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Full text of "SMC's second new collegiate handbook 1979-80"

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SMC's 

Second New 

Collegiate 

Handbook 



a dictionary on college 

manners 
morals 

mores 

people 

places 

philosophy 

whats 

wheres 

whys 

whatnots 






Southern Missionary College 

a liberal arts college of the Seventh-day Adventist Church 

published and prepared by 

Dean of Students 

1979-80 



NOT TO BE TAKEN, 
FROM LIBRARY 



SMC's 



Second New Collegiate Handbook 



a, A (a) — 1. The first letter of the English alphabet. 2. The most 
desired grade on campus. 

A— (a minus) Second most desired grade on campus. 

Abbott, Ruth — Instructor of Nursing. 

absences — 1. Chapel, four unexcused are allowed each semester. 
Excuses must be to the Dean of Students' Office by the following 
Friday noon for the missed Tuesday chapel and by the following 
Monday noon for the missed Thursday chapel. Those who do not 
choose to go to chapels will be asked to leave school. Excuse blanks 
can be obtained at the Dean of Students' Office or the Residence Hall 
Desks. 2. Classes, absences are counted from the first scheduled 
meeting of the class and are considered as either excused or unex- 
cused. Excused absences are recognized as absences incurred be- 
cause of illness, authorized school trips, or emergencies beyond the 
student's control. To have a class or laboratory absence excused a 
completed absence excuse form must be submitted to the absence 
committee no later than noon the first Monday following the ab- 
sence. Absence forms "are available at the student center, library, 
dormitories, and the dean's office. A box for submission of these 
forms is located in the Student Center. The absence committee will 
determine whether or not the absence is to be excused and notify the 
teacher of their decision. An excuse due to illness may not be granted 
unless the student has contacted Health Service prior to the absence. 
Students having absences exceeding the number of credit hours for 
the class may be subject to counsel and/or academic discipline. 
Make-up Work for classes — no make-up work will be allowed for 
daily quizzes and homework. A daily average will be recorded for 
excused absences. Tests and major assignments missed because of 
an excused absence will be made up within a week of the absence 
unless other arrangements are made with the teacher. 3. Residence 
Hall Worships — one unexcused absence allowed per week. (See 
Residence Hall Handbook for details). 4. Church, both Sabbath 
school and church attendance is required. 

Academic Affairs Committee — to give study to and make policy 
recommendations concerning academic matters of the college, in- 
cluding the curriculum, the library, admissions and graduation re- 
quirements, and teacher training; to advise the academic dean on the 
application of the academic policies. 

academic dean — Dr. Larry Hanson, office 2nd floor Wright Hall. 

academic grievance — The college is committed to fair play in both 
social and academic problems — here is the route of appeal if a 
grievance of academic nature occurs: A student who believes that his 
academic rights have been infringed or that he has been treated 
unjustly with respect to his academic program or any portion thereof, 
shall be entitled to a fair and impartial consideration of his case. 
Before instituting the grievance procedure, the student shall first 
present his case to the teacher or teachers and then, if necessary, to 
the department involved. If the student feels that he has not obtained 
justice at this level, he has the option of submitting the matter to the 
Academic Dean or asking for a review of the case by the Grievance 
Committee. This committee shall be chaired by the Academic Dean 
or a person designated by him and shall include three other faculty 



members and two students. These members will be selected by the 
Academic Affairs Committee on demand. Both the student and 
faculty members involved in the case are entitled to appear before the 
committee or to present a written statement of the case. The decision 
of the committee shall be presented to the individuals involved in 
writing within three (3) days of the committee meeting unless a later 
time is agreed upon by both parties. The decision of the committee is 
binding and will be implemented by the teacher or administratively. 
"The decision of any committee may be appealed to the college 
president." (See also Right to Petition). 

academic probation — When for any reason a student's scholarship 
falls below a "C" (2.00) average, he will be placed on academic 
probation. A student reaches the point of academic dismissal when 
his cumulative grade point average fails to reach the following 
accumulated levels: 

Semester Hours GPA Dismissal 

Attempted Level 

24-48 1.50 

49-64 1.65 

65-80 1.75 

81-93 1.85 

94- up 1.95 

The above individual should seek help immediately from the Direc- 
tor of Academic Counseling. 

Academy, Collegedale — 1. A Seventh-day Adventist non boarding 
high school serving the Collegedale area. 2. A laboratory school for 
secondary education students. 

accent (ak'sent) — 1. The usual manner in which non-Southerners 
speak. 2. (See SOUTHERN ACCENT). Name of college news- 
paper. 

acceptance letter — formal written notice that you have been accepted 
for admission to the college. 

accounting — one of the many Bachelor of Science degrees offered 
(The College Catalog lists the requirements). 

accounts — records kept by the college's accounting office as to 
charges and payments to student's records. See Advance Payment 
and Billing. 

accreditation — SMC is accredited by the Southern Association of 
Colleges and Schools and is approved by the Tennessee State Board 
of Education for the preparation of secondary, elementary and early 
childhood teachers. The curriculum of both the Associate of Science 
degree program and the Baccalaureate degree program in nursing, 
including Public Health Nursing, are accredited by the National 
League of Nursing as surveyed by the Collegiate Board of Review. 
The Division of Nursing is an agency member of the Department of 
Baccalaureate and Higher Degree Programs of the Division of Nurs- 
ing Education of the National League for Nursing. It is also accred- 
ited by the Tennessee Board of Nursing, and is recognized by the 
Florida State Board of Nursing. The College is accredited by the 
Seventh-day Adventist Board of Regents and is a member of the 
Association of American Colleges, the American Council on Educa- 
tion, the Tennessee College Association, the American Association 
of Colleges for Teacher Education , the National Council of Accredi- 
tation for Teacher Education (NCATE), and the National Associa- 
tion for Schools of Music. 



1 



McKEE LIBRARY 

Southern Missionary College 

Collegedale, Tennessee 37315 



administration building 



attendance 



administration building — named in honor of former President 
Wright, houses administrative offices, accounting, and admissions. 

Administrative Council — committee chaired by the president of the 
college consisting of the following administrative officers: Frank 
Knittel, Melvin Campbell, Larry Hanson, Ron Barrow, Kenneth 
Spears, Robert Merchant, William Taylor. This committee deals 
with the financial aspects and legal dealings of the college. 

ad hoc (ad hok') committee — A committee formed for a specific 
purpose in a specific situation. 

admissions to SMC — The college welcomes applications from stu- 
dents regardless of race, sex, religion, color, or national origin 
whose principles and interests are in harmony with the ideals and 
traditions of the college as expressed in its objectives and policies. 
To qualify, applicants must give evidence of Christian character, 
intelligence, health, and a will to pursue the program outlined. 
Although religious affiliation is not a requirement for admission, all 
students are expected to live by the policies and standards of the 
college as a church-related institution. Only those who by their 
conduct and attitudes respect the total program may have the 
privilege of student citizenship on the SMC campus. Southern Mis- 
sionary College students are not required to be members of the 
Seventh-day Adventist Church or any other religious organization, 
but the College administration does insist that no student detract from 
or weaken the spiritual character of the College or interfere with the 
benefit which might be received by those who wish to take full 
advantage of the College's spiritual emphasis. 

Adventist, Seventh-day — Sponsoring church of the college. 

advisory board — A group of administrators that offer counsel for the 
college's Board of Trustees. 

a-fixin — getting ready as in I'm a-fixin to go to the library and study. 

alcohol (al'ko.hol) — 1. Used only for medical purposes at the col- 
lege. 2. Students who drink alcohol are no longer students. 

alternating courses — Throughout the following section, courses 
which are not offered during the school year 1 979-80 will be starred 
to the left of the course number. This arrangement of offering courses 
in alternate years makes possible the enrichment of curricula without 
a proportional increase of instructional expense. 

alumni — 1. Those who have gone before and have made it. 2. What 
you will soon become. 

Alumni Association — Over 5,500 students have entered into that 
Graduate- Alma Mater situation that is satisfying and gratifying. Plan 
now to become one. The Association keeps track of all alumni and 
publishes quarterly the Southern Columns. 

ambulance service — 1. The community has a fine ambulance in case 
of an emergency — call 396-3 111. 2. Membership in — see Fire 
Department. 

Anderson, Doyleen — Secretary to Elder Barrow, Office of Recruit- 
ment and Retention. 

Andrews, Frances — Associate Professor of Journalism. 

Andrews University — A sister SDA educational college that offers 
advanced degrees. 

announcements — Sorry, none are made at chapel time, but an- 
nouncements of general interest can be put on the back of the chapel 
attendance card. (Give this information to the Dean of Students' 
Office a day in advance.) All announcements posted on the College 
campus and all announcements or materials distributed on the cam- 
pus must receive prior administrative approval. 

appeal route — For academic problems see Academic Grievance. For 
social problems see Discipline Appeal. Admissions Require- 
ments — the College Catalog lists these. 

appliances — See dormitory handbook for regulations. 

application procedure — 1. When — New students are urged to 
submit applications not later than the last term of the senior year of 
high school. Applications submitted at the beginning of the senior 
year will sometimes enable the College to suggest ways of 
strengthening the student's preparation. Because of the difficulty 
sometimes encountered during the summer months in obtaining 
necessary transcripts, test scores, and recommendations, more time 
will be necessary for processing late applications. Students in resi- 
dence may submit re-applications without charge until March 3 1 . 



Thereafter the regular application fee of $10 will be required until 
July 15, after which the fee becomes $15. 2. How — Request 
application forms from the Office of Admissions and Records. 
Return the completed application, budget sheet and medical form to 
the Office of Admissions and Records with the application fee of 
$10. This fee is $10 if the application is received at least six weeks 
before the beginning of the semester. After that the fee will be $15. It 
is the student's responsibility to request his former schools (high 
school and college) to forward his transcripts to the Office of Admis- 
sions in support of his application. This will become the property of 
the College. NO TRANSCRIPTS WILL BE ACCEPTED DI- 
RECTLY FROM AN APPLICANT. To permit a more effective 
program of counseling for admissions, applicants who have earned 
fewer than 12 semester hours must submit scores from the American 
College Testing Program (ACT). Test scores are valuable in deter- 
mining ability to pursue a college program, and in discovering areas 
in which the student may be deficient. Upon receipt of the applica- 
tion, transcripts of credits, recommendations and test scores, the 
Admissions Committee will.notify the applicant of the action taken. 

art — One of the many majors that can be obtained at the college. 

arrival — Before a student takes up residence on the campus, either at 
the beginning of a school semester or for work prior to attending 
classes, he must have a letter of acceptance from the Admissions 
Committee. Before a housing or room reservation may be made, $50 
of the advance payment as a deposit must be paid. Tentative reserva- 
tions may be made without a deposit before July 1 , however, the 
deposit must be paid by that date in order to hold the reservation. 
After July 1 , requests for reservations must be accompanied by the 
$50 deposit. On arrival at the campus the student should: 1 . Present 
his official letter of acceptance at the college cashier's office and 
make arrangements for cafeteria privileges, advance payment (If not 
paid in advance of arrival) and safekeeping of personal funds. 2. 
Report to the residence hall (men at Talge Hall and women at 
Thatcher Hall) for room assignments. 3. Consult with the student 
finance director regarding a work program and/or other financial 
assistance which may be necessary. 

artist adventure sub-committee — Faculty and student committee 
that plans and makes arrangements for programs in the Artist Adven- 
ture Series (which means many of the Saturday night programs). 

Ashton, Bruce — Professor of Music. Wife of Leila. 

Ashton, Leila — Instructor of Music. 

attendance at — 1. Chapel — Is required of all students. Information 
concerning work appointments which conflicts with chapel schedule 
must be directed to the Dean of Students' Office. See absences. 2. 
Residence Hall Worships — All residence hall students are re- 
quired to attend the worship service that is held in the residence halls 
each evening, Monday through Thursday each week. The Friday 
evening vespers and Sabbath evening meditations which are held in 
the church are counted for residence hall worships. Students are 
allowed two unexcused absences from these meetings each week. 
Failure to attend residence hall worship will place the student under 
disciplinary process. Absences which are not satisfactorily cleared 
with a residence hall dean will be recorded as unexcused. Residence 
hall students will be notified of the record of their absences on a 
weekly basis. During the fall and spring weeks of Religious Em- 
phasis the evening programs are counted for residence hall worship 
attendance and the morning programs are counted for chapel atten- 
dance. Residence hall students who anticipate conflicts between 
regular work appointments and the worship schedule are responsible 
for having a written statement of explanation sent from their 
employer to their residence hall dean. No excuse will be given for 
worships missed because of work unless advance arrangements have 
been made with the residence dean . 3. Class — see absence, class. 
4. Questionable place of amusement — such as movies, drive-in 
theaters, bars, etc., will not be tolerated among the students. 5. 
Sabbath school and church — required of all students. 

attendance at Sabbath school and church — Attendance at Sabbath 
school and church services is required of resident students each 
week. Students are required to individually indicate in writing as 
they leave the residence hall the Sabbath school and church they will 



attire 




-SO/4 

u~D 

.An 

be attending that day. Students who accumulate unexcused absences 
will receive discipline letters and will be subject to further discipline. 
Absences which are not satisfactorily cleared with a residence hall 
dean will be recorded as unexcused. Record of Sabbath school and 
church attendance is kept in the student's respective residence hall. 

attire — See dress code. 

attitude — A state of mind or feeling with regard to the principles and 
practices of the college and Seventh-day Adventism. A good attitude 
worketh like a good medicine. 

audit courses — With the approval of the department, a student may 
register on an audit basis in courses (other than private lessons) for 
which he is qualified. Auditors are to be admitted to classes of 
limited enrollment only if there are places after all students who wish 
to enroll for credit have been accommodated. Class attendance is 
expected but examinations and reports may be omitted. With the 
approval of the instructor a student may change a course registration 
from audit to credit, or from credit to audit, during the first week of 
instruction only. No credit is given for courses audited, and the fee is 
one-half of the regular tuition charge. 

