(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Ram pages [microform]"

THE 

RAM PAGE S 

VOL. 23 

1988-1989 





IS)®Ilsiss;ysimi^anfl(S^ (^(Dlin®^® iSoodlcgoQtJ l^fe^RTspopiir 



Vol. XXIII. No. 1 



NOTICE The opinions expressed in any individual article do not necessarily reflect the viewpoint of the papyer or school 



Friday. October 7, 1988 



Ram Pages 
Returns 

Yes folks, it's official. Ram Pages is 
back in action. The reason you haven't 
seen the paper out is that there was no 
editor. Now we have three. They are 
Marc Krasner. Kathleen Stasney and 
Loretta Skibowski. Together they will try 
to give you. the reader, a timely and in- 
formative paper. They welcome sugges- 
tions and articles from everyone. This is 
your paper, and we want to hear from 
you. You can put suggestions in the 
paper's mailbox (917). the suggestion 
boxes outside the pub and in the dining 
hall, or in the envelope on the door of 
103 Berkowitz. 

Thanks for your support! 



HOMECOMING 
RESULTS 

Homecoming Queen from Biologi; Oub 
^^ Joanne Pekol 

Float Winner • ■ 
Horticulture 

Spirit Car Winner 
Lab Animal Club 

Result of Football Game 
DVC 30. Albright 10 



Do\;lestown Sesquicentennial 
■■::--■■:' Grand Ball 

The Doylestown Sesquicentennial 
Grand Ball will be held Saturday. Octo- 
ber 15. 1988, 7 p.m.. at the Delaware 
Valley College Student Center. Cost is 
$45 per person . There will be dinner and 
dancing. Formal period attire from 1838 
to 1988 is requested. For more informa- 
tion call 794-8031 or 348-1350. 



WE'RE BAAACK! 



¥ 

¥ 
¥ 





This Week on Campus 

SATL»U>AY. OCTOBER 8 

Cross Country (H) vs. Susquehanrw 

2:15 p.m. 

Field Hockey, (H) vs [>ew. 11 am' 

Football (H) \«. Susquehanna, 
1:30 pm 

SUNDAY. OCTOBER 9 

Equestrian Team (A) vs. Scton HI 
8 a.m. 

MONDAY, OCTOBER 10 

Nod^ses! 

[>ea<fline for sjbmitting resumes to 

Pwdue. 

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 11 

Monday's schedule 
Movie: B^xi flii^s. 9 p.m. 

WQ>N£$DAY. OCTOBER 12 

Field Hockey (H) vs. Scrantcai, 4 p.m. 
Vc^^^ (H) vs. Swai^m<»e 
Socca- (H) vs. l^puia. 3.90 pm 
Placement Offfce: Prfanex. Stop by ttw 
Placement Office to sign up for 
■f>te!nw>AS md ch«k (cnt addMkms and 
chtfi^s in kTt^view sdiedules. 

THURSDAY. OCTOBER 13 

D^ Band. "Rogue." 9 pm . ^R 

Haamtnt OfBce Intennew^ 
Workriwp. 7:30 p.m.. Segal Hal 

FRIDAY, OCTOBBl 14 

Forms lor DVCstop 100 due 








Sandra L. Solimene 

improving Your 
Tipping Skills 

How are your typing skills? To brush 
up your typing for those papers you'll be 
writing, or even to learn the keyboard, 
try the Library's new software package, 
TYPING TUTOR IV. A video game. 
Letter Invaders, helps you improve ac- 
curacy and keeps score as well. Stop by 
the Periodicals Room, on the lower level 
of the Library, to sign up for computer 
time. 

The Library has two Apple He's avail- 
able for student use. Staff members will 
get you started on word processing using 
the easy-to-learn program PFS Write. 
Other software includes PFS File and 
Printshop. which generates cards, signs 
and banners. Time on the computers fills 
up quickly so reserve your slot early. 
There's a two-hour daily time limit per 
student. If you have questions go to the 
Library, Periodicals Room M-W-F, ex- 
tension 2253. 



1988 PEP RALLY 

by Darlene Geiter 

Spirits were soaring last Friday at the 
1988 Pep Rally. The most spectacular 
event was "CREAM THE LIONS." The 
object was to yell "cream the lions" pro- 
gressively louder, bringing the pies closer 
to the lions. President Rorer. Vice Presi- 
dent Mertz and Dean Craver were the 
lions. As a result, the pies got quite close 
to the lijjns. These guys were great sports! 

Several teams were represented, in- 
cluding field hockey, equestrian, cross 
country, soccer and volleyball. The 
cheerleaders were all there and although 
their dance was postponed several times, 
they were undaunted. It was worth the 
wait. 

The dorm banners were so good that it 
was difficult to decide who would win. 
Barness, Goldman and Wolf son all tied 
for the $50 first prize. Congratulations. 

Last, but definitely not least, was the 
football team. Although the captains 
mentioned only a few members, the 
whole team deserved recognition. Ob- 
viously our supp)ort paid off with a 30- 10 
victory. Happy Homecoming! 



DVCS NEWEST AMBASSADOR 



DVC has named Sandra L. Solimene, 
a junior Ornamental Horticulture major 
from Hackettstown, NJ, as the College's 
newest ambassador for the Food and 
Agricultural Sciences. Miss Solimene will 
be a spokesperson for the College's pro- 
grams in this division, appearing before 
civic and professional groups, at the 
Pennsylvania Farm Show, with the 
media and for admissions recruitment 
purposes. 

Miss Solimene is the daughter of Sal 
and Rita Solimene of Hackettstown, NJ. 
She is specializing in Floriculture and 
minoring in Business. . f * ;" '= 

She will join junior Brad A. Bittner, a 
Horticulture major from Kersey, PA, 
who served as one of the College's first 
two "Agricultural Ambassadors" last 
^Hf. '-'■'■^::-: I.-. 

The two ambassador positions were 
established in an effort to present the 
field of agriculture in a positive light, in 
keeping with the importance it holds in 
the world today. Studies have shown 
that there are insufficient graduates in the 
food and agricultural sciences to fill 
vacancies in these careers, and the situa- 
tion is expected to become more serious 
in the near future. 

DVC sees its role, and the role of 
these two young people, as one of bring- 
ing to the public an awareness of the 
career potential of the programs offered 
at DVC in the food and agricultural sci- 



ences, and of the global importance of 
this field. * ^ 

Sandy Solimene began her road to 
DVC with an interest in landscaping. A 
job in a floral shop for a DVC alumnus 
helped convince her of her career and 
her college choice. 

"There's no where ehe you can go," 
she notes, "unless it's a short course or a 
two-year program, wh«?re you can really 
learn 'the business." 

"I'm very happy here," the tall, cheer- 
ful redhead explains. "When I hear 
about other schools, I know I made the 
right choice." . ■ ' ;. 

Miss Solimene has a busy schedule, 
one that will challenge her to maintain 
her grades while fulfilling her other 
responsibilities. She is president of the 
Class of 1990, treasurer of the Land- 
scape Nursery Club, a member of the 
band (playing flute and piccolo) and of 
the Floral Society, and a peer counselor. 
She also serves on the Student Life and 
Philadelphia Rower Show committees. 
• ."I'm involved with a lot on campus,** 
she readily admits. "I just take it as it 
comes . . . you alwaysiind time for every- 
thing that's important to you, and this is 
important to me! 

**! want to be able to represent my 
school," she emphasizes, "to get a chance 
to tell everyone how / feel about it." * 

And she will have a lot of opportunities 
in the coming year. 




SEGAL HALL RENOVATIONS 



Delaware Valley College has received 
a grant from the corporate contributions 
program of Bell of Pennsylvania to assist 
in renovations of Segal Hall for student 
academic services. 

The College was given $10,000 to- 
ward the project, which is expected to 
cost $250,000 for the proposed interior 
renovations. Presentation was made by 
Bridget Hughes, Account Executive for 
Bell of PA. 

Segal Hall is located at the center of 
the campus, near the library, dining hall 
and gymnasiums. It was once the princi- 
pal building for the National Farm School, 
forerunner of today's four-year college. 

The services that will be conducted in 
Segal Hall are tutoring and counseling, 
the Pennsylvania State Act 101 program 
which provides remedial training, the 
career placement office for graduate 
employment and undergraduate work 
service training, mathematics and 
English tutoring programs and a new 
program — English as a Second Lan- 
guage — for international students. 

Renovations started this past July and 
the new facilities opened September 5. 




DVC President William H Rorer III shows off the 
plar}s for renouatiorK to Segal Hall to Bridget 
Hughes (left). Account Executive for Bell of PA, 
John C Mertz. the Collet's vice president for 
academic affmrs: Russell K. Schuk. vice f^esident 
for opertOioris. Terry Farrell. system design consul- 
tant for Bell. Tom Pelletreau. Bell sales manager, 
and, in the back. Joe Murroii. systems design 
manager for Bell. 



The Western Team Starts 
Off on a Winning Season 

Congratulations to the DVC Stock 
Seat Team. Our first competition was 
held on October 1st at Open Gate Farms 
in New Ringgold, PA. Our team was 
High Point Team for both the AM and 
PM shows! Way to start the year guys!!! 
Thanks to all who went and did a super 
job. Special thanks and welcome to our 
new coach Judy Penell for helping us out 
to a super start. 

iteSULTS AT KUTZTOWN 
AM Show 

CIms13 

Betsy Myers. 2nd 

CUssU 

Sue Hann. 1st 
Melanie Nuskey, 4th 

Class 15 

Chris Farst, 3rd 

Class 16 

;: Lisa Wilkoski. 2nd 

"*^N'',;-' Class 17 

L^.« Kris landola, 1st 

PMShow 

Class 13 

Betsy Myers. Ist 

Class 14 

iSue Hann, 1st 
Melanie Nuskey, 6th 

Class 15 

Chris Farst. 1st ; . 

Class 16 

Lisa Wilkoski, 2nd 

Class 17 

Kris landola. 1st ; s ' 

We had many class-ups and Chris 
Farst, Kris landola and Betsy Myers 
qualified for Regionals! 



New Items 
At the Libraty 

by Janet Klaessig. Periodicals Librarian 

Have you seen the new display in the 
Periodicals Room of the Library? Called 
"Major of the Month." it highlights jour- 
nals of special interest to each of DVC's 
majors. The text reads as follows: "One 
of DVC's newest majors, Agribusiness 
links the business aspect with the produc- 
tion side of agriculture. 

SOME MAGAZINES OF INTEREST 
TO AGRIBUSINESS STUDENTS 

Agribusir)ess — scholarly articles, inter- 
national in scope. 

Agrologist — Canadian point of view on 
domestic and international agriculture, 
briefly stated. 

American Journal of Agricultural Eco- 
nomics — for the advanced student. 
Lengthy and theoretical studies. 
Farm Supplier — trade magazine aimed 
at those who provide agricultural sup- 
plies to the farmer. 

Implement & Tractor — another trade 
magazine, this emphasizes the farm and 
industrial equipment industry. 
United States Department of Agriculture 
(U.S. DA.) publications — These brief 
journals are full of statistics and forecasts 
about U.S. and foreign markets. Be sure 
to look at the entire U.S. DA. collection, 
filed along the last range of bookshelves 
at the far end of this room. Below are 
listed some titles of special interest to 
Agribusiness students 
Farmer Cooperatives — brief articles 
of interest to farmers in co-operative 
organizations, 

FATUS (Foreign Agricultural Trade of 
the United St(^s) — published six times/ 
year. FATUS charts imports and exports 
by country, volume and value. 
Foreiqn Agriculture — traces trends 
througnout the agricultural worW. 



About Editorial Policy 

Ram Pages has specific rules and 
guidelines we must follow regarding edi- 
torials received by students, faculty and 
staff to be printed in the newspaper. This 
is for your use. Use it as a guide to writ- 
ing acceptable editorials. 

Ram Pages Editorial Policy 

1. Ram Pages reserves the right to 
make any editorial changes in all 
material submitted for publication. 

2. Only signed material will be con- 
sidered for publication. Signatures 
will be withheld upon request. 

3. Any material which is considered by 
the student editor{s) or faculty advisor 
to be potentially libelous will be inves- 
tigated and documented before con- 
sideration for publication. 

4. The writers of material in question 
must certify sincerity of purpose and 
correctness of facts to the best of their 
knowledge. K 

5. The person {$) named 6r Implied in 
the controversial material shall be in- 
formed of any article before publica- 
tion and shall be given the opportuni- 
ty to respond. ' =v ' - * - 

Thank You, 
/CCo-EditorsinChief 
Kathleen Stasney 
Loretta Skibowski 



"HueU ^f»u% . . . 




S« lOfS • »*^ t-232-3<t47 



NEW BRITAIN INN 

"De/ VqH home away from home" 

SUN. NIGHT: DJ and Dancing 

MON. NIGHT: Steamers - 
$195/Dozen 

TUCS. NIGHT: Innport Night - 
Most$1.25/Bottle 

WED. NIGHT: $125 Cheese 
Steak Night 

THURS. NIGHT: DJ and Dancing 

FRI. NIGHT: DJ and Dancing 

SAT. NIGHT: Live entertainment 

Seafood & Sandwiches 

All Items to Go! 

Rt. 202*NewBritcan,'PA 
348-1968 



STAFF 

Editors-in-chief . . Kathleen L, Stasney 
Loretta F Skibowski 

Advertising Editor Marc Krasner 

Reporters Fred Newton, 

Tony Palumbo. Ty McSherry, 
Frank Reich. James Moye 

Photography Dave Stomp. 

Laurent Lance 

Advisors Joe Ferry, 

Anne Biggs, Mr, Edward O'Brien. 
Dr, Richard Ziemer 



Dear Editors 

Dear Editors, 

What happens to the money for the 
parking stickers? That was the last ques- 
tion asked by the students during the 
Question and Answer period at Presi- 
dent Rorer's speech. Or should we say. 
that was the question that ended the 
speech for President Rorer. I guess he 
figured that he had better end it before 
he was thrown any more "stumpers." 

It's a shame that the students here at 
DVC spend $20 to park in the parking 
lot, and no one seems to know where 
the money ends up. Does security see 
the money? Does it go for snow removal? 
Part of it goes to student government, we 
were told. Why do we have to pay a 
$100 student government fee when we 
pay our tuition bill? We pay over $10,000 
a year for tuition. Does anyone know 
where that money goes? 

Students have the right to know how 
all of their money is being used . A good 
place to start would be with the money 
for the parking stickers and the tickets. 
Students deserve to know; maybe the 
president does too. 

Anonymous 




PEACE CORPS SENDS OUT 

URGENT PLEA 

FOR VOLUNTEERS 

Volunteers are needed for assignments 
in the Pacific. Asia, the Caribbean. Africa 
and Latin America. The U.S. Peace 
Corps is sending out an urgent appeal for 
volunteers to help developing countries. 
If you have a four-year degree or at least 
five years of work experience in a field 
requested by a developing country, you 
could be on your way to an adventure of 
a lifetime. 

Benefits include roundtrip airfare, 
medical and dental coverage, living al- 
lowance, housing, readjustment allow- 
ance of $4800 upon completion of your 
two-year service and much, much more. 

Call Monday-Friday between 8:30 
a'm, and 5 p.m. (215) 597-0744 or 
1-800-462-1589. Ask for Extension 10. 



PLACEMENT OFFICE 
XALLLISr 

Attention all students! The Placement 
Office has devi«4'd a "Call List" for stu- 
dents who are available for temporary 
work. Interested students should sign-up 
in the new Placement Office. Segal Hall. 

Part-time jobs have been coming in in 
great numbere. Some of these jobs could 
possibly be used for the Employment 
Program. For more information check 
out the Placement Office bulletin board.; 

All seniors should stop by the Place- 
ment Office to pick up their free copy of 
Volume 1 and Volume 2 of the CPC An- 
nuals (company/employer information 
directories). 



AT&T COLLEGE STOCK MARKET 



College students from every state this 
year will play the stock market with noth- 
ing to lose and much to gain. The money 
they'll invest is make-believe, but the 
$25,000 that goes to the top finisher in 
the first annual AT&T Collegiate Invest- 
ment Challenge is real. 

The competition, with a total of 
$200,000 in cash and prizes, is based on 
Wall Street Games, a year-old educa- 
tional game that's drawn national atten- 
tion for the way it re-creates actual stock 
market trading without financial risk to 
the players. 

More than 10.000 college students 
have already registered for this year's 
AT&T Collegiate Investment Challenge, 
and Tim DeMello. founder and president 
of Wall Street Games Inc.. expects that 
number to reach 20,000 by October 21, 
the registration deadline. 

Students who call 1-800-545-1 990 to 
register will receive game rules and all 
the materials needed to participate. The 
registration fee is $49.95. 

"College students are an important 
market to us," said AT&T's college 
market manager, David Pugliese. "Spon- 
soring this comp^tion for students 
makes ATitT mare visible on college 
campuses, and it jwowides an enjoyable 
means for ^udents "lo learn how the 
stuck market worics." 

Tk\e ccMTipeMion ^gins when the 
stock maikA o^mi^ "for trading on the 
morning of Uosjenism 1 . Starting with a 
fictional $5^,600 ifcrokerage account 
and Standard and Poor's Stock Guide, 
the students will buy and sell shares of 
stock via toll-free AT&T 800 Service 
calls to "brokers" at Wall Street Games. 
An instruction booklet for players ex- 
plains such strategies as "buying on 
margin" and "selling short " 

The trading simulates the real thing 
because Wall Street Games uses a com- 
puterized stock quotation network that 
receives up-to-the-minute prices via 
satellite . All trading is done during actual 
stock market hours. 

For four months, the students will 



compete against one another by trying to 
increase the value of their portfolios. 
Each month, students will receive per- 
sonal account statements and current 
standings so they can check how well 
they're doing against other players. The 
top 100 students each month will receive 
various prizes. 

The competition ends when the stock 
market closes on February 28 at 4 p. m, ' 

The 10 students who compile the 
most valuable portfolios will receive cash 
prizes totaling $61,500, with $25,000 
going to the top finisher. In addition, the 
top 10 students and their guests will be 
flown to New York City, where they'll be 
treated to an awards dinner, a Broadway 
play, a tour of the New York Stock Ex- 
change and visits to AT&T's Bell Labora- 
tories and Network Control Center in 
New Jersey. 

Next, the top players and their guests 
will be flown to the Bahamas for a one- 
week vacation. 

DeMello. 29, a former stockbroker 
from Boston, started Wall Street Games 
with the idea that many people are gun- 
shy about the stock market because 
learning how to invest involves trial-and- 
error. He says his creation's popularity 
bears that theory out. 

"Underlying the competition and the 
prizes is the educational value." DeMello 
said. "Before we put together the AT&T 
Collegiate Investment Challenge, several 
professors were already using the game 
as a classroom tool. We think whether 
students finish the Challenge with a 
million dollars or a thousand dollars, 
they'll have learned a lot about the finan- 
cial markets. And they'll have had fun." 

Any college with at least 50 students 
participating in the AT&T Collegiate In- 
vestment Challenge also stands to bene- 
fit At the end of the competition, the 10 
colleges with the highest average student 
portfolk)s will win free access to an elec- 
tronic news and stock quotation service. 

College or individual students can call 
the toll-free registration number for more 
informction (1-800-545-1990). 





in)®lkRRfsiiPs^aQlin(§^ (g®fln®g(g ^goodlsoot^ M(S^:j^fsp}p§ff 



Vol. XXIII. No. 2 



NOTICE Thf opinions expressed in any individual article do not necessarily reflect the viewpoint of the paper or school 



Friday, October 14, 1988 



From the Desk 

of the Ambassador 

by 6rad A. Bittner 

Good day Aggies! This is the first in a 
series of articles I will be writing in the 
weekly issue of Ram Pages, in my articles. 
I will address a variety of subjects while 
concentrating on what's happening in 
the food and agricultural sciences here at 
DVC — since that is what I represent as 
the Ambassador, incidentally, my "better 
half" is Sandy Solimene who represents 
DVC in the same capacity. 
s I shall address the good and the not- 
so-good aspects of DVC, the controver- 
sial and the not-so-controversial issues 
— for 1 believe one should question what 
he does not understand or agree with. 
One should not rely on rumors, but get 
to the heart of the matter and present 
facts and opinions based on those facts. 
Opinions are not wrong and one should 
not be afraid to express them. But I need 
your input to make this column a suc- 
cess. I need your opinions and questions 
concerning DVC and DVC agriculture. 
Please address your questions to Sandy 
at Box 871 or to me at Box 514. Thank 
you . May I hear from you soon? 



Officers 

Student Government 

President .... .... ., . Laura Etzweiler 

Vice President , . , ..... Laine Hellien 

Secretari; Michelle Dobbs 

Treasurer Margaret Shultz 

SAC Co-Chairpersons . . . Ched Baker 
• -iriv Jackie Leoncavallo 

Class of 1989 

President Kathy Reganhardt 

Senate Representative Open 

Class of 1990 

President Sandy Solimene 

Senate Representative . . Joe Diamond 

Class of 1991 

President Angela Mazaika 

Senate Representative Open 

Class of 1992 

President Stephanie Mason 

Vice President Jimmy Marini 

Secretanj Open 

Treasurer Open 

Senate Representative Open 

SAC Deborah Shepherd 

There are still three openings for SAC 

SAC 

Steve Metzgar • Maryann Baily 

Jay Graham • Holly Eckloff 

Edie Fiegles 



BAND AND CHORALE 
NEED PEOPLE 

The band and chorale are looking for 
musicians — instrumental and vocal who 
are interested in making music on cam- 
pus. We meet Monday and Wednesday 
for chorale rehearsals and Tuesday and 
Thursday for band rehearsals in the 
Music Room at the Student Center. Our 
first concert is on Saturday. October 
22nd for Parents' Day. The annual DVC 
Christmas Concert will be presented on 
Sunday, December 11th. Watch for more 
details. 




$$$$$$$$ MONEY FOR COLLEGE $$$$$$$$ 



The decade of the 60's was one of the 
most interesting periods in American his- 
tory. Through all of the good and bad 
times, it was the music that brought us 
together and sometimes tore us apart. 
The political turmoil, the social upheaval, 
the Hippie Movement, the Vietnam War 
and the Generation Gap were all re- 
flected in the popular music of the day. 

The Beatles, Bob Dylan, Jimi Hendrix, 
The Supremes. The Beach Boys, Simon 
& Garfunkel, The Rolling Stones, Otis 
Redding and yes, even The Monkees, 
were the sounds filling the airwaves 
throughout those turbulent years. 

60's Rock - When the Music 
Mattered," a multi-media presentation 
by Barry Drake, will celebrate, examine, 
clarify and put into perspective one of 
the most exciting ten years of our music 
history. ^ > 

Barry Drake has often been called a 
walking encyclopedia of music. A gradu- 
ate of Manhattan College, he has been 
totally involved in the world of music 
since buying his first Rock 'N' Roll record 
in 1954. Growing up in the New York 
City area, Barry went everywhere there 
was music to be heard. He saw everyone 
from Buddy Holly and Chuck Berry at 
The Brooklyn Paramount in 1957, to 
Jimi Hendrix and Janis Joplin at The 
Fillmore East in 1967. When San Fran- 
cisco exploded with the "Summer of 
Love" in 1967. Barry was there hanging 
out on the streets with The Grateful 
Dead and The Jefferson Airplane. There 
is even a rumor that he once danced on 
"American Bandstand." 

In the middle 60's Barry became a 
performer and songwriter, and was soon 
signed to Capitol Records. Since then, 
Barry has recorded three albums of his 
own music and has toured the United 
States and Europe for the past 20 years. 

Not content to be just a performer, 
Barry has successfully started his own 
record company, booking agency and 
management firm. He is also a respected 
collector and dealer of rare records. Most 
recently he has been called upon to 
share his knowledge of music and enthu- 
siasm for Rock 'N' Roll at colleges and 
music business conventions across the 
country. 

Combining his extensive knowledge of 
music and his abilities as a dynamic stage 
performer, Barry has succeeded in mak- 
ing his lectures among the best and most 
inspiring in the business. 



BOB'S BOYS END 
69ERS WIN STREAK 

The Bob's Boys team of the Intramural 
Football League (IFL) , consisting of DVC 
grapplers, stymied the 69er defense on 
Wednesday, October 5th, to end the 
nine-game win streak of that team. The 
69ers took the lead with a TD run by Neil 
B. Honer on the first 69er drive and then 
it was all Bob's Boys. The 69ers defense 
had its hands full and came out on the 
losing end of a 26-6 score. No details 
available for Bob's Boys scoring. 



by Irving Bender 

Q: "I plan to begin graduate study in 
electrical engineering. My family income 
excludes me from most government help. 
What can I find? 

Look into the PRIVATE SOURCE 
awards. Every student is eligible for 
many, for reasons in each student's per- 
sonal background. For example: 
^ You are eligible for a $500- $5, 000 
award, based on your ability. Financial 
need is not considered. v,^^^ - 

— You are eligible for full tuition ^nd 
fees plus $925/month coop fellowship 
program in electrical engineering, if . a 
minority member. 

— You are eligible for $1,000 or $2,000 
award to study anywhere in the electrical 
engineering field, if you are a woman. 

"What am I eligible for? There are so 
many sources!" 

Q: "What are the financial aid oppor- 
tunities for me in the arts, specifically, in 
video arts?'" ■;• * - . ;. 

. There are a significant amount of 
awards from the PRIVATE SECTOR. 
Every student is eligible for awards re- 
lated to the field of study, and for awards 
related to the student's personal back- 
ground. For example: 

— You are eligible for a $7,000 award 
(average) for a video film on social issues. 

— You are eligible for $1 ,500 grant for a 
film or video production. 

— You are eligible for varying money 
amounts to study any field in the Boston 
area if you arc a Jewish woman in need. 

— You are eligible for L 100-700 per 

Homecoming a Huge Success 
for Horticulture Society 

The DVC Horticulture Society experi- 
enced a very successful 1988 Home- 
coming weekend, thanks to some hard- 
working, fun-loving club members. Our 
float, the California Raisins, danced to 
the tune of "Heard It Through The Grape- 
vine" and took first prize in the parade 
through campus and was invited to par- 
take in the Mummers Day Parade in 
January. 

The cider and apple sales went ex- 
tremely well at the game and proceeds of 
over $300 will be appropriated towards 
the cause of Margaret Schukz, our beloved 
classmate and club member battling 
cancer. We thank all club members for 
their support and help for without you it 
couldn't have been accomplished. A 
special "thank you" is in order for Dr. 
Vincent, Dr. Nash and Scott Robertello 
for their generous support and advice. 

Look for upcoming events such as 
cider pressing, winery tours, guest 
speakers, hay rides and much, much 
more in October. 

Aggie proud. 
Brad A. Bittner 

Vice President 

DVC Horticuhure Societ]; 

Help! Help! 

We Need People! 

We still need articles, and live people 
to continue putting Ram Pages out. We 
can't do it all alone. Come help us and 
have fun while earning half a credit each 
semester. 



semester to study any field at Warn- 
borough College, England. Based on 
essay, "Briton I want to meet." 

"What am I eligible for? There are so 
many sources!" 

Q: "My daughter is a high school stu- 
dent who is musically gifted. What help is 
there to pay for college?" 
TIP *1: The colleges your daughter will 
consider all have scholarships for their 
students. Check this out. 
TIP ^2: Get career information from 
MUSIC EDUCATORS NATIONAL 
CONFERENCE. 1902 Association Dr., 
Reston VA 2209 ; . They will also have 
financial aid rnaterials. 
TIP *3: Tap her music teachers or poten- 
tial teachers for their first hand knowl- 
edge or experience about financial aid in 
music. 

TIP #4: Check out PRIVATE SOURCE 
awards. Every student is eligible for 
many, but these sources are not well 
understood. - ; ," , . 

For example, as a gifted high school 
student, your daughter is eligible for a 
$500- $1,000 award. 

"What am I eligible for? There are so 
many sources!" 

The Moncy-For-College Catalog an- 
swers this. It cites thousands of awards 
for students at all levels. You can order 
any of these or order a computer search 
based on your background. 

Send $1 for the catalog to: FINAN- 
CIAL AID FINDERS, 77 Gristmill Road, 
Suite 10, Randolph, NJ 07869. 

Student Government News 

A-Day and Student Government will 
be sharing the new office, Mr. Decker's 
old office. An answering machine will be 
purchased sometime this week. 

Caesar's Pub will continue to be run by 
the clubs. The club that sponsors one will 
receive $50 for the night. 

Last year each class sent one officer to 
the NACA Convention. SAC would like 
to know if they would like to do the same 
again this year. Last fall it seemed to really 
work out well. 

New committees were elected. They 
are as follows: 
Student Life Conduct .... Ched Baker 

Sandy Solimene 

Joe Diamond 

Curriculum .-. . ... ... Margaret Shultz 

Michelle Dobbs 

Food Open 

Instructional Resources Open 

LOST 

One gold earring shaped like a star- 
fish. Lost Monday, October 5. Please 
contact Loretta Skibowski at Box 7 1 . 

STAFF 

Editors-in-Chief . . Kathleen L. Stasney 
Loretta F Skibowski 

Advertising Editor Marc Krasner 

Reporters Fred Newton . 

Tony Palumbo. Ty McSherry. 
Frank Reich. James Moye 

Photograph]^ Dave Stornp. 

Laurent Lanee 

Advisors Joe Ferry. 

Anne Biggs, Mr. Edward O'Brien, 
Dr. Richard Ziemer 




BASEBALL'S BEST BETS 



lony DeLise, co-captain of the Eque^an Team. 



Equestrian Results 

Open Under Saddle 

Tony DeLise, 2nd 
Betty Lollin, 3rd 

• Open Over Fences 

Tony DeLise, 1st 

Intermediate Under Saddle 

Jan Egner, 1st 

Liz Kelly, 6th 

Stina Liebman, 2nd 

Intermediate Over Fences 

Betty Lollin, 4th 
Jan Egner, 4th 

Novice Under Saddle 

Mark Hayes, 1st 

Paige Bamett, 4th 

Deb Shepherd, 2nd 

Beth Walz, 5th 

Novice Over Fences 

Mark Hayes, 2nd 
Paige Bamett, 1st 
- Beth Walz, 3rd 
;■ Stina Liebman, 1st .: v 
Deb Shepherd, 6th ; ;^ 

Advanced Walk /Trot /Canter 

Sue Hahn, 1st 
Janet Distler, 1st 
Julie Keane, 2nd 

Advanced Walk/Trot 

• Kelly Cunningham, 3rd 

Beginner Walk/Trot 

Kelly Ritsick, 1st 

Alumni Over Fences 

Donna Forte, 4th 

Alumni Under Saddle 

Donna Forte, 4th 

DVC was Reserve High Point College 
of the Day with 38 points behind Wilson 
College with 42 points. Penn State was 
third with 37 points . 

Betty Lollin qualified for Regionals in 
Intermediate Over Fences and Stina 
Liebman qualified for Regionals in 
Novice Over Fences. 

Our next show is October 16 at Penn 
State. 

Overall tally of placings: 1st - 8, 2nd - 
5, 3rd - 3, 4th - 4, 5th - and 6th - 2. 

Congratulations to everyone! Let's 
keep up the good work. 



by Fred Newton 

Now that the baseball season is over 
and the playoffs are in full swing, the sea- 
son's awards are up for grabs. Here are 
the picks of who will win and who de- 
serves to win. 

A.L. M.V.P.: Oakland's Jose Canseco 
(.307, 42 HR, 124 RBI, 40 SB) is the 
leading candidate. Minnesota's Kirby 
Puckett (.356, 24 HR, 121 RBI) and 
Boston's Mike Green well (.325, 22 HR, 
119 RBI) are also in the running. 
Canseco will win and he deserves the 
award. 

A.L. Cy Young: Minnesota's Frank 
Viola (24-7, 2.64 ERA, 193 SO) should 
win the award. Kansas City's Mark 
Gubicza (20-8, 2.70 ERA, 183 SO) de- 
serves mention. 

A.L. Rookie of the Year: California's 
Brian Harvey (7-5, 2. 13 ERA, 17 Saves) 
and Oakland's Walter Weiss (.250, 39 
RBI) are the leading contenders. Weiss 
will win because of his strong defensive 
game and he plays for a w'sner. 



N.L. M.V.P.: Kirk Gibson of Los Angeles 
(.290, 25 HR, 31 SB), Montreal's Andres 
Galarraga (.302, 29 HR, 92 RBI), New 
York's Darryl Strawben-y (39 HR. 101 
RBI, 29 SB) and Will Clark of San Fran- 
cisco (.282, 29 HR, 109 RBI) all have a 
shot at the award. Gibson helped turn his 
team around and will probably get the 
honor. I would give the award to Straw- 
berry, his numbers are just too good to 
overlook. 

N.L. Cy Young: Cincinnati's Danny 
Jackson (23-8, 2.73 ERA. 161 SO) and 
Orel Hershiser (23-8, 2.26 ERA. 178 
SO) were battling throughout the second 
half of the season. When Hershiser broke 
Don Drysdale's record of consecutive 
scoreless innings he wrapped up the 
award and I would give it to him . 
N.L. Rookie of the Year: Chicago 
Mark Grace (.296, 57 RBI). Cincinnati's 
Chris Sabo (.271, 42 Doubles) and Tim 
Belcher (12-6, 2.91 ERA, 152 SO) of 
Los Angeles are the leaders. Sabo will 
win the award but Grace had a better 
year and he deserves it. . > 



Dear Editors 

Dear Editon, 

Re: "Freshman Orientation" 

1 am 24 years old and a transfer. Many 
of the topics are geared to the 18-year- 
old freshman living on campus. I don't 
live on campus and find that most of the 
information being presented is irrelevant 
to me. 

I think the orientation program is a 
good idea but that DVC should screen 
incoming transfers for older people like 
me returning to school. Perhaps a pro- 
gram aimed at the older student with 
more relevant issues could be discussed. 

1 find it annoying to have to spend an 
hour sitting with a group of freshmen 
who talk and pass notes instead of listen- 
ing to what they should be. 1 could be 
studying or reading instead. Are there 
any other transfers like me who want this 
looked into? 

Thank you. 
Anonymous 



Uldotrtwant ,? 
a lot of hype, rt 
I just want 
something I 
can count on.^^ 




Is Wed( on ConifNis 

SAIUROAY. OCTCMCR IS 

VofayMi (H) vs. Vfmia 
Sottcr (H) vs. Kirk's Colege. 12 

Fosttwl m vs. Wikm, 1:30 p.m. 

WmWi% OCTOKR 17 

OMfwton/Migic^, AF^ 

TUEMIAY, OCVOHES IS 

Socxer 0i) w». Saanton, S.X p.m. 

WBHiffiKIAY. OCTCMra If 

McMe: Gwd MorNr^ VkOrmn, AFf^, 
9 p.m. 

imjRsoAY, ocitMm m 

VofeyteB m vs. Muhl»ri)erj 

nn>AY.ocTGnisi 

D J. Cfex», W^, 9p.m 
Latf d^ im fWg-rpgjKrwttDn 



4- 
* 

Ik 




Some long distance 
companies promise you 
the moon, but ^^iiat you 
really want is dependable, 
high-quality service. That's 
just what you'll get when 
you choose AT&T Long 
Distance Service, at a cost 
that's a lot less than you 
think. You can expect low 
long distance rates, 24-hour 
operator assistance, clear 
connections and immediate 
credit for wrong numbers. 
And the assurance that 
virtually all of your calls will 
go through the first time. 
That's the genius of the 
AT&T Worldwide Intelligent 
Network. 

When it's time to 
choose, forget the gimmicks 
and make the intelligent 
choice-AT&T 

If youd like to know 
more about our products or 
services, like International 
Calling and the AT&T Card, 
call us at 1800 222-0300. 




ART 

The right choice. 





Vol. XXIII. No. 3 Friday. Octotxff 21. 1988 

NOTICE: The opinions expressed in any individual article do not necessarily reflect the viewpoint of the p>ap€r or school 



Buenos Dias! Bonjour! 

Guten Tag! Hello! 

Sayonara! . . . 

by Laurent Lanee (France) 

A new column is coming up in your 
Ram Pages newspaper. Its purpose is to 
introduce each of the countries which are 
represented on our campus through our 
international students. 

We have felt that American students 
would appreciate learning about their 
international friends, extending their 
knowledge about foreign countries. 

This is why, each week, one of our 
columns will focus on a foreign student 
and his country. 

In that way, you will get informatioti 
about different aspects such as geogra- 
phy, history, way of life, customs, cul- 
ture, food, etc. 

Because we have students from all 
over the world we will present countries 
like Japan, Vietnam, Iran, Lebanon, 
Camcroun, Gambia, Zimbabwe, Nether- 
lands, France, Scotland, Mexico, Ecua- 
dor, Venezuela, Colombia and Bolivia. 

We are sure that you will enjoy read- 
ing this new column; however, feel free 
to make any suggestion you want. 
P.S. A group of French-speaking people 
is on the wa\; to being created. If \;ou 
haue some notions of the French lan- 
guage, if you want to practice it or j/you 
just want to learn about France, join us! 
(Contact Dr. Heath as soon as possible.) 










• ••••••••••• •^^. 

This Week on Campus 

SATURDAY. OCTOI^ 22 

Volleyball (H) vs. Khig's College 
Football (H) vs. UpsaJa, 1:30 p m. 
(Parents' Day, see aiteie on the 
folbwing page.) 

MONDAY. OCTOBER 24 

Movie: DO A, Student Center, 9 p 

WEDNESDAY. OCTOBER 26 

Flamin' Caucasians HaDouwen Party 
APR, 9p.m lam 

THURSDAY. OCTOBQi 27 

Rock n Roi L^rture. APR. 9 11 p.m 
1960's and beyond! 

•••••••••••* 




Del Val Chorale Invited to the FCC Festival 

The Delaware Valley College Chorale has been invited to participate in the Penn- 
sylvania Collegiate Chorus Festival (PCC). It's being held at Bucknel University in 
Lewisburg, October 27 through October 29. 

All colleges in Pennsylvania may send students. There are no auditions. The college 
directors send those people they want to. 

The guest conductor chooses the number of people in the entire choir and then 
decides the number of people each college may send. This year the guest conductor is 
Stephen Wilkinson from England. The music they will sing is: 
. 1 . Pater Noster I, Das Valer unser Frantz Ltezt 

2. Christus f actus est Anton Bruckner 

3. Festund Cedenkspruche, Cp 109 .' Johannes &-ahms 

'' a) Un sere Voter hoffen aufdich 

b) Wenn ein Starker Gewappneter 

c) Wo ist ein so herrlich Volk 

4. / Was Glad CAH Parry 

5. Two Madrigals , Dc Pearsall 

a) Laif a Garland 

b) Great God of Love 

6. Nonsense Richard Rodney Bennett 



Help Support DVC Clubs 
and Activities 

Many club^sell things that they make, 
produce or buy in quantity to sell as fund 
raisers. 

Chorale will be selling candy in a cou- 
ple of weeks. 

The Equestrian Team is currently sell- 
ing candy; see a member. 

The Horticulture Society sells the ap- 
ple cider they make. They sell it at the 
Horticulture Building. 

Honey can be bought at Lasker Hall. 

Most of the candy being sold is 50C 
per bar. 

Help support the clubs. For many this 
is the only way to raise money. 

Chorale is also selling cookbooks. See 
Kathleen Stasney, Berk 103. The books 
are $6.00. 



Open House 

Once again, we are inviting campus 
clubs and organizations to participate in 
our Open House program during the 
registration period, between 9 a.m. and 
10 a.m. on October 29, 1988. We will 
provide a table for you to display any 
paraphernalia relative to your club; in 
addition, we ask that a member of your 
club be on hand to meet with prospective 
students and their parents. 

In the past, our guests have greatly en- 
joyed this aspect of Open House. They 
particularly enjoy learning about campus 
organizations and meeting Delaware 
Valley College students. 

If your club would like to participate, 
please contact Pam Gazda in Admissions 
at extension 2211 before Tuesday, Oc- 
tober 25. Thanks for your consideration. 
Hope to have yon involved. 



'.ill. .» 



Lenape Chamber Ensemble at DVC 

On Saturday and Sunday, November 12th and 13th, the Lenape Chamber Ensem- 
ble will present two concerts at DVC. On Saturday at 10 a.m. a children's concert will 
be presented. On Sunday at 3 p.m. a concert will be presented for adults. This ensem- 
ble will perform a concert of baroque music by Bach, Corellio and Vivaldi. It is directed 
by Mary Eleanor Brace and includes musicians from Philadelphia and New York. 



DUKAKIS vs. BUSH 
Who's Better? 

As you know, the Presidential Election 
is coming up fast. Whom do you vote 
for? Why? Where does the candidate 
stand on issues such as education, day 
care, foreign policy? 

What we want to know is "Whom will 
you vote for and why?" We will print one 
article for each candidate in a future issue 
of Ram Pages. 



WHY SHOULD I 
GIVE BLOOD? 

There are several good reasons to give 
blood, but the most important reason of 
all is that by giving blood you could save 
a life. Possibly even your own. 

Blood supply in the United States is 
dangerously low and it is desperately 
needed. One of the reasons for this is the 
scare of AIDS. You will not get AIDS 
from giving blood! 

You can sign up in the Nurses Office 
or in the dorm. You must register by Oc- 
tober 26th and the drive will take place 
on November 9th from 12-5 p.m. in the 
Student Center. ■ 

Please come out and help save a life! 



Placement Office 
Interview 

Attention all Biology, Chemistry and 
Food Science majors, on Thursday, 
November 3, 1988 Rohm & Haas will be 
on campus to interview students for the 
six-month Laboratory Assistant co-op. 
Interested students should sign-up in the 
Placement Office. 

An interview workshop will be held on 
Thursday, October 27 at 7:30 p.m. in 
the Segal Hall Conference Room. All 
students who have signed -up for on- 
campus interviews should attend. 



STAFF 

Editorsin-Chief . Kathleen L. Stasney 
Loretta F. Skibowski 

Advertising Editor MarcKrasner 

Reporters Fred Newton, 

Tony Palumbo, Ty McSherry, 
Frank Reich, James Moye 

Photograph}; Dave Stomp, 

Laurent Lanee 

Advisors Joe Ferry, 

Anne Biggs, Mr. Edward O'Brien, 
Dr. Richard Ziemer 



Editorial From 
Under the Editors Desk 

More Lighting on Campus 

Is there anything that can be done 
about the lighting on campus? I'm a 
freshman and I've noticed there is very 
poor lighting around the dorms and the 
parking lot. The area around the Student 
Center is slightly better, but not much. 
This is very dangerous as one could easily 
trip and get hurt or attacked. One won't 
be able to identify an attacker. 

The main reason for rape is the lack of 
lighting in places such as parking lots. 
The victim is usually unable to identify 
the attacker. The attacker knows this and 
uses it to his advantage. The police often 
suggest using bright lights to scare rob- 
bers to homeowners, so why not here at 
Delaware Valley. 

There is currently a petition going 
around urging the installation of more 
lights around campus. I urge everyone to 
sign it. It could be a matter of your life. 

School Participation and Spirit 

I'm a sophomore and I've noticed that 
school participation and spirit is not very 
high . The majority of the people who are 
active in sports or clubs are active in a 



number of them, they also are the ones 
who are getting the better grades (or at 
least maintain an average grade) . 

I agree with parents that college is for 
learning but this is also a time to get in- 
volved in other activities. 

Some people have complained that 
it's boring here on campus, especially on 
the weekends. The only way things are 
going to go on at the school is if people 
become involved in the activities. 

The Ran) Pages staff needs people to 
help us keep the paper up to date and let 
other people know what is happening on 
campus and in the area. We still need 
someone in each sport to keep us up to 
date on the sports results. If you're in a 
sport and want to let everyone know 
how your team did, just drop us a note 
saying whom you played and what the 
score was. 

We also need people to cover other 
activities such as club nights in the Pub, 
concerts, etc. If anyone writes a story 
about such activities, just send us the 
story and we'll try to use it in our paper. 
Our deadlines are Wednesday. So an ar- 
ticle may not go into a paper that issue 
but maybe the next. 

Sincerely, 

Loretta Skibowslci 

Co-Editor 



DVC Flower Shop 

ur\der new management 

Monday 10 a.m. -12 noon & 4-5 p.m. 

Tuesday 10 a.m. -2:45 p.m. 

Wed. 11: 15 a.m. -2:30 p.m. & 4-6 p.m. 

Thurs. 10-11 a.m. & 4-5 p.m. 

Fri. 11:15 a.m. -4 p.m. 

The DVC Rower Shop is located in 
the Floral Lab at the Greenhouse Com- 
plex. Remember that Delaware Valley 
College affiliates receive a 10% discount 
on all purchases. 

The flower shop extension is 2275. 



IS DATING DEAD? 

According to a recent article in USA 
Today, group dates are becoming more 
and more popular. People tend to go out 
in groups and pair off later or go to a 
function to meet someone there. 

What Ram Pages would like to know 
is this: "Is dating dead here at Delaware 
Valley?" Let us know what you think and 
drop your answers in the Box at the 
Cafeteria. 

Results will be printed in a future issue 
of Ram Pages. 




Emplo^iees of ServiceMaster, the College's Housekeepmg department, recently/ cor\tributed a total of $1,000 
to the 1988-89 Annual Giving Fund. Brian Dotte. former head of housekeeping, presented the check to 
President William H Rarer III at a special ceremony/ at the Student Center Coffeehouse. 



PARENTS' DAY 

You arc cordially invited to attend our 
annual Parents' Day at the College on 
Saturday, October 22, 1988. We sin- 
cerely hope that you will be able to visit 
our campus on this special occasion and 
enjoy the day's activities, which are as 
follows: 

9:30-11:30 a.m.: Reception in the 
Student Center All-Purpose Room (cof- 
fee and donuts). During this time period, 
members of our faculty and administra- 
tion will be available to meet parents. 
11:30 a.m.: DVC Musicians at the 
Joshua Feldstein Campus Courtyard in 
front of the Student Center. 
11:45 a.m.-l p.m.: Luncheon in the 
Student Center All-Purpose Room and 
Dining Hall. 

1:30 p.m.: Football, DVC vs Upsala 
4-6 p.m.: Hors d'oeuvres/ entertain- 
ment in the Student Center All-Purpose 
Room for parents, students, faculty and 
administration . . . sponsored by the stu- 
dents especially for you! So do come and 
relax, mingle and enjoy the music before 
you leave for home. 
5-6 p.m.: Dinner. Parents may pur- 
chase dinner in the David Levin Dining 
Hall on a cash basis ($5/person). 

We are looking forward to having you 
on campus for Parents' Day. See you 
then! 

Dear Aggie 

■' Got a problem? Need to talk but don't 
know who will listen? Talk to Ram Pages' 
Dear Aggie! No real names are needed, 
just a pen and paper. We'll do what we 
can to solve your problem and if we 
can't, we'll find someone who can. 



NEW BRITAIN INN 

"Del Vol's home owoy from home" 

SUN. NIGHT: DJ and Dancing 

MON. NIGHT: Steamers - 
$ 1 ,95/Dozen 



TUES. NIGHT: 



Import Night — 
Most $1.25/Bottle 



WED. NIGHT: $126 Cheese 
Steak Night 

THURS. NIGHT: DJ and Dancing 

FRI. NIGHT: DJ and Dancing 

SAT. NIGHT: Live entertainment 

Seofood & Sandwiches 

All Items to Go! 

Pt '»02 • New Britain. PA 
346-1968 



He Vl/C -dOtM^ PtMuatum 




'^u4€ and 9tiviA 
Su fOfS • »•#* 1-232-3447 



DVC CHORALE 

ITS NOT TOO LATE TO JOIN CHORALE! 

WE ARE LOOKING FOR NEW PEOPLE 

WHO ARE INTERESTED IN MUSIC AND 

ENJOY SINGING. 

OUR PRACTICES ARE MON. AND WED. 
4:15-5:30 PM 

IF YOU ARE INTERESTED. JOIN US FOR 
A PRACTICE. I'M SURE YOU'LL ENJOY! 

OUR PRACTICES ARE HELD IN THE 
MUSIC ROOM. STUDENT CENTER 

IF THERE ARE ANY QUESTIONS. 

DON'T HESITATE. PLEASE CALL 

MRS. ROBERTS. DIRECTOR 

OR 

SUZEHE DIPETE. PRESIDENT 

AT 

340-9528 

BARNESS 202 

HOPE TO SEE YOU!!!! 



HAPPY HALLOWEEN! 

HAVE A SAFE 
PARENTS' DAY WEEKEND! 



+ American 
Red Cross 



lb donate bl«Ml. call 1-— » * BLOOD 



DVC Ranked Nationally By U.S. News & World Report 

Delaware Valley College has been ranked 22nd among small comprehensive col- 
leges in the United States in a Special Report on America's Best College written by staff 
members of the U.S. News & World Report. 

In the October 10 issue of the magazine, DVC's selectivity, faculty quality, instruc- 
tional budget and retention rate were analyzed and measured against 167 similar insti- 
tutions across the nation . A small comprehensive college is defined as having between 
1 ,500 and 2,500 students and awarding more than half of its bachelor's degrees in two 
or more occupational or professional disciplines. 

"We are extremely excited about this good news," said President Rorer. "We have 
always thought that our college was the best kept secret in Bucks County. Now, the 
word is getting out on a national level tht DVC can compete successfully with the best 
colleges in the country." 

All data used to compute the rankings were compiled from the freshman class of 
1987 and were derived mainly from the Annual Survey of Colleges, a data base main- 
tained by the College Board, a non-profit membership organization composed of more 
than 2,500 colleges, schools, school systems and education associations that provides 
tests and educational services for students and schools. 

In the area of individual student retention, DVC was ranked in the top five in the 
country within the small comprehensive college category. Retention rankings were 
based on both the percentage of freshmen who return as sophomores and the percen- 
tage of entering freshmen who graduate with bachelor's degrees in four years. 

Student selectivity was based on acceptance rates for applicants, average combined 
scores on the Scholastic Aptitude Test or American College Testing Assessment, and 
high school class standings for entering freshmen. 

Faculty quality was measured by the share of full time professors with doctorates, 
the student-to-faculty ratio and the per-student instructional budget. 

The resources measure reflects the endowment per student and the library budget 
per student. 

Scores in each of the four categories were converted to percentiles and then averaged 
to produce the rankings. 

in the article accompanying the rankings, DVC was mentioned prominently for of- 
fering unusual programs such as ornamental horticulture and animal science. 



■n 



ALCOHOL AWARENESS AT COLLEGES 

The University of Missouri-Columbia uses a creative marketing approach to sponsor 
one of the most successful alcohol awareness programs in the country. 

The University has taken an active role in the National Collegiate Alcohol Aware- 
ness Week (NCAAW), sponsored in part by Adolph Coors Company. In 1986 and 
1987, the University was selected as one of the top five institutions in the country for 
developing an innovative alcohol awareness program. 

The program has been directed by Kim Dude, assistant director of Residential Life/ 
Fhrograms. 

"The focus of our program is not alcohol, but on the behaviors and decisions people 
make about alcohol. We're providing information to college students to help them 
make those responsible decisions," said Dude. 

"We take a marketing approach to our alcohol awareness week. We develop events 
and programs around a fun, upbeat theme." 

The 1988 program is modeled after the "M'A*S*H" TV show, but in this case it 
stands for "Making Akohol Sensibly Handled." Events throughout the week will fea- 
ture familiar "M*A*S*H" scenes, characters and costumes. 

Two of the more fx)pular events include a dance and "happy hour," titled "Club Hot 
Lips" and "The Swamp." 

A designated driver program is sponsored by a student organization called 
P. A.R.T.Y., "Promoting Alcohol Responsibly Through You." 

The key to success is student involvement. In its first year, four students were on the 
organizing committee — in 1988, nearly 90 students are working on the program. 

