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Full text of "Royal_Canadian_Air_Force_Exercise_Plans_"

_, . 10009 -$1.00 

Remsed U.S. Edition of the Official 

oyal © Canadian 
Air Force 

Exercise 
Plans For 
Physical Fitness 



Two books in one / Two famous basic plans 






12-MINUTE-A-DAY 
PLAN FOR WOMEN 




m 



PAGE 3 



11- MINUTE- A -DAY 
PLAN FOR MEN 



PAGE 49 



ACKNOWLEDGMENT 

The RCAF acknowledges the contributions made to the 
preparation of this book by physical education experts, 
RCAF medical advisers and P. J. Carey, D.A., Art and 
Craft Specialist. In addition, the RCAF particularly ac- 
knowledges the contribution of W. A. R. Orban, PhD, to 
the 5BX Section and of N. J. Ashton, BSc, MS, Physical 
Education Specialist to the XBX Section. 

The kind permission of the Royal Canadian Air Force to 
make the text of this training book available to the public 
is gratefully acknowledged. 

Published in the United States by Pocket Books, Inc. by 
special arrangement with THIS WEEK MAGAZINE. 

CROWN COPYRIGHT 

This book, or parts thereof, may not be reproduced in any 
form without permission. 

First Printing 140,000 

Second Printing 120,000 

Third Printing 140,000 

Fourth Printing 200,000 

Fifth Printing 100,000 

Sixth Printing 110,000 

Seventh Printing 150,000 

Eighth Printing 100,000 

Ninth Printing 125,000 

Tenth Printing 100,000 

Eleventh Printing 100,000 

Twelfth Printing 100,000 

Thirteenth Printing 100,000 
Fourteenth Printing 100,000 

Fifteenth Printing 200,000 

Revised Edition 1962 

Printed in Canada 






"Feel Better- 
Look Better- Now!" 



Introduction by Roger Duhamel, Queen's Printer 



When the Royal Canadian Air Force went about setting up a physical 
fitness program in the years following World War II, it based its plans 
on three basic facts: 

• physical fitness is a direct result of physical activity; 

• physical activity leading to physical fitness must be vigorous and 
regular; 

• people will accept challenge. 

After two years of painstaking research, an RCAF team of doctors, 
scientists, physical education specialists and artists produced the 5BX 
and XBX Plans for Physical Fitness. These five basic exercises for men 
and ten basic exercises for women were designed to provide everyone, 
no matter what age or physical condition, with the opportunity to 
achieve and maintain desirable levels of physical fitness. And it only 
required a very small portion of the day — 11 minutes for men, 12 
minutes for women. 

The result has made both fitness and publishing history. Although 
there have been innumerable works written on the subject, never was 
one received with such enthusiasm as the two series of exercises offered 
in this book. When the Office of the Queen's Printer made them available 
to the public, the booklets grew into all-time Canadian best sellers. At 
first a few thousand, soon over a hundred thousand, now over a million 
Canadians have taken to the 5BX and XBX Plans. Praised by medical 
authorities, endorsed by Physical Fitness Organizations, the exercises 
have become a daily habit in most Canadian homes. 

Reports that the RCAF had designed a unique, simple way to keep 
fit quickly spread abroad. Requests for information began to pour into 



Canada from many countries. In the United States, THIS WEEK 
MAGAZINE reported on the publishing phenomenon and arranged to 
offer the exercises to its 14 million families. 

In a year, half a million copies were sold by mail, and now Pocket 
Books, Inc. is also offering the exercises to the American public through 
bookstores. This edition follows exactly the Royal Canadian Air Force 
edition; not a word has been changed. 

The RCAF way to keep fit is now yours for only a few minutes of 
your time each day. Read the instructions carefully, start at the bottom 
of Chart One, and away you go on the road to FEELING BETTER and 
LOOKING BETTER! 




^fc» yti 




Queen's Printer 
Ottawa, Canada 



UiiiiJ 




for? kmmi i%m 



The 



XBX 

Plan 
FOR WOMEN 



10 Tested Exercises 
12 Minutes a Day 



The Official RCAF Fitness Plan 



CAUTION 



before you start 

If you have any doubt as to your capability to under- 
take this program, see your medical adviser . 

You should not perform fast, vigorous, or highly com- 
petitive physical activity without gradually developing, and 
continuously maintaining, an adequate level of physical 
fitness, particularly if you are over the age of 30. 



Physical Fitness - What it Means 

The question is frequently asked, "What is meant by physical 
fitness?" Technically, physical fitness involves measures and levels of 
muscular strength and endurance, muscle tone, heart action and response 
to activity, agility, balance, co-ordination, and so on. But fitness is also 
a personal thing. It is how we feel when we get up in the morning; 
how tired or fresh we are after a hard day's work; how eagerly we look 
forward to doing those things which we all like to do — picnic, ski — or 
those things which we have to do — wash floors. 

Each person is her own best judge of what physical fitness is and 
what it means to her. 



Why You Should Be Fit 

Research has shown that: 

the physically fit person is able to withstand fatigue for 
longer periods than the unfit; 

the physically fit person is better equipped to tolerate 
physical stress; 

the physically fit person has a stronger and more 
efficient heart; and 

there is a relationship between good mental alertness, 
absence of nervous tension, and physical fitness. 

REMEMBER THAT: 

weak stomach muscles cause sagging abdomens; and 
weak back muscles are a major cause of back pain. 



There are countless reasons for being fit. YOU know how you 
feel. EVERYONE knows how you look. Regular exercise can improve 
YOUR sense of well being and your appearance. 

Fitness is necessary for the fullest enjoyment of living. 



Read the XBX booklet carefully. 



Your Appearance 

Your appearance is controlled by the bony frame of your body, and 
by the proportions of fat and muscle which you have added to it. 
You cannot do anything about your skeleton, but you can, and should, 
do something about the fat and muscle. 

All of us require a certain amount of fat on and in our bodies for 
functional reasons. Fat softens the bony contours of the body; it 
helps to keep the body temperature constant; and it acts as an energy 
storage vault. Fat appears in layers on the outside of the body, covers 
and lines the internal organs— the heart and blood vessels, for example 
— and it also makes up a part of muscle. 

Except for certain neurotic or glandular conditions, people are over 
FAT because they over EAT and under EXERCISE. 

Muscle is the other controllable factor in the appearance. When 
we are young we are fairly active; the muscles of our bodies are used 
and they retain that pleasing firmness— MUSCLE TONE. The less we 
exercise muscles the softer and more flabby they become. They become 
small with disuse, less elastic, and much weaker. Much of what is con- 
sidered fatness in the abdominal region is nothing more than weak 
stomach muscles which permit the internal organs to sag forward. 
Your muscles perform the same function as a girdle — keep them as 
resilient as your foundation garment. 

Because the condition of your muscles is so important to the way 
you look and feel, diet alone is not the best method for trying to improve 
your body measurements. The best method is a combination of diet and 
exercise. A thigh that is made up of little muscle and a lot of fat may 
have the same measurement as one that has firm muscle and a light 
fat layer, but— let's face it— it is just not the same thigh. 

Do not confuse good muscle tone with bulky, unsightly muscles. 
The XBX is designed to firm your muscles — not to convert you into a 
muscled woman. 




Weight Control 

The major purpose of weight control is to reduce the amount of 
fat on the body and to increase the amount of muscle. It is, in reality, 
a program of fat control rather than weight control. This control can 
be exerted only by coupling a sensible dietary program with a regular, 
balanced program of exercise. 

When we eat, the food is used, stored, or discarded. The body 
stores fuel, or calories, as fat. The more fuel we consume, and the less 
of it we use, then the more of it that is stored in the body in the form 
of fat. The human body is not like a car's gas tank that will overflow 
when full. Our bodies accept all the calories that we put into them, 
and store those which we do not use. 

For example, if you eat food that has a value of 3,000 calories and 
use only 2,600 of them in your activity, then the remaining 400 calories 
are stored in the body. Every time you accumulate about 4,000 of these 
calories you will notice an extra pound of weight on the scales. 

When you exercise you burn calories. Energy used in this way will 
result in muscle development. As muscle is slightly heavier than fat, 
you may very well notice an increase in your weight rather than 
a reduction. However it must be stressed that this muscle weight is 
useful weight and will improve the way you look and feel. 

Research has shown clearly that the most effective way of taking 
off weight and keeping it off is through a program which combines 
exercise and diet. 



ENERGY 

(calories) 
REQUIRED 
IN NORMAL 
DAILY 


EnergyV 
Required 


ENERGY 1 

STORED 

AS 

BODY J 


\ EXCESS FAT 

1 PLACES AN EXTRA BURDEN 

1 ON THE HEART AND MUSCLES 


WORK i 


FAT r 


IV 




NO EXCESS BAGGAGE 
IN FORM OF FAT 





Diet 

For many women, the knowledge that they have gained a few 
S2E » Z?u a fCW inch6S ' causes what ma y be ^lled the "Diet 

ftefv to* ,5 P T \° COn l UU . a medical ex P ert the y resort Medi- 
ately to their favourite diet, which is more usually a fast. If you wish 

to go on a stringent diet— consult your physician first. 

of foo] ■ ?v y u U °! n 3VOid the need for resortil, g t0 a s ^ct reduction 
of food intake by the constant use of sensible dietary habits. In the 
norma individual, fat is added to the body very slowly. It may be 

t S io V n r Yon ° r , T en m ° nt , hS bef ° re you notice this 8 radua l accumula! 
on You cannot hope to take this fat off and keep it off without making 
subtle changes ,n eating and exercise habits. After a "crash diet" you 
will undoubtedly return to your old habits and, once more, in a few 
weeks you will note that IT is back again. 

A slight change in diet (along with XBX) can take off, and keep 
off, several pounds of excess fat over a period of time. For example 8 
you eat bread with your meals, eat one slice less; add a litde less 
sugar, or none at all, to your tea or coffee. The calories so avoided each 
day add up to several thousand in a few months and may be the 
difference between the way you look and feel and the way you would 
like to look and feel. By the time you have arrived at the condition 
you desire your habits will have been changed enough so that you will 
probably not slip back into the old ones. 



What You Can Do About Fitness 



Unless you are engaged in a full time program of conditioning 
for athletic endeavours you should take part in some form of active 
exercise. 

The average woman is engaged in one of three activities daily — 
school, employment, or housework. None of these provides the balanced 
activity for the body that is desirable for good physical fitness. House- 
work, for example, though it may involve a good deal of hard physical 
labour, does not take into account the flexibility of the muscles, nor does 
it work all the muscles of the body. Day after day you do the same 
things. The muscles that work get plenty of exercise; the others get 
little or none. 

The same facts that are true of housework also hold true for most 
sports. Sports make specific contributions to fitness but do not condition 
the whole body. Most people taking part in a recreational sport do not 
pursue it vigorously enough to develop adequate levels of fitness. Before 
they become completely effective, even those sports which can produce 
all round fitness require more skill than the average person possesses 
and more time than the average person can devote to them. 

No matter what you do in your daily life you probably need a 
good, balanced program of exercise which will enable you to become the 
person you want to be. 



How You Can Use XBX 

XBX requires little time and space, and no equipment, so you can: 
Do it alone — at home — at any time. 

