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Full text of "Newmarket Era and Express"



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SERVING NEWMARKET, AURORA AND THE RURAL DISTRICTS Of NORTH YORK 



ERA IOOTH YEAR, EXPRESS-HERALD 57TH YEAR 



NO. 9 



NEWMARKET, ONTARIO. THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 1952 



SINGLE COPIES 5 CENTS EACl 



HOUSEWIFE'S QUICK 

ACTION SAVES 

HOME FROM FLAMES 

* — 

The quick action of Mrs. Fred 
Conklin, Prospect St., prevented 
what could have been a serious 
fire in her home early thj$ morn- 
ing- Mrs. Conklin found the 
wastepaper basket lit '.her' bed- 
room on fire and the fire spread- 
ing to the bed-clothes and gar- 
ments. 

She managed to get some of 
the burning clothes down the 
stairs and into the yard. The rest 
she threw out the window, burn- 
ing her hands in the process. She 
had made her husband's break- 
fast and was lying down until 

time to get the children off to 

school when, prompted by her 
young son, she went upstairs to 
discover the fire. 

Newmarket Fire Brigade was 
called but there was little for the 
firemen to do, thanks to Mrs. 
Conklin's quick thinking. 



HOKT. SOC. MEETING 

A meeting of the officers and 
directors of the Newmarket Hoi*- 
ti cultural Sodety will be held on 
Tuesday, Mar. 4, at 8 p.m., in the 
recreation room of Trinity 
United church. 




In broomball scramble, the fellow on the Ice is Bert Tomlinson, Miami Beach, who is 
pinned down in Big ice show at Keswick last wee kend by, left to right, Betty Galloway, Evelyn 
Young and June Winch. The show revealed new and old taiem in the district. Experienced tech- 
nicians were found in neighborhood for the show. The three cowgirls below, Marjoric Page, 12j 



■•> 




uartet Inspires 



, i 





er Interest In 




USLC 



The program by the Solway 
String Quartet at the Newmarket 
Concert Association's second con- 
cert in a series of three this year, 
changed many interested moder- 
ates into enthusiastic supporters 

of chamber music. 

The prospect of two hours or 
so of Mozart and other early 
composers could have been over- 
welming for some music lovers 
but the Solway group chose 
'Pop' numbers for part of their 
program. 

The string quartet was found- 
ed in 1948 and has achieved a 
reputation through many concerts 
throughout Ontario and on coast- 
to~coast broadcasts over the C. 
B. C. as well as short-wave 
broadcasts to South America and 
Europe. 

:.: "Convinced that the general 
public and not merely a small 
audience with specialized tastes 
can be interested in chamber 
music, the Solway Quartet pre- 
sented a "Pop" concert at Hart 
House theatre, Toronto. The suc- 
cess of the concert started a C. 



ations on the Theme, London 
Bridge Is Falling Down." 

The next concert to be held 
Friday, April 4, will feature 
Mary Syme, pianist, and James 
MiUigan, baritone. 




Marlie Mathews, 13 and Lois Sedoro, 14/ threaten to put an end to 13-year old cowpoke, George [ _^lil'_ s ? ( r ' es aiu * a tour of Ontario 

'Skip' Proulxs singing career if he hits' a sour note. 



Photos; Ted Leonard, Keswick 



_i_. 



Keswick 
Revives 



Described by some as the "big- 
gest thing that ever happened in 
Keswick", a great ice show was 
held in the Keswick Memorial 
arena Friday and Saturday nights 
with a cast of 200 children from 
seven district schools. Sponsored 
by the North Gwillimbury Ath- 
letic Association, the show was 
written and directed by Horace 
Brown, association president. 
.. The carnival was a co-opera- 
tive affair from start to finish, 
with cast representatives from 
schools at Jersey, Bclhavcn, Kes- 
wick, Mount Pleasant, Baseline, 
Roche's Point* and Elmgrove, 

Some of the children had never 
been on skates before; Back- 
stagers who had never worked in 
shows "handled props like vet- 
Brown found talent and technical 
Brown found talent an d technical 
experts from the Keswick dist- 
rict, hitherto unknown for their 
skills. Make-up man Jack Wright, 
Keswick, once was make-up man 
for the Halifax Repertory theatre. 
Bob Tomlinson, Roches Point, 
was lighting expert who once 
handled the lighting at the West 
End theatre, London, England. 
Dick Msjn, Sutton theatre man, 
handled the spotlight/ . 

A hardworking executive had 
spent many hours in preparation 
or the show. They often sat for 
four or five hours at a time at 
planning meetings. . 

Association executive is made 
up of Horace Brown, president; 
vice-president, Ross Hea ton; vice 
president Perry Winch, Jr.; sec- 
retary, Mrs. Doug Arnold and 
treasurer, Sam Borscellino. Board 
of directors is made up of Roy 
Galloway, Keswick, Bert Tomlin- 
son, Miami Beach, George York, 
Jersey, Dot Menar, Willow Beach, 



Jud Rutledge, Mount Pleasant, 
Clarence Selby, Elm Grove, Ber> 
nard Thompson, Belhavcn and 
Alan Chalmers, Roche's Point. 

The Athletic Association plans 
future projects in the community; 
proposed projects outside, of pre- 
sent sponsorship of baseball, 
hockey and other sports, include 
proper aquatic instruction, more 
figure skating and a township 
regatta. 

Ice soloists at the carnival were 
Mary LaChappcllc, Sutton, Bar- 
bara Hare and Anne Burgain, 
Stouffville. Mine. Zizi La tour, 
European refugee skating star, 
turned out to be Harry Haines, 
Newmarket. Newmarket Taxi 
boys and Delbert Gibney, New- 
market, clowned with their vin- 
tage Ford. Roy Galloway, for 
the first time in his life, was in 
charge of sound effects and 
music. 

Special school numbers were 
Painted Doll by Keswick school. 
Winter Wonderland by Roche's 
Point, Jersey Roundup by Jersey 
school. Old Woman In A Shoe by 
Elmgrove, (Doug Arnold's shoe 
holding eight children). Baseball 
on Ice by Baseline school, Belha- 
vcn Fallies by Bclhaven and 
Mount Unpleasant Witches by 
Mount Pleasant. 

*T never enjoyed doing a pro- 
fessional production as much as 
this amateur one" said Horace 
Brown. 




under the auspices of the Depart- 
ment of Education. 

The program at the high school 
auditorium Tuesday night in- 
cluded Mozart, Tschaikowsky, 
Boccherini, Dvorak and a light, 
humorous miniature suite. 
"Pops" were "Smoke Gets In 
Your Eyes," "Jamaican Rhum- 
ba", arranged by Lucio Ago- 
stini, "Jazz Pizzicato" and " Vari- 



SCOUTS AND GUIDES 
PARADE TO SERVICE, 
ST. PAUL'S CHURCH 

Activities for Scout-Guide 
week were climaxed in Newmar- 
ket by a church parade to St. 
Paul's Anglican church on Scout- 
Guide Sunday, Feb. 24. The 
Newmarket Citizens' band pro- 
vided the music for the parade 
and joined with the cubs, scouts, 
guides and brownies of the town. 
St Paul's church was filled to 
capacity for the service. 

The parade fell in at the Scout 
Hall and moved along Timothy 
St. to Main and down D'Arcy to 
the church. Following the pro- 
cessional hymn, the colors were 
received by the rector, Rev. J. T. 
Rhodes, from the color party. 
Hymns for youth were selected. 

Mr. Rhodes paid tribute to the 
leaders who volunteer their time 
and energies for the young people 
of Newmarket. He called atten- 
tion to the invaluable training 
received in the movement and 
encouraged the parents to active- 
ly support their local groups. 



FOUR GENERATIONS WITH OLDEST 100 






c-vv -: r '"i 



A r" I '■' 3" 






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tfr. *& gen f^ ons are represented in this picture and the oldest, 
p.k" «r ar il r0t She '" u man - Island Grove, reached her 100th birthd^ 
f,T' tt .1^ WaS ** e f,rst Canaan woman to receive congratula- 
tory b-rthday greetings from Queen Elizabeth II. Mrs. Sherman 
^f 10 !™ "fij Mr -, w an 'l M «- A - N. Day, second generation, M™ 

Je4 fiEtoSSi th ' rd g * ner ? U T a** their little daughter, Nina 
Jean Uaj, fourth generation n, the family Photo by Budd 





■ -^ l „* m _ — - . 







I NG EVENTS 



THURS., FRL, SAT., this week— 
At Insiey's store, "Rond"' double 
value sale. Every suit with 2 
pairs of trousers at regular one 
pair prices. §39.75, $49.75, §59.75. 
mm clwO 

THURSDAY, FRIDAY, FEB. 28 
and 29— Two one-act plays, The 
Browning Version, by Pickering 
College and Harlequinade by the 

Newmarket Dramatic Club, at 
the town hall, 8.30 p.m. e2w8 
FRIDAY, FEU. 29 — Dance in 
Holland Landing Community 
■ball, at 8.30 p.m. Geo. Mitchell's 
orchestra. Admission 5Gc. c3w7 
FRIDAY, Feb. 29 — Euchre in 
Armltage school, sponsored by 
the Armitage Community club. 
Good prizes and refreshments. 



Time 8 p.m. Admission 3oe. 



At 8 p.m. Extra good prizes. Ad 
mission 35c. o2\v9 

FRIDAY, MAR. 7- Don Douglas, 
special representative of Filth 
Bros.. Tailors, will be ai Ang 
West's, 48 Main St., Newmar- 
ket. Choose your material now 
aiid arrange for an appointment. 

c2wi> 
FRIDAY, MARCH 7 — Euchre 
and crihbage party, Newmarket 
Legion Hall, 8 p.m. Prizes, re- 
freshments, admission 35c. Un- 
der auspices Legion Ladies aux- 
iliary. c2w9 

FRIDAY, MAR. 7— North York 
Temperance convention in Aur- 
ora United church, at 7.30 p.m. 
Oratorical contest and film. 
Guest speaker. Royal Moulton, 



*2wS 



SCHOOL OPEN HOUSE 

Newmarket public schools will 

hold open house next Tuesday 
evening, March 4. The four 
schools and class rooms with ex- 
hibits will he open for inspec- 
tion. Parents, guardians and 
friends of Newmarket pupils are 
invited to attend the open house. 



HITS EXPORT BUSINESS 
the closing of the border to 

shipments of Canadian cattle 
into the United States has meant 
an end to an* extensive export 



NAt 




E B. W. HUNTER 
SSESSOR, 

CONSIDER HELPER 

B; W. Hunter was re-appointed 
assessor by the Newmarket town 

trade from York county for the to , ullcI! J ast week at a 

time being. Cattle S&S "** * ?!>2 °° P,US |3 f ° r «" 

from York totalled over §100,000 



a year in recent years. The bor- 
dor was closed this week be- 
cause of the outbreak of foot and 
mouth disease in Saskatchewan. 



GERMANY. WAR. NOW PEACE 



Boy Throu 



A new Canadian boy, Lothar 

Kurt Awramow (pronounced 

Avramov), will he celebrating 

his third birthday tomorrow, 

with school friends. He is about 
four feet, eight inches tall and 
is in the fourth grade at St. 
John's school, Newmarket. 

Born Feb. 29, 1940, in. a* hospi- 
tal at Rathenow, a town near 
Berlin, Lothar was a leap-year 
baby; ho celebrates his birthday 
only once in four years but he 
Is 12 years old). 

''When Lothar |s CO years old, 
sitting in a rocking chair with a 
pipe and beard, telling stone* to 
his little grandchildren, he will 
say 'And today I am having my 
20th birthday/ and his grand- 
children will lx? astounded." 
That is what the doctor told Lo- 
tha's mother when he was born 
on Feb. 26, 1*40. 

As a Canadian citizen, it is un- 
likely that Lothar will tell his 
grandchildren much about the 
experience he had In the early 
part of his life. Although he has 
had only two birthdays, Lothar 
has seen much of war, death and 
suffering. He and his mother 
were in the encircled area of 
Berlin, just before the collapse 

and surrender to the Russian 
army. 

Now Mr. and Mrs. Petko Aw- 

ramaw and Lothar live in an 
apartment on Main St. Mr. Aw- 






ramow originally came from night for 



Kt IW 8 ^J!! . !?" ■ Gwnffl, V. fliey slept in the 

clothes they wore and their shoes 
were worn down through walk- 
ing until their feet bled. Since 
that time they lived in camps for 
displaced persons until they 
could come to Canada. 

Lothar has attended five dif- 
ferent schools, at Helmsteadt and 
Brunswick in the British zone, at 
Munich in the American zone, at 
Altenstadt, in view of the tower- 
ing Alps, and finally hero at St. 
John's Jn Newmarket, where he 
s settling down to catch upon 
lost time. 

Mr. Awramow, who speaks 
seven different languages, came 
to Canada on November S and 
found a job at the Office Special- 
ty. He also found ^glceaparU 
ment. His wife and Lothar ar- 
rived December 31. Compared to 
a tiny room in Europe/the fam- 
ily lives n a comfortable spa- 
cious apartment 

In spiter of the news on the 

radio and In the newspapers 

about the dangers of war again, 

Lothar's mother wants to forget 

about war, whether It Is justified 

or not, to have a home, to cook 

meals an^b^fe after the apart- 

ment^nl|S|Kj glad that her hus- 

ba "^ : JS®MP?*n* no °"g will 
refuse her that privilege. 

And Lothar will learn to speak 
better English, he a Canadian 
and celebrate his birthday every 
four years. 



Specialty Mfg. Co. Hut Lothar 
and his mother remember what 
it was like under a rain of 
bombs, when there was no place 
to turn or hide, fear that if you 
run here you will be killed, or 
if you run there you will be 
killed, to see civilians mowed 
down by strafing aircraft and a 
city in chaos. 

A mother and small boy didn't 
understand the "politik" or the 
war but they saw and felt a hor- 
ror which they are helpless to 
describe to Canadian friends. 
Now it is too far in the past and 
a lot of people wouldn't believe 

/Those last days of Berlin were 
a nightmare and the nightmare 
continued after the Russians oc- 
cupied the arcjBV There was 
little controt bvir Russian-occu- 
pying soldiers who would shoot a 
civilian who refused to give up a 
wrist watch or a bicycle. 

To flee asjfjiigas possible frohV 
the Russians was the one thing 
this family waft?e§ Now they 
wsnt to help a brother, a sister 
and a molheffi^ffigt stUMjiving 
a few kilometers from the Rus- 
sians in the British zone of Ger- 
many. They want them to cs% 
cape that fear too. 9 

Lothar and his mother, with 
other members of the family, had 
fled the Berlin area after the oc- 
cupation and walked day and 



assessing of new properties. 
Council also discussed the train- 
ing of an assistant for Mr. Hun- 
ter. 

Mr. Hunter is an excellent 
man, said the deputy-reeve, J. L. 
SpilJette, but some thought 
should be given to training an 
assistant. 

Members of council expressed 
satisfaction with Mr. Hunter's 
work but there was general 
agreement that an assistant 
should Le trained. It was felt 
too that an assistant would case 
the amount of work required of 
the assessor. 



over a week to West 



ART EXHIBITION 

An exhibition by professional 
artists living within a 20-mitc 
radius of Newmarket will close 
at Pickering College after the 
weekend. The show is open to 
the public on Friday evening, 
Saturday and Sunday after- 
noons. The show had an en- 
thusiastic opening and there has 
been a steady stream of visitors 
since. 

The works on display include 
a variety of media and are sign- 
ed by men whose talent has earn- 
ed them permanent , places in 
Canadian art.. 

The show is part of the effort 
of the college to bring to New- 
cultural displays which 

ouid not ordinarily be found in 
:a3owr^thl8 slz^ 



.^ >" 






TW 



FRIDAY, FEB; 20— World Day 
of Prayer in the Salvation Army 
Citadel, Queen St. W., Newmar- 
ket. 3 p.m. All women are urged 
to attend. clwO 

FRIDAY, FEB. 29— Leap Year 
Haiti Time dance in Zephyr Com- 
munity hall. Charlie VanZnnt's 
orchestra. Sponsored by Zephyr 
W.I. Lucky prizes. Admission 

FRIDAY, FEB. 20— The annual 
Toronto Centre North Presby- 
tery young people's skating party 
will he held in Qucensville 
Arena, at 8 p.m. Everyone wel- 
come. Admission 25c. *2w8 
MONDAY, MARCH 3 — Scout? 
Guide Mothers' auxiliary will 
meet In Scout Hall, 8 p.m. Pro- 
gram by Newmarket Girt Glikfis. 
Light refreshments. All mollu.'i- 
of scouts, cubs, guides, brownies 
and rangers welcome, clw9 
TUESDAY AND WEDNESDAY, 
MAR. 4 AND 5-Ontario Hog 
Producers' annual meeting at 
the King Edward Hotel, Toronto. 

elwO 

TUESDAYS. MARCH 4 AND 
MARCH 18— Meetings of King 

Legion Branch 438, at I««ko 
Marie Association Hall, 8.30 p.m. 

clwO 
TUESDAY, MARCH 4— General 
meeting, York County Hospital 
Women's auxiliary. Scout flail, 
3 p.m. W. II. Eves will give in- 
formal talk on "The Origin and 
Growth of the York County Hos- 
pital". Refreshments. Public 

cordially invited to attend. 

ctwO 

TUESDAY, MARCH. 4 — York 
County Nurses* Association 
meeting. Time 8 p.m., basement 
of St. John's school, Newmarket. 
Dr. John Dales will speak on 
"New Drugs". c2w8 

WEDNESDAY, MAR. 5— Legion 

hinito at tho Newmarket Legion 
hall, $ p.m. sharp. Jackpot. 
Share-the-wenlth and special 
games, 20 games 35c. Free bus 
after hlngo. clwfl 

WEDNESDAY, MARCH &:*& 
Bingo. King City Masonic Hall, 
at 8.30 sharp. Special prizes. 
Shnrethe-woallh; Jnckpot $23. 
Indies' Auxiliary, King Leplnn 
•138. * ctwn 

THURSDAY, MAR. 6th — At 8 
P.m., Aurora Lions Club bingo. 
Ideal playing conditions in our 
new Lions Hall. 15 games. Share- 
the-wcalth. $00, Jnckpot, ad- 
mission 50c. e2wf> 
FRIDAY, MARCH: 7— Benefit 
dagge^ln Mount Albert hall fojtf 
Jacqueline Lynas, Jackson's 
Point, whoso truck eolltled wltjiv 
a C.N.R, train, and Miss Lynas 
had fingers of one hand severed; 



session 

*1W9 

New- 



Toronto. No afternoon 

TUESDAY, MARCH II 
market Veterans' Association 
bingo. Please note change of 
day from Wednesday to Tuesday. 

Town Hall, Newmarket, lime "8 
p.m. cl\v!» 

WEDNESDAY, MAR. 12-Sprin" 
fashion show, Town Hull, New- 
market. Auspices Newmarket 
Business and Professional Wo- 
men's Club. Time 8 p.m. Admis- 
sion .50. Proceeds to furnish 
hospital room. tfT 

WEDNESDAY, MAR. t2 — St. 

Patrick's ten at the home of Mrs. 
E. H. Adams, 58 Park Ave., New- 
market, sponsored by the Good 
Cheer Class, Christian Baptist 
church. Tea from 2.30 to 5 p.m. 

c4w6 
THURSDAY, MAR. 13-St. Pat- 
rick's tea* and bake snip, at St 
Paul's Parish hall from 3 to 5.30 
p.m. Sponsored by St, Paul's 
Parochial Guild. tl? 

FRIDAY, MAR. 14 — Dance In 
North Gwillimbury Memorial 
Hall at Keswick, to Harvey Mil- 
ler's Orchestra. Dancing to 1 
a.m. Proceeds hi aid of Keswick 
Hockey. Admission 50c. c3w9 

TUESDAY, MARCH 14--Euebre 
nt Snowball school, 8.15 p.m., 
snonsored by the W.I. Admission 
35 cents. Good prizes, lunch. 

clwO 

SATURDAY, MAR. 15 - Whit- 
church No. fi and 7 Homo and 
School Association, second great 
annual rummage sale, nt Ash's 
Booth, Wilcox Lako a from 1 to 8 
p.m. Grand auction starts nt 8 
am. Also home-baking and 
fish pond for the children. 

c3w0 
THURSDAY/MAR, 27 — Begin 
now to collect your donations of 
good used clothing, white ele- 
phants for spring Onorlunity 
sale, Newmarket Home and 
School association, town hall, 1 
p.m. Mrs. Robert Morrison, con- 
venor. ^ clwO 
SUNDAY EVENING, MARCH 
30— Mnunder'a beautiful Cnntnla 
of Olivet to Calvary. Christian 
Baptist church senior choir, New- 
market, chvp 
THE SALVATION ARMY— na- 
tional Red Shield appeal will be 

from May 5Jo.M? v 26- ' t!2. 



The first organization meet- 
ing for night classes in Newmar- 
ket was held on Tuesday night 
in the council chambers over the 
fireball All those who were in- 
terested in carpentry were asked 
to be present and some 30 attend- 
ed. 

The group was divided into 
those wishing wood-working in- 
struction and those wishing 
household carpentry instruction. 
A second meeting will be held 
next Tuesday night in the base- 
ment of the town hall. It was 
planned to have it in tfie old 
council Chambers over the fire- 
hall, but the chambers were book- 
ed in advance by atiothor group 
so the meeting will be held in the 
basement of the town hall. 

Instructors in both phases of 
carpentry have been approached 
and are expected to be present 
for the meeting to outline the 
course. 

Those who wish to learn sew- 
ing are asked to attend a general 
organization meeting in the base- 
ment of the town hall on Thurs- 
day night at « p.m. when the 
courses will be discussed and 
class nights decided upon. Over 
30 replies to the questionnaire 
favored sewing courses of various 
sorts. 

On Thursday night, there will 



s To Organize 
Classes For 



Instruction 

It is hoped to make early an- 
nouncements about other gener- 
al courses, but at the present 
time, there is nut much hope for 
establishing commercial or aca* 
demic courses since they are usu- 
ally set tip during the start of the 
academic yeaft 

It would be appreciated, how- 
ever, if qualified instructors in 
English would contact the- Era 
and Express as there are several 
applicants for such a course. 




GET 

CASH AND CHEQUES 
FROM SGHOMBERG 

\ Safecrackers stole nearly $900 
In cash and $800 in cheques from 
the office of Cecil Maynard, 
weekend receipts from six sep- 
arate enterpr&es in the village) 
early Monday morning, when n 
heavy safe was broken into. Con- 
stable Arthur Moody stated. 

Ktvets of the safe door were 
drilled with an electric drill own- 
ed by Mr. Maynard. A heavy 
railway bar- was used to force 
open ,1he door and pry the parti- 
tions to reach the inner, bars. The 
safe door was left wide open. 
" The front door of the building 
oh Main St. was forced open to 
gain cntryf The break-in was 



be a meeting of those interested • discovered by Arthur Harrington 



in leather-work. The meeting 
will be addressed by an experi- 
enced leather-worker who will 
outline the course, its estimated 
cost, etc. The meeting will also 
be held in the basement of the 
town hall at 8 p.m. 

Those wishing to study welding 
are asked to meet at Orville Wil- 
son's Body Shop on Davis Dr. 
east near Goodman's Auto Parts 
on Monday night. Mr. Wilson 
will outline a course in welding 
and give an estimate of its prob- 
able cost. 

Courses in other subjects are 
being considered at the present 
time and as meeting places and 
instructors are found, they'll be 
announced in the Era and Ex- 
press. 



at 7 a.m., Mr. Maynard said the 
safe was badly damaged and 
repairs would cost hundreds of 

dollars. 



-,-/• 






1 



--v: 



« 




ST" 



mi 




a»B.» 



BILL 
...... KHALL 

Th£-. _.^ewinarkct Dramatic 
Club, In : co-operation with the 
staff of Pickering College, are 

presenting Terrenco Rattigon's 
play-bill consisting of "The 
Browning Version" and the 
farce, "Harlequinade", in the 
Newmarket town hall tonight 
and Friday nt 8,15 p.nv 

This joint undertaking prom- 
ises to provide one of the most 
interesting evenings of dramatic 
entertainment in Newmarket to 
date. 



. t - 




Mario Alice 'Minerva Munro, a ?"/' hns x J? m Iff h™Pl Wfor over 

four-vear ota frnm 7««w»? *2J ,w0 weeks. Norm Burling nnd 

hrnto^nr n «!T ^P 1 ^? ^ his orchestra nre donntlmr their 

urates her first leap-year birth- services for this tlnnec. Your at- 

day tomorrow, February 20. tendance nt the dance will he 

Marie is the daughter of Mr. and yetir contribution and will be 

Mrs, Leslie Munro, Zephyr, treat ly appreciated. Admission 



Rramidaughtcr of Mrs. Andrew 
Tait, Zephyr, and Mr. and Mrs. 
George Munro, Uxbridge. 



HOe ner person. c2w0 

FRIDAY. MARCH 7-Eiicnro in 
Qucensville school, snonsored by 
Queensviilp Women'* Institute, 



EUCHRE EVERY' WEDNES- 
DAY lit 8 p.m., In Roche's Point 
Memorial Club. Admission 35c, 
Every Thursday, at p.m., dnnc 
ing, admission 50c, Every Fri- 
day, at 8 p.m., pictures, admis- 
sion 25c. * tft 
EVERY THURSDAY NIGHT, 

mV chre A «P lnR0 °- v , er y Saturday. 
1?nm -iRSO p.m> Under auspices 
Keswick Hockey Club. tft 

DANCING EVERY SATURDAY 
night In Mount Albert hall to 
Norm Hurling and his Klngsmen 
orchestra. Modern and nld time 
dnnchm Jnckpot and other spe- 
cial prizes. A good time for all. 
Admission W)e. Time 9 p.m. tfl 
EVERY SATURDAY NIGHT — 
Dance to Jack Olios and his or- 
chestra, 0.12 p.m. New River- 
view Inn, Bradford, Ladles, 50 
cents. Men, 75 cents. tf5 



Mrs. David Askew, Newmar- 1 his 
ket, was elected president of the than 
North York Humane Society unsaid, 
the annual meeting on Tuesday, 
Feb. 21, Guest speakers were 
Mrs. Noel B. Knton and Col. E. 
CJeorgo Ilea do. 

Mrs. Eaton, president of the 
Ontario Society, Prevention of 
Cruelty to Animals, gave an in- 
teresting talk on "What the Hu- 
mane Society is and What it 
does." Mentioning the objec- 
tives of the S.P.C.A,, Mrs. Eaton 
said that it was an organization 
primarily founded to prevent 
cruelty to animals and birds. 

She described work carried on 
by the society, said that the so- 
ciety's Inspectors have the right 
to visit logging camps to check 
on the care given their horses; 
to stop trucks carrying cattle or 
chickens, and to ensure that they 
arc not overcrowded or abused 
in other ways, and ti follow up 
any reports of cruelty. 

Mrs. Eaton urged that Junior 
Humane Society he started in 
this district. Work of the edu- 
cational comimttee in teaching 
children how to care for their 
pots is one of the important ser- 
vices a society can offer in a 
community. 

Col. Rcade is Toronto Humane 
Society chairman of Civil De- 
fence for the Ontario S.P.C.A. 
Ho told nf a number of cases of 
cruelty which had come to his 
attention. Col. Readc said that 
everyone owes an animal care 
and protection. Frequently an 
animal is mistreated because of 



owner's ignorance rather 
malicious Intention, ho 



He echoed Mrs, Eaton's re* 
marks on the importance of be- 
ginning with the youngsters. By 
distributing information on the 
proper care of animals and the 
training of them as pets, through 
Its veterinary services which aro 
available to all animal owners 
and by its work in tho preven- 
tion of dlsenses among animals, 
the society Is one of the moat im- 
portant organizations in any 
community. 

Reports were presented by the 
officers and committee chairmen. 
The ennvass for funds which was 
chaired by Mrs. T. B, D. Tud- 
bull, Aurora, with the assistance 
of Mrs, Fred Edwards, Newmar- 
ket, realized. $7Gfl.<J8 In Aurora; 
Oak Ridges and district raised 
$200.<iB and the canvass in New- 
market netted $568.00, 

Elected to office for the year 
included: president, Mrs. Askew; 
vice-prcs., Mrs. Earl Fielding, 
Aurora; corr, sec., Ifl£S, Fred Ed- 
wards; rec. sec, Mrs. C. K. Grif- 
fiths; Irons., Mrs. Alex MacKay; 
hon. shelter manager, Mrs. J, E. 
Waterhouse; ways and means 
chairman, Mrs, James Gnirdner; 
educational chairman, Mrs, G. L, 
Boynton; advisory council, J. B. 
Wnterhouse, Col. E. G, Rende, 
Aurora, Dr. C. R, Boulding, Au- 
rora, James Otton, Alex MacKay, 
I,ornt> Paynter, Col. T. Dann, Au- 
rora, Byron Burbldge, Dr. Allen 
Ripley, Rfchmond Hill, A. M. 

Mills and Joseph Greer, 






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Thft Newmarket Era and Express, Thursday, Feb. 23, 1952 Page 3 



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Page 2 The Newmarket En *ad 

Express, Thursday Feb, 28, 1532 



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DEADSTOCK 

HORSES - CATTLE 
HOGS 



POTTAGEVILLE 

There was a good attendance 
at the United church service on 
Sunday morning to hear Rev. Dr. 
Little of Toronto, who gave an 
interesting talk on *-The Youth 
of Today". 

The W.A. held their monthly 
meeting at the home of Mrs. 
Claire Shaw on Wednesday, Feb. 
20. The ladies met in the mom- 



Queensville News «, 2S!K P „, 

Saturday in Toronto. 
Miss Anne Cunningham spent their grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. V S Jjjfr v^," „W*" d ; J^" a 






the weekend in^Guelph. 



rora on Sunday. 



Ffione Ma 
Toronto Em* 



GORDON YOUNG 



UMMED 



celebrated their 50th wedding 

anniversary on Tuesday. . 

• Master Jimmy PhinusterX*' tif 

ing for a quilting, and a delicious Newmarket spent several days 

lunch was served, by the hostess- v -ah his grandparents. . Mr-, and 

We are sorry to hear that Mrs. j|j^ Geo. Pearson' . 
Efts? Patton was confined to bed rae Mission Band has been re- 
in a heart attack last week, o^ani^ alfcwlffibe held every 



We extend congratulations to i On Friday, Feb. 29, the bingo, j Mr. Vine* Merrick of Toronto I t cnde .<* the Women's Institute 
Mr. and Mrs. Fred Smith, who j sponsored by the Athletic Soci* i visited friends here over the rmeetin £ an< * spoke on behalf of 



Mount Albert News 

^^^•^^eyer.edi-ltJwir „ arc „i s to celebrate the 
\Z«Z ^S^S^ES •?! !"PPy ^nt. They are: Mr. and 



\ 



^W 




GIBBONS 
TRANSPORT 

LOCAL ft LONG DISTANCE 

r ^— _', — r 

MOVING AND CARTAGE 

rawfure Storage 

PHONE 1161 NEWMARKET 



Another on our list is Mrs &m;. iw0 . w6eks in the Uniteathurfift; 

basement from 3.30 to 4.30 pJtn. 
The next meeting will be field: 
on Thursday, Mar. 6. : 

Mr. and Mrs. Ross Chapman, 
Donald and Bruce, ~ spent the 

weekend in Owen Sound; ' . 

We wish a complete recovery 



Li van who is at present withrher 
daughter in Toronto. 

Mr. and Mrs, George V/est aftd 
Barbara spent Sunday with their 
son, Mr. and Mrs. Ken West of 
Hamilton, 

Mrs. A. Funnell and Mrs." G. 
West visited Mrs. Jenkins last! 



ety, will be held in the school. .. j weekend. 
JV^ Angus Smith is OTpplymgi, JV W etin S of the Wj\. was 



at Jersey, school during Che iab- 
-called to her home in Prince Ed- 



held at the home of 'Mrs. Wilfred 
Aitdusoii on Thursda$i ; / 
Quite., a number- - frohi here 



ward Island because of her moth- f e ^ m J£ 6r ^ fo W'FndaJv at- 
ers illness. i e& v "#. Sff &*m& of tfte late 

rf^-wi .-« ^*x* z^ *u y* - l** *^ Stnckey, who was a former 

The WA will meet in t&e ^nr- J&ugg&t n ere* - 



ted church basement on Tuesday 
afternoon, March 4. The supper 
hostesses are Mrs. E. Stickwood, 
'Mrk-^-R^jf^.-afii ft. Sennett, 
Mrs;. HI Kershaw, and MrS. Me- 
Farquhar. 



Mrs. Geo. WStson, Mr. and Mrs. 
Clinton bendt (Annie), Mr. and 



the Health Unit. 
Capt. and 

Toronto spent 

%^%m S ^& Case en- &K" W * * 



Mr* r wiftW. r ¥& Granl A,Ien (Nora), and 
K.!v ?». f i & ,,cn ' M of Toronto; Mr. ahd 
fJu^ "L3? 9» K %6g (Cora) of Hamil- 



tertained at a family party on 
Thursday evening for Mr. and 



Eighty friends called to con- 



Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Davis 
spent Sunday with the former/si 
brother, Mr, Fred Davis, in Au> 

Miss Borinda Moss of Toronto 
spent tlte weekend with her pari 



Mrs. Jack Case, on being their gra . lulatc . thcm in * h e afternoon 
33rd wedding ^hnivcrsar£ They ?? d e >' en,n «- Mrs. H. Ross and 
were presented >VlR> a lovely 



j Tuesday." She "is stal" "suttering 1 f or Mr - Fred Simpson whs is \m 
from a bad knee injured some patient in York County hospital. 



-■TJri.^i.ianr.. 



weeks ago. 



; -* 



v 




KESWICK 
WEL1>DKUXING CO. 

4, 5, and 6 inch veils 
PHONE QUEENSVILLE 2404 

KESWICK, ONT. 



PAN t*s 

If ,iiv;n)able aj' 
wheru, I ;i i J ft y, 
• carry ih* largi 
| Stock of dresi a 
work pants /or 
mrr> an J boyi. 
Made - u> - rfteaj- 
urc is our special- 

CUFF 1NSLEY 

It'* the store with the 

merchandise. 



Sanitary Contractor 






Septic Tanks Pumped 

DraJfis Cieaned and Repaired 

24-Ifoor Service 



,C. STUNDEN 
Richmond Hill Phone 32IW 



SNOWBALL 

(Held from last week) ■ 
Mr. and Mrs. E. S. Keddicfe, 
R. R. 2, King, were at home io 
their friends during the after- 
noon and evening of Salurc&J* 
Feb. 23, in celebration of their 
25th wedding anniversary. 

A number of ladies from Snow- 
ball W.L visited the ladies of 
York County home on Feb. 14* 
Each lady received a gift, wrajH; 
ped as a valentine, cookies and; 
tarts -vere then served to both 
men and ladies, followed by a 
musical half hour with Mrs. W. 
E. Browne and Mrs. C. Copson 
at the piano. The singing was 
led by Mrs. C. Copson who also 
sang se\ r eral solos. 

The sympathy of the commun- 
ity gees to the Robert Cain fam- 
ily. Mr. Cain's sister, Mrs. L. 
Foster of Detroit, died suddenly. 
Mr. Cain left for Detroit imme- 
diately. 

Sunday guests at the home of 
Mr. and Mrs. Win. Gould were 
Mr. and Mrs. Win. Wassink of 
Kettleby. Mrs. Wassink is the 
former Barbara Gould. 

Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Blum and 
daughters spent the weekend at 
Stratford visiting relatives. 

Nan net te Dennis and brothers 
Eddie and Keith of Aurora were 
weekend guests of Miss Cora 
Morning. 



Newmarket, 

Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Clark, 
formerly of Kingston, $£&* now 
of Toronto, were Sunday guests 
of Mr. and Mrs. H. Kershaw. \ u 

M2S5 Jean Cunninghamof Bow- 
manville spent the weekend with 
her parents. 

; -_ Mrs. Tomlinson of Baltiesgettt 

several days with her sister, Mrs. 
Fr,ed Qibson* who is conva lescing 
at her home following her receht 

operation, 

: jBiy anoV Mrs. Cecil Cummer 
and Janice, and Mr. and Mis. E. 
Hutchinson of Warkworthj were 
home for the Suth wedding an- 



The" Young People's Union wiHJ^nts^ Mr.jandMrs^ G, Moss; 
present tfie^iJr play; '^Ih doubt I M^ L -G. Jackson and girls and; 



about Daisy",: ' ih the United 
church : basement on Wednesday 
night, Mar, », at 3.1$ p.nl. Every* 

one welcome^"-. 

Qri -£^^>tii|Ebt»KH^:7i'(fi«- WL 
t. is sponsoring; a euchre in 
Queens vUIe schbbl. The euchre 
committee i$ ^Irs. S. Grant MrSi 
T. Miller,. Mrs. Clarence Wright 

Mrs. ft Mahoney, and Mrs. R. 

Sennett. Extra good prizes will 

oe given. 



Mrs. Wm. McKinley and Delia 
spent Monday with Mrs. R, 
Bryan in King. ''■-// 

Mr. and Mrs. Russell Dove 
yfeited friends at Belleville, oh} 
Sunday. 

Mr. and Mrs. Aldfn Winters 
are on a tour through the United 
States. 

Miss Mary Oldham passed: 

away on Sunday at h|f residence* 

here. She had been in faiiihg 
health for some time, but recent^ 



rhUTor from alt the guests. 
Congratulations to Mr. and 



Mrs. Steeper poured tea ih this 
afternoon, and Mrs. Mary Roll- 
ing and Miss E. Hayes In the 



Mrs; Geo, Burnham, who on Feb- H> emi ]«' 3*** Lols Leach and 

ruary 19 celebrated their 62nd Hev, ; r, y 1-ehman attended the 

wiDdding: anniversary. gu ^ sts In the dining room". 

\ ^mm0^^m^,&S&me *M supper-time they tit? ad^ 

||^^%h| Mrs. Mary ionrned io *N United church 



Slrk .Bobby Johnson is spend- 'ly >t was believed that sne was 
ing a couple of weeks at the home some better. We wish to extend 
Of her soni Mr. Alfred Johnson.! our sympathy to her brother, 

M^ses Ann and Marian Main- Stewart, at home, and sister, 



niversary of their parents, Mr. ! Smith, 



prize of Belhaven spent the week- 
end with Mr- and Mrs. Angus 



" 



and Mrs. Fred Smith. 

Watch for later announcement 
of the fashion show to be held 
in the United church basement 
sometime in March. This will 
be sponsored by the W-A. ladies. 

Miss Marie and Master Lome 
Burgess spent the weekend with 



Mrs. Calhoun, at Beeton. 



Prize winners st the euchre 
last week were: Women's: 1st, 
Mrs. I. West; 2nd, Mrs. Wm. 
Sweezie; Men's: 1st, Mr. Wm. 
Swee2ie; 2nd Mr. Roy Watts. 

Mrs Burling won the lone hand Smith. Mrs. Leslie Mount and 
pme and Mr. Fred Dew won the Mrs. Stewart Stickwood. 



HOPE 

Hope W. A. will be held at the 
home of Mrs. Joe Gibson on 
Wednesday, March 5. Assistant 

hostesses will be Mrs. Vern 



iucky draw. 



1 r . 









Whitchurch Nos. 6 and 7 Home f played at the WX euchre in Van- 
and School Association will hold dorf •hall. last Friday evening. 

Winners were:" Ladies', Mrs ; El- 



* 



ZEPHYR 





Mrs. M. l/Ahiati is visiting her 
cousin, Mrs. A. B. Lockie. Mrs. 
Lothian has just returned Via 
Halifax on the S.S. "Cythia", 
after spending the past year in 
I England and on the continent, 

"and is on her way home to Van- 
couver, B.C. 

A grand concert will be given 
on the evening of March 17 in 
the United church, by some of 
the members of the Borden choir, 
Toronto. For further particulars, 
see the hills later. 

The W.A. of the United church 
held the February meeting at the 
home of Mrs. L. Profit last Tues- 
day. A goodly number were 
present, and a good program and 
social half hour was spent. 



SHARON 

■ ■ 

In keeping with Education 
Week and requests for a repeat 
performance, the pupil3 of Shar- 
on Public School will present the 
operetta "Rumnelstiltskin", in the 
Sharon Hall, Mar. 5; at 3 p.hi. 
Everyone is welcome. . Silver col- 
lection. . 



their Founders* Day meeting; at 
3. S. No. 7 school on Friday 
evening, Feb. 29, at 8.30. 

A cordial invitation is extend- 
ed to all to come and hear Don; 
Fairbarn, commentator for -the 
C.B.C., who will be the guest 
speaker. 

The second great annual rum- 
mage sale will be held at Ash's 
booth, Wilcox Lake, on Satur- 
day, March 15. The rummage 
sale starts at 1 p.m. and the auc- 
tion sale at 3 p.m. 

A canvasser will call for dona- 
tions at each home in the school 
sections. Good, clean, used 
clothing, pictures, books, maga- 
zines, chairs, canned goods or 
what have you to spare will be 
accepted. 

Congratulations to.' Mrs. John 
Forester, who is 92 years young: 
on rob. 2a. . 

Also congratulations to Mr. 
and Mrs; James Lee, who are the 
proud parents of twin boys, born 
last week. 

Miss Rosemarie Rcid returned 
home on Tuesday after under- 
going an appendix removal '■ in 
Newmarket hospital a week ago. 
Best wishes to her- for a quick 
convalescence. 

STr.AIvin Stephenson is seri- 
ously ill ih St. Michael's hospital, 

Toronto, His friends air wish wcekrcccnHv 
hwn the very best for a quick re- ™ ww 

covery. Mrs.. Stephenson and 
daughter Eleta are staying in 
Richmond Hill for awhile. 
There were 15 tables of euchre 



men Wells, Mrs. ten Scott, Miss 
Muriel Pattenden and Sliss Shir- 
ley Eade; men's; Messrs. Harry 
Eade, Fred Blizzard, Boy How^ 
lett arid Harry Barber. The 
freeze^out was won by. Mrs, Fred 
Blizzard arid Mrs. R. Ellas. Mrs, 



Mrs. Lowndes, Angus, Mrs. Joe 
Gibson, Marion, Mrs. Elmer Ob- 
erer, had dinner on Wednesda 
with Mrs. Stewart Stickwood. 

MrSi Lang and Mrs. Stewart 
Stickwood had dinner on Thurs- 
day with Mrs. Auley Brenair. 
\ Mr- and Mrs. Arthur Smith, 
long Branch, spent Sunday with 
Mr. and Mrs. George Broderick 
and Mrs. flail. 

Mr, and "Mrs; George Evans 
and family spent Sunday with 
Mr> and Mrs; Aubrey Miller* 
Barrie. '■;■- 

Mfe arid Mrs; Jack Rye; Mi\ 

and Mrs. Longford Pegg/ Mr. 



Zuibell, 100 years old; and on 

March 12 s\fri Albert Madill will 

be ?p years young and still going 
strong. .';. 

■ : Tne choir of the United church 
n^d- a very lovely; social in the 
Sunday school room oh Friday 
evening. On coming in the ladies 
were asked to go up stairs and 

wheh they caitte down they saw 

the grandest oyster supper pre- 
pared by the men of the choir. 



and enjoyed a lovely dinner; 52 
were present. A toast to the 
bride and groom of 50 years was 
proposed by Rev. C. P. Shapter. 
Mr. Ford Lehman gave a fine 
reply. Mrs. Grant Allen sang 
two lovely songs and Mr. Alonzo 
Allen also sang. 

The bridesmaid of 50 years 

ngo, Mrs. Joyce of Toronto, was 

present. Mr. and Mrs. Wilson 
received many lovely gifts and 
cards. Some of the guests from 



The ! W^^Uie United church a distance were: Mr. and Mrs. J. 



George Neil; of Jefferson was the fPenntsbn, Brampton, had supper 
winner of the prize quilt. . .on Sunday' with Mr, and Mrs, 

A birthday party was held for 



Helen WiJsorv in her hoirifc . on 
Wednesday, Feb, 20, Helen. was 
10 years Old and there were 12 
school churns to. help her cele- 
brate. , 

MrSi George Boyhton enter- 
tained her intermediate Sunday 
school class of seven pupils' to a 
tobogganing, party last Saturday. 
■\ Mrs, R, G. Raycrbfr, . accom- 
panied by? Mrs.. Fred Hare of 
Temperanceviife, called on Mr., 
and Mrs. E. Roddick at Snowball 
last Saturday afternoon. It was 
the silver weddih*g . anniversary 
of the Reddicks. .■ 

Mr. and Mrs. Garnet ■ Evans 
arid Donald had Sunday supper 
with MK and Mrs. Harry 
Rumble, Toronto. . 