"Our awareness efforts started six years ago targeted at resident housing, the pro- 
gram quickly grew to encompass the entire campus and the local community," com- 
mented Dude. 

"When Coors sponsored the NCAAW contest, it gave us the opportunity to test our 
program on a nattonal level." 

Coors has helped sponsor the national competition since 1986, awarding the top 
five universities with the most innovative programs scholarships of $1,000. 

"Our focus with the NCAAW is to help colleges take a leadership role in their com- 
munity, educating people to make responsible decisions about alcohol," said Ben 
Mason, director of Coors Alcohol Issues. 

During 1988. the NCAAW will be held October 16-22. 



New Dairy Science Center 




President Horer; Richard A. bailey/, trustee, Ur. teldstein. and Ur. Hummer presided at the Uair\; Science 
Center groundbreaking held October 1 



■ 
■ 
■ 

■ 
I 

■ 

■ 

■ 

■ 
■ 
■ 

I 

I 

■ 



DELAWARE VALLEY 
COLLEGE 

STUDENT ACTIVITIES COMMITTEE 

ANNUAL 
HALLOWEEN PARTY 

«Uj» WITH 

RAMM' 
CAUCHSiAte 



SPECIAL QUEST 

PAT GODWIN 




iUiit 



■ 
■ 

■ 

■ 
■ 

■ 

■ 



STUDENT CENTER 
ALL PURPOSE ROOM 

WED OCT 26 

SHOWTIME 9 PM 

FREE TO DEL VAL STUDENTS 
I • 

^••B •■•••••■•••«•• 

••••••••••••■•« •_• •_■ 

•■■■■■■•■•a ■■■■.•_■ 



• I 

I 

■ 






■ ( 

■ 

■ I 

■ 

■ I 

■ 
■ 

•> 

■ 

• I 

■> 



RUN WILD 
AT THE ZOO 

Spice up your sprints and add a little 
splash to your dash! Come out to the 
wildest place in town for the eighth an- 
nual Run Wild at the Zoo lOK Race 
on Sunday, November 6. 

The race begins at 9:30 a.m. when 
runners will wend their way through Afri- 
can Plains, Bear Country, Wolf Woods 
and scenic Fairmount Park. Awards will 
be presented immediately following the 
run to the top three finishers in each class 
plus male and female top five winners in 
open class. 

Sponsors for this year's race are the 
Philadelphia Coca-Coca Bottling Com- 
pany, Wissahickon Spring Water, Acme 
Markets and radio station WMGK-FM. 

Registration for the race day ends Fri- 
day, October 28. The $8 entrance fee 
entitles each runner to a T-shirt, Zoo ad- 
mission and $1 race day discounts for 
the runner's guests. Race kits can be 
picked up on Saturday, November 5 
from 10 a.m. until 1 p.m. and starting at 
7:30 a.m. on raceday. Late registration 
is $10 and includes a T-shirt. 

Run Wild at the Zoo is limited to the 
first 2.000 entrants, so early registration 
is recommended. For more information 
on the race, call Jeff Miller at the Zoo, 
243-1100. ext. 220. 



ZIEMERISM 

Continuing Ed: 
Edward the Umpteenth 





lo)®lkRj^iP®^aQllIl(S^ (S®flll(sg® ^SoacflsoQt^ Irfewspipgir 



Vol. XXIII. No. 4 Wednesday. October 26, 1988 

NOTICE: The opinions expressed in any individual article do not necessarily reflect the viewpoint of the paper or school 




Left to right are: Lame Hellem. Kevm Stanton. Jeny Myers (coach). Al Jenkins and Rick Lawrence, members 
of the Delaware Vo/Zey College Dair\; Judging Team that finished 1 1 out of 26 collegiate teams in national 
competition in October. ■ '" 

Dairy judging team 11th in nation v 



The DVC Dairy Judging Team finished 
1 1th out of 26 teams in the National In- 
tercollegiate Dairy Judging Competition 
held in Madison. Wisconsin on Tuesday. 
October 4. 

Each of the four team members was 
among the top 20 finalists, from over 
100 college and university students, in at 
least one of the individual breed com- 
petitions. Kevin Stanton finished 25th in 
the overall individual competition. He 
was 12th. 14th and 15th, respectively, in 
the Milking Shorthorn. Ayrshire and 
Guernsey breeds. Laine Hellein placed 
16th in Guernseys and 19th in Jerseys, 
while Al Jenkins received 21st in Guern- 
seys and Rick Lawrence was 15th in the 
Brown Swiss breed. 

These individual recognitions gave 
DVC a 5th place team standing for 
Guernseys and 7th place team in Milking 
Shorthorns. 

All four team members are seniors in the 
Dairy Science major at the College. The 
team is coached by Jerry Myers, instructor 



for the Dairy Science Department. 

Once again, the students were excited 
about the industry and university con- 
tacts they were able to make through this 
judging experience. Judging allowed 
them to view a variety of dairy manage- 
ment set-ups and to speak with many 
dairymen about the genetics used to pro- 
duce top-quality dairy animals. 

The DVC team appreciates the time 
and effort that all of the breeders have 
put forth over the years. It is their com- 
mitment to the future of the dairy in- 
dustry, as hosts of judging practices and 
workouts and by assisting with the train- 
ing of students and young people, that 
allows the College's judging programs to 
be very successful. 

Laine. Al. Rick and Kevin should be 
commended for their diligent efforts and 
the positive image that they projected for 
DVC. This team became highly respected 
by other university teams for its posi- 
tive attitude, personality, integrity and 
sportsmanship. 



Buenos Dias! Bonjour! 
Guten Tag! Hello! Sayonara! 

This Week . . . FRANCE 

by Laurent Lanee . .: 

France is one of the oldest nations of 
the western world, but one of the most 
youthful in spirit. For centuries France 
has played a large role on the worW 
stage. ■■.-• ■'.•'- '-.-# .^f- . 

France is shaped like a hexagon, or 
six-sided figure. The nation's area of 
212,659 square miles (551,000 square 
kilometers) makes it the largest country 
in western Europe. More than on? half 
of France's boundary is coastline, washed 
by the North Sea, the English Channel, 
the Atlantic Ocean and the Mediterranean 
Sea. France has a variety of landforms, 
ranging from high mountains to pbins. 
Mont Blanc, 15,781 feet (4,807 meter^, 
In the Alps is the highest mountain in 
western Europe. si^.. 

France is surrounded by Belgium and 
Luxembourg in the north, Germany and 
Switzerland in the east, Italy in the 
southeast and Spain in the southwest. 

French is the language of 56,000,000 
people of France, although some also 
speak Breton. Basque or Alsatian. 
French is also widely spoken in other 
parts of the world: Belgium, Switzerland, 
Luxembourg, Canada, in some south 
pacific islands, in some countries of the 
far east and in many African countries. 

Altogether. French is the official lan- 
guage for over 40,000,000 people out- 
side France. , ^ 

The creation of a national school sys- 
tem in the 19th century helped to spread 
the use of correct French throughout the 
country. 

Approximately one-fourth of the pop- 
ulation attends some sort of school. Edu- 
cation is compulsory for children between 
the ages of six and 16. All primary and 
secondary schools and the institutions of 
higher education are under the direction 
of the Ministry of Education. 

Children between the ages of six and 

Please see page 2 



Dear Editors 

Dear Editon, 

I am writing this letter to get the record 
straight. The Student Government fee is 
not $100, it is $40 per semester. This 
money is used to pay for activities, dorm 
improvements (TV's, microwaves, etc.) 
and for special events (Homecoming). 
All money for activities comes from this 
$40 fee. The College does not foot any 
of the bill. 

Student Government does not get any 
of the $20 parking sticker fee. What we 
get is 50 percent of all traffic tickets. The 
money from parking stickers goes toward 
snow removal and road maintenance. If 
everyone can remember, the road was in 
very poor condition this time last year, 

' , Sincerely, ;^>i 

; I Chcd Baker v 

Student Government 

PNA committee to visit 

The College Liaison Committee of the 
Pennsylvania Nurseryman's Association 
will be a guest of the College's Ornamen- 
tal Horticulture Department on Thurs- 
day, November 3. The committee was 
formed to promote Pennsylvania's ex- 
cellent educational opportunities in Or- 
namental Horticulture. 

The committee is in the process of 
visiting all post-high school OH. pro- 
grams in the state to gather information 
for a promotional brochure that PNA 
plans to publish to promote Pennsyl- 
vania's O.H. education choices. This 
new brochure will be distributed to high 
schools across the state through a new 
outreach program. -^ 

Rick Ray and John Martin are mem- 
bers of this important committee. 

The true "DVC difference" will be 
highlighted when the PNA group visits. 
The itinerary for the day includes visita- 
tions to actual classes, tours of facilities, 
informal meetings with students, preser»- 
tations by other Plant Science departs 
ments and a meeting with faculty. 



STAFF 

Editorsin -Chief . Kathleen L. Stasney 
Loretta F. Skibowski 

/Advertising Editor Marc Krasner 

Reporters Fred Newton, 

Tony Palumbo, Ty McSherry, 
Frank Reich, James Moye 

Photography Dave Stomp, 

Laurent Lance 

Advisors Joe Ferry, 

Anne Biggs, Mr. Edward O'Brien, 
Dr. Richard Ziemer 



FTD & DVC: 
Beautiful together! 

DVC was on hand September 18 and 
19 to help Florist Transworld Delivery 
Association (FTD) District 3-B celebrate 
its 50th anniversary. 

DVC was active in all phases of this 
year's special Philadelphia Christmas 
Design School and Trade Fair held at the 
Valley Forge Exhibition Center. 

As part of the celebration, $10,(X)0 in 
scholarship monies was awarded to 10 
students enrolled in four-year colleges. 
DVC college students received the lion's 
share of these monies. $8,000. The 
eight DVC FTD scholarship recipients 
were Louise Advena, Leonard Azzarano, 
William Dear, Francis Kitchener, Keith 
Pfaff, Linda Schemp. Kathleen Stasney 
,#nd Elizabeth Walz. 

This year's design school featured 
eight designers from around the world, 
and DVC students were there to help 
and assist these internationally-known 
florists. Four DVC students now enrolled 
in our Advanced Floral Design course 
were selected to assist with this 50th an- 
niversary Christmas Design School. 
These students were Beki Fegley, Diane 
Ivey, Julia Keane and Joan Mayer. 

Wait a minute, that's not all! DVC 
students also competed with some of the 
area's top retail florists in the trade show's 
annual Christmas design competition. 
Six teams of two entered two door de- 
signs, two mantle designs and two table 
designs. Our student competitors included 
Beth Bevins, Anthony Cooper, Beki 
Fegley, Jennifer Freshcorn, Don Griff- 
ing, Emily Hukill, Diane Ivey, Julia 
Keane, Beverly Lichota, Joan Mayer 
and Patty Rupell. 

While we didn't win first place, our stu- 
dent entries received a great amount of 
attention and praise. One group of visit- 
ing florists was overheard saying. "This 
was done by students? Write down their 
names — this is better than some of the 
pros." 

For the fourth year in a row. DVC was 
the only college to compete in this pro- 
fessional design contest. 



This Week . . . France 

continued from page I 

1 1 attend elementary school. From 1 1 to 
13 years old. children are in the "cycle of 
observation." Teachers try to determinate 
the course of study that pupils should 
follow in their teens. At the end of the 
cycle, students begin to study in the field 
they feel comortable with; then from the 
tenth to twelfth grade students follow the 
courses of one of the 24 different pro- 
grams which lead to the "baccalaureat." 
the equivalent of a high school diploma 
in the United States. 

Among the 24 different programs are 
majors like business, physics, engineer- 
ing, music, computers, languages, 
maths, philosophy, history, economics, 
etc. 

French high school students usually go 
to school between 25 and 40 hours a 
week according to their major. 

Students must pass the government 
examination (the "baccalaureat") to 
enter one of France's universities. One of 
the oldest is the University of Paris. Sor- 
bonne, founded in the 12th century and 
specializing in arts and sciences. 

The French way of life is very closely 
centered around the family France's 
youthful fathers and mothers enjoy 
doing things for and with their children. 

FRANCE will continue next lisue 



Annual Halloween Dance 
to be held 

The Annual Halloween Dance, spon- 
sored by the Student Activities Commit- 
tee, will be held on October 26 in the 
APR. All students and faculty are in- 
vited. Costumes are welcome but not re- 
quired. There will be prizes of $15, $10 
and $25 in a costume contest. There will 
also be a pumpkin carving contest spon- 
sored by the Horticulture Society. The 
Ramin' Caucasians, with special guest 
Pat Goodwin, will perform. A D.J. will 
be there at 8:30 p.m. and a band will 
perform after 9 p. m 



Professor to play major role in '89 Red Ball 



John Martin has been chosen as Chair- 
man of the 1989 Red Ball. The Red Ball 
is the culminating event of Bucks' Fever, 
a celebration of the arts which is spon- 
sored by the Central Bucks Chamber of 
Commerce. This will be the fourth year 
John Martin has been involved with the 
Ball on behalf of the College. Gerry 



McMullen of Keystone Tree Expert 
Company will serve as Vice Chairman. 
Almost 500 people attended last years 
event held at the Aldie Mansion. The 
Ball has become the social event of the 
Bucks* business community of which 
DVC is an important part. 



Hunt Seat team 
rides to top of Region 

DVC was High Point College of the 
day at the Hunt Seat horse show held at 
Penn State October 16. with an eight- 
point win over Penn State's team. This 
advances DVC to first place to date in 
Region V. 

Jan Egner, Kelly Cunningham. Betty 
Lollin, Stina Liebman and Janet Distler 
have qualified for Regionals. which will 
be held in April. Congratulations, team! 

Good luck at your next show. October 
30 at Keystone Junior College in La 
Plume, Pa. 

Results of the Penn State Show: 

Open Over Fences 

Tony DeLise, 1st 

Open Under Saddle 

Tony DeLise, 3rd 
Betty Lollin. 4th 

Intermediate Over Fences 

Jan Egner. 2nd 

Intermediate Under Saddle 

Jan Egner. 2nd 

Novice Over Fences 

Paige Barnett, 2nd 

Novice Under Saddki 

: > Janet Distler, 6th - : 

1 Paige Barnett, 3rd 
\; Kim Schenk, 1st 

Advanced Walk /Trot /Canter 

Jamie Caffaro, 1st 

Beginner Walk /Trot /Canter 

Deb Brozoski 

Advanced Walk/Trot 

Kelly Cunningham, 3rd 
Renee Kazskas, 6th .: 

Placement Office 
interview 

Attention all Animal Science and 
Biology majors! On Tuesday. November 
1 , a representative from Smith . Kline & 
French will be on campus to interview 
sophomores, juniors and seniors for the 
six-month co-op. All interested students 
should sign up for an interview time in 
the Placement Office. 

A workshop on interview techniques 
will be held Thursday. October 27 at 
7:30 p.m. in the Segal Hall Conference 
Room. All students are welcome. 



TOP 100 DANCE 

November 3 
9 PM • APR 

Dance to DVCs 
All Time Favorites! 

Sponsored by SAC 



DVC students choose 
Flower Show theme 

The problems and solutions of garden- 
ing with limited water will be the theme 
of Delaware Valley College's 1989 Phila- 
delphia Flower Show exhibit, titled 
"Xcriscaping: What to Do When the 
Well Runs Dry." 

The College's entry in the educational 
division will feature a demonstration 
landscape presenting landscape tech- 
niques, design principles and "xeric" 
(drought-tolerant) plant material basic to 
xeriscaping and water conservation. 
Signage within the exhibit and a media 
display area with computer-generated 
graphics will provide detailed information 
to aid gardeners in understanding the 
causes and problems of drought and the 
potential of xeriscaping. Proper mulch- 
ing, plant material selection and group- 
ing, irrigation techniques and water con- 
servation design principles will be pre- 
sented to visitors via the exhibit. 

The concept of xeriscaping was devel- 
oped out of necessity about five years 
ago in Colorado, and its use is spread- 
ing. It has been estimated that gardeners 
who follow the principles of xeriscaping 
can realize water savings of between 30 
to 80 percent, while still enjoying a pleas- 
ing, aesthetic landscape. Xeriscaping is a 
holistic approach to water conservation 
in the garden that does not sacrifice 
beauty to achieve its goals, but is a prac- 
tical gardening alternative. 

DVC has been exhibiting at the Flower 
Show since 1950. and over the years 
has won scores of major show awards. 
The College placed first in its class last 
year and also was awarded the presti- 
gious Bulkley Medal of the Garden Club 
of America. The entries are always 
student-devised utilizing student designs, 
exhibit construction, plant material forc- 
ing, etc. The 1989 entry may be the 
most challenging they have attempted to 
date. 

The Philadelphia Flower Show — the 
largest indoor show in the world — runs 
from March 5 through 12, 1989 at the 
Civic Center. 



it if Fundraisers if if 

FFA: Currently selling raffle tickets 

Dairy Society: Now taking orders 

for cheese gift packages 

Hillel: Selling caramel apples during 

October 24 9 p.m. movie in APR 

Agronomy Club: Selling hoagies in 

dorms. November 7 

A-Day: Dance-a-thon. November 18 

and 19. enter to win color TV! (Call 

x-2393 for information.) from ICC 



Coming up in November 

Look at these hot items on the calen- 
dar for early November, from your SAC! 

On Monday. November 7, comedian 
Jack Cohen stops by DVC to bring some 
laughs to the east coast kids. Jack usually 
does his thing in LA., so come by the 
APR between 9 and 10 p.m. to see this 
California boy. 

"The Trend," a band playing 50's and 
60's music, will perform on Thursday, 
November 10 from 9 p.m.-l a.m. in the 
APR. Prepare to be entertained and edu- 
cated by everything from Motown to old 
TV themes! (Faculty, staff and adminis- 
tration; search the back of your closets 
and dress to the occasion!) 

Sculpture unveiled 

"The Hand of God," a reproduction of 
a Rodin sculpture, was recently contrib- 
uted to the Business Division of the Col- 
lege by Dr. Samuel Segal, dentist and 
Bucks County resident. 

The sculpture, which stands about 
three feet tall, is displayed in the lobby of 
the Allman Building. A back-drape, 
commemorative plaque and spotlight to ■ 
enhance the setting will be installed in fhe 
near future. 

Many thanks to Dr. Segal for his gen- 
erous contribution. 



Ram Pages information 

To write to Dear Aggie, the editors 
or to submit articles, put them in the 
Ram Pages box (917) or drop the in- 
formation at 103 Berk. We are waiting 
to hear what you have to say. 



NEW BRITAIN INN 

"Del Vol's home owoy from home" 

SUN. NIGHT: DJ and Dancing 

MON. NIGHT: Steamers - 
$1.95/Dozen\ 

TUES. NIGHT: Import Night - 
Most$1.25/Bottle 

WED. NIGHT: $125 Cheese 
Steak Night 

THURS. NIGHT: DJ and Dancing 

FRI. NIGHT: DJ and Dancing 

SAT. NIGHT: Live entertainment 

Seafood & Sandwiches 

All Ifems fo Go! 

Rt 202 • New Britain, PA 
348-1966 



Tutoring at Delaware Valley College 

The tutoring program has been moved to Segal Hall on the second floor Help can 
be scheduled or on a walk in basis. 

For help in math and writing, see Mrs. Price in Segal from 1-430 p.m ddily to 
schedule an appointment 

If you wish open tutoring, just walk in and ask during the times listt^d 



TIME 


MONDAY 


TUESDAY 


WEDNESDAY 


THURSDAY 


1:00-2:00 


Chemistry 




Biological Science 




1:00-4:00 
2:00-3:00 




English 

Biology 

Chemistry 

CAT I & II 

Calculus 1 


Business 

Biology 
Genetics 




2:00-6:00 


•'".", ' " ' ' : 


CAT 1 & 11 

Chemistry 

Biology 

English 


. 


f 


3:00-4:00 


• ■ .■ 


. 


C AT I & II 

Chemistry 

Biology 

English 


Cienetics 

Organic Chemistry 

Biology 

Chemistry 

Physics 


4:00>6:00 

■ ■ -.7--' ''' '' ''■-' = 


Genetics 
Organic Chemistry 
Biology 
Business 
Chemistry 
Physics 


Business 


Business 


CAT l&ll 
Chemistry 
Business 


4:00-10:00 


Calculus 1 


C.A.T.I&ll 


,■:-::,,:.■.■, 




6:00-8:00 


Biology 

Chemistry 

Physics 

CAT. I&II 

Biological Science 




Biology 

Chemistry 

Physics 


b-7 

English 

Business 


6:00-9:00 


English 

Biology 

Chemistry 

CAT I&II 

Calculus I 


English 

Biology 

Chemistry 

Physics 

CAT I&II 

Calculus 1 

Genetics 


■ ■ ''■ ' ■ •■ ■ .: - -' 


C.A T 1 & II 

English 

Biology 

Chemistry 


7:00-8:00 


Biology 
Genetics 


Biological Science 
Chemistry 


' 


.... 


7:00-9:00 


., ' - 




Chemistry 

CAT I&II 

English 

Biology 

(jenetics 


- 



Dance-a-thon scheduled 



The Student Activities Committee and 
the A-Day Committee have joined to- 
gether to organize a 20-hour dance-a- 
thon for Friday and Saturday, November 
18 and 19. The event will provide funds 
for the two committees to bring a special 
entertainment event on campus for 
A-Day. 

"Right now," said Ched Baker, co- 



chairman of SAC, "We're looking for 
dancers to participate. That is our most 
pressing need at this time. Anyone inter- 
ested in taking part, please let me know." 

He can be reached at x-2393. 

"We're thinking of a special concert or 
singer that will make this A-Day really 
memorable and even more fun," Baker 
explained. 



Turkey Trot on menu 

The 15th Annual Delaware Valley 
College Turkey Trot race is scheduled for 
Sunday, November 20, starting at 2 p.m. 
The starting line is located between the 
Student Center and the gymnasium. 
The 3.5-mile course goes through many 
parts of the beautiful DVC campus. 

Last year over 200 persons finished 
the race. In ability, they varied from ex- 
perienced runners to some who were 
racing for the first time. Prices include 
turkeys provided by Gross Gourmet 
Foods of Doylestown to the first two 
male and two female finishers, merchan- 
dise prizes to the next 13 male and eight 
female finishers, medals for the first three 
in numerous male and female age groups, 
plus team trophies and medals for the 
first place men's and women's open 
teams and the first high school team. 

Race information and applications are 
available from the Athletic Office in the 
gymm, the receptionist in Lasker Hall 
and on the day of the race. Post entries 
will be accepted until 15 minutes before 
race time. Pre-race entry fee is $v3; $4 on 
the day of the race. 

Why not do a little training over the 
next couple of weeks, and join our "hap- 
pening" on Sunday, November 20 If 
you are not interested in runnirig the 
Turkey Trot, but you would like to help 
out as an official, please see Dr. Eierthold. 
x-2285. .... -.v..^ >, 



■ .V -.r 



New scholarship available 

The Warrington Garden Club has 
established the Louise Burkhardt Schol- 
arship Award. This award will be given 
annually to a deserving student enrolled 
in either Horticulture or Ornamental 
Horticulture at Delaware Valley College. 



Floral Society 

The Floral Society is sponsoring 
pumpkin painting in the Head Green- 
house at 6 p.m. on Thursday, No- 
vember 27. Open to everyone. Mem- 
bers free, non-members $l/pumpkin. 



ZIEMERISM 

Ear-ritation: 
excessive decibels 





in)®IkRRfsii?:g^ainil(SSf (^®flll®g® ^Soodlsoot^ Ki®wsp]ip(§ff 



Vol. XXIII. No. 5 



WcdneMlay. November 2. 1988 



NOTICE: The opinions expressed in any individual article do not necessarily reflect the viewpoint of the paper or school 



Buenos Dias! Bonjour! 
iCuten Tag! Hello! Sayonara! 
This Week . . . FRANCE 

by Laurent Lanee 

continued from last issue 

All the French people get pleasure 
from food. French cooking is famous all 
over the world. Every dish, whether 
served in a restaurant or in a private 
home, is carefully prepared to appeal to 
the sight as well as to the taste. 

There are thousands of regional food 
specialties, such as the thick fish soup 
(bouillabaisse) of Marseilles on the Medi- 
terranean coast, the snails (escargots) 
of Burgundy, the pancakes (crepes) of 
Britany, the cheese "fondue" of the Alps 
and the sauerkraut (choucroute) of 
Alsace. 

No meal is complete without lots of 
bread, those long, crisp loaves brought 
home warm from the bakery. Wine, too, 
is usual at both the midday meal (de- 
jeuner) and the evening meal (diner). 
Dejeuner is customarily the main meal of 
the day, and the French like to take their 
. |ime eating it. 

Many people who have jobs in the big- 
ger cities (Paris, Lyon, Marseilles, 
Bordeaux, Grenoble . . .) cannot spend 
much time for lunch and have now 
learned to enjoy the convenience of the 
self-service and the fast food, where they 
can buy a hot dog, hamburger or any 
other kind of French sandwiches. 

Nearly everyone these days does have 
time for sports. French ski slopes in the 
Alps or Pyrenees are excellent and 
heavily used. (The 1992 Winter Olympic 
Games, like in 1968, will take place in 

Please see page 3 

Apiary Society gets busy 

The members of the DVC Apiary 
Society have been busy over the past few 
weeks. During the beginning of the 
month, th^y assisted club advisor Dr. 
Berthold . judging the extensive Mont- 
gomery County Beekeepers Association's 
Annual Honey Show. The show included 
numerous liquid honey entries in addi- 



DRUNK DRIVER FACES FIRING SQUAD 



This could be your fate if you were 
caught drinking and driving in El Salva- 
dor or Bulgaria. In Malaysia your spouse 
would share your jail cell. In fact, most 
European countries have such strict 
penalties that drunk driving is almost 
unheard of. 

In the U.S. punishment would consist 
of a 45-day loss of license, a fine and an 
alcohol-education program. With such 
low penalties, it is no wonder that drink- 
ing and driving is the number 1 cause of 
death for Americans up to age ^. In 
fact, half of all fatal accidents involve 
alcohol. In our age group (16-24) alcohol 
is responsible for 8, (XX) deaths and dis- 
figuring 40,(X)0 victims. This means two 
people are killed by a drunk driver for 
every 50-minute lecture period. 

tion to comb honey, chunk honey, ftnefy 
crystallized honey and a number of cate- 
gories of beeswax including blocks and 
various types of candles. During the 
judging, the club members had the op- 
portunity to sample honey from numer- 
ous different floral sources from through- 
out Montgomery County. 

The members of the club also spent 
two evenings extracting and processing 
(and eating!) the College's honey crop. 

Membership in the club is open to all 
interested persons and knowledge or 
background about the honey bee is not 
necessary. During the remainder of this 
semester, the Club will be involved in 
judging the Bucks County Honey Show, 
making a special beeswax preparation 
for conditioning and waterproofing 
leather and holding a beeswax candle 
making workshop. 

Club members and the Lasker Hall 
receptionist have honey and beeswax 
candles available. These make nice gifts 
to take home for the Thanksgiving and 
Christmas holidays. 

If you are interested in attending a 
Club meeting, look for the hexagon signs 
with the bees on them, which give details 
about meetings. 



Having heard all the facts we ^sk you 
to make a pact with yourself never to 
drink and drive or allow another person 
to do so. Here are suggestions on how to 
prevent someone from driving drunk. 

1 . Get a non -drinker to give the person a 
ride. 

2. Suggest that they stay overnight. 

3. Take the keys to his car. 

4. Physically retain anyone who insists 
on driving. j, 

5. Call a taxi and pay for it yourself. - 

6. Call the police. 

These suggestions may sound a little 
outrageous, but could you live with youff 
self knowing that you could have stopf^ 
a death or injury. Let's celebrate National 
Collegiate Alcohol Awareness Week by 
starting a lifetime of acting responsibly. :^ 

S.A.D.D.I 

S.A.D.D. Fact — If you're out on a Fri- 
day or Saturdaii r\ight, one out of Wears 
around you is driven bv a drunk driver. 

Food Science students ? 
receive scholarships 

Carol Janovsky '90 and Jennifer 
Jesiolowski '90 were awarded $13(X) 
and $1(XX) scholarships by the Institute 
of Food Technologists at a meeting 
Thursday evening, October 4 at Chubby's 
Hearth in Collingswood, N.J. Jennifer 
was presented with a plaque by George 
Foster of the national office in Chicago^ 
which administers the national I.F.T. 
scholarship program. Carol received her 
plaque and check from George LoPresti 
of Campbell Soup Co. Mr. LoPresti is 
chairman of the Awards Committee of 
the Philadelphia Section of the Institute. 

The students were accompanied by 
Dr. Palumbo, Mr. Porter, Mr. and Mrs. 
Janovsky and Christina McColgan '91. 

Application forms for I.F.T. scholar- 
ships for the 1989-90 academic year are 
now available in Dr. Palumbo's office. 
Students must have a GPA of 2.5 or bet- 
ter and be enrolled in the Food Science 
program. 



Dear Editors 



Interiorscaping students tour casinos 



Dear Editors, 

In response to the letter asking, "What 
happens to the money for parking stick- 
ers?": It goes into the general College 
treasury along with other tuition, room, 
board and fee charges. "Does Security 
see the money?" No. "Does it go for 
snow removal?" Not directly, since this is 
paid from the general College budget. 
"Does anyone know where the money 
goes?" Yes, I do and so do others, in- 
cluding the College Comptroller. Mr. 
Pyne. 

The purpose of parking stickers is to 
ensure that only authorized people are 
permitted to park on College property. 
Unauthorized, unstickered cars may be 
identified promptly and their owners 
contacted to determine why the car is on 
campus. This is a standard security mea- 
sure practiced at almost every college. 

We have determined, through ques- 
tions to other colleges, that our parking 
fee is extremely low. While a parking 
sticker and a fee to some are general ir- 
ritants, they are absolutely necessary for 
student safety, security and control of 
our property. I did not institute the park- 
ing fee at Delaware Valley College, nor 
have I changed or increased it. This policy 
was in effect when I started at DVC. and 
I conskjer it a legitimate and appropriate 
part of our operations. 

'-"'-•-- W.H. Rorerlll 

77i/s is excerpted from President Rorers 
letter. Copies are available. — Editor . 



Students enrolled in this fall's Interior- 
scaping course had the opportunity to 
recently tour some of Atlantic City's glit- 
ziest casinos. The tour was sponsored by 
Parker Interior Plantscape Inc. of Scotch 
Plains. N.J. The tour was suggested and 
set up by the company's vice president, 
Richard Parker, after a meeting with 
O.H. department chair John Martin this 
summer at the Ohio Florists Association 
Short Course. Parker maintains the inte- 
rior and some exterior plantings at the 
majority of Atlantic City's casinos. 

The tour was conducted by Sally Mc- 
Call '83, general manager of maintenance 
for the entire Atlantic City Division of 
Parker. Students visited five Atlantic City 
casinos and spoke with interiorscape 
managers in each. Individuals on the tour 



had the rare opportunity to visit one of 
the lavish and very private penthouses 
atop Bally's Grand Casino (formerly the 
Golden Nugget) and to visit spas and 
health clubs in various casinos, all of 
which were beautifully accented with live 
plants and flowers. 

Students learned first-hand how interi- 
orscapers interface with these pleasure 
palaces. Students were treated to a deli- 
cious luncheon at one of the hotels (Cour- 
tesy of Parker, and each was given a gift 
bag including a stationery kit, calculator 
and pen. The group even had the oppor- 
tunity to see a motion picture being filmed 
on the Boardwalk. 

The day at the casinos was an excellent 
real-life OH. experience for all those 
who were involved. 



ACT 101 Offers New Way to Study for Exams 



ACT 101 and Ron Johnson teamed 
up with the Athletic Departments on 
Tuesday, October 18 to help students 
prepare for a major science exam . 

Approximately 100 students turned 
out for the Natural Science Study Group 
sponsored by the ACT 101 /PLUS Pro- 
gram at Del Val. Professor Ron Johnson, 
volunteering his time from 7:30 to 9:30 
p.m., reviewed the material to be covered 
in the exam. With Steve Davis, ACT 101 
director, he also demonstrated techniques 
of HOW to learn the material. 



Coach Bedesem and Coach Pento 
made a special effort to assure that their 
players could attend the study session, in 
some cases, practices were shortened to 
allow time for students to participate in 
the science study group. 

The ACT 101/PLUS Office extends a 
special thanks to Mr. Johnson, Cc»ach 
Bedesem, Coach Pento and Dr Craig 
Hill for their support. ACT 101/PLUS 
also encourages other faculty and staff to 
support future study groups and similar 
projects. 



On campus 

SATURDAY. NOVEMBER 5 

Soccer TBA MAC Championships 

; Football (A) vs. Lebanon Valley, 
1:30 p.m. 

Cross Country Men's and Women's 
TBA MAC Championships. Gettysburg 

MONDAY. NOVEMBER 7 

Jack Coen. APR. 9 p.m. 



STAFF :''J-'^'M^ 

Editors-fn-Chie/ Kathleen L. Stasney 
Loretta F. Skibowski 

Reporters Fred Newton , 

Tony Palumbo. Ty McSherry. 

Frank Reich, James Moye 

Shaun Smith 

Photography Dave Stomp. 

Laurent Lanee 

Advisors Joe Ferry. 

Anne Biggs. Mr. Edward O'Brien. 
Dr. Richard Ziemer 




A cor)tir\gent of visitors frorh Argentiria were or) campus recently; for a tour of our facil- 
ities as part of a Rotar\> International Group Stud\^ Exchange. Or. John Avery served as 
a guide for the visitors while Vice President, Operations Russell Schulz welcomed the 
group on behalf of the Del Val Administration. 



Peace Corps sends out 
urgent plea for volunteers 

Volunteers are needed for alignments 
in the Pacific, Asia, the Caribbean, Africa 
and Latin America. The U.S. Peace Corps 
is sending out an urgent appeal for 
volunteers to help developing countries. 
If you have a four-year degree or at least 
five years of work experience in a field 
requested by a developing country, you 
could be on your way to an adventure of 
a lifetime. 

Benefits include roundtrip airfare, med- 
ical and dental coverage, living allowance, 
housing, readjustment allowance of 
$4,800 upon completion of your two- 
year service, and much, much more. 

Call the Peace Corps Recruiting Office 
in Philadelphia Monday through Friday 
between 8:30 a.m. and 5:00 p.m., 
(215) 597-0744 or 1-800-462-1589. 
Ask for extension 10. 

Special Programs 
Bulleirt now available 

Information on dozens of exclusive 
short courses and special programs is only 
a phone call iway. 

The Delawc^e Valley College Special 
Programs Bulletin is hot off the presses. 
It lists courses on home wine making, 
cheese making, floral design, low main* 
tenance home landscape design, Christ- 
mas decoration , home food preservation 
and food safety, houseplant care, herbal 
crafts, and many, many more inexpen- 
sive programs for the homeowner and 
professional. 

Classes run from one to five weeks, 
one night a week; all are fun, educational 
and useful. The bulletin provides course 
descriptions, costs and registration infor- 
mation, and it's free. 

Call extension 2375 for the Office of 
Continuing Education and ask for the 
Special Programs Bulletin. An exciting 
new woHd of non-credit short courses, 
workshops and seminars will be delivered 
to your door. 

DVC Chorale 

It's not too late to join chorale! We are 
looking for new people who are interested 
in music and enjoy singing. Our practices 
are Monday and Wednesday from 4:15 
to 5:30 p.m. If you are interested, join us 
for a practice, I'm sure you'll enjoy! Our, 
practices are held in the music room, stu- 
dent center. 

Right now. chorale is looking for stu- 
dents who would like to join to sing Christ- 
mas songs with us for rehearsals and our 
concerts. If there are any questions, 
don't hesitate, please call Mrs. Roberts, 
director. 



President's Hot Line 
DVC - 1 replies 

... Ice cream cones will be available, 
in limited quantities, soon. 

... If gravy is available when you 
order french fries, you may have a 
serving, but gravy will not be available 
as a special order with fries. 

. . . Plans are being made to give suit- 
able recognition to the Class of '88 for 
the aeration fountain in Lake Archer. 

. . . Work Hall second floor doors will 
remain locked to outsiders at certain 
timps to enhanrp camous security and 
safety, and at the request ot our RA's 
and student personnel. Certain Work 
Hall second floor doors will be locked 
at 10:30 p.m. Monday through Thurs- 
day (after evening classes) . They will 
remain locked on the other evenings. 

. .. . When it is necessary to park for 
five or ten minutes at a DVC dormitory 
or hall, put on the hazard (parking) 
lights to avoid being ticketed, or con- 
tact Security (ext. 2315) in advance of 
your plans. > ^ ■ ..^ : 



Scliolarships awarded by PFA 

The Pennsylvania Florists Association 
(PFA) has announced three Del Val win- 
ners of the PFA Peter B. Pfahl Scholar- 
ship for 1988. «-.>l;a v. 

David B. Mount, Anthony J. Cooper 
and Joan E. Comly will share $1,200 for 
1988-89. :s 

Congratulations! "' - 



Hate Christinas Shopping? 

Solve your problems! Contact a 
member of the Agribusiness Marketing 
Associates for some delicious Charles 
Chips snack products sold in attractive- 
ly decorated cans. Products include 
chips, popcorn, nuts, mints and many 
more. These items make excellent 
gifts for family members, friends or 
whomever you buy gifts for. Orders 
must be received by November 14. 

The group is also selling snack food 
now in the dorms. If interested in the 
Christmas items or if you're hungry 
while in the dorms, see any one of 
these ten members: Mary Ann Bailey, 
Barness 205: Jay Graham. Work 102: 
Kevin Milz. Tabor 3: Robert Zeigler, 
Samuel 108: Michele Fulmer. Berko- 
witz 121: Andy Hartzell. Samuel 223: 
Todd Benner, Samuel 214: Joe Dia- 
mond. Wolfsohn 15: Fay Lobaugh. 
Work 231: John Ackley. Ulman 202. 



This Weeic . . . France 

continued from page 1 

Albertville in the French Alps.) Tennis, 
hiking, golf and cycling attract large 
numbers throughout the country. Team 
sports: soccer (called football in Europe) 
and rugby have their devoted players 
and fans just like football and baseball in 
the United States. 

For the fashionable French and for in- 
ternational society there is great attrac- 
tion in the horse races. The world famous 
tracks of Longchamp and Auteur are in 
Paris. 

The traveler in France sees the very 
old and the very new. Almost all French 
history can be traced through some 
monuments, statues, churches or an- 
cient ruins. 

No place reflects France's past and 
present better than Paris. From the 
crooked streets of the oldest part of 
Paris, the "ile de la cite," to the modern 
Beaubourg Museum or Unesco buildings. 
Paris has something for everyone. The 
city is full of museums, churches and 
monuments. The Louvre Museum, the 
Orsay Museum, Notre Dame Cathedra!, 
Sacre Coeur Church, the Arch of Tri- 
umph, the Eiffel Tower and the Hotel 
des Invalides with the tomb of Napwieon 
I are world famous. 

If you wish to learn more about the 
beautiful, which is France, contact your 
French friends at DVC: Laurent Lanee 
or Laurence Guyot. A Bientot 



ZIEMERISM 

Past Perfect: 
a flawless antique 



NEW BRITAIN INN 

"Del Vol's home awoy from home" 

SUN. NIGHT: DJ and Dancing 

MON. NIGHT: Steamers -^_ 
$1.95/Dozen 

TUES. NIGHT: Import Night - 
Most$1,25/Bottle 

WED. NIGHT: $1.25 Cheese 
Steak Night 

THURS. NIGHT: DJ and Dancing 

FRI. NIGHT: DJ and Dancing 

SAT. NIGHT: Live entertainment 

Seofood & Sandwiches 

All Items to Go! 

Rt. 202 • New Britain. PA 
348-1968 





is)®ikiwsio^^aflii(§sf <s®nn' 




Vol. XXIII, No. 6 



Wednesday, November 9. 1988 



NOTICE: The opinions expressed in any individual article do not necessarily reflect the viewpoint of the paper or school. 



Haunted House tribute 



by Melissa Bravo 



By da\; we passed the time away 
Going to class or waking up late 
But at night we've had a secret life 
Haunting the basement of Lasker Hall. 
If };ou had dared and had fare 
You were invited in, to witness first hand 
The fiends, freaks and creeps lurking 
inside. 

Twenty-five students designed and 
organized the Haunted House this year 
that hosted over 530 people. We are not 
an organized club, but a committee com- 
posed of any students who have one 
thing in common: a desire to put our im- 
aginations and potentials to good use 
and have fun doing it (and maybe get a 
4.0 out of it if we scare our roommate to 
"death"). 

We would like to thank Lasker Hall for 
allowing us to have our Haunted House 
in their basement, Security for locking 
and unlocking the doors at crazy hours, 
the Dining Hall for letting us use their 
facilities, and most of all. Maintenance 
for their assistance and advice. Look for 
us somewhere on campus next year and 
help us put on an even better event. 



Crew / Cast Recognitions 
Advertisement: Sue Dipete, Brian 

, Hahn 

' Chairpersons: Melissa Bravo, Donna 
Miloszar, Frank Gunson 
Construction: Nick Giorgianni, Art 
Rudiger, John Manalty, Hardy Rueb» 
Frank Gunson, Brian Hahn, Paul Pas» 
querelli, Rob Hofstetter, Julie Rabin, 
Doug Caldwell. 

Music: Tricia Gimon, Sandra Terry 
Props: Lisa Dietrich, Donna Miloszar, 
Sue Dipete, Anthony Calazzo, Steve 
Hager. Tricia Gimon, Julie Rabin, Jen- 
nifer Freshcorn, and company. 
Host/Hostess: Frank Gunson, Melissa 
Bravo, Donna Miloszar 
Torturer: Hardy Rueb 
Victims: Lisa Dietrich, Tricia Gimon, 
Kim Hussinker, Paul Pasquerelli, Rob 
Hofstetter. John Manatty, Sandra Terry, 
Jimmy Marinni, Mona, Sandi Slanker 
Grave: Nick Giorgianni, Art Rudiger, 
Doug Caldwell, Dawn Reckner 
Spoolts: Steve Hager. Brian Hahn, 
Dave Cohn, Kevin Dickmeyer, Kirsten 
Dresser, Rob Martucci, Anthony Calazzo 
Morgue: Sue Higley. Sue Dipete, Julie 
Rabin 



Choices: A new course next semester 



A new course offered this spring, ' v. : 
"Technology: Processes of Assessment , 
and Choice." examines the policy options 
(choices) that address the technological ... 
issues facing our nation. , ; 

Dr. Goldberg, instructor for the course, 
explains that it will offer a social science 
perspective on technology, issues ex- 
plored will include the regulation of risky 
technologies, improving U.S. competitive- 
ness through technology, controlling pol- 
lution and aiding less developed countries 
through technology transfer. Topics 
ranging from the "greenhouse effect" to 
the management of hazardous waste will 
be covered. Guest speakers will participate 
and contribute to the range of the course. 

The prerequisite for "Technology: 



Processes of Assessment and Choice" is 
one year of college-level science. 

"Although the title of the course tea 
mouthful," said Dr. Goldberg, "it is also 
■ one that will attract the notice of anyone 
reading your transcript." 

He adds that it may be particularly apt 
for pre-professional students, students 
thinking of careers in management and 
those intending to play a leadership role 
in our society. 

The class will be held spring semester 
on Monday evenings. 7-9:45 p.m. Be- 
cause this three-credit course (LA 3038) 
is offered in the evening, day students 
will be able to sign up only on January 17. 

For more information or a copy of the 
course outline, contact Dr. Goldberg. 



DVC students initiate 
exchange with CB East 

The international students from Del 
Val visited Central Bucks East High 
School recently in order to lay the foun- 
dations for an exchange program between 
the high school students and the college 
international students. 

Delaware Valley College was repre- 
sented by Laurence Guyot and Laurent 
Lanee from France and by Hubert Nout- 
chogouin from Cameroon. Joining them 
were Tarja Oinonen of Finland and Chris- 
tine Loboda of England, who arc visiting 
in the area from overseas. 

The Exchange Program wiH aHow the 
Del Val international students to provide 
insight into their countries to the CB East 
students and thus encourage a dialogue 
regarding the differences in cultures be- 
tween countries. The program will also 
provide an opportunity for the College's 
French and Spanish-speaking internation- 
als to attend French and Spanish 
language classes at CB East. 

In exchange, the internationals will be 
invited into the homes of the high school 
students and will be guided by local fami- 
lies in exploring internships and work/ 
study opportunities with local businesses. 

This will also be a chance for the inter- 
nationals at the College to take part in 
CB East classes and other aspects of local 
life, including visiting places of interest 
close by and in nearby cities. 

The CB East students and the DVC in- 
ternational students are looking forward 
to building a program that will benefit all 
parties in this new exchange opportunity. 

Student APICS wins gold 

The Delaware Valley College Student 
Chapter of APICS has been awarded the 
Affiliate Student Chapter Gold Circle 
Award, one of the first student chapters 
in the country to be honored. 

The DVC chapter is affiliated with the 
Bucks-Mont APICS Chapter. 

Special thanks go to Dr. John Avery 
and Dr. Dominic Montileone for the per- 
sonal effort they contributed to this award- 
winning program. 



Dear Editors 

Dear Editors, 

Some good news about Delaware Val- 
ley College that I want to share: 

1 . We are fourth in the nation among 
institutions producing graduates who go 
on to become Ph.D.s in the life sciences, 
an indicator of the quality of our educa- 
tional program. 

2. DVC has 37 recent biology graduates 
currently in professional schools (e.g.. 
dental, veterinary, medical). Compared 
to just 29 biology graduates in 1988. 

3. We were ranked 22nd in the nation 
in the small comprehensive colleges cate- 
gory of the 1988 annual "Best Colleges 
in America" report in U.S. News and 
World Report. This year was the first 
time that this report was based upon ob- 
jective measures of faculty quality, student 
quality, institutional resource commit- 
ment a. id student retention . 

4. When *>. Craig Hill was presented 
with the Eastern Regional Outstanding 
Teacher Award last summer by the Na- 
tional Association of Colleges and 
Teachers of Agriculture, which promotes 
excellence in teaching in this field, he 
joined a select group of educators who 
have been so honored . . . among whom 
are two other DVC faculty members! 



On campus 

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 9 

Bloodmobile, 12-5:30 p.m., APR 

THURSDAY. NOVEMBER 10 

50's-60's Dance Band. "The Tand" 
9:30 p.m -1 am . APR 

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 11 V 

Veteran's Day , ' ; 

SATURDAY. NOVEMBER 12 ^ 

Wrestling vs. Binghamton Tournament 

(A) 

Football vs. Widner, (H) , 

12-1:30 p.m. 

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 13 • 

Movie: "Stand and Deliver," 
9p.m.. APR 



STAFF - < - '^• 

Editors-in-Chfe/ Kathleen L. Stasney 
Loretta F. Skibowski 

Reporters ......... Fred Newton, 

Tony Palumbo, Ty McSherry, 

Frank Reich, James Moye 

Shaun Smith 

Photographic Dave Stomp, 

Laurent Lanee 

Advisors Joe Ferry, 

Anne Biggs, Mr. Edward O'Brien, 
Dr. Richard Ziemer 



5. The LaSalle joint MBA program 
has enrolled 120 graduate students, testi- 
mony to the quality of our business pro- 
gram, while further growth in the continu- 
ing education division is seen by our other 
on-campus and off-campus programs. 

6. A recently-signed agreement with 
Beaver College now makes it possible for 
our students to qualify on our campus, 
for secondary teaching certification in the 
sciences. . 

7. Our 1988-89 allocation for state 
funds was increased from an initial 
$397,000 to a final $438,000. In addition, 
we will share in a $14 million block of ad- 
ditional funds for educational equipment 
(DVC expects about $40,000). 

8. New programs are adding exciting 
directions: the first Bachelor of Arts for 
English is awaiting approval from the 
state, and we expect to apply shortly for 
a Laboratory Animal Science separate 
degree program. The core curriculum is 
being upgraded to bring new dimensions 
to our students' background. 

9. DVC is reaching out in a variety of 
Ways to cooperate with the community in 
the business, agriculture, biotechnology 
and local education areas to reach its 
needs and our own in a newer, broader, 
more sensitive manner. 

10. We are also reaching out interna- 
tionally. Very soon, DVC faculty mem- 
bers will have opportunities to teach at a 
brand new institution is Haiti; a delega- 
tion of College officials are planning to 
visit the People's Republic of China this 
winter to discuss collaborative programs 
with two institutions in Beijing. 

From the above, I hope you can all see 
that your college is "on the move" in a 
major way. We are taking the best we have 
at DVC and making it better. Stick with 
us. It's going to be one heck of a ride! 
John C. Mertz, Vice Presider}t 
Academic Affairs 
The complete text of this letter is avail- 
able. — Editor 

''Humor'' could be fatal 

by Dr. Robert Berthold Jr. 

It has come to my attention, and it 
greatly concerns me, that some person 
has been loosening the lug nuts on the 
wheels of some vehicles on campus. I 
am sure that this person thinks that what 
he is doing is quite amusing. In hopes of 
changing that thinking, let me point out 
that this action has already caused one 
near accident and has the potential of 
causing a fatality. 

If these unwarranted acts continue and 
result in a fatal accident, the one responsi- 
ble would always have this responsibility 
on their conscience. I ask whoever has 
been responsible for the lug-nut loosening 
to stop this life-threatening prank. 



Dear Editors, 

I would like to comment on something 
that many people recently enjoyed at 
DVC. The recent Halloween Dance held 
in the APR on October 26 was by all 
measures a great success. A sincere con- 
gratulations to Ched Baker ('89) and 
Jackie Leoncavallo ('90) and everyone 
else who was involved for the great job 
they did. Mr. and Mrs. Spratt, Mrs. Max- 
well. Dr. Weber, my wife and I were for- 
tunate enough to be judges for the cos- 
tume contest. A lot of people really got 
into it! The band was good, the turnout 
was good, and the pumpkin carving con- 
test was fun. I have since heard that Dr. 
Nash is somewhat of a "Jaws" personality? 

Dr. Craig Hill 
P.S. The agent for the Flaming Cauca- 
sions was really impressed with the spirit 
and fun had by the students in atten- 
dance. He made it a point to say to 
several of us that the group had proven 
to him that not everybody has to be 
drunk or stoned to have fun! r 

Floral Society update / 

This is a reminder to all members that 
the pictures for the Floral Society will be 
8 p.m. on Wednesday, November 9, in 
the Student Center. 

The Foliage Design Workshop is 7-9 
p.m. in Greenhouse IV on Thursday, 
November 10. 

There will be an Oriental Design Work- 
shop on Thursday. November 17 in 
Greenhouse IV. 

Our next meeting is Tuesday, Novem- 
ber 15 at 5 p.m. in Greenhouse IV. We 
hope to see all members at the workshops. 



Placement Office Events 

Job Search Workshop 

Thursday, November 17 
"All December graduates" 
7:30 - 8:30 p.m. 
Segal Hall Conference Room 

TWA Recreational Service, Inc. 

Presentation 

Wednesday, November 30 

Sign up in Placement Office 

7:30 p.m. 

Student Center, Room 201 

TWA Recreational Services, Inc. 

Interviews 

Summer Internships: Food & Business 
major; sign up for interview time in 
Placement Office. 

TEMPORARY JOBS: The Place 
ment Office has been receiving many 
temporary jobs for over winter break. 
If you want to earn extra money over 
break, stop by the Placement Office 
for further details. 



The 29th annual competition 

for 

The James A. Finnegan 

Fellowship Foundation 

Awards 

The James A. Finnegan Fellowship 
Foundation provides cash prizes, partici- 
pation in ten weekly seminar meetings 
and assistance in arranging summer intern- 
ships for practical, on-the-job training in 
Pennsylvania government or political 
offices. 

