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Full text of "Sigma Phi Epsilon Journal"


Kotter 

congratulates 

SigEp for 

working to , 



* 



9m 



2009 Citation incipient and 

1 Ian -<ird JjL-atiui'shin Aiiltaitv 

John Hotter. MITW 



page 23 



RLC at Oklahoma State: 

Beyond the "sizzle" 

page 7 

Are we diverse? 

page 25 

Astronaut helps 

preserve space 

telescope 

page 29 

2008 Educational 
Foundation Report 



From the Grand President 




What about your mark? 
Will you be proud? 



Garry Kief, Southern 
California 70, is the 
President and CEO of 
STILETTO Entertainment, an 
international entertainment 
company that produces, 
manages and markets 
hundreds of concerts, 
theatrical productions, TV 
programs and live events 
throughout the world. For 
17 years, eight as president, 
he has served as a trustee 
of the Sigma Phi Epsilon 
Educational Foundation. 
In 1999 he was elected to 
the National Board of 
Directors. Kief received the 
Sigma Phi Epsilon Citation 
in 2005. While at USC, Kief 
served as president of the 
Class of 1970, and was 
inducted into Knights and 
Skull & Dagger. He lives in 
Malibu. 



See Garry Kief's 
Grand President 
acceptance speech at 
vvvvw.sigepcondave.com. 



I'm on a flight from London to Los Angeles. We left two 
hours late. We're hitting head winds. It's going to be a 
long night. 

With the lights off and everyone else asleep, it's a 
perfect time to catch up on paperwork and email. Maybe 
I'll even tweet Archie. 

Every few days I receive a status report from our 
Headquarters Staff in Richmond. From Day One, I asked 
that they include the good, the bad, and the ugly. 

Fortunately, most of it is good. 

At chapters across the country, our brothers are 
leaving their mark by welcoming more new brothers 
than ever before. Their GPAs are up, their resumes are 
impressive, and they are all great guys. 

So far... in my visits to chapters in California and 
Washington, D.C., I've met many of these future SigEps 
who we all will be proud to call brother. Quite a few are 
here because they heard about something called a 
Balanced Man Scholarship. And their first big event at 
their new school is a Balanced Man Scholarship Dinner. 
They were both impressed and impressive. 

To our really smart chapters, they know that it 
doesn't matter if they are BMP... or non-BMP. Either 
way... the Balanced Man Scholarships and the Balanced 
Man Dinner have become a great program to meet 
incoming students, recognize new scholars, and recruit 
outstanding brothers. 

As part of my welcome to our Fraternity, I often share 
our history as leading the way in diversity, scholarship, 
sound mind, sound body, and living a balanced life. I tell 
them about SigEps willing to be different, to go against 
the tide, and to have the courage and conviction to stand 
behind their decisions. And as I share that history, I can 
always feel the room swell with pride as I list the contro- 
versial subjects that SigEp has dealt with, embraced, 
and championed. 

As I tell them... I also remind myself... we have some 
pretty big shoes to fill. 

Sometimes I wonder if twenty years from now, SigEps 
will look back at this era and swell with pride at the steps 
we are taking. Will they brag about our innovations in 



housing, in truly embracing diversity, in finally elimi- 
nating hazing, in partnering with higher education, in 
welcoming volunteers, in engaging modern communi- 
cation, in having a positive impact on our world, in 
being balanced leaders? 

Will they brag that we not only took credit for the good 
but also took responsibility for the bad and the ugly? 
Will they brag that we finally acknowledged that we have 
some problem children and finally resolved our differ- 
ences with obnoxious frat boys who make us cringe when 
we read the morning paper? Or will they be embarrased 
because we couldn't wait for the story to fade away? 

Will they be proud that we built on the foundation left 
to us by Ruck, and McCleary, and Carlson, and White, 
and Tragos, and so many more? 

I wonder if they'll look back and think we really left 
our mark. 

And I wonder what they'll think about you? 

What about you? 

Will you look back with pride at your Sig Ep Experience? 

Will you be proud that you left your chapter stronger? 

Will you be proud that you left your chapter with a 
better GPA, a diverse membership, a Residential Learning 
Community, brothers who will be your friends for the 
rest of your life and traditions that you will be honored to 
share with your son? 

Will you be proud to tell your kids what you did in your 
Fraternity? That you took the wealth of riches available 
to you and ran with them; that you became a man, a 
balanced man? 

The programs are there. 

The resources are there. 

Take them. 

Run with them. 

Leave your mark. 

And next flight. . .1 hope to find your name in the file 
marked "Good." 

f 




GARRYKIEF 

Grand President 



In this issue: 




John Kotter was one of three Citation 
recipients and five Order of the Golden Heart 
recipients to be honored at the 51st Grand 
Chapter Conclave in Orlando. In his remarks, 
Kotter moved the audience when he 
congratulated them on their contribution to 
leadership, service and learning. 



CHAPTERS 



4 Red Door Notes 

Stetson renovates RLC 
space I Vermont AVC 
undertakes two improve- 
ments on historic house I 
Massachusetts adds 
industrial kitchen I East 
Carolina members 
escape fire 

7 Academics 

RLC at Oklahoma State: 
Beyond the "sizzle" 

8 Phi Beta Kappa 
Wheelhouse 

9 SigEp 
Champions 

10 Chapter News 

Internship offers real 
world experience 

18 Varsity Scholar 
Athletes 

Scholar Athlete focus: 
Patrick Bloomstine, 
John Carroll '09 




Grand Chapter Conclave 2009 

22 Over 1,300 SigEps honor and inspire each 
other to leave their mark 

23 Alumni dedicate countless hours to 
Fraternity, humanity 

By STEVE DORSEY, American '09 

50 years since member restrictions were removed 

25 Are we diverse? 

By RYAN SUGDEN, Wisconsin '06 

2008 Educational Foundation Report: 

34 New Foundation President appreciates 
brotherhood in tough times 



By DONALD W. HUDLER, Ohio Wesleyan '56 
President, Educational Foundation 



SigEp Journ* 



Fall 2009 Issue • Volume 107, Number 1 

www.sigep.org • (804) 353-1901 
The SigEp Journal is published by Sigma Phi Epsilo 
founded in 1901. for the undergraduates and alumn 



November 1; Summer: March 1; Fall: July 1 

The Journal welcomes all submissions. Decisions to publish 
material we receive is based on the sole discretion of the 
editorial staff. 



DEPARTMENTS 



2 Commentary 
6 Wellness 
29 Alumni News 




48 In Memoriam 

Florida mourns loss of Hendon 



SigEp Stringers: the Journal field reporters 



Thomas Baudendistel, Cincinnati '11 
Steve Dorsey, American '09 
Tim Forman, Oklahoma State '08 
Zach Germaniuk, Ohio State '09 
Joshua Gutierrez, California State- 
San Bernardino '09 
Richard Higham-Kessler, Emory '09 
Thomas B. Jelke, Ph.D., Florida 
International '90 

Benjamin Y. Lowe, Columbia '01 
Michael D. McDowell, Nevada- 
Reno '03 



Salvatore A. Moschelli, Lawrence 

Tech '00 

Erin Mullally, Michigan State '99 
Patrick Murphrey, Christopher 

Newport '05 

Brian Rapien, Cincinnati '10 
Will Robinson, Duke '11 
Michael Selby, Eastern Michigan '02 
Brian Shawn, North Dakota '02 
Ryan Sugden, Wisconsin '06 
Kevin Teets, Tennesee-Martin '06 
Trey Wydysh, Richmond '07 



ADVERTISING: Advertising is accepted in half page or full 
page increments as space allows. Deadlines for artwork ai 
as follows: Spring: December 1; Summer: April 1; Fall: 
August 1. For ad specifications, please contact Director of 
Marketing Communications Aaron Granger, 
aaron.granger@sigep.net. 



The SigEp Journal 

Executive Editor 

Doug Scheibe, Kansas State '87 
Managing Editor 

Gay-Lynn Carpenter 
Art direction 

Propolis Design Group 

2009-2011 National Board of 

Directors 

Grand President 

Garry C. Kief, 

Southern California '70 
Grand Treasurer 
Chris Bittman, Colorado '85 
Grand Secretary 
Bert Harris, Florida '70 
National Director 
Richard W. Bennet, III, Central 

Missouri '74 
National Director 
Phillip A. Cox, Indiana '84 
National Director 
Thomas B. Jelke, Florida 

International '90 
National Director 
Billy Maddalon, North Carolina 

State '90 
National Director 
Shawn McKenna, Maine '77 
Student National Director 
Zach Barilleau, Louisiana State '10 
Student National Director 
Matthew Eisen, Yale '10 
Student National Director 
Adam Motycka, Toledo '10 



Fraternity Staff 
Interim Executive Director 

Doug Scheibe, Kansas State '87 
Chapter Operations 
Director of Operations 
Brian C. Warren, Virginia '04 
Senior Director of Chapter Services 
Sean M. Anthony, Dartmouth '06 
Director of Chapter Services (West) 
Michael Repasky, Ohio State '08 
Director of Chapter Services (East) 
Justin T. Motika, San Diego State 

'08 

Regional Directors 
Jordan Bronston, Minnesota '09 
Mitch Goldrich, Lehigh '09 
Michael Guentner, Western 

Michigan '09 

Greg Hogan, James Madison '09 
Justin Kleiderer, Texas-Austin '09 
Andrew Lemens, Drake '08 
Sean Mittelman, Ohio State '09 
Mark Nagel, Minnesota '09 
Jonathan Shoemaker, WPI, '09 
Clayton Simons, Texas 

Christian '09 
Brady Wolfe, Drake '09 
Director of New Chapter Development 
Ryan C. Dressier, Ohio State '08 
Director of New Chapter Development 
James D. Oliver, James 

Madison '08 

Chapter Services Coordinator (West) 
Morgan L. Maclin 
Chapter Services Coordinator (East) 
Donna B. Jarvis 



Director of Risk Management 

Kathryn E. Johnston 

Administrative Coordinator 

Karen A. Simpson 

Programs 

Program Director 

Stacy K. Dudley 

Director of Leadership Development 

Jacob P. Wick, Indiana '08 

Director of Programs, New Members 

and Volunteers 
Ryan P. Blanck, Western 

Michigan '02 
Director of Learning Communities and 

Member Development 
Charles "Chad" North, Bucknell '06 
Communications 

Director of Marketing Communications 
Aaron V. Granger 
Accounting 
Controller 
Julie W. Ross 
Finance Director 
Susan L. Williams 
Technology 
Director of Technology 
P. Sean Leahey, George Mason '96 
Database Administrator 
Tesa M. VonBurg 
Administrative Coordinator 
Debbie H. Hunt 



Educational Foundation 

Trustees 

President 

Donald W. Hudler, Ohio 
Wesleyan '56 
Vice President of Programs 

Garry C. Kief, 
Southern California '70 
Vice President of Grants 

Arthur J. Hurt III, Davidson '88 

Treasurer 

Mark W. Davis, Nebraska '90 

Secretary 

Scott H. Bice, Southern 

California '65 
Trustees 

Scott A. Baxter, Buffalo State '84 
Ryan M. Brennan, Truman 

State '95 

James L. Clayton, Tennessee '57 
Jeffery L. Johnson, Colorado '89 
Troy Queen, Florida '96 
Doug Scheibe, Kansas State '87 
Bobby S. Shackouls, 

Mississippi State '72 
William G. Tragos, Washington in 

St. Louis '56 

Educational Foundation Staff 
Executive Director 

Douglas D. Scheibe, Kansas 

State '87 

Development Director 
Joseph M. Baird, Florida 

Atlantic '07 
Development Director 
Sean C. Cosgrove, Cincinnati '05 
Gift & Grant Administrator 
Susan A. Ilch 



Development Administrator for 
Chapter Campaigns 

Mindi Seidel-Adler 
Director of Chapter Campaigns 
E. Scott Thompson II, Southern 

Mississippi '99 
Development Administrator for Annual 

& Special Campaigns 
Laurie B. Ursiny 

SigEp National Housing, LLC 

Directors 

President 

Bert J. Harris III, Florida '74 
Secretary-Treasurer (Interim) 

Douglas D. Scheibe, Kansas 
State '87 



Clark H. Byrum Sr., Indiana '57 
Timothy J. Harmon, 

Washington '82 

Jonathan J. Kucera, Virginia '69 
Kenneth S. Maddox, Oregon 

State '75 

Shawn McKenna, Maine '77 
Murl R. Richardson Jr., 

Texas A & M '76 
John D. Weir, Purdue '01 

SigEp National Housing, LLC 
Managing Director 

Christopher M. McCaw, 
Appalachian State '03 
Director of Real Estate 
Jessica L. Faison 
Accountant 
Melia B. Hoyle 
Administrative Coordinator 
Jan R. Brammer 



District Governors (by district) 

1: Brian P. Tahmoush, Miami '90 
2: David L. Middlemiss, 

Syracuse '91 
3: Timothy R. Swift, Babson '96 
6: Joseph W. Langella Jr., 

Connecticut '83 
7: Paul J. Miller, Thiel '69 
10: Steven B. Chaneles, 

Connecticut '83 
11: Chad H. Carlson, Baylor '95 
12: Gary W. Adkins, Morehead '74 
13: Marcus P. Robinson, 

Dayton '99 
14: Salvatore A. Moschelli, 

Lawrence Tech '00 
15. David T. Bertorello, 

Evansville '89 
16: Bradley C. Nahrstadt, 

Monmouth '89 
17: David M. McLaughlin, 

Minnesota '92 
18: John W. Hartman, 

Missouri '61 
19: Jeffrey C. Gates, Wichita '89 
20: Daniel W. McVeigh, Texas 

Wesleyan '90 
21: William H. McCausland, 

Texas '83 
22: Joseph A. Montana Jr., 

Daemen '90 
23: William C. Tucker, 

Colorado '85 
24: Steven R. Ruttner, 

Washington '79 
25: James Amen, Cal State- 
Sacramento '96 
26: David Calderon, Cal-Poly 

Pomona '88 
Vacant districts are not listed. 



Commentary 



Brother responds to 
Connecticut closing article* 

Dear Chris: 

While our paths may have crossed only 
briefly on campus, your article rekindled my 
own passionate feelings about brotherhood 
and the deep feelings of despair that came 
with the closing of my chapter— your 
chapter— at Connecticut. 

I won't speculate about the events after my 
graduation, but everyone can see the lasting 
effects of bad decisions, misjudgments, and in 
retrospect, the 
mismanagement that 
must have marked the 
last several years. I 
feel compelled to 
blame someone, some 
people, or some 
institution for our 
problems. While 
many have played a 
role in this saga, I 
blame myself and my 
brothers, more than 
any other group, for 
this tragedy. Why? 
Because we knew 
better. We invented 
"knowing better" on 
the Storrs Campus. 
After leading consecutive 100-man chapters, 
winning two Buchanan Cups, multiple Greek 
Weeks and a slew of other accolades, 
something happened. We graduated, often 
with multiple opportunities on Wall Street, in 
engineering or in banking. It was a completely 
different time, a completely different place. 
And we felt BIG. In our hubris, we assumed 




Richard Vogel, Connecticut '87 



that our past would be prologue for our 
younger brothers. In the smallest parts of our 
mind, we assumed that the gravitational pull 
of the road we had followed would be so strong 
as to cast a spell on the brothers who would 
follow. Same Fraternity. Same values. Same 
aspirations. Same opportunities. No other 
outcome possible. 

What idiots we were. What an idiot I am. 
What a narcissistic and naive bunch of 22- 
year-olds. With a few remarkable exceptions 
(giant names that you'd know if you were 
there), we didn't pay attention to what was 
going on behind us. We couldn't find the time 
to get fully involved, give young brothers the 
benefit of our experiences; we couldn't 
understand why they might have a different 
point of view. Our way was proven. It worked, 
so it must be right. 

Chris, your article is brilliant in the lessons 
that it tries to teach and brilliant in its attempt 
to save others from this fate. The demise of 
this once great, once dominant, once right- 
minded, once welcoming, once proud 
institution of brotherhood and growth is a 
real-life example of how alumni can radically 
change the lives of others. I'll never know who 
I might have helped or in what way that might 
have made the world just a little better place. 
My alumni brothers (stellar exceptions aside) 
and I failed in our mission to serve and guide 
the brothers behind us. That disappointment 
will be with many of us forever. Thank you for 
writing about it. 

RICHARD VOGEL, Connecticut '87 

* Lessons from Pericles and Lincoln: An oration for 
SigEp at Connecticut by Chris Albert in Spring 2009, 
page 20. 




"The demise of this once great, once dominant, once right-minded, 
once welcoming, once proud institution of brotherhood and 
growth is a real-life example of how alumni can radically change 
the lives of others. "-richard vogel 



Michael Lembach, Northern Colorado '65 

Fundraising steps work 
wonders 

You are going to love this, I suspect. 

The spring edition of the Journal was excellent 
as usual. 

The story that captured my imagination was on 
the chapter that raised $400,000+ to fund ongoing 
endowments of $20,000 per annum, probably in 
perpetuity. I was amazed at the simple numbers 
involved and saved it in my "great ideas" file. 

I attended a heated board meeting of my 
financially struggling lawn bowling club, where I 
serve as a financial advisor. The 80-year-old 
Kensington Bowling Club, like many in Sydney, is 
faced with declining membership, falling 
revenues, and increasing liabilities for deferred 
maintenance, as well as higher ongoing operating 
costs; yet the club is loved by its 100 active 
members, myself included. 

I recalled the three-step fundraising process 
and did some quick calculations. If we could 
convince 60 of our group to commit $25 a month 
for 36 months, as the SigEp endowment process 
defines it, the club would raise some $54,000. We 
could meet our impending liabilities and have a 
few dollars to spare. 

The "boys on the board" were ecstatic when I 
proposed this. 

So, yet another benefit has been derived from 
my nearly 50-year association with the men of 
Sigma Phi Epsilon. I am delighted and very 
thankful that I make it a practice to read the 
Journal from cover to cover. 

MICHAEL LEMBACH, Northern Colorado '65 



Tourette's: What Makes You Tfc? 




t'.M-iosj ■( O C D 



Marc Elliot, Washington in St. Louis '08 
2 SIGEP JOURNAL Fall 2009 



U Online Journal Extras! 

Throughout the Journal, you'll see this icon that lets you know about online 
extras from the Journal at www.sigep.org/journal. Keep an eye out for it. 
Here's an example: Marc Elliot, Washington in St. Louis '08, is on a mission. He 
has Tourette's syndrome, a neurological condition that causes him to twitch 
and make sounds he can't control. He has been speaking across the country 
on tolerance and acceptance, and he shared his story at the Orlando Con- 
clave. Link to an amazing 10-minute documentary about his experience and 
his message on www.sigep.org/journal. Look for "What makes you tic?" 



A father appreciates how SigEp 
has helped his son grow 

Richard Russell, father of Sean Russell, Evansville 
'09, and a member of Phi Kappa Tau, wrote to Interim 
Executive Director Doug Scheibe about his son's 
SigEp experience. An excerpt is below: 

I am writing this letter for the benefit of all 
prospective parents who may have doubts 
about their son pledging a fraternity, and 
particularly, Sigma Phi Epsilon. I have watched 
my son mature and grow into a well rounded, 
level headed young adult. In his initial weeks at 
college in 2005, he met several SigEp brothers 
and started the formal rush period, choosing 
SigEp over Phi Kappa Tau and Sigma Alpha 
Epsilon. He totally embraced the Fraternity 
and immediately 
began assuming 
leadership roles for 
various projects, 
eventually being 
elected Vice President 
in 2008. 

I have met many of 
the brothers at this 
chapter and have one 
common thought 
about this group— 
they genuinely like 
each other in spite of 
their differences, and 
they get along very 
well. I have attended 
some of their 
functions and always 
felt welcome and, in 
fact, part of their 
brotherhood. My own 
chapter of Phi Kappa 
Tau recently had 
their 40th anniver- 
sary, and my own 
brothers were struck 
by the SigEps' caring 
attitude toward me 
and my friends who 
attended the ceremonies. We were sitting by 
ourselves at the basketball game, making 
noise of course, and the SigEps came up to us, 
made us follow them to sit in the student 
section, and we cheered together as the Aces 
won the game. 

You hear about all the bad things in Greek 
life. I am very impressed with this chapter and 
am very proud to call my son a SigEp alumni. 
His experience was outstanding, and I wish to 
thank your organization for living up to your 
ideals and providing an excellent environment 
for student growth and success. I am sure he 
will continue his brotherly ties in his life and 
will always wear the skull and cross bones 
with pride. 

RICHARD RUSSELL 




Richard, left, and Sean Russell 

"I wish to thank 
your organiza- 
tion for living 
up to your ideals 
and providing 
an excellent 
environment 
for student 
growth and 
success" 





r'\^ %!|P«W 



Left to right: Texas Alpha Brothers Michael Cosby, '07, Graham McCall, '07, Jason DeVinny, '07, and Charlie Johns '07, became 
a band of brothers against DeVinny's testicular cancer. His mom is grateful and believes their support sustained her son 
through the battle. 

Brotherhood helps son bear and survive cancer 

To Erin Mullally: 

My response to your article entitled "Two brothers survive testicular cancer," in Fall 2008 is late. 
My son, Jason DeVinny, Texas-Austin '07, was diagnosed with testicular cancer in January of 
2008. Jason lived with Brad Neff, '05, and Ryan 



Puckett, '05, in Denver. The guys had played 
football on New Year's Day and Jason felt a 
soreness in his testicle. The next day he went to 
the emergency room in Boulder, Colorado and 
was diagnosed with the "Big C". He had the 
testicle removed and had 20 chemotherapy 
sessions to kill a lymph node in his stomach. 
The great news is, 17 months later, he 
continues to test "cancer free." 

My idea of responding to you was your 
article (Two Brothers Survive Testicular 
Cancer, p. 6) is about brotherhood. As the 
chemo affected his hair loss, Brad and Ryan 
shaved their heads to match Jason. Both guys were very supportive of Jason in the four-month 
ordeal. Other brothers came to see him and were in constant contact. The tremendous outpour- 
ing of support from the SigEps was very important in Jason's recovery. 

It is so important for these guys to do a self check just like women do a breast check. Thanks 
so much. 

CAROL DEVINNY 




Sigma Phi Epsilon continues 
to encourage undergradu- 
ates and alumni to perform a 
monthly self exam for 
testicular cancer. For more 
information on how to 
perform the exam, go to the 
Testicular Cancer Resource 
Network at www.tc- 
cancer.com/selfexam.html. 



Army captain credits SigEp for " 

William G. Tragos, Washington in St. Louis '56 
wrote to Mason Ward, Cincinnati '06, to thank him 
for his donation earmarked for the Tragos Quest to 
Greece. In the excerpt below, Mason responds and 
explains what inspired him to make his pledge. 

Bill, 

I appreciate you 
taking the time to 
write this note. 

I think my coming 
back to the States 
after spending eight 
months in Afghani- 
stan has motivated 
me to donate more 
than anything. What 
the last eight months 
has proven to me is 
the worth that my 
fraternity experience in SigEp, as well as the 
Leadership Continuum, has given me in my 




best leadership training" 

career leading Soldiers in combat. SigEp's 
experience has helped me save countless 
lives and lead my men safely and proudly. I 

tell my men often that the best leadership 
training I ever received that I employ in 
combat was not in military training, but as 
chapter president of my Fraternity. Motivating 
men to do things they do want to or think they 
are capable of.. .that is what a chapter 
president and Infantry Platoon Leader do. No 
doubt my experience will be worth many more 
of my donations into the future as well. 

The references to the Greeks in your email 
were great, in particular, "they never believed 
they should just hide away and think, Aristotle 
demanded action from their smart thinking." I 
am an action man myself, and couldn't have 
put it better myself. I hope that I may continue 
to represent Sigma Phi Epsilon through action 
of leading men in our Army. 

MASON WARD, Cincinnati '06 



COMMENTARY 




Red Door Notes 



The red door on SigEp chapter houses started at Syracuse University in 1928. 
While not the only factor in a high performing chapter, well appointed chapter 
facilities establish the foundation for creating the right experience through 
efforts like the Balanced Man Program and Residential Learning Communities. 



Vermont Gamma — 
University of Vermont 



Ml 



aim i " mm 



Florida Beta — Stetson University 






Vermont's snow-covered facade is fitting for this 
historic house. 



i Vermont Gamma 
recently received and 
installed a Preserva- 
tion Burlington 
Historic Building 
Marker indicating , 
that the house was 
built in 1881-1882. 
The local marble 
industrialist who 
built it installed 
many magnificent 
marble fireplaces. 
The house is located 

in Burlington's 

& i 

historic district two 

blocks from thriving 



downtown Burlington, 
Vermont's largest 
city, and two blocks 
from the university's 
campus green. 

The chapter has 41 
undergraduates and 
enjoyed a successful 
new member 
program for the 
academic year. 
Twenty members 
will live in the house 
in fall 2009. 

From the cupola of 
the house are 



beautiful views of ■ 
Lake Champlain 
and the Adirondack 
mountains in 
New York. 

i The Alumni and 
Volunteer Corporation 
(AVC), revitalized in 
the past year, 
includes Brian 
Bertsch, '02, John 
Broscious, '04, Ryan 
Cook, '02, Tom ■ 

Donohue, '66, Ken 
McGuckin, '66, 
Steve Waltien, '70, 
and Jared Waite, '01. 

i The AVC is under- 
taking two improve- 
ment projects to the 
house: refurbishment 
of the downstairs 
chapter/piano rooms 
and renovation of the 
upstairs bathroom. 

i Vermont, chartered 
in 1791, is the fifth 
oldest university in 
New England. 



The house, owned by 
the university, was 
renovated along with 
all Greek housing on 
campus last year. 
Members of SigEp 
took advantage of 
this opportunity to 
markedly improve 
their facility and 
moved in for the 
spring semester. 

The project cost 
$40,000 beyond the 
university's basic 
renovation, half of 
which was dedicated 
to a Residential 
Learning Community 
(RLC) space. The 
Educational Founda- 
tion committed $8,000 
for the project, with 
an additional $4,000 
available if the 
chapter met certain 
benchmarks. Chapter 
alumni donated at 
least $7,000 for the 
cause and the chapter 
withdrew $17,850 from 




Natural light, sturdy seating and small meeting space 
make this setting ideal for academic and chapter work. 



their Chapter i 

Investment Fund to 
cover the rest. Stetson 
tapped into multiple 
sources for funding. 

i SigEp was the only 
fraternal organiza- 
tion allowed to alter 
their renovation i 

blueprints from the 
university's "cookie 
cutter" design. This 
gave the chapter the 
ability to section 
off a portion of their 
main common room 
as residential 
learning space. 



The renovated 
educational space 
includes a study area 
and faculty fellow 
space for their newly 
recruited faculty 
volunteer, Dr. 
Elizabeth Heins. 

The chapter has also 
made significant 
strides in volunteer 
recruitment and 
recently gained a 
chapter counselor 
and Balanced Man 
steward. 



Massachusetts Alpha — University of Massachusetts 



i Over the past three i 
years, Massachusetts 
has undergone 
several phased 
renovations 
including the 
bathrooms, windows 
and other facility 
repairs costing about 
$300,000. 

i In the past year, 
exciting additions 
have been completed 
to a new study room 
and kitchen/dining 
room facility. 



The study room, 
funded by a grant 
from the Educational 
Foundation and with 
the help of a few 
parents, was 
completed last April. 
It has six individual 
work spaces, which 
create the best 
environment for 
brothers to study 
and complete school 
assignments. 



i A center conference 
table enables 
brothers to collabo- 
rate on projects, the 
executive board and 
committees to meet, 
or alumni to present. 
An overhead 
projector, wireless 
internet and wireless 
printer provide the 
technology for these 
group activities. 



i The original kitchen 
and dining room 
were demolished 
and renovations 
were completed 
last September, 
representing the 
largest project to 
date. The modern 
kitchen allows the 
chapter chef to 
prepare meals and 
provides plenty of 
room for storage. 




Soup's on in the new industrial kitchen at Massachusetts 



i The dining room has i 
a built-in serving line 
and drink station 
with seating for 80. 



A breakfast nook 
provides brothers 
with a place to make 
breakfast and enjoy 
leftovers on 
weekends. 



SIGEP JOURNAL Fall 2009 



East Carolina members 
escape house fire 



By MIKE UPCHURCH, East Carolina 89 

Fraternity Fire: frightening 
words that can lead to tragic 
outcomes if you aren't prepared. 
In the case of East Carolina, all 
students survived a fire that 
completely destroyed one of two 
facilities owned by the chapter. 

At approximately 6:20 a.m., on 
January 30, 2009, neighbor David 
Perry was enjoying his morning 
walk when he noticed smoke 
billowing out of the porch area of 
the "back house," and immedi- 
ately alerted the residents. By 
6:23 a.m., the fire alarm system, 
hard-wired to the university and 
Greenville city safety systems, 
was blaring. 

As terrified students tried to 
escape the smoke and flames, 
some could only jump from 
second story windows. 

Perry helped guide them 
through the smoke as they at- 
tempted to land on the hoods of 
cars to break their fall. In less 
than five minutes, 13 students 



escaped; they had no time to save 
anything but the clothes they 
were wearing. They lost a beloved 
pet dog, all of their possessions in 
the house, and three cars that 
were parked near the building. By 
6:27 a.m. the Greenville fire 
department was on the scene and 
spent four hours extinguishing 
the blaze. The fire has been ruled 
accidental and electrical in 
nature. 

Thanks to the amazing commu- 
nity response, all students had 
living arrangements within a few 
days. East Carolina, the Red 
Cross, Interfraternity Confer- 
ence, students and alumni have 
worked together to supply cloth- 
ing, textbooks and other 
necessities. The students must 
replace their laptops and per- 
sonal belongings. Chapter 
President Ryan Harris, '10, was 
quoted in the Daily Reflector the 
day of the fire: "Right now, every- 
body is in shock. I think it will 




Out of the ashes, East Carolina's new, 
improved chapter facility was rebuilt by the 
start of this academic year. 



take some time for them to absorb 
everything. We'll take it all one 
step at a time." 

The Alumni and Volunteer 
Corporation worked with many 
alumni, undergraduates, the 
Greenville Historical Preserva- 
tion Commission and others to 
rebuild the house. According to 
board member Matt Chance, '88, 
"Thanks to the broad support we 
received and focused diligence, 
the back house was rebuilt and 
ready for students to occupy in 
time for the fall 2009 semester. An 
unexpected benefit is that having 
a brand new house attracted a lot 
of interest, and we had the largest 




The house and its contents were completely 
destroyed while its inhabitants escaped 
injury. A passing neighbor saved the day. 



new member group on campus 
this fall." 

David Perry, a teacher at J.H. 
Rose High School, continues to 
walk by the site daily, no doubt 
musing that his timing turned an 
otherwise ordinary day into his 
opportunity to save lives. 



" Thanks to the broad support we received and 
focused diligence, the back house was rebuilt 
and ready for students to occupy in time for the 
fall 2009 semester."- 



- MATT CHANCE, '88 



Preventing traqedv 














Conduct a fire safety 
inspection. This is 


owner's policy to see 
f they have coverage 


Carolina is mandating 
installation by 2013 or 


pered; but somehow 
things worked out 






Ensure you have a 


fraternity and sorority 


required and con- 


and obtain renter's 


the organization will 


well. The house is 


hardwired alarm. 


houses to submit a 


ducted by city fire 


nsurance if it doesn't 


not be recognized. 


in a residential 


Ours allowed 


written evacuation 


officials in Greenville 


exist. An unfortunate 


These rules are the 


neighborhood, and 


firefighters to be on 


and fire life safety 


and is usually per- 


mpact of the fire is 


result of a 1996 fire 


the chapter has 


the scene in four 


plan annually. You 


formed as the fall 


that most of the resi- 


at North Carolina's 


worked for many 


minutes and the 


should have one. 


semester begins. An 


dents will have to 


Phi Gamma Delta 


years to build neigh- 


occupants to escape 


Include contingencies 


inspection can help 


replace laptops, 


house that sadly re- 


bor and community 


in less than five 


if escape routes are 


you identify risks 


clothing and all other 


sulted in five deaths. 


support. Get to 


minutes. 


blocked. 


such as overloaded 


personal items out of 


The chapter is slated 


know your neigh- 


Have an escape plan 


Practice the plan. The 


circuits and blocked 


their pockets. 


to have its system in 


bors, be a good 


and equipment. Two 


chapter conducted 


escape routes. 


nstall a sprinkler 


place by this summer. 


steward of your 


escape ladders were 


bi-annual fire drills, 


Check your insurance. 


system. North Caro- 


Simply put, sprinklers 


property, and excel 


available and each 


however in the after- 


The rules vary by 


ina mandated that all 


save lives. 


at citizenship in the 


room had designated 


math of the fire, the 


state; however the 


dorms have sprinklers 


Generate some good 


local community. 


escape plans, how- 


university is now 


Fraternity's policy 


n place by 2012, and 


luck. David Perry 


Brothers received 


ever some could not 


mandating four drills 


generally only covers 


most universities 


might not have 


tremendous sup- 


follow the plan be- 


per year with fire 


the structure. For 


lave established 


walked by that day, 


port, partly because 


cause the fire was 


department personnel 


personal contents 


similar policies for 


the university and 


of their good reputa- 


blocking the route. 


present during the 


coverage, students 


raternity and soror- 


community response 


tion and history of 


As a result of the 


first drill. Conduct 


should check their 


ty houses. East 


could have been tem- 


community service. 


fire, the university 
will require all 


your drills at various 
times of day. 


parents' home . 








