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Full text of "Quebec"

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SUMMARY 

.ebec, the city unique, has retained its Old. World 
charm even down to the present time. This city is built on 
two levels, on the north bank of the St, Lawrence River, It 
has a picturesque medieval appeal and abounds in historic 
interest. The memory of many of the early French residents 
of Quebec and its surrounding province is perpetuated in the 
names of automobiles, cities, and lakes. The present inhabi- 
tants of Provincial Quebec live much the same way as did 
their 17th century forefathers. Quebec 1 s citizens maintain 
an unusual position. Although encircled by English speaking 
peoples, and pledging allegiance to the Dominion of Canada and 
to the British Empire, yet they keep intact the quaint modes of 
the civilization of their French ancestors. 



JEBEC 

THE CITY UNIQUE 

While other cities may become so modernized and stream- 
lined that the visitor scarcely notices the difference between 
one city and the next except in location and size, Quebec, scene 
of the recent Allied war conference, stands out as the guardian 
of Old world charm In the New World* 

Magnificently situated on the north bank of the mighty 
St. Lawrence River, its first residents were those native Ameri- 
cans, the Indians, When that intrepid Frenchman, Jacques Cartier, 
sailed up the St. Lawrence early In the 16th century, he endorsed 
the Indians* selection of the site as a place of safety and 
advantage, Samuel Champlain, Lieutenant Governor of Kew France, 
founded the colony of Quebec in 1608, where later was built a 
great fort. This fort, "The Citadel", is surrounded by a moat- 
beyond which are outer ramparts enclosing Upper Town. 

The city of Quebec has long since outgrown its original 
site, the summit of Cape Diamond, The Citadel is now the resi- 
dence of the Governor General of Canada when he is not presiding 
at Ottawa, The Chateau Frontenac, built on the ruins of the 
long- crumbling Chateau St. Louis, home of early Canadian Viceroys, 
overlooks the St, Lawrence River and the harbor, Dufferln Terrace, 
Frontenac 's boardwalk, is a fashionable promenade. 

The tour of these and other points of interest of the 
Upper Town atop Cape Diamond is an unforgetable experience for 
the tourist, especially if he rides in an old-fashioned, high 



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wheeled, one horse caleche. The Upper Town is built entirely 
on the majestic rock which has given Quebec its title of "The 
Gibraltar of America"* Quebec has the distinction of being 
the only walled city in America. St. Louis Gate is one of 
the three gateways in this wall which have been preserved in 
their original state. From this Upper Town the city spread to 
the valley of the St. Charles River. This later development 
has been appropriately called the "Lower Town". 

A resemblance to the oldest cities of Europe is 
striking— the medieval architecture, the narrow crooked streets, 
and the number and magnificence of monuments and churches. 
Elstory is relived through a visit to the L f Esplanade, the 
museums, famous old homes, and the Basilica of Mountain Hill. 
Parliament Buildings located in Quebec house the seat of 
provincial legislature. 

Through the names of lakes, cities, and motor cars, we 
are familiar with the names of the early French settlers of this 
historic city. Cadillac, Frontenac, Champlain, Joliet, Laval, 
LaSalle, Cartier — to recall but a few — the deeds of these men 
form a part of the rich heritage of Quebec, the city once the 
capital of the ill-fated New France. . Rebec's proud recollections 
encompass time fiora the war whoops of the Algonquins and the 
Hurons. Encompassed too are the happenings on the nearby Plains 
of Abraham where the gallant Wolfe achieved victory over the no 
less valiant Montcalm. It is interesting to note that monuments 
are erected which equally honor Montcalm and Wolfe. 



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PROVINCIAL 4CTCBEC 

La Province de Quebec is the oldest and largest of the 
Dominion of Canada, Its invigorating climate, the beautiful 
mountains, valleys, lakes, and cascading rivers delight the 
traveler. The majestic Montmorency Palls plunge from a height 
of almost three hundred feet into the St. Lawrence below Quebec • 
The picturesque villages with their ornate twin-spired churches, 
and the old Norman homesteads preserve the romance of Old Prance 
in the shadow of the Laurentian Mountains. Well traveled, modern 
highways lead past quaint towns, wayside shrines, and monuments 
to ancient French heroes. The courteous French- spe ale ing people 
still prefer their outdoor bake ovens, hand looms, and spinning 
wheels, even as did their 17th century ancestors, thus perpetuating 
the Norman type customs to this day. 

ATTITUDE OF FRENCH CANADIA 1 " 

Explorers, soldiers, missionaries, fur-traders, 
farmers — to these liberty loving citizens of 'Quebec Province the 
Act of 1774 guaranteed the free exercise of their religion, their 
civil rights, laws, and their customs. Although encircled by 
English speaking peoples, and pledging allegiance to the Dominion 
of Canada and to the British Empire, Rebec's populace has 
always preferred to live by itself to preserve its identity. 
In spite of this pronounced individualism, down the long corridor 
of the years there has been no criticism of the worthy citizen- 
ship and stalwart patriotism of the French- Canadians of 4iebec. 