Aussner, Rudolf — Professor of Modern Languages. 

Austin, Wiley — Associate Professor of Chemistry, pre-medical and 
pre-dental advisor. 

automobile — Note automobile policy in ap- 
pendix. 

automobiles — parking: 

The campus security is charged with the re- 
sponsibility of enforcing campus traffic regu- 
lations including giving out traffic tickets to 
any hot-rodders zooming along over 20 mph. 
There are a few things you need to keep in 
mind. (The Vehicle Code is in the Appen- 
dix.) 

1) Vehicle Registration — Residence hall 
students parking permits run $20 per 

semester. Two-wheeled motor vehicles are $ 1 5 per semester (you 
will need a wet suit to ride one). Community students parking 
permits run $7. 50 per semester. Bicycles and skate boards require 
no registration. Place decal on the lower left of rear window 
(except two- wheel vehicles). Parking permits can be obtained 
during registration from the Dean of Students' Office or the 
residence hall deans. 

2) Parking violations are $5 each for first two tickets and $15 
thereafter. A couple of choices can be pursued once a ticket is 
obtained — run over to the Cashier's Office and pay, or let a few 
stack up to see what disastrous thing will happen. If a ticket is not 
paid as required on that ticket, the fine plus a $2 late fee is put on 
the student's statement. Rest assured, the college will not give 
unlimited tickets to students who may or may not have unlimited 
funds. Excessive number of tickets is an easy way to get parking 
and campus driving privileges revoked. 

3) If you get a ticket and feel it is unjust present your case in person 
or in writing to the Traffic Court. The time and place are given on 
the ticket. If you decide to appeal the ticket be sure you have 
sound evidence. 

4) Note carefully the signs for parking. Of all places to park, don't 
try faculty parking or handicap zones. (Sidewalks and lawns are 
for walking and mowing, not driving and parking.) 

auxiliary and vocational services — This service has provided student 
work for many years on the college campus. The auxiliary and 
vocational buildings include the College Press, Laundry, Cabinet 
Shop, Broom Shop, Bakery, and Central Plant. 

average — Implies both sufficiency and lack of distinction, students at 
the college are encouraged to rise above. 

awards chapel — An annual chapel devoted to bestowing awards to 
deserving students — April 8, 1980. 



B 



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B.A. — Abbreviation for Bachelor of Arts degree. 



B.A. vs. B.S. — The fundamental difference between the two degrees 
is that the BA requires about 'A of your college work in the major 
field whereas the BS requires about Vi. 

baby-sitting — Not permitted in the residence halls. 

baccalaureate degrees — The degree of Bachelor conferred upon 
graduates of the college. Fifteen majors for the Bachelor of Arts 
degree are offered: Art, Biology, Chemistry, Communication, Eng- 
lish, German, History, Language and Culture, Mathematics, Music, 
Physics, Psychology, Religion, Spanish, Theology. Fourteen 
majors for the Bachelor of Science degree are offered: Accounting, 
Behavioral Science, Biology, Chemistry, Early Childhood Educa- 
tion, Elementary Education, Health, Phys. Ed. and Recreation, 
Home Economics, Industrial Arts, Management, Medical Technol- 
ogy, Nursing, Office Admin., Physics. The Bachelor of Music 
degree is available to students planning to major in music with 
special emphasis in music education. 

bag — Yankee word for poke. 

Baker, Sue — Associate Professor of English. 

band — The college has a 75-member full band under the direction of 
Mr. Bob Anderson. The band in addition to its regular tours within 
the southeastern US also makes a major tour to such places as 
Canada, Mexico, etc. 

bank — American National — Full banking service at this bank in the 
college plaza. 

banking and cash withdrawals — The accounting office operates a 
deposit banking service for the convenience of the student. Financial 
sponsors should provide students with sufficient funds through the 
banking service to cover the cost of personal items of an incidental 
nature and travel expenses off campus including vacation periods 
Withdrawals may be made by the student in person only as long as 
there is a credit balance. These deposit accounts are entirely separate 
from the student's school expense account. Withdrawals from regu- 
lar expense accounts are discouraged and permitted only under 
special arrangements with the Director of Student Finance and with 
the permission of the financial sponsor. 

banquet arrangements — While every effort is made to accommodate 
requests for specialized food service, it must be emphasized that due 
to the advanced planning often required and to the possibility of 
conflicting requests, the College Food Service cannot be expected to 
provide specialized food service unless planning for the occasion has 
been initiated with the Director at least two weeks in advance. 

Barrow, Colleen — Instructor of Nursing, 
wife of Ronald Barrow. 

Barrow, Ronald — Director of Recruitment 
and Retention. 

Bata, Peggy — Secretary to the Development 
Office. 

Bechthold, Wayne — Instructor of Nursing. 

Beckett, John — Director of computer center. 

behavioral science — A combination major of 
Psychology, Sociology and Philosophy. 

Bennett, Douglas — Professor of Religion and 
Chairman of the Religion Department. Douglas Bennett 




123121 



Bennett 



citizenship 



Bennett, Peggy — Assistant Professor of Library Science, sister to 
Douglas Bennett. 

Bible — The central book around which the college is built. 

Bible conference — A weekend convocation conducted by the South- 
ern Union of Seventh-day Adventists in conjunction with the col- 
lege, an in-depth study of the Bible is made coupled with inspiring 
speakers . The usual cost is $ 1 5 for the weekend . A student is allowed 
class excuses for only one such type conference per semester. 

Biblical languages courses — Greek and Hebrew are taught. 

bicycles — For all the use you will get from them, it is best to leave 
them at home. For safety's sake, always lock when not in use and 
park only in the designated areas. Operate only on the regular roads. 
(No decal needed!) 

billing procedure — See the College Catalog. 

biology — A general major consisting of plant and animal study. 

Birch, Ruby — Assistant Professor of Nursing. 

birds — A study of, See ornithology. 

blue denim — A fabric not to be found on the legs of college students 
during class or chapels, or in the cafeteria. (See Dress Code for 
details.) 

board of trustees — A group of 29 church leaders and businessmen 
that give the college its authority and direction. 

boning up — 1. That which is done immediately before an examina- 
tion. 2. A type of studying. 

Bonny Oaks School — A school that exists to help young people with 
disadvantaged backgrounds. Many college students participate in the 
Bonny Oaks School educational help process. 

book-read — Educated or well-informed, as in: The faculty aim for the 
SMC students to git book- read someday. 

botany — A course in the study of plants. 

Brooks, Philip — Instructor of Business Administration. 

B.S. — Abbreviation for Bachelor of Science degree. 

budget committee — A faculty-student committee which watchdogs 
the college's expenditures and budgets. 

business administration — A major that includes management, ac- 
counting and economics. 

business manager — Richard Reiner. 

BYKOTA — An acronym for a campus organization "Be Ye Kind 
One To Another." Sponsor is Dr. Lorenzo Grant. 



CABL — 1. An acronym for Collegiate Adventists for Better Liv- 
ing. 2. An organization of the college that promotes healthful living 
as a spiritual outreach. 

cafeteria — College-operated eating establishment ■ 
ered the finest in miles. 

calendar — 1. A yearly publication that gives the dates and events for 
the school year. Published in May by the 
Dean of Students. 2. Day by Day is a 
monthly publication by the Dean of Students 
dealing with the detailed activities of campus 
life. 

Calkins, Alice — Assistant Professor of Home 
Economics. 

Campbell, Melvin D. — 1. Dean of Stu- 
dents. 2. Professor of Chemistry. 

Campus Chatter — A weekly publication giv- 
ing announcements concerning school func- 
tions, published by the Student Association. 

Campus Kitchen — A quick-order eating 
house located in the College Plaza, run and 
operated by the College Cafeteria, referred to 
as the CK. 

campus ministry — Name given to the organi- 
zations that work on campus to promote a 
deeper spiritual life and the sharing of it, 
includes such organizations as Sabbath 
school, CABL, off- and on-campus minis- 



■ food is consid- 



le dates and events fi 



MkfSi^K 




tries. The college chaplain administers the Campus Ministry pro- 
grams. 

campus organizations — Aside from the Student Association and its 
committees, more than thirty campus organizations provide oppor- 
tunity for leadership training. They may be classified under four 
divisions: church-related organizations, social clubs, professional 
clubs, and special interest or hobby clubs. The church-related or- 
ganizations are the Campus Ministry, Ministerial Seminar, Col- 
legiate Adventists for Better Living, and the Colporteur Club. The 
departmental clubs are organized by the instructional departments of 
the College under the sponsorship of department heads. The social 
clubs are organized according to place of residence. These are the 
Married Couples' Forum; Upsilon Delta Phi, the men's club; and 
Sigma Theta Chi, the women's club. 

car — similar to automobile — see automobile. 

chapel — Meetings held twice weekly usually at 11:15 a.m. Tuesday 
and Thursday. Attendance is required. The President is directly 
responsible for the chapels. The Dean of Students assists with the 
administration. 

chapel attendance — (see attendance, chapel). 

chaperonage — All overnight off-campus group activities involving 
mixed groups, not sponsored by a campus organization, require 
chaperonage and clearance by the residence hall deans. It is the 
responsibility of the students involved to make proper arrangements 
for the activity which includes arrangements for chaperonage. For 
the protection of the students it is urged that all daytime off-campus 
activities involving mixed groups have chaperones. Parents and 
faculty members may serve as chaperones and on certain occasions 
the Dean of Women may grant approval for chaperonage by married 
students. It is considered wise that there be one chaperone for every 
15-20 students. 

chaplain — 1. College spiritual advisor. 2. Pastor Jim Herman. 

cheating — 1. A totally unacceptable procedure to obtain a grade. 2. 
An action that leads to failure and/or suspension from the college. 

chemistry — One of the many Bachelor of Science and Arts degrees 
offered. The College Catalog lists the requirements. 

Childers, Malcolm — Assistant Professor of Art. 

Christmas — 1. A formal ceremony surrounding the birth of Jesus. 2. 
A time for vacationing — December 20 - January 7. 

churches — Seventh-day Adventist. Listed are the area churches with 
approximate mileage from the campus. 
On Campus 10-15 Miles 

Collegedale Church Ringgold Church 

Collegedale, TN 37315 Ringgold, GA 

Bowman Hills Church 
3-5 Miles Cleveland, TN 



McDonald Road Church 
McDonald, TN 
Apison Church 
Apison, TN 
Standifer Gap Church 
Chattanooga, TN 



Chattanooga Church 
Chattanooga, TN 
Hixson Church 
Hixson, TN 
8th Street Church 
Chattanooga, TN 



Melvin Campbell 



church — a large edifice on the edge of the campus where chapels and 

religious services are conducted. 
church attendance — (See attendance, church). 
Circle K Club — A campus club sponsored by the East Hamilton 

Kiwanis Club — Jim Herman, sponsor. 
citizenship probation — See discipline, levels of. 
citizenship, standards and policies — Students are not to have the 

following as a part of their lifestyle: 

1 . Disseminating ideas which undermine the religious ideals of 
the institution. 

2. Displaying a detrimental influence or spirit manifestly out of 
harmony with the standards or basic philosophy of the school . 

3. Using profane language. 

4. Possessing or displaying obscene literature or objects; indulg- 
ing in lewd conduct or suggestions. 

5 . Drinking or possessing alcoholic beverages , allowing their use 



4 



citizenship standards 

in one's room, or frequenting places where such beverages are 
served. 

6. Using tobacco, narcotics, or hallucinogenic drugs in any form, 
having them in one's possession or allowing their use in one's 
room. 

7. Gambling and possession of playing cards, dice or other 
gambling devices. 

8. Stealing or possession of goods known to have been stolen. 

9. Any form of cheating, willful deception or dishonesty. 

10. Meeting persons of the opposite sex in a secretive manner. 

1 1 . Violating college standards governing social conduct. 

12. Immoral behavior. 

13. Attending places of questionable amusement including movie 
and drive-in theatres. 

14. Entering or leaving residence halls by any means other than the 
entrance designated for regular use at the time. 

15. Unapproved absence from a residence hall after closing hours. 

16. Illegal possession or use of keys. 

17. Failing to conform to the stipulations of any disciplinary ac- 
tion. 

18. Disruption of either the learning experience on the campus or 
the normal administrative operation of the College. 

citizenship standards, general statement — Attendance at Southern 
Missionary College is considered to be a privilege granted to those 
who give satisfactory evidence that they can benefit from the unique 
features which characterize the College and that their presence 
among the student body will contribute to the accomplishment of the 
College's distinctive objectives. The administration reserves the 
right to require withdrawal of any student who does not give such 
evidence. A student's citizenship standing is determined largely by 
the following criteria: Observance of social regulations; dining 
room, residence hall and library conduct; attitude toward the reli- 
gious ideals of the College, attendance of vesper, Sabbath school, 
church and residence hall worship services; compliance with campus 
automobile regulations; dress and personal grooming; room cleanli- 
ness; faithfulness in meeting appointments; 
honesty and recreational standards. A stu- 
dent who finds himself out of harmony with 
the social policies of the College, who is 
uncooperative, and whose attitudes give evi- 
dence of an unresponsive nature may be ad- 
vised to withdraw without specific charge. 

