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Full text of "Newmarket Era and Express"

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ERA 98TH YEAR, EXPRESS- HERALD 55TH YEAR 



NO. 26 



NEWMARKET, ONTARIO, THURSDAY, JUNE 29TH. 1950 



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'There'll always 
Be a York county' 



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Birthday theme 

York county's centennial was observed on Satur- 
day at Sharon Temple, the oldest public building in the 
county. Present were county council members, descend- 
ants of county officials and pioneer families. The cele- 
bration took the form of an entertainment and basket 
lunch with plenty of good old fashioned "visiting 
around." 



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A highlight of the celebrations 

was the adoption into the Mo- 
hawk tribe of Warden Clive M. 
Sinclair, reeve of Etobicoke, with 
the name of "Sagabawe" meaning 

"Director." 

Sharon Temple, built in 1825 by 
David Wilison who established 
the religious sect, Children of 
Peace, was originally known as 
> The Temple of Peace." "In this 
; age of the cold war, if there 
were many more 'Temples of 
Peace/ there would be less un- 
certainty in our days," said War- 
den Sinclair in his brief re- 
marks. 

The ceremonies opened with 
the singing of Psalm 100, follow- 
ed by the reading of scripture 
and prayer. Major J. C. Boylen, 
president of York Pioneer and 
Historical Society, was principal 
speaker. After extending a wel- 
come and congratulations to 
members of county council, he 
said: "In a very real sense, York 
is the mother of counties Rob- 
ert Baldwin represented this di- 
vision of York in the parliament 
of Canada. Here in Sharon he 
addressed the electors advocat- 
ing the system of local govern- 
ment with which his name is in- 
separably associated. From here, 
it may be said, came forth the 
system of municipal government, 
the centennary of which wc are 
celebrating today. 

"No more appropriate selling 
than this park, beside the Temple 
of Peace, could be found in York 
county for this occasion," ho 
said. "In these days of concrete 
and steel, and milled woodwork, 
this Temple of Peace stands as 



a tribute to the craftsmanship of 

the pioneers who reared this 
buildinira century and a quarter 
ago." 

Major Boylen pointed out that 
Warden Sinclair, while presiding 
over the IOlst county council, 
was the 89th warden. "We hope 
to have the pleasure 11 years 
hence, unless wardens serve 
more than one term, of congratu- 
lating the 100th warden. Not- 
withstanding the Ontario Muni- 
cipal Board or applications by 
Toronto we feel there will al- 
ways be a York county." 

Among those present were the 
senior surviving ex-warden, Hon. 
George S. Henry, onetime prem- 
ier of Ontario, descendants of 
Yorks first warden, Franklin 
Jackes, and descendants of Rob- 
ert Baldwin; Many of those pres- 
ent could trace their origin back 
to the pioneers settling on land 
grants within the county. 

The desk on the platform was 
from the collection of historical 
relics in the Temple and had 
been used in the council cham- 
bers by wardens prior to 1907. 

Following the addresses there 
were Indian dances by Chief 
Albert Green and members of 
the Mohawk tribe and music by 
old time fiddlers. There was 
community singing, and' music 
by the Aurora Boys* Band. Mem- 
bers of the county regiment, 
Queen's York Rangers, put on a 
display In the uniforms worn 150 
years ago. 

The program was arranged 
under the direction of Reeve 
Norman Ingram of North York 
township, chairman of the coun- 
ty's centennary committee. 



COMPANY, UNION 
SIGN CONTRACT 
AT SPECIALTY 

Management and union repre- 
sentatives at Office Specialty 
Mfg. Co. Ltd. in Newmarket 
this week signed a contract fol- 
lowing some weeks of discussion. 

Main features of the contract 
are pay increases of five and four 
cents an hour to men and wo- 
men employees respectively, the 
addition of one more paid holi- 
day. The pay increases are re- 
troactive to April 1, 

The union demands were for 

three extra paid holidays, 15 

cent increases, extra rest periods 
and check-off. The company 
originally offered increases of 
four and three cents to men and 
women and one additional paid 
holiday. 

When there was no immediate 
agreement, a conciliator was 
called in. The company increas- 
ed its wage offer by one cent 
for both men and women and 
following acceptance by the bar- 
gaining committee, the offer was 
put to the membership which 
voted in its favor. 



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'Small Denomination, 



Large opportunity' 
Friends offer hope 

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"Good-will is news. The contribution of the 
lleligiouH Society of Friends in the world today lies in 
a wholly new approach to areas of tension and fric- 
tion, an approach based on moral and religious 
grounds. We are a small denomination with a large 
opportunity," Homer Morris of Philadelphia, Ph., 
told the members of the Religious Society of Kriends 
(Quakers) who met at Pickering College, June 2:1-27 
for their Annual meeting. 



"Most peace groups aro sus- 
pected of communism but 
^Friends so for have been free of 
such accusations so they ore In 
^a unique position to continue 
trying to find some basis for 
^understanding between Kussia 
TJinci the Western world." 

■ The book published recently 
<by the American Friends Scr- 
.•Mcc Committee on 'The United 
^States, and the Soviet Union, 
■ ;flome Quaker Proposals for 
;/.fPcaceV has been widely rcview- 
££ed in the press in the United 
States and copies of it were 
sent to Cnnndiun government of- 
ficials. 

Delegates from Friends Meet- 
ings \j\ Canada and visiting 



Quakers from the United States 
discussed at the meeting the 
problems presented by the lack 
of educational facilities and the 
circumvention by local laws of 
the citizenship of the North 
American Indians, the lock of 
rehabilitative care for patients 
discharged from mental hopsl- 
tals, the need for rebuilding the 
war-shattered Meeting Houses 
of Japanese Friends, and the 
precarious position of German 
Quakers in Berlin, living on 
the edge of the East-West ten- 
sion. 

In a letter which the Canadian 
Yearly Meeting of Friends com- 
posed to send to other Friends 
(Continued on Pngo 7, Col. 4) 



WILM©T HILL WINS 
J. GIBNEY CUP 

Wilmot Hill won the J. Gibney 
cup for the best iris in the show 
at the annual iris show of the 
Newmarket Horticultural Soci- 
ety on Saturday, June 17. The 
show, which was held Jn the 
basement of the Christian Bap- 
tist church, attracted a large 
turn-out of local flower enthu- 
siasts. Charles Dodson, Aurora, 
judged the show. 

The iris show, which Is never 
very large by comparison with 
the peony or gladiolus shows, 
welcomed entries from five so- 
ciety members who had never 
exhibited before. Mr. Howard 
Proctor, show committee chair- 
man, said that he hoped this 
trend would continue and that 
there would bo many more new 
exhibitors as well as the regu- 
lar ones enter their flowers and 
vegetables at the other shows 
this season. The judge compli- 
mented the exhibitors on the 
high quality of the bloom dis- 
played at the Saturday show. 



Optimists donating 
Legion derby trophies 

The Carnival committee of 
the Canadian Legion, Newmarket 
branch, has announced several 
prizes to be offered in the Soap 
Rox Derby, carnival and dance, 
to be held July 20. 

The Legion has been advised 
by J. O. Dales, president of the 
Optimist Club of Newmarket 
that trophies will be furnished 
for the Soap Box Derby out of 
the Hoys* Work Fund of the 
club. 

Cecil Jarvis, Legion president, 
has acknowledged the Optimist's 
offer and adds that cash prizes 
of $10, $5, S:j and $2 will be 
given by the Legion. 

The street dunce to be held in 
conjunction with the carnival 
will he of interest to teen-agers. 
The Marigold Gift Shoppe has 
offered a prize for the dance. 
The dance competition is being 
arranged In the meantime. 



PIANO RECITAL 

The piano recital, by pupils 
of Mrs. Geo. Blackwell, which 
was given In Trinity United 
Sunday-school room on Friday 
evening was well attended. The 
numbers wcro well presented by 
the pupils. 

Following the recital, Mrs. 
BlnckwcU'fl pupils presented her 
with n corsage of carnations and 
n pin. 



Board health moves 




The Newmarket board of 

health held Us final meeting on 

Tuesday afternoon. The v/ork 

which the board of health has 

been doing In Its six -years of 

existence will be carried on by 
the newly formed York County 
Health Unit. Tho health tmlt 
Is to be started In July. 

Dr. J. G. Cock who has been 
chairman of tho board of health 
for tho past four years pnlcl tri- 
bute to Miss Clara S. Klttmer, 
public health nurso whd will 
leave Newmarket this summer, 
•'Wo appreciate tho fine work 
sho has done in tho schools," ho 
sold. Tim third public health 
nurso to servo in Newmarket, 
Miss Klttmer will bo going to 
Weston when tho health unit 
tokos over. 

" "I think that Newmarket will 
bo hotter when this county 
health unit Is In operation be- 
causo tho unrounding munici- 
palities will be belter," said Dr. 
Cock. 



Ill 1044 tho health services 
wore first started in the schools 
In Newmarket. Dr, Doles rccai- 



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led how difficult a- time tho town 

had In reaching tho conviction 

that a health nurso was needed. 
Referring to tho former editor 
of tho Era and Express, ho said, 
•'Andrew HcW> was ten years 
before his time. Ho worked 
hard to got a health nurso for 
tho schools." 

Dr. dock sold that tho mcdlcol 
officer of health, Dr. Dales, has 
kept very efficient health rec- 
ords. "Tho extent of his records 
would surprise any other 
M.O#II«i" ho sold, Appreciation 
was expressed for tho work chief 
Constable Byron BurWdgo has 
dortd as sanitary Inspector and 
*ls exceptional Interest In sani- 
tation problems. 

"Public health is n largo field," 
said Dr. Cock. "It takes In work 
relative to health standards such 
as pasteurization, housing condi- 
tions, sewage end water condl* 



unit 



tlons, sewn go disposal problems 
and many others. I sometimes 
think that these things are more 
important than looking nfter 
children In schools. People do 
not realize tho number of prob- 
lems which can bo related to 
public health." 

Other members of tho board 
of health this year were Mrs. 
G. h. Boynton, Hudy Rcazius 
who was council's representa- 
tive. Clerk Wesley Brooks, sec 
rotary, and Miss Klttmer. Mr. 

Btirbldgo sat In on. many of tho 

meetings. 

Tho now cottnty health unit 
will replace tho services of tho 
board of health, medical officer 
of health, public health nurso 
and sanitary inspector. The 
sarrio work will bo done by tho 
unit in 11 townships which tmvo 
joined tho unit, Tho chief 
health officer; Dr. King, has ta- 
ken up residenco in Newmarket 
this week. As soon as It Is lo- 
cated in offices, it Is expected 
that tho unit will be operating 



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Inducted as Chief Sagodowc (Director) of tho Mohawk Tribe, 
on Saturday at the York County centennial picnic at Sharon, War- 
den Clive Sinclair, reeve of Etobicoke?, meets Wanda, 5, daughter 

of Chief Pale Moon of the Six Nations Indian Reserve at Brant- 
ford. 



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VARIETY MARKET 



Hot 
Classi 



Do you want a "Hot Rod Spe- 
cial"? 

Perhaps you need some pine 
boards, two years drying. 

Most likely you are looking 
for a cottage, or an ice box to 
take to a cottage . 

.Or it might be transportation 
to and from the city, a chicken 
form to which to retire, a motor- 
cycle, a bargain in household 
furnishings? 

Or farm implements. . 

Or used cars. 

They're all to be found in the 
Era and Express classified sec- 
tion. 

In this weeks' issue, and it is 
not unusual, there are classified 
advertisements from Richmond 
Hill to Sutton, from customers 
in King township to potential 

buyers in Whitchurh. There are 
ten columns of classified adver- 
tising including 13 uscd<car 
and truck advertisements, !&4 real 
estate advertisements. 

In the first six months of 1950, 
there were over 5,000 classified 
advertisements inserted in the 
Era and Express. The increas- 
ing volume of classifieds Is 
proof of their satisfaction. 

But that is not all. Classified 
advertisers get a bonus of ser- 
vice this summer, .^rhcir adver- 
tisements are being carried with- 
out extra cost In the 2,000 cop- 
ies of the "Beaches*' edition of 
the Era and Express, 

Tlds means that your adver- 
tisement appears in over 5,000 
copies of tho Era and Express, 
In an area which extends north 
from Oak Ridges to Suttott, 

For quick classified service, 
phono Newmarket 7110 or Roche's 
Point 73w. 






Remove road hazard 
At 'Cemetery HOT 




The stretch of dangerous 
road at "Cemetery Hill" on 
the outside of Schomberg is 
to he eliminated within a 
month* The department of 
highways announced this 
week that the dangerous 
curve and hill will be taken 
away as well as another 
dangerous curve at the Junc- 
tion of No. 9 and No. 7 
highways north of Schom- 
herg. 

Last year five people were 
killed at Cemetery Hill In 
a head-on collision and 
other accidents have occur* 
roil there. Accidents were 
blamed on the contour of 
the pavement and curve. 



\ 



ENTHUSIASTS SEE 
HARMAN'S IRISES 






Over 80 visited the Iris gar- 
dens of Mr. and Mrs. Charles 
llarimoi on Thursday, June 15, 
when these well-known growers 
of top quality iris opened their 
gardens to the public. The visit 
was sponsored by the Nuwtnnr- 
ket Horticultural Society. 

Tho visitors were delighted 
with the lovely display of Iris. 
As Mrs. Harman commented, 
"Our gardens arc always open to 
anyone Interested In flowers," but 
this was tho official visit under 
tho society's sponsorship. 

Mrs. Harman and Mr. Howard 
Hugo, nro tho garden consultants 
of tho sojeety and have placed 
their years of experience In flow- 
er growing at tho disposal of the 
society's membership. Feel free 
to call on them for assistance with 
your Hardening problems. 



Duclos Pt. camp truck 

Leaves Trinity at 6.45 

The true!" taking boys to 
North York Memorial camp at 
Duclos Point, Lake Slmcoe, will 
leave Trinity United church, 
Newmarket, on Thursday, June 
20, at 0.45 p.m. Ono hundred 
and five boys have registered, 
taxing the camp to Its maximum 
capacity. They will return on 
July 8. 

The junior girls will leave the 
church by truck on Monday, 
July 10, at 0.45 p.m., returning 
July 10. Intermediate girls will 
leave tho church on Wednesday, 
July 10, at p.46, returning July 
20* 



CITIZENS' BAND 
WINS FIRST 
AT WATERLOO 

\ The Newmarket Citizens 
Band won first prize in its class 
at the band festival at Waterloo 
on Saturday. The Newmarket 
band scored 93 of a possible 100 
points. Second place was won 
by a band from Wisconsin with 
92 & points. 

The Newmarket Citizen's 
Band has been an active con- 
tender at festivals at Waterloo 
and elsewhere, and in its 80 

some years of experience, has 
been a consistent winner. This 

year, the band was conducted by 

Bill Grieg. 

The Newmarket band was en- 
tered in class three, open to 
bands from towns of not over 
10,000 population and with not 
more than 35 instrumentalists. 
There were ten bands entered 
in this class, the largest in 
years. 

Dr. Charles O'Neill, noted 
bandmaster and teacher, mem- 
ber of the faculty of the Royal 
Conservatory of Music, Toronto, 
was adjudicator. The band was 
presented with the Waterloo 
Musical Society Trophy and 
each member received a gold 
medal. The band's test piece 
was "The Wanderer Overture" 
by K. L. King. 

Earliest records on the New- 
market band are dated 1870. In 
the 1880's the band put on sev- 
eral concerts at night during the 
warm weather. The bond went 
from one schoolground to an- 
other as they played and carried 
coal oil torches to light their 
music. 

Rod West, son of Mr. and 
Mrs. Art West, was entered in 
the cornet soloist contest, coming 
fifth in a class of 14. 



SINGLE COPIES S CENTS EACH , 



Contributions assist 
Ahshunyoong campers 

Financial help Is available to 
send boys who leave for Camp 
Ahshunyoong tonight at 6.45 
p.m.; also junior, intermediate 
and senior girls, who want to 
go to North York Memorial 
Camp at Duclos Point, Lnke 
Simcoe. This is possible through 
donations by the Office Specialty 
Mfg. Co., Newmarket Recreation 
Commission, Newmarket Lions 
Club, Newmarket Ministerial 
Association and other donations. 
A list of the subscribers will be 
published next week. 

Girls who wish to attend camp 
must bo registered by July 1. 
The first 75 registrations will be 
accepted of residents of North 
York County, up to July 1, so 
get your registration In early. 
Transportation both woys for all 
camps is provided. Registration 
forms and further Information 
may bo obtained from Rev. 
Henry Cotton or Betty Brammer, 
nt the Ero and Express office. 



GARDEN TOUR 
AT ROCHE'S JULY 8 

A tour of the gardens of the 
summer estates at Roche's Point 
hm been arranged for Saturday, 
July 8, from 1.30 to S p.m. 
Afternoon tea will be .served nt 
Roches* Point Memorial club 
from 3 to 5 p.m. 

Theso tours, which aro the an- 
nual events attracting great 
crowds of visitors from the sur- 
rounding district and as far as 
Toronto, hove proven very pop- 
ular in the past. 

Sponsored by the Women's 
Aitl of York County hospital 
and the Roche's Point Memorial 
club tickets ore obtainable from 
members of both organizations. 




timing Events 





Authorized 






ision, 



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St. property 



Newmarket council reversed an earlier decision and 
authorized the purchase of the Webb Main St. prop- 
erty Monday night. Mayor Jos. Vale said that the 
building would be ideal for the health unit. No alter- 
ations would be required, he said. 



At a meeting the previous 
week council had passed a res- 
olution in favor of constructing 
offices, for the health unit on 

the ground floor of the town 

hall. The health unit is sched- 
uled to start the first of July. 

The history of the council's 
consideration of buying the 
property goes back to last fall 
when the library board first 
requested the town to buy it. 
Earlier this year it had been 
considered again as a possible 
location for the York County 
health unit. On both occasions 
members of council thought it 
undesirable to have scattered 
municipal buildings winch would 
add to heating costs and said 
the purchase price was too high. 
Some members said they would 
like to sec a new library build- 
ing. 

The council has been confront- 
ed with the need to acquire 
more municipal building space. 
At the beginning of the year 
council learned that the court 
offices for the magistrate and 
court clerk would be moved to 
Newmarket. These offices are 
near completion at the .town 
hall now\ 

When it was learned that the 
health unit could be situated 
here, a search for available of- 
fice space brought no immedi- 
ate results. The town clerk's of- 
fice was considered a suitable 
location but there were objec- 
tions - because of no immediate 
alternative accommodation for 
the 'clerk's office. 

The health offices on Botsford 
St. were considered but they 
were too small for the health 
unit. A proposal for an entirely 
new building to house all muni- 



cipal offices was made at coun- 
cil several weeks ago but it still 
offered no immediate means of 
escaping the office shortage. A 
notice of motion is yet before 

council recommending the new 
municipal buitding. 

In the last few months coun- 
cil has\ looked over two sets of 
building plans, one for the re- 
novation of the town hall, an- 
other for a completely new 
municipal hall on Park Ave. In 
the same period numerous reso- 
lutions have been passed and 
rescinded. 

With a matter of days to go 
before the health unit would be 
due to start functioning, the 
resolution for new offices in 
the town hall was passed. This 
week the purchase price of tho 
Webb property went down $2,000 
to $16,800. Council reversed 
all its decisions and decided to 
buy it. Said Mayor Vale. "It 
could s^ill be used as a library 
later on." 

Voting against the purchase 
were Councillors Chas. VanZant 
and Lome Paynter. 

Councillor Charles VanZant, 
in protesting the decision to 
purchase the Webb house, argued 
that it was uneconomical. "We 
have to put a new heating unit. 'CM 
in the town hall because b!f\t85 1^ 
office for the magistrate. .Jl 1 *| 
would also heat the health unittf | 
offices if they were there. 

"We can put the health unit 
office in the town hall for»i; ^ 
good deal less than we ore pair- 
ing for the Webb property. We 
would derive more revenue from 
this in the long run. The pur- 
chase of the Webb property 
means the loss of the tax rev- 
enue." 



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Onetime councillor, 
Fred Doyle buried 
At St. John's Tues. 



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A onetime Newmarket councillor and chief of the 
fire brigade, Fred J. Doyle died in St. Michael's hod))!* : 
tal on Saturday. lie was buried in St. John's ceme- 
tery, Newmarket, on Tuesday. 

Mr. Doyle, the son of tho late 




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COURT OP REVISION 

A court of rovUloh . in New- 
mnrket will lit R t 7 p.m., July 
19,. to hear any property owner 
regnrdln^ the focal Improve- 
ment BMcsiment roll, Member* 
of eooftdi. will' •» on the court 
of rovIMon. v 



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Krklfty, 4uno 80 — RoHon Jnm- 
tKtrce at 7 o'clock. 3 bnnrts, opcri- 
nir concert, midway of fun ami 
frolic. Your 23o lucky number ad- 
mission licket given you a chnnco 
to win one of over 40 vnlunblo pr|* 
zo*. Gigantic fireworks rilsplny, 
rinitclnjt In Cnslno. •11*20 

Friday, June 80 — Strawberry 

FoMlval on Inwnfl of Dolhnvcn 
Community hnll, sponsored by 
•Boihel United church, from 5 p. 
m. Program follows. 75c nnd 50c. 

c2w23 

Kattmlfty, July i — Dancing In 
tho now Glcndnlo Pavilion, norlh 
shore. Mussolmnn's l^iko, to Norm 
Huillnft's 10-pleco orchestra* Will 
rifitice 1,000 people Admission 73c 
nnd 50c. clw20 

WFitucKfoy, July f$ — Bingo, In 
Holland Landing Community Imll 
at R.ltS p.m. 2 cards 35e, Jackpot 
$?5. clw26 

Wednesday, July 5 — Mndlll re* 
union picnic, In fitouffvllle Mem* 
orlal Pnrk at 2,30 p.m. All mem- 
bra of the family welcome. Mw26 

Friday, Juy 1 — Kottleby Com- 
munity club la Hponwrlnff a 
IwiflDbnll Rome (Schomberg vs Ket- 
tleby filrls) followed by an Ice- 
cream .social on rink spnee. Wes- 
Ion's mm hand alone- with local 
tal*«*« * AdmlMlon ehOdrtn 20e., 

adulti 33c. c2w9€ 



Saturday, July 8— Tour of gar- 
dens, Roche's Point, I.nko Slmcoe. 
1.30 to 5 p.m. Sponsored by 
Roche's Point Memorial club and 
Women's AW of York County hos- 
pital. Tickets $1.00 Including tea 
served 3 to 5 p.m., Rocho'a Point 
Memorial club. c3w25 

Wednesday, July WSU John's 
annual garden party. Suppor nnd 
games. clw20 

- Willow Beach ravtllon, Wilcox 
Lake. Under now management. 
Dancing every Saturday to RUM 
Crelghton's orchestra. Sunday 
evening concerts at nine p.m., 
featuring Ron Leonard and Doug 
Uomolne, Canada's number ono 
comedy team. tf26 

Dance to Norm Burllna and his 
Klngsmen at Beoton Memorial au- 
ditorium every Friday night Art- 
mission 7Rc nnd 50e. tf27 

Food Haven fun, out ax Ir la of 
Bradford, jpcclnKzlng In Chinese 
d.'Bhos. "Chicken In tho n«n»» 
Menk*. chops. Catering. Phone 
nvadford 2-MWi t!27 

Dmoo at Aurora m*fc school 
Auditorium every Satuiwy night 

Admluton 50c. ■ H27 

Dnnee to Norm fluttln* nnd hi* 

Klngimen In the new Community 
hall at Bohdhead hull every Wed- 
heoday. ; Will accommodate nbeuv 
400 people. Modern and old tyme 
dancing, : ; t|27 



Mr. nnd Mrs. Stephen Doyle, 
was born and raised in New- 
market. He was employed In 
Cane's factory, becoming a fore- 
man there. Ho worked as a 
preventative officer for the do- 
minion government nnd for the 
Inst 14 years, was employed as 
an inspector by tho Liquor Con- 
trol Board of Ontario. 

Actively interested in public 
,nf fairs, Mr. Doyle _ was member 
of council after tho first world 
war. Ho was a member of the 
Independent Order of Foresters 
and the Holy Name Society. • He 
was a member of the Sacred 
Heart church. As a young 
man, Mr, Doyle was an active 
athlete, specially interested in 
baseball and hockey. In more 
recent yenrs, his attention was 
devoted to curling and bowling. 
Mr. Doyle married Margaret 
Doyle who survives him with 
two brothers, Tom nnd Frank ot 
Newmarket, and four sisters, 
J Mrs. Feo (Rose), Sault Sto. 
J Mario, Mrs. Osborne (Ann), Mrs. 

Duncan (Irene), and Grace, oil 

of Newmarket. 
The funeral service nt St. 

John's church was attended by 

friends and associates from 



SCHOOL RESULTS 

School examination results for 
Newmarket and district will be 
published in next week's issue 
of the Era and Express. 



MOVES OFFICE 

Dr. C S. Gilbert has moved 
his office from the King George 
hotel to 44 Main St., over 

Maher's Shoe Store, 






ColHngwood, Hamilton, Ottawa, 
Toronto, Richmond' Hill. 

Rev. T. J. McCabe conducted 
tho service. Rev. Father Basil 
Regan of St, Michael's College 
School was present In the Sanc- 
tuary and said the committal 
prnyer at the cemetery. 

Among those present wero 

members of the inspection 

branch, UC.B.O., W, J. Frixall, 

Q. Snnpe, J, A. Smith, John 

Hyndnjnn t B. Coon, F. Buchanan 

and J. McPhaden, all of whom 
had worked with Mr, Doyle. 

Pallbearers were six nephews, 
Larry Osborne, Jack and Don 
Duncan, Gene Howard and Clare 
Doylo. 



\ 




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square, 

Main St. 



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It may bo the start of a sec- 
ond business street on a small 
scale. A few years ago" one of 
the best topics of town council 
nnd barbershop discussion 

groups was a second Main St, 
along tho former Metropolitan 
railway right-of-way. The plan 
was fought down. Anyway Mr. 
J. W, Bowman Is building a 
store in thi*,tjrca between Bots- 
ford and Timothy Sts. ".** ,; /vv.K; 
Although it is a small shop in 
comparison to most Mali* ;.St« 
store*, Mr. Bojvmah aa>s.' Ihst 
there are many' types -of 

newes ' which could JocM«: 
secondary business street 



.■ 



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would find a small shop suitable. 
Tho store is on the south side of 
the market square opposite tho 

town hall. " i v W . 

'( It Is noted that many towns 
similar to : Newmarket such os 
Lindsay have, small secondary 
stress parallel to the main 
^!ehi/>vv;^ v;, ; > , 

v r.AHH6u|h;. 'JUbti Buwntan does 
«#•; J wlfhvtev.cV^afci excitement 
about? a <s fee on d Main St, or a 

ifuwr ^mM m*M } m : «** 

will) wp* out, v Ho had M 
Proj^rty; wanted ?fo'U|e itrHfc'lie 



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News 







Br all means place awnings j 
over your windows and other 
places that require protection 
from snn and wind Awnings 
are not only serviceable, bnt 
the way we make and place 
them they are pleasingly dec- 
orative. See our new designs, 
onr new color combinations 
and get onr prices. 



Barrie Tent & Awning Co. 



U BAYFIELD ST., BARRIE 



TEL. 43M 



■ 



■ 



i > 




This is the reward of each and 
every motorist that purchases a 
new Morris car* Either the fam- 
ily size Morris Oxford or the 
world famous Morris Minor. 

This reward is the saving each 
19,000 miles you drive. Compare 
your motoring costs with the man 
in a Morris. 




NEWMARKET 



* 



6 Water St. 



Phone 720 



** * .— 



,»4.* — — » _-m^.. 




WHITCHURCH CONSERVATION CLUB 











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Wednesday, July 5, 1950 

9 A.M. - COMMUNITY HALL, VANDORF 

TOUR YORK COUNTY FOREST AREA 

1 PJH. - MI DHURST PARK FOR LUNCH 

ZM r.M. - TOUR OF PLANTATION AND AQUARIUMS 

Those wishing transportation and those having extra 
transportation accommodation please notify the committee 
not later than June 30* 






EVERYBODY WELCOME 

Come and bring the family and picnic basket 

JOHN CRAWFORD, Sec. L. Jf. IIABPIB Pr«. 




*■"■**■ 



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(I you can't canotr, you 
shouldn't, no matter 

how romantic the night. 

But thirt ar» plenty of 

other boots for your 

safe en}oyment of 

our lakes and rivers. 

•OUMDTJV-IYKft 

BURKS FALLS 

HUNTSVILLB 
JACKSON'S PT. 

OKILLIA 

Subject to Change 



Sunday weather was ideal for 
the Pine Orchard cemetery dec- 
oration services. The attend- 
ance was large and Rev. James 
Findlay of Carlton St. United 
church, Toronto, gave a very 
inspiring message. The chorus 
by Newmarket male quartet was 
fitting for the occasion. 

The Willing Workers will 
meet on Thursday, July 6, at 
the home of Mrs. Wood. Note 
change of date. 

The Bogarttown Club picnic 
will be held on Wednesday, 
July 5, at Wilcox Lake. Every- 
body welcome. 

Guests at the home of Mrs. 
G. McClure and Mr. E. Madill 
for Sunday tea included Mr. and 
Mrs. R. Jewitt and Glenna of 
Kettleby, Mr. and Mrs. M. Mc- 
Clure and Wanda, and Mr. and 
Mrs. Doug McClure and Roger 
and Miss Joyce VanLuvan. 

Mr. and Mrs. A. Colville at- 
tended the dinner at Briar Park 
Lodge, Lake Simcoe, as guests 
of the lions club, Newmarket, 
last Thursday evening. 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank Chantler 
and Marie of Burlington and 



Mr. and Mrs. A. Forbes and 
Donna of Oshawa were Sunday 
guests at the home of Mrs. 
Chas. Toole. 
Mr/and Mrs. M. McNicol and 

Mr. and Mrs. Tom Sheridan, 
Bradford, had Sunday dinner at 
the home of Mr. and Mrs. Roy 
McNicol, Dunbarton. 

Mr. and Mrs. Herb Cole, 
Leona and Ward, Ravenshoe, at- 
tended decoration services Sun- 
day afternoon and had tea at 
the Greenwood home. 

Mrs. Raymond Stanley and 
two children of Columbiana, 
Ohio, are spending a few weeks 
with Mrs. Stanley's parents, 
Elmer and Elma Starr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Vern Sheridan 
and four children were Sunday 
supper guests at the home of 
Mr. Frank Sheridan. LUtle 
Miss Verna Sheridan remained 

for a week's holidays at her 

grandparents* home. 

Mr. and Mrs. M. McClure and 
Wanda, and Mrs. G. McClure 
had Wednesday night tea with 
the A. Richardson family, Au- 
rora. 




News off the W.I. 
In North York 



' 






News for this column must be In tht olfks Monday 
night Copy must be written u briefly as possible and 
confined to news and reports. Other than routine reports 
end announcement* will be printed separately. 



,-■-. 



Mount Albert News 



Mr. and Mrs. Geo. Calver of 
Renfrew were in town on Sat- 
urday calling on old friend3. 

Miss Anne Carruthers return- 
ed on Saturday from a trip to 
Vancouver. 

Mrs. T. Mather has returned 
to her home at Kapuskasing 



week at the home of Mr. and 
Mrs. J. Oliver, Sr. 

The members of the board of 
the United church are improv- 
ing the path that leads to the 
church from Centre Street which 
was badly in need of it. 

Mr. John Lundy is visiting his 



The Sharon branch is having 
a picnic at Midhurst Park on 
Tuesday, July 4. Bus to' leave 
Sharon at 10 a.m. Will the 
members please get their tickets 
early and bring your baskets 
along. 

Elmhnrst Beach branch will 
meet at the summer collage of 
Mrs. Chas. Hodgins at Glenwood 
park on Wednesday, July 5. All 
members are asked to bring a 
box lunch. Mrs. M. Millar will 
give a demonstration on making 
flowers. This meeting will be 
in form of a picnic. Everypne 
is welcome. 

Union Street branch will meet 
at the home of'Mrs. Roy Cowie- 
son on Thursday, July 6, at 8 
o'clock, D.S.T. Roll call: "Do's 
and don'ts in etiquette." Girls* 
program. Committee, Ida Bcr- 
tolin, Jean Rose; guest speaker 
will be from the department of 

agriculture. 

A collection was started at the 
last meeting for the Manitoba 
Flood Victims. Will those who 
have not given and wish to do 
so kindly bring or send contri- 
butions in time for the next 
meeting. Hostesses, south group 
to provide. Please note change 
of place and program. 



lovely lunch was served by the 
hostesses Mrs. Clayton Pogue, 
Mrs. Mervin Loucks and Mrs. 
James Wright. 



The Bognrttown branch was 
attended by over 30 lodics and 
22 children at the home of Mrs. 
Earl Toole on Tuesday, June 20. 
Mrs. Armitage «nve current 
ovenls and Mrs. G. McClure had 
a contest on "The Human Body." 



after spending a couple of weeks 1 nephew, Mr. S. Cain, and Mrs. 



with her sisters, the Misses Har- 
rison. 

Mr. and Mrs. Murray Kerr of 
Washington, Indiana, were at 
the home of Mr. and Mrs. H. 
W. Pearson last week renewing 
old acquaintances. 

The W.A. of the United church 
were hosts on Wednesday even- 
ing to Hartman W.A. and also 
members of the W.M.S. Their 
guest speaker was Dr. Margaret 
Arkinstall who gave a very 
interesting talk on the 25th 
birthday of the United church, 
telling what has been accomp- 
lished and what still is to be 
done. She also told of the work 
in hospitals in the north coun- 
try. At the close of this enjoy- 
able program, a nice social time 
was shared by all present. 
Thanks go out to all who made 
such a pleasant evening for so 
many. 

Mr. Dawson Dike has struck 
a flowing well while drilling for 
water on one of his lots on Vic- 
tory Drive where he was pre- 
paring to build a house. 

Miss Wilma Anglin of Toronto 
spent the weekend with her par- 
ents, Mr. and Mrs. W. S. Anglin. 

A number from town attended 
the Centennial picnic at Sharon 
on Saturday afternoon. 

Mr. Percy Thompson of Tor- 
onto spent several days last 



Cain at Sutton, for a few days. 
Mrs. S. Stickwood, Hope, was 
a Wednesday evening visitor of 

Mrs. R. Carr. 

Mr. and Mrs. V. Mitchell end 
daughters, Newmarket, were 
Sunday visitors of Mrs. John 
Cain. 

Mr. and Mrs. Jas. Slorack and 
Mrs. Mathers and Miss Eva Har- 
rison visited friends in Bramp- 
ton on Sunday. 

Mr. and Mrs. A. Crowle, New- 
market, visited Mr. and Mrs. G. 
Burnham on Sunday. 

The firemen will practise on 
Monday, July 3, at 7 p.m. The 
first Monday of each month is 
practice night. The siren will 
sound. 

Mrs. Herbert Harman arrived 
at Malton airport on Tuesday 
from a trip to Western Canada. 

Mr. Robt. Harmon of Parry 
Sound was a visitor this week- 
at the home of his sisters, Mrs. 
Thcaker and Miss Harmon. 

Mrs. B. Sinclair attended the 
anniversary of Kleinburg Wo- 
men's Institute on Tuesday af- 
ternoon. 

Mrs. V. Shields of Burlington 
is spending a few days with her 
sister, Mrs. E. Harmon. 

Mr. Jack Lapp is nursing a 
broken foot after a fall when the 
horse he was riding fell and 
threw him off. 



* 

Vandorf News 



$7.45 

90.60 
$1.85 
$3.40 



Wesley United church Wom- 
en's Association monthly meet- 
ing will be held at the home of 
Mrs. William Kingdon Tuesday 
afternoon, July 4. The motto is 
"The blue of heaven is greater 
than the cloud." The roll call 
is to be answered by naming a 
place in which you are interes- 
ted and tell why. Devotional 
period is "Seeing God in Nature' 1 
by Mrs, Hawtin. Topic will he 
a travelogue by Mrs. Geo. Rich- 
ardson and Mrs. Walter Graham. 
Hostesses are Mrs, Fred Avis 
and Mrs. Harry West. 

Mr. Bill Kontly spent the 
weekend at the Richardson home 
and will leave this week for 
Vernon, B.C. 

