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Full text of "Political Science Of The State"

INDEX.

The figures standing alone denote pages of Vol. I.   For the first references under
a title to VoL IL, ii. is added   The sections of Vol. II. begin with $ 177-

ACHJEAN league, ii. 181-194; first form,
182; later form, ibid.; constitution, 183-
189; external relations, to whom com-
mitted, 183; primary assembly, 184 ;
senate, 185; equality of members, 186;
magistrates, idid.;the general, 187; pow-
ers of the senate, 188; federal courts,
189 ; the league not a strict confedera-
tion, 190-192; causes of its failure, 192,

193-
ADOPTION, right of, 106.

ADULTERY, its penalty in several codes,
357; sometimes looked on only as a
private injury, 358.

ADVOCATE, the, as a part of the judicial
system, ii. 346.

^ESCHINES, the orator, his account of
the Amphictyonic league, ii. 177-179.

^ETOLIAN league, ii. 180, 181.

AFRICA, negro tribes of, their govern-
ment, 448.

AHRENS, Prof., on rights, 134.

AMPHICTYONIC league, 176-179. See
Confederation.

ARAB tribes, institutions of some of them,

452. 453-

ARISTOTLE, often cited, as  on justice,
120-122; on slavery, 122,123; his objec-
tions to Plato's community of goods, 320;
on relative criminality of actions, 356;
on political changes, 407; on forms of
governments, 466,467; on mixed govern-'
ments, 471; on the constitution of Spar-
ta, 470, 540-543 ; on Solon, 471; on the
tyrants in Greece, 513-515 ; on aristoc-
racy in Greece, ii. 2-11 • on the insti-

tutions of Carthage, 37, 38, <?jf seq.; on
demagogues in a democracy, 106; on
•plans to check the power of a democ-
racy, 112; on the meaning of demits,
125 ; on the causes of the long continu-
ance of the Spartan monarchy, 269; on
personal solicitations for office, 325, n.;
on the causes and the means of pre-
venting revolutions, 577-583.
ARISTOCRACY, ii. i ; in1 Greece, 2-11;
aristocracy and oligarchy, 2; names
given to the upper class, 3 ; elements
in A. 4; A. and membership in the
tribes, ibid. / a council or councils in
aristocracies there, 4, 5 ; magistrates,
6; administration of justice, 7; efforts
against change of polity, 8-10; dangers
in A. and oligarchy, 10, n ; party
spirit, 12. A. at Rome, ii. 12-15; $o-
pulus, 13; consuls, 14; throwing open
offices, 14, 15; senate as organ of aris-
tocracy, 16-18 ; its functions, 18-22 ;
increase of rights of plcbs, 22; right of
appeal by the Valerian law, 23; crea-
tion of tribunes, ibid. / their part in the
constitution, 24, 25 ; revision of the
. laws, 26, 27; laws of twelve tables not
political, ibid.; military tribunes, 28;
censors, 28; consulate opened to plebs,
30; Licinian laws, ibid.; praetorship and
office of pontiff opened, 31, 32 ; rise of
an oligarchic party, 33; the optimates,
34; Caesar's ascendancy, ibid. A. in
Carthage, 35-42; account of the govern-
ment by Aristotle, 37-39; senate and
judges, 39, 40 ; suffetes or kings, 41; a