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"Je me souviens", Is found on the Provincial seal and 
on the flag of the regiment stationed at the Citadel. The true 
spirit of the French- Canadian Is seen in this motto, which trans- 
lated by him reads, "We give our loyalty to the British Crown and 
we consider ourselves an integral part of the Dominion of Canada, 
but we respect and remember the courage of our ancestors in 
"planting a colony on the shores of the St. Lawrence River, and 
we pledge ourselves to keep Intact the civilization which they 
so nobly began" • 



WJW * 




SCENE OF MILITARY CONFERENCES — Towering above a 
Quebec park here is the Chateau Frontenac, where high-rank- 
ing Canadian and American military leaders are conferring with 
British staff officers In conjunction with conferences between 
Prime Ministers Churchill and King and forthcoming talks with 
President Roosevelt. 



WEDNESDAY, AUfi-UST 11, 1943. 




EVENING 



TO MURRAY 8iY AND CHICOt/TtW 

rosr£-Aft,vE0ttiEAvpxirtertJt5s 

TO MON Tf-KWENCY FALLS- 6 /•' 



OP THE CITIES OF 

QUEBEC? LEVIS 

SHOWING THE MAIN ARTERIES 
FROM THE 

QUEBEC AUTOMOBILE CLUB 










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J" 9. 



Jacques Cartiur 




© National Geographic Society Natural-Color Photograph by William D. Boulwell 

FRANCE HELD IT, BRITAIN SEIZED IT, A FRENCH-CANADIAN RECIMENT COMMANDS IT 

The Duke of Wellington, victor of Waterloo, approved the plans which made the Citadel of Quebec at one time a Gibraltar of America, The inner 
fortifications— which are to-day obsolescent— overlook the moat, which in turn overlooks the outer ramparts inclosing Upper Town Quebec. 










The City of Quebec- has been aptly called the 

Gibraltar of America. View of the Citadel 

and Cap aux Diamants 




Historic entrance to an old city. The St. Louis 
Gate is one of the three gateways to Quebec 
which have been preserved in their origami stale 




Provincial Government Building, Quebec. The 

seat of legislature of the Province erected in 1878. 

giving accommodation for both upper 

and lower chamber assemblies 



Try one of these for a novel ride. A high wheeled 

caleche. smart equipage of cenluries ago. typical 

of the many quaint sights of old Quebec 




© National Geographic Society Natural-Color Photograph by William D, Boutwcll 

THE BLACK RIVERS OK QUEBEC RUN RICH IN " WHITE COAL" 

Like liquid from a ladle, the torrent of Montmorency Falls, more than one hundred feet higher 
than Niagara Falls, spills over the edge of the Laurentian Shield plateau into the St. Lawrence 
River. Passengers on liners sailing up or down the river see the cascade, which bursts into view 
six miles below Quebec City, The province has water-power resources estimated at 13,000,000 
horsepower. 




I Katioual {xeogrLijihit: Sucit'ly Nalural-Color Photograph by Edwin L Wishcsrd 

PROUD OF HIS HANDMADE "CE1NTURE I-LECHEE" 

Even if Jacques's sash is an old one made of hard-twisted wool, dyed 
with natural colors and mellowed by age, it is worth money. Ceintures 
Jlerhe'es made by habitants are prized like Persian rugs or hand-woven 
ponchos of South and Central America. The weaving of fltjchees, once 
almost a lost art, has been revived by the Provincial Government, 




Nalutal-Cnlor Photograph by William D. Boutwell 
A VISITOR PAUSES AT A STATION OF THE CROSS 

Bronze figures reenact the Christian tragedy by the quiet hillside 
paths of Ste. Anne de Beaupre\ the Lourdes of the New World. On St. 
John the Baptist's Day, June 24th, and the day of days in French Canada, 
a colorful religious procession journeys front Quebec 22 miles to Ste. 
Anne, halting front time to time at wayside shrines. 




The Church of Sl-Franeois-de-Sales, Isle of 

Orleans, noted for its richness of ornamentation 

and artistic carvings; it is typical of rural 

churches of the Province. 









There's no bread deliver} in (Jasne, and so 

Madam bakes her own and finds the old-fashioned 

outdoor oven quite suitable lo her needs 





© National Geographic Society 

THEIR SCHOOL IS 264 YEARS OLD 

Quebec Seminary was founded in 1666 with 8 French boys, 6 Hurons 
and a few Algonquins, Laval University developed out of the Seminary. 
Boys who live in Lower Town have the tun of sliding down about 200 feet 
of iron guard railing on their way home from school. 



Natural-Color Photographs by William D. Boutvvell 
FRENCH-CANADIAN SOLDIERS SHOW THEIR COLORS 

French-speaking "Tommies" swear fealty to a regimental flag car- 
rying the emblems of nations that were once sworn enemies. The lilies 
of France, the lion of St. George, and the maple leaves of Canada em- 
blazon the Provincial escutcheon embroidered on the banner. 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 

"The National Geographic Magazine" April 1930 

Encyclopedia Britannica 

icellaneous information and pictures obtained on a personal 
trip throu, ... 3 3bec Province, August 1941