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Full text of "Newmarket Era"




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Net Paid Avse. 6 Months Enoins Ma*. 31 

Newmarket 446 Aurora 179 

District 416 Others 182 
TOTAL PAID 1,223 

DOES NOT INCLUDE CONES TO COM ElfON DENTS. 
ADVERTISERS OR ANY UNM1D COPIES 



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. NO.-. 17 



Class 



NEWMARKET. ONTARIO. THURSDAY, OCTOBER I6TH, 1941 



Member of Audit Bureau op Circulations 



SINGLE COPIES, 5 CENTS EACH 






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O. E. Tench Built Several 
. Factory Buildings 
?> In Newmarket 

.Well-known Newmarket citi- 

-«|V Oliver E. Tench died at his 

homo. Queen SI. E., in his 83rd 

^r'on Tuesday. Kev. J. A. 

rKoffend will conduct funeral 

jrvices at the family residence 
Ij^iday afternoon, with inter- 
ment in Newmarket cemetery. 
■;v: Barn in King township, he was 
the son of Jane Shanks and 
HCharles Edgar Tench. ' His 
■father, whose family came to 
King town ship from Pennsyl* 
f'Viiftia, was of U.E.L, stock. His 
.tether operated a sawmill at 
Pottagcville, 

-..He came to Newmarket as a 
young man and worked at Cane's 
factory. Subsequently he was 
■to. Caledon East for a couple of 

years and married Isabella Pot- 
ft/tv of Caledon. Then he returned 

-to Newmarket and Cane's. 

*? Later he studied privately to 
j become" an architect, and turned 
rio that profession. He drew the 

plans and supervised construc- 
tion of the main buildings of the 
^Office Specialty Co. and the 
itjkvts Leather Co. and was also 



Architect Dies 



WILL HOLD TAG DAY 

The True Blue Lodge, New- 
market, is holding a tag day on 
October* 25, for the True Blue 
and Orange, Home, Richmond 
Hill. The home now has about 
150 refugee children. 



the architect for the King George 
and Stuart Scott schools. 

His first wife died in 1910, and 
in 1913 he married Matilda Mason 
of Adjala, who survives. He 
also leaves a brother, Dr. J. M. 
Tench, Buffalo. N.Y., and four 
children, Mrs. W. H. Whipps 
(Maude), ColHngwood, Miss Ada 
M. Tench, Ottawa, Mrs. R. E. 
Robertson (Anne), ColHngwood. 
and Charles Edgar Tench, Blind 
River. 

Mr. Tench followed public 
affairs with close interest, but 
never took an active part him- 
self. At the time of the last 
beverage room vote he served 
as treasurer of the anti-beer 
room committee. 

He was active in the affairs of 
St Andrew's Presbyterian 
church and served at one time as 
treasurer and as librarian of the 
Sunday-school. 



NEWMARKET BOYS JOIN 
R.CA.F., GO TO BRANDON 

AC2 Geale Hewson, son. of Mr. 
and Mrs. Fred Hewson, and AC2 
Donald Rose, son of Mr. and 
Mrs. Lyman Rose, who have 
joined the R.C.A.F., left on Tues ; 
day evening for the manning 
pool at Brandon, Man. 



NORTH TORONTO RINK 
TAKES AWAY TOP HONORS 

Thanksgiving day chickens at 
Newmarket bowling club were 
won by Wilson and rink, North 
Toronto, high for three wins, 
Mr. and Mrs. R. D. Brown and 
their guests, Mr. and Mrs. M. A. 
Donahue of Teeswater, high for 
two wins, Mrs. Robt. Smith, 
George Stark, Mrs. C. F. Willis 
and Jack Luck, high for one 
win. 



Driver Thought There Must Be Some Mistake 

When He learned That If Was The Parsonage 



It happened some time ago, 
but it is still tellable. 

A. m m. ^^ ■ 

Looking out the window, Rev. 
Arthur Greer, pastor of the 
Christian-Congregational church, 
saw a brewery truck stop in 
front of the parsonage, and the 
driver start up to the house with 
a parcel. , 

"Here conies the beer," he re- 
marked to his wife. * "The 
what?*' demanded Mrs. Greer. 

"Well, it looks like beer/' said 
Mr. Greer. And so it was. "Is 



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driver. 

-1 guess it is, sir," was the 

reply. "Isn't this 158 Main St. 

"Yes. It Is." 

"It's for you all right, then.' 
"This is the first beer we have 
ever had delivered to the par- 
sonage." 

4i The what?^* "The parson- 
age/* ^ .. '.:- 

."Isn't this 158 Main St.?" 
"Yes. but it is still the parson- 
age.'V : v •■'"; "-".--' .;■". 

, /.'Excuse me. It's my mistake." 



FAIL, BELIEVES 

WYCUFFE MAN 



that for me?" he asked the I And away went beer and driver. 






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SCOUTS HAKE $122 
ON "APPlf DAY 



K 



MAY MEAN YES BUT 
YOU STILL VOTE NO 



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The Boy Scout and Wolf Cub 

?'AppJe Day" on Saturday was a 

huge' success. So much so that 

the boys went over the top and 

| passed last year's mark. They 

:. -raised $152.67 in the tag and 

^Cleared $122.07 Last year they 

Cleared $115. 

The older Scouts were at the 
^factories as early as 0.30 a.m. 
RThe; Wolf Cubs had a Jjttle more 
/sand to rub out of their eyes 
than the Scouts, but they were 
;Oii the job bright and early, too, 
rand worked hard until 6 o'clock 
at: night. 

^'Thc two highest Scouts and 
th® two highest Cubs will receive 
prtees. The figures for the top 
ggers were as follows: Scouts, 
m Dales, $15.16; Don. Cock- 
dVh; $12.09; Clyde Adams. S&56: 
red Case, $$; Ned Skeed, $5.47; 
fla Laisch. $4.60; Cubs, I'e.lcr 
lie, $5.28; Dan. Bovair, $5,21; 
Snneth Hunter, 55.07; Billy 
$3.06; Brian Binns, $3.52; 
ft! Marwood, $3.17. 
^bl$i:is the third consecutive 
; ; that ' Scout Tom Dales has 
s ., r , highest honora. ;. ?'>. 

%A)i- the Scouts and Cub» 
orkccS hard to put the drive" 
the top. The Cubs tied 
■000 tags on their meeting night 
" gi*v the Scouts polished and 
gCJii.'d 20 bushels of apples. It's 
>jtot ...of work, but the boys de- 
light In doing it cheerfully.' ■•■'"* 
)$hQ 'leaders deserve great 
f edit for they were on the job 
1- day as casiiicrsi . Tliey. are 
Mill- Revill, Clark Hill, Jack 
iRcvill, Scoutmaster Victor Hig- 
gihson, Bill Denne, Scoiii Mike 
IcCaffrcy and Cubmaster Jack 
^Hamilton, the chairman. 

The Scouts and Cuba . were 
■^grateful to the people of thV 
town for their splendid support. 



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To make sure that everyone 
understands the meaning of the 
question on the ballot concerning 
beer and wine will be one of the 
most important jobs of the New- 
market Citizens'/ League, stated 
Dr. S. J. Boyd, the president, at 
a meeting in the Friends church 
on Tuesday evening. 

"The question is so worded 
that moderate drinkers who are 
opposed to the establishment of 
beverage rooms might easily not 
vote as they intended to do/' 
said Dr. Boyd. "The question on 
the ballot is: 'Are you in favor 
of the sale of beer and wine 
under the provisions of the 
Liquor Control Act?' 

"The man who uses beer is 'in 
fayor of the sale of beer and 
wine under the provisions of the 
Liquor Control Act* but he must 
vote 'No* if he is opposed to 
beer rooms.; The question on the 
ballot; ybu will observe, makes 
no mention of beverage rooms. 
It is so worded as to favor those 
who sell beer, and to mislead 
people who do not think care- 
f fitly before voting." - 

From 100. to 200 names have 
probably been left off the voters' 
list, and will be put on at the 
court of revision, Fred C ha ntler 
told the meeting. Mr. Chantlcr 
said- that people should be urged 
to check the* voters* list them- 
selves .for : their own names. 
Copies; were to; be seen in the 
post office, the schools, and the 
(own clerk's office. .: 
'■-" W; H. Eves, treasurer, reported 
that about $60 had been deposit- 
ed; to the credit of the organ* 
ization, and. that other contribu- 
tions Would be welcomed; Sec- 
retary Wesley Brook* was cotn- 
pHmented by Dr. Boyd on the 
skill and care with which he 
was keeping the organization's 

: records. 

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MRS. WM. CARLEY DIES, 
LIVED HERE 20 YEARS 



A resident of Newmarket for 
the last 20 years, Jennie Kaiser 
Carlcy, wife of William B. Carley, 
died at St. Michael's hospital, 
Toronto, on Saturday after an 
Illness of ten weeks. She was in 
her 55th year. 

Jennie Kaiser was born In Maple, 
Vaughan township, and was the 
daughter of Hannah Boddy Kaiser 
and Joshua Kaiser of Maple. She 
lived in Maple until about 38 years 
ago, when she married William B. 
Carley of King City. 

They lived In King City for 
some years, where Mr. Carley 

helped In his father's store. Later 
they moved to Toronto, to West 
Lome, to Aurora, and 20 years ago 
to Newmarket, where they had 
lived since. 

Mrs. Carley 's great interest was 
in her home and family, fjbe Is 
survived by her husband; two sons, 
Trooper Dudley Carley, with the 
Canadian forces in England, and 
Frank Carley, Newmarket; one 
daughter, Mrs. John Furness 
(May), Toronto, and two grand- 
children. 

Funeral services were conducted 
on Monday afternoon at the funeral 
chapel of Roadhousc and Rose by 
Rev. Dr. A. E. Runnclls and ct 
King cemetery by Rev. J. Galloway. 
Pallbearers were: Trips.. Falrey. 
Newmarket, John Furness and 
Herbert McFeilly, Toronto, Gordon 
Wiley, Hamilton, Hiram Ash, Tor- 
onto, and James Kaiser. 

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I NEWMARKET SOLDIER 

ASSISTS AT WEDDING 




True Life Of Spirit Cant 

Be Destroyed, Speaker 

Tells Lions 

■i'S-L'IONS^GUEST 



Ul 



Makes Short Visit To 
Newmarket To Visit 

rii E. ©ILROY 

Gordon Gray, of London, Eng- 
land, was the guest of Mr. and 
Mrs. H. E.-Gilroy for a few days 
this week. Mr. Gilroy became 
acquainted with Mr. Gray when 
overseas during the last war. 
Mr. Gray has been in the United 

States on British government 
work and will fly back to Brit- 
ain next week. : :. 

Mr. Gray's work has to do with 
the planes which the United 
States is shipping to Britain, and 
which Britain is using to wrest 
superiority in European skies 
from the Nazis. 



WAS PIONEER RESIDENT 
OF JACKSON'S POINT 



Capt/ Norman Macleod of 
Newmarket. assisted at ah Eng- 
lish wedding recently, when he 
gave the bride^ Miss Phyllis 
Ped!ey,.in marriage to Pte. Her- 
man Brown, son of Mr. and Mrs. 
Ross Brown oi Toronto. The 
ceremony took place at the Ang- 
lican church at Sutton, Surrey, 
England. 



PICKS GKEEN BEANS 

Maybe we are going to have 
green vegetables all year round 
this year. Mrs. Ben Phillips, 11 
Tecuniseh St.. says that she 
picked green beans from her gar- 
den just last Saturday, Oct. II. 



A pioneer resident of Jack- 
son's Point district, .Duncan 
Munro King died at his home 
there lost Thursday. Mr, King 
was born at Napanee, but had 
resided at Jackson's Point for 35 
years. He was in his 90th year. 
■ : For some years Mr. King 
farmed at Belhaven, and at one | 
time was proprietor of the 
Trolley Rest and the Simkineoe 
hotel at Jackson's Point, but re- 
tired from business about ten 
years ago. A staunch Liberal, 

he took an active part in pro- 
vincial and federal political cam- 
paigns. He was a member of 
Keswick United church. 

Mr. and Mrs. King celebrated 
their 65th wedding anniversary 
last year. 

Surviving besides his wife are 
two sons. John and Angus. The 
funeral service was held on 
Saturday afternoon at Keswick 
United church. 

Interment was in Queensville 
comet cry. 



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Reserve Units Plan 

Gala Sports Night TKA ANI> SAIK cancelled i- 



JOE GLAOMAN SENT TO 
QUEBEC WIRELESS SCHOOL 

. Telegraph^ Joseph" Gladman, 
ton of Mr. and Mrs. H. M. Glad- 
man. Newmarket, who has been 
on Alive service on the eastern 
Atllntte, has been sent to St. 
Hyocinthv, P.Q.; to take a five 
weeks training course. ,. 



WOMEX ARE WARNED 

AGAINST RACKETEERS 

A. R. Haskell, manager of the 
Better Business Bureau, this 
week issued a warning against 
racketeers who are profiteering 
by the war in going about solicit- 
ing from wives and mothers 
framed picture enlargements oi 
men in the army services. 

Over S735 was recovered by 
the bureau last month for 
mothers and wives who had 
been imposed upon in this way. 



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The five reserve units at Fort 
York Armories are uniting to 
hold a monster Fort York sports 
night on Saturday evening. 
;■" It is the first time the units 
have combined in a joint enter- 
r... prise since the outbreak of the 
•'"war. Each unit is entering 
picked platoons to be judged for! 
precision drill and general 
K&nartncss. Lieut. J. Woodhridge 
j is in charge of the platoon from 



The tea and sale of hoihp 
cooking, arranged by the. Cher- 
okee elub for Saturday, Oct: 13, 
at Jack's Grill, Main St.; has 
been cancelled. 



HERBERT HAIGHT DIES 
OF STROKE, WAS (8 



PUPILS HEIP TO KEEP GROUNDS NICE AT 

MODERN, AtTR ACTIVE, TWO-ROOM SCHOOL 



A resident of Newmarket for 

the last two years, Herbert 

petite Queen's York Rangers. I Hoight suffered a stroke on 

Brigadier General C. F\ Constan- * Tuesday night and died this 

He was in his 69th 



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"tine, the district officer com- 

rgj^smding, will inspect these pla- 
itltoom; Then sections from each 

unit will enter an obstacle race, 
in .which steel helmets, full pack, 

respirators and fixed bayonets 
JwiH be featured as the men 
£ r; 'Sattlc their way through barri- 
cades, doing anti-aircraft and 

anti-gas movements at the same 

time. 

I/The Royal Canadian Engineers 

and the Canadian Women's Ser* 

ylce Force will each give a spe- 
r clal "display. Boxing bouts to 
'■:- decide the garrison championship 

:wili be held, with Bob Benville, 

well-known York county athlete, [ Newmarket, 

being one of those entered. A at home. 

dance and refreshments will 

bring the evening to a close. 

.1 Prizes have been donated by 

the five officers in command, 

Col. D. H. C. Mason of the Royal 

Regiment, Lieut-Col. John Hyde 

Bennett of the Queen's Yorks, 

Lieut Col. T. F. Howlett of the 

Royal Canadian Engineers, 

lieut-CoL W. B. Hambly of the 
£>.;. Toronto Scottish regiment, and 



morning, 
year. 

Mr. Haight had lived in 
Aurora most of his life until 
coming to Newmarket: Born 
in Whitchurch township of 
Quaker stock, he was the son 
of Mary Jane Ellis and John 
Durland Haight. He married 
Elizabeth Sandford of Shelburne. 

He was a member of the 
I.G.Q.F, 

Besides Mrs. Haight, four 
daughters survive: Mrs. J. E. 
Johnson <Reta), Toronto, Mrs. 
John Smith (Mary), Newmarket, 
Mrs. Kenneth Tanslcy (Myrtle), 

and Betty Haight, 

Mr. Haight had been in ill 
health for some years. 

Rev. Arthur Greer will con- 
duct a funeral service on Satur- 
day afternoon at the residence, 
7 Ontario St. E. Interment will 
be in Aurora cemetery. 



Lieut-Col. N. C. Pearce of 
Irish regiment. 



the 



In the village of Holland land- 
ing, situated on the banks of the 
Holland River, is to be .found 
one of the finest rural schools in 
southern Ontario. 

It is a two- roomed brick build- 
ing set In the midst of the vill- 
age, just far enough from the 
BarrierToronto highway to make 
studying ideal. [ : ;\ _•'. \ 

: This school is kept up to. full 
efficiency by 'a most capable 
board of trustees, consisting ot 
G. B. Thompson; chairman; S. C, 
Sheppard, R. Watson and R. U. 
Tate, secretary-treasurer. ; Clar- 
ence Fawcett, who is the care- 
taker, does his work well and 
lakes a keen interest ; in the 
school. 

•;1- -Attractive flower-beds, walks 
and lawns to an outsider appear 
to be a big job to care for but 

with careful planning on the part 
of teacher, board and pupils, it 
can be done. Much of this work 
is carried on in school hours in 
conjunction with the subject of 
agriculture, sub-topic of which 
is landscape gardening. 

Wm. Blackshaw, the principal, 
states that the children, as well 
as he himself, give up part of 
recess periods toward the beau* 
tifying of the grounds. 

Inside are to be seen modern 
classrooms which are redecor- 
ated from time to time. The 
school is equipped with Hydro, 



which furnishes lights and 
power for hot plates. In the cold 
winter, months the pupils are 
given hot cocoa or tea with their 
lunches. There is a well-filled 
library of good books. The 
school has two furnaces plus in- 
side lavatories of modern design 
suitable for schools. " . 

This present school was built 
in .1012 upon the site of the old 
school which was burnt that 
year. The senior room was con- 
structed first, the junior added 
later.;" ■ "■■•" : 

So tar as. can be ascertained 
the following names are those 
of the teachers who have 
taught, as far back as 1907 and 
up to 1941: L. Gilbert, C. Fraser, 
M< Parsons, G. H. Kirby, J. 
K. Cranky,- K. M. Colilngs, W. 
Hembest, E. Edwards, E. Legge, 
P, MacKenzie. S, E. Young, D, 
A. Webster, A. A. Lewis, J. P. 
Scott. J. E, Brown, W. Black- 
shaw, M. A. Kendrick. 

Over the same period the sec- 
tion was fortunate in having 
these people as caretakers: 
Misses Gray, Miss Mae McCar* 
nan, Mrs. Robert McCarhan and 
Clarence Fawcett. 

The present staff, as men- 
tioned above, consists of Miss 
Marjorie Kendrick of Huntsville. 
in charge of the junior room, Jtnd 
William Blackshaw of Owen 

Sound, principal, in charge of 
the senior room. 



MEET AGAIN ON 28TH 

The next meeting of the New- 
market Citizens' League to 
oppose the establishment of bev- 
erage rooms in Newmarket will 
take place on Tuesday, Oct 28, 
at the Friends church. • 



: WHITCHURCH TOWNSHIP .] 

SNOW SHOVELLING AS 

USUAL, REEVE THINKS 

T I J 1 * " " 

" * t " 

Bruce W. Hunter informed 
Whitchurch township council in 
session on Saturday concerning 
an alleged bad condition on the 
roadway adjacent to Newmarket. 
This piece of road, said Mr. 
Hunter, "is about 25D feet long 
and badly in need of repair. It 
was built at no cost to the 
township, and we feel the least 
trie council can do is to supply 
a few loads of gravel." 

Saturday's session of council 
was extremely quiet Reeve Earl 
Toole presided, arid inquired 
about total expenditures on 
roads so far this year. He was 
told that there had been $18,000 
expended, leaving about $2,000 
appropriated for this work. 

"Wo will have to go very 
carefully and make only repairs 
that are absolutely necessary, 
otherwise we will overrun the 
budget." said Mr. Toole. 

H.. H. Mitchell, Musselman's 
Lake, strongly protested at the 
September meeting about the 
alleged action of a poundkeeper 
in freeing cattle to their owner 
without collecting the bill for 
damages owing Mr. Mitchell. 
The solicitor's opinion was given 
on the matter on Saturday to the 
effect that Mr. Mitchell should 
sue the owner of the stock for 
damages. 

The iolicilor also advised the 
council on the question of build- 
ing a hard-top road around 
Mussehnon's Lake. He stated 
that the road could only be built 
and charged to the ratepayers 
around the lake under by-law, 
but that no subsidy could be 
collected if constructed in tills 
manner. The information will 
be passed on to the Ratepayers' 
Association, who sought advice 
from the council on the matter. 

On motion "of Deputy-Reeve 

George Leary and Councillor 
Eugene Baker, a resolution was 
introduced and carried asking 
the game wardens in the town- 
ship to form themselves into an 
association for the regulating and 
handling of the game regula- 
tions, particularly as it relates to 
pheasant hunting. The wardens 
consist of all road foremen and 
their helpers. 

Before adjournment Reeve 
Toole put at rest many fears 
that there would be no snow 
shovelling done this winter.: 

* f It was news to me to hear 
that the council contemplated 
such a step and it has never- 
even been considered," said the 
reeve. The yarn probably arose 
from the discussions on gasoline 
curtailment;-. 

Mutton-eating dogs did con- 
siderable damage in September 
among the sheep fold '..of north 
Whitchurch. Dr. C. J. Deyins 
was awarded $45 for four killed, 
Edward Breen $16 for one killed 
and two injured, and John 
Crawford $75 for six killed. 
Sheep Valuator J. A. Clark val- 
ued the dead animals. 

Relief for September totalled 
only $57.13. and hospitalization 
$52.12. : 

Grants were made to Whit- 
church veterans for $10 for a 
wreath at the cenotaph and $25 
to the North York Plowmen. 

Councillor Herbert Wells was 
absent from the meeting, and 
Councillor E. Logan asked to be 
excused at 2 o'clock to attend to 
other pressing business, to wit a 
wedding. 



BREAKS ARM 

Bruce Burch, con of Mr. and 
Mrs. Leonard Burch, Andrew St, 
broke his arm on Monday when 
he was thrown from his bicycle 
when he ran over a dog. 



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Hitler is only doing in a more 
thorough and complete way 
what most of us have been doing 
in, the past," declared Prof. B. 
Wi Horan of Wycliffe College, 
University of Toronto, hi an 
address before the Lions club at 
the King George hotel on Mon- 
day evening. 

Prof. Horan said that Hitler 
was trying to destroy the better 
life but that he would not suc- 
ceed because this "life that we 
feel" lies within men, implanted 
there by God- 
President W. M. Cockburn was 
in the chair.' Rev. A. J. Forte, 
Roche's Point, Rev. A. J. Pat- 
stone, Rev. J. A. Koffend; Rev. 
Burton Hill and Rev. Arthur 
Greer were guests of the club. 
Other clergymen were unable to 
be present for the Thanksgiving 
meeting. 

"The Two Lives," was Prof. 
Horan's subject." 

"Some years ago I visited 
Palestine." said Prof. Horan. "I 
found that the holy land was far 
from holy. The holy land is 
disappointing. Why do we call 

this land holy? 

"It is because there once lived 
in that land the choicest human 
spirit, one who was good, up- 
right and pure to an extent that 
was unknown to man. The spirit 
of Jesus has largely fled from 
that land. It has found a rest- 
ing-place in the hearts of men 
in all countries. 

"We are confronted with- two 
lives: the.life that we see and 
the life that we feel. 

"The life we see is a harsh 
life, a selfish life, an acquisitive 
life. It is dominated by the com- 
petitive spirit. 

"I suppose that there is some 
excuse for it It is a world gov- 
erned by the law of high finance. 
Few of us understand high fin- 
ance but we know that we must 
abide by its decrees. And then 
there is the economic law. Few 
of us understand it, but we must 
abide by it And then there is 
the peculiar law of high diplo- 

mac3'. 
"The visible world which we 

see is a prison house, and we are 
abject slaves. The fittest sur- 
vives only to be a slave. 

"Then there is the life we fee*. 
We all feel that we want to be 
friendly. We all admire the 
generous spirit. We take off our 
hats to the man who gives his 
time and his life to his neigh- 
bors. 

"If you want to find a strong 
sense of fellowship you will find 
it when the clouds are dark. 

"We say that the life we sec is 
the real life, but the real life, 
the life we are meant to live, is 
the life we feel. 

"There is a determined attempt 
today to destroy the life we feel. 
'Hie attempt is being made in 
every country, but it is being 
made with exhaustive energy in 

Germany. 

"Hitler is only doing in a more 
thorough and complete way what 
most of us have ber-n doing in 
the past 

"I'm sure he won't succeed. 
He may succeed for a short 
time, but the life we feel will 
never be destroyed, because it is 
deep within us. It comes to us 
from God himself, and it is my 
belief that it will never perish 
from il\Q earth. 

"The life we feel, the Christian 
life, the spiritual life, the life 
•ao know in our heart of hearts 
to be the true life, may be 
eclipsed but it will never be 
destroyed. It will revive." 

WORKED IN TANNERY 
27 YEARS, HEART FAILS 



An employee of tho Davis Leather 

Co. for tho past 27 years, Harry R. 
Smith died on Saturday In hU 47th 
yeir. 

Rev. Dr. A. K. Runnells conduct- 
ed the funeral service at Roadhouse 
and Rose funeral chapel on Mon- 
day. Interment was In Newmarket 
cemetery. 

Mr. Smith suffered a Mart attack 
and died within a few minutes. 
A brother. Thomas, l« on the staff 
of the Newmarket military camp. 

lie was boarding at the home of 
Arthur Pcgjf. 12 Ontario St. E., at 
the time of his death. His wife 
and famtly are living in St. Marys. 
His wife was the former Gertrude 
Gould. He also leaves two sons 
and a' daughter. Earl, George and 
Audrey. 

Besides the brother at the mili- 
tary camp there also survive a 
brother, Ira, Aurora, a sister, Mrs. 
Wm. Atkinson, Aurora, and a 
brother, Robert, Barnla. 



Asked To Lend To 
Canada For Britain 

Town Asked To Double War Savings Purchases, 
Records Show Town Slipping U tile From Pledge 

— — — ._-. — m 

Newmarket starts out next week in an effort to lend the gov- 
ernment enough money monthly, through war savings certificates, 
to buy two universal carriers. 

That means doubling Newmarket's war savings certificates 
purchases. Newmarket pledged $7,000 a month at the time of the 
spring campaign. This gradually dwindled until at the present 
time monthly purchases are only $5,000. 

Joint chairmen of Newmarket's war savings committee, P. J- 
Tod and W. I#. Bosworth ask all citizens to co-operate in increasing 
their pledges and their savings to ensure and speed victory. Mr. 
Tod and Mr. Bosworth attended a meeting in Toronto yesterday to 
hear Hon. J. L. Ilsley, minister of finance. .. 

"The Canadian government has told the British government 
to go ahead and order all the goods it can get in Canada for war-" 
time purposes, and that somehow wc -will settle the balances of 
accounts later," Mr, Ilsley said in a recent address. "It has been 
and will continue to be the policy of the government to sec that 
the United Kingdom purchases in this country are not hampered 
by any lack of Canadian funds:- - 

"This current fiscal year I expect we shall have to provide 
Brilain with $900,000,000 to meet her deficit of Canadian dollars. 
Perhaps it will be more than that Whatever it amounts to I am 
confident that the Canadian people want us to continue to see that 
Britain is somehow supplied with all that we can provide her both 
physically and financially in these hours of trial. 

''Of course, as I have pointed out on numerous occasions, we 
must obtain these dollars that we provide to Britain from our taxes 
or borrowings just as wc obtain the funds for our own expend!- 



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EAST GW1LLIMRURY 
PLANS TO DO ITS BIT 



East Gwillimbury township 
citizens are determined to get 
into their stride in the coming 
war savings drive. The township 
hasnU made much of a showing 
so far, due to lack of organiza- 
tion, it is said, and a group of 
citizens headed by Garry Thomp- 
son of Holland Landing arc con- 
vening a meeting in Sharon hall 
next Wednesday, Oct 22, at 7.30 

p.tn. t S.T., to form a township 
war savings committee. 

The plan is to be ready for the 
drive which, begins on Oct 20. 
P. J. Tod and W. L. Bosworth, 
both of Newmarket, joint chair- 
men for the district, will be. pres- 
ent to address the meeting and 
to help with organization. 



DONATIONS WELCOMED 
BY VETERANS' FUND 






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The soldiers* comforts fund; 
sponsored by the Newmarket 
Veterans* Association, received a 
$5 donation from Arleigh Arm- 
strong this week. The fund is 
for the purpose of sending par- 
cels to Newmarket boys over- 
seas. 

Donations to the fund may be 
made to any member of the 
Newmarket Veterans' Associa- 
tion. 



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FRANK BOYD ENJOYS ARMY 
LIFE, STUDIES WIRELESS 

Signalman F. II. IL Boyd, son 
of Dr. and Mrs. S, J. Boyd and 
formerly "of The Era, writes 
from Kingston: "We have a very 
fine camp down here, and our 
barracks arc said to be • the fin- 
est In Canada. . The food is quite 
good and there is really very 
little to kick about here. . . 