Mr. Arthur Mason of Agin- 
court and his brother, Mr. Reg- 
inald Mason of Toronto, had 
Sunday tea with Mr. and Mrs. 
If. A. White. 

We are sorry to report the 
illness of Mr. George Van Nos- 
trand who was rushed to n Tor- 
onto hospital on Saturday for an 
appendix operation. Wo wish 
him n successful recovery. 

Rev. nnd Mrs. John Addison 
have sold their farm, they moved 
on Saturday and are spending a 
holiday nt Lake Simcoo before 
taking up residence in Toronto. 

Rev. and Mrs. Harold Under- 
bill, missionaries from India, 
were Sunday guests of their 
nunt, Mrs. C. Bostwick. Rev. 
Underbill was special speaker 
at the Friends church, Newmar- 
ket. 

Mr. and Mrs. Everett Forres* 
ter of Beulnh, Man., had dinner 
with their cousin, Mrs. Roy 
Mo r ley and Mr, Morley, on 
Wednesday. 

Mr. and. Mrs. John Irwin, 
Johnny and Barbara spent Sun- 
day with Mrs. Irwin's father, 
Mr. Thaxlcr, Uxbrldge. 

Mr. nnd Mrs. If. C. Powell 
entertained their slnler-in-law, 
Mrs. Grant Powell of Toronto, 
president of the Local Council 
of Women, and Mr. Powell, on 
Sunday. They are leaving short- 
ly for a trip to England. 

The Whitchurch Conservation 
Club is making arrangements for 
n picnic trip for several schools 
in the township July 5, also any 
others who are interested In a 
visit to the Vivian Forest and 
later to Midhurst Park. Anyone 
wishing further Information Is 
to got in touch with Mr, John 
Crawford or Mr. I* Harper, 

Misses Doreen nnd Margot 

Ledson of Pfcrth are vWting a 
few days with their grandpar** 



ents, Mr. and Mrs. II. A. Switzor. 

Vandorf Women's Institute has 
accepted an invitation to supply 
the program at the Homemakers 
Club meeting July 13 at Van- 
dorf hall. They have also accep- 
ted an invitation to visit the 
Snowball branch August 23. 

Vandorf W.I. is sponsoring a 
Field Day and Picnic nnd an 
old fashioned community party 
at the Vandorf Community 
grounds Wednesday afternoon 
and evening July 19. Ball games, 
races, fish pond, ice cream and 
pop are being arranged for. All 
families of this community nro 
invited to bring n basket lunch 
which will be served on tables 

at 0.30. So come one como all 
and have a good time. 



Vandorf branch regular 
monthly meeting was held at the 
home of Mrs. Austin Richard- 
son, Wednesday afternoon, June 
21, with 37 members and friends 
attending. Mrs. George Rich- 
ardson, the president presided. 
It was decided to send $10. to 
York County Hospital Aid. The 
short course chosen was on froz- 
en foods. A splendid report 
was given on the District Annual 
meeting by Mrs. Clare Powell 
assisted by Mrs. H. White. A 
reading titled "Be the best of 
whatever you are" given by 
Margaret Richardson and a piano 
solo by Mildred Richardson 
were very much enjoyed. 

Mrs. Wicks, recently returned 
from England, gave us a travel- 
ogue of her trip. She gave us 
some very interesting facts of 
the conditions over there. She 
says the people are getting very 
tired as they have had such strict 
food rations for so long and 
that most of their woges go into 
taxes. She said the children in 
England are well cared for 
through a system in the schools 
when they serve them their 
meals with the proper vitamins 
added. The roll call was ans- 
wered with "the most interesting 
place I visited." Meeting closed 
with God Save the King and a 



HOLT 

Visitors at the home of Mr. 
and Mrs. Wm. Stickwood Sun- 
day were Mr. nnd Mrs. Elias 
Gibson and Verne, Quecnsvillc, 
Mr. nnd Mrs. Donald Stickwood 
nnd family, Sharon. 

Mrs. Rick Curry, Toronto, 
spent a couple of days last week 
with Mrs. Harold Watts. 

Mr. Alf Hill who underwent 
a serious operation recently Is 
able to be home again. 

A group of young people en- 
joyed the charivari Inst Wednes- 
day night ot Ralph Cupples for 
Mr. nnd Mrs. Wienecke. 

Mr. and Mrs. John Spence, 
Pefferlaw, were guests of Rev. 
nnd Mrs. N. A. Bosko Sunday. 



HOLT 

Tiic Farm Forum enjoyed a 

a picnic at Woodland Park June 

20. 

Mrs. Stewart Traviss suffered 

a slight stroke on Friday. At 

time of writing she is improving 
nicely. Friends and neighbors 
wish for her speedy recovery. 

Mr. and Mrs. Don Thompson 
Judy and Johnnie spent Sunday 
with Mr. and Mrs. Hunt Taylor, 

Roche's Point. 

Mr, and Mrs. Wilber Holliday 
celebrated their 1st wedding an- 
niversary last Wednesday, June 
21. 

Visitors at Harvey Gibney's 
home on Sunday were, Mr. and 
Mrs. Harvey Cole and family, 
Barrie, Mr. and Mrs. Clarence 
Bairett, Mrs. Harry Ford, Tor- 
onto. 

Mr. and Mrs. Murray Varney, 
Newmarket, celebrated their 6th 
wedding anniversary at the 
home of Mrs. Varney's parents, 
Mr. and Mrs. Thos. Andrews, 
Saturday. 

Mr. Bruce and Ira Coates at- 
tended Field Day at Guelph on 
Saturday, * 

Mr. Allen Holliday, Watson 
Lake, Yukon, spent Thursday at 
the home of his brother, Mr. and 
Mrs. Wilber Holliday. 

Mr. and Mrs. Aubrey Pollock 
and family spent Sunday with 
Mrs. Pollock's parents, Mr. and 
Mrs. Gordon Coates. 

A number from the communi- 
ty attended Decoration Services 
at Queensvilte and Pine Orch- 
ard. 

School closed here on Monday, 
June 26, owing to the illness of 
the teacher, Mr. Galloway. 

Mr. and Mrs. Wilber Holliday 
spent Sunday with Mr. Holli- 
day's parents, Mr. and Mrs. Fred 
Holliday, Brooklin. 

Mr. and Mrs. Fred Coates had 
dinner on Monday evening with 
Rev. and Mrs. N. A. Bosko. 

Mr. Harold Mahoney, Raven- 
shoe, was a visitor at the home 
of Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Cupples 
Sunday. 

A number of ladles from Holt 
attended the Cheerio Class, held 
at the home of Mrs. Harvey 
Leek, Mount Albert, on Sutur- 
day night. 



QUEENSVILLE 

Mrs. Mabel Thatcher spent 
the weekend with her son in 
Toronto. 

Mrs. John Hamilton of Mount 
Pleasaht spent Sunday with her 
daughter, Mrs. Bong. 



ELMHURST BEACH 

The Sunday-school picnic at St. 
Paul's church, Jersey, on Satur- 
day, June 24, was a grand suc- 
cess. The children of Christ 
church, Roche's Point, Sunday- 
school joined in the afternoon 
activities and all had a grand 
time. 

The W.A. met In the Parish 
Hall on Thursday, June 22, with 
18 members present. The ladies 
were busy sewing all afternoon 
nnd making plans for the bazaar 
and tea to be held on Mrs. Fred 
Lockerbie's lawn on Wednesday, 
July 12. Hostesses for the after- 
noon were Mrs. Thomas Lowndes, 
Mrs. Carl Anderson and Mrs. 
Bill Stephens. 

Don't forget the euchre every 
Tuesday in the Parish Hall at 
8.30 p.m. Good prizes. 

Mr. and Mrs. Elgin Hayes, 
Northmount, Mr. and Mrs. Orley 
Hayes and Margaret, Newmarket, 
and Mrs. Beatrice Deavitt and 
Mr. Norman Deavitt of Raven- 
sho^ were Sunday guests of Mr. 
and Mrs. Wesley Hayes and 

Beatrice. 
Mr. and Mrs. Austin Cain and 

family of Zephyr, and Mr. and 
Mrs. Morley Bain, also of 
Zephyr, -were Sunday guests of 
Mr. and Mrs. Bruce Lockie. 

Mr. and Mrs. Wallace Lunn 
are happy to announce the birth 
of a grandson born to their son* 



liUaw and daughter, Mr. and 
Mrs. Harry Webber, Toronto. * 
Miss Donna Anderson spent 
last weekend with Miss Doreen 
Anderson at Belhaven, 



ft 



'39.90 

PUTS A NSW 

NORGE 



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V: 






IN YOUR HOMK 



... -■--.■ 







Balance over 18 months 
IMMEDIATE DELIVERY 



SpiHette's Appliances 

34-38 Main St. 
PHONE 139 NEWMARKET 

Open Tuesday nights until 
9 pJR. 

This Friday night until 10 p.m. 
Closed Saturday, July 1 



BROWNHILL 

Mr. Timothy Longhurst hns 
been quite a busy mnn this year 
with his hnnds in most of tho 
gardens hereabouts. Ills record 
of rnt trapping Is good. Ho hns 
trapped about 50 rats this sea* 
son. Sorry to sny he won't re- 
ceive anything for the hides or 
even a bounty. However, keep 
up the good work, Mr. Long- 
hurst. 

Mr. Gordon Sedorc is driving 
a new chariot. 

Miss Shirley Scdore has be- 
come quite n pointer nnd decor- 
ator while working for Mrs. B. 
Sedore. 

Mr. Billy Mncnnmnra hns re- 
turned to the city after spending 
his vncntion at his summer houso 
here. 

All the new babies nt Brown- 
hilt nro doing t very well nnd so 
nrc the new mothers. 

Mr. and Mrs. J. Brnsseur havo 
moved Into their now homo. 

This Is tho week for the school 
picnic, Juno 29. Wo nil hope 
for fine weather for tho picnic. 

And might I say our school 
snfthnll team hns dono very well 
this year. Tho score of the tout 
gamo was 35 - 5 in favor of 
Brownhill, 

Mrs. Sargoant has tho usual 
stand for vegetables and fancy 
work. 

Tho Free Methodist camp 
meeting commences July 14 this 
year. Speakers are to be Hev. 
L. K. Snider, B.A„ Rev. R. A. 
Kelly, D.D., along with visiting 
preachers, For further Informa- 
tion write Rev. R, O. Babcock* 
58 Cotter St, Nvwmarket. Board 
and lodging can be ofrder*d 
from Rev. N. A. Bosko, Holt, 

Out 



ANSNORVELD 

Graduation exercises will be 
hcl ■' nt the Reformed church 
auditorium next Wednesday 
evening when the largest class 
of, tho Christian school since it 
began will graduate. 

Miss E. Havinga, daughter of 
Mr. A. Havinga, hns received 
her B.A. degree nt the Univer- 
sity of New York City last week. 



Sunday school as usual at 10 
n.m. next Sunday. A number of 
children received prizes for good 
work, good attendance and good 
behavior last Sunday, Congrn* 
tulatlons. 




don't yon know 
thil 85% of sll tttcitri* 
In milk come* from un- 
unhiitd miniili? Vou csn kilt 
t»cttrU-*tt lower counts with 

LO-BAX 
NOXSOIL 

In- dm, Cfclorint rinw. conltlm 
90% srsUftblt Ghlorhwi kills 
bscteris slam! innsntly on 
conuct. Vm Lo4u jm btfort 

milking. 

Noxsolt, tmd iu« star milk* 
iajc. cltim utfnsUi thoroughly 
~ h m f, brijhirr, «*ilf r. 

A$ ys*r «NMr#ii <»Wfr* 






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Watch 

FOR 

Children 

* 

Happy Holidays 

ARE 

Safe Holidays 



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KEEP YOUR FAMILY TOGETHER BY 
CAREFUL, COURTEOUS 

CHECK YOUR CAR . . . 

Check Your Driving too 



■ 



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This advertisement sponsored by the following- members 
of the North York branch of the Garage Operators* Association 
of Ontario: 

STILL'S OARAGE. QUEENSVILLE 

MORTON BROS., NEWMARKET - MOUNT ALBERT 

ALEXANDER'S OARAGE. QUEENSVILLE 

STOREY AUTO BODY, AURORA 

GEER AND BYERS, NEWMARKET 

T. M. KEFFER, NEWMARKET 

POLLOCK'S GARAGE. KESWICK 

JACK'S GARAGE. QUEENSVILLE 

AURORA AUTOMOTIVE, AURORA 






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"Tho SHUR-GAIN Way" 



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SHUR-GAIN fab an PRACTICAL FEEDS 






I.OCAI, MANUFACTURER 

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CONTROLLED QUALITY 



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; By Appointment 




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- '?■ ""-^ 



T. A* 



HULSE, 



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. Solicitor 
Notary Publl c, Etc, 



ACTEOSA FBONK 111 

UWeOlmctMSL 



K Main St - Over SpiliettV* 
PHONE 1050 '" 






- :•■■ " 




KESWICK, ONTARIO 



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VEGETABLES TOO 



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CARPENTRY 



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MATHEWS. STIVER 
LYONS * VALE * 

Barristers, Solicitors, 

Notaries 
N. L. Mathews, KC. 
H M. R. Stiver, B.A. 

B. E. Lyons, B.A. 
Joseph Vaui 

newmabkkt office 

m Mate »t 




EVERYTHING IN WOOD 

Houses, Trimming, Alterations 

Repairs 









'. 



«• 



A. M. MILLS 



I 

Notary Frtlla 
SI MAIN ST. 

Mmurket 



THE VARIETY OF 
DESIGNS 

fa out eollcetica o! MONU- 
MENTS is sue* teat we on meet 
almost any requirement both aa 
to kind and post Wo also aaako 
memorials to order of erery des- 
cription Toall find oar work 
excellent always and oar aerflee 
prompt and reasonably 



and Farm Maintenance 
First Class Workmanship 

I 

ANYWHERE — ANYTIME 
PHONE l«t?4 

W. J. Brookes 

Main St. Newmarket 



Ml 



, 



a * 



VIOLET 
ROBJNSON-MacNAUGHTON 

notaiy wkic 

Conveyancing - - Insurance 
1 Botsford St Phono ISO 

Newmarket 



G. W. LOBBY & SON 

MAIN ST. NEWMABKKT 



Insurance 



; 



ACCOUNTANTS 



S. J. HUNTER LINES 

k ACCOUNTANT 

** VANDOBF 

*eL Aaron SfBIS 

NEWMABKET — Phone 318 



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DENTAL 



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DR. W. 0. NOBLE 

DENTIST 
Over MUNICIPAL OFFICE 

OH lee 47 
Evidence 47 J 

Dr. C. E. VanderVoort 

DENTIST 

SI Main SL, Newmarket 
Fbom464w 

DR. A. O. FARBY, Dentist 

KESWICK, ONT. 

Office Hours: 10 - 12 a.m. 

2-5 p.m. 

For' appointment phone 

93R6, Keswick 

MEDICAL 



S. J. BOYD, M.D. 

214 Indian Bead 

TORONTO 
Phone ME. 9559 



JOHN E. JARVIS 

Confederation Life Association 

representative* 

Fire, automobile and casualty 

45 Eagle St* Newmarket 

Phones: Newmarket HWw 

Mount Albert 2417 



Consult 

J. A. WBIoughby & Sons 

for 

complete real estate serrko 

Head Office, Toronto 

256 Yonge St, AD. 06M 

City and Country Homes 

Farms and Small Acreages 

Industrial and Business 

Properties 
J, Denne is Your Local 

Representative 

Phone 292J, Newmarket 



A. E. HAWKINS 

* 

Contractor for 

BULLDOZING, GRADING 

CELLAR EXCAVATIONS 

and 

Hauling gravel, sand and fill 

Phone 219w, Aurora 



KEN FOOTING 

Piano Toner and Teeknlelaa 
Pianos Bought, Sold and Rented 

Phone 637J Estimates Fret 

38 Millard Ave, Newmarket, Ont 



A. STOUFFER 

19 Racks St 

Expert Piano Tuner and 

Repairer 

Pianos Bought, Sold and 

Rented 
Phone 276 






REFRIGERATION 

REPAIR SERVICE 

Domestic and Commercial 

All Makes 
SPEEDY 24-HOUR SERVICE 
Aurora and Newmarket Areas 
G. CHALK, Phone King 26B5 



NEW CABS AND TRUCKS 
FINANCED ' 

INSURANCE 

FIRE, BURGLARY, AUTO 

AND LIFE 

BILL MclNTYRE 

S Main St 
NEWMABKET 

Phone MOW 



TOMBIRREU 

AND SONS LTD. 

Ford & Monarch Ford Tractor 
Caw 



DR. G. MERVYN PEEVE* 

I . rkfftfcian and Surgeon 
^ Phone 415 

;• Consultation by Appointment 
^Dnly* At residence corner of 
Raglan and Tecumseh SU. 






DB. I. H. WESLEY 

Phone 13 
Phone 36J . 
CMfnlUtkmby 



Newmarket 
Roche's Point 



*^- 



* '^ 



:1 >*>jfc -,C. ARKIN8TALL 

Pbyalclan and Hun eon 

MARGARET ABK1NSTALL 

Phyaldatt 
Office 125 Prospect St 

CensalUUon by Appotctmet 
TELEPHONE; Office 91S 
Residence 399w22 
Dn. W. C* & M. Arklnstall 
W Save purchased the goodwill 
and prescriptions of , 
Dr. B. J. Boyd 



tDft. 



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L r . W 



•■jrjSrr . 



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66 Gorham St. 
fEWMARKET 

- : ^"XTflioBe M5 

sase con exist In ft 

chemicalized blood stream. 
;fi'The HfelSHtho flesh Is In 

*;the blood" 
Bring us your aches and pains 
You may suffer on « you will?? 
But there is no need now to suffer 
roar Appointment 
i "Health" Today 

aboat our Health Club 



■ *~W^' 




STOUFFVILLE SAND 
AND GRAVE LID. 

for government approved, crush* 
ed stone of various sizes, crushed 
gravel, sand, concrete gravel and 
pit run - delivered or at bin. 

Plant phono 125 
Of flee, phones 370 and 126 



Anglia & Prefect 

Can 

Ford Tracks 



Fordson 
Tractor 



ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR 

Ifoujte nnrl Farm Wiring 

DOUG RAIN 

General Repair* 

Tlmkcn Oil Burners 

Fawcett Space Heater 

All Electrical Household Appliances 

Phone 422 Bo* 717 

U OnUrlo St W. Newmarket 







& 




. : :«*K*rr**ert^v-;i 



BUTTEBFIELD, O L.8. 

'eyor, Englnoer and 

ft\AMts^ * > 1 



Town Planner 
S30_BAY|SjP. t i TORONTO (1) 
— eekend summer address: 
LAND DROVE, ONT, 






c^ohnaton's Ferry 




STEWART BEAM 
RADIO SERVICE 

RADIO PARTS, TUBES 

BATTERIES, ETC. 
113 Main St. gggg tW 

GEER ft BYERS 

Dealers la 

DODGE AND DESOTO 
CARS * DODGE TRUCKS 

Complete stock of 
Genuine Chrysler Parts 

Phone 68 

E, BECKETT, RRAL ESTATE 

Listings invited for town and 

farm properties, also small acre. 

ages and cottages. 

D'ARCV MILLER 

Your Local Representative 

S9 Gorham St., Newmarket 
_'_^ Phone fl 

D, 4 HARTFORD 

Plastering Contractor 

WRITE RICHVALE, ONT. 

or phone 872J, Newmarket 

FREE ESTIMATES 



, 



Dearborn Farm 
Equipment 

"Genuine Ford Parts" 

Phone 7M Newmarket 



Complete Stock of Gennlae 
GENERAL MOTORS PARTS 

SEDORfS 
MOTOR SALES 

Dealer In 

CHEVROLET AND 

OLDSMOBILE CARS 

CHEV. AND MAPLE LEAF 

TRUCKS 

Complete garage service for all 

makes of cars and tracks 

FIIONfc B51 



EVANS' FUELS 

newmarket 

Coal, Coke. Wood 
And Stoker Coal \ 

PHONE S 

Orders taken for grave], sand 

and crushed stone 

and general hauling 



JOHN DALY 

Expert Watch and Clock Repair 

SI Gorham Street 

or 

Phone M8W* Newmarket 

ALL WORK GUARANTEED 



Well, here i: am again, and I 
am still keenly interested in 
gardens and want to write an- 
other little bit along that line, 
even if I said last week I'd 
change the subject. All those 
other things can have their turn 
when we have no flowers in our 
gardens to tell about. You see 
I have something a little off the 
regular line this week to write 
about. I told about wild flow- 
ers last week and the beautiful 
wild orchids; this time I want to 
tell about several splendid vege- 
table gardens I have seen lately. 

At the garden tea held in the 
beautiful grounds of Mr. Aubrey 

Davis, at the top of Millard Ave., 
wo were priviledged to go x 
through a rustic gate west of 
the rose garden and along a 
path beside the orchard, through 
the part where a few years ago 
Mr. Davis tried his hand at re- 
forestry with the result that now 
he has a "plantation" of beauti- 
ful young evergreens, already 
quite a bit taller than I, along 
a path leading to that delightful 
little grove of fine tall trees I've 
so often written about. What I 
am trying to say is that we pass 
through part of the vegetable 
garden, and I assure you, folks 
were keenly interested in it — 
rows and rows of vegetables of 
all kinds, not a weed to be seen. 
There were also long rows of 
iris of a beautiful pale mauve 
shade that roused the envy of 
everyone who saw them. There 
were iris flowering in such un- 
expected places everywhere, and 
all along the fence to the grove 
are flowering shrubs— hawthorn, 
sumach, flowering currant, etc., 
and in the orchard the two sleek, 
fat Shetland ponies, the pets of 
all the younger generation in 
former years, now spend their 
declining years in comfortable 
surroundings. 

There were still a few annuals 
in the hot-bed, awaiting trans- 
planting. Oh what a satisfying 
garden it is! And now I've had 
an invitation to sec another 
splendid vegetable garden, and 
I must say it too was most satis- 
fying. Not a weed anywhere. 
Rows of every known vegetable, 
with a new asparagus bed ready 
for cutting next year. Such to- 
matoes and such green peas — 
potatoes in flower already. Great 
long rows of gladiolus, 12 or 15 
inches high this early. Oh yes, 
there were flowers as well — 
and bridal wreath ail along the 
edge of the lawn. Lettuce ami 
radishes and onions, beets and 
carrots, corn, N too. 

Jt does your heart good to see 
such a splendid vegetable gar- 
den right in the heart of the 
town. It reaches from Tecumseh 
St. more than half way to Queen 
St. It is the garden of Mr. and 
Mrs. A. J. Miller, Tecumseh 
St. — and it was quite a treat 
lo be allowed to see such a weed- 
fice, flourishing garden, all so 
orderly and the rows so straight. 

Right opposite, you can see 
the most inviting pleasure gar- 
den of Dr. and Mrs. Pccvcr, 
through the decorative picket 
fence. You can see the huge 
garden umbrella and garden 
chairs and flower borders. We 
used to be able to nee Dr. tind 
Mrs. Case's lovely garden through 



er now 



Brian Doherty runs 

Red Barn Theatre 

Getting a favorable verdict from a theatre audience 
and critics is a good deal more difficult than presenting 
your case in a court of law, says lawyer-turned-producer 
Brian Doherty who has taken over the Red Barn 
Theatre at Jackson's Point. 

'The Canadian jury of theatre- 
goers is recognized here and in 




the United States for its good 
judgment in condemning a show 
or predicting its ultimate suc- 
cess," Mr. Doherty says. He be- 
lieves especially in giving a show 
the kind of summer theatre try- 
out The Drunkard had two years 
ago in Muskoka before Doherty 
Productions took it on tour across 








ROY WOLVIN 






Canada and the United States. 
As he prepares for the July 1 
opening of his 1950 summer ser- 
ies of musicals at the Red Barn, 
Mr. Doherty presents one of the 
best cases of his theatrical career 
in collaboration with Roy Wolvin, 
young Montreal actor, director 
and composer well known in 
New York. Together they intend 
to stimulate Canadian laugh- 
reactions with new and fast- 
paced comedy acts, sparkling 
novelty songs and dances. 

With the showmanship which 
ensured the success of his num- 
erous Canadian and American 
tours, Mr. Doherty has spent 
more than a year and a half 
assembling the Red Barn comp- 
any from hundreds of young 
Canadians auditioned for beauty 
and talent in cities coast to coast. 

The result is a group of 25 top- 
flight professionals prepared to 
sing and dance their way through 
comedy acts from the pens o£ 
some of Canada's foremost stage 
writers. 

First Doherty-Wolvin produc- 
tion at the Red Barn will be 
Crazy With The Heat, starring 
the famous Canadian comedian, 
John Pratt. Crazy begins a scr- 
ies of four two-week musical 
comedy revues. 

Mr. Doherty became a qualif- 
ied lawyer in 1929. In 1937, his 



home on Park Ave. but since the 1 play, Father Malachy's Miracle, 



new parsonage of Trinity United 
has been in process of building, 
we can see it no more. 

Mr. Elgin Perrin's garden on 
Gorham St. is always a picture — 
and this year his tulips and early 
spring flowers were no excep- 
tion. We are sorry to hear that 
Mr. Perrin himself has been on 
the sick list, and not able to en- 
joy his garden as in former 
years. We hope he will soon be 
back in his garden in good health 
onco more. 

I want to add a few more 
words to tell about the lawns 
and flower gardens up around 
Indianola Beach, Lake Simcoe, 
where I was privileged to be one 
day this week. Mr. and Mrs. F. 
Chandler always invite our 
church group up to their summer 
home for an annual picnic, and 
when one looks back to early 
days it is amazing how people 
and Mother Nature have literally 
"changed the wilderness to a 
garden of Eden." You do not 
have to look back many years to 
recall the opening up of that 
section of the shore of Lake Sim- 
coe. Mr. and Mrs. Chandler 
were among the first to build in 
that section and their summer 
home Is one of the most attrac- 
tive along the shore. 

Mr. Chandler has built a sort 
of arbor as an entrance, and a 
shelter for the car from the sun. 
Years ago he planted a grape- 
vine and that smalt beginning 
has now grown to wonderful 
proportions, literally covering 
the irellis-work, but it Is the 
blossoms on that grape-vine that 
amazed inc. The arbor must be 
six or eight feet long, and the 
vine covers it completely. If all 
those blossoms set they will have 
a good crops of grapes. We told 
time by his sun.diul, as wc did 
Inst week up at Mr. Aubrey 
Davis* home; but wc remember, 
ed we were on D.S.T. and sun- 
dials naturally run on sun time. 
If the out-of*d*,w 5 surroundings 
at the cottage of Mr. and Mrs. 
Chandler were attractive, what 



was produced on Broadway. 
Then came the war, and on dis- 
charge from the RCAF, Wing 
Commander Doherty forsook the 
law to devote full time to the 
theatre. 

Since the war, Brian Doherty 
Theatre Productions have hand- 
led the Canadian tour of the 
John Gielgud Company and both 
United States and Canadian tours 
of the Dublin Gate Players and 
the Michael Redgrave-Flora 
Rob-son production of Macbeth. 
The 1948 season found Mr. 

Doherty on a successful Canadi- 
an and American tour with The 
Drunkard, followed in 194D by a 
journey through major Canadian 
cities with Arsenic And Old Lace. 
Roy Wolvin, co-producer with 
Mr. Doherty at the Red Barn, 




BRIAN DOHERTY 



ro 



can we say of the grand wood 

£ , . . , fire Mr. Chandler built for us In 

their picket fence behind their ■ his big fire place? 






has been Interested in the thent 
sinco childhood. While a stud- 
ent at McGUl University he look 
part In musicals and plays, and, 
Inter, in the Royal Canadian 
Navy, he wrote, produced and 
appeared In the Navy stage show, 
Wakey- Wakey. After a post-war 
season in Connecticut with the 
Greenwich summer theatre, he 
moved to New York to sing, dance 
and stage-manage for the Broad, 
way musical, Naughty-Naught. 
At tho Red Barn, he will con- 
tribute songs and comedy rou- 
tines for many of the season's 
prominent guest stars. 



LOCAL AND LONG DISTANCE ] 

p.av.'s^g 

CONTRACTS CO 






rms&im, newmarkct 

Authorized Dealers h ™».c .«™ 



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rH*^.^>-^Wjg>M.*i^-:w ^^.i^r^rT'' 



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Regal Pi 9 Starter 

Rc S al 

Regal Sow 

MADE ONLY BY 

PERKS FEED MILL 

Newmarket, Ontario 



also available at 

Bradford Feed Mill, Bradford 

Davidson's Store. Belhaven 

R. Chapman's Service Station, Pine Orchard 






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PROTECT 
YOUR 



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Contour farming helps reduce soil wasting and 
flooding of fertile lmttom lands. It conserve 
soil, water, scctl, fertiliser and tractor power and 
is of incstiuialilo value to every farmer with 
moderately sloping land. 

Yet, much can be learned by consulting with your 
nearest Agricultural College or Experimental 
Farm, 1 here are methods that case work, improve 
results, wliith they may Lo aide to pass along to 
you. Special cases are dealt with individually. 

In farm hanking, tho Hank of Toronto ofTcrs you tho 
same kind of useful service— advice hacked by 95 
years of experience in serving Canadian farmers. We 
invito you to drop in and make the acquaintance ol 
our local manager. Ho will Lo glad to discuss tho com. 
pleto facilities offered hy this Lank. 




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BAKER 

Window Frame*, Sash, Kitchen 

Cupboards mndo and installed if 

desired, also take contraets for 

Lultdinr of summer cotta«et, 




-...dWr 

ESTIMATES 
CHEEHFULi; 

111 AND 

^ raOKEIMJ 




AT THEIR NEW OFFICE 
AND SHOWROOM 

129 Main St., Newmarket 

will bo pleased to discuss any 
questions relating to 

INSULATION, ASPHALT 
HOOFING, SIDING AND 

BUILT-UP BONDED ROOFS 

if you call. 

Inspections surveys and 
estimates FREE, , 

Generous budget terms 
can bo arranged. 

PHONES 831, M9W 
1021M 






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Chemistry is spovts-minded too ... is part and 
parcel of enough sport* and pastimes to fill m\ Olympic 
programme Ammunition for field and rongoj Nylon 
for tennis rackets, fishing lines and long-lasting Nylon for ■' 
sportswear; Plastics, Paints and Lacquers for bolter 
ski equipment . * . these are but a fow of Chemistry^ 

contributions to tho world at play. Yes, tho all-round 
sports chompion— Chemistry, is symbolized by tho 
. C-I-L Oval, tho quality.mark of tho company 
Hiwvlno Canadians Through Chemistry. 1 ! 



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"ACT NRFORMANCI 

Euy.llving Nylon for sports 
clothe* and Nylon for 

racket siring* aire luting 
performance under all 

coaditlonte 



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FUN WITH A GUN 

Whether you go for tkttU 
_ iron or target shooting;, 

for bluU, upland game er 

big game . « .your itaadby 

is C-t-b Ammunition* 

detlgned for every 

•booting need 



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schools thoy attend. ; h '$& 
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when yoa a*e tough Nylon 
Haw and leaders, new a 
ttaoat" will* ftitdo 



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PA|^ 4 llie Newmarket Em And Express, Ttanfry, lone 2$, 1§5# 



Pages fr 



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the 



Editor's Notebook 



The centennial celebration at 
Sharon Temple on Saturday 
was a pleasant affair and not 
seriously inconvenienced by 
the beat. A larger crowd 
might have been more gratify- 
ing to those who prepared the 
celebration, but had the crowd 
been larger, there would have 
been less of the homey, easy- 
going atmosphere of neighbors 
visiting and old friends renew- 
ing ties. 

We think it must have been 
educational too for a good 
many residents of North York 
who have driven time and 
time again by the old Temple 
without in the least realizing 
its significance and place in 
the county's history nor aware 
of the treasures of the county 
history which were contained 

within it. 

It was a revelation to us to 
hear it described as the oldest 
public building in the county. 
Osgoodc Hall is the oldest pub- 
lic building in Toronto and the 
Temple pre-dates It. The cen- 
tury and a quarter which has 
passed since the building of 

the Temple was undertaken is 
a fair measure of our compara- 
tive youth on this continent 
and must seem merely a pass- 
ing phase to visitors from 

abroad who are accustomed to 
monuments of a thousand years' 
duration. But if the Temple 
dates the county as an infant, 
historically, wc can at least \el 
it is a lusty, growing Infant 
with some remarkable accom- 
plishments in its 100 years of 
existence. 

Some 70 percent of Ontario 
industry lies within its board- 
ers. Its council is the fourth 
largest legislative body in Can- 
ada, exceeded only by the 
Federal house, and the legisla- 
tures of Ontario and Quebec. 
Its assessment, some $227 mil- 
lion, is the largest county as- 
sessment in the province and its 
population, excluding Toronto, 
of 400,000, is also the largest. 
Including Toronto's population, 
York county has one-quarter of 
the population of Ontario with- 
in its limits. 

♦ * * 

* 

We enjoyed the Indian 

dances although afterwards, 
ive were somewhat disillusion- 



ed- The committee in charge 
had .tried to have Lake Simcoe 
Indians for the performances 
. but without success. The In- 
dians who danced on Saturday 
were Mohawks from Oswekon 
near Brantford and were mem- 
bers of the All Canadian Indian 
Variety and Theatrical Troupe 
under the direction of A. T, 
Middleton, better known per- 
haps as Chief Fighting Wolf. 
He told us that he had been 
born on Lake Simcoe but that 
members of the troupe were 

from Brantford. 

The undoubted star of the 
performance was a little Indian 
girl, Sun Flower by name, and 
never was there a more appro- 
priate choice. She gave us a 
solo dance and then with a ges- 
ture that reminded many of a 

very young Barbara Ann, blew 
a kiss to her admiring audi- 
ence. The response made the 
leaves dance in their turn. 

And it was a colorful scene 
too when members of the 
Qaeen's York Rangers paraded 
in the uniform of the regiment 

in 1709. One becomes accustom- 
ed to seeing old costumes and 
uniforms on dummies or neatly 
folded in museums. When they 
arc filled out by flesh and' 
blood they make a brave show. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

As pleasant as Saturday was, 
however, we continue to feel 
that the centennial is not being 
given its due, unless of course, 
there are other events in the 
planning stage. York county is 
far too important a unit in the 
provincial, indeed the federal, 
picture that its centennial be 
dismissed lightly. We don't 
think for a minute that pa- 
geants and fire works and all 
the other trappings of public 
birthdays are themselves an 
objective, but they do help to 
firmly implant in the minds of 
all who witness them something 
of the meaning of the event. 

York county has had a brave 
history but for most of its 
residents, it continues to remain 
a closed book. The York Pion- 
eer and Historical Society has 
done much to reawaken the 
glories of the past, but its 
labors arc too frequently ignor- 
ed. 







• 




Office €«i reperl* 



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^^~^ W •—— ▼▼▼.▼ ^/-— ^---^ ^ 

Serving Nswmarket, Aurora and hS« rural districts of North York 
The Newmarket Era 1852 The Express Harold lit 5 

- 

Pc/W/shtd ovory Tfcvrstfoy at 142 Main $f., Ntwmarkot, by fno Nowmorkol fro and Exprot* limited* Mm A. Mtyor, adth*. 
Subscrlpf/on $4 fat two yon, $2.50 for ono year, In advoitco. Singh tophi oro 5e tach* Momfcor of h\o Canadian 
W**kly Niwtpapan AnocfoNon and fho Audit Buroau of Cfrcufarfons. Author! fd at Socood Cfnis Miff, Past Offfco 

Doparhnonr, Ottawa. 



From the File* of 



The Editorials: 

Citizens Band wins again 

111 its 80 years, the Newmarket Citizen's Band has 
been a frequent winner at music festivals. On Saturday, . 
under the baton of Mr. Bill Grieg, it won again, taking 
the first prize for bands from centres of less than 10,000 
at the Waterloo Musical Society Band Festival. It was 
a close contest as the marking would indicate, New- 
market scored 93 points of a possible 100. A band from 
Wisconsin, U.S.A., had 9216, and the Leamington band 
had 91. There were ten bands entered. 

The earliest records of the Newmarket Citizen's 
Band at e dated 1870. About 1885, a complete set of new 
instruments was brought out from England. Mr. Tom 
McDonald was the leader and Mr. E. S. Cane, the secre- 
tary at that time. For several summers, the band used 
to play one evening a week at the different school 
grounds, carrying with them coal oil torches on poles 
by which to read their music. 

