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Full text of "Scientific Papers - Vi"

1917]
AND ON THE THEORY OF FOUCAULT's TEST
467
the alternatives following the sign of 6 — (f), with exclusion of the case <f> = 0. If 0 is finite, 2 Si (<££) may be equated to TT, and we get
/ = 47r2 (1 or 0),
according as 9 — <£ is positive or negative.    But if <£ = 0 absolutely, Si ($£) disappears, however great f may be ; and when $ is small,
I = 47r2 cos" p '+ 4 sin2 p {2 Si (<££)}2, in which the value of the second term is uncertain, unless indeed sin p = 0.
It would seem that the difficulty depends upon the assumed discontinuity of R when 9 = 0. If the limits for 6 be + a (up to the present written as ħ 6), what we have to consider is
+ 00
r  r+a.
sn     -
in which hitherto we have taken first the integration with respect to 0. We propose now to take first the integration with respect to £, introducing the factor eħ^ to ensure convergency. We get
2 sin (T - R)
cos (0 + c/>)
. . .(33)
There remains the integration with respect to 0, of which R is supposed to be a continuous function. As /x tends to vanish, the only values of 0 which contribute are confined more and more to the neighbourhood of — <p, so that ultimately we may suppose 0 to have this value in R. And
u,d6
tan"
— tan"1
which is TT, if ^> lies between + a, and 0 if </> lies outside these limits, when /A is made vanishing small. The intensity in any direction 0 is thus independent of R altogether. This procedure would fail if R were discontinuous for any values of 0.
Resuming the suppositions of equation (31), let us now further suppose that the aperture extends from £ to £2, where both |x and £2 are positive and & > fi- Our expression for the vibration in direction 0 becomes
sin T [cos -p {Si (0 + </>) % + Si (0 - 0) f }
+ sin p {2 Ci (0£) - Ci (0 + <£) | - Ci (0 - </>) £}]g
+ cos T[cos p {Ci (0 - £) f - Ci (61 + 0) £}
......... (34)
We will apply this to the case already considered where £20 = 500, £0 = TT ; and since we are now concerned mainly with what occurs in the neighbourhood of ^ = 0, we may confine <j> to lie between the limits 0 and £0. Under these circumstances, and putting minor rapid fluctuations out of account, we may
30—2the maximum illumination near the edges is some 6 times that at the centre.n unity. Under the same conditions the Ci's in (21) may be omitted, so that