAND ST.. also 

fir ■ 

NO. 427 6TH AV . t;OtiTiET 26TH ST. 

POST OjftflCt& sJtJTlCE. 

The foreisQ mails lor the^^ek ending Saturday, 
Oct. 7, 187'j. will close at lbi«iofflje cm Tuesdav ai 12 
M. for Eurooe. ner steaiu-ship! jWyoming. v1;i Queeus- 
town ; on Wedneslay at I ! .^i tor Europe, psrat^am- 
thip Al'reria. via Que nstown; ^on Thuri lav at 11:3.1 
A. AI. for Eurooj, per stjamsliip liesslng, vi» fly- 
mouth, Cbeibnuri. and Uaiumirs: on SaCardav at 
4:30 A. M. for Europe, per stxj^aiu-ahip Britannic, via 
Qa enst wu ; correspontence Ipr »co land, Geimany, 
and France t« be torw, rded pi*) this steamer must be 
apeci lUv addre sed ; anl a,t A'.'a > A.M. for Scotland 
diri.ct, per s enm-ship i.oUvi4i|Vla G.asgow ; and at 
4:30 A. Al. for Franci> oirect. Ip4r ste.amrabip Can.ida, 
via Havre ; and at W.'io A. Mit'l>*" H-urope, per steam- 
ship Oder, vi<i .-^outhanpton siiid Biemju. The Bteam- 
Bhlps Wyomi, Iff. Algeria, and jLijitaiiiiic will not fake 
mails lor Denmark, i^wrjd n. lajol Norwn.v. The mails 
fo the Wes' Indies, Via Bermiiid* and 8t.' Tliomiis, will 
leave New-York Oct. 26. Thbiioads for Caina, tc, 
will leave San Frauciso Nov.! L The m^iU lor Aus- 
tralia, ic will leave oau Fr.iijitfsco '>cr. 1 1. 

T.tlJAMiiS, Postmaster. 



AT A .niiETlNii <»Fji*rHE EXKCUTIVE 
Committee of the New-Yfek* Infant Asylum, held 
.•^ept. 29, i87d, at No. '24 Lliri]tb;a place, the loDowing 
pie mine and lesolutiona we^eiadooiud : 

If /ii^rmn It has plea ed Aliqijtihty God. in bis all-wise 
Privi enct^io suddeulv re nofeiiroin tlie sphere of her 
usefulness our i-irsc Directrebs'i iirs. C. K. Ganisou; 

iJedo'tfd, Ih^t the iNew-YorK; Ijifanr AsvJuin bas ex- 
perienced, in this toss, a greit jiffliction, wnich wi.) bi; 
more severely felt as he ■ vaiusii assistance, her judi- 
cious advice, and kindly iutefest will hereafier be 
missed from its counsels. i | ' ; 

Jtesulveit. I'uat, in too death ; Of Mrs. Gmrrison, this 
insticuliou nas lost one of its ^riiest and earnest sup- 
porters, ae nsisieutaad devoUti Curisuaa aud pbiloo- 
throphiat. iji,: 

.Hesplved, Tbat we tender is! Ibe family of the de- 
c«a8i;d our heartf".t s,ymi)..th.T'ni their deep affl ction. 
and that a copy of these re.soiaii ms oe Iransmirted to 
them, and that the Al'^u'^gers of the iiew-York Inliuit 
Asylum attend the fuutral in a bod.y. 

L. .vi.BAitS. Chairman. 
. W. t^, ;POWEHi. .secre tary. 

BEIHti^HA tiHl.'tO 'l\iHi MAi!llt:: OF .SO 
lu .ny miueral springs, wbicb cannot cure one case 
to ten ol his, Dr. Ui,.>Ta has ehiuiged lb.> name of bis 
to -Isabel — meaning piiysician. healer, made otGod — to 
protect sufferers ao well »• uliaselt; iberetoreall who 
w.int lbs soring water, midei celebrated ny him as 

Bbtbes.ia. must Sena direct Ito his depot,. No. '2<>0 
hio-i-iway, New-YorK. Relidl ipnco 40 ceut. per gal- 
lon; wh .lesa e, 25 cents. 

BAItTLKTT'jj WKW L.tkPS FOR STREKTS, 
URoU.sOS. A.ND riUiLDlNUS;— All sizes, ttyiea. and 
puces, irjiu $J upward, buruiax 

GA!i, GAiSuLL'liiJ OR OIL. 
Also, all Btvles and sizes of LAlIP-PobTS, BURNERS, 
PKKSM.A'HC R>jFL,EL."l'<jRi, too. No. 619 i>roadway, 
lourth store aoQve Uousio.i sti, ,New-Y^orK. 

JAjiES .Vi'CtvisiUiiit «Sc Co., 

BROADWAY AND 1 ITH ST., 
Hnve just received » consignment ot IVUIA CAMI%L'3 
H iliv SU.* WiiS, the fiaesi, ever Ptfered in ihis market. 
Ladirs will idease examine before purchasing at to 
st.yle, price, and quality. 

KEEP''' CUSTOM !!«aiUTsi WADE TO 
MEASURE.— The Very best, sis for $9; not tne 
fcl giites oidigaiion to lake Or keep snv of li.<EP'd 
Buir s im.ess p rfectlv sausfac)bi>r.y. Nu. 571 Broad- 
■»vay. and No. ii2 1 .nrch st , I'liiiiuelphia. 
• T 

KSTIIA«T WILil^lM. A'rrORXBY ANI> 
•Counselor at Law. .Notai'.yPuUdc i.'JUb ItiJ Bruwl 
MUV, uooiu .Nf\ 4 .'lew- V.iri. 

N. 0. -.Special *tt.eiitiou onl to ssttUu' "nJiitiM,'' 
ConveTanoiiic, 'lad I'it*' lale.oiitrv .; linnti-iiv 

MliP>.S l»AKTI.,\ -JHAiiii: Uttiiti * tsHlK P.s. 

—Tue very Pest, six tur »6; can be (iuished as 
euBii.y as heuiniiiig h haudke-ciiiel^ Nu. 571 Broad- 
wav and No. 921 Arch St., I'hi.alolpbii. 

t:U*Ji^il£r'> t^L.f.V rrfO-Citl'-MICAi. HA'PUSli 

— iibeumatisin. debit ty. and chiouic ulBcaaes, by 
tho disco v.ier, No. 14 Ka-t f3th a . 

GiQ ii.i\ vv«iiv'i'U So.— Fall sTYLuSs GK.M- 

♦JpO 0"«tli-nieu8 bilk il.Us; specialty, &ue Der- 
Uyo. No. lo .-vw Church St.. u>siaira. 



^_^J^V_PUBLJ0ATlONa__ 

0.«!G0«u>i9 .NEW UaUHi^. 

I'OKMS OP PLACES. 

Edited by H. W. hsoFULhow. Uniform with •• Little 

Classics." $1 each. 
ENGL-IND— Vol L (Aldborouah— Furness Abbey.) 

VoL IL (Glad?toubur.y-^J>(oaingQam.) VoL HL 

(Oakley— Tyne.month.) 

We can conc<;ive of nS series «o charming, when 
com|>lciod. as this, or one wliidh promises to become 
ku popular. — Jii^st.jn a ro.icerijjt 

"LITTLE CLASSIC" HAWTHORaB. 
THE DOlLIVKR ROMANCE. 
The twenty-third and loaclod'ng volame of the pop- 
ular • Little l-laistc" ilaw.lipriie. With Index of Sub' 
jeclB 111 tne enare seiies. *! 2&. 

Csf^ Each of the twenty-three volumes contains a 
new Vignette Illustration. 

We cannot sufficiently praish fl'i* splendia edition of 
Hawti.orue. The pub islier< ii-o to ue c meTatn>ated 
on their artistic success wita^it, and it 8h'>uld be la 
evoiy lioiary. — Nevc-tiaven JoatimI and Courier. 

ILLUSTRATED ..^LIBKARY HAWTHORNE. 
FANSH.4WE AND THE Df)LLlVKR ROilANCS. 
With Ttvo Iliuatratioius. 12mo. $2. 
This volune completes the Illustrsted Library Edi- 
tion of Hawthorne's Work*, ia twelve voiumen, 12iiio, 
each contui Jiug two iilu .tratious. 

VEST-POCiiiiP. SERIES. 

EAM AND HIS KU KNDS, and MAKJORIE FLEMINQ. 
By Dr. Jod.i Ckowx. Illustrated. Flexible olutb, 

60 cents. ] 

A beautiful Pocket Edition oft wo rf the most charm- 
InK sto.iesiu the Kiigliah lauguaT". " Rat) " and "Pel 
Maijurio " are unique and delinbtfuL 

TUE HUNTING Or'! THK SNARK. 

AN AGONY IN EIGHT .FITS. By Luwu Carroll. 

Author of "Alice's Adveotures 1,1 Wonderland," to., 

with niue tiUistratious h^ Heskt Uolidat. 

1 vol., 3'.;iuo. 00 ceuis. 

A cheap edition ol a eurioas and entertaining Httio 

book, iu which tlie Bebman, |.tiie; SiKer, lhe Beaver, 

the Bairister, and the B iiker'tclt siorioe and dreams 

of J Juos. S arks, bo Jums, .i^nd other Krote quo anl 

tmubijg folks. The readers fjf '" Alfee's Adveuiures " 

wi.i need no si'Coad invitatlbtt jto iead"The Hunting 

oftbeSuark." \ V'. 

'•^* For sale by Booksellers. Sent, postpaid, on 
receipt of price by the Publishers, 

J.AMES R. OnGOOU 4. CO.. Boston. 

E. P. DUTl'O^ U. CO.. No. 7'i'3 Br >adway. New-Tork, 
Special .Agents for J. R. O. &. Qd's i'ubLeatiODB. 

Qfc,VE.\ HL'-<:>ltliU KEIi;jEirT»K..>R.jUCENi'8. 
O— I'UE 'ITjIcS' REClPiiJi, iliy a thousand practical 
hoU8e'<< epers; the art of I'oarvlii^ wita wood-outs, 
fc.i: ; from ttie houseliold cduijra of the New-Yor«. 'J\mtt. 
Jlailed by ihe A. Me.RlOA.'i .'^IBWj. ,Ct> sIPa.S Y. 

jTTnTixT HA.n.UKiL iUnu aivvil.— this 

' J. capital new uovei. by FfiUirx Lbb bKNBom', autuor 
of " 41V .langliter hliaor." i«t|3i, is naviug au Immeiite 
«uie. Four editinni . oil in ttka iia.vs I 

t >\'. CaitLli ioN iL CO.. Pnhliab**- 

< \ '■ 



A NEW OKFAtirCnKE. 

AMERICAN T...M PEE i NOB UNI0^f will bold Interest. 
ing exercises this afternom at 3:30 P. M. and 
weekly thereafter, in Ste.nway UalL i^xerciBet-^>- 
^•;n voluntarv. singing by clioir. address by B-kv. 8. H. 
Virseii, D D., r eitalion hy Mrs. J. E Parns. lecture 
on Alcohol, and its Eflfects," oy T. .S. Lam «rt, «. 0.. 
LL. D.. of this City. J. Ii. Olbbs, President; Tbomsa 
McTaggart, ecretar?. 

kTS^l^*^^J^\^\ HACU SI'K A.V., <oR. 
r\nerl8ih St., to-day U openiuu buiiday of Ouloa 

ii.Ts'.'*''kV '"''-3 d'^'"''™^*™"''' 'oleord Kill preach mt 
10:45 S. M. and Rev T. De Witt Talmage at 3:W P. 
M. .singing led by Charles L. Gnnn and a clioir of 200 
Vidces. .-ervices continued everv buud y Fiftee'i 
mlnntes service of song, then short tervi.e and 
sermon. Seats free. Priyer-inooiia^ every Tburs lay 
evening at No. H04 4th kv., q. a.- 231 s t. AM invited. 

AT CilUBCH OF THE BOi.Y APOS TI.Bt. 
corner of 9; hav. a:: 1 2.-th st , Su div, Oct. I . at 
i:30 P. .14. service, R^Lt Ker. Dr. Pierce, Bish.p of 
Arkansts, will oreach before the Youn^ Peop.e't dis- 
sionary A«8oci<ti p. A fall anthem service will be 
rendered ly ttio cl»0'r. 



ANIUO.N .UU.nuUlALi CflUltCU, 

4Sth St., -west of 6th n v.. 
Rev. H. IHBBBR NEWTJ.S. Rector. 
Services on Sunday at 10:30 A. M. and 7:30 P. IL 
The Kectoi' will preach. 

\A. SOULS' CHCKCH. 4i'a AV., COeNBR 
of 20th st— Rev. D-. Bellows will p'.e.cji Kaodav 

Oct. ], at 11 A M., aL.d 7:15 P. iL Seats free at even^ 

liiz service. 

ISHOP SNOW, OF THK CAi'HOLIC . 

Church of Mount Zi m. will preach in th ■ coileen 
corner of 23d st and 4th av.. on Sundnv at 3 P. }i.\ 

Bests free? sn ject — "The Second Advnf of thn*t 

Its Time. Manner, and Resu lts." Straneers wel omn. 

Bi.ECrKKR ST'tEEF UMYERSACIHT 
Church, corner of Downing sL— The t-astor. Rev. 
E. c. Sweetser, will preicti this (Sunday) morning and. 
evening, at It: t A and 7: JO o'clock. Commuaioa ser- 
vice aud reeepciou of members after the motoiag 
sermon. All are invited. 

riAI^VAltY BAPTIST CHURCH, 'ZZO ST^ 

Vy'ljctween 5th and 6th »vb Rev. R. 8. Jl u-Arthur, 

Pastor, preaches iiunaay mo ninjr and e.veninz. Kun- 
dav-Bctmol, 2:3(1; prayer meetings V.ooday and Friday 
ev(jiing.<; lecture on Wednesday ereaii.g. Straogera 
Invited tb all services. 

HICKKUlNti HALil.,— U-nIO.n GOiieKL sEK- 
vices, oth av., earner 18th st. to-day. Kev. Sam- 
uel Colcord, 10:45 A. M.: Rev T. De Witt Talniaee. 
3:30 P. M.; bingigg by Cbaa. L. Guon a nd choir of 200. 

CHURCH OF THB NEW JEKUSALESI. 
(Swe .enbnigian,) East 35th sL, between 4td aud 

Lexington avj., Ch uncey Giles. Pastor :erTi east 

11 A. .'d. Sacraments ol baptism and , tbe Lord's Sap- 
per to-morrow. Sunday-school at 9:30 a. M. The New 
Church has lonnd the means of su3stanti\tin<r ibs 
f ct that theBioie is tbe Word of God, that it is a di- 
vine uook, written in a divine style, u a rev,-I»tloa of 
divine trut'i, aud every way worth.y of iu id viae A» 

CHL'RCU OF TUE HOL.Y TKl-NAfk, 

Madison av. and42d st. 
Houm of aervlce : lu:3U A. M. anl 7:301. ■. 

sriiPriE.s H. TVNG. Ja., D D., . i 

Will preach morning and evening. 

Rev. W. 8. BAINSFORD will preach io the Go*pA> 
Tent on 34th st., near 6th av.. at 1:30 P. (M. Rev. 
Stephen H. ivng, Jr., will address a me.-ting of T"aa< 
Converts in tb ■ lent on doulav evenim; at 7:3 . P. iL. 

CxiLitCU OF OVA SAVlUL'R, 

(Sixth Daiverssfiist Society.) 

67th St., neir 8th av. , j^ 
Jsmea M. PnUman, Pastor. "■■ 
Sunday mcraing at IL 
Evetiicg at 7:45. , 

CULiUCa OF Til If HUAVB:>iL.Y JCkaiC,'^ - 
5TH AV., ABOVE 45TH Sr, 
REV. DB. HOWLAND. EECTOR, ^ 

SKRVIi;KS, 11 A. M-, 4 p. M. 

Bishop PIKBCB. ot Arkans.is, «* 

Will preaco lu th-? afterimon. 

/ >U[;rch of 'ruK Diot.'iFL.ti.is. iMiAui.<««»:i 

Vyav.. corner 45th St., Rev. Georje H. H,pwortti.— 
Momiai; — " A Trinmphact Faith." hvening — " .Notblmr 
but Leaves." sn.idsy-scbool and Bible class at S. 
Praver meetmg Friday evening at ii. Mz. Thatcher 
will conduct the -ineloe. 

CaRlHT CULRCU. 

5th av. and 35tb sf., 
JOHN K lTO.'«, D. D., Rector. 
Hormnx serviue and Ho y Commaaion. 10:30 A. M. 
Eveuiug Service. 7:3o P. M. 



..fi 



^f 






# 



m^ 



.■*,-- 



..CUCH OF TUE KEsURRECriON, 85 T^ ^ 

St.. between Lexinzton anl 3d ava.. Rev. J.>iiii W. » 
nimble, Rector. — services every buiidiy at )0:45 AM. v 

■' " ' — - -^xiL ■■■ ■ 



,8nd 7:.iO P. M. Sunday-school at 2:; 
dlally invited t-> attend 



AU arc oor- ' -ci 



CHtJUC'H OF THK AlfiiSSlAU, ^IH ^T. AND 
Park a v.— Tbe Pastor, Kev. Wm. 87 Alger. wiH. 
preach at 1 1 A. M. SuLJect— " Some More of tbe Lee- 
Bous of a Vacat.on." Souday-school will reopen ut i 
P. >I. 

/ ^HURCU Of THK A!«CEN.»tO>, COziSKH. 

Vyof 5tb av. and loth sts.— Services at 11 .K. .A., tUoly 
Ck>mmnrion. ) and 4 P. M. Tbe Rector, Rev. John Cot- 
ton .^mith. U. U., will ofileiate. 

fAUURCHOF !»Ai.VT.>lAJlYTUE VIRGIN. 

v.'West 45th St. near "Bnia lw.\v. — .saadtys: 10. 
morning pra.yer: 10:45. litany, hign ceiebrati m; 4. 
vespers ; aaiL', 7 A. H. , eele^rstion or noiy cnmmnaion. 

V. WiI<S>>N WIL.L. L.IJCTUtfti A NO 

•give tests lortne Society of ProtTesoive Spintuai- 
ists, at taeir hal', .No. 55 West 33d it., uesr Sroaow^y, 
at 1(::^0 A. lA. nad 7i30 P. H. '1 be chilareu's Lyevmrn. 
meete at 2-.30 P: M. 

IRST REi^O.tiMFl) KPiSCOPAL. CBCaCH, 
.HadisoD av., corner of 47(h st , Rev. WilLam T. 

Sal i.ie. Rector. Saut'ay-Bcbeol »t 9 o'cloolc, A A. 

Divine services at lll:3J A. il., and 7:45 1*. M.; tbe 

Rector wid preach. 

t:iKSr BAPTISr CHURCH, CORNBR 
39th s'. aud Paric av. — Preachioc bv ihe Past«r. 
Rev. -T. Anderson. D. D., at lOr.iO A. M. and 7:45 eye- 
Dine: Suuday-Bchool, 9 A M.; oo-.dial io ite.t1o.'u 

OR SALiB OR TO RKNI'— PEW NO. 53 iilD- 
<ile aisle, St. Thomas' t^hurcb. Address JOHN AL 
B ;WliRS. No. 45 Vtilliam st. 

GOSPKIj UAL<ti. -NO. 2o 4ia AV.— THE HRri^K- 
ins of Bread at lOtoO A. U. : Ex. osiioa, Bomftns 
VlL,at4P. M.: Preachine at 8 P M. ; tbe Go-pel o^ 
the Glorv ol the B.essea God. TueBdav. at » P. m., 
Bible Readins. Tbursaay, at S P. AL, Temple Aledita- 

tions. 

GRACE CHAPBI.,. EAST I4PH ST., NEAR 
4th av., will t>eo|>ea for divine service ou soodav. 
Oct. I, Ut 11 A. M. anil 7:30 P. H., tUf> P.uiMr, Bev. 
William T. Egbert, I fflciating. 

ASONIC T£>II>i,b, !se30 S r. AND STH: 

iV — services will be resumed on Sands .v mornins 
at 10:45 o'clock. O. B.' Frotbiugham, P.iBtor of tha 
Independent Liberal Church, wdl speak on ** In : 

Btitured aud Ideal Relierion." 

ROF. AOL.i<R'.S r^CSUAt nOR.MNG LE(> 

tures on '' Ktbical Proidems" will be inaogaratMl 
at Standard Hull No. 1.462 Broadwa.v. eoruer 42d at., 
Ocr. 15, at i;l A. M. Seats of snbscriiiers will be re- 
served. AU others interested are respectfallj' invUod 

to attend. 

bV^ THOMAS S. HAsTl.NJiS. U. U., 

Pastor, w^il prvixsh in tbo West Preabyteriaa 
Cburcb, 42dst., between Stb and 6tb avB.. to-day at 
11 :.iO A. HL Communion service at 4 P. M. There wfU. 
be no evening service. 

ST. •1U0.'»1AS> «;HrRCH. SPH AV. A>0 
53d Bt., Rev. Dt. Horean. Rector, Rev. Frederlefc 
Courtney, assistant. — Si rrlces Suud«.v, Oct. 1. Mom- 
ins; nm.yer at 9 o'c'ock. Litany, sermon, and Uolv 
Communion at 1U:30 o'cloek. Alteruoon aervioe aud 
sermon ai 4 ii'ei.ick. 

iomCK WILL BE Htt:LD TS THSi 

Gospel Tent. 34tli at., two weciis longer. Rev.' 
WiLlniu t'. Raieaford. fif Norwich, Kugland. will preaeli 
Sunday evenins at 7:30 -i.c oek, and every evening 
danog tho week except .Vloadav, wnen Rev. & H. Tyug, 
Jr.. I). D., will address tbe youn.? converts. 

tI I.,CKt;»-* It^iEl HOUI^P EFISCOPAU 

Church, 4lBt St.. near 6th av. — PreachluK- at l(::.'*t» 
Ji. M. by Lev. Dr. I'.utler, of Mexico, followed T»y com- 
munion and reception*of uinmt>er8; a prayer anl 
nraivs-meetine at 7:4 > P. M.; tbe Ax el Oiee Clcb will 
have cliaree of tbe music ; all Uivited. 

ST. ."HAKK'S, 3!> AV. AND lOTH ST., REV> 
J H. Rylance. D. D., Rector. — Moroina: serviee 
11 o'clock.— "In Remembrance of Me." Eveoiug. 7:45 
— " Abuses ot the Doctrine of Passive Obedience" 

T. 1«.NA ri IJ.*.' OilOttCU, 4:.»TH r>F.^BIS- 

twcen i>th aud 6 h avs , Rev. Dr. F. C Kwer, Rts:tor, 
otflciitmg— Services 7, 9.10:30.11AM.; 7:30 P. M. 
btranirerscordiall.v in-vited. 

ST. AI.BA-N'S (PKRBl CUUIvCH, KAbT 4TCH 
St., near Lexinstun av., KeV. 0. W. Mornil Eector.^ 
sundry services 7, 10:30, 11 A M.; 4 P. -M. 

S'l.SrKPHK.N'.^ CHURCtl, BSTWBEN NOS j 
57 and 59 Wo<t 46th at , Rev. A. B. Hart, tteetob—! 
Services -m Suudav at 1 0:3J .\. M. and 4 P. M. ' 

ri^HIRTl-FOUKlU STREET KEtJ'tlRiMKD 

X t hnreh. west of 8th av.. Rev. Carlos Martyn. Pas. 
tor. — Divl:ie service iu this Cluircb, Oct 1. at 10:30 
A. M. and 7:3j P. M. Preachinz bv ih« Pastor. Hall- 
hour service of sunn iu the evening. Btiaagers wel- 
come. 



■'■V: 



rfclHE TWENTY-KOCRIH A-V-MVER-^ARY 

JLof St. Ann's Cbiireb, ibth st . near 6th av., wiU o« 
obMorv.-d to-day. Rev. Dr. Gallaudet w)l: prfacb at 

l<.:.'j,i A 1., and a'so for deiif-mntes at 2:45 P. M., an4 
Rev. Mr. Kraos at 7:3.i P. M. JTee cealB 

UNHY CHAPKL« HARoKil, (12jTri .ST. A.vT) 
4tli av.)— R V. W. T. Ciarke will preach this 
moruine. on •• (beating tbe lievil." Service begins at 
llo'CiOOk. The pujiic luvited 

A MEKTISQ TO 

RATIFY THE NOMINA 1 IONS 09 

HAYES ASiD WHEELER 

will be held by the Boys io Blue ol the Cities ofXeW" 
York «nd Brook vn at Cooper InsMtute, ou rUo'SDAf, 
Oct. 3, al 8 P.".U. Major (ieu. J,'ii.N A. 1>1X. ex-QoV- 
eruor State of New-Y rk, and Chairman ot the Union 
Vet, rans .National Committee, will addr ta tbe nketa- 
bers of toe orsjaniz ition. .... 

All companies of iioys in Blue desirous of participat- 
ing iu tne anuonstratmn are requ<'Bted to repoit al 
beart-quirters Departra-nt New-Yort, Fifth Avenue 
hotel, between 4 and 8 P. M., ^om this d.ite ontil thv 
eveninit of the meeting. 

" CHARLES K. GBaMA"*. 

Chairman Committee of Arrangeiaantr 

SiDKKT De Kat, oecr tar.y. 

H" EAO-Qt'AUl'EKS FOR POLITICAL NET UAS' 
iiera. I'm tr Jt«. Trausparencies.kc. Cao, Cape, aud 
Patent lorcb, *1 per set. M. U. LbVY Si CO., 

corner Broadway and Howard at. 

OLlllCAI.. BAN.NniRS, FLAKS, ANU 

Trausporeuclea. J. W. TYLbR, No. 141 Fulton at 
aud Mo. 379 iiowerv. ____^ 

J.I. KI.VUS O.*- POLITICAL BA.^lNKKdr 

llaict and portraits ou banl and to order. 

HOJe,R Jt URaUAU. No. 97 ooane st. 



P 



Oi.lTICAL BANNiiitsJ, Fioj fortroics, Flagl 
rranspareucias, Jte, W. fl, Oojb 13J puttoust.. N. i 




THK UP-rOW.\ OFFICE «»cf THE 'Hattiii., 
^o. 1,457 Broadviray, bet. SXst and S'Zi atr- 

ADv'AiiridUjid-'if UitJiii/iiJ iJjirxti 4 c. jjt, -4 









^ '^1 



& 




'm^ 



w 



8 




BBPPiP^f^^l 



' It^' 



i.l Hi^.LLIJI^.4l8Nq|p[|pill|iUi,,iM tllJIi 



■^^^^^^^^" 



■^■^i^ 



g>^' i ?y 11 



^ -i 



"'I' 



! 1; 










icfir* * -^ »'^-^"«SiT;jU'» 









PBY GOODS. 

BULIilNEKV. 




ARR MAKING A GRAND DISPLAY OP 
FIUNCH HATS AND BONNETS, 

TKIMMEO »a<l C.TTaiMUBO, VEBT ELKQAAT, Arom 
VIltuTsad OTUGR CELEBRATED ARTISTS. Also, 
IMBW-f ORK BATS AND BONNBT8, 
TBSia OWN MAKE, OF aiMILAB DBSIOM. 

FRENCH FEINTS 

Vt ALL THB 5BW 8HADB3, COLOttS, AND STTLBS. 

VBBKCS FLOWBBS, FANCY FBATSBR3, 

OSTBICH PLUJiB8, 0BNAlfE5TB, La 

MOrRMNO HATE) AND BONNETS, 

A SPKClAiiTT. 1IA.UB TO OROBB AT SHOBT KO- 

ncK. ' 

TROADtyAT, 4TH AV.> 9TH ANP lOTH 8T8. 

iUteffurlKo. 

UnriTB SPBriAL ATTESTION TO THBIR CHOICE 

A5D EZTBNSIYB ASSOBTMBIIT OF 
rBRrCUEUV AND 

FAN07 GOODS, 

CONSISTISa OP BVHKT DESCRIPTION OP 

BXTRACTS. COIiOaNBS, CO8METIQ0B8, 

BOAPS. I.AVKSDSR, AND TOIIiBT WATERS, 

HAIR TONICS, DSJfTRIFICBS. tc. 

fHE PBODCCnON OP TBB CELEBRATED MAKERS. 

VIOLET. QOE&LAIN, LUBIB, COUI)&AT,U>d OTHERS; 



BNOLTSH LAVESDER WATBB. 

i BTTPBBIOR ARTICLE. AND A LAROB VARIETT OF 

FANCY GOODS, 

CONSISTING OF 

MIBBOBS, I1A\D GLASSES, OPERA GLASSKS 

FROM THB BEST FRBNCH MAKERS, 

TVOBT, aiiEI.L, BOR«, ABD RUBBEEt. 

DBB8SIN0 AND BACK COMBS. 

. HAIR ANT) CLOTH BBUSHES. 

fOCXBT-BOOKS, MEMORANDUM-BOOKS, 
• PUBJBS, CARD-CASES, 

SHAWL STRAPS, tea, lea, 
ALL OF Sin>BRIOB QUALITY AND AT 
POPUI^VR PRICES. 

BSO^D'TAT, iTH AV., 9TH AND lOTH ST3. 

__jClJY^REAIi^ESTAT]^^ 

ATTKNTION OP PURCHASERS IS ESFE- 
.^^gAUjr caUwd VQ tlie foUowinx flrst-clua ireil-looated 

. lUdison ATe.,Mnrra7HUl. 28 feet BoUt br owner. 
^^ Pirk At., near SSth St. Flr«t-c)Mii fall ilae. 
Ottt Av».. D. w. comer, balov SAth M. i 82 test. Witb 

extm lot and stable. 
I7tlt 6t.,i>ear 6tli at. 84 fbet. la Use order. Prio« 

$40,000. 
'SUth St.. neitr Sth ax. Be«ntlftil fbnr-storr browa 
•tone. $27,000, ^ 

84tli St.. between Oh and 8th an. A fine AiU-eiM 

house. 
86th St. near 5th' AT. Anextr* wide hoiufc Stable 

•(Sjclniat 
•MA BL. near 6th er. 37^ f^t front, and diniax-room 

eztecs'oo. Boilt br owner. . 
46tb St.. uear 5th ar. 20.BX5S. .Fonr-atoilea, stoned 

Lot 100.6. Fee«27.00a 
47tkiir., uear 5th ar. In f(>a. Four atoriea. brown 

atoQp. 20f*et. $30,000. 
. Mth St. East 5th st. Elofiant fhll-siie house; cheap. 
Setb St.', ^es* Sth aT. Fine foor-story house. 25x66. 
For pcrmitt and furthex particulars apply st No. 3 
^^"•■t- B. H. LUDLOW fc CO. 

A Fi>i£HOUai£FOi£ SAJLB O.V \VE.-!»T 17TH 
< » «*■. near 5th sT-.^at a reasonable prlee; siae 
83.8x65 teet; baa eleitant dinlng*room; Ubiary and 
two ]>artor« on first fleor; homereeeotbr moderoiaed and 

eit U perf^t order ; priee $4(U)00. Apply to HOMER 
OEUaX. No. a Pine St.. or F. CL * a S. BBOWJT, So. 
»U Broadwa y. 

$30.000i . 

IwoBe, ii fee: -wide, on 53d St., between eth and 6tn 
mm. Aptly to IS.^AC UOBIO, So. Ill Broad'way, 
raoma b and U, basement. 

. A IflStt, FULil<-SlZBO HOUHE. NEAR <5TH 

dCAair. below the Park, for sale cheao, or exchange '~ 
■ p^rt tor reaiaenee at Oranj;e : others' for sale ana ( 
•tean^ W. p. 8KYM0DB. ho. 171 Broadway. 



WILL BOT A HAM080D1£ 



in 
ex- 



A Pt>S COKNKH PLOT, 

jCAPu^iirtli.— Comalato order; . 

J>^talnx^_i all* neirlr carpeted and painted. 



.,_ . ^„., SOUTHERN E3t- 

Ltti.— Comaleto order; also smaller one ad- 
; I ;vi;» newlT carpt^ted and painted. J. B. HAY, 
m Bro.:ilwaT ; No. 907 6th ar. 



F?. 



RTV-EIGHTH ST., NEAR MADISON 

A». ANu TUa WINDSOR.— Exceptloually desirable 
OB-elaed dwelUn<, ta exqnisitu order ; a oar,;ain. 
V. K. SrEVENSON, Jk. 



FOR a.ALi»i OH. EXtHANGK— FiaaT-CLASS 
teneiaent propert.r oa tha base side, to exchange 
mag a uKoium-tiize dweiiing-boose, liKhtlr tneumberud, 
la a Kood m-iifhuorhood. Addre ss OWNER. Station D. 

AUIAUiSO.X AV. CORNER, BELOW 3'4TH 
ab, for B-.ile at an nnpreeedentedlj low price; 
Jsw-atoryhoaae; lot 24x100; stable in rear. F. G. fc 
<;: 8l BitUWN. Ma 90 Broadway. 

A.NV FAUTV WITH 83,000 CAN BUY 
tbreo-story bieh-stooa bro-wn-sioue homie; ooex- 
«M>puoi!abiy lurnUhed; hard pin price; Immediate 
•loo. A. UAILEY. No. Obtf 6th ay. 



FOR P.ALE— PRICE $15,600. BASEMKNT THREB- 
storr wwwn-stoce huose, (new,) three minutes' 
walk Oon Central lark. Inquire at 13i Kast 78th st. 



TJOR SALE OrICeASeInNEWARrTn. J.- 

w \. •••""''>' brown-sione hoasn ; -walls two leet 
:thiek. hixb eeilines, Brst flojr flnlshed with black 
w»inBt, and black walnut Inside blind! throngh- 
mi^i French plate Klaas, sIbkIo Danes, gas 
•ad wa:er In eTory room, and filled -with 
t^ftj cosrnnienee to make an elegant and oomfort- 
•ble borne; street paved with granite blocks; 
three huee of horse cars near; less than one hour 
ir«m J«ew-Tork oy four lines of steam cars; dvrelliuK 
and emeh'huuse occupy the entire block on high 
Rraund. eonimaaduiii- hae TieTrs of the City and ex- 
teiialra flews of tbe Barroiindiu>; ooautry, including; 
Faaaale KlTer, ^ewark bay, &taten Island, Sec The 
altuattien und bniM of tbe boose is suuii as toinake it 
-wani In Win*-r and cool In Saoimer, aud in the esti- 
Battan of must pf rsooa the baudaomest boiue in the 
Ceuaty of oBs^x. healthtul to a decree aud no mos- 
mitos. leqaire of Mr. WILLIAM CLEaVKLA.HD or Mr. 
V^lLLLvU FiiCK, NK 18 Cortlandt St., .S. Y. 

aoito oPHOuru.viTV is paiisB.NTEu of 

'>avin« at a low price a country place at Pougb- 
keepsie, Joeated on 5th and Bowena ara., and Towns- 
call and »v iUi»ui sta., the property consUtiug of twen- 
ty-f»ur aere« ; the house la replete with a>l coDren- 
iraeea; there is a good greeiihoiue and other outbirild- 
Usa; the property will ue divided to suit purchasers. 
Apply t. j.icoj ttOWK, Box No. .^12 foanhkeepeie 
OT to K. H. LL^DLOVV k CO., Ng 3 Plae st. 

IjHiHfALli— DWBLLINO-HOUSK— rWliATyACBEi 
•f land uuderiaid with slate, with two of ths best 
red-date tcIus for tile-Dlalnin« aud rooUoe kuowo, ad- 
joining the highway between BteeWi Biiafce ana 
MMaie Crannlia. one mile from depot, Wasbin^lou 
CeQcty, S. X. yat parttenlara apply to D. AL SEAMAA. 
Vo. 14 Pice St. 



I;Oit SALE— BBAUriFOL COt'STRY EE81UENCE 
«t naiiitteid; house containiDCfifteeu lar^e rooms, 
turdwood dao.s, and all modern improrements; larse 
■lat/ie; four seres of lawn; bedtces: dattned waUs ; 
Jar«» shade treesj abundant fruit r perfectly healthy; 
nne «1«wa ; excellent nelKbborhood. Price reasonable. 
A<>ply to c. w. OPorKK. No. ^5 .Nassau st. 

ORA>GE. N. J.— COUNTRY HuUSBS. LAHDA 
sB«l Tiliase lots for Kale: a neat yariety Also, 
nmiialicd and anfOmisbed iiouaee Co let for seasou at 
2*"^ br WALTkR & MMITU. formerly Black well k 
B«.itli. Oranse, ooruer of Main and Cone sts. 



BJBAL JJ^STATE AT ACrOTIQN. 

AU..T1UNSALB OFVaLUAULE BUSI.NESS 
proprrty, consisting of ten s ores aud dwellings, 
^iS^t^ ."? i"* westerly side of 10th a*., between 
167th and I68th sts., on MONDAY, Oct. 2, 1876, at li 
wcloek. at Exchange aales-rooni, No. Ill Broadway. 
" Rlt:ilARb V. HARNKTT. A uctioneer. 

TtfO.44* WKSr 3irH ST., KUING THREE- 

J-~ *t«r». Ifigb'Stvop improrod JweUio<;-bou8e, will be 
•uul at aacuoa, through Hi. Kenueiiy, at lixchange 
Waiss'Cuoms, ucu 3, at uoon. For particulars apply to 
WLLUAM bXlUUdS, Plauitill-'s Attorney, 
Bo. 261 Btoadway. 



DEY GOODS. 



■ I 




AT 



DHRICHS 



J 



ON 




WE 




OCT. 3D AND 4TH. 

WE CORDIALLY INVITE OUR PATRONS, FRIEnDS, 
AND THB LADIES lt> GGBBRAL TO AT- 
TEND OUB GRAND OPENING OF 

FUl&WHITIilSTW 

ELEGANT DISPLAY OP 

FINE SUITS AND CLOAKS, 

TRIMMED BONNETS, 
MILLINERY GOODS, &C., &C., 
LADIES' AND CHILDREN'S UNDERWEAR, 

FINE FURS, 

DRESS TRIMMINSS, AND 
FANCY GOODS IN GENERAL. 

STRANGERS VISITING THE CITY ARK CORDIALLY 
INVITED TO ATTEND OUR GRAND OPENING, 
TUESDAY AND WEDNESDAY, OCT. 3 
AND 4. 

EHWCHS', 

287 EIGHTH AVENUE. 289, 

BETWEEN 84TH AND aSTH STS. 

PEDAL BEAUTt 



AND 




NOTICE.— THE NEW DESIGNS IN 300TS AND 
SHOES FOB Fall and WI.VTEB WEAR WILL BE 
DISPLAYED FOB THB INSPECTION OP OUR PA- 
TRONS AND THB PUBLIC IN OUB MODEL « 

SHOE DEPARTMENT 

OB WEDNESDAY AND I'HURSDAY NEXT, 

WHEN THE LARGEST AND MOST V4RIBD A8S0RT- 
MBBT OF SUPERIOR GOODS IN THB TBADB WILL 
BE FOUND, OPPKBISQ A BAVLIQ OF AT IiBAST 
TWENTY PER CENT. 

FOB THB EXECUTION OP CUSTOM OBDBBS Wfi 
ABB PROVIDED WITH THB BEST MBCHANIOAL 
TALBNT. 




BRDADWAYAND20TH STREET, 

"VTArTTsTEWAST ^SGl inriNCITYr^^ 

TO LET. SEVERAL ELEGANT and CONVENIENT 
DWELLINGS, fitted for Winter and Summer residences, 
'With all the modern ImproTements, gardens, Jtc. 

BENTS from $350 to $1,000 per annum, according 
to size and quality of house and grounds. 

TRAINS by Flushing, North Shore, and Central Rail- 
road, Tla Long Island Ciiy or Huutet's Point, at 7:36, 9 
and ll o'clock A. M. Betnmlng. 8:35, 11 A M., aud 
1, 2:30, 5, 6:28, and 9:30 P. M. week days. 

SUNDAY TRAINS : 9:15, 11:33 A- M., and 5 P. M.. re- 
turning 3:20, 5:19 P. M. Boats connect with trains. 
from foot of 34th Jt., leaving fifteen minutes previous- 
ly. Bplenold cars, beautiful ride, and an unsurpassed 
hotel and restaurant near the statloiL 

Apply to W. B. UiNSDALB, Manager, at ofBoe ad- 
jacent to the railroad station. 

I TO RENT. 

Per month. 
49th sf.. near 5tn st., ftill sized, completely fnr.$500 
54th 8t.,5t.h and 6th aT8..16.8, with eiten.,unfur. 200 
32d St., 6th aud Madiaun avs.. fuU size, furnished. 375 

5tb av., 4lBt and 42d sts., me'liuai sized, fur 275 

6th a7..49th and SUth sts., foil sized, com. fur 600 

6ih ar., 19ih and 20th 4ts., full sized, com. far... 425 
5th aT.,30tb and Slst sta., full sized, lur. or nnur. 

Per annum. 
6th ar., corner 32d St., extra size, with stable. .$7,600 
6th ar., 49tt< and 5Utb, extra size, elegantly for. 9.000 
;>8tb St., near Uadison ar., full size, partly tur..ll.500 
89th St., near Madisuu bt., full bize, uuturnished. 4,000 
4l&t St.. near 5tb st.. 22 it. and exten., Uofur.. 3,000 
25th at., Broadwar andOtti av.. fnil sizeil, fnr.. 4,600 
2oth St. Gramercy P'lrk, 30x76, unfnrni»hi.-rt.. 2,000 
Lexiogton ar., near 40th it, 20x50, fur. or uatnr, 
Clint >n p' iCe, near 5th av., fall siz^il. beatifullv fnr. 
Permits from F. G. Jt C. 8. BROWN, No. 90 Broad'way. 

O RENT— ONE OP THE MOsT ElxAliOaATKLY- 
furuished houses on 6th ar., below 40th St., of ex- 
tra width and depth. 
We bare offered no house this season that could com- 

Sare 'with tbis one. and it ia in tbu best location eu 
Lurray HilL B. H. LUDLOW t Co., Na 3 Pine st. 
(.No branob or agency elsewhere.) 

IFTH AV. AN;> iUUKRAY HILL.— EXTRA- 

eize mansion. wUh or without stable, furnished 
'With a degree of tast° and at an expense seldom met 
with; low rent to a first-class teuaut. 

V. K. STEVENSON, Jr., 
Na 33 East I7th or No. 4 eine st. 

OR KENT— THE ELEGANT \SU COVl.MOuIOUS 

remdeuce at i4<>tii st. and Grand Bouierard ; it is 

completely furntshe'l turoughoutr' table and beo linen: 

crockery, silver, ecc: terms moderate. Appl.v to RICU- 

AUO VuTE, No. 13 Barclxy nt. 

IFTl: -SIXTH sr.. NUAK 5TH AV.— KLE- 
gantly-furnis ed i'our-ntory brown-stone house to 

rent to a private family. IIIOHAUO V. HARNETT, No. 

Ill Broadway, basement. 

RENT— FOR THE WI.STBB SEV.iN MO.VTUS. 

an eiegantly-furoished houifO on 6th ar., near 49tb 
St. E. H. LODLOW k. CO., 
No. 3 Pine st. 

LENUX MUUSE, i>TH AV. AND 13TH »T. 

Just completed. Sereral very larze and magnificent 
suites suitable for large families. Meals at option of 
tedaot. A, J. RurJE^, Manaeer. 



riio 

Xnc 



LET— A 

north-east corner of 5th ur. 



seen from 10 to 5 on Monday, 
28(h bt 



SMALL FLAT IN THE BUILDING 

and 28th st.; to be 

Inquire at Na 1 East 



REDUCED RKNTS.— NBvV 
uisbed aud nnturnisbud lists. 
St., or ^'a 33 Ease X'ltii St. 

V. K. STi'.VEN.<!0N 



COMPLETE FOR- 
Ofaces No. 4 Pine 



Jr. 



_REALJESTATE^WA^rEa 

WANTED,— A DBSIRABLB, FOLL-SIZS FUR^ 
ulibed bouae tot seren months, from Not. 1, on 
Mormy Ulil. for a small prlrate family; undoubted se- 
cnrtty if required. Address U, Box No. 3.707 Hew- 
ToBk Poet Odloe. 



"WANTED-rOBNlfflED HOUSE FOR SMALL 
y.» m-iTate family. Al lOoatlon, good order, fully fur- 
fdahfcd. Address D. GRAY, Box No. 307 TiAlBti OP- 
Towa OFFICE. NO. 1,267 BROADWAY. 

STOKES, &0., TO LET. 



*'^^M»*»*%^»* 



rpO LKT-A5 OFFICB IN THB TIMES BUILDING. 
■■- aacoud floor, 23 tlset by 23 feet, dirlded into three 
•p»rtia«au, lo good condition, suitable for a lawyer's 
•Seek Apply to 

OEOROB JONES, 

________^ Titna O ffloe. 

rpO LET— OM WEST ST., BETWEEN VESTRY AND 

XxiBb r eB s aa sta., a flre-story warahouse 44x85 taot, 
•ottabte (Or storage or tor a mantUBsctory for heary 
foodab Apply to 

H. H. CAM MANN, 
No. 26 Pine st. 

JILHGANT hTORH>I{.OO.VIS IN NO. Hr 

Pulton, aud one floor No. 44 Ann St.; with or 'wtthj 
«u Bteaia power; well lighted fiont and rear. 

F. J. KALDKHBEBu, Na 117 Fulton st 

' STOBAGE. 

STOKAGS FOR FCRNITUKE, PIANOS, MIR- 
KOBS, BAOUAGB, lu).— Seperate rooms 1 lowest 
rates I halldiags have ererr oonTenience; elaraton I 
watehsBBBt faraitua boxM sad •hippadi traokaal* I 

Says uB hand to raaoT* fumltnrc MiOHALBii It SOM^' 



E 



rilO LET— AT FLiJSUINU, LONG ISLAND. REN f 
A very low toa good p^rty, a nice cottage in the best 
P'lri of the riila:fe, rniu only three minutes' walk from 
depot. Ai<ply u> H. Q. GKbGy, So. 1 Bower.v. 

libAtTlFULiL^ -i-UKMsiHED HOUjSE.— 

Full-sized f/ur-story bouse on 33tli St., near Park 
ar., to rent for Winter or .vear. Perihits at No. 4 Pine 
St. and .No. 33 Kaot 17tl. St. V. K. Si'EVE.NSO.V. Jr. 

WOUi.D SDlr A OOC- 
or a family of udults; rent $25 per month; 
private bouse ; seen Monday. No. 13 < West 4th «t. 



rpO LET— PAULOR tLOiJR: 
A tor. 



UPPER PART OF A PRIVATE HOUSE 
to let for a amall and renpectabis t..mlly. Inquire 
at No. 236 East 3gth st. 

KENCU FLAT TO LET.— SOU fU Wr.ST COR- 
uer of Utb ar. and 47th st. Enquire on premises. 



F 



mE-OREAM. 

HOKTON'S ICE-CUEAM. 

Made from PURE O.tANGK COUJiTlf ■ REAM, appre- 
ciated for i's purity, richness, and certainty of being 
dellrered in goo<t order. Churches, fairs, strawberry 
festlrals, kc., snpplied at 

'iA Cents Per Quart. 

Nos. 305 4th ar., 1,284 Broadway, and 75 Chatham st. 

IJ'USS ELL'S ICE-CKEAin— BESTI.V THE CITY. 
Dealers aud chnrcties, 25 cents per quart. Special 
No. 12 Biule House. 



Dealers aud chnrclies, 25 cents 
attention to out town orders. 



___Ca^^ND WOOD. 

pOAL AT REDUCKU PltlCBS. - LOCUST 
vyMountaiunut. $4 50; Locust .Mountain egs, $4 50; 
Locust Mountains to ve,:p.5 60; Liehit^ti turnaoeor broKeu 

t5 ; red asb nut, $3; red ash enz or stove, $6 50; best 
uglish canuel, *13 Apply at 313 Bowory, 512 Broome 
at., 21 / Greene st, 154 Leroy st. JACOB WisEKS. 



EXCURSIONS. 



To LONG BRANCH ON SCNDAV.— SUNDAY, 
Oct. 1, the fine kieamer CRVBTAL WAVE, of the 
^ew-Jersey isoutbern itaiiroaU Line, leaves Pier ^o. 8, 
N. B., loot of Rector st., at 9:;i0 A. M. Beturnlng, the 
train leaves Long Branch at 5. P. M. 
W. 8. a.NEDEN. Ge neral Manager. 

KMT POi.NT. .NBW3URG, PuUGHlCEliPaiA 
AY lux LINE bXEAMBB* 



■M- 




s 



DRY GOODS. 




Br 




5 



SIXTH AVENUE AND 23D STREET, 

BEG TO 

CALL THE ATTEN- 
TION OF THEia prii:nds, 

PATRONS. AND THE PUBLIC TO 
THE EXTRBMELY LARGE AND SPLEN- 
DID ASSORTMENT OF GOODS IN ALL THEIR 
NUMEROUS DEPARTMENTS THBOCGHOUT THEIR EN- 
TIRE ESTABLISHMENT, MANY THEIR OWN 
IMPORTATIONS, ALL OF WHICH WILL 
BE OFFERED AT 8DCH LOW 
PRICES AS CANNOT FAIL 
TO MAKE IT OP IN- 
TEREST TO 
INSPECT BEFORE PURCUASI.SQ ELSEWHERE. 

SPECIAL AND ATTRACTIVE NOVELTIES 
IN THEIR 

MILLINERY DEPARTMENTS. 
HATS, FEATHERS, FLOWERS, 
RIBBONS, SASHES, TIES, 
DRESS AND TRIMMING SILKS, 

VELVETS AND SATINS, 
TRIMMINGS AND FRINGES, 
PARIS FANCY GOODS, 

HOSiE.RY AND UNDERWEAR, 
. WORSTED EMBROIDERIES. 

HOUSE-FURNISHING GOODS 
FINE WHITE GOODS, 

LACES AND EMBROIDERIES, 
MADE-UP LACE GOODS, 
LADIES' MUSLIN UNDERGARMENTS, 
CORSETS AND PANIERS, 

WRAPPERS, FELT SKIRTS, 
^ TOILET GOODS AND PERFUMERIES, 

LUPIN'S KID GLOVES, 

IN , . . 
ALL OP WHICH 
AND OT.gER DEPARTMENTS, '"' 
WE ARE PREPARED TO OFFER BE. VL 
AND UNDENIABLE BARGAINS, WHICH A 
PiiRSONAL EKAMI;|ATION ^ ILL PROVE. STRAN- 
GERS VISITING OR PASSING THROUGH THB 
CITYARE CORDIALLY INVITED TO IN- . 
SPECT. NO IMPORTUNITY to 
PUBCHASE. 

STERN BROTHERS, 



SIXTH AVENUE AND 23D STREET. 



A, 



J,' 
jj 
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JJ 
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JJ 
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JJ 
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1111 



HH 
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hh""hh" 



HH 
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HH 
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SSSS 
SSSkSS 
8S SS 
68 
bS 
8388S 
88S8S 
68 
8S 
SS 83 
BS 88 
8SS8S3 
8SB3 



cccc 
crcuc 
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CO cc 

CO 

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HH 
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cc 

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HH 
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11 
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11 
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LL 

LO 

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NO. 68 WEST 14TH ST., NEAR 6TH AV., NEW-YORK, 
WILL MAKE A SPECIAL OFFERING! OF 



1,000 DOZ.-.N FINE iEE.SCH 



FFFF EEEE L 
PEL 
FFF BEE L 
F B L 



T'PTT'P 
T 
T 
T 



EEEE LLLL T 



H H A TTTTT S8S 
H H AA T 8 

HHHH A A T SS 
H H AAAA T S 

H H A A T 868 



IN THE VERY LATEST .NOVEL SHAPES, AT 



8833 565 

8 8 6 

888 655 
8 8 5 

8388 655 



Cl;C TTtTT SSS 

C T 8 

C T SSS 

C T 8 

ceo T SS3 ^ 



Sold ererywhere at $1 25. 

Also our USU1I srranil display of our w-li-knotm choice 

Stock, in every department of BICU FRENCH 



MM M3I n L 

H M MM II L 

M MM M 11 L 

M M M n L 



L 
L 
L 
L 



II NN N ERE RKR Y 



a N N N E 
II N N N EB 
UN N N E 



M M M II LLL LLL It N NN EEE 



B B Y Y 

RRR YY 

k R T 

R R Y 



G00D5 EXPRESSLY IMPOKTED FOR THB FINE 
RETAIL TRADE. SPECIAL GRAND DISPLAY OP THE 
MOST KECflEiiCHE oTYLES OF IjIPORTED AND OUR 
OWN MANUFACICRiiD 

TKIi>L>JBD HATS AND BONNETS, 

which are of surnassing elegance and variety. 
ALL AT A3.0NISHI.SGLV: LOW FRICiiS. 

SPECIAL ANNOUNGEfflENT ! 



GRAND OPENINB 

OF IMPORTED 

COSTUME 

CliOARS, 

AND 

BONNETS, 

WEDNESDAY AND THURSDAY 
Oct. 4 and 5. 



We beg to announce thatr our regular sera'- innual 
opening will take niaco on the ahure dates, whoa we 
will uialve a inaKuifleent display of 

COSTUMES, BONNETS, OLOAKS, &c., 

and general exhibition throughout tho entire estab- 
meut well worth your special attention. 

Costumes, Cloaks. liC, will be exhibited la our new 
ahow-ruoms on second floor. 

Trimmed Bonnets ou first floor, in rooms formerly 
used for Costumes. 



Our friends, customers, and the public generally are 
invited to pay us a riait of inspection. 




6th Avenue and 19th Street. 

RICH SILK FRINGES 

AND HEADINGS, 

TITAN, MOHAIR, AND PERSIAN BRAIDS, THIMMING 

VELVBTS, NEW SHADBS. 

ALSO, 

NOVELTIES IN BUTTONS, ALL SIZES AND STYLES. 

MILLER & GRANT, 

NO. 8f9 BROAD WAF. 



MILITAEY. 

TAILORS WANTED. 

To enlist, for assignment to companies and regiments 
In the United states Army, nlnety-sereu (97) tailors. 
Apply at No. 100 Walker st., New-l(oric City, or No. 
HkH WastPiutiit., Baltlmora, 1Kb 
L 8aK. i. 187& ^ ^ 



M^^ 



-4Jia. 



DE^?i GOODS. 




81 

WILL SHOW DURING jALL THIS WEEK TWO CASES 




PURCHASED AT THljlfijULY AUCTION SALK3 IN 
i... LONDON.AND NOWibUOTED FlFTi PKR CENT. 



LESS THAN jI^RKET VALUE, VIZ.; 

$350, $300, ^325, $350, $400 

ALSOi *IVE CASES 



Ma Ciel's Hair 



lt< J HE MOST ARTIS-j-lfp DESIGNS FOR THE COM- 

INtjlifjEASON, 

950, g55. S60,; ^6d, $rs, SS5. 395. 



CUSTO.MERS AND KTBiVNGEUS VISITIN'G THE CITY 
WILL FIND IT MUliai TO THEIR ADVANTAGE 
TO MAKE A YpiT OF INSPEl^TlON 
BEFORlfltuRCHASING. j 



BROADWAY AND 20TH STREET. 

FREDERICK ilOESER & CO., 



FULTON, TILLARYJ lAND WASHINGTON STS., 
BROOKLYN. 



TRADE 




MAGE. 



Wo wish to call thei 'particular attantlou.of the. 
ladies to our j ■ ' 

EXTRAORDINARY ATTRACTIVE STOCK OF 

DEESi GOODS, ■ 

COMPRISI.NQ A COMPBETK ASSORTMENT, OF 

' . THE LATEST N(|)VELTIES OF THE SEASON. 
We are retalllug tbemi iiosiciyely 

AT LOWlR PRICES 

than goods of this kind liaTe erer before been offered 
. • in Ifew-Yotk or Brooklyn. 



A KIND INSPECTIp^ 
CLOSEST BU15ER4 OJF 
ASSERTION. 



WILL CONVINCE THE 
THE TRUTH OF ABOVE 



WE ARE OFFERING OUR BEAUTIFULLY-AS- 
SORTED STOCK OF FljfllsCH 




AT THE VERY LOWEST MARKET RATEa 
PLEASE CALL AND EXJlMINE. 

FEl^DERICK LOESER & CO., 
1 1 Brooklyr. 



SHI|t>PIIJG. 

FOR SAVJANnAIL GA., 

THE FL(!)filDA I'ORTS, 

AND THE S0L1'^';A.ND SOUTH-WEST. 

GREAT SOUTHERN FSEttiHT AND PASSENGER LINE, 
CENTRAL KAILKo.\it!OF GSORGrA. AND AT- 
LANTIC ANDltjULF RaIlROAU 

WKDNESD.4YSiiiND S.\TCRDAYS. 



GENERAL BARNSS. Cfe 

Oct. 4, from Pier No. 16 ' 

ML'icRj 



^t. cuBKBHAs, wF,nNESD.\y, 

st River, at 3 P. JI. 
F.HKUIS t CO., Agents, 
xso. OiSSouthst. 



SAN JACINTO. Capt. |Haz.*rd, SATURDAY, Oct. 7. 
irom Pier Na 43 North Kijier, at 3 P. M. 

i '! GEO. YONGK. Agent, 
i I No. 400 Broadway. 

Insurance on this line (I'ifJK-llALF PER CENT. Supe- 
rior accommiidations tor pa^ienirers. 

Through rates and bills of liLdiuu in connection with 
teatial Railroad of Georalii, to all ooi it.?. 

Through rates and bills' nt ladinz in connection with 
the Atlantic and UvUf Rail!ikjad and Fi.>rida steamers. 
ijl GEORGE YONGE, 
Agent Ceiijtral Railroad ot Georgia, 
iil No. 409 Broadway. 




FMIi MAIL 



FOR CALIFOItNIA, .lAi'iAN, <;HIN\. AUSraALI^ 
NKVV-ZKAL.i.Vl) iittITI.-}aM.)L'JJl »[.A, OKKJJ.S, fcj. 

hailing tr(im t'i.^r .So. 12 iWrth tiv.ir. 
ForS.\N KftANCLSOO. -rii IdTrtMUS OK PASAMV 

Ste;iic-6bic> COliON ,jj Monday, Oct. IG 

eunnei^tiUK lor Central |A^ueriOi i^nd .Sjinn I'joi.lJ 
I'Oita. Jj 

^ ^0 JAP.W audOHI.V.i. 

Weaiicsday. Nor. 1 



From SAN FRAN ULSO 

Steam-Bliip CITY UF TOit 

Kroiu ban Kianctstio to {: 

and Ne 

Steam-shio ZtiALANDlA..( 

For ireigui; or p isanjo .t9 

WM. P. ULir.)EittlJ..i)r rl. 

No. tJ Bownngiireeu, 



^ndvsicu Islands, 

r^^PuiaaJ. 



.Australia. 



..Oct 11 



JOLLAY, Saparint'.mleat 
liar 4J. !.>(. [t.. tjji, Oaail bC 



GREAT SpUTHERN 

FItkilGHT AND ifAs.-jENUiiK 1.1 VK. 

SAILI.'.G FROM PIKiCjTo 29 .NO.tTil UIVER. 

TUK8DAVS, TUURSDAYSjBiTid.sATUXIiAYS Ht 3 P. VI., 

FOR CHAUL.K-iTO>iij<. t\, FljUlclUA. TUii 

.SOI Til, ANDlAuUi H.WIi.ST. 

CHARLESTON ^,TL'KSUA\ Oct. 3 

CUI.K .STRSA-U, , lillUtriDAV Oct. 5 

CITV OF ATLA.NTA isiTURDAi Oct. 7 

HL'l'l'JKlOit PA.^SENGriii AC U.d.d'J JA I'M-S.^. 

Insurance to do-stiualiiim ut--halt ot on- p"r cent. 

Goods forwardii I tree ot|«Qm.Qis9ion. Passenger tick- 

etsttnd hills of ladinst issuj- t iu 1 signed at tho oBIcb of 

JA.Ui^iS \\. ilVl.\l\kn» ife CO., Aseuts, 

No. if!^ West St., corner w'nrron. 



Or W. P. CLYDE &.ro 

Or BK.N'TLEY D. has 

(irrat !Soutdcr.i KrcitfJU 

!4 



No. li BowUnir Creen. 
LFj, General Agent 
. L,lne, 317 Broadway. 



NEW-VORK. HAV; 

''>teamers lea> 

CITI Oil NEW-VOKii... 
LlTx OF ll.iVA.i.A ib.bte^- 



lAVANA. A.VliwSXlCAN d.Vlb.-1. S 
avu Pier No. \i •iatx, i .ti . m- it I i'. 
OK 'SAVA^.A OIREIM". 



LINk~ 



.Thnrsdar. Oct. 6 

u.p CO t ity oi . ow-\ork.) 

Weiinesdav, Oc. ll 

lliu scliiv. Oct. 19 

Nl» NEVV-OKIiEA.N.S. 
Jluia.^eauny Turp.io, itnd 



CITY OF VERA CRUZ... J 
HtU. VEUA CRUZ 

Via Hnr.iua, Pro^rea'J, 
I'ampico, 
ClTi OF .MERIDA ;.[.! Tuesday, Oct 17 

For t^ei"lit or pissasfe •»i)»ly r,o 

F.ALKX.l.VDREi.,SJ.V.s]Noi. U md ii UpoilwvT. 

Steanier,4 will leavo .Sev^-^lrio.ins Oat. 1, aiia Oct. 22 
for Vt^ra Cruz .'Hill ill the pjlori > irtj. 

iV^^ W- YOBKmND HA VAN A 

•OIKKt!T »AII, LINE. 

Tbisc flrst-cla^ staj.naui,)* i kil r-j'j lUrlr 
at31'. Si., U'oDi rsier Ao.- iJ .'iorti 'lir.ic ti 
IoUo'^vb;. \\\ 

lLi. nrKSDAY. Oct. 3 

CtiLuMBU.-' "X 1'HL'liSI)*^. <N'n 1'-' 

Aet'oinnioiiations unsnryUjed. b'or tr.iiiut or pia- 
tarre upplv to W.M. P. CLMij),'. Ji fO.. iVo. ti Bowling 
crcen. MiI'iKLl.Eit. LULlJu i CD.. -A rent i in Havana. 



CLYDE.. 



VVJI..SOiN LINE FOK WOLTjlAi>IFTON AM> 
"■"L.S/. 



Paillnc from Pier Pl(9. W.% 

HI.SDOO Oct. 1,1 

NAVARINO Oi't. a 



ortli 'IIT07. as tollow* 

lOLiOMliO Nor. 4 

OTHKI^LO Nov. 18 



Firat cabin. 't=7t), '■uirenj'^v; 8'c:rii 1 ci ita, Pl.3, o ir- 
lencv: cxonr'iiou ticketji^n verv f'wiraoli ler iii. 

it^l and lialtis OJi'Oi. 
.iiL,l« U WRlUHr Jt 



lencv: cxonr'iiou licKctji'in ver 
Tbroimli tickets ssued toiijiiitin"'! 
A))i>Ij' lor lull (i.trilcularsi^ CHAii 
t O. No. 5t> SoutU Jt. 



UNITEO STATEM 
United States passpdi't^ 
iesued by J. B. NONEa, Pjif 
k(_ corner Broadwar. 



al 



H.OKSKS ANjjl 



ASSI'ORT mi EI A U.- 

indispensable to travelers 
,eut, No. 1*1 Duane 



Bipur 



OA^IIAGES^ 

THE Ur-TO\VN OK|?|iCii Of Tllii: TliUK-^. 

Tlioup-town offlce otHi K TIMSS is locatel \i 
No. 1. '.£57 UraadtrayLl bol. 3 1st ani 'Hi 9:1- 

Opendally. simday.s la'iliiljsJ, I'ra a I .L <i. O J .^ 11. 
huliscriptious recolred, a|ijl|uo?ies jt TtlS TlAii'M 

AnVFRTLSEMENTH !lj{| i\VK\) V.WIU 1 ?. M. 



EUKEKA I10U!!iK ^fLANKKT CO.MPANV. 

JSo. 510 Broadway, opjiMailo dt. Nicholas Hotel, 
WILL OFFlBR AT RETAIL 
$-JO,UIIO Kl'O JK OF GO'.)DS, , 
AT WHOLKS.tllK PdK'fi LIST. 
A HARE t:UANr|<]|rO .SAVE MO-IKY. 



I 70 It JSALIi— AN KLW(VNT DAPPLE OIIAY lAP.- 
riaije iiorse. IC'ahandk'Very stylish ; also, a very 



flue black aaddlo an'J ral 
vcrv baiidsoiufc? aud s.yl 
No.134 West 39tn st. '■■\' 

. Li-I- 



1 mare; can trot,- in fl'iy ; 
111.. American Club aiable. 



STABLE TO LiET-H^fO 
firat-ciaHS; to private 14' 
William at. \ 



LANO£AUANU UO 
ABOlr at srlrata stab 



J » 



lliECOUPK FOB SALE. 

If a. lahJUkXilth.nU 



10 EAST 271'H ST.: 
Uy only. Apply at No. 170 



DEY^OODS^ 

KINZJEY'S. 

OPENIXG NEW GOODS 
IN EVERT DEPAETMENT. 



Trimiaed Ronnpts .ind Uonnd Hats, 
leu Hats, all tho new bhapes. 

Silks and Velrcts at low prices. 
Silk l-iniali Velveteens, &0c. yard. 

French Flowers, all the new styles. 
FeatLen in all tho ncw.^hadcs. 

Lots of Ribbons, 2c. .yard up. 
Sash hibbous, 15c. yard up. 

Real Guipure Lnces. 12 Wc. vard np. 
Real Yak Laces. 10c. yard up. 

Frenrh Guipare Laces, 5c. yard up. 
Valeuuieunes and Point Laces low. 

Fine Lnce Tidies, 19c. np. 
Large lot Toilet Mats, 5c. up. 

Harabure Embroideries. 3c. yard up. 
Lace and SLk lies very low.' 

Linen Collnrs, white, and colors, 5c. each. 
Linen Cuffs, worth 2ac., at iOc. pair. 

Very fine all Unen llfmdVerrhiefs, 8c. np. 

All linen heuiatitched Handkerchiefs, 13C. up, 

Gents' Linen Handkercliiefs, 15c. up. 
Silk Uandkcrohitfs, 25c., 3ic., 6uc. up. 

Ladies' Cnderwear, prices do-wn. 
Fine Drawers and Cbeniises, 39c. up. 

Ladies' fuU-sizi Embroidered Skirts, $1. 
Ladies' Ten-Tucked Skirts, 50c 

Fine Underwear at very low prices. 
Splendid Whalebone Corsets, 60c. up. 

Full asBortraent ol Infant-.' Cnderwear. 
Full assortment of Misses' Underwear. 

Hand-Kblt Worsted Goods. 

Ladies' aud Misses' Merino Underwear. 

Lot of One and Two Bntton Kids. 25c. pair, 
line lot of White Kid Gloves, 31c. pair. 

Lot of Black Kid Glores, 25c. and 50c. 
Lot of one-button Heal Kids, 25c. 

Dollar Gl, ves in Oneras, all sizes, 50c 
Dollar Glores in mode colors, 60c. 

Fine lot of Real Klda. 50c. pair. 
Fine lot ot Kid Qauutlets, 09c. pair. 

Boys' stitched Dog-skin Glores. 50o. pair. 
Men's heavy Do,{-8iiln Gloves, 6Uc pair. 



KINZEY. 
KINZEY. 
KINZEY. 
KINZEY. 
OSZEY. 
E|NZBY. 
KINZEY. 
KINZEY, 
KINZEY. 
KINZEY. 
KINZEY. 
KINZEY. 
KINZBY. 
KINZEY. 
KISZEY. 
KINZEY. 
KLSZEY. 
KISZEY. 
KINZEY. 
KINZEY. 
KINZEY. 



Opening 2 cases cents' new Fall shades. 

every size, fine stitched Dog-skin Gloves, 7oc 

KINZEY. 
Real Kid Gloves, two to six buttons, 
t'uahman Kid Giove, warranted, 97o. 



Bargains in Damask Towels and Napkins, 

Taule Liuejna, Linings, tc. 

Large lot Mists' Striped Hose, 10& pair, 
iljsses' extra length otriped Hose, I9c. pair. 

Striped Ebtflish Hoae, full regular, 25c 
Very fine ii^l regular fancy Hose, 31c 

Ladies' full leirular Balbi-lirgans, 25c 
Ladies' title ni<tde colors, 17c pair,, 

Laales' extra striped English Hose, 35c 
Ladies' Balbricgaua, colored i^lk, clocked, 39c 

Gents' Balbriggan Half Ho«o, 25c 
Genu' full regular rialf Hose.'iiOc 

Gents' Lisle Thread Half Hese, l!5c 
Fine Engiisli Half Upse, 3Ic up. 

Gents' Merino Underwear, very low. 
Boys' Merino Underwear, very low. 

Jewelry, Belts, Bags. Btodms, 
Parian aud FAncy G.ass Goods. 

Toys and Games of all kinds. 

Wax Crying Dolls, UatiUrAl hair, 20c up. 

Fans, Perfumeries, Soaps, Brushes, 
Combs, Swiss Goods, Fancy Baskets, be 

Wffl. mZEY, 

Nos. 767 and 769 Broadway, 

CORNER BELOW STEWART'S. 



KI.NZEY. 
KINZEY. 
KINZEY. 
KINZEY. 
KINZSY. 
klNZEY. 
KINZEY. 
KINZEY. 
KINZEY. 
KI.VZBY. 
KINZEY. 
KINZEY. 




GRAND, CHRYSTIE AND FURSFTH STS., 

WILL HOLD THEIR 

MIllilRY OPJMM 



ON 




OCT. 4 AND 5. 

FRENCH AND AMERICAN PATTERN 

BONNKTS AND HATS, FLOWERS! 
FEATHERS, RIBBONS. TIE J, ta 

GRAND, CHRYSTIE"AND FORSYTH STS. 
§TEAArBOAm___ 

FALL RIVER LINE. 

FOR BOSTON. nUd all points Enat, VIA NEWPORT 
and FALL RIVER, at D P. -M. dally (Sundays, until 
r.lter Oct. 8, inclusive.) from 1 ier No. 28 North River, 
loot of Murray sc The worlJ-reuoWiied st-aiuars 

BRISTOL and PROVIDENCE. 

HALL'.S BANDS KNG U}:D PJIi THE .SKA.SO.S. 
'liekefs and state--ooin9 S"cared at prini:ipil hotels 
anu tl< k -t offlces, aud ou tiie pier and st-^ain rs. 

ItORUE.N &, LOVEliL, 
Ageuts, New-York. 
GEO. 1.. CONNOR, 

tieucral Passencer Agent. 



SPECIAI, NOTICE. 

For the sccornmada'.ion of Centennial travel the 
steamer OL D COLo Y will bo mn on ibis line as an 
cxtr.i b lat as loilows : F'roin Ne'W-Y'ork, Tuesd iv» and 
Fr days, Oct. 3, (5. 10. and 13- To New-Y'erk. Monciays 
, KndThuisda\ 8. Oct. 2. ,t, 9 and 12, leariuc New-Y'ork 
at 6 P. M., and Ptnusylrania Railroad Depoi, Jersey 
Citv, at 0:15 P. M. 

GREAT REDUCTION OF FARE 

BY PEOPLE'S LI.nE TO .LBASY. FIRST-CLASS PASS- 
AGE ONLY $1. 

HMsDi Rifer liy Moinlilt, 

Centennial visitors can en)i>y a riew of tbe best and 
most magnificent scenery ol the Hi iblan,la on the Hui- 
eon by trnvclinson th- -PEuPLi'.'S LINE" of elecanr 
and commodious hoita. i'assins West Point aud all 
places 01 interest early m the evening, and conneetin;; 
at Albany with luorninK trains fir Chicago aud ail 
poinis NottTU and W.',.'5T. Hoata leave dailv at G P. >l. 
from Pi.r No. 41 North Kiver, near Peunsvirnnia Kail- 
road Pier, in .Sew-Y'orK, Slati^-rooms warmed by steam. 
Meals on the Kuropean pian. 

N. B. — Resrular Hudson Kiver R ilwav tickets taken 
aud passage and 8late-r<iom berth allowed iu exchange. 
1 enti-nnal excur>-i»n tickets by rail also taken and 
passaiic allowed f r them. 

STONINGTON LINE 

FOR BOSTO.N AND ALL, POl.NTl"* E %ST. 

Elecrant st<'am°rs FHOnE HLAVI) and NARRAfJAN- 
.sl'"!"! leave Pier No. 3:; North Rivar, fiot of J iv st . at 

5P. .M. .NOr A lUU' MISS ':t) I.V SSVB.'J Y.'^AttS. 

Tiilci-ts tor s lie at lit ormcipil ticitet offlcea. .'<tat3 
rociins s(<:ureil at 'tllresof Wcstcolt ri.tpress Oompaay, 
and at No. HOo Jroudw.iy. 

PIMtVUfKNCK MNR. 

Steam-ships lilectra and Galate.-i leave Pier No. 27 
.Niiitli River, foot of Park idic.e. .'itl:jO i'. M. Freights 
Tia either liiii- taken at lowesL ratft'i. 

1). S. li.MJOOi'K. I'-;"?. L. i\' '■"iL.TCixa. G. P. Acnn!. 

A I.B.^.NV A.M> TKOY OV DAY IIOAT?^ 

i\c. VlliSARD AND U.VMEL DuEW.— Leave V«'.3try 
Sireet Pier at 8: Iu, and 24th st. at 8:30 A. JI., landing 
nlNvack ami Tarrytowu. (by leirv-boat.j^W'esi Point, 
Newbury. PouKh.iee[>siP, Kliiuelii^ck Catekill. anil Hui!- 
son. ' oonectiuns at Alu:iny " ith new train at 8 P. .M. 
tor the Wi 8t, ovir New-Y'orU. ieiiiral, arriving at 
Bufi'alo at Till), i-uspensmn ilridgc 8:30, and .Niagara 
Falls at b:-0 tli- lolii.wing mornini;. ( ontinuous 
trains on Loke Shore iiud Canada .'■outhern Roads. To 
West Point aud .Vcwburg and return tbe same uay, $1. 
Piuglikecjisir, $1 fill. 

SKA UliiO, 

Capt. H. B. PARKiC.t. will ru i between New- York 
(f ot ot Franklin St., Pier Ao. 35) and Red Bank, as fol- 
lows : 

LiiAVE Rr:D BANK. 



LEAVE NEW-YORK. 
Tuesdav, 2l)!h. 9:3i» A. M 
Weil'ilav, 27tli.l(,:,30 A. .M. 
Thuraduv,-'Sth. 11:;'.0 A. il. 
li'ndav. 'iiith... .12:01) M. 
Satnrdav. liUlh. o:*)i» P. M 



Tuesii ly. 26tb. 
vVea' av, 27ih. 
ThuiBdav,28tu. 
iriday, 29tb.. ..' 



2:iiOP. a. 
3:.)0p. M. 
4:00 P. M. 
4:00 P. M. 



I:\OK NEV\-;i..\Vli>. *.\<Cl'Fi»tti». Sl'ttl.Ntr- 
M'Ti-.Ln. Alliri-; >I )i;STAl.'*.1, MO.Vr.tSAL, A.VD 

I.NTEIOIEUI.M'K P01.NI\S.-St;o;im'jra W\73 1'i.ir No. 
'25 Kiist Kiver daiiv (Suii.lay exeepled) st :■( p. ^L (23d 
bt. E. it.. I'll 16 P. .M.,)^'il Ll P. -M.. eoiineetln? witii 
[-p.'Cial ti-aiaa .It :<e«-- Haven, tor Hertford, .■^pr^Il^fleld, 
&c. Til-kola 30i i au 1 baiiiagi^ cti.'ctdl At No. 94-1 
lirnaiiwav. ^'ov^ork. an I So. 4 Couctat., Brooklya 
Kxcursionto Niiw-ilavi-n ana reiurn. -R i r>X 

' FOH >OK^VAL,Iv lllKiit:!. 

Connecting with Danbury, .sorwalk aud New-Haven 
llailroads. By steamer 

AMI'ltK US. 
dailv, (Sjnda^' excepte.i.) inui Jewell's Dock. Brook- 
lyn at -■::19P. M. Pier .Nn. 37 E ist Uiver, at 2:45 P. SL, 
and foot oi;i3d st , East River, at :'. P. .M. 

Fare. 35 <'ent•^; exrnroion icUets, 50 cents. 

l.D.K.-ilAKI.l!StlKO LI.Nli VUR 6rtIV- 

VEc-AST. CAfSKILl,, A.nD 1X1' hit .MEDIATE LAND- 
INGS.— Stean.er ANDR1';W' HaROEK. from Frauk.in st,. 
Pier 35, luesilay, Thursday, an! Saturdtv. Steamer 
MiiMTOR, .Monilay. Wednestay, and Friday. 6 P. JL 

Li<OK BKIDGbl'OltTANO .*.L,I. fOIN T.-i ON 

I;HouBHtonic and Naa<»)taok Railroad.— P«r« iL 

tteamara laare Catharliia tiXa .kt 11:80 A. Ua 




DRY <K)ODS. 



DRY GOODS. 




Will on MONDAY. Oqt.i ?, offer their ENTffiE 
FALL mppETATIOK if tie LATEST STYLES 
and FABRICS of the 'ji 

EmM ni ijicl Maitels, 

CONSljsTlNa OF 

Plain, Colored, Ipaney and Black 

Silks. Damasse, Matellasse, 

Brocade, Embosse^, Plain, Colored 

and Bla^t TelTets. 

RICH t ACES 

OF EVERT DESCRIPTION. 

PARIS & HAMBOfiG EMBROIDERIES, 

EMBROIDERED, COLORBOi BORDBRRD 

INITIAL AND HSkMBD HANDKEBCHIBFS . 



DRESS iGOODS, 




India audi CashmeriB 

SHA^VLS, 

Men's Fitisli M&, 



•• CHOSSON'S" CELEBRATED KID GLOVB3, 
SUN AND EAi^ 'UMBRELLAS, 
HOSIERY ANlii LNDERWBAE. 

Blankets, Flaniieii; 

Arctic and Bjider Down (guilts, 
Sprj^s, Comfortables, 
Linens, Whijij) Goods, ke* ^ 



Lies', Missel ll Cllien's 

^ FURNISHlHGijjpEP&RTMEIlT 

NOW OPEN with a comnleii stock of 

f^BNCH AND AMlj^CAN imDSSWBAH^ 

INFANT*^ jODT PITS, 

LADIES' DRBSSINCJ i^liCEi AND ROBES, 

COSSETS, DRESSi ;iMPBOVBES, La. 

WEDDING I't^OtTSSEAUZ 

To order a^ ^ort notice. 




Broadway, ciOrner 19th st* 




FALL dPENINQ, 

WEDNESDAY orTflulgPAY, Oct. 4 A 5. 1876. 

SHOES AND HOUSEiliRliltSHIN& GOODS. 



Dress Goods, 

Ladle«' & Children' s Z 

Z 

Stilis. Sacgues, Z 

Z i i'i 

&0. Buys' & Z I I I 

z iiM 

Misses' Z 

Z 
Suits, Z 
Z 
Z 
Z 
Z 
Z 

o- 



JONES 



Black and 

Colored Silks, 

Pweignit 

Z Domestle 

Z - — 

Z Wool- 

Z 

z ena, 
Z 

.Z 
Z 
z 
z 
o 



o- 



EIGHTH AVENUE j | [ 'EIGHTH AVENUE 

I Aiti»! 

I NINETEENTH STREE'fj^lNBTBENTH BTftBBT. 




James HcCreery & Co., 

Broadway and 11th st. 

EXTEISITE 11 tillES UlLUliTIll 



-&, 



op 



COLORED SILKS, 

tl SS AND UPWARD. 

23-iDo1i dLACK SILK, t2 50, <kid-gloTe Boilhl 

Sretent markat , value, $3 25. Warranted anperiol 
nisb and eoior, and lea* liable to wear shlay thZt aar 
other makeu 

NOVELTIES IN 
VELVETS, 

MATELASSE, 
MMASSE, 
FACONNE, 

AND OTBEE PAHCT GOODS. 
28-tnch all Silk BLACK VBLVSrS. $8. wirth (10 tO. 
18 aiMl 20 inch Silk-faee COLORED VBLVETB, $3 29 
and upward. 



•'M 



'*1 




Hosiery, 
Millinery, 
Laces, 
Fancy Goods. 



Carpets, 

Upholstery, 

Ftimlture, 

Blauketa, 
Flannels. 



Broadway and lltb st. 

POPULAR DRESS 600DS. 

DECIDED BABaATBTS. 

JOB LOTS 20 CSVT8 PKR TASD AVD VfWAXO. 

HIGH NOVELTIES 

- « nr 

BM mil Coloreil tm Mk 

(BT THB FIB8T DB8I0NBKS OF BUSOFE. 

loUBNIN&QOODS, CRAPES, k, 

AT ATTEACnVB PRlCSa / 

JaiesIcCreeiTiGo, 

Broadway iaid.jUth st## , , 

WILL EXHIBIT ON MOKDAY, OCt. 2,^ 

nr T&vni 

Ladies* Dress-mafeuif anj. 
rnmishiiig Departmenla 

ftOkS CHOIGB HOVkLTIBS ftSCSlfXD .PBB LAST 

Suits, PolonaiseSj 
Cloaks, Ddlfftkfis, &e. 

ouiit iTobc 09 ' ' 

MILLINERY GOODS 

is COKPLETB, AND FBEL COllFtDKn WA CMM 
t>LBASB 'ras ROST FABTIDIOCS TABTS. 

FURS 

t5 ALL THB NEWEST STYLES. 

Seal-skln Sacques a ^pe&ialty,^ 
Silk and Sicilian Fur-lined Garmefrt! vn 

tMeslcGreei7&Co.,l 

Broadway and llIlL st^ - 

will offer on ,■ ■' 

MONDAY, oat. 2, ' 

Cpecial batjtaiiu la > .. . -^ 

REAL LACE eOODSi I 

temprisiuic POINT, GACZB, AP^LIQUB, TALB!fCl> 
BNNBS, isnd DUCHESSB LACBS. HA.'fOKUtCHItFS. 
BARBBA, and CAFBS. 

BLACK THREAD QUfPtiRE AND FRENCl 

TRIMMIN6 LACES. 

Spanish and Gaip«i« Netts a«t Searli. Black Tkraai ' 
Barbs. Pnrssol and Pan CoTar*. 
ALSO NOVELTIES IN MAKOFACTURBD LACB 0009S, 

eon*iatinKor8ear&, Jaoots. risa, Haif HanlkeraUelk. 
fec.,ln Valencienaes and Dasheasa Laees. Hamkarx 
EDahtoideTie*. Edjincs. Inkertions and Baada, Llaea • 
Collars and CnS*. OreM Lisse RoSiiif*. A«. LadiM' 
and Gents' Lines Cambric & indkerchiete, Bmsiaed 
and hemstiehed. In plain and fancy boraeta. NoTfcltlea 
in Ladle*' and Gents' SUk Pi>ckat uil Vtek HMtdin^ 



4;^ 



*^ <f 



1^ 



ehtelk, kc., be. 



-u» 



Particular att?ntion is Ihtited to this deparlttent 
GooviB ot superior workmanknilo, elegance oi style, ami 
durability unsurpassed, at :i^ces that 'VTill asto&lsh. 

Also. .j|l 

HOUSE .«lUL„,„^ 

FURBISHING ^^^^^ 
{! GOODS. 

Every article desirahle, ofiik excellent quality, tad 
at prices loner tban elsewfajehje ia the City. 

Great inducements In Dum^Biics. 
JONESi 8TH AV., Cok ;19TH ST. JOKES. 




INVITE THEIR LADY FEl|Nl)S TO AN INSPECTION 

ON t 





OCT. 4 \i^o a, 

OF THEIR ELEGANT STOCK OF 




Ti Sim 



BLACK_GOODS. = 

AT JACKSON'S* 

FKEKCft CASaXBSBS AND UBRINOBS. 63«.. TS&r 
83e.. 900., aodSl. 

BI*A.CBi: SIXiKS- 

AN lataiENSB STOCit Af ULST !»CA!iOIP9 
PKICE8. / 

A BOedal lot of 

ARMXTRE DE SOIE, 

RAKUFACTUBBD 80LBLT FOB OUB OWN TRADB. 

'^°^"'22E^u"l^!^^^?BlfE°^F^fA^:^''' 

AT ^RJEAT BARGAINS, 

OBDBBS FBOHPTLT BZBCUTBB. ' 

Jackson's Mourning Store, 

NO. T77 BBOiU)WAT, OPPOSITB BTBWABPS. 






SILKS, CASHMERES, CAsijS^'S HAIR CLOTHS. BAS- 
KET CLOTHS, iC, tc. M*i0!b up and trimmed in 
THE L.iTEST AND MOST rJA: 



lONABLE STYLES. 



BROADWAY & MENTIETN ST.. 

GRAND. CHRYSTIE m FORSYTH STS. 

,M^— — ^ — ^— ^M^— Pi**js— — — aii**— — 

MISOEL LMtSTEOUS. 



FiiKtEGl 



BOKER'S ilTTERS. 

ill 

No. 78 John St., New-York. fMi O^loe Box No. 1,08a 
l» FU^KE, Jr..l?»Wl.E AGBKT.. 



CARPETS. 

\ PBICBS bbduced, 

G^orgre E. L. Hyatt* 

271 attd 273 Camd, tbr««cb *• SI How«»|«.i, 

now offera at reUil, at reduced prlooa, new stock of 

carpets, as follows : 

AXMIN8TERH, BODV BRL'SSBUS, 

TBLVBT!*. TAPBSITRT B&CSSRliS. 

3-PlT I6st«in CarpeU. Oil Clotha, Bug*, an* MatttlCB. 



MTLLiyBRY. 



PARIS miL.LinsR'ir. 

No. 7 WEST SOTH BT. 
Mil*. ELISE COUOBN. •noo«*sor to Mm«. Ftirerok 
has Just returned from Pari* with an ezqnislU ••!•«- 
tlon of FaU and Winter Bonnets, which will be «i** 
play«d at her aeleot opemuK an TBDBSOaT, Oct «. 
luTltstlon card* will be dn.y seat t« aU auatamen aad 
patron* *t Mme. Ferrero. ^^___ 

JOMB. NATALifi nLSAN, 

<Late of 9th aud 16th eta.,) 
Kow Sa 1.2SS Broadway, between Slat and SBd *tfc 

FLEURS. UOOES, &OBKB. 

K. B.— BRIDAL WRBATHS ANP f BrL«l % «p»etalty. 



GH«AT BAROAINS JKjfWR THIRT%' ©AYS. 
The laree stocV of tonncppr.s and Statuary in ZinO . 

and Bronzed lor ornameiiynig lawna and pn^te 
pronn^s. Also Iron Scab e iFUture*. Copper Weather 
Vanes, CsBtlDgs for M.111S ■r<^ iltboli, to., kc. 
Will be closed out at co»t- 1 m^,„_ _ 

H. T. pttlKSON, SuC'ffessoT, 
luameroii Iron Work*. 
,No. 142 <. bamber* *t. 



UYSICIAWS' pil.i:.si}COL,J(>KCTRI>| ALSO, 



Jc strict atteniion elveu to 
in or out ot ihe City. W ' 
Beekman St., Ko«m No. 23. 



A BURIAL PL.OTFdflt. 

fLat over 3,100 *quare te^l;. 
Cemetery, near Farragut, *- 
>k TUiUlEiL No. aa fiasaaa at. 



.-..ft..- . - -.-r- .--.jaf- 



lllrcttng rents or bills 
;N ■&. WILXUT, Ko. 6 



4al« «n»M»i8WN« 

Tlecitfeed U wooKiawa 
kuauAb A|f^ ft «- 






PLAITING. -BOX, SIDE AND NPACE. »! "*• 
chmeor hand; ahirri 'K, bntton-hol«*, Itat maobuw 
and band •mbroilermB to order. 

C G. STKVEN.-. It VO.. Ko. 114 Ba«t lata a^ 
(Qrote bnildint.) oppoaite Academy of >t«*lc. 

AIARlB T1L.*IANM»S, OF PARiiS ' 

lL«te ."Htchel's.* „ .. .__i. 

Offer* elegant PARIS MILLINKRT from aH th* MM 
makanot Uoonet* and Bouad Huta. On expomtloii 
>0U new modiel* Monday. 4.:a 6th ar. near Wth *t 

MI»1« HARTliEV NO. 947 BROAD WAV 
M?No'l77 5tb a^ , hSsiurt recelTed the lla<s«B» 
taU choicest a»flortui*nt of Vrench »»w»*J,t5^*; 
Jiaa ever heretofore imported, ^Wch aba WIU ezMttt 
during th e eo*uiag week. 

MAMOKi WAtTON.NO.gWMOABWAY, 



-r. f.i. ,.: ,JJ /.--I 






^ww^ 



-m 






p*i,^ 






C^ giic6>-|[A)th CLtmcs, ^unpajj, 



. THE HOUSE'[OLD;v 

SK JBUSDjyT aUPFLY IK TEE 
MARKETS. 
The niarlcetB aro abuudantly STOplied -with 
6v«ryMiiDZ 't)»t ia •eu<>"*blc<. Meato of all kinda 
iTvaeJIioK a> reaauti»ble prioeit, notwitbatandiDK 
tb« t»ct tliat thn cjol weather provailinit creates a 
gre>ater dAmand for them. XVtaltry is looked upon 
with miire f.^vor, bat there is mora than eaon^h of 
It arrlriai; to^apply the needs of City eoassmers, 
and it can be boasbt at low prices. 
Game i« In (ood demand. Qroase are plenUfnl and 
low-prioed. and partridces are also in good eupply 
■o(l DOt dear. Woodcock of choice-'qiialitv are a 
liKl« biebar priced than any other variety of came 
atpr««*nN M>d wild docks are scarce ana bich. 
yentsA* Iwtt tn»» Made Its appearance 1q the 
uarkeca, bnt ic J» not advisable to bay It as 
vet. as th« mfat has arrived iu rather 
Door eondltlon. The flah iffj-ed for sale 
Is eenvrally fresh, and the variety presented 
by the fiainoontfers is so ^reat that the purchaser Is 
Wwildered in making a choice. Ko raistake can be> 
mad« in bnylos Spani.sh msckerel. kinc-flsh. satmon- 
trout. pike, and tUe many kinds of pan fish now 
caa(;ht, which, though small, are very good. There 
isnnlrck of iresh frmts, and prices are not high. 
Peachea are still in fioid sapniy, pears are 
atrasdant, and so are erspes. Plums for 
prvserTini; are also plentiful, and watermelons 
have not ret disappeared. Cranberries 
are now arrivlDC in large qnantities, bnt they are 
not as |!ood as they wlH be a little later in the 8«>a- 
eon. Vojtetcbles of all kinds are very plentifnl 
aad cheap. The present is a B'«<J "me to buy 
pJlMtoes, onions, tamlos, and cabbages. It is not 
likely that prices will be lower this year. Butter, 
cbseSe, and eggs are dearer taan they were last 
wet-k. the advance in the raies being caused by a 
apeenlative feelini; in the wholesale markets. There 
U bnt mtle probablity sf a tall in the orioe of 
chfese, bnt there may bo shortly in those of butter 
and egiis. ^^^._^_____ 

Will some ocs furnish me with a rood receipt for 
nakiiif iiuuipkiu pief ¥ ease staie lue am'>UDt ot 
each iut:redi<;ut tJ^e^. Al.<«>, a arai-class receipt for 
aclaiu-ci>ow>:«r} Is rhtre auy way 111 winch star 
gouo cau btr used to mske it palatable. — ItC.vDEK. 

Will doooe oue tell lue of a iiA)d way to jjat- lid of 
Crovuu bu^s ami other in-teon which ars infosiin;; 
our bart'aU'i, tranks, «fco — W. J. 

What wilj prevent hair from comins out? I 
do o <i w<.>a to uju auyt .liig oily nor tu have my 
. baod abav<^— Pu^auuMi. 

X would Like to oa informed how to maKe ohow- 
chow yickios. — 0. W. V. 

Will y>o tell an inex.ienenced boasokeeper the 
bwi iwy to wash red tlanatil (kiiic ^uods) under- 
wear.— O. K. M. 

I ah "Bid lika to have a eood recpipt for raaking 
" asarsu-maUow drops,"— .A. Co3sia.\t Rbader. .:;_ 

Pleaae give ase a ncsipt tor DOiiiiuai wood so as 
to retain toe nacariil'i;r.iin and color. — F. H. C. 

' Can any one inf'mt ma how to take the shine off 
m \txtun. silk ^c(^U'j \ I have wjru it one Winter, 
and ti is^nacu liKu a lookiaK-ffloas.— B. C. 