Any Pennsylvania student enrolled, for 
at least one semester, as an undergradu- 
ate at an accredited college or university, 
or any non-resident student similarly 
enrolled at an accredited Pennsylvania 
^college or university, who is considering 
a career in government or politics and who 
has not previously won a Foundation 
, Award is eligible to participate. 

Students interested in and eligible for 
this annual competition may request ap- 
plication forms from the Contest Coordi- 
nator. All application forms must be com- 
pleted, and mailed, with all supporting 
documents, postmarked by February 
15. 1989. 

Write to: 

1989 Contest Coordinator 

The James A. Finnegan . 

Fellowship Foundation 

P.O. Box 591 

Harrisburg, PA 17108-0591 

AWARDS 

Cash Prizes 

$2,000 The James A. Rnnegan Award 

$1,000 The David L. Lawrence Award 

$ 750 The Richardson Dilworth Award 

$ 500 The Matthew H. McCloskey, Jr. Award 

$ 250 Honorable Mcntion(s) 

Seminar Meetings 

During ten weekly seminar meetings, 
award winners meet and discuss issues of 
importance with state cabinet officials, 
other elected and appointed state officials, 
and other specialists in state government 
operations (party organizations, media 
and special interest groups) . • 

Summer Internship Assistance 

Additionally, the Foundation assists in 
arranging a paid internship for a maxi- 
mum of ten weeks in a state government 
agency or jxjlitical office during the F>eriod 
of May 15 to August 15, 1989 at standard 
state trainee rates. 

Return of the skeleton^ 

The Biology Department would appre- 
ciate it if the person who borrowed our 
human skeleton and a lab coat from the 
Agriculture building, room 211 and its 
preproom, respectively, would return 
these items immediately. Both items are 
needed for the teaching of the Bioscience 
Labs. 



Buenos Diasl Bonjourl 
Guten Tag! Hello! Sayonara! 
This Week . . . CAMEROON 

by Hubert Noutchogouin 

with Laurent Lanee 
PARTI 

Covering an area of 475,000 square 
kilometers (about the size of California) 
with 9.1 million inhabitants and a diver- 
sity of peoples, Cameroon is a sort of 
crossroads, a melting pot where all the 
features in black Africa are present: forest 
and grassland; Bantu and Sudanese; 
Muslim, Christian and Animist; French, 
English and Arab-speaking peoples. 

In Cameroon, one will find geographic 
and historical diversity; diversity of cul- 
tures; diversity in economic and tourist 
potential. 

Cameroon was discovered in 1472 by 
a Portuguese named Fernando-Po. The 
Portuguese were then followed by the 
Dutch and later by Germans. But in 1918, 
the Germans lost the First World War 
and Cameroon was divided into a French 
and British colony. When the wind of 
nationalism began to blow across Africa 
after the Second World War, the two 
colonies expressed a desire to be reunited. 
Reunification took effect soon after 
Ahmadou Ahidjo proclaimed the French 
zone independent on January 1, 1960. 
Cameroon became a united republic in 
1972 and has a presidential system of 
government. Today Cameroon is gov- 
erned by a one-party presidential 
regime, led by president Paul Biya, who 
Is also chairman of the Cameroon Na- 
tional Union Party. 

The most important cities are Dovala, 
Yaounde, Bafoussam, Garoua. Dovala 
is the largest commercial city in Came- 
roon, serving as the principal port of entry 
by sea and air to the rest of the country, 
but Yaounde is the administrative capital. 
Part II will appear next issue. 




Lab Animal Club 
plans activities 

by Patrick Rynn 

Greetings from the Lab Animal Club! 

Although for the past few years we 
have been a relatively quiet club on cam- 
pus, things are changing. The club has a 
new president, Alek Zajac. The "Ratmo- 
bile," or whatever it was, was a big success 
at Homecoming and everyone seemed 
to enjoy it. 

The club has been invited to the Mum- 
mers Parade on New Year's Day as well, 
and that means national exposure! 

Our trip to Merck, Sharp & Dome on 
November 3 should expose us to creative 
careers. The club also plans to attend all 
meetings of the American Association of 
Laboratory Animals Science (AALAS). 

If you have an interest in seeing what 
the Lab Animal Club has to offer you, 
check out the campus bulletin boards for 
dates and times of our meetings. Please 
join us; your ideas are welcome. 

Yearbook Information 

SENIORS: All proofs must be returned 
regardless of whether you are buying 
them or getting retakes. The retakes will 
be done November 21 and 22 in the 
Coffeehouse from 9 a.m. - 5:30 p.m. 

Club pictures will be taken on Novem- 
ber 7, 9 and 10 in the Student Center. 
Meet in the front lobby. All club pHrcsidents 
received a schfcdule. 

When last yea 's books come in, it will 
be announced in Ram Pages and posted 
around campus. 

Thank You 
'\r' -':''C[:-':-'.-::'''^'\- Beth Bevins 



NEW BRITAIN INN 

"De/ Vol's home owoy from home" 

SUN. NIGHT: DJ and Dancing 

MON. NIGHT: Steamers - 
$i95/Dozen 

TUES. NIGHT: Import Night - 
Most$125/Bottle 

WED. NIGHT: $1.25 Cheese 
Steak Night 

THURS. NIGHT: DJ and Dancing 

FRI. NIGHT: DJ and Dancing 

SAT. NIGHT: Live entertainment 

Seofood & Sondwiches 

All Items to Go! 

Rt. 202 • New Britain. PA 
348-1968 



Hunt Seat Equestrian 

Team continues 

in first place 

Del Val finished reserve high point col- 
lege for the day at the Keystone College 
Show on October 30, just two points 
behind Wilson College, first place winner 
with 36 total points. The number two slot 
still maintains the DVC team in first place 
in Region V. 

Missy Gordon was Reserve High Point 
Rider for the show. 

The next show for our illustrious hunt 
seat riders will take place on Sunday, 
November 6 at Beaver College. 
• Results for our riders are: 
Open Under Saddle 
First — Jan Egncr 
Second — Betty Lollin 
Third — Tony DeLise 
Op«i Over Fence 
First — Betty Lollin 
First — Tony DeLise 
Third -^ Alicia Kedzierski 
Intermediate Under Saddle 
Fifth — Paige Barnett 
Novice Under Saddle 
First — Mark Hayes 
First — Missy Gordon 
Third — Jane Faranetta 
Fifth - Janet Distler 

Novice Over Fences 
First — Jane Faranetta 
First — Missy Gordon 
Fourth — Deborah Shepherd 
Advanced Walk / Trot / Canter 
First — Sue Hahn 

Quit tips for 
Smokeout Day 

1%row out all cigarettes by breaking 
them in half and wetting them down. 
Clean out all ashtrays in your home, of- 
fice, or car and put them away. Discard 
matches; hide lighters, or give them away. 

When the urge to smoke hits, take a 

deep breath. Hold it a second, then re- 

. lease it very, very slowly. Taking deep. 

^rhythmic breaths is similar to smoking, 

only you'll inhale clean air. not poisonous 

gases. . 

When tempted to reach for a cigarette » 
think of a negative image about smoking. 
Select your worst memory connected 
with the habit — the time you burned a 
hole in your suit or when you were left 
completely breathless running for a bus 
that pulled away. Imagine this experience 
for 15 seconds whenever the urge occurs,^ 
;' Reward yourself with oral substitutes 
in the same way you may have used ciga- 
rettes. Good examples: sugarless gum. 
lemon drops, pumpkin or sunflower 
seeds, apple slices, carrot sticks, unbut- 
tered popcorn and stick cinnamon. 

Eat three or more small meals. This 
maintains constant blood sugar levels, 
thus helping to prevent urges to smoke. 
Avoid sugar-laden foods and spicy items 



We interrupt tliis 

semester witli ... 

BASKETBALL 

by James Moye 

It's that time again! Basketball season 
is looming and already the teams are 
practicing. 

Six players return to the men's squad 
from last year's team. These are: Joe 
Butts, Eric Banko, John Maresca, Dan 
Law. Dexter Manley and Jerry Skoda. 
The team is counting on the support of 
the fans at all the home games to keep 
them enthusiastic. 

Coach Werkiser has the men working 
out every day. getting ready to show 
their skills on the court. Senior Joe Butts 
is approaching his 1,000 points this sea- 
son. We are looking forward to seeing 
how the team shapes up and handles its 
opponents. 

The women's team returns most of its 
players. All- American Michelle Shirhan- 
dalso leads the veterans from last year's 
super squad: Rhonda Hill. Laura Rotz. 
Carla Marinetti and Lynn Gleisner. 

Last season, the women went to the 
playoffs, and although they were elimt» 
nated in the first round, we're looking for 
more of the power that made them excel 
in '87-'88. They feel they have a chance 
to win the MAC with the talent returning 
from last year and the quality of freshmen 
recruited by Coach Pento. 

But where each of us can help is in of- 
fering our support to these teams by 
coming out to cheer them on. Let's fill 
the stands and let our athletes know 
we're there. ?^ ^T i, ^ ''•''[ 

Good luck to both teams as they pre- 
pare for their seasons. . .„ ... 



that can trigger a desire for cigarettes. 

Cleanse your body of nicotine. Drink 
liquids — lots of them. Water (6-8 glasses 
a day), herbal teas, fruit juices and caf- 
feine-free soft drinks all fit the bill. Pass 
up coffee, caffeinated soft drinks and al- 
cohol, as they can increase your urge to 
smoke. ■'%'_' 

Keep your hands — and mind — busy. 
Work on a crossword puzzle, knit a 
sweater, balance your checkbook, fix 
something around the house. 



Open House appreciation 

The Admissions Staff would like to 
whole-heartedly thank all campus 
clubs and organizations who were on 
hand during Fall Open House to greet 
prospective DVC students. Thanks 
for helping to make our program the 
success that it was! 



Thanlcsgiving Food 

Cupboard loolcs for 

donations 

As the holiday season approaches, the 
members of the Interclub Council will be 
organizing various efforts in the holiday 
spirit that will gather food and small house- 
hold items for the less privileged residents 
of Bucks County. 

This Thanksgiving drive will include a 
collection day within the Doylestown 
community, donations from area mer- 
chants and from student groups, and 
."We're looking to our Del Val employees 
for assistance, too. 

On Wednesday. October 26, two col- 
lection boxes were placed on campus, 
one in Lasker Hall and one in the Student 
Center. Any donations can be placed in 
the box or you can call extension 2388 
and we'll arrange for someone to pick up 
your items. The drive will continue from 
now until November 17. 

ICC is working in conjunction with 
Mary's Cupboard, a community food 
distribution center for Archdiocesan 
Nutritional Devetopment Service, operat- 
ing as a social service to elderly, single 
parents with infants, the poor and the 
homeless of Bucks County. 

Any donations would be a wonderful 
help. In addition to the traditional Thanks- 
giving food items, Mary's Cupboard sug- 
gested some of the following: 

• redeemable coupons for non-food 
items, example: paper products or 
toiletries 

• baby products 

• can openers 

Remember to stop at a collection box 
in the lobby of Lasker Hall or the Student 
Center's Residence Life Office before 
November 17. 

Thanks for Giving! 



ZIEMERISM: 

Election '88 
Mind Your B's & Q's 



Floral Society Workshops 

November 10 - 7:00 - 9:00 p.m. 
"Designing with Foliage" 

Guest Speaker: Chris Ondrak. AIFD 

November 17 - 7:00 - 9:00 p.m. 
"Oriental Design Workshop" 

Guest Speaker: Michael De Rosa 

Bring corxtmner appropriate for 

oriental design if possible. 





lo)®Ikiwaa2^^aal]fl(g^ ©®flll®g® ^fiondlsmt^ lr^(S^j^7spQlp®ff 



Vol. XXIII. No. 7 



Wednesday, November 16, 1988 



NOTICE The opinions expressed in any individual article do not necessarily reflect the viewpoint of the paper or school 



Business seminars offered this month 



by Darren Samuel 

Students from Delaware Valley College 
attended a management seminar, given 
by Byrne Management Consultants of 
Jenkintown, on Wednesday. November 2. 

The seminar, offered to DelVal student 
at no charge, addressed time manage- 
ment and was led by Pat Sanaghan, 2) 
business consultant. He required each 
participant to choose a specific goal for 
the seminar, then shaped the seminar so 
these goals were accomplished. 

Time management problems are a daily 
occurrence in the workplace. This semi- 
nar focused on six aspects of time manage-, 
ment: defining personal time manage- 
ment style, analysis of what causes 
wasted time, effective delegation, con- 
quering procrastination, running focused * 
meetings that obtain results and develop- . 
ing an approach to time demands. 

A second seminar will be held Novem- 
ber 30. led by Pat Sanaghan and entitled 
Conflict Resolution, it will teach the parti- 

The Great American 

Smokeoutfact sheet' 

1988 

The Great American Smokeout is held 
each year on the third Thursday in No- >' 
vember. This year's date is Thursday, 
November 17. The event, now 12 years 
old, is sponsored by the American Cancer 
Society, but thousands of other organ!- ^• 
zations, businesses, schools, and hospitals, 
in addition to millions of individuals, join ' 
the nationwide effort. 

The Smokeout is an upbeat, good- 
natured effort to encourage smokers to 
give up cigarettes for 24 hours. It focuses 
supportive attention on cigarette smokers 
from coast to coast, and nonsmokers join 
in the fun. helping them to quit for the 
day. 

The goal of the 1988 Great American 
Smokeout is to get at least one in every 
five smokers to give up cigarettes from 

continued on page 4 



cipants to solve problems in their business 
and personal lives, with participants 
achieving five general goals in addition to 
their individual purposes. They will also 
learn to define their personal style to 
conflict resolution, identify the primary 
sources of conflicts in the workplace, 
communicate clearly, verbally manage 
conflict effectively, expand their responses 
to conflict and become more flexible in 
resolving conflicts. It is a seminar to 
benefit students in the business disciplines 
and in the other majors. 

1 found the first seminar to be well 
worth the time invested, and encourage 
students to consider attending the second 
seminar. It will be held at Williamson's 
Restaurant. Route 611 in Horsham, from 
9a.m. to 4 p.m. There are two openings 
available, ro, if you feel like investing 
some time in your future, reserve a posi- 
tion for yourself now. Contact Darren 
Samuel at 884-1742 or in the off -campus 
mailbox. 

R.A. applications 
available 

Every November the Residence Life 
Office begins its search for male and fe- 
male students who fit the multi-faceted 
role of a Resident Assistant (R.A.). The 
R A. is a paraprofessional position offer- 
ing practical job experience that will at- 
tract future employers. Learning through 
leadership, interp>ersonal and organiza- 
tional communication, abng with lecture 
programs on current issues and personal 
skill, are several of the advantages of this 
position. 

An R.A. applicant must have lived on 
the DVC campus for at least one semester 
and have a GPA of at least 2.0. R.A.s 
are hired for one semester, with renewals 
based on overall performance. Delaware 
Valley^ College provides the Resident 
Assistant with a room at no charge, plus 
a minimum salary of $300.00 for first 
time R.A.s. * 



On campus 

WEDNESDAY. NOVEMBER 16 

Lip Sync Competition, 8-10:30 p.m 

Women's Basketball (H) vs 
Muhlenberg 

THURSDAY. NOVEMBER 17 

FFA Day in APR, 9 a.m. -2 p.m. 
Smith and Mayer, 9 p.m.-l a.m. 

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 18 

Wrestling (A) vs Villanova, Eastern 
and LaSalle, 7 p.m. 

Men's Basketball (A) vs Widener 
Tournament 

Starting today: 20-hour Dance 
Marathon to benefit A-Day 

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 19 

Women's Basketball (H) vs Wilke«. 
College, 1 p.m. 

Men's EJasketball (A) vs Widener 
Tournament 

SUNDAY. NOVEMBER 20 

DVC's 15 Annual Turkey Trot, 2 p.m. 

MONDAY, NOVEMBER 21 

Movie: "The Serpent and the Rainbow," 
APR, 9 p.m 

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 22 

Women's Basketball (H) vs Trenton 

State, 6:30 p.m 

Thanksgiving Recess begins 4 p.m. 

MONDAY, NOVEMBER 28 

Classes Resume 8:30 a.m. 

Men's Basketball (H) vs King's College 

TUESDAY. NOVEMBER 29 

Women's Basketball (H) vs Upsala 
College, 7pm 

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 30 

Men's Basketball (A) vs F.D.U.. ' 
7:30 pm. 



If you want to accept a challenge — 
pick up an application and reference forms 
at the Residence Life Office in the Student 
Center beginning on Friday, November 
18, 1988. The final day for returning all 
completed forms is Friday, December 9, 
1988. Late applications will not be ac- 
cepted. Applicants will be notified early 
next semester for interviews. 

Feel free to talk with a Resident Assis- 
tant or stop in the Residence Life Office 
for further information. 



Dear Editors 



Dear Editors, 

As election day comes and goes, one 
can only say, "Thank goodness it's over" 
and we can begin to wash away the mud 
we've been covered in most of this year. 
It's the end of a long campaign, a cam- 
paign characterized by negativity. Voters 
are getting more information about what 
a candidate's opponent didn't do, instead 
of what the candidate will do if elected. 

The '88 elections have been overrun 
by the unprecedented use of nasty com- 
mercials. The sad truth is that they are 
becoming increasingly effective. 

Since the 1960 Presidential elections 
between Kennedy and Nixon, television 
has functioned as the number one medi- 
um between candidates and voters. In 
the early years, television advertising was 
well-constructed with good taste, yet hard- 
hitting honesty. There is no detenent to- 
day. Now, it's manly to attack first and 
wimpish if you don't respond. It seems 
the attack ad will be here for a long time 
unless the public speaks out against it. It's 
become "part of the wallpaper of presi- 
dential politics," in the words of Vice- 
Presidential hopeful, Lloyd Bentsen. For 
months TV. screens have been flooded 
with images of filth (Boston Harbor) , 
human flotsam (criminals in a revolving 
door), flimflammers (actors posing as 
packagers for George Bush) coupled 
with questionable claims on both sides. 

It is my opinion that these do harm to 
all voters. They are simply games played 
on our emotions and fears. This election 
I've seen plays on racial, ideological and 
moral fears. George Bush used the 
American public's fear of the Russians to 
paint a picture of inexperience in Michael 
Dukakis. Dukakis did the same with Dan 
Quayle. 

When we go to the polls each electioh. 
it should be to vote for the candidate 
who best exemplifies our goals and ideals 
for this country — not to vote against 
another candidate for some prejudice 
caused by the mudslinging and subliminal 



STAFF 

Ed/fors-in-Chie/ Kathleen L. Stasney 
Loretta F. Skibowski 

Reporters Fred Newton, 

Tony Palumbo, Ty McSherry, 

Frank Reich, James Moye 

Shaun Smith 

Photography Dave Stomp, 

Laurent Lanee 

Advisors Joe Ferry, 

Anne Biggs, Mr. Edward O'Brien, 
Dr. Richard Ziemer 



seduction of naive voters. These negative 
ads hide the issues in filth . Let's stop par- 
ticipating in the mud wrestling and clean 
up politics! 

Hakim Richard Savoy 

Horticulture helps smokers 

The GREAT AMERICAN SMOKE- 
OUT, sponsored by the American Cancer 
Society, will be held on November 17. 
The Horticulture Department will supply 
apples and information in the Ag. Building 
at a "Survival Station" for all those par- 
ticipating in the SMOKEOUT. The Hor- 
ticulture Department is also supplying 
apples to the survival station in the Bucks 
County Courthouse. 

Hot items at the 
student store 

To soothe those early morning hunger 
pangs why not pick up a box of Pop-tarts? 
Several varieties to choose from . Instant 
hot chocolate will warm your inners 
before class too. For in-between class 
snacks, we have Cup-O-Noodles. or 
Landis' Peanut Butter and Ritz crackers. 
For that late snack we have Micro-wave 
Popcorn, or try a bag of Nachos, regularly 
$1.59 on sale for $.99. 

All stuffed animals are on sale at 25% 
off. Now's the time to stock up on Christ- 
mas gifts for all the little munchkins on 
your list. 

We now have two SALE RACKS. 
Maybe that sweatshirt you've been want- 
ing is on sale. Check it out. 

NEW CLOTHING ITEMS ARE: Polar- 
fleece zip jackets in gray, white or forest 
green. Gold, gray and green sweatshirts 
with matching pants and a great new 
100% cotton sweater, 

Don't forget to check out our Thanks- ' 
giving Day cards. Far Side cards, books 
and calendars. 

If you have suggestions, we'd like to 
hear them! Happy Thanksgiving to all 
students, faculty and staff! 



UPCOMING 

from the Student Store 

Hoida\; Midnight 

Madness Sale! 

Date, time and location 

to be announced! 

SAVE YOUR $$$ & CCC 

Do all your Christmas shopping 

in one night and SAVE $$$ too! 



President's Hot Line 
DVC - 1 replies 

from Russell K. Schulz. 

Vice President, Operations 
. . . Glad you liked Pasta Night! Steve 
Kline and his "team" appreciate your 
comments. 

... As soon as we got your call, the 
Elson Hall soda machine was refilled. 
Thanks. 

. . . We removed the old candy ma- 
chine from the hallway of Elson. Who- 
ever smashed the machine in the first 
place is not a DVC team member! Let's 
do better in the future. 

. . . Concerning your library: We are 
examining the DVC library hours of 
operation. By the number of calls re- 
ceived, it is apparent we are not meet- 
ing your needs completely. 

. . . We're sorry, the ginko trees do 
have a distinct odor. We will keep the 
walkways as clean as possible. 

. , . We will have the pay phone on 
the second floor of Barness fixed. 
ASAP. 

. . .To the senior who called in about 
"social etiquette." Yes, you. should 
know which fork to use first, how to 
dress and certain things not to say 
during a job interview We're boking 
into this suggestion. 



Bring in the Terminator 

by Neil A, Bittner 

Or is it the exterminator? 

Don't you just love it when you are sit- 
., ting at your desk and a very pesty fly 
buzzes all around you? It's worse when 
you are sleeping and the six-legged, 
winged creature crawls all over your face, 
in your ears or up your nostrils. 

Don't leave food in the trash or exposed 
or you'll hear the clattering march of a 
whole battallion of, yes, ants! They will 
jump right on that piece of grub and pig 
out (or is it ant out?) . What you probably 
really hate is when you're studying and 
eating at the same time (some probably 
find this sequence hard to do), anyway, 
you set down your chocolate chip cookie, 
write something down, pick it up again, 
and it has become a chocolate chip ANT 
cookie (MMMM). 

Living with ants is great. It adds a new 
dimension to our lives. They only tough 
part they have in living with us humans is 
that they have to crawl over the carpet 
which is very cumbersome for them. 

Great little article, isn't it? Well, truth- 
fully I don't like living with ants. Maybe 

continued on page 4 



Agribusiness firm seeks 
grads from Ag, majors 

Agway Inc., a farm supply and food 
marketing cooperative, will seek 60 or 
more 1989 college graduates, with most 
of the new personnel being recruited from 
the 14 agricultural colleges in the north- 
east. 

This was one message given educators 
and Agway people at the cooperative's 
annual meeting, held October 27-28 in 
Syracuse. N.Y. Susan Cromwell, mana- 
ger for Recruitment and Management 
Development for the firm, anticipates an 
increasing demand for personnel over 
the next few years. x 

Dr. John H. Avery, chairman of the 
Agribusiness Department, participated 
with a dozen agricultural educators from 
seven colleges in the region in the oriefi- . 
tation program held during Agway's an- 
nual meeting. Their purpose was to learn 
more about the characteristics of person- 
nel and desired educational preparation 
for those seeking a place in the Agway 
Management Development Program. 

Gene Fried, director of training for the 
program, emphasized the importance of 
developing a comprehensive background 
in agriculture, written and verbal com- 
munication skills, the ability to delegate 
responsibility and the willingness to work 
on a team. 

The educators had an opportunity to 
observe recent college graduates who are 
in the Management Development Pro- 
gram during a communications skills 
workshop the trainees participated in. 
Former students and college personnel 
met together and discussed ideas for 
strengthening student success and 
achievements in the program. The 
students suggested that the institutions 
place a stronger emphasis on communi- 
cations skills and expect an even higher 
level of accomplishment in most courses. 

Current graduates of Delaware Valley 
College in the program are Clay Butter- 
worth, Connie Hajioannou and Beth Karr 
in Business Administration; Rebecca Rice 
in Dairy Husbandry: Carolyn Lehman 
and Kim Lunger in Animal Husbandry: 
and Joseph Ryan in Agribusiness. 

Agway Inc. was ranked 132 in the 
1988 Fortune 500 list of corporations. 



Floral Society Workshops 

November 17 - 7:00 - 9:00 p.m. 
"Oriental Design Workshop" 

Guest Speaker: Michael De Rosa 

Bring container appropriate for 

oriental design if possible. 

Meeting: November 29 



Buenos Dias! Bonjourl 
Guten Tag! Hello! Sayonara! 
This Week . . . CAMEROON 

by Hubert Noutchogouin 
with Laurent Lanee 

PART U 

Agriculture is the mainstay of Came- 
roon's economy, it provides a living for 
80% of the population and accounts for 
over half of all export earnings. Came- 
roon is one of the few African countries 
to be a net food exporter. Cocoa and 
coffee are the main cash crops. Other ex- 

"Is include timber, aluminum, cotton, 
-al rubber, bananas, peanuts, tobacco 
a. a. 

O. . duction in Cameroon is becom- 
ing more ^nd more important; it was five 
million t is (100,000/barrels/day) in 
1982. but the government has a policy of 
underpaying the significance of the oil 
sector to avoid pressures for faster eco- 
nomic development which would easily 
lead to overheating of the economy and 
neglect of the agriculture sector. Came- 
roon remains one of the soundest econo- 
mics in sub-Suharan Africa, with one of 
the best potentials for balanced growth. 

Parents may select either the French of 
the English school system for their children 
until the end of high school. At the uni- 
versity level, only the French system re- 
mains, but French and English languages 
are used in teaching. 

French and English are the official 
languages of Cameroon, although there 
are 24 major African language groups. 
The four-fifths/one-fifth demographic 
division seems to be a relatively accurate 
representation of the French/English split 
within Cameroon. 

Cameroonian diet depends upon the 
social level of people: the upper class 
tends to consume foreign dishes, whereas, 
the lower class eats mainly dishes mad,e 
with the regional products. 

During their spare time, Cameroonian 
teenagers enjoy playing soccer, running 
track and field and swimming. Tennis is 
played mostly in the upper social classes. 
The sport heroes are soccer player. Roger 
Milla, who plays in the French league 
and the world renowned tennis cham- 
pion, Yannick Noah, who plays under 
the French flag. 

Older people enjoy the same pastimes 
found in Western countries, such as go- 
ing to the movies, watching T.V., etc. 
There is no drinking age in Cameroon: 
everyone is able to get akroholic beverages 
in a bar, but the voting age remains at 18. 

is it worth a transatlantic flight just to 
enter a bar at any age? We can reap two 
of Cameroon's benefits by knowing 
Hubert and Caroline Nkuo. 



ZIEMERISM 

Eunuch: an ancient 
^'have-not" 



Intramural volles;ball 
champions 

Nobody beats "Layin' Pipe" 

Dan Lee 

, Dave Stomp 

Curtis Cooper 

Steve Nguyen 

Frank Filar — Captain 

Bob Solly 



Placement Office Events 

Job Search Worlcshop 

Thursday, November 17 
"All December graduates" 
7:30 - 8:30 p.m. 
Segal Hall Conference Room 

TWA Recreational Service. Inc. 

Presentation 

Wednesday, November 30 

Sign up in Placement Office 

7:30 p.m. 

Student Center, Room 201 

TWA Recreational Services, inc. 

Interviews 

Summer Internships: Food & Business 
major: sign up for interview time in 
Placement Office. 

TEMPORARY JOBS: The Place 
ment Office has been receiving many 
temporary jobs for over winter break. 
If you want to earn extra money over 
break, stop by the Placement Office 
for further details. 



NEW BR TAIN INN 

"Del Vol's home o\^^y from home" 

SUN. NIGHT: DJ and Dancing 

MON. NIGHT: Steamers - 
$1,95/Dozen 

TUES. NIGHT: Import Night - 
Most$1.25/Bottle 

WED. NIGHT: $1,25 Cheese 
Steak Night 

THURS. NIGHT: DJ and Dancing 

FRI. NIGHT: DJ and Dancing 

SAT. NIGHT: Live entertainment 

Seofood & Sondwiches 

All Items to Go! 

Rt. 202 • New Britain, PA 
348-1968 



Top 50 countdown 



1 . Stairway To Heaven 


Zepplin 


2. Sweet Child O Mine 


Guns n Roses 


3 Red Red Wine 


UB40 


4. Love Bites 


Dcf Leppard 


5. Pour Some Sugar On Me 


Def Leppard 


6. Southern Cross Crosby, Stills and Nash 


7. Hotel CaUfornia 


Eagles 


8. Groovy Kind Of Love 


Phil Collins 


9. Wild Wild West 


Escape Club 


10. Freebird 


Skynyrd 


1 1 . Wasted On The Way Crosby, Stills and Nash 


12. Bad Medicine 


Bon Jovi 


13. Neuer Gonna Let You Go 


Rick Astley 


14. Rough Boy 


ZZTop 


15. Teach Your Children 


CSNY 


16. ru)isf& Shout 


Beatles 


17. You Shook Me /\;; Night L 


ong AC/DC 


18. American Pie 




19. Doing The Butt 


EMO 


20. Pnde 


U2 


21. When It's Love 


VanHalen 


22. Angel 


Aerosmith 


23. B/ue Eyes 


Elton John 


24. Flame 


Cheaptrick 


25 Rog Do/; 


Aerosmith 


26. Roxanne 


Police 


27. Crocodi/e Rock 


Elton John 


28. Born 7o Be IVi/d - . 


Steppen Wolf 


29. You 'ye Lost That Loving Feeling 




Righteous Brothers 


30. IVhere The Streets Have No Name U2 


3\ . Tunnel Of Love 


Bruce Springsteen 


32. Who Are You *^ ' 


WHO 


33. Loue The One You're With 


CSN 


34. Jumping Jack Flash 


WHO 


35 /'// /\/u;ays Loue You 


Taylor Dain€ 


36. Fire & Rain 


James Taylor- 


37. Cocomo ■ • 


Beach Boys 


38. Bom To Run 


Bruce Springsteen 


39. Tom Sawyer 


Rush 


40 Add It Up 


Violent Femmes 


41 Rock 0/ Ages 


Def Leppard 


42 Saturdov Nights A// Right For A Fight 




Elton John 


43. Shake Me 


Cinderella 


44. Country Boy Can Suruiue 


Hank Williams Jr. 


45. Sledge Hammer 


Peter Gabriel 


46. Someu)here Out There 




LiRda Ronstadt/James Ingram 


47. Against A/I Odds 


Phil Collins 


48. For Whom The Bell Tolls 


Metallica 


49. Imagine 


JohnLennon 


50. Su;eet Home A/aboma '■ 


;, Skynyrd 


Terminator . . . 




continued from page 2 





aunts, but not ants! It's ridiculous! Why 
not let the ants live where they are now 
and build a new place for me to live. Or,, 
use a wrecking ball on their p' -^ and 
build a new residence for me on the same 
spot. Why maintain a building that just 
wants to die? Pull its plug and replace it 
with a new socket, the socket being a 
whole new modern structure. Sure, put 
money for maintenance into Lasker Hall 
to preserve the beautiful building, but 
give the residents of Wolfsohn and Elson 
hall a better place to live. PLEASE! Next 
week more on the college dormitory para- 
dise, where everyone wants to live: 
WOLFSOHN HALL. 



Smokeout ... 

continued from page 1 

midnight to midnight on Thursday. No- 
vember 17. Anyone getting a late start 
on Thursday can extend the 24-hour 
period as long as necessary past the mid- 
night deadline to get in a full day. It's 
great when smokers can prove to them- 
selves that they can reach the goal of 24 
hours of abstinence. 

For Smokeout '88, smokers are urged 
to "Take a Breather." This helpful sug- 
gestion is offered to smokers on every- 
thing from T-shirts to payroll stuffers. In 
addition to the familiar programs such as 
quit-smoking clinics, "Cold Turkey" lun- 
cheons and "Run Your Butts Off" races, 
there is a humorous new GAS postcard, 
a novel "I'm a Born Nonsmoker" baby 
T-shirt and two brand new buttons. One 
reads: "Nonsmoker in progress, please 
be patient;" the other ~ with a Teddy 
bear logo — says: "I've quit smoking. 
Please bear with me." 

Atlantic City trip to Caesars 

Sponsored bi; the Delaware Valle}; 
College Busmess Club 
Date: Friday. December 9. 1988 
Time: Bus leaves at 5:00 p.m. from 
DVC to Caesars with an hour min- 
imal stay. 
Cost: $10.00 which will be refunded 
upon arrival in coins and deferred 
vouchers. 
Note: Must be 21 or older. Free refresh- 
ments on the bus. 
If interested, please contact John Burk- 
hardt (Cooke 222), Bill DeMarco (Cooke 
210) or Dr. Handler. 







YELLOWSTONI 



Positions in tlie hospitality industry available 
in Yellowstone National Park. Entry-level and 
mid-level positions in areas such as: 



• ACCOUNTING 

• FRONT OFFICE 

• LAUNDRY 

• KITCHEN 

• HOUSEKEEPING 



•COOKING 

• SECURITY 

• MAINTENANCE 

• RESERVATIONS 

• FOOD SERVICE 



• RETAIL MERCHANDISING 

Housing available 

No facilities for families or pets 

Minimum age of 18 

Preference given to applicants available 

mid-May through late September 

Equal Opportunity Employer 

' Representatives will be on campus 

Wed., November 30, Presentation: 7;30 p.m. 
Thurs., Deceml)er 1, Interviews: 9a.in.-4p.m. 

FOR MORE INFORMATION AND 
APPLICATION CONTACT: 
The DVC Placement Offkc or 

, V«A«IIECREATIONAiBH 

' I WSERVICESJNC. 

c/o Employment Office 

Yellowstone National Park, WY 82190 

(307) 344-7901, ex. 5323 or (406) 848-7481 




Student Financial Aid Office announces 

$5000 in scholarships made 
available by Sire Power 



: TUNKHANNOCK, Pa. - the board 
of directors of the Maryland Sales Division 
of Sire Power announces the initiation of 
a scholarship program to help deserving 
youth living in the Maryland Sales Divi- 
sion area to continue their college educa- 
tion in agricultural related fields. A total 
of $2,(XX).00 in scholarships will be made 
available, ranging from $250.00 to 
$500.00 per semester. These scholar- 
ships will be awarded at the 1989 Sire 
Power annual meeting which will be held 
in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, on Tuesday, 
January 24. 1989. 

The eligibility requirements for these 
scholarships are as follows: 

1. The applicant must be a college 
sophomore, junior, senior or graduate 
student. 



2. The applicant, his/her parents or 
guardians must be a member of the 
Maryland Sales Division of Sire Power. 

3. The scholarships will be awarded to 
students continuing their education in an 
agricultural related field. 

4. Previous scholarship award winners 
will remain eligible during subsequent 
years. 

The continuing education of our youth 
is very important to the Maryland Sales 
Division board of directors and Sire Power 
management. To receive a scholarship 
application form, interested students 
should write or call: Ted Ridgely, Mary- 
land Sales & Service director. Sire Power. 
Inc., P.O. Box 555, Frederick, Maryland 
21701, phone: (301) 898-9101. 

Deadline to submit applications is De- 
cember 1. 1988. 





]l)®lklWSlJ?®^aQflIl(S^ (g®flll®g(g ^CtH(S®DQt^ Kl(§^RfSpQIP®ff 



Vol. XXIII. No. 8 Wednesday. November 30. 1988 

NOTICE The opinions expressed in any individual article do not necessarily reflect the viewpoint of the paper or school 



Visitors on campus 
from U.S.S.R. 

byRickKulp 

Dr. Avery and his Agribusiness Man- 
agement class enjoyed a valuable cross- 
cultural experience on Monday, Novem- 
ber 7. when they were visited by two 
brothers from the Soviet Union. Boris 
Kantorovich. the elder brother, is an 
agricultural engineer at a 10.000 animal 
collective beef farm near Leningrad, 
. Russia. Vlad Kantor, who has American- 
ized his name, is a U.S. citizen and an in- 
dustrial engineer for Moore Products in 
Springhouse. 

After touring the local Bishcroft and 
Bodder dairy farms in the morning. Dr. 
Avery and the Kantoroviches added a lit- 
: tie surprise to the usually routine Mon- 
day afternoon class. The class responded 
by engaging in almost an hour long two- 
way discussion about the differences be- 
tween the U.S. and Soviet agriculture 
and every day life. With the Bishop and 
Bodder farms fresh in his mind. Boris 
stated that seeing the computerized stan- 
chion feeding systems used at both farms 
made his whole trip to the U.S. worth- 
while. Boris was quick to add that Soviet 
agriculture is light years behind the U.S. 

Boris attributed the depressed state of 
Soviet agriculture to the highly centralized 
decision making of the government. Boris 
states that "the Soviet way of farming is 
exactly how not to farm." He does believe 
Gorbachev would like to see Soviet agri- 
culture move toward smaller, more pro- 
ductive, family oriented farms. One ex- 
ample he gave was when the government 
purchased 1.000 silos from the U.S. and 
they turned out to be useless because the 
extreme cold weather caused the con- 
tents to freeze solid . Another example of 
low Soviet productivity is their dairy cow 
production. An average dairy cow in the 
Soviet Union produces 6. (XX) to 7.000 
lbs. of milk per year. Boris called Kevin 
Bodder's cows, which average 18,000 
lbs. , "super cows." and could not believe 

Please see page 3 




Dr John Avery. Vlad Kantor and Boris Kantorovich 



2 new members selected 
for Board of Trustees 

Two individuals with national reputa- 
tions — one as a horticulturalist, the 
other as a builder — have been selected 
for the Delaware Valley College Board of 
Trustees. 

J. Liddon Pennock, from Meadow- 
brook. Pa., and Donald 0. Stein, from 
New York, were unanimously approved 
for inclusion on the board at a recent 
meeting of the trustees. 

"We are very pleased to have two 
gentlemen of such high stature agree to 
join our board," said President Rorer. 
"Both men will be instrumental in help- 
ing us reach our goals on both a short- 
and long-term basis." 

Pennock has been an active member 
of many Philadelphia-area cultural and 
civic organizations. He currently serves 
as vice chairman and member of the Ex- 
ecutive Committee of the Pennsylvania 
Horticultural Society, which sponsors the 
Philadelphia Flower Show, the largest in- 
door show in the world. He is also presi- 
dent and a member of the Board of 



Trustees of the Academy of Music as well 
as of the Philadelphia Orchestra. 

Pennock also serves on the Advisory 
Committee to Longwood Gardens and is 
an Advisory Board Member of the Morris 
Arboretum of the University of Pennsyl- 
vania, two of the most well-known horti- 
cultural display institutions in the area. 
Pennock is past-chairman of the Members 
at Large of the Garden Club of America 
and is a life member of the Philadelphia 
Society for Promoting Agriculture. 

Please see page 2 

SantaLines 
are coming to town! 

Arriving in the December 14 issue just 
in time to keep you company for Finals 
are this year's SantaLines. At 25C each 
(25 words maximum) or five for $1, tell 
someone you care about how you feel, 
say a Merry Christmas to a prof, share 
some words of wisdom with your co- 
miserables during Finals week. 

SantaLines will be on sale (cash only!) 
in the Dining Hall at lunchtime on Thurs- 
day, December 1 and Tuesday, Decem- 
ber 6. Plan now what you can send! 



Dear Editors 

Dear Editors, 

Concerning the New Alann System 

I live in Berkowitz and feel that many 
of the girls here are giving the administra- 
tion a bum rap. It seems the girls are not 
being particularly understanding. 

The general feeling is that the system is 
a good idea, but we would have liked to 
have been consulted or at least told 
about it before it happened. As it is, we 
realize that the system will not be removed 
but we would like for the administration 
to listen to our side of the deal. 

We would like to have the alarm sys- 
tem on when the core keys would be used 
(from 12-6, as we understand), but to 
have it turned off on major moving days. 

What about the core key system? It 
seems that it can easily break down. Is 
there any way that it can be permanently 
fixed? 



On campus 

WEDNESDAY. NOVEMBER 30 ' 

Men's Basketball (A) vs. FDU, 
7:30 p.m. 

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 1 

Women's Basketball (A) vs. I>ew 

University, 7 pm. 

SantaLines sold in Dining Hall at lunch. 

SATURDAY. DECEMBER 3 

Stock Seat Horse Show at Open Gate 
Farm In New Ringgold, Pa., 9 a.m. 
Wrestling (A) York Tournament, 
11:30 a.m. 

Men's Basketball (H) vs. Albrighl 
College. 2 p.m. 

MONDAY. DECEMBER 5 

Women's Basketball (H) vs. Moravian 
College, 7 p.m 

TUESDAY. DECEMBER 6 

Men's Basketball (H) vs. Elizabethtown 

College, 8 p m. 

SantaLines sold in Dining Hall at lunch. 

WEDNESDAY. DECEMBER 7 

Wrestling (H) vs. Swarthmorc and". * 
Delaware College, 7 p.m. 



STAFF 

£ditors-/n-Cfne/ Kathleen L. Stasney 
Loretta F. Skibowski 

Reporters Fred Newton. 

Tony Palumbo, Ty McSherry. 

Frank Reich. James Moye 

Shaun Smith 

Photography Dave Stomp, 

Laurent Lanee 

Advisors Joe Ferry, 

Anne Biggs, Mr. Edward O'Brien. 
Dr. Richard Ziemer 



At least two other residents feel as I do 
that the inconvenience is worthwhile if 
the alarm system makes things safer for 
us here in the dorm. 

Kathleen Stasney 
New Board members ... 

continued from page 1 

Pennock currently serves as President 
of The Philadelphia Flower Show, Inc. , a 
private foundation which provides finan- 
cial support for horticultural projects 
which benefit the Philadelphia region. 

Stein is a partner in the firm of S/A 
Associates, a builder, developer and 
owner of office buildings, hotels, con- 
dominium apartments and townhouses 
on the East Coast. He has been involved 
in real estate development for over 35 
years. 

Stein is also vice chairman of Newport 
Hotels, a management company with 
more than 1,200 rooms in seven hotels. 
He also serves as President of Anchorage 
Woods Construction Company, the build- 
ing contractors arm of S/A Associates. 

Stein, who lives in Sands Point, New 
York, received his Bachelor of Science 
degree in Mechanical and Civil Engineer- 
ing from the University of California at 
Los Angeles in 1949. 

All trustees serve on at least one, and 
sometimes two, board committees. Ac- 
cording to Rorer, Stein and Pennock will 
both serve on the Physical Plant and 
Agriculture Committee. 

From the desk 
of the Ambassador 

by Brad A. Bittner 

Yes, fellow Aggies and other interested 
readers, the Agronomy Department of 
DVC has taken a giant step forward in 
the name of education . What have they 
done you might ask? One could say they 
did a little housecleaning. The depart- 
ment is now aptly named Agronomy and 
Environmental Science. 

The reason for the name change is to 
better describe the programs we actually 
have, instead of leading one to believe 
we only teach about soils and field crops 
— the definition of "agronomy." 

The program's strong point is still the 
basic soil sciences, but this has been ex- 
panded from the current turf grass spe- 
cializations into a soils and environmental 
science specialization. This new special- 
ization and the current turf and field 
crops specializations make up a well- 
rounded program challenging anyone 
who pursues this major. 

Department chairman Larry Hepner 
described the program's structure as 
follows: 



ZIEMERISM 

Happy Hour: 
social sudsing 




J Liddon Pennock 




Donald 0. Stein 




Required Major Credits 


28 


Elective Major Credits 


15 


Free Elective Credits 


15 


Employment Program 


4 


Other Required Credits 


23 


Core Credits 


47 


TOTAL CREDITS 


132 



There is also a 15-credit agronomy 
minor offered for those who may be inter- 
ested in this rewarding field of agriculture. 

Beyond survey of agriculture, one 
should explore his neighbor's major 
more thoroughly and gain a deeper ap- 
preciation for other majors on campus. 
Why not start with Agronomy and Envi- 
ronmental Science? I'm sure Mr. Hepner, 
Mr. Claycomb, Dr. Palkovics, Mr. Bailey 
or any Agronomy and Environmental 
Science major, would be happy to let 
you in on a good thing. 

Any commer)ts. cor^cerns or questior)s 
or\ this article or ar)y other campus prob- 
lem that you would like addressed can be 
directed to Box 514. 



President's Hot Line 
DVC - 1 replies 

from the desk of Vice President. 

Operations — Russell K. Schulz 

... A student has been necessarily re- 
located from one dorm to another. In 
this case, we encouraged adult behav- 
ior and did not see any positive results 
so the relocation was accomplished. 

. . . We are examining all exterior door 
locks on Elson. Samuel and Goldman. 
This week we will install a new alarm 
system on the exterior doors of Berko- 
witz. This new system will greatly en- 
hance this dorm's security. 

. . . We appreciate confidential calls 
addressing students who appear to 
have drug and/or alcohol problems. 
We are often able to make contact 
and help the individuals get profes- 
sional treatment. 

. . . When Security sees a vehicle ille- 
gally parked in any location — espe- 
cially a HANDICAPPED area - the 
vehicle is issued a ticket. We have had 
a few students violate the "reserved 
parking" adjacent to Segal Building 
and their vehicles have been towed 
away. Read and heed! 

. . . Thank you for the compliments 
on the dining service. We like know- 
ing you all enjoy the QUARTER 
POUNDERS ON A ROLL. FRIES. 
ROAST BEEF AND LINGUINE. 

... If you request a room in the Stu- 
dent Center and it is available, it will 
be approved on the spot. Should any 
problems arise concerning assigning 
club rooms, contact Dean Graver. 



Talk on pre-vet guidelines 

by Patrick Flynn 

There will be a meeting of particular 
Interest ot those students interested in 
veterinary school on December 1 in the 
Music Room. Dr. Purdy, the school's 
new veterinarian, will be speaking on 
guidelines for the pre-vet students to con- 
sider in their quest for the all-important 
DVM. A graduate of the University of 
Pennsylvania, Dr. Purdy should have 
many pearls of knowledge to cast to us, 
as well as suggestions for avoiding com- 
mon pitfalls. 

The talk will begin at 7 p.m. and will 
be followed by a question -and -answer 
period . The Lab Animal Club is sponsor- 
ing the meeting, but it will be open to 
Biology majors and all others who are 
interested . 




Bruce Brown of W. W Smith Charitable Trust exp/ains the scholarship prograrr} to Robert Sauer. Director of 
Financial Aid: Dr John Mertz. Vice President. Academic Affairs: and President W H Rorer III 



DVC receives 

DelVal has been awarded a $40,000 
grant from the WW. Smith Charitable 
Trust to be used for student financial aid 
during the 1988-89 academic year. 

This marks the eighth year in a row 
that the WW. Smith Charitable Trust 
has supported the College financial aid 
program. This year's grant represents a 
$10,000 increase over last year's grant. 

The money will be distributed to stu- 
dents based on academic achievement 
and financial need. The minimum size of 
each grant is $1,000, with a maximum 
of $2,500. Grants are made to the same 
student for two or more years to encour- 
age continuity and recognition. 

Visitors on campus ... 

continued from page 1 

that American dairy farmers send culled 
heavy producing cows to the butcher. 

Vlad and Boris also answered ques- 
tions about general cultural differences. 
The class was shocked when they learned 
that 80 percent of a Soviet citizen's earn- 
ings go toward food. Boris, who is paid 
approximately $100 twice a month, would 
spend $80 of that to feed his family. 
Boris has one daughter, age 17, and one 
son who is 25 and works in the computer 
field. Boris also stated the way to become 
more important in the Soviet Union is to 
involve yourself with the party, but he 
says he is an engineer and doesn't wish 
to become involved politically. 

Vlad mentioned that his brother's curi- 
osity might lead one to believe he was a 
spy if he asked so many questions about 
topics other than agriculture. Kevin Bod- 
der agreed: "Boris asked questions con- 
tinuously" while at the farm . Bodder en- 
joyed the brothers' visit thoroughly add- 
ing "It was like showing a little kid around 
my farm." Bodder hoped to see them 
return to visit again. The Agribusiness 
Management class also enjoyed this 
great cross-cultural opportunity. 



scholarship grant 



"We arc pleased to receive this grant 
from the WW. Smith Charitable Trust," 
said Robert Sauer, Director of Financial 
Aid. "We make every attempt to assist 
each student as much as we possibly can 
in meeting the costs of a higher educa- 
tion. With the generous help of the 
W.W. Smith Charitable Trust we can 
continue to offer financial aid packages 
which help ease the burden on our 
students." 

The WW. Smith Charitable Trust pro- 
vides financial assistance for scholarship 
programs, heart disease, cancer and 
AIDS scientific research projects, and 
human needs in and around the Phila- 
delphia area. 

A total of 40 students from DelVal are 
receiving WW. Smith Scholarships for 
the 1988-89 academic year. Those reci- 
pients were recognized at a luncheon 
held in the College's Student Center. 



NEW BRITAIN INN 

"Del Vol's home owoy from home" 

SUN. NIGHT: DJ and Dancing 

MON. NIGHT: Steamers - 
$1.95/Dozen 

TUES. NIGHT: Import Night - 
Most$125/Bottle 

WED. NIGHT: $1.25 Cheese 
Steak Night 

THURS. NIGHT: DJ and Dancing 

FRI. NIGHT: DJ and Dancing 

SAT. NIGHT: Live entertainment 

Seafood & Sandwiches 

All Items to Go! 

Rt. 202 • New Britain. PA 
348-1968 



Campus lighting planned 

Where are lights needed on campus? 
For security ... for safety ... for aesthe- 
tics . . . the Administration would like 
your opinions as it plans new and up- 
graded lighting campus- wide. 

Please respond with your suggestions 
to Ram Pages Box 917 in the Post Of- 
fice, one of the Suggestion Boxes in the 
Dining Hall or the Pub, or the Ram 
Pages editors in Berk 103. 

it is important to the Administration 
that you who use the campus facilities 
most take this opportunity to give some 
guidance to the decision of where light- 
ing will be placed. 

Beekeeping students 
speak at honey show 

The Annual Bucks County Honey 
Show was held Thursday. November 10 
at the College, sponsored by the Bucks 
County Beekeepers Association in con- 
junction with the College and the Col- 
lege's student Beekeeping Club. 

The show was judged by Dr. Robert 
Berthold, beekeeping specialist, assisted 
by students from the Club. 

The association's program for the 
evening included presentations to the 
bee association by members of the Col- 
lege Beekeeping Club who had spent the 
summer working in bee-related activities. 
Paul Jardel and Joe Diamond worked as 
Apiary Inspectors for the Pennsylvania 
Department of Agriculture, inspecting 
bee colonies for various diseases and 
pests. Art Ruediger was employed by the 
New Jersey Department of Agriculture in 
its honey bee laboratory in Trenton. Dan 
French spent his summer working on a 
state-funded project that is examining 
the use of the enzyme-linked immuno- 
sorbent assay for identifying honey bee 
disease. 

Kick up ];our heels with 
Christmas Magic 

Shine up your dancing shoes and 
shake out your formal clothes! Christmas 
Magic is returning to the Student Center 
on December 10 for the fourth year of 
great food, great dancing, great fun. 

The student-sponsored dinner-dance 
will be held from 7 p.m. until 1 a.m. in 
the All-Purpose Room, and tickets are 
on sale now through December 5 for 
$20 per couple or $10 per individual. 

