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Full text of "Political Science Of The State"

INDEX.

6n

morals, 601, 602. Are the institutions
of modern society self-sustaining ? 602,
603. Can morals be pure without reli-
gion ? 603, 604. Need ot religious faith
in advanced societies, 604, 605 ; condi-
tions of prosperity according to Plato,
605; they are ineffectual, ibiet.; reli-
gious and moral forces can save some
states, but not all, 606 ; and can revi-
vify others, ibid.

DEFINITIONS of rights, 131-137; by
Paley, 131; Abicht, ibid. / Lieber, ibid. ;
Von Rotteck, ibid,; Zachariae, 132;
Whewell, 132; Roder, 133; Ahrens,
134. I3S; Stahl, 135, 136; Trendelen-
burg, 136; Lorimer, 136, 137.

DEMOCRACY, Aristotle on, 466,467, § 154;
definition of, ii. 102; distinction between
form and spirit, ibid.; democracies with
a great number of slaves, ibid.; those
where suffrage is restricted, 103; some
politics of doubtful nature, ibid.; city-
democracies, their advantages as to
education of citizens, 104; as to politi-
cal value of citizens, ibid.; disadvan-
tages of, 105. Demagogues in democ-
racies, 106; moderating principles in
modern democracies, a constitution,
107; a representative system, 108 ; its
advantages, 108, 109; feeling of trust,
ibid.; temptation of representatives,
109, no; modern limits on special
legislation, no, in. French democ-
racy, 115; democracy in United States,
116, 117. Eligibility to office in democ-
racies, 117. Representation and suf-
frage in democracies, 116,118. Extreme
democracy, its marks, 119-122; Athe-
nian democracy, § 201 ; Solon's re-
forms, the seisacktheia, 123 ; the sen-
ate, 124 ; subsequent democratic insti-
tutions, 125-138. See Athens. Mod-
ern democracy in France and United
States, 138-145. Practical ends in the
latter, 139; few changes made by the
revolution, 140; greater, since, 141,
142 ; doctrine, its sway in France, tbid. ;
logical equality of political rights there,
143; contrasted with United States,
ibid. ,- perils of democracies from
changes in society, 144, 145.

DEPARTMENTS of government, coo; J yS.
ii. 259-347. Necessity of division ui'
power, 259; \shieh is supremo? 2^0.
261 ; their essential differences, 262 '*
independence, 262, 265; yet not entire
separation, 263, 264 ; danger of cunllirt,
264, 265. Executive cU-pu.rtmcnts, aW»-
288 ; legislative, 288-326; judicial, 327-
347. See Executive, Judicial, legisla-
tive.
DILKE, A. W., on the  Russian ml>\ ii*
389, 39°-
DIONYSTUS of Halicarnnssus, on mixed
governments, 471; on Roman colonies*
ii. 151.
DISPOSITION testamentary* Sec Testa-
ment.
DIVISIONS of rights, 36, 37.
DIVORCE, 100-102.
DOKIMASI^E at Athens, ii. 130.
DONATISTS, their protest against the
state's use of force in matters of opin-
ion, ii. 473.
DUTCH United Provinces, ii. 223-236.
Utrecht Union, 223-235; defects of this
instrument, 226, 227 ; Duke of Anjon,
as general stadthoklcr, fails and resigns,
227 ; William of Orange stadthokler in
Holland and Zealand, ibid. ; Karl of
Leicester general stadth., ibid. ; diffi-
culties preventing entire union, S27<-
229; Maurice stadtholder in Holland,
Zeeland, elsewhere, 229 ; religious dis-
putes, 230; William II,, ibid. ; this of-
fice vacant, ibid. / John De Witt, the
perpetual edict, 231, 232; William of
Orange (III. of England), stadth., 233,
233 ; office again vacant, 233 ; restored
and made hereditary, ibid. ; destruction
of the republic, 234; remarks on the
constitution, 234, 235 ; M, Passy's com-
parison of Swiss and Dutch republics
and their destiny, 235, 236.
DUTIES not the origin of rights, 31.
Duties of individuals towards parties,
390.
DUVERGTER d'Haurane on the way to
elect the chief magistrate in France, it
272-275.
EARLY institutions, 431-465.