Mrs. Lydia Howdcn is visiting 
friends in London for a few 
days. ■ ','..'■■-._ • 

Mr. Gordon McConnchie, To- 
ronto, visited the Howletls for a 




"Travelling by bus is a won- 
derful way to see our country 
-the busy farms that border 
trie highways, the rivers and 

lakes, thegrandeurof our hills 
and forests, fascinating close- 
upsof every town and tUf 

along your 
foute. Oii 
your next hip 
go by bus] 
You'll enjoy 
the thrill pf 

seeing so/ 

much." 



The annual vestry meeting of 
Christ church, Roche's Point, was 
held in the Memorial Club on 
Monday evening, Jan. 28, . Rev. 
A. J; Arthur wis in the chain 

Mri Arthur explained that his 
report must be brief as he had 
only come to ftoche*s Point three: 
months ago and; he had .jiot y;et 
become thoroughly acquainted; 
but jie did wish to express his 
sincere gratitude ^ for the v/onder- 
ful asshtnnco he had received 
irorn the wardens and cohgrega-i 
tion since his arrival. He was 

delighted Jvith the church which; 
had been, .newly dcc^rate.d! 
throughout and presented a very 



Runn, came in for special praise 

for the wonderful activity during 

tho year. Through the sale of 

work, bazaar, and a number of 

social teas, etc;, tlft-e ; W.A. had 

shipped quite a number of bales' 
of clothing to the north country 
for Indian children. Parcels hod '-, 
also been sent to Britain besides 

several other donations, and a 
generous gift was made to the 

church funds. '■"..,. 

* 

.Beporls were also read from 
parish, council and Sunday 
■schobL Miss Gumherbalch, in, 
charge, of Sunday school, report- 
ed an average attendance of 2a. 



pleasing appearance. The Rectory ' The following officers were flp- 
was also as comioruible as could, pointed and elected for the yem 




*+ * 



MM 

30.35 



VANCOUVER 

CHICAGO 

WASHINGTON 
ST. LOUIS 

(SURCHARGE INCLUDED) 
Tickets and information at 

KING GEORGE HOTEL 
PHONE 300 



..- V 

• • >\i it 
1 '*■* * . 



Ntf i 




he desired. 

During the |>ast year lhere*had 
been three other rccto^ t^Idc& 
himself in charge of the cfturch 
:at various tjmcsv^- They werei 
Rev. Hutl, ilcV^;©u\KW^ OM: 
Canon Suntcr. Eighty three scr*; 
yic&s were lield,' cclcbratfohs $L 
Holy Communion', numbered 32*. 
Tharo were s^c baptjsmsi two' 
marriages and one burial. . : ; 

During the coming tcrtli . :JSr^ 
Arthur plans showirig a seriiis of 
films in the Community C(ub omj 
he also i nVfel.im-o't .4# ilbat' there 
would be sneciaj s^irvSce9/ori the: 
occasion of the churcnS $0th nu~ 
niversary m^m^Xt }$$&\ ! 

Mr. Bynn^people's warden.pfe^ 
sented rfe^fuWci^ 
showeStsSBe cTjurclifs;^^ 
in cxcvltehtSJ^fe ^^5jp«^ 
plained the purtrhase ^^fanndd!* 

cemetery^ ;>®mM$mm>$m£ 
jtossMe through (nuin^ef; ; of 

generous donations ^ aha ia volun- 
tary offer of a guarantee r*f the 
purchase price in the form o|. a 
non*interest loan. The land will 
be used to enlarge the ccmcter>*. 
The wardens! budget for 1952 
was set at $2,300. Increased as- 
sessment and allotments were re- 
sponsible for the $100 raise over 
last year. ■■'. 

The WA. report, read by Mrs. 



•foclotfs warden, Jm, Scotland; 

ipCopJes warden, Ernest Bunn*'^ 
sidesme0^Cfllder Boyd, Andrew 
Kidd, Robt. Tomlinson, Fi*cd 
iSonieryiSe, I£ OfJ^ton and A.. 
jWnlintlcii^rish eoyncil, the rcc> 
iUjr J8njt.liwp)^wardens, Mrs; A^ 
mffi% \tHt; W$# ^m ^C«mber- 
1 batch for Sunday school, Miss M; 
m ^oung; lay member, 0> \%-0$ 
iter eleeied; vestry clerks 'A\ Wb 
Wrilinck; fluditor, *fc D; Harbin. 
isonv-.;^ '. —': -. : . ''' : -' : %\ 

I Plans were: discussed r iot: :$&V 
ijroving the new jl and for the 

;ccnietcrir: also: m allowance wos 
rnM^imnt rio budgctitoii tftiirovei 

Ifope report on religious cducp* 

involved, mstwmwmwmm 

ttfrne to ^permit t\i&far sfjt* 
He olso mentioned niJ^iiiL 
^Should there he ladies m\ 

^nod^V The Idea did not Solf 
favor among the menibors pros. 

The meeting expresse<l n hear* 
ty vote of thanks to all those who 
had been responsible for such a 
splendid year's work and also to 
those members who had Io gen- 
erously donated financially. 
There being no further business 
the meeting was closed at X0.45 
pjn. after which the usual social 
tea was enjoyed by all. 



Mr. and Mrs. Roy Smith and 
Shirley had Sunday dinner with 
Mrs. Av Pattenden, Vandorf. 

Misses Diane and Donna 
Dceits, Kitchener, are staying 
this week with their grandpar- 
ents, "Mr. and Mrs. Norman 
Brown, and. family. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ed. Scott and 
son Jack, Dundalk, visited Mr, 
and Mrs.. Wallace. Scott and 
Muriel on Sunday; Jack stayed 
down with his brother and fam- 
ily for a few days. 
: Mr., arid Mrs. Les, Smith and 
family visited Mr. and Mrs. Walt. 

Graham and Donald at Sharon 
on siinday. 

■' ' ' ' •'' ' • ■" 

Mr, -and Mrs, Frank Sheridan 
»f Pine Orchard had Friday night 
tea with Mr. and Mrs. Jack Pres- 
ton and Mar jorie. . 
. Mrs* N. Gardner. Sh, of Torxm- 
; tOi returned to bc> home in Tor- 
onto on 'fiieaday, after a few days* 
>yisit with her daughter and fam- 
ily, Wrs. Wm. Glover. 
; Mr. rib* Mrs. M- McNicol were 
Saturday 'night lea: guests of Wr, 
and v Mrs. Dnlton iRichardson of 
Aurorn/ '. 

Mr. tfn«I Mrs. Chas. Greenwood. 

Mr, and Mrs. Carl Grcenwiiod 

and Charles, spent most of Sat- 

orday' with XHe, Jferbert 'a>\e 

f#mMy M iRnvenshae, . 
• '74iss f. Malcolm or RogmUovvn 
^wasn Sunday guesl flt the home 

tit Mk ; and Mrs. Whv Doisnn. 
'/Mrs* Alhert MEfcMlllnti nitond- 

cd I lie furicrn_l o()ier Aunt Inst 

weefc near Cornwall. 

I. jCWa* i«^Tenorl Master Roger 
MeCliffe Is ribie to lm rrnt again 
«0er mt} ftWRcte iof chicKent j h >x, 
butsorr^to (earn Master K. liar- 
mr nnij: Miss Hiimlra Penrose 

mm $m measles. 

j ?iminmg0orkeTs will meet 

m r WMSm^y M»r. s, at #& 
iborno M MW- -It Armitage, 
*" irayMi'Shariilnn visiterl al the 
horM of her a*sler nnd husband, 
MK nntl Ux$, llai vey Tau D , 
Gormley, on Sunday. 

'She community prayer meet- 
ing on Monday night at the home 
of Mr. M. Sheridan was attended 
by 25 folk. Next weejc al Mr. 
and Mrs. Mitchell's home in Au- 
rora, 



Selby Evans. 
Mr. and Mrs; Joe Gibson, 

Marion, had supper on Sunday 

with Mr, and Mrs. Wilfrid Rae. 
Zephyr. 

Miss .Amy Gibson, Newmarket, 

spent Sunday with Mr. and Mrs. 
DonaJd Stickwood. 

Sorry to xeport that Gordon 
Davis is confined to bed with 
scarlet fever; Wc wish him a 
speedy recovery, 

Mrs. Lillian Boyd* Orillia, liad 
supper on Saturday with Mrs. 
?eg& ■ .'-'" ."■ 

Mrs. Dean Pegg spent Friday 
with Mrs. Ethel Case, Newmar- 
ket . 

Mr, a*! Mrs. Jack Harmon, 
Aurora, had supper on Sunday 
wiljfi Mr. and Mrs, Gillham. 

Mr. and Mrs. Moriey Moore; 
Port Hope, are spending a few 
"ays with Mr. and Mrs;. Howard 



met on Wednesday evening at 
the home of Mrs. B. Sinclair. The 
president, Mrs. Willbee, suggest- 
ed the group start a fund to as- 
sist lis renovating the church. A 
St. Patrick's supper will be held 
ojr Wednesday, March 12, in the 
church. ;• . 

, A meeting was held in the 
community hall on Thursday 
evening to; arrange for the an- 
nual sports day on Saturday, 
June 7. If you have new ideas 
and suggestions for the day, 
come along to the Park Board 
with them. 

The firemen had a hurry-up 
call on Thursday to R. Crone's 
farm, but it was only a chimney 
lire which was quickly put out. 

You were asked by the fire- 
men some time ago to please 
not use the telephone for at least 
10 minutes after they get away 
when called to a fire, as it may 
cause delay. Some seem to have 

forgotten. Please remember next 

time. . . 

50th Wedding Anniversary " 

tr>S n £ ? ears #* on F «b. 16, 

1902, Robert Wilson and Alberta 

&it? vv «?re -married by Rev. 
Ebby at the home of the bride's 

parents, Mr. and Mrs. William 

iS?' on ,he 8lh concession; 
-.They have lived ever since in 

Mount Albert, where for many 

years Mr; Wilson had a black- 

gnith shop, but is now retired. 

Their family were all home with 



F. Wilson from Niagara Falls, N, 
Y., only brother of Mr. Wilson; 
brothers and sisters of Mrs. Wil- 
son present were Mr. and Mrs. 
F. Lehman, Thornburv; Dr. and 
Mrs. Stevens, Oshawa; Mr. and 
Mrs J. Booth, Newmarket; Mr. 
and Mrs. Ed. Allen of Aurora; 
Mr. and Mrs. Russ Allen, Pine 
Orchard; Mr. and Mrs, A. Allen 
of Stouffville. Other relatives 
were Mr. and Mrs. H. Clark, Ag- 
mcourt; Mrs. E. Heidman, Mr. 
and Mrs. C. Plowright and Mr. 
and Mrs. E. Plowright, all of 
Oshawa, who all wished Mr. and 
Mrs. Wilson many more haoDv 
years. 



CO-OP 
CHICKS 

, THE BEST 
MONEY CAN BUY 
With the embargo on cattle 
and hogs going into the U.S., 
accompanied with the govern- 
ment slaughter policy or cattle 
in Canada, no one knows 
where meat prices may go* 

BE PREPARED 

Get some Heavy Breed Cock- 
erels NOW and have your own 
meat. : 

We Hive: 

STARTED COCKERELS 
also DAY-OLD PULLETS 
and MIXED CHICKS 

For Immediate Delivery 

ACT NOW 






: 







O-OP 
Hatchery 




SEE FRED HOLDEN 

For Good Anthracite 
and Stoker Coal 

Pine St., or phone I049R 

Newmarket 

- 

PROMPT SERVICE 



f. 



MOUNT MfiERlf 

The Cheerio cliib met on Sat- 
urday evening at the home of 
Mrs; Jas. Slorach. witK: 32 ladies 

present. 

Mrs. M.. Stokes and Mrs.. K. 
Mitchell were in charge of the 
program. A reading by Joan; nnd Mrs. Harry Webster iitte'nd- 



Mainprize and a talk by. Mrs. 
Steeper on her trip were enjoyed 
by all. 



Mr. and Mrs; Jl 6. Blatchford 

spent Sunday with Mr. and Mrs. 
Richard Coffey, Schbmbery. - 

Mr, and Mrs. Donald McQuar- 
rre ancl family. King City, and 
Miss Beatrice Clarkson, Lansing, 
> v «"; Sunday guests at the home 
Of Mrv and Mrs. J, F. Curtis. 
: Mr; am Mrs. Wm. Rabcock, 
Thorotd, spent the weekend with 
Mrs. Babcock's parents, Mr. and 
Mrs. Jack Archibald; 

t>r. and Mrs. Harry Mount and 
faimly, Stratford, have been 
visiting friends and relatives in 

the community, 

Mr. Walter Ciarkson, Lansing; 
spent Saturday with Mr. and 
Mrs. Leo Blackburn. 

Mr; and Mrs. George Rymal 
and family, Agincourt. spent 
Sunday with Mr, and Mrs. E. 
Tienkauip. 

Mr. »n<l Mrs; Stanley Barra- 
dell; Mrs; E. Bnrradell and Mr. 




S4&/6 m/4 (?(utfcW<:*«r< 



-,--^ 




: :' 



-i ' 



A-r" -:* 



< * . t 



MEN'S and • B OJfSt ,. ,W E A R 

N e w m a r k e t , O n f. * < ■ ' -. ! *V. ^ : * % p h 



STORE 

290 , 







0{i the funeral of their cousin. 
Mrs. Adeline ((Lloyd) Williams, 
in Toronto on Saturdnv. 



A few tickets left for the 

BIG P1TRINA RESEARCH FARM TRIP TO 

ST, I.O VIS, MISSOURI 

We are leaving Toronto. Saturday noon. March a for 
our annual Purina Farm Trip returning March 12. Ticket- 
this year are JiM.tiO winch includes evervthins such as vour 
railway fare, hotel accommodations at Detroit. St. Louis' and 
Lhicago. ail meals eimmte, taxi fai^es, etc. 

You have heard your neighbors who have been on this 
trip in the past say it is the bast trip they ever had for the 
money. Many feeders and agricultural leaders will be on 
the tram which is chartered by Purina dealers. Drop in or 

?*? WLS. aU ?° thal > ve ma >' W* you more about this won- 
derful 2.000 mtle, all-expense farm tour to St. Louis, Mo. 



**"-. 



PERKS FEEO MUkhh, LTD, 

Newmarket, Out 




^ 






*, 1 



L 



■ " ' 










■' 



' -■ 



- 



. . * ■ 



^ ^ \ 



.- 






■ 



.t 



T 



'»* 



■ 






* * 



— 1 



...PAYS BIG DIVIDENDS 

Ccrlilicil or Covcriiiuciit Tested seed for improved pastures and other crops 
assures liigu germination, greater frc<<loin from weds and more profit 
per aerc. Sow tlic crops best adapted lor your soil. Success usually follows 
good management. 



' ■■ - 






;' •- 



1 a 



A FARM IMPROVEMENT or other loan may be 
obtained for the purchase of seed— or for any odier worthwhile purpose. 

Yon ih twl my*/ io be a regular 
cttslomev in order Io secure a Ichuu 



■ i 




The Welleiut Canal, short-cut 
around Niagara Palls for Great 
Lakes and St. Lawrence River 
ships, is 20 miles long. 



THE DOMINION BANK 



fSTJLatfSHfO 117* 

NEWMARKET BRANCH — M. R. ROBERTS, MOR, 

VXBRIDQK BRANCH — D. O. DUNSIRE, MOB. 

MOUNT AUJERT BRANCH — G, E SNYDER, MOR. 



* 



if 



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... 



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■r«TE:^*i: v -- -7" ;, 



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p * 



LEGAL 



• i;;».. i ^ 



latere. Solicitors and 
Notaries tmblic 
Floyd E. Corner 
H. Rnhmer BA^ D.F.C 
M. Holden BA- 
Office: ArdiU Block, 
ige and Wellington Streets 
Telephone 406* Aurora 



O. Dales, ra. 

lwrW«-At-Liw 
S*lteH#r 

ZWu7 riWe 

Office and Residence 
844 * 150 Main St 

NEWMARKET 

By Appointment 



T. A H. HCLSE, 



Barrister, Solicitor 
Notary Public, Etc. 

PHONE 151 
U WelttBffcn St. 



MATHEWS, STIVER 

LYONS AND VALE. 
Barristers, Solicitors 

Notaries 

Joseph Vale, Q.C. 
M. R. Stiver, B.A. 
B* E. Lyons, B.A. 
IN. L. Mathews, Q.C. 

Mais St., Z2* Bay St, 

12d rhones WA. 23*3-1 

tet, Ont. Toronto, Ont. 



A. a. MILLS 

Barrister,, Solicitor and 

Nctary mblie 

51 MAIN ST. 

tet Phone 461 



VIOLET 
HNSON MacNAUGHTON 



NOTAR* PUILIC 

- - Insurance 
ford St. Phone 333 



[Conveyancing 



Newmarket 



D. OTTON, BJL 

MISTER. SOLICITOR, ETC?. 

35 MAIN ST.. 

[PHONE 804, NEWMARKET 

DENTAL 

DR. W. O. NOBLE 
DENTIST 

Over MUNICIPAL OFFICE 

Office 47 
Residence 1344 

Dr. a E. VanderVooH 

DENTIST 

Main St. Newmarket 

Phone 461w 



MEDICAL 



Dft. G. MEBVTN PEEVEB 

Physician and Surgeon 

Phone 485 
€7— nrtUUon by Appointment 

At residence corner of 
Raglan and Tecumseh Sts. 



MISCELLANEOUS 



A.E.HAWKMS 

Contractor For 
BULLDOZING, GRADING 
CELLAR EXCAVATIONS 

and 
HaaBn* Gravel, Sand and Fill 

Pfrme 219w # Aaron 



STOUrTVHlf SAND 
and GRAVEL LID. 

far gwve nunent ipproved 
crashed stone of varioos sizes 



jsr -. 



s 



CANADIAN 

PLOWMEN 

ABROAD 



*3*8 



fr r J.A.CAftROU. 

ONTARIO 
nOWMEN*S ASSOCIATION 



Editor's Note: This is the last of a series of weekly stones 
which John A. Carroll, assistant deputy minister of agriculture 
for Ontario and formerly secretary-manager of the Ontario Plow- 
men's Association, will write about the visit of Canada's champion 
plowmen to the British Isles, Germany, Denmark and Sweden. 

hooves came so close to Norman 
that some in the crowd thought 
he had been hit. As it was, the 

horses* bits inflicted some nasty 



cvnerete crave! and pit 

Delivered or at bin. 

Plant phone 125 
Office phones 370 and 128 



ELECTRICAL CONTRACTU* 

House and Farm Wiring 
DO C GjBAIi* 

General Repairs 
lltfl 






v^«. Space Heater 
Jfi Electrical Household 



Phone 422 
25 



box m 






St W. 



y> '***-- - 



A.STOUFFER 

./.'. 19 Raglan St. 
Expert Piano Tuner and 



Pianos Bought, Sold and Rented 
PHONE 270 




PLUMBING, HEATING 
CONTRACTOR 

Dealer for 

Deleo Water Pressure Systems 

Arcoflame Oil Burners 

Cement Septie Tanks 

Constructed 

-. 

OAK RIDGES 

Phone King 111 

Phone Aurora 46J 



EVANS' FURS 

■ 

NEWMARKET 

. 

Coal. Coke. Wood 
and Stoker Coal 

s 

Orders taken for Gravel, Sand 

and Crushed Stone 

and General Hauling 




OSTEOPATHY 



i 



WILSON 

Osteopathic and Arthritis 

Clinic 

| WILSON BUILDING, BARBIE 
Telephone 2293 

Consultation by Appointment 




London: It's rather lonely here 
in the largest city in the world. 
Four days ago I watched my two 
young companions of the past six 
weeks depart for Canada and 
home. By the time you read this 
they will have been back more 
than a week, and I too shell be 
once again standing on Canadian 
soil, trying to re-adjust myself. 

And so I repeat it is lonely 
here. Though there is much for 
me to do and many government 
officials to see in this last week, 

I miss the banter and comments 

of Norman (Norman Tynda$l, of 
Richmond Hill) and Gene (Eu- 
gene Timbers of Millikeri). . 

As I watched their plane dis- 
appear from view I could not 
but feel proud of them. They 
have been two perfect unofficial 
ambassadors for Canada* for 
Canadian agriculture, and. . for 
Canadian youth. It goes with* 
out saying ihey were ambassa- 
dors for Canadian plowing. With 
'them returned to Canada two 
silver cups, one in the possession 
of Gene and the other tucked* in 

Norman's bags. 

But for a certain amount ol 
misfortune that seemed to dog 
their footsteps at Belfast, they 
would have been taking more 
than two cups back, pft the 
practice day before the Northern 
Ireland International ^Match — 
held at Armagh, south :pf -Belfast 
— there was an inch, of frost in 
the low, wet field; they were 
using. Although they were full 
of confidence, both of them bad 

trouble. 

On the day of the match, an 
overnight snowfall had left two 
inches of snow on the. sloping 
contest area. When .'%' tell yo0: 
that of the 65 tractors entered, 
55 converted to steel before the 
match, you will appreciate that 
it was slippery. Norman plowed; 
without steel grips. He plowed 
with confidence and put .tip a 
good crown. He had the bad 
luck to finish in a wet depress^ 
ion, but we were proud of his 
work and heard many compli- 
mentary remarks. He won the 
Overseas Class — open to lion- 
rcsidents of U.K.— against ploVrv 
men from Holland, Switzerland 
and Norway who placed in (hat 
order behind him. 
Favorable Comments 

There were many favorable 
comments too, on Eugene's \vork; 
chiefly on the job he was mak- 
ing under difficulties. His land 
was sloping and slippery. The 
reason for his downfall was two- 
fold: his team and his skill. 
When he left here Norman still 
bore the scars of battle that he 
received when he went to Gene's 
aid. 

The crowd impressed by 
Gene's performance swung 
round to watch him; the horses, 
unused to contest work, took 
fright and became unmanage- 
able. Norman went to Gene's 
assistance. When he attempted 
to lead the (earn, the horses 
reared on (heir hind legs and 
when they landed their front 



The Story Of SHARON 

ETHEL WILLSON TREWHELLA 

This is the thirty-eighth instalment of a continuing 
"Story of Sharon' 9 from its founding to the present. The 
story teas written after almost two years of research 
and will, xve believe, be a major contribution to know* 
ledge of the past. The remaining instalments will 
follow weekly. 



The Newmarket Era and Express, Thursday, Feb, 2$, 1952 Page 3 



Signs of Time?.. 

Sharon has probably forgotten 
when oranges, lemons and ban- 



Tench, S Nathaniel Vernon. 
Thomas Wayling. 

Directly to the west of tile 



anas were uncommon and pine- Rowen property and half-way 
apples not at all in the local through the concession, Joseph 



cuts, and scratches about his 
hands. 



store; that Sharon people made 
their own ice cream along with' 
their own butter aiftt cheese. Bier 
fore oil was used In lamps there 
were lamps burning tallow: 



As it was a one-day event, the i Candles, also r&ade Jrom beef 
match resembled one of our bet- land mutton tallow^ were com- 



THE VARIETY 
"felGNS 



CHIROPRACTIC 

fttarian I LocMe, D.C 



in our collection of 
MONUMENTS fa such that we 
can meet almost any require- 
ment both as to kind and cost 
* | We also make memorials to order 
of every description. You'll find 
our work excellent always and 
oar service prompt and 
reasonably priced. 



TOR OF CHIROPRACTIC 

BOTSFORD ST-, Newmarket 

Telephone 1408 

OPTOMETRICAL 




SLEIGH'S 



. ».- .. . .- . _*-. 






G. W. LUESBY and SON 



MAIN ST. 



NEWMARKET 




Main St, Over SpJIIette'i 
PHONE 1030 



W. A. HURST, Optometrist 

Newmarket Clinic BIdg 

Office Hours: 

9.30-1Z.M - 1,30-5.45 

Esc/pt Wed* and Sat. 

MO - It o'clock 

Evenings by Appointment 

Pfcono 147St Newmarket 



JOHN E. JARVIS 

Conli)deratlon Life Association 

Representative 
Fire, Automobile and Casualty 

45 Eagle St. Newmarket 

PbimeS: Newmarket ll&iw - 



RAMO 1 APPLIANCE 
SERVICE 

* 

218 MAIN ST., NEWMARKET 
PHONE 1204 






A. W. HEARD 

Painter and Decorator 

Siimvorthy and Suntcst 
Wallpapers 

Phono 182, Aurora* 



*- -i 



■ : 



TiV 




ACCOUNTANT 



A. A. CONLIN 
5 Hato Si 

Chartered Accountant 

/ 

Mm* 1236 - Newmtet 



.- \ 



FIRrV BURGLARY, AUTO 
AND LIFE 

Bill Mclntyre 

3 MAIN ST. 

NEWMARKET 
PHONE 470w 



JOHN DAiT 

Expert Watch and Clock Repair 
31 Gorham St. 



ter county matches more than 
the Canadian International. The 
manufacturer^ exhibits could 

not compare with those seen at 
the International fou r-d a,y 
match. The banquet was. not 

held until the day following the 
match, and we missed it* for we 
flew home the evening of the: 
match to be in London the day 

of the King's funeraL " :■ 

Though by now you will fiave 
read the many accounts of the: 
fling's funeral, arid perhaps even 
seen the newsreete o^ifi-I can--: 
not let this last letter close 
without offering a few personal 
observations. Eor tisV it "wis; the 
most ^ impressivje ; si^it\6f^ ^the tduri 
and may well be the most im- 
pressive sight we will ever see. 
We heard of the King's death as 
we stepped from* our ^ car to enter 
the Aberdeen-Angus sales at 
Perthi Later ft<SnV our hotel 
window in Edinburgh we could ; 
see at least 12 flags flying at 
half-staff. That afternoon we 
were in Edinburgh castle when 
the 56-gun salute in memory of 
the King was fired. • 

By some wizardry known only 
to themselves, the officials at 
Ontario House reserved seats for 

us iirt a private hotel Iff Sussex 

Gardens, near Paddington sta^ 

tioni, ;We had been warned to 
•^ .at .our : vantage point W ®S 
near to 6 a-igi .as 
Wafting Patlenfly 

^We left the Cumberland: Hotel 

at Marble Arch, shortly after 6; 
We ' could s<fe why. Thousands 
were already in: position Uienj 
waiting patiently for the proces- 
sion , thati would riot arriyc/ for 
another four or five hoursi Many 
had been there all night and on© 
little woman from Wales was in 
place 21 hours hi advance. We 
shuddered in the pre-daWn 'chill, 
to see people, particularly w;o-. 
men and .girlsy not warmly cladi. 
using newspapers as cushions oh 

the^wet curbs. ■ 

". \Ve were , in our places by .7 
a.rh; Wo had; breajcfast> watch- 
ed the people on the street and 
iistoned to radio reports until a 
few minutes before the proces- 
sion was due; . Just itjcfore 1 1 we 
went out on to a specially erect- 
ed scaffolding which gave us a 

perfect view^ 

Naturally we all wanted to get : 
as many pictures as possible. The 
boys decided to use black and 
white; I took a chance on color 
as there were periodic hursts of 
sunshine. As the procession ap- 
proached, the sun shone brightly 
on the leading horses. I 41 hcld 
my fire" for the more important 
sections and the sun faded be- 
hind a cloud. It did not appear 
again until the cortege had pass- 
ed and then it shone with a sum- 
mer-like brilliance. 
All Heads Bowed 

For hours the crowd had re- 
mained most orderly* As the 
gun carriage bearing the coffin: 
approached, a hush decended. It 
was broken only by the sound of 
horses* hooves, walking men and 
military commands. As the gun 
carriage passed, all: heads: were 
bowed; there was not a flutter 
among the thousands lining the 
street and buiUHngs* lh; sortie 
sections, rows 50 deep were re- 
ported and many Had! brought 
their temporary benches, scaf- 
folding and homemade peri- 
scopes. Shopkeepers had taken 
the precaution* Of boarding up 
their windows along the route,. 
which at intersections was solid- 
ly fenced with iron-pipe fixtures. 
It was on occasion never ^to he 
forgotten; on e which siioulci- 
mean much to the Common- 
wealth and democratic:: .nations.; 
As the rear of: the procession 
movexl away from us, one mnn^ 
turned and said: *'Could that^ 
have happened anywhere but ftfc 
London?" 

Countless Little Happenings 
Time and space has again 



mon. Men wofe paper collars; 
they were stiff niit not washable. 
Eyeglasses mostly' -had silver 
rims^— only' people with superipr 

opinions of themselves possessed 

gold rims. . * i 

Butter: was taken at the store 

in ^change tot necessary com- 

modities. The price averaged 
m-I5c and probably 20c lb- in 

the wihterv Eggs sold in a simi- 
lar way at eight cents per dozen 
and 20c in the Winter. Wheat 
and barley were sold to buyers 
at Newmarket station* Milk 
brought five cents per quart — 
any surplus was churned or 
given away. Before seed drills 
were used, a bag of grain was 
placed over the farmer's shoul- 
der and the seed was scattered 
by hand. A man followed with 
steel harrows. 

Scythes were used to cut hay, 
even in 1870 there were no 
binders, cradles being the imple- 
ment used. In those days thresh- 
ing- machines were rented, with 
the thresher supplying three men 
and . two teams. The machine 
was Operated by horse power. 
After flireshingj the wheat was 
placed: in a fanning mill, where 
it was screened and then sold to 
Lundy*s flour mill. 
i One feature common to most 
of the dwellings in Sharon was 
the mounting block, a set of 
steps and platform upon which 
those alighting from the high- 
bodied buggies migh t step. 
Toeite were the hitching posts; 
some had an iron band encircling 
the top to which was attached a 
heavy ring. Others were topped 
by. an iron horsehead with ring 
Tn the mouth. 
Sharon Gardens 

' The gardens of Sharon were 
like Marget llbwe'svgarcien of the 
Bonnie Briar': Bush. - <l They were 
oldf fashioned, with pinks and 
daisies aiid forget-me-nots, with 
sweet-scerited Wall flowers and 
thyme and^ moss roses, where na- 
ture had her way and gracious 
thoughts could visit without a 
Jarrihg note/ ; . . where a thriish 
was singing- and a sound of hecs 
was in the air." In the sj^ihg. 
over the: orchards >i» ' Sharon 
drifted the pink fragrance from 
the olfl-fashioned apple trees. 
Mingling with the incense of 
autumn was tne v spicy ripeness of 
pumpkin sweets, the sun-kissed 
russets and the glowing crimson 
of juicy snows. There were ap- 
ples, pungent and luscious and 
nameless, which were the allot- 
ted portion for the cider press 
of Reuben Phillips. Many of 
these old-time favorites of nos- 
talgic memory in the limit of 
commercial orchards have slip- 
ped to the side of the road. 

Trees still stand in Sharon 
that have come to be landmarks. 
One, on elm. is on the Mount Al- 
bert; . roatT near Mid Hughes* 
homestead. .Another patriarch 
stands in the field north of the 
school house;. A well-rememt^er- 
cd group of trees, now Ctjt do\vn^ 
were the tall; spruce h* front of 
the one-time Davidite meet]!.;; 
house. On the Ramsay lawn 
stands a row of splendid trees 
Which had been planted by de- 
scendants of David Witlson. 

A magnificent walnut tree, and' 
which has the unique distinction 
of ;»n internatiohal pc<iigreev fe- 
to be seen on the farm of! N^rW 
man Crone. Mrs. J ud ah Lnncty 
had Jived there: from 1822 to her 
death in 1004. In 1876, while 
her son. Dr. DnviS fcttntly, was 
practising medjeine In Albanyi 
111, she visited him and brought 

bnck with her n Walnut, this 
she planted and from it grew 
the free Which - is a; Iwautiful 
monument to her. To yarious 
reJntiVes she gave nuts ifrbm the 
tree, which Jp- lurnv ftave pro- 
duced trees wliiclv are . still 
growing o n. - tfte ^ropertie*!. 

Speakingvor -ihft- im* Mr* <?ipnc 

remarked that often on a i burn 



Brammer had established a saw- 
mill on the stream— -Brammer's 
Greek ^- which meandered from 
the Davis- firm ii't#$ towii Tlihe 
through the faiTOs of Seaissellaer 
IScCmxi Mo s es ; Knight, fc 
Jonnson, Calvin Wedctel, John 

Collins, and John TcrryV where 

it supplied water for the terry 

tannery- It crossed Queen St 
to \vander ori through therfarms 

of Israel Willson, William Kite- 

ly, Samuel Haines, Peter fioweh^ 

John p/^illson, iand poured its 

cedar freshness into the sunshine 

of the Clearings- the opUleht 
depths of this creek long since 



and military supplies were stor- 
ed there. It, too, later was used 
as a skating rink; the Dr. Mont- 
gomery house and the Mackerili 
home; the Methodist church; the 

Amos Lundy farm; house of Mrs. 
McArthur and the marble works; 
the Mansion House, where now 

stands the Collins house; Tom 
Morris and the harness shop; Ira 
Betlar and the paint shop; a 
lane leading to the Willsoh pro-- 
petty; house of John GrUdffnY 

the piano, tuner; OTfflte^fflai; 
the: Dey? : Crop InrV which \Vas 
burned in the late century j ihe 
RoAVen>; Houses; fiheV sideroad 
known familiarly as -^^0105 
Hughes slderoad; property of 

Rodney Willsbh; the Teniperahc^ 

Hall? Eted^ t3eorge^ 
shoemaker; Austin boati; ctent^ 
1st; the Lake property^ Around 
the corner on the sideroad stood 
the Terry house aiict the Seaben 
Phlll ips house; pump lacidr^ anS) 
cider milk Across the^ ^mI* 

north* were the two housesi on 1 
the Hughes ; farm. '"\ ;. ' ,-\J 

: Sfes. Albert MiJhe (Nelda 
^rhgosser), WiiliaiD>.l)6an and 
Howard Moore are three who, 
after more than four score years, 
are still watching the happenings 

of Sharon. A great-granddaugh- 
ter of David Willson, Mrs. Emily 



ter of Israel Lundy, Mrs. Bertha 
Phillips, reside in the village. 
Old Homesteads 

■ r 

Several homesteads around 
Sharon have remained the pro- 
perty of the descendants for 
more than a century. There are 
Crown patents belonging to Wil- 
liam Doan, the Selby family, the 
Weddel family* and Mr. Frank 
Ramsay is now the owner of the 
Witlson crown deeds. Until quite 
|ej^% the Kitely family be- 
longed in ;%*s l!s# 

IfcM^ition; to ifie families al- 
to; and which 



^c^^qsilJr'ffie early fabric of 
M$Mii 3fc#at of Isaac ' Kitely 
^fiffi l^ittpi <M his patent in 
4®8§£ ->m was the son of James 
l«teM m$ had trained to be 
any AngHQin minister, but upon 
Sa*«t9tfi® to America he joined 
the. Society of Friends and mar- 
tied jt friends* minister^ Eliza- 
beth Wood. These two early and 
esteemed Friends are interred in 
Friends' burying ground at 
Pcnnsdale, Pennsylvania. 



haVe: ; •b«S>mfe htimniocky banks J Gross, and a great-granddaugh- 

where meadowlarks build their' 



■ 




.1..1.1..I.1.4 



v^t^'-i^.^ I 



Si 




^ 

--=":-^^^^ 




IN ¥ OUR WILL 



f r. 



7, * 



. 



^* * »^*^*»- "Vf"^*- 



! 



* - 






ncstsi 

Village in 80's 

Over a cup of tea, a stroll.of 
reminiscence through the vill- 
age during the 80*s was taken 
with Mr. Howard Moore. Mr. 
Moore was born in Sharon, and 
is now 83 years of age. Begin- 
ning at the Lundy Road, in or- 
der, were: a house owned by 
Christopher Oxtoby and remem- 
bered as the "Mrs. Wayling 
house"; Samuel Proctor; Kitely 
property and once occupied by 
the Anglican minister; a house 
destroyed by fire; Oxtoby pro- 
perty, a house, wheel-wright 
shop with paint shop above, 
blacksmith shop and the large 
brick house built by Peter 
Rowen. 

To the north of this Rowen 
house stands a small frame 
dwelling house adjoining the 
farm .of George Doan, and this 
latter was later owned, respec- 
tively, by the Bateman and Shaw 
families. Ascending the hill, the 
first building was known as Mrs. 
Thorpe's home; Adam Born- 
gasscr and later John Brammer; 
Anglican church; G. P. Smith's 
house, tailor shop and store; the 
post office and dwelling house of 
John Kavanagh; carriage shop of 
Selby Driver* boot and shoe shop 
of George Driver; Sr.; John Tait 
the blacksmith; the Music Hall. 
Atone time the Music Hall had 
been divided; then later one sec- 
tion was used as a skating rink, 
the promoters of this being 
George Doan, Jack Doan, Mar- 
shall KStely, William Bellar. Be- 
side this stood the house of John 
\yasley; Hannah' Lundy; David 
Willson, later Occupied by his 
grandson, Abso'am Willson; the 
Davidite kitchen; Meeting 
House; Itaehel Graham; a lane, 
the store, and lastly the Temple. 
Other Buildings 

Going north along the cast 
side is the Stokes house; Chris- 
topher Sommerville; the present 

Wreggit house built upon the 
site of a previous house owned 
by Mr. Thompson. The drill 
shed stood back of these houses, 



* . 



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IUMI-B0WL LAMPS 




CANADIAN GENERAL ELECTRIC 



COMPftN T L IMf TIP 



" 



■ 



or 



Phone 656M Newmarket 
ALL WORK GUARANTEED 



;.- 




KEN PONTING 

PIANO TUNER 

AND TECHNICIAN 

Dealer For New 

Maaon and Risen Pianos 

Wnriitzer Organ 
tTied PUnoa Bought and Sold 

H GRACE ST,, NEWMARKET 

SC7J - Esthutes Pre* 



McCONKEY & SONS 

Brick and Block laying 

CHIMNEYS ft FIREPLACES 
BUILT ft REPAIRED 

Phone 29r31 - Sutton 



CAR OWNERS 

Insure your car today the Co-Op 

Way. Sponsored by your Fed. of 

Agriculture 

JOHHSYTEMA 

Newmarket Phone 211J4 



beaten me and I cannot now tell tngsday In. /surnrncjfr ^ ijffir*; #<? 

coolness; of -Jts; shoclc; sjie ihaflj 

/ervently offered n ; ^hnhte ftm 
Mrs. Lundyi*' These arc ibUt.Ri 
few <& thp beaytiful trees (o be 
seen in SUgrdri, jeach ot_ whlchj 
i^mtifibutes tor the; drowsy, con^ 
servniiVe peat^} ofc the ErigHsh- 
Cona^o Japjlscnpe. 

Upari exgin^t'o?! of a map 
made? in lJtJ0>jaV'VO.ry efeo f?jp} c- 
Itire IS obtolfted of the changes 
which hmir ihken place during; 
the first lifttt^enlury^ Much of 

Jge; fere^t had dlsa^ejixed, and 
the farms a^ 

MiM of^Be(x^8cftfcrs had he- 

come 1IJ& owners, and new 

pnmes had become familiar: Ro» 
bert Barker, John and Benjamin 
Eves, Thomas Brown, William 
Knight, Mr. Maguire, Jacob 
Powell, John ' Stcrland, Mr. 



you of the many other things 
that wo have seen and riono in 
the past six weeks. As welt as 
the big events, there ;!n^-^^pu^t>^ 
less little happenings that we 
will remember for maijy^il >yelft? 
Such as the sense ofc physical: 
inadequacy we felt that d^ 
Denmark when we wcr^ dining; 
in an ancient inn across fromvtlje^ 
beautiful Fredcriksborg CasUe, 
The table was loaded with about 

a dozen different types Of jporkj 

dishes. So to please pur host^i 
we thought — we sampled most of 
them and ate hearty. Just about 
the time we were feeling stuff- 
ed, along came the whisper from 
our host, "The main course will 
he coming In n mhuite." 

There ore many such incidents 
over which we will chuckle in 
the future. .. 

But most of all we will re- 
member the many friends we 
have mndc tn the countries we 
have visited. We will long re- 
member the warmth of the wel- 
comes extended us and the hos- 
pitality which sometimes em- 



barrassed us. Our hope Is^thnt 
we have done our share in 
strengthening the bonds of inter- 
national friendship, and perhaps 
brought nearer the day when we 
will see a , really representative 
international plowing match. 








"It sure was a lucky tlay for me when my 
Rank of Toronto manager showed 
mc how 1 could replace my poor milkers with 
purebred dairy caule. My present herd is the 
envy of chc district. I get greater profits from 
more milk* higher percentage milk and 
more hut ter fat gains— and I find 
them a good investment by cutting 
down on costly turnover." 

jg$ FARM IMPROVEMENT LOAN 

t*m im;t*ttntn\ {mm it* alio 
Avaitibte t« new irnpfCinirtU » 
Imp*o*«minl$ to the hnd or fjr/n bulMintv 
Ynur 1.x a I Sink ol Toienlfl ns0l|ct * 
vrillgliilly tfutt >ou hCM YCU cm 
t#n»tit— (Jicp In Jfld Uth II ov*» with 



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HMNKo'TORONID 



frisorportttJ itSS 



NEWMARKET, ONT. 




•TOM MANAQCM 






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Wc were in Montreal over 
the weekend, attending the an- 
nual meeting of the Class A 
Newspapers, and of all the 
sights and sounds of that city, 
the one that gave us most satis- 
faction was a little notice, past- 
ed over the cashier's window at 
a corner movie theatre. As 
near as we can recall, it read: 
Owing to the fact, that Ameri- 
can dollar has fallen below par 
with the Canadian dollar* we 
must discount all American 
currency by one percent. 

How that sign must have 
tickled the fancy of all Cana- 
dians who have had to put up 
with the arrogance of border 
storekeepers when the Cana- 
dian dollar was devalued. It's 
nasty, we' know, but there is 
much pleasure to be had In get- 
ting your own back. 

And in keeping with the 
theatre notice was a conversa- 
tion we overheard on the train 

on the way home. Three Am- 
ericans were ichaitiril together. 
One of them, 6 youngish fellow, 
said he wished he could go to 

South America. "That's the 

country for you," he said 

"You can really make the 
dough. They're really going 
places down there." 

His two companions, older 
than he, both answered him. 
The place to be is right here, 
in Canada," one of them said. 
'The development of the cen- 
tury is taking place right under 
your nose in Canada. Why go 
to South America?" asked the 
other. 

One spoke of the Labrador 
and Quebec iron ore deposits. 
The other waxed enthusiastic 
about Alberta oil. The first 
cited the soundness of Cana- 
dian economy. The second con- 
struction figures. 

By the time they were 
through, there was nothing left 
of the young man's ambition to 
go south. And we listened 
shamelessly but with consider- 
able pride to these American 
businessmen. 

• * » 

We note there was great agi- 
tation in the Korean forces 
when it v/as learned that an 
American pipe band had or- 
dered Stuart tartans to dress 
the pipers. The matter has 

From the Files of 

25 and 50 YemrsAg 



since been ironed out to most 
everyone's satisfaction but it 
was touch and go for awhile. 

We have it on the word of 
Newmarket Scots that only de- 
scendants of the clan are en- 
titled to wear the clan's tartan. 
And although there is no law 
prohibiting the stranger, cus- 
tom is strong and apparently, to 
be observed in Korea. - 

/tte. flurry brings up an in- 
teresting consideration. In one 
of the Scottish weeklies, we 
read that. Canada has 22 kilted 
regiments wearing the .tartan. 
The reason for it, according to 
the columnist, is the strong ap- 
fe^of the kilts. 

He cites the case of the Es-' 
sex Scottish, formerly the Essex 
Rides. Between the two wars, 
the Essex Rifles were not do- 
ing at all well in recruiting so 
they decided to adopt a Scot- 
tish title and a^kilt of the Mac- 
gregor tartan. The recruits 
poured in. 





market fra and f xnrcss 




Swing Ntwmaiitt, Aurora and th* rural district* of North York 

Tho NowmarWt Era 1852 Tlw ExpreM H.raM 18W 

Published every Thursday at 142 Main St., Newmarket by H» Newmarket Era and express limited. Subscription $4 tor two yean, 

$2.50 for one year, in advance. Single copies are 5c each. Member of Class A WeefcfTei of Canada, Canadian Weekly Newipop*. 

Association, and the Audit Bureau of Circvlations. Authorized as Second Class Mail, Port Office Deportment, Ottawa. 

. JOHN A. MEYK . . Managing UHor j6ftH i. STRUTHMS .'. News f direr 

ION . . . Women's Editor . GEOtGE HASKETT . . Sports fdUe, 



T 



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LAWRENCE RACINE . . Job Printing and Production 

THE EDITORIAL PAGE 



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PAGE FOUR 



THURSDAY, THE TWENTY-EIGHTH DAY OF FEBRUARY. NINETEEN HUNDRED AND FIFTY-TWO 



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* •. 