"At the present time I am 
taking a course in wireless oper- 
ating, line telegraphy, etc., and 
when finished I hope to be a 
first-class operator.** 



ESCAPE SERIOUS INJURY: 

WHEN TRUCKS COLLIDE 

When their trucks collided 
almost head-on at Oak Ridges last 
week, William Miller, Toronto, 
and John Grainger, Newmarket 
escaped serious injury, suffering 
only minor cuts. Police said 
Miller's truck was proceeding 
north when it skidded. Grain- 
ger's truck was loaded with 
cattle. Both vehicles were ex- 
tensively damaged. Traffic Offi- 
cer Alex. Ferguson of Aurora in- 
vestigated. 



You Have The Fun, War 
Victims Get Money 



Another of those nights of real 
s]h;m for roal lovers of the fistic 
art Is being offered next week by 
Newmarket Veterans' Association. 

The beneficiary will he the Tor- 
onto Telegram British War Vic- 
tims* Fund. It will bo a, kooiI night 
for a good cause. 

There will be about eight bouts, 
between fighters of various weight 

classes, representing Newmarket 

camp and Camp Borden. Probably 

they will bo all new men to the 

local farH, but not new xnen to the 

ffghtinK game. 

Next Wednesday's show In the 

nrenn Is likely to be the last of 

the present season. Vice-President 

Bill White is promoting the event 

with the support of President Alf. 

Smith ami Secretary Jack Duf- 

f it-Id. Andrew J. Davis is patron. 

Ten prizes are belnK given away 
with the admission tickets. 



OOES TO SUDBURY 



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W, G. Muldoon is the new 
teller at the Bank of Toronto. 
Mr. Muldoon was relieving at 
St. Catharines before coming 
here. Glen Wentworth was 
moved to Sudbury. 



Baptized In Church 
Great-Grandsire Built 

. 

Communion and baptismal ser- 
vice at Mount Pleasant Presby- 
terian church last Sunday was 
conducted by Rev. Dr. Car- 
michael of Toronto. The infant 
son of Mr. and Mrs. Max Stiles. 
Donald Maxwell, was the only 
child presented for baptism. 

This service recalls the fact 
that 36 years ago this baby's 
great-grandfather, Joseph D. 
Davidson, was largely instru- 
mental in building this church. 
While, both grandfathers were 
assisting. The child's parents 
were also baptized in this 
church. 

The grandparents. Mr. and 
Mrs. Robert Stiles, Mount Pleas- 
ant, and Mr. and Mrs. Donald 
Davidson, Newmarket, were 
guests at the home of Mr. and 
Mrs. Max Stiles for the day. 

CLOTHING SENT OVERSEAS 
IS MUCH APPRECIATED 

The following letter was re- 
ceived by Mre. C. Barber of 
Newmarket, who recently sent 
some clothing to England. 

50 Bugsley Lane, 

Fulham, London, Eng. 

Sept. 16, 1941. 
Dear Mrs. Barber: 

Just a line to thank you, also 
Mrs. Albert Lee, Mrs. Robt. 
Sheldon and Mrs. George Smith 
for your kindness in sending 
dresses to England, which we 
greatly appreciate. We are ex- 
tremely grateful to you all. 

Yours sincerely, 
Mrs. D. King. 






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Coming Events 



Saturday, Oct 18~*Tag day. 

Funds to be used to furnish the 
Citlxen-Soldier Club. This club 
will occupy the I.O.O.F. hall on 
Mil bird Ave. Possession Nov. 22, 

c2w38 

Wednemlay, Oct 22— Newmarket 
arena. $ p.m., e'Kht bouts, between 
boxers from Camp Borden and 
No. 23 B.T.C. Draw for ten 
prizes. Newmarket Citizens/ band 
In attendance. Auspices Newmar- 
ket Veterans. c2w38 

Friday* Oct &t— Banquet at Knox 
United church, Sutton, at 7.30 pjn., 
D.S.T. Speaker: Judge Hawley 
Mott, Toronto Juvenile Court Ad- 
mission 50 cents. c3w37 

Tueaday* Oct. tt— Wabaeao dem- 
onstration and fashion show fat Bt. 
Paul's parish hall. Utt 

Friday, Oct 31— Red Crosa Hal- 
lowe'en dance In the high school 
auditorium. Art Weet'a oreheatra. 
Admission fl.G0 a couple* (f97 

Friday, Nov. 14. — Newmarket 

high echool graduation exe tri ata 
and commencement program at 6 
pjn. Further detail* will be 
announced later. 



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THE NEWMARKET IRA, 



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FOUNDED 1852 



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ONTARIO'S FIRST PAIQ.1N-ADVANC6 
WEEKLY and MEMBER OF CANA- 
DIAN WEEKLY NEWSPAPERS 
ASSOCIATION. 

Membks or Audit Bureau or 
Circulations 



MKItHIO tYHV fHUISOAT. TWO OOtUM ftt «A* 

IN AOVAHC*, THRU OOUAKS FOR TWO 

VCAI1. SINfill COfllS fSVi CENTS EACH. 

ANDREW OLDING HE6B 
RUTH DIN©MAN HEBB 

FfMOIS AND PftOMIifOM 
HI MAIN ST., NEWMARKET 



and common sense rather than upon the product 
which they have misused." 



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THURSDAY, OCTOBER I6TII, 1941 



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NON-INTEREST BEARING 
PATRIOTISM 



PARTY POLITICS IN B.C. 

Out in British Columbia a provincial election is 
in progress. The balloting lakes place next 
Tuesday* The betting is with the government 
(Liberal), which won 31 seats in the last election. 
The potential opposition comes from Conserva- 
tives, who won eight seats the last time, and the 
C.C.F., who won seven seats. It is interesting to 
see the ability of men to fit their, minds into a 
particular pattern determined not by themselves 
but by the party as a whole or the party lender. 
We suppose that it has to be done, as long as 
there arc spoils to divide, but it would be prom- 
ising if members of the legislature could sit 
without any party labels, just as members of our 
town council do, and be free to do what they 
think best just as members of our town council 

are- 
It is our considered opinion that municipal 
government, with its freedom from partisan 
politics, is belter government than provincial 
government or federal government, and we say 
that with cognizance of the strengths and failings 
of municipal government. 



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Not long ago we called attention to the domin- HAD PRINCIPLES 

Ion government non-interest bearing loans. The 
Bank of Canada's report of these loans for 
September is now on our desk, and we are inter- 



Executors of Sir Herbert Holt's will have 
issued a statement to the effect that estimates of 






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estcd to note what escaped our attention before, his wealth have been grossly exaggerated and 

that there are two series of certificates issued denying that he transferred any property to 

for these loans, "A," earmarked for prosecution Nassau, the Bahamas, to avoid Canadian taxation, 

of the war, totalling $56,578 during September, The executors say; "Others may have transferred 

and "B." earmarked for relief of suffering caused property and assets out of Canada to escape 

by war, totalling $1,083 during September. An- taxation here, but Sir Herbert refused even to 

other interesting point is that no commission is consider the advisability of following their 

paid on these subscriptions, which are handled examples. He took the position that such wealth 

by banks and post offices. as he had accumulated had been accumulated in 

Among interesting subscriptions during Sept- Canada and would remain within the jurisdiction 

ember were "A 'Colored Accountant," $200, bring- of the laws of this country-" 

Ing his total to $2,600, a $2 loan apparently in Yes, others have transferred Canadian-accum- 

trust for a child, bringing another subscriber's ulated wealth out of Canada to avoid Candian 

total to $6, the Petrolia Lions club, $500, bring- taxation, some of it gold dug out of the Canadian 



ing its total to $1,500, and Lake Saskatoon com- 
munity club, Wembly, Sask., $40. 



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earth. Tnere is nothing we can do about it, of 
course, but we are all told on good authority that 
there is little real happiness for those who put 
the accumulation or preservation of wealth before 

FARMERS ARE FIGHTERS everything else in their lives. While we do not 

believe that any one citizen should wield the 
"Government shows bad taste in sending out tremendous power that ffir Herbert Holt had, We 
this cartoon," says the Bowmanviile Canadian 
Statesman of a picture of a soldier leaning over 
a farm fence talking to a youth with a pitchfork. 
"We've got to fight Xo save our homes. That's 
why I've enlisted." So says the soldier to the 
farmer. 

"Here is a pastoral scene which has just come 
to the Statesman office from a government pub- 
licity department at Ottawa," says the States- 
man. "This drawing depicts a soldier on leave 
or on u recruiting mission trying to entice a 
fanner's son or hired man away from his 
important job as a food producer. No more elo- 
quent testimony of government policy concerning 
agriculture could be presented than this official 



can see that he probably led a happy life. If he 
had one principle which prevented him from 
exporting his capital to avoid taxation, he prob- 
ably had others. And in principles, not in riches, 
lies happiness. 



WHAT OTHERS THINK 

THANKFUL 

(Amherstburg Echo) 
Canadians will not have to search their minds 
, . . very much this year to find something to be 

picture. A study of .t is particularly recommend- thankful for on our annual Thanksgiving Day. 
ed for members of the Canadian Federation of Oct. 13. From the most humble person in the 
Agriculture as ground for protest to the govern- , aiul lo lhc highcst and mightiesl we can a „ bo 
ment on general farm policy. thankful we are Canadians, citizens of a free 

"Many an aging farmer and his weary wife country, part of a great Commonwealth of 
will naturally ask: 'Why is the government so Nations that is now a bulwark against world en- 
persistent in making a direct appeal to farmers' slavement. Wc can be thankful for our empire 
.sons and their hired help, as is shown U% this leaders and for our brave young men who are 
-cartoon, when thousands of able-bodied young risking their lives that their homeland might be 
.men in towns and cities are deliberately evading free from ruthless aggressors. We can be thank- 
[military service by working in factories, shops ful for the bountiful crops of this year and for 
and other places, many of which arc non-essential the fact that we can till the soil and reap the 
to war activities?' " ; harvest in peace; content in the knowledge that 

*" Such propaganda aimed at the farms, which no invading hordes will wreck our green fields 
: must soon be regarded as part of the front-Iirie, •' W lay waste our homes and properties. We can 
"| is unfair and unwise, as the Statesman says. We be thankful for the sea dogs of the empire that 
.- agree with the Statesman, even though we don't P'-'owl the seas and for the eagle eyes of the air- 
agree with the Statesman's implied conclusion mc « who patrol the skies protecting as from 

murderous gangsters of rraxiism and fascism. We 



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that there should be. conscription of men for the 
fighting services. 



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A WORD ABOUT WINE 

A letter directed to us by the Wine Producers 
Association encloses a little pamphlet containing 
"some facts about wine.'*. There are two main 
classes of wine. First mentioned are light, dry 
wines. "The word 'light' means that it is low 
in alcohol and 'dry* refers to the presence of 
little or no sugar. The lack of sweetness and 
the low content of alcohol permits one to con- 
sume it regularly at meals in quantity similar to 

J that of tea or coffee, which it replaces. There 

are millions of people in the world to whom 

: wlne such as this -fills a place in their lives 

} almost as important as their daily bread." 

p "/ Sweet wines "contain more sugar and alcohol 
than the light, dry wines. In view of this they 

^ PhouM be consumed in smaller amount. A fine 
quality port or sweet sherry, whose flavor and 
-bouquet bring only pleasure if; Used in niudera-. 

;;' ' tloiii will on the other hand cause intoxication 
and nausea if consumed in an excessive amount/' 



can he grateful that we arc allowed to worship 
as wc wish and to be able to bow the knee to the 
Almighty in humble thanksgiving. 



The following wc quote as a point of view. It difficulty in 
Vis interesting in view of the approaching bever- j ounicy to Canada 
■ : age room vote in Newmarket, for what Is said of ,our,lty w ^ mmn - 



COL DREW'S 
SUGGESTION 

(Orllli;* Packet and Times) 
CoJ. Drew has apparently made something of 
a hit in England by his suggestion made in a 
H B.C. broadcast, that British panzer troops 
should be .sent to Canada to get their training 
for the invasion of the continent which military 
men believe must come before the Nazis are fin- 
ally overthrown. The reasons are similar to 
those that inspired the Commonwealth air train- 
ing plan— wide spaces for training, undisturbed 
by attacks from the air. Of course, there Is the 
need for transporting large numbers of men back 
and forth across the Atlantic. But this would be 
offset to a large extent, if not entirely, by the 
saving of transport for food and other requisites 
which have to be imported into Britain. Aside 
from the need for strong naval forces for convoy- 
ing the transports, there would probably be little 

finding ships for the westward 



•^ wine may also be.satd of beer. Those who vote Sklitch> lhc l,,,,^,, s , ar an<| oU [ Uj 
>•, against beverage rooms are not necessarily vol- spoken favorably of the scheme e, 
;■.,... Ing against beer but rather against having it u Js m5<| to bc rcwJvin|{ oKWa , 



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Lord Beaverbrook's l/mtlon tixprcs.s, the Daily 

other papers have 
editorially, ami 
.. . . - — - — — — ...living official consideration, 

KSiffC P ? 'm* ? l ^m<**to*- way. The advantages of the plan are manifest. U» 
Many of those who w 11 vote against the bever- difficulties will be best appreciated by those who 
age room no doubt make moderate use of beer in have Xi > overcome them. One factor that would 
the r own homes ton do not wish to be contin- have sloml in » he wuy in lhe |)ast _the need for 

♦? .5^. ?'» f Wi >OU ' t ? 1 fr,cnds w *° bringing over equipment as well as men-no 
™ •£? ♦ nu C !u l0n \ WOl ! W cont,nual, y longer exists, now that the United States is 

urge them to go, with them to a beverage room. Iuri „ ng out tanks and other materials in large 

Here is the point of view of the Ontario wine quantities. It would be just as easy lo deliver 
makers: "Every purchaser of a bottle of wine these to British troops in Canada, and afterwards 
should bear in mind that the fermented juice of send them overseas, as to send them over to 
the grape is the most ancient of the alcoholic Britain for training purposes. The decision must 
beverages enjoyed by man. Down through the rest with the war office, which knows the con- 
ages, countless millions of people, from prince to ditlons much belter than any outsider. But if it 
peasant, have enjoyed and benefitted from the should bc found that Canada can aid the hard 
regular and proper use of it. Furthermore, those pressed mother country in this as En other mot- 
^. . .who suffer as a result of over-indulgence in wine tors, the people of this country will consider it a 
V... as well as in any other food should lay the blame privilege and an honor lo have the British 
V- v.*? r tncir coition- upon' the lack of moderation armored units get their training here. 



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greatly restricted instalment buy- 
ing and borrowing. Changes, which 
affect retail sates to consumers, 
were effective from Tuesday of 
this week. The measures are 
designed to combat inflation. 



A report from Ankara last week 
dominion government has | stated that between 300.000 and 



310,000 Sorbs rind pro-Yugoslav 
Croats hod been killed by the 
Croatian revolutionary U s t a a h I, 
German SS units, the gosiapo and 
Italians. 



It was Indicated In Ottawa on 
Saturday that the dominion govern- 
ment would take steps to freeze 




TWO LADIES INTERVIEW A YOUNG TRAVELLER 

BY RUTH D1NGMAN IIFJttl 



"A 
Mrs. 



little raw today, Isn't it?" 
Woody Woodpecker e«l« - 
merited to Mrs. Nutty Nuthatch* 
as they "went over" a big ever- 
green tree. 

"Yes. it's chilly, but the tiee> 
are certainly lovely." replied 
her friend. "Nutty and I took 
a Wt of a hike over into Kim: 
township yesterday and realty. 

it's unspeakably beautiful. It 

almost look my breath away." 
"Did you see anyone inlcresl- 

iMg?*' inquired Mrs. Woody. 

"One is apt to bump hilo queer 

birds these days." 
"We ran into a big flock of 

Bluebirds/' Mrs. Nutty said. 

"And they were calling, too. 

We had quite a nice chat with 

so.uc of them/* 

"You wouldn't suspect that 
there were so many Bluebirds in 
the country until you see them 
flocking in the autumn, would 
you?" the Woodpecker said, as 
she paused from her vigorous 
pecking at the tree bark. "In 
the spring and summer we only 
se^ the occasional lovely flash of 
blue, or hear that sweet warble 
of theirs across some field." 

"One of the Bluebirds told us 
of a sad thing that had hap- 
pened yesterday morning," the 
Nuthatch told her friend. 

"What was it?" asked Mrs. 
Woody. 'The usual, I suppose?" 

•'Yes/' replied Mrs. Nutty 
briefly. **A group of several 
Hawks followed their Bluebird 
party and grabbed two of the 
younf Bluebirds with no trouble 
at all. They were all feeling 
rather badly about the incident, 
but then, I suppose, wc must 
expect that sort of thing to hap- 
pen these days.** 

"Oh, yes, it's an old story, but 
it never fails to make me feel 
sad/' sighed Mrs. Woody. 

"Surely you ladies aren't feel- 
ing sad, are you?" a new voice 
broke in and a pretty Sparrow 
hopped onto a small bush near 
the other birds. 

"Well, I declare!" exclaimed 
Mrs. Nutty. "We're certainly 
delighted to see you, my dear, 
even if you are a young one and 
we've never met you before." 

"Dear me." murmured Mrs. 

Woody in embarrassment. "I'm 

not just sure who you are. 
You're some kind of Sparrow, of 
course, with a reddish brown 
back, a yellowish spot in front 
of your eye and a suggestion of 
a white throat, but it certainly 
isn't very distinct.** 

"I can't blame you for not 
knowing me," said the young 
Sparrow. "But I'm sure you'll 
know my father when you see 
him. He's down there on the 
grass with those other birds. 
See him just beside that big 
bush to the right?" 

"l.et me study him a moment," 
Mrs. Woody said as she turned 
around to look. "Oh, good 
gracious, I won't need to do that 
now that I see him, though- 
black and white on his head, a 






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The Common Round 

THANKSGIVING - 
By Isabel Inglis Colville 



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white Wing Ijrtis IHw his Ittlfgillj 
the Whltp-ftowhcil gpftft'pw* H&H 
Mr WMIe-lhioal, the Caiimfu 
bliu\ '■' tom?e. Mow glut! wi- 
iue I" fee you fiilkfi here figftffi, 
Ihive yoti jetittied hi *Ink your 
lovely family w«mk yet Vwert, 
sweel. dm » ihi (.'.'in-ii da. Crti»- 
a-ila * 

"I wi'di I could r.ay I hud, hilt 
1 really haven't." admitted l|#« 
you»K \Vhlle-lhHi;ite<] Sp;irro\v 

with d hutch. "I can t|et a<; far 
a.i *:;wcrl, sweet. Can,* ami then 
1 seem lo \\v\ stuck and ean't go 
or.. However, I'm determined to 
learn it right, and ( know I'll 
succeed soon. 

"My father and mother feel 
rather ashamed of the .sounds 
We White-throats make when 

we come down to the cultivate*! 
sections of Canada in the aut- 
umn," the Sparrow continued. 
"They say that all folks hear 
are the short snatches of song 
oi the youn;: ones and they don't 
always realize what a beaulilu! 
sweet song the White-throat 
family has. However, when 
we all come hack next spring we 
will bc perfect singers and thee 
you'll really hear something. 1 * 

"Where were you born?" asked 
Mrs. Nutty of the young bird. 

"Up in Haliburton county/' 
answered the Sparrow. "Wc had 
a lovely childhood up in the 
north. Our home was in a big, 
tangled thicket on the edge of a^ 

field and we had a grand sum- j they can reap the benefit of f 
-. I hated to leave, but the their toil: their lives are one 



Now, a* another Thanksgiving 
Ihty sinks behind the horizon of 
I ho pust, one thinks of the few 
nations where » national Thanks- 
gtvitift could still be held. 

Pi for lo the v/ar, most of the 
r*>nroj»*an nations held harvest 
festival* which combined the 
religious observance of our 
Thunk.ngiving Day untl the fes- 
tive :>pii ii of u carnival. 

hi some parts of England the 

children of each . parish v/ove 
Iheinselvi-s crowns of ftov/ers, 
J hen marched to the church 
where the crowns were hung in a 
sereen made for the purpose, umi 
after a service of thanksgiving 
for a bountiful harvest children 

and grown-uf»s adjourned to 
some pleasant place where games 
were played and often a little 
fair v/as held, with a display of 
fruit, flowers and vegetables.. 

But 1 think thai Canada and 
the United States are the only 
countries where a day of nation- 
al thanksgiving is a part of the 
yearly scheme of things. 

Norway, Belgium, Holland find 
Denmark were all countries 
where people rejoiced in little 
festivities and where a simple 
piety marked the lives of the 
peasant-folk. 

Can one imagine any festivity 
or any service of thanksgiving 
taking place in these martyred 
countries? 

Their harvest is robbed before 



ideals that are the watchwords 
of the fighting democracies and 
pray we may be made worthy to 
help in some small way in the 
final restoration of the rights of 
all men, and to take our place 
when the great day of thanks- 
giving for final and just victory 
arrives. 



6E0R6INA LADY MAKES 
QUILT FOR LONDON 



The Hospital for Sick Children, 
Great Ormond St.. London, Eng- 
land, which was wrecked by 
bombs, received a little help 
from Newmarket at tht time of 
the Lions club carnival. 

Mrs. C. C. Richardson dropped 
in at The Era office last week 
with % cheque for $5 which the 
Lions club will add to the fund. 

The Era this week is in receipt 
of a letter from Mrs. E. L. 
Binnington, R.R. 2, Uxbridge, 
asking further publicity for this 
hospital's plight, and stating: 
"Being very interested in this 
appeal from the most outstand- 
ing children's hospital in the 
world, I have made a wine- 
colored satin comforter, which 
is to be raffled off in the near 
future. 

"My home is in Gc-orgina but 



I am in Toronto at present^ 
ene'eavoring to get as much sale 
for the tickets as possible," she* 
continues. "I should be glad it'i 
you would bring this appeal toi 
your readers' attention and will i 
send tickets gladly if there is i 
any response. They sell ' at* 
three for a quarter,*' 

The Era has published the-': 
letter from the hospital's ichair-V; 
man before, but two paragraphs : 
pre repealed; "For years men 
md woiren had toiled devotedly 
and unceasingly to rebuild this 
famous children's hospital. The! 
greater part of a beautiful mod- 
ern building had been completed 
at a cost of £350,000. Then 
in the night, came the bombs.. :' 

"Doctors and nurses and the 
hospital staff fought a fire the; 
flames of which roared into the 
air. They battled through the?*! 

roaring floods shoulder deepi 

from the burst water mains. 
Every baby in the hospital was 
saved. By a miracle not a singti 
little life was lost. 

The wreckage remains and 
amid the wreckage the hospital!- 
that has never closed its doorsl 
.since the day it v/as first opened 
in 1852 carries on." ,«'.•■ 

Mrs. Binningtor/s Toronto §*; 
dress is 700 Mzrkhzm St.. Tor-. 
onto. 



their toil; their lives are one 
long series of being repressed 
and spied upon, with the con- 
stant fear of being haled away 
to concentration camps as a 
block background. 

No person can live continually 
with fear and oppression and 
not become bitter, and so lose I 
the instinctive turning to God in 
thankfulness for mercies re- 
ceived. 

Italy, France and Spain, where 
once sunshine and laughter held 
sway and all the pleasant fruits 
of the earth abounded, are torn 
with dissension or under the 
sway of the Gestapo and secret 
agents of all kinds. 

Czechoslovakia. Poland and 
Finland, where a democratic 
form of government was begin- 
ning to make of these nations an 
example of what that form of 



while throat and quite a yellow ! row cheerfully as he flew 
spot in front of his eye. and j to rejoin his comrades. 



may rejoin a flock of their own 
kind any time. The best way of 
spotting us for sure, young and 
old, is the yellow spot in front 
of our eyes." he added. "They 
say that we young ones look a 
lot like the Swamp Sparrows, 
but, of course, wc have the yel- 
low spots and our backs are 
redder. And our parents always 
have the white throats, which 
none of the other Sparrows 
have." 

"You seem to be a very well 
educated and intelligent young 
fellow/* Mrs*. Nutty said approv- 
ingly. "You be sure to tell 
your parents that we enjoyed 
our chat with you." 

I will," said the young Spar- 
back 



** 



(uicen and 

Ciinadu. 



wages throughout 



The terrific German drhv to- 
ward Moscow w»M believed to ffmvo 
.somewhat allowed Us pace this 
week, but tire Cvrin/uis Wftr« ^titi 
pushing forward. The Hiiir.sian.H 
JfAVe Up the important towt! of 

Vyazma, 12.*i inik-a west of Moscow, 
ami Bryansk, 2JO miles xouthwest 
of the capital. 

Britain Intensified her iu*r|rd 
attacks on thu continent ov**r the 
weekend. On Suudiy night y/j 
htisiihttiH hattcH'd Bavaria, lhe 
Ithlm.-land and northwest Germany. 



General <;. J, li«* r en seho t, 

commander-in-chief of (he Nethei- 

l/nidft Kast Indies army, was killed 

in a |»liM4 crash on TliankK^lviiig 
day In Urn Netherlands Baal Indlt-a. 
shortly after u corifcienoo with 
mulsh army officials on joint 
defence. 



Continued chaos in occupied Kur- 
o|m? was evidenced on TueHday In 
the reported execution of n!m v 
I'Yench and 20 HclKluns Jn reprisal 
for the killing of two Nazi Middle is, 
ami others In Hftrhlu and Bohemln- 
Momvla were condemned, in Oslo 
It was repotted that school* had 
been cloHed bec/uiKe of demoriHtia- 
Unns made durhuc Hrltlsh nH inldH. 



The GertiiMin were ndvamdiig to- 
ward Mohcow in n new direction 
on Wednesday with heavy fighthu; 
at Kalinin, only 93 mites north-went 
of the capital. 

I>r. Samuel Irvine, reseaich 
fellow hi physics at the thdversfty 
of Toronto, Interned since last May 
following six months in the Guetph 
reformatory for "hrtvhiK hi his 
possession a ijuuntity of rtuhvauslve 
literature." has been released from 
internment because, he "no longer 
is eonsldeied tt danger to the state." 



mcr. 

older birds insisted thai .we 
should start on this southward 
journey that it seems we have 
to make. And I must admit 
that it's very nice farther south 
and we are finding plenty of 
weed seeds to eat." 

"And I'm sure no one around 
here will be sorry to see # you 
come and help eat the weed 
seeds up — the farmers and gar- 
deners, I mean/* said Mrs. 
Woody. 

"Are any of your first cousins, 

the White-crowned Sparrows, 

with your crowd?" asked Mrs. 

Nuthatch. "They look so much 

like you to Iks, with their pretty 

white and black caps — but then. 

they haven't got your white 

throats, of course." 
"There are one or two of 

them with us right now," the I 

Sparrow answered, "but they J government can do, arc now 

writhing beneath the heel of a 

ruthless conqueror. 

No room, one would think, in 
any of these countries for nat- 
ional thanksgiving and yet. in 
Denmark, Holland". Norway, Bel- 
gium. Czechoslovakia. Poland} 
and Finland, is the consciousness 
of a background of good govern- 
ment, of lack of evil intention 
towards their neighbors, and of\ 
a slowly kindled flame of j 
righteous indignation, which will j 
give them strength to rise again 
when the time is ripe above the 
evil tide which has engulfed 
them, and feel ready to join a 
decent world fellowship. 

In our own land we look over 
a land tapestried in all the gor- 
geous colors of an eastern poet's j 
dream. [ 

!, \Vith what a glory comes and j 
goes the year." wrote someone. \ 
anil when one looks al the flam- 
ing maples, like torches lighting 
the landscape, al the golden 
elms, as if they had stored the 
summer sunshine to lighten 
grey days, and more homely, 
look at your collar, gleaming 
with shining jars of almost 
jewel-like splendor, one can say. 
with the poet, 

"We thank Thee. Lord, fair this 
fair earth, 

The glittering sky, the silver 

sea. 
For all Iheir beauty, all theii 

worth. 
Their life and glory flnwttiou: 

Thee." W 

War planes. dropping n*» 
bombs, fly our skies; tank> 
nimble over our roads, hut no 
hail of htillets fly from tlu-m. 
soldiers march our highways, j 
hut instead of throwing Ironihs . 
nnd hand grenades they sing lhe . 
songs wc all know— we are OF: 
the war, but md IN it, and our i 
thankfulness for our peaceful 
land, while deep ami hcmiiVli. 
should lie tempered by the 
thought of others* sufferings 
and by the thought of what wv 
can do to alleviate them, and 
also by lhe salutory ivmiuder 
thin though as yet no enemy has 
nearvd our shores, time alone 
can assure us of immunity. 

We have so much to he lhank- 
ful for, that it makes one 
ashamed not lo be MOKK thank- 
ful. We can give thanks for the 



Knglaud's 
for this 

Newmar- 



Frank. of Oak wood, spent hist 
week with her brother, Hailiff 
Mutiny. 

Mrs. Elder of Heeehville and 
her son, Mr. Nelson Ktder, of 
Buffalo, with his wife, spent a 
couple of days this week with 
Mrs. I). W. Itcid. 

Tire Church of 
teachers* " convention 
diocese look place in 
ket yesterday. 

Mr. liert Lloyd, son of the: 
tmvn clerk, who graduated from i 
the Ontario Hank here and is ' 
now located in Kingston, is home 
for U couple of weeks' holidays. 

A regular meeting of the pub- 
lic school board took place on 
Tuesdiiy evening. 

IIOKN— Near Sharon. Oct. «. 
IJISH, to Mr. aud Mis. Hubert 
Coekerill. a daughter. 