Form your own fitness club. Make XBX a part of your daily or 
weekly get together with "the girls". 

Have your family work on fitness together. XBX for the ladies, 
5BX for the men. It can be fun. 



Why XBX was Developed 

Research has indicated that Canadians— male and female, young 
and old— are in need of some form of regular, vigorous, physical 
activity. As more and more labour-saving devices are put into general 
use as more and more people watch more and more television, movies 
and sports events, the amount of physical effort expended by the average 
person decreases continually. 

T,^A^ n anaI ? sis of the exercise needs of Canadians was conducted by 
RCAF specialists and led to the development of the 5BX program for 
men. XBX is the complementary program for women. 

The RCAF analysis indicated three major deterrents to regular 
exercise: & 

first —a great majority of people would like to 
exercise, but do not know how to go about 
it — what to do, how to do it, how often, how 
to progress, or how far to progress; 

second— most exercise programs call for the use of 
equipment and gymnasiums which are not 
always available; and 

third —most exercise programs call for a great expend- 
iture of time, which most people cannot spare. 

Clearly a program which resolves these problems is required. 

The XBX Plan does this. 

XBX tells you what to do, where to start, how fast you progress 
and how far you should progress to achieve a desirable level of 
physical fitness. 

XBX requires no equipment 
and very little space. 

XBX takes only 12 minutes 
a day. 




V 
^ 



The program is here — 

the rest is up to you. 



10 



How XBX Was Developed 

XBX is the product of extensive research into the problems of 
physical fitness for girls and women. 

The research was conducted at several RCAF stations and in the 
later stages included sections of the civilian population. 

Over 600 girls and women of all ages participated in the project. 
The RCAF is indebted to these persons for their contributions to the 
program. 

The first step in the project was the administration of a series of 
physical fitness tests. The tests included an examination of muscular 
strength and endurance, testing of heart response to activity, and 
measurement of fat layers. From the results of these tests the physical 
fitness needs of women were analyzed. 

Experiments were carried out with a wide variety of exercises to 
determine those most effective in producing the desired results. Many 
of these exercises were discarded as ineffectual. The ten exercises of 
XBX provided the most balanced and effective program. 

The time limits for each exercise were varied until the optimum 
time for good results was determined. 

Tests were conducted to arrive at the number of times each exercise 
could be done, and should be done, within the time limits. 

The first experimental exercise programs were used by several 
hundred women. Periodic tests showed that XBX was an effective plan 
to improve levels of general fitness. 

The program was then distributed to groups and to individuals 
across Canada for further trial 
and comment. Further modifica- 
tions in the plan were made on 
the basis of this final field trial. 

The results of this research 
are presented in this booklet — 
RCAF XBX Plan for Physical 
Fitness. 




What the XBX Plan Is 

The XBX Plan is a physical fitness program composed of four 
charts of ten exercises, arranged in progressive order of difficulty. The 
ten exercises on each chart are always performed in the same order, 
and in the same maximum time limits. 

The charts are divided into levels. There are 48 levels in all, 12 
in each chart. The levels are numbered consecutively, starting with 1 
at the bottom of Chart I and ending with 48 at the top of Chart IV. 

In addition to the regular exercises, two supplementary exercises 
are available for Charts I, II, and III. These exercises are for the muscles 
of the feet and ankles and for those muscles which assist in the 
maintenance of good posture. 



How XBX Works 

Any exercise plan or program should work on the basis of an 
easy start and gradual progression. As physical fitness improves the 
work load is increased. The XBX approach to exercise follows these 
principles. 

XBX incorporates two methods to make the work load greater: 

first — the time limit for each exercise remains the 
same in all charts, but the number of times 
the exercise is performed within this time limit 
is increased at each level within each chart; and 

second — the exercises are made more difficult from each 
chart to the next higher one. 

On each chart you do the same exercises at each of the twelve 
levels but increase the number of times you do them. 

As you move to the next higher chart the exercises are basically 
the same but have been modified and made slightly more demanding. 

The XBX has been planned for gradual, painless progression. 
Follow the plan as outlined in the booklet. 
Do not skip levels. 
Do not progress faster than is recommended. 



12 



What the Exercises Are For 

The XBX will improve your general physical condition by: 




increasing muscle tone; 
increasing muscular strength; 
increasing muscular endurance; 
increasing flexibility; and 
increasing the efficiency of your heart. 



Each exercise is included because of its contribution in one or 
more of these areas. 

The first four exercises are primarily to improve and maintain 
flexibility and mobility in those areas of the body which are usually 
neglected. They also serve as a warm-up for the more strenuous exercises 
which follow. 

Exercise 5 is for strengthening the abdominal region and the 
muscles of the fronts of the thighs. 

Exercise 6 exercises the long muscles of the back, the buttocks, 
and the backs of the thighs. 

Exercise 7 concentrates on the muscles on the sides of the thighs. 
These muscles get very little work in routine daily activities, or indeed 
in most sports. 

Exercise 8 is primarily for the arms, shoulders, and chest, but at 
the same time exercises the back and abdomen. 

Exercise 9 is partly for flexibility in the waist area and for strength- 
ening the muscles of the hips and sides. 

Exercise 10, the run-in-place with jumping, while exercising the 
legs, is primarily for the conditioning of the heart and lungs. 

The two supplementary exercises are included for those who wish 
to do a little more. One exercise is for strengthening the muscles of the 
feet and the ankle joint. The other is for those muscles of the back and 
abdomen which assist in the maintenance of posture. 



13 



What the Charts Mean 

Below is an explanation of what the chart pages mean. Check the 
paragraph headings below with the sample chart on the opposite page. 

EXERCISE 

f mm ?, "In^ T* the t0pS ° f the chaits are the exerci ^ numbers 
from 1 to 10. The column headed 1 refers to Exercise 1, and so on 

The exercises are described and illustrated in the five pages following 

each chart. Exercises 8A and 8B are the supplementary exercise! 

described on pages 42 to 44. If you choose to do these, do them 

between Exercises 8 and 9. 

LEVEL 

The numbers along the left side of the chart are the levels of the 
program and each refers to the line of numbers beside it under the 
exercise headings. For example at Level 14 you do Exercise 3 seven 
times, Exercise 6 fifteen times, and so on. 

MINUTES FOR EACH EXERCISE 

The allotted time for each exercise is shown here. The exercises 

numbered 1 to 4 are the warm-up and all four are to be completed wuhL 

2 minutes, or about a half minute each. Other examples" Exercise 5 

akes 2 minutes, and Exercise 6 takes 1 minute. The total time for each 

he a! ,v er Sl SeS " ! 2 mlnutes - II is im Portant that all the exercises 
be done within this total time limit. Do not move up to the next level 
until you can do your present level, without excessive strain or fatigue 
in the 12 minutes. s ' 

RECOMMENDED NUMBER OF DAYS AT EACH LEVEL 

Record in the box provided on each chart page the number of days 
it is recommended that you spend at each level before progressing to the 
next. (See instructions for using the plan on page 17.) 

MY PROGRESS 

This chart is provided to enable you to keep an accurate record of 
your progress on the way to your physical fitness goal. Record the dates 
you started and finished each level. Make a note of how you felt as 
you did the exercises. To use the bottom chart, select a reasonable aim 
at J xf " in tCrmS ° f b ° dy measur ™ents and record this in MY 
AIM. Then record your present measurements on the START line 
When you have completed the exercise chart, note your latest measure: 

TL£ c^ lm t abeUed FINISR The FINISH «ne on one chart 
will be the START line on the next. 

Note: Do not expect startling results. Fitness takes time and per- 
sistence. Couple your XBX program with a good diet and 
your progress will be steady. 



14 



NOTE: This chart is for illustration only. Charts for use start on Page 18. 



CHART II 



24 



23 



22 



21 



EXERCISE 



15 16 12 30 



15 16 12 30 



20 



19 



18 



17 



16 



15 



14 



13 



Minutes 
for each 
Exercise 



15 16 12 30 



13 14 11 26 



13 14 11 26 



10 



35 38 50 28 20 210 



33 36 48 26 18 200 



31 34 46 24 18 200 



29 32 44 23 16 190 



8A 8B 
40 36 



38 34 



36 32 



27 31 42 21 16 175 



13 14 11 26 



12 12 9 20 



12 12 9 20 



12 12 9 20 



10 10 7 18 



10 10 7 18 



24 29 40 20 14 160 



22 27 38 18 14 150 



19 24 36 16 12 150 



16 21 34 14 10 140 



14 18 32 12 10 130 



33 29 



31 27 



28 24 



25 22 



22 20 



19 19 



17 15 



10 10 7 18 



11 15 30 10 8 120 



9 12 28 8 8 120 



14 13 



12 12 
1 1 



Recommended number of days at each level 



MY PROGRESS 



LEVEL 


STARTED 


FINISHED 


COMMENTS 


24 








23 








22 








21 








20 








19 








18 








17 








16 








15 








14 








13 












DATE 


HEIGHT 


WEIGHT 


WAIST 


HIPS 


BUST 


My Aim 














Start 














Finish 















15 



Your Fitness Goal 

As is explained in the instructions for the use of the program on 
the opposite page, each age group is given a physical fitness goal to 
attain; that is, a level which they should try to reach. 

The goals indicated in this plan are based on the average achieve- 
ments ot girls and women who have participated in it 

Your goal, then, is the level of fitness that the average girl or 
woman of your age reached without undue stress, strain, or fatigue 

,. W f Z? I , aVCrage T ' there are individ "als who surpass it, and 
those who fall below it. In terms of the XBX plan and the goals this 
means that there will be some women who are capable of pfog essing 
beyond he goal indicated, and on the other hand, there will 1 L person! 
who will never attain this average level. f™suhs 

P oal I L y ° a n fed 3bl ^ t0 m T fufther throu 8 h the charts than your 
goal, by all means do so. If, on the contrary, you experience great 
difficulty , n approaching this level you should stop at a level wffich 
you feel to be within your capability. It is impossible to predict Accu- 
rately a level for each individual who uses this program. Use the goals 
as guides, and apply them with common sense. S 

i» F JiT J™ 6 l u time aS yOU progress throu g h the levels V ou may 
have difficulty with a particular level or exercise. If so, proceed slowly 
but keep working at it. (These "plateaus" may occur anywhere in the 
progression.) Generally you will be able to move ahead after a few 
days at this level. If you cannot, then you have probably arrived at 

is^ncemed fit " eSS '^ " S ° *** ** thJS P articular P r °g™m 

Caution 

If for any reason you stop doing XBX for more than two weeks 
because of illness, vacation, or any other cause— DO NOT restart at 
the level you had attained before stopping. DO drop back several levels 
or to the next lower chart until you find a level which you can do fairly 
easily. Physical fitness is lost during long periods of inactivity This is 
particularly true if the inactivity were caused by illness 



Pv f\ ^ 







16 



Instructions for Using the XBX Plan 

First select YOUR GOAL for YOUR AGE from the table below. 
Locate this level in the charts which follow. Mark it in some way- 
circle it or underline it. 

Record the recommended minimum number of days at each level 
in the box provided on each chart page. For example if you are 28 
years of age, your goal is Level 30 on Chart III and you spend AT 
LEAST 2 days doing each level on Chart I, 3 days at each level on 
Chart II, and 5 days at each level on Chart III. Do not move faster 
than the recommended rate. 