At one time, there was a band stand at the top of 
Main St. hill, where the Dales apartments now stand. 
One of the earliest bands wore frock coats, with wide 
brim soft felt hats with large white ostrich feathers on 
top. 

The band has always been a popular institution 
in Newmarket, and iU summer Sunday evening con- 
certs in Lions club park are enjoyed by many. Recently, 
a band platform was built in the park. Now the band 
is anxious to see a shell built over the stand so that the 
music will be heard better, and lights so that darkness 
will not halt the concerts. There is talk too of placing 
seats. 

These sound like worthwhile undertakings. The 
band has demonstrated its quality* as if there was much 
doubt among the townsfolk, and it is only reasonable to 
provide the facilities so that their music can be the 
more enjoyed. 



25 and 5© Years Ago Tempi* n«tdi support 



JUNE 2G, 1935 

Sutherland's church, Brad- 
ford, is closed after being in use 
continuously for 90 years. The 
ground on which the church 
stands was deeded to the Meth- 
odist church in Canada in De- 
cember, 1885, by Mr. Suther* 
land. The first church was a 
log building, then a rough-cast 
and the present brick building 
was erected in 1376 and was 

opened by Rev. Dr. Potts- The 
closing services on Sunday were 
conducted by Rev. Dr. Harper, 
Aurora, and Rev. Geo. Law* 
rente, Clarkson. 

Miss Anna Dow has resigned 
her position on the public 
school staff. She has accepted 
an appointment on the staff at 
Ottawa, her home city. 

Mrs. (Dr.) Hutlcdge has re- 
ceived the appointment of or- 
ganist and choir leader at the 
Christian church. 

On Tuesday evening a fare- 
well social was given to Rev. 
and Mrs. J. F. Dunlop in the 
basement of the United church, 
Qucensville. An address, was 
read by W. If, Eves and a purse 
of money was presented by Max 
Bait. Rev. J. C. Cochrane gave 
a humorous address. 

Rev. J. C. Cochrane leaves 
next week for his pastorate at 
North Bay and preaches his 
farewell sermon on Sunday ev- 
ening. Rev. W. L. Lawrence, 
Toronto, former minister at the 
United church. Newmarket! Is 
going to Sault Ste. Marie, 

Sergeant Ilmtnluck, Toronto, 
was at Island Grove this week 
imiking arrangements for n 
Catholic Boys' Life Council 
camp. There arc 150 hoys with 
their leaders coming on July 2 
to stay 40 days at Island Grove 
Park. 



JUNE 29, 1900 

Mr. J. R. Y. Broughton, his 
father and Rev. A. McGillivray 
went fishing down the Holland 
River last week and caught sev- 
en lunge in the lake, not far 
from the rnouth of the riven 

Afr. Obed Widdifield, Pine 
Orchard, brought in a sample of 
his rhubarb on Monday. The 
stock measured 2' 8" in length 
and the same measurement 
across the leaf. 

A number of people visited 
Mr. E. Jackson's conservatory at 
the Bowery last Tuesday even- 
ing to see a night blooming ceres 
in flower. 

Although the weather was 
threatening last Tuesday even- 
ing, the Presbyterian garden 
party held on Silas Armitege's 
lawn was vary successful. Four 
hundred attended and proceeds 
warn $70. 

Mrs. O. J. Wilson went to 
Whitby to see har daughter, 
Miss Kiva York, graduate. They 
both returned home on Tues- 
day. 

On Tuesday afternoon the 

students at Newmarket high 

school presented Miss Starr, 

who has been Uie science teach* 
er for two years, with a gold 
plated clock- Miss Berte Wes- 
ley read the address, Clarence 
Grondy made the presentation 
and Morley Cody presented Miss 
Starr with o bouquet of red 
and white roses. 

Recent visitor* in Kcttlcby 
iiavc been Dr. and Mrs, Butler, 
Mr. Frank ButJer, Mr. Win. 
Blackburn, Mr. Jos. Lemon and 
Mrs. T. M. I low tin), Toronto. 

Mr. C. Penrose, Pine Orchard, 
held a bee on Tuesday and suc- 
ceeded in getting nearly rill thfc 
brick he required for his house 
drown from Aurora, 



The York Pioneer and Historical Society acquired 
the Temple of Peace at Sharon in 1918 when a number 
of public spirited citizens subscribed towards its pur- 
chase price. Since then, it has been maintained by the 
society as a museum of county history. It is a happy 
location. The Temple is, of course, unique in its con- 
struction, and it illustrates a chapter in the life of North 
York, ft Is the oldest public building in the county. 

Unfortunately, as was revealed in the address of 
Maj. J. C, Hoyleii, president of the York Pioneer and 
Historical Society, the building is in the need of repair 
and some consideration must lie given to restricting its 
contents to relics of immediate county interest. He said: 

"We have sought to maintain it (the Templo) as a 
pioneer museum. We quite agree with those who point 
out to us that such a museum should not Im a dumping 
ground for uti reflated objects. Neither should it he a 
place where people send things limy do not want to 
keep themselves. Kill with our limited resources, our 
plans have to ho worked out gradually. Our groat and 
immediate responsibility, wo fool, is to maintain the fab- 
ric of the building Itself, A number of porsous already 
today have mentioned the need for repairs. Wo ii}« only 
too conscious of this need. We hope thai in York coun- 
ty may be found those who will coino to our assistance 
in v/hat is becoming an emergency situation so far as 
this building is concerned," 

it is a hope shared by all with tho in lores I of the 
county at heart. Til© society itself could possibly con- 
tribute moro if there was a determined effort to publi- 
cize the Temple ahd its content* by Uie many thousands 
of tourists who drive up Yongo Ml. ami the third con- 
cession. Their admissions could he made a major sham 
of the cost of repair. 



Tli« future of lh« mailtat 






ttmtfVt *<***• 



By STANLEY 




The ground floor of the town hall has boon used 

by the weekly farmers 1 market for years, Now lis 
renovation into offices for the health unit is conlom- 
phtlcd, If this is carried out, where will the market go? 
We know of no alternative site except outdoors In the 
square whore portable booths with roofs could be set up. 
This would be practical in the warm weather only. 

Tho possible eviction of tho market raises tho ques- 
tion: Is the market worth keeping? Apparently "yen" 
in the opinion of the JBnst fiwillimhury Federation of 
Agriculture. Tho executive recently pnssed a resolu- 
tion directed towards the improvement of the market, 
Tlds is, to the host of our knowlodge, the first indica- 
tion in some years that a farmer's organization was lit* 
i lerested in maintaining the market, 



The market has been nominally under the direction 
of the town council. Until the last few years there was 
a market committee. As the market has deteriorated, 
there has been little, if any, official cognizance of its 
existence beyond the announcing of changing hours, 
and the Christmas markets. The market has become 
less and less important as modern retailing has over- 
come many of the market's advantages. 

What is unfortunate about the market is that had 
some intelligent interest been shown in it, an asset 
could have been made of it both for town and farmer. 
Markets are not obsolete despite chain stores and other 
recent developments. Given the supervision they re- 
quire, they can be made to serve a useful purpose for 
both buyer and seller. Neither town nor farmer has 
provided that supervision either jointly or singly. 

Frequently in the past, there were complaints from 

the town that the farmer would not assume any share 

in tho market's responsibility, a complaint which was 

echoed just as frequently by the farmer and directed 

at the town. The truth is that a well managed market 

would be sufficiently important to both town and farmer 

to justify the acceptance by either of the full responsi- 
bility. 






. Since the above was written, council has reversed its 
decision to use the {/round floor of the market bnitdiny 
for health unit offices, and instead is now seeking the 
purchase of the Webb property for that purpose. 



Says price support must 90 



The next decade, says Mr. Sumner H. SKchter, 
noted economist, writing in The Atlantic Monthly, "will 
be a crucial period in the economic and political life of 
the United States." He relates his observations to the 
state of the country's domestic economy and its position 
in the cold war with Russia. Two major economic ad- 
justments, he says, must be made. The first is the bal- 
ancing of U.S. foreign trade aud the second is in M tlu> 
adjustment in the prices of farm products to the long* 
run conditions of supply and demand/* 

The United States is currently spending about $ t.-l 
billion keeping up the price of agriculture products and 
at tho same time, piling up huge surpluses of farm pro- 
ducts priced too high to clear the market. These $ui> 
phiKcs are bound to increase as long as the government 

continues In maintain its present policies. The govern* 

ment, however, dares nol quit this policy, despite it$ 
cost, for fear of being thrown out of power by the farm 
vote. Tho Hranuan plan is an attempt to compromise 
political aud economic fact, and without too much suc- 
cess, 

"ESvent unity," sa.Vs Mr, Slichter. "tho support levels 
will have to bo lowered so that they become effective 
only in times of abnormally low dcmand—mul possibly 
in periods of lotnporarily largo supply/ 1 Mr. Slichter 
thinks tho adjustment can bo made in a time of expand- 
ing economy without hurting the general economy of 
the nation. Increasing population aud more acllvo sell- 
ing it) the domestic market will help sustain farm prUvs, 

Tho United States Is some years ahead of Canada 
In its farm price policies, but llio gap will be rapidly 
narrowed if the minister of agriculture, Hon* James 
(Sardiner, carries out his promise of permanent price 
supports, after tho pattern of the United Staltvi, In llio 
light of our nolghhor's huge surpluses, the heavy Inxav 
lion required to maintain prices, and now tho effort to 
compromise this policy with tho count ry'a economic in- 
ability to support II indefinitely, there seems Hit to rea- 
son to follow that lead. 



Fair w««th«r ahead 

A good many individuals on Main St, had begun to 
believe that lite long expected postwar slump was on us 
last fall. Newmarket has indeed felt some of the effect 
of iho inevitable postwar re-adjustment, particularly 
where ioeal firms had been doing extensive trading in 
stcrlingjireas. However, there is not now any Indica- 
tion of a slump, or recession such as was exacted. 

Thorn aro a number of reasons why there shouldn't 

be. There Is hotter regulation of economic factors 

which helped preclpllato tho 1020 break, nuslnossmon 
are generally moro cautious In thoir plans than In tho 
1020'*. There are several other reasons, Hut moro im* 
porlanl than these aro tho indications of increasing 
business lu tho future, Of these, perhaps tho most con- 
crete aro tho recent five-year contracts signed In tho 
auto 1 >lan Is, Hero was clear evidence of management 
belting on a prosperous future. 

Tho contracts meant moro than optimism, how- 
ever. Mr, !,coii If* Keyserling, chairman of Prosldont 
Truman's economic committee, says they aro tho kind 
of policies which encourage prosperity. 



- 



tho itof h tho $ •rvant, not Iho mentor, o9 tho pooplot tho itoto h thotr gvoramftf 
ogatntt Inhingomonf on thoir rigftft, thoir agont In tnrorrmtionol and national foutf/ H 
U not tho function^ at tho §tafo §a auwna iho frothon of thoto ottivMoB wMcfc rott 

*■ on lr#vtM *om ^ 



■ . - 

Catnips By dinger 



There's much talk about slore 
closing, opening and holiday 
hours these clays. Your favor- 
ite cat correspondent has taken 
it on himself to wake the l.tTMst 
rapid survey of retail establish- 
ments on Main St. 

These are the findings. D2 
percent of nit the merchants aro 
definitely in favor of all-day 
Sunday closing. The remaining 
8 percent said that they realty 
had nothing against these hours 
but that they wanted to make 
sure all merchants were in fav- 
or of It before they would make 
a definite statement. 

In a quick gallup down Main 
St. it was discovered that ten 
merchants have been secretly 
putting arms into a cache. 
Their plan is an uprising in 
Ottawa to force an order-in- 
council whereby all statutory 
holidays which fall on Satur- 
days will fall on Tuesdays so 

that they can be changed to 
Mondays by local authority so 
that a petition may be circulat- 
ed supporting store closing 
hours for late Friday night. 

Co-ordination and co-opera- 
tion was being preached by one 

of the radical Main St. merch- 
ants on a street corner. He 
was assassinated this morning. 

The suggestion made by your 
correspondent that a Chamber 
of Commerce be formed again 
was considered by most as 
sheer effrontery. 

Since the news came out 
Tuesday morning about a stock 
market slump over the Korean 
war, one merchant has been re- 
maining open until 6 a.m. when 
the night watchmen get their 
pay and come down town on 
mad spending sprees. He has 
been branded as an opportun* 
lit. 

-. • •' 

The story of the bank hold- 
up and shooting is over but an. 



■ 
other hair raising account has 

since appeared in a city paper 

about another trigger' happy 

man in the same back woods. 

Two ardent newsmen had set 

off for the country and one of , ; 

the paper boys made the cap* 
litre. The paper guvts it tho 
big full-length spread with 
pictures. . ' 

One of tho pictures ahowe&.tf^ 
.burly reporter leading nwav 
his captive. The uuwsmaiw^ 
ft. 10 or It inches, towered 
over a frail, pint ailed "erlm- 
inal' 1 who was At least 5 ft tall. 



•3 






4 










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tfr*ftA+**t* 



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tlotnt a gallup poll ... 

I see In the Newmarket 

Journal (England) that Herbert 
S. Gray's Super Pun Pair i* 
coming to town at Depot Pield, 
Newmarket, Some of the tea* 
lures will be the 1930 Dodgems, 
American Whip and all of the 
fun of the fair for young and 
old. 

Let lis here in Newmarket 
there has better luck than We 
there has beter luck than we 
in Newmarket had about a.cer* 
tain circus a few weeks ago, X{/ 
is long enough since past v to 
mention in print that a .)*<$&. 
wrote in a letter of csmxuujw? 
which was legally unprintable. 
Riot tendencies among our citi- 
zens have now subsided. 



by "Back Concession" 

- 

The Top Six Inches 






We would like to think the 
person writing under the name 
of ^Bluenose* in the Sri and 
Express of June 22 for his Xin-i 
remarks. We had hoped that 
our farm column \\\>uli be r*id 
by some of i?ur urban ftiece& 

It is very gratifying t* no;* 
that this study gsvuf ia th-* 
city took time to di&tiss cm 
of our farm pn>W?m$. A few 
years a^\* farm ftvum stu*iy 

groups wese sUsskJL Out sub- 
jects fw d&ctt&tett w*r* what 
might b$ termed etose to 
home such a* wop> swxsimHicn 
and stock raisings Aftse a 
few yeans, our subjects fbr <&»* 
eussion haw assumed vesy 
wide range aiKt sometimes at\\ 
a* some farift people vvmpUur*, 

kv> haul to discus 

Market his and &nnJ export 
aiv very difficult to understand* 
Our (arm tatutft auWect* are 
tried out in a panel dUeus&KHt 
givup. Nt*tes and part el flute 
finding* at* printed a* a guide. 
The farm people have e«e week 
to study and prepare the sub- 
ject. Our groups are never 

move than seven people, this is 
so that everyone must pa&.< his 
opinion 

Here i* one reason why our 
farm forums do not go in 
some school seclUuw. It is *ur* 
prift'MK how little reading 1$ 
dene lit some farm homes. Hi 
some homes, you would never 
see a magazine or book, while 
In other hemes, vesting ma* 
terlal has to be cleared oft the 

ehmfi before flMktMii *tt down. 

A man whoso business takes 
hint tnto farm homes made this 
comment: That In n district 
where there was an active farm 
f\mun t it was very easy to talk 
to the farm people, finch day 
In our lichouls. the children 1 * 

lessons become harder ami bo 

with our farm forum subjects: 



e*;h jf*asr th*y "«wrae assc* 
di&snilt. Aa£ &* cor £&& $**«- 

? r-x- Ifc^v ft *vi££ ?*&& ss to fej* 

Fe$p&» ciat «aii in£ semiSp 

sui^r jwu$« £Saa tt» MW2i£&n^ 
ia &gis -jwtt asfietssJSi THi& <aa» 
:aly $>> $a (at so longv. t&ei& 
th<ty £tmi &at ^wv thust cpsfc. 
*:<i<ir i'ltf in?sr*st >tt trcvpteyoufe* 
*isto &3j£. own ir*2ujh Wfe 
fiusom hlUtj* i'mvtd ifcafc » 

haw $wd jjciras* Sjc ftia&geis 

<Svs\\ iaihw mu« ft*.**- ftiBi 

tfiwpl\»ment ai ^vedfwagje*- £&? 
cvr and Industry ha&f*. ;qunu 
t&afc If fcirm prices at* asfc 

&tvd. $a&« and $mp Joy men £ a» 
eat. Our feut& reports $i** *>u£ 
very Kttte *pace to thehr owa. 
&iafeixi& taurtttt feuft $tv* pa«^ 
e* »ug^cstiena azwl s.vntrr^n:* 
ea farm, tabor, and iadustty. 
We have svvue txw&& wile ^ 
iuh Relieve we need vr^uti4a> 
tk>n or jjudy *cew^ .V svofc- 
meat tuaw by a fcrv&er iaruu 
er was that these ^aruiec* did 

net KvX Quite tfut stupid: We 
farm p&H&v must te w*iy to 
sit in with eth^r ^reuy* *> 
suuiy a vvliey ter *U OAnjt- 
di.tns. 

In the jMst few nvonths, we 
farmers have been asXcvl to sit 
hi conference with Uber and 
industry* The opinions coming 
torn our farm forums are used 
by our lenders at these confer* 

cures, A complaint c$mes that 
a few have to study. attet>d 
meeting! and do all our organ* 
uatlon business aud nit fann- 
ers bcuetlt. This la true in 
every organization. A man 
may «ive a lifedlme for nit In* 
veution and not live to use the 
fruits of his labor. Wo farm 
people, by the training our 
farm forums are giving us, can; 
take our place in guiding the 
destiny of Canada, Cheerio, 



L- 



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THE NEW HOPE 



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DOROTHY BARKER 



Having had the use of a free parking area right on 
Yonge St. for the past two years, local drivers refuse to 
pay a Quarter to park long enough to buy the weekend 
groceries. 




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>TH CULTIVATORS. 
20 M--D. TRACTOR. 



Mary Caruso has been most 
generous in allowing her prop- 
erty to be used as a municipal 
parking lot. However she has 
to eat and pay taxes and it is 
understandable that she should 
consider it necessary to obtain 
some revenue from a lot situ- 
ated in a high tax area. 

What the parking solution in 
Aurora will be is as vague to- 
day as it was some weeks ago 
when council was notified the 
property was no longer available 
as a free parking lot 

Saturday, shoppers were curb 

parked solidly the entire length 
of the shopping district on 
Yonge St. and for blocks on every 

side street 

At one time the air took on 
an indigo hue when an Ameri- 
can hailed a pedestrian and 
asked where the municipal park- 
ing lot was situated. Precious 
American cash, which might 
have been spent in Aurora* stay- 
ed safely in the wallet of the 
tourist as he departed northward. 
He cruised for a few blocks look* 
ing for a space to park the cus-: 

torn nuflt job, and then quickly 
pulled out of town. 

Tourists take a dim view of 
parting with a quarter to park 
ten minutes, or even a half 
hour, which is about the time it 
takes to pack away a meal or 



purchase a Canadian product. 
Naturally his , expressed ideas 
about parking were hardly 
complimentary to our town. 

Poor parking facilities can 
ruin not only the tourist trade 
but the local shoppers are find- 
ing it just as easy to drive a few 
more miles to where you get 
ten minutes parking for a penny. 

Meters are of course not the 
perfect answer to this problem, 
but they do remind the public 
that minutes are flying with 
the result that parking space is 
constantly being made available. 
Local drivers know that during 
the congestion of weekend traf- 
fic; two constables cannot check 

cars for a 20-minute parking 

limit. They take advantage of 
this situation with the result 
that it is a miracle if a space 
large enough to park a baby 
buggy can be found on Yonge 
St. from early Saturday morning 
until late at night. 

Council has the problem under 
serious consideration and no 
doubt has found a solution. In 
tthe meantime, several merchants 
have voiced the conviction a 
free lot is the only answer. It 
would certainly bring more 
outside dollars into local circu- 
lation than were known to have 
changed hands last Saturday. 



Austin Carmon Pickering died 
suddenly at Whitby on June 10. 
Born at Zephyr, July 2, 1914, 
he was the son of Mrs. Picker- 
ing and the late Mr. Ches Pick- 
ering. He was employed by the 
Ontario hospital, Whitby, and 
was an adherent of the Baptist 
church, Whitby. 

Mr. Pickering is survived by 
his wife, Ruth E. Lockie, a son, 
Wayne, three years old; a daugh- 
ter, June Diane, 10 years old; 
his mother, Mrs. Pearl Picker- 
ing. Zephyr; a brother, Keith W. 
Pickering, Toronto; and sisters, 
Mrs. Ches. Lunney, and Mrs. 
'Harold Morrison, Zephyr. 

Funeral service was held In 
Zephyr, June 13, with Rev. Dar- 
nell, Whitby, and Rev. Bamford, 
Zephyr, in charge. Interment 
was in Zephyr cemetery. Pall- 
bearers were Hugh Arnold, Ho- 
ward Pickering, Ken Pickering, 

Bruce Lockie, Stan Lunney, Carl 

Meyers. 



Walter C 




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STER. tCCOMOmONB) 



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YOW COUNTY 



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In 



few 1615 - 1949 



This is another of a series off articles on the history of 
York County, edited by Hugh Griggs, Mimico, from in-* 
formation compiled during the post four years by W. G. 
Goddard, staff member off Weston Collegiate Institute and 
Vocational School. York County celebrates its centenary this 



^ * 



Dr. William Warren Baldwin built Spadina House 
on the hill near where Casa Loma is now situated. From 
it ran a private road lined with chestnut trees which is 
now Spadina Ave. 



Gladys (Was) Fairbam 

Gladys Irene Speck (Wass) 
Fairbarn passed away suddenly 

at her home 30 Srigley St., New- 
market, June 14. She was born 
at Ravenshoe on March 28, 1888, 
the daughter of the late Mr. and 

Mrs. Charles H. Speck, where 
she lived until 1900 when she 
married George Wass who pre- 
deceased her in 1907. She was 
an active member of the Meth- 
odist church at Sevembridge, 
both in the church where she 
was organist, and in the Sunday- 
school. 

She moved back to Ravenshoe 
where she lived until 1921 when 
she moved to Newmarket. In 
1908 she married Peter Fairbarn 
who predeceased her. She was 
an adherent of the Christian 
church, Newmarket, and her 
chief interest was in her home 
and flowers. 

Mrs. Fairbarn is survived by 
two sons, Charles H. Wass, New- 
market^ and Stanley Wass, Tor- 
onto; two daughters, Mrs. Vehna 
Sunn, Newmarket, and Mrs. 
Lena Barend, Rochester, N.Y., 
and five grandchildren. 

Funeral service was held at 
the chapel of Roadhouse and 
Rose on June 17 with Rev. Fred 
Breckon conducting the service. 
Interment was in Queensvflle 
cemetery. Pallbearers were Sid 
Brice, T. Eaton, H. Gibbons, A. 
Stickwood, R. Martin and B. 
Adams. 



Walter C. Hall, of 27 Kendall 
Ave., Rutland, Vermont, died 
recentty at the Veterans hospi- 
tal in White RiVer Junction. 
Born in Plymouth, October 15, 
1899, he was a son of the late 
Christopher and Lora (Avers) 
Hall. 

Mr. Hall is survived by his 
wife, formerly Florence Verity, 
Newmarket; a son, Charles, Rut- 
land; a daughter, Mrs. Herbert 
Warren, Ludlow; a sister, Mrs. 
Prudence Vondette, Bennington; 
four brothers, William, Dayton, 
Ohio; Eiwin, East Jewett, N.Y.; 
Mathew, Hensonville, N.Y.; 
James, Bridgewater. Rev. Wil- 
liam Hall was at the Christian 
church some years ago. 

Rev. Harvey D. Butterfield, 
rector of Trinity Episcopal 
church conducted the funeral 
services. Military honors were 
conferred by officers and mem- 
bers of Rutland post, American 

Legion, of which Mr. Hall was 
a member. Interment was in the 
Plymouth cemetery. 






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Nontwn Ktfittf 

Norman Horner, Zephyr, pas- 
sed away suddenly at his resi- 
dence on June 6. He was born 
at Zephyr, December 6, 1892, 
the son of the late William and 
Rebecca Cronsberry Horner. In 
1924 he married Velma Mildred 
Comer, Baldwin, who prede- 
ceased him March 1, 1945. ' 

Mr. Horner farmed near Ze- 
phyr until his retirement six 
years ago. He was a member 
of Zephyr United church. Last 
summer he took a motor trip to 
the west coast and renewed ac- 
quaintance with many former 
friends and nieces. 

He is survived by two daugh- 
ters, Laura, Toronto, Reta, Ham- 
ilton; brothers, Mason, Canning- 
ton, George, Winnipeg, the late 
Frank, Kinsella, Alta.; sisters, 
Eva, Zephyr, and the late Laura, 
(Mrs. Frank Murray), Kinsella, 
Alta. 

Funeral service was held at 
Zephyr United church on June 
9. Rev. A. F. Bamford in charge. 
Interment was in Zephyr ceme- * 
tery. Pallbearers were Chesley 
Clark, Frank Curl, Chesley Lun- 
ney, Max Urquhart, Edward 
Hewlett, and Arthur Smith. 







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In the same year it was de- 
cided that Osgood e Hall should 
be the permanent seat of the 
Law Society of Upper Canada. 

Trinity church, Thornhill, was 
completed in 1830 also. The 
grave of Lt-CoL Moodie, killed 
in the Rebellion of 1837 while 
attempting to dash through the 
rebel lines to warn Toronto of 
an attack to be made on it. Is to 
be seen in the churchyard. 

The first ploughing match in 
Canada was held in the Town- 
ship of Scarborough on the farm 
of Robert Stobo. J. Torrance 
and A. Glendinning were the 
principal contestants. 

The first post office in the 
Township of Scarboro was estab- 
lished on Lot 19, Concession 3D, 
along the Markham Road. Peter 
Secor was the first postmaster. 

In 1831, the Mechanics' Insti- 
tute was established as a means 
of education and cultural devel- 
opment for those engaged in 
trade and business. 

The Typographical Society, 
the first trade union organized 
in Canada, was formed on Oct- 
tober 12, 1832, at York. Mem- 
bership consisted of 24 printers. 

The General Board of Educa- 
tion was replaced by the Council 
of King's College, the following 
year, and the third Parliament 
Building was completed- 
Hrst VX. Winer 

Alexander Roberts Dunn, born 
at York, son of the Receiver- 
General of Upper Canada, was 
the first Canadian to win the 
Victoria Cross. As a lieutenant 
in the Eleventh Hussars he rode 
in the charge of the Light Bri- 
gade at the Battle of Balaclava, 
1856, His heroic actions in this 
famous engagement won the 
award for him. 

First toll-roads in the Prov- 
ince of Ontario were established 
in the County of York. Yonge 
St, Kingston Rd., and Dundas 
St. were placed under the sup- 
ervision of a board of five 
trustees. Government loans of 
4,200 pounds, 2,000 pounds and 
1,500 pounds were advanced to 
improve these three highways. 
Toll revenues were to repay the 
loans. 

Qsgoode Hall was enlarged by 
the addition of a series of cham- 
bers occupied as living quarters 
by students and barristers. 

In 1834 the Town of York was 
incorporated as a city and made 
a self-governing municipality. 

The name was changed to Tor- 
onto. The Act of Incorporation 
was passed by the Parliament of 
Upper Canada on March 6, 1834. 
The first municipal election 
was held on March 27, and all 
male householders, tenants or 
owners, had the right to vote. 
In this election William Lyon 
MacKerme was chosen the first 

mayor. 
The extent of the city was 

the area on the mainland within 
its boundaries, Toronto I s land , 
Toronto Lagoon, Toronto Harbor, 



Island and South of Ashbndge's 
Bay. 

The population at this time 
was over 9,000. 

This year the slaves in the 
British Dominions were freed 
by Act of Imperial Parliament. 

The Reform Legislature of Up- 
per Canada established a board 
of commissioners and gave to it 
most of the authority in muni- 
cipal affairs which had hitherto 
been in the hands of the Courts 
of Quarter Sessions. 



The next year, 1835, the Tor- 
onto Police Force consisting of 
five constables was organized. 

An act of the Provincial 
Parliament was passed authoriz- 
ing the ratepayers of each town- 
ship to elect a board of three 
commissioners to administer the 
affairs of the township and sup- 
ervise the work of the officials 
elected by each town meeting. 

The Arctic explorer. Sir John 
Franklin, was given a reception 
in Newmarket on his way over- 
land to the Arctic. The house 
in which he stayed still stands. 

Yonge St. through Hogg's Hol- 
low was straightened. The de- 
tour to the east of the present 
road which followed the height 
of land through York Mills was 
marked out by early surveyors 
to avoid the low marshy ground 
of the valley and the Don 
River. 

Toronto Club, at the comer of 
York and Wellington, founded 
this year, is the second oldest 

club in North America. The old- 
est, the Philadelphia Club of 

Philadelphia, PeniL, was estab- 
lished in 1834. 

The first municipal meeting 
for the Township of York of 
which a record remains was held 
on Monday, January 4, 1836. It 
was held in the home of William 
Cummer, and adjourned to John 
Marsh's Tavern on Yonge St. 
John Willson was elected Town- 
ship Clerk. John David, Daniel 
McDougall and William Donald- 
son were elected councillors. 
James McMulIen was chosen the 
Assessor. 



Ottffttte L TfMnfcis 

Charlotte Elizabeth Timmins 
passed away in Sutton West 
after, an illness of four months. 
She was born in Seabright, Feb- 
ruary 3, 1884, the daughter of 
the late Mr. and Mrs. William 
HepinstalL She married George 
N. Timmins who predeceased 
her January 4, 1950. Mrs. Tim- 
mins was a member of Sutton 
United church. 

She is survived by three sons, 
Earl, Parry Sound, Aubrey, and 
Victor, Sutton West; two daugh- 
ters; Clara {Mrs. A. E. Stiles), 
Alice (Mrs. Robert Pugsley); a 
brother, Mr. Charles Hepinstall, 
Orillia; and a sister, Mrs. Thom- 
as Joslin, Hawkestone. 

Rev. E. Nichol conducted fun- 
eral service at Sutton West on 
June 13 and interment was at 
Briar Hill cemetery. Pallbear- 
ers were F. Shannon, Miller Mc- 
Donald, Wm. Harris, Garnet Jos- 
Iin, F. Culverwell and R Thomp- 
son. 



SHARON 

Mrs. R. Port of King spent a 

few days with her cousin Nora 

Shaw- 
Mrs. B. L. Phillips spent last 

week at Port Bolster with Mrs. 

Wilson. 







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Rfrprtsenlatives for Newmarket and District 

r. N. ClnUir, CX.V, W%mmm 
W. OriniUm, Kettteky, Oat, 



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SHARON 

Mrs. Cecil Bellman and Miss. 
Janie Bellman of Bowmanville 
spent a few days with the for- 
mer's sister, Mrs. L. Collins. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Long at- 
tended a family reunion on Sat- 
urday at High Park. 

Mrs. WiUard Grose and Miss 
Kathleen Grose spent last Thurs- 
day with Mrs. C. Montgomery 
in Toronto. 

Mr. and Mrs. W. Armstrong 
and Miss Annie Jones' of Tor- 
onto spent the weekend with 
Mrs. M. Jones. 

Miss Flizabeih Shaw, Mrs. R. 
Ward, Mrs. R_ Wheaton and Mr. 
Jack Wheaton, all of Toronto, 
were Sunday guests of Miss 
Nora Shaw. 

of Tut unto 



fcfcn W. Sharps 

Connected w»;.. the weights 
and measures Hisiness for more 
than 40 years, John Joseph W. 
Sharpe, 75, died Saturday in St. 
Michael's hospital, Toronto, after 
a short illness. During his busi- 
ness career, Mr. Sharpe had 
worked for the Brantford Com- 
puting Scale Co., International 

Business Machine Co. Ltd, A. 
J. Peer Co., and Deer Fixture 
Co. 

Born in Newmarket, son of the 
late John Sharpe, veterinary 
surgeon, and the late Jennie 
Chantler, Mr. Sharpe went to 
Toronto as a young man. He 
leaves his wife, the former Phoe- 
be Pook; two sons, Leslie and 
Harry, and one sister, Mrs. 
Maude Wilson of Hamilton. 




Herbert 6. 8§§vf 

At Hillsdale, Mich., on June 
24, 1950, Herbert G. Bogart pas- 
sed away after a long illness. 
A direct descendant of John Bo- 
gart, who came to Canada in 
1802, he was a son of George 
Bogart, one of the early teach- 
ers at Bogarttown school His 
mother was Susan Webb, a great 
granddaughter of Isaac Webb, 
who came to Canada from Penn- 
sylvania in 1806. 

A former resident of Cleve- 
land, Ohio, Mr. Bogart has lived 
in Michigan for the past 15 years. 
Interment was in Lakeview ce- 
metery, Cleveland. 

Twice married, his first wife 
was Charlotte Jennings, of To- 
ronto, who predeceased him in 
1925. Later he married Ruth 
Williams, of Cleveland, who 
survives him. 

A son, Harold, lives in Toledo, 
Ohio, and a daughter, Gertrude, 
in Ann Arbor, Mich. Also sur- 
viving are two grandsons, two 

great grandchildren and three 
half sisters, Mrs. Ottve Stan- 
cliff and Mrs. Martha CmpfceH 
in 
£ Watfon of 



«T" SHIRTS 
Priced for your purse at 98 cents 

Penman's cotton T shirts ............. $1.23 

Brashed cotton English T shirts ........ $L9t 



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8 POST SHIRTS 

Morrison's watchword is quality. We carry a 
wide range of sport shirts by nationally 
known advertisers — Leighton, MigoyW 
Arrow, Forsyth, Sun Valley 



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NYLON SrOUT SHIKTK 



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Leighton and Sun Valley |CJ5 and $1.95 

TROPICAL SLACKS to relax in - a Morrison's 
special - ffcM . ffc» - $lt« - fl&ftt 



ARROW SUMMER 

New knitted models 
Arrow broadcloth 



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ENGLISH ALL-WOOL GABARDINES 
«8JS - $19.95 - S1L95 - 918,95 - *21 M 



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CRAVENETTE JACKETS styled for casual 

summer wear . : .V 

$CS5 - $l» - 99£5 * 912JS - $1&95 - H&M 



SHORTS AND «*lWg3l^ #1 



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by Harvey Woods and Rose Marie Reld 
$2 M ■ 93.95 - H-St • :1$M ? W^ 



Morrison's leads in summer footweax^wittig 
-, ^ Slater, %UM 

John Palmer's oil tanned MOCASSINS 

94 M TJ9 VM 



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▼aMtton ttee WOMEN'S BATfONG SUITS 

99.9S - IMS'- 9*JS - 9I9J5 - tl&SS - fHJS^ 

Dressmaker style and lastex creations, one and 




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A LUCKY NUMBER ' * * ^ 

Bring your handbill to Morrison's^^yoti^iiay^ 

Keid women s swimming J *" 

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wW— Bright front bedroom, 

. rurnfehed. Gentleman preferred. 

fin-! Fhone 11GK Newmar*eL clwDS 

ROOM AND ROARD 



SPECIAL REDUCED 
HOLIDAY PRICES 



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Bros, S Catherine : J»w ^ ^jf • r ^\v26 






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F0r » fc—4-rtwm house. Bath, 5 |© APARTMBIT FOR KBIT 
tosernwit. Urge eartfen. Nenf f -±;,-.:f - 



3-room apartment. 

aarket hot \rater- 3So children. Phone 
c2w25j725j. Newmarket- : *lw26 



highway, school church, bus ser-! 

«©e- Russell O. Thornpscm, Hc*-;umt*i««~«~, -., ■ «■&««* 

land Landing- Phone Xmoaxtat hot water. >o children. Phone 

51JL ^" ""- 5 v — 



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First class shape, maroon. Not 
a mark on this car. 