HOKN-On Yorrge St., Oct. «. 
18111. to Mi. ami Mrs. John II. 
I'roctor, a son. 

MAIUUKJ) -At the residence 
of the brute, on Oct. 10, laSM. 
by Itev, Mr. Fraser. formerly of 
Qtieensville, Mr. Tims, Coatcs of 
Newmarket, to M r«. Klea nor 
Burr of l«itli, near Owen Sound. 



25 YEARS AGO 






50 YEARS AGO 

From Kra file, Oct. 16, ih;>i 

Mrs. Bogart of Napanee, sis- 
ter of Mrs. Lydia Scott, is here 
on a visit. 

Mrs. J. K. Sotich has been 
visiting at Port Perry the Inst 
couple of weeks. 

Mrs. Martin Rose of North 
Gwillimbury left on Tuesday for 
Dakota to visit her parents. 

Mrs. J. Dittman and son. 



From Kra file, ml. 13, l»lt» 

Wliile operating a Sander (tt 
the Office Specialty on Tuesday, 
George King had his right hand 
mangled severely. 

An entrance was effected at 
the rear of Adams', barber shop 
last Thursday night and about 
$0O worth of good* stolen, he- 
sides some money in the till. 

On Thursday ami Friday of 
next week, the public school 
teachers of North York will hold 
their annual convention in Tor- 
onto. 

Whitchurch council meets at 
Vnndorf on Saturday. 

The mayor, clerk and assessor 
spent Tuesday evening detecting 
Jurors for the courts in Toronto. 

Mr. B. Jackson Is in Hamilton 
this week visiting his daughter, 
Mrs. J. S. Marker, and expects 
to spend next Sunday with an- 
<4her daughter at Tottenham. 
Mrs. C. A. Belfry, before relum- 
ing to Newmarket next Wednes- 
day. 

Last Sunday was nn awfully 

hot day. 



The new chopping mill nt 
Citenville will soon he in opera- 
lion. 

The annua) meeting of the 
Newmarket curling chin will he 
held on Thursday lit lhe Kin^j 
George hotel. • 

Queens ville fair was favored 
with fine weather both days aud 
a good crowd was in attendance 
on the second day. 

The number of motor ears In 
Keswick is rapidly increasing, 
several having been purchased 
during the last few weeks. 

IIOKN— At Pine Orchard, Oct. 
8, to Mr. and Mrs. Harry CSilroy, 
a .*on. 

DIED -On Oct. 9. Win. Ostley, 

hi his 70th year. Interment in 
Newmarket cemetery. 

DIED— At his son's residence, 
Oak Ridges, on Sept. 28. William 
Monkman. in his 90th year. 



TACT 

"John." a%id tfc* 26m&# trsA'tet* 
"iVa d«*cld*fi 6n * r*arr,* fr, r •%£ 
b*V>\ We will cfidi R#.r tx&%& 

John W4.t p,ft* is thv-:?'*-* fr- 
te-w mi>iui*i Hit itA B'9fe '.ijcz 
n&Tnt. 

•That's nic*/' h* a*5c ??«**$$£ 
"My first sw«*:h4art -*^m ftaaia^ 
Imogen, and *hVl' zaUa i\ *j ^ 
rjjTnpUtzhnV X; 

"W* wit* c*z: h$V Mxrj. *£pli 





Is Your OVERCOAT Ready! 



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CAPITAL CLEANING PRICES 



LAIHTES* KAM. COATS. TUUN 

LAIUKS* WIXTKK COATS. Fl K TKIMMKO 

i.adiks* ruvix i>UKssr:.< 

l,.\m*CS* KKIT HATS 

MUX'S TOr COATS 

M EN'S 1VIXTKU COATS 

MKNS S-IMKCK St 'ITS .. 

MK.VS MATS Ct.KANKO AM) HLOl'KFO 



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CLEANERS CAPITAL 



DYERS 



Head Offliv and Plant, Newtn.irkot. Kheno SSO 

Aurora: l\ Kowl.uid. Venice St. — Thone T^> 
Uradford: Ura.tferd H:ir-ain tlou^ 
Mount Albert: \\\ n. Steejvr — t'hoiw 8W0 
t)iuviiMillc: Honv's Su»rv — PhoUf »:^o 
Sution West: Park's St>le Shop — Thoue I3nf 



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SAVE and LEND 



this 




convenient 



way 



y\ S ci good citizen of Canada who wants 
*"* CaiHida's war effort lo count in this War 
for Democracy, you are planning to save 
regularly and buy War Savings Certificates. 

THIS IS THE PLAN 

Simply authorize the Bank to deduct regularly 
from your account any sum in multiples of 
$4.00 up to $40. We will deduct lhe 
amount on the 1 5lh of each month, and you 
will receive from Ottawa lhe War Savings 
Certificates registered Fn your name. 

For each $4.00 you put into War Savings 
Certificates, you receive back at maturity 
$5.00. 

If you haven't an account, you will find It a 
convenience to open one now af any branch 
of this Bank 



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IMPERIAL BANK 



OF CANADA 



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HIAD OWCIt TORONTO . tRANCHCS THROUGHOUT CANADA 
A. I, rHll»W # ft«afclM# a T. lAmAY, 0— md 

F. H. HEW80N 

Manager Nawroarket Branch 



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.:• ■:■■ "■ : ■.*■'.:-■•■■ ^••'•^-_.:^ . ,.. .. . .... . 

THE NEWMARKET ERA, THURSDAY. OCTOKft I4TH, 1941 



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Reconvicted of ' assaulting h!s wlf« 
%Hh an axe, Alfred MerrJman of 
^bttageviHe v&a sentenced to three 
'months In jail by MagUtrate W, F. 
AWctodliffe at Newmarket police 
court on Tuesday. 
j'"J"*We hsvt been roarrled since 
flWO*/' testified Mra. Merriman. "My 
husband look* after the farm and 
I'M work in Toronto from Monday 
I morning unUl Friday night. On 
-Saturday, Oct. i, I came home from 
VTotaato -with Ambrose Archibald 
"•bout 10.30 D.8.T* My husband had 
vjisked me to bring a bottle of wine, 
■'- so as soon as I came (n he asked 
10m tor the wine. 1 #*▼* H Jo him* 



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Fad and Winter 
CMhing 

Forsyth Shirts, Ties, 

Under. vear 
^ Suitings from 
.BOULTER BROS. 

C. F. WILLIS 

TaHortfi* and Men's Wear 

'-.-. Cleaning and Pressing 
Agency 

Mate Street Newmarket 




he too> a drtok and gave me a 
small drink.-. 

"I cooked breakfast and started 
to do my washing and baking. He 
kept giving me a little drink and 
I put it in a bottle in my shopping 
bag. He drank the rest ot the hot* 
tie himself. Then he started argu- 
ing and called me all the filthy 
names he could think of > Just the 
same as he has done before. Then 
he gave me a blow on the nose with 
his fist 

*T got out on the highway and 
tried to get away from hjm and he 
tried to bring mc in. Finally I 
went back and he had a hatchet 
In his hand and struck me oh the 
top of the head with it. 1 put my 
hand up and blood streamed out. 
He said 'You've got it this morning 
and that's what you deserve: I 

went out on the highway and tried 

to get to a doctor. A car came 
along and he wouldn't let them take 
me. Then two gentlemen in another 
car came along and I put my hand 
up. They asked me what had hap- 
pened and I said 'He's hit rho on 
the head with the axe/ They rush- 
ed mo to Dr. Urnuhart in Aurora 
and I was taken to the hospital." 

"Did you have the axe in your 
hand?" asked Crown Attorney N. 
I* Mathews. K.C\ 

"I don't think so/' replied wit- 
ness. 
"Do you know if you did or not?" 

"No. I did not-'* 

"Did your husband have any rea- 
son to stiike you?" 

"No, but when he has a drop too 
much he goes crazy and doesn't 
know what he's doing, lie's a good 
man when he's not drinking and 
does his best to look after the farm. 
I clean, wash, cook and bake and 
do the best I can over the week 

«ids." 

"Was there any discussion about 
a wedding?" asked defence counsel. 



fe 



Coal or Wood 



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ELECTRIC STOVES AND HEATERS 



Roof Paint - Weather Stripping C Frost King, 



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L#\ BUY YOU/i FALL ffAHDWARB KUQUtRti- 

MKNTS WITH C0NF1DENCB AT 



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SMITH'S HARDWARE 

Newmarket 



Phone 39 



W^^^^ 



Lewis Raxlen, Toronto. 

"What wedding?" replied Mrs. 

Merrlmari. 

"Didn't. he fell you about a wed- 
ding that took place in Pottage- 
ville?" "He told me a lady gave 
him' a glass- of wine." 

"How did you feel when he told 
you that?" "I told him he shouldn't 
have taken it when I wasn't there." 

"When did the first argument 
start?" "I don't know." 

"What time did you get the 
blow?" "1 don't remember." 

"Do you remember uslns the 

axe?" "I use it to split wood." 

"Do you remember using it to 
split your husband?" "No." 

"Did the police come to see you 
about laying your husband's cheek 
^open?" "No." 

"Is the hatchet kept In the wood- 
shed?" "Yes." 

"I am suggesting to you that you 

were in the woodshed with the axe 

and were going to attack him when 
he tried to take it away?" "That's 
not true." 
"Didn't you drink half the bottle 

of wine?" "No, I put it In a bottle 
In my shopping bag and he took it 

out along with my purse and 
money." 

"How much money did you 
have?" "Two dollars. I paid the 
feed man the rest of it." 

"! was driving east from Schom- 
herg to Aurora and Mrs. Merriman 
was on the road and waved to us 
to stop," testified W- J. Waters, a 
banker from Toronto. "I noticed 
she was all covered with blood 
and was still Weeding quite pro- 
fusely. X asked her what happened 
and she said her husband had hit 
her with an axe. I got out of the 
car and opened the rear door and 
had Mrs. Merriman get in. When 
she got on the scat Mr. Merriman, 
who was standing up the road a 
short distance -away, came over to 
the car. She said, 'That's the man 
who did it. He's my husband/" 

"Was there any evidence that 
Mis. Merriman had been drink- 
jing?" asked the crown. 

"No." replied the witness. 

"This man came over to the car 
and Mrs. Merriman said, 'That is 
the man who did it with an axe. 
He's my husband/" testified A. T. 
Whitehead, barrister of Toronto. "I 
thought there was something pecu- 
liar about the look of this man. 
He had a stupid grin, was stary 
eyed and didn't say anything." 

"What condition was Mrs. Merrl- 
irtan In?" asked Mr. Mathews. 

"She was quite normal, nnd very 
quiet. I watched her on the way 
to Aurora and thought perhaps she 
might pnss out. Her hair was mat- 
tod and her dress soaked in blood. 
•She told me the name of the doctor 
arid answered any questions I asked 
her." 

"On .Saturday, Oct. 1, from in- 
formation received, I went to the 
home of the accused at Pottage- 
ville in company with Chief Dun- 
ham of Aurora," testified Sergeant 
Sidney itfriaclough. "I had n war- 
rant for accused's arrest. He met 
u.5 at the door and asked us what 
We wanted. I told him what had 
taken place and he said, 'You've 

got the warrant for the wrong per- 
son, it should be rny wife. She 

.struck me on the wrist, then ran 



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into the gate and struck her head.' 
"We went to the woodpile and 
X asked him if he was sure that 
he hadn't hit her with a mallet and 
he said, *No, she had a mallet and 
threw it some place/ Then he said 
the fell over a block of wood and 
struck her head on this mallet. We 
v/ent back into the house and I 
started to read the warrant and he 
became quite abusive, trying to put 
Chief Dunham and myself out of 
the house. He refused to dress up 
e.nd we had to take him by the 
arms. He was going to take the 

warrant from me and we had to 
handcuff him. He seemed very 
much under the influence of liquor. 
Sunday I found this mallet in the 
rain-barrel. Later at the Don jail 
he gave me a statement." 

The statement told that an argu- 
ment had started about the wine 

and Mrs. Merriman had grabbed 

the axe. Mr. Merriman took it 

away from her and threw It in the 
garden. She found ft and started 
at accused again, and In trying to 
get the axe from her, it fell and 
struck Mrs. Merriman on the head. 
He had washed her head off and 
she disappeared, and that was the 
last he saw her. 

Chief Dunham corroborated the 
evidence of Sgtr Barraclough. ' 

"file argument started when I 
told her the neighbors had given 
me some wine" testified the ac- 
cused. "She said, what did I take 
wine from other women for? She 
attacked me once before with the 
axe and cut my face. This time 
she got the axe and X ran out to 
take it away. She ran to the mail- 
box, fell down nnd I took- it away 
from her and threw it in the gar- 
den. She found it and came to the 
back door with it again and had it 
up all ready to strike me. X 
grabbed it away and while getting 
It from h*sr she cut herself. I 
told her to come in the house and 
be quiet and she got out." 

"Is this statement true?" asked 

the crown attorney. "Yes," replied 
accused. 

'Then you didn't sec her get in 
the car?" "No. X never saw those 
gentlemen before." 

"Even though they swear they 
s.»w you standing by the car, and 
your wife swears she saw you, you 
deny being there?" "I don't think 
I was." 

"Your wife works hard all week, 
brings the money home and you 
beat her up?" "I never see the 
money." 

"Did you ask her to bring home a 
bottle of wine?" "No. X didn't ask 
her- She brings one every week 
snd takes as much as X do." 

"Where did you put the axe?" 
•In the raiu-harrel." 

"Did vou put it there so the police 
wouldn't find it?" "No. I put it 
there tat my wife wouldn't find it." 

"Mrs. Merriman whs brought to 
my office by a couple of gentle- 
men," stated Dr. J. I*. Urquhart of 
Aurora. "She hud a three-cornered 
wound right to the skull, one inch 
each way. There was a Kood deal 
of puffiness around the cut and an 
artery was cut. She bled veiy free- 
ly, and was very weak when I got 
her to the hospital. She made a 
very quick recovery." 

"Could the blow have been caused 
by the hatchet dropping a couple 
of Inches?" asked the crown. 

"Xo, I wouldn't think so," replied 
Dr. Urquhnit. "A struggle for the 
hatchet and a good deal of wrench- 
ing might cause it, but not the 
weight of it." 

"Was *he hit by the blunt -side 
of the hatchet?" asked Magistrate 
Woodliffe. 

"1 don't know If she was hit by 
the hatchet or not. but if she was 
It would be the blunt side." 

"In this case I was impressed 
with the evidence by Mrs. Merri- 
man," commented his worship. 
"She told her story in a straight- 
forward manner. I accept her evi- 
dence »ls the truth, f am tinder 
the Impression that Mr. Merriman 
knew very little of what occurred, 
ami liellcvc he was wider the in- 
fluence of liquor. Although he WAS 
present when Mrs. Merriman got 
in the car. he has no recollection 
of this taking place. There wilt 
be a conviction. 



: GLENVILUS 

FNBWS PAY TRIBUTE 
TO DEPAKTM6 FAMILY 



SNOWBALL 

iNSTHUIE HOLDS 816 
DANCE IN NEW BARN 



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A surprise farewell party of 
about 40 friends and neighbors 
was held on Friday night for 
Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Deavitt at 
their home here and presented 
them with an electric iron and 
toaster. 

The farewell address was read 
by Marion Jefferson and was 
signed on behalf of the Glenville 
community by Roy Sharps, Wm. 

Keffcr and Mrs. Aubrey Doan. 

The address expressed the 
esteem in which Mr. and Mrs. 
Deavitt are held in the Glenville 

community, the regret which 

was felt by the community on 
learning of their departure and 
conveyed good wishes for the 
future at their new homo in 
Sharon.: 

4i VYe have always found you 
ready and willing to help in any 
undertaking in the community, 
whether social or personal, 
whenever called upon," was one 
tribute expressed. 

The Young People's Union was 
entertained on Monday evening 
at the home of Mr. and Mrs. 
James Webster in honor of Mer- 
land Deavitt and presented him 
with a fountain pen. The ad- 
dress was read by Bob Doan and 
was signed on behalf of the 
Y-P.U. by the president, George 
Wray, and the secretary, Marj- 
orie Miller. It included the fol- 
lowing: 

"You have given unsparingly 
of your time and talent in pre- 
paring recreation for our meet- 
ings and it will be hard to find 
another to fill the convenorship 
as capably as you have- done. 
Whether the attendance was 
large or small, we could always 
depend on something interesting 
for your part of the meeting. 
Your interest in this work is 
greatly appreciated. 

"Now you are moving to a new 
community and will probably be 
engaged in a different line of 

work. We wisli you the best of 
luck in your undertakings. 

"We ask you to accept this pen 
as a remembrance of the happy 
times we have had together in 
the Glenville Young People's 
Union/' 

The W.A. of the United church 
held a surprise farewell party at 
the home of Mrs. Stanley Somcr- 
ville on Wednesday evening, 
when Mrs. Somerville and Mrs. 
Wm. Deavitt, who arc* leaving the 
neighborhood, were presented 
with tokens of remembrance. 
Mrs. Somerville was presented 
with a lovely set of bath towels, 
and Mi's. Deavitt with a beautiful 
China tea-pot. 

An enjoyable evening was 
spent in games and music. 

Anniversary services will be 
held 111 the United church on 
Oct. 19. The services are at 11 
a.m. and 7.30 p.m. There will 
he a special speaker at both ser- 
vices and special music. 

Mr. and Mrs. Win. Deavitt 
visited Mr. and Mrs. K. Deavitt 
on Sunday. 

Mr. and Mrs. Wm. George and 
Mary, Mr. Russell Somerville 
and Miss Frances Somerville. 
had dinner on Sunday with Mr. 

and Mrs. J. West. 
Mr. and Mrs. George Aiming. 



routo w;is fined S5 and costs. Wm. 
Go i fat, Aurora, S8 and costs. Com- 
plaints were laid by Constable Ken- 
neth Mount. 

Charged with speeding <>n a 
comity road !*uxurn Tea Company 
of Toronto was fined $8 and cost-v. 



The big barn dance held in the 
new steel barn on the farm of 
Fennel! Rothwell at Snowball 
and sponsored by the Women's 
Institute was a grand success. A 
very large crowd enjoyed danc- 
I ing to the music of Russ Creigh- 
ton and his variety dance orches- 
tra. Hearing the popular songs 
of the orchestra's young mascot, 
Jimmie, was a pleasing feature 
of the evening's fun. Norman 
Payne of Temperanceville won 
the beautiful fan quilt made by 

Mrs. Leonard Hall. The mem- 
bers of the Women's Institute 

were very grateful to all who 
helped to make the evening such 
a success. Proceeds will be used 
for war work and the war vic- 
tims. 

The hot turkey supper under 
the auspices of the Snowball 
Women's Association will be 
held in Fennell Rothwell's new- 
barn on the third concession, 
just south of the church, on Oct. 
16. Supper is to be served from 
5 to 8 o'clock, standard time. 

The "Happy Gang" girls' club 
met at the home of Miss Annie 
Harrison on Saturday afternoon 
and opened their fall project, 
"The supper club/' The elect- 
ion of officers was as follows: 
hon. pres., Mrs. E. Roddick; 
president, Miss Mary Mills; 1st 
vice-pres., Miss Eleanor White; 
secretary. Miss Helen Lloyd; 
treasurer, Miss Annie Harrison; 
leader, Miss Gwen Copson: ass'l. 
loader, Miss Lois White; pianist, 
Miss Beth Copson. 

L.A.C. Bert Taylor of the 
R.C.A.F., Toronto, spent Sunday 
with friends in this vicinity. 

Miss Rhoda Webb and a friend, 
of Toronto, spent Thanksgiving 
with Miss Hazel Webb. 

Mr. and Mrs. Chas. Roberge 
and Mrs. Matilda Arnold* of Bar- 



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rie were Sunday visitors of the t was guest soloist. 



Mills family. 

The anniversary sen* ices held 
in the Snowball United church 
on Sunday were very well 
attended. The church was very 
tastefully decorated with glad- 
ioli and vegetables. Rev. A. E. 
Marshall of Toronto look charge 
of both morning and evening ser- 
vices. Mrs. Willson of Aurora 



Mr. Leslie Robson of Aurora 
spent Sunday with Mr. and Mrs. 

Aubrey Wood. 

Auction sale bills are printed 
promptly and ot low price by 
Era printers. 



*' 



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FALL COATS 



I would like to suggest beeaus*- rht ; *>mpl»int was laid by Con- 






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NADA'S telephone traffic U flimhing to new peaks! Rngagi'4 in 
___ _ all out war effort Canadian* arc depending on telephone fucilillca 
more limit ever. That'* why telephone worker* urc dctrrnnutd to iimin. 
^ - ' tjBHESHTfwlcil, m0it efficient ■ervlrc under all condition*. * 

They are specially grateful for the *yiitpulhelir cooperation of all tele- 
phone- uterv Subscriber* can aid In making scvrrcly-taxcd telephone 
^"fielUtle* yield maximum twice # . 4 

jBy looking up the number hi llie directory 

•peaking dhlinclly directly into the mouthpiece ' 
Ily tuiwrring promptly when llie bell rlii** 

IHeaie be sure, olio, to replace tliu receiver on lite hook. Over 120,000 
tf ,s ilme* hut year, telephone* were reported 
K *0Ut of order* because of receiver* left m^ 
.. off or Improperly replaced,. •** 



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of .the circumstances In the case. 
that -your worship* net: fit to iinp«».v 
a fine," stated defence counsel, "It 

wasn't pjcim'ditated. The complain* 
nut had had a -drink. She brought 
the wine home, and If she. hadn't 
brought 11/ tfiisi would -probably 
not hfivn happened." 

"This is much too serious an 

a.M^anlt." replied hhs worship. "ThU 

-woman might have bled to death" 

Peter Supu.-fak of l.loydtown wa.-* 
fined £10 and coxttr on a charge of 
en it • ! * ' ■ s d r Iving. 

- : "I w:m driving north on the lOlh 
concvi.sioii of King on Sept. 26 at 
about lO.lo n.m.." Uglified Frank 
Kowlcy of Uoydtowii. "Ah i ap- 
proached the coiner this chap eiwne 
from the east, cut the corner shoit 
to make a . left-hand ttitn and 
struck the right front corner of ray 
ear." 

Countable VVati. who investigat- 
ed, testified that the* Impact took 
place* rif'ht on the intciHcctlon. nix 
feet from the o'itt ditch, 
! "I wait mnklng n left-hand turn 
I and couldn't see th« corner on ne- 

I count of the IHac bush, huust! and 

(Kauifjo/' Kiild the accused. "Kvery- 
j on© «iiy» H id the woj.it comer in 

the county" 

"You must keep on your own 
hide of tlw* load," warned hi.-j wor- 
ship. "Vou are driving blindly 
around that coiner on the wrong 

Hide of the road." 

Carman Kutledgc of East Qwllt- 
imbury was fined $ 10 and cost* on 
a chaise of careless driving. 

Mr. Kiitlcdgo'ri car. which was on 
the wrong side of the road between 
[the Ith and ath concessions of 
Whitchurch, collided with a car' 
driven by T. BonRe of StouffvlUo, 
causing $50 damage to the ISoakc 

car* 

- "I wa.s coming over the hill and 
didn't see the car until short no- 
tice." said licensed. "I was using 
tho beaten path with loose stones 
on top." 

"You weio very foolish to drive 
on the left-hand side of the road." 
admonished his worship. "You 
might expect to meet another car 
coming over the hill." 

Charged with speeding In Au- 
rora, Joan T. Tamblyn of Toronto 
was fined $5 and costs, Itonkc Mfg. 
Co., Toronto, 58 and costs, Petvr 

Legatt of Camp HordcH* $10 ami 
cost*. W. K. Doan, Toronto, $& and 

cost*. Dr. Thomas Hrlnnt, Wetlond, 
Id and costs. York Oarage. Toronto. 
JO and cost*, K. 1). Leitcb, Toronto, 
$3 and costs. Complaints were laid 
by Chief Constable Fisher Dunham. 
Charged with speeding In New- 
market. Jnmed Robinson of To- 



Ktattta Alex. .McCalium. Sutton. 

Charged with speeding on Yonge 
St., Krank J. Mcllwain ut St. Cuth- 
arines was fines! $10 an<l costs. The 
complaint wan laid by Pioviuciat 
CoiiMablv Alex. Keigu.sou. 



Miss Shirley Aiming and Mr. 
John Black attended the Wood- 
bridge fair on Monday. 

Mr. and Mrs. Stanley Somer- 
ville and family and Mrs. James 
Somerville have moved to the 
city for the winter. 



LOCAL MARKET 

Fowl were plentiful on the 
local Thanksgiving market on 
Saturday morning, chickens sell- 
ing at 23 and 25 cents a pound, 
ducks, 23 to 25 cents, and tur- 
keys, 33 cents a pound. Eggs 
brought 25 and 28 cents a dozen 
for pullets* and large were 42 
cents a dozen. Butter sold at 38 
cents a pound. 

Cauliflower were 5, 10 and 15 
cents a head. 

TORONTO MARKETS 

Butter, creamery solids, No. 1, 
were 32!i cents a pound, and 
creamery prints, first grade, 
were quoted to retail trade at 
34 cents a pound on the Toronto 
markets on Tuesday. CountvJ' 
dealers were quoted on graded 
eggs, cases free, delivered to 
Toronto, for grade A large, -II 
cents; A medium, 40 cents; A 
pullets, 28 to 30 cents a dozen. 

Nominal prices to the shipper 
for poultry were: young turkeys. 
8 to 10 pounds. 28 cents, 10 to 12 
pounds. 32 cents a pound; young 
geese, over 8 pounds, 22 cents a 
pound; spring broilers, l'i to 
lv, pounds, 22 cents a pound. 

Prices in the cattle section 
were: weighty steers, $8.25 to 
$0.40; butcher steers and heifers, 
$7.51) to $8.75, with a few lops 
at $0; tvd calves, §9.25 to $11.50. 
Choice veal calves brought $12.50 
b> $13, with a few tops at $13.50. 

Good ewe and wether lambs 
sold at $11.25 to $11.50. 





* * 



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V3fc&£#-a ssfcete^ 




asryierea/ 

HELPS PREVENT 



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due to /act of 
*u/*f» the diet 



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Fur trimmed nnd plain, 
in straight and half sizes. 

Smart Hats 

New Dresses 

Skirts, Sweaters 

and Blouses 

F. N. CHANDLER 



Main St. 



NewtnarUct 




.*-* 



#*- 






-YEASI 

Squibb Vitamin A -B-D-G Tablets 

51.00 



A 



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Contain feolb Cod Liver 
Oil and Yeast Vitamin* 

Biologically tested for 
Vitamin Potency. 



80 
TABLETS 



250 ... *2.39 



TABIET5 



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BELL'S I.D.A. DRUG STORE 

PhoiHi t!Kl for F;»sl Fryo IVUvvry 



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means 



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plenty 



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by feeding 




EGG 




PEP 

4ASH M. 



It's the Oatmeal that puts 

the "Pep" in Fid-O-Pep 




FOR SALE AND RECOMMENDED BY 



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48 MAIN ST., NEWMARKET 



PHONE NEWMARKET 129 



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A BIT, TRY YOW LOCK. WIH A TREAT, 
TAKE A FRIEND, SEE "WHEN IAWES MEET" 



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Classified ad puzzlers sent in 
29 correct solutions for last 
week's contest. The answers 
were: market, circulator, regis* 
tered, tillable, reservoir, every- 
thing, afternoons, experienced, 
bottles and slightly. 

Mrs. F. N. Chandler, Newmar- 
ket business woman, drew the 
five winners as follows: Mrs. T. 
J. McNicol, R.R. 3, Newmarket; 
Mrs. Cheslcy V. Scott, Sutton 
West; Mrs. Gordon Howe, 
Queensville; Miss Lottie Tansley, 
Sharon; and Mrs. Elias Smart, 
Newmarket. These five ladies 
receive double passes to the 
Strand theatre for cither Tues- 
day evening or Thursday even- 
ing of next week. They may 
obtain their passes any evening 
at the theatre or on the night 
they attend. 

Everyone whose answer 
Is correct and whoso answer 
reaches The Era office by Tues- 
day morning at D.30, D.S.T., has 
an equal chance. One answer 
was too late this week. 

These five winners may see 
either the new, thrill-packed pic- 
ture, "They Met in Bombay," 
featuring two popular stars, 
Clark Gable and Nosaiind Hus- 
sell, with "Misbehaving Hus- 
bands" as an added feature, on 



. \ 




The rate for Want Ads Is 25 cent* 
for W words for one Insertion; 4f 

ceflts for two insertions; 50 cents 
far three insertions. For over 25 
words, each additional word, one 
insertion, one cent, additional 
Insertion*, one-half cent per in- 
sertion. 



REAL ESTATE FOR SALE 



Yor »a!e— S% acres garden land, 

with ft-roomecj frame house. Wired 

for light**, llnitl water hi kitchen. 
Stable and other buildings, ftprlng 
cre«?k. Bright location. IVIceii for 

quick mile. Aj>]ily IvJ. Houghton, 



I'ottilKPV 



le. 