If 

Your Age 



Your Goal Recommended Minimum 

is Number of Days at Each Level on 
Level Chart Chart Chart Chart 

It HI IV 



7- 8 years 30 

9-10 years 34 

11-12 years 38 

13-14 years 41 

15-17 years 44 

18-19 years 40 

20-25 years 35 

26-30 years 30 

31-35 years 26 

36-40 years 22 

41-45 years 19 

46-50 years 16 

51-55 years 11 







2 


X 






2 


X 






2 


3 






2 


3 






2 


3 




2 


3 


4 




2 


3 


X 


2 


3 


5 


X 


2 


4 


6 


X 


4 


6 


X 


X 


5 


7 


X 


X 


7 


8 


X 


X 


8 


X 


X 


X 



To Start and Progress 

Start at Level 1, which is at the bottom of Chart I. When you can 
do this level without strain and in 12 minutes move up to Level 2. 
Continue through the levels and charts in this way until you reach the 
goal level recommended for your age group, OR until you feel you are 
exercising at your maximum capacity. 



When You Reach Your Goal 

Once you have reached your goal you should require only three 
exercise periods a week to maintain it. 



17 



< 



12 



11 



CHART I 
EXERCISE 



1 



9 8 10 40 



9 8 10 40 



10 9 8 10 40 



10 



26 20 28 14 14 170 



24 18 26 13 14 160 



22 16 25 12 12 150 



Recommended number of days at each level 



8A 8B 



18 20 



17 18 



16 17 




J-A 









MY 


PROGRESS 






LEVEL 


STARTED 


FINISHED 


COMMENTS 


12 








11 








10 








9 








8 








7 








6 








5 








4 








3 








2 








1 










DATE 


HEIGHT 


WEIGHT 


WAIST 


HIPS 


BUST 


My Aim 


7K Z ViX - t- 


Xu. 


I/O 


a5 ! /v 


35 


H 


Start 




i"-3 


\\t 


£% 


' ity 


/ *H 


Finish 








if% 


*-* V L_ 


4 



18 



Exercise 1 — Toe Touching 




Start, Stand erect, feet 12 inches apart, arms over head. 

Bend forward to touch floor between feet. Do not try to keep 
knees straight. Return to starting position. 

Count. Each return to starting position counts one. 



Exercise 2 — Knee Raising 



i 

r 



Start, Stand erect, hands at sides, feet together. 

Raise left knee as high as possible, grasping knee and shin with 
hands. Pull leg toward body. Keep back straight throughout. 
Lower foot to floor. 

Repeat with right leg. Continue by alternating legs— left then 
right. 
Count Left and right knee raises count one. 



19 



Exercise 3 — Lateral Bending 





Start. Stand erect, feet 12 inches apart, hands at sides. Keeping back 
straight, bend sidewards from waist to left. Slide left hand down 
leg as far as possible. Return to starting position and bend to 
right side. Continue by alternating to left then right. 

Count Bends to the left and right count one. 



Exercise A — Arm Circling 






Start. Stand erect, feet 12 inches apart, arms at sides. Make large 
circles with left arm. Do one quarter of total count with forward 
circles and one quarter with backward circles. Repeat with 
right arm. 

Count. A full arm circle counts one. 



20 



Exercise 5 — Partial Sit-ups 







Start. Lie on back, legs straight and together, arms at sides. 

Raise head and shoulders from floor until you can see your 
heels. Lower head to floor. 

Count. Each partial sit-up counts one. 



Exercise 6 — Chest and Leg Raising 




Start. Lie face down, arms along sides, hands under thighs, palms 

pressing against thighs. 

Raise head, shoulders, and left leg as high as possible from 

floor. Keep leg straight. Lower to floor. 

Repeat raising head, shoulders, and right leg. 

Continue by alternating legs, left then right. 
Count Each chest and leg raise counts one. 



21 



Exercise 7 — Side Leg Raising 



^ 



Start. Lie on side, legs straight, lower arm stretched over head along 
floor, top arm used for balance. 

Raise upper leg 18 to 24 inches. Lower to starting position. 
Count. Each leg raise counts one. Do half number of counts raising 

rihtte' t0 ° ther side and do half number of counts raisin s 



Exercise 8 — Push-ups 





~-\ 



Start. Lie face down, legs straight and together, hands directly under 

shoulders. 

Push body off floor in any way possible, keeping hands and 
knees m contact with floor. Sit back on heels. Lower body to 
floor. J 

Count. Each return to starting position counts one. 



22 



Exercise 9 — Leg Lifting 




Start, Lie on back, legs straight and together, arms at sides, palms 

down. 

Raise left leg until it is perpendicular to floor, or as close to 

this position as possible. 

Lower and repeat with right leg. 

Continue by alternating legs, left then right. 
Count Left plus right leg lifts count one. 



Exercise 10 — Run and Hop 



n 






9 



Start. Stand erect, feet together, arms at sides. 

Starting with left leg, run in place raising feet at least four 

inches from floor. 

(When running in place lift knees forward, do not merely kick 

heels backwards.) 
Count. Each time left foot touches floor counts one. 

After each fifty counts do ten hops. 
Hops. Hopping is done so that both feet leave floor together. Try to 

hop at least four inches off floor each time. 
Note: In all run-in-place exercises only running steps are counted 

towards completing exercise repetitions. 



23 











CHART II 








EXERCISE 




1 2 


3 4 


5 6 7 


8 9 10 


8A ft R 




24 


15 16 


12 30 


35 38 


50 
48 


28 
26 


20 210 


40 36 


L 


2T 


15 16 


12 3tT 


- 33 36 


18 200 


38 34 




Z'/r 


_15_ 16 


12 30 


31 34 46 


24 18 200 


36 32 


t 


Hr 


-13 14 


-ITr 24 


29 32 44 


23 16 190- 


33 29 




-20 


13 14 


11 26 


27 31 42 


21 16 175 


-31 27 


V 


19- 


-»- 14 


11 26 


24 29 40 


20 14 160 


28 24 




18 


12 12 


9 20 


22 27 38 


18 ] 
16 ] 
14 ] 
12 1 


L4 150 


25 22 


E 


17 


12 12 


9 20 


19 24 


36 
34 
32 


.2 150 


22 20 




16 


12 12 


9 20 


16 21 


-0 140 


19 19 


L 


15 


10 10 


7 18 


14 18 


130 


17 15 




14 


10 10 


7 18 


11 15 30 


10 8 120 


14 13 




13 


10 10 


7 18 


9 12 


28 
1 


8 
2 


8 120 


12 12 


Minutes 
for each 
Exercise 


2 


2 1 


1 3 


1 1 




Recommended number of days at each lev 




" 




el £, 






MY PROGRESS 


LEVEL 


STARTED 


FINISHED 


COMMENTS 


24 








23 






/i"'v / V 




22 




y 




21 




W+- 




20 




' ' - !/ 




19 




- '0 




18 




10 




17 








16 




1 " 7-v 




15 




ZKZV ■ 




14 




rrt 




13 


7. - ^ 






DATE 


HEIGHT 


WEIGHT 


WAIST 


HIPS 


BUST 


My Aim 






II v 


* 


T 


^7 


Start 


/'■/? 






— L 


-1 




Finish 










— k 


s 4y ^ 



24 



Exercise 1— Toe Touching 









Start. Stand erect, feet 12 inches apart, arms over head. 

Bend forward to touch floor between feet. 

Bob up and down touching floor a second time. 

Return to starting position. 
Count. Each return to starting position counts one. 

Exercise 2 — Knee Raising 




Start. Stand erect, feet together, arms at sides. 

Raise left knee as high as possible grasping knee and shin 
with hands. Pull leg against body. Keep back straight through- 
out. Lower foot to floor. 

Repeat with right leg. Continue by alternating legs— left then 
right. 

Count. Left and right knee raises count one. 



25 



Exercise 3 — Lateral Bending 






Start. Stand erect, feet 12 inches apart, hands at sides. 

™e% h Z Ck /T [ght \ bCnd Sidewards from wais < to left. 
Wide left hand down leg as far as possible. Bob up a few 
inches and press sidewards and down again. 

righted? $tarting P0Siti ° n 3nd rCpeat Same movements to 
Continue by alternating to left then right. 
Count. Bends to left and right count one. 



Exercise 4— Arm Circling 






Start. Stand erect, feet 12 inches apart, arms at sides. 

Make large circles, with both arms at same time, backwards 
and around. Do half the number of repetitions making back- 
ward circles and half making forward circles. 

Count Each full arm circle counts one. 



26 



Exercise 5— Rocking Sit-ups 






Start, Lie on back, knees bent, feet on floor, arms extended over 

head. 

Swing arms forward and at same time thrust feet forward and 

move to sitting position. Reach forward, trying to touch toes 

with fingers. Return tq starting position. 
Count Each return to starting position counts one. 



Exercise 6 — Chest and Leg Raising 





Start Lie face down, arms along sides, palms pressing against thighs. 

Raise head, shoulders, and legs as high as possible from floor. 

Keep legs straight. Return to starting position. 
Count Each return to starting position counts one. 



27 



Exercise 7 — Side Leg Raising 




jlmL__ ^ 



Start. Lie on side, legs straight, lower arm stretched over head alone 
floor, top arm used for balance. 

Raise upper leg until it is perpendicular to floor or as close 
to this position as possible. Lower to starting position. 

Count. Each leg raise counts one. Do half number of counts raising 
left leg. Roll to other side and do half number of counts raising 

right leg. 6 



Exercise 8— Knee Push-ups 



J 



| ^^p^ J^^_ 



Start. Lie face down, legs straight and together, hands directly under 



shoulders 



Push body off floor until arms are straightened. Keep hands and 
fcnees in contact with floor. Try to keep body in straight line. 
Count. Each return to starting position counts one. 



28 



Exercise 9 — Leg-overs 




[ 







Start. Lie on back, legs straight and together, arms stretched sidewards 
at shoulder level. 

Raise left leg to perpendicular. Drop it across body, and try to 
touch right hand with toes. Raise leg to perpendicular and 
return to starting position. Repeat same movements with right 
leg. Keep body and legs straight throughout, and shoulders on 
floor. 

Count Each return to starting position counts one. 

Exercise 10 — Run and Stride Jumping 






7 




et i 



? V ! 




J 

Start. Stand erect, feet together, arms at sides. Starting with left leg 
run in place raising feet at least four inches from floor. 

Count. Each time left foot touches floor counts one. 
After each fifty runs do ten stride jumps. 

Stride Stride jump starts with feet together, arms at sides. Jump so 

Jump, that feet are about 18 inches apart when you land. At the 
same time as you jump, raise arms sidewards to shoulder 
height. Jump again so that feet are together and arms are at 
sides when you land. 



29 



36 



35 



34 



33l. 