What's your plan in case of fire? 



RED DOOR NOTES 




Dr. John Brummer, DPM, SUNY- 
Stony Brook '95, is a podiatric 
surgeon and a Fellow of the 
American College of Foot 
and Ankle Surgeons. 
Brummer has competed in 
several marathons and is 
training for the New York 
City triathlon. 



Wellness 



Feet first: Before you ramp 
up running, treat your feet 

By JOHN BRUMMER, DPM, SUNY-Stony Brook '95 



Fall is the perfect time to indulge in the great 
outdoors. We will run on our favorite trails or 
neighborhood streets. Before pounding the 
pavement, consider your feet and what they 
need to perform at an optimum level and 
remain injury free. 

Shoe sense 

A basic running shoe is versatile for many 
running surfaces and has an approximate 
lifespan of 500 miles if you use the shoe for 
running only. Once it loses support and 
cushioning properties, you are more prone to 
injury. Most runners train on pavement or 
well manicured trails which easily accommo- 
date a road training shoe. 

Assuring adequate fit is vital. Visit a local 
running store where sales staff, who are likely 
to be experienced runners, measure your foot 
and assess your foot and ankle functionality. 
One place to look is the Store Locator at 
www.runnersworld.com. 

Wait until the end of your day to try on any 
footwear. During the day, feet begin to swell, 
which best represents what happens during 
your runs. Because of swelling, regular long 
distance runners (three to six miles) should 
buy about a half size larger. However, too 
much room can cause excessive friction , 

leading to blisters. 

General shoe types 

About 90% of consumers find the right 
shoe in one of these two categories. 

Neutral Cushioned Shoes -Maximum 
cushioning, minimum arch-side support. 
Best for runners with moderate to high 
arches. 

Stability Shoes -For runners who need 
arch-side support and good midsole cush- 
ioning and want to address moderate 
pronation. 

Specialty shoe types 

Motion Control Shoes - For overpronaters. 
Also suited for big or heavy runners with very 
low arches. 

Performance Training Shoes -A light, 
well-balanced shoe suitable for racing, speed 
work, or daily training. Best suited for fast, 
efficient runners. Can be a complement to an 
everyday training shoe. 



Don't forget 
socks! 

A good sock is 
breathable, will not 
bunch in the shoe, 
and features a 
wicking fabric aimed 
at drawing moisture away from the foot. "No 
show" socks have become popular in gyms; be 
careful to choose one that will not slip into the 
shoe over the course of a long run. 

Stretch factor 

Whether you are a long-time distance 
runner, a weekend warrior or someone 
committed to routine maintenance for cardio- 
vascular health, you must stretch. Warming 
up is vital to increase blood flow to the ex- 
tremities and raise body temperature prior to 
activity. Individual stretching routines should 
incorporate static stretches where you hold a 
particular position for 30 seconds. Most 
running injuries are avoidable with good 
static stretching. Injury -prone areas such as the 
Achilles tendon and the plantar fascia are 
important and can be addressed with a simple 
calf stretching exercise. Athletes should stretch 
for at least 10 minutes before their activity. 




If you get 
injured, seek 
medical 
attention and 
remember 
R.I.C.E. 

Rest 
Ice 

Compress 
Elevate 



Pain on the pavement 

While running, you can experience a wide array of problems and 
discomfort, which may include: 

Tightness on the top of the instep, commonly caused by the laces 

tied too tight. 

Dull pains on the top of the feet, which can be stress fractures from 

increasing your mileage too quickly. 

Tight heel cords and lower extremity musculature can lead to 

overuse injuries such as plantar fasciitis and Achilles tendonitis, 

which can be avoided by stretching and starting off slowly. 



Some experts claim that dynamic stretching, 
which takes place while the body is in motion 
doing things like jumping jacks or lunges, will 
increase power, flexibility and range of motion. 
Immediately prior to exercise, athletes should 
consider some dynamic stretching to loosen up 
tendons and tissues and increase blood flow. 
Cooling down during and after athletic activity 
should include a shorter stretching routine 
depending on your sport. 



QFor more 
details, link to 
Stretching: The Truth, 
New York Times, 
10/31/08, online at 
www.sigep.org/ 
journal. 



SIGEP JOURNAL Fall 2009 



Academics 




Residential Learning Community 

at Oklahoma State: Beyond the "sizzle" 



By RYAN MCCAVITT, Miami (Florida) '07 

Advertising experts often speak of steak and 
sizzle. But they aren't talking about food. 
They instead use the analogy to mean that the 
"steak" is the product and the "sizzle" is the 
buzz surrounding it. 

Former advertising executive and Grand 
President, William G. Tragos, Washington 
in St. Louis '56, referred to this analogy in his 
revered "Beyond Phi Beta Kappa" speech at 
the 1999 Grand Chapter Conclave in Chicago. 
"Let's start by expecting more of ourselves," 
said Tragos. "Let's work not on the sizzle, but 
the steak— the product we offer young 
America." 

In striving to go beyond Phi Beta Kappa, 
Brother Tragos challenged Conclave attend- 
ees to create within their chapters "a 
pro-academic, pro-intellectual atmosphere 
that goes beyond the pursuit of the diploma or 
grade point— that seeks to expand the horizon 
of the mind, helping you to your best expres- 
sion of yourself." 



"Educated men are as much 
superior to uneducated men 
as the living are to the dead." 

-ARISTOTLE 



These concepts led to the birth of the 
Residential Learning Community program. 
Ten years later, the program now boasts over 
35 accredited chapters with an average 
member GPA of 3.12 and an average man- 
power of 77. These numbers, however, are just 
the sizzle. What is the steak? What impact can 
RLCs have on our undergraduate brothers in 
the future? 

Partnering with your university 

College students can earn credit for a wide 
variety of activities: a class in biology, an 
internship with a financial firm, or playing in 
the marching band. Our brothers at Okla- 
homa State have found a way to earn college 
credit through participation in their chapter's 
development program. 




The men of Oklahoma Alpha RLC have 
been pushing innovation within Greek life on 
their campus since their chapter came back to 
Stillwater in 2004. In just three years, before 
they received their charter in fall 2007, the 
chapter formed a dynamic partnership with 
^^^^ the Leadership Certificate Program 
on their campus. 

The typical requirements for 
this certificate include six hours 
of course work, six hours of field 
experience, six hours of elective 
projects, and 40 hours of commu- 
nity service. Since the chapter 
incorporates aspects of field 
experience, projects, and community 
service into their member development 
program, the university allowed members to 
use their chapter experience in lieu of these 
requirements. 

"Our brothers' commitment to a positive 
environment, enabling great strides in per- 
sonal development, is unparalleled by any 
other Greek organization at Oklahoma State 
University," wrote Chapter President Jesse 
Hollingsworth, '09, in the chapter's RLC 
accreditation application. "Oklahoma Alpha 
strives day to day to change the view on 
fraternal life by truly being different. Our 
brothers are known all across campus for 
being men of great character. This is a direct 
result of not only recruiting great men, but 
also of continuing to make them better during 
their undergraduate days." 



Beyond gaining college credit for mem- 
bers' experience, the chapter has taken its 
university partnership one step further by 
recruiting the university's vice president of 
student affairs to become its faculty fellow. 
The results of its hard work? Oklahoma 
Alpha recently increased its membership to 
94 men who continue to excel in the class- 
room with a 3.21 GPA, nearly four-tenths of a 
point higher than Oklahoma State's All- 
Campus Average. 

For its efforts, Oklahoma Alpha was among 
three exemplary SigEp chapters recognized 
with RLC accreditations at the start of the 
spring 2009 semester (the other two were 
Indiana and Austin Peay). 

The young men of these three chapters are 
beacons in one of the fraternity world's most 
innovative personal development programs. 
In the process, they have transformed their 
own undergraduate experience from a simple 
sirloin into an extraordinary filet mignon, and 
the sizzle took care of itself. 

The chapter has 
taken its university 
partnership one step 
further by recruiting 
the university's vice 
president of student 
affairs to become its 
faculty fellow. 




Phi Beta Kappa Wheelhouse 



Fall 2008 national GPA is highest for 
a fall semester 

SigEp chapters are continuing to break academic records and set new, higher standards each 
semester, inching SigEp closer to its goal of a 3.15 national member GPA. Our fall 2008 academic 
performance broke a new fall record with a 3.05 national member GPA— based on 224 or 89% of 
chapters reporting by August 27, 2009. Sixty-eight chapters or 30% earned their way into the Phi 
Beta Kappa Wheelhouse. The most chapters in the Phi Beta Kappa Wheelhouse is 82 from spring 
2007, and the highest GPA of 3.08 was reached for spring 2008. 

Though fall academic performance usually trails the spring, SigEp is expecting to see bigger 
improvements in the future. The 2009 Grand Chapter Conclave saw the adoption of two resolutions 
aimed at setting new academic standards for SigEp members and chapters. These resolutions have 
increased the GPA standard for membership from 2.4 to 2.6 by fall 2011. SigEp will also require 
chapters to achieve a GPA at or above their local campus All-Men's GPA, or 2.60, whichever is greater, 
by spring 2013. By raising the bar for chapter and member academic performance, SigEp will ad- 
vance its academic goals and remain the academic leader in the fraternal world. 



Doing the 



3.12 



of 224 %Jm I^L All-RLC 

ters reporting chapters reporting Member GPA (32 

a GPA above have a GPA below chapters reporting) 

(49%) 2.60(7%) rx rxrx 



chapters 
reporting earned 
a 3.15 GPA or 
higher (30%) 



chapters reporting chapters reporting 
are #1 on campus have a GPA above 
(28%) the All-Campus 

Average (48%) 



O.UUaii-bm 

Member GPA (178 

chapters) 

2.90 a„ 

Pledging Member 

GPA (46 chapters) 



3.09 
3.08 
3.07 
306 
3,05 
3.04 
3.03 
3.02 
3XH 
3.00 
2.99 
2.88 
2.97 
2.96 
2.95 
2,94 
2.93 
2.92 
2.91 
2.90 
2.89 
2.88 
2.87 
2.86 
2.85 
2.84 



GPA progress by 
academic year 



Fall'08avg. 

3.05! 




Fall ^h 
Spring 02 



Fall f 02 
Spring '03 



Fall '03- 
Spring '(H 



Fall '04- 
Spring '05 



Felt "05- 
SpriTij* 'OB 



Fall 'Ofr- 
Spring '07 



Fall 07 
Spring '08 



Fall '08- 
Spring 'OH 



Spring Average Yearly Average Fall Average 




1. 

2. 

3. 

4. 

5. 

6. 

7. 

8. 

9. 
10. 

11. 
12. 
13. 
14. 
15. 
16. 

17. 
18. 
19. 
20. 
21. 
22. 
23. 
24. 
25. 
26. 
27. 
28. 
29. 
30. 
31. 
32. 
33. 
34. 
35. 
36. 
37. 
38. 
39. 
40. 
41. 
42. 
43. 
44. 
45. 
46. 
47. 
48. 
49. 
50. 
51. 
52. 
53. 
54. 
55. 
56. 
57. 
58. 
59. 
60. 
61. 
62. 
63. 
64. 
65. 
66. 
67. 
68. 



Washington in St. Louis 3.49 



Illinois' 

Nebraska* 

Dartmouth 

Indiana* 

Richmond* 

Maine* 

Georgetown 

Emory 

Columbia 

American 

Florida 

Nebraska-Kearney 

Miami (Florida) 

Ohio State * 

Washington 

Stevens Tech* 

Washington and Lee 

Michigan 

California-Berkeley 

Tufts 



3.49 
3.48 
3.47 
3.45 
3.43 
3.43 
3.43 
3.41 
3.39 
3.38 
3.38 
3.38 
3.37 
3.36 
3.36 
3.35 
3.35 
3.34 
3.33 
3.33 



Maryland-College Park* 3.33 



Lawrence 

Quinnipiac 

UCLA 

Pennsylvania 

Minnesota* 

Babson 

North Dakota* 

Toledo* 

George Washington 

Villanova 

Delaware 

Johns Hopkins 

Lehigh* 

Davidson 

Loyola Marymount 

New York 

Georgia 

Drake* 

Murray State 

San Diego 



3.31 
3.3 
3.3 
3.3 
3.3 
3.3 
3.29 
3.29 
3.28 
3.28 
3.27 
3.27 
3.27 
3.26 
3.25 
3.24 
3.23 
3.23 
3.23 
3.22 



Clarion of Pennsylvania 3.22 

Oregon State* 3.22 

Texas Christian 3.22 

Case Western Reserve 3.21 

Oklahoma State* 3.21 

Saint Louis 3.2 

Austin Peay State* 3.2 

Southern Methodist* 3.2 

Texas-Austin 3.2 

Kentucky Wesleyan 3.18 

Miami (Ohio)* 3.18 

Cincinnati* 3.18 

WPI 3.18 

Cornell 3.18 

Denison 3.17 

Washburn* 3.17 

Bucknell 3.17 

James Madison 3.17 

Southern California 3.16 
Southeast Missouri State* 3.16 

Rutgers 3.16 

Pepperdine 3.15 



n/a 
n/a 
3/17 
5/13 
4/12 
1/46 
3/24 
2/14 
1/36 
1/6 
1/16 
1/1 
5/15 
5/12 
1/10 
4/25 
2/5 
2/12 
3/31 
2/30 
1/10 
3/14 
4/27 
9/37 
n/a 
3/24 
2/5 
1/2 
7/14 
17/29 
3/26 
1/4 
1/12 
1/9 
1/15 
2/9 
3/22 
4/10 
1/18 
2/9 
1/6 
5/14 
6/26 
1/8 
1/13 
2/5 
1/4 
1/24 
n/a 
6/19 
3/20 
1/11 
1/6 
2/9 
3/23 
1/3 
2/27 
4/20 
n/a 
34/46 
4/6 
1/4 
7/12 
1/15 
16/21 
1/9 
4/22 
1/4 



77 
40 
102 
63 
90 
183 
119 
102 
86 
75 
54 
79 
25 
39 
42 
140 
55 
90 
100 
63 
58 
23 
95 
47 
57 
72 
28 
76 
82 
50 
48 
46 
50 
71 
92 
62 
88 
77 
71 
78 
114 
23 
115 
90 
78 
56 
12 
79 
133 
51 
78 
94 
46 
56 
171 
25 
127 
93 
66 
42 
52 
26 
87 
44 
37 
83 
74 
43 



Key: 3.5 GPA Phi Beta Kappa Standard 
*Residential Learning Community 
Italics Denotes a Sigma Epsilon chapter 
2009 SigEp Champion 

Don't see your chapter listed? Please verify and 
e-mail your chapter's official campus grade report or 
a completed Academic Verification to academics® 
sigep.net. This form is available at www.sigep.org/ 
documents/academic-verification.pdf. 



8 SIGEP JOURNAL Fall 2009 



SigEp Champions 



46 chapters crowned 
intramural champion on 
their campus 

The following chapters reported they won their respective intramural 
league at the end of the Spring 2009 semester. This year-end ranking 
provides a snapshot of which chapters dominated their competition. 
Schools in red also have reached the Phi Beta Kappa Wheelhouse for 
fall '08 (seepage 8). These chapters have made the commitment to 
Sound Mind and Sound Body and our cardinal principles through their 
virtuous and diligent pursuit of perfection in the classroom and on the 
field. See your school on the list? 

What's ahead? In the next issue, the Journal will recognize the mid- 
season intramural leaders. 





Current Intramural Champions 



1. 
2. 
3. 
4. 
5. 
6. 
7. 




American 
Arkansas Tech 
Ball State 
Barton 
Bucknell 
CalPoly-Pomona 
Central Missouri 

8. Colorado State 

9. Drake* 

10. Eastern 
Washington* 

11. Elon 

12. Evansville 

13. Florida 

14. Florida International 

15. Huntingdon* 

16. Lambuth* 

17. Maine* 

18. Marquette 

19. Memphis* 

20. Miami (Ohio)* 

21. Minnesota* 

22. Missouri State* 

23. Moravian 

24. Morehead State 

25. Nebraska-Kearney 

26. Nebraska-Omaha 

27. Northwest Missouri 



28. Ohio State* 



29. Ohio Wesleyan 

30. Oregon State* 

31. Pittsburg State 

32. Quinnipiac 

33. Rider 

34. Salisbury 

35. San Diego State 

36. South Carolina 

37. Southern 
Mississippi 

38. Stevens Tech* 

39. Texas A and M- 
Corpus Christi 

40. Texas Christian 

41. Texas-Arlington 

42. Toledo* 

43. Washburn* 

44. Washington in 
St. Louis 

45. Washington State 

46. Wyoming 

Key: Phi Beta Kappa 

Wheelhouse chapter 

*Residential Learning 

Community 

Italics Denotes a Sigma 

Epsilon chapter 



"The mind 
is not a 
vessel to be 
filled but a 
fire to be 
kindled." 

~ PLUTARCH 



intramural 
champion chapters are 
among the 68 chapters 
in the Phi Beta Kappa 
Wheelhouse 



Residential 
Learning Communities 
are intramural 
champions 



Sound Body message inspires undergrad to lose almost 100 pounds 



By WILL ROBINSON, Duke 11 

By resisting the superficial allure of fad diets 
and trendy weight loss programs, two SigEps 
at Montana State are role models for Sound 
Mind and Sound Body 

Anthony Layton, '10, has shed nearly 100 
pounds since joining the Montana SEC Chap- 
ter in spring 2008, when the 6 ft. tall Layton 
weighed 270 pounds. Attending EDGE New 
Member camp helped Layton realize he had 
to make a change in his lifestyle. 

"I didn't actually know what was going to 
happen at EDGE," Layton said. "[But] it got 
me thinking about everything, about my 
future, first impressions, trying to get a job 
when I graduate." 

The EDGE Camp, which emphasizes 
healthy personal choices, included a physical 
competition that pitted SigEp chapters 
against each other. Layton said he struggled 
with basic physical activities like pushups 
and running. 

"During this event I realized that I was 
completely unable to perform at any level. 



I was the last guy to cross the finish line, 
and I had every brother from around the area 
cheering me on to keep going and finish," 
Layton said. "This made me realize that most 
of my brothers from around the area were in 
shape, and that I was probably the fattest guy 
there. After this actualization I decided that I 
needed to do something about it." 

Layton said the support he received from 
other SigEps at EDGE, and from the brothers 
in his chapter, motivated him to start losing 
the weight. 

Over the summer, Layton began to focus on 
his diet and change his eating habits. He said 
he lost his first 40 pounds without changing 
anything about his physical activity. But, by 
the end of the summer, he was doing 30 minutes 
of cardiovascular exercise, five days a week. 
By spring 2009, he added a strength-building 
workout to his routine, allowing him to lose 
weight while gaining muscle. 

Layton said he weighs around 174 pounds 
His body fat has dropped from 31 percent to 




Before: Layton at 270 
pounds 



14 percent. "When 
someone asks me what 
SigEp can do for you, I 
think what can't SigEp 
do for you," Layton said. 
"Sometimes I wonder 
what my life would be 
like now if I had decided 
not to join SigEp, or go 
to that Edge." 
SigEp brotherhood encompasses more 
than an individual's accomplishment, and 
Layton has motivated his friend Lincoln 
Kroft, '11, to lose weight as well. 

"He's the one who pushed me to care about 
myself. Anthony has always been there 
encouraging a healthier choice," said Kroft, 
Kroft has dropped from 325 pounds to 280 
pounds through a combination of diet and 
exercise changes that he made over the 
summer. "I wasn't being as healthy as I could 
be," Kroft said. "That's a huge part of the 
Balanced Man [Ideal]." 



SOUND MIND AND SOUND BODY 



Chanter News 



ESPN Internship offers aspiring sports 
journalist real world experience 



By PHILLIP FISHER, Colorado 10 

The day I got a call from Lee Hood, the intern- 
ship director for the School of Journalism and 
Mass Communication at the University of 
Colorado, was the day everything changed. 
She was calling on behalfofESPN.com and 
Senior Staff Writer Rick Reilly to offer me an 
internship as Rick's personal assistant. As 
a journalism major, I saw it as a dream 
internship; I would be working for ESPN 
and for Rick Reilly! From then on my career 
goals would slowly change. 

In his first email, Rick surprised me, not 
because of the assignment, but because he 
quoted Seinfeld. Who knew that Rick Reilly 
was into Seinfeld? It was nice to know he 
appreciated humor. 

My assignment was stressful. Rick wanted 
me to write 25 questions to ask legendary UCLA 
basketball Coach John Wooden in front of 300 
people. No pressure right? When the "Life of 
Reilly" column was posted about Wooden, Rick 
had included a discovery from my research. 
Wooden had always coached his players about 
how to properly put on socks so that they would 
not develop blisters, and Rick mentioned it in 
the article! 



I continued to get assignments along with 
positive and constructive feedback about how 
to become a better journalist. During finals 
week, I was asked to rate my top ten sports 
years ever and state reasons why. I did not do 
well on the first attempt. I had been deter- 
mined to get it done super fast. Rick said if I 
were in the professional journalism world, 
I would never be allowed to touch a computer 
again. As a learning experience, he gave me 
some tips and allowed me to correct my 
mistakes. Rick was very pleased with the 
second attempt. 

I learned that in professional journalism, 
there is no payoff in trying to be superman. 
Rushing through things to turn in the article 
before deadline can't substitute for thorough- 
ness and quality. 

My five months as an ESPN.com intern has 
also shined a new light on my career. In 
addition to media law, sports journalism has 
become my passion. Before, I was passionate 
about each separately. Now I want to combine 
them into a career that I love. Hopefully one 
day I will be able to announce sporting events 
to all my brothers across the nation. 




Working with ESPN's Rick Reilly was a dream realized for 
intern Phillip Fisher, Colorado '10. He has now trained his 
sights on sports journalism as a career. 




Top-<| 1 ahead of 

tJ\J all-cai 



campus average 



SigEps spend Martin Luther King Day at food bank 

Last semester, California-Irvine's SigEps honored Martin Luther King 
Day with a community service event held at the Orange County Food 
Bank. Fourteen SigEps, most pictured above, packed food for the 
elderly community. Participant Daniel Stirewalt, '09, said, "MLK Day 
was one of the most rewarding experiences during my college career. I 
was able to give back to the community while hanging out with some 
of my best friends. I hope to do more community service events like 
this one." The chapter plans to stay involved with the food bank. 



Rank and School 


Fall '08 
GPA 


ACA 
Difference 


08 Man- 
power 


1 Toledo 


3.29 


0.59 


71 


2 Western Kentucky 


3.06 


0.55 


43 


3 Virginia Commonwealth 3.05 


0.42 


29 


4 Nebraska 


3.48 


0.41 


119 


5 Illinois 


3.49 


0.39 


183 


6 Oklahoma State 


3.21 


0.39 


78 


7 Austin Peay State 


3.20 


0.33 


46 


8 Indiana 


3.45 


0.33 


86 


9 North Dakota 


3.29 


0.32 


50 


10 Nebraska-Kearney 


3.23 


0.31 


55 


11 Quinnipiac 


3.30 


0.31 


76 


12 Oregon State 


3.22 


0.30 


79 


13 Ohio State 


3.36 


0.28 


100 


14 San Diego State 


3.03 


0.28 


138 


15 Central Arkansas 


3.13 


0.26 


117 


16 Richmond 


3.43 


0.26 


75 


17 Colorado School of Mines 


3.11 


0.25 


25 


18 Colorado State 


3.05 


0.25 


57 


19 Delaware 


3.27 


0.25 


88 


20 Minnesota 


3.30 


0.24 


48 


21 St. Joseph's 


3.04 


0.24 


37 


22 Stevens Tech 


3.35 


0.24 


58 


23 Cincinnati 


3.18 


0.23 


93 


24 Babson 


3.30 


0.20 


46 


25 Washburn 


3.17 


0.20 


29 


26 Arkansas Tech 


3.00 


0.19 


47 


27 Louisiana State 


3.06 


0.18 


95 


28 Washington 


3.36 


0.17 


63 


29 Davidson 


3.26 


0.16 


78 


29 Eastern Illinois 


2.93 


0.16 


82 


29 Southeast Missouri State 


3.16 


0.16 


83 



The All-Campus 
Average (ACA), also 
known as the All- 
Undergraduate 
Average, is the mean 
of the GPAs for every 
full-time undergradu- 
ate student, both 
male and female, on 
a campus. Evaluating 
your chapter GPA 
against the ACA is 
a great bench- 
marking tool. 

By consistently 
outperforming the 
average under- 
graduate's GPA on 
their campus, these 
31 chapters (a three- 
way tie for the 29th 
spot) demonstrate 
that they are 
committed to the 
academic success of 
each chapter member. 



10 SIGEP JOURNAL Fall 2009 





One dime at a time: 

ange for Youth AIDS 

Alaska Alpha at Alaska-Fairbanks depended on coins to 
raise money for the YouthAIDS Foundation. Shown left at 
the university entrance next to their mascot polar bear, 
Nanook, the brothers had a simple idea. They asked each 
floor in the dorms to chip in change and compete for a 
series of prizes generously donated by local businesses: 
t-shirts, coupons, briefcases, iTunes gift cards and airlines 
miles. Project Lead Patrick Frymark, '07, wanted to show 
the positive efforts of the chapter in a community that can 
be skeptical of Greek life. Chapter President Conor 
Brennan, '08, said, "I was pleasantly surprised by the 
results of the program. Alaska-Fairbanks is a small 
campus and the bonds students make with one another 
really helped make this program a success." Those dimes 
and quarters added up to $557 from 25 floors. The chapter 
looks forward to making this an annual event. 



Panel offers insights on life after college 



By MICHAEL BRIANTE, California-Davis '11 
LOGAN TAXDAL, California State-Sacramento '10 



Only 20 miles sepa- 
rate the brothers of 
California-Davis and 
California State- 
Sacramento. Last 
semester, men from 
both chapters joined 
alumni and friends at 
the California-Davis 
Chapter House. With 
graduation looming, 
the focus of older 
brothers shifts 
towards starting a 
career. Graduating 
seniors are looking 
for guidance, and 
this Sound Mind 
seminar was aimed 
at what happens in 
"Life after college." 
Seminar modera- 
tors Logan Taxdal, 
California State- 
Sacramento '10, and 
Michael Briante, 
California-Davis '11, 
interviewed three 
panelists: Andy Beal, 
California State- 
Sacramento '82, 
founder and president 
ofMaxPreps.com, an 
American high school 
sports authority; 



Christopher Cabaldon, 
Mayor of West Sacra- 
mento, Calif.; and Ruth 
Coleman, Director of 
California State Parks. 
They shared their 
perspectives about 
what might be in store 
for graduates, espe- 
cially in light of 
California's current 
economic challenges. 
Beal offered keen 
insight on how to 
establish and manage 
a start-up company 
by encouraging 
investment, hiring 
the right people and 
emphasizing busi- 
ness ethics. Because 
many brothers are 
pursuing careers 
in business, Beal 
immediately caught 
their attention. He 
noted that not every- 
thing learned in 
college comes from 
the classroom and 
attributed much of 
his personal and 
social development to 
his experiences as a 
SigEp. In retrospect, 



he realizes that he 
learned how to 
respect others and 
how to work with 
people effectively. 
Coleman shared 
her experiences in 
the Peace Corps and 
her uncharted path 
to becoming director 
of California State 
Parks. She was 
surprised by her 
destination. To hear 
a prominent govern- 
ment official state 
that she didn't know 
what to expect made 
uncertainty seem 
normal. She helped 
brothers expand 
their understanding 
of a job search when 
she insisted, "If you 
don't work at a job 
that you are passion- 
ate about at least 70% 
of the time, then you 
should quit. Life is 
too short to waste 
time like that." Every 
head in the room 
began to nod. While 
Coleman noted 
challenges as a 
woman in balancing 
work and home life, 



she also stressed 
the importance of 
practicing a firm 
handshake and 
avoiding interview 
jitters by thinking of 
the one-on-one 
conversation as an 
"informational 
treasure hunt." 

Mayor Cabaldon 
explained the impor- 
tance of taking 
advantage of the 
intellectual primacy 
and creativity of 
our 20s. He shared 
his experience in 



striving for more 
effective public 
policy by pushing 
limits and thinking 
outside the box. His 
high energy and 
passion for effective 
leadership was clear. 
Cabaldon believes 
that the best leader 
can push the enve- 
lope and gain support 
while doing so. 

Each panelist's 
response was colored 
by the current eco- 
nomic turmoil and 
budget cuts in 



academia, but their 
optimism, enthusi- 
asm and experience 
gave brothers a 
chance to ponder 
their futures as they 
enter the job market 
or graduate school. 
After a question- and- 
answer session and 
informal conversa- 
tions with the 
panelists, the 
California-Davis 
house hosted dinner, 
making that 20-mile 
distance shorter still. 





| sfetf & Epsilon 


T , &, 


| 



A panel of local professionals helped SigEp undergraduates begin to picture their 
journey once they move to the next stage in life. Andy Beal, Founder and President 
MaxPreps.com, Ruth Coleman, Director of California State Parks and Christopher 
Cabaldon, Mayor of West Sacramento offered their perspectives on the work world. 



CHAPTER NEWS 11 



CHAPTER NEWS 




Florida lota brothers 
practiced their scaling 
skills at a local indoor 
rock climbing wall. 



South Florida measures up 



By KEVIN LYNCH, Maryland-College Park '08 

"This chapter exemplifies the Balanced Man 
ideal, not just by being well-rounded, but by 
being number one in everything," said last 
year's Regional Director Jacob Wick, Indiana 
'08, of the Residential Learning Community 
chapter at South Florida. Florida Iota bears 
out Wick's observation by excelling at mul- 
tiple measures of fraternity success. 

The chapter shows an ability to focus 
intently on achieving its goals. For example, 
when brothers noticed their academic perfor- 
mance was faltering, upper-classmen in the 
chapter made efforts to guide the chapter and 
put the issue front and center. These efforts 
included contacting their chapter advisor, Dr. 
Mark Greenberg, who gave a seminar on the 
significance of academic success. This semi- 
nar had a profound impact on the chapter, 
causing an instant increase in study hours. 
The chapter continues to emphasize academ- 
ics in their newly-renovated Residential 




Left to right; Past Chapter President Rob Sozio, '08, 
Chapter President Robert Brann, '10, and Brother Mentor 
Rodel Beredo ,'09, hold their Greek Chapter of the Year 
Award from South Florida. 

Learning Community (RLC) and has the 
highest GPA among fraternities on campus. 

To live the Balanced Man ideal, the chapter 
hosts regular brother jogs and workouts, in 
addition to educational programming that 
includes seminars on studying, incentive 
programs, study logs, and academic-major- 
driven study groups. 

The chapter has the top spot in manpower 
among the school's 16 organizations in the 
Interfraternity Conference with 109 members. 
Members intend to maintain this position, and 
they have recruited 46 new members this past 
academic year. They have also won Fraternity 
of the Year and Greek Chapter of the Year 
awards from the university and have merited 
the Buchanan Cup for the past three Conclaves. 



"We pride our- 
selves on having an 
amazing reputation 
on the USF campus, 
with leaders in every 
corner," says Chapter 
President Robert 
Brann, '10. The 
chapter has had a 

member in the upper echelons of the student 
government for four of the past five years, and 
with the election of Bruno Portigliatti, '10, 
this year, has a member serving as student 
body vice president two terms running. 

This reputation has led to significant 
success in the chapter's philanthropic pur- 
suits; the brothers raised over $8,000 in the 
past year through various service learning 
events. They have also logged 650 hours of 
community service in the last semester and 
have led the campus in participants in the 
university's annual "Stampede of Service." 

"Florida Iota gives SigEp a great name on 
the campus of USF, and we also give back to 
the community in so many ways," said Brann 
of the chapter's commitment to service and 
philanthropy. 

The chapter's success is also due to the 
dedication of its volunteers. According to 
Wick, a new Alumni and Volunteer Corpora- 
tion (AVC) was created "to promote 
mentorship and professional development." 
The AVC is composed mostly of alumni at 
least six years removed from the current 
chapter, providing a bridge from the younger 
members to older alumni. Kevin O'Connor, 
Loras '88, the chapter counselor, has been a 
strong advocate for the chapter: "I have not 
seen a group of young men look up to a men- 
tor the way Florida Iota brothers look to 
Kevin," Wick said. The chapter credits its 
success partly to his high expectations: 
"Without Kevin's demand for excellence, we 
would not be going for our third consecutive 
Buchanan Cup," said Brann. South Florida 
achieved this goal at the 2009 Conclave in 
Orlando. 

Through dedicated members, volunteers, 
and a steadfast adherence to their goals and 
values, the men of Florida Iota have proven to 
be a model of success for other SigEp chapters. 