ZWM 



E. A. BOYD 

17 Main St 
«KAL K8TATE — For Sale: 
fanns, Houses, Acreages, Lota. 
INSURANCE— Automobile, Fire 
ind Casualty. 



FOB RENT 



For ri'iit — Two iiuni-tin.1 nmm*. 
Oenileman piefernd. Vhtmv NVw- 
market 707. Mw37 



For rrnt — Downfall a ijiiiiiinUh- 

ed flat, four nice moms. Hot wati*f 

tu-.-itiiiK- Hath r o o in fucilltlOd. 
Oarage. Central location. Wr i l « 
Km box 770. 'Jw37 

For rent — HlmI-hUIiiik rooin with 
flrejilace, atno other k«»iim. A|*|»ly 
Km box 775, '2wil 



For rent— Furiilnheil or UiifiiM- 
ixhc*<l loom, with hoard tu without 
hourtl. Handy to downtown. 
ftea.tiMiahu* iat««a. All convent- 
ence*. I'hoiin 722 Ncwrnatkei. 

c2w3G 



V 



.1 



:- 



For rent — Farm, \t\to acted of 
y.tuni fertile land. Hank ham. (good 
limine, plenty of water. Apply Mi.i. 
Kred Joluintoii, (jiieeiifVllk. *3wM 

For rent— Sloie. Top Main St. 
hill. Apply 3. KiiHto, 72 Hot if ford 
8l., Newmarket or phon<- 1 10. 

<-3w35 






FOR SALE 



' 



" 



Yor •Mtlt"— Countei.i and rthow- 

cage*. Cheap, ftjiectul pi ice on 

harnc.i.4 fi>r this w* v ««k only, l-in- 
qulro Mm. A. Wolfe. io Main Ht. 

elw37 

For Mlttt— < 2 - p I i' e .• ChiMteiHetd 

unite; l-plecf bcJioom niilte; bed 
j>l>rh)K: blind*! euiialnn; kitchen 
table. dlldlriK couch, (t<'ai(ouahli>. 
Apply % Tecutnseh St. *lw37 



For kale— Sprayed /ipplerf. Tol- 
nmm, Hnown, and Ontaiio.i. $1 por 
bii.i., %2'Jd per hht. Apply K. 
Dcnnli. Newmarket. <*3w37 




For wih 1 — N a v y hlue cheviot, 
IlromlelKh. winter coat. In &nnl 
condUlon. HI/«. 10. For $3 Apply 
Kleanor Curl. Hox 870, NeWinai- 
U«t. -tw37 



For w*l«wHtove. Hdf feeder. Coal 
only, Prico $7. Apply Mr*. John 
Cain, 24 Slmcoc St. W. Clw37 




f huh— <Juohi-e r a n g a. In 
condition. Apply 7 Queen St. 

elw37 



or »!*— Small cook rtove. Drop- 
table, larKe. Dresser. Apply 
M Pro»p«ct Ave. Mw37 




ne circulator heater. 

In good condition. 

enivllle 2720. *2w36 



\t 




be purchased at the 
|*ace*: Splilette'i*. Hoi- 
Il'a Book Store, Bell> 
Beit Drug Store. 



Tuesday evening, or the great 
outdoor epic, "Billy the Kid," 
starring Robert Taylor, plus 
"Las Vegas Nights" as a second 
feature, on Thursday evening. 

THIS WEEK'S CONTEST 
Winners of tills week's contest 
will receive double passes to 
the Strand- They will have a 



Home furnlnhlng* urgently need- 
ed tor soldier's family of five 
children who have had the mis- 
fortune to lose almost everything. 
What you can Hpare please send 
to E. F. Streeter, Second St. S., 
or phone 258. and It will be called 
for. Articles for living-room, 
dining-room, and kitchen particu- 
larly needed. *lw37 



Tows of Newmarfctt 



MUNICIPAL ELECTIONS 

TAKE NOTICE that His Honor 

Judge Barton will sit at the Council 

Chambers, Newmarket, on Monday, 
the Third day of November. 1941. at 
ten o'clock in the forenoon to hear 
appeals from Parts I and II of the 
Voters' List for the Town of New- 
market for the year 1911. These 
appeals are only those dealing 
with Voters' list to he used at the 
Newmarket Municipal elections. 

DATED at Newmarket this 16th 
day of October, A.D. 1W1. 

N. L. Mathews, 

Clerk. 



CONGREGATIONAL- 
CHRISTIAN CHURCH 

Pastor: REV. ARTHUR GREER 

Sunday, Oct. 19, 1M1 

11 a.m.— COMMUNION SERVICE 
and RECEPTION OF MEM- 
BERS. 

7 p.m.— "STANDING." (Second in a 
series on "Postures.") 

2.30 p.m.— Sunday-school. 
"I was glad when they said unto 

me, 'Let us go Into the House of 

the Lord/ " 



Phone 1% 



NEWMARKET 
GOSPEL TABERNACLE 

12 Millard Ave. 
Just west of Main St. 

Pastor: REV. L. R. COUPLAND 

Sunday, Oct 19, Jttf 



BIRTHS 

Ihile*— At York county hospital. 
Oct. 13, to Mr. and Mrs. Earl Dales, 
Gilford, a daughter. 



Opening day of annual missionary 

conference. 

10 a.m. — Sunday-school. Open ses- 
sion. Slides will be shown. 

11 a.m. and 1 p.m. — Speaker: Mrs. 
C. L. Whitman of the Sudan 
Interior Mission. Special 
music. 

Don't miss these services. Mrs. 
Whitman, a returned missionary 

from Africa, is one of the finest 

women speakers of the land. Come 

and enjoy the services with us. 

The full conference program Is 

| listed on page Mx. 






chance to see the sophisticated Marks— At Bradford, Oct. 10, to 
new comedy, "When Ladies I Mr. and Mrs. Harvoy Marks, a son. 

Preston — At York county hospi- 
tal, Oct. 10, to Mr. and Mrs. Clar- 
ence Preston, Newmarket, a son. 
Primr«H— At York county hospl- 



Mcel/' starring Joan Crawford, 
Grccr Garson and Robert Taylor, 
plus the East End Kids In "Pride 
of the Bowery," on Tuesday, 
Oct. 28, or they may prefer to 
see Wallace Beery Sn "Barnacle 
Bill" and FrtscHIa Lane and 
Jeffrey Lynn in "Million Dollar 
Baby," on Thursday, Oct. 30. If 
more than five send in correct 
answers a Newmarket business 
man will be asked to draw the 
winners. 

This week we give you ten 
scrambled words, with all the o's 
(if there are any) left out. This 
will make it a little trickier, we 
hope. All the words occur in the 
classified columns of this week's 
Era, but remember, the o's aren't 
there. Here are the ten words: 
ehlnpete, ariwnsdte, ffveignaar, 
plecffare, srtesr, nclersu, dreu- 
fwfn, aemtmsn, aitcln. 



for naif*— One slightly used 1910 
gparton electric radio. Cost $89. 
Will sell for $40. Can ho seen and 
tried at Smith's Hardware. Apply 
H. Dtmnta, Newmarket. *2w25 

Yor dale— Personal rubber fcoods, 
mailed postpaid. In plain sealed 
envelope, with price list. Six 
sample* 2. r >e, 21 samples $1. Adults 
only. At»?x Kuhher Co., Hox 231, 
Hamilton, Ont. cSw34 

FARM ITEMS 

Yor f»ale— Perclieron filly, 18 
months old, 1'ercheron gelding, 10 
months old, Holsteln cow (re^latcr- 
edi due with second calf; Here- 
ford heifer, 2 years old; Ayrshire 
heifer* 2 years old; Jersey cow, 7 
years old, Jersey heifer, 15 months 
old. All animals may be seen at 
the east end of Catharine Ave., 
Aurora, or telephone Aurora 183. 

elw37 

for wile — Good serviceable work 
horse 4 at very reasonable- prices. J. 
IC. N«->ibiu Phone Newmarket 197. 

r3w3* 

Wanted— Head horses and mltlo 
Kor free pick-up phone Newmar- 
ket 79, We pay phone cbarKea. 
Ooitloti Young I Ail., Toronto, 
phone Ad. 343JJ. c27w2l 



LIVESTOCK FOR SALE 



I'or nitto — Seven weaning plK*. 
Apply M. Colin, <.Vd;»r Valley, 

*lw37 



Yor Kale— Kresh and spihiKlox 
regUtoied HolMelri heifers. IU-ni 

ace i edited and listed. Apply J, PaJ- 
lon Fails A Hon*, Newmarket. 

c2w3fl 



Tor Hah* — Two sows, one with 
plgii. Also 15 plgn, eight week* old. 
Apply llariy Jocktioti, Ke»wlck. 
1'hone IJueeOHVllle 2021. *2w3«> 



POULTRY FOR SALE 

I'or »ate— 100 8. C. White Ug- 
hoin yearling hvti*, averaging 
flv* pound*, 15c per lb. Very 
healthy, wondei fill layem. Apply 
Miu, J. U. l^itkle, Xephyr, Out. 

• I w37 



U8ED OAR FOR SALE 



Tor 

ill*.* 

172. 



condition. 



OUlMuiolilte, Kiirtt- 
Apply Kia hox 

•2w3fl 



WANTED TO BUY 



tVantt-d to hoy— Wood turning 
rathe, without Mutnl. Apply l'/7 
1'ioHptrt Avi-.. or write Urn box 777. 

1137 



Wanted to buy— Live i".ultiy, 
especially fat bftiw ami 'ooateia. 
T«»p prlCCH paid. Write to I. 
Ilalsky. two Hhaw .St, Toronto, or 
phonu Moydhrooh m#>i. lovprno 

eliaige. *3w.'«7 



WiinUsi to buy — Olaffdwaio, 
iiuiifrf, oil I a nip n, ormuoettts, 

furniture, etc. Must he old. Will 
pay Well. Call ot wiit« Wealuy 
Hquirc*, 200 Main .St, Newmarket. 

•3w30 



HELP WANTED 



Help uunteil — A mu Ul for general 

housework. Sleep out. Apply Kru 

hox 773. rlw37 



tal, Oct. 15, to Mr. and Sirs. Alfred 
Primeau, Newmarket, a son. 

Hone—. At York county hospital, 
Oct. 10, to 51r. and Mrs. Carl Hose, 
Mount Albert, n son. 

Steels— At the Private Patients' 
Pavilion, Toronto General hospital, 
to Mr. and Mrs. flurry Clayton 
Steels, Islington, inee Eleanor E. 
Webster of Aurora), on Wednesday, 
Oct. 15, a daughter. 

DEATHS 

Cwrley— At HI. Michael's hospital, 
Toronto, on Saturday Oct. 11. 
Jennie Kaiser, wife of William B. 
Corley. In her 51th year.' 

The funeral service was held at 
the chapel of Roadhotise and Rose 
on Monday afternoon. 

Gordon— At Htouffville on Sunday. 
Oct. 12, Frank B. Gordon, husband 
of tho late Harah McUenn Burkitt. 
and stepfather of Jane and 
Altumn Burkitt, In his 76th year. 

The funeral service was held at 
his late residence on Wednesday 
afternoon. Interment Stouffville 
cemetery. 

Green— At Hamilton Mountain 
hospital, on Oct. 13, Laura Adams, 
wife of Pte. Alfred Green and 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Alfred A. 
Adams, of Dundas, Ont., formerly 
of Newmarket, in her 10th year. 

Funeral at Duntioa Thursday 
afternoon. Oct. 16. 

Utilftlit—At Newmarket, Thurs- 
day, Oct. 16, Herbert Ifaight, hus- 
band of Mary Elizabeth 8andford, 
in his edlh year. 

The funeral service will be held 
at the residence, 7 Ontario 8t. R, 

, A n ?n fllu . nlay ' <*t 1*. at 2.30 n.m.. 
u.si.r, interment Aurora cemetery. 

King— At his late residence, 
Jackson's Point, on Thursday, Oct. 
0. Duncan Monro King, husband 

of Mary Cole, father of John and 

Angus. 

Tl*e funeral service was held at 
the above address to Keawlek 
united church on Saturday after- 
noon. Interment Queensville 
cemetery. 

.Smith— Suddenly at Newmarket, 

on .Saturday, Oct. |i, Uutry It. 

Hrnlth husband of Gertrude Gould 

and brother of Thoma* and Ira and 

Mis. Wm. Atkinson of Aurora 

and Robert of .SornJa. in his 47th 
yar. 

The funeral service was held on 
Monday. Oct. 13. InEoi Merit N« :W . 
market cemetery. 

'JVrich— At Newmarket on Tu«d- 
Jay, Oct. II. Oliver K. Tentdi, in his 
Mn\ ymr, husband of Malilda 
Mason, arid father of Mrs, W. If. 
Whlfifiii tMaude) of OollinKwood, 
Mm. R \% itoberlson CAhrio) of 
tollingwowl, Mtn* Ada Tench of 
Ottawa, and Charles ot liltrid 

River. 

Funeral (torn |h f vm ||y ^-i, 

dence, Quec-ri Hi. Kast, Newrnrtrhel, 

r,'u4t y 1'^WiOn. Oct. 17. at 230, 
r r.M. i . lull:, tntmi u ,-. w m a t k a t 
cernefery. 

U'llloiiKhby— Al Hut ton private 
hospital, on Tunwlay, Oct. M, Wil- 
liam A. WIHoiighhy. f atMOr of 
Ormafi and Winnie, In Ids 83rd 



ST. ASDMSMS 
riiKSBVTERIAN CHI7KCII 

Minister: HEV. J. A. KOFFEND 
Sunday, Oct. 19, 1911 ~ 

11 a.m. and ^ p.m. — Hev. U. B. 

Bowman of Maple will preach. 
2.30 p.m. — Sunday-school and young 
people's Hible class. 



TKIMTY IfNlTKl) ClItVKCII 

Sunday, Oct. 10. 1011 

Preacher: Dr. Arthur E. Runnells 

11 a.m.—'THK GOLUEN MKXS." 
7 p.m.— "WILL VOUK ANXnoit 
IIOLU? N 

Illtyd Harris, organist and choir- 
master. 

Welcome Soldiers und Visitor* 



Engagement 



Mr. and Mrs. Gordon Coates of 
Holt wish to announce the engage- 
ment of their only daughter. Helen 
Viola, to Aubrey W. Pollock, son 
of Mr. and Mrs. W. Pollock of 
Toronto, the marriage to take place 
early In November. 




BARBER * FAI11EY 

Quietly in Toronto on Satur- 
day, Oct. 11, Gladys Ellen, R.N.. 
daughter of Mr. E. M. Pnirey of 
Newmarket and the late Mrs. 
Fa toy to Sergeant James Leslie! 



—Ken Ponting of the R.C.A.F., 
Ottawa, spent last week in town 
with his parents. 

— Mr. and Mrs. George A. 
Armstrong and Miss Irene Arm- 
strong spent the weekend with 
Mr. and Mrs. James Jackson, 
North Bay. 

—Miss Helen Blendauer spent 

the weekend at her home in 
Port Elgin. 

—Mr. and Mrs. Doug, Beckett 

of Queensville were Sunday 
visitors ot Mrs. Beckett's mother, 
Mrs. W. R. AshenhursL 
— Mrs. W. R. Ashenhurst is 

spending a couple of days this 

week visiting friends in Toronto. 
— Miss Dorothy Connell of 
Toronto spent the holiday week- 
end with her grandmother, Mrs. 
L. Atkinson. 

—Mr. and Mrs, Howard Dennis 
of Sarnta spent the holiday 
weekend with Mrs. Dennis's par- 
ents, Mr. and Mrs. J. J. McCaff- 
rey. 

—Mr. and Mrs. W. J. Quinn, 
Mr. and Mrs. Alex. Hobson, Dor- 
een arid Sonny, were Sunday 

guests of Mrs. W. Coyle and 

Miss Margaret Coyle. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Jack Muggins 

of Peterborough were weekend 

visitors of Mr. and Mrs. Orville 
Clarke. 

—Miss Amy Caldwell of Barric 
spent the weekend with her 
mother, Mrs. Thos. A. Caldwell. 

— Miss Mary Klimack of Lor- 
etto Abbey, Toronto, spent the 
holiday weekend the guest of 
Mr. and Mrs. W. L. Carruthers. 

— Mr. Denne Bosworth, who is 
attending the University of Tor- 
onto, spent the weekend with 
his parents, Mr. and Mrs. W. L. ! 
Bosworth. 

—Mr. and Mrs. Stewart Stouff- 
er of Stotiffville spent Thanks- 
giving day with Mr. Stouffer's 



the holiday visiting Miss Lenorr* 
Norriss, Toronto. 
— Mr. and Mrs. J. B. Marshall 



£>*b32£ 



C*r 



Tor- 

Mm 



of Peterborough spent the 
Thanksgiving weekend at the 
home of Mr. and Mrs. V7rn 
Dixon. 

—Miss Jean Peppiatt of 
onto, daughter of Mr. and 
Arthur Peppiatt of Newmarket, 
was on the committee which 
planned the "fall frolic" of the 
Newman club, held at the Royal 

York hotel, Toronto, on Tuesday 

evening: 

—Mr. and Mrs. W. II. Eves 
have returned to their home in 

town from their cottage at Lake 
Simcoe. 

— Miss Olive Rae Fives ha?, 
returned to Toronto and is driv- 
ing a Red Cross transport. 

—Mr. and Mrs. K. A. O'Brien 
of Dennisport, Cape Cod, Mass., 
are visiting Mr. O'Brien's sister. 
Mrs. W. J. Thompson, and Mr. 
Thompson. 

—Mr. and Mrs. Ted. Kershaw 
and family of Toronto spent 
Sunday with Mrs. Kershaw'* 
parents, Mr. and Mrs. W. J, 
Thompson. 

— Mr. and Mrs, Ronald Neiily 
and Mrs. Arthur Scott of Van- 
dorf spent the holiday with 
friends and relatives in London 
and St. Thomas. 

— Mrs. Wm. Watson and little 
daughter, Nancy, have returned 
to their home in Aurora after 
spending the holiday v/ith Mrs. | 
Watson's parents, Mr. and Mrs. 
J. E. Neiily. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Pearcey Thorn- 1 

as of Oba spent the Thanksgiv-i 

ing weekend in Newmarket visit- \ 

I ing their parents. i 

— Mr. and Mrs. A. J. King and | 
little daughter, Catherine, and | 
Miss Dorothy Watson of Toronto ■ 
spent the holiday weekend with ' 
Mrs. Roy Watson. 









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OCTOBER I ATM TO UTH 



-- •• . -N- 



■ 



GROCERIES 



Monarch Flour 
Coffee 



U L-1 I* 



37 



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7 \i i*^ 




Flaky Sodas, Weston's 




' p .'/('",;t>*:^ 



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A 



sister, Mrs. Gordon Boyd, and ' _ Mr . and iMrs ; Fred Peck 




Odex Toilet Soap 2 

hHolder — Fruit Round, Mother's 
Cookies and Duple/ Creams 
Babbitt' s Cleanser 2 

Durham Corn Starch 2 

"York Brand" Choice Peas 
Glass Fruit Bowls 



W='. sc* 



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Mr. Boyd. 

— Mr. Lloyd Rose, a student at 
the University of Toronto, spent 
the weekend at his home. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Audrey Bar- 
tholomew of Stouffville are 
spending this week with their 
son and daughter-in-law, Mr. 
ami Mrs. Allan Bartholomew. 

— Mr. Allan Bartholomew, 
accompanied by Mr, Grant Nigh- 
swander of Markham, spent the 

weekend in the French river 
district. 

— Mr. Lome Hottby spent the 
weekend with his parents. Mr. 
and Mrs. Geo- E. Holtby, 
Brougham. 

— Miss Leo! a Lord of Toronto 
was n weekend guest of Miss 
Marion Stark. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Norman Pick- 



Heinz Mushroom Soup 
Kellogg's Bran Flakes 
"Old Tyme" Apple Juice 
Beehive Corn Syrup 



7im 



1 
2 



'-. ' 



'•;■» 



Boys- Ru 



ecii 



Barber of the H.C.A.F., son of | erl t ft 8 f P™ 1 U ,e weekend visiting 



Mrs. W. C- Barber of Orange- 
ville. 

SMITH - STEWART 

On Friday, OcL 10, at the 
Trinity Anglican church, Aurora, 
the marriage took place of Eve- 
lyn Mary Stewart to Alfred 
"Mickey" Smith, both of New- 
market. Rev. It. K. Perdue per- 
formed the ceremony. 



year. 

KilfMial durvlce at Uin lute roal- 

donce, Joi m t von. 6. North CSwililm- 
hwry. on Friday, Oct. 17, at 2 
o'clock, H.T. inUutmtui liriiti Mill 

| Ctf mctiri y Mot Mi it. 



relatives in Stnyner, 

•'-Mr. E. Young spent the holi- 
day weekend in Drncebridge. 

— Mr. mid Mrs. C. A. Andrews 

and Miss Shirley Andrews 

attended the Wcuulbridge fair on 
Moruuiy, 

—Mrs. Frank I Ictmer of 
Medicine lint is n visitor of Mrs. 
Chflft. Near and Mr. W. II. Ilcl- 
roer. The family visitcul Mr. nml 
Mrs. Robt. Ilelmer at New Lis- 
kenrd for the Thanksgiving 
weekend. 

- -Miss Dorothy Burbt*r sj>ent 



. ..... hhv .u.o. * .*.^ ^>n and !■ 

| Beverley of London and Mr. and 
Mrs. John Feasby of Kitchener | 
were holiday visitors ot Mr. and \ 
Mrs. Bruce Foote. t 

— L.A.C. George Johns of Vic- ! 
toriaviUe. Que.. Mr. Chas. Harris? 
of Niagara Falls. Ont., and Rev. I 
Gordon Harris of Conn 3pent| 
the weekend visiting L-A.C. ; 
Jolins" parents. Mr. and Mrs. A. j 
F. Johns. j 

—Mrs. Wm. Flintoff of San j 

Fernando. Calif., is visiting J 

J friends and relatives in town. ; 

— Messrs. Burt and Rae PIay-( 
ter and S. Thompson are holi- j 
daying in northern Ontario. 

—Mr. John Pfeffer of Kit- 
chener spent the holiday week- 
end with his daughter, Mrs. Wm. 
J. Hopkinson. and Mr. Hopkin- J interesting description or ner 

son ** f , .. - •*»**. work as 3 missionary in Kor*?a 

—Mr and Mrs Carl Nwber- / or the past 32 years, until her 

gall of Pans and Miss Leda recall lasi year due to the Loter- 

Hopkinson of Kitchener spent national situation, 

the holiday weekend with Mrs. Mis* Rogers ha* *e*n stawr.eu 
NiebergaUs and Miss Hopkin- 



\2 ZX. "* 4 < 



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it 

29-. 

If 

2S= 



RUBBERS 



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zi a 



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75c 
69c 



W.A.BRUNT0N 




32 



FR£E DELIVERY 






'A* 



CHHiSriA>' CHUBCH UVDi 

U1IJ. MEET ON OCT. £1 

■ • " "H 

The r*s'^ : ^r sicatiiiy 2Xt*>^2^-jifc-' 
:ae senior £aU**$~ Aid i2C HLkw&tS 
ary Society >f :r.^ «^ir:*t:xa ^svixdH^'^ 

S^3. Stamsier, MiQar-i Ave-* oa;^ 



.in Wonsan, which ^ the most 
sons parent*. Mr. and Mrs. W m. U out hern of five Canadian mf* f 1*un*w Cc.. a a; i» 
J. Hopkinson. I sions— extending north ;o tiiel 



tXIXL .CT 



• • 



-Mr. and Mrs. Many Olbwr Russian bonier. She was dress- 
spe»t Ihe ThankSKtving week- od in Koreaw native costume 
end at the home of Mis. Stalli- and had some verv Suveiy 



IS STILL LN HOSPITAL, 

Mrs. U 3. Re*? is -sail in 



brass. 

— Mrs. H. E. Ctihx»y. Xowntar- 
ket. and Mr. and Mrs. X. F. 
Johnson, Aurora, spent thi* holi- 
day weekend at Montreal and 
Sorul. P.Q. 




E. 8TRA8LEB A SON 

iiVKY.NHVH.LH 

FUNERAL DIREOfORS 
ANU 

AMBULANCE SERVICE 
PIIONKB— 250&— 2503 



tAttn OY THANUH 

Mid Uuiteati KiiiK anil rnniily 
wbh in i-x\ru(\ Ihvlr lUimU* to 
many tilntuU fiml ficJ«Mj(i(h for 

many kimi e x |i r u ■ « I o n » »r 
Mymji/ithy mm vomIoU.m:* *UuU*$ 
Oi'-n ft!f*«;fit t>iri onvcjiicnc 

(%\UH UY THAHiiH 

Ml'. Win. <*Jii-Juy wlahtm to lliqnk 

tr\wuin nml iii;Ighhiiin tur thoh 
numy whh of kUuttwn* uiul uym- 
tfilliy ut Ihb llinu irf llio iiiviiK of 



I 



our 



In Mcmoriflm 



Ikilllo— In loving mtinuiiy oi 
m oiUti r, Ylorenco Itulflu, wh<» 
priucil away Out. 2fK 103V, 

Tlio Wfiftii may cUunuu trom 
to year. 

Anil trlamt* taint tiny to iluy. 
Hut never will the utiti Wit IuvajI 

Yvom memory pnt$n nwny. 

lovingly r&menilinruil l#y |iur 
fihifilton, Mnrjurlo, l»'innk nml Tml 



ytutt 




PERRIN'S 
Flower Shop 

Member florbrts Tclernpli 
Delivery AMoeiaUoa 

Flower* wired to all part* of (he 

World 
Klowera for every oeeaaton 

Funeral F(owers 

A SPKCIAt.TV 



11» Mala HU 

Pkoaa 



Newmarhil 



IS5W 




ll**l|> wariteij — OoihI cook gtfnural. 
Wagvn $25 to Mart. In Nuwnuirket. 
Apply Era box 774. ciw37 

Hflp wuntrd— Experienced «(rl 

for kl'ii tnil housework. No cook- 
ing. Two children. Sleep in. 
Apply Kra box 471. «2w3« 



R0ADN00SE & ROSE 

Funeral Directors 

MAIN STREET, NEWMARKET. 



GRACE KNIGHTS 

WEDS E. G. MILNE 

Muplo Hill nnpliat chureJi with 
lliv HOllina for thn mnrrlnun ut 
MhH Qruco Victoria Kiilgjib, 
ilaiiKhtor of Mr. niul Mn*. R. A. 
Knluhta QwennviUo, In Mr. Kail 
(ferirgo Miliio, Ron at Mr. unci 
MJ«. William MillKt ut \.\nW, mi 
Monday nfterwmii. Ilev. A. K. 
McAftb nml Uov. C. K. \Uuwa 
otUvlaivil titiulHHi n bacltgrutmiJ 
of autumn folii^.. ami wlilto 
osiers, MUh HiiIIi KniuhlH wit* 
HoloUt anil MIha frcno Kniuhlft 
was at | Ik- organ, limy, arc? 
twin bixU:t» ut \ho briilti. 

Tins brldot tfiven In marriage 

l>y her father, was tfowiu><| In 
white brooailcd nrjjanzn, lior volt 
lu:iil wild a UnUi of orange hlojfa- 
oma. Hh« carried pink romu. 
Miss Kva Btanlvy wfla hrides- 
inuf<l ami wnru a hUio hriiviu\<n\ 
taffeta gown iiiul carried Joanna 
llllf roHes. 'Il»e grnninsinan was 
Mr. Harvey Hyer. ami the ii»hurs 
were Mr. Lluyil Wjdumaii and 
Mr. (iordnn Hche|| f liolh of 
Stouffville. 

T\\o rerc|>tinu was held ut Ihe 
home of ihe hrido'4 pnrcuU 4 
Maple Hill farm. Following a 
short motor trip Mr. ami Mm. 
Milne will reside in Toronto. 






NT. I'AIJI/tf laiMlttt HI'ONSOU 
COTrON IIK.1IONSTKATION 

An Inturcfltlng and iuivoI irmt 
i» being offered to tlio women of 
ihe town and vicinity whoa ihu 
Wo Unruo rVdtnn Co. piiin on a 
dcinonslrnUoii of ihoh |>riuliicirf. 
coinnlele wllh n fnnlilnn simw 
nunMieil by Ineat Voting Indiori. 

'Hie event la Hficiiidnred by tlio 
i.mik-H' Aid or Ht. I>aul'» clutrelt 
nnd will \hj held in tlio naiuh hall 
mi Tuesday evenliiH, Oct. SM. m g 
inn. Mrs. MulllofjiiN, who in om* 
lilnyed hy Hie Wabnaaii Cotton Co. 
fin Ihla imujkwo, will gtv*% nn 
inlen«tlng lulli, full of usufid 
hUHUt'*Ucmn for muthvr« nml homo- 
iij'ifu-i-H. A beautiful lied Sot, 
ilonuied by Hip eonirmny, will bo 
Kivtm lo thu holdur of n lucky ntim- 
Ui'-r llcltot. Ten will be api-vctl at 
ihu end of Hie domonati-allnn. 
price 16 cuiiIm, KvorylHMty wvlc«inio. 