We have an apology to make 
to Johnny Greenwood. Johnny 

spotted Newmarket's first robin 

last week and gave us this in- 
telligence over a cup of coffee 
at the Newmarket Grill. We 
promised to see that the item 
was reported on the front page 
but we forgot to get it printed 
in time. 

However, Johnny's honor of 
seeing the first robin is unques- 
tioned. There have not yet 
been any other reports of the 

"first sight". 

» • » 

Present at our newspaper 
meeting in Montreal were two 
American publishers who were 
acting as observers on behalf of 
a somewhat similar organiza- 
tion in the making in the 
States. They had pleasant 
words to say about our group 
and asked if they could borrow 
our constitution, standards of 
practice, and so on. 

They said they were greatly 
impressed by Canada and Can- 
adians. On our part, it was 
pleasant to hear that we were 
able to export ideas as welt as 
many of our best brains. Now. 
if the trade in ideas could be 
increased and the brains per- 
suaded to remain at home, we 
would indeed be in a nanny 
position. 



9 



FEBRUARY 25, 1927 
The York County Hospital 
Hoard has effected a settlement 
of fire loss with the insurance 
companies for $14,400. The 
president, Mr. J, F. Harvey, in- 
forms us thai the Board are 
taking .steps to rebuild the part 
that was destroyed by fire, as 
soon as possible. With the two 
wmgs which escaped the fire 
through the fine work of the 
fire brigade, a splendid hospi- 
tal with all modern appliances 
Will be the result. 

Now that the sua is getting 
up before seven, spring can't be 
far away. 

An east wind with a touch of 
the north in it is said to depress 
people more than anything else. 
We had it last Sunday. - 

The Newmarket branch of 
the women's Institute held a 
very successful at home in aid 

°c lh * P uee « Mary hospital. 
Mrs. IJiIborough of Aurora, ac- 
companied by her daughter, 
gave a monologue which was 
much enjoyed. Mrs. Arthur 
trammer gave two fine selec- 
tions and Miss Lillian ifart, nc* 
compared by Miss Afarjorle 
Lloyd, gave two lovely solos. 
The program was high-class in 
every respect. 

To Mrs. P. W. Pearson, wile 
of the member for North York, 
in the provincial legislature! 
must be accorded the honor o( 
holding the smartest and most 
beautiful reception ever given 
to the ladies of Newmarket, be- 
ing hostess to over 130 guests 
Jasr Saturday afternoon at the 
King George Hotel. 

Hope: Very small congrega- 
tion out last Sunday/ I guess 
everybody was afraid of the 
weather. 

Only one Friday, the 1.1th, 

will occur in 1927. The <luy 
and date when the superstitious 
arc watchful and wary will 
come in May. In 1028, there 
will be three "hoodoo" days, 

THE OLD HOME TOWN 



FEBRUARY 28, 1902 

Queensville Methodist Sun- 
day school, conveyed in five 
good bfg sleighs, passed through 
town on Tuesday. They had a 
delightful day and all seemed to 
enjoy themselves. 

Baldwin: Market was lively 
on Monday, folks feeling as gay 
as a robin in springtime! 

A number of town ladies are 
Planning to commence spring 
housecleaning next week. 

-^? ron: £* r - George D<wn and 
faimij', who ore spending the 
wmter at the postmaster's, ex- 
pect to return to their home at 
Pent*, early in March. 

m J&Pfip That famous Bck- 

™ l < fat . n,J y ?/ musical artists 

and Swiss bell-ringers will cn- 

msda" PUbIiC heiC on Wed ' 

in°R A M0 AM a ? evenln & March 
win £/ Mk \ mon oi Toronto 
will give a lecture on astron- 

mW - m 

The market in cattle in To- 
ronto is somewhat easier than 

!L W « as a . wetik a «<>. this being 
partly due to the heavy re- 
ceipts and partly to the weaker 
feeling m the Old Country. 

The sudden death of the Rev 
George Mcculloch, on Thurs- 
day afternoon of last week, 
caused profound sorrow, not 
only throughout the entire 
own, but among his brethren 
in the ministry. 

On account of the outbreak 
of smallpox in Aurora, a spe- 
cial meeting of the town coun- 
cil was held on Monday after- 
noon when a by-law was pass- 
ed, ordering compulsory vac- 
cination. 

,r-, Ev .°?t rey: Miss '"Blehart in- 
vited the neighborhood to the 

school on Monday afternoon of 

ft !3KP. to fi VH( ^«ine social. 
J he children took charge and 

u^fnli Ti |)ro « rn '». which 
was followed by lunch. 



***—*•***-# 



By STANLEY 



Henm^^^K^dyonM... so i c*„ show 



^H^RE^-nVwHOLH *THIM« 
( fcOUND TOp TtC^s 

^a -- itcomestoa < 

£*£\~\ f^e-tty p^m^- 



HrHfcY HO"// MUCH VrtTSAVEO 
BYSTAY//IG HOME Tins 
W/AfTE-R - • - SYE- BYE V 



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- - 

FOOT AND MOUTH DISEASE 



The outbreak of foot and mouth disease in the 
west has come as a serious shock to all of Canada. Most 
of us have seen pictures of or read about the outbreak 
in Mexico a few years ago and we have in the back 

of our minds thememories of mass slaughter of animals 
as well as some appreciation of the heaviness of the 
blow to the national economy. 

How bad the outbreak in Canada is cannot be 
ascertained at this writing. There is no question, how- 
ever that much damage has already been done to both 
Canada's reputation as a livestock breeder and to its 
economy as a livestock producer. "Dairy Farmer", m 
his "Top Six Inches" column on this page, further cata- 
logues anticipated evils as a result of the outbreak. 

It should be noted too that the most serious affects 
of the outbreak are not immediately felt. They are 
accumulative. The slaughtering of' a few cattle now 
will not be felt immediately; the closing of the border 
comes at a time when traffic is slow. There may be a 
tendency, as a result, to discount the ultimate damage 
the outbreak can do to our economy. In such an atmos- 
phere, there is easy acceptance of the conventional 
means to control the outbreak, by slaughter of infected 
animals and strict quarantine. 

The fact is that if Canada is to be freed of the 
disease, programs for research into its cause should be 
vastly expanded, even at the expense of other research. 
We think too, that in the course of such research, other 
avenues of approach should be utilized. There is, for 
example, the experiments of an English breeder in India 
where foot and mouth disease is prevalent. 

He found that by careful feeding, with attention 
to the nutritional elements in his animals' food, he was 
able to immunize his cattle to a degree that they could 
run with an infected herd yet escape the disease. Surely 
this whole question of nutrition in its relation to disease 
among animals deserves further study. There has long 
been the opinion that the root of manv of the diseases 
so injurious to our livestock lies in our failure to feed 
our animals properly, and our insistence upon weight 
and size rather than upon food value itself. 



• 






HIGHER SCHOOL STANDARDS 

# - 

The trend in education in recent years has been 
towards greater attention to the individual pupil. A 
by-product of this li-end has been the sacrifice of mental 
discipline and academic standards, and the tendency to 
substitute less relevant subjects in favor of those found 
too difficult, in the main, there can be no general 
disagreement with greater attention to the individual 
pupil, but when this is used as an excuse for the above, 
it becomes a menace to (he whole educational system. 

Not long ago, President Sidney Smith of the Uni- 
versity of Toronto repotted a serious decline in the 
ability of students to handle the English language, if 
ho was surprised at the outcome of his investigation, 
the average employer was not. Few can claim satis- 
•action with the average product of our school system, 
aud an inability to write was not the least of their 
complaints. \ 

So a is welcome news to rend that the Ontario 
minister of education has warned that "frills" will bo 
curtailed ... the school system, that curriculum will 1» 

,r V S ?• bnn '>; f ba <* emphasis upon the fundamentals 
of education Nor is it surprising to rem! that one 
teacher, out of step with the minister, characterizes him 
as one of the "old school". v«««« 

tho IS "'"I 8 , t, " ,e,lts ,MJ fjrm, y c<, " c «t«« "' 
ho fundamentals of language, history, geography, 

nathemat.es, i s „ mm lo .- Ul0 old schoi)1 »* ^ j^f; 

hope the return voyage will be accomplished in the: 
shortest possible lime. 

No school system, any more than other aspects of 
I'v.ng, can remain static. A school system must he. 
continually adjusted to changing times. But such 
adjustment is only proper when basic values are main- 
tained. It seems to us that our school svslcm. in its 
process of adjustment, has lost sight of those basic 
values of mental discipline and high standards. Wo 
hope Dr. Dunlop is able to restore them, . 



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others are said to have done the same. A minister of 
the United church thought this was an excellent Idea 
and, in a broadcast sermon, suggested church members 
who had received this windfall might pass it on to 
the church funds as a thank-offering. 

Undoubtedly a large number of people of 70 years 

and over who do riot need it have applied for the pen- 
sion, and indeed the government has utfged them to do 
so. The Prime Minister himself was the first to set the 
example. The more the merrier, for the government 
has more than enough and to spare in the big surplus— 
and is there not an election in the offing? It is a time 
for generosity, and if the generous action of the govern- 
ment prompts and provides people with the means of 
being generous toward good causes, so much the better 
for all concerned— except, perhaps, the future tax- 
payers. 

Opposition party politicians, who have been com- 
peting with the government in their promises of larger 
bounties in the form of "social welfare," are naturally 
jealous of the popularity of the free-for-all pensions. 
They may even go so far as to accuse the government 
of "bribing the people with their own money," as they 
did in the case of the baby bonuses. But there will be 
no criticism from the General Hospital, and apparently 
the churches are quite willing and eager to accept a 
share of the pensions distributed to people who do not 
need the money. All such contributions would, of 
coui-se, be deducted from income tax returns. But a 
much more straightforward and honest way of state 
subsidizing churches would be for the government lo 
make direct grants to church funds. 

QUITTING THE COUNTY? 

(Murklium Economist (titil Sim) 
It was reported the other day in the daily press 
that Richmond Hill was considering withdrawal from 
York county council. This is more than just idle talk, 
since council instructed their solicitor, Mr. J. D. Lucas, 
to determine how the municipality could drop out of 
county council. 

"Wo were assessed $8,000 last year by the county 
and the only benefit to the municipality was the privi- 
lege of sending old people to the countv home for the 
aged," declared Deputy lteeve K. Tomlin. 

Reeve \V. J. Taylor said he did not believe it was 
necessary for the village to be a member of the countv 
council. 

This is a new viewpoint to us — that a municipality 
might withdraw from county council if desired. Wo 
have often heard the view — mid from men who are 
qualified to have an opinion — that county councils 
could well bo abolished. From what we havo learned 
of government and municipal affaire, wo agree, with 
this view. But it is a little beyond our comprehension 
to see how permission could bo granted to municipal^ 
tics to withdraw while the system of .comities remains. 

\\e do believe that counties could wry well be 
dispensed with and its functions shared by the provin- 
cial govcrnm. ->i, 9 nd ti 10 individual municipalities. Wc 
grant that v hen the county system Was sot up it prob- 
ably served a useful function — but we believe that day 
has passed. \ . l .f 



i- . 




FLAG 



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Toronto redpioi* of lift first ^finthly cheque of 
?<10 under the new blanket Old Ago Security scheme 
was reported to have handed over his chwjuo to the 
General Hospitol Fund. This action was featured in 
the newspaiiers as an example of generosity, and many 



i 



' i 



(Ft-OHiM* Swift Gun cnl Suit) . 
.Now that the Government of Canada in its wis- 
dom has decided to dispense so far as possible with the 
word '♦Dominion^ % effieinl designntions; and now 
• that they feel XJanadh cim stnnd on its own fcofrby even 
having n imtive-born Govcrno*Gchcrnl, wo think it fit 
and proper that Canadians should impress right now 
on tho same government that Canada is way behind the 
times in not Imviiig n distinctive flag of its own. 
. Wo have i«jve*$et been able tomlequalcly put a 
finger on the fcnsoij Joir the of ficial Uinilicence in this 
regard. For many jwars t^arllamoht has sporadically 
debated the question. For one %VW period there wa's 
even quite an netivo Parliamentary committee saddled 
with the responsibility of trying to chooso a flag which 
would meet the tastesand nationalistic -(if any) nspira- 
tions of various sections of Canada* There are hundreds 
of designs gathering diist in tho archives or desks of 
Ottawa today, 

Canada has now grown to a very adult stature in 
tho world of nations and there Is no reason on earth 
why we should have to use the flag of Britain even* 
though our tics with the Mothor Country arc as strong 
as ever, witness the love and affection showered on 
Queen Elizabeth, on her recent visit hore. Australia 
and New Zealand are tho most British of nil tho Com- 
monwealth countries, yet they havo their own flag, and 
rightfully so. 






i. 



Thm note 



t* not 



h thm Mrvont, ik* *• mm*,, * thm pmoplm, *• tfoto It ffrWr gnmmt— 

W#W«JHW# on thmir rfeto, thmk ogtfif in fa fmg M oww f omf notion oi luum; it 

ftmefton of thm sfof» fa auww thm dfrveffen of fftm activfttoi whkh nut 

on tmMvUuot 



1 ' 



Office Cot Reports 

Catnips By Ginger 



Tlial mad, impetuous flyer, 
Stallimprang BHggens, Slim's 
retired air race pilot cousin, fi- 
nally projected his Bllggens- 
made aeroplane into the air n 
couple of weekends ago, in do- 
fiance to all aerodynamic Im- 
possibilities. 

■^ Stallanprang has been work- 
ing on this second in a scries 
of two Dliggcns machines. He 
already owns a factory-made 
Corndcvil monoplane but b#" 
sheer designing genius, has 
constructed a second machine 
from parts of a World War I 
Sopwith Pup, on original Bier- . 
iot and certain parts of a Cock- 
shutt binder. 

AH this work has been going 
on for months under a veil of 
secrecy in his Oak rtidgc work- 
shop. Two weekends ago, the 
Stallanprang craU was rolled 
• out' of the workshop and taken 
by tractor to nearby SSipper- 
ville aerodrome. . -.- 

Enthusiasts at: ; the drome 
were anxious to see this radical 

machine perform, particularly 
since Stallanprang was using a 
hew sensation in power plants, 
the three and a half cylinder, 
102 h. p. Hung Lung if aero- 
engine, never before introduc- 
ed to district flying circles. 

Your correspondent was io* 
vited by the master airman to 
fide along on the first tes$ 
flight but because of an acute 
case of asthma attacking this 
columnist for the first time in 
his life just before take-off. he 
was unable to go. ' 

The thing shot into the afc' . 
before the undercarriage 
wheels revolved even once, so 
powerful was the Hung Lung 
II. Stallanprang put his home- 
made ship through its paces, 
performing unbelievable aero- 
batics. He was last seen head- 
ing north, teeth barred, nose in 
the wind at 15.000 feet; 

Over C.F.R.B. sideroad, 
something happened. Stalian- 
prang lost altitude, descending 
to 500 feet directly over a barn- 
yard. With quick presence of 
mind, Stallanprang turned the 
propeller to- reversible pitch 
and backed up to 15.000 again. 

by "Dairy Farmei 
i 

The Top Six Inch 



But it was too much for 
Hung Lung II and he 
landed into the barnyard. 
This weekend Stallanp 
tore down the ship for an < 
haul. He took apart the f 
ago, took off the wings, r» 
signed the airframe, repl 
the Gockshutt parts with 
sey-Harris, and finally f 
the trouble, a hair in the 
buret tor. 

Stallanprang took off i 
cow pasture and flew bac*- 
base. "She acted well on tl 
off;" said the noted pilot 
had three cow-breadths a 
chaw of tobaccie to spare. 

Back at the airdrome, 
lanprang discovered that 
had forgotten to refit the 
frame to the aircraft i 
bashed, he flew back, fitted 
airframe on and returne 
the cheering crowds at Zi 
vilie. 

Our Zipperville corres^ 
ent wrote: "Lindberg had n* 
mg on our local Stallanp* 
Bliggens. Thi3 week ru 
have been flying around h 
community that StaHanpri 
Will attempt an Atlantic cr| 
ing upside down. BHggens £ 
consistently denied the rejg 
but we told him we thought- 
had something special on S 
mirid. n - r; 

. M ¥er ding ri§ht.- said S^ 
lanprang as he rubbed olive% 
on a large bump on his do£ 
•aiy wife doesn't like me di 
experimental flying.- he sS 
pointing to a broken rolling s 
on their kitchen table. li 

In spite of problems ofif 
domestic nature. StaHanori 
looks to new adventures la 
air. Quoting that French 
thor. Antoine de Saint Ex 
erj% Stallanprang said re 
tively, -fn the mould of 
here ; new profession, flyin' 
new breed of men has fce«n 
and me behV one of them 
corollary thereof is that 
matter what yer wife says, 
gonna anyway.** 

But wives are great confdi 
ders of corrollaries. conclusit 
and logic. Even great flyer- 
ventors like Stallanprang B 
gens are not immune to wiv 



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We are wondering if we all 
realize what the outbreak of 
foot and mouth disease will 
mean to the agricultural econ- 
omy of our country and par- 
ticularly to our province. It 
will be great uftfc and the re- 
sult of a concentrated effort if 
this is not to be the end of the 
golden ago of cattle breeding 
in this country. 

Few of us realize that we be- 
came, through the ability of 
our farm community* an ex? 
porter of seed stock to the 
whole world and that wo be- 
came dependent on this source 
of income to bolster revenue 
received from slaughter cattle. 
There are few breeders of 
pure-bred stock who didn't ship: 
to the States at one time or on> 
other and many shipped as far 
as Europe, Mexico and many 
other parts of this world. 

Having done this, wo in turn 
>yere forced to import new 
bloodlines, going back time and 
again to the source of the 
breed, with the exception of 
Holsteins, and to the United 
States in some other cflscs. . Un- 
doubtedly it was the importa- 
tion which got us into trouble 
although there bus been as yet 
no announcement as ^ uw 
probable origin of the outbreak. 

We are sure that in time the 
d isoase wi 1 1 bo erudicntca- 
again, but not until it hns crtf- 
ate«l hardship for all of us and 
heavy financial losses to 'those 
whose cattle will havo to SeT 
slaughtered. Wc <lon't want \$x 
sound too inueli like an nlavm> 
st. hut we think thnt -it will 
be years before we regain the 
position we had in the world as 
the breeders of. superior breed* 
ing material, the umiucstiom-d 
leaders in numv breeds. 

In the meantime, the stock- 
yards will ho aflutter with ru- 
mors and prices will he going 



up and down, and we will 3 
scan our daily papers with aj 
xiety for news on this seour^ 

In our immediate neighbej 
hood, it will have many vcsixi 
It will stop the exporting ) 
cattle to the States. This w 
affect the purebred breeders | 
well as the breeder of U 
quality steers. Organized sat 
of breeding stock wilt suff 
from the absence of Amerieil 
buyers. There are several 
these in York County. 

The feeders of beef cattle wi 
have to face the chance of pt< 
ting in stockers, since each an 
Will brought in will be a ti 
tcntial danger. This is true tl 
more so since a lot of the! 
stockers came from the Wcj 
Ontario was never self-su 
porting in raising cattle f 
: uni5hing. This .vill re^idt 
soifle readjustment of the pr 
graiit. .on many farms, necess 
itajyi^tnore investment. 

Bfeedei's of all breeds 
Rattle wi» have a smaller r 
turn Jrpm their cattle and the] 
svjll bj& a hesitation on the pa 
otfalXbrccciers to. import or bu 
localty improved breeding 
tcmli ;.' 

B ■ SvUli as well, affect€ffi 

br^ders ot sheep and swf 
thesmhewoy. -' : J * 

■Tljejre is little, if any tlii 
oh the credit side. If price¥ Jfe 
tip. Ihero might be ntore mfcen 
live to market inferior breed 
M)8 stock, and thus impro? 
our hftwls. It also niighV-Kli 
the trend a\va>* mm dairying 
«*ld increase the suppIv<"o 
dairy ' pixuluets. Uiulaubtediy 
the prinhtetlon of milk am 
other dairy products will be 
come more attractive to many 
Wo are hoping that promp 
and vlgorotis action on the par 
of the government and co-op 
eratiim of all of us will halt the 

disease soon. 



CLIMBING LIKE A HOMESICK ANGEL 




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Fm* 5 Tte Kewmffcet Era and 
Emfteav, ITrimday, FA. 2S, 1»2 



Our readers 

write 



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Oak Ridges News 

The development of an Angli- held at the home of Mrs. Eric 



The Editor: I think your edi- 
torial "Need Firm Milk Policy** 
was right on the target— ^arid it 
impressed me the more, because 
I happened to have had the pri- 
vilege of studying the six-col- 
umn text of the address upon 
which it was based. 



can Young People's Association 
at St John's church holds special 
interest for a large number of 
young people in the district. For 
many years an A-Y.P.A. thrived 
in the community under the 
presidency of the late Mrs. W. X 
Whitton, and it is her daughter, 
Helen, (Mrs. Colin Crawford), 
who is president of the execu- 
tive committee. ./Other officers 
are: Rev. D. G. H T Mchell, fipiL 
ores.; Geoffrey Beatty, 3r i9 wSti 
Rosemary Wright, vice-pres*? 
Mary McNair, sec.; and j8r- Colin 
Cfrawford, treas. Bruce Bell is 
program convener. 

Oak Ridges teaching staff were 
hosts to King Township Teach- 1 



Frankly, I was tremendously [ers* Association on Thursday ev- 
impressed with not only the dy- [ening, Feb. 21, when the study 
namic thought in the address by j of map reading was the subject 
Mr. F, W. Walsh, deputy minister iof discussion. Mr. Bennett, 



for agriculture in Nova Scotia 
and its official background, but 
also by the fact that, as ypy jput 
it, these "hard but very appro; 
priate words were spoken to the 
Dairy Farmers of Canada at their 
annual meeting in Montreal**; 

It seems to me that only a 
realist and an expert ' would 

bring the following points to the 
spotlight: "(1) Milk production 
per capita has been declining 
since 1941 and is now lower than 
it was ten years ago — though we 
have 2,600,000 more people; (2) 
In terms of milk equivalent, the 



Johnston, King, on Thursday af- 
ternoon. Miss Dickenson gave a 
demonstration on pottery. The 
King smocking group was re- 
sponsible for refreshments. 

The formal opening of the new- 
Jefferson public school will take 
place on Monday, March 10^R|y;; 
IX <J. : it Michel?, rector pfe gfci 
John's Anglican church, will tak^j 

Mrs. 0. -iR., Gunn enrolled 
members of the King Erpwriie 
Pack last Saturday. She is the 
County Commissioner of Gui3es 
and Brownies. y 

Organize Sports 

One of the first activities for 
Lake Wilcox boys, planned by ■ 
the recreation association,. ef ; 
which George Gourlay is presi- 
dent, is a model airplane club;; 
The wood-working class started: 
on Monday night at the school; 

A three-day water regatta will 
be held on a holiday weekend. It 
is hoped water skiing Will be 
featured. 

Mumps and impetigo among 
Lake Wilcox children have cut 



ducts v/as a little greater than 
the quantity of dairy products 
exported; (3) Fewer dairy cows 
on the farms. Statistics, in fact, 
indicate the lowest number of 



principal of New Scotland school. 
Was the speaker. 

Dr. Robert M. King, York 
County Health Unit, director; 
and Deputy-Reeve K. Tomlin of 

Richmond Hill, will address Oak 

Ridges and Lake Wilcox Rate- 
night, March 4. at Lake Wilcox 
payers' Association on Tuesday 

school. 

Festival Awards 

Miss Anne Stephenson won 
first place in the vocal class Un- 
der 21, at the Kiwanis Music 
Festival last week, receiving 88 Ridges association 

- Ini 



KING RIDGE NEWS 

The first euchre under the aus- 
pices of the King Ridge W. L was 
held in the Sacred Heart school 
auditorium on Wednesday. Feb. 
20. Although a very stormy 
night, enough people turned up 

for 10 tables. 

We wish to express pur thanks 
to the Sisters and pupils :6f ttte 

school for the. wbridertul way 



pretty: valentine: costumes who: 
waitea on thii* .: tables with re*\ 
fresnments at the end. of the 

^rrii-;'-;-;'* •••*■ ■•'■-•.-'. '"" =- 

The pmes werje donated: by 
Sirs. K.' gproule, Mrs* Ji ,'*fe 
Scott; Sf rs: P. W. Bail! alid Mrs; 
•&% Jones. . i-;. ;.'-'..... 

Winners were: Mrs. H- Parker, 
% Jones; consoktion, >tr& M : . 
Taten; men's, Mr. P. Flanagan, 
Mr. Wl d r Reilry? cbhsolatiorii Mr. 



TO TELL HISTORY 



W.C.T.U. MEET 

The regular meeting of the W. 

£ T ;V1- w "' ^ e lVr,! h \ h< T' 0F Y °RK HOSPITAL 

0£ Mrs. E. Bull, 33 Church St., 
on Tuesday, March 4, at 3 p.m. 



ENJOT PARTY 

last Friday the annual Valen- 
tine Party of the Christian Bap- 
tist Junior choir was held. After 
a short practice the choir officers 
supervised games, after ^which 
Mrsv& Winter, Mrs. W. Robnv 



W. H. Eves, a director of the 
original York County Hospital 
beard, will be guest speaker at a 
general meeting of York County 
Hospital Women's Auxiliary on 
Tuesday, March 4. The meeting 
will be held at the Scout hall at 

Air, Eves will speak on "Hhel 
Origin and Growth of the York 



SELHAVEN 



ing entirely on his memory butf 
has located the valued minutes; 
of the early hospital board meet- 
ings. His talk promises to be 
interesting and highly informa- 
tive. Following the brief busi- 



on Friday arid Saturday evenings. 

. Miss Muriel Willoughby spent 

tjie Weekend with Miss Phyllis 

E GreenwoaJ; ^QOr pxfee. $&? A birthday party in the form 
H. Parker- ... ;■-■■ - ©fa; family reunion was held on 

Bobbie and; Susan Sproute Saturday evening at the home 
have just returned from: visiting; of airs. Selby Fairbarn, who was 
their grandma, Mrs. Ji Sproute \ celebrating her birthday, with 2? 
at Port Credit. . j members of the immediate fam- 



Mr. Lloyd Pollard, Hamilton, 

visited his grandparents, Mr. and ^ 

Mrs. Charles Pollard, oh Sunday; jness session, ilght refreshments 

Many from the vicinity attend- 1 will be served. A cordial invita- 
"ea /-the carnivalm Keswick arena (lion is extended to the public to 
**** * attend this meeting. 

Attention is drawn - to thel 
change of place for this general} 
meeting as the regular meeting 



RESERVE ALL-CANADIAN 

Illehee Soverign * Supreme 

owned by H. C. McClookey, 

Queensville, has been named 

reserve all-Canadian two-year* 

old Holstein bull in competition 

with the top show bulls of the 

dominion, ffhis animal was sen- 

Jipr &tt« gyahd champion at Pet- 

lerbqro ^ampionship s}u>v? ; arid 

at tfie V6Hc County Black arid 
White E^Jr held in connection 
i^itK Mafkhaitt Fair*'. He was 
also third at the Royal Winter 

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spot, the Agricultural Board 
rooms, will be in use on March 4. 



Mrs. F. Griffiths and daughter 
down school attendance, mo- jDonaleen have just returned 

thers say. On Monday, 50 were 'from a month's vacation in Flor- 



marks in a class of 28 competi- 



1951 importation of dairy pro- tors. In the Jieder class she 



placed sb:th in a class of 12, with 
82 marks. Mr.- Clayton Rose,, 
Aurora, her accompanist, re-' 
ceived 84 marks to rank sixth. 



, , in the open soprano class, Anne 
cows of the past 20 years; (4) came second/ receiving 82 marks. 



Annual production of butter has 
decreased more than 38,000,000 
lbs. in the past 3 j'ears. Produc- 
tion in 1951 is now down to the 
1935-39 level; (5) The volume of 
cheddar cheese produced. i3 at its 
lowest point of the present cen- 
tury. The production of 85,000,- 

000 in 1951, represents but 54 g ca re invited "to view* toe 
percent of ^e 194^47 average, hibit from Feb. 23 to Mar. U 
and is down 34,000,000 pounds 



16 competing In the oratorio 
class of 16, Anne was fourth 
with a mark of 78. 
At Art Gallery 

Mrs. S. C. Snively is exhibiting 
a set o/ miniature china at the 
exhibition currently in Toronto's 
Art Gallery. The general pub- 



ex- 



from the 1935-39 average/* 

Now it seems io me that the 
above is the kind of fact lan- 
guage which even the speediest- 
reader will get. It goes without 
saying that Canada's housewives 
understand the relationship be- 
tween the price-tag of a' pound 
of No. J creamery butter and Oft 

a pound of margarine, and cer- 
tainly one need not be an Ein- 
stein to figure out the link be- 
tween hundreds of thousands of 
fewer cows on Canadian farms, 
millions of additional mouths at; 
Jack Canuck's breakfast-dinner- 
supper table, and today's milk' 
price trends. 

My own view is that Canadian 
leadership was very , much 
''asleep at the s^rilfeh^ in the 
overnight decision":- tb give the 
green light to margarfne>^as; : art 
effort to lower the pnefe of butf 
ter. Even if the. direction was; 
right, that 70-year-itfa vc^roer 
was turned too *asl*-indced, jm 
quite a reckless speed; . ;We .are 
going to have plenty of . time fo: 
ponder its consequences! 

War Veteran, 



16. 



Mrs. Geoffrey Beatty brought 
Miss Mary Dickenson of Toronto 
to a meeting of Kingcrafts Guild 



absent from school, ..--. - 
Special Speaker 

The 22nd anniversary of York 
County Home and School Feder- 
ation was observed by the Oak 

on _ Monday 
night, when Mrs. Fred Coon out- 
lined the history and activities 
of the local association since its 
inception six years ago. Mr, P. 
E. Perryment, Aurora, was the 
principal speaker. He deeribed 
recreation programs available 
from provincial government di- 
rection. 

Miss Freda Dent, Miss Ruth 
Beynon and Miss Suzanne Grew 
gave a program Of piano selec- 
tions. They are pupils of Miss 
Dorothy Armstrong of King. 

Mrs. Bert Comfort made a 
beautiful birthday cake, decor- 
ated with 22 candles, which were 
extinguished by Mrs. Harry Hut- 
chinson, charter member of dak 
Ridges Homo and School Associ- 
ation. - 



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The Editor; In regard to your 
article in last week's Issue, Top 
Six Inches. The writer* in telling 
about hog producers .meeting, 
said that the speaker, Mr. Chas. 
McGinncs, gave a very interest- 
ing and intelligent address; and 
had his subject welt in/hany and 
that we agreed with -eVer^fhihg, 
but the last part when* ftp said 
we must curtail production in or- 
der that the farmer can make a 
profit. , ■_ : . 

I was also at that meeting and 
I can truthfully say that I "fully 
agree with everything 'ifi& speak- 
er said. Why should hot the *§*** 
mer make a profit on his produc- 
tion of pork or anything else for 
that matter? When ^Industry can- 
not sell Its goods at a profit It 
closes Its doorsC Why should not 
the farmer curtail producJIon 
also? ■-.; ..*- 

In my mind, InthG-fm^Xit 
pork, the fair way^^dlhyfor' 
each producer to Hf|ui(I^te; onfe 

brood sows In -^ire ;'iot? i&fi "one: 
hroo<l cow; »nd In the case of 
chickens, 8 pr 1fttpe_rccnt> \Vliy 

produce more tn^n^^ii : -bc:'<bsi(iCn': 
at a profit to the produoer?; , , -1 
Tnis lack of profit, anil long 
hours Is the cause of the boys 
leaving the farm. As f see it the 
neopte in urban areas are living 
In one grand circle with rural 
producers. When the farmer can- 
not sell his goods at a profit, he 
quits buying the manufacturer's 
goods. Consequently the manu- 
facturer has to lay off his em- 
ployees and the women and: 
children suffer. Just remember 
the old slogan; Live and let live. 
Aw* everybody will be happy. 
- Yours truly, 

Edgar Dennis, 
It. it. % Aurora. 
Wlllowdale Farm 




REFRIGERATION 

Servicing, repairs and 
tenance on domestic and 
merrial refrigerators, milk 
coolers, w*tkin coolers, soda 
fountains, etc. 



AjEwtt UNIVERSAL COOLER 

DEEP FREEZERS 

HOME LOCKERS 

WALK-IN UNITS, ETC. 

WM. CLARK 

PHONE SUTTON 3UW 
BOX tJ, JACKSON'S POINT 



Mrs. Clare Powell ahd Mary 
and: Mrs, William Powell of Au- 
rora visited oh Friday with the 
formers mother, Mrs. Michencr 
of Toronto.. 

, Mr. and Mrs. Lome Johnston 
of , Claremont, and Mrs. . John 
Irwin of Stouffville, visited Mr. 
and Mrs. John, If win on Friday. 
Mr. and Mrs- John Irwin, John- 
fly and Barbara, had Sunday din- 
ner with Mr. and Mrs> ICen Bacon 
um Wayne of Bethesda: . 

Mn fifio* Mrs. Clarence Mackey 
6t Toronto ^jicht Sunday with 
their parents, Mr- and Mrs. 
George Mackey. .: 

Miss Pearl Cole had the mis- 
fortune to fall on some ice and 
break her arm. She is home 
from the hospital ami we wish 
her a complete recovery;* '• 

We are pleased to report the 
improvement of Mr. George 
Preston, who came home from the 
hospital on Sunday. 

Blue Cross dues should be paid 
to Mrs. George Dewsbury by 
March I. ' 

Mr. and Mrs. II. A. White and 
Mr> and Mrs. Grant Morley at- 
tended the funeral on Saturday 
of Mr. Whites aunt, Miss Carrie 
Duncan of Todmorden;' 

Miss Shyrlca Wilson spent the 

weekend with Miss Sheila Van 
Nostra nd. . 

Mr. and Mrs. Clayton Pogue 
and. family were supper guests of 
Mr. and Mrs. Stewart Burnett 
and family. 

Mrs. Floyd Yoke, Betty and: 
Bcrnicc of Angus, OnL, spent 9. 
few days last week with her 
parents, Mr. and Mrs. E,. Ran± 
sonS ■'•.. 

Mrs* Percy. Aliin of Aurora vis^ 
ited hut daughtcfi Mrs. Herbert 
Oliver, last week. 

Mr. and Mrs. Charlie Vanlloof,: 
Bill and Mary, spent Sunday with; 
Mr. Vanlfoors brother at Oak- 

ville, ■-- 

Mrs. Herbert Oliver had Mon- 
day dinner with Mrs. Ben Cook^ 
son of Holt 

Mr. and Mrs. John Irwin had 
dinner on Monday with the tat- 
ter's sister, Mrs. Harvey Ewen 
and Mr. Ewen of Holt. 

Mr. and Mrs. OrlHc McCliire 
of Manchester, Mr. Madill, Mrs* 

Elsie McCIurc of Bogarltoivn. 
Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Cook and 
Donnn, Miss June Harbinson, Bd 
and Howard Kichardsoh, all of 
Toronto, were Sunday guests ; -Qt 
Mr. and Mrs. Austin lUchardsoh* 
-Mr- and Mrs. Arthur VanNes- 
trnnd, Mr. and Mrs. George 
VanNostrand, attended the fun- 
eral of Mrs. William Currcy of 
Bradford last Tuesday. . 
(Held from Inst week) 

Mr. and Mrs. Norman Burns 
and Miss Jean Lundy spent the 
weekend with their parents, Mr. 
and Mrs. Wilfred Lundy. 

Mr. and Mrs. H. A. White, Bob 
and. Ruth visited on Friday with 
Mr. and Mrs. H. A. Duncan and 
Erma of Todmordon* ■":' 

Mr. Alviii Irwin and family 
visited on Sunday with Mr. and 
Mrs. John Irwin and family. ■. 

Mrs. John Irwin, Johnny and 
Barbara spent a few days last 
week with her father and sister, 
Mr. A. Thaxter and Marie. 

Mr. and Mrs. Charlie Scott, 
Donna and Linda of Leasidc had 
ten on Saturday with Mr. and 
Mrs. W. Kingdon and Bill. 

Mr. and Mrs. Charlie Penfold 
of Aurora had Sunday tea with 
Mr. and Mrs. W. Kingdon. 

We are pleased to report the 



improvement of Mr. Geo. Pres- 
ton. 

The Vandorf Women's Insti- 
tute play entitled •'The Family 
Next Door" is to be presented in 
Vandorf hall on March 18. 

Blue Cross dues are to be paid 
to Mrs. George Dewsbury the 
last week of February. 



Mr. and Mrs. B.Iiodgihsoh arid 

daughter Susan spent Sunday 
with Mr. and Mrs. Or vi He King. 
Mr. and Mrs. Perry Winch, Sr., 
visited Mrs. Christie Irwin at 
QueensvJHe on Sunday. ." 

Mr, and Mrs. !. Waldon have 
returned home after being in 
Hanover for two months with 
her sister, who has been very 
ill, r 

Mrs. Brock Currcy of Toronto 
is visiting at Mrs. IL Lcppard's 
for a few days. ; 

■ Mr. George Traviss is visiting 
friends in Toronto for a few days. 

The World Day of Prayer will 
be held in the United church, 
Keswick, on Friday afternoon. 
Feb. 29, at 2.30 p.m. Several 
congregations are taking part 
and all ladies are urged to at- 
tend. 

The March meeting of the Kes- 
wick W.C/IMJ. will he held on 
the evening of March 4 at the 
home of Mrs. Freeman Pollock. 
Everybody welcome. 

The Busy Dizzy Dozen Dra- 
matic club are practicing for a 
rip-roaring play entitled "The 
Carnival Comes to Town", which 
they plan to present in March in 
the Keswick Community Centre. 



ELMHURST- BEACH 

Mr. oftd Mrs. Art Dawson have 

returned homo after spending q 
few weeks: in the sunny south.: 
Air. arid Mrs. Miller Sedore arc 

enjoying their holiday in New 
.Orleans. 

: Tfie Island Grove L.O;L. held 
a very successful euchre at Pine- 
mere Lodge. Ladies' first prize 
was won by Mrs. Inmah; ladies* 
second by Mrs. Wesley Hoyes; 
gents* first, Mr. J. Harper; gents* 
second, Mr. Orvan Huntley; con- 
solation. Mr. Marvin Clark, *". 

Tlie Elmhurst Beach Women's ' 
Institute Will meet at the home 
of Mrs. Selby Sedore on March 

L The WiA. of St, P*u\% jersey,; 
Jhejd ■ motif' monUil^--/nfiMit(MC. at- 
the hprno of ;Mra. Leslie on 
Thursday, Fob, . 21. (Jur n^w 
preflident> Mrs. Leslie, wosiinthe 

chaifiv.. . .*'-."■ .'.:-: 

;-Vt special service was lield in 
St Paul's on Sunday Ia* with 

Rey. J. : Sm»h front St James' 
church, Sutton, ns guest minted 
ter. and their choir giving special 

music. 

£he neighbors are gradually 
returning from the south and all 
report wonderful weather and a 
good holiday. ■ 

The Sunday school is having a 
PEEK -.on March 7 In the parish 
HIE at T?0 p.m., for ail the pu- 
pils, parents and tiny of the con- 
gregation who would care to join 
them. 



Mr. Carl Proctor is attending 



iiy present. 



WJ\. TEA 

A delightful spring tea was 
held on Friday. Feb. 22, under 

the auspices of the Women's As- 



Mr. and Mrs. W. Stevenson, | sociation. Trinity United church. 

Royal Beach, Virginia, and Mrs. There was a sale of home baking. 



E. Kay, Belhaven, spent Sunday 
with Mr, and Mrs. Norman Kay. 



the convention of painters and! Miss Lois Holborn visited her 
decorators being held in LaSalle 1 grandmother, Mrs. Holborn, Kes- 
Hotel, Kingston. I wick, on Sunday. 



The association wishes to thank 
Us many friends who contributed 
to the success of this venture, es- 
pecially since the tea had been 
postponed. 



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..Mr 

IMMEDIATE 
DELIVERY 

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PHONE I379W 
NtWMARKET 



FEELING 

SEEDY? 

How often do you feel so sliu^h mk* 
headachy that jou just bng for ihm 
uay to be overt You know \hom dnys. 
Yon fed tenth-rate from the time you 
wake up in the rooming. Every hour 
■eems like two. 



■<>.~^ 



nms^nly. H ordinary constipation 
;a|? Sluggish Jsldne>*a are preventing 
proper waste elimination your system 
W mm being iXfisoccd. Tbat^what 
ttaualfymakeayou feel all draggco^ouL 

Kruschcn Salts are the ansAver. Be- 
cause they offer the wmo benefits as 
several famous Mineral Springs, 
Kruschen Sails are a valuable aid 
because they net two way*— laxative 
and diuretic. Knisclien 13 a gentle 
yet effective laxative txnd also stimu- 
I latcs healthy kidney nctton. 

Buy a package today. You'll be renaved 
a hundrwl times over in relief from the 
misery of a sluggish system. 

KRUSCHEN 
SALTS 

AT AU BtUQ SIOUS 



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?2NI» BIRTHDAY 

Patterson, Newmnrket, 
will celebrate his 72nd birthday 
tomorrow, Feb. 29. 



IS IMPROVING 

Wo are glnd to report that 
Thorold Miller Is home after 
spending some time In York 
County hospital. 




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Pa«e € The Newmarket Era and Express, Thwsday, Feb. 23, 1953 



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rtOUSfc FOR SAll 



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MORTGAGE V/ANTED 



SIX-KOOM house, Duiii iii l&oO. 
modern in every detail, forced 
air with oil, tiled four piece bath, 
two piece bath on second lioor, 
finished recreation room, N.H.I* 
mortgage, garage, cement drive- 
way, completely landscaped, 
possession April I. Complete 
with storms, screens and Vene- 
tian blinds /or every window. 
Hardwood floors throughout. 
Phone 571 j, Aurora, for appoint- 
ment, 21 Spruce St., Aurora. 

clw9 

~_3 

EIGHT room insul stone, house, 
oil heated, ganiKC, possession 
arranged. Also 8 room stucco 
house, garage, i*>ssession ar- 
ranged. Private persons only. 
For particulars write Post Office 
box 718. Newmarket. C3w9 



; SJ.ooo first mortgage money 
j wanted on new bungalow with 3 
I acres. Private. Write 
Express box 95. 



jbra ani 
*lw9 



FIVE room bungalow, msu! 
bHe sidin«, on Victor Drive 
Mount Albert Nicely decora- 
te, insulated, water. S5,U0Q. 

Terms. Possession April 1. Daw- 
son Dike, Mount Albert. c2w9 



10-KOOM brick house, lot 21, 
East Gwillirnbuiy. Queensville. 
AnnlV Mrs. James Cunningham, 
or write P.O. box 48, Que*™ 
viHe. 3w9 



2 B UILDINGS FOR SAlf 

IJAKN 45'x55' to be removed. Ap- 
ply Allen Cody, 5 miles east ot 
Aurora, 1 1-2 miles south of £jne ( 
Orchard. —=^ 

3 FARM FOR SAl£ 



FARM for sale to wind up estate. 
Owned by late Adeline Eves, sit- 
uated on the 4th concession of 
the Township of Whitchurch oc- 
cupied by Wesley Eves, about €0 
acres workable, balance pasture, 
large brick house, bank barn. 
For further particulars apply to 
Wesley Eves, phone 271 w4, New- 
rnarket. c-*** 

4 REAL ESTATE FOR SALE 



VALUABLE propony in New- 
market. Centrally located, frame 
building in good condition, at 
present used as church. Proper- 
ty approximately 39*G"x82'6"x 
74'C"x52'3*', suitable for 2-storey 
apartment or small manufactur- 
ing plant. Write Era and Ex- 
press box 87. c4wfi 

ON Jersey lUver south of Kes- 
wick, boat house with living 
quarters over same, 100 ft. front- 
age on river. Ideal for small 
boat owner or suitable for perm- 
anent home or cottage. Howard 
Morton, phone &it>, Newmarket. 

clwfl 



$10,500, SIX-KOOM, two storey 
house, modern conveniences, in 
Newmarket. Practically new. 
immediate possession. 
$8,000, SEVEN-ROOM, 2-storev 
frame house on large lot with 
garage, in Newmarket. Modern 
conveniences, suitable for room- 
ing house. Bruce I»ekie. real 
estate broker. Keswick. Phone 
4303. Queensville. clwO 

WILLIAM HOLLAND ~ 
HEAL ESTATE 
1130 College St., Toronto 
§8,000 — SEVEN-ROOM frame 
house, nicely painted and decor- 
ated. H. A. furnace, hydro, 3- 
plece bath, new garage, good 
gaiden. Cash $5,000. 
S0.500 - SEVEN-ROOM frame 
house. In village, on highway, H. 
A. furnace, hardwood floors, 
w.(rU>rn kitchen, heavy wiring, 
small acreage, low taxes. Cash 

sum, 

82,500 -- THREE-ROOM flame 
house, on one acre lot in village, 
on highway, hydro, good well 
and garden. Half cash. 
E. J. Wright, phone 700J, J3 (ftp 
hum St.. Newmarket. clwS 

6ft WANTED TO RENT 

SELF-CONTAINED apartment, 
duplex or small house, by March 
15. No children. References if 
desired. Write Era and Express 
Ixjx ti7. *2wft 



ARTICLES FOR SALE 

Venetian blinds, aluminum or 
steel, made for all styles of 
windows. Free estimates and 
Installations. Phone 755, apply 
40 Ontario St. W\, or write P-O. 
box 496, Newmarket. tfl 

Vacuum cleaners bought and 
sold and repaired. Complete re- 
pair service depot for all types 
of vacuum cleaners. All work 
guaranteed. Filter Queen Sales 
and Service, GO Andrew St-, 

phone 1315, Newmarket tf6 

OIL - FIRED air - conditioning 
units, also burners, all makes, 
ranges, refrigerators, television 
sets and radios, phonographs. 
Dealers surplus. Write A and 
A Surplus Sales Co., 2277 Yonge 
St.. or phone HY 2255, Toronto. 