Will some one furoish me with a receipt tor 
iltuiiiOjC autl r«sloiiu;{ biaok uce I — SViisCKlB^ 

• • ( '^ 

AMsiVEIlS. \ V 

CnocoutTB Carambm.— Two cups of sagar, 

>ne ui luolasaed. onooi oii.K, one spowuiul of buiter, 
3ae et fl •ox, haJ a ^ouna Bakci '* chocoiaie. i5t.ti/ei 
foarskoo pau ; pntiu sui;ur,uio)at«es,and milk; bull 
tttieen oiiuates ; U'td fijur anu batter, stiiTed lo a 
srean, «iia aiiuw u> oou hve minutes; theu add tht- 
- C4iuouial«, graitxl, and boU liii tiiick ; uufter tin fi.ii- 
pans aud pour IB tha mixiurs. bal! au luch thick, 
sna men mark il in squarus betore it gou batd in 
B<'Oiini;. ~ 

SOaTOS RiCEIlT FOB Cabamkls.— One pint bowl 
Bukci's ^rate.i ctiouuiate, iM'o uuwis yellow sagar, 
oue now I ^ew-Orleaua molasses, oue-bali teacup 
Bi^, Di«ee ot i>ai:er the &\za ot a am:ill ecrir, vaml- 
i-. fl..vi,j- ; boil at>oac iwentv-flv6 minutes. Ii 
eooald not be SO britUe aa muiasse* cauuy ; pour 
into ba;tered Uos; when partly cool marc in 
BQ tares quite deey; cut with • kuife. — Wake 

III.— Two caps angar, one cup nsolassss. half cup 
Siiia, tbree-quaricr cup f^ratud chooolato, piecu ot 
Laaer ibe sso of a b.oicory uut, oue teaspouu ex- 
t-aci vauUi.1 ; Loil H^Uten or twenty miuuies, till ii 
BTikpa iu cold water, thea pour in liuiteied paus 
toU miirk ott in sqLt^as; aet it in a oool place to 
kyrdro. — Y. C 

IV. — VjLSitLA Carambi-S. — "East Siae " -will 
Bud iliis a tiuud rc-cci>ji lur Ciiamels : Oae-ha.i 
pound £.ikbr's chocolate, three poundd sutfai'. 
(uru^'O i« otrsi.) :wacup8 luilk, tour t^iUiespooutuis 
suiaasea, and uub tuaspouo.ui oi butter, c^tir all 
tui:e. bei- and bull li.; ii uaiaeus wbeu uropptjii inio 
cuid water, yiavur with vauilla when takeu off the 
ftr»-.— A. SS E. 

Crrw>.s PitE«.'?BVE.— Peel and cut the citron into 
t^cu aquarus; uiu u.^rt cuacainiog the suedd snouid 
be oat i.Ol ; itieu to every gaiiou of waier, add 
ft^'uui as UriQ as a iarue vcitluui ; iu this buii toe cit- 
rwu siKWiy ii.ladtraw >i,i c<ibi y pierce it; ttieudii.i.i 
ireii auti ,)Ul lutu ine " prc^aurva svra;)," alluwiu;^ a 
p'.und ot suyur to c-vtary pouua oi iruic Alau san 
toar si.ccU lemous (rtuiuvo ctie seea><) to evcxy ten 
m^upas ul ci rou, auj Que-quu'ler poanil |:rtieu 
frnjicr rout, ne?! cleaiieu. ^oii id tUo vyrup nil 
ciaar; lh«v pn*- aw^y iu cloeeiy-uovered jura alivi 
it lia- •ecoiut? iM\ . 

lKlJ$EBVi>G SyullP.- To every pound of block 
■aj;u .» <uube ;:iii ut vira;er. aou to every teu pouiida, 
ouc bU'ioe itu.iti^i< ikii.gl-kAS, diasoivod ; Doll ana 
•kim uliQltiari (hu is rcauy tor uuy kiud ot fruit 
pouuU lur pouud. 

GBidfAN OB FBEXca ilusTARD. — Bqual quantities 
ot i!>.<4uaii auU ikasUiMi niUBirti'vi seou aTa mixeu wiih 
•uiuwifs, Clows, iBace, caycuoe p(>pper„ sait, auu 
Tin«t!sr{ mix auu an>>d iu a mill uniil ii is as line 
aa ]l.iar; tare* criaduiss aro uoouosary; aa<* wholo 
spuiea. 

lo CtEA58B Kid GL0VP9.— m the elovesnpon 

a cieau ItcAiu : a>ako a uiixturu ot diii-d lulier'n 
sarto aaa poTrdervd aiUm, aud pads tueiii over ou 
lacn S'Ue vtiib ac-^muun siitf biu^h; then sweep 
ttolt and spriLklei them well witu dry brau and 
whi;iu(^ and duat theui we:ll Tuis. it they be n<^l 
iX.e«a:uKiV greasy, w.ll leuder them quite clean ; 
:<ut It tuev are much soiled taka out ^ae urbane 
wifn crnuiOa ot tuanted bread auJ po%iter oi burued 
Doz^e ; then p^&s theoi over ^vitu a vtoulen cloth 
ItiJijed m foliei's earth or alum powiUr rin this 
manner toey caa he cleaned without wettiu;;, 
ahicn trequcntly shrinks ana spoils them. 

Lkmos JmcE axALNs.- Here is a reieipt for re- 
Doviuir trail, staiua, wuich may remove lemoa 
|i4co : Let tl>e spuctel p^rt ot ibe cioth absorb a 
iutle water witliout Uippiuj^, and hold ti;e pai t over 
a lijcuted common uriuiatoue mateh at a proper dis- 
tance. Ttia sulphurous gas waich is aischarifod 
soou MUioas the spots to disappear. 

Fxi£X> S'.rEKT POTATOB*. — Peel the sweet pota- 
to«« ; Slice lueia abuut a quarter of au lucn tiaick, 
or oat ibsm In shavings, round and roand, as you 
woniU peel a iemon ; dry tu»m well iu a clean 
etotti, a-id fry ttieoi in lard or diiiOping ; take care 
, thai >Ottr tai aud trying pan ai-e qaite clean ; put it 
oa a qaiek tire ; watch It, and aa soon as the lard 
boils ana is still, p&t iu tua s.ices ot potatoes and 
keep moving tbeiu ull tbey ai-e criap ; take them 
ap ana lay them to dratu on a eijva ; send them 
ap with a very lit:is »all apriuklea over ihem. 

Clka^i 50 sTATLAiiy — It your sutue is marble try 
lie lv.ij..w.uj;. ou. ue oaroiui 01 it /or u may be 
^ibouoUj: Take verditriB and pummice-stuue, well 
powjeietl, fciiU liiue uowly siakeu ; mix wiiu soap 
*es to liio cuiiaidtence ol putty ; put i iu a wooieu 
rag. and ruo ilie siaiua weii oue way ; Wash i,ff vTiiu 
Map aud Water ; ie^e.4i It not ro.uuved. 



■■'': * 



until The slioss are transp^rsnt and a straw will co 
thrxusb them. Put tho citron while warm intojirs, 
and pour the syrup ou slowlv; cover tigbily. — O. H. 

" CiiAFiMG Dish"— OYSTFJt Stew. — Take a 
dozeu oysicrs and strain ihdin. AVith a htUe of 
the liquor, or milk, mix smoothly abonr. a tnble- 
SDoonlul of butter iind halt a tua-apoouiul of flower, 
(do not let It he lumpy.) Warm auo-t a cupful of 
milk, (with a scrap ot m.ice, if you like, or a crate 
ot uutmot;.) stir loto ttiis tbe butter and iluur — 
have it quite smooth — tie sure to stir always one 
wav. or it will curdle. Xow add your oysters, put 
tbe pan on the lire, and wUon it comes to a buil, if 
tbe oyters are " plumped up," your stew is ready. 

Corn Brkad.— One pint of soar milk, one and one- 
halt pints ot Indian lueal. two ujics, bait a teanpoon- 
ful.ot' salt, one tablespoonful ot butter or lard, two 
tablespoonfuls of molasses, oua-hait teaspoonl'ul ot 
salerstus; bake half au hour. 

Pakker Hol'sf. Rolls. — At nicbt take two quarts 
of tlour, rub in three tablespooufuls of lard ; make 
a bole in the middle and put in one pint of ooid 
Polled milk, one-half cup <rt yeast, three table- 
spoonfuls of sugar, oue e^jj', aud oue teaspoonlul of 
salt; let U stand until luornine without mi^iuc; 
tnea mix aud let il stand until uoou; cbeo roil uut, 
cut into rolls, let them est very li);ht; then bake 
in a quick oven. 

Queen's Pudding. — One pint of flno bread crumbs, 
one (|uurt ot swei*t milk, oiio cui> of su^ai, the 

yolks of tonr eii^s woil beaten, grated r!ucl of one 
lemon, a tablespoonlul of butler; l^iike until done, 
but not watery; beat the whites of the four e;;2s to 
a stiff irotti, audsweeton teem with one tableiuoon- 
lul of sucar, in wnich rboro has been stirred tbe 
juico of one lemon ; spread oyer ibo puddins a la\ or 
of jelly, puur the whites of the eg^fs over this; 
place iu tlie uvon aud bake lishtly. 

Sil/erCakk. — Two cups of powdered sugar, two 
and' a halt cups of silted flour, ont>-hait cap ul 
butter, three-fourths of a cup of swl-oi milk, the 
wbites ('f eiiibt eg^s, one teasoooutul of baking- 
powder; Biir bntirec aud sui;ar to a croatu, tb«!U 
add the whites ot the e^iss, beaten to a Ktill' I'rotiij 
tbeu add'tiio milk; thou .stir tho voait powder 
tlivoutrh the fl.)ur : flavor with oitter almond. — 
llrs. B. 

Mou.tvfAN Sugar Cake — Oae cent'.<i worth of 
yeast, oue cup miii. oua cup sucar,' thiee ruiia 
fliiur; set over n gut, then add tbreeiourlbs oun 
of butter, two ojjcs; m'ud up with flour and se; to 
raise aeai 11 ; woen li^ht, put in pans aud t-et lo 
raise aaaia wbeu livhc ae.tiu, put ou the top but- 
ter, buj;ar, and powdered ciunauiou. Bake iuijuick 
uvea. 

Gouj Caki! - -Take the i yolks of eight ecKs, 
beat; tupiu well, -ihen add one cup of powiieie.l 
Butrar,. three-tourtba of a cup ot butier : stir buiter 
a.iu sutfar to a cream, add iwo cups of Ilour, one 
teDiigioouful ol baking pjwdar; flavor to tiuii the 
taste. 

GingekSsaps. — Tw3 cups of molasses, one-half 
cup ol BU<{ai', a neaping cup ot lard, one t^ble^ipoou- 
tul of jii'iilur, oue-haii tea^poonful of «iil , oue aim 
a balf toaspoonfals of .lalera us, ball a cu j of warm 
water; mix atitt enoU'.rh lo roll ou: tbiu. — Mrs. B. 

Soft Mouvsses Cake.— One cup of molaases. one- 
haif ('Up ol bucier or lard, one e^tCjUaif a cup ol 
sour miik, one leasp >ouful ot saleratus, biilf 4 ta- 
blespoonful of eiuy;er; mix soft with flour. — Mrs. B. 

CilOCOLATE Caelh. — Take hilf a cup of nuiter, 
thrcf e.;i:!>, two cupd "t »u>;*r, oue cup of milk, oue 
teaspoonlul of soda, two of ciea n of tart.ir, tour 
ounces ot grito . cboco ate, threo cuds of fl lur, oue 
tauiespoouful extract of vanilla. Siir in t^e cuoco- 
iatc Ibe last tbiuc. 

PiXEAPFLE Ice. — G-rate the pineapple. Allow one 
pouud ul sugar lu ttvo of tho U'uit. Add oue pine of 
water, and fryczs. 

Obaxge Ice. — Cut the oranies in slices, pnel, and 
seed. Allow sugar as for uiaeappie, omit tbo 
water, and freeze. 

PiG'd Head. Baked. — Divide and clean thoronsh- 
ly ; taite oat ine biau!! ; tiiin the snout aud earn ; 
oake an hour and a bU'; wash tiie brains well ; 
blaucu them ; beat tbeni uo wiih an ejig, psppiT',- 
aud sate, aud add som-j flneiy-powfered sase aula 
small lump of Daaer; fry brown, and serve with 
the head. 

IMPORT AJ^T POLICE CHANGES. 



isvxpz:firrz Crkam C'AiiE.—Tbree ezga, one 

Cnp WuiM> o-i^ar, ouo lU^Ho^i, oue loaa.uoouiu. ciuaui 
tarttfi', uiie-ualf leaspooulul of nou^i viiosoivkU in 
two lablespuoiitaia sweet laiik ; tliyorwuu vauiiia. 
h^aiie into lareo C-ikes a? j -ny caitc. i'^r a cuSianl 
»r CI earn 101 the same, take ouo-uait piut mi.k, oUi< 
tfi~% '<*■' fubUs^oiiiitals 01 Curu stai'cb, out;-baif cuu 
Ol wuub su;:ar ; flavor alsu Wlih vaailla. K^ist-rvo 
a li'lie cui^ Uiiia auii Uiix ibe c jru slarcli ; iiicu tu.x 
ail ivue.uer nuu s-ir in tbt> Uoiiiu^ nnii;. bpntiklu 
lliie v^uite auj;.r oyer whaju Cold. Suihoieni tur six 
pursuuj.— l^:ouxwooo. 

'lo KKsTOUE TUB WmXESESa TO IVOUrilASULED 
SjilVbtt — >V ..aU „ UU saupuu U.>Uunl auU iutt.i -tV..iiii 
■virutci ; ,i.eu Wipe very ur.v. ijoak iliem occusiou- 
ally iii aaiui wuier toai bas been boiied uuii aiioned 
t<i cool. Lut ibe uaiiilies Un lor oiie hour iu ibis. 
th>u leuitivb tit«m auu oruitti ibem w-jll, (say wub a 
nui -biusu.j At cr Ibis taie a cieaa liueu towel, 
uii> i IU 1 oil Watt:, : quet z < K iiuc, aud wDi.e Wot 
»rak> It lU'i.Uu'i 'be Ua....it;.-'. leav u.; tuum lu it 10 
diy i^imiua i,>. us 11 uriHU too lajiialy uut ot tbe 
t'u»i «v .ter uiey win bt- iiiju'ea. ill popcrly mau- 
tuid, .i,is piocess wi.l w.iHou ibeui. Kuivos, afior 

Oalli,i, oiiouiii ue wij^cd with so;l papo:, l«.iioyiUi£ 
111 i^'.caa4, (tc. ibcii p aceo iu a diioi> o .n '^v ve^*!-!, 
keepiiiij i.^io u-u'Uo ao.,vc waiBi, lunoua.m, uuiil 
lva«xe , coiUr. , auJ iliurou.iiiy Uiiud. 

CoCt'ASLri AliU— U.i -U ilf cup DUll.i:r. two cum 
SU_-i, i"i'0 •»" ' a ".ill cU » rt.ui, Oau cup Ul.k, 
ei4''t "iJiis. ('^ iJ'tei i).i,\.) liiiL-ts Isaayouiiu n b k- 
iU,.po\*usi; baiio lb Joi J-Caku paas. iMliii;;— Ojc 
^r^t-jU »ocoaiiut, la-j Will. oof laiee \}ic». ilncf- 
q>iar,eraoi a piiiiuU of .-l;;;u-; beat tiu, wuHcs to a 
tiiU frotu. IUbu utat lu luc su^iur; put bilweiu tbe 
la>ertf an" spriukle tbe c.icoauui. thukly oyer; 
Bovor t^o top auu 8:de» also wuU tbe iciii,^ aud cn- 
OOanut; plac« io tybolo ou i!ik laiilo, amj it not all 
Baton wra,> tbe reuiaiuder lu a thick damp cloiu 
and iMor lb a i-ool place. 

PRS«h.uVBP ClTKOS .V!El.OSS.— Pore, core, and cut 
the me.oT.s into slices, \veiieu ibeiu, uud lu every six 
pou'tuS ji DieluQ allow six puiiuds ot white sug.ir 
and tU« j'JX'e aud yellow mid, uared oft' vury tiiin, 
of lojr large juioy lemons; also halt ^^ pound of 
race giuijer. Put the slices ioto a preserviog kuttle, 
CovtT with water, and a layer 00 all ot i>«ach leaven: 
boil aooac bait' tn boar, or until clear and a broom. 
Kbua \vUI vierce theiu ; dram tbum. spread thciu 
j> a pan of co.d water, aud let them stand over 
aiiiui. Ksxt momiui; ti» tbe :ii]i>:er in a muslin 
;loib and boll it iu tbreo pints of water tt>l tho 
wauir iahiieWytlavored; take out tbe Kinger, dis- 
solve (tia sQ/^ar 10 tbe Kiuxe2-wat«r, pat in the 
l*Dinit''peal, and bail and skim tlU no moro scam 
Ttaca f taka out tbe lemon-p«el, pat in the slices o( 
citron and jolo* ot tha UmwM. *sd boUia tha avrao, 



APPOINTMENT OF TWO ADDITIONAL CAP- 
TAINS — TRASStKR Of thri:e inspec- 
tors, SIX CAPrAI.NS, AND FOUR SEK- 
GEANiS— THK COURT SQUADS UEOKGAN- 
IZH.D. 

The Police Board held a meeting yesterday 

at wnich in aJdiliou to the promotiou of two Ser- 
geants to the rank of Captain, several transfers of 
a very import Jht nature were made, aud a pretty 
thorougn reorgscization of the Police Court hquads 
was effected. The action taken by the board, so 
far as relates to the transfer of Captain.s, has been 
anticipated several months past, it beinjr well uu- 
uerstood that tbe Coiumissionors were not 
whclly pleased with tbe administration of 
ce/taio commaudinfr oEBcers within their respective 
precincts. In the case of Capt. Steors, ot the 
Twenty-Dinlh Precinct, particularly, tho board was 
outspoken in its disapproval ot tiie mauiier in wbicli 
tbat cfiirer perfonueu his duties', a tact wlucb was 
manliest in the stin;;inff rebuke to bim when, a lew 
days »jjo, a request of nis for three days leave of ab- 
sence Was refused by the lull boaid, which then 
took oooasiuii to censure bini rather severoiy. Too 
reoiganiialii'D of tbe praseut couri squads was un- 
d ubtedly elfeoted for toe sole parpo:<o of breaking 
optha"riues" created to lunher the inlercsLi of 
cue "'shyster" lanrycrs. 

The full Doard w s present at tho meotins, Pr^si- 
deai Smith occupyius: the chair. Tbo leaamj; 01 
the minutes bei.iK rtiaoensed wi b, tbe lirst budliie.-;S 
of au important character transacted >ya» the ap- 
poincmeul of Sorit. J. B. Eakius, oi tbo I'lr.-it In- 
Hpeciiou District, as Captain of tbu Eigbieeu.b Pre- 
ciuct, anu Serat. William -Mnrray, ot tiia Fifce.'UiU 
l*re( iuc, as Captain of the i\u'r«b Precinct. I'.otli 
oi the new Captains are Aiuencaus bv bi;ih. Capt. 
Murray was appointed to tue lorce in March. 1:G6, 
Huu Capt. £akiu m May of the same year. Oj tbe 
recomirienuation of tbe Commitioe ou lla.es and 
Discipline, tbe tollowiiig traniitrs weie made: 

IXSPECTOES. 

Dtlks, from the first to the Second District; McDcr- 
moii, from the Second to tbe Third Dist.ict; Thorno, 
Irum tbe Third to the I'irat District. 

CAPTAINS. 

Williams, from the Fourth to the Twenty-nliitb 
Preciuct: Steers, irom iheTwcnty-nlDth to ihi; fiurty- 
secouil Prccinut; Davis, Irom tbo Tuiity-si-coud to tbe 
1 wirlltli Preoi.ict: Lemy, troiu the Twcutv-iitn ti> 
the ibirtieth freciuct; Uarlaud, from tiie ti^b e^-.uih 
to the 'Iweniy-fijth I'recmct; W.ush, irom tbe Thir- 
tieth to the Twenty-sixth t'leciuct. 

SEHGEANT3. 

W. C. F. Berghold, Second District Police Court to 
the ^eventeento Precinct; VViiiiain fbompao'.i, Seveu- 
teentn to the EisUteeutb I'reciuut ; 'I'hoiuaa Ahem, 
jileveiitii Precinct to th ■ Second Dia.ricc Police i oun; 
syivtBter usLiorii, Twelfth Precinct to tbo lounh uU- 
irict Police Court. 

TATROLMEJl. 

John M. 'Bennett, First District Police Court, to tbe 
8to*m-boat .quad; William Cotier, First District Police 
Court, to the r'irst Preciuct; ueorge Urussick, becoud 
Dijitilcl Police L'eurt, to tue^inth Preciuct; JaiuosA. 
McPberson. Second district Police C'ou.t, ti> tue hix- 
tceuth Precinct; Michael Kluuimiuis, -ecoud District 
Pobce Court, to Ibe Nineti-entb Precjiicir George iSiveu, 
Ibinl uistrict Police Court, to the Sttam-boai Squad ; 
Valeotioe Gass, Taird District Police Court, to tbe 
KtTonth Preciuct : 't'bomiis McJormick. Tbird District 
Police Court, to tbo dxteenlh Preciuct ; Atirabam G. 
l>ertholf, fourth Dist let Police Couic, to tuel wclftb 
Preciuct; Dennis Deary, E urtn District Poiice Court, 
to the Elgbteeuih Precinct; David O'Couue.l, 
Fourth District PoUce Court to the ^lneteeuLb Pre- 
cinct; H. N. tlitcbcoct, Fourth Didirict Police Court 
to the Twelfth Preciuct; L- D. Kmalley, Pourtb Dis- 
tiict Police Court lo tue Twelfth preciuct; (iabnel 
A^iuire, l-ourili Precinct to the First I'l.-itr'ct I'olico 
Court; Freoeiicli IU Le.via. rweutyfuurib Precuict to 
tbe F'irst District Police Court; Heury Duryer, Filth 
1 recluct to the F.rsi Disirict Po.ice touri ; 
Patterson Jolly, Twenty-SLVculh Picciuct to tba 
Secoud Uisiiict Pol.ce Court; Cuarlea E. Van Duscu, 
Tweaty-titib lecinct to tue .-ecoud l.ii8i.iict Poiico 
Court; llichard ticary, Tlurteeuth P:-. cinct to tbo 
hecoua i>istnct Pol'ce Court; DeijaUiiu TeaKard, 
hUbtli Prcci.ct lo the tiecoud District Police Court j 
JoiiiiJU. lown, Fourlu Precinct to me ."Second District 
Pouce Couit j O.ivcr H. SieWi.rt, Scveuieeuib I'rccijct 
to tbe Secoati idu'rict Poice C/Ourt; Jaiue^ W. nartell, 
acveut^eiub Precinct to tbe 'Ibird Disiricl Police 
Court ; John ilcucruiott, Teuth Preciuct 10 
ttie Third Diainc!. Police i oun ; Eicbaid 
Ci ff?e, .>jObnted ^quad, to tbe Tliiid 1 i trict (oupt; 
COtuel.iis F'oiey, Kigutb Preciuct 10 the Fourlu L),a- 
trict Poiico Court; lidsvarvl t»'';oauor. iNiuetieutb :>uo- 
preciucL to too Fourlu Diutrict I'olico C'i)Urt; Davul 
G ideu, Tnbllih Precinct to tbo Fourth District l^ohco 
Court ; .'Uicbael Keliard, tenth Pr ciuc to tuet-ounn 
l>it>,rici 1 olice Couri ; johu l\eiiy, tiybcb Preciiici to 
tl;c Fiitb ills., let loilce Court ; Dcclau Keuuedv. bixib 
1 iceii.ct 'o Ibe Tbird Diblrict Police Couri ; Jo..u 
Koniei, Fourtli Preciuct to tue F'uurtii Lui ic. Police 
lour: ; Jl.cuaei D..rtn;au, First Pn-einci 10 ibe 'lluid 
liitttr.cL I'olice Court ; 1 aviil bbtruau. Twe.iiy-nrtot 
1 r.ciiict to tbo Fi.lo District Ponce couii. 

TUe loilowiuj; uamed court otliceri Veore assicued 
a-J loDoWr.. 10 luoi alter MjiSHous of Coryoratiou 
oi-.liuauce.' : 

John L. AnrSre. Second District PoUce Court to the 
Sixtciiitb iTocuul; Jiili.i iwUiUbuo. Fu'si, DiatiKtlo- 
11, e ' ourt l> tue .cve.iteeutu I'leciuci ; .iiexaaJer 
FerKUsou, .Seco..u Diaiiict C'mu, 1 to ibe .luth ii.cij.ci; 
IjCuiv : . Ji-u-s. .>eeouu HUtiict louco tocit lo iba 
'll.i.iy-iuird Prfciu I; Joi.u ..iciicu. Secou.t Oistru t 
Pol e couru Id tue Twicuiieib I'reci.ictt i;cu.,eu 
Rogers, touilh Liot-ict Po-ico Court to tbe f»vou lieu u 
A r.iciucl. 

Koundsmau John E. liouk, of the Pourteenlli 
Preciuct, wad truusleired to liie Moiiuuni >qu,id, 

HUli tUO lolluWUli PatrolUICU Wcle oulc|i;J lo icport 

l.u- duly ar tue otiicca of iUm lu^iiecloi- of tbe ibii 1 
lus.rci'Uou District ; Jouii W. (jarusido, Xucopbi- 
lui II lime!?, aud Cuarlc.T Minor. 

Too residuiiou adopteu by tlio Police Board ou 
Au;;. Mi, IriiJ. providiuif tliat uj oiiiecr wii.j b ol 
Octu oi»iuir.sed Irom ihe departmeul, or bad re- 
Bijiucd uuder caart^us, slioald be rcapuointed to ibj 
roief, wa.s rescinueil, and Thomas i'arrell. who vma 
nceutly dismissed, was reanpuiutea uuder tue now 
rule. E. S. Parker was appomted ciert at an an- 
nual salary ot $i.',40U. An application from bupcr- 
iuieiideut Waliiiijj lor tUieo Uuys leave ot absence 
was grauted, 

SIOLEy FROFt^KTY RECOVERED. 
On Friday evening threo strange men en- 
tered the laeer beer saloon of l^cter Wiuells, No. 104 
Hixth avenue and requested pennL'Sion to leave hIx 

bundles there until they called for them. Mr 
■\Viuelis cave hia conseut, but after the men bad 
lott he thought their actions suspicious, aud be noti- 
fied Patrolman Johnson, of tbo ifuteeutb Preciuct. 
On openmc the bundles they were found to con-j 
tain a number of Qua tablecloths, ovideutly tb9 
proceeds of a burglary. The goi>tis are in pos- 
' session of the Police, ttiamsa having: failec^ to caU 
lot Laeu»- 



MILITARY GOSSIP. 

— « — 

Gatling Batteiy, artillory, had a special 
drill at tbe Cify Armory last Monday evening. 

Hynes H. Loowcnfhal has been elected Cap- 
tain of Company I, Fifth Ee-itiment, vico Achcn- 
bach ro.'iiirned. 

Coinpanits G in the Twenty-third and Forty- 
seventh Regiments, Brooklyn, are to shoot a rotorn 
match shortly. 

Priyato Is'elson H. Squires, of Company B, 
Porty-Boventh Regiment, has been expelled for im- 
proper conduct. 

A series cfi eix promenade concorta ■will be 
Civeu byths Thirteenth Rcy;iinenD Band, at the 
new armory, in Flatbu.sh avonuo, Brooklyn, coin- 
meucing on the 7ih inst. 

Tlio late Emil Haas, a member of Kolte's 
Post, No. 32, Grand Array of tho Republic, was 
bnried with military honors bv his late comrades at 
Cypress liiils Cemetery last Tuesday. 

Com])any G, Seventh Eegiinent, Capt. J. C. ' 
Abrams commanding will par.tde to attend tho 

funeral of their late cotnrade David Scott, to-dny 
at 1 P. M.. at bis remdence, No. 307 Lexiucton 
avf uuo. 

Tho Fourteenth Regiment, Brooklyn, Col. 
McLeor coiuiuandinK, will parade to-morrow for 
review. The commissioaed ofBcers nsnerobled at 
tbe armory fordiill and instiuction on Saturday 
evening la.st. 

The corarais.sioncd officers of the Fifth Bri- 
cade, Brooklyn, assembled at tho Pourioenth Retji- 
looiit Arinoiy laa^ Satiirdny evening and spent 
^'omo time in drilliu;;, under the instruction ot 
Lrij;. Gen. Jourdaii. 

A new uniform is being made for Gilmore's 

band, which its members will wear ou tbo occasion 

of tho divi!>i in parade on Tuesday. Tho coat is of 
while ciotli, trimmed with red ; pants o\ red cloth, 
a'ji; caps ot tlio same material. 

CoQiiiany F, Scvcnry-fir.st Eesiment, L'eut. 

W. Milne, Jr., commanding, will assem'olo at the 
rettiuiental armory in fatigue uoiforni, with white 
bolts, knaps.'icks, and blankets rolled, lor inspec- 
tion, next ■Wednesday at 3 P. M. 

Mtijor Geor;ie W. Suuer, of the Third Cavalry, 

will have his opening military ball at Germanic 

Assembly Rooms on 'Wednesday, Oct. 18. Tho oc- 
casion will be the anniversary of bis iwonty-flfth 
year of lervice in the National Guard. 

Brig. Gen. Smith, commanding the Connecti- 
cut National Guard, has written a letter to Gen. 
Ward, commandiug the ]^irst Brigade of this City, 
thauiting him lor the bo;. or conleired upon his c «ni- 
maud iu escorting it tbruu^h the City on the 9lh ot 
cf last month. ^ 

In compliance with orders from Division and 
Brigade head-qarters, the Twenty-second Rej^i- 
bient. Col. Josiah Porter Comnianding, wili parade 
lu luli-dress uniiorm nest iuesdav, to particiiate 
lb tbo divi-sicn review. The hour for assembly at 
the armory will be -JiJO P. M. 

At a meetJiiy of the members of Company 
H, Seventh Rejiiment, last Friday evening. Second 
Lieut. James L. Prise was elected Captain, vice 
Cap'. George 'William Smith, resigned; Sergt. John 
U. Andrews First Licuteuaut, vice Xicoll, resigned, 
and John A. TacabeiTy Second Lieutenant, vicc 
Price, promoted. 

Tiie Thirteenth Regiment, Brooklyn, Col. 
Criggs commanding, heM a drill at its armory last 
Tuesday evening. At a meetiua of Company B, 
last Monda'y evening, William A. Brown was 
eeoted First Sergeant. Privates K. C. Peabody 
and John R. Grant have been added to tbe Court- 
martial Committee. 

The Twenty-ihird Regiment, Brooklyn, Col. 
Rodney C. Ward coinmandiog. will parade ''to- 
morrow with its brigade, and the commandants of 

the company are directed to take the necessary 
steps to supply rations to their respective com-, 
iiiaods during IransoorianoT or immediaiely al'te<S 
their arrival at the parade ground. 

At a meeticjj of the field and line officers of 

the Forty-seventh , Kegitnent, Brooklyn, last 
Wednesday evening, 1: wag niutn.illy agreed that 

there should be no change in the ofliccrs during t!;e 
conuBg drill sea.'ion. The '■Veterans"" badge will 
be formally presented to the regimuiit at a bu'taliou 
drill to be held dunnj; tbe present mouth at tbe 
armory. 

The cotftmission nf First Lieut. Frederick 
Fies"ler, of Company C, Twenty-eighth llogimuut, 
Brooklyn, has been " vacated for deficioucy in tac- 
tical knowledge.'" There must have been some 
other reason for the removal of Lieut. Fie.s.'dor. for 
if tins rule woro ap lied to a 1 trie commissioned 
oSicers in tbaccoinmaud there would be several 
v ociucius. 

The loUowing non-cominissioned officers have 
been chosen in tbe new separate company of In- 
fantry, Second Division, of Flushing, Long Island: 
Sergeants — Michael O'Mara, Walter Onslowe, ■\\''. 
il. Filzpatrio-i, Charles F. Kcllv, Michael Cunning- 
ham, and Henij^ Joyce; Corporals — Michael Eec- 
iiedy. William M. R ibsoji, Henry Jarvis, Johu 
Deleliautv, and John Hogau. 

Tbe Separate Troop Cavalry, Fifth Brigade 
Brooklyn, Cajit. Saudhusen commanding, paraaed 
for rifl^ practice at the S^ihuetzen P.trk, m that 

city, last week. Tne public-spirited Mayor Schroe- 
dcr uresenteQ a handsome silver goblet to the troop 
for campetuiou, which was won bv Private Henry 
Tolirmann. There were f.irty-threo other pr zes 
contested, and tbe carabineer's enjoyed a day's 
sport. 

Qhesetef guidons, pre.'ieDted by the First 

Brigade Staff to ihe regimental team iu the brigade 
which should make tbe highest score in the State 
match at the late Fall meeting of tbe National Rifle 

Acaociat ion, were won by the Twelfth lleeimcnt,and 
Will bo presented to that command on the occaai'iu 
of its hrst battalion drill nt theStato Arsecal. The 
tropbios are tour iu number, two of blue, and two 
of rod material, with the figare "12" embroidererf 
on eiicli. They are handsomely mounted. 

The following officers have been commiasioned 
in the First and Second Divisions duiiug tbe past 
month : Fir.^t Division — Staif : Col. John C. Barron, 

Surgeon, and L:eut. Coi. Augustus G. Paine, Qiiir- 
teriuaster. Eleveulh Regiineut — Cuptaiu, Matiuias 
Kieter ; First Lieutenants. Peter Ponimor, and Al- 
bert Ficke. Tweu;y-eigbtU Ilegiment. Brsoklvn — 
Capt. Jlenry J. Hesse, Assistaut'Surgeou. Sepa- 
rate Troop Inlp.ntrv, Second Division, Brooklyn — 
Captain, Thomas L. liobinsou ; Pi rut Lisutemint. 
George Phillips, eud SeCond Lieut^uaut, G. A. Koul- 
lier. 

The Creedmoor Rifle Guard, an association 
composed of the markers and other employes of 
the range, will hold their annual prize meaticg at 
Creedmoor on Monday the 16cb inst. Prizes have 
been otfercd by muay ot the commissioned otlicers 
of tbe iS'alional Guard, and au iiiteresting time is 
anticipated. The diTitaace covered will bo 200 
vaids ; pusition, standing ; weapons, military rifles. 
In the evening tbe prizes will be distributed, alter 
which a dinner will 'oe nerved to the conipelitors 
und tboir ladies, aud a ball will terminate the fes- 
tivities. 

Ihe Soparate Troop Cavalry, Major Karl 
Klein commsi.ding, will parade Tuesday on the 
rigbt of tbo First iiivision, m full dross, msuutod, 
with carbine.-a. Tbo troop will assemble <iu Second 

avenue, between Seooni and Third streets, at 1 P. 
M. A Sergeant, bugler, and six privates bave been 
detailed to act as 01 dcrlies to the Major General 
coniinauding. They have been provided with coal- 
black horses for tbo occasion, and. win present a 
showy nppearatco. The regnlar monthiy nieotiug 
ot this Command will be held at the armuiy next 
Wounesiiay oveiiing. 

The T-sveltth Regiment, Col. Johu Ward com- 
manding, will par-ide ou Tuesday next, assembling 
■at tho armory in full uniform, licld and slalf mount- 
ed, at 2:30 P. -tl. Tbe following non-commicsioued 

I fficcfs, baviug passed tbo Board of E.\amiiiatiou, 
nave been granted wairaiiU : piist St-rgt. Cbarlcs 
J. ilelicricb, CoiiipaiiyK; Seigis. Jobii N'reeiaiid, 
Corujiany K; Peier Arnold, F .Wufu P. Alcuru, 
Company 11 ; il-iiris W. t'obeu, Couipauy K. 
Corps. John ii. Bi.-ibop, C' mpaus E; Thomas W. 
U.veus, Conn aay F; Gusiave Ji-uuson, Lewis 
.Item, ll^■nr^ W. C. Diliue, (Jonipany il, and Edjiene 
Librziiv, Cvin;jany K. Pn»aies Jo;iii Dwyei, 
l-;,i«3.a P. M.ibie. and WiUium S. 'Williar.is liav.i 
been I xpeilcu lioui Company G, being cou-idercd a 
uis^r.^co to Ihe set vice. 

!(HThii drill tseasou will comaicnce iu Coiupanj' 
I, Sevcutb llttgiiuout, Capt. William C. Casey com- 
u;auding. uoii Thursday evoniug, at 8 o'clock. 
Tbo coiumaiidaut expresses the hope, in ord;;ra, 
tbat eyori' member of tho compauy will b» pre.seut 

during the leiin, aud thcreliy assist m tuaiutain:nj^ 
Ihe cslablisliou jiood name 01 llie. couio.iuv. lue 
atleuiiou 01 uiemoers is Uhcccd u» tbe couip'tit lo^s 
tur tbe •'Audiuws" uuimoud piu aud tbe •'Cali- 
hiruia Ve irau b.ulge " at Creedmoor uexi Tburs- 
liav. The practice i.irrdcu by 1 be lorly-tivo sbois, 
lo wlii.'U fc.icb inijino' titor i.-i ciiiitlrd, iviU, iu ih« 
opiuiou of Capt'. Casey, prove valuable to tbose 
members who propose to represeni tho cumpauy m 
the matcli lor the " .iNOvada " badge. 

The unusual number of parados of one sort 
and another during the past seasou, iuchi.liug the 
time lust at Creo«imo»r, h.s not been leceivoit wi.b 
favor by the Xatioual Guard, us some of tbe letters 
Tue ll.MtB has published, and hundreds tbat have 
not beeu published, will, attest. In consiqusnco of 
tbis fact, aud tiia coraiug parade of ihe division 

noil Tuesday .Major Wylie, Insppctor of the Third 
llrigade, b.is wise:v liecidcd to bold his luspectious 
iu tbe ereUiUi:. I'his action suoulrl b" lollowed oy 
Ci-eu. Vihoar, of tUo Seooud Brigade, at l;:uat in tiie 
case of the Xiutb eud Seventv-Urst Regiments, 
which h.iye doae a good deal of duty out of doors 
this season already. The result 01 the indoor iu- 
■peotions would be an addition — of certainly one- 
fuurth — to tne nam ber present, and would be aiure 
appreciated by tbe men themselves, lodoor inapeo- 
ijunii . aro sot to be ccmmended. ai a tola., but Uxi« 



"11 " I "I "iJ I .. I >iii I II mi l I I 



-^r-BTti^i!^' 



1.1 an exeeptlonal year. Pro]f)k|i)ly the trrtrgement* 
for coiirlnctiug r^fle practiiM at Creedmoor next 
season wilt bs impravHd In Ifpjch a manner aa to be 
less onerous upon Dusliiess rnrtn- ' ■wi ■■~ 

During tho past niifflth tho loUowing 
officers havo received thct|{ discharges : Twen- 
ty-eighth Regimout, BrlibUyn, First Lieut. 
Adolph Wilson ; Separate Tifilop Cavalry, Eleventh 
Brigade, Brooklyn, Seiniiiid Lieut. Joseph 

A. » Laiibv ; Thirteenth ;l.egiment, Brooklyn, 
Sccona Lieut. Andrew Fjljfomez 1 Seventy-first 
Regiment, First Lieut. Benjjkpin J. Oniber, Qaar- 
teimaster: Seventh RegimMit. Lieut. Col. Oscar S, 
Ryder ; Galling Battery, Brwklyn, Second Lieut. 
Louis G. Dalbv ; Twenty-tiilifd "Roeiment, Brook- 
lyn, Cart. Tlionias J. Steveijaj Thirty-second Reg- 
iment, Brooklyn, Lieut. lioU;ti<t Spltzer ; Fifth Reg- 
imout, Capt. Charles Lamb iiii^d Capt. Philip Asoh- 
enbncn. ;ji 

At First Division Hoadtliiuavtera, tue accept- 
ance of tho resignation of First Lieut. Edward L. 
Xicol, of the Seventh Regimfeint, apd the appoint- 
ment by Gen. Ward, of AleiUider F. Clark as First 
Brigade Surgeon have been rebeiveJ. Col. Porter, of 
the Twenty-second Regiment; returns the comrais- 
sinn of Second Lieut. Daniel'iSherwood. who f,Til«d 
to qualify. The resignation plapers of , Capt. .John 
LI. trrny,' (Jommissary of Sullsisteuce ou the Third 
Brigade stall', havo been forwarded to Albany. Tho 
aiipoal of (Japt. Alax Ebbler,;pf the Fifth Regiment, 
from tbo sentence of the Fijipt Brigade court-mar- 
tial, has been disml.ised, and i ns the valiant Captain 
is now safely ensconced in Qqicago the New-Vork 
soldurs are not likeiv to soeniuch ot him hereafter, 
niMi a Hue of $100 awaiting iiipi should ho chance 
to rot urn to this City. ||l j 

The Kighth Regiment, Cpl. George D. Soott, 
commanding, will parade iU't'iill uniform with wbite 
gloves, next Tuesday, lorr^^ew with tbe diyibion. 
Field and staff, muantod, wjilj report to the com- 
mander at 2:3 J P. M. Non-ciommissioned staff and 
others will report to the Ad|atant at the same hour. 
Roll will be caJlea by companies at 2 P. M. The 
following elections are annbunced in orders: Cap- 
tains, Henry Gibson ana Henry J. Bohrer; First 
Lieutenants, John D. McL^i^n, Jacob A. Gee. and 
Jobn,P. Ufly ; Sccoiia LiciHimiauts, John L. Shirley, 
Jacob Voeipol, Jr., JamesjiJ. Horgou, and George 

fiustow. The follow'iug riesitnatioiis have taken 
place: First Lieutenants, j\villiara Halligan, Wil- 
liam J. Douglas, James G. qi^'art, and Second Lieu- 
tinant Cvrua A. Shannon, i! The regular raouthly 
meeting: of the Board of (Jfgcers of this command 
will take place on Monday, iOct. 9. 

The forudation of the i; Thirty-second Regi- 
ment, Brooklyn, has beeii,: reorganized, and tbe 
several companies will herqafter align as follows: 
G, D, F, C, E, H, A, and B. ;i The following changes 
are announced iu orders : promoted — Capt. Louis 
Bo.ssart, Mi.j or, vico Petty, transferred; Corp- 
Diedrich Cordes, Second lliieutenant, vico Wahl, 
discharged ; Coi-p. Gustay Gillet, Sergeant, and 
Private Ernest Wimder, Cjprporal, in Company G, 
vico Kramer, fiischai'ged, ai^d Schlatter, reauced to 
the rauKs. Discharged tot expiration of term of 
service — Private Michael iBuchman, Company C, 
and Private William Kaikib. Company D. Corp. 
Peter Klotz, of Company' E. has boon reduced 
to the ranks, and_Privatefc ^Trank Schneider, and 
Jacob Auer have been expfjlled from Company B. 
Tbe several companies iu Ibis command will com- 
mence drilling this week. jThe Thirty-second Regi- 
ment nflo team bad a pleasant reunion ou Friday 
eyi'uing last, in celebration of its luck in winning 
a prize at Creedmoor at jibe Fall prize meetings. 
Lieut. J'ohn A. Diilmeir, of Company H, was pro- 
moted to the Captaincy of ^hat company last even- 
ing, j: : 

Company K., Seventy-iirst Regiment, Capt. 
Robert S. Oraoi , commandiiiig, held a full dress drill 
aud inspection last Wednesday evening by way of 
shaking off tbe rust of tbe past season, and prepar- 
ing for the coming Winter's work. Line was formed 
with twenty-foiir files front, and after going through 
tbe drill, Col. Vose, whowais present, was requested 
to make a presentation spejeoh as a fitting form of 
presenting sets of epaulets to Lieut. Taylor and 
Capt. Orsor. The Coloael did all that was expected 

of him, and In his pleasant way contrired to arouse 
a feeling of mirthfalness a^ong the men, and bau- 
i.sbcd tbo solemnity and Icirmality wbicb generally 
atieud such occaiions. Tbe set speeches which 
Capt, Oisor and Lieut. Taylor had intended to 
make, by way of expressing their " surprise," were 
lorgoiteii, iind tho few words, which each in a happy 
vein had to say, were, doubtless, much more 
acceptable. A new company is being organizod in 
this regiment to take the place of the late Company 
A. Au effort is being made by certain fi lends of 
the command to organize'- the company from the 
voterans of the reeiment, and a former Colonel, 
whose past services are gratetilly remembered by 
man .y of the old members, w.ll be Invited to take 
the Capiaiucy. Th© name, of the new rvgimental 
Quartermasier is Edward C. Ripley, a brother «f 
aiT. Chauucey B. Riplev, whose name was g\v<da to 
the wri;er last week as the appoifllee. 

Tho Nmth Regiment. Col. James A. Hitch- 
cock commanding, is under orders -to parade in lull 
uniform for review by the Commander in Chief 
next Tuesday. The hour for assembly will bo 1 
o'clock P. M. Those members not being provided 
with full dress uniforms are directed to report ia 
fatigue dress. All nsemberb having rifles in their 
possession aro directed to return tbem to the armo- 
ry at oneo. The annual inelpection of this regiment 

will occur ou tho 17rh inst.,j probably at the armory 
iu the evening. Col. Hitciicock has beeu making 
bis annual personal inspeclien of the sev- 
eral companies. On T-uesda.v evening Com- 
pany G was inspector with thirty-two files 
irout, in all about 'eighty men, aul on 
Tiiiirsday Companies A, i D, K, and H were in- 
suecied. Compauy A papKued twenty-four flies ; 
Company D twenty -seven ij.Uompany K seventeen, 
ana Company H twelve flies. Company D supple- 
niented iis drill ou that occasion with one of tbose 
pleasaut ceremonies winch, though truial in itself, 
engenders good feeling aud ustablishes harmony 
among members. .Lieut. T. H. Xnigbr, an officer 
who performed meriioiious service iu tbe field aur- 
iug the dark days of the rebell,iou, was the lecipient 
01 the cour.esy. After the company had formed in 
a, hollow Bcjuafo, tbe Lieutonanc was ordered to the 
centre, auu Capt. AuKl teiiuered to liira a full-dress 
sword on behalf of the cpmnany. Lisut, Knight 
accepted the trophy iu a happy manner, aud the 
Company then proceeded to celebrate the event at 
a caie. 

Capt. James C. Abrams, commanding Com- 
pany G, Seventh Regiment, has issued au order 
annonncing that drills in bis command will com- 
mence to-morrow aud willihe continued every Mon- 
duy evening daring tho di-ill season. Roll will be 
called promptly at 8 o'clock. I^on-oemmissiened 
ofBcers' drills will take phice as follows : Satur- 
rtays— Oct. 28, Nov. 2o, Dec. 30, Jan. 27, Feb. 24, and 
March 31 at 8 o'clock. Konfcommissionedoflioers are 
(iiiecled in orders to provide theraselveswith a cor- 
rect roll of the eompauy, and mast be at all 
limes prepared to call the roll or to form or dis- 
miss the company should ' they be required to 

do so. Tho reeruit clas^ is directed to report to 
Lieut. Bob'ringer, at the regimental armory, next 
Wednesday evening at 8 o'clock. Tho rank and tilo 
of the cumoany are directed, in orders, when in 
fatigue uniform not to wear white collars wliich 
may be visible above tiio collars of their 
jackets, and iu full dress te wear collars 
yybicb shall prelect oue-qaartor of an iucb 
above ibe cuai-collar. This insures neatness 
aud uniformity among tbe men. As the regimental 
iuspeciion w*ll prooably o^uur on tho 19ih or 20lli 
insf., Capt. Abrams says! "Let every man feel 
tuat under uo circumstances whatever cau he ab- 
sent hiufseif upon this important occasisu, and let 
the same spirit manifest itself in all the drills of 
tbe coming season, ibe rOsqlt of which cannot be 
otberwiKu than a source, of pi ido to uSicers and 
members alike." Piivato J. W. Hale has Been 
trausferre.i from tbe rocruit class to tho ranks of 
the company. The lollowiug elections are an- 
noancod lu orders: Sergt. John J. Behiiager, First 
Lieutciiani, vice Steele, resigned; Corp. George W. 
Hariaii, Sergeant, vice Bebringer, promoted ; Pri- 
vate Kruesi H. Crosbj'. C jrporal, vice Doughorty, 
leiiu'ed to the ranks at his request; Private Geoigo 
A. Weber. Corporal, vice Hanau, promoted. Pri- 
vate James D. Wpgiom has been expelled for cou- 
tiLuuiiB (Uro'ictiou of duty, and nou-paymenk of 
rates iiuii tiucs. • 

Col. Emmons Clark, eommandinj the Sev- 
enth Regiment, has ifsued the necessary orders for 
the parfido next Tuesday. The regiment will as- 
seuible iu lull uniform, with knapsacks and over- 
coats rolled, at the armory at 2:15 P. M. Drills by 
companies ia this command will commence to-mor- 
row, and will be continued weekly by each com- 
p.iuy until Apai! I, lb77. Gol. Clark enjoins punc- 
tual atteud.TDce and the promp' and thorough per- 
lormauco of every duty coduected with company 
luetiuciiou, and says that 'J,{!ommandant.'?, being re- 
siiousiblo for the proper lustk'Octiou of the now mem- 
bers of their co;iijiauies, tiill exercise a constant 
aiiLi c.ireUil supervision Ovi3r the classes lu tbe 
Scbool ot tlie boUiiir. Miio will a.low no recruits 10 
b>- iranslcr:i'd to the rabkiibi Iheir companies until 
t borout:hiy drilicd and iijsariic;ed." 'lue resiiruii- 
ti.nsof Luut. l^i.l. Ityieri Capt George Wi I liam 
.Suiiib, and Lieui. Lowanl i>icoii nave been ac- 
oute;;, and tbey have benji honorably discharged. 
Tlieir long aud fiiiiliiul service is ipccially uo.i 'cd 
ami couiu.cmtcU. t^uoi. Smiitb enlistrd in the hub 
coiui-aiiy of ihis command 'June 11, 18Jj, aud was 
c oniniiJ.iioneii Second Lijeuiaut in lc37, Fust 
Lieutenant in 18119. aiid i^aotaiii iu 18-iO. 
Ill tbe year IS-tl ho resigned bis 
commission as Captain, and in the same year ac^copt- 
ea a cuiiiuiissiea hh First Lieulenaut iu Uie eighth 
coujpaiiv, aud in l';i)4 was jilccteil Captain of thai 
company. •' His tciui of active and valuable mili- 
tary sei vice," says Col. Cl^l'k, " almost continuous 
(ol a ptriBu ot lorti -Olio years ; bis Oistinguisbed 
ubility as an ofSccr, auu bii admirable quslttieo as 
u liciitlciuau, eiitit.o biin to) great distinction in the 
bisloiy ol tills iei;iinent." ;Cdipt. Smith retires with 
ib'i friendship auu <'sreoiu Of his military associates, 
8i;d wi,u tbcirbtsit "wiahci^tor his heallb. lung life, 
lino bappinese. In tbis coiinecliun. Adjutant Gen. 
Townsend pays the following trioute to the dis- 
tinguished officer : " lu accepting the resignation 
ot Capt Smith, the CummsQuer in Chiei cannot bat 
express his regret tbat the State must lose the ser- 
vices of BO valaable aa officer, and one woo ha* 
served most faithfully iu its citizen loldiocr fbi:. 
oyer ftrtv-one ycua." i 



FINANCIAL AFFAIRS. 

♦ 

6ALB6 AT THE 8TOCK KXCHAKGB — SBPT. 30. 

BALBS nBFOBB TUB CALL— 10 A- M. 

Sn. 000 NM.("cn. Coll.. 7t!'2 

6,000 N.\V.C.(.G...c. 94U 

1.000 Pac. of .Mo. l>t. P33a 

V!,OU(IO. U .M. C. .S. 1'. 9a 

300 Mich. Central M 



100 
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100 
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.^00 U'cstcru Union.. 
1(11) N. Y. C. tH....c. 

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,300 Lake Shon- 



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1100 
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looo 
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100 Erie Rnllwar..- 

300 do 

MOO Rock Island cl 

100 Tol. k. Wabash.., 

200 do 

100 Ohio k. MUs 

100 do bo. 

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100 Del, I.. «t We»t.. 



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GOVERKMKNT STOCKS— 10:15 Airo 11:30 A. It. 



$5,000 U. 8. 68, '81, 

Reg I2.II714 

8,000 U. .s. 5--'0 R., 

'65, new. b. C.1133& 



$10,000 0.9..-IS, 10-40 

Kcj? lUia 



FIRST BOARD— 10:30 A. M. 



$50,000 D.of C.3-G5S. 200 C. 

b.c 7OI3 40 

8,000 L. it W.B. Con. 55 ;;0 
1,000 MtSt.P.lst, La 

C. DiT 10284 

5,000 do 1-.C.10214 

1.000 do 102 

6,000 M.Ji. .S.P.CS.F. 87 100 
5,000-N.VV. C. C.O.B. iH^s 100 C. 

4,000 G. t C. 1st 1(17 100 

15.U(»() .M.t E.78, '71. 103 100 

15,000 >1.& K. l>t, C.IOO 300 

2,000H.&.St.J. 8(i,C- 77 IcO 

1,000 N.Y.C.68,'»3. loo 100 

1,000 N. J. C. Ist, 400 

Con b.c 78 700 

2,000 C.,( .tLClst. 37'a :li5 
6,000 Tot. t W. 0.(;. 38 1900 
5,U00 Gt. Heat. 2d-. 02 500 
3,000 O. t Miss. 2d. 64 lo 200 
1.000 ii.T.V.tG.lal. 93I2 100 
50 Imp. &T. Bank. 185 100 
6 ( onsolld'nCoal.. SO 1-2 100 
100Mar.L.icM.C.b.c. 4 5 

400 Del. k H. Oanal.. 62 "^l lOU 



fc. R. I.... 

ao 

do. 



JdO do b:c. 62^j 

•zOO 60 6234 

200 do «2i-j 

18 do 82 

40 do c. MJ^ 

600 do 6212 

50 do s30. 62 

100 do c. 63I4 

lo(» do c. G3if> 

100 do c. 6234 

loO do »3. G2i-i 

6 U. a Express 61 

lOU Wells F. lii-.b.c, 



400C.tN. W. pf..b.c. 
400Tol.,W.j!, W..b.c. 

100 do c. 

oOAtl. t P. Pf..bc. 

do 

H, of i\. J..b.c. 

do 

do 83. 

do 

do.-.- 

do 

do 

do.--. 

do 

do 

do 

do b3. 

do...* 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do c. 

do s3. 

4I0 

do 

do- 



,b.c.l04 

103''^ 

(■.10334 



200 W.U. lei b.c, 



do... 
do... 
do... 
do.. 



200 
•/OO 
100 
500 

60 N. T. 
2oO 
300 
100 
100 
200 

30 
100 

200 Erie 
200 Harlem 
200 do... 

50 Panam:i 

11 Cle». i. P. O 
100 

500 Mich, 
3iiO 



79 

70 Is 

- 70 14 

. 7038 

. 7014 

- Tds : 
C. tH..b.c. 9714 

do 9738 ■ 

do 97M 

Qo 97i« 

CO 97=8 

do .' 97^2 ' 

tio op'g. 97 "^s ' 

...83. 9714 
C.83. 914 

I3314 

..b.c.13314 
..lxc.l2(}iii 
.b.c. 87asi700 

do 86=11! loOO 

Cent..l..c. 4138.2600 



Co. 
R'.y 



100 

200 
500 
300 
(iOO 
OOODeL.L. t V'«'..D.c. 



1800 

4iiO 

700 

300 

100 

600 

V!00 

1800 

800 

1200 

.:100 

2000 

1100 

200 

70O 

400 

100 

400 

300 

3o0 

100 

1400 

2U0 

1100 



s3 



do. 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

^", 

do 

db (;738 



5934 

4=4 

4 '4 

2 

1='4 

25«8 
2d>a 
2534 
25 '''b 
26 

2l>l8 

2o 

25 H 
26 

26 »4 
26=4 
25 •fg 

25 "s 
2534 

2638 

26 ^0 
26 
2534 
'ibH 
25=8 
2534 
6738 
67 '4 
67 >8 
67 
66 '^8 

66 ^a 
.. 6634 

66 'a 
67 

67 >• 
67 14 



York 

iMtt 



do 

do., 
do., 
do.- 
do.- 
do.- 
do.. 
do., 
do., 
do.. 
00.- 



67'% 
...c. «7i« 

67=8 

673+ 

67'''s 

67=11 

6738 

67=4 



.iOO 
100 
100 
200 
500 
400 



do... 
do... 
do-.. 
do.., 
do... 
do... 
do. 



....b3. 



41^-^1500 
4134 loO 
4l'?g''J00 
4l34|400 

4iveo(» 



41=2 

.s3. 41=4 



5U0L.S.tM.S.b.c-8D. bo'v 



700 

loOO 

8U0 

500 

500 

2600 

3200 

5u0 

14i;0 

200 
600 
500 
liOO 
2100 

75 
IL'OO 
X80O 



do. 
tto. 
do. 
do 

do-.-- 
do...- 
do.... 

do 



83. 63=11 

83. o3'Si 

b3. " " 



1300 
3200 

3100 

2500 

40 



5334IIOOO 
5 3 ■^8 500 



do 

Uo 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

ilo 

do 

do 

do 

do.-.-. 

do 

do.... 
do 



s3 



67 1« 
67 
67 
«7H 
67=4 
.... 67i» 
.-.- 67 
83. Ott'', 
83. 60 •J4 

.... 6678 
-..- 663^ 
— . 66C8 

66=2 

.... 66»8 
.... 6084 
--. 66I12 

— - 6.j7g 
.-.. 6638 

..-. 66=11 
b.0. 2y 

.... 287, 
29 



do 
do 
do 
do 
do 



53-'<llOOC.,M.k8t.P 

. 53 78U00 do 

54 1600 do.... 

aA. 53'8 •'i'OC.M.tS.P.Pf..b.o. 6834 

-...d3. 64. too do 59 

c. f)378|l00 do s3. 591s 

537gi900 do 59 



.. 54 ' 77Cl>lc. t Alt-. be. 97 

6378 lOChio. tA. Pf.b.cloaia 

do 83. 5334 23 do 188 

do 53 'u 2'JO Ohio t Miss.. b.c. ll^g 

do 5,S38l300 do 11 =a 

do 53'?8| 



BALKS BEFORE THK CALL— 12:30 P. IL 

$13,000 US. 5-20S, R. 1700 Lake Shore.. bS. 64 



1868 118!% 2075 

2,000 D.of C0L3.658. 70=4 800 
l.iKlON.J. Oeu.,cuav. 72=<> 1500 
16,000 Harlem Jbi,C'.119^ 700 
1,000 A1.&.S.P.,C.S.K. 8O34 20 J 
1,000 D.kH.rcg.'91. 107 11 2200 
2,000 aiU.reff.'84.1u3=4 100 



b3. 

u3. 



5.000 Obiot Jl. 2d- 64 

100 Debt Hud c. 63 

lOO do 63 

lUO do 63^0 

400 Western Uaion.. 70 3^ 
100 Pac. Mail s3. 22^8 

lOON. Y. a &H..8S. 9714 

lOO do 85- 97=8 

100 do 

lUO do 

100 Ene Railway 

100 do »3. 

200 do 

4t0 do b3. 

200 Mich. Central 



do.. 

do 

do.... 
do-,.. 

do b3. 

do-V 

do 



9 

9734 
9'4 

938 

.9'% 
91.J 

4108 

4134 

417g 

42 

42=8 

42 

4178 9l»0 

42 ,300 

4218 100 

..83. 42=8 700 
42 • 

093* 

84 

29 =« 

591b 

59=1! 



100 

100 

3U0 

400 

300 

1000 

1200 

200 Cen, 

200 

400 
400 
,100 
100 
luO 
1000 

juODeL, I. 



ao.. 
do.- 
do.. 
do., 
do., 
do-, 
do. 



of ."«. J 

do 

do 

do.... 

do 

do.-.. 

do 

do- 
lt 



54 

&4i« 

64=4 

64=4 

5438 

5438 

, 5414 

»6- 54=4 

p3- 54=4 

6438 

64I4 

--..83. 64^8 

54i« 

54=4 

...o. 2534 
25 3^ 



'200 do 

700 do.... 

1550 do 

400 do 

300 do.... 

200 do 

100 do 

400 du 

•JOO do 

500 do.... 

700 North- West' n ¥1. 
lOOUliuois Ctiiitial.. 

100 St. Paul 85. 

100 St. P»ulPf....s3. 
700 00 

BKCO.VD BOAKD— 1 V. M- 

200Del. t Hnd...b.c. 64 , 10 Cen. of N 



W.. 



400 

47(10 
1500 
500 



4^i00 
3900 
9.10 
500 



do... 
do... 
do... 
do... 
do... 
do... 
do.-- 
di»... 
do... 
do... 
do... 
do. 



26^8 

26 

26 H 

26=4 

2019 

26 

66=-. 

esBg 

6(i34 

66'e 

...... 67 

67>fl 

...S3. 67 

...»3. 67', 

07=4 

67 3» 



....b3. 



9o0 Worth- western.. 



6VI4 
67 14 
67 3* 
33 



100 do Wia 

100 Mariposa b.c. 4 

•J.0i} W. Un. Ttl..b. c. 70=4 
50 Wells-Farjjo hx.. 79 
200 Pac. Mail....b. c. 23 
100 trie R'waj^..b. c. 9=2 
300 Mich. Cen. b.c. b3. 



200 
400 
600 
100 
L-OO 
200 
600 
'.;00 

700 



42 

41^8 



100 
100 
500 
100 
200 
600 
100 
300 
100 



J. .b.c. 
83. 



do 

do 

do 

do b3. 413^ "200 



4134| 

410s! -200 



do. 

do 

GO 

do 

^o 

do 

do c. 

do 

do 

do 

do '2018 



26I4 
26 
26=9 
2b >4 
26 =» 
2634 
2678 
2678 

2634 

a6»8 

26=2 



do 41341500 Del, L. U W.b. 0, 67 



41 79! 500 00 

"" 1200 t\o.. 

30OO do.. 

700 do.. 

800 do.. 

1000 do.. 

do.. 

do.. 

do-- 

do.. 

do 67 "l 

u4=4iI00C.M.&St.P.b.c.ba 29=4 

yoO do 54=4jlU0 do 29=s 

25 New-Jersey R....135iii'300 "do 29 

100 C. t ^^. v\...l). e. 35=8ll00 do 287, 

6(10 do b3. 3,')=4!lOOChlc. M. t St. P. 



do 

do 4134 

do 41«« 

do 41^1 

'iO 111. Central 83 

200N.y.C.4iU.bc. b3. 9734 

300 do 

4ii5 do 

ISOO li. S. t -M. IS.b.c. 

lluO do 

6u0 do 

GjO de 03. 



9778,100 
98 2000 
541s 200 
54 1200 
54=8,100 



6738 

67=4 
— 67'<8 

... O?!-.! 

... 67»B 
-.- 6734 
... 677, 
.0. 68 
... 68 
....07 7, 
6734 



1000 C. il N. W. I't. b.c. 697g 




Pf....b. 0.816. 59=11 


200 Cnic 


, Si. R. l.b. C.103 78;i00 


do 5934 


100 


do 104=4 400 


do dfliu 


200 


no 104^:300 


do ;. 5934 


1:00 Pac. 


R. 01 .Mo. b.c. 3=.jl 






BALKS FROM 2 TO 3 


P. M. 


$2,800 yi 


or. ii Us. 2d. 107 100 Cen. of K. J 257. 


1,000 Pitwuuig 4th 105=8 200 


do 2538 


1,000 Can. Pac. U. «.1,0=4 400 


do 2UI4 


100 Del. 


Hi, HUUhOD... 03 =-.2 lOO 


do 83. 26 


100 MariDOsa 4=41100 


do 85. 2534 


Co Cousol Coal 32 


100 


do u.r.c. 20=11 


100 West. Union. .03. 70=4 


100 


do 26=8 


4uO 


do 70=4 


200 


do 20=11 


•JOO N. Y 


C. il liu 1... 9734 


100 


do b3. 26=8 


100 


do b3. 97»8 


r>o 


do 83. 2038 


200 


do 9708 


200 


do 26 


500 


do »3. 9734 


100 


do u.r.c. 201a 


100 Mich. Ceutiai 4i-'B 


lO'J 


di) 26=4 


400 


do 41 "-.i 


loll 


do 20=11 


loO 


do 41 >B 


100 


do u.r.c. 20=11 


4UO 


ilo 41 '1 


100 


d.. •.'G'<8 


GOO 


do 4J=b 


-00 


do u.r.c. 26=11 


1100 


do 41 


loo 


do u.r.c. 26^8 


;h)o 


do ii3. 41 


iOiJ 


do 26ie 


500 


do 41=4 


300 Rook Island lu.l 


OoO Lake .>bore 51 '» 


,.00 


do x.d.lOO 


1000 


do 54 


:;5 Morris i. JiBsex... 89 =u 


7()0 


do .''o7, 


i.iuOol., L. Il West.. 67-4 


im^O 


do 503,. 


JOO 


do 0. 677s 


IJIHIO 


do 3 -v 


JUO 


•lo 6759 


15 '0 


do S3. 53 "-J 


,V;0 


do s3. 07'-j 


IcOO 


do 5;if's 100 


do b3. 6738 


2100 


do b-6-iA ;uuo 


do b7'i> 


100 


Uo so. 5y'-a KloO 


ilo GT-is 


loO 


«io 5.'-l'''8 3.IJ 


a.. 6<=.t 


l.JUO 


Co 53-..jl3o0 


00 G(1m 


1000 


do a3. ooi-j 


SdO 


do (^7=1 


li:uO 


do oo-'i 


J4 


00 G V 


i:0(i 


du u:^''d 


IXOO 


'lo 07-a 


5uO 


do sS. 53'.,i 


JOO 


do 07=4 


luOO 


do 0.1=12 


soo 


do ti7\ 


•.^000 


00 »3. 63!%, 


J 11)0 


do 61' '-J 


KJUO 


do U33b 


.loo 


Uo iVi'Si 


1-100 


do 53=-^ 


.M fit. 


Paul 2834 


l.')00 


do .1366 


Kid 


do 2&68 


1:00 


do ilO. iW ': 


LlK) «t. 


Paul Pref oO'-i 


400 l-.rle Ituilwav UK 


-).I0 


<lo Ol>=4 


l(;O.Nortli-n'eateru... 3;> 


.00 


do slj. 6U=4 


•_'l)0 ixorr 


1-xv. 8t Pref. 50 ■• 


.uo 


do 5!l»8 


100 Pac. 


K. ot ilo.... 3-% 


J-IU 


do 83. 09'4 



Saturday, Sept. 30— P. M. 
The bank statement stiowa a decroaBe of 
$2,335,975 in surplus reserve, which now Btaads 
at $16,332,725. The loss, as on last week, is 
chiefly represented by specie, the tailing otf in 
legal tender* heine emaller than U last Sator-, 
day's statement. 
^'•_ Tha fbllavina la tli« ataiaiaeQt oL tlu "Skw, 




W- 



9 



Bept 23. 

Loans t2«l,84-2,000 

Specie 18.897,700 

Z/Oeal teod's. 57.C69,(>30 

Deyosits 231,635,400 

Circulation. 14,495,200 



Dltferences. 

Inc.. $586,900 
. Dec.2.434 500 

D^o. »14.700 
i Dec. 4, 052. 900 
!lnc.- 152,000 




hnjj off ' from 

Central ' from. 

Hudson Canal 



IS62.4 

16.<i 

5«,7 

227 

14, G 

The bnamess on tho Stock j Exchange footed 
np 251,900 shares, which ii|iic!ud<id 108,900 of 
Delaware, Lackawanna anil jWestern, 72,100 of 
Lake Shore, 22,100 of Ne-vr-^ltsey! Central, and 
17,200 ^ of Michigan Ceril^jil. : The bears 
wore again free selleridjl | of the* coal 
shares, which declined, JDelaware, .. Lack 
awanna and Western 
G81i to 66%, New 
26 to 24%i, and Delaware a; 
from 64 to 62^4. Later thesft j jshares improved 
sharply. Delaware, Lackavjijipna and Western 
closed at 67%, New-Jersey Ccktral at 26=«, and 
Delaware and Hiulson Canal!(|t 63^. The gen- 
eral market exhibited strengt!^, which ■was most 
conspicuous in Lake Shore 4t((^ Michigan Cen- 
tral. Prices at the close weffe fini. 

Tbe money market was ea.S'^, throughout the 
day at Hd-aS ^ cent, on <mil. The national 
bank notes received for rei(iflmption at Wash- 
ington during the week amcitinted to §1,500,000, 
against $3,250,000 for the ecjifrcspoadhKr week 
last year. The following hjfere the rates of 
domestic exchange at New-Tp^rk to-day : Saran- 
nab, =4 discount ; Cincinnati ' easier, 75 to 100 
discount ; St. Louis, 100 dialcoant ; New-Or- 
leans — Commercial, V^ diacoMt; bank, Va pre- 
mium ; Charleston — Offeringji; iligbt ; % to par; 
Chicago, 75 discount. j 

The foreign advices report jtbe London mar- 
ket lower for Consols and genQerally steady for 
American eecuritieH, th» idrmer eloslns nt 
9515-16 for both money and 'the account, and 
the latter at 106"^® 106 14 fori 18658, (old,) 109 
for 18679. IOSMj for 10-408, (a decline of ^i-aVi 
*> cent.,) and 107^ for neW: Ss. The Bank of 
England lost bullion to tho apionnt of £25,000 
on balance to-day, and yesterday the sum of 
£60,000 in American eagles 'were 'withdrawn 
from tbe bank for sbipment i to this country. 
Rentes at tbo Paris BoniBlS; wore quoted at 
106f. lOo. to lOGf. 15c. il' I 

The sterling exchange market was dull, with 
actual business at $4 K2@$4 82Mi for prime 
bankers' 60-day bills, and $4 83 a $4 83 "-i for 
demand. The nominal asking rates were $4 83 
and $4 M\<i. 

The gold market opened firm, but afterward 
became weak, and the price declined from 
IIOV4 to 110. The highest rate paid for bor- 
rowing to^ay was 1-64 V cent., vhile most of 
the business was at 3 ^?' cent, per annum. At 
the close loans were made flat to 2 ^ cent, 
currency. These rates show that the move- 
ment to " squeeze " cash gold has not been 
very successful. Tho market has been weak- 
ened somewhat by the reported shipment of 
gold from London to this country. 

Government brands were dull and steady. 
In railroad morttrages the transactions 
amounted to only $125,000. of which amoimt 
115,000 were in Morria and Essex 7s of 1S71 at 
103, and 15,000 in do. consoiiiiated firsts at 100. 
New-Jersey Central Convertible declined early 
riatheday &om76^ to 72Vit. and coasolidated;; 
firsts sold at 78, against 80 yesterday, but at t&i 
close the former were in demand at 79, with 80 
asked, and the latter at 83, with 86 asked. Le- 
high and Wilkesbarre Consola sold at 55 ; Mil- 
waukee and St. Paul, Lacrosse dividend, ad- 
vanced to 102^4 and afterward fell off te 62 ; 
do. sinking funds wer.e firm at 8C%, and Chicago 
and North- weetern oonsol, gold conpons, at 9414 
®94%. Ohio and Mississippi second declined 
to 64M!, and C, C. and L C. firsts to 37^4. State 
bonds were dull and steady. District of Colum- 
bia 3,G5s fell off to 70i>4. 

CLOSING QUOTATIONS — SEPT. 30. 

KridaT. BfttnnJay. 

American Gold llOi^ HO 

UuitedSrate8 4ia-'», 1891, couoen...lllJ4 IHH 

XT iiited States 5s, 1881. coupon IK'^a H^'^s 

United States 5-30». 1S67, coapon.. .II6I4 II6I4 

Bills on London 94 82®»4 eu^ U 8S-3$4 ii^ 

Kevr-Yort Central 97^j 973t 

Rook Island lOS'^s ■ *100 

PacittcMaU 2i''a_ S-Tq 

Milwaakee and St. Paul '-8^ fig's 

Mil-Yankee and St. Paul Preferred. 59^4 59 J4 

Lake Shore 53^4 Rj^g 

Chicago and North-western 35ia itSiQ 

Chicago and North-weatoTB Pref... 59^ 59I3 

Western Union 7u^ 70=4 

'Union Pacific - 61 61 

X)ol., Lack, and Western egig 673s 

New-Jersey Central 26 Siiis 

Delaware and Hudson Caaal ()4 63^ 

Morris and Essex 89% 80ia 

Panama ....Z....12d 12d 

Erie 91* 9^ 

Onio and Mississippi 1, 11^ ll^ 

Harlem I3314 133ifl 

Hannibal ana St. Joseon l-.i^i 12^ 

Hannibal and St. Joseph Preferred. S2 ^ 

Michigan Centra! 41 41^ 

Illinois Central b4 84 

*hi diridend. 

The extreme ran^ of prices in etocks and 
tbe number of shares sohl are as follows : 

Wo. of 
Elghest. : Lotrest. 
03 i 97 14 



Now-York Central -^ < 

Uarlem 133^3 ' 

Erie .- flia j 

Lake Shore • H'-^ 

Waliash... ^•'s 

North-western SSV* 

Northwestern Preferred — 5«"8 

Kock Island 10438 

Milwaukee aud St. Paul 'i9.^ 



Milwaukee and St. Paul Pf- Sim^ 



•;•• 



Pittsbafa 

Del., Lack, and Western. 

New-Jersey Central 

Del. and Uodson Canal... 

Michigan Central 

Illinois Central 

Missouri Pacific. 
Uuio aud Mississippi. 

Western Union 

Paciflo Mail 

A. and P. Pref 

Mariposa 

Wells, ITaigoik Co... 

Total sales 



«6l9 

68% 

26''8 
64 

84 
358 

Ilia 

7y38 

23 
1% 
41a 

79 



133 14 

■, 913 

r <'* 

5: 35 

■ft 6s>i4 
1U3% 

fee's 

iA\ 

41 
84 

31a 

1138 

70 
2279 
1% 

4 
79 



' Chares, 
-« 3,460 
400 
- 1,800 
■ 72,100 

800 

"^ 1,600 

S,3UU 

a, 000 

4,800 

6,100 

100 

108,900 

22.100 

13,tJ00 

17,200 

100 

300 

800 

S,6iJ0 

3'JO 

150 

300 

100 



, 251,900 

The following were the olosing quotations o 
Government bonds : ' ; , 

Bid. Atked. 

United States currency. 68..-.. 12u^ isesg 

United States 6s, 1881, registered... 1 17 ifl 11714 

UuiteU Slates 63. 1881, coupon* llSis llc!^ 

UnltedStates 5-20i, 1665, re^iistered.liaifl 113^8 

United Slates oSOs, 1865, coupons... lia^ij 113^% 

United States 5-208, I863, new, reg.. 11314 113^ 

United States 5-20s, 18C5, new, coup.ll3i4 113^8 

United States 5-20s. 1867, registerea.11614 116 "ii 

United States 5-20s, leti7, coupon*. .-116i4 116^ 

United Swtes 5-20«, ISbd, i-egisterea.llSi* 118 is 

United States 5 SOs, 1868, coapoua...ll8i8 list's 

Uoiisd States 10-40s, legistersd 114i% IH^ 

United States 10-40s,. coupons llJia lli-'s 

United States Ss, 1881, reti<ttered...ll4% ll-l'a 

United SUtesSs, 1881, coupons 114% lH's 

United Suies 4i2« - iui8 llisa 

Tbe Sub-Tre.'isurer disbursed iu gold coin 
$41,000 for interest, $22,rOO lor called bonds, 
and i'16,200 silver coin in exchange for frac- 
tional currency. 

The following table shows the transaotiens 
at the Odd Exchange Bank to-day : 

Gold cleared $46,797,000 

tiold baiaiiCBS 1 1)34, 166 

Currency balances 8,"2oa,6-23 

Tho following is tho Cle|lring-hous^ state- 
ment to-day : ; r 

Currency exchanges 4f .1 f ."'9,333:761 

Currency balances .l.;|i iia;),l43 

Go] a exihaHKes -I^ j 4.7aj,993 

(iold lialances .iJ» I,5;,;i,s26 

The following is the weokly Cleanng-house 
statement: ■ ' ^'' 

Cuirency exchanges J.j. , f350,£78,704 

Can eutv b.iiauons ..'--i 21,0i.U,i>-.'8 

Li ii'l i.'XcliauacH T--\ 4i,J5ii,J38 

U.,-. ..■i,:turifB .-I--.J 8,i'H.~~i 

l!io loiliiwiiig wore the bti}*! tor various State 

securities : 

Alr.bauia 5s, 1883 

Alabaui* Oi, 18kG 

Atauiiius 8j, 1886 

,Al»I>amft ^i. lse8 

Arkansas 6.-, Kund.. 
Ar.7i^,Lll.diPt.S.iSi. 
Georgia 6s 



32 

32 
3II2 

ol 
89 
11 
91 



GeorciJ 78, new bds.104 
Guoreiu 7s, indersed 10 1 
Georcis 7<. G. has.. 104 

111. coup. Os, 77 

Ul. coup. :>•, 79.-.. 

111. War Ljau 

Koutuokr 6s , 

Loaislt^ 6s, 

Louisiana sew bds- 



1U11.J 

I'Jii-i 

1U1»S 
102 

41 

41 

41 



J.a. 6s, newIl'tD 
La. 7», PenlteBtlary. 41 ., 
'J.XA.&LjL.«v«a..kd<_.. 4L. 



N. 'Xi. p. Bonn tyL.. 1021a 
N. UCj, (.5.11. i7...1:iU 
-V. 13.6s. G. C. '67...1-,ii) 
.V. CUO^. liiu. J. &. J...ltji2 
N. d.:6s. iiUl, A. i. (.)..!(; i-j 
-V. UN. C. It., J.iJ. 60 
y. Cl ^. C, l{.,A.i:U. -fiO 
N.C.!S.C.R..»'..>.J.dcJ. 40 

y.o.is'.c.rv.c.w., AdcO.' -co 

X. (TF. A., '66 

N ah l»s., J. & J. 
.V. C. il. be.. A. Ai (). 
N. C'S. X., cla'>»l.. 
N. C.S. T., class 2-. 
N. CB. T., clau3.. 

ObieCs, '81 

Ohio Bs, '83.. 

Itbode Island «s.. 



6 
5 


11a 
1^ 
1 

107 

113 

110 



L». 8s, Levee bda... 41 

La. 8», LeT. b. of "TS. 41 
I-a. 7s. Consoli.lated. 58 
Miciiigan 6s, '78 73.-101 

Michijjuu 6s, '83 105 

Michigan 7*, '90 Ul 

Mo. 69, dne in ls76...1013a 
Mo. 6«, due in 1877.. .101% 
Mo. 68, dueiu 1878... 103 
L.Bs.dufe in'Sito'OOin.loei* 
Paad. BUs.due '94.95.108 
Asy.orUolv. due'92.108 
Uan. &..St.J. due'86.1(t8i4 



S.C.6S.J.&J » 

8.C.«a,A.*0 39 

& C. r. A., •««. M 

S. C. L.C.,'SS, J.ftJ. 40 
8. C. L. C. '89, A.AO. 4a 

S.C.7so*'e8 89 

S. C. Non-fund. bda.. 9 

Virginia 6s, eld M 

Virginia 6t, n. ba.,'««. tt 
Vireinia6»;n. b«.,'67. 96 
Virginia 6i, C. bda . 






,„ ^. , T7 

VireiDia 6s, ex m. c VTU 

» VirKinia 6», 0.. 2d a.. 39V 

Hail. & St. J. due '87.10814! Vlrgmia 6a Def. bs - f W 
>i. 1. It. Bounty L-.102ifl| " ' 

And tho following tor railway mortgajrs 



Boston, n. &. E. let. 18% 
B..C.lt.4;M. 1S1.7SG. 35 
Ches. & Ohio Cs 1st. 22 
Cbic. &. Alt4jn In...l05>« 
St.L.. J. &. Chlo. lst.105 
C.,B. & Q. 8 ^ c.lsf.116 
C, R. 1. & p. Ist 7«.loyifi 
C.,R.I.&P.S.F.1.6s'S5 89 
C. K. ot N.J.lst,new.l05 
O. K. of N.J. 1st Con. 77ia 
C.ll.of N.J.lstConv. 72 
!..'&. W. B. Con. g'd. 55 . 
Atn. Dock t Im. bs. 65 ' 
M. & St.P.lst e».P.D.n6 
M.&. S.P.l8t7s$.O.KD103 
M. &St.P.l8i,La.C.D.102^ 
-M. & St.P.lst. Li; D, 85 
M.<t St.P.lst,C.i; M. 99 
M.&St.P.Con. S.F'd. 86% 
Mil. & St. Paol 2d.. 90 

C. 4,N. W. S.F IO8I2 

C. &N. W. Int. bds.104 
C. <fc N. W. Con. bd8.104ifi 
t;. &.. N. W. Ex. bds. 95 
C.tN. W.C.G.bds. 94% 
C. tN.W.Il.G.b«*. 94 

Ch.o. & Mil. 1st 105 

C.,C.,C.&.Ll8t 78,S.P.110 

D., L. & W. Sd lOa 

D., L. & W. 7s, Con.ioa 
Morris A Esjex Ist- -116 
Mor. & Es. 68, of '71.102% 
Mor. & Es. Ist, C. G. 99''a 
Erie Ist, extend*d...l09 

Erie 3d, 78, 1883 98 

Erie 5tb, 7s, 1688 100 

B., N. T.&.E.L. Oda. 90 
Han. &St. Jo. 88, C. 77 
Dnbi & S. Cilv lst...105l3 
Dub. JkS. City 2d D..105ia 
C. Palis Sl Minn. Ist 90 
Ind., Bl'n& W'n Ist. 20 
Mich. So. 7 ^P' e. 2d-. .104 
Cleve 



i 



Saath. Garohiia^ tm.*^ 3a ^ 



Ciero. a. ToL N. b«..lM 
Clove.. P. & A. O.bs.104 
Cleve., P. &.X., N.ba.l07»i 
Buffalo ft Brie N.bs.lOS 
liulE»lo & bt«teL.7a.ie3W 
Lake Shore Blv. bs..lOS>f 
Marietta Sc Cin. IsL.ia? 
Mich. C. C. 7* 1902..109 

MC.C.l«t.88,188a,Sf.ll«Y 
N. Jersey S. Ist. 78.. 90 
N.T.Centrid 6«, lS83.104>t 
N.Y. Central 08,1887.105 
N.y.Gentral 68, K £.101 
N. Y. Central 6s, Sab.101 
N.Y.C.4.H. Ist cuup.118 
Hud.R.7«,2d,SF188BLllO 
Uar.lst 7srein*(«r'A.lU% 
North Miasoun, Ist. 97'« 
Ohio & MIm-, 9d,coB. «4>t 
Ceniial P., Gold ba..llO 
Central P. S.J.B'cb.. 95lt 
Western Pa«ao b«..10l7a 
Ub. Pao. Ist bd^...-l06a» 
Ua. Paa i,. G. 7*...10«i« 
Vn. Paa Sid kin t V. 91 
Pao. R.of Me. lat... S3 
Pae. K. of Mo. Sid... Si^t 
Pitta., Ft. W. 6c C.lst.iao 
Pitt8_Ft.W. 4f^.9d.llOi» 
Cler. it Piiu. C.8.F.lie . 
Ciev.de Pitt*.4th&f .lOiV 
CoU Chic, it lad. Ist- 37 ' 
AIL & Xsrre 1£- lat.lM 
Ait&TerreS.2dPL 86 
A:t.& Terra H.SdlB. 79 
'loi-,P. ii. W.lsiK.l>. 8J 
Tol.,P.&. W.latW.D. (J3 
ToL. P. & W.»i.... 33 
Tol., P. & W. Con.7«. « 
Xol. it Wab. let Ex. 91 
Tol. &. Wab. CobslC. 37 
Han. &. Naples 1st.. 3S 
Gfcat Weat. Ist. '68. 90 
WeatUo. bda.i900C.1031« 









&.X01. S-F-.-lOU 

And the foUowin]; for City Bank thwa*: 

America 136 iGallatin Kat4oiul.^l]| 

Amcr. Exchange 109 Hanover —.__. n 

Central National IOOI5 Merchants'.... ttS*^ 



MelroDolita* „H3 

New- York. JlTlf 

North Antarvca 31 

Park IM 

Phenix U 

fiepnoiio ra 

iu Nicfa«laa......._ 37 



,83L«BI 



City 300 

Commerce ll'o 

Continental 08 

Com Exchange l-JJO 

Fii-st National 200 

Tourtb National 89^ 

Fulton 145 

Fitth Avenae 212 

Tbe following is tho Custem-hotiBe retora ot 
the exports of gold and silver from the pert «f 
New- York for the week ending to-day i 
Sept. 27— Steamer Scythla^ . Liverpool- 
Silver bars tU.tSI ' 

Fractional silver coin ^.._^. 3^033 

Sspt 28 — Steamer saevia, Ilendon — | 

Silver bars -^ i 

Sept. 30 — Steamer Aeapnloo. Aspinwall-;^ ^ 

United States gold com.... ..J' 

Peruvian silver oein — ' * 

Sept 30. — Steamer City of Richmond. Live«> , 

pool— Silver bars 41381 

- Fractional SUver coin .-_._ - 30f 

Total....^- fU8,S3i 

Messrs. Vermilye & Co., bankers, Nos. 16 and 

18 Nassau street, will receive subscnptia&a ti 

the New-York Cab Company. 
The coupons ef the consolidated 8 W eent 

currency bonds e£ the Hoostoa - and TecuM 

Bailread Company, maturing Oet. 1, vUt b* 

paid at the liational City Bank. 

CALIFORNIA MLSIXG 8T0CKM. 
' Sas Feancisco, Sept. 30.— The foUowinic aa^ 
the closing official price* of miniaK stacka tadavt '■ 

Consolidated Virginia.JCisiCrown Point _ll^ 

California BJ Yellow Jactet.. Si\ 

fegregated Belcher 75 jalpha.-. 4*^ 

Opnir ... 55^21 BfcicOer .21 % 

Choilar hyiaKonfidence — ......17 

bavage IS Sieira. Nevada J»^ 

Consolidated Imperial. 4121 cxchcqaer — ...'^IS 

Mexican 2»»4 Omnuui 79 ' 

Uoald and Cnrry. 16 jjostic* ......19^ 

Best and Belcher 4534JCaiedoaia — . ......It 

Hale and >oruros8 11. 



-S* 



BANKING AND FLNANCIAL. 



■-'-I- 



STATE OP Massachusetts. 

SSOO.OOO Five per cent. Gold Bonds, twenty ytiers ta 
rnu. Price 114 'ti; pAyment to Os made wltiua tUit^ 
davs; l>onds deiiretbd as soon aa received from tM 
State, for said by _ k.Il>l)ER, HEaBODI k CO., 
. Ho. AiWaUitt.. Ktw-YvOe, 
Ka 40 6tate ak, Boston 

FOREIGN MARKETS. 



roxnox, Sept. 30—13-30 P. M.— Cons(«U. 38 15-13 
for both mone.T and the account. Coited Statea Beaitfs 
— lU-408, lus^ lixie iUilwayiiharM,»\; Sew^kecM 
Ceutral, 9U. 

2 V. M.— Consols, 95 13-16 for both iBon«y and Vkm 
account. 

4 P. M.— Consols. 99 15-16 ^r both asoner aaA tka 
ascount. Krie Uailwav Shares, 8^ Tne asawt «■ 
bullion witfadrawn from the Bank of Eoc-aad aa 
balance to-day is £25.0oa Paris advlcea qitata 3v« 
per cent. Itentea ai li'St. 15c. for the accoont. 

FRA.N'KFoax, Sept. ^\t. — United btatea Band*— Saw 

Paris, sept SO.— Exehang on London, 251 Sla Im 
short sijcht. 

Liverpool. Bepk 30—12:30 P. M.— CottOB— Tk* 
mametis easier, bat not <ittOiably lower: H iddhm 
Uplands. 6 15-ltki; lUddling Oneana, tt»#L; 
7 UOU oalea, includinc l.UOO Dales tor speeuiatfam i 
exiKirt ; rtceipts. \-jt,ii'M bales, ot wbicb 4.300 
were Amtric^in. Futui^s, l-32d. cheaper ; Ufrtaa4% 
Low Miitdiing clause, Sep ember delivery, b'ifSriA^ 
Uplands, Low Miudling clause, Septemoer and Octo- 
ber delj»ery, 6 13-160.; Dplaods, Low Midland ela»!i^ 
October and November de.irorr, 6 13-IcmL; Dplaoda^ 
Low MiddliuB cUubc, November delivery. 6 1&-I3d4 
Uplands, Low Middliuit clauae, new crop, shippeA 0« 

tober aud Korombor, sail. 6 l;^lt>d.| 0» 
lands, » Low Middlios clkuaei, 
shipped Kovember 

Uplands, Low MiddHng _. . , 

vembcr aud i>eeemuiBr, sail, 6 13-16d.; Oplaada,IiO« 
Middiioj; cliinse, new icrep, shipped Deoember and Ja» 
nary, sail, o'^gO. . .. . w 

2 P. At.— Cotton— Futures ateadier; CplaaAi^ M« 
Middling clause, new crop, shipped October m4So< 
vember. 8011. 5 -^7-324 Of tho sales to-daj 4i.800 Mm 
Here Americaa. Prorisious— Lard, 67*. 9 ««fc Im 
Amtrican. Piodace— Tallow, 438. 6d.*'owt. ^, 
Kvening— I'lust'od Oil 2o8. ei.a'itjs. Y cwt •■" 
London. Sept. 30—4 P. M.— Befinod PetroJiB« 18>iL 
» Kalion. _ . _ 

■ KTeniug— 'Llceeed OU 268- 9d- ^ cwt. 

Kio Jakkiko, Sept. 2ij.— Coffee— Market aateateAi 
prices drm ; good lirsta 6,100 1» <>,2aO reis ^ 10 kllM. 
^xuhanpe on L»ndon, 24. 

■ sastos. Bept. i:9.— Coffee— Market animated; vsioea 
firm ; Buperior Santos ti,Ol>0 to 6,150 rei* ^ 10 kilo*. 

ASTWKKP. Sept. 30.^aTenin«— Petroleum hXi. tm 
fine pale Amerio^in. .^. 



adlios clkuaei, new eru 

and December, aail, 6 27-33&J 

ing clanae, new crop, ehipped >» 



JBBOOKLTN BOARD OF CUT WOBSA 



" boss" m'laxtghlin', with the aid of a sc»» 

- PENT)ED COJfMiSSlOJtKK, KUXNI>'0 IHl 
f DEPARTMENT. 

It is a well-known fftot that William A. Foir 
ler. Commissioner of the £oard of City Works, wh8 
was suspended some weeks ago, for uonfeaaanoe ia 
office, by Jdayor Schroeder, and agaia^t whom 
charges are now pending, haa exercised since hii 
suspension, lu conlonctioa with Boss McLaaghlua, 
quite as much tnflnenee in tbe board aa he did prim 
to that eVent Since hia suspension Fowler k«| 
made his head-quarter* in a room in BarroKaM 
■Veeder's office, and from this place he and McLaach< 
lin have, through Mr. Adams, the other ' RiBg" t^ooi^ 
missiouvr, directed the operations of the board. 
Gen. Slocnm, the Presldenl of the departveai, 
found It necessary to make a large reduction in ih« 
force of employes, owing to the exhaustion o( 
several cpproprlaiions lor the different bureao*. 
McLiiugliiin and Fowler at once iasned order* to 
the head* of the different bureaus to ret aro th« 
names of certain men on the lisc of those to be dia< 
chai 4ied. 'fho list* were made np by UcLanchlix 
and Fowler and sent by them to tbe beads of tb« 
dilicreat bureaus, who in turn •cut then to frees 
dent Slocma. Learning of tblf fact Commiasionei 
Siocum at a meeting of tbe boarct^yesterday olleced 
the following resolution : 

Rf solved, Tbat in all eases In wbtch It becomes neee* 
■arv lo discUarKe emi)loye8 of tbu departmout. thea» 
lection of ttioSe lo bo disoiarstd sUall be made up<i« 
the recommendation oi the uhiei ol the Bureau XroM 
wnich tbe discliarpes are to t>e msde, aiid that a oer- 
tmcate shall be reqiiirod trom such CLlet of bureau to 
tlie rtt'ect that in uialtin* tbe seleclieus he has beea 
goverued solely bv his knowledge ef the cuaracter, 
corn;)! lency, and faithluiuess with which ench of the 
various employes has hereiolore dlsoiiarged his duUeS. 

Oommlssioner Adams refused to vote for it. bat 
offered a substitute which did not require the keada 
of bureaus m making up the lists of men to be oi»" 
charged to certily that tb«<.v wore jtovernea by the 
Character of the men employed. Aa (here are only 
two Commissioners in the Board at preaent, tliafe 
was a tie vote on both resolution*. By the aid of 
Commisuloner Adams. McLiaughltn aud FoWlM AM 
aiill practically able to oontrol the Board. 

-■ -^^^^ fe#»5 

A FAJTHLSaS PABTlfElL 
Andrew Hume lives at Glendale. He Is ei» 
ployed la the Lutheran Ceasetery, and u a hard- 
wurKiugman. A few morniaga ago, a* belett home 
for liis work, be . noticed a horse and -oart neia the 
house, and later In th* day a friend asked bim If h« 
was moving, as his wife was: Uk ing the furnitnrs 
away. SaspeoUng tbe truth, ue started ia pArsuity 
ai.d overlook his faithie^ partner #« Baahwick. ua 
her way to the Grand btr^set F*rrv, wn»rt) a new 
loaiid lover was awaiting her aivival. Oi U.* wagoa 
were all his bedding, lineu. aad other boiue]i»14 
goods. Homo a»ked tbe woman for hi* watob, b^l 
she refused to give it up, jkiid is.wae <Akea from tuti 
by force, togetner with $173 of bis money eeerMid 
on her penon. Ham* ha* o«w »dv«rti««a hi* wifa^ 
and onlese she retaros.withiB a *n<*eiflcJL.S^iM W 
ilUMn i im i r l i ii ssiii t Ji * ■ ■ ",„ , . 



f.* 



*sWi-' 



iim 



.-C^d^J 



t^Si^ji^j^j 






i^->i 



10 






^^^; 












<i*«j»iig» 









^. 