5O50, 30-day guarantee 

. >4» METEOK DELUXE 

4-door 

The most outstanding, car com- 
._. ^— „ B „ , .blnation on the road. Beige and 

iBarket. AU coove»»ence^ Ap-{ r*r re»t — Woodland i «e 3C ^ tan .air-conditioning, heater, radio, 
ply Ira TYaviss, QaeensriDe. ; : Geor^au Bay. small cottage. 3 j Tnere are thousands of miles of 

•4«<26_ rooms. Mronderfiuly safe /^ndy i trouble-free driving in this car. 
— --—■ -■ -•-•■- . •--.-- -beach, first 2 weeks July, last 2i 

**. uniKCWAMTPn -weeks August- Near Wasaga 

|A HOUSE W ANTtP ;^ rh Phone 303, Newmarket. 

*2w25 



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^ ^ , -r^^JTS ^wi «2A COnAGE FOR RBW 

liai^an and Tecamseft St, ^ew- 



Wanted — Female help, pref- 
errably over 21, for grocery store 
and tuck shop at Paradise Beach, 
Lake Simcoe, for balance of July 
and August- Reply stating salary 
and experience to Newmarket P.O. 
box 6S9. *lw26 



AH for 91,?»5 
Hurry, it won't keep! 



■ 



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Want<4 t« rent— Tcong bOHEess ; 

coupte desire to rent srnaD ho^e : Fm ^^ __ g,^^ cottage at 
m cmmtiy^MhaconnBat^ ^iLakc SimcoeL AvanabTe for July 
tance ol >^wmar^ Wrae „^ ^ August. Phone G. »cC^ 
aT<l Express box 43X awgS ; npgh. l«>j, Newmarket- *l\v26 

3 ^ FARM FOR SALE j FRANKLIN BEACH 

r „ ,**- to acres bash withf For mt-4-ipom cotlage, % close 



M9 ANGUA 
2-door 

Economical for the thrifty per- 
son, 45 miles to a gallon. 






i 



- Jl^T^J "JS'^Ste ^ ! *° lake - Weekl y ° r ^S " 31 ren " '« STCDEBAKER CHA3CPION 



Help wanted — Single man. or 
boy 15 years or older, to work on 
farm for summer. Apply Ken 
Howard,- phone 161w3» Newmar- 
ket. *lw2S 

Help wanted — We want a man 
who feels he would like to supple- 
ment his income with part time 
work. The man we need must 
know his community well. There 
Is no selling attached. The work 
can be done in your spare time. 
It is interesting and remunera- 
tive. The man who has a know- 
ledge of typing would be given 
preference. Reply giving full par- 
ticulars to P.O. box 190, Toronto, 
Ont- clw26 



Wanted to boy — Old horses. 

Dead horses and cows. We pay 
for dead stock If fit to use. Noti- 
fy as soon as possible after death. 

L. B. Pollock, Keswick, Ont .. 
phone Queensvllle, 2031. 



LUMBER FOR SALE 



23 



WORK WANTED 



REAL ESTATE 



IS BOARDERS WANTCD 



Air conditioning and heater. 
Rides like the long of the roads. 

$1,725 



* CKONTS 



I Boarders waated — Gentlemen 
{preferred. Apply 228 Main SU 



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■*§ turns st w. - n*. 

RETIKIXG ?? 



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iNe'w-market* 



16 APARTMBIT WANTTO 



• 



IIOM, — or near offer. >ewj Wanted to rent — 2 or 3 room 
modern bungalow on l?i acres. ; apartment, furnishecL Must have 
nicely landscaped on paved high-| ty JaIv 15. e^i r_ Bell, Bell's 
way. 2ff combined Irving-room ( corner; phone OOOw, Newmarket. 
wMh large picture window andi *lw26 
frreplace. Modern boOt-in bathj _ 

and large super modern kitchen. ! AfV^AlufMnDATIOfl 
Two good size bedrooms. 400 AU.UMMUUA 1 1UIH 

raspberry canes; and good straw-j jtccMmziodaUen for summer 
terry patch. Close to shopping- ■ guests. Housekeeping fadlities. 
Srbool bos at door. 25 minutes R^er fishtng, boats available, 
from Toronto. Taxes $14 per Write or phone E. G. Burrows, 
year. (Washaga, for reservations. *3w26 
Mr. Dixon„ King 5-R-12 CRev.j 

chgs). c2w26 ii7 ARTICLES FOR SALE 









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Vm Jgf e S 3 acres, aD workable, j r#r v ^ t ^ venenan bDnds, alu- 
on paved higbway, also 3 or 4 } ^^^^^ or steel, made for all styles 
bonding lots adjacent to highway; ( of W x n d OWSfc Free estimates and 
5- roomed hoose. implement shed, j {nstallations. Phone TS5, apply 
good barn with underground stab- 1 43 Ontario St. W.. or write P.O. 
ling, ben house, pig pen; close toj^x 49^ Newmarket. tf27 

lake. Good tourist trade in fowl,! ; — - 

etc. Fan possession- 40 rods to j For sale Ice box, white enamel. 

school, stores, etc _ 150 lb. capaciy, excellent condition. 

H. X. UFFAE1X BKOKEaX \ Apply 104 Andrew St, or phone 

Ke^wicat, Oa*. 112% Kewmarket, 

PHONE ROCHE'S POINT STR12 j -^ 



M6 3IEBCUBT 

One owner since new. Motor 
completely overhauled. Perfect 

rubber. 

$1,350 

- 

*« FORD 
Deluxe Coupe 

Custom radio and heater. This 
is a snappy car for 



>39 PLYMOUTH 

A real bargain. 



*5 FORD 

Motor overhauled and new 
b.-ake re-lining, good tires. Runs 
like new. 

For $S50 



Work wanted — Upholstering 
chesterfield suites, chairs. Reason- 
able rates. Apply Ken Sargent, 85 
Gorham St., phone 382, Newmar- 
ket. *4w23 



Builder open for new work or 
repair on homes and cottages. 
Apply James Wight, Keswick, 
phone Roche's Point 107rl4- 

•4w23 



Advertising posters made-to-or- 
der for store windows, special 
events, etc. Phone 821, Newmar- 
ket c3w21 



Wanted to buy — Worses for 
mink. Will call for with truck. 
Good cash prices paid. Frnnk 
Coleman, phone 1089J, Newmar- 
ket, or write P.O. box 25. tf27 

29 POULTRY FOR SALE 

Benersyde Poultry Farm Breed- 
ers of fast feathered Barred Rocks. 
Hatching from December to June- 
Choice dressed roasters at all 
times J. S. Murby, Aurora, phone 
44m. tf27 

29B POULTRY WANTED 

Wanted to bay — All kinds of 
live poultry wanted. Any amount. 
Will pay highest cash prices and 
^alt at door. Phone 657, Newmar- 
ket U27 

CHICKS FOR SALE 

¥&*s jip in price, meat soaring. 
Don't miss out on the high prices 

you are bound to get this summer 
and fall for eggs and poultry meat 
Prompt delivery on chicks day old 
to eight weeks, non-sexed, pullets, 
cockerels. Turkeys, day old to 
four weeks, non-sexed, sexed hens, 
sexed Toms. Reduced prices for 
July. Tweddle Chick Hatcheries 
Limited, Fergus, Ontario. c2w26 

IMPLEMENTS FOR SALE 



For mite— 3450 feet white pine. 

<trlcd two years. Phone 231J or 

1127 cn q U i rc 51 park Ave, Newmarket. 

clw2G 



NOTICE 

Decoration Day 
Hartman Cemetery 

will he held Sunday evening, July 
2, at 7 p.m. 

Herb Leek, 

Scc.-Trens. 

c2w25 



NOTICE 

LOTS FOR SALE 

On July 6th the Town will offer 
for sale choice buiidinc: lots on the 
south side of Englc Street. 

Further particulars apply to the 
Town Clerk's office. 

Wesley Brooks, 
Town Clerk. 

THE BARRIE PUBLIC 
LIVESTOCK 

AUCTION 



SALH REGISTER 

ftatttrriBY, July *— Auction sale 
of household effects, tools, etc., 
the property of Mrs. Geo. Yates, 
to ne sotd fit her residence In the 
Vllliifse of Keswick. Terms cash, 
sale 1 p.m. F. N. Smith, auction- 
eer. c3w25 

Friday, July 7— Auction snle of 



* 



COURT OF 
REVISION 



- 



- 



Take Notice That a special 
Court of Revision will be held r# 
.special assessments as follows: • 

1. The council of the Corpora- 
otion of the Town of Newmarket 
ha* constructed as a local im» 
provement sidewalks and cross^ 



farm lands, livestock, Implements, j walks on T*owell Ave., Arthur St 
ate, the property of the estate SrlRley St„ Wesley St., and Muriel 
of tho late Fred Mahoncy to be St. 
sold on the premises known as 2. The cost of the work 1* 



■* 



1 - • 



iot 35, con. 5, township of East 
Gwilllmbury. nt Ravenshoe. Terms 
ensh. Sale at 1 p.m. P. Mahoney, 
clerk, F. N. Smith, auctioneer. 

C2w25 



COURT Of 
REVISION 



3M85.00 of which $3,277.00 ti to be 
paid by the Corporation. Tho 
special rate per foot frontage is 
of 12.50 cents. The special assess- 
ment is to be paid in 15 annual In- 
stalments. 

3. The estimated lifetime of the 
work Is 15 years. 

4. A Court of Revision will he 
held on the 13th day of Jul y, 
;!*50. at 7.30 p.m., at the Council 
Chambers. 101 Main St., Newmar- 
ket, Ont., for the purpose of hear* 
in? complaints against the pro- 
posed assessments or the accuracy 

Provomcnt unitary sewers . on I 1^;iZ S S« ^ *il 7 



Take Notice That a special 
Court of Revision will be held re 
special assessment as follows: 

1. The council of the Corpora- 
tion of the Town of Newmarket 
ha? constructed as a local im- 

on 



^Mftiuvlf 01 wnicn aoui^n « to wu . - " 
paid by the Corporation. The spe- *t22^ at N .. vmflrkAt 
cial rate per foot frontage is 9U*\*1?WJ* *2E2? ^ ' 
coual to an annual charge of da > of June - ^ 



For safe — No. 4W Cockshutt 

„ „„,, spreader, in good condition, 5 yrs. 

PLASTKR1MI oId> A ppiy William H. Smith, 

Free estimates. Apply Fre <* Queensville, phone Mount Albert 

Norton and Son, Ravenshoe, phone 2G20 ^ »2w25 



Queensville 209i 



*3w25 



-^m-'^-T^ 



WORK, 
Sidewalks, footings, stucco work, 
block laying. Anything in con- 
crete or woodwork. Combina- 
tion doors in stock. Material sup- 
plied if desired. Apply Murray 
Baker, 93 Andrew St., phone 651j, 
Newmarket- ...fSwSS 



. 



- 






crlw26 



♦ 






. 



1 



__ i' If you live in Newmarket and 

...... ^... *i>-;W. iwish to visit our store, we will 

V/IlLOV/ BEACH {send a car for you day or night 

■ Far sole-ar rwrt — Brick resi- 1 without charge or obligation. 

dencc or guest lodge, boat house^ j Over's Fiirniturev phone ISO. 

wharf and water lot Excellent j Newmarket. <f27 

business location- Apply S- Bruels. 



■■ 



> 



phone Sutton 113w. 



clw26 






*■- 



l,S«a*tw land for buMbag lots in 
Holland Landings 

5-r#aaac4 house, hydro and wa- 
ter, 3-4 acres land, at town limits, 
possession arrangecL 



TRUCKS 



HI DODGE 

■ 

1-2 ton pick-op 

Heater, new paint job. This 
truck has yet to see a heavy load, 
perfect rubber, come quick. 

$7W 



Landscaping, decorating of 
graves. Beautify your homes and 
property. See Robert Van Manen, 
34 Millard Ave., phone 743r, New- 
market. , *2w26 



Work wanted — General house- 
work, by the day. Apply Era and 
Express box 435. clw26 



For sale — 14K Renfrew separa- 
tor 600 with new bowls. 14K 
Renfrew separator 600, In good 
repair. 4H Renfrew separator 450, 
pood. No. 15 DeLaval separator 
700, good. No. 74 Viking separa- 
tor 700, good. Briggs and Stra- 
ton 1 1-2 h.p. gas engine, used one 
year, good. 

Apply Roy Taylor, Mount Al- 
bert, phone 2308, Zephyr. c2w25 



24 



LOST 



• 



'41 FORTJ 






Far rent — Cement mixer, 
gasoline. Apply 27 Andrew SWj 
Newmarket. *4w23 



'•19 motor. Brantford hoist. 



Liberal allowance on trade-ins 



L r 



sale— White Ice box, 100-lb. 
capacity. Modem. Phone Meyer jCASfci 

of Era and Express office. 



— TRADE — 



For 



box with drip pan, 



«— ^ *«?£»>"'• 4 P^JTd lb. capacity. Reasonable. Ap- 
batb, hardwood floors, kitchen . 35 A ^ re ^ Sf Newmarket. 



■ .. 



' • 



cupboards, garage, possession ar- 
ranged. 

?— at 1 c farm. 100 acres work- 
able, 100 acres bush and pastare, 
hydro, water at house and barn. 
Possession- 

p— 4 rooms down and Z 



*Iw26 



STOUH MOTORS 
Aurora, Ontario 

clw26 



Lost— Light maple armchair In 
Newmarket, or on highway be- 
tween Newmarket and Aurora, 
Tuesday, June 27. Phone 1400, 
Newmarket- c 2 "^ 

Last— Steel carrier for top of 
car with four suction cups.- Be- 
tween Keswick and Newmarket- 
Reward. Apply Mitchell's Hard- 
ware, Aurora. *2w26 



24A 



PERSONAL 



For sale — 6* Frost and Wood 
mower, 1 year old. 5' Frost and 
shape. Rubber tired wagon, new, 
roiler bearings. Massey Harris 
101 tractor in good condition. All 
these Implements to be sold at re- 
duced prices to clear. Geer and 
Byers, Botsford St., phone 1400. 
Newmarket. clw26 

For sale — Skyline forage har- 
vester, complete with V.P. 4, with 
Wisconsin engine, all in excellent 
condition, ready for the field. Ap- 
ply lot 22, con. 4, King twp., or 
phone Aurora 93r5 after 6 even- 
ings. clw2fi 



► 



j 



» *, 



For sale— Bicycle, new tires., and 
tubes, Al condition, $20. Apply J. 

W. Taylor, 31 Newton Ave., phone roT KaSe _ .47 Mercury coach, 

810/jv. Newmarket- clw26 yrffc heater, spotless condition. 

tf , g „ , ** or *> le — Baby's silver-grey M9 Custom F ord sedan, beautiful 

rooms up. Hardwood floors, kit- j Ondron folding carnage, fully ^foam grey. Phone 770wl3 f 

chen cupboards, possession. [lined, chromium trimmed, very j Newmark< £ * clw26 

Apply ITArcy Miller, 39 GOrham . ?0 od condition. Phone 812j, New- i - - 

S*-***™* 1 **' <* t**™* **%! market. c2w26 } For ^11^1032 Chevrolet sedan, 
*»«*« *"- c2w26 — ; ^— motor and body in good condition. 



* 



SIMM— S rooms, soiSd brick. A 
beautiful home. Every conveni- 
ence. One of the nicest places in 
Keswick. Reason for selling, oth- 
er interests. 

• — 7 roomed stucco home 



For *a!e— 0-piece walnut dining j"""" 1 
room suite. Apply 40 Park Ave.. IU ;iJ " ,e:> 
Newmarket- * 1 w26 



For sale — American cement for 
stucco, $1.50 a bag. 1 camp table, 
8* x 2*. 1 sideboard. 1 single bed. 

Cedar 



newly lined. Telephone 
afler 6 p.m. 501r Aurora. c2w26 
For sate— 19-10 Chevrolet coach, 
in good running condition. Apply 
Herb. Paul, Bogarttown Service 
Station. •Iw26 



Skinny men, women! Gain 5 to 
15 lbs. New pep, too. Try fam- 
ous Ostrex Tonic Tablets for 
double results; new healthy flesh; 
new vigor. New "get acquainted'* 
size only 6 0c. All druggists. 

Stendor Tablets are effective. 2 
weeks' supply $1; 12 weeks* $5; nt 
all druggists. clw26 

TRANSPORTATION 



; 1 ■ 



'■'- .. 



and about three acres of land I mattress. Swivel chair, 
right in village of Keswick, all chest. Cupboard suitable for base- 
conveniences. Berry bushes, ap- j ment. Cookstove with oil connec- 

fde tree-s, currant boahes. etc. This ( tion. Apply 1 Cedar St. Newmar- j tires and battery, hydraulic 
place would suit some retiring ket. »lw26 brakes. Best offer. Phone 202w2, 



HOT ROD SPECIAL 
For sale — '30 Auburn 8, good 



i 



■ ■ 



fa* 



* - 



gcntleman- 

_ %19jtm -x- Home, five acres of 
land in Keswick, this place is no- 
ted for raising from 5 to 6 thoos- 



auod chickens eveo - year^ a great 

-OpportUEity. . 

*#;»•— nve-roorned winterized 



ARTICLES V/ANTED 



to bay— Used bird cage. 
Phone 463J, Newmarket. clw26 



LM 



PRODUCE 



Newmarket. 



•Iw26 



For (kale— Convertible baby car- 
riage with mattress, excellent con- 
dition. S20. Phone If/H], New- 
market. clw26 

For »ale — Electric 2-burner 



nvnllnnle to Tor* 
onto daily. Leaving Newmarket 
7 a.m., returning 5 p.m. Phone 
330j, Newmarket. c2w25 

Transportation daily leaving 
Aurora 8 a.m. Leaving Toronto 
5 p.m. Call Aurora 466J. clw2fi 



Transportation wanted — - Elgin 
Milts - Yonge - St. Clair. Hours 
9-5. Phone Richmond Hill 437\v\ 
reverse chnrges. clw26 



27 



FARM ITEMS 






home on Met. Rd.. in the village j For «ale— No. 1, good cooking . heavy duty Kitchen Queen stove 

potatoes. Apply C E. Crittenden, j with oven . Perfect condition 
Keswick, phone Queensville 1313. J Apply 37 Larmont St., Aurora. 






♦Alw26 



Of Keswick. A lovely lUtle place 
and a real opportunity for some 
one who wants a nice place. 

I have one of, the largest Ihfs 
of cottages for sale of any broker 
al Lake Simcoe- Some very inter* 
esting buys at greatly reduced 

p 1^ «»* *„» for *** J tg^tSSS^SSiSt MmmivmwmmBmm 



_^ c2w^6 

I7B MERCHANDISE 

_ — - > + ^ *^ 

Far safe— Hearing aid batteries 
I for most popular makes. Stewart 



For safe — Good strong work 
mare, Percheron type. Horse mow- 
er, Cockshutt, oil both. Apply H. 
P. Dunham, Yonge St., Newmar- 
ket. # 3w2-i 



L'SED FARM MACTDNCRV 

Nearly new International hoy 
loader 

Cockshutt No. 4 manure 
spreader- 

Cockshutt 7 ft., oil bath, grain 
hinder, complete. 
International 10 ft. dump rake 
Massey-Harris scuffler 
8 ft. power-angled discs, nearly 
new 

TRACTORS 
10-20 International on- steel. - 
\V4 International 
Mnssey- Harris Pony with at- 
tachments. 

NORMAN UNSTEAD 

Your Oliver Dealer 

QUEENSVILLE, CALL 1120 

clw26 

For sale— 36-50 Coodison thresh- 
er with cbersol feeder, grain ele- 
ator and straw-cutter. Practically 
new belts. Lister 3-4'* chopper 
and O.K. potato digger. Apply 
l>on Stickwood, lot 2 and 3, con. 5, 
East Gwillimnury. •2\v26 

For Hal© — Gehl P.T.O. forage 
harvester with hay pickup and 
row crop attachment. Gehl for- 
age l/ower. As sold by United 
Far me. of Ontario. Complete 
outfit ready for work. $2,012. For 
Information n p p 1 y Newmarket 

District Co-Op, phone 366, New- 
market, or R. B. Brown, Vnndorf, 
phone 81 r5, Aurora. ctw26 

l«TS 

Great Ihute, registered with pa- 



NEXT SALE ON 

FRIDAY, JULY 14 

AT 1 P.M. 

The Barrie Public Livestock 

Auction offers the finest facilities 
for handling — » 

Dairy Cows - Butchers - Feeders 
- Stockers - Calves - Hogs - 
Horses - Sheep and Poultry 

This is the market where buyer 
and seller meet. Bring your 
livestock to Stmcoe's leading 
and most modern market 
Advance Listing Requested 
Stabling and Sales Ring under 

One Roof 

THE LOCATION IS: 

Barrie Fair Grounds 

Highway 27 at the South Limits 

of Barrie 
C. D. Sproule, Auctioneer 

F. C. Martin, Manager 
.101 Dunlop St., Phone 4869 

Auction Sate 

Of Household Furniture, Etc. 
at the house of 

G. A. JAMES 

70 Park Ave., Newmarket 

on 

Thurs. Evening, June 29 

Severn! bookcases End table 

2 Smoking stands Chesterfield 

3 Chesterfield chairs (1 small. 2 

large) 
Occasional chair Ottoman 

Small Quebec stove Mlxmaster 
Several table lamps Crib 

Oak dining-room table and side- 
board y 
F.lectric stove Lawn swing 
Electric ironer Record player 
2 Single beds, complete 
Oardcn lounge chair Couch 
Rocking-chnir ladder 
Several pictures, pots, kettles, jars, 
crock, table, toboggan, skates, 
skis, skt-boots, etc., etc. 
Terms cash. Sale Marts at 7 p.m. 
\V. DICK, Clerk, F. N. SMITH. 
Auctioneer. ' ctw25 






equal to an annual charge 
S12.£5: The special assessment 13 
to be paid In 15 annual instal- 
ments. 

3. The estimated lifetime of the 
work is 15 years. 

4. A Court of Revision will be 
held on the 13th day of July. 
1950, at 7.30 p.m., at the Council 
Chambers, 101 Main St., Newmar- 
ket, Ont., for the purpose of hear- 
ing complaints against the pro- 
posed assessments or the accuracy 
of frontage measurements and 
any other complaint which per- 
sons interested may desire to 
make and which is by law cogniz- 
able by the Court. 

Dated at Newmarket this 26th 
day of June, 1950. 

Wesley Brooks, 
Clerk. 

c2w26 

NOTICE to CREDITORS 

IN THE ESTATE OF TIMOTHY 
FREDERICK HODGINS. LATE 
OF THE TOWN OF NEWMAR- 
KET, IN THE COUNTY OF 
YORK, GENTLEMAN. 

Creditors of the above-named 
deceased, who died at the Town 
of Newmarket, in the County o( 
York, on or about the 22nd day 
of February, 1050, are hereby no- 
tified pursuant to The Trustee 
Act to send to the undersigned 
proof of their claim on or before 
the 17th day of July, 1030. after 
which date the assets of the Es- 
tate will be distributed, having 
regard only to the claims of which 
the undersigned will then have 

notice. . v 

DATED nt Newmarket this 14th 
day of June. A.D. 1950. 

Thomas Hodglns, 
Administrator, 
by his Solicitors. 
Mathews, Stiver, Ly- 
ons and Vale 

Newmarket, Ontario. 

c3w24 



Wesley Brooks, 
Clerk. 

c2w26 



i-.i-t i 



TENDERS 

CORPORATION OF THE TOW* 
OF NEWMARKET 

For sale by Tender 
Sealed tenders will be received 
by the undersigned for the sale 
of lots 21, 22, 23, 24. 25. plan 73, , 
on the soutfc side of Davis Drive, v 
also for lot 21, plan 78, on the 
north side of Simcoe Street, until 
12 o'clock noon, D5.T., Monday, 
July 3, 1950. Terms cash. 

The lowest or any tender not 
necessarily accepted. 

For further particulars apply to; : 
the undersigned. 

Wesley Brooks, - 
Town Clerk. 

c2w25 






NOTICE 



< 



m 

The annual cemetery service 
will be held at Mount Albert 
cemetery on Sunday, July 9, at T' ■ 
p.m. 

Joseph Harrison, pres., 
W. R. Steeper, sec. 

c2w26 

McCaffrey's 



Flowers 



' 



OCCASION 

Rowem 

mi 



—to 



,v .*'**.'.**- 






ROADHOU&ItftE 
FUlfflttl DittWte 



MAIN STREET 



«hutt mower, oilhnth; Pandora 

cookstove. Cheap for quick sale. 

For *ate — 2 tents, heavy duty I Apply Doug Pottage, Sharon, R, R. 
canvas, first-class condition. Phone \h ^one Queensville 431, *2w25 

c4w26 



For ft*!*— Team of horses, on*!,™,, win clvo nwnv *o nnvone 
10 year,, one 3 yonm oM«r: Cock- ^ ¥ ff%Jl%^Jtfg2Z 

Apply 6 Charles St., Newmarket. 

C2w25 



537w, Newmarket. 



■ ,\£J 






S»a 




Apply Clark Martin, Clariyn 
I^odge, Orchard Beach, phone 
Roche's Point 120. clw26 



f" 



LOIS KM SALE 



'^~. 



Choice bunding lots 

Bolton ^and Lundy Ava, New- 
market, Apply C. F. Wilis, phone 
^Newmarket. . tf27 



1127 



Bulking Io«s on Penn 
sotnh- of New- 
cemetery, approximately 
50* x 200r. Apply Mrs. John Walsh 
Vincent St* Newmarket- c3w24 




fW aale— 1-2 acre tot with well 
and cellar- ' In Cedar Valley dis- 
trict. Apply 33 Prospect SU New- 



| £ Sap»»"e-1^ oa Prospect St^ 

*^f x 4?. Phone ^lw, Newman 



TIHHI WA9HTJK * GLAMRO* 

Electric 25 and 60 cycle; gas 
washers, repair parts and service. 
Stewart Beare, Radio and Applian- 
ces. 113 Main St., phone 355, New- 
market. tf27 

V* tale— Beatty and Westing- 
house washers, refrigerators, ran- 
ges, cleaners, tub stands, wash 
tubs, clothes racks, tub drainers, 
radios. Service on all appliances. 
Spiliette and Son, Newmarket. 

" tf27 

Ft* all* - 1 -™— " 

J219. up. Immediate delivery. 

JKHwat, aW. hiarllrtia deUv- 
ery. Phone 2fir5, King. c2w25 

If USH) CARS FOR SALE 




•35 Ford coach, $175.; *35 Ply- 
mouth coupe, $200.; '28 Chrysler, 
$65.* *37 Lafayette, $200.; '36 
Bulck sedan, 1200.; '37 Chevrolet 
coach, $475. These cars have been 
driven every day and are In good 
running order. Cash or terms, 
Newmarket Motor Sales, Davis 
Drive, West. clw26 

20 USED TRUCK FOR SAU 

If you are buying a new truck 
this month, you can save money 
by buying on the co-operative 
plan. Write today tor further In- 
formation to box 338, Aurora, 

ciw26 

MOTORCYLES FOR SALE 



For mIr — 9 acres of standing 
hay. Apply Fred Phllp, Sharon, 
phone Newmarket 200JI. •\w t 2S 

For aato — McKenzie, nine-noale, 
potato sprayer. Apply John Bank, # 
l-t miles west Mulock's siderond, 
R. R. 3, King. c2w26 



31 



MISCELLANEOUS 




between 
between 
between 
between 



Wanted to buy— Good hny, eith- 
er lo cut or already baled. Write 
Era and Exprcs box 434. clw26 

31 IIVKTOCX FOR 5A16 



For sale — 2 purebred Tamworth 
boar pigs, 5 mos. old. Apply C 
B. Arnold, Zephyr, phone Mount 
Albert 2306. *2w25 

For *ale — Goals, 3 months old. 
Phone 057w, Newmarket. clw2S 



W* buy and ^11 shotguns and 
.22 rifles. We have ammunition 
available for all calibres, Morri- 
son's Men's Wear, Newmarket. 

tf27 

THE BEST BRONCHI At 
COtMlH HTMIP 

For coughs, colds and bronchi* 
tls. A prompt and effective rem- 
edy for the relief of bronchitis, 
tight or chesty coughs and calda, 
50 cents. The Best Drug Stone, 
Newmarket. 



Far amle — 42-45 Ifarley, saddle 
bags, buddy seat. Motor over- 
Far aair l^TT Chevxptet fleet- {hauled. Newly painted. Phone 
line sedan, low mileage-, excellent J 202w2, Newmarket* »lw26 

condition. Phone 1150, Newmar- j 

**- ^ cgw2 * 22 HaFWANIED 

Far amle_*29 Dodge Aoto-trac, 
shape. Apply Cedl Lee, Kes- 

^k._ *>w26 

trailer, sleeps 4, 
cu pboard 



HHp waMa i G ood handy lab- 
orer Apply Ward and Allan Co, 
129 Main St., Newmarket, even- 
ings phone 949w. c3w24 



HHp w ail i < — Man for service 
station, experience nnnectwry, 
but must be willing to Iran. 
Steady employment. Ar^p^lS^ 
lor's Imperial Service Station, ~ 
vis Drive and Main 
Newmarket. 



2tA LIVESTOCK WAWTEO 






—Fox feed. Old 
horses, dead horses, dead cows. 
We pay for the dead animals If 
they are fit for our use. Advise 
Immediately as dead stock soon 
spoils, & B. Thompson, Holland 
Landing, phone 51J1, Newmarket. 

- tf27 



*i L * * *— 



ATTENTION FARMERS 

*»d or crippled turn mUdmIs ««l 

Tor 

WW®*** - 



m -- - 

i i\ TTVinsj IT 1 1 1 Hi ilCfmniTT Tf7¥f~. ii j.i 




Fer sale— 1 russes, surgical sup- 
ports, elastic hosiery for those who 
suffer from varicose veins, ankle 
and knee trouble. Arch supports. 
Lumbago belts. Best Drug Store, 
phone 14, Newmarket. 

MfJOOTO EN TWstOAT 

Thuna's Pink Tablets for the 
noae and throat, for the dropping 
of mucous discharge, sensation of 
the lump In the throat and other 
disturbances. Ttiese are the same 
reliable pink tablets that have been 
used for many years by adults and 

children wtth good remits. Price 

fLOO; ft.15; t*» The Beat Drag 

Store, phone t«, 



r^: -rv*,v>- 



tablets for 

See •#^sn^^n>^a^a* ^ *_ SMve9rrfPe ssa^a^Bne ♦e^^sa* 



Drue Stern, 




ONTARIO 

HIGHWAY niPROVRMENT ACT 
PUBLIC NOTICE 

IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursu- 
nnt to Section 79 <n> of the High- 
way Improvement Act and 
Amendments, nn Application has 
been made by the Department of 
Highways to the Ontario Munici- 
pal Hoard for the approval for the 
closing of the following roads in 
the 5th Concession of the Town- 
ship of King In the County of 
York, where crossed by the Tor- 
nnto-Bnrrie Controlled Access 
Highway. 

(n) Road allowance 
Lots 10 nnd 11. 

(b! Kond allowance 
Ixits 20 nnd 21. 

(c) Road allowance 
I,ols 25 nnd 26. 

id) Road allowance 
Lots 30 and 31. 

Such Application will be heard 
by the said Hoard in the Town 
Hall In the Town of Newmarket 
on the 17th day of July, 1050, nnd 
if necessary on Tuesday, the 18th 

day of July, 1050, nt the hour of 

10 o'clock in Ihe forenoon. Day- 
light Saving Time, at which time 
nnd place all persons claiming to 
be Interested or affected may at- 
tend nnd be heard. 

By Order of tho said Board all 
persons objecting to the said clos- 
ings or claiming that their land 
will be Injuriously affected by the 
said closings must file particular* 
of ftuch objections or claims with 
the Ontario Municipal Board, Par- 
liament Buildings, Toronto, and 
with tho Chief Property Valuator 
of tho Department of Highways, 
Parliament Buildings, on or before 
tho third day ef July, 1950. The 
Hearing of such claims will take 
place nt such time and place as 
may be subsequently fixed by the 
said Board. 

A Plan P. 2752-50 showing the 
portions of road proposed to be 
closed rnay be seen at the office 
of the Clerk of the said Town- 
ship and at the office of the De- 
partment of Highways in Room T. 
9M ot the East Block of the Par- 
liament Buildings, Toronto, during 
regular office hours, on and be- 
fore June 22nd, 1950. 

DATED at Toronto, Ontario, 

tide third day of June, 1900, 

^'iSsH^srt; Geocaw H. Doneatv . 

; - ^Minister of Highways. 




&SON 
QUEENSVILLE 

FUNERAL DIRECTORS AND 
AMBULANCE SERVICE 

PHONES 



m.. 

f TIMOTHY ST. W. 




r < 



PliiiM^ 



\m 




Ftawerawttwit.au 



118 aula St. 



A SPECIAL** 



T" — -+*•*•&?*: 




FRKK METHODIST CHURCH 

REV. F. A. DAW, Pastor 

10 a.m. — Sunday-school 
Superintendent: Miss C. Crowder 

11 a.m.— Divine worship 

7 p.m. — Evangelistic message 
Tuesday, S pjav — Prayer and 

Bible study 
Thursday, 8 p.m. — W.MS. 

A welcome is' extended to all 

FRIENDS' MEETING 
Botsford Street 

9.45 a.m.— Sunday-school 
II a.m.— Meeting for Worship 
Doaglas Rep* 

"Let us meet together to wor- 
ship the Lord/' ■ 
Camp Ncekaunis sessions: 
Jnly 15 - Si ; 

"The influence we have as 
Christians is entrusted to us to 
use in winning others to Christ. 



»» 



CHRIST IAN BAPTIST 

CHURCH 

Kc v . Fred Breekon, Minister 

Mrsi J. B. Cane, Orfaniat 

10 a.m.— Sunday-school 

Union services with Trinity 

United church for the month 

of July 



The GOSPEL TABERNACLE 

— IS WtiGtnl St — . 

11 a.m. — Devotional service 

? p.m.— Evangelistic 
Tie pasasr at bet* suiiies 
A Cordial Welcome to All 



ST. ANDREWS 
PRESBTTERIAN CHURCH 

REV. M. E. R. BOUDREAU 
BJD., S.T.D^ -Minister 

MISS BLANCHE BAILEY 
Organist 
9.45 a.m. — Sabbath school 

11 a.m. — Divine worship 



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CHURCH OT THE NJ 

Rev. A. E. Petersen, Pastor 

Miss June Haines, Organist 

Jerry Black, Choirmaster 

Sunday-school — 10 am. * : .. 

Devotional Service— 11 
Rev. Earl WaJtaaare t 
Evangelistic Service — 7 
Rev. D. Rept ef the 



Tuesday, 8 p.m.— prayer 
Friday, 7 p-m.— Junior 
Friday, 8 p.m.— N. 



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TRINITY UNITED 

Rev. Henry Cotton. Mmster 
Herman G. Foxier, Mus. Rao, 



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i mir-n a a,a- , M 



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I |A.M. UNION SERVICES WITH CHRISTIAN 

BAPTIST CHURCH DURING THE 

MONTH fj*--*»l«*<tt«a»« 















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:j«?!«w&-vkr«s» 






■ ^TV-^^ -' >--.," 



man, Newmarket* ifc happy to 
announce U* engagement of their 
eldest daughter. Joyce Tureen, to 
Mr. Harold Peter Sedore. son of 



and Mrs. Walter Jarrfe, Pefferlaw, 

a daughter. 

#UW| — At York County hospi- 
tal Monday. Jus* 26. 1950. to Mr. 
and Mrs. Earl Jessop, Bradford, a ; 



y 



Social News 



ter. 



Thursday evening. Mrs. M. 
l^Trt^ At York County hos- 1 Smith. Newmarket, entertained 
Mr- and Mm S. Scdore, Toronto, ^.^ -r^^i^ June 27. 1950. to I at a handkerchief shower for 
the wedding to rake rtoce ScpL] Mn ^ Mf ^ Er fe LaTrobe. R. R. Mrs. Clifford Case. 

£. 1950. in Torcnro. h Zopfeyr; a daughter. j Miss Eva Lemon was hostess j 

— ' Lwtdi — At York County hospl- at a supper party honoring Mrs. J 




CARD OF 



I tat Tuesday. June 27. U9& to Mr. Clifford Case and Mrs. Hugh 



McRae. 
Mrs. George Morrison and her 

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Mrs. P. Catania aia* fanuSy "«i5b j and Mrs. Wa. Le£tch. BrownhiUL 
to" thank tinar many Xrjeuds asdia dwghter. 

relatives for their bfcautiful floral L*t«ai* — At York County ho?*! two children accompanied by 
txibut.es and kindness emended <®{pi*at Saturday. .fun* 2L !»>. to* Mr. and Mrs. A. Taylor left Mon- 
thezn during tbeir reocsit sw oe-|jr n ^j^ jr,^ Kenneth Leonard, dav bv motor for Scarsdale. New 

ww*"* iSdacanterg. a son. York." where they will reside in 

Mcfataaa-At the East General ^ future. 