_ «3wa7 

Queensville 



'flu? aerviet-K in Ihe Uniletl 
L'hftH-ti lire being wilhdmwn next 
Holiday an that nil may intend 
Ihe aiinlvt'iKury acrvlce* nf the 
Shoron United tbtircb. Rov. H. 
V. WIIhoii, HA, D.D.. of Mount 
Albert, will be iluj apeaker for 
Ibo day. Servieoa uro being held 
at II a.m. nnd 7.30 pin. All 
meu.tieis and friends' ore urged 
to attend. The Sharon anidvei- 
aary Hiipiier la being held oil 
Tuesday evening, <ki. 21, from ft 
oVIork on. 

The VV. M. S. ihank'Offeinig 
iiieeling will b« held at the 
borne of Mrs. Jacob Smith Ut- 
morrow aflemoou at 2. .'Id p.m. 



Jolinaion and seiv^l a dehcUuia 
slipper. 

Mr. tisul Mrs. Elraton Sliding 
and two children ot Lansing, 
Mich., are visiting Mr. ami Mrs. 
Shannon. 

Alt are pleased to see Mrs. 
Silos Sei.no 1 1 out again after her 
recent illness. 

Mis a II. I'unty ot Keswick 
spent Tueiiddy evening with Mrs. 
ft. Sennet I. 

Mrs Ivan St. George and 
Bryan of Dottnald. Man., nw 
visilinis Hev. und Mrs. Hugh 
Shannon, 

Korean Missionary 
Speaks In Costume 

^Bmmm*&^*^*^ 

*n«e nuiiithly meeting of the 
Rvnnyetiiie auxiliary of 'IVinitv 
United vbiiri'b was bebl Tuesday 
evening al the church, ami a 
very delightful evening was 
spent by members and friciuU 

Miss (Sweu Luinhcrl .saiij* 
three very a|4>ropriale songs, 
nceoni i lanied by Mrs. T h o s. 
liCuch. 

Tlie fc'uest speaker for the 
evening was Miss Maude HoKcrs. 
who nave a very vivid 



..- 



. ; • i. 



bright-cvltmd article*' of cloth- 1 f° un ;>" *«gW but 
in« to show. ! in & tavopatjjr. 

Sh*? exoiained how the sty test 
for women are all of the sann*l 
paiU»rn and bow each woman { 
from the ag<* %vf t<J can make her i 
own. They learn beforo *har- \ 
riage how to make their hus- 
band's clothes also. The men 
have a standard patient for their | 
clothes, too- ; 

The Women's Missionary Sooi- f 
ety in Kvuva was founded in ; 
1910 and since then has grown] 
rapidly, she expiamed. Thervi 
are 23 millions in Korea. Of; 
these two percent are Ch^tsiiansi 
and !U percent have hcaixl the! 
gospel 

Siuce 1910 Japan has exercised 
complete comr^l over Korea and 
the Koreans have the same iniv- 
iteges atfd laws aa Japa.n. How- 1 

ever. Koivaiw have never f£iv«n{ 
up lK>pe ot independem-e. They I 
have derived many benefit* from 
Japanese rule and the younger 
generation is almost c<»mplctcl,v \ 
Japaniied, Mis* Koxcvs said. 
Miss Hogers closed by singing 
o( a hymn in Korean. 



:s 




?n.^rft^'.^ 




T^m 




■* 

S 

; 



XuturaUy. when >ou Ket 
>oux pennaneut, >eu wiuit.t 
.<o to a beauty (harlot 
you have every confldeiice^ 
Our urtcca uro rwwotuibto* 
our ucrmtiiicuts satUfactor 



- . 



* * 



IVvmauents aiv 
■$S'to $7.50 




■* • • 



■ "^ - 



out* vento 



3*E 



1'iW 



v».> 



* rf' 



'IVy Kra printing tor quality 
ina satisfaction at I ho lowest j 
price*. 



arm 

HIXO OKOItUK 1IOTKI. 
llniolhy SI. at Main 

Oill 695 for upiiuhilmcut 



-a 



■ i*C-*> 



^•vv^^^Ji; ^- 



Mrs, J. Mi Kilfitp of Tmonto will 



be Ihe sjU'atcer. An invilatbui u 
cxlcndi-d In all who are inter* 

esled in iuls»louaiy work In 
attend* 

The Women* Association hold 
tbclr regular monthly meeting 
In llur bnsemeid of I be church 
on Tuetfday afteruoDn with Ihu 
|>resldvnt, Mrs. Willanl Cole, in 
the chair. 11m devotional part 

of the meeting Was ably taken 
by Mrs. Hiickwooxt. .Thu beer 
question In Nowuutrket was dis- 
cussed and it was slated that if 
(he law were passed, it would 
not only affect Ncwmatkct, but 
the youth (if this community as 
well. 

After .the buniuess of Ihe meet- 
ing was disponed of a quilt 
for the air raid shelter was com- 
pletcil. The hnalcfttieti were Mi.t. 
Prank Milue, Mrs. Jamc* Wright, 
Mrs Wm. Hnin and Mrs. Itohcrt 




ELASTIC 
HOSIERY 



It uitd tot lh« |«- 
lUf olipj4lm.iti«lni. 

iwotUn llmbl «nJ 
v*tlcot« vclnt, etc. 

Intk« blttf c*ic tlt« 

twitted, knotty 
«ppe«Mn<t CAUteu 
by the velnt length- 

«nln9» «n«l moil 
commonly found on 
the Inner tide of tn» 
it) enil thl^li cai.tte 
•rfoidedielterbtthe 
pi op«f fi 1 1 1 ii i o< 
tliitlc itocldnst. 

Such uici ncceit- 
llett the! tur^lcil 
hoi* of lh« piopef 
weight end itMtck of lubber be utecf In 
otdcr to tffeclfvety obUtn " relief with 
comfort ". * 

"oTco" ELASTIC HOSIERY 

■ *«(* tU<h ftqulrt mwntt, 

THE 

BEST DRUG STORE 

rilONK 14 NKlVMAKKKf 




t- 



- j 



Overseas Mailing Cartons 

Gummed Tape for Sealing 
Heavy- Weight Wrapping Paper and Cord 

Address Labels 



Stationery and Chocolate Bar in Overseas : 
Carton, Testaments for the Army. Navy and 
Air Force, Military Writing Kits, Pen and .; 
Pencil Sets, Trench Mirrors. Money Belts,' 
Rontson Lighters. Bill Folds. Cigarettes. 

Playing Cards, etc. 





^ / 



j 






- 



-. ■ "A-as 



Campbell's 




I I 




rhrmt* 417 



Xewnurket 



C-Wi 



». +* 



\1£ 



'irnw 



ij-*- 



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rT^wpss 






iPRii 



■ ft 






THE Hfc*eMfi^^ 







■:--v5-- 





■ _ 



AURORA 


sod* 


■ 

''AND "J 

'• ■'..: ' 

Person 

• ■ :• . 



al 



Mrs. John X-aWiUlut of Brock- 
vUle baa been (flatting her parents, 
Mr. and Mm. Duncan McDonald. 

Major W. H. Taylor *pcnt a few 
days In Toronto last week. 

Mm. Dorothy O'Dcil of Toronto, 
the former frothy Snowdcn of 
Aurora, baa been spending & wok 
in town at Mr, Milton Fleury* 

home. ^ . „ 

Mrs. Stanley Irwin of Cartoon 
Place is Spending a few days with 
her mother, Mrs*. M. Jenkinson. 

Mr, and Mrs. Thomas Speace 
and Larry are spending this week 
at Orillia. 

Mr. and Mrs, Norman. Johnson 
spent the holiday weekend in 
Montreal. 

Miaa Hazel McBridc of Mooref icld 
spent the weekend with her par- 
ents, Mr. and Mrs. Orlic McBride. 

Miss Hazel MiUsap spent the 
holiday weekend at Stayner. 

Mr. Harold Pringle spent the 
weekend in Haliburton county. 

Mr. A. N. Fisher spent the holi- 
day weekend at London, Ont. 

Miss P. Banbury of Toronto 
spent the weekend with her par- 
ents, Mr. and Mrs. Jesse Banbury, 

Mrs. L M. Benson of Toronto 
spent the weekend with Mr. and 
Mrs. Hairy Ricnbell. 

Fred. Teasdale of Toronto spent 
the holiday weekend with his par- 
ents, Mr. and Mrs. H. E. Teasdale. 

Miss Marian Thompson, who is 
attending Victoria College, Uni- 
versity of Toronto, this year, spent 
the weekend with her parents. 

Mr. Cyril Hambiin of Toronto 
spent the weekend with his mother, 
Mrs. Frank Smith. 

Harvey Fingold of Cornwall 
spent the holiday weekend with his 
parents, Mr. and Mrs. Louis Fin- 
gold. 

Miss Audrey Walker of Toronto 
spent the weekend with her par- 
ents, Mr. and Mrs. J. B. Walker. 

Miss Bertha Wood spent the 
weekend at Woodstock. 

Mr. and Mrs, Rocklif fe -Linton 
of Midland spent the weekend with 
Mr. and Mrs. Ross Linton. 

Mr. and Mrs. Murray Wood and 
family .of Toronto spent the week- 
end with Mr, Wood's mother, Mrs. 

C F. Wood, 

Mr. Charles Browning of Bramp- 
ton, former Aurora resident, spent 
the weekend in town. 

Misses Ruth and Rita DeLaHaye 
of Toronto spent the weekend with 
their parents, Mr. and Mrs. Hoy 
DeLaHaye. 

Mr. and Mrs. Donald Hoffman 
of Toronto spent Sunday and Mon- 
day with Rev. and Mrs. A. C. 
Hoffman. 

Mrs, Edna Middiebrook of Brent- 
wood. Oat- has been visiting her 
father, Mr. John Stubbg. 

Miss Florence Petlovaney of Tor- 
onto spent the weekend with her 
parents. 

Mrs. E. Frctwell and Mrs. G. 
Burdett of Toronto are visiting 
Mr. and Mrs. R. V. Smith. Mrs. 
Fretwell is Mrs. Smith's mother. 

Miss Dorothy Miller of Barrie 
spent the weekend with Mr. and 
Mrs. J. B. Walker. 

Miss Mae Fry, nurse-ln^training 
at Toronto Western hospital, is 
spending a few days holidays with 
her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Charles 
Fry. 

Mr. William Ma Hoy, former 
Aurora resident, has been spending 
a few days with bid brother, 
Reeve C. A. Malloy. and bis sisters, 

M isscs 31; and C. MaUoy. 

Miss Eleanor McDowell of Tor- 
onto spent the weekend with her 
cousin, Miss May Heath. 

Miss Irene Heath spent the week- 
end with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. 
Oral Heath; ' 

Miss Bertha Andrews of the staff 
of Honeywood Continuation school 
spent the -holiday with her mother, 
Mrs. M. L Andrews. -, 

Mrs. Robert Hodgkinson attend- 
ed the Milgate-Ncsbltt nuptials in 
Toronto on Saturday.. '.. 



l * 



KETTLEBY 



Christ Anglican church, Ket- 
tleby, is holding its annual hot 

turkey dinner on Wednesday, 
Oct. 29. 



UNCLE MANAGES DAIRY 



. 



Joseph Cousins, who is man- 
aging the Newmarket branch of 
Cousins Dairy, is an uncle of 
Archie Cousins, formerly of 
Newmarket and now the man- 
ager at Aurora, and has had 
many years of business exper- 
ience. 



WJTM THE SOLDIERS 

Rifleman Jas, Tran, formerly an 
XCO, with No. IX: platoon of the 
Queen's York Rangers, arrived in 
England recently. . ; _ ■ ■ ■ \ 

Sgt. George Davis of the R.C.AJF., 
former local high school student, 
was in town last Thursday, He 
reports to Halifax, N-S^ next week. 

Karl Neiliy of the R.CA.F., Jar- 
vis, is home on 14 days leave, visit- 
ing his parents, Mr. and Mrs. R. J. 

Neiliy. 

Uoyd Chadburn, who went over-, 

seas "last year as a pilot officer 
with the R.CAJ=\, has been pro- 
moted to the rank of flight 
lieutenant. 

William Wilson of the R.CA&C, 
Camp* Borden, spent the weekend 
ut his home. 

Jos. McGhce of the R.CA-F., 
Guelph, spent the holiday weekend 
with his wife and parents. 

Eric Buan of the R.C.A.F. is 
now stationed at Guelph. where ho 
is taking a course at the air force 
cooks' school. He spent the week- 
end with his parents, Mr. and 
Mr*. G. A. Buna. 

Sgt. James Murray of Toronto 
spent the weekend with his par- 
ents, Mr. and Mrs. Archie Murray. 

Harold Petrlc of the ffcCAJj 
Guelph, spent the weekend with 
his mother. Mr*. Everett Petrie. 

Corporal Kenneth Babcock of 
Camp Borden spent the weekesid 
with his, family. Corporal Babeock 
rejoined his unit a few weeks ago 
after taking special training in 
the U.SA. '•-'• ->\ 

Keith Southwood of the R.CA.F., 
Hagersvillc.. returned to camp on 
Tuesday after spending a. few -days 
leave with his mother. Mrs. Charles 
Southwood. f 

Signalman Robert Bond of the 
R.CC.S. has been transferred from 
Newmarket camp to Vituy Bar- 
racks, at Kingston, where he is 
now stationed. 

CARD OF THANKS 

Mr. Thomas Chotburn and family 
wish to thank their friends and 
neighbors for their many kind 
expressions of sympathy and con- 
dolence during their recent bereave- 
ment. 



Calendar 



• » 



The Queen's York Rangers regi- 
ment is holding its battalion church 
parade on Sunday to St. Jude's 
Anglican church. Roncesvalles Ave.. 
Toronto- The unit will fall in at 
High Park at 2.10 p.m. and will 
parade to the church via Howard 
Park Aw. The padre. Capt. the 
Rev. J. H. Shires, will preach. 
Following the service the unit will 
parade to For: York armories for 
dismissal. 



On Sunday the 1st Aurora Boy 
Scout troop and the Wolf Cubs will 
proceed :o Richmond Hill where 
they will take part in the district 
Boy Scouts" church parade. They 
will fall in at 10.40 a-m. at the north 
end and will parade to Richmond 
Hill United church, where Rev. C. 
B. Bret hen will deliver the sermon. 



The evening auxiliary, of Aurora 
United church mat on Tuesday 
evening at ' the home of Miss 
Mildred Graham. A special thank- 
offering was- contributed by the 
members. 

The W.A. of Aurora United 
church realized $SS at their imagin- 
ary bazaar, held in Aurora United 
church last Thursday. 

Mrs. A. M. KU'kwood, the presi- 
dent, and Mrs. Roy Hicks received 
the guests, white those 'agisting 
with tea. were Mrs. W. U Milgate.. 
Mrs. Ross Linton, Mrs. ■& = V\ 
Underbill. Mrs. W. J. Siaman, Ml*. 
J. 1*. Urquhart, Mrs. Harold. Lub- 
bock, Mrs. R. V. Smith, Mrs. Cv J, 
Oevins. Mrs. H. C. Summers,. Mrs. 
£. Rouseite. ■ '. 

A new adult Bible class has been 
formed at Aurora United church 
with Frank Young as president 
and A, & Gray as discussion 

leader. Mns E. H, Clarke is 

.secretary-treasurer. 

A social evening was enjoyed by 
the parents' cias* at Aurora United 
church yesterday evening. Miss 
Settle Lewis of Toronto, a member 
of the Ontario Religious Education 
Council, was present and conducted 
the recreation hour. The men of 
the class provided the refreshments. 
T„C. McLeod is president of the 

Rev. Roy Hicks* service took' a 
new form at the United church on 
Sunday evening when the pastor 
answered a series of religious 
questions and problems that he hud 
encountered , in visiting the mem- 
bers of the church >ince coming to 
Aurora. Mr. Hicks plans to con- 
duct a similar service periodically. 

A new C.GXT. group was formed 
at . Aurora United church last 
Friday evening with a joint com- 
mittee of Barbara- Walker, Doro- 
thy Richardson and Barbara. Oil- 1 
belt m charge. I 

Officers elected were: president, I 
Ruth Knowles; vice-president. Carol 
Ui\ derhiil ; .secretary, Barbara 
Cook; treasurer. Marian Cook. The j 
group will meet each Friday nigh:, j 

'■ ■ i 





%* 



WH1 
Marh 120th Birthday 



copal church for several confer- " 






encos. 

Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth Booth by 
I of Newmarket were guests at the 
home of Mr. and Mrs. Perry 
Winch on Sunday and attended 
church. 

Pte. Chas. Cowieson jtvas homo 
during the weekend. 

Mrs. W. E. Morton spent the 
weekend holiday in Ottawa. 

Mr. Leon. Connell visited his 
home during the weekend. 

Miss Dorothy White and a 
friend were at home for the 
holiday. 

Mr. Floyd Mainprizc of Tor- 
onto ■•"spent: the' holiday at home. 

:Mr. and Mrs. Isaac Morton 
and Mr. and Mrs, Donald Morton 
of Oakwood visited at Mr. J. A. 
Morton's on Saturday. 

Mr. Winston grosser has been 
sick and confined to his bed. but 
at last report was improved. 

" Mrs. Redforn of Calgary, **ho 



Mrs. Carson Poliqck of Island 
Grove entertained at Thanks- 
giving dinner Mrs. Washington 
-Winch and , daughter, Alma, of 
Belhaven,'. Mrs, Friend Morton, 
Mrs. Chas. . Willoughby and Miss 
Muriel Wiiloughby of Keswick 
and Mr.; arid Mrs.. Elmer McCarty 
of Seattle, Washington^ who are 
spending their honeymoon in 
Canada*. ,, ;-vl- '•. •■ ., 

The annual white gift service 
of the W.M.S. of Keswick 
United .'church and i also the 
regular meeting were held on 
Oct.- 9. ' -"-.iV 

Mrsl -Gordon Lapp presided. 
Mrs. Lapp used the ; theme for 
October: "We live by faith in 
God. our Father," During the 
worship service Mrs.; Fisher read 

a chapter .. on l "Export* and xvas formerly. Miss Coza Thomp- 
Imports front Re\%Archor ■ Wil- ^^ daughter of Mr. Geo. 
lace's ■ new book, *The Faith of j T!^omp.son of Queensville. visited 
3Com.; Airs. .AinAap Huntley at lhe home ci Mr% and MrS . 

Cecil Grant over the weekend. 

Miss Kerr and a friend, of 
Toronto, visited at the home of 
Mrs. Cecil Taylor. Miss Kerr's 
sister, over the weekend. 

Mr. and Mrs. Rozclle of Clin- 
ton were guests at Mr. :xnd Mrs. 
Angus King's during the week- 
end. 

Mr. Kenneth MacKinnon vis- 
ited in Toronto during the week- 
end. 

Miss Beth Carscailcn of Gall 
is visiting her sister, Mrs. Gor- 
don Lapp, at the manse. 



Weddings 



COOK - TAYLOR 

. 

The wedding took place on 
Saturday at Malum, of Mary 
Jane Taylor of Richview to 
Charles Arthur Cook of Aurora. 
The ceremony was performed by 
Rev. M. C* Gandicr. 



Pleasantville 



arid Mrs. Percy Mahoney also 
assisted in the service. 

.The .white gifts for the Fred 
Victor Mission in Toronto were 
received and dedicated by Mrs, 
Lapp. Mrs. Wm. Vail, president, 
had charge of the business meet- 
ing. . 

On 2Co\\ 13 the W.M.S. are 

entertaining the members of the 

mission band. 
Thanksgiving Sunday services 

were held in the Urated church 
on Sunday. Rev. Gordon Lapp 
preached in the morning on 
"Thanks be to God" The 
church was beautifully decorated 
with autumn leaves, vegetables 
and fruits. Special music was 
provided by. the ehoir. The 
morning service was attended 
by a capacity congregation. 

This Sunday, in the absence 
of the minister, who will be on 
holidays, the guest minister at 
the morning service will be Rev. 
A. J. G. Carscadden of Toronto. 
who will speak in the interests 
of the Canadian National Insti- 
tute for the Blind. In the even- 
ing the service is withdrawn 
owing to anniversary services 

in the Christian church. 



WM. G. MILGATE 
WEDS IN TORONTO 

Tho marriage was solemnized on 
Saturday In St. Barnabas* church. 
Toronto, of Margaret Nesbitt. R.X.. 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. James 
Nesbltt. to Mr, William George 
MUgate, sou of Mr«. Benjamin 
Milgate of Aurora and the laie 
Mr. Milgate. Rev. F. E. Powell 
officiated. Mr. John Lovtck way 
at the organ. ■* 

Given in marriage by her father. 

tho bride wore a powder blue sheer 

gown wltlvblnck hat and carried a 
white prayer book with streamer* 

Kenneth Hunter, teacher of {of rosebuds and lily of the valley, 
the Jersov school, is in charge I ***** Jennie Mildred Nesbltt was 
of the Keswick Boy Scout* dur-i h *>' iistw "« bridesmaid, and wore 
ine Mr. Lapp's absence. L^*W". b!u ° »L wlth 



mg Mr. Lapp 
Rev. Gordon Lapp left on Mon- 



day for Alberta, where he 
j be' tho representative ni 



On Sunday evening the Young j 
People's Union of Aurora United 
church will be in charge of the 
service. 



The SStb anniversary services will 
be held at the Aurora Baptist 
church on Sunday, with Rev. L. P. 
Kipp, editor of . the Canadian i 
Eaptist, >f Toronto, preaching at 
the morning service. In 



the 
evening Rev. W. E. Hodgson of 
Toronto, president of the Baptist ! 
convection of Ontario and Quebec, j on Monday after Spending the 



A social evening was enjoyed j 
last Friday at the home of Mrs. 
Georgia Keacock. Bogaruown. j 
During the evening Miss Sadie 
McQueen made the lucky draw 
for the beautiful quilt made 
and donated by Mrs. Malcolm. , 
Sin elderly lady. The quilt went j 
to Mrs. J. A. Lyons of Newmar- 
ket. A lovely and substantial 
lunch was served by the 
hostesses, Mrs. Heacock. M rs. 
Flintoff. Mrs. Price and Mrs. 
Druery , w h o were responsible 
for the event. Tr.c sum of $30 
was realized, which all goes to 
the British War Victims* Fund. 

Mrs. Will Flintoff of Califor- 
nia and Mrs. A. Flintoff had 
Monday evening tea at tho home 
of Mr. Chas. Toole. 

Miss Dors McCJure of Toronto 
and Trooper Orley McClure of 
Camp Border* spent Sunday at 
their home. 

Miss Sadie McQueen returned 



holiday weekend at her home in 
Stayner. 
Mr. and Mrs. S. Taylor and 



An organization meeting of the 
Aurora junior hockey club will fac 
held In the Aurora town hall on 
Monday, evening. Oct. 20, at 6.X5 
p^n. A full attendance of players, 
fans and supporters, both from 
Aurora and Newmarket, is urged: 

A meeting. of all the graduate 
nurses of Aurora and ■ vicinity is 
being called for the purpose of 
discussing and arranging a course 
)n "The Emergencies in War/" 
The meeting u to. take place at the 
Red Crosa room*; the post office, 
on Wednesday. Oct. 22. at 3 p.m. 
Kindly make a apccial effort to 
attend and consider this a notifica- 
tion to attend thi* meeting. 



f 






. "- 



will speak. Mrs. C. Russell of Tor- 
onto will be «oloi«t at both services. 
A . special young people's service 
win be held on Monday evening j Mr# j ohn Taylor of Cedar Brae 

day. 

Mr. and Mrs* Bannerman and 
two children of Bradford had 
Sunday dinner at the home of 
Mr. Frank Williams. 
' Mr. Bill Walker of Kirkland 
Lake is spending a . couple of 
I weeks at the home of Mr. Joshua 
Stickwood, Bogarttown. 

A speedy recovery is wished 
for Mr. Chas. Toole and Mr. 
Doug. McClure. who are both ilL 

Last Thursday evening at the 
home of Mrs. Earl Toole, a box 
for Albert Chalklin was packed 
for overseas, while on Tuesday 
evening at the home of Mrs. 
Gordon McClure several ladies 
gathered to prepare bags of 
candy for the Industrial Home. 
A lovely pen and pencil set anu 
a testament were given Mrs. 
Needier to be passed on to her 
son, Wilford, who is at present 
stationed in Toronto. The boys 
from this district are being 
remembered by the Bogarttown 
club. 



A Hallowe'en euchre party is 
being held in Trinity parish hall on 
Oct 2S, at S p.m. by the Parochial 
Guild. There will be good prizes 
and refreshments will be served. 
Proceeds are for Christmas gifts to 
boys overseas. Everyone welcome. 



Era printing costs little. 



will 

the 
National Boys' Work Board at 
three church boys* conferences 
in that province. These confer- 
ences, known as the trans-Can- 
ada boys* conferences, are being 
held this fall in 20 centres in 
various parts of Canada. Later, 
there will be one in Owen 
Sound and one in Toronto* Mr. 
Lapp is on three weeks* holidays 
from his duties at Keswick. 
Some years ago he was secretory 
for boys* work in Alberta and 
has many friends and former 
associates there. During his stay 
in the west he will also visit 
Mrs. Lapp's parents. 

Mrs. Lapp will be at Brighton 
during Mr. Lapp's absence. 

The United church anniversary 
services come the last Sunday of 
the month. Oct. 26.. Rev. R. J. 
D. Simpson. D.D., of Toronto, 
who was minister of the Queens- 
ville circuit from 1901 to 1903, 
will be the special preacher. 

Funeral services for the late 
Duncan King of Jackson's Point 
were held in the United church 
on Saturday. Mr. King, fn- 
many years a resident of Kes- 
wick, was one of the leading 
members of the building com- 
mittee of the present church and 
took an active part in the life 
and work of the church. He 
was in his 90th year. Interment 
was at Queensville. The sym- 
pathy of many friends is extend- 
ed to his widow and family. 

This Sunday is the occasion of 
the 120th anniversary of the 
Christian church in Keswick. At 
the morning service Rev. Mr. 
Brown of the Altona charffe will 
be the guest minister. At the 
evening service Rev. Mr. McCuIl* 
ough of St; Andrew's Presbyter- 
Ian church in Sutton will be the 
preacher. Mrs.; Cecil Prosser 
will sing. Ail services will be 
in the charge of the minister. 
Rev. Mr. Serried 

The anniversary will be con- 
tinued on Monday evening when 
a hot supper will be serve*.! in 
the basement of the church. 

Rev. E. F. McCarthy of Lan- 
sing. Mich,, was the guest of his 
cousin. Mr. Francis Morton, on 
Sunday, and attended church. 
Mr. McCarthy is secretary- 
treasurer of the missionary de- 



black hat and corsage of Talisman 
roses. Pre, Robert Hodgkinsou of 
Aurora was best 



reception 



man, 

was held 



at she 



Tho 

home of the bride. Mrs. Xesbttt. 
in a wtnc sheet dress with corsage 

of fall flowers, received the guests, 
assisted by the groom's mother in 
wine sheer with corsage. 

Following a motor trip to west- 
ern Ontario. Mr. imd Mrs. Milgate 
will Hvo in Aurora. 



Vivian 




Mr. Mulholland had the misfor- 
tune to have his leg badly hurt 
lust week while digging potatoes. 

Mr. Edward Peterson met with 
an accident last week, and had 
sonic ribs broken. 

Mr. and Mrs. W. Stickwood ami 
family and Mr. E. Peterson haw 
moved to Newmarket, 

Earl Gro$e gave the messuge at 
the Young People's meeting on 
WedneAiay evening, and spoke on 
the "Bible and Science." Miss 
Edna Pegg read the scripture and 
:ho young people's quartet brought 
t message In song. 

The prayer meeting WAn held at 
he home of Geo. Smalley on Frl- 
iay evening. Mr. Rowan was In 
charge. The meeting will be held 
as the home of Mr. and Mrs. Bruco 
Pegg this week. 

Got don Woodward of t he 
R.C.A.F., who has been stationed at 
Calgary, was calling on friends in 
the community last week. 

Members of the young peoplc'x 
Bible cias* met at the home of 
John Mitchell on Saturday evening 
for the purpose of organizing 
their claas. B. Reid was in charge. 

Wilfred Needier and Fred Wood- 
house of the Queen's Own Rifles 
were at their homes on Sunday. 

Mrs, S. Pollard and little Stanley 
were home over the holiday. 

Mr. and Mrs, W. Hood returned 
home on Tuesday evening from a 
visit to -Niagara Fall*. 

Mr. and Mrs. Fred Gray and Miss 
Nora Gray of Toronto were holiday 
visitors at Mr. and Mrs. Wm. 
Hood's. 

A special Thanksgiving message 

wa.s brought by the pautor. Mr. 
Rowan, on Sunday evening and a 
message in song was brought by 
Mrs. Rowan. . 

Holiday visitors at the home of 
Mr. John Mitchell were Mrs. R. H. 
Mitchell, Miss Mildred Mitchell, 
Mr. and Mrs, Harold Ryan aid 
Betty Lou. of Toronto, and Mr. aid 
Mrs. Leonard Seedhouse, Jackie 
and Jirnmle, of Leasidc. 



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♦ ■; 




YOUR CO-OPERATION INVITED 



AURORA. ONTARIO. THURSDAY, OCTOBER 23RD. 1941 



*. 