*»^- 






m^ 



AN AUTOIN^ FESTIVAL 

TEE JEWISH FKASTOi' TABERNACLES 

A nEUGIOUS F;"STIVAJ. THA.T LASTS ftKVKN 
i . PAYS — nS ORIGIX AND IirQUIRKMENTS 
— ITd DBSKBVANOK IN ANCIENT AND 
MODEKN TIMES — 1 HE BYMBOLS AND 
, l;irUAl*'OF TUt: FIOSTIVAL. 
f Tbo Jewish festival of Sukkoth, or Taberna- 
den, oommoocca t.o-morroir eventug at sunset aud 
laats seven <i.-<fyi. Tho origiu and institntion of thU 
Jiijrbly Imporannt feast ia to *de fuuxd in the twenty- 
third ohaptor of the book of Xorrticua : "And the 
l.ard apcktraaCo Moaea Ravine. Speak nnto tho cbil- 
druii of laraci, sayinsr, Oa tlio tliteouth day of this 
aeTeuth moath aliall be the Feast of Tabornaclea for 
e<*veu dava itnt» tbo Lord. On tho:ilrat day sball be a 
Jiolv coavocation : ye bU^II do uo servile work there- 
ou. Ou tho £iteeiith day of tiie sereuth monib, 
trbeo ye have gathered iu the fmit of tho land, ye 
ehatl keep the feast nf the Lord sereD days : oq tho 
first day shuU bo a Sabbat.<i, and on the eichth day 
afcall be a Sabbath. And ye shall take unto yonr- 
aeiyea on the first day tho fruit of tho tree liadar, 
Lrarchfa •■'f pr.lm tx-eei, and the boughs of tho tree 
jlboti. aud wiilowsot tbo biook, and ye shall re- 
joice fik-Jcio the I.c>rd youri.'Jod seven days. AuU ye 
eUall k\i"';> it aa a feast uuto ilie Lord seven 
iil^'S in \ the year; an frvoriastinc statute in 
ail your ceDcmtiotis: in tlie seventh month shall 
ye celeorate it. In booths ye shall dwell seven 
ilavs; all that are Israelitea born shall dwell in 
booths. I;i- order tliat your tteneratious may know 
that 1 caused the oniiaren ot Israel to dwell in 
booths, whi'u 1 brimght tliem forth out of the land 
«f j:cypt: I am tho Lord your God." In exact ac- 
- conlauce with tijie Biblical command the festival 
,i lias always been celebrated by the great majority of 
\ .Tewa thi'ouguout the world, aud is atill observed. 
Gumoienciut: on th« fifU'arith day of the seventh 
kionth, I'iahri, it continues for seven days, at the ex- 
j.i ration ot which time a sc parato feast is held on 
the eitjhth d.i.v , or the day imuiediateiy followiuR 
tjM last day ot Xai>eraacles. This final holiday is 
called j^zoreth, the Coocladine Feaat, and partakes 
At the same sacred character as that, which dis- 
trnsniviien the other Jewlsi^ festivals. Of the seven 
dajs of Tabernacles only the first is considered 
Judy, theontarv-^ning days between this one and the 
.Azefetii feast beius i>3lf h olidays, on which tbo 
v^aat t>ii9ineas vocatioiis of life are permitted. 'lal- 
Uadii^ aitthoi'ity, huwever, ia this instance as in 
•II the feativsts, has srren a sanctity to the second 
day which ia not assigned to it in the Bible. Uence 
orthodox Jews, who acciipt Uaditional authority and 
*- consider the enactments' of the rabbinical fathers 
land doctors of the Xalmad to be still binding on all 
aTcws, keep two days holy iiat of the sevea. and re- 
gard the second day as boiiu eqaal in erery respect 
jto the first. 

Tti» ohxTftotcr of the Feast of Tabernacles ia that 
•f aa Aatamnal festival, a reii^ious rejoicins over 
|the incatlienui; uf the manifukl trails of tho trees 
land other produotiona of the earth. At all times, 
: and amoO£ all nations, the harvest home has been 
xeKarded as a season ot festrvitiea aud rejoicing;. 
Tue Israelites, when iu the possession of their own 
llaad, had ample cause to exalt in the privilege of 
•ipreasing their gratitarfe to God lor the numerous 
bleasioifs which He bestowed apon them. Favored 
'Witii a country overflowinir w^ith nulk and honey, a 
Mlabrioua climate and a rich soil, and conirsstiag 
that happy .condition with tiiair farmer misery and 
desradaliou in Exypt, they i-ndeed conld well ap- 
preciate the love aud goodness of God, who bai re- 
deemed them from slavery, protected tbeui in the 
fTildemess, and settled them in the promised 
laao. Theref jre did the Festival of Tabernacles be- 
«xMne one of zratirade &nd of tliankaipving to 
ineir Heavenly Father tor the inuumerable 
laTots which He so lavishly bestows upon His chil- 
dreu. Ac Tue same time it was intended tu com- 
liiDjnarate the especial mercy ot God in preserving 
tue Israelites during me loriy year* ihey wau- 
uttrea ui the wilaeruess, whert there is neither 
Bowinc nor h«i-re8tius. The recollection of thi.s 
«iViMiC, broacht I'oroiuty to luiud by the cnstom of 
clweUias id boolUs or temporary houses duriug the 
aeVB^i days of the feast, slrengtliened within the 
bearta oi the pecple tho belief m toe ever- watchful 
jiioTldeuce ol God and in the wisdom sud i^OjdDess 
of ilia (iiviue Kuvemment of the world. 

Xh« obaervauces prescnbea tor this feast are, 
first, (be dweiliax in buuihs, and seconaiy, the 
"Uiioit tor the porpose of prayer aud commeiuoration 
, lour species ut ttfe rt^getaole kingdout. in the 
' puMoae irom Leriticoa quoted above, these four 
•peclcs are thus ebumeraied: The fruit of the tree 
.h,wur, branches ol* palm trees, boughs of tho tree 
:ai>«th, and willows of the break. The true sifrnili- 
«atiuD of the woroa haoar and aboth is a matter of 
coundurable doubt, but tradition teaches that the 
tree haOar meautt the uitron, aud the tree 
aboib 13 the mjTtle, and as such they are 
grnetally interprdtu>'t. That the reader may clearly 
nude;:stand too luteotion ot these observances it 
Viil he necessary to duaider them separately. 

Db* first is the co.timand to dwell in booths or 
tabernacles, and ti-om i ois the title of the festival is 
deriveo, the word «Uii;i»>tA signify mg buutbs. £>nch 
a tuktati must be erecieu nuder the open sky. It 
musi, not be cBiirely rooferf.in or covered with a solid 
tiiatenal, bat must be so catistraciedas to admit the 
V4ew of thje sky and stars. The nsoal way is to 
■ Iba.ch It with the buiishs or branches ot trees, 
tarowa loosely together. DaTing the seven days of 
toefealiTai it is iniperative to di^ell in this sukkab; 
ail meals miis: ue taken t^re, and in councii-^s 
wtaerd the eiimate permits it is customary even to 
■isep there. Referoiei-s who Ao not adhere to tho 
bteral or verbal iutcrpretatioa of the Bible have 
k>*r:>cated itaia commaud. and do not ecest itie 
bootos at all. Orthodox Jews, however, carry one 
tbei^anciiun to the very letter, and all who can 
afforu uie laxoiy erect very handsome tabernacles 
sojaceot to ihea iiuases. These tabernacles are iu 
Biaaj instances very elaborareiy iieouruted, flowers 
«ad iruus being conspicaons among the orua- 
menta which are saapeuded from the roof and 
Krani(e«i along the waiia of the temporary euidce. 
If ha sukkah generally consists of.bnt one room, 
which s>-rv«8 mu purpose ot both the dining aud re- 
<;3i>tiun rooms. Here the host receives his visitors 
aau bet« the tamiiy assemble for their meals. 
tjiiOQtd lUe weauier D ; inclement, howvevtr, a hasty 
retreat has to be made tu the house, :l'or, as already 
•vated, tjQe sukkaii is uot rain-proof, aud though 
■oauy are boilt witn extra roots uf wt>o^, vrhicb, bv 
ma aid ot palieva, are so anani^ed. as to be shut 
down or r<i,tsed up at pleasure, yet waenever this 
extra raof is let oown over ihe thatched 
r<M/f the btiiiding ceases to be a. boutb, aud 
toe residents tbereiu may jnet as well 
lepair to their ordiaary bomea. All ortho- 
(tox cougreeaiiuns have sakkahs aojuining or 
Ocltaectua aith their <>yuago;:nes, and these aro for 
tbe use of the poor aul loosie who are uuable to 
bare ibeir own private .inkkutbs. In this country, 
buwever, these veiigre^titioDal bootlis are about the 
only ones which ate us.^d, very tew bvt-u of the 
Billet Jews havioe loUiviuual ones. Tu tueee ouu- 

hc tuoeriiaoles the congregations adiouru at the 
coDclusioB of the services ou the first and aecoad 
avauiuga and tirst aud second naurniDKa of ihe 
tessl, aud thtre partiUi<> uf wine, bread, olives, 
iruit, and Other reirestiiuents, iu order to have a 
religions frjoiciug aud a benediction within its 
■wans m accuruaiice with the Biblical injauction. 

Xli« priuuipiU reasun for the oibservauce ia given 
In iicripiarD as foiiowa: "That your generaciuns 
may kuoW ttut I causod the children of Israel to 
uweil iu booths vrheu I bironght them forth out of 
the land uf £i:ypt." Iu addition to tlxis reason, 
there ate laauy svinbonoal uiuicatioss which tho 
commt-utators have endeavored to expLio. One ot 
the Miost iDi^reatint: of thesu explauations is that 
the Israeiile.may always havo his heart directed to 
Gud uud may be rcoiiDded tuac he is only a 
ac.j..>amer on tbis earth, and that his real home is 
iu another aod better world. Therefore he quits 
ilia appointed residence to Uarell in a booth, fie- 
ciseiv at 'he time ot harvest, iu the midst of gea- 
• ral prosperity aud abundauce, when people are 
inure apt tu kormui the (Jreaior:; he abandons his 
lioUiu auude, where are all the incentives to worldly 
^ Vassiona, aud resigns himself to contemplation iu a 
irail aud ephemeral dwelling, from the roof of 
which he may view the sky and the stars, and tbns 
be reminded uf the Great Creator, who governs all 
Dattu'e ui wi»iom aud in love. 

Wi^h r>a»peci to ihe second observance of using 
the lOur apecias ot Ihe viKetaoie kingdum,the sacrua 
bciipiurt'S aie sileui, auu du not uveu expresa tbe 
m.*uuer 111 wiiicn uliL-v are to be used. Tradiliou, 
iiowever, lias soppiied this want, and the rabuiuical 
Itttueis uave sel lueir luueuuuy tu work tu assigu a 
xea^uu lur wb.ii may st.-eiu tu be a very aruurary 
4^ oomuiaad. From utnsn^ sevt;rai explanations the 
lt4iiowiak two, wuii/ti seeiu very rational auu appro- 
pciato, o«eldea naviU'C llie merit of being uretty and 
. lateies'iUji. lire ael'.'uied : The four is'p:i;iea are 
•l^mbulical of the ruialiou betv/een the Unity aud 
taeauiverse. cumpu.nsa ot the spuifaal, the astral, 
and the interior woiid. Tot Citron or jilsrug. wbich 
l»i<:ai't-iaiiy aelecie" so as to have ic perfect aud 
Jfraa iruui the s;li^liteao stain, blemish, or imperlec- 

UuiL ludioates the Groat First Cadse. Tbereioie this 

fruit Js not uuund up wicb the ether ibiee specien, 

bat I* neld separately in the iiand duriuif tne cuaui- 

IDS of that part uf the service known by the 

liame of '' iiallel," or praises. Tnu» 4t denotes 

tual the Great Being it indicates is aosolnte aud ab - 

•1.;acl iiuui ail cre^iiun. It uxprenaea clearly ttae 

Jawisb luua ot God, that Ha is nut nature uor ideu- 

3^^- Ucai With narure, but that He i.i above aod indc- 

{wudeui ot uaiuie ; in tact that fle is the absolute 

aud supremo Creator, aud that all uatiire is bui au 

atuaBuUoij Irooi Mini. Toe '* iulao," or " palm 

bruucuoS," deuoie the spiritoal beiugg, who. aU 

(Uodiiu acparate like the leaves, are nevenbeless 

etoaely nui.ed to the stem, aud, however oifijient 

ui decree, lorm out one whole. Taemyriie," Aboth," 

aeuates ti.e aalral world, and the ** willows of 

the brook " indicate tuls inferior world. 

These thrao species are tied : together, to 

fcbovr that, however graduate!, creation 

J^oTins bnt one whole, subject to ono master will, 

roiiuiatu!' by one bupremu legislator, and created 

lor one noble purpose, the happiness ot the creature, 

ItacU accoraiutj to its oo^i-ee. Wne» tied tocether, 



whom they raufit ever remain nnited. The .lecond 
explanation of the font species is that ttieyreDrLSMit; 
the four principal parts of the liuraau buds' which 
mtiBt be bi'ouirht as au ofiorms to God. The Eiroc — 
citron — is n tyiie of the hoart, thereby twichniic, that 
the iirst sacrifice required by God is a he.irt th.ir, 
like tho citrc.-n, miisi have no .■tiain, no blemish, no 
imperiection, but must be offered up wltli all it.s 
iiiuivo pnrity and fracrflDct\ The "Itibab " 1 1- 
"palm brunch " denoies the vertebra) or bacL-bone, 
and thoreb}' InoulcatDs the duty of woisliip, whfh 
boc'nuinir at the earliest age, nuts t, be carried oat 
through the entire lite. Tins worship, however, 
must not be niechauical, tor that is ipff.-u.sive to Hiai 
wh.> readeth the hea-.t, but it must be a devout aud 
reveren. worship, in which tho heart is tliorouguiy 
euliHted. For this reason when tho festal palm is 
u.-ied during the reliiiiou.s exerrises it is ueccssary 
to join the citron with the palm branch at the tuiio 
of waviue if, that both be used together, 'i be 
boneh of the irtfe Aboth, a myrtle sprie, HyinboliZ''s 
tho eves, thereby ttaching that as tho eyes are 
olteu the introducing ajjent of letuptation they 
deservs especial wy.tchtnlness. This uart of the 
ofl'criug, therefor!', is hiahly sigiiiflcaut. Lasily, 
the "willows of the brook' denote the lips, which 
must also be kept in propir Bubjectiou aud umlcr 
the control ot tne heart it tho oUVrins is to oe an 
acceptable one in tho sicht ot Gnd. 

Among orthodox coagregadons, the miniatpr, 
reader, and many of the wifshlpers possess thrso 
fonr species and use them duriui; tne services, but 
amon,'; reform congreeations tue actual using of 
them has bettn abolished ; but od« complete set is 
placed on exbibilioa in the temple, so ta to com- 
memorate the Biblical precept aud the ancieni cus- 
tom, aud at the same time to incu.oate or symbolize 
the many instructive lessons which may be deduc*)d 
therefrom. 

The Feast of Tabernacles rioses on the seventh 
day. The eisjiitli i* the Azereth or concluiliui; 
feast, aud is kept holy by both reformers and ortho- 
dox aliae. The dweiliuj: in booths and usinu' the 
foni species ends with the seventh day. Part of 
tho litiirgvof the Azertin festival is a prayer for 
rain and a propitious season. Among orthodox 
coramiinitics a ninth day is kopr, tor the purpo-e of 
rejoicing over the conelusion of yie reading of the 
i'entatencli, which is divided into weekly sections 
and gone ihrobgh once every yrar. T.iis holiday 
l.s called '■Siuichath Torah," or Ki'iJicing ot tbn 
Law, and is celeOrated by taking out all the scrolls 
ot the law irom the ark and carryiu« them around 
tho synagotiue in jirocession. The iiturayof the 
day celebrates the excelleiioy of the law and of the 
mission of Moses, while tho oay itself is [ia?«ed lu 
joyous festivity. 'J'hus the Jewish Autumnal fesii- 
vals are ended. 



WORK OF THE AMEBIC AX BOARD. 



TUB BXT. NT 
MISSIONS- 
OF THK 
MKKTIXG 



AND IMPOnTANCE OF ITS 
-EXPENSES AND DKFICIKXCY 
PxVST YKAR — THE COMING 
AT IIAKTl-OliD. 



The American Boar^l holds its annual meet- 
ing this week at Hartford. There will be a larire 
attendance of Congregational ministers from all 
parts of the country, and several missiouaries will 
doubtless also bo present. The beard has been 
much ombarrassed the past year by ibe ii?ce.<(8ity 
imposed upon it, in conseq nonce of diminishod re- 
ceipts and reduced appropriaUons, of curtailing its 
operations in foreign lands. Where all its missions 
seemed equally important, and where in many fields 
there were pressing deintnds tor increased means, 
it has been found extremely difljoult to reduce the 
expenses by $37,000. The receipts for the voar 
were 1458,511, a decrease of $10 000 from the pre- 
vious ye.ir. Bnt the debt of f44 dUO, with which 
the year was began, has been reduced to 531,000. 
The number of missions rem.tius the same hm last 
year, viz.: eighteen. There are 8G staiious aud 517 
out-station.'i, 135 ordained missionaries, the aasisr- 
ants. pbysiuiaus. and teachers brinjiin;: the total of 
emplojBS up to 1,488. Connected with the nassions 
are 2;i7 chutches, au increa.<<e of 14 ; 12,871 comma- 
nicnnts. an increase of 1 GiS. The edu-jatiooal de- 
partment represents a very large share of the 
work of the board. It iuciiides eleven ti-jining 
and theological schools, with 3G5 students, and 600 
boaiding and common sclsools, wi;h nearly tweniy- 
lour rhonsanrt ocholara. The press has also been 
au active agent in the work of evangel. zttion. Ttid 
pages of priuted matter for the Turkish missions 
only reach an aggregate of nearly seven and om- 
half millions. Turee missionaries, Mrs. John T. 
Giilock, of !North Ctiina; Dr. nonry S. West, of 
Suas, Western Ihirkey, and Kev. il. R. Peck, of 
India, have died during the year. Twenty-seven 
missiouaries have returned to mis conn try ior rest 
and improvement of health, ten of whom have 
closed their connection with the board. Twenty 
have gone back to their work, and twenty-two new 
laborers bavu been sent out. 

Turkey has naturally been the most important 
field, and the missionai'ies in that country have oc- 
cupied a very delicate position. But they have 
conducted themselves so prudently as to maintain 
their work and iudueuce uniuiuaired. Churches, 
preaching places, and schools are maintained, and 
much Curiatian literattire has been distributed 
throughout the Empire. More than twelve thou- 
sand children and youths are receiviag Christian 
iustructlou in the Sabbath schools, aud are, it ia be- 
lieved, exercising a wide inflaence which will soon 
make Itself known in results. The natives begin to 
help in the suniiort of churches and schools. 

A striking leatore of the Indian and Ceylon mis- 
sions daring the year has been thd increased 
interest in the work among women. Iu Cevloii 
women missionaries are warmly welcomed In every 
home, and native Christian woman have become 
very efficient helpers. Steady progress has been 
made by the missions in China, education being 
there as in Inula and Turkey a valuable auxiliary 
to evangelical work. The increase of communicants 
in Japan aud the organizati< n of new churches 
and the extension or missionary operations in Mi- 
cronesoa, have been very gratitjing and eacouraj;- 
ing indications of growth. 

In Atrica and among the North American 
Indians the resalts ot the yaar's work have not 
been so large as to give special enouurageraent, or 
so small as to dishoarteu tho missionariea. In Papal 
lands the past year has beeu a very auccesaiui one. 
In Mexico the churches have increased, and in 
Spain new fields have been oceuplud. 

For the enoning year, the boaid asks for an in- 
crease of 125,000 in its receipts, and desires to add 
ten missionaries to Its working torce. 



JTIJIAN iiCEyE^S. 



TWO PREHISTOmC SIGHTS — PIUMITIVK VASE- 
MAKING — THE PKEPAKATION OF FIJI 
GROG. 
A correspondent who has traveled from Fiji 
to San Francisco writes to the London Timet from 
the latter town, under date ol August : " I was 
fortunate when I was in Fiji in witnessing two 
thoroughly prehistorio spectacles. One was a 
young girl, dressed in two yards of calico print and 
a girdle of leaves, breaking 'ivi' nuts, a kind of 
large coarse chestnttt with a bard shell, with a 
genuine stone adze, fixed to its wooden handle by 
coils of plaited string. The damsel was evidently 
unaware that the work on which she was emuluyed 

for the satistactionof her own hanger and that of 
her relatives would secure her a most favorable re- 
ception at most learned aud antiquarian kocieties. 
The other was a little, shriveled old woman, 
who was making an earthenware Tfssel nearly 
as large as herself, with no other imple- 
ments than a round fl.itt'ned pebble about foar 
inches in diameter, and a pieoe oi wood about as 
larjje as the back of an ordiuarv hair-brusb, slightly 
concave on the surface. Diuping both stone and 
wood frequently in water, she molded the iuklile 
of the huge pot with the former, and pattkd the out- 
side into shapa slmultaneons y with the latter. Tho 
vessel waa egg-shaped, the opening being at tho top 
or large end of the eg:;, with an everted lip. It was 
nearly three feet in height and two in diamotar, and 
was formed of clay found near the villag". W'hen it 
is complete a flre is built round it on the groand 
and it i» carefully baked before being removed, lu 
the houses we saw several pots of the kind in use. 
They are placed on their side with the mouth iu- 
ciiued slightly npward, aad are seldom exposed 
to the risk of breaKage by removal 
from their site. They are, "of course, 
very fragile, ba; in the bands of the 
natives they are said to last for years. I doubted 
whether it would conduce to the old lady's peace of 
mind It I informed her that by merely consenting 
to carry on her work lu public she could doubtless 
secure a lucrative and nermmeut en;:agomeul, at 
Barnum's, am I finally decided to leave her iu 
ignorance. Fijian houses, if one may iud^eot them 
by the villages ronnd Ngaioa Bay, Kindavu, are, 
with few (.xceptions, ruue as to coustruciion and 
filtby as to condition. Indeed, prehistoric man 
presents himself to our observation here as a do- 
cidediv dirty animal. He may o^ may not wash iu 
cold wat<ir once a day ; but ho never misses an up- 
portuuity of oiling him-elf, and Ue is not at all care- 
ful in his selecUoii of oleaginous ^Uostance-*. The 
crouud in the interior ot hii hoaso is coveted 
with ooc.ia-:iut le.ives. over which lue laid mats 
pliilcd of the leave, of tbb screw pine. On these 
mats sit, stand, lie, roll, and m1o!-d cue popu aliou 
ot the house. It Is an airangimani reuiarKably 
wall suited for the maiuteuancu ot vermin, and 
the plau of Ir.qucutly plasteiiug the beau with 
lime which the astivus adopr is iDsufflcieut to 
Counteract it. The priLcipal uiflerence, as a pass- 
enger remarked, between a cujtf und a person 
who waa not a chief was that wuile the 
latter spat irequentlv on the umt on which 
be was titling, the loraiei- lifted up the 
coiner of the mat and spat under i;. Wh'tuer the 
use of ' yaiigsoDa,' or i'lji groji, is preliialorici do uot 

know. It 18' prepared lu tins wise: Some pieces of 
the root of kava {Fiper methysUeum) are chewed by 
a number natives sitting lu a uruup, until snf lene l 
aud pulpidi'd sutliuieutly. Thuy ate tiieo disgorged 
into a Wooden bo>vl about two feet in diaiueter, 
aud water is pourad over ihom. Next a bundle 
ot duo grass or roots is put into tho bowl, and one 
native stirs It about with the bauds and sweeps 
nut all tho Iragmeuisof kava root, laaviug nothing 
but the juice of the plant, saliva, and water. Final- 
ly the nil stare, which is or a dull greenish gray 
color, aud is said to resemble soap-suds aud mag- 
nesia in taste, is baled oat in cooauut shells and 
handed to the company according t* senio ity. I 
waa informed that a doctor at L'tvuka had weighed 
out twelve oanues of the root aud glveu it to some 
of the native* to chew. After ihe operation be 
foundtbe weight to be seventeon onncss, the adai- 
tional weight having, of coarse, been contiibuted 
by the native mouths. I was also informed tbai the 
otficias of the Colonial Government 



, _ , T, r,- I '^'"* have re- 

<i''y aie pressed or held against tho Esrog or Citron, I oently arrived from England hiVe adopted the fssh 



f,o snow their perfect dependence on the one great I ion of drinking thi* fiitny nj^iate, hat tht* seems I ^''^ 
juuise who gave them aU their being, and wiiJt tlx^uu-qfay cradibie.'.', I inrtl 



THK AMERICAN POLITY. | 

— « — - 1 

A TBIED AlsD SUCCESSFUL GOVKRIi- \ 

m!<:nt. ; 

TUE INFLUENCES THROUGH WHICH IT WAS j 

DKVKLOPED — A SKKTCH OF I f S HISTORY ' 

— TIIK REAl.IZ.\TtON OF A GRAND PRIN- j 

CIPI.K— C MPAKISON WITH OTHER GOV- ' 

ERNMK-NT3. 

The following letter, of mtiah interest in it- I 
self at this time, has a special significance as writ- j 
ten by a direct desccudanr of one of the Regicido 
Judges. Its estimate ot American progiess is com- 
prehensive and fl.ittenng: 
To the Editor of llu Neui- York Timts: 

We celebrate thisyeiir the liundrodth anniversary 
ot the Declaration of Independence, which history 
recoguizes as the commencement of our Govern- 
ment. So in pome sense it was ; but, viewed 
through the influence of several generations of 
Anglo- Americaus, it appears to be only one stage in 
the progress of a polity that commenced 256 years 
ago. And now the Government of the United 
States appears to be tho oldest, the most thorough- 
ly tried, the most successful, the least altered, and 
the least likely to be altered, of any Government 
now existing ia Christendom. It was developed 
through influences moral, intellectual, politicil, and 
material, that were never combined before, aud 
which lift it entirely above all precedents of history 
with which to compare it. Hence the signal-failure 
of all prophesies that have been raado in Europe 

vvi;h regard to it, especially of lace veara. These 
reinaras are true of it If its date is fixed at the lev- 
olniion of onfi" hundred years ago, but still more so 
if it 18 earned back to its commoncemeut, C06 years 
ago. 

' In 1620, a small company of English men and 
women passed over irom O'd to Kew England. 
They were educated, religious people, foremost 
among the English for tlieir devotion to civil and 
religi lus 1 berty. They went to establish a new 
society, in a new country, where they cnnld erjoy 
a liberty they failed to fiud at home. They carried 
with them the language, religion, laws, arts, itera- 
ture, science, customs ol the English nation, one of 
the foremost in civiizitiouj the courage, per- 
eistence, truthfulness; and powen of combination, 
which distinguish the Euglish character. Thev 
left behind them monarchy, theocracy, the privilege 
of caste, primogeniture, and all the prescriptive 
lights in Church and S'ate. that have ao impeded 
every step toward reform in England ever since. 
They took all that was valuable, aud left behind 
all impedimenta. Quite unknown to themselves, 
they lanaed on the suortjs of a country ot immense 
extent and unuxampied resources, possessing a 
vast co.asc on two oceans, studded with magniflcent 
ba,\s and harboi's ; ilvers and lakes afibrdiuff uavi- 
giuioi) to the heart, of the continent; all the 
Viirieties of climate iu tho temperate zone ; a most 
inxuriant virgin soil ; almost oubonnaed wealth of 
mineral and vegt'table productions, abundance of 
game, and a si ugular absence of aiiimais hostile lO 
human life. With all these advantages they stopped 

iuto the coiDnieuceiuent of a new natluu fail grown 
in all the eloinonts of civiiiz:itioti, without any 
mythical or barbaric era, aud tbis was at ihecoui. 
muucement of a period ot scientido 0isc.>very and 
Its application to the arts ot liiu hitherto uopre- 
cedeuted. 

Ou Ihe. r voyage over they formed a programme 
tor a govemmuut. It was; very simple and natural 
lor theui to make, based upon the naiuial rights of 
niaukind. Bui it was quite new to history, li was' 
perfect equality ot all men before the law ; no slav- 
ery ; uo privilege of class ; no primogeniture ; uui- 
vtrsal sullrage; universtu 6uucuuon by the State; 
sup;iort of religion bjindiviaiial cont.ibutiou, lade- 
penOent trom the State. Tnus the touudaiiou wa-s 
laid. F'or m^re than one hundred years the tide of 
eujigranun coniiuueil to ii iw, chiefly from Old Eng- 
land, bringiug to Kew-Englaud some of the best 
blood of (he Old Cuuuity, with a spriiikling of 
Duton aud Huguenots. Impelled by the same mo- 
tives and principles as the pioneers, the succeeding 
emigrauts adopted the same programme. Every 
ueu settlement becaoiu a little republic, with it's 
acliool-liouse. meeiiug-nouse, and town-house, where 
the people were instructed in the elements of learn- 
ing, their mural aud religious duties, and political 
praciice. Wuen the town-house was opened for 
business, all the men at.euded to partioipate iu it, 
and must ot the buys to learn how. When the 
towns tuultiplied, with ouucurrent and couflictiug 
questions, they elected delegates to form legislative 
as.>iembiies to enact laws for all. And ao States 
grew up. 

Thus the American Government was developed 
under entirely new circiiipatancea and influeuoes, 
W^iien European writers comptare it with Athens, 
Kome, Yenice, aud Florence, mere are no eleineuts 
of .•similarity iu the character or surroundings of 
the peoples, to afford any materials tor eomparison. 
England, from whence it soraug, fnimshes the 
nearest resemblance, unlsss ib oe Switzerland, 
which is tht^-oldest governmeut in Ea.-ope. Mean- 
while the British Government, busied with revolu- 
tions at home, ana only too happy to be rid of a 
population generally opposed to ir, conferred the 
greatest possible benefit upou it by iettiug it alone, 
aud treating it with marked neglect, it afi'orded 
DO protection, no couatenasce, no assistance. 
There whs a nominal cunaesiion witu the *° mother 
coun:ry,"but only nominal. The Americans made 
their own laws, elected their owu magisiratesj 
judges, clergymen, established their owu ciortB 
and churches, sometimes coined their own money, 
raised their own little armies ot militia, and elected 
Its olficers. Aud when England went to, war with 
Fiance, they sent their owu little forces to Canada 
and Xew Breton to help the English. Ia fact, they 
virtu;illy performed all the lunctions ot govern- 
ment, on the oasis of their original programme, with 
yery little lutetveution ou the part of the 
mother country, and thatofteuer for evil than for 
good. The King sometimes appointed a Governor. 
But he could uo Utile wiihuui the legislative assem- 
bly to make the laws and the Exeruuve Council to 
assist in their execution, who' were almost entirely 
Americans. He gave awav the lands, wnich never 
belunged to him, tu persdual lavorites?. or sold tbem 
to adventurer.-*, describing them sometimes by de- 
grees of latitude aud sometimes by heudleands, the 
latitudes ot wbicn were unknown to him, and thus 
overlapping them, and always extending into uu- 
known aud undeliued space towaru the setting sun. 
But as the lauds were valueless except to tho^e 
wiiu worked them, these grants practically amuani- 
ed to notniug. He sent some convicts over as a 
penal colony, but New-England would not permit 
them to laud. More siiccesslul in another pari, uf 
the country, be did succeed iu iutroducm^', against 
the pi-otesLs and even torcible resistance of the 
Americans, the gteate.-it evil that, was ever inflicted 
on any country, negro slavery, the only approach to 
leudaiism that ever came to afflict us, lue suuico ut 
all our woes and dissensions, and tho sole cause of 
a great civil war. Thus, while we owe all that is most 
Valuable, stable, and glonuns— principles uf justice 

and liberty mat have Oeeu tUe tuuudatiou ut ail uur 
success, au iuestiiuaule luUeriiuuct — lo Brltian men 
and women, we owe very Utile to the Biiii»h Gov- 
ernment. 

Sj adairs progressed, by a steady and consistent 
development ou the orikiiial piogramme, till the 
Americans grew sufiicieucly important tu attr^iCt 
the utteniiou ut Europe aud the cupidity of toe 
iaome tiovernment. 'X'ueu began a series of eu- 
cruachmeuls npou the American sysiem, aud lur 
the first time there was witnessed a considerable 
importation of British troops aud fleets, sent to 
coerce, nut tu protect, provoking wuai was called 
luo Amei'icau Jtevuluiioa. In some sense it was 
certaiuiy a revolutiou; iu othurif, nut at all. It was 
not a revolution to change the settled state of 
aflaim, but a couservatiyo resistance to radical 
changes, Boaghl to be lutroauced by the Bruich 
Goveiuiueni lur ils own put poses; opposed b.y the 
wisest and purest statesiuou in ir'ariiAmeut, as it 
was by ihu Americans lu tho tjeld. beuaratiou 
ensued, aud, sooit' atier, the auoption'of the Const:- 
luaon of the Uuited States. We only repeat wuat 
has been frequently exiiiessed uy British and Cou- 
tiiientol statesmen and writers, when we say thai no 
body of men ever uuseubieu lor uuulic or political 
purposes nioi'o pure, Uisluteresteii, and sagacioas, 
or batter quaiiiiua lor the unties they were caaed 
tu perform, thuu ihe Cougiess that was eleuted to 

toim tnat Cuusii.ution. I'bere were Wasbiug^uu 
ana Mjdi.-oti, (^u .scquontlj' Bresideuce,) Hamilton, 
Fiaui^iin, Butuj i^iu^, K'Uert Alorris, aud many 
olIiui'B, lueir cquais lu eveiylbiu;^ but the oppor- 
tnuity to be distiugoioheo. They brought with 
them an intimate iui>iwiedge ol itiw, hisiorv, and 
precedent; aud, best of all, lull expcrieuce in the 
Americn sysiem of goyeromout mat uad existed 
and beeu developing lor i.bu years Deture. And 
wuat uid tuev do < JJeviso a uow specuiaivo sys- 
tem of government '< Not at all. lUaj merely 
adapted luo oiu syseui, tuat bad workeu au well, .u 
tiiu new state of luuij^s. -I'uey created a home ex- 
ecttiivu lor iDe LOmiU:il lurcigu one tu.tt hao ^o 
m:smaiia;(ed. Otherwise it WuS a cuuibiu:Htiou of 
\.^la S.aLijs tu form a uatlou, )dst as tUe luwus Uad 
cumutued to lurm ::>iu^es, a^tl on tue same pro- 
gramme. The same piiucipies ot uuiver.^al equaiity 
belore lUe law, ciVii aud leagiuus liueriy, and ab- 
bcuce ul a b>a..e Cnurcu. 

Oui> uue local diuuruuce was admitted. They 
louud themselves oi>agud lo make a comptomi.->e 
wiiu Slavery, ..s 11 eii.ioiLU in the Suuiht in oleics, 

aiiO tu puiuiiL tuut o^o liiLu.1 reiuuaut ui leuaaiiam 
lo bo eugiail^a ou t.e new CuUstiiuuou. Bui — 
thanks 00 to heavcu — „ltcr seveuti-Uve yea. sol 
co.idiCt aud Cumproin.se, tua. iata> ci..Uoo has ueeu 
expurgaied, mm lUu dusiiiutiou uow stands true, 
lu Ils urgauiu priuuipies, lo tho piugramme ol tuo 

un^iuat luuhuers. 

.. Whue America has thus beeu steadily developiug 
a ijew civi.iz .li^u, luuuucu upon tUo equal iiguio ux' 
all mou, auu xouiziUk a principle wuicu uas la<eiy 
ueeu loi'mulaivu iulo tuc expression ui " tue gre.ii' 
est uappiuuss ol the gieaiest uumbuf," wuat uas 
bapubuud in Europe, tue uuas.eu seat ol civiliza- 
tion, siuce lti_;U ( Cicarcely a dynasty or uoverum .•nc 
remains uocuuugeo ; kiu|:oums nave beeu exiiu- 
tiuguisued ; pru\ luces h.ive swollen luiu empires ; 
buuudanes have uovu ho changed tuat hiulory must 
be read wi.h series ol maps i.dapied to oacu epucu; 
republics have been t^iven to people uupreparea, 
ouiy to be subverted ; Uaib,«ruus, -leleulless war, 
chiefly for oyiiastic purposes or seclanau quesaous, 
iu which the people nan littie real interest, uas beeu 
mere frequent than peaeo ; indeed, peaco seems to 
h.\ve been kittle mure 'than au mieivai of test to 
prepare for new war. 

Aud now she stands in a position of armed neu- 
traiit.v, her le^uurces crippled by dynastic ambi- 
,tion, with 8,000,000 of her male population, the 
er ot youth aud vigor of manbgoo, sue apart tor 



are annually extorted from property and industry, 
to support this nation of soldiers. But still the 
tendency has been coiietantly toward dcnocraey. 

What has happened in Et.gland since 1G20? They 
settled tlii quostioD of the divine right ol Klugs, 
bv bringin;; one to trial and execution, and driving 
out nnoihor by two bloody revoluiiouH. Then 
ctiine two other revolutions, not entirely bloodless, 
in which they invited, tirsl a Dutchman, and then 
a Get man to come and govern them, t'oraewhat as 
the Florentines elected their Podestas from abroad. 
Ill the last 100 years thev have, hy a scries ol blood- 
less revoiuiinus,. onately cu..uged the character of 
titeir Government, i'ney nave strip pad the tjrown 
< fall political power, leaving it only a small politi- 
cal aud large social influence. Tiii-y have rednced 
the authority of the Lor'i.i* and the Church, and 
throwu the Go^ernmeiit almost entirely iutothe 
hands of the Hou.-'e ol Comni'>us. Aud the cliarac- 
tcr ot this has been so ciianged thiu Pitt and FoX 
could hardly rec.Oj;nize It .ts Ihe same body they 
fitqueut'.'d. They have ononed it first to Di-.^enters, 
tlieu to Caihoiics, then te Jews; and suci:eediug 
iliiiiaters vie with e.ich other in dtmocrat:zin_ ira 

cohstiiuency. Ali admir.'ii;le changes, it not loo 
last, but all tending to tliJt democracy that was 

established in America 25(i years ago. 

The qurstion is sometimes ivsked, Will nor, 
America become a inou5rch> 1 Wnen propounded 
by an Eugnshtuan it Seeins especjally amuiiui:, 
since they have been soBteadily loouiMug their own 
tua meie shadow, audaifsimiiatiu<; t bi-ir system crn- 
siauiiy towaru ours. Stidit penouiis an importaut 
liiucliuu tuere. iUeir social svslem sciil tests ou 
a pvivil.dgid class, the remains ot icuualisin, ano 
tne throne is an esseuiiai apex to the svstcm, the 
s iiree oi all distinciious, the balance-n Oeel to 
ueuruliz-icouflictimi jealousies. In America, where 
We h.»ve uo stiuu s^sleui, whole sociii dibliuciious 
rest doieiy ou merit, aud are only hereditary as lar 
as the sources uf merit at e inherited, there is no.h- 
iu,i to louud a mo.iarchy upou. It Woutd only be 
au expcns.ve aud suptifl .ous anachronism, and 
biiug into tho body p./iitii.- au element eniirelv' hos- 
tile to 11. Nothing n'-eiii.-5 to an Amerioan more im- 
prub.ible. The ouggeotiou only ixei.ea a smile. We 
hojje uot to be nii.'«uudot3t-.od. Our xiurposo is to 
treat on the philosophy ot facts. vV^e iiueud ou.y lo 
muuuest from lacls ibo superioiity of our own Gov- 
erumeui — not to reflect uuiairly on oih. rs, that are 
ocveiopiug under .utitely difl'erent circumotauces ; 
auu least ot ..11 on rue Bruish ciowu auu ansioc- 
lacy. Iu commou with must of our couuliymeu we 
eutertaiu a proiound respect — nay, adiuiratiou — or 
the lUusirious lady who now occupies the British 
throne, aud for her laffi accomplished consort. We 
Icel graieiul tu them tbr the influence they exerted 
lu the-causo ol right duiiug our own iryiu;i con- 
fl.ct. Tbeir purity of lUe, honesty ot uurpose, aud 
cevonon tu duly have sued uuwouted lustre ou ihe 
Briiibh cruwu, aud eievaieJ the who e puiliical 
uud kucia. .iie of the uaiiun. So with reguid to 
ihe nubuiiy. \Vo kuuw" that tne cauoe ot Uuerty 
\Nas indebted to many ot them tor most imporuiut 
services when the coufi ct was wi,h the crown; 
that many of the brigutest name* th^t adorn tue 
pages of history, disiiuguished tor courage, viriut-, 
and lalen.. Come Irom or were elevated lo.u their 
rai.ks; that many uf them, resisting the uaiaral 
ieudeucy to seltisuuess that inures to privilege, ue- 
voiu themselves wi.h assiduous diligence tu the 
luauy ooiigaiiuns wnich devolve upun lueir high 
positions. We admire the wise temperance with 
winch I hey have yielded to the luevitaule pressure 
of popular righLC, aod are uow guiding auu a->sist- 
lug tue masses lu their traositiuu Irom leu.lalistn 
towaid democracy. We believe it WaS merely the 
naiiuai ettect ul the system lor men oi very ordi- 
nary virtue and talent, whether Lord JNorth or Ljrd 
J:*uimcroCou, wuen cui^rged witu .he admiiiistra<,iuu 
Ol govei'umeui, to leei aud act in aa uuitiruuiy 
mauuer toward a system tuunded npuu equal lights 
bciure the law, the succ^s Ot which wuuid imperil 
their priviletiea. 

Aud whai, It may be asked, has this American 
Guvei'umeDl lurwli.cu yi.uo.uimso much success 
and siauility, dune? Has i. piouuceu perieci re- 
au.18 1 No, Certainly uot. Tuat is ouiy to be 
looiied loi irom a porieci^syslem, administered by 
per.tct men. However ^ood u uity be, iv is ad- 
m.uisteied by lai.ible auu imperfect meu, and we 
coiistaut y leceive a great u'eai ui vice uud iguorauce 
irom Europe, ibat lequires a generation tu ouuuatu 
auu purity. At ;iio ^reseat time laUils in its «d- 
miuistratiou huve Ue^n developed, esO<;cially iu its 
civil set v.ice, Co i<rdy ine uetaoranz.ug lesu.is of lue 
lato war, to iho reform ot woicu the people are 
arwaienuig. Aud whou duly luustjd, the rciurms 
will surcly come, as they have heic-to.ore. But etui 
i. has i.one mucn. it uas pruveu ihst a Goveru- 
meuL touuded aud admiaisiereu by the peuplc, aud 
tut the pcupid, has the uubuuiidou cu.ifldeuce ox the 
peopie, and cau cany th..m ou lo uuwuuied n.ippi- 
uess and puwer. Xuuse wuu retieilcd ajiain.^t It euiu- 
g a.id It as tne " uest Gov'ernnteut tue world ever 
aaw" — aud auopted the same lurm tur iDemsolVcs. 
All they wauled was to wioid ii m ihe inieresle of 
si.AVei'y. it has proved tu the world tUa. agrOiit 
uatiou cau bo developed in ail -he arts of peace, 
and civiiiZdtieti, uu equai ri;:his, without a privi- 
leged class ot nubility, uud witn.,u, a great stand- 
ing uriuj ; reiigxuu sustained witu>,ui an csiaotisueu 
cuurcu ; educatiuu wi,Bout the special uitcxveuiiju 
or tue c.ergy ; aud thai it Cau assimilate other 
uatioualuien, as well as tuat from which it sprang. 

Aided by the application ot science to all the arts 
of liie, I'- uas uecn louud auequate to the goveru- 
luentuf 40,000,000 Ul peo^lJ as wtU as 3,000,000; 
lorty-iuur Stacea and Territories as well as luir- 
teeu ; the whole ureaotn uf a cuuiiueui as well a 
narrow stiip along .he coast. It h.ts been fouud 
auequate to inspire au enthusiastic patriotism wneu 
assaulted; leadiu«^ meu ut all classes freciy to sac- 
riUce thuir ilvec, children, homes, auu lortuues iu 
its deiense. Adequate to repressing, by its own 
unaided resources, the greatest rebellion the world 
has Seen, covcnly assisted irum auroad. Strung 
onough, aud temperate euuagh, to treat the va<i- 
quishca wiih a clemency hitherto unkoowu to his- 
tory. And now It rests enthroaed in tue hearts of 
ail the peopl<— 'North, S lUtu, East, and West— re- 
uuiied aud strougti thau ever ^eiure. 

AaV AMEHICAK. 



way, vi-iiteo many of the churches in^ 
aud left for India, expec lug lo be at ; 



ISARSKuE-StLU. 



A RUSSIAN PLEASURE PALACE — A HORSE 
ASYLUM AND CKMETEKY— A MARVEL- 
OUS DINING ROOM. 

The laembars of the Congress of Orientalists, 
recently in session in St. Petcrsbarg, were invited 
by tho Emfieror of Bussia to visit Tsarskoe-Selo. 
The coriespondent of the London standard sup- 
plies the fo.lowiug account of the beau ties aud curi- 
osities of the place : 

" The palace at Tsarskoe-Selo, with Its fa^ode 7d0 
feet long, recalls the cjurt grandeur of tho xust cen- 
tury, aud on turniug itoiu this sp.endid monument 
ot European art. if we kave the palace yard oy the 
gate which separates the two portions of the Hem- 
leycle, we seem all at once to step into Asia. Alter 
crossing the Chinese bridge we come to the Chi- 
nese thea:re, the oruamonis of which are all in the 
taste of the Middle Kingdom, and, a* if that 
wore not homage enuugu to the Celes- 
tial Esipire, wiihia a sioue's throw there is 
a whole group of houses, wicn tent-like roofs, 
surmouuiud ^with dragons and other strange 
looking animals — this is the Cainese Village. If 
we walk frum the palace by one of tne duors load- 
ing to the garden wo come ution the Hermitage, a 
small building, which is a real Oijou, pos^iessiug an 
historical luiere.-^t. Besides the uasemenc, it has 
ouiy oae fljor, which is reached by a liti. In the> 
principal ruom there Is au arrangement by which 
an euiertaiiimeut cau be given without a siogle 
servant being present Tue lasie in the centre 
is so coustrau.ed that at a given sigaai 
vour plate is conveyed down a tube, another is im- 
mediately sent up to supiily its olace, auu tnis pro- 
cess is repeated till you havo goue through the 
menu. Wheu the dinner is over the whole taole 
disappears, and.by means uf the same inachioery the 
d 'ur IS replaced. Tae gildiug, tue paiutinx, the 
mirrors, tue elegant inougD trivial siyieoi tue 
whole buildlt'g. tu sar nothing ot tue four mysteri- 
ous rucms wnich lead out of the prmcipal apart- 
ment, artj very suggestive. 

The lake waa then visited, with its specimens of 
boais ot all naiious, foraiiag a reaily valuable mu- 
seum ; the tamous sialue or the Saviour, by I>au- 
ueck^ir; ibeaiseual, witi^its niagnihoout ^olluctiou 
ol Oriental arms, tne best In Europe with the ex- 
C3pi.iou ot that uf Aladrid. 

One ol the curiosities ,of Tsarskoe is the Horse 
Asyium, wheie the imperial ckargers live in snug 
quarters when they are uo lunger fit for use. !Near 
the comfortable stables is the Cemetery, where the 
history of many a tamous steed may uo read in tac 
inscriptions on the lumb-stones. 

The visitors were, ot cuuise, conducted over the 
palace. The rooms which present tho greatest his- 
torical interest are tnose wuich were occupied by 
the i:<mperor Alexander 1., and wnich are snown 
exactly as he lett luem ; aod the chamber which is 
cousiue;ed as the grwatest cuiiosity is tue room lu 
wuica all tne walls are ol amuer. Bound the gar- 
deu in front of that partut the palace occupied by 
their Ali.jcsties is a lutie island in which more is a 
Kussian cottage, u garden, a cow-bouse — ,n short, a 
complete es>aolishmeut ou a dimiuutive scale, ur- 
laug.'d tor ibe amuaemuul of tho Duouess of Eaiu- 
buigh when she was a cn:ui." 



o o 
urthef war?, wtu^o exore thai) S.SOu.OOU.OyO irancs. L at tne day alter lua atxival at ^r. Skene's house. 



TUB DEATH OJf' AlK. U£0U(JE SMITO:. 
Two or thruo additioual facts relative to the 
death of Air. George bmitb, near Aieppo, are givsn 
by tue Levant Herald lu its issue of the 4 h ius.: 
"Mr. amith lelt Coustautiuople aboat slxmou:hs 
ago ior Bagdad, with a firmau of autuorizatiau irom 
the Porte, being accumpaui..'d by J!dx'. M.%taewsou, 
formerly uf toe Ecglisb Poa^ Odice here, as general 
tsaistau:. From Bagdad he proceodcid to tho As- 
cyriau sitei^ but iu constrqueuce, parilv of the 
distnrbed slate of the country, arising out 
of coQiinotion among the iiumad triucs, *aud 

more especially ou accooat of tho pieva- 
U'Uce of plague, he was uuaole on this ocCuSiou 
to lolluw up his exuloratlons with auy practical 
result. These causes brought the expc-aitiou to a 
staudatill; and as Mr. Siuiili was sutfcriuij serious- 
ly in health, he at leL.th reiuctauih duterimned to 
return lu England, with the hope of resuming his 
efforts at a more propiuous opuoriuuuy. M:. 
Smith had ex,jerieuced veiy bad results from 
having had twice tu endure all the 4ucoavenieuce 
and danger of a strict Asiaiic quarantine, and when 
be left Bagdad tor Aleppo he was pbyDicaliy v«eak, 
tUough iu good courage aud spiiitii. Tuejodrney, 
howuver. told severely upon bim, and ho broke 
down aud was unable tu riue any longer when be 
had reached a viilage called Esla<,jie. fitteeo miles 
on this side of the Euphrates, auu seventy miles 
distaut from Aleiii^o. Leaving a servant with ilr. 
Smith, Mr. Mafniewson puoued <ju to ootain as- 
sistance at Aleppo, whuher Mr. Smith vras evtiDtu- 
ally conveyed in a liiier. He was, unhappily, so 
exhausted that be died at 6 o'clock iii the evening 



CHURCHES AND MINISTERS. 

— ♦ 

HOME AND FOREIGN EVENTS. 

Rov. L. K. Janney and Rev. A. Gilrutb, of 
Ohio, nave gone to reinforce the Methodist mission- 
aries in South India. 

Major Cole and his family, of Chicago, are 
attracting great attention in Eogland. whore they 
are holding revival services. 

Sunday and Monday, Oct. 22 and 23, have 
been set apart as days ot prayer for Sunday- 
Bchools tbroughoijt the world. 

It has been generally thought that tho late 
Bishop Janes w^s wealthy. The fact ia he leaves 
but a xmali sum for Lis family. 

Rev. George Leidy is tbo oldest minister of 
th,- (rermau Reformed Church. He w is ordained 
in 1819, and is now eighty-lour years old. 

The Disciples of Christ, a numerous body of 
Baptists in the West, will hold their annual General 
Convention at Richmond, Va.. beginning 0:t. 17. 

Tho Toronto Mail says there are 1,150,000 
Catholics in the Domini. >n of-Canada, and 24i,0l6 m 

the M.iritinio Provinces, or nearly half of the total 
tiopulation. 

Kev. Dr. Sevrall 5. Cutting, for several years 
the efficient Secretary of the Baptist Board of Edu- 
cation, has become Secretary of the Baptist Home 
Mission Socieiy. 

Ifcv. Joseph G. Binney, D. D., Missionary to 
Rangoon, Burmah, who ii visiting this country in- 
tends to return to bis work, tnough he is more than 
seventy yeaia of age. 

Dr. Butler has raised a large sum of money 
in the Uuited States tor printing evangelicU litera- 
ture in the Spanish language, and returns shortly 
to his missioQ work In Mexico. 

The American Baptists established missions 

in Sweden twenty-five years ag ■. They have now 

in Swed»n 234 churches, 10,500 members, and 16,500 
SunUay-.'ichool scholars. 

The Methodist Episcopal hymn-book is under- 
going another rovision. It is hoped that it will be 
shortened. It ontiins over a tbotisaud hymnif, 
many of which, it is said, are never used. 

Bishop Levi Scott, of Dover, Del., by right 
of seniority, becomes the Presiding Bishop of the 
Methodist Episcooal Church, in place of Bishop 
Jaues, deceased. He was elected in 1852. 

The venerable Dr. Tholuck, the great German 
tbeolotian, has become veiy feeble, though his 

mind remains clear. Ha is living a retired life with 
his wiie, expecting death. He Is •eTeniy-ei.iht. 

The Christian Reformea Church, whioh 
separated from the Eetormeii Church of Holland iu 

1834, has now about thr^e hiin tired and fiftv congre- 
gations, 300 ministers, and 4J,000 commuuicauis. 

Bishop Andrews, of the Methodist Episcopal 

Church, held recently an annual c>>«fCT«pc9 iu Nor- 

at country, 
z Oo.-. 22. 

Bishop Cheney, of the Reform^fe Episcopal 

Church, anu uucas the foUowiug sianding com- 
mitteeforthe Third District: Tne Jurisdiction of 
the Eist— Epv. William T. Sabine, Rev. J. Howard 
Smith. D. D., Mr. James L. Morgan, Mr. W. 
Schariff. 

The Seventh-Day Adventi^ts, one of the 
most vigorous brauches of the Milennial faith, have 
been holding a great camp-meering at Lansine', 
Mica. Sept. 24 1 is estimated thai 10.000 
pi.Mipls were on the grouncs. As many as 400 were 
forward lor juayers at one .ime. 

Dr. Herzog, the :^st Bishop of the Old 
Catholic Church in SwRzpriaud, was to have been 

con:^pcrated Sept. 10, but the minister at Lolothnrn, 
where the consecration was to take place, was, for 
some nnacconniable reason, reiused lor toe pur- 
pose. It is said Herzog will be cousecraced in Ger- 
many. 

Lieut. Cameron, who has been credited with 
saying spiteful things of missionaries aud mission- 
ary work in Africa, says he has been greatly mis- 
understood. Tne worK of the niissiouary he es- 
teems as one of the noblest callings. WQut he did 
arge was that care sauuld be usea in selecting mis- 
sionaries. 

A remarkable movement has begun among 

the Spani.'jh Jews at Oraa, Algeria. Mr. Beoohel, 

an evangelist, writes that bis churcli, which holds 
auout turee huadreil. is thronged every Souday by 
Jews, who have become interoslel in the doctrines 
ot Chiistianity, and publicly proiessed their deaire 
to be insirucied in them. 

The Presbyterian Board of Foreign Missions 
has in Us employ nearly nine hundred Mission- 
aries, helpers and teachers, with 8,567 communi- 
oauts, and i3 501 scholars iu day and boarding 
schools. The missions are among tue Indian tribes, 
in M'jxico, South America, Africa, India, Siam, 
China, Japan, Persia and Syria. 

Kev. O. L. Leonard, an evangelist from the 
United States, is laboring in Irelaud with good re- 
sults. For three weeks he conducted services m a 

largo tent measuring 150 by 30 feet, pitched bv 
Uuited ETaugelistic Services committee, in one of 
tne very low districs of Dublin, known as " Tho 
Liberties." There were mai.y conversions, includ- 
ing a number of Roman Catboxics. 

Kev. Dr. Deau, who has been a missionary 

for forty-two years lu Siam aud China, is paying a 

short visit to this country. In a speech at Bosion, 

recently, be said he " had been permitted to plant 
seven ciiurches. We have now at Bangkok and the 
surrounding country six charches, 4J0 disciples, 
seveu niliv-' pre.iChers. They were now uudor the 
care of a womau wuo had been over ihirty years iu 
the fleUi, auJ who was the only one speaking the 
Chinese language." 

Florence McCarthy, formerly pastor of a 
Baptist Church in Chicago, prints a letter in the 
daily p.tpers of that city asking the Christian peo- 
ple who may attend Moody's meetings to pray for 
him [McCarthy. 1 Six months ago, he writes, he re- 
nounced his beiidf in the Christiaa religion and re- 
tired irum the miniHtry. Siuce then no prayers 
have been oflored in his behalf. Having yet an un- 
defined feeling that there is great truth somewhere 
iu the Christian religion, he asks that pra\ ers be 
ofiored that he may regaia his faith lu Christian 
character. 

It is Slated that a chapel belonging to the 
first ages of the Cath ilic Church was discovered 
lately iu the excavations in the Virioal Hill, at 
Borne. Its interior walls are covered with lre»co 

paintings, renreseotiug the Saviour on an elevated 
throne, dresseil m a tuuic and ' pallium, the face 
beardless, the aspect voiitntnl. seated in the midst 
of the Twelve Apostles, who are also seated, and in 
similar costume, with saudals ou their leel, each 
holding a volume m bis left hand, the Divine Mas- 
ter having two castets flllod, uot with volumes, but 
scridls (the books of the Qid and New Testameni) 
placed beside hi.s feet ; his head alone being encir- 
cled by the nimous. S ipposed date, tne laiter part 
of the fourth or beginning of the flith centary. 

Tho Philadelphia Baptist .-Social Union has 
provided for a coarse of leciurss aa follows : 

Oct. V2 — "Great Cities as Centre's of Inflaence." 
Kev. W. W. Everts, D. D., Chicago, 111. 

Vet. 19 — '•Chiistiaiis at tue Po.ls." Rev, Lem- 
uel Moss, D. D., President luuiana Stale Uui- 
versity. 

act. 26— "Hints Conceniiug Leisure Hours." 
Prot. Truman J. Backus, of Vassar College. 

The last turee lectures at tne First Church, as 
follows: 

Hov. 2— "Ba.xiness Integrity." Rev. Henry G. 
Weston, D. U., President Crozer Tueological Sem- 
inary. 

^'ov. 9 — "Division of Labir in Church Work — 
Based uu Diversity of Gius." Kev. Wayland Hoyt, 
Bo.->tou, M 3s. 

Aou. 16 — "Capital and Labor — In the Light of 
Chiiaiianuy." Key. J. M. Gregory, LL. D., Presi- 
dom Illinois luddsiiidl Collese. 

The Ti-ibune of Denver, Col., reports a 
most shucking occurrence ut Comerus deck, fifteen 
miles Irom Denver. It declares that one of a baud 
ot Mexican 'peuitentei" was cruc.fied. Crosses 
about twslveor filteon feet high had been erectsd 
at intervais of porhips eight hnndreJ feet apart. 
Tuere wero lour. Oue of these bore the legend, 
"yiii DomiiiUJ jrustra.'^ (Lest God be with you all 

is vaiu ;) aiio.uci, ' .i^a paadun en credo " (fullering 
by laitu,) and still .^..o:iit-i. aciiiauy p:.intea in 
blood, ' Umiiia ad J^ei Oioriuin. ' (A.I thiugs lo the 
glory of Lr.nl. y hi ch pai.ii-jiK- vy.,ro simply a pair uf 
luu luiuuesi kiud ot &. i^ ui'awers. Tai:^, wixu the 
tne ma8», was lUeir ouiv atiirc. They were lormed 
lu groups ot luur or hve pcui.e:its, aud six or seven 
atieuauuls. \y heu discovered the.r b.iciis were 
luuuiiig with blood iroul injuries which tuey had 
intlicled ou theiu.iclvej'. Several ol ihem dloa Irom 
lo'S ul o.ood, ituu It Was Sail! lUatuueoi tue tanaiics 
was actually nai.od to a ciO:5S. 

At tho late maoCmg ol the British Associa- 
tion for ihe Adviuc-..'.xicnc ot Si;ieuce a payer was 
read bv Kov. Aaron B iz.icotcou " Slaver i' Siiil Ex- 

isung." lie said : "' Slavery now prevjileJ la 
Turkey, Egypt, Persia, Tunis, Morocco. Maja^ias- 
cii', Por..ugaI, Attghaoistiin, in ihs dum.iiious uf 
the Seyyid ot Ziuzioar, aud among the difierent 
tribes ot EiSD ana Ceuital AtVica. Poriugjlhad 
the will, but not the power, tu abolish slavery 
turoughout her terriiorius on ibe suuth-east coast 
of Atrica. Spain stood alone among the Chiisiiau 

nations ol £.irupe in resuluiely maintaining slav- 
ery in spite uf tre.iiv obligaiious witu (ireut Brii- 
uiu. lu Asia, wiih the excoiitiou of British India, 
slavery was cu-exleusive with Islamism. Iu the 
Uuitea States slavery jnd Itie slave iradn bad been 
utterly alulished, but they still lingered in Soutu 
Ameuca 1 1 the Euipiie of Brazil, where 1,500,000 
Alricaus were hcid in bondage, ihe annual drain 
ou Airica cui. sequent on slavery was estimated at 
l.OOU.UOO, aud It was ompuled that at the lowest 
70,000 Airicaus crossed the sea into Slavery; and, 
accepting Dr. Ltvingsioue's usiimaieof the number 
uiassaored U.v slave-nun ters, and punsbiiig un the 

route to the aea-coaat, it wai> computed that pot less 



than 500.000 were 
human traffic." 



annually sacnfloed to the In- 



ANOTUER WALKING TEIF. 

Tc thr. Editor of tht Aeic- ForJt Timet; 

In May. 1S75, my health bad rnn down to 
such a degree that I decided to try the effect of a 
few days in tho open air in Central and Northern 
Kew-,)ersey. and In Pike County, Penn.. along the 
Delaware River, as a restorative. The plan I 
finally decided upon w.ts to go to Lake Hopat- 
cong by the M rns aud Essex Enilroad, walk 
thouce by way of Greenwood Like to the Erie 
Kiilwav at Monroe, to go thence by cars to 
Port Jervi.s, and to walk down the Delaware River 
to the Water Gip, doing this in a week, and re- 
tumin;: by the Morris and Esspx Railroad. 

The day of departure arrived; "no postpone- 
ment on account of the wsAther" was rho order of 
the day. 1 was tired of the town, ai.d'Svould have 
been satisfied to spend a day in looking out at the 
raiu frona the window of tt country tavern rather 
than stay longer nmong the bricks and mortar; so 
nny friend, Mr. C. W. B., my fompaoion in 
the walk of the previous i"all from Lake Mobonk 
to Cooperstown, as sketched in my last note in 
The Times of Sept. 3, 1876, and I start- 
ed one cloudy morning for the earliest 
Morri.s and E^sex tr.ttn. Oar oVjective point 
by rail was Drakesville, about iit'tv miles from 
Xew-Tork Ci'v, whence we walked along the rail- 
road to where l^ crosses the M)rr:s Canal at Ship- 
ping Port. Turning' then ti the north we followed 
the canal and eauern shore of the lake, in rain most 
of tho time, to Wtllia'ms' Lake View Hoaso, where 
wo got di'iner. We 'afterward walk<'d on to 
Brlght's Hotel, at Woorisport. at the nortlieni end 
of the lake, an eai»y day's Walk of about nine miles. 
At Shipningporr we wereablptostndy the immense 
pow r exrrted by the tori. ine wheel In cai vying 
canal-boats up and down an inclined plate, about 
three hundred feet lone, with a fall of at lea<it 
seventv-flve teet. The motive power. pi,iced half- 
way down the slope, is supplied by a wheel with 
four arms, each about four or five t»'et long ; the 

otienings throngh which the water escaofis at the 
ends ' f the arms, Rre 3 inches widf by 11^ inches 
verticil length. The streams of wafer rushing ont 
ot these openings Kupply force enimgh to eas ly pnll 
up, bv means of a wire-rope, the loadei boat, 
sitting in a fiame railed a cradle, .which runs 
on imn rails. To one who does not anderi^tand 
the pfipc'ples involved it may bo simply called in- 
coipp,-«»hensihle. 

Lake Hooatcong is a beautiful sheet of water, 
suiienor in nrtny resnecrs, us It seems to me, 
to Greenwood Lake. It h&* many headlands and 
bays; nowhere is there 8»pn a long straight- 
away stretch as when one stands at either end of 
Gr'^enwood and inoks north or south. Ir will 
scarcelyserve for a regi'ts. with which I see Green- 
wood is threatened, but for qui t beauty bow far 
snjienor ! On it» surface one may go on vi'yages of 
di3covery ; there are uooks and c ir ers t • expiore; 
on the eRst and south there are aitract've-lo.iking 
farms and dwellings ; rin the w^s' there are 
stretches of unbroken forest. Iu the afternoon the 
clouds blew off, .ind we had a most brilliant 
hi ur on the luke during a row at the 
iiirrhern end^-^The warm, snll air of th- 
Spring afternijon, the c-ion tless western sky. 
ths sullen and slowly retre.iting masses of 
heavy cloud, the soft delicffie young f>liage, the 
iirowih of wbich we could alfno«t imagine we saw, 
the glassv surtace of the hike, n fleotiMgsunand^ky 
and cion-a and evei y ahap^ ot tree and bu h unrt 

leaf a >ove it, the evoiiiogj/ songs of the hir is, 
ri j licing, like ourselves, "in this kinuiiesi 
aspect of natnre — was not this wealth 
aud health for ono tired of city life I were 
not we reading extravagant rewai-d for 
our eaily rising and traveling by rail, and nine 
miles of luu' dy walking % 1 thio;{ <"U - tisU was ex- 
ceptitmally well timed. In the dusk ot the evening 
we neatd the song of the whip-u<«r-will — a long 
umam'ltar. and, therefore, a welcom- sonnd. 

In tue neigntiorhoort there are s -vi-ral iron mines 
from some ol which a railroad runs to a point on 
the lake near the Like View House, where canal- 
boats receive freight for the onthide wor d. 
Passing by sr.me of these mines next day, our walk 
took us to Miiton to dinner, atttr wu.ch, going 
act OSS the fields aud oyer & small munniain we 
reached Green Lak' , a pretty piece o( water, siii.i- 
lar in apouarauce to (jrieeu wuod Lake, clear and 
deep, with wild, sieeo hills or moiiutaius rising on 
the east and west. A row on the lake ano a swim 
in 11 prepared us for a second dinner, the 
best meal we .i had had since starting, 
at the Green Lake Hotel, situated at ihe nortnern 
end of the lake. Xhree "miles more, (twelve for the 
day,) dowuhi.l, by a good road, brought ns to New- 
Pouadland, where, at Brown's Hotel, we were very 
well accommodated. This was my aecoud visit. 
My firsi, described some lime ago in one of the 
former notes of this series, was on a chill November 
evening, alter several miles of hard walking. 
Ran and snow outside; a laughing, roar- 
lug, warming, scorching, horning, but most hos- 
pitable open tire ot logs of season^ wood, 
kept well piledjip. within; an excellent supper, 
taole furniture tJlean and v.ands govd, whyshculd I 
nut recollect it with pleasure and hope to walk into 
it again at the eud ot some iuture day's tiamp ? 

i enjoyed the view from my window next morn- 
ing, iu the distance, to the notth, across the val- 
ley of the Pequanuck, roee small mouutains, wlid 
and rugiied, by which, among tbr fty larms, we 
were to go during the day on our way 
to Greenwood LaiLe. After a fine day'e 
walk, a little waim, eleven miles of walk- 
ing and thrwo of nding evening luund as at 
tbeWindcrtjcre House, at the uortn eud of Gieiu- 
woud, under the huspitable care of Mr. Jenlu»^. 
The next lorenoon was warm, and, as we were in 
pleasant quarters, we were lu no bnrry to leave, 
but leave we aid alter diuner, and uncer a warmer 
sun tor halt the way than was agreeaul.-, we walked 
Itiiurely along the eleven miies of road to Monroe, 
0^1 the Erie, where, at the Is'aiioual Hotel, we found 
tair accommodations until the morrow, when we 
wont by rail to Port Jervis. There, iu the after- 
noon I ascended the two hiiis that overlook 
the town irom mo uorta. Tue view is exteuelve 
and line. Tho Delaware is SLen to the 
west, tuo Neversink to the north-east, the Junction 
01 the two tu tue suuth and easi.ana the turthex prog- 
ress of the Delaware aud the village A Moutezuma 
toward the soutu, the Sbawangauk Mouutains tu 
the east, up tue side of whicu tho Erie Railway can 
he traced by the m.,viug iratu^ Wuou too loiiage 
chau^^es, the view of the-se mountains must be flue. 
Ou tiiem, in Oo;obei, 1874. 1 had a graiid effjoc of 
light au.i color, oi which I have alreaoy written. 

Tne air was uor, hazy, aud oppressive, and about 
sunset a sharp tbuuder-sturm raged for a snore 
time, cooling the air and laying tae dust. By the 
evening rrain Mtt88r^. L. and S. joined as from 
New-York ior the rest oi the walk— to the Water 
Gap. Nixt morning B. decided" to return home, 
and the lurec uthers, crossing the Delaware Kiver 
ut 7-50 by the suspousiun bridge that was su mucn 
oamagou by tho ice a tew lUontbs betort — it was not 
yet luliy repaired — au* pussmg through the 

ocfore-meuriOLitd village of Muutezuma, walked 
down tlio valley oy a good road to Miltord, 
and tiifuce to Dugaiau's Pcriy, reacting 
Dr. Fuimcr's High P„ii8 Hotel, sixtoea miics, 
at 1 • Clock. We louud pleasant quarters, and do 
clued to spend tue night, and next morning taka 
the e.>riy etiige toBu.iukiii, ibiiieou miles, wnence 
a walk of luunetu miles wouxd take us to the 
Water Gap. It was uo part of my purpose to sea 
how many miles I could get ovtir lu a d»y. I had 
lett home out id health, and wanted to uuild my- 
self up, and not pu.l uowu. 

Ou the west side uf the Deiawara Siver 
steep biuffs rise, down which the siieams frum 
tne country to the westleau in bold and beauiilul 
tails una cascades, most of them cuntaiuiug catck- 
able brook rrout, out fljwiug, we were to.tt, through 
a laud ot laiilesuakes. Tue Sawkid Eaixs, 
near^ 'Milfortl, were said to be sspeciaiiy 

utiractive, as also the BusnKill. further on our way, 
but we bad uot time lor eitner. We weut to see 
High Pails ill the aiieruoon, about one mile west of 
the noiei, and found toem wdl worih a nsit. . We 
also viaited "Soau Trough" Palls, so called 
Uecaaae the water ru^nes iu a foaming current 
dowa a crevice in the rock — a prosaic name lor a 
beautiful object 1 In the early Sammei, when the 
ihouodendrous are lu bloom, inis ci^uuiry must bo 
extraoraiuarily atiracuvo. Tuj liy-usaer cau iheu 
navc flue sport. s' 

N; xt moruiug we took the early stage, and a^out 
8:;iJ loacued i,usiiKili, tuirteen miles, Jrom which 
p.,rul we were lu waiii to tne SVaier Gai), lourtseu 
luilos lurcher on. 'I'ue dav was hot. out tue scenery 
was lu.erestiug. Our road lett the river valley antl 
carried us ou uigu uiiL-, o.;caalonully geitiu/ views 
Oi the liver. Aoout 1:J0 we leacneU lOu G.xtJ aud 
the ii.!lia.i"iny House, where we Were able 
to clcau u^ oumortuut. Tiio houao already 
uad a good number ot gnosis. Alter 
dinner two ui us wa.ia.<-d to Pu spect niil, the view 
Hum who b, lookK g oacii ovur ibo » »j wu hud 
come, and uuwh Uitu llio Gap, la Ver, flue. A cuoit 
llLue t'ciorc b ocluc^ we tooK uu: humcwai'd-uuuud 
itaiii, vXi-ecLiiig lo Uo IU New iToixt ojtore 10. out 
an acclucat delayed us uvar.y lureo UoUis, casiu^ 
a iiresume ehuiUg or an uiuerwiso very pioaeaxil 
day. 

Oa tnis trip I had a pUasure that has been denied 
mo lu lu \ i,iu.;r \v..ixiko, Gou. rau\ I uav'v u eu lu 
the COdu ly iu the laie Suiumor or Jl'jIi. WUeo iJd 
buus ttio ollUcr alien, or auscul. lu Ma,., uoWeVel' 
lucli- sou*: w*s at l.s l-Wue.cs,. auti two .-i.lil s^-^aU..-,' 
li.liage Ol tUo lorest trees euubled u.-! tu^i \' to se,i 
ih-m. I saw ma^y mole thau I kxicW, out ot all, 
lljo most Weicmc, tbo OLO i. s.tw add 
bcixid with muat delx^u;, wis the lii.io 
liiortu wren; evcvyivucro w..- bo.ird him 

siJiiiUi;, auu aaw the active iitilu lellow, as lull ut 
Courage as he was ot soug, a0..uth.iufles ana ou lue 

li-UC 



THE NEWEST SWLNDLE. , 

MOCK AUCTION HORSE AND CAJU 
Ml AGE SALES. 

W0BTHLES3 ANIMALS BOLD AS CKLEBRATSB 
TROTTERS-^BOGUS PEDIGREE^ OlVEK— 
PROMINENT CITIZENS WHOSR KAMS^ 
HAVE BEl^af FRAUDCLEHTLT CSED— 
DEVlCliS TO ATTRACT PURCHASERS. 

The large number of strangera in the City 
has sli.uuiated the m<^ auction horse salM, and 
there are nine now in fall blast the aalM bciag 
carried on nearly evary dv. Thev advertlM ax- 
tcnsively, and use numerous devices to attriMt par 
chasers. A favorite method is the as* of the oaaaas 
of prominent persons either deeeaMd or baok* 
rupt as the owuers of the property. Anonr tba 
names recently used were those of Henry C-vira 
Daniel Drew, Jav Gould, J. B. DoreiLat, WaltCC 
Gamer, W. H. Aspinwall, Lester J. Astor, Geern 

A. Sherman. James £. Howlaod, W. £. &ao««relt, 
James A. Peckbam, J, W. Irapbagen. u. Stftdiar 
James L. Monteith, J. W. Orinnell. and G. H. 
Jerome. To make the notice appear genniu 
thwy always wind iip either 'witb the nam* of aa 
assignees or executor, wblcB ia^i>f mmtm, fictitioaa. 
The assignee •! Henry Clewa was Kiven aa D. Gil- 
oert Bilmoot, Daifiel Drew's aa H. O- Keonard, J'. 

B. Doremns' as C Jarles &. Darling. Tua sale* are 
invariably advertised to take place io the privat* 
stable of either the aeceaaed or the binkrapt XlWM 
stables are located in laahionmble naiglibJrtwwms, 
are kept in excellent order, and hare evarv appaar- 
ance ot beine the stables of wealthy Kantlemea. 
The principal ones wher,p the swindling aaloa taka 
place are located as follows: No. 115 Eiat Twaotr- 
aecond street, a few doors from St. Panl's W. S. 
Church ; No. 8 West Thirtieth street, totir daon 
from Fif-h avenue; No. 57 East Thirty-third atnat 
No. 24 East Seventeeotk sirect, ia the tear «f 
Drew's mansion; Noa. 11 and 13 W«at TweKtT' 
entb street. No. 112£aatTwBn'y-aeTMtaatraait tf*, 
31 East Twelfth street, and at the oorsar of LaCkt* 
ette place and Foarth street. The aactioaacR aiv 
Cbailes C. Dufi, W. B. Nelson, O. W. Jeakiaa, and 
Wiluam Burst. The aoctionews ara by lav ffaa* 
pelled to piaoe their name* at th* taaad <A tba a4* 
veriisement of sale, bat ttaia U viol *t«d every day, 
and it is only occasionally that their nam*a appaar 
at all, and then tbey are in a positaoa vhar^ (hv^ 
are uot likely to be seen. 

Bogus pedigrees are given, and tba aame daaarift 
tion 18 usea for difierent horse* at varioos etablaa. 
The very fast tiotticg borse Midsieht aold at Ko. ft 
West Thirtieth street i* caUad the Terjr taat trot- 
ting horse Ouward at No. 115 East Twenty-aeeoaA 
street. The very fast brown geldinc Monitor bat 
c omes the very fast trotting golding KovalJotaa; 
the very fast trotting mare Stella becomea tha racy 
handsome sorrel mare Victoria, and the very •!•• 
gaot and fast-trotting selding Yellow Jacket b^ 
imes the very elegant and iast-trottine gelduc 
Kegalator, as follow*: 

so. 8 WEST THIKTISTB ■ ,»0. 115 CAST TWE 

sTKBtx. oso rraE«T, 

Very eieg.>iit and fasti Very k.vkaih sxid 



r ousii -s aioug luc-r ,aa. Ho is iUi uid ac- 
<]u.iiij..iiuce : as iiiUi: a„o as 1 cau rtco.lecl 1 Mueur' 
uim. X>ui over auu uver agaiv did x slop to ad- 

miie hiui aud listen lo uis cuceiy sung, and wouder 
how BO .i.uch suuud codxd roix su cxeaxiy oui ur aO 
8mj.li a buoy. <!• S. P. 

iNoTii.— .\ finer trip for the Fall would be lo bOiiin at 
Mout.e, wfcla. ti,en-je lO vv codo,^ori, o.i tne ucrin end 
of La e llopaicoug, going liy Auwiouutilauu. Ureen 
l^uke, ai.d .iiuiou. At n oodsijort (ji t a Ouat, aud ruw 
o.-wu io tue tiiige View House, a.iout four uiilea. Tnis 
W..! show enough of tbeliae; rcturu aud \Tiilk oy 
. 4) rta to Ogdeuaourg, on the .MioUud Kaiiroad. Take 
a .rain lUuro lor L'uiouville or V^eBt Town, from which 
It will be a uue walli. across the .iliawauguuit Muuu- 
talus to I ort Jcrvi.-. Tuis is 1 ss tnau siXtt mi.es uf 
walking.! ur, uuiead oi stopping at L'iuouviue or \Ve»t 
lowu, it ^^ould be ea y to to ou uy rail to Miatlletuwn. 
and txiKre take au f.iie tiaiu t < fort Jervis. Tfho Water 
^i:p ia lortv -three miles sjuiU ot fott .lervlS. If time 
were short, ono might walk to tringman's Ferry, 
■eveutem mixes; cross the river there, aud iwala to 
JiraoahvUle, niixe mllea, and taat* the .Uorris aud Jjlsses-t- 
JitaU'oud for Mcw-^urxw 



truttioa gtrliing i'el.ow trot. 1 Iff geldio^ BctKoiatot. 
Jacket, stred itj Vvalkiil sired by (S'^iL^ixl Chief 1m 
Lhii't, he by old Hamole- bv old UaiBoleto.:iau ; pea- 
touiau ; pedigree ot dauj igree of dam ankuoan; ta 
uuKooA-n; is lu^ hands I.1S4 bind* bign, 7 yeazs 
hijfii, 7 years olu ; f baa ui'i ; has trot.^»l mtrvKUi 
trotted several races isuder race* undt-.r the aouva 

the above name , irp teJ name ; trotted at Catakiil 
at Catskul tht* 8a.i<m;:r, this "nmmer, beatiag Oia- 
beatiug David, i b^ulry -rid, Cuarley Ed*aii, a<jA 
bdsaO, aud six otbcra in six uiuets in '^i^^ Ss:3fl^ 

2:3A '2:3d. 'JtJS'a; he is •^-.AZ^i-. he is the baatfeo- 
tbe fine .t gentiemaa's road th m^tn's road uorse u> tata 
bu.se iu tuls oily ; has a City ; naa a boio, re*olaie 
Tery oold, dasbias way ofway at goios; ia good 
go!u>!; guud ^iaied ; uue&g^ited; does not poll oc 
not pull or snt; en oe shy; can ue otivaa at 
d.iven witaaslact rein at sueed «itb a ' alk«k rata, 
speed, aud as never be<-B aoa has nev^r been aeatca 
Uea ten down the road tu a down tne road to a top 
top wagou : is aalexor auy-|wa^oD : ia saiCe for aoy- 
body to drive; IS a good Oouy ro drive; U 
poie b> rse, and is wari ant- pole boise. and is 
Ou. sound and xxud. Kn souiiu i^aa kind. 

Tne legiiimate horse aaeiiuoeer* iUtnoone* the 
swindle in the severest terms, aod say that it ia aal 
only iBJurmg their basin***, bat is bortuic the ia- 
tereat which gentlemen take in hocatfldata. The 
horses purchased tor ' theae aalea are tb* 
must common kind of atoek. "failroadeca" asd 
horses from Ball's Heaa are deaicd np, (ivcA aa 
eziraordinarv pedifrec^ aoa then aold for faa^ 
prices. One of the aactiouecrs adver.iaed Heather- 
bloom tor sale with a record of bettar tbaa 2^30, aad 
It was knocKed down tor fSOO., "Sow this very aaaa 
borse was purchased as a coamaa itorse at a lasiti- 
mate sale for |100. The real HeatbeiMooas coaid 
aot be bonght lor $7,000. Another hota* waa aulA 
bva weU-known dealer withont a caaiaatee te 
158. and it was pnrcbaaed by ooe of tbe awiiMlIeca, 
who called it M-Jor Allea, and he sold it tor tIM. 
The auctioneer Doff is eaid to have aold a obaauat 

mare three times and realised over eight hnadred 
dollars by the trau*acnoDa It wa* bought bv one 
of Stewart's men for fSDO, bat ftuouig toat be had 
beeu duped he took ii. to a regular aaenoi) uoaa^ 
where It brought (140, Duff being tbe parehsgar, 
wno resold it tor ^la. 

Horses oiiiig as high aa tLSOO which are not worth 
more than- (ilSO. l.'utt ourvuasers wnea taey dad oat 
tuat tbey ate " stuck '' sumetiiufaB send tae.a to a 
regular auciijn-rtHim to be sold on t-:eir acooaot, 
and endeavor 10 get tbe swiodiin.; aactiJneera to - 
pav the aiffcreiice. Tae sutforer* are mosuy eoon- 
trymeu wnu think tbey kuuw a great deal absat 
hulsefiesh, and believe that they are stealing auine- 
body's trotter when they buy oue of tbe our»e* pa* 
up tur sale. A gendeman ltx>ni Cleveland, atoppiag 
at tne Pitta Aveiiue Hotel, wa« bitten atone of lueae 
sales to the extent ol |1,^0. He paroha*ed a hurae 
witn a fi.ue ude. repivauuted to oe ^at-cla*s ia 
every teopecu Uu showiug it t* a friend be waa 
told th it It was but worth $2i>0. aod be beoaiae ao 
dis.;usted that he auld it aud went to tbe aootluneei 
la a imiiless euaeavur to get hi* money back. 

Mr. iirig.^Si ot tne Fiitn Aveuue Hotel slabiaa, 
*a d that be is ireqaeuuy requested by the pre 
piletora of the hotel to go to ixxe aaciioueer* with 
guests who have been taicen in at the sale*, and la 
several iDstaucee he ha* obtaiafd reurets*. He 
went witu a geuileoian uie oiber day who bad pur- 
chaseO a huiite, but wouid not take it unitis* iba 
auctioneer wuuld show bim au order irum me 
executors to seiL He went to the Maryhai'aeJtet^ 
ana tne anctumecr not l>eing preDar<»d to preduoa 
any oraer reiunded the money. Taey have a bar- 
vest now, be said, aud a Kuud many wen wilt retnrm 
to tbe West wxxn trotcexs woicn will turn eat to be 
wui tiilecs. 

These auctioneers also ad venlaabeddea, aalea of 

valuable Si^oc^ sent Irum tne atoca larma ut Well- 
known oreeuers, wUxcb are likewiae ticiiuooa. Mr. 
Van Tasecl, of Van Tassel dt Kearney, the well- 
ktiQvru aaoiioneers in Satt Tuirteeutn atreet, said 

yesterday : '* X'oa oanuoi. oondema chia swinai* toa 
strongly, and 1 wouuer that lite newapapera orCiCy 
authorities have not exposed theee fictitioaa aaiea 
belore, as they have beeu going on at Intertal* fur 
many moutos. Xoev are doiug a tashius boaineaa 
uow, with all the Centennial visitors lu t^^wa. Xbera 
ate several men iu the twiuole-^uS 
Horst, Nelson, aud Jim Imug, whe t« 
uue of tue backora. Tuey have a BOiBbei 
ut aiables where taey *eli, and- the huraee 
that are uot eoid ou use uay are t«ken to a&othet 

stable and sold the next. Tbey sell horse* for a 
tew aunured dollars uuuer the names of pcumiaeot 
trotters tnao are worth thousands uf dollar*. A 
hurse Was sold at Tweniy-socond street a few d«>'a 
ago tur {230 wuich, U it had been tbe rtial one, would 
be wui tu «5.000. auaugers, aeeinc tbe aaveruse- 
nieuts witu tue flowery pedictee, ihink they uave 
got a pr.ze ana leauiiy buy. Haory Clews' horsea 
are advertised fur *aie in Twtiniy-aeveutn siree|k 
aud uot oue ever belonged to hiiu. Daniel Dnw'a 
horses have t>eeu soiu twice, aud tue late £. J. 
SuaU'iiey's horses wore aovcrtieed ior sale last 
week, wuen it waa well icnowu tu<it the Judge had 
none.' 1 vi 

These anciioneers not only sell horses In tola 
way, but they sell cheap wagons also. They pu 
the name ot a well-kuuwn uakkJ uu a commoa 
waguu *ud got a uig piico for li. Iney buy LU«*s 
waguus at a mauuiac.oiy in Biooktyu aud at Am*»- 
bdij, aiass., ivr leas than ♦loO. They make a 
Bl'gut change, geueriiiv, in tue,ji*ve to eava tueat- 
suves. Tuus K. AL S.ivera ia changed to ii. AC. 
S.ivcru, J. B. Bxcws.cr lu J. 14. Bi-ewi«ter, VamDasec 
lu V,th Duz.n, Br:idicy. Prey Jt Coi to Bradley ft 
Priy or i.raiiiey Pr. y, Dusrubury ti. Nelsuu to Da- 
Bcuoury Neisuu. i'leqae-uiiy tnoy take au old 
plate irom a wagou aud piaoe it on one ut tueirs. 
Xue pi oiuiueiit ma<.ers oiieu go to the *a esand taka 
iiieii p.atcs uH MUeu ihey tuiuk any ot luem will 
tu ::oi.i. Tue lui.uwiu^ card* ate pab.isaad oy 
Brcwsier <x Co., ul Kr^ume street, a..d uy W. H. 
pia.v, ut the iaie hrm uf i>radiev, Pray & Co. 

fortas are cu'tltiuued against biLviug wagons or ear- 

iliig-s uuipottiuo tu havj ceeu luu^e by ^ra..tXc.v. xra/ 
^ .^ c. Ul j^xsa.ey X 1 r..y, wixhuut slricl i.,v<i<>c.gii;iuii 
ai> to M uctuei iney are geuuta.), a* certaia uiuc.upu- 
Iju.- peisuns iire uti'cruig. uoih at nrivaie *jL' ana at 
uuciiuu, t^e.ier..lijr in pxlVixte siau.os seemed l«txi^rf>- 
r.iriij lOi txic puxpuse. ii.lBriur jtuudii, do^Mammi ua 
llxv' au.jve uami., ox tuubc ui other repUtttOi* maaers, 
tu secure taic* at exuriiiuni prices. 

W^ILDKR B. PRAT. 
: Buvere of w^agooB are rantloned agalukt the dece|>. 
tiuu practiced uy uogds auuti*.iecis aud dealers, uhj 
oa.xiioax '• i.riv..t«) o.abiiB" vvorlbleas wagons ucaf> 
lug cudd.ei'Jeaod UixOie-plates ot nrea'slei k Ul aod 
o.uer weli-iiuuwu juauuiacturera 

BEl-WSTKB It oa - 

The "private atables," where tueae sales ol 
wa,.una taixe plM:e, are reported to bu at Noa. 1 and 
3 West Pi teeuLh street; Thirty-llr*t •creei, b» 
twt>eu 6ix.a aud bevauth aveuues; Thirtieth street, 
near bevdntb avenue, nod Nineteenth street, bei 
iwesn Sixtn and Sevento avenues. The Carriagi 
Mau ulacturers' Associauon will probably take legal 
means to break up the swindle. 

Cheap harucs?, mauulaciBred in NewJ'ereey, i| 
also palmed off, with the impriut of aach weU> 
known names as Dunscomb and Demorest. 

Air. Eatbrop, Cnief Clerk ot the Mayer** oifBoe, 
bus given orders to the Ordinance Police ta put a 
stop to the sales, and he say* that as aooa aa thl 
auctioneers violate tbe law they will be arreated ao< 
proceeded against. He naa a list of the aaol 

iljuid w.UJl keeu a sUaxp vatuii m ]itSBk 



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ffeiiliSMfelFW-^''^*^^"-^^----'* ■ ^.-!~--^^-'.M.^ £j,}>. 



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Jg^lU^gjoyh WjMb, ^nrSiKQ, ftjcfaycrer i, lim, — Cr^ Stpeel v 



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lysTBUOTipy. 

A tMttk tne for pareots ftnd goanltMUi 

0. §, mm ANB €(H.U€E fiiM€Tifly. 

ETerytbl:ts nboat achools. 

U. S. SCHOOL AND COLLEGE DIRECTORY, 

210 p»<'M with map aad Qlastrat-loiu of uhoola 
tre« at offl'-e ; bv mail for postage, 9 o«n«a. 

11.^. SCHOOL AHD COUEtE DffiEOmJtY. 

NATluNAL Sv UOUJCi BURH&a, 

T. (Oi'sswoara pq{Cknkt. 

Someatie B uilding. 14th at. a nd Broadway. New-York. 

-i? I - XULB. O. DA WlI^VA ' ~~" 

AND 
MRiii. AliBX. BRADFORD'S 

ffnnMrlT tfra. Oitdan Hoffin|kB'i) 9ncllali, Fceoflh. vaA 
G«niuu> boar iinir aad ter tohool tor ronnKltdiea and 
ediMren. with oaUsthento& Ho. 17 Woit asthst.. New- 
Tork. Reop na Sept. 25^ AQpUoatlooa OK^y bo mads 
Tjt letter or psrs^nalij', as abiva. 

K.;*. F^I^N r jpAAKOW. ••AUNT FANN V,»» 

will op'-n a achoo) Tor little uhil<lren of both sexea 
CD toa-lSia of J^ootenbar. at No. HO East 35th st. Hrs. 
Barrow wili 1)^ »t ^me (tern S to 6 f • M. Cirenlara 
'toot if cBJaueai^ 









intermediate 



1^ l5 



KM^unnr WAHai^v<^xoM 

COt^J^GIATB liNSTlTCTE. 

Va 40 WAja^lJiClTOX SQUAaB. JIKW-IOEK CITi; 

OBO. W. CLABKE, Pb. P., Prtno^t»l- 

ftvpajNapapils of all a«as for bjistaeia or oollefo, 

Adoponalts thlrtjr-foorth year Sept. 13. Circulars 

>t book at« tt^ and at tae Instttnte. 

. Nan. 32 aad 34 WmC 40tb St., 

VACnra KKSKSVOia H-fxS. i&Di;Ush. Preneb. imd 
i nnii Uay School fUtopeos sent. 37. 

puptos iiijUiTKO TO aiirriita. 

f class and private ciaas tor hojh 
KIM>KRGASTKiN IN <;aAKGB 0» 

mmn orahamar scih)ol. 

Ka 262 Madison at., 
Qetween 3ath and Sdtb sta. 
School hours, 9:30 A. M. to 2:30 F. M. 
The ra tep ot tuition have bee n rednced. 

f\lsA> COL.i>£4i>K ASD CONSCiayATURY 

M-f^f MUSK'. BlNOnAMTOJf, N. Y.— For yonnu 
•dl^s; S7a per qoarter. iuoliidins board, niitlon in 
btfc lah. Lacia, Greee. Italian, German, freoc^h, piauo, 
Rgao. Knitiir, KHnnastics. drawiog, palntiu«(: bsrp 
Ittaaoos ana etiquette a speciattr- Commences Sept. 
la Rev. K. A. f-A I'fciRSU.'l, A. M., President. 

VTELLsi COLLiKGE FOK Yl>LN«» UAPJSA, 
( ADItORA, CAYUGA LAKE, N. T. 

Vntl CoIletfWte Qoais), ItMJitioB onsorpasaed for 
be*nty and bealthtatoesd. rtlU^e is illscinzaUhed fot 
reflnemeut; rhn I'oliasro Is a hniua where p.tronte may 
wttb euttre confiduauo iocriut their djMiehti^rs. Term 
eosunencea 9«pt. 18. 1S76 Sena for cataloene. 

Rev. KDW^RO S. PitT-iBKS. President 

R8. RIGKYE'J^ »CHIOI>Li FOR TODSO 

ladiei, New-Brishton, otateo Island, offers, on 

■MXtecDte terms, the adirant<*gaa of a flrat-claas Oltr 

(ahocu; will reop->n Wednesday, fieot. 20; application 

BAT M made aitor Seot. 1. to 

*i;9 iilGBYE, »t Mrs. Rewton'*, 
Westervc-lt av., New-Brighton. 

SIRS. FRKDBKICK. JONSsON 

and 
mj»S AGN£!« L. JONES 

<sBli»ap>n thetr ftacliali, Freaeh. and Oerman Beard- 
' utaad J>aY school for youitK la'^iea aad obUdren at 
m- 1,3 East 31»cst., uu TiiUR^DAY, Fept. .:3. 



^^ 



mst* AYKES. 

Ko. 15 wesr 420 ax.. 

NKW-YORK, 

Win reop«a her English. French, ani German School 
V>r Tonng Ladies ami Children .MOSDAT, Sept. 18. 



^: 



y 



C A. 3IXl^C«i, 

ESOUSH AND CliASr^ICAl. SCHOOL FOB BOT6, 
Ko. 160 WMt 43d St. coraer 6th at. 

School boors. 9:30 A. M. to 2:30 P. M. 

(lirUTiilU.M'H <!lTKKIi r SJKifllMARY. NO. 

168 WtST 14 ra SX.— Knelisli French, and Oer- 
■•a aefaool tor Tuang ladles and children, inclnding a 
iacoeastnl kiudeirartui, reoaens t^ept. 21. L875. 