Bridge Club to which Mrs. 

;e belongs presented 

fitted travelling case 

I was a*xy *H£ a ixro5xsa Waa.f*******' -. . -, . i at the home of Miss Anna Smith. 

yZMfSir* Keats. ? IMm^M *** £2*?** **" A tea was held Tuesday by the 

-l^£^^^ e ^J^J ^|Lai!i^ Section of the Highlands 

Golf Club in honor of Mrs. Hugh 
McRae who leaves Monday for 
her new home near Sarnia. 



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NEWMARKET WOMEN'S EDITOR: Caroline Ion, Phone 9M 
AURORA WOMEN'S EDITOR: Mrs. R. D. Hodgklnson, Phone 136 

SEE ALSO PAGES 8 AND 9 



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4 - 

the Newmarket Era and Express Thursday, Jane 29, 195f rage I 



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IT'S A 

Woman's 



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By Caroline Ion 



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CAM* OF THAWS ;&£« Hrs. Thos. McKenna. Oak 

3Srs. Jack Eisai *w3 fasaSy vM^ftHgefc, a daughter. 
to thank th**i SW «5*^«s» ( XataV — At York County hospt- 
friend* and wd&KSS K* t -*^ r tal. Wednesday. June 2& 1550. to 
Vinoness. s> ~j^ihy a^i n*?»3*CE-- ; >r ._ ^^ j^ Henry Xatale, Oak 
bates extended to i&k» GSOTSg Kdg«. a daughter. 

2fti£W ^f^T^L5 tf Wlw^f- and Mrs. J. B. 
^£ *S!f»£ ^ ^ te *^C^br«*e Patterson take pleas 
ana fai — .. ^ : c .^ ^ jj^ ncunC j n » the birth of 

*.-. n ^. r Ynivsa -Sheir c^iusfcter Pauline Elizabeth. 

CAEOOF1HAM5 Jjim# 21. 1550. at their home, 

We *&& TO ««pMs_«ra ™^f ■ \Vri-e Ma?es. Aurora. 



HARNESS RACES 
IN SUTTON 
FOR JULY 5 

The Sutton Kinsmen club has 
announced that July 5 will be 
Sports Day in 1950 and that the 
first Wednesday in July will be 
Mrs. McRae was presented with an annual sports day in years to 






an electric tea kettle. 
B Mrs. I*. Simmerson, St. Cath- 

-." ! arines. is the guest of Mr. and 

Mrs. C. W. Spence. 

Mrs. Norman Johnson gave a 
supper bridge Monday evening 
for Mrs. Hugh McRae and Mrs. 
Clifford Case. 

Mrs. I/»rne C. Lee entertained 
at tea Thursday for Miss Helen 

Devlin. 



come. Harness racing is featur- 
ed this year and purses of $200 
are offered. Between the harn- 
ess events, the Kinsmen have ar- 
ranged pony races and with these 
two features, the track is ex- 
pected to draw a large crowd. 

In addition to the events for 
track fans, other sporting features 
are planned for the infield. 
Amusement concession owners 



Mr. and Mrs. R. D. Hodgkin- J have shown considerable inter- 



«*«, t-sJl **3 rcc«-=at«* «-)»«***, a ^Mer. 

Ywfc Cteslv I4££&33 #vm=£ r£*f Sefcrwier-At lor< Coanty ho^- 

iMks afififss el S!-9z»sd. Afeo Hop* { pita*» Sunday, June 25, 1930, to son spent Sunday with Mr. and jest in the day and games and 

WJL tor £k?*fes* IMS *tf fjc5t.-3Er. ar.d Mrs. Alian Schroder, - 

caros ae/2 to:5s» Mr. assd Mrs. - ; Qceer^-.nTIe, a son. 

I-ans, ara EHi^fera «feo te£p€d £s I Trimlrfe— At York County hos- 



tsv* «3T cm tfc* f«2n=E. Masgr. PitaL Sunday, June 25. 1S60. to Mr. 
:n«£>& " 5fc* A. Eaaasrij and and Mrs. David TrimWe, Georgina 
fe^Sy. | *sla£<l a daughter- 

" r. -r * Correction » 

_ • Ganlner — At York County hos- 

IN MEMORIAM ; pl»t Monday, Jur.e 19, 1950. to 

Mr. ar.d Mrs. Wm. Gardner, Xew- 



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— Ir: fo-nag ireniory : nsarket. a son. 
c-5 a <S*a*- cictc-er and giantf-j 
xaKfcer. 2f«^Se Crs^enaanv wfco DEATHS 

I^^ed a*ay Jtine 25, l?OL U ™ 

With tears ^e wa:<2i*d yoa s£nk-r Carrotfcer»— At Toronto General 
?rsg. 1 hospital, on Sunday, June 25. 1350, 

We vatf&ed 50a pass a-*ay; JTromas Carruthersv in his 02nd 
We tested yea «itfc fewtng care,* year, husband of the late Mary 
Bast cccM cot csa&e yoa stay. [Lundy, and father of Isabella 
We wfcfcbed *«^^ y° tir SK^fcjl»t» Arthur Heard), Toronto, 
As tfce «ary fc<«rs passed; iMaad fMrs. R- Carruthers), Van* 
Ob boTF oar hearts were feofeeajcouver, Witi£an% Strome, Alta.; 
z&vzi* j Jennie «Mrs. Ansley> r Elmvale, 

W&en »e **&!& yoa breathe! Garnet, Swift Current, Sasfc.; 



Mrs. G. D. Lindsay, Toronto. 

Miss M. Andrews spent Sun- 
I dav* in Toronto with friends. 

Mrs. W. M. Patrick and Mrs. C. 
Patrick spent Sunday in Tor- 
onto with friends. 

Mrs. Rose Spence. Toronto, 
spent Thursday of last week 
with her mother, Mrs. Geo. 

Spence. 
Mrs. Bull and Shirley are 

spending a week's holidays in 

Toronto- 
Mr. and Mrs. J. Bolton of 

Peterborough spent Sunday with 

Mr. and Mrs. F. Bolton, Machell 

Ave. 



$*ms last- 
Eve? resoenabered by son John, 
Va5er» and family. 



Soring memory of a 
dear daughter asd s&ter, Joan 
Kansas, *bo passed away June 
2^ 19G. 
The dtpsfc of sorrow we cannot 

tea 
Of tbe Ices of ooe -*e toved so well. 
AxA whale sfee sfee^s a 



Her nxts&ty we shall always keep-. 
S&A& missed \& mother. broth- 



Thomas and Waiter, Uxbridge, and 
Kenneth, Queensville. 

Interment in Sandford cemetery 
on Wednesday. 

CaIaitj* — At his home, conces- 
sion 2; King Township, on Satur- 
day, June 24, 1950. Pietro Catania, 
husband of Natala Carozza, fath- 
er of Michael, James, Mrs. S. 
Mizzoni <Jennie>, Mrs. John Gio- 
vanelli «5fimi>, Leonard, John and 
Sam. 

Interment Mount Hope ceme- 
tery, Toronto, on Tuesday. 

Do;t*— At St. Michael's hospital, 
on Saturday, June 24, 1950, Fred- 
erick J. Doyle, husband of Mar- 
garet Doyle. 

Interment St. John's cemetery. 
Newmarket, on Tuesday. 

ffisey— Suddenly, as result of an 
accident at lot 26, concession 7, 
Marfcham township, on Friday, 
June 2£. 1950, Charles Douglas 
Hisey, son of Mr. and Mrs. 
Charles Hisey, in his 14th year. 

Interment Dickson's Hill ceme- 
tery on Monday. 

t * ~ - ..^ l*SS<e — At the home. King, on 

* — 'Z&SPS&mS TbSSb*. June 22, 1950, EL Mil- 

% * £*l ^5^L*^J^S «cn Le^; r husband of Jennie Pax- 
Wm. WTnkwortfc, wfco died Jonej to0 /^f fa|her o£ Efafe and Nor , 

h yes 

King ce'metery on 



1Mj*—1g l&ving memory of my 
&*aa husbaxA Freecnan B. Uo?d, 
*tbo fussed away July 3, liM7. 
As fcxog as life, my heart shall 

fcoM 
Thy xsxszxay erar dear; 
And o'er the gra*e in lovfog grief 
Shall fall a sitent tear. 

fXAingjy remembered by wife 
cad daughters*. 



HONOR P»C. LEADER 

Gathering at the Aurora 
Legion Hall Tuesday evening, 
the members of the Aurora 
Women's Progressive Conserva- 
tive Association honored Mrs. 
Clifford Case who, until this 
year, has been the president 
since the inception of the Associ- 
ation. Mrs. Hugh McRae pre- 
sented Mrs. Case with a beauti- 
ful silver tray as a tribute from 
the members, wishing her hap- 
piness in her forthcoming mar* 
riage. 



amusements are certain to fill a 
large part of the grounds. 

At the Kinsmen's meeting, a 
long discussion developed over 
the pros and cons of including 
a legal gambling set-up in the 
arrangements. It was decided to 
do without the extra profits that 
could be had by operating race 
betting on the harness events. 

On the evening of Sports Day, 
the centre of attraction moves 
to the Red Barn Theatre. 
Through the kindness of Mr. Bri- 
an Doherty and the "Barnstorm- 
ers*', the gross profits from that 
night's show will be turned over 
to the Kinsmen club. The com- 
pany is doing "Crazy With The 
Heat", an original musical revue. 



Newmarket Social News 



AID CHILD PATIENTS 

The Aurora Business and Pro- 
fessional Women's Club is col- 
lecting comic books and child- 
ren's picture books for the 
patients at the Aurora Ontario 
Hospital. They will also distiib- 
ute candy to the inmates. Any 
contributions to this worthwhile 
cause may be left at Scanlon*s 

Bakery. 



.-w . traa, in his 66th year. 

X>a>s of sadcess still come- cfex us> * J 



Tears in sCence often flow; 
For memory fceeps you ever near 



yoa 



Interment 
Sunday. 

Sharp*— At St. Michael's hospi- 
tal, on Saturday, June 24, 1950, 



inrogn >«« ^ "r *^1 ^Zi *> h " ***!* Wellington <DJck> 



family. 



5harpe. husband of Phoebe Pook, 



KIN SURPRISE 
ON BIRTHDAYS 

A surprise party was held at 
the home of Mr. and Mrs. Wil- 
liam Ash by relatives and friends 
on Saturday evening, June 24. 
Approximately 30 gathered to 
celebrate the birthdays of both 
Mr. and Mrs. Ash and their 
three grandchildren, Joan Rob- 
son and Carol and Donald Ash. 

Many lovely gifts including 
flowers were received by the 
five ^ honorces. An enjoyable i ^~£j% fn *ou7 depth? con- 



SMALL DENOMINATIONS 

(Continued from Page 1) 
Meetings all over the world, a 
practice dating back to the early 
days of Quakerism in the 17th 
century England, it was stated 
that "If in this world the bustle 
and business we are to lead ded- 
icated lives with their necessary 
periods of prayer and medita- 
tion, we must learn to practice 
the presence of God by living 
simultaneously on two levels; on 
the surface concered with our 



evening was spent with refresh- 
ments being served. 



COURT OF 
REVISION 

Take Notice That a special 
[Court of Revision will be held re 



BIRTHS 

Etmtfetf 1 1 — At York County 
tv:#ifsl, Tfcct3day, Jane 23, 1S60, 
to Mr. and Mrs. Dooald Barra- 
cfcfti *h* Aak RMgesv a «w- 

C**— At York County nospital, 
Sunday, June 25, 1550* to Mr. and 
MhL Oford Cor, Palgrarev a 



Evan*— At Torfc Oxmly fcospe- 
taJ, Wednesday, Jane 2% 1360. to 



tal, Tuesday, Jane W, J9&K toMr 
and Mrs. Walter GroTes, Kewroar- 
ke^ a son, 

#*r*f« — At York Cotmty faospJK 

Monday, Jose 26^ 15S0, to Mr. i the covering. 



and father of Leslie, Everett, and i l 

Harry, Toronto. • special assessment as follows: 

Interment Prospect cemetery on 
Tuesday. 

Wlute — At her home, lot 20, 
con. 8, King Township, on Monday, 
June 26. 1950, Ellen B. White, 
oasghter of the late Robert and 
Sarah White, En her 77th year, sis- 
ter of. John, Minnie (Mrs. Groom- 
bxfdge), Edward, Susan (Mrs. Wit- 
son >. 

Interment St. Paul's Presbyteri- 
an cemetery, 9th concession of 
King on Wednesday. 



A "mermaid's parse" is the 

leathery-like covering with 

which a skate protects its eggs. 

hatching the little fish shed 







The New Canadian Built 




1. The Council of the Corpora- 
tion of the Town of Newmarket 
ha? constructed as a local im- 
provement sanitary sewers on 
Srigley St., Pteasantview Ave., 
Wesley St., and Vale Ave. 

2. The cost of the work is 
$26,707.99 of which $16,423.77 is to 
be paid hy the Corporation. The 
special rate per foot frontage is 
$2.10 equal to an annual charge of 
S18.25. The special assessment is 
to be paid In 15 annual instal- 
ments. 

3. The estimated lifetime of the 
work Is 15 years. 

'1. A Court of Revision will he 
held on the 33th Hay of July, 
1956, at 7.30 p.m., at the Council 
Chambers, 101 Main St., Newmar- 
ket, Ont„ for the purpose of hear- 
ing complaints against the pro- 
posed assessments or the accuracy 
of frontage measurements and any 
other complaint which persons In- 
terested may desire to make and 
which is by law cognizable by the 
Court. 

Dated at Newmarket this 26th 
day of June, 1050. 

Wesley Brooks, 
Clerk. 

c2w26 



stantly giving prayer and praise 
to God, as Brother Lawrence 
and more recently our own 
Thomas Kelly have described. 
Only so will we receive the per- 
ception and the strength to 
handle creatively the concerns 
whose urgency has been laid 
before our sessions." 

Howard Clayton of Norwich, 
Ont., was again appointed as 
presiding clerk for the joint 
sessions of the three branches of 
Friends who gather at Picker- 
ing College. Mabel Willson of 
Welland, Ont., Stirling Nelson 
of Niagara Falls, Ont., and Fran- 
cis Starr of Newmarket are the 
clerks of the separate branches. 

The Rev. James Finlay, pas- 
tor of Carlton St. United church, 
Toronto, reporting on Friday 
evening on a conference on the 
church and war held in Detroit, 
Mich., in May, 1950, said: "The 
Detroit conference gave the an- 
swer to the alternative of pagan! 



*— Mr. and Mrs. John Isham 
have returned to Indianapolis, 
Indiana, after spending holidays 
in Beaverton district as guests 
of Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Bowman 
and Carol. 

—Mr. John Fedders of Winona, 
Minnesota, visited in Newmar- 
ket this week as the guest of 
Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Bowman and 
Carol. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Harry Beer 
returned home on Monday after 
a week's visit In New York with 
Mrs. Beer's brother, Mr. John 
Holmes. 

— Miss Mary Hunt, Toronto, 
spent the weekend with her 
brother-in-law and sister, Mr. 
and Mrs. Ross Eves and family* 

— Mrs. Roy Spence and Miss 
Shirley Brown, Toronto, were 

Sunday guests of Mr. and Mrs. 

Fred Lynn. 

— Miss Florence Morritt is vi- 
siting her sister, Mrs. J. K. New- 
ton, Bradford. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Clarence Burl- 
ing, Mr. and Mrs. Frank Burl- 
ing. Mr. and Mrs- Floyd Burling, 
Miss Audrey Burling and Mr. 
and Mrs. Herbert McKenzie at- 
tended the band festival at 
Waterloo on Saturday. 

— Jack McCarnan left Monday 
morning for a trip to the prairie 
provinces. 

— Mrs. Ray Allen, Malton, ac- 
companied by her children, 
Diana, Ray and Lorraine spent 
the weekend with her parents, 
Mr. and Mrs. Frank Widdifield. 



—Ruth Mary Winch, Keswick, 
was the weekend guest of Bar- 
bara Pritchard. 

—Mr. and Mrs. G. F. McCar- 
nan accompanied by Mr. and 
Mrs. Alex Paul, Victoria, B.C., 
attended the band festival at 
Waterloo on Saturday. 

—Mr. and Mrs. Grant Sine 
visited their son, Jack, in Wa- 
terloo over the weekend. Jack 
is a member of the Waterloo 
band which acted as hosts for 
the festival on Saturday. 

—Boys from Newmarket who 
leave for North York Memorial 
camp. Duclos Point, Lake Simcoe 
tonight arc Gary Dyer, David 
Andrew, David Jefferson, John- 
ny Haines, Frank Waltho, Herb- 
ert Walker, Donald and Francis 
Lewis. Michael and Larry Mur- 
phy, Ralph Hill, Donald Zogalo, 

Neil Ransom, Maxwell and John 

W. Hope, Jim Shrophire, Ronald 
Dewsbury, Lawrence Curtis, 
Jack Stickland, George Ramm, 
Gary and Bill Saunders and 
George Davis. 

— Misses Alice and Elsie Gib- 
bons, Mrs. H. G. Gibbons and 
Mrs. Mary Webster left on Tues- 
day for a trip to Grandview, 
Manitoba. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Harry Boag, 
accompanied by their children, 
Terry and Peggy, spent the 
weekend at the home of Mrs. 
Percy Boag, Queensville. 

—Mr. J. F. Starr of Canadian 
National Railways, Allandale, 
visited his uncle and aunt, Mr. 



Strawberry time is here in earnest. Our first joys 
at having a strawberry patch have simmered down 
considerably. No longer is there a heady delight in 
the prospects of luscious, ripe fruit fresh from the 
garden, but in actuality there is a hearty back-ache as 
the dream reaches realization. 
Nevertheless, it still seems 

wonderful that all the family 

can eat of these berries and 



—Barbara Pritchard is spend- and Mrs. Raymond Huntley, Sim- 



ing a few days this week with 
Ruth Mary Winch, Keswick. 

— Mrs. George Dutton and 
daughter, Rita, Toronto, spent 
the weekend with Mrs. and Mrs. 
Roy Keffer and family at the 
latter's cottage, Alcona Beach, 
Lake Simcoe. 

—Mrs. Flossie Prosser, Wind- 
sor, is visiting her mother, Mrs. 
Annie Sanderson, and her bro- 
ther, Harold. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Alex Paul, Vic- 
toria, B.C., visited over the 
weekend Mr. and Mrs. G. F. 
McCarnan en route to Eng- 
land for an extended visit. Mrs. 
Paul is a cousin of Mrs. McCar- 
nan. 

—Mr. and Mrs. William Walk- 
er, King, spent Monday evening 
with Mr. and Mrs. William 
Cooper. 

— Jack Sine will bo a counsel- 
or at the Bolton summer camp 
for the next five weeks. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Harold Stop- 
per and daughter. Donna, and 
Mrs. Libby McKrill, Toronto, 
were weekend guests of Mr. and 
Mrs. William Ash. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Roy Smith, 
Toronto, and Mrs. T. Bell, Au- 
rora, attended the shower on 
Wednesday evening held In 
honor of Juno Martin at the 
home of Mrs. Robert Patterson. 

— Mr. William McCrae and 
Mr. William Leach, Toronto, 
visited on Wednesday Mr. and 
Mrs. Fred Lynn. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Norman Se- 
dore and Mr. and Mrs. Charles 
Wrightman left yesterday for a 
three weeks' motor trip to Hali- 
fax, N.S. 



coe St. 

— Mrs. M. Jarvis, who has been 
visiting her daughter, Mrs. E. 
Bailie, and family in Kelowna, 
B.C., expects to leave for Van- 
couver and the United States 
shortly. She expects to return 
home in the fall. 

—Mrs. Gilbert and Albert at- 
tended the Gilbert-Hoover wed- 
ding at Dickson Hill on Saturday. 

—Dr. and Mrs. J. C. R. Ed- 
wards and Jane, Newmarket, 
returned on Monday from a two 
weeks* motor trip to Halifax, 
where Dr. Edwards attended the 
Canadian Medical Association 
convention. While there they 
visited Lieut, and Mrs. D. C. 
Edwards. Robert, who accomp- 
anied his parents on the trip, 
remained in Halifax and as the 
guest of his brother. Lieut. D. 
C. Edwards, is on n cruise aboard 
the "Swansea" to St. John's, 

Charlottetown, Pictou and Tad- 

oussac. 

—Mrs. H. W. Chubb, formerly 
of "Hillvista", North Yongc St., 
and elder son, Albert, motored 
over from Battlecreck, Mich, to 
visit her father, Mr. A. S. White, 
"Hillvista", and her brother, Mr. 
Wallace White, Toronto. She 
attended morning service with 
Mrs. Arthur Evans, Millard Ave., 
at St. Paul's Anglican church, 
where she was married over 13 
years ago by her uncle, Rev. Dr. 
W. W. Judd of Toronto. 

—Mrs. W. A. Webster, form- 
erly Miss Mabel Rogers of Davis 
Drive, now of Brandon, Man., 
is in Toronto for the summer 
season doing secretarial work at 
Willard Hall, Gerrard St. E., 



have lots left for jam and can- 
ning just for the picking. 

As we are growing up most 
of us form an idea of what we 
want in our future homes. For 
as long as we can remember, 
our plans have been for a house 
in the country or on the out- 
skirts of a small town with a 
garden. (No doubt because we 
lived in cities through childhood 
and adolescence). 

But the important part was 
the garden. Some people want 
a swimming pool included in 
their dreams; others are satis- 
fied with a picket fence enclos- 
ing a simple flower garden, but 

we wanted a strawberry patch. 
Of course there were to be other 
requirements. We were not to 
be that easily appeased, but the 
strawberry patch was awfully 
important. So when we com- 
plain about the job of picking 
it is only in a half-hearted fa- 
shion for actually we love every 




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SHOWER BRIDE-TO-BE 

Miss Marion Harrison was en- 
tertained at a bridal shower in 
her honor at the home of Mrs. 
Richard Beckett on Wednesday 
evening. June 28. Miss Evelyn 
Crowder and Mrs. Ruth Spence 
were the hostesses. 

The bride was the recipient of 
many lovely gifts, after which a 
delicious lunch was served. 



, - 



was 



FRIENDS SHOWER 
JUNE 24 BRIDE 

A miscellaneous shower 
held for June Martin, bride-elect 
of June 24, at the home of Mr. 
and Mrs. Robert Patterson on 
Wednesday evening, June 21. 
There were 30 present. The 
honorce received many lovely 
gifts. 

Following an evening of good 
comradeship delicious refresh- 
ments were served by the host- 
ess assisted by Mrs. Garfield 
Firth and Misses Mary and 
Phyllis D'Angelo, Toronto. 



SHOPPING WITH BETTY 



Has original from show 



By BETTY BRAMMEft 

No one can say Newmarket is 
behind the times as far as fash- 
ions are concerned. Eves* Ladies 
Wear has one of the original 



nationalism, an answer which dresses that was shown at the fall 



the world expects of the organ- 
ized church." The Conference 
called upon the church to "re- 
pent of war-making" and advo- 
cated that "individual Chris- 
tians and the church support the 
use of the methods of reconcili- 
ation and non-violent action, 
such as Gandhi has demonstrated 
in our time." 










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M. KEFFER 



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**^+MiJ&i K»^c. .-. 




Holidays 



By HOWARD MORTON 




Next week is holiday time for 
most of the people in Newmar- 
ket and Aurora. We've been 
taking a little holiday too. In 
fact, we're jumping the gun and 
cutting our column now. Truth 
of the matter is that while it's 
lots of fun, and there's a real 
kick to> seeing your efforts in 
print, this column writing busi- 



v.-:\ 








km eot me. 

But here is • reminder. 



- _ -^-^Z>1 



your car given a thorough check 
before you take that holiday 
trip. It will save you a lot of 
bother at a time when you 
should be carefree. 

That'* w* at we Mb are 
i» tesbea far— to mare yea 
better ajMi tre-Me by ref»- 
lar terrieiar el ywmr ear. 
We've been busy, but we're 
never too busy to give you the 
kind of service you want You 

are, at the Tex- 
*a you 
Neinnartai on bglc St 



wrt- 







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fashion show held at the King 
Edward hotel, Toronto, a few 
weeks ago. It is beautifully made 
of black nylon marquisette over 
taffeta. The slip could be worn 
alone, the bodice is beige taffeta 
covered with black lace and fits 
like a dress. 

The overdress has long sleeves 
caught at the wrist by a band. 
The shoulders are of lace which 
extends down the length of the 
sleeve. The neckline 5s high 
with a small bow at the front 
and a single dome fastening at 
the back. A really beautiful 
dress. 

— B — 

One of the newest things out 
this summer in sweaters is the 
"Shrug Shoulder Sweater". Of 
fine wool in white, pale pink or 
blue, they may be worn for the 

beach, bedtime, office or evening. 
These versatile little sweaters are 
only $3.98 and may be purchased 
in Newmarket. 

_ B — 

Bathing suit time is really here 
and whether you're a regular fish 
in the water or prefer to sit and 
acquire a tan a new bathing suit 
is a must. A pretty blue brocad- 
ed effect strapless suit seen in a 
Newmarket shop is elasticized all 
over and has a boned bodice to 
ensure M no slipping". Several 
others were iridescent satin in 
black with flashing front panel 
of chartreuse or poppy red. Get 
in the swim in summer '50. 

_ B — 

There's nothing like a change 
of make-up to perk you up on 
a sweltering summer day. A new 
brand or different shade does 
wonderaL Tussy*s newest -.is 



"Midnight" and includes a purse 
vial of perfume, cologne in two 
sixes, dusting powder and creme 
rouge and lipstick in midnight 
pink shade. If yon use more 
cologne or toilet water in the 
hot weather you will be interest- 
ed in the special sale of a $2 
bottle of Tussy's "Garden Party" 
colognefor $1 at Harvey Lane's. 

— B — 

Every shipment of hats at one 
of the shops in town is nicer. 
We were partial to two in par- 
ticular. One is a large black 
taffeta with broad stitched brim 
and around the crown are small 
pearl beads and a band of velvet 
ribbon ending in a small bow at 
the back. Very sophisticated 
worn with a black transparent 
dress. The other, a younger- 
looking hat is navy mohair, bon- 
net style, trimmed with navy vel- 
vet under the brim and on the 
crown. The only adornment is 
two small rhinestone clips and 
a bit of veiling. The mohair is 
put on in rolled layers giving the 
hat an altogether different look. 

— B — 

A jewel box is something just 
a little different for a gift idea. 
We saw some beautiful ones at 
the Marigold in leather and sil- 
ver metal. The jewel cases by 
Tory are genuine leather with 
24 kt. gold tooling and are nicely 
lined with plush. The silver 
jewel boxes would add something 
to any dressing table. They are 
very well made, not expensive 
and are lined with pale blue 
plush. Some have locks and 
little keys. 

_ B — 

A tip from Betty: Store your 
colognes and face cream in the 
refrigerator. You'll find they 
are more refreshing when cold. 
Don't wear a wide leather or 
plastic belt on hot days — it holds 
in the heat 



COTTAGE OUTING 
A very enjoyable day was 
spent at the cottage of Mrs. 
Howard Morton at Lake Simcoe 
on Thursday, June 22, when the 
incoming executive of the New- 
market Home and School Associ- 
ation were hostesses to last 
year's executive. The group 
chartered a bus and proceeded 
to the cottage where a delicious 
luncheon was enjoyed before the 
welcome fireplace. Despite the 
rainy, cool weather the day's 
outing proved very successful. 
" ^ I 

Toronto. She visited her neph- 
ew and niece, Mr. and Mrs. Orla 
Phillips, this week before com- 
mencing her duties. 

— Mr. and Mrs. John I-ee, Mil- 
lard Ave., left last week to make 
their home in Hamilton. 

Mr. and Mrs. Nicholls of Ot- 
tawa spent a few days last week 
visiting their son-in-law and 
daughter, Mr. and Mrs. Ken Pon- 
ting and grandson, Bryan, Mil- 
lard Ave. 

— Mrs. F. Couplnnd of Barrio, 
spent the weekend in town. 

— Messrs. J. A. Boyd and Da- 
vid O. Miller attended the C.B. 
M.C., Canadian Keswick Confer- 
ence, Ferndale, Muskokn, last 
week. 



back-breaking minute of it. 

For awhile we seriously con- 
sidered declaring war, not cold 
or lukewarm, but decidedly of 
the hot variety on our so-called 
little feathered friends, the ro- 
bins. "Robbers", would be a 
more appropriate name for them* 
No wonder they have red 
breasts after devouring so many ' 
strawberries. 

■ 

We tried several ways of dis- 
couraging their activities but 
without luck. Finally, we had 
to take down the improvised^ 
scare crow for it made on ex- 
cellent perch for the robins. 

They would sit there casualty 

surveying our strawberry patch 
and make their selections of just 

the reddest, plumpest berries. 

We even went so far as to offer 
them the regular commission 
per box for picking them for us, 
but no, they were uninterested.; 
Robins, it would appear, are in- 
dependent operators. 

During the past few days we 
have managed to keep up with 
them in the harvesting of the 
strawberry crop. Perhaps it is 
but a temporary lull in hostili- 
ties while the robins bring up 
reinforcements from the rear. 
Wonder how they like black 
currants, raspberries and cher- 
ries? ? ? 



Even if your Mary or your 
Johnny have never been in an/ 
oratorical contest before, why 
not let them try out in the 
public speaking contests to take 

place at the Canadian National 
Exhibition? 

Cash awards totalling $125 will 
be presented to winners in the/ 
etementary grades of 6, 7 and # 
according to the C.N.E. prize 
list. 

Open to any Canadian school 
child, entry forms for registrar . 
tion may be obtained now by 
writing to tho Women's Division, - 
Canadian National Exhibition, 
Toronto. Deadline for entries Is 
July 15. 

Contestants may choose their 
own subjects, Kate Aitken, dir- 
ector of Women's activities, ex§ > 
plains. Competitions take place 
at the Exhibition the afternoon 
of August 29. Each contestant 
is allowed three minutes. Any 
number of pupils from any one 
school may compete. 



r .;« 

1 



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and $1.00 a weak 

THIS 



V 



- : 



(Advertisement) 

WILL CXWDUCr SUMMER 
SCHOOL FOR CHILDREN 

Mrs. Myrtle Purcell. teacher at 

the Stuart Scott school, will con- 
duct a Child Care and Play Cen- 
tre, 5 days a week during tho holi- 
days, nt her home, 103 Engle St. 
Town bus service to door. 

Attractive weekly rate nnd a 
reduction when more than one 
chil'l comes from a family, mini- 
mum age, 4 years, A splendid 
opportunity for your child to en- 
joy supervised play, stories, paper 
sculpture and handcraft* Phone 
125 Iw, for particulars. clw26 



Y J.U. PICNIC 

Toronto Centre Presbytery 
North Young Peoples Union 
held a picnic and play-off Tues- 
day evening at Preston Lake. 
The young people enjoyed a 
marshmallow roast aiyi a devo- 
tional service. 



for 



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USED DOMESTIC 
and COMMERCIAL 






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Aanda.T, Jmt 29, 1W». Fife 8 

NURSE APPOINTED 
BY AURORA V.O.N. 

At a board meeting of the 
Aurora Victorian Order of Nur- 
ses held Thursday, Miss Helen 
Devlin, whose marriage takes 
place in the near future, ten- 
dered her resignation. It was 
announced that Miss Lamb, who 
has recently finished her post- 
graduate course in V.O.N, nur- 
sing, will" take Miss Devlin's 

place. 

With the establishment of 
health unit services in Aurora, 
the prospect of continuing the 
work of the V.O.N, will have 
to be decided at a future meet- 
ing. 

Miss Devlin in her report 
stated that the year had been 
most successful mentioning es- 
pecially the work done among 
the public school children. 



THE HOMEMAKBIS 




7: -■-?.. =SvrV:r^ 



Sandwich time again 

On hot summer days everyone! U cup mayonnaise 
has an excuse to be lazy and the Vi tsp. minced onion 



.4*^.. i~~ _ 



PANTS 



..■-.. ."jbie any- 

*'h« i- . ! n * ! e y * 

r.ir.v tfc* Urged 

slo*-k „' d-ess and 

*••' > r a " t s for 

'•irr. a-.* - hoys 



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CLIFF INSLEY 

It** the \iorr with ihe 
merchandise. 




Begins to Ache 



HMOfFOft 




DODOS 

KIDNEY 

PILLS 



H*c£ieheu*ftM4*t» 

tfco; lad for «m bai* i caotorr Dcdtft 

U^T P3h h* t. Wp*4 tnnf «w fr « 
Ud»d» by Crtttiof tf» W»rt C-* 
Owif* Ki-Wj r«H» loAiy it «T *«* 
<»wfer. U* for &■ blot bt with tf* red 
fcmdL Y»r*iciej*od«D*M'«. 155 




CHEMICAL 
TOILETS 



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SUMMCR 

CAMT», 

COUNTfty 
HOM1S 



Modernize your property by in* 
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ftfid cary to fnrtalj no water pres- 
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Write u« for full information. 

TWEED STEEL 

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housewife can be lazy about food 
too. Man-sized sandwiches are 
the solution to suppers which 
are prepared quickly and easily. 
The housewife can keep cool 
making them because little or 
no cooking is required. When 
the family supper is served pic- 
nic style a variety of tempting 
sandwiches may be prepared, all 
taste-appealing but appetite-ap- 
peasing too. A "Dagwood" or a 
"club" sandwich can be enjoyed 
by any member of the family 
from father to the teen-agers. 
An excellent combination for 
this type of sandwich 'is ham and 
mustard on one layer and let- 
tuce and tomatoes on the second 
layer. Another variation is cold 
sliced meat on one layer and 
pickle relish on the second. 

Mrs. Housewife should try 
varying her sandwiches by us- 
ing buns and rolls instead of 
bread. For the next picnic sup- 
per a weiner roll may be split, 
hollowed out and filled with 
chicken or salmon salad, or a 
hamburger bun may be filled 
with cheese, sliced tomatoes 
and crisp bacon. A broiled 
v/iener, of course, is a "natural" 
for a long soft roll, and a var- 
iety of spicy chili sauces, pickles, 
mustard or relishes are the fin- 
ishing touches necessary for this 
repast. If a hamburger bun is 
to be used the old fashioned 
"Denver" filling of scrambled 
eggs which has onions and diced 
ham added to it, is always in 
demand. 

Grilled and toasted sandwiches 
are hot and tempting. Hot fill- 
ings on bread or buns are 
another form of hot sandwiches 
and French toasted sandwiches 
are a third alternative not for- 
getting of course the hot meat or 
chicken sandwich served with 
gravy. Practically any sand- 
wich may be grilled or toasted. 

BOLOGNA SANDWICH 
FILLING 

Yt lb. bologna or weiners 

2 tbsp. chopped pickles 

VA tsp. vinegar from pickles 



H tsp. spicy meat sauce 
U cup ground raw carrot 
2 tbsp. chopped celery 

Grind bologna, add the other 
ingredients and mix well. This 
makes \ x h cups of filling. 

For the sandwich which is to 
have a hot filling try hot meat 
loaf with chili sauce or hot sau- 
sages with applesauce and see if 
the family doesn't welcome this 
change in diet. 

To most housewives the 
French-toasted sandwich is some- 
thing new and different. Here 
are a few suggestions for varia- 
tions. Fill the sandwich with 
ground meat and pickle, or 
sardines and pickle or a cheese 
mixture and then dip the sand- 
wiches in this French-toast mix- 
ture: 
2 eggs 

% cup of milk 
M tsp. salt 

pepper 

Blend slightly beaten eggs, 
milk, salt and pepper. Dip each 
sandwich In this mixture. Saute 
in a small amount of fat until 

brown on both sides. 

Any type of hot cooked meat 
whether it be beef, pork, lamb 
or liver may be served on one 
or two slices of bread and cov- 
ered with gravy. The result is 
a delicious hot meat sandwich. 
The left-over Sunday roast may 
be used up by serving this sat- 
isfying sandwich. 