Left to right: Kevin Cao, '11, Jonathan Shaw, '11, and Matt 
Majerick, '10, point upward, the direction South Florida is 
headed, during a break from a volunteer clean-up project 
at a local park. 



Fast Facts 

GPA: 3.12 
Manpower: 109 
Rank: 1/12 
South Florida Greek 

Chapter of the Year 
South Florida 

Fraternity of the 

Year 
Three consecutive 

Buchanan Cups 



12 SIGEP JOURNAL Fall 2009 



-30 



Chapters in 

Manpower 



Below are the 30 largest chapters in the 
nation in SigEp for 2009. Twenty-five of 
these chapters claim 100 men or more. With 
a total of 250 chapters, these top manpower 
houses represent just over 12% of our 
chapters. In sheer numbers of men, however, 
these 3,562 undergraduates account for 24% 
of the 14,559 SigEps currently on campus. 



Rank and 


Man- 


Rank and Man- 


School power* 


School power* 


1 Oklahoma 


195 


18 


Kansas 


109 


2 Texas Austin 


172 


19 


George 




3 Illinois 


167 




Washington 


105 


4 Illinois State 


142 


20 


Dartmouth 


104 


5 Florida 


135 


21 


Indiana 


103 


6 Texas Christian 


133 


22 


Loyola 




7 Colorado 


129 




Marymount 


102 


8 Georgia 


128 


23 


Southeast 




9 Auburn 


127 




Missouri State 


101 


10 Ohio State 


124 


24 


Kansas State 


100 


11 Nebraska 


121 


25 


Kentucky 


100 


12 Miami (Ohio) 


118 


26 


Cal-PolySLO 


99 


13 Central Arkansas 113 


27 


Drake 


99 


14 San Diego State 


113 


28 


Delaware 


98 


15 Louisiana State 


112 


29 


Mississippi 


97 


16 Saint Louis 


110 


30 


South Carolina 


97 


17 South Florida 


109 


*as of ApriH, 2009 






Yale investment challenge winners ring NASDAQ opening bell 

Last semester, a five-person team from Yale of three undergraduates and two graduate 
students rang in the investment day at the NASDAQ Stock Exchange in New York City. 
On the winning team is SigEp's own Michael Simpson, Yale '10 (center, blue tie). The 
team won the New York Society of Security Analysts Investment Research Challenge, 
where entrants have to compile an investment report on a publicly-traded company. 
Fourteen schools entered, and the other teams were comprised exclusively of MBA 
candidates. In the finals, the teams presented their investment thesis to a panel of 
Wall Street professionals and fielded questions. The team placed second in the global 
finals of the competition in London. 



Our Very Own Frat Boys 



Chapters that do not live up to the ideals of Sigma Phi Epsilon bring dishonor and disgrace to our name. The Journal reports 
these stories to inform its readers and to show that actions have consequences. 



ARIZONA BETA— UNIVERSITY OF ARIZONA 
Reason for intervention: Alleged hazing activity 
Action: 85-man chapter closed 



In fall 2008, two reports were made 
to the University of Arizona's 
Hazing Hotline. In one report, the 
caller identified himself as a new 
member and indicated that he was 
expected to be at the chapter house 
from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. unless in class 
and be at the house in the evenings 
until 9 for song practice and/or 
study hours. He said he was 
blindfolded at times and asked to 
stare at the ceiling for an extended 
period. He was required to drink 10 
beers in rapid succession, and he 
was repeatedly slapped in the face. 
He said he was asked to wall sit and 
then his legs were kicked out from 
underneath him. Based on these 
allegations, the university placed 
the chapter on immediate 
suspension and began an in-depth 
investigation. 

Hazing activity in fall 2007 led to 
a membership review in spring 2008 
which resulted in the loss of 54% of 
the chapter's membership. 
Optimism prevailed about the 



group. They were supported by a 
dedicated group of alumni to help 
them build a strong chapter. But the 
turnaround potential slipped away. 

Later in 2008, the university 
conducted an investigation and 
advised Headquarters that they 
would withdraw the chapter's 
recognition. It appeared that 
several former members were 
responsible for the misconduct. The 
chapter planned to pursue an 
appeal this spring but withdrew it 
the day before the scheduled 
hearing. The closed chapter was 
able to negotiate a return in four 
years instead of the five as 
originally set by the university. The 
AVC is selling the chapter house to 
the university along with a six-year 
option on a lot on campus. In this 
situation, the actions and poor 
judgment shown by a few 
individuals along with the inability 
of the chapter leadership to enforce 
its standards resulted in a negative 
outcome for many 



ALABAMA BETA— UNIVERSITY OF ALABAMA 
Reason for intervention: Alleged hazing activity 
Action: 113-man chapter closed 



In November 2008, Headquarters 
was contacted by a local emer- 
gency-room doctor stating that a 
young man and new member of 
Alabama Beta was in the hospital 
with life threatening injuries. The 
individual had second-degree burns 
to his buttocks. An immediate 
investigation began, and it was 
determined that the chapter had 
been questioning new members 
while they sat on a "hot seat," a 
folding metal chair heated with an 
iron. According to the Alumni and 
Volunteer Corporation President, 
this was a tradition in the chapter 
dating from the early 90s. There 
had been no indication that this 
practice was still going on until this 
incident. The investigation showed 
seven new members were burned 
after this hazing exercise, and one 
sought medical treatment. 
This chapter has had its 
struggles in the past; the National 
Board suspended the chapter in 
2006 for hazing. Signs of improve- 
ment after that created anticipation 



that Alabama Beta would be 
removed from suspension status in 
November 2008. That was not to be. 

SigEp has zero tolerance for 
hazing. The National Board of 
Directors withdrew Alabama Beta's 
charter for failure to comply with 
policies regarding new member 
programming. The 113-man chapter 
had recently celebrated its 80 th 
anniversary. 

All were asked to vacate the 
house by December. The university 
also revoked its recognition of the 
chapter as a student group on 
campus. The AVC is leasing the 
chapter house this spring. 

This incident brought down one 
of our largest chapters. The 
individuals involved are subject to 
criminal and civil charges, judicial 
action and possible expulsion from 
the university The university has 
agreed to a return to campus in fall 
2010, and SigEp plans to put 
together a group of individuals who 
will live up to the core values of our 
Fraternity. 



SigEp has zero tolerance for hazing. 



CHAPTER NEWS 




CHAPTER NEWS 



Embezzlement tests chapter's mettle 



By ERIN MULLALLY, Michigan State '99 



The University of 
Wyoming Chapter 
recently hit rock 
bottom when a 
chapter alumnus and 
active volunteer 
embezzled over 
$100,000 from chapter 
accounts. While the 
responsible party was 
aggressively pursued 
through the court 
system and eventually 
convicted, Wyoming 
Alpha was left to face 
a mountain of debt 
and unpaid bills. The 
strain created a 
serious lack of morale 
among chapter 
members. 

Clay Long, Wyo- 
ming '05, the secretary 
for the chapter's 
Alumni and Volunteer 
Corporation (AVC), 
was an undergraduate 
when the chapter 
discovered the em- 
bezzlement. "Our 
members were angry 
and at a loss for what 
to do. The size of the 
financial loss was 
so daunting and 
immediate that we 
faced the potential loss 
of our chapter home," 
Long shared. 



A dedicated group 
of alumni, parents 
and undergraduates 
moved quickly. 
Members of a newly 
recruited AVC set 
specific goals with 
the undergraduate 



"A man's 
most 
valuable 
trait is a 
judicious 
sense of 
what 
not to 
believe." 



chapter to save 
Wyoming Alpha and 
address the financial 
losses. 

The chapter 
immediately focused 
on recruitment. In 
2008, the membership 
increased from 27 to 
40, while the chapter 
focused on academics 
and quality member- 
ship development. 



The chapter's GPA 
improved, and they 
won the campus 
homecoming and 
Greek competitions. 

Meanwhile the 
AVC created and 
executed a financial 
plan, which has seen 
the chapter's debt 
level cut in half. 
Financial procedures 
and transparent 
control measures 
were implemented 
and strengthened. 
The AVC also started 
an alumni communi- 
cations program to 
reestablish links 
with alumni. 

"One of the chal- 
lenges for a relatively 
young chapter like 
Wyoming is the 
limited alumni base. 
We reached some 
brothers from the 
1950s before our 
chapter went dormant, 
but since reestab- 
lishing in 1995, the 
majority of our 
alumni base is 
under 40," Long 
said. Wyoming 
Alpha alumni can 
update their contact 
information on the 



chapter's website, 
www.wysigep.com. 

"The current AVC 
knew that it also had 
to reestablish trust 
with undergraduate 
members," Long 
explained. "The AVC 
holds most of its 
meetings in the 
chapter house formal 
room and asks 
undergraduates to 
attend. Chapter 
members are encour- 
aged to ask questions 
about AVC finances, 
while the AVC does 
the same for the 
undergraduate 
chapter. The result 
is an open and trans- 
parent method of 
operation that has 
improved chapter 
morale and communi- 
cation." 

Each AVC member 
identified an under- 
graduate leadership 
position to mentor, 
which "encourages 
alumni to further 
distinguish roles of 
participation and 
unique areas of 
support," Long 
explained. "Maybe 
even more vital than 




Wyoming Alpha brothers won the 2006 Excelsior award 
for their work on financial issues following the theft. Will 
Freeman, '06, (second row, second from left), AVC 
Treasurer, has been intensely focused on conquering the 
chapter's debt. 



financial support 
are the leadership 
lessons, stories and 
experience that a 
chapter can miss out 
on without strong 
alumni and volunteer 
participation." 

What major lesson 
has Wyoming Alpha 
learned from this 
embezzlement night- 
mare? "The only 
alumnus actively 
involved with the 



chapter at the time 
was the one who was 
caught embezzling, 
so there were no 
accounting checks 
and balances," said 
Long. "If a chapter 
struggles to recruit 
alumni members for 
AVC roles, chapters 
should not be shy 
about recruiting 
parents, professors 
or others in the 
community." 



Prevent financial abuse 

Every SigEp chapter is susceptible to 
financial abuse, but it can be prevented. 
Alumni and Volunteer Corporations should 
implement the following basic safeguards: 

Require dual signatures on checks over a 

predetermined amount, such as $500. 

Have an account that prohibits debit card 

and ATM withdrawals. 

Assign monthly account reconciliation to 

an officer other than the person with 

check-writing authority. 

Reconcile liquid asset accounts monthly. 

Assign an independent third party to 

conduct an annual audit of chapter 

finances. 

Acquire directors and officers insurance 

as offered through SigEp Headquarters. 
SigEp and its insurance providers prosecute 
embezzlement cases to the fullest extent of 
the law. If you have questions, contact Kathy 
Johnston, Director of Risk Management, at 
Kathy.Johnston@SigEp.net. 



-30 



Chapters in 

percentage 
growth 



PMR* PMR* Change growth 



PMR* PMR* Change growth 



For the first time, we list the 30 chapters 
that saw the greatest percentage increase 
in their membership. As you can see, some 
of our smallest chapters made great strides 
in replenishing their ranks while signifi- 
cantly growing membership. Notable leaps 
include Drexel, Arizona State and Southern 
Methodist which each added over 30 men 
while Appalachian State and Cal State-San 
Bernardino more than doubled their ranks in 
a single year. 



1. Appalachian State 


16 


40 


24 


150% 


16. 


Rider 


29 


46 


17 


59% 


2. Cal State-San 










17. 


Indiana State 


24 


38 


14 


58% 


Bernardino 


25 


51 


26 


104% 


18. 


Southern Methodist 


56 


88 


32 


57% 


3. Utah State SEC 


13 


25 


12 


92% 


19. 


Southern California 


37 


57 


20 


54% 


4. Louisville 


23 


44 


21 


91% 


20. 


DePaul 


17 


26 


9 


53% 


5. Kent State 


17 


32 


15 


88% 


21. 


Canisius 


16 


24 


8 


50% 


6. Sacramento State 


29 


54 


25 


86% 


22. 


Chicago 


23 


34 


11 


48% 


7. New York 


23 


41 


18 


78% 


23. 


Barton 


19 


28 


9 


47% 


8. Idaho SEC 


13 


22 


9 


69% 


24. 


North Carolina 










9. Drexel 


46 


77 


31 


67% 




Greensboro 


19 


28 


9 


47% 


10. Alaska 


12 


20 


8 


67% 


25. 


Austin Peay State 


46 


67 


21 


46% 


11. Northern Kentucky 


24 


40 


16 


67% 


26. 


American 


42 


61 


19 


45% 


12. George Mason 


24 


40 


16 


67% 


27. 


SlU-Edwardsville 


34 


49 


15 


44% 


13. Huntingdon 


14 


23 


9 


64% 


28. 


Florida International 


56 


80 


24 


43% 


14. Columbia 


39 


63 


24 


61% 


29. 


Trine 


36 


51 


15 


42% 


15. Arizona State 


55 


88 


33 


60% 


30. 


James Madison (SEC) 


44 


62 


18 


41% 


*PMR: Periodic Membership Rept 


irt updc 


ifeof eac 


'h March 


i 















14 SIGEP JOURNAL Fall 2009 




Over $18 million pledged for SigEp housing since 2003 



You may have noticed that the back cover of previous 

Journals announces a chapter 

housing campaign. Take a look at 

the results some of these groups 

report. To alumni who pledged to 

their chapter's capital campaign, 

thank you. To those who have not, 

you can still make a gift. 

Chapters that want to 
get started on their own 
housing campaign need 
to know that these results 
don't happen overnight. 
Fortunately there is a formula 
for success. Have a represen- 
tative from your Alumni and 
Volunteer Corporation contact 
Chris McCaw at chris.mccaw 
@sigep.net or Scott Thompson at 
scott.thompson@sigep.net. 




School 



Ball State 
Drake 

Georgia Tech 
Kansas 
Kansas State 
Miami (Ohio) 
Miami (Ohio)* 
Missouri 
Missouri-S&T 
Nebraska 
North Texas 
Pennsylvania 
South Carolina 
Texas-Austin 
Washington State 
Wichita State 



Totals** 



Amount Pledged Amount Collected 



$1,290,399 

$619,849 

$874,837 

$925,000 

$2,044,886 

$878,616 

$87,435 

$1,210,174 

$817,368 

$1,481,572 

$796,050 

$1,118,605 

$799,150 

$3,263,675 

$809,284 

$1,235,654 

$18,252,553 



$376,345 
$435,129 
$462,514 
$635,000 

$1,656,344 

$658,633 

$69,613 

$670,674 

$154,015 

$1,294,622 
$453,949 
$442,391 
$429,142 

$1,804,712 
$530,959 

$1,082,033 

$11,156,076 



Number 
of Donors 



223 
209 
232 
190 
332 
577 
94 
248 
136 
384 
166 
249 
192 
276 
201 
182 

3891 



"represents a separate campaign to pay down mortgage debt 

**Totals as of April, 2009 

Amounts pledged include gifts that are tax-deductible and non tax-deductible. In most instances 
tax deductible gifts were made to the SigEp Educational Foundation which in turn grants these gifts 
back to the local chapter. 



Washington State reclaims charter 



By SPENCER OLSON, Washington State '11 

Striving for change, academic excellence, and 
quality manpower were the keys to success for 
returning SigEp to Washington State. Since 
reopening in 2005, the volunteers and under- 
graduates at the Washington Alpha Chapter 
have diligently focused on becoming a strong 
and productive fraternity Craig Dewey '72, 
President of the Alumni and Volunteer Corpo- 
ration (AVC), explains the re-colonization 
effort, "The tradition of Sigma Phi Epsilon at 
Washington State stretches back to our 
original chartering in 1912. After a short 
closure in 2003, we were thrilled to be invited 
to re-colonize in 2005. Since then our men have 
excelled in academics, campus activities, 
intramural sports, community service, and 
manpower. They have truly earned this 
achievement. It is an honor to once again be 
known as Washington Alpha, a chartered 
member of Sigma Phi Epsilon." 

Washington Alpha has grown in manpower 
and academics as well as in spirit. Viewed as one 
of the strongest fraternities within Washington 
State's Greek community, the chapter has won 
Greek Week three out of the last four years. This 
competitive week of games and fundraising gives 
each chapter a chance to show its creativity and 
ability to work together to become the top 
chapter on campus. "It feels great to take first 
place again and be known as a fun but challeng- 
ing opponent," observed Jeff Donovan, 11. 



The Balanced 
Man Ideal 

Washington State 
has achieved great 
strides in recruitment 
and membership. 
With over 80 mem- 
bers, it's the largest 
chapter on campus. 
Membership has 
steadily grown since the reopening, and the 
chapter sustained 3.0 GPA in spring 2008. The 
Balanced Man Scholarship is its most effec- 
tive recruiting strategy and attracts only the 
most diligent and creative young men through 
personal interviews and a selective applica- 
tion process. Thousands in scholarship 
dollars were awarded last year to potential 
new members in the quest for finding the best 
men. The chapter supports the lifestyle that 
incorporates the Balanced Man Ideal in 
everyday life by hosting a variety of weekly 
Sound Mind and Sound Body activities such 
as football, ultimate frisbee, soccer, basket- 
ball, swimming, other intramural sports. It 
also promoted university- sponsored classes 
for improving and strengthening study habits. 

About the Campus 

Washington State offers an assortment of 
extracurricular activities within its Pullman 




campus. It has over 300 student organiza- 
tions, which vary from career clubs to social 
and entertainment clubs. Washington State 
has one of the largest outdoor recreation 
facilities west of the Mississippi. 

"Re-chartering has been our number one 
goal these past few years, and it feels fantas- 
tic to finally achieve it. Now we can focus on 
our next two goals, becoming the best chapter 
at Washington State University and winning 
the Buchanan Cup. It will take much work but 
both goals are very obtainable," said Spencer 
Olson, '11. 

By the Numbers 

Originally Founded: 1912 

GPA: 3.00 

Total Lifetime Members: 1,630 

Current Undergraduate Membership: 83 



CHAPTER NEWS 15 



CHAPTER NEWS 



Indiana gets charter back; 
surpasses 100 men 



By KEVIN ZACHARIAS SWAD, Indiana '11 

In spring 2006, then SigEp Expansion Director 
Jason Cherish, Saint Louis '03, recruited a 
team of roughly 30 Indiana undergraduates to 
re-colonize Indiana Beta. He sought high- 
achieving young men who were proven 
leaders on campus. He turned to campus 
sorority women for help recruiting men who 
personify the core values of the Fraternity. 
With these members assembled, the bonds of 
fraternal brotherhood quickly emerged. 

The Sigma Epsilon Chapter (SEC) worked 
diligently to implement the Balanced Man 
Program, recruit quality men, and collectively 
excel in academics to become the premiere 
fraternity at Indiana. Out of 29 campus frater- 
nities, SigEp ranks first in GPA with a 3.45 for 
fall 2008. The chapter has been recognized by 
the university with the "Highest Standard of 
Excellence" award for three consecutive 
years. SigEp left its mark on campus by 
hosting its annual philanthropy, "Hoosier 
Sweetheart," a female talent show where 
contestants compete for the coveted title 
supporting the chapter's fundraising efforts 
on behalf of YouthAIDS. 

SigEp at Indiana is the first chapter to 
charter as a Residential Learning Community 
(RLC). This chapter accreditation reflects 




Left to right: SigEp National Housing Director John Weir, 
Purdue '01, congratulates Indiana Beta's Brice Floyd, 
Indiana '10, and faculty member and residential learning 
advocate Dr. Herbert Terry. 



collaboration be- 
tween academic 
professionals, under- 
graduates, the 
university, and the 
chapter to create a 
holistic learning 
experience. Chapter 
leaders aspired to 
this RLC designation, 
headed up by Brice 
Floyd, '10, and Ben 
Kipfer, '08, because 
they believed it would 
improve men, make the chapter more relevant 
to learning, create brotherhood through class 
work and boost the GPA, a trend demon- 
strated in RLCs across the nation. The chapter 
met with professors and faculty to promote 
the program and designated classroom space 
in the house. Indiana can serve as a model for 
SEC chapters to build their RLC concept into 
their chartering plan. 

This year Indiana Beta is 103 members 
strong. After an eventful week of spirited 
competition, Sigma Phi Epsilon was awarded 
the 2008 Greek Homecoming Championship. 
Within three years, the chapter has accom- 
plished virtually all of its original goals, while 
upholding high standards for itself. 

Balanced Man Ideal 

Indiana SigEps demonstrate the ideals of 
the Balanced Man with the highest GPA 
among fraternities for the last three semes- 
ters. Brothers are involved in many other 
non-Greek campus organizations including 
IUSA, the Indiana University Student Asso- 
ciation, the Union Board, and the Korean 
Club. The Union Board plans major events on 
campus. The chapter is involved in almost 
every intramural sport. SigEps participate in 
Indiana's biggest sporting event of the year, 




the Little 500 bike race. Some members train 
for months to race and proudly represent 
SigEp at the same time. 

Volunteer Support 

The chapter meets monthly with the 
Alumni and Volunteer Corporation board. 
Two chapter counselors, Tom Shaw, HT '71, 
and Jonathan Purvis, Indiana '98, sit in on 
chapter and executive meetings. A valued 
alumni graduate advisor, Kipfer lives in the 
fraternity house and assists brothers if they 
need guidance. 

About the Campus 

Indiana University was chartered in 1820. 
The Bloomington campus has over 38,000 
undergraduate students and over 8,500 gradu- 
ate and professional students. The university 
has 19 sororities and 23 fraternities. 

By the Numbers 

Originally Founded: 1931 

GPA: 3.45 

Total Lifetime Membership: 2,121 

Current Undergraduate Membership: 103 



Drexel chapter unites community in time of grief 



By RICHARD HIGHAM-KESSLER, Emory '09 



When tragedy strikes 
a college campus, 
most students will 
express their condo- 
lences and continue 
their daily routine. 
The SigEp brothers at 
Drexel, however, made 
the choice to be 
different. 

Following a fatal 
car crash this January 
that killed two stu- 
dents and injured four 
others affiliated with 



the Alpha Chi Rho 
fraternity, the Drexel 
SigEps canceled their 
upcoming sorority 
social and set to work 
to help the devastated 
community. 

In an amazing 
example of brotherly 
love, the Pennsylvania 
Beta Beta chapter 
held a music and pasta 
dinner fundraiser, 
bringing together 
more than 200 mem- 



bers of the community 
and raising $1,000 for 
the victims' families. 

Dave Eisner, 
Drexel'12, said the 
inspiration for the 
event came from his 
belief in the healing 
powers of music. After 
Joe Atar, Drexel '11, 
suggested the idea of 
including a pasta 
dinner, the chapter 
focused on its plan. 



"My reasoning," 
said Eisner, "came 
from being a musi- 
cian—and music has 
always been a way of 
escaping hardships 
for me. It unleashes 
happiness when I am 
sad, and I always try 
to do whatever I can to 
spread that to other 
people." 

Using its own funds 
to pay for supplies, the 
chapter enlisted the 
help of the Fraternity 
and Sorority Life 
Council and spread 



the word for the event 
on Facebook. Supple- 
mented with acoustic 
performances by 
members of Pi Kappa 
Alpha and Delta Phi 
Epsilon, the event was 
a huge success. 

"When I thought 
about Brotherly Love, 
I realized that it is not 
only meant for our 
Fraternity's brothers, 
but for brothers of 
other fraternities as 
well," said Eisner. "I 
think that was mutu- 
ally felt within the 
whole chapter." 



In a letter written to 
the editor of the 
Drexel student news- 
paper, the brothers of 
AXP said that the 
victims' parents 
donated the proceeds 
of the dinner to two 
foundations in 
memory of their 
children. 

"It is your kind 
words, presence and 
contributions that are 
now helping us carry 
on," they wrote. 



16 SIGEP JOURNAL Fall 2009 



-30 



Chapters in 

Recruitment 



Below we list the Top 30 chapters in recruitment for the '08-'09 
academic year. These men are registered with Fraternity Headquarters. 
Learn more about how to recruit men to your chapter using programs 
such as a Balanced Man Scholarship, summer recruitment plans and 
making the most of the formal recruitment period on your campus. 
Check the Undergraduates section at www.sigep.org. Congratulations 
to these chapters for setting the bar high for new members. 



Rank and 




Rank and 




Rank and 




School Recruits 


School Recruits 


School Recruits 


1 Oklahoma 


60 


13 Saint Louis 


45 


22 Georgia 


38 


2 Texas -Austin 


59 


14 Arizona State 


45 


23 Cent. Arkansas 


37 


3 Kentucky 


57 


15 George 




24 Austin Peay 




4 Illinois 


54 


Washington 


44 


State 


37 


5 Florida Int'l 


53 


16 Southeast 




25 Northwest 




6 Texas Tech 


52 


Missouri State 


44 


Missouri 


37 


7 Illinois State 


50 


17 Southern 




26 Cal State-San 




8 Colorado 


50 


Methodist 


44 


Bernardino 


37 


9 San Diego State 


49 


18 Indiana 


40 


27 Ohio State 


36 


10 Auburn 


48 


19 Florida 


39 


28 Drake 


36 


11 South Florida 


46 


20 Missouri State 


39 


29 Nevada-Reno 


36 


12 Louisiana State 


45 


21 Kansas 


39 


30 CalPoly-SLO 


36 





Fostering hope: chapter helps find homes for dogs 

The Appalachian State Chapter volunteers for High Country's Friends 
for Life, a non-profit organization aimed at finding homes for pets in 
the local animal shelter. This weekly adoption day offers local animal 
control dogs and cats to potential pet owners in Boone, N.C. Brothers 
also take in two to three dogs to help rehabilitate them. Fostering 
services have reduced the local shelter's euthanasia rate from 90 
percent to below 10 percent. L to R above: Andrew Brinson '10, Earl 
Laing, '11, and Matthew Hess, '12, show off Finlay, Marley, and Medea 
at Lowe's Hardware in September. 



Northern Kentucky regains charter after overcoming challenges 



By DAVE WENZEL, Cincinnati '06 
DAVE STETTER, Northern Kentucky '08 

In 1982 the Kentucky Eta chapter was char- 
tered at Northern Kentucky; it closed in 1992 
due to low manpower, a challenge revisited 
while reestablishing the chapter. Through the 
implementation of the Balanced Man Scholar- 
ship and a strategic recruitment game plan 
this past year, the chapter doubled its man- 
power in 2008 from 22 in May to 44 by 
December. These efforts were recognized 
with an Excelsior Cup at the 2009 Carlson 
Leadership Academy in Chicago, Illinois. 

The charter banquet was held at the Hilton 
Netherlands Plaza in Cincinnati, Ohio, a 
venue that has seen many important events in 
the Fraternity's history, including the 1959 
and 1979 Conclaves, several Carlson Leader- 
ship Academies, and the Miami (Ohio) SigEp 
chartering banquet. Over 190 local and out-of- 
town guests attended, including many 
university faculty and staff, representatives 
from campus fraternities and sororities, local 
SigEp chapters, and alumni. 

Since re-founding in 2003, brothers have 
held almost every leadership position on 
campus, including the IFC president for three 
consecutive years, IFC executive vice presi- 
dent, student government president, four 
senators, student directors for the university 
leadership institute and numerous others. 

Balanced Man Ideal 

Brothers host and participate in Sound 
Mind and Sound Body events monthly to offer 
a "different" type of fraternity experience at 
Northern Kentucky. Brothers' physical fitness 
is measured twice a semester with a chapter- 
led Presidential Fitness Test, providing status 
and needed areas of improvement. They host 



guest speakers on diversity and leadership 
during chapter meetings. The chapter is 
competitive in intramurals, and members 
attend numerous arts programs including a 
brother's theater productions, in addition to 
hosting sorority mixers at various local 
cultural venues. Academics are a top priority 
for the chapter, and their grades show it, as 
they had the highest grade point average of all 
15 Greek organizations with a 3.08. 

Volunteer Support 

Mark Krzy wonos, '84, is a lifelong volun- 
teer of the Kentucky Eta chapter. An original 
founding father in 1983, Krzywonos has 
provided guidance, leading to the re-charter- 
ing of Kentucky Eta. David Wenzel, 
Cincinnati '06, is president of the Alumni and 
Volunteer Corporation (AVC). Maintaining 
young alumni as key volunteers has helped 
the AVC grow to 10 members and led to the 
creation of several innovative programs. The 
Programming of Undergraduate Mentorship 
by Alumni (PUMA) for instance, gives one-on- 
one support to the executive committee from 



alumni, based on the career and life experi- 
ences of the volunteer. Other AVC members 
include David Stetter, '08, the recruitment 
mentor, Bob Gardner, Renaissance, parent 
liaison, and Frank Braun, Miami (Ohio) '81, 
faculty advisor. 

About the Campus 

Founded in 1968, Northern Kentucky sits on 
400 acres overlooking the Cincinnati skyline. 
A growing metropolitan campus dedicated to 
providing a private school education at a 
public school cost, it offers students an engag- 
ing learning environment. Enrollment is just 
over 15,000 students with 11,000 undergradu- 
ates; 6% of the undergraduate student 
population is in one of 15 Greek-lettered 
organizations. 

By the Numbers 

Originally Founded: 1982 

GPA: 3.08 

Total Lifetime Members: 251 

Current Undergraduate Membership: 40 




CHAPTER NEWS 17 



Varsity Scholar Athletes 



Spring sports review 

By JAY LANGHAMMER 

Review the outstanding accomplishments of SigEp undergraduate 
scholar athletes in spring sports such as track and field, baseball, 
tennis and lacrosse as well as fall sports athletes and a few alumni. 
We encourage all chapters and alumni to send names of athletes to 
journal@sigep.net for future coverage. 



ARKANSAS TECH 

Taylor Wallner, '09, 
was named Tech's 
Outstanding Senior 
Male Athlete and was 
on ESPN the 
Magazine's College 
Division Academic 
All-District IV team 
with a 3.47 GPA. Over 
12 golf tournaments, 
he averaged 75.6 for 
28 rounds and played 
in the NCAA Division 
II meet. He shot three 
69's and placed fourth 
(142) at the Ouachita 
Baptist Invitational. 

BABSON 

Andy O'Brien, '11, 
was a good distance 
runner for the track 
squad. 

BAKER 

Tanner Gleason, '11, 
ran on the 400 and 
1600 meter relays at 
the NAIA meet and 
A.J. Jimenez, '09, was 
a teammate. Mem- 
bers of the golf squad 
were Zack Rockey, 
'10, Adam Taylor, '11, 




Kevin Hostetter, '12, 
and Eric Reimer, '12. 

BALDWIN-WALLACE 

Competing for the 
track team were 
sprinter Tim 
Levitsky, '11, and 
distance runners 
Stewart Pozzuto, '12, 
and Adam Brown, '12. 

BUCKNELL 

Key members of the 
crew team were Tom 
Bernardi, '11, Hugh 
Shepard, '11, David 
Ross, '10, Byron 
Garoufalis, '10, and 
Kells Green, '10. 
Parker Phillips, '11, 
saw action for the 
golf team. 

CALIFORNIA 
RIVERSIDE 

Seeing mound duty 
for the baseball team 
was Zac Bishop, '11. 

CARNEGIE MELLON 

James Hulley, '10, 
won the UAA shot 
(school record 511") 
and discus (1451") 
while going to both 
the NCAA Division III 
indoor and outdoor 
meets. Also on the 
squad were javelin 
throwers Carl 
Spindler, 10, and 
Anthony Pacella, 12, 
plus pole vaulter 
Heath McAlister, 12. 



Kevin Silver, Miami (Ohio) 
'09, won a Bronze Medal for 
the U.S. team at the 2009 
Maccabiah Games in Israel. 



CASE WESTERN 
RESERVE 

Returning for his 
final season of eligi- 
bility was pitcher 
Kevin Haley, '08, who 
led the baseball staff 
with five wins, 77 
innings and 46 
strikeouts. Andrew 
Pozzuto, '09, threw 
the discus and javelin 
for the track team. 

CHRISTOPHER 
NEWPORT 

Tennis standout 
Lorenzo Sison, 11, 
was 13-8 in doubles 
and 10-9 in singles 
play. 

CLARKSON 

Attackman Tim 
Leahy, '09, played 10 
games for the la- 
crosse team and 
scored two goals. 

COLUMBIA 

Tennis co-captain Jon 
Wong, 10, played in 
the NCAA Division I 
meet and was All-Ivy 
League second team 
in doubles (14-5) and 
singles (12-7). Light- 
weight rowing team 
members Bob Duff, 10, 
and Mike Nucci, 10, 
competed in the U.S. 
men's quadruple 
sculls competition at 
the Under 23 World 
Championships. 
Other rowers were 
Brian Dunn, 10, 
Brian Marcus, 12, 
David Mulhern, 10, 




Kevin Snyder, Oklahoma '10 

Alex Powell, 12 and 
Bruno Salemme, 12. 

CORNELL 

Oarsmen on the 
heavyweight crew 
squad were Kade 
Laden, 10, Aaron 
Doliber, 10, and Sarp 
Aksel, 10. The 
lightweight crew 
squad included Nick 
Carbone, 10, Christo- 
pher Livingston, 10, 
and Brandon Sea- 
man, 11. 