CK — Abbreviation for Campus Kitchen (See 
Campus Kitchen). 

Clark, Ann — Assistant Professor of English. 

Clark, Jerome — Professor of History. (On 

leave of absence). Ann Clark 

class — 1. Usually 50 minutes of time devoted 

to the educational process. 2. Place where some learning occurs. 

class attendance — See Absences, class. 

CLEP — 1. Acronym for College Level Examination Program. 2. 
Series of examinations administered by the Testing Office that can be 
taken for college credit. For more information, contact K. R. Davis 
in Counseling and Testing. 

club activities — All social events sponsored by clubs or other organi- 
zations terminate at least seven days before test week begins. 

clubs — 1. A stout, heavy stick suitable for use as a weapon. 2. See 
campus organizations. 

co-ed dorms — Not available on the campus. 

college days — An on-campus visitation program involving interested 
seniors of high schools and academies. Held April 13, 14, 1980. 

college plaza — College-owned shopping area that contains a variety 
of college-owned and leased businesses. The shopping center was 
completed in the spring of 1963 and contains a bookstore, hardware 
store, food store, bank, dry cleaners, a washateria, post office, and a 
credit union. 

Collegedale — 1. City of population 3,669 at an elevation of 860'. It 
was incorporated in 1968. 2. Mailing address of the college. 

Collegedale Nursery & Crafts — 1. A campus business where stu- 
dents assist in growing thousands of plants . 2. Sales outlet for plants 
and crafts. 




Cotham 

Collegiate Chorale — The small touring choir under the direction of 

Mr. Don Runyan. 
Colvin, Gerald — Professor of Behavioral Science. Chairman of the 

Department. 
commencement — 1. The most desired event on campus. 2. May 4, 

1980. 
committees — 1. Small groups of people who develop programs and 

policies for large groups of people. 2. Something that we don't need 

more of. 
communication — 1. That which we are all a part of daily, either 

verbal or non verbal. 2. One of the many Bachelor of Science 

degrees offered. (The College Catalog lists the requirements). 
computer center — The first floor rooms of the student center building 

that houses the actual computer hardware and the administrative 

offices thereof. 
computer conduct code at SMC — 

1 . Users must use only those computer accounts which have been 
authorized for their use. 

2. Users must use their computer accounts only for the purposes for 
which they were authorized, as arranged with the Computer 
Service Department. 

3. Users should minimize the impact of their work on the work of 
other users. It is the responsibility of the user to learn efficient 
means of utilizing the computer. 

4. Users must not attempt to subvert the restrictions associated with 
their computer accounts. 

5. Users must not attempt to access information concerning the data 
or jobs of other users except as provided by techniques arranged 
for that purpose by the Computer Service Department. 

6. Student users shall not exceed default parameters for priority 
factors except in cases where published policy provides for dif- 
ferences. 

computer science — A study of the computer in which a minor is 
given. 

conduct — 1. High standards of behavior as characterized by the 
Seventh-day Adventist Church are maintained by students at the 
college. (See Citizenship, Standards and Policies.) 2. Admission 
and retention is a function of a student's 

conduct — Sabbath — A distinctive practice of Seventh-day Advent- 
ists is the observance of the seventh day of the week as the Sabbath. 
Southern Missionary College requires all students on the campus to 
respect the sanctity of that day by attending Sabbath services and 
refraining from all ordinary recreation and labor. 

Cooper, Amos — Pastor of McDonald Road SDA church. 

correspondence work — A maximum of twelve semester hours of 
correspondence or extension credit may apply toward a bac- 
calaureate degree program and eight hours toward a two-year termi- 
nal curriculum. The Home Study Institute of Washington, D.C., is 
the officially recognized correspondence school of Southern 
Missionary College. The college recommends the Home Study Insti- 
tute for those students needing correspondence credit and accepts all 
such credits when the study program is approved by the director of 
admissions and records prior to enrollment. A student will be permit- 
ted to carry correspondence or extension work while in residence 
only if the required course is unobtainable at the College. Corre- 
spondence courses, whether taken while in residence or during the 
summer, must be approved in advance by the Director of Admissions 
and Records. Correspondence work may not apply on the upper 
biennium requirements of the major or minor. A minimum grade of 
"B" must be earned to apply on the lower biennium requirements for 
a major. Correspondence credit with a "D" grade is unacceptable 
and a course in which the student earned a grade of "D" or "F" 
while in residence may not be repeated by correspondence. No 
correspondence credit will be entered on the student's record until he 
has earned a minimum of twelve hours in residence with an average 
of at least "C. " Official transcripts must be in the Office of Admis- 
sions and Records before a diploma will be ordered. The graduation 
date will be the last of the month of the receipt of the official 
transcript. 

Costerisan, Francis — Director of Physical Plant (Engineering). 

Cotham, Joyce — Instructor of office administration. 



counsel 

counsel — See discipline, levels of. 

counseling and testing — The Dean of Student Affairs administers a 
formal program of counseling through the Testing and Counseling 
Office. This program provides various aptitude and psychological 
tests as well as interest and personality inventories which are availa- 
ble for students who wish to gain insight into various problems which 
may be associated with their college experience and planning for life. 
College entrance examination results and other personal data which 
may assist in counseling and guidance are kept on file in the Testing 
and Counseling Office. 

counseling by deans — Because the residence hall deans are coun- 
selors as well as administrators and have opportunity to become 
closely acquainted with students in their dormitories, they are in a 
position to give particularly helpful counsel. Students are encour- 
aged to take advantage of the counseling skills available to them from 
the various members of the College staff. 

course load — The measure of a college course is expressed in 
semester hours . A semester hour usually consists of one fifty-minute 
class period per week for one semester. Thus, two semester hour 
classes are scheduled to convene twice a week and three semester 
hour classes three times a week. A laboratory period of two or three 
hours is equal to one class period. To qualify for a baccalaureate 
degree in four years, a student must take an average load of sixteen 
hours per semester. The summer term may be used to advantage by 
students wishing to complete degree requirements in less than four 
years or by students having to take reduced programs of studies 
during the regular academic year. Except by permission of the 
Academic Dean, a resident student may not register for more than 
sixteen or less than eight semester hours. By permission, students of 
superior scholastic ability may register for a maximum of eighteen 
hours. Freshmen may not exceed seventeen hours. A student is 
expected to pursue a program of studies equal to his ability. Study- 
Work Program . It is exceedingly important that the student adjust the 
course load to achieve a reasonable balance in study and work. 
During registration the student should confer with his adviser or 
major professor in planning the proper balance of study and work. In 
determining an acceptable study-work program, the student's intel- 
lectual capacity and previous scholastic record is considered. Excep- 
tions to the following schedule of study and work must receive the 
approval of the Academic Dean. Maximum 

Course Load Work Load 

16 hours 16 hours 

14 hours 20 hours 

12 hours 26 hours 

10 hours 32 hours 

8 hours 38 hours 

Crist, Nancy — Instructor of Nursing, Orlando Campus. 
curriculum — A course of study at the college that reflects the 
educational philosophy, purposes and needs of the Seventh-day 
Adventist Church. 
Cushman, Thelma — Associate Professor of Home Economics. 
cussing — An unacceptable form of communication at the College. 



D 

Daniells Hall — The former library building 
which now houses physics, mathematics and 
computer science departments. 

dating — 1. To make or have a social engage- 
ment with a person of the opposite sex . 2. A 
favorite activity on the campus. (See appen- 
dix for statement on sex.) 

Davidson, Lenna Lee — Instructor of Nurs- 
ing. 

Davis, Charles — Professor of Library Sci- 
ence, Head Librarian. 

Davis, Jean — Secretary to the President. 

Davis, Jefferson — President of the Confeder- 
ate States of America. Citizenship finally 



v- 




L. L. Davidson 



discipline 

restored in 1978 by the Congress, retroactive to 1868. (And you 
think you have problems with SMC's red tape!). 

Davis, Kenneth — Assistant Professor Religion , Director of Counsel- 
ing and Testing. 

Day by Day — A calendar published monthly by the Dean of Students' 
Office. 

dean, academic — 1. Watchdog of academic activities. 2. Lawrence 
Hanson. 

deans, residence hall — 1. Supervisors of the dormitories. 2. Men, 
Everett Schlisner; Women, Millie Runyan. 

dean of students — 1. Coordinator of all non-academic student social 
organizations. 2. Melvin D. Campbell. 

Debbie — See Little Debbie. 

deferred payment — A system of compensation for students and 
parents desiring to pay education expenses in 12 or 15 monthly 
installments, instead of six installments. A deferred payment pro- 
gram is available through Tuition Plan, Inc., and Richard C. Knight 
Insurance Agency, Inc. Repayment of funds for four years of college 
may be made over a period of 48 to 72 months. A typical loan of 
$1,000 for a school year would require 12 months' payment. 

degree requirements — That which is needed to obtain any of the 29 
majors offered by the college. The College Catalog lists the 
specifics. 

department — An administrative unit that concerns itself with a 
narrow spectrum of course offering, e.g. , Department of Chemistry, 
etc. 

Dick, Donald — Professor of Communication, Chairman of the Com- 
munications Department. 

Die Meistersinger — A men's choral organization directed by Dr. 
Marvin Robertson. 

Dingle, Roy — Instructor in Family Sciences and a first-class baker. 

dining — An oft-repeated experience of students at the cafeteria, CK, 
or the room. 

discipline — 1. Punishment intended to correct or train. 2. Training 
that is expected to produce a specified character or pattern of be- 
havior. 

discipline, appeal of — A student who has been disciplined or denied 
readmission for social reason has the following route of appeal: 1. 
Dean of Students. 2. President of the College. 

discipline, levels of — Herein are the stated levels: 

All disciplinary procedures are under the direction of the Dean of 
Students. A student whose negative behavior is under consideration 
is subject to disciplinary action at any level. 

1. Counsel — The Dean of Students or other administrative 
officers of the College may give a student involved in a minor offense 
or a relatively small behavioral deviation a written or verbal word or 
letter of counsel. 

2. Advice — The Dean of Students or other administrative offi- 
cers of the College may give a letter of advice to a student involved in 
a more serious offense or behavioral deviation. 

3 . Warning — The Dean of Students may give a letter of warning 
to a student involved in a serious offense or behavioral deviation. 

4. Citizenship Probation — The Dean of Students may place a 
student who is involved in a serious offense or behavioral deviation 
on Citizenship Probation. 

Citizenship Probation carries with it some or all the following 
restrictions: 

a. One approved weekend leave per month, 
■b. No use of automobile. 

c. No late leaves. 

d. Clean record on all appointments such as classes, chapels, 
worships, Sabbath school, church, night checks. 

e. Campus Restriction — May leave once a week with permission. 

f. Loss of all student leadership positions including the SA and 
religious activities. 

g. Not permitted to participate in off-campus public appearances 
which represent the college except when involved in class activity. 

h. Other restrictions deemed appropriate. 
If student fails in living under the conditions of the citizenship 
probation he or she will probably be asked to leave the college. 



dishonesty 

probationry status. Citizenship probation is normally a period of at 
least six weeks duration. 

5. Termination at the end of semester or summer session — The 
Dean of Students may suspend a student but grant permission for the 
student to complete courses in progress provided the student's con- 
duct is acceptable during the interim. 

6. Suspension — The Dean of Students may suspend a student 
from College for a definite or an indefinite period of time. Students 
under suspension will leave the campus during the entire period of 
suspension unless specific arrangements to the contrary have been 
made. A student who has been suspended must submit his request for 
College readmission to the Dean of Students. 

7. Withdrawal — A student who is involved in a single major 
misbehavior or who has accumulated a series of deviations , or who is 
insubordinate in his relation to the College authority may be advised 
by the Dean of Students to withdraw from the College. A residence 
hall student who accepts the privilege of withdrawing agrees to move 
away from the College community; unwillingness to do so may result 
in formal dismissal . A student who has been suspended must have his 
re-application approved by the Dean of Students. 

8. Dismissal or expulsion — In severe cases of discipline the 
Dean of Students may expel a student from College. Such action may 
result from a student's being involved in any of the three situations 
above under "withdrawal." Expelled students will not be eligible 
for readmission to Southern Missionary College. 

dishonesty — 1. Want of integrity. 2. A practice not allowed at the 
college. 

dismissal — An act or notice for one to leave the college. For causes 
leading to dismissal see Citizenship Standards and Policies, see also 
Suspension, Expulsion. 

discos — 1. A combination bar and music establishment. 2. An 
unacceptable place of entertainment for the college's students. 

distribution of information — All announcements posted on the 
College campus and all announcements or materials distributed on 
the campus must receive prior administrative approval. 