, i. F. MARTIN. Priucipal- 

ffr^M|i^XYEttSBT, Afl»Sl.-*TE» BY COJl- 
Det)-nt maaticra, will reopen her Boarding and Day 
avluKjl for -boys unier dtieen, atN^i. 102 West 29t:h St., 
anedoorfirom titb -ST., oa MO.SPaT, Sept. 25; day 
boaidera nrr ta4:en to the Park after an early dinner. 

8NN.«*\"L.VA.\1A iVill.lrAAV ACADEHY, 

fhfster, Penn. oueoa ^epc 13.— Cirll easdoeeTian. 
ttMB e).<as ca, a>>d KngUAii ihorvaaal/ taixht For oir- 
nu«n apply to O. M. BvjQiiiir, Ssa . No. I NaataosU, 
iew-Jtorlc. ui to U.>L Tiirti>. dl aI'T; t^reAJianl;. 

T|t>'«YB«'aiir GJtAWMAR esCHOOI*NO. 1 

UW4athr»» piaun, '(ooe bl»«f iTom New>Toik Uni- 
versity.) be^^ioa its Forcietb Year Sept. IS. CUsaical. 
eommercii), an4 artniuy dep«rtaiKnta. 

JO. M. ifOBUr, B. S. LASSITBR. Principals. 

»Li^«ujA-rE TRAiSiidiG >*cao»C, NO. 

182 ."jth ay., .1. L. HDNl'. AL A., Principal, reopena 
Bept. 20. AU Ut partisexta. Handsome location and 
cooois. Bea collegiate pfaparatiou. Thoronch work. 
Ctrvulara at Potoam's. 

/-KH^I.I^OIAriilNSTITCTB, mjWTiHt, 80B8RX 
\JCODHTY, N. J. 8. ». .>TKVTSS8. PRINCIPAL.— A Ihor- 
onch tirst- class school for $260 a year. Refer to A. 
Netoon, >a '<ja5 Pearl et, Kew-York, Darid Eipley, 
Kewark. M.J. Order catnlogns. 

MISSJAUDO.N'.* YO0NU UADIB* B50LI3H, 
Preach «Bd Oerman boa -din| and day school and 
kiBdrutari^ No. 32 ^ast Slut st., wiU reopen 
r^OeSuAY. Mpt. -/It. Eladerzarten pupils limllea to 
tWvaty: boJuxHoe scholars to ^x- 

LLE. D'ORBMIEULS AND MisS KEITH, 

(au<»:tBSors to Miss Hinsdale.)— l-'reucb and Eug- 

bau lioanKas »na Day School fur yonns ladies, with 

kindereartea, opens 2.oth Sept., No. 27/ Madison ar., 

comer 4«M,b at., Ncw-Yo*^ 

RARXCBANCB.— A NOTBD BUARDIMa SCHOuL 
B'sr Hew-Tork to complete its namuer will re- 
ceive boys this season at ^ discouat uf $1U0; $300. 
Address iiex .No. A.947 Poet OtSce, New-Toric 

R«. KOBEKT!« AND MfAM WALKBK'S 

ochool for yonns ladies. No. 148 Mad;soii av., re- 
op ua ' ept 'io. 'I'hreo ywunc ladies will be receivod 
tnl o th< fcaHly. 

TM !.•*?« BLL.H.t,KV'S B>»ARJ>ING .*ND DAT 
iXLal^ool lor yooag ladles, Tarrvtown, iki tb« Hudson. 

Will i^ofen l^odaeaday, Mpt. i;i Address ^ tatter 
BBtil ^eot. 1. 

ClBBtSTBU. V vLL-.Y aCAD.-:MY— A Boa riling School 
./tor i>o*s. l>uwDin9;ton. Pa.; limied in number; boys 
b«Te Iwuia Qonlorts and careful i raining: e«8y ot acoess; 
»a00toS2tf0ayt!*r. F. UOMLiKAVf Lij.NO. A. »., Pnii. 

IIA l5Wt!.!4 CLAKi^>0.'< k. BU.-«tl'S SOAROlNtt AND 

inJDay bcl^ool for youn; laiiies and children, Bliiv 
brtb.N. J., reopens oept. 21: young ladies prepared for 
"i ssT i;«llei(-. For clrculan address the Principals. 

OrniC I1AL.L., !«TA3U>URD, CONN.- 

r.nguab, French, an . Germaa tlOARUING and DAY 
8i HOOLtor YOC.NG LADIKd. Reopc-ns Sept. 2J. Ad- 
I tti-wos AIKB5 fc < UA4K, PniiclpaU. 



MLLK. JAC:QUK.»Iv»l»»d 

Soardiac sod day stThool for young ladles and ehO- 
4imi, B«. Iu8 West 42d st., will reopou Wednesday, 
toyt. 27. 

/ 1 AKD.\l!:a IN"»TITUTE, ^O. 4 V^BST 47Ta ST. 
VT tV»K YOU.no LAuliid A.-fD CHILDREN. 
Nineteenth year opens Sent. 28. 
■ gr. Di!. and Ata. C. H. QARD-VKH. Principals. 

MUM. VV'lt,l.lA.nE!H» KKULI9B ASU PRBNCH 
boarding dod day school fbr young ladies and «bil- 
dren, No. 26 We<t 39ih sc, will reopea on THUBd- 
DAY, Sept. 2& 

..f.', '^ UKOVB UAIiU 

^- ^' Si rt -H 4 VBN. UO.N N. 

Kiss MONTFOKTS School for Young Ladles and 
rhildren. Fa>I lerm begins St-Dt. 20, 1878. 

Sfc**— ^11 ni l !■■■■■■ ■■ I ■-.. ■ I ■ !■. I ■ 11 I !!■ — — pa^M^M^ 

FOKT VUESTKK INSTITUTE, 

PORT CUKSTisa. WESTOUEaTER COUNTY. W. Tm 

A BOAHDlJie SCHOOL FOE TWBNTY-FIVl BOT8. 

O. WlSTUROP .-'TAKK, a. M. , PrincipaL 

HK .VIl!*.'*KS DCCK..NAI>>I.<''« BOARDING 

School forvoung Udles and little girls, .\ew-firuns- 
wick M. J. The Ananiny schooi year will commeaoo 
fcept. 19. 187a . 

THEiVllM.tE!4HAyWAai>'S bNGh1.'«H AND 
French school, No. 4ii9 Jef .srsna av., rslizabeco, N. 
J. reopens Wr.D.SBSDtlt, Sepc 20. Speeial cUsses iu 
DKaWINO Hua LIlKaATUB.t. 

J8.->A.NNA C. URAt'KUTT AND UtSS IDA 
M. BUOT. No. 9 WMt 39tlt st.. will reopen thelz 
boaie and Day nebool for girls on TUhbDAY, Oct^ 3. 
Cixcttiars »eat on appUcatiou. 

HOLLADAY COLLEGIATE INi^TITUTB, 

Jfa 1,286 Broadway; 8 to y A. M., voluntary study 
hear; 9 to l:3u, recitations: 1.30 to 2:3l*, study. 

MRS. D»Ty».S AND MRW. TttlVETT'd EHQ.. 
lishaBdFVetichBaariiiug and Dav School for young 
ladl s aad childreo. Astoria, L. i., will reopen Oct. 2. 

ViYk^ S>tfMINAUY. 

BXB, N. I. 
For particulars address Mrs. 8. J. LIFE. 

S^OkTI Pii^K. YliAtt.-Tr.BjI;* _ ilSJlJCiSD; 
ShOcJl/PlusLii); lasticute for boys. Addresi B.A. 
Pil t.aiLD, Flosbinn. -N. Y. 

flUt. CUilN\VAL.Li?<« sCiiUOL. FOll BUYS, 

KO. 1.267 BROADWAY, 
WILL 2EOP.-N UN Wh OS .SPAY. 8HPT. gO. 

lUViNG'M HCUUOL OF ABT, 

j5ew-Tor^ (kici.-.ty Library, No. tJ7 University place. 
i/»awing. -n atf r-cuior. aud Oil Painliag. 

[AH. J.T. <lt]:.Nl:;i)IOP.S DOAHUI.NU A.VO DAT 
«Ci ool tor ;oan< 'adii-s and oliUdrcn. .io. T East 

A2dst., N. t., wi I reupuu Se,>C. 23. .^ead for uircoLtr. 

M' le>!9 ». M. itUU^Jit.V i^CtlUOL,, EXING 
too av., BoaiU-eust corner uf S7lh at., will reopen 
bepu 18. \ 

TP HAUUls PATTON'M CLASSICAL 

iff eSchiiol will reopeu Wednesday. Sept. -0, at No. 
1, 193 Biomiway. 

IlH:^ «. U. UOUKMlIb UJ<;UPB.\8 HER DAY" 
school tor young ladle.i and culidrea, Oct. 3, atNa 
47 asl 2 Ist St. 

V]|riL.l.lA.tl 11. L.IHi«i»!.TI'«» tiCUJOL., NO. 

VT 1.214 Broadway; thirty -sixth year begins Sept. 
18. Circulars at Putnam's. 

r|1Ht£ .MiMsEn RiiUEU>> ENGi.lSU, AMU 

X French Boarding and Day bchool lor young ladies 
aad children, 352 West 2Uth St.. will t«oi>«n Sept. IS 

EWUtKG l-S. i.) UVSTITUTq— A Kiimily School 

for boys.not surpassed as a preparatory schoqU 14th 

auntial se.isdn bogius Sept. 12. Siglar &. Macule. Prin's. 

rSXANOBK I.NSTITLTK. — A MIUTARY 
eoanlliig School. White Plidos, M. T. PrinGi{>at, O. 
WILLIS Ph.D. 



M^ 






MIMM BALL.OVV'8 ENGLIHH AND FRSNCa 
school fur \oung Ladies and Cbiidren, No. 24 East 
22d St., will reopen on Wednesday. Sept. 27. 

le»8 M. aUUYN WILL. KEOPBN HEB 

school at No. 2U West 16th St., 8BPT. 29. 



M 



D 
D 



OLDEN HILL HEMlNAfiY FOR YOUNG 
ladies -Brldgeuort. Conn. Hiss KMILY NELSON. 

tt. A. CALUSEN'S DAY bOHOOL FOR BOYS 
No. 131 Weet43d st., reopen* Wednesday, Sept. 20 

ABNBY UAIVBBSITK SOUOOL. 25 BAST 29TU 
su: preasration fox coUase; uc$Qlan oa(IPBU«iUloa. 



bTfiVENS HIGH tiCaOOL. 

Wrer st, between 5th and 6th sts.. Hobaken, 9. J. 

Frenob, German, aud drawing taught io all the 
elasses; instruction Kiven in the elements ot natural 
jhlstozy, of ouemistry. ana of physios, both by lectures 
and by text-boolcs; puplla fltieu for college aad fur 
business. 

FREE SCHOLARSHIPS. 

Four free scholarships io the Stevens Institute of 
Techaoloc^ open t» the oomputittou of the graduates 
of the St^eiis Eixh school. 

TERMS RKDDCKn. 

For first and second classes. $100 oer annum; for 
third class, $150 par annum; tuitiun for term in pro- 
portion. 

Fall term begins Oct 4. 

For circulars or catalogues apply to the Principal. 

Prof. KDWARD \VALt. 

KT. JOHN'!;! SCHOOL. 

BOARDING AND DAY .SCHOOL 
FOB YOUNG LADIKS A.SiJ CUILDRKN. 
Ser. TBEODOUE IRVING, LL. n., Rector. 
, No. ^1 Wesf 32d st- 

^tBOFETIH WEDNESDAY, SKIT. 27, 1870. 
A SEPARATK DEPARTMENT FOR YOUNG BOK8. 
Dr. IBVTyO'S Mpecial clasaes «n History. Literature, 
and Itie Fine Arts, beginning iIk first week in. Hciober, are 
ODen to any young ladies wlu> mtty wish to Join them. 



THE CP-TOWN OFFICE OF XliB. Ti.Uiia. 

Tlie uptown ofBce of THE TIMES is looateil^ 
No. l.'.JS7 Broadyynv, bet. :{lat and :ijd4ts.^ 

Open 'lally, .Siimlnys lucUnlod, from 4 A. A. to i P. .H. | 

t-ubscriptions roceived, aud copies of TlIS TlHaS for . 

sale. 

AnVERTISEMKNTS RKORIVPn UNTrti 1 P. M. 

AS^IAI.L I'RIVATK FAiVllKV, l,IVI.N« IN 
their own hiiusn would n-nt to a giutlpman a 
; spacious chamber on the first floor, with private nath; 
j appointments and talile 8lri(!t.ly first cl.i8»; reterenoes 
I eicliaiigerl ; a gcntltmau wishing quiet aud icflnod 
I Burroundlnes will please address PAKK AVK.N'UE. Bo 
! Ko. 301 IIAIES U-'-'l'OWN UFKICK. 1,'J57 BKOAhWAI 



J>ILLi£. TAttlUVKL, 

Jio. 25 WEST 4nTU ST., 
NKW-YORK, 
Seopensher French, English, and German Boarding 
and Day iionool fur .youns ladies ami children Sept. 21. 
Circulars and refereui'ei sent oa app luation. 
French spoken fluently in one ve:ir. 
Latin, drawing, singiag, pastal, water color, needle- 
work, tc, included io thj tuition. 

lULLES. CHAKBONNIER'S 

FRENCH BOARDI.NG AND DAt SC 10 JIj 
for young ladies. No 36 East Soth st, (formerly No. 42 
Avenue an Roule. NeuiUy. Patii.) w.ll rooo'-n on Wed- 
nesday. Sept. ?7. Address a.s abiv), niitr Sept 8, 
whem Mile. ChARBONM KK wiU bo i g Noar-YorH. 

MRS. MAR\ ROUtiERS I^KIFKITT.S 
will reopen her English. French, and Germaii day 
school fir young ladies and children at No. ^^S West 
48to St. on" Tuesday. Sept 26. Advanced classes m 
English literature and the German language for post 
^graduates and others. 

PREJPARATOKY SCIENTIFIC SCHOOL* 

Na 1,267 Broadwa.y. Fifth year begins Sept 25. 
for Schools of ."science, Techuoloey, Mines. Architec- 
ture. Pupils aged seven to twenty. Seven enter col- 
lege this vear. A. COLIN^, -M. K., 
late Engineer Corns, U. 8. N.. and Prof, at Naval Aca'y. 

CAUKi>lj:K DE FAlllS.- TO LADltS WHO 
Wish to acquire a porlect knowledge of French, 

Mme. G. DKL.M BASSE, medallist with diplomas from 

the Academie of Pans, reopens her course on Oct. 9. 

No. 385 6th av For further particulars apply to Mme. 

G. DKLACHA83E. 

AKNEST TEACHING. 

CDjIilON SENSE MAN.\GEMENT. 
TOKKER) MILITARY INSTITUTE. 
A B0A8D1NG-3CE0OL FOR BOYi 

BE.NJAMIX MA.SON, 
Box No. 564. Yonkera. N. Y. 

COLLEGE OF MUSIC. 

NO. 6 WEST 14TH ST.. WEST OF 5TH AV. 
Mme. and Mr. ALBITEs, iijstiuctors m all branches of 
siauinx. acO(a'dingto the true and pure tta tan methods. 
Prompt vocal reading upder Prof J. COSTER.NO., 



E 



M 



Ama 



TILB FIFTH AVENUE SCHOOL FOR BUYS, 

AT NUS. 639, .i41. AND 543 5iU AV., 
REOPENS SEPT. 18. 
E. A. GIBBENS, Harvard, J princinals. 
D. BHACa, Jb.. lale, ^ i^mcipaiB- 

PREPARATUKV CLASS OK MR WM. W. 
NKWKLL f,)r Harvard and other col leses. Refers 
to paceiits of pruDils. R. A. McCurdy, JEsq., Robert It. 
Livingston. Beq.. Jarvis Slade, hsq., Governeur M. 
Ogden. Esq.. tc. Rooms No. 115 Kast 2Gl h at. 

Ut.UfcAR'.>9 CO.HinJ3K.CIAI. C«H>l>]b;Gii, 

No. 1,198 Broadway.— Special lessons in business 
writing, cook-keaping. arithmetic, correspoudeuce.&c. 
Gentlemen, ladies and boys prepared practically for 
basiness privately. 

ISS HAINES AND AILLE. Dii JANON 

wlU ceopen their boarding and day school for 
young ladies and chilaren, at No. 10 Gramercy Park, 
Sept 28. Kindergarten and boys' class, Oct. 2. 

MRS.ANDWl.SS STEERS' 

Boardlngand Day School lor voun^r ladies und children. 
No. 12 ISasi 47rh St., will reopen Sept. zl. A Klnder- 
gaiteu c<ass wiil commence Oct. 2, at Xo. G2 West 12tn 

fit '"School Omnibus." 

HOLLADAY COI..LBOIATe INSTITUTE, 
NO. 1,285 BitOADWAY.— Study ho oia tor pupils: 
conversational metho'i of Boston school of 5lodern 
taogiuues. Preparatioa for ('oUege. 

A lifSEBBA, BOOilK.KEFl.>0, AKITriMETlC, 
.ULSpelUng. reading; wriiing $3 monthly; Pnioe's 
ISusiness college, No. 284 8th ;iv., and No. 62 Bowery; 
backward persons taught privately. Ladies' Department. 

OHN MaeiHULUE .>>.-* SCHOOL. Su. 1.214 
Broadway. —Three boarders taken. Circulars at 
latnam's. 

ISa F. B. raiBSl'HS SCHOOL, NO. 22a 

nast 19th St.. will reopt-n MONDAY, Sept, 25. 

r fl, MORSE'JS SCHOOL. 1,267 BROADWAY, 
' •reopeas Sept. 25: prepares for Harrard, Yale, Slo. 

SCHOOL lor Young Bovs, 358 Lex. av., bat. 40th 
41st sts. 7th year o'vens fiept 2U. 

A PKIVATE FAMILV OF THRER. RE.StD- 
JCMint in the vicinity uf Madison sqaure. will ler., to a 

feotleman of rednement a small and pre ttiiv -furnished 
ed^oea. with use of b th; bishest references re- 
quired: terms, $7 per week. Address A.. Box No. lt>3 
TtmeaOacM. 

IFTH AV. NEAR :*0 TH ST.— PRIVATE FA.\1. 

ily will rent second fl'>or ; also pariar aud bedroom 
on tniid floor; handsomely fnrnn ed. with strictly 
first-class bOHrd: reierences exchanged. Address M. 
B., Box No. 2,468 Post OfHce. 

rpHlRTV-FOURTH sT., NO. 341, WEST.- 

JL Supeilor board and rooms, with flrsi-claxs ^w;com- 
modations, in the best location in the City for Wiuter ; 
balf block from Elevated Railway etaiion, and con- 
venient to horse cars. 

NO, SO EAST 32D ST. 

Haadiomslr-fimlshed Myites of room^ to let with 

board for the Winter; also.'einsle room; references. 

~^ iVIRS. J. B. ItElD, 

No. 17 East 31 st St., Madison and 5tli avt-, ofTers band- 
soine1y-lumlBh'^<l floors, en suite or separately, with 
or without private taale ; retVreuoes. 

WO OR THREE GENTLEMEN, OR GKN- 

tleman and wife, wishing board can be accommo- 
dated with two nice rooms on Beeond floor, at No. 280 
Madison av. Beterences exchanged. 

NO. 33 WEST 4aD ST.. FRONTING! RESER. 
voir Psrk. — House new; elegan'tiy-fumisMed sec- 
ond and third fliors, wither without private table; 
only to parties S'eking su(>erior accommodatior:8. 

O. 1 NORTH WASHINGTON SQUARE.— 

hiegant furnished rooms to let, with or without 
beard; prices very moderate; location fronting the 
park. 

FIFTH AV., NO. 73, CORNER I5TH S P.— 
Handsomely-fnrnlsh.-d rooms on first and second 
floors, with or without private table; also, other 
rooms; tiansient parties taken. 

SECOND FLOOR, WITH PRIVATE TABLE. 
— Litfge, commodious apartments, handsomely fur- 
nished, with elesant parlor. No. 14 East 32d at., be- 
tween 5th and Madison avs. 

NEBLtiCKFROM BROADWAY. NO. 114 

Bast 18th st — Handsomely- turnisbed rooms, with 
first-class board; central and hue location; day 
board; transient (ruests accommodated. 

■\rO.y4 WEST 35Te ST.-A SUITE OP THREE 
X^ rouns. second floor; excellent lioard: also, two 
rooms, tbird fl or; southern exposure ; terms very 
moderate ; references. 

NO. 9 EAST 30111 ST., BETWEEN 5TH 
ND MADISON AV.i.— ElegaDtlv-furnished apait- 
Bcnts. with or without superior private table; refer- 
ences ezchansed. 

NE SUITE OF FURNISHED UOO.ns TO 

»et. with board ; also, hail rooui !or genileui.iu ; de- 
sirable location ; Broadway ohis piss the door, Nos. 
1.451 and 1,453 Broadway. Astor oluck. 

IFTH AY., NO. S NEAttTan IREVOORT.— 

An entire second floor, handsomely lurnisbel; 

also one Inrge anii two s.ugle room i; accommodations 

and taole unsurpassed. 

5TH AV., NO. a08, CHESTERFIIiLD HOUSE, 
.MADIbO.S i^QUARI''). Looatioo unsurpaaued; becond 
audthird flours ; table d'h'te, or privaie; other ruomg, 
table board. Jonu P. Worsteil. 

VI ENTIKTH ST., N»». 106 VVEST.-ROOMS 
to let with board to single geoiiemen, or jzentiem^u 
aud wives; also table board. References ireely ex- 
changed. 

KSIRABI.E ROO.ilS, HA.NUSOMi-.LY J-UK- 
nished, with i:oard, at No. 33 West 2T4h st., ue4r 
Broadway. 

O. 4 WEST-J9TH .sl\— WITH aOAAV, LAltGE, 
bands me parlor aud one or two bedrooms on sec- 
ond floor, front ; also large room on fourtli floor, front. 

NO. 319 VVE.ST 3.iDST.-PLfc:ASA.\T llO.).Ms 
with uoird. lor Keiitieiniri aud wife or sinslo gen- 
tie.iuan; a. so one unfLiruidhod 'room. 

1\rO. 36 EAST !iil> SI'.— LARGE, liLBGANT 
1.1 ro ms to let, with Brst-cUkhs board, to lamilies aud 
single gent erne a; 'eriT'Ucu eich;iu!;e(l. 

O. :£31 WliST ari'll ST.— KOO.M ON SliCO.ND 
floor, nicely lurmshea, to let, with board ; all ihe 
tnodern ImproveneiitB, 

LEASA>'r uUkiJi^. WIT SI BOAKU.— 

Secuiid aud third floors, en suite or siugly ; other 
rooms; references. No. 116 Uc^i, lotu st. 

IVJO. 37 WEST 31 ST ST.— KOo l.S, .,I.\GLli A.VD 
j3l en suite, with or without uui.id, lor select parties ; 
house and appoiutmeuts tirst-ciasa. 

NO. •.i:i7MADI.-»0.> AV., UEtVVEhN 371UANI) 
b8th sta i-.legiiU'. apartmLUls, witd or witliou. 

nrlvute table; reureuces exehan,ie.l. 

OUitTEENTH ST., NO.. 3J3 EAST.- 

Roums. with board, on secoud. thud, and fouith 
floors ; terms moderate. 

ROOMS TO LET, WITH 1J0A11D-E.\ SUItE 
or siugiy, to flrst-elass parties, m a pnvaie family. 
Address A.,°SCatiou U, City. 

LEASANT ROOJUs^, VVIPll BOARD, IN A 

private tiimily ; references exchanged, .-ipply at 
Na 229 East li^th st 

O. 345 5PiI AV.— HANDS J.Vli-:LYFURNl.SHKD 
rooms, wlto board, for familLua or Keutlemeu; pri- 
vatb table if desired. 

EVENTEENTll ST., NO. 61 WEST, NEAR 

5TH AV.— Rooms, with ooard. lor parties desiring a 
refined home. 

TyO. 8 EAST 9TH Sr.,(.NKAR 5TU A V. )— SUITES 



UN 



I of rooms to let with board. References. 

O. aO EAST a^D ST.— SECOND FLoOil.Pitl- 
vate table, &c. 



0,p46 WESTaiaO ST.— ELEGANT COVIMUNI- 
Ciitiug 10 'ma on second floor to let, with board. 



O. 54 WEST 38 PH SI'.— A FINE SIZED ROOM, 
BSsail familir. and a sood boraai. xaCuranues, 



1 



N 



AY. 

A PRIVATE FAiVIIiiV IN WESP 4.5TH StT 
would r' nt, witli boord, two floors, eu Buito or 
separnte ; liouse occupied by owner; rooms hand- 
BOihely fuiniahed ; in perfect order. Apnt.y desiring 
a refiued home where tb(•r•^ are no cliiMnn will find 
this an unusual opporiuni"y. Address L. .S..BoI^o. 
271 TIME.^ DPTOW.S OFFICE, 1,2.)7 BROADWAl. 

PRIVAIE FAMILY, OWNING THEIR 

house, near Windsor, will rent a very desirable 
second floor, handsoinely furnlshrd, havius every oon- 
venience: table, locatioii, ami all appointments strictly 
first class. Adult p.irti -s desiring a rt-flned, elegaut 
home .address M.. Bot .Vo. 147 Times t.flloe, 

TsTTTi^erTvESTTeTTrsT^ 

Rooms single or en suite; rooms for gentlemen; pri- 
vate table or tablo d'hdte; house and appointments 
thorouehly flrst-class; retprenres. 

O. 70 IKVING PLACE, ((JRAMICRCY PARK.)— 
i^econd floor, large, and two hall rooms: extra 

lar^e hall rooms tor one or two centlemen, with fires ; 

all hau'lsomoly furnished ; locatlou, house, and table 

first-class. 

PRIVATE FA.VilLY WILL TAKE A FEW 

boarder*, single genileinen or gentlemen and their 
wives, at So. 121 West 12oth St., near ."jth av. : ex- 
ponent location; desirable chauoe; trains to and 
from city enih hour. 

PRIVATE FAMILY OP CULTIJlfEAND 

refinement wtii rent, with board, to gsntlemm and 
wife or single Kcntlemen, two rooms ; appointments 
fiist-elass: reference Address L. 11. 11.. Box NO 206 
TIMES UP- roWN OFFICE. NO. 1,257 BltOADWAY. 

S.>IAI,I, PRIVATE FAJYIiLY C.4N A(;;OM- 

modato agentleraau and wi*e, and two sinirle gen- 
tlemen, with elegantly furnished rooms and board ; 
nppuintmeuts and table of the best ; lefeieuce. No. 
223 West 34th st. 

O. 26 EA.ST SOTH ST.-ELEGaNT ROOMS 
lor families or gentlemen; tablp first class; also, 
a bsudsome back parlor for an elderly couple ; ref- 
erence. 

O. ai EA.ST 49i'H ST.-A P.aRTY OWNING 
their h/iU'^e have somo double and single rooms to 
let. en suite, or separate, with excellent board; ref- 
erences. 

MRS. SUiHNER, 

NO. 22 EAST 33TH ST. 
Handsome largo parlor and bedroom on second floor ; 
private bath, tc: or two larce eonnectinz bedrooms. 

O. 56 dPH ST., FEW UOORS WEST OF 

BRO.AD A .\Y.— Sioely-l'urnlshed floor aud einele 
rooms; break ta'^t it desired; terms moderate; quiet 
home ; near reataurauts. 

J^ORTY-PiFTH ST., NO. 175 WEST.— 
Handsomely-turnished rooms, en suite or Bingly, 
with excoileiit bo:ird and pie isunt surroundings, to de- 
sirable people with references. 

")\TO. 75 MADISON AV.— PARLOR 1-LOOlt, 
1^ With every ooaveni»nc'> ; private table only ; also, 
rooms ou second and third floors; references ex- 
changed. 

O. 39 WES .".Ora ST.— NICELY FUKNISIIED 
room slor families ; also two or three single rooms ; 
location uueiceptionable; home comforts; table excel- 
lent ,' ti'rms reasonable. 

I:;^IFTH AV. rvo. 45, BENVVBEN IITH AND 
12th sts.- Spacious suite of apartments on parlor 
floor, also on second and third flours, with or without 
private table. 

CHARGE LISTS AND PARTICULARS OF 

&rst-ola«8 buarding accommodations. 

SANDo' BROADWAY DIRECTORY, 
No. 1193 Eioadway. 'id floor. 

NK SCITK OF KOl'.>IS, AND ONE MNGLE 

ruom, eiegant and conyeiil^ut in every respect, 
with board ; family occnpyins their own ho.ise, No. 43 
West 22d St. Highest references exchanied. 

OURTEENTH ST., NO. 310 WEST.— A FEW 

handsome single and double rooms, with board, 
from $7 to $'20 per week. Transient parties accomo- 
dated. 

FIFTH AV.. NO. 439, CORNER 39 I'H ST.- 
Kiegint rooms en buiteto let to tamilios or gentle- 
ni>n ; with or without private table. Unexoentionabie 
reiereuee aiven and lequired. 

fi^HIUTV-FOURTH ST., NEAR SPH AV.- 

i Four lisht, elegaucly-rurnished rooms; prWate 
table it desired ; with owner. Apply to A. DAlLKY, No. 
666 6th av., near ;-isth St. 

1MFTH AV., NO. 24I.-HA.NDS0.ME PARLOli 
floor, with all modern conveniences ; private table, 
or without board; unquestionable references given ani 
required. 

O. -.^3 WAVKltl.EY J',r.,ACJfc:.— ELEGANTLY- 
furnisued parlor flour, with or without private 
table ; aiso other rooms. 

tVKNTV-PHIllD SI., NO. 30 EAST.- 

Roouis, en suite or singly; good board; private 
taule, if desii«d ; reference. 

TVrO. 33 WEST 3IST ST.-A SUITE OF FOUR 
1.1 or SIX rooms tor a family, with private table, or 
party ol Eenclemeu, with breaKtas.. 

O. tiC PARK. Av.—hLEGA.Sr SECOND FLOOR, 
eu suite, withbourd: adults only; h use, and ap- 
vuintmeuts first chias: .American piivate family. 

O. la LEXI.'^«.^T«»N I'LACE.— SiUi'VESANT 
squaie, heiween lUth ar.d 17tli sts.— Kuruishod 
rooms to let with bo rd ; references exchaasjeiL 

rilHIRD HOUSE KKO.VI STH AV., -NO. 6 EAST 
JL 42d St. — Firat-elass board aud accommodations ; 
table board ; r^fereneos e:s changed. 

IVfO. l:»7 EAsTaSl'H SI'.-HANDSOMELYFLB- 
i T uished rooms, wii,ii or with. nit first-class board, to 
adults only; southerly expasure ; convenient to cars. 

0.5 FRilSI'ECT PLACE, EA6T 41sTST., NOT 
Brooklvn. — .alcove rooms. %TiLh board for t'wo per- 
sons, $ljand$I6 per week; room forsingle gentleman. 

Its. *i'iA;A\S, NO. 273 5TH ^,V.-KLB- 
iaut pariois, also other rooms, with or without 
board, or private table. * 

FIFTH AV., NO. 3;jl.— FRONT ROOMS OR E.n- 
t:re floor, handsomely furnished, with board; 
moderate terms ; small fainilr. 

<l. ISEAsiaSlH ST.-HAND.^OVIE I'ARCOR 
aud bed-room, with board ; aiso two large bed 
rooms-. 

O. 41 EAST aiSl" ST.— i1A.nD.SuME ROO.V1S 
tor families or gentlemen; first-class board; reter- 
euces. 

OARO.— HANOsUMrtLY FURNiSHrfD ROO.US IN 
a p'rivate family: referocces eichangeiL At No. 
23J East lUth 81. 

4J. 8 E.AST ;i'.iD ST.-HA.>DSUMELV'-FUR- 
nislied seeond floor; also rooms on iliird floor; 
superior table, private, if desireo: refeieu<re8. 

<». 13 WEST -iJi'H Si'.. OPPOSITE 
SrUKfEVA-NT HOUS;-:.- Kirst-class nccommoda- 
tiuus, with ooard; highest reference exchanjed. 

E81KAULE PARLOR FLOOR, WELL 

arranged, with baths. &c , attached, elegantly fur- 
nished, at No. 25 5th av.; first-class private table. 

01 To* WEST 38 I'H ST HAND,SOME 

square and hall-roims. with board ; piivate thble if 

desired; relerences eivenand required. 

I'RIVATL 1<A.»1ILY OF A O LILTS HAVE 

two faruinhed rooms, with board ; residence near 
Uuiou square. Address Box No. 3 768 Post uffice. 

Tj.IFTHAV., IaO. a»7 TvVO V,-.KY PLE WSANT 

AT suites 01 apartments, with or without piivate 
table; lefeicnce. 

7^0. 33 VvK.xT 330 .Si'.— SECilMD AND THIRD 
1.1 floor tiont, sunny suites; superior board or pii- 
vate table. 

IV O. 5 WE.ST 4'iD ST.— I'HOKOUGULi-FCR- 
ll nished rooms uu second flour, wth ooard; refer- 
ences exch.iuged. 

O. 28 WEST 3lsT ST.— i-Ult.Nl.->Hi-.L» APAltT- 
lueiiDs. with private taole it desired ; also sIiibIo 
rooms, w th bonrd; leierenees. 

O. 17 WEST 31 ST ST A SkCO.SO FLouR, 

witii or withoui private table: large and siLgle 
rooms (or geutiemou. 

rflViO UE.MLE.flKN OR <Jt-.>TLEMAN A.ND 
A wife can have liome comforts, with board, at No 
11)4 West loth St. 

VrO. us WEST 12 I'H ST.— WITH BOARD. 
ll haniUome roonn, en auire or singiv, tor families or 
par.y of g^iiit e u»ii ti >.o Av<t el u • i 

fnolli Nr, WITH ItOAlcD. A P .\o. 3£ west 

I a2U X. — .i pirlor and bedroom, ulso a si.iKle room; 
reference required. 

ARLOK KLOOjI. WlPil HOARD; HOP 

.Hid cold water; rooms on second flour. xVo. I28 
b.ast 23d sc. 

\r«». r.*2 .'iia;.'I.'^«).n av.— Ui>-iKAeLii uouule 

II aud bin^ie rooms to l,:t, with board. Kefereuces 
exchani!ou. 

.\E 1>0 :>U JbHOU AlADISON SQIjAKE, 

-Nil. He* n.^Bl' '.i.jD .-)T. — tleg-uitlv-iuruisLiod floors, 
Willi private tables. 

\[<). -.a HA.-^V 40111 ST.— lU.tNl UED ROOMS 
jjl to let, >>iLb buuru. ou secoud .lud iLird fl ,ulh; let- 
eieoces. 

NI.NTH ST., NO. 54 VVLS a.-NiiAl'LV-FUR- 
uished rooms to l.t, with buuru; transient parlies 
aecommodated. 

I^^IFTIl AV., NO. 29J A^ LLKG.VNi FAillLY 
floor, witU sup . lor ap^iointmeuLs, and priv..te 
tauio, room lor pentleaian. 

fllvVEM'V-FilHiini Si'., NO. 131 E.AST.- 

I5»lM<*tf aid sm 111 iiewly-furuiahc;d rooms, with lUat- 
classboiE^: refer nees. 

|>0<mi WITH KOAUD KOIl CJ liiNTl^E.^I A.N 

Xli.uid wife, or siuiilo geiitlemeu; rel'eieaces Oi- 
cuau;;r>d. .So. 34 V\ eSL 2Gtll at. 

"]^«J. e KAST 3^U S r.— Di.tSlKAUl^K -SUITE; 1 IVK 

III iijUtrooms, witu board, together or separate; very 
aesirable. 

riMlKEE DOOHS PUO.n 5PH AV.— NO. 12 
JL E.'ist 16th St.; very desirable rooms, with board, tor 
f.imilics ; extr.i wide house, aud cverytliiug in haj 
order. 

QJITKS OF ROOWS, PRIVATE BATHS, 

kjSi.c.; private table ouly; rooms lor jjeutlemeu; lef- 
eieuces. No. 38 East 2 .tii st. 

SlIPE OF KOO.US, WITH liO/iRll, \Usl» 

50 ^V est 4Stb st ; priv.vt' family ; references. ^ 



A5' 



N 



JO. 43 EAST 9TH Si'.— A FLUOR AND SINGLE 
rooms [o let with board. 



THE UP-TOWN OFFICE OF THE TIMES. 

So. 1,257 Broadway, bet. 33 3t and 32d sts. 

ADYBRTISEMBNTS RECEIVED UNTIL 9 P. M. 



UNION SQUAReTFiIEATRE. 

Proprietor Mr. StlEEIDAN SHOOK 

Manager .Mr. A. M. PALMER 

Begins at 8; over at 11:10. 
The management hnve great pleasure in announcing 
that thei! REGULAR SEASON FOR 1876-7 Will open 
ON MONDAY EVENING, OCT. 2, with a reproduction 
of the most successful play of the century, Messrs. 
D'Euuery and Coriuon's m irvelous drama, 

THE TWi* ORPHANS, 
which will be presitnted with magniflcent scenes, new 
aud brilliant co.stuines, aud the fdlowinjt unrivaled 
C.A:5T, most of too members of which coutribnted so 
laraerly to theoriginall succets ot the piay in the Union 
Square season of 1874-5: 

Cheyalier Maurice l>e Vftiidrev.Mr. Charles R.Thorne, Jr 
Count De Liuieies, .'Vliuisterof Ponce.. .«r.J.ohu Parselle 

Jacques hrochard. an outliw »lr. Frederic Rubiuisou 

Pieiro Irociiura, the ciipple, his brother, (his 
first appearance at ihs theatre). ..Mr. James O'Neill 

Picard. valet to ^heChevaher .Mr. Claude Burroughs 

Marquis De Presles Mr. J. G. Peakes 

Ii.ifleur, in the seryico of the Marquis De 

Preal's Mr. H. VV. Montgordery 

Doctor of the Hospitals St. Louis and La Sal- 

pdtriere.... Mr. Thomas E. Morris 

Martin, citizen of Paris Mr. Lysaiider Ihomosou 

< ffieer of the Guard.*. Mr. John .Matthews 

Chief {;ipik in the Ministry of Police. .Mr. w . H. Wilder 

D r Mailly Mr. Horbort Aviiug 

D'Estrois Mr. W. Rayaor 

Autoine .Mr. W. S. Qulgley . 

Footman Mr C. M. Collins 

Countess Dlano Do Liuiercs Miss Fanny .Morint 

Louise in.,„rr-,„ri i ( . .Mis§ Kate Claiton 

Heuriette, J f'e fwo Orphans. | ....jiiss Sara Jewett 
(Uer first appearance here.) 

Marianne, an outcast .Miss Kate Qirard 

(Uor tirttt appearance here ) 
La Frochard, mother of Pierre and Jacques, 

Mrs. .Marie Wllklns 
Sister Genevieve, Matron of La Saltpetrifere, 

Miss Ids Vernon 

Julie Miss Hooerta Norwood 

Florette Miss Ktliel Allen 

<:ora .Miss Lililan Cleves 

Sister Therese airs. 1j. E. Seyniour 

Bofdiers, Guards, liadies and Gentlomeu, Prisoners, 
Nuns, «ic. 
SYNOPSIS OF .-mKXEKY. 
ACT I.— Tablbau I.— The Pfacs Pout Neu£ 

Tableau II. — Illuminated Garden and Terrace 
at bcl Air, near Paris. 
ACT IL— Tableau L— Private offl so in the Hotel of 
the .Minister o' Po.ice. 
Tableau 11.- The Pljice St Sulpice. 
ACT III. — Tablkau I.— Uenriotte's Chtt.uoer. 

Tableau 11.— couityard of l!he prison of La 
>ulpetri6re. 
ACT IV.— Table.iu L— Boat-hoiisi! ou the Bank Of the 

Kiver Seiue. 
The scenes all painted and de- •* 

signed by Mr. RICHARD MARSTOIT 

The now costumes and toilets by Mr. T.W. LANOUfTE 
Incidental to second act villi be sung for the first 
time an entirely new drinking song aud chorus, com- 
posed by Mr. H. TI.SSISGTON. 

Box-sheet tor any of the I'VVo ORPHANS nights now, 
open. Good seats may aiways be secured by mail or 
telegraph. SATIIKDAY. Ot:T. 7, FIRST MATiNiiE OF 
THE I'VVO ORPHAN .>. 
Duo notice will bo given of the first appearance of 
~»iii8 CLARA -MORRIS, Miss KATHERIiSE RoGiiRS, and 
Mr.^»vjI^SfuDDAi;D. 

During^the seiiuua the management will have the 
pleasure of ufleiiug to their oairous a number of bril- 
liant novelties, among which are Messrs. NUS and Bii- 
L01"6 drama eatitled "MlSS .UULTo.>," and the ;ireat 
success of the last and present Parisian seasun, ' L.-'iS 
Dai\ICHEFF." 

rpuii BEST RESERVED SEATS FOR ALL 
X THEATRES six days iu advance, at lY^O.N'S 
Nr.W THEATRE TlL'KEi' OFFICii. WINDSOR HOTKL. 

NEW-YOifK. CO.NSEkVATOUY OF MUSIC. 

New- York, Offices onlv at 

NO. 5 EAST 14TH STdiicT, 2U DUOR EAST OP 6TH 

AV. 

(Incorporaiod 1365.) 

THIS RENOWNED 1N.STITUTIU.V offers unequaled 
advatita<;p& to pupi.e iu all branches of Vocl and 
Instrumental Music, Harnioliy and ComposiLiou, Elo- 
cution, Dramatic Action, Modern Languages. Drawing, 
and Painting. 

fcUB- ilnlfl'ION BOOKS open from 9 A. M. to 9 P. M. 

Brooklyn Nos. 102 to 106 Court st. 

PUlLHAK-ViOMCSOClETVOFNEW-VOKH. 

Patrons of this Society arerespectfullv informed that 
Bubscriptioub will be received ou aud after OCT. 11. 

Suuscri> era of last season can re-eugagtj*their seats 
NOW AND UNTO OCT. 10 by applying to 

D. SOU.^.\D, SECRET.\ttir, No. di EAST 3D ST. 
Price for Ooe season ticket, admitting to all MX CON- 
CERTS aud Three Public Rehoarsa s, fir each, $iO. 
For the ElGuTiiKS PUiJl>l>'. EHlli-.AliSALS oulr$9. 
At tbeFlK.T Co.xCERl', iNov. 4, will be peifoimed 
■' SINFONIK." NO. 6. (O miuor,) lieeihoven. 
The BNTIdE FIRST ACT of DIE WAlKO'KE, from THE 
KLsa UES j.\IBhLU.^fGE.N, by R. WAG ^Ell, in its 
original form, vocal and iosirutucntal. 

Fe.rticul.rs in fuluru Hdvertisenieiits. 
TO-NIOJHT, TO-.MtJUT. 

ChlCKtiRINQ HALL, 

CHlCKKitlNG HALL, 

5TII av. a-md isru ST. 

GRAND SACuED CONCERT 

by the 

OLD ORIGINAL JUBILEE SINGERS. 

and the great HORACE WEbTON. 

QKNERAL ADMISSION, 50 CENTS. 

Doors open at 7 p. M. Concert commences at 8 P. M. 

SAN FRANCISCO xniNSTKELS. 



OPERA 

HOUSE. 

BROADWAY 

& 29 I H ST. 
MATIN h-E. 



THE .MINSTREL PALACE. 
BIRCH, WAV180LI), BACKUS, 
and TailtlT BRILLIA.NT AKTI0T8. 
The ci^me de la creme ol minstrelsy, 
SATURDAY at 2. Seats secULofl. 



ALAdIFoWMNGA FJRS'I'-CLASS HOUSE 
in one ot the most conveuient locations in the City, 
wo'il.l let to one or two gs.itiemen elegantiy turuished 
rooms without busrd, at a moderate rent. No. 230 
Ea.st 23d st. 

O. ii9 EAST 10 PH ST., NEAR IJNIVEK- 

■■-IfY PLACE. — Haudiomely-iUrnisbed rooms, ea 
B ite or singly, in a privatH family, for geutletneu 
oiil,y; referun.o required. 

rpo LE I'.— FUR.VISflED PAKLOit AiSD BKDROOM, 
JL second floor ; ulso si iKle rooms to ifeiitl men only; 
breekfast If required ; house aud location flrst-ciass. 
No. I02. East 'A.ia St., second door east ol 4th av. 

O. 249 WEST 4STU ST.— To RUN 1' TO 
geuteman, a larpre second story fiont room. 
8 utnern exjiosuro, with use of bath-room, aiso break- 
fast and ^uuday dinner ; private family ; references. 

l\rEATliV-rtIKNl.Sl-IEl> Rooms TO LET, 

li cu suite or Singly ; hot and cold water; inbiowu- 
stone house ; stiictly private. Call at No. 200 West 
38tii St. 

I^lEi'H AV. No. 2i4. OfPO.>.Il'EHorr.L BttUNS- 
. VVICK.— Parlor aud Becond floor; aiso otbersnpeiior 
rooms for geutlemt:n ; front oascmeut as obyiiician's 
office. 

TV"4». 55 WESP x8PH SI'., NEAR BROAD- 

1.1 W.ll. — Kiunished rooms in handsome pnyato 
house; also uufuinished rO' ms. 

ECOND FLOOR ENPlRE OR .sEPARATELi'; 
aeutiemen ouiy; without board; private family; 
relereuees No. 131 fait 17tii st. . 

HANDSOIUELV FURNISHED ROOiMS TO 
let at .So. 4» East Iwth st., between Broadway and 
University place; references required. 

AN DSO M EL Y - f t RNI S H E D APART M E&TS 
to let, witnout board ; references exchanged. No. 

D4 vVest 2od St. 



NO. 42 WEST 19TH ST.— Ti\0 SCITlis, 
secoua floor front. $(>j jer weak, third floor, front, 
$15 per week; references. 



riM) LEP.- 

Xi 



,,, ^^.. -MNELY-FURNIdllED ROOdS TO PER- 

nianent parties, fi-o.u $6 to $12 a week. Call at i\o, 

S East 3 th St.. near 5th av. 

iVO. 68 WEST 46 I'M ST., BETWEEN 5PH 

11 A.Nl) ofil AVS. — Double«nd single rooms; famvliea 
or gentlemen ; private family. 

rp H R E E HANDSOMELY-P CRNISHED 

J. rooms with private family in hrst-class house, near 
restaurant. No. 140 West 42d st. 



N 



O. 40 IRVlNU I'LACli.- FUii.MBHED ROOMS ; 
lelefences. 



EOOMS WANTED. 

WTANTED— BY A GENTLEMA-N AND >vTFE, A.MER- 
TT leans, lour or five uuliu'nished second-story 
rooms, with convenieuces tor housekeeping; rental 
about $35 per luontn; location west of Mabison av. 
and below 40tb st. Private parries haviusr surplus 
room can secure a quiet .\ oung couple, wiih uueiCep- 
tiouaide reter nees, by addressing E. A. K., Dox Ao. 
6,427 Post Ufflp.c. I 

GEN PL 1>IAM DESIRES A.< UNFUKNUSIlliD 
bedroom, havi..g southern exposure, looted be- 
tween litli aud .14th sts, aud west 01 -lib av.; tent 
mupt be low. Address J. B., Box .\o. 167 Tim,a ufflee. 

B0im)JVAOT15D. [_ 

AEADV OF LONUEXPEKIE.NCK IN TEACH- 
lug, with referenc- unexcoutiouabie, desires uOard 
iu a priy:ito family where lessons ou the piano ami in 
vocal music would bo received iu exeha.ige ; aiso 
use of p. auo 11 desired. Address Miss -M, No. 74 East 
12dtll St. 

WANTED — BOAUU IN A PI{1V.,TK FA.UlLY 
where no other. boarders are takeu; loc'.tion must 
be between o'tli iind -lOih sia.. betwe uHiil) uiid MioU- 
sju avs. Address .\DAM1S, bOA No. 270 Tl.uEi Ui'- 
'I'OVVN OFi'lCi., .--O. 1,207 liltUAUnAV. 

WA.\Tfc;i».— DV A Glil\Ti.E.M-.N. V. IfE. A.,1J .'"iON 
TT two or three eunny rooms, w.th bond, iu a first- 
class priV.ite family ; iOCitiou uetn e«Q 20t b and .Jiuih 
Sts. and ueai Otii av. Address, stating terms, itc,| Vv. 
B., H^atiou r:, Ciiy. 

B\ 'iUlli.l:.E IjA.'IES I.. A PlCIV.iTE FAM- 
ily, between 23d and 09th«t.-f., .Madioon aud (jtli 
avs., t.t'O rooms and use of ii.ir.or. .Address, Willi 
terms aud r^ie.euees, C. , box .\o. J.ii Post ofllce. ! 

j;cujNTO\:;^BOAiiLx ;_ 

(~iREi;Nvvicii, j'o.v.v.— ri.sii itoo.M.s, Kiiisr- 
TTc'I.AiS fABL.; location central, v. ry beauqiful 
and lie.iUhlul, for one or two tftiui.ies during Full jiiud 
Winter; i-pecialiy altriietive to liimiiies Seeliiug 
tieakli, comfoit an I iiul't; relereuees (iiven i»nd- re- 
qiiir d. Addresa losl udicJ Lioi -■•o. lUS G;eenwich, 
I'oun. 1 

O.VKU FOR CHiLiJRh..> NE.AR <iO0D 

school, in n te'ieboi's laiuiU . at Mooteliir; closest 
supervision : rronch ami music wi, bout cxcia ciinige. 
Address l-oi No. '245 .Moutciai:, .>. J., or lor particulars 
No. 2;J7 Gth av.. .New-York. 

OAKI) FOR «< ALL.— GLEN RIDiE, COK.N- 
.\ iil.L, N. Y — luacrei niounds: fruit, nulk, vog{;ti- 
bles; citiri.iges, gas, water, apdui beda, Sji;. 1 

JA.MEs G. KOli 



HOTELS. 



HfSTEL ROYAL, RESERVOIR sQl ARE 
and 4otli St.— .\ 8iiictl.y first-class famu, iiotei ; 
airy quiet; the restaUiiMit is of UDsurpass.'d excel- 
lence; prices moderate; a tew elegantly-luruished 
%uiice vr.caut. 

ENOX HOUSE, N<l. 7J 5 f H AV.-OPESS 
Jet. 1. A. J. UUTJKS. Manager. Tlie bouse ihas 
been rcmodeiied into French ti. tta; ele;;ant suitea to 
jmnt. Meals iii li. oarte. if desired by tenaut. 



AMUSEMENTS. 



COMMENCING MONDAY EVENING, OCT. 9. 




BOOTH'S THEATRE. 



QRASO BALLET. 



JARRETT&. PALMER Lessees and Managers 

'THE GLORY OP TJK STAGE." 

B EIGHTH WBEK of the triuraohant pro- 

duction of LORD BiRON'S exquisite ro- 
mantic play, 

SARDANAPALUS. 



L 



ra^ 



EVERYTHING NEW: 

Scenery, costumes, regslia, weapons, ban- 
ners, &.O. 

THE GREAT CAST INCLUDTKQ 

J>1R. F. C. BANGS and 

AGNES BOOTH. 



THE GRAND ITALIAN BALLET, 

introducing the renowned BAUTOLKTTI, 
premiere dansense assoiuta. of the Orand 
Opera, Paris, and La bcaia, Milan; Sin. 
MAsC.\GNO. principal dancer ot La Scala, 
Milnn. and Sao Carlo, Naples. 
in.ATI"^EE EVERY SATURDAY AT ItSO . 

KELLY & LEON'S. 23D 8T. AND 6TH AV. 

The Great Troupe. 40 Artists. SIR DAN O'PALLUS. 

Added tuis week 8 Comedians. S. S. Ballet. 
2 Phenomenal Tenors. Douoie Quartet. Cranky Lou. 
Mr. GEO. LESLIIi. 40 Ar t fits. Mr. J. O. HERBERT. 

MR. willialU castle, late of the 
Kellogg Euglisn Opera, is at liberty to accept en- 
gagements for concerts and oratorios. Address Albion 
Club, No. 21 East 15th st., or care Thos. Hall, musio 
store. No. 814 Broadway. 

COLIiEGE OF MUSIC, 

NO. 5 WEST 14TU f«T., WEST OP 5TH AV. 
Mme. aud Mr. AL31TES, instructors in all orunches 
of singing, accordiug to the true and pure IlaUan 
method. Prompt vocal reading, uader ProL Q. CON- 

TER.'.O. 

FRENCH YOUN<i LADY, GOOD MUSI- 

clan, of some experience, is desirous of givinj; 
piano and sinsing lessons ot pupil's residence or her 
own home; terms very moderate. Address J. M., Sta- 
tion F. ^ 

f|>HE MISSE."* SLOIU.AN, PROFESSORS OF 
ipiam. singing, and the harp; residence, No, 63 
West 35th St. Lessons in the best methods of Euro- 
pean academies : harpi lor sale or hire. 

C. HAlVl.noND. CORNET SOLOIST, CAN 

• be engaged tor sacred or misoelianeons concerts ; 
Kn^iish and French method taught; terms. Call at 
N o."00'J 2d av. 

A SACRIFICE FOR CASH.— BEAUTIFUL 
stocK of Planus and Organs, on installmeDta or to 
rent; (upright) pianos a specialty. GOLDSMITH'S, 
No. 26 Bieecker st. 



WANTEO-PLPILS FOR THE PIANO BY A COM- 
peti?nt teacher who has a few leisure hours : 
terms moderate. Apply to C. IL, at Sd. Schubetth's 
music store. No 23 Union square. 

RIVA IE FAiillLY, NO. 50 EAST 9 I'H ST., 

must saeiiflce maenihceDt 7^ Uospwood Piano- 
forte, cost $900, for iji200. 

AN EXPERIENCED CLA.->sICAL AND 
mathematical teacher, classic.t; gold medalist Of a 
loreigii universitv, desires orivate pupils ; prepares for 
coUoite, {English or American ; ) highest City reference. 
Addresk TEA. HER, Box No. 32o TIMES UP-TOWN 
OFFI CE, NO. 1.257 JROADWAY. 

I.-IIIAG GoVliliNliSS ^AN E.NOLISH LADY 

desires an engagement; her acqniremeutt are 
En<,'li9U, t:!OioUshiy ; Freuoh and music; the highest 
references aiven from New- York families. Address G. 
D BoxNo. 292T..rtESUc'-TOW.'i OFFICE. NO. 1,257 
BROADWAY. 

LEG ANT PAKlsIAN FIIBNCU MADE 

easy ; also. Germ.in; Engl sh to ioreiirners ; trans- 
lations. &.C.; schoola and families attended. KLFKIDA 
DE WAILLY, Professor of Laaguages and Literature, 
No. 809 Park av^ - 

N ENGEISH VlSlTINti GOVERNESS DK- 

sires an eojra-'eiuent. speaks French and German 
fluently; good musician; , hi 'best rcfereuoos. Ad- 
dress -Miss HE TO R, No. 67 |We-t 3oth st 

Al<0.ii.eiGN L.ADV DESIRES ENGAGEMENTS 
to teach Uuishiu); music, sioging, French, Germaa, 
Italliin. Hnd Ku^lish. Address M. S., care of Mr. 
Chdsteni, No. 77 U niversity place. 

OYS KITI'ED PRIVATELY FOR HAR- 

VAIll), \aIo. or any othprcollfira by an oxperieuced 
teacher; biirhest reterences. .■address fEAUilER. Box 
239 iIMi';.> UP-TOW.S OFFICE, l.'2o7 BEOADWaY. 

Its. .lilTCilEl.L SUPPLIES FAlTllLiIES, 

without c'la'ee, with competent visitiae or rest- 
deut governesses, tutors, pTO-essors of languages and 
music. Teaclurs' Bureau, No. 67 West 35tli st 

^flSS llECT;»*t .AND .HISS WIG LEY, CKR- 
iTAiificated English leaeliers, receive pupils for prl- 
v:ite tuition iu English brauciies. languages, music, 
iio. hchi Icuce, No. 67 vVe-t 35fh st. 

iN E\<il.lSH VlSlTlNCi UOVEttNESS, 

earelul in >;r 'Uii ling pupils, desires tution ; Eng- 
Hsii, I. aim. music ami drawiug. .\doire8S Duljiin, Box 
302 Tl. K.S Ul'-rOWN OFFICE. 1,257 BROAOWAX. 

A' l-K. >c;il PltOTKSIANX LADY OF CUL- 
Mirii auo refiuement, wishes to give instruction in 

eiehui'je for a home; references une.vceptiuuabie. 
Address IN SlRUn I'lON. Box No. 129 Piotm Ofllce. 

TEACHER OF EXPERIENCE DESIRES 

priviit • pupils iu English, Latin, and mathematics. 
Adoress M., Box .">o 152 i'tmea Office. 



LAAV^^OHOOLS^ 

COLD.HBIA COLLEGE L.AVV SCHOOL. 

The nineteenth annual term of Ihii institution will 
conime.ice at No, 8 Greit Jones sl,, New-York, oa 
Weilnesdav, Oo . 4, and will o ntlnae uaiil M»vl7, 
ib77- Catalogues c-nitaialne full inrormatfou may ba 
obtained ttv personal apphcatioa at No. 8 Groat Jonei ' 
Bt.,«i I, y letter a.idresseU to TaEODOttJt W.OWHiilf, 
Professor, tc • 

LAW SCHOOL OF THE IJNIVPJKSITY OP 
^ITY OF NEW-Yi'BK.— The eighteenth annual 89s, 
Blon licgius Oct. 2, 1S76. Fur circulars, last eiamln- 
Btion, papers, &.C., apply to iV. li. MAH II.n', Kecretary 
of (ouucil. No. 141 Broadwav, or D. R. J.iQUBd, Sej-a- . 
tarv of Faculty. No. 25 Chambers s» 



AT 

GILMORE'S GAEDEN, 

Occupying the entire great square bounded by 4th and 

Madison avs. and 26th and 27th sts. 
THE GREATEST SHOW OP THE GREAT CTTY I» THE 
AMUSEMENT PALACE OF TUB WORLD I 
THE TROPICS TRANSPLANTED, A VAST AND VBB- 
ITABLEZOGLOQICAL GARDEN, embowering the rar- 
est of exotic creatures. Ths Jungle Monarchs, in a 
vernal conservatory of bloom and beauty. 

THE NILE NATURALIZED I 

and Bamum's $25,000 BEHEMOTH, the only living 
hippopotainus In America, disporting beneath a eata- 
ract of living waters. HUGE SEA LIONS and ;«AEI NB 
MARVELS, gambohngln aquarium ftebdem. 

The most memorable of mortal marvels, CAPT, 009- 
TENTENU8, a noble Greek Albanian, tattooed from 
head to foot, in China Tartary, as punishment for en- 
gaging in rebellion against the King. 

A VAST OaNTENNlAL MXJ3BTJII. 

Life-sized automatic marvels and mechanical scenic 

illusions, operated by a solid silver steam engine. 

A CENTENNIAL PORTRAIT GALLERY, the most gro- 
tesque and wonderful of living human phenomena. 

AN ALADDIN AMP HITHEATRB, 

lustrous with ten thousand vari-colored lights, 

GORGEOUS ORIE.STAL SPECTACLES 

and peagents. The acme of decorative art. 

THE MARCH OF THE MAMMOTHS. 
$2,000 PER DAY IN .SALABIBS, 

TO FIVE GREAT ClRCUS TROUPES. 

AH EQUESTRIAN EXPOSITION necessitatiag a con- 
staut change of programme for its presentation. A 
brilliant and varied Centennial of circus triumphs, 
without parallel in Metropolitan annals, and present- 
ing in a rapid succession of sensational sarprises the 
greatest heroes and heroines of the arena, including 

MARTfllflO LOW.^NDE. 
the hurricane horseman of Brazil, in his terrific nnl- 
versalchaUenge two, four, and seven-horse bare-back 
acts. 

CH.1ELE8 W. FlSa, 

the single-horse bare-back champion tnck equestrian 
of the universe. 

SIX LOVELY L.iDY EQUESTRIANS I 
POUR FROLICSOME AND VOCAL FOOLS:— 
Geortje Clark, Ted Almonte, Jerry Harper, and Wm. 
Roland. Over one hundred peerless principal per- 
formers. More and rarer wild beasts, birds, and rep- 
tiles ; more marvelous human phenomena; more cu- 
rious, costly, and cunning mechanical triumphs; 
more distinguished equestrUns and athletes than 
were ever before presented at any one time, in any 
age or pUce. and MORE THAN TES TIMES THE 

PRICE OK ADMISSION, in wonder and inatraction, de- 
light and inspiration, Oitcltemont and amusement, re- 
turned by 



Admission to the entire garden, and to every depart- 
ment of the colossal exhibition, 50 cents. 

Children under nine years, 25 cents. 

Beservod seals, 25 cents extra. 

Doors open at 1 and 6:30 P. AL Grand Animal and 
Arenic Spectacular Entree one hour later. 

Reserved seats may be secured at the boz-offlce one- 
week in advano. 



AMUSEMENTS 

WALLACE'S. 

MS. IB8TBB WALLACE Proprietor fnd H»nagar' 

In oommenciag the 

PALL AND WINTER SBASOJir; 

ON TUESDAY, OCT. 8, 

Mr. WALLACE begs to draw nottoe 

to the p-oduptlon of 

A NEW COMEDY, 

In three acts, 
entitled 

FORBIDDEN FRUIT 

TTritten expressly for this theatte. 



AMUSEMENTS. 



Th* play will be produced with most eoinplete and 
perfect aooeisories at t o ^ . 

MUSIO, SCENERY, AND APP0IIITMB5TS, ' 
which wlfl be 
ENTIRELY NEW, 

CBAEACTBRSt 
Mr. Sergeant Buster, Leading 

Counsel in the great Brighton 

case Mr. HASBT BECKETT 

Mr. Cato Dove, Junior Counsel Mr. H. J. MONTAGUS 

Capt. Derringer, Royal Artillery Mr. B. AKNOTT 

Dodd, Lawyer's Clerk Mr. W. HERBERT 

Swalback, a Head Waiter Mr. J. SHANNON 

Victor, a Walter Mr- W. EYlTNGB 

Joseph ..Mr. nDWIN 

Jim Cuddy, Railway Potter Mr. LEONARD 

Whistler, a Conductor.: Mr. J. PBCK 

Crawl, a cabioan Mr. T. WILSON 

Mrs. Cato Dove Miss ADA DYA8 

Mrs. Sergeant Buster MME. PONISI 

The Great Zulu, of Robinson's 

Circtu, Oeui of the Ring and 

Princess of the Trapeze Miss EPFIB OEBMO!T 

Miss Julia Cripps Miss BLAUDXiiL- 

SCENE, LONOON.— rniB, P^BSBIIT. 

ACT I,— TEMPTATIONS I — AFTBEWOON. 
LA"W CHAMBERS OP MR. CATO DOVE IN THSTBM- 
PLE— How Mr. Cato Dove, weary of happiness at 
home and curious to taste pleasure abroad, is tempt- 
ed to make a night of It • ' 



ACT IL— CONFUSION.— EVENISQ. 

EBFEESHMENT BOOM OF MIDLAND BAILWAT BTA^ 

TION. 

Bow Mr. Dove begins making a night of it 

AOT m.— DISSIPATION.— MIDITIOHT. 
BOOMS No. 4 AND No. 9 IN THE HOTEL AT OBB- 
MORNE— How Mr. Dove mad* a night of it, and the 
sort of night Mr. Dove made. 

Ineidental music composed by Mr. Tbda. Baker. 

Due notioe Trill be riven of the first appearanoe of 
Mr. JOHN GILBEBT. Mr. C. A. STEVENSON, Mr. B. M. 
HOLLAND, .virs. JOHN SEPTON, Miss ROSE LISLE. 
Hiss JOSEPHINE BAKER, and Miss KATE BARTLETT. 

BOX-OPPICB OPEH FROM 8 A. >L TO 4 P. M. 

MBIiO'S GARDEN. 

CHARLES B. ARNOLD Lessee and MaBager 

BBNSBN SHEEWOOD Direelor 

Third week of the sensation of the season, 
THE BUIGHT, TUii BEAUTIFUL, TUB BBWILDSBIKG 

BABA. 

BABA. 

BABA. 

Time Table. 

Ccloek. 
ORIGINAL OVERTDBE. "BABA" (Marstsek).... 8:00 

PROLOGUE : 8:06 

THE FAIRY TABLEAU 8:21 



OUST 



FIRST ACT 

AMORBT AND BABA' 8 TOPICAL 
GRAND BALLET, "LA BULTANd 
THE PREMIERES. MLLRS. MEN2ELI. 

THE TRANSPAEB.sn' BATH 

TH PRISON , 

BaBA'S KONG 

THE TRIO 

THE SILVER. GOLD, AND EMERALD GROTfOBS 9:28 

BALLET, "LE8 AMOUR DBS DIABLES 9:30- 

THE MENZELId 9:36 



8:80 
8:40 
S:44 
8:50 

8:56 
9:00 
9:05 
9:10 



SECOND ACT. 

THB FIBLD OP MU.SHR00M8 _« ftSO 

TUB GREAT ORIENTAL AMAZON MARCH _ 9:63 

AMORBTS TROUBADOUR'S SONG 10:16 

THE MaRVELOU-I TRANSFORMATION OP THE 
SHIP ON OPE .T SEA TO THE PAlRY PALACE, 
INVENTED BY MB. BENSE.N SHEEWOOD 10:23 



THIRD ACT. 

THE CRDMBLINO PALACE ^10:35 

QUIffTET ^10:40 

FINALE , 10:o8 

GRAND TRANSFORMATION 8CBNB (Invantad by 
Bensen Sherwood and W. E. Devema) THE 

EEVBLS OF THE EOSES , 11:00; 

CURTAIN, 



EVBar BVBNI50 UNTIL FDETHBE NOTIOB. 

BOX OPFICB OPEN DAILY. 
THIED BABA MATINEE SATU <DAY. AT 1:80. 

FRBB LIST ABSOLDTKLY 
SUSPENDED. 



BOOTH'S THEATRE. 



SUNDAY NEXT 



JARRBTT k PALMKB Lessees and Manager^ 

Messrs. MAX MARETZBK and J. C. FRYER having 
mode arrangements with the lessees of the above 
popular plaoe of resort for a series of 
GRAND SACRED YOCAL AND 

INSTRUMENTAL CONCBRTS. 
Beg to annoanee that the flrat uf the seriui ttUI take 
place on 

,j ETHOiii, Oct. 8, 18T6, 

AT 8 O'CLOCK P. M., 

when' th9 following artists will assist : 

Mho. B. PAPPBNUbIM, the Prima Donoa Soprano, 

Mlts ADELINE kiCUAED, Contralto. 

Mr. W. CASTLE, the favorite Tenor. 

Mr. A. SOHST, the distinguished Baritena. 

First appearance In America •! the celebrated 

SWEDISH LADIES' VOCAL QUABTBT. 

QU8TAV BATTEE, the eminent Pianist 

THE GRAND ORCHESTRA. 

Mr. MAX MAaETZEK Mosleal DlrectoJr 

During the season many of the known foreign and 
local celebrities'wi II appear. 

POPULAR PRICES. 

Admission (including reserved seats) ONE DOLLaB. 
Further particuTars on Wednesda.y next 

ACADEMY OF .nUSlC, lAthst. Mme. FALMIEEI. 

First night Of the 

STBAKOSrH GtAN.) ITALIAN OPERA, 

TO-MOEEOVf (Mondw) EVENING, Oct 2, at 8 o'clock, 

NOa.MA. 

Mme. Maris' 

PALMIER! 

Prima donna of the 1 heatre Sau Carlo, Naples, and La 
Seal I, -Milan, will make her d6but la NcW-Xork in her 
grfat idle of NOKMA. 

Sllie. Pers!Bni,(fir8t appearance in New-York).Adalglsa 
Signor Palmirri. (first appearancein New- York ).Poliione 
Mr. Conlv, (first appearance in Italian opera).. Oroveso 
HuMeul Director and Conductor 8. uEHR.sNS 

TUESDAY EVENING, Oct. 3— First appearance this 
season of Allle. BrlOCCAasARSACE in SEMISAMIDE. 

WEDNESDAY EVE'JING, Oct 4— First of Signor 
BRIGNOLI as FEKRANIMJ In LA FAVORITA. 

TiiUltSDAY i;V8MNG?a)ct. 6— IL TBOVATORB. 

FRIDAY EVENING, Oct 6— FIFTH OPERA NIGHT. 

SATURDAY, Oct 7— GALA Ot'KRA MATINKB. 

Seats can be secured at Box office. Academy. 

CHICHERING HALL. 

THE CITY LECTURE COURSE. 
AnVBrican'Liternry Burean Managers. 
! MONDAY EVENINGS. 

J<diansT B_ O-OXJO-IEI- * 

blihitiCt — "Eliiquence ana Orators." 

OCT. 16-BAYARD TAYl,OU. 

Snldeci — " Literature as an Art" 

OCT. 23— Hartin Faraaiiar Tapper. 

Readings from bis own works. 

OCT. 3.1— 'VHBODOaE TILTON. 

Subject — " ihe Master Motives^" 

NOV. 13— COL. JOHN W. FOUNBT. 

bubject— ' (lur Centenniil in Europe." 

NOV. 20— KEY. R. S. S'I'ORRS D. D. 

Suyect^ — •• The Old and Sew In Euro, e." 

COURSE TICKETS, With reserved seat; $2 50, at 

POND'S Music Store, No. 39 Union square. No seats 

reserved tor single nigbts. This course will be given 

iu the UrooKlyn Academy, Inesday evenings. Tickets 

at CnAND LEK'S. 

PARISIAN VARIETIES. 16th st t Broadway. 

Immense bill, everything entirely |new. 
Lively. I Rich, Rare, and B icy. I Funny. 

For Better or Worse, Tableaux Vi rants, French donees, 
MISS Rose Fieldins's last exciting domes ic episode, 
entitled Searching for Spice, qi- A Slice From a Cut 
Loat. First appearance of Mlleofllsnch Dantlgny, fWim 
Le Jardiu MsbiUe and Closerie de Lilis, Paris. Mile. 
Bertha, i<eSor Car lella, Prot Qilfnn, and 100 others. 
Evening at 8. Matinee 1'uesday. If hnrsday. and Sat'y 2. 

BBILLIANT NEW MUSIC. 

'• Eilleen AUauna," song, Thomas. 50 cents. •* Ellleen 
AUannan," waits, arranged by Borjj. 40 cents : as quick- 
step, by Wiegand, 41) cents: for brass band, $1. " Seven 
Times Three." soug, Bsssford, 50 Cents. *' Gootl-Nicht, 
my ^weet," Bassford, 40' cents. "American Rifle 
Team," march and polka, OperM, each 40 cents. 
" Nearer, my God, to Thee " Williams. BO cents. " Shot 
Proof," (triumph-U march played by Gilmore,) Pearoe, 
60 oent«. "Tambourine and (''astauets,'' FIsner, bo 
cents. Copies mailed. WILLIAM A. POND U. CO.. 
No. 547 Broad war, and No. 3D Union 8q:n are. 

' THEJTURF^ 

AMERICAN JOCaEY CLUB. 

FALL MKETINO, 1876, 
AT JEht0.dB PARK, 

Sept. 30, Oct, 3, 5. 7, 10, 12, and 14. 
Races commence each day punctually at 1:30 P.M. 
A. BliLflO.ST, President 
C. WHBATI.T, Secretary. 

___8m[jVIER RESORTS. 

Famous Health Resort. 

For iDTalida darios Aatnmn and Winter. 
'^ OUR HOME HYGIENIC INSTITUTE, 

DANSVlLLk, LIVINGSTON COUNTY, N. Y.. 

is the finest place on the American Continent tar the 
sick to-recover health, or lor invalids to become 
btroug by th6 use of sanitary agencies tiuly, during 
the Fall and Winter mouths; last vVinter we u-.d 
eighty lady and seventy ^eallemeo pittb ncs, this Win- 
ter we cao care for aeirly rwleo as many: <lrnul»rs 
giving full infoimatlon nna references, and a beauiitul 
steel engraving oi the Cure and its < ottages, will he 
sent free to all who ask for them by postal card, and 
all letters of inquiry will b<i promotly and feourt«oii8l.v 
answered. Addi-esS as above. JAMES G JAiKSOS. 



THB MOST FASCINATING 



ENTSBTAINIIENT 



EYBB PRBSENTBD 15 
NEW-TORK. 



COMIDTAND EPBCTACLB 



UNITEa 



WPTH AYENtTB TBBAT&K^ ': 

l»rA«H-*», .-„ '?'oa<»''»y »nd 28th st 

BViiRT NIOHT at 7:45. AnOVRRWHBLJUNGSeCCaa* 

LIFE! 

,_ .., A coMKDT Ok crnr tvi-bri 

AUQUSTIH DALrs GREAT SPtCTAi DLAR HOrBLTTI 
x..Tm„ .«- EEcmVED NIGHTLY ^^^^^^^^ 

WITH SCREAMS OF CONTl.iiCOUS LAnn;iT>n ot 
AUOIliNCBS CROWDED To THB dSmB 4°"!ooS 
Love, Hope and Joy— fair Pleasure's smiling f.-ain» 

These, mixed with Art and in dne bound, oonfloed. 
Make and maintain the balaoce of the mind = 

The Lights and Shades, whose weil-accordad strlb 
Gives all the strength and color of our Lift I 
LIFE! 

Tb« TVOvwsavs; "Life* 

Is rather a trolic thanapUT 

The Worid sajs i " Lift?" 

oontalos no eud of atttaoi 

tluns. 

The Time* says i "Life" 
provoked nproartoos men 
riment 

The Ttlegram saysi "Ltf^ 
may b« considered a graat 
success. 

The-iKTisays: Tbelsngh^ 
terand apolisose were up- 
roarious. 

The Herald aarsi Th« 
Snow Ballet in ■• Life" is 
most novel and is a grtat 
realistic eff.-ct. 

TheAfaUsxyst Certainly 
never was a play mors 
spieo^dly monnied aoi 
east to such accomplished 
artists. 

The OravMe says : Tbc 
Japanese set outvies ii 
picturesoue elegance any< 

___ . thing ever seen. 

THB MOST BBTLLIAKT GATHtSBI-VG Of COMEDI AS* 
EVKR SEE.S IN O.SB PLAY. 
CHARACTERS OP REALITY: 
Bohnrler Samples, type of the unwise, who 

roam but do not soar Mr. COQHLAK 

Poney Mutuel, a lively practitioner waose 

tale may be told to the marines. .Mr. JA j1K3 LBWTSi 
Mr. Lynn Lessurely, whose lite was " rounded 

by asleep" Mr. CH.\ELKS FISHEB 

Frank Dodge Mr. M. BAR^IYMOBlt 

Harry Gresham, otherwise " Osprey." 

Mr. OEOEQE PARCBS 

Hosen Pokis, " Confldentlal"... Mr. W. DAViiXiB 

Mrs. Hasham Mallory, Trith a Tridow's mite of 

/ a million ^ Hiss AMY FaWSITT 

/Mrs. Brown Boston, with an eye. .Mrs. G. H. GILBXBV. 

Bthel, type of the confiding Miaa EJiULr uIUM 

Mrs. Gresham, type of the mjnred. 1 

• MUs GEORGIAN A DEBW J 

Mary Ann, eook and conspirator. ..Miss MARY Vf>iH.*\ 

Uapitola Aurora, the despoiled of nams. j 

Miss S YD .VET COWBLU 
CHAEACTEE9 OP FAIRYLAND i 
Mr. Chnmley Oievert, the Bhakesperean revi- 

▼sllst Mr. JOdS BROUCHAK 

Slgnor.pieri. Maitre de Ballet. ..Mr. FRANK BENNKTt 

Tr^dltt Interpreter Extraorolaary Mr. J. H. RISO 

Lord Loomax Mr. J. Di^VBAO 

Daeh, of the great Shakesperean Temple. 

„ Mr. W. BEECMAS 

Slgnorina Qnlsstplna Samltl, (otherwise Ml«» 

Josephine Smith) MiasELSi.i MOOR! 

Miss Btlghtstars iiisi VlNTOl 

And In the novel and magnificent 
8SOW BALLET, 
Mile. BONFANTI Ad THE SPIEiT OF THB BtTN. 
Mile. 80HLKB, A3 THE SPIRIT OF THE S.^O,?.-, 
Act L — Romance of Home 1 1 
Act IL — Romance of Adventure !l 
Act IIL— Romance ot tie Theatra 11 
Act IV.— Eomanoe of Law 'I 
"«* Seats seciued a week bbaad mi 
the Box-office, and anv ol the aX» 
tions of the Atlantic and Pacific nn. 
thQ American Dist let Te'egranhs* 



-f' 



^•; 



■f 



MATINBBOF 

IIFI 
SATUBDAT 

AT a. 



BS- 



8TBINWAY HALI..^ i^u.>lA<k 

The pubUo is respectfiillT informed that 

THEODOEB THOMAS TrtU give a settee o« 

GEAKD AND POPULAR CONCBBTa. 

WEDNESDAY EVB.MNO, Oct. 4. at 8. 

FIRST GRAND CONCERT. 

The folloTrtng artists will appear during the seiieM 
PRINCIPAL SOLO VoCALISTo : 

UlSS HBSBIBTTA BGBB.'?, Soprano: 

Stlss AB.NA DBASDIL, Contralto; 

Miss ANTONIA HBNNE, Contralto-. 
Mr. H. A BI8CH0FF, Tenor ; 

Mr. PRANK ERMMr.Hr::. BarttMS) 
- Mr. MYRON T, WrilTNBr. BassOi. 

PEINOIPAt INSTRUMSNTAt SOLOISTS: " 
Mme. MADELINE SCHILLER, r'i:>nO, 

Mr. 8. E. JACOBSOHN, Vloha, ani 
THBODORB THOMAS' USaiVALED OKCHKSTitA. 
THURSDAY, Oct. 5— SECOND GRAND CC^Ci-Rr. 
FRIDAY. Oct. 6— THIBD GRAHU CO.N'CERT. 
SATURDAY AFTERNOON. Oct 7, at 3 o'cl'vik 

MATINEB I GRASD MaTLnBH 

ADMiaSIU K Tl CCBTS OH« DOI,LA-t EACiL 

bBaVBD SBAT8 FIPTT CB.VT8 EXTRA. 

BBOOND BALCONY 60 CENTS. 

The isle of reserved seats for the first Track's eo» 

eerts TnU commence on Saturday morning at the boz- 

offlee of SMlnws7 Hall; at 6. Schirmer's, No. 70J 

Broadway, and at the General Theatre Ticket OlBee, 

No. Ill Breadw«y. Full programmes caa be had at 

the ticket of&ces and all the principal music and-pianc 

stores. 

WOOIPS MUSEUM. WOOBA 

MONDAY. Oct 9. 

. ETItST AVTBBNOON a* 2 and ^'VEKINQ at »- 
■ Aagnatl& Daly's great play, 

FLASH OF LIQETSINO. 
Aet 1— Tke Stolen Chaia. 
Act 3- Bessie's Flight. 
Aet 8— The Bnmlng Steamez. 
Act 4— The Coal M ystery. 

LOOK AT THB OAST, 
Miss SO PHIS laLBS. 

H«T7 ColtOB, WsL M. Ward, H. BteTrari 
PolW Booth, Emily Maynarl, Aggia >Vood, 

G. CL Jordan, Harrv Vaughn, U. Wilson, 

Bertie May wood. a«o. C. Childs, Ice, kc 

SEDUCED PRICES. 
ADMISSION. 

Taan,.Matin4«fl .....,.^..15 eenu 

To j|}l evening porfora iapees . 20 e-nta 

AMERICAN INSTiTUTE, 

Forty-fifth annnal exhibition of the 

GREAT INVENTIONS OF THE YEAR. ^ 

An unusual display of 
AMEBICAN IN'VEHTIONS .*>D AMERICAN FBODCCIf 

Now to be seeii. 









Upward of 400 Tarieties of Frait. 

2d and Sd avs.. between 63d and e4cb sts. 



GILMORE'S GARDEN. 



FIFTY CENfa 



MADISON AND 4TH AVS. AND 28TH AND 87TH STSk 

THIS (SUNDAY) EVENING SEP f. Sa 

LAST NIOHT BUT ONE OF T E SEAdON. 

A GRAND SACRnD OQi<CERT. 

ALL THB DISTINGUISHE ) SOLOISTS 

AND GlLMOEa'a MILITARY BANB 
In a nagnlfloent programme. 

This, "the Biest deliEhrfnl Bammer resort of tbfi 
world," is the only place of puUuo •ntertaloment is 
the City open Snnday evening. 

MONDAY KVENINO, COT. 3, 

last night of the season, and repetition of the 

GRANO CKNTBNMAL JUBIL'E CON''F.ET 

given for Mr. Gilnore's benefit SATURDAY. 

60 OENTS AD.'ttlSSION .50 CS "TS, 

ST. THOK CHOia 

to. Wi Wamii, Dirsctor. 

Twenty good fresh Toioes wanted to fill vseande^ 
Rare eduer tional advaiitiiget. Circulars at the mnsU 
stores and at Chlckering HalL 

Apply personally to the Director or by post 

THEATRE CO.UIQUE. NO. 614 BROADWAY.' 

BARRIGAN k. HART _ nroyrietort 

M. VV. HANLBY .lanngej 

HAERIGAN t Hart in Edward Harrii.'ans mast r 
piece, 'Walking f^r Dat Caae." Dili Darr.?** • rieij 
Gate Explosion." First appearance of DiiL..HANfli 
I and CUMMl.NGS, and Miss LOClSK FKA.^fiLlN. Rs- 
appearanceof JOHN WlLLIA.ttiS. Edward Harrigui'i 
'• I'errible Example " in wnicb HaiTiitaa aud H rt, 
Billy Uray. Lsrry Toolev. and all the companv api>ear. 
Wednesday and Saturday M»tin6es^ 

PARK THEATRE. 

GENUINE SUCCESS 

OF 

THB KBW AUERIOA<T PLAY, 

Buoeesser to the " Mighty Dollar" and •' Qilded Age,* 

CLOUJS! 

CLOUDSI 

whieh Trill be presented ev«ry evening at 8. Paturdat 

Marin^e at 2, Trith its splendid cast and be utuui 

sce nery. 

LE COMMANDE UR. CalCKERI.sG ilALL 

C.AZBSEUVE. 

The Emperor of Prestidlgitateurs. ani tne Presti.!!- 
gluteurot Emperors, will appear erery T;.E3DAI, 
TnUESDAY and SATURDAY >.VENING. 

Marin^e SATORDAV, 1:30 P. M. 

Admission, iucludiug reserved seats, $1, 76 cents 
aud 5 J cents. 

Tickets for tale at Scbabertb k Co.'i, No. 23 Union 
sqMare. 

OLYMFIC-NOVBLTV PUliAl R.E, 




Matinees. 

Wednesday, 

Saturday, 

15. 2J,it.i. c. 



Admission, ISc. 3.'>a. 6i>o., 7oi-.,- and CI. 
NOVELTY COMl'iNY .Ml. f>. 
Complete change of spclslcU't and 
dram I of FALSE LIG'-IP^. 



REMOVALS. 

Dli^r.^ ON I CD'S 

REMOVAL. 

L. DELMONICO WILL RR.MOVS FEOX 

oTH AV. AND 14TU ST. TO 
BROADWAY, 5TH AV.. AND 26TH ST., 
(MADISDN SgOAKR,) 
TUURSDAl, SEPT. 14. 



JVIAJBBL^MANTELS;^ 

M'^'^KBLB and MARBLEIZED MANTELS at greatly 
reduced prices; also, monuments, head-stones, 
Slumberb' and turuiiare slabs, marble oouncers, and til* 
!«, A. rr^ABRR. 184 te 136 East 1 8th St.. near 8d av-^ 



ORANb 

MRS. 0. C. HOWARD, 



ELOCUTION, ^ 
Prof. P.'IJ LIP LAWRENCE, 



OP BRA UOCsiK. 

8LAVr,V3 GEOEGM R!.V3!^RS, 
AND 200 GENUl.N'E ."^OUrSHRN dIkKiEs 
IN U.NCLB TO-tl'^ CAUr."*. 
MATINEES WED.NKSUAY AND SAIDtDA- AT ■?.. 

~~" ORATIi^UY, ANii ACii.M'.- 

. author of .'Uide.l 

Speaker." "OomstocK's Eloootio'a," " LAwreaoe Sp<- k- 
er." instructs for the minis ry, balis of O.uer.-s, 
courts of law. and the $ta^-e. No 164 > ^'e«t J.'ith st. 

171XERC1SK, HEALTH. AaiUSL..n.iNT.-.r. 
li.voo I's Uymnasium, No. 6 East 2.'^th st. ; opeu dny 
and evening; boxlug. tencing, bathing, pnva.e tr. in- 
ing. tc ^ _^_^ 

ETfcANT KRE.NCH CO.'MV ritCSAiI ,S 

■iUABANTBED.- p-.ikl"s: a speoi-lty ; <la8S-^«: 

a lesson free. Address UAVAB!), Box No. 278 TIMua i P- 
TOvVN OFFICE, NO. 1,2j7 lidOAUAAY. 



I * •-■> - 



DANCING. 

Bi 
BROoME .>T., will open for the season, 
TUESDAY, Oct. 3, lor adults. 
SATURDAY. Oct 7, for cuildren. 
These rooms are centrally located and easy of access 
tnva all parts of New-York, Brooklyn, aod other ad. 
' jftcent cities. The first lessons can be taken privatciy 
and no extra charge from clas s prices. , 

liLEN DODWOM-X'tt'S liAi^Cl-xw ^^^\^\jU 

REMOVED TO NO. 631 6TH AV. 
Commences on 8ATbEDAY, Oct 7. 
For partlonlars send for circular. 

H. RIFEltS' SCHOOL FOR IMNCINO,! 

•NO. 175 STaTX. COE^JER COURl' ST., BE04MS.J 
LY.v.— Classes for beginners ate now formino, 6ead fbr 
^adrcnlafc'' 



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«MSW«*l«0»S»*K 



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i4. 



C^i Sl^fa-g0r(i Cxims, Buntraflr^^^to i, 1876, — Cnpfe S^^rt/, 



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LOCAL MISCELLANY. 

— ♦ 

THE SAVINGH BANKS. 
co^'TI^■UATIOX op tbe rux on thk dry 

DOCK ISrsmUTION— ITS ASSETS AND LIA- 
BILITIES — THB SUSPENDED CONCERNS. 

Afifairs at the Dry Dock Sarin^s Bank were 
jot mnierially cbaoged Testorday, excepting that 
tlie run was not so Br«ai as it was on ibe dav bo- 
fore. The clerk-a of the bank were busr all day 
balaseinK accoantsand paying amonnts dae the de- 
pualtura who had demanded a settlemont. "When 
the (luora were closed there were nut haU so many 
•wauine ax there were on Fi-lday. The ran on this 
iustitatioo, which was doabtlesa tbe resalt of fri<rht 
i>coaaiuDed by Ihereonat snspensioo of one or two 
-others of tho aitme kind, was began on Wednesday, 
on which day a small a mounC only was drawn out. 
On Thiirsdai", however, the panic increased, and 
$9?, OOO were withdrawn, and on Friday tho amonnt 
take.'! out was over one hundred thonsaud dollars. 
The amount paid on the firat two davs was mado 
tip mainly of smaU sums. Allhoagh there were 
fewer p*r80Ds in tbe line yesterdav, the President, 
stated thk t abont one handred and fifty thousand 
dollam h<id been paid out. As to the sonndaess of 
the jnstitntlon, it may be stated that its resouices, 
ts puWiahed July 1. and which li ive not materially 
changed, araitint to more than eleven million dol- 
lars, all of which can be readily converted into cash, 
wi'h »lie exceptiDU of the rea,l estate, valued at 
16S1,252 CG. Tho liabilities are only • little over 
• tea million do.lat*. Toe ac.ual flcur*s on July 1 
were : 

BESOUECE8. 

Bonds and mnrtsaees _ $2,345,050 00 

Called hiaifis rrcistereJ bonda 2,3u3.ij(>i) OO 

btatebnas - 45,744 MO 

>i«fw-iork City l)ouds - S,&'^~i,\.b 00 

Booklvo ( ny bouU _ 7o,u0u Ou 

Albany Citv bouils 424, 00 00 

Svraouie fit V bonds 31.'>,0ii0 00 

t sw-go Ciiv bonis •J19„".00 Ov) 

Buffjlu a:y bon.is lii.tiOO 00 

Koohe to. City buuUs 19,000 00 

Cuua Citv bonds 9.;..500 00 

ioadsof towns in West ches.fr Ciiunty. 138,000 00 

Beul estate iind Uunking-huaaes, (cos ). *i'Z\.,'ib'i 6t) 

I p*h in oanA „.... D0ti,:i76 24 

Casu on hiiua 172. 2>7 22 

fruiuium* and accrued luterust 7 5.H.4. > 8,d7 

low! $il.C8i,0i;4 09 

LIABILITIEa. 

^ Amount doe deposit- 

uis $10.507,r<H S.'S 

Juy .(ividend 280.9Jii 57— $10,797.>S08 53 

Wrplns tun J - 8 rf7,3 i 5 57 

Total. .*ll,6o4.0li4 oU 

Ibout &tty Doraiins deposited money in tho bank 
iifeatcruav. ageregatinfr abont five thonaanddoUais. 
At the B >ud street B ;nk. 'So. 330 Bowery, which 
^went into voluntary liquidation and applied to tbe 
'court for the appointment of a Hecoiver, the Presi- 
dent, Mr. Joba Q. Adams, said yesterday that he 
waa -oiinijiy uwaiUug tlio apuointment ot a Kuceirer 
Xy Judjto i^anUon, of isohcnecrady, and that ao t-oon 
a^ the apMO ntmnnt waa n<ade tie would asaiat iu 
triBiJut; up me fiffiira of the bank. He said that a 
i liffCeiveroouid, if ue desired to do so, pav sixty cenra 
ou [be dollar oa the iuoebteouess of the bank wiibiu 
•ixty days after iie aosuuied co^iirul of its afiAirs; 
land that au hone-st Receiver could eventually P4y 
100 cents ou every dollar ot the bank's IndeotedauSs. 
\ jar. Wiliiaoi .1. Beat, Receiver of the Mechanica' 
said Traders' Bauk. saiu yesterdav afternoon that 
}ie exi>«cted to tia aULe to uegiu to nay tht> lira!; divi- 
'dend on Mondny, or Tue.«!day at the fnrihest. He 
«aid that ho hud promiaed to givo the depositors 
•evenly fis'e ceiis oir (he doll.nr, and he bcipcd thac 
Ji<9 w..a>d be aoie to cC'^ike it eisaiy or ei;;btv five. 
. Tiicre wa-i uo excUciuent whatever at tue Bowery, 
Bixpeijoy, Citizeoa', Aietropjiiiau, Irlanhactan, una 
Sicievkor Slreei Si*vin&'s B.tnks ye.s eraav, and no 
trouble was aut:cipatt<d. The truateeaot tneMetro- 
yoliiau S..viO'_'a tiauk held a meetius during the 
moruiu;: aiid examined the accounts of the bank. 
Tuey were louui to be iu a perfectly saliafaccory 

COUQKiou. 

At.ihe AbingdoaSqtiara Bank, in Eighth av°nnn, 
whicli closed its doora oa Au£. lb, ana nhich was 
t&keo p laaessioa of by the Receiver, Mr. i^Vank 
"TUonpaoD, Sept. 1, aff:tirs were foiiiid to be in a 
Vary uuitaiiafaciory cou>ntioo. He has applied to 
tb« ooart tor power, to se>l real eata:e ptupertj', 
ana be sava that if that DOtver is granted, and ne 
Itas no aoabt it will oe, he will be able to declare a 
<liTidena ot from tweuiy to tweaty-dv© p^r ceut. 

Ac the 2iew Amsterdam SaviLga iiaak, No. 215 
Suwery, thinsa wore rheir usual quiet aapecr. Tue 
Stdnigcrs 01 tnia institution loilowed ide creditable 
ex^muie ««t by tbe Bond Street Bunk, and applied 
%o tue cuuria lor the appointment of a Receiver aa 
0OOU as liioy became couvince<l that tbey were 
Idsmg money. They are aw-tiiing tbe ^ppoistmeut 
of a Receiver i>y Judge Lanuin. Tue assets, 
amountioi: .to 9^63,94-2 52, are conaiJereu <!ood, aud 
In toe bauds of » g.o\.Mi Receiver the dopo&itors will 
pr /baoiy be paid in tail. A meeting of toe de- 
positors, representing aboat $100,000, was h«ld last 
Bveniua m one of ihe rovUis ni tntj bank, it was 
de«iuea to nolJ a meering on Tuesday next of ail 
tiie depositors and the Board of Trustees, to choose 
tome one 10 pr stnt to J adge Laiidoa for Appoint- 
Bieut as Recci*ac. 