CREIGHTON 

Golfer Jimmy 
Zuegner, 11, aver- 
aged 80.0 over five 
rounds with a low of 
76. Also on the squad 
was Michael 
Colclasure, 12. 

DARTMOUTH 

Five SigEps saw 
action for the track 
squad. Chris 
Alexander, 10, 
placed eighth in the 
outdoor Heptagonals 
shot put (48') and 
KenDiCairano, 10, 
was ninth at the 
indoor Heptagonals 
pole vault event 
(14*9"). Andy Han, '09, 
placed 12 th in the 
outdoor Heptagonals 
3,000 meter steeple- 
chase and Kevin 
Treadway, 10, was 
18 th in the outdoor 
Heps 5,000. Alex 



Hall, 10 was on the 
seventh place indoor 
Heptagonals 4 X 880 
yard relay event. 
Evan Greulich, 10, 
was on the heavy- 
weight crew squad 
which sent three 
boats to the finals at 
the IRA champion- 
ships. 

DENISON 

Four SigEps were key 
players for the 21-19 
baseball team. All- 
NCAC second team 
catcher Alex Horn, 
10, hit .374 (40 of 107) 
and third baseman 
Kevin Teague, 11, 
wasa.327hitter(32of 
98). Pitcher Freddy 
Marino, 11, had a 3-2 
record in 15 contests 
and outfielder Danny 
Pritz, 11, batted .243 
and scored 18 runs. 
Lacrosse midfielder 
Justin Hess, 10, 
scored eight points 
for the 14-3 NCAA 
Division III playoff 
club and goalie 
Patrick Cuff, 10, had 
16 saves in five 
games. Ben Pendery, 
'09, was a good 800 
runner for the squad 
that won the indoor 
NCAC title. 

EMORY 

Trackman Adam 
Moroff, '09, had a best 
400 hurdles time of 



55.73 at the UAA 
outdoor meet. 

FRESNO STATE 

Matt Ryan, '09, was 
named an Ail-Ameri- 
can Scholar by 
Cleveland Golf (3.46 
GPA) and won the 
team's Bulldog 
Award. Over 15 
rounds, he had the 
second-best average 
(73.20) on the squad. 
His best finish was a 
16 th place tie (216, 
including a 69) at the 
Giustina Memorial 
Classic. 

HUNTINGDON 

Tennis player Sean 
Buysman, 12, was 
named to the GSAC 
All-Freshman Team 
after posting records 
of 4-0 in doubles and 
4-4 in singles. Daven 
Bailey, 12, was also a 
squad member. 

ILLINOIS TECH 

Appearing in seven 
games for the base- 
ball team was pitcher 
Sean Irish, '09. 

JOHNS HOPKINS 

At the Centennial 
Conference outdoor 
meet, Jacob Kramer, 
12, placed third in the 
110 hurdles and sixth 
in the 400 hurdles. 
Taylor Reese, '09, 
was a member of the 
crew squad. 



18 SIGEP JOURNAL Fall 2009 




LAMBUTH 

Golfer Scott Metcalfe, 
'12, placed second 
(152) at the Union 
Spring Invitational. 
He played in the 
Stone Cup summer 
tournament and 
Aaron Ingalls, '11, 
played in the Tennes- 
see State Amateur 
meet. Eddy Whitaker, 
'10, was also a golf 
regular and was 
joined by Andrew 
Asbridge, '10, and 
Heath Lay, '12. Mem- 
bers of the 35-20 
baseball squad were 
infielder Paul Bucher, 
'10, and pitcher Ben 
Howell, '12. 

LOYOLA 
MARYMOUNT 

Keyon Mitchell, '10, 
had top times of 11.53 
for 100 meters and 
22.95 for 200 meters. 
He also competed in 
the long jump (22'6") 
and triple jump 
(47*5"). 

MAINE 

At the Wildcat 
Invitational 3000 
steeplechase event, 
Christopher McGary, 
'12, placed third and 
Brendan Carr, '10, 
was sixth. Spencer 
McElwain, '12, 
finished 10 th in the 
5000 at the Wildcat 
meet and was 23 rd 
in the event at the 
American East 
Championships. 

MARYLAND 

Andrew Kay, '11, 
had a good year for 
the golf team, averag- 
ing 76.89 over 18 
rounds, with a low 
score of 70. His best 
finish was a 17 th place 
tie at the Maryland 
Intercollegiate. 




SCHOLAR ATHLETE FOCUS 

Sailor, lacrosse player navigates on land, 
in the water and in class 



Patrick Bloomstine, John Carroll '09, 
is a member of the varsity 
lacrosse and sailing teams who 
maintains a 3.61 GPA as an 
economics major. He also serves 
as the chaplain for his chapter. 
His sailing team ranked for the 
first time in eight years as 6 th in 
the Mid-West, and his lacrosse 
team turned in a 4-0 season. He 
offers Journal readers a bit of 
insight into how he balances his 
athletic and academic endeavors. 

Journal: What's the difference in skills 
needed for lacrosse and sailing? 

Lacrosse is much more physically demanding. I 
play long stick midfield, and it involves a lot of 
running on the wings of face-offs, on defense and on 
clearing plays. Sailing requires a lot more concentra- 
tion and the ability to multitask. I have to drive the 
boat and keep it moving quickly while making tacti- 
cal decisions throughout the race. 

J: What are the trickiest things to learn in 
each of your chosen sports? 

In sailing, there are a lot of tricky things. Tuning 
your boat to the wind conditions can have a huge 
bearing on how your day goes. With so many sail 
controls, forgetting to adjust one or two of them can 
ruin your day. In lacrosse, its really important for the 
defense to recognize what set to get into. As a senior 
on defense, it often falls to me to call what defense 
we will be in, while still keeping track of the ball and 
my man. 

J: What is the most interesting thing 
about economics? 

I enjoy everything about economics and one of my 
favorite courses was industrial organization and 
public policy, where I learned about anti-trust cases, 
mergers, collusion, and oligopoly and monopoly 
behavior. It's also interesting to study the current 
economic crisis — both causes and possible solutions. 

J: What challenges do you face in 
balancing varsity sports and high 
performing academics? 

One of the major challenges is sleep deprivation. 
Sometimes the only thing that got me through the 



day was caffeine. That's better since my course load 
has leveled out. I've also had to sacrifice the occa- 
sional social function. I've always seen clearly that 
academics come first for me, and I worry about the 
rest after that. 

J: How has the fraternity played a role in 
shaping your athletic and academic 
experience in college? 

I'm not sure if I would have played lacrosse without 
a few of my Fraternity brothers encouraging me to do 
so. They were already members of the team and 
urged me to join. With the sailing team, I recruited 
some brothers to help crew for the team and they 
ended up joining. 

In academics, three other brothers in the chapter 
are senior economics majors. We have classes to- 
gether, and it helps to study with other guys who care 
about academics, particularly economics, as much as 
I do. 

J: What are your plans after you 
graduate? 

I plan on attending law school. 




VARSITY SCHOLAR ATHLETES 



MIT 

Distance runner Jack 
Bourbonnais, '10, was 
All-NEWMAC at 
10,000 meters and 
placed sixth at the 
NCAA Division III 
New England outdoor 
meet. He was also on 
the NEWMAC spring 
Academic All-Confer- 
ence Team. Kevin 
Kleinguetl, '11, was a 
middle distance 
runner. 

MIAMI (OHIO) 

After placing ninth in 
the MAC outdoor 
5000 (14:53.32), Kevin 
Silver, '09, won a 
Bronze Medal for the 



U.S. team in the event 
(14:52) at the 2009 
Maccabiah Games in 
Israel. 

MICHIGAN 

Chris Baldwin, 09, 
was Academic All-Big 
Ten and reached a 
season-best pole 
vault of 141" at the 
Len Paddock Invita- 
tional. He also had a 
38'11" triple jump 
versus Ohio State. 

MINNESOTA 

Addison Demer, '11, 
won the indoor 
Minnesota Open long 
jump and placed 
seventh (231/2") at 




the Big Ten indoor 
meet. He also had a 
467-1/2" triple jump 
at the indoor Big Ten 
event. Outdoors, his 
457-1/4" triple jump 
won the Lee Krough 
Invitational and he 
was second in the 
long jump (23* 6-3/4") 
in a second place 
finish at the Minne- 
sota Open. 

MISSOURI 

Ohio State head 
baseball coach Bob 
Todd, Missouri 71, 

had another success- 
ful spring, leading his 
Buckeyes squad to a 
42-19 record. 

MONMOUTH 

Ben Morrow, 11, and 
Brian Miller, 12, were 
tennis regulars and 
high jumper Matt 
Hassler, 12, placed 
fifth at the MWC 
outdoor meet. The 
baseball squad 
included outfielder 
Andrew Weidner, 10, 
and pitcher Phillip 
Scott, 12. 

MORAVIAN 

Gary Zack, 12, was 
second in the javelin 
(198* 11-1/4") at the 
ECAC outdoor meet 
and third at the 
Landmark Confer- 
ence outdoor meet. 
Justin Starcher, '09, 
was fifth in the 
Landmark discus 
event and also threw 
thejavelinasthe 
team win the ECAC 
Division III title. 
Playing lacrosse were 
Nelson Knudsen, 12, 
and Daniel Cress, 11. 



MUHLENBERG 

Leading tennis 
players were co- 
captain Jonathan 
Farber, 10, John 
Osborne, 11, and 
Jason Kirschen- 
baum, 11. 

MURRAY STATE 

Members of the tennis 
team were Jonathan 
Headford, 10, and 
MikelHeadford,10. 

NEBRASKA 

High jumper Sam 
Haase, 11, reached a 
best indoor mark of 7' 
1/4" at the Nebraska 
Tune-Up and 610-3/4" 
at the outdoor Ward 
Haylet Invitational. 
He was also 11 th at the 
Big 12 meet. Matthew 
Schilling, 11, ran a 
best indoor 600 time 
ofl:24.24attheNWU 
Invitational and had a 
top 800 outdoor time 
of 1:57.44 at the 
Nebraska Quad meet. 

NEBRASKA- 
KEARNEY 

Golfer Kris Koelzer, 
12, averaged 77.17 
over six rounds and 
tied for 10 th at the 
RMAC Fall Invita- 
tional. Teammate 
Garrett Goldsberry, 
12, shot 78.33 over 
nine rounds and tied 
for fourth at the fall 
Nebraska Invita- 
tional. At the RMAC 
track meet, Scott 
Wenzl, 11, was third 
in the triple jump 
(4810") and ninth in 
the long jump (22' 1/4"). 
KyleMcBride,ll, 
was on the tennis 
squad. 

NEBRASKA-OMAHA 

Seeing action in singles 
and doubles for the 




Tennis star John Watts, Washington in St. Louis '10 



Andrew Kay, Maryland '12 

tennis team was Ryan 
Robertson, 12. 

OHIO NORTHERN 

Trackman Jerrod 
Stevens, 12, com- 
peted in the long 
jump and triple jump. 

OHIO WESLEYAN 

Seven players led the 
baseball squad to a 24- 
16 season. All-NCAC 
first team pitcher Matt 
Struble,10,was6-2 
with a 4.01 ERA in 15 
games and a team-high 
60.2 innings. Second 
baseman James 
DiBiasio, 12, was 
NCAC Newcomer of 
the Year and an All- 
NCAC second teamer 
after batting .375 (54 of 
144) with 43 runs 
scored. Third baseman 
Eric McComas, '09, hit 
.293(36ofl23)with24 
RBI and outfielder 
Matt Rhode, '09, had 19 
starts. Also playing 
were pitcher Greg 
Vasami, '09, and 
outfielders Jared 
Turner, 10, and Jared 
Haas, 11. Clay Davis, 

10, won the 10,000 
meter run (32:11.75) at 
the All-Ohio Division 
III meet and was joined 
on the squad by Alex 
Havran, '09. Tennis 
player Zach Weaver, 

11, was 12-9 in doubles 
and 6-2 in singles. 
Goalie Frankie 
Weschler, 11, played in 



six games for the 10-5 
lacrosse squad which 
went to the NCAA 
Division III playoffs. 

OKLAHOMA 

After earning All-Big 
12 high jump honors 
in 2008, Kevin Snyder, 
10, battled injuries 
this spring. He placed 
second (6*8-3/4") at 
the indoor Razorback 
Invitational and also 
was second at the J.D. 
Martin Invitational. 

OREGON 

Ingmar Kerem, 11, 
placed fifth in the 
decathlon (5,413 
points) at the Oregon 
Relays and was fifth 
in the high jump (6' 5- 
1/2") at the Pepsi 
Team Invitational. At 
the Oregon Preview 
meet, teammate 
William Taylor, 11, 
was fifth in the 200 
(23.16) and seventh in 
the 400 (50.99). 

RANDOLPH-MACON 

Connor O'Leary, '09, 
played six rounds for 
the golf squad and 
Daniel Doherty, 10 
played tennis. 

RICHMOND 

Brad Miller, 12, was 
fourth on the golf 
team with a 75.93 
average. He won the 
Landry Invitational 
(210), earning him 
Atlantic 10 Player of 



20 SIGEP JOURNAL Fall 2009 




the Week honors, 
and placed second at 
the Georgetown 
Invitational. 

ROCHESTER 

Golfer Kevin Gay, 11, 
was named to the 
UAA All-Academic 
Team and Alex 
Magill, 12, saw action 
on the tennis team. 

ST. MARY'S OF 
TEXAS 

Golfer Alex Maurer, 
'09, was third with a 
76.0 average for 13 
rounds and gained 
ESPN the Magazine 
Academic All-District 
honors (3.82 GPA). He 
tied for 10 th (216) at 
the Heartland Con- 
ference meet; was 13 th 
at the Charles Coody 
Invitational; and 
played in the NCAA 
Division II regional 
meet. Teammate Sam 
Jernigan, 12, was 19 th 
(221) at the Heartland 
meet and 28 th at the 
Division II regional. 

SOUTH CAROLINA 

David Wolff, 10, had a 
good spring for the 
tennis team, posting 
records of 6-4 in 
singles and 4-1 in 
doubles. 

STANFORD 

Fencer Julian 
Jennings-White, 10, 
competed in the foil 
event at the NCAA 
Mid-West Regional 
meet and Michael 
Hammer sley, 11, was 
also on the squad. Max 
Halvorson, 11, saw 
action for the 21-11 
volleyball squad and 
Mark Murphy, 10, was 
on the rowing squad. 



STEVENS TECH 

SixSigEpssawalot 
of action in baseball. 
All-Empire 8 first 
teamer Ken 
Meerendonk, 11, led 
with a .343 average 
(50 of 144), eight 
home runs, 30 RBI 
and 33 runs scored. 
He was also the top 
pitcher with a 5-5 
record in 69.1 innings. 
Named All-Empire 8 
second team was first 
sacker Dan Silva, 10, 
who hit .343 (37 of 
108). Other key 
players were pitcher 
Dan Anunziatta, 12, 
outfielder Matt 
Roman, 11, and 
infielders Matt 
Glassman, 11, and 
Mike Pagliaro, 12. At 
the Empire 8 track 
meet, John 
Sangiovanni, 10, was 
on the third place 400 
relay and Kevin 
Morgera, 10, was 
ninth in the 400 
hurdles at the ECAC 
Division III meet. 

TCU 

Trackman Adam 
Benz, '09 was 14 th in 
the 200 at the indoor 
Texas Tech Invita- 
tional and MWC 
prelims. Outdoors, he 
was 18 th in the 200 at 
the MWC meet. 
Javelin thrower Eric 
Storey, 12, was also 
on the squad. 

THIEL 

Four SigEp standouts 
led the 29-15 baseball 
team. Outfielder Eric 
Boylan, '09, was 
named to the ABCA 
All-American and 
NIC All-Fraternity 
All-American second 
teams after hitting 
.404 (59 of 146) with 



seven homers and 34 
RBI. Pitcher Josh 
Tedesco, '09 was on 
the NIC All-Frater- 
nity second team and 
the ABCA All-Mid- 
west third team. He 
had a 9-3 record in 95 
innings. Earning All- 
PAC first team honors 
was third baseman 
Matt Stumpf, '09, who 
batted .335 (54 of 161) 
with three homers 
and 32 RBI. Pitcher 
Mark Brewer, '09, had 
a 2-1 record and four 
saves in 22 contests. 
Arrel Strock, 12, was 
on the track squad. 

TRINE 

First baseman/DH 
Jeremy Howard, 11, 
hit .271 and pitcher 
Adam Shiltz, 10, won 
two games. Playing 
lacrosse were Andy 
Lauer, 12, (14 goals, 
seven assists) and 
Kyle Mates, 10, 
(11 points). Seeing 
action for the track 
team were sprinter 
Samuel Johnson, '09, 
weightman Lucas 
Rosengarden, 12, 
and distance runner 
Adam Starcher, 10. 

TRUMAN STATE 

Second baseman 
Luke Crader, 11, 
started 47 contests 
and hit .231 (36 of 156) 
with 20 runs scored. 
Also seeing a lot of 
action were pitcher 
Andy Updike, 11, and 
first baseman Kevin 
Zukaitis, 11 (34 
starts). 

VALPARAISO 

Jarrett Mickens, 11, 
was 10 th in the long 
jump and triple jump 
at the Horizon 
League meet. His best 



triple jump distance 
was 43'4-l/4". Joel 
Mathwig, 10 placed 
15 th in the Horizon 
3000 steeplechase and 
20 th in the 1500. Other 
runners included 
Derek Egley, 12, 
Justin Bui, 11, and 
Dustin Lawrence, '09. 

VILLANOVA 

Five SigEps saw 
action on the golf 
squad, led by co- 
captains Brett 
Bergman, '09, (18 
rounds, 77.78 aver- 
age) and Andrew 
Alexander, '09, (10 
rounds, 83.0 average). 
Colin List, 10, ranked 
second with a 76.55 
average (low of 69) 
over 20 rounds and 
Doug Stadler, '09, 
averaged 77.50 for 22 
rounds. Eddie Ryan, 
12, played six rounds. 
Zach Siegler, 12, 
played on the tennis 
team. 



the NCAA Division III 
doubles champion- 
ship. He was 38-5 in 
singles and 33-3 in 
doubles. Teammate 
SlaviFildish,10, 
posted a 12-3 singles 
mark. 

WESTMINSTER 

Golfer Jordan Flaim, 

09, was on the PAC 

Academic Honor Roll. 

Teammate David 

Mlinarich, 12, tied for 

fifth at the Thiel 

Invitational 

and 24 th at 

the PAC 

meet. 

Also on the 

links was 

Steve 

LaRue, 

11. 

Playing 

baseball 

were outfielder 

RickDeBlasio, 

11, (.262) 



three saves and 104.2 
innings pitched. He 
was also ECAC New 
England Pitcher of 
the Year and played 
in the New England 
All-Star Game at 
Fenway Park. Also 
playing was catcher 
Justin Deveaux, 10. 
Competing in track 
was sprinter/jumper 
ToddLeClerc,10. 




WASHINGTON 
(SEATTLE) 

Zach Woods, 10, had 
a best javelin throw of 
170'8"atthePacific- 
10 meet and earned 
Pac-10 All-Academic 
honorable mention. 

WASHINGTON 
&LEE 

Pitcher Nate Adkins, 
10, saw action for the 
22-15 baseball squad. 

WASHINGTON IN 
ST. LOUIS 

Tennis star John 
Watts, 10 was named 
UAA Most Valuable 
Player and played in 




and 
pitcher Andy 
Wallen, 12. Mark 
Drabick, 10, was a 
regular for the tennis 
squad. The track 
team featured Mike 
Cercone, 11, and Josh 
Bradley, 12. 

WORCESTER TECH 

Co-captain/pitcher 
Conor Fahey, '09, led 
NCAA Division III 
with 122 strikeouts 
and was named to the 
ABCA All- American 
and NIC All-Frater- 
nity All-American 
first teams. He had a 
1.55 ERA, 8-2 record, 



Ken Meerendonk 
Stevens Tech '11 



( < 




Grand Chapter Conclave 2009 

Over 1300 SigEps 
honor and inspire 
each other to leave 
their mark 

Over 800 undergraduates 
and nearly 500 alumni and 
volunteers descended upon 
the Rosen Shingle Creek 
resort in Orlando, Florida 
this past August for the 51 st 
Grand Chapter Conclave. 
After a legislative kick-off 
on Wednesday evening, each day featured its own 
theme: Sound Mind, Sound Body on Thursday; Broth- 
erly Love and Leadership on Friday; and Personal and 
Professional Development on Saturday. Nearly 80 
programs and masterful attention to detail led many 
to comment that this Conclave was one of the best 
organized and most energized they had attended. 

Journal readers can find daily Conclave news, 
legislative highlights, key speeches and literally 
hundreds of photos from the event at 
www.sigepconclave.com. In these next few pages 
and on the back cover, we focus on the honorees, 
those alumni, chapters and undergraduates who 
bring honor to the SigEp name, who make the Frater- 
nity different, who show others how to leave their 
mark by leaving one of their own. 






National 
Board of 
Directors 

2009-2011 




Grand President 

Garry C. Kief 

Southern California '70 




Grand Treasurer 

Chris Bittman 

Colorado '85 



Grand Secretary 

Bert Harris 

Florida '70 







National Director National Director 

Richard W. Bennet, III Phillip A. Cox 

Central Missouri '74 Indiana '84 



22 SIGEP JOURNAL Fall 2009 



Alumni dedicate countless hours to Fraternity, humanity 



By STEVE DORSEY, American '09 

I sat on stage in front of several hundred 
people— exiting my position as a Student Direc- 
tor on the National Board— just as I had begun 
two years ago, with lights glaring on me, reflect- 
ing on my Fraternity experience. It's been an 
unforgettable few years as an undergraduate, 
and then serving the Fraternity as an alumnus— 
albeit only for a few months. 

But that does not compare to the endless 
working hours of eight alumni, honored at the 
51 st Conclave's premiere event, the Alumni 
Awards dinner. The Sigma Phi Epsilon Citation 
and Order of the Golden Heart recipients have 
dedicated decades to their fields, professions, 
Fraternity and brothers. 

The following brief descriptions offer only a 
glimpse of the contributions from these alumni 
who the Fraternity has honored for their achieve- 
ments, their dedication and their commitment to 
SigEp and beyond. Read more and watch videos 
of these recipients at www.sigepconclave.com. 

The SigEp Citation 

Three alumni received the Sigma Phi 
Epsilon Citation, which honors a small group 
of members who have achieved a laudable 
level of accomplishment in their professional 
life. Since the award was first presented in 
1965, 228 brothers have been so honored. 

Gene Keady, Kansas State '58 

As a NCAA Division I basketball coach for 
Purdue, he became the "winningest" coach in 
the program's history with 505 wins, including 
many appearances in the NCAA Tournament, 
during his tenure from 1980 to 2005. He also 
served as assistant coach for the 2000 U.S. 
Olympic basketball team. 

Right Rev. Jack M. McKelvey, 
Delaware '63 

As an ordained Episcopal minister, he has 
led several dioceses, including those of 
Newark, Delaware, and Rochester. He has also 
written several articles on Christian educa- 
tion and team-building. "My experience in the 
Sigma Phi Epsilon community is one of the 
three most important leadership development 
experiences in my life," he said. 



Dr.JohnP.Kotter,MIT'68 

As a distinguished professor at the Harvard 
Business School, he is an expert in the field of 
corporate leadership, authoring several 
ground-breaking books on the topic. He became 
a tenured professor at Harvard at the age of 33. 

"Congratulate me? No. No. I showed up 
to congratulate you. Good work. Keep it up." 

DR. JOHN P. K0TTER,MIT'68 

Order of the Golden Heart 

This award, now in its 50 th year, is bestowed 
upon brothers who have shown outstanding 
dedication and personal sacrifice to Sigma Phi 
Epsilon as alumni. The first OGH was 
awarded to William L. Phillips, "Uncle Billy," 
in 1959. It has been presented to 143 brothers. 

Judge David Roman, Cornell 73 

Traveling over 200 miles each month to 
attend meetings as AVC President for the 
Cornell chapter, Brother Roman has led alumni 
and undergraduates across the region and 
nation, for more than three decades. During his 
time as an undergraduate, he served as chapter 
president, and was honored with the Sigma Phi 
Epsilon Distinguished Alumni Award in 1998. 

Dean Duncan, Indiana State '52 

Brother Duncan has been dedicated to the 
Fraternity for over a half-century. He began his 
SigEp experience as a Founding Father of his 
chapter. He continues to the serve on the AVC, 
often requiring hours-long trips to and from the 
chapter. 

John Abraham, Cincinnati 77 

Brother Abraham's dedication to alumni 
service has earned his chapter 11 consecutive 
Buchanan Cups since 1989. Abraham is a proud 
supporter of the Balanced Man Scholarship, and 
coordinated his chapter's 50th anniversary that 
more than 500 alumni attended. 



"If you care 

about your 

chapter, 

commit 

yourself, 

right now, 

to volunteer 

after you 

graduate." 



Tom Gray, Kansas 77 

For over 30 years, Brother Gray 
has been an active alumnus of the 
Fraternity, and the driver of 
several successful capital cam- 
paigns for his chapter. In April 
1987, he led the chapter to recover 
from a devastating fire that 
destroyed the chapter house. 



□ 



See Citation and Order of the Golden Heart 
speeches at www.sigepconclave.com. 




Gray 



Prouty 



Jeff Prouty, Iowa State 78 

Brother Prouty has served in many leader- 
ship capacities of the Fraternity on chapter, 
regional, and national levels. He most recently 
served on the National Board of Directors. After 
graduation, he served as a Regional Director. 
He started a consulting firm at the age of 31. 




National Director 

Thomas B. Jelke 

Florida International '90 



A 



National Director 

Billy Maddalon 

North Carolina State '90 




^ 



Jfk i^ 



National Director 

Shawn McKenna 

Maine '77 



Student National Director 

Zach Barilleau 

Louisiana State '10 




Student National Director 

Matthew Eisen 

Yale '10 



Student National Director 

Adam Motycka 

Toledo '10 



51 st GRAND CHAPTER CONCLAVE 23 




GRAND CHAPTER CONCLAVE 2009 



Doud-Clayton recipient inspired to help fallen soldier's family 



The touching photo- 
graph of fallen 
Marine Major Trane 
McCloud, Tennessee 
'89, on the Journal's 
In Memoriam page 
propelled Renato 
Villacorte, CalPoly- 
Pomona '91, into 
action. He too had 
been a Marine and 
felt a deep connection 
to and empathy for 



McCloud's wife and 
three children. He 
connected with 
Snowball express, an 
organization dedi- 
cated to the children 
of fallen soldiers, and 
helped raise money 
for the family to go to 
Disneyland. He 
greeted them, and 
hosted them for the 



week. "His efforts 
truly exemplify 
brothers helping 
brothers, that Jim 
Clayton Tennessee 
'57,(andWallyDoud, 
Wisconson '48) 
sought to encour- 
age," said Maggie 
McCloud, McCloud's 
wife. For this effort 
and his fundraising to 



help SigEp vets with 
a Fallen Brothers 
Fund at the SigEp 
Foundation, 
Villacorte was 
recognized with the 
Doud-Clayton award. 
The award is a grant 
of $10,000 which 
recipients can use to 
issue scholarships to 
deserving SigEps. 




Renato Villacorte, CalPoly- Pomona '91 



Total 

number of 
registrants 




229 

Chapters representei 

3,8412 



Total meals served 

Conclave 
functions 



599.249 

Miles traveled for undergraduates 
to attend Conclave 



Total Educational Foundation 
umbrellas used to get attendees 
to the Balanced Man Celebration 
during a torrential downpour 




24 SIGEP JOURNAL Fall 2009 



50 years 

since member 
restrictions were 
removed... 

are we 





In the early 1950s, the country was beginning to integrate the federal 
workforce and the military. Color barriers were slowly eroding in 
professional sports. SigEp was also a forerunner in setting the stage for 
integration by beginning to debate about its membership requirements. 
This effort came to a turning point at the 26th Grand Chapter Conclave. 



It was called the Conclave of Progress. In 
September 1959, nearly 700 SigEps gathered in 
Washington, D.C., to debate the future of the 
Fraternity. In a city where segregation was 
still widely practiced, legislation to lift a 
restriction that limited fraternity member- 
ship to white Christians was introduced, hotly 
debated and overwhelmingly approved. In 
protest, prominent leaders in the Fraternity 
threatened to renounce the brotherhood that 
they had created. Despite their efforts, the race 
barrier had been broken. After this Conclave, 
Sigma Phi Epsilon would never look the same. 

What sense of justice drove these men to 
swim against the tide of segregation? Five 
decades later, are we a more diverse Fraternity? 
And how can we continue to build a diverse 
brotherhood with members prepared to lead in 
an evermore multicultural and international 
society? Join the SigEp Journal as we look 
back on one of the most important milestones 
of the Fraternity's past and forward to the 
composition of the Fraternity's future. 



New York City, 1959 

Days before Conclave, Bruce Hasenkamp, 
Dartmouth '60, huddled with friend William 
G. Tragos, Washington in St. Louis '56, in 

Tragos' cramped New York apartment to put 
the finishing touches on an ambitious strategy 
to end the Fraternity's policy of racial and 
religious discrimination. They had spent the 
summer orchestrating a national letter-writing 
campaign to convince other chapters to approve 
the reform. "We just really worked," Tragos 
said of their strategy. "We planned for every 
response someone could have to the legislation." 

Tragos was a veteran of the fight. At both 
the 1955 and 1957 Conclaves, he had attempted 
to reverse the policy but would fail to see it 
removed. Instead, with many chapters facing 
pressure from their universities to remove 
racial membership exclusions or face being 
kicked off campus, delegates at the 1955 Con- 
clave voted to move the membership 
restriction from the by-laws to the Ritual. "We 
thought that was even worse because then 



you're hiding it and lying about it," remarked 
Hasenkamp. 

Little time remained before Dartmouth's 
April 1, 1960, deadline to change the national 
fraternity policy. Hasenkamp had been sent to 
Conclave by his chapter to avert disaster. "We 
were not only facing that deadline but hap- 
pened to believe that it was wrong to pick our 
membership so narrowly," Hasenkamp said of 
the motivation to end the policy. "We could not 
see anything about being a good Christian that 
should tolerate discrimination." 

As the Conclave opened, Hasenkamp knew 
he had the support of many chapters, district 
governors and Headquarters staff, but the 
situation remained tenuous. Members came to 
Conclave holding strong, divergent opinions on 
this issue and were determined to weigh in, 
much like the emerging national debate that 
was beginning to unfold. Among the dissenters 
of the measure were several prominent and 
older alumni. 

"We knew that our problem would be going 
up against the older and more venerable" 
alumni, said Hasenkamp. After these vocal 
opponents addressed the delegates, 
Hasenkamp realized that they needed their 
own "old and venerable" to speak in favor of 
the measure. That man was District Governor 
William E. Rogers, Pennsylvania State '16, 
"who had a southern accent you could barely 
penetrate," Hasenkamp recalled. "I can still 



51 ST GRAND CHAPTER CONCLAVE 25 



^fl 




GRAND CHAPTER CONCLAVE 2009 



hear him," Hasenkamp said of Rogers as he 
rebutted one critic by telling him he was "living 
in 1901." 

The vote was a landslide: 134 for, 37 
against. Membership in Sigma Phi Epsilon 
would no longer be defined by race, religion 
or background. Years before the federal 
government would pass the Civil Rights Act, 
with race riots flaring throughout the coun- 
try, SigEp had voted to integrate the 
Fraternity. 

Hasenkamp was ecstatic. Some delegates 
headed for a German restaurant to celebrate. 
The euphoria even caused Trueman "Sandy" 
Sanderson, WPI '31, a National Board mem- 
ber in 1959, Order of the Golden Heart 
recipient and "complete teetotaler" accord- 
ing to Hasenkamp, to enjoy a martini. 

The elation wasn't universal. Disgruntled 
alumni called a press conference to declare 
their anger with the reform. One alumnus tried 
to lead some chapters out of the Fraternity, but 
the attempt at secession failed. Hasenkamp 
said, "He called a parade and no one showed up 
to march." 

But the march of progress was on. 

"True brotherhood has no color" 

Are we a more diverse fraternity now 50 
years after this historic vote? 

Data are elusive. Demographic information of 
the Fraternity's members is not collected, and 
success stories are anecdotal. Without data on 
the race of undergraduates and alumni, there is 
no quantitative way to assess progress. But by 
many signs, as diversity grew on college cam- 
puses across the nation, so did diversity in 
SigEp chapters. 

Tragos served as a regional director and 
district governor. He has seen one of the 
traditional dividing lines disappear. Tragos 
said, "which religion you practice is no longer 
an issue" in the Fraternity. 

Some chapters have been more successful 
than others in recruiting a diverse range of 
men. The dynamics of individual campuses, 
Greek systems and chapters are crucial to 
understanding diversity, many say. 