Dixie (dlk'se) — The Southern States of which the college is in the 
midst. 

doctor (from Latin docere, to teach) — 1. A person who holds the 
highest academic degree awarded by a college or university in any 
specified discipline. 2. College physician — Waldemar Kutzner. 

doctor of philosophy (Ph.D.) — 1. Highest earned academic degree 
offered in the U.S. educational system. 2. A degree that well over 
half of the college's faculty hold. 

dodo (do'do) — 1. A large flightless bird. 2. One whose ideas, dress 
or manner of living is hopelessly out of step with the immediate 
society. 

dress code — The faculty of Southern Missionary College believe that 
every student will benefit from understanding the principles and 
practice of Christian dress, namely, attractive, neat, modest, simple, 
appropriate, tasteful and healthful attire. We believe that the applica- 
tion of these principles varies from place to place and from age to 
age. Therefore, we have a responsibility to all associated with the 
college to interpret these principles for the here and now. 

"There should be no carelessness in dress. For Christ's sake, 
whose witnesses we are, we should seek to make the best of our 
appearance. ... In all things we are to be representative of Him. 
Our appearance in every respect should be characterized by neatness, 
modesty, and purity. . . . Even the style of the apparel will express 
the truth of the gospel." Testimonies, Vol. VI, p. 96. 

"A person's character is judged by his style of dress. A refined 
taste, a cultivated mind, will be revealed in the choice of simple and 
appropriate attire." Education, p. 248. 

Sabbath Attire: For regular Sabbath meetings men must wear dress 
slacks with appropriate shirt and coat or dress slacks with shirt and 
tie. The women must wear dresses. 

General Campus Wear: This includes classrooms, laboratories, 
library, student center, chapels, joint worships, cafeteria. The excep- 
tion being the recreational area and the college plaza. 

Slacks must be worn with appropriate shirts or sweaters. This 
dress should convey a modest and professional appearance. Blue 
jeans and overalls are not acceptable. Sleeveless shirts or common 



examinations 

T-shirts, tank tops, sweat shirts, or sloppy attire are not appropriate 
for general campus wear. Shoes must be worn at all times. For 
certain academic experiences a different type of dress may be permit- 
ted. Any exceptions must be cleared through the Student Affairs 
Committee. 

General Campus Wear Exceptions: The student center, library and 
cafeteria will permit jeans as a part of student clothing on Sunday and 
after 7:00 p.m. on weekdays. 

Jewelry: Jewelry such as bracelets, necklaces (including medal- 
lions), earrings and ornamental rings, as well as professional, frater- 
nal and engagement rings, are not allowed. 

A person who in his dress, appearance and conduct shows unwill- 
ingness to cooperate with the expectations as outlined by the college, 
may be asked to withdraw and/or denied readmission for the succeed- 
ing term. 

Students are urged to request their guests to respect the standard of 
dress at all times. 
drinking — The act of taking a liquid into the mouth and swallowing; 
the college insists the liquid be non-alcoholic (see Citizenship Stan- 
dards and Policies). 
Dulan, C. Garland — Associate Professor of Behavioral Science. 
Durichek, John — Associate Professor of Industrial Education, co- 
sponsor of the Nicaragua Project. 

E 

eating — The practice of chewing and ultimately swallowing food, a 
common practice on the campus. 

economics — 1. The manner in which money and goods are obtained 
and used. 2. Several courses are taught in. 

egg-heads — Slang given to those individuals who are out of touch 
with reality — particularly those of the teaching profession. The col- 
lege hires none. 

Elam, Mary — Associate director of admissions and records. 

elementary education — One of the many majors offered at the 
college. 

employment — 1. The act of working. 2. For on-campus: Students 
who accept employment assignments on campus are expected to 
meet all work appointments with punctuality, up to and through 
exam week. Preference is given to residence hall students for 
employment by the college or college operated industries. 3. Off- 
campus: Students may not be employed off 
campus at any job where any part of their 
work involves the serving of alcoholic bev- 
erages. Residence hall students may not 
secure off-campus employment without 
permission of the Dean of Students. 

Evans, Earl — Food service director. 

Evans, Ted — Assistant dean of men. A 
friend, but no kin to Earl. 

even — Sundown, the beginning of the Sabbath 
on Friday. 

examinations to obtain credit — The college 
will permit a maximum of one-fourth of the 
credit required for a given degree to be earned by examination. The 
college recognizes three types of examinations for this purpose: 
those prepared by each department which must be passed at "B" 
level above, the College Level Examination Program (CLEP) sub- 
ject examinations which must be passed at the 65th percentile or 
above, and the Advanced Placement Examinations which must be 
passed with a score of three or better. A student may challenge by 
examination a given course only once. No course may be challenged 
after the student has enrolled in that course beyond the second week 
of a semester. No course may be challenged as part of the last thirty 
hours of any degree. Grades are recorded for departmental challenge 
examinations and scaled scores are recorded for nationally normed 
examinations. Permission to take a departmental examination, for 
which there is a $25 fee, must be obtained from both the department 
chairman and the academic dean. Credit for challenge and/or valida- 
tion examinations will not be placed on a student's permanent record 




Earl Evans 



expenses 

and is, therefore, not transferable until that student has successfully 
completed twelve semester hours in residence at Southern Mission- 
ary College. Additional information concerning challenge exami- 
nations may be obtained from the Office of Admissions or the 
College Counseling and Testing Center. 

expenses — (See Financial). 

expulsion — The ultimate in discipline action at the college. (See 
Discipline). 



faculty — A group of scholars whose task is to impart knowledge, 
wisdom and understanding. 

faculty assembly — Consists of all college teachers and administrative 
personnel. 

faculty meeting — A convocation of the faculty. Attendance is re- 
quired of faculty but not students. 

faculty senate — Legislative body established for the purpose of 
formulating and reviewing all educational policy delegated to the 
faculty assembly. 

financial aid — For more information contact Student Finance Office. 
Also see appendix — Loans & Scholarships. 

financial information — (Consult the College Catalog). 

fines — That which is levied for infraction of rules. Schedule of Fines: 

1 . Campus buildings, being present on top of or in other 
unauthorized places $25.00 

2. Tampering with Fire Fighting Equipment 50.00 

3. Firearms or pellet guns, possession of 25.00 

4. Fireworks and Combustible Chemicals, possession 

of or exploding 25.00 

5. Pets in residence halls 10.00 

6. Television, possession in residence hall room . . . 25.00 

7. Property, willful destruction of (fine plus payment of 
damages) ' 25.00 

8. Motor Vehicle: 

Failure to register a motor vehicle 25.00 

Failure to properly display parking decal 5.00 

Parking violations (1st and 2nd tickets) 5.00 

Tickets received thereafter 15.00 

Reckless Driving 10.00 

Secreting unauthorized vehicle 50.00 

Speeding ' 10.00 

Stop Sign violation 10.00 

Driving on lawns and in other unauthorized places 1 0.00 

Parking in handicapped area 10.00 

All fines must be paid in cash to the Cashier's office by a specified 
assigned date. 
fire department '■ — Called Tri-Community — object of the department 
is to fight fires! Located at City Hall, it is 
mainly a volunteer organization. 
fire department volunteers — To be an active 
member of a volunteer fire department or 
ambulance service, a first-semester 
freshman student must have a secondary 
school grade-point-average of at least 2.50 
on major subjects. Other students must have 
a cumulative grade-point-average of 2.25 or 
2.50 for the previous semester. All active 
members must maintain a current minimum 
GPA of 2.00 at each grading period. This 
also applies to the ambulance service. 
fire equipment, misuse of — The misuse of fire extinguishers, fire 
alarms, or other fire protection equipment will subject a student to a 
$50 fine and/or other discipline. 
firearms and fireworks — Items of explosive nature. Firearms or 
pellet guns are not allowed on the campus. Possession of or explod- 
ing fireworks or combustible chemicals in the residence halls or on 
the campus is expressly prohibited. Violators of these regulations 
will be fined and will be subject to suspension or dismissal. 





freshman standing 

fire drills — Act of practicing vacating a building when the siren 
sounds. 

fire hazards — Candles, open-flame lamps, fire hazards of any nature 
are not permitted in the residence halls. 

fireworks or combustible chemicals — Possession of or exploding 
fireworks or combustible chemicals in the residence halls or on the 
campus is expressly prohibited. See firearms and fireworks. 

food service — 1. In addition to its basic func- 
tion of making available attractive meals 
which will provide the best possible nutri- 
tion, the College Food Service is equipped 
and organized to provide specialized food 
service for lunches, picnics, receptions, 
luncheons and banquets. While every effort 
is made to accommodate requests for 
specialized food service, it must be em- 
phasized that due to the advanced planning 
often required and to the possibility of con- 
flicting requests, the College Food Service 
cannot be expected to provide specialized 
food service unless planning for the occasion has been initiated with 
the Director at least two weeks in advance. Mealtimes provide some 
of the most valuable educational and cultural experience on the 
college campus. Users of the College Food Service are expected to 
relate themselves in accord with the cultural standards appropriate to 
a Christian College. An identification card allows the student to 
charge meals on the monthly statement. A $.50 surcharge is added to 
each meal charged without an identification card. 2. Available at 
both cafeteria and the Campus Kitchen. 

foreign students — Foreign students must remit $ 1 ,000 to the College 
and submit a written statement verifying financial strength to cover 
college expenses. An agreement to make payments in accordance 
with the financial policies of the College is also necessary prior to 
issuance of an 1-20 immigration form. In addition to the $1,000 
advance payment, which is held in reserve until the student termi- 
nates studies at the College, the student must make the regular 
advance payment required of all students by the date of registration. 

Four-Corners — The intersection of Apison Pike and Ooltewah/ 
Ringgold Road. The location of several businesses including the 
Medical Center. 

Francia Sirpi — A small town in eastern Nicaragua where the college 
operates a medical mission station. 

French — A language taught on the campus. 

freshman — A first year college student. 

freshman standing — Requirements are as follows: 

A. Regular students: 

1 . Graduation from an approved secondary school with at least 
2.00 GPA in major subjects*, and a minimum of 15 standard 
score in English and composite on ACT. 

B. Students without graduation from secondary school: 

1. At least 18 units, including 12 Carnegie units. 

2. At least 3.00 GPA on solids (English, foreign language, 
mathematics, science, and social studies). 

3 . A minimum of 20 standard score in English and composite on 
ACT. 

4. Must have recommendation of secondary school staff. 

5. Must be socially mature. 

C. Students with an equivalency diploma from their state of resi- 

dence or a certificate of equivalence from the Home Study 
Institute if they meet the following requirements: 

1 . A minimum of 1 5 standard score in English and composite on 
the ACT. 

2. The time of enrollment at Southern Missionary College is at 
least four calendar years after the completion of the eighth 
grade. 

Applicants not meeting the requirements for regular admission 
will be given individual consideration. 

While the College does not recommend specific subjects for 
admission, the following minimum preparation, with quality per- 
formance in evidence, is recommended: 



freshmen, restrictions 

► Three units of English, excluding courses in Journalism and 
Speech. 

► Two or more units of mathematics including algebra — algebra and 
geometry preferred. For those wishing to pursue any curriculum in 
science or science-related fields, the second unit should be either 
algebra II or geometry. 

► Two units of science — laboratory experience required in at least 
one unit. Students planning to enter the Program in Nursing must 
have taken high school chemistry with a grade of at least C in each 
semester. Students planning to take any paramedical or science 
curriculum should include either physics or chemistry. 

► Two units of social studies. If World History is not included, 
Survey of Civilization should be taken during the freshman or 
sophomore year at SMC by all Bachelor's degree students. 
Two units of one foreign language, and a course in typing are 

recommended. Other deficiencies revealed by transcript and en- 
trance examinations will be given individual attention. Make-up 
work involving remedial non-credit courses and college level 
courses intended to satisfy secondary unit deficiencies may be as- 
signed as part of the academic program during the freshman year. 
freshmen, restrictions — 1. Auto — Residence hall students allowed 
to have a car on campus but to be used for home leaves only . Key and 
plates are to be turned in to the Security Officer. See auto policy in 
Appendix. 2. Social — Because of the difficulty that many 
freshmen students encounter in adjusting to college life and in the 
management of their time, they are strongly advised to remain on 
campus each evening Sunday through Thursday in order to take 
advantage of the study hours . 3. Leaves — If under 2 1 years of age , 
freshmen students with less than a 3.00 grade-point average on a 
minimum of 12 graded semester hours and students who are on 
scholastic probation are limited to overnight leaves which involve a 
maximum of eight (8) nights of absences from the campus per 
semester, excluding vacations. Students on citizenship probation are 
limited to overnight leaves which involve a maximum of two (2) 
nights of absence from the campus per calendar month excluding 
vacations. 



gambling — The act of risking or betting something of value on the 
outcome of an event. This is not allowed on campus. 

Garner, Dorothy — Dean of women and men — Orlando Campus. 

Garren, Robert — Associate Professor of Art. 

Garver, Betty — Instructor of Nursing. (Phil's 
wife). 

Garver, Philip G. — Assistant Professor of 
Physical Education. 

Gebert, Paul — Associate Professor of 
Chemistry, an avid sailor. 

general education requirements — The Col- 
lege Catalog lists these. 

Gerhart, Bruce — Associate Professor of En- 
glish. 

German — One of the languages taught on 
campus. 

Giacamozzi, Dorothy (jack-a-mozzi) — Associate Professor of Nurs- 
ing. 

Gilbert, Ellen — Associate Professor of Nursing. 

Gilbert, Orlo — Associate Professor of Music, Director of Suzuki 
program, conducts the world- traveled symphony. 