THE A' AVAL GOVJil OF I SQUIRT. 
The Court ct Inqairy to which baa been in- 
trobtad tbe daty of investigating everything con- 
nected with the recent Earopead cruise of the 
XJaiied States sloop of war Alaaki, resumed its 
^•sion yesterday at 10:30 o'clock in the Xavy Yard, 
Brooklyn. The only witness before the court dur- 
ing tbe day was Capt. Brown, of the marines, whose 
testimony had not concluded when tne conrt ad- 
journed. Surgeon Bradley was in attendance, but 
was not called upon to tesiify. These two srentle- 
Bjun are unotratood to be tbe principal 
wicoeases against Capt. Semmes, who in 
turn ocenpie^ the position of complainant 
•;;auiat inem. Which are the cliareea 
and winch ibe counter-charges it is not eaay lo 
Dndeisiand. lor it appears tbey were reeeived at 
toe same time by the Navy Department, Tbe do- 
inas ot the Court »l Inquiry, being prelimiBary, are 
aiiuaetker sccrat. Tue conrt declines pobiicity. 
uid it would be saf« lo say that the witnesses dare 
but make any statements outside tho precincts of 
tbe court-room. It iw expected that the. inquiry 
will exivod over a mvotb. It will be resnaed at 
10:30 o'clock to-morrow. Cnpt. Semmes has been 
deiaci.ei iroui command of tne Alaska and placed 
on Wtfiiing orders. 

fVNEBAL OF MB. LJJOIUS HOPKINS. 
Tha funeral of the late Mr. Lucius Hopkins, 
Bf the firm of Houkins, Dwight &. Co., No. 134 Pearl 
•treet, took place yesterday afternoon. The ser- 
vicM ware held at his late re&idence, No. 126 Fifth 
avenue, and were periormed by Rev. Jonn Ha 1, 
D. v., of whose cborch Mr. Hopkins had long been a 
member. A lar,e number of the relatives of the de- 
ceased were present at toe services. The otficers of 
the Importers' and Trailer*' Bantc, tha Maohactan 
Sank, lue Uome, Standard, importers' and Trauera' 
and Commercial Ma iue insurance Compameii, with 
"whicn iuatitutions Mr. iiopkius had been conuecied 
at different times duiiiig his life, aitended in 
• body. Tue Cotioa Sxchanue was also 
represented by a large nuaioer of its members 
and by a special committee composed of 
^tueasrs. Thomas Scott, J. M. E^rle, Henry Hentz, 
A. B. Graves, Thomas Feuuer, \V. H. Brodie, H. 
'W. Brooks. L. R. Caeeaeboroagh, W. H. Guion, 
Charlea A. Eaatoa, W. H. Pnce, P. Henry, Jr., and 
"W". Birs.e. Atter the luueral tue remains were 
taken to Woodlawn Ctmetery for interment, the 
foUowiug bank ofiicers and merohanis ac(i:ig aa 
Pali bearers: h\ H Cossett. W. A. Booth, A. R. 
Eno, A. T. Dwight, Jumea .McLean, R. L. Stuart, 
i. >i. Constable, and Jatuea M. .uorruon. 



:«^' 



f^i 



» 1 






XOTES from: tee OOi^TROLLER'S OFFICE. 
, Controller Geeen paid yesterday to tho State 
.Treasurer Il,2i2t),275, being the balaaje due on ac- 
cotmief Now- York Cuy and County's proportion of 
the Slate tax for lB7t>, the total amount of which 
was f9,72<>,275. The Controller also signed war- 
rants on the loUowing accounts, and transmitted 
the same to tbe Mavor tor hia countet-ai.;nature : 
[uteiest on tb»' C:ty debt, #557 5J ; Croton water 
Dialu fund, ^724 50: assesameni lund, $14,416; 
lu'lgmeut tand, 416 55 ; street improvoment tuuu, 
tU.VM 99: Fire Deparimetit tand, $-^,523 05; bealiu 
tuuti. C304 76 ; aireut improvemeuia auovu i'ifty- 
aiuih sduei, 14,3^ 96-: streets, repairing and cln.iu. 
lu^, «15 yj ; aoivei repairing and cleaiuue, 1274 02; 
-re,/AirinK aud keepiLK in uider wood and concrete 
paveineuta, t20U : repairing stone pavement. $651 ; 
&iuali-p.>x H..apitai, t>69 26 ; public iustruction, 
lb73 93. Public Charitiea aud Coireotion, $22,604 01 : 
tola., «61,344 43. 

♦ 

A QUEER PLACE TO HIDE MONET. 
Some days ago Mary Ssaitli, of No. 221 East 
Forty-xixtn street, drew 9300 from a savmea bank 
to pay her passage to California, and upon arriving 
St her rooms she rolled the monov up in a sheet 
On Wednesday afternoon Sarah Mailer, a neighbor, 
called upon her, and, the conversation turning npon 
ibools, Mr*. Smith produced the one in which she 
b<id biddea her money and Ui.rolled it tot inspec- 
tion. Alter faer visitor bad soue Aim. ^mich luii-sed 

hir money, aud au vised Deteotrve Mc(i.)Wuti, of the 
Kmeieeulii Prrciucc, of h«r loas. Suapicion fell 
ppoii Mrs. MuUer. aa aha had been the onlv ptraon 
Iu the rooms, aud was known to tiavo made several 
tar^e puroUases saoiciy alter the di«.ippearauce of 
li^p fuucs. She wai arrested yesterday aud taken 
Detnre Juatice Waudell, ot the Yoikville Police 
Conrr, wbo held her for examioaiion iu uelault of 
bail. 

m 

Ji OONaRATULArOuT ADDRESS FROM 
IRELAND. 
Mr. John O'Connor Power, M. P. for Mayo, 
arrived yesterday in the Biit.innic bearing a con-, 
^atalatory address from the people of Ireland lo 
president Grant on tbe Centennial of American 
Independeuce. Mr. Charles Stfwart ParnelL M. P. 
C»r M^tn, is also iu this City, and he was appoiured 
wiiu Mr. O'Couuor Power a deputatinn trom ihe 
li'iab people to pre8<;nt the address lo ibePreaideut. 
Tbu addict* was adopted at a meeting held iu D .b- 
llu at which Mr. Paruell presided. Both gentlemen 
•re leauing members ot the Home Rule partv. Mr. 
O'Connor Power is a self.maaeman, huviug achieved 
Ilia present puaitiou by mere force ot abiiiiy. He is 
.pn alMaotiaC .and fln«nE ansaba* aad ia in unh re- 



spected by all parties in tho House ot Commons. 
He belongs to what is known as the Advanced Na- 
tiotal party. Mr. Parnell is a member of aii old 
aristocr,itio 'nmily, and a large landed proprietor. 
Hia gr.inifather wjis Speaker or the Irish House of 
Commons, and voted s;ea(ltaatly neaiust tbe Uuion. 



DISTRIBUIION OF TEE EXCISE FUM> 

JUDICIOUS SUGGESTIONS MADE BT THK 
CON'TROLLKR— JUSTICE DONK TO ALL 
IXSTITUTiONS. 

The judicious manner in which the Excise 
fund ha.i been diatributed among the various char- 
itable institntions was owing to tbe fact that gnat 
care was taken to ascertain tho number of persona 
who received relief from each, and to make an equit- 
able division of the mooey. The Controller, who 
had charge Of the matter, presented the following 
communica ion to the Board of Apportionment at 
its last nieetiiig : 

Fl.VAXCE DErABTJrF.NT. CONTROLLER'S OFFICE, ) 
Aew YOUK. Sei.t 29. Ie76. i 
To the Board of Eglimate and Apportionment: 

By chapter 2J1 of the lawa of 1875 the Board 
of Estimate and Apportionment is auiuorizsd, from 
time to time, and iu Bum3 according to its discre- 
tion, by-resjluti'ju, to apprupiiate all excise moneye 
derived by the Eicise Commii.sionera trom licenses 
for the atde ot lutoxivjarinir liquors, to unch benevo- 
lent or obantable institutions in the Citv, " which 
shall gratuitously aid, support, or assiat the poor 
thereof," as c^y seem lo said board deserving or 
proper. Herewith I piesent a schedule of oQ.iri- 
t ibie and beuevolou(|mstitutioua coming within this 
proviaion of tjie liiw, ciaasifled under the variou* 
hea is of homca and usyluma. oronan aeyioius, hoa- 
pitula, Cispenaanes, iuflimanes, »uo cbaritabie sj- 
ciuties and mis.siuijs. 

The law direcLs I hat "no payment shall be made 
in pursuance ol this act, except as a per capita 
allowance for the poor and destitute per-ions, ac- 
tually tiea'ed, Ciired tor. or educated in the i'.istitu- 
tious referred to in this ace," buo the law does not 
fix the rate per capita, nor pteacrioo the mode of 
uetcrminimr the amount to be allowed ; thia duty, 
thert'tor^, rests in tuo discretion of the Board of 
Estimate and Aoportiooiuent. 

The applications made by various societies for a 
share of the Excise moneys having been leferred to 
ihe Controller tor exaujiiiMtiou, 1 prepared tho ac- 
companying oircnlar, asd addrssaed ii to the various 
chai'itable iustituii >iia for the purooae of obtaining 
sncn information of their actual operations during 
tbe first six mt ntbs oi 1876 aa wonid tuniisb a basis 
for a fur aud equitable distribuiion among 
them, baaea on a per capiia allowance 
to each of tbe Excise monevs, according to 
their relative usefuiueas and the extent ot tLeir 
operations iu gratuitously aiding, buijp irtine, aod 
assisting the p:ior and de.ititaie. 1 have endeavored 
to aageest a just at<d equitable di^tnbutioo, baaed 
on a pel capita allowance, among the various caan- 
tabte institutions, according to the information fur- 
niahud in their answers to the circalat sent to tbeAU, 
and upon such other reliable iutormation 1 have 
been able lo obtdiu concerning them. O^uig to 
want of positive iuformaiion It is difficult to estab- 
iisb any rule that wui van with exact justice be- 
tween their relative claims in a diatribntiun of the 
Excise moneys, and to fix the amounts to which 
they are entitled respectively. The numbers ot 
persons relieved, and ike amount ot money expend- 
ed, are not ihe only grounds upon wuicu to deter- 
mine lairly the per capita alio trance to auy iastitu- 
tioQ. There arp many Cjn8idera«ii>u3 to be taken 
into view, aucti as the nature and value of the char- 
itv, an.i tho extent or ihe relief fuiniabed lo each. 
Au individual may be supported in the institution 
for a whole year, anl auoiiier relieved by a single 
passing meal, or a night's lodiring, or a Hin:>le pre- 
ocnp.ijn ; bu. it would obviously be quite inequi- 
tab.e 10 make the same aiuoaut of aliowanoe per 
capita in each ctsc. 

While the diatnoution may he considered as the 
general di^triuuioii tor the year to ihese inatitu- 
tioua. such as dispiuaaries, hospitals, asylums, &.C., 
it will be iii the power <if tha board, from moueys 
still in hand, to make a lurtber oiitribaiion, by aod 
by. to such iusiitntioas aa uioreiinmediatel'v fnrniah 
food and shelter to tbose in preaaing aud e^tc^ue 
need. Reapeuttultv suiimtted, ^^^ 

ANDREW H. GREEN. ControMer. ^ 
Tbe schedule of inatitutioos, and the appropria- 
tions made to e.ch, have already been pnbliahed. 
Upon the Controller devolved all tho labor of mak- 
ing the appropriations npon an equitable basis. 

BIFLE SHOOTING AT CREEDMOOR. 

FOURTH COMPETITION FOR THE MAKKSMAN'S 
BADGE— RAINY WEATHKK AND LIMITED 
EXTKIES. 

The fourth competition for the "Marks- 
man's" Badge took place at Creedmoor yesterday. 
Tbe rainy weather kept many markamon from the 
range, and a very small number of entries was the 
eonaequence. A mist hung over tbe field dnrine 
the contest, bat tliere was not tbe f tintest iudica- 
tiun of wind, and althonzh a high eley&tion was 

necessary, the day was a good cno fur shooting. 
There were twenty-five eotriea, but one of the oon- 

testants withdrew, taking his ticket with him. 
The scores and condi.ioua of the mutch were as fol- 
lows: 

Open to all comers ; distances, 200 and .500 yards ; 
position, aiaiidiug at 200 yards, any at SiiOyardu; 
nve snots, two aigntiui; shots, at each dlsraace; weap- 
ons, hemincton military nfies, 8t>itu model ; entrance 
fee, fifty ceuts; prizes: the highest agg;regate 
score, to take tlie bad^^o and onu-quarter ot the eu- 
trance money ; the next higuest soorp. one sixtb ; 
third prize, oue-twelfrh ; to be woo three times, not 
necessarily consecutively. 



them sold in small lots to Hyde .t Co., of No. 90 
William 8tri«et ; Klein &; Feet, of Maiden Lane. 
and J. F. Marhes, of No. 75 Pearl street. Testi- 
reonv in support of these aliegniions atraiust the 
brothers CoUina was gathered bv Sergt. Smith and 
Datoctive Koirns, of the Fir.>!t Precinct, and pre- 
sented to the Grand .Tory, who indicted them for 
receiving stolen goods, 'fhey were arrested yester- 
day on a bench warrant isautjd by Recorder Haokett, 
and were held tor trial. 



Names. 


200 yds. 


Tl 
20 


500 Y'ds. 


TlJTl 


A K. Van Heusen 


5 3 4 4 4 


4 5 2 5 5 


21 41 


B. Deforest 


:^ 4 4 5 5 


2i 


J 3 64 5 


20 41 


Qeorge >v'atermaa... 


3 4 4, 4 4 


19 


5 3 5 4 5 


21 40 


T. W. Linton 


4 4 4 3 4 


9 


5 5 4 4 3 


^1 40 


Col. U. D. Scott 


3 3 4 4 3 


.7 


4 5 3 4 


•<!1 


38 


Capt J. L. Price 


3 4 3 4 4 


l", 


4 4 2 5 5 


20 


3S 


U. H. Meoaj 


4 3 4 6 3 


A) 


5 3 6 3 3 


19 


3H 


Oiipt. C. F. Robbins... 


3 3 4 4 4 


.8 


3 6 3 5 3 


19 37 


W. L. t andee, 


4 3 4 4 4 


ta 


12 4 4 4 


18 37 


J. F. Bu.tman 


4 4 4 3: 


.8 


4 6 2 4 3 


IS 36 


Liejt. J. .'i. (jiee 


4 4 4 4: 


;; 


4 4 4 4 


16 35 


W. ri. Cochrane. Jr 


3 3 5 3; 


.9 


:i 3 -^ 3 o 


15 


34 


S. T. Unbuai-Q, jr 


2 5 -J 3 4 10 


J 4 4 3 4 


i7 


33 


W. S. Thompson 


4 3 4 2 215 


J 5 5 4 3 


17 


32 


G. P. Merchant 


3 4 3 3 4 


17 


3 2 3 3 4 


l6 


32 


H. 1-uuke, Jr 


4 3 3 4 3 


17 


2 3 3 5 2 


15 


32 


J. L. killiuKer 


4 4 4 4 4 


•.:0 


4 2 2 2 2 


12 


32 


E. W. fnce 


5 4 3 3 5 


2i.> 


-.i 3 2 4 


11 


31 


Lir. J. L. Farley 


4 4 2 2 -J 


14 


5 3 5 3 


1(> 


30 


Homer;Fi8her 


3 4 .H 3 6 


IS 


3 3 3 3 


1? 


30 


G. K. Kieed 


4 3 5 3 R 


16 


2 3 3 6 


13 


VA 


C. H. Eaele 


4 4 3 4 4 


19 


2 2 2 i2 


« 


27 


J. W. Hale 


3 4 4 3 
4 6 3 4 4 


14 

•JO 


2 4:. 



:i 






L. t!ags - 


*^0 









The sixth competition for the Spirit of the Timet 
medal will take place at Creedmoor next Uaturday 
at 3 P. M. 



DEPARTURE OP THE RIFLEMEN. 
Several members of the visiting rifla teams 
left this City for their homes yesterday. Capt. J. 
McGarvie Smith, of the' Australian team, and 
Messrs. Johnson and Dyas and Lieut. Ward and 
lady, of the Irish party, left by tho City of Rich, 
mond, of thb Inman Liu«. Assembled at the pier 
to bid them " good-bye " were Col. Gildersleeve, 
Col. Mitchell, Mrs. G. V\'. Wingate, Miss Mann, and 
Mr. G. S. Schermerhoru, Jr. Tho latter, iu 
behalf of tbe Joint Committee of the National ' 
R fie Association and Amateur Rifle Ciub, pre- 
sented to each ot the gentlemen a gold badge sim- 
ilar to that worn by the oirectois ot the association, 
as a souvenir of their viait. In making the pre.^eu- 
tation, Mr. Schermeihorn made a pleasant litae 
speei'b, aayiug that the a'Bociaf.ioo "acl^nowledged 
its indebteunese to tbe foreign teams lor too impor- 
tant part they I ad reudered in bringing to a suc- 
cesstul termination tho internaiiooal iifle matcb, 
conceived lu hou'ir of ih^ Centennial year of Amer- 
ican Independence." Mosars. Gee aud ^ing, of the 
Auatraliuu team, loft fi/r ijau Fianciacu by tho 
overland route. 



AnniTALS AT ItLE HOTELS. 

Miss Rose Ejtiuge is at the Coleman House. 

Rev. Dr. J. E. Twitchell, ot Clevelanti, is at 
the Si. Nicholas Hotel. 

Dr. Keeier, of the British (Indian) Army, is 
at'the Sturtevaut House. 

Prof. J. E. Nour3e, of the United States Na- 
val Observatorv, is at the Astor House. 

Key. Dr. J. L. Bur<-ow8, of Ljuisville, and 

Rev. Dr. Georai- S. Mallory, of Hartford, ara at the 
£)t. Denis Hotel. 

F, De Vangalas and M. De Coroelle, of the 
Freuch Legation at Waniingion, auJ Gen. Cuvior 
Grover, Cuited States Army, are at tho Brevjort 
iaouie. 

O'Connor Powor, M. P., of Ireland ; Gov. 
Oden Bowie, of Maryland ; Thomas H. Ismay, of 



Tbjmodun, of 
MaoAdaraa are 



tlie While Star Line; Capt. VV. H 
the sleam-stiip Uritaniiic, and Gen. 
at the Fltlh Avenue Hotel. 

T. B. BlacKBtone, President of the Chicago 

and A. lou Railroad Company,' is at tha St. Jauiea 

Hotel. 

• 

TEE SURThY UF TEE REEF. 
The survey of the reef at Ualletl's Point 
was continued yesterday. At slack water, ar 7 
A. M., operations were begun with one party, and 
two trips trere made by tbe boat. Sixty souudiutis 
were taken aud located. Too geoeial result was 
tbe aame as beretoture— Che water was fuuurl ro be 
oeeper and the rock «ell biokeu up. At 1:36 P. M. 
souudiDca Were aicaiu taken, two parties aud two 
boats being eueaged in the work. >i'iuety sound- 
ings were tskeu aUogetber. Beyond a distance of 
15U ieet trom tbe ahore bottom couiil not be touched 
witu the ::6-iooi pole. Tbe work will be ruauiued 
to-morrow. 



AQUATIC SPORTS. 

FIRST ANXUAL REGATIA OF THE NEAV- 
JKRSKY ROWING ASSOCIATION — FOUR 
WKLL-CONTKSTKD RACKS ON THE 

nuDsoy. 

Nearly two hours after tho appointed time 
yesterday, the barge Walter Sands was taken from 
her moorings at the foot of Filth street, Hoboken, 
by the tug-boat M. Finn and towed up the river to 
Pleasant Valley, and moored about two hundred 
yards below the landing-place. About four huudred 
persons were on board lo witness the first 
annual regatta of the Kew-Je-aey Rowing 
Assoeiatlon. The association comprises tho 
Atlantic, Meteor, Empiro, Nautilus, and Va- 
lentia Clnbs, and has a large fleet. 
The course was from a boat moored above the llnd- 
son River Chemical Works to Tho barge, a distance 
of one mile and a half. The water waa smooth, and 
every race passed off without any mishap. The 
judg?, Mr. H. F. Offetman, had very little difflcnlty 
in deciding who were the winnors. Mr. Christo- 
pher J. Thom, as starter, and Mayor Russell, of 
Hoboken, as referee, filled their offl.'es to the satis 

faction of all. Mr. J. Benson, th« Commodore, did 
his best to co through ihe programmo, lui! the late 
hour of starting precluded ite completion, and oply 
four races were decided. 

FIRST RACE — jrSIOK SCULLS. i 

Slu»—F. Barkelew. Atlantic ( liio. 



Crimjon — \\. i. liuplcins, Mrt.or l luo 2 

Hopkins got off with the lead, but almost imme- 
diatel.y crossed Barkelew's bows and touled him' 
They were called back and started afresh, when 
Barkelew took the lead and won easily. No time 
taken. 

SECOXD RACE — SENIOR SCULLS. 

White— D. MtiQaeen, AtlaLtic Club 1 

Blue—H. S. Murray. Atlantic Club 'J 

Murray caught the water Rri^t and led tor nearly 
two hnadred vards, when McQueen, ou the inside, 
who was rowing a long, drat:;iing stroke, picked 
him up. Thev kept side by i-ide for a short time, 
but the endurance of iMiQueen enabled him lo wear 
his antagonist down, and ne won very easily bv a 
clear length, having eased an towards ttie finish. 
Time— iMcQdeen. 10m. 42s.; Murray, 10m. 48j. 

THIRD RACE — FOUR-OARED GIGS. 

Emptr? Boat Club — Blue ond white. — .Messrs. R. Hill,. 
Jr., H. atootboof, .V. S, > hurch. and J. T. Ileacley, Jr., 
BtroKe ; J. i>abcock, c xswal . — I. 

Meteor Boat Ci«6— Crims 'U and white.— .Messrs. W. T. 
Hopkins. G. Mill r, L. .>le.yer, and i''. v\ alter, stroke; J. 
cchoeuteld. Coxswain— 2. 

This rsce was for ihe championship in gigs among 
the clubs of the assuclaLion. They got off togethe 
aud kept close to one another ^'or half the course 
when loe Empires, who were rowing a quicker 
stroke %ban their antagonists, began to leave them, 
more particularly when No. 2 in the Meteor boat 
kept miasing the water tbe first half of Lis stroke. 
The others kept on antl p lased tho winniii:: post by 
throe clear lengths, having rowed a clean stroke 
trom begmnlnii to end. Time — Empire, 8m. 41j.j 
Meteor, 8in. SO^isc. 

FouBTH Race— Four-oared shells, (scratch crew.) 

Messrs. Benson. Allaire, Barkelew, an! McQaean 1 

Messrs. Kiele.v, Taylor, Murray, aud KudiicK 2 

This race calls for very Utile comment, although 
it was done in very goot time. Mr. McQueen a 
crew took the lea i from the start ana held it 
throughout, although the.y were closely pressed ihe 
k greater part of the race. Tho winners rowed in a 
Iboat belonging to Ihe At' antic Ciub, and the losers 
!in a Mateor CJab hoat. Time — Atlantic, 7:35; Me- 
teor, 7:40. 

REGATTA AT WEST RUTHERFORD PARK — 
THB TRITON CLUB OF NEWARK TAKK8 
THE PRIZE. 

An amateur rowing reijatta waa hold yester- 
.dar afternoon on tne Passaic at West Rutherford 
Park. The event waa a very interestint; one and 
the races were good. Mr. Pi. L. Leffmaa, of the 
New-Jersey Athletic Club, acted as Referee, and 
Mr. P. W. Vail filled tho position of Timekeeper. 
The prize in the single scull race was a gold badge 
valued at |25, and in tbe iour-oared race a set of 
colorti, valued at (75. The distance in all races waa 
one mile. The single icull race was rowed in three 
heats, with a final heat. The contestants in the 
first heat were W. H. Jasper, of tlie Bayonne Row- 
ing Club, and G. S. At terbnry, of the Patterson 
Rowing Cinb. Attsrbury won with ea&e in 6m. 13s., 
Jasner coming in twelve seconds later. The second 
heat was between G. D. Small, of the Triton Boat 
Club, and W. B. Johnson, of the Adelphl Rowmg 
Association. Tueheat waa closely c utested.and waa 
wonin 5m. 46s. by Small. Johuaon'a time was 5m. 51s. 
The third heat was won by F. E.T >wuley in 5in. 378., 

E. E. Snaw following in 5m. 3^^. Shaw rowed in good 
form to the three-quarter mile, where Townlpy 
drew ahead. Shaw's due rowing against Townlev, 
who is somewhat of a ciack oaraman, was a sur- 
prise to the friends of tbe former. 

The second event waa for four-oared shells, be- 
tween tbe following clubs ; Hud.'^on Boat Ciub — 

F. Sayles, bow ; G. Ochersb-inaen, No. 
2; H. Ockerahausen, No. 3; F. Ockers- 
h:iusen, stroke. Triton Boat Ciub^G. D. 
Small, bow ; S. A, Smith, No. 2 ; H. C. Eoinmull, 
No. 3; E. L. Phillips, stroke.- Bayonne Rowing 
Cluh— T. B. Meiram, bow; W. H. Jasper, No. 2 j 
J. H. Chsuwick, No. 3 ; L. Van Buakirk, stroke. 
At the word '• go" the Tiitons sprung to the front, 
with a quick stroke, with Hudson a good second 
aod Bayuune tar in the rear. The Hudson crew 
clung desperately to the Triton boys to the 
three-quarter point, where they dropped 
behind, the Triton winning in 4m. 40«., with 
tbe Hadaon crew three seconds behind. The 
Bayonue l>oya caught several craba, which throw 
ihem far in the rear. 

Tbe last event was the final heat of single sculls, 
and was contested by Small, Townley, aud Atior- 
burv. Atterbury was the favjiiie in the pools, 
but, to the chagrin of bis friends, ha bruuguc up 
the rear at the finish. Townley won by half a 
length. Small hugging bin cloaeiy. The 'ime was 
not taken, aa it was too d<irk to aee the flag. It has 
been determined to bold another legaita at this 
place iu tbe Spring. The Park has but just come 
into nonce as a suitablo place for holding regattas. 
Its hotel accommodations, as we.l as ica rowing 
facilities, are excellent. 



BUSINESS I-.MBAIiHAASMENTS. 

William F. Hyatt also made an assignment to 
Nathaniel Niles for the benefit of his ere ii tors. 

in the Coiint.y Clerk's ofiioe yesterday Charles 
Barmore, plater, ot No. 3ii3 Pearl strset, Qled an as- 

slgoment to Horace G. Case lor the benefit of his 
creditors. 

The schedule of John Bartels, tailor, who on 
tbe 25ih alt. made au as&igument to Gerhard Pupke, 

sets forth his liabilities at $3,69t! i)0; nomiaal aasets, 
t7,959 59, and actual asseca. i(4,UUU. 

A schedule was also filed in the matter of tbe 
assignment of the firms ot Fisko Brothers & Co., of 
New- York, and Monroe, Fiake &. Co.. of Boston, 
dealera in umurellus. to Waahinjitoo E LiiUL'lev, lu 
which tho ji,tbiliiies are set lortb as t9,9?5 37 aud 
the assets aa t3,7U7 04. 

In the matter of the assignment ot Peter 
Abies, brewer, ot No. 305 East Forty-.seventh street, 

to Richard !]^atzenmeyer, a schedule was yesterday 
tileu iu tba Court oi Common Pleas showing the lia- 
Oiliiiea of tho bankrupt to i e t81,497 50; bis nomi- 
nal asstits, $16,226 35, aud actual usaets, <8,U14 68. 



DROWNED WHILE FISHINO. 
At a late hour on Friday, two men named 
James Donaldson and Thomas McDonald, residing 
at One Hundred and Eleventh street. East R.ver, 
came ashore from a suiall boat at the larm of 
Gonveneur Morris, ou tho Harlem River, and re 
ported that they had been fishing from a boat iu tbe 
Harlem Kiyer off the uppiT eu.i of Ward's Islaud. 
iu company with Peter McNamara, a painter, who 
reaideu iu One Hundred aud Fuurieanih street, be- 
tween F.rst aud Second avenues. Tho boat was ao- 
cideuialfy capaiz^^d. aud jMcNainaia was diowueil, 
his compaaions saving themseives with great difli- 

culty. i'hoy auueoedeit in ritjhiinir the boat aud 
made search tor McXamnra, out could not UnU 
auy-trace of him. Tbe body oi the urowntd man has 
not been recuvereu. 



A I'AKD. 

To citlrens and stranjri-ra: I^noi's Fall Hat roadv 
at ^o. :;l2 Broadway aud uud^r the l-'iith Avenue 

iaotel. — AUveriUiement. 



Fbench Dyeing and Clea.mxg. — Lord't, No. 860 
BroadTuy, curm r of iiih «t.j ^o. 7oi 0th av., corucr 
of 4 vth at. — AdverlitcmciU. 



RECEIYERS OF SlOLt.N OPIUM ARRESTED. 
The banded warehouse No. 5 Bridge street 
was entered by burglais on tue night oi Fobruiiry 
28, and 1,000 pouuds of opium, valued at $6,000, were 
OJirried off. The police of the Firat Precinct, by 
whim Ihe burglaiy was investigated, alleged that 
thev had ascertaiLed that tbe burglary was com- 
mitted by one Wm. Mor";an. and that tbe stolen 
opium was firat taken to No. 3 Biid^te street, aud 
was then e subseqneutly removed to No. 31 Brioga 
street, and placeJ in chart;e of John aud Nicholas 
Cullina. brotaers. residinn at tnat nlace. and hv 



PA USE .V OtjliS SAIL £ D. 

lnileam.»hip i:itu of Hichmond, for Livtruool. — Thomas 
Adaisou, lurs. Thomas lodibou licorno ij. Urowu, Jlr. 
llowers, .MiB. Bowo a, Lo. (iia.lea A. Uouton, K J. 
Uradley, l)r. J. ii. Karboar, Mrs. J. B. l.aroou ,Mi-. 
B.jiley. William S. Bruiiuer, ilias limma BrooK, W o. 
Co viile, M jor VV. W. t, ool;, WiUiuni J. Cleija. iirs. 
William J. Cngi:, .MioB il. K. i.lo,;v;. J .s.iuii .M. I'hi et- 
liam. .laiues 1-oeK.er, diaries r' I'oi-Ji.i.A il. Uiiwb iru , 
Mr. I)yu8, 11. W. D.ivis. iieo^jje vV. li.norv. li. l-'o.cy < . 
f. Kishe, Mrs. C. T. Fishe and iuiitut. Geoige Gre;.'^. 
James (jobljie, Miss .11. iry Cehjio. James Gi-utle. v\ i!- 
liam U.asae.v. Oeorsi- Giiea. i. U.ies. i'. i). O'G. Oiio- 
biiia. J. 11. Uereioid, Samuel J. iiarris, 5Iis. .auuiuij. 
11 iiris, Johu uait.ey. lliomaa I'., i.e^nn, V. u. 
U. lluul, .M. ^v. Brookea, It. ."*. Kosi-nthnl, 
G. Ho. per. W. > urst, H.C lumuu. I.JohuBo.i,.H^.Joril;«ii. 
Alia. Jordan. Kawai^l Jolinii.i. c i oiiiuir.l Keudali, 
CoL .'S. K. Kamjuhky. J F. Lr\vi», J. T. Lee, .Simon Le- 
vy, T. W. Morgan, T. F. iioUiii. lleiny .ilouKa, F. Ma- 
drozo. Miss fc.. '-> .uurr.iy, Diw^on Mayer, biltv. .SeviU, 
iuro. A. Fation, Miss Mauiic I'aliou. Mi^a Gushio Fatton, 
Miss Jo.^ieFnttun, .diss Kililu t'sLton, >li8s ^ellie i'atton, 
Alfred Padley, \V. Rjtcaffe, -diss F. C. KHiuea. M. Salu- 
mon, A. U. balomon. J. W, .imith. E. • . Kauzay. Kuas .11 
buiith, Heurv smith, SlicUjel Suiomoii, '.\. Tempirst, 
T. W. H. T»lhn^.. Miaa K A. TUnrn. A. Ward Jilrs, A. 



Wsrd. David Q. Toun?, Mrs. R. 8. Rosenthal, Mr. Chis- 

z.ila. 

In iteam-ship AcapMltx), for San Francxtco.—C. W. 
Pflckard and wife, Mrs. Surah Lorln? and daughter, 
Capt. B. B. Handy. wUe and thr'e ilnu:;hter». .Mrs. H. 
W. Rogers and clilld, Mrs. \V, At water, Leonard K. At- 
water, A. O. Luckey, wife ai.d two children, F. J. Hall, 
H W. Hall, Daniel Ijyrno and wife, Mrs. C. Wil eon. 
Mrs. W. s. R. Taylor, stm and two da ghters. VV. K. 
Kearsing and wife, Mhs Mary Hart. Thomas 
I'hillps, Mrs. K. C. Freeman. J. D. Powr, 
Lieut. Fiank Scott nnil wile, Lieut. Quackennush, 
Charles .S. iSrior, wire nnd aon, A. <i. Pondlet n. 
iMiss Kate Kliuz. .Moses Knsel, A. Foininn and wife, VV. 
^J. Shipmau, T. Holiinuworth, VV. G. Ullery, VV. A. 
Miicond.iiy. son and aervant. Mrs. S. Carv. J. M. Clark 
nud wiie. For Central and South America — fohn Wll- 
s '0, J. Thor'ngtsn. wif", nurse and cliil I, Jose Po', H. 
Kamind. wife^ind child, J. J. Andras, M. F. Padilla, V. 
Sierra, C. Jijcni, J. All'aio, Flnoido iSnlsL wife and two 
chiMren, .Manuel Aivarado M. Da'tis, Lyon Davis, J. 
1'. Itiesgnt, J. J. H. Bagot. Pedro Carto, .Mrs. Burt iind 
ehlM. J. K. Coldwell. S J. Whitney, John Hall. VV. H. 
Kathhum, s. W. D. Jackson, J. J. Biiggs, Mrs. . J. 
Clark, .Mrs. B, Foster. 

In ateam-'h'p f.ahrador. for Bavrf. — A. Marchand, 
Ptephanc de Rouvillo, .Mr. Henry. Mr. Kennedy, Georpe 
Mesmiu. C. Roes*, .Mr. Josso, A. '({raiihe, A. .MLhaut. F. 
Hutchlns, M's. F. Hutthins. Miss F. M. Hiitchirs, Miss 
.VI, li.Tyenpurt, E d • enaritlens, A. Senarclens. Le Rond 
de Gevrie, .Mr. .nnd Mrs. Bennett. Mrs. L. E. ComuiP. 
Mr. Do Mointiri, K. Laiirenrot, Rov. P. Kiigc; ri 
L. Deep t, K. Despot. Mr. Vernier, \. Farcot, D. Farcot, 
P Fareot, .Mr Naeiier, Mnie. Poirer. .Vlr. Descli imps, 
Mr. Buisson, E. Corbel. Mr. Roimbault, <'. Romano, 
Mr. Hocan, Mr. .Vtoricado. D. Har holi. Mr. Soulcce, 
Mr. Hos'ier, .Vl]li>. Marchanc>, Mr. VVi lin n K. Ohiecht, 
.". Kupler a. Berts, Mr. Agostini, Miue. Vve Blet, .Mr. 
Tivier, .Vlr. Bnbe.y. 

Tn steamship Hhf in. for Bremen.— GehPirarath Ludwlg 
Hatceu. John A. VVriuht. licyhrnnvarath Ad. Dresel, 
B.iumi-iater Krnst Kumioer, nitss F.uiny B. Trcnach, 
ta 1 Kuuup, :■• iss l)r. F. M. Davton, I'hrisi. Feuner, 
-Micbnel Keeso, C. B. Sue d, Jr.. E. A. !<chrodi-r, 
W. Kuuer, Mrs. is. S.-iuer, C. A. Andrews, 
Hinrleh Mul'or, Ml^s K. .Marshall. Fred. Ar- 
11 lilt, Mrs. Fred. AniauU. A. ^p:^t, A. Chppsky, 
John Olsliausen. Rol. JOrgcnsen, Tiernhard T. biiitiier, 
(.. Kidiso. Edward ICmde, .Mrs. Kdwaid Kmile and two 
children, John F. .VIoy>-i. \V llauew'ukel, Ju.ins Tinp, 
Ja oh llirsch, Max Sclionfelder, Heinr.cn Ensel. John 
D Tobelma n. Kgel Jouann, Miss Mary Dolli.iger, Miss 
Mary Derleter. 

Til selam-ehip Enuland, for ttrcrpool.— Capt. O. Giles, 
Mrs. lilies, Miss Alice O. Fairdl. Miss Logan, Mrs. 
Brie"-8, Charles U. Morgan W. J. Conne-, Jr.. Mr. hos- 
aiter, E. Stepr, Jr., M.s. Steer. Master ■ hales Steer, 
and mfint. t hr. Stewart. Miss .Stewart, W. Clarke. 
John Power, Mr. Prevost, Mrs. Howard Marshall, .Vliss 
Edith M-rtin. Dr. It. 8. Newton, Kdward t'hamtier^ 
Daniel Kiiott. Mrs. Knott. .VI rs. bt"phon Howl 
ell, H. ,8. Foster.. VV. B. Clapp, Mrs. Ciapp. 

Tn iteam-ship Denmark for London. — ("apt. St. An'ivn. 
8. W. Be.ii, Mrs. Beut, Mr. Neirm m and son, Dr. Georse 
Berg. Mrs. Berg, Walier White, Henry Kueiien, George 
Reis, .Mrs. Charlaa burke. J. VV. Hams, Alexander 
Mo iBompry, Thomas Atklr.a, Mrs. Atkins, H. M. R b- 
prtsou. VVi'liam T. Handy, J- EngMs , .Mrs. Greaves 
Alexander Pullen, Rev. rraucis H. Renan'1, Rev. Alov- 
sius ClIc, Mrs. George Liceliurat and child, MUs Bar- 
Liett, Capt. Gibba. 

PASSENGERS ARRIVED. ' 
In Iteam-ship Bal ic, from Liverpool —Dr. VV. F. Scoree- 
by, .Ml 8. L. Sherta in, Mr. VVa.ah. Mr. Oirlosbv. J. 
Spence, It. b-peuce, O. B. Braldico. Edward Haslewi>od, 
Mrs. Blakslee \Vallare. M.s. E. Cook. Mrs. Horace 
Kellev. Jlr. Forbes, Miss M. Swi Z3r. Miss . Switz r, 
.Mr. and Mrs. Jonn Miller, Mlsi Payne and liiend, E. 
Ileym:in, J. VV. Miller. .Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Everett, 
Kev. D. -ri. Jones, .drs. D M. Jones, .ur. aud Mrs. Lewis 
S iiidcrs. F. R. Hose, Kev. J. H. Krutn. D, U., Heurv Per- 
rin, Ihorais Garrett, Slfnor Alfredo Paoletti. Henrv 
Huntington, D. W. Moore, Richard Hart, Mrs. 
Anne Hait, Miss Mary S. Hart. John O'Connor 
Power, M. F., S. C. Maflroe, Mrs. C. B. Camp 
and infatit. Miss Ida JI. clipper, vV, H. .^cheper, 
Mr. aud Mrs. VVi.liam H. Kdmunls, Miss iVlacyF. Ed- 
munds, .VJis* Siiphia E. Edmunds, Miss Ii. A. Hkeaff, 
..l.redr. Oavii s. Miss F. >i. G rard, J. B. Van Vor I, 
<". H. G. J-nkinson, C. K. Leaycroft, Ellen B. Reid, 
Jiseph Winchester, E. 0. Biake, C. M. Holsh, b. A. 
.Sra,iil, T. B. Roi.b Halsey R. Stevens. A. F. Lllya. VV. 
Aioigins, E. C. Booth. H. Horace Ruaaell, R. is. Irwin, 
Gcorg(« Peacock, Mr. and .drs .VI. Simpson, E. Inion.s 
B. G. Hepworth, A. Jac..8on, Mdjor Gen. C. Grover, 
United oiates Army. T. P. Wiltshire, h. Hornthal, 
Miss Dowliug. Mrs. O'Douneil, J. .VI. Quigiey, IL P. 
.Vloorbonae. Mr. and Mrs. C. W. BinKuam, Otto G- 
.Vlayer, M, H. lioid, jMr-i. Harsey. ter. ^arsey, Jr., 
Gen. MacMani'*, Mrs. Adams, t; H. Ismay, .Vira. f. H. 
Ismiy, J. H. heroy Mrs. J. U. Heny, Miss lleroy, W. 
S. winger, D. F. Nullivan, Johu D. Bmoou.-, Mis. John D. 
Barbour. W. K. Pomeroy, VV. H. i r.itt, Mr. Dempster, 
Mr. JScolt, Mr. Burnet, Mrs. Bnruet, Sao net Llackburn, 
Mr. Woo ley, G. E. Armatroug, Lee Smith, J. H. Spaiks, 
J Oty uradioid, ulurtou C. Fisher, Mrs. Morton, C. 
Fisher, Alra. 8touf;h oa. A. G. P. Dodge. Mrs. A. G. P. 
D' dgf. A. G. P. J)iKi);«. Jr., Miss f.vaiis. Miss Boeqnet, 
T. U. Jackson, Mrs. T. H. Jackson, A. VVimpfueimer, 
Re^t J. Curtis, Johu Jankson. Mrs. John Jacksuii. Kev. 
D. J. McDonnell, Jirs O. J. McUoniiell, James Michie, 
G. VV. Doui;I:i8s, Albeit Marlman, A. Wood. William 
Jackson. O. brmgemann, William Skene, n. Cohen, A. 
Adair I'oubrouKh, Mr. English. Johu ... Ferris. B. Kra- 
ner, James Wat*, VV. Queutell. VV. (Juentell, Jr., C, 
Quentell, .dr. Mc^aenberg, ijuueiin McLacblau, (ieorge 
...i. hie, Patrick Keneily, John Rhodes, Kev. Miciiael 
Wulsh, Rev. Emilu'.s Kaiteiu, Capt. Berry. 

Tn neam-ship Dakota, from Liverpool — JobnD. Walk«r, 
John Uu!;bea, Phil ip" Hair. William Fryer, Augustus 
jcaulou, Mrs, Lot:ie Bieviii, idra. Kroat an i cbiid, 

David Evans. Joseph Evans, Mrs. Jessie wheelwright, 
Mrc. Sarah southali, i>.r8. .viary Ford. E. A. Skogsberg. 
J. .^pinK, <. barles Farleigh fiich^nl M. Jones, jjias 
Anuie X. Jones, S. Howe, Mrs. E. Harris aud child. 



MINIATURE ALMA-NAO—IUIS DAT. 

Sunrises 5:56 I Sun asts 5:43 I Moon sets... 3:57 

HIOH WATBR— TUlS DAT. 

Sandy Hook... 6:04 | Gov. i3laud.;tj:4d j flell Gate. ..8:05 



MABIJ^E INItlLLIQENCE. 



KBW-roRK SATURDAV, Sept. 30. 



CLEAUHD. 



Steam-ships Gordon Castle, (Br..) Jones, London, 
Eug., UeuJersou Brothers ; ASsvria, (dr. ) Douald- 
fcou, oriatol. ling., Henderson Brothers ; Oiympia,(br.,) 
Voung, Gasgow, Hcnderaou Brothers; Victoria. iBr.,) 
Heddcrwiek, Glasgow, Henderaoii tirothera ; Labrador, 
tPr..) Sauslier.Havre via Pi.ymouth,Eng.,L. De i>ebiju; 
Othello, (iir.,) Bristow, Hull via bouihampton; Lone 
otar. Forbes, Galveston, TMas.Chas. A. Whituoy t Co,, 
Acapulco, clapp, Aapiiiwall, tJ. S. C. Pacilic Mall 
.Steum-ahip Co.: City of Austin, SI evens, Ualvestou 
via Ke.y West, C. H. Maliory St Co., AlKiera, Uawtliorn, 
^ow-Orleans, C. A. Whitney k. Co.; San ^alvaaor, 
Nii:koi8ou, Savannah, George TOiiKe ; Champion, Lock- 
wood, CnurleatoD, .s. C. J. ». <iuiaiard k. Co.; Beguiii- 
tor. Doaue, Morehead City and Wilmington, M. C, vV'il- 
liam P. Clyde .c Co.; Oad Dominiou, Walker, Norfolk, 
City I'oiot, aud Richmond, Old hominioa Steam-ship 
(,o.; City of Kicbmoud, (Br.) ^..Ive^poul via Queens- 
town, J. G. Dale ; Heamark (Br.) Williams, Loudon, 
Eng.. F. W. J. Hurst; Ln-iland,' (Br.) Tnompson, Liv- 
erpool via Queenstown. F. W.J, Ilurst ; Rheiu. (Ger.) 
Francke, Bremen via southamptou, Oelricbs & Co. 

Ships bates Family, (Br.,) Uuugall, Liverpool, Eng., 
Cbaries L. WrlKht cSe. Co.; ivituhoe, (til.,) Luke, Liver- 
pool, hng , C. L. VVrlKht Ik Co. 

barks Harding, (.Vorw,) Jensen, Havre, Fr., Punch, 
Ed.ve t Co.; Ger^a. (Norm.,) Uisen, Eisiuore, Deu., for 
orders, Bockmann, Oerleia & Co.; Hilda, (Norw ,) Os- 
mnudben, Havre, Fr., C. Tobiaa U. Co.; Boriieli. (Ausi.,) 
'Iripfoovich. Pnilnuelphia, Penu., blocovich t Co.; Aa- 
syri..n, (lir.|) Murchi^o i, Cork for orders. Perkins & 
Joo: i.'uracoa, (Br., Roberts, VVilliamstadt, Cur., Jos. 
Foiuk's Sons. 

Urin George Gilchrist, Oroutt, Cork for orders. Par- 
sons At Loud. 

^chr8. Rbbecoa and Harriet, Hankin% hew-Haven, 
Pidgeon Chrisiopberson; Carrie A. Frarebay, Portland, 
Me., Jed Frye fc Co.; Helen, Feiry, Baltimore, VV. Chal- 
mers. 



ARRIVED. 



Steam-ship Britannic, (Br..) Thompson, Liverpool, 
Sept. :iil, via Queeuatown 22J, with mdae. and 4:^4 
passengers to R. J. Cortis. Sept. '^6, ist. 43 13, Ion. 
bJ Zl, passed eteam-shi)' Dakota trom Liverpool tor 
New-tort. Same date, lat. 43 02, Ion. bi OtJ, ateam- 
ship Wisconsin, hence lot ijivcrpooi. 

sieam-bhip Albemarle, Tl^bs, Lewes, Del., with 
mdse. 10 Ola Dominio.i Steamship Co. 

Hteaai-sbip Arrat;on, (Br.,) synious, Bristol Sept 15, 
with mdae. una paseeogera to VV. I>. Morsau. 

8team-ahip Pi^acal, (tii.,) Umw , Rio Jauelro Sept. 1, 
Balua Bih, Pernamouco 8tb, Para loth, with mdse. 
and i8 pa'^sengers to Busk II Jevons. 

Stcam-ahip Dakota. (Br.,) Hoimes, Liverpool Sept 
20, via Queenstowu '21ai, with mdso. and pusaeagera 
to vViili.im^ Sc Uuiou. 

Situm-ahip Hraucunia, Brag:;. Portland. 

Dark Amarautn, (Ger..) i.rauer, Iquiqne June 25, 
with uitr.ite oi e>oda to Charloa Luliu^ it co. 

liarii Geasiier, (Ger. ) Chriatulfeia. Bremen, 48 ds., 
witn mdse. to H. Koop it t'o. Hid s.roiig westi il.y 
winds to the Bunks ; from thence light variable winds. 

Bark r!oi'.;iria. (ItaL,) Bertolotto. Ipswicn 48 ds., iu 
ballast, to J. E. Seaifur. 

bcur. Gettysburgh, Coraou, Alexandria 7 da., with 
cuai to Uucsou Coai Coal Co. 

WIAD— Sunset, light ., cloudj. 

SA ILED. 

Steam-ships Rhein. lor Biemen; City of Richmond 
and Koiiaud. for Liverpool ; Denmark and Goruon Cas- 
tle, iof Loudon ; Victoria, fpr Olasfjow; Labrador, for 
iiavre; Otheilo, fir .juU; Acapulco, for Aspiowail ; 
Uu..80n and .Algiers, for .New-Orleauj; City ol Austin, 
lor Galveston : i.'i romlel'-t, for Fernaudiua: San .->aiva- 
dor, for .savauaab : Charleston, lor Cbanealon. f. C; 
Rej;ulator, for Wilniinfftou, N. ('.: Old Uomimoii, tur 
Noifoik. &c ; Ii. C. Kuinht, for Ueo.rgetown, D. C. Barks 
Malta, 101 Queenslown ; Vnar, lor do., or raimouth for 
oroers. AloO, (via Lou^ l&laud Sound,) steam-ship 
ticu. Whitney, tor Boston; Bchr.-. Lizz e K., tor St. 
John, N. B.: Lizz.e B. Jjcftichols, H. ^.. Harp, Eafurt, 
\v iiiiam Arthur, and William itice, fur Bostou. 



MARINE DISASTERS. 

Hong Kong. Sept. 23.— Tbe American ship Alexander 
Mc.^ell.^. > upl. Pettea, i.utwanl .ouud Irum this port, 
for »:iu Francisco, ha^ returnei partially dismaated. 

iNewc.48Tlk.- lieL. sept. 30. — The steamer VV. 
Will. Idea, i-altimore, lor Philadei| bia, wuile coming 
throu'li the canal spiung iiicak. She is now in the 
harbor in a liiuKin,^ codition, with the steamer Viuc- 
lani aioii;;3ido un.oadiofir ot-r c^tTS'^- 

Vineyard Havkx, .-ept; 20.— The schr. James S. 
Hi wilt, fioiu I'erih Aoiuoy, lor Bustou, arr. here to- 
day. ha\ ing sprung a lea this moruiui;. She wid pro- 
ceedimmcdlatel.y lof MewlSedford for repairs. 



BT CABLE. 



LONDON. Sept. 30.— >-ld :teept. 18, Flsclietti; Sept 
28. i.aii'ji 1. Bertou-T li.emcu; Si-vt. 3i', ho.val Uauc. 
Uertololto Sivona. i cter C car, hxcelsioi-, Vcnns, Coa- 
iiuu^lit, u.cheie Picas o. .il iry D., Liuda, BcigeuBeren, 
B. .^u.ip.siuh, Stella, (i apt., Kay.) 

Arr. teot. i;S, K. 11. Duvlul, Lina. Franklin. Minnie 
Swiif, t'uebuc o, Due dej .taie. Bremerlehe, hukIi 
Cauu ; Sept. 30. Kotiiaa. (at liluuoeatcr,) Jumaicau. 
>e«- h a. A geht{iie. 

LoNDu.v Sept. 3u.— Advices have be 'U received here 
that the Ame.iedU aliip Herald. Capt. Gardner. Irom 
llulioJuueS. and Latavia Juiy ll', fir aaud.v Uook, 
w B uuaiidose.i in » aiU.iii.g conditiuu .Aij.^. ijj. lue 
crc'v were saved aiiil liudeii .it t. nel, na. 

The Ancor line tteuiner Australia, Cupt. Gidcy, 
ficiiu .New-lork Sept, 10. lur. to- lav. 

llAVKE. .-seiit. :iO.— I he ■ticueral Irnnsatl intic Co.'s 
Btc .uiei- Aiiicrniue sld. at S o'c.ock this morLiiag lof 
i\e'.y-ioik by way of Plymouth. 



\VAKRt;NUAlSU»ScC(>.,IHA.\L'FACTL'REKS 



of 



FUMNITURE, 

>'os. 75 and 77 bprins St., corner Crosby St., 
IVe^'-iork, 

Offer their large and elogant etock, in the latest de- 
sigas of Mediaeval and °°Ea<it,aku" styles, at gteatfy re- 
duced oricus* ! 



CROSSIEY'S 

EWGLiISH 

TAPESTRY BRUSSllS, 

1,250 ROLLS 

AT ONE DOLLAR PER YARD. 

CROSUEY'S 

ENGLISH BRUSSELS. 

ON MONDAY, OCT. 2, 

WILL OPEN 

1,250 ROUS AT OXE DOllAR. 

J. 6 J. W. 




320 AND 322 BROADWAY, 



COR. PEARL ST. 





ARE 0FFER1.\G 



SILKS, 

Bin COIOBED in FAUCI 

AT 20 PER CEN'T. LESS 
THAN THET CAN BE EKPLACED. 

Fall aEi Wiit&r Dress Gooils, 

NEW BTTLE3 OPENINQ DAJLI 
AT POPDLAE PEICE3. 



■ib 



KEMOVAL. 

WOOD BROTHEES, 

Carriage Manufacturers, 

HAVE REMOVED THE ENTRANCE OF THEIR WAEE- 

ROO.Ma FROM NO. 710 BROlDWATTO 

THE REaE of their PAEMISES, 

Is. 49, 51, Mi 53 Lafayette place, 

WHERE, WITH 

DIMINISHED EXPENSES, 

THET AEE PRSPARED TO SEtt THEIR STOCK OP 
FINISHED CARRIAGE^ AT 

GREATLY REDUCED PRICES. 

THESE CARRIAGES WF.RE MADE FOR THIS SE.\. 
SO.NVS SALE, OP THh BS8T M VTEUIAL AND UNSUR- 
PASSED WORK\IA.NSHIP, AND COJiPaiSiS EVERr 
STYLE OP PLEAKURE CARRIAGE. 

WOOD BROTHERS, 

Nos. 49, 51, and 53 Lafayette place, 

REAE OF THEIR OLD STA.-^D, 
NEXT DOOR TO ASTOR PLAuS AND 8TH ST. 



Strangrers iu New- York are 
cordially invited by Messrs. 
Tiffany & Co. to visit th^r 
establishment, where an ex« 
tensive and varied coUectJon 
of artistic goods may be leis- 
urely examined without in- 
curring the sUghtest obliga* 
tion to purchase. 

UNION SQUARE, 
Comer 15th st 

THE IMPROVED 

HOWE SCALE 

TRIUMPHANT, i. 

FIftST PB-Enivn AWAaOBO 

AT TUE 

CENTENNIAL 

• F >U 

r BEST WEIGHING MlCni'TBS. 

Fnll aanortroent at NO. 3 PARK Pi.ACB. Vew-Toffc 
PAGE Sc CO^ GU.>ERAL AtiEWTS. 



["^Imt 



KAFF, FLEI^GEHll & CO., 

Original introducers and Manufacturers of Com- 
pressed Yeast (Deutsche Press Hefe) in the United 
States, 



EECErV^D TH? 



HIGHEST AWARD 



AT THB 



CENTEMNIAL^ EXHIBITION. 



R.H.MAOY&CO 



48-in. Black Cashmere $1, 



A GREAT BARGAIN. 



We Are closing out an importfttloti of 



Embroidered Sacks and Polonaises 

AT LESS THAN HALF PRICE. 

SILK HAIOKERCHIEFS, 25o. 

LeBoutillier Bros., 

No. 48 East 14th St., N. Y, 

FURNITURE 

New & Elegant Styles. 

FURNITURE 
COVERINGS. 

A Magnificent . Assortment of 
ENTIRELY NEW GOODS. 



MAcrs. 

MACT'S. 
UA ^V'o. 
MACT'S. 
MACY'3. 
M ACT'S. 
MAOY'S. 
MACr.--i. 

MA r-^. 

MACY'S. 
MACY'8. 
MACY'S. 
.MACY'S, 
MAOY'd. 
>1ACY'8, 
.MACY'S. 
MACY'S. 
MACVS. 
MACVi. 
M.aCV'S. 
MAT'S. 
.lACY' . 
MACY'S. 
MAC\'.^. 
.MACY'S. 
MACY'S. 
.uACrs. 
MACY'S. 

MAcrs. 

M.\CY'3. 
MACT"*. 
MACi'S. 
MACY'S. 
MACfS. 
M.^CY'ii. 
MACY'S. 
MACY'S. 
MACY'S. 
MaCTH. 
iiAcr's. 

MAClf'S. 

nAcy'd. 

MACY'S. 
uACfS. 

MAcrs. 
MAcrs. 

M.'.Cl'S. 
MA. X'S. 
.HAOY'.-S. 
MAi;V'.S. 
MACY'S. 
*iACi'«. 
MAC. '8. 
M\CY'3. 
MAlY'S. 



14TH ST. AND aTH AV. 

CiaiEE A.NT UTHEE HOUSE 15 TBE 
COCSTET. 
WE BA'V^ ElfLARGED oar estobUsliment. 
added new departmeat*, aa 1 »re manofiie- 
tnring FaU and Winter saito aod cloaks for 
ladies and misses to ori!er, trom onr own ma- 
terials or material farniahed by themselres. 




CUE MILUSEEY MAIOTFACTTJHI^fO and 
DRESS-MAKING DEPAETMS.NTS ARE PLACED 
BEFOEE THE POBUC AT QDR USUAL POPU- 
LAR PRICES, AND KO EXKRTIO.S W.LL 
BE SPARED to GAIS FOR THEM THB 
SAME FAVOEaBLB ESTIUATION WHICH 
OUB OTHKE DEPAETMENJrS AE3 EBOETV- 
ISa FEOM THE PCBLIC. 



ON THE FIRST FLOOE AEE CUE • 
LACfi.>«. EMB .ori)ERUa-„,jLSU TATE'S 
HAiSDKBECHlaFjJ. ttlBB:>S.'3. Plowrrs, 
Feathers. Uata, and MtU.aery O >nd8 of every 
(lescription. Ties. Toilet AKicief, Small 
Wares, Triminiues, White (roods, Hoase- 
keepini; Gouds. Worsteds, Albauii. Books 
DDd 6tacioDery, P.^a-ie P'iriouCs. Bronsas, 
Fj,ncy Goods, Silver bd'I Platjtl Ware, Bm 
iioii Boxes; Ladies'. Mi.<seB°, aud ChUireu's 
Boots. &(iU'='8. .-^LlPPiitti. snl OvKrsUoe*: 
Genta' Fomistil 'g Goo.s; li<9ats'. L>diss'. 
Youths', and Cbiidreu's Uosierv and Cuoer- 
wear, 

TOYS, DOLLS DOLLS' ARTICLES. CONFEC- 

TiO.nERV. an 1 SOD-i. Also, 

OUE KKW DKPaRrM:i-NT. 



BLACK DRESS SILKS. 

iMOES & mnn 

AT VfiEY ATTRACTIVB PEICK3. 

LA FORGE TWO-BUl-iuS KID GLOVES, 
93 ceuta, warranted. 



MACY'S, 
MACY'S. 
jjACY'd. 
.MACY'S. 
MACY'S. 
MACY'J. 
MACY'S. 
MACi'S. 
MACY'S. 

MACY'S. 

MA> i'S. ON THE SECOND FLOOR: 
MACY'S. DESIRABLB STOCK itF 
MACY'S. MldjbS' U^DEtt-Cl^OTHl.^G 
.ttAi.rs. iers, tc, 



THE 



BOSS 




99 



AT THE 



CENTElfNIAX. 

AS^ WELL AS AT 



THE 



WILSON 

RECEIVED THE i :? 

HIGHEST AWABD, 

MEDAL AND DIPLOMA 



FOR THE 



A FULL AND 

L-iDltb' AND 

Corsets, Pan- 



Estimates and Designs Fur- 
nished for Furniture, Draperies 
and House Decorations. 



B.LSOLOMON&SONS 

667 & 659 Broadway. 

Opposite Bond Street. 



Jais E. CiwBll& Co, 

JEWELERS, 

No, 902 Chestnut st, Fhiladel- 

Ehia, begr to announce that they 
ave purchased the entire ex-^ 
hibit of the American (Wal-' 
tham) Watch Comjpany at the 
Centennial, consisting of more 
than t-wo thousand gold and sil- 
ver watches. They now offer 
these popular and standard 
time-pieces at retail from the 
Company's stand in Machinery 
Hall. The public should bear 
in mind that, through the great 
reduction in the pnce of labor 
and increased productive ca- 
pacity, the Waltham Company 
are enabled to put their prices 
lower than ever before, and 
lower than seemed possible a 
few years ago. 



MACY'S. 



AL*0, 




BOYS' CLOTHING 

MACY'S. ID Hall aoi Winter sui s. uasarpassad 1b 
MACY'S. style, assortment, qmiit.v, and )>nce, ad- 
.viACY't*. joLlng our NcW tiUiT ROOMS. 

MACT'S. 

MACV'8. • 

MACrs. ON THB LOWER FLOOR: CHINA AITD 
MACY'S. house-lTiml»l)lns[ Uiir-ARTMENTS, crowded 
MACY'S. with uuw and desirable goods at poouiar 
MACY'S. pnces. 



WHIPS! 

We bare Just received a oarefally-s^lected assortment 
from the cele Pirated 

LONDON MAKER, CALLOW, 

« 

for whom we are the SOLE AGENTS in the United 
btaceB, cumprisins 

FOUR-IN-HANDS FOR PARK 

AND ROAD, TANDEM, . 
SINGLE AND PAIR HORSE 

DEIVING WHIPS, some vprv handsomely mouixtea, on 

rare Stic its. 

BREWSTER & CO., 

6TH AT., CORSBE 14TH ST. 




THB I<EATnER-WEIfiHT V.>IBREL.LA 

Has 'cceived the only 

CENTENNIAL MEDAL 

For umSrellis exclu^irelr 

OViiR ALL COttl'liTirOES. 

TilO.MAS MILLER, 

No. 35o (JLh uve luo, corner 224 81... 

and No. 1,1-5 Broauway, near tit. Jimes Hotel. 

j^ o:E3:^A.x.x.Eisrc3-E 1 1 

To all icture cutUors, imblUliers, and the public, 
THA'I' .1UL.L.tK'.^ •'UltliVr C"EN rUN.VUl. 
FlCi't'KK," or •' IM^U.UI.VATEO CUAUT." 

is tlie nidsi tiutlit'ul .lud complete puljlicati )u of the 
kiuii .x.-iu;. 

.^11 wUii U)Vr< America should pOBSO>ii t'jo best uls- 
torieai •' Illustrated Cent nnlai." 

.\ut utr.ipuio iiuiuiiiemBU.s from ^uioiJustio.- TVaite, 
ei-Uov. Dix. Won. llaiul.tou Kish Hon. Geo. VVm. 
Curtis, Maj ir (jc 11. Sualo.. and mibiiT otoer euiineut 
niiu; nlso .hepre^s. Two btzl's mailed for $1 50, or 
75 (tents f. ica. 

Agents wanted r:r every town in tbe United 
t»talC6. 

.1 4 MKS MILLER. No. 176 William St.. New-York. 



PIANOFORTES 

NILSSOX. I Bhall takeereryop^ortunity torseom- 
mend and pra >e y.ur iustruments. 

KELLOGG. For tiu- last i>ix y-.Trs .vou.- pi m -s hire 
been m.v choice for tho coneert-roo-n 
and m.v ovrn house. 

LOCCA. Tour uoriRhts ar- er<raor<Iinorv inKtro- 

ments and des-ive iheir great «iu<;v.«». 

FATTI. 1 have used the Pian^ s ot eTi-rv ce!e- 

liratsd maker, oat s/ioe vo»rt the pref- 
erence over alL 

8TRACSS. Tour I'laiMs nstonisii ms. / kire never 
yi't seen at]/ PianniwMc/i equal i/ours. 

WEHLI. Mi«danie Parop;! cjlied your I'lano th' 
finest ill the Dnited 6(tat-is. / fully 

indorse m 't pi..ioa. Tin;.v haf e uo 
rival aij/ fR«r«. 

Prices Reasonable. Terms Easy. 
WAItEROO.MS: 

Fifth av., corner Sixteenth st., N. Y. 




ELEGANT PATTERS IV CA J 1 LAlVil AS 

low-priped as ordiu iry Furaiiur<>. 

SoliJ A'alnut and Asn Laa late Iledroom Suits .$70 

Eastlake Sidebo^ids - 40 

Ea.-tlalte uining Chiirs, ia leather .7 

liastlake Library Tables 8 

Sic. t •, tc. 

The eboic'-SD desicns from the Philadelpliia Eihihl- 
tion at mo' eiMte rates. 

NoTcltleb in Parlor Suits of White Hol'.v. Kbony, tc. 
A vrrv larse stock of every uescrlption of yu.niture, 
BeduinR, tc. 

"JVX OF THE MAKSRS AND MAKE BT IT." 

GEO. C. FLINT & CO., 

KANUFACTURERa. 
NOS. 104 AyD 106 WEST 14Tn ST.. 

Betwoen 6tb and Trh ^fu.. ona dnnr wait at 6rh av. 



F&Dilj Uf MiiUss 

IN THE *^" -U" 

WORLD! 

WILSON SEWING MACHINE Ca 

Chicago, New Orleans, New Tort 

CARPETS. 

BARGAINS ABSOLUTELT CNPEECED«Tt«a. 
BARGAINS THAT DEFT ALL OOilPnTnOJl. 

DlTRnTQ TAB PRBSB.VT MOTTH THB LAVBIt 
HOUSES IN THB COU.^tTRT HA7B TdSOWS UC 
JIE.N'SB STOCKS IN THB ADCTION SOOttl. TO B8 
Dl°K>SED OF REGARDLESS OF COST, ILIKCFAQ 
ICRE, OR I^PORTATICf. UAVIKG PCBCfiAMI 
LAhGELY, 

WILL OFFEa ■.^.• 

Real French Moqaettes, $2 D?r nrd sal npNi^ 

VeiT-et Carpets, $1 '2j and upward. 

Bo.ky Brussels. $1 and upward. 

Tapestry Brussels $1 and upward. 

Ingrains, extra saber best qu 'liry, 75^. and V9W§ 

In^raUis, goodqoalit.v. S5c. snd SVc per ym>4. 

OIL CLOTHS. I .' 

A MANITFACTCRBR'S STOCK, FROM ONB TO DM) 

TAKD3 VnOE. FROM 250 PER rAEta 
DRUGGETS OF EVEUT .'ESCRlPTiON A AeHGUXiXt 

8i}3.ooa 

wuani OF I 

LACE CURTAINS. 

Rongti.K .rom j '' ^ 

ONE DOLLAR 

per pair to the finest Imported tuto the eoontok 

Over oae thoosanil diffjreat ps.t:*rui iu S«ns«,1 
IngUam, Guipar«, Tambour, »ad B.-us^e^s Ljc« Otxtaiir 

AT HALF PRICE. 

ONE CALL WXL OO.NVI.NCH AIL PDRCHAS] 

Reps, Cretonnes, Furnitor^ Cliintsss, Shades. 
Piano a:.d Tabie ( ovei-s, Co:d8 and TAoSeiS, , Laa 
quins, UollanUs, te. ' j 

SHEPPArT KNAPP, 

NOS. 1S3 AND 1S3 era at., 

ONE DOOR BELOW 1313 ST.. NBW-T3BK. 

PIANOS & ORGANS- 

AT EXTRAORDIXVBt 

LOW PRICES, 

WATERS k sm, 

M 481 Broaiway, Isel^-Yort 

TOCLOsE OOfAN ENTIllfi sroc.'v OFl.\'fraUiIK.VTa 

OF FliWT-CLA-jS .UA:i.;as. Niivv ax© 

SECO.M> IIA.VD. G&ASV, .Mil.AttjB, A.\J> 
Cl'RUiUT, I'iii.viuLs ro jj, 

K. E 3V^ O V X Ij^ 

■V) yi'^lB. SEVT sroRB. 

No. 4D East 14th St^ -; 

•* UM3.V SiJUARR, ASD 

79 UNIVER^ilTY PLACE. 



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VOL. XXVI........ifO. 7816. 



nTEW-YOEK, MONDAY, OCTOBEE 2, 1870.— WITH SUPPLEMENT. 



PRICE FOUR CENTa 



THE POLITICAL CANVASS. 




* 



WJBM WORK ly INDIANA. 

XBE LASr WEEK OF THE CAMPAIGN— EIOHTT- 

THKBB COUNTY BAIXIKS A>'D NINE 

HUNDBSD REPUBUCAX MKETJXGS AR- 

BANGK©— THE CONTEST WITH TILDEN'S 

, &EFOBM BALLOT-BOX STCFFERS — EV- 

i' WIT , REPUBLICAN VOTER NEEDED ON 

pt£EC7riON DAY. 
' Sp*eial Dispateh to tke Xew- STork Timet, 

XvDiANAPOLis, Oct. 1.— The last week of 
the campaign opens to-morrow, and it is to be 
one of unparalleled aotivitv. Gen. Ben Har- 
rison bej^ins at Peru to-morrow, and ends with 
Lebanon on the succeeding Monday. Senator 
Morton begius with North Vernon, and ends 
with Bedford on Fridar. Hon. Robert 
G. lajjer^oll , speaks evory day. com- 
meooing at Cbarlestowu and endins at 
Torre Haute. Senator Newton Booth 
nontinnes his good work durin;: the week, eotl- 
iae at Damvilie on the Saturday before the 
election. Carl Schurz speaks at Seymour, 
Xflncie, and Fort Wayne. Amoac the 
other speakers aro Hon. H. K. Pease, 
of Mi^tsjippi ; Hon. J. C. Burrows, of Michi- 
gan : Concresamen Frje and Hale, of Maine, 
a|>d Kasaon. of Iowa ; Senator Crascin, of New- 
Hanpahlre ; Hon. Frederick Hecker, of Illi- 
noia ; Hon. Henry Armict Brown, of Pennsyl- 
▼•nia; Mr. Fiero, of New- York ; Frederiofc 
boasrlaas; Gtov. Kirkwood. of Iowa; Emory 
A. Slorrs, of Dlinois ; John Baker, of Illinois ; 
<..orporal Tanner, of Brooklyn ; Gen. Sickles ; 
Wavae McVeijjb, of Pennsylvania, and thirty- 
nuie more. Between now and the niglit 
befcffe the election there are to be 
eighfy-thrM zrand county rallies and more than 
r.hie hundred Beoablioan meetings of all kinds. 
Ijhe Democrats will bo hardly less activs, so 
tkat it will be seen that durinc these olosins 
tia^m <>f the c<mte6t the people of Indiana will 
devote ihemselves almost exclasively to their 
'public duties. Com "Will remain ungathered 
wbater«r may betide, and potatoes undue. 
Now the qaeeiion asked by all is, " How will it 
ai: eod->f " It is one easily answered. Unless 
ttte Demoeratio conspiracy ag-wist the ballot 
i>ox under the guise ot a soldiers' convention 
en Thursday proves to bo a complete suo-> 
ce«8. Gen. Harrison will bo the n^xt 
Qovemor of Indiana. All Batmblicans claim 
A Wd all Democrats fear ic The 
great qusstion then is whether the Repub 
Ikuins will permit the fraud to be perpetrated. 
Gov. Morton, who ia here to-day, says there can 
be &o douht from all he has heard in diiferent 
parts of the State ftnd is Cincinnati during the 
j^t four or ftve de^s that, under the guise of 
thia coirreotkn, it it the purpose of the Demo- 
erata to iniiadMe the State with thieves and 
ballot-box Btitffezs from New-York, Baltimore, 
OinoiuLad. QaeasiO, t>t. Ixmis, and Louisville. 
It ie believed to be the intention of the Demo- 
crats to concentrate their men here on Thurs- 
fiaj. and th ^*! ! scatter them over the State to 
laaugurate fraud and violence everywhere. 
&o firmly is it believed that this is Til- 
den's pvrpoee, and that in the interest of 
Ira peenliar Ittnd of •' reform " he intends to 
pat the Mississippi plan into practical opera- 
ttoBia Indiana, that Col Fri^ey will to-morrow 
nr next day issue an open le'.ter warning R>v 
^blicans m every county of the design of the 
Democratie "reformer*." This letter will say 
9 plain terms that the information received 
txom vorioiu ciiies leads to the conviction that 
reform in this case leads through such frauds 
upon the ballot-box as Tilden committed and 
Siarhie saw in ISdS, and will warn Republicans 
everywhere to use all proper means to 
iweveot the cousammation of Tilden's 
latent efforts in the furtherance of "reform- 
in" " hinself into the Presidency. More than 
tins, it is believed and will be sail that Tilden 

wUt. on Tuesday week, be in the market an 
open purchaser of votes. There wUl be intim- 
idation and all possible maimer of corruption, 
mod every art which Tweed and Tilden ever 
saed, bat the Bepablicans believe, and with 
go<i<i reason, without efiect They are deter- 
SKued there shall be no intimidation nor cor- 

raptioiL With a lair election Gen. Harnson is 
sure to be Governor by. a handsome majority, 
aeutL. the eiforts of the Republicans during the 

week will be chiefly directed to securing a fair 
eleetion. 

One lact should be jffominent enough to 
reach voters who are a*»ay from home. There 
are at least two thousand Republican voters 
absent from this State at the Centennial Exhi- 
bition, or visiting triends in the East, who may 
not realize the importance of being at home to 
vote on the 10th of this month. They should 
io no case risk being away ^m their homes on 
election day, and to do this those who may be 
near New- York should not delay in starting 
tor home later than Thursday or Friday 
of this week. They should peimit no personal 
consideration to iutertere with this duty, for it 
eoDoems more than this State alone. The 
Oetober elections are of national importance. 
2nd every vote c^st then mav count for ten in 
toe moral effect in November. No Republican 
would be likely to pardon himself if be should 
fiad that bis vote would have saved the State 
and he had not cast it. Every man who lingers 
at this critical moment is liable to find himself 
in this position. Evei7 vote ia needed, if not 
ti> secure the State, certainly for its effect on 
the Presidential election, and none should be 
■\riihheld- ■ 

- , : BECBVITS FUM INDIANA. 

•AX.TIMOBE SENDING THREE HUNDBED EX- 
PKBIENCED RCFKIAN8 TO dELP THE 
DEMOCRAT!^ — EX-CONFEDEBATES GOING 
TO SWELL THE CONVENTION OF " union" 

K>LUIEB8. 

Ojlteua I>iaj>aleJi io tlie Neio-York Timet. 

Baltimobr, Oct. 1 — The effort to get 
'V'om Maryland a decent representative 
to the Indianapolis Convention of Union 
Soldiers who support Tilden and Hendncks 
has resulted in il e collection of about one 
kun&rjd so-^illed veierans, who will depart 
oti Tuesday afternoon by the Baltimore 
aJid Ohio Railroad. With them will 
bo a couple of hundred rouahs . who 
<iisticgaisbed themselves at the November 
eit^tiou last year in Baltimoi-e by dnvinir 
negi'oes away from the polls at the point of the 
pistol. The call for delegates to the conven- 
tion was confined to '• boys who wore the blue," 
and it was announced that the delegation would 
only consist of five from each of the twenty 
Wards of the City, tut it is a, fact that 300 
tii'kuts have been to-night and are, be'.ug dis- 
tributed among the •'shoulder-hitters," who 
are willing to go out to ludijina to do ille<cal 
' voting in the cause of Tilden and reform. 
The (inpvosititious ex-Union eoldiers who 
/will lead the delecation are mainly frauds 
' of tbe first water. There are not over fifty of 
. them in all, and most of them were Confederate 
J prisoners who were recruited 



of them. It never saw anj' servico, and its 
members, who call themselves the " boys who 
wore the blue," but really wore the gray longer 
than they did the blue, are returning to their 
old status now. 

The call has come from the Indiana Democracy 
to the little Tammany of Baltiraoro to "come 
out and help us," and the King here responds 
by sending out 300 experienced ruffians and 
ballot-box stuffers to do "reform work in In- 
diana." 

NOTES OF THE CHICAGO CAMPAIGN. 

THE RKPDBLICAN NOMINATIONS FOB CON- 
GKESS IN THE CHICAGO DISTRICTS CON- 
FIUM THE CIVIL SERVICE REFORM 
PRINCIPLES OF THE PAUTY'. 

From Our Ottvi Corrtsponxsti,',. 
Chicago, Thursday. Sept. 28, 1876. 
The Republicans made nomiuations to- 
day in two of the three Congressional districts 
of this city, the First and Third, now repre- 
sented in CoDjiTviss respectively by B. G. Caul- 
lield and J. V. Le Moyne, both Democrats. The 
former made himself somewhat conspicuous as 
Chairman of the Committee on Expenditures 
in the Department of Justice by publishing the 
libel that President Grant had misappropriated 
tunds of the Government to aid in his re-el ec- 
tiou — a statement for which the evidence in tha 
Davenport investigation furnished not the 
slightest warrant ; the latter only obtained his 
seat late in the session, whan the Democrats 
ousted Mr. C. B. Farwell to make room 
for him, and was not heard of otherwise. 
It is likely, the Democrats will re- 
nominate both of them. The Republicans 
have Dominated Mr. William AKlrioh in the 
First District, and Mr. Lorenz Brentano in the 
Second. Both candidates are of a cbaractsr to 
assure their election. Mr. Aldrich is one of the 
leading merchants of the city aud has never 
been in politics till last Spring, when he con- 
sented to have the Republicans elect him to the 
Council. He was one of a number of prom- 
inent citizens who for the first time wore will- 
ing to take seats in the Council, because it had 
become apparent that the city would be bank- 
rupted by bad mana;;eruent and corruption 
unless the honest business men could be in- 
duced to take charge of its affairs. This 
Council bae reduced the expenses of the city 
about forty per cent, below the appropriations 
made by its predecessor, and saved something 
like two millions of dollars to the tax-payers 
this year. Mr. Aldiich has been one of the 
leaders in the work of retrenchment, and has 
shown a devotion to honest government and a 
caoacity for public service which have won for 
him the admiration and confidence of the entire 
community. An excellent and encoura^ins 
featiue of his nomination is that 
ho was not even a candidate when 
the convention met, so that bis nomination 
was a sign that the " machine" system ot poU- 
tiis had bf»en abandoned, and that it was poa- 
sibre to make up a convention of enough inde- 
pendent and unpledged delegate? to control 
the result in behalf of the public rather than 
the politicians. This result was largely due to 
a modification of the primary system, the va- 
rious ward clubs having designated the primary 
tickets and brought to the meetings an unusual- 
ly large number of intelligent voters and busi- 
ness men. There is reason to believe that the 
abuses of the primaries — which are frequently 
used only to defeat the choice of the mass of 
the voters who neglect to attend them — can be 
largely overcome by this means. The same 
spirit was noticeable in the Third District Con- 
vention, which nominated Mr. Bieutano. He is 
a German, but has been a citizen ot the United 
States for twenty-seven years. He was a con- 
spicuous character in the German revolution of 
1848, President ot Baden, and a piominent mem- 
ber of the Frankfort Parliament. He was early 
identified With the abolitionists in this country, 

was once editor of the Staats Zeitung, in this 
city, and held the position of United States 
Consul at Dresdei^ for many years, to which he 
was appointed by President Linculu. He is, 
besides, a man of scholarly attainments and a 
devoted student of the sciences of Government 
and political economy. The German-Amencan 

population is very large in the Third District, 
and Mr. Brectano's nomination is likely to 
allay much of the disaflection of two years aKO 
among the Germans of Chicago aud the State. 

It is curious that there is but one German in 
Congress, (Schleicher, a Democrat, frpiu Texas, 
and a man of good ability,) notwitbstaudinc 
the large place occupied m pohtics by the Ger- 
man voters. Mr. Brentano will increase tbe 
number to two at least. Both these conven- 
tions adopted civil service resolutions in keep- 
ing with the national platform and Gov. Hayes' 
letter of acceptance, and both candidates are 
pledged to sustain these principles, as applied 
narticulai-ly to Congressional non-interierenco 
with the appointing power. If every Republi- 
can district in the country would nominate men 
as reliably earnest in their intentions to break 
down the spoils system, civil service reform 
would be no longer a mere theory. 



late in the war 
. ja the Third Maryland Cavalry when the Gov- 
ernment ofEered amnesty to all such prisoners 
wb« would eobst in the Federal service, and 



MARK TWAIN IN POLITICS. 

HE PRESIDES AT A GREAT RKPUBLICAN 
MEETING AT HARTFORD — HE THINKS IT 
A TIME FOR LITERARY MEN TO COME 
OUT FROM THEIR STUI IE3 AND WORK 
tOS HAYES AND WHEELER. 

Special Ditpateh to the New- York Timet. 
Hautford, Oct. 1. — The Republicanmeet- 
ing in this city • last night .was great both in 
attendance and enthusiasm. Before hand there 
was a fine torchlight parade of Boys m Blue. 
The meeting was presided over by Samuel L. 
Clemens [Mark Twain.] It was his introduc- 
tion on the political rostrum, and he was re- 
ceived with much favor. He spoke as follows : 
Ladies axd Gentlkmen: I feel very greatly hon- 
ored ia beinsi chosen to preside at thin meeing. 
This employmeut is new to me. I never have 
taUen any part in a political, canvass before except 
to vote. The tribe of which I am the liucQblest 
member— the literary tribe— is one which is not 
piven to bothering about politics, out there are 
times when even the straDgest departares are.iiiaii- 
fiable, and such a season, I tike it, is the pretient 
canvass. Some one asked me the other day why it 
was that nearly all the people -who write books 
and magazines had lately come to the front 
and proclaimed thdr political preference, since 
ench a tbinj; had probably never occurred 
before in« America, aud why it was 
that almost all ot this strange, new hand of volun- 
teers marched under tbe Danner of Hayeti aud 
Wheeler. I think these people have come to the 
front mainly becau«e they thinfc ihey see at last a 
chance to make this Government a good Govern- 
ment, because they think tnoy see a chance tu insti- 
tute an honest aud sensible system ol civil service 
which shall 90 amply prove its worth and wortbi- 
nes« that no succeedinfr President can ever venture 
to pat his foot upon it. Our present civil system, 
born of Gen. Jackson and the Democratic Party, 
is 80 Idiotic, so contemptible, so srotesgue, that 
it would make the very savages of Dahomey Jeer 
and the very gorts of solemnity laiigh. We will nut 
hire a blacksmith \7bo never lifted a sledse. We 

will not hire a school-teacher who dotis not know 
the alphabet. We will not have a man aboat ns in 

oar bnsinesa life, la any walU of it, low or bigb. 
nulesa he has served an apprenticeship and caa 



to do. We even require a plumber to know some- 
thing flaufchter, and a pause by the speaker] about 
his business, [reueweJ lauuhter,] that he shall at 
least know which side of a pipe is the inside. 
[■Roars of lauahter.J IJnt wheu yon como to our 
civil service, we serenely fill great unmhers of our 
minor public otlioes with iguoramuaes. AV'e put tb'* 
vast business of a Cu.ston^-bouse in tbo hands of a 
flathead who does not know a bill of lading 
ttoin a transit of Venua, |langhtor and a 
pause,! never having beard of either of 
them belore. fLiushter.] Under a Treas- 
ury appointment we pour oceans of money and 
accompanying statistics throush the hands and 
brain of an ignorant villaaer who- never bcffiro 
could wrestle with a two weeks wash l>ill without 
getting tbiowD. fGreat laughter.] IToder our con- 
sular system we send cre,atur?K ail over tho world 
who sneak no language but tlioir own, and even 
when it comes to that, ao wading all thfir days 
tbrongh floods of mnods and tenses and floarishiu;; 
tbe scalps of mutilated parts of speech. \Vhea 
forced to it -sve order hon»e a foreiirn am- 
bassador who is frescoes all over with — 
with — with — indiscveetnesses, f laughter, 1 but 
we immediately send one in his place whose moral 
coiling has a percentible shady tint to it, and then 
he biays when we supposed he was eoinij to roar. 
We carefully train and educate our naval ctScers 
and military men, and we, ripen and perfect their ca- 
pabilities through long services and exptrifuce, and 
keep hold of the^<o excellent servants through a just 
sy.'item of promotion. This is ex.ictly what we hope 
to do with our civil service under Mr. Hayes. 
[Applause.] AVe hope and expect to sever that ser- 
vice as uiteily from polities as is the naval and 
military service, and we hope to make it as re- 
spectable too. We hope to make worth and cipac- 
ity the sole rBquiremmite of tho civil service, ia the 
place of the amount of party dirtv wurk the candidate 
has done. Bj- tho time Gen. Hawlcy has fliilshe d 
his sreecb, I thinlr. you will know why we, in this 
matter, put onr trust in Hayes ia preference to 
any other man. I am not, gome to say anvthing 
about onr candidates for State officers, because 
yon know them, honor them, and will vote for them, 
but Gen. Hawley, being comparatively a stranger, 
|!aughter,] I -will say a sinjrle word in commenda- 
tion of him, and it will fnruish one of the many 
reasons why I am going to vote for him for Con- 
cress. I ask you to look seiiocsly and lUought- 
fally at just one almost incredible fact. Geu. 
Hawley, in his official capaci'y as President of 
tbo Centenoial Commission, bas done one thing 
which you may not have heard commented upon, 
and yet it is one uf the most astounding perform- 
ances of this decade, an act almost impossible, 'per- 
haps, to any oiher public officer in this nation. 
Gen. Hawley has taken as hich as $121,000 g.ate 
money at the Centennial in a sinele day, [p^use and 
applause, I and never stole a cent of it. [Great 
laughter and long continued applause.] 

Gen. Hawley then spok."^ for about an h»ur 
and a half, making a very eifective speechv and 
covering all the leading points of the cam- 
paign. It was one of the most powerfulx 
speeches he has ever made here. He spoke in 
New-Britain, the home of Congressman Lan- 
ders, the night before, and while being escorted 
by the Boys in Blue the procession was stoned, 
and the color-bearer alone was struck nine times. 
Alluding to this outrase. Gen. Hawley, in siiiu- 
ming up the reasons why the mission of the lle- 
publicau Party was not ended, said that it 
would not end till it was possible not only in 
the South for men to exercise all the 
right of citizensl ip without iuterference, but 
possible, also, for Republicans in Hartford 
County and Connecticut, to pursue a peaceable 
march, and he added: " We will have this 
right in Connecticut if we have to march tho 
whole State through to . secureMt ;" and this 
declaration was greeted with proionsed ap- 
plause. ' 

THE NEW- YORK REFUBLICANS. 
THF. SAUGERTIES, DLSTER COUNTY, HAYES 
AND WUEELEK RALLY OF SATURDAY — 
BRISK WORK IN KORTHEKX XEW-Y'ORK. 
Special Diipatch to the New- Yor'i Times. 
SAUGERTIES, Oct. 1. — Muxwell Hall was 
crowded last night 'with Eepublicans aud Demo- 
crats, it being the first grand rally ot tho cauipaiim 
of tbe Hayes and Wheeler CJlub nere. Tbe msetiue 
was addressed by Hon. Georne Becker for over two 
hours. Mr. Becker's speech was In the main ad- 
dressed to the Democrats, and waa a masterly argu- 
ment presented in an eloquent manner. He took 
his text from the New-York TTorM of Saturday 
wiih the speeches of Seymoar and Kernan at 
Utica, and answered them in a way that lelt 
a deep impression on thinkinii Democrats. 
Mr. Becker made the following amung 
Other points : That it is uufortunate tu 
have another "bloody shirt " campaign, but that 
the Democratic Party are alone responsible for it 
In not nominating pronounced Union men who sup- 
norted the war and accepted in good faith univeisai 
emancipation ; that every attempt to revive the old 
Democraiio Party as it was before the war will 
make the results of the war an issue in any cam- 
paign, to the exclusion of the discussion of measures 
necessaiy to the revival of our industries and the 
solution of the problems tuat the war has left us to 
settle ; that the loyal men of both parties are en- 
titled to administer the Government, and not those 
who attempted to destroy it, and thereby created 
the burdens of which they now complain; that 
a national honest war Democrat can find no 
home' now, no place in tbe present Democratic 
Party, oreanizod as it is, and led by men who are 
still auherents and advocates of the old dead heresy 
of States' rights ; that the present leaders attempt 
to conceal their real principles and purposes under 
the sham and pretentious cry of reform; that every 
lover of his country who desires true reform, every 
Onsiness and laboring main who wishes a sonad cur- 
rency aud early resumption, should support Gov. 
Hayes as the only candidate now before the people 
who is their true exponent. 

Gen. T. B. Gates arrived at a late' hour, and ad- 
dressed the mHeting at some louglU trom the Re- 
publican stand-point. 

Keeseville. Oct, 1. — A large and cnthnsiastio 
meetiue, tiliine our Town Hall to its utmost ca- 
pacity was held here last night, and addressed by 
Hon. Geo. Vi. Huxie, who delivered a speech of 
great ability and power, holdiuK tho constant atten- 
tion of the audience for nearly two bonis. A uni- 
formea club, 150 strong, with torches, band, and 
banners paraded the streets. Northern New-York 
IS awake, the Republicaus united, and many re- 
cruits from the Democracy daily received. 



DEMOCUAIIC MOBS IN OHIO. 

.Special Dispateh to the New- York Times. 
Gallion, Oct. 1. — The Democrats in some 
portions of Ohio seem to be determined to suc- 
ceed in the coming election by mob violence 
and by disturbing, of Republicau meetings. 
To-night Tilden's "reformers" here tried to 
break up a Republican meeting addressed bj' 
Gen. Conway and Jir. Smalley. They booted 
and yelled like Indians, but the meeting was 
held aud the speakers defended. 



tltftt gaffimant. y M OatUcL with a 2'Cftt.BQIQ'^><>' i^ sceve that be la aan*Ua of doJDii tne work h« offers 



HEPUBLICAN NOMISATIONS. 

Nominations have been made by t;ie Kepub- 
licana as toUows iu the counties named: 

Clinton County. — For Member ot AssemblViShep- 
ardP. Bowen, County Clerk, Williaa J. McCaffrey; 
Justice of Sessions, Andrew W. Morboup ; Coro- 
ners. Samuel I). Phil'ins and Michael Vande,rvoort. 

^c■^F,NKCTAl)Y■^ OUNTY. — For Mcmbsr of A sseiriDly, 
Chaiieo ilablinRS; Couuly Clerk. James G. Cai\ ; 
•lu.-ilice of Sbsaioiia, John Pttilo , Coroners, J. W. 
Wick. Nathaniel Ciieesman, and Alexandet Ennis. 

Chemu.N'G Cou.ntv.— I'or Membsr of Assemuly. L. 

A. B..ilev ; Slierift". J. A. Wisiitr; i'leuHurer, Majjr 
Alexander Diven; County Clerk, Theodore Smitu. 

« 

OOIfORESSIONAL NOMIlfATlON. 
L.oi:isvii.i,E, Oct. 1. — John B. Clarke has 
been noiiiiaated for Congress by tbe Demccrats uf 
the Tenth Didincc. of Kentuckj. 



HOPE FOR KINGS COUNTY. 

— ♦^ — 

BRIGHT PROSPECTiS FOR THE LOCAL 
RKPUBLICAN TICKET. 

A COAL»lIOX ro BE FORMKD WITH THR IX- 
D;;PENPENT DEMOCRATS lAGAINST THK 

m'l.m'ghli.v-ki.ngslk'V' ri.vg — senti- 
ment t)F the peoplk on the politi- 
cal SITUATION — I'ltOBABLE NOMINA- 
'i roNP. 
Never before, at so early a istage iu a cam- 
paign in Einas County, have the prospects for the 
Hucoe-js cf the local Kepul lieaa i ticltet been so 
bright as they are at present. It is not meant in 
refernucr to the •' local Republican ticket " to cou- 
voy the idea that a ticset made ni>;solely ot Repub- 
licans is going to be successful! uexb November. 
Such a result in a couutv so largely Democratic as 
tho Cjunty of Kings would be almost impossible. 
Aside trum that fact, however, tho p-jople, without 
regard to party, having last year lasted the sweats 
of power, evince a wholesoite disposition to disre- 
gard party so far as local nominations are coucerued, 
and select men lor office whose claims rest on firmer 
ground than mere party fidelity. With suprema and 
even coutemptuous indift'erence to the wishes ot the 
people, ''Boss" McLaughlin last year selocCed, as he 
had In years past, the men who +were to occupy 
positions an the Democratic tic'.£et. Wheu his 
uomiuees were beateu he attributed their defeat to 
theR;publican "tidal wave," and,inotliiug daunted, 
has this year, as usnal. undtrtaken the leadership 
of tbe Demicratic campaign. That McLaughlin 
will esperiaiice opposition even ■ in his own ranks 
there is baralyroim to doubt. The Independent 
or Slocum Democrats hare already declared asaiusL 
him, and have coni^uded to unite with the Repub- 
licans in placing a local ticket in tbe field. In a 
community so intollisent as that of Brooklyn it is 
onl.y necessary to zlve tne people a chance to vore 
for fiiot-class candidates, selectfid solely on the 
ground of ability and williugness to break down 
party lines. TjI.s tbe Republican organizalioa Old 
last J ear, and the result was b errand success. 
No persju dictated the notuiuations ; they 
were made after many conferences among 
prominent citizens, and only when the 
will of the people had been thoroiighly ascartained. 
The Republican organization oflfered tbe best ad- 
vantages, aud was, therefore, selected by the peo- 
ple to lead the fi^ht atramst the Ring. This year 
there is every reason to believe ttiat a similar 
course will be adopted. The Democrats who are 
oppose I to tne absolute rule of ^ciLangblin will, ot 
course, have the naming of candidates for sime of 
the principal offices, and the Republicans will take 
up those candidates. A careful canvass of tbe 
situation, however, bas made clear the fact that to 
nominate a man merely because: he belongs to an 
orgai-izatiiu of independent Democrats, or because 
he is a Republican, will not do. To secure victory 
only tbe best men must ba selected. The asiump- 
tion of a dictatorial attitude by ahy one man or set 
of men will be fatal to success. Strange 
as it may appear, the ; weakness of 
the Democratic State ticket is the 
greatest danger the Republicans and Independent 
Democrats have to contend witl^. It is a WdU- 
kuown fact in Brooklyn that the rank and file of 
tbe regular Democracy care so little tor tbe suc- 
cess of the ticket headed by Lucids Robinson that 
they are prepared to make any trade of votes to 
secure local success. Tho " Boss " has already 
•' given it out" though his lieutenants that he 
will give more to the Slocum Democrats, as some 
of the independents are Xalled. than the Republi- 
cans can postibly give. XMcLaughliu does not 
appear to have learned ye^xthat it is thi» very 
assumption of ihe power to give — as if they were 
his private property— positions vfhich are con- 
ferred only by tbe .voters of Kings Cpnnty, that 
has offended the people, and driven *. large num- 
ber of honest Democrats to rebel against his dicta- 
tion. It is the defeat of the Ring of which Mc- 
Laushlin and Kingsley are the priincip.il member* 
that the people seek rather than the election of any 
parlioular set ofmen. ; \ 

TUE OFFICES TO BE FILLED. 

