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Full text of "Rama Vijaya"

64

give it to me." " How did you know that the head of your
husband was carried off by us," asked the monkeys.    Su-
lochana told them what had happened but the monkeys said
to her, " We can not believe  what yon say.   It is impos-
sible that a lifeless arm can write.    Here is the head of
your husband ; and if you were faithful to him, just make
it laugh; and then we will be convinced ofcwhat you say."
Whereupon  Sulochana,  embracing the head,  said, " My
love, I am now in difficulty.    These monkeys have met
here together to judge of my fidelity towards you; and if
your head does not laugh, they will look upon me as a vile
woman.''    Sulochana tried her utmost to make the head
laugh but it did not listen to her.    At last she said, " I
made a great mistake.   If I had called my father, Shesha,
to help you, nothing could have been done to you.' >   As
soon as she uttered these words, the head heartily laughed.
The monkeys said,   " Though  Sulochana spoke to the
head in so  many pathetic words, it did not laugh but as
soon as she took the name of Shesha, it heartily laughed.1*
 What is this mystery?" asked the monkeys* " Sulochana
is the daughter of Shesha," replied Rama, " and Lakshu-
man is an incarnation of Shesha.    The head laughed, be-
cause his  father-in-law killed his own son-in-law.'*   Itfo
sooner did Rama inform the monkeys of this than Lakshu-
irian much grieved for his son-in-law, Indrajit,  when the
former pacified and consoled him, saying that he would re-
suscitate the demon-prince, if he wished him to do so.
But at the entreaties of the monkeys Rama did not resus-
citate Indrajit.   The monkeys   then handed the head
over to Sulochana, which she took and brought on the sea-
shore near Lanka, where she arranged at pile of wood and,
having set fire to it, burnt herself with the head. Ravana,
who was present there with his family according to the
custom, was deeply affected at the sight,  and returned
home over-whelmed with grief.   Ravana was in a confused