A delicious, home-cooked dinner will 
be served buffet style and will include 
roast beef, baked chicken, baked ziti. 
meatballs, salads, appetizers and des- 
serts. Dancing will follow until 1 a.m. 



Guests of International Club 



by Laurent Lance 

Some international students from 
DelVal have recently met two visitors 
from overseas: Tarja Oinonen. 22. of 
Finland, and Christine Loboda. 31. of 
England. 

Tarja is a student at the University of 
Tampere, Finland, where she studies 
English translation; Christine, who has a 
secretarial background, has spent most 
of her life traveling around the world; she 
has already been to 25 countries. But for 
both of them, this is their first trip to the 
United States. 

They both came here at the end of 
July with a program called "Kansainvali- 
nen Vapaaehtoistypleirijarjesto" (or if 
you prefer K.V.T.) in Finland, "interna- 
tional Voluntary Service" (I.V.S.) in En- 
gland and "Volunteers for Peace" in the 
United States. 

The purpose of this program is to pro- 
mote international peace and under- 
standing all over the world. Tarja and 
Christine were staying in one of the 
camps here in Pennsylvania, at Miryam's 
Farm. Pipersville. from August 1 to 
August 15, 1988. 

Their job included outdoor manual 
work, weeding, construction work and 
renovation work, from four to five hours 
a day. At the camp were people 18-33 
years old. coming from Italy. West Ger- 
many, France. England, Denmark. Fin- 
land. Hungary and Czechoslovakia. 

During their spare time, all of them 
visited local places of interest or met local 
persons. Most of the people who were at 
the camp traveled around America after 
their two- week program. 

Tarja. for example, visited relatives 
and penpals in Ontario, Minnesota. Ari- 
zona. California. New York and Wash- 
ington. DC. Christine also went to On- 
tario, as well as West Virginia. Virginia. 
Vermont and Massachusetts to meet 
some friends. 



A limited number of tickets will be 
sold, so get yours now. Tickets are avail- 
able in the cafeteria during dinner, from 
Mrs. Ellis in the Dean of Students Office, 
from Mrs. Martin at the Lasker Hall re- 
ceptionist's desk or from Chris or Patty in 
Barness. 

This is one of the premier events on 
campus for the entire year, so don't take 
a chance on missing it! All members of 
the college community are invited. We 
hope to see all of you in high holiday 
spirits! 



Both of them seem to have enjoyed 
their trips in North America; they could 
appreciate the real size of the country. 
According to Christine. "It's only by 
traveling around that you can see how 
huge the United States is!" 

They also enjoyed the American hos- 
pitality all over the country. They both 
agree that "Americans have always been 
very friendly and very nice with us!" 

Another point of interest for them is 
the language. Christine says "I like it here 
because people speak almost the same 
language as I do!" Tarja says "1 like it 
here because people do not speak Fin- 
nish, which makes me speak English all 
the time. It's very good for my studies!" 

Tarja also noticed that Americans 
"know how to take it easy even if the life 
is fast and not so easy!" According to 
her, this is the opposite of Finland, 
where people are "much too formal." 

Christine wishes to come back (o the 
States to visit the middle and western 
parts of the country, but "only after hav- 
ing settled down in England for awhile." 

Tarja. for her part, would like to come 
and study in the States, "certainly in 
Pennsylvania." because it would be part, 
of her program of study in English trans- 
lation in Finland, and also because she 
loves the American language and culture. 

"Nakemiin!" (Goodbye) 

Beeswax candlemaking 
workshop scheduled 

The College Apiary Society will spon- 
. sor an evening workshop in beeswax 
candlemaking on Thursday, December 8 
beginning at 7 p.m. in the Student Cen- 
ter. The workshop is open to the public . 
with only a nominal charge for materials.* 
Participants will make candles to take 
home with them. 

Beeswax is considered to be the most 
ideal wax for candles, since they burn 
noticeably longer than those made from 
paraffin. In addition, beeswax produces 
a distinctive, pleasant fragrance when 
burned. 

Although beeswax will be used ex- 
clusively in the workshop, the techniques 
that will be demonstrated can be used 
with paraffin candlemaking as well. 
Methods for making a variety of differ- 
ent types of beeswax candles will be 
demonstrated. 

The workshop will be conducted 
under the direction of Dr. Berthold. 
assisted by members of the Beekeeping 
Club. For further information, call Dr. 
Berthold at x-2285. 





©(glkRjMms^siflllcg^ (g®llll®g(§ ^Soodl®QQt^ j^fe^j^j^paopgir 



Vol. XXIII. No. 9 



Wednesday, December 7. 1988 



NOTICE: The opinions expressed in any individual article do not necessarily reflect the viewpoint of the paper or school. 




DelVal students surround officials from Bucks Count\j Bank and the College administration following an 
awards luncheon to honor Bucks Count\; Bank and its scholarship recipients Front row. from left John 
Spier, president and CEO of Bucks County Bank: John Ri/ey, senior VP of the bank; Robert Sauer. 
Director of Financial Aid: W.H. Rorer III. DVC president: and Dr John Mertz. VP. Academic Affairs. 



The Cupboard was not bare for Thanksgiving 



by Christine Janeczek 

The Thanksgiving spirit was evident 
on the DVC campus when students con- 
ducted a Thanksgiving Food Drive for 
the needy of Bucks County. The dona- 
tions collectively weighed 2,350 lbs., 
with a value estimated at $1,500. Mone- 
tary donations totaling $92 were collected 
as well. The donations were received in 
the two-part Food Drive organized by 
DelVal's Interclub Council to benefit 
"Mary's Cupboard," a food distribution 
center located in Levittown, Pa. 

The Interclub Council kicked off the 
Food Drive on campus on November 1. 
Throughout November, DVC employees 
and students filled collection boxes with 
food and household items, which were 
the tip of the iceberg of donations to 
follow. 

On Saturday, November 19, 30 stu- 
dents put their books down to pick up 



leaflets describing their DVC Thanksgiv- 
ing Food Drive for the needy. Off to local 
supermarkets students went, distributing 
leaflets to customers and collecting dona- 
tions. Students were surprised by the 
generosity and interest of the customers. 

"Some people were donating as much 
as a full bag of groceries," said one stu- 
dent. Another student met a woman who 
wanted to know who "Mary" was. Was 
she the woman who operated "Mary's 
Cupboard?" 

"Mary's Cupboard" is named after 
Mary, mother of Jesus. The Cupboard is 
set up much like a small grocery store 
and provides food for individuals and 
families in emergency situations in the 
Bucks County area. It is available to any- 
one in need, without religious restrictions 
or any other requirements. Its clients in- 

Please see page 3 



Bucks County Bank 

scholarships awarded to 

DelVal students 

Fourteen Delaware Valley College 
students have been awarded $2,000 
scholarships from Bucks County Bank 
and Trust Co. , it was announced recently. 

The scholarships, to be used for the 
1988-89 year, are based on academic 
achievement and Pennsylvania residen- 
cy, with an emphasis on Bucks County 
applicants. 

"We are happy with the opportunity to 
help these students meet the costs of 
receiving a fine higher education,' said 
John Spier, President and Chief Operat- 
ing Officer of the bank, in remarks during 
a reception held recently. "We fook at 
this as an investment in the future. These 
students are the leaders of tomorrow. 
We need them to be well-prepared to 
handle the challenges which they will 
face." 

Also on hand for the presentation of 
the scholarships were: John Riley, Senior 
Vice President of the bank; W.H. Rorer 
III, President of the College; Dr. John 
Mertz, Vice President, Academic Affairs; 
Robert Sauer, Director of Financial Aid; 
and Linda Dolby, Executive Director of 
Development. 

The scholarships are part of a 10-year, 
$260,000 commitment the bank made 
to DelVal's financial aid program in 1985. 

The following students have received 
Bucks County Bank Scholarships for the 
1988-89 year: 



Bradley Braun 


BY 


'91 


Jennifer M. Canjar 


CH 


'92 


Matthew A. Chupalio 


BA 


'90 


Joan E. Comly 


OH 


'89 


Holly W. Eckloff 


HT 


'89 


James Etheredge 


BY 


•90 


Jason W. Freed 


CH 


'89 


Dena Hamilton 


BY 


'92 


Shawn Hennigan 


BY 


'90 


Susan Higley 


BA 


•90 


Richard W. Kulp 


AG 


'89 


Randi A. Misnik 


BY 


'92 


Eric D. Thomas 


BA 


•90 


Stephanie A. Wright 


BY 


'91 



President's Hot Line 



DVC 

from the desk of Vice President, 

Operations — Russell K. Schulz 

. . . Lights will be installed at Barness 
— Student Center end — soon. 

. . . The leak has been repaired that 
cai'sed flooding in Miller Hall. 

. . . The leaves have been cleaned out 
of the clogged drain which caused 
flooding at the underpass near the 
Horticulture Building. 

. . . The Carillon has been adjusted so 
that it chimes in a "timely" manner. 
Note: An alumnus donated the carillon 
to DVC for our pleasure. 

. . Please have patience with our 
construction of the walkway between 
Elson and the Dining Hall. 

j, ,( .Library hours have been adjusted 
to accommodate study privileges. See 
the chart elsewhere in Ram Pages. 
We are still working on expanding for 
earlier hours in the morning. Segal 
Hall has extra hours for study, as welL 



On campus 

WEDNESDAY. DECEMBER 7 

Movie: Vice Versa. 9pm, APR 
Wrestling (H) vs Swarthmore and 
Delaware State, 7 p.m. 

THURSDAY. DECEMBER 8 

Women's Basketball (H) vs Cabrlnl 
College. 7pm 

Men's Basketball (A) vs Drew 
University. 7:30 p.m. 

FRIDAY. DECEMBER 9 

Applications due for Resident Assistant 
positions 

SATURDAY. DECEMBER 10 

Semi-Formal Dinner Dance. 
7p.m.-l am , APR 

SUNDAY. DECEMBER 11 

Christmas Concert. 3pm. APR. by 
Chorale /Band Dinner buffet after 
Conceit tickets $7 50 p>er person 



STAFF 

Editors-inChief Kathleen L. Stasney 
Loretta F. Skibowski 

Reporters Fred Newton , 

Tony Palumbo. Ty McSherry, 

Frank Reich, James Moye 

Shaun Smith 

Photography Dave Stomp, 

Laurent Lanee 

Advisors Joe Ferry, 

Anne Biggs, Mr. Edward O'Brien, 
Dr. Richard Ziemer 



1 replies 

. . . Old Alumni House residents: a 
pay phone will be installed soon. Also, 
for the record. Old Alumni House is 
locked after visitation hours, just as 
the other dorms are. 

. . . Thanks to Berk for the security 
suggestions. 

. . For those who DO NOT want their 
grades sent home to parents, please 
see provisions for this in Student 
Handbook. 

... News Rash: the Musical Janitor's 
plug has been pulled! 

. . . The Goldman electric outage was 
due to necessary maintenance . . 
Sorry! 

. . . The Dean of Students Office will 
be wholeheartedly supporting the 
caller who wishes to start a DVC Pep 
Club. 

. . . Cooke. Barness and Wolfsohn: 
Action has been or will be taken to 
correct cleaning problems. Also. 
• Wolfsohn will be getting new tile in 
place of the hall carpeting very soon. 

. . . The Barness candy machine will 
be repaired. 

... We will take care of the tree in the 
Conifer Garden damaged by a way- 
ward driver. 

. . . We are looking into getting suffi- 
cient sawdust for use in the Dairy 
operations. 

This report does not create a breach 
of confidentiality for D\/C-l calls. No 
details, names or other identification is 
released to Ram Pages concerning 
. any confidential communications to 
the Hot Line. 

Dear Editors 

Land sale concerns 

, As a concerned student at DelVal. I 
find myself wondering what is happening 
to the school's land. 1 understand the 
leason why the old dairy was sold be- 
cause of safety hazards, but why are we 
selling additional land that is beneficial to 
the farms? 

1 have heard that there is a possibility 
that the school is considering selling two 
additional parcels of land, one of which 
is prime land for growing alfalfa which 
could be used by the school's animals. I 
know we are in debt, but if we keep selling 
our land, how are we going to expand? 

So where are we going to put the 
university? 

Name withheld 



From the desk 

of the Ambassador 
"Moooving Forward** 

by Brad A. Bittner 

If you haven't looked beyond the rail- 
road tracks lately, you may not have 
noticed the construction being done. 
Located in the former block of Cortland 
apple trees, between the beehouse and 
the equine facility, is a large, white, block 
structure that is to be our new dairy facility. 

The current construction is Phase I of a 
two-phase project costing a little over 1 . 1 
million dollars. This may sound steep to 
some, but to maintain our reputation for 
high-science agriculture and practical 
"hands-on" experience, we must mod- 
ernize and upgrade our facilities. What 
better way than to start from scratch? 

Phase I consists of the feed area, exer- 
cise lot, cow barn, young stock and dry 
cow facility, superintendent's office and a^ 
modem parlor room consisting of a quick-/ 
exit restraint that releases all the cova.*s at 
the touch of a button . 

The cows will be equipped \A,1th a 
transponder that transmits the amount of 
feed eaten and milk produced b<i each 
cow to a computer. At the touch of a 
button the superintendent can check the 
status of any one of the 51 milking head. 

The cows will have ample room in a 
free stall system divided into three areas, 
each with a different total mixed ration 
(TMR) and a computer feeder to handle 
the feed. 

Existing facilities that will be moved to 
the new site include a high-moisture corn 
silo, a 70-foot Harvestore silo and pro- 
cessing equipment that will be idle until 
Phase II is completed. 

Phase II will consist of an embryo 
transfer (ET) center, stantion facilities for 
recipient cows and student use, locker 
rooms, student office / conference room 
and a processing room containing milk 
homogenation and pasteurization equip- 
ment as well as cheese and ice cream 
making equipment if enough money can 
be acquired by the fundraising committee. 

In the meantime, the milk in the cafe- 
teria will not be milk supplied by DVC 
cows, but instead DVC milk will be sold : 
to the Atlantic Dairy Cooperative (ADC) . 
So. enjoy that milk while you can, be- 
cause on February 28, 1989 the Great 
DVC Cattle Drive will be here and all 
120 animals will have a new home. 



Any comments, concerns or questions 
on this article or any other campus prob- 
lem that you would like addressed can be 
directed to Box 514 



Professor gives lecture on ''Date Rape" 



Dr. Roberta Dimond presented a lec- 
ture recently to about 380 freshmen, in- 
forming the audience what "date rape" is 
and how it can be prevented. 

Rape is any sexual act conducted with- 
out the full consent and/or knowledge of 
the other party, it is assault and abuse 
and is a criminal offense punishable by 
law. When the act is performed by force 
by someone you know, it is called "ac- 
quaintance rape," but is still a criminal of- 
fense. Just because the two people know 
one another does not make it "provoked" 
and therefore "all right." If you don't give 
your permission, if you say "stop" and 
the person doesn't stop, then it becomes 

Cupboard not bare . . # .• : 

Continued from page t 

dude the poor, the elderly, the unem- 
ployed, people waiting for disability or 
other benefits, abandoned or abused 
women and their children, the homeless 
and victims of fire or other emergencies. 
"Mary's Cupboard" has assisted 18,193 
people since its opening in 1978 and 
4,307 people were helped last year. In- 
dividuals and families are provided with 
one week's worth of groceries and may 
return for three additional weeks. 

The coordinator of "Mary's Cupboard," 
Maryann Slack, was overwhelmed by 
the amount of food that was collected by 
DVC. 

"It's a blessing that we can fill our 
shelves at this time of the year, because it 
helps us through the rougher times of the 
year when donations are fewer," said 
Mrs. Slack. 

Food comes primarily from local 
churches and parochial schools. The 
Cupboard benefits from the annual 
"Operation Helping Hand" collection in 
private and public schools in Bucks 
County. Quarterly shipments of many 
basic food items are purchased by the 
Archdiocese with money from the 
Lenten "Operation Ricebowl" fasting 
program. Cash donations from individu- 
als and organizations, such as the $92 
collected by DVC students, will enable. 
"Mary's Cupboard" to provide fresh 
meat and other foods in short supply. 
Bread and other donations come from 
local stores. 

Everyone at "Mary's Cupboard" ex- 
tends his thanks to the students who 
helped with the Food Drive, and also a 
warm thank you to those who extended 
their hands by making a Thanksgiving 
donation. 

"Mary's Cupboard" is located in the 
offices of Catholic Social Services, 100 
Levittown Parkway, Levittown, PA 
19054, 215/ 945-2550. 



an act of violence and could become 
rape. 

Dr. Dimond pointed out that many oc- 
casions of date rape occur when situa- 
tions get out of control: when under the 
influence of drugs or alcohol, for exam- 
ple. At other times, mixed messages are 
sent or received, and one person may be 
hearing a "yes" that the other means to 
be a definite "no!" 

To prevent acquaintance rape from 
happening, Dr. Dirriond suggests being 
very clear about what your personal 
boundaries are, and communicating them 
clearly to your date. Don't put yourself in 
a position where you do not have control 
over your situation : let at least one other 
person know where you will be on a date, 
do not go where yoi don't feel comfort- 
able and secure, clways have enough 
money to telephone for help or get a taxi 
home if your date doesn't "turn out." 
And if you feel you are being pressured 
by your date, get out fast. 

The Network of Victim Assistance 
(NOVA) can be reached at 348-5664 
any time, day or night. In case of a rape 
or attempted rape, you can call NOVA, 
leave your name and phone number, 
and a trained counselor will call you 
back, assist and advise you through any 
treatment or care, and be with you, all 
confidential and free of charge. The 
NOVA person can be the first one you 
call; they will help you make any other 
calls you need to make, including to the 
police, and will drive you to the hospital 
if necessary. ■ v : 

Perhaps as important as knowing what 
date rape is and how to prevent it, would 
be to know what each person at DelVal 
can do to help. Dr. Dimond suggests a 
range of ideas from breaking the "victim" 
psychology and becoming assertive fe- 
males, to supporting more co-ed activities 
where men and women can get to know 
each other in non-sexual, more "whole 
person" ways like co-ed volleyball, co-ed 
dress dinners, co-ed Trivial Pursuit, 
charades and Pictionary contests. • 

If you would like more information on 
NOVA, date rape or this lecture, or you 
would just like to make a suggestion on 
this topic, contact Dr. Dimond in Lasker 
Hall. 

Note from the 
Counseling Center 

The Segal Hall study hall is available in 
the evenings until midnight. The study 
hall is especially well-suited for group 
study sessions. The room is accessible by 
the lower level rear door. No special ar- 
rangements have to be made in advance. 



SANTA'S 

COMING 

& SO ARE 

FINALS 

Be Prepared 
For Both 



ABSOLUTE FINAL CHANCE! 

SENIOR PORTRAITS 

FOR 

YEARBOOK 

WEDNESDAY, DEC. 14 

12 NOON - 9 PM 

STUDENT CENTER 



Pre-Finals course 

Every Tuesday at 7:30 p m. in the 
lower level of Segal Hall between now 
and finals, Steve Davis and Norm 
Danis will be teaching students how to 
make the best of final exams. Don't 
just sit there feeling sorry for yourself; 
go out and do something positive for 
your future! Let Norm Danis and 
Steve Davis show you how to improve 
your grades. 



NEW BRITAIN INN 

"Del Vol's home owoy from home" 

SUN. NIGHT: DJ and Dancing 

MON. NIGHT: Steamers - 
$1.95/Dozen 

TUES. NIGHT: Import Night - 
Most$1.25/Bottle 

WED. NIGHT: $1,25 Cheese 
Steak Night 

THURS. NIGHT: DJ and Dancing 

FRI. NIGHT: DJ and Dancing 

SAT. NIGHT: Live entertainment 

Seofood & Sondwiches 

All Items to Go! 

Rt. 202 • New Britain. PA 
348-1968 



DECEMBER 1988 



THE LIBRARY 



SUN 


MON 


TUES 


WED 


THURS 


FRl 


SAT 




•, 




■ - ",- '-'~~^ , ' ''- ' 


1 


2 


3 






'■ ■ '■''■■.-■-". ■■ 




8:00 a.m. - 
Midnight 


8:00 a.m. - 
9:30 p.m. 


12:00 pm.- 
5:00 p.m. 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


2:00 p.m. • 
Midnight 
Hanultkah 


8:00 a.m. - 
Midnight 


8:00 a.m. - . 
Midnight 


8 00 a.m.- 
Midnight 


8:00 a. m.- 
Midnjght 


8:00 a.m. - 
V 9:30 p.m. ' 


. 12:00 p.m. - 
5:00 p.m. 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


2:00 p.m. - 
V Midnight 


8:00a.m.-;: 

Midnight 
(Reading Day) 


8:00 a.m. -s 
Midnight 

RNALS BEGIN 


o - ♦ 

8:00 a.m. • 
Midnight 


8:00 a.m. - 
Midnight 


8:00 a.m. - 
Midnight 


9:00 a.m.- 
4:00 p.m. 

CE EXAMS END 


18 


19 


20 


21' 


22 


23 


24 


2:00 p.m. - 
Midnight 


8:00 a.m. - 
Midnight 


8:00 a.m. - 
-. Midnight 

LA SALLE 
EXAMS END 


8:30 a m. - 
* 4:30 p.m. 

FINALS END 

Winter Begin*: 


8:30 a.m. - 
4:30 p.m. 


8:30 a.m. - 
3:00 p.m. 


CLOSED 


25 


26 


27 ' 


28 


29 


30 


31 


CLOSED 


CLOSED 


LIBRARY REC 


iPENS TUESDAY, JANl 


JARY 2, 1989 


CLOSED 


CLOSED 


ChristmK Day 












New Year's Eve 



I 



New law could affect aid, 
federal funds 

The Anti-Drug Abuse Act of 1988, 
passed October 22 and scheduled to go 
into effect September 1, 1989. could 
deny federal benefits, including student 
financial assistance, to those convicted of 
illegal sale or possession of drugs. The 
legislation would also require employers 
who receive federal funds (most colleges 
and universities, including DelVal) to 
maintain a drug-free environment. 

Specific provisions of the law call for 
suspension of benefits upon conviction, 
:With the period of suspension increased 
...for subsequent convictions at the discre- 
tion of the court. 
! For example, a first conviction for 
those trafficking in drugs results in a five- 
year suspension of benefits. A second 
conviction results in a ten-year suspen- 
sion, and third or subsequent convictions 
result in permanent ineligibility to receive 
. federal benefits. 

Conviction for possession calls for a 
one-year suspension of benefits for the 
first and a five-year suspension for subse- 
quent convictions. 

Benefits may be reinstated upon com - 
: pletion of a drug rehabilitation program. 

Drug-free workplace requirements for 
federal grant or contract recipients call for 
: employers to publish a statement notify- 
ing employees of the employer's drug 
policies. They must also establish an 
awareness program informing workers of 
the dangers of drugs, rehab opportunities , 
and penalties for drug abuse. 

Employees must notify employers of 
any conviction for drug offenses in the 
workplace, and the employer must then 
notify the grant agency and impose sanc- 
tions or require rehabilitation for con- 
^% ; victed employees. 



If [;ou haven t picked up [;our 

SENIOR MEMORIES 
FORMS 

AVAILABLE IN PUB 

ON 

COMMUTER BULLETIN BOARD 

MUST RETURN BY 
READING DAY 
DECEMBER 12 



SADD hack on campus 

If you are interested in becoming a 
member of SADD (Students Against 
Driving Drunk) . drop your name and 
box number in Box 270 or see Mrs. 
Somerville. 













A 








i^m 






H • 








■K% 






i'-'-m 












' i 


./ 

f 


j 1 








^ 


-wfe^fc.J» 






^/ 


f 


\ 


m 

Mm 


1^ 




-^'a. 


MM 


^ 




r^ 








I ■ 


■■m 




% 


i 




' ^m 




' %r 


r- 










^^^^S 



Do\,ilestou'n automobile dealer Hred Beans, a member of the Colleges Board of Trustees, presents to 
President Wm H. Rarer IH keys for two new vehicles that will he used b{; the staffs in Serurifi' and 
Admissions. 



New technology course 
draws on guest lecturers 

The new evening course "Technology: , 
Processes of Assessment and Choice." 
beginning this spring at DVC. will make 
generous use of guest lecturers to cover a 
wide spectrum of subjects related to tech- 
nology and the choices that confront us. 

Drawing on the expertise available 
from other colleges and organizations, 
the course will present the following 
lectures: 

• Bruce MacLeod. Dept. of Manage- 
ment, La Salle University. 
"Technology and International 
Competitiveness" 

• Burt Strieb. Dept. of Physics. La > 
Salle University. Science. 
Technology and the Arts" 

• Carole Gorney, Dept. of Journalism, 
Lehigh University, "Dealing with 
Public Perceptions of Risk" and a 
second talk on "Satellites and the 
Shrinking World" 

• Lorraine Sexton. Ph.D., 
Anthropology. "Culture and 
Technology" 

• Larry Eckman. Information Liaison. 
Limerick Nuclear Generating Station, 
"Nuclear Power: Does it Deserve its 
Adversaries?" 

• Robert E. Moore. Chairman, Bucks 
County Planning Commission. "Con- 
flicts in Goals: Development vs. En- 
vironmental and Other Concerns. 
Why Planning Commissions Exist" 

Several experts from our college com- 
munity will also participate: 

• Nathanial Wallace. Liberal Arts. "The 
Modernization of Technology in the 
People's Republic of China" 



A Student's Psalm 

The professor is td^/ quizmaster, , 

I shall not flur\k. 
He n)aketh me to enter the 

examination room. 
He leadeth me to an alternate seat 
He restoreth m\; fears. 
He leadeth me into a deep problem 

for the grade's sake. 
Yea. though I know not the answers r 

to the question. 
The class average comforts me. 
I prepare m]; answers before me in the 

presence of my proctors. 
He anointeth my head with figures, 

my time runneth out. 
Surel]; grades and bluebooks will follow 

me all the dai;s of my life. 
And I will dwell in this uniuersit]; forever. 

Amen 

From a Penn State publication Submitted by Dr 
Richard C Ziemer. 



• Roberta Dimond, Liberal Arts. "How 
American Schools Should Meet the 
Challenges of Technology. How 
Technology is Changing Human 
Psychology" 

• Ronald Johnson. Biology. "Effects of 
Acid Rain on Recreational Areas" 

• Craig Hill. Animal Science, 
"Technology and Its Impact on 
Animal Agriculture" 

• President William H. Rorer III will 
give two talks on subjects related to 
Medical Technology 

• Vice President Russell Schulz and 
President Rorer will present "Weapon 
System Choices, Two Points of 
View: Submarines or Airpower?" 




1988-89 Wrestling Team with first place trophy from Binghamton (N.Y.) Tourriament held November 12 Congratulations, team and coaches 



Wrestling team wins Binghamton Tournament 



by Shauii Smith 

At the Binghamton (N.Y.) College! 
Wrestling Tournament, Saturday, No- 
vember 12, Delaware Valley came away 
with the team title with 178 points. 
Lycoming College was second with 84 
points. DVC had nine out of 10 of its 
varsity in the finals and eight came out as 
champions. 

Dave Pinson 118, Chuck McGrath 
126, Jim Heniott 134, Shaun Smith 
142, Tom Schoffstall 150, Mark Am- 
brose 158, Randy Won-ell 167 and Nick 
Lefcakis HWT all were champions at 
their weight class. Frank Pershpalaj was 
second at 177. 

Coach Marshall said, "This was an ex- 
cellent first showing for this early in the 
season. 1 hope we can maintain the 
same level of intensity through to the 
second semester and MAC's. If we don't 
have any surprises waiting for us in 
January, and everyone returns, we 
should be looking at an excellent ranking 
nationally." 

To be one of the top teams in the 
country DelVal needs at least six place 
winners, according to Coach Marshall. 



Show your 
Christmas Spirit! 

The Chorale, Band and Horticulture 
Society invite you to come caroling with 
them in Doylestown on Reading Day, 
December 12 at 8:00 p.m. 

Everyone will meet in the Campus 
Court (Student Center) . The Hort Society 
will provide refreshments afterwards. 

Let them know if you will join them 
. . . sign up in the Dining Hall. 



"We have three on the team now: 
Shaun Smith, first; Mark Ambrose, sec- 
ond; and Randy Worrell, sixth. If the 
other seven keep up their intensity, we 
should get at least three or more out of 
the seven placed in the nationals. 

"But first we must get through the dual 
season and then MAC's.** 



Agriculture in the 
Third World 

International Agriculture will be the 
theme of a special program on campus 
Friday, December 9 from 12:20-1:10 
p.m. All are welcome to attend this 
presentation, held in the Student Center. 

Diane Gooch, Catholic Relief Services 
(CRS), New York, and Whitney Finn- 
strom. Peace Corps, Philadelphia, will 
be presenting their perspectives on agri- 
culture in the Third World. :^ 

Mrs. Gooch, trained as an agricultural 
economist, serves as project evaluator 
visiting long-term projects sponsored by 
CRS. She said, "Our organization has 
been effective in many nations because 
we work directly with people at the grass 
roots, helping them help themselves." 

Finnstrom, trained in finance, served 
as rural credit worker in Nepal and now 
works as a Peace Corps recruiter in 
Philadelphia. 

The program is sponsored by the Agri- 
business Department as a conclusion to 
the Survey of Agriculture class. 



From the Act 101 / 

P.L,U.S, Program 

; Study the way the pros do 

Did you ever wonder how pre-law and 
pre-med students master the volumes of 
information that they have to know? 
Don't you hope that your surgeon didn't 
cram? The common study method for 
Ivy League and graduate students is to 
study in groups. 

Next semester marks the beginning of 
a new program to form study groups to 
help Act 101/P.L.U.S. students with 
Natural Science, Economics and Mathe- 
matics (Algebra and Trigonometry). 
Steve Davis and Norm Danis have been 
meeting with Assistant Academic Dean, 
Craig Hill and faculty members Mr. 
Johnson, Mr. Christ, Dr. Goldberg, Mr. 
Popham and Mr. Tabachnick in an effort 
to coordinate these student study groups. 

These study groups will help students 
create a study time and stick to it, im- 
prove notes, motivate each other and 
create questions to quiz each other. 
Study groups make studying more effi- 
cient and less monotonous. They can 
also be competitive, and we've made 
them more challenging by creating a 
Study Group Sweepstakes. 

For more information see Act 101 
Tutorial Coordinator Norm Danis in the 
lower level of Segal Hall. 



ZIEMERISM 

Snowflakes: 
heavenly downy 





Vol. XXin, No. 10 Thursday. December 15, 1988 

NOTICE: The opinions expressed in anh individual article do not necessarily reflect the viewpoint of the paper or school. 



'Peer Harassment' on the Rise on Many College Campuses 

by Eileen M. O'Brien, in Black Issne* in Higher Education, Nov. 24, 1988 



A new report indicates in recent 
years another negative trend has paral- 
leled the increase in racial incidents on 
college campuses: the harassment of 
female students by male students is also 
on the rise. 

"Too many women arc experiencing 
hostility, anger and sometimes even vio- 
lence from male students," according 
to Peer Harassment; Hassles for 
Women on Campus. Published by the 
Project on the Status and Education of 



Women (PSEW) of the Association of 
American Colleges, the report com- 
pared peer harassement to the "increase 
m racial tension and bigotry. In some 
ways, the situation with women is com- 
parable — some men are treating women 
badly, sometimes even abusively." 

The study said some of the reported 
Jbehaviors could be called "sexual bigo- 
try," and cited several specific incidents, 
including: 

• A rape occ urred at one university 



DelVal Offers New SAM Program 



Delaware Valley College will offer a 
new, Associate degree program in 
Supervision, Administration & Manage- 
ment beginning in January, 1989. 

The degree is designed to meet the 
needs of adults who are presently hold- 
ing supervisory positions or who are 
preparing to enter this career area. 

The curriculum is designed to pro- 
vide students with the essential con- 
cepts and principles of supervision, 
administration and management as well 

From Act 101/P.L.U.S. 
The Recharger 

Actively storing and recalling infor- 
mation requires energy. Use this exer- 
cise when you are slowing down. 

• Stand straight, hands at your side. 

• Inhale deeply and hold it. 

• Raise your arms out in front of you. 
Relax as you hold them up. 

• Slowly make fists as you bring your 
hands to your shoulders. 

• Keeping fists tightly clenched, slowly 
extend your arms in front of you. 

• Keeping your fists tight, pull them 
to your shoulders again. Do this as 
fast as you can. 

• Relax, hands at your sides, and 
exhale forcefully through your 
mouth. 

• Repeat these steps again. 



as an understanding of how these con- 
cepts are influenced, changed and 
implemented. Students learn the func- 
tions, procedures and concepts of super- 
vision and leadership along with the 
basic core areas of business admin- 
istration. 

"We are instituting this program in 
response to an overwhelming need on 
the part of businesses in the area," said 
Dr. Dominic Montileone, chairman of 
the Business Administration Depart- 
ment at DelVal. "We determined that 
need by surveying over 100 corpora- 
tions in the Bucks and Montgomery 
County areas. The survey's findings 
indicated a favorable climate for this 
type of program." 

Dr. Montileone said the College is 
hoping to help meet the shortage of first 
line managers which many corporations 
are currently experiencing. 

"Our potential audience is those 
people who are already in business, 
government or social agencies who are 
seeking to develop a career," said Dr. 
Montileone. "This program could also 
be used as a springboard or feeder to a 
Bachelor of Science degree in Business 
Administration." 

The Program is scheduled to be given 
through DelVal's Evening Division. 

Please see Page 4 



in dorm room 436. Subsequently, some 
fraternity members would call out to 
women walking by, "Let's do a 436 on 
her." 

• In one class, when a female stu- 
dent raised an issue concerning women, 
several male students groaned and 
booed. The woman did not particir>dte 
again in that class. 

A few colleges and universities have 
surveyed their students to determine 
the extent of the problem, and the 
report offered these available figures: 

• 78 percent of female respondents 
in a Cornell survey said they had expe- 
rienced sexist comments and 68 per- 
cent had received unwelcome attention 
from their male peers; 

• 92 percent of the women and 57 
percent of the men in a study at the 
Massachusetts Institute of Technology 
had experienced at least one form of 
unwanted sexual attention; and 

• 70 percent of the women sur- 
veyed at the University of Rhode Island 
reported haveing been sexually insulted 
by a man. 

What effect does peer harassment 
have? The report said for women, "(it) 
sends the message that a woman is not 
equal to a man," and can reinforce self- 
doubt, affecting a woman's entire aca- 
demic experience. "When harassment 
comes primarily from classmates in a 
particular field, some women may 
change classes or majors, change 
schools or drop out altogether," the 
study added. 

Peer Harassemnt noted that some 
groups of women tend to be singled out 
more than others. 

"Because of fantasies, myths and ste- 
reotypes that may portray minority 
women as 'exotic/erotic' or sexually 
active, these women may be more likely 
than others to be subjected to harass- 
ment focusing on their sexuality." The 

Please see page 2 



ZIEMERISM 

Landscraping: 

dcfallo«vpiiicnt 



Dear Editors: 

Response to land sale concerns 



School Store 

Holiday Sale 

The "Midnight Madness Sale" was a big 
success!! Congratulations to our 
winners: Debbie Shephard, Mike Mor- 
ris, Kathy Butler, Tom Higgins, Carlos 
Tentelltels and Lynn Fulton. A bis 
thanks from manager Mrs. Spratt to 
her crew, who helped make it a success! 
For those of you who missed it and 
those who forgot someone on your 
Christmas list, we will have 20% off all 
clothins on December 12, 13 and 14. 

On Campus 

Wednesday, December 14 
Exams continue. 

Wednesday, December 21 
Exams End. 

Monday, January 16 
Dorms Reopen 

Men's Basketball (H) vs Muhlenberg 
8:00 

Tuesday, January 17 
Registration 

Women's Basketball (A) King's 
College 7:00 

Wednesday, January 18 
Classes Begin. 
Happy Wednesday 
Wrestling (H) Kean College of NJ 
7:00 

Thursday, January 19 
DJ Dance 9:30 APR 
Women's Basketball (H) vs Drew 
University 7:00 

Friday, January 20 
Men's Basketball (A) vs Susquehanna 
University 8:00 
Movie, Roger Rabbit 9 p.m. APR 



STAFF 

EditorsinChief Kathleen L. Stasney 
Loretta F. Skibowski 

Reporters Fred Newton, 

Tony Palumbo, Ty McShcrry, 

Frank Reich, James Moye 

Shaun Smith 

Photography; Dave Stomp, 

Laurent Lanee 

Advisors Joe Ferry, 

Anne Biggs, Mr. Edward O'Brien, 
Dr. Richard Ziemer 



Now that the dairy has been sold, the 
college is selling only one additional 
piece of land. It will probably be the 
Farm 4 property, which does not adjoin 
the College. Currently, we use this 
property to raise forage for our animals. 

The College has been operating in 
deficit for five years and this needs to be 
corrected. One way to correct this is to 
recapture capital funds from other 
assets, such as land. The particular 
piece of property in question is worth at 
least $6 millk)n and at current invest- 
ment interest rates should bring in 
income of approximately $400,000 a 
year. The College deficit projected for 
the school year ending June 30, 1988 is 
approximately $300,000. The strategy 
then becomes clear. 

Nothing is simple, however. There 
will be increases in operating costs and 
in all supplies and services the College 
purchases. Salaries will increase about 



Peer continued from page 1. 



report cited other groups of women 
who are often targeted including: those 
in traditionally male fields, heavy or 
unattractive women and women who 
raise women's concerns. 

Some of the most serious forms of 
peer harassment involved groups of 
men, and Sandler added that fraterni- 
ties and athletes — sepcifically basket- 
ball and football players — are fre- 
quently culprits. 

Yet, Sandler pointed out, institutions 
share the blame by not addressing the 
problem head-on. "Schools need to 
make it clear that this behavior is not 
tolerated," she said. Victims need to 
know which offices can handle their 
complaints and they must be protected 
from retaliation. 

One problem, the executive director 
said, is that many schools have not 
extended their sexual harassment poli- 
cies concerning faculty, staff and stu- 
dents to cover these situations. "These 
do not cover student-to-student 
harassment," she explained. "We're 
somewhat behind in our thinking in 
terms of peer harassment." 

Peer Harassment also examines legal 
considerations of this issue and the 
interactive role of alcohol and drugs, 
and pornography and violence in the 
media. In addition, the report offers an 
institutional self-evaluation, provides 
many policy recommendations and lists 
selected resources. 

— Edited for Ram Pages by 
Act 101/P.L.U.S. Office 



the same amount, as will frin^ benefit 
costs. All of these factors will be taken 
into consideration in setting the annual 
budget for the school year beginning 
July 1, 1989. 

When we have completed this par- 
ticular land sale, we intend to take two 
other pieces of land off the market. 
These are Farm 7 and a small four-acre 
piece. The small piece lies within our 
four roads and Farm 7 physically adjoins 
the College and is larger by 57 acres 
than Farm 4. 

On completion of the Farm 4 sale, we 
will have more than sufficient land to 
cover our needs and our program for 
many years to come. DVC is cash poor, 
but land rich. The decisions described 
will place the College on a firmer finan- 
cial basis for the coming years. 

Please do not assume from this letter 
that tuition and fees will not increase. 
We will have an increase next year, but 
we will do our best to keep it reas<xi- 
able. We are aware that attending col- 
lege is an expensive investment and 
think of our student in proposing tuiticm 
and fee levels. 

W.H. Rorer, III 

Buenos Dias! Bonjour! 

Guten Tag! Hello! 

Sayonara! 

This Week . . . LEBANON 

by Laurent Lanee 

Lebanon: the name means "milky- 
white," apparently in reference to the 
snowy caps which grace the country's 
mountain peaks for more than half the 
year. The natural beauty of the country 
has also made it the "playground of the 
Middle East!" 

Lebanon is a small, independent 
republic since 1943, on the eastern 
shore of the Mediterranean. The coun- 
try has an area of more than 4,000 

square miles, about the size of Connec- 
ticut. Lebanon is populated by some 
three million {persons. Because it is a 
crossroads between Asia, Europe and 
Africa, its people have become good 
traders. Lebanon's capital, Beirut, is a 
strategic international air communica- 
tions and transporation center. 

History is important in Lebanon, and 
doubly so in sorting out the apparent 
paradoxes of the recent period of trou- 
bles. For example, between 1975 and 
1983 - - the first eight years of the "civil 
war" that is still running today - - 

approximately two percent of the Leb- 

Please see page 3 



(( 



Rats" and ''Raisins" to 
march with Mummers 



Two floats from our Homecoming 
Parade will take part in the New Year's 
Day Mummers Parade in Philadelphia 
this January 1. 

The College's Horticulture Society 
will bring Homecoming winner "Cali- 
fornia Raisins," a humourous tribute to 
the fruit producers of the country, to 
the popular holiday event. "Ratmobile," 
a representation of the Laboratory 
Animal Club, will also be part of the 
parade on New Year's Day. 

A representative of the Mummers 
Parade attended the College's Home- 
coming Parade on Oct. 1 and 

A special way to help 

Santa's Helpers in Lasker Hall will be 
celebrating the holidays in a special way 
this year, by caring about and sharing 
with two families who badly need our 
support this holiday season. And we are 
asking if any of you in our College 
community would like to take part. 

We are requesting donations of cash, 
toys and non-perishable food. Kindly 
bring all your items to Lasker Hall 
before Dec. 18, or give your contribu- 
tion to Erma Martin, Lasker Hall recep- 
tionist. Any donation would be a wond- 
erful help! 

The children in these families are 
ages 4, 6 and 9 (boys) and 2, 6 and 8 
(girls), if that helps you with any gift- 
shopping ideas! 

As you are busy doing your errands 
and shopping for the people on your 
lists, why not add an extra item or two 
for these families who are not so 
fortunate? 

Thank you for sharing your holidays 
with others. May your holiday season 
be filled with love and hope and good 
health! 

• - Santa's Helpers 



FOR SALE 

APIARY SOCIETY 

HONEY 

many varieties 

and 

BEESWAX CANDLES 

tapers, colors, shapes 



CLUB MEMBERS 

or 

LASKER HALL 

Receptionist 

great Holiday Gifts! 



approached students on both floats, 
asking if they would like to take part in 
the annual Philadelphia parade. About 
10 persons from each club arc directly 
involved in presenting the club's float. 
Both "California Raisins" and "Ratmo- 
bile" will be entered in the comedy 
division. 

So look for your College's represen- 
tatives on television on New Year's 
Day, F>€rhaps wedged between Mayor 
Goode and a strinq band!! 

Buenos Dias Continued from poQe 2 __«_^__ 



anese population was killed by its fellow 
Lebanese citizens. This is without con- 
sidering the many thousands more who 
died at the hands of the Israelis, Syri- 
ans, Palestinians or other outsiders. It 
was, and still is, a time of chronic per- 
sonal trauma for most Lebanese, of 
deep social and political upheaval and 
of mass violence. 

Today Lebanon is considered an Arab 
country, even though Lebanese people 
do not consider themselves as Arab, 
and its language is Arabic. Slightly more 
than 50 percent of the people are Chris- 
tian, which makes Lebanon the only 
Arab country with such a large non- 
Muslim popluatran. There are also about 
90,000 Druzcs, an Arabic tribe with a 
religion that is a mixture ofmany differ- 
ent faiths. 

In addition to Arabic, most educated 
people speak either French or English. 
Syriac is used in some of the Christian 
churches. Over 75 percent of the Leba- 
nese population can read and write. 
This literacy rate is much higher than 
that of most other countries in the Mid- 
dle East. Lebanese people enjoy learn- 
ing and improving their knowledge and 
culture. Many degrees in medicine, 
engineering, law, etc., are given every 
year in the American University of Bei- 
rut; the Universite Saint Joseph, a 
French institution; and the Lebanese 
University, opened in 1951. Almost every 
woman has a degree in Lebanon, but 
they are almost never put to use, since 
customs call for the women to be 
housewives rather than employed out- 
side the home. 

The family is very important to Leba- 
nese people, and even between neigh- 
bors there exists a close bond of friend- 
ship. Since the war began in 1975, it 
seems people care more about each 
other. Now, at the end of 1988, Leba- 
nese F>eople continue to live with the 
war and the bombs at their doorsteps, 
while still maintaining their important 



Ag Business tours 
research facility 

by Darren Samuel 

Dr. Avery's Agribusiness manage- 
ment class recently visited the Rohm & 
Haas Research Center, Springhouse, 
PA, touring the Agricultural Chemical 
Research Division. 

The students were shown the various 
steps and stages of testing, including 
the spraying machinery and green- 
houses. They were fortunate to see the 
beginning set up of a prototype robot 
that will be used in the handling of 
newly-formulated fungicide compounds. 
In the Insectary, where insects are bred 
and inoculated, the students were shown 
the stages and species of insects cur- 
rently under experimental control. 

The visit was a great success and an 
excellent opportunity for the students 
to see what goes on in a large research 
facility. 



Crammins for exams. 

• Don't try to learn too much. Con- 
centrate on a few essential facts 
(and remember them!) 

• Work with knowledgable classmates 
and support each other. Compare 
class notes and develop good ones. 

• Work together and create test 
questions, then quiz each other. 

• Recite, recite, recite — make your 
notes your own. 

• Develop cards with key words or 
phrases — keep it simple. 

• Remember, it's better to know a 
few things well! 



traditions. 

(For more information about Lebanon, 

contact Maggy Abdoud) 



NEW BRITAIN INN 

"Del Vol's home ovvcf^ ^oni home" 

SUN. NIGHT: DJ and Dancing 

MON. NIGHT: Steamers - 
$1.96/Dozen 

TUES. NIGHT: Import Night - 
Most$1.25/Bottle 

WED. NIGHT: $1.25 Cheese 
Steak Night 

THURS. NIGHT: DJ and Dancing 

FRI. NIGHT: DJ and Dancing 

SAT. NIGHT: Live entertainment 

Seafood & Sandwiches 

All Items to Gol 

Rt. 202 • New Britain. PA 
348-1968 




Soil Judging Team and Coaches, from left to right: coach Joe Valer^tine, Chris Faulkler, coach BUI 
Palkcwics, Nancv Ondra, Walter Preiss, Jeff Kerr and Darren Alles. 

bVC Stock Seat Team 3rd 
in Regional standings 



The DVC Stock Seat Team had 
another successful day of showing on 
Saturday, Dec. 3. The shows were co- 
hosted by DelVal and Rutgers and were 
again held at Open Gate Farm in New 
Ringgold, PA. DelVal was reserve 
champion college for the AM show and 
there was a tie for champion team with 
DelVal coming in 3rd overall for the 
PM show. Thanks to everyone for pul- 
ling off these shows with real team 
spirit. Special thanks to Dr. Hofsaess 
for all his time in planning, for the use of 
his phone, and for announcing yet 
another pair of shows. 

Results: AM Show 
class 13 Y 

Wayne Chabot, 1st 
class 14 

Melanie Nuskey, 4th 
. class 15 

Sue Hann, 3rd 

Alek Zajac, 4th 
class 16 .^ 

Chris Forst, 2nd 

Marybeth Polek, 4th 

Joanne Staats, 5th 
class 17 

Lisa Wilkoski, 3rd 
class 18 

Kris landola, 4th 

Results PM Show 
class 12 

Wayne Chabot,4 th 
class 14 

Melanie Nuskey, 2nd 
class 15 

Sue Hann. 3rd 



Alek Zajac, 5th 
j* class 16 

Chris Forst, 1st 
f Marybeth Polek, 3rd 
^r; class 17 
• Joanne Stoats, 4th 

Lisa Wilkoski, 1st 
, class 18 

Kris landola, 5th 

For the semester overall DelVal's 
Stock Seat Team is third in the Region 
with 66 points, following Penn State 
with 69 points, and Rutgers in first place 
( but only leading us by 5 points! !) with a 
total of 71 points. 

Thanks to everyone who supported 
the team. Good luck on finals and get 
some riding in over break! 



Operation Native 
Talent conies to Philly 

On Dec. 28 and 29, career-seekers 
from hundreds of colleges will get a 
chance to meet representatives of Del- 
aware Valley businesses - - - from the 
conference room of Philadelphia's 
Wyndham Franklin Plaza Hotel. 

The event is Operation Native Talent, 
and it plays a key role in the strategy of 
many area recruiters. 

For those who wish to work in the 
Greater Philadelphia region, perhaps 
you should consider registering for ONT 
1988. Contact Patricia Smith at the 
Chamber of Commerce, (215) 875-6774. 



DVC's Soil 
Judging Team 
placed 3rd 

On October 22, the DVC Soil Judging 
Team competed in the Northeast 
Regional Soil Judging Contest at Penn 
State. They competed against Penn 
State, Maryland, Cornell and Connec- 
ticut. DelVal came in third place among 
the teams defeating Cornell and Con- 
necticut. Members of the team were 
Darren Alles, Chris Falkler, Jeff Kerr, 
Nancy Ondra, and Walter Preiss. The 
coaches were Dr. Bill Palkoviks and Joe 
Valentine. Nancy Ondra placed ninth; 
Darren Alles placed eighth; and Jeff 
Kerr placed third in individual 
competition. 

SAM Continued from page 1 __ 



According to Dr. Montileone, a highly- 
motivated student could complete all 
requirements in two years. But the 
average student will probably take three 
years to finish, he said. 

A total of 66 credits is required to 
receive the AS degree. At least 27 cred- 
its (nine courses) must be completed at 
DelVal. Among the specifk; courses 
required for graduation are Bu^ness 
Organization & Managment, Sup)€rvi- 
sion and Leadership, Business Com- 
munication, Industrial Relations and 
Organizational Behavior. 

"This new program meets the needs 
of supervising management," said Dr. 
Montileone. "This particular concept is 
used at other places. But our uniqu- 
eness is that wc are offering upper level 
courses as well as introductory courses. 
Our graduates will be well-prepwred to 
assume responsible positions when they 
leave here." 



DelVal Track & Field 
begins 

Coach Acker announces that men 
and women interested in becoming part 
of the 1989 Track program should attend 
an organizational meeting on Thurs- 
day, Dec. 15 at 4:30 p.m. in the Student 
Center Coffee House. 

Traning programs, meet schedules, 
and opF>ortunities in track & field will be 
presented. There is an event in track & 
field for all. Both men and women are 
looking forward to one of their best 
years, said Coach Acker. 





IMkRj^sts^aQnil®^ (S®fln(ig® ^StfflcScSQQt^ lffe\:R7SpQJP®ff 



Vol. XXIII, No. 11 



Thnrsday, Janaary 26, 198f 



NOTICE: The opinions expressed in any individual article do not necessarily reflect the viewpoint of the paper or school. 



Student Financial Aid 

Office Announces New 

Scholarships 

There are new scholarships being 
offered at Delaware Valley College. The 
New Directions Charter Chapter of the 
American Business Women's Associa- 
tion from Warminster, Pennsylvania is 
granting scholarships up to $1,500. Stu- 
dents are required to have a GPA of 2.5 
or higher and who have accomplished a 
minimum of 32 credits. Any financially 
needing students wanting to enter are 
requested to submit applications by Feb- 
ruary 15, 1989. 

The Miller Meester Advertising Inc. is 
presenting a scholarship. Delaware Val- 
ley College's FFA members are eligible. 
The scholarship is $1,000 and students 
must be junior or senior to apply. Also 
former FAA members are eligible. Stu- 
dents who are interested are urged to file 
for an application by March 1 , 1989. 

Applications can be picked up at the 
Student Financial Aid Department. 



7th Annual Career Day 
arrives in February 

On Wednesday, February 15, the 
Placement Office will sponsor the 7th 
Annual Career Day to be held in the 
Student Center APR from 11:00 - 3:00. 
Approximately 80 companies and organ- 
izations will be in attendance. 