Gillham, Edith L. — Associate Professor of Nursing. 

Gladson, Jerry — Associate Professor of Religion. 

Glass, Judith — Assistant Professor of Music, church organist. 

God's Love Song — A student-conducted singing group consisting of 
about 18 musicians. 

golf course — The college maintains a 3-hole course on the campus. 

government policy — All regulations adopted by the faculty and 
announced to the students have the same force as those published in 
the annual bulletin or in the STUDENT HANDBOOK. Students and 
student employees Irving in the residence halls or in the community 
must conduct themselves in harmony with these regulations which 




Paul Gebert 



guidance and counseling 

are binding upon them from the time they reach Collegedale to begin 
their program of study or work, and until they withdraw permanently 
from the College and leave Collegedale. 

Any student under official college discipline will be so informed 
by letter from the Dean of Students. A copy of the official statement 
of disciplinary action will be filed in the student's personal folder in 
the Dean of Students' Office and additional copies will be sent to the 
student' s parents and to the Dean of Men or the Dean of Women if the 
student is a residence hall student. 

Grace, Loranne — Assistant Professor of Library Science. 

Grading System — Mid- semester and semester grade reports are 
issued to the student and his parent or guardian (if authorized by the 
student). Only semester grades are recorded on the student's perma- 
nent record at the College. The following system of grading and 
grade point values is used: 



A 4.0 grade points per hour 


D 


1.0 grade points per hour 


A— 3.7 grade points per hour 


D- 


0.7 grade points per hour 


B+ 3.3 grade points per hour 


F 


0.0 grade points per hour 


B 3.0 grade points per hour 


W 


Withdrawal 


B— 2.7 grade points per hour 


WF 


Withdrew Failing 


C+ 2.3 grade points per hour 




(0.0 grade points per hour) 


C 2.0 grade points per hour 


AU 


Audit 


C— 1.7 grade points per hour 


NC 


Non-Credit 


D+ 1.3 grade points per hour 


1 


Incomplete 


A student may receive an "inco 


mplete 


' because of illness or other 



unavoidable delay. A student who believes he is eligible for an 
incomplete must secure from the Office of Admissions and Records 
the proper form on which he may file application with the Academic 
Dean to receive an incomplete. In order to receive credit, the student 
must make up his incomplete grade by the end of the first six weeks 
of the following semester. A course in which the student received a 
grade of " C , " " D" or " F" may be repeated before he takes a more 
advanced course in the same field. Only the last grade will be 
counted on repeated courses. No course may be repeated more than 
twice. The grade point average may be calculated by dividing the 
total number of grade points earned by the hours attempted. 

graduation — 1. The act of receiving a diploma or degree upon 
completion of course of study. 2. A ceremony all students look 
forward to. 

graduation in absentia — Seniors who are enrolled at Southern 
Missionary College during the semester in which the commencement 
exercise is held are to be present for the ceremony, or an "in 
absentia" fee of $25 will be levied. 

graduation requirements — The College Catalog lists these. 

graduation with honors — A degree candidate in good and regular 
standing, having attained an overall grade point average of 3.50 or 
higher, may have the degree conferred "cum laude." 

Grant, Grayce (pron. grace) — Secretary Academic Dean. Close kin 
to Lorenzo. 

Grant, Lorenzo — Associate Professor of Religion. 

Greek — A foreign language of New Testament scholars, required of 
all theology majors. 

Greenleaf, Floyd — Professor of History, Sponsor of the Nicaragua 
Project. 

Grindley, Thomas — Assistant Professor of 
Industrial Arts. 

Grindley, Murlita — Director of Purchasing. 

grossed-out — Completely disgusted with. 

gross — That which is ill-mannered or too big, 
or obnoxious, or fat, or odd, or smart or 
anything. 

Grundset, Edgar O. — Associate Professor of 
Biology, SMC y'ole timekeeper and Santa. 

guidance and counseling — During registra- 
tion each student is assigned a curriculum 
adviser to assist in program planning. 
Throughout the school year the curriculum adviser will be available 
for advice and guidance on academic questions. Although cur- 
riculum advisers may be consulted on questions and problems other 
than academic ones, students are invited to seek counsel from any 
member of the faculty. Personal problems will be given thoughtful 




Murlita Grindley 



Gulley 



intramural sports 



consideration. Members of the faculty deem it a privilege to discuss 
with the student great principles, concepts, and ideas in an atmos- 
phere of informality and friendliness. Students are urged to become 
personally acquainted with as many members of the faculty as 
possible. Students with personal problems who wish assistance from 
a professional counselor should consult the Dean of Students or 
Director of Counseling Services. Personnel trained in psychology 
and counseling are available to those with serious social and personal 
problems. The testing service works in close cooperation with the 
counseling service in providing guidance information to both stu- 
dents and counselors. Students are urged to take advantage of the 
testing service as a means of obtaining information useful in choos- 
ing a profession or occupation. 

Gulley, Leona — Assistant Professor of Nursing, Mission Club spon- 
sor. 

Gulley, Norman — Professor of Religion. One-time missionary to the 
Philippines. 

Gustin, Virginia — Assistant dean of women. 



H 

Hackman Hall — The building housing the departments of Chemistry 
and Biology. It is so named after Earl Hackman, one-time chairman 
of the College Board. 

Hanim, Minon — Professor of English. 

handball — A popular game on campus. The college maintains four 
courts. 

handicapped students — For information concerning, contact Dean 
of Students. 

handicapped student coordinator — Melvin Campbell, Dean of 
Students. 

Hansen's disease — Leprosy. 

Hanson, Eleanor — Director of Health Service. 

Hanson, Lawrence E. — Academic Dean, Professor of Mathematics. 
(You guessed it — Eleanor and Lawrence are 
married). 

health — May you prosper and be in 
good. . . . 

health course — An academy course dealing 
with care of the body. 

Health Service — Administered by a nurse in 
cooperation with the college physician. Reg- 
ular clinic hours are maintained by the staff. 
After clinic hours a nurse is available at all 
times for emergencies by calling 396-4300. 
In order to provide maximum health benefits 
to students the following provisions are 
made: 

1 . Services are extended to all dormitory inhabitants and all village 
students taking 8 or more hours during the school year and 3 or more 
during the summer. 2. The college physician makes daily calls at the 
Health Service Monday through Friday beginning at 9:30 a.m. He 
leaves as soon as all who are waiting have been seen. 3. An insur- 
ance brochure concerning information about insurance coverage and 
details about how and when to file a claim are given to each student at 
registration. All students registered for a minimum of 8 hours or 
residing in dormitories are covered by student insurance. 4. A 
fourteen bed infirmary is maintained for overnight confinement if 
necessary. 

Health Service issues no medical excuses. It is expected that the 
student will contact his or her teachers and work supervisors as soon 
as possible regarding illness. See absences, class. 

Hefferlin, Ray — Professor of Physics, Chairman of the Physics 
Department. Just back from Russia. 

Herman, James — College chaplain. Office in the Student Center. 

history — One of the many majors offered by the college. 

history of the college — Long and rich. 

Holbrook, Frank — Professor of Religion. 

holler — A small valley as in: SMC is located in a holler. 




homosexual — See statement in appendix on Sex. 

honors — See Graduation with Honors. 

Hooper, Dorothy — Assistant Professor of Nursing. 

Houck, Duane F. — Associate Professor of Biology. 

housing — Off-campus residence — The college owns a number of 
apartments for married students. Information concerning the availa- 
bility of both school-owned and private apartments may be found in 
the College Manager's Office. 

housing deposit — Before a housing or room reservation may be 
made, $50 of the advance payment as a deposit must be paid. 
Tentative reservations may be made without a deposit before July 1 , 
however, the deposit must be paid by that 
date in order to hold the reservation. After 
July 1 , requests for reservation must be ac- 
companied by the $50 deposit. 

housing regulations — See Residence Hall 
Disturbances. 

Howard, Lorella — Assistant Professor of 
Nursing. 

Howard, Shirley — Instructor of Nursing. On 
study leave. 

humanities — A much underrated course in the 
development of human thought. 

Hummer, Francis — Instructor of Industrial 
Education. 

Hunt, Bonnie — Instructor of Nursing. 

Francis Hummer 





Student 
79-80 



Student, Joe 





* 1 k 1 77-65* 



ID Cards — Identification cards distributed to each student. This is a 
credit card, good for purchases at certain places on campus. It is also 
valuable for identification just about anywhere. Authorization for ID 
cards is made by Student Finance, although mechanical preparation 
is done by the Computer Service Department. Should you lose an ID 
card, bring another form of identification to the Computer Center to 
have your card replaced. Price for replacement is $2.00. Any time 
you visit administrative offices to inquire about your bill or records 
you should bring your ID card with you. 

incompletes, a possible grade — A student may receive an "incom- 
plete' ' because of illness or other unavoidable delay. A student who 
believes he is eligible for an incomplete must secure from the Office 
of Admissions and Records the proper form on which he may file 
application with the Academic Dean to receive an incomplete. In 
order to receive credit, the student must make up his incomplete 
grade by the end of the first six weeks of the following semester. 

industrial education or arts — A multi-facet major dealing with the 
industrial world. 

industrial superintendent — Man or woman who operates the col- 
lege's industries. 

injuries — Report to Health Service. 

insurance — A health policy is carried by the College. (See appendix 
under Insurance.) 

intramural sports — An organized series of sporting contests for both 
men and women. Note the Day By Day Calendar for details. See 
Sports. 



10 




Wayne Janzen 



Jacob's Ladder 



Jacob's Ladder — A series of ill-conceived steps connecting Lynn 
Wood Hall with the men's residence hall. 

Janzen, Wayne — Professor of Industrial Arts 
(Chairman of the Department). 

jeans — 1 . A type of covering for the lower half 
of the body. 2. Pants that are made of blue 
denim material (see dress code). 

jewelry — Items of personal adornment such as 
bracelets, necklaces (including medallions), 
earrings and ornamental rings, as well as 
professional, fraternal and engagement 
rings. These are not allowed to be worn. A 
person who in his dress, appearance and 
conduct shows unwillingness to cooperate 
with the expectations as outlined by the college, may be asked to 
withdraw and/or denied readmission for the succeeding term. Stu- 
dents are urged to request their guests to respect the standard of dress 
at all times. 

Jones, Barbara — Secretary to the Music Department. 

Jones Hall — One of the original buildings of the caimus, built in 
1917. Used through the years as a men's dormitory, women's dor- 
mitory , housing of the departments of Art and English . At present it 
houses some men, as well as departments of Art and Einglish. 

journalism — Several courses are taught on writing which are called. 

junior college credit — A maximum of seventy-two semester hours 
may be accepted from a junior college. 

junior standing — 1. Those students that have acquired between 55 
and 93 semester hours. 2. One who is lower in rank. 

K 

Kamieneski, Carla (kam'-ienes'-ki) — Associate Professor of Physi- 
cal Education. 

Kamieneski, Robert — Associate Professor of Physical Education. 
(Yes, Carla and Robert are married). 

Kennedy, Howard — Principal of the Spald- 
ing Elementary School, a 400 plus student 
elementary school on the campus. 

key, duplication of — Students are not permit- 
ted to duplicate keys to campus locks. 

Knarr , Catherine (narr) — Instructor of Nurs- 
ing. On study leave. 

Knittel, Frank (K-nittel) — President of Col- 
lege, Professor of English. 

Krall, Marie — Instructor of Nursing. 

Kuhlman, Henry — Professor of Physics. 

Kuhlman, H. H. — Professor of Biology. 

Kutzner, Waldemar — College physician. 



labor-class load — Exceptions to the following schedule of study and 
work must receive the approval of the Academic Dean. 

Maximum 
Course Load Work Load 

16 hours 16 hours 

14 hours 20 hours 

12 hours 26 hours 

10 hours 32 hours 

8 hours 38 hours 

Students of average scholastic ability are advised to plan a study- 
work program involving less than the maximum hours of labor 
permitted. Freshmen in particular need more time for orientation and 
adjustment to the college academic program. 
labor regulations — Birth Certificates and Work Permits — Whenever 
a student seventeen years of age or under is registered, the College 




Frank Knittel 




leaves 

issues a Tennessee Employment Certificate. This must be signed and 
on file at the College before a student may start work. In order to 
provide work opportunities to students, industries are operated by the 
College. The industries must serve their customers daily, necessitat- 
ing a uniform working force. To continue these industries in opera- 
tion, students assigned thereto must continue their work schedules to 
the end of the term. (Preparation for tests should be a day-by-day 
matter.) Any student who drops his work schedule without making 
proper arrangements may be suspended from class attendance until 
proper arrangements are made with the Director of Student Finance. 
It should be understood that once a student is assigned to work in a 
given department, he is expected to remain there for the entire school 
year except in cases where changes are recommended by the school 
nurse or approved by the College. Should a student find it necessary 
to be absent from work, he must make prior arrangements with his 
work superintendent. In case of illness, he will inform the Health 
Service. The Office of Student Finance for the college strives to 
place students on jobs to the best of its ability. For various reasons the 
college cannot guarantee work to a student even though his applica- 
tion may have been accepted on a plan calling for an approximate 
number of hours of work per week. Some students choose class 
schedules with classes so scattered that a reasonable work program is 
impossible. Some are physically or emotion- 
ally unable to work, others are erratic at 
meeting work assignments. It is the respon- 
sibility of the student to render acceptable 
service to his employer in order to maintain a 
job. The department superintendent reserves 
the right to dismiss the student if his service 
is unsatisfactory. The student pay rate is not 
less than student rates set by the government 
wage-hour law. It may be higher if a student 
possesses special skills or training. 

