(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Children's Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Political Science Of The State"

INDEX,

REVOLUTIONS, great differences in, 405:
we cannot argue that it is wrong, from
duties of individuals to obey law, 403 ;
importance of the practical side of the
question of right, 4041   opinions on,
among the Greeks : Plato's, 406, 407;
Aristotle's, 407; among the Jews, 408 ;
in the Middle Ages, ibid. ; the Pope the
fomenter of revolution, ibid.; the right
sanctioned in some mediaeval states,
409; theories on the revolution after
the Reformation, 409, 410; as by Bu-
chanan, Languet, Rose, Mariana, ibid. ;
opinions in  England,  411 ;   Milton's,
411-413 ; South's and others', after the
reaction, 413 ; Locke's doctrine resting
on contract, 414; the Whig doctrine,
415; Burke on this, ibid. ; French the-
ory, 416; doctrine in the United States,
416, 417,    Kant on resistance to public
authority, 417, 418 ; Stahl on the limits
of obedience, 419;   Fichte, the elder,
on revolution, 419, 420;   Schleicrma-
cher, 420; R. Rothe, 421, 422 ; doctrine
in the New Testament, 423-425.    Rev-
olution is aright of a people, 426 ; jus-
tified by the   circumstances   in  each
case, ibid.; an extreme remedy, 427;
to be used if the wisdom of the people
so decides, since they are the ultimate
source of power, 428, 429 ; and has been
in its exercise a great benefit to man-
kind, 430. Revolutions differ from other
polit. changes by being quick and seek-
ing to reach their end at once, ii. 576;
no concert necessary at first, but only
a common feeling,  ibid.;  immediate
causes often trivial, 577;   illustration
from Sicilian Vespers, ibid. ; Aristotle
on revolutions, 578-583 ; on the causes
of political changes in various polities,
578. 579  on changes in democracies
and their causes, 580 ;  on preventing
revolutions, 581, 582 ; as by not having
public offices lucrative, 583 ; nor bur-
dening the rich, ibid.; on preventing
polities from running to extremes, 584 ;
on conforming education to the polity,
585.    Comprehensiveness of the term
revolution, 586; illustrations, 586, 587.
Treatment of revolutions by govern-

ments, /V'/V, Theoretical character uf
some modern revelations, &&. An-
cient and modern revolutions I'otn-
parcel, itnJ.; moral conviction* uf their
rightfulness in modern times, sty?; re-
marks qi' Gui/ot and Hucht'Z on thr:*:
convictions and their causes, $&i, 300,
What politics are most exposed to
them, 590; national character as influ-
encing their course, 591; course t*t
revolution in France, 59i*S93 ^*im
revolutions be prevented, and how?
593-595 ; effect of a trained militia,
594 ; coups </V/(j/, ibid.
REWARDS, should good citizens receive
them, 335 ; Beccariu's opinion on, 343,
RIGHTS as powers of free action, 6; de-
rivation of the word, /VvY/., n. ; are sub-
jective, as being personal, ibid,; proof
that they exist, 7; from man's convic-
tions in the family, ibid. ; and the state,
8; are recognised oven by lower races
of men, 9; state-law solely cannot ac-
count for the conviction, 10; final canst!
of their existence the nature and des-
tiny of man, 12; needed as chocks on
wrong, 12 ; necessary for moral devel-
opment, 13. Relation to morals; are in-
cluded in morals, 14; may be waived
in part, 15; are most important on the
prohibitory or negative side, 16; obli-
gation correlative to rights, ami chiefly
negative, but duties both positive and
negative, 16 ; arc external, but moral
requirements both external and inter-
nal, 17; may be sharply defined, 18 ;
can be enforced, 19; but use of force no
necessary criterion of rights, 19, 30.
Recognition of rights, necessary for law
and society, 21 ; imply coexistence of
men, 22; thus point to society and
government, ibid.; Kant's definition
founded on this coexistence, 23. Natu-
ral rights, in what sense are there any ?
24-26. Equality of rights, sense of the
term, 27, 28. Relation of rights to
honor, 29, 30 ; to Christianity, 30, 31;
to justice, 32; to freedom and slavery,
33; seeming collisions of, 34; limita-
tions of, 35; divisions of, 36,37. Particu-
lar rights. See Life, Locomotion, Prop-