•4w6 

SINGER sewing machine. Re- 
ferse stitch. Good as new. 
Phone 4209, Queensville. c3w7 

THREE-piece chesterfield suite, 
upholstered in silk repp material, 
rose and gold. Apply 57 Millard 
Ave., Newmarket, or phone 190. 

crlwO 

Zippers replaced, alterations 
and repairs, invisible mending, 
rellning, cleaning and pressing. 
Master Cleaners and Tailors, 6 
Timothy St. W„ phone 1400, 
Newmarket. tf3 

HEAVY-WIRED electric stove. 
Large wood and coal space-heat- 
er, §25. total price. Phone 80], 
Roche's Point, or apply Rainbow 
Gardens, Keswick. '2w8 

.STUDIO couch, Waysagless, 
good; oak office armchair; oak 
hat tree; oak office desk, folda- 
way beds, bunk iron beds; man- 
tel radio; ice-box; 1-4 h.p. motor; 
Mandrill with twin emerys; sev- 
eral trunks; several tables; 
chairs, stands, lamps, Jav/n 
mower, 18", rubber tires, ball- 
bearing; jacket heater, etc. 
Phone F. Hirst, Queensville 1110. 
crlwa 

TWO girls' spring coats, size 12 
and M, excellent condition and 
clean. Phone Mrs. Rose, 318}, 
rVewmarkct, before 4.30 p.m. 
^ c2w9 

QUEREC stove with stand and 
reflector, in good condition. 
Phone 2P13, Queensville. clwU 

MAN'S bicycle in good condition. 
Phone 078w2, Newmarket. *twil 

TIRE, G ply, 700x16. Kiisl class 
condition. Murray Raker, Eagle 
St., Newmarket. elwi* 

■ 

SALE OF USED TV SETg"^ 

ADDISON 16" screen, mahogany 
console, used about 2 mos. Tor- 
onto price $299.50. Our price 
$240. 

ADMIRAL 12" screen, walnut 
console, like new $250. 
ADMIRAL 10" screen, mantel 
models, $175 each. 
ADMIRAL 10" .screen mantel 
models, new $300. 
Installation extra* Demonstra- 
tions arrange*!. Terms. 
Stewart Bearc, 131 Main St.,, 
phone 355, Newmarket. clw9 

DRAFTING set. Excellent con- 
dition. Phone 437, Newmarket. 
^ clwfl 

PINK Gendron baby carriage, in 
excellent condition. Phone 2I3J, 
Newmarket. *l\v9 

AROliT 67)00 new buff bricks, 
at teasonable pried. W. J. Gecr, 
phone 018, Newmarket. elwJfr 

USED clothing. Indies' dresses, 
etc. Mrs. Crfeotti, Brownhill. 

Mwfl 



*J V _-^ - - - 



10 APARTMENT FOR RENT 

THREE-ROOM unfurnished n-| 
partment, conveniences. Apply 
f.O Timothy St. W., Newmarket 

clwO 

SPACIOUS 5 room heated upper 
duplex, heavy wiling, balcony. 
Available in March- Phone 13, 
Newmarket, or write P.O. box 
449. Clwfl 

MODERN 4 room heated apart- 
ment. $00 per month, one or two 
children welcome. 
Chas, E. Royd, 17 Main St., phone 
fr:n, Newmarket. clwfl 

UNFURNISHED, 3-rooin, heated 
apartments. Phone 1353 w, New- 
market. clwfl 

ROOM AND SOARO 



ROOM and board for gonilcmnp. 
Annly *1fl Prosoect St., or phone 
21fiw. Newmarket. e?wfl 

ROOMS K>R REWpJ 

BURNISHED, heated room. Ap. 
nly 11 Slmcoe St; R, or phone 
8Mw, Newmarket, clwfl 

DOCTOR'S stilte. Or suitable 
for nnv profession. Bent loca- 
tion. Phone 343\v, Newmarket, 
etivu 

FURNISHED room with board 
for 1 or 2 persons, Phone 14781. 
Newmarket, clwfl 

FURNISHED he.! room, in 
Christian- home. Phone 1192r. 
ffcwmarket, after 5 p.m. *rlwv 



ELECTRIC brooder stove; pair 
skis, 12 ft., almost new; ice- 
lM)x, 50 lb capacity; 4 kitchen 
chairs, table and buffet, maple 
with red trim; green chesterfield 
ami chair. 'lids furniture is al- 
most new. Phone Mrs. G. Me- 
Clurc, 2ilw4, N ewmarket. # 2w9 

G.E FLOOR iwllsher, twin brush 
es and buffers, new $35, l«nrgc 
jacket heater, heal 4 rooms, $15. 
Phone 18013, or apply <.*co. Mid- 
diet on, Muin St. No., Newmar- 
ket, clwfl 

PAINT - PAINT - PAINT 

200 QUARTS mixed pnlnl. all 
colours, $L |»cr quail. Well- 
known brand. Phone 1201 or ap- 
ply 218 Main St., Newmarket.. 

crlwfl 

BROWN double bed, with spring 
and spring-filled mattress, wine 
chesterfield chair; occasional 
chair; man'* overcoat, size 42, 
blue grey, good as new. Phone 
Mrs. E, Unnna, 1370 Newmar- 
ket, daytime, clwfl 

LADY'S short length Hudson 
seal coat, $25. Kitchen cabinet, 
fn good condition, $15. 75 lb. 
capacity lee-box, $5, Phone 1128, 
Newmarket. clwfl 

TAVO new truck tires, 050x20, 
diamond tread, $55, each. 2 Good- 
year car tires, 20x475500, gon<* 
about '100 miles, $10 each. Daw- 
son Dike, Mount Albert, ctwl* 

— ■ b_ _ 1 LJ JT TTTI 1 1 ■ 1 1. 

OAK dining loom suite, 8-plece, 
$25; 2-t>lecc chesterfield suite, 
wine; Raymond sewing machine, 
$20. Phone 578J. Newmarket. 
Mwfl 

OAK dresser. 4 drawers an<l 
lor«e bevelled nlale mirror, in 
evcellent condition, t*. P. Cane. 
72 Davis Dr., Newmarket. c2wfl 



ARTICLES FOR SALE 



CUSTOM MADE drapery, slip 
covers, bedspreads, Venetian 
blinds. Material. Kirsch tracKs. 
Pin on hooks, lining, weights, 
tapes, etc. For information or 
appointment, call Richard Sene- 
caflW Main St., phone 117. Free 
estimates . No obligation. ti» 

SKIS, poles, and boots. $15. 
Phone 1 388, Newmarket. c3w9 

BUNK beds, almost new. com 
olete with springs and mattress- 
es, red maple finish. Apply 30 
Srigley St., Newmarket . cl wg 

REcSsEDBA'TTI'nJBS-S^O 
Smart Martha Washington and 
Richlcdge stainless three Piece 
bathroom sets, White $H» to 
$189; Colored S274; complete 
with beautiful chrome fUtiners. 
Air conditioning furnaces S29.T. 
Special offers to plumbers and 
builders too. Save many 

valuable dollars, buy with 
confidence and have a 
nicer home. Satisfaction guar- 
anteed. Extra discounts off 
catalogue prices if wo supply 
everything you need for com- 
plete plumbing or heating Instal- 
lation. Catalogue includes iitho 
photos of main fixtures, prices 
and installation diagrams. Se- 
lect style of sinks, cabinets, laun- 
dry tubs, showers, stoves; re- 
frigerators. Pressure water sys- 
tems, oil burners, septic and oil 
tanks, etc. Visit or write John- 
son Mail Order Division, Streets- 
ville Hardware, Streetsville, Ont. 

Phone 261, evenings 51R15. 

ClwO 






STRAIGHT CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING 

Two terns a word, minimum of 50 cent* for each advertisement. 
Half price when advertisement Is repeated on successive weeks- 
Ten percent discount if advertisement I* paid within week of pub- 
lication* 

Coming Events costs two cents a word, minimum 60 cents. 
Half Price when repeated on successive weeks. 

Sale Registers, $1 for the first week, M cents for each successive 
week. 

Card of Thanks, Wedding and Engagement announcements, 75 
cents for each announcement less 25 cents tf paid wilbin week of 
publication. 

In Menioriams, 75 cents for each insertion plus 5 cents a lino 
for verse, less 25 cents If paid within week of publication. 

Classified advertising may be phoned Into, or left at The Era 
and Express office on Slain St., Newmarket, phone 780: at White- 
law's, phone 76. in Aurora; at Mrs. V. E. Rolling, phone S, King; 
or with any correspondent. Advertisements accepted through the 
mail where n<*me of sender nnd address ts clearly indicated. 

your advertisement get! into over 3,300 homes In North York. 



USED CARS 



I 



ARTICLES V/ANTED 



ANTIQUES 
Antiques of every description. 
Highest prices paid. 151 Main 
St., phone 738j Newmarket. 

tf5 



EIGHT-FOOT cedar posts, six 
inch top. State best price per 
hundred. Phone Toronto, Mo 
hawk 2814. »lw!> 

MEDIUM sized Victorian walnut 
huffet, splendid condition. Phone 
928, Newma rket. clw O 

USED hand power cement mix- 
er. Please advise price and lo 
cation. Apply Era and Express 
box 93. "rlwfl 



22 



HELP WANTEO 



MALE OR FEMALE 

APPLICATIONS will lie receiv- 
ed for office position. Duties 
will Include bookkeeping, short- 
hand, typing, billing machine 
and addressograph experience. 
Apply by letter only stating ex- 
perience, when available, and 
salary expected. References re- 
quired. Position offers excellent 
opportunities, pension plan, 
group Insurance. Rox 759, New- 
market, Ontario. c2w!) 

MARRIED man, experienced in 
general farming. Phone flCr2, 
Oak Ridges. *lw» 



23 



WOKK WANTED 



FIRST class panel truck and 
driver for hire. Apply Allien 
Osellon. 15 Ontario St. E. New- 
market *2w8 

UPHOI-STERING 

Chesterfield suites, occasional 
chairs, rebuilt, recovered In any 
fabric. Apply Ken Sargent, 85 
Oorham St., or phone 382, New- 
market, tfl 

Are you thinking of tiling your 
kitchen or bathroom floor? If 
so, please call 1282, Newmarket, 
for free estimates for rubber, 
mastic, mnrholeum, Jaspe anil 
plastic wall tile. R. J. Rundle 
and Son, 100 Andrew St., New- 
ma rket. tf2 

OAK RIDGE Plumbing. AH 
work guaranteed. Earl Alkhi- 
son, p hone 5'Jr3-l, King. tfO 

EXPERIENCED gardener, mar- 
ried, no family, would operate 
large garden or country estate 
flood references. Available after 
March 1. Apply Era and Express 



box flO. 



Iw7 



EXPERIENCED fanner desires 
steady employment on farm. 
Married. No children. Avail- 
able after March 15. Write Era 
and Express box !>H. «lwu 

PRUNING fruit trees and berry 
bushes. Now is the time. Phone 
5«lj, Newmarket. clwfl 

PART-TIME bookkeeping for 
stores, restaurants and small 

businesses, by qualified man. 
Phone J. K. Sully, Maple -lOr-l. or 
write Era and Express box tin. 

MwO 

YOUNG married m an desires 
farm work, experienced. Write 
Era and Express box 1M. MwO 






USED CARS 



1050 FORD custom, I door sedan. 
very low mileage. 1951 Eord 
1-2 inn truck, excellent condit- 
ion. Phone 0271 or «'M5 Nowmar* 
kct. clw£ 

1038 CHEVROLET with '52 He- 
oiiso bought. $300. Apply Geo. 
Mlddleton, Main St. N., or phone 
100J3, Newm arket. clwtt 

1031 CHEVROLET coupe, very 
pood mechanically,- body and 
tires good. $125 cash. Apply 40 
l^rmont St., Aurora. egwfl 

1042 DODGE sedon. Apply J. R. 
Styles. Cedar Valley, south on 
the 7th concession, Whitchurch. 

•IwO 



CASH CLEARANCE 

TRADE-INS 

MO DODGE 1-2 ton pickup, two 

brand new tires ami tubes, Pros- 

tone, handy little tmck. $175. 

cash. 

•345 PONTIAC sedan, solid body, 

godU mechanically, heater and 
Prestone, $175 cash. 
'30 PLYMOUTH sedan. 11 
months on new motor, heater 
and Prestonc. $175 cash. 
Newmarket Motor Sales, Davis 
Drive W., Newmarket. clwO 

193-1 FORD coupe, good tires, ex- 
cellent motor. Phone 008w. 
Newmarket, evenings. c2w0 



IMPLEMENTS 



27 



FARM ITEMS 



FEED carrots for sale for live- 
stock, free from frost and soil, 
.20 per bus. W. C. McCailum, 
Holland landing, or phone 
078 w3, Newmarket. elwli 



NEARLY new I.H.C. hay loader. 
Also sliding one-man half rack. 
Cheap for quick sale. Alfred 
Oliver, phone 1401 Queensville. 

Mwl> 

M.-H. MANURE spreader, tract- 
or hitch; 20-tooth cultivator; 3- 
furrow plow; 5 section harrows; 
good wagon, steel tires. All 
these are in Al condition. E. 
Mainprise, Queensville. *2wt> 



WOOD FOR SALE 



HARDWOOD, stove lengths. R. 
1 Linvis f Yonge St., phone 202wl. 
Newmarket. # 2wS 

HARDWOOD: Maple and beech: 
Phone Aurora 85r33. c2w8 

PLENTY of 12" oak slabs and 
round oak on hand for firewood. 
Excellent fuel. Phone 409 Mount 
Albert. cf>w8 



.tf r- - 



TWENTY ton of baled hay. Alf- 
alfa and Timothy mixed. Les- 
lie Smith, lot 12, con. 3, Whit- 
church, phone 6-1221, Stouffville. 

•2w8 

s s s $ $ 
LIVESTOCK OWNERS. Why 
take less for your dead ami crip- 
pled cows and horses when the 
Ontario Rendering Co. guaran- 
tees you more. Phone any time, 
collect, Newmarket 900J or Aur- 
ora 212. '• VVy Us first.'' US 



GOOD quality mixed, baled hay. 
Phone 255j, Sutton. MwO 

SPECIAL 
OAT and barley chop. $02. cash 
per ton. Queensville FeeW Mill, 
phone 3000, Queensville. •2w9 

MONTCALM barley, AJax oats, 
Alfalfa hay. Phone 909, Queens- 
ville. clw9 



2% LIV6S10CK FOR SALE 



TWO dark rod Shorthorn bulls, 
vaccinated, 9 and 10 months old. 
Phone Mount Albert 1930 or ap- 
ply Kay Bros., Cedar Brae. cl\v9 

NUMBER of chunks. Apply Roy 
Harper, R.R.3, Newmarket, 
phone 271J3. *lw9 

YOUNG pigs, Yorkshire. Apply 
J. Warrington, Potlagcville. 

clwO 

PUREBRED Din ham bull, 1 1 
months old. Apply Bruce Cup 
pies, Queensville. *lw9 

SIX Durham and Polled Angus 
heifers weighing 350 lbs. eaeh. 
Two Durham stackers, approx- 
imately 900 lbs. Phone C. Lin- 
stead, I2r32 Sutton. MwO 

NINE PIGS, 10 weeks old. Al- 
fred Oliver, phone M01 Queens- 
vilhv Mw9 

GRAND LAKRVIEW SHORT 
HORNS 
THREE service-age bulls, dark 
red, registered, vaccinated, ac- 
credited, Alfred Oliver, phone 
M0I. Queensville. # 2wi» 



28A LIVESTOCK WANTED 

Horses for mink feed- Highest 
prices paid. Rex Smith, Queens- 
ville, phone 1912 collect. tfl 

Horses for mink. Will call for 
with truck. Hood cash prices 
paid. Frank Coleman, phone 
1089] Newmarket, or write 
P.O. box 25. tfl 



29 POULTRY FOR SALE 

THREE young baniies, thin 
combed roosters and bantle bens. 
Apply M Centre St., Aurora, In 
In the evenings. c2w9 



PRODUCE 



GOOD eating potatoes. Apply 2 
Wellington St. or phone 773 j, 
Newmarket, cl\v9 



PERSONALS 



SKINNY MEN, WOMEN! Gain 
5 lo 15 lbs. New pep, too. Try 
fnmous Ostrex Tonic Tablets for 
double results; new, henlthy flesh; 
new vigorC New "got acquainted" 
size only 60c. AH druggists. clwf>0 



PETS 



'fWO purebred Scotch collie 
female pups, I en weeks old, well 
marked and reasonable. Phone 
725J, or write box 300, Newmar- 
ket. *lwii 



LOST 



RED wallet and change purse 
combined, on Tuesday afternoon, 
near the Main St., Reward. 
Phone M78j, Newmarket. cl\v9 

WHITE and )i«ht blue hudele 
bird, l>etwccn Roche's Point and 
Keswick. Reward. Phone Mfir2 
Roche's Point. ' Mw9 

Ti\ilPAULlN, on'l1iui*sday night 
in Queensville, off 3-1 ton truck. 
Reward. Phone Queensville 1907. 

Mw9 



€** 



MISCELLANEOUS 



MUCOUS IN THROAT 
Timlin's Pink Tablets for the 

nose and throat, for tlie dropp- 
ing of mucous dischari'r, sensa- 
tion of the lump In the throat 
and other disturbances. These 
are the same reliable pink lab- 
lets that have been used for 
many years by adults and child- 
ren: With gnod results. Price 
S1.00; $1.75; $2.50. 'Hie Rest 
Drug Store, phono II, Newmar- 
ket- 

AIMIeibal rheumatic tablets for 
muscular, arthritic, neitrlile and 
sciatic pains. Price $1.00. Rest 

Drug Store, phone M, Newmar- 
ket. 



FOR SALE OR RENT 
Hospital beds, wheel and Invalid 
chairs. Theaker and Son, Mount 
Allien. 3503. HI 

We repair all makes of sewinc 
machines. New machines $fi9.50 
up. Singer Sewing Center, New- 
market, 138 Main St., phone 
1075. tfl 



ONB hundred carefully brondetl 
2-week old NF.IL x L^. cockerels, 
Apply <J. MacPherson, Cedar 
Valley. e2w9 



HOI.STEIN cow, <lue March II, 
vaccinated. Applv/lordnn llontl, 
Queenavillo. at lot 12, can, \, 
East Gwllllmbury. >lw9 



W?" 



- "_ * I V 



29B POULTRy WANTED 

- -- ..- 

All kinds nf live poultry wanted. 
Will pay above market price at 
your door, Phnne 657, Newmnr- 
^t. tfl 

Live poultry. Any quantity. 
Rrlng them In or will call on re- 
quest. Highest prlees paid. W. 
S. Apnleton. Oak Ridges, or 
phono Klnc 59rl4. tM 



m 



¥*M\ 



t * 



Trusses, surgical suppnrln, elast- 
ic hosiery for those who suffer 
from varicose veins, ankle and 
knee trouble- Arch supports, 
Lumbago Mts. Rest Orug 
Store, phone M, N ewmavket. 

Reconl players for rent, S3 a 

day. Delivery antl plolc-iq) 
charge 50 cents. Rudd StudlnQ. 
plu me d31, Newmarket.' 1H9 

THE HEST BRONCHIAL v 
COUOH SYRUP 
For coughs, colds and bronchi- 
tis, A prompt and effective rem- 
fitly for the relief of bronchitis, 
tight or chesty roughs and colds. 
75 cants. The Rest Drug Store, 
fewmarket. 



COME In and compare. We will 
nnt knowingly be undersold by 
any competitor anywhere. You 
Im! the Judge. Dyer's Furniture 
phone 1250, Newmarket. UH 

Your old fur cont can look like 
new If you have it repaired and 
rest y led. Highest prices on your 
old coats. Our new coats ore 
very low In price. By aiu>olnt« 



ment we will come to your own 
home and you can select your 
own furs and style. Master Fur- 
riers and Tailors, 6 Timothy St. 
\V., phone 1409, Newmarket- 



WE would like to show you the 
new spring sample by Finn 
Bros, for your spring and sum- 
mer dress and sportswear. Ang 
West, phone 911, Newmarket. 

• c2w9 



BE properly measured for your 
new spring suit and topcoat by 
Don Douglas of Firth Bros., on 
Friday, Mar. 7. 325 samples to 
choose from at Ang Wests, 
New market. c2\v9 

FOR SALE: 

* 
CAPONS, ROASTING 
CHICKENS 
BOILING FOWL 

All At Wbolessale Prices 






PHONE NEWMARKET 1116 

FOR DELIVERY ON 

FRIDAY OR SATURDAY 

WANTED: 

LIVE POULTRY 
Best Prices Paid 



'4\vS 



SALE REGISTER 

SATURDAY, MAR. 1 — Auction 
sale at the Stouffville Livestock 
Sales Arena, selling livestock 
our specialty. Fresh cows, 
springers, heifers, sheep, calves, 
pigs and horses. Pickup and 
delivery can Im? arranged. Tins 
is your community sale. Come 
early and bring something to 
sell. You bring it and we'll sell 
it. Sale every Saturday, at 1 
p.m. Make this your market 
where buyers and sellers meet. 
Sellers and Atkinson, auction- 
ores. - WIS 

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 5— Auc- 
tion sale of 200 acre farm, also 
farm stock and implements 20 
head, of milking Shorthorn cat- 
tle, Yorkshire hogs horses, poul- 
try, hay and grain. Oliver tract- 
or model W>. like new, at lot 33, 
con- 3, East Gwillimbury. 3 miles 
north of Queensville, known as 
Lowlands Farm, lite properly of 
Alfred Vcrrecchia and Walter 
Kozuh. At the same time and 
place will lie offered for sale 
(subject to reserve bid) 200 acre 
farm with bank barn. Implement 
shed, and 8 room house. Farm 
owned by L. E. Rollings. Terms 
on chattels cash. Sale at 12.30 
sharp. Percy Mahoney and 
.lohn Grant clerks. A. S. Far- 
mer auctioneer. C3W7 

WEDNESDAY, MAR. 5 — Mon- 
ster auction sale of $10,000. 
worth of brand new Internation- 
al Harvester (McCormick Dcor- 
iug) farm machinery, consisting 
of Wt», Wl, A.c.H. tractors, cul- 
tivators, seed-drills, plows, SOT 
balers. No. 400 and No. 200T 
spreaders, power mowers, double 
discs. International, refrigera- 
tors, home freezers, etc. The 
preales I display ol new farm 
machinery ever offered by pub 
bile auction in this counlry, at 
King Citv. con. 3, King Town- 
ship, 4 miles west of No. 1 1 high- 
way, 20 miles north of Toronto, 
the property of M. A. Wilson. 
Reason for selling, lease on ware- 
house suddenly expired and no- 
where to store goods from the 
weather. Terms cash unless 
otherwise arranged before sale 
starts. Sale 10.30 a.m. sharn. 
Lunch served on grounds. Jack 
Wolkinfiton, clerk. Sellers and 
Atkinson, auctioneers, phone 3M. 
Stouffville. e2\vS 

SATURDAY, MAR. 8 — Auction 
sale of used farm machinery lit 
I p.m. Approximately 30 tract- 
ors, all other types of farm 
machinery Including threshers, 
binders, plows, seed drills, for- 
age harvesters, combines, etc. 
Draw prize of registered 
Hoist el n heifer calf 

valued at $250. (Only purchasers 
of machinery eligible for draw.) 
Ux-Sprlng Farms Limited, Inter- 
national Harvester Dealers, cor- 
ner 12 and 47 highways, phone 
Uxhrldge or Port Perry. c5w0 

JERSEY DISPERSAL 
MARCH 10 

MONDAY, MAR. 10— At I p.m. 
Auction sale of 30 Registered 

Jerseys. Included arc cows ami 
young stoek of. all ages. Many of 
the cows are bred to Vaughan 
Standard Fern Lad, whose dam 
was Vaughan Standard Fern 
wllh I'l.tWO |M>unds of milk test- 
ing till percent In 305 days— life 
alllhno Senior four-year-old Can- 
adian champion butterfat pro- 
ducer. 
Many of these high-producing 

cows are fresh or due at sale 
lime --cows thai give lietwecn 
0,000 and 11.000 pounds of milk 
—making them a wise buy to 
raise a dairy test. 
Also selling Is a Chore Roy 
Milker- -In |x»rfeet condlllnn— 
with a guarantee and five ser- 
vicing. 

The sale is under cover. The 
farm I* located 1 mile north and 
1-2 mile west of Unlonvllle, 
Dean Hughes, Unlonvllle. A. R. 
Rronhaeher, Auctioneer. clwfi 



The largest drydock In the 
British Empire Is at Saint John, 

N.n. 



WEDNESDAY, MARCH 12— Ex- 
tensive auction sale of register- 
ed and high grade llolstelns, 
Reg. Percheron horses, 3 tract- 
ors, 2 combines, 32' conveyor, 
baler with pick-up, new and near- 
ly new tractor implements, pigs, 
grain, baled hay and straw, 
quantity of good tools, the prop- 
erty of Samuel Winger at lot 15, 
con. 3, Vaughan, on Dufferin St., 
2 1-2 miles north of No. 7 high- 
way at Concord. Farms rented. 
Terms, cash. Sale at 12 o'clock 
sharp. Extra large sale, must 
start on time. W.I., Carrvllle will 
have a refreshment booth on the 
grounds. D. Colliding, clerk. Sel- 
lers and Atkinson, auctioneers. 

c3wS 

THURSDAY, MAR. 20— Auction 
sale of farm stock and imple- 
ments. 21 head of registered 
and grade Hotsteln cattle; five 
sows; team of horses ;milk cool- 
er, and full line of farm imple- 
ments, the property of Wm. 
Storey and N. Storey, at lot 20, 

rear concession 2, King. No re- 
serve. Terms cash. Sale at 1 
p.m. F. N. Smith, auctioneer. 
c3w8 

NOTICE 

OUR cleaning prices, for the 
time being, remain at the same 
rate: 2 or 3 piece garments $1.; 
overcoats SI.; ladies winter 
coats, with fur trimmings, $1.25: 
divsses $1. . 

These prices will be maintained 
only for a short time. 
Master Cleaners and Tailors, 
Timothy St., phone 1 109. New- 
market. clwD 

'. MORE CLAS1FIEUS 
ON PAGE 7 




& Son 



QUEENSVILLE 

FUNERAL DIRH&TORS AND 

AMBULANCE SERVICE 

PHONES 2509 - 25$Z 



Roadhouse & Host 

FUNERAL DIRECTORS 

MAIN STREET NEWMARKK 



PERRIN'S 
Flower Shop 

Member Florists Te!egrm»ft 

Delivery Association 

Flowers wired to all parti 
of the world. 

FUNERAL FLOWERS 

A SPECIALTY 

118 Main St Newmatfal 

Phone 1S5W 



Era and Express Claslflc* 

Bring Results 



-^>,-i-#*.--» +**u 



LOW COST HEARING 



vtfoc with oU*r *Ui ratting ^ 

to twlct as muck Se* it, or *t4« • 

(ct littf %tute. «■ 

; Rochester best drug stou 

Phone 14 Newmaike* 

tf* 




McCaffreys 

Flowers 

FOR EVERY OCCASION 
Flowers Telegraphed 
All Over the Wo»M 

^ 6 MAIN STREET 

Phone 5731 

NEWMARKET 



Attend One of These 

CHURCHES 



SUNDAY, MARCH 2 



FREE METHODIST CHURCH 

REV. E. S. BULL. Pastor 
The Church of a warm welcome 

10 a.m. — Sunday School 

Miss Clara E. Crowricr, Supt 

11 a.m. — Divine worship 

Solo bv Donald Deyo 
7 p.m.— EVANGELISTIC Rally. 

A ladies duet will siug 
EVANGELISTIC CRUSADE 

beginning March 6 with Rev. 

Sara E. Gregory, evangelist 

i\i\i\ the Henderson Sisters 

Trio. 
You have an opportunity to help 



THE CHRISTIAN BAPTIST 
CllllKCIl 

Main Street Newmarket 

Minister, Rev. Fred Breckon 

Organist, Mrs. J. E. Cane 

II a.m. — Communion and wel* 

coming of new members 
2.30 p.m. — Sunday school 
7 p.m. — 'Hie Gospel 

Subject: 'The Exallation of 
the Cross" 
Wed., tt p.m.— Mid-week Lenten 

service 
God nlways has an Angel of help 
for those who arc willing to do 
their duty. T.L.C. 

CHURCH OF THE NAZARKNK 

Minister. Rev. A. E. Petersen 
Organist, Miss June Haines 
Pianist, Miss Norine Greenwood 
Choir (Junior), Mrs. A. E. 

Peterson 

Sunday School— 10 a.m. 

Devotional Service — 11 a.m. 
Featuring a tape recording 
by Dr. A. S. London on "The 
Importance of the Sunday 
School". This is a master- 
piece. Come and hear II. 

Evangelistic Service — 7 p.m. 

Regular prayer meeting (Wed) — 
R p.m. 

Murray Varnle, special 
speaker 

Junior meeting (Fri)— 7 p.m. 

N.Y.P.S. service <Fri.)-» p.m. 

In absence of the pastor, who is 

lo he away for the following four 

Sundays, there will be capable 

speakers. Watch for announce- 

menls; " 

Church going families are Imp- 
pier". | 

* 



M 



FRIENDS* MEETING 

Botsford Street 

9.45 a.m. — Sunday-school 
U a.m.— Meeting for Worship 
Douglas Ropp 
Come and meet with us 
All Welcome 
Thurs., Mar. $ at 8 p.m. — Monthly 

Meeting 
"Only those who hear the voice 
of God and obey His commands 
are like n house built upon a 
rock". 

THE GOSPEL TARERNACLR 

Millard Ave. 

Pastor, REV. A. R. YIELD1NQ 

Pianist, MISS VIOLET CURTIS 

9.50 BIBLE SCHOOL for all 
ages 

11.00 The Pastor studies in 
Lamentations of Jeremiah" 
(Notes on the subject) 
Communion and reception of 
new members 

7 The Pastor speaks on 
"Seven Better Things" 

Week night meetings 

Tues. at "a— Prayer and Bible 

study (with notes) 
Thurs. at 2.30— Women's Prayer 

group 
Fri., 7 p.m.— Crusaders 

A cordial welcome to all 

TRINITY UNITED CHURCH 

Rev. M. J. Aiken, Minister 
N. W, Hurrle, A.R.C.T., Organist 

tl a.m.— Our Living Faith 

"The Ravage* of the World" 
THE SUNDAY SCHOOL 
9.45 a.m.— The Senior School 
11 a.m. — Nursery, Beginners and 

Primary 
7 p.m.— Questions People Ask 
"The Day of Judgment" 

Attend Church durtof Leal 

SALVATION ARMY CITADEL 

14 Queen St. W-. Newmarket 
Officers: Senior Capt., Ruth Beat 

Lieutenant, Arlian Cameron 

Sunday 

II a.m.— Holiness meeting 

il p.m. — Sunday school 

7 p.m.— Gospel meeting 

Every Wednesday - Home League 

Everyone wclcomo 






- 






118TN ANNIVERSARY SERVICES 

8T, ANDREW'S PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 

NEWMARKET 






11A.M. -MARCH 2ND 

By Kpecial request of the Kenton 

REV. F. R. MEREDITH 

will preach at both servke* 
Special music at both wrvfcw under direeti«a •! 

HERMAN G. FOWLER, MUS. BAC, R.M.T. 

fluent SoIoUta 
Mr* Vera Brown • Mm Alm» Stow* - »« »» * * 
VISITORS WELCOME AT ALL SWVK3KS 



, 



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USE THE CLASSIFIED PAGE THAT THE MOST PEOPLE 



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Classifieds Continued 



MONSTER 

Auction Sale 

$40,000 WORTH 
INTERNATIONAL HARVEST- 
ER, Mccormick - peering 

BRAND NEW FARM 
MACHINERY 

Tractoi*s, 50- i* Baler, Plows, 
Cultivators, Refrigerators, 
Home Freezers, Etc. 
"Hie property of 

M. A. WILSON 

KING CITY, CONCESSION 4, 
KING TOWNSHIP, 4 MILES 
WEST OF NO. 11 HIGHWAY 

20 Miles North of Toronto 

WEDNESDAY, MAR. 5 

TRACTORS 

lVD'9 Diesel tractor, hour meter, 
pulley, P.T.O., swinging and 
adjustable draw bar 

VV-6 Tractor, pulley, PTO, swing- 
ing drawbar, radiator shutters 

%V-4 Tractor, pulley, PTO, rad. 

shutters 

Farmail H, pulley, PTO, SDB, 

Fenders 
fVu«wil super "C", pulley, PTO, 

S.IX bar, hydraulic system 
Farmail Super "A*', pulley PTO, 

S\>U, with 9 or 10 Inch tires, 

touch control, hydraulic sys* 

tern 

Farmail Cub, pulley, PTO, hy- 
draulic system 

33 Disc Fertilizer, grain and 
grass seed drill, with foot 
boaids and steel wheels, horse 
drawn 

35 Disc Tractor Drill, fertilizer, 
grain, grass seed drills, with 
foot boards, marker, power 
Hit, depth control, on steel or 
rubber 
TILLAGE EQUIPMENT 

Mc-Deering 3-sec. Lever harrows, 
with draw bar 

lO" Mc-D tractor Ko. 8 field cul- 
tivator, with regular spring 
teeth ' 

•B 1-2* Mc-D tractor No. 8 field 
cultivator, with heavy spring 
tooth 

3 1-2' Mc-D tractor No. 8 field 
cultivator, with regular spring 
teeth 

7' Mc-D tractor Ko. 8, field cul- 
tivator, with regular spring 
teeth 

Mc-D No. 26 tractor double disc, 
equipped with automatic ang- 
ling device, 6' size ., 

Mc-D No. 26 tractor double disc, 
equipped with automatic ang- 
ling device, T ste 

Mc-D No. 26 tractor double disc, 
equipped with automatic ang- 
ling device, 8' size 

Mc-D 4-sec, smoothing harrows 

Mc-D 5-scc. smoothing harrows 

No. 55 Walking scunicrs 

No. 9-C-6 Disc harrow plow Cone 
way disc) on rubber, oil bath 
power lift 

4- Furrow No. 8C tractor plow, 
Ace base and Jointers, adjust- 
able beam, adjustable levers to 
suit all makes of tractors 

3-Furrow No. 8C tractor plow. 
Ate bases, adjustable beam, on 
rubber 

3 Furrow No. 8C tractor plow. 

Ace bases, adjustable beam, on 

steel 
2-Furrow No. 8C tractor plow, 

Ac<? bases. Ace beam pick-up, 

steel 
/t-212 Direct Mounted tractor 

plow. Aw bases, adjustable 

beams and jointers, bydrauUc- 

ally controlled 
C-21-1 Direcl Motintel tractor 



8-Can Mc-D milk cooler Hess 

motor! . 

U-A-95 International refrigera- 
tor, 9.5 cu. ft. 

H-A-92 DeLuxe model Internat- 
iona} refrigerator, 92 cu, ft 

U-A-87 Inu refrigerator, 8.7 cu. 

ft. 
fi-A-82 Int. refrigerator, 32 cu. 

ft. 
No. 358 Int home freezer, cap. 

35-S cu. ft. ;,-.-; 

USED EQUIPMENT 

Mc-D 22-38 Threshing machine, 

equipped with straw bruiser, 

14ft, feeder, grain, thrower, 

rubber tires 

MoD W-6 Tractor* complete, 

PTO pulley, etc 

Farmail H Tractor, (being re- 
conditioned) 
Farraall H Tractor, Al condition 
Farmall F-30 Tractor on rubber 
2 Cub Tractors, touch control, 

hydr, system 
CUb No. 22 Mower, 5" cut, hydr. 

controlled 

Cub No. 23A Tandem Disc (auto- 
matic angling device) 

McD No. 8 Field Cultivator, &0 
size power lift depth regulator, 
tractor hitch, reg. teeth 

Mc-D 20OF Spreader on rubber 
(liquid typo) 

Famous . International tractor 

made in 1911 

Cub 144 J -row Cultivator with 
- ST teeth, shields, disc hillers, 

hydr. controlled 
Cub 447 4-row Cultivator, too! 

bar type 

6 Manure spreaders (miscellane- 
ous makes) 

1 8-0 Judson Fertilizer distributor 
on rubber 

1 8-0 ML Vernon Fertilizer dis- 
tributor, on rubber 

1 IV Eze-Flow Fertilizer distribu- 
tor, on rubber 

1 10* Judson Fertilizer distribu- 
tor, on rubber 

15 Disc Cockshutt plain grain 
drill 

Cockshutt grain grinder 

No. 2 Ensilage Harvester, PTO, 
blower attachment 

Model A Ford coupe, good tires, 
good condition 

Mc-D Hay rake with roller bear- 
ing wheels 

Mc-D Corn-binder tractor hitch 

Mc-D 3-sectIon lever harrows 

MoD £0 Cultivator spring tooth 
(horse drawn) 

Mc-D 7 1-2 Cultivator, spring 
tooth (tractor hitch) 

Quantity scrap Iron 

NOTE: Services, guarantees and 

warrantees on this machinery, 

the same as on all new machin- 
ery. 

Jack WaJkingfon, Clerk 
Sale at 10-30 o'clock sharp 

Terms: Cash, unless otherwise 

arranged before the sale starts. 

Sellers and Atkinson, auctioneers 

Phone Agincourt 2Qlw2 or 

Stouffville 363 

REASON FOR SELLING; Lease 

on warehouse expired suddenly, 
nowhere to store goods from the 
weal her. 

' - ' ; ClWO 

TORONTO AND YORK 

ROADS COMMISSION 

NOTICE TO TRUCKERS 
HALF LOADTNO 
REGULATIONS 
ON AND AFTER SATURDAY. 
MARCH 1ST. the 1-2 Load Res- 
triction will he enforced on all 



BIRTHS 

DAVIS— At York County hosp* 
tal, Monday, Feb. 25, 1&>2, to 
Mr. and Mrs. Harry L. Davis, R. 

R. X, Keswick, a daughter. 

DUNCAN— At York County hos- 
pital, Wednesday. Feb. 27, 1952, 

to Mr. and Mrs. George Duncan, 
Elgin Mills, a daughter^ 

GATES'— At York County hospi- 
tal, Wednesday; Feb¥27> 1952, to 
Mr. and Mrs. Herbert Gater, 
Gater, Richmond Hii£ ason. _•'_ 

feiLPIN— At York County hospi- 
tal, Saturday, Feb. 2$ 1932, to 
Mr. and Mrs, Douglas 
Aurora,, a daughter;, = . 

HARRISON — ^frYork County 
hospital, Tuesday, Feb. 26, 1952, 
to Mr. and Mrs. Willis Harrison, 
Zephyr., a daughter. 

HENLEY— At Ydtk County hos- 
pital, Saturday, Feb. 23, 1952, to 
Mr. and Mrs. Russell Henely, 

Langstaff, a daughter. 

JONES— At York County hospi- 
tal, Saturday, Feb. 2S, -1032, to 
Mr. and Mrs. William Jones, Jr., 
Elgin Mills, a daughter. 

KUREK— At York County hos- 
pital, Saturday. Feb. 23, 1952, to 
Mr. and Mrs. John Kunek, Rich- 
vale, a daughter. 



* _ * 



A flower so lovely and fair; 1 SKATING CI MR TO 
A blossom so tiny and precious' 9t</Kl llN ^ ^LUB |U 

PRESENT CARNIVAL 



and sweet. 
That the Master who planted 
it there; 
Gathered it lovingly into His, 
arms. 
And now, in the light of His 

love, 
Sheltered and blessed by His 

Presence it grows 
In His Beautiful Garden above. 
As we loved him, so we rruss 
him. Mother a*rtd Dad ...... 

^cBRlDE— In lov'tng memory oi- 

James A. iicBrlde wh<* passed 

away March 1, -f9i2*. 

A page In the beautiful book of 

J memory j-v . j 

fe- gently -turned today. . . 

Wife and family. 



• 



roads in the York County High- 
way System under the jurisdic- 
tion of this Commission with the 

plow/ Ace base] adjustable [?)!?^% P% lzxCKPTIONS: -- 



beam and Jointer, hydraullcal- 
ly cont relief J 

Ctib No, vxi direct mounted 
tractor plow 

No. 407 Walking plow, hanging 
coulter 

HAYING EQUIPMENT 

A-21 Tractor mower, mounted, 
power driven automatic break- 
away device, cutter bar raised 



and loweivd hydraullcally, slip ■ # W R ston Road -North Limit of 



clutch 

<y>\ Tractor Mower, mounted, 
power driven, 70 size, auto- 
matic break-away device, cut- 
ter bar raised and lowered by- 
draulically, slip clutch 

ntc-f) 21-U Tractor semi-mounted 
mower, a universal mower, /its 
other makes of tractor, silo 
clutch, -rubber caster wheel, 
7-0 size 

Peering (Giant) Mower, famous 
for its cutting qualities, 00 size 
(horse drawn) 

Me-D Side Hake and Tedder, 3- 
bar (horse or tractor drawn) 
on steel 

MM One Row Cultivator to fit 
A tractor, spring-trip teeth, 
hydraullcally controlled uni- 
versal mounting frame and 
rear roeksbaft 

C-2:y| 2-row Cultivator (to) fit C 
tractor; spring-trip teeth, hy- 
draullcally controlled 

No. 400 Spreaders, jwwer drive, 
large capacity, trailer type, on 
iubf>er 

No. 200T Tractor Spreader, roll- 
er chain drive, on rubl>er 
MISCKU.ANKOUS 

No. 31 Power leader with buck- 
et, blade fits U or M tractor* 

Henderson Power Loader, with 
bucket and fork to fit A tract- 
or 

No. fl Hammer Mill with low 
cyclone and bag per *2 screens) 

No. IK Hammer Mill wMh low 
cyclone and bagger /2 screens) 

'2 13x24 Sillier Sure Grip Tractor 
Tires (new) 

Wooden Wheelbarrows 

Farm fence 

Farm gates 1(10 

Mc-D Farm Trucks, all steel 

construction, auto stnoring 

tiOO 15 rubber tires 
Kte-0 Fai-m Trucks, all steel 

construction, auto stealing, 

less tires. 
Me-D No. <l Lime and Fertilizer, 

GOO-lfl tires 
SOT Bator, motor driven, auto- 
matic pickup, bale counter, 

twine tie 
No. r>2 Combine, 0", engine drive, 

grnln tank, automatic pick-up, 
. Scour Kfeen ".. * - 

NEW BEATTV EQUIPMENT 
Realty litter carrier buckets 

(new) 

iffn? troughs, galvanized and 8 

ft. 
63 Gal. galvanized pressure 

tank* 
Number of horj water bowls 
Number cow water howls 
Galvanized water troughs 6-8 ft, 

sizes 
Heatty deep well, shallow well, 

sump pump systems 
REFRIGERATION 
6 Can Me-D milk coolei, 60 cycle, 

pneumatic n*?lt*-»~r;* electric 

and thermal controlled 



EJOAD NO. 