This event presents students with the 
opportunity to meet prospective 
employers and discuss employment 
opportunities. All students are encour- 
aged to participate in this event and 
dress professionally. Students should 
also bring with them a supply of resumes. 

More information coming up in the 
next issue. 



Yearbook Information 

Senior Memory Deadline — Jan. 
27. 

If you did not receive a memory 
sheet, print your name, home 
address, major, activities and memo- 
ries on a sheet of paper and put them 
in Box 614. No memories will be 
accepted after this date. 

If you have any pictures you would 
like to appear in this years' book, put 
your name and address where they 
can be returned on the back of each 
picture and put them in Box 614. I 
will do my best to return them to you. 

— Beth Bevins 

Statements regarding 
Cook's Fire 

— by Julia Keane 
The dormitory fire of Cooke Hall was 
quite an unfortunate experience for 
everyone. Renovations amounted to 
$350,000. As stated in the student hand- 
book, candles are prohibited, obviously 
there was a slight misconception some- 
where along the line. The renovation 
required full furniture replacement as 
well as the first and second floor ceilings. 
There will be however no reinburse- 
ments for student belongings because as 
stated in the Delaware Valley College 
Student Handbook of 1988-1989, "stu- 
dents' personal belongings are not insured 
by the college against damage or theft, 
and the college is not responsible for 
such incidents." The handbook also 
stresses the fact that students ought to 
"check with their family's homeowner's 
policy to see if their belongings are 
covered, and if not, are urged to pur- 
chase their own policy." 

Thru the rapid evacuation of the stu- 
dent body involved, no one was injured. 
Perhaps some learned the hard way 
about fire safety. It is hoped that we, as 
students, can use these safety rules as a 
tool to prevent any such mishaps from 
happening again. 



Ram Pages Searches for 
Staff Members 

Ram pages need your help. With a 
limited staff of two to four people (at 
times one person) completing a weekly 
publication, it is difficult, if not impossi- 
ble, to cover all areas of interest on cam- 
pus. We need reporters and photo- 
graphers who are willing to take a few 
minutes of their time to submit materials 
for publication. One will receive 0.5 cred- 
its per semester for the effort which is 
applied toward Liberal Arts reqwrernents. 
If the Wednesday 6:30 p.m. mating time 
is inconvenient for one to attend, other 
arrangements can be made. We also 
encourage clubs, faculty and staff to 
submit materials. Since a handful of peo- 
ple cannot cover all campus events, if we 
don't know about the event or receive 
information, we can't print anything about 
it. The future of the student paper is in 
question. If interest in publications 
remains as it is presently, this publication 
will inevitably cease to exist. There are 
some people to whom this doesn't mat- 
ter one way or another, but there are 
other people who would be disturbed by 
this, as they do look forward to reading 
Ram Pages each week to catch up on 
campus happenings. We want to remind 
everyone that this is a student publica- 
tion, meaning student body, not two or 
three people straining to cater to the 
publishing desires of several hundred. 
Are you interested in joining the staff? 
Would you like your voice, your news 
and your concerns to be aired? Visit one 
of our meetings on Wednesday 6:30 
p.m., basement of Ullman or drop a note 
in Ram Pages Box 917 and we'll get back 
to you. We'd be more than happy for 
your company. 

— Ram Pages Staff 



Dear Editor 

I would like to express my opinion on 
how well the Cooke fire was handled. I 
feel that the evacuation of the students 
involved went well. It's unfortunate that 
some people had to learn the hard way 
why certain rules are made. The admin- 
istration handled the emergency well by 
finding rooms for those students who 
were displaced by the fire, it was conven 
lent that they were able to arrange finals 
to give those students involved in the fire 
time to recover yet let the rest of us get 
out no later than previously scheduled. 
— Kathleen Stasne]>i 

Assies Win over Kins*a 
College 

Del Val won 5946 over host King s 
College. The Aggies are 9-2 overall, and 
3-0 MAC. 5 Aggies scored eight or more 
points throughout the game. Lynn 
Gleisrer scored 12 points, Cathy Lowe 
10 points, Laura Rota 12 points, Rhonda 
Hill 10 points, and Michele Shirk 8 points. 

On Campus 

Saturday, January 28 

Men's Basketball (H) vs Wilkes 
College (MPC game) 2:00 
• Women's Basketball (A) vs FDU 
Madison (MAC game) 7:30 

Wrestling (A) vs Gettysburg College 
and Widner University 7:00 
Monday, January 30 

Women's Basketball (A) vs Spring 
Garden College 6:00 
Tuesday, January 31 

Wrestling (H) vs King's College 7:00 
Wednesday, February 1 

Men's Basketball (H) vs University of 
Scranton 8:00 

Women's Basketball (H) vs University 
of Scranton (MAC game) 6:00 

Happy Wednesday Turtle Races 
Thursday, February 2 

Women's Basketball (A) vs College 
Misericordia 7:30 . :- ;= 



Staff 

Editor-in Chief . . . Kathleen L. Stasney 

Reporters Fred Newton, 

Tony Palumbo, Ty McSherry, 

Frank Reich, James Moye, 

Julie Keane, Shaun Smith 

Photography Dave Stomp, 

Laurent Lanee 

Advisors Joe Ferry, 

Anne Biggs, Mr. Edward O'Brien, 
Dr. Richard Ziemer 



About Editorial Policy 

Ram Pages has specific rules and 
guidelines we must follow regarding edi- 
torials received by students, faculty and 
staff to be printed in the newspaper. This 
is for your use. Use it as a guide to writing 
acceptable editorials. 

Ram Pages Editorial Policy 

1. Ram Pages reserves the right to 
make any editorial changes in all 
material submitted for publication. 

2. Only signed material will be consi 
dered for publication. Signatures will 
be withheld upon request. 

3. Any material which is considered by 
the student editor(s) or faculty advi- 
sor to be potentially libelous will be 
investigated and documented before 
consideration for publication. 

4. The writers of material in question 
■ ■' must certify sincerity of purpose and 

correctness of facts to the best of 
their knowledge. 

5. The person(s) named or implied in 
the controversial material shall be 
informed of any article before publi- 
cation and shall be given the oppor- 
tunity to respond. 

V — Thank you, 

J / - _^ , Editor-in-Chief 

" "" Kathleen Stasney 

Ne%v hourly pay rates 

for Work/Study 

employees 

There are changes concerning this 
semester's pay scales interns of the Col- 
lege Work/Study and Campus Employ- 
ment Programs. These 
changes, filed by Mr. Robert Sauer, 
Director of Financial Aid, are as follows: 
Students employed for the 1st year 
earn $4.00 per hour 
>\ Students employed for the 2nd year 
earn $4.25 per hour 
Students employed for the 3rd year 
■ earn $4.50 per hour 

Students employed for the 4th year 

earn $4.75 per hour 

With this exception: students employed 

with an authority status or in vital areas 

of confidentiality will earn $5 .00 per hour. 

These changes will be in effect starting 

January 17. 1989. 

Sauer states, "By paying incentive 
rates for continuous years of service, I 
feel we will be able to retain more quali- 
fied students from year to year, resulting 
in a more efficient operation." 

DVC Chorale 

It's not too late to join chorale! We are 
looking for new people who are inter- 
ested in music and enjoy singing. Our 
practices are Monday and Wednesday 
from 4:15 to 5:30 p.m. If you are inter- 
ested, join us for a practice, I'm sure 
you'll enjoy! Our practices are held in the 
music room, student center. 



President's Hot Line 
DVC - 1 replies 

From the desk of Vice President, Opera- 
tions — Russell K. Schuiz 

.. Thanks for your many calls concerning 
the carpeting in Elson. We do not intend to 
install new floor covering at this time. 

.. In regard to Alumni House, as with the 
remainder of our on campus housing we 
are, and will continue to, make many 
improvements. Please note —soon we will 
have a CC living on the 2nd floor of Alumni 
House. 

.. A general comment concerning heat in 
yoyr rooms. Kindly keep your calls com- 
ing if you lack adequate heat in your room, 
but please make sure all windows 
(including all storm windows) are closed. 

.. Yes, barn boxes are a thing of the past. 
Your recommendations in regard to the 
state of the shower spaces in Segal Hall 
are noted. Corrective steps are being 
taken. 

,. In regard to recycling, we have been exa- 
mining such a program at DVC for several 
months. More to follow on this subject. 

.. Clean up in Woifsohn Hall starts as early 
as feasible on Mondays, but often our 
employee cleans another dorm first, and 
then arrives at Woifsohn. 

.. Certainly, exterior lighting on our campus 
IS a matter of concern. Last year several 
students joined Mr. Frank Burk ?r.d oth- 
ers, to identify campus lighting mreds after 
which, we installed several new lights. 
Over the holidays, we installed some new 
lights to improve campus security and 
safety. Should you see a need for addi- 
tional lighting, call Security (2315) and 
advise as to the location, etc. Thanks! 

., Jennifer, thanks for your call addressing 
the weight lifting room. Yes, we all want to 
improve physically, so please see Mr. 
Wolfgang with your best recommend- 
ations. 

.. Ice on the walkway near Cooke Hall was 
also noted by Mr. Tim Varacallo and the 
needed sand was promptly applied. 
Thanks, as your safety-related call was 
really appreciated. 

.. Concerning the fire alarms, the alarms in 
all buildings are periodically tested. You 
should all know that the automatic feature 
on the fire alarm system worked perfectly 
on the evening of December 12th, in 
Cooke Dorm when the tragic fire started 
to spread. 

.. We try to keep the PUB open when the 

' student population on campus will sup- 
port the operation. Sometimes we are 
wrong, and close the doors when they 
should be open (late during the exam 
period). Mr. Steve Kline always appre- 
ciates your constructive suggestions when 
it comes to dining, so feel free to call, or 
see Steve. 

.. The contractor who owns the DVC clothes 
washer/dryer business has increased his 
rates. Sorry you were not informed in 
advance, but neither were we informed in 
a timely manner! 

.. We did have a program in effect to allow 
personnel on the 16-Meal Plan to eat 
meals during Saturday of final exams 
week. Many DVC students were accorded 
this opportunity. It's obvious one caller, at 
least, didn't have the opportunity! Sorry 
for that breakdown in communications. 



Placement Office Events 

Sign up for interviews in Placement Office 
in Segal Hall. 

. Students must submit resumes and 
transcripts to the Placement Office no 
later than Monday February 13. 

Thursday, February 2 

Barefoot Grass Lawn Service. 
Positions: Landscape Manager, Territory 
Manager 

Majors: Horticulture, Agronomy, Orna- 
mental Horticulture 

Sande Castle Winery 
Positions: Vineyard Manager, Assistant 
Manager, Assistant Winemaker 
Majors: Agronomy, Agribusiness, Orna- 
mental Horticulture, Horticulture, Food 
Industry ^ . 

Tuesday, February 7 

.. Lady Foot Locker 

Positions: Management Trainees 
Majors: Any majors, preferably Business 
Admin. 

Wednesday, February 8 

* NPC Services 

Positions: Interior Maintenance Techni- 
cians, Gardener, Landscape Technicians 
Majors: Ornamental Horticulture, 
, Horticulture. 

Thursday, February 9 

W.A. Novak — Investments 
: Positions: Full-time and internships 
Majors: Business Seniors, Juniors, and 
Sophomores 

Thursday, February 16 

Eichenlaub, Inc. 
. Positions: Landscape Foreman 
Majors: Ornamental Horticulture, 
Horticulture. 

• Agway " ; ' 
. Positions: Management Trainess 

Majors: Agribusiness. Agronomy, Animal 
A Science, Business, Dairy Science, Horti- 
J culture. Ornamental Horticulture 

Tuesday, February 21 

Evergreen Lawn Corporation 
Positions: Sales and Customer Service 
Majors: Any majors. 

Wednesday, February 22 

International Computer Print (ICC) 
Positions: Programmer Trainees 
Majors: CISM, Business Admin, with some 
computer courses. 

Wistar Institute V 

Positions: Research Technicians 
Majors: Biology, Chemistry 

Thursday, February 23 

Farm Credit Bank of Springfield 
Positions: Credit Rep. Trainees 
Majors: Business Admin., Agribusiness, 
Agronomy with a minimum of 2 Account 
ing courses. 



Aggies on the Road to Ist Place 



by Kathleen Stasney 
At the York College Tournament Del 
Val was the dominating force. DVC took 
the team title beating Lycoming 112-80. 
Del Val also had six individual cham- 
pions. Shaun Smith was named the 
tournament's Outstanding Wrestler. 
Each school was permitted to bring two 
wrestlers in each weight class and the 
Aggies ended up wrestling each other in 
four weight classes in the finals. Coach 
Bob Marshal said the tournament was "a 
real workout and a good tournament for 
the kids to be in" as a tune-up for the 
season. 
Del Val took three wins against host 

$11,000 POETRY 

CONTEST 

Students Urged to Enter 

Poets can now enter a new poetry 
contest with $11,000.00 in prizes. The 
Grand Prize is $1,000.00 and the First 
Prize $500.00. In all, 152 poets will win 
awards and national publication. The 
contest, sponsored by the American 
Poetry Association, is open to the public 
and entry is free. 

"Students are often winners in our 
contests, and we would like to see more 
students' poetry," said Robert Nelson, 
Publisher for the Association. "We want 
to find undiscovered poets and give them 
the recognition they deserve. This year 
our winners will be published and public- 
ized to the utmost of our power." 

Poets may enter the contest by send- 
ing up to six poems, each no more than 
20 lines, name and address on each page, 
to American Poetry Association, Dept. 
CT-22, 250 A Potrero Street, P.O. Box 
1803, Santa Cruz, CA 95061-1803. The 
contest remains open until June 30, to 
allow students ample time to enter dur- 
ing spring or summer break. Poets who 
enter early will be invited to another con- 
test with another $1,000.00 Grand Prize. 

Each poem is also considered for pub- 
lication in the American Poetry 
Anthology, a leading collection of con- 
temporary verse. 

During six years of sponsorship the 
American Poetry Association has run 28 
contests and awarded over $112,000 in 
prizes to 2,850 winning poets. 



Tuesday, February 28 

Parker Interior Plantscape 
Positions: Service Technicians, Manage 
ment Trainees 

Majors: Ornamental Horticulture, Horti- 
culture, Agronomy. Agribusiness. 

Southern States 

Positions: Management Trainees 
Majors: Agribusiness, Agronomy, Orna- 
mental Horticulture, Horticulture, Animal 
Science, Dairy Science, Business Admin. 



Ursinus, 40-0, Lafayette, 37-6, and Stev- 
ens, 49-6. The Aggies had more dual 
matches that night than they have had 
this season. "It was a long night," said 
Marshall. "I was really happy with our 
conditioning. We only took a few min- 
utes between each match." 

At the Ithaca Duals Del Val all but 
assured itself of the No. 1 ranking in Div- 
ision III. The Aggies beat not only top 
ranked Ithaca, 21-13, but also won against 
No. 8 Cortland (NY) State, 36-7, and No. 
4 St. Lawrence, 36-9. Del Val wrestlers 
won 21 of the 30 matches they were 
involved in and drew in two others. 

Del Val's Joe Butts 

makes the 
1,000-PointClub. 

by Kathleen Stasney 
Joe Butts made his 1,000 point 54 
seconds into the game against the Eliza- 
bethtown's Bluejays. 

The Aggies started the game off quick 
and had control of the first half until the 
final six minutes when the Bluejays 
brought the score up to a tight 34-33. 
Brian Manley was the games high scorrer 
with 19 points, while Joe Butts made 17 
points. Manley and Butts found them- 
selves with Matt Duffy and Mike Bunick 
lor shadows. 

In the second half the pace was kept 
fast when Joe Butts, Marc Reason, Eric 
Banks, and Brian Manley started hitting 
again. The Aggies lost in overtime to the 
Bluejays 77-71. Coach Bill Werkiser was, 
"pleased with tonight's effort. We have a 
lot of young kids on the floor and they're 
experienced. They blew us out last year 
and we stayed with them tonight." 



lie V^C -dtUtaitf Pu6UcaU(XH 



^^, 




S»t tOI5 • A*«c 1-232-3447 






v#^ro. 




***PLEASE NOTE***: EVENING HOURS WILL BE EXTENDED UNTIL MIDNIGHT WHEN STAFFING CAN BE ARRANGED. . 
Sunday/ Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday 



1 


2 


3 


4 


5 .:0:>^i. 


6 


7 ■ 


8 


9 

8:30 a.m. - 
4:30 p.m. 


10 

8:30 a.m. - 
4:30 p.m. 


11 

8:30 a.m. ■ 
4:30 p.m. 


12 

8:30 a.m. - 
4:30 p.m. 


13 

8:30 a.m. - 
4:30 p.m. 


14 

9:30 a.m. - 
5:30 p.m. 


^5 

NOON -11:00 p.m. 


16 ::Mr 

8:30 a.m. - 
11:00 p.m. 


17 

8:00 a.m. - 
11:00 p.m. 


18 

''V 

8:00 a.m. - 
11:00 p.m. 


19 

8.00 a.m. • . 
11:00 p.m. 


20 

8:00 a.m. - 
9:30 p.m. 


21 

9:30 a.m. • 
5:30 p.m. 


22 

NOON - 1:00 p.m. 


23 

8.00 a.m. - 
11:00 p.m. 


24 

8:00 a.m. - 
11:00 p.m. 


25 

8:00 a.m. ■ 
11:00 p.m. 


26 

8:00 a.m. - 
11:00 p.m. 


27 .,,.; 

8.00 a.m - 
9:30 p.m. 


28 

9:30 a.m. - 
5:30 p.m. 


29 

NOON 11:00 p.m. 


30 

8:00 a.m. - 
11:00 p.m. 


31 

8K)0a.m. - 
11:00 p.m. 






JANUARY '89 





Vol. XXm. No. 12 Ttoraday. Fobroary 2, 1909 

NOTICE: The ooinions expressed m any individual article do not necessarily reflect the viewpoint (rf the paper or school. 




Solanges Smrcka c/ the American Universify of Les Caves in Haiti. 

DVA announces Third World project 
%vith Haitain University 



bif Kathleen Stasney 

Delaware Valley College will assist the 
American University of Les Cayes 
( AULC) in the Republic of Haiti to estab 
lish a program of hands-on applications 
of modern agricultural techniques. Dr. 
John C. Mertz, Vice President for Aca- 
demic Affairs, announced at a press con- . 
ference held Tuesday, Jan. 24. 

Mrs. Solanges Smrcka, Chairman of 
the Board of Trustees of AULC, a nurse 
and a native of Haiti, and her husband, 
Dr. Antonin Smrcka, Executive Vice 
President of AULC, were on hand at the 
conference to hear the announcement 
and answer questions of the press. 

Mrs. Smrcka views the College's 
involvement as "a positive move." 



"The Haitians are aware that they 
need help, and they want it and appre- 
ciate it," she said earnestly. 

Of his visit there Jan. 4-9 this year. Dr. 
Mertz said, "The first thing people told 
me was Thank you!' " 

This program not only will give the 
people of Haiti a chance to improve their 
lives, but also will give the students from 
DVC who participate in the exchange an 
opportunity to observe the culture and 
needs of a tropical nation. 

"By late fall, our College hopes to be in 
a position to begin sending faculty and 
students to AULC to start setting up the 
needed model facility there," projected 
Dr. Mertz. 



GRADUATE SCHOOL??? 

by Dr. Robert Berthold, Jr. 

During one of our Annual Career 
Days, I had the opportunity of spending 
quite a bit of time with Dr. Roger Locan- 
dro, a Cook College (Agricultural branch 
of Rutgers University) dean. During this 
time, we spoke with a number of our 
students. I was surprised to find how 
many of them had no idea how to finance 
a graduate education. 

In the case of Liberal Arts majors — 
including those majoring in business and 
related fields — most students have to 
finance their own graduate educations. It 
is true, however, that many business 
graduates receive financial assistance 
from employers to help finance their 
graduate educations. '# 

Financing a graduate education is fre- 
quently a different matter for those stu- 
dents majoring in Agriculture and in 
many of the sciences. Many graduate 
,school departments offer research 
'^ssistantships and/or teaching assistant- 
ships to academically qualified students, 
with often a "B" average being enough to 
qualify. Presently, graduate assistance is 
averaging about $10,000.00 per year plus 
tuition being waived. All assistance is 
often tax exempt. 

Many of the stud^ts whomT)r. Locan- 
dro and I initially spoke with, said that 
they couldn't afford to go on to graduate 
school after the high costs involved with 
their undergraduate education. However, 
opportunities for financing graduate 
education do exist. If you are interested 
and you have the academic credentials, 
you really should consider graduate 
school. 

If you think that you might be inter- 
ested in pursuing a graduate degree pro- 
gram, talk it over with your advisor, or if 
you like, make an appointment and come 
and discuss it with me. (Mandell 203, 
Extension 2285 or 2284). 



Annual Beach Party 

Are you ready?! Get out of the winter 
cold and get into the summer, as Haagen- 
Dazs presents the Summertime Anytime 
Beach Party, sponsored by the Student 
Activity Committee. 

Ray Boston, the producer, is behind 
this exciting, fun-filled happening and 
you are invited! This event includes an 
actual swimming pool, dance floor, golf 
area, and ■ get this, a realistic beach 
scene complete with heavy duty lighting 
to make everyone look tan! 

What is a beach without sand?! You 
guessed it, they will have sand too! 
That's not all, there will be a concession 
area, games, contests, prizes and more! 
Admission is free, so why not start the 
summer a little earlier and come over to 
have some fun? 

This event started in February of 1987 
and has become a popular gala. The 
Anytime Beach Party will be held on 
February 23, in the All-Purpose Room in 
the Student Center. Administration, Faculty 
and Staff are more than welcome to 
attend. If there are any questions, please 
feel free to contact Ched Baker at 
Extension 2393. 



On Campus 



Thursday, February 2 
Women's Basketball (A) vs 

College Misericordia . . 7:30 
Saturday, February 4 
Men's Basketball (A) vs 

Messiah College 

(MAC) .......8:30 

Wrestling (H) vs Moravian 

College IKW 

Monday, February 6 
Men's Basketball (A) vs Spring 

Garden College . . 8:00 

Women's Basketball (H) vs 

King's College 

(MAC) ../.*.... 7:00 

Wednesday, February 8 
Happy Wednesday Taylor 

Mason — comedian, 

musician, and ventriloquist. 
Men's Basketball (H) vs FDU 

Madison (MAC) 8:00 

Women's Basketball (H) vs 

FDU Madison (MAC) . 6:00 
Wrestling (A) vs Elizabeth- 
town College ......... 7:30 



Editor-in-Chief 
Reporters . . . 


Staff 

Kathleen Stasney 

. . Tony Palumbo, Julie Kuarie 


Photography . 
Advisors .... 


Brad Bittner, Pai^ Barnett 

Laurent Lanee 

Joe Ferry, Anne Biggs, 

Mr. Edward O'Brien. 
Dr. Richard Zicmer 



From the Desk 
of the Ambassador: 
PA Farm Show 1989 

by Brad A. Bittner 

It was the 73rd annual show-and-tell 
for Pennsylvania agriculture and it was a 
grand display at that. It was my second 
as the DVC Food and Agriculture 
Ambassador and was very productive. 

The pre-farm show dinner was deli- 
cious. The Governor Robert P. Casey 
and his Secretary of Agriculture Boyd 
Wolff warmly greeted Sandie and me at 
the opening ceremonies and later on 
their tours through the show. Secretary 
Wolff aptly described Gov. Casey as a 
"blue ribbon supporter of agriculture" 
when he introduced him to officially open 
the show. 

The Dairy Science program was well 
represented by six fine animals and a 
well-kept education'display. Dairy Society 
advisor Jerry Myers, Rick Lawrence, 
Cheryl Warren and all the other students 
who helped throughout the week should 
be commended Tor a job well done. 
Steven Shetterly (Dairy Science "91) 
presented himself very well in an inter- 
view for the local T.V. news after a calf 
was born to one of his family's Ayrshire 
cows. 

Sandie, myself and other DVC stu- 
dents and recruiters spoke to many 
prospective Aggies and parents inter- 
ested in Del Val. A cat skeleton at the 
DVC display caught many a person's 
attention — especially the children. I 
enjoyed the delicious food and drinks 
sold by the PA commodity food booths 
and the time 1 had to watch the very 
popular horse pulling contest! I met 
some fine people and had a great time. 

I would like to extend a sincere "thank 
you" to Dr. Plummer for all his support 
and to my partner, Sandie Solimene, for 
her wonderful company and conversa- 
tion throughout the week. To all the oth- 
ers who supported us in our efforts — 
thank you! 



''Hansel and Greter 
Slated 

The DVC Players has scheduled its 
first production of the 1989 season. The 
Players will be performing "Hansel and 
Gretel", a children's play based on the 
Grimm fairy tale, on February 10 and 11, 
at the Student Center Coffee House on 
the Delaware Valley College campus. 

Show times are 7:00 p.m. on Friday, 
and 10:00 a.m., 2:00 p.m. and 7:00 p.m. 
on Saturday. Admission is by reserva- 
tion only due to limited seating in the 
Coffee House. Tickets are $3.00 (with a 
$1 .(X) discount to adults accompanied by 
a child). For reservations, call 345-15(X), 
Ext. 2259. 



HAPPY WEDNESDAY 

SPONSORED BY 

STUDENT ACTIVITIES COMMITTEE 

PJ DANCE PARTY 

FEB. 15 

9 AM 1 AM 

WEAR YOUR PJ'S, ROBE, SLIPPERS 

AND PARTY!! 

BOXERS, NIGHT SHIRTS & 

TEDDY BEARS 

WILL BE GIVEN AW AYr 

(REST UP FOR THIS ONE, 

SWEETIES!!) 



Bee House 
Improvenients 

by Dr. Berthold 

The old stone building across :he rail- 
road tracks in back of Berkowitz Dorm is 
one of the oldest buildings on campus. It 
initally served as the headhouse for the 
College's early duck raising operation. 
When Dr. Berthold began his career 
here at Delaware Valley College, Dr. 
Feldstein asked him if he would be inter- 
ested in using the building as the center 
of operations for Apiculture. Although 
the building had been abandoned for 
many years and no longer had windows, 
doors, water, electricity, or a heating 
system, "Doc" Berthold recognized its 
potential. Over the years through the 
efforts of the College, the Apiary Society, 
and a number of local beekeepers, the 
building has become quite functional. 

The building, and the recently con- 
structed Agway type building currently 
serve as the center of operations for the 
management of the College's apiaries, 
for teaching the College's apiculture 
course and its two beekeeping short 
courses, as the meeting place for the 
College's Apiary Society, and for various 
ongoing research projects. 

As with any old building, there is 
always a need for improvements in the 
Bee House, as it's come to be called. 
Recently, through the auspicies of the 
Apiary Society, certain alumni, and a 
number of local beekeepers, all of the 
windows in the building were replaced at 
a cost of $2,6(X).00. The work was done 
by a local contractor Mr. Norm Schorr 
who along with his daughter Lisa both 
graduated from Delaware Valley College. 



Companies that will be 
attending career day 

Agway, Inc. 

American Homes Foods 

American Production Inventory 

Argus Research Labs., Inc. 

Asgrow Seed Company 

Atlantic Breeders Corp. 

Bartons West End Farms 

Beverage Capital Corp. 

Brickman Industries 

Bucks County Bank 

Cargill, Inc. — Nutrina Feed Div. 

Chapel Valley Landscape Co. 

Chemlawn Services Corporation 

Ciba — Geigy Agricultural Div. 

College of Agriculture, PA State Univ., 

Graduate Program 
Control Services, Inc. 
Crop Production Services 
Devro, Inc. 
Doylestown, Hospital 
Ecogen Inc. 

Evergreen Lawns Corp. 
Farmers Home Administration 
Federal Bureau of Investigation 
Fisher Brothers Wholesale Plumbing & 

Heatiijg Supply 
Frank's Nursery & Crafts 
Friendly Restaurants 
Gale Nurseries Inc. 

General Services Administration (GSA) 
Quality Floral & Garden Center 
Robert Montgomery Landscape Nursery 
Rohm & Haas Company 
Rolling Hill Hopsital 
Rotele Inc. 
Royer's Flowers, Inc. 
Shearon Environmental Design 
Shemin Nurseries, Inc. 
Sire Power Inc. 
Smith Kline & French t 
Soil Conservation Service 
Southern State Cooperative 
TSC Shores 

Thomas & Bet ts Corporation 
Thomas Jefferson University 
Tree-Tech, Inc. 

Union National Bank & Trust Co. 
United States Air Force 
United States Army 
U.S. Healthcare 
U.S. Restaurants (Ponderosa, Rib-st, 

Burger King) 
U.S.D.A.,AMS,FPB,F&U 
USDA Farmers Home Admin. 
USDA — Soil Conservation Service 



Ziemcrisiii 

Stagecoach: 

drama director 



What is 

Happv Wednesday? 

The Student Activities Committee 
(SAC) has defined every Wednesday to 
be the Happy Wednesday activity night. 
The SAC stresses, "Since Wednesday is 
the middle of the week, this is one good 
reason to be happy." 

Another good reason to be happy is 
that throughout the spring semester of 
1989, the SAC is sponsoring events that 
will be held every Wednesday night in the 
Student Center and will start at 9:00 pm. 
This event may be a comedian, a movie, 
a singer or a band. 

Of course, this certainly does not 
mean that Wednesday will be the only 
night for events. There will also be var- 
ious popular Pub Nites held every 
Thursday night. 

Along with these events, the SAC is 
planning additional daytime and wee- 
kend events. Look for more details on 
Happy Wednesdays and other SAC 
activities in the Ram Pages and on bul- 
letin boards on campus. 



By any other name 

This is the last straw. 

First, "liberal" became a dirty word, to 
be avoided by every self-respecting 
politician. 

Now, no one wants to be called a 
farmer. 

It's not that they don't want to be 
farmers, at least not according to leaders 
in the field. They just don't want people 
to know that's what they are. 

The Future Farmers of America has 
voted to take "farmers" out of its name. 
The organization's powers-that-be said 
the word hurt recruiting. 

So they got delegates at the 61st 
annual convention of the (former) Future 
Farmers of America to vote to change 
the name. From now on, future farmers 
will be card-carrying members of the 
National FFA Organization. 

To add insult to injury, delegates also 
voted to strip the words "vocational 
agriculture" from the FFA symbol, 
constitution and bylaws. The words 
"agricultural education" will take their 
place. 

. Next thing you know, farmers will call 
themselves "agricultural engineers." 

And they'll be lamenting the demise of 
the family office complex. 

—By Jodi Enda 
— Courtes)^ Philadelphia Inquirer, 

Nov. 11.1988 



P&P Day IS COMING 

APRIL 13. WILL YOU BE 

PART OF IT? 



NOTICE 

Graduation will begin at 10:30 

AM on Sunday May 21. Make 

plans accordingly. 



"Feature the Teacher" 

proudly presents: 

Dr. Nathaniel O. Wallace 

by Tony Palumbo 

Delaware Valley College this semester 
welcomes Dr. Nathaniel O. Wallace, 
Assistant Professor of English, to its Lib- 
eral Arts faculty. Dr. Wallace is curently 
teaching two sections of English I, an 
introductory-level course designed for 
incoming freshman, and two sections of 
Developmental English, a remedial 
course. 

The addition of Dr. Wallace to the L. A. 
faculty is part of DelVal's efforts to 
enlarge its English division. This expan- 
sion is designed to aid the college in its 
attempt to gain accreditation for an Eng- 
lish major, an effort of which Dr. Wallace 
wholeheartedly approves. The adminis- 
tration felt that a professor with a Ph.D. 
in literature would greatly benefit the 
department, and Dr. Wallace, with a 
doctorate in Comparative Literature from 
Rutgers University, satisfies this need 
quite well. The administration also sf >ught 
someone with a wide range of experien- 
ces who could bring an inter-disc iplinary 
approach to his work, and Dr. Wallace, 

Please turn to page 4 



NEW BRITAIN INN 

"Del Val's home away from home" 



SUN. NIGHT: 

MON. NIGHT: 

TUES. NIGHT: 

WED. NIGHT: 



THUR. NIGHT: 

FRI. NIGHT: 

SAT. NIGHT: 



Restaurant/Tavern 
Employees Night 

DJ Steve Coffey 
(DelVal alum) 

Steamers — 
$1.95/Dozen 

Import Night — 
Most $1.25/Bottle 

$1.25 Cheese 
Steak Night 
College Night: 
$1 off Pitchers 
with College ID. 

DJ and Dancing 

DJ and Dancing 

Live entertainment 



Seafood & Sandwiches 
All Items to Go! 
HAPPY HOUR 
4-6:30 Mon.-Fri. 



Rt. 202 • New Britain, PA 
348-1968 



Continued from page 3 

having spent seven years teaching abroad 
in China and Europe, certainly fulfills this 
criterion as well. 

Nathaniel Wallace is an alumnus of 
both the College of Charleston in South 
Carolina and Rutgers University in New 
Jersey, completing his graduate work in 
comparative literature at the latter. In 
the Spring of 1981 he left the states for 
Mainland China, where he taught at 
three different universities: Hebei, Jilin 
(both provincial schools), and Peking 
Normal University, a training facilty for 
teachers. While there, he taught "a little 
of everything," irrcluding composition, 
British, American, and comparative 
literature, and even some Latin to three 
Linguistics graduate students. 

After four and a half years in Asia, Dr 
Wallace turned his attention to the Ola 
World when he joined the University of 
Maryland's European Division. During 
this period, he taught at both NATO and 
American military bases in Belgium, 
Germany and Holland. While his prim- 
ary teaching concern at this time was 
composition, his eclectic courseload 
included classes in literature, Greek 
mythology, and contemporary Chinese 
Culture, which he taught jointly with his 
wife. He describes the students there as 
primarily "vocationally oriented," noting 
that a high percentage of them has been 
involved in agriculture. Finally, after two 
and a half years in Europe, he elected to 
return to American soil, concluding a 
seven-year trip abroad. 

At present. Dr. Wallace resides across 
the Delaware River in Princeton, New 
Jersey, which he describes as a very 
pleasant location. His wife, Janet Koza- 
chek, is currently attending Parson's 
School of Design in New York. While 
abroad with her husband, she studied 
Chinese art and literature, and a painting 
of hers in this style hangs in his office. 

After nearly a semester. Dr. Wallace 
has thoroughly enjoyed his stay at Del- 
Val thus far, finding the college agreeable 
both personally and professionally. He 
looks forward to tl^ future, and hopes to 
be able to integrate his diverse expe- 
rience into his teaching for the t>enefit of 
the students. He also hopes to possibly 
return sometime in the future to China, 
where DVC now has some ties. He says 
that he holds the college in high regard, 
noting its unusual history, speaks highly 
of its student body, and praises his col- 
leagues' energy and dedication. He 
approves the school's efforts to gain 
accreditation for an English major, citing 
what he perceives as an increasingly 
"communication-skills oriented" society. 
His advice to students is to be less reti- 
cent about participating in their classes, 
for he believes that "they are capable of 
inuch more than they realize," 




PA Farm Show showcase for DelVal 

by Jerr\/ Myers, 
Dairy Society Advisor 

Delaware Valley College experienced another successful year at the Pennsylva- 
nia Farm Show. This annual exhibition, displaying all phases of Pennsylvania 
agriculture and its commodities, was held in Harrisburg at the Farm Show Com- 
plex from Saturday, Jan. 7 through Friday, Jan. 13. 

Several dairy science students worked long, hard hours to prepare and present 
DVC's dairy cattle at this year's competition. The College won 4th, 8th and 10th 
place honors in various age catigories in the Ayrshire show. The Brown Swiss 
Aged Cow placed 5th, while both Holstein Cows had a final placing of 13th in 
strongly competitive classes. 

Once again, this year's work crew proved successful in its diligent work by 
capturing 4th place honors (on three out of four days) in overall presentation, 
cleanliness and up-keep of the DVC dairy exhibit. 

Rick Lawrence, Cheryl Warren, Jennifer Garfield, Chip Campbell, Sue Blaclc 
and James Lenhart are to be commended and congratulated for their excelent 
efforts in building and presenting this year's display. Other students who offered 
their assistance for show day are Chris Faulkler, Pete Brummer and Robert 
(Beaver) Zeigler. The Diary Society can be proud of their efforts and achievements. 

Dan Alexander and his great greenhouse crew are to be thanked for working 
with us by providing flowers to decorate the exhibit. Each year they give us 150% 
cooperation with our display, and they certainly deserve credit for the success of 
the dairy exhibit. 

It takes much time, collaboration and cooperation to create a positive impre;;- 
sion for the public. All of these people have done a great job of presenting an image 
of sportsmanship, positive attitude, integrity and professional ability to both the 
public and to industry-related jjersonnel. 





IS)®nsRR^mg^afll]®^ (S®nil(§g® ^SoodlcgQQG I^few^lpaIp®ff 



Vol. XXIII, No. 13 Tharsdav, February 9, 1989 

NOTICE: The opinions expressed in any individua! article do not necessarity reflect the viewpoint of the paper or school. 



Career Day Coming 

You have probably heard about our 
7th Annual Career Day by now or at 
least seen our flyers around campus. If 
you haven't, here's your chance to find 
out more about the February 15 event. 

Career Day is designed to be a casual 
information exchange between you and 
prospective employers. All students are 
welcome. Although many employers will 
have full-time job opportunities, many 
others will have part-time and summer 
employment opportunities. So, Fresh- 
men, Sophomores, Juniors as well as 
Seniors should attend equipped with a 
supply of resumes. All majors will be 
represented at the day's event. 

This year we expect 87+ organizations 
as you can see by reviewing the 
attendance list. Remember the time and 
date, Wednesday, Feb. 15, 11:00-3:00, 
Student Center All-Purpose Room. 

See you there! 

Agway, Incv -'-^.^ •-.^*:. 
American Homes Foods 
American Production Inventory 
Argus Research Labs., Inc. 
Asgrow Seed Company . 
Atlantic Breeders Corp. 
Bartons West End Farms 
Beverage Capital Corp. 
Brickman Industries \ , , 
Bucks County Bank 
Cargill, Inc. — Nutrina Feed Div. 
Chapel Valley Landscape Co. 
Chemlawn Services Corporation 
Ciba — Geigy Agricultural Div. 
College of Agriculture, PA State 

Univ., Graduate Program 
Control Services, Inc. 
Crop Production Services 
Devro, Inc. 
Doylestoivn, Hospital 
Ecogen Inc. 

Evergreen Lawns Corp. 
Farmers Home Administration 
Federal Bureau of Investigiition 
Fisher Brothers Wholesale 

Plumbing & Heating Supply 
Frank's Nursery & Crafts 
Friendly Restaurants 
Gale Nurseries Inc. 

Please turn to page 2 



Some Del Val Students 
Make Who's Who 



The 1989 edition of WHO'S WHO 
AMONG STUDENTS IN AMERICAN 
UNIVERSITIES AND COLLEGES will 
include the names of 30 students from 
Delaware Valley College who have been 
selected as national outstanding leaders. 

Campus nominating committees and 
editors of the annual directory have 
included the names of these students 
based on their academic achievement, 
service to the community, leadership in 
extracurricular activities and potential 
for continued success. 

They join an elite group of students 
selected from more than 1 ,400 institutions 
of higher learning in all 50 states, the 
District of Columbia and several foreign 
nations. 

Outstanding students have been 
honored in the annual directory since it 
was first published in 1934. 

Students names this year from DVS 
are: 

"FOR LOVERS 
ONLY" LIVE 
MUSICAL REVUE 

Enhance your Valentine's Day candy 
and flowers routine by treating your true 
love to an evening of live romantic music 
and delicate hors d'oeuvres, intimately 
presented in the Music Room of the 
Delaware Valley College Student Center 
on Tuesday, Feb. 14 at 8 p.m. 

"For Lovers Only," presented by the 
Pennsylvania Theaterworks Company, 
is a romantic revue featuring sensitive, 
sensuous solos and loving duets (spiced 
with a few humorous happenings!) from 
opera, operetta and musical comedy. 
The program promises to set the mood 
for quiet tenderness and gentle passion-- 
the rest is up to you! 

Tickets are available at the door for $4 
general public and $3 for senior citizens 
and students. For further information, 
call the college at 345-1500. 



Gary A. Apgar 
Charles Baker 
Suzanne Barnhiirst 
Ann E. Bastian 
Peter E. Brummer 
Glenn Carlson 
Wayne Chabot 
April DeGeorge 
Kevin S. Dickmyer 
Todd Doucette 
Laura L. Etzweiler 
Jason W. Freed 
Kara Ghering 
Donald Griffing 
Nancy Ondra 
David Haninchick 
Laine R. Hellein 
Kristina Heston 
Jennifer Jesiolowski 
Jeffrey Kerr 
Richard W. Kulp 
Richard W. Lawrence 
Daniel W.Paulus 
Tracy Marshall 
Hubert Noutchogouin 
Joanne M. Pekol 
Richard Shaddinger 
Robert W. Solly 
John H. Stierly 
Michael Zarbatany 



Blood Mobile 

February 22, 1989 

from 12 5 p.m. in the APR 

the goal is - 125 pints 
Sign up with your RA, Ceasers 

Pub or Health Service 
Please sign up by February 

15th. 



FLORAL SOCIETY 




VALENTINE'S 

DAY 

CANDY GRAMS 



see 



Bev: 345-4193 or 
Tony/ Dave: Elson 20 



On Campus 



Thursday, February 9 

Pub Nite Dance 9 p.m.-l a.m. 
Friday, February 10 
Win, Lose, or Draw in the 

Pub 9 p.m. 

"Hansel and Gretel" in the 

Coffeehouse 7 p.m. 

Saturday, February 11 
"Hansel and Gretel" continues 
Valentine's Dinner Dance in the 

APR 7 p.m.-l a.m. 

Wrestling (A) vs Western 
Maryland College and 
Susquehanna Univ. 

■ •••••■••••••••••a ^ fJ ■ I 1 I * 

Sunday, February 12 

Flyers vs Vancouver on Prism 
----' in the Pub 
Monday, February 13 . 

No classes 
Tuesday, February 14 
Follow a Monday Schedule 
Comedian "Sniglets" Rich Hall 
Tickets will be on sale 
Wednesday, February 15 
Career Day in the APR All 

Day Dress to Impress 
Pub Nite - PJ Dance in the 

Pub 9 p.m.-l a.m. 

Men's Basketball (H) vs 
Lycoming College . . 8 p.m. 



Staff 

Editor-in-Chief . 
Reporters .... 

Photography . . 


Kathleen Stasney 

. Tony Palumbo, Julie Keane 

Brad Bittner, Paige Barnett 

. Laurent Lanee 


Advisors 


. . . . . Joe Ferry, Anne Biggs, 

Mr. Edward O'Brien, 

Dr. Richard Ziemcr 



Dear Editor 

Cafeteria Manners 

I would like to bring up the subject 
involving some students who refuse to 
bring their finished trays and utensils to 
the dish area. Some people may not 
realize, but is is very disrespectful to 
other students who must sit down at 
tables where trays have been left. One 
other important reason is that the 
cafeteria employees should not have to 
pick up your trays. They must do other 
things. 

It is really not a hard thing to 
accomplish. If students do their part, it 
will help considerably in the long run. If 
they choose not to bring up their trays, 
the rules shall be enforced. 

Julia Keane 
Cafeteria Employee 



Career Day 

Continued from page 1 

General Services Administration 

(GSA) 
Quaiitv Floral & Garden Center 
RobcrtMoid a oineiyLaMdwapeNiaaeiV 
Rohm & Haas Company 
Rollins Hill Hospital 
Rotele Inc. 
Royer's Flowers, Inc. 
Shearon Environmental Design 
Shemin Nurseries, Inc. 
Sire Power Inc. 
Smith Kline & French 
Soil Conservation Service. 
Southern State Cooperative 
TSC Shores 

Thomas & Betts Corporation 
Thomas Jefferson University 
Tree-Tech, Inc. 

Union National Bank & Trust Co. 
United States Air Force 
United States Army 
U.S. Healthcare 
U.S. Restaurants (Ponderosa, Rib^t, 

Burger King) 
U.S.D.A., AMS, FPB, F & U 
USDA Farmers Home Admin. , 
USDA — Soil Conservation 
Service 



FOR SALE 

APIARY SOCIETY 

HONEY 

many varieties 

and 

BEESWAX CANDLES 

tapers, colors, shapes 

see 

CLUB MEMBERS 

or 

LASKER HALL 

Receptionist 

(Great Gifts!) 



REPLIES TO DVC-1 
(President's Hot Line) 

. . For the woman student who called 
concerning alleged harassment in the 
case of a College employee. Thanks 
for the call — corrective steps have 
been taken. 

. . Darlene, concerning the loss of your 
change in the cigarette machine. See 
Mr. Decker or Dean Craver and your 
money will be refunded. 

. . Concerning the waxing of floors in 
Cooke Dorm. Sorry, but the job being 
accomplished was the "sealing" of our 
new tile floor. This process is far 
different than waxing and should not 
be walked on for a certain p)eriod of 
time. 

. . Mud between Wolfshon and Goldman! 
We got out a fire hose and the mud is 
gone! 

. . Cleanliness on Goldman, 2nd floor — 
corrective steps have been taken. 
Keep us posted if the job isn't getting 
done. 

. . You say, "The food is bad — do 
something about it, please." What 
day? What meal? Do you have a 
name/phone number? We need more 
specifics to be responsive to your 
complaint. 
. Dave, we're working on identifying 
unloading spots at our dorms — 
especially Barness, Cooke and Work. 
As the weather improves we'll do 
some paving. Remember, if you have 
to make a brief 5 minute drop off/ pick 
up at a dorm — keep your hazard 
lights flashing. 

. . All pay phones have been fixed. 
Thanks for your calls. 



What is 

Happy Wednesday? 

The Student Activities Committee 
(SAC) has defined every Wednesday to 
be the Happy Wednesday activity night. 
The SAC stresses, "Since Wednesday is 
:the middle of the week, this is one good 
reason to be happy." 

Another good reason to be happy is 
that throughout the spring semester of 
1989, the SAC is sponsoring events that 
will be held every Wednesday night in the 
Student Center and will start at 9:00 pm. 
This event may be a comedian, a movie, 
a singer or a band. 

Of course, this certainly does not 
mean that Wednesday will be the only 
night for events. There will also be var- 
ious popular Pub Nites held every 
Thursday night. 

Along with these events, the SAC is 
planning additional daytime and wee- 
kend events. Look for more details on 
Happy Wednesdays and other SAC 
activities in the Ram Pages and on bul- 
letin boards on campus. 



Phonathon '89 calling for 
volunteers 



pho-na-thon / *fo-na-thon / n 
(L, fr Gk phon-, phono-sound) 
1: volunteers phoning for funds 
2: one heck of a good time 

Are you willing to generate generosity 
for your alma mater? Then Phonathon 
1989 is the place to be this winter! 

The Development Office has an- 
nounced the dates for this year's "dialing 
for dollars" fundraising event. On seven 
weekday evenings between Feb. 27 and 
March 9, volunteers from among current 
students, alums and DVC faculty and 
administraiton will be calling other DelVal 
alums and friends to ask them to give as 
generously as they can to this year's 
Annual Giving Campaign. And we would 
like you to consider helping us and being 
part of the fun and excitement. 

Each evening, dinner and a training 
session runs from 5:30 to 6:30 in the 
Lasker Hall Lobby. Then, from 6:30 until 
9, we call alumni from the lists the 
Development Office has formulated. It's 
easy, it's fun, and it's a great way to give 
your College a hand. 

We have t-shirts, lots of food and 
prizes, so send in the coupon to Linda 
Dolby, Development Office Lasker Hall 
as soon as possible. Thanks! 



SAC Presents 

RICH HALL 

Originator of 
"Snislets" 

Tuesday, February 14 
Tickets on Sale : 
See a SAC member' 



^^Hansel and 
GreteV Slated 

The DVC Players has scheduled its 
first production of the 1989 season. The 
Players will be performing "Hansel and 
Gretel", a children's play based on the 
Grimm fairy tale, on February 10 and 1 1 , 
at the Student Center Coffee House on 
the Delaware Valley College campus. 

Show times are 7:00 p.m. on Friday, 
and 10:00 a.m., 2:00 p.m. and 7:00 p.m. 
on Saturday. Admission is by reserva- 
tion only due to limited seating in the 
Coffee House. Tickets are $3.00 (with a 
$ 1 .00 discount to adults accompanied by 
a child). For reservations, call 345-1500, 
Ext. 2259. 



I 
I 
1 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 

%' 

I 

I 

I 

I 
I 

r 

I 

I 

I 

I 



(A 

(A 

JO 

u 



w 

D 

mi 



> 
S 

z 


Z <y 
OE 
X oi 



c 



JZ 

a. 



00 

^ ^ JS 

tf) -ft i- 

S{ w 3 

H- > H 



t^ 00 CO 



CM 



E 
2 



CM <N (^ . 

O (Q (O « ^ 

,„ a) o ^ w 2 

w :£ 2 H 5 H 






CLIP, FILL OUT, DELIVER TO: 

Linda Dolby 

Development Office 

Lasker Hall 



RAY BOSTON 

PRODUCTIONS 

MUSIC • DMNX • FUN • SMILES • FRNENOS 




. . HAPPY WEDNESDAY 

" -SPONSORED BY 
STUDENT ACTIVITIES COMMITTEE 

PJ DANCE PARTY 

FEB. 15 

9 AM 1 AM 

WEAR YOUR PJ'S, ROBE, SLIPPERS 

AND PARTY!! 

BOXERS, NIGHT SHIRTS & 

TEDDY BEARS 

WILL BE GIVEN AWAY! 

(REST UP FOR THIS ONE, 
SWEETIES!!) 



^mm 



Frit HiMin Dm tct Crtin Bin • 3 Gietf $lz(d Posit 

B H#9 SPONSORED BY a^ 

Hdogon-Dozt 

c Ray Botlon Producllont. PC Boi 302. KtlHnglon. VT 0S7S1 



leaturing 

Free Haagcn-Oaxi Ice Cream Bar* 

Three Pools, Each 1,000 Gal., 2v, Ft. Deep.* 

• Beach Area complete with Sand. 

Scenery and Sun Lamps 

• Heavy Duty Lighting to make everyone look fanned 

• Tvi^o 8 Ft Lifeguard Chairs 

• Beach Umbrellas and Chairs 

• T-Shirt Give Aways • Balloons 

• Astro Turf Dance Floor 

• Sand Erosion Control Fence 

• Wind Machine to blow scent of 

Suntan Lotion around 

• Haagen-Dazf Ice Cream Vendor s Cart 

• Twister Games • Golf Areas • Contests 

• And much much more' 

All that's missing is ^lou and i/our bathing suii! 

Must have a towel and he in a bathing suit 

to enter pool area! 

*ln some sifuafions. only one or luo poo/s wiH he liwd 



Thursday 

Feb. 23 

8 p.m. — 1 a.m. 

APR 



NEW BRITAIN INN 



"Del Val's home 
SUN. NIGHT: 



MON. NIGHT: 

TUES. NIGHT: 

WED. NIGHT: 



THUR. NIGHT: 

FRI. NIGHT: 

SAT. NIGHT: 



away from home" 
Restaurant/Tavern 

Employees Night 
DJ Steve Coffey 

(DelVal alum) 

Steamers — 
$3.25/Dozen 

Import Night — 
Most $1.25/Bottle 

$1.25 Cheese 
Steak Night 
College Night: 
$1 off Pitchers 
with College I.D. 

DJ and Dancing 

DJ and Dancing 

Live entertainment 



Seafood & Sandwiches 

All Items to Go! 

HAPPY HOUR 

4 6.30 Mon. Fn. 