David Wenzel, Cincinnati, '06, who serves 
as Alumni and Volunteer Corporation presi- 
dent for the Northern Kentucky chapter, said 

the Cincinnati and 
^^^^^^^^^^^^ Northern Kentucky 



"A^Thof'o "f)QQf chapters have very 

1 55 different member- 

lo pi OlOg UC ships as a result of the 

-Shakespeare dynamics of their 
respective campus 
Greek systems. At 




Cincinnati, a university with a diverse student 
population, there are many traditionally 
African-American or Jewish fraternities. The 
SigEp chapter's efforts to recruit minority 
students are hampered by many students' 
desire to join the traditional organizations. 
Alternatively, the Northern Kentucky chapter 
has a number of openly gay, Indian- American 
and African-American brothers, this on a 
campus not as diverse as its neighbor to the 
north, Cincinnati. 

At Virginia Commonwealth, the chapter is 
comprised of a racially diverse group of 
brothers. Chapter President Richie Boe, '10, 
said that while diversity should be a factor and 
"should be in your mind" during recruitment, 
it has become a non-issue for the brothers at 
Virginia Commonwealth. "On a diverse 
campus, we don't have to focus on [recruiting 
for diversity]. If you are doing all the right 
things, it shouldn't be a problem." 

For Victor Wilson, Georgia Renaissance, 
executive vice president of student affairs at 
the College of Charleston, "true brotherhood 
has no color." However, he said using tradi- 
tional African-American or Hispanic 
fraternities as an excuse for low diversity in 
SigEp is not the whole story. "Not all black 
males want to be a member of a traditional 
African-American house." It takes a strong 
and unique type of student to look beyond 
traditional cultural fraternities, Wilson said, 
and these are exactly the type of men who 
ought to be SigEps. But extra effort must be 
made to recruit them. Imagine the anxiety a 
minority student feels entering a white 
fraternity on his own, Wilson said. "It's no 
different [a feeling] than that of a white 
student pledging Alpha Phi Alpha (a tradi- 
tionally African-American fraternity)." 

Wilson played an instrumental role in 
forming the first integrated fraternity at the 



"We see the need for 
recruiting for diversity; 
we see that diversity 
makes us a stronger 
chapter." 

~ UTAH STATE CHAPTER PRESIDENT 
ALEX PUTNAM, '09 

University of Georgia. In 1997, while serving in 
the university administration, Wilson was 
approached by a student who wanted to bring 
the SigEp chapter back to campus. Seeing that 
fraternities at Georgia were divided along 
racial lines, Wilson and Bart Newman, 
Georgia '99, set out to recruit a diverse group 
of men. "I was the one who was hesitant and 
doubtful at first, actually," Wilson said. But a 
handful of African- American students were 
among the first two dozen recruits, making 
SigEp the first previously all-white, now 
integrated fraternity in the University of 
Georgia's history. The chapter was disrespected 
for having an integrated house and excluded 
from the Interfraternity Conference. They 
were even told that "sororities wouldn't want 
to have socials with us because we had black 
brothers," Wilson said. After the SigEp chapter 
began thriving as an integrated fraternity, the 
IFC requested that SigEp join, Wilson recalled. 
And as for the sororities staying away from 
SigEp? "That was not true at all." 

Diverse experiences prepare 
men for adult life 

While race or ethnicity is the most visible 
marker of a chapter's diversity, recruiting men 
from diverse economic, geographic and social 
backgrounds can also prepare members for 
their post-graduate experience. Chapters can 
expand diversity when they recruit men of 



26 SIGEP JOURNAL Fall 2009 




ABOVE: Northern Kentucky gathers for a recruitment event. 
FACING PAGE: Virginia Commonwealth brothers take a 
break during their spring retreat. Chapter experiences that 
involve people from diverse backgrounds are vital to 
preparing members for living and working in a multi- 
cultural society. 



distinct academic and professional interests, 
divergent political opinions, all ranges of socio- 
economic status and be accepting of different 
lifestyles, including sexual orientation. 

Diversity in this sense is what creates the 
unique personality of a chapter, former 
National Board member Jeff Prouty, Iowa 
State 78, said, and is a key factor in preparing 
students for the real world that lies beyond the 
college campus. "In professional settings, you 
will be better suited to lead and be successful 
because you've had exposure and interaction 
with people who are different than you." 

Interacting only with similar, like-minded 
brothers will harden stereotypes and assump- 
tions about different cultures. With a diverse 
fraternity experience, our chapters can 
facilitate a learning experience that helps 
brothers capitalize on cultural differences 
rather than judge them. We simply would be 
doing a disservice to brothers if we do not 



In professional settings, you will be better 
suited to lead and be successful because 
you've had exposure and interaction with 
people who are different than you." 



properly prepare them for an ever more 
multicultural world, Prouty said. 

Even with a top-flight college degree in hand, 
Wilson said, students who have not met and 
interacted with people very different than 
themselves are missing a key educational 
component. "You are not preparing yourself" 
for the real world, he said. He admits that 
interacting with cultures other than those 
experienced during one's childhood or early 
adult years is difficult and often uncomfortable, 
but its value cannot be overestimated. 

Increasing diversity 

While the value of diversity is largely 
uncontroversial, increasing it is a bit trickier. 
Chapters on mostly homogeneous campuses 
have small numbers of minority students to 
draw from. Setting quotas or recruiting men 
based on skin color runs counter to the prin- 
ciple of recruiting for character. 

"We see the need for recruiting for diver- 
sity, we see that diversity makes us a stronger 
chapter," Utah State Chapter President Alex 



~ JEFF PROUTY, IOWA STATE '78 

Putnam, '09, said, but the chapter doesn't set 
a quota. "We are looking for the best men." 

Putnam acknowledged that it is a challenge 
to recruit and retain a diverse chapter at a 
university with a mostly homogeneous student 
population. "Our fraternity reflects the 
university's population." Most university 
students and SigEp brothers are white and 
members of the The Church of Jesus Christ of 
Latter Day Saints, typical of Utah, Putnam said. 

At Northern Kentucky, the chapter doesn't 
target recruits of a specific background, but 
brothers do "consider it a plus if the new 
member will add something that the chapter 
doesn't already have," Wenzel reported. 

Improving diversity requires chapters to 
expand where they focus recruitment efforts. 
Wenzel suggested it's like fishing, "If you only 
fish in a lake, you can only catch certain types 
offish. If you fish in the ocean, you open up a 
whole new world of possibilities." 

At a minimum, Wenzel said, chapters 
should be holding events in new student 
communities. The benefits are two-fold, 



Actions you can take to increase diversity in your chapter 



Recruit in new 
places. 

Identify groups, 
organizations and 
other areas of campus 
life that are under- 
represented in your 
chapter and reach out 
to them. Hold events, 
meetings or simply 
facilitate discussion. 
This might be 
uncomfortable and 
new, but the benefits 
in the long run will be 
valuable personal and 
professional develop- 
ment for members. 



Have the 
discussion. 

Talking openly and 
honestly about diversity 
in your chapter and 
discussing its value is 
an important first step. 

Discussion points: 
How have you benefited 
from diverse environ- 
ments? What is the risk 
of not increasing the 
diversity of your 
chapter? Where is 
diversity playing out in 
other areas of your 
life — music and film 
interests, hometowns, 
academics — and how 
do you benefit? 



Make it known: 
Diversity is 
important. 

Be vocal about your 
support of diversity in 
your chapter. Don't shy 
away from stating your 
desire to include men 
from many ethnicities, 
perspectives, and 
social backgrounds. 
Making others aware of 
your interest in 
creating an inclusive 
brotherhood will make 
SigEp an attractive 
place for men seeking 
a balanced and diverse 
fraternity experience. 



Celebrate your 
diversity. 

Give your brothers a 
platform to celebrate 
their unique back- 
ground or heritage. 
Host a Jewish Seder or 
discuss Native 
American history. 
Simply encouraging 
brothers to speak 
about their unique 
background, home- 
town or heritage is 
important. Discussing 
one's differences can 
be a powerful way to 
create common bonds. 



Avoid cultural 
conflicts and ban 
offensive actions. 

Is your chapter inad- 
vertently scheduling 
events on religious 
holidays? Do you host 
insensitive events like 
"Run for the Border" 
parties? Does your 
chapter allow offen- 
sive or homophobic 
speech? Creating a 
balanced chapter and 
diverse fraternity 
experience requires 
that brothers respect 
one another. Practice 
an atmosphere of 
respect by avoiding 
cultural and religious 
conflicts and banning 
hateful speech. 



Reach out. 

Developing Sound 
Mind programming 
that extends to less 
privileged or under- 
represented 
communities is 
important for the 
education of brothers. 
Become a Big Brother, 
host military veterans, 
hold joint events with 
minority fraternities 
and sororities or host 
an international dinner 
with other student 
groups. The outcome 
will be fun, fulfilling 
and quite delicious. 



51 st GRAND CHAPTER CONCLAVE 27 




GRAND CHAPTER CONCLAVE 2009 



"If an event leads to a new member - great - 
but it will build cultural competency no 
matter what." 

A future priority? 

Where does increasing diversity fit as a 
national priority? 

The role of the national Fraternity, ac- 
cording to Past Grand President Steve 
Shanklin, Murray State 70, is to raise 
awareness of the issue of diversity for a 
chapter if it isn't sufficiently aware of and 
actively looking to increase diversity. "If a 
chapter isn't self-aware, it is our responsibil- 
ity to raise the issue." 

A good goal for a chapter, Shanklin said, is 
to reflect the diversity of its campus, and be 
mindful that SigEp should not be an organi- 
zation defined by socio-economic status. 
"We do not need to be an elitist boys club" 
that many students cannot afford. For 
campuses and chapters that are not very 
diverse, Shanklin recommends that chapters 
should seek out new experiences that 
challenge their existing worldview. "If 
necessary, the chapter needs to go off cam- 
pus to experience different cultures, to get 
the rich and robust fraternity experience 
that is the result of exposure to diversity." 

For Cincinnati's Wenzel, diversity cannot 
be treated like a numerical goal to be com- 
pleted. "Increasing diversity should be a 
national priority and priority for all chap- 
ters, but it isn't something you can put on a 
checklist." 

Wilson believes that more needs to be 
done to increase diversity. "I'm not trying to 
champion quotas or affirmative action. I'm 
trying to champion greater effort." For 
Wilson, recognition of the need for greater 
diversity is there, but the action is lagging. 
"We can't keep talking about preparing 
young men to be balanced leaders of the 
world's communities if our own communities 
don't look like the rest of the world's." 

What to expect in 2059 

Reflecting back on the historic 1959 vote, 
Tragos said that one of the Fraternity's 
potential weaknesses turned out to be its 
greatest asset. SigEp saw most of its growth 
after World War II, and most alumni were 
younger than those in other national fraterni- 
ties at the time. In addition, undergraduates 
have a significant majority of votes at the 
Conclave which allowed them to take up and 
overwhelmingly pass a reform that was 




radical for its time. Had there been many more 
alumni voting at the Conclave like other frater- 
nities saw, Tragos doubts it would have passed. 

The same dynamic remains today. While 
SigEp's alumni rolls have swollen in recent 
decades, the majority of votes at Conclave 
are still cast by undergraduates. The power 
to make change rests with them. 

So, what can we expect to happen in the 
Fraternity in the next 50 years? 

Today's generation seems poised to achieve a 
greater level of diversity. This "Millennial" 
generation is more apt to discuss race and 
embrace new cultures. Studying abroad is a 
more common occurrence. 

SigEp has a history of embracing changing 
times and needs to cultivate the diverse 
backgrounds of our brothers to create a 
better Fraternity. As D.A. and Sara Biggs 
wrote in the same 1959 Journal that 
announced the removal of the membership 
exclusion: "The ability to change indicates a 
healthy, seeking, growing state of mind; to 
remain unmoved leads to stagnation. In 
order to change, the members of a fraternity 
must shake themselves from their comfort- 
able niche, must view themselves objectively, 
and then take the necessary steps in the 
direction they wish to go." 




TOP: Attendees of the legendary 1959 Conclave in 
Washington D.C., where the Fraternity removed racial and 
religious member restrictions. 

ABOVE: Bruce Hasenkamp, Dartmouth '60, (to left of man 
in safari hat) checks in to the 1959 Conclave. He would be 
an instrumental player in getting the resolution passed 
that year. 



"To do all the talking and 
not be willing to listen is 
a form of greed." 

~ DEMOCRITUS OF ABDERA 



28 SIGEP JOURNAL Fall 2009 



Alumni News 



Restoring Hubble: 

Astronaut helps preserve space telescope 



Journal readers may recall a story in our Spring 2007 issue 
about Andrew Feustel, Purdue '89, an astronaut selected 
for the final servicing mission of the Hubble space tele- 
scope. After several years of intensive training and a few 
delays, Feustel and his six crewmates took off from the 
Kennedy Space Center on May 11, 2009, for a two-week 
mission that included five spacewalks to repair and up- 
grade the telescope's powerful instrumentation. These 
upgrades will enhance the Hubble's ability to record and 
analyze the cosmic frontier and extend its space life to 2014. 
The Journal caught up with Feustel to ask a few questions 
about this experience, an honor bestowed on those precious 
few people who get to travel through space. 





Journal: How did your 
experience in space 
compare to training 
for space travel? 

The space walk 
training in the pool (a 
vast water environ- 
ment used to simulate 
space on land) was 
very similar to the 
point that I thought 
that we were in the 
pool, except the view 
was really different! 
There was a certain 
level of comfort and 
familiarity. What was 
really different was 
the ability to stay still. 
You can actually do it 
in space but not in 
training. There was 
always some affect of 
gravity on the ground. 
Still, you have to 
concentrate on not 
moving and try not to 
push off of anything. 

What surprised you? 

The ability of our 
minds to become 



normalized to the 
environment. I could 
talk to other crew 
members upside down 
or easily float 
something toward 
them. Within an hour 
it all seemed normal 
to be talking sideways 
or upside down. Once 
we landed, my legs 
were just not 
prepared to hold my 
body weight. Even my 
arms felt incredibly 
heavy. 

What was the most 
exciting moment? 

The first spacewalk 
was set up to replace 
the Wide Field 
Camera 2 with the 
Wide Field Camera 3. 
The bolt was stuck, 
really stuck. I'm 
realizing that I can't 
get it out, and it's 
extremely important 
for the mission. What 
a way to kick things 




Hubble telescope pushing off from Atlantis 



off! Fortunately with 
support from the 
ground control teams 
and the proper tools 
we got it removed. It 
took only about 30-40 
minutes of additional 
time. Once we got past 
that, everything went 
pretty well. 

What helped you the 
most when it came 
down to actually 
repairing the 
telescope? 
Two things. Training 
over the past three 
years as a team with 
mission control every 
day. And for me, it was 
past experience 
working with tools 
and working on cars. 
That was one of the 
key components. 
Other crewmates 
brought different 
assets to the mission 
like specialized 
education and 
analytical skills. 

How would you 
describe the physical 
demands of the job? 

We spent a lot of time 
on physical condition- 
ing to get us ready. 
Spacewalks can be 
fairly taxing, and the 
average age of the 
crew is about 45. I'm 
close to being in the 
best physical 
condition in my life. 
At 43, I'm in better 



shape than I've been 
in the past 15-20 years. 
It's especially 
significant in 
recovery, which is 
difficult. You certainly 
don't want your 
physical condition to 
be in the way of the 
mission. 

What did this fulfill in 
terms of your career? 

I spent nine years in 
the program waiting 
to fly in space and 
have the opportunity 
to share the experi- 
ence with friends and 
family. They went to 
the launch and 
watched me get 
rocketed in space 
knowing that they had 
a part in getting me 
there. Then they got 
to see the results of 
the efforts: to allow 
the world community 
to continue to benefit 
from seeing the 
wonders of the 
universe. That's big 
stuff. 

What's next for you? 

Getting back in line 
for next trip! 

Feustel recently got 
word that he has been 
selected for a new 
mission to the 
International Space 
Station in late 2010. 




Pacheco's portrait 
of Gandhi appears on 
international stamp 

The United Nations Postal Administration 
(UNPA) has issued a New York definitive 
stamp in the denomination of $1.00 which 
depicts an image of Mahatma Gandhi painted 
by Ferdie Pacheco, 
Florida '50. Journal 
readers will remem- 
ber other examples of 
Pacheco's intensely 
colorful and compel- 
ling images of famous 
people featured in a 
cover story from the 
Spring 2008 issue. 
The stamp was issued 
on the International Day of Non- Violence, 
October 2, also Gandhi's birthday. 

This is the latest in a long line of accom- 
plishments for Pacheco. He was a pharmacist, 
physician, and "fight doctor" for Muhammad 
Ali and other boxing champions for 17 years. 
After a decades-long boxing commentator 
career, he has focused primarily on his art. 
And now, he has an international platform to 
share it. The UNPA says of Pacheco: "As a 
painter, his imaginative use of color and 
design and his aggressive use of vivid, slash- 
ing colorful patterns exude a sense of strength 
expressing the bold and gutsy personal 
statements of a man who has immersed 
himselffullyinlife." 

Q Readers interested in more 
information about Pacheco or the 
stamp can go to www.sigep.org/journal 



ALUMNI NEWS 29 




ALUMNI NEWS 



Oh, the places a SigEp still goes... 




Roger Gilbertson, Georgia 
Tech '58, reading to the 
Samantha Long clubhouse of 
the Boys and Girls Clubs of 
Greater Washington, in 
Washington, D.C. 



By MICHAEL SELBY, Eastern Michigan '02 

He probably couldn't have imagined, when 
"Dr. Seuss" Theodor Geisel, Dartmouth 
'25, penned his famous book, Oh the Places 
You'll Go! in 1990, that it would lead him to 
the California Hall of Fame. 

Last year, California Governor Arnold 
Schwarzenegger and First Lady Maria 
Shriver announced that Geisel would be 

f_>. inducted posthumously into the California 

Hall of Fame, located at The California 
i Museum for History, Women and the Arts. 
The induction ceremony took place last 
December, and Geisel's widow, Audrey, 
accepted the honor in his place. 

Geisel joins an accomplished and varied 
class of inductees including actors Jane Fonda and Jack Nicholson, 
scientist and Nobel laureate Linus Pauling and musicians Dave 
Brubeck and Quincy Jones. 

In 2002, the Dr. Seuss National Memorial Sculpture Garden opened in 
his birthplace, Springfield, Mass. On March 2, 2009, Google celebrated 
Seuss's work as well. The website temporarily changed its logo to 
commemorate Geisel's birthday— a practice it often follows for holi- 
days and events. 

At his alma mater, where over 90% of incoming first-year students 
participate in Dartmouth Outing Club trips into the New Hampshire 
wilderness, students returning from the trips stay overnight at 
Dartmouth's Moosilauke Ravine Lodge. Here they are served green eggs 
and ham for breakfast in honor of Dr. Seuss. 

Perhaps the most enduring effect of Dr. Seuss has been in the lives 
of children. In March 2009, the SigEp Feds, an alumni group based in 
the Washington, D.C, metropolitan area, organized its third annual 
Cat in the Hat Month Volunteer Reading Program. SigEp Feds alumni 
volunteers coordinate reading days with local elementary schools and 
other education-minded, civic organizations such as chapters of the 
Boys & Girls Club and Big Brothers/Big Sisters. "I read for about an 
hour— with plenty of audience participation," remembers Rear Admi- 




Ed Potter, George Mason '85, reading to Fair Hill Elementary School in Fairfax, Va. 

ral Roger Gilbertson, Georgia Tech '58, USN Retired, "Reading is 
fundamental [and] SigEp is lucky to have had Dr. Seuss as a member." 

With initiatives like the SigEp Feds events and a similar program 
recently held by the brothers at Loyola, Seuss keeps inspiring us to 
love reading and the power of imagination. It seems altogether fitting 
that Theodor Geisel would be honored with an invitation by Governor 
Schwarzenegger to join the 
California Hall of Fame. 

As we look fondly upon the life 
and legacy of our brother, we are 
left with only one question: Did 
he succeed? Yes, he did indeed. 
(98% guaranteed.) 



"Dignity does not 
consist in 
possessing 
honors, but in 
deserving them." 



ARISTOTLE 









ary brings Loyola's charter out of hiding 








) ^yS 25 th annivers 








L^ ^k J Loyola's Louisiana 


Arkansas '64, who 


had to be reissued 


Steve Shanklin, 








~" M[ I Gamma Chapter 


presented the original 


fifteen years ago, is 


Murray State '70, 






celebrated its 25 th 


charter to the chapter 


rarely on view and 


among them. Six of 




r * ? i KW 


anniversary over a 


in 1983, is joined by 


kept in a secret 


the chapter's 




1 l*Jr ^ki 


v **' weekend last Novem- 


Chapter President 


location after being 


founders attended 






iH j ber. The main event 


Tyler Cocek, Loyola 


stolen twice from the 


and each was pre- 






fl h took place at The 

' k 1^1 T\ --11- -A-l AT 


'09, and Alumni and 


chapter house. The 

1 i- 1 il A "\ 7"/~1 


sented with a 25-year 






^1 hm 


' J Republic, in the New 


Volunteer Corpora- 


chapter and the AVC 


pin. A video presenta- 






1 JBSa 


! 1 1 Orleans warehouse 


tion President James 


distributed several 


tion along with 






I Ij jflffli 


K 1 ■ district. Left to right: 


T. Hannan, Loyola 


awards, and the 


fireworks and confetti 








ly t i i\ Order of the Golden 


'99, with the chapter's 


brothers were 


brought the event to a 






■ & l \ Heart Recipient John 


rarely seen charter. 


pleased to have Past 


memorable close. 






£ JF' | H. Stanley Jr., 


The charter, which 


Grand President 











30 SIGEP JOURNAL Fall 2009 



Memphis alum has a 
hip hop hit 



By DEREK MILLER, Memphis '11 

Popular music has changed many times 
throughout the last century, and so has the 
probability of making it big in the music 
industry. However, Dusty "Dizzy D" Warren, 
Memphis '07, is well on his way to living his 
dreams with the release of his Billboard 
single, "What It Be Like," which peaked at No. 
1 on Billboard Magazine's Hot Singles Sales 
Chart, beating out popular artists like Lady 
Gaga, Katy Perry, M.I.A., and Madonna. 
Warren's song also ranked 68th on the Top 100 
Airplay Chart for R&B and hip-hop songs on 
the radio. 

Warren grew up around music, gaining 
musical experience through his church choir 
and talent shows. 
He began working 
on his hip-hop career 
in high school and 
continued that 
journey while 
pursuing a college 
education. Although 
he is earning acco- 
lades these days, his 
success hasn't come easily. "Being a college 
student, working a regular job, trying to make 
it in music, maintaining a strong relationship 




with family, and 
being a brother in 
Sigma Phi Epsilon is 
a lot of stuff to work 
around," he said. 
"Being in SigEp has 
played a huge role in 
my success. The 
Balanced Man pro- 
gram was crucial in 
helping me organize 
what I was doing. I 
would have been lost 
without it." Warren 
also acknowledges 
that brotherly love 
played a major role in getting him off the 
ground, stating, "I've never had anything but 
support from my brothers." 

While in school, Warren was involved in 
student recruitment, multi-cultural work, and 
new student orientation, as well as being 
voted Greek Man of the Year. He made it a 
point every day to reach out to all areas of the 
Greek community, vastly improving 
interfraternal relations on campus. These 
relationships and the foundation he built with 
other Greek organizations added to the 




Dusty "Dizzy D" Warren is making his way in the Memphis music scene with a Billboard 
hit single, "What it be like." 



respect SigEp enjoys from others on the 
Memphis campus. 

"Memphis is one of the hardest cities to 
make it in musically," said Warren, but 
thanks to his unique style, diligence to work 
hard at his craft, and the love that he re- 
ceives from brothers nationwide, Warren is 
expecting to realize his lifelong dream of 
making it big in the world of hip-hop. You 
can hear his music on iTunes. 



Idaho 

State 

SigEps 

celebrate 

50 years of 

friendship 




Idaho State was established in 1958 as 
Idaho Alpha, and after 14 years of leader- 
ship in the Greek community, the chapter 
closed. The loyalty of brothers from this 
time was re-enlivened at their 50 th reunion 
weekend last fall where brothers posed on 
the steps of the Idaho State Performing 
Arts Center. Friday golf and a reception 
led off the celebration of over 100 SigEps 
and friends. Brothers enjoyed the 
university's homecoming parade, revisit- 
ing old hangouts, and extensive touring of 
the campus on Saturday. The evening was 
capped off with a dinner and silent auc- 
tion. While Sunday morning was filled 
with goodbyes, the brothers of Idaho 
State will continue to hold on to their 
memories and appreciation of SigEp. 



ALUMNI NEWS 




ALUMNI NEWS 



Soldier fulfills the heritage of his native land, 
serves in Israeli Defense Force 



By TOM BAUDENDISTEL, Cincinnati 10 

Even before graduating from Case Western 
Reserve last May, economics and finance 
major Nadav Weinberg, '08, was offered a 
dream job at Merrill Lynch. Instead, this Ruck 
Scholar did something that most college 
graduates would consider unconventional. He 
decided to return to Israel in order to fulfill 
every native-born Israeli's obligation to serve 
in the Israeli Defense Forces (IDF). Born to an 
Israeli father and American mother, 
Weinberg has dual citizenship, exempting 
him from serving in the IDF. But this would 
not stop him from fulfilling his duty. "Knowing 
that my father fought in Lebanon and every 
one of my aunts, uncles and cousins has been 
in the IDF, I think it is my time. I'm patriotic, 
and I don't want to live my life with regrets, 
wishing I had done something," he said. His 
decision to serve in 



"I don't want 
to live my life 
with regrets, 
wishing I 
had done 
something." 



the IDF rather than 
the U.S. military was 
much simpler. "It is 
the duty of all Israeli 
citizens to serve their 
country. It is not 
required in the U.S., 

being a non-drafted army. If it was so, then I 

would fulfill my duty to serve in the U.S. 

military as well." 

Weinberg has faced many hardships since 

his arrival in Israel. He has been forced to take 



classes where English is prohibited in the 
classroom, he has been through grueling 
military training, detailed in his blog entries 
at nadavweinberg.blogspot.com. He has 
suffered from temporary hearing loss, and 
had to cope with the loss of a dear childhood 
friend in the United States. 

He has immersed himself in a country 
wrought with terrorism and warfare saying, 
"You can watch CNN day and night, but until 
you see ashy craters and smell the rancid odor 
of burnt sand, you do not realize the true day- 
to-day fear that Israelis live with." Yet 
somehow he remains positive. He does not 
regret his decision to serve his country, and 
through all the mental and physical exhaus- 
tion, he maintains the positive motto that at 
the end of each day "life is good." His reunion 
with a SigEp brother at the airport was one of 
those moments that "make you see the big 
picture and make you realize what really 
matters. You don't realize what you have until 
you are away from it. Then when you get it 
back, it means even more," he said. 

Weinberg was selected as one of only 35 to 
serve in the Orev Special Units Force of the 
Nachal Brigade. It is an anti-tank unit and 
part of the elite battalion of the Special Forces 
Units known as "Gasdar." The Orev Unit is 
named after the Orev anti-tank missile, and 
when not at war, the unit deals with high 




Weinberg on duty in Hevron in the West Bank. He earned 
the right to carry his Negev, a 15-pound "light machine 
gun." Soldiers are encouraged to name their guns. He 
named his gun Kam, after his close childhood friend, 
Kambili Moukwa, who died suddenly in the States while 
Weinberg was in training in Israel. 

security missions in Arab territories. 

The best way to capture Weinberg's experi- 
ence is through his blog, which will give 
readers a front row seat in the adventure that 
shows his character and resolve. 

nadavweinberg.blogspot.com. 



«^w^— 



SigEp behind the scenes at Super Bowl XLIII 



By PATRICK ALBERTS, South Florida '07 

Past the grit and gridiron, underneath the highlights and the half time show, 
a network of personnel works tirelessly to create the spectacle that is the 
Super Bowl. SigEp was represented behind the scenes to pull it all together. 

Pre-parties and charity events are happening throughout any Super 
Bowl week, but the spectacle for most people is the number of media 
that descend on the event. As an intern with the Tampa Bay Bucca- 
neers since 2007, 1 was invited to work on the NFL Media staff for Super 
Bowl XLIII. 

Networking allowed me the privilege to work with media from all 
over the world and side by side with the industry's biggest names. 
Dealing with pre-game media relations, from duties in the press box to 
gathering post game quotes in the NFC Champion locker room, I 
covered serious territory throughout Raymond James Stadium. 

I appreciate the opportunity I had, value the relationships I built and 
treasure what I learned from my inside view of one of this country's 
biggest events of the year. 

The amount of detail that goes into making sure that hundreds of 



media personnel cover an event such as the 
Super Bowl is amazing. Lots of guys would 
love to be in this spot, and you can too if you 
have the drive. 

I know that the Balanced Man program 
and its lessons on the importance of 
networking and being able to perform in the 
spotlight helped me. SigEp helped me to 
prepare for such an experience in other 
ways too. I understand that opening up to a 
group of professionals, listening, and 
communicating your ideas in order to work 
efficiently and successfully is vital. I learned 
that through events such as EDGE, chapter 
meetings, brotherhood events and Conclave. I realize that the tools and 
lessons learned within those four years helped me excel in the rest of 
my life, particularly on one incredible Sunday this past February. 




Alberts has served as a 
Buccaneers intern since 2007 



32 SIGEP JOURNAL Fall 2009 



SigEp Tough: 

Brother handles serious duty on 
America's Toughest Jobs 



SigEp completes New Zealand 
Ironman Triathlon at 51 

By PATRICK MURPHREY, Christopher Newport '05 



Steve Hopper, Loyola Marymount '07, often 
has breaks between jobs in film production. 
During downtime in March 2008, he came 
across an ad on Craig's List for contestants to 
work on a crab boat, be a logger, and take on 
other tough and dangerous jobs. "I'm always 
looking for an adventure, so I answered the 
posting and interviewed the next day. One 
hundred on-camera questions later, the 
interviewer turned the camera off and said 
he'd be in touch." The producer chased after 
Hopper and stopped him for a conversation 
that went something like this: 

Producer: Do you have a criminal record? 

Hopper: No. 

Producer: These jobs are extremely danger- 
ous. Will you sign a form saying you will not 
sue NBC or us if you get injured or killed? 

Hopper: Yes. 

Producer: Can you leave for Alaska in 
two days? 

Hopper: Yea. Whatever. Let's do it. 

Hopper ended up on the TV show 
America's Toughest Jobs and placed second 
overall, which came with a 2008 Dodge pick-up 
and a whole new definition of sweat. 

In Anchorage, after a last call to his mother, 
Hopper took a crash course in driving an 18- 
wheeler for the first time. He would be driving 
along the Trans-Alaskan Pipeline to a town 
called Deadhorse! The Dalton Highway there 
is considered one of the deadliest roads in the 
world. And things were just getting started. 

Hopper would go on to work on a crab boat 
in the middle of the Bering Sea near Russia. 
On his birthday, he was running over cars and 
flying through the air in a monster truck, and 
he had a close call on the oil rig when he 
almost lost three fingers. 

Hopper fought bulls in San Angelo and 
hung from an 80-story bridge in Long Beach, 
Calif., despite a fear of heights. "I learned an 
important lesson on that episode: Tt's all in 
your head.' Conquer that and you can do 
anything." About logging in Washington, he 

"Life shrinks or 
expands in proportion 
to one's courage." 

-ANAISNIN 




Hopper played monster truck driver on one of his 
assignments with America's Toughest Jobs. He was at 
least afforded a fire-proof suit, but his guts had to take 
care of the rest. 

said, "I hated my bosses and life. I have never 
worked so hard in my entire life." 

Mountain rescue in Alaska's Denali Na- 
tional Park turned out to be Hopper's favorite 
job. "Looking back I've asked myself 'what 
was it all for?' I'm not entirely sure, but I do 
know that it was an experience of a lifetime. I 
pushed my body and mind to their limits and 
made it through every job." Hopper said. He 
also was inspired by a key market for the 
show, boys ages 5-12. Parents let him know 
their sons had found a role model in Hopper, 
an idea he relishes. "Knowing that some kid 
in the middle of Minnesota wanted to be like 
me was cool." 

So what will Hopper do for an encore? He 
was disappointed in his 2 nd place finish, but 
has moved on from that. "This show is just 
one of my adventures, and I'm on the hunt for 
the next one!" 



How does a SigEp 
celebrate turning 50? 
Will Turner, Vir- 
ginia Tech '80, 
decided he would 
complete an Ironman 
Triathlon, one of the 
most grueling ath- 
letic experiences the 
human body could 
endure. It consists of 
a 2.4-mile swim, 112 
miles of cycling, and a 
26.2-mile marathon. 
The Ironman Triath- 
lon occurs across the 
globe, and Turner 
selected New 
Zealand, March 2009, 
for his date with 
destiny. 

Turner's motiva- 
tion was a milestone: 
"When I turned 50 
last year it really hit 
me hard. I took a hard 
look at my life and 
said, 'What now? 
What is it that I want 
to experience and 
accomplish?' With 
lots of soul searching, 
one thing became 
painfully obvious. I 
was running out of 
time, and I had so 
much more to do, see 
and become." 