1 Bathurst Street, south of Eg- 
linton Ave 

2 Kingston Hoad 

i Victoria Park Avenue — Sun- 
rise Avenue South 

5 Dunrfas Street — Citv Limit 
lo I lumber River Bridge 

fi Vauehan Road — Eglinfon 
South 



Town of Weston South 

7 Old Weston Hoad 

8 Broadview Avenue- -City Limit 
North (O'Connor Drive— Hon 
Mills Hoad West) 

10 Lawrence Avenue (In Town 

of Weston) 
10A Dixon Hoad— West of Town 

of Weston 
17 I^tusfng Side Hoad — Dawe:; 

itoad to Kingston Hoad 

19 Eglinton Avenue West- -City 
Limit to Keele Street 

20 Scarlett Road 

3-1 Bay view Avenue- York Mills 

Hoad South 
35 Blythwood Hoad 
II. C. Rose, Chief Engineer, in 
Adelaide St. East, Toronto 1, 
Onl. 
N. W. Long, Chairman 

ClWll 



NOTICE To CREDITORS 

IN THK ESTATE OF 
MICHAEL MYLICS, Deceased 
ALL persons having claims 
against the estate of Michael 
Thomas Myles, late of the Town- 
ship of King, In the County of 
York, carpenter, who died on 
the 20th day. of June, 1950, are 
hereby notified to send in to the 
undersigned on or before the 
22nd day of March, 11152, full 
particulars of their claims. Im- 
mediately after the last men- 
lloncd date, the assets of the said 
estate will be distributed among- 
st the parties entitled thereto, 
having regard only to the claims 
of which the undersigned shall 
then have had notice, 
' Dated at Aurora this 251 h day 
of February, 1052. 
Marten Wnsslnk, Executor, by 
Ills solicitor, Lome C. !.ee, Aur- 
ora, Ontario, ; <3w9 

Mice to creditors 

IrfjTHE ESTATE OF IDA 

PROCTOR* LATE OF THE 

TOWN OF NEWMARKET, IN 

THE COUNTY OF YORIC 

[V SPIrWPRi PBCEASED : ; 
Ci*edl|ors of tho niwve-nnmed de- 
ceased, who dittLnt.JKe Towji of 

York, on or aliout tho twenty- 

hereby notified purgpant to The 

Trustee Aet^o^i&o^ 
signed proof of their claim on or 

l>efnro the second day of April, 
1»52 after which date the assets 
of the estate will he distributed 
having regard only to the claims 
I of which the undersigned will 
then have notice. 
DATED at Newmarket this 
twentv-elghth day of February. 
A.D. 1&52. 
Mathews, Stiver, Lyons and Vale, 

Newmarket, Ontario, Solicitors 
for Joseph Vale, Executor. 

c3w9 



LEE-At York County hospital, 

Friday, Feb. 22, 1952, to Mr. and 
Mrs. James Lei?, Bethesda, twin} 
sons. 

MITCHELL — At York County 
hospital, Friday, Feb. 22, 1&52 

to Mr. and Mrs. Donald Mitchell, 
Newmarket, a daughter. 

MELBOURNE— At York County 

hospital, Sunday, Feb. 21, 1052, 
to Mr. and Mrs. Staffer Mel- 
bourne, RJL 2, Bradford, a 
daughter. 

McCONACHIE— At York County 
hospital, Tuesday, Feb. 26, 1052, 
to Mr. and Mrs. Harold McCon- 
achfe, R.R. % Aurora, a daugh- 
ter., 

LONGIIURST— At York County 
hospital, Friday, Feb. 22, 1952, 
to Mr. and Mrs; Frank Long- 
hurst, Quccnsville, a daughter. 

ItfGCALLr-At Private Patients 
Pavlllion, Toronto General hos- 
pital, Wednesday, Feb. 27, 1052, 
to Mr. and Mrs. Douglas McCaU, 
Toronto, (Ida Owens), a daugh- 
ter, 

■ 

M « - 

OOSTERHUIS— At York County 
hospital, Monday, Feb. 25, 1052, 
to Mr. and Mrs. Staffer Ooster 
huls, R.R. 2, Newmarket, a son. 

SUTTON— At York County hos- 
pital, Monday, Feb. 25, 1952> to 
Mr. and Mrs. Howard Sutton, 
Aurora, a daughter. 

THOMS— Al York County hospi 
tal, Monday, Feb. 25, 1052, to 
Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth Thorns, 
Newmarket, a son. - 

VERHOOG — At York County 
hospital, Thursday, Feb. 21, 195^ 
to Mr. and Mrs. William Ver- 
hoog, Bradford, a daughter. 

WILIJSON — At York County 
hospital, Sunday, Feb. 24, 1&52, 
to Mr. and Mrs. Marshall Will- 
son, SIM. 1, King, a daughter. 

WIDEMAN — At York Count v 
hospital, Wednesday, Feb. 27, 
1052, to Mr. and Mrs. Harvey 
vyideman , Gormley, a son. 

DEATHS 

ARMITAGE — At Flint, Michi- 
gan, Friday, Feb. 22, Geo. P. 
Armitage, son of the late John 
S. Armitage. Interment at Flint, 
on 'Diesday. 

HALLIDAY— At her home ft 

Queen St. W., Newmarket, on 
Tuesday, Feb. 26, 1052, Selena 
Elizabeth Baker, wife of the late 
John Hallidny and mother of 
Margaret Janic Halliday. Rest- 
Ing at the chad of Roadhouse 
and Hose, Service on Friday at 
2 o'clock. Interment Newmar- 
ket cemetery. 

HARRIS — At Newmarket, on 
Wednesday, Feb. 20, 1052, Alice 
Harris, wife of the late Thomas 
Henry Harris and mother of 
Maud (Mrs. W. Stanley), J. W. 
Harris, Charles L„ Hazel (Mrs. 
J. Clarke) and Richard B. Har- 
ris. Service was held on Satin- 
day, Feb. 23. 

KESTER — At Newmarket, on 
Sunday, Feb. 21, 1»52, Marshall 
Keslur, son of the late Enoch 
and Isnvtvt Kester, in his 81st 
year. Service was held on Tues- 
day, Feb. 2fi. Interment Stouff- 
ville cemetery. 

LEiTCH — At his home. Brown 
Hill, Ont., on Friday, Feb. 22, 
1052, George Leitch, in his 7-tih 
year, husband of Maude Ridddl 
and father of Harford and Geo- 
figQi Service was held on Sun 
day, Feb. 24. Interment Xephyr 
centetery. 

TOWNS LEY — At Sunnybronke 
hospital, Toronto, on Sunday, 
Feb. 21, l»52, Charles Frederick 
Townsley, husband of Alice 
Ionise Nightingale, father of 
Charles of Acton, Mrs. Stanley 
Smith fliouisn), William, Hoijert, 
Henry and Bruce, nil of Newmar- 
ket. Service was held on' Tues- 
day, Feb. 20. Interment New- 
market cemetery! 



fiYE— In loving memory of our 
mother, Mary J. Rye, who pass- 
ed away March 2, 1047. 
Just beyond life's gateway. 

Is a garden bright and fair; 
Where again Aye will meet our 
loved ones; 

And there will be no parting 
there. ... 

Pain and sorrow will be banish- 

Gone alt heartaches and all 
fears. 
Just beyond life's gateway 
Where they count not time by 
years. 
Rose, Gladys and families. 

SWEET— In loving memory of a 

dear husband and lather, John 
Sweet, who passed away March 

i, i*m. 

Ever remembered by his wife 
and family. 

WALTERS — In loving memory 
of mother who died March 1, 
1950. 

God gave the world mothers. 
Lovingly remembered by daugh- 
ter lJIlian. 

WEDDEL— In loving memory of 
Mrs. Graham Weddel who de- 
parted this life March 5, 1951. 
We think of you often and men- 
tion your name,; 
You are not forgotten, fond 

memories remain. 
Ever remembered hy sisters Jul- 
ia and Minnie. 



x • 



WEDDEI^— In loving memory of 
our dear mother, Sarah Eliza- 
beth Weddel, who passed away 
Mar. 5, 1051. . - 
Sweet are the memories silently 

kept. 
Of one we loved and can never 

forgeL 
Lovingly remembered by Ken- 
neth, L Earleam^vclyn 1 __^ 

. CARD OF THANKS ->"_.'• 

Mrs. Frank Billings wishes to 
sincerely thank her neighbors 
and friends for their kindness in 
sending cards, flowers and tele- 
phone calls during her stay in 
the hospital. ._ ' 

CARD OF THANKS. 

Sincere thanks are extended to 1 
the Mount Albert firemen, also 
friends and neighbors for their 
quick response to our call for 
help. 

Roe Crone and family. 

CARD OF THANKS 

* * 

The family of the late Jos. Mai- 
tin wish to sincerely thank their 
many relatives, friends, and 
neighbors, also Rev. Hhapter, Dr. 
Carruthers, and Miss Eva Harri- 
son, for flowers, expressions of 
sympathy, and kindess shown, 
during the illness and passing of 
an affectionate father. 

; CARD OF THANKS 

The family of the late Mrs. Rich- 
ard Curl wish to extend heart- 
felt thanks and appreciation for 
the acts of kindness, messages of 
sympathy and beautiful floral 
offerings received from neigh- 
bors, relatives and friends dur- 
ing the illness and Itereavement 
of a loving mother. 
The Curl family 

CARD OF THANKS 

Words cannot adequately ex- 
press our gratitude for the kind- 
ness and sympathy shown us in 
the sudden loss of a dear hus- 
band and father. We extend a 
special "thank you" to Div Wm. 
Arkinstaii, Rev. E. Warren and 
to the ladles of Queensvlllc and 
district, who so kindly provided 
lunch for the relatives and 
friends on the day of the funer- 
al. 
Mrs. Rolwrt Johnson and family. 

CARD OF THANKS 

I wish to thank my school 
chums, friends and neighbors for 
their acts of kindness extended 
during my accident. 

Ronnie Scott 



MARCH 14 AND 15 

The Newmarket Figure Skat- 
ing club will hold its second an- 
nual Skating Carnival in the 
Newmarket Memorial Arena on 
March 14 and 15. One hundred 
and .seventy-five . chtldrett; and 
adultsy int tad i ng 36 men and 
boys, will take part in the pt&* 
gram. -.., 

tHete will be solo numbers by 
the clu'r/sv skating teacher, Har> 
old Hartley^ as well- as; -feyr ; Jeah 
McDonald, Colleen' Cairt, -Guy 
Revel!, Sally Hrice and Maureen 
West Velma Lillicrop, a Tor- 
onto skating star, wilt be feat- 
ured in solo work and in special 
numbers with Mr. Hartley. $Iuri 

Burbidge^ : ttt^:eomedlah;--Whl6-'Was 
a favorite with last year's audi- 
ence, will appear in the 1952 car- 
nival. Mr. Burbidge has design- 
ed the costumes for this season's 
show. -'-.'-•-. 

The program will include Irish; 
ballet, Western, modern numbers 
and a dance court with* the wee 
toU being spotlighted in their 
own presentation. There will be 

additional solo work in the vari- 
ous group numbers. - 

The seating plan is at Best 
Drug store with reserve seats 
still available for both nights. 
There will be rush seats as well. 
Those will be placed on the north 
side of the ice surface. 



I PETITION FOR END 
OF FAN NOISE 
FROM ICE PLANT 

A petition was received in 
Newmarket council on Monday 
night asking that some action be 
taken to end the noise from the 
Ice plant in the north end of 
town. Mayor Vale said the pet- 
ition would be looked into and 
action decided upon, 
.There was some question of* 
the town's position in the matter 
since only two of the signatories 
were .within the toWn limits. 
!C 'Jf/L Ri; .Stiver suggested the 
issue rftight f be one for private 
'action.* .' ■'. 

"It is a definite problem^ said 
Councillor Charles Soyd. Mem- 
bers of council who have hoard 
the noise agreed that it repre- 
sented a: hulsahce; ;"The- noise 
was said to have come from the 

fans oh the roof, ■ 



* 



PLANS 



GUILD 

- PA* S- TEA 



maj. a. a. Mackenzie 
honored at dinner 

A social evening was held in 
the Scout hall, Newmarket, on 
Friday evening, Feb. 22, in honor 
of the provincial member for 
North York* Major A. A. Mac- 
Kenzie. This was sponsored by 
the Newmarket Piogrcssive Con- 
servative Association and organ- 
i/cd by the ladies* organization. 
Progressive euchre was enjoyed 
and during the serving of lunch, 
a troupe of actors, under the di- 
rection of Mrs. Dorothy Bowman, 

staged a short entertainment. 

During the evening, the fol- 
lowing officers were elected for 
the coming year: hon. pres., Mr. 
F. A. Lundy, Mr. J. O. Little; 
pres., Mr. Jim Otton; sec.-trcas., 
Mrs. J. O. Little; executive com., 
Mr. Wyatt Moorby, Mr. Allan 
Mills, Mrs. Frank Hope, Mr. Roy 
Penrose; St. George's ward, Mr. 
J. Coltham, Miss Connie Smith; 
St. Andrew's ward, Mr. Charles 
Boyd, Mrs. A. Armstrong; St. 
Patrick's ward, Mrv Walter 
Brown, Mrs. Jim Otton. . 



Arrangements were made by 
the Parochial Guild, St. Paul's 
Anglican church, Newmarket, 

for their St. Patrick's tea at the 
regular meeting on Tuesday, Feb. 
filft The group met at the home 
of Mrs. Robert Woncb. Mrs. 
John-Dales, president, was in the 
chair. The devotional period 
was conducted by Mrs. George 
Hoare. 

The St. Patrick's tea will be 
held in the parish hall on Thurs- 
day, March 13. There will be a 
sale of home baking and candy. 
At last week's meeting conveners 
were appointed. Mrs. George 
Cuppage wil be in charge of the 
kitchen. The tea will be under 
Mrs. James Hitler's direction. 
Mrs. J. O. Little will supervise 
the sale of home baking and Mrs. 
Joseph* Peat will convene the 
Candy table. 



The N ewmarket Era and Express, Thursday, Feb. 28, 1952 Page t 

Patchell's Reply 



ANNUAL H.S. SALE 
IN TOWN HALL 

The annual spring Opportunity 
sale of good used clothing and 
white elephants will t>e held by 
the Newmarket Home and 
School association on Thursday, 
March 27, in the town hall. 

Homeimikers are requested* to 
collect their family's outgrown 
clothing for this sale. Hats, 
purses, shoes or costume jewelry 
are among the articles in demand 
at these sales. Donations may be 
left at Budd's Studio or Stewarl 
Bearc's Radio store, Main St. If 
pick-up is desired for any contri- 
butions, a phone call to Mrs. 
Robert Morrison, 2fi0 will ar- 
range details. Proceeds from the 
sale are used for Home and 
School work in the community. 

OBITUARY 



I 





NOTICE 



* 



. iiWv 



L- _ ' * 



lit Memoriam 

EDWARDS-dn lovlns memory 
of a dear wife nmV mother, Lil- 
lian Edwards, who departed this 
life on Feb. 20, 1050, 

God knows how jriiiclv we miss 

her, ■ ; . 

[ ^Ncver sPmirher Tncmory fade- 

iwim thoughts shflll SpppHR 

(&WJ&mW*$$* i»Y husband, 
AMaM^RQtfej«#;t9iliily« 

of 

went 



"-—: 



Ih; loVIng memory 
Rlehh Kennelh^Keay, who ^ we 

God knew that he. was suf fei inK. 

The hills were hard to climb, 
So, he closed his weary eyelids, 

And whispered "Peace be 
thine." 
Ever remembered by his rela- 
tives at Rohlin, Manitoba. 



- 



KEAY— In loving memory of our 
dear son, Glenn Kenneth Kcay, 
who passed away Feb. 28, 1051. 
Out In the garden of life there 
grew, 



I WILL not lie responsible for 
any debts contracted in my name 
hy my wife, Mrs. l.orna M. M. 

Brodie. nflrr Thursday. Fob- 11, 

1952. 

John Brodie. *3w? 

Bears To Meet WhHby 

Schomlierii's "mi«hty atoms" 
nosed out Ayr to advance to the 
third round of O.M.fl.A. bantam 
D playdowns last week. Playing 
at Nobleton, their home ice, 
Schomberg, ©n goals by Doug. 
Hollinshead find I^irry Hill, 
gained a 2ra.il draw with Ayr. 
The Berger hnhtoms moved iftlo 
Ayr last Thurai'oy and with 
Doug. Hpllirishcad and Larry 
WW omh iloing <IHi ; potting, 

found 4*3| ! 

The .Blili: Section clonched, 
iO'o'W g ..' Mcrchnnt managed 
Schomix>rgers moved Into the 
;rh|rd round against Mactler and 
Playing M the Muskokn centre 
Soturrfny picked up a 5-3 victory 
and a two-goal margin to carry 
into game two due for attention 
at Nobleton Wednesday. Larry 
Hill ran In two, Ken. Douglas, 
Doug. Hollinshead and Howie 
Fry one. each In MacTier tri- 
umph. 

Schomberg: G. Bonham, B. 
Hodgson, K. Butler, F. Davis, O. 
Samson, U Hill, D. Hollinshe»i 
A. Dion, D. Dion, K. Douglas, H. 
Fry, D. Cober, T. Cober. 



After a short illness, following 
a stroke, Kdward Clemenu, of 
Toronto, died at the Tono.tO Bust 
General hospital. 

He was horn in Port Perry, 
Ont., in 1870, and on Septomlier 
10, 1002, married Dorcas Cuffe, 
who survives him. 

He was n retired Krocerymnn, 
and a member of Danforth 
United church. He was active in 
the Salvation Army. His Hobby 
was motoring. 

Also surviving arc a son, Rus- 
sell Kdward Clements, Toronto; 
two daughters. Mrs. Viona Bry- 
ant, Toronto, and Mrs. Doreen 
1-eppard, Newmarket; and three 
sisters. Mrs. C. Sleep, Mrs. Wm. 
Brown and Mrs. U McTaggart, 
all of Port Perry, Ont. 

Bev. it. Bell conducted services 
nt the Trull Funeral Home, To- 
ronto on Monday, Feb. 4. Pall- 
bearers were Herl>ert Leppard, 
N- Bryant, N. Sleep, A. Homely, 
Miner and El wood Clements. 

Interment was in Searboro 
Lawn Memorial cemetery. 



RYE-VIDAL 

On Feb. 0, the home of Mr. and 
Mrs. Noel James Vidai. Lake- 
shore Drive, Keswick, was the 
setting for the marriage of their 
only daughter, Hilda Nola, to 
Ivan Milford, son of Mr. and Mrs. 
Milford Rye, in a double-ring 
ceremony. Rev. Geo. Campbell 
officiated. 

Tiie bride, given in marriage 
by her father, was attractively 
gowned in a white taffeta and 
net floor-length dress, and her 
veil was held in pl%ce by a pearl 
tiara. She carried red roses. 

She was attended by Louise 
Hamilton; maid of honor, in pink 
taffeta and net. Marina Wnllnck, 
bridesmaid, chose pale green taf- 
feta and net, and Carol Diane, 
junior bridesmaid, sister of the 
groom, was in yellow taffeta and 
net AH carried nosegays of 
carnations ami sweet peas. Al- 
bert Smith attended the groom. 

Foa the reception, Mrs. Vidnl 
chose blue crepe and lace, with 
gold accessories and a corsage of 
pink roses. The groom's mother 
was in silver grey jersey with 
wine accessories and corsage of 
red roses. 

For travelling, the bride chose 
a blue suit and fur coat. The 
couple went to the States on 
their trip, and on their return 
will reside in Keswick. 



Newmarket 
Social News 

—Visitors at the home of Mr. 
and Mrs. S. C. Sheppard were 
Mr. and Mrs. Geo. Shields ond 
daughters Morilyn and Donna, 
Wilson Heights; Mr. and Mrs. 
Murray Tonaley; Mr. anil Mrs. 
Albert Hunt and son Jimmy, Tor- 
onto. 

—Miss Ruth Palmer and Fred 
Palmer, Toronto, spent the week- 
end with their parents, Mr. and 
Mrs. Win. Palmer. 



Last week, a group of ratepay- 
ers in the Lake Wilcox school 
section passed a resolution high- 
ly critical of the chairman of 
the school board, A, B. Patchcll. 
He was charged with failure, to 
co-operate with other members 
of the board, and indifference 
to school business. The follow* 
Wg Is Mr, Patchell's reply:* : 
; In reply to the charges of norfc; 
^operation with the other board; 
members, G; Gbufley and f*' 

"!n 1051 I was voted in as 

chairman of the board. In Jan- 
uary, 1052; at a board meeting 
I was selected chnirm^n lor 
1952. Does this show lack of cor 
operation? Whynlid the trustees 
re-elect me? The meetings i 
was said to have missed anj: 
Oct. 1051, death in family imy 
Mother); Nov. 1951, myself rush- 
ed to hospital for operation; Dec* 
lOal^ present; Jan. Three weeks 

in Florida— holiday with family. 

At special meeting of board at*- 

ranged lor signing cheques, etc. 

the regular meeting of the 
board third Monday of the 
Month, February.. On the advice 
of school inspector and myself, 
all books, cheques and school 
accounts in the hands of town- 
ship auditor at that time. These 
books should have been In the 
hands of the auditor early in 
Jan., 1052. 

Feb. 21, group for examining 
the audited books met at my 
residence with Professor Smith, 
auditor, Mr. McKiltop, school 
inspector, myself as chairman. 
Mrs. Lillian Stephenson as sec^ 
retary refused to come. 

This audit of ledgers and 
accounts, gave us a complete 
cost of operation of our school 
and cost of building program in 
the erecting of Lake Wilcox 
school. 

Mr. G. Gourlcy, who was elect, 
ed in December, 1051, attended 
his first official board meeting 
in January, 1052. 

Tills question of accommoda- 
tion for children next September 
was raised. Plans were made in 
October, 1951, for addition of one 
classroom on the south, or two 
classrooms on the north, by our 
architect, Mr. IL Horner, at ho 
cost to the ratepayers and filed 
at his office to future reference. 
Mr. Corn-ley's questions on the 
building program— I have offer* 
ed him full . co-operation at all! 
times to come and I would show 
him my holes of former meet- 
ings, bills paid and general ex- 
penses of the school, that lie 
might know some details of the 
administration of school busin- 
ess. '-.-''. ■ '.- 

The petition signed by the rate- 
payers was also signed by sec- 
retary-treasurer, Mrs. Litlinh 
Stephenson. It Is interesting to; 
note that she sighed a petition: 
against n member of the very 

hoard from which she receives 
her salary. 

The ii»5l board of trustees 
have complete*! your school at a 
cost of less than our debenture 
issue. These costs were check- 
ed by Professor Smith nml the 



school inspector and myself on 
Thursday evening and are ready 
to be presented to the board of. 
trustees, on Friday evening, Feb. 
29. at 6.15 p.m. at Lake Wilcox 
school. 
;puring 1951, our building year, 
we have held over 75 meetings. 
This means time off business, 
high long distance phone calls, 
car charges without any cost to 
tftie ratepayers of this section. 

This section must be very care- 
-|(rt pf all money stent for the 
1852 school costs. By careful 
planning by the school boArd, 
cutting out all unnecessary items 
hot connected with the education 
of your children. 

Our debentures $50.000— This 
means a yearly payment by the 
taxpayers of $3,843.81 payable 
over 20 years; total cost 
S76,STb\20 including nil Interest. 

The added cost of North Road 

(Local Improvements) increase 

in township administration costs, 

this Will be a considerable load 

tpr this school section to carry. 

/The board of 1051 has a motion 
on its books stating all publicity 
must come from the school 
board and at no time have they 

I refused the press admission to 
our school board meetings. 
Regarding the spending of 
school funds, debenture, this 
board of 1951 has paid all ac- 
counts by cheque and have not 
handled any cash, in accordance 
With the School Act of the De- 
partment of Education. 

The 1951 board has worked 
very closely with" the Board of 
Education and the school in- 
spector and has their approval 
with work done on school build- 
ings. All tenders called for and 
contracts given without fear or 
favor to lowest tender. This 
schoo has been built at lowest 
cost to taxpayers for size and 
construction than any school in 
Ontario today at the period it 
was constructed 1951. 

In view of all the above men- 
tioned facts 1 feel confident that 
the Ratepayers of S.S. No. 13, 
Whitchurch, will readily believe 
that 1 have done my full duty 
during my term of office In pro- 
tecting the interests of the rate- . 

j payers. . J am fully prepared to 
do so in the future ns I have in 
the past. . 

It Is clearly understood that I 
have no Intention of having any 
further communications through 
the press regarding any such 
complaints. If any they shoutd 
always be addressed to the 
school hoard and not to the press-, 
I remain, 
Hespect fully yours, 
Alfred E. Patehell, 
.Chairman of the hoard, 
&S. No. 13. Whitchurch. 

; LANDING U.S. MKKTINO 

The Holland Lauding Home 
and School Association meeting 
Will be hold at the school on 
Monday, March 3, from two to 

four p,m. 



Canada has 61 ocean-going 
cargo vessels carrying the flag of 

the Dominion. 



■ 



CUSTOM GLEANERS 

HKAlWOKDi ONTARIO 

Brine your cleaning to 

OUR NttWMARKRT AGKNT 

GEORGE CARR 

3t Pleasant View. Newmarket - Phone 1WR 
Prompt, Courteous Service is our Policy 



■?- * 



OBITUARY 




■' 



Am. Wag, 



Mrs. Mary Ann Wagg died on 
February 10, 1052, at her home, 
238 O Connor Drive, Toronto. 

She was born in QueensvlUe 
on September j, 1(172, the daugh- 
ter, of the Into Mr. and Mrs. 

tJSl ry John - Bntt - ,n ,he vonr 

WW she was married to Oliver 
Wagg, who predeceased her in 
February, 1035. 

, She was a member of the 
Unitetl church at Niagara-on-the- 
Lake, Ont., where she lived for a 
number of years before moving 
to Toronto In 1040. 

Surviving aro son, Kenneth 
H. Wagg, 238 O'Connor Dr., To- 
ronto; a daughter Hilda (Mrs. 
Norman Ingram), Victoria, B.C.; 
and twq sisters, Mrs. Geo. Cole, 
Queensville, and Mrs. W. A. 
Smith, Toronto. 

Funeral services were held at 
Mount Albert on Wednesday, 
Feb. 13, and interment was in 
Mount Albert cemetery. 



GLENW00D PARK 



MAIN ST. 



FRUITS AND GROCERIES 

NEWMARKET 

SPECIALS 



PHONE 944 



VEl 2 for .69 

FAB with FREE cake 
Mmollve Soap .77 

SUPERSUDS with FREE 
Plastic Apron .54 

COLGATE'S BEAUTY SOAP 
bath size, 

Reg. .11, 2 for .19 

NU-JELL With FREE 

Plastic bowl 3 for .29 

PARKAY MARGARINE 

lb. .35 
PARKAY, new color- 
fcwfck bag '. lb. .39 



SIDE RINDLESS BACON 

lb. .55 

SPY APPLES bus. 1.75 

URGE HEAD LETTUCE 

2 for .21 

URGE CELERY STOCKS 

2 for .23 

FRESH GREEN CABBAGE .9 

3 lb. BOXES CHOCOUTES 
Christmas stock 2.09 

HARSH POTATOES 

tasfcet .55 



COOKED MEATS, MILK, CHEESE 

AND BUTTER 

DELNOR FROZEN FOODS 

FREE DELIVERY 



I 



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f. 



f»t* • I*e NrwMifcet En juid Express, Ttaratfay, Feb. t*, 1952 



IT'S A 

Woman's World 

By Caroline Ion 

Hockev and a string quartet. They do seem incon- 
gruous when set down in print. But, this past week, 
we have thoroughly enjoyed an evening of each. 



Both were completely absorb- 
ing amusing and stimulating. 
That the latter evening was 
more satisfying, richer in. its ^re- 
wards, lay, perhaps, in the fact 
that we welt witnessing top rale 
artists in performance. No doubt 
there are many local hockey fans 
who would argue the point with 
me. but we felt the refereeing 
fell far short of perfection. 

On Tuesday night, together 
with several hundred others, we 
settled in our seats at the New- 
market high school to listen to 
the second concert of this season 
in the local Canadian Concert 
series. The visiting artists were 
the Solway String Quartet, 
Maurice Solway, violin, Jack 
Groob, violin, Ivan Romanoff, 
viola, and Marcus Adeney, cello, 

Mr. Adeney was the spokes- 
man for the group and we were 
not long in discovering that, 
coupled with his great love of 
music and outstanding talent, 
was a fine sense oi humor. His 
program notes were a real treat. 
They piqued the curiosity of the 
audience into responsive atten- 
tivencss for each selection of the 
varied program. At one point, 
following the quartet's playing 
of Anderson's 'Jazz Pizzicato^' 
without bowing, the applause 
augmented by the enthusiasm of 
a group of students, prevented 
the artists from continuing their 
program. Mr. Adeney, in a quiet 
aside to the audience, remarked, 
**The next number is good, also". 

The Solway String Quartet 



whelming that they were offered 
a series of "Pop' programs over 
C-B.C. as well as a tour of On- 
tario under the auspices of the 
Department of Education." 

Tuesday night's program saw 
this theory put into practice 
again. Mr. Adeney, in his open- 
ihg remarks, said that the quar- 
tet had drawn from many levels 
of music for the evening's pro- 
gram- He said that if Jerome 
Kerri writes good music, rt re- 
mains good music regardless of 
the medium used by the compos- 
er an4 deserves presentation from 
concert stage, the quartet^ un- 
usual treatment of Kerns 
"Smoke Gets In Your Eyes was 

warniiy applauded by the audi- 
ence. . ' - 4 . 
the program was begun with a 

irid from the old masters, Moz- 
artfschaikGwsky and Boccher- 
ini* arid included favorites of 

everyone. 

"Every program must have a 
cartoon," said Mr. Adeney as he 

introduced, 'The P'xy Rwft a 
fairy miniature suite by Waldo- 
Warner. "And, this is it." Again, 
the quartet gave themselves over 
to the music. As they had play- 
ed with passionate intensity 
Tschaikowsky's composition and 
been awakened to the feel of 
spring and the challenge of a 
new country in Dvorak's "Quar- 
tet in F*. they now laughed and 
frolicked in the woods v/ith the 
small woodland creatures and 
the "little folk" from the land 
of the Pixies. 



was founded in 1948 by Maurice But to return, if only briefly. 



Solway, the program informed 
us. But the majority of those 
present were already familiar 
with the ensemble through its 
C.B.C. broadcasts, many concerts 
given throughout the prov : nce 

or its appearance at the Canadian 
National Exhibition last summer 
where the quartet played before 
a record crowd of 40,000. 



to the hockey arena for last 
Thursday's game . . . After six 
years' residence in Newmarket 
we finally made one of these 
popular events and can now un- 
derstand their drawing power. 
Perhaps Mr. Haskett would like 
to change places with us. He 
could take in the epidemic of 
spring teas, fashion shows and 



Its repertoire includes works f such events and we could cover 
of the old masters, popular clas- I the sports* events for awhile. 
cics, modern and Canadian com* I The resulting stories would im- 
positions/' the program notes idoubtly vary from the routine 
continued. j and the change would be good 

"Convinced that the general ' for everyone. . • 

public and not mereiy a small I There was a scramble in front 
audience with specialized tastes of the Midland net and we start- 
can be interested in chamber ed to yell, "Hurrah, Newmarket 
music, the Solway Quartet for (scored. See, the red light is on." 
the first time in Canada present- ; My husband nudged me. Quiet- 
ed a 'Pop' concert at Hart House iy and with infinite patience he 
theatre. Toronto. The success said, "Sit down, dear. That's the 

of this venture was so over- \ exit sign" 




Win Valuable 




BV ENTERING: 



The 





H0RNBL0WER" 






COLOR-IN CONTEST 

FOR YOUNG ADVENTURERS 



Newmarket 
Social Mews 



— Atr. and Mrs. Gerald Van- . 
nest and Sheila, Verona, were re- j 
cent guests of Rev. and Mrs. R. 

G. Babcock. 

— Warren Graves and Harold 
Jones, Cedar Valley, .visited Mr. 
and Mrs. Frank Widdifieid last 

week. 

— - Miss Jeanine Payntcr spent 
the weekend with her grandpar^ 
ents, Air. and Mrs. George Bar- 
ker, Sharon. 

—Mrs. Ernest McKenzie, To- 
ronto, was a guest last week' at 
the home of Mr. and Mrs. Mel- 
vin Cook. 

. —Rev, and Mrs. R. G. Bab- 
cock, Mrs. Babcock's mother,. 
Mrs. Van Sickle* MarmQnat| and 
Mr. and Mrs. Charles Wrightman 
Were dinner guests on Monday 
evening of Mr. and Mrs. Norman 
Sedore. 

— The Falcon Hunt Club were 
guests of the Bond Head Hunt 
Club at a venison dinner and 
dance on Friday evening. 

— Misses Eleanor and Jsobel 
Rose visited over the weekend 
with their sister. Mrs. William 
Bray, Toronto. 

--Mrs. F. K. Cook returned on 
Friday night from Centralia 
where she had spent the past 
ton days with her daughter, Mrs. 
J. M. Hollov/ay, and family. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Dobbie 
had a telephone call on Sunday 
night from their son, Arthur, 
who is at Sarasota, Florida. 
They were speaking with Mrs. 
Dobbie and their granddaughter. 
Patsy, as well. All the family is 
well and enjoying their stay in 
the south. 

— Mrs. Lelia Rolph spent three 
days last week in Toronto, the 
guest of Dr. Irene McGuilli- 
cuddy. 

— Mrs. George McCarnan visit- 
ed last week in' London, Cen- 
tralia, Detroit and Wyandotte, 
Mich., v/ith friends and relatives. 

— Miss Vonda Martin spent 
[Sunday with the Misses Audrey 
and Betty Brillinger, Pine Or- 
chard. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Donald Stevens 
and family had Sunday dinner 
v/ith Mr. and Mrs. Bruce Sedore 
and family. 

—Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Findlay 
and Bobby, Port Credit, spent 
Sunday with Mr. and Mrs. James 
Rogers. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Lome Payn- 
tcr visited Mr. and Mrs. George 
Barker, Sharon, on Sunday. 

—Rev. Gorfion Harris and his 
father, Charles Harris, Manitou- 
lin Island, visited this week at 
the home of Mr. and Mrs. A. P. 
Johns. - 

- — Mr, and Mrs. George Barker, | 
Linda and Donna, Toronto, spent j 
Sunday with Mrs. Fred Barker, 
Newmarket 

— Sunday visitors at the home 
of Rev. and Mrs. T>; J. Lake were 
Petty Qfficcr and Mrs. John 
Howe, Halifax; Mr. and Mrs. W, 
J. Howe, and daughters Alison 
and Sandra, Toronto; Mrs. L. S, 
Lake, Toronto; Mrs. Roy Clarke 
and family, Janice and Douglas 
of Agincourt. 

—Mrs. Geo. Smith, Long 
Branch, Mrs. F. Hall and Mrs. 
Madeline Pervie, Mimico, spent 
Monday with Mr. and Mrs. Geo. 
Smith- 



News Of The W.I. 



News tur this column must he in the office Monday 
aiiht Copy must be written as briefly a* possible and 
confined to news and reports. Other than routine reports 
and announcement* will be printed separately. 




King City branch heard an ex- 
cellent address by Mrs. Elton 
Arrnstrong of Newmarket on 
**Wdrld Wide Affairs in Relation 
tpvPeace" at a meeting held at 
the home of Mrs. J. P. Norris, 
convener of branch public rela- 
tions and community activities. 
As president of North York W.I. 
district, the speaker has made an 
intensive study of world affairs. 
She snowed how institutes, in 
their relation to Associated 

Country Woftien of the Wdrltl, 
must be 'informed!-- on world 
events. ' . - ' 



. > 



_ - _ ~ - _ 

^We cannot fight communism 
with the atom bob/' she stated. 
"Fowl and homes are the wea- 
pons Communist Russia fears 
most** Mrs. Armstrong was in- 
troduced to the meeting by Sirs: 
Karris and was thanfced by the 

president, Mrs, A f E. Jarvis. 
Two appeals were approved by 

the branch, which grantee! $5 to 

the Navy League to be used to- 
ward ditty bags for Korean sail- 
ors. The other was an appeal 
from Save the Children organ- 
ization requesting diapers for 
Europe's babies. To the Kfarcti 
meeting* each. W.L menibcr will 
bring one. or more diapers made 
from bid or new' material. ; 

-Members will donate food par-, 
eels on March 11, to be sent to a 
WJ. organization in Kent, Eng- 
land* with which the local 

branch has been closely associ- 
ated ior the past four years. A 

letter from the Sittingbourne 
branch thanked King for the 
Christmas packages. The new 

parcel should reach England by 
Easter, . 

A letter from the Jamaica So- 
cial Welfare Council thanked 
the Institute for a donation ($10) 
toward rehabilitation of sections 
of that country damaged by tor- 
nado last year. Mrs. R. G. Pur- 
cell, president of provincial In- 
stitutes, wrote .to acknowledge 
the $10 donation toward a relief 
project in Mesovouno, Greece. 




Pine Orchard branch met at 
(he home of Mrs. Allan Cody on 
Wednesday, Feb. 13. A letter of 
thanks was read from the Titch- 
marsh VAI. of Kettering, Eng- 
land, for Christmas parcel. Mrs, 
R. C. Baycroft, our district presi- 
dent, was our guest, and gave 
a talk on the subject "Home/* 

Mfrs. Ross Armltage gave an 
account of the Federation of Ag- 
riculture trip to Ohio co-ops and 
Farm Bureau organizations. . 



*.-- 



PLAN FASHION SHOW 
IN TOWN HALL 

A fashion show of spring styles 
will be presented in the Newmar- 
ket Town Hall on Wednesday, 
March 12, under the auspices of 
the Newmarket Business and 

Professional Women's club. Co- 
conveners of the affair are Mrs. 
Kmest Rank and Miss Margaret 
Ward. 

Commentators at the show will 
be Mrs. J. W. Bowman and Mrs. 
M. B. Scldon. The ushers will 
be Mrs. Seneca Cook, Mrs. Wil- 
fred Oliver, 'Mr* J. C. R, Ed- 
wards, Miss Ward, Mrs. Morden 
Carter and Miss Mae Patterson. 
On duty at the door will be the 
treasurer, Mrs. Horace Jamics, 

assisted by Miss Nora Mcintosh. 
There wilt be a sale of candy 
with Mrs. Florence Clarkson and 
Miss Mary Lou Kilgotir in charge, 



ENTRY FORM 



I 



NAME 



L 



AGK 



■ w ■ 



■ " T 



#* ****** 9 • y 



■ I 



* 



V 5 



- f 



ENTRY RULES 

1. CHU.OREN 12 YVAHH AN« VSM'.H MAY KNTKR. ' 
t. COLOR WITH CRAYON TUB AROVK PICTtlKK. 



. j 



U* 



Z. KNTRIK8 MUBT BK IN NOT I.ATfclt THAN NKXT WEDNKK- 
DAV, MARCH 5. 

4, MAIL TO MANAOKK ROXY TIIEATRK. 
NOTE: Entries are judged by a**, nealiiCHs, and color harmony. 

Winners to be announced from Koxy Theatre htaie during 
Saturday matinee, March 8, 

m\ The AIMtfw Adventure Rfffl 

CAPTAIN HORATIO 
HORNBLOWER 

THUR., m., Shi, Mm 4-7-8 



BOXY 



NrlMARKET 



■iejgctfe-. 






BUSINESSWOMEN 
HEAR I^LK ON EAST 

TJie Newmarket Business and 
Professional Women's chili held 
their International Night dinner 
meeting at the King George hotel 
;on Monday, Feb. 18. Miss Norine 
rAyers presided over 4ho inter: 
esting nrdgranv -. 

It hicludtd an outstanding ad- 
dress on conditions in Kgypt and 
Iran by Miss Mary fiowman, 
Aurora, ao InUloiion of new 
members and an imi)r«easive can* 
dlellgtit service; which was coni 

ducted :-m Mrft itsfcOe iPftfmi 

with cantlles hoing: lit for each 
country wfierc H, and m cluhB 
are organised. Miss Clara Tri- 
vett was guest soloist. She was 
accompanied at this piorwhy Miss 
Mae Patiprsoni'- ■".:' '/ ; "- : "'^, 

Head teWo SUc^ts wero Intro* 
duced ot (he close of- the delf cinus 
dinner by tlm cM;» prostdeni. 
Miss Ayers. mWm Ol the 
Newmarket club hail invited 
guests from town and titers were 
representatives from the "final* 
nesi find rrofcssiohol Women's 
elnfos in Aurora, Markluun-Union- 
vHte and Toronto. 

Two minutes' silence Inrnem* 
ury of King George VI was fol- 
lowed hy prayer for Her Majesty, 
Queen Elizabeth SI, led by Mrs. 
Lillian Hank, 

Canada's southernmost part— < 
Peleo Island — is slightly south of 
the northern portion of Call* 

fornia. 



The Mount Albert branch held 
its February meeting in the 
community hall on Feb. 14. A 
short business meeting was call*. 
ed at 7.30 p.m. at which it was 
decided to " sponsor a cosmetic, 
demonstration lor the ladies of ; 
the town and community some- 
time in March. Our hockey boys; 
ore in need of funds so the 
Institute is holding a euchre and 
dance in the town hall on March 
18. 

The. program was in chnrjje of 
the publicity committee of Mrs. 
Car men Rolling and Mrs, .jfas. 
McDonald and assisted hy Mrs. 
Ifcrb. i!artnnn p program con- 
vener, who acted as cimlrman« : 
The prograiA consisted of public 
sneaking in which we had nine 
contestants, recitations with sev- 
en contestants, solos with 10 en- 
tries and duets with five entries. ; 
There v/cre Ifi scraphooks on disvi 
play at the contest. 

Mrs. Jack Smith of Queens-, 
ville, Mrs, Elton Armstrong of 
Armitagc, Rev. Thornloc of 
Zephyr, who kindly consented to< 
l>e our ju<lge.s- r had a difficult 
tosk and we appreciate very 
much the lime, and effort they 
gave in making this evening 0; 
success. 

Mrs. Ilev. Sinclair, in n few 
well-chosen words, thanked our 
judges. 

.. The teachers and pupils are to 
he congratulated for the talent 
displayed. The Institute is hop- 
ing to make this contest an an- 
nual affair- Prize list will ft>e 
found in Mount Albert news col- 
umn. 

Lunch was served and oil felt 
that thoy had n pleasant even- 
ing. 



munity singing: Mrs. Thornloe 
gave a talk on the course in oc- 
cupational therapy she took at 

the university, and showed many 
of the crafts they learned. The 
meeting closed with the National 
Anthem, followed by a social 
half hour. 

Miss Gladys Martin, head dieti- 
cian, Sick Children's Hospital, 
Toronto, was guest speaker at the 
Feb. 21 meeting of the Newmar- 
ket branch. Mrs. Frank Hodge, 
home economics convener, was in 
charge of the program. 

The meeting opened with the 
president, Mrs. Elman Campbell, 

in the chair. Two minutes* sil- 
ence in memory of our late sov- 
ereign was observed. The Na- 
tional Anthem was sung. . 

Mrs; Elton Armstrong reported 
on the successful afternoon tea 

and sale of home baking held by 
the institute in conjunction with 
the re-opening of the Rest Rooms, 
-Botsford St. Mrs. T. A. Mitchell 
reported on the Valentine party 
held for the residents of the 
County- Home for the Aged, 
Yonge St., oh Feb. 13. - 

Miss Anna Lewis was present. 
She announced that the date had 
been set for the annual York 
Pioneers and Institute picnic at 
Sharon Temple grounds as Sat- 
urday, June 14, 

Mrs. Hodge introduced the 
guest speaker* Miss Martin. Miss 
Martin is a graduate of the Uni- 
versity of Toronto in home econ- 
omics. She is now with the Sick 
Children's Hospital as supervisor 
of food service. Miss Martin gave 
an interesting account of the 
equipment and kitchens at the 
hospital. She told of the plan- 
ning of menus and problems en- 
countered in feeding children. 



- 



. ' 



Union Street branch will meet 
at the the home of Mrs. Bob Reid 
on Thursday, -March 6, at 2 p.m. 
Motto: "Today's best should be 
tomorrow's starting point." Roll 
call: Something I remember 
about my grandmother. Grand- 
mother's meeting; program com- 
mittee, Mrs. O. Diceman, Mrs. 11. 
Deavitt, Mrs. Frank Perry. 

Hostesses: Mrs- Roy Cowieson, 

Mrs. W. Cryderman, Mrs. Lome 
Mahoney, Mrs. M. Woodward. 

(Please note change of place.) 

,i • ..i., ...',■ 

The February meeting of Kins- * 
grove branch was held at Mrs. 
Wcldon's home. After the open- 
ing ceremonies, two minutes' si- 
lence were observed in memory 
of one of our members, Mrs. 
Richard Small wood, who had 
passed away since our last meet- 
ing, and also in memory of our 
•beloved King George VI. 

The roll call Was answered by 
a garden hint. The president 
asked that each member look up 
the roll call before the meeting. 

Letters of thanks., were rend 
from school children of Mr. 
Corps' travelling train school in 
Northern Ontario, where Christ- 
mas cheer had been sent by . the J 
Institute. Arrangements were 
mode to moke quilt tops. All 
members will be nsked to qiiilt- 
Ing l>eea at different times. 