The offices tu be filled iu Brooklyn and Kings 
County next November are as follows: On tbo 
county ticket. Register, County Clef-k, and one Com- 
missioner of Charities ; on the city ticket, Con- 
troller and City Auditor, and on thie city Judiciary 
ticket, one Police Justice io th« place of Justice 
Walsh, and three Civil Justices in the places of 
Judges Delmar, Morse, and Semler. ; Aldermen will 
be elected m the odds wards and Supirviaors in tbo 

even wards. Nine Assemblymen aud three Cou 
gressmen from the Secand. Third, t^nd Fourih Con- 
i;res8ional Districts are also to be chosen. 

Nothing definite is yet known aboul tbe 
nominations to be made by the Republicans aud 
Independent Democrats, but beloWl will be found 
the names of a number of gentlemen who are 
spoken ot in connection with somoot the offices 
to be ailed next November. Tha ollice of Ragister 
18 held by the incumbent for three yeais, and the 
emoluments come in^ the shape ot fees, whitjh are 
said to amount to about 130,000 anitiially. Several 
names have been mentioned in connectiou with the 
office, and among thera are tjiose of Col. 
James Cavanngh and Capt. Xaniier, but it is 
the opinion of many that neither will re- 
ceive the nomination. There : is, p.-rhaps, 
an equal amount of donut as to who i^!il recoivo'the 
nomination for County Clern. Among the cauul- 
Oiitv-S lur the po->itiou uro Eu;;eufc U; Keni, (xeoriio 
Thomas, Jacob Worth, and Capt. William B. fSteers. 
Prefilent of the Quarantine Commission, ftieer.-i 
and U'crtb are very popular, but Beiri is probably 
the strongest candidate and has the best chance ot 
receisiue tbe nomination.' Tue talk|as to the nomi- 
nation for the oflicB of tiurrogate has so lai- been 
vague. Among the names mentioned for tho place 
are those ol Gen. Catlin and iieuij C|. Place. Alany 
promiuL-nt m»u speak ot nominating some first-class 
independent Democrat for the otlicf, xome such man, 
for instance, as William M.Ivans, .\lr.i James Jensen, 
loiiuerly Police Commissioner, is thb only person 
whose name has been thus lar prominently mentioned 
for tbe City Auditorsnip. Concerning the office ot 
Controller, which is one ot great trust, and ono 
about the filliugof which th« people ate particularly 
carelul. many comerences will yet bei held before a 
nominee is selected. Tho nomination may bo mveu 
to an luaepenaeni Democrat, but the; nomination of 
Air. Riiiley Ropes, who is a R*pub!,iean, and who 
would makti a very atroug candidate, is urned by 
many. A circnmstance in connection with the 
Democratic nomination for Controller two years 

d'^o has caused the name of Mr. Waljt.er L. Livinfc- 
sion, a well-known and wealthy lawyer, to be 
widely mentioned as the best and most available 
nominee for that otfii* this year. Atj the time rc- 
fcirad to, the McLaughlin Democrats, being ba:d 
pressed by tho reiormers, louked arijund lor a re- 
spectable man to nominate lor Controller, who 
waa to be used as a sort of fieuie-head tor the 
ticket, ill'. Livingston was bit upon, and Mc- 
Laughlin, never doiibung his own ability to control 
mat ceutleman, dirt-clud the convention to uuuu- 
uate him. Befoie the delegates assembled, how- 
ever, the 'Bo<!'," in order lo mako tli ii;a sure, 
asked Mr. Liviugston to pledge himself to allow 
McLaughlin toapfoiut all bis eleiks. • Tho insolent 
pioposiTiou was receued with ■ scorn, and 
the "Buss," In a towering rage, ordered the con- 
vention to nominate Mr. Samuel T'oweil, who. 
though a respectable man, beuus us pliantly to the 
will of McLaughlin as au.y poiiiician in that niah 
and mighty potentate's train. It was a similarly 
iusoleut act on the pan of ihe "Bohs" last year that 
aroused honest Democrats to a semie of the degradiuc 
posiiion into which the arrogance of this political 
dictator had torced them before the commuuity. It 
will oo remembered that McLauehliutiitfrtd an ui- 
flee in ihe City Hall and addressing Gou. Siocum 
with watch in hand commanded him to have nis 
name withdrawn as a caudidiite tor Police CoAimis- 
siLuer insule of twenty minutes undoi pain of last- 
iuii (ll.Holeasure. Geu. Slocum treated the man's in- 
solence in tho way lu which it desei vud to ba 
treated. The feeling in favor oi .\lr. Liviagstcm .i 
nomiiiatiou is akin to that wUiou induced nonest 
D.tuuetats to throw ofl' the gallinj* yoke ol Iho 
'• Hos.i" and announce their intention ot votiiid 
only for men capable ot assuming themselves 
the respoubibiliiy of aduiinistering tho at- 
fairs ot anv oQiso to wi.lcii they iniclit 
be elected. The spectacle of an un.-'crupciloiia pulili- 
cai leader, a chief meiuber of one oi : the nino^t <-.)r- 
rupt political Rings ihatevei- existed, jrlictaiiusr '.vho 
shall and who shall not be clerks in aii office wliere 
seveu ur eijjnt niillous of ihe peopln's money is 
handled annually is not pleasant to :c.>ntomi..late. 
It is not certain that Mr. Livingstoniwould accept 
the uoiuiuatlon. He is a man of w^ralth and exten- 
sive practice as a lawyer, and has never shown .-xny 
particular liking for politics. Should he receive 
aud accept the nomination, however, and should 
the remainder of the city ticket be, made up by 
nomiaatine Mr. James Jensen, who ia oerliapa the 
moat popular German in Brooklyn, for; City Auditor, 

itaccHss Will bo assured io November. ; 

, Xhnre ar* a uomiatf uf candidate* for sIkm on. 



the City Judiciary ticket. Among them mav be 
mentioned tne following: Forjudge Walsh's placs, 
Richard Marvin, ex-Judge Morehonsp, and C<d. 
Kenipstreet; for Judge Morse's place, W. E. S. 
Fales, and J. Monck ; for Juilce Semler's place, 
James Eschwigo and Albert Adier, and for Judge 
Delmar'.< place, Capt. Tanner and Tunis G. Bergen. 
There are, however, many other candidates, and 
uoihinif dedii!;*< can bo predicted aboutthe nomiaa- 
tions at prpfent. In the Second Congre8sion;il Dis- 
trict Gov. Lowe is spoken of by the independent 
Democrats as a good m.m ro nominate, and, t-houid 
he receive their supporr. there would be. litlle doubt 
of Ills noinilifttiou by the Repiihlicans and his sub- 
sequent election. In tne Third District Mr. Chit- 
tenden Is strong! V supported fur re-election. Gen. 
Catlin has also many warm friends in the district 
who woulti like to see him nominated, and who 
claim that his nomination would tn.sare the district 
to tbe Eepnblicaiis. In the Fonrth Distiict ibe 
candidates thus tar spoken of are George C. Ben- 
I'Ctt and es-Iudg'> Erastus Cook. It would ho pro- 
maniro at present to speak ol the Aseembl.v and 
Aldermanic noininatio.is 



HOME WORK. 



George William Curtis is announced to speak 
for°the Republican candidates at Oyster Bay, Louii 
Island, on Wednesday, the25:h inst. 

j\Iajor Gen. James W. Husted, of Westches- 
ter, will address the Rapublicans of the Seventh 

As.sembl'V District lo-iiight at the rooms of the Liu- 
coln Club, No. liJ Puiveisity place. 

A Haves and Wheeler luVss-uioeting, to coni- 

pnse delegations tium ail t\e lowus ot Suffolk 

f^ountv, is announced to be berl on the AaTiciiltural 
Fair arounds at Riv< ihpad, Lim^: Island, on Thur.s- 
day, the 13. Ii i'lst. Iji Gov. Dix w tl! speak. 

A corps of sappers and minors have been or- 
ganiziid by the Lincoln Club, of the Seventh Assim- 
bly District, to be attached Io the Lincoln Battalion 
ol the Boys in Blue. 'This makes the teuih company 
of that battalion. 

There will be a Republican luas^-meeting at 
Huntington, Long Island, to-morrow evening, under 

the auspic.-s of the Ha.yes and Wheeler Campaisn 
Club of tliat villaae. A himdsume banner, iO by 30. 
will be raised, and addresses will bo made bv Giu. 
Joseph C. Jackeou, Judge Fieeman, J. Fithian, and 
Hi:n. H. J. Scudder. 

The German Republican George Loeser As- 
sociation held a very lurge meeting at their head- 
quarters. No. 104 Allen street, on Saturday night, 
Mr. Ferdinand Appel presiJine. After the'ioutlne 
business had been disposed of, Mr. John Renter, 
President of the Eighth A&scmhly District Club of 
Geiman Republicans, deliveied a speech in which 
he said that the success of the R^^public^an Party 
was certain. The meeting adjourned with cheers 
for our next Pre^iQent, Rutherford B. Hayes. 

A meeting of the citizens of the Twenty-first 
Assembiy District was held at Chatterson Hall, Sec- 
ond avenue, on Satoffdav evening for the purpose < f 
oiganizinc an association to be cilied the Anthony 
H. Hills Association. Tbe oreanization has for its 
otiject the cleotion of the above-named Ecuileman to 
the Legislature, ilr. Hills is very popular with all 
classes in the district, is an active Republican, and 
it is thought will make a snccessiul run. Tbe asso- 
ciation adopted resolutions indorsiua the nomina- 
tions of Hayes and Wheeler and Morgan and Rog- 
ers. 

THE YELLOW FEVER. 



DEATHS IN GEORGIA— IHK MAILS AND THK 
MISSISSIPPI QUARANTINE. 

Savannah, Oct. 1. — The total numbei of in- 
terments to-day was twenty-five, of which seventeen 
were from yellow fever. Eight of the burials were 
of colored persons. 

James BL Munnerdyn, Sr., Superintendent ot 
Agriculture, died to-day. The mate of the 
scaooner C. 'W. Lewis died at Tyboe tc-day. 

Washington. Get. 1. — A dispatch lias bean re- 
ceived at the Post Office Department saying that 
there is no mail communication with Tesas via 
Morgan City, on account of quarantine. The agent 
in . forwardina the dis.iatch says that he ha.^ 
instrncted the New -Orleans office to send 
Texas mails via Memphis and Little 
Rock, and adds: "It is understood that yellow 
fever in Kew-Orisans has caused Galveston to es- 
tsbheh a quarantine. To^-i-fover appears to be 
spreading over the entire South. I expect to hear 
of it at ■Memphis in a day or two. If the Memphis 
route should be Quarantined I will try Columbus, 

Ky." 

Nkvv-York, Oct. 1.— The following dispatch bas 
been received this day ftom our Xew-Or!ean» 
house : 

" Learning that quarantine Is enforced against 
New-Orleans steamtre. the Board of Health tele- 
graphs the facts to your Healtb'Officer. Concerning 
health of this citv, only eight cases here, and but 
one new case since the SSih." 

Believine the above to be of public Interest, we 
inclose for pubhcation. R«spectfnlly yours, 

C- A. WHITNEY Jt CO., AKCuts. 



IHE CENTENNIAL EXHIBITION. 



ADMISSIONS ON SAFLKDAY THE FIFTY-CENT 

PIKCK HULK IO BE RE-ESTABLISHED— 
THE COMMISSION PASSIinG ON AWAKL'S — 
STATE DAYS. 

Philadelphia, Oct. 1.— TTie attendance at 
the exhibition on Saturday, despite the heavy 
rain which continued without cessation throughout 
the day, amounted to 103,204 cash admissions to the 
mr.ln exUibitioD, and 1-357 to the live stockyard. 
The day was the last of the special hall'-fee days 
heretofore appointed, «nd a^ the statement is 
anthoiizcd by tbe management that there 
will be no twenty-five cent, days in October, 
It is improbable that any exceptions will 
hereafter be made in the rule requiring 
auadmission fee of fifty cents on all days of the 
w«k. The rule rsqniring the piiymeiit of a fifty- 
oeuS note, silver piece, or package ticket, as an ad- 
mission fee. will also be adbereil to, and conse- 
qiieutlv a one dollar bill will not be taken for I wj 
adniisiims. 

The Centennial Commission on Friday and Sat- 
urday, in executive session, approved a number of 
the awards of the jndaes upon which action bad 
not previously been taken for wnnt of time. These 
comprised mainly the awards on printing presses, 
but ipcludel .ilso several intended to have been em- 
braced in groups already published. 

This being the week ot the Centennial jubilee of 
Rhode Island, the observance of wliieh will culmi- 
nate on Thursaay. Gov. Lippitt. of that Stale, is 
expected to arrive on Tuesday, wheu the tirrange- 
ment of a programme for the day will be perfected. 

New-Hampshire day has been appointed for the 
12ili inst., and It is officially announced that G.'V. 
Cheney will hold a reception at the New-H.impshire 
State Bnildiue on that day trom 1 to 3 o'clock P. 
M.. to be loilowed b.y an 'adrticss, .inpropriiie :o 
the occasion, at the same \^\?xt. bv Piof. " E Iwm 
D. Sanborn, LL.D.. ot Dartmoulh Cidlesre. Reduced 
taies by railroad from Rhode Inland and Xew- 
Hamnshire havt been secured tor this aud next 
week. ^ 

TUE WEATHER. 



PKOBABILITIt-S. 

Washington, Oct. 2-1 A. M.— For the Middh 

states and New-Enalrtnd. rUiiiy f«cct-ed;d during the 
day by slowly Jailing haron|(;^•r. cool north umttrly 
uindg bnckinrj to warmer i-outk-w^'iterlu. and dear o:- 
partly cioitd'j veather. 

IN THIS CITY. 
The following recovd shows the changes in 
the temperature for tbe pa'it twemy-tour hours, iu 
comparison with tho corresponding date of la.^t 
year, as indicated by the thermometer at Huduul's 
Phar.Dacy : 

1875.1870.1 IS7."'.. 1S70. 

3 A. M til'" 48^1 n:30P. M Cj' (!(i° 

(i A. .M oil' ■li-'l 0P.M... r.7-' b',^ 

9 A -M I'l" r..Jl t) 1'. M .'.o'- bi^ 

1- M «"-' 67ili;PM 44° 5^: 

Aveiu;^e teiuperaiure .v< slorOay .^;;-V 

Avera;;e teuipeiata.e for corri.S(joiiUiug date last 



year. 



58^ 



i\/00/)r J.\X> ^A.NKhY MEETISaS. 

Chicago, Oct. 1. — Tbe lUooJy and Saiikey 
mefiiiijis opened at c o'elori; this morning, all ar- 
raugeuierts for tlie great tabeiuacie hsine com- 
plete, ."-(even thon^ami p?o|)!e greeted MooCv's 

first appearance. Many city Pastors were on the 
platform. Sai.key sang with a good voice 
and effect, aud the .choir was haiuioaioiis. 
Dr. Goodwin, of tbe First Congrejjktional 
Church, prayed with fervor and »motlon. 
Mr. Moody'* sermon was cnaracteristic, and di- 
leoted.to Christian worker*, the text beioK taken 



from John xi., "39 : " Jesus said : take yo away the 
stone." The point of the discourse was the dnty of 
Christians to rid their nearts of whatever rendered 
them unfit for the Lord's use : I'ride, covetonsness, 

nubclier, prejudice, and sectarian bigotry. After the 
benedietidu of Bislio-,i Cheiiey there were great 
hnnd-shakincs and hearty greetings. Half an hour 
before the time f.ii tbo afttrnoon service the taber- 
nacle was full and thfre were eiioutth of people in 
the strcft to fiil a d. z -n chiirches. Moody preached 
from tne text : '• He that reapeth roceiveth 
wages," .lohn iv., 36. H's discourse was a torrent 
of gospel enihnsiasm. 

Kev. Dra. Kit ti edge, Chamberlin. Goodwin, and 
Thompson held an overflow meeting in Farwell 
Hall. At the. evening meetinif in Farwell Hall 
twelve persons presented themselves as seeking 
Chris:. Toe sermons evely evening this week will 
be addressed to Christians. 

THE SERVIAN WAR. 



AN ESTlMATi: OF PHINCK MILAN'S FOIICES— 
MORE iiClIflNG— THE PEACE NEGOTIA- 
TIONS. 

London. Oct. 2 — Tbe Standard's Belgrade 
dispatch leports that the Servian fotces between 
Aiexicatz and Deligrad are estimated at 120,000 
men and 140 guns. The only aim and 
Tesult of Servia's accenting the armistice 
was to seeiiie time ; for Geu. Tchernayeff 
to assemble an army in that quarter and surprise 
the Turks, it being his Intention to 'cut off Fa.sl! 
Pasha's army from Nisch, drive it into the aioun- 
tains in the Kruschevatz district, and the.-e destroy 
it. As has aiready been leported this eff"ort ot 
Thursday was nnsuecessfnl. The Servian loss on 
that day was at least 3,UO0. 

The Standard's dispatch from Deligrad states 
that th^ Servians have tiiviously attacked the Tut'ks, 
and been again iepnlsed with tne loss of 1,500 
men. Another battle is imminent. 

A despatch to the same paper from Belgrade saye 
Gen. vSumarckofi', the Russian envoy, is not coming 
to Belgrade, as was expected. The Russian inun- 
dation is steadily crowding out the Servian 
element. Preparations are m'akins in Belgrade 
and (^n the border of Russia inconsistent with 
the pacific declarations of the cabinet at St. Peters- 
bore. There are eood grounds for sapposine that 
Russia will soon openly take the responsibility of 
the war which has been waging under the fiimsy 

cover of the Servian flag. 

Constantinoi'le, Oct. L— Contrary to exnectation 
no meeting ot the Extraordinary Council was held 
lo-day to decide upon a reply to tho peace pro- 
posals of the European Powers. 

RUSSIA AM) AUSTRIA. 



THE czar's LETTKK to FRANCIS JOSEPH TO 
BE SENT TO ALL THE POWHKS. 

London, Oct. 2. — The Puns correspondent 
of the limeg i-iya the proposals contained in tbe 
Czar's letter to Francis Joseph will probably be 
sent to all the Powers. They will cer- 
fiiinly be received in Rome. The object 
of sending the autograph letter to Francis Joseph 
is to induce Austria to take joint action with Rus- 
sia. . 

It is reported that this letter, after describing in 
detail the dangers of the situation and condemn- 
ing the original peace propositions, proposes 
the immediate occupation of Bulgaria by 
her army and the occupation of Bosnia and Herze- 
govina by the Austrian Army; the watching of 
the Bosphorns by the navies of both powers ; Ser- 
via to retain her present independence. This 
proposition ii to make sure that tho Russian inter- 
pretation of th«rterm of self-covernment be adhered 
to in the reforms to be introduced by the Porte. 
Russia thinks this will stop bloodshed and impose 
on the insurgent provinces the acceptance of the 
conditions stipulated in their favor. 

Turkey may put an immediate end to the war by 
grantuie a long armistice. It is now" ad- 
mitted by the Powers rhat a Con- 
ference alone can deci.de the question 
between Turkey and her vassals. Russia makes 
two conditions in ' accedina to the idea ot 
a conference. First, the conference is to b« 
held iu a \ neu'ral citv. Second, it is 
to be composed of Ministers of Foreign Afifairs. JNo 
Powers will object to these conditions sow. If the 
Porte only grants an armistice the Powers are 
ready to undertake a peaceful settlement. 

A Yleuna disnatch to the Daily Newt says 
the reply of Francis Joseph to the Czar's 
note will not be made until the Porte's 
answer to the peace proposals is received. 
It seems that Count AndraSsy will oppose joirnoe 
Russia in the occupalion of the Turkish provinces 
it Austria finds suiipoit in her retusaL 

NOTES FROM THE CAPITAL. 



W^ASHiNGTON, Oct. 1.— Regulations for the 

examination and admission of Cadet Lieutenants in 

the Revenue Marine Ser\i;;eof the country, under 
the recent laws of Congress, are now beinz prepared 
at the Treasury Department. At present there ia 
but one vacancy in tbe service alluded 
to, and there are fifteen or twenty ap- 
plicants tor that position. The law 
under which cadet Lieutenants are to be appointed 
provides that whenever a vacancy in the grade of 
Third Lieutenant occurs, the Socrotary of the 
Tr-easury may appoint a cadet not less than eigh- 
teen nor more than twenty-five years •f age, with 
rank ne.xt below that of Third Lieuteuant, whose 
pay shall be three-fourths that of a Third Lieuten- 
ant, and who shall not be appointed to a higher 
"lade until he sliali have served a satisfactory pro- 
bationary term of two years and passed the exam- 
ination required. &c.; but the whole number of 
Third Lieutenants and cadets shall at no time •x- 
ceod the number of Third Lienleaants now author- 
ized by law. 

The citizens of Washington have shown substan- 
tial interest In the ceremonies connected with the 
unveiling of the statue of Gen. McPherson during 
this month. Invitations have been sent to all Gen. 
McPlierson's classmates, including those who 
served in the Confederate Army, among them Gen. 
J. B. Hood. 

Ex-Gov. Shepherd last'night entertained the visif- 
ing rifle teams at his residence. A largo number of 
other (juests were also present. There was music, 
instrnnienial and vocal, the foreizners takine part 
in the latter. In the brief addresses deliv- 
ered, the teams expressed themselves de- 
lijlhted with tlieir trip turouv'hout, meotinK 
w7tb uothins: but kindness and abundant ho.spitali- 
Hes everywhere. Tbey said th«y would take borne 
with them the story of their reception, and wonid 
not fail to relate tbo pleasant incidents to their 
triends. who, tbey had ui doubt, wunld think more 
favorably than ever of Americans lu appreciation 
of the omrtesies exf-nried to the teams. They left 
AVashinirtoa to-night for the north, preliminary to 
taking passage tor their respective homes. 



OT HSMtW DRO IKA ED. 
Halifax. Oct. 1.— Obed Smith, bow oarsman 
of the champion four-oared crew who distinsuished 
thoiDselve) at Pniladolphia, aud Mark his brother, 
were drowned this mornioe about 3:30 o'clock in 
Halifax Harbor. Tbey were some home <n their 
Rchoouer boat of about sixteen tons burden wiih 
siooie co.il and wiutvr stores on board, when they 
were run down bv tbo mail steamer Nova Scotian, 
bound in from Baltimore. A woman nsmedTuke. 
a passenger iVitb thi'm, was rescued. Ibe Smiths 
were n.it'seen after the collisiou aiid it is supposed 
th'?y sank with the boat. 

FOVRTEES rEUaOyS DROWNED. 
COKK. Oct. 1.— .\ loiTv-boat was swamped on 
Saturday evening in YoUL'al Harbor, and fourteen 
persons were drowned, nearly all farmers and their 
w ives. 

BVtiyKD IO DEATH. 

Tkoy, Oct. 1.— Edward tJnichcster and wife 
were iiuitied to d^atii to-d.iy by an -explosion of 
:ilC"hol whirh w.is biini: used in the prepararion of 
vaiiii^Ii. The mixture v^as put into a leaking pan 
on ;i kitchen stove. 

.VOFE MOVl-.T .XhEOEJJ FOR CCTBA. 

London, Oct. 2.— Renter's telegram from 

iladrid unuouucos that public adjudication was 
made last Saturdav t>ir theloaji of 13,000.000 piastres 
required for the expenses of the Cuban war. 

ARRITAXj of A STEAyfER OUT. 

Pltmocth, Oct. 1. — Th« steamer Pommera- 

nia, Capt. Schwensen, Ironi Now York Sept. 81 hm 
ariived bare and sailed for HLambora* 



THE EAS TERN S TRUG&LE. 

QUALITIES OF THE CONTESTANTS, 

THE COMBDY OV POLITICS, AS PLAYED OKCH 
EVERY WEEK — THE POSITION OF PRINCS 
MILAN— A BATCH OK TURKISH PRISOK< 
EKS — CONT>rTION OK THE HOSPITALa. 
I^om Our apeclal CorretpoiKUni. 
Belgrade, Sunday, Sept. 10, 1876. ; 
From the tragedy of war I vrill turn foi 
an instant to the cdnedy of politics, an plaved 
once every week at the Council of State pr» 
sided over by that much-to-be-pitied young 
man Prince Milan, who will, if bostJitie^ 
go on much longer, lapse into the condition at 
the last Sultan, Mourad "V. Mr. Ristios, tot 
whilom advocate for war, has now beco.ni< 
intensely pacific. This nerson, bavinz »ao- 
eceded in embroiling his sovereign, whom he 
hates, would rejoice in the consummatijon ol 
an unpopular peace, and so urge* it on bv«verr 
argument at his commana. To him repliei 
Mr. Stepcho, tbe worthy Chairman of thi 
Skupochtijna delegation of seventeen, ol whom, 
par parcnfhcHe, eleven can neither read not ■ 
write. Stepcho is patriotic, and parodies th« 
illustrious "Jules Favre'a pat une pierrtt 
pojt un ponce, but he is an OmU^Ainm 
man of bellicose proclivities who ia sup- 
ported by his seventeen colleagnes m 
his assertion that, as the Skupochtiina d©' 
clared war, it alone haij any legal nght to eater* 
taiB proposals tor either a peace or an anDi»-( 
tice. The Prince says never a • word, and' 
Stepcho, being constitutional, carries hif 
point and tells M. Bistics that he and tiie com' 
mittee are quite willing ts aceept the responsi^ 
bility of their acts. After this the Cabise^ 
Council breaks no. Tbe Prince goes home to 
nurse the baoy. Ristics to write out a reparft 
for the Kuesiau Censtil and concoct a "bnUatv 
of victory from the Army of the Yftror," aud 
the seventeen to the nearest caff, where they > 
talk patriotism and drink sUpbmes natiitlia 
Police corner to order the extinctaDa ( 
of all lights and the closing of the eetaUish< 
ment. Such is political life in Belgrade. 
Of social life little can be said ; foceiginers; 
liave rarely been admitted to its inner ^eanctn-j 
ary, aqd the war is an all-sufficient excuse foTt 
closing tbe few houses where a show of bospi* 
t-ality wai^nce made. The hotels are crowded^ 
with adventurers of all nationalitiea, either va. 
search of employment in the Army, or as mem- 
bers of tbe Ked Cross Associanon, the mi^ocity 
of these last being more or less eenneeted with 
tbe press, a branch of indostrv for which the 
Servian Grovernment entertains small sympa- 
thy. One of this fraternity, who passed him- 
self off as an English " milord" and thereby 
obtained some courtesy from the official worid, 
was found out last week and ignoaunioosly 
sent over to Semlin, as being a 'volf in sheep's 
clothing. Indeed, of r^ularly accredited eorte' 
epondente the majority live over the fwater aud 
rarely show their faces on this side. / ' 

Having, with some difiieolty, obtained ths 
necessary permission from the Police, I paid » 
visit yesterday to the ancient fortiees, to wbioli 
ingress has been strictlv refused since ttie di*« 
covery of an attempt to blow up the powd sp 
magazine, in July last. A few old-£&shioa »«1 
guns have been isonnted on the walls, whec e^ 
a certain resirtaaee might ba made to as a*«> 
tack from the Save or the Daaube. Bat &<>m 
the land aide the place is eomoiaoded by a lugli 
ridge, within cannon ranges It iru from tins 
direction that Prinee Eocene operated, ana as- 
no attempt has been made to intrench tha 
heights, I presume that no defense will be o(- 
fered should the Turks manage to get op tiuu 
far. What will hs the results ia tbe Mo- 
rava Valley it is difficult to &rgoe, 
but I do not hesitate to assert tha^ 
Sherman or Lee, Stonewall Jackson or Kea>< 
uy would have dictated terms of peace in the 
capital w^ithin a fortnight after cbe deoiarattoa 

of Trar. There were somis 'wretched-looidng 
oon scripts working painfully at the goose -s ten 
on the terr^ plHn, but tho only objects of in- 
terest were the Turkish pris<Hiera. Thase »» 
the first whom I hare seen. I believa 
they are all who have ever been taken not 
wounded, and they number exactly twenty- 
live. This is carcaiuly simralar, an>l . 
gives rise to some specolatire thooghw. ; 
The Servians do not attempt to explain, 
the why and wherefore, but those Turks with ' 
whom I have conversed maintain that their 
enemy declines to take prisoners, and prefers 
the other thing. However^ those who are hara 
now admit that they are well treated. They 
occupy two large rooms, mtich cleaner thaa 
those inhabited by the earrison, with a 'broad 
bench running around three sides, on whicX 
they have spread tlieir clothes and some oatv 
pets. At first regular rations were sarved| 
out to them, but now, at their own request^ 
they receive au equivalent in money for the 
purchase of fond and other articles from. • 
th6 Jewish peddlers> who are allowed to 
eater twice a day. During the daytime they 
take their kief within doors, but are permitted 
two hours' exercise in the oi»eB air every even- 
ing. One of the rooms is tenanted exclusively* 
by the Nixam or resulars, the other "by Bosnian 
R6difs, who appear to take things much moru 
gayly than their brothers in misfortune. . All 
were smoking, of course ; one was playing thcx 
guzla to a small but admiring audience, and 
several oouplea were deep in a game ol 
draughts. Manv of the prisoners had their 
tingers covered with rings, and wore two or three 
watches with heavy silves chains, about wbosi 
original ownership it is as well not to make 
too close an inquiry. A great proportioc 
spoke Servian, being nauves of «m 
of the border States, and it was onU 
among the Nizam that Tui-kish was al 
all intelligible. From one of these, a neu- 
commissioned officer, who was somewhat less 
sullen than his fellow-captives, I tried to elicit 
information about the proce«dings in use 
against the Rayahs, but his statements, if true, 
arc utterly at variance with the reporu wlucu 
have allowed enthusiastiff Sclavophiles to 
^crve up such banquets of horrors as i 
see are effered to the European public bv iUi 
regular purveyors, tha uitra-Liberal English. 
press. AchBiet Agha pretends ,that the firsi 
excesses were committed — he speaks ot Bosnia 
only — by the Christians ; that everything hap- 
pening to them since was only in tho way of re- • 
taliation, and that as to killing and mutilatinjc 
the wounded and the prisoners, it was the com- 
mon custom, and had been so time out oft 
mind. This .Mussulman professed to teel na ' 
particular animosity to the Servians, with, 
whom the present difficulty is looked' 
ujion as a sort of familv quarrel. But 
great resentment is entertained against 
the "Moscov giaours," the Russians, ton 
tbeu" interference. About Toheruayeff, iu 
particular, the Agha was very bitter, iutcrnmM 
lue that a petiuon w«uld be signed by th< 
whole Army, indeed, by the whole nation, beg- 
ging the Sultan to inflict upon him tbe 'most 
exemplary punishment as soon as he was cap« 
tured. The Serceaat's eyes danced with de- 
hghtlul auticipation as he detailed the perform», 
ance which is to take place pn the Atmeidan-^ 
Hipwodrome — ^inlxont of the Mosque ol Achmel^ 
at Constantinople: "The infidel dog will be 
brought forth, his teeth will be pulled out one 
bv one and drives into his skull, anU theu ho 
shall be coverod with tar and pitch and ba 
buiaed alive.'' . ,4 

An inspection of the hospitals has sonvincccl/ 

me that, although bettoi- supplied than daring 
the month of Auguet, these establiahmsut^ 

leave much to be desired. The Tentilation irf _ 
,aU oases is iuu>&ct«9t> the oontluetttal bottox.oL, 



J'^ 



SHHI^&#'^^ 



iv;i/« 



m,^v^m- 






:u ^if^x.-.^j^At ^^^'i 









HiP?^ 




PPWPP 



r<- ■■■,■-' 
• ■ ■ Al. - 



Z\z |tefa-g0tk gumt^, gBitb^s, @ct0lrfr 2, I8T6, — Mft^ Sttp^Itmt< ' 



mm 



"drauBhts" and eourante tfoir prevailins: over 
every other consideration. Excepting this, I 
(ouod the Rusnian ambulance very comfortable 
Bud amply provided with medicines and at- 
tentive nurses, all Russians, however, and 
many of them ladies trom Moscow, under the 
Presidency of the Princess Scharoska, 
who baa establiished relavs of field ho8- 
pitala all alont: the road from Semen- 
dria to Alexinatz. Of the Servian 
Icstitntions for the same purpose, the 1«S8 s:ud 
the better. Tho two English societies— Knights 
ot St. John and the National Aid Society— sent 
out deputations with a grpat iiourish of 
trumpets. Of these, ihe former immediately 
■went to the front anu did good service in the 
oniform and under the orders of the Servian 
znedioal staflF. Tlien arrived a certain Col. 
Lloyd Lindsay, a "great medicine man," with 
nagniiicent promises and half a dozen boxes of 
stores, and an omnibus but no horses to pull 
it. (tome extra wagons were on sale in the 
town and were purchased by the aforesaid 
♦• great medicine man." Attcr consider- 
able hesitation caused by his fear of 
committing a breach of noutrajity, 
l»e got over this difficulty finally, after con- 
sulting Qrotius and some other works on in- 
t«mational law, by which he learned that medi- 
cal appliances were not strictly " contraband 
of wai\" But he was inflexible on the point of. 
horses, which were not specified in the " medi- 
cal stores" authorized to be purchased in the 
schedule furnished him with thti credit of 
£:20,000 sterlmg contributed by his society. He 
phowed his authority, however, by making the 
Knights of St. John pull oft their uniform, and 
'- was astonished that; any Eugiisbman would 
80 far torget the neutrality imposed," &c. He 
has a t;ad attack ot neutrality on the brain. 
Meanwhile, a hospital of 100 beds has t)een 
decreed by him in a school-house, wluoti. re- 
(juiring alterations, continues to be untenanted, 
■and there being a deficiency of stores, an agent 
has gone to Vienna to get a supply. All this 
has considerably added to the ill feeling against 
England, a eentiment not much diminished by 
Col. Lindsay's departuns lorWiddiu this morn 
ing with a lot ot stores for the Turks, and sev- 
eial doctors who have been at the front with 
the SHrvians. Naturally, the native mind is 
Rhooked, and will not be persuaded that the 
English are not the prime 8up(iorcors ot Tur- 
key, and that Russia is not their only frionil. 
To-morrow is the Czar's birthday, and there 
will t>e, I hear, a great dcmoustratioo, but, as I 
rtart tonight for Boania, I must leavo its de- 
scription to some other currespondeut. 

;, ja-QOV. JLLliiN'S VIEWS. 

» . ^ 

■fnr: GREEHnACKKRS to get the best 

TREATMENT FROM THK DEMOCRATS. 
£x-Oov. William A. Allen toldacorresDondent 
•f the Cincinnati Commereial on "Wednesday that 
be should take no part in tb« political oampaien, 
except to cast hU vote t that the rising generation 
qiast fight this battle withoat his aid. Speaking of 
resumption he sail: 

'■ The resntuption plank 'of the Eenublican plat- 
form i» hiimbn*; and claptrao. I said, some time 
%iiO, thai the rcsnuintion ao viguroosly aeitatetl by 
ibe Kepablicans was a liarren itiealitj-, and I think 
(O no\T more Chan ever. The resumption of specie 
payment at this tinia would break every man of 
rat-ans in the country, uid none know it better 
tfian the Bspubllcina. They daren't try it. The 
people don't need specie to iracsact their buainesx 
with, and, therefore, don't demand It, What tuey 
do need, what they want, and what they demand, is 
ab honest GoyerDment, and one that won't steal 
every dollar they pay into Ui3 United States 
Xrt^umry. 

Dj yon think the Cooper-Gary movement will 
affect (be result of the election to any great ex<ent I 

&OV. Alien — It will have a conalderable effaot, un- 
douoteuty. Ic represents ideas which, if they had 
been promnlgated by the St. Lonis Convention, 
would nave jiwept this coimtry for toe De- 
mocracy, beyond a doa^t. The people need 
more atoney^ They need a healthy siimnla- 
tioQ of th* indnstries of the country, whioti 
will ecable them to gain a livelihood at 
tbelr iegitimate ocoapations. The Bepablioana say, 
*VOfi, wvUj there's plenty of money in the coun- 
try." So there is>, but it ain't m circulation. A mau, 
immediately after his death, it' he dies by fair 
means, has ia*t as mnob blood in his veins as he 
bad boiore, bat it isn't in circulation. That's Just 
the nay with onr money. There's plenty of ic m 
the coantry, bnt it isn't cirealating. 

I The UoTemur was ureatly tickled at this simile. 
ana chaclced oyer it with an air of contentment 
tltat wa» qoite relresning. He eyen went so far as 
to say, '*^ake a hute ot that ; that's a pretty good 
tlimg. Ijast thoui:tu of lt."| 

HocontiDoed: 'I'be Cooper-Cary movement wiU 
draw more votes irom the Kepnblicau than it will 
from the Bemucratic Party — m^oy, many more — 
from the tact that the Bepablicaoa who hold those 
ideas have nothing whateyer to expect trom their 
own party, and will vote with those who ai« nearest 
them in poiiticai sympathy, while the Bemocrats 
will, as a rule, vote with their own organizatioa, 
fetying on iho good sen^e and Kood faith of thtsir 
leaaers to bring about the neoesiiary financial re- 
f«ra>s if the party is saccesafuL 



TEJS XABTHQVAKE ly lyDlANA. 
The Indianapolis News of Monday evening 
Mys : "A telegram from Evanaville brings intelli- 
geaca that a distinct shock of an eartbqiuke was 
felt m that city shortly alter midnight last night, 
and an inquiry about the streets of Indianapolis to- 
tey shews tliat th* wave, or rathe; a suocession of 

waves, was distinctly noticesble abont the same 
time ui this city. Mr. £. A. Davis, No. 634 Ko/th 
Pei^sylvania gtreet, was awakened by a succession 
ot peculiar sounds, which after the first alarm he 
attuoated to the righttnl oaiua. Mr. Ingram Fletch- 
er. Ku. 400 Korth Pennsylvania streat, and the mem- 
Ikers of' bis family were distnrbed, and Mr. Fletcher 
first supposed a burglar had placed a heavy 
ladder against the bouse, er perhaps had 
pushed it alone fur change ot position. At tne 
time of the awaacning the bonsa shook, the chan- 
delier Pendants hit one another, and the musquito 
netting rustled as It stirred by a breeze. Mr. George 
J. Scbiey. Xu. 176 North Ea<it street, reporta a dis- 
tmci ahuek, or rather a suceesaion of shocks, the 
first of which both he and his wife tbonzht was 
owing to a bar^lsr ooeruting on the outside. Dr. 
I'iatcoer, No. 6;i5 Nurtb Pennsylvania street, relates 
aoout the same experience, and so do gentlemen 
resii:ius upon School and North Mississippi streets. 
Mr. A. F. Fay felt two distinct shoolis. He arose, 
aad conabltiog liis watch loand the time to be 12:18. 
Judge Hinea was also alarmed. The visitation was 
not sn&itient to alarm any material number of in- 
habitants, bnt those who were awakened experi- 
enced seosatioDS anything but pleasant in their 
oaturs." 



HAPPY EFFJSCnS OF A DREAM. 
' Tho Luzerne (Penn.) Leader relates this inci- 
dent : " The terrible accident at the railroiid bridge 
at Pittston. by which Bobert Helme was almost in- 
stantly killed. Is of too recent a date to have been 
forgotten by ear readers. Tne sorrowful disaster 
brought to the home of the deceased a terrible deso- 
lation.- and the wife who was left to mourn his 
sudden loss was nearly distracted. For inany days 
sftsr her hnsband was bttrisd she oout Inned to de- 
plore bis death, and went nearly wild when- 
ever she tbuUKbt of ic. Her nights were 
caued in restless ravings and her days were 

zloomy and cheerless. It was feared by her 
trieuds that her mind would become diseased If her 
griet was nut in some way assuaged. At last she 
dropped to sleep one snouy atternoon, and while 
thus at rest siie dreamed that her husband came to 
her, and, bending over her, ituDlanted a kiss upon 
her brow. She asked him to remain with her, but 
he told her tlial he could not, that he was too hap- 
py where he was, but that they would meet again 
fatoreafter in the better world. The vision passed 
and she awoke. Since then her thoughts have been 
at Tt'vt, and she is thorouiihiy Impressed with the 
belief that her husband is happy, and that Hhs will 
gu Zu himVhen she comes to lie down in tne grave 
beside him. ' 



A KECOaHlTIOH OF BKAyEBY. 
The Boston TrareiZsr of Friday says: "Mias 
Ella Diew, daughter of George H. Drew, Boston 
Highland*, received through the mail yesterday 
au elegsnt gold token made In form of a Maltese 
cross, inserted on one side "Aug. 26, 1878,' and on 
the other Bide 'To trie Heroic Touok Lady.' The 
token wss inclosed in an elegant case, bnt there 
was nothiOK to indicate from whom it came. The 
date, however, indicates that it was sent to Miss 
Drew lu recognmoa of her bravery while at Downer 
LandiDS, ou the 26th of August last. On that 
uvcasiuu Miss Drew was speadiog the day there, 
and while out rowing with a lady iiisnd, about half 
a mile Irom the sbure, a sall-buat wiih a party on 
board passi-d clone by them sailing rapidly. At that 
moment a chdd on board the saiUboat fell over- 
boaid. The party weie unable to brlsg the boat 

aruaod qaickly, not undtirstaudiogits maoaeement. 
Uiss Druw immediately Jumped out uf ber boat, 
sod swimming to the child re^caed it after it had 
Kauk twice. She then swam Lack to her boat, b^ 
.wbiuh claie the aail-boat was ne»r by. and the pa- 
rents took the child to the hotel. Miss Drew re- 
turued to the shore, and alter dryiui; her Ciotbes 
came hack to- Boston in the steamer without hearing 
tiie name uf the child or its purents.' ' 



THE OLD aiORY FliOU OHIO. 
Tho Diiyton (Ohio) Journal ot Tuesday says : 
•'There is a "serious deficiency of tlO,OOU in tho 
pnhlic funds' of Crawford County. The Demo- 
cratic County I'reasurer retired from offico on the 
7«b ot September, and admits that the school fund. 
Which was in his keeping. Is $10,000 less than it 
ougot to be. The Bocyrus Journal »ay» that thero 
has been a deficit in the county lunds proper tor 
years, and that the settlement et the late Treasurer 
was made by using the Union school fund of buoy- 
'.ns, held by him, to close his acoonnts. There are 
so mure voelferoos advocates ot ' reform ' in the 
Btate (ban are to be found among the Deroocr<icy of 
Crawtord Cotrnty, and yet these very reformers 
have been engaged tor years in covering np a de, 
lalcation in the County Treasury, w'bioh is at last 
fSiji$a J)y Mhhina thaaalv«»iH ^4 otBttCnah 'I ^^ 



*'EEFORM" IN MARYLAND. 

♦ — 

CONFEDERA TE R CLE A ND ITS FR UIT. 

FRAUD AND TREASOX HAND-IN-HAND — EX- 
PENSES, TAXATIOX, AND THE PUBLIC 

INDEBTEDNESS INCREASKD UNION MKN 

K'VERYWIIERK CROWDICD OUT BY RE- 
TURNED REBELS — FlfTKE.V PER CKN'T. 
OF APPROPRIATIONS TAKEN BY THE 
RING FOR GRANTING THEM — BABY- 
CARRIA.G."CS AND COPIJ'S OF THK POKIS 
CHARGED AS STATIONERY BY ELECTION 
JUDGES. 

Baltimore, Friday, Sept. 29, 1876. 

To tht BdltOT of the New- Toric Timet: 

As candid, thoughtful mau all over tho 
country are now considering what Democratic 
reform means, I think it will materially assist 
them in reaohinij a carract conc'ii-sio'ti hy eiU- 
ing their attention to an illustration of it iu ttio 
"State ot Maryland, and desira to use your valu- 
able columns for that purpose. Your renders 
are doubtless aware that the Republic an Party 
was doteatodat tho polls in 1856, and t:ie Demo- 
cratic Party entered into the pnssessioa of 
power in 1867. Never did any parly have a 
better chance to develop its best tendencies 
than that poirty in this State. Baltimore is the. 
commercial centre of the State, anl is so close- 
ly connected with the commercial centres ot tho 
North that the spirit of commerce raijcht 
naturallyhavebeen expected to exercise a liber- 
alizing influence. Moreover, many Union men 
who had been alienated from the- Republican 
Party on account of its policy iu rel.ttiou to tho 
bJacks, went into the ranks of tho Deraooratic 
Party. Unricr those circumstances 1 repeat 
that wo might naturally liave looked to soe the 
Democratic Party develop its best tondenoios. 
What has been the result ? ^ 

AVEXGING THK SUPPKESSIOX OF TFT'? HK- 
BELLION. 

Maryland, during the war, was honej-combed 
with treason. There were thousands of men 
who were ready to do alt that they could, by 
word or deed, to aid and abet saoossiau. Hor 
young men wore constantly stealin;^ across tho 
lineB to join the Confederate Army. The State, 
however, was too near the seat of Governmant 

for treasopable manifestations to be allo^vecl, 
and it was accordingly, during the whole war, 
virtually under military governmeat, having 
nominally a doveranttent of its ow^n. but really 
under martial law. The suspension of the 
writ of habeas corpus enabled the Goverument 
to repress treasonablo speech as well as trea- 
sonable acts. The Union men also establis'acd 
a Registratiou. law, with a test oath, wiiioh 
disfranchised thou'sands of tho seces- 
sion sympathizers. This system of re- 
pression was broken down m 186G, aud the re- 
action was equal to tho rspresjion. The men 
who would have done all that they dared to do 
to aid and abet secession really fancied that 
they had sulfared a grievous wronj because 
the Government bound them and kept them 
comparatively harmless until the war was 
over, when mere talk could do n 3 harm. Ths 
Maryland Confederate soldiers also came home 
to swell the cry. '" Down with Radicalism and 
Republicanism !'' was tho universal shout 
The defeat of Lee was avenged on 
the sacred coil of Maryland. Tho Con- 
federacy was triumphant. Service in the Con- 
federacy, without re^jard to character or other 
qualifications became of itself the highest qual- 
ification for office. The so-called martyrs must 
be rewarded. If there was an office, they must 
have it; if there was none, one must be made 
for them. The Union soldiers were accordingly 
all turned out and the Confederate soldiers 
were put in. Hunter Davidson, a Captain in the 
Confederate Navy, was made Commodore of 
the oyster navy. Tho notorious Harry Silmor 
was ultimately made a Police Commissioner. 
The position of Adjutant General has always 
been filled ever since by some man who served 
in the Confederate Army. These are notable 
instances, and the minor ones merely followed 
the riue. 

CONFEDERATE. DEMOCRATIC REFOIOI. 
I call th6 attention of tho country to these 
facts, not because I deem them wrons, but be- 
cause I deem them right. The fundamental 
principle of a Republic is that the majority 

shall rule ; and if tho majority are Confeder- 
ates they have the right to put Coutederates 
in oflBce. It may look rather hard to see the 
Union soldier, who has been mainietl and dis- 
abled in the service of his country, take up 
his crutch aud leave an office tinder the 
Government which be 8ave:i, and co out 

to earn a living for himself and bis 
dependent family as best he can, while 
the Cenfederato soldier goes in to become a 
part of the governing power of tho Stare : but 
the philosophic mind overlooks the hardahip iu 
the individual case in submission lo a great 
prmciple which may lead to better gen- 
eral results. I only desire to call the aUentioa 
of the country to the tact that the change in 
Maryland was what may be strictly called a 
genuine Confederate Dbmocratic rotorm. 

A comnaiison between the expenditures in 
Baltimore in 1864, when the city was under the 
control of the Republicana, and in 1874 will 
bring putthe extravagance in very strong light. 
In 18t>4 tho sunport of the courts cost $73,513 40 ; 
in 1874, 1205,853 89, the Criminal Court in 
that year alone costing $82,552 74. In 
1864 the City Commissioner's Department 
expended *59,290 03; in 1874, $497,485 41. 
In 18(j4 the Health Department expended $98,- 
163 48; in 1874, $',»79,773 63. In 1864 the Port 
■Warden expended $58,522 94 ; in 1874, $225,- 
555 48. In 1864 the expenses of the City Coun- 
cil were $16,430; iu 1874, 1^52,751 77. In the 
Health Department the principal expense was 
in cleaning the streets, ' which went up from 
$52,500 m 1864 to $225,253 88 in 1874. In com- 
menting on this extravagance one writer re- 
marked that it, would seem as if the street- 
sweepers laid the dust with cologne aud inlaid 
their broomsticks with gold uud precious 
stones. This euormuus increase in expendi- 
tures and taxation dues not indicate a diminu- 
tion of municipal indebtedness, but, on tho 
contrary, the municipal mdebteiiness increased 
from $22,755,828 69 in 1867 to $32,0^5,725 77 in 
1874. 

CONCEALISTG THE PLUXDER. 

Every one wUo has had the means to sec the 
actual operations of the Legislature knows 
that it is equally baJ, but the Controller in his 
report oareiuUy contrives to cover up the plun- 
dering. For instance, he puts down the ex- 
penses of the _ Legislature ot 1872 at $44,500. 
while a detailed staiement recently made 
shows that thay were .$180,953 89. Sutlice u to 
say that the expenses ol the State Government 
aud tho State indebtedness have steadiiy in- 
creased. 

RADICAL-PHOBIA, ITS Sy.MPT0.M3 AND EF- 
FKcrs. 
I suppose that your readers by this tims are 
desirous to know how a whole people came to 
submit patiently for years to eujli extrava- 
gance and misrule, and I will accordingly pro- 
ceed to explain. The average Democrat in 
Maryland at that time was affected with a 
peculiar disease, which may be called radica;- 
pliobia for the 'want of a better name. The 

Uisease is not much known in your section, 
but in this locality it was a regular endemic, 
and attacked a great many persons, some, ot 
course, sufifcring wor.^^e than others. Tue pecu- 
liarity ot' the aiseaso waw this, that the com- 
binaliun ot seven letters in tho simple 
word radical — a h:U'!nIo.ts word as every sane 
man know^ — liail tho power to conjure up 
strange ami dirt- visions belore tho iuiattin'atiou 
ot the victim. It set hnu crazy, <lruyft him wild, 
and unsettled his rea.s(in. Ail that any one had 
to do \Ta.^ to slidut liio word, and tUo efteet on 
the victim was instantaneous. While tUe nii.'*- 
erablo victim was iii thi.s condition he wouid 
submit to almost uuytliiii;;. Pluiulcror-i could 
rifle his pockets, villain.^ coiiltl thwart justice, 
and demacogues could systematize corruption 
and misrule wliilc he looked ou smiling auu ap- 
proviuj;, utterly uncoiisciou.s ot tho laet that 
they were simply stutiirtg tlieir pociiets at his 
expense. 

THK PLUNDERING RING AND SOMK OF ITS 
GE.MS. 

Now jt is the part ot demagogues to study 

•the public mood aud turn it to their advan- 

,Vtaffe. and in . this iiutanoa tbe? were neithfic 



slow nor backward in doing so. A Ring was 
at once formed. An eminent writer in describ- 
ing it, said: "One takes one part, another 
takes another part of the machinery in charge, 
but they all take a hand. One does the moral- 
ity, and another the immorality ; one sees that 
the sentiments are lovely, while another looks 
after the ballot-boxes and the ' bo\-s ;' one sets 
the traps and another covers them up, bitt 
there they all are on the spot, each at his 
post and each keen tor his share of tho 
game that is caught." The jjerson who 
ttiil the morality tor .be llini; and saw that tho 
sentiiuents were lovely was Mr. Pinl^ney 
Whyt!', tho pjcsent Senator from this Srato. 
Last year, when an assault was made on tl;e 
King," lie undertook to uohold its purity and 
assert his own mte^rity. lu reply, the same 
eminent writer to whom 1 have betore referred 
said in biting sarcasm. "Hardly a day iiasses 
that Air. W'hyto does not lind bimselt com- 
pelled, like Jlr. Pecksniff, to lay suildcn hold 
on somftliing heavv to prevent himself from 
ascenaintj into heaven." This omiuently virtu- 
ous citizen is now au advocate of "Tilden 
and Kotorm." Mr. iVtichacl Bannon was 
an eminent coadjutor in the i.inir. He also is 
a peculiar person, his prinijpal busiuess bel'oro 
he look in that of politics was lendiug money 
at usur.ous rates. His charges were euonuous; 
his victims, the untortunate who were iorced 
to submit to such rates. Woo to them if the 
money was not ready at the appointed tiiue, 
tor his creed was never tempered with mercy, 
and if money could not bo made iu any otiior 
way. it miybt by a sacrifice of the property. 
No wonder that m such a business the man 
made a iortuue and :ost his couscieacc. lie is 
now perfectly callous, morally pacbyder- 
matou.^. No sarcasm cuts hitn ; no jibe moves 
him ; public scorn does not aff ct him. No- 
toriety with him is fame, and h.; would rather 
be known for his misdeeds than remain iu 
obsourity. He holds that Tweed is a puolic 
beiietactor. He also is iu tavor of',' Tilueu and 
Re.'orm.'' Arouud these two ring-masters were 
;j:athered others of mora or less note, from tiie 
men who tilled tho higher othjes to the " bum- 
mers" who iillod ths City yurd and tobacco 
warehouses, and whose chief cinplo;,:meiit con- 
sisted in diiukiug whisky, consuming taxes, 
and stuffing balioC-buxa-i. Such was tne /)cr- 
so.'Uie/ of tho .Maryland Kicf;. These now are 
all in lavor of " Tilden aud Kelorui." 

I\-VVOKini M0DF.3 OF PLUNUKRING TIIE 
PSOPLE. 
The peculiar ways of this Uing might be 

illustrated by a hundred exaiQ,d<»3. A few 
mus-; suffice. The .Maryland University ap- 
plied for aa appi'o:)riatipa ot' §30,0JJ. Mr. 
Baunon notified t*io Directors fhat they could 
got it if they would allow lum dttseu per cent., 
othertyiso not, and they were compelled to 

conseut, tor tho Rin^ owned iho Ligisiataro. 
A copy of every application for a charter or a 
private bill, or aa appropriation was put ia bis 
hands, and a similar contiibution exacted 
wuerever it could bo ilone. An eminent 
Democratic lawyer was emijlojed to advocate 
a private bill before a legislative commit- 
tee. In the course of his argumoat ho observed 
one person whom he then thought to be very 
attentive aud pertectly impariiai. He-siib.se- 
quently learned that the iadividnal had re- 
ceived an equal fee from each side. The Legis- 
lature appropriated §10.i,000 to buiid the Soucn- 
orn Maryland Railroad, to be paid when the 
worit was comiileced to a certain extent. This 
was paid out by the Treasurer upon false aih- 
davita. A Deuiocratio Legislature appointed a 
committee, who conducted the investigation in 
such manner as to cover up the parties 'who 
concocted the Iraud, tor ttiey were tuemoers of 
tue King. A b.,nk was chartered with a capi- 
tal ot SlO.OOO, owned entirely by the Kinj;. Tho 
funds ot the State are deposited iu that bank 
to the extent ot over $60,000. Wuen venality 
was the rule among the masters, what could be 
expected of the aaser elements ? Rjgiaters of 
voters were appointed, and they presented a 
bill to the City of Baltimore for stationery ap- 
propriate to the proper aischarge ot taeir of- 
ficial unties, and among these were items for 
baby ctirriaics, dictionaries, and illaslrated 
copies of Byron and other poets. Thero were 
I'orty-lour Justices ot the Peace for Baltimore 
City, but there was scarcely an honest mau 
among them all. There were lorty-four oou- 
stables, but these were so many political bum- 
mers. The legislators sent trom Baltimore 
were taken from tho lowest and worst clas.ies 
iu the city. Your readers should bear in iniud 
that all tUese things were done by Democrats, 
lor from 1867 till 1875 the Republicans had 
scarcely a single representative in th© Legisla- 
ture or City Council. Ail things, however, 
have an end. TUe American people have one 
pecuUardv — they are biogtilar^' sensitive in the 
ijocket. An appeal can be martle to the reason 
tiirough that avenue more etiectuaUy than iu 
any other way. A tax brought on the Kevolii- 
tion. Taxes brought about au agitation for 
relorm in Marjlaud. The King had carried 
matters with such a high hand that it took 
nearly one-titth of the rent of a house to pay 
the taxes thereon. Ihiuk of that ! Yet the 
King now prate that the depression of trade in 
Baltimore is due to national taxation, which is 
but as a feather's weight compared with the 
millstone which the.y have hung around the 
people's neck. 

STHANGLING THE PEOPLE. 
The first trial of strength between the Re- 
formers and the Democrats was in the October 

election for Mayor aad City Couucil ia Balti- 
more. The Ring was thorougly exoosod, tho 
people were intensely excited. The Pylice Com- 
missioners, who were colleagaed with the Ring, 
made an ostentatious display of fairness by ap- 
pointing oue Reform Judge and one Reform 
Clerk at each election precinct. This was done 
out of confidence, for the Ring had already 
made preparations to stuff more thau seven 
thousand fraudulent ballots in the ballot box. 
Thero were numerous -disturbances on that tlay 
nnd the King Judges used their power to dis 
franchise as many Reform votes as possible 
on one pretext or another. Yet on the morn- 
ing alter tuo election the Kinjj louuil that 
they had made a mistake. With all their fraud 
the maiority for. the Kiug Mayor was ouly 
2,665, while the Reformers elected ten out of 
twenty Councilmen in the First Branch, and 
three out of seven in the Second Branch. The 
King became desperate. They knew that tho 
counties would roll up a majority for the Re- 
form candidate lor Governor, aud that unless 
they could get a heavier majority tor tJeir 
Crovernor in Baltimore than they had tor their 
Mayor, they would inevitably be doleated. 
They accordingl.y resolved on uesperato meas- 
ures, and the means were at hand. The regis- 
tratiou list had not been revised for years. Ou 
it were the names of all the persons who had 
died or removed during that time. The 
King had possession of the list, and 
knew every name. Ihey also devised y/hat was 
called a " pudding ticket' — a ticket printed oU 
very thin paper, so tnat eeyeral coulu be folded 
in one without materially increasing the bulk. 
They had also an available tool in the Police 
Commission and the Police. The notorious 
Harry Gdmor was one of the Commissioners, 
and he had with him kmdied spirits. Under 
the lead ol such a mau it m.iy well be ima^.ued 
that the lorce had gradually become demoial- 
ized. Some of ihem have smce been 
indicted lor systematic thieving wnich 
they had carried on successlully 

lor years ; others have been indicted lor inde- 
cent assauits ou femttlss, and others havo been 
goiity of diver-i od'ouses. Such was the mate- 
rial that the Ring Ibund ready to tueir hands, 
aud such were their yreparations. In order to 
carry out tiicir scheme they removed many ot 
the relorm Judges aud clerks on the eve of tho 
election and appointed tools ol their own. 
1 hen, ill order to raise a pretext for their pre- 
determined violence, they caused a rumor to 
be circulated that negroojj were comiiiti Irom 
Noriolk, Washiiigtou, and other places in order 
to voiu Irauduieutly. 

" kougiiixg" the city. 
The arrangemenis having all baeu made, the 

order was given to ''roUih" tho c'.ty. Mv. 
Harry Gil aior declared his luteution to " pre- 
vent tac liadic'lls and negroes from carryin;; 
the election," and the work was done regard-;, 
less of consequences. Oa election daj' fraud" 
and violence Loid high carnival. The ballot 
boies were stiifiud wiih immunity. In some in- 
stances tho votes of reformers were dropjied 
outside to make room for the Iraiululeul/ votes. 
Ufpcaters went from procittct to picijiiict to 

vo'lo on the iiamos of those wlio hatl died or re- 
moved, and were fnriiished with the iiame.s by 
tho King. The rough e.emoiit, in obedience to 
orders, rose en tho peaceful voters, aud riot, 
disorder, and blood.shed prevailod. The Policti 
simply looked on as amused spoctaior.s or ac- 
tiVe champious of violouoe. lu soaie wards 
they actually led tho ruiiiaas in their wanton 
assault upen colored voters. The result of 
sucii an election, Avhere tno Police side witn 
rutlianism aud aid and abet traud, cau be read- 
ily told. Tha majority for the Kiug Alayor has 
in the five days that intervened between tha 
Municipal and Qubernatorial elections expaud- 
. .ed £rum 2.665 to 14.495. Mow sadlr tiiiii was 



needed is shown by the fnct that the Ring ma- 
jority in tho whole State was only 1.5,095. 

IHE FRAUDS CLEAIILY SHOWN. 
This election is worthy of soni2 attention, ■ 
and in order that j-o r readers may compre- 
hend Its full significance itis necessary to go 
into some details. In the Mayoralty election 
Mr. Warfield was the Reform candidate and 
Mr. Latrobo the Ring candidate. In tho Gu- 
bernatorial election Mr. Harris was the Re- 
form camlilate and Tdr. Carroll the Rinu; can- 
didate. The best way to test the rolativo 
streugth ot Mr. \Varlield and Mr. Harris is to 
take bom;^ precinct where there is no docu- 
mentary or oral evidence of anything wrong. 
The first precinct of tho Thirteenth W'ard 
shows oue less vote cast at the State than at 
the .>luuicipal election, and .Mr. Harris gains 
eight votes over .'\lr. Warfiald. It may, tlierc- 
I'nre, bo a.saumed that if there had been no in- 
timidaiion tiie vote foi Mr. Harris wouid have 
been equal to that tor .Mr. Wartield. 'I'lie 
to;al vole tor Mr. Wartield, however, was 25,- 
477, while that tor.Mr. Harris was only 21,853, 
showing a decrease (d' 3,624. This very nearly 
represents tho uu"uiber ot voters who were 
driven irom the polls. One fact alouo out of 
many upon this point is significant, lu the 
First Precinct of the Eighteenth Ward there is 
a registered colored vote of over eight hun- 
dred, yet it U proved by the testimony of both 
Democratic and Relorm clerks that only tliroe 
colored men were allowed to vote. 
The magnitude and character of tho 
fraud may be shown iu another way. 
lu many of the wards the Reform aud Demo- 
cratic clerks kept books in which the names ot 
the voters were entered, and these bookai, bar- 
ring the repeaters, show the legitimate number 
iu nearly all cases. In one precinct tue number 
ot ballois in the box in excess of tho nauios on 
tho clerks' books was l44; in another, 64; iu 
another, 277 ; in another, 23 ; m auoth<>r, 177 ; 
in anottiwr, 1'28 ; in another, 4'J8 ; lu auothei^ 
2-9; in au.ither, '219; m another, 494, and in an- 
other, 834. Thcsj ai'3 only a few speci- 
mens. The city IB. -divided into throe legisla- 
tive districts. lu one district thj number 
ot votes at the Muuicipal election was 15,527, 
antl the number on tUe clerks' books at the 
Gnbernaiorlal election was 15,435. Yet Mr. 
Carroll's gain over Mr. Latrobe was 4,0»7, 
which was the exact number ot the ballots in 
excess of the names of voters. Yet the excess 
of buiots over the names in the clerks' books 
does not indicite the whole iraud. In tlio 
i'ourth Precinct of the Filteenlh Ward the ex- 
cess was 219 anil tne number ou the clerks' 

books was 57'1 Tho return gives the whole 572 
to Mr. Carroll, and tno excess of 219 to Mr. 
Harris. Iu the i'ourth Preciuct of the Nine- 
teenth Ward the .judges drepped the Reform 
tickets on the olitside of the ballot-box aud 

supplied^ their places with Ring tickets. These 
are ouly a few specimens of the manner in which 
the iraud was perpetrated. Pudding tickets 
and unfolded tickets that nev^er went through 
the hole iu too ballot-box abounded ever,^. - 
where. But the fraud did not stop even there. 
The poll-buoks are copied irom the registry 
books. The names ol tne dead and removed, 
which were cr.issed off on tne registry books 
were copied into tho poll-books, and priated 
slips containing these irauduient names were 
placed iu the hands of repeaters, who went 
jrom preciuct to precinct co vote upon 
them. Those who have e-xamined the matter 
caretully estimate the number of fraudulent 
votes at nearly twenty thousand. 

TUE FRAUDS ONLY EQUALED IN NEW- YORK 
LN 1863. 
This is the way in which those who now cry 
" Tiiden and Reform " carried the last election. 
All the circumstances clearly indicate au or- 
ganized system of fraud and terrorism. They 
were not sporadic or the result of mere indi- 
vidual action. They prevailod all over the 

city, in every precinct, with a similarity of 
features aud means that indicates that they 
came irom a single source — from some control- 
ling spirit. They thus implicate the King lead- 
ers as clearly as direct evidence could possibly \ 
do. Prof. Sumner, in his recent essay, seems 
to regarti the Democratic and Repub- 
lican Parties as equal to each other 
iu morais. I havo road something 
of American history and observed American 
politics somewhat closely, aud 1 know of no 
parallel to this stupendous crime against the 
ballot-box, except in New- York in 1803 — and 
there it was perpetrated by the- Democratic 
Party. I know that there .ire petty rrauds on 
bo^i sides lu every election, but those are the 
result ot individual action, and merely- indi- 
cate individual depravity. But these stupen- 
dous Iruuds touch the leaders themselves, aud 
prove that the whole party is thoroughly rot- 
ten — that corruption has infected the highest 
men iu the party as well as the mere political 
bummers I know ot no such instance iu the 
history of the Republican Party. 

THK ATTliJIPr TO PU.VISH THE GUILTY. 

In this State the Reformers kncvy that they 
were in the majority and resolved to hunt 
down tho corrupt minority with unrelenting 
energy. They first appealed to the courts, but 
the Ring had elected its State's Attorney and 

Sheiift", and through the latter also controlled 
the Grand Jury, the result is easily told. The 
Grand Jury shielded themselves under an al- 
leged " usage " for the Stale's Attorney to ar- 
range the docket of the cases they were to try, 
and occupied thein.^elves with patty crimes, 
while they ignored the enormous crimes coin- 
mitied at tue election. A low were indicted 

tor the sake of appearances. In some cases the 
indictment was ueiective ; in others the rascals 
cleared themselves by perjui'j, which was read- 
ily swallowed. In one notorious case tne crim- 
inal was indicted lor voting under the name of 
another, while the evidence was that he had 
voted five times on his own name. Justice thus 
was made a tarce aud a mockury. 

CONTESTANTS OF THE ELECTIONS CHOKED 
OFF. 
The Reform candidate for Governor gave no- 
tice to the Legislature ol his intention to con- 
test the election of his opponent, but the Riug 
was .master there too. They decided to inau- 
gurate the Ring candidate aud hear tho con- 
test afterward, althousU the best lawyers in 
the State showed that there w^aa no means of 
removing a Governor, once inaugurated, ex- 
cept by impeachment. After the inauguration 
the Reform candidate declined to be a party to 
the laroo of a contest. Yo gods! it is enough 
to make the bones of Charles Carroll of Carroll- 
ton turn in the grave to kno .v that his grandson 
in the centenuary of the Repuolic was foisted 
into power by a minority through traud and 
violence worthy of the petty despots who in 
ancient times trampled upon the liberties of 
the Grecian republics and ruled in shameless 
infamy with usurped authority. What a spec- 
tacle for lae coutemylation oi the philosophic 
historian 1 The Ketorm delegates to the Le- 
gislature gave uotice a- so of their iatoution to 
contes;; the sears ot their opponents. Oue of 
the chiot means of proot were the poll-books 
and baliottj, which were under the control of 
the King Clerk ot tho Superior Court. Ha re- 
fused to take them to Anuapoiis himself, or al- 
low anyone e^so to do so. Tne Kiuj"; committee 
appointed to take the testimony refused to 
j;o to Baltimore to inspect them or to issue aii^' 
process to coerce their productiou. Some orai 
and documentary evideuce was taken. This, 
without even baing printed, aithougn the Kiug 
printer v\ as paid lor printmg it, was reported 
to tue House on the day beibre the final ad- 
journment, the Chairman of tne committee say- 
in;; that It was mere rubbish, and the House, 
without having any evidence properly before it, 
or even knowing what evideuce there was on 
tue Buoject, decided, that tue Kiug delegates 
were cutKled to their seats. Ot this evidence, 
thus styietl robbisu. it is sufiicient to say that 
it proved outrages which were a di8,;race to 
free luatiiuiious aud a bloc on a civLizatiou 
that cannot now evou bo called Christian. 

UlL.MOil'S RKBli;L 




WuIIEWAtiHlNG n.VHIiY 

POLICE. 

The Police Commissioners desiring to be 
whitewashed asked lor au luvestuation of the 

charges agauut them. Ojo of them was called 
bi'iore tke coiamittce to tcitiiy, and was asked 
an immaterial question and then turned over 
to the Kaformers for cross-ex, imination. The^' 
immediately began to. outer iaio the merits ot 
toe case. when they were told by 
tho couuiiittco that laoy wouid make 
lum their own witness. '1 i't'.y replied 
that they wac willing to tlo that, aud kciit oa. 
fhey WlTc^ p.oiuiat-'iVia copy of iliat cro.ss-ex- 
Hiniiialiou by t;as st^io^raphcr and the com- 
iniuee, but uevi-r could obtain it, and tho 
record i.s now dc.strftyod, aithou^Mi the Rm.g 
lirioter was also paid to iiriiit tnis. The I'olico 
t.'omniissiomrs, «if course, got tho whitewash- 
ing whicu they songat. Finally the King 
Ltvislaluro apiiroprhitoil $10,0iH) to pay tho 
counsel who had conducted tho contested elec- 
tion lor tho K. us doienates. Were such impu- 
ilence aud ell'routory ever kuowii beiore I 

ONE HESULUrK AND IXCORRUPTIBLt: .VAX. 

One of the leaJius spirits in carr.ying on 
these contests with tho King was C. Irving 
Ditty, a gentleman who deserves to be far bet- 



ter known. In 1861 he saw that war was in- 
eyitable, and so bought a gun and joined a 
military company. On the 19th of April he 
asked the Mayor and Marshal il the passage of 
the Massachusetts troops was to be resisted, 
and was told that it would not. Not desiring 
<o be in any unlawful affray he went to his 
office, and was there when the riot occurred. 
As soon as he was informed of it he got his 
gun, but the troops had left before he reached the 
scene. Shortly after that he wentSouth,equipped 
one-fourth of the First Maryland Cavalry, and 
joined it as a private, but was ultimately 
promoted to the rank of Captain. Ho 
was with the Army of Northern Vii- 
giuia duriUE; the whole ' war, and was 
in every important action except tho battle of 
Gettysburg. When Lee surrendered hi', and 
others started to join Johnson's army, but he 
surrendered before they reached nim. They 
theu started to join Kirby Smith, but soon 
learned that he also had sui'rendered. When 
he found that tho last Confederate flag was 
lurled, and that there was no longer any stand- 
ard to tight under, he returned to Baltimore, 
and took an oath to support the Government. 
Ho did not consider that the oath precluded 
him from asserting his principles at the 
pqlls, and in 1868 he voted- tor Seymour. 
Ill 1872 he pronounced the placmg 
of Greele.y on a Democratic plat- 
form a sham, and on election day he would 
havo nothing to do with it, but went out to 
hunt partridges. The steadily waxing corrup- 
tion ot the Ring roused the indignation of his 
honest soul, and he dung all his energy into 
the ceutest. Wnen the election returns re- 
vealed the enormit.y of the iraud, it only served 
to nerve liiiu to a liiore determined ettor,'. He 
has confronted the Ring everywhere with In- 
vincible piuck, and has flung the evideuce of 
their shamelessness and degradation in their 
faces and spread it before the public. The 
Ring has tried to persiude him, but he w;ll 
listen to no persuasion ; they have tried to 
silence him with the bribe of an oflice, 
out he will make no terms with them. 
Ho tells them openfy that he has entered upon 
a war that shall never cease until the corrup- 
tion of the King is exterminated. He is honest, 
tearless, and resolute. H he were a Radical, 
the Riug could break his influence by calling 
him names, but bis splendid record as a Con- 
lederaio soldier lies behind him. He has 
changed his principles and is now an advocate 
ot Hayes and Wheeler. He says that the 
Democratic Party has abandoned the doc- 
trine of secession, and when he ac- 
cepts Kepublioan principles he knows 

of 110 reason why he should not 
support RepuDlican nominees if they are hon- 
est. He siili thinks that the framers of the 
Constitution intended to recognize the right of 
secession, but he now knows that the doctrine 
is not suited to these times, for the nation has 
outlivea it. He feels that tho Deiuvcrats have 
nothing but professions, and his honest soul 
scorns insincerity. As a speaker he has few 
of the graces of rhetoric and but little ot that 
inellitiuous eloquence which is coininonly 
deemed au essential requisite iu an orator, yet 
be is one of the most eifective of popular 
speakers. This comes from the fact that he is 
ia earnest, and is a complete master of the 
facts pertaining to the corruption of the Ring. 

AN ATTEMPT TO AoSASilMATK HIM. 

The Jling dread him and hate him. When 
his fearless blows come thundering down on 
tlieir rotten structure, they feel it quake, and in 
his resolute enthusiastd they foresee their 
doom. The roughs would like to kill him. Intact, 
the v tried to do so recently. He was announced 
to speak at a Republican meeting at the Cross 
Street Market. The roughs came, and Harry 
Gilmor's guerrilla Pobce witn them. When in 
the course ot his speech he said that last Fall 
truth and justice went down betore fraud and 
violence, one of them told him that he lied. 
That wasthe signal lor a riot. They shot at him, 
but, fortunately, did not hit him. They then 
rushed upon him, knocked him down with a fciUy, 
and kicked him. Bruised and bleeding, he con- 
trived at last to escape. The excitemsnt on 
the next day was intense. An indignation 
meeting was called. He spoke, and poinied out 
the tact that the King, iu shielding the criminal 
classes, were rendering lile and property inse-, 
cure. His speech was the severest arraignment 
ot a party that I ever read. Nothing daunted 
by the recent ^issault, he had his assailants ar- 
rested, including a Police Sergeant as one of 
tbem. He went betore the Police Commis- 
sioners and demanded the removal of the Police 
who participated in the assault. He found one 
of the parties who participated m the riots last 
Falf on the Grand Jury which was to pass on 
his assailants, and he demanded the indictment 
of the grand juror himself. Such is the tearless 
work that is being performed in this State by a 
Confederate soldier against the corrupt Democ- 
racy who cry for." Tilden and Reform." 

A PARALLEL WIIH THE NEW-YORK RING. 
In this State Reformers recognize a resem- 
blanoe between our Ring and your Ring. You 
had a Tweed ; we have a Bannon. You had a 
Tilden to do the morality and make the senti- 
ments lovely ; we have a Whyte to perform 
tho same rftle. You had a Morrissey ; w© have 
a Roland for your Oliver in the person of Slater, 
a notorious gambler, who was one of those 
"honest, pure, and intelligent men" whom 
Prof. Sumner's fancy imagines to have gone to 
St. Louis to make a platform and nominate 
Tilden. Your Ring stuffed ballot-boxes : so 
did ours. Your Ring bid for the Catholic vote 
by sectarian, apuropnatious; so did ours. Your 

Ring plundsred ; so did ours. In fact, our 
Iting is simply a copy ot yours, and Whyte and 

Tilden can sleep in the same bed, except that 
the time has not yet quite come m State affairs, 

but soon will, lor Whyte to aoandon the sink- 
ing Ring, raise his unctuous hands to heaven, 
and shout tor refoim. 

THE MOHAL. 

I have not drawn up this narrative of the 
doings of the Confederate Democratic Party in 
Maryland without intending to point the tale 
with a moral. I think the intelligent reader 
has drawn it alreatly. Au effort is being made 
to elect Tilden and Hendricks by moaus of a 
united South. That means a transfer of power 
from the North to the South. The nation is 
pondering.- tho qunstion whether that can 
be dene 'either safely or prudently. I 
have endeavored to give you a true 
and l«4thful sketch of the Demo- 
cratic Party in Maryland. It is simply a dark, 
fearful picture of fraud, violence, corruption, 
and unscrupulous use of power. Ex uno discite 
omnes. Where is the intelligent . observer 
that cannot perceive the same linea- 
ments more or less developed in Missis- 
sippi, Alabama, and other Southern States ? 
Who does not see in this picture the same law- 
less, uuscrupuioi^ element that in 1861 plunged 
the country into a fearful war ? 

pkof; sumner'3 gravk mistake. 
Prof Sumner says that his Democratic neigh- 
bor on one side is very much like his Republi- 
can neighbor on the other. The reason is ob- 
vious. Both were born in the same clime, have 
breathed the same air, been trained by similar 
iullueuces, and havo felt the plastic power of 
tho same institutions. They are, of course, 
as much alike as two paas, for his neigh- 
bors are both respectable. But let him 
life his . eyes from his books and 
extend his vision till it reaches south of Mason 
and Dixon's line, and there Ue will-see that otner 
influences and other institutions have been at 
work molding character and forming men. In 
1787 Luther Martiu said : " Slavery lessens the 
sense <»f tho equal rights of mankind, and 
habituates us to tyranny and oppression." 
Thomas Jefferson said : "The whole commerce 
between master aud slave is a per'petual exercise 
of the most boisterous passions, the most unro- 
mittinji despotism on the one part and degrading 
submission on the other. Our children see this 
aud learn to imitate it, for man is an 
imitative animal. » * * The parent storms, the 
child looks OD, catches the lineaments ef 
wr.ith, puts ou the same air in the circle of 
smaller slaves, gives a loose r«iu to the worst 
of passions ; aud thus nursed, educated, aud 
daily exercised in tyranny, cannot but be 
statiiped by it with odious poculiuritie*. The 
man must be a prodigy who can retain his man- 
ners ami morals untlepraved iiuder such cir- 
cuinsUucee."' The whole hiistory of the coun- 
try irom 1801 up to the present time has be»n 
ntithmg but a fearlul excuipliticatiou 
of these doctrines. The traud and vio- 
lence that have mauifeated themselves 
ill the process of reconstruction were 
imbodued deep in tho social system and 
would have appeared under any policy. They 
came to .Maryland nnd that lias loup oeeu un- 
der tne control ot a pure Confederate Democ- 
racv. Tli<>y are attributable to the individuals 
and not to the form of the government. What 
t^iso could be expected from a society composed 
of thou.sands of uneducated blacks, thousands 
ot eqna.ly uneducated whites, and an aristoc- 
racy of culture and intellect whose numbers 
were limited by the inevitable laws of political 
economy, while the whole mass is dominated 
by the sentiments born of slavery f The 
predominating spirit of that aristocracy is the 
spirit of caste, based ou contempt 
blacks. The verf Ibi^eflt 6l&6s, On 
band, find that tho 



the avocations ot lite, and hence hate them as 
onlv one competing race can hate another. Tho 
virulence of that hatred, born of ignorance, 
must be seen to be comprehended. This simi- 
larity ol sentiment lias led to an unholy alli- 
ance between the intellect of the South and 
the lowest classes, m which the intellect is 
overwhelmed by numbers. It is a demon- 
strated fact that the intellect of the Seuth can- 
not, without extraneous aid, control the lawless 
elements ; Lamar cannot do it in Mississippi ; 
the culture and intellect of the Monumental 
City cannot do it in Maryland. Prof. Sumner 
says that the South must be left to work out its 
social problems " simply under the constraint 
of social and economic forces." I agree with 
him on tho policy of local self-government. 
The time for Federal interference, except to 
maintain peace at Federal elections, has passed. 
But doss he not recognize the fact that a stern 
public sentiment in the North acts on the social 
elements in the Soutli, just as sunlight does in 
nature to produce order, beij^ity, and harmony 
out of chaos and corruption ? Ben Hill made 
one rebel speecti in Congress, but he never 
made another. Why ? A stem sentiment of 
loyalty in the North commaudoi silence, and 
he kept still. One Hamburg massacre has oc- 
curred, but no more. Why } The Democratic 
leaders have fold the rnfBan element tnat the 
North will not tolerate such wanton murders. 
An assault was made on C. Irving Ditty, and 
the Democratic leaders made haste to repudiate 
and denounce it. Why 1 The Immolation of 
pluck and honesty on the altur ot 
truth and justice would ring the 
death-knell of the Democratic Party. The 
policy of local self-government means a 
united South, and that is fraught at ail times 
with national pei-il. There is always a posabil- 
ity that by some accident, some freak of for- 
tune, at some inopportune moment;the baton of 
power may be transferred from the North to 
the South— from the land of free schools, tdu- 
ca^iou, and obedience to law, to the land of 
ignorance and lawlessness — to the hands of 
men who are known to be unscrupulous 
in the use ot power. A united South 
makes a. united North a necessity. The 
political instinct of the people has divined 
the real -issue, scented the real danger with 
a perception that is keenef^nd truer than that 
ot tho philosophic intellect of the Professor, 
lor the questions of peace and obedience to law 
take precedence over all others. What is 
needed in this Centennial year of the Republic 
is an overwhelming manifestation of the senti- 
ment of nationality. Loyalty, patriotism, love 
of order, devotion to the Union— aU point in 
the same direction. Tho highest hopen, the 
brightest nrospeots for the future depend upon 

a iol'ty fublio sentiment, and b« comoiits a 

serious udetake who doss aught to impair its 
tone or diminish its power. 'Vesitas. 

THE COLLECllUN UF DEBTS. 



importa:sce of paoviDixo accommoda- 
tions FOR THE FOURTH TBIAL TERM OF 

THE MAKINK COUKT — BENEFITS TO AC- 

CRUL TO CREDITORS FROM SPEEDY TRIALS 

OK Cases. 

To the Editor of the New- Ymrk Timea: 

I wish to draw the attention ol the public to 
a matter of some interest to that portion of it who 
find litigation occasionally nseful in collecting their 
accounts. Several attempts have been made by the 
Legislature from time to time to confer on some one 
of the many court* of this City snch a jurisdiction 
Bs vrould render It exolusiyely a coart for collection 
of debts. PractilMners will readil.y-ieiuember that 
a strenuous effurt was made to enconiaee the briag- 
ing of this class of salts uxcliuively in the Superior 
Court at one time. From the diffioalties which snr- 
ronnd degislation .on this point, a direct enactment 
that no suits except on contract should 
be brousbt in any coart of the State 
wonid be of donbtfnl conititutionality and still 
mote donbtfnl ntility to the class intended to be 
served. Bat in enlarging the Jurisdiction and 
miidilying the practice of the Marine Court, it was 
hnped that this desideratnm wOald be attained. 
The Jadiies of the Mirine Court on their paTt, 
divided the trial branches of their court into four 
paits, for some time holding a trial term in each of 
tbem for at leant three weeks in each month, ex- 
cept Jnly and Augnst, and,' in fact, one of the 
Judges held trial term dnnng the latier months 
in 1674, continuing the court lonf; after midnight. 
His action, however, was declared illegal by the 
Coart of Comm«D Pleas, and since then cases have 
accumulated hopelessly. The importance of the Mar- 
ine Court may be inferred from the fact that 



The Princess Salm-Salm baa married, in Sttitt« 
gardt, Mr. Charles Heneace. a Liucolnshire eentli^ 
man. 

Gcatave Dord is engaged in completing ft 

eeriesofiilustrationstoa new edition of JUiehaud't 
History of the Crutadee, wiich will be pnoUshetf 
in raris in the ensumg Winter. 

M. Emmanuel De MacMahon, second son ol 
the Marslul Preddont of the Rennblic, flgores the- 
eleventh, amnoe 345. in the list of the aecood elaMt. 
flcaOon of the first division at the Military Sctaeoli 
ot Saint Cyr. ' 

A singularly audacious theft has taken placo 
in the Church of St. ApolUnaire at 'Valence. A. 
band of robbers broke into the ve«try of the cathe- 
dral In broad daylij;ht, and carried away the altar 
ornaments and sacred vessels, which were of era^t 
value. ^ "^ 

In demolishing the loTrer •wall of the Cattle 
of Dieppe a great many interesting r«;Uc« har« 
been discovered, coutistinz of coins and pottery of 
different periods. The workmen bsve also come 
nodu the foundations -of the ancient Gtrarch' of Su 
It£mv. known by antiquariea to tasve stood oaar tb# 
castle. 

If we are to believe the Gauloit, a barrel ot 
1861 Jrttiannisberg, from the famoos cellars ot Prinoe' 
Metteinicb, has Joat been knocked down for the 
hlehest price ever eiven even fir that mach e»- 
teemea but overrated wine. The parcbas«c, we ar« 
assured, is non" other than the recently depoaM, 
Suttm. The pitce contains 1,400 bottleo, wortk 
about S16, in gold, a bottle. 

At Dirac, near Angoulferoe, pn Sept. 19, anaa 
eighty years of aee killed a woman wich whoa 
he had lived for forty years, named Marie Foama.' 
The instrument which was ns*d by the octoseawiaB- 
murderer was a cutlass, which he applied wlUi, 
great vigor, and the motive of the crime was that 
he believed bis partner to hold criminal reIati<iBa. 
with another man. The accused, Kuaid, i« 1b pne- 
oh, and will be tried for murder at the forthcoioinf 
assize.'. 

The inauguration of the new Jewish ajna- 
gogae in the Rae des Toarnelles. at Pans, took, 
place on Sept. 15, with mnch solemnity. iThe plaa 
of the strnctnre is precisely the same as tb%t aeeo, 
in the more costly edifice in the Bae de la Yto- 
toire. the tbeba, sanctnary, and tabernacle beinc 
disposea in a similar manner. In the omameata- 
liOD of the synacozne the hnmao figure is nowheca 
represented, according to the prescriptioiu of the 
Jewish religion. 

The English newspapers record the deaittt of 
"the father of ttie Hoaae of Peera," the Sari o( 
Leren and Melville, which happened at Gienfer^ 
ness, fais residence, near Dampbail, io Kairnshira, 
at the age of all bnt ninety yeun. The second bar 
eldest BurviyiDg son of A'exaodcr, nintb Eirl o( 
Leven, end eishthEarl of Meivdle. by his marriaco 
wi;h Jane, oaly oaagbrsr of the lave Ur. Joba 
Thornton, of Clspbam. Sorrey, be w^s bora ua ttka 
18th of Decern oer, 176<3. 

Some interesting Druidical remains liava 
been discovered in France, ia the territory o£ 
Benqu6 and Bilh^re, on a mountain which aeparatea 
the ralleys of Oneil and Lar'ooast. not far frooi' 
Lacbon. Thoy cocsist rf aeTeral eroapa of ctota^i 
lecbs united by fines "of meabirs, with each vna* 
cipal cromlech snrronnded by several smaller 
circles. Excavations have already been begun, biii 
not as yet carried very Car. Several vases contain* 
inz ashes and tragmenta of human bones have, bow* 
ever, been found in the interior of tue •mallea 
circles. 

On Sept. 11 Queen Vlrtoria had a narroir ea- 
cape frama serioas accident. Her Majesty waa 
taking a long drive frovi Balmoral t« Kildnunaay 
Castle, a distance of forty miles. "V^hiie procee d s 
ing ttirongh Ballater one of the boraee in the rojal 
carriage fell. The others were with some, d'aeulty 
reined la. end the fallen horse, spnoeing to i;s 
feet, was dashing off at great speed when a fotie*- 
man conraeeouely ran np to it, seized the brwUe, 
and succeeded in stoppin: it. Fertaoateiv no sd« 
was iniared. Her Malesty remained quite cool, bat 
much alarm was felt bv the a'>.teodania. 

That the new French gudlotine is wortaB^ 
BStisfactoriiy was proved by the execatloa of tfai 
carpenter Marm, at Blois, on Sept. 19. A larji 
crowa gathered on the Grande Piaee of the town al 
5 o'clock m the morning, the time at which tae 

extreme sentence of tne law is carried into opeat 
non in France. Hsrin took a cap of coffae betore 
monntini: the scaffold, and acted with eoDsideraU« 
firmness for some time. As the last mmnt«s ap- 
proached, however, his strength gave way, and M 
the sight of the instrameiit of oeath he was 



from 
there are tiome tive thousand untried ca.ses now on 
Its calendar. As a medium for tbe collection of 
debts It might be rendered one of the most valuable 
Courts in tbe City, and a powerful engine for im- 
pruvini; and mainiainlng tbe credit ot tbe solvent 
portion uf our businens commnnity, that is, of snch 
of tbem as have tbsir business affairs erected on an 
honest and honorable basis. Under existing cir- 
cumstances a merchant may sue tor the price of 
goods sold on thirty days' credit, and be pat off two 
years by a sham defense, the debtor thus evading 
'bi» just debt and getting an opportunity 
to procure credit trom other victims, by 
a course scircely short of swindling. 
If this class of suits were tried at once a stop 
would be put to such dishonest practices, and 
benefits would accrue to the solvent deserving 
traders and to the general tone of business morali- 
ty. This end may be readily i-eached if tne Com- 
niirsioiier of Public "Works will famish aocommo- 
datioQ for the proposed fourth trial term jn.^ or- 
dered in this court. The Judges seem ready on 
their part if he will onlv co-operate with them. It 
caunot be very difficult to find a room in the many 
City edifices in Ciiy Hall Park for the purpose, 

and the good to be effocted by such a coar«n is 
really incalculable. L£X- 

EX-GOT. EDWIN D. MORGAN. ' 
The Troy yime» forcibly says : "It must be 
conceded that Gov- Morgan made one of tho best, 
the most patriotic, and thoroughly earnest and en • 
lightened Executives this State baa ever had- He 
was our war Governor. He did his duty nobly, and 
to the honor of the Empire State, when treason un- 
dertook to strikis' down our old flag. He never 
flinched ; he stood by the country with determined 
perseverance ; scores oi thousands of boys m blue 
he sent to the front, and did everything to encour- 
age them aad minister to their comfort in the groat 
and perilous work they had to do. He executed 
his office in respect of civil aff^iirs with intelli- 
gence and integrity. He vetoed profligate legisla- 
tion ; he saved the people hundreds of thousands of 
dollars that hasty or corrupt legislation had appro- 
priated for speculating enterprises ; he protected 
the Treasury from peculation, and up-held the 
integrity of the Common waalth. He repulsed 
treason at home, and directed the mighty power of 
this great State ih-the work of crashing rebellion at 
the Sotith. Such was Edwin D. Morgan, NewYork'n 
heroic war Governor, in the days ih%t tried men's 
sonii'. The patriotic citieons of this imperial Com- 
monwealth, grateful for those grand services In the^ 
past which afford a guaranty for ability, integrity 
ana fidelity in the discharge of future duties, will 
now sustain him with redoubled zeal and honor him 
with h6i»rty enthosiaftm." 

BEN. B. HILL'S ACCEPTANCE. 
Hon. Benjamin H. Hill has accepted the 
Deraocratio nomination for re-election to Congress 
ttom tbe Ninth District of Georgia. His letter is 
somewhat interesting from it« cool assamptiona. 
He says: VThe approval of a good conscience is 
the highest possible rew ard for any service or ac- 
tion in this life. Next to this to a public man is 
tho approval of his o<'n»titaent8. In the light of 
the cu'oumatanoes surrounding me, and in view of tbe 
labors I nave endeavored to perform, the action of 
tha intelligent .delegates comprising tbe Gainesville 
conveDtion, so' unauimous and so ooruial, is pe- 
eullarly,gratifying, and tho uomiDatioD is accepted. 
To mait'e the tliiion once more a Union of equal 
Statec, resting iu the consent of the people ; to re- 
store the Southern States lo their full constitutional 
place aud power in that Union, and to make all 
sections agaio united, cordial, prosperous, peace- 
ful, and ' happy, is now the grand mission 
of the Democratic Party; and to aid io this 
glorlou* work is my chief ambition. The com- 
plete vindication of the Southern people Irom the 
calamnies which anscraoulooa partisans, in their 
grcjpd for power, have so industriously sought to 
fix upon them, ia. an indispenaable part of this 
work and must be performed Urgely by oar Sena- 
ators and representatives in Congress. Without 
the approval uf the people themselves the aoconi- 
plisbment of this great end would be impossible, 
and usmelnt Itself would be brought into serioUS 

questiou.'' ^ 

POSIAL CUANGES. 

Washington, Oct. I.— y:^ following are the 
postal changes for the week onftuia Gupr 30, ,1876; 
JV'eioi-'aoJand.—PostmastersAppointed— Frederick 
A. Staples, South Elliott. York County, Me.; 
Warren W. Eiuory, Rindge, tOho^hire County, 
K H : ilohu W. Perkins, Stark Water, Cooa Couu- 
IV N. U.; Milo.K. Day, East Middleonry, Addison 
County. Vt.: Apihur W. Juquiib, Nonh ThettorO, 
Oraugo'CjUnty,Tt.; Johnli. Blaisdell, Union \ii- 
Inffe, OriHgo CAtiuty, Vf. 

A«u-rarA.— Qtfico EsUblishod— Forest Home, 
ToiiipUm^ t;ouii*v. NVilliam Lo Barr. Postmaster. 

i'?nii«i//oaiiia— "Oflices Eslablislied-^Heltenstein, 
Srhiii'lkill County, John Pursel, Postmaster; La- 
coyyllle, Wyoming County. Joseph E. French, 
P(l»tmaater; Turkey City, Clsnon County, .•^. S. 
Graoiim, Postmaster. Postmaster Appointed — Miss 
Mary Kaudenbu»h, Paokerton, Carbon County. 

Maryland. — Odice Establiehod — Wilhem's Cross 
Rouus, Anue Arundel County, J. T. Wilbelm. Post- 
master. Postmasters Appointed — Charles H. Mc- 
Pneraoa, Aquasoo, Priupo George's Ooneiy ; Sam- 
uel M. Coatcii. Costen, Some: sot County ; Harper 



tor tbe 

the (StKer 

blacks are ooiaUtftilora uUL •rufuiBoii...JCaoiDaa Ttim, .Hartord 



aeixed 

with a violent trembling. Notwitnaranding some 
slight resistance, the machine did iu work witk 
unerring accuracy, and deatli was almoct fn a t a a 
taneoua. . 