Lacey, Charles — Instructor of Agriculture, in 
charge of the grounds at the College. 

Lamb, Edward — Associate Professor of Behavioral Science. 

Lamb, Katie — Instructor of Nursing. 

Lange, Paul — Assistant Professor of Nursing. 

languages — 1. Several are taught on campus. 2. That which is used 
daily by students. 

late registration — Permission to register late must be obtained from 
the Director of Admissions and Records. Students failing to register 
during the scheduled registration periods will be assessed a late 
registration fee of $10.00 and $2.00 for each additional day. The 
course load of a late registrant will be reduced by one to two semester 
hours of each expired week of instruction. No student should expect 
to register after two weeks of the semester have elapsed. Changes in 
Registration. To avoid changes in registration the student should 
carefully consider the program of courses necessary to meet his 
objectives. To avoid subsequent adjustments, a balance should be 
maintained between the course load, work program, and extra- 
curricular activities. 

lead (led) — That which impedes a student's progress. That which 
needs to be gotten out. 

leaves — 

Late — Residence hall students are expected to remain in their 
residence halls between closing time and 6:00 a.m. if they have not 
arranged an overnight leave with the residence hall dean. 

Overnight and weekend — Printed forms for overnight leave 
requests are available in the residence hall offices. If the period of 
proposed leave from the campus includes a work or class appoint- 
ment, suitable arrangements must be made with the work superin- 
tendent or Academic Dean respectively. Women students wishing a 
campus leave to visit a home other than their own or that of close 
relatives, should present a letter of invitation from the hostess and, if 
under 21 years of age, also authorization from their parents or 
guardians. Overnight leaves in the surrounding community (Chat- 
tanooga - Collegedale - Cleveland) are not permitted unless the 
students are accompanied by parents. Overnight leaves are cancelled 
at any time students are present on campus or in the surrounding 



Charles Lacey 



11 




■7 



Marion I.indermaii 



Ledford Hall 

community (Chattanooga - Collegedale - Cleveland) during the time 
of the leave. If under 21 years of age, freshmen students with less 
than a 3 . 00 grade-point average on a minimum of 1 2 graded semester 
hours and students who are on scholastic probation are limited to 
overnight leaves which involve a maximum of eight (8) nights of 
absence from the campus per semester, excluding vacations. Stu- 
dents on citizenship probation are limited to overnight leaves which 
involve a maximum of two (2) nights of absence from the campus per 
calendar month excluding vacations. In case of an emergency requir- 
ing a leave which is not provided for by regular policy, parents 
should contact the residence hall dean. Weekend leaves terminate at 
10:30 p.m. Sunday. If an emergency situation makes it impossible to 
return to the residence hall by 10:30 p.m., students have the respon- 
sibility of telephoning their residence hall dean to request an exten- 
sion of time. 

Ledford Hall — The name of the building housing the Industrial Arts 
Department. 

library science — A minor offered by the College dealing with care 
and maintenance of a library. 

Lien, Jerry — Professor of Communication. 

Lien, Claire — Secretary for the Alumni As- 
sociation. 

Lincoln Room — A special collection of mate- 
rial on Abraham Lincoln and Civil War. 
Open for research — McKee Library. 

Linderman, Marion — Associate Professor of 
Library Science. 

Lindsey, Marvyn — Assistant Director of 
Computer Services. 

Little Debbie — A nationally known snak cake 
baked by McKee Bakery. Behind every Lit- 
tle Debbie there is some student labor. 

Liu, Ruth — Associate Professor of Nursing. 

loans — The college participates in a variety of loan programs. See the 
appendix for a list or consult with the Office of Student Finance for 
information. 

location of the college — 20 miles east of Chattanooga, Tennessee, in 
Collegedale, Tennessee. 

lollygag — To loaf or loiter as in: Why 's them boys always lollygaggin' 
about Thatcher? 

Loma Linda University — A sister educational institution that offers a 
variety of graduate and professional degrees, and is located in South- 
ern California. 

Longway, Ina — Associate Professor of Nursing, Chairman of the 
Department. 

lost and found — The lost and found depart- 
ment is in the Service Department located at 
the rear of Lynn Wood Hall. 

Lynn Wood Hall — Main building for class- 
room instruction. Houses the departments 
of Communication, Education, History, 
Secretarial Science, Behavioral Science, 
Modern Languages, Religion, Audio- Visual 
and the radio station. One of the original buildings on campus. Built 
in 1918. 

Lyzanchuk, Iwan — Manager, VM Bakery. 

M 

Maddock, Dean — Principal of Collegedale Academy. 

mail — Dormitory mail is delivered daily whereas community students 
must make their own arrangements with the post office for mail. 

major requirements — A series of academic hurdles that must be 
accomplished before graduation. The College Catalog lists these. 

make-up work — A student may expect to make up class work only if 
the absence is excused. All make-up work involving examinations 
and other class assignments must be completed within one week after 
the student returns to class unless an extension of time is arranged 
with the instructor. A teacher may have the option, if it is agreeable 
with the individual student, to give an average grade on a make-up 





music groups 

quiz or use it as one of the quizzes to be thrown out if that practice is 
followed. However, if the student prefers to be given a make-up 
quiz, it is his prerogative and the instructor shall be obliged to do so. 

Marlowe, Linda — Secretary to the Nursing Department. 

marriage — Sorry, no students are to marry during the school year. 
See the Dean of Students for exceptions. Students who fail to follow 
these instructions will be asked to withdraw from school. 

mathematics — A major offered on campus. 

Mazie Herin Hall — Name of the nursing building, so called in honor 
of Mazie Herin, one time teacher at the college and long time church 
nursing educator. 

McArthur, Ben — Assistant Professor of History. 

MCAT — Acronym for Medical College Aptitude Test. An examina- 
tion required of all prospective medical students, given by the col- 
lege at various times. Consult K. R. Davis in the Student Center. 

McClarty, Wilma — Professor of English, Chairman of the Depart- 
ment. 

McCurdy, Robert — Associate Professor of Computer Science. On 
leave. 

McKamey, Arnold — Manager, Collegedale Nursery. 

McKee Bakery — A major bakery in the U.S. Home of the famed 
Little Debbie. Plant is located adjacent to the college and provides 
excellent work opportunities for students. 

McKee Library — The name of the building housing the college's 
collection of books. Name comes from the McKee family who so 
generously contributed to its construction. 

McKinney, William — Head of Motor Pool. 

Merchant, Robert — Assistant Professor of 
Business Administration , Col lege Treasurer, 
SA sponsor. 

Miller Hall — Name of the music building. So 
named for renowned SDA hymn writer. 

minor — A collection of specified college 
courses totaling at least 18 semester hours. 
The College Catalog gives listing and de- 
tails. 

Missions Field Day — An all-college effort to raise funds from the 
surrounding communities for mission work. No school is held that 
day. 

misteak — An error. If found in handbook, report to the Dean of 
Students. 

modern languages — A major offered on campus. 

motel — The college has some guest rooms for rent, but it is not a full 
service motel. Call Thatcher Hall for details. 

motion picture policy — All feature length motion pictures must be 
cleared by the Faculty Film Preview Committee for showing by a 
student group either on or off campus. The Student Association is 
permitted one feature film showing per year for a public benefit 
program. Campus organizations may be permitted to show a feature 
film in a program restricted to the membership of the sponsoring 
group and invited guests. No campus organization will be allowed to 
show more than one such film during an academic year. Requests for 
the showing of any feature length film should be directed to the Dean 
of Students. 

motor pool — The building immediately behind the service station in 
which the college vehicles are cared for. 

motor vehicle code — All vehicles must be registered. For more 
details see Vehicle Code in the Appendix. 

Montgomery, Marilyn — Assistant Professor of Nursing. Orlando 
Campus. 

Moon, Donald — Associate Professor of Physical Education. 

Moore, Robert — Instructor of Mathematics. 

Moots, Judy — Assistant director of student finance. 

Mopera, Feliza — Assistant Professor of Nursing. 

Morrison, Robert — Professor of Modern Languages. 

music — 1. A major offered on the campus. 2. That which supple- 
ments most of our religious services. 

music groups — Non-college groups must have permission of the 
Student Affairs Committee to perform on campus. Contact the Dean 
of Students for details. 



12 



music organizations 

music organizations — Groups of musicians banded together to render 
sounds of beauty. 

music standards — Music performed or reproduced anywhere on 
campus is expected to be in harmony with standards of good taste 
applicable to the occasion and in keeping with the ideals of spiritual 
commitment and personal relationship with God to which the Col- 
lege is dedicated. To assist with this responsibility a screening 
committee is appointed by the College president each year to screen 
all student programs before they are pre- 
sented. Student groups should contact the 
chairman of the screening committee in 
ample time before their scheduled perform- 
ance so that the committee can be called for 
the screening. Failure to have a program 
properly screened may cause cancellation of 
the program. A musical group organized by 
students for public performances must be 
approved by the Student Affairs Committee. 

Myers, Clifford — Director of campus se- 
curity. Instructor of Industrial Education. 
Works out of Dean of Students' Office. 

Myers, Clifford O., Jr. — Manager, Village Market. 




Clifford Myers 




N 

non-departmental courses — Classes that are offered outside of any 
department, e.g., aviation, gardening, and humanities. 

nursing — The largest department on campus. 

nursing admission requirements — The College Catalog lists these. 

nursing scholarships — See Loans in the appendix. 

nursing students — Students desiring to enroll in the nursing program 
are required to send an advance payment of 
$50 along with their application to insure a 
reservation in the nursing program. This ad- 
vance payment will be considered a part of 
the advance payment necessary for registra- 
tion. This advance payment will be credited 
to the last statement of the school year along 
with all other advance payments as outlined. 
If a student applies for the nursing program 
but does not attend the College, the $50 nurs- 
ing advance payment will be forfeited. All 
advance payments will be refunded to the 
student's account at the close of the academic 
year except for the special foreign student advance payment of 
$1,000, which is refunded at the termination of the student's stay at 
the College. 

nursing uniforms — A specified mode of dress required for nursing 
students while in laboratory experiences. 

o 

objectives of the college — Purpose for which the college exists, see 
appendix for codification of these. 

off-campus functions (see Leaves, overnight) — All overnight off- 
campus group activities involving mixed groups, not sponsored by a 
campus organization, require chaperonage and clearance by the 
residence hall deans. It is the responsibility of the students involved 
to make proper arrangements for the activity which includes ar- 
rangements for chaperonage. For the protection of the students it is 
urged that all daytime off-campus activities involving mixed groups 
have chaperones. Parents and faculty members may serve as 
chaperones and on certain occasions the Dean of Women may grant 
approval for chaperonage by married students. It is considered wise 
that there be one chaperone for every 15-20 students. All student 
organizations planning social or recreational activities off campus 
must make proper advance arrangements through the Dean of Stu- 
dents' Office. Requests, complete with the names of chaperones and 
the signature of the faculty sponsor, are to be filed by 10:00 a.m. 



Pearson 

Wednesday of the week preceding the proposed activity with a 
description of proposed Sabbath activities including Sabbath school 
and church services. Residence hall students expecting to take 
part in any off-campus social activity must complete the regular 
residence hall leave form which must be submitted to their 
respective residence hall dean. No approval will be given for 
overnight group activities that are to take place during the final three 
weeks of each semester. 

officers, student qualifications — For a student to hold an office in 
any student organization including a publication staff or a committee 
or in any non-academic organization which performs publicly on or 
off campus, he must have a record of good citizenship and a 
minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.00. To run for or to 
hold any elected office in a student organization, a student must have 
a record of good citizenship and a cumulative grade point average of 
2.25 or a 2.50 grade point average for the previous semester with a 
minimum cumulative average of 2.00. Secondary school grade-point 
averages will be calculated on major subjects only. 

Oh, no! — One expression that is uttered after the obvious on a test is 
explained. 

one-year terminal curricula — The College Catalog lists the offer- 
ings in Clerical and Food Services. 

Ooltewah — 1. A community located some 3 miles from the college. 
2. Means owl's nest in the Cherokee language. 

organization chart — A diagram of flow chart showing the college's 
lines of authority. Note the Organization Chart in the Appendix. 

organization of new clubs — Students who wish to organize a new 
club should first consult with the Dean of Students. A constitution 
should subsequently be drawn up and approved by the Student 
Affairs Committee. 

organization, records of student — Each student organization is 
required to place an up-to-date copy of its constitution on file in the 
Student Affairs Office. 

organizations, meeting of student — Administrative policy of the 
College requires that a faculty adviser be present at all meetings of 
each student organization and at all meetings of major committees 
serving student organizations. 

orientation program — Orientation for new freshman students is held 
prior to the opening week of the fall term. It includes examinations 
and instruction helpful in course planning. The student is introduced 
to the facilities, purposes, and functions of the college. Social 
occasions are also provided when students may meet faculty mem- 
bers and fellow students. All new freshman students are required to 
attend the orientation program. The program is the responsibility of 
the Dean of Students. 

Orlando — 1. City in Florida in which is located a nursing extension 
campus. 2. Home of Disney World. 3. Home of many SMC stu- 
dents. 