Rt. 202 • New Britain, PA 

348-1968 



New Times for Library 

Because students have requested later 
evening hours for the DVC Library, 
additional staffing has been obtained and 
the Library is now open until midnight 
five nights a week. 

Library hours for February are: 

• Sunday: noon-midnight 

4i> Monday through Thursday: 8 a.m.- 

|v midnight 

> * Friday: 8 a.m.-9:30 p.m. 

• Saturday: 9:30 a.m. -5:30 p.m. 
Please take advantage of these 

increased, later hours of operation — • 
Use your Library! 



Blood Donor Facts 

• A nurse on the Bloodmobile will 
interview the prospective donor to 
determine whether that person can 
donate blood safely. 

• Everyone over 1 10 pounds has enough 
blood to be a donor. The average 
person has 10 to 12 pints of blood in 
his or her body. Less than a pint is 
taken, and that volume is replaced 
within a few hours by the body^ ^ 

• Donors can give blood safely every 56 
days. Many donors give blood four to 
six times a year. 

• Every blood type is needed. A person's 
blood is never too rare or too common 
to be donated. 

• Additional blood is needed for hospital 
patients; therefore, additional donors 
are needed. Donors who give once or 
twice a year should consider donating 
three or four times a year. 

• Other questions? Phone 1-800 26- 
BLOOD. 



Hide to 
MACs! 



The Student Government has arranged 
bus transportation for students, faculty, 
administration and other DelVal fans to 
travel to the Middle Atlantic Conference 
(MAC) playoffs Saturday, Feb. 25 to 
cheer on our First Place Division III 
wrestling squad. f . 

Activities at the University of Scranton 
that day begin at 10:30 a.m. and end with 
final matches scheduled for 4 p.m. The 
bus for DVC fans will leave from Work 
Gymnasium at 7 a.m. 

Reserve your seats by Feb. 17 by 
contacting SGA President Laura 
Etzweiler at 340-9582 or Box 537. A small 
donation of $2 per rider is requested with 
your reservation. 

Show your DelVal spirit and join the 
troupe! 



Scholarships 
Available 

The following scholarships are now 
available for qualified students: 

Garden Club 
olHarrisburg 
Scholarship Award 

The Garden Club of Harrisburg is 

offering two $1 ,000 scholarships this year. 

Qualified applicants must be graduates 

of local high schools in and around the 

Harrisburg area, and should be attending 

an accredited college or university for 

the study of floriculture, plant pathology, 

^ forestry, horticulture, landscape design, 

f or related studies. :" 

' Interested students should contact the 

Financial Aid Office. 

Complete applications and supporting 
data must be postmarked and received 
no later than March 15, 1989. 

■t ■„■- ^ 

Class of 1984 
^Scholarship 

J The objective of this scholsfrship is to 

g;assist students with a financial need 

J which cannot currently be met at present. 

i Students must be incoming juniors or 

seniors, display financial need, maintain 

at least a 2.0 academic average and be 

involved in campus activities and/or be 

working to raise money to pay tuition. 

The scholarship is for $1,000 dollars. 
To apply, one must fill out an application, 
stating need for financial assistance, and 
file two recommendations. •; 

Applications are available in the 
Financial Aid Office. Application deadline 
is February 16. 



CX^e /)TJC Siierarif T^uS/icaiion 
ftttjeU *if<xu't . . . 




^)c^ 



WorRs o^ Kjreah'oiiu: 

Drawings, J^o/o^rap/is, 

\Prose ana J^oeiru 

suomiitea to: 'jjraa Mraun 
7lo\ I0L5 • T^Aone: 1-232-14-^7 



Placement Office Events 

Sign-up for interviews in Placement Office 
in Segal Hall. 

Students must submit resumes and 
transcripts to the Placement Office no 
later than Monday February 13. 

Thursday, February 9 

W.A. Novak — Investments 
. J Positions: Full-time and internships 
,i- Majors: Business Seniors, Juniors, and 
"Sophomores 

Thursday, February 16 
Eichenlaub, Inc. 
Positions: Landscape Foreman 
'Majors: Ornamental Horticulture, 
Horticulture. 

Agway ..^ 

Positions: Management Trainess 
Majors: Agribusiness, Agronomy, Animal 
Science, Business, Dairy Science, Horti- 
culture, Ornamental Horticulture 

•if- ■■ 

Tuesday, February 21 

Evergreen Lawn Corporation 
Positions: Sales and Customer Service 
Majors: Any majors. 

Wednesday, February 22 

International Computer Print 'ICC) 
Positions: Programmer Trainees 
Majors: CISM, Business Admin, with some 
computer courses. 

Wistar Institute /.■ 

Positions: Research Technicians 
Majors: Biology, Chemistry 

Thursday, February 23 ^ ,; .■^., . 
Farm Credit Bank of Springfield 
Positions: Credit Rep. Trainees 
Majors: Business Admin., Agribusiness, 
Agronomy with a minimum of 2 Account- 
ing courses. 

Tuesday, February 28 .% <- . 
Parker Interior Plantscape 
Positions: Service Technicians, Manage- 
ment Trainees 

■Majors: Ornamental Horticulture, Horti- 
culture, Agronomy, Agribusiness. 

Southern States ; ' 

Positions: Management Trainees 
Majors: Agribusiness, Agronomy, Orna- 
■ Rental Horticulture, Horticulture, Animal 
Science, Dairy Science, Business Admin. 



Zeimerism 

Kitchen C rafter: 

cuisine art 





Vol. XXIIl. No. 14 Thnrwlav. February 16, 1989 

NOTICE: The opinions expressed in any individual article do not necessarily reflect the viewpoint of the paper or school. 




Comedian Rich Hall on stage at DelVal 



The stage at DelVal will be graced by 
Sniglets author and late-night comedian 
Rich Hall when the Student Activities 
Committee presents Hall's hilarious act 
on Tuesday, Feb. 21. 

Tickets will be sold to DVC students 
the week of Feb. 13 in the Dining Hall at 
dinner for $4 each; to faculty, staff, 
administration and alumni for $5. 
Students will be required to show their 
i.d.s at the door to gain entrance to the 
show with their $4 tickets. There will be 
no tickets sold at the door, so get in 
line to buy your way into this great 
comedy act before all the seats are sole 
out! 

The SAC has set aside 300 tickets that 
k will make available to the general public 



for $12 each, with sales beginning at 
noon on Wednesday, Feb. 15 in the 
Student Life Office. Any students who 
wish to bring "outside" guests to this 
event on campus must purchase the $12 
general public tickets. 

Rich Hall, creator of comedy skits for 
such TV shows as "Saturday Night Live" 
and a regular visitor to "The Tonight 
Show" and "Late Night With David 
Letterman," goes on stage at 9 p.m. 
following the 8 p.m. opener with comedian 
Billy Garan. Hall is also well-known for 
his three books on the New York 
Times paperback bestseller list: 
Sniglets, More Sniglets and 

Please turn to page 2 



Act 101 Meeting to 
be held at DVC 

Delaware Valley College will host the 
ACT 101 Sub-Regional Director's 
Meeting at the Student Center on 
Tuesday, Feb. 14. Directors from the 
following schools will be attending: 

• Allentown College of St. Francis de 
Sales 

• Bucks County Community College 

• East Stroudsburg University 

• Kutztown University 

• Lehigh County Community CoUege 

• Montgomery County Community 
College 

• Northampton County Area Com- 
munity College 

• Pinebrook Junior College 

• Reading Area Community College 

Also, a presentation on grants, pro- 
posals and budgets will be given by 
Eastern Regional Advisor, Mr. Mel Hodes. 

New club features 
folk music 

by Tony Palumbo "- 

Delaware Valley College's newest 
addition to its ranks of extra-curricular 
activities, the Folk Music Club of DVC, 
became official on Monday night, when 
its constitution was ratified by a majority 
vote of the Inter-Club Council during its 
regular weekly meeting. 

The purpose of the Club, according to 
its constitution, is to promote oppor- 
tunities for and interest in folk music 
among the DelVal community, as well as 
to give people an appreciation of the full 
range of the genre. As current club 
leader David Frank hastens to point out, 
"Most people think of folk music as only 
bluegrass and country, without realizing 
that it encompasses forms such as 

Please turn to page 3 



Annual Beach Party 

Are you ready?! Get out of the winter 
cold and get into the summer, as Haagen- 
Dazs presents the Summertime Anytime 
Beach Party, sponsored by the Student 
Activity Committee. 

Ray Boston, the producer, is behind 
this exciting, fun-filled happening and 
you are invited! This event includes an 
actual swimming pool, dance floor, golf 
area, and ■ get this, a realistic beach 
scene complete with heavy duty lighting 
to make everyone look tan! 

What is a beach without sand?! You 
guessed it, they will have sand too! 
That's not all, there will be a concession 
area, games, contests, prizes and more! 
Admission is free, so why not start the 
summer a little earlier and come over to 
have some fun? 

' This event started in February of 1987 
and has become a popular gala. The 
Anytime Beach Party will be held on 
February 23, in the All-Purpose Room in 
the Student Center. Administration, Faculty 
and Staff are more than welcome to 
attend. If there are any questions, please 
feel free to contact Ched Baker at 
Fvtension 2393. *^': 



On Campus 

Thursday, February 16 
Movie"Cocktail" ^^ i' ' '^ 

APR 9 p.m. 

Saturday, February 18 
Men's Basketball (H) vs Drew 

University 2 p.m. 

Women's Basketball (A) vs 
Widener University 

2 p.m. 

Sunday, February 19 
Flyers vs NY Islanders on 
Prism in Pub. 
Monday, February 20 

No Classes 
Tuesday, February 21 
Comedian Rich Hall 

APR 9 p.m. 

Wednesday, February 22 

Blood Mobile APR 12-5 

Movie "Big Business" 

APR 9 p.m. 

Follow a Monday Schedule 
Thursday, February 23 
Beach Party 
APR 8 p.m.-l a.m. 



Staff 




Editor-in-Chief . 


Kathleen Stasney 


Reporters .... 


. Tony Palumbo, Julie Keane 




Brad Bittner, Paige Barnett 


Photography . . 


Laurent Lanee 


Advisors 


Joe Ferry, Anne Biggs, 




Mr. Edward O'Brien. 




Dr. Richard Ziemer 



m 



IDEAL EMPLOYMENT 
FOR STUDENTS 

• $8.00 -$9.00 per hour 

• 3-5 hours per day 

• Weekends off 

• $500.00 annual bonus 

• Career opportunities 



FOR PART TIME 

EMPLOYMENT 

INFORMATION 

CALL 

UNITED 

PARCEL 

SERVICE 

830-7934 

After 5 p.m. 
Call 830-7941 

UPS IS AN EQUAL 
OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER 



Blood Mobile 

February 22, 1989 

from 12-5 p.m. in the APR 

the goal is - 125 pints 
Sign up with your RA, Caesers 

Pub or Health Service 
Please sign up by February 

15th. 



FOR SALE 

API ARY SOCIETY 

HONEY 

many varieties 

and 

BEESWAX CANDLES 

tapers, colors, shapes 

see 

CLUB MEMBERS 

or 

LASKER HALL 

Receptionist 

(Great Gifts!) 



Placement Office Events 



Thursday, February 16 
Eichcnlaub, Inc. 
Positions: Landscape Foreman 
Majors: Ornamental Horticulture, 
Horticulture. 

Agway 

Positions: Management Trainess 
Majors: Agribusiness, Agronomy, Animal 
Science, Business, Dairy Science, Horti- 
culture, Ornamental Horticulture 



Tuesday, February 21 

Evergreen Lawn Corporation 
Positions: Sales and Customer Service 
Majors: Any majors. 



Wednesday, February 22 

International Computer Print (ICC) 
Positions: Programmer Trainees 
Majors: CISM, Business Admin, with some 
computer courses. 

Wistar Institute 

Positions: Research Technicians 

Majors: Biology, Chemistry 



Thursday, February 23 

Farm Credit Bank of Springfield 
Positions: Credit Rep. Trainees 
Majors: Business Admin., Agribusiness, 
Agronomy with a minimum of 2 Account- 
ing courses. 



Tuesday, February 28 

Parker Interior Plantscapc 
Positions: Service Technicians, Manage- 
ment Trainees 

Majors: Ornamental Horticulture, Horti- 
culture, Agronomy, Agribusiness. 

Southern States 

Positions: Management Trainees 
Majors: Agribusiness, Agronomy, Orna- 
mental Horticulture, Horticulture, Animal 
Science, Dairy Science, Business Admin. 



Rich Hall. 



Continued from page 1 

Unexplained Sniglets of th* 
Universe. Sniglets are words that 
"should be in the dictionary, but aren't" - 
such as "premblememblemation," or the 
act of dropping a letter in the mailbox 
and then rechccking it to make sure it 
went down. 

There will be no taping of the show, 
either audio or video, permitted, nor will 
smoking or alcohol be allowed in the APR. 



Dr. John C. Mcrtz, Vice President, Academic Affairs, has announced the Dean's List for fall 1988 semester. The 
college faculty, staff, administration and Ram Pages staff offer congratulations to the following students: 



Thomas C. Allen BA 
Gary A. Apgar AH 
Leonard M. Azzarano OH/F 
Suzanne S. Barnhurst BA 
Ann Elizabeth Bastina BY 
Ronald Kenneth Buck, Jr. BY 
Glenn A. Carlson BY 
Caroline Ann Carpenter AH 
Matthew Anthony Chupalio BA 
Joan Elizabeth Comly OH/F 
Audrey O. Daniel BA 
April M. DeGeorge AH 
William Joseph DeMarco BA 
John Edward DeSouza AH 
Janet E. Distler AH 
Todd A. Doucett BA 
Lisa Maureen Dougherty AH 
Julie Y. Dutton BA 
James T. Enoch BA 

Keith A. Alderfer CH 
Brad A. Bittner HT 
Christine M. Boyer AH 
Lisa Chase BA 
Fbbert S. Deemer HT ' 
Janis M. Dunn BA 
David L. Ebright AG 
Joyce Ely BY 
James B. Etheredgc BA 
David Harry Frank BY 
Pamela H. Frey OH/L 
Kevin M. Guldin AH 
Shawn P. Hennigan BY 



CLASS OF 1989 

Laura Lee Etzweiler BA 
Kathleen Marie Feron AH 
Steven David Fischer AH/L 
Coleen Frederic k BY 
Jennifer Garner BY 
Lynda Carol Green BY 
Scott R. Hargraves AH 
Alexander J. Harris OH/F 
Timothy S. Hayden AH 
James J. Ivy CH 

yjenntier Joanne Kauffman BA 

"^ffrey W. Kerr AG 
Kirsten Lee King AH/L 
Michael Francis King AG 
Richard Warren Kulp AB 
William Francis Lamack OH/L 
Karen K. Lechelt AH/L 
Michelle A. Ure OH/L 
Rita L. Lesh BA 

CLASS OF 1990 

Susan Y. Higley BA 
Carol A. Janovsky FI 
Elizabeth A. Jenkins AH/L 
Jennifer Jesiolowski FI 
Laura L. Jones BA 
Dennis J. Keeler CH 
Sean D. Kelly BA 
Joan Blair Kinley AG 
Elissa J. Kirkegard CM 
Todd A. Koch AH 
Matthew M. Laino OH/L 
William B. Liakakos HT 
Fay E. Lobaugh AB 



Beverly Arlcne Lichota OhVF 
David C. MacGregor AG 
Tracy D. Marshall BA 
Richard Warren Mercier BY 
David B. Mount OH/F 
Nancy J. Ondra AG 
Joanne Marie Pekol BY 
V; , Cathryn V. Rabea BA 
Scott Allen Rudolph BA 
Mary Senausky BY 
Myra E. Shields BY 
Robert Walter Solly HT 
Michael K. Swartley DH 
Sharon F. Sykcs OH/L 
Mary Ann Thompson BA 
Lisa Ann Thornton BY 
Dianne L. Vagasky BA 
Michael J. Zarbatany OH/L 
Kevin M. Ziegler BA 

Randi Misnik BY \ 
Nancy C. O'Donnell ES 
Samantha L. Porter AH/L 
Gretchen E. Posch BY 
Walter Paul Preiss HT 
Frank W. Reich BA 
Philip D. Saul OH/L 
Theresa Schneider BY 
Max Sperry BA 
Eric D. Thomas BA 
Margaret N. Whitacrc AH 
Stephanie Anne Wright BY 



Mark N. Ambrose BA 
Dina M. Antonelli AH/L 
Christian G. Beaulieu OH/L 
Bryan Scott Benner OH/L 
Christine Helen Borowsky AH 
Bradles T. Braun BY 
Thomas Craig Brown OH/F 
Kelli S. Carpenter AH . 
Michael R. Dommel BA 
Christine Druck AH 
Sally A. Gargula BA 
Darcll W. Garner BA 



CLASS OF 1991 

Pamela M. Gordon AH 
David A. Gundrum FI 
Frank B. Gunson BY 
Laurence Guyot BA 
Corinne M. Herb ES 
Jun Iwata CM 
Renec A. Kazokas AH 
Stina A. Licbman AH 
Douglas T. Lindc AG 
John D. Maniatty BY 
Jeffrey D. Martin OH/L 
Christina McColgan FI 



Erin M. McGowan AH/L 
Kevin Michael McGuire BY 
Melissa Lynn Miles ES 
Julie A. Rabin AH/L 
Mark A. Ringenary OH/F 
Rebecca H. Schatschneider BA 
Elizabeth A. Shandor BY 
Travis E. Sherman AG . 
Steven A. Shetterly CH 
Phillip M. Stark OH/L 
Laura Wah ES 
Elizabeth A. Walz OH/L 



Amin Ahmadazadch CH 
Jill M. Bachman BY 
Juliann Marie Battle BY 
Eric Bryan Bish OH/L 
Kimberly A. Carroll BY 
Donovan C. Dagner AH 
Scott D. Druckenmiller CM 
Robert George Drummond, Jr. AG 
Jennifer Anne Fonseca AH 
Michelle Lynn Garee BY 
Melody Geesaman OH/L 
Jim Stanley Genetti OH/L 
Dena Jill Hamilton BY 
Laura May Harding AB 



CLASS OF 1992 

Michelle Lynn Harley BY \ . 
Kimie Loraine Heckler AH 
Tara Keefer BY 
Boden S. Knapp AB 
Sandra L. Lachman FI 
Robert Niles Livingston, Jr. CH 
Sharon Marie Loeffler AH 
Lynn Marie Long AH 
Stephanie Ann Loro BY 
Catherine E. Lowe CM 
Eugene Leroy Lowe, III AG 
Bruce Robert Mellott BY 
Matthew Joseph Michonski AH 
Andrea Grace Moree OH/L 



Susan K. Napp AH 
James A. Neal FI 
Anthony J. Palumbo CH 
Charles A. Rekemeier OH/F 
Linda Elaine Schempp OH/F 
Peter J. Schweitzer BA 
Patricia A. Seiger BY 
Thomas D. Sperry BA 
Michael G. Strohecker AH 
Kathryn E. Swarthout ES 
Carol Trimber AH 
Joel Thomas Wiker DH 
Marvin E. Zimmerman DH 



Farm Toy Show 
Schedaled for 
Doylcstown 

Toy collecting is a growing hobby in 
which whole families participate. Farm 
toy collectors from Connecticut, 
Delaware, Maryland, Pennsylvania, New 
Jersey, and New York will meet at 
Delaware Valley College Student Center 
on Saturday, February 25, 1989. 

The public will be admitted from 10 am 
on to observe displays, negotiate 
purchases, or discuss collections. At 4 
pm an auction of consigned toys will be 
conducted with bicMing open to all. 
Admission for children under 5 is free; 
ages 6-14, $1; and persons over 14, $2. 

Farm toy collectors tend to concen- 
trate on different sizes, brands, or time 
periods. One collection will be John 
Deere toys of the 1930s including both 
horse-drawn and tractor-drawn models. 
Others will include many brands and 
models popular in the 60s, 70s and 80s. 
This specilization of interest will be 
rewarded at 2 pm with awards in 5 
categories: l/16th-scale display; l/32nd- 
scale display; l/64th-scale display; 
custom-built display; and best overall 
collection. 

This activity is sponsored by the 
National Agri-marketing Association, 
DclVal student chapter. The College is 
located on US Route 202, southwest of 
Doylestown, Pennsylvania. Specific in- 
formation can be obtained from Maryann 
Vogt at (609) 758-0518 after 6 pm or Dr. 
John Avery at (215) 345-1500 ext. 2328 
during the day. 



Ride to 
MACs! 

The Student Government has arranged 
bus transportation for students, faculty, 
administration and other DelVal fans to 
travel to the Middle Atlantic Conference 
(MAC) playoffs Saturday, Feb. 25 to 
cheer on our First Place Division III 
wrestling squad. 

Activities at the University of Scranton 
that day begin at 10:30 a.m. and end with 
final matches scheduled for 4 p.m. The 
bus for DVC fans will leave from Work 
Gymnasium at 7 a.m. 

Reserve your seats by F«b. 17 by 
contacting SGA President Laura 
Etzweiler at 340-9582 or Box 537. A small 
donation of $2 per rider is requested with 
your reservation. 

Show your DelVal spirit and join the 
troupe! 



Yearbook 
Information 

If you haven't received 

your 1%8 Cornucopia 

you can pick it up in the 

Public Information Office 

located in 

Lasker Hall 



'Hudi ^AUt . . . 




JOorAs ofOreaiiuilu: 

/^rose an(f 7^oe/ry 
suBmiitetf to: lirarf'JSraun 
7lo\ 101.5 • TAone: 1-232-3447 



Ne«v Club. 



Continued from page I 

calypso and even reggae as well." 

At present, the primary focus of the 
club will be on expanding its member- 
ship. Although the organization has been 
steadily growing since its inception, its 
leaders indicate that they will continue to 
solicit and welcome new members and 
new ideas. 

Long-term objectives of the club center 
on recruiting local folk musicians for 
performances at DelVal. Concerts are 
tentativley scheduled for Friday nights at 
8:00, with free admission offered to any 
student willing to play a set of three or 
more songs. In order to expediate this 
recruitment of performers, club leader 
David Frank plans to contact Roger 
Deitz, a professional banjo player and 
active supporter of folk music based in 
New Jersey, over the upcoming weekend. 

Overall, David says that he's very 
enthusiastic about the club's future 
prospects. He cites the extent of musical 
interest evident among the student body, 
and professes a desire to fully realize the 
potential for musical and cultural growth 
and expression at DelVal. 

Anyone interested in joining the club 
or contributing useful suggestions should 
contact Dave Frank, Box 539. 



$11,000 POETRY 

CONTEST 

Students Urged to Enter 

Poets can now enter a new poetry 
contest with $11,000.00 in prizes. The 
Grand Prize is $1,000.00 and the First 
Prize $500.00. In all, 152 poets will win 
awards and national publication. The 
contest, sponsored by the American 
Poetry Association, is open to the public 
and entry is free. 

"Students are often winners in our 
contests, and we would like to see more 
students' poetry," said Robert Nelson, 
Publisher for the Association. "We want 
to find undiscovered f)oets and give them 
the recognition they deserve. This year 
our winners will be published and public- 
ized to the utmost of our power." 

Poets may enter the contest by send- 
ing up to six ix)ems, each no more than 
20 lines, name and address on each page, 
to American Poetry Association, Dtpt. 
CT-22, 250 A Potrero Street, P.O. Box 
1803, Santa Cruz, CA 95061-1803. The 
contest remains open until June 30, to 
allow students ample time to enter dur- 
ing spring or summer break. Poets who 
enter early will be invited to another con- 
test with another $1,000.00 Grand Prize. 

Each poem is also considered for oub- 
lication in the American Po«try 
Anthology, a leading collection of con- 
temporary verse. 

During six years of sponsorship the 
American Poetry Association has run 28 
contests and awarded over $112,000 in 
prizes to 2,850 winning poets. 



NEW BRITAIN INN 

"Del Val's home away fronn home" 
SUN. NIGHT: Restaurant/Tavern 
Employees Night 
DJ Steve Coffey 
(DelVal alum) 

MON. NIGHT: Steamers - 
$3.25/ Dozen 

TUES. NIGHT: Import Night - 
Most $1.25/Bottle 

WED. NIGHT: $1.25 Cheese 
Steak Night 
College Night; 
$1 off Pitchers 
with College ID. 

THUR. NIGHT: DJ and Dancing 

FRI. NIGHT: DJ and Dancing 

SAT. NIGHT: Live entertainment 

Seafood & Sandwiches 

All Items to Go! 

HAPPY HOUR 

4 6:30 Mon. Fri. 

Rt. 202 • New Britain, PA 

348-1968 



Phonathon '89 calling for 
volunteers 



pho-na-thon / *fo-na-thon / n 

(L, fr Gk phon-, phono-sound) 

1: volunteers phoning for funds 

2: one heck of a good time 

[:. Arc you willing to generate generositys 
for your alma mater? Then Phonathon 
1989 is the place to be this winter! 

The Development Office has an 
nounced the dates for this year's "dialing 
for dollars" fundraising event. On seven 
weekday evenings between Feb. 27 and 
March 9, volunteers from among current 
students, alums and DVC faculty and 
administraiton will be calling other DelVal 
alums and friends to ask them to give as 
generously as they can to this year'i 
Annual Giving Campaign. And we would 
like you to consider helping us and being 
part of the fun and excitement. 

Each evening, dinner and a training 
session runs from 5:30 to 6:30 in the 
Lasker Hall Lobby. Then, from 6:30 until 
9, we call alumni from the lists the 
Development Office has formulated. It's 
easy, it's fun, and it's a great way to give 
your College a hand. 

We have t-shirts, lots of food and 
prizes, so send in the coupon to Linda 
Dolby, Development Office Lasker Hall 
as soon as possible. Thanks! 

Blood Donor Facts 

• A nurse on the Bloodmobile will 
interview the prospective donor to 
determine whether that person can 
donate blood safely. 

• Everyone over 1 10 pounds has enough 
blood to be a donor. The average 
person has 10 to 12 pints of blood in 
his or her body. Less than a pint is 
taken, and that volume is replaced 
within a few hours by the body. 

• Donors can give blood safely every 56 
days. Many donors give blood four to 
six times a year. 

• Every blood type is needed. A person*! 
blood is never too rare or too commorf . 
to be donated. 

• Additional blood is needed for hospital 
patients; therefore, additional donors 
are needed. Donors who give once or 
twice a year should consider donating 
three or four times a year. 

• Other questions? Phone 1-800-26- 
BLOOD. 



Zeimerism 

Pedaler: 
Spokesman 



(A 

u 



I 

4- 
t 

I 
I 
I 

i 

I- 

t 

I 

I 

I 

t 

I 

I 

I 

r 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 



fifi 
u 
u 

h 
Z 

;;) 



> 

» 

z 



S- 

Z (^ 

£ 

Z 

flu 



at 

c 
o 

JZ 

a. 



00 

$ 1 1. 



ts. 00 CO CM 
C^ CVJ 



eg 



c 
o 



Q) 



E 

2 



■o 
-o 

< 



> 

C 
^ 

£ 2 



CNJ 

-o 

3 
I- 






T3 

at 

c 



T3 
(/) 

3 



1 



CLIP, FILL OUT, DELIVER TO: 
; f^r Linda Dolby 
" Development Office 
Lasker Hall 



I 
I 
I 

H 
I 

«^ 
I 



_ .-1 

W 

^■■ 
.1 

I 

I 

I 

■♦: 
I 
I 
I 

J 
I 

I 

I 

I 

4. 



Tuesday, Feb. 21 

SAC Presents 

Rich Hall 

Originator of 

"Sniglets*' 

Tickets on Sale 

in Dining Hall 

Students $4.00 

Alumni & Faculty, $5.00 

General Public $12.00 



Film showing 
in A.V. center 

On Thursday, March 2, at 7 
p.m. in the A.V. center (Eisner) a 
film will be shown: The Brain: 
Learnins and Memory. 

The showing is in conjunction 
with the Honors Calloquium being 
presented by Drs. Stenson and 
Heath, but it is open to all. 



RAY BOSTON 

PRODUCTIONS 

MUSN; • DANCE • FUN • SMILES • FBIENOS 




mmi 



ftn NiMin Bi» let Criim lin • 3 Gstd Slittf Podi 

■ ■•• SPONSORED BY Mj^ 

Haagen-Dozs 

c Hay SoMon Pioduelloni. PO Boi 302. Kimngton. VT 0S7St 



featuring 

Free Hiagen-Dazt Ice Cream Bar* 

Three Pools. Each 1,000 Gal., Th Ft. Deep,* 

• Beach Area complete with Sand. 

Scenery and Sun Lamps 

• Heavy Duty Lighting to make everyone look tanned 

• Two 8 Ft Lifeguard Chairs 

• Beach Umbrellas and Chairs 

• T-Shirt Give Aways • Balloons 

• Astro Turf Dance Floor 

• Sand Erosion Control Fence 

. • Wind Machine to blow scent of 
Suntan Lotion around 
• HSagen-Dazf ice Cream Vendor s Cart 
• Twister Games • Golf Areas • Ccntftsts 

• And much, much more' 

AH that's missing is you and vour battmnq suit! 

Must have a towel and be in a barMn^ smit 

to enter pool area! 

*in some sitiiauons. on/v on*' or two ;xK)/i \mH tie used 



Thursday 
Feb. 23 

S p.m. — 1 a.m. 
APR 



Scholarships 
Available 

The following scholarships are now 
available for qualified students: 

Garden Club 

ofHarrisburs 
Scholarship Award 

The Garden Club of Harrisburg is 
offering two $1 ,000 scholarships this year. 
Qualified applicants must be graduates 
of local high schools in and around the 
Harrisburg area, and should be attending 
an accredited college or university for 
the study of floriculture, plant pathology, 
forestry, horticulture, landscape design, 
or related studies. 

Interested students should contact the 
Financial Aid Office. 

Complete applications and supporting 
data must be postmarked and received 
no later than March 15, 1989. 





Vol. XXIII. No. 15 Thursday, February 23, 1989 

NOTICE: The opinions expressed in any individual article do not necessarily reflect the viewpoint of the paper or school 




A Little Bit of 
Yesterday 



Spanky is coming! Spanky McFartand, 
from the "The Little Rascals" and "Our 
Gang" will be on campus Thursday, 
March 2 at 8 p.m. in the APR. , ' -l 

Spanky started as a "Rascal" when he 
was three years old and stayed with the . 
gang until he was 14. He retired from 30; 
years in sales to once again become 
"Spanky." He now tours the country, 
showing "Our Gang" comedies, lecturing, 
answering questions from the audfence 
and signing autographs. ^ . 

Spanky's act begins with film clips 
from some of his shows. He will then 
come on stage and talk about the shows, 
himself and what the cast is doing now. 
He will be available for autographs. 

Students, faculty, administration and 
staff are welcome to see the show at no 
charge. 



ZEtMERISM: 

Balloonins: 

An air-raisins 

experience 



Summer Job? Try 
Work-Study 



The State Work-Study Program 
(SWSP) is a financial aid program that 
provides career-related work experience 
and earnings for eligible students through 
the cooperative efforts of SWSP 
employers, postsecondary institutions, 
and PHEAA. Through the SWSP, you 
EARN money for immediate school 
expenses and GAIN EXPERIENCE for 
your future. 

In order to participate in the SWSP, 
you must: 

• Be a Pennsylvania resident 

• Be enrolled at a participating Penn- 
sylvania postsecondary institution 

• Be a 1988-89 State Grant Award 
recipient OR be certified by your 
financial aid officer as demonstrating 
financial need 



• Be able to benefit from a career- 
related work experience in a "high- 
tech", community service, or com- 
munity development job 

• NOT owe a State Grant refund or 
have defaulted on any student loan. 

PHEAA will process your application 
and mail a packet of information to your 
permanent home address. This packet 
will include tips on locating an SWSP 
position; the SWSP Employer Brochure, 
^'invest in the Future", to give to a 
potential SWSP employer; and an SWSP 
Student Placement Form that you must 
give to the employer that hires you. 

If you have any questions about the 
SWSP, please contact PHEAA Work- 
Study staff at (717) 257-2550 or the 
Financial Aid Office, 2nd floor Admissions 
Center. 



Cross Country Wrap Up 



The Delaware Valley College men's 
and women's cross country teams 
concluded their year in January with 
their Annual Awards Banquet . In addition 
to the team members and coaches, a 
number of guests includihg alumni and 
college staff members were present. 

Senior letter winners were Colleen 
Fredericks, Jim Enoch, Hardy Rueb and 
senior captains Sue Barnhurst and Don 
Griffing. Junior letter winners were Joan 
Kinley and co-captain Dee Smith. The 
sole sophomore letter winner was Art 
Tuediger. Freshman letter winners were 
Kim Douglass. Sandy Slanker and Frank 
Filor. 

The team voted the most valuable 
male harrier award to Art Ruediger. Art 
led the team in scoring, was a medalist in 
the Ursinus Invitational, and was the 
only one on this year's team to run the 
home course in under 30 minutes. The 
team voted the most valuable female 
harrier award to Joan Kinley. Joan led 
the women's team in scoring, averging 
11.5 points per meet out of a possible 12 



points. She was also a medalist in the 
Ursinus Invitational as well as finishing 
second in the Drew Invitational. The 
coaches also presented special awards 
to the senior captains Sue Barnhurst and 
Don Griffing for their dedication and the 
leadership they showed throughout the 
season. 

Co-captains elected for the fall 1989 
season were Joan Kinley and Dee Smith 
for the women's team and Mark Brinsky 
and Art Ruediger for the men's team. 

Both teams are looking forward to 
next fall, since many of the team members 
will be returning. Any current under- 
classman who thinks he or she may be 
interesed in running cross country next 
fall (no previous experience necessary) 
is urged to see Coach Berthold or one of 
the captains. 



SAC presents a movie double feature 
on Sat., March 4 in the APR. The 
movies will begin at 9 p.m. 



YOVR OPINION 



The following letters express the opinions of the writers and not necessarily 
those of the newspaper staff, facult\j, administration or staff of the college. 



Recyclins needed now Praise for Cafe food 



The time has come for Delaware Valley 
College to set an example for this 
community. We must recycle everything 
we can on this campus. Recycling saves 
money, energy, natural resources and 
creates less pollution! In addition, DVC 
can actually make money by recycling. 

Here are a few disgusting facts recently 
tabulated by the Environmental Defense 
Fund (EDF): 

• Every Sunday, more than 500,000 
trees are used to produce the 88% of 
newspapers that are never recycled. 

• American consumers and industry 
, throw away enough aluminum to 

rebuild our entire commercial airfleet 
every three months. 

• We throw away enough office and 
writing paper annually to build a wall 
12 feet high, stretching from Los 
Angeles to New York City. 

I urge the Administration to begin a 
recycling program by March 1, 1989. I 
will be glad to help in any way I can, and 
ask everyone at the College to do the 
same. . ■ '' 

David E. Benner 
O.H.Dept. 



On Campus 



Thursday, February 23 

Beach Party APR . . 8 p.m.-l a.m. 
Friday, February 24 " ■■ ' 

VCR Movies in the Pub ... 8 p.m. 

Wrestling MACs 
Saturday, February 24 

Wrestling MACs 
Wednesday, March 1 

Preregistration begins 
Thursday, March 2 

A.U. center film — "The Brain: 
Learning and Memory" 



Staff 




Editor in Chief . 


Kathleen Stasney 


Reporters .... 


Tony Palumbo, Julie Keane 




Brad Bittner, Paige Barnett 


Photography . . 


Laurent Lanee 


Advisors 


. . . .Joe Ferry, Anne Biggs, 




Mr. Edward O'Brien, 




Dr. Richard Ziemer 



Quite often I hear students com- 
, ment about the cafeteria food at AVC. 
Most of these comments are negative; 
In fact, all of them are negative. These 
comments then carry over to the 
faculty, parents and friends, so there 
is a general attitude that college 
cafeteria food is poor. 

A group of other students includirjg 
myself agree that the food offered at 
DelVal is appetizing much of the timt. 
With the addition of the American 
Grill, Deli Bar and ice cream machine, 
the selection is usually extensive. 
Maybe some of the food is not made 
the way "mom makes it," but for a 
meal that you do not have to cook or 
to wait for it to be served, it is good. 

I have eaten at other college and 
university cafeterias and was not 
impressed with the food, selections or 
atmosphere. I found poor variety and 
the food temperature was often not 
what it should have been. 

I think the problem is with the 
student, and not the cafeteria food, at 
OVC Too many people say "1 don't 
•like that," "yuk, what's that?" or "that 
doesn't look good" without even 
tasting it. Those people are usually 
"picky" eaters and seldom will try a 
new food or a different taste. That's 
too bad because they are missing out 
on good tasting, nutritious food such 
as: spinach soup, baked pollack, bean 
salad, tapioca pudding and apple 
butter. 

It is true that you do not have to likt 
every type of food, but you should not 
degrade DelVal's variety, convenience 
or atmosphere offered by the cafeteria. 
Be adventurous. Try a new food. 
DougLindeAG'9i 



ICC Report 

by R. Brittam 

• Blood Drive Wednesday Feb. 22. 
Please give! Don't chicken out! 

New fundraisers suggested: 

• Survival kits for exams 

• Battle of the Bands. 

If you have any ideas about a 
fundraiser, please feel free to come to 
the ICC meeting every Monday night 
at 7 p.m. in the Student Center. 



REPLIES TO DVC-l 
(President's Hot Line) 

HOT LINE 

. . Lack of adequate heat in your 
room is a concern to all of us. Mr. 
Burk reports that most often the 
problem lies in the fact that the 
storm windows are left open - - 
check them first! 

. , Yes, graduation will be held at 
■ 10:30 a.m. in the morning. This 
modificaton from last year was 
made after thoroughly considering 
factors such as; devine services, 
parent/friend travel time, meals, 
and especially the prospects on 
weather at that time of year. 

. . Campus lighting. Yes, the 20 new 
lights are almost all installed at this 
4 time. 

. . Sorry about the chainsaw noise 
which awakened you at 0745 a.m. 
last Wednesday, but the tree was 
unsafe and work must continue. 

. . The 1989 DVC Diplomas will read: 
DELAWARE VALLEY COLLEGE 
OFSCIENCEANDAGRICULTURE 

., . In regard to your concern for 
extended hours at the Library the 
new hours are: Mon-Thurs. 8 a.m. 
until midnight. Sat. 9:30 a.m -5:30 

• p.m. and Sun. noon until midnight. 
Pass the word and encourage 
your friends to use the library as 
well. 

. . Machines do fail and your call 
about the soda machine in COOKE 
HALL WAS APPRECIATED. 

^, Refunds on change list in a machine 

f can be obtained from Mr. Decker 
in the Student Center. The machine 
was repaired within 24 hours of 
your call. 

,\ Why can't the other dorms have a 

. rnicrowave and heated foods like 
r ¥ you have currently installed in Work 

- Dorm? We'll check this out with 
the contractor (Blue Ribbon 

: Services). 

, ,Ice and snow on steps can be 

; mighty dangerous, so thanks for 

, the reminder that we needed to 
give some attention to the steps of 
Goldman Dorm. 

. , Several people have mentioned that 
our otherwise beautiful campus is 
looking shoddy. Well, the first step 
to turning this around is to not toss 
.^ litter in the first place or to pick it 
upas necessary. Your housekeep- 
ing staff already have enough work 
to do. 



The Roommate Game 

March 10 

Friday 

Want to be a contestant? 

contact 

Holly Eckloff, Box 863 

Lisa Gerity, Box 1451 




The Roots of Rock 'N' Roll 



m 



IDEAL EMPLOYMENT 
FOR STUDENTS 

• $8.00 • $ 9.00 per hour 

• 3-5 hours per day 

• Weekends off 

• $500.00 annual bonus 

• Career opportunities 



FOR PART TIME 

EMPLOYMENT 

INFORMATION 

CALL 

UNITED 

PARCEL 

SERVICE 

830-7934 

After 5 p.m. 
Call 830-7941 

UPS IS AN EQUAL 
OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER 



The Roots of Rock 'N' Roll 1953-63 will 
be presented by Barry Drake. He will be 
at DelVal on March 7 at 7 p.m. in the 
APR. 

A graduate of Manhattan College, 
Barry has been involved in the world of 
music since 1954. He attended the Rock 
'N' Roll shows at the Paramount and 
Apollo Theaters and heard every artist 
from Buddy Holly to Frankie Lymon and 
The Teenagers. His record collection 
swelled to gigantic proportions and his 



expertise quickly grew until today he is 
considered a foremost authority on the 
subject of Rock 'N' Roll and record 
collecting. 

Barry is also a musician, singer and 
songwriter. He has recorded for Capitol 
Records and has released three albums 
of his own music. He has toured this 
country and Europe for the last 15 years 
performing at colleges, clubs and 
major concerts. 



in 



R.S. V.P. is not a four-letter word 



Who writes thank your notes, and 
when? When do you by lunch for your 
boss? How much do you tip the guy who 
parks your car? How do you use your 
credit card to charge dinner and a tip? In 
this day and age, when can you hold the 
door for another person? Brown belt 
with brown shoes? How do your read 
that menu?! 

Polish your manners and fine-tune 
your professional technique so you feel 
more confident in your career and social 



interactions, and so those you hope to 
impress favorably can put their 
confidence in you. 

A five-week seminar in Professional 
Etiquette is offered free-of-charge to all 
DelVal juniors and seniors March 29- 
April 26, Wednesdays, from 11:20-12:10 
in the Coffee House. Register by March 
17 with Dr. Craig Hill, Academic Service, 
Segal Hall. 

Get it all together before you take your 
show on the road! 



NEW BRITAIN INN 



"Del Val's home 
SUN. NIGHT 



MON. NIGHT: 

TUES. NIGHT: 

WED. NIGHT: 



THUR. NIGHT 

FRI. NIGHT 

SAT. NIGHT 



away from home" 

Restaurant Tavern 
Employees Night 

DJ Steve Coffey 
(DelVal alum) 

Steamers — 
$3. 25/ Dozen 

Import Night — 
Most $1.25, Bottle 

$1.25 Cheese 
Steak Night 
College Night: 
$1 off Pitchers 
with College ID. 

DJ and Dancing 

DJ and Dancing 

Live entertainment 



Seafood & Sandwiches 

All Items to Go! 

HAPPY HOUR 

4 6:30Mon.Fn. 

Rt. 202 • New Britain, PA 

348-1968 



OPEN TUTORING SCHEDULE 

No Appointment Necessary 
Segal Hall . . . Room 202 



TIME 


MONDAY 


TUESDAY 


WEDNESDAY 


THURSDAY 


9:55-11:10 






Economics 1 
Survey ol Fme Arts 




2nd Period 










11:20-12:10 








CAT 1 


3rd Period 








CAT 11 

Calculus 


12:20-1:10 


GerteiRs Btulugical Scwtme 


CAT 1 




CAT 1 


4th Period 


Biology . s 
Natural Science > 
Chemistry 
Org.inic Chemistry 


CAT n 

Cakulus 




CAT II 
Calculus 


1:20-2:35 


Genetics 




CAT 1 




5th Period 


Biology 

Natural Science 

Chemistry 

Organic Chemistry 

Ecnnomics 1 

F-cofKimics II 

CAT 1 

CAT II ' 

Biological Science 


' 


CAT 11 




2:45-4:00 


Economics 1 


CAT 1 


CAT 1 




6th Period 


Economic* II , 1 !; '• 


CAT n 


CAT II 

Cak ulus 




4:00-5:00 


Genetics 


Genetics 


Genetics 


EcononiKs 1 




Bwlogy ., 


Biology 


Biok>gy 


Survey ol Fine Arts 




Natural Sciencf''" 


Natural Science 


Natural Science 






Chemistry 


Chemistry 


Chemistry 






Organic Chemistry 


Organic Chemistry 


Organic Chemistry 






BOM 


Economics 1 


Economics 1 






Economics 1 


Survey ol Fine Arts 


Survey ol Fiiw Arts 






Economics U 
Business* 
Biological Science 


Biological Science 


BiologRal Science 


; 


5:00-6:00 


Genetics 


Genetics 


Genetics 






Biology 


Biology 


PiolcHjy 




• 


Natural Science 


Natural Science 


Natural Science 






Chemistry 


Chemistry v 


Chemistry 






Organic Chemistry 


Organic Chemistry ■ ' 


Organic Chemistry 


• 




BOM 


Economics 1 


Economics 1 . 


r 




Economics 1 


Economics II 


Economics 11 ■ 






Economics II 


BOM 


BOM 






Business* 


Business* 


Business* 






Biological Science 


Biological Science 


Biological Silence 




6:00-7:00 


BOM . - , ■ 


Economics 1 . i , 




Economics 1 




Economics 1 ■ 


Economics II 


• * ■ 


EconomHs II 




Economics II . . ■ ' 


Survey o( Fine Arts 


"')■- . ' .,.'•■ ■ 


BOM 




Business* 


BOM 

Business* 




BOM 


7:00-8:00 


Biology 
Natural Science 




Biology 
Natural StierKe 






Botony 




Botony 






Economics 1 


7 JO CAT 1 


Economic s 1 






CAT 1 


CAT II 


CAT 1 






CAT II .. 




CAT II 






Genetics ' 
Political Science 
Modern Am History 




Genetics 

Political Science ,^ 

Modern Am History , ,. «> 






Survey o( Fine Arts 


. :■ „ . .-*; ■ ■.*! yri_ .M: if :• 


Survey ol Fine Arts 






Biological Science 




Biological Science 




8:00-9:00 


Biology 


CAT 1 


Botony 


Survey o( Firw Arts 




Natural Science 


CAT II 


Biology • ■•:" 


Economics 




Botony 


Biology 


Natural Scit»ic# '.■.-•,, 






Econorr^cs 1 


Natural Scienc* 


Economics 1 .' ' ■ 






CAT 1 

CAT II 

Genetics 

Political Science 

Motlcrn Am History 

Survey of Fine Arts 

Biological Science 


Biological Sci*tKe 


CAT 1 

CAT II 

Genetics 

Mcxiern Am History 

Political ScierKe 

Biological Science 




NOTES 


*Business 

Human Resource Management 

Production Managenrwnt 

International Trade 

Taxes 











Vol. XXIII, No. 16 Thnrtdav. March 9, 1989 

NOTICE: The opinions expressed in any individual article do not necessarily reflect the viewpoint of the paper or school. 



Summer Prosram 
In China 

Eavt China Normal University, Shanghai or 

Fudan University, Shanghai 

July 2 to August 14, 1989 



Chinese Language (3 cr.) beginner - 

intermediate - advanced 
Chinese Art and Culture (3 cr.) Given in 

English Graduate and Undergraduate 

level 
This program is open for undergraduate 
or graduate students, faculty members 
(high schools, colleges or universities), 
high school seniors and limited number 
of interested adults. Participation is 
limited to 15. 

Total costs: $3500 
Including: Roundtrip from JFK — New 
York; Tuition fees; room and board 
(three meals per day); lodgment in foreign 
student dormitory (double occupancy); 
Visits in and around Shanghai; two 
weekend tours; ten days tour in East 
China (Beijing, Ming Tombs, Great Wall, 
Louyang, Xian, Nanking). 
Note: Drinks other than tea not included. 

FOR APPLICAITON AND INQUIRIES 

CONTACT: 

U.S. Program Director: Advisory Pro- 



fessor, Fudan University, Shanghai. 
U.S. Address: 1522 Schoolhouse Road, 
Ambler, Pennsylvania 19002; Tel: (215) 
699-6448 

Deadline for application: April 1 , 1989 
Downpayment: $200 should be received 
with application (nonrefundable) 
Balance Due: April 1, 1989 *"'' ^ 

Note: Special permission could be 
obtained to pay half of the balance before 
April 1, 1989 and the rest of the balance 
upon arrival in Shanghai in cash or 
traveler's checks. - ■ 1 ;\ h ^ 

Important Notes: 

(1) The acceptance of transfer credits 
from Shanghai should be arranged by 
the participants with their school author- 
ities. 

(2) PARTICIPANTS ARE RESPON- 
SIBLE FOR THEIR OWN SICKNESS, 
ACCIDENT AND GRAVEL IN- 
SURANCE. 

A special program on Chinese law and 
joint-ventures could be arranged (with or 
without Chinese language). 



Pre-Vets Schedule 
Road Rally 

by Patrick Fl^nn 



The Pre-Veterinary Society, one of the newest and most innovative groups on 
campus, dares to go where no other group has gone before - on the road. 

Yes, the Pre-Vet Society is "takin' it to the streets," in the form of a Road 
Rally/Scavanger Hunt. All you need is a car and a crew as large as you want, and you 
could take the first prize of $100.00! 

If you don't have a car, join someone's crew. The cars will be leaving DVC on the 
morning of Saturday, March 11 looking for answers to the clues given out that day. 
Clues like "What times are the masses at Mt. Carmel Church in Doylestown" will be 
worth a number of points, based on how far away they are and how difficult they are to 
find. The car with the most points wins! But, if you've got a heavy foot. Watch Out! 
Cars stopped by the police will be disqualified. 

The event will be preceded by a movie on Friday, March 10 in the Pub for drivers 
and their crews, complete with popcorn and hotdogs. A dance will follow the rally on 
Saturday night, when the winners will be announced. It should be pure fun. Happy 
Motoring! 



College Hosts Two-Day 
Music Prosram 

The Lenape Chamber Ensemble will 
be featured at Delaware Valley College, 
Route 202, Doylestown, PA open 
Saturday and Sunday, March 11 and 12. 

The Ensemble will conduct a special 
children's concert from 10 a.m. until 
noon on Saturday, March 11, to include 
an instrument demonstration. Pro- 
fessional artists will perform music for 
the violin, viola, cello and French horn. 
Refreshments will be served. Admission 
to this concert is $2 for children; adults 
are free. 

On Sunday, March 12 at 3 p.m. the 
Lenape Chamber Ensemble will perform 
a program including the works of Mozart, 
Kodaly and Mendelssohn, featured artists 
will be Dennis Cleveland, concertmaster, 
American Ballet Theater Orchestra and 
Joseph Anderfer, French horn, Metro- 
politan Opera Orchestra. 



Pride and Polish Day 

Enthusiasm for Pride and Polish Day is 
growing! We need everyones' cooper- 
ation to make it a successful event. 
Students will be distributing question- 
naires in the classrooms with faculty 
permission, the week of March 6th. The 
committee needs to know what type of 
projects and skills the students have to 
contribute. Everyone is urged to become 
active and contribute to our campus 
community! 



Workshop Schedule 



Interviewing Workshop 

Wednesday, March 15 

11:00 Segal Hall Conference Room 

Job Search Workshop 
Wednesday, March 29 
11:20 - Segal Hall Conference Room 



Your 
Opinion 

Circles! 

Feb. 1 , 1989, it feels like spring on Del 
Val campus, bright sunny and warm, yet 
in the minds of the students it's still 
winter. It's cold, dreary, and depressing. 
Student moral is down because we are 
lost in a winter storm of mass confusion 
and lack of communication. What is 
administration trying to do? Do they 
really hate us and disrespect us as much 
as we feci they do? Have they violated 
our civil rights? Or do we lose all our 
rights when we step on Del Val's private 
property? This is our home and we are 
not ready to give it up. We realize 
changes have to be made but we are also 
adults. Please treat us like adults. Stop 
going behind our backs, stop talking in 
circles to us, and stop making excuses! 
Wake up administration and let's all 
enjoy the sunny day. 

Names witheld 



SAC is again sponsoring a Win, 
Lose, or Draw Game for DVC 
students to be held on March 31. It 
will be run like the TV show. 

SAC held this event February 10 
and it went great. Come get in on the 
fun. Siqn-ups will be on various signs 
througnout the Student Center two 
weeks prior to the event. 