1/ 



SiNOIJi COPIES. 5 CENTS EACH 



*,' 



MRS. THOS. CHATBURH 
DIES IN 62ND YEAR 



The death occurred on Friday 
morning of Mrs. Thomas Chatbum 
in her 62nd year after a lengthy 
illness. 

Mary McMahon was born in 
Vaughan township and lived there 
all her life until coming to Aurora 
17 years ago. She had resided in 
Maple many years. 

She was a member of Trinity 
Anglican church, Aurora, 

The funeral service was conduct- 
ed on Sunday from P, M. Thomp- 
son's funeral parlors- by Rev. R, K. 
Perdue. Interment was at Maple 
cemetery. 

Mrs. Chatbum is survived by her 
husband, two daughters. Mrs. 
Gladys Bursey and Mrs. Irene 
Floury, both of Toronto, and, three 
sons. Ptc. Leslie Pllson of the 
Royal Hamilton light Infantry 
regiment, of the staff at Newmar- 
ket training centre, and George 
and Fred Chatburn. both of Aurora. 



Struck By Mad Cow, 
Fanner Escapes Injury 

Ccorue Robinson of Whitchurch 
township had a narrow escape from 
i-erious Injury last Friday when 
he was charged by a maddened 
cow and struck down. The Incident 
occurred on the farm of Charles 
Case on the second concession. 
Mr. Robinson escaped practically 
unscathed after belnj; knocked 
down, as the cow had practically 
no horns. .' . 

ATKINSON WINS RACE 
EVENT, 10 GIRLS ENTER 

^^^^— — 

4 

Running a heady, steady race. 
Ross Atkinson finished In front of 
nearly 70 competitors in tho annual 
Aurora hi#h school cross-country 
run, last Friday, to hold the Dr. 
Bruce McDonald cup for this school 

year. 

He will receive a miniature of 
the cup for permanent possession. 
It was the 13th running of the 
fall classic and the course was 
.slightly over three miles. Ted 
Kerr and Alan CrotsBley finished 
In second and third positions, 

Last year four young ladies 
essayed the grind and this year 
no less than 10 dared to do bottle 
with the sterner sex. Among 
these Betty Smith had the honor 
of finishing first. Medals will be 
awarded to those finishing first in 
each form as follows: grade 13, 
Al. Crossley; grade 12, Ted Kerr; 
grade 11. Douglas Tunncy; grade 
10A. Bruce Hoyles: grade 10B. 
BUI Gilkes; grade 9A. Howard 
Sutton; grade dB, Russell Hoover. 



TAKES CHARGE OF 

UNIT'S KITCHEN 

Grant McCachen of the R.C.A.F. 
has been transferred from Brant- 
ford to Toronto, Ho is now in 
charge of the kitchen at the newly 
formed women's unit of the 
R.C.A.F.. which Is occupying the 
old Huvergal college property. 



REI) CROSS PLANS NEW 

"EMERGENCIES" COURSE 

A course of eight lessons in "The 
Emergencies in War" is being 
arranged by the Aurora Red Cross 
Society, 

A clans may be rormed from any 
group of women, girls, men or boys 
over 1G years of age. It is not 
necessary to have taken the course 
in "Home Nursing." A small fee 
covers the cost of tho Red Cross 
manual and the cost of materials, 
etc., used. Those interested are 
asked to register at Willis' ■ drug 
store as soon as possible and may 
consult an information circular 
there. Announcements as to dates 
of lectures will be made in this 
paper later. 



WM&, MEETS 
The Young Women's Missionary 
society of St, Andrew's Presbyter- 
ian church met at the home of 
Mrs. Gordon Baldwin on Tuesday 
evening. 

ATTEND FAIR 

Among those from Aurora attend- 
ing Woodbridgfl Fair on Monday 
were Mr. and Mrs. William Mount. 
Reeve C. A. Malloy, Mr, Fred Cous- 
ins and Mr. and Mrs. Dales Borden. 

LITTLK GIRL CHRISTENED 

On Sunday Mary Jean Flee, 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. T, Kers- 
lake Flee, was christened at Trin- 
ity Anglican church by Rev. R, K. 
Perdue. 



ATTEND MEDICAL MEETING 

Dr. and Mrs. C. J. Dcvins and 
several other Aurora medicos and 
their wives attended the meeting 
of York-Simcoe-Ontarlo-Peel' medi- 
cal district held at Grace church, 

Brampton. 

A fine day's entertainment, 
including a visit to the famous 
Dale estate, was arranged by the 
Peel county doctors. Dr. Devins 
is the councillor for the four- 
county district of the Ontario 
Medical Association. 

WILL USE POST-OFFICK 

Arrangements are being made 
whereby the local company of tho 
Queen's York Rangers will store 
their rifles and machine guns in 
the Aurora post-office. 



ST. ANDREW'S DEFEAT 
U. T. S. RUGBY TEAM 



St. Andrew's College firsts on 
Tuesday afternoon surprised the 
critics when they downed Lou Hay- 
man's unbeaten University of To- 
ronto school's team 11-9. 

It was the first defeat for the 
U.T.S. team In five starts and lost 
week in Toronto they had defeat- 
ed the local school 6-0. St. An- 
drew's, except for tho last period, 
were always in the driver's seat. 

In the first quarter Sablston 
kicked for a single after the An- 
dreans had made three first downs 
to the Toronto one. In the 
second quarter the same player 
booted another. A fumble on the 
15-yard line gave St. Andrew's the 
ball but thoy were held to no score 
on three downs. Then Bark boot- 
ed from behind his own line and 
Chipman, who caught the ball at 
the 35-yard line, lateralled to Joltffc, 
who went over for a touch on a 
brilliant run. Chipman converted. 

In the third quarter Don Bark 
kicked a field goal which bounded 
over off the crossbar. Early in 
the last quarter Chipman booted a 
field goal and then U.T.S. marched 
50 yards for a major score, which 
D. Bark converted. With five min- 
utes to go U.T.S. had the ball on 
their own 45, and advanced to the 
St. Andrew's 10, where they were 
stopped cold, and forced to kick. 

St. Andrew's hung on in the final 
few minutes with grim determina- 
tion. Milllgan, Joliffe and Chipman 
were the three stars for St. 
Andrew's. 

BENVILLE DECLARED 
CYCLIN6 CHAMPION 

Bob Benvllle 'ho* been declared 
champion for 19-11 of the Aurora 
Cycling club and will hold the 
Dawson trophy for a year follow- 
ing the final tabulation of indivi- 
dual standings by the club execu- 
tive which met at the home of 
President John Offord on Wednes- 
day evening. 

Benville will receive a miniature 
of the trophy for his permanent 
possession. Jim Hanson was 
runner-up, with Harold Foster in 
third position. Both boys will re- 
ceive medals. This la the third 
year of competition. Cliff Chapman, 
now in the R.C.A.F., being the 
winner the two years previous. 

FORMER RESIDENT JOINS 

WOMEN'S R.CAF. WTNC 
Miss Nina Elmsley of Toronto, 
former Aurora resident and daugh- 
ter of General J. H. Elmsley, 
reported for active service this 
week with the CW.AA.F.. the 
newly formed women's wing of 
the R.C.A.F. Previous to that Miss 
Elmsley had been very active with 
the C.W.S.F. 

FORMER A.H.S. STUDENT 

HAS DUKE'S PHOTOGRAPH 

Flight Lieut. Harry Kay, of No. 
7 elementary flying training school 
at Windsor, son of Dr. and Mrs. 
A. F. Kay of Schomberg, has 
received an autographed photo- 
graph of the Duke of Kent, along 
with a letter from tho duke's secre- 
tary stating the former's regrets 
that he was unable to visit the 
training centre. Harry attended 
high school here. 



HEAR APPEALS NOV. 5 

1 ■ t 

The court of revision to consider 
assessment appeals will sit on 
Wednesday. Nov. ft. and wilt be 
composed of the following members 
of tho council: Mayor Frank Under* 
hill. Reeve C. A Malloy, Deputy- 
Reeve C. E. Sparks and Councillors 
A. A. Cook and Ross Linton. 





INQUEST WILL BE HELD 

The inquest Into the .death of 
Miss Elisabeth Cai*t*r, aged Aurora 
resident who was killed when 
struck by an automobile driven by 
Harold Freethy of Grey county on 
Oct. S, will be held tomorrow 
evening at 8 p.m. in the Aurora 
town hall. 

No date has yet been announced 
for the inquest into the death of j 
the late Richard Pugh which was 
postponed from Sept. 30. 



Cycling 



t*"- ' 



BILL THOMPSON HEADS 
HIGH SCHOOL "LIT. 



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Bill Thompson was elected presi- 
dent of the Aurora high school 
literary society lost Friday In a 
three-cornered fight. The same 
situation existed in the contests 
for the other three major positions, 
which saw Mary Bowman elected 

as vice-president and Dorothy 
Aldrlch .and Anson Gilbert as 
secretary and treasurer respective- 
ly. 

Form representatives elected 
were: grade 13, Ronald Kyle and 
Beth Shortt : grade 12, Craig 
McKenzie and Mary E m m e 1 1; 
grade 11, F'red Rowe and Joan 
Patterson; grade 10, Don. Brown, 
Lorna Cousins and Mavis Sisnmn; 
grade 10B. Bob Galloway and Vera 
Walker; grade 9A, Jim Willis and 
Jean Koako; grade 9B. John Monk, 
Valencia McNaught and Etta. King. 
' Following the election returns a 
dance was held in the auditorium. 
Miss Gladys Humphreys of the 
staff was previously elected honor- 
ary president of the society by 
acclamation. 

Contractor Resigns To 
Submit Higher Tende 

Raymond Rowling, who holds the 
contract for the collection of gar- 
bage in the town, tendered his 
resignation to Town Clerk A. C. A. 
Willis on Tuesday evening to take 
effect as of Dec. 1. 

At the last meeting of the 
council Mr. Rowling requested an 
increase in pay from $1,200 to 
$1,800 and the "council said they 
could not make such a raise 
without submitting the contract 
for tender anew. 

Reeve C A. Malloy was author- 
ized to negotiate with Mr. Rowling, 
and to Clear up the situation and 
give council a mandate to deal with 
the question Mr. Rowling has sub- 
mitted his resignation. At the 
meeting held on Oct. 6 Mr. Rowl- 
ing intimated that he would 
tender again at his suggested 
figure. 

Tenders are being called for by 
the council and applications will be 
received up to Nov. 1. 



Jim Hanson, Bob Benville and 

Lattice Pugh were the three-star 

performers In the-23-mUe road race 

held by the Aurora cycling club, 
with 4:he sanction of the C.W.A* on 

Thanksgiving day. 

Twenty-one of the best riders in 
the province faced Starter BUI 
Elder and when the gruelling course 
of five laps, from Aurora to Snow- 
ball and return, had been com- 
pleted all but four were still in ac- 
tion. 

Hanson and Benville finished one, 
two. in a photo finish that hud the 
spectators cheering. Only Inches 
separated the two boys, who gave 
everything they had. Hanson had 
a one minute hundlcap over Ben- 
ville, who took second place in the 
race and second place in the time 
prizes. 

Lance Pugh of Oshawo. the 
scratch rider and provincial cham- 
pion, finished ninth in the race, 
but first in time He gave up to 
13 minutes in handicaps. He gave 
seven minutes to Hanson and six to 
Benville. His time for the course 
was OS minutes. 43 and two-fifths 
seconds. Benvlllo's time was 70 
minutes, 58 and three-fifths seconds. 
Herb. Brooks of Toronto, who fin- 
ished fourth, took the third prize 
for time, with 71 minutes, 32 sec- 
onds. Hanson's time was 71 min- 
utes, 55 and three-fifths seconds. 

Great credit is due all tho North 
York riders for their fine showing. 
Harold Foster, Aurora, was third, 
Floyd Dennc of Newmarket, fifth, 
Bill Heath, Aurora, eighth, while 
Norman Rank of Aurora and Ed. 
Mosley of Newmarket finished 18th 
and 17th. All. with the exception 
of Foster, are Junior riders. Rank 
winning the special prize for the 
youngest rider. Hanson the winner, 

rode in the junior class lust year. 
As the turn was made in the 
third lap John McFarlund of To- 
ronto wax unable to make it and 
was forced out us his front wheel 
crumpled against the curb and he 
was thrown heuvlly. He received 




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medical aid and suffered a yprain* 
ed wrist.- Jimmy DeBoncdetti was 
forced to stop for repairs to his 
wheel and was virtually eliminated. " 
On the fLcat leg of this lap Noty 1 ' 
man Foster was forced out N with .... 
cramps, as was Bed Brown of To- 
ronto, 

Final standing saw them finish 
in this order; Jim Hanson, Bob 
Benviite,': Harold Foster, Herb. 
Brooks. Toronto* Floyd 'Donne, 
Johnny Lyons, Toronto, Gus Hog- 
ben, Hamilton, Bill Heath, Lance 
Pugh, Oshawo, Bob Anderson. Tor- 
onto, Frank Bull. Oshawa, Cliff 
Pringle. Ouhawu. .Tom Hayes, Tor- 
onto, Ernie Dickson, Toronto, Jules 
Churbonnoau, Toronto, Norman 
Rank, Ed. Mosley. ' 
Officer Alex Ferguson^ and Chief 
Constable Fisher Dunham policed 
the course perfectly and traffic did 
not interfere with the riders. Dr. 
J. L. Urquhurt was on hand to look 
afler the injured. Bill ISldcr, D. 
B. McDonald, Sim. and George 
Pack ham of the Canadian Wheel- 
men's Association, along with Pres- 
ident Jack Offord. Secretary Geo. 
Spence. Orval Heath and Mickey 
Smith handled the official duties 
without an error. 

The oldest rider to compete was 
53-year-old Gus. Hogbon of Hamil- 
ton, while Norman Rank of Aurora 
was the youngest. Pugh took the 
Cousins cup for the best time, while 
every rider won an award. 

Among thosu who donated prizes 
were Capt. Dr. C. R. Bouldlng, Au-: 
rora, Dr. J. L, Urquhurt. Aurora* 
Highland Oil, Aurora, Aurora Fkmr 
Mills, Stiver Brothers, Aurora, H., 
E, Gilroy, Newmarket* Aurora, 
Dairy, Dr. £. J- Henderson, Aurora, J 
J. L. Spillctte, Newmarket, R. C. m ' 
Morrison. Newmarket, J. F. Willis* f$Af 
Aurora, Smith's Hardware, New-'p" * 
market, P. M. Thompson, Aurora, i 
Fred Rowland, . Aurora; Marys^^fJ 
Fruit Store, Aurora, T, Sismnii 1 i^.'V'S 
Shoe Co., Aurora, E. C. Mingay; x \ : '.1 
Aurora, and the Royal Theatre 
Aurora. The presentations were *J 
made by Jack Offord. '" '." - 



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SCOUTS RAISE $50 

Net proceeds of the 1st Aurora 
Boy Scouts' Apple Day held Satur- 
day are expected to be about $50. 
The amount l« somewhat smallor 
than last year. 

RED CROSS DANCE 

RAISES OVER $160 

By their euchre and dance, held 

on Wednesday of lost week the 

I Aurora Red Cross cleared $162,07. 



MOVE FROM SHELBURXK 

Mr. and Mrs. E. J. Scarlett of 
Shclburne have rented the apart- 
ment on Wells St., formerly occu- 
pied by Mr. and Mrs. Earl Simmer- 
son. Mr. Scarlett has accepted a 
position with the Scanlon Bakeries. 

COLLEGE DEFEATED 

Tho Newmarket high school rug- 
by team defeated St. Andrew's 
College seconds, 11-10, in a # well 
played game on Friday, which was 
in doubt untM the final whistle. 

W.C.T.U. MEETS 

Members of the Aurora W.C.T.U. 
met this afternoon at the home 
of Mrs. Howard Oliver. Mrs. A. E. 
Quinn wan In the chair, while the 
guest speaker was Mrs. N. R. 
Phipps of Richmond Hill. 

DR. PIDGEON SPEAKS 

Rev. Dr. George C. Pidgeon, pas- 
tor of Bloor Street United church, 
Toronto, and well-known church- 
man, preached the Thanksgiving 
chapel service at St. Andrew's 
college on Sunday. The chapel was 
beautifully decox-ated and special 
music was given by Davis Ouch- 
terlony at the organ. . 

, JOIN ' QUEEN'S YORKS 

. Two recent recruits to the ranks 
of No. 11 platoon. Queen's York 
Rangers, are Ptes. Roy Graham 
and Bob Hlllls, both of Aurora. 



SHOP ENTERED SECOND 
TIME. GOODS STOLEN 

Thieves made their entry into 
the confectionery and tobacco store 
of Miss Lorraine Hudson, Yonge 
St., early Friday morning, and 
again removed a handplcked lot 
of cigarettes, tobacco and razor 
blades. 

Following a previous entry a 
few weeks ago a light was left 
burning in th.« store each night, 
but boldly disregarding the chance 
of being seen the miscreant forced 
the rear door in tho same manner 
as before and turned off the light. 
The fact that tho light was turned 
off was verified by a neighbor who 
returned homo from war work 
about 5 a,m. Chief Constable 
Fisher Dunham is investigating. 
Constable James Goulding, who 
was on duty last Thursday evening, 
noticed nothing out of the 
ordinary as he made his lust round 
before going off duty. 

* 

ANONYMOUS GIFT MADE .. 

TO UNITED CHURCH 

A new baptismal bowl was dedi- 
cated at Aurora United church on 
Sunday morning. It was a gift 
from a member of tho congrega- 
tion who desires to remain anony- 
mous. Murion Lynn Anderson, 
daughter of 24r. and Mrs, H. G. 
Anderson, had the honor to he the 
first child baptized, using the new 
bowl. 

GORMLEY FARMER DOES 
WELL AT PLOWING MATCH 

Les. Smith of Gormlcy dis- 
tinguished himself at the Inter- 
national Plowing Match at 
Peterboro this week in the open- 
ing competition. 

In the open class for horses, 
winners were: R. G. Brown, 
Gait; Ed. Timbers, Millikcn; 
Alvin Mark, Cameron; Ed. Gray; 
Rock wood; Harold Pickett, Sorn.-- 
by; Les. Smith, Gormlcy; Mar- 
shall Deans. Paris; Wilber'Mfc- 
Fayden, Millbank; a J. Tran and 
Mervin Smith, Cavan. 

To assure the success of a 



BOYS INJURED IN 



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Two Aurora young 
severely Injured last Thursday rj v^ 
evening and three other Aurora— |«i^ 
residents narrowly escaped aeriou»'IC..vi« 
injury in an automobile accident at* '"' v ' 
the northern iimlta of the town. ' . 3 

Mrs. Fred White and her son, 2 \'V:£ 
Arthur, were at the Royal theatre '. .'Ij, 
and when they entered their cju*/ ;.' ;l v 
to return homo around 10 pjn„ at, >;J/ :Vj 
which time it wa« raining heavily. - ! V ; v| 
they were unable to start the : 
motor. Mrs, White's son, Alan, and 
his two companions, Reg. Bennett 
and Murray Allen, came to the 
rescue with Bennett's car, driven 
by Allen, by giving the White car 
a push up Yonge St. The bumpers 
of the two cars became locked and 
the cars were stopped at the side 
of the road to unlock them, when 
a car driven by Charles Ingram of 
Newmarket, which was travelling 
north, crashed into the rear of the 
Bennett car. 

Murray Allon, who was in the 
rear car, received a broken bone 
in his ankle, cuts and bruises. 
Alan White suffered shock, cuts 
and bruises, while Bennett escaped 
uninjured. In the White car, which. V 
was in front, the driver, Arthur 
White, received fractured bones in 
his back as well as cuts and 
bruises. Mrs. White was thrown} 
from her car but escaped unscathed, . 
except for shock. Passing motor- 
ists took the boys to Dr. G. W. 
Williams, who treated them. 

Arthur White and Murray Alien . 
were taken to York county hospital. 
According to witnesses the tail 
lights in the Bennett and White 
cars were lit. The Bennett car was 
the mostly heavily dumaged of the 
trio. County Constable Aubrey ' 
Fleury and Constable James Gould- 
ing are investigating. 



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; ATTEND MEETING 

* 

Councillor A. A. Cook and Rev. 
Roy Hicks are attending the boys* 
work • conference in Newmarket 
this evening. 






-4 



RECEIVES' FAIR AWARDS 

W. L. Stephens of Aurora won 



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iO assure ujc suui^> *j± «* w. u. siepnens qi Aurui». l( w« ■ -% 

farm sale have the list printed j one of the big winners in the vege- v^j 
;« tko.Vm tAhl* classes at Woodbridge Fair. i<*m& 



in The Era. 



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THE NEWMARKET: 



THUKSOAY. 






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OCTO» UTH. 1941 



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-,., Ert Miction sale bills com- 
Band attention and arc produced 
at a low price which includes a 
Mle notice hi The Era. 



EVBftSLEY 






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STIVES 



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CanoJot 

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The correspondent Is thankful 
for this bright, beautiful Thanks- 
giving day. The world is a beau- 
tiful place after all, and autumn 
is certainty a season of beauty 
and fruitfulness. May our 
Thanksgiving continue in thanks- 
living! 

Mrs. Isa Ferguson of Rich- 
mond Hill, her son, Scott, in* 
structor of aviation in Mai ton 
airport, and Mrs. Ferguson, of 
Toronto, visited at "Scot* Wha 
Mac" on Sunday. 

Rev. Mr. Atkinson gave a good 
Thanksgiving service at Evcrs- 

ley on Sunday morning. 

Miss Elizabeth Tinline. retired 
King school-teacher, celebrated 

her 94th birthday on Friday and 
received many remembrances 






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CHANGE OF TIME TABLE 

' EFFECTIVE MONDAY. OCTOBER I3TH 

BUSES LEAVE 

TORONTO NEWMARKET 






b 
d 



1:15 am, 

1:15 p.m. 

10:00 p.m. 

9:30 is. in. 

%'M p.m. 

« 



a 
c 
d 

8:00 p.m. 



9:40 a.m. 
6:10 p.m. 
6:10 ii.m. 
13:35 p.m. 
4:30 p.m. 



» 
a 



8:35 am. 

4:30 p.m. 

10:00 p.m. 

7:35 a.m. 

11:15 -:i.m. 

e 






a 
b 
a 
6:35 p.m. 



12:50 
8:10 
6:35 
8:35 

3:10 



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Daily ox. Sun, & Hoi.; b— Sun. & Hoi. only; c— Sat. 
-Daily ex. Sat., Sun. & Hoi.; e— Fri., Sat., Sun., & 

(Kuht>rri Standard Time) 
Ticket* and Information at 

"""©GEORGE HOTEL, PHONE 300 



p.m. 
p.m. 
a.m. 

a-ni. 
pan. 

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and tails from friends. She 
expects to try walking in a short 
time. Her hip bone has appar- 
ently knitted well. 

Mr. Hiram A. Clark, well- 
known throughout the county, 
celebrated his birthday on Sun- 
day. 

Truck-loads «if crate* filled 
with choicest cauliflower come 
this way from the Holland marsh 
on their way to Toronto. Large, 
perfect cauliflower are now 
cheap and abundant. 

Evcrslcy Young People's held 
their monthly social meeting at 
the home of Mr. and Mrs. Hoy 
Uovven on Tuesday evening- 
The attendance was small Miss 
Ethel Ferguson presided and 
Miss Marie Dall was in charge til 
the program. Miss Edith Bovair 
read a good article on prayer. 

Miss Marie Ball contributed 
some ridiculous meanings for a 
list of words and read a very 

amusing story. Miss A. A. Fer- 
guson told snake stories, then 
explained references in the Bible 
on serpents, ending with the 
.application of "When Moses 
lifted up the serpent In the 
wilderness/' Mrs. Roy Bowcn 
conducted a contest. A social. tea 

hour was much enjoyed. 

Among the many people who 
called at "Scots Wha Hae M on 
Thanksgiving day were Rev. and 
Mrs. T. L. Williams of Uxbridge 
and Mr. and Mrs. Ted Fae and 
two young sons of Toronto. 

LAYS TWO AT A TIME 

. Mrs. Wesley Hayes of Keswick 
brought in a real novelty this 
week to The Era office. It was 
an egg laid by one of her six- 
monlhs-old pullets, which was 
large enough to be a turke3'*s 
egg, and when cracked open 
was found to contain a small 
egg inside, complete with shell. 




Hrrhle Coin, dynamic wingman for- "Mr. Eves" from hockey, 
ami centre of the champion Bos-; cycling and " baseball. ■ ;/.' 

ton Bruins, reports for another* Sylvonua App* /who, as we tola 
season's training at Hershey, Penn- i you. received three hooks recently 
H.vlvnnln, next Saturday. (from tae Toronto Scottish, Is now 

The Hriilmt arc later reporting ' enrolled In the of i icer-cadci course 
than any of the other N.H.U clubs, -at the b.isule school at Fori- York 
but Miotc Is a reason. They doa'tlaimorles, attending classes on 
open the season until the eighth, I S u n d a y morning and Tuesday 
i week after the others. "Art -night. Apps win be available '■•■■ 



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FROM THE WAR 
COMMITTEE, OTTAWA 




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The |ii'fij»lr nf f jinaila un- llur most 
forliiiiulif iu iUi' world. 

frorttiiiutt* Su lint jfieal bwwji of ttjucci: 
tlidt Ih ourn from oreun to on-au. 

JPorluiiatP iu tin- vuhI )hhl anil inminiM* 
n«oiirt'i»of our fori hlh, (iebln ami tJillif a «« 

: Foiliiualr, loo, in Otir ili'iiioi ralii 1 iiihti- 

IllliollH. 

In a word, forltiuatr in our tremtum* 

fl'llis fret'iloirt 1m tlirealeued today an it 
liiltt iMivtrr bfi'ii thriali inil lafore. 

| nillC fall of the Hi ilinli Kmphi* would 
llimil romjili'h* diffloL-alion of our tilt- 

feltt*rwl way <*f life. 

Kvrryomi wuiiIh iIiIh way of lift* defended 
" \".'#llii» freeilom naved— for our own fnlnrt- 

J,for jmhterlty. This reapoiise to every 
1 lor out; ilefeiiet* ha.s hern iiiuk* 
fllr-Iiearl4'iiliij4 to the wholi? Kuipln* 
— uhirmiii^ to Hitler. 

tins need for weapon** of war *4rows 
- jnoMs urgent, iih ihe iSa/i llireat 
ttdif wider over the world* 




;•--/ 



Tin* help of every Cnnudluil is 
needed for Victory, 

In litest! day* of war ihe flioiiglilleafi 
htlfi-li h|ieud«-r \* a traitor lo our 

war effort. 

A lednetioii In perhunal spcutlhlg 
ih now a vital neeeMtiily |o rcllovo 
Ihe preniore for ^oodn, to t'IKll>lo 
morir and more laliour and nifiter- 
hdn to he diverted lo wiriflllltf lllO 
war. The all-out effort, which 
f.'auada mu*t make, demaudd fliid 
^elf-denial of eaeJi of ua« 

Invehl in War Saving CerlIiiCaf€S 
the dollars you don't hCCil t0 8JiCHtJ# 
After Vielory, they eomts hack lo 
you Willi interehl. Spend Ie*i» NOW 
mo that you ran hiienrl moro TUKNj 
when labour and material* will [10 
avalluldi; for tin: thiuga yon iu?etl* 

There Ih no prkc too lilftli for 

freeilotu. 



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frVfltOU fAVIHOS WAN-fV iflf«/y raid m** earn 
•n. The entftloyee simply oV'm a Payroll S*tt inta 
'{nine, turn* ii in lo Ith pay office* und hit fMflvyrr 
' id* ia« pledged amount regularly from hit pay, 

)|Mf FIAN — Convrnient for Uttiinvn men 
mivn, and other* not on a payroll. Simply 

fl (lank Pledge and give it to your 
mill mnhe monthly deduetfant 

ml. 



'e Regular Methods of Saving 



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WAR SAVINGS STAMPS-/! handy Imlalment pton. 
Stamp folder* tuny t>r obtained from Poll Offices, 
llanlst and many retail outlet*, Ih *lamp% ulU buy 
one $1 Certificate, worth 15 at maturity, 

RURAl SAVIN0S HAH-Farmer* In receipt a] regular 
payment* from eu-operatlvc*, creomerle$ t elteeio 
factories, etc,, can authority deduction* of any 
desired amount regularly out of each cheque. Vie 
the Hnral Pledge Card. 



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WEAPONS DRIVE IN YOUR COMMUNITY 

da will ftuon conduct a War WeajMiat Drive. You villi tie Hiked lo put 
got behind the campaign in your romuiuoity. ( Jmndu iau«t provide more ehoir*. itwro 
Unkf, more guru, more khrlU. If yow are alreaily hayisN War Saving* (.VrlKlraic*- 
"U-JfiWPW* n °t» K^t your dollar* workintf for Vlrlory. 






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far Sai/af< Committee, Ottawa. 



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It omi kn<»Wj his husiness," said 
llorble. "Wc always start the 
niTisuii tiehlnil the others in condi- 
:ion. Tiie hos.s likes to see us 
round into shape gradually. A 
Ho.slon learn seldom goes stale 
or faifea In the stretch." We 
e<Mildn*t argue with that statement. 
Tor no team in years has had the 

At retch (1^1*1 l«c« the teams from 
Ueantowu pnntiiee annually. 