Ost, Genevieve — Associate Professor of Speech. 

Ott, Helmut — Assistant Professor of Religion. 

Otto, Larry — Assistant Professor of Music. 

outings — See Off-campus functions. 

Owens, Gerald — Instructor, Computer Science. 



P. E. — Abbreviation for Physical Education. 

P. E. Center — Physical Education Building. 

Parker, Marilyn — Assistant Professor of 
Education. 

parking — 1. Placement of an automobile on 
campus. 2. Allocated for students with stick- 
ers. (Purchase sticker at registration or the 
Dean of Students' Office.) (See automobile.) 

parking fines — The first two parking fines are $5.00 each, the third 
and on are $15.00 each, to be paid at the Cashier's Desk in Wright 
Hall. If not paid in cash, a $2.00 late fee is put on statement, in 
addition to fine. 

PDA — See public display of affection. 

Pearson, Carolyn — Secretary to Director of Admissions. 




13 




Olson Perry 



Pearson 

Pearson, William — Professor of Education. 
Chairman of the Department. 

Peek, Norman — Director of Audio- Visual 
Department, Associate Professor of Chemis- 
try. Manager, Collegedale Air Park. 

Perkins, Christene — Associate Professor of 
Nursing. 

Perry, Olson — Instructor of Communication. 

personal property — Residence hall students 
are held responsible for all activities which 
take place in the room assigned to them. The 
College is not responsible for personal prop- 
erty stored in the residence hall, for loss of 
money or other valuables on the part of students, nor for any damage 
suffered by motor vehicles on College property. For reasons of 
security, students should deposit all but small amounts of money in a 
student drawing account at the Business Office or in a bank. 
Adequate comprehensive insurance coverage for bicycles and motor 
vehicles should be maintained. 

Peters, Louesa — Assistant treasurer. 

pets — 1. Friendly or unfriendly animals. 2. Not allowed in the 
dormitory. 

Ph.D. — 1. Abbreviation for doctor of philosophy. 2. Abbreviation 
for post hole digger. 

philosophy — The pursuit of wisdom by intellectual means and moral 
self-discipline. A statement of one's objectives and guiding princi- 
ples. See Appendix for a statement of the College's. 

physical education — One of the many majors on campus. 

placement folder — A collection of information such as a resume, 
letter of recommendation that students collect and the Dean of 
Students' Office maintains for prospective employers. 

placement service for graduates — The Dean of Students operates a 
placement service which issues announcements concerning 
employment opportunities and provides potential employers with 
data on graduates of the College. The placement service is effective 
in assisting students to find satisfactory professional employment. 
Registration with the placement service is voluntary and should be 
made at the beginning of the senior year or end of the junior year. 

poke — Another name for bag. 

policies — Set of rules and procedures that 
govern the operation of the college. For 
specifics read the College Catalog and this 
Handbook. 

positive way — A non-academic volunteer 
class devoted to the practice of prayer. Over 
1 ,500 students have taken this class in the 
recent past. 

post office — Is located in the College Plaza. 

prayer — Communication with God, an oft- 
practiced activity on campus. 

prayer room — A secluded room for medita- 
tion and prayer located in the Student Center. 

pre-professional — The college offers a wide 
variety of courses that prepare students for 
professional schools. 

pre-registration — A process of enrolling for classes early — held on 

Nov. 18. 
probation — 1. A conditional status. 2. A condition on which a 

student may remain at the college. See Citizenship Probation and 

Academic Probation. 
profanity — Not allowed or tolerated. 
programs committee — A group of students and faculty that plan the 

activities not cared for by the Artist- Adventure Series Committee. 

property rights — Only individuals who have made appropriate pre- 
vious arrangements with the Administrator in charge of the building 
involved are permitted access to the roofs of College property. 
Anyone responsible for damage to College furnishings and other 
school property will be obliged to make restitution for the damage 
and may in addition be subject to discipline. 




religious activities 

psychology — 1. A study of the mind and its functions. 2. A course of 
study that can be taken. 

publications — A number of communication periodicals are published 
and these include the school newspaper, the yearbook, plus an 
assortment of academic and public relations materials. 

public display of affection — Overt physical expression of emotional 
feeling toward the opposite sex. The public expression of affection is 
in poor taste. Students who do not demonstrate self-respect and 
self-re' Taint in this matter are subject to discipline, which may 
invo) e their being asked to withdraw from the College. Students can 
expect members of the College staff to correct those bringing dis- 
credit to themselves or to the College through inappropriate display 
of affection. Being seen in public with arms around one another is 
inappropriate. 

Purple People Treater — A cut-down, open-air bus painted white 
with purple polka-dots, used to conduct tours of the campus. 

put out — Annoyed, not happy with, as in: I shore was put out 'bout 
going to chapel. 



quiz — 1. A test usually consisting of few questions answered in a short 
period of time. 2. Something that must be studied for. 



R 




Rachel's Ladder — A series of steps from the 
women's residence hall to the upper campus. 
A classic in steps. However, the engineer is 
unknown. 

radio — See WSMC. 

rank and tenure — A faculty committee that 
recommends to the president the rank and 
tenure promotions for each faculty member. 

reckon — To suppose, think, believe, as in "I 
reckon I oughta get to class." 

record player — See Stereos. 

recreational facilities — Unless previously ar- 
ranged for or scheduled by others , the recrea- 
tional facilities of the college are reserved for use only by students, 
faculty and staff. While actively participating in the campus recrea- 
tional areas, attire for women may include bermuda or gym shorts. 
Attire for men may include bermuda or gym shorts , but shirts must be 
worn at all times. 

registration — An official or formal recording of an individual as a 
student at the college. 

Rehabilitation Act of 1973, Section 504 — "No otherwise qualified 
handicapped individual . . . shall, solely by reason of his handicap, 
be excluded from participation in, be denied the benefits of, or be 
subjected to discrimination under any program or activity receiving 
federal financial assistance." The College is committed to end 
discrimination on the basis of handicap whenever it is reasonably 
feasible. 

Reiner, Richard — Business Manager. 

religion — 1. An expression of man's belief in 
the supernatural. 2. The Seventh-day Ad- 
ventist religion is the prevailing influence on 
campus. 3. One of the many majors on 
campus. 

religious activities — Southern Missionary 
College exists for the purpose of promoting 
symmetrical growth, mentally, socially, 
physically and spiritually. For this reason, it 
must have guiding principles for spiritual as 
well as mental, social and physical activities. 
The College recognizes that legislation can- 
not create spirituality, for this results only from intelligent individual 
choice. The chief function of the College is to provide an educational 
environment in harmony with Biblical teachings and standards. One 
does not have to live in this environment or help provide it unless he 
chooses to become a part of Southern Missionary College. Since 
environment depends on the people who make up an institution, 




Richard Reiner 



14 



Remley 



room care and inspection 



legislation is necessary to insure the character of this environment. 
Southern Missionary College students are not required to be mem- 
bers of the Seventh-day Adventist Church or any other religious 
organization, but the College administration does insist that no 
student detract from or weaken the spiritual character of the College 
or interfere with the benefit which might be received by those who 
wish to take full advantage of the College's spiritual emphasis. 

Remley, Hilda Fern — College relations field representative. 

reservation of college facilities — Consult with the President's office 
for details. 

residence halls — Dormitories are maintained for single students. 
Single students who have not completed a baccalaureate degree and 
who do not live with parents, close relatives or legal guardians in the 
vicinity, live in the residence halls. In order to live elsewhere they 
must present written request to the Dean of Students. Such requests 
will be considered if the student is not on Citizenship Probation, 
demonstrates definite financial need which off-campus living will 
correct, or other extenuating circumstances making non-dormitory 
residence necessary. In general only students 25 and older are al- 
lowed to live outside the residence halls. When a student has been 
given special permission to live off campus, no change in residence 
may be made without permission of the Dean of Students. Residence 
hall students are held responsible for all activities which take place in 
the room assigned to them. The College is not responsible for 
personal property stored in the residence hall, for loss of money or 
other valuables on the part of students, nor for any damage suffered 
by motor vehicles on College property. For reasons of security, 
students should deposit all but small amounts of money in a student 
drawing account at the Business Office or in a bank. Adequate 
comprehensive insurance coverage for bicycles and motor vehicles 
should be maintained. Off-campus residence policies apply to all 
unmarried students who are enrolled for more than three semester 
hours and who do not live with parents or other close relatives. 

residence hall disturbances — That which you are not to be. For more 
details consult the Handbook for the Men's and Women's Resi- 
dence. 

residence hall hours — Residence halls will be open according to the 
following schedule: 

Sunday - Thursday 6:00 a.m. to 10:30 p.m. 

Friday 6:00 a.m. to 9:45 p.m. 

Sabbath 6:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. 

Young men may call at the women's residence halls according to 
the following schedule: 

Visiting hours (lounge only) 
Sunday-Thursday 7:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. 

Friday 7:00 a.m. to Sunset 

Calling hours (the above plus) 

Friday Sunset to Vespers 

Sabbath 7:30 a.m. to 11:00 p.m. 

residence hall privacy — The college residence halls are private 
homes for their occupants. Community students and others may visit 
in the residence halls during residence hall hours in accord with the 
normal proprieties for visiting a private home. 

residence hall visiting — Sorry, mixed groups not permitted in private 
residence hall rooms. 

residence hall worship — All residence hall students are required to 
attend the worship service that is held in the residence halls each 
evening, Monday through Thursday each week. The Friday evening 
vespers and Sabbath evening meditations which are held in the 
church are counted for residence hall worships. Students are allowed 
one unexcused absence from these meetings each week. Students 
who accumulate excessive unexcused absences will be subject to 
disciplinary action. 

residence, Orlando campus — Housing is provided only for single 
students. Single students who wish to live off-campus please see 
residence, off-campus. 

residence, off-campus — The college provides residence hall housing 
for single students and a limited number of apartments for married 
students. Information concerning the availability of both school- 
owned and private apartments may be found in the College Man- 



ager's Office. Single students who have not completed a bac- 
calaureate degree and who do not live with parents, close relatives or 
legal guardians in the vicinity, live in the residence halls. In order to 
live elsewhere they must present written request to the Dean of 
Students. Such requests will be considered if the student is not on 
Citizenship Probation, demonstrates definite financial need which 
off-campus living will correct, or other extenuating circumstances 
making non-dormitory residence necessary. In general only students 
25 and older are allowed to live outside the residence halls. When a 
student has been given special permission to live off campus, no 
change in residence may be made without permission of the Dean of 
Students. Off-campus residence policies apply to all unmarried stu- 
dents who are enrolled for more than three semester hours and who 
do not live with parents or other close relatives. 

residence requirement for degree — Baccalaureate Degree: Thirty 
semester hours of credit must be completed in residence immediately 
preceding the conferment of the Baccalaureate degree. These hours 
must include 16 upper division, with eight in the major and three in 
the minor fields. Associate Degree: Twenty-eight semester hours of 
credit must be completed in residence immediately preceding the 
conferment of the Associate degree. Sixteen of these hours must be 
in the major area of study. 

responsibilities of residence hall students — Residence hall students 
are held responsible for all activities which take place in the room 
assigned to them. 

responsibility of the student — The responsibility for satisfying 
degree requirements rests with the student. Each student is expected 
to acquaint himself with the various requirements published in the 
bulletin and to plan his course of study accordingly. The student may 
choose to meet the requirements of any one bulletin in effect during 
the period of residency. If he discontinues for a period of twelve 
months or more, he must qualify according to a single bulletin in 
force subsequent to his return. 

Rice, Desmond — Assistant Professor of Education. 

Rice, ila/il — Associate Professor of Nursing, 
Coordinator, Orlando Campus. 

Richards, Evonne — Instructor of Office Ad- 
ministration, Director of Word Processing 
Department. 

Richards, William — Associate Professor of 
Business Administration. 

Richert, Arthur — Associate Professor of 
Mathematics. Chairman of the Department. 

Riffel, Krista — Assistant Professor of Nurs- 
ing. 

right of petition — A student who believes 
there is a valid reason for requesting variance 
from or exception to an academic policy stated in the Bulletin, may 
make a petition to the Academic Dean for consideration of his case. 
The student must first obtain the advice and signature of the head of 
his major department. The petition shall contain a statement of the 
request and supporting reasons. The student will be notified in 
writing by the Academic Dean of the action on the petition within 
five (5) working days of receiving the petition. Petition forms are 
available from the office of the Academic Dean. 

roads — A pathway between two points, hopefully you will find the 
road from the college to eternal life. 

Robertson, Charlene — Instructor of Nursing. On study leave. 

Robertson, Marvin L. — Professor of Music, Chairman of the Music 
Department. (Jeanne is Marvin's wife's name.) 

Roe, Cyril E. — Associate Professor of Education. One-time teacher 
in India. 

Roe, Joy — Admissions Clerk. 

Rolfe, Becky — Counselor. 

Rolfe, Cecil — Professor of Business Administration. 

room care and inspection — Students are expected to keep their 
rooms clean and orderly. The College reserves the right for the 
residence dean or his representative to enter and inspect a student's 
room at any time. Pictures and other objects placed on the walls must 
be supported in a manner which will not mar the wall surface. The 




Arthur Richert 



15 




Rowe 

room deposit will be refunded when a student checks out of the 
residence hall after the first 30 days of residency provided all dormi- 
tory obligations have been satisfactorily cared for and the floor, 
walls, woodwork, and furniture of the room are clean and undam- 
aged. Redecorating is to be done by the College. 

