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Full text of "Political Science Of The State"

POLITICAL SCIENCE.
constitutional grounds, as they interpreted the federal instru-
ment, to put their quotas of militia under the command of
the president And it is worthy of notice that these meas-
ures of the federal governors were spoken of by the presi-
dent, belonging, too, to the democratic party—as frustrating
the authority of the United States and showing, if they were
a correct exposition of the constitution, that the United
States " are not one nation for the purpose most of all re-
quired."
Again, how inconsistent with the notion of a federal repub-
lic is the treatment of Aratus by the league or its chief offi-
cers on more than one occasion. Thus, after the defeat of
Laodiceia, in B. C. 226, the assembly voted "not to give
him money for the war, nor to maintain mercenaries, but
that if it were necessary to go to war, he must provide his
own supplies/' (Plut. vit. Arat, § 37, in Freeman, p, 452.)
And again, in B. C. 223, after the loss of Corinth, the assem-
bly conferred on him absolute power, and had a guard of
citizens granted to him for the defense of his person* (Plut.,
u. s., § 41.) Nor was he restrained in his unauthorized nego-
tiations with the Macedonian kings.
The constitution of the Achaean league, then, would seem
to have had no adequate powers for state action, and hence
irresponsible power had to supply their place. From the ces-
sion of the citadel of Corinth in the year B* C. 223, according
to Mr. Freeman, " the glory of the league passes away—the
free and glorious league of so many equal cities acting by a
common will; the league which had warred with kings, and
had overthrown and converted tyrants, had now become a
thing of the past." And yet this was seventy-five years
before its dissolution, and less than thirty from its first begin-
ning to act an important part.
Are we not justified, then, in saying that while the Achaean
league was a step forward, and put the power of joint action
in confederations in a new light, it did not show the strength
or the self-subsistence of this kind of government in a way to
commend them to posterity. When it went beyond the