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Full text of "Political Science Of The State"

INDEX.

617

LORTMER, Prof. J., on rights, 136,137 ; on
payment to members of a legislature,

ii. 324-
LOYALTY or obedience to law, obligation

to, 386, 387 ;   limits to,  394-     Comp.
402.

MABLY, his Platonic communism, 312.

MACCIIIAVELLI, his princip^ 150; dis-
courses on Livy, 151; principles of
state policy, ibid.

MACKINTOSH, Sir J., on natural law, 3.

MACLENNAN, on primitive marriage, es-
pecially on exogamy and bride-steal-
ing, 90, 9L 93, 94-

MAINE, Sir H. S., on village communi-
ties, 52, 59, 60; on territorial sover-
eignty, 144; on Montesquieu, 171.

MAJOR domus, or mayor of the palace,
origin and growth of this institution, ii,

357-359-

MARQUARDTon Roman antiquities, cited,
ii. 32, 153, 154, 156, and elsewhere.

MARRIAGE, begins in contract, 85; ob-
stacles to, 86 ; prohibited degrees, 87-
90; primitive marriage, recent writers
on, 90, n.; statements as to primitive
usages, community-marriage, ibid. /
polyandry, 91; family following moth-
er's kin, 92; incest common, 92 ; en-
dogamy, exogamy, bride-stealing in
early times, 93, 94 ; polygamy, 95-98;
rights and obligations of a married pair,
98-100; divorce, 100-102; rights of
parents, 102-106; the child not prop-
erty, 104 ; Roman patria potestas, 103,
104 ; adoption, 106; inheritance, 106-
no. See Testamentary Disposition.
Roman qucrela itjojftciosi \estamenti,
108 ; intestate succession, 109; disin-
herison, ibid.; right of making be-
quests for religious and other purposes
outside of the family, no.

MAY, his constitutional history of England
cited, 547, 557,558, and often elsewhere.

MILAN, tyranny of the Visconti and
Sforzas there, 515-518.

MILL, J. S., on limits of state action, or
individual liberty, 249-261; remarks on
his opinions, 261-263 I against- electing
chief magistrate by popular vote, ii.

276-279 ; against indirect flection ,
301 4 n. ; on tlio composition of an
upper legislative chamber, 312-315 ;
on election f subordinate offiri.tl>, 3$*';
on "representative suh-p.irUiimcMto/*

324-
MILTON, on the right of revolution, 411-

MOJIAMMKDAN monarchy, 504,
MOMMSKN, Thcod., often died ; his his-
tory of Rome, ii. 24, 23, sS( etc, ; his
Rom. Staatsr., 28, etc. ; on Roman suf-
frage, 13 ; Roman colonies, 132-134,
MONARCHY, early, 441 ; in jjent-ral, 487-
586 ; absolute, especially growing out
of conquest, 495 ; Theorrratie, 497 (stje
Theocracies); absolute patriarchal, 501 ;
Chinese, ibid.; Japanese* 502; Peru-
vian, 503 ; Mohammedan, 504 ; Impe-
rial despotism, 504-508 ; later Human
empire, 508, 509 ; French empire, 50;,
510 ; tyranny in city-states, Greek, 510-
515 ; in Italy, especially at Milan, 518 ;
limited and mixed monarchy, 518-520;
elective, 520-527; feudal monarchy, 528-
535 ; mixed, especially Spartan, 536-543;
linglish, 543-579- ttuii Knyli.sU Mon-
archy. Constitutional niunarehy and
written constitutions, 579-585,
MONTESQUIKU, estimate of him, 168-171 ;
on two legislative chambers, ii, 309 ; on
sumptuary laws, 435, 436; cm the spirit
of governments, 519-526; on influences
from climate, 514,
MORALS, moral and jural provinces, 4 ;
moral not in general subject to human
law (see Rights); moral legislation, gen-
eral rules as to, 232 ; practically con-
sidered, ii. 422-438 ; useless to decide
whether the immoralities are so in them-
selves or by reason of their conse-
quences, 422, 423; ought law to forbid
that which hurts only the person com-
mitting it ? 425 ; laws concerning broth-
els, 426 ; laws concerning spirituous
liquors, 426-431 ; reasons for prohibit-
ing the sale, 427 ; can such laws be en-
forced ? 428 ; license of the sale, 429 ;
necessary restrictions on the gale, 430 ;
claim of right to sell, ibid. / laws con-
cerning obscene books and pictures,