A [Committee was named to 
look lifter euchre party for Feb- 
ruary m Deilmvcn hall. A donn- 
■tion was sent to help repair the 
Newmarket Institute rest room, 
'which was damaged: by fire. 

Next meeting will be nt Mrs. 
Rol>crt Riddell's home. Meeting 
closed with God Save the Qneen, 
.Olid lunch was served. 



The March meeting of Sharon 
branch will be held nt Sharon 
school on Wednesday, March 5, 
at 2 p.m. (Please note change of 
time.) Roll. call: A school-day 
memory. Citizenship and educa- 
tion: Mrs. Unrry Walker. lie- 
fresbmenl com.; all members. 
Ail the Indies are welcome. 



- 



When I'Osfiay branch held 
the annual family night In VRfe 
hall, Saturday evening* 75 liirnV 
ed out for i ho pot-Juck HUpjM>»\ 

Mrs. Norman Kgan, president* 
was chairman. Mrs, I* Hoys 
convened . (he ehterlnlnment and 
Mrs. Aubrey Glass, the supper; 

l>rv Clifford Taylor presented. 
several movies. Thef© were: 
pictures of the const of Maine 
t«Hcn personally l»y DK TVttrtoVi 
scenes of tjie vuggeU sJBtft oi 
Utah and views of thoTayjor 
flower gardens at the Loskoy 

Mis? M«rJorlo M^Miu^hy coft.' 
(UJct^Un sjng-sontf. •: 



Tlio March meeting of ttie King 
flldge branch will be held nt the 
homo of Mr*. '•% J. McCormick 
on Tuesday, March 4, ot ft p.m. 
Motto: Make life worth-while 
where you are. Roll call: Where 
1 would like to vgo on a holiday. 
Hostesses: Mrs. % Jones and Mrs. 
E.Fry. - , :. 



firftiicJi held their Pel*- 

r«^(m«oiij»ywj' v^flSte np 

iornoon, Foh^ 20; willv Mrs; Pick* 
oring In the :cbnir. 50iB. ntcoiV 
ing opened with tho fnmUiar ode 
art<| Mary gtgwart cojlcci. Thu 
pTesidenl read o poeniu Tsvon^ 
momlwrs ahswercd tlio roll call 
with a helpful hint on how to 
improve our vlllngo. Two visi- 
tors were present. 

Mrs. Howse then took charge 
of the meeting, opening with a 
poem. Mrs. Oilkooy gavo a 
reading, "A Personal Check-up". 
It was public relations meeting 
and Mrs. Win. Rynard gave a 
splendid article on publicity. 

The meeting included com- 



: Tho ItogarUowii branch meet* 

\W nt i'AUq homo of Mrs. G. Me- 
Gluro last Tijesdoy, was attended 
by 30 ladies and 10 children. 

vMrs, W SHronsliJro and Mrs; II. 

Jiolipinrv woro Btlosts from Pine 

|Owhw<fcJostJtu)o, ■ 'J 

\ The Vandari nmnch held their 
MV "toontBJy meeting iil tho 

ilio^o^Mv^presIdorifi Mrm ©tare 
Powclli m Wfidnesdny, F6b, 20, 
with- a s.p I o hd i d attendance 
Current events werO given hy 
JMrs. Qbor^n^ftoriftoni , v -j 
i 'ffe> ^ojplc m Mslorjciiij Re* 
scordi wa T H given hy tlio conven- 
;er #> Mm Mfcrolff Bowsl«*ry, when 

flOTfle^Itennofenlso orilioVrtn 

tho roj) calL was nuawercd 
■ijKUh 3UitohIo clippings pntl snap- 

fsjiots'fc^ 

tory 1>poI^. A lovely hmcli was 
servetl by the hostesses Mrs. II. 
A. Switseer, Mrs, Fred Pattenden 

and Mrs. I-en Scott. 



-J** 



■ ■ ■ ■■ — ■ ■ ■ ■ j l i — . ■ ■ ■ » ■ ■ j^-.y 

HAS OrERATlON^i v 

J. W. !«ockhart, principal New- 
market«Sutton Area High school, 
underwent n major operation on 
Thursday. He is reported to be 
progressing satisfactorily, - - 









. 




ENTER LOBLAWS SI 0,000 CONTEST 

10 FREE WEST1NGHQUSE TELEVISION SETS 
15 FREE WEST1N6HQ0SE RilDIOS {E9MBWAH0fiS) 
25 FBEE WESTINGHODSE FOOD MIXERS 



GrT YOUR INTRY BLANK AT ANY LOBLAW STORt 



UPTONS SOUP MIX T c°^;?H yt H C USt'r" 2 
GOOD LUCK MARGARINE regular 
GOOD U7CK Color-Mix Margarine 




WICI 



38c 



LUX 



SOAP 

ma 



REGULAR 
CARE 



2RIQUUR |9 
CAKIS «' 







t-W. 

I-tS. 
NUB. 

PK& 

LAR6I 

9KG. 

CARES 

■ATM sm 
CAR1 



2 RATH lEtt 
CARES 



25c 
40c 

38c 



Ccnodo's B.m( 
Coftca Value! 

LOBLAWS 
FRESHLY 

GROUND 

PRIDE oi 

ARABIA 

COFFEE 

POUND 90 c 

"So Go«i You'O 
W«M Maia" 



LOBLAWS 

TWO CUP 



21c 
13c 



BAII IXCkUSlVnY IN ALL LOBLAW STORES 

'OMAN'S MAGAZINE 




EACH So 



FOUND 92c 

LOBLAWS 

HIGH PARK 



POUND 99c 




SPECIAL! GREEN TO> TIXAS 

FLORIDA ORANGES ««■ 



ZORIGIHAL 1C 
flUHCHIS JI9 C 



$1ZI 214 



tf< w "-, ' , r^ 



. 





CRISP RIO 

CAL1EORNIA 

* 

AVOCADO PEARS ' F0R YS^SST" 

AVAIlAtLI m MOST LOBLAW STORtS 



box. 29c 

2 us- 29c 

EACH 19c 



- ' 



TASTY GREEN TEXAS 



BROCCOLI 

LY HEARTS 



ORIGINAL 
•UNCH 



M x m x ; 



TENDCR CRISP PASCAL 



Northern SPYS «y™»«»™ ,»65 

Ontario Grown, Fancy Grade 



29c 

BUNCH 35c 

29c 



3-LB. 
BAG 



• LENTEN SUGGESTIONS • 




^ii :*<. y*o> F m t : 



MAPLE IEAT CHEESE fl Z\r W£ 

&OBLAWS Tongy Old White Cheese 
MONABCH CHEESE 
BULK MACARONI m& 2 

MACARONI quick cooking 



29c 

30c 
57c 



babt L roiltI/c 



^Ki 



r - **y^\^> 




(--'_-_ rfjt 



WESTONS SWLTIVSES 

i 



PCVNDS 

1602. 
PKG. 

16-OZ. 
PXG, 



c**^c t ^**=*fle*f\^ 



t ZZ— K 



i- " Ttl '. **f. ^i"^ 



GOLD SEAL MEAT TUNA 

(SOVEHEIGN Sotkeyc Sa8m»jra 

t mrB^V raV wf Pnllj n 1 !? %° 



» 



FANCY 

WHITE 

EANCY 
REO 



\ 



COHSE SALMON 



G0LDIM CELL 
FANCY 






3' 



CALEDONIA PINK SfilMBS Fanov v i 



Vi-IB. 



\n 



I H i 




ate 

25c 

MACAROME SiU CHEESE 2 

SPACHETTS \}\ TOMATO SAUCE 2 



TIM 

S-OZ. 

TIN 

l-OZ. 
TIN 

M' 

TIN 

MB. 

TIN 

IS.fi. 

OX. TINS 

U-Jt. 
OI. TINS 




I 





TINS 



X-OZ. 
TIN 

100Z. 

TIN 

TINS 

3V 4 .OZ. 
TINS 



23c 
16c 
35c 
25c 

37c 

39c 

45c 
67c 

42c 
37c 

317c 

25c 



SPECIAU 

exceptional 
Value 

Children's 
RECORDS 

UNERIAKASLI 

EACH J^c 



SPECIAL! 

McGOfiMICKS 
BUPtEX 

•iscuns LB. 33 c 



m TOMATO SAL'Ct 

SARBI^ES in oil 

Munswick chicksk katobie 

CONNORS riSH CiiiiES 
BRUNSWICK SAROIMES 3 

KIPPERED SNACKS 2 
SALT SMOKED SARDINES 



TIN 



23c 

23c 
25c 
19c 

lie 



\ 



THE WINNERS OF THE RECENT 

$12,000 LOBLAW CONTEST 

WILL IE ANNOUNCED IN THE LOBLAW ADVERTISEMENT ON 

• THURSDAY, MARCH 13TH 

(NOTIi— THE «I3,000 CONTEST HAS NO CONNECTION WITH THE $10,000 
CONTEST FEATURED IN THIS ADVERTISEMENT.) 



SPECIAL! LOBLAWS 

ICEO 

ORANGE BUKS0M 

CME ea. 33c 

A QUALITY PRODUCT O? 
THI tOBLAW BAKERY 



SPECIAL* 

HOSTESS 
EDMBHOPS 



MB. 

cillo rxo. 



33 



RED ROSE Orange Pekoe Tea 

rNING 



fl 




QUAKER SUGAR PUTTS 

Lemon Juice 



- 7s— ". 







2 
2 



OLOE TOWNE STMWBEHIY JAM ,« 
OLDE TOWNE MSPBEMY JAM fflfflR 
MATTAIR SPICED BEET LOAT 




Vna 

MS. 

CARTOM 

MB. 
CARTON 

w- 

02. T1NI 

W\ 

uri. 

OX. MR 

24-FL. 
0Z. MR 



SUNCREST EVAPORATED MILK 



OC^Astk "»-^: 



61c 
36c 
35c 
29c 
21o 
51c 
3«o 
37o 

35o 

"W- 42c 
1& «c 



IDOIIROOK 



EGGS 

, GRADE "A" 
LARGE 



m 



.43 



. • 






* 



: W 



1 




• CHOICE FRESH PORK CUTS * 



SHOULDER BOAST 
LEAN BUTT BOAST 

LEAN LOIN BOAST 
SIDE SPARE RIBS choice 



CHOICf IRISH 

hock oi r 



CHOICI 
IRISH 

CHOICI FtlSH 

IITHLR fHD 



CHOICI 10 Hlltll 

MILK IIP 



LB. 

LB. 
LB. 
LB. 

LB. 



THRU UTTU MB 
»MAU LINK 

iCRSIVf HIT 
HORTHIRH mien 

*W|*T 
fRIMIMM 



LB. 
t*ox. 

MR 

Ml. 

CILLO MQ. 



VEAL FBONT BOAST 
FORK SAUSAGE 
FRESH OYSTERS 
FRANKFURTERS 

• LENTEN FROSTED SEA FOOD FEATURES • 
OCEAN PERCH FILLETS choice lb 

CHOICE HADDOCK FILLETS " 

CHOICE SMOKED FILLETS "■ 



COD FHleU 



CHOICf 
LI. 



45 



SOLEFIUtts 



; ^'. 



ict 



39c 
49c 
45c 
39c 

69c 
55c 
72c 
55c 

47c 

55 c 

47c 
67c 



LONLAW GROCmftIA* CO. LIMITED 



men wktiv! Ft* at, at, ma*c* i 



■■• 



. . 







>*{ I 



*K^mJ m ■— ->^* > S -* * 



T *» 



■" '\ 






"\- ' V 



V 3 



■ 



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, 



hMsAt 




Newmarket and Aurora "fea- 
therweights" took part in the 
novice (under 10) hockey tourna- 
ment at Brampton Saturday. 
Five teams entered; Weston, 
Brampton, Guelph, Aurora and 
Newmarket. 

Frank Hollingsworth s New- 
market small fry drew a bye in 
round one. Bill MundeU's 
featherweights topped Bramp- 
ton 4-0 In their round one game 
on two goals by Keith i Brawn- 
in? and single sniping efforts by 
Teeter Murrcl! and Jack Murby. 

With Leroy *Short* EHis 
fashioning a shut-out and Larry 
Sutton, Keith' Browning and 
Hughie Hammond firing goals 
Aurora downed Newmarket £-0 
In round two. MundeU's lads 
hit the strong Weston "Marlbor- 



i 



os" In the finaj and were set- 
back 5-0. In the consolation 
series Newmarket battled to a 
l-all tie with Guelph. Newmar- 
ket was given the nod as third 
team by a board of arbitration. 
Johnny Hopper chalke dup the 
Newmarket tally in the l-all 
deadlock. Newmarket's Wayne 
Croutch finished second in puck- 
carrying contest Larry Sutton 
of Aurora finished third. 

Newmarket: R. Peterson, D. 
McComb, W. Croutch, B. Mac- 
nab, L. Bone, K. Burling, W. Mc- 
Comb, B. Sedore, A. Rennctte, B. 
Cryderman, J. Hopper, R. Mor- 
rison, L. Tunney, X„ Kef for. 

Aurora: W. Zimmerman, I- 
Ellis, L. Woods, H. Hammond, E. 
Evans, G. Bennett, W. Calhoun, 
K. Browning. L. Sutton, M. Pat- 
rick, J. Murby, B. Davis, W. 
Cr>'sda!e, H. Bolsby, D. Faulk- 
ner, T. Murrell, G. Chapman. 



PUBLIC SCHOOL BOWLERS 




MS. Wins Tfree 



! 



TOP SCORER 




r ^ 

L * 

Admission prices for the Play-Offs between 
Coliingwood and the Spitfires will be: all reserve seats 
75c; standing room 50c; children standing room 25c. 
We expect the first game of the Play-Offs will be 

Thursday, March 6. 

THE ARENA MANAGEMENT 










NEWMARKET 
TOWN HALL 



SATURDAY, 



. . . you'J] recognize tlie worth and l! Je 
character winch makes 'ol.iffer-Hill; 
dollies a really worllnvliili 



man 



e possession 



> 



Am we find that matnj men 

on- amazea* to team that they 

can enjoy Sliiffcr-1 lillnnm 

clothes for as little ,j# 

$75 

» 

Vonr appearance will lielp yonr affair*, if 
you chooie from the Sliiffer-Hillman 
Collection of British woollens, here now 

Morrison's Men's Wear 



« MATH 



NEWMAMUT 



raoNB IW 



Hockey is king for four months, crowding oxher school sport 
activity into the back-ground. Unknown tc most, an active public 
school bowling league has been functioning each Saturday after- 
noon for the past 15 weeks at the Brown-Brymer North End Alleys. 
Twenty-four boys and girls are active members. They turn in 
scores that would shame a good many of their bigger brothers 
and sistexs. Here's samples, Shirley Tnvett 553 <205-25i-97), Edna 
Markham 405, Colin Stevens 544 (181-182-181), Aubrey Burling 405. 

School teachers Neil Lothian, Frank Hollingsworth and Mrs. 
Neil (Mabel) Lothian share the credit for getting and keeping the 
league rolling. Back row, standing, I. tor., Martha Carr, Shirley 
Tnvett, Edna Markham, Colin Stevens, Ken Harman, Floyd Mor- 
ton, Mrs. M. Lothian, Donna Bah. Front row, 1. to r., Donna Mc- 
Knight, Lois Hoskin, Dana McGrath, Jean Morton, Ken Lothian. 

(Photo by Haskett) 






Prestonville of the Lake Shore 
league will be Keswick's first 
round opposition in the O.R.H.A. 
intermediate C playdowns. The 
home and home goals to count 
series is being arranged for this 
week. 

Keswick bantams, after com- 
ing through the first and second 
rounds in the O.M.II.A. bantam 
D playdov/ns, were spilled from 
the race by Brooklin. Keswick 
lost at home 4 - 3 and suffered 
an 11 - set-back in Brooklin. 

Roche's Point and Jersey are 
meeting in the finals for North 
Cwillimbury Married Men's Hoc- 
key League title. . Second game 
of the series will he played Fri- 
day, Feb. 29, and the third game 
if needed, Mar. 4. 



FRACTURES WRIST 

For a second week in a row, 
Dame Fortune has taken a swipe 
at the Ditch Diggers, current 
leaders in the Aurora Town 
League. Centerman Grant Daw- 
son suffered a fractured right 
wrist in last Tuesday's town 
league game. That leaves the 
Ditch Diggers without the ser- 
vices of playing coach Mickey 
Sutton and their high scoring 
centerman Dawson for the play- 
off tilts, due to open this week. 



Pee-Wees At Gardens 

Aurora pee-wees, with teams 
from Leaside, North York, East 
York, Toronto Township, Bramp- 
Wo, Weston and York Township, 
took part in the pee-wee hockey 
tournament held at Maple Leaf 
Gardens Saturday morning. Tar- 
get for the teams was the Inter- 
Suburban Athletic Association 
Trophy. 

The trophy, for the third suc- 
cessive year, was won by Weston. 
3ill MundeU's crew dumped 
Brampton 5-1. Chas. Vrana, 
'.toss Patrick, Jack Brooks and 
Beit Loveless were the Aurora 
marksmen. Alan Childs turned 
*n super shot-blocking effort in 
the Aurora cage. 

Aurora hit the ultimate win- 
ners, Weston, in round two. They 
out up a tidy battle before los- 
ing 3 - 2. The latter clicked for 
the game winner with a minute 
and a half to go. Dan Patrick 
and Hon Egan poked in the Auro- 
ra goals. Weston capped their 
winning march with a 3 - 2 win 
over York Township in the finals. 

Aurora: A. Childs, J. Griffiths, 
D. Storie, B. Loveless, L. Spence, 
D. Fines, D. Broom, P. Chapman, 
R. Patrick, D. Patrick, J. Brooks, 
C. Vrana, W. Spence, R. Egan, D. 
Hears, R. Preston, D. Glass, D. 
Zimmerman. 



Though Fred Sneer's N.H.S. 
hoop-squads are out of the COS 
SA playdowns. they closed their 
North York Secondary Schools 
basketball league season Thurs- 
day on the right note by collect- 
ing three wins from Pickering 
College. 

In senior, the purple and gold C ' 
hoopsters drove for 30 points in W-- 
the last half to gain a 45 - 30 
triumph. In junior B, Newmar- 
ket hooped 21 points to 6 by 
Pickering in the final half to 
wrap up a 36 - 17 victory. Jn 
junior A, Fred BenniU scored 24, 
Alaistair Sinclair 15 to spark the 
N.H.S. to a 56 - 23 win. Pely 
Frattini 8, Enrique Abarora 8 
were the Pickering junior A top 
scorers* 

Jerry Hugo paced Newmarket 
seniors with 22 points. Bob 
Saunders sank 12. Dave Stewart 
ID, Don MacMillan 8 were Pick- 
ering senior leaders. Grant Mor- 
ton 13 and Owen Mellon 10 led 
the N.lfcs; junior B shot-makers. 
Ian Christie counted 6 to lead 
Pickering, . 

N.H.S. Seniors: B. Saunders, D. 
Trivett t D. Budd, J. Hugo, J. 
Vance, B. Bannister, j- Shrop- 
shire. - . 
. Pickering Seniors: D. MacMil- 
lan, Walters, G. Grant, Hunt, D. 
Stewart, B. Moffatt, W. Alger, 
Baker- 

. N.ILS. Junior A: F. Bennitz, R. 
Eaton, R. Dick, A. Sinclair, P. 
Widdifield, K. Wheeland, A. Van- 
Winsen. 

Pickering College Jr. A: Fra- 
ser, P. Frattini, Tavera, McKel- 
lar, J. VanVHct. C. Odney, Pat- 
erson, E. Abarora, Barron, Mal- 
kin, Forrester. 

N.H.S. Jr. B: F. West, G. Mor- 
ton, P. Hillaby, O. Mellon, R. 
Beckett, G. Scott, B. Forhan, J. 
Dolan, L. Purcell, K. Cassavoy. 
..Pickering Jr. B: Melville, C. ! 
Arnold. J. Brownlee, B. Jestin | 
Hitchcock, I. Christie, McGillv- 
ray, L, Bowby, Willis, Forbes, 
Blackslock. 




The Newmarket Era and Express, Thursday, Feb. 28> 1952 Pag* * 



SECOND IN SCORING RACK 

Spitfires' winger, Don "Spider" 
Gibson, is number two in the 
Big Five scoring race, according 
to figures released this week. 
"Spider" has 17 goals and 23 as- 
sists for 40, four points behind 
Ab Bowen, Orillin centerman. 
Laurie Thmns with 13 goals and 
17 assists and Don Smith with 10 
goals and 20 assists, 30 each; arc 
up in the top brackets of the 
race. Bill Johnston is next Spit- 
fire in line with 20 points, 15 
goals and II assists. 



DOWN THE CENTRE 

Bears Prepare 







Wlijtfiy Redwings will he ti*.-vccal!cd 
first-round opposition for the 
Aurora Bears in the junior "C" 
p'aydowits. The opening game of 
a best of five series is at Aurora 
on Friday night. The second 
tame is carded for Whitby on 
Monday but with the present 
weather, natural ice conditions 
may make that impossible. The 
third game comes back to Au- 
rora, and you'll find it for either 
Wednesday or Friday of next 
week, depending on when Whit- 
by has their home game. 

Like Aurora, Whitby has been 
playing all year with "D" clubs 



like Sunderland, Uxhridge. Port 
Perry, Millbrook, etc.. and from 
reports we get straight from 
Whitby, the Rears should lake 
the Wings in three straight. It 
might not turn out that wny of 
course, but Vern. Dillon's club 
hits been having some internal 
differences as well as playing to 
small crowds. 

Aurora vs WliiChy is no new 



that in 19-16, Aurora 
Midgets met Whitby in the third 
round of the O.M.II.A. scries, 
besting them In three games. In 
1933-34, Aurora Intermediates 
met a Whitby club led by Art. 
Handle, onetime Toronto St. 
Pats pro. Aurora had a great in- 
termediate club that voar with 
!-cs. Hart. Eric White, Bob Scott, 
Brute Browning, Percy Preston, 
Ken Hose, Norm. Woon, Bob Mc- 

Cfthe, Shorty Turan, Keith Davis, 
Wilkie Fleury, Atib, Fleury, on 
the roster. It was this club that 
last to Graven hurst before the 
largest crowd ever to sec hockey 
in the old-new Aurora arena. 
We hope the present series will 
be n good one. 

On Friday, the Rears lost a 9-G 
verdict to Stan. Long's Uarric 
Bees. Stage-fright in the first 
25 minutes led to a count 7-1 at 
one time, but the Bears battled 
back and were 7-5 at one stage, 
and holding their own an on end. 
These are the type of games the 



Piay-olf arrangement. It will be | club should have been having 



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all year. Rarrie played in the 
same group wilh Collingwood in 
the regular season and the Col- 
lingwood club won all but one 
game from them, so that you can 
have some idea as to what's to 
be faced later. The Hears can 
improve. 

Hill Mellale, who played some 
useful and sound, if not spectacu- 
lar hockey at the Aurora blue- 
line last winter, is working out 
with the club again and may 
shortly be seen in action. It's 
his last year in junior ami for 
that reason club officials didn't 
press him to play earlier. Also 
signed, and eligible is <Jhris. 
Wansbaroiigh, the former St. An- 
drew's boy wlin was the defence- 
man in the junior '*!)" series last 
season. Wanshorough wilt likely 
have some overtures made to 
him to rejoin the Hears for the 
play-off drive. There's no doubt 
about it. The club needs 
strengthening on defence, "<t 
the addition of the above two, u 
In shape, would enable Coach 
Hownlree to move up some of the 
blueliners to aid the forward 
si I nation. 

Ltked that article last week by 
Ha/. O'Mcnra in the Tely's week- 
end section on whether a coach 
makes a team or a team makes 
n coach. Wo have always said 
that a coach can't be any belter 
(hart the players he has to work 
with. Some of the critics of 
Messrs. Itowntrce and Shew- 
chuk might bear that in mind. 

fiuelph AfiRiw* won the west- 
ern intermediate intercollegiate 
section and two North Yorkers 
played their part. Wizard 
Winch, ex-Sulton Grccnshirts' 
goalie, was the slur of (he decid- 
ing contest, mid Hill Dale of 
Schombcrji, who had a brief 
whirl with Aurora Mack Hawks, 
scored one of the goals that mode 
the difference between victory 
and defeat. 

Ray Fox, better known ns 
Ozark to Bradford, Newmarket 
and Aurora, where lie has play- 
ed either hockey or lacrosse in 
recent years, Is bard at work 
trying to annex a berth on Can- 
ada's Olympic wrestling team 
He's featured o card or two at 
OnmgeviHe and Toronto, and 
you can look for him to join 
*'Tunney's loonies" sometime 
next fall. 

Hobble liusaard, of Pittsburgh, 
in his first year in the A.H.L., 
stands ninth in scoring. Hnssard, 
it will he recalled, broke into 
hotkey at Hichmand Hill under 
Charlie Howntree. Don't he sur- 
prised If the familiar face of Karl 
Cook Is missing from district 

baseball. "The Lemanville 

Farmer" has had one or two pro 

offers in the coaching end that 

aren't bad, and If it wasn't for n 

physical ailment that calls for 

hospitalization right now, ho'd 
probably he away south. The 
offers, however, will wait, we 
understand. 



Dave Couch, Mount Alberts 
rapid fire scoring centerman, has 
captured the Newmarket and 
District Hockey League scoring 
Crown. Dave punched home 18 
goals and tacked on 13 assists to 
build a fine 31 point total. Short- 
ly he will receive the President's 
Trophy donated by Town League 

prexy and sportsman Ray Smith. 

(Photo by Haskett) 

■ 

Era and Express Classifieds 
• Bring Results 



Wont to gtt 

WELL? 

bring bmJih, but much am 
be Accomplished by earae** 
application. And the first 
step is to seek die cooper* 
Wioo of your Phyakuux Tell 
hira your stocy, eoawe* bis. 
queries. Help him diagnose 
joor coodiiioo. Tfeeo heed 
bis experienced couoseL 

If tbe Doctor spires jro* 
a peescriptioa . . . we shall 
coast it a privilege to scrte 
;oo~prompdyai^pceciselr. 




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Drug Store 



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SPORTS COLUMN 

Selecting by vote the one considered, 

rightly or wrongly, as the outstanding 

athlete of the ye3r, male mid female, U a 

comparatively easy chore, for the reason 

that your memory Isn't overtaxed In mak- 

. . _ bf the selection. It Isn't very difflcutt to 

look over your shoulder, 12 months back, and name the stand- 
outs, because they're still fresh in your memory. 

n™ Ut » SUpP T „ you ? el »>volved in one of those pointless 
arguments pointless because unproveable, about who was 
the greatest in any one sport over the years, not the vear, 

(or Srs.)^ci„S XinR " ' ° r F00lba " ' * * ° r *" ■*• 
What name comes to mind first when the talk turns to 

those sports - the all-time hero through the years* 

No man or group has ever given the answer, but the 

arguments make the best fuel when the hot stove league 

opens up the damper & 

The greatest names of sport arc not always the finest 
performers. They do, however, combine ability with the 
most valuable asset - color. 

Babe Ruth not only hit more home runs than any other 
man, but every move he made was news. Even to his famous 

stomachache. The Bambino was probably the most colorful 
figure ever to hit baseball. Many declare Joe DiMaggio a 
greater player, and of course there are legions who insist 
that Ty Cobb, witli his breath-taking speed on the bases, his 
deadly hitting, and his daring, was in a class by himself. 
And he oozed color, too. To which the Ruthians retort that 
the Babe was a great pitcher, a catcher, a first-rate outfielder 
and the greatest home-run hitter of all. 

Was Jack Dempsey Ihe top figure in boxing's history? 
\ eteran ring fans Insist Jim Jeffries was a better heavyweight 
champ, Filzsimmons a harder hitter, Jim Corbet* more skilful, 
and undoubtedly that hero of the 80's, the mighty John L. 
Sullivan, was more boisterous. Yet no one has approached 
the gales Dempsey attracted, and few have matched the 
slashing fury of the colorful .Mauler lu the Willard or Firpo 
fights. Who gets the nod in boxing? 

Since the dawn of football, the fans have fought over 
then- favorites. They bring up Jim Thorpe, the Carlisle 
Indian, whose plunging and kicking are legendary. Jim has 
made virtually every all-star eleven listed, ftut" they can't 
forgot Red Grange, the Galloping Ghost. And in Canada they 
say that Lionel Conacher was probably the equal of either, 
and a far greater all-round athlete than Grange. 

Racing has its immortals in Citation, Exterminator and 
Sea Biscuit. Yet most racing fans m America start and 
finish wilh one name - Man O* War. The jockey heroes will 
be Tod Sloan, Karl Snnde and right on down to Johnny Long- 
den and Eddie Arcaro. 

Track and field has produced many great names - Olympic 
and world champions. Who comes first? Is It Charlie Pad- 
dock, the "world's fastest human", or Paavo Nurrai, the 
Inscrutable Finn, or fleet Jesse Owens, the scourge of the 
Nazis in the '3G Olympics? Or Clarcuee DeMar, seven times 
winner of the grucJIIllj* Huston marathon? 

What of golf? Is it Uobby Jones, Ihe only man ever to 
Win Ihe "Grand Slam", or Walter llagen or today's Ben 
llogan. Tennis and Hill Tlldcn, wrestling and Frank Gotch 
or Kd (Strangler) Lewis. 

You wanna headache? Pick 'em yourself. 



Tour Kommtnt i end suggestions for Ihh column wJfl tie welcomed 
by Elmer Ferguson, c/o Cabiert House, 43) Vonge St, foronfo. 



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**r* 1# The Newmarket Era and Express, Thursday, Feb. 2S, 1952 



r 

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THE PICKERING COLLEGE GLEE CLUB 

PRESENTS 

"IOLANTHE" 

■ 

By Gilbert and Sullivan 

m 

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Spits Defy Predictions 



Predicting the weather is an 
(easy task compared with telling 
what to expect from our Spits. 
A week ago, it you care to recall, 
the Stouffville Clippers came in 
and put our hopefuls to misery 

9-3- 

Saturday night, benefitting 
from steady .defensive plugging placed himself up oh 



Garnet Armstrong scored to forge 
the visitors a commanding 6-3 
margin. With ten to go. Spits 
took to racing the clock and lost 
their battle with . time. They 
came within one of a tie on mar- 
kers by Normie Legge and the 
now desperate Al Shew 



SPORTS CALENDAR i hashman award 



rchuk who Kedwiags, Leafs vs 1 
the wing P-" 1 -' King-Vangban 



by their back- wall quartet of Al 
Shewchuk, Grant Firth, . Fink 
Tunsfead ;§g& .Jack Andrews, 

coupled ^Si siiot^blocking Ir&nr 

pep ^^r^^^^ibetore ;iheir 
stuiihfed home^foiSsi. : : . :_ 

It was Jack Andrew^ goal at 
the^thre> ciquarter pole ptffie sec- 
ond that saltetf tm game ^ray. 




a » altgaB^ :§gaii|ig m& pa^lgg: 
with more atithori^ Xhm iitlli^ 

Iasfe severiif slarfe • - aMi i&mafcl ' 

string? \yere ^ctjye and cHcfcing; 

S DOS Gibson ^ punWleU hom6 tw^ 

Swifty ^lojid one to keep pace 

with the?£iippers in earl^p- J 



ing. Oriie Thorns got three as- 
sists, Stan Smith bench^^ '' - — 5 



the teani in a manner that .rates 
top credit marks, Spits stayed 
on the ice^gettiJSg^:iw^y two: pfeia* 

alties. 



..- 



and went like a heat wave. 

T 9 

Despite their plastering bar- 
rage at Midland net-minder Bus. 
Gagnoni.Atife e<juaUzer *?as. X0 
to jbe idtind. It ended ^wStli; Joe 
Tiuiafe^ out; of ^ev^nefe -a^wK with 
everything but the biscuit in the 
Midland m&L .V ",.-■.,■"• " : :-■• . 




SPITS LOSE TO MIDLAND 

Summing up Thursday's senior 
B clash here. Spits shaded by 
Midland 6 - 5, safe to say Spits 
galloped in round one, slept in 
two, dozed in . first half of the 
third and then pulled out all the 
stops in the final ten minutes. 

While they galloped, Spits j ^p— ' '—- ^^"^ffcmti 
edged ahead 3 - 1 on goals by wouW wash out the propose( i 



, Fiifet news on the intennediate 
jA Big Five group playdowiis- 
comes to hand this week from 
arena manager Stan. Smith. 
Present indications are that Col- 
lingwood and Newmarket will be 
the participants. Proposed play- 
off schedule will be as follows: 
in Cbllingwood Tuesday, Mar. 4; 
in Newmarket Thursday, Mar. 6; 
in CoHingwood Mar. 8; in New- 
market Mar. 13. Fifth game. If 
required, in CoHingwood Mar. 15. 
Later playing dates, if needed, . 

will be set after the series gets ' 

underway. Group title will be 

settled In a four-out-of-seven 
series. There is still a mathema- 
tical possibility Midland could tie 
the Spits for that second and all 
important intermediate play-off 
slot. Midland, to do this, would 
have to beat Orillia, Newmarket 
and Stouffville in turn. A tie be- 



Bill Patrick, Jack Andrews and 
Don Smith. While" they slum- 
bered. Midland added tallies by 
Jack Duggan, Harry Morrison, 



group play-off schedule as out- 
lined above. In the event of a 
tie, Newmarket and Midland 
would play home and home 



and Mutt Collings to a first pen- games on consecutive nights, 
od goal to shoot ahead 4-3. J goals to count, in order to get Uie 



While the Spits dozed in the 
early third, Leo St Amand and 



group final series 
without delay. 



underway 




Bruce Mall's King City Ma- 
roons shaded Elgin Hastings 
Sehombergers 3-2 in the feature 
King-Vaughan opener Friday, 
Scoring at a goal a period pace 
and blessed witti some super- 
dooper shot blocking from Bill 
Dalton, Bolton : , - white-washed 
Kleinburg : 3-fe /Cafnen Pearcey,; 
Tom Carberry and; Jim Skuce 
were the Bolton marksmen. . 

Ray Roger's impi'oved: Ketlle- 
by platoon piiiiu^ quite a- scrap 
before saying "uncle" to the 
loop-leading Nfojleton's 3-1. 
Nobleton spark was Torn Owycr 
with two, Stan. Foster a single 
Doug. Terry kicked in with/it| *ine; 
defensive display and managed 
to poke in Kettfeby,^ lone tally. 

Getting back to game one. 
Schomberg and. King iftaUJhedi 
first period counters. Gollopin* 
Hill Winters- connected for 
Schomberg, Jim Pattern for King, 

King took the i^m^^:^' 
Urn's mid-second period goal flnd; 
Bill Winters evened it with His 
number two counter early in. the 
the King win with six minutes to 
third. Alan Dowbigg Jn wrappedi 
go. 

Schomberg had the pressure on? 
Tom Hulme in the Kihg cage iriv 
ithe dying minutes l)ut :coul8h*fc 
ftre the equalizer. The Ipssi 
dropped Schomberg: back ;td) 
fourth place in the league race; : 

'Berg In 3rd Round 

It's definite now Aurora Bears 
will meet Whitby in the first 
round of the O.H.Ai junior; C' 
playdowns. The O.H.A. pSssedi 
on this information to Manager 
Andy CIoss last weekend. Series 
opener, will be aired: before the 
Aurora fans tomorrow .^IfWdayy 
nieht. Games time fe 8.30 p.mi> 
Game two in the best of live 
series will be played in Whitby 
Monday; 

Coach Charlie Rpwhtrce ex- 
pects to have his charges at full 
strength for the series- ;ppener. 

Little is known o^ WKHby'a 
strength. They, like the Bears, 

have been displaying fli pi r wares 
in a Junior D group this winter. 
Regular season prices wlll-pr^ 
vail for the play-off games, re- 
ports bossman Closs, 



School League Hockey 

A pair of shutouts, Bears G 
Bispns. 0» BiHs 4 Flyers 0, a tie, 
Hornets .3: Barons3, and Marlios 
2*1 over Rockets in the Saturday 
morning school league activity. 
Boar's white-wash triumph was 
engineered by two-goa! men, Don 
Bone and Ralph Bray, and sing- 
les by Barry Emmet son and Paul 
Forhan. 



Feb. 28 - March 5 
Feb. 28, 8 p.m., Queensville 

Arena, Lake Simcoe Junior 
Hockey League finals (fir^t 
game), Queensville vs Vandorf; 
Feb. 28, 6:39 p.m., Newmarket 
Arena, Optimists N.n.L. semi- 
finals, second games, Rangers vs 

Hawks; 7:45 
an ^ckey 

League triple-header, Kettleby vs 
;KI e i aba rg, King vs . Bolton, 

Aurora Arena, Xuhfor j^'JiayT- 

dow^ Whitby m Aarb^lS^sj 

aSSrch i, a &an., SfldlXnd 

Are^iv Big Five Senior, Newiuar- 

kef Sgfcs te^Hidland F^*sg|iO 
a.hi;, Newmarket' Arena, ;Newv 
market pubHc school hockey, 

Hornets V3 Bisons, Marlies vs 

^em^^vfe^Barpns, iiiits : # 

Rockets; . •. 

3far; I> 9^0 a.m^ Aurora Arena, 
Aurora Peg-wee Alien Cup, Oe- 
froit vs Chicago; Leafs vs Caiia> 
diens; - -. ' 

^Iar. 3^ 7.3Q pJm^ Newmarket 

Arena>;Jlih game, Town League 
semis, Vandorf Vs Specialty, ex- 
hibition game, 9 pjn., Nobleton 
vs Mount Albert; ? pjn.> : J?ew- 
market High School gym, North 
York Badminton League, Stonif- 
ville vs Newmarket; 8 p.n% Au* 
rora High School gym, North 



Mundell For Hat Trick 



ONTHE AlUYS 



fn the tUtttiiiStti l/uijjiJi? Mcor- 
in^, Vorelone « ^hK-t Metal 2,. 
MachJne Shv>p,& Vte?* Shop 2. 
SMndmg 1'ress Tl, M;ir hlne 72, 
VoMOti* m, ftbftet MeJiii 50, Top 
scorers Ahdy Ati<U'rA:\"A m>, AU 



There're three reasons for naming Bill .Mundell for fhe Hash- 
man award ami lloxy Theatre p»ss this week. Hill, as a tftttfi 
Digger, slogged In three quick goals In last Tuesday's Aurora Town 

Legue titt to spark the Diggers from the doldrums of a 5 - 1 fleffelt «" Daniels ert8 f - SJcw Dfjw 048, 
to a 6 - 5 win. He has dnne a very Hue coaching job with Aurora *i iSryvm fi^ # PM ViitVAnni KM, 
minor hockey teams. Aurora featherwclghls reached the finals in Casey Joim OH, Chiracs Mac- 
the Brampton. tourney Saturday and Aurora pee-wees gained the JJt^MM 
semi-finals at 51aple Leaf GaiUchi, 

. The third fe*so^ - u to feff A«fo^ 

EttdistfM ho^ underway In theAnro> 



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Item ^m j^^arkflman 



m mm*M&Wi< 5he (axpayers should get dowrt In greater flSmV 
bers to see the ?irnonjHini4i M Mtiok Tuesdays. Tlie te^fter *f* 
putting on tidy tussles and rate ypur suptW>rt. . 




York Badminton Leagne, Rich- 
mond Hill vs Aurora; 

Afar. 4, 7.15 p.m., Aurora Town 
League semi-finals. Ditch Diggers 
vs Case's Aces; Victory Flyers 
vs Hotel; 8,30 p.m., Stouffville 
Arena, Big Five Senior B, Mid- 
land Flyers vs Stouffville Clip- 
pers. 




.Final 



Vandorf and Queensville have; 
a date for the Lake Simcoc Jun- 
ior Hockey League title. Series 
opener gets underway tonight' 
(Thursday) in the Queensville 
arena. Time 8 pjn, Queensvilie 
marched to the finals last week 
by dumping Holland Landing 
Sea Gulls in two^ straight. Van- 
dorf and Mount Albert required 
three games to settle their semi'; 
final joust; -. , 

After languishing; hear the" cel- 
lar season long Vandorf popped 

up with a 3^-1 win Thursday diver 
Mount Albert to capture Jfte> 
semis, two games to one, Two 
goals by Jack Baber and one by 
Bill Bennett powdered the Vaiir 
dorf trek to the finals; "; Stan. 
Card was the Mountie marks? 
man. Queensville kept III trjin 
for the finals V-iaortVexhibitiori 
game with Belhaven — -Belhaveri 
3, Queensville 21 The game had 



yahdprf sizzles. SWciafty life 
zlesi Mouhties spry^" . downers 
cry. T\!That ii$ a ! quick summary of 
the- ; very': bpfc^ Monday Town 
League semis. The out^Pf^toWftr 
ers won ; bofH - tills; Mount Ate 
bert filed obituary 1 notices oa 
T6\Vn^ Regent^ .^:fcf Mpunlies. 
now await winner of Specialty- 
Vandorf set for T6\vn Crown. . 

The Mouhties broke up a l-all 
deadlock — product of the -first 
two rounds, with a four-goal raid 
in the final session. '•' 

Vandorf hit fpr threje first perr 

iocl goals and: hu^g on gamely 16 

win a 4-3 decision from Office 
Specialty. That gives the Dorfers 
a 2-1 game edge itv the best <>f five- 
seriesi Neufejd [ - Craddock hien 
opened in the usual way, with a 
protest, on the eligibility of Van- 
dorf Jets* Archje ?6rfar. They 
won it, but lost as it made the ^bat- 
tlers from Vandorf so hot under 

the collar they went-out and: won 
the game. Second half menu was 
generously spiced with high- 
sticks, elbows, assorted jabs and 
Bun Sellars tried spearing Spe- 
cialty' defenseman Red Wilkinsi. 
It earned him an oti^pi-the^game 
ticket. Seiiars counted three 
goals, and with ^ one-goal effort 
by Dave Richardson arid altout 
Effort. by Suss Forfar^ fathered 
the Vandorf triumph. 

Bohiner Groves, Howie :Ash 
and: Jack Staley Avrapped: . tBe ; 
Specialty goals. Sellars* .miscon- 
duct came in the final five min- 
utes and Specialty jammed Van- 
dorf back in their owri. ;eiid but; 
couldn't Ue it. 




w^ : « 

$ mm 



Michael Smith, Peter Watt, . , _ _ __._ n 

Jim Barber and Ken Needier j to bo halted in the third period 
potted a goal each as Bills when - |he soec tators got into the 



DQUBLr^HMl^gn PLANNED 

. ^ibu*h the mm1ti&*& 

tv:ere^ ousted from the Ct««# 

te^ : iraej^i^d^ * 

bill attraction Is planned for : 
next Monday, feature event 

will Se; !t*m#3ai& atViilte 
ot nee S^dclaHy^npfRa|fe; 
semi-final series. Game -. . 
time l-SO^p-m. In game (\v^ , 

Mount Albert, conquerors of . 

the ftegenls, will clash with 
. Nobleton, current leaders in 

the King-Vaughan Hockey 

League. Nobleton should 
more than keep the Mountles 
busy as they boast a 13 win, 
1 loss, 1 tie season in the 
IClng loop. Close to 400 fans, 
largest of the season, attend- 
ed Monday town league tilts 
and enjoyed every minute of 
a pair of rugged contests. 





f;(07O'IWI* 

s high at 

£#ijr#iird- 

il. fiord 

>inC12.Netl 

.£: IV>tbwell 

?i l^nsley 7 Cul- 
'■% >Bennington S5, 
itt&i 7&/Tans!ey 



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Ml Mm paced the Udfes 
XiSmxp m&m& feavxi* with 5SS 

mm^gsmtm &*m 575, viv 

Gihaofr S^Jlazel Hopper 509. 
League 8f4«2ing: Streaks 29, 
l&pei uls $Stf£r Trailers 17 12. 



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Wkr^ "f: Atkinson 'racked up a 
SfiS to;; Te^fte^Veflnesday a! ter- 
hdori liflcl}^ : Close second Hel* 

en fajrl^S^^rther top efforts 
Marg (Snlfrt 515, Canneita Ben- 

llihigio31 Wk &Jna MoGrath 501. 

Betty VdhZant counted a 651 
to pac&lhe Thursday Night Lad- 
ies over past two weeks. Olive 
j Jlughson 613, Edna. ?.IcGrath, 
[607, Myrt Dunn 601. Hazel Ben- 
I nitz 577, Ede Hall 572, Fran Ben- 
nitz 567, Bev Walker 546, Aliens 
McBride 536. Helen Tomhnson 
528, Faye Struthers 526, Audrey 
Holme 502. 