A few daj-s ago, in Englani^ a number of tfa^ 
Braes ot Derwent foxhounds were observed to ba 
llL MaiorCowen, the master, called in aoompo. 
rent veterinary surgeon, who at once pronowiced 
the diseaiie . hydrophobia, and the wh<da 
pack, consisting of twenty-three couples, ware 
destroyed. All the cau in the neigh ixjrhood 
of tbe kennels were also destroyed *" JP''^^*"* '*" 
disease from spreading. The Braes of Darweat for. 
hotmds had been in existence aa an orgaaued pack 
lor twenty years and were the fastest pack ia tfce 
north of England. A form of hydropbouii made lf« 
appearance in the neighboring Ncrth Dartaam a lew 
years ago which necessitated the wholeaale destme- 
tion of tbe bounds. 

In Rome there occurred recently t^e nsnal 
demonstration in honor of the sixth anniversary ol 
Italy's entry into the Eternal Ciiy. The tbonderol 
cannon ushered in the morning, and in the after. 
noon there was a march of tae enrviyors of tiia 
country's battles and of thirtv <rtTic asaociaaosa. 
with their reapeetive insignia, from the Piuadet 
Popolo to the Capitol, where the tablets commMBor*. 

tive of the Romans who tell from 1S48 to 1370 weio 
solemnly unveiled io the presence or 10,000 sp««iA- 
tors Inese proceedings seem to have given bitter 
,ff«use to the Pape. who referred to it in_^ his ad- 
dress to the Savoyard pilgrims, while the Cainoae 
organ, the Voce delta Verita, describes U»a corie^a- 
u8 th.it of Satan. 

A telegram from Narbonne to the Freach. 
newspapers informs them that Mme. Girard do 
Grandvignes has just departed this life at the asa 
of one hundred and six years. She retained all ber 
faculties to the last, and has left a considerable for. 
tnne to her grand-nephew, who is a maitre det 
requcUt at the Council of State. Mme. de Grand- 
vi^ues was aunt to the celebrated s.>vant and acad- 
emician Flourens, who died ja^i ten years ago at 
the a^o of seventv-ihree, leaving a son, Gas:ava 
Fiourens. who, alter fighting for the Cretana 
against tbe Turks, loined the Commane and waa 
killed while aitempttng to march ou Tersaiii**. 
The family is so well hnown in France that there 
will be little difficulty in verifying the real age ol 
Mme. de Grandvignes. 

The crane mauufaotured for the poroose of 
lifting the 81-ton gua into the barge at TToolwlcU 
has been satiafactorily tested, and is oonsidered fli 
for the heavy work it will have to perform. The 
81 -ton gim. whatever else it may prove to be, is at 
least a very expensive thing. It cost at least £10,- 
000 to make, and to this some thousands more muss 
be aoded for us carriage. Tbe gunpowder asea ta 
the proof experiment* cost £ii.OOO. and each roan4 
fired in active service will represent £55. Tae co»> 
tract price of tbe barge which i% to take the c«a <• • 
Shoeburyness was £2.300. The crane has oo«| : 
£3 OOO aud many thousands have been spent on u 
ex'ens'ion of the pier, which would bav« been ua- 
necessary if tbe demand for largo oidniwco hadj 
stopped at thirty-eight tons. t 

The Birmingham Gazette informs its reader* 
as' to the daily hfe of "Sir Boier ' at Dartmoor, 
He rises in the morning at 5 o'clock. He the* 
has to dress himself, clean his ceil, get his break- 
fast, wash up the utensils employed ttaereio, an* 
then to be in readiness for chapel at 6:4i. 
Tho servico is brief, lasting only about fif- 
teen minutes, and, should the weather nermit, atlta 
conolasion tne prisoner Is taken out for parada^ 
Before commencing his day's labor, which be is aap> , 
posed to enter upon at 7:33, he haa, Uk« 
tbe whole ot his fellow-oonvicta, to undergo th« 
operaiion of searching. His daily taak is to work a 
sewing-machme, at which he naa b*come qoite aa 
adept. After working for tbreeq uarteia of an hour 
he is allowed a quarter of an hour's rest. At tha 
termination of this respite he is samaioned to dm- 
ner, and oouflned to i;is cell uulil 1 o'clock. Pr»i 
vions to resuming his task be ia again searched, and 
I Itben works the machine intrusiea to him autil 5:11. 
o'clock. His day's employment is then ar an end: 
he i» escorted to his cell, served with tea, ano, aa • 
7-43 on week clzhts and an hoar earlier on Sutida.rs,' 
he reures to rest. Our contemporory, after giviu« 
the claimant's dietary table, remarks thit Lia 
knickei Dockers have had to bo altered several 
times aud some sieniflcance may be attached to the 
fact that be is reduced in^th about aeveneeea 
inches. 

TBE FIRST I STEAM J^M TIF TUE XELLO\9i 

STONE. I 

To ttte Bdttor of the New- YorK Timet : ' 

la your issue of Sept. 12 your corre»i 
pendent " C. M., ' writing Irom Powder Elver, ua 
der date of Auc. 23, makes a very serioas miatalBl 
in saying that Capt. Grant Marsh was the first t« 
take a. sleamboat op tho Yellowstone River, in 186^ 
in connection with Gen. SUnley's reooanoissanoa^ 
for the Northern Pacific Railroad. In 18153 Gen. 
."Itaulev was ttahiing rebels down »n D'J^ie, and dUj 
not make his reconuoissanoe on the Yollowstoue uU| 
1873 ten years after. (Jen. Sulley in his campaiga 
of ide4 took the steamers Alone aad Chipaway iaii« 
twenty unlos above StUly's Crossing, aad use«J 
them in transferriug his command to the torth sioal 
of that river. Capt. W. McCail, of the Sixth lowaij 
Cavalry, now iu tuis cUy, bAa_j^C00uaaad of the e^jl 



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GERMANY AND WAGNER.* 



SEVERE CRITIQVLS BY TBS COil- 
rOSER'iS 1< EL LOW-CO UNIliT MEN. 

WHAT FECILLLrTONISTS SAY CONCKRNING 
TUK BAYBEUIH FESTIVAL — PAUL IIN- 
XthV'A UUKAM — A DAY UNDEll A KEIGN 
OV rKKSOK. 

ZJer.w L'orrts]foiidt)\et of (ht Liindan Daily Tel»- 
graph. 
The " world cTeiit" at Bayrouth haa bocn so 
ibly aiitl extianiiivoiy chrunicled fir tho E:isl''h 

paulic OT ti»« uiusic^l euvcya of the Luudou and 
. proTiiiciA) piWs tUat tlie haachty iusularics, my 

fouutrfmen, aruas wellacquaiiitttil •( ii>o piesout 

t^tue with the iucidonta ami characti r gtics'ol the 
Tatraiajcy aa are lh«< «B-itlictio Lcioo» who have 

tbe huuur to ciaim tbe more tbao impcriai— 

!•( tta Siiy rha Imperiou- — Kicbard tor their coin- 
pAtriut. lim il nJrti" not bo ijiopportuae tor 
oi»« wbo ha* WA(l«il ilir.usrii miles of b (gsry ana 
bottWPlesa Ger.iiaii "co^y. " tbo disuiul ix-salt of 
lb« tiaTrvutiici- l>"e»tS():oie, ia the earu9«r eoileavor 
to K«l at \lte iiverjiTO opuiun o( the Fatherlaal 
Wiih TMoeCc to tiioi« «tiMu;';d pbon nuena, to rucorJ 

tb«t the TO.e ot cul'^^^ted inu3icijna nail capaoie 
crilic» lUiouj;lioiJ! G/rmany, bwlutf Cinscienti'iaslv 
t»k«uupuu she qaiiitioM, "Iii>ri»nol ibo'N'ibeun- 
ceu liiii^' a ffiiiu to lUo nr: of tujaior' tho navs 
\>4Vit ic bv a la.ea niajorUv. 1 uo aot pruposo 
tu •oiiuit yoiii- ruader* to hall upua aujr of the 
STWrn ami tVrcile o.ucs that doe (be deaert of 
t«ohniual and piiiosuphical criticism spread oat 
aanoic tbu laat luunth or to o^fora tlie acbiag eyea 
(if Gfrman nei^apapar rp»lei3, thoasb I coalJ Joy- 
f«ily asK aU trua ra otic lovers to wliile away an 
tour ar two moit delijfbtfuliy over tbe admirable 
■rtioies of Dr. IIinsUcK ana Prof. KUrlicb ; ')ut it 
ae«m« to me dekiiabltt that Eu.'ti;< hiueu sboola cod- 
tamplaie «»4 pastant a woid-i>iciure of the efi'ect pro- 
Caced npou the great intellijieut Geriuau pubiio 
coiisenitally r.itlier than ioalructealy maaival. by 
lh»>. looe-an aopiied lo (irami. ag Wauner and hia 
Ciaeipie* TOW autl dei'iarv u vu^ht to be. must be, 
•hull ^^^ To ibis euJ I so. J ia liliiai traus- 
lariitiis ot exoerjca from aitio.oa writ uu upon 
the " iviu/ of lUtf Nibeiunjeii, ' smca thai woiUa 
cuniineU) and repca.ed i>oi-( •riuauuc by two of tbo 
motft PUiiueut wilt ipiriJafJ f-uiliefounts lu Ger- 
iuau n — iitj6.>r». Pan LuOiU ami Li'Ui* Piei-cu — 
tueu who woula bo oiuaiui'Uis to liuraure in any 
Ciuutry, AUil «vb«»e biUinncy aud ori^i.uality tauso 
lb«MU lo dl.iu>^ out tVuin cue liaCK|ir'>iioa ot I't^uloiiic 
runieinporM'y journaiisui aa bri;;Uliy as uo the 
Hime-iTowued Viojia of * tolty lijiUt-Louaea from 
tue Handy mjnoiouy of «lbe B.ltio sb'jrcs. Paul 
LiuiLiu oeiiveii bis Juaj^meut from uait^-r 
th« biuclc aua sUifcinc muutio of EphiuUea. i^iko 
tbe iiei waved Giiea Scrujbtlaa, be "dreama a 
dream." ijeaays: 

As I lay rei>euLly :n a co<»d comlortable bed I had 
« teanui tlretim. 1 dreiiim^d that 1 fouul'iuvsclt in 
» Ciacuu&olitto resciou. ii >rtu» quito a peculiar laud- 
•cape. Wbeu yuu looked iuio it clusely yi'U beuaiue 
kwani of mlibiy, iuipo»:ii*: Oe-«ntiea — ^rosaut moun- 
taiur. tciunoBS ue«te. roaiinj waterii. But cespuo 
nil thia, the wae)« wiia joyieas, luharmoiuuus, of ua 
iiuearititv glooiu. TbF.Ki°eat hot sau stood last, laii- 
L'utd, auJ uumcrtstiui: m the cluwijig, boindlv 
}'eaow aky. out of which evury chaim of color 
ie«iu*<l lu have been bto;ted. Xbe air wus au tbick 
tbai tiio lierv ball uid nut bliua juuf yi^tiju; 
btti loukeii like a tiist-clssg cab-lamp. "I'wad 
muicsv. auU upprossive. ana tireautue. An loue- 
icii..able lowueas of spirit leiffaed over 
averytiitnz- Buautes myself, tbe ore.imer, ouly 
cuu iiviuK beiou existed auioui tot'ae joyieaa aur- 
coauaiBKa — a tail, uucomiortable mail, ilo seemeii 
lo b« rcciiiiii: uu eui^irmouj uiouoiogue. As I w;ia, 
ioriauaie y lor Uiy»elt, a pretty ^loo distauce iVum 
bim. I uouiil oofc iiutlersLaud \ru.it be vm^t talkinii 
tboai : ail I couiu ca>cu waa a couaitlerauie vaneiy 
Dt suriii aau tuoea of a peciinar lau;:liter with which 
hi jiuv and tueu, as it wcri^, aocoaipuuieil his leci- 
talioB — "JUU; ua I'' or 'kid hel" "111 I uil' or 
"Ho! uu I" I hiiO, durioiC the Us< fcv? uayn, heard 
tvu leai a i;rr,*l deal aOuat " leauiu^ molivi," aud 
Ihe iiOvreaeii/iiS of mv wak.ug b<>uis cauju to itie 
ftt 111 in my urt urn. I saia do uiyselt, " 'i'lHd m.iu i;i 
Ua.;uiii^ Ifaitiui; moiiei." Be^iues ibis be ac- 
cuu>p.>iiied his &|>c^cu with cxtrumciy livuly 
paaium.mio ;:eataic^,' tbo while tbe speech 
luttli tio'ed aiou^ witbou» an. maimer 

III eiDpu^»ia, r>l puuse, or of tliVisiou, lu o 
partit. " Aa, u,t ! " I s.tia lU Diyaslf, " mis is ine now 
ays.etu. Xue uj.iii inuis.era his exprcosiun trom 
Ui« ia;{UMl of his wurda lu lue wiiiikics of his f»ce. 
AiMi Uii* waiJtsicU tetiow cams iieorer aud iie.<ler. 
). rnea to luro away, out be duizeu uie snovea me 
into » coraer ui the ia>.uau^pe, pianied bimselt lu 
tiOui oi me *o taat I coUid hot bjd::e au iiicb — 
*'p>'ililta" me. iii tac, as a weil-tr.^i.it.'U iiun dues a 
iii.au I 1 ii»uiK — auu auulesseu me ku> loliuws : "JSuw 
1 have KUi yuu auy aaeoipn at fl ttbt wuiua oo 
auprieiOK;^tury 1 must tirst lelate to yoa hu bo! 
kl-iuii ietii£Ui my story so you see aUer tue three 
taaiueos ua ha I h^d h;sd tua riu;; hc-bu I laJteu 
t.uui ibein this riuji gets h'.'-b» ! luio uaa 
Liiuua aua also Ua uctv owuer bi-hi ! shall hot 
hr-:ie '. uo luaou htpuy by it lor ciuneu ;;ooUj dju't 
l/«ucht auyiio y ulit why should I aticr ail tell yuu 
the %4vtu suirr hu-iiu ! ui the b*'.w uuiuer hi-ui! 
tuariuir lieta >>e-ba 1 luootuer baada uii;.iiu iiutil 

• I lasi lue Ibrra uialduus iia-ba ! uel uuiil ui it 
Siiulu dou'c LU eirupl me 1 Kuuw wbat yoa waut to 
Cav vuu aecui to ojina tue puuc.uaiiou lu my 
iKiaarKs but it was tait^h tiuie that that siupid u.d 
iastiiou suuuld bo doue aWuy with the resuiyiu^ ot 
ta« tutiicriw-uotaiuiu^ cuueiiuci'ous ui scutcuces 
into the liew uevei-euaih;; senteace is 
lue aiyis of tlie luiuru yoa have seeu 
Tvtiat 1 can do li^r Co ni,t lull to observe 
thai X have nut yet onoe takeu bieath it is now 
your luru to wai aud if yoa choose we shall now 
Lave a sijlfe'' * • • liere 1 awakened with a 
crjufag'juv; the sweat wus roiliu^ utf my tuie- 
liead. iuv hrsl uluiicu ligUled auou a Volume of 
Lcssius. ID wbicu i bad ueeu leauiui; uuriu:; tbe 
(vtijiui;. ItKasaa tbougb a luuuutaiu had been 
Ltieu ult my chtwt. "ii'ur ihe pi'e.>oui," I said to 
bi^srit, ''wewiU stick tu tois s^ye — we will ao- 
UeaTor to turiu uiU'Beivt'8 alter this model oi trutu 
auu deurueas — auu w» will leave the ' iitTer-enuiui; 
seuleiice' tu later (^eueralioDS." 

Xbe cauotic yet K'-'"uii M>azer heads bis feailleton, 
"A Day usUer the Jiayreath Kci){a ot Tenor," aud 
lUaervcs: 

Oae cannot always take thinzs os tbey come, pay 
court tu'ih* lauios, auu change £10 uolcs. As it 
bapp«us tua , esueviaiiy ill tue last respect, a aa- 
eaciutu ProviUeuce has lutpused certuiu lutlexiuie 
biuita apoa maukind, one is turced tu rememucr at 
last iiMti it is uot man's miasiuo upon earth to eu- 
)->>', bu& always tu improve himself aud to lucrease 
m rcacimbiaauu to thn diviuittoa — which, tbauka to 
exisiiut: railway cummuuicatious, caii be tuu moat 
■ tkiitiy acaicVcd <ihruui;u a culture irip to Wa;;- 
xeii.i.. iiayteuih. I tiiuruiuie iiaveled tu E^ier, 
wuere u»o approacues the subiiaiily of the Ji'icu- 
t«.|teu: !-;;,<. — lUid Iri m aubiiuiiy lu rtajreuth is ouiy 
a Cat's Jump, i wanuerea .liroufch toe oiue-clad 
Diiiauiaius «u aa tu i^ei KiaUoaily luiu ttie I'lumised 
Laiiu m which Jiiuharu VVu;-uer'a "iliuvious fuuud 
frea<:e," as he Uimaeij, to the irauqaiilzjitiuu ot roe 
Uiiiverse, auuuuucea throoga the meuium ot paiut 
t pua tbe iioul ut aia Tilia ''Wahutiiea." I su;j- 
poiiea tue baruobip or this Journey palieoily, lur 

fvazy time the iiayreuth lagt/iuU leii lutu my hanus 
loaud II) ita auvurti.-<euiv;ut uulumus that tresh 
liTer aausaee aud liukeis tor the Itlibeiauiieu- 
li>D2 Were bc-iuj: Ireeiv otluied lor sale. Aias 1 
aiiut 1 w hen X airived iu iiayreutb ou the <iay 
Ot tbe "Stci^tnea" pcrluimauce there were 
plenty ot iiCB.eis tor the ''iNiueluhc^u" tu be 
Lad. but Ihe liver sauaajies wvra uuluriuaata- 
ly all Kune. 'Xue vuiiie auseuco oi uu;iitivu 
Cuiumuuuies was oouuly discreasini; to those 
liuesia who Wi-re qiiiiu at home lu the ga^- 
tiuuumicai pans oi tue Edaa, (.nd knew 
Very Well that the Xui'theru co^s, wuo appear upon 
tUrf Wii;cueiiau Bti>i;e, were lu the habit uf stluom 
eaiibi: lesa ih&a au eu lie butloci£ tor auppvr. 
LiiUiiiug Oeaperaleiy to toese lueinuiies, I walked 
aunuap'.ciuu8:y inu' an iuu. "l\va> a quiie, uiodciii 
hwatierv ; bui, iho wauer, ashu as pta»l.c txanq^uil- 
, Ui was coucerueJ, camu uear to' tue auiiquc- X 
CaiieU liiui iiiuialv, uuc be lemainud immovaole, 

Iiae a Gieuk sia.ue; aud only a slight movowent of 
t|jt ptciuresqueiv-i'iiuuueii Mx^i aimrovcaied to tUu 
•yiupaihe.ic cuuichipiut. r .hat bu was pkkiut: his 
Iveib. i r-^pea. eil luy cu.i, uut lo vaiu, so tuat at 
leu^th 1 tooa 'rKJuj:e lu a uttlo " icaaiua moiivo" 
liuiu " Xtuciujii.Jut" uuU bOu;;ht lo orouso 
Ills atteuiluU Oy^ the seiluc;.ivu summons ol 
tbe rouuisu water nympu : "I Lm alone; 
if joa caiuO to lue tucie would be two uf 
tisl Xbu little recilatiVD did uoi unas its purpose, 
lor be beg»a to ruii his eyes hoinui\, uui, up- 
pruacniu.. sh< uied. '•VVbaLUoyou wau. I " I was 
sppaileu, lur 1 lememuerea Aiutos — aua, puihai/S 
tiju Wtii.er mijibl belicvu that i uad coiue '' :o liue 
tlie town tiom lyruuis-" i>u X tcolt out my <<asii- 
pvr:, ana, ou the sti°tU|{ih ut u, asaed tor a Lecl- 
«ieaA. But a li^obie ilaebiOi auuer spread over iiiu 
paiiiu liueaiuents OI the Germau-Nauooa.-X<'cSiivitv 
waiter; uuU hu ii-peuoil mv liUOuciuUS oieteuoiou 
lu (ijo 'ivui'ds, "Ibere Is uotbihg lo eat or uriuk 
' bciol" X waudi-.xcu irecu luu lu lun, and was ao- 
lutiily setii auuui h.y uusinei-s at an. At last 
I ulucked up cuuxatie. and asked a auu- 
tlemau wbuni X mei, ''Cau't yui| tell uiu 
HUuie one can |;et ujytbi.j2 to eat here?" 
Ido sauij Shock bis heud aod rtpii'd, 
"X'ur iiii\3e d^3n pant 1 uivsuli nave had nwiuiu;; 
W..I m lUiiie eiccpt iLrte iicta of the ' WailiU; e ' !" 

'• UU 1 bi«<a/i," X exoiaimcd, ' L have always, 
iiua khuwa ' Ui^ea a ^uud beatbeu ; save me irom 
Cialu uy staivaiiou, aud I bwcai' tu luee that 1 
Will isijvo b> loro the 'X'wiiight of the Gods 1" So 
tbe limt- pasaeu be.we<.u tus iu;; and prayint;, aod I 
teit ibat 1 had beeu made lit by theeo ascetic pio- 
eeediii^^s lo i/ul up wiili ih- very severest tiiiva- 
Uuua of uiciuuy iu ■' iMcttiieu." As too poiiorm- 
«hce wu» lo ci mmcuce a^ 4, aud cariiaKou uaiuially 
(;u tills a^e or raiiWaVB) w^re uul l)e liau, X 
had lo uiBlie up luy mum to tramp lo the 
i<eatpluiz ou tool. 'Xue r^au teemed >Mib ludies 
fcou (ieui;emoo, p8le;;;iualiui: iii tho suaUo of 
gigituiiu oual-ciouUB. One tehllemau of uLjiiuc- 
uoi., iu lesiivo jiliiic, uiti»cteU kuo atjeuliou aud 
t.u\> ut lue pedeS'tiaha, lor Uo held lu his bi-ud a 
liuiiU. ot ort-au-auu-.-u. tcr b.-i.eckeu »ii.u muut, out 
Oi wuicii be Oil a piece Iroiu luue lo liriis. It was 
ptuuraliy believeU that this pil^nm was tuo Ur..ua 
Uuke ol Weimar, who hau juatariived lu Bayieuib, 
(Hiu, prubauly Ihruuiih his hi;;u cuuuociiuus. Uad 
Ruccecued ill uecuuiiutl t^e posnesaur oi a suuiiwicU. 
l;*it;seuily the road icot sieeper. uud was coveiod 
*>iih buiie loose stOhes ; whitt< oi ruucid ;;ieiiM« aud 
3Ui beer barrels biled ihehiiiuer atmusuiuiicuiraia, 

!'or we had urnvoa at iho two sheiiu, the prupij. 
loca ut the tlieiiife. I ordered cull'eo ; but. anei- 
l hiKl waited lu vaia halt au hour lor 
it, trumpet oiasta sounUed, auucanciD^ the coiu- 
gaeLCeiueni uf the pertormauce; au that i had tu 
Km* ut sxfaaa Um sxava of sav iiusaa lux BunxUii- 






mast. 1 1 'vr^nt to the theatre, a baildlnK of TSiiKh 
briciia, wfalob looka like a mannfaotory in -which 
«ndiesa melody is fabricated, ami entered. Tha 
iiaditoriam, in tbe shape oi ao amphitbeatra, im- 
pressed me difiaureenbly as a council chamber, in 
whioli tbe represeniativea of the various Waijner 
iliocesos were sitiiog In order to detotmine tbe in- 
fallibility of the master. The honso was crowded, 
aud as tiie "Waa:ner Clubs had vomited forth their 
most savaea miiaiciaus of tbo fnture a starillne un> 
komptness of bair reigued over tbe anoience. 

I was bnav in my fani^y, perfecting the portrait 
of AVa^ner with pendent side-locks and a loue 
caberdine, when suddenly the lamps were turned 
out all over tho boure, and absolute darkness en- 
pcrvened. I found this joke rather out of place, 
even in nn amphiiheare; bat as all the doors were 
faat locked, so that nobody niin:ht protit by a tem- 
porary mdlgpoairion to get away, X was com pe led 
to sit quiec lu my place, uervunsly awaitintr tho 
Burprues about lo bij ))rncticod upon his defonse- 
10s3 giitsis by the tbeatrioul reioniier. Hie inatru- 
nit-uti ill riie cavemoas orcliestra were beiog 
tuii*U; — no 1 it was the overture which bad 
just commenced I Tho curiam divided j we 
uebeld a cavo witb a smiib's furhace, and 
a bristly man camn on with bis knees curi- 
ously twisted inwards, a mothoil of locomo- 
ikju iuieuded to dL-noto that he wis a dw.-irl. He 
beaan to reclaim iu wailing tones, but X did not 
uiinpratand a MViialiie of it. it was ihetuusic of tlie 

1U-. are, »upplemt>Dted by the lauguaee of the pas:. 
A ler tbi: liwurf in bis cave had Hiriven for a long 
mue to make himseli umuieliisriolp, another persou 
j lined mm m a blue c.oak, bis bat w/)ra low down 
ou iho 101 ebi-atl, bat carrying; a »poar iu his baud 
inijti-ad I'f a cabujei/s wii'p. Tbin s.raHirer was Iho 
eoii Violan. who endeavored to couceal the special 
olije.'i, OI his uppcafauce by means of a if-njiUiy 
dLclaiuaiion. A* soon as bo bil tborou;jbly 
eiucseUed in this reiipect, he withdrew to 
niati ' room for the real hero ot tbe d^iy. 
liiiexfriid. aod for ihiit person's bear. Tuis 
iaii.3 ■, ID every limb of whom the "super" was 
couapicuously disceruible, li-iieiied for a lonj; time 
withtheair^t a counoisseur to tbe dialo.ue be- 
tween his master and tbe dwarf, but hurried away 
|irei i.iitately aa s:)ou as he lia<l absolutely couvincod 
hiuiaeif tuai, iu xuoh an entemltle as that, he could 
produce .no effect whatsoever ly his h'Wiipg. 
Aiiera protr^icted daolooue of yelling: SUg/ned 
caught bold of an iron bar and be^an to tors;o away 
atuun.ilat last be got quite hoarse. Wi'h the 
very last trasmeofs of his vocal powpra he heaved 
up the welded suord and smote with it upon a bui:e 
lump or siimeibiDi; that saffered from a privy 
niechauical arraunempnt, and tumbled asuuder iu 
two peitoctly smooih halves. Xne curtaiu closed, 
tbo liist act was over, and I lushed into the 0|)eu air. 
Aly struiuod endeavors to uunddle the proceeiiinss 
on the sru^e h.id made such nemauds on my eyes 
and ears that, as it just then occurred to me, I had 
sliogetiiur missed lue music ef tbe orobe.'<tra. But 
whot was lo bu d'lae? Should I bear tbe second 
a.i. ? Never ! never I Exuausted, X entered the 
shed in front of the theatre, aud le.med my weary 
beai upon both hands. I bad sat iiiusioratew 
uiotueuts when I h:ari1 a leiuaie voic», "Sol here 
is aiieadv the coflee ih:it you nrdereil." It was the 
cuifee which I bad truitlsiiidv bOi^aed f r before the 
boi;iuning of the perlormance, and wliich was 
brougiit to me alter I had outlived a whole act of 
" liiealrieJ." 'I'hii wa.* the slowest coffee of my 
whole lite, which, however, ceased to a:ttuul.*,h me 
When X (ume to consider its weakness, X hastened 
to tho station. " Whither triveU tb|} next train ?" 
a^ked I. '' To Bamberg:." Thus comes a man to 
XSambure, ana knows noi how. 

DEMOCKAIW LVONOMY AGAIN. 



SENATOR SAULSBURY'S TOWN OP DOVER, 
DEL., WITH ABOUT MNETEBN HUNDRED 
PEOPLE EECKXVH8 $55,000 TO BUILD A 
POST OFFICB. 

To the Editor of the New- York Timet : 

Tbe allvuion in a Tuica editorial of to- day to 
tbe erection of an extravasant United States Post 
Office building at Dover leads me to remind yoa that 
tbe apprnpriAtion for it waa made tbroasb tbe ef- 
forts of Senator £11 Sanlabnry, who livef in that 
town. Nobody amooK all tbe Tildenites would 
make a prettier oretensa of a desire far "economy" 
and reform than Eli, ba > be fathered this aowar- 
rauted expenditure without Oiffluulty. Tbe first 
appropriation was $40,000, bat, as usual, that did 
not sntfice, and il5,0J0 more was voted. This will 

make 455,000 expendf>d lor aPc* Office in a country 
town tua.. had, in 1£70, but 1.906 luhaliiianis, and 
has iriown only mouerateiy siuce. Iu tact, there 
are seveu other towns in Delaw -re of tbe same 
rank as Dover — i. e., having between 1.000 and 2,000 
people iu 187l' — :3mvrna, Miliord, Laurel, Newcas- 
tre, L-aldid, Delaware City an I X,ewti-i. Any one 
of ijieui is as much entitled to a |55,u00 Pos>. Office 
as Dover, and ibe croas extra va^^auoe of suco a 
i/Uiluiu£ in each of them would nut be more palpa- 
ble. 

You sboold know, too, that one of tbe last acts of 
WiUard Saulsbury, (now Caancellor of Delaware, 
aud broihur to Eii,) wbeu in cho Senate, was to 
procure lU^ appropriation ot $235.0(10 tor the erec- 
tion ot an iron wbari' at Lewes, at ihe mouth of 
D:-)awareBav. That auo) Wis Ionic since expended, 
and sevetal adaitional aopropnatious hare baeu 
made, wniie the wharf — or " pier " — remains far 
tr. HI completion. To wbatuseic will be put wben 
huisoed nobody really knows, bat the expoudituie, 
liK.e thajt at the Dover Post Oihce, w.ts a due Uius- 
tratiou ot how a Democraiio (Jouxreas would save 
tbe public m< nev. 

WDLMDiGTOX, Del., Monday. Sjpt. 25, 1876. 

A.V INOIDEM OF A. FAUINE. 
A characteristic incidant coanected witb the 

famne in the north of China reaches tha Shanghai 
Courier trom Peltin. It ssems that the scatcity of 
food baa been j^eatly felt in many of tbe oallylng 
rountry villaces, and tho dearth was all the keener 
trom tbe fact ^bal the psople wtre uncared for by a 
single Mandai'io, tbe ouly antboritJes iu tbe ueijih- 
boriiOOu being seldiere. So au old (feutleaaan, a 
subolar and a mau of much repute, bestirred him- 
self, and lu spite of muoQ disuoura°;suieut fsova. 
his frienda he went round to ail toe wull-to-do 
crentry witb a beautifully-written petition praying 
tor aasis.auce. 'J'he otti man pleaded the caose uf 
tbe suffsrers ao well ibat be sncceeded in soraping 
tOi^etber not less than 3,000 Utels uf silyer; but 
alasl it was a diop m tbe bucket, and was not 
sullicient'to feed a tenth of those who needed suo- 
coi. However, he managed to open au establish- 
uiout fur providing the Tillagers witb "congee," on 
the Soup-kitchen principle, thou|£b the amount 
that each man received was barely lart:e euoaeh 
to hold body and soul together. Ac lenutb one 
niurulng it tnysterioas placard waa found affixed 
to tbo door of the congeu-bouse, urgiog the 
heads of tbe district, if they wanted more assist- 
ance to apply totwopowetlul Mandarins, who were 
vunamed, connected with the Imperial Goycmment. 
Twenty ihoosand taali, said tbe anouymoas anchor 
of ihe pruclamatiun. Is required to uo any good; 
and Ihe only way iu which that sum is likely to be 
procured is by aupealiug to these nigh officers. For 
some lime nobody seemed willing to go upon so ven- 
turesome an errakd. At last, however, one of tbe 
Pekia officials known us " Yu-shiu" — "the. 
Emperor's eyes aud ears" — made U his duty to 
tiiia out Irom whom tbe proclamat^n emanated. 
Xii.4 researches bi ought bim in contact with tbe two 
IXiuisiers who bad oeen referred to, aud tu hia un- 
bounded a.<<toslsiiment, be no suoner msntioaed bis 

boaiueas tbaa they eiich presented hiui with 10,000 
taels. sayiiie at tbe same time that, as they had 
provided the mooay, ba was to aee that it waa well 
dispensed and take all .trouble off their bands. It 
alio trauspired that they themselves, and no other, 
were the authors of the proclamation. 



A TtXAS GlKUa FRKAK. 
The "Waco (Texas) jEJrawiwer says : "About 
two weeks ago an Indiridual appeared in tbo 
Childer's Creek neighborhood, in this county, who 
gave the name of Tom Johnaoa, and claimed to be 
tbe »oa ot a prominent citizen of ComaDOhe Coaoty, 

bnt afterward proved to be a woman in male attire, 
ishe was in tbe neigh borboed several days before 
ber sex was discovered, during which time she 
acied the part of a last youni: mau t» periociiou. 
She associated freely with young men, called on 
several young ladies, aud carried the part of a 
beaa admirabl.v. fcjbe proved herself an exoerc 
borsemau, and an adept iu the use of the revoiver 
aud bpeiicer rille. She aiteuded a camp- 
meetiiii; which was beisg conducted by Xtov. 
Mr. Alelugin, of this city, aud Kev, Mr. Harris, 
of CuilUer'd Creek, aud on two occasions 
went forward to tbe anxious seat and asked tor tbe 
pray rs of tbe cungregaiioi', all the while repre- 
sl'U ing herself to be ' Tom Johnson, trom the old 
mau's stock lancbe on tha iriutior.' Xier spilgbt- 
liuesM and pieusaut manner attracted the atteotion 
ot everybody, aud she was last becoming popular 
niih people of all aites and sexes, particularly with 
the youoji; ladies ot the neighborhood, wheu, bv an 
uu;oriuuate ucciQenC her SiiX became known. Clar- 
euce Williams was notitied, aud arrested tbe yoaug 
Woman, and carried her before Eaquiie W. Ot. 
lioyu, J u^.tice ot the Peace of X'lecmut No. 4. He 
knew uo law by which he could bold ber, aud she 
was perailttcd to go tree. Afier leaving the Mag- 
istrate's iiffice she stated to several parties that ber 
real name was Kuiu, aud said she lived iii Co- 
Bianche i..oaui.y. and bad aRsuiiiod the disguise o.,i 
account UI haviug killed a Mexican lu Bruwuwood, 
bus remarked that she woald go to Ktmball." 



A SCHOOL QUJ^allON DEOIJDED 
The Supremo Court of Ilhnoia has renderod 

a decision of great interest iu connection with tbe 
publie scbuols, A girl in Winnebago County be- 
longed to a class that was required by the rales to 
study book-keeiiXnz. Her parents did not wish ber 
to pursue that study, aud reiused to provide her 
wiib tbe text-books. Tbey were notided tbai they 
must do so, or tbe girl would be expelled. Keturn- 
log tu tbe scbual witboat the books, she was 
ejected. Upon this, suit was broai^bt against tbe 
Priucipal aud Duectors fur trespass. The Jury 
lu tue coart below found tor tbe plaintiff^ and 
abs»8scd ine damagss a'. <136. A motion tor a new 
trial was made aud denied, and the case was ap- 
pealed tu tho Supreme Court. That court has 
idst rendered a uecision affirming the Judgment, 
bevcrai p^.iutsare dsouasod aud passed upou lu tbe 
upiuiun, but the chief one is thii : Tbe school law 
01 Illiuois declares that orthography, reading in 
EuKiisu, pemuansbip, arithmetic, English grsmuiar, 
inijttoru ueoi;raphy. and the history of the Uulted 
Sicaiei shall bo taught in tbe public schools, but 
tu tbi.t section is added t proviso that nothing 

tUereiu contained shall prevent the teaching of 
other and bigner oraucues. The reasoniug uf the 
court IS that It was tbe design of tbe law first to 

1 secure to every child instruction In the braucbes 
euumciateu, and that while other studies may ba 
lauoduoad \M%y oaa nut ba nuule eompoiaucy* 



-mNANCIAL^AFFAIBS. 

. ^ 

SALB8 AT THIS STOCK KXOHAKaB— SEPT. 30. 

BALES FROU 2 TO 3 F. M. 
$2,800 Mor. & Gs. 2d.lU7 |XOU Cen. of ^. J. 



1,000 PittsDurg 4tb lOo's '-200 

1,000 Cen. Flic. G.B.I i 0^4 400 

100 Uel. & Hudson... OaHijlUO 

100 MariDosa 4141100 

60 Consol. Coal 3'J llUO 

100 West. Union.. ba. 70I4U00 

400 do 70'4r.i:ii0 

iiOON. Y. C. t hud... 97^4 100 

XUO do sH. 97 ''si 60 

liOO do 97»8 200 

600 do b3. 07^1' 100 

100 Mich. Central 



400 
luO 
<too 

bOO 

1100 

:ioo 

500 



do... 
do... 

do... 

do... 

do.. 

do.. 

do.. 



iias'lOO 
4112' -100 
4i'8|100 
41>< lUO 

4ii8 -Oi» 

loo 



tii'U Lake Shore. 



1000 

700 

lOoO 

3O0O 

15 lO 

I1.OO 

2iU0 

100 

luO 

1300 

1000 

looO 

iiOO 

5v^0 

loOO 

•2000 

lUUO 

1400 

loOO 

'.^00 



do.. 

do... 
do... 

do... 
do .. 



.... 41 

.bU. 41 
.... 41 I4 
54I1, 

.... f>4 
i7, 



00 '8 
5:1 =■ 



do 

do.. 

do.. 

do.. 

do 

do 

do... 

do... 

do... 

dg... 
do... 

d.i... 

do 

do ttr.c. 

d. 

do u.'r.c. 

do u.r.c. 

do 

800 Rock Island 

oOO do x.o 

'.^5 Morris a, Kssex. .. 

3.10 l)ei., L. it Wesi.. 



...s3. 
...85. 
u.r.c. 



....sit. 

...83. 

.u.r.c. 



iUO 



.83. 53i-2l(Ji..O 

do...-. 5tS=8' 1"'" 

do iirt^j ;uoo 

do sfj. 5J»d li'oO 

uo . 6S^ i5tiO 

do D;tv J3U0 

do s3. o^i-j 8.J0 

.... 6a34' -'4 

.... Oi-i'-s l.^'J» 

b:?. 531.J 600 

6;:>l-j'S00 

.sa. oa^aP'^iOO 

Oiiil^lliLlO 



do. 

do., 

do.. 

do., 

00.. 

do. 

do., 

do 

do slO. 

400 Erie RaiUrav 

luo i<oith- western... 
HOO j.iorth-w St fref . 
100 PaC. It. Ot AlO.... 



Alio do... 
oitO tie 

do... 

do... 

Oo... 

(lo... 

d.... 

ilo... 

do... 

do... 

do... 

do... 

do... 

do... 

do... 
bSH a.'OSt. Paul... 



...c. 



..a3. 
..b3. 



oat's 



35 



lOJ di. 

too St. Paul i'ref 



9 12 5tJ0 



100 

iuo 

^00' 



do.!.. 

do si j. 

do 

do sJ. 



20 "s 
20 14 
20 
2534 
20ia 
20 'a 
20 "a 
20^8 

2 Gas 
20 

2b I4 

•M^i 

20 'q 

. Vii-'s 

. •--b'-j 

. 20'".^ 

. '^iih 

104 

ii,(l 

sy>a 
U7''4 
ti7-H 

07=8 
07 -J 

o7-J 

c, u 

Ol is 

|-.7'4 

6 "b 

07 ;'8 

07 I4 

07 •■'8 

2«:«4 

2S'"'8 
Oil "-J 

ribi4 

5lI'4 

69 14 



MONUAT, Oct. 2— A. M. 

The statement of the Associated Bauks 
issued from the Clearing-house on Saturday 
last ahows a lose in surplus reserve of $2,335,- 
975, and the banks now hold $16,322,775 in ex- 
cess of legal requirements. The specie average 
is decreased |2,434,500, which is due partly to 
speculative operations, and partly to tho Syn- 
dicate movenaents. Tbe continued remittances 
to the interior for crop purposes are again re- 
flected in a decrease in the legal-tender item of 
$9X4,700. TLe other changes are an increase in 
loans of $586,900, and iu circulation of $152,- 
000, and a decrease ol $4,052,900 in deposits. 

The following shows tho condition ot the 
banks this week, compared with the previous 
statement, and with the statement lor the oor- 
responding week last year : 

Sept. V3. Fept i^O. 

Loans $261,b42.000 |2G2. 428.900 

Specie 18897.700 16,46;t.'.!00 

Legal tenders. 57,669.900 56 755,200 



Deposits 

Circulation. 



18 897.700 

57,669.900 

231635 400 

14,495.200 



Got. 2. '75. 

$-i78,f'41,:iO(i 

6.448,yoii 

6iJ.49(),(ifl0 

227.58-2.500 2;i4.40:).CJ0 

14.647.200 17,925.e00 

And the following the relations between the 
total reserve and total liabilities ot the banks : 

Specie $13,897,700 $16,463,200 Dec. $2. 434, 500 

Legal tend'rs 57,669,900 56,7.15.200 Doc. 914,700 

Tot'l re've-$76,567r600 $73,218,400 Dec. -?3, 349.200 
Eeserve re- 

qaired agt 

ueposits... 57,908,850 56.895,625 
Excess of re- 

seiVe above 

l^gal le* 

^uirements 18,658,750 16.322,775 Dec. 2,335,975 

'the money market displayed no new features, 
and borrowers on call supplied their wants at 
lMi'S~^ ^ cent. There ia an abimdance of 
capital seeking employment ou call, the de- 
mand in comparison being exceedingly light. 
The further loss ot legal tenders b.y tbe banks 
last week is indicative ol a hardening in the 
rates for money in tbe immediate future, as it 
shows tnat the West and Sauth are beginning 
to move the crops to the seaboard. There was 
BO important change in the market for com- 
mercial paper, prime names being in demand 
at 4 to 6 i* cent. 

The foreign advices reported tbe London 
market for secarities a declining one for cun- 
sols, and on the whole firm for United States 
bonds. The former declined hi V cent, closing 
on Saturday at 95 X5-X6 both for money and the 
account. United States bonds at the close ot 
the week showed an improvement of \^'3>V4, ^ 
cent., except m new 53, which wera unchanged. 
Erie showed a decline of 1 ^ cent., being 
quoted at 8%.. The bank of England lost 
£190,000 for the week ending Wednesday, since 
when £63.000 has been withdrawn oii balance. 
The bank ia strong in reserve and abundantly 
able to stand a large drain, it acy should take 
place. The minimum rate of discount remains 
at 2 ^ cent., and in the open market three- 
months bills are still discounted at lower 
figures. 

The sterling exchange market was quiet, the 
demand bavins been light as usual at this sea- 
son, while on the other band tbe supply of 
commercial bills is steadily augmenting on 
the increasing shipments of cotton, cereals and 
other produce to Europe. The nominal rates 
were maintained at $4 83 and $4 84^, but actual 
business was dene at $4 82® $4 82 V^ and at 
$4 83^'S)|4 83^, those figures being current at 
the close. • 

Speculation in the Gold Boom was tame, ex- 
cept in the loan market, where an attempt was 
made to create a " squeeze" in cash geld. Some 
of the leading bulla it is said, withdrew consid- 
erable amounts of gold from active uso with 
this intention, but the highest rate exacted 
irom borrowers was 1-64 V cent, per diem, 
while the bulk of tbe densand was satisfied at 
2®3 ^ cent, per annum. The price of gold de- 
clined from 110 >>& to 109%, advanced to IIOV4, 
and closed at 110. The dispatches from London 
that shipments of gold had been made to this 

country had a weakening influence on the 
market. 
Government honds were generally steady on a 

(mall volume of business. Early in the week 
there were some large exchanges fur 4^ per 
cents, for the older bonds at tbe Treasury at 
Washington, to be used as security for Na- 
tional bank circulation. Ia railroad mort- 
gages the dealings were moderately large and 
tbe course of the market was mainly toward 
lower prices. The New-Jersey Central 
issues advanced at the opening ot 
the week, but subsequently recorded a heavy 
decline, firata selling down from 109 to 107, do. 
coDBolidated frem 91 to 78, convertibles from 
86 to 72^(8, and Lehigh and Wilkesbarre consol- 
idated from 59 to 55. New -Jersey Central con- 
solidated firsts closed at S3 to 86, and converti- 
bles at 79 to 80. The Morris and Essex and 
Delaware and Hudson Canal issues were lor 
the most part steady, and closed at an advance 
over the quotations current on the previous 
Saturday. The North-western and St. Paul 
issues were next in point of interest, some 
large transactions and sharp changes taking 
place. State bonds were dull on slight fluctua- 
tions. 

Speculation on tbe Stock Exchange was 
active and at times attended with considerable 
excitement. Tbe passing of the October divi- 
aend by tbe iJelaware, Lackawanna and West- 
em Company, and tbe sharp decline in Reading 
stock at Philadelphia caused a break in the 
coal shares, Delaware, Lackawanna and West- 
em tailing ott" XO V cent, and Delaware and Hud- 
son Canal 5V<j ^ cent, and Ntw-Jersey Central 
3^4, V cent. Unfavorable reports from the North- 
west in regard to the crop yield exercised 
an adverse influence on the granger 
shares. St. Paul common declined from 
30 Mj to 28 and the preferred from 62 to 53 "4, 
while North-western common fell off from 
36"* to 31%, and the preferred trom 6II76 to 
57Vi. Outside of the stocks named, and which 
were affected by the special causes referred to, 
the market exhibited a strength which indi- 
cated that Wall street, despite the efforts ot 
the bears, is beginning to respond to the better 
and more confident feeling in the future 
of values wliich the recent revival in busi- 
ness is so well caleulated to inspire. 
It was announced on Saturday that tho repie- 
sentatl^ea of some of the leading trunk lines 
had held a meeting in this City lor the purpose 
of making an amicable arrangement for the 
, sattloBaeat of tha rai4wa7 war. Xha aaaotiiut 



waa entirely harmonious, and it would appear 
that only the co-operation of the New- York Cen- 
tral is necessary to arrive at a satisfactory set- 
tlement of the questions at issue. Auother 
conference is to bo hold immediately, at which 
it 13 confidently expected that the Central road 
will be represented. 'The intelligence that 
tbo conference was being held produced a 
favorable elieci on. the Stock P^xchauge, 
and an advance in pricee, Lake Siiore and 
Michigan Central being conspicuous in tho im- 
iirovement. Tho attack of ilio bears upon. 
New-York Central •uiakea no headway, the 
price closing ou Saturday -witbin a traction of 
the highest point 01 the week. The firm^icss 
of tlio stock is no doubt iu largo measure at- 
tributable to tbe leeling of conliilence created 
by Mr. William H. Vandorbilt'a letter to the 
stockholders. In the late dealings tbo coal 
roads partially recovered fro.m tbo early de- 
cline, as did also the Granger shares. NortU- 
westeru common waa conspicuously strong, 
advancing from 31% to 35V4, aud closing at 35. 

'Ibe improvement in business circles con- 
tinues to make satisiactoiy proiiro.ss, and even 
the most inveterate croaUera are faiu to admit 

that we are otiteriafi upon a season of pros- 
perity, an.'l that tbe revival in trade is destined 
to last and produce good eft'ccts. The improve- 
ment is not couQucd to a tow branches of busi- 
ness but extends throughout all tho ramifica- 
tions of trade and commerce. The statements 
ol merchants engaged in every variety of busi- 
ness are of a cheering character as to tho pros- 
pects of trade, and this indicates a confidence 
which in itself is a most important element in 
tho advance to prosperity. 

COURSE OF THE M.^EKET — THE WEEK. 

( los'ug Slit., 
Hl«rhp8t. Lowest. Oct. 2,1 81 o. 



American Gold II0I4 

U. S. 5'<, XSSI coup 1147^ 

U. S. 5-29s, 1S67 coup II6I3 

New- York Central Obis 

llick Island .' lt,4^s 

Faoihc .Mail 2j^4 

Milwaukee & St. Paul... Sols 
Mil & Si. Paul Pref.... 62 

Lake bhore 

ChieaLio & North-western. 
Chic. &■ .North-west. I'ref. 

Western Union 

i 'U Pacific 

ToIfctHj*. WabaHh 

D*l., Un^. & Western... 

Now J eric V Genlral 

soil Canal 

ssei... 



&< 



Dol. & 
Morns 
Panama. 

Erie 

Ohio ic 
C, C 
llarletu 



luo "8 
114^% 
111)38 

96 
103 19 
2258 
28 
5814 
51 -^S 
3178 

57 14 
6.>Ui 

CO>-j 
24 
ti2i8 
89 -!i 
128 
9 

11^4 
3-^ 

131^4 
12^ 
iii 
40 
84 
3lfl 



117 
XI8I4 

12U H 

108 
3038 
34^8 
03 
53 "8 
3913 
54% 

*7o 
65^4 

iiy'>b 

*1U8 
J-.:0i4 

135 
16^4 
17 
3^8 

131 

19 

23 

57 14 

9734 
*3638 



5438 
3l.l8 
6118 

70 12 
62 

4^8 

70 13 
27 14 

... 67!i8 
... 90^ 
...l'^8 
... I014 

iasiDpl 121.1 

Ceutral 3"^ 

VSiia 

Hannibal & St. Joseph... 13 
Uan.& St. Joseph Ptef... 23 

Michiuan Ceutral i2^ 

Illinois Ceutral 84i2 

Missou ri Pacific 3ta 

*Ex-diTidend. 

RANGE OF PRICES AND CLOSING QUOTATIONS 

— SEPT. 30. 

'-Cl0Blng-^ 

HiKhest. Lowest. Bid. Asked. 

SNewTork "Central.... 98 971.4 97 3i 98 

Harlem. 13;Jia l^-*'^* 132 134 

Erie ....._.... Oifi 9V6 938 912 

Erie Preferred... J... .. .. .. 13 

LakeShore .':.... 5438 5319 5313 SSSq 

Wabash 438 4I4 414 4U3 

North-western 35I4 35 Si-it, Sjig 

N.irlb-western Pret.. SO'^s ?9i4 SD^a 5968 

Ruck Island 10438 1033i IUO *100i4 

KoTt Wayne .. 99'^8 IO0I3 

Milwaukee & St. Paul. 2914 28i« 2i5g 28% 

Mil. & St. Paul Pref.. 59 ?i bf^-^s 53^ 5914 

Piitsburg eCtfl 80I3 eC 671.2 

D.d., L.'ok. & West... eti4 . OG^a f'738 C7I2 

New-Jersev Centr.jl.. 267q 2434 aijig 21114 

Del. &. Hudson Canal. 64 U2ie G'-i^ 6334 

Morn.-ifeEssPX 89 i-^^' 

Michman Central 42i8 41 4II3 4114 

II inoi* Central 84 84 e3 84 

Union Pacific .. 60 63 

Mi.^souii Pac'fic 35^ 3I3 3I3 4 

C, C. <t I. Central .. 3ia S^s 

Han. & St, Joseph .. 12 13 

ilsn. it at. Jos. Pref 22 23 

Ouio & Miss llifl 1138 llifl nsg 

I'anama. 128 130 

Western Uuion 703a 70 70^ 7038 

A. & P. Telegraph .. 1514 16 

Pacific Mail. ..J 23 2373 22^ 23 

Qaic^ksilver .. 13 15 

Quicksilver Preferred. .. .. 17 20 

Adains Express .. 105 107 

Well", Eiirco & C 1 78 80 

Am. Mor. Uuian Ex .. 59 59 

United States Ex .. 61 63ia 

*Ex^ivldend. 

The toUowing are the returns of the foreign 
commerce of the Port of New- York, and the 
operations of the United States Sub-Treasury 
here for the week ending Saturday last and 
since the beginping of the year, compared with 
the return for the corresponding periods of last 
year: 
IMPORTS OF DRY GOODS AND GENERAL 

MEUCUANDISE. 

Week ending last Saturday $5,499,261 

Correspoudiun week last year 4 963.203 

Since Jan. 1 this year 229,631,601 

Correspi ndinii period last year 257,124,160 

Gold, S'pt. 30. 1876.. 110 

Gold, Oct. 2, 1875 117 

EXPORTS OP DOMKSTIC PKODOCK. 

Week ending last Tuesday $5,550,475 

Currespuaiiing week last year 4,100,294 

Since Jan. 1 this year 196,517.(599 

Correspouding period last year 185,442,681 

EXPORTS OF GOLD AND SILVER. 

"Week ending last Saturday 1138,263 

Corresponding week last year 370,5t)0 

Since Jan. 1, this year 4*,332 575 

Corresponding period last ybar 62,877,017 

RECKIPTS FOR CUSTOMS. 

week ending last Saturday $1,888,206 

Correspondmg week last year 1,935 463 

Since Jan. 1, this year 78.170.221 

Corresponding period last year 87,351,121 

GOLD XNTKBEST PAID OUT BY THE SUB- 
TREASURY. 

Week ending laatSaturday $349,914 

Correspoiidmg week last year 113 729 

Since Jan. 1, this year 5Mli'?'l^" 

CorrespoiidinK period last year 44,6(4.750 

Following is a statement of the receipts and 
disbursements at the office of the Assistant 

Treasurer of the United States, at Now- York, 
for the month. ending Sept. 30, 1876 : 

Auz.31, by balance $68,500,019 30 

Koceip.'S during the mouth — 

On Bccouut ot Customs. $8,882,559 39 

Ou account ot gold notes. 3,u83,500 00 

On account of Internal 

Revenue • 162,537 00 

On account ot cerlitt- 
cates of deposit, act 
Juue 8, 1872 2.000,000 00 

On account of Pout Of- 
fice Deparluieut 443.641 8S 

On account of trauslera. 8,727,0e6 89 

Ou account of patent 
fees 873 90 

Ou account of miscella- 
ueons 740,176 89 

On acconul of disburs- 
ing account 11,638,948 58 

On account of Assay Oi 

fice 

Interest accounts, viz : 

lo cuiB 3,860.848 43 

Incuirency 2,584 2 0—40,96 1,971 51 

Xotal *109, 401,990 81 

Pavmeiits — ' 

Treasury drafts Sl5,34G,699 12 

PuSlOdicu drafts 



.. 1,418,214 38 



3U3,U42 12 

13 84a,d-«0 64 

1,073,087 t9 

3,834,025 57 

2u,j2d 52— .34,4-2r),401 86 



*7j,03u,58d 95 



DisOursiujj accouu 8... 

Assay Office... 

Interest accounts, viz. 

In coin 

Iu currency 

Balance ■■ 

Balance to credit of 'X'rea- 

turer Uuited States. - .$64,860823 18 
Balance to diabursiui 

accounts •-•• 

Balauca to Assay Office. 
Balance to inierest ao- 
counis, viz.: 

In coin 

Iu currency 

Keceipts tor CU'^toms in the luoutb ot 

September, 1875 

Keceipts for Cunioms in the month of 

September, 1876 ; 

Decrease September, 1876 $l,5c)8.674 05 

The following ie the statement ot tbe busi- 
ness at the United States Assay Oflice at New- 
York for the mouth ending Sepit. 30, 1S76 : 

Deposits of gold — 

X'oreign Coin 

Foreitu bullion 



9,537.464 34 
501,161) 58 



133 41 4v 85 

3, 72 J 00- 



•75,036,538 95 

10,471,233 44 

8,882,559 39 



Uulted Siaies bullion.. 
Uuitcd biates bullion, 

ro-depusiis 

Jewelers' bars 

Dopo.-dts of silver— 

Jewelers' bars 

I'\ireian coin 

Foiei,:u bullion 

United St.iles bullion, 

c ntaiued/in gold..... 
United states builiuu, 

re-dcuosits 

Uulted States alliou, 

Culoraou 

United States bullion, 

Lake HaxtatiM........ 



$750,000 00 

30,OO0 00 

7UU,000 00 



70,000 00 

2J.0U0 00—11,575,000 00 

70,000 00 

3uOJ OO 

10,OoO 00 

10,000 00 

25,000 00 

S20.000 00 

15.000 e» 



I Uaited States btiUion, 

Montana 36,000 0(^ 

United States bullion, 

Nevada.... 16O,005 00 

Unite;! States bullion, 

New-Meiico 21,000 00 

Uuited Stales bullion, 

Utah ;„. v 10,000 00— ^80.000 00 

Total deposits 

Silver bars stamped 

Transmitted to Uuited 
States Mint, Philadel- 
phia, for coinage, gold fl,126,558 22 



.$2 1.55.000 (10 
. $803,829 55 



BACKING AND FLVANCIAL 

* 

rF" STATE OF MASS.\CnUSETT.S. 

SSOO.OOO Five t'cr cent. Gold Bonds, twentr years to 
ruu. Price 114H!; p.iym nt tube made witlii-.i thirty 
days; bonds (ieiivered as soon as received from the 
State. For sale by KlIiDER, Ph.^BOUi' k ('()., 



Ko. aa Wall ht . New- York, 
Iv'o. 4 ' Btale sC, Boston. 



COMMERCIAL AFFAIRS. 



Nkw-Tokk, Saturday, Sept. 30, 1876. 
TU" recpipts of tu" pnueiiiiil kiuda of Produce since 
our ast have bepnaa follows : 

Leea-w x. ps 3|Oil. bids 



B. n. reaa bajis 

beans, ooLs 

Cotio.j, ba.es 

I rie I iruit, pits 

Ki;{;.H, uo.a 

l-ioiir, bLl3 

^Vlleat, , u.ii!iei8 

torn, iius.H'.s 

Oiits, bu helB 

liye, bu b U 

Ulait, uu:iiiei£j 

' arley, i.usluds 

Peas. tiusiicU 

Crass-seid, oaus... 

I'lai seed, baus 

< oru-LUeal, Uol 

Co.-n-me.il. bags... 

Uit.ueal, obis 

Lieaip, liales 

Hupa. oales 

Hl'fs, .\o , 

Hid. 8. balos 



•'r 

12 Spti. Turu., ubla.. 
403 ruJp Turp., buls.. 

3,819(Tar, bu.ls 

7'JjPiicii, bdis 

l,o43li!i sill. Iiols 

14. "cO - >ii-(;alle, pks , 

57 2011 Pork. Jilts wi... 

'd.'i Cut-m ats, pks 

27,17J bird pks 

4Ui. tiuttir, i.ks 

4,.".oti .Juei-s -. pK.a . . 

uO'J 1 .illow, pks 

7,2iJe|L"rd-..i', Lbls 



4.J2 
u7.^ 
O'lO 
]9j 
10 

15 
?,G 1 

04 

27a 



I'ea-uuis, u.igs...... 

nice, pKB 

Kice ' haff. bags 

-t rcli, bxs 

Skius. b^les 

1 ea, naif- beata 

Tonaeco, ulids 

iooacco, oxi.t cs.. 

Whisky, ouis 

Wool, bales 

Btron<t 



150 

723 

25 

3t.S 

172 

1.287 

2,a^o 

;i2l 

9)9 

000 

5, .308 

0,044 

107 

1 20 

£03 

30 

351 

50U 

12 

5.'! 

:ot> 

4 12 
bl.'. 
loS 

de- 



Leatlier, Bides 9,;itj3 

CjFFKE— Kio advanced I4C. $»■ Iii,, and 
miindsood. Tho Pascal has arri v. u with u cargo of 
18,000 baas, billed l.oi buKS, by the Gray Eajfle. at 
baJiiiniire, at 17 "s*-'-, gold, (jtucr Kinds very tirm aud 
waute'i. ^ 

I OTTO. \ — H B been very quift for early delivery at 

unD.tered figu;es urliuarv quoted at \} 3-lOc.; Low 

Jlidd.iug, iy) g-lOc.a-io la-IOc; Middling, Ilea) 

11 3-toe Sales were oflBoia I. .y renorted lor prompt 

delivery of i,2bl Oaiea. (of wnieh &0O oalea were on 
last evei.ius,) inciudiBi 303 b.ilea to sliippeis, aud 589 

bales to tpiu.nr, and 19 bales to specul.it.irs Aud 

fir forwar ileliv. ry, a moderate (.nsiuesa ipaa reported 

ut ratlirr Oiisier prices sales have oeeii re|)ur.ed 

since our last of io.boo bales, of which 6,lOubales 
were ou 1 St eyeniuu, and 11. 5 JO baies lo-auy, with 
50iJ b'lies 00 the c.iUa. on t.ie basis of Middiin:, With 
October oiiiioiis eiosiu;{ at 10 'z9-.>2c ; No ■ cmoer. 1 Ic. 
ctll 1-.12C,: i.evember, 1 1 3-32c. o^l 1 180,; January, 
II 7-a^c. <Bili4C.; l-eoritary, 11 lb-32c.<^ll 7-16c.- 
M.trcb, 11 19-.i2c.atl5gc.; .^pril, 1125-32^3 

11 13-i«c.; Alay, 11 31-.JJC.®l;;c ; June, 12'8C« 

12 5:3^.0., July, 12 y-J/c.O'lJ 5-lt>j.; AUiiuot, 
12 7-lUc. aslvj'ee. ^S* lb.. Bliowin; a dcciius of 

l-3;;c.toi-10c. ■^ It)., closing barely steady 

'1 he receipts at this port to-day were 3.819 halts, and 
at the shipping ports 14,930 baies, asaiust 13,525 

b lie-'i same oay last weeic Ihe week's elpoita lieuce 

have ueeu 7,744 oalvs, including 7,741 bales to Liver- 
pool, ■ 97 bales to llavre, iiud -00 oaies to liivmen 

1 he exp Tts Hum all the po.'ts since 8ept. 1, 187b, 
h^ve been 49.79rf i>ales, (of which 39,201 b.ilea were 
sent to Uritisn ports and X0,i>97 bales te the Conti- 
ueut.) 

CloainQ Price! of Cotton in New- York. 



^'ewCottou. Uplands. 



IG 
9-lG 
l-iti 
6-10 
9-16 



Ordinary 9 

Strict ord'y... 9 
Goodurd'y....lO 
Strict G'dOrd. 10 
Low Middliug. 10 
htirict Low ju,..10 13-10 

Middling 11 

UoodJiUdUoglX 3-16 
Strict G.iod:ii. 11 7-16 
.Middling Kair-ll 1:^-16 
Fair 12 0-iU 



Alaliama. N. 0. Texas. 

9 3-iO 3 16 9 S-i6 

9 9-10 9 9-16 9 9-16 

10 116 10 1-ltt 10 X-16 

10 6-16 1038 103e 

10 11-16 10 13-16 10 13-16 

10 1o-i« 11 1-16 11 1-16 
11 H 11 3-16 11 a-iu 

11 5-16 11 7-16 11 7-16 
11 9-16 XX ll-i.6 11 11-16 

11 16-16 12 1-16 12 1-16 

12 i;.-ltt 12 13-16 12 13-16 

Staiiieil. 

Good Ordinary 8 lo-lO, Low Middling 9 15-16 

btrictOood Old... 9 9-lb|jliddUng 10 5-16 

FLOUlt AND MEAL— Cable we.ther. market, and 
war reports were iiioro favorable to tbe export trade 
iu x>ie.id8tu&'a. ai)a served to stimulate busiuesa here. 

Au uBusuaity active mov> mi.ut was reported iu 

8iate and Western Flour, chiefly in low-grade stocK, 
at a partial rise uf 5i:.'iDI0c. v* bul. Tbe dea.iuKs ou 
export account were large, in guoi part iu City .ilili 

hxtiaa Sales have been reported slace our last of 

2o,7oO b.iis. of ail srades, iuciudiu;; Lusouud Flour at 
!pii 250/95 05, uialniy at $4 6uw$j; ijuur Flour ut 
$°3 2oa.$5 50, chiedy LXtras at $4 50'S>;£4 7-'> ; pour to 
choice i>o. 2 at 960/9^ 06; p.ior to choice buprr- 
flae Western, $4 i:5®^>4 75 ; very poor to 
^uod Extra State, $4 9o'a';to Yb, mostly at ¥5 06 
'S'^o 10; tfood to strioily laucy Oo. at iJJj 25®$5 50; 
t. ity Mills r.xtras, shippiu;^ grades, io O./'O'iiiO 30, 
maiul.v at $5 ^ow^Q 3/ for tbe West ludies, aud 
Spo iba^b lu lor the liUgUaii trade, at w^bicb latter 
h^u: ca .1,1:100 bols. soid; iu.etior to uood ahippiui; ivxii-a 
VVe..teru, $1 9j'a'3!5 26; very good to fancy do,. 
$0 209 jio oO; rauiid-uoop uuio buippiug at $4 Qo'c) 
$j 35; aail oth r gra'ies withiu the previous range. 
. ..luc.u .ed iu the sales have beeu i'AoO.i buls. ship- 
ping ..Xi, aa,(ot whiuh 'J,8JU buia.Ciiy Uiiis,)1.3uO uuls. 
.iilunesoia str.ii/ht Lxtias, 900 bols. do. patent do., 
(iu p .ri. to arrive; ; 2,900 bliiS. U iu.er tVheat Kxiras, 
(lor 8hipm"ut; ) 950 bbU. ISuperilue, aud 7oo 
bbls. Boiir Extras, aud VjO bbla^ uu- 

euund Lxi.i'as, at quoted rates isoutbern 

Fiour quoted steady bales, 1,075 bols Of Kye 

Flour, 5.5 bbls'. sold iu lots at $4 7->a>id 25 1 or good 
to cuoice buperdue, cbi. tly at4'5a>;j>5 V20 for Mate. 

of Corn-meal, 85j buls. sold, iucluding 450 bbls. 

Yellow Western ia lots at it>2 io'a>a, uiusUy at £2 SO 
'ivii dO; 120 bbli lirandywiue at *3 25; aud 100 

bjJs While Weotern at 5>2 7u Coru-meal in bags, 

iu fair request at SliBSl 85 4? iuu lb Of tue sales 
were 2,uOo uags coarse, niosily on tue basis of $1 06 
for City Mills, aud *1 lor Wt stetu ^ lOo lb. 

UitAlN' — ^priug U heal advauccu lc.®.c ^bushel 
iu tbe lustauee of prime to choice qualities, which 
were scarce aud in very good demand fur export. 
Poorer qualities quoted iiriu, bu^ uot i.i much dem.iud, 

and Wiut?r V\ ueat atfrady, out quiet .>aies have 

beeu lepoited to-day ol iU7, oOU uuaticia, iiiuiudiui; 
very choice 1874 So. 1 Mmucsoia iSpriug, in ^to^e, lOi 
export; 27,OoO busiicls at $1 30; primo 1874 No. 2 
Chicago Npriiig, alloat, b.OOd bushels, at 1*1 20 ; old 
i^o. 'J 1- bica^o uo., iu arore, lO.UOO ou<hi;la, $1 LO, (witu 
piiine uew iSo. '^ do., tu arrive, quoicd at $1 20 bid, 
and prime UcW ^u. 2 ililwauke- do., to arrive, at 
u>l 2 J bidj") old and new ^o. 3 chic;igodo., mixed, at 
$1 Oo ; old red V^csteiu at *1 lOfli*! 12, cbietiy iu 
bioreutiiii i'J ; and new Ited Western, l.iir quality, 

at^l 12 ife^* buabel Corn baa beeu in rudud-d atucii, 

aud quoted up about '•.^c. a busucl uu a lair demaua 
fur siiiiimcut und huiue use, with the main deadugs re- 
ported iu s. earner jiixed VV'eaieiu, iol expjrt.... 

bales havu oe.a reported atuco our last of xi'-.OUO 

buslieas, iuciu iiug uusiuued sullujt yessol iliJted West- 
ern at 57V>.'<i'.i8c.; Very choiie do., OBi-jC.; Kauiaa uo. 
ac uS'ac. bid lud 59c. asked ; ungraded steamer Alixed 
do.., obc. aio7c., cniedy at bd'^ca-uYc: ^ew-i■or^i >o. 
1 ut bH^uc. bid aud 59u. asked; New- York steamer 
Mixed at 67c. a'57^.iC.;lNe\v-Voik Vellow at 59^0.; • eat- 
eru Yellovv at 69 .•a>j9'iio., and warm Coru withiu 
the rauge of 54c.'ii56c And lor foiwaril de- 
livery, prime sailing vessel Mixed Western, for 
October, qu <ted at u7'-.;C. bid, aud up tu bSStc. 
asked, out without tui'tuer movemeuts reported. 

ut Rye, altout 0,800 biifches Wew k\ e«tern sola at 

7ic.'0'74c., cliiedy iit 72i<!C. a'7ac.. with boat-loads of 
new 8taie, tu urrive, quot. d at b6o. bidaua87^2U. 

asked >arle.y hem driuly, but quel; ;;oud to cooice 

Canada, to arrive, quoted ut $1 iuti'*! 25. Sales re- 
p rted of ".^.bOO bushes upper-lake cauadn, to arrive, 
at Jtl 05 ; 3, JOO busuela 1 loriur Canada at yoCfl'Sl, 
aud ;i,000 bushels six-rowed biate oa privaie terms. 

Of barley-m.ilt, sales were reported ot u car-loads 

pf choice i.auaua VV iieal, to arri.ve, at ail 25, time, aod 
4,u00 bushels six-rowed Ktate at $1; market 

uuchauged Outs lu limiied demand ; track aud lu- 

fenor lots lower; pure to cbuice ueld himiy Sales 

reported uf 43, uOu bushels, mcludiug Wuitii Wcsieru, 
lu 10. a, at -iv'e a5Uc., us to uuaxiiv. tue lai.ier tor very 
cuoice; mustl.y ai 4.ie. o/lYc; While State at 4oe.'c» 
60.. lor lair to choice, cbi. fly at 48c.</'u0c.; Mixed 
Western, new, at 30c. t;42c.; i<ew-ioik No. 2 White, 
cur lots, (tirade receutly revise.!,) at 4i;iac. O'ilc.; 
rsew-^oi"«i .No. i;- quoted at 3oe.'a>o7c.; Mixcu btuto, 
44c. a'47 '•.iC, tor tair 10 choice; fair lo prime old 
No. 2 Chicago, iu store, quoted at 4bi-. a)Ju>;. 
flay. Straw, eed, leas, and Foeu a jou*; as last quoted. 

Oi Calcutta Linseed, 7,ouu Oajta reported sold ^i 

$1 ao, Kold, time ibo week's export clearances 

beuce for i.uropcau puns iaciuUed ..2,299 bbls, liiuur, 
oo0,871 busheiS u boat, 480, -..uo bushels Coru, 26.otj6 
buanels «ye. aud 1, :i9 buubcls fe.-s. 

llAtiUU A.-.E— .4. very gj»d demaad prevails for the 
le;idius! kiuds at llrm prices. 

HiiibS-Haye 6ceu in tAv demand at generally quite 

lirm prices.... the weet's recei^ta have ueeu 64,d45 
aides aud iz bales do.; sales. J9,.i2j ilid^s auu 2_6 
dales, the latter iueiu.uu^ i.ccordiug to Jleasrs. Pick- 
urd & .indreseu, u,u2i) Dry uueuos .lyies, 22 to 2714 
tt)., at i9c.®i9i-.iC.; i.OSO tiry Enire bius, '/S to '^o lb., 
ut i9c'ffl'i9-40; i,97o Dry Curie. ilea, .:2 10 2.;ia lb , 
ut tac, aii iiold, 4 Ui luius, usu.il stle^tioua; aio ury 
aauta he, 24 lb., at i8'4c., »;o,d, 3 moulha, Uau.ii seiee- 
tiuus; Vao Dry Ijueuos Aj res becouds, '^^'-Ki 10., at 
lo'vi-., Kold ; BoO iry Eutre Itios Secouds, '^j iu., at 
lOHic., g-io; 77u Diy Currient. a t.tuoads, z2lb.,at 
l./C. gold; 455 Dry ^^uta ro ceeoiids, -4 lb., at lOc, 
cold, all 4 mon.lis, as llivy run; 2.3. u ur.v Corneu.ea 
Kii.s. li Iti.. i, 1 00 Dry Can'oiula, Sd Id.', all ou piivate 
terms; 2,045 Dry liuuota, 21 to 22 ID., at lOc.Vd 
lO'-jC, go d, 2 t ;/ 4 luuuths, seiccted; J,9lo Dry Ceutrul 
Auier.c.iU, 20 to., jait ,.t idc gol.., tjo uays, sel ced ; 
5i,o Ury aud Vv et sailed i'apiu, 2,j to 4010,, .L,4^i> Dry 
Weslem. 22ii>tt)., l,_Ou ury salted Texas, 34 lb .99Ui^r'y 
I'ex-s liips, Lo 11), 405 *\ et-oa.tcd ttio liraudj Cow, 
Ol 111., VI cl-aaliea r.ira, 4ulb., 8uu Couutr.y blaugbter, 
b71C., aud 1.300 City Slau>;iicer, 70 lb., 
ou pr vato terms; 'J16 bales Calcutta biif- 
lulo, '20 10 35 E)., at Sc. tiJc, awl', 00 Uajs; aud 

to-day 2,388 (Neutral A.ociicaa, ou private tc.ms 

Stock in hist k.uds lo-nay, 138,UUJ liides aud 072 
Oi.lea 110 , ai;aiuHt lJio,ouu utdea aud '^,-27-2 do. same 

tiiua last year Tbe stock now ueve ineiudes 17.-iOJ 

Diy Uuenos .lyres, ii.ro Kius, Jtc, '^a-OOO ury Aloute- 
viuco, l.uou Dry Uio Uraude, o,luo ury Orinoco, 3 bOO 
tr. Caifoinia 2.i,(.uo Dry Ceuiral -Amerieau, Ecuador, 
iij. 2o,10o Dry lio^ot.! bavuuiilu, icu., i,7uO ury T.im- 
pico, t;,.'O0 Dry Jlexicau. d2,0u<J ury 1 exaa, VVeateru 
and 8outderu, 2,0u'J Diy-saited Africa, 37 bales Cal- 
cutta Cow, a.id 6.^5 bales i.aicuita dutiaio. 

ilOLi^a£>Et> — v\ i liuut turtbasr luuvement of impor- 
taiiCer values esseutiully as last guoied. 

NAVAL bl'oUES— Uesiu less uciivc uud lather easier 
iu piice ; qduLcd uu the basis ul $1 95aSi2 o5 lur com- 
luou to Ko.^u olraiueu n^ zSj ID. aaiCa, 7oO bbls. I»u. 1 

uiiar^alc at i:i oOceiyt <* 260 ttJ laraud Fitch aa 

last uuuted opli'its 1 urpt- utiue in moderate aemaud, 

With aiercauiuule, lur prom,ji d^dvcry, quoted at the 
cioae up 10 3o^4e. "•au'.jc. •^ galiouj sales since our 
last, i-'^ti ools. 

oiL-Ciiic — lias been uioro souifht after, with West- 
eru.ia oa.:s, quoted at $o9u.i>ija 50, currency. ...nx- 
poits lor lue week, 3,083 p»s. 

f uTiiOuuL u — ^luae has oecn more active, but nn- 
setCKU lu uree; quoted at tuo ciooo, for early deliv- 
ery he.e, at 140.0/14141-., lu baiK. S.iUs of 9,0t^0 uuls., 

in ulpp.og Older, rei.oried at about Itji2t'a'i0-'4C . 

Uellucu haS bueu iu request ; q;^oied at the close at 

•2{ju licbued. lu caseo. ouoted at the close at 30c. c* 

oic. for .-.iauoard -Naphtha at 14'c At Pliiladel- 

pUia. UehuPd Peiiojcum, lor ean.y delivery, uuoted ut 
-0C....A1 Daiiimorv, for early delivery, at a^c. 

I'ltoViol. '.>S — jieos I'srii has beeu in moderate de- 
msud. upeuiug moti' ti.m.y, b.il ciosiug weaker, lur 

lariy oehveij Sales' r. potted iluce our last, f r 

luri.y delivery, dOo^bois. v\ esteru .uess, tor sbipiueui, 

p.^1 L at ,~> 1 O I'O piUer UluUsquiet; lOU bole, piiiuo 

i>iess, OI fanc.y uraiid. smd ut 4>,iU /o .Mid lur ti>r- 

Waid de ivery, vvtSK^n ylcss dull, qiioteu ior October, 
$.0 65. aud .-elier ntaaiudei' of tue year ai $ij OO'if 

jislo 7t> .^aies'^ l;.»o iioia., octoaer option, 

at ;pl6 Oo. ...Iiiessed lloffs iu ^ood request, WHO i ity 

quoied up tu ac.<^9e . ut-uie.its iu i.iii' demand ait 

buuui pieviOas qudl tlous SuL-s included 25 uxa, 

l.cUKS. 13 »., at liLC; lu.OOO tt. Hcilod BelUeS, 13 
Us., at XO'>«u., aud du...ucy lots of Utv buLt wuiua our 



^erlouB ning0....Of Bacon, lalei were made for 
Western delivery of 15o bxs. Long Clear, at Chicwro. 
next week'9 delivery, at 8»<o. Market qaoted steady, 
but quiet.. ..Western btesm Lard bus been lost 
active lor early delivery, closing heavily..,. 
Ot Western Steam, for tiarly dellver.v here, sales re- 
ported uf 350 tcj, prime at $10 6oa)i6lO 70, closing at 

ItlO 60; and 57 tcs. ofl-grade at $10 26 And for 

forward delivery. Western Steam quoted at the close 
much lower, with Octooer at $10 67'2'<?$lt) 60: t»'o- 
veinber at $9 92 i^a^g 95 ; December at $9 76, asked ; 
January at .•tf9 75 ; Febru.ry at it-9 80, aud seller tho 

remainder of tl>e year at $9 75, asked bales have 

been lepurted ot Western iSteam to the 

iimuunt Of 2,750 tcs., Novetnber. at $10®. 
$10 07I2; 250 tcs. December, at $9 80; 1,500 
tc.-,., January, at $0 80^*9 92 in, an 1 2,000 tcs., seller 

the leniiiiuiler ot the vear, at $9 77'a3$9 9u Cbl- 

ciixo advices unfavorable City Steam aud Kettle 

quiet, and quoted at $1(1 50; salei. 00 ics....And No. 

Iat*ioa$i0 I2I2; tales, ou tcs Ketined Lard has 

been in lair lequi at ; quoted for tbe CiMitiuent, on the 
spot, at$tl 12'-^; November at SlO 62 »2; January at 

!plo 26. and for the West ludies at $10 25 ales of 

1,3.")U tcs. fd, the Contiuent, November optious, part 

at tiiequolpd rate ; 250 tea., lor December, on private 
terms, uud iibO K-s. lor the West ludies also ou pii- 
vate terms Beef quoted as in our last; 

sales, 6> bbls. ...Beef Hams quiet at $2i'a 
$22 for prime to choice Wesieru: sales, 25 bbls ... 
t;iioieo to ftuey lotsot llutter meet wit 1 u miderately 
active inquiry, but tbe extreme ra tea claimed opei ace 
asiilui^t free dealings. .Uediuoi and low crudes are in 

less rtq.est, a.iu imcessbowconoiderablelrregulariir, 
ou ace mula.iug supplies We quote State fair to 

f.iney pails, at •Zac.w.^Hi:. (with lii^ilier di^uros quoted 
lo ver.v fane.v lots in exceptional i.istauces; ) do., tubs, 
f.iir tu strict.y lajcy, at 2. c.'a/36c.; do., Welsh tubs, 
23c. ^aoc; d.i., m kins and liali-hrklns, f^ir to strictly 
t.iliiy, 2Jc Sa.ic.; iVestern^ails. lair to fancy, at v^ac. 
vi.-jje.; do., tuba, cuiuiijun to sti-ietlv ehoiee, 17c. * 
1,7c.; do., f li to rtrletly prime ifeilnw, iu flr- 

kiiis. 10e.®z4c — The liuest uialtes of Cnecse are 
iu most ittvur with buyers, particumrly for shipment; 
Bt lull rates. Aloat other kinds are rather moderately 

suu,ibt (liter and quuLid wi ak and unsettled We 

quote Slate i-'aetory at Irom llcfel rt'-jc. for tine to 
btricliy fiiiiov, the lalti r uu extiewe; 9c.a'llc, for lair 
to hue. a.,d at oc 'izJac. for skimmed; aud Western 
iacior.y at 9c.®12e. tor fair to strictly linc.y ; btate 

d.iir.s-maoe, ijir to dbbice, 7c.@lli'jc bgi;8 have 

beeu lu lair request, apd desirable lots have been gen- 
erally held with tirhmess We quote fresh Eggs' 

withiu the range of 2--'c. <i-.i7c. tor ordiuary to strictly 
laiiey. i he main dealings have been lu louod lots of 

Kood to strictly choice at trom 24 "..iC. a'26c 

laliow has been in leSs demand at about former prices ;, 
salee, llo.oOu tS. veryi good to prime at 8^iC.u8 13-16c 

dieunue Ooutiuues in fair demand, witu prime 

Wesieru lu tcs., quutedut $12 ; sales, 100 tcs Tue 

wei-k's exports to Europe have been l,2o7 pks. Pork, 
1,305 tcs, xieet, lu,5o7 ois. Racou, 8,o95 p*s. Lard. 
ao.fioa bxs. Cheese, 9,78 J pks. Butter, (uf whicb were 
2,271' piis. to Liverpool, 1 20O pks. to Loi.doa, 3.000 
pka. tu tiiivsirow. 1, 200 pks. to Bristol, 1,616 pks. to 
Autwerp, aud 493 pks. to Uamburg;) also, X,09j pka. 
Tallow. 

biil.v; — Deer have 1 een In fair demand, but at droop- 
in.;; p iie.-.; receipts. Si>i> Oales; sale--, ;i7,OOU lis. Para, 

uud 9,iioU to. ceutrul Amei lean, on p.ivaie t.-rms 

Coat has been rather luoie sought after at ub ut 
former quitaJuns; receipts. i78 ua^es; sales, 
4u uaiea Curacua; 16u uales Mexican, aud 50 

bales Payta, onj private terms We quote 

leer tliuj; Vera truz, 3..C.; Gaateiuaia, 
3uc.; Para, a2'2C.; olsal, 3t/C.; Puero Cabeilu, 27c.; 
Honduras. 30e,; Ceutral Amer.cau, '2iic.'a>'S'2^^c. ^ tb. 
...Auu i.o-xt thus : iauipieo. 4'Zi-tc.a<4oc,; .d,atumoro8, 
i2''2i:.'a-lbc.; Vera Cruz, 40c.'2Z'45c., gulu : Uuenos 
Avres, ,)0c.; I'a.vta, 47c.: Curacoa, selected, 60C.; cape, 
32c.; .Madras. 50c.; f atua, 3 , c. a'35c. 

BUAf — A fair jobuiug trade has been reported at 

stead/prices Castile quoted bt S''aC-®8''8C., gold; 

Cob: .te's Pamilv. 8c., carieucy, and Sterliui: aud other 
braud.s at pruportiuaate tigures, less usual discount. 

t:cGAU— .-{aw ha le been very dull at S^4C '4i)9c for 
fair tu ijuod Cuba Ueuned continue in moderate de- 
mand, with Powdired and Granulatedquoiedat lU'aC., 
uu<l otlu r icinub aa Oefore. 

WiliHKA— 8oldtotiieeirtcntof60bbUi. at $1 I3»a, 
aud lou bols. at $1 13, closiug at $1 13 ^ gallon. 

K.tEIGll ^ — A good demand was reported for Grain 
room ou bertb and charter. espi"cially lu the charter- 
in,' liue, at generally hrm i^tes. M,arket otherwise 
without impoitaut Change. ...For Liverpool the eu- 
gagemenis reported since our last nave been, 
by sail, 2.U00 bushels feas at Ti^d. ^ 
bushel, aud, by steam, 16,000 bnshels Grain. 1 relet 
room,) at 7^2d., quoted iu the leguiar way at 8d. 
asliea; 1,500 bbls. Apples, (of reteut shipmenl,) at 
fulliaies. And by steam, tiom Phiiadelpnia, (in ad- 
ditiou to the engaeements already reported by us,) 3uO 
tons Provisious at o2s. U8.^35s.: 30o pks. Tallow, at 
40s.; '/uo pks. Leather at 758. ^ ton; 
and 100 buds. Tobacco at 368.'3A6s. Also, 
a new American snl», 2, 187 teas, with Cotton, from 
fort Eoyal, at 4b. ^ ton, regisior; two barks, with 
Cottou, irom 1 barles^on, reported at 'ad. ■i^ tb., (with 
option of Uavre;) an lAiBerican abip, 1,350 tons. With 
do., from Norielk, at about 37s. 6d. ^ 

tun, register Frum Lundou, by steam, 350 

P1.8. 'Iooacco and 2,7O0 pKS. Provisions, 

(of recent sbipmeat,) at current tlgtires tor 

Glasgow, by steam,: 1.500 bbis. Fiuur, on private 
terms; 10 tous -Tullbw at 32B. 6d., aud, (of recent 
bhipiuent,) 3,5uO puc Provisions ut luarltet rates; 
alsu a tiritish uark, 434 tons, hence, with flour, at 2s. 
6(1. <i^ bbi....l'or Whitehavea, a British brig, 380 
touB, bence, with aoout 2,u00 quarters Ui-aln at 

Os. ^ quarter For Soathaaiptuu, a Norwegian 

bark, 44a lous, hence, with Slate, reported 

at 26a. 3d. ^ tou For Cork aud orders, 

au Italian bark, 685 tons, hence, with about 
4,70o quarters Grain, at Os. Sd.; another, 487 t.O>s, 
heuce. with sbiiut ;$,4oO quarters do., at da. lO^sd.; an 
Ameiic.in uark, 563 tons, (toaiTive,) with about 3,800 
qu.irters do., tiomiialcmore, at 6s. 611.; a Norwegian 
bark. 433 tuus, (to arrive,) with about 3,00o qi.arteni 
du., frum do., at 6s. 6<L; nn Austrian bark. 4u3 tous, 
with ab .ut 3,200 quarters do., from Phitaileiphu, at 
Os. biL; another, 705 tons, with about 
4,700 quarters do., from do., at Us, 3d. #* quar- 
ter; ana Lriiisb bark. 046 tons, hence, with aeals, 
'a 90s, at which latter rate vessels have beeu in mod- 

eiate request lor this iuterest For tue Uuited l^iug- 

duin, direct, a Noiwegiau br.g, 299 tons, beuce, with 

Uesia. reported ait 3s. 6<l. #'280tS For Dublin or 

lieifast, a british bark, 671 tous. with about 4,200 
Quariera Grain, from Philadeipuia, at 5s. lO'^d.; 

iinuiber 1,069 tons, aud another, HH) 
tous, i^o with Grain from do., re- 
ported at 6s. ner quarter For llavre uy 

ste.im, (of recent shipmouts,) l,i60 bales Cotton, 
2,o50 pliB, Lard and Dacou, 660 pits. Hideo, tiS cKs. 
Vvh.ile-oili aud loo pks. MercbaniUse, at market ratcSb 

Fur Antwerp, by steam, >60 uaies Hops 00 private 

teruis ; aiBu a i>ritisb bark, 346 tons, witb about 2,400 
bsis. iiehned Petroleum, from Pbiiadeipbla. reported 
at 48. 9d. per bbi....Kor tue Continent, (excluding 
Dutch ports,) a German ship, with about 8,OuO 
bbls. Kellued Peiroieum, uom Baltimore, at 4s. 
i'-id. 1^ obi., aud a German - ship, 7a4 

tous, with Tubacco. from do., at 208. 6d Fur Botter- 

daui, a German suip. 1,120 tous, and a German l^ark, 
6,^0 tuus witu Tubacco, Irom liiltimore, reported at 

-278. bd For .Amsterdam, a Qermao <hip, o77 tons. 

With Tobacco, from uaitimare, reported at 27s. 6d 

Fur Giuraitar, by sail, X60 hhda. iooacco at 40s.; bW 
Cases da at 14ii. ^ cubic toot, aud 200 Oasea 
Florida Water at proportionate rates; also, 
an American bri;;, 352 tous, placed on tbe 

berth hence, for general cargo Fur Gtunltar and 

orders, au Italian bark, 401 tuus, hence, with about 
1.5UU bbla. and 5,0.)0 cases Petroleum at 4s. loial. ^ 
bol. and 25c. ^ ease, and an Amencaa brig, 293 tons, 
with about 2,000 ubls. Rehned Petroleum, la bbls. and 
cases, from Philadelphia, reported at 6b. tid. 

aud 3os For Mali.a. an American schooner, 

i3S tons, with Luasber, tiom St. Mary's, 
reported ut $12 60 For Matausas, an Ameri- 
can schooner. 232 tons, with Hoops, from Rich- 

moad, repoiteJ at $10 For tbe uiver Platte, aa 

American bark, 474 tons, with Lumber, tram Portland, 

reported at .'tlu For ilio Janeiro, a t^rman bark, 

239 tons, with FJour trom Uickmond. at 87>ac. if 
bbl., kud a British brig, with Lumber, Crom Cedar 

Keys, at $22 For Demerara, and back, au American 

brig, 442 tons, w>tb Keueral cargo, reported 

at iii32 60 For ^spinwall, au American schooner, 

479 tous, witb Coal, iTom Georgetown, at $4 ^ ton 

lor Uiilifax, a brig and schuOKer,. with Coal, from 

Philadelphia, at i£l 75 ^ ton For Forto Uico, aa 

American schooner, with Lumber, fTom Bangor, at 

$7 50 For Demerara, an American schoon-r, 313 

tons, with Lumber, from Whmiugtun, at $11, goid. 

For bC. Pierre, an Amerieau schooner, 19J tuus, 

hei.ce, with geurral cargo, on private terms.. ..For 
bun tiomiuKO, an Amepcaa brig, 207 tons, henoe, with 

geuerai caig , reported at $X,o60 For NewTork, a 

schooner, with Salt, from Turk's Island, reporiea at 
lue. ^ oushel, and a suhoouer, with Lumber, from 
Cedar Keys, at $9. 



=S| 



XRJS &TATJ£ UF TRADE. 

Buffalo, Sept. 30.— Lake Receipts— Flour, SWO 
bbls.; corn, 92,480 btisbels; Wheat, 61,726 bushels; 
o»ts, 7.0UU bushels. Raiiroad Receipts — Flour, 2.900 
bbls.; Corp. l4,auU bushels : Wheat, 18,400 bushels ; 
Oats. 10,900 bashels; Uarle.y, 4oU bushels; Bye, SoO 
bushels. Canal Shipments— lo tidewater. Com. 298 
busbels; Whea!, 7u,a79 bushels ; to iuterior points, 
noihin^ Railroad Sblpmeuts — Floar, 2,u50 bbls.; 
Coru, 34.000 oush. Is ; Wheat, 39,000 bushels ; Oats, 
10,000 buahels ; Barley, 400 bushels; Rye, 800 bush- 
els. Hour, demand go.id; prices steady ; sales, l,3oO 
bills, at aucii..niced prices. Wheat uall ; sales 400 
bushels No 1 liurd Milwaukee at $1 3i ; 10,000 
buaheis Milwaukee Spring, and 9,0Ut> bush- 
els No. S Milwaukee an priyate terms. 
Iu the absence of - km)e» we q.ote 
No. 1 Milwaukee at $1 2U ; No. 2 do., at $1 16: stock 
(lfuria;r- Uf^ht. Com dull but firmer ; sales, 6, 6bU No. 
2 m.xed vyestern, iu lots, at 6mc.'®u2c.; 6,U00 do. at 
&'.;c.; held firm at the clise at 62c Oats dud; quoted 
at36ca'40c; netuiug duini(; stock on sa.e fair, itye— 
Nsthiug doing, liarley duil ; sales, oue car four-rowrd 
State, ou the track, at 85c. Mait is iu fair tfad» de- 
maud; prices uocli^H^ed. Seeds quiet, little doiug; 
prices ^tr^Juger ; quoted: Timothy, $2'3$_' 15. tmver 
nei^lccted. roic and Lard — Ueuand fair; prices uu- 
ciiauged ; holdius for a shade advance ; light cuts of 
For., anil small paettages of Laid in best demaud. 
Ui.'hwiuas— Trade firm; sales, 2uO bbls. at Si 11 
'2z$l 12; quality ruling prioea. Canal treighis on* 
obuu;;ed; held arm. 

s-T. Louis, Sept. 30 — Flour steady and firm for 
aouud medium Extras at $4 &0'345 60. Wheat lu- 
aitive; No. 2 ReO Fall, $1 18; >o. 3 do., $1 Oti't. 
c/sh; $1 12 November. Cum— -N'o. 2 Mixed, 40<^.i* 
41c., cash; 41'.^. bid, October. Oais active and drm; 
Nu. % 3i' i<2e. a>38c., cash; 8dc, October; 34c, the 
year. Rye quiet und unchanged. Barley steady and 
uuehaugeX Pork dull aud unchanged. Lard Inac- 
tive; luisa asited; lO'^c bul. Rula-meats dull and 
uomiaal. iiticon firmer for Clear Kib ^id,es ; sales at 
T'ii^.'SiT^c. 9i9C'a9»4C. aBd lOC^lOi^o. for bhonl- 
dcrs. i.lear Rib, uad Clear Sides. Live Bogs steady 
aud uncbauged. Cattle steady for belter grades ; i\vli 
fur others; 1 rimii to choice Steers. $4 75®$d 25; 
g od. $-• 4o@»4 tiO; Pony do., $3 50'a)«4 ; Cows and 
Uetiers, !jp2'a>iit 10 ; Rood to choice through Tuxans, 
$1^ 9u'a>$3 50, common to fair do.. $2 25a'$3 76. 
Receipts— 3 4o0 boLi. Flour, 47.000 bnsheis Wheat, 
30,uui) busbels Corn, 17.000 bushels Uacs, 1,000 
busbels Rye, lo.UuO boabela Barley, X.'iiUU head Bogs. 
400 head Cattle. 