We ankctt Herb about the Bruins* 
prospect* this year and ho opined 
as how they would be in there all 
the Way. " Terry Henrdon is the 
only one we have lost from last 
season, liy reason of the Canadian 
military laws, ami there arc 
several good youngsters on our 
farm teams. The Kraut line, 
however, have started on their 
American papers ami so would be 
eligible for the draft over there. 
The same thing applies to Frankte 
Brimsek. who is American born, 
and the loss of any of these 
fellows, particularly Frankie, would 
make things tough. The athletes 
don't get any exemptions in the 
States and these four all hnve 

numbers and might be called in 
mid season/* 

Imve Kerr, now on the retired 
list, will be missed by the Rangers, 
sez Herb. "I always found Davie 
tough to beat- They said he wasn't 
as good as usual last year, but 1 
didn't notice any difference. Each 
player finds some goalie harder to 
beat than any other. An all -star 
team chosen by players finds them 
all named somewhere. Broda of 
the Leafs, who was really hot last 
season, never presented any par- 
ticular trouble, for me if I had an 
opening, hut to many he was un- 
beatable. Omar Kelly, who is 
replacing Kerr, is a pretty cocky 
kid. He was at camp with us 
and was sure he was going to 
make the grade. He has a nice 
record but it will be hard to fill 
Kerr's pads."' 

Cain had a good word for Hurry 
Frofitt the new winger from the 
Hershey club, who is receiving a 
trial with the Toronto Leafs. 
"Harry is a good boy, but not 
very sturdily built. He looks like 
a beanpole, for he is long and 
gangly, but he can really go. He 
has had a great season in the 
minors and has been up with us 
but didn't stick. He may be just 
what the Leafs need. If he can 
stand the gaff." 

Herb. U reporting for his ninth 
season in the big league and at 
the 30 mark he looks good for 
many more years. Plenty of golf 
over the local course and hardball) 
in the Newmarket town league 
have kept him In great shape, 
plus, of course, clean living. There 
aren*t many athletic heroes whose 
private lives set a. better example 
for the kids to follow than the 
genial Newmarket lad. Happy 
hunting this year Herbie! 

Monday night finds the local 
hockey solons getting together to 
discuss the pros and cons of the 
past and present seasons. Jimmy 
Walker la urging all interested to 
be present and Is extending a 
special invitation to Xcwmurki'l 
spo/Uancti to attend. The place is 
the town ball and the time eight 

downbeats. Charlie Howntiee and 
Vie. QtovaneJII are two of the 
Newmarket men who ore planning 
to attend. Prospect* for a slrone 
team look very good, but thf' 
OH. A. grouping available may 
present somo difficulty. If you 
don't attend the meeting you hove 
no right to squawk o/terwordH 
about the officers elected. 

Ous Ilogheu of Hamilton. Ih* 
oldest rider In the Thnnksgivimf 
cycling classic on Monday, attracted 
a great deal of attention for mor<- 
tban one reason. Qua la bold, 53 
years of ago, has only ono good 
hand and finished In seventh posi- 
tion close behind the leaders, 
liogben, who lost year won the G0- 
milo Ontario championship. Is a 
mainstay of the cycling game and 
a remurkablu man. 

Born in England, he started In 
bike races hero in 1900 and £or the 
noxt five years was a atariduut 
competitor, ('ami) Kaiser Withelm 
on the. scene and Ous decided he'd 
have to do something about u, ft" 
ho joined the 16th battalion. At 
Hill 09 a shell <fgploded and Qua 
woke in hospital to find his right 
arm gone four inchus below.. 'the 
etbow. 

After the war he obtained a 
hooked appliance for bis urnt, but 
it took a tot of courage to try Ii 
out on a wheel. Ha didn't Intend 
to ride in races but Just lo -exer- 
cise, so It was not until 1331. he 
entered competition again after an 
absence of 17 years. . 116 did so 
wall and flls arm seemed to navi- 
gate pretty well, flQ that be soon 
got hack bis old confidence and 
now, for iff/Hnncua which: to you 
and I.flcem like a hopeless task, 
Hogbon mows them down . with 
machine- like precisian. 

Next week he rides in a 100 mil** 
jaunt*- *'l like the races ngultiM 

time and the longer tlw better/ 1 
Ous told yours truly, "Cycling 
keeps u mrtn fii und is not a young 
man's game either. The old joints 
aren't much good for II)*.- uprlnts, 
but they atlll have durability, so 
there 1« a place for both young und 
old. 1 ride fur Ihe fun and cxer- 
cIpo, but naturally I like to win." 

Otis' son, Htevo, Is the present 
Ontario ons'inllci junior champion, 
and bo Is on active service with 
the navy now, .We'd like to be 
us active at 63 as friend Hnghen. 
Maybe ho has something with that 
blko business. 

Dour. Gillespie, the Ornngevillu 

boy who spelled fin la for the first 
Aurora attempt at a junior hockey 
crown, has joined tho 30th battery 
<Connle Bmyiho's). Olllosplo nfter- 
wurds played with Hunneyrnede 
and Marlbnroi and is Just 21 now. 
He played lacrosse with Ktoblcoke 
Indians last year. 

Mickey Hmlth pulled a fast one 
by mlddlc-ntsllng It on Friday 
with Miss Kvelyn Hlewart, Herb. 
Cain was best man for Mrnltty. who, 
along with Mrs. Smith, wiih receiv- 
ing congrats from the lads mi 
Monday here at the bike race. We 
hope this doesn't mean retirement 



the Leafs for Uiis season but next 
year will probably .be a different 

£ton\ 
Richmond Hill lawn Itowler* 

deserve a , bit- of credit -for "the 
amount expended for wbr savings 
stamps this year. The club bought 
no less than $185 worth.. to distrib- 
ute as bowling prises this year. 

It Is a nice practical way. to con- 
tribute to Canada's war ^effort 
while having the Usual fuii. -Tito 
other clubs In tho district did the 
same things too, but wc haven't 
their figures. . .There** 00- reason 
club secretaries should hide, their 
efforts. Roughly wo would ve«U- 
mato over $1,000 was spent oh war 
savings slhmps by : tho clubs of 
the district and no oho suffered, - 
rcuclufig: wilt ho back In junior 
C hockey this year -arid might 
possibly be hooked MP In ; ii group 
with tlie locals. The club nearly 
had to move over to Midland to 
piny their games, na a: deal v/as 
just ahout completed whereby the 
local nretia ■ would have .been used 
in the war effort. Now that is all 
off\ so the boys will , perform In 
their hariillkc structure once 
again. 

Charlie Donne, n lud from 

Bradford. | s entitled to a bit of 
attention. Charlie,* who was one 
of tho outstanding athletes at 
Bradford high school field day. 
tossed the javelin 100' T\ which 
is a pretty fair bit of work for u 
youngster in the intermediate class. 
Vic Canmitta of the Irish regi- 
ment, who is a member of the Elm 
Grove A.C. and said to be some 
pumpkins with his dukes, is the boy 
that has been matched with Rob 
Renville on the Fort York sports 
card next Saturday. Renville, 
however, has met boys just as 
tough and since he is in good con- 
dition can be depended upon to do 
his best in the 135 lb. class. The 
Irish regiment tops the field with 
six entries. The Yorks and Engin- 
eers have two each, and a single- 
ton has been received from tho 
Scottish and Royals. 

- Tom Flommerfrlt, who is the 
official physician for the Ontario 
Athletic Commission, is official 
timer and, along with Major Burn- 
ett and Lieut. Jack Patterson of 
the Yorks, will be on hand to set- 
that any injuries will be attended 
to pronto. Military rules, with the 
referee out of the ring, are to pre- 
vail and Major II. C. Beaumont hns 
been named as the third man. 
Lawric of the Engineers rind Rap- 
son of the Irish are expected to 

be tho feature of the six-bout card, 
faecal rldt-rs, who numbered 
eight, iu the cycling race against 
13 of the province's best, did pretty 
well on Monday. Jim Ifntison, with 
a minute handicap over Bab Ren- 
ville, finished only two feet in front 
of the latter, Renville's time was 
just Ihut mlnule better. Harold 
Foster, third. Bud Denne, firth and 
Bill Heath, eighth, were right up 
with the hesl, whih> Xrum. Rank 
and Ed. Mosley, two novices, game- 
ly trailed the field. 

Denne showed particular promisi- 
In his first race and is a hoy lo 
watch in the future. Notiuuu Pos- 
ter was the only one of the Aiuoia- 
Newmarket riders nol to finish und 
el-amp* forced him out. A milk 
shake about two limits before prob- 



ably did the Jrlck. Eating was 
some tldng Jim Hanson didn't do 
for 24 hours before tho race and 
jt apparently j>aW dividends, but 
when St was all oyer Jim was ready 
to tear a steak wide apart. 

I^nce Pugh, who was the scratch 
rider.. rode a lovely' race and his 
time was two minutes faster than 
Bob Benvlllo's, his nearest rival's. 
Tho crowd marvelled at the fair- 
thatched Oshawn hoy, who nonchal- 
antly started and finished llkcwhu, 
a picture of perfect motion, 

Pugh Is 21 years of age and has 

been riding about five years. He 
Is the present all-round Ontario 
champion, having won all the races 
but the 2*>m$le event on Labor 
Day at Oshuwu. He was injured 
In the latter race, which went to 
Jules Chnrbonneau, who finished 

loth here. He Is a modest fellow, 

this same I'ugh, and riiidikes to, 
talk about himself. HJx-day riding f 
Is Interesting him at present and; 

he Ifl definitely Interested In tbo] 
pro game. Immigration troubles and' 
very little competition in Canada i 
make the mooted venture a bit uu-j 
certain at present, but the amateur 
game, with no one" in sight U> de-* 
throne him, must be getting a bit? 
tiresome. - :-.::; r-- _,%;; J "■"■ : ■ \ 
' ""•*•'» found tho .course very tough/' \ 
Mbl Rugh. Hi was one of the best; 
rvo.scon. : '.Thefcltovvs have a grest 4 
country to rid o in, but I guess th?:y: 
don't 'get enough cfimpetitlon. Yc>u f 
have some fine riders hero, .who \ 
only need a little more experience."^ 
.The ;tlme of the race . was not \ 
record-breaking, but it was conafd-: 
cred "go<id for a tough course" by 

BUI Elder, well-known Cana/lion 

Wheelmen's official. 

Jack Of ford and ail those asso- 
ciated with him. are again deserving 
of orchids for providing a fine day's- 
.-rporl, definitely high class, and run;, 
without a flaw to war It. - 




IVh an opportunity worth looking into now* It'8 (I 

rent chance to buy a winter coat. 

-'.-■■.•• v 






I'KKSENT GENERAL 

MOTORS' PROGRAM 

The Oct. 27 meeting of the 
Newmarket Lions club will b* 
arranged by Wm. White, J. E. 
Nesbitt and Arthur Evans. 
Sharon. A General Motors 
movie program, "On to Victory/* 
is scheduled. 



Era printing costs little. 



Annual 

Missionary Conference 

OCT. 19 --26 

at the 

Newmarket Gospel 
Tabernacle 

12 Millard Ave. 

.Ilist WVst Of MuiH St. 

SUNDAY— II a.m. -7 p.m.— MUS. 

V. I- WHITMAN ii f Afriej 
MONDAY— KAKL. A. IWJl.NMM 

Supt. of Toronto Jewish Mis-ion 
TUES1IAY— MISS I. MelXXKS \>i 

tin* ^Ilsslon t4* lepers, AfrU\i 
W K I> N K S » A V— KIV. \ I . 
CitQCKETT uf the i'hinn Inland 

Mission 

TiiritsoAY— nv:v. i>. \ urxN 

of ltnl!a 

FiimAY— iie:k»ki:t e. « iik a 

I.KV of I'niin 

l.iiliti'rn .slides nlnioNt ncry it'ulii. 
Special mush*. 

St:XHAY— It a.m. - 7 » in.— HUV 

and MIIS. d. 11. W. COOK and MISS 

ItORNK of Smith VltierU'a 

Week" <l.iy itieeilngs siuti m 

p.ei., ll.S.T. 

Kverytifie Is cordi.th* invited 




Lindenbaum's 



OFFKH THE SKA- 
SON'S SMARTEST 
FASHIONS FROM 
CANADA'S OUT- 
STAN 01 NO STYL- 
ISTS, 




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Misses' — Women's 



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Th^rt dr%££€s sra hzmg saiti ac LOW. 



ACCESSORIES 



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FOR QUALITY A\D SAT^SrACTtON 



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'PREST0HE ' A*t£-7xeeze for Motorists 
curtailed to equip our fighting forces! 

TUB Ingredients which go into the making of "Prestonc" 
AntM ; rce/u uro vital war-timo necessities. These raw 
fwitcriuls nro so valuable to our fighting forces that pro- 
duction for motorists' use has heeu radically curtailed. 

The makers of "Prestone" Anti-Preeze are proud to divert 
much of their supply to war services. Motorists who aro 
forced to use a substitute will gladly make this sacrifice* 

fHESE ARC FACTS WORTH REMEMBERING IF YOUR DEA1ER IS UNABLE 
TO SERVE V0U WITH YOUR USUAL "PRESTONE" ANTIFREEZE. 



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Balttritu "Beertady" garth llalttrtiu "Sta+VPair" intra Repellent Lotion, eta 



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Winnipeg 



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THE NEWMARKET 





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TH URSDAY, OCTOBER 



.1 V"* 3 







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1941 



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SEVEN 



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IiATHEWS, LYONS & 

l!tf ■■.: vale ;.'-.. 

Wr**™, Solicitor* 

Solicitor* for 
Towo of NcwmnrkH 

*ow»ftttp of E«t 

" QwUiixbuTj - 

Ifamk of Toronto 

0mc*-lM MAIN ST. 

#&. JL MATHEWS, MXJ. 

B, E. LYONS, B.A. 

P JOSKPH VALE 






«£.'» 



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' KENNETH H* Ik - : 

v ftTIVEB, *A. 

Mmrrhter, Solicitor, Etc, 
NoUry roblW, Etc 

f BOTSFOBD ST. 
NowmftrkH 



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&RLEIGH ARMSTRONG 



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BarrM*', Solicitor and 
NoUry Public, Etc. 

ABM5TBONO BLOCK 
f hone fiS5 



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A, M. MILLS 



fUrrttUr, Solicitor and 

Notary YtMie 
? . 51 MAIN ST. 

£itarm*rfcH Phono Ml 



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BABHlSTKHft, SOLICITORS 
mud NOTABIES 

■ 

Aurora Offlco; 
pfc CAMERON Mmc»ONAU> 

l/dmc*t AHove DAN'S CAFB 

Phone S18-w 
fbMtdtnce; Phone S3*-J 

Houf*; 9 a.m. to 5 p.m*, 
j Werfntftdfty*: 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. 



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mtk*. YA m m\n% hy Appointment 

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DK. W. 0. NOBLE 

DENTWT 
0%cr IMPEH1AL BANK 

Office fhon« 41-W 

Kc*ld«nc«i fhone .. 47-<f 

fclUy 
Evening »>X Appointment 



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MP/L C 6UHT0H 

1»ENTAL BUHOEON 

Offlc« fhowe — Aurora 100 
tnce fhone — Aurora 




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[ ; - -'BliANCJI OFEI€E 

Mount AIlH^rt IO00 



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/; DK. A. W. BOLANI) 

DENTAL HUKOKON 

tiicc€J(i*or to 
DU. U. K. HOBKHi'SON 

. and tlio lato ■ 
DK. E. V. UNDEHHILL 

;-r Qltitu* phono — Aurora 108 
Kealdeiufo phono — Aurora ll&l 



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DH. S. J. UOYI), ALB. 

(Sruduulo Su M4'dlc*lu«i iu Tor* 
onto L'nhcrnUy; h!m> LlrviUlatti 
of tho Hoyal 0*Hex« of S'kyifl- 
cluiu and mcmlwr of tho HoyuS 
CoU«k» *» f KiirK<v>im of KugUrid. 
ronnrr clinical annUtatit In 
Moorcflcld'a Ky«», feir, Noho and 
Tfcroat IfoNpltnl, I^mdon, 

EtiKland 

Ey«*« U«t4*d. Ola«fM^ Niippllrd 
MAIN ST, I'HONE HO 



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DR. J. H. WESLEY 

MAIN ST. NKWMAUKET 



Phono 13 
IIOUKS — 10-12, *-8 






;: . 



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DR. J. CHAS. R. 
EDWARDS 

OFFICE IIOIJKH 

3 to 5 p.m. — 8 to p.m. 

Bundfty* and Holiday* by 

Appointment Only 

Ffeoao 91 

m MAIN ST. NEWNAHKET 



. ■ 



£■••■ .•■ ••• 

I-/ ..— 



MISCEULANEOUS 



. -- ■ 



PUK4NN6 



EAVEIMWHIMG 



OUR 5KCULTIES 



See the Bathroom 
OUTFITS AT THE SHOP 



Join Die NrtMay CU 



Name 



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# * 



Cprwt) 



Add«^5 



Age bM blrthd; 



IMrthdny 



Signature of parent or t*»:ir)ier 



BIRTHDAY CLUB 



R. Osbome 8 Son 

* 

THE ttAOlNS TINSMIIHS 

IMPERIAL BANK BUILDING 



d 




Birthday congratulations this 
week to: 

David Enge, Queensville, 14 
years old on Monday, Oct. 13. 

Ruth Marie Armitage, R. R. 3, 
Newmarket, 15 years old on 
Tuesday, Oct, 14. 

Robert Cunningham, Queens- 
ville, 10 years old on Friday, 
Oct. 17. 

Send in your namn and birth- 
day and become a member of 
the birthday club. 



OPPORTUNITY 

Mrs. Hill And The Soldiers 
By E. M« S. 



"Ever since the war had 
started she had wanted to do 
something for the country and 
it looked as though the chance 
had been given her at last." 

Though sadly out of practice 

of "writing up articles for the 
paper," or "preparing a paper" 



STEWART BEARE 
RADIO SERVICE 

4 

NEW AND USED RADIOS. 
RADIO PARTS, TUBES, . 
BATTERIES, ETC. 

113 Main St. f'Jione 355 



ROCHES POINT 

Summer Red Cross Work 
Reaches Fine Total 



V. N. SMITH 

MCBNHKI) AUCTIONEER ' 

County of York 

AIJ saleH promptly attended 

to at moderate charge*. 

WIONK 187.1 NKtVMAKKKT 



m 



KDITH A. JIAWTIN 

OPTOMETRIST 

MAIN ST. NKtVMAKKKT 

t:\en\nu* hy Appointment 

Phone 112 



A. STOUFFEfi 

Id KacJan HI. 

Teswrher of I'lano, f»lnghi^ and 

viol J n 
Healer In New und I'jmnI Tlano* 
riafiof* Rented - - Piano* Tuned 



i 



- 



■ _ 



Zephyr 



Mr. and Mrs. Norman L. King 
and son, Floyd, of Helhaven, 
wore visitors on Sunday, Oct, 5, 
at Mr. and Mrs. Krnest Pi I key 'g. 
Mis. King is a sister of Mrs. Pil- 
key. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ward and son, of 
Brampton, spent the holiday with 
Mr. and Mrs. Corbet I and fam- 
ily. 

Mr. und Mrs. Sidney Bradley 

of Toronto spent tho weekend 
with Mrs. Bradley's parents, 
Mr. and Mrs. F. Cronsberry. 

Mr. and Mrs. Austin Pickering 
and June spent the weukend 
Willi Mr. and Mis, Cheney Pick- 

erijitf. 

Miss Grace l/jckie of Toronto 
was at her home here for tbv 
weekend. . 

"i Miss Helen ttynard and a 
friend, of Toronto, were at her 
home .for the holiday. 

Mr, and Mrs. J. W. Hynard 
ppent .Sunday in Toronto. 

I. B. Law has bought the faun 
which . L e s J i e Kenin.'dy has 
vacated. •.''■•". 

Douglas Curl has moved his 
family to Oshawa Where he is 
working. / 

Mr. *jnd Mrs. Khner Myers and 
Italph and Mr. J. It. Myers 
attended the. w<.'ddin# of Miss 
Buth Smith, near Ouelph. 

Mr. and : Mrs, Tihnan My^is 
spent Sunday in Toronto. 



Miss Doreen Thompson of 
Hamilton was hon." for the 
weekend. 

Misses Frances and Margaret 
Baines of Toronto spent the holi- 
day weekend at home. 

Mr. and Mrs. Douglas Genge 
of Toronto and Pte. Kenneth 
Blaine of the air force training 
school at Gait spent the holiday 
with their parents, Mr. and 
Mrs. Blaine. 

Pte. T. Crandall of Montreal 
was home for the Thanksgiving 
weekend. 

Mr. Taylor of Toronto was 
home for the holiday. 

Mr. Ted Sutcliffe of Toronto 
was home for Thanksgiving. 

Mr. Herbert Cole of Toronto 
spent the holiday with Mr. and 
Mrs. P. J. Cole. 

Mr. T. Slocum, who went to 
England before the war started, 
has recently returned to Canada 
and had Thanksgiving dinner 
with Mr. and Mrs. Walinek. I 
The community is sorry to lose 
Mr. and Mrs. Diamond, who have 
gone to Toronto for the winter. 
Mrs. Diamond has been active in 
the Red Cross, haying looked 
after giving out the wool and 
taking in the comforts for the 
soldier.?. She will be much 
missed. 

The local lied Cross unit has 
made the following articles in 
seamen's comforts, for July, 
August and September: 15 turtle- 
neck sweaters, 15 helmets, 15 
scarves, 25 prs. se&me^s stock- 
ings, 15 prs. mitts, a total of 
85 articles. 

Soldiers* articles: 3 prs. of 
two-way mitts, 2 pairs of gloves, 
£5 pairs of socks, 14 sleeveless 
sweaters, one woman's cardigan, 
two pullover sweaters. 

Refugee work: one sweater 
and one pair of soekees. 

The unit made and shipped in 
all 1U4 articles. Members are 
now working on their October 
quota and the Red Cross wishes 
lo thank all those who have so 
faithfully worked in the sUifl- 
mer, as so many had no time for 



knitting 



rXMIIUltST BEACH 

ROCHE'S PT. GUESTS 
PROVIDE W.I. PROGRAM 



for a meeting, the urge had been 
.strong to get at it and "write 
something," when an unexpected 
phone call came for a book re- 
view or something for the ne»t 
day — so now "the opportunity." 

Remembering the adage, "Op- 
portunity knocks but once// de- 
lay to do first the little things 
planned for the afternoon seem- 
ed excusable, the more so as I 
remembered about Mrs. Hill 
and her soldier guests for whom 
she promptly did so much and 
found satisfaction as her re- 
ward. 

This vivid picture of English 
life and a number of other 
stories found in the new book- 
let, "Come Wind, Come Weather" 
by Daphne DuMaurier, have 
been read and reread as just 
meeting my longing to know 
more of "the changed attitudes" 
to life over there. 

To further quote sketches: 
"Shortly after Christmas, the 
district was invaded by a mass 
of troops. At first Mrs. Hill was 
filled with dismay. The peace 
of the village would be destroy- 
ed. The first reaction was 
swiftly overcome and thrust 
aside as ungenerous. If these 
men were willing to risk their 
lives for her sake and had left 
home, and work and family be- 
cause of it, the least she could 
do was lo make some contribu- 
tion in return. 

"Mrs. Hill summoned up her 
courage and went down to head- 
quarters to see the CO. 

"Td better make you god- 
mother to about 24 men who are 
billeted in that empty house, 
Tairlawn/' not far from you,' 
he said. 'Perhaps you would 
call in there some time. They 
are rather a tough crowd, I 
hope you don't mind.* 

"•Of course not,' Mrs. Hill 
answered, but as she walked to- 
wards 'Fairlawn' sh6 was con- 
scious of that nervous pain 
reminiscent of past visits to the 
dentist. 

"The 'tough crowd' turned out 
to be a forlorn little group. 
" 'Come up, any of you, when- 
ever you feel like it,' she told 
them, 'I shan't entertain you or 
anything like that, 1 just want 
you to feel the place is there 
when you want it.' " 

Yes, Mrs, Hill It* ' n>a<te her 
start towards realizing her do* 
sire to do something for her 
country and the brave boys wh*> 
were giving up all to do inch 
best to help defend it. Now 
some of us, and very likely most 
all of us. around Newmarket 
have a like desire towards coun- 
try and "the hoys and our neigh- 
bors." l/»l us not neglect our 
opportunity. It too may come 
suddenly and in an unexpected 
way. 

But let's see how Mrs. Hill got 
along: "The men were impressed 
by tlie quiet home atmosphere, 
and by the absence of any 
'forced' entertainment for their 
benefit. She would wander in 



tune. It was all about a con- 
versation he had with his wise 
'Old Horsey,' and the men called 
for it again and again, and be- 
gan singing the choruses. 'Old 
Horsey 1 , said: 

"The trouble with the world is 

the folks that live in it, 
They've all learn'd to get an" 

they've never learn'd to give 

in it; 
You'll never build a world, a 

decent sort of world. 
You'll never build a world that 

way.' 
"So the cowboy said that that 
was the way we were made, and 
he guessed we'd have to stay 
that way. But 'Old Horsey* 
didn't agree, for the third verse 
went: 
"*You're wrong, says my wise 

old horsey, 
If you're willin' God'&l change 

you right away. 
He'll tidy up your life so your 

friends won't know you. 
And He'll help you change the 

world by a plan He'll show 

you. 
But you've gotta be willin' — an' 



MOUNT PLEASANT 

LATE HARVESTING IS 
STOPPED BY RAINS 



... * ■*> 



The Klmhursl Heach Women's 
Institute met at the home of 
Mr.s. s Jas. Clark on Wednesday, 
Oct. «. 

The Hoche's Point branch were 
guests at this meeting and pro- 
vided an excellent and varied 
program, including humorous 
readings by Miss Krnma Young 
and Mrs. Jiicld Cole. Mrs. j with tea and sandwiches, and 



. * • 



To assure the success of a 
farm sale have the list -printed 
in The Era. 



Men off 30,40,50 

PKI\ VI3!, VICOH, Subnormal? 

Want nomnl t*p, tlm, vJg«r t - vitality T 
Try Oitx«x Toole Tablet*. Cfcataliu 
tonic*, tUmuJanU, ©y*t«r oTtmont*— 
jJ(U to normal ptn aft«r 30. 40 or w. 

2tf V^i 1 .* 1 '»h*o<J*ttiory aUa for only 
»#. Try thla aid to norma) pep an*S vlrn 
today. For aala at all good drug store* 



Thompson read a paper on hoim 
economies and conducted a con- 
tent. A demonstration on mak- 
ing crepe paper flowers was 
given by Mrs. A. Walinek. 

Mrs. Clark served a delicious 
lunch, assisted by Mrs. Chas. 
Jiodgius ami Mrs. W, Anderson. 

Tho Klrnhiirst Heach Institute 
is holding a euchre at Mrs. Rich- 
mond's tea -rooms at the Jersey 
River on Friday evening, Oct. 17. 
Proceeds will be for soldiers 
comforts. There will be good 
prizes and lunch. 



; 



* • - 



Sharon 



a 



WORN 



V ' . 



auction sale bills com* 
Ji'inahd attention and are produced 
^ v -ii~-:a low price which includes a 



notice hi The Era. 



thnfrt ««»4 aack 
a]ay, «a»bU «a 4* 

aauiawark — eranaf 
«kb tka ctaldrtn- 
f«allag aalatriblt. 
Maaaiag fitaa "nmu" 
***m tfca fci*»;a a«ay 
btaajtataraW, WW 
IdaWjafaldMsratafl* 
<**•*«• 

HaaJadMa 

DUa". UaW? fiaia 






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daar Urn »? Uaat. 

t» raaaara laaaJUi 

(la 



:£',* 




. Anniversary services in the 
United church this Sunday, Oct. 
10, -dm at It a.m. and 7.30 
l>.nb Rev. R. V. Wilson of 
Mount Albert will he the guest 
speaker at both services, and 
Queensville choir wilt lie in 

charge- of the. music for the 
evening service. 

There will be a supper Tues- 
day/ Oct. 21. in the township 
hall. Supper will commence at 
5.30 p.m. and continue until all 
are served. 

MrY Rnbt. Barber spent Mon- 
day at the home of Mrs. Kthel 

Evans. ■_ v V ' . 

Mr. and Mrs, Knowlcs and 
family of Toronto spent Sunday 
at the home of Mr. and Mrs. 

Chris. Jones. 

Mrs. Houston ami family spent 
the long weekend with Mr. 
Houston. 

Services in St. James* church 
on Sunday are Sunday-school at 
2 p.m, and evening prayer at 3 
p.m., S.T. 

The Sharon branch of the Red 
Cross is holding a euchre party 
on Tuesday, Oct. 28. Good 
prizes will be given. Playing 
commences at 8.30 standard 
time. All are invited to come. 



then sit down and talk, asking 
about their homes and families. 
Mrs. Hill began to guess some- 
thing of the fear and anxiety 
that lay hidden al the back of 
many of their minds. First the 
fear of death itself, of pain, of 
the horrors of war they would 
shortly be called upon In face. 
And then the anxiety about 
those they had left at home. 
"Mrs. Hill listened to each of 

these stories and gave the bebt 
of advice and sympathy, l:ut *hc 
knew from her own experience 
that all the fear, the worries and 
the anxieties expressed by Hit- 
men were common to every 
man and woman of every class, 
of every race, who had grown 
up without faith in their Creator. 
She knew that when self is put 

first and foremost in life, fear, 
anxiety muI unhappiness march 

side by aide— but that there is 
another way. 