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In game one, teams fired 
matching goals in the firsts Cliff 
Gunn opened the scoring as the 
Towners appeared headed to ex- 
tend the series. Doug. Terry tied 
it late in the early rouncU Teatns 
battled through a scoreless sec- 
ibfid; diiefly due to some very 

effieieht sleight of Band mtlzftt 
Towners' Bill Ingram and Moutt- 
tic^' Bill MUlholland; Mounttes 
saitf d the; game away $ti list 
period goals by Bruce Paisley, 
Pete Swarfzman; .. Dave Couch 
and Doug: Boss. Close to 400 
fans took in the two battles. 




floored the^Flyei^. 

Murray Ga 11a ghan snipe<l iwo 
and Gary Hogan c<jllectc<l a 
single scoring credit for the Hor- 
nets in their three all tic with 
the Barons. Bol> "Kef fer, Francis 
Garrett andl Paid Blair were 
Baron marksmen, Malcolm Ol- 

sen,and Terry Gibney Avqri? Hie 
Marlie shanishooici^ in- their 
nl^ antl tuck 2-1 win over Rock- 
ets Mearl Obee Sited the Rock- 
ct^lbne Wily: 



act m 
game. 



(he rugged, smashing 



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East G wily mbury school hock- 
hPy le^gue> iolip\yer8 were ready 
;t 6 '{alp ten over 4fc) land: Landing 
Nighthawks when they Jost 
game one \b£ the ECmis lo Mount 
Aibert8.2; . V, / 

.; TTtc ken rfnrman coached: 
Nj^hlhawks, bcnefiUing Trdm .«;? 
steady netrhilnding from , ■ • Ii 1 1 1] 
Cook, demon checking from Ken 
BeJJar and iwo fiP3?9 tapped In 
by Glen Bcllar and oho by Joe 
Kcarns, evened their best flf- 
three series with' the .Mountles 
vyith a 3«2 win Tuesday. John 
Redding was the Mountie slmrp- 
shootcd. 

!"•.'. Murray E<lgar , s Mount Ztpn 
skooters enptured the first game 
of their soml-fin«l set with n 
M win over Brown Hill. Pall 

Thompson, jt.wp;. Eddie Hopkifts 



one/ were the Mount Zion marks^ 

men tvTin Scdpre ami Earl Hill ^J^o^ 



■ 

Diggers, Hofelmen Wfn 

Mickey Sutton's Ditch Diggers 
and Jim Murray *s Hotclmcn nail- 
ed the first games in the Aurora 
Town League semis Tuesday. 
Ditch Diggers, sparked by a pip- 
ing hot four-goal assault by Bill 
Mundell, walloped Cliff Chap- 
man's Case's Aces 7-3. 

The rough-tumble contest saw 
Referee .Bob; ^Peters; hand out 
four fighting major sentences to 
Bruce Rose, Harold Stephenson, 
tommy Brodic- no# Ted: Sutton, 
plus two: minor sentences to 
goalie Charlie Gasp, pitch Dig- 
gers' wjiv was anticipated but not 
the Ifotelrnen's. It was a surprise 
packet^ Breaking: out of a 2-all 
deadlock with n three-goal Spurt 
lln tjie third, Queens Hotel drop- 
ped Victory Wlyers 5r2. Clem 
Kilns and Joe Lundy counted 
ififst period goals fdHho: Flyers. 
Ted Marsdefr and; Hill Kirbyson 
got those two back and Bill Mc- 
Ghee, Lqrne Finery and Pave 
Dinner managed tlie game win- 
nersjnthe fhiale. . 

fn the curtain rai^?r, Grant 
Dawson, iplaying despac « frac- 
;t|tr«1 /wrist,. 1 potted two, and 
•Whlley jfti>es one to add to BUI 
Mundell's four to build the Dig- 
pgers' edge- Aces tallied at a goal 



Hawks Tnlffi^lft 

: Black Hawks mosjed. throtigh 
the Optimists N;H&, regufep 

season with only /two losses. 

Semi-finals opened Friday; and 

B.olf . Bradley's Lehfs bumped 

Hawks 4*1. Leafs . tiiere&y pro> 

tcct a 3^gpal!.etlge for game two; 

of the best of two, goals to count, 

series. -" ■"■..- 

• - * 

' Contest two saw Jack Hamil- 
ton's speedy Rangers do a sharp 
at>out face to bounce the Ue<l 
Wings 6=1, Rangers have i\ 5- 
Koal margin to nurse through 
game two. 

S;>ecdhoy Don McKnight was 
Leaf's key-man, going nil out to 






i --- 



pot two goals. Norm CJp>yfil ^and 
Bobbie ./Wilson, colcctett oihei 

Iieaf titiltes; Cdwftl-s tally; was 
a gift: it long ice sKlinmer Iropv 
center, that siieak^d Ky. : Hawfe 
fioajie Jimmy Rich, Bob. Smith* 
assisted by; Graft* Moilpfii the; 
latter: n; Ilawk^s woijt-hprse, ^ gptj 

tfe«a^iv^^niiiyi r s 

-Raiigore* big gun was Glen 

Kef for with three. Norm Smart 
drove in two, Paul Mainprise 
completed the Rangers' scoring 
with a late tally. Bill Mair sank 
a Geo Davis pass for the Speer* 
Waller coached Red Wings lone 
goal. Teams hit the Ice again 
tomorrow evening at 0.30 p.m. 



Scoring in Monday Night Lad- 
jes League, 450*s 3 Blue Bonnes 
1* Coons 3 Jets 1, Hot Rods 2 
Wildcgts 2- Standing: Coons 49. 
Wildcats 46, 450*s 41 1-2, Hot 
Rods^ J?ets 35 1-2, Blue Bon- 
nets ;3iic 'Alice Gibson snapped 
up_indivicLuai honors with a €05 
(1793^2391. 500 bracket scor- 
ers Hester dark 579, Audrev 
Stevens $f% Ede Hall 573- Phil 
Siclnnis:564 t _ Jeanne Gatti 557, 
Emma Brpadbent $49, Edna Mc- 
Grath p^ Mary Gsborne,515, 






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High scorihg week in Town: 
Industrial League. Top hand 
Bert RWout ^31 (230-22t»-3T2>, 
franfe Va^nBerg;h 777, Murray 
Alien 75S* G&k Frtaell 750, 
Dave AVeddelJ Wi Sid Simmons 
6M, Harry PUgh C83; Geo Watt 
GS0. ¥ioyd Pegr679, l-yie Bond 
678 f Doug Moimt &&. Roy Gib- 

spn Gm 4P^n Hlsey K>3, Jack 
Waiiffn 651t Scoring: Denne 4 
Ol^ot^ 6;;^bVer Kickers 4 His- 
e>*Cfe GomWnes 4 Turkey Cat- 
chers 0, Specialty 2 Hillsdale 2, 
Leeion 2 Metal Workers 2. 
Standing; Legion 51, Office 
Specialty 50, Meteors 46, Clover 
Kickers 43, Hillsrtnle 42. Com- 
bines 42, Metal WorkeiN; 41, Hls- 
ey 30, l^miu^s 29. l\nkey Cat- 
chers 24, Newmarket Dairy 1[> # 
Dlxons 13 . 



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»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦»♦♦♦♦♦ + ♦»+♦♦♦♦♦»»»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦< 



Here's The Proof 



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is scorch for; Brown Hill 



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Till RSI? A V - 8ATIIKDAY 

In t*cfcnlco!or 






Yvonne Drf a ri o, R I rba rd Greene 
SECOND FEATURE 



» a 



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TT 




tr\* 



Richard Wldmarl^ Dan* Andrews 



MON„ TUKS, and WED 



;DULT ENTERTAINMENT 



Tgrc*: 



William Ben 




'*» 



IS FOTO 

9 :; - '-■ - \ 



OUR 



*31ft 
OFFER «W 



Keswick Comets wrapped tip 

their best of three series for the 
Trl-County Hockey League inter- 
mediate B title Saturday, knock- 
ing off Woodyiile 6- 2i Kcs>vipk 
captured pi bome ^ -- 4 with Ken 
Davie lea?lfntf the scoring Svifiif 
three gppls; Ivan Uye^l^Vfe W 
two, Alb, Smith nntl Dave Hunt 
ley ope eacb, ^Sbprty" CamPr 
on was WtK^vllle^tpp a^set wltlt 
a ijat-triek ^ periprin^rice;^ 

IvQn ifiye Was SW Keswick 

pace-setter in the Saturday win 

with two goals. Ken Day io; Don 

Smltfii Dove liuhUey m& ^3eo. 

Ourrowa got into the scoring act 
with- single fajlles^ .*«!j^y» 

Caineron hh«| Ken l^clhrtls rfito 
petl fo'Wfa bWoikivifie mrtrliewil 
Cometsjgo^t^ |pa)^cepjrtg s^p 
port ifoni Doriioni Kay^nd beflfe 
fitted fl^^fi^^fle^n^yo|>l^ 

from Tomn>y irare, JpcJi Cple 
sni Dave Ilurttley. 
Keswiek: yvjll ripw lacklp th,o 

Lake Shorn jLeagMPfWiiffi^^Jn:! 
the first rPuoaLot^ 

playdowns, • ■:-:;. • -.>•'■- -j 

Keswick: D, Kay»* jftp!^^ 
Cole, K. Davie, S. Utimciy £ 
Rye, q, C lark, D. Huntley. J. 
Cook, B, Thompson, M. Winch, O. 
Burrows, C. Pollock; D. Smith, 
A. Smith; 



Pldllips and Eugene Rose being 
the trlBKermem 



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The second largest producer of 
silver and lead in the world is 
pi mine near Mayo in Canada's 
Yukon. 

r 

Flln Flon, third largest centre 
in Manitoba, was named after 

Flintabatty Klonatin, a charac- 
ter in the story, "Sunless City". 



For n second Htraiglit year, 
Aurora Ladles nix* North York 
Hockey League queens. Tuesday 
in the Aurora arena, they took 
the best of five series in Mirce 
^trajght ami annexed the league 
crown wllh a 2*1 win over Kcs- 
wJcfc , 

!.' rA fltsi' peiiwl goal by Edna 

^Mpfinptf and a second by Trudy 

Purchell, asfilsled l>y Gwen Myke, 

faslUonM tbo Autova win. Kes- 

?yf\mi>; 4 W}W$M\ dlsplnyeit their 
^>eSt foxift(|n1|^c;closetip chapter, 
Grpc^ Pptprslxiir»K duly reward- 
Sft ^IJhiJfesiv.MJk's lone counter 

■ Congrats m> in order to the 
lAtiroVft l(Ulie« and Coach Ken 

Rose, Keswick ladies coach 

S§ffiUftffro and manager Jack 
MMfW weto first over to offer 
U}Mr congrats to the twice 

^Sra; Bathor Topp, !-uellle 
i^SSfe "-'Cilnrln Evans, Joloi Marin- 
mfi ®<J n 9: Mnrlnoff, Rosalie 
(Rose, Joan PateheU, Owen Mylco, 
Maxlno McGann, Trudy Pur- 
chell, Lily Snow, 

Keswick; Lll Reattlo, Kutlil 
York, Kny Peters, Nancy Daley, 
Ruth M. Petcra, Bev Henton, 
Grace Peters* Jackie Godseli, 
Helen Porter, Lyla Clark, l«or* 
ralne Dolnn, Myrna Brown. 






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In This Weeks Issue 



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Your aassltied Advertisement BmicIms 



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cut lew 



Readers] cm far south as 

as far west as SCHOMBERG; 

east as MOUNT ALBERT; as far north 

as SUTTON. 



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Movs Sports 
Paffes 7 & 9 



OUR READERSHIP over this WIDE 
AREA helps explain why so many use 

ERA & EXPRESS CLASSIFIEDS 

. ■ . - 
..... .- . _ , 

In NEWMARKET - Call 780 

In AURORA - Call 656-J 

■ 

♦ ♦ 

Era and Express Classifieds Get Results 



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COUNCIL SIDELIGHTS 



It Can't Be A Happy Chore 
Asking For Extra $35,000: 



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PS Chairman 




The idea of a "Welcome" sign at the south approach 
to Aurora is a good one. The saying, "You're Welcome", 
is always pleasant to hear, Gordon Hoffman's idea is 
to make known that, visitors are really welcomed to 
Aurora. So he wants a sign to that effect put up on 

the BJStM* subway bridge...: - 
Mr Hoffman wrote a letter to) not be exceeded Sure thing. His 

Tit a . nd ^IS^fcSSuK - S 

to back it up, which he did very ^g m ^ mone y. They 
well. The proposal was handed - -* • *- 

over to the chairman of the Pub- 
licity committee, Councillor Jim 
Murray, to find out if the CNift: 
authorities would grant permis- 
sion for the sign to be installed. 
And there the matter rests until 
the next meeting of council. 

Gordon Hoffman is Sttite pi 
personage. He isn't a blusterer. 
He doesn't suffer from- -M\ "Big 
Shot" complex. There are no 
airs of superiority about him. He 

doesn't try- "to take the town 
over." But when he gets, going j 
on anything he's pretty persist- 
ent i.e., the former Collis leather 
odors, and, later, the meters. 

So far he hasn't sold us on 
meters. $500 plus for parking 
tickets was summonses.. Doesn't 
sound very kind, does it? "Wel- 
come to Aurora" says the sigh. 
Pay up and look happy says the 
"one-arm -bandit" If the visi- 
tor parks his car for a few mo- 
ments, to run into the nearest 
store for a package of cigarettes 
or a sandwich, he'll get a ticket 
if he doesn't beat the constable 
to it. Not a very happy "Wel- 
come", is it? 

However, we'll leave this for 



would stay right on the jack, to 
use a lawn bowler's expression." 
S'et here he was hack again, 
In less than six months' time, 
asking for an extra $35,000. Dr. 
Henderson did give some figures 
of costs, but as he had no written 

statement containing these we 
did not publish in our council 

report of last week the figures 
we had in our notes. We thought 
it fairer to all concerned, and 
telephoned Dr. Henderson to 
that effect, to await his promis- 
ed written breakdown. When 
this is to hand we shall duly pub- 
lish it 

It must be a nasty job asking 
the town council for $35,000. 
"Dear brother ratepayers" were 
the first words used caressingly 
by Dr. Henderson as he smiled 
benevolently on his audience, 
like a skilled old auctioneer fry- 
ing to put it across, while his as- 
sistants, Peterson and Nisbet, 
huddled tight in their corners. 

By the time he sat down, the 
chairman seemed a bit groggy, 
like a boxer taking the count. 
Mayor Rose began it by asking: 
"If you haven't spent all of your 
Dr. Henderson will come back 
Then some of the boys knifed in. 
money, why do you want more?" 






«TS£&^1ShS £ on the carpetin two w^ time. 
"Welcome to Aurora" sign is a H* 5 ** «♦«* Objects 



good idea. Our colleague, John 
Meyer, strongly advocated such 
a sign for Newmarket and it was 
sponsored by the Newmarket 
Lions club. Later it was discuss- 
ed by the Newmarket town 
council. But the sign hasn't ap- 
peared yet. We are prepared to 
bet that in this excellent cause 



Until the press was mentioned, 
Reeve Cook had sat so still in 
council that he might as well 
not have been there. Immedi- 
ately Councillor Murray sug- 
gested that there should be 
equal advertising for the Banner 
and Aurora News Page, the reeve 
sprang to life with the sudden- 



Aurora will beat Newmarket _to j»<*s D?-Wi exploding f ire-cracker 



it 

The Dark Cloud! 

Yes, the dark cloud was Dr. 
Henderson, lie came to council 
to warn members that his hoard 
needed an additional $35,000. 
•Whilc he spoke, two 61 his col- 
leagues, Charles Peterson and 
Keith Nisbet, clung to their seats 
behind him as though they were 
seeking shelter from the effects 
of an atom bomb that was about 

to burst. 

Why did he want an extra 
$35,000? The board had already 
received $250,000, a substantial 
portion of which sum was still 
unspent. The chairman spoke of 
rising costs and mentioned sev- 
eral reasons why the extra for>-. 
tune was needed, Bii t he 
brought no detailed statement 
with him to back up his applica- 
tion. This detailed statement 
was promised for the next meet- 
ing of council. 

Meanwhile, . several members 
of council bored into him with 

questions, notably Councillors 
Murray, Davis and; Corbelt. 
Murray edged to and fro on his 
chair, as though a sudden attack 
of rheumatics had seized him;! 
Davis ffdgctted and mutely 
fumed, while Corbelt had a 
pained expression on his face as 
though the doctor were about to 
extract all the best teeth in his 
lower jaw. 

In their obvious pain a;t jhe 

chairman's request for this fur- 
ther hunk of town money, they 
put the chairman on the spot, tiri 
Henderson was obviously very 
unhappy over the whole busir 
ncss. And no wonder. For no 
later than August, 1051, he as- 
sured the former council that the 
$250,000 debenture would be 
more than enough for the board's 
needs. Not only so, bill the 
chairman told council that he 
was happy to say that there 

would be a saving to the rate- 
payers of $4,000, "./*■ 

On The Record 

These facts are on the record. 
Of the $250,000 debenture loan, 
the sum of $10,000 was irtclui|cB> 
for contingency purposes. Ttiis: 
is what we wrote in our issue of 
August 23, 1951: "Dr. Henderson; 
like a troublesome boy placating 
his worried parents, promised 
that the sum of $250,000 would 



* 



B.G. WHITELAW 

Stationery, Wallpapers, Select 
Range Of Greeting Cards, etc. 
Agent For Era Classified Ads 

13 Yonge St. Aurora 

Telephone 79 



on Hallowe'en night. He object- 
ed to our having any advertise- 
ment, as he has previously done 
to our certain knowledge. 

What a red rag is to a hull, 
Aurora News Page is to Reeve I 
Cook!_ We have no doubt he 
would suffocate the life out of it 
if he could. Yet we believe he 
reads it. Mr. Cook objected, 
and Mr. Davis objected" to Mr. 
Cook's objections. And so did 
Deputy-reeve Murray; he asked 
for Aurora News Page to Jiave 
equal advertising with the other 
paper. The deputy-reeve is a 
fair-minded and an honest man. 
Mayor Rose put the matter to a 
vote of council, and only Reeve 
Cook abstained from a yea. In 
its report of council the, other 
paper didn't tell its readers that! 

Cook Beaten Again, we could 
have put in a headline. But we 
didn't avail ourself of such an 
opportunity. After all. Reeve 
Cook's present attitude to us 
looks like a case of "biting the 
hand that feeds you.** - 

It is only simple justice to Au- 
rora News Page and its readers 
that town printing should be 
equally divided between it ond 
the other paper. The other 
paper is not owned by the town 
but by private shareholders; . It 
confers no -benefit on lite tdwft 
which ours- cannot dp. And wo 
can truly claim that Aurora 
News Pfigc Is the^pnly independi- 
ent weeklV newspaper circuint*: 
ing- in Aurora at this present 
time. . And its circulation grows. 

Publicity Committee ••-■'"." 
_• Hie functions of the |*ublicity 
committee shbtild- bo amended to 
enable It to suppryisa oft printing 

done for the town. .If Uiis were 

done all costs of printing could 
be closely look® ififolby the 
Publicity committee and esti- 
mates for the bigger jobs brought 
to council for its approval or 
otherwise; . .; 

The present arrangement ap- 
pears fo be that the town elerk 
puts out printing work on his 
own responsibility and that, we 
MBg^itijffifa^ best inter* 
ests of the town. iPrlntirig can 
boa pietty expensive undertak- 
ing^ yfe have known instances 
lately ol-great differences jn Ufo 

price of a printing job. One in- 
stance brought to our notice 
showed 6 difference of as much 
as $50 for r.a- relatively small- 
printing job. 

As wo have suggested In an 

editorial in this week's Issue, oil 
town printing should be done at 
competitive prices, and this me- 
thod could in all likelihood save 
the town of Aurora a large sum 
each year for printing. No town 
clerk should have the responsi- 
bility of placing orders for town 
printing. This should be done 
through the Publicity committee. 



VIBRATED 



Cement Blocks 

8" and 10" plain 

Also 
t Stylet at ftaektaee Vfecfca 

m ORCHARD CEMBff BLOCK CO. 




Aurora News Page 

J. G. SINCLAIR, Editor 



T.F. Swindle Writes 






D AGE ELEVEN THURSDAY. THE TWENTY-EIGHTH DAY OF FEBRUARY, NINETEEN HUNDRED AND FIFTY-TWO 






* * 




•4 : 



AN EXTRA $35,000 

The surprise call from Dr. Henderson, chairman 
■ of the Public school board, giving notice that an addi- 
tional $35,000 would be needed for the completion of 
the work on the old High school, appeared to astound 

i i 

members of council at their meeting on February IS. 

Only two weeks ago we called attention to the 
policy of keeping the ratepayers in a state of ignorance 
on the way their money is being spent by the local school 
boards. No statements on expenditure are issued and 
the press has not in our experience been invited to meet- 
ings of the school boards* We have strongly protested 
this hush-huih procedure. 

. No sensible person would pay a bill unless he was 
informed on what it was for. Yet the ratepayers in 
Aurora are called on to accept large financial obligations 
in connection with a new High school and a remodelled 
Public school without being informed on how their 
money is being spent. 

As recently as August of last year a debenture loan 
for $2-50,000 was approved by the former council for 
the Public school. Of tftat amount $10,000 was set 
aside for contingency purposes, namely, to meet unex- 
pected needs. Later the chairman assured council that 
he could see a saving to the ratepayers of some §4,000. 
Dr. Henderson categorically assured council that no 
more money would be asked for, and that assurance 
is on the record" ... •;! 

Now, Ic^.tiiahi'-8te : 'in6ritM'a.| f lj--b : r that assurance 
was given, the chairman, on behalf of his board, comes 
to the new council to ask for an additional $35,000, 
although a substehtlar ]iOV%feii- : of'' 'fifie= ifSSOgOOQ is not 
yet used up. There has been a serious slip in calcula- 
tions somewhere along the line* or else .unnecessary 
spending has taken place. 

What is now needed is a full and detailed account of 
all money spent, who has had it, and for what purposes. 
We have repeatedly asked for this in the interests of 
the ratepayers; and surjh a report has now become 
imperative*. - 






r» 



am frills" 



The Hon. W. j* Dunlop; minister of education, has 
come out with some sonnd^ salutary advice for school : 
boards, as well as a .warning that building expenses will . 
have to be cut down. lit his own words the "day of 
lavish spending is gone*'. . Dr. Dunlop insists on the 
need for better learning- and less emphasis on sports. 

Quite recently Dr. Sidney S m it h, president of-.. 
Toronto university* made some scathing observations on A 
the failure Of many students to pass simple tests in 
English, and was reported as saying that he did not ' 
like to see "illiteracy go hand in hand with a degree". 
We ourselves could confirm this from our knowledge 
of at least two graduates from the university who could 
not spell correctly fairly simple words, nor intelligently 
compose a paragraph of news for a local weekly news- 
paper. 

Rather than "fancy subjects", Dr. Dunlop em- 
phasized that "more time should be spent on arithmetic, 
spelling, English literature, English composition, writ- 
ing, history, geography, and some old-fashioned English 
grammar:" It could be that some members of school 
hoards, who have the responsibility of appointing 
teachers, might themselves find time to browse on some 
of the foregoing subjects to their great advantage. 

Said the minister of education: "Some of the man- 
sions school boards are building will not bo filled in a 
few years." Dr. Dunlop also said that "many boards 
have spent too mttch money on buildings." He also 
expressed himself as being opposed to the plan of "school 
ai' l ca#' whlclt lead lb the loss of "local pride". 
- .. One could almost imagine that the minister of 
education hail been spending some time in Aurora, and 
taking stock of the do luxe new district area High school 
and the renovation tie luxe Public school ! The jninister 
of education reveals himself as a man of practical wis- 
dom. 




COMMITTEE 

'- ' — - - 
** *^«- _ ***-,■■ 

._" At the last meeting of the town council an import- 
ant question was asked by Councillor Tucker. He 
wanted information on the functions of the Publicity 
committee of which he is a member. He rightly argued 
that all. advertising should be handled by that committee 
and not Jjythe town clerk. : 

Tte Chairman of the Publicity committee Is Coun- 
cillor Jim Murray and the third member is Councillor 
C&rbclfe Tliis shoftld be m ex^llent committee for the 
punmse of controlling and directing publicity, advertis- 
ing and the ltethting worfe ordered b^OuriQil on behalf 

Mm^fm^^: ..'••••: ..- ;'v. "•v-.^ "' " 

^on and;:in<ottr. opjntqii it shotikl I>c pvtn^rtpd by itfflv* 
politivc prices. It should not be handed out to the first 
prfnlcV who happens t$ ibe WSJ^^j^ l^pyeritha^ 

printer may be. Estimates on all largo printing orders 

should be obtained so tjflit prliges ebuJd Ikv compared;: 
before tjifr^^ ■ 4 ,- 

-- Thefe is ho iihmi on couiicil more ieonipetent f or ihe 
WOVk of supervising such estimates and pi icings ^tliaitf 
Councillor Tucker, who fii« Jjfttl wide experience m ft 
purchasing supervisor, first with the Hart manufactur- 
ing company and i a t e v with the Canadian General 
Electric, of which company he has just been promoted 
to the positions of purchasing and production manager. 
The chairman of the Publicity committee, Council- 
lor Murray, has had a long business training; and Coun- 
cillor Corbett is a member of the Finance committee. 
We suggest it is only common sense procedure to place 
town advertising and printing in the hands of such a 
responsible trio, and to leave the town clerk free to carry 
out his other many duties. 






WHAT THEY ARE SAYING 



I 



_■ * 1 



*- 




At Kiwanis 




in a press report of discussion 
of arena affairs at a recent Au- 
rora council meeting, Mr. Cous- 
ins is reported to have asked the 
council to investigate the matter 
of a government grant of §5,000. 

Mr. Cousins did not explain 

why the executive of the Arena 

Commission, W.hieh includes 
himself, failed to carry out a mo- 
tion passed about 18 months ago 
instructing that application be 
made for this grant - .;--, • 

Certain requirements must be 



mission executive have conduct- 
ed arena business in many in- 
stances, which has frustrated the 
efforts of the members. 

To, pass a motion means little 
if it is not carried out. 
. There :are several instances of 

similar . unnecessary delays and 

omissions; . [- 

• : Tfif ifaflufe to hold regular and 
more frcqUent meetings and lack 
of proper organization to dis- 
tribute the, work among the 
members, and a disregard of the 



complied with and intorrnation i !?#?? M'. ^ piembers, was no 
dsti, etc. ( must be 
pecial form for that 



regarlmg l^s^'etc.!" must"be | ^°"^ responsible for 'the fact 

given on a special form for that ;.=:**? ?°M m ?!^ rs tiw^tly with- 





CLIFFORD GRIFFITHS 
Manaser 



Friday and Saturday 



- 



c£m&z>&xzm: 



Brilliant successes have again been attained at the 
Kiwani3 Music Festival by Aurora choirs under the 
conductor/ship of Mr* Illtyd Harris, adding further to 
the triumphs of past years. The United church junior 
choir won the Kiwanis Shield for the third successive 
year, while a remarkable achievement was registered 

for the High school mixed Glee club, which was placed 
21 marks ahead of other competing choirs. 

In winning the Kiwanis Shield 
for the third successive year, the 
United church junior choir suc- 
cessfully competed against choirs 
from Toronto, Brantford. Car- j 
narvon and Stratford. They re- 
ceived a mark of 87 and a cash 
award of $50. 

The Aurora high school mixed 
glee club won the Kiwanis Shield 
in the open junior choral class 
for ages under 21 on Thursday 
night, Feb. 21. The club was 
awarded 85 marks for the test 
piece entitled l4 The Ash Grove", 
and 88 marks for the club's own 
selection entitled "Saint Patrick 
Was A Gentleman". These com- 
bined marks of 173 out of a pos- 
sible 200 placed the choir no less 
than 21 marks ahead of other 
competing choirs. 

The high school girls' triple 
trio won the shield with a mark 
of SO in a class of 10 entries. 

The Aurora high school girls' 
glee chib was placed second in 
their class. 

The Aurora public school en- 
tered one choir and was awarded 
the Kiwanis shield with a mark 
of 85. Tills completes the fifth 
successive year for the winning 
of the shield for soprano, alto 
and baritone voices. 

Outstanding tributes were paid 
to the performances of Mr. Har- 
ris's choirs ond in a latter issue 
of Aurora News Images the ad- 
judicators' comments will , bo 
published. 

The competition's took place in 

the Eaton auditorium. 
"It's A Shamer 

•Thafs the expression we've 
heard dozens of times since it 
became known that Mr. B. G. 
Whitelaw is likely to have to 
close down beealise his rent is 
to be doubled. .■ "Tlws business 
can't stand that much money," 
laments U B.G.'\ "and I have no 
alternative but to go out of busi- 
ness after being in this store for 
nearly a quarter of a century." 

The Whitelaw establishment is 

something more than a store; it 
is an Aurora institution. ^*The 
WhiteJaws are lovely people/' 
said a neighboring merchant, 
"and the street won't be the same 
without them. . Theirs is a per- 
sonal business and nobody can 
ever take their place and make 
a go of it. If and when they go 
their business will go elsewhere." 

Said another merchant: "If the 
Whitclaws go our store will 
benefit. But we don't want that 
sort of money and for the r^son 
that we want to see Mr. Aviate- 
law carrying on. Everybody 
likes him. We have found him 
a grand man through all these 
years and we hope he will get a 
break. NotxMly can tnke the 
place of 'B.G/ " 
Town Comment 

Such are the testimonials that 
are being expressed on behalf 
of Mr. and Mrs. Whitelaw, Par- 
ents who come to the Whitelaw 
store came there as children and 
have been loyal customers 
throughout the years. The busi- 
ness is something more than a 
business to Mr. Whitelaw; the 
store is a meeting place for old 
friends from Aurora and the 
countryside for miles around. 
Kverybody is known to Mr. 
Whitelaw by their Christian 
names. - 

The popular feeling Is that 
something. can be worked out to 
enable the Whitclaws to remain 
where they arc, at least until 
such time as "B.G." feels that ho 
wants to retire* That is ; not his 
wish at present But his busi- 
ness does not realize big profits 
and the doubling of his rent 
would make. It impossiblo for 
hirn to carry on. There should be 
$ &gy out; . V* ' • j :■ j ..: 

That, a Way will be . found to 
solve this problem is the ardent 
hope, orhuhaVcdsV^ 
pie, and It is a hope most deeply 
shared by Aurora News Page. 
Rotarlans At Bradford 

A splendid gathering of some 
300 JRotarians assembled, at the 
fiiverview Inn, Bradford, for 
charter night for the Bradford 
Rotary club which was sponsor- 
ed by the Aurora Rotary club. . 

Burt Gilbert, president of the 
Aurora Rotary club, acted as the 
M.C, and conducted proceedings 
in his usual efficient manner. 
Ken Partridge, district governor, 
was also present. 

Among the many Interesting 
features of this historic occasion 
was the presence of four mem- 
bers of the Rotary club of Brad- 
ford, Penn., who travelled by air 
to attend the proceedings of the 
American namesake Ontario 
town. This courtesy visit from 

TAGE It, COL 2 



drew at the first opportunity arid 
others did not take any further 
interest. 



purpose. 

This form was; completed, 
ready for presentation to the. «*,,,<, 
town council in April, 1951, but- * J:*!Lt?f £ _ ®" e °. th S mcnv 
has not yet reached them. "*"" ~ 

This is a grant given by thc^ 
Department of Agriculture to 

municipalities establishing mem* 



orial community centres, arid' 
should not be confused with the 
grant given by the Department 
of Education to Recreation Com- 
missions. 

Application for this grant must 
be made by the town council and 
is paid through them. 

| The delay in this matter is 
quite typical of the dawdling 



bors called a meeting in Septem- 
ber, 1G49, over the chairman's 
hend, in protest at the delay in 
dealing with urgent arena busi- 
ness^ indicates dissatisfaction 
among the members at an early 
date. ■ ' . - 

How long will Mayor Rose and 
his council tolerate, this dawd- 
ling inefficiency of Ihe arena 
executive? 

Many Aurora citizens are look- 
ing for prompt action to remedy 
this undesirable situation. 

Thos. F. Swindle. 



THEATRE 



AURORA 



Tel, 8 



Feb. 29 - March 1 



ihe*L come, 



BAD MEN 



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3 MIRING 



CUIKTKYK 



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MCKHETU-lflOTMrSlM 

wrifcMUUIICHII 

_ ill! IICIII . tlVIIItt MIIIT 



Plus Part 11 "Batman and Robin" showing Friday at 6.45 and Satur- 
day matinee at 2.00 p.m. 

Starting MONDAY, March 3rd, and showing each night through Sat- 
urday, March 8th. 



Hong £ibc ®t)e 




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£W£>ra 



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THE STAGE 

IS SET......F0RTWS. 

THEATRE'S M05T HEART* 

THRILLING TWO FEATURE 

PRESENTATION 



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IHTIMIYW 
610RI0US 

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C0I0I 



JOURNEY 

A FULL-LENGTH FEATURE 



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ClixoUtH and 

«t» Ovkft of 

SdJrvWgh 

ciose up 

in tt*finl 

cMBpktt pictorial 

itory of thtir 
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COMPANION FEATURE ATTRACTION SSS> 



Abo Showing Monday and Tuesday 



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TO ALL OUR FRIENDS 

Each nceompanyinir feature with tho "ROYAL JOURNEV" was 
carefully selected. The programme therefore Is Ideal entertain- 
ment both for yoaojr and olct. 

PLEASE make careful note retarding screening times of the 
"ROYAL JOURNEY"; 

Monday to Thursday Showing at 7.0ft ana 9.15 
Friday at 1M *m& &33; Satnrday at Mf i IMiWM 



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— 

Aurora News Page 



* 



TWELVE 



THURSDAY. THE TV/ENTY-EIGHTH DAY OF FEBRUARY, NINETEEN HUNDRED AND FIFTY-TWO 



OBITUARIES 



i%»V -■ 



: 



Aurora 
Social News 

Miss Grace Willis, of McMaster 
University, visitedV her parents, 
Mr. and Mrs. J. t. Wiiiis, oyer 
the weekend. 

Mr. W. H. (Bill) Case, presi- 
dent of the Aurora and district 
Progressive Conservative Associ- 
ation, v.*as included among those 
who were favored with tickets 
for the ceremonies connected 
with the opening of parliament 
at Queen's Park last week. 

Mr. Victor Attridge is on a va- 
cation at Raytona Beach until 
around Easter. 

Councillors Murray, Davis and 
Jones attended a meeting of mu- 
nicipal and planning board rep- 
resentatives held at the commun- 
ity hall, Vandorf, on Friday, Feb. 
22. 

Dr. and Mrs. N. G; Madge are 
planning to leave early in March 
for an extended tour of many 
European countries and of the 
British Isles. They expect to be 
away for four ™<»r>ihs ..-.. ..- _.^f... 

Mr. and Mrs. I. D. Ramer. and 
Miss Marion Ramer. of" Rich- 
mond Hill, visited with Mr. and 
Mrs. B. G. Whitelaw over the 
weekend. 

Mr. and Mrs. Howard Wood of 
Picton visited Mr. and Mrs. 
Grower Gage over the weekend. 

The many friends of Mrs. Al- 
bert Collins. Spruce street, will 
be pleased to hear that she is 
making a satisfactory recovery 
following a recent, severe opera- 
tion. Mrs. Collins is at the York 
County hospital. 

Mr. and Mrs. Walter Durming 

and party have arrived at the 

. halfway mark on their visit to 

Florida and are at present at 

Miami. 

Mr. and Mrs. N. Senutovitch, 
Kennedy St. W., are on a week's 
visit to New York. 

Mr. and Mrs. Grover Gage and 
family are leaving shortly to 
take up residence at Oshawa. 
following Mr. Gage's promotion 
to the position of assistant man- 
ager of the Metropolitan Life In- 
surance Company. During his 
years of residence in Aurora, Mr. 
Gage has been prominent in a 
number of activities, notably as 
superintendent of the United 
church Sunday school and the 
50-50 club, of which he is presi- 
dent. 

Miss Hereon Wood of Lindsay, 
and formerly of Aurora, visited 
Mr. and Mrs. Clarence Davis on 
Sunday Jast. 

A very enjoyable euchre was 
held on Friday evening, Feb. 22, 
in the recreation room of the 
Col I is leather company, at the 

conclusion of .which an excellent 
luncheon was serv 

were Mrs. Gordon Burling and 
Mrs. Clarence Davis, first and 
second. Consolation prize went 
to Mrs, Shridan of Newmarket 
and the door prize to Mrs. L. 
Harmon. 

Mr. and Mrs. H. G. Steele of 
Islington were weekend guests of 
• Mr*. Charles Webster. 

Mr. Jirri Bryan, son of Mr. Lee 
Bryan, who travels the seven 
seas for Imperial Oil Co., has 
now received a "stand-by" order 
after being home on leave since 
January 12. 



• a 



■ • 



■ , 



WIN FOR THIRD TIME 



• - 



- •*. 




August F. Gibson 

August Fredrick Gibson, a 
farmer in the Queensville area 
for many years and well-known 
to many in this district, died 
suddenly at 151 Prospect St., 
Newmarket, on Jan. 24, 1952. 
24, 1952. 

He was the son of the late Mr. 
and Mrs. John U Gibson of East 
Gwillimbury, and was born on 
August 22, 1866. On December 
12, 1906, he married Miss Hannah 
May Swain, who predeceased 
him January 22, 1945. 

He attended the United church, 
and throughout his life his chief 
interests were his home and 
farm. 

Surviving are two sons. 
Elias and Joseph, and a daugh- 
ter. Amy; a brother. Rev. J. E. 
Gibson, Toronto; four sisters, 
Mrs. E. Morton, Newmarket, 
Mrs. T. Hill, Toronto; Mrs. L. 
Shields, Sharon; and Mrs. M. 
Woodruff, Newmarket. 

Rev. Warren of Queensville 

conducted funeral services on 

January 26 at the chapel of 
Roadhouse and Rose, Newmar- 
ket. Pallbearers were E. Mor- 



ton, C. Rye, L. Pegg. F. Gibson, 
IM. Lepard, H. Smith. 



Interment 
cemetery. 



w 



He was highly respected and 
loved by all his family, all of 
whom survive, including 27 
grandchildren and four great- 
grandchildren. 

Dr. Mulligan officiated at the 
funeral service, held in the Pres- 
byterian church, Aurora, after a 
private service at the home on 
January 14. The pallbearers 
were six grandchildren, Austin. 
Clarke and Edward Trent. Bob 
and Douglas Case, and William 
Wood. 

interment was in tte family 
pint, Aurora cemetery. 



Dr. E. G. Evans 

One of Muskoka's pioneer doc- 
tors. Dr. Edgar G. Evans, died in 
Huntsville after a short illness. 

Born in Sutton. Ont, he gradu- 
ated in medicine from the Uni- 
versity of Toronto, and in 1916 
came to Huntsville as assistant 
to the late Dr. MacDonald. He 
retired from active practice two 
years ago. 

He was a son of Mr. and Mrs. 

George Evans, formerly of New- 
market. In 1926 he married 
Miss Hilda Peacock, who sur- 



JOSEPH QUINN 
Real Estate * Germed Insurance 



!■ 



Homes 

Businesses 
Farms 






V 



■*- 



Courtesy 



Gl QUEEN ST. &' 

: NEWMARKET Casually 

Phone 1038 - 







Service 



* , \ 



*i 



. L 




L 



Vivos him. Also surviving are a 
daughter. Sally Mae, and bro- 

■ in n<iM««rfii» thers ' WiH Evans - Sutton, and 
as in Queensville | Dr< De |bert Evans, London, Eng- 

land. 

Rev. Mr. MiUigan conducted 
services in Trinity United 
church, and burial was in Hunts- 
ville Memorial cemetery. 



Walter Pift Wood 



The Aurora United church junior choir unaer the direction of Illtyd Harris placed first in 
their Kiwanis Music Festival class in Toronto last week. It is their third win and the Kiwanis 
Shield becomes the choir's permanent property. Three members of the choir are shown above, 
Donna Yake, Dawna Case and Brian Knowles. 



• - 



- 



i 




notary's American members was 
manner in which the Arena Corn- 
mentioned over the air by Mrs. 
Kate Aitken. t 

In her remarks, Mrs. Aitken 
made reference to the growth of 
Hotananism and emphasized its 
international services and the ex- 
cellent work it was carrying out 
in the development of world un- 
derstanding. 

Among the recreational inter- 
ests of the Bradford Hotary 
charter night, was a bonspiel. 
The Aurora Rotary club is justly 
proud of its work in sponsoring 

red* Winners ** ie Bradford club, which already 
Rnrlimr nwA Sj-| a good membership. 

A Kotarian's Word 

Burt Gilbert relates a recent 
experience which befell him in 
the sale of a used car, the price 

of which was in the $1,500 

bracket. 

The buyer of the car was ask- 
ing some very natural questions 
about it Noting that Mr. Gil- 
bert was a Rotarian he said: 
"You need not say anything 
more. The fact that you are a 
member of a Rotary club is suf- 













AURORA RECREATION 
COMMISSION 

At its meeting held on Thurs- 
day evening, Feb. 21, Mr. J. E. 
Buchanan informed the mem- 
bers of the commission that the 
Craft classes would start on 
March 1. There w->uld be two 
sessions weekly, on Wednesdays 
and on Saturdays. 

Kecreation director* P. E. 
Perryment, reported that swim- 
ming classes were being organ- 
ized and that the pool at St; An- 
drew's College had been donated 
for the use of the instructors and 
the/ classes in life-saving and 
swimming. 

The director also pointed out 



CONTINUED FROM PAGE 11 

The Aurora Lions Hall will 
furnish the opportunity for more 
bingo entertainment on Thurs- 
day night, March 6, announce- 
ments of which will be found in 

our "Coming Events" columns 
and in the classified advertise- 
ment pages of this issue of the 
Era and Express. 

Bingo has been popular during 
the season of such entertainment 
which, with the approach of 
spring, will be coming to a tem- 
porary pause. All who are in- 
terested should make a note of 
the date, March 6, for the Aurora 
Lions Hall bingo night. 
Change Aft Graystones 

A change at the Graystones is 
being mentioned, to the effect 
that a well-known Canadian auto- 
motive corporation is to have an 
agency in the front portion of 
the building. 

Arrangements may not lie 
completed for a few weeks, it is 
being said, and in any case the 
banqueting hall and other ameni- 
ties will be retained. 



AURORA ROTARY CLUB 

The after-luncheon speaker at 
the regular 'meeting of the Au- 
rora Rotary club on Monday, 
Feb. 25, was Dr. Roddick, who 
spoke on the need of a television 
set for use at the* Ontario mental 
hospital. 

President Burt Gilbert 
promptly called a meeting of his 
executive and it was decided 
that the club would initiate a 
campaign for funds with a gift of 
$100. It is hoped that other vol- 
untary subscriptions may be 
forthcoming to provide a TV in- 
stallation for such a worthy need. 



ficient for me. There need be no He Didn't Make It! 



more questions." 

A fine tribute indeed to the 
word of a Rotarian. 
Distinguished Visitor 

Members of Our Lady of 
Grace church were recently 
greatly honored by a visit from 



A man jumped from his car 
and raced to the opposite side of 
the street to buy a five cent 
newspaper. He was quick on the 
ball, but not nearly so nifty as 
a patrolling officer who prompt- 
ly planted a parking ticket on 



His Excellency, Bishop W. Lithe windshield, cordially to wel- 
Webster, who addressed the in- j come back the owner of the car. 

augural meeting of Our Lady of j Sure thing; the officer was 
Grace subdivision of the Catho- 
lic Women's League. The dis- 
tinguished guest of honor was in- 
troduced by the pastor, the Rev. 
Father M. R. Lynett. 

The following officers wcrcj 
elected: president. Miss Mar- 
guerite Murphy; 1st vice-pres., 
Mrs. Earl Boynton; 2nd vice- 
pres. r Miss G. Griffin; 3rd vice- 
pros., Miss M. Caruso. 

Other officers elected were: re- 
cording secretary, Mrs. W. Din- 



that square dance groups were I nick; cor r, sec, Mrs. W. J, Din- 
now almost ready to act as in-lnerj treas., Miss AL McHenry; 
Mructors and new.- members councillors, Miss J. Casey, Miss 
would be welcomed. 

Members of the commission 
present were Don Gloss, chair- 
man; J. E. Buchanan; Council- 
lors Corbett and Murray* Be^i 
G. II. Purchase and Mr. KJL 



R. Caruso and Mrs. D. Tyrcll. 
Another Bingo 



trustworthily performing h i s 
constabulary duties. He didn't 
know how long the car had been 
standing there, boldly defying 
the "one-arm bandit" who mute- 
ly pleaded for his penny. He got 
it. And the owner of the car 
likewise got his ticket, value $1 
fine. 

Wonder what the car-owner 
thought as his eye caught sight 
of the little bit of paper? Won- 
der, too, what he was saying as, 
grasping his $1.05 newspaper, he 
climbed back into the driver's 
scat? Wonder if he has any sug- 
gestions to offer on a "Welcome 
I to Aurora" sign? 