Turner hired a 
personal coach to 
customize his train- 
ing regimen. He 
pushed himself to 
new limits every day 
and said he was 
"looking pathetic but 
feeling exhilarated 
that I did it. The irony 
is that I look so 'dead' 
but feel so 'alive' 
when I've survived 
yet another workout." 
After completing five 
training races, 
overcoming a torn 
soleus, and surviving 
over 18 months of pre- 
dawn alarms to get in 
his workouts, Turner 
headed to New 



Zealand for the 
opening gun. 

As he left, Turner 
reflected on his 
motivation and the 
importance of bal- 
ance in achieving our 
goals: 

"So that's what this 
journey is all about, 
proving to myself that 
I don't have to settle. 
That I can accomplish 
whatever I set my 
mind to. That I can be 
over 50 and still be 
vital. That life is for 
living and not sitting 
on the sidelines. That 
a challenge is just an 
opportunity. And that 
I am strong in body, 
mind and spirit. I'm 
reminded of my 
favorite quote from 
Winston Churchill : A 
pessimist sees the 
difficulty in every 
opportunity. An 
optimist sees the 
opportunity in every 
difficulty.'" 

Turner completed 
his Ironman in 12 
hours, 55 minutes and 
27 seconds. 

Turner is the 
President of Dancing 
Elephants Achieve- 
ment Group and a 
district governor for 
SigEp. Read more 
about Turner's 
journey to the New 
Zealand Ironman at 
nzironmanwordpress.com 



< 



Turner as he nears the half- 
way point in the run. 



ALUMNI NEWS 33 



Sigma Phi Epsilon Educational Foundation 



2008 Educational Foundation Report: 

New Foundation President appreciates 
brotherhood in tough times 




By DONALD W. HUDLER, Ohio Wesleyan '56 
President, Educational Foundation 

I miss Ron. 

In preparation for this report, I started working with the 
Foundation staff to give you a detailed list of accomplish- 
ments and pie charts regarding the countless scholarships 
we awarded and how our assets performed in the turbulent 
market, but this will be a different kind of report. So, I want 
to tell you about Ron and some other brothers, because you 
can probably relate. 

The purpose of the Fraternity and Foundation is the 
people. We build men. We bring love and balance regard- 
less of the campus, decade or diversity of background. 

That is why you give time and money. That is why I 
volunteer my time and make an annual donation. That is 
why I have smiled as much as I have cried recently. 

This has been a tough time for many of us at work and 
home. We worry a little more and spend a little less. Some 
have lost jobs, and some have had to stay on the job longer. 
Priorities have been pruned. 

Yet it has still been a wonderful time for brotherhood. 
Our undergraduate brothers are still striving together 
daily to live their best lives. And, like me, you may have 
been the recipient of many tokens and signs of true 



friendship that have lifted you for a day or month or 
longer. Some for small things and some for tragedies. 

My last year has been carried on the shoulders of many 
people, starting with my wife Dannielle. She is a blessing 
to me. I love her. 

I have also been blessed by the outreach of countless 
SigEp Brothers — some of whom you see in the picture 
accompanying this story. Those are my chapter Brothers 
from the 1950's at Ohio Wesleyan. We had a wonderful 
reunion last year, and their hugs and words mean more 
than they will ever know. I love them. 

You do not see in the picture the brother I love and miss 
the most. Ron Hudler was my brother, not only my SigEp 
brother but my twin. He was killed in a senseless act of 
violence. It shattered his family, our family. 

But just like you find every year on Ron's Christmas tree 
farms, life is returning. 

Death and reunions put into perspective things like 
financial bailouts that lead to bankruptcy or watching assets 
we have built or saved being scattered to the winds. I have a 
different outlook than many of my peers on the difficulties of 
companies I helped build — General Motors and Saturn. 




Sigma Phi Epsilon Educational Foundation President and Chairman of the Board Don Hudler (second row, second from right, wearing a button) was 
part of the Ohio Wesleyan's Ohio Epsilon 1950's reunion held last October in North Carolina. 



34 SIGEP JOURNAL Fall 2009 



In spite of current difficulties, I am optimistic about the 
future. Who would not be when you have family, brothers 
and friends like I do. Like we do. 

So, when my fellow Foundation Trustees asked if I 
would take the gavel as President and Chairman of the 
Board in the middle of all this madness, I gladly said yes. 
Here is why. 

While this fiscal year is the most trying since 2001-2002, 
thousands of brothers will make over $1 million in chari- 
table contributions that will benefit our younger brothers. 

While our assets declined 25% in 2008, many others had 
far more serious market consequences. Bessemer Trust 
has managed our investments admirably in the face of 
uncertainty. 

We had to make difficult decisions. We cut 40% of the 
grant promised for this year, trying to give as much as 
possible to the good work of the Fraternity while consider 
ing our long-term endowment capabilities. 

Yet we — donors and volunteers — are still changing 
young men's lives. 

SigEp Residential Learning Community 
initiatives continue to bring the best possible 
development experience and environment to 
young men across the country. Over half a 
million dollars given by alumni improved Fraternity 
houses. 

The Balanced Man Program and the Leadership Con- 
tinuum programs make SigEp a partner in higher 
education to 14,000 men on campus. 

We have had a great response to our new donor groups 
— The Ducal Crown Society for young alumni and The 
Hoop of Steel Society for undergraduates. Over 500 under- 
graduates have made a gift in 2009. 

And the best part is that thousands of our undergraduate 
Brothers have received scholarships and attended leader- 
ship programs while some around say the future may not be 
as bright. Try telling that to a SigEp who is pursuing his 
diploma with the same vigor as our band of Brothers did in 
Delaware, Ohio more than half a century ago. 

Please join me in being optimistic. 

I ask that you find a way to keep or put SigEp on your 
priority list. If all our 200,000 alumni gave the cost of a 
Christmas tree (or pick your own favorite holiday decora- 
tion), we would be able to increase our scholarships and 
grants even now. 

SigEp alumni always respond and lead. We graduate, 
but we maintain responsibility. The Oath you and I took 
was to foster every worthy endeavor of Sigma Phi Epsilon. 
I can tell you that these fine young men in the nation's 
largest fraternity with the highest GPA are worthy. 

What better investment is there these days? 

Finally, I want to take a moment to recognize the shoul- 




ders that have put 
me in this position 
to build men and 
pass on my love for 
SigEp. 

The Sigma Phi 
Epsilon Educational 
Foundation has 
been fortunate over 
the years to have 
caring and insight- 
ful Trustee leadership like Ed Zollinger, William & Mary 
'27, Curt Carlson, Minnesota '37, Bill Schreyer, Penn- 
sylvania State '48 and "H" Clark, North Carolina State 
'56. We began 2009 celebrating another change in leader- 
ship as I followed Garry Kief's eight years as President and 
Chairman of the Board of Trustees. 

Garry has served as a Trustee since 1991 and has 
played a critical role in the team taking our Foundation 



"In spite of current difficulties, I am optimistic about the 
future. Who would not be when you have family, brothers 
and friends like I do. Like we do." 



from the Campaign for the Heart in the mid-90's through 
the transition of executive directors to the recent success 
in raising money to fund leadership programs and Resi- 
dential Learning Community housing campaigns. He 
constantly reminds us to focus on delivering the best 
possible programs and the most scholarship money to the 
undergraduates — that we are making an investment in 
their today and our future. Garry's background in enter- 
tainment is helpful in keeping us focused on making an 
immediate impact on the lives of young men and con- 
stantly seeking their feedback. 

I will always miss Ron, but I would like to thank the 
funny-looking guys in the picture and Garry and so many of 
you who have reached out to remind me what is important. 

I promise more pie charts next time. The report that 
follows is designed to show where your investment is 
spent in scholarships and leadership programs. You will 
see how the national programs affect every chapter and 
that some chapters are doing a great job with chapter- 
specific scholarships. Any chapter can. Call the 
Foundation staff (804-421-GPA1) and go to 
www.sigepfoundation.org for details. 



Undergraduates get 
started on their SigEp 
journey at the EDGE new 
member program in 
Colorado earlier this year. 



L^v^-v/c^^ 



EDUCATIONAL FOUNDATION 35 




SIGMA PHI EPSILON EDUCATIONAL FOUNDATION 



Honor Roll of Giving 



Red Door Trust | $50,000-99,999 



The Honor Roll of 
Giving recognizes 
the many generous 
alumni and friends 
who contributed in 
2008 to programs 
of the Educational 
Foundation. On 
these two pages 
are the members 
of our top ten 
cumulative giving 
clubs. These are 
alumni and friends 
who have contrib- 
uted gifts and 
binding pledges 
over the years 
which reach the 
cumulative level 
indicated. These 
clubs have addi- 
tional members, 
but this list reports 
only those members 
who made a contri- 
bution to the 
Educational Foun- 
dation in 2008. 



Hall of Honor | $5,000,000+ 

William A. Schreyer 

Penn State '48 

Sigma Circle | $2,500,000-4,999,999 

James L. Clayton 

Tennessee '57 

Phi Circle | $1,000,000-2,499,999 



Mark W. Davis 

Nebraska '90 

Donald W. Hudler 

Ohio Wesleyan '56 

Garry C. Kief 

Southern California 70 



A. J. Scribante 

Kansas State '56 

William G. Tragos 

Washington in St. Louis '56 



Epsilon Circle | $500,000-999,999 

Christopher L. Bittman John R. Grayson 

Colorado '85 Purdue '46 

W. H. Clark 

North Carolina State '56 



Thomas G. Allardyce 

Lamar '70 

A. G. Atwater, Jr. 

Drake '64 

Christopher M. 
Coleman 

Kansas State '01 

Mitchell G. Crane 

West Chester 77 

Cicero A. Frazier* 

North Carolina '34 

Rex E. Garrelts 

Kansas State '68 

John M. George 

Auburn 76 

Carey E. Heckman 

Dartmouth 76 

Patrick C. Henry 

Georgia Tech '86 

Kent B. Hickman 

Colorado '61 

J. Gregory Keller 

Missouri-Columbia '86 



Marvin E. Lampton 

Kansas '64 

Douglas S. 
MacDonald* 

Rutgers '56 

Gregory J. Pusinelli 

Indiana '80 

Eugene C. Schurg, Jr. 

Davis & Elkins 77 

Richard D. Shiney* 

Kansas State '52 

Robert C. Stempel 

WPI '55 

Roger H. VanHoozer 

Washburn 72 

Jack D. Wheeler 

North Texas '61 

G. Duncan Wimpress 

Oregon '46 

Charles N. White, Jr. 

Western Michigan '62 



Sigma Senate | $250,000-499,999 Brothers of the Heart | $25,000-49,999 



Denis H. Dieker, Jr. 

Wichita State 77 

Wallace C. Doud 

Wisconsin '48 

Thomas O. Hicks 

Texas-Austin '68 

H. Lorenz Horn 

Florida '56 



Arthur J. Hurt, III 

Davidson '88 

Andrew C. Land 

Clemson '04 

Steven A. Nienke 

Wichita State 



Chairman's Circle | $100,000-249,999 



Scott A. Baxter 

Buffalo State '84 

Scott H. Bice 

Southern California '65 

Edward H. Blackburn* 

Penn State '43 

Roger C. Chapman 

Texas-Austin '49 

John M. Corby 

Arizona State 74 

C. Dean Davis 

North Texas '52 

Dean Duncan 

Indiana State '52 



*deceased 



Frank T. Ko 

Pepperdine '97 

Shawn McKenna 

Maine 77 

Mark J. Owens 

Wichita State '86 

B. M. Rankin, Jr. 

Texas-Austin '50 

Jack L. Sunday 

South Carolina 71 

Michael C. Williams 

Memphis '69 



David L. Balint 

Cleveland State '69 

Michael R. Borkan 

SUNY-Binghamton '86 

Donald A. Burgio 

RPI '89 

Clark H. Byrum, Sr. 

Indiana '57 

Robert C. Connor 

North Texas '64 

Phillip A. Cox 

Indiana '84 

Stephen T. Diltz 

Arizona State '90 

Conrad J. Eberstein 

Pennsylvania '65 

Jack J. Faussemagne 

Georgia Tech '64 

Jere D. Fluno 

Wisconsin '63 

Glenn T. Gnirrep 

Rutgers '82 

Jay K. Harness 

Arizona '65 

John W. Hartman 

Missouri-Columbia '61 

Bruce H. Hasenkamp 

Dartmouth '60 



Conrad W. Hewitt 

Illinois '58 

Michael D. Hurst 

Missouri S&T 74 

Thomas B. Jelke 

Florida International '90 

Jeffery L. Johnson 

Colorado '89 

Joseph W. Langella, Jr. 

Connecticut '83 

Paul H. Litcher 

Indiana Tech '88 

William R. T. Oakes III 

Georgia Tech '91 

Harold A. Poling 

Monmouth '49 

Barry Z. Posner 

California-Santa Barbara 70 

E. Preston Rahe, Jr. 

Georgia Tech '64 

James F. Rippey 

Oregon '53 

Paul T. Steffens, Jr. 

Thiel 70 

John K. Tyler 

Texas-Austin '63 

Kelly L. Williams 

Tennessee '92 



36 SIGEP JOURNAL Fall 2009 




Bailey's Brothers | $10,000-24,999 



John P. Ayres 

Kansas State '68 
Anthony C. Balestrieri 
George Washington '03 
Richard W. Bennet, III 
Central Missouri '74 
James R. Bernard 
Western Michigan '60 
Lawrence J. Biacchi 
Penn State '89 
Herbert H.Bullock 
Northern Arizona '78 
George A. Chappell 
Missouri S&T '59 
B. Joe Clayton 
Tennessee '57 
David W. Detjen 
Washington in St. Louis '70 
Matthew T. Domenici 
Texas-Arlington '94 
John M. Eber 
Bradley '73 
Arthur R. 

Ehrnschwender 
Cincinnati '48 
Roger R. Festa 
Truman State '72 



Christopher S. Fidyk 
Columbia '02 
Michael T. Fogarty 
Fairleigh Dickinson '77 
L. Kent Fowler 
Evansville '85 
Michael A. Green 
California-Berkeley '62 
Melvin H. Haas 
Cincinnati '62 
Richard A. Hallahan, Jr. 
Missouri S&T '62 
Edward H. Hammond 
Emporia State '66 
Ken E. Hansing* 
Georgia '71 
Bert J. Harris, III 
Florida '74 
Michael B. Harris 
San Jose State '62 
Thomas W. Hatfield 
Texas Wesleyan '75 
Stephen W. Hayes 
Wichita State '79 
Donald E. Heard 
Houston '89 
David D. Jenkins 
Colorado State '64 



Columbus L. Johnson, Jr. 

Sacramento State '85 
Craig S. Kaufman 
Washington in St. Louis '86 
Gerald W. Kehle 
Southern California '58 
Max A. Krey 
Kansas State '49 
James D. Latham 
Kansas State '68 
Richard G. Long, Jr. 
Colorado State '79 
Kenneth S. Maddox 
Oregon State '75 
Phillip N. Maisano 
Belmont Abbey '69 
Richard A. Matthes 
Drake '64 

William J. Mayor 
Missouri-Columbia '69 
Craig M. McDaniel 
South Carolina '76 
George M. Mcllveen 
Cincinnati '56 
Roger A. Mermelstein 
Miami (Florida) '87 
Hank Moonjean 
Southern California '52 



JohnW. Mosch 

Pennsylvania '39 
Kent C. Nelson 
Ball State '59 
Galen 0. Norby 
Kansas State '71 
John J. O'Hara 
Missouri S&T '76 
Derek L. Pardee 
SUNY-Buffalo '83 
F. David Parrott 
North Carolina State '55 
D. Cary Peaden 
Wichita State '76 
Brian B. Plombon 
George Mason '84 
Mark W. Pray 
Kansas State '71 
Jeffrey D. Prouty 
Iowa State '78 
Troy Queen 
Florida '96 

Wendell G. Rakosky 
Baldwin-Wallace '78 
Jorey E. Ramer 
MIT '95 

Philip G. Rector 
Georgia Tech '55 



David R. Reynolds 

Kansas State '65 
Joel T. Rickman 
Missouri S&T '95 
David J. Roman 
Cornell '73 

Frank E. Rutherford* 
East Tennessee State '57 
Michael H. Sanders 
South Carolina '70 
Stephen B. Shanklin 
Murray State '70 
Gary Shepard 
Boston '61 

William G. Sikes, Jr. 
East Tennessee State '57 
Michael D. Smith 
Missouri S&T '65 
Vernon C. Smith 
Missouri-Columbia '72 
C. Thomas Snyder 
Wichita State '62 
Lauren D. Sperry 
Missouri S&T '71 
Todd R. Stanley 
Rutgers '85 
Chuck Stegman 
Colorado '81 



Max Supica 

Kansas State '64 
Howard E. Teagarden 
Kansas State '43 
John W. Thatcher 
Davidson '48 
Robert W. Thurman 
Wichita State '75 
Michael J. Transue 
Oklahoma '66 
Dale D. Wagner 
Wichita State '71 
James H. Warsaw 
Oregon '69 
Leo W. Wehkamp 
Wichita State '72 
R. Eric Weise 
Cincinnati '54 
Charles E. Wilson, Jr. 
Kansas State '62 
John S. Witemeyer, III 
Rutgers '55 
Jay D. Yancey 
Kansas State '54 
Archer L. Yeatts, III 
Richmond '64 
John E. Zollinger, Jr. 
Lehigh '57 



Zollinger Associates | $5,000-9,999 



Robert L. Anderson 

Pennsylvania '50 
Frederick E. Barton 
Evansville '66 
Lawrence L. Biacchi 
Friend of Sigma Phi Epsilon 
Ron S. Binder 
Toledo '83 

Jeffrey M. Birdsell 
Arizona '87 
Gary R. Black 
Utah State '63 
Gary W. Blauth 
Stevens Tech '66 
Brent W.Bogden 
Utah '73 

Brian A. Boron 
Western Michigan '89 
Robert C. Bowman 
Southern California '80 
Rudolf Bredenbeck 
Cincinnati '54 
Ryan Brennan 
Trumans State '95 
Benjamin E. Brodie 
Oregon State '64 
Stephen J. Buce 
Stevens Tech '86 
David R. Calderon 
Cal Poly-Pomona '88 
James E. Cantalupo 
South Carolina '88 
Richard A. Captor 
Utah '73 

William H. Caulfield, II 
Mississippi '76 
Steven B. Chaneles 
Connecticut '83 
Philip E. Cline 
Marshall '55 



Howard A. Coleman 

Kansas State '31 
Matthew S. Costa* 
Tulane '03 
Richard D. Cowell 
Washington in St. Louis '52 
Edward E. Dahlkamp 
San Diego State '63 
Steven D. Daniels 
Lambuth '78 
Brett R.Danko 
Pennsylvania '90 
John E. Davis 
Western Carolina '87 
Laurence A. Deets 
Stetson '62 
Robert G. Denison 
Oklahoma '58 
Christopher S. Dillion 
Illinois '03 
Peter B. Dirlam 
Cornell '56 

William P. Douglas, Jr. 
Penn State '47 
Charles G. Eberly 
Bowling Green State '63 
Robert A. Eckert 
Arizona '76 
Robert A. Elrod 
Missouri S&T '60 
Matthew W. 
Engelhardt 
Valparaiso '91 
R. Clayton Funk 
Washburn '93 
Jeffrey C. Gates 
Wichita State '89 
Cory S. Gerdes 
Northwestern '92 
James F. Gillespie 
Wichita State '72 



Daniel A. Greef 

Wichita State '72 
G. William Gregory 
Syracuse '55 
Richard M. Hanley 
Toledo '85 
Peter G. Hansen 
Missouri S&T '53 
Allen W. Harmann 
Cincinnati '62 
Norman T. R. Heathorn 
MIT '57 

Robert J. Heintzelman 
Texas-Austin '88 
Jeffrey O. Henley 
California-Santa Barbara '66 
Thomas E. Hill 
Richmond '64 
J. Warren Hilton, Jr. 
South Carolina '64 
Charles J. Inacker 
Thiel '58 
Frank P. Jank 
Central Michigan '56 
Gary L. Jefferies 
North Texas '68 
Edward F. Jones 
Buffalo State '96 
Bryan J. Kaminski 
Johns Hopkins '06 
Robert J. Kerr 
Wichita State '75 
G. Wayne Knupp, Jr. 
Huntingdon College '95 
Kreth J. Koehler 
Central Arkansas '92 
George H. Krieger 
Missouri S&T '62 
Robert C. Loesch 
Cincinnati '63 



Jay F. Lombardo 

North Texas '85 
R. Terry Lyle 
Florida '48 
Michael L. Mann 
Southern California '78 
Robert L. Mannfeld 
Purdue '47 

Thomas C. Mays, III 
Lamar '76 

Ralph B. Metzger 
Penn State '37 
John D. McClure 
Sacramento State '54 
Brian P. McCune 
Oregon State '72 
John F. Mikkelson 
Miami '78 

William L. Monroe 
Western Michigan '63 
Kirk L. Munson 
Kansas State '81 
Douglas M. Nabhan 
Purdue '77 
Henry Z. Norton 
Stetson '62 
Bill M. Ohland 
North Texas '72 
Duffy S. Oyster 
North Texas '69 
Russell J. Pantsari 
South Carolina '70 
W. Daniel Pate 
North Carolina '71 
William M. Patten 
Texas Christian '73 
David J. Patterson 
Massachusetts '93 
Douglas J. Pavese 
San Jose State '63 



Mario A. Perez 

North Texas '87 
Karl L. Perrey 
Missouri-Columbia '85 
Robert S. Peteuil 
Evansville '91 
Donald L. Piper 
North Dakota '68 
William L. Porter, III 
South Carolina '93 
W.Clifford Price, III 
North Texas '88 
James E. Pruitt, Jr. 
Georgia Tech '56 
Carlos Quintero 
Clemson '73 

Maurice L. Richards, Jr. 
Tulsa '51 

Donald R. Rochau 
Iowa '59 

Thomas M. Roode 
Kansas State '68 
ToddA.Ruberg 
Oregon '82 
Paul A. Runge 
Thiel '70 

Douglas D. Scheibe 
Kansas State '87 
Scott A. Schwartz 
Iowa '93 

David E. Schwartz 
Friend of Sigma Phi Epsilon 
Gerard C. Scott 
Wichita State '81 
Ronald J. Sebonia 
Illinois '84 
Bobby Shackouls 
Mississippi State '72 
Kevin E. Shumaker 
Georgia '84 



Richard D. Skinner 

Missouri S&T '64 
Donald K. Smith 
Maryland-College Park '54 
Loran B. Smith* 
Washburn Renaissance 
Thomas C. Smith 
Nebraska '67 
Drew A. Springer, Jr. 
North Texas '89 
Paul D. Stephenson 
Kansas State '66 
Stephen R. Sussdorff 
Utah '79 

Timothy R. Swift 
Babson '96 
Craig D. Templeton 
Kansas '81 

LeRoy E. Thompson 
Missouri S&T '56 
William R. Tiernay 
California-Santa Barbara '52 
Andrew J. Triplett* 
Northern Iowa '99 
Robert L. Trovaten 
San Diego State '67 
John E. Vercellino 
Illinois '75 

Patrick B. Welborne 
Texas-Arlington '91 
Dale A. Werts 
Baker '84 
Monte J. White 
North Texas '88 
Joseph R. Whittinghill 
Montana '89 
David R. Wolverton 
Texas-Arlington '85 
Kevin M. Zimmer 
Kansas '94 



EDUCATIONAL FOUNDATION 37 




SIGMA PHI EPSILON EDUCATIONAL FOUNDATION 



Chapter Report Card: 

Your donation: What a difference your dollars make! 



Thank you for your gift in 2008 and your 
continued support in 2009. You helped the 
Fraternity change lives. You enabled our 
chapters to recruit smart men, provide them 
with a great experience, award them with 
scholarships for academic excellence, 
challenge their leadership skills and unleash 
them on the world. You helped the Fraternity 
become a valued partner in higher education. 
Thank you; without your support, this would 
not be possible. 

In return you've asked for some more 
information; you are curious to know more 
about your gift's impact on Sigma Phi Epsilon. 
To respond to your feedback we've published 
this Report Card showing donor activity 
alongside undergraduate participation in 
Leadership Continuum events, spring 2008 
GPAs, manpower reported in the chapter's 
Periodic Membership Report, and any 
scholarships the local chapter awarded. 
Essentially it's a snapshot of the chapter's 
activity and performance in 2008. 



Making a difference in Scholarship, 
Leadership and Housing 

Some of you gave to the Annual Fund, which 
funds the Leadership Continuum. Some of you 
gave to help offset the costs undergraduates 
incur to attend leadership programs. Some of 
you gave to your chapter's scholarship fund(s). 
Some of you gave to your chapter's housing 
efforts. For some of you, your home chapter is 
publicly raising funds to help renovate the 
chapter house (or build a new one) and a 
portion of that project is tax deductible. And 
some of you gave to several areas. All of these 
gifts are consolidated in the Total Giving 
column. From there 



in 2008 is not in this issue of the Journal Don't 
worry, you can see every donor who gave in 
2008 on the Educational Foundation's website at 
www.sigepfoundation.org. You can also see 
2008 memorial and recognition gifts. The 
website can connect you in numerous ways to 
other alumni. Interested to see what your home 
chapter's Alumni and Volunteer Corporation 
has planned? You can check out their webpage 
on the site. Want to see which SigEps live in your 
city? It is all there. If you have not done so, 
register on the website. You will gain access to 
all of this and more. You can even make a gift. 

Thank you for all that you do for Sigma 
Phi Epsilon. 



you can see the 
number of donors 
from your chapter, 
along with the 
average, as well as the 
highest gift made and 
the average gift size. 

You may have 
noticed that the 
complete list of donors 



About the Chapter Report Card 

You will notice that certain chapters are highlighted in the following 
pages. These chapters rank among the top 10 of all chapters nationwide 
in a particular category for 2008; the category in which they excel is 
noted in purple. We hope this serves as motivation for your chapter. 
Where can you help improve in 2009? Is it in total dollars raised? Number 
of donors? Can you convince that rising sophomore to apply for the Ruck 
Leadership Institute? 

Information is arranged in alphabetical order by school name and 
reflects data as of April 1, 2009. Chapters in regular italics are Sigma 
Epsilon Chapters (SEC). Dormant chapters are noted as gray. Chapters 
closed in the past 18 months are noted as gray with an asterisk. 



School 


EDGE 
08* 


Carlson Ruck Quest 
08 08 08 


Total Leadership 

Continuum 
Participation 08 


2008 
Manpower 


GPA 
Sp'08 


All Campus 
Average 
Sp'08 


Rank 


#of 
Donors 


#of 
Gifts 


Total 
Given 


Avg 
gift 


Largest 
Gift 


Total 

Scholarships 

Awarded 


Alabama* 


4 


8 




83 


2.84 


2.94 


12/29 


13 


13 


$1,300.00 


$100.00 


$500.00 




Alabama- 
Birmingham 
















1 


1 


$35.00 


$35.00 


$35.00 




Alaska-Fairbanks 









12 








2 


4 


$450.00 


$112.50 


$200.00 




American 


11 


5 1 


17 


79 


3.46 


3.28 


1/10 


18 


22 


$1,960.00 


$89.09 


$300.00 




Angelo State 
















1 


2 


$200.00 


$100.00 


$100.00 




Appalachian State 




4 


4 


16 


2.88 






4 


16 


$741.63 


$46.35 


$100.00 




Arizona* 


24 




25 


85 


2.57 


2.72 


17/30 


14 


14 


$4,370.00 


$312.14 


$1,500.00 




Arizona State 


13 


9 


22 


55 


2.86 


2.97 


6/19 


14 


14 


$6,475.00 


$462.50 


$5,000.00 




Arkansas 


25 


8 1 


34 


30 


2.76 






7 


10 


$1,225.00 


$122.50 


$500.00 




Arkansas State 
















3 


3 


$420.00 


$140.00 


$200.00 




Arkansas Tech 


18 




19 


47 


2.98 


2.86 


1/6 


2 


2 


$125.00 


$62.50 


$100.00 




Auburn 




12 1 


13 


122 


2.68 


2.85 


16/26 


23 


27 


$5,580.00 


$206.67 


$3,000.00 




Auburn - 
Montgomery 
















1 


1 


$100.00 


$100.00 


$100.00 




Austin Peay State 


16 


7 1 


24 


46 


3.31 


2.89 


1/6 








$0.00 


$0.00 


$0.00 




Babson 


18 


4 


22 


46 


3.25 


3.05 


1/4 


5 


6 


$2,775.00 


$462.50 


$1,250.00 




Baker 




5 


5 


25 


2.95 


3.05 


3/5 


8 


12 


$1,810.07 


$150.84 


$1,000.00 




Baldwin-Wallace 




4 


4 


31 


3.02 


3.19 


2/5 


13 


15 


$1,915.00 


$127.67 


$500.00 




Ball State 


10 


14 


24 


66 


2.81 


2.91 


3/10 


12 


22 


$2,255.69 


$102.53 


$1,000.00 




Barton 




4 


4 


19 


2.52 


2.69 


2/3 


5 


6 


$360.00 


$60.00 


$100.00 




Baylor 


18 


5 1 


24 


38 


3.14 




2/14 


7 


17 


$1,217.30 


$71.61 


$100.00 




Belmont Abbey 












2 


2 


$2,525.00 


$1,262.50 


$2,500.00 


■ 


Bentley 




- 












6 


7 


$525.00 


$75.00 


$200.00 




Boston 
















6 


9 


$1,225.00 


$136.11 


$250.00 




Bowling Green 
State 


32 


6 1 


39 


49 


2.57 


2.88 


12/14 


22 


36 


$3,194.16 


$88.73 


$380.00 




Bradley 


33 


6 


39 


57 


3.05 


3.14 


4/14 


19 


20 


$3,160.00 


$158.00 


$1,000.00 




Bucknell 




^B 


9 


87 


3.38 


3.34 


6/14 


19 


61 


$2,589.00 


$42.44 


$500.00 


$400.00 


Buffalo State* 


■ 


4 






■ 






2 


9 


$11,500.00 


$1,277.78 


$10,000.00 




Cal State - 
Fullerton 




4 


4 


60 


2.60 


2.66 


1/5 


1 


1 


$25.00 


$25.00 


$25.00 




Cal State - 
San Bernardino 


18 


13 1 


32 


25 


2.59 


2.77 


3/4 


4 


4 


$600.00 


$150.00 


$500.00 





38 SIGEP JOURNAL Fall 2009 




School 


EDGE 
08* 


Carlson Ruck Quest 
08 08 08 


Total Leadership 

Continuum 
Participation 08 


Manpower 


GPA 
Sp'08 


All Campus 
Average 
Sp'08 


Rank 


#of 
Donors 


#of 
Gifts 


Total 
Given 


Avg 
gift 


Largest 
Gift 


Total 

Scholarships 

Awarded 


Cal State-Long 
Beach 
















1 


1 


$31.50 


$31.50 


$31.50 




Cal State- 




























North ridge 


18 


4 1 


23 


43 


2.84 


2.62 


3/11 


15 


16 


$1,085.00 


$67.81 


$250.00 


$800.00 


CalPoly-Pomona 


25 


12 1 


38 


75 


2.68 


2.73 


2/15 


7 


22 


$3,149.98 


$143.18 


$250.00 


$395.00 


CalPoly-SLO 




4 


4 


108 


2.82 


2.78 


2/20 


2 


2 


$85.00 


$42.50 


$50.00 




Canisius 




8 


8 


16 






1/1 


5 


5 


$175.00 


$35.00 


$50.00 




Carnegie-Mellon 




12 


12 


81 


3.25 


3.18 


3/12 


6 


9 


$1,200.00 


$133.33 


$250.00 




Carroll 
















4 


4 


$350.00 


$87.50 


$100.00 




Case Western 




























Reserve 




7 


7 


51 


3.19 


3.30 


12/19 


9 


13 


$1,500.00 


$115.38 


$250.00 




Central Arkansas 


21 


8 1 


30 


117 


3.16 


2.82 


1/7 


9 


31 


$5,090.63 


$164.21 


$1,000.00 




Central Florida 
















4 


7 


$250.00 


$35.71 


$100.00 




Central Michigan 
















4 


4 


$550.00 


$137.50 


$400.00 




Central Missouri 




5 1 


6 


44 


2.80 


2.93 


6/11 


5 


5 


$1,675.00 


$335.00 


$1,000.00 




Chapman 


- 














1 


1 


$25.00 


$25.00 


$25.00 


- 


Charleston 




























(South Carolina) 




7 2 


9 


46 


2.84 


2.93 


5/8 


8 


13 


$852.43 


$65.57 


$151.09 




Charleston 




























(West Virginia) 
