"So. in her quiet, r.imple, un- 
affected way, she told the 'tough 
crowd* stories from her own ex- 
perience, while they, sat and 
drank her tea. The response 
oma/ed her. They wanted to 
help, they wanted to learn how 
to live, and. needed a standard 
to live up to. After a time one 
of them said to her, 'We've been 
talking about your way of liv- 
ing. Some of the fellow.* want 
to hear more about* it. What 
say we throw a party and yoti 

tell us.' 

'"All right/ said Mrs. Mil. 
'ami I'll get some of my friends 
lo help. Make it next Saturday.' 

"That Saturday evening some 

50 of the company jammed the 

drawing room. Some of Mrs. 
Hill's friends were speaking. 

'There was a private from an- 
other unit, a naval lieutenant 
back from convoy. Then there 
was o gramophone record in 
which a cowboy sang a catchy 



absolutely willin — 
For God to hold the reins His 
way.* 
"The song seemed to sum it 
all up. They got hold of Mrs. 
Hill and her friends and talked 
to them quietly. 

"•Why not try "listening to 
God"?' said Mrs. Hill. . 

"As the days went by the 
change began to show all 
around. Corporal had lost his 
fear of what would happen to 
his family. The toff of the com- 
pany was not standoffish any 
more. Then there was the 
miner, tough, hard as nails. He 
used to come in half-seas over 
night after night. The 'Old 
Horsey' seemed to take his fancy. 
He would slip into Mrs. Hill's, I 

take the gramaphone to a corner 
without a word to the others, 
and put on 'Horsey' over and 
over again. The company not- 
iced that he went off the drink 
after that. 

"Mrs. Hill was no angel. She 
was an ordinary woman. The 
soldiers were not saints. They 
were ordinary men. Hut be- 
cause she had the courage to 
break down the barriers of clnss, 
of shyness, of fear and ridicule, 
she had enriched the lives of all 
these men she had welcomed to 
tlie house, and her own life as 
well. And the CO. compliment- 
ed her on their heightened 

morale. 

"Just before Easter they were 
ordered abroad. Mrs. Hill stood 
at her gate and watched them 
march past. Her 'tough crowd' 
looked very yotmg. and full of 
enthusiasm. She wondered if 
she would ever sec any of them 
again. 

"Since then they have been 
through the campaign in Flan- 
ders, 12 have come back safely. 
The men told Mrs. Hill that the 
most remarkable of the party 
hod been the sullen miner. . 

"'He kept us going all 'the 
time* It seemed that on one 
occasion during the retreat to 
the coast they had been subject- 
ed to veiy heavy raids. The dive 
bombers came low. The com- 
pany took to cover while the 
enemy aircraft screamed over- 
head. 

"'And what do you think?' 
said the lance-corporal. 'There 
was Fred, as eool as ice-cream, 
listening to God in all that din. 

tell you I got up close to him. 

What's the orders?" 1 asked. 

"Don't he afraid, and look after 

the chaps/' said Fred, "and I'm 

not afcar'd. Now you try."* 

"'And did you/ said Mrs. Hill. 

" "Sure,' grinned the lance- 
corporal. 'I waited a minute, and 
something said to me. "Don't get 
net op." And then we got the 
chaps singing "Wise Old Horsey." 
■lust I hen a fellow come up be- 
side ns, who'd got cut off from 
the rest of his lot. Different 
company to us. "What's that 
you're singing?" he said. "I've 
never heard it before. I like it." 
"We ain't very honest, and we 

ain't very lovin'. 
An* times we're pretty dirty. 

an* times we're pretty shov- 



Rain! Rain! Farmers think 
they are getting too much of it, 
as it seems impossible to harvest 
the buckwheat and red clover. 

Tlie communion and baptismal 
services were held last Sunday. 

Mr. and Mrs. Donald Davidson 
of Newmarket visited at the 
home of Mr. Max Stiles on Sun- 
day. 

Mr. and Mrs. Hugh Elliot of 
Agineoujt visited at Mr. Robt. 
Stiles' on Sunday. 

Most of the men are talking 
of going to the plowing match 
al Peterborough on Thursday. 

The Mount Pleasant Young 
People's Society will be held at 
the home of Mr. Bernard David- 
son on Friday evening at 8 p.m. 

Mrs. Bernard Davidson, Mrs. 

Everett Yorke and Mrs. Ross 
Stiles spent last Friday in the 
city. 

Mr. and Mrs. Robt. Davidson 
received word from their son, I 
Glenn, who is with the Gov- 



ernor General's Horse Guards, 
that he has been promoted from 
corporal to sergeant. 

The Ladies' Aid meeting will 
be held at the home of Mrs. 
John Hopkins next week. Mr. 
and Mrs. Hopkins will be mov- 
ing to Keswick the first of 
November, 



union Street 



^ > 



W.C.T.U. MEETS OCT. 21 

The postponed meeting of the 
W.C.T.U. will be held on Tues- 
day, Oct. 21, at 3 p.m. at the 
home of Mrs. R. Meades, north 
Main St. A cordial invitation is 
extended to all interested. 



U.S. MAN IS VISITOR 

Alfred Stark, of Flint, Mich., 
who is holidaying here, was the 
guest of H. J. Luck at the Lions 
club on Monday evening. Mr. 
Stark was born not far from 
Newmarket. 



Mr. and Mrs. Will Rozell of 
Clinton and Mr. and Mrs. Angus 
King called on Mr. and Mrs. E. 
Gibson and Mr. and Mrs. W. 
Micks during the weekend. 

Pte. F. Kittega spent the 
weekend at the home of Mrs. E. \ 
Kittega. 

Weekend visitors at the home 
of Mr. and Mrs. Newall were 
Mr. and Mrs. A. B. Newall and 
Mr. and Mrs. G. Vanner and 
children, Mr. and Mrs. Wilson, 
Mrs. Friel and children and Mr. J 
and Mrs. Cowieson. 

Mrs. A. W. Newall celebrated . 
her birthday oh Oct. 11. 

Tlie hunt club enjoyed a good 
hunt on Thanksgiving day. 

Tlie Cunningham family vis- - 
itcd Mr. and Mrs. Obee Peters . 
on Sunday. 



- 



.* 



* \ 



Era classifieds save money. 






in.' 



44 



That's right/ Fred told him. 
•It tells you how God'll look 
after you if you give Him the 
chance.* " 

Note: "Come Wind. Come 
Weather," may be obtained at 
the United Church Publishing 
House, Toronto, 25 cents. 



I 



i« I 




Brilliant, per- 
fect solltalro 
In an oxqul- 

8lte soiling. 



"i^ffiffi; 



- 



WAINMAN 



REGISTERED OPTOMETRIST 
JEWELLER AND OPTICIAN 



*_ 



■ ■ ■ 






. 



- •- - 



H 



HEAR YE! 

Buy Your Own 
Cherries" 



:^~:*.' i *^' : ~"' 




: l^ 



AN 



ILLUSTRATED 
STORY 



Narrator 



Rev. R. J. Kof fend 

«if Tomato 

ST. ANDREW'S 
PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 

Tuesday, Oct. 21 , 
at 8 p.m. 

YOUNG PEOPLE 
INVITED 



I - 1 940 Deluxe Oldsmobile Sedan 

I - 1 939 DeLuxe Dodse Coach (heavy duty 

NEW TIRES) 

I - 1938 Chevrolet Master Sedan 
I - 1936 Plymouth DeLuxe Sedan 
I - 1933 Pontiac 8-cylinder Coach 
I - 1931 Model A DeLuxe Ford Sedan 
1 - 1 929 Chevrolet Coach 
I - 1929 Essex Sedan 

\ - 1940 G.M.C. I -Ton Pick-up Truck 

I - 1 939 2-Ton Chev. Truck with new stock 

RACK. LONG WHEEL 8ASE 

I - 1936 Ford 1.2 Ton Panel Truck 

I - 1934 Chevrolet 2-Ton Truck Equipped with 

Stock Rack 

All cam and trucks reconditioned and will be sold 

under guarantee 

SKVKUAI. ROOt) WORK IIOItKKS AT VKKV REASONABLE 

l'KICKS 



+- 





Nesbitt 



PHONE 197 



NEWMARKET 




FARMERS. ..AS IMPORTANT 

AS ARMOURERS 



* 



• t 



i. • 



t\ 



It may not appear so dramatic to operate a dairy farm, to grow grain 
or raise bacon as to make planes and steel tanks, but the work of the 
farmer is just as essential to victory as the work of the armament maker. 

Always interested in the development of agriculture and practical co- 
operation with farmers, the Bank of Montreal is especially desirous now 
of assisting our growers of foodstuffs. 

- 

Farmers arc cordially invited to talk confidentially with our nearest branch 
manager respecting their credit needs, 

BANK Or MONTREAL 

* 

"A BANK WHERE SMALL ACCOUNTS ARE WELCOME** 

Modern, Experienced Hanking Service the Outcome of 124 Year*" Succcuful Operation 



Newmarket Branch] R. D. DROWN, Manager 



i 



. 









■■ 






. • • 



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* - 



■ 



* 



."* 



■ * 



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161 



■■* 



-- 



■ -:-.* 



lllllBIg&la^^^ THE NEWMARKET ERA, THURSDAY, OCTOKR 16TH. >94l . • : ii 



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?jy av day passes that we do 
felr of long mileage records 
x Super Lastics, 



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19X500 



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21X440 



$8.10 
$8.25 
$6.80 
$6.10 



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^[Sec us re our trade-in allowance. 
WAll tires purchased installed 



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MOUNT ALBERT -, 

FffiKHT 
TMM, FOUR ESCAPE 



■ -r — 

Mud end Snow Tires 



ST'-: - 

S Save cost of chains and be assured of perfect 

traction in mud or snow. 






19X500 

c : 



/• ■ ■ 



- - * . 






l ' * 



$9; 10 

16 X 600 



17 X 550 

$12.35 



$11.75 






Mor-Power 



r- 



1- 



BATTERIES 



Super Built 



* ' 



t-.—. 








ESI 





Mafce nure of a fiulck ufart HFfteii the frosty walher urrivf* 

BE PREPARED 

Buy a MORPOWER BATTERY 

IVfl INV« a» cii>jiriK*fc<l type for wery car, 

years of battery building experience goes into 

each Mw~Powcr battery. 

WE SAVE YOU UP TO 40 PERCENT AND MAKE AN 
ALLOWANCE FOR YOUR OL0 BATTERY, 






- '- 



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- iZS 



- "^ 



■ :? 



MOTOMASTER ANThFREEZE 



Good for ail winter — anti rust — anti corrosive 



iH- •■ 



- 



$1.49 Gallon 



. ■ 



- ■? - 



Auto Bulbs 

We have lli« iarj?<«it 
vark'ty of auto hulliH 

In toivn 



V 



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rw.£ 




Kord A Mufflers $2.05 









Radio Tubes 



i- 



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W 



•»e carry a compUu* 
fitwk of r;OK TiiU-k. 



Chev, 2941 Mufflers 
Chev. 29 Drive Shafts 

Chev. 29 Axles —.. 

Ford A Carburetors ... 
Generator Kxchange ... 

Oil Kilters 

Winter Front 

Thermostats 



ff* 



r#t«* •*• ■ - 



1.20 
2.70 
2.10 

3.08 

4.85 

1.55 

.49 up 
.60 up 



Mr. Jos. Harrison spent a few 
days at home, returning lo 
Kingston on Tuesday, where he 
and his son Russell have had 
contracts for moving buildings 
for several months and expect 
to be away for some time yet. 

While driving on the town 
line on Sunday night, Garnet 
Risebrough, John Lunau, Roy 
Lunau and Bruce Harrison ran 
into a C.N.R. freight train and 
had theic car badly smashed. 
John Lunau had his face cut 

badly and the others were shaken 

up and bruised. The freight 

had stopped at the time of the 
collision but began moving im- 
mediately afterward. 

The Y.P.S. of the United 
church will hold their first meet- 
ing on Monday evening. This 
was postponed on account of 
Thanksgiving day. 

Mr. Oscar Robertson of Fort 
Erie was at his parents' home 
over the holiday. 

Among the many Thanksgiving 
visitors noticed in town were 
Mr. and Mrs. Bruce Ross, Barry 
and Trevor, Toronto, Mrs. J. F. 
Burr, Richmond Hill, Mr. and 
Mrs. Grant Draper, Mrs. Rich- 
ards and Carol, Toronto, Misses 
Etta and Dorothy Stokes, Mrs. 
Doris Carroll and Geo. Stokes, 
Toronto, Mr. and Mrs. Donald 
Loach, Toronto, L.A.C. Harold 
Murphy, stationed at Aylmer, 
Mr. and Mrs. H. Shields, Tor- 
onto, Mr. and Mrs. A. C. French, 
Ottawa, Mr. and Mrs. Asa Jewell 
and Mrs. McKnight, New Lis- 
keard, Miss Daisy Watts, Dunn- 
ville, Miss Belle Cook, Toronto, 
Mr. Donald Degcer and Mr. Nor- 
man Miller, Toronto. 

Mrs. J. Russell of Erin and 
Mrs. Kendree and daughter of 
Montreal spent the holiday with 
their parents, Mr. and Mrs. Jas. 
Arnold. 

Capt. W. L. Carruthers of 
Camp Borden and Mr. and Mrs. 
W. Nash and Connie of Hamil- 
ton spent Thanksgiving with 
Mrs. W. L. Carruthers. 

Rev. Hugh Shannon will 
occupy the pulpit of the United 
church on Sunday in the absence 
of Rev. R. V. Wilson. 

Mr. and Mrs. Grose of Thorn- 
ton spent Thanksgiving with 
their daughter, Mrs. Geo. Walsh. 

Mr. Lyman Pearson is recover- 
ing nicely in St. Michael's hospi- 
tal, Toronto, after an operation 
which he underwent on Satur- 
day and hopes to be home again 
in a short time. 

L.A.C. Alvin Dike, who lias 
been home on extended leave 
owing to business, returned to 



Victoria on Saturday. 

Mr. and Mrs. Barnes and fam- 
ily spent the weekend at their 
cottage at Lake Simcoe, 

Mr. and Mrs. Gordon Wagg, 
Jimmie and Linda, of " Picton, 
were in town over Thanksgiving. 

Mr. and Mrs. W. Draper, Doris 
and Ross, and Mr. and Mrs. Ber- 
nard Draper of Toronto spent 
the weekend in Sarnia at the 
home "of Mr. and Mrs, Harry 
Draper. 

H. Leadbetter has commenced 
work on the apartment over his 
shop, in which he will live 
when completed. 

The hall board held their first 
dance of the season on Friday 

evening with Audrey Smith's 

orchestra, and a good crowd had 
a very successful evening. 

On Saturday afternoon five 
carloads from L.O.L. 902 visited 
the True Blue and Orange Home 
at Richmond Hill. 

All the visitors were shown 
over the well-equipped home. 
There are an isolation ward, 
operating room and recreation 
rooms. The children are able to 
receive a public school education, 
under teachers approved by the 
Ontario department of educa- 
tion, at the home. 

The 104 children there are as 
happy, healthy children as are 
to be found anywhere. 

The $47 raised by some of the 
Orangemen's wives on the quilt 
on July 12 was presented to the 
matron, also the following; 15 
bags of potatoes, one bag and 
one basket of carrots, one crate 
of snow apples, one basket of 
apples, seven large cabbages 
(two of these were prizewinners 
at Scott fall fair), seven turnips, 
three baskets of tomatoes, one 
bag of citron and squash, 32 
pounds of honey, about four 
pounds of bacon, six pounds of 
butter, two dozen eggs, four 
boxes of cookies, 11 jars of fruit 
and pickles, nine jars of jam. 

The officers and members 
of 902 appreciated very much 
all donations received for this 
very worthy cause. 

The matron and staff expressed 
their appreciation of these gifts. 
The children also thanked the 
guests for all the wonderful 

gifts. 

Mr. and Mrs. Roy Carr spent 
Sunday in Oshawa with their 
cousin, Mrs. Ruth Cook, and 
family. 

Mr. and Mrs. S. Pegg of Kes- 
wick had dinner on Monday 
evening with Mr. and Mrs. Roy 
Carr. 



MOUNT ALBERT 

RED CROSS UNIT PACKS 
ANOTHER URg BAIf 

The Mount Albert unit of the 
Red Cross packed this week; 
ten pairs of khaki socks, three 
pairs long seamen's socks, 24 
pairs 18 inch seamen's socks, 
nine seamen's scarves, five sol- 
dier's scarves, three helmets, 
five khaki turtle-neck sweaters. 
11 grey lurtle-neck sweaters. 

Four pairs khaki whole mitts. 
13 pairs grey whole mitts, one 
lady's cardigan, one baby bon- 
net, jacket, soakers, bootees, 

three ladies' scarves, 14 quilts, 
one refugee sleeveless sweater, 
two refugee skirls, two dresses, 
one suit, one jacket, one sweater. 

One pair men's shoes, one 
shirt, one short grey blanket. 
two winter coats and hats, one 
sweater-coat and one hoy's coat. 

Corporal Murphy " of the 
R.C.A.F. training camp at Ayl- 
mer spent the weekend at the 
home of Mr. and Mrs. A.* Park. 



MOUNT ALBERT 

IS HONORED BEFORE 
LEAVING FOR CALGARY 



The International Plowing 
Match opened on Tuesday at 
Petorboro. 'Hie match closes to- 
morrow, when the Ear! of Ath- 
lone and Princess Alice will be 
present. 



■ . 



V •- 



£ 



Pay an a call and mve money 







m 



- * * 



— ^r^ ;i-..-- 




ASSOCIATE }>KAUm 

J.L SPILLETTE 

. Opjf'Mll* l'o%l Offfi'fl 

| rQpen nighta till 10 \>,m. 



_- _ 



NVwinarket 





Friday Night is V for VICTORY NIGHT 
A Free Victory Pin for Everyone 






'a 



THEATRE 

AURORA 



PKIDAV - SATURDAY — OCTOHKK 17 • 18 
WM. ISO VII — ltl*SSi;i,i\ IIAVDKN — AXl>V CLVI>E 

"IN OLD COLORADO" 

li:\\ J'AKKKR ~ WALLACK IOH1) 

"ROAR OF THE PRESS" 



AIOXIIAV - TIJKSIIAV — OCTOHKK W - 21 

I'ltisi iij.a i.an'i; — .m:i'I'Uj;v lank 

"MILLION DOLLAR BABY" 



IVKIlNKSfltV - TIlfJlsnAV — OrTOHKK 'i'Z ■ 2H 

i,AL : ici:.\< i: ouviElc — vivii;n i,i:t<;n 



"THAT HAMILTON WOMAN 



ii 



Mr. and Mrs. Nelson Boden, 
Carol and Doreen, visited their 
sister, Mrs. Douglas Barnard, 
and other friends in Toronto on 
Monday. 

Miss Olive Boden left for the 
Grace Salvation Army hospital 
in Calgary, Alia., on Monday, 
where she is going to nurse. 

About 25 friends and relatives 
gathered at the home of Miss 
Olive Boden on Thursday even- 
ing of last week to spend a few 
hours with her before she left 
for Calgary. 

She was presented with a 
purse of money. The address 
was read by Mrs. Nelson Boden 
and Miss Marie Paisley made the 
presentation. 

The evening was spent by sing- 
ing and readings. Miss Irene 
Boden sang "God he with you 
till we meet again." 



Is visiting her sister, Mrs. C. 
Blyth. 

Mr. and Mrs. Geo. Walker are 
spending a few weeks with their 
son, Max, at Greensville. 

The post office is being im- 
proved inside by painting and 
changing the ceiling, which adds 
much to the appearance. 

The Women's Institute October 
meeting took place at the home 
of Mrs. Bruce Rolling on Thurs- 
day with an attendance of 25 
ladies. 

Ten dollars was given to the 
Institute by Mrs. Rear, Sr., for 
which the Institute was grateful. 
This is being spent for yarn to 
knit for the boys who go from 

here. 

Ten dollars was voted to the 
public library and the ladies 

decided to put on a Hallowe'en 
party for the community on Fri- 
day, Oct. 31, in the hall. 

Mrs. Boyes of Churchill gave 
an interesting descriptive talk 
on a visit to England two years 
ago and told of England and 
other European countries before 
the war, and asked her hearers 
to 'take a bit of the spirit of the 
past into the future. 

One was surely taken through 
beautiful scenes that will not be 
forgotten. 

Mrs. Donald Stiver sang a 
beautiful solo. Jean Parks played 
vety nicely a piano solo and Mrs. 
B. Sinclair gave educational cur- 
rent events, explaining the new 
curriculum in relation to the old 
standards of teaching. 

Roll-call gave a nice donation 
of all sorts of pins to send over- 
seas. 



Miss Ruth Pegg, Toronto, 
spent the weekend at her home. 

Mr. and Mrs. Kirkup, Toronto, 
visited Mrs. Kirkup's mother, 
Mrs. Arnold. 

Mrs. W. Church is visiting her 
daughter, Mrs. Glen Micks. 

Mr. and Mrs. Gordon Tansley 
and family, Toronto, spent the 
weekend with Mr. and Mrs. 
Auley Brenair and visited the 
Brodericks and Tansleys. 

Miss Ethel Henderson. Tor- 

onto, spent the weekend at the 
Broderick home. 

Mrs. E. Pegg and Lowell 

attended Woodbridge fair on 

Monday. 

Mr. and Mrs. E. Pegg. Verne 
and Lowell spent Sunday with 

Mr. and Mrs. Fountain, Sharon. 

Capt. T. C. Armour and Mrs. 

Armour. Dorothy and Bill, Mr. 
Trent and Mrs. Charles Murray. 



Toronto, were holiday Weekend 
guests at the Dike home. 



• .w W &g 



^fw 



There will be no church set 

vice here on Sunday owing ti 
the Sharon anniversary. y0-i 

Mrs. M. Tansley had dinriei 
on Thanksgiving day with Mrs 
Auley Brenair. 

Mr. and Mrs. John ScoUJ 
Shirley and Ronald. Miss Ste'eHf 
<-ind Mrs. Mathieson, Toronto 
were guests at the Tansley honi 
on Thanksgiving day. 



WILL GIVE ILLUSTRATED 
TALK AT ST. ANDREW 

All young people are invit 
to St. Andrews Presbyte'ria. 

church next Tuesday evening a 

p.m. to hear an interesun 



3 



illustrated story entitled (, Bu; 
Your Own Cherries/' by Rcv| 
R. J. Koffcnd of Toronto. 




Township Of 

EAST GWILUMBURY 



>:*: 



Hope 



Mr. and Mrs. Ross Boyd. 
Louise and baby, Billie. and 
Mrs. Esther Boyd of Orillia 
were weekend guests of Mr. and 
Mrs. Stanley Boyd. 

Mrs. Jack Smith. Toronto, 
spent the weekend with her 
parents, Mr. and Mrs. J. Breen. 



Notice is hereby given to dog owners that 
any dogs found straying from their premises 
after sunset will be destroyed. 



•->:.- 






Dogs straying on to property where sheep 
are kept will be destroyed at any time of the 
day. 






** 



" ^ 



JOS. JARDINE.. 

' 

CONSTABLE 



-1 



MOUNT ALBERT 

Ten Dollar Gift Buys 

Yarn For Overseas Men 



Mr. and Mrs. J. Tilley and 
Alex, spent the holiday at the 
home of Mr. Til ley's parents in 
Belleville. 

Miss E. Hayes spent the week- 
end at the home of her brother, 
Mr. E. Hayes, at Port Perry. 

Mr. and Mrs. Bruce Leek of 
Tirnmins were calling on friends 
in town on Friday. 

Mrs. S. Jewell of New Liskeard 
and Mr. and Mrs. J. 'P. Crozier 
of Guelpli spent the weekend at 
the home of Mr. and Mrs. W. R. 
Steeper. 

Mr. W. R. Sommerfeldl and 
John Summcrfcldl of Canning- 
ton, and Mr. and Mrs. McKillem 
and Marion of Midland were call- 
ing on friends in lown on 
Thanksgiving day. 

Mrs. Ckinence of Peterboro 




TO SAVE MONEY - - SEE GOODMAN'S 

TIRES and BATTERIES 



-/': 



BATTERY SPECIAL 



TIRES 



1 1 -Plate 

(One-War Gua*j*uttt>) 

13-Plate 

<Onc»-Yf;ir Gtiurantvc) 

Ford V-8 Batteries . . . 



S4.25 
4.85 
5.98 



Si;'.- 


ti 


i;UKl 


Ply 


Pi :eo 


fffttfl 


Comoio 


rciai 






450-21 




• V 




J 


IU0 


475-1& 












5(0- 10 




** 




i 


7.00 


&5-1& 












550MS 




41 




l 


$.26 


525-1? 












550*17 




■• 




J 


$.90 


600-16 




It 




i 


10.30 



Months 
Guarantee 

tft 

15 
15 

13 

15 



GOODMAN'S 



HURON ST. EAST 



PHONE 305W 



AUTO 
WRECKERS 

NEWMARKET 



i 









5 



a 



- 1 



TOUAV ONLV 
f'*nt»k .Morrill 

"iii:i.i-.\ji.\i.o(r 
iiml 

SHINING 

VM/i'OHV' 1 



t* 




A<:roi:.vrs aiuc IMH3KD 

HV SKIVMAIIKKT ( 01 NCII. 

Account.- j#:i.->>i'»i by On- town 
Council on .Monday of last w*rl< in- 
r)ti.l*d: Mi*. J. U'lUU'ii. $2; C;iliu- 
<lia» National Kail way a, $17.25; 

Coil.siiiH DahW*, $10. lft; M.ui)a!> 
H.iMlwarc, 7ft Califs; UeU Teh- 
f.hoin- Co. <:i7.I8; l>.:ol. of Inaltli 
of OntaiM. 2iJ £<*i)ls; Cruinty of 
Yoik, $!*.V>; N<rwmaikit Kia. J210; 
.1. J'J. Blotftfi 5 10.77; W. II. Uvea A* 
Co., $ J 5.-1 1: iU'OtKH II. Thompson. 
53.16; Hy<iioKWctil<: IMVtir Com- 
* trtfaHlOH of Onu.ilo, 11*5.13; Tin- 
I KxprwUteraM, |W27; Or. J. H. 
UValiy, $5; Or. U W. OuUh, $5. 



•:. .---. .--. 



Monoay . Tuesday 

ilhrlil-puMi 




v 



Wednesday • Thursday 





ONTARIO 



THE 



* 



VOTERS' LISTS 




& -<i 



(Referred to in Section 58) 



NOTICE of SITTINGS of REVISING OFFICER 




TAKE NOTICE thai llie sittings of the Revising Officer for the purpose of hearing complaints or 
Appeals with regard to the voters" lists to he used at the vote to he taken under the provisions of The Liquor 
Control Act (Ontario) in the Municipality of NEWMARKET will held at the limes and places set forth in 
the schedule hereinafter set out: 







FOR A 
BACK . 



QUICK COME- 
. . TO AUIUMN 
BEAUTY ■ 

Ciuric- U> 



Add«4 r**lur« 
: With an All-6Ur Cart 



y* 



V'i 




.«** 



* t- »■■ r^ 



THE EMBASSY 
BEAUTY SALON 

I'bono 40 

M Main 81. 

NKWMAIIKKT 

> 

Have a soft new perm- 
anent and our special 
reconditioning service, 
the necessary basis for 
the loveliest in now fall 
and winter coiffures. 



V 



SC H EDU 





Name of Municipality 



NEWMARKET 



Date and Hour of Sittings 



NOVEMBER 5. 1941 
AT 10 A.M. 



Place of Slttlnoa 



COUNCIL 

CHAMBERS 

NEWMARKET, ONT. 



Clerk of Revlslno Officer 



N. L. MATHEWS, K,C 

09 MAIN ST. 
NEWMARKET, ONT. 



l-i 



Ou 



HIS HONOUR JUDGE BARTON WILL BE THE REVISING OFFICER FOR THE ABOVE MEN- 
TIONED MUNICIPALITY. 



v 




AND FURTHER TAKE NOTICE that the list to he so revised is Parts I and III of the voters' list 
prepared for the municipality of Newmarket. j 

AND FURTHER TAKE NOTICE that any voter who desires to complain that his name or the 
name of any person entitled to he entered on the said list has heen omitted from the same, or that the names of 
any persons who arc not entitled to be voters have been entered thereon, may on or before the THIRTY-: 
FIRST DAY OF OCTOBER, 1941, apply, complain or appeal to have his name or the name or any other 
person entered on, or removed from the list. 

AND FURTHER TAKE NOTICE that such appeals must be by notice in writing in the prescribed 
form, signed by the complainant in duplicate and given to the Clerk of the Revising Officer or left for him at hi$ 
address as stated above. (S . gned) T R BARTON> 

Chairman of the Election Board for the County of York 
Dated this tenth day of October, A.D. 1941. * 



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