SNACKWICII 

Using a large cooky cutter, 
cut round from %-inch slices of 
bread spread with softened but- 
ter. Cut the centres from half 
these rounds with a small cooky 
cutter. Spread the full rounds of 
bread generously with chopped 
chicken and celery, moistened 
with salad dressing (or any 
other suitable filling). Top 
with the doughnut-like circles of 
bread and fill the centres with 
sliced pickles or small onions. 
Spread the small rounds with a 
nippy cheese and serve sepa- 
rately. 






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CLUB 



Birthday wishes are extended 
this week to: 

Russell Morton. Sutton West, 
eight years old on Friday, June 
23. 

Joan Emily Chapman, Willow 
Beach. 12 years old on Friday, 
June 23. 

Dayle Elizabeth Craddock, 
Newmarket, ten years old on 
Friday, June 23. 

Clarence Elgin Toole, Pine 
Orchard, ten years old on Sat- 
urday, June 24. 

Donald Woods, Schomberg, 15 
years old on Saturday, Jute 24. 

Sandra Jane Watt, Newmarket, 
12 years old on Sunday, June 
25. 

Jackie Stickland, Newmarket, 
12 years old on Monday, June 
26. 

Leonie Rath Paul, Cedar Brae, 
15 years old on Monday, June 26. 

Helen Carr, Schomberg, six 
years old on Monday, June 26. 

Jean and Joan McLeod, 
Schomberg. 13 years old on 
Wednesday, June 28. 

Wilda Preston, Bethesda, two 
years old on Wednsday, June 28. 

Earl Johnston, Newmarket, 
eight years old on Wednesday, 

June 28. 
Jimmie Sine, Newmarket, 15 

years old on Thursday, June 29. | 
George King, Brownhill, 12 

years old on Thursday, June 29. 
Myrna Jean McCIure, R. R. 3, 

Newmarket, four years old on 

Thursday, June 29* 
Shirley Ann Draper, Toronto, 

nine years old on Thursday, 

June 29. 

Send in your name, address, 
age and become a member of 
the Newmarket Era and Express 
birthday club. 




The Common 




By Isabel Ingti* ColviiU 

FRIENDLY GATHERINGS 



Anyway, this piper pip*** us 
all Into the realm of laughter. 
It was nil good and as we drove 
through the quiet night beside a 
lake ailvcrcd by moonlight, we 
said again "It was a perfect eve- 
ning. Thank you, Lions." 



This year, for almost the first time since 1 joined 
the Women's Institute, I was not a delegate to the Dis- 
trict Annual and so did not have to glue my eyes to a 
notebook and stretch my cars that I might lose no word 
of wisdom. I could relax and just jot down anything 
that took my fancy. 



Y OUNG HOPEFULS iy dokothy mui* iowmah 

Too solicitous Mom slows boy 



50-50 CLUB PICNIC 
The 50-50 club of the United 
Church, Aurora, held a family 
get-together Wednesday at the 
home of Dr. and Mrs. A. W. Bo- 
land, Lake Simcoe. Meeting at 
the church at 2.30, the cars pro- 
ceeded to the beach where a 
picnic supper was enjoyed by 
the members and their children. 
Colored movies were taken 
which will be greatly enjoyed 
at a future meeting of the club. 




David, 14, suffers humiliation 
and retardation as a result of a 
domineering and too solicitous 
mother. 

During infancy and pre-school 
years, David v/as in need of 
extra care because of his v/eak 
physical condition. HJs left side 
was partially paralyzed— a con- 
dition which rendered limited 
use of left arm and left foot. 
Every description of medical at* 
tention had been given David 
and by the time he was eight 
years old, he was able to take 
his place in school and play with 
other boys and girls of his ago 
group. 

However, although David was 
willing and eager to be accepted 
as one of the group of children, 
he v/as thwarted by his mother's 
interference. David's mother 
proved to be his biggest handi- 
cap. She couldn't break herself 
from the ties that had been so 
necessary during David's early 
life. She considered herself ne- 
cessary to her child in every 
move he made despite the fact 
that he no longer required spe- 
cial attention. 

Among the humiliating ex- 
periences which David's mother 
unv/ittingly Inflicted upon him 
were accompanying him to and 

from school, helping him put on 
his clothes, carrying his books, 
taking his hand when crossing 
the street, telling other children 
not to play rough with David, 
warning the teacher that David 
needed special consideration. 
David's mother was continually 
restraining him and publicly, 
too. By Ihe time he was 14 ho 
was a very big baby indeed. 

The result of this domineering 
attitude on the part of David's 
mother has not only been on© 
of humiliation, it hns retarded 
his normal mental and physical 
growth. When problems present 
themselves, David takes the sure 
way out and says his molher 
wouldn't want him to do tlilft or 
thnt. Typical of his answer for 
tho reason for not bothering 
with homework is that his mo- 
ther said ho v/as too tired. 

This case Is moro exaggerated 
than most; nevertheless, those 
in attendance at child guidance 
clinics arc continually finding 
tho root of tho child's difficul- 
ties situated in tho home. Most 
of the trouble is a mutter of 
misunderstanding between par- 



ent and child. As a result the 
child suffers from improper 
treatment — more often neglect 
though in a great number of 
cases overconcern, as in David's 
instance, is responsible. 



BROWNIES RAISE 
$28 IN AID OF 

A very successful bake sale 
was held by the members of the 
Newmarket Brownie pack at the 
Scout Hall on Saturday, June 10, 
when a total of $28 was raised 
for the Manitoba Flood Relief 
Fund. The Brownies, who are 
under 12 years of age, did all 
the work for the sale and man- 
aged things in a very adult 
fashion. They v/ere supervised 
by their leaders, Mrs. Ray Sher- 
rard and Miss Grace Colclough. 

The Brownies and their lead- 
ers v/ould like to take this op- 
portunity to thank those who 
donated home baking to the sale 
as well as the purchasers. 



CITIZENSHIP TALK 
HEARD BY W.A. 

The Women's Association of 
St. Andrew's Presbyterian 
church, Newmarket, met at the 
home of Mrs. Leonard Little on 
Tuesday, June 20. Mrs. T. Con- 
nell assisted the hostess. Mrs. 
Joseph Greer presided over the 
well otiended meeting. 

The guest speaker was Mrs. 
Elton Armstrong who gave an 
interesting and instructive ad- 
dress on citizenship. It was 
decided to continue the weekly 
bake sales each Saturday after- 
noon during the summer months. 
Mrs. T. II. Walls is convening 
this project. 

Dainty refreshments were 
served by the hostesses and a 
pleasant social hour was spent. 



OIVKN CKRTIFICATK 
Mary Lou Little, daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. Leonard Little, has 
received her first class interim 
certificate from Toronto Normal 
school. She will teach on the 
public school staff of the Tot on- 
to schools next year. 



Marian Martin Patterns 



n^mm**.. 



PKTKCT VOUK BABY 

with a 

CARRIAGE NET 

FITS ALL CAimiAOKS 

$1.39 

PRINT DRESSES 

Sixes 2, ;t and 4 yis. 
Reg. sum at 

$1.79 

flood Aftftortmcnt of Hoy*' 
and Girl*' 

SUNSUITS - 98c 
JACK « JILL SHOPPB 

Main St. Newmarket 




No matter that some 20 odd 
years have rolled over my head 
since my first D.A., I always 
feel the same thrill of anticipa- 
tion when I see the rows of wo- 
men's faces, intent, interested 
and alert. I think I deserve to 
relax, I go through so much be- 
fore I even get started. 

The man of the house left an 
hour before I did, and after 
that, between rounding up six 
cats, who thought the round-up 
was a game, trying to keep 
Stripey, the biggest, from eating 
all the food meant for their din- 
ner, making sure no lights were 

left on in the stove, and then 
again counting six impudent pink 
and rose noses to see that none 
had hidden someplace, I was so 
tired that I was glad to toll in- 
to Jean Williams' car, and even 
the dash of rain on the wind- 
shield sounded soothing. 

We picked up Mrs. McCIure 
and went on over to Penrose's 
where Murray was ready to take 
us and his mother and Miss 
Starr to King City. A drive in 
the spring, even through a land- 
scape seen through the silver 
veil of rain, is always lovely and 
restful, especially if you've been 
chasing cats! It was pleasant to 
see the rows of faces — many fam- 
liar ones — though the cleavage 
has left many vacant niches — 
and to join in the opening ex- 
ercises. 

Our Collect, "Keep us, O 
Lord from pettiness," is such a 
heart-searching one and for a 
little while, at any rate, arouses 
in us the desire — and determina- 
tion to live up to its tenets. 
Some of us occasionally fall in- 
to the pitfalls of our own per- 
sonalities, but none with a high 
objective and the will to climb 
to it, can ever wholly fail, and 
the Collect pricks us with the 
arrows of conscience. 

As I said, I am leaving details 
to other observers and only giv- 
ing impressions. One was the 
simplicity and sincerity with 
which the Rev. M. R. Jenkinson 

welcomed us to his church and 
the town. He paid tribute to 
the wonderful work done by the 
women of all ages, from Bible 
times till now, and he poked a 
bit of sly fun at us also, lie 
said that M Ood created the 
world and rested; He created 
man— and rested; then He creat- 
ed woman, and neither God nor 
man has rested sinccl 

We listened to the secretary- 
treasurers reports and then to 
the reports of convenors of com- 
mittees and wo realised just 
what tho W.I. is doing in the 
crusade to enrich home life, com- 
munity life and world-wide fel- 
lowship. 

Mr;. Howard Cane told us 
something of the growth and 
needs of York County hospital 
to which many of the branches 
contribute. Its growth, its up- 
keep and its efficiency depend 
on the support it receives and as 
there is no doubt that it fills a 
big and growing need in our 
community, support should he 
given gunermwly. Kroin very 
small hcginrt'iuts, Its growth has 
heen phenomemd. 

Mrs. Ito.M Armitnge had an 
exacting role to play that day— 
three reports— while most of US 
found one enough, but Mrs. 
Armilage carried hers off with 
humor and understanding, giv- 



ing us new ideas on the Federa- 
tion of Agriculture, and with 
Mrs. Farren giving us glimpses 
of the Guclph conference which 
made us think we, too, had been 
there. Two vocal solos and two 
violin selections were very 
pleasing, us was also the appet- 
izing luncheon which being 
everything a luncheon should be, 
provided us with strength of 
mind and body to assimilate 
and digest the mental food serv* 
cd up to us in the afternoon. 

Mrs. Corner gave us an excel- 
lent address. She quoted Dr. 

Sehendler as telling that the 

way to live to be 100 is to have a 
hobby, learn to like work and 
people, to accept misfortunes, to 
say the cheerful and the humor- 
ous thing, and to meet problems 
with precision. 

It was good to hear what the 
juniors were doing and we were 
pleased to have with us Mrs. 
Elton Armstrong, North York 
president, and Mrs. Weston, pres- 
ident of West York, who both 
spoke of what the home can 
mean in the community, in the 
making of its citizens and in the 
furthering of every good pro- 
ject. 

I think we all left King with 
an added sense of our responsi- 
bility as members of the W.I. — 

that to hold them too lightly is 
to be false in our creed. 

Ladies' Night 

When the Lions club of New- 
market entertain the ladies, they 
also tuck in the Newmarket 
Orchestra which assisted at its 
Minstrel Show and when the 
man of the house and I gathered 
up Hilda and Mr. and Mrs. 
Kudclka, we all felt that the de- 
lightful drive through a coun- 
tryside rich In the promise of 
all Ontario can give, that we 
were just at the beginning of a 
delightful evening — and so we 
were. 

Arrived nt Briar Park Lodge 
we soon found ourselves a little 
unit in a great number of simi- 
lar units— all friendly — and all 
hungry! The call to dinner was 
responded to with enthusiasm, 
and the excellent menu and 
good service met with n warm 
welcome. 

We sang old songs with our 
mouths full of this and that, and 
wo drank toasts and listened to 
speeches and watched the in- 
duction of guests. A nice gesture 
was the rosebuds which wore 
distributed to the ladies. Mr. 
Wainmnn's record of perfect at- 
tendance for 20 years received 
an enthusiastic hand. Mr. 
Kvans called on Mr. Kduumds of 
Richmond Hill for an address 
and he spoke eloquently of the 
Christian and philanthropic side 
of the Lions work. About the 
Newmarket part of which Mr. 
Kvans told us something. 

Then followed the floor show 
which was fine. Colonel La Polnte 
gave n demonstration In magic 
which left us all In a delightful 
stale of confusion as to what we 
saw. He was good. There was 
a troupe soloist who sung pleas- 
ingly and n piper who did 
things that even my husband 
confessed he didn't think those 
hlonled instruments could do. At 
any rate, with all a Scotsman's* 
reserve he said "it mounded dif- 
ferent from when you heard 
them on the Highland Hills. 



— Miss Margaret Jones and 
brother tfofa are leaving on July 
1 for a month's vacation with 
their brother and his wife, Mr. 
and Mrs. Harold Jones, at Cultus 
Lake, British Columbia. 








Cleaners and Dyers 

Phone 7761 48 Hr. Service 

GRANT ROBINSON 
139 Prospect Ave. 

NEWMARKET 



TO OUR MANY FRIENDS . . 

PI.EA8E BTOf AND READ 

Summer will soon be with us and with summer comes holi- 
days. We have tried without success to obtain someone to 
help us out while each of us ha3 a short vacation. 
During July wc are going to have shorter business hours. 
The following will be the store hours for July: 
Monday 8.30 a.m. to 6 p.m. Thursday 3-10 a.m. to ft p.m. 
Tuesday 8.30 a.m. to 6 p.m Friday HM a-m. to 8 p.m. 

Wed. 8.30 a.m. to 12.30 noon Saturday 8.30 a.m. to 10 p.m. 
Although we will be closed every evening except Thursday 
and Saturday, we will have during July all day delivery 

(to 6 p-.m.). 

If you cannot get down town during the day, anticipate you* 
needs and let us send them to you before (> p.m. 

May 1 ask your fullest support. By having a vacation, we 

will be better able to serve you in the months to come. 

Sincerely, 
HarveyLane. 

Harvey Lane's Drug Store 



f 



Newmarket 



108 Main 




* ^^^^Tue rorit iirtv ¥ 



THE GREAT NEW 



^Wfestinghouse 

TRUE-TEMP" REFM0EMTOR 




• CAOtNETi provtdtt «or+ 
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Open Tuesday nljthta until 9 p.m* 
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rt.OSKI) SATURDAY. JUliY 1 

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34-38 Mntn St. 



(Next to Lobltw'a) 



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Mill DKU< KH'M HWriNfl AMI WONOMY 



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EMMA MARGESSON . 
WEDS WM. L MARSH 

The marriage of Emma Muriel, 
only daughter of Mr, and Mrs. J. 
S. Margeson, Aurora, to William 
Leslie Marsh, only son of J. T. 
Marsh, Ethlone, and the late Mrs. 
Marsh, took place Saturday even- 
ing at the home of the bride's 
parents. Iris and spring flowers 
formed a lovely setting for the 
ceremony which was performed 
by Rev. A. R. Park. Mrs. Park 
played the wedding music. 

Given in marriage by her fath- 
er, the bride was lovely in a 
white satin gown fashioned with 
deep lace yoke. Her full length 
veil fell from a circlet of satin 
and she carried an arm bouquet 
of yellow roses. Her matron of 
honor, Mrs. Robert Margeson, 
was gowned in pale blue eyelet 
embroidered organza. She car- 
ried a shower bouquet of shaded 
pyrethreum. Robert Goulding 
of Mono Mills acted as best man. 

For the reception the dining- 
room was decorated with white 
streamers and wedding bells, the 
table centred with a three-tier 
wedding cake and tall white tap- 
ers. 

The bride's mother chose a 
smart pinpointed crepe gown 

in larkspur blue with corsage of 
pink and blue forget-me-nots. 

For travelling the bride wore 
a navy blue gabardine ensemble 

with white accessories. Mr. and 

Mrs. Marsh left for a honeymoon 
trip to the Thousand Islands. 
Upon their return they will re- 
side on the groom's farm near 
Ethlone. 

Before her marriage Mrs. 
Marsh conducted the Happy Hour 
Kindergarten and previous to 
that taught in Nova Scotia. She 
has been a popular member of 
the Baptist church in Aurora 
v/hich was evidenced when 70 
members of the congregation 
paid her a surprise visit and 
showered her with gifts. The 
Gleaners class of the church pre- 
sented her with a pair of boudoir 
lamps and her young kindergar- 
ten pupils a tri-lamp. 




***#■* 



iCaarS 



N.H.S. TEACHER WEDS 

IN TORONTO 

Calvin Presbyterian Church, 
Toronto was the scene of the 
wedding of Grace Elizabeth 
Thomson, daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. Thomas Hamilton Thomson, 
Toronto, and Frederick John 
Speer, son of Mr. and Mrs. Fred- 
erick Speer, York Mills. Rev. 
D. Joseph Wasson officiated at 
the double ring ceremony, with 
Florence Craig, organist, and 
June Skinner, soloist, providing 
the wedding music. 

The bride, given in marriage 
by her father, wore a gown of 
white eyelet Swiss organdy o ,r er 
white taffeta, matching mitts, a 
full length tulle illusion veil 
caught to a Juliet cap and car- 
ried an all white bouquet of 
white roses and swnnsonia. At- 
tending the bride were her sis- 
tors, Shirley, maid of honor; 
Isabel, bridesmaid, and Barbara, 
junior bridesmntd, gowned In 
crisp white organdy over yellow 
taffeta, with coronets of yellow 
and mnuvc flowers matching 
their cascades. Best man was 
Colin Cranham and ushers were 
Robert McMillJn, Victor Koby, 
Roy Quance and Thomas Thom- 
son. 

At the home of the bride's 
parents, her mother received In 
a powder blue Ince gown with 
pink and blue corsage, assisted 
by the groom's mother wearing 
a grny and pink ensemble with 
pink corsage. After the recep- 
tion the couple left on n motor 
trip to the Gaspo. They will 
live in Newmarket. 

Mr. Speer Is athletic director 
at Newmarket high school. " 



■'r 






'*»" **••<-.'- 



ANNA MAE CARLILE 
WED AT OAK RIDGES 

St. John's Anglican church, 
Oak Ridges, was tlto scene on 
Saturday, Juno 17 of the mar- 
riage of Anna Mao Carl Me, 
daughter of the Into Mr. nnd 
Mrs. Archfo Cnrlile, Oak Ridges, 
to James Edward Turriff, Tor- 
onto. White peonies formed the 
setting for the ceremony per- 
formed by Rev. D. C. F. Micholl, 
the rector, and Rev. Charles 
Minly, Toronto. The bride's 
cousin, Donald Watson of Auro- 
ra was soloist. Mrs. Colin Craw- 
ford was organist. 

Given in marriage by her 
brother, William, the brldo was 
charming in n fitted gown of 
white satin styled with lnco 
yoke and full flowing train. The 
hemline of the gown was deftly 
caught with clusters of pearls. 
Her fingertip veil fell from n 
Hweetheart halo headdress. She 
wore n necklnto of pearls, tlio 
gift of her Into mother and car- 
ried red rosoft. Tito matron of 
honor was Mrs. John Warner. 
Betty McOuchan nnd Marlon 
Duncan wcro bridesmaids nnd 
im bride's niece, Chvenlth New- 
tort, acted as flower girl The 
senior attendants woro off-the- 
ahoiiMer satin gowns, matching 
mitts and picture hats. Mrs, 
Warner jjImkwi pale mauve and 
yellow mums. The bridesmaids 
wore yellow and carried mnuvo 
mums. The flower girl was at- 
tired In pale green, matching 
poke bonnet, carrying green 
murm John Wnmor was heat 
man nnd the groom's brothers, 
John Turriff and George Tur- 
riff woro ushers, The groom's 

gift to the bride was penrl ear- 
ring!. 

For the reception held at 
Ridge Inn, for more thnn 100 
gnosis, Mrs, John Turriff, Jr., 
the brldo'* alater wore blue with 
corsage of red rosea. The 
groom'a mother wo* attired In 
black and white with corsage 



Mr. and Mrs. Charles Williams are signing the register after 
their recent marriage in Trinity United church, Newmarket. The 
bride, the former Shirley Geer, is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
W. J. Geer, Newmarket. Photo by Budd. 



LOIS CLIMPSON 

WEDS IN TORONTO 

Standards of pink and white 
peonies formed the setting in 
the Reorganized Church of Jesus 
Christ of Latter Day Saints, Tor- 
onto, June 17, for the marriage 
of Lois Yvonne, daughter of Mr. 
and Mrs. Frederick George 
Climpson, 82 Eastwood Rd., 

Toronto, formerly of Newmar- 
ket, and Mr. Herbert James 
Owen, son of Mr. and Mrs. Wil- 
liam Henry Owen, Toronto. 
Elder B. H. Hewitt performed 
the ceremony. Miss Jacqui 
Marks was organist and Mr. Roy 
Lockyer, soloist. 

Given in marriage by her fa- 
ther, the bride was lovely in an 
iridescent satin gown, fashioned 
with slim molded bodice, the full 
gathered skirt sweeping to a 
circular train, long pointed 
sleeves, Chantilly lace yoke be- 
low a Peter Pan collar. Her 
fingertip veil of tulle illusion 
was held by a satin and lace cap 
trimmed with satin rosettes 
joining cap and veil. She car- 
ried a semi-cascade bouquet of 
pink and white roses, centered 
by a white orchid, bouvardia and 
larkspur. 

Attendants were Miss Beryl 
Climpson, maid of honor, Miss 
Olwen Climpson, bridesmaid, 
sisters of the bride, and Mrs. 
Stephen Burk, bridesmaid. They 
were gowned alike in pink 
marquisette over pink taffeta, 
fashioned with full tiered skirts, 
fitted bodices and portrait neck- 
lines, with headdresses to match 
their flowers of pink and white 
carnations and larkspur. Mr. 
Stephen Burk acted as grooms- 
man and ushers were Messrs. 
Jack Canty and Lome Goodwill. 

For the reception held at the 
church, the bride's mother re- 
ceived in pink figured sheer, 
navy accessories and a corsage 
of pink roses, assisted by the 
groom's mother in skipper blue 
sheer, white accessories and cor- 
sage of red roses. For travelling 
to the Eastern United States the 
bride donned a spring green suit 
with golden wheat and brown 
accessories and white orchid 
corsage. On their return Mr. 
and Mrs. Owen will reside In 
Toronto. 



MARGARET BAINES 
• WEDS AT ROCHE'S 

The marriage of Margaret 
Itouise, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
Joseph Raines of Keswick, to 
Mr. Allan Harold Campbell, son 
of Major and Mrs. If. C. Camp- 
hell of Toronto, took place In 
Christ's Church, Roche's Point, 
with Rev. James Puxley and 
Rev. M. C. D. Ifutt officiating. 
Soloist was Mrs. L. Wilson who 
sang "I'll Walk Beside Thee All 
the Way". The wedding music 
was supplied by Mrs. John Lane. 

Given in marriage by her 
father, the bride wore a fitted 
gown of guipure laco flowing 
into n full skirt, and a matching 
lace headdress held her finger- 
tip nylon illusion veil. She car- 
ried n shoaf of gardenias and 
lilics-of-the-vnlloy. Her maid of 
honor was her sister, Miss Fran- 
ces Raines, and her bridesmaids 
Mrs. Karl Crawford a n d Miss 
Rosalie O'Knpskl. Their gowns 

of English tulle over orchid ant- 
ln lind tight strapless bodices 

nnd bouffant skirts. All wore 
tulle stolen and head circlets: of 
pink roses, nnd carried sheafs of 
pink roses and sweet pena. 

The flower girl was Miss Gal) 
Complin, nelco of the groom, 
who woro a bouffant frock of 
tu lie over orchid satin, head cir- 
clet of pink roses, and carried 
pink roses nnd sweet pens. Mr. 
Jack Campbell was groomsman 
for his brother* and the ushers 
were Mr. Reginald Wilcox end 
Mr. Ernest Hrookcr, 

A reception was held at the 
Royal Hlmcoe Hotel. Keswick, 
wlioro the parents received with 
the bride and groom. The 
bride's mother- woro n drew of 
Princess Elizabeth blue crepe, 
navy accessories and corsage of 
pink roses nnd sweet pons. The 

groom's mother woro a green 
printed silk dress with brown 
accessories and o comigo of pink 
roses and mnuvo sweet pons. 

For travelling tlto bride woro 
nn imported allk dress with 
navy accessories. After their 
trip to the Lmtrentlnnn, the 
couple will live in Toronto. 

of yellow roses, For travelling 
the bride and groom woro mat- 
ching royal blue nulls, the brldo 
choosing white hat and match- 
ing accessories, The honeymoon 
will bo spent at Nings, Manito- 
ba, the home of the brldo'* uncle 
William Corllle. On their re- 
turn the couple will reside at 
Mlmico In their newly built 
home, 



AUDREY SWITZER WED 
IN AURORA TRINITY 

Trinity Anglican church, Au- 
rora, was the scene of a double 

ring ceremony, June 17, when 
Helen Audrey, daughter of Mr. 
and Mrs. Hiram Switzer, Van- 
dorf, and Mr. George Frederick 
Bilton, son of Mr. and Mrs. C. 

Frederick Bilton, Toronto, were 

united in marriage.. Mrs. Pal- 
mer, Toronto, sang the Lord's 
Prayer arid Because, accom- 
panied by Mr. Gibson at the 
organ. Rev. K. D. Watmough 
officiated. 

The bride, given in marriage 
by Mr. C.vKing, worcwhite em- 
bossed organza over taffeta with 
short train. Her long veil was 
held with organza and she car- 
ried a white prayer book with 
butterfly roses. Mrs. Jack Chi- 
nell, matron of honor, Miss Mari- 
lyn King and Miss Mary Bab- 
cock, niece of the bride, brides- 
maids, were gowned alike in 
blue corded taffeta with flower 
headdresses and carried nosegays 
of roses and sweetpeas. Mr. 
Leonard Bilton was groomsman 
and ushers were Messrs. John 
Babcock and Lloyd Bilton. 

The reception was held at the 
Graystones where the bride's 
mother received in grey crepe, 
matching accessories and corsage 
of pink roses, assisted by the 
groom's mother in navy crepe, 
white accessories and pink car- 
nation corsage. For travelling to 
Florida, the bride changed to a 
pink linen ensemble. They will 
reside in Toronto. 



DAISY HOCKLEY 
WEDS CHAS. CRONE 

On June 10, under an arch of 
mauve and white lilacs, at the 
home of the bride's parents, the 
marriage was solemnized of 
Daisy Georgina Hockley, daugh- 
ter of Mr. and Mrs. A, Hockley, 
Zephyr, to Charles Lincoln 
Crone, son of Mr. artfi Mrs. N. 
Crone, Sharon. 

Rev. H. Cotton, assisted by H. 
Hallman, officiated. 

The bride, given in marriage 
by her father, was gowned in 
white satin, fashioned with long 
sleeves, and bertha collar on n 
fitted bodice. Her full circular 
skirt, caught up occasionally at 
the hipline with seed pearls, 
fell into a slight train. A match- 
ing half-hat of satin, trimmed 
with seed pearls, held her finger- 
tip veil and she carried a cascade 
of yellow roses and white sweet- 
peas. * 

Bridal attendants were Elsie 
Hockley, sister of the bride,, and 
Marian Moore, gowned alike in 
paddy gTeen and lilac taffeta and 
with headdresses of matching 
flowers. They carried nosegays 
of roses and sweetpeas matching 
the color of their gowns. 

Groomsman was Earlby Ruth- 
ven. Mary Law was soloist 
gowned in rose taffeta styled 
similar to the bridesmaid's. 

The bride's mother received in 

navy figured crepe with a cor- 
sage of carnations and sweet- 
peas. She was assisted by the 
groom's mother, . wearing navy 
sheer and a corsage of carnations 
and sweetpeas. To travel to 
Philadelphia, Pa., t h e bride 
chose a yellow and grey ensem- 
ble with grey accessories. 




SCHOMBERG GIRL 
WED AT TWILIGHT 

An arch of evergreens and 
lily-of-thc valley with tall white 
baskets of pink nnd white mums 
was the scene of a pretty twi- 
light wedding on Saturday eve- 
ning, June 3, when Beatrice Eve- 
lyn, daughter of Mr. nnd Mrs. 
Stanley Proctor of Schombcrg, 
became the bride of Mr. Jack 
Arthur Irwin, son of Mr. and 
Mrs. F. A. Irwin of Lome Park. 
Rev. D. G. Ray officiated. 

Given in marriage by her 
father, the bride walked down 
an aisle formed by long white 
streamers held by two ushers. 
She looked charming in a beige 
gabardine dress suit with match- 
ing lint and brown accessories. 
She wore a beautiful corsage of 
Talisman roses. Her only at- 
tendant was Mrs. Robt. Pearen, 
sister of the groom. Mr. Wtn. 
Irwin was best man. The ush- 
ers were Mr. Robt. Pearen nnd 
Mr. Nelson Sherwood, both of 
Toronto, The wedding music 
was played by Mrs. Thos. Proc- 
tor and during the signing of 
the register Master Jock Proctor, 
brother of the bride, sung O 

Perfect l«ovc. ' 

After the marriage a recep- 
tion was held. The bride's moth- 
er received in penrl grey crepe 
with matching accessories, as- 
sisted by the groom's mother in 
Queen's blue sheer with navy 
accessories, both wearing harm- 
onizing corsages. After a dainty 
buffet lunch was served the 
happy couple left amid showers 
of confetti and good wishes for 
n wedding trip through Northern 
Ontario and Quebec. 

FIRST BANQUET 

The teen-age girls of the. 
Church of the Nnaarene, New- 1 
market, hold their first annual 
mother nnd daughter banquet on 
Thursday, June 22. Twenty-four 
gathered nt the home of Mrs. 
Rarl Wetldel for the occasion. 
Mrs, A. K. Peterson presided 
over the nffalr which was pro- 
nounced a great success by oil 
Tho tonst to tho mothers wis 
proposed by Gornldine Black. 
Mrs. Weddol responded. 



BELHAVEN GIRL 

WED AT KESWICK 

Keswick United church was 
the scene of the marriage, June 
3, of June Been, daughter of Mr. 
and Mrs. Leslie Hcrdman, Bel- 
haven, and Mr. Kyle Selby Fair- 
barn, son of Mr. and Mrs. Selby 
Fairbarn, Belhaven. Rev. G. 
Campbell performed the cere- 
mony. Mrs. Angus Cowieson 
was organist and soloist was Miss 
Dorothy Rye. 

Given in marriage by her fa- 
ther, the bride wore a gown of 
white slipper satin made by her- 
self en princess lines with 
sweetheart neckline, over which 
she wore a long lily-point steevo 
bolero of fine lace. She wore 
her mother's veil which stood up 
in n crown caught with a spray 
of lily-of-the-valley. Her only 
jewelry was a rhinestonc neck- 
lace, and she carried Ophelia 
roses with white sweetpeas and 
llly-of-thc-valley with a gardenia 
in the centre. 

Mrs. James Wight, matron of 
honor, chose pale blue taffeta 
made on princess linos with 
sweetheart neckline, nnd short 
sleeve bolero of valern, matching 
beanie with spray of llly-of-thc- 
valley nnd taffeta lily-point 
gloves. Her flowers were in a 
fan shape with n centre of light 
red roses surrounded by a mix- 
ture of pnnsles ond daisies with 
nn outer fringe of pink sweet- 
peas. Bridesmaids, Mrs. Earl 
Hcrdman, sister-in-law of the 
bride, and Miss Gladys Fair- 
barn, sister of the groom, wore 
pale green ami orchid taffeta 
gowns, same style as the matron 
of 'honor nnd carried harmoniz- 
ing fan-shaped flower bouquets. 

Miss Marilyn Fairbarn, cousin 
of the groom, was flower girl 
gowned in yellow taffeta with 
full skirt, round neckline with 
matching bolero of valern. She 
wore a ma telling poke bonnet, 
lily-point gloves and a locket, 
the gift of the bride and groom. 
Her flowers wore Talisman ro- 
ses, yellow sweetpens, with yel- 
low and rust ribbons. Mr. 
Thomas Severn acted as best 
man and ushers wore Messrs. 
Karl Hcrdman, brother of tho 
brldel Raymond Fairbarn, bro- 
ther of the groom. 

Tho reception was held nt 
Rouho's Point Momorinl hall 
whore the bride's mother re- 
ceived in n flowered navy silk 
dress with white accessories nnd 
gardenia corsage, o&slated by the 
groom's mother In n wine tlress 
nnd hat with pale blue nnd black 
accessories and gnrdonia corange. 
For travelling to Georgian Bay 
the bride chose a banana yellow 
gabardine suit with white ac- 
cessories nnd n gardenia corsage. 
Mr. and Mrs. Fairbarn will re- 
side nt Belhaven, Visitors were 
present from Barrio, Toronto, 
Aurora, Whitby, Brampton and 
Newtonbrook, 






TROtJW.AU TKA, SHOWERS 

Prior to her marriage, Mrs. 
J, E, Turriff, Saturday's hrlde, 
was tendered a trousseau tea 
hold nt the home of her sister, 
Mrs. John Turriff, Jr., Onk Rid- 
ges, attended by n wldo circle 
of guests, on Wednesday, Juno 
14. A unique feature of tho 
dining room table was n minia- 
ture replica of tho bridal pnrty 
complete with gowns. Throo 
prc»nuptlnl showers were glvon, 
ono by tho brldo's niintB, Mrs. 
J, Duncan and Mrs. R. Stone of 
Toronto. Girl friends from tho 
Snngamo Elect rlc, No wmnrkot, 
with whom tho bride had for- 
merly been nanoctntod, gave a 
shower, nnd n group of .young 
ladles of this company presen- 
ted her with n table lamp. 



adds zest to lunch 



£3t s rs ?&%%ggnBSE& 






«•-- - 



Year in year out 

alway s been and €L ^_ 

bethe fint consideration ivi A 



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SERVICE 



Repairs to all makes, 

ANYTIME - ANYWHERE 

DON CH 



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Classified Ads Bring Results 



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MONTREAL — Weddings — showers 
birthdays . . • ail red letter days are "right" 
days for cake decorated to suit tho occasion. 
But make sure it's tho best cako ever — by 
using the finest ingredients! Ingredients 
such as SWANS J)OWN CAKE FLOUR, 
the enko flour that's sifted over and over 
again until it's 27 times as line as ordinary flour. Not party 
cakes alone — but all cakes — aro better made with Swans 
Down. Don't Just take my word for it that Swans Down is 
a wonder-worker (though I've proved it to myself over and 
over again 1). TRY Swans Down — the very next "gala 

occasion" cake you bakel '**■** "^ 

. — ■■■ -. ... ^ 

8*rte U If ot — or serve it Icy-coM...thb coffee is ahraya delicious! 

For RED ROSE COFFEE is quality coffee t You cm 
count on its good tasto whenever you feci like a cup 
of really good ccfTeol When guest* drop In — when 
your bridge club meets at your house — or when you're 
buying coffee for your church social. .. do moke sura 
it's Red Row Coffee I But don't servo it only on 
BDcciat occasions— your family will like Rett Rem 
Coffee, tool And you'll find that the samo Red Rom 
quality makes Red Rose Tea tow In taste, tool That's 

shy Red Rose is a ton-ol-the-Bhoppbg list buyword m so many 

thousands of Canadian homcal 

Multhtd 






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Equipment In TA# 
Kitchen is coo 
of the things 
which, in my 
opinion, make 
tuodemkitchens 
not only mors 
attractive, but 

work-snvintf and time- 




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saving, That's why I like that 
catchy slogan the Frigiriaire people 
thought up for the FttlCllDAIUti 
UtiFlttUKRATOU and FRIG* 
1DAIUK KI.ECTIUC UANQBi 
"Your matching pair — Imlh Frig* 
uluiro!" In just live words it tells 
you what you really want to know 
about these two appliances ... that 
they H go together beautifully in 
your kitchen . ..and that they both 
give you tho convenience, tho 
economy mul tho dependability 
that hits been identifled with the 
Frigidaire name for a quarter cen- 
tury, do see them at your Frigid* 
aire Dealer's. Rcmetnlttr, only 
Genera! Motors makes Fngldairo 
products* 

If#r*'« Tha Oulchett, surest way 

1 know to 

make tender, 

beautifully 

jams 

lie« . . . UW * fNHgV 
GRtVro Fruit ^^ 

1' oo tint For 

Certo is tho natural substance in 

fruit that makes, jama "Jam" and 

jellies "jell' 1 — extracted, concen- 
trated and conveniently Imttled. 
Certo recipes use fruits at their 
clioiccst--fu1ly*ripe, fulMlavoured 
— and retain the precious flavour 
nnd templing colour you lose by 
the long-hnil method I (Certo 
recipes cut the boiling titno to 
list t minute for both jams nnd 

ellies, and mnko up to 50% more 
am or jelly from tho huuo 
amount of fruit.) Yes. you can 
make thrifty u*e of ihi* Mini- 
inor's fruits with Certo . . . ami 
rnd all tho guesswork by follow- 
ing tJtwlly the rvfi]H\* under tho 
IntH'l of each Certo bottle I 






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Lifully set ^\M 
and jet- OT 







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Tom ffmw DOUBLE A*mt***m 

of conmleto baking success when 
you bake Mho "no-failure" (7<nV 
met way! Yes, CALUMET RAK- 
ING l'OWDKU assures you muf- 
fins and biscuits, cakes and batter 
puddings that are always light, 
tender and perfectly delicious! 
It's tho double action of Calumet 
that does the trick I In tho mtx» 
iag bowl, thousands ol tiny bub- 
bles aro formed to prepare tho 
mixture for baking. Tho second 
action takes place in the oven, 
when thousands of now little 
bubbles continue raising tho mix* 
ttire to fenthcrydight, lender |>cr- 
fectionl It's just a 'iittto 1 ' thing 
— this two-way action , . « but so 
very important, I find, for all *myi 
baking! 