Rowe, Mary Lou — Secretary to the Dean of Students 

Rozell, Daniel — Assistant Professor of Business Administration. 

Ruf, Barbara — Associate Professor of English. 

Ruf, Holland — Associate college pastor. 

Runyan, Don — Associate Professor of Music. 

Runyan, Millie — Dean of women. 



SA — Abbreviation for Student Association. 

Sabbath school — A weekly religious service devoted to group study 
of the Scriptures which all are required to attend. Meetings are held 
in various places on campus each Saturday (Sabbath). 

Sabbath services — A distinctive practice of Seventh-day Adventists 
is the observance of the seventh day of the week as the Sabbath. 
Southern Missionary College requires all 
students on the campus to respect the sanctity -0 ^^^ 

of that day by attending Sabbath services and 
refraining from all ordinary recreation and 
labor. 

Sage, Robert — Assistant Professor of Music. 

safety regulations — Candles, open-flame 
lamps, fire hazards of any nature are not 
permitted in the residence halls or in any 
campus buildings. 

Santa Claus — Usually E. O. Grundset. 

Schlisner, Everett — Dean of Men and Assist- Robert Sage 

ant Professor of Education. 

Schmidt, Harold — Chairman of the colleges' governing board and 
the president of the Southern Union Conference of Seventh-day 
Adventists. An ordained Seventh-day Adventist minister. 

scholarships — (Consult the College Catalog). 

scholastic probation — When for any reason a student's cumulative 
SMC or overall grade point average falls below a "C" (2.00) 
average, he will be placed on academic probation. A student reaches 
the point of academic dismissal when his cumulative SMC or overall 
grade point average fails to reach the following accumulated levels: 
Semester Hours G.P.A. 

Attempted Dismissal Level 

Up to 48 1.50 

49-64 1 .65 

65-80 1.75 

81-93 1.85 

94-up 1.95 

Beginning freshmen will be allowed to attempt 23 semester hours 
over a maximum period of two semesters before being subject to 
dismissal. Candidates for the Associate of Science degree must have 
a grade point average of at least 1 .95 before being accepted for their 
final year and at least 2.00 to graduate. A student academically 
dismissed may not be readmitted until two sessions (for this purpose 
the summer is counted as one session) have elapsed. Eligibility for 
readmission shall include successful college-level work taken in 
another institution or other evidence of maturity and motivation. 
Transfer students should have a grade point average of at least 2.00 in 
order to be eligible for admission to Southern Missionary College. 
Any person coming to the senior year with a grade point average of 
less than 2.25 in the major will be placed on academic probation. 
Students with less than a 2.00 cumulative grade point average may 
not hold office in any student organization and may not participate in 
any non-academic organization which performs publicly on or off 
campus. In addition, to hold any elected office in a student organiza- 
tion a student must also have a cumulative grade point average of 
2.25 or a 2.50 grade point average for the previous semester. 

screening committee — A group of faculty and students appointed by 
the president to screen all student programs before presentation. 




special fees and miscellaneous charges 

SDA Room — A room in the basement of the 
library that houses only Seventh-day Advent- 
ist books and periodicals. 

secondary education — 1. A requirement for 
college entrance. 2. A program leading to 
high school teaching certification. The Col- 
lege Catalog lists these. 

security — Mr. Cliff Myers is the director — 
available each week day morning 8-9 by 
phone (396-4231). 

Self, Don — Director, WSMC, Instructor of Communication. 

senior placement — See Placement. 

senior standing — A student who has completed at least 94 semester 
hours and has filed a formal request with the Office of Records. All 
candidates for graduation must join the senior class organization and 
meet the non-academic requirements voted by the class membership. 

service department — The custodial service of the college. 

setting of the college — SMC is unique in its location. The main 
campus is nestled in the pleasing Collegedale valley, surrounded by 
some seven hundred acres of school proper y. The quietness and 
beauty of its peaceful surroundings is in keeping with the educational 
philosophy of its governing organization. The community and cam- 
pus post office address is Collegedale which is located eighteen miles 
east of Chattanooga and three miles from Ooltewah off Interstate 
Highway 75 (formerly U.S. 1 1 and 64). The Southern Railway line 
passes through the north side of the campus. A bus service operated 
by the CARTA Line serves the college campus. The Orlando campus 
situated in Florida's "City Beautiful" at the Florida Hospital pro- 
vides additional clinical facilities for the baccalaureate program of 
the Division of Nursing. 

Sex — See statement in appendix on Sex. 

Shultz, Christine — Associate Professor of Nursing. 

Shumate, Frieda — Assistant dean of women. 

signing out — Residence hall students are expected to sign out for 
off-campus activities. 

skittish — nervous, as in: Them students shore get skittish 'bout grade 
time. 

SM — Abbreviation for Student Missionary. 

SMC — Abbreviation for Southern Missionary College. 

social functions and outings — All student organizations planning 
social or recreational activities off campus must make proper ad- 
vance arrangements through the Dean of Students' Office. Requests, 
complete with the names of chaperones and the signature of the 
faculty sponsor, are to be filed by 10:00 a.m. Wednesday of the week 
preceding the proposed activity with a description of proposed Sab- 
bath activities including Sabbath school and church services. Resi- 
dence hall students expecting to take part in any off-campus social 
activity must complete the regular residence hall leave form which 
must be submitted to their respective residence hall dean. No ap- 
proval will be given for overnight group activities that are to take 
place during the final three weeks of each semester. 

social restrictions, Freshmen — Because of the difficulty that many 
freshmen students encounter in adjusting to college life and in the 
management of their time, they are strongly advised to remain on 
campus each evening Sunday through Thursday in order to take 
advantage of the study hours. 

Somers, Dorothy — Assistant dean of women . 

Sophomore — Comes from the word sophism 
which means a plausible but fallacious ar- 
gument. See sophomore standing. 

sophomore standing — A student who has 
completed between 24-54 semester hours. 

Southern Columns — A quarterly publication 
for the alumni of the College. 

Spanish — 1. One of the foreign languages 
taught. 2. The mother tongue of many stu- 
dents. 

Spears, Kenneth — Director of Admissions. 

special fees and miscellaneous charges — 

The following special fees and charges are assessed separately inas- 




Kenneth Spears 



16 






special student 

much as they may not apply to all students nor do they occur 

regularly: 

Application for admission (not refundable) $10.00 

Late application for admission (not refundable) 15.00 

Automobile parking fee (per semester) Dormitory .... 20.00 

Automobile parking fee (per semester) Village 7.00 

Change of Program 5.00 

Late Registration 15.00 

Nursing Education fee (per semester)* 50.00 

Re-registration fee (must be cash) 25.00 

Credit by examination 25.00 

Special examination for course waiver 5.00 

Transcript 2.00 

Graduation in absentia 25.00 

Late return of organizational uniform 10.00 

(The full cost will be charged if irreparably 
damaged or not returned.) 

*Deciared nursing majors enrolled in a nursing class. 

The following items may be charged to the student's account: 

a. Books and class required school supplies (Maximum $100 
each semester.) When a student reaches the $100 maximum 
during the semester, all further books and supplies must be paid 
for in cash. 

b. Approved uniforms for physical education classes and recrea- 
tion. 

c. Subscriptions to professional journals as required by depart- 
ments of instruction. 

d. Nursing uniforms costing approximately $50 but not including 
capes or other non-required garments. 

e. Membership dues for professional clubs of the following de- 
partments of instruction: Nursing (T.A.S.N.), Education 
(S.E.A.), and Music (M.E.N.C.) 

special student — Mature individuals who do not meet the above 
college admission requirements and who do not wish to become 
degree candidates, or otherwise-qualified students who may desire 
limited credit for transfer to another institution of higher learning, 
may register as special students. 

speech — 1. A manner of communicating ideas and emotions. 2. 
Courses that are offered on campus. 

sports — The College encourages intramural athletic activities as a 
means of providing necessary physical exercise and relaxation from 
mental activity and also as a means of providing experience in team 
relationships and developing good sportsmanship. Competitive play 
between a team representing the College and a team representing 
another institution or organization is considered to be out of harmony 
with the principles and objectives of Southern Missionary College. 
To be eligible to participate in intramural sports a person must meet 
one of the following stipulations for fall and spring semesters: 

1 . Reside in a college residence hall, or 

2. Be currently enrolled fora minimum of six (6) semester hours. 
For summer terms: 

1. Reside in a college residence hall, or 

2. Be currently enrolled for a minimum of three (3) semester 
hours, or 

3. Be accepted as a student for the fall semester. 
Springett, Jean — Assistant Professor of Nursing. (Yes , Jean and Ron 

are married). 

Springett, Ronald — Associate Professor of Religion. 

spring vacation — A much-looked- forward-to mid-term vacation. 
This year it's Feb. 28 - March 4. 

Spurlock, Donna — Assistant Professor of Nursing. 

standards of conduct — In harmony with the objectives of the Col- 
lege, high standards of behavior are maintained to encourage the 
development of genuine Christian character. Mature Christian stu- 
dents of sound spiritual and social integrity delight in standards that 
elevate and ennoble. Admission to SMC is a privilege that requires 
the acceptance of and compliance with published and announced 
regulations. Only those whose principles and interests are in har- 
mony with the ideals of the College and who willingly subscribe to 
the social program as ordered are welcomed. A student who finds 



student officers 

himself out of harmony with the social policies of the College, who is 
uncooperative, and whose attitudes give evidence of an unresponsive 
nature may be advised to withdraw without a specific charge. The 
use of tobacco or alcoholic beverages, the improper use of drugs, 
theatre attendance, card playing, dancing, profane or vulgar lan- 
guage, hazing, and improper associations are not tolerated. Each 
student is expected to acquaint himself with the standards of conduct 
as they appear throughout this handbook. 

Steen, David — Associate Professor of Biology. Husband of Linda. 

Steen, Linda — Secretary to Health Service. 

Stepanske, Bruce — Assistant business manager. 

Stepanske, Jeanette — Assistant Professor of Education. Wife of 
Bruce. 

stereos — Only low volume sets allowed in the dormitory. 

student affairs committee — A group of faculty and students who 
recommend and study policies concerning the religious, social and 
cultural life on the campus. This group sets the social standards for 
the campus; a review board for non-academic and non-financial 
policies of the college. 

student apartments — The college maintains a number of housing 
units as well as a trailer park for married students. Additional 
facilities are available in the community. For information contact the 
Business Manager's Office. 

Student Association — Every student at SMC who is taking 8 or more 
semester hours of classwork is a member of the Student Association, 
with voting privileges in the election of officers. Opportunities for 
leadership development and for cooperation in achieving the objec- 
tives of SMC are afforded by the Association. The Association 
assists the College administration and faculty in the implementation 
of policies and assumes responsibility in giving direction to campus 
activities entrusted to it. The Association's activities are coordinated 
and communicated through the Student Senate and Cabinet and their 
several committees. The activities include the publishing of the 
weekly newspaper, Southern Accent; the yearbook, Southern 
Memories; the announcement sheet, Campus Chatter; and the 
student-faculty directory, Joker. The activities and responsibilities 
of officers and the detailed organization of the Student Association 
are outlined in the Student Association Constitution and By-laws. 

Student Bank — The Student Bank for safe-keeping of students' funds 
is in the cashier's office in the administration building. 

Student Center — A building that houses teachers' offices and class- 
rooms on the first floor and the cafeteria on the second floor. On the 
third floor are located Student Association Offices, a formal and an 
informal lounge, a snackshop, a prayer room, Chaplain's Office and 
Counseling Center. 

student employment — The College operates a variety of auxiliary 
and vocational services and enterprises where students may obtain 
part-time employment to defray a portion of their school expenses. 
Opportunities to engage in productive and useful labor can help to 
develop character traits of industry, dependability, initiative and 
thrift. Students may also take advantage of these employment oppor- 
tunities to acquire vocational skills by contacting The Director of 
Student Finance. Students who accept employment assignments are 
expected to meet all work appointments with punctuality. To be 
absent from work appointments without cause or previous arrange- 
ment, or notification of illness is sufficient reason for discharge. 
Students accepting employment by the College are required to main- 
tain their work schedule during the entire semester including exami- 
nation week. Residence hall students may not secure off-campus 
employment without permission of the Dean of Students. 

student missionary — One who serves outside the United States as a 
volunteer worker for the church. Last year the college sent 25. See 
Dean of Students if interested. 

student officers, qualification of — For a student to hold an office in 
any student organization including a publication staff or a committee 
or in any non-academic organization which performs publicly on or 
off campus, he must have a record of good citizenship and a 
minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.00 and be a member 
of the Student Association. To run for or to hold any elected office in 
a student organization, a student must have a record of good citizen- 



17 



Student Park 



UAP 




ship and a cumulative grade point average of 2.25 or a 2.50 grade 
point average for the previous semester with a minimum cumulative 
average of 2.00. Secondary school grade 
point averages will be calculated on major 
subjects only. 

Student Park — A park area behind the plaza 
that contains water and a shelter. Reserva- 
tions are made through the president's office. 

Summerour Hall — A modern two-story 
structure that was completed in the fall of 
1971. The complex houses the entire Home 
Economics facility and includes a foods lab, 
sewing lab, interior design classroom, child 
development observation room, other