On Campus 

Thursday, March 9 

Movie — Dragnet . . .9 p.m. APR 
Friday, March 10 

VCR Movies. 8 p.m. Pub 

Saturday, March 11 

Dance 9-1 in Pub 

Road Rally 

1:00 p.m. Flyers vs. Chicago 
in Pub 
Wednesday, March 15 

Happy Wednesday, Rockn-Roll 
and Comedy 

Carl Rosen 9 p.m. APR 

Thursday, March 16 

Pub Dance .... 9:30-1 in the Pub 



Staff 




Editor-in-Chief . . 


Kathleen Stasney 


Reporters 


Tony Palumbo, Julie Keane 




Brad Bittner. Paige Barnett 


Photography . . . 


Laurent Lanee 


Advisors 


.... Joe Ferry, Anne Bi^s, 




Mr. Edward O'Brien, 




Dr. Richard Ziemer 



Marine 
Biology 
in Jamaica 

Once again the Biology Department of 
Delaware Valley College will be offering 
the course entitled "Tropical Marine 
Communities", a natural history of coastal 
tropical marine life and marine fringe 
vcgitation. 

Instructors: Drs. William Allison and 
Richard Mulstay 
Dates: June 20-29, 1989 
Cost: $1100.00 includes: 

- round trip airfare (direct flight Phila. 
-Montego Bay) 

- bus transportation to and from Hofstra 
Marine Lab 

- room (double occupancy) & board (3 
meals/ day) & gratuities 

- lab fee 

- boat trips to reefs and other habitats 

- tuition (2 credits) 

Payment Deadline: April 14, 1989 
For further information about course 
and how to register contact: Dr. Richard 
E. Mulstay, (215) 345-1500 ext. 2440 
NOTE: This course will not be offered 
again until 1992. 

Get Your 
Resumes Done 

Give your resumes that professional 
look. The CISM department is offering 
to do your resumes on their new laser 
printer. 

1. Type your resume using WordStar 
(available in Ag 1 and Ag 5). 

2. Fill out a Print Request Form (next to 
the resume box in Ag 6). Put your 
diskette and the Print Request Form 
in an envelope and put the envelope in 
the resume box. 

3. Check back the next afternoon to see 
if there were any problems. If not, 
your resumes should be ready for you 
to pick up. 

Get up to 5 copies printed on plain white 
paF>er at no charge. 

OR 
Bring your own paper (suitable for use 
with a laser printer) and get up to 25 
copies. 



FOR SALE 

APIARY SOCIETY 

HONEY 

many varieties 

and 

BEESWAX CANDLES 

tapers, colors, shapes 

see 

CLUB MEMBERS 

or 

LASKER HALL 

Receptionist 

{Great Gifts!) 



On-Campus 
Interviews 

Wednesday, March 15 

NPC Services 

Positions: Various positions 

Majors: Ornamental Horticulture, 

Horticulture, Agronomy. 

Monday, March 13 
Perdue 

Positions: Plant Management Trainees, 
Poultry Supervisors, (full-time), Interships 
Majors: for full-time - Agri-Business, 
Agronomy, Animal Science, Dairy 
Science, Bus. Adm., Dairy Science, Food. 
For internship all of above majors, jr.'s 
going into senior year. 

Thursday, March 16 
Ortho Pharmaceutical Summer Co-op 
Positions: Summer Lab Technicians 
Majors: Bio, chemistry, animal science 

Monday, March 27 

Positions: Management Trainees 

Majors: Any majors, business strongly 

preferred 

* Check w/ placement office for additional 
recruiting dates. 

An Evening With 
The Classics 

The Delaware Valley College Chorale 
with guest instrumentalists will perform 
Vivaldi's "Gloria" on Thursday, March 
30th at 8 p.m. in the Student Center 
Auditorium. The Gloria, a sacred work, 
with the text written in Latin was 
composed in 1708 by Vivaldi, who was 
known as true "red priest". Pre-work 
contains 12 movements with 8 for chorus, 
3 for solo voices, and 1 duet. Soloists 
performing from the chorale will be; Kara 
Ghering '89, Lyric Soprano, Patie Faubcr 
'89, Mezzo Soprano, and Carnie Hayes 
'90 Lyric Soprano. After intermission the 
second half of the program will feature 
vocal and instrumental soloist: Donna 
Parris, Donna Doan, Dr. Richard Ziemer, 
Dr. Nathaniel Wallace, Diana Costa, and 
Diane Wheaton. 

The Chorale will be conducted by 
Joann Roberts. 

This is the 5th in the series of concerts 
this semester sponsored under the 
Department of Liberal Arts at the college. 



ZEiMERISM: 

Ariatocat: 
high'claBa feline 



^W(? 


Pride and Polish Day 



WI wasn't rubbing 
it in-I just wanted 
Eckjietoknow 
the score of 
lastnigjit'sgame.^^ 



^^^^^^^^^^^^>;ri4 J^I^H 




I AlexSumlM«:%ofVP^shii^lDnClassofl990 | 


^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^.^ p^^^^^H 



Go ahead and gloat . You can 
rub ii in all the way to Chicago 
with ATST Long Distance Senice. 
Besides, j-our best friend Etklie 
was the one who said your team 
couW never win three stra^ 

So give him a call. It oosisa 
kx less than you think to let him 
know who's headed for the PUyoffs. 
Reach out and touch soineoae* 

If ycxid like to know more about 
AIST pioduos and services, like 
IntematKwal Callii^ and the AIKT 
Card, call us ail 800 222-0300 




AKT 

The right choice. 



Km 



IDEAL EMPLOYMENT 
FOR STUDENTS 

• $8.00 • $ 9.00 per hour 

• 3-5 hours per day 

• Weekends off 

• $500.00 annual bonus 

• Career opportunities 



FOR PART TIME 
EMPLOYMENT 
INFORMATION 

CALL 

UNITED 

PARCEL 

SERVICE 

830-7934 

After 5 p.m. 
Call 830-7941 

UPS IS AN EQUAL 
OPR^TUNITY EMPLOYER 



i 



NEW BRITAIN INN 

"Dei Val's home away from home" 
SUN. NIGHT: Restaurant/Tavern 
Employees Night 
, DJ Steve Coffey 
(DelVal alum) 

MON. NIGHT: Steamers - 
$3.25/Dozen 

TUES. NIGHT: Import Night - 
Most $1.25/Bottle 

WED. NIGHT: $1 25 Cheese 
Steak Night 
College Night: 
$1 off Pitchers 
with College ID. 

THUR. NIGHT: DJ and Dancing 

FRI. NIGHT: DJ and Dancing 

SAT. NIGHT: Live entertainment 

Seafood & Sandwiches 

All Items to Go! 

HkPPY HOUR 

4 6:30Mon.Fri. 

Rt. 202 • New Britain, PA 

348-1968 




The student body has spoken. 



U.S. Department of Health & Human Services 





I.. -.i.i. — I,. , .— ■■ , ,,..■■ _. ,, i_, „ ,— .11 — I I , I ■ - ...I.., ■ . iii - ii — .I,.. _ — - ■ „ ■ — ■ .- ■ I ,_, I II I I \itm 

Vol. XXIIl, No. 17 TknrMlay, March 16, 1989 

NOTICE: The opinions expressed in any individual article do not necessarily reflect the viewpoint of the paper or school. 



Formal and 
Informal French 
Style 

by Laurent Lanee 

A French formal dinner is almost like a 
real ceremony. If one wants to respect 
the pure tradition, he or she would have 
to know how to set the table, how to 
entertain, how to plan the menu, all the 
little things that are so important! 

• French silver is decorated on the back 
so we often set the table with the 
cutlery face down. 

• The centerpiece shouldn't be to high; 
guests like to see each other over the 
table! For something very formal we 
put a big china tureen in its platter in 
the middle, or a seasonal flower 
arrangement; the French love 

'' symmetry! 

• A formal dinner begins with cocktails, 
almost always champagne and fruit 
juice. It's an old French habit to serve 
champagne. In Bordeaux, they 
sometimes serve a sweet wine before 
dinner, but that's only in Bordeaux. 

• The period for drinks is very short, ncfc 

• more than time for a glass of 
champagne. 

• Usually, the French have the first 
course already on the table when the 
guests come into the dining room. 
This way, one can begin pouring the 
wines, which should never be poured 
before the guests are at the table! 

, Usually, one would also serve plain 
water delicately chilled, not freezing 
like in the states! 

,# There are no place indicators for a 
dinner under 12. Seating arrangements 
follow general principals, divide 

/ couples in alternate seats. If a couple 
is engaged or married less than a year, 
you can seat them together. 

• Bring in the main dish, meat and 
vegetables on the same serving platter. 
The second course is always served 
twice. 

• Most of the time you don't serve a lot 
of wines. To begin with, one should 

Please turn to page 3 




D.V.C. representatives to the 1989 North East Student Affiliate were: Front row (L to R) Sue Biock, Rick 
Lawrence, April DeGeorge, Chris Druck, and Marvin Zimmerman. Back row(L to R) Pete Brummer, Mike 
Morris, Todd Gulick, Joanne Staats, James Lenhart and Jerry Myers (Advisor). 

North East Student 
Affiliate 1989 

by Rick Lawrence 

The North East Student Affiliate (NESA) is a convention held for Animal and Dairy 
Science students in the North East Region, the affiliate consists of a livestock judging 
contest, quiz bowl contest, and a paper presentation. Through these events a score is 
reached ranking the schools on their performance. This year's affiliate was hosted by 
Cornell University, in Ithaca, N.Y. 

This year eleven students from Delaware Valley College Block & Bridle and Dairy 
Society Clubs attended NESA. The students attending were Heather Hernley, Chris 
Druck, James Lenhart, Mike Morris, Joanne Staats, Sue Block, Rick Lawrence, Pete 
Brummer, April DeGeorge, Marvin Zimmerman, and Todd Gulick. Also, Professor 
Mr. Jerry Myers acted as advisor to our students and vyas also the senior advisor for 
NESA. Rick Lawrence served as the Vice President for NESA for the 1988 year. 

Del Val had two livestock judging teams representing the college. The "A" team 
consisted of Pete Brummer, James Lenhart, Sue Block, Chris Druck, and Marvin 
Zimmerman finished 5th and the "B" team made up of April DeGeorge, Joanne 
Staats, Todd Gulick, Heather Hernley, and Mike Morris finished 9th out of 1 1 teams. 
On an individual basis James Lenhart was second high and Pete Brummer was fifth. 

The quiz bowl contest is based on anatomical, physiological, and production 
questions related to animal and dairy science. This year Delaware Valley College 
managed to place second and third following one of the Penn State teams. Team "A" 
consisted of April DeGeorge, Joanne Staats, Mike Morris, and James Lenhart, and 
Team "B" was made up of Rick Lawrence, Pete Brummer, Heather Hernley and Todd 
Gulick. 

There were six papers presented at NESA this year. Del Val was represented by 
Rick Lawrence with a paper on Bovine Leukosis.' Rick placed fourth. This lead to 
Delaware Valley College finishing in third place overall following University of 
Vermont and Penn State. 

Delaware Valley College was very well represented during this event. The group 
had a most positivie outlook and had a great time, the students who participated in 
NESA 1989 should be commended for their performance and positive representation 
of the college. The group would also like to commend Mr. Jerry Myers for doing a 
superb job as both Junior and Senior Advisor for the North East Student Affiliate. 



On-Campus 
Inter vie vys 

* Check w/placement office for additional 
recruiting dates. 

Thursday, March 16 
Ortho Pharmaceutical Summer Co-op 
Positions: Sumer Lab Technicians 
Majors: Bio, chemistry, animal science 

Monday, March 27 

Positions: Management Trainees 

Majors: Any majors, business strongly 

preferred 

Tuesday, April 4 

Environmental testing and certification 

Positions: Lab Technicians 

Majors: Any majors w/at least 1 year of 

college chemistry. 

l"hursday, April 6 

Penn State Co-op extension service 

Positions: County Extension Agent 

Majors: Agronomy, Agribusiness, Animal 

Science, Dairy Science, Horticulture, 

Food Science, Ornamental Horticulture. 

Wednesday, April 12 
Philadelphia College of Pharmacy and 
Science 

Positions: Summer co-op animal care- 
taker 
Majors: Animal Science. 

Job Search Workshop 

bN CAMPUS 



An 



With 



Thursday, March 16 

Pub Dance sponsored by the 
cheerleaders . . . 9:30-1 in the Pub 

Friday, March 17 
St. Patrick's Day 
Spring Break begins at 4:00 

Sunday, March 26 
Easter 

Monday, March 27 ^, 
■ Baseball (H) vs. ' - ' ' 

Ursinus , 1p.m. 

Tuesday, March 28 
Classes Resume.*^ . .... 8:30 a.m. 
Softball (H) vs. ' 

Upsala 2:30 p.m. 

Gold (H) vs. Kings 1 p.m. 

Wednesday, March 29^-^ '•^'■^'^ -?-*-' 

Dance Band Semate 9 1 in 

the APR 

■; Baseball (A) vs. 

Swarthmore 3 p.m. 

Thursday, March 30 
Follow a Monday schedule 

Classical Concert 8 p.m. 

Film Everybody's All- 

American 9 p.m. in APR 

Advisors Joe Ferry, 

Advisors Joe Ferry, 



J:-- 



The Classics 

The Delaware Valley College Chorale 
with guest instrumentalists will perform 
Vivaldi's "Gloria" on Thursday, March 
30th at 8 p.m. in the Student Center 
Auditorium. The Gloria, a sacred work, 
with the text written in Latin was 
composed in 1708 by Vivaldi, who was 
known as the "red priest". The work 
contains 12 movements with 8 for chorus, 
3 for solo voices, and 1 duet. Soloists 
performing from the chorale will be; Kara 
Ghering '89, Lyric Soprano, Patie Fauber 
^9, Mezzo Soprano, and Carnie Hayes 
"90 Lyric Soprano. After intermission the 
second half of the program will feature 
vocal and instrumental soloist: Donna, 
Parris, Donna Doan, Dr. Richard Ziemcr, 
Dr. Nathaniel Wallace, Diana Costa, and 
Diane Wheaton. 

The Chorale will be conducted by 
Joann Roberts. 

This is the 5th in the series of concerts 
this semester sponsored under the 
Department of Liberal Arts at the college. 

Career Day 
Charisma 

b\^ Jerry Myers 

Once again the DVC career day 
was a great success. The placement 
office continues their gallant efforts in '. 
bringing many businesses to the 
college. But the placement office is 
not alone in their recruitment 
strategies for the participation of these 
businesses. Reputation seems to be a 
sweet enticement to obtain the 
continued return and support of these 
organizations. 

The success of our career day lies in 
the high-quality reputation of the DVC 
student. On career day 1 had the 
■ pleasure of speaking with several 
representatives who were recruiting. 
Their reports of student interaction 
were outstanding. 

One company recruiter said they 
had been to other colleges for similar 
events. She was amazed by the 
professionalism of the DVC students, 
commenting that, "Your students 
-present themselves incedibly well... and 
are so very well prepared." She went 
on to comment that the other colleges 
were no camparison to the students 
with whom she had met at our career 
day. 

Although many staff members are 
to be commended for our successful 
career days, we must not overlook 
our 'supply' which keeps the demand 
so very high, it is truely the charisma 
of the students that keeps the 
businesses 'dazzled', and coming back 
for more. Thank you and congratula 
tions!! 



REPLIES TO DVC-1 
(President's Hot Line) 

. . Yes, 1 too agree the new main gate 
(gate #1) is a nice addition to our 
DVC campus. 

. . Concerning the chairs, etc. which 
someone stored in the shower 
spaces of Segal Hall the mess has 
now been cleaned up! Thanks for 
the heads up. 

. . The Intelligencer remains on file 
daily in your/our library. Should 
you not find it there, let the librarian 
know. 

. . Yes, the Career Day and full Board 
of Trustees meeting did tax our 
campus parking spaces. There is 
no ecuse for people to park on our 
lawns. We have initiated revised 
procedures to preclude such actions 
in the future. 

. . I'm glad to know that so many 
people enjoy Mrs. Donna Parris' 

. ^singing, as do 1. She will sing again 
at our Founders' Day celebration 

. . Possibly you noted, we recently 
hired several more full-time security 
force personnel. Yes, they do have 
hand-held radios and flashlights 
which are provided. 

. . The quality, quanitity and variety of 
food in our dining facility remains a 
top priority. Keep your comments 
coming, buf remember we need 
specifics. We are following a Lent 
feeding routine, thanks for the 
reminders. 

. . The Ulman clothes driers have 
been checked. If they fail again, let 
Mr. Duchnowski or Ms. Janeczek 
know. 
• . . The hallway in Wolfshon has been 
checked and cleaned daily - thanks 
for your personal interest. 
■ . . Heat control in our buildings is 
difficult, especially when the temps 
; Vary greatly in a given 24 hour 
period. We'll try harder! 

. . Ants are normally attracted to food 
- have you cleaned your room up? 
The exterminator visited Cooke 
1st floor, three times last week. 

. . The furnace in Miller has been 
repaired. Sorry about the paint 
odor, but that paint job meant 
progress! 

. . Yes, due to the unusual warm 
outside temps, we have con 
siderable mud to put up with this 
winter. The messy grounds around 
Cooke and Barness will be cor- 
rected in spring. 

. If you must load/ unload your car at 
your dorm, keep the hazard lights 
on and you shouldn't get a ticket. 

. . When a shower drain is clogged, 
notify your RA or CC. Don Griffing 
our Cooke 1st floor RA, repaired a 
recent drain problem in no time at 
all! Thanks, Don! 



Del Val Receives National 
Recosnition 

Delaware Valley College's 1989 Philadelphia Flower Show exhibit, 'Xeriscaping 
— When the Well Runs Dry,' has received two awards and national nnedia 
coverage. With predictions of drought and water emergencies looming for this 
summer, the College's exhibit illustrating landscape design for water conservation 
is very timely. The award winning exhibit was featured on ABC television's 
nationally broadcast 'Good Morning America' program. Dr. John Martin, 
Chairman of the College's Department of Ornamental Horticulture and 
Environmental Design, was interviewed by horticulturist Ralph Snodsmith, long 
time WOR radio personality. Numerous local television and radio stations also 
covered the College's exhibit. The Xeriscape exhibit won two awards at the flower 
show; the Philadelphia Flower Show Award for an exhibit of distinction in the 
educational academic category, and a Special Achievement Award of the Garden 
Club Federation of Pennsylvania awarded for unusual excellence in Conservation. 
The exhibit is a demonstration Xeriscape, illustrating the seven principles of 
landscape design for water conservation. Xeriscaping can save 35-75% of the water 
used to maintain gardens and landscapes. 

"The Delaware Valley College Philadelphia Flower Show exhibits are totally 
student designed and constructed," according to Rick Ray, a faculty advisor for 
the exhibit. Students conceive the idea, create the design, select and force plant 
material, build the buildings, make the signs and labels, and even write the 
brochure. This student effort has been going on since 1950. Work has already 
begun for next year's show. 

The Philadelphia Flower Show is the oldest and largest indoor flower show in the 
world and runs through Sunday, March 12th at the Philadelphia Civic Center. 

Del Val to Hold Seminar on Free 



Trade Agreement 

National leaders in agriculture, 
agribusiness and industry will assemble 
at Delaware Valley College on March 
20 to learn about the free trade 
agreement concluded last January 
between the United States and 
Canada. 

Members of a distinguished panel 
will help those in attendance develop 
an understanding of the challenges 
and opportunities to be presented as 
the agreement is implemented. 

The featured luncheon speaker will 
be United States Ambassador Peter 
O. Murphy, Special Negotiator for 
U.S. — Canada Trade and Investment 
and Coordinator for North American 
Affairs, Executive Office of the 
President. As Chief Negotiator, 
Ambassador Murphy was responsible 
for the successful conclusion of the 
U.S. — Canada free trade agreement. 
This historic agreement covers more 
than $150 billion in trade with the 
United States' largest trading partner. 

The Canadian point of view will be 
presented by Michael Hart, a member 
of the Canadian Foreign Service. Hart 
previously served in the Department 
of External Affairs and is currently on 
academic leave to write a book on the 
trade agreement. 

Other members of the panel will 
include: 
' Honorable Boyd E. Wolf, Secretary, 
Pennsylvania Department of 
Agriculture 



• Sharon A. Ainsworth, Executive 
Assistant to the Secretary, New Jersey 
Department of Agriculture; 

• Richard Petges, Group Leader, Inter- 
American Division, United States 
Department of Agriculture; 

• John Donohue, Internation Trade 
Attorney; 

• John M. Urbanchuk, a leader in the 
implementation of The Free Trade 
Agreement. 

Commodity groups will look at special 
concerns involving their products while 
resource leaders will help participants 
identify strategies for making the most of 
the new market environment. Represent 
atives from local, regional and national 
businesses such as Wakefegi Food 
Corporation, Hatfield Quality Meats, Inc., 
Pennfield, Inc. Kreamer Feed Store, Inc., 
Longenecker's Hatchery, WLR Foods, 
Agway, Inc. and The Dudnyk Company 
will be on hand to lead break-out group 
discussions. 

A cross section of the Delaware Valley 
regional economy are sponsoring the 
conference, including Delaware Valley 
College, the Pennsylvania Department 
of Agriculture, PennAg Industires 
Association, The Bucks County 
Commissioners, the Philadelphia Society 
for the Promotion of Agriculture, the 
Delaware River Port Authority, the 
Pennsylvania Food Processors, the 
Pennsylvania Farmer's Association, and 
the National Agri-Marketing Association, 
Chesapeake Chapter. 



Formal and informal 
French Style 

continued from page 1 

usually choose a dry wine white wine 
from Alxace, which is always served in 
tall, colored glasses, either red or 
green. Red wine arrives with the main 
dish, and the same is served with the 
cheese. 

For dessert, one should offer her or 
his guests the choice of champagne. 
Coffee is served with liqueurs, 
Calvados, armagnac, and sometimes 
sweet for the ladies. 

• Something like one hour after the 
coffee, people usually enjoy a bit of 
champagne or fruit juice. That's also 
the signal that it's time to leave. 
Generally speaking, a French formal 

dinner should look easy but it does take 

organization. 
The only real problem is to make sure 

guests come with a big appetite! 



NEW BRITAIN INN 

"Del Val's home away from home" 
SUN. NIGHT: Restaurant Tavern 
Employees Night 
DJ Steve Coffey 
{DelVal alum) 

Steamers — ^ " =, 
$3.25 Dozen 

Import Night - 
Most $1.25 Bottle 

$1.25 Cheese 
Steak Night 
College Night; 
$1 off Pitchers 
with College ID. 

DJ and Dancing 

DJ and Dancing 

Live entertainment 



MON. NIGHT: 

TUES. NIGHT: 

WED. NIGHT: 



THUR. NIGHT: 

FRI. NIGHT: 

SAT. NIGHT: 



Seafood & Sandwiches 
All Items to Go! 
HAPPY HOUR 
4 6:30Mon.Fn. 

Rt. 202 • New Britain, PA 
348-1968 



The cost of the conference, including 
the luncheon, is $65. An informational 
brochure, including a registration form, 
is available by writing to the Agribusiness 
Department of Delaware Valley College, 
Doylestown, PA 18901 or by calling (215) 
345-1500. 



Staff 




Editorin-Chicf . . 


Kathleen Stasney 


Reporters 


Tony Palumbo, Julie Keane 




Brad Bittner, Paige Barnctt 


Photography . . . 


Laurent Lance 


Advisors 


.... Joe Ferry, Anne Biggs, 




Mr. Edward O'Brien, 




Dr. Richard Ziemer 



The College Credit Card Corporatior\ is 
looking for a student organization that 
would like to earn $500$1000 for a week 
oncampus marketing project. Must be 
organized and hard working. Call Gina' 
or Cheryl at 1-800-592-2121. This is a 
confirmation only. 



ZIEMERISM: 

PaulBunyan: 
the wizard of adxe 



Workshop 

Job Search Workshop 
Wednesday, March 29 
ll:20-Segal Hall Conference Room 

Resume Workshop 
Wednesday, April 5 
ll:20-Segal Hall Conference Room 

Interviewing Workshop 

Wednesday, April 12 

ll:20-Segal Hall Conference Room 



Gym Hours During 
Spring Break 

The James Work and Rudley-Neumann 
Gymnasiums will be available for use 
over spring break according to the 
following schedule: March 19 thru March 
23from8:30a.m. until 4:30 p.m. and after 
4:30 p.m. upon presentation of identi- 
fication card to Security Office; March 
24 thru March 27 all hours upon 
presentation of identification card to 
Security Office. 

WANTED 

Student to work on vegetable farm 
this summer. Duties include harvesting, 
irrigation, spraying, and weed control. 
No experience necessary. Must be a 
hard worker. Driver's license a plus. 
Farm raises 60 acres of vegetables and 
small fruits. Apply to Whistle Stop 
Nursery and Farm, RD 1, Box 313, 
Ringoes.NJ 0855 lor call (201) 788-8552. 



The City Hall 
of Paris 

by Lauren Lanee 

One of the most remarkable buildings 
in Paris is without a doubt the "Hotel De 
Ville". It is totally unlike any other. While 
it is indissociable from the history of the 
French capital, it is also the most typical 
expression of the architecture and 
decorative art of the "Belle Epoque" at 
the end of the 19th century, the dawn of 
the third republic. 

The Hotel De Ville is located in the 
very heart of Paris. It is architecturally 
splendid and its exuberant Neo- 
Renaissance style has recently been even 
more highlighted by a cleaning and face- 
lifting. 

It is here that the administrative affairs 
of the capital are conducted, under the 
direction of the Mayor, who is actually 
Mr. Jacques Chirac, with his 163 city 
councillors, each of whom is elected by 
universal suffrage. 






7 





IS)®lkiw3iiK§^aQnil(§^ (g®fln®g® ^gQO(fl(SQQG K!®^s;:7Sip33ip®ff 



Vol. XXIII, No. 18 ThurMlav, March 30, 198f 

NOTICE; The opinions expressed in any individual article do not necessarily reflect the viewpoint of the paper or school. 




Q & A on P & P Day 



What Exactly; is Pride and Polish Da\;? 

It's a day set aside in the spring when 
faculty, administration, staff and students 
alike put aside their work at hand and 
spend a couple of hours sprucing up our 
campus. 

W//iy Do We Have to Have Pride ar\d 
Polish Day? 

The fact is we don't have to have it. 
But this is a great way for us to come 
together as a family and to work on some 
worthwhile projects which we never seem 
to have time to get done. 
What's In It For Me? 

For anyone who participates in Pride 
and Polish Day, quite a bit, beyond the 
satisfaction of having completed an 
important project. First of all, everyone 
will receive a special commemorative t- 
shirt and painters cap. We'll also have a 
special luncheon barbeque. There will be 
volleyball and softball games once our 
work is completed. A special slide show 
at dinner that night will highlight the 
day's activities. Everyone who par- 
ticipates in the full day will receive one 
week's credit on their Employment 
Program. There will be gift certificates to 
the Student Store given as door prizes. 
And one lucky student will receive a $500 
tuition waiver good for the Fall, 1989 
semester. So you can see, there's a lot in 
it for you. 



Please see page 4 



4 



PROJECT 



General A-Day Work 

Student Center 

Poultry Diagnositc Laboratory 

Greenhouses 



Isolation Stall (Equine) 

Sod New Dairy 

Erect Fence (Farm 3) 

Scrape & Paint Athletic Bleachers 

General Groundskeeping /i 

Allman Building 

Organize Supply Closet (Lasker Hall) 

General Landscaping 

Bee House 

Library 

Wash College Vehicles 

Mandell 

Miller Hall 

Paint New Britain Road Fence 

Segal/ Eisner Hall 

Dormitory Lounges 

Lasker Hall 

Admissions Building 

Ag Building 

Chapel .' 

Security Area 

Pesticide Building 



These are the 26 projects which have been established for Pride and Polish Day. 
Some are very specific, such as washing the college vehicles or painting .'- ^ fence 
along New Britain Road. Others are more general, such as general landscaping or 
Mandell Hall. Those projects could include everything from raking to sweeping to 
cleaning windows to painting. Individual project leaders will decide exactly what 
will be accomplished. 

Signing up for a particular project is easy. Simply go the the Dean of Students 
office and put your name on that list. Your leader will tell you where to report for 
work on Pride and Polish Dav. 




Your 
Opinion 



I am writing in response to last week's 
letter entitled "Circles". But before 1 
even start to reply, I have to ask; exactly 
what are you talking about? I am not at all 
sure what your problem is, beyond 
general discontent with administration. 
So this is what 1 will reply to. 

The administration neither hates nor 
disrespects us. They have not violated 
our rights in any way. If student morale is 
down, and I don't think it is, it is because 
whiners like you moan and groan so 
much. Why does there have to be such a 
gap between students and admini- 
stration? You accuse them of going behind 
our backs and talking in circles. Look in 
the mirror! What they are saying makes 
sense, if students will only stop whining 
and listen. You want them to treat us like 
adults. If we start acting like adults, 
maybe we'll get somewhere! > 

Name witheid 



On Campus 

Thursday, March 30 
Follow a Monday Schedule 

Classical Concert 8 pm 

Movie: Everybody's All- 
American 9 pm in APR 

Friday, March 31 
Win, Lose or Draw 
9 pm in Ceasar's Pub 

Saturday, April 1 
Hillel will have it's 
annual Auction 7 pm APR 

Sunday, April 2 , ^o 
Shakedown 



Staff 

Editor-in-Chief Kathleen Stasney 

Reporters ...,,.. Tony Palumbo, 

*: Kathleen Stasney 

Photography . »ife^ « Laurent Lanee 

Advisors Joe Ferry, 



Norristown Garden 

Club 

Scholarship 

Norristown Garden Club Scholarship 
of $1,000. available for the 1989-90 
academic year. Applicant must be either 
enrolled as a Floriculture, Forestry, 
Horticulture or Landscape Design major. 
They should be from the Norristown, 
Collegeville, Upper Merion, Methacton 
or the Plymouth Whitemarsh area. 
Applications are available at the Student 
Financial Aid Office. Deadline is April 2 1 , 
1989. 



REPLIES TO DVC-l 
(President's Hot Line) 

, . Concerning Computer Room 1 , we'll 
make sure the hardware is fixed. 

. . Dave, your offer to donate a United 
States flag is appreciated. We welcome 
the contribution. 

. . Tom, thanks for your call regarding 
our dining facility. Sorry for the long 
lines and no forks. We'll try to do 
better in the future. 

. . We're checking into dryers in Samuel 
and Ulman. We'll get the broken 
machines fixed pronto. Thanks for 
the many calls! 

. . With regards to the recent forum held 
for students and staff, the date and 
time were selected by students. 

, . Concerning temporary identification 
cards, please see someone in the 
, Dean of Students Office. 

, . The clock in Mandell 1 14 and the soda 
machine in Elson have been repaired. 
Thanks for your comments. 

. . A reminder to thoiie w^o called ahl>ut 
our dining hours. Lunch is served 
from 10:45 a.m. until 12:45 p.m. and 
dinner is served from 4:30 p.m. until 
6:30 p.m. Sorry, but two hours is the 
maximum we can provide for food 

• service. :,i.,."_ . ■;,-,'.;. i,:ST'* 

, . Thanks for the many calls regarding 
the temperature of the water in our 
showers. We are working hard to 
solve the problem. Keep us posted on 
our progress. 

. . Yes, the new wrought iron gate is 
attractive. Thanks for the complement. 
The old yellow and red gate has been 
' removed. -, 

, . We'll be testing student living spaces 
for radon gas and asbestos over spring 
break. The results of our examinations 
in the classrooms and buildings were 

. fiiW- . 

, . The fire extinguishers have been 
outfitted with small wooden sticks 
because the metal hammers have been 
mysteriously disappearing. Help! 

. . We are all concerned about the 
problem of driving on our grass. It 
must come to a stop for our campus 
to be as beautiful as possible. 

. . Thank you for your many calls 
concerning the third floor of Ulman 
Hall. They are noted with concern. 

. . Yes, Mr. Benner's idea for recycling is 
an excellent one. A similar project was 
attempted in the past but with little 
success. The concept is being 
examined once again. 



On-Campus 
Interviews 

Tuesday, April 4 

Environmental Testing and certification 

Positions: Lab Technicians 

Majors: Any major w/at least 1 year of 

college chemistry. 

Thursday, April 6 

Penn State co-op Extension Service 

Positions: County Extension Agent 

Majors: Agronomy, Agribusiness, 

Animal Science, Dairy Science, 

Horticulture, Food Service, Ornamental 

Horticulture. 

Wednesday, April 12 

Philadelphia College of Pharmacy and 

Science 

Positions: Summer co-op Animal 

Caretaker 

Majors: Animal Science c * 



Workshop 
Schedule 



Wednesday, April 5 

Resume Workshop ' *" 

1 1:20 - Segal Hall Conference Room 

Wednesday, April 9 

Job Search Workshop 

1 1:20 • Segal Hall Conference Room 

Wednesday, April 12 

Interviewing Workshop 

1 1:20 Segal Hall Conference Room 



Get Your 
Resumes Done 

Give your resumes that professional 
look. The CISM department is offering 
to do your resumes on their new laser 
printer. 

=1. Type your resume using WordStar 
(available in Ag 1 and Ag 5), -? 

2. Fill out a Print Request Form (next to 
the resume box in Ag 6). Put your 
diskette and the Print Request Form 
in an envelope and put the envelope in 
the resume box. 

3. Check back the next afternoon to see 
if there were any problems. If not, 
your resumes should be ready for you 
to pick up. 

Get up to 5 copies printed on plain white 
paper at no charge. 
OR 

Bring your own paper (suitable for use 
with a laser printer) and get up to 25 
copies. 



46 Mom says the 
house jiist isnt the 
same without me, 
eventhoi^it^ 
a lot cleaner. W 




luM Ivimist" \xtuT Mom 
is iar a\\~jy. tk)i*sn t im-an 
)\)\i can 1 Ix." iloM.- \cn.\ can 
siill sharf ihc love and 
laughier on AT&T Long 
Distance Senice 

It costs less than you 
think to hear that she hkes 
the peace and quiet, but 
she misses ymi So po 
ahead, fjivt* \xxir Moni a 
all YtHi can clean wxjr 
iXN)m later Rexh out and 
touch someone* 




The right choice. 



Scholarships 

Information on more scholarships are 
available at the Financial Aid Office in the 
Admissions Center. Some scholarships 
currently available are: 

Apha Gamma RHO Scholarship 

Amount: $1,000 

# of Scholarships: one 

Contact: Scholarship Office 

National FFA Center 
P.O. Box 15160 
Alexandria, VA 22309 

Eligibility: Student pursuing a four year 

college degree in agriculture. Write for 

complete details. 

National Council of State Garden 
Clubs, Inc. 

Contact: Mrs. C. Manning Smith 

P.O. Box 450 
■ / , Charles Town, WV 15414 
Eligibility: Resident to the state of the 
Federation applying. Must attend an 
accredited university, but does not have 
to be in home state majoring m 
Horticulture, Floriculture, Plant Path- 
ology, Landscape Design, Botany, 
Agronomy, Environmental Control, 
anchor allied subjects. If student changes 
major or drops out of school during 
school year, balance of money must be 
returned. Scholarships available to 
juniors, senior and graduate students. 
Renewable as long as high academic 
standards are kept and need is still 
apparent. Write for complete details. 



NEW BRITAIN INN 

"Del Val's home away from home" 

SUN. NIGHT: Restaurant/Tavern 
Employees Night 
DJ Steve Coffey 
(DclVal alum) 



MON. NIGHT: 

^UES. NIGHT: 

WED. NIGHT: 



THUR. NIGHT: 

FRI. NIGHT: 

SAT. NIGHT: 



Steamers — 
$3.25/Dozen 

Import Night — 
Most $1.25/ Bottle 

$1 25 Cheese 
Steak Night 
College Night: 
$1 off Pitchers 
with College ID. 

DJ and C ncing 

DJ and P mcing 

Live entertainment 



Seafood & Sandwi-h'^s 

All Items to Go! 

HAPPY HOUR 

4-6:30 Mon.-Fn. 

Rt. 202 • New Britain, PA 

348-1968 



Phonathon '89 Thanks 



Thank you and congratulations arc in 
order for the many students, faculty, and 
alumni and administrators who helped 
make Phonathon '89 such a tremendous 
success. A total of $77,695 was pledged 
by 1 122 alumni over the seven evenings 
of calling from Lasker Hall lobby. 

Jennifer Canjar "92 led the student 
volunteers with 31 pledges and Dave 
Waskko '67 maintained his top form with 
57 pledges. 

The following students helped to meet 
DVC's goals for Phonathon '89: 
Susan Higley "90 
Kathy Regcnhard '89 
Tom Makowski '89 
Robert Hofstettcr "91 
Mary Ann Bailey "90 
Honor Brush "90 
Bechie Schatschneider "91 
Jennifer Canjar "92 
Laura Etzweiler '89 
Stacey Hoover '89 
Jill Wolfe "90 
Don Griffing '89 
Beth Bevins '89 
John Koury '91 
Joe Diamond '90 
Michele Harley "92 
Kim Carroll "92 
Jen Jesiolowski '90 
Shawn Hennigan '90 
Audrey Daniel '90 
Jackie Leoncavallo "90 

Kristy Morley '91 ' ' 

Chris Schatt '89 



Holly Eckloff "90 
Edie Ann Feigles '89 
Karen Cummiskey '91 

The trustees, faculty and admin- 
istrators who volunteered were: 
BillRorer 
Joshua Feldstein 
Bob Berthold 
Craig Hill 
George West 
Connie Shook 
Dave Bcnner 
Jim Miller 

Gary Brubaker ..,.■,, 

Joe Fulcoly 
Ron Johnson , 

Ted Christie 
Willie Gourley 
Oska Larsson 

Barbara Heisey * *.' 

Joe Ferry 
Ken Hinde 
Richard Woodring 
Pat Hilton 
Richard Ziemer 
Art Foley 
Steve Zenko 
RussSchulz 
Paul Schatschneider 
Rita Chrismer 
Bill Craven 

In addition, fourteen alumni joined the 
effort that broke all records! On behalf of 
the entire College family, these special 
volunteers are gratefully recognized. 



Q & A on P & P Da^ . 

How Long Will We Be Working? 

Our schedule calls for you to report to 
your chosen work area at 8:30 a.m. 
You'll work until noon. After a picnic 
lunch which begins at 11:30 a.m., you'll 
return to your work area at 12:30 p.m. 
You'll complete your project by 3 p.m., 
at which time you will begin clean up. At 
3:30 p.m., the volleyball and Softball 
games will begin. From 4:45 until 6:00 
p.m., you'll eat dinner in the dining hall 
and watch a continuous slide show. At 
6:00 p.m. , the informal awards ceremony 
will begin. 

OK, You've Convinced Me To Give This 

A Shot. How Do I Sign Up? 

Simple. Elsewhere in this issue of Ram 
Pages is a list of projects which need to 
be completed. Some of the areas are 
specific, others more general. Just go to 
the Dean of Students office by April 6. 
There will be sign-up sheets for each 
project. Put your name on the appropriate 
list. Your project leader will let you know 
where to report for work. 



Marine 
Biolo9V 
in Jamaica 

Once again the Biology Department of 
Delaware Valley College will be offering 
the course entitled "Tropkal Marine 
Communities", a natural history of coastal 
tropical marine life and marine fringe 
vegitation. 

Instructors: Drs. William Allison and 
Richard Mulstay 
Dates: June 20-29, 1989 
Cost: $1100.00 includes: 

- round trip airfare (direct flight Phila. 
-Montego Bay) 

- bus transportation to and from Hofstra 
Marine Lab 

- room (double occupancy) & board (3 
meals/day) & gratuities 

- lab fee 

- boat trips to reefs and other habitats 

- tuition (2 credits) 

Payment Deadline: April 14, 1989 
For further information about course 
and how to register contact: Dr. Richard 
E. Mulstay, (215) 345-1500 ext. 2440 
NOTE: This course will not be offered 
again until 1992. 



Major of the Month 

Buisiness 
Administration 

Business students, take note! If you've 
been using the Library this semester, 
you will have noticed lots of new 
magazines about different aspects of 
business. Many of these have been added 
to strengthen our collection to support 
the new LaSalle MBA program available 
here at DVC. Fortunately much of this 
new material is useful for undergraduate 
study as well. You can access all of these 
magazines through BUSINESS 
PERIODICALS INDEX, the blue volumes 
shelved along the file cabinets on the far 
wall of the Periodicals Room. DVC's 
holdings of each journal are listed after 
each annotation. 

These magazines are in the Periodicals 
Room, lower level. 

COMPUTER DECISIONS - of interest 
to CISM students as well, this magazine 
focuses on hardware and software 
developments for business applications. 
Hands-on info. Product index in each 
issue. 1989- 

EXECUTIVE FEMALE - Recent 
statistics show an impressive influx of 
women into middle management 
positions, up to 40% from 20% in the past 
several years. This magazine is geared to 
women but many of the articles are 
pertinent to any manager, male or female. 
1989 

INTERNAL AUDITOR - current trends, 
computer applications, book reveiws, as 
well as in-depth articles on internal audit 
and control. Published by the Institute of 
Internal Auditors. 1989- 
JOURNAL OF ADVERTISING 
RESEARCH — Marketing students, look 
at this one. Lots of charts, graphs and 
comparison studies as well as statistical 
analysis. Some referenced articles. 
Articles are accessible to the introductory 
level marketing student. 1989- 
JOURNAL OF CONSUMER 
RESEARCH — scholarly journal from 
the College of Business Administraiton 
of the University of Florida. Well- 
referenced extensive articles for the 
advanced student. All articles are referred 
by at least three reviewers. 1989- 
OFFICE — informative and informal 
magazine about current products 
manufactured for the office. Concerns 
all types of office equipment, not limited 
to computers and peripherals. 1989- 

Samples of the magazines described 
above are displayed on the first two 
shelves of this bookshelf. Several other 
new Business magazine subscriptions 
have begun. INC., MANAGEMENT 
COUNTING, SUPERVISORY 
MANAGEMENT, and TRINING AND 
DEVELOPMENT JOURNAL are in the 
Periodicals Office. Ask to look at a copy! 





Vol. XXIII, No. 19 Thursdav, April 6, 1989 

NOTICE: The opinions expressed in any individual article do not necessarily reflect the viewpoint of the paper or school. 



Free Trade 
Agreement 
Conference 

by Tony Palumbo ' ' " 

Last Monday, in recognition of National 
Agriculture Day, Delaware Valley College 
hosted an International Conference on 
the Free Trade Agreement between the 
United States and Canada. Subtitled 
"Implications for Agriculture, Marketing 
and Management for the 90's," the 
Conference was designed to provide a 
forum for a discussion of the potential 
impact of this agreement on the U.S. 
agricultural industry. The planners of the 
event chose the topic because of its 
extreme timeliness; the Free Trade 
Agreement, signed by President Ronald 
Reagan and Canadian Prime Minister 
Brian Mylroney in January 1988, took 
effect on the first of this year. ,, 

At the Conference, members of food- 
producing industries had the opportuntiy 
to listen to government speakers and 
others familiar with the Agreement speak 
about its implications for the agricultural 
community. 

Attendance ^ the Conference re- 
presented a wide diversity of geographic 
and vocational interests. Approximately 
75 persons from the U.S. as well as 
Canada participated in the event, drawn 
from various fields of industry or public 
service affected by the Agreement. 

Support of the Conference also 
reflected a wide range of local interests in 
the topic being discussed. Sponsors 
included such diverse organizations as 
the College itself, Pennsylvania and New 
Jersey Departments of Agriculture, 
Bucks County Board of Commissioners, 
and St. Josephs University, as well as a 
host of groups representing industry 
concerns. 

The first speaker on the agenda was 
William H. Rorer III, President of DelVal 
College. Mr. Rorer welcomed the 
assembly to the College, and expressed 
his gratitude to those whose efforts had 
helped to make it possible, particularly 

Please turn to page 4 



Summer Session 
Registration Open at : 
DelVal 

Registration is now open for Summer- 
study '89 at Delaware Valley College. 

Summerstudy '89 is designed for 
working adults who are seeking to 
continue their education through evening 
study; college students who want ro 
accelerate or catch up on their course 
work; and high school student seniors 
who would like to get a head start on 
their studies. , :, 

Delaware Vaftey College offers (wo 
summer sessions with both dot and 
evening classes. Session I begins May 22 
and runs until July 3. Session II starts 
July 10 and runs until August 17. 

Summerstudy '89 offers a wide variety 
of courses in Business Administration, 
Computer Information Systems Manage- 
ment, Agronomy and Environmental 
Science, Animal and Dairy Science, 
Biology, Chemistry, Equine Science, 
Food Science, Liberal Arts and 
Mathematics/Physics. 

Students can also pursue an MBA 
degree from LaSalle University at 
Delaware Valley College during the 
summer. A Bachelor's degree in Business 
Administration (Accounting, Marketing, 
Management and Banking) or Computer 
Information Systems Management is also 
possible through the evening program. 
Students may also earn an associate's 

Please turn to page 3 

Assistant To The President 
Named at DelVal Collese 

Jack D. Rininger has been named Assistant to the President at Delaware V^'lley 
College, it was announced by President W.H. Rorer III. 

Rininger, of Collegeville, Pennsylvania, is a career financial executive with 30 years 

experience in financial management. In his last position, Rininger served as a senior 

financial executive of Rorer International, a company with $4 19 million of annual sales 

and 25 subsidiary companies. He served as Treasurer of the company from 

September, 1977 until February, 1982 and prior to that as Comptroller of the 

company. He began his career as a staff auditor for one of the Big 8 accounting firms, . 

Coopers and Lybrand. 

Pleae turn to page 3 




A 



Outdoors!!! 

The rejuvenated Outdoors Club of 
D.V.C. is proud to announce its new 
addition to the Ram Pages. Outdoors will 
be our way of informing you as to what 
the club is about, as well as alerting you 
to the many activities that you will be 
invited to join. 

Our first big event of the year was a 
success. Three members of the club 
entered their cars in the Road Rally. We 
wish to congratulate Doug Spencer 
(Droopy Dog) with his co-pilot Matt 
Machonski, who pulled third place, Mark 
Ringenary (Captain Diesel) with co-pilot 
Dave Mattus and navigator Donna Albert, 
who achieved fourth place, and Al Cicconi 
(Pathfinder), who made sixth place. We 
would also like to congratulate the other 
entries and let them know that we will be 
back next year. 

There's a lot more to come. Our next 
events are on A-day weekend, where the 
Outdoors Club will be holding the first of 
two big events. The first, the incredible 
"Huff n' Puff", is a bike jaunt around 
scenic Bucks County. The second 
incredible event is extra special; it's the 
first annual "Lake Archer Canoe Classic". 
The canoe races will go down and back 
on peaceful Lake Archer. So, dust off 
your bikes and gather your rowing teams 
for two of the most exciting A-day events 
you will encounter. 

We don't want you to get bored, so 
we've scheduled a few events to keep 
you amused. Our adventures this month 
include: 

April 8, 1989 — A hike to the Pinnacle of 
the Appalacian Trail. 
April 15, 1989, April 22, 1989 - A bike 
ride will be held on one or both of these 
days depending on the weather 
(destinations will be announced later). 

If you would like to have more 
information about our activities or would 
like to become a member of the Outdoors 
Club please contact Mr. Lawrence or 
drop a letter to Al Cicconi in box 530. 
Come and join us and become a part of 
the great outdoors! 



Staff 

Editor-in-Chief Kathleen Stasncy 

Reporters Tony Palumbo, 

Kathleen Stasney 

Photography Laurent Lanee 

Advisors Joe Ferry, Anne Biggs, 

Mr. Edward O'Brien, 
Dr. Richard Ziemer 



Attention *"■"!"" 
College 
Students 



Need a summer job? 

Would you enjoy a summer of travel 
while you can gain valuable resume- 
enhancing experience or college credit? 

Northrup King has openings in their 
summer sales representative program, 
calling on established packet-garden seed 
accounts, after attending an expense 
paid training session in early June, you 
will travel in the eastern United States in 
a company van for approximately 8 to 10 
weeks. , 

All business expense and gas paid. 

Salary $740.00 per month. 

Approximately $840.00 to $870.00 per 
month living allowance, plus a generous 
incentive plan (1988 ave. $750.00) 

To schedule an interview with a 
Northrup King representative coming to 
your area in April, please contact 
Service/Checkout Department, 1-800- 
445-0956, 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. CDT 
Address: Northrup King Company, 7500 
Olson Memorial Highway, Golden Valley, 
Minnestoa 55427. An equal opportunity 
employer. Use the above address for 
billing. 



continued from page 1 

degree in Supervision, Administration & 
Management or a certificate in Food 
Technology^ through evening sfucly. 

Registration is open now and continues 
through the beginning of classes. The 
Continuing Education Office is open 
until 7 p.m. for registration and advising 
prior to the start of each session. The 
last day for mail registration for Session / 
is Friday, May 12. The last day for 
registration for Session II is Friday, June 
30. 

Registration can be completed in- 
person during evening hours on the 
following days for Session /; May 8, 10, 
16, 18, 22 and 23. For Sesion II, evening 
registration hours are available on July 
6, Wand 11. .,• 

Tuition for Summerstudy '89 is $115 
per credit ($345 for a 3-credit course, 
$4Mfor a 4-credit course). Registration 
fee is $15. The lab fee (if necessary) is 
$40. The computer fee (if necessary) is 
555. 

For more information about Summer 
study '89, including a bulletit. and 
registration form, contact the Office of 
Continuing Education at 3451500, 
extension 2375. 



■if 



I've got an edge." 



"Wfwn I graduate. I II 
get more considiTatu>n 
friim company 
recruiters because Ihev 
know my UPS 
experience will pay otf 
for them." 



the imiu^n 4 \v.tf.- 
in .1 fiHv 



•MprI 

AmnNrewM: 

MMMV-FIMir 



DtKHTkWS H«1ri.nH Dnv. in 
Irrwxl- «Hih K»«l (Itiulr oil hi-t 

Kiiatj. dpprtiximdtfU 2 ^ mill's m|.s| 
.■I Wilhm l.niH' I'wk Mril ' 



I T I 






United Parcel Service 



I M.h.ir.tt..! Hifik. (Vpi 



t UN . 

I'lhivi 



i>nbiT M<)1 K,>,hl 



"I Ml /))* 

W*-l Il\« K'i Ml 



IM* Ml M I 
IV4M .h,u.^ 

NKtIt 

MIU U\1i 



:rj 



Senior Transition 
Week 

The Placement Office is happy to 
announce that we will be sponsoring a 
special workshop series entitled "Senior 
Transition Week" to be held during the 
week of April 10. The workshops are 
designed for you and will address the 
specific concerns and issues you will be 
facing as you embark on your first 
career-related job. The workshops will 
cover the following subject matters: 
Dress for Success - appropriate 
workplace attire, Interviewing 
Techniques tough interview questions 
and how to respond, Your First 
Paycheck - how deductions are made, 
Job Hunting Roadblocks 
psychological blocks that get in your 
way. The workshops will be presented 
by experts on each topic: a Wardrobe 
Consultant, investment Counselor, 
Payroll Administrator, Placement 
Director and Counselor, v; ^;^i;*;.,f 

the space for the workshops are 
limited to 25 students per session, if you 
are interested in attending any of the 
workshops, you must sign up in the 
Placement Office. The dates and times of 
the workshops are as follows: Dress 
for Success Monday, April 10, 1:30 
3:00 p.m.. Interviewing Techniques 

"-tuesday, April 11, 1:30-3:00 p.m.. Your 
First Paycheck, - Wednesday, April 
12, 11:30-12:30 p.m.. Job Hunting 
Roadblocks, Friday, April 14, 1:30- 
3:00 p.m. The workshops will be held in 
the Segal Hall Conference Rpom. 
(Refreshments will be served.) '; ; V • 

We in the Placement Office are excited 
about sponsoring the first Senior 
Transition Week. The week should prove 
to be enjoyable as well as informational. I 
look forward to seeing your there. J 



Beekeeping Short Courses 
Offered At DelVal 



Delaware Valley College will again be 
offering its popular three-day short 
courses on beekeeping. The courses are 
designed for beekeepers, for those 
considering taking up beekeeping, and 
for those interested in learning more 
about the honey bee. Beekeeping is a 
very interesting hobby, and in addition to 
providing the beekeeper with honey, it 
also provides valuable pollination of 
garden, field, and orchard crops. Honey 
bees can be kept just about any where, in 
fact there are a number of people keeping 
bees right in the City of Philadelphia. 
Over the years, the course has been 
attended by people from all over the 
United States, from a number of foreign 
countries including Canada, Venezulea, 
and Germany. Also a significant number 
of our faculty and students have taken 
this course. 