SptcMtr Ife-fene* to* 
Mesj|*tfffttlnff 

iUmtcn fence , - • 
that's the now 
1) U 11 II A M 

CORNSTARCH 

package. I I'm so 

emu to open mid 

close I All you 
do: Just break 
the seal and insido you'll hud 
Durham Cum Starch neatly pro- 
tected in a paper tajf. No fussing 
w fuming with a kttifo or other 
*harp instrument to open thi 
packnge. Then, when you'vo fin- 
ished using at much s "l)urhnra* 
ai you need at the time, replace 
the top. It fits snugly— keeps out 
every tot particle of dust ami 
provents any starch" from (milling 
out. You'll )>o delighted, as I was; 
with this hnntlydo-hniullo, pack- 
ago. And you'll bo thrilled with 
the marvelous Ann tt/aru recipes 
on I he package! 'iVy the Aim 
Adam j*mnit lUu soon I ;, , , n» 
good nmi bo economical, toot 






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Whrt\ Vow .<*>««! Tho YounmHer* 

shoppiugdist item 



off to market for yot!,,.therofc one 
™ I iii wire they won't forget I 
M W 1JKIN8 1'KANVT ltfylWil 
W Iteiui .VMMNA llulter ia a "mnsterpiece ,, l ltf 
"chuek-full" of delicious wanut flavour right dc 
to the last .luscious i spoonful. So keep a supply nlw. v . 
on hand for all those peanut-hut I er-lovers in votir 
family! lleins Peanut Ifiitter is ahww lu demand! 
...for luncheon nam wehr---for parties nnd picnic* 
—and for "good-ulgh t" siuicksl 

No MiiHrr Htm Jf?«irs>/sifly you "locked up M before leaving on your 
vacation— you can t be *ure burglar* won't prv their 
into ' 




of safety for nil your important papers, ToweU nnd 
keepsakes. '1 hat h why 1 urge yon to rent n 8ofoty,& 
Ih'pwjt Hog at your HofM bmnch m soon &m 
possible. It will Ik> a happier holiday if you know 
your valuables are safe in tho vaults of the It of M, 



Trousert mode from nylon 
like orlon, retain tholr crcaie. 








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Ordinary. fan-type oil 

burners cg&om tbe flams 
in a pit where much of fU 1 
Fireman's moocy-^vfag Voctt* ofl 
blankets every inch of beating mxfaco 
rich radiant heat, Sa«t you up to 30% 

CONVOIT YOUR OLD RftNACl OB ftOILEfe 
OR INSTALL A SBF-MD UNIT 

Why pay for beat you're not getting? An IronHrcraaa 

Voriex can be installed in your present fttrrace or bolkf 

In just a few hours— and then watch year fuel WHsgo 

down, homo comfort go up. Complete aelf-fired Vortea 

units are available too. Exclusive Iron Fireman auto* 

malic controls, {too* Of write tUt week m% for a 
FREE survey. 



- _ 

Queensville News 



.-.' • /^ 



R. W. 




SALES AND SERVICE 




Mione 442W 
4 42 J 



24-Hour Service 

Newmarket 



THE COLMAR is a 

small compact house 
with little waste 
space. It has three 
bedrooms, combina- 
tion kitchetydinette 
and a comfortable 
■ living room. The 
covered front en- 
trance enters a ves- 
tibule, in which 
there is a coat closet. 

The entrance is located conveniently close to the kitchen. 

Outstanding is the beautiful kitchen with its three exposures. 
Windows overlook the front entrance and the side and rear yards. 

It is connected to the centre bedroom which can also be used as a 

workroom. The corner sink is in the centre of the cabinets, the 
stove on the left and the refrigerator on the right. 

Eight closets are distributed one to each bedroom, three in 

the kitchen, one in the vestibule and a linen in the bathroom. 

Plans call for an exterior of wide siding and asphalt shingles. 

Dimensions are 42' by 24'. Floor area is 975 square feet, while 
the cubage is 19,012 cubic feet. 

For further information about THE COLMAR, write The 
Small House Planning Bureau, The Newmarket Era and Express, 
Newmarket, Ont. 






Classified Ads Bring Results 



* 




SMALL HOUSE PLANNING BUREAU 

NEWMAKKEJ ERA AND EXPRESS, NEWMARKET 

Please send me more information, without obligation, 
about the plan features and the type of construction used 

in the house as pictured 

in the issue of June 29. 



NAME ... 
ADDRESS 



+ *«*»* 



4a>+t*a + lBi p 4 



We are very sorry to report 
Miss Joan Campbell is in Toron- 
to General hospital and had an- 
other operation on her eye this 
week. We hope that»she may 
sojn recover. 

Mrs. frank Ostley returned 
home on Saturday from Toron- 
to General hospital. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ross McFarland 
of Irma, Aha., were guests of 
Mr. and Mrs. J. B. Aylward last 
week. Mr. McFarland was born 
here and went west 37 years ago 
tvlth his parents. ' He is now a 
successful merchant in Irrha, 
Alta. 

Mrs. James Farr is visiting 
her daughter, Mrs. R. Strasler, 

Mr, and Mrs. Frank Johnston 
and Carol spent a week in Que- 
bec City. 

Mr. and Mrs. Jesse Smith of 
Sudbury visited Mr. Smith's 
brothers, Messrs. Angus and 
Archie Smith, last week. 

Mr. Frank Kavanagh returned 
to the Western hospital, Toronto, 
on Monday. We sincerely hope 
he may be much improved in 

the very near future. 

Miss Norma Morton spent the 

weekend with Mr. and Mrs. A. 
Maries. 

Mrs. F. Green and family ol 

Orono are spending this week 

with Mrs. Green's parents, Mr. 
and Mrs. N, Gibncy. 

Mr. and Mrs. Floyd Cunning- 
ham spent Sunday with Mr. and 
Mrs. Joe Watson, Uxbridge. 

Mrs. Geo. Bond, Guelph, is 
visiting her mother, Mrs. A. 
MacKenzie, for two weeks. 

Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Watson 
of Churchill visited Mr. and Mrs. 
Wm. Burkholdcr, Jr., on Sunday. 

Miss Lena Burkholdcr spent 
the weekend with her parents, 
Mr. and Mrs. Cliff Burkholdcr. 

Mr. and Mrs. L. Wellman and 
Billy attended decoration day at 



f 



WEEKLY 



Garden graph 

By DEAN HALL1DAY 

Released by Central Press Canadian 



Orillia cemetery on Sunday and 
wore guests of Mr. and Mrs. D. 
Teskey and family of Orillia. 

A large number of out-of- 
town people were present for 
decoration day at our local ceme- 
tery on Sunday. 

Mrs. Jackson and Mrs. G. 
Moore of Midland are spending 
this week with Mrs. Rex Smith 
and sons at Duclos Point. 

Rev. and Mrs. A. E. Milieu of 
Maxwell were guests of Mr. 
Harry Hulse on Thursday. 

Mrs. Millen attended the 25th 
anniversary tea of the W.M.S. at 
the United church as a former 
president of that society. Rev. 
and Mrs. W. C. Conning* of Tor- 
onto also attended the same 
meeting. 

A farewell party for Miss J. 
Barnes was held on Wednesday 
evening at Maple Hill school. 
Miss Barnes has. taught at Hilt- 
side school for the past two 
years. 

Sunday visitors at the Hulse 

home were Mr. and Mrs. Alfred 

Robinson and Mr. and Mrs. 

Lome Robinson and daughter of 
Aurora. 

Miss Irene Lockie of New- 
burgh visited Miss Vera Arnold 

on Sunday. 

Mrs. Etta Wilder of Keswick 

visited Mrs. S. Sennett on Satur- 
day. 

-We welcome Mr. and Mrs. 
Wallace Gillies of New York 
back to their home here for the 
slimmer. 

Mr. and Mrs. Chos. Crone 
have returned from their wed- 
ding trip in United States and 
for the present are living with 
Mr. and Mrs. Hockley. 

Miss Jean Cunningham has 
completed her school year at 
Bowmanville and is holidaying 
with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. 
Floyd Cunningham. 




Pine Orchard News 







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TO EIGHT MILLION 

Canadian men and women have 
" J f 8,000,000 deposit accounts in 
the chartered banks— equal to 
one account for every adult. 

Banks value each depositor's business highly 
. ♦ • safeguarding your money, paying 
interest on your savings, standing ready to 
repay , ♦ • striving to retain your confidence 
and friendship. 

Your bank manager appreciates his 
obligation to you. Ank him what in a 
banker's first concern, Ho will answer, 
"Safeguarding the depositors' funds." 

For he realizes that depositors are the very 
foundation of tho efficient credit process by 
which banks mobilize deposits to servo 
tho needs of this working, growing, 
enterprising Canada. 

i 

SPONSORED BY YOUR BANK 



The beauty of roses is'such 
that when the bushes are in 
blojm the onlooker pays little or 
no attention to the plant's foli- 
age. Yet the new leaves which 
roses keep producing must bo 
kept free from disease and Insect 
pests if one is to enjoy perfect 
blooms. 

The leaves are the only means 
the plant has to manufacture 
foud. Hybrid tea roses do not 
have as large leaf area as some 
plants do and consequently can- 
not spare any of the leaves with- 
out having the loss interfere to 
some extent with the normal 
function of the plant. 

There arc three types of rose 
pests which attack the foliage, 

chewing insects, sucking Insects 
and fungus disease. It is perfect, 
ly possible to control these pests 
ami there is no mystery about it. 
All that is required is the right 
material, properly applied, at 
the right time. 
The familiar aphids, or plant 



lice, often cluster in great num- 
bers on the tender growing 
shoots of roses, as shown in the 
accompanying Garden - Graph. 
They suck the juices from stems, 
leaves and buds. They can be 
controlled, however, by spray- 
ing with nicotine sulphate, which 
is available at nearly all seed or 
hardware stores. 

Mildew frequently injures rose 
foliage by coating it with a paw- 
dery deposit, as illustrated. It 
also affects the buds. Mildew 
and other types of fungi can be 
held In check, however, by the 
use of sulphur dusts. A more 
recent introduction for control 
of mildew, black spot and rust 
is called fermato- 

The roses should be dusted 
every week or ten days. This 
will keep a fine protective film 
on tho leaves. Protection is 
especially important during wet 
or foggy weather. He sure the 
dust is applied to both the upper 
and lower surfaces of the leaves. 




APHIS SWAfVAINK* 
ON ROSE. SHOOT* 




Mrs. Ralph Willis of Toronto 
spent the weekend with Mr3. A. 
Lloyd and Mrs. G. P. Wood, 

Mr. and Mrs. H. V. Armitago 
of Stouffvillc were Sunday 
guests of Mr. and Mrs. Ross Ar- 
mitago. | 

Decoration service on Sunday, 
June 25, was well attended. The 
beautiful setting under the state- 
ly trees in the great outdoors 
made a fitting place for a re- 
membrance service. Elmer Starr 
was chairman. Harold Moddlo 
led in prayer followed by n 
scripture lesson by Mr. Ford 
Lehman. 

Rev. J. M, Finlay of the Carl- 
ton St. United church, Toronto, 
delivered a very thoughtful re- 
membrance message. The sacred 
selections by the Christian Busi- 
nessmen's quartet were very 
appropriate. Rev. E. C. Meddle 
closed the service with prayer. 
Tho departed were fittingly re- 
membered by beautiful flower 
tokens. 

Among those in nttcmlance 
from n distance were Mr. and 
Mrs. W. Galley and Carolyn, Mr. 
and Mrs. K. Drown and son, Mrs. 
Ralph Willis, Mr. and Mrs C. 
Richardson and sons. 

Mr. Stuart Starr of Toronto, 
Mr. and Mrs. Frank Chamltcr of 
Burlington, Mr. and Mrs. Weir 
Reid of Hamilton, Mr. and Mrs. 



John Sheridan and family of 
Claremont, Mrs. John Reid of 
Toronto, Mr. and Mrs. Fred Reid 
and Betty Lou of Markham, Mr. 
and Mrs. Carman Rose of Holt, 
Miss Leila Starr, Mrs. J. Skinner, 
Mrs. L. McDonald, Mr. Edmund 
Skinner, Misses Greta and Fern 
Flintoff, Mr. and Mrs. Colin 
Widdifield, Mr. and Mrs. Walter 
Hall, Mrs. M. Brillinger, Miss 
L. Toole, Mr. and Mrs. N. Rush, 
Rev. and Mrs. R, R. McMath of 
Newmarket, Rev. and Mrs. E. C. 
Moddlc of Aurora, Mr. and Mrs. 
Alien Forbes of Oshawa, Mr. and 
Mrs. Harry Thompson of Gorm- 
ley. 

Sorry to hear Miss Durene 
Ash is confined to hospital. Best 
wishes for a complete recovery. 

Willing Workers are holding 
an Ice cream social on Monday 
evening, July 17, nt Union 
church. Illustrated lecture and 
musical program. 

Willing Workers will hold n 

picnic and quilting at the home 

of Mrs. A. Lloyd and Mrs. G, 

P. Wood on Thursday afternoon, 
July o. 

Congratulations to Blossom 
Portingale, Eileen Holobeck, 
Joan Anger, Donald Johnrton 
and Hilary Davidson on passing 
nlgb school entrance. 

Miss Blossom Portingale is 
spending a month nt Y.W.C.A. 
camp at Parry Sound. 



MIUDBW ON 

Rosa icAVc* 



■• ■ ft- 



, t* v~a »rt* * * 



_fi 



Zephyr News 



Mr. and Mm. Wilfred Clal- 
brnllli and family of Dundnlk. 
spent Sunday with Mr. and Mrs. 
Jas. Galbraith. 

Tho W.Ai of the Zephyr Uni- 
ted church met at tho homo of 
Mrs. C. Pickering on Friday 
evening. 

Rev. A, F, Barn ford luw re- 
ceived u pastoral call to Dun- 
bar ton. We will indeed ho sorry 
to have Mr. Bumford leave tin. 
Mr. and Mrs. Bnmfnrd hove 
made many friends while here. 




His sermons were always to the 
point, and enjoyed by all who 
availed themselves of bearing 
them, 

Another resident of our com* 
munity wan called nwny by 
death recently In tho person of 
Mr. J. W. Honk. Mr. Donk hnd 
been In foiling health for qui to 
some time. He was of a quiet 
and retiring disposition, nnd bo- 
cnuso of ill health was unable 
to tako an active part In com- 
munity affairs, but wan hlKhly 
esteemed by his friends nnd 
neighbors. Our sympathy es- 

Ho leaves to mourn his loss, 
pcclally goes out to his mother, 
who lifts been ill for some llmo 
and not able to go about like 
others. 

his wife nnd ono son nnd daugh- 
ter, his mother, two ulsters, Fay 
Funeral Chapel. Tho community 
Zephyr, The funeral was pri- 
vate from the Mount Albert 
Funeral Chapel. .The community 
extends the kindest sympathy In 
the hour of their bereavement, 

Mr. Rod. Rynard called nt his 
home last Saturday. 

Buy a ticket on tho fancy 
quilt, donated by tho Women's 
Institute, Tho proceedfl for tho 
Manitoba Flood Rollaf Fund, 3 
ticket* for 25c, Tho lucky draw 
on Zephyr Sports Day, Satur- 



BELHAVEN 

Congratulations to the follow- 
ing pupils of Base Line school 
who were successful In passing 
their entrance examinations: 
Ann Riley, Donnle Andrews, 
Joan Chapman, Marie Matt, Har- 
vle Mainprise, George Pnrndlno 
and 'Wold Draper. Best wishes 
for « happy holiday to tho tea- 
chirr, Mrs. Glover and pupils. 

Many families were present at 
Decoration service at Queens* 
vllte on Sunday. 

Mr. and Mrs. Fergus T/xkie 
and Mr. and Mrs. Donald ]<ocktn 
of Toronto spent last weekend 
at the home of Mr. and Mrs. 

Walter Bell, Barrio. 

Miss Main visited Mr. and Mrs. 
Perry Fairbarn on Saturday. 

Mr., and Mrs. Lorno Holhnrne 
and family had dinner on Sun- 
day at tho homo of Mrs. W. 
Holborne, Keswick. 

Congratulations to all those 
who were successful in their 
examinations at high school. 



Mr. nnd Mrs. Sheldon Walker, 
Donald and Gordon, attended 
decoration service at Orlllin on 

Sunday. 

Mr. ami Mrs. Cecil Taylor, 
Downsview, spent Sunday with 
Mr. and Mrs. Gcorgo Broderick 
and Mrs, Hall. 

Miss Ruth llrenair, Newmar- 
ket, spent Sunday with Mr. and 
Mrs. Auley Brenair. 



FOR THE 

House 



.* 



HOPE 

■ 

Hope W.A. will meet at the 
homo of Mrs, Selby Evans on 
July 0. 

Mr. and Mrs, Allan Balsdnn, 
Lloyd Balsdon and Betty Pegg, 
Mr. and Mrs. Sheldon Walker, 
and Anne Walker attended the 
graduation nt Toronto East Gen- 
oral hospital on Juno 17 in honor 
of Miss Alma Balsdon. 

Mr. ami Mrs. Ellerby Farr vis- 
ited Mr. ami Mrs, Auioy Bren- 
air on Sunday. 

Mr. and Mrs. Harold Farr 
spent Sunday with Mr. and Mrs. 
Stewart Pegg. 



i 



RIDSECT 

A 3 -WAY KIM, Kit 

cunlaliw other killing nxenfa 
to destroy the ll.D.T. resistant 

files 



Garden and Potato 



DUSTS 



FOB AM, MANNKK 
OF 

* 

1NBKCTH 
ANDPKSTS 






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day, July «. 
Mr. and Mrs, Cltirhsan Arnold 

spent Saturday nt Guelph. 

Mr. nnd Mrs. Atvln Arnold 
hnvo loft by motor on an exten- 
ded trip to friends in Manitoba 
and {tantcntchawnn. 

ntiy n llckot on tho tablo lamp 
and Smyrona rttjt, donated by 
tho Women's Institute. Throe 
tickets for 2Uc< The lucky draw 
for first nnd second prlr.es to bo 
drawn on Zephyr Sports Day, 

Saturday, July &! *m 

■ ■#— • ■-.■"*. 

'*'■ « g 



Haying 
Equipment 

HOPKH, I'MU.KYH, FflllKH, 

CAULKS, 'MACK CAHH, 

HAI.KR AND BINDER TWINR 



BUILDING LOTS r*GR SALE 

12,000 SQ. FT. AND UP 



* v *« 




fc •: 



ON 





76 LOTS WITH PARK AT *£AR 

RESTRICTED AREA 

900* ELEVATION - EXCELLENT DRAINAGE 

WATER AVAILABLE . LOW TAXES 
SANDY CLAY LOAM 

Ever-flowing spring and some bush on one line of lots 

Prices $250 Akd Up . Terms 






* 






PIIONE: 



Elgin Evans newmarket 

B. R. 1, NEWMARKET 



2 97 S 3 



* *■ 






/TV. 







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--- 



tve yourself peace of mind and a pleased pttdt of 
ownership! by using BISCO Roofings and Sidings on 
your home. BISCO products art fire-rtilttont, tnsurt 
protection against wind and wtather for a lifetime 
and beautify your houst for ytars to comt. 

Mads by ono of Canada's oldest roofing manufacturer* 
BISCO is easy to apply, requires no servicing, and Is 
of the finest quality obtainable. Ask your dealer to 
show you BISCO's attractive colours and stylet new. 



Manrf<x!w«rt of 

"LONDON ROOFINgS" 
ASPHALT SHINQtIS A SIDIN4* 

Smooin awl mfrwof-ttfr/awf 

ROLL ROOFIIMS 

AtphaH and farratf 
SHIATHIMOS A HITS 

lUltT-UP IOOPINO MATIRIAIS 

PLASTIC ClMINTt * 
WATIRFIOOFINft MINT* 

INSULATION 

HOOP COATIN0 

ChMift 




W. H. EVES AND CO. 

NKWMARKET DEALER 
11 Davis Dr. E. Phone 83 



- a * ':* 




FOR THE 

Barn 




METHOXYCHLOR 

1 lb, makes 3 RAltons of 
burn spray for 

$1 .35 



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or 

13 inllons of livestock spray 

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also 






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■I II). 50 4i • SO lb. 83.50 

m H.D.T. • V,i COI'PKK 

SIXES 
I II), 10 II). nnd 110 II).' 




Uitnrnnlced io kill 9596 ol tho 

D.U.T. reslntunt flhSi 

$2.85 of Concentrate make* 3 

Kalians of barn *pray 

or 

82.55 of Concentrate mokes a 



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ll 5 ■">: 



■HI 

■ /-? 

I :-- 



' A KS 



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giillniw of livestock spray 



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District 



PHONE! 360 



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NKWMARKflT 



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with your groceries 



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WINS SECOND FUZE 

Jack McCarnan, son of Mr and 
Mrs. G. F. McCarnan received 
second prize in the junior drum- 
ming competition at the band 
festival, Waterloo on Saturday. 
Jack is a member of the New- 
market Trumpet band. He re- 
ceived 79 points, 3 points less 
* than the first place winner. 



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LIONS CLUB 





SCHOMBERG 

WEDNESDAY, JULY 5 



Baseball 



Dancing 



MONSTER DRAW - $500 in Prizes 

Free Movies for the Children 
GAMES GALORE 

Proceeds for Community Betterment 



i * 









ice 




FROM 




3 to 15 



INCLUSIVE 



Charles E. Boyd Boyd & McMath 



REALTOR 

17 Main H\, Newmarket 



INSURANCE 
17 Main St, Newmarket 



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REMEMBER 



OUR 




SALE 



CONTINUES 



to 




8 



MANY OUTSTANDING BARGAINS 

AT 




Opposite Post Office, Aurora 

phone ii9w 




Plans are being formed for the 
celebration of the 50th anni- 
versary of the Women's Auxiliary 
of St. John's Anglican church 
in the latter part of August. 
Mrs. S. Snively and Mrs. W. 
Capeli are preparing the histori- 
cal background of the auxiliary. 
Mrs. Snively is an officer of the 
deanery and Mrs. Capeli is one 
of the earlier members of s the 
organization. 

The June meeting of St. 
John's W.A. was held at Glen 
Lonely, the home of Mrs. 
Snively. Mrs. Maurice Beynon, 
the president, presided. Mrs. 
W. Capeli read the scripture les- 
son and Mrs. Snively gave the 
devotionals and dealt with part 
of the study book on the Life 
History of Canon Turner. 

Mrs. Beynon presented high- 
lights of the West York Deanery 
annual of the W.A., held at 
Woodbridge in May. She said 
she was greatly impressed with 
the remarks of the literature 
secretary, Mrs. Lester, who em- 
phasized the importance of 
home reading by auxiliary mem- 
bers. From a display of literature 

dealing with better Christian 
living, Mrs. Lester pointed to the 
advantage of wider knowledge 
in today's problems and the en- 
couragement found in the works 
of good authors, in dealing with 
general and personal situations. 
Mrs. Beynon felt greater under- 
standing is to be gained through 
this source. She exhibited the 
"Literature Kit" describing the 
types of "isms" of the day. 

Mrs. Beynon also recounted 
an address by a returned mis- 
sionary who spoke at the Dean- 
ery annual. Refreshments for 
the meeting were served in the 
comfortable sunporch at Glen 
Lonely, 
Gift to Bride 

Before her marriage, Mrs. Jack 
Turriff, of Mimlco, the former 
Anna Mae Carlile of Oak Ridges 



was tendered a mark of appre- 
ciation for her past work with 
St. John's Anglican Junior Aux- 
iliary, in the presentation of an 
electric tea kettle from the sen- 
ior auxiliary of the church. As 
the first president of the jun- 
ior group, Mrs. Turriff had been 
specially kind to the girls in 
her mother's home. Her mother, 

the late Mrs. Archie Carlile, was 
made a life member of the sen- 
ior W.A. last autumn. 
Sunday-school Closed 

Sunday-school at St. John's 
church has been temporarily 
closed down for vacation 
months. The bus service for 
Lake Wilcox district to the 
church has been discontinued for 
a time. It carried children to 
St. John's Sunday-school. Mrs. 
Bates of Bond Lake has offered 
to conduct Sunday classes for 
young children at the regular 

period of the Sunday-school 
hour. 

July 13 has been set for the 

congregational and Sunday-school 

picnic of the church, the location 

for the event being in charge of 

Mrs. Donald Gunn, who is Sun- 

day-school superintendent, as- 
sisted by Maurice Beynon, 
Decorate School 

Oak Ridges school will take 

an interior new-look in the near 

future when a complete paint 
job is completed during holidays. 
It will then favorably corres- 
pond with the appearance of the 
new building adjacent to the 
original school. Gamble and 
Lcwaska have been awarded the 
contract. 
First at Gait Show 

Miss Marilyn Hawman, a skill- 
ed horsewoman, placed first in 
the open equitation at Gait 
Horse Show. She also won the 
pair of jumpers contest riding 
with J. Stickling of Guelph. 
Miss Hawman is the daughter of 

Captain E. C. Hawman of Oak 
Ridges. 



ANSNORVELD 

Several families have left for 
their holidays before the busy 
season starts. 

The members of the Girls club 
and Young Men's Society have 
planned a combined trip 

BELHAVEN 

Friday, June 30, the Bethel 
church is hoping for fine wea- 
ther to serve its strawberry fes- 
tival party on the lawns of the 
community hall. If it should be 
rainy they plan to go inside the 
hall. A program is also being 
prepared. Bethel ladies are 
known for putting on a very de- 
licious supper. Come and spend 
a pleasant social evening and 
help in the cause of repairs for 
their church. 



SHARON 

Visitors at the home of Mr. 
and Mrs. Welly Stevens on Sun- 
day were; Mr. and Mrs. Richard 
Thompson of Toronto, Mr. and 
Mrs. Herb. Stevens, Sue and 
Sandy of Mimico. 

Mr. and Mrs. E. R. Fry atten- 
ded a family reunion at Owen 
Sound on Saturday. 

Miss Laura Thompson and 

Mr. and Mrs. Harvey McCordick 

of Newmarket were Sunday 

guests of Mr. and Mrs. Howard 
Fife. 

Mr. and Mrs. Harold White of 

Oshawa and Mr. and Mrs. Don- 
old Wood of Whitby were Sun- 
day guests of Mr. and Mrs. Fred 
Hall. Mrs. Wood is remaining 
for a few days. 

Congratulations to Mrs. Arth- 
ur Hall who celebrated her 82nd 
birthday on Sunday. 



MOUNT PISGAH 

Mr, Dennis Dcrmott, Toronto, 
was a weekend visitor of his 
sister, Mrs. Ed. McColgan, and 
family. 

Messrs. Bob Petch and Clem 
Ellas motored to Guelph on 
Saturday to represent Vandorf 
Junior Farmers in the baseball 
tournament staged for the var- 
ious counties of Ontario, They 
were the representatives along 
with members from Sharon, 
Unionville and Schomberg clubs 
for York county. They defeated 
Huron county but lost out to 
Ontario county in the second 
round. Brant county was the 
final winner. 

Mr. and Mrs. Russel Sproxton 
and family had Sunday dinner 
with Mr. and Mrs. Levi Groves 
at Dixon Hill. 

Mrs. Henry Campbell and 
Miss Flo Falconer were weekend 
visitors of Mr. and Mrs. M. 
Wells and family. 

Congratulations to Mr, and 
Mrs. Harvey Biddlccomhe who 
celebrated their 37th wedding 
anniversary June 21. 

Mrs. Norman Brown, Mrs. it. 
C. Baycroft and Mrs. Bernard 
Kayes attended the York Cen- 



* FIGHT - 
Poultry Colds 

with 



tennial picnic on Saturday. This 
picnic was sponsored by the 
county of York council in co- 
operation with members of the 
York Pioneer and Historical So- 
ciety and celebrated the estab- 
lishment of York as a separate 
county 100 years ago. It was 
held at the Temple of Peace, 
Sharon Park, 

Mr. and Mrs. Wes. Comlskey, 
Downsview, were Sunday visi- 
tors of Mr. and Mrs. R. Ellas. 

Mr. and Mrs. Willis Lehman, 
Delhi, called on Mr. and Mrs. 
John Ash on Sunday. 

Mr. and Mrs. Len Scott enter- 
tained a few friends and rela- 
tives to a social evening in their 
home last Saturday evening. 
They are leaving this commun- 
ity July I and moving to Van- 
dorf. 



KETTLEBY 

The Kottleby cemetery will 
hold its decoration day services 
on Sunday, July 2, at 2.30 p.m. 
D.S.T, AH visitors are invited to 
attend. Rev. Wray of the Unit- 
ed church and Rev. Abbott of 
the Anglican church will con- 
duct the service and Rev. Smil- 
ley of the Baptist church will 
read the lesson. A choir of 
voices will be In attendance to 
assist in the singing. 

On Saturday, June 24, Mr. 
and Mrs. Norman Grecnsides at- 
tended a birthday supper at 
Brampton in honor of the prize- 
winners inj a recent contest of 
the Mutual Life Insurance Com- 
pany at the home of the bank 
manager, Mr. G. T. Harris, 1*nd 
Mrs. Harris. 

On Friday, June 23, the chil- 
dren of Christ church Sunday- 
school were tuken for a hay ride 
by Mr. F. Beatty, A wagon was 
filled with hay and hitched to 
a tractor. They were taken sev- 
eral miles around the country- 
side and returned to the Com- 
munity clubhouse where they 
were served hot dogs and soft 
drinks. All the children enjoy- 
ed this unique way of travel. 

The sympathy of the whole 
community is extended to the 
family of the late Mr. T. Miles 
who passed away in Sunnybrook 
hospital on Tuesday,, June 20. 



KESWICK 

Congratulations to Mt\ and 
Mrs. Wallace Lunn, Pine Beach, 
on the arrival of a grandson. To 
Mr. and Mrs. Webber of Toron- 
to (Agnes Lunn). 

The Christian church held its 
monthly missionary meeting on 
Friday evening. It was excep- 
tionally well attended. Credit 
and thanks go to Mrs. Ferg 
Taylor and Mrs. Serrick In their 
patient training of the children 
who gave the most % of the pro- 
gram including *the prayer, 
scripture reading, responsive 
reading. Mrs. Serrick gave the 
missionary address followed by 
interesting drills, piano solos, 
duet etc. by the children of the 
Sunday school. Afterwards a 
social hour with abundance of 
good things to eat was enjoyed. 
These monthly meetings of the 
Missionary society have been 
growing in interest through the 
year. 

Mrs. Etta Wilder spent the 
weekend a guest of Mrs. Clar- 
ence Wright, Queensville. 

Mrs. George Yeats is at home 
from Toronto hospital and her 
sister's of Toronto, and is break- 
ing up her home here and hav- 
ing a sale of household goods on 
July 8. 

A great many from Keswick 
journeyed to Queensville ceme- 
tery to decorate the graves of 

loved ones for Sunday Decora- 
tion Day. 

Rev. and Mrs. Hyde and three 
children of Cadillac, Mich., are 
visiting Mrs. Hyde's parents, Mr, 
and Mrs. Roy Hobson. 

Mr. . Munro Mann of Detroit 
and a party of friends are spend- 
ing two weeks' holidays at the 
home of Mrs. Thos. Mann. 

Little Denise Humphrey, Tor- 
onto, is visiting her grandmother 
Mrs. Leslie Morton for a time. 

On Thursday, Juno 22, Mrs. 
Francis Morton and Mary atten- 
ded the wedding of Dr. Helen 
Robinson and Professor S. Beat- 
ty in Old St. Andrew's church, 
Toronto. 

Mrs. Ferguson, Richmond Hill, 
is visiting Mrs. Nellie Sheppard 
who had the misfortune to fall 
and break her collar bone re- 
cently. 

Mr. and Mrs. Jesse Smith, 
Sudbury, were Sunday callers at 
the home of Mr. and Mrs. Leslie 
Morton. 

Mr. and Mrs. O. M. King were 
guests of Mr. and Mrs. Byron 
King nt Thorncrest village last 
weekend. 

Miss Lynnc CowJeson, Toron- 
to, was home lost weekend 

Miss Mary Morton visited 
friends at Creemore, Big Cedar 
Point and Durham this week. 



MOUNT PISSAH 

Mrs. C. Sab In and Mrs. T, 
Sabin, Toronto, spent the week- 
end witli Mr. and Mrs. Garnet 
Kvans and Donald. 

Mr. and Mrs, Howard Broome 
and family, Concord, had Sun- 
day supper with Mr. and Mrs. 
Meredith Ash and Sheila, 



DOWN THE CENTRE by ab hulse 



Diamond notes: Stouf fville to Sutton 




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Close at 2 a. m. 

AT 8 A.M. DAILY 

mm 

% UtU Aim Plan to. Coil 

OR CHICKEN DINNERS - SNACKS - BANQUETS 





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O.B.A. Lehman was a team- 
mate of Karl Cook in the 30%. 

Alliston will furnish the op- 
position for the up-and-coming 

Stouffvllle basebnllors arc cut- 
ting quite n dash in the Tri- 
County league this season, and 
It looks as if they, along with 
Sujulerlaml, will represent the 
group In the league play-offs. 
Karl Cook, wl»II over 40, cx-ln- 
termitiorml league player, is per- 
forming at second base for the 
Stourfvillites and covering plen- 
ty of ground too. He'll take the 
mound shortly, hut will confine 
his effort* moHtly to relief work. 

Hocus-pocus Miller, lanky 
Hurler, is carrying the pitching 
burden and with tuition from 
Cook has greatly improved, The 
team Is; Ken 'i»orky" Schcll c, 
Boh llussurtl lb, Cook 2b, Nigh 
3b, L. Schcll or Polly Mhiton ttt, 
outfield, Minion, Jennings, Cud- 
dleux, McMulten, Bradbury, Rax* 
lin. As can be seen from the 
above, many of tho lads who 
starred In minor baseball, have 

dropped out for some reason or 
oilier. 

Mutton, another North York 
hnsiibnll hotbed, has been having 
trouble gutting started thin «en- 
hoii but threatens to bust-up any 
game from here in, Johnny Lea« 
royd, son of Dr. Hal Loaroyri, 
ono of tho district's alltlmo dia- 
mond great*, <leor«© Kolbornj 
and n newcomer, Moss, are 
handling tho pitching chores. 
Boh Dunn Is behind tho pinto 
with an Infield of Weir lb, one 
of tho pitchers, Hancock, Chain- 
noy ss, and McLaughlin, Shan- 
non, Mountain, BeatUo, in tho 
outfield. 