PINE ORCHARD 

Willing Workers of the Union 
church will meet at the home of 
Mrs. Ross Armitage on Wednes- 
day, March 5, at 2.30 p.m. 

Mr. and Mrs. Colin Widdi field 
of Newmarket were Sunday 
guests of Mr. and Mrs. Russell 
Allan and Miss Aleta Widdificld. 

Mr. and Mrs. Harold Eveleigh 
and family of Aurora, Mr. and 
Mrs. Walter Johnston and Earl, 
were Sunday guests of Mr. and 
Mrs. J. R. Chapman. 

About 40 attended girls' night 
at Community Club at the school 
on Friday evening. Mrs. L. 
Hendry was editor of "Enter- 
prise". A good time is reported. 

Mrs. W. Reid, Miss Helen Reid 
and Mr. S. Gibney visited Mr. J. 
Gibney at Bradford on Sunday. 

Pine Orchard baseball club is 
sponsoring a progressive euchre 
at the school on Friday night, 
Feb. 20, at 8 o'clock. Everyone 
welcome. 



- ■ 



BE ON TIMES 

PHONE 339 

NORTH END TAXI 

AURORA 
Look for the Cars 
With the Yellow Tim., 




■ - 




ARMITAGE 

Visitors on Sunday at the 
home of Mrs. H. Hendricks were 
Mrs. Dan Kenny of Orillia, Mr. 
and Mrs. Jack MeFaddcn and 
John, Miss Feme Doanc and Mr. 
Bill Wallace of Toronto. 

Mr. and Mrs. Clayton Reid and 
family spent Sunday in Toronto 
with Mrs. Hold's parents, Mr. and 
Mrs. R. Johnson. 

Mr. and Mrs. Floyd Reynolds 
of Toronto and Mrs. Philip Rey- 
nolds of Aurora called on Mrs. 
V7. Cook on Saturday evening. 

Mr. and Mrs. J. A. MacMillan 
are vacationing in Florida for 
two weeks. 

Don't forget the Community 
Club euchre at the school on Fri- 
day, Feb. 29. Everyone wel- 
come. 



A well-known resident of this 
community, Mr. Walter Pitt 
Wood died Friday, Jan. 11, 1951'. 

He was born in Mariposi 
township 82 years ago, a direct 
descendant of the late English 
statesman, Sir William Pitt. 

He first settled in King town- 
ship on what was known as the 
"Pellatt Farm". There he mar- 
ried Mary Ann Lloyd, who pre- 
deceased him 34 years ago. Over 
4<f years ago, he moved to Yonge 
St., where he purchased the 
"Major" farm, now "Hazelburn". 
which he sold to Mr. Jarvis. He 
then purchased the Graham 
farm, n o w Crescent Brook, 
where he resided until death. 

He was a public spirited citi- 
zen, who sought to make a fuil 
contribution to his community. 
He was a member of the Knv* 
and Vaughan Ploughing Associa- 
tion, the North York and Whit- 
church Ploughing Association, 
Aurora Board of Trade, firmer 
president of Agricultural Associ- 
ation. He served for a number 
of years on the Aurora Memor;?! 
Board and was a member of St. 
A ndrew's Presbyterian church . 

He was keenly interested in 
agricultural fairs, especially the 
Royal Winter Fair. An untiring 
neighbor and friend, he gave aid 
to tliose less fortunate than he. 

Mr. Wood had been in failing 
heal tli for the past two years. 



sivc croquinole party at the hall 
on Friday evening, Feb. 20, at 8 
p.m. Everyone welcome. Prizes 
will be given, and lunch served. 
Come and have a good time. 

Mr. Dan Gill spent a few days 
in Montreal and attended his mo- 
ther's funeral while there. The 
sympathy of their friends goes 
out to Mr. and Mrs. Gill and 
family. 

Messrs. George Thomas of Cnl- 
lendar and Arthur Thomas of To- 
ronto spent the weekend with 
their parents. 

Mr. and Mrs. John Henderson 
and children of Port Credit and 
Mr. Mac. Henderson of Toronto 
visited their sister, Mrs. D. Gill, 
on Sunday. 

Mr. and Mrs. M. E. Kitcley at- 
tended the christening of their 
granddaughter i n Aurora o n 
Sunday afternoon. 

Mr. and Mrs. Bier*. :d Thomp- 
son of Toronto spent the week- 
end with Mr. and Mrs. Welly 
Stevens. 

Lieut, and Mrs. D. C. Edwards 
and son, Charles, arrived in Vic- 
toria, B;G., on Friday, Feb. 22. 
They motored via central and 
southern United States. 



J. F. WILLIS, PhmB 

Druggist 

The Rexall Drug Store -News- 
agent - Tobacconist, etc. 

(Business Founded 1879) 

Yonge St. Aurora 

Telephone 21 



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NEXT TO LOBLAW'S 



TALK ABOUT 





Redd what Mr. E. C. Holub of 
Dawson Creek, B.C. has to say 
about his Hillmon Minx following 
a 4,000 mile trip over the lough 
Alaska Highway — including 100 
iw7es in a raging blizzard. 

•1 went from Edmonton, Alio., to Fairbanks, 
Alaska and back — 4,016 miles —without so 
much as a flat tire, or mechanical trouble. 

"On my return, I confronted a blizzard raging 
across country; swirling, blinding snow, through 
which K had to break trail for over 100 mites. 

"I could continue on and on # sir, but In short, 
what I would like to convey to you is, my 

admiration for this wonderful, economical, 
reliable means of transportation." 



Fur trading is not n thing of 
the past in Canada' by any means. 
In 1950, in the North West Tor- 
ritories alone, it was n big busi- 
ness, worth $2,500,000. 



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OFEN DAtXY a^n. - II p.m. 
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' ■ 



NEAR STOPLIGHT 
WELLINGTON ST. 




This magnificent story of the 

tour through Canada of their 

Royal Highnesses, the Princess 
Elizabeth and the Duke of Edin- 
burgh, has taken on a new and 
historic significance since the la- 
mented death of King George VX 1 
For the Princess has now become 
Queen Elizabeth II and the Duke 
S_j^Pdinburgh may shortly be 
proclaimed Prince Consort 

This is a ; color movie that will 
take its place as a unique event 

in the annals of the screen, with 
Canada herself as the evcr-vary- 
*n« <§88« far the wonderfully 
intimate presentation of the 
royal visit. The Itoyal couple 
are shown against a background 
as distinctive as historic Quebec; 
the scat of government at Ot- 
tawa; the grandeur of Niagara 
Falls; Cape Breton, Montreal, 
Toronto and Vancouver; and the 
cosmopolitan varieties of the 
West, where modern ballet takes 
its share beside the romantic and 
colorful presentation of Indians 
and cowboys. 

The work of photographing, 
editing and producing all these 
manifold scenes was the task of 



SHARON 

Sharon Women's Institute are 
Canadians, and they have re- s P°ns*>rin|f a progressive euchre 



Make It A Habit! 
Meet Your Friends At The 



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Emergency Calls Tel. 38 





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i - 



vented n remarkable aptitude in 

producing a Canadian film of 
great distinction; the first fea- 
ture-length film to be turned out 

by the Canadian National Film 
Board; 

Here, in "Royal Journey," is a 
continuous close-up presentation 
of a tour by two young people 
who won the hearts of all Can- 
adians through, their simple 
charrn and strength of personal- 
ity; two young people destined 
to hold the foremost places in the 
British Commonwealth at Jfq* 
lions. Long live Queen Eliza- 
beth II and; hefiRoyal Consort. 

Mr. Clifford Griffiths, man- 
ager ^\3h^Rpyal theatre, is to 
be heartily' congratulated on 
bringing this historic presenta- 
tion, "Royal Journey," for the 
pleasure und delight of the peo- 
ple of Aurora and district. 

(J.G.S.) 



at Sharon hall on Tuesday, Mori' 

11, at 8.15 p.m. 

Mr. Jim Stevens of Durwash 
spent a few days with his pari 
cnts, Mr. and Mrs. Welly Stev- 
ens. . 

The World's Day of Prayer 
will be held at St. Jame's Angli- 
can church pri Friday, Feb. 2!), at 
2.30 p.m. A cordial invitation is 
extended t6 everyone in the 
community. 

^hcVWiAfc #£ Sharon United 
church are sponsoring a progrcs- 




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Fajre 13 Hie Newmarket Era and 
Express, Thursday, Feb, U, 1932 



RECONNTIOHED 

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SPILLETTE'S 
APPLIANCES 

PHONE J39 - 31-38 MAIN ST. 



Valentines A Day Early 
At York County Home 



BIRTHDAY 
CLUB 



couraged these older citizens to 

join in iheir favorite old songs. 

Soo, everyone was singing whole- 
heartedly and there was reluct- 
ance to stop when the signal 
came for supper. 



_j . 



Your best paint buy... 



I Valentine's came a day early to 

j York County Home for the Aged, 

j Yongc St„ when members of the 

I Newmarket Women's Institute 

\ held a party on Wednesday, Feb. 

j 33. In charge of the affair was 
Mrs. T. A. Mitchell. 

Special guests invited to the 
party included the county ward- 

i en, J. L. Spillette, the honorary 

! presidents of the Newmarket 

; Institute, the district president, 
the county commissioners and 

j the Women's editor. Era and Ex- 

I press. Henry Ogden, Reeve of I to thank tiiem personally for the 
Stouf fville and a member of the lovely party. As they left many 
board of management of the invitations for another visit were 

J County Home spoke briefly and 
thanked the Newmarket Insti- 
tute for their kindness. The sup- 
erintendent of the Home and his 
wife, Mr. and Mrs. Lovick wel- 
comed the ladies and also ex* 
pressed their appreciation for 
the party, . 

The Institute has hold parties 
for the residents at the home 



Birthday wishes are extended 
this week to: 

Shirley Haskett, Newmarket, 
5 years old on Friday, Feb. 22. 

David John Boothby, Keswick, 
9 years old on Friday, Feb. 22. 
John Lehman, R. R. 3, New- 
i market, 6 years old on Saturday, 



FOR 
BEAUTIFUL 

WALLS & CEILINGS 



extended to them. 



PR. CHARLES SCHOOL 
WINS FEB. PRIZE 



they decided to keep their treat 
until Valentine's as frequently 
many groups visit the home dur- 



Mrs. Mitchell at the piano en- 




The party fare consisted of ; Feb. 23. 
tasty sandwiches, relishes, beau- j Bobbie Pearson, Holland Land- 
tifully decorated Valentine cakes, j mg t 10 years old on Saturday, 
pink and white ice cream and at Feb. 23. 

each place were fruits and a Rawlins Lowndes, Keswick, 8 
treat of candy. After the meal, years old on Saturday, Feb. 23. ■ 
many of the old men and women j Wayne Francis Craig, New- 
came to the Institute members | market, 2 years old on Saturday, 

Feb. 23. 

Allan Lloyd Renneff, Newmar- 
ket, 9 years old on Saturday, Feb. 
23. 

Bonnie B. Watson, Aurora, 3 
years old on Sunday, Feb. 21. 

Diane Jean Whittaker, R. R. 1, 
Keswick, 5 years old on Monday, 
Feb. 23. 

Susan Lloyd, Newmarket, 5 
years old on Monday, Feb. 25. 

Brian Bales, Newmarket, 9 

years old on Tuesday, Feb. 28. 
Roderick Gregg Harrison, 

Qneensville, 14 years old on 
Tuesday, Feb. 26. 

Carolyn May Fletcher, New- 
market, 5 years old on Tuesday, 
Feb. 26. 

Elizabeth Prior, Newmarket, 5 
years old on Tuesday, Feb. 26. 

Bentley Frederick John Conk- 
tin, Newmarket, 6 years old on 
Tuesday, Feb. 26.- 

Betsey Bell, Newmarket, 12 

years old on Wednesday, Feb. 27. 
Clifford Morton, R. R. 3, New- 
market, 9 years old on Thursday, 
Feb. 28. 

Lome Foster, Aurora, 7 years 




fc ■ 



The Common 

Bound... 

By Isabel Inglis Colville 

TWO POEMS 






THREE CLOCKS 



- 



Prince Charles school won the 

attendance prize for February 
with the highest percentage of 

. _ ... , ,- , ,. . parents and teachers present at 

at Christmas time, but this year thc Newmarket Home and 



- 



School meeting. Held on Febru- 
ary 19 in the Prince Charles 
school, the meeting was chaired 



log the Christmas season. A! by the president, Mrs. Howard 
sing son? began the party when! Morton. 



The religious education con- 
vener, Mrs. J. T. Rhodes, opened 
the meeting with prayer. A re- 
port on the procedure recom- 
mended by federation for nomin- 
ations and elections was given 
by the president. Mrs. Morton 
and Mrs. A. A. Bailie had attend- 
ed a conference on this topic 
the previous week in Troonto. 



Mrs. Nelson Ion gave a report 
Jon the discussions held at the j old on Thursday, Feb. 28. 



* _- 



. 



i ■ 



1 




January meeting on the estab- 
lishing of a parent-child code. 



Brian Yates, Newmarket, 10 
years old on Thursday, Feb. 28. 



The findings of these groups will j Bobby Gibbons, Newmarket, 2 
be mimeographed and distribut- ; years old on Thursday, Feb. 28. 
ed to public school parents. | Send m youP name, address, 

age and become a member of the 
Newmarket Era and Express 

birthday club. 



We have three clocks that live with us, 

Each has its proper place; 
They stand alert, yet with no fuss 

They set the household pace. 

The parlor clock — a lady fair 
In cream and gold array — 

Ticks gently, lest she break the peace v 
That comes at close of day. ■ 

A haughty grandee is the clock 
That stands within the hall; 

His voice is firm, as tock, tick, tock, 
He says to one and all. 

The kitchen clock — a little maid, 
In blue and gold is gay; 

Her nervous "tick tock" sounds afraid 
She'll lose the time of day. 



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KING COUPLE GIVEN 
SURPRISE PARTY 

A surprise party and presenta- 
tion of a complete chest of silver 
was made to Mr. and Mrs. Ed- 
ward Reddick, King, on Friday, 
Feb. 22. About 90 of their 
friends from the district gather- 
ed at the Agricultural Board 
rooms, Newmarket, to assist the 
honorees in suitably celebrating 
their 25th wedding anniversary. 
Mr. Reddick is assessor for King 
township. 

Mrs. Elton Armstrong was in 
charge of the program which in- 
cluded several musical contests 
organized by Mrs. Charles Wil- 
liams. Elton Armstrong, reeve 
of King township, and Ray Jen- 
nings, Aurora, spoke briefly, 
j paying tribute to the couple. 
Mrs. Jennings made the presen- 
tation and Mrs. Herbert Patrick, 
King, read the accompanying ad- 
dress. Mr. and Mrs. Reddick re- 
sponded in an appropriate man- 
ner. 

They had been taken com- 
pletely by surprise and for some 
time remained quite amazed that 
such a lovely party had been ar- 
ranged in their honor. Delicious 
refreshments were served by the 
ladies, bringing a pleasant even- 
ing to a close. 

BUSINESS WOMEN 
ADD MEMBERS 

An initiation ceremony was 
held at the February meeting of 
the Newmarket Business and 
Professional Women's club when 
nine were admitted into the 
! club's membership. Mrs. Nora 
French, membership chairman, 
conducted the service, assisted by 



Rank, who read the aims and ob- 
jectives of the club. 

Those received as new mem- 
bers in the Newmarket club are 
Mrs. Jean Dymante, Mrs. Alice 
Janes, Mrs. Florence Clarkson, 
Mrs. Caroline Edwards, Miss 
Mary Lou Kilgour, Mrs. Ruth 
McCullough, Mrs. Violet Mac- 
Naughton T Mrs. Kate Skinner 
and Mrs. Myrtle BlackwcII. 



DISCUSS SET UP 

OF OFFICIAL CENTRE 

Mrs. Dorothy Bowman will be 
guest speaker at the regular 
meeting of the Women's Associa- 
tion, Trinity United church, 
Newmarket, on Thursday, March 
6, 2.45 p.m. Norman Hurrle, 
church organist, will be in charge 
of the music. 

Mrs. Bowman's topic will be 
"The Development of Special 
Children". Thc speaker is in- 
terested in thc possibility of es- 
tablishing a play-training centre 
for special children in this com- 
munity. AH ladies of the con- 
gregation are invited to attend. 



So lady fair and maiden gay, 

And gallant grave and tall, 
They've timed our work, and timed our play, 

They're friends — not clocks, at all ! 

GATHERING GOLD 

Bo you gather your gold in the busy mart 
Where the ticker beats like a robot heart, 
Where stocks and bonds reign like gods of old 
And the honor of men is bought and sold? 

Do you gather your gold from men who toil, 
Whose backs are bent in the ceaseless moil, 
From women who stitch till their eyes grow dim 
Or feed their machines in endurance grim. 

If you'd gather your gold from the sunset sky 
And the silver flung from the moon on high, 
If you'd open your ears to the voice of God, 
Live more like a man and less like a clod. 

You'd give of your gold and give and give 
Till you'd wrung from your soul the right to live, 
And those words of the Christ would sound anew 
Give all, and God's all will come back to you. 



Food For Children 
Said Lacking Value 






TO PROVIDE PROGRAM 

Members of the First Newmar- 
ket Girl Guide company will 
provide the program for the 
Scout-Guide Mothers' auxiliary 
on Monday, March 3. The meet- 
ing will be held in the Scout hall 
at 8 p.m. Light refreshments 
will be served. All mothers of 
cubs, brownies, scouts, guides 
and rangers are invited to attend. 

IN HOSPITAL 

A. F. Johns, Gorham St., is a 
patient at Western Hospital, To- 



ronto. He was admitted to hos- 
the vice-president, Mrs. Lillian I pital on Sunday. 







Get The Best At The Most Savings 
THOR, GIBSON APPLIANCES 



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The THOR WASHER at special price 
Your minimum trade-in allowance 



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YOU PAY 



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Terms on all the above appliances. When you buy from us, you are sure tit PROMPT and RELIABLE 
servicing — No endless waiting for parts — As your THOR and GIBSON dealer, we can service your 

appliances without delay. 



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"Between n third and a half of 
all our school children are receiv- 
ing insufficient milk, citrus fruits 
and Vitamin D, but too much 
sweets," said Mrs. Voegc, nutri- 
tionist with the provincial depart- 
ment of Health in a talk, "Food 
for the School-age Child", deliv- 
ered at the Feb. 10 meeting of the 
Newmarket Home and School 
association. Dr. Hobert King, 
director of York County Health 
unit, introduced the guest speak- 
er. 

Mrs. Voege said that emphasis 
in the field of nutrition* is being 
placed on a four point program 
which would ensure that each 
child would daily receive at least 
one pint of milk (114 pints for 
teenagers), a satisfactory source 
of Vitamin C\ 400 units of Vita- 
min D and simultaneously de- 
crease the consumption of sweet 
foods. 

Oranges and milk are not ex- 
pensive even at present costs in 
view of their food value, Mrs. 
Voegc said. The good foods are 
the cheap foods. It is thc weet 
food which is expensive lx»tn in 
costs and in iis effect of dulling 
the appetite for the necessary 
foods. 

Mrs. Voegc compared the cost 
of eight ounces of pop at seven 
cents with milk selling at 22 
cents, the eight ounces costs four 
and a half cents; eight ounces of 
the skim milk po\v<ler only costs 
two rents. Sufficient Vitamin D 
for an individual daily dose can 
be obtained for approximately 
one cent and bulk wholegrain 
cereals are much cheaper than 
the packaged fancy varieties, the 
speaker pointed out to her in- 
terested audience. 

"Why Won't Tommy Eat", n 
movie in color, was shown with 
William Blackshaw operating the 
projector. It was a most interest- 
ing a n d entertaining film and 
dealt comprehensively with thc 
problem of a child's refusal to 
eat. The desired natural, easy 
manner of the mother during 
breast and bottle feeding was il- 
lustrated. The lack of tension 
and need for a quiet and relax- 
ing atmosphere at meal times wns 
emphasized. 

Children learn thc use of eat- 
ing implements gradually. The 
polished table manners of the 
adult are not to be expected of 
the child, but the mother and fa- 
ther in their own meal habits set 
the example they want their 
children to follow. During early 
childhood or if a feeding prob- 
lem exists, there should be no 
forcing or unpleasantness at meal 
times. This refusal to eat is one 
of the most effective weapons at 
a child's command and frequent- 
ly he uses it unconsciously. Even 
when the problem is recognized 
nnd an attempt Is made to cor- 
rect the tense atmosphere, it may 
take six months to undo what 
it took five years to build into 

a regular habit. 

At the close of the film, Mrs. 
Voege spoke on its highlights 
and then followed on open dis- 
cussion period. Mrs. Voege said 
that there was not enough Vita- 



min D found in our foods and so 
it had to be obtained from outside 
sources. She said that it was es- 
sential for the growth of teeth 
and bones and that Vitamin D 

was needed every day all through 
growth, until the late teens are 
reached. It is a known fact that 
the body does not use the miner- 
als obtained from other foods to 
the same degree if insufficient 
Vitamin D is present in the diet. 

The guest speaker was thanked 
by Mrs. W. O. Noble, chairman 
of the health committee who was 
in charge of the program. 

GUIDES HOSTESSES 
AT VALENTINE PARTY 

Members of the Girl Guide 
local association were guests at a 
Valentine party held by thc sec- 
ond class guides of the First 
Newmarket Girl Guide company 
on Wednesday, Feb. 20. The 
party was planned as a special 
celebration to mark Scout-Guide 
week with thc Guides qualifying 
for their hostess badge. 

An investiture ceremony was 
held, with the district commis- 
sioner, Mrs. Nelson Ion, taking 
charge in thc absence of the 
Guutcrs, Mrs. E. Thompson and 
Mrs, 11. Jaques. The patrol lead- 
ers were invested in their office, 
using a form of service origin- 
ated in thc Guide companies in 
France. Thc ceremony bus 
spread throughout thc continent. 
It is used in Great Britain nnd 
this was the first time it had 
been used locally. 

The Guides wrote the invita- 
tions, received the guests, plan- 
ned the program and refresh- 
ments, made tea and cocoa and 
cleaned up the kitchen following 
the serving of their delicious 
lunch. They also had to write 
letters of thanks and letters re- 
fusing an invitation. - 

The following day they assist- 
ted at the Scout -Guide Mothers* 
Auxiliary tea. Those who quali- 
fied for their hostess badge are 
Company Leader, Colleen Rkead, 
and Patrol Leaders, Eleanor 
Smith, Betty McArthur, Shirley 
Wass, Shirley Beare and Lois 
Hoskins. 



HORT. SOC. TO MEET 
IN CITY MAR. 6-7 



-. - 



The 1052 convention of the On- 
tarto Horticultural Association 
will he held at the King Edward 
hotel, Toronto, on March 6 and 
7. Donald Jackson, son o! Mr. 
and Mrs. H. A. Jackson, New- 
market, will read his winning 
essay in Ihe province-wide com- 
petition, "Save the Wild Flow- 
er", at the afternoon session on 
Thursday, March 6, 

An interesting program has 
been arranged for the two-day 
convention. Any members of 
the Newmarket Horticultural So- 
ciety interested in attending any 
sessions of the convention are re- 
quested to contact the president, 
Mrs. Nelson Ion, not later than 
Monday, March 3. 



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Drapery Fabrics 

SAVE $1 to $2 A YARD 

— * 

.IJ'c have imported directly from New 
York the best and latest of the drapery 

styles. Because we have imported directly, 
ive are able to place these drapery fabrics 

on sate at GREAT SAVINGS to YOU. 



SELLING ELSEWHERE ' 
$3.95 TO $4.95 A YARD 

OUR PRICE $2.95 a yard 



Also on our New York trip, we 
purchased several patterns suit- 
able for matching bedspreads 

and drapes. 





BRING SPRING 



INDOORS! 



Try some of these New 

* 

York fabrics as slip cov- 



ers and d r a p e r y to 



match. 



Take udvantuye of these 

9ti mUffS to re-do your^ 
living room. 



Save $1 a yard on 36" PEBBLE CLOTH Patterns 
for Boy's Room, Den, Hall, Play-Room, Cottage. 

All Washable 

Special: Only $1.49 a yard 



Special Prices For This Sale ' 

tl *' » 

Drapery lining - llc£. $1.50 Sale 9«e 
The Latest In Drapery Tracks . 
Mngnosium Tracks - lighter nnd stronger than any 
other track on the market. Cut in any length. 
Easy to install. Reg* 80 cents a foot 

Sale 35 cents a foot 

Complete with three runnel's to the foot, wall 
brackets, end stops. 

We also carry the famous K1HSCII track, custom 
made — pin-on hooks — lead weights, etc. 



FREE 

We will cut your drapery fabrics and match the 

pattern free of charge if you bring 

your window measurements 

WE WILL MAKE YOUR DRAPERY AT A 
SLIGHT EXTRA CHARGE 

\ 

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SENEGAL 

Dry Goods 

104 M* St. HewMrtet NkIII 



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[press, Ttansday, Feb. 2S, 1933 



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King City And District 



MKS. LAURA ROLLING, 

Mr. George Courtney, West 
King plumber, received first de- 
gree burns to his face last Fri- 



'. FflOVE KING § 



active service. Four of his crew 
were killed on that night Walk- 
er had made his 2Sth flight and 
died at the age of 25. 






day while attempting to thaw 

out a waierline pipe connecting j Very recently Mrs, Walker re- 

to the water main, at Fleetwood iceaved a memorial bar from R. 

Motors. He was using a chemi- { a A. F. headquarters at .Ottawa 

cal liquid and pressure hose. He; Rearing her son's name, rank and 

was driven by Mr. Bert Wood to 

Schomberg for treatment gjr Dr 



date of death. 
New Street Lights 



M K. Dillane. Dr. DiUane said rfhe adcfitjon; M 10 -new hydro 



DIRECT FROM CANADIAN PREMIERE 



the eyeballs had not been af- 
fected by the burns vn& his 
vision returned. It -will Ixpome 
time before Mr. Courtney can re- 
sume work. 

Meetinus of King L^gi^n are 

being called for March 4arid 18, 

in Lake Marie and King Athletic 



fights* recently installed in the 
village of King City, has light- 
6d the Jilace to the village limits. 
Forty-two cotnpiete the system, 
with the large brackets central- 
ized iff the main portions of the 
town. &Ld limits have been re- 
fused and re^wired, and new 



Association rooms. The date of porcelains put in. It_was noted 
the annual carnival arid dance at the monthly meeting of vil 



«• 






has been set for Wednesday, 
June la. 

Laskay United church Yi>.U. 
will hold a banquet m the church 
basement on Friday, F©& 29, 

with a special speaker 

W.A. Installation 

At AH Saints' 

held at the home of Mrs. Len 

Robb on Thursday, Feb, 21, it 

was decided to hold installation; 
of WJL officers on gunday^ Mar, 
fl, at the regular morning ser v - 
vice at 10 o'clock. On Sunday 
morning, April 6, commuriion for^ 
ihe auxiliary wiU"£& conducted' 
at the same hour* : • 

A birthday club was formed 
as an extra means of raising 
funds for the branch. Mrs. Fred 
Monson will convene this tte? 
partment. She will forward 
birthday cards to each W.A. 
member, who is asked to con- 
tribute a sum equal to her age, 
at the regular monthly meeting. 

Mrs. Kay Burt, the president, 

took the opening devotions and 
read a report from the Diocesan 
Board, evening section, when the 
president, Mrs. D. Osier paid tri- 
bute to the late King George VI. 
Comments on the board meeting 
were also given. The March 
meeting of the auxiliary is to 
be held at the home of Mrs. Cf. 
D, Lockhart, when a special 
speaker will be heard. 

• 

Enrolment Ceremony 

The enrolment of 18 girls of 
the First King Brownie Pack 
took place during Scout-Guide 
week, on Saturday afternoon, at 
King United church. Mrs._D, R. 
Gunn of Oak Ridges, County 
Guide Commissioner, conducted 
the ceremony in the presence of 
the leaders. Brown Owl Marion^ 
losing and Tawny Owl, Fay e 



lagfe trustees this week that the 
Provincial Department of High- 
ways has made a start in nam- 
ing road signs approaching the 
village "King City". 

Auxiliary Meeting 

Mrs. R. Farren gave a com- 
plete report of the annual meet- 
ing of Toronto West W. M. S. 
jVesbyteriai, held recently in 
Toronto/to Eversley Presyterian 
Auxiliary, at a meeting held at 
the home of Miss Jessie Gellatly 
last weefc It was decided to en- 
tertain v%; visiting society at the 
Easter meeting in April. Three 
quills will be done to augment 
the supply fund. 

■'■ ;¥wen(y*one children of King- 
horn school were delighted with 
the hot supper provided by their 
mothers after their afternoon of 
skating at Nobleton arena last 
Friday. In the evening Mr. Eric 
Hudson of Maple showed several 
sound films. _. 
Ko Tax Increase; 

The 1952 tax rate for the vil- 
lage of King City* was set at 12 
mills for village purposes at a 
meeting of trustees oh Monday 
night in the Masonic hall. It re- 
mains the same as the 1951 mill 
rate. Based on an assessment of 
S21 1,415, the 12-mill rate will 
raise ajevy of $2,536.93 for ex- 
penditures. The 1951 assessment 
was $!p5 : 190 f providing a levy of 
$2,341.08. The balance on hand 
pn December Si, 1951, was 
$294.84, which was an increase of 
$#6.74* over the amount in ihe 
treasury on January I. 195 1. 
Buffeting By-Law 

A recommendation will be for- 
warded to King Township coun- 
cil, requesting, approval by the 
Ontario Municipal Board, of cer- 
iainv portions of the township 




James Stewart and Julia Adams arc starred with Arthur Ken- 
nedy and Rock Hudson in Universal-International's Technicolor 
"Bend of the River," the rugged story of the settling of early 
Oregon by a band of pioneers. The picture opens today and 
continues till Saturday at the Roxy Theatre. 

Now in it's 3rd week at Loew's Uptown, Toronto 



courier on King rural route No. where his wife, the former Eliza* 



Armstrong, and several mothers j^ 1 *"^ 1 ^ P%^}^ 
of the little girls, who wore their ***** Trustee D. M. Find- 

new uniforms and berets*. 

In groups of six, they pledged 



4 -To do my best to God and the 
Queen: io help other: 1 jWjopi^ es- 
pecially those at nome^. \Each 



Jay and seconded by Trustee 
Chairman Crawford Wells, would; 
give greater effectiveness to the 
application of the by-law, St was 

pointed out by Mr. Firidlay. 



girl received her pin frorn Mrs. i. Drainage Is Problem , 

Gunn. i Village drainage, road im- 



Refreshments were served by 
the Brownies, and convene^ by 

the local association chairman, 
Mrs. Gordon Tetley, Afterward, 
Mrs. Marguerite Gellatly, L.A. 
vice-chairman, presented a sub- 
stantia! cheque from the associa- 
tion io Mrs. Laing, for use in the 
purchase of needed equipment 
Mrs. Laing expressed thanks oh 
behalf of the pack. 

The presentation .of the First 
King Brownie charter and the 
local association charter was 
made to Mrs. Teiley by Commis- 
sioner Gunn. v ... 
Craves in Austria 

With the coming of spring at 
the beautiful British cemetery 
near Klagenfurt, Austria^ three 
Canadian flags will be placed oh 
the graves of WOr2 Gordon V. 
Walker, P.O. Norman H. John- 
ston and FA Wilfred ft De; 
Marco, Canadian . Sir mCny who 
paid the supreme sacrifice in 
World WarvSI;. wheri their Lan- : 
caster bomber, Squadron 010, 
was shot down over Berchtes- 
endtm .Germany^ on the irjorinine; 
of April 25; lfl45i; They are ihe 

only Canadians buried in Klag- 
enfurt. . • -" ; ■ . ■' 

The flags will be placed on 

these graves by Ctfjitoin; W, &= 

James, off ictsr commanding, it; E. 

M F. Inspectorate, British 
Troops in Austria, who ls>&vean- 
aciian by birth. By his request; 
ih*y were sent t# Weir. M~ R. 
Jenkinson, after Captain James 
had written to say he had placed 
wreaths on the graves of the 
Cannd.an i at fc on No Verrt |j^ ft 

Air Gunner Walker •''«£$' (he 
son of Mrs. Cecil Walker of 
King. She has pictures of the 
cemetery and the cross" that 
marks his grave. Captain James, 
a stranger to her, has sent com- 
munications to her. ..: 

Walker enlisted with the & G. 
A. F. On April 29. ID44,he^Jnt 
overseas and on April 2Mhe fol- 
lowing year, he was killed on 



provement,.. sidewalks, street 
signs and building excavations 
were among the many questions 
discussed by the trustees. "Drainv 
age is a very serious problem;" 
declared Trustee Findloy when 
C. G. Wells enlarged on the ne- 
cessity of ditching and providing 
catch drains for the two main 
roadways. King and north Keele 
streets. 

There is little use in spending 
$70 to top surface 140 rods of 
Keele St., north from the rail- 
road to the school, until ditches 
arc made to carry off the water 
that lies on the roadway, said 
Mr. Well* •' 

Investigation: into the cost of 

applying cold asphalt for re- 
pairs to sidewalks was approved. 
A satisfactory job at less than 
half the price of paving the side- 
walk leading to the school would 

result The erection of sidewalk 
on King St. E. would depend on 

how soon the province Intends to 
mien the roadway. 



3. In September, the 72-year- 
old war veteran cailman will re- 
tire from the career he chose, 
after shrapnel shattered his hip 
on the battlefields of Belgium in 
the first great war. 

Not only has Mr. Gambrili his 
daily trips on the route; he car- 
ries the mail to and fro from the 
post office to the train twice 
daily. When he first commenc- 
ed his route in 1918, there were 
about 100 boxholders. Now 
there are 175. 

A mailman is the trusty friend 
of his patrons, Mr. Gambrili de- 
clared. But one favor he refus- 
ed. He had brought a letter to 
the post office to find a tele- 
phone call awaiting him. Would 
he please write a letter for the 
lady? The exasperated Mr. 
Gambrili told her he just could 
not take the responsibility of 
writing her epistle. 
J,Home from Hospital 

Mrs. Campbell McKay is very 
happy to be at her home again 
after being hospitalized at Peel 
Memorial hospital for more than 
a month, after injuries received 
in a highway accident on Janu- 
ary 25. *While complete recov- 
ery from the results of the acci- 
dent may take some time, Mrs. 
McKay's condition is considered 
very favorable. ;.. 

Pte. Charles DeWierd, just re- 
turned from Germany, was a 
visitor at the McKay. home for a 
short time on Saturday after- 
noon, accompanied by his fi- 
ancee, Miss Katharina Merlau. 
Miss Merlau has been caring for 
the McKay children. 

Hobert Sloan of Vaughan 
township was in an accident last 
Thursday afternoon, Feb. 21, 
when the rear of his car was hit 
by a car driven by a Crecmorc 
man, when Sloan turned left off 
the Barrio highway at the clover- 
leaf. King sideroad. While his 
vehicle had a damaged wheel 
and fender, the other car was ex- 
tensively damaged. Investiga- 
tion by PC. Olson of the Thorn- 
hill detachment had not been 
completed by Monday. There 
were no personal injuries to the 
occupants of either car. 
Veteran Mailman Passes 

One of the earliest rural moil 
couriers at King, Andrew D. 
Cadden, fl0, passed away sud- 
denly at the home of his son 
Bert, third concession, King 
township, on Friday, Feb. 22. 
The remains rested at the 
Thompson Funeral Home, Au- 
rora, for the funeral service held 
in King Baptist church on Mon- 
day afternoon. Interment was in 



beth Riddell, passed away in 

1942. Surviving arc his son and 

grandchildren and a sister, Mrs. 

Maggie Hill of Brockville. 

More than 30 years ago Mr. 

Cadden drove the mail on rural 

route three and later on R. R. 1. 

This position he held for about 

eight years, at a time when 
horses were used and Mr. Cad- 
den used a lantern in his sleigh 
in winter time to afford heat on 
sub zero days. He had worked 
on the old Grand Trunk railway 
prior- to that time, when an ac- 
cident befell him, causing the 
loss of his left leg, replaced by 
an artificial limb. Mr. Cadden 
had earlier been engaged in 
other trades. He made bricks 
and shingles with his father, and 
many of the old district build- 
ings still retain the old type of 
brick. The farm house of the 
late John Lawson is one of 
these, Mr. Cadden went about 
the country shearing sheep, 
among other activities. He was 
a man of his word, and highly re- 
spected by his friends and neigh- 
bors. He was connected with the 
local Baptist church. 
.The funeral was well attended 
by a large connection of the fam- 

iiy. 



Miss Gerry McDonald held a 
gathering of the King smocking 
group at her home last Friday 
evening. The members are pre- 
paring work for the June sale. 

Miss Marilyn Panke of Teston 
passed her grade 8 piano at; the 
recent • Royal Conservatory of 
Music examinations. In June of 
last year she completed her 
grade 8 theory with first-class 
honors- Marilyn intends to at- 
tend Bible college and later go 
out as a missionary^ 

Music Results 

Pupils of Miss Dorothy Arm- 
strong have completed February 
examinations at the Royal Con- 
servatory of Music, Toronto, 
with the following standing: 
grade 2 piano, Frances Forester, 
Jimmie Langdon, honors, Paul 
Harnden, honors; grade 6 piano, 
Christena Beggs: grade 8 piano, 
Mary Anne Moore, Marilyn 
Panke; grade 1 theory, Marjorie 
Scott, 82, 1st class hon.; grade 2 
theory, Audrey Simpson, 93. 

Pianist Passes Test 

Spencer Finch, aged 11, passed 
grade 4 piano examinations with 
second class honors. A pupil of 
Miss Helen Hunter of Laskay, 
Spencer took the test this month 
at the Royal Conservatory of 
Music. He is the pianist of 
Young St. Andrew's Club of 
Stranee Presbyterian church. 
To Enter Nursing 

Miss Mary Scott entered the 
mid-winter class at Toronto Gen- 
eral hospital on February 19, to 
take the three-year course in 
nursing. Her mother, Mrs. Earle 
Scott, and her aunt. Miss Helen 
Hunter," were with Mary for the 
afternoon tea given by the staff 
for those entering, the training 
school. Miss Mabel Jennings, of 
Temperancevilie, was one of the 
nurses on the staff to welcome 
the newcomers.. 

Roger Rawlings spent the 
weekend at the home of his 
friend. Bob Bull of Aurora. They 
were in Toronto on Saturday. 

Baby Christened 

At the home of Mr. and Mrs. 
Laurence Scott, on Friday, Feb. 
22, the christening of their 
daughter, Susan Marlcne, aged 
six months, was performed by 
Rev. M. R. Jenkinson. Mrs. 
Scott served supper for Mr. and 
Mrs, Charles Kerr, the child's 
maternal grandparents, her 
aunt, Mrs. Dooks and huband 
Glenn, Mr. and Mrs. George Har- 
vey and Rev. and Mrs. Jenkin- 
son. Also present were the 
baby's twin sisters, Lyn and Lee 
Scott, aged five years. 

Mr. and Mrs. Harry Williams 
of Toronto accompanied Mr. and 
Mrs. Irving Scott when they. left 
for Daytona Beach, Fin., on Sat- 
urday. 



Kiwanis Festival 

Miss Janet Langdon achieved 

creditable marks when she sang 
in two vocal classes at the Ki- 
wanis music festival last week. 

In the class for girls under 18, 
18 competed, and Janet was giv- 
en 80 percent. She sang "The 
Shepherd's Cradle Song" and *^I 
Know a Bird", in the under 17- 
year-old class, with 81 marks, 
Pupils* Results 

Grades I and II tneory pupils 
of Miss Dorothy Armstrong have 
won first-class honors at the 
February examinations at the 
Royal Conservatory of Music, To- 
ronto. In grade 1 theory, Mar- 
iorie Scott received 82 marks. In 
grade 2 theory. Daphne Turpel 
was given 95 percent arid Audrey 
Simpson 93 percent. 



Pupils of Mrs. Dan Rawlings 
were also successful in their 
music tests. Betty Alexander of 
Eversley passed her grade 1 
piano with first class honors. Pe- 
ter Rawlings, aged J), and son of 
the teacher, made grade 2 piano 
with honors.-, 



i SVlii AT AURORA LEGION 
At the euchre and bridge held 
In the Aurora Legion hall on 
Monday night, Feb; 25, the fol- 
lowing were prize-winners: 
bridge, Mrs. Lee Bryan; euchre, 
ladies' firsts Mrs. Tom Patrick 
Sr.; second, Mrs. Phillips; conso- 
lation, Mrs. A. McHcnry of 
Armitage; men's first, Myrtle 
Quinn; second, Ron Egerton; 
consolation, W. Bovair. 



3KOICIN tabfelt fe*«n «twdi*» f* 
di«K Ikf! ( It a tak way to fndwt* %Wt* 
or quirt It* mil wh«a Hit*** PM 
Pr»iS>ttrtion!ylotS»dt r tw,Toffootp2. 



DODDS 

KIDNEY 

PILLS 



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OF J40.M0 WORTH OF HEW 



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FARM MACHINERY 

We are forced to move from our present, location 

to a new one. 



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To make the move easy our whole stock will be put up to auction 



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On lot 6, Concession 4, KIN6 TOWNSHIP at 1 0.30 am 

Many hard-to-gct items will be on sale including a T-50 hay baler, a 
No. «2 combine, a W-<> tractor and a WD-9 Diesel tractor, together with 

a full line of other farm implements. 



SELLARS AND ATKINSON, AUCTIONEERS 

M. A. WILSON 

KINO, ONTARIO 



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rfll,EPHONE KING 18 



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Open building excavations in Kins' cemetery. Pallbearers were 
the village will he discussed with 6 rantIsons ,<*■? *he deceased. 



the townahirj council. Mr. Wells 
recommended that immediate Jjc- 
;tipn t>e requested to deal -with 

the Sharatt excavation/ presently 

filled with water, 

The trustees would like to in- 
«tail street signs, as part of the 

forlhcoming improvemerits In 

ms village. Investigation into 

the cost of standards will be 
ihado. ; ■ 

b ® G^WcHs and W, Carsoii: 
were appended a committee to 
negotiate for a man to maintain 
the village pumping station. Mr. 
Dick Williams, presently in 
charge of the pump, is vacating 
March 1. 

Will Retire From Mall Service 
^Frflnlc Gambrili of King City 
has not done too badly in the last 
34 years. He has worn out n 
So^cn t horses, as many motor cars 
and has travelled "around the 
world and yet he has actually 
gone only 30 miles return trip 
from his homo, on his job as mail 



Qcorgo, Arehic and Carl Cadden, 
Harry Ford and Robert Waite of 
Toronto and Harry Finch, a 
neighbor, 

. rn a * A u «m*. the son of An- 
drew Cadden, he was one of 
eight children and had lived 
ere Tor more than 50 years. He 
had occupied a small dwelling 
n the King and Vaughan town- 
ine at the fourth concession, 




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Your best paint buy.. 



► FOR 

BEAUTIFUL 

WALLS & CEILINGS 



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1 O ^^^L ~ L IB 



THE LEADING INFANTRYMEN 

Canadian soldiers are playing *a world-wide role to 

discourage aggression ... to help guard peace. At home, and 

overseas, our soldiers stand as ~ Guardians of Peace* 

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The Canadian Infantry Soldier is the toughest, the best 
equipped fighting soldier in the world today; 

■ 

Recently a new specialty with extra pay and prestige was created 

for the Infantry Soldier. This is the Leading Infantryman/ 

He is the trained Infantry Soldier. He has learnt to handle expertly 

the many weapons of modern infantry. He has been trained to take 

care of himself anywhere, any time, in any hind of situation. The Leading 

Infantryman is the most thoroughly trained fighting soldier in the Army, 

Play your part in Canada's most important business today, defence. 
you are eligible if you are; 17 to 40 years of age, (tradesmen to 45), 

physically fit and ready to serve anywhere* 



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Apply fo Me Mcmt ftecruit/ng Dtpot; 

No. 13 Fenonavl Depot, Wnllli Houmt, Rlcftau A Cnarfott* Int., Ottawa, Of*. 

No. 5 Personnel Depot, Artillery PaHr, Bagor Street, Kfngtron, Onr, 

Canadian Army Recruiting S lei ion, 90 Richmond St. W., Toronto, Ont. 

No. 7 Personnel D«po», Wofseley tarrocks, lUiaboth Street, lomton> Ont. 

Army Recruiting Centre, 230 Main Street Wo«r r North Ray, Ont 

Army Recruiting Centre, Jamee Street Armoury, 

200 James St. North, Hamilton, CM. » 

Allien 

Listen fo "Voice of the Army" — Tvetday 
and Thursday evenings — Dominion Network* 





ACTIVE FORCE 




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