32 



CHART III 
EXERCISE 



15 22 18 40 



15 22 18 40 



15 22 18 40 



13 -20 16 36 



10 



42 40 60 40 20 240 



41 39 60 39 20 230 



40 38 58 37 19 220 



31 



30- 



29 



13 20 16 36 



39 36 58 35 19 210 27 33 



13 20 16 36 



I2"~ 18 14 30 



37 36 56 34 18 200 



35 34 56 32 16 200 



28 



27- 



25 



Minutes 
for each 
Exercise 



12 18 14 30 



12 18 14 30 



10 16 12 24 



26 10_Ifc-42 -24 



10 16 12 24 



33 33 54 30 15 190 



8A 8B 

32 38 



30 36 



29 34 



25 31 



24 30 



32 31 54 29 14 180 



31 30 52 27 12 170 



29 30 52 25 11 160 



27 29 50 23 9 -K0~.~- Jj = M--- 



26 28 48 22 8 140 



23 28 
21 26 



20 25 



19-23^ 



16 20 



1 1 



Recommended number of days at each level 









MY PROGRESS 






LEVEL 


STARTED 


FINISHED 


COMMENTS 


36 








35 


tefv- 






34 


-* h 


/ 




33 


iV-.T'/l 


i 




32 


/ %s ... . 






31 


■ 






30 


• 






29 


■ i 






28 


1 1 - 






27 








26 


/ b - U - - «| 






2 % 


h - " - 








DATE 


HEIGHT 


WEIGHT 


WAIST 


HIPS 


RIKT 


My Aim 


l> |. 


. 


If* 


*^H 


3&% 


±T' 


Start 




ri 




h 




— ~*^ 


Finish 












___ 



30 



Exercise 1— Toe Touching 






Start. Stand erect, feet about 16 inches apart, arms over head. 

Bend down to touch floor outside left foot. Bob up and down 
to touch floor between feet. Bob again and bend to touch floor 
outside right foot. Return to starting position. 

Count. Each return to starting position counts one. 



Exercise 2 — Knee Raising 




Start. Stand erect, feet together, arms at sides. 

Raise left knee as high as possible, grasping knee and shin with 

hands. 

Pull leg against body. Keep back straight throughout. Lower 

foot to floor. 

Repeat with right leg. Continue by alternating legs— left then 

right. 
Count. Left and right knee raises count one. 



31 



Exercise 3— Lateral Bending 





Keeping back straight, bend sidewards from waist to left 
Count. Bends to left and right count one. 



Exercise 4— Arm Circling 





Start. Stand erect, feet 12 inches apart, arms at sides. 

Make large circles with arms in a windmill action-one arm 
following other and both moving at same time. Do h^numb™ 

ctS m maklng baCkW3rd Cirdes and half -aking foCrd 
Count Each full circle by both arms counts one. 



32 



Exercise 5 — Sit-ups 



W V ▼ 



Start. Lie on back, legs straight and together, arms along sides. 

Keeping back as straight as possible, move to a sitting position. 
Slide hands along legs during this movement finally reaching 
forward to try to touch toes with fingers. 

Return to starting position. 
Count. Each return to starting position counts one. 



Exercise 6— Chest and Leg Raising 






Start Lie face down, legs straight and together, arms stretched side- 
wards at shoulder level. 

Raise entire upper body and both legs from floor as high as 
possible. 
Keep legs straight. Return to starting position. 

Count Each return to starting position counts one. 



33 



Exercise 7— Side Leg Raising 





tW Each leg raise co„„ K „„, ■>, ^ n „ mber of 



Exercise 8— Elbow Push-ups 



M» 



^ 





Stort J£,!Sf ^ k8S Straight and to S ether ' elb ™s directly under 
shoulders, forearms along floor, and hands clasped together 

Raise body from floor by straightening it from head to heels 

a™?a U n P d P t°ot i0n ' *& k h a Strai « ht ,ine «* *»-, fore- 
arms and toes are in contact with floor. Lower to startC 
position. Keep head up throughout. ng 

Count. Each return to starting position counts one. 



34 



Exercise 9 — Leg-overs — Tuck 




>• 



Start Lie on back, legs straight and together, arms stretched side- 
wards at shoulder level, palms down. 

Raise both legs from floor, bending at hips and knees until 
in a tuck position. Lower legs to left, keeping knees together 
and both shoulders on floor. Raise legs and lower to floor on 
right side. Raise until perpendicular to floor and return to 
starting position. Keep knees close to abdomen throughout. 

Count Each return to starting position counts one. 



Exercise 10 — Run and Half Knee Bends 







Start Stand erect, feet together, arms at sides. 

Starting with left leg, run in place raising feet at least six 
inches from floor. 

Count Each time left foot touches floor counts one. 
After each fifty counts do ten half knee bends. 

Half Half knee bends start with hands on hips, feet together, body 
Knee erect. Bend at knees and hips, lowering body until thigh and calf 
Bends, form an angle of about 110 degrees. Do not bend knees past a 
right angle. Keep back straight. Return to starting position. 



35 



48 



47 



46 



45 



44 



43 



42 



41 



40 



39 



38 



37 



Minutes 
for each 
Exercise 



CHART IV 



EXERCISE 



1 



15 26 15 32 



15 26 15 32 



15 26 15 32 



13 24 14 30 



13 24 14 30 



13 24 14 30 



12 22 12 28 



12 22 12 28 



12 22 12 28 



10 20 10 26 



10 20 10 26 



10 20 10 26 



32 38 44 11 



30 38 40 



29 36 38 



27 35 36 



25 34 34 



Recommended number of days at each level 



10 



48 46 58 30 16 230 



45 45 56 27 15 220 



44 44 54 24 14 210 



42 43 52 21 13 200 



40 42 50 19 13 190 



38 40 48 16 12 175 



35 39 46 13 10 160 



150 



8 140 



130 



115 



100 









MY PROGRESS 






LEVEL 


STARTED 


FINISHED 


COMMENTS 


48 








47 








46 








45 








44 








43 








42 








41 








40 








39 








38 








37 










DATE 


HEIGHT 


WEIGHT 


WAIST 


HIPS 


BUST 


My Aim 














Start 














Finish 















36 



Exercise 1 — Toe Touching 




* <f 

• ] * * * * £ . * ] * * 



Start. Stand erect, feet about 16 inches apart, arms over head. 

Bend down to touch floor outside left foot. Bob up and down 
to touch floor between feet. Bob again touching floor between 
feet once more. Bob and bend to touch floor outside right foot. 

Return to starting position. 

Count Each return to starting position counts one. 



Exercise 2 — Knee Raising 





Start. Stand erect, feet together, arms at sides. 

Raise left knee as high as possible, grasping knee and shin with 
hands. 

Pull leg against body. Keep back straight throughout. 

Lower foot to floor. 

Repeat with right leg. Continue by alternating legs — left then 
right. 

Count Left and right knee raises count one. 



37 



Exercise 3— Lateral Rending 



Ifffi 

Start. Stand erect, feet 12 inches apart, right arm extended over head, 
bent at elbow. 

Keeping back straight, bend sidewards from waist to left. 
Slide left hand down leg as far as possible, at same time press 
to left with right arm. Bob up a few inches and press to left 
again. 

Return to starting position and change arm positions. 
Repeat to right. 

Continue by alternating to left then right. 
Count. Bends to left and right count one. 

Exercise 4 — Arm Flinging 





T 



• % 




Start 



Stand erect, feet 12 inches apart, upper arms extended side- 
wards at shoulder level, elbows bent, outstretched fingers touch- 
ing in front of chest. 

Press elbows backward and upward. Do not let elbows drop. 
Return arms to starting position and then fling hands and arms 
outward, backward, and upward as far as possible. 
Return to starting position. 
Count Count one after each arm fling. 



38 



Exercise 5 — Sit-ups 




j>j 



Start Lie on back, legs straight and together, hands behind head. 

Move to sitting position. Keep feet on floor (support may be 
used if necessary) and back straight. Lower body to starting 
position. 

Count. Each return to starting position counts one. 



Exercise 6 — Chest and Leg Raising 






Start Lie face down, legs straight and together, hands behind head. 

Raise entire upper body and both legs from floor as high as 
possible. Keep legs straight. Return to starting position. 

Count Each return to starting position counts one. 



39 



Exercise 7 — Side Leg Raising 





Start. With right side to floor, support weight on right hand (arm 
straight) and side of right foot, using left hand for assistance in 
balance if necessary. 

Raise left leg until it is parallel with floor. Lower leg to 
starting position. 

Count. Each leg raise counts one. Do half number of counts raising 
left leg. Change to other side and do half number of counts 
raising right leg. 



Exercise 8 — Push-ups 




Start Lie face down, legs straight and together, toes turned under, 
hands directly under shoulders. 

Push up from hands and toes until arms are fully extended. 

Keep body and legs in a straight line. Return to touch chest to 
floor and repeat. 

Count Each time chest touches floor counts one. 



40 



Exercise 9- 



-Leg-overs — Straight 




<dP 



Start. Lie on back, legs straight and together, arms stretched side- 
wards at shoulder level, palms down. 

Raise both legs until they are perpendicular to floor, keeping 
them straight and together. Lower legs to left, trying to touch 
left hand with toes. Raise to perpendicular and lower to right 
side. Raise again to perpendicular and return to starting 
position. 

Count. Each return to starting position counts one. 



Exercise 10 — Run and Semi-Squat Jumps 




Start. 




n 

% 



o 






/ 



Stand erect, feet together, arms at sides. 

Starting with left leg, run in place raising feet at least six inches 
from floor. 

Count. Each time left foot touches floor counts one. 

After each fifty counts do ten semi-squat jumps. 

Semi- Drop to a half crouch position with hands on knees and arms 
Squat- straight. Keep back as straight as possible, one foot slightly ahead 
Jumps, of the other. Jump to upright position with body straight and feet 

leaving floor. Reverse position of feet before landing, return to 

half crouch, and repeat. 



41 



Supplementary Exercises 

On this page and the following two pages the supplementary 
exercises for feet, ankles, and posture are illustrated and described. If 
you wish to do these exercises they are to be included in your regular 
program between Exercises 8 and 9 and are numbered 8a and 8b. 



Chart I 
Supplementary Exercise 8A— Feet and Ankles 



Start Sit on floor, legs straight and about six inches apart, hands 
behind body for support, feet relaxed. 

Press toes away from body as far as possible. Bring toes towards 
body hooking feet as much as possible. Relax feet. 

Count Each return to relaxed state counts one. 



Supplementary Exercise 8B— Posture 



A 




Start Sit on floor, knees bent, feet on floor, hands clasped about knees, 
head bent forward, and body relaxed. 

Straighten body and lift head to look directly ahead. Pull in 
muscles of abdomen. Relax to starting position. 

Count Each return to starting position counts one. 



42 



Chart II 
Supplementary Exercise 8A— Feet and Ankles 

WW 



Start Sit on floor, legs straight and heels about 14 inches apart, hands 
behind body for support, feet relaxed. 

Move feet so that toes make large circular movements. Press 
out and around and in and towards the body. Do half number 
of counts moving toes in one direction, then reverse for 
remainder of counts. 

Count Each time toes describe a full circle counts one. 



Supplementary Exercise 8B— Posture 





Start Lie on back, knees bent, feet on floor, arms slightly to side. 

Relax muscles of trunk. 

Press lower part of back to floor by tightening muscles of 
abdomen and back. Relax to starting position. 

Count Each return to starting position counts one. 



43 



Chart III 



Supplementary Exercise 8A— Feet and Ankles 

in HI 

Start. Stand erect, arms at sides, feet about 12 inches apart. 