3 


5 


$260.00 


$52.00 


$100.00 




Chicago 


7 


8 1 


16 


23 








1 


1 


$100.00 


$100.00 


$100.00 


$1,000.00 


Chico State 
















5 


17 


$660.00 


$38.82 


$100.00 




Christopher 
Newport 


8 


4 1 


13 


47 


2.85 


2.79 


1/6 


2 


3 


$125.00 


$41.67 


$50.00 




Cincinnati 


15 


7 1 1 


24 


93 


3.25 


2.99 


3/32 


33 


53 


$7,029.55 


$132.63 


$2,000.00 




Clarion 


6 


2 


8 


12 


3.01 


3.01 


1/4 


2 


2 


$75.00 


$37.50 


$50.00 




Clarkson 


3 


5 1 1 


10 


28 


3.19 


2.99 


2/10 


3 


3 


$125.00 


$41.67 


$50.00 




Clemson 


24 


16 1 


41 


89 


2.89 


3.07 


13/18 


12 


14 


$790.01 


$56.43 


$150.00 


$1,500.00 


Cleveland State 


- 














4 


8 


$8,760.00 


$1,095.00 


$5,500.00 




Coastal Carolina 


22 


4 : 


26 


32 


2.76 


2.89 


3/9 


2 


2 


$50.00 


$25.00 


$25.00 




Colorado 


22 


7 2 


31 


106 


3.00 




4/14 


29 


44 


$30,300.09 


$688.64 


$10,000.00 


$6,500.00 


Colorado School 




























of Mines 




9 


9 


40 


2.98 


2.89 


1/10 


7 


9 


$1,263.02 


$140.34 


$500.00 




Colorado State 


32 


12 2 


46 


57 


3.04 


2.81 


2/14 


17 


19 


$6,290.00 


$331.05 


$2,500.00 


$3,750.00 


Columbia 


2 


8 1 


11 


39 








10 


13 


$3,375.00 


$259.62 


$1,000.00 


$1,750.00 


Connecticut* 




5 1 


6 










15 


23 


$3,927.01 


$170.74 


$1,000.00 


$500.00 


Cornell 


12 


7 1 


20 


42 


3.29 


3.26 


25/46 


13 


14 


$2,110.18 


$150.73 


$1,000.00 




Creighton 




4 


4 


71 


3.25 


3.28 


3/5 


3 


3 


$100.00 


$33.33 


$50.00 




Culver Stockton 
















3 


3 


$250.00 


$83.33 


$100.00 




Daemen 
















3 


4 


$1,124.00 


$281.00 


$500.00 




Dartmouth 


34 


4 2 


40 


102 


3.49 


3.47 


5/13 


18 


24 


$27,295.00 


$1,137.29 


$20,000.00 




Davidson 




4 


4 


78 


3.21 


3.17 


3/8 


18 


20 


$1,814.01 


$90.70 


$500.00 




Davis & Elkins 




4 1 


5 


12 








8 


14 


$4,525.00 


$323.21 


$1,000.00 


$1,000.00 


Dayton 


33 


8 1 


42 


82 


2.93 


3.13 


6/10 


8 


9 


$1,525.00 


$169.44 


$1,000.00 




Defiance 
















1 


1 


$25.00 


$25.00 


$25.00 




Delaware 


14 


9 1 


24 


88 


3.24 


3.06 


2/22 


16 


19 


$1,700.00 


$89.47 


$500.00 




Denison 




4 


4 


52 


3.07 


3.14 


4/6 


1 


1 


$50.00 


$50.00 


$50.00 




Denver 
















2 


3 


$175.00 


$58.33 


$75.00 




DePaul 


10 


10 


20 


17 


2.83 


2.99 


6/7 


3 


3 


$200.00 


$66.67 


$100.00 




Detroit 




1 


1 


5 














$0.00 


$0.00 


$0.00 




Drake 


45 


6 1 


52 


90 


3.2 


3.09 


1/8 


16 


18 


$59,654.45 


$3,314.14 


$40,107.10 




Drexel 


22 


8 1 


31 


46 


3.31 


3.22 


1/10 


7 


7 


$245.00 


$35.00 


$50.00 




Drury 
















2 


2 


$70.00 


$35.00 


$50.00 




Duke 




3 1 


4 


63 


3.48 




4/15 


20 


22 


$2,176.01 


$98.91 


$1,000.00 


$1,500.00 


East Carolina 




4 


4 


40 


2.66 


2.81 


2/15 


3 


3 


$215.00 


$71.67 


$150.00 




East Tennessee 




7 


7 


43 








18 


20 


$4,225.00 


$211.25 


$1,000.00 


$420.00 


East Texas 
















2 


3 


$400.00 


$133.33 


$250.00 




Eastern Illinois 


19 


13 


32 


82 


2.81 


2.80 




7 


9 


$650.00 


$72.22 


$200.00 




Eastern Michigan 
















3 


5 


$75.00 


$15.00 


$25.00 




Eastern 




























Washington 


24 


15 1 


40 


82 


3.00 


3.12 


3/9 


2 


25 


$554.00 


$22.16 


$50.00 




Elon 


14 


4 1 


19 


85 


3.17 


3.17 


2/7 


8 


10 


$900.00 


$90.00 


$300.00 




Emory 


8 


7 / 


16 


25 


3.54 


3.39 


1/15 








$0.00 


$0.00 


$0.00 




Emporia State 




4 1 


5 


29 


2.95 


2.88 


2/6 


6 


6 


$1,250.00 


$208.33 


$1,000.00 




Evansville 


9 


6 


15 


54 


2.80 


3.11 


5/6 


21 


41 


$8,733.76 


$213.02 


$1,333.38 




Fairleigh 
Dickinson 
















2 


4 


$1,050.00 


$262.50 


$500.00 




Ferris State 


11 




11 


43 


2.56 






6 


6 


$494.01 


$82.34 


$250.00 




Florida 


14 


7 1 


22 


140 


3.39 


3.29 


5/26 


32 


36 


$5,189.01 


$144.14 


$1,000.00 


$2,000.00 


Florida Atlantic 


36 


9 1 


46 


51 


2.67 


2.83 


1/7 


7 


29 


$2,448.01 


$84.41 


$500.00 




Florida Gulf Coast 


8 


9 1 


18 


60 


3.02 


3.06 


1/3 


4 


5 


$250.00 


$50.00 


$75.00 





EDUCATIONAL FOUNDATION 




SIGMA PHI EPSILON EDUCATIONAL FOUNDATION 



School 


EDGE 
08* 


Carlson Ruck Quest 
08 08 08 


Total Leadership 

Continuum 
Participation 08 


2008 
Manpowei 


GPA 
Sp'08 


All Campus 
Average 
Sp'08 


Rank 


#of 
Donors 


#of 
Gifts 


Total 
Given 


Avg 
gift 


Largest 
Gift 


Total 

Scholarships 

Awarded 


Florida 
International 




9 


9 


56 


2.99 


2.67 


4/14 


4 


14 


$1,519.00 


$108.50 


$250.00 




Florida Southern 
















2 


2 


$100.00 


$50.00 


$50.00 




Florida State 


- 


. 




■ 




- 




8 


10 


$1,594.01 


$159.40 


$700.00 




Fort Hays State 
















1 


1 


$25.00 


$25.00 


$25.00 




Fresno State 


22 


8 1 


31 


51 


3.08 


2.52 


1/10 


4 


4 


$225.00 


$56.25 


$100.00 




George Mason 


11 


5 1 


17 


35 


2.78 


2.90 


6/15 


4 


16 


$525.00 


$32.81 


$100.00 


$800.00 


George 
Washington 


28 


7 1 


36 


92 


3.21 


3.27 


5/15 


15 


35 


$5,945.66 


$169.88 


$2,000.00 


$1,350.00 


Georgetown 


12 


14 1 1 


28 


42 


3.49 






20 


33 


$1,981.08 


$60.03 


$250.00 


$5,280.00 


Georgia 




5 


5 


115 


3.32 


3.16 


2/26 


9 


21 


$2,658.00 


$126.57 


$750.00 




Georgia Southern 




7 


7 


41 


2.94 




3/14 


8 


10 


$472.03 


$47.20 


$200.00 




Georgia State 
















2 


2 


$119.01 


$59.51 


$100.00 




Georgia Tech 




7 1 


8 


57 


2.92 


2.98 


14/31 


18 


20 


$54,722.00 


$2,738.61 


$26,000.00 




Grand Valley 
State 


11 


7 1 


19 


42 








1 


1 


$150.00 


$150.00 


$150.00 




Hawaii 
















2 


13 


$220.00 


$16.92 


$100.00 




Henderson State 




4 


4 


21 








1 


1 


$50.00 


$50.00 


$50.00 




Hofstra 
















1 


1 


$50.00 


$50.00 


$50.00 




Houston 


4 


8 1 


13 


40 


2.84 




1/8 


3 


6 


$803.32 


$133.89 


$250.00 


$2,200.00 


Huntingdon 




4 


4 


14 


2.91 


2.97 




4 


6 


$1,750.00 


$291.67 


$1,000.00 




Idaho 


11 


7 


/S 


13 


3.14 


2.90 


2/15 


4 


4 


$300.00 


$75.00 


$100.00 




Idaho State 
















1 


1 


$25.00 


$25.00 


$25.00 




IIT 


12 


13 


25 


58 


3.07 


3.04 




10 


10 


$1,065.00 


$106.50 


$500.00 




Illinois 


21 


12 2 


35 


183 


3.36 


3.08 


4/20 


35 


47 


$6,410.01 


$136.38 


$1,000.00 




Illinois State 


37 


14 1 


52 


116 


2.88 


2.84 




9 


9 


$375.00 


$41.67 


$75.00 




Indiana 


30 


7 2 


39 


86 


3.38 


3.10 


1/36 


16 


17 


$8,875.00 


$522.06 


$5,000.00 




Indiana State 


12 


8 


20 


24 


2.82 






19 


34 


$11,606.74 


$341.37 


$7,261.74 


$6,800.00 


Indiana Tech 


4 


5 1 


10 


20 


2.65 




1/2 


11 


24 


$3,837.69 


$159.90 


$1,000.00 




Iowa 


24 


7 


31 


85 


2.97 


3.00 


5/13 


13 


29 


$4,201.67 


$144.89 


$1,000.00 




Iowa State 


19 


16 1 


36 


55 


3.02 


2.95 


8/29 


26 


28 


$2,599.01 


$92.82 


$1,000.00 




Iowa Wesleyan 


- 


. 












3 


3 


$135.00 


$45.00 


$100.00 


- 


IPFW 
















1 


1 


$100.00 


$100.00 


$100.00 


- 


Ithaca 


- 






- 








1 


2 


$72.00 


$36.00 


$36.00 


- 


IUP 
















2 


2 


$29.01 


$14.51 


$19.01 




Jacksonville State 




4 


4 


25 


3.00 


2.56 


1/7 


2 


3 


$102.00 


$34.00 


$50.00 




Jacksonville U.* 




4 






2.22 






2 


3 


$200.00 


$66.67 


$100.00 




James Madison 


39 


16 2 


57 


44 


3.05 


2.98 


9/15 


14 


18 


$2,120.01 


$117. 78 


$1,200.00 




John Carroll 




9 1 


10 


42 


3.06 


2.99 


3/4 


3 


3 


$135.00 


$45.00 


$100.00 




Johns Hopkins 


9 


7 


16 


77 


3.19 


3.22 


13/22 


22 


53 


$8,314.00 


$156.87 


$1,625.00 


$600.00 


Kansas 


28 


8 


36 


102 


3.16 


3.02 


4/22 


30 


55 


$13,248.00 


$240.87 


$8,000.00 


$995.00 


Kansas State 


30 


7 


37 


93 


3.13 


2.85 


5/24 


34 


64 


$78,252.27 


$1,222.69 


$10,022.00 




Kent State 




4 


4 


17 








7 


7 


$610.00 


$87.14 


$150.00 




Kentucky 






1 


92 


2.80 


2.99 


15/21 


14 


17 


$895.00 


$52.65 


$100.00 




Kentucky 
Wesleyan 


1 


4 


5 


25 


3.33 




1/3 


6 


8 


$936.29 


$117.04 


$366.34 


$600.00 


Lamar 




4 


4 


30 


2.73 






13 


20 


$6,052.04 


$302.60 


$2,000.00 


$4,635.00 


Lambuth 


3 


9 1 


13 


34 








5 


6 


$350.00 


$58.33 


$100.00 




LaSalle 




4 1 


5 


26 


2.88 






5 


6 


$155.00 


$25.83 


$50.00 




Lawrence 




4 


4 


28 


3.27 


3.34 


3/5 


4 


4 


$255.00 


$63.75 


$100.00 




Lawrence Tech 


18 


17 1 


36 


59 








15 


19 


$1,159.80 


$61.04 


$100.00 


$335.00 


Lehigh 


24 


7 


31 


71 


3.25 


3.15 


1/18 


19 


20 


$2,375.00 


$118.75 


$1,000.00 




Lewis 
















1 


1 


$10.00 


$10.00 


$10.00 




Lewis & Clark 


- 


. 




■ 




- 




4 


4 


$300.00 


$75.00 


$100.00 


- 


Lincoln Memorial 
















1 


1 


$10.00 


$10.00 


$10.00 




Longwood 




4 


4 


27 


2.07 


2.81 


5/7 








$0.00 


$0.00 


$0.00 




Loras 


- 


- 












4 


17 


$3,070.00 


$180.59 


$1,000.00 


■ 


Louisiana 
Monroe 
















1 


1 


$19.01 


$19.01 


$19.01 




Louisiana State 


35 


7 1 


43 


95 


3.06 


2.90 


2/23 


16 


29 


$1,432.00 


$49.38 


$100.00 




Louisville 


18 


11 1 


30 


23 


2.64 


2.92 


11/13 


2 


2 


$125.00 


$62.50 


$100.00 




Loyola 


15 


8 


23 


49 


2.67 


2.97 


4/5 


2 


2 


$519.67 


$259.84 


$319.67 




Loyola 
Marymount 


9 


6 1 


16 


114 


3.30 






17 


26 


$1,904.01 


$73.23 


$500.00 




Lynchburg 




4 


4 


42 








7 


12 


$812.03 


$67.67 


$500.00 




Maine 


8 


20 1 


29 


54 


3.35 


2.85 


1/16 


12 


14 


$2,225.00 


$158.93 


$1,000.00 


$620.00 


Marquette 


6 


4 1 


11 


16 








3 


4 


$275.00 


$68.75 


$100.00 




Marshall 




4 


4 


34 


2.67 


2.65 


2/8 


10 


10 


$1,740.00 


$174.00 


$1,000.00 




Maryland- 
Baltimore 


. 


. 




. 








1 


1 


$20.00 


$20.00 


$20.00 


. 


Maryland- 
College Park 


14 


16 1 


31 


72 


3.30 


3.01 


3/24 


30 


36 


$3,004.01 


$83.44 


$500.00 


$1,400.00 



40 SIGEP JOURNAL Fall 2009 



Donor groups provide multiple giving options 



Alumni, undergraduates, parents 
and friends of SigEp can support 
the Educational Foundation by 
making a gift annually or by join- 
ing one of the various donor 
groups. As a member of a donor 
group, you are a valuable insider 
and receive special communica- 
tions and incentives that help 
to keep you connected with the 
Fraternity. 



Hoop of Steel Society 

Where it goes: Annual Fund 

Donors: Undergraduate SigEp members 

Giving level: Minimum annual gift of $19.01 

Why/benefits: Personal/Chapter incentives 

visit www.sigephoopofsteel.org/ for more 

details 

Ducal Crown Society 

Where it goes: Split Gift: half Annual Fund / 
half Chapter Specific Scholarships 
Donors: Young Alumni 1-5 years out of school 
Giving levels: Monthly: $19.01, 
Quarterly: $57.03, Annually: $228.12 
Why/benefits: Chapter Scholarship Fund 
Growth, Ducal Crown Pin, Regular updates 
that contain relevant Fraternity and Founda- 
tion news 



Board of Governors 

Where it goes: Annual Fund 
Donors: Alumni of all Classes, Friends of 
SigEp / Young Alumni 1-5 years out of school 
Giving levels: 

Beacon Society (1-5 years out) - Monthly: $42, 
Quarterly: $125, Annually: $500 
Standard Membership - Monthly $84, Quar- 
terly $250, Annually $1,000 
Beacon Society Sponsor (covers self + 3 young 
alumni) - Monthly: $209, Quarterly: $625, 
Annually: $2,500 

President's Circle - Monthly: $417, Quarterly: 
$1,250, Annually: $5,000 
Why/benefits: monthly e-newsletters, invites 
to special events, directory of fellow members 



A Fund with incredible yields... the SigEp Annual Fund 



Making a gift to the Annual Fund provides 
unrestricted support used for SigEp's scholar- 
ship and leadership programs. This support 
helps to drive the annual grant provided to 
Sigma Phi Epsilon Fraternity. This grant 
helps to fund such things as The Leadership 



Continuum, Balanced Man Program, Residen- 
tial Learning Communities and National 
Competition Scholars (see page 46 for the 2008 
recipients), involving thousands of SigEp 
undergraduates in 2008. 



School 


EDGE 
08* 


Carlson Ruck Quest 
08 08 08 


Total Leadership 

Continuum 
Participation 08 


2008 
Manpower 


GPA 
Sp'08 


All Campus 
Average 
Sp'08 


Rank 


#of 
Donors 


#of 
Gifts 


Total 
Given 


Avg 
gift 


Largest 
Gift 


Total 

Scholarships 

Awarded 


Massachusetts 


19 


6 


25 


56 


2.87 


2.86 


5/12 


17 


33 


$2,428.74 


$73.60 


$250.00 




McDaniel 
















1 


1 


$25.00 


$25.00 


$25.00 




Memphis 


27 


20 1 


48 


70 


2.99 




1/9 


13 


20 


$3,185.50 


$159.28 


$750.50 




Miami (Florida) 


27 


4 


31 


90 


3.30 


3.17 


3/11 


14 


46 


$3,811.50 


$82.86 


$500.04 




Miami (Ohio) 


19 


9 1 


29 


127 


3.25 


3.10 


2/28 


23 


24 


$7,415.00 


$308.96 


$6,000.00 




Michigan 


12 


11 1 


24 


95 


3.34 


3.28 


5/26 


23 


28 


$1,505.00 


$53.75 


$100.00 




Michigan State 




1 


1 


75 








13 


14 


$610.00 


$43.57 


$100.00 




Michigan Tech 









40 


2.90 


2.85 


1/13 


9 


12 


$600.00 


$50.00 


$150.00 




Middle Tennessee 
State 




4 


4 


32 


2.78 


2.58 


3/11 


3 


3 


$200.00 


$66.67 


$100.00 




Minnesota 


17 


16 2 1 


36 


48 


3.27 


3.12 


3/26 


21 


50 


$4,996.63 


$99.93 


$500.00 




Mississippi 




4 


4 


127 


2.45 


2.73 


12/13 


16 


41 


$1,340.00 


$32.68 


$250.00 




Mississippi State 




4 2 1 


7 


60 


3.01 


2.88 


3/18 


5 


5 


$200.00 


$40.00 


$50.00 




Missouri State 


2 


14 1 


17 


110 


3.00 


3.02 


4/17 


8 


10 


$400.00 


$40.00 


$100.00 




Missouri- 
Columbia 


18 


6 


24 


53 


2.9 


3.04 




21 


33 


$18,900.00 


$572.73 


$5,000.00 




Missouri- 
Kansas City 


15 


6 


21 


25 


2.86 






5 


7 


$1,585.00 


$226.43 


$500.00 




Missouri-Science 
& Technology 




8 


8 


61 


3.13 






42 


48 $139,829.18 


$2,913.11 


$30,000.00 


$3,500.00 


MIT 


6 


6 1 


13 


39 


3.45 




12/27 


13 


28 


$3,311.64 


$118.27 


$250.00 


$1,000.00 


Monmouth 


8 


5 1 


14 


46 


3.00 


2.98 


1/3 


12 


14 


$2,405.00 


$171.79 


$1,500.00 




Montana 


14 


5 


19 


29 


2.98 


2.96 


2/5 


10 


13 


$900.00 


$69.23 


$250.00 




Montana State 


14 


4 1 


19 


22 


3.16 


2.99 


1/7 


8 


9 


$1,015.00 


$112.78 


$500.00 




Moravian 


14 


5 1 


20 


40 


2.83 


3.04 


2/3 


2 


3 


$351.00 


$117.00 


$151.00 




Morehead State 


2 


25 


27 


77 


2.95 


2.92 


2/9 


8 


10 


$2,090.00 


$209.00 


$1,000.00 




Muhlenberg 




4 


4 


41 


3.11 


3.34 


2/3 


16 


17 


$1,170.00 


$68.82 


$150.00 




Murray State 


39 


16 1 


56 


78 


3.24 


2.65 


1/11 


8 


18 


$1,959.00 


$108.83 


$1,000.00 




Nebraska 


30 


8 1 


39 


119 


3.47 


3.11 


3/24 


21 


43 


$2,685.00 


$62.44 


$1,000.00 




Nebraska- 
Kearney 


26 


17 1 


44 


55 


3.18 


2.90 




13 


16 


$624.92 


$39.06 


$50.00 




Nebraska- 
Omaha 


33 


12 1 


46 


43 


3.01 


2.97 


2/4 


8 


31 


$779.00 


$25.13 


$100.00 




Nevada- 
Las Vegas 


■ 


■ 












1 


1 


$200.00 


$200.00 


$200.00 


- 



EDUCATIONAL FOUNDATION 41 




SIGMA PHI EPSILON EDUCATIONAL FOUNDATION 



School 


EDGE 
08* 


Carlson Ruck Quest 
08 08 08 


Total Leadership 

Continuum 
Participation 08 


2008 
Manpower 


GPA 
Sp'08 


All Campus 
Average 
Sp'08 


Rank 


#of 
Donors 


#of 
Gifts 


Total 
Given 


Avg 
gift 


Largest 
Gift 


Total 

Scholarships 

Awarded 


Nevada-Reno 


22 


15 


37 


56 


2.88 


2.91 


3/8 


5 


9 


$609.50 


$67.72 


$324.50 




New Hampshire 




5 


5 


20 


3.17 


3.10 


1/11 


2 


3 


$100.00 


$33.33 


$50.00 




New Mexico 
















10 


10 


$995.00 


$99.50 


$500.00 




New Mexico State 












- 




2 


2 


$185.00 


$92.50 


$150.00 




North Carolina 




4 1 


5 


51 


2.87 




21/22 


16 


16 


$1,900.00 


$118.75 


$1,000.00 




North Carolina 
State 




11 


11 


31 


2.86 


2.95 


7/23 


21 


25 


$8,100.38 


$324.02 


$5,024.58 




North Carolina- 
Charlotte 




4 


4 


22 


2.74 






6 


7 


$575.00 


$82.14 


$250.00 




North Carolina- 
Greensboro 




6 1 


7 


19 


2.45 


2.47 










$0.00 


$0.00 


$0.00 




North Carolina- 
Wilmington 




. 












1 


1 


$35.00 


$35.00 


$35.00 




North Dakota 


3 


14 


17 


50 


3.25 


3.00 


1/12 


15 


79 


$3,022.36 


$38.26 


$1,000.00 


$900.00 


North Georgia 
















1 


1 


$100.00 


$100.00 


$100.00 




North Texas 


8 


4 1 


13 


37 


3.02 


2.8 


1/14 


18 


20 


$15,748.00 


$787.40 


$5,000.00 




Northeastern 


7 


12 


19 


67 


3.08 


3.14 


3/8 


4 


4 


$100.00 


$25.00 


$25.00 




Northern Arizona 


4 




4 


10 


2.68 




5/14 


5 


16 


$2,317.28 


$144.83 


$1,000.00 




Northern 
Colorado 
















4 


4 


$225.00 


$56.25 


$100.00 




Northern Illinois* 




3 


3 


23 








5 


5 


$614.01 


$122.80 


$500.00 




Northern Iowa 


18 


7 1 


26 


31 


3.14 


3.08 




5 


12 


$1,011.68 


$84.31 


$200.00 




Northern 
Kentucky 


21 


16 1 


38 


24 


2.92 


2.84 


1/5 


3 


4 


$545.00 


$136.25 


$345.00 




Northrop 
















1 


1 


$50.00 


$50.00 


$50.00 




Northwest 
Missouri 




4 1 


5 


71 


2.81 


2.84 


2/10 


9 


12 


$1,450.00 


$120.83 


$395.00 




Northwestern 


31 


5 


36 


102 


3.41 


3.44 


5/16 


15 


18 


$2,165.00 


$120.28 


$1,000.00 




Northwood 









29 


2.68 




4/5 


3 


3 


$100.00 


$33.33 


$50.00 




NYU 


4 


7 1 


12 


23 


3.32 






8 


9 


$531.00 


$59.00 


$100.00 




Ohio 


6 


4 


10 


72 


2.73 


2.97 


6/14 


1 


1 


$100.00 


$100.00 


$100.00 




Ohio Northern 


8 


10 


18 


40 


2.94 


3.19 


3/8 


3 


3 


$385.00 


$128.33 


$185.00 




Ohio State 


49 


11 1 


61 


100 


3.43 


3.10 


2/32 


22 


41 


$2,630.38 


$64.16 


$500.00 




Ohio Wesleyan 




8 1 


9 


35 


2.70 


3.00 


7/7 


15 


16 


$8,160.00 


$510.00 


$7,500.00 




Oklahoma 


60 


4 1 


65 


202 


3.16 


3.15 


4/18 


30 


35 


$3,269.01 


$93.40 


$500.00 


$175.00 


Oklahoma City 
















1 


1 


$50.00 


$50.00 


$50.00 




Oklahoma State 


31 


8 2 1 


42 


78 


3.19 


2.81 


3/19 


16 


16 


$1,331.00 


$83.19 


$250.00 


$2,000.00 




These awards are made 
possible by the generosity of 
Past Grand President and 
Order of the Golden Heart 
recipient J. Edward Zollinger, 
William & Mary '27. 



2008 Zollinger Outstanding Seniors 



The Zollinger Senior Award is presented to the outstand- 
ing senior in each district of Sigma Phi Epsilon and is 
chosen by the District Governor for that district. These 
brothers represent the best of Sigma Phi Epsilon. 
Each Zollinger Senior chapter selects an outstanding 



Eric M. Adkins 

Oklahoma State '08 

Gregory D. Allen 

Memphis '08 

Aaron D. Alt 

Toledo '09 

Steven M. Altmann 

Quinnipiac '08 

Zachary C. Ames 

Utah State '10 

Christopher A. Badtke 

Wisconsin-Platteville '08 



Bryan J. Baker 

Delaware '08 

Andrew S. Brady 

George Washington '08 

Bradley M. Cerf 

Northwestern '08 

Andrew S. Clare 

MIT '08 

Brian J. Eady 

Lawrence '07 

Scott A. Garrigus 

Indiana State '08 



sophomore, the Zollinger Scholar, who receives a scholar- 
ship from the Educational Foundation in his junior and 
senior years. The Zollinger Scholars are chapter members 
who possess special potential for future leadership roles 
in the chapter and on campus. 



Thomas J. Hanrahan 

Eastern Washington '08 

Bradley Hicks 

Texas-Austin '08 

James P. Howe 

Northwest Missouri State 
'08 

Scott T. McDonough 

Clarkson '08 

Scott N. Powell 
Georgia Tech '09 

Kyle B. Reynolds 

Central Arkansas '08 



Scott M. Sandstrom 

Nebraska-Omaha '08 

Patrick A. Scott- 
Klingborg 

UC-San Diego '07 

Donald A. Sivick, III 

Pennsylvania '08 

Robert B. Sozio 

South Florida '08 

Lowell C. D. Trott 

Loyola Marymount '08 

Cody J. Wagner 

New Mexico '07 



42 SIGEP JOURNAL Fall 2009 




School 


EDGE 
08* 


Carlson Ruck Quest 
08 08 08 


Total Leadership 

Continuum 
Participation 08 


2008 
Manpower 


GPA 
Sp'08 


All Campus 
Average 
Sp'08 


Rank 


#of 
Donors 


#of 
Gifts 


Total 
Given 


Avg 
gift 


Largest 
Gift 


Total 

Scholarships 

Awarded 


Old Dominion 


8 


6 1 


15 


33 








3 


4 


$275.00 


$68.75 


$100.00 




Oregon 


12 


4 1 


17 


60 


3.11 


3.09 


4/12 


22 


26 


$5,724.00 


$220.15 


$1,921.50 


$1,900.00 


Oregon State 




13 2 


15 


79 


3.26 


2.98 


1/24 


26 


63 


$2,616.18 


$41.53 


$200.00 


$13,666.65 


Parsons 












2 


2 


$125.00 


$62.50 


$100.00 




Pennsylvania 

Pennsylvania 
State 




9 1 1 


11 


50 


3.23 


3.41 


22/29 


37 


77 


$17,706.03 


$229.95 


$11,541.03 


$3,500.00 




8 - 1 


9 


98 


3.05 


3.17 


21/48 


17 


29 


$12,160.43 


$419.33 


$1,750.00 


$5,905.00 


Pepperdine 


17 


8 1 


26 


43 








7 


30 


$3,414.00 


$113.80 


$1,000.00 




Philadelphia 
















2 


2 


$1,050.00 


$525.00 


$1,000.00 




Pittsburg State 


32 


6 1 


39 


45 


2.98 


2.89 


2/7 


4 


7 


$475.00 


$67.86 


$100.00 




Pittsburgh 




4 


4 


43 


2.96 


3.16 


10/17 


5 


6 


$725.00 


$120.83 


$500.00 




Purdue 


32 


^H 


42 


138 


3.09 


2.89 


3/40 


39 


41 


$9,452.39 


$230.55 


$5,000.00 


$7,160.00 


Quinnipiac 


16 


7 1 


24 


76 


3.28 


3.21 


1/2 


1 


1 


$50.00 


$50.00 


$50.00 




Randolph-Macon 




7 


7 


19 


2.43 


2.78 


5/6 


2 


2 


$125.00 


$62.50 


$100.00 




Rhode Island 


7 


11 1 


19 


33 


3.01 


2.69 


2/10 


5 


5 


$1,165.00 


$233.00 


$1,000.00 




Richmond 




4 


4 


75 


3.40 


3.21 


1/6 


29 


34 


$4,950.00 


$145.59 


$1,250.00 


$8,605.00 


Rider 




4 


4 


29 


3.21 


2.98 


1/3 


1 


1 


$50.00 


$50.00 


$50.00 


$1,000.00 


Rochester 




2 1 


3 


40 


3.52 






7 


7 


$285.00 


$40.71 


$75.00 




Rollins 
















2 


2 


$35.00 


$17.50 


$25.00 




Rowan 
















1 


1 


$43.57 


$43.57 


$43.57 


- 


RPI 


13 


7 


20 


34 


2.94 


3.14 


16/26 


17 


20 


$7,405.00 


$370.25 


$3,000.00 




Rutgers 


21 


^H 


26 


74 


2.99 


3.02 


10/22 


20 


28 


$20,217.00 


$722.04 


$5,700.33 


$500.00 


Sacramento Sate 


16 


6 1 


23 


29 


2.95 


2.89 


1/7 


9 


36 


$3,025.00 


$84.03 


$1,000.00 




Saint Louis 


26 


7 1 


34 


94 


3.30 


3.17 


2/11 


17 


19 


$929.01 


$48.90 


$100.00 




Salisbury 


4 


7 1 


12 


39 


2.88 


2.89 


1/6 








$0.00 


$0.00 


$0.00 




Samford 


3 


4 1 


8 


20 


2.93 


2.99 


3/6 


2 


2 


$50.00 


$25.00 


$25.00 




San Diego 


14 


6 1 1 


22 


56 


3.08 


3.09 


5/5 


7 


18 


$1,958.31 


$108.80 


$250.00 




San Diego State 


36 


8 1 


45 


138 


3.16 


2.77 


1/16 


27 


30 


$2,385.00 


$79.50 


$500.00 




San Francisco 
State 


. 


. 




. 








3 


5 


$425.00 


$85.00 


$150.00 


. 


San Jose State 


■ 










- 




6 


7 


$1,475.00 


$210.71 


$1,000.00 


- 


Santa Clara 
















1 


1 


$50.00 


$50.00 


$50.00 


- 


Seton Hall 


- 










- 




2 


2 


$50.00 


$25.00 


$25.00 


- 


SlU-Carbondale 


■ 














1 


1 


$50.00 


$50.00 


$50.00 


- 


SlU-Edwardsville 


15 


4 


19 


34 


2.84 


2.85 


3/4 


3 


4 


$125.00 


$31.25 


$50.00 




South Carolina 


25 


9 


34 


111 


3.02 


3.19 


6/19 


24 


41 


$28,476.69 


$694.55 


$10,000.00 




South Dakota 
State 


8 


17 1 


26 


40 


3.26 


2.89 


1/6 


3 


4 


$350.00 


$87.50 


$100.00 




South Florida 


43 


13 1 


57 


92 


3.12 






13 


18 


$1,213.03 


$67.39 


$125.00 




Southeast 
Missouri State 


24 


9 1 


34 


83 


3.11 




1/9 


13 


14 


$875.00 


$62.50 


$250.00 




Southern 
California 


10 


4 2 


16 


37 


2.96 


3.26 


20/20 


29 


43 


$87,627.63 


$2,037.85 


$50,000.00 


$9,000.00 


Southern 
Methodist 


5 


10 1 


16 


56 


3.22 


3.15 


3/9 


15 


19 


$1,485.00 


$78.16 


$250.00 




Southern 
Mississippi 




4 1 


5 


44 


2.67 




10/16 


6 


11 


$478.35 


$43.49 


$100.00 




SPSU 
















2 


2 


$30.00 


$15.00 


$20.00 




St. Johns 


2 


4 


6 


31 


2.85 


3.08 


8/10 


2 


2 


$125.00 


$62.50 


$100.00 




St. Josephs 




7 


7 


37 


3.00 


3.01 


2/4 








$0.00 


$0.00 


$0.00 




St. Leo 
















1 


2 


$40.00 


$20.00 


$20.00 




St. Mary's 


9 


4 


13 


33 


3.33 


2.99 


1/5 


2 


2 


$250.00 


$125.00 


$200.00 




Stanford 




7 


7 


39 








6 


14 


$1,435.01 


$102.50 


$500.00 




Stephen F. 
Austin 








. 