Chicago, Sept 30.— Flour steady, nnekanged. 
Wheat unsettled; No. 2 Sprlns.Sl X0I4, cash ; $1 10>a, 
Septciuoe.; $1 06I4, October; Si U6^8®.»1 07, No- 
vembii.'; No. 3 do., 920. Cotn quiet, bat Arm, at 
40^c.'a)46'9C, cash ; 44'ao., October; 44^■c., Novem- 
ber. Oats easier, at 3319C., cash and October. Kye 
ii.m, unchaniied. 1 arley unsettled, at 85o., oasb. 
I'ura uusetiled, at $16 40 cash ; $16 20, October ; 
$14 90, the year. Lurd uncbauged, Bulk-mea.s firm* 
er. nt 7c.. aisc, and 9'<(0. lor Sboulderi, Clear Rio, and 
Clear bides. W hlsky, $1 Otf. Receipt*— 7.01)0 bbls. 
Flour, 74;000 bushels Wheat, 502,500 bushels Com, 
84.01H) busbels Oats, 11.000 bushels Rye. 47,0<i0 
baahelB Uarle.y. shipments— 5,OoO bbia. Fluar, 65,000 
busbels AV'beat, 269,000 bushels Corn, 33,0o0 btubels 
Oats, o3,0uo bushels Rye, 15,000 bushels Barley. 

ClNCnKNATl, Sopt. 30. — Floar hrm; demand fair. 
Wheat hrm; Red, $1 Ob'^iL 16. Cum firmer, uu- 
changed. Oats dull, uncbauged. Kye qniet, bat firm 
at uac.'<^7tic Barley stroux at $1 {)ou)il lu. Fork 
firm at $16 60. Lard, fair demand at lO^c.^lOi^e. 
forbioam; lie. c{<lli.jc. for Kettle. Balk-muals hrm ; 
fair demand at 7c'^SSsC.'38'>4C.®9c fur Shoulders, 
Clear aiu. and Clear biaes. Baouu quiet, oncbanged. 
V/hisky active at itil 09. Butter easier, but uo- 
chaaged. Live Hogs quiet; cnuimon Light, $5 259 
f^o 75 : fair to 20nd do., $6 SCSiiiO M ; ileavr. $5 90 
'S.^u 20; receipts, 1,143 xiead; shipmeuts, oio head. 

IiOUiSYiLLK. Sepi^ 30 — Flour quiet, unchanged. 
Wheat quiat, bat steady; tied, $1 06; Amber, $1 08 
'ii'$l 1.; White, $1 U6dsil 16. ( orn dttU. uossttled ; 
wbUA. ASLau MUad. Ai9, Bye %ai«t, but tUm.»t <Ma.^ 



Oata a™, naehaagad.! Pork actlre .at fl6 5a BaIhA 
Tneiiteqnlet,butftn»H»* 7e., fiiao.. wid 9c S»eaa 
quiet, weak at 7S4C.. fl^tc and 10>*c. 8iu»r-c«z«« 
llanis firm, unchanged. Lard quiet, WMkt Ttore»„ 
12c.; Keg. 12'9C Whisky fira> at $1 Oi. tagilaj^ 
Fair demand at lia4c®12c. .'' — - 

Oswego, .. Sept. - 30.— Flour t anshavMd i ' aalaa. 

ri-h'it "i^ .^Y^H'K'^'^S^-^ »»'«• of »»• 2 MUwa«S 
Clmb at $1 24; Amber Micbii^n. $127; Extra Wbtta 

kZ' ^il^ .'* *^ 30. Com steady ; wistern MtxML 
A* ^?^}5/ ''^**' •»'''•• 10,000 bushels Mo. 2 CanZ 
;*,ft*lf\ Corn-meal- Bolted, $26 ; Unbolted. $26. 
llill-feed-bhorts, itl4a$15, ShTpstiffs, $157 ESI 
dlinffs $20. Canal Freights-Wheat. 5(1^ Com aad 
Kye, 4 lac.; Barley, 4I4C. to New- York ; Bariev, XSse. t« 
Albany; do. 7 "40. to Philadelphia j" Lumber, «? M 
Hudson, $2 bO to Netv-iork. Lake ^ceipt»-l:».80Cr 
bushels Wheat, 7.700 bushels Rye, l8,oOO b^M* 
F.w' . y- V ^'^"J*' ':l'lpnient8-3,000 busbals Wheat, 4&m 
S l^e^'fe^c'^"^'*''-^'^ *^* ^'^'^» ahipp;dS 
Toledo, Sept. 30.— Flonr steady. Whaat dull'i 

WM? *'M^'-t^*'«S^,*^ 23; No. 3do..$l 16, ffi 
White Michigan, $1 10; Kxtra do., $X 19; AmMS 

Ml«?hl«an spot, $1 10 s* ; October. SI 17: NovemMr. 
«1 19; No. 1 Red Fall. $1 '23^; Ho. 2 dc spot i^ 



7, . " ' — i., T^, *""- *'• .'■'-a; »o- .i ao.. spc 

; llOb 



48^cj October, 48146.; Low do., 47c Oats daU; no. 

2 ottered at 33c.; White, 39c; Miclil«an. S&o.- K(jM* 
ed.27i3C. Recelots—ooO bbls. Flour, 49.0U0 baa'hela 
>VTie:it, 66.0i)0 Dnshe'a Corn, 19,oiK» bnnhels Osta. 
hhipments— 2.000 bbla. Flonr, 43,000 bostaela IThaiZ 
6,000 bushels Corn. 6,000 bushels Oata. ^^ 



^...T, ..^...n.,.^^ k.,,^^,.. .w. — .c n,ii.r uaier I unci 
Wheat firm; Na 1 Milwaukee, $1 12«3- No 
fl 08: October, $1 0734- November. $1 OS>n: Hat 
do.. 9(Jc.a$X 0013, Corn dull; Na 2, i4e.945a. Oata 
—Demand good; So. 2. 33c Rye dull; Wo. X, «li«. 
Barley steanier; No. 2 Sprin-?, StTc, cash and Oetoi>«rt 
No. 3 do.. 53c. Freights nominallv uucbaaeed. Ot'' 

ceipts- 7,500 bbls. Flour; b3,000 bushels WhmHf 
Hhlpmcnts— 4,000 bbls. Floor : 750 biuheU Wheat. 

Chicago, Sept. 30.— Cattle — Koeeipts, 600 bendi 
snipmeuts, 3,.50d head; dull anl weak; etoek Stens 
and ( ows, $3®$3 25 ; fair to good do., $4V#4 46 • ex-' 
traprime, $5 40. Hogs— Keceipts, 8,000 beadi alilp* 
menu. 6,2iiO bead; steady and firm; heavy. %$ 769 
$0 15; li)itat shipping aud packing, $6 95iiM ly%tl 
extra smooth. $6 202>$6 30. iiheep qsist aaA mi* 
changed ; receipt*, 100 Dead. 

New-Oeleasb, Sept. 30.— Flour stronz»r: Somc 
$3 60'a!$3 75; Treble Extra, St 753'$6 80: dbSS" 
Family, 44 75(*$7 60. Cora firm; White, 68e.95»«, 
Pork stronger; Mess, $17 7o®$18. Woiakr auJ? 
Louisiana and Western Rectified. «1 18 : otMrs bb- 
changed. Gold, llo»8. Exchaajre— Sew-Iark HtU, 
's®"^ oremium: Sterlia?, bank, W SI"* 

Albany, Sept. 30.— Na aales of Wheat reporttd., 
Rye, 80c.@a2c street lots ; car let* of W««teni WM) 
at 75c Oats scarce, demand alow. Cora very a«tiv«j 
for car lots ; sale' or 17 cars no grade and Ma 3 Htgfc) 
Mixed Western at 66^. Ior tormer and 67a lor tattaikl 
ail spot. Barley nominal. Mait steady. 

WoMtSG-ros. Sept 30.— Spiriu Tarp«ntht« asM 
at32i2c heain steadj- at $1 65 tot fittalBad. XM 
BteaaTat$14a ^ 



THE COTTON MARKETS. 

Savaknah. Sept. 30.— Cott«» qniet » ICddHaft 
10 %c.; Good Ordinary. 9c; Low kladUnx, lOc: aS 
receipts, 2,391 bales; ^ross, 2,492 twlea; expart^ 
coastwise, 1,698 bales; sales, 11,1M halMi UmS, 
30,3 J 1 bates. 

New-Ohlkaxb. Sept 30.— Cotton qulat: lOddMas.' 
lOSgC; Low Middling, loiec: Good Ordbtary. 0%M 
net rsceipts, 3.275 bales; ^rosa. 3.610 balea; frimTSLl 
to France, 3,437 bales ; sale*, %OoO balMi stock, M^ 
Oo9 bales. 

t 

Bos'TOV. Sept. SO Cotton qmiet and aMT i laid* 

dlin^, 11>4C; Low Middling, lie; OMd OMlMfyj 
IOI4C; net receipt*, 102 bales ; gross, 1.162 kaiaa 1 a? 
ports to Great Biitam, 627 bales; stock, 1.640 *»im, 

MOBILB. Sept 30 Cotton irresolar: Middliac< 

10c; Low Middling. i^c.'Si^^ae.; Qoud Oidinarr, SWej 
net receipts, 1,583 bales; exports, coastwiaa, MC 
bales; snies, 500 bales; stock, 10,679 bales. 

Galyestok, Sept. 30.— Cottoi dull aad trrenteJ 

Midtiliog, lO^ac; Low Middline, 9^c: Good OroinsM^ 
918C; net receicU. 917 bkles; Kross. l.OAU kafaas 
aaies, 420 bales ; stock, ;^,043 bales. ' ^ 

Chablestoh, Sept 30.— Cotton lawer { mddliaaj 
103gc^l0i2C; Good Ordinary, Q^^cS^i^t.. ae* i« 
ceipis, 2,326 Dales; sales, X.OOO bales; atoek, M.SM 
bales. 

Norfolk, ' S«pt. - 30— Cotton dvll i lOddllaa 

10»2C®10V!-: net receipts, 2.698 balas; ex i -'- 
eoastwiae, 1,283 bales ; bales, 142 balM i aMaM 
bales. 



BOSTON WOOL MARKET, v <r : 
BOBTOK, Sept 30 The demand for Wool laaWL 

been very argent or pressing donas the paat va^ 
and has been exolmsi veiy uom manofactareia. Um 
marxet Is steady aud firm. The aaiea af OhiaaM 
Penusylrama Fleece have >>eea 223.0O0 ft., waA M 
cluoes X and No. 1 at 37c342 igc.; XX at 42>sB. *4B*A 
mostly at the latter tate, and ZXZ at 47«} 
The market was quite firm at tbeae Prtaeaj 
The sales of Michigaa have beeu 1SS.MM 
lb. at S5c®38c, some choice lots of Na 1 aad « 
selling at 3 ; c SaSc; bat sales were diffl colt ta bmM 
at over 35c®36c for good average lots. Tb« saJea al 
Wisconsin have been at a5e.'»36a.,andtheanzica4 
quite firm. CoiHbing and Delaine have been iM a e fav 
aemaud, bat there is no chance in ttie pilee. Pealw 
ai)le lots are held quite firm. The aales haTs raocM 
from S9cSi47c for Delaiue, as to qoalitv. and 46*. J 
hoc for Combing. These pricee are readliy '■*«*^-<"«' 
for aU lets offering. California eoatianas 1i 
very fair demand, and sanpUes <tf ^^9'^ 
are sold up close. The new Fall does not a>e«t vnk ai 
ready a sale, as bnyera are limited. Traasaetiona M 
elude a36,UOO lb. Spring at l--c3i2e.. sonw good awl 
choice lots selline at from 2Sc332c., and 150,000 T 
Fall at i7c<£26c., as to quality. Palled Wools hv 
been rather more inqairatl for, aud are si 
firm. The sales have oeen 182,000 lb. at 27>9C. 
for Super and X. mostly trom 3.>a'8Siia, but 
choioe Ibts of Super and X at 4oc. 

f 

THE ARMENIANS AND XKE 



■TUEKOL 



THX SSCBKT'UAKDATK Or^THX 'IX>tl> Tti 
TKIAROH — AJS XXTRAORDUTAKT ^»*»<»^ 
ACCOnXTEO FOB— 60MK ACOOUnf Pi 
THB ABMBKIAX CHURCH. . 

The extraordinary aiaadato of*"tk«^L«r^ 
Patriareh af tbe Armeniana " at Coastaatiaopl^i . 
whieh waa pnbUshad In Tas Tnoa U>e other d^jj 
miut bave pozxled maay pruoiu who az* Md 
familiar with the pacnliar oonatitatiaB of tko •» 
callaa Ajrmeniaa Charoh, its Ghrlatiaa «toot«1»—, 
and history, aa related by the Garmaa hiatada^ 
Keander, and otbara. That a ChriatiaB Patriuofe/ 
■hoold, in tha name af ** the sapraate ehiaf of tM. 
faltb of our Lord Jesus Chiist," call npa* Ckiiaf 
tiaos to aid Mofaamaedans in their barbarons van 
fare against Christian communities does eartaialjl 
aaemsiranga. Aad yet whea tha eharaator aftfef 
Constantlnopla branoh of tha Armeaiaa Charak 
IS stadied, and Ita paat history and rape ata d aa*) 
flicta with the "Orthodox." Bomiah. and eraa^ 
Charchea is remeiabered, tha action of Pattiaral^ 
Naraea if ill sot apoaar ao anaaaalona. Xhffdac 
trUal belief of the Anaaaiau sar ^ kit<4f 
aummed up in a few aentencas, althooch thateij 
bare bean and are aectional branehaa of tkf 
Charoh which hold . peculiar . aeetrines aa^ 
reject aome of the orthodox teaeta< Ihey^ 
behere in the j mltj ef Chriat as vm^ 
body and' nature, % aad embraciBK tka Hidj^,. 
Ghoat and God.' They praatioe ^^i*^ 
baptiam, aad admit, after prefession af tai.vf*mt^ 
conrarsien from Jndaiam, adults to baptiaai. ^^*T. 
beUera in transiibscantiatioa, bmt, atrange to aaTf 
rejaot purgatory, and praT for tbe aonU of tha J eai i . 

Theae three doetnnes are at least Intelhfible wkea 
profeaaad by a Somaa CathoUo. The doetrlmal ha 
Uef of the Axmealans is at least lUogioaL Xhar ba 
lieye in the eyerlaating virginity of Mary, worahip 
aainta and ahrlnes, make confession to the prised 
neceaaaiy to aalvatlon. and anfoin mortiflcatloa, 
The traffic ia ladoige&oes is unknown la the Choreh^ 
acd, taken, aa a whole, the prisata are learned, lih^ 
eral-rainded. and enhghteaed. Without entarla^ 
mpon a sketch of the hlaiory of thla peculiar Chn*< 
tian oommuotty, the antiquity of which Is ondoabW 
ed, we may refer to the peooliar constltation of th«( 
•ranch of the Charoh which ia eatabUahed at Cosi 
atantiaople, for in thia we find a solntion ef the ap^ 
parently anomaloos coadaot of the Patriareh. 

The Patriareh of Constantinepla has probably 
ander hia care about two milliona of people dad tt 
la important to bear In mind that the ArmaBiaaa 
are an exceptionally industrious and enlightened 
class of Asiatics, fie is not only the spiritaal head 
of his Immense dioceae, whicb, witb the czoeptloa 
of Jerusalem and Sis, embraces the whole «f Tor. 
key. but the civil head as welL He is a aort ol 
temporal and apiiiiu&l Pop<>, aad eraa aa a Cbriatia^ 
Bishop paying homage to the " Intalllblo" Pope aa 
Borne, tie ia. therefore, a person of great lafla< 
enoo, and at a critical period like the prea^t hit 
iafiuenoe among hia people mnst be of vast iotpet* 
tauce to the Porte. He holds tbe rank ofihPaaDa^ 
aad is eleet»d by tbe united vote dftbe eoolealaa- 
tical heads and tha seoalar '*noUblas" of the 
Charah. Since 183» or 1840 tbe high ofllcUis uf the 
Porte and Great Pasbaa baye practically elected 
thia Patriarch. Tha Chnreh proper haa haa a aaera 
nominal voiee in tha choice, and thia may aeeoaat 
for the seemiag onohristian mandate *it the patd' 
archal " stool pigeon" of ih* Saltan. 



BOHTOH JDl TIDES DS. 
The - October dlndenda payable in Beaton 
aggregate 11,658,000 trom Donda, aod 13,515,973 troai 
other Boureea. The report aayai "Tha paat ala 
months, ao faraa net profits are concerned, haa beaa 
one of the hardeat periods our banks hare experts 
enoed for very many years, bat the faUinc eff fa 
dividends at this time is not large, tMoanae of pra< 
Tiooa beavy raductiona. Four banks, tbe Ceatral, 
Commonwealth, First Ward and Webster, whioh 
pa.saed in April, have now resumed. Four others, 
the Tremont, Metropolitan. Eleventh Ward aad 
Broadway, now pass, the latter for the aeeone 
time. Two new banks oommeoce divideada, th^ 
Fourth National, (new July 19, 1875,) 9>3 per oaot, 
nod tbe Merobandise. (new Nov. a 1875.) 3 per oenti 
The other changes are all redacUuns. Ths Boetom 
National 4 to 3 per oent; Continental, 3 to 8 1 fiagl^ 
3toS; Kliot,3toa; Hide and Leather, 3 te «»#:' 
Mecbanioa, 5 to 4; Monument, 6t«5; People'a, • 
to 5 ; Third National, 4 to 3 ; Traders', a»* to S pea 
cent The banks pay their dividenda free of all 
taxes aad most of them charge off the amoant now,; 
whlls aome divide ii, half in October and half la 
April. Oi the sixty-one banks withla the limitB of 
Boston, three pay 6 per cent., four 5 per oMt, 
twelve 4 per eimt., one 3Jfl per cent., twenty-fomr 
8 per oeat. one 3 per cent, quarterly, four 8% P«l 
cent, seven S.B«r «eat,.Jbur oaai^ auc aoa j***.^-* 
,.«iared.*' 



Iii 



/ 






S% 



i 






M. 






.:-<!.:ss*^i5 



"3fe^S^~ 



i^j^ij^-. 



^:rk''J^- 



. J^-L 




WUUi'Wi? "S^V^, 



%'^^gtfrft'gaim5r^Moag;(!PMlja 2/i87fi~-^fflj-'^itggIriitrtgl 



LAW REPORTS. 

«. 

J30VRT CALiiyjJAIiS—TBIS DAT 

>>•' ^ BCPRKME COURT— CHAMBERS. 

Held bu Barrett. J. 
Fir-jt Moailay motion cRleudiir. Court opens at 

1U:3U 'V. M.: calentlar called at 12 M. The calendar 
, iriil b« Oftlled to-day fiom Ko. 1 up to and including 

SUFBEME COURT— GENERAL TERM. 

lull bg tatU. P. J., Broiiy ana Daniel*, JJ. 



rel. 

Nu- 
VS. 

of 

The 
The 



Vos. Nun-euamM Motions. 
1— Th* Mayor, ace, ts. 

Corno 1 etal. 
2— Mul.ur ra. .atrauss et 

ai. 
3— Stlefel ot a). tb. 

Strauss et al. 
4~Werttielmer Tersu* 

Su:»S34 et 9\. 
9>-May et al. vs. btrauss 

ft al. 
6— Same va. Same. 
7 — iicwiett vs. Wood el 

S—Pxaixty V3. I'lie M. S. 
& .. I. tlAi.jouu Co. 
9— 3aaie ts. .->aui>'. 
Vit— -iiaisUdli Vs. Macy 
etKU 
• 10— Prou y T-. Tin* Lake 
8H»-.-e &.'4 .-'.IMt. Co. 
11— SlIIUH vs. >„niB. 
1"— 111 me m.-ttter, oic. , ol 

14— iuuCi et 111. vs. i;ut;er 
tt.1'. ' 

IS— 3»ni , T«, .'^aiiie. 
ii»— I'ti.m. ueociver, Vf, 

17 — Tljo i>»uK of the Ohio 
Vaiief, ol. WllPei'K. 

\> . Va., vs. KccBii. 
17ia-.-Ti»eKmuireB «c.vi.L. 

As.t.t a,. va-Sre Vfciis. 
18— P»-.ciS,v8. PetW uv »l. 
Id— .Norton V*. M-irkie et 

»>. 
20— Cuttins. Ex'F. ts, 

ai— :ain3 vs. miui.. 
Sj— Sjiuju To. Siime. 

It.-;— UUIO TS. SEIII-". 
«4 SiBUC Td. S^.inii-. 

^kr— Same v... Sime. 
iti — aouie v». Saiuf. 

■^— liie Uer. Am. B'k vs. 

I'tlO .11. h. t'o.vl (Jo. 
I.9->-TUe Gei. .\i!i. 1>'K v». 

1 he f. &. n Coal Ca 
S. -'Ssnom ».'» T«. loa.L 
«i— Cnri» .iXentli -t.it. ic. 

i-i.. Ts. Ceuu Cross- 

V ■ 'licwa ltjilrt)a4 y'u. 

SI— CrfiooC.31 Co.oiTeun. 

vii. iCitU et al. 
S3— iffOto. ei »1., Kv'rs, 

« TS, Griscomo tst hi. 
34 — 'tCest Ns. Mtikeriou 

r.,al. 

?CJ— Tlio Feoplo ex r-l. 
Clay tuu vs.! ac J us- 

t'CfcS of il:Uiuf Ct. 

30 — RlchitrUson vs. Clark. 
;^j— SHIUe ▼*. oi>mf. 
»>— Wunu«il vs. Karat. 
l,\> — lu tao niaicer of 

Bcue t ,xc. 
40 — Cnhuujk Ti, tdieht. 
«i— rio»veil va. Vaa blc- 

Iraetal, 
4?— Same fa. Same. 
•*o— vv !({.na, .^s^l!;oee. ts. 

l*!!;]})**:! at. 
44— Oiil vs rii<$ (iutrdiaa 

a«via.;a lasLittuiuu. 
45— III tli«9 uiatter. jcc oi 

the t.iuardi;ui Saiv- 

>>i;:slasiicuciuu. 
4C— la tbo maiUtr, 'SLC, ot 

Jkiuure. 
17— i.t»ii4i-y TS. Wood et al 
4;t— ^«ulle TS. s^auitr. 
At) - tMMiiC TS. dame. 
6^ — ^IU0 V!^ Stiiiii;. 
OX— T».tgar. vs. I'erry. 
ttj- -as^i*rt Td. Keuu 
.Mr— Tbc. .i^rPUoto.Cbem. 

Co. vs. Herrier. j u'd, 

f4— Baructt vs. Benjamin. ;17d—Duiaeld vs. Hortonef 
V>— ioa l*t;ople ex ruLJ a'. 

W'elne T3. Connor, 1 < 9 — Pect. Survivor, t:., 

dbvr IT. ic, Va. Gi.r<luei- et al. 

S^Hotitisou Tcrsus Van'lSO— Woo'iruil" vs. bher- 

Volltcudarjth et al. j rard, .Ir., tj. 

67— Goo .win et ul. v».:lSl— Haot va. Hunt. 

(Joai^liu. IS-' — Fotten vs. Coulter. 

' 6j— MciiouoH va. Scrip-jltJ-'* — IJouglas vs. Unusias. 



144— The People ex rel. 

Central K. K. ol .N'. 

J. vs. the (,'ommt3- 

stoiiers ol Taxes. 
145 — In the Matier of 

Smith. 
148— In the Matter of Kee- 

Raa. 
147— The Peoole ex 

Tba Gallatin 

tiOU.11 Hauk 

(.'ominissioiiers 

'iH-tes. 
148 — Hiiya, Kx'x, vs. 

.\iuyor lav. 
141)— Cornell <t al. va. 

.•iiiyor, ic. 
150— TiiiKi- Yd. I he .Mayor. 

151— It-i'i vs. The Mayor, 

to. 
l.">2— ^'aiiij vi». .SHni •. 
15.1— Tlie Mayor vs. The 

Nor. 11 fclitire and &. 

r. o.rry Co. 
l.")-i— Siili'o.t I't !»!, vs. TllO 

Mlijor, A:i'. 
lo.'i— Uial.;i It .il. TS. Tho 

-M.iyor. i^f. 

15G — Bin lie vs. Iho Mayftr, 

i;o. 
lo7— The Peojile ox rel. 

Law V8. < omuiia- 

sioiiers of Taxc • 
158— Visschor v*. 'I'ho 

iiieeubank .\lkali 

Co. 
159— X. V. T.lf- Ins. and 

I'l'ugt I i>. vs. Lee et 

III., iinpi'd. 
160— Kniimrv T8. SlieUlon. 

Kx'r," 
161— Wooa vs. The .Mayir, 

1B2— TJie iVoplo ex rel. 
Muith vs. Jus^tices 
ot ^pecialt5e.Aalonn. 

163— Til.) hoopif ex re,. 

Uitnil T3. JU3tlC'l-Sof I 
Svcciil Sessions. 

164— The People ex rel. 
l)o;ioIiiie vs. Jas- 
ticoa ol Special oes- 
Bioiiii, 

165— Tho Park Bank vs. 
Piatt ef.aL 

l6tS — Th" PvO|>!e ex rol. 
■; rtMlesuien'3 Na- 
lioual Batik va. 
Coiiimissiojiers of 
'i'aXLB. 

167— Gnmt tt aL vs. Coop- 
er. - 

16S-»-Bromer vs. iNoyes et 
. ai. I 

16& — The People i ex rel. 
_ Bauta vs. Kuerssel. 

170 — Tue People ex rei. 
Han! a vs. Kent. 

171— Purdy vs. The Alayor, 

172— Tho People ex rel. 

Heiser Ts.Asuiaet 

al. 
173 — Sieorech; v», Claac.v. 

Justtce, tc. 
173 "a— Tile iietropolitan 

(j.is-iight Co. vs. 

The Aiayor. &c. 
Enumerated Causes. 
174 — ilofteu va. flottea et 

ul 
175^Weeks vs. The N. Y., 

x\. U. and U. Kail- 

load Co, 
176 — Booth vs. Kehoeetal. 
177 — Gray vs. lireen, im- 



Noa. 

2()8— Kelly Tg. The Mayor, 

269 — Uevrlich vs. Br-nnau, 

Siheritt". 

270— Buess vs. Koch. 

271- Burkett VS. Tiiyioret 

aL 
272— Kelly, Slier:ff, tb. 
M arsh et al. 

27.3— SalisLiiirv v^'. Stlnson. 
i74— .iticniotiiy v*. l-vauk- 

iil,. 
275 — The Bri wers' it. Mlllt- 
btero' ins. i.o. vs. 

OavriiiiiMi et al. 
27(>— ttoolsey vs. Biosvd. 
1;77 — Bt-rsfii et al. va. Bus- 

tetil ei al. 
278— Mt" wart V8. BramhalL 
i78 "2— Anthony vs. I);iy. 
279— ilirchwaid va. Ocean 

Meaiu NaT. Co. 
2S0— The People's Bank 

VS. Mitchell. 
281 — Southard, .\8siffnee, 
Walsh et aL 



Nos. 

325— Marshall ys. Macy 

et al. 
326 — Same vs. .Same. 
'3-~ — VN \\\t£ et aL vs. 

Smith. 

328— Brown ct al. vs. 

.SliiitU. 
329 — Welch vs. Smith. 
33(1 — Je-sni3 vs. ;:jmith 

e.t al. 
331— The Gcnnania B^k 

vy. ."^i-hafer, iinpi'a. 
332 — V"o83 vs. Covfdrev et 

o'33— ObfTiiLiu V8. The 
World Mut. L. T. (.0. 

;l:!4 — Godihird vs. .>lo\vir. 

J3o — Hay vs. The §tar Fire 
Ins. Co. 

3.3G— Sinclair, Receiver, vs. 
Oakley, iiuplea.iod. 

3.37— Llttauor va. Gold- 
man. 

33S— Kaiser vs. Bartela. 
J9 — Casseb'-er et al. ts. 

KMlOflflBh. 



V3. 

2.S'2 — C lautnst va. Cii-iliinir. 34f) — Ljl dv va. AlcVe 
i;Sa— Gr:iy ct al vs. Tlic|.t{!— Uooicy VS. Hn.piii. 

Ci-ntral K. r{. of .V.J.3-11'— t'ur.viii va. Hart 
281- Ociirjic the Coiiut 

Joanno-4 vs. Tne 

IhMM AT. I{. tl. in,. 



;?4;5- 



uiann. 
Peufljije vs. Ui.-atUal 

et al 
M44— Bi-alhiirst vs. Bi:ll et 

ill. 
;115 — Sanic vs. Wame. 
:^lt_i — hilliiis vs. .Melville. 
;!47 — Kvpriii^liftin vs. Van- 

(liTlii.i. 
348- Hei ri!M vs. Piatt, iui- 
yi-'adpil. 
■The Oat.ir.o lank vs. 349— V\ nrurop vs. II. B. 
.M<'.Neill. ClUliii. 

•.;!).;— Lit! AoUvs .Mnrschail. 35U— Wlic Icr va. Tho Con- 
■/SU— .Salinou vs. Alien. m client L. lua. Co. 

L'I'J — (.InrKva. i. olei, lix'r. :-!51— Schueuier vs. Hart, 
"'.M — • orriaoii va. ferry. Iiiipie.Ktid. 

2'.tl— Lyi.ui V8. Kosciithal 3r)2— Goouwin vg, C nlilln. 
eta'. |;<^;!— I'l-nUiv vs. tJ.v.fi etal. 

295 — Danierell vs. Wslkcr 3,i4 — I'aiso vs. Waiiu 



2S5— Ilcrrlieh vs. hrcuuan, 

.^hfi-.tt". 1 

2,S6 — Ber.lsall vs. Kowleri 

.t al. I 

'261 — Hnutii <t al. vs. r'ai- 

C'jiicr. III. p. railed, 
'J83 — Bia.iliur.<i vs. iontii- 

.'■euu et al. 
2S9- 



296- 



et al 
-Ycrkos ct al. vs. Sal- 

ninu. 
297— Child et »1, Kxecu- 

tora, va. CUilit. 
29 • — nenuHiiu vs. Tavior. 
-Uy— i 1 ifliii et al. vs. t)0?. 

scl. Jr.. el al. 



35j — VVlieoiOck va. v ickes 

et ul. 
356— Byrnes et al. vs. The 

Mayor, 6cC. 
357 — Kii.pp cc i«l. va. Aa- 

(.ersdii et al. 
;!5S— Slierilau et al. vn. 
(i,,net. 
MOO^Wiues, Kxceuiiix, vs. '35812— Visa, her et al. vs. 

Kirivoi al. j '1 he O. .\lKali Co. 

301— Btt.dwin ct al. vs. The 359— W.lutman vs. Leslie 
Liverpoid and Great' Hal. 

Western 6teani Co. 360— Dil out vs. Cavana;;h 
10'? — AiiijWcirth v^. isaekus. ! et aL 

;->03— Ur;)^vll vs. LMdy. SgI- Ho.vell vs.Vau Sic'en. 

304 — Vau tichaick vs. Hijj- 303-iH:iryia vs. frenace 



gin 

.105 — Rauuay vs. Fey-er. 
3u(' — Mo au T3. JltiLariv. 
307 — The N. \. State Loan 

atid Tiust Co. vs. 

Helmer. 
30,?- Saa:e vs. Snme. 
309 — jianin et al.vs. Walk- 
er et ah 
310 — Jaeksim vs. Johnson. 
;jll — Gray vs. Grceu et al 
312— Uioper va. Fowler, 

i npieaded. 
31S— Keuuey vs. Schmidt 

etc.l 
314— Hiithain vs. Mllon 

et al. 
315— HoiTiek T3. Smith. 
3i6— i liamootlaiu versus 

Kiliot. 
317— Mollis vs. Da WoU: 
3i8— Kent vs. Quicksilver 

Jl. Coaipany. 
319— Freund et .11. vs. Imp. 

ana Traderi' B.iiiii. 
320 — Wiikunou vs. U au. 
3:il— Uf.utie: et ai. vs. 

Uoaelas MTk Co, 

et aL 
322 — Oleoit, -issiKuee, va. 

.'ttliCLirllU bt uL 

32213— Maunvs. VVillough- 

hy. 
rf23 — -Mann va. Wilson. 
324 — Grasahiick vs. -rown. 



I'tal. 
300 — TUe -Satlonal Hank of 

l-aiiuaveu va. Thij 

Plioeaiv i>iireliOUS- 

iii;; comp.iiiy. , 
,167 — Gray vs. i.rejnetal. 
li. 3 — .Mi:pi:cu v.s. Laah. 
309- Kent vs. -Miller. 
37i— -Ul tl.itt Vs. AtcLaugh- 

lin. 
o72 — Ouaylco et a!, vs. 

.uerivin. 
373 — Vau lervoort vs. Sea 

1 1 ft' Grove Asa n. 
374 — SouinHioic t . i he 

1 Uot .Nat. Bank or 

.iiemi.hia. 
375 — Sniitu vs. l.'rankiield. 
J7G— Spilauo vs. Dvvyerct 

a I. 
377— Clomenta va. Vturriii. 
6lS — itich.irdsoa et al. va. 

Joliii.ion et al. 
379 — Sher-.vooa. H.Kcciitiix, 

cti' . vs. Hiubous et 

Ui. 

380— Sc hi fir et ah vs. 

DiUiiuner. 
3S1 — Bariiu vs. ilarli et al. 
oS2 — Sutherland vs. Tne 

Alayor, i.c. 
3S3— Dorritiy vs. Uaop. 
384 — ijurt, vs. Glohe .Mat. 

Liftf Ins. Coinpaay. 
335 — Jones vs. Buuer. 



SUPKK.ME COnRT— SPECIAL TERM. 

Beld bu Van Vorst. J. 

V09. Demurrers. Nos. 

1— Little vs. The Alayor. 23..— Allien vs. Cinsay. 



tiue. 

fid— Kei y et aL va. Scrip- 
ture. 

00— Boseub:ick vs. Tli? 
.>iauaiui-tarer3' aud 
Baiidais' Kack. 

61— Jacous vs. Miller. 



1X4 — isaiuuels vs. Kveniug 
Post .Association. 

185 — Connolly vs. i>-a.¥ton. 

186 — ocean .Satioual Batik 
vs. Oaril. 

187- Home In-surance Co. 
vs. Penu. It. K, Co. 



tt^— In the matv«r, to,, of i 188— Steveos, r.xecutnx. 



aewell 
63 — ^In tne matter, iu:., oi 

XAltmaa. 
64— lu the matter, be, of 

Waisn, itc. 
S-J— Leauot's i>.«nk of N,T. 

Vi. Jacotiy et al. 
66— Cimpoetl vs. spratt. 
67— la lue Blatter, &c.. ot 

. Ihotc, Keceiver. 
SS—UttuUeik va. Jlitcliell 

etai. 
80 gaiiuey ts. Peyser. 
7t>— Fenoergast et aL vs. 

- HMU:. 
?1— Uniou Uime Battiogs 

liisiitatiou TS. Sou- 

furd. iwpieadeil. 
t^ — Same TS. bamei 
74— .eil^am-tT^. Brown. 
V«— liarnctt vs. fuelling. 
^&— iljiraeii vs. Mcver. 
1»}— Marcliwalil vs. Tho 

uceauic iSteam Say. 

Co., ^LuOiteU.) 

.7— Keily m. vtaterbarv. 
't S— i/uugc vs. Moan. 
7»— Jttuwa vs. The 

juavor. Uc. 
Sd— b..nie vs. issme. 
ISi— aame vs. buue. 
t^ — oruwn et kL va. The 

JtajoT, &v. 
£3 — In iUc maiver, fcc, of 

Vulkeuing. 
84— lu Uio mutter, Itc., ol 

v« 1,11a. 
85 — Httgues vs. Bubtns. 
b<t— bJkaiC TS. aiUUK, 

t>7— Vou Heun, Aksigaee, 

V:,. lyKos et HI. 
.88— Tatialfcsn, vs. Can- 

ireu. 
39— Mc/ey ▼«. CantrelL 
tK>— i-«iuU3tt et aL vs. 
CslanelL 

m— Hayea ts, Dickinson 

fctaL 
92— dc»Tcr et aL vs. The 

AlaTOr, Sic. 
03— Same Tb. o^ine. 
t>4— lieiifeii vs. Kaymond. 
i)a— Waru tb. J.ime>. 
9u — Bii,>C. Itee'r, T*. King, 

j&x'r, feu. 
i>7— Blahop TS. Davis, 
9<^— Vitii .j^kea Tt!. Vaui 

dken. 



itc, vs. The Mayor, 

&e. 
1S9— TiKld v?. Shelboume. 
i9i'— l>Tuch va. IjCvv. 
lyl— Van Jjchttick vs. Hijr- 

mns. 
192 — Kia.<? va Livermcfre. 
laa — Union Trust Co. vs. 

Wuitou. 

194— Whaieii et. aL vs. 

Burke. 
195— Ruotmaa vs. Green. 
196— Casserly, Keceiver, 

vs. Manners. 
19612— Hastings, Iteceiver, 

vs. Drew et al. 
197 — Chetwooil vs. Chet- 

wood tt aL 
197'2— Tyngvg. Clark. 
Iii>8 — .4uearuva.Uoodbpeed 

et al. 
199 — Cohen ot aL vs, Ban- 
croft. 
200— Getty et aL vs. Atkia- 

sou et aL 
201— Wilcox hilver Plate 

Co. vs. Green. 
202— Mathes vs. Neidig. 
2U3 — Casstily et el. vs. An- 
thony et al. 
204 — Xaiioin!;, Bowman & 

Co. TO. Keenauet al. 
205— Oe«tilch et aL vs. Gil- 
bert et aL 
206— Wbiteside vs. Human 
Pott's— St. Nicholas .ia- 

tijnal Bauk vs. 
, Bauk of istttte of 

>ew-rorii. 
207— Wood vs. The Rrio 

Kailway Comoauy. 
208 — Getty ei a., va. Uev- 

iiu. Executor. 
209— Chapiu et al. vs. lioh- 

sun. 
210 — Clu;:,8man vs. The 

Lonx Island R. K. 

Co. 
211 — Alexander et aL vs. 

isrown et ai. 
213 — Liitaner vs. Goldman 
213 — The Western K. K. Co. 

vs. Bavue ei al. 
214 — Hoe et ul. va. Hiisae.y 

et aL 
215 — ifiuii vs. Bnlsse. 
216— Part. Jr., ei aL va. 

;iliump:ia, sur. 



"B8-rho, i-Jopla state uf^lC^Park, Jr., et aL vs. 
.-.. T. vs. BieecKer' ,„ Muimics et. a!. 
•t. and t' r H. a,,^' '-'^i^^^ee vs. Kins. 

I".il7'!j — Gcttv et ai. vs. 

i.>oonelly, impi'd. 
218 — CorrijSan vs. bneliield 
et ai. 



Co.. ei aL 
OU— In Tue master of the 

Pel.U.u of Uuae. 
'i>l— In tne uiatier et the 

i-Ccitiuu of Irwiu 

et Hi. 
^02— In tne matter of th-- 

P.Uliuu uf Bur- 

iaei.itei. 
t03— Lury. het'r. t«. The 

iiSu Tiuat Co. 
U«4— Uihitir vs. iiiB Bur- 



;219 — O'Dernian va. World 
t J^lULUitl Life Ind. Uu. 

220 — Monr va. i'eit et al. 

■J'.il — Tho l'raae8:ueu's.Nat. 
I i.'k vs. Jlcl'eeiy et 

ai.. ExecuTora. 

222 — Siui ih vs.Budiue et aL 

223 — Sullivan. .\am'r, vs. 

Uiver ... tt. Co. ;224-Phimps vs. MeiviUe, 



VB. 



TS. 



JUn — FaK>ii vk. U;;ggs 
lob— O.auam et aL 

tolijltn. 
lL7-»^or».e vs. A»hl-y 
Jto-^titti %•». G.e.';u. 
if,'J — it Maul* al au 

lkO..StiTdt. 

in; — ia'lh'.; matter of the 
Mruieu 'i'i*|»u :>Li..-i 
CviUi.<»ii.>. 
^111— HowL.ud vs. Cronin. 
Vj.-— xI.fWl»uu Vi. tho tfiag- 

liu.ii mUu 1 ^lue4 As' u. 
Us— Ul-tsm^ v» l-n.;ipa ei 

114— The Pcoplj IX ifcL, 

i". elite va. i.oi.ut:r, 

eb«i ui'. 

1 to— la the uatler, licoi 

Foster 

■ lie— lu <ii,- matte:-, 4tc, oi 

i.tr.i.e.-. 
ll7-~The (jenn^xc .4ra.rl- 
I uuu Bau:^ Tn. Mie 

lUlsCuUaltJ U.UiUa 

" , Coul vom.i.iuy. 
ClS^^Tlio Uei'iuau Ameri- 
can i^au^ vs. ru'- 
tfUiiauis .MotVer te 
', Itettpei Lomoanv. i 

. , ,tl9— The la mors L. k 1 .' 
t-o. Vd. lUe Jliiw...a-| 
keu *L ^L. I'aui itui.-{ 
rOau Ccui>>auy, 

' Prel.;rrci Cauae.j. 
121— .aver v». lue Peorile. 
itLli — FruDiiiin vs. tuo l-eo- 
pie, 

i-U— CI ocyvi t.'ie People. 
J24— ivutieitaj ti aL va. 
b^'ile t.b. 

i;i5— iJcLjau v.^ ilcLean. 
;kv— 'I'hci ..hiluruu's .»ia ..o- 
fitly v<. Lovjiidge 
• Biecutt/r, tt ul 
127— Sa.ue v». a^uie. 
1^&— <.u.livi«a, <iduiinist'r. 

vs. *u»aick et aL 
129— COit TS. Heard, Aum 
il4:i»*a— njui/cry v». hhe*- 

oo.", Axucutor. 
180 — tJinrtcTaut tt aL, Ki- 
ecuoorii, TK. 't'beras- 
son ot a I. 
131 — Btewei et al., E.-iee'r, 
vs. ueuiiuiDau et al 
V, 132— The People, ic •.. .f. 
' iweed, lUi, leaded. 

133— borne vs. Same. 
1<14 — :Sume vs. caiue. 
li;»— ilume v«. the Alayor, 

4tc. 
138— -Na»h T«. the Mayor, 

*tc. 
IS7— Itel.iier vs. the Alay- 
- o., itc 

; X^jt— The People ex rel. 
cmith vs. the Com- 
m,8sloiier» of Taxes 
M>&— The Peopie ex .el. 
liJrrucB.Ts theCom- 
tiilsaiouers oiT'iixes. 
140— The Peoyie ex reL 
Konwieit vs. cne 
Comiurs or Taxes. 
141— The People ex rel. 
j^ , Coming etai.Ti. the 

" Cumm'rs of Taxes. 

142— Tlie People ex rel. 
Koacu ra. the Com- 
uiibsione ,-• ofTaxrs. 
14*— The People ex rel. 
»hivpeueiiultT9,the 



a»5 — »Vilii!u8on vs. James 

Gill. 
J 25 "-J — jLilfiav et aL Tersus 
!:rjwu, iiupleadeij. 
226 — Eol/iusjii Vs. iireu- 

u.iu blieriff. 
226*2 — Marahall. sur., vs. 

.u. rev et ai. 
227 — Youngs vs c'aiter et 

at. 
228— Bates et al. vs. Cun- 

iiiaghaui. 
229— Huoaeil vs. The Gi. 

Western iiis. i_o. 
230 — L/olz vs. .iiorris el al. 
-31 — iviiuhoiTju vs. >en. 

eouiue et aL 
232 — .>aie va. Tno Uola- 
T/are. L.tW.R.K.Ci). 
233 — iioui- et aL Ta. teit 

CI al. 
234— L_-i.maler vs. PureelL 
^isij — is,uv,r ,£-l1,( vs. Hatna- 

\* a.y. 
230— darutty et aL vs. Lu»i- 

dinutou. ' 

237— Sp.-.iaue et al. vs. 

llosuier et ai. 
23S — CLirti et al. vs. Dick- 

iuS'iii. 
1-239— McCull ugh et al. vs. 

Hi.fl.'.ii.in et ai. 
1-40 — Vojurun vs. Sher- 
! rar.i. Jr., ic. 

j241— .Sithol vs .Nusshaura. 
'242 — Cowici vs. VVasouet 
; al. 

'243 — >V'illiamsou va. Maaon 
I 244— ipeaia et 111. vs. .Viat- 
; thews et al. 

i245— Rourue vs. Finczan 
; et al. 

j24b — An.o.uet al. vs. Tho 

Pae. yiut. ins. ( o. 
U'47— Gopsili vs. uocker 
j et aL 

|248 — Uocker vs. Martin 
ct aL 



iC. of .N.lf. 

2 — Swiitv.'.The Jlavor 
iLi:. -N. 1. 

3 — WiiUace vs. The May- 
or, ii-C, iN. V. 

4 — Murray vs. The May- 
or, 4te , N. V. 

6 — Cuuuiugham vs. The 
Mayor, itc, >". Y. 

6-IIorspiiol vs. The May- 1 o24 
or. ic. 

7 — Church of the Holy 
Trinitv vs. Tne Ma.y- 
or, i;i . 

8— The Harlem Presb.Ch. 
vs. The .>ia.yor, &fi. 

9— KsUv vs. The Mayor. 
4i.C., ot 2(- 1. 
10— Forsyth va. The May- 
or, itc. N. Y. ■ 
11— Pelletr.-au vt rsusThe 



71 — La ViCju Granular tlor. 
<.' . V5. The Ocean 
^teaIU Coaling ( o. 
19.S — Ward vs. Krniuni. 
1413— Curry vs. \\ Itters. 
4iU — Ford vs. Connor et al. 
421— iiilis va. Aiidrewa. 
493 — rattan et aL vs.Knox 
oti'.l — Tone vs. BelL 

Clark vs-Waterset al. 
tjueklpy et al. vs. 

The .Mayor, &e. 
Kenwortny vs. Phyfe 
er al. 
90- Blaichfopd vs. Kidd. 
110 — Houg.iton et al. vs. 

LiHuouette. 
313 — BarriTiirer versus 

Sc.i wariz. 
360 — Edolstiiiu vs. Shand- 



58- 
91- 



ley. 
i:qui ableLije As3'n;40j — SUe.Tvva.Bates et al. 
Society. I Ba — Clark vs. JJ aeon. 

12— C;:nail;an B'it of Com- 45— -Afi..jell, Kx'x.vs.Craw- 



merce vs. Ue Mcir 
et al. 

13 — Thompson vs.Thomp- 
soii et aL 

14 — Connors, &,c., versus 
^hiiw et al. 
. 15 — He.ymau ct aL v?.Tha 
AtuoriC'iu Patent 
hpnuse Compnuy, 
' 16 — "oiuers vs. Vaoer. 

17 — Simulamg va. Martin 
et aL 

18 — Li;et vs. The Equita- 
ble Lifi AiSociaiKin 
oJ the United States 

19 — HieksVB. The liquiia- 
blc Life Assuciation 
ol'the United States 

20 — Nolan vs. Harris. 

21 — rtinlield va. Ki.k. 

22 — Herries vs. Norveli. 

2:1 — Woo.l vs. Avery. 

•z4: — Wlieatuii vs. Voor- 
his, Jr. 

25 — Watts et ail. vs. Dun- 
can e aL 

26— Gr euwich B.ank of 
2{eJV-Voik vs. Da 
vid, «t=. 

27— Ford vi. The Victor 
tjewiua-machine Co. 

23 — Covert VB. Henaeher- 

29 — Galpin vs. Gray ct iiL 

30— Wails vs. The Caliior- 
nia Pet. co. 

31 — Roiiwaijea vs. Eoll- 
vvae.'ju. 

32— McGuiu .ess vs. The 
-Vl^yor, Jte. 

33— Geery et aL vs. Web 
stm- et al. 

34— Colt, iiy Kuartiian, vs. 
iieaid et al. 

35 — Hall et al. va. .Atlan- 
tic Giuat Powder co, 

36— W althers vs. Gultz. 
La IT and Fact. 
361— Loeiie TB. Locke. 
2c3 — Grand Kaijids aud I 



foid. 
183 — Boardnnn vs. The 

L. S. Si. M.S. K.R.Co. 
184— Clark vb. The L. S. 4c 

n. .S. It. R. Co. 
185— Same vs. Same. 
180 — Drake et al. vs. The 

L. S. &. ,i. S. It. K.Uo. 
187 — Jermai.. v.-. The L. ei. 

U. M. 8. R. U. 1 o. 
188- LoiiuK, Trustee, &c., 

vs. Tho L. «. &. M. a. 

R, K. Co. 
189— Monroe vs. The L, S. 

ii j1. t!. K. U. Co. 
190— llor.vn et al. vs. L. S. 

t ii. 8. U. R. Co, * 
191— Seymour, Jr,, et al. 

vs. L. S. &. M. S. K. 

R. Co. 
192— Spencer vs. L. S. & 

j1. .>. R. 11. Co. 
193— Vau .irslaie vs L. S. 

St M. S. K. S. 10. 
194— Voisiu vs. L. S. & M. 

b. R. I!. Co. 
195 — Whitmau vs. L. S. Si 

.M. b. K. K. Co. 
412— Hutehiugs vs. L. S. St 

:.l. >o. K It. Co. 
40 — Grinuell vs. Miuturn 

et aL 
144 — Paine vs. TUe Rector, 

&L'., of Trinity 

Church. 
180 — Eur is vs. Timnson 

et al. 
261— ^Jeilier vs. The Kings 

Co. .M'l^'Co. 
311— Clark va.Kheianet aL 
314 — i-;ari vs. Kleley. 
334 — Stevens vs. hlevens. 
343 — dilei et aL vs. Tii-us 

et aL 
350 — Fowler tb. Mehrbach 

et aL 
366— Reilly vs. Dillon et al. 
37 I— .vlaio 1 vs. Libuy. 
379 — Am. Padjle-wnael Co. 

vs. Guessl ng 



K. R. Go. vs. San- 382— Ti'.U> vs. br„Bs et al. 

402— Grivet vs. barloetaL 

420 — .Mittuacht vs. Stauf 

et aL 

3 '— T,,ylor vs. Thomas. 

427— Big low VB. iiurchill 

etal. 

428 — Same vs. Same. 

-■ImendjiJO— Sams vs. Saiua. 

43o — :>ame vs. i^aiue. 

431 — iame vs. Same. 



dcrs, 
131- Levyetal. vs.Meirlll. 
27s — Liiigdun va. Graj. 
279 — -.amo va. Same. 
173— Union i>iaio savings 

last. vs. L-iari et aL 
174 — Same vs. Same. 
Sa7 — Mus aclt vs. 

et ai. 
591— Bcekuian, Kiecutrii. 

v-f. VanDerveeret 

aL 



BUPKEJIE COURT — CIECUIT — PART I. 

Held bjj Douohiie, J. 



Sos. 
107: 



-CoU 



on vs. Morris 

sey, Koeeiver. 
1311— Morgan vs. Tho Con 

tinen^al L. 1. Co. 
252 — Ma ler vs. O'ljrien. 
1148 — ..oui?hra :, Jr., va 

Mattiiewa ot al. 
1369 — Niculav et al. 

.-■euumiker. 
976 — Johnson et aL 

h .tberj;. 
3 920— ii 112 jrd et al, 

Peicrsou et ai. 
2072— <jttVriuau vs. i^ster- 

bo.i e. aL 
1527 — Lyies e, aL vs. Dav- 

enpurt et al. 
1S50 — Partridge va. Thay- 

e r. 
1801— '^oiield vs. Tiomp 

1651— .Miner vs. Crortutt. 
lUi/H- lUi'.icr vs. .-icuen. 
OTj^j- Wallace Bt al., vs 



vs. 



vs. 



versus 



The 



-NOi. 

1^93— Gallau let 

Brown. 
1389— 0'C,mu.)r va. 

C. .-'. Life Ins. 
1313 — Goger va. Tiio D. D., 

H. B. t ,S. R R. 1 o. 
1316— Go'jer. by guardian 

va- The D. u., E. U. 

it B. K. R. Co. 
1047 — berjjua-as va. dpaul- 

diiii:, 
3030 — .Moouey vs. Francis 

et al. 
1795 — Moore va. Ammer- 

uian. 
1723'..2— liiuca el .aL vs. 

.Nev\cil et al 
1739— Ciiru VS). Conner, 

Sberifl-. 
1329 — Gil.;.' .1 vi. Crawford. 
17.aj — K.aur,naii vs. Oa- 

IjOi.u.: et ol. 

1051— ko. Idas. Jr., vs. 
Goul . fct al. 



A-aier.L. Ihu-eiju Co. ,1731 — W'liitiuore etal. vs. 



249— Same vs. fcame. 



vs. Kelly, 



i'Jjo — uie L;Ke 

1 .'hrr.ff. 

1251 — Bhieh et a), vs. SU'lu 

I hariit, 

|252— PniiiipB, surv., 

I 1 nerassou. 

,253 — .Ma-:;uire va. Lloyd. 

I -'54 — Howiaud et ai. ^ 



VS. 



VS. 



Gillespie. 
255— Wiilelt, Admr., 

Kip;) et ah 
25(3— Sanlard vs. Wheeler. 
:rS57 — La lirop vs. Godfrey 

et HI. 
253 — Maas et nl. vs. Mo., 

K. Si 1 . h..t,i.o.et al.' 
2.^9— .Schiller et aL vs. 

Brummer. 
260— CaylusetaL va. The 

li. V. 4tK. it S. R. It. 

Co. 
261— St. Nicholas Ini. Co. 

vs. .Merciciuts' Mn- 

tuil ¥. 1, Cu. 
2C2 — Ulhmaua vs. Ha»s et 

al. 
2C3— lianhattan L. I. Co. 

vs. Uairis et al. 
264— Whitou et al. vs. 

Spring. 
265— Kinjt V8. Llyennore, 

ImpPd. 
266— Higi;)«i» vs. Murray. 
267— Bos' wick vs. Frauk- 

u6l(k 



1725 — rieriies vs. Wesley 

el al 
1617— Jlilier vi. Miiier. 
a62 — Tne Canadian Bunk 

ol Co.jiLUirree va. 

llilhaor ,ud. 
595 — Loacr vs. Kapp. 
oUy— LyUuli '.s. lieruan. 
3207 — u iiovan vs. xiuos. 
X4l#9 — >aHl et al. vs. 

'Traeey et al. 
1721— 0'ui-i«u vs. The 

.Mayor, Sec. 
1845Vriie 'layor, -Stc, vs. 

Mo ire 
1847— Kidi et al. vs. Farr 

et aL 
613'ii— Tailcott va. Burn- 
hop. 
1047— Ui..,<.e et al. vs. 

Wright e(»ai. 



Jotiiiboii et al. 
2783— soiomou VS. Conner 

Sheriff 
777— Mellaig vs. Strat- 

tc/.l. 

1099— Cuileiider vs. Cul- 

leiidei-. 
1635— Forsyth vs. Easier 

et a I. 

1377 — Hermatty vs. 

Guire. 

1519''j— Koubo et al. 
Price. 

1177— Rooert vs. Hill. 
177J — •h1- Vd. Taleoft. 
Ii27— Curter et »1. 

Wyman. 
1111 — Wi.kiusou et al. 
*" Nooie et al. 



Me- 



V8. 



va. 



BLPRliMi; COURT— CIRCUIT — PART UI. 
Held by iMrremore, J. 



>'o3. 

24s9. 



.Snehly vs. Conner 
Slienff. 
1629 — GiaiJ;uo vs. tho Xa- 

tioual S. S. Co. 
2888 — Gumiug vs. The 
.Mayor, itc. 
301 — Leu va. Sayles et. 

:a. 
1 197— Newburger tb. Mo- 

(jniu. 
1127— 1 lie .Manl&ttan life 

iusuianceCoiiipan> 

Va. uevhii. 
871 — Lowciistein va. 

Lowenthal. 
1071— Goodridge Tg. Skid- 
more, et. aL - 
1918 — '..euet et. aL vs. 

The .Mayor. 
950 — Mauui's. ii. Buildiirs 
BaulL of New-lorK 
vs. Asieu, impl'd. 
IICO— Koso vs. The .Me-sv- 
York Gas l^jUtCio. 
718 — Waun va. Ashley. 
691— Vau VVlniiie ys. 
Wuttlock. 



.>03, 
1078L2— Bumstead, adm'x., 

vs. Uoadley. 
1291 — Meyer va. vviiite, et. 

a.. 
1741 Hi — F.;lihee vs. Hem 

miind. 
1513 — Brown vs- Decker, 

impleaded., 
1S37— stepuen vs. The 

Board oi Kuucatiou 

of Bro.iiiiyu. 
621 — Averiil vs. Webster 

et. aL 
IS 11 — oanc et. al. vs. 

Hodleu. 
1735 — lieuderson va. Whits 

er. al. 
3182— I'auer et.aU vs. The 

Mayor itc. 
3086 — 'Ine commensal 

Advertiser Asuo'.i. 

vs. ThH Mayor, in:. 
2968— tlsoer^ vs. Tho 

Mayor, Stc. 
2559 — The Mayor, tc, Ta. 

iiaro et. al. 
1549L>— Hickey vs. The 



Mayor, lie. 
8CPERIOR COtfRT— .TRIAL TERM— PART II. 

,^ A^ourned natil the first Stomlay iu iVoyembBa 



8KPRKMK COURT— CTRCUl'r— PART I, 

. Held bv Lawrenct. J. 

Xns. I Nos. 

USO— Saportas vs. Vau-;iy2'_' 



Vau 
ilerbilt. , 

3210— GeudU VS, Kohuson 

Exeeutrix. 
IS'24 — Iloi'ac.ier vi'vsiia 
O'Brien, .'iherilT. 

2404— .Nelson, Jr., vs. The 
-Miyor, Ike. 

1318 — HoasT va. Couner. 

S..erifl-. 
2110— DeLaveletta vi-r.-ui 

(.ieult, Eiecut.n.t. 

1436— I'ursoll \i. 'iho 
Mayor, ice. 

1437 — Hayes vs. The May- 
or, St.'. 

1876— Bi<;lcrotfll. vs. The 
-Mavor, iti'. 

1164 — Conn va. Fioeraheira 
et al. 

3012— Folsoin, Assisnee, 

vs, Kilev. 
770— Wiley vs. -Miller. 
204G — Cava m^th, .^ilminig- 
tiT,:rix,y3.Di,iaiiioi'() 



SCr.'vUIOIt COITUT— uF.NKRAL 'ITUM. 
J-li'lU bj ^pflijici.-.k and .^p*^lr. J J. 



.\pDc:-.ls from cu-.lers; 
Nos, 
1— Tyng v.s. -Mfir-sli. 
2 — -Neher vs. .McD;>noH2h. 
3 — Hoe e(, ai. v.*. iiarr.iah. 
4— Ra^udall va. Dusbnuury, 

1 luslec, Sec. 
.')— Ileruiaii vs. Jeasiier. 
G — Kurro 1 vs. Van Tu.yl. 
7 — .s rixlit vs. Wriiihr. 
S— He<?euian vs. CinlrelL 
9— B.,-rlei;:!i vs. Center, 
1 niftee, itf. 
10 — Braiiue vs. Lord, tc, 
11 — Smith vs. CantreiL 
12— Ihe Dry Duck baviiic.s 
in^tllution va Pcp- 
jier, imijieaded. 
General C<»!. ndar.' 
1 — Wal inn vs. The -May- 
or. Stc. 
2 — Newti.ld vs. Opper- 

111 1 n. 
3 — Gritlitli vs, Burk". 
4— alontv-s, Riualdo. 
5 — ^New-York Catholic 

J'rotei-tiry vs, T.ie 
Bieecii'T.-itreet Rail- 
road Cniupaii.y. 
0— Ilarueckel va. Eni-wn. 
7 — Volkinan etal. vs.Keld- 

maii- 
8 — Madnn vs. Covert etal. 
9— Btiruham vs. ureiiua ;. 
10 — Campticil vs. Connor 

Sheriff. 
11 — Carni.-s va. Piatt. 



I'J — Rn-x vs. Hextcr. 

i,-l — o',-;uiI van vs. -Roberta. 

1 4— .Moore v . He'loiii, 

1 a — Tall iiiAilfje vs.Spoffort). 

10 — Danpliv vs, r.ie Eno 

'Railway C- mpaii.y. 
17— Piiruei Vs. ilari-tio i. 
18 — dyan vs. Tho -Mayor, 

&.e- 
19 — llagaimn vi. r'lirr. 
— Kiu.steiu v.s. Chapman. 
'21— J'-sallp vs, .S;eiii-er. 
^i.^. — vVhite vs. -Mealioet al. 
23 — Litwr'^nci et al vs.Mer- 

riliehi. 

24— Twoiiiey va. Duun. 
25— Riizer vs. Wor.d Mu- 

TUal Lit'o Ins. Co. 
26 — Brown et al. vs. forrey. 
27 — Kairchild vs. Lynch. 
28 — Tvng vs. Marsh. 
2U — Hams vs. Uillon, 
30 — uan-jfia et al. va. Dlns- 

iiiure. 
31 — Pmiyort vs. Be'niont. 
;i'2 — iho iNatio'aril Trust i_o. 

vs. Koiiertd et al. , 
3." — Ross vs. ll.irJeu. 
34 — 'lark va. Flanagan. 
35 -Ciibo va. Wood .-t bL 
36 — F iwlc! vs. Kiiiedon. 
37 — Weston vs. .New-York 

tlevated R R. Co. 
38— VVell vs. l'':8Clier. 
39— L'ally vs. o gat?. 
-10 — (Iraliani va Lyady. 
41 — Coob vs. Knaup- 



6UPERI0U COURT— SPECIAL TER-M. 
Held b-j Curtis, J. 



Nos. Demurrer C.-ilendar. 

1— Staut VS- Tho Mayor, 
itc. 

2 — Bockoi-er. Adin'r, tc. , 
vs. Haines et aL 

3— Nnar vs- Oraw. 

4— Diler.^ vs. L,-Qch. 

5— Rinold V3 Pi-f. 

6 — Venables vs. The .Mis- 
souri, Jtc, f". R. Co. 

7 — Giiiu.eraate va. Go'ild 

et rll. 

8— nealth Department, 

&te-, vs. Smith ct al. 
9— Low jiistetn vs. Be 

Lei 01 et al. 
Is.sufs of Fact. 
10— Daly v;.. .Munio et nl. 
11 — Ingei-iioll va. Ihe Tenth 

jS tioiial Liank. 
1 '2— Amol't et al.va.Iaorris. 
13 — Gaiis va. Ridsrely. 
14— The Sinclair Reetifyinsj 

Macliino Co. vt, 

Keloril, 
13— Fraz e v;. Woodin. 
16 — Carv vs. Smit.'i. 
17 — Smith vs, Toaer. 
18 — iiarriiran vs. Rojjin. 
19— Cral:rhoad vs. Kidd et 

ai- 
20— -^icho.son vs. Elliott. 
21 — ilill.^ et aL vs, Cole- 

man- 
22 — Bk xam vs. Lous. 
23— conant vs. ^ot. Ice 

Co. of -S. Y. 
24— The Mayor, ice, vs. 

N. Y. and . .st.iten 

Island Ferry Co. 
25 — RoderigaH vs. i'. lUvor 

Suv. iDSIitUtiDn. 
2G— Roceri,?as. Arm'r. i:c., 

vs. K. R. ^^ay. Inst. 
27 — Fowler va. Buitorby. 
2 — Benner va. D.icloa et 

aL 
29 — Dugan vs. C!all3?rhan. 
30— Heischl vs. Seller et 

al. 
31— McLean, Pres't. &c.,tb. 

-Tlauhattaii (Juota^ 

tioii . elegrapii Co. 
32 — Arnoidet al.va -VngelL 
33— Shcrhen et al. vs 

Jacobs. 
34 — Schaler vs. Germinia 

Bauic of New York. 
35 — Ban.i of Paris va. 

Sciiuchardt et aL 
36— Hanili!* va. Br .-wuer et 



■Nos. 
38— Atl. St Pao- Tel. Co- vs. 

Pro:cott et al. 
.■JO — 'ihaiinon vs. -StaiTDrii. 
40 — Spader vs. -V.Y. tlova- 

teil, It. K. Co. 
41— Joiitfs.'-x'r.Stc.Ts.Win- 
s^cr et al. 
42— Dusoubury vs. Hiller 

er. 111. 
4.0— Hatcu V.9- Dillon et al. 
4-i — Cunainj-Thain vs. Cau- 

niu'rhfiin. 
45 — Waidrop vs. Howell et 

aL 
46— WoodiuiT vs. Boyden. 
i7 — Wakitnaa, Receiver, 

itc. Vs. Gross et id. 
48— Miirr..y vs. McClane 

ec a I. 
49— Bi-ailoi-d et al. vs. 

B!s8el et aL 
50 — Po'hauiua vb. Meigs, 

Jr.. etaL 
51— AntiTPWs vs. Elehards 

et al. 
52— Boll,:idin'r,V!>- Si>o;ts, 
53 — iccctinsrer, adiu'x- vs. 

John. 
54— .Slaws u et al. vs. 

VV'aikins et nl- 
55 — Heiidersju vs-Sextou. 
5(3 — I'otter vs.Gracv et ul. 
57 — Vaiidenbur^ih vs, N.l. 

lilevated K. R. Co. 
OS— Smith vs. Schwarz- 

chiou e! aL 
59— Sniiti va. Cautrell. 
Gl — Lovveustein va. De 

Leyer et aL 
61— Biyca va. Furan etal. 
62— 'iVistermau va. Rem- 

iny:tou, Jr. 
63 — Rossi! er et al. vs, 

Wiekes. 
64— Tlaitni-iu vs. Koster. 
65— Oakley va. Ilvatt. 
Or>— Mack va- Baraett. 
67 — Haines vs. .Maikham. 
tiS-Shafer vs. Ruck, 
69-Me.yeret al. vs. Koss. 
70— Moid vs. -Moid. 
71 — Bever et oLvs.Kester. 
72— Wilder vs. De la 

Vei'irue ot al. 
73— Keli/ vs. D3 la Verguo 

ec al. 
74 — lilinger et a", va. De 

• > idf et ill. 
7.")- Deitz vs. Fariah. 
76 — i.''ald\ve)l, rec'r, vs. 

i'reauor, 
77— Winn etaL vs. Crosby 

asalgnec. 



37— Blackwell et al. vs 
Boeae et al. 

BITERIOR COURT— TRIAL TKRM— PART I. 
Held bu Han/ord. J. 

Xoa. -Nns. 

298— Canzi va. Rothe:8-;301— Moranse vs. 



vs. 



beriier licaL 
254— De iiait et al 

Fowler. 
761— Treacy vs. Uecker et 

aL 
687— Furnian vs. Titua. 
291 — Ci#si.iluo vs. sharty. 
257 — Arnold vs. Clark. 
812— Gl. hurt vs. Chase e! 

at. 



Herz 

bern. 

632— Kiiapp, Receiver, vs. 

The Mayor, 5tc, 

97— Ne-wcinjuoe vs. Terry. 

i97 — Kohnetivs. Uiggma et 

al- /' 
'47— Dtacher vs; Frey. 
'76— Seas vs,Marelinet al. 
75 -O'.irieu vs. arey. 
270— Schuster vs. Moore, 
I impioadetL 

COiniOX PLEAS— EQUITY TEEM. 
Htla bii ICobumon, J. 
Kos. (N'os- 

1— Finlcenauer vs. Demp-!35— The Eleventh WarJ 8. 
s y. , I Bauk va- Hay et aL 

2 — Jardiue vs, Payne et aL i36— Same va. -ame. 
3 — lie 1 e.ver vs. Wade. 137 — Same v.s. ,Sa:ue. 
4 — Matthews vs. Irish et 38— Hosenield et aL va. 



aL 



39- 



5— Renaald vs. Wheeler. 
6 — Renauld vs. Cull, nan. 
7 — >anie vs. Same. 
8— ReuauM vs Le liard. 
9- Htiudel vs. Krooks. 

10 — i<ewliud V3- Ugan et 
..L 

11— Holly vs. Biltke. 

1'2— Weiuer, Jr., vs. Mo- 
r-tnite. 

13— Patteu T.S. The N'. Y. El- 
evated It;.i,wa.y Co. 

14— Roberts V8. ..i.L ' ' 

io— Dald et ai. vs. f hyfe et 46 
aL 4^ 

16— Van Dolsen et al. vs. 
Smith. 

17— Schott vs. Wright et al 
aL 

18 — Brady vs. Brady. 

19— Sciiinitt vs. Jo-l30hn. 

20 — Jentel vs. Joelaohn. 

21— :^f.ha vs- Buhl- 

22— Ba.rd va. Averiil. 

23— ocotl et aL va. Knick- 
erbocker Ice to. 

24 — Phelan va. MeGiuuess, 
impl'd. 

25— Anb vs. Lehmaier. 

26— Same vs. same 

27— ^^'^lcn vs. vVelch et al 

2i — Friedlauder vs. Harris. 

29 — Barton va. -Moller et al. 

30 — liiileniann et al- vs- 
Dayis 

31— Wanner vs. Uoifman et 
al. 

32— Hubb?il vs. TheJudd 
Linseed and -perui 
Oil I o. , 

33— Lavrlor et .il. vs. Bren- 
nau et al 

34— The .M. Y- Life Ins. Co. 
vs. iie.-iguer et aL 



aL vs. 



Sto., 



Friedburg. 
-ispinwail et 

Balch et al. 
40 — Golzier, Receiver, 

Bur.;har I. 
41 — -indeisoii vs. Lav bold 

et al. 
4'2— Wal lack v». FuUing et 

al. 
43— Lat.irnp, Jr., vs. Neu- 

beriier et ::l. 
44 — Levin vs- Brusn 
45— crichio.-i et al. vs. 

Blesson et ul. 
•Steninie vs. Sufle;i. 
D.'Kraaf vs. H.r.isiin. 
48 — ->iewuiaB vs. Kehoo et 

a!-' 
49 — Weiner ts- itlchman. 
on — Uu at vs. Waa- k et aL 
51 — Davis vs- Bechstcin. 
52— Baier va. Uauschildt 

et al. 
.53 — Levev vs, Newman et 

aL 
54— Bosenburg vs. Connor. 
.>5 — Currau vs. tiuike ot al. 
50 — H*)We vs. Tne ftceoud 

Av. K- R. Co. et II I- 
57 — McKenuey va. 

Kcuiiey. 
53 — ^Yates vs Cnrr. 
59 — -Mahnlien vs. 

m lun it al. 

Demurrera. 

1 — Manchester et 

Scuappsrt et al. 
2 — Salter vs. fhe ilayor, 

itc. 
3 — Schysiicrg vs. Gold- 
stein. 
4— Pike va. Knfrlobarclt. 
o — Led'Aith Vs. The Mayor, 

G— McCarthy v3. The May- 
or, itc. 



Mo- 



Baum- 



al. vs. 



COMMON PLEAS— TRIAL TERM— PAKT I, 
UcLd by C. F. OAy. >J. J. 

SO: 



?t03. 

796 — Toppiag et al. va 

Bii*3.iye 
797— Kelly vs. Pravia. 
7a8— town v.s. -uelcher. 
7^9— Guidet vs-The .Mayor, 

itc. 
800 — Havtniu vs. Biachoff 
80i— Z I'lilev va. Levy. 
b'i*2 — - tllvr va. Kra.oer- 
803 — Eb jiniiaaseu versus 

Worm Club et aL 

COMMON PLEAS— TRIAL TERM— PART H, 
.tield by Kua Brunt, J. 
Nfis- 
82S— Flanac n, Assignee 

vs Couiier.v-, 
829— Mcuouald vs,H mover 

-Saiioaal B,i.nk. 
S:;0— Willis vs. Ueatv. 
831 — Brunine.hop versus 

Knickerbocker LU 

las. Co- 
832 — Do.vna va -Melvillc- 
833— Allen vs- Keia. 

COMMON PLEAS — TRIAL TERM— PART— III, 
HetUbyJ. f. Daly. J. 
Nns. iffoa. 

8l:>— Britton vs. Hastings. 1821— Wlilre. vs. Munford- 



8j4 — S-iBoA v.a.T-nddiniton. 
ii;0— WiiKea Vs. Irvi.g. 
sOa — ^ilcrrii et ai. va. 

Beyer. 
807- Gno i,-ieli vs. New- 

i'or;; Times et uL 
808— Same va. auic. 
8Jii— "irtUic v.i. Sam.'. 
SiO — aauie va. Same- 



831— ityan va. Slattery. 
835— F. pe Vi. Couiier, 

Sheriff. 
33G — Denny va. Grenuan. 
■>..7 — uoiison vs. ;hiur.ut>p. 
•i ..S — VV'u;iQer vs Whitney. 

39— .it; r.jach vs. i.r.ioka. 
■(lO— Sliea va. biooks. 

,.ii — KoUiuyer vs. isrooks. 

42— -Por.uue vs. Broona. 



S14— linoii vs. Wurth- 
81u— omiili VS. Wardrjp. 
816— Siuith Ty. Kerns. 
817— Ze.iiffv\ teekjr. 
»18 — ^ larit V8, Lee- 
»19— White va. W.nfo'.d. 
820— 'Jernstein, by Guard' 
ian, va, Jackson. 

MARINB 

Nos, 

8089— Rouse vs. Cohen. 

4551 — ^lehiu.alo ct al vs. 

Faith. 
4552— Sclimale et 

liiuiuierle. 
4553 — Scamaie et 

Juu>r. 
4568 — Uyiuau et 

Helu. 
3903- Huut vs- Clark- 
4oU9 — K.orn et al. vs. Solo- 

moa et aL 
3994 — Ljuilsnerg etal. vs. 

Loucseiu. 



822 — Jarvis va- Jk^ues. ic. 

i23— L'tiZiiero vu. Gates. 

824— .-^adder vs. ihe. May- 
or, ote- 

825 — C oint vs. Kquitable 
Lile Ins. Co- 

82G— Wakeniau vs. Phyffe. 

8-;7— Heidick va. iioyd. 

COURT— TUIAL TERM — PART I. 
J\l.t:id lu -dcker. J. 

-So3. 

1919— Tho Penrhyu Slate 

Co- vs- Allell- 

3707— Doll V,. Fialo. 
vs. oi82— L/ighlUi^r vs. Hirsh 
et ai. 
1.129 — Man et iiL vs. Cohen 

et aL 
j51'2 — 'the Chatham Nut. 
Bank vs. Kiiputrick 
et aL 
8^97 — Goruiauia Bank, N. 

Y-, vs. Stein. uetz 
4565— -Wood Broibers Co, 
vs- Kliiu et al. 



aL 



al- Vd. 



al. 



MARINE COURT — TRIAL TF.R.M 

Held by .^Innott, J. 

Nos. Noa 

7128— K ha vs.Oppenheim 

et al. 
2915 — stover Machine Co. 

VS- Phillips- 
6990— Glimiu et aL vs. 

Menziogei'. 
7067 — R hreuuurg et al- 

V8- Treanor. 



-PART lU- 



Sche- 



7148 — Hennessy vs. Mack-, 4349 

linet al. 
7117— Fr»nkelvs Clark. 
69 il— Thayer vs. Fuller. 
6098- Hayes et »1. V« 
„ Braudlt et aL 



5881— Silherinan vs. 

b.-r^ et al. 
COSj— WuiteliiU et aL vs. 

CniiiMi et el- 
7054— -Ntitiuaai Toy Co. vs. 

1) luoins et al. 
4869 — .:evuiaii ec al- vs. 

I-.lias et al- 



Denrau et aL vs. 

Cnrpp liter. 
7131— ^taunard vs. Petri 

et aL 
7058— Botbachild vs. Jack- 

aoi^ 



h 



IIea«^ vs. Stevenct. 
1062 — Cilst.iLiee vj. iuiiT. 

OoBV— l'OllhO:lV ft 111. V9, 
I he Mavor, 5tc- 

50712 — Wynkoop va. Tho 
Ma,> or, Si.e- 

598 "o— Forrester etal. vs. 
Ibc -Mayor, itc. 

1434_'riu. Bulla Head 
Bank. New-Yoik.va. 

.Moore i t al. 

1393— Uiiicd. States .'^pri'ai; 

Bed Coni;>iiiv vs. 

<'onn;;r. Suer-tl". 
1372 — Walah va. Kooney. 
lo46— The Security Bank 

ct X. V. va. Fuller. 
278(3— Vial vs. Tne Mayor, 

&.C- 

514 — Carrington et al. vs. 
VvarJeial. 
24SJ — Matlies vs- .^harp, 
Adininistratrix- 



MABISE COURT— TRIAL TERM— FART O, 

Meld by Goepp, J, 

NOB- 

46O0 — ■Wiih'beiiburst 
Fa ling.' 



al- 



N09- 

SJ-d — Schwarzand ©t 
vs. oppold et al. 
4'i;iO-C]au Itauald vs Mc- 

Don a id. 
1432 — WnUetit al. vs- N. 
Y. -S- Butter Co 



4601— Vnleutiue versiu 

France. 
400U — Martin vs. Martin. 
4tt0,'i — t'liunor va. Juch- 



4090-Bonaflon vs. Cham-'4605— Runyon vs. Phillips, 
herliu. '4606- Weatcott VS. Stiger. 

4u3I — Hulleuder vs. Aora- J460S — Fitzainraions el aL 

hams. vs. Johnson. 

4jo/— liai.er vs. King et 4G09-Biirke vs. Keete. 
al- 4015— Davis vs. White, 

8Jo5-Sm!th vs. Hawley ,i61u— KieiVr et al, vs. Hi'.- 

4390— N- Y. Ccllene of Vet. |4G21— WbitVk'Jr et al. ts. 

Sure- TS. Dickie. Haeker. 

4612— lliiDkins vs. Fisher. 14623— Valcutitic et al, vs. 

BiPiwber. 



4339 — l-uoha-vs. Sclimidt 
4a41 — Gohiamidt vs. tieo- 
hardt. 

4562— PCorzhelmBr vei.su.s 

Tucker. 
4.164- Le.mhaidt et al. vs, 

Ohler. 
631'.'— lilt to V8, BOBSiiD'' 

Ct.ll, 

8014— Srnwn ct at. vs. 
Wriuli;.. 
S'.aiiiH va. Same. 

Stcrnfells 



.=io:5- 

8a2'J- 



8U1- 



Fuller 
ct al. 

O'Dwyer vs. McAr 
t h ur. 
S '08 — Eritlia VB. Lopet. 

4,"«i— Palmer vs Struuss, 

4589— Pier et al, va, i eu- 

fral It- R. of -V. J- 
4590— U.,ker vs. Webb. 
4591— -Mattais ot al. 

vs. . \ 

4592— Weeks vs. Lichten- 

heini- 
7594 — Goldatetn vs. Juch- 
459i;— Frank vs, I'liillipj. 
41)97— Loehr vs. Melil. 
4o99 — Fraiikhu Vo-Maguire 

et ul. 



4624— Bach et al yr. Grosa- 

inever. 
4C25-KcIiock vs. Wilson. 
46-1) — Blaneliaril vs. Bun. a 
4628 — Decker va, Walters, 

liUi'ie idi'd- 

1632 — .Scliaipr vs. Kritlay, 

4i);-i3— dari'liir ct al- va. 

BiiKer et ui. 

4ii.*-.''i — BeViiis Va- llallz.'ir. 
4037 — -McKeiiii"y versus 

O'Hiien. 
4G38— trie and Pacific His- 

I'Ktcli vs Rii^; r et al 
tO.lfl — Lawless vs. i onlea. 
4010-Kol)leiiger vs. !• rank. 

4643— Kcvt)i.M-g et al. vs, 

Halse.v. 
4044 — I lioniel vs- Dicks 

et al- 
4645 — Fieiiideuborger va. 

Walker, 
4647 — Hi;;nios vs. Slev-ns, 
40ol — Rebleinnii YS. < l.ax. 
4653 — Deiizer ot al. va 

Colrfman et al. 
4555 — llacres vs. Pollock. 
4o56 — Marks vs. .Sclioi'per. 
4057 — Keeuan va- Schttn- 

w.LL 



COURT OF GENERAL SESSIONS— PART I. 
ITeld by Sutherland. J. 



John Liiipin, robbery. 
VViLitiii DefnaD, felonious 

csSdUlt and battery. 
Jolin J.ic -son, felonious as- 

BHUIt and battery, 
James .Meehau, feiouious 

assault au 1 battery. 
James H. Morns, feiouious 

tiSSHult una battery. 
Pnilip Cnyle. felonious as- 

Bauit and battery. 
Eeu,jamiu Nooie, burglary. 
Kat.. tiujiietju- grand lar- 

eeu.y- 
Nellii! Meyers, grand lar- 
ceny. 
Ch-iries Barman, gtand 

la rcea.V- 
Alonzo Loaee, grand lar- 

ce.iy- 
Thomas Cavan, grand lar- 

ctuy- 



Wiiliam McGowan, grand 
larcen.y 

Daniel Gilmore, grand lar 
cen.v. 

James McLoughlln, false 
pr teusea. 

John dain, lalae pretenses. 

Dennis Garrcy, petit lar- 
co n.y. 

John Clifford, petit lar- 
ceny. 

The following homicitle 
cases are placed on -he 
day calend.ir to tlx date 
for trial : 

John Laz::rie. 

Armand Baux, Eniil Jost. 

itcoertr-Gerrity. 

Francis .ucGuire. 

James alcGuiiO. 

Daniei Browne. 

Uavid Ileniy Peterson. 

COURT OF GENERAL SESSIONS— PART U. 
KelJi by Gildersleeve, J. 
John Walsh, robbery. |Wilihim Ross and William 

hdv/a.d tiuclair, leionlousj Doyle, burglary. 

asaauU and battery. Jobu Donovan, grand lar- 

Pftirick Harill, felonious ceny- 

asiunU and battery. ICharles Wilsoa, grand lar- 

Wiliiaui c. Sherwood, burg-' ceny- 

i ry. Ma :gio Rogers, grand lar- 

Geo.-ge Leitch and Louisi een.y. 

M'ovHIer, burglary. i George E- Nortoa, petit lar- 

Jainca -Martin aud James ceny, 

Tracy, disorderly 



Campbell, buiglaiy. 
James, vv ilaou, burglary. 
Chuiles Colo, uurglaiy. 
Jonn Cardigau, burglary. 



Ann 

house. 
Tho iiaa Ileuaon, 

and battery. 



as.iaolt. 



IHE SUFUBVlSiON OF ELECTIONS. 



DKCISrON OF JUDGE BKNEDICT IN THE UNITED 
STATES CIRCUIT CuURT IN THK MATTER 
OF APPLICATIONS TO BE APPOINTED 
SUPERVISORS. 

In the matter of the spplicatron of Jamea Tyner, 
John Wood, aud Huj^h jSlcQuiijir, to ba appointed 
Supervisors of Elections, J uujie Benedict has ren- 
dered the lollowing decision : 

The statuta which imposea npon the Circuit 
Court of the United States mo duty of ap- 
poiutinR Supervisirs of Elooito-js , provides that 
tile Cuief Supervisor shall receive the aoplicatious 
of all pan Its lor appointment, aud in open court 
" present such appiicacions to the Judge thereof, 
and luniisn inlormation to him lu respect to the 
tippoiutmeut by the court of such hapervisors ot 
E'.ecuoiis." In pursuance of this requirement of the 
la^y, the Chief Supervisor has presented (o 
tho court lour appiicatious to be ap- 
pointed Supervisors of the Second -District of 
the Second Ward of this city, and informs the 
court that each ot each applicants t>oaseascs the 
requisite intelligence, character, aud integrity; 
ihaC they are reaideuts of iho election district; 
that one of tbeiu, Wiuijin Burton, is a memoor of 
the Kepnblicau party, and tnat the other three are 
memoers of the JJemocratic Party. Ij'roiii these ap- 
piicau.s two are to be chobea, -who, to nso the 
v^oids of the stataie, shall he of difloreat political 
partiua. No objection is made to cne appoiutmeut 
o! W'iUiam Burton as a mombor of the Kepublican 
rarty, but* to tae appoimineDt of Wood 
and Mct^uigg objaotiou ia made on the 
Uiounds mat they are not members of the 
li.-mocratlc Paity, and have not been recom- 
lueuded by the rej^uiar treuerai Committee of 
the Ueiuocratic Party, but have been recommended 
b.y what has been termed tne General Committee of 
Slocdm Democrat.s, but wnich styles itself the 
King* Count.y Deiuocratio Ueneral Committee. 
Tuts objection h-as been taken upon the aiteruoon 
of tha last day betoro the day^ of registration, and 

I am comneUe*'. to dispose oi U lorthwith upou the 
casu as it stands, for, when applicatioua have been 
made, I am nut willing to appoint a K«publican 
Supervisor without at the same time appointing 
oue of a diffdrenr political party, aud if no app.dnt- 
meni be made the registry ot to-morrow will be 
beld without the presence of any Supervisors. 

1 remark, iheu, that ueirher the Htatute nor any 
DriQciple of law requires that the recommeadatiou 
ot a Gdueral Commiiiee or of any other org uiza- 
tion bhoil be cnsidered the sole and necessary evi- 
dence to snow till) poiiiical standing of an aopiicaut 
fur appoiutmeut to be Supervisor ot Elections. The 
rcC'jmmendatiOn of what nas beeii here termed the 
regniar Democratic G-dueral Committee ma.y be sut- 
iicieat to iinuw taat a person is u memour of the 
Democratic Party, but the absence of such recom- 
mendaiiou is nut conclusive or prima lacie proof 
tiiat the persoQ is not a member of that nary. 

In this instance the applicants ouircted to in 
th-.r written applications declare thsmselvea to be 
members of the Democratic Party, and the report 
OI the Cnief Supervisor is in conformity with the 
ueclaraauu. Upon tne argument it was conceded 
tnac the applicants have for a couaideraole period 
ot time acted openiy as belonging to tho Demo- 
cratic Party, and are uow opeulj- supporting ali the 
C:iudida.ea tuat up To this time have been uonil- 
naed bv tho Democratic Party tor lue coming elec- 
tion. Such being tue fac.s I am unable to see 
any good reasons tor rejecting the applications. 
Upon tbe argument, the suggestion was 
mam by counsel that the app.icuuts obiected 
t , were acting with a lozal crgauizaciou, styled the 
Slocum Organization, aud that it is the design ol 
tuao orgauiZjLion to co-operate with the Kepuuiican 
Pariy at tuo coming election. In Dehaii of the 
iipijlicams it was conceded tiiat they were acting 
wun the Slocam Democrats, but tue tsibteuce of 
any such intention as suggested was deuiea. jiXue 
requirements ot the statute that a,jpiicacioii8 o! this 
coaracier shall he preseuted in open court by tuo 
Cuiet Sjupervi-sor, that intormation respecting 
the applications shall be lurnished by the 
Cuiet Supervisor, aud that the appomiment shall 
b.:; made .ly tue court, indicate that at least 8uii.e- 
miug more than a suggesliau ot counsel shall he 
placed hoiure tne couic as a basis of judicial action. 

II i„ be uut tho ii.ieutiou oi the stutule that tbe 
facts roporteu by tue Chiet Suyemsor sball consti- 
tute the; facts upon wuiob tne uuuit is to act, it cer- 
tainly IS not too much to asit that the tacts relied 
ou bo maue to appear by alhaavit or otuer proof. 

lu the absence, iheu, ol any iutorm<»iion from the 
Chief fcuperviser as to the loun atiou ot the sugges- 
tion mane, and of any proof ot any fact tiom 
WJich the truth of the suggestion c-in be iu- 
f. rrcd, Us accuracy haVing boon denied, I 
must uold that tne case presents no taut lu auoport 
of tne suj.gestion that can be made the basi-s of 
jadici.li aciiiin. As the matter has been pUced be- 
luie me tuero is no room to douot tuat if one of 
those applicants be^tipointed the two Supervisors 

will be or different political parties, as tne law re- 
quuos- 

li appears that out ot the whole number there 
are sumo tjiteen appiicaiioas to wuich tue present 
obieciion Is deairea to ue considered as made, aud 
in ibeae cases tbe upiiOiutments will be maile troiu 

those roconimenoed by the iwo General Cominit- 
tei-a in th a city equally, wuere tbe appiicanis 
iil'o ot equal luteliigeuce aud good character, se- 
Iec,in2 tueiu alct'i'uateiv irom iho di.»triet8 lu tne 
order ot the a,jplicat:ons. 1 also take this oopjr- 
tuuity to repeat what waj staled at tho o])eniiig of 
court, that uoua of tue upjoiuimjUis are tlaal. 
Any one or all may he revoko.i aua a new apiioiut- 
meut made, aud sucn action will be promptly 
taiien wuon atiy eviacnce, wlic.hjr of collus'.vti 
Ocsigu, poluicai staudiug, or othoi pertiiieui fact\ 
shall oo presented to tue court, wuicU for tuatr 
liurpiisB is Kept open every day until the election, 
it oeing tho uetetiuiuatiou ol the court that the 
requireuicut ot the law that the two Supervisars 
Bh-,ij be otdilfjieut political parties, shall bo com 
plied with in letter and spiiit. 

SCIENCE IS AMEIilCA. 

THE BRITISH ASSOCtAtlO-\ AND ITS SES- 
SIONS— SIR W. TliO-MSO .'S OPE-XING AD- 
DRKSS — A TKIDUfli TO SCIE.VCI^ AND 
ACTIVITY IN THE NEW WORLD. 
Iu the department ot mathematical and 

physical acieuca of tUo British Associatioa, tuo 

President, Sir W. Tttoms'in, in the course of his 
opeiilug address, said : 

'- Six weeks ago, (vheu I landed in Eiglaad after 
a most interesting trip to Aiuerici aud haoi, and 
became painfully conscious that I must have tho 
honor to address you hero to-day, 1 wished to write 
an adJress of which sc.eace in America should oe 
tho subject- I ca-nj ham', indeed, vividly im- 
picssed with much that I had seon, both in the 
great Exnihiiiou of Piiiiadelphia auJ out of it, 
Bhowiui tho truest sciouiitic spirit aud devo- 
tion, the originality, the inveutlveuosa, the patieui, 
pe:-»averiu;i, tnorougDuess of work, the appi-ec;a- 
iiveuoss, and the generous opea-tuiudednes:) and 
synipatuv irom which the great things ot scieace 
come- I wish Pc inid speafc lo you ot tbe Teteraa 
Hcury- generous rival ,oi Faraday lu electro-magne- 
'<c aisovvery ; of Peuce. tho louuder oi hb^li 




mathematics in Am»rlc»; of Bach«, and of tbe 
SDlendid hmltaee he has left to America and to the 

world in the United States Coast Survev ; ot the 
great school of astronomers wbich followed Gotild 

Newton, Newcorab, Watson, Youne, Clarke, 
Rntherford, Draper, father and son ; of Gommander 

Belknap and bis great exploration of the Pacitiij 
deptha bv pianoforte wire, witb Imperfsct apparataa 

mippiied from Glasgow, out of which he forced a 
fliiccess in hia own way ; of Capt. Sigsbee. 

who followed with hke fervor and resolu- 
tion, and made lurther improvements Jn tho 
apparatus by which be has done marvelR of 
eibv, quick, and sure deep-sea souudiug in his little 
surveyng-ship Blak"; and of the admirable official 
spirit which makes such men and such domes ooa- 
Bitilem Ihe United Slates :NaTal Service. I would 
like to tell Tou- loo, of my rea.son for confidently ex- 
pecting that American hydrography will soon sup- 
ply the data from tidal observations long ago asked 
Of our GoTernmentin vain by a Committee of tho 
British --\8Si)ciation, by which the ataount of tho 
earth's elastic yielding to the distorting influence 
of the suii and moon will be measured- and of 
my strong hope that the Compass Depart- 
ment of the American Navy will repay tue 
debt t> I'l'iiNCf, E;i;:lanii, and (ierniauy 

HO appreciatively aekanwitrtse.l in their repvint o"l 
the works ol UoisaQti, Airy, Arcbiiiald Smith, 
Kvana, and the ]-,ivei pool Compa8,s Oomintttee, by 
giving Ul return a fresh uiaiiue survev of terres- 
trial magneti-m, to supply the navigator with data 
fir coiTe'iting hia c;impa,H« without sights of sun 

or stars. In tho United States telegraphic deparc- 
rnent I saw and heard Elisha Gray's splendidly 
vkorkodout electric telephone actually sounding 
tour mesaage.s silnultaueousiy ou the Alor.se 
Code, aud clearly capable of doing yet lonr times 
as many with verv moderate improvements of 
detail ; and I saw Edison's autiim.^tic telegraph 
delivering 1,015 words in fitty-soven seconds : 
this done by the hmg-nogleotcii electro-chemical 
niuthed of Bain, long ago condemned in England to 
the holfct work of recnrdiug from a relay, and then 
turned adrift as ueediessly delicate £»c that. In 
the Canadian department I heard 'To be or not to 
btj ■* * * there's the rub,' ihrough an electric 
wire, bat, scoru'ng monosyllaoRss, the electric ar- 
ticulation rose to hleher flights, and nave me pass- 
ages taken at random from the New- York new,»- 
papers: 'S, S. Coxhas arrived, (I faiUd to make 
outthes.s (.'ox;) "Ihe City of Kew-Tork,' 'Sena- 
tor Morton,' -'itie Senate has reao.vod to print a 
thousand extra copies," 'The Americans iu London 
have resolved to cciebratd the coming Fourth 
of July.' All this my own ears he.ard 
spoken to me with unmistakable distinct- 
ness by the thin circular disc armature of 
just such another little electro-magnet as this 
wlixh I hold in my hand. The words were shouted 
iviih a clear and loud voice by my colleague-judge. 
Prof- Wat.sor, at the far end of the line, holding his 
mouth close to a stretched Membrane, such as voa 
see before yon here, carriiug a little piece of soft 
iron, which was thus made to perform in the neigh- 
borhood of an electro-magnet iu tiicuit with the 
line motions proportional to the sonoridcmotlons of 
tho air. This, the greatest by far of all the mar- 
vels of the electric telegraph, is due to a young 
countryman ot our own, Mr- Graham Bell, of 
Edinburgh and Montreal, and Boston, now a nat- 
uralized citizen of tbe Uaited State*