First raise up onto toes, then lower until feet are flat on floor. 

Next roll outward on sides of feet, then roll feet so that outside 
edge of foot is off floor. Return to starting position. 

Count. Each return to starting position counts one. 



Supplementary Exercise 8B— Posture 




Start. Lie on back, legs straight and together, arms slightly to side. 

Relax muscles of trunk. 

Press lower part of back to floor by tightening muscles of 
abdomen and back. Relax to starting position. 

Count. Each return to starting position counts one. 



44 



Live To Be Fit and Be Fit To Live 

This pamphlet has been concerned primarily with the habits of 
exercise and diet as steps on the road to fitness. Many more ways and 
means exist which can become habits that will also contribute to this 
goal. Try to make some of these a part of your daily living and you 
will soon find that without conscious effort, or extra "work", you are 
gaining many benefits. 

Walking is an excellent exercise if done at a faster pace than a 
slow shuffle. If you use public transportation do not use the nearest or 
most convenient stop, but get on or off a few blocks away and walk 
briskly. Walk to the corner store or mail box rather than using your 
car. At every opportunity, walk rather than ride. Climb a few flights 
of stairs instead of using the elevator or escalator. 

Use your muscles to lift objects when you are able, rather than 
pushing them. 

Even an everyday practice like drying yourself with a towel after 
bathing can become a fitness activity. Rub down briskly rather than 
daubing. 

While sitting at a desk or table you can aid posture and tone up 
muscles. Sit tall with your back straight; do not slump with round back 
and shoulders, and head forward. 

To tone up the shoulder girdle and arm muscles: sit erect, place 
hands on desk, palms down, elbows bent, and press down trying to lift 
body from chair. Hold the pressure for a few seconds. Repeat two or 
three times a day. 

When standing, sitting, or lying, tense the muscles of the abdomen 
and hold for about six seconds. Do this a few times each day. 

Constantly think of how you look, and walk tall and sit tall, 
always attempting to maintain a good postural position. 




WALKING IS A M BEST" EXERCISE 



45 



Rest, Relaxation, and Revitalization 

It is just as important that your body receive adequate rest as 
it is that it be exercised. Sleep requirements vary from person to person 
and each person is her own best judge of her needs. The important 
thing is to awake refreshed and revitalized. A few tips on getting the 
most from your bedtime hours: 

Keep the room as dark as possible; 

Do not take your problems to bed with you — if you must think, 

think calm, restful thoughts; 

Mild exercise before retiring may be helpful; 

If you are hungry, have a light snack or a warm, non-stimulating 
beverage. 

Relaxation, both mental and physical, is becoming more and more 
essential in the fast moving, hurly-burly world in which we live. Many 
emotional tensions are reflected in physical (organic and muscular) 
tensions. 

You can consciously reduce both forms of tension. Physically you 
can learn to relax muscle groups. A simple illustration is: hold your 
hands in front of you, tighten up the muscles of the forearms so that 
the hands and fingers are straight, abruptly relax them so that the hands 
fall limply. Try this with other muscles — tighten — then relax. Stretch, 
writhe, and wriggle yourself into a relaxed state. 

For mental relaxation try consciously to think pleasant and restful 
thoughts, ignoring for a while the troubles of the day. Healthy forms 
of recreation (picnics, golf, etc.) are fine ways to release not only the 
physical tensions, but some of the mental ones as well. 




WAKE UP REFRESHED 



46 



Exercise and the Heart 

There are many misconceptions about exercise and its effect upon 
the heart. "Exercise is harmful." Nonsense. There is no evidence to 
support this contention. There is a large body of opinion which holds 
that exercise, appropriate to age and physical condition, continued 
through your life span will help to reduce the possibility of heart and 
blood vessel disease. Exercise, in mild form of course, is recommended 
as part of the recuperative phase in cases of heart or coronary disease. 
Evidence is also on hand that indicates exercise is beneficial to the func- 
tion of the cardio-vascular system. 

A healthy heart can obtain many benefits from a good conditioning 
program. Research has shown that the heart of a trained person has 
a smaller acceleration of pulse rate under stress, and that it returns 
more rapidly to its normal rate afterward than that of an untrained 
person; that it pumps more blood per beat at rest, and that it can pump 
more during exercise; that it has more richly developed small blood 
vessels supplying the heart muscle and that it functions more efficiently. 
An efficient cardio-vascular system means a better supply of food and 
oxygen to the muscles (as blood is the carrier of these items) and a 
quicker recuperation after exertion, be it work, play, or exercise. 

A CAUTIONARY NOTE. Persons over thirty-five years of age, 
and anyone who suspects she may have something wrong with her 
heart, should have a thorough medical examination before engaging in 
a vigorous exercise program. Experts have noted that a heart already 
injured by disease will suffer extra abuse through extreme forms of 
exercise. Sudden violent exertion after a period of inactivity is to be 
avoided. 




EXERCISE YOUR HEART 



47 



Exercise Strength and Endurance 

The strength and endurance of the body can be increased through 
regular exercise. Such improvements are primarily localized in the 
muscles and organs which are exercised — one cannot strengthen the 
arms and shoulders by exercising the legs. To improve the condition of 
all muscles one must undertake a program which will provide them 
all with work. 

The strength of a muscle is measured by the amount of force that 
muscle can exert and is dependent upon the size and number of muscle 
fibres that can be brought into action at any one time and the frequency 
of the nerve impulses to them. 

Endurance is concerned with the ability to repeat an action over 
and over again, or to sustain a muscular contraction. 

Since the fuel for muscular contraction is carried in the blood, 
endurance is chiefly dependent upon the functioning of the cardio- 
respiratory system, (heart, blood vessels, and lungs) — that is, the 
ability of the body to transport food and oxygen to the muscles, and 
waste products away from them, efficiently. 

The human body requires proper use to function efficiently and 
endure. The body is very different from a machine that wears out 
with use. Most persons have noted how the muscles of an arm or a leg 
in a cast become smaller and weaker the longer the arm or leg remains 
so encased. While this is a dramatic example it is in effect what happens 
to the muscles of the body in a milder way when these muscles are not 
used enough. 

Exercise over and above the normal demands of daily living is 
essential to the development of an efficient, strong, and durable body. 
The resultant more pleasing appearance and sense of well being are 
added benefits that cannot be overlooked. 




LEAD A BALANCED LIFE 



48 



gsasa 







The 



5BX 

Plan 

FOR MEN 



5 Tested Exercises 



11 Minutes a Day 



The Official RCAF Fitness Plan 



49 



CAUTION 



before you start 

If you have any doubt as to your capability to under- 
take this program, see your medical adviser . 

You should not perform fast, vigorous, or highly com- 
petitive physical activity without gradually developing, and 
continuously maintaining, an adequate level of physical 
fitness, particularly if you are over the age of 30. 



for whom 

This exercise program has been designed for varying age 
groups covering male members of the Royal Canadian Air 
Force, Royal Canadian Air Cadets, and dependent children. 



50 



THE ROYAL CANADIAN 
AIR FORCE 




Here is a new scientifically designed approach to Physical 
Fitness which can develop an adequate level of reserve energy 
needed for vigorous positive well being and zestful living. 
This plan enables you to get fit: 



By yourself 

At home 
In your spare time 

At your own rate of progress 
Without discomfort and 

in only 77 minutes a day. 



51 



FIVE BASIC EXERCISES 



The 5BX Plan is unique: 

SIMPLE be cause it is easy to do, easy to follow. 

PROGRESSIVE because you can develop your own personal fitness at 

,.- v ? ur ow a rate, to your required level, without getting 

stiff or sore muscles. e 

BALANCED because you condition your muscles, your heart and lungs 
harmoniously for your daily needs. 

COMPLETE because the principles of muscle and organic develop- 
ment are applied simultaneously and progressively. 

SELF-MEASURING because it gives you clear cut "targets for fitness" 

ctfln , . rut,- ° r your age and body build ' alon 8 with graduated 
standards for checking your progress. 

CONVENIENT because you can do these exercises any place at your 
convenience, without gadgets, 




PER 

DAY 



52 



Research has 
Demonstrated that the 
5BX Plan will: 



Increase the strength of the important muscle groups 
needed in everyday living. 

Increase the ability of muscles used in essential body 
movements to function efficiently for long periods of time. 



the body. 



Increase the speed response of the important muscles of 



and flexible. 



Keep the important muscles and joints of the body supple 



Improve the efficiency and capacity of the heart, lungs and 
other body organs. 

Increase the capacity for physical exertion. 




^TOC 




53 



Why Should You be so Concerned 
About Physical Fitness? 

Mechanization, automation, and work-saving devices to make life 
easy are depriving us of desirable physical activity. Canadians, as a result, 
are in danger of deteriorating physically. 



Here are the Pertinent Facts 

Muscles unless adequately exercised or used will become weak and 
inefficient. Let's take a look at some of the evidence which shows 
why regular vigorous exercise is so essential to physical well-being. 

Weak back muscles are associated, in many cases, with lower back 
pain. It has been estimated that 90% of these backaches may be 
eliminated by increasing the strength of the back muscles through 
exercise. 

A bulging, sagging abdomen resulting from weakened abdominal 
muscles is detrimental to good posture. 

The efficiency and capacity of your heart, lungs and other organs 
can be improved by regular vigorous exercise. 

A fit person is less susceptible to common injuries, and, if injured, 
recovers more rapidly. 

The incidence of degenerative heart diseases may be greater in 
those who have not followed a physically active life. 

Regular vigorous exercise plays an important role in controlling 
your weight. 

Regular vigorous physical activity can help you to reduce emotional 
and nervous tension. 

You are never too old to begin and follow a regular exercise 
program. 



54 



You can collect valuable dividends 
of physical efficiency from 
your daily activities 



Hidden in the simple activities we do every day are wonderful 
opportunities to get exercise and keep refreshed. Because we have 
developed an attitude of "doing it the easy way" we take short-cuts 
which seldom save time. Consequently we have developed habits to 
avoid physical exertion. 

Here are some routine activities which can be turned into small 
challenges that will help to maintain physical fitness once you have 
attained the suggested level of physical capacity for you. Make them 
a HABIT! ! 



Balance on one foot without support while 
putting on your socks or shoes. 



Give yourself a vigorous rub-down with a 
rough towel after a shower. 



Take the stairs two at a time instead of 
trudging up one at a time. Avoid elevators 
for short trips. 






Lift your chair, don't shove it. 

Bend your knees fully and keep back straight 

when picking an object off the floor. 



Welcome an opportunity to walk; look for 
ways you can walk a few blocks rather than 
ways in which to avoid walking. Step out 
smartly and breathe deeply. 



55 



PHYSICAL FITNESS 



W S m& 




PHYSIQUE 

BONE, MUSCLE, FAT 



56 



Physical Fitness 

The human body is made up mainly of bone, muscle and fat 
Some 639 different muscles account for about 45% of the body weight 
Each of these muscles has four distinct and measurable qualities which 
are of interest to us. 

(1) It can produce force which can be measured as strength of 
muscle. 

(2) It can store energy which permits it to work for extended 
periods of time independent of circulation. This is generally 
referred to as muscular endurance. 