2 


2 


$550.00 


$275.00 


$500.00 


. 


Stetson 




7 


7 


34 


3.09 


2.95 


1/6 


15 


18 


$17,900.00 


$994.44 


$5,000.00 


$950.00 


Stevens Tech 




7 1 1 


9 


58 


3.41 


3.13 


1/9 


24 


30 


$1,877.67 


$62.59 


$500.00 




SUNY- 
Binghamton 


. 














3 


10 


$3,420.77 


$342.08 


$1,869.77 


. 


SUNY-Buffalo 




4 


4 


2 








9 


17 


$6,313.33 


$371.37 


$5,000.00 




SUNY-Fredonia 




4 


4 


30 


2.80 






2 


2 


$125.00 


$62.50 


$100.00 




SUNY-Oswego 
















1 


1 


$500.00 


$500.00 


$500.00 




Susquehanna* 




4 












2 


12 


$130.00 


$10.83 


$12.50 


- 


Syracuse 


18 


4 


22 


59 


3.32 


3.17 


2/19 


12 


25 


$1,939.01 


$77.56 


$100.00 




Tampa 


10 


8 1 


19 


27 


2.78 


2.99 


5/10 


7 


8 


$245.00 


$30.63 


$50.00 




Temple 
















8 


8 


$450.00 


$56.25 


$100.00 




Tennessee 




10 1 


11 


101 








15 


16 


$3,825.00 


$239.06 


$1,000.00 




Tennessee Tech 


14 


10 1 


25 


54 


2.85 


2.93 


3/10 


5 


5 


$425.00 


$85.00 


$100.00 


$260.00 


Tennessee 
Wesleyan 
















2 


2 


$220.00 


$110.00 


$200.00 




Tennessee-Martin 


10 


9 


19 


28 








4 


9 


$4,000.00 


$444.44 


$1,500.00 




Texas A&M 




4 


4 


81 


2.90 


2.89 


8/22 


7 


17 


$800.00 


$47.06 


$100.00 





EDUCATIONAL FOUNDATION 43 




SIGMA PHI EPSILON EDUCATIONAL FOUNDATION 



School 


EDGE 
08* 


Carlson Ruck Quest 
08 08 08 


Total Leadership 

Continuum 
Participation 08 


2008 

Manpower 


GPA 
Sp'08 


All Campus 
Average 
Sp'08 


Rank 


#of 
Donors 


#of 
Gifts 


Total 
Given 


Avg 
gift 


Largest 
Gift 


Total 

Scholarships 

Awarded 


Texas A&M- 
Corpus Christi 




6 


6 


31 


2.73 


2.75 


3/4 








$0.00 


$0.00 


$0.00 




Texas Christian 


30 


10 1 


41 


133 


3.3 


3.16 


2/10 


19 


32 


$7,700.03 


$240.63 


$1,500.00 


$2,700.00 


Texas State 
















4 


5 


$500.00 


$100.00 


$100.00 




Texas Tech 


41 


7 1 


49 


83 


3.04 


2.89 


2/22 


12 


12 


$1,550.00 


$129.17 


$1,000.00 




Texas Wesleyan 
















3 


13 


$2,132.00 


$164.00 


$1,000.00 




Texas-Arlington 


6 


4 


10 


40 


2.72 


2.94 


5/10 


7 


11 


$3,100.00 


$281.82 


$1,000.00 


$500.00 


Texas-Austin 


52 


12 2 


66 


171 


3.15 


3.09 


7/22 


27 


52 


$12,883.00 


$247.75 


$5,000.00 




Texas- 
San Antonio 




4 


4 


32 


2.66 


2.61 


4/8 


3 


5 


$145.00 


$29.00 


$50.00 




Thiel 




4 


4 


31 


2.56 


2.45 


2/3 


7 


8 


$3,355.00 


$419.38 


$1,000.00 


$775.00 


Toledo 


29 


14 2 


45 


71 


3.3 


2.74 


1/10 


18 


38 


$2,899.17 


$76.29 


$500.00 




Trine 




7 1 


8 


36 


2.90 


2.78 


2/8 


6 


6 


$275.00 


$45.83 


$50.00 




Truman State 


28 


4 1 


33 


64 


3.16 


3.21 


4/13 


9 


18 


$3,825.02 


$212.50 


$1,000.00 




Tufts 


4 


4 


8 


57 


3.27 


3.36 


6/10 








$0.00 


$0.00 


$0.00 




Tulane 




7 


7 


78 








28 


51 


$8,489.01 


$166.45 


$5,000.00 


$2,000.00 


Tulsa 
















3 


3 


$1,150.00 


$383.33 


$1,000.00 




UC-Berkeley 


18 


7 


25 


47 


3.29 


3.28 


12/36 


13 


15 


$2,350.00 


$156.67 


$1,000.00 


$2,000.00 


UC-Davis 


17 


7 


24 


52 


2.84 


2.93 


16/28 


3 


3 


$2,625.00 


$875.00 


$2,500.00 




UC-lrvine 


34 


4 


38 


79 


2.85 


3.07 


17/23 


2 


14 


$876.51 


$62.61 


$83.33 




UCLA 




4 


4 


82 


3.32 


3.21 


5/20 


9 


21 


$1,483.37 


$70.64 


$200.00 




UC-Riverside 


7 


8 1 


16 


49 








1 


1 


$19.01 


$19.01 


$19.01 




UC-Santa Barbara 


27 


15 1 1 


44 


105 


3.03 


3.08 


5/16 


16 


20 


$3,774.13 


$188.71 


$1,000.00 




UC-San Diego 




4 1 


5 


52 








1 


1 


$100.00 


$100.00 


$100.00 




Utah 


15 


12 


27 


41 


3.01 


3.08 


3/8 


25 


34 


$7,428.00 


$218.47 


$1,000.00 




Utah State 


7 


4 


// 


13 


3.13 






5 


5 


$1,155.00 


$231.00 


$1,000.00 




Valdosta State 
























$50.00 




Valparaiso 


10 


11 1 


22 


77 


3.23 


3.15 


2/8 


20 


48 


$4,204.41 


$87.59 


$500.00 




Vanderbilt 


40 


8 1 


49 


76 








5 


7 


$326.00 


$46.57 


$100.00 




VCU 


30 


2 


32 


29 


3.18 


2.64 


2/17 


7 


8 


$469.01 


$58.63 


$150.00 




Vermont 


14 


4 1 


19 


38 


2.86 


3.13 


5/8 


4 


5 


$155.05 


$31.01 


$50.00 




Villanova 


17 


7 


24 


62 


3.24 


3.22 


1/10 


16 


16 


$1,208.00 


$75.50 


$250.00 




Virginia 









62 


3.30 






9 


16 


$909.50 


$56.84 


$100.00 


$1,000.00 


Virginia Tech 




4 2 


6 


106 


2.92 


3.06 


9/36 


24 


28 


$5,710.00 


$203.93 


$1,000.00 


$2,000.00 


Wake Forest 
















2 


2 


$45.00 


$22.50 


$25.00 






Thomas 0. Hicks, Texas '68 



2008 Hicks Scholars 

The Thomas O. Hicks Endowment of the Sigma Phi 
Epsilon Educational Foundation, is funded by Thomas 
0. Hicks, Texas '68. He is a trustee of the Sigma Phi 
Epsilon Educational Foundation, and owns the Texas 
Rangers Baseball Club and the National Hockey League's 
Dallas Stars. Hicks is Chairman and Chief Executive 
Officer of Hicks, Muse, Tate and Furst, a private invest- 
ment firm based in Dallas, Texas. 

As a sophomore in college, Hicks was motivated by 
the Texas Alpha Chapter to get serious about his grades, 
which had suffered during his freshman year. He improved 
his GPA significantly that year and kept it up. He obtained 



a Masters Degree at Southern California and had a 
successful banking career in New York and Dallas before 
starting his own company. 

In funding this special scholarship awards program, 
Brother Hicks recognizes and rewards brothers who 
get on track with their grades after a poor start. Another 
goal is motivating all SigEp undergraduates to achieve 
academically. 

These scholarships go to a SigEp junior who signifi- 
cantly improved his GPA in his sophomore year compared 
to his freshman year. 



2008 Hicks Scholars 


Freshman 
GPA 


Sophomore 
GPA 


GPA 
Improvement 


% 
Improvement 


Lawrence J. Danielson, Texas-Austin 10 


2.90 


3.39 


0.49 


17% 


Justin M. Kleiderer, Texas-Austin '09 


2.60 


3.45 


0.85 


33% 


Timothy L. Lucas, Southeast Missouri State '09 


1.67 


3.50 


1.83 


110% 


Ishan R. Majumdar, Emory '11 


3.43 


3.86 


0.43 


13% 


Thomas C. Pruet, Salisbury '09 


2.21 


3.10 


0.89 


40% 


Matthew N. Savage, Texas-Austin '10 


1.65 


3.12 


1.46 


89% 


Matthew T. Sheffield, Texas-Austin '10 


2.50 


3.83 


1.33 


53% 


Michael A. Silvestri, Loyola Marymount '09 


2.90 


3.53 


0.63 


22% 


Jake D. Soderberg, Minnesota '09 


2.39 


3.72 


1.33 


56% 


Aaron W. Walker, Texas Christian '10 


2.12 


3.89 


1.77 


83% 



44 SIGEP JOURNAL Fall 2009 



Educational Foundation sponsors 
Spelling Bee scholarship 



By SEAN C. COSGROVE, Cincinnati '05 

For the fifth consecutive year, the Sigma Phi 
Epsilon Educational Foundation has awarded 
a scholarship to the Scripps National Spelling 
Bee winner. Held every year in Washington 
D.C., the Spelling Bee attracts national media 
attention, and SigEp provides a $5,000 scholar- 
ship to the champion. The more than five 
million viewers of the May broadcast on ABC 
saw SigEp's name next to the likes of Merriam 
Webster and Encyclopedia Britannica. 

At the awards dinner held after the week- 
long competition, SigEp shared the stage with 
all of the sponsors to present our scholarship 
to the winner. Paul Happel, Georgetown '08, 
Jake Rocchi, George Washington '11, and 
Walter Hoenes, George Washington '86 
represented the Educational Foundation at 
the Scripps Spelling Bee Awards Dinner. 
Brothers Happel and Rocchi presented the 
$5,000 scholarship to 13-year-old Kavya 
Shivashankar, the 2009 champion. 

Kavya is an eighth grader at California 
Trail Junior High School in Olathe, Kan. She 
correctly spelled laodicean to win. Laodicean, 



meaning lukewarm or indiffer- 
ent to religion and politics, is of 
Greek origin. More than one 
third of the English language 
has Greek roots. 

Kavya enjoys practicing her 
violin, bicycling, swimming, and 
learning Indian classical dance. 
She names Nupur Lala, the 1999 
Scripps National Spelling Bee 
champion, as her role model and 
the inspiration for her spelling career. She has 
plans for her future career as well; she looks 
forward to becoming a neurosurgeon. Kavya 
participated in the 2006, 2007, and 2008 na- 
tional finals— tying for 10th, 8th, and 4th 
place, respectively. 

Kavya, as well as 2008 Champion Sameer 
Mishra, were recognized at the Educational 
Foundation Luncheon at the Orlando Con- 
clave in August. Kavya said, "I have always 
wanted to become a neurosurgeon, and I am 
planning to use this scholarship for college. 
So, I want to thank the SigEp Educational 




Jake Rocchi, George Washington '11, and Paul Happel, Georgetown '08, proudly 
present the 2009 Scripps National Spelling Bee Winner with her $5,000 
scholarship. Winner Kavya Shivashankar plans to become a neurosurgeon. 



Foundation, for their scholarship, and for 
providing great educational opportunities." 
Both families were so inspired by the 
Foundation's educational mission that they 
each made a gift during the luncheon. 

The Sigma Phi Epsilon Educational 
Foundation is a proud sponsor of the 
Scripps Spelling Bee as the stated purpose 
of the Bee aligns with our Sound Mind, 
Sound Body philosophy. Spellers who 
master the axioms of the Bee are poised to 
make learning a lifelong endeavor. 



School 


EDGE 
08* 


Carlson Ruck Quest 
08 08 08 


Total Leadership 

Continuum 
Participation 08 


2008 
Manpower 


GPA 
Sp'08 


All Campus 
Average 
Sp'08 


Rank 


#of 
Donors 


# of Total 
Gifts Given 


Avg Largest 
gift Gift 


Total 

Scholarships 

Awarded 


Washburn 


2 


12 


14 


26 


3.03 


3.00 


2/4 


50 


53 $6,826.68 


$128.81 $1,000.00 


$1,500.00 


Washington 


28 


4 1 


33 


63 


3.36 


3.32 


1/29 


14 


14 $744.01 


$53.14 $100.00 


$2,000.00 


Washington 
& Lee 




7 


7 


23 


3.20 


3.28 


11/16 


3 


3 $150.00 


$50.00 $100.00 




Washington 
in St. Louis 




4 1 1 


6 


90 


3.51 


3.41 


2/11 


22 


28 $7,880.00 


$281.43 $1,000.00 




Washington State 


37 


6 1 


44 


73 


3 


3.02 


3/24 


11 


11 $3,625.00 


$329.55 $2,500.00 


$4,000.00 


Westminster 




4 


4 


37 


2.88 


3.21 


5/5 


2 


2 $230.00 


$115.00 $200.00 




West Chester 


15 


6 1 


22 


44 


2.81 


3.02 


6/7 


6 


8 $1,325.00 


$165.63 $1,000.00 




West Virginia 


- 














16 


32 $1,705.00 


$53.28 $200.00 




Western 
Carolina 
















5 


5 $1,452.00 


$290.40 $1,000.00 


. 


Western 
Kentucky 


21 


10 1 1 


33 


48 


2.92 


2.68 


6/16 


5 


17 $410.00 


$24.12 $100.00 




Western 
Michigan 


18 


9 1 


28 


50 


2.88 


3 


3/12 


32 


81 $6,997.10 


$86.38 $1,100.00 


$2,450.00 


Wichita State 


28 


13 1 1 


43 


53 


3.01 


2.97 


3/7 


64 


225$444,355.49 


$1,974.91 $250,000.00 


$2,000.00 


William & Mary 
















6 


6 $470.00 


$78.33 $100.00 




Wisconsin 


15 


7 1 


23 


103 


3.09 


3.24 


14/24 


15 


15 $11,675.00 


$778.33 $10,000.00 


$2,000.00 


Wisconsin- 
Oshkosh 


. 


. 




. 








3 


5 $225.00 


$45.00 $100.00 


. 


Wisconsin- 
Platteville 


5 


14 1 


20 


25 


2.68 


2.81 


3/8 


3 


6 $550.00 


$91.67 $125.00 


$225.00 


Wisconsin- 
Stevens Point 
















2 


2 $125.00 


$62.50 $100.00 




WPI 




8 


8 


66 


3.16 






9 


10 $1,440.00 


$144.00 $1,000.00 


$7,800.00 


Wright State 


8 


7 


15 


28 


2.76 


2.87 


2/5 


4 


23 $391.00 


$17.00 $50.00 




WVU Tech 
















5 


6 $1,010.00 


$168.33 $500.00 




Wyoming 


10 


5 2 


17 


40 


2.73 






3 


3 $150.00 


$50.00 $100.00 




Yale 




5 1 


6 


77 


3.61 






11 


13 $2,150.00 


$165.38 $500.00 




Youngstown 
State 


- 






- 








9 


9 $424.01 


$47.11 $100.00 


- 


Totals 


2950 


1803 158 16 


4902 


14194 


3.08 


- 


- 


3,057 


4,842 $1,610,250.52 


$322.56 $250,000.00 


$140,101.65 




EDGE 


Carlson Ruck Tragos 
Leadership Leadership Quest 
Academy Institute to Greece 


Total Leadership 
Continuum 
Participation 


Total 
Manpower 


for 224 
chapters 
reporting 






Donors 


Gifts Total Given 


Average 
gift 


Total 

Scholarships 

Awarded 



EDUCATIONAL FOUNDATION 45 




SIGMA PHI EPSILON EDUCATIONAL FOUNDATION 



2008 National Competition Scholars 

Each year the Sigma Phi Epsilon Educational Foundation presents $1,000 scholarships to outstanding SigEp undergraduates who have a strong 
academic record, participate in campus community life and are active in chapter leadership positions. Below are the 2008 recipients. 



Spenser Cassinelli 

Nevada-Reno '09 

Major: Biochemistry & Molecular Biology 

Fraternity Involvement: VP Recruitment 

Campus Activities: Student orientation staff 
member; Order of Omega; Golden Key 
National Honor Society; Phi Kappa Phi; Delta 
Epsilon lota 

Joseph C. Curtis 

Trine '09 

Major: Business Administration 

Fraternity Involvement: President 

Campus Activities: Alpha Chi; Delta Mu 
Delta; Golf Management Student 
Association; Football Team Captain 

Patrick T. Gaston 

Rider '09 

Major: Secondary Education & History 

Fraternity Involvement: bms Chairman 

Campus Activities: IFC, Vice President of 
Internal Programming; freshman seminar 
leader; Baccalaureate Honors Program Peer 
Mentor; Student Rep on Administrative task 
force; RU tour guide 

Michael D. Giacalone 

Rhode Island '08 

Major: Music Teacher Education 

Fraternity Involvement: VP Member 
Development 

Campus Activities: IFC, Director of 
Academic Affairs; Student Organization 
Leadership Consultants 

Clay P. Gleb 

Pepperdine '09 

Major: Economics 

Fraternity Involvement: VP Finance 

Campus Activities: Pepperdine Volunteer 
Center, Program Coordinator and E-board 
member; Italian Club member; Dean's List 

Adam B. Greer 

Oklahoma State '10 
Major: Nutrition/Pre-Med 

Fraternity Involvement: VP 

Communications 

Campus Activities: HES Student Council; 
Chaplain & Recruitment Committee, Relay 
for Life; President's Leadership Council 



Jason D. Hartman 

Texas Christian '09 

Major: Finance/Accounting 

Fraternity Involvement: VP of Finance 

Campus Activities: TCU Order of Omega 
Junior of the Year; Neeley Fellows Program; 
Frog Camp Facilitator; Chancellor's 
Leadership program; Neeley Networks 
Mentoring program; TCU Ambassadors; 
Baseball Club; Educational Investment Fund 

C. Brandon Leake 

Pepperdine '09 

Major: Biology/Pre-Med 

Fraternity Involvement: VP of Development 

Campus Activities: Pepperdine Volunteer 
Center, Program Coordinator; Natural 
Science Division Campus Tour Guide/mentor; 
Order of Omega; Phi Delta Epsilon; Phi Eta 
Sigma; Golden Key 

Matthew Lee 

Oklahoma '10 

Major: Microbiology/Pre-Dental 

Fraternity Involvement: VP of 

Communications 

Campus Activities: Secretary, Pre-Dental 
club; OU Health Sciences Center tour leader; 
Big Event Volunteer; Alpha Lambda Delta; 
National Society of Collegiate Scholars; 
President's Honor Roll; Dean's Honor Roll; 
Honors College Writing Assistant 

Christopher J. MacLellan 

Wyoming '09 

Major: Computer Science & Mathematics 

Fraternity Involvement: VP of Recruitment 

Campus Activities: President, Student Math 
Association of Wyoming; Vice President of 
the Association for Computing Machinery; 
College of Engineering Senator 

Owen McCarthy 

Maine '10 

Major: Biological Engineering 

Fraternity Involvement: President 

Campus Activities: President, Sophomore 
Owl's Honor Society; AICHE; Agent for Class 
of 2010 Council; Class Rep for Chemical/ 
Biological Engineering Class of '10; Student 
Orientation Leader 



Brian A. Mead 

Iowa '09 

Major: Dentistry 

Fraternity Involvement: VP Recruitment 

Campus Activities: National Scholars Honor 
Society; President's List; Pre-Dental Club 

Christopher J. Ojeda 

Christopher Newport '09 

Major: Political Science 

Fraternity Involvement: President 

Campus Activities: President, Citizens of 
the World; Treasurer, CNU Club Swim Team; 
Resident Assistant; President's Leadership 
Program; Community Service Committee; 
Mentor for Captain's for Excellence Program 

Alexander M. Rak 

Bradley '09 

Major: Mechanical Engineering 

Fraternity Involvement: President 

Campus Activities: Vice President of IFC; 
Student Senate; Club soccer; maintains a 4.0 
GPA; Society of Automotive Engineering 
(SAE) 

Kyle Rodenbach 

Johns Hopkins '10 

Major: Psychology & Brain Sciences 

Fraternity Involvement: VP Finance 

Campus Activities: National Society of 
Collegiate Scholars; Psi Chi, Exec. Board; 
Orientation Student Advisor 

Michael B. Schwartzman 

Yale '09 

Major: Mechanical Engineering 

Fraternity Involvement: President 

Campus Activities: Men's Soccer Club, 
Captain; Yale Economic Review, Staff Writer; 
Assistant, Legal Aid Office at Yale Law 
School; Morse College Intramural Basketball; 
Tau Beta Pi; Torch Honor Society 



46 SIGEP JOURNAL Fall 2009 



Benjamin Solarz 

Yale '09 

Major: Economics 

Fraternity Involvement: VP Finance 

Campus Activities: President, Yale Mock 
Trial Association; Investment Principal, 
Globalfund Group; Phi Beta Kappa; Managing 
Editor Emeritus, Yale Economic Review; 
Student Investments Analyst at Yale 
Investments office 

Richard Z. Speyer 

Washington in St. Louis '09 

Major: Computer Science & Applied 
Mathematics 

Fraternity Involvement: VP of Recruitment 

Campus Activities: National Society of 
Collegiate Scholars; ACM; One in Four 
Recruitment Chair; Research Assistant; Arts 
& Sciences Computing Consultant; 
Engineering tutor; ACM Programming 
Competition participant; Seminar Course 
Director 

Villy Stolper 

South Carolina '10 

Major: International Business 

Fraternity Involvement: VP of Member 
Development 

Campus Activities: VP of External 
Development, Gamecock Leadership Society; 
Student Government, Secretary of 
Organizational Affairs; Blatt Advisory 
Committee Member; USC Honors College 

Russell S. Terry, Jr. 

Alabama '09 

Major: Chemistry & Biology 

Fraternity Involvement: President 

Campus Activities: SGA Judicial Board, 
Justice; IFC Recruitment Committee Co- 
Chair; University Standing Committee on 
Information Technology; University Standing 
Committee on Student Health; Blount 
Undergraduate Initiative; SGA Block Seating 
Committee; Alpha Epsilon Delta Premed 
Honor Society; Phi Eta Sigma; Alpha Lambda 
Delta; Order of Alpha; Golden Key; Sigma 
Alpha Lambda; Cardinal Key; Order of 
Omega; Mortar Board; Anderson Society; Phi 
Beta Kappa 



If everyone reading this page 
sent this... 




. . .your home chapter could: 

Award $20,000 in scholarships this year 

Send seven chapter officers to the 2010 
Carlson Leadership Academy free of charge 

Send two undergraduates to the 
2011 Grand Chapter Conclave free of charge 

This check could do a lot. 

(Now imagine what 
$1,000 could do.) 



In Memoriam 



The following is a 
partial listing of 
SigEps who have 
passed away in 
recent months. It is 
our chance to 
remember those 
brothers who, 
through their death, 
have reminded us 
that life is transitory. 



Julio Aldecocea 

Miami '84 

F. Wayne 
Armstrong 

Iowa '50 

John Bentley 

Carroll '64 

Jerry Blessinger 

Northern Colorado '60 



Con Borsting 

Oregon State '69 

Wayne Bridgeman 

San Diego State 76 

Walter Carmo 

Indiana of 
Pennsylvania '60 

Adam Cook 

Indiana State '93 

James Cotter 

Michigan 71 



Florida mourns loss 
of Hendon 

Dave Hendon, Florida '50, passed away in May. This Order 
of the Golden Heart recipient was nothing short of legend to 
his chapter where he bestowed six decades of service. 
Brother Hendon spent the majority of his life making 
Florida Alpha a better experience for everyone, and 
his love of the Fraternity centered on brotherhood. 

"The best 
things about 
SigEp are the 
people and the 
friends." 



In 1999, Hendon accepted 
his Distinguished Alumnus 
Award from then Grand 
President William G. 
Tragos, Washington in 
St. Louis '56. 




Christy D. 
"Chris" Dale Jr. 

Florida State '50 

Michael Debacker 

Wichita State 72 

Emmett Carl 
Dillard 

Texas-Austin '44 

William Dues 

Kentucky '64 

Lewis Deahl 
Frazier Jr. 

William & Mary '81 

Paul Gallo 

Ball State '66 

Andrew Gerke 

Maine '08 

J. Richard Gilger 

Pennsylvania State 
'55 

Robert "Bob" 
Heestand 

Oregon '49 

Dave Hendon 

Florida '50 

Gerald Jones 

Mississippi '65 

Stephen Klosen 

Pennsylvania State '88 

Conrad Lewane 

Richmond '59 

Lou Lewis 

West Virginia '60 

Howard 
Liebengood 

Kansas State '39, 

Benjamin M. Lowe 

Washington & Lee 77 

Sherman Orwig 
Lyon 

Purdue '61 



Irwin G. Mahr 

Alabama '39 

Michael Markham 

Oregon State '68 

Kenneth Mast 

Illinois '41 

Grady Matthews 

Northern Colorado 
'60 

Bruce McCarvel 

Montana 76 

Jack McClarty 

Montana '60 

Warren Gregory 
Millar III 

Western Kentucky 
'95 

Leo Naughton 

Maryland-College 
Park '59 

Nunzio Pollina 

Florida Southern '60 

Charles Henson 
Pulley 

Ohio Wesleyan '39 

David Rea 

Miami (Ohio) '59 

Marshall P. (Jack) 
Reeve 

Kansas State '43 

Ronald Schulte 

Kansas State 70 

Frederick G. 
Schwartz 

Syracuse '52 

Edward Eugene 
Sires 

South Carolina 72 

Dr. Loran Smith 

Washburn 
Renaissance 



Mark Soden 

Wisconsin '38 

Eugene Staehle 

Cornell '49 

John Sutherland 

Florida '50 

Steven Tolson 

North Texas 76 

Albert Keith 
Tirrell 

Dartmouth '54 

Andrew J. Triplett 

Northern Iowa '99 

William Tubbs 

Missouri-Columbia 
'58 

James P. Vellanti 

West Chester '89 

William Walter 

Davis & Elkins '62 

John Weihing 

Colorado State '42 

Rohn Wenner 

Lamar '83 

Edward A. 
Zacharias 

Richmond '52 



Undergraduates 

Todd J. Edwards 

Texas Tech '10 

Michael T. 
McCormick, Jr. 

Pennsylvania State 
'12 

Michael Zipse 

Middle Tennessee 
State '12 




Chapter holds funeral for dedicated brother 



By MIKE BLACKBURN, Ohio Northern '93 

Ohio Northern's Ohio Alpha Chapter lost a dear brother, 
friend, and father figure in February. Brother Frank Lyons, 
Ohio Northern, Renaissance, house cook and general 
"handyman" for about 30 years, passed away peacefully 
with brothers, family, and friends at his side. Lyons gave his 
numerous talents to so many at Ohio Alpha. 

Recently, as he became ill, the constant giving Lyons 
had demonstrated for so many years was reciprocated by 
the undergraduate brothers within the chapter. No matter 
what he or his family needed, a brother was there to lend a 
hand. The outpouring of our three cardinal principles of 
Virtue, Diligence, and Brotherly Love was on full display. 



In a fitting tribute, the undergraduate brothers worked 
tirelessly over just a few days to put the chapter house in 
immaculate condition to host the viewing and funeral. 
The chapter held a viewing at the house for the family in 
February, with the funeral held there the following day. 
The chapter house was filled to capacity on both days. His 
family was deeply moved by the love and honor expressed 
by so many undergraduates and alumni. And Frank was 
where he loved to be. The Alumni and Volunteer Corpora- 
tion and undergraduates took care of all arrangements 
and paid for all funeral expenses. 

Frank will be missed dearly by all those he touched. 



48 SIGEP JOURNAL Fall 2009 



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SigEp 



Sigma Phi Epsilon 
Fraternity 

P.O. Box 1901 
Richmond, VA 23218-1901 



Non-Prof it 
U.S. Postage 

PAID 

PERMIT #271 
Greenfield, OH 



Change Service 
Requested 



Address changes? 

Members: Provide SigEp with your 
new address, phone and e-mail to 
continue receiving your Journal. Go 
to sigep.org/update.asp. Or e-mail 
them to address.update@sigep.net. 
Parents: Provide SigEp with your 
son's address, phone and e-mail if 
he no longer resides with you. 
E-mail his contact information to 
address.update@sigep.net. 



Order of the Golden Heart recipients 
gathered at the 51st Grand Chapter Conclave 





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Read more about this year's five recipients on page 23. 

Buchanan cup awarded to 44 chapters 

The Buchanan Cup Award was established in 1961 as the Chapter 
Leadership Cup to recognize outstanding chapters. In 1967, the 
award was re-named for Edwin T. Buchanan, Ohio State '11. 
"Buck," as he was affectionately known, served as Grand President 
from 1953 to 1955 and as Grand Treasurer from 1932 to 1967. 

These 44 chapters are achieving greatness, consistent excel- 
lence over time. The average GPA for a Buchanan Cup chapter is 
3.26, well above the Phi Beta Kappa Wheelhouse threshold. The 
average manpower for these chapters is 97, over 70% larger than 
SigEp's average chapter size of 56. The Gold Cup recognizes five 
consecutive Buchanan Cup wins. If you are in one of these chapters, 
these chapters, emulate them. 




be role models. If you know 



Gold 
Bucknell 
Dartmouth 
Cincinnati 
Illinois 

Loyola Marymount 
Miami (Florida) 
Nebraska 

Southeast Missouri 
State 



Silver 

Austin Peay State 

Central Arkansas 

Colorado 

Davidson 

Delaware 

Drake 

Florida 

Georgetown 

George Washington 

Johns Hopkins 

Kansas 

Lehigh 



Maine-Orono 
Maryland-College 

Park 
Memphis 
Miami (Ohio) 
Michigan 
Minnesota 
Morehead State 
Murray State 
Nebraska-Kearney 
Ohio State 
Oklahoma 
Oklahoma State 



Oregon State 

Quinnipiac 

Richmond 

San Diego State 

South Florida 

Saint Louis 

Stevens Tech 

Texas Christian 

Texas-Austin 

Toledo 

Washington in 

St. Louis 
Yale 



"Seeing-eye brothers" receive 
Honor of rhilias 

When Jeremy Poincenot, San Diego State 
'11, noticed his vision went blurry last year, he 
didn't know what to think. Maybe he needed 
glasses. Multiple tests later, he discovered he 
has a disease that makes him legally blind and 
unable to drive, read or recognize faces. 
Despite the shock, he returned to school. "I 
knew that I could go back to school because I 
knew all my friends 
would support me 
during this dramatic 
change in my life," 
he said. 

And so it was. 
Poincenot's San Diego 
State brothers Josh 
Rousch '11, Eric Loya, 
'11, and K.J. Higgins, 
'12, read his assign- 
ments to him, and they 
drove him where he 
needed to go. "My neighbor, fraternity 
brother, and best friend, Josh, registered for 
the same spring classes I did so he could help 
me find my way to and from classes, and 
connect with the professors and classmates 
whose faces I cannot see. Josh, along with my 
other 'seeing eye brothers,' have stepped up to 
support me in many ways, adapting to the 
needs of the visually impaired." 

These three men, recognized with the 
Honor of Philias at the 2009 Grand Chapter 
Conclave, also started a charity called 
C.U.R.E., Cycling Under Reduced Eyesight, to 
generate financial support for research on 
Poincenot's condition, Leber's Hereditary 
Optic Neuropathy. Poincenot recently com- 
pleted a 250-mile bike ride from Santa Barbara 
to San Diego, raising $2500 for C.U.R.E. 




Poincenot, left, with his 
best friend, Josh Rousch 



More Conclave 2009 coverage on pages 22-24!