Lust week Aurora Junior* 
Journeyed to Sutton ond dropped 
a 4-2 decision to tho northerners' 
junior loam on which aovcral In- 
termediates play. Aurora will be 
represented In the O.B.A. play- 
offs In junior, midget, and ban- 
tam this year. Doug Harrtaon of 
Aurora Dairy Is sponsoring tho 
junior club with Jack Beaton as 
manager. Friday night will see 
ono of tho Aurora clubs In no- 
tion at homo agolnst appropriate 
opposition from Sutton. Thoro 
la quite a scramble for places 
on tho Aurora junior club, with 
Ron und Gerry 8lmmon« head- 
ing the pitching ataff. Grant 
Winter*, Don Gibson, Druco Mc- 
Millan, Qr»nt Ore«n, Bill WilK- 
inion, Bill McQhee, Hah Ste- 
phenson, Andy Ctoii, Or*nt Ed- 
wardi, Gerry Hugo, AL Mc- 



Knight, Ortle Thorns, Bill Dale, 
Don Murchnnt, Ed. Couch, Jack 
Atkinson, among the many cand- 
idates on hand. Normio Stunden, 
Mac Clement, Sylivo Slcffan and 
Sonny Charles from Richmond 
Hill are others that Ihc manage- 
ment hopes to persuade to join 
the club. It is too bud the team 
hasn't regular opposition but 
they'll manage with exhibition 
tilts against Beeton, Kverett, and 
ono or two Toronto teams. A 
juvenile club will bo carried for 
exhibition purposes hut the feel- 
ing fa that n club In this cate- 
gory v. ouldn't he able to hold its 
own in the O.B.A. The Aurora 
Recreation Commission has done 
an excellent job of organizing. 
There'll be plenty of baseball to 
.satisfy the fans before the sum- 
mer is over. 

Collin* wood junior hookey 
club wound up Its season this 
month with a monster banquet 
and shindig. The boys received 
watches from tho town, lighters 
from tho service clubs, photos, 
wlndbreakers and cash from the 
club, medals from the O.II.A- 
Already there's a change In 
management personnel, Messrs. 
B. K. Stewart, Hoy Hurmlstcr and 
Connora having retired, and 
treasurer Fred Crew taking over 

the presidency. They plan a 
strong team to defend their laur- 
els. 

ThlKH und lhatat Duck from tho 
dim distant past rode Alex Web- 
ster a fow days ago to take the 
mound for Thiatlotown In the 
district softhall league and sil- 
ence the bats of tho Aurora club. 
•'!«« Alex," probably tho great- 
est pitcher ovor the years to per- 
form at Softball In thoso ports, Is 



still plenty good. Ho uses his 
noggin and control to fool this 
present crop of softbullors. Tho 
youngsters nro marvelling at his 
ability and think ho definitely 
has discovered "tho fountain of 
youth." Not quite so anclont 
but still in tho "old mon" of 
softball class Is Jack Elder of 
Woodbridge who also pitches. 
Nino years ago Jack was toiling 
for Aurora softballors , as was 
Webster. Jack Is tho driving 
force of tho present Woodbridge 
club which by play-off time 
will bo mighty dangoroua, Bruce 
Lehman, onetlmo Stouffvllle 
baaoballor, Is another who 
laughi at old man time as ho 
performs with sprightly vigor 



30 in what should be a lacrosse 
pipperoo. The celery town boys 
have not looked too good against 
Woodbridge, Maple or Malt- 
lands, but In Alliston they'll be 
meeting their own class competi- 
tion. Tho U-club boxla group 
has three sections. In Intermedi- 
ate "A" are Huntsvillc, Fergus 
and North Peel. In tho "U" sec- 
tion, Woodbridge, Maple, Ilrook. 
lin, Toronto Wostmounts and 
Toronto Muitlauds are grouped, 
leaving a "C" section composed 
of Streets vllle, Bradford and 
Alliston. That makes for some 
good games. 

We hasten to point out to you 
that despite rumours otherwise, 
Bradford Arena Is still owned 
by the village and has not been! 
sold. Same of the hockey en- 
thusiasts have perhaps hcon a 
bit premature in their plans, but 
steps are definitely being taken 
towards artificial ice within the 
next two years. Soccer Is grad- 
ually attracting its followers in 
the South Slmcoo metropolis us 
Bradford b r o g a n s kick tho 
sphcrcold with accuracy and 
abandon to lend tho Simcoe coun- 
ty league, Some familiar faces 
among tho line-up are Joo and 
Mlko Kuhla, Hudy and Mlro- 
sulv Osadehuck, Jack, "Kny" 
and S. Doan, Paul Skok, M, 
Massln, !\ Ililtenbindor end M. 
Plasko. A new floor Is being 
considered for Aurora Arena. 
Unfortunately there's had to be 
repairs done to tho piping and 
no definite decision as to typo 
of floor has been mado by the 
commissioners. Too bail thero 
Isn't some action as box lacrosse, 
wrestling and dancing would 
have produced some nico rev. 



onue. Will probably bo ready 
before It's time for Ice. 

Cobourg and Harris are both 
back in tho lee business again as 
figure-skating classes start for 

the summer season undor oxport 

guidance, 

Ked Garner, the Richvalo grap- 
pier, and his troupe of trained 
grunt and groan artists are hold- 
ing forth regularly at Weston 
arena this year and drawing good 
crowds. Red Is gunnlntt for a 
regular circuit In tho metropoli- 
tan area which will enable him 
to import a few new men. Clovo 
Burton and Buddy Jordan, tho 
local boys performing, are are all 
Improving as crowd attraction!, 
Garner end his Theiplam would 



The Newmarket Era and Kxyrew, Thursday, June 2§» 19M Pace II 







KINSMEN OF SUTTON 

* • 

PRESENT A 

w 

Daily Double 




GAMES 



ENTERTAINMENTS 




. 



Fair Grounds 




AND 
A GALA THEATRE NIGHT 

RED BARN THEATRE 



JACKSON'S POINT 



<' 



The Hilarious Stage Musical 

Crazy with the Heat" 



EVENING 8.45 P.M. 

Tickets on Sale - Ardill Motors Timminshop • 

or any Kinsmen 




AND GET THI IIST 

THAT MON I Y CAN IU Y 




CANADA'S FINES! FUSHlHt II IU 

fiaarantMd 
Without Time Unit 



Ym fit a IfMd Ntw Tiia— la <»*• 

»f felhut tram lay cam 

Ui outlined btfowl . 

suria-uiTic rim aai iauty.iuu.ti 

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to w*tfc «■*!*!#. t*4 material!, iMm t4#*- 
tk« *r# |ftiMr«4 at*rrHt Otatt C«N» A««t- 
tfMH, Uttf-Out* Itftftt Cutf. AitHfNit If 
Collhlon D«mat*i «H« In tan •! faN«f* 
tnm Mr iMtllM ««u« YOU flIT A BRArlf 
NIW TIRI, Mylflt «rttf Hi Ik* amount tt 

tf##4 mi r«i at* HV« a«t raaaia aji i aa 
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far aatfcj tva miMhi af nnka. (laa aat*» 

tic!* «udi«ntt« Una) fit fall partltMtaf*) 



Prlc« UtU "Supr-Uitic" tlg i 

* Lht Allowance Your 
My trie* (up to) NitCoit 



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4.40-4.50/21 


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5.2J.J.J0/I7 


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5.15/5.90/1* 


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400/14.... 


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•450/14 ,.«*, 


4 


450/14.... 


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450/14.... 


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470/15.... 


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470/14.... 


4 


700/14.... 


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740/1.5 



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$12.30 

13.00 

13.40 

1S.45 

16.4ft 

20.05 

10.70 

21.30 

27.50 

20.B0 

20.10 

33.25 

23.50 

24.00 

29.2ft 

37.05 

26.20 

28.70 



2.05 
2.00 
3.00 
3.00 
6,20 
3.35 
5.35 
B.25 
4.55 
7.20 

11.30 
6.55 
6.05 
7.35 

10.15 
7.25 
8.25 



$11.45 
10.95 
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Open Tuesday nlfhU until 9 p.m, 
ThU Friday nlfht until 10 *m. 

CMMKI) SATURDAY - JULY 1ST 

Tires ao marked nro numbor ono quality accond Jlno and carry 

„on©-yonr road htuard tiuartmteo. 

WE MOUNT All TIRES FRH 






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Fa* 12 Tfae Newmarket Era ajid Express, Thursday, Jane 29, 1939 




: 



■ 



to start 
fti rink floor soon 

A start is expected to be made 

next week on the removal of 
the sand from the Newmarket 
Memorial Arena. This is the 
first step in preparing the arena 
for the installation of a concrete 
floor. Permission to proceed 
was given by the Ontario Muni- 
cipal Board and the by-law went 
through council Monday even- 
ing. 

Plan at present is to have a 
4 3-4*' thickness of concrete 
pour«d in and around the pipes. 
On top of this 1-4" thicknes3 of 
trap rock is laid. This is buffed 
off to a smooth surface to allow 

dancing, roller skating and other 
summer activities. 

It is estimated that from the 
start of the concrete pouring 
until the job is completed will 
take 30 days. The actual pour- 
ing of concrete requires from 
48 to 50 hours and a waiting 
period of 28 days is-allowed for 
the floor to set. 



Aurora loses two 
ta Mt. Dennis contest 

Aurora 12 and 13-year-old 
baseballers didn't fare too well 
at Mount Dennis last Saturday 
as they dropped two games in 
decisive fashion to Le aside and 
Lindsay and were eliminated. 
Eight teams competed, Leaside 
taking Aurora 9-1, and Red 
Mitchell's Lindsay club hammer- 
ing out a 25-1 win. Both Lea- 
side and Lindsay were bigger 
and more experienced.^ 

Mount Dennis won the tourn- 
ament defeating Lindsay 9-7 in 

a great final game. The Aurora 

warriors included: Bruce Mc- 

Rae c-o, Murray Chapman c, 

Ralph Hammond p. Bill Wray p- 
3b f Bill Jans p, Buddy Sutton lb, 
John Bunn 2b, Al. Child ss, 
Steve Mills o f Jim Preston o, 
Bob Murby o. Bill Mundell 
handled the club from the 
bench. 



■■ - 



s- 



■ 



- - i 



DANCING - Every Friday and Saturday 

Cedar Beach Park 

NORTH SHORE 

MUSSELMAN'S LAKE 
Van Walker and His Music 

featuring wally scott, vocalist 

Now accepting reservations for group picnics and cabin 

and cottage accommodation* 




■ 



* - 



THEATRE, NEWMARKET, PHONE 478 



DAYLIGHT SAVING TIME POLICY 

OPEN MONDAY TO FRIDAY 6.30. SHOWS 7 & 9 

SATURDAY OPEN 6.15. SHOWS &3«, 8 & II 




June 29 - 7 and 9 p.m. 



CIM/DHW COLBERT 



'-**- |* _| 



' 1 Iff ^B >' «^W^ 



rV~- 



. — **- ---» * 



ROBERT YOUNG 



*4eJftiU*{rni«sktf.n4 






*" 



-u>? 



GEORGE 6RENL *&* 



•CM, * 



ff 






OlMSfAWf 



ALL PROCEEDS OF THE 2 THURSDAY NIGHT 
PERFORMANCES GO TO THE WOMEN'S AID 

YORK COUNTY HOSPITAL 



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Friday - Saturday, June 30 - July 1 

SttOTMG LAW AW ORBEfl WTO NEVAU 

hi the days sAsi a killer wis linf! 

M M iHU*' 1 ' " iMu m i ■■ l ii i ini r iii ij ii inr ifii i w yi n riiT aii rTiTiiTin^ 

COWMSU nCTVtCS PftttMi 

Scott 




i«CW£CQLQ& 

fiSl«J5?W' * MjMti * !om Powms - Jock O'Wrtwnr 




Week of 




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"fit, liid., try, ie&t fi&$0tytlfti££/ f 
[wQA not ZA&hSl dmf* ~ $&)tdiAL 



That Belvedere Man really delivers the goods... 
In th e true family story that became the 

•beloved Bonk-of*the*Month 
ReadcrVDitfcst Feature! 



NUGGETS SPLIT 
PAIR AT HOME 
LOSE TOUGHIE 

Schomberg "Nuggets" defeated 
Aurora 9-7 last week and lost a 
close decision to Thistletown 8 7 7 
Tuesday under the lights. 

Ken. Ellison mastered Aurora 
because of a good pitching stand 
and nifty fielding support. Bill 
VanZant, working the Aurora 
pitching shift, fed Don Marchant 
a home run pitch in the second 
with Bill Dale and Don Rainey on 
the base-paths and Schomberg 
had a three-run margin. VanZant 
meted out a similar offering to 
Walt Thompson in the sixth and 
with the same result. This time 
for two runs as Doug Marchant, 
who had tripled, trotted home 
ahead of him. 

Ken. Ellison helped his " own 
cause with a run scoring double 
in the eighth. "Mickey" Sutton 
sparked Aurora in centre-field 
with some nifty catches. 

"A tough one to lose" was the 

way Elgin Hastings classified the 
Thistletown 8-7 loss. Ken Ellison 
pitched steady ball but fielding 

support waxed and waned. A 

nothing-nothing ball game to the 
fifth, Thistletown scored two runs, 
added a single in the sixth and 
put the crusher on with five in 
the eighth. Schomberg broke 
their horse-collar string in fifth 
with a run, matched the visitors' 
five in the eighth, to make it 8- 
6. The Nuggets had a big rally 
simmering in the ninth, got a 
run out of it, but failed to squeeze 
the tying run over. 




:::;>■ 



f .. 



-:*">-*■--. 



i' 



• * 



■ ■ 



BY GEORGE HASKETT 

Newmarket Sports Editor 

So it's Hawshaw, Mr. Hulse, is it? You have the 
goods on us. What magnifying glass are you using? 
Tom Watson Trophy, vintage 1911, stashed away here. 
Many a hot ball clasfi; not to mention committee room 
squabble, over that hunk of plateware as probably Bill 
Epworth, Lou Bovair, "Shorty" Turan, Dick Hugo, 
Bernard and Basil McHale and a host more will tell 



MORE SPORTS NEWS 
ON PAffi 11 



LAST CALL DIXON SINGLES 

For those who were un- 
able to enter on Monday for 
the Dixon Shield singles, 
please be on hand Friday, 
June 30, 7 p.m. Winners of 
this group will play winners 
of first group Friday. July 
7, for the filial. Enter now 
with K. Hugo, See*?. 



KETTLEBY 

Services next Sunday, July 2, 
at Christ church will be: morn- 
ing service, 9.45 a.m.; Sunday- 
school 11 a.m. 

There will be no service at 

the Baptist church July 2 and 9 
as Rev. W. E. Smalley is on 
vacation. 




Eveiy Saturday Night 

In the 
AMBASSADOR ROOM 

* of the 

GRAY STONES 
RESTAURANT 

YONGE ST., AURORA 
featuring 
DON GILKES and fab orchestra 

Excellent Dining Room 
Service 7 a.m. to 11 p.m. 




you. 

Revived from town league 
competition in 1938. League ran 
through to 1943. Participants 
to the end were Specialty, 
Davis and Army. Army won 
last couple of seasons. Your 
Hashman had sign off for it 
when the. army camp closed 
here. Signing, might add, was 
the only way we could lift the 
cup from those good army 

teams. Couldn't take it from 
them on the diamond. 

That was last phase in town 
league baseball up and downs. 

Tried several times to revive 
the league but no go. Guess 
those long base runways had the 
old-timers stumped. Being a 
good baseball man myself, ahem, 
looking forward to the day town 
league baseball comes back. 
Town Softball League trophy 
taken care of by Citizen Dewey 
Kuhns, home address Baltimore, 
Maryland, who has proffered a 
trophy for teams to battle for. 
Still, you have a point in it 
being used by the kids league. 

While on the subject of hawk- 
shawing. Bettor take a bow 
yourself, "Ab". Fans — old- 
timers — players are liking those 
down the memory lane trips of 
yours.. Saves some of the old- 
timers a lot of embarrasing ques- 
tions from the grandchildren 
and so forth when they can 
pick up the Era and Express 
and say "I told you so." -\ *■•' 

Challenges? Pleasure to hear 
Aurora Town Softball League to 
function. Hear it's four teams, 
Sisman's, Town, Collis and 
Hart's. Thought struck us the 
other p.m. which might cause a 
little interest — not to mention 
commotion. Inter town clashes. 
Maybe go so far as to arrange 
an inter-town play-off scries. 
Aurora Town League champs 
against Newmarket Town League 
winner. How's it strike you? 

Town Leaguers and senior 
ladies close down for two weeks. 
Junior gals continue with Tues- 
day home fixtures, Aurora soft- 
ballcrs and Schomberg teams 
ant| Lake Simcoe carry on, kg 
guess we'll have something to 
pen for you. School out re- 
minds us that Tom Dickson, busy 
Aurora Recreation director, is 
trying along with Sutton and 
Stouffville to swing a deal for 
a minor baseball circuit. New- 
market should be in. Optimists 
are going to take care of ban- 
tams with four-team town cir- 
cuit. Leaves canal town with a 
raft of midget, juvenile and 
junior players knocking around. 
Won't have much of or any 
juvenile problems during the 
holidays if the lads are whack- 
ing the apple around the dia- 
mond. Would like to see New- 
market In the league when it 
opens. Ah soon as Optimists' din. 



mond ready there's no excuse 
for not hopping in. Think it 
over while you*re vacationing. 
Must be a sponsor, a coach or a 
manager around among the old 
time baU players willing to lend 
a hand. 

Rumors. They're with us all 

the time. Going full bias"! of 
late. Had Davis Leather out of 
the town league, then the Bell. 

Spike • these— both are staying 

in or at. least Prexy Mickey 
Smith hasn't any information 
to the contrary. 

Guys it's good to hear about: 
A little late but still, sincere 
Congrats to Don. "Spider" Gib- 
son, voted Aurora Blackhawks* 
most valuable player, deceives 
O.H.A. award. 

Ken Broughton, coach of the 
Orillia gals, was in to see us 
Sunday. Orillin out with new 
uniforms this week. Team is 
sponsored by Orillia Bus Lines. 
Ken is also chucking hardball 
for Orillia in the North Simcoe 
League. Out in Ivan Law's 
eck of the woods, Zephyr, they 

plan their annual sports day for 
Saturday, July 8. Mr. Law, in- 
cidentlly has never explained 
satisfactorily to us how the 
cidentally has never explained 
Cup away from Sutton. Now 
how about that, Ivan? 

Let's peek at the calendar — 
tonight better get over to the 
park. Midland ladies here for a 
test with our gals. Laskey Old 
Boys' Field Day July 1. Next 
Tuesday, Reg BaU and Geo. 
Watt have the junior ladies in 
action here. Visitors must be 
Mount Albert. Well kiddies, so 
you're off on a holiday. En- 
joy yourself. Take It easy. 
You'll last a lot longer and fin- 
ish a whole lot stronger. Come 
back rested up and ready for 
round two in the summer sport 
battles. 



20 SCORE 



/ 






COACHES 




AURORA JRS. VS. SUTTON 

Aurora fans who ore looking 
for some baseball action will 
have it v Friday evening, Aurora 
junior baseballers, slated to car- 
ry the town banner into the 
O.B.A. playdowns in August, 
will seek revenge for a 3-2 de- 
cision dropped to Sutton last 
Friday. They'll meet the Sut- 
ton trl-county intermediate club 
in a return engagement at Au- 
rora Town Park tomorrow, Fri- 
day evening, at seven chimes. 



THEATRE 



AURORA 



.^ - 



FRIDAY - SATURDAY 
WINK AUTRY 
In 

"COWBOY t INDIANS" 



% DAYS - 



JUNK 30 • JULY 1 

PLUS 



"BLONDIE'S HERO" 



Arthur Lake • Penny Singleton 
MATINRR SATURDAY 2 P.M. ~*~ 



MONDAY - TUESDAY - % DAYS - 

Charles Lnugton - Franchot Tomi 

"THE MAN ON THE EIFFEL TOWER 

IN COLOR 



JULY 3 ■ 4 



r# 




Jr. gals win away 
Lose to Sutton at home 

The Junior Ladies slnm-bangcd 
their way to n 15-14 triumph at 
Sutton Monday. Down 7-3 at the 
end of the fourth, our gals hit 
back with six runs In both the 
fifth nml sixth and held onto 
their one run 1 e a d to the end. 
Jean McDonald, Jnnn Quinn and 
Glenna Woodhousc did the power 
hitting. Tuesday, before the 
largest home* crowd, tho shoe 
w;is on the other foot. Our gals 
allowed Sutton a big five-run 
fii.%11 innings to give them a 13- 
II division. Barbara Watt, Joan 
M.-Dunald, Marilyn Darker and 
Murk-no Martin topped |ho IpcoJ 
hit parade with two each. Dar- 
lene Stuffles pitched both games 
for Newmarket. 

Newmarket: Barbara Watt, 
Glonna Wood house, Jean Mc- 
Donald, Joan Quint); Marilyn 
Barker. Marleno Martin, Isobel 
Rogers, Darlene Stuffles, Bar- 
bara Shropshire. Sutton: V: 
Thrayer, D. Lonorgan, L. Crow- 
tier, iM. Sinclair, II, Dunn, R. 
RIddell, M. Cl)mp.son, N. Quinn, 
II, llibbort. 

EVINRUDK MOTORS 

• MORRISON'S 




Need 2 more frames 
To win at Orillia 



One fact stood out like a sore 
thumb after Monday night's Op- 
timists-Hoffman clash at the 
Hoffman diamond. Respective 
coaches "Ceegars" McDonald of 
the Ironmen and Ernie Miller of 
the Optie's, plus one haggard 
score-keeper, aged ten years. The 
teams pummelled each other for 
41 runs in extra innings. A two- 
run spurt in the last of eight gave 
Hoffman's the decision 21-20. 

Hoffman's used four pitchers, 
Bob Benville, Vic Langford, Bob 

Murray and finally Ivan Ruddock. 
Optimists used Jim Juffs to start 
then switched over to Ken. Rus- 
nell. 

The score went up and down 
like a yo-yo. The teams scored in 
every innings but one. At the 
end of five Hoffman's was up 
14-8. Optimists swooped back 

with a big ten runs in the sixth 
to go ahead 18-14. Hoffman's kept 
coming on to even it at 19 at the 
end of seven. Optimists got one 

in the eight. Hank VanZant 

tripled to start the Hoffman eight, 
scored on Grant Blight's single, 
then Freddie Dillman provided 
the blow that killed father and 
the Optimists chasing "Blighty" 
home with the winner. 

Grant Blight ranged over a lot 
of infield to steal the fielding 
spotlight. Hank VanZant proved 
the terror of Optimist's pitching 
staff — two base circlers, triple 
and single. Optimists swatters 
were led by Bev. Ruddock, Ken. 
Rusncli, Morlcy Hunter and 
Jack Hamilton with three apiece. 

BELLlEfT" 
WRONG NUMBER 
LOSE TO TOWN 

Mick Smith's telephone crew 
got the wrong number last Wed- 
nesday when they tried to win 
their second in the Town League. 
The Atomics knocked them off 
the hook 13-5. 

It wasn't what they did — it 
was how they did it. Towners 
spun around the sacks like six- 
day bike riders on their last 
laps, stealing the Bell blind. 

Herb Cain, making his start for 

town, hit a two-run homer 

in the first frame. Bell 

tosscrs Art Dobbie and Bill John. 

ston treated "Hack" with respect 

after that. Don Smith's single 

evened it at two nil in the second. 

Art Dabble lost his control in the 

third, gave up five walks, and 

this plus an error and a hit by 

Alvie McKnight swung the Town 
into a comfortable 7-2 lead. 

Town jugged together a pair of 
Bell errors, a wulk and a string 
of hits by Jerry Hugo, Howie 
Peterman, Jock Baisdon, and 
capped by Ivan, Gibson's four 
baser for six runs. Bell attempted 
a come-back, scoring single tal- 
lies off Ivan "Lefty" Gibson in 
fifth, sixth and seventh but 

couldn't get an honest to good- 
ness rally mobile. 

Ueit: I). Smith ss, W. Johnston 
3b, ft. Cody lb, J. Tensdalo cf, 
J. Smith 2b, J. Donaldson e, A. 
Dobbie p, L. Cudmorc rf, I. 
Brown If, II. LaPlanto If, M. 
Smith ph. 

Town; A. McKnjght 3b, D. 
Brice c, J. Hugo ss, H. Cain cf, 
D. Couch lb, T. Taylor If, It. 
Peterman rf, J. Bullion 2b, T, 
Gibson p. 



AURORA TOWN LEAGUE 

Aurora Town Softball 
League Is all set to go. 
Harts and Merchants ^y 
the lid off on the season 
July 1. Last week's meet- 
ing of the league confirmed 

the fact that four teams will 
face the barrier. It's Town, 
Harts, Collis and Merrhants. 



KEN MITCHELL 
PITCHES MOUNT 
TO 2ND PLACE 

< * 

The Mount and Ken Mitchell 
are moving up in the Simcoe 
loop with two wins to hop into 
second slot, a bare point behind 
Willow Beach. Hope was first 
to feel Mount's sting— was put 
away 15-5. Joe Case worked 
overbite with his hitting for 
three. Vern Pegg lifted out two 
safeties. 

Motilities' other victims were 

their old rivals from Zephyr— 
7-0. Zephyr swingers couldn't 
cope with Ken' Mitchell's three- 
hit flinging. Mounties grouped 
all their runs in the third and 
that was it. Ron Kester went 
wild to walk in three. Gord. 
Rynard took up the pitching to 
throttle Mount production. 

Keswick won one and lost one 
to Willow Beach 15-7. Harold 
Smith and Cec. McNeill were op- 
posing moundsmen. Home run 
king Ken. Hedging came to life 
tor a four baser with two on. 
Cec. McNeill matched this. Bob 
Pollock also in on the base 
circling. Beach was off to a 
four-run spurt in the first to 
lead all the way. Al. Hodgins 
enjoyed himself with a triple 
and two doubles. Don Cooper 

SSai Do . n Camcro " unleashed 
Willow 'heavy artillery, former 
got four latter three. 

Scores are levelling out with 
Keswick 10 to Vandorf 5— Har- 
old Smith over two Vondorf 
hurlers, Lloyd Preston and Har- 
old Both am. Keswick got the 
jump in the first two frames 
and five runs in the sixth. Tom 
Hare on three and Ken. Hod- 
gins, double and single, corner- 
ed the hit market. Trip across 
the border must have done 
Coach Art Starr good— led Van- 
dorf stick work with three, 
Harry Lavender slapped two 
out of the reach of eager-beaver 
Keswick fielders. 

Hope and Queensvllle staged 
a hot one for York Pioneers* pic- 
nic. Took 55 minutes to play 
nnd otulcd 8-7 for Hope. Latter 
needed nil their early seven 
runs to stave off n determined 
late bid from the losers. Bruce 

Pegg missed n chance to tie or 
win ids own game in the seventh 
with one on nnd two out but 
couldn't get a hit off Lon. Qan- 
on. Bob English had Lon. Can- 
tons number nil night, two 
doubles and a one bagger. Jack 
Perry am! Lmnn Smith „!.... 



TOWN SOFTHAU, I.KAC1UK 



Office Specialty 
Town "Atomics" 

Hell Telephone 

(Jan. Hoffman 
Optimist* 
I)uvl» Leather 



W 

3 

1 

1 

1 

1 





L 

1 
1 
1 
% 
1 



PR 
4 
2 
•4 
% 
2 




RAKIIIK AND MSTKKJT 
I.AOIKS' HOtTIIAl.fi I.KAC1UK 



Newmarket 
Valley'.! 

Midland 

Orillia 

Slrnn.imun'H 



W 

7 
4 
3 
2 
1 



I. 

2 
2 
4 
4 

3 



Sodbusters win 
Over Keftleby 



1.8 h.p, 
3.S3 h.p. 

7.5 h.p. 
14 h.p. 

82.5 h.p. 



$123.00 
I1B5.00 

1*37 

1355,09 
M80.M 



Mnko suro of a pleasant mimmer 
on tho lnko with on Evlnrudo 

motor. 



. 



AGENT 



<*£>» 



ROM BOATS 



CU^-:^' 



MORRISON'S 





Schomhortf "Sodbusters" hml 
n well slocked klHy of haso-hits 

Monday ovcnin#, under Iho light* 
at Soho?nhor« Park to breeze to 
ii 24-7 runaway win over Pot- 

toflovillo in n Pool-York Mnftluilt 
fixture. N Dmifl. Drown, Schom- 
licrjr nmitulsinnn, hud a 
p»rntivc4y cosy limp rccoi 
tho victory ns his mates swung 
for a flock of extra hnso driven. 
Howard and Ken. Archibald, 
Pottnuevillo mound porpa, took 
quite n lacing. 

Everybody hit with Sehombortf, 
Tho SodbiiHters worn never be- 
hind In tho score-book, Extra 
base department was lopped by 
Murray Kdwarda nnd Al, Steven- 
son. Both found tho range for 
n pair of home run sma.shw, 
Doug. Palmer, making his first 
start of the .season at tho Schom- 
berg Initial fiaek, floldod fault- 
loasly and had two throe- ba 90 
knocks, Cliff Clraham, rofutlar 
receiver, was an nbsontce, Coach 
Hob Moody and Manager "Pike" 
Cabll and Dick Flynn don tho 
catching equipment. 

Cablt'i hustling youHgiteri aro 
•tartlng to go places. The larg- 
est crowd of tho icoion wai out 
Monday, Tho SodbiuUrt have J 



rry and Lome Smith also ... 
hit wur-path. On the Mopu side 

f.n n -,, C 'i ,n, ? n ' "« ss Pegg and 
nun Cook supplied main bat- 
tling strength. Cookie plastered 
u homer. Carl Pickerel got 
himself a slice of Holding spot- 
light with fine catches around 
second. 

Pino Orchard's acquaintance 
with the top roost ended almost 
a» soon as it began. Their 
merry-go.rotnul broke down be- 
fore 10-4 decision for Hope. 
Hope made amends for previous 
display in tho field. Ted Tid- 
man no puz/.lt\ walked six. Lon. 
uanton, the winner all the way. 
Ned Tonsley and Harold Fair 
wero main hitting assets. Noel 
Ash and Dill Dike made the but 
music for Ivan Kves' boys. ■ 

Quoensvllle, still searching for 
first win, rapped soundly by 
Zephyr J0-» Tuesday, Ches 
iamney realized ball players' 
dream—a homer with the sacks 
populated. Lester Kizloy and 
Carl Meyers in on Zephyr hit 
assault on Queenavlllo pitchers 
Hrueo Pegg, and Hev. Elsby, 
newest Queensville recruit. 
Uruco Loekio, taking his cut- 
backs at his old team mates, 
punched out two two.basers, Hill 
Durkholder and Jerry Perry also 
tip with twb safeties, latter** 
fielding at short-stop stand-out. 
Vandorf and Pine Orchard tilt 
postpuned Friday duo to rain. 

Next week; June 89, Zephyr 
at Pino Orchard; June 30, Mount 
Albert at CJuernHVllle, June 30, 
Viittttorf at Willow Heaohs Julv 
com- 1 3, Hope at Pine Orchard | July 
•ding i, Zephyr at Keswick* July 5, 
Vandorf at Mount Albert. 
LAKK H1MOOK IiKAttUti 
<all games to Juno 89) 

W I* * 



Pis. 
U 

8 

4 

ii 



Newmarket Ladies pocketed a . 

6-4 photo finish decision o$er 

Orillia at Couchiching Park last 

Thursday alter two extra in- 
nings. 

It was a four-all deadlock 
after seven and Orillia all but 
loused up the script in the 
eighth when Arlene Moore, hav- 
ing trouble getting a bead o» 
the plate, walked the bases full 
with none out. Mona Dean put 
away a pop up for one out. Phil. 
Mclnnis then paid a big divi- 
dend on the win snatching a 
scorcher headed for extra bases 
and sending the ball to first 
to complete the double killing. 

Now to write the story of 
that winning ninth into the 
records. Phil Mclnnis, first up, 
bounced a down the middle 
single just out of reach of 
pitcher Irene Patterson's hand. 
Mary Ellen Mclnnis, back in 

the game again, skied out to 
first for out one. Edna McGrath 
drilled a double over short, 
shunting Phil Mclnnis home 

with the tie breaker. Edna try- 
ing for third was out number 
two. The two Lois's, Manning 
and Blight, combined for New- 
market's sixth run, Manning 
tripling and Blight allowing her 
to trot home on a single. That 
was the game 6-4. Arlene 
Moore put Orillia awav in order 
in the ninth not allowing the 
luxury of hoisting the pill out of 
the infield. 

Headlined was pitching. Jackie 
and Arlene Moore made it fi 
family triumph. Jackie "th<*i 
old gal," went along nicely for 
six frames allowing Orillia one ; 
run, that in the fourth. Jackiei 
had control trouble in th§ 
sixth. Coach Chas. VanZant 
called in 'The Kid" Arlene to 
stop Orillia. Arlene did just 
this at the cost of a run and 
Orillia broke through for two 
in the seventh to tie it at four 
all. Irene Patterson on the> 
Orillia mound pitched steady 
ball, keeping the 13 hits New* 
market gathered well scattered. 
Phil Mclnnis, Mary Ellen Mc- 
lnnis, Edna McGrath, Paulino 
Bovoir and Jackie Moore swung 
for two hits each. The Moore 
gals allowed seven hits, Mabel 

Naismith smote out two of 

these. 




• ■ 
-■ - 

1 



1 - 






DRIVES 
TIREMEN OVER 
AURORA 7-1 

Auroras* softball entry in the 
North York major softball loop 
lost 7-1 to the front running Lans- 
ing l! Tiremen u at the Aurora 
Town Park Tuesday. They lost 
H mainly because they couldn't 
get hep to fast and stow mixtures 
shot at them by Geo. Hall on tho 
winners' mound. Hall was hot- 
he allowed Aurora only four hits. 
Hall whiffed only four but his 
fielding support was practically 
air tight. 

Andy O'Neill on tho Aurora hill 
was more generous with tho hits. 
Lansing picked up 12— but Andy's 
main fault was an over abundance 
of home run balls, one each to 
liny McGhce, Jack Statham and 
John McKlnley, all coming with 
the bases empty. Still U would 
have been enough to swing tho 
game Itself. 

Only once did Aurora find tho 
right combination. This was in 
tho third. "Red" Castle looped « 
Texas leaguer into eentro field 
and Tod Master gave him tho 
transportation to thopay-off-win- 

dow with his two-base wrong- 
field double. From there on Hall 
was unbeatable, allowing only 
one lilt, to Earl MacDonald, n 
single in tho sixth. Aurora's 
other binglo* fell to outfielder 
Mickey Sutton in the second. 

Lansing ll Tlremen M produced 
two runs in the third to cop tho 
lead and outside of another two 

In the seventh, homers did tho 

rest. 

Doth teams featured sparkling 
Infieldlng, But when it cam to 
laying tho laurels on tho lino: , 
Bruce McMillan can't be over- 
looked. McMillan ranged tho : 
Aurora short-stop territory In 
great style to got everything lift- 
ed his way. His mattf across tho 
keystone sack, "Junior" Stephen- - 
son, also pulled off a wham-doozl- 
or of a grab, 



Ft*. 



Willow Hfach 


a 


8 





10 


Mount Albert ' 


4 


8 


1 


9 


Pino Orchard 


4 


2 





8 


Keswick 


a 


3 


2 


8 


Hopo 


4 


S 





8 


Zephyr 


3 


2 





e 


Vitmlorf 


2 


S 


8 


4 


Quoensvllle 





1 


1 


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two raincd-out gamcu to eldon 
up thelt schedule, Pans can 
look forward to a merry time of 
It as traditional rivals, NobUton 
and Woodbrldge, will bo tho op- 
position. Date of these games 
hasn't been sot as yet. ■ 

Schomberg! D, Flynn c, D, 
Brown p, D« Palmer lb, A, Ste\fe 
emon 2b, L. Bell u,M> Edwards 
3b, A. pale If, H. Lipiett ef^ft 
Atehtion ff. * * 






Tuesday evening tennis 
Classes for Juniors 

Keith Davis, who has been 
conducting classes for Jun- 
iors at the tennU eeurts 
each Saturday morning, In- 
tends to add an evenlnr 
cIam en Tuesday evenings 
at 6.8t p,m. The 9.S9 aon. 
Saturday Instructional per- 
iods will continue, 

Keith reports two doien 
junior members at the Sat- 
urday ttiendaf classes and 
hojws to m an increase In 
the number for Tuesday, All 
juntos a« welcome on 
either Saturday or Tuesday, 
There b aba a good report 
en U* numb* of junior- 
mtmfem witt t*e Newmax- . . 






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