(3) It can shorten at varying rates. This is called speed of 
contraction. 

(4) It can be stretched and will recoil. This is called the elasticity 
of muscle. 

The combination of these four qualities of muscle is referred to as 
MUSCULAR POWER. 

If muscles are to function efficiently, they must be con- 
tinually supplied with energy fuel. This is accomplished by the 
blood which carries the energy fuel from lungs and digestive system to 
the muscles. The blood is forced through the blood vessels by the 
heart. The combined capacity to supply energy fuels to the working 
muscles is called ORGANIC POWER. 

The capacity and efficiency with which your body can function 
depends on the degree of development of both your muscular and 
organic power through regular exercise. However, the level to which 
you can develop these powers is influenced by such factors as the type 
of body you inherit, the food you eat, presence or absence of disease, 
rest and sleep. 

You are physically fit only when you have adequately developed 
your muscular and organic power to perform with the highest possible 
efficiency. 



57 



(A) ACQUIRED CAPACITY 
BY NORMAL DAILY 
DEMANDS 



W ACQUIRED CAPACITY 
BY REGULAR 
EXERCISE 




■I 
100% 



ENE 



20% 

GY USED 



40% 



60% 



80% 



NERGY USED BY (A) 



THIS IS THE AMOUNT OF ENERGY (B) HAS LEFT 
OVER TO ENJOY HIS RECREATIONAL ACTIVITIES 



58 



How fit should you be? 



Heredity and health determine the top limits to which your 
physical capacity can be developed. This is known as your potential 
physical capacity. This potential capacity varies from individual to 
individual. Most of us for example, could train for a lifetime and 
never come close to running a four minute mile simply because we 
weren't "built" for it. 

The top level at which you can perform physically right now is 
called your "acquired capacity" because it has been acquired or 
developed through physical activity in your daily routines. 

Your body, like a car, functions most efficiently well below its 
acquired capacity. A car, for example, driven at its top speed of, say, 
110 miles per hour uses more gas per mile than when it is driven 
around 50-60 miles per hour, which is well below its capacity. Your 
body functions in the same way, in that the ratio of work performed 
to energy expended is better when it functions well below acquired 
capacity. 

You can avoid wastage of energy by acquiring a level of physical 
capacity well above the level required to perform your normal daily 
tasks. This can be accomplished by supplementing your daily physical 
activity with a balanced exercise programme performed regularly. 
Your capacity increases as you progressively increase the load on your 
muscular and organic systems. 

Exercise will increase physical endurance and stamina thus 
providing a greater reserve of energy for leisure time activities. 




LEAD A BALANCED LIFE 



59 



PHYSICAL EFFICIENCY COMPARISONS 



100% 




The efficiency of the human body compares poorly with the modern machine. 
However, through regular exercise its efficiency can be considerably increased. 



160 

150 

140 

130 

120 

110 

100 

90 

80 

70 

60 



A 



THE EXTRA WORK 



THAT THE HEART 

HAS TO DO / 

WHEN A PERSON « 




LYING 



SITTING 



This graph illustrates the number of heart beats required for 
your different routine activities by a human being, (A) before 
and (B) after a regular vigorous exercise programme. 



60 



The contribution of sports 
and other activities to 
basic physical efficiency 

Just as a balanced diet must be composed of a sufficient quantity 
of the proper kinds of foods to ensure that nutritional requirements 
are adequately met, so should a balanced physical activity programme 
be composed of a sufficient quantity of the proper kind of physical 
activity so that all the important parts of the body are adequately 
exercised. 

The parts of the body that require special attention are the 
muscles of the shoulder and arms, abdomen and back, legs, and the 
heart, lungs and blood vessels. 

No single sport provides a truly balanced development for all 
parts of the body. This can only be acquired by regular participation 
in a number of carefully selected sports. Such participation, however, 
is not possible for the average person for a number of reasons — 
availability of play opportunity, time, finances. The most practical 
physical fitness scheme for most of us is participation in one or two 
sports supplemented by a balanced set of exercises. The 5BX pro- 
gramme has been designed to bring physical fitness within the reach of 
any healthy person who is willing to devote 11 minutes a day to a 
simple but balanced set of exercises. 



WALKM ft A 

"BEST 

EX£RC/C£ 




» 



61 



Common Sense about Exercise 

"It won't do you any good to exercise unless you do it until it 
hurts" — the saying goes. This is absolutely false. Although you may 
get some benefit from doing exercises until "it hurts", this is not 
necessary in order to acquire an adequate level of physical fitness. As 
a matter of fact, greater benefits can be derived from exercise by avoid- 
ing stiffness and soreness. 

There are basically two ways in which you can avoid discomfort 
and still develop high levels of physical capacity: 

*Warm up properly before participating in any strenuous physical 
activity such as sprinting, handball, tennis, etc. 

*Start any training programme at a low level of activity and work 
up by easy stages. 

Warming Up 

The 5BX Plan was designed so that no additional warmup is 
necessary in order to receive its maximum benefits. 

The older one is, the more necessary proper warming up becomes 
to avoid "strained" muscles. The 5BX Plan has a built-in method of 
warmup. This is achieved in two ways: 

— by the arrangement of the exercises; and 

— by the manner in which these exercises are performed. 

For example the first exercise is a stretching and loosening exercise 
which limbers up the large muscles of the body. In addition, this 
exercise should be started very slowly and easily, with a gradual 
increase in speed and vigour. 

Let us see how this principle applies to exercise No. 1, which 
requires you to touch the floor. You should not force yourself to do 
it on the first attempt, but rather start by pushing down very gently 
and slowly as far as you can without undue strain — then on each 
succeeding try push down a little harder, and, at the same time, do the 
exercise a little faster so that by the end of two minutes you are 
touching the floor and moving at the necessary speed. All the 
exercises can be performed in this manner. 

If you choose to do the exercises in the morning, and are a slow- 
starter, as soon as the alarm rings, stretch, arch your back, lift your 
legs, and start riding your bicycle. 



62 



Weight Control— Exercise 



When you are overweight, you have more fat stored up in your 
body than is necessary or good for you. 

You become overweight and flabby when you eat more "high- 
calorie food" than your body can use. Foods such as fats, sugars, 
starches, etc., supply the energy your body needs for its work. If you 
eat more high-calorie foods than is required for your daily work the 
surplus is stored in the form of fat. Fat is stored under the skin and 
around the internal organs. 

Everyone has, or should have some fat on his body. However 
excessive fat storage, particularly about vital organs, impairs physical 
efficiency and health. Fat makes the heart work harder since each 
extra pound of body fat requires about one quarter of a mile of blood 
vessels. It is obvious, therefore, that you cannot acquire the highest 
level of physical efficiency when you are overweight. 

The accumulation of fat on your body can be prevented or reduced 
either by eating less high-calorie foods or increasing your physical 
activity. It is better still to combine these two by cutting down on 
high-calorie foods and increasing your physical activity by regular, 
frequent exercise. 



ENERGY / 


EXCESS ^ 


(calories) / 


ENERGY 


REQUIRED / 


STORED 


IN NORMAlA 


AS 


DAILY / \ 


BODY 


WORK / i 


L FAT J 


# Erwrgy 




^^^ / Require 


\ ^r 


^^ / hr 




^^^^A Body Heat \^^^ 




[excess^ 


TENERGY I 


ENERGY 1 


(calories) 1 


USED UP 


REQUIRED / 


BY A 


IN NORMAlA 


REGULAR 


DAILY / V 


EXERCISE 


lWORK / * 


^PROGRAM 


^ # Energy 


A ME i 



EXCESS 
FAT PLACES 
AN EXTRA 
J BURDEN ON 
THE HEART 
AND MUSCLES^ 



NO 

, EXCESS 
| BAGGAGE 
IN FORM 
OF FAT 



63 



What is it? 



The 5BX Plan is composed of 6 charts arranged in progression. 
Each chart is composed of 5 exercises which are always performed in 
the same order and in the same maximum time limit, but, as you pro- 
gress from chart to chart, there are slight changes in each basic exercise 
with a gradual demand for more effort. 

A sample rating scale of Chart 3 is reproduced on the opposite page 
and is to be used in the following way : 



LEVEL 



These are the Physical Capacity levels, each indicated by a letter 
of the alphabet. 



EXERCISES 



Exercises 1, 2, 3 and 4 apply to the first four exercises described 
and illustrated on the following pages. The column headed 1 rep- 
resents exercise 1 (toe touch), etc. The figures in each column 
indicate the number of times that each exercise is to be repeated in 
the time allotted for that exercise. Exercise 5 is running on the 
spot. Two activities may be substituted for it however, and if you 
prefer, you may run or walk the recommended distance in the 
required time in place of the stationary run of exercise 5. 



MINUTES FOR EACH EXERCISE 



The allotted time for each exercise is noted here. These times 
remain the same throughout all the charts. Total time for exercises 

I through 5 is 1 1 minutes. 

NOTE: 

It is important that the exercises at any level be completed in 

II minutes. However, it is likely that in the early stages, an 
individual will complete certain exercises in less than the allotted 
time while others may require longer. In these circumstances the 
times allotted for individual exercises may be varied within the total 
11 minute period. ^^^ 

HOW FAR SHOULD YOU PROGRESS? 

The level of Physical Capacity to which you should progress is 
determined by your ; "Age Group. " Levels for 'Tlying Crew 1 ' are 
listed separately. See "Your Physical Capacity Level" on page 80. 



64 



NOTE: This chart is for illustration only. Charts for use start on Page 68. 





PHYSICAL 


CAPACITY RATING 


SCALE 




Level 


EXERCISE 


1 

mite 
run 


2 

mile 
walk 




1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


In minutes 




A+ 

A 

A- 


30 


32 


47 


24 


550 


8 


25 






30 


31 


45 


22 


540 


8 


25 




30 


30 


43 


21 


525 


8 


25 




B+ 

B 

1- 


28 


28 


41 


20 


510 


81 


26 




28 


27 


39 


19 


500 


H 


26 




28 


26 


37 


18 


490 


•i 


26 




c+ 

c 

c- 


26 


25 


35 


17 


480 


•i 


27 




26 


24 


34 


17 


465 


H 


27 




26 


23 


33 


16 


450 


•J 


27 


_- 


D+ 



D- 


24 


22 


31 


15 


430 


8! 




24 


21 


30 


15 


415 


H 


28 




24 


20 


29 


15 


400 


81 


29 




Minutes 
(or each 
exercise 


2 


1 


1 


1 


6 







AGE GROUPS 

12 YRS. MAINTAINS D + 

13 YRS. MAINTAINS C + 

14 YRS. MAINTAINS B + 
35-39 YRS. MAINTAINS B 
40-44 YRS. MAINTAINS C 

FLYING CREW 

AGE 40-44 MAINTAINS A + 
AGE 45-49 MAINTAINS B 



CHART 3- 

1 Feet astride, arms upward. 

—Touch floor 6" outside left foot, 
again between feet and press once 
then 6" outside right foot, bend 
backward as far as possible, repeat, 
reverse direction after half the num- 
ber of counts. 

2 Back lying, feet 6" apart, arms 
clasped behind head. 

—Sit up to vertical position, keep 
feet on floor, hook feet under 
chair, etc., only if necessary. 