The course will include pertinent 
aspects of beekeeping including equip- 
ment, apiary location, seasonal manage- 
ment, honey production, beeswax candle 
making, and home uses of honey. 
Illustrated classroom instruction will be 
coupled with hands on experience using 
the College's bee yard and its Honey 
house. Enough information is presented 
during the three days to enable the 
student to get started in beekeeping. The 
course is under the direction of Dr. 
Berthold, the College's beekeeping 

* Job Bulletin 

Attention All Seniors: 

it is time for you to start picking up the 
■ weekly Job Bulletin, available in the 
Placement Office. This bulletin is a weekly 
listing of all full-time job openings that 
come through the Placement Office. 
Each week approximately 15-35 jobs are 
listed. Begin your job search and start 
^ sending your resumes today! 



Assistant 



continued from page 1 

Rininger received his Bachelor's degree from Indiana University of Pennsylvania 
and his MBA in Business and Accounting from Bucknell University. He is a licensed 
Certified Public Accountant in Pennsylvania. 

At Delaware Valley College, Rininger will be primarily concerned with College 
financial matters and planning. 

"1 am very pleased that Mr. Rininger has accepted our offer to become part of 
Delaware Valley College," said Rorer. "By adding this new and highly-qualified 
financial executive to our current management team, we expect to more rapidly 
overcome audit discrepancies, design a new computerized budget system and 
upgrade our financial activities." 



specialist, and he will be assisted by Mr. 
Jack Matthenius, the N.J. Dept. of 
Agriculture Supervisor of Bee Culture. 

The spring course will be held on three 
Saturdays, April 8, 15. and 22, 1989, and 
the summer course will be held on Friday, 
Saturday, and Sunday, June 23, 24, and 
25, 1989. Classes will start at 8:30 and 
end by 4:00 P.M. Further information 
can be obtained by seeing Dr. Berthold, 
Mrs. Noonan the Science Division 
Secretary in Mandell Hall, or Mrs. Martin 
the College's Receptionist in Lasker Hall. 



MARKETING REPS. WANTED 

STUDENTS 

EARNUPTO 

'24,000^ 

PART TIME 

Looking for individuals 
who need totally flexible 
hours and high earnings, 
we have hundreds of 
people presently 
working part and full 
time, earning big money 
while working the hours 
they set. call Lisa Kallen 

(215) 962-5700 



NEW BRITAIN INN 

"Del Val's home away from home" 

SUN. NIGHT: Restaurant Tavern 
Employees Night 
DJ Steve Coffey 
(DelVal alum) 

MON. NIGHT: Steamers - 
$3 25 Dozen 

TUES. NIGHT: Import Night 

Most $125 Bottle 

WED. NIGHT: $125 Cheese 
Steak Night 
College Nigh 
■ - • $1 off Pitche s 

with College i D 

THUR. NIGHT: DJ and Dancing 

FRI. NIGHT: DJ and Dancing 

SAT. NIGHT: Live entertunment 

Seafood & Sandwiches 

All Items to Go! 

HAPPY HOUR 

4 6:30Mon.Fri. 

Rt. 202 • New Britain, PA 

34S-1968 



Free Trade continued from page 1 



Dr. John Avery, Chairman of the 
Agribusiness Department at the College. 

The next speaker was the Honorable 
Boyd E. Wolff, Secretary of the 
Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture, 
who served as moderator of the Con- 
ference. Mr. Wolff spoke of the need for 
the United States to enter the inter- 
national food market while the dollar it|- 
relatively strong, the importance of atf 
dependable, consistent and uniform food 
supply in such a competitive market, and 
the active role played by the Penn-- 
sylvania Department of Agriculture in 
global marketing. Finally, Mr. Wolff 
expressed the Department's ambitious 
goal of increasing Pennsylvania's already 
impressive $202 million annual food 
export by 50% over the next five years. : 

A number of other distinguished 
speakers then addressed the assembly, 
representing a broad spectrum of govern- 
ment agencies. Notable among them 
was U.S. Ambassador Peter O. Murphy, 
who had served as chief negotiator for 
the United States on the Free Trade 
Agreement, and is considered to be 
largely responsible for its successful 
completion. Mr. Murphy spoke of the 
historical signifigance of the Agreement, 
describing certain aspects of it as a 
"major break with the past." He also 
lauded the Agreement's establishment of 
Bi-National Panels as effective instru- 
ments of dispute resolution. Finally, he 
stated that the United States' trading 
policy is perceived as protectionistic by 
many other nations, and he urged the 
U.S. towards a more open and expansive 
foreign trade practice, from which it 
would greatly benefit. ' !"• ' ' * :' -^ 

Also noteworthy among the speakers 
was Dr. Michael Hart, who had acted as 
an associate with the Canadian delegation 
to the Free Trade Agreement 
negotiations. As a resident of Ottawa 
and a member of the Canadian Foreign 
Service, Dr. Hart functioned to balance 
out the panel of speakers by furnishing a 
Canadian perspective on the Agreement. 
He remarked that while Canada wel- 
comed the Agreement with a great deal 
of enthusiasm, the Canadian populace 
was still somewhat apprehensive about 
the possibility of an economic "takeover" 
by the United States. He found it curious 
that the attention paid to the negotiations 
by the U.S. was minimal, when Canadian 
kiterest in the proceedings was so intense 
that their last Prime Ministerial Election 
was virtually a referendum on the 
Agreement. Finally, he expressed his 
personal support for the Agreement and 
exhorted those in the agricultural in- 
dustries to help make it a success. 

Other speakers included John 
Donohue, an international trade attorney, 
Richard Petges, a representative of the 
U.S. Department of Agriculture, and 



Sharon Ainsworth, Executive Assistant 
to the Secretary of the N.J. Department 
of Agriculture (the Secretary of the 
Department had been originally 
scheduled to speak, but his presence 
was required at a trade meeting in Japan, 
instead). Ms. Ainsworth discussed the 
success of the "Jersey Fresh" produce 
jnarket. Produce bearing the label 
- Fraicheur Jersey" is now commonplace 
in many Canadian stores. 

After a luncheon in the College's dining 
hall, the Conference participants split up 
into seven smaller discussion groups, 
each led by a number of representatives 
from the various food and agricultural 
industries. These groups were designed 
to discuss the ramifications of the Free 
Trade Agreement for the individual 
commodities. 

A number of common themes recurred 
throughout the Conference. All of the 
speakers emphasized the need for those 
in agriculture to think globally as opposed 
to regionally with respect to marketing, 
stressing the desirability of active inter- 
national trade. Several of them ex- 
pounded on the need for industry to now 
assume its role in making the Agreement 



work, noting that the governments of 
both countries had already laid much of 
the foundations. Finally, throughout the 
Conference a tone of optimism was 
prevalent, as all of the speakers expressed 
optimism for the opportunities made 
possible by the Agreement, citing its 
historical significance, its ambitious scale, 
and its capacity for growth and improve- 
ment. 

Interestingly, it was not until the final 
speaker, John M. Urbanchuk, a leader in 
the implementation of the Free Trade 
Agreemnet, was delivering his closing 
remarks and inviting questions from the 
audience that the issue was raised of the 
implications of the Agreement for small 
local farmers. Previously, most of the 
discourse had focused on the effects of 
the Agreement on the larger corpor* 
ations. Mr. Urbanchuk responded by 
saying that while the Agreement will 
afford local members of the agricultural 
communtiy increased access to foreign 
goods and markets, the primary impaci 
will be psychological, encouraging even 
small regional farmers to think in terms 
of the global community. 



SHAMROCK RESUME SERVICE 


QUICK 


COSVENIENT AFFORDABLE 


* ." '■ ' ■ ■ -- - 


Look what just $45.00 will get you: 


* 


Custom Resume printing and formatting. 


* 


50 Copies on top ^quality bond paper. 


* 


Pick up and delivery right on your campus. 


* 


Choice of paper colors. 


* 


Quick turnaround. 


CALL FOR FURTHER INFORMATION: 




Shamrock Resume Service 




(215)355-5996 





in)®IlsRj;:^jp®^3il]n(§^ (g®nil(gg® ©goodlsQQt^ lffew^[pip®ir 



Vol. XXIII, No. 20 Thursday, April 13, 1989 

NOTICE: The opinions expressed in any individual article do not necessarily reflect the viewpoint of the paper or school. 




Consumer Advocate Ralph Nader to 
Debate Issue of Food Safety at 
Delaware Valley College 

Consumer advocate Ralph Nader will debate the issue of food safety at a forum to 
be held at Delaware Valley College on April 14 at 7:30 P.M. 

Nader will be joined in the College's Student Center All-Purpose Room by 
representatives of the Food and Drug Administration, the Uniroyal Chemical 
Company and the National Agricultural Chemical Association in an exchange of 
ideas on the topic "How Safe Is Our Food?" After opening statements and rebuttals, 
the debaters will answer questions. 

Please turn to page 3 



Bachelor of Arts Degree 

in English To be offered 

atDelVai 

Delaware Valley College will offer a 
new four-year program in English this 
fall. It will be the first Bachelor of Arts 
degree available at the College. 

"An English major in the Liberal Arts 
Department is a vital addition to our 
otherwise premier curricula in science, 
agriculture and business," said Dr. John 
Mertz, Dean of Academic Affairs. Now 
students can enjoy the opportunity of 
combining an in-depth English program 
with other disciplines, in addition to a 
24-week employment program in their 
major, both of which will give them a 
distinct advantage over others when 
completing for jobs or for acceptance 
into graduate school." f 

According to Steve Zenko, Director of 
Admissions, the new program will help 
meet the needs of college students as 
well as the local community for liberal 
arts education in Bucks County. 

"The English major will satisfy the 
wishes of a number of potential students 
who have indicated an interest in such a 
major at Delaware Valley College", said 
Zenko. 

"The baccaluareate degree in English 
was designed to ensure that students will * 
be able to successfully compete for 
professional-level employment or 
graduate study because they will have 
developed a high competency in the 
analytic and expressive skills", said Mertz. 

In addition, all English majors will take 
part in the 24-week employment program, 
a tradition at Delaware Valley College, 
under which students are required to 
complete 24 weeks in an approved, 
supervised employment program prior 
to graduation. 

The emphasis of practice! experience 
along with theoretical knowledge has a 
long history with the college. Such a 
program is unconventional for liberal 
arts majors, according to Mertz. But it 
will make English degree graduates highly 
competitive over others when they apply 
for jobs, by giving them practical 

Please turn to page 2 



Special thanks to all the individuals 
and groups who participated in the 
Admission Department's Spring 
Open House. Thank you for helping 
us make the day a huge success. 

The Admissions Department 

On Campus 



Thursday, April 13 
No Classes 
PRIDE AND POLISH 

Friday, April 14 
Follow a Thursday Schedule \ 
Ralph Nader Debate 
"How Safe Is Our Food?" 
...,. 7:30 p.m. APR 

Saturday, April 15 
Baseball (A) vs. Kings College 

Double Header 1:00 

Track (H) vs. Albright and Lebanon 

Valley 1:00 

Softball - (A) vs. FDU 

Double Header 1:00 

Sunday, April 16 

Hunt Seat Horse Show (A) 
hosted by Rutgers College 

Monday, April If * ' ' * *«" 
Class Elections in the Ag. Building 

Golf (A) vs. Upsula Time TBA 

Baseball (A) vs. Allentown 

College 3:00 

Softball (H) vs. Allentown 

College ......4:00 

Wednesday, April 19 #;.:;, 
Happy Wednesday: 
Magician Sam Simon . . .9 p.m. APR 
Baseball (H) vs. Muhlenberg 

College 3:00 

Track (A) vs Ursinus and 

Haverford .3:30 

DVC Drama — "Spoon River 

Anthology" \,: i 

Dress rehersal students invited to 

attend $1.00 with DVC ID . . . 8:00 
Thursday, April 20 ■ 
The DVC Drama Club Presents 

"Spoon River Anthology" 

plays until April 22, 8 p.m. — Adults 

$4.00, Students and Senior 

Citizens $3.00 
Golf (A) vs. Albright, Muhlenberg, and 

Gettysburg .,..., 1.00 

Softball (H) vs. Moravian^,, "^ 
- ..College. 4:00 



Staff 

Editor in-Chief Kathleen Stasney 

Reporters Tony Palumbo, 

Kathleen Stasney 

Photography Laurent Lanee 

Advisors Joe Ferry, Anne Biggs, 

Mr. Edward O'Brien, 
Dr. Richard Ziemer 



English 

continued from page 1 

experience focusing on the use of the 
English language in the work place. 

"After all", said Dr. Mertz, "outstanding 
preparation for career placement is what 
a college education is all about". 

Those choosing the English program 
will complete 36 credits in their major 
plus 48 core credits along with 38 free 
electives, and 4 credits in the employment 
program. They will be offered courses 
ranging from Literary Interpretation to 
Western, British and American Liter- 
ature, to Senior Seminar. 



Act 101/P.L.U.S. 
Calendar of Events 

April 3-7 Card Tournament 

April 18 . . Act 101 Goes to the Dorms 

April 18 Roller Skating Night 

April 20 Annual Picnic - 4:00 

April 23 Act 101 

AWARDS BANQUET 

Act 101 Award Winners 

This month 4 outstanding students will 
be honored at the Annual Act 101 
AWARDS BANQUET at East Strouds- 
burg University. 
Congratulations To: 

Barry Brown 

Audrey Daniel 

Susan Higley 

Tom Markowski 

Act 101/P.L.U.S. Office will be open 
Tuesday and Wednesday evening at 6:30 
from now until finals for supplemental 
instruction. 

Finals Count-Down - "37 DAYS" ' 



A Special Thanks 
To The Class of 
'89 

During our Founders' Day program 
on April 9, senior class president Kathleen 
Regenhard presented the Class of '89 
gift, a check, to Vice President Russell 
Schulz. The funds are to be used for the 
new wrought iron gate at the main 
entrance to the College. The entire DVC 
family joins together in expressing a 
special thanks to the Class of '89 for this 
generous and most appreciated gift. 



The Gerry Guzzy 
Story 

For those students who take our 
Apiculture (beekeeping) course, one of 
the course requirements is that the 
students must participate in selling honey 
at A-Day. We feel that this is justified, 
since one aspect of Apiculture is the sale 
of honey products. 

During the first year that I taught 
Apiculture, there was a student in the 
class by the name of Gerry Guzzy. 
Gerry considered himself to be a tough 
individual since he had graduated from 
East Side (Paterson, NJ) High School 
which as recently gained national 
notoriety due to its current baseball bat 
carrying principal. 

Gerry prided himself that he went 
home every weekend, never participated 
in any on campus activities, and never 
been to or taken part in A Day. After he 
found out about the Apiculture A-Day 
requirement, he asked his roommate 
what he thought I would do if he skipped 
A-Day to which his roommate replied 
that "Doc Berthold was probably a son 
of a B. enough to flunk him". 

Therefore, it was with much beating of 
breasts, pulling of hair, and gnashing of 
teeth that Gerry participated in A-Day. 
After class the following week, Gerry 
came up to me (and I figured that for sure 
he had brought a weapon from home and 
was going to get even with me!) and 
although he said that he hated to do this, 
he thanked me for forcing him to 
participate in A-Day, and he said that it 
was the most enjoyable time he had had 
at DVC, and that he wished that he had 
started when he was a freshman. 

From Gerry's experience, I strongly 
urge all members of our college 
community to get involved in A-Day. It is 
really fun and rewarding to be in the 
"trenches" with other members of the 
college community and to deal with thte 
public and the numerous alumni who 
return each year for A-Day. 

All majors have clubs on campus who 
could use your talents. Also nonclub 
members are always welcome to help 
out in the many different A-Day activities. 
Hope to see you here on the last weekend 
in April."" ' 



Job Bulletin 

Attention All Seniors: 

It is time for you to start picking up the 
weekly Job Bulletin, available in the 
Placement Office. This bulletin is a weekly 
listing of all full-time job openings that 
come through the Placement Office. 
Each week approximately 15-35 jobs are 
listed. Begin your job search and start 
sending your resumes today! 



Ralph Nader. 



continued from page 1 

The debate will cover such topics as the use of pesticides and growth regulators 
(specifically Alar), quality control of food, imported corps, and governmental policies. 

Nader will argue that the increased use of chemicals in agricultural production has 
poisoned the American food supply, that governmental bureaucracy has permitted 
food producers to use these chemicals, which increase yields and preserve freshness, 
without regard to the possible long-term effects they might have on the health of 
consumers. 

John Lacadie, Ph.D., Director of research and Development for Uniroyal, which 
makes the growth regulator Alar, will counter Nader's case by presenting data which 
he insists shows that Alar does not pose a health threat. Alar, which is used primarily 
on apple crops, has come under attack recently for causing cancer in laboratory rats. 

Loren Johnson, District Director of the Food and Drug Administration, will present 
the government's position on the issue. An as-yet-undetermined representative of the 
National Agricultural Chemical Association will give the trade's perspective on the 
use of pesticides and growth regulators. 

A limited number of tickets will be available to the general public at $3 apiece. DVC 
students, faculty, and administration free. Tickets can be purchased at the College's 
Dean of Students Office from 8:30 A.M. through 4:30 P.M. Monday through Friday. 



^i I wasn't rubbing 
it in~I just wanted 
Eddie t() know 
the score of 
last night's ganie.^ 



Pre- Veterinary 

Society 

Road Rally 

by Patrick Flynn 

On March 11, 1989 the greatest 
automative event in years at DelVal took 
place. Yes, the Pre-Veterinary Society 
Road Rally was run and was an incredible 
success. Eleven cars lined up that 
morning and proceded to spend the day 
touring Bucks County for things ranging 
from grave stones to U.F.O.s and came 
back with enough stories to tell for 
months. Ask any of the drivers or crews 
and they'll tell you it was a Saturday well 
spent. When the points were totalled 
(special thanks to Jen, Melody, Sharon, 
and Becky) the winner of the $100 was a 
turbo Regal that lost a little rear tire 
rubber, "Landshark". Second went to 
"Gypsy Wagon", third was taken by 
"Captain Diesel", fourth was awarded to 
"Dropy Dog". Due to popular demand 
there will probably be another Rally in 
the fall of '89, so get those cars in shape, 
it's not to early to start buying maps! 




(lojlxnkjandxkut Vucan 
nib It in all ttx- wax in Chu j(?ii 
w iih \rST IxHif! Oivunci' vrv kv 
fi«.■>K.k•^ \(Hjr hi-si trmki Fddic 
\\ as iIk" itnt- wtio said \()ur leam 
It lukJ iK'wr w in ihiw siraifjht. 

Ni.ui^vhimaiail lionma 
kH k^^tilanv()u think 10 lei him 
kmw ulvis hi-aded for the Ptnoffs, 
Beath oui and touch someone' 

It \iHjd like to know irxxeahtnit 
AIXT pnidutis and senxes, like 
IniiTnatmnal Calling and the ATXT 
(Jul. call us ail 800 222 030Q 




Aiur 

The right choice. 






NEW BRITAIN INN 



"Del Val's home 
SUN. NIGHT: 



MON. NIGHT: 

TUES. NIGHT: 

WED. NIGHT: 



THUR. NIGHT: 

FRI. NIGHT: 

SAT. NIGHT: 



away from home" 
; Restaurant Tavern 

Employees Night 
DJ Steve Coffey 

(DelVal alum) 

Steamers — 
$3.25 Dozen 

Import Night - 
Most $1 25 Bottle 

$1.25 Cheese 
Steak Night 
College Night: 
$1 off Pitchers 
with College l.D. 

DJ and Dancing 

DJ and D« King 

Live entertainment 



Seafood & Sandwiches 
■ Ail Items to Go! 

HAPPY HOUR ' 

4 6:30Mon. Fn. 
Rt. 202 • Sew Britain, PA 
348-1968 



I've got an edge.' 



"When I graduate, I'll 
get more consideration 
from company 
recruiters because they 
know my UPS 
experience will pay off 
for them." 



Rtrtune Magazine rates UPS best in 
the industry 4 years 
in a row. 



• SSperkour 

• flxN sdMdules 

• no wMkaiids 

• company paid bonoflts 

APPLY IN PERSON: 
MONDAY -FRIDAY 
7:00AM -8:00PM 



DIRECTIONS; Electronic Drive in- 
tersects Welsh Road (Route 63) bet- 
ween Rte. 611 and Dreshertown 
Road, approximately 2.5 miles west 
of Willow Grove Park Mall. 



9^— 




United Parcel Service 









vWW^ 



-•*<•«... 




Or, please mail the Emplovment lnquir\' Below to: Ms Angie Gordon, 
United Parcel Ser\ice, Dept DVC-331, 700 Blair Mill Road, Horsham, PA 
l«<(V44. We are an equal opportunity employer m/f . 



NAME 


•• 


ADDRESS 


CITY 


STATE ZIP 


PHONE 


BEST TIME TO CALL 



INDICATE SCHOOL YOU ARE ATTENDING. 
Please check the times you are NOT available to work. 



Shift 


Monday 


Tuesday 


Wednesday 


Thursday 


Friday 


11AM-4PM 












5PM-10PM 












10PM-3AM 












3AM-8AM 













This IS not an employment application 





ID®]]aORJ^I?S^anfl®^ (g®fln®^® ^G00(S®0QG IrsId^IJ^fSpi)®!? 



Vol. XXIll. No. 21 



Thursday, April 27, 1989 



NOTICE: The opinions expressed in any individual article do not necessarily reflect the viewpoint of the paper or school. 



DVC Horticultural 
Career Activities 

Since 1950 (our first college class), DVC Horticulture graduates have achieved 
success in a wide range of challenging, rewarding and exciting careers. This article will 
report three important job activities in several career positions as listed by grads in a 
survey study done by the author. 

Some examples of graduates and their activities are as follows: 

1 . Don Baker '62, a Supervisory Plant Protection Quarantine Officer, is responsible 
for supervising, motivating, and evaluating 1 1 PPQ officers, keeping foreign pests 
from entering the country, and controlling the spread of or eliminating established 
pests. ■ ,. a. 

2. Dr. William Bauerle *64, Professor of Horficulture (Ohio State University), is 
involved in high technology development for greenhouse cultural systems, 
greenhouse energy conservation, and research projects in plant physiology. 

3. Russell Clark '82, Roadside Market Manager at Green Mount Fruit Farms, buys 
produce and plant material, raises bedding plants for sale, and arranges market 
displays. 

4. Glenn Compton '65, USDA Farmer's Home Administration Agricultural 
Management Specialist, processes loans for farms and housing, does credit 
counseling, and manages county office employees. 

5. Win Cowgill '74, Extension Service Area Fruit Agent (Rutgers University), 
develops and implements educational programs for commercial fruit and 
vegetable growers, is secretary-treasurer of the New Jersey State Horticultural 
Society, and is editor and business manager for "Horticultural News." 

6. Tom Debrowski '72, Director of Production Operations for Kraft Europe, is 
responsible for technical controls of all production and formulation, quality 
assurance and quality control, and industrial engineering for this large inter- 
national food company. 

7. Dr. Edward Funkhouser '67, Professor of Biochemistry and Plant Physiology 
(Texas A&M University), directs research and training of graduate students. Dr. 
Funkhouser received the Faculty Distinguished Achievement Award in teaching 
in 1988. 

8. Howard Heritage '68, Commodity Affairs Director (California Farm Bureau 
Federation), analyzes legislative bills, lobbies with and testifies before legislators, 
and communicates with Farm Bureau members. 

9. Abbott Lee '73, Lee Brothers Vice President, is in charge of mechanical 

Please turn to page 4 

The Gerry Guzzy Story 



For those students who take our 
Apiculture (beekeeping) course, one of 
the course requirements is that the 
students must participate in selling honey 
at A-Day. We feel that this is justified, 
since one aspect of Apiculture is the sale 
of honey products. 

During the first year that I taught 
Apiculture, there was a student in the 
class by the name of Gerry Guzzy. 
Gerry considered himself to be a tough 



individual since he had graduated from 
East Side (Paterson, NJ) High School 
which as recently gained national 
notoriety due to its current baseball bat 
carrying principal. 

Gerry prided himself that he went 
home every weekend, never participated 
in any on campus activities, and never 
been to or taken part in A-Day. After he 

Please turn to page 4 



Two or More Heads 
Are Better Than One. 

Natural Science Professor Ron Johnson 
and Act 101 staff have teamed up again 
and the study group students came up 
big winners. Those students attending 
the group review made a dramatic B«^ 
average in the last exam whereby those 
not attending were in low C range. 

This shows that team work, group 
support and early study pay off. Stop 
down and visit Norm Danis in Segal Hall 
if you need help or want ideas on how to 
run a study group. It's simple! It works in 
a big way. ^ ^. 

From the 

Act 101/P.L.U.S. 

Program 

1. Congratulations to the Act 101/- 
P.L.U.S. '88 '89 Award Winners: 

Barry Brown 

Audrey Daniel ' ^ 

Susan Higley 

Tom Makowski 
They will be honored at the Act 101 
Awards Banquet on April 23rd at East 
Stroudsburg State College. 

2. Special Congratulations to one of 
last year's Act 101 Award winners, Mr. 
Frank Phillips. Frank has been accepted 
at both Harvard and the University of 
Pennsylvania to do his graduate work. 

3. The 2nd Annual Act 101 Picnic will 
be held on April 20th. Please contact Ms. 
Karen Kay for details. 

4. Nat. Sci. 11 Review Session 

Once again Act 101/P.L.U.S. has 
teamed up with Professor Ron Johnson 
for a Natural Science review session. It 
was Standing Room Only in the Segal 
3rd floor classroom. Everyone partici- 
pated in a unique review format in which 
each student went to the blackboard and 
wrote ONE thing they knew about the 
material they were to be tested on. From 
that point Professor Johnson demon- 
strated how it all fit together. 



Thank You From 
The Library. 

A big thank you to all students and 
staff who came to the Library Book Sale 
on April 5. Over $500.00 was raised 
towards the purchase of a replacement 
computer for the library's heavily used 
student computer facilities. 

We still have for sale a 1983 set of 
Encyclopedia Britannica in good 
condition. The 30 volumes are priced at 
$90.00 Call ext. 2255 if interested. 



OPINION 



":m*- : 



FOR SALE 

APIARY SOCIETY 

r HONEY 

many varieties 

and 

BEESWAX CANDLES 

tapers, colors, shapes 

see 

CLUB MEMBERS 

or 

LASKERHALL 

Receptionist 

(Great Gifts!) 

or 

look for us 

:*'A'-DAY ? 



On Campus 

Thursday, April 27 
Softball (A) vs Wilkes 
College (Double Header) .... 3:00 
Friday, April 28 
Track (A) - Penn Relays 

.*.>«. Time to be Announced 

No classes 
Set up for 'A'-Day 
Friday, April 29 
Baseball (A) vs Scranton 

(Double Header) 1:00 

Track (A) - Penn Relays 

, Time to be announced 

'A'-Day 
Saturday, April 30 

'A'-Day 
Thursday, May 4 ' " 

Movie: "Little Shop of 
Horrors" 9 p.m. APR 



Staff 

Editor-in-Chief Kathleen Stasncy 

Reporters Tony Palumbo, 

Kathleen Stasney 

Photography Laurent Lanee 

Advisors Joe Ferry, Anne Big^s, 

Mr. Edward O'Brien, 
Dr. Richard Ziemer 



Priorities 



As a concerned student, who has 
listened as well as actually heard what 
administration has said to the student 
body, I feel that in all honesty I can 
sincerely voice my concerns. I understand 
that administration believes that we do 
not listen when they speak but I want it 
clearly understood that 1 have listened 
even when they had nothing to say. 

All 1 keep hearing is how we are afraid 
of change and that we'll never "fit" into 
society because the world is changing 
and if we fight it we'll never progress. I 
would like to make one point very clear: 
it's not change that we are reluctant to 
face; it is the lack of a sense of priority 
concerning those changes. All we have 
been hearing about for the past two 
years is getting a swimming pool, yet 
obviously the student body presently 
attending DelVal and those who attended 
in the past did not choose their college by 
the presence or absence of a swimming 
pool. However, the fact that enrolement 
is increasing is a major concern due to 
the fact that you can only house so many 
people in one dormitory's lounge. Does 
administration only tell us what they 
think college students put as priorities? 

Administration made great efforts to 
beautify the campus. I think that is really 
a good effort; however have they taken a 
look at the pot holes in the parking lot? 
This is the first place parents and 
prospective students see when they enter 
campus., i" 

I realize that we have a limited amount 
of money to spend on repairs, but why 
not ask the students what their concerns 
are? it makes you wonder what the 
progressive changes are being made for; 
the good of the college and the students 
or the good of the college and admin*, 
istration. 

Name vuithetd 



Job Bulletin 



Attention All Seniors: 

It is time for you to start picking up the 
weekly Job Bulletin, available in the 
Placement Office. This bulletin is a weekly 
listing of all full-time job openings that 
come through the Placement Office. 
Each week approximately 15-35 jobs are 
listed. Begin your job search and start 
sending your resumes today! 



Major of 
The Month 

Chemistry 

The Chemistry Department at DVC is 
accredited by the prestigious American 
Chemical Society which sets strict 
standards for college coursework and 
facilities. One of the Society's require- 
ments is a substantial Library collection 
of Chemistry journals. As a result, DVC's 
Chemistry collection is extensive. A 
number of the journals include material 
that would be of interest to students in 
majors other than Chemistry. DVC's 
holdings of each journal are listed after 
each description. If the journal is indexed, 
this is also listed. 

ASSOCIATION OF OFFICIAL 
ANALYTICAL CHEMISTS 
JOURNAL— of special interest to 
food scientists, this venerable 
journal's main area of interest is 
chemical analysis of foods, drugs, 
agriculture and the environment. 
It was previously entitled 
Association of Official Agri- 
cultural Chemists Journal, so you 
can see how its scope has expanded. 
1915-55, 1968-. Indexed in Biological 
and Agricultural Index. 

CHEMICAL AND ENGINEERING 

NEWS -the weekly "trade organ" of the 
American Chemical Society. Lively letters 
to the editor, well written articles on 
industrial trends and current political 
issues. Good source of information on 
the chemical industry for business 
students. Large HELP WANTED section. 
The Library keeps the most current 10 
years. Indexed in Business Periodi- 
cals Index. 

CHEMTECH-This journal covers 
issues in industrial chemistry. It's offered 
to students at half the subscription price. 
Technical and general articles on 
chemical procedures, state of the in- 
dustry, research and development. 1971- 
. Indexed in General Science Index. 

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE 
AND TECHNOLOGY focuses on 

impact of chemical processes and their 
by-products on the environment, surely 
a timely focus. Technical and non- 
technical articles. 1968-. Indexed in 
General Science Index. 

INDUSTRIAL AND ENGINERING 
CHEMISTRY RESEARCH one of 

the more technical chemistry journals, 
this is geared to advanced study. Peer 
reviewed articles, abstracts, biblio- 
graphies. It has changed titles over the 
years, but the Library's holdings go back 
to 1920. Indexed in Chemical 
Abstracts. 




April 29 & 30, 1989 

9 am-5pm 

Rain or Shine 

Route 202 • Doylestown 

Bucks County • Pennsylvania 

(215)345-1500 



animals, food, contests, flowers for sale and 
flowers for show, hay rides, music, tractors, the 
petting zoo, demonstrations, pony rides, milk- 
shakes, sheep, cows, pigs, horse shows and 
much more. But most of all, A-DAY is 
FUN. 



Beekeeping Short Courses 
Offered At DelVal 



■;%^v 



'■■l-^,p,K:, 



Delaware Valley College will again be 
offering its popular three-day short 
courses on beekeeping. The courses are 
designed for beekeepers, for those 
considering taking up beekeeping, and 
for those interested in learning more 
about the honey bee. Beekeeping is a 
very interesting hobby, and in addition to 
providing the beekeeper with honey, it 
also provides valuable pollination of 
garden, field, and orchard crops. Honey 
bees can be kept just about any where, in 
fact there are a number of people keeping 
bees right in the City of Philadelphia. 
Over the years, the course has been 
attended by people from all over the 
United States, from a number of foreign 
countries including Canada, Venezulea, 
and Germany. Also a significant number 
of our faculty and students have taken 
this course. 

The course will include pertinent 
aspects of beekeeping including equip 



ment, apiary location, seasonal niu.iage- 
ment, honey production, beeswax candle 
making, and home uses of honey. 
Illustrated classroom instruction will be 
coupled with hands on experience using 
the College's bee yard and its Honey 
house. Enough information is presented 
during the three days to enable the 
student to get started in beekeeping. The 
course is under the direction of Dr. 
Berthold, the College's beekeeping 
specialist, and he will be assisted by Mr. 
Jack Matthenius, the N.J. Dcpt. of 
Agriculture Supervisor of Bee Culture. 

The summer course will be held on 
Friday, Saturday, and Sunday, June 23, 
24,and25, 1989. Classes will start at 8:30 
and end by 4:00 P.M. Further information 
can be obtained by seeing Dr. Berthold, 
Mrs. Noonan the Science Division 
Secretary in Mandell Hall, or Mrs. Martin 
the College's Receptionist in Lasker Hall. 



NEW BRITAIN INN 



"Del Val's home 
SUN. NIGHT: 



MON. NIGHT: 

TUES. NIGHT: 

WED. NIGHT: 



THUR. NIGHT: 

FRi. NIGHT: 

SAT. NIGHT: 



away from home" 
Restaurant Tavern 

Employees Night 
DJ Steve Coffey 

(DelVal alum) 

Steamers — 
$3.25/Dozen 

Import Night - 
Most $1.25 Bottle 

$1.25 Cheese 
Steak Night 
College Night: 
$1 off Pitchers 
with College ID. 

DJ and Dancing 

DJ and Dancing 

Live entertainment 



Seafood & Sandwiches , 

AllitemstoGo! 

HAPPY HOUR 

4 6:30Mon.Fri. 

Rt. 202 • New Britain, PA 

348-1968 



Career Activities _.,......_-._ 

continued from page 1 

innovations and cultural operations in growing Ocean Spray cranberries and 
TruBlu blueberries on their outstanding farm. He is also a member of the New 
Jersey pesticide control council. 

10. Larry Rossell '61 , Campbell Company research Specialist, screens and evaluates 
fresh market vegetables and improves processing crops for this leading food 

s, company. 

11. Dr. Henry Schumacher '63, President of Schumacher Hydroponics, Inc., 
developed a controlled environment solar greenhouse, designed a system that 
increases yield with minimum energy demands and labor, and produces high 
quality hydroponic vegetables. 

I hope this article gives you a better idea of some of the varied career activities 
engaged in by our talented horticulture graduates. 

Dr. David Blumenfield '50, Professor 
' Horticultural Plant and Food Scier]ce 

Gerry Gu2ezy ""—-''■■• ' ■■ • - -■ ■---■-'- ' ■ •■ ' 

continued from page 1 

found out about the Apiculture A-Day 
requirement, he asked his roommate 
what he thought I would do if he skipped 
A-Day to which his roommate replied 
that "Doc Berthold was probably a son 
of a B. enough to flunk him". 

Therefore, it was with much beating of 
breasts, pulling of hair, and gnashing of 
teeth that Gerry participated in A-Day. 
After class the following week, Gerry 
came up to me (and I figured that for sure 
he had brought a weapon from home and 
was going to get even with me!) and 
although he said that he hated to do this, 
he thanked me for forcing him to 
participate in A-Day, and he said that it 



was the most enjoyable time he had had 
at DVC, and that he wished that he had 
started when he was a freshman. 

From Gerry's experience, I strongly 
urge all members of our college 
community to get involved in A-Day. It is 
really fun and rewarding to be in the 
"trenches" with other members of the 
college community and to deal with thte 
public and the numerous alumni who 
return each year for A-Day. 

All majors have clubs on campus who 
could use your talents. Also non-club 
members are always welcome to help 
out in the many different A-Day activities. 
Hope to see you here on the last weekend 
in April. 



M don't want 
a lot of hype. 
I just w'ant 
something I 
can axint on.^^ 




Sumrkxigdisunuf 
ampanics pnxnise \txi 
I he ma «, bumtai you 
a'jlh tt aiil IS dependibiL'. 
luxh uiialMy stTMre Thai s 
lusi what >ou1l get wtien 
M HJ I hix ise AIST Liif^ 
I teurxie Service, M i cosi 
ihaisakxlessthanyuu 
ihink YiHi can e^ipen kw 
kin(i diManw rates, in txxir 
I iperaior assisianoc. dear 

Hintwimis and immediaie 
va-dii ti «• wDiij^ llumbe:^, 
And ihc assuranoc that 
Mniulh ail ()f uxir rails will 
)(i)ihnKj(jh Ilk- first ume 
Thaisihe j{en»B(if(he 
MXT MUirid* idc Inidligcni 
NetRxirk 

Whenitsiimetti 
tlxKttt'. forjifi (he gjmmkte 
and make the mtelligeni 
i-h(*f \IS1 

It ycHxl bkc ID kn(» 
mixe ahi mi (lur pitxiucxs or 
■^■n Ki?.. like ImcmaiKxul 
(allin){andtheA1inCanl. 

1 all us at I )«0 222030a 




Get Your 
Resumes Done 

Give your resumes that professional 
look. The CISM department is offering 
to do your resumes on their new laser 
printer. ' - 

1. Type your resume using WordStar 
(available in Ag 1 and Ag 5). 

2. Fill out a Print Request Form (next to 
the resume box in Ag 6). Put your 
diskette and the Print Request Form 
in an envelope and put the envelope in 
the resume box. 

3. Check back the next afternoon to see 
if there were any problems. If not, 
your resumes should be ready for you 
to pick up. 

Get up to 5 copies printed on plain white 
paper at no charge. 
OR 

Bring your own paper (suitable for use 
with a laser printer) and get up to 25 
copies. 



MARKETING REPS. WANTED 

STUDENTS 

EARN UP TO 

'24,000^ 

PART TIME 

Looking for individuals 
who need totally flexible 
hours and high earnings. 
We have hundreds of 
people presently 
working part and full 
time, earning big money 
while working the hours 
they set. call Lisa Kallen 

(215) 962-5700 



Altf 

The right choice. 



Outdoors!!! 

On A-Day we will be holding the first of 
two big events. The first, the incredible^ 
**Huff n' Puff", is a bike jaunt around 
scenic Bucks County. The second 
incredible event is extra special; it's the 
first annual "Lake Archer Canoe Classic . " 
The canoe races will go down and back 
on peaceful Lake Archer. So, dust off 
your bike and gather your rowing teams 
for two of the most exciting A-Day 
events you will encounter. 





©©Ikwas^^anil©^ (g®flll®g® ^GoocScsoQt^ Ir^csw^ipsipgff 



Vol. will. No. 22 



Thursdav, Mmsi II, 1989^ 



NOTICE: The opinions expressed in any individual article do not necessarily reflect the viewpoint of the paper or school 





^he Cafeteria Says Bye 
^o a Friend 

This is an article to make known to aft 
of you, that a wonderful man who started 
working with the Wood Company is 
planning his retirement this year. Yes, it 
is our good friend Earle Hicke Jr. 

Earle, working side by side with the 
many students at D.V.C. and his other 
Wood Company coworkers is always 
willing to put forth that little extra effort 
for everyone envolved. 

Earle receives much enjoyment 
through reading the Ram Pages every 
week. He always makes sure ea- h of his 
co-workers had one to enjoy along with 
him. Earle was also faithful in forewarding 
copies to former employees. At the 
present time, he is sending out four 
copies a week to former employees at his 
own expense. . ; ■- , ^ X: V-,; -U. ' 

We can only hope you have enjoyed 
being acquainted with Earle as much as 
we have. To show our deepest 
appreciation and to let Earle know that 
he will be missed, but not forgotten we 
are honoring Earle at a retirement dinner. 
It will be held in the David Levin Dining 
Hall on Monday, May 22, 1989 at 5:00 
p.m. 

Earle. we hope that your retirement at 
Christ Home may be the start of a great 
new experience for you. 



Crammins for exams. 

Don't try to learn too much. Con- 
centrate on a few essential facts 
(and remember them!) 
Work with knowledgable classmates 
and support each other. Compare 
class notes and develop good ones. 
Work together and create test 
questions, then quiz each other. 
Recite, recite, recite — make your 
notes your own. 

Develop cards with key words or 
phrases — keep it simple. 
Remember, it's better to know a 
few things well! 



OPINION 

DearDVC 
Students: 

Your school spirit is showing and I 
think it is great! Thank you for the hours 
of planning and enthusiastic effort that 
you have devoted in the past year to both 
Pride and Polish Day and A Day. 

These special days will be a part of 
your memories of DVC as alumni. We all 
know that these events are a lot of hard 
work, but those of us who participated 
and profited by doing so have moved the 
College and our classmates forward. 

I am especially proud of the student 
leaders who emerged and grew in the 
process. Next year we need you all. 
Come join the fun and enjoy the success! 

. Sincere^, 

W. H. Rorerlll 
President 



On Campus 



Thursday, May 11 to Wednesday, 
May 17 
Finals 

Saturday, May 13 
Track — Princeton Invitational 

Sunday, May 14 
Mother's Day 

Monday, May 15 to Friday, May 
19 
Senior trip to Bahamas . 

Thursday, May 18 
We're outta here 



Saturday, May 20 
Graduation practice, 10 a.m. 
Registered Graduation Party 
seniors Free 

Sunday, May 21 
Graduation 10:30 a.m. 



Staff 

Editor-in-Chief . , , ♦ ; , i , , Kathleen Stasney 
Reporters . ,,.>..»*.** . , , .Tony Palumbo, 

Kathleen Stasney 

Photography Laurent Lanee 

Advisors Joe Ferry, Anne Biggs 

Mr. Edward O'Brien, 
Dr. Richard Ziemer 



Telephone Mixup? 

A student was told by a telephone 
operator that her AT&T phone card 
would not work because the payphone 
was switched from AT&T long distance 
service. 

ACTION TAKEN 

ITT, the company that provides long 
distance service for the 32 payphones on 
campus, assures us that almost all credit 
card calls should work properly. The few 
AT&T credit card callers with a 
"Scrambled Code" must first enter 
"10288" before "1" and the area code 
and telephone number. "10288" puts the 
caller directly into the AT&T network. 

As with other non confidential pro- 
blems, we can serve the DVC-1 callers 
better if we have their names and where 
we can reach them. This will allow us to 
discuss the problems and confirm 
whether the corrective action works. 

BACKGROUND 

Recently DVC was required to select a 
long distance telephone company for 
their payphones just as individuals did 
several years ago for their personal 
telephones. We selected ITT because it 
also provides the College's long distance 
service. If we are not satisfied with ITT, 
we will switch back to AT&T. 



Soil and Water 
Conservation Society 
Scholarship. 

The SWCS is offering two $250.00 
Scholarships. They will be awarded to 
full time students enrolled in an 
agriculture or natural resources related 
field. See Financial Aid in the Admissions 
building for applications. Applications 
should be completed and sent by June 
15, 1989 to Richard A. Pennay, Box 286, 
RD #1, Liverpool, PA 17045. If you have 
any questions please call me, Richard A. 
Pennay, 717-444-3779, or call Joel Myers 
at (h) 717-921-8775 or (o) 717-782-4403. 



Northern New Jersey 
Unit of the Herb Society 
Award 

The Northern New Jersey Unit of the 
Herb Society of America is offering a 
$2,000.00 award to a student, under- 
graduate or graduate, majoring in Botony, 
Horticulture, or a related field. Appli- 
cations are available at the Financial Aid 
office. 




Morris County Parks 

and Conservation 

Foundation 

]■' The Morris County Parks and Con 
servation Foundation was incorporated 
in 1981 for the purpose of encouraging 
the preservation of open space and 
historic sites, and fostering the develop- 
ment of parks for public use. The 
Foundation participates in the following 
activities: • j ; " ^ 

• Conducts public education and in- 
struction in open space preservation 
and conservation. 

• Coordinates such activities with 
existing groups. 

• Assists and cooperates, in an appro- 
priate manner, in fostering municipal, 
county, state and national projects 
relating to the preservation of open 
space and historic sites, and the 
conservation of natural resources. -. 

• Applies for, receives and administers 
grants from private and public sources 
for these purposes. 

To discover how you can be a part of 
this worthwhile effort to preserve open 
space, contact the Morris County Parks 
and Conservation Foundation by writing 
to P.O. Box 1295, Morristown, New 
Jersey 07962. 



Applications being 
Accepted for 1989-90 
HTA Scholarships 

Scholarship applications for $15,000 in 
college grants are again being accepted 
by Harness Tracks of America, the Harry 
M. Stevens catering company and Peter 
Haughton Youth Foundation for their 
academic scholarships to children of 
participants in harness racing, or young 
people actively engaged in the sport 
themselves. 

The HTA-Stevens-Haughton scholar- 
ships are awarded for one year based on 
merit and financial need for study beyond 
the high school level. Sons or daughters 
of licensed harness racing drivers, 
trainers, breeders or caretakers, or 
persons participating in these categories 
are eligible for the awards. 

Initial applications for the 1989-90 
academic year must be received by 
Harness Tracks of America no later than 
May 3 1 . Selected applicants will be asked 
to provide additional information. 
Students interested in receiving an initial 
application should write or phone the 
HTA Scholarship Committee, c/o 
Harness Tracks of America, 35 Airport 
Road, Morristown, NJ 07960; (201) 
285-9090. 



ACT 101 Study 
Groups Make a 19 
pt. Increase on 
Natural Science II 
Exam!!! 

Natural Science Professor Ron 
Johnson and the ACT 101 Staff have 
teamed up again and the Study Group 
students came up BIG WINNERS. It 
was STANDING ROOM ONLY as over 
45 students crowded into Segal Hall for 
the review session. 

Mr. Steve Davis got everyone involved 
using a technique called mapping and 
Mr. Johnson followed up by connecting 
the concepts so that the students get an 
understanding of The Big Picture. 

The outcome for the ACT 101 students 
was an 18.5 pt. increase between 
their first and second test grades. 

The overall Class Average was 77.6. 
The average of those not attending the 
study session was 74.1 and the average 
of those that did attend the study session 
was 84.3!! That's 7 points above the 
class average and over 10 points above 
the group that did not attend the study 
session. 

bottom Line is: IT WORKS!! 

For more information on Study 
Groups, call Norm Danis in the ACT 101 
office, Ext. 2452. 





Results of the Equestrian Team Meets 



Lehigh University March 5th 1989 

Open Equitation on the Flat 

Tony Delise 1st 

Betty Lollin 5th 

Open Equitation Over Fences 

Tony Delise 1st 

Betty Lollin 5th 

Intermediate Equitation on the 
Flat 

Paige Barnett 2nd 

Stina Liebman 5th 

Intermediate Equitation over 
Fences 

Paige Barnett % J 3rd 

':■. LizKelley ^- T ':'-:^: 5th 

Stina liebman 5th 

Novice Equitation over Fences 

Janet Distler 1st 

Sue Hahn 6th 

Deborah Shepherd 2nd 

Novice Equitation on the Flat 

Sue Hahn , 4th 

• Deborah Shepherd 2nd 

Beginner Walk Trot Canter 

Chris Borowsky 2nd 

Kelli Carpentar 5th 

Melissa Miles 6th 

Tony Delise was High Point Rider for the 
day at Lehigh 



University of Delaware March 12th 
1989 



Open Equitation Over Fences 

Tony Delise . :>: - 1st 

Betty Lollin 3rd 

Open Equitation on the Flat 

Betty Lollin 6th 

Intermediate Equitation on the 
Flat 

Paige Barnett 1st 

Stina Liebman 5th 

Intermediate Equitation over 
Fences 

Paige Barnett 2nd 

Stina Liebman 5th 

Novice Equitation over Fences 

Janet Distler 3rd 

Stephanie Forest 2nd 

Mary Beth Poiek 1st 

Deborah Shepherd 1st 



Advanced Walk Trot Canter 

Annette Canacichio 4th 

Laura Harmer 3rd 

Julie Keane 1st 

Kelly Ritsick 3rd 

Beginner Walk Trot Canter 

Chris Borowsky 1st 

Kelli Carpentar 2nd 

Missy Miles 5th 

DelVal was the High Point Team for the 
day. "'':_'■ -■'"/ . 



Wilson April 9th 1989 • 

Open Equitation on the Flat 

Tony Delise 6th 

Betty Lollin 3rd 

Open Equitation over Fences 

Tony Delise 4th 

Intermediate Equitation on the 
Flat 

Paige Barnett 2nd 

Intermediate Equitation . Over 
Fences 

Stina Liebman ' l$t 

Novice Equitation over Fences 

Janet Distler 4th 

Deborah Shepherd 3rd 

Advanced Walk Trot Canter 

Julie Keane 6th 

Annette Canacichio 4th 



Beginner Walk Trot Canter 

Chris Borowsky 
Kim Carroll 
Michele Harley 



4th 
3rd 
4th 



Rutgers April 16th 1989 

Open Equitation on the Flat 

Tony Delise 3rd 

Jan Engcr 4th 

Betty Lollin 5th 

Open Equitation over Fences 

Tony Delise 4th 

Jan Enger 5th 

Intermediate Equitation on the 
Flat 

Paige Barnett 2nd 

Stina Liebman 4th 



Intermediate Equitation over 
Fences 

Paige Barnett 4th 

Mark Hayes 6th 

Stina Liebman 4th 

Novice Equitation on the Flat 

Janet Distler 2nd 

Sue Hahn 1st 

Laura Harmer 6th 

Mary Beth Polk 3rd 

Peborah Shepherd 3rd 

Novice Equitation over Fences 

Janet Distler 3rd 

Sue Hahn 4th 

Liz Kelly " .4th 

. Mary Beth PoIek' .. . 5th 

Advanced Walk Trot Canter 

Ann Bastian 6th 

Annette Canacchio 1st 

Kris landola v • 1st 

Julie Keane ■ ^ '■ 4th 

Kelly Ritsick 2nd 

Beginner Walk Trot Canter 

Chris Borowsky 1st 

Kelli Carpenter * 1st 

Kelly Cunningham ,/ 2nd 

DelVal was the High Point Team for the 
day at Rutgers, 



Open House 

at the 

Poultry 

Diasnostic 

Laboratory 



Egg tossing contest Winners were i 
Dr. Nash and Dave MacGregoru 

Contestents: 

Dr. John Purdy, Eugene Constantine, 
Jamie Ryan, Dr. Jim Miller, Mileen 
Altier. Elwood Decker. 

Door prizes were won by: 

Russell Schuiz, Dr. Robert Orr, Dr. 
Mary Palumbo, Maureen Mihalko, 
Laura Hamer, Allison Angle. Al 
Jenkins. 

Thanks to Steve Kline for preparing the 
delicious refreshments. 

Thanks to Green House for the lovely 
plants. 

Thanks to all who attended. 





. ',. 



o 



»^. ■- s*- 







■/