3 Front lying, hands interlocked 
behind the back. 

—Lift head, shoulders, chest and 
both legs as high as possible. 

—Keep legs straight, and raise chest 
and both thighs completely off 
floor. 

4 Front lying, hands under the 
shoulders, palms flat on floor. 

—Touch chin to floor in front of 
hands— touch forehead to floor 
behind hands before returning to 
up position. 

—There are three definite movements, 
chin, forehead, arms straightened. 
DO NOT do in one continuous 
movement, 

5 Stationary run-( Count a step each 
time left foot touches floor.) Lift 
feet approximately 4 inches off 
floor. After every 75 steps do 10 
"half knee bends." Repeat this 
sequence until required number of 
steps is completed. 

Half knee bends— Feet together, 
hands on hips, knees bent to form 
an angle of about 110 degrees. Do 
not bend knees past a right angle. 
Straighten to upright position, rais- 
ing heel off floor, return to starting 
position each time. 

Keep feet in contact with floor— 
the back upright and straight at 
all times. 



65 



HOW TO SEGfN 



Check your daily schedule and determine the time most convenient 
for you to do the exercises. It should be the same time each day. 
Here are some suggested times: 

— before breakfast; 

— late morning or afternoon, at your place of employment; 

— after your regular recreational period; 

— in the evening just before you retire. 
Regardless of the time you choose START TODAY. 

Maximum Rate of Progression Through Chart 1 According to Age 

20 years or under, at least 1 day at each level 
20-29 years, at least 2 days at each level 
30-39 years, at least 4 days at each level 
40-49 years, at least 7 days at each level 
50-59 years, at least 8 days at each level 
60 years and over, at least 10 days at each level 
(If you feel stiff or sore, or if you are unduly breathless at any 

time, ease up and slow down your rate of progression. This is 

particularly applicable to the older age groups.) 



A Note of Caution 

Even if you feel able to start at a high level and progress at a 
faster rate than indicated— DON'T DO IT— Start at the bottom of 
chart 1 and work up from level to level as recommended. 

For best results from 5BX the exercises must be done regularly. 
Remember, it may take you 6, 8, 10 months or more of daily exercises 
to attain the level recommended for you, but once you have attained it, 
only 3 periods of exercise per week will maintain this level of physical 
capacity. 

If for any reason (illness, etc.) you stop doing 5BX regularly and 
you wish to begin again, do not recommence at the level you had 
attained previously. 

Do drop back several levels — until you find one you can do without 
undue strain. After a period of inactivity of longer than two months, 
or one month if caused by illness, it is recommended that you start 
again at Chart 1 . 



MAKE 5BX A HABIT 



66 



WW t&PffOGKECf 



TO CHARTS 
4, 5 & 6 




CHART 3 

PROGRESS AS 
IN CHARTS 
1 & 2 



CHART 2 

PROGRESS THROUGH ALL 
STEPS OF THIS CHART BEFORE 
MOVING UP TO CHART 3 



CHART 1 

PROGRESS THROUGH ALL 
STEPS OF THIS CHART BEFORE 
MOVING UP TO CHART 2 



Start at the lowest Physical Capacity Level of Chart 1 (D— ). 
Repeat each exercise in the allotted time or do the 5 exercises in 11 
minutes. Move upward on the same chart to the next level (D) only 
after you can complete all the required movements at your present level 
within 1 1 minutes. Continue to progress upward in this manner until you 
can complete all the required movements at level A+ within 1 1 minutes. 
Now start at the bottom of Chart 2 (D— ), and continue in this fashion 
upwards through the levels, and from chart to chart until you reach the 
level for your age group, i.e., age 35-39 (B Chart 3) does 32 levels from 
D- on Chart 1 to B on Chart 3. 



67 



PHYSICAL CAPACITY RATING SCALE CHART 1- 



Level 


EXERCISE 


i 

ran 


1 

Rile 
.walk 


r 


2 


3 


4 


5 


In minutes 


A+ 

A 

A- 


20 


18 


22 


13 


400 


5i 


17 


18 


17 


20 


12 


375 


5i 


17 


16 


15 


18 


11 


335 


H 


17 


B + 

B 

B- 


14 


13 


16 





320 


6 


18 


12 


12 


14 


8 


305 


6 


18 


10 


11 


12 


7 


280 


6 


18 


c+ 

C 
C- 


8 


S 


10 


6 


260 


H 


18 


7 


8 





5 


235 


U 


10 


6 


7 


8 


4 


205 


«i 


19 


D+ 

D 

D- 


4 


5 


6 


3 


175 


7 


20 


3 


4 


5 


3 


145 


7! 


21 


2 


3 


4 


2 


100 





21 


MiiHtts 
lor each 
•xtrcise 


2 


1 


1 


1 


6 







AGE GROUPS 

6 YRS. MAINTAINS B 

7 YRS. MAINTAINS A 



1 Feet astride, arms upward. 

—Forward bend to floor touching 
then stretch upward and backward 
bend. 

—Do not strain to keep knees straight. 

2 Back lying, feet 6" apart, arms at 
sides. 

—Sit up just far enough to see your 
heels. 

—Keep legs straight, head and 
shoulders must clear the floor. 

3 Front lying, palms placed under 
the thighs. 

—Raise head and one leg, repeat 
using legs alternately. 

—Keep leg straight at the knee, 
thighs must clear the palms. 
(Count one each time second leg 
touches floor.) 

4 Front lying, hands under the 
shoulders, palms flat on the floor. 

—Straighten arms lifting upper body, 
keeping the knees on the floor. 
Bend arms to lower body. 

—Keep body straight from the knees, 
arms must be fully extended, chest 
must touch floor to complete one 
movement. 

5 Stationary run- (Count a step each 
time left foot touches floor.) Lift 
feet approximately 4 inches off 
floor. Every 75 steps do 10 
"scissor jumps." Repeat this 
sequence until required number of 
steps is completed. 

Scissor jumps— Stand with right leg 
and left arm extended forward, 
and left leg and right arm extended 
backward. 

Jump up— change position of arms 
and legs before landing. Repeat 
(arms shoulder high). 



68 



CHART 1 



t> 



EXERCISE 1 



EXERCISE 2 



EXERCISE 3 



K. 



EXERCISE 4 



utn 



EXERCISE 5 



69 



J\\\ 



n«\ 






Art* 






PHYSICAL CAPACITY RATING SCALE CHART 2 



Level 


EXERCISE 


1 

mile 
ran 


2 

mile 
walk 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


In minutes 


A+ 

A 

A- 


30 


23 


33 


20 


500 


9 


30 


29 


21 


31 


19 


485 


9 


31 


21 


20 


29 


18 


470 


9 


32 


B+ 

B 

1- 


26 


10 


27 


17 


455 


*§ 


33 


24 


17 


25 


16 


445 


*h 


33 


22 


16 


23 


15 


440 


H 


33 


c+ 
c- 


21 


15 


21 


14 


425 


10 


34 


19 


14 


19 


13 


410 


10 


34 


11 


13 


17 


12 


395 


10 


34 


D+ 

D 

D- 


IS 


12 


15 


11 


380 


10* 


35 


15 


11 


14 


10 


360 


10| 


35 


14 


16 


13 


9 


335 


m 


35 


Miivtts 
tor tKk 

eierttu 


2 


1 


1 


1 


6 







AGE GROUPS 

8 YRS. MAINTAINS D- 

9 YRS. MAINTAINS C- 

10 YRS. MAINTAINS B- 

1 1 YRS. MAINTAINS A- 
45-49 YRS. MAINTAINS A + 
50-60 YRS. MAINTAINS C + 



1 Feet astride, arms upward. 

— Touch floor and press (bounce) 
once then stretch upward and 
backward bend. 



2 Back lying, feet 6" apart, arms at 
sides. 

— "Sit up" to vertical position, keep 
feet on floor even if it is necessary 
to hook them under a chair. 

3 Front lying, palm placed under 
thighs. 

— Raise head, shoulders, and both 
legs. 

— Keep legs straight, both thighs 
must clear the palms. 

4 Front lying, hands under the 
i shoulder, palms flat on floor. 

— Straighten arms to lift body with 
only palms and toes on the floor. 
Back straight 

— Chest must touch floor for each 
completed movement after arms 
have been fully extended. 



5 Stationary run — (count a step 
each time left foot touches floor — 
Lift feet approximately 4 inches 
off floor). After every 75 steps, 
do 10 "astride jumps". Repeat 
this sequence until required num- 
ber of steps is completed. 

Astride jumps — Feet together, arms 
at side. 

Jump and land with feet astride 
and arms raised sideways to slightly 
above shoulder height. Return with 
a jump to the starting position for 
count of one. 

Keep arms straight. 



70 



CHART 2 



t> fr 




EXERCISE 1 



W«^ 



EXERCISE 2 



EXERCISE 3 




EXERCISE 4 



HX"4I? 



EXERCISE 5 



71 



PHYSICAL CAPACITY RATING SCALE 



CHART 3 - 



•ft* 



\l 



,0 



Level 


EXERCISE 


1 

mile 
run 


2 

mile 
walk 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


In minutes 


A+ 

A 

A- 


30 


32 


47 


24 


550 


8 


25 


30 


31 


45 


22 


540 


1 


25 


30 


30 


43 


21 


525 


8 


25 


B+ 
B 


28 


28 


41 


20 


510 


•i 


26 


28 


27 


39 


19 


500 


Bi 


26 


28 


26 


37 


18 


490 


8i 


26 


c+ 

C 
C- 


26 


25 


35 


17 


480 


8* 


27 


26 


24 


34 


17 


465 


H 


27 


26 


23 


33 


16 


450 


H 


27 


D+ 

D 

D- 


24 


22 


31 


15 


430 


H 


28 


24 


21 


30 


15 


415 


•i 


28 


24 


20 


29 


15 


400 


8! 


29 


Minutes 
for each 
exercise 


2 


1 


1 


1 


6 







AGE GROUPS 

12 YRS. MAINTAINS D + 

13 YRS. MAINTAINS C + 

14 YRS. MAINTAINS B + 
35-39 YRS. MAINTAINS B 
40-44 YRS. MAINTAINS C 

FLYING CREW 

40-44 YRS. MAINTAINS A + 
45-49 YRS. MAINTAINS B 



1 Feet astride, arms upward. 
—Touch floor 6" outside left foot, 

again between feet and press once 
then 6" outside right foot, bend 
backward, as far as possible, repeat, 
reverse direction after half the num- 
ber of counts. 

2 Back lying, feet 6" apart, arms 
clasped behind head. 

—Sit up to vertical position, keep 
feet on floor, hook feet under 
chair, etc., only if necessary. 

3 Front lying, hands interlocked 
behind the back. 

—Lift head, shoulders, chest and 
both legs as high as possible. 

—Keep legs straight, and raise chest 
and both thighs completely off 
floor. 

4 Front lying, hands under the 
shoulders, palms flat on floor. 

—Touch chin to floor in front of 
hands— touch forehead to floor 
behind hands before returning to 
up position. 

—There are three definite movements, 
chin, forehead, arms straightened. 
DO NOT do in one continuous 
movement. 

5 Stationary run-( Count a step each 
time left foot touches floor.) Lift 
feet approximately 4 inches off 
floor. After every 75 steps do 10 
"half knee bends." Repeat this 
sequence until required number of 
steps is completed. 

Half knee bends-Feet together, 
hands on hips, knees bent to form 
an angle of about 110 degrees. Do 
not bend knees past a right angle. 

Straighten to upright position, rais- 
ing heel off floor, return to starting 
position each time. 

Keep feet in contact with floor— 
the back upright and straight at 
all times. 



72 



U I I 



CHART 3 



fa fk &0\ 




EXERCISE 1 



L ~w ' 



EXERCISE 2 



EXERCISE 3 




EXERCISE 4 






EXERCISE 5 



73 



PHYSICAL 


CAPACITY RATINC 


1 SCALE 


Level 


EXERCISE 


1 

mile 
nw 


2 
mile 

walk 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


In minutes 


A+ 

A 

A- 


30 


22 


50 


42 


400 


7 


19 


30 


22 


49 


40 


305 


7 


19 


30 


22 


40 


37 


300 


7 


19 


B 


20 


21 


47 


34 


300 


71 


20 


20 


21 


40 


32 


375 


H 


20 


20 


21 


40 


30 


305 


71 


29 


c+ 

c 

c- 


20 


10 


44 


28 


355 


7i 


21 


20 


10 


43 


26 


345 


7* 


21 


20 


10 


43 


24 


335 


7* 


21 


D+ 

D 

D- 


24 


10 


41 


21 


325 


7! 


23 


24 


10 


40 


10 


315 


7f 


23 


24 


10 


40 


T7 


300 


71 


23 


MilDtlS 

fir tick 

exercise 


2 


1 


1 


1 










AGE GROUPS 

15 YRS. MAINTAINS D- 
16-17 YRS. MAINTAINS C + 
25-29 YRS. MAINTAINS A + 
30-34 YRS. MAINTAINS C- 

FLYING CREW 

30-34 YRS. MAINTAINS B 
35-39 YRS. MAINTAINS C- 



74 



CHART 4 - 

1 Feet astride, arms upward. 

—Touch floor outside left foot,, be- 
tween feet, press once then out- 
side right foot, circle bend back- 
wards as far as possible, reverse 
directions after half the number of 
counts. 

—Keep arms above head and make 
full circle, bending backward past 
vertical each time, 

2 Back lying, legs straight, feet 
together, arms straight overhead. 

—Sit up and touch the toes keeping 
the arms and legs straight. Use 
chair to hook feet under only if 
necessary. 

—Keep arms in contact with the 
sides of the head throughout the 
movement. 

3 Front lying, hands and arms 
stretched sideways. 

—Lift head, shoulders, arms, chest 
and both legs as high as possible. 

—Keep legs straight, raise chest and 
both thighs completely off floor. 

4 Front lying, palms of hands flat on 
floor, approximately 1 foot from 
ears directly to side of head. 

—Straighten arms to lift body. 

—Chest must touch floor for each 
completed movement. 

5 Stationary run-( Count a step each 
time left foot touches floor.) Lift 
knees waist high. 

Every 75 steps do 10 "semi-squat 
jumps." 

Repeat this sequence until required 
number of steps is completed. 

Semi-squat jumps— Drop to a half 
crouch position with hands on knees 
and arms straight, keep back as 
straight as possible, right foot 
slightly ahead of left. 

—Jump to upright position with body 
straight and feet leaving floor. Re- 
verse position of feet before land- 
ing. Return to half crouch position 
and repeat. 



CHART 4 





^V 




EXERCISE 1 




EXERCISE 2 




A 





EXERCISE 3 





EXERCISE 4 



r 





{ 



EXERCISE 5 



75 



PHYSICAL CAPACITY RATING SCALE 


Level 


EXERCISE 


1 
nite 
ran 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


Mills : Sits 


A+ 

A 

A- 


38 


48 


58 


44 


506 


6:86 


30 


38 


48 


43 


485 


6:86 


31 


38 


48 


42 


475 


6:88 


1+ 

B 

I- 


21 


36 


47 


48 


465 


6:12 


21 


35 


46 


38 


455 


6:15 


28 


34 


45 


38 


445 


6:21 


c+ 

c 

c- 


26 


32 


44 


36 


435 


6:27 


26 


31 


43 


35 


426 


6:33 


26 


38 


42 


34 


416 


6:38 


D+ 

D 

D- 


24 


28 


41 


32 


486 


6:45 


24 


27 


48 


31 


385 


6:51 


24 


26 


38 


38 


375 


7:88 


Minus 
fir sack 

titrclse 


2 


1 


1 


1 


6 





AGE GROUP 
18-25 YRS. 

FLYING CREW 
UNDER 25 
25-29 YRS. 



MAINTAINS C 

YRS. MAINTAINS B 
MAINTAINS D + 



CHART 5- 

1 Feet astride, arms upward, hands 
clasped, arms straight. 

—Touch floor outside left foot, 
between feet, press once then out- 
side right foot, circle bend back- 
wards as far as possible. 
Reverse direction after half the 
number of counts. 

2 Back lying, legs straight, feet 
together, hands clasped behind 
head. 

—Sit up and raise legs in bent posi- 
tion at same time twist to touch 
right elbow to left knee. This com- 
pletes one movement. 
Alternate the direction of twist each 
time. 

—Keep feet off floor when elbow 
touches knee. 

3 Front lying, arms extended over- 
head. 

—Raise arms, head, chest and both 

legs as high as possible. 
—Keep legs and arms straight, chest 

and both thighs completely off 

floor. 

4 Front lying, hands under shoulder, 
palms flat on floor. 

—Push off floor and clap hands 
before returning to starting position. 

—Keep body straight during the 
entire movement. Hand clap must 
be heard. 

5 Stationary run— (Count a step each 
time left foot touches floor. Lift 
knees waist high.) 

Every 75 steps do 10 "semi-spread 

eagle jumps." 

Repeat this sequence until required 

, number of steps is completed. 

■" Semi-spread eagle jumps— Feet to- 
gether, drop to a half crouch posi- 
tion hands on knees with arms 
straight. 
-Jump up to feet astride swing arms 
overhead in mid-air, return directly 
to starting position on landing. 
-Raise hands above head level, 
spread feet at least shoulder width 
apart in astride position before 
landing with feet together. 



76 



CHART 5 



ftl 





$v 




EXERCISE 1 



%v 



V 



EXERCISE 2 



EXERCISE 3 





M9i 



EXERCISE 4 





EXERCISE 5 



77 



PHYSICAL CAPACITY RATING SCALE 


Level 


EXERCISE 


1 

mile 
ran 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


Mire: Sees 


A+ 

A 

A- 


30 


50 


40 


40 


000 


5:00 


30 


40 


30 


30 


500 


5:03 


30 


47 


30 


30 


555 


5:03 


B+ 

1 

1- 


20 


45 


37 


30 


530 


5:12 


20 


44 


30 


35 


525 


5:10 


20 


43 


35 


34 


515 


5:24 


c+ 

c 

c- 


20 


41 


34 


32 


505 


5:27 


20 


40 


33 


31 


405 


5:33 


20 


30 


32 


30 


405 


5:31 


D+ 

D 

D- 


24 


37 


31 


20 


475 


5:45 


24 


30 


30 


27 


400 


5:51 


24 


35 


20 


20 


451 


0:00 


Mintis 
lir tack 

•xtrcist 


2 


1 


1 


1 








PHYSICAL CAPACITIES IN THIS 
CHART ARE USUALLY FOUND 
ONLY IN CHAMPION ATHLETES. 



CHART 6 — 

1 Feet astride, amis upward, hands 
reverse clasped, arms straight. 

— Touch floor outside left foot, 
between feet, press once then out- 
side right foot, circle bend back- 
wards as far as possible. Reverse 

direction after half the number of 
counts. 

—Keep hands tightly reverse clasped 
at all times. 

2 Back lying, legs straight, feet 
together, arms straight over the 
head. 

— Sit up and at the same time lifting 
both legs to touch the toes in a 
pike (V) position. 

— Keep feet together, legs and arms 
straight, all of the upper back and 
legs clear floor, fingers touch toes 
each time. 

3 Front lying, arms extended over 
head. 

— Raise arms, head, chest and both 

legs as high as possible then press 

back once. 
— Keep legs and arms straight — chest 

and both thighs completely off 

floor. 

4 Front lying, hands under shoulders, 
palms flat on floor. 

— Push off floor and slap chest before 
returning to starting position. 

—Keep body straight during the 
entire movement, chest slap must 
be heard. 

5 Stationary ran — (count a step 
each time left foot touches floor — 
lift knees waist high). 

Every 75 steps do 10 "jack jumps". 

Repeat this until required number 

of steps is completed. 

Jack iumps— Feet together, knees 

bent, sit on heels, finger tips touch 

floor. 
— Jump up, raise legs waist high, keep 

legs straight and touch toes in 

midair. 
—Keep legs straight, raise feet level 

to "standing waist height". Touch 

toes each time. 



78 



CHART 6 



/MA Ik 




EXERCISE 1 




EXERCISE 2 



EXERCISE 3 




EXERCISE 4 



F-k 




#£ 



EXERCISE 5 



79 



Your Physical Capacity Level 

Each age group is given a Physical Capacity level to attain; that is, 
a goal which they should try to reach. 

The Physical Capacity levels in this plan are based on the expecta- 
tion of average individuals. 

With every average, there are individuals who surpass it, and those 
who fall below it. fn terms of the 5BX Plan and the goals, this means 
that there will be some men who are capable of progressing beyond the 
level indicated, and on the other hand, there will be persons who will 
never attain this average level. 

If you feel able to move further through the charts than your Physi- 
cal Capacity level, by all means do so. If, on the contrary, you experience 
great difficulty in approaching this level, you should stop at a level which 
you feel to be within your capability. It is impossible to predict accu- 
rately a level for each individual who uses this program. Use the goals 
as guides, and apply them with common sense. 



Here are a few tips: 

When you start, defeat the first desire to skip a day; then defeat 
all such desires as they occur. This exercise program has plenty 
of bite; the longer you do it the more you will enjoy it. 

As you progress well into the program you may find certain 
levels almost impossible to complete in 11 minutes— work hard at 
that level— it may take some days or even weeks— then suddenly you 
will find yourself sailing ahead again. 

Counting the steps in exercise 5 can be difficult. You can lose 
count very easily at times. If you have this problem, here is an easy 
way to overcome it. Divide the total number of steps required by 
75 and note the answer— place a row of buttons, corresponding in 
number to this answer, on a handy table or chair. Now count off 
your first 75 steps— do your ten required movements— and move the 
first button. Repeat until all the buttons have been removed, finishing 
up with any left over steps. 8 

For diversity, occasionally an exercise from the previous chart 
may be substituted. 

80 

Printed in Canada 



^m 




Physical fitness makes 
us work better, look better, 
and feel better. All of us 
should have enough self-dis- 
cipline tc spend a few minutes 
each day exercising. The 
RCAForogram is an excel- 
lent method of attaining and 
maintaining fitness." 



Charles B. Wilkinson 

Consultant to the President 
on Youth Fitness 



POCKET BOOKS, INC. PUBLISHERS 

630 FIFTH AVENUE, NEW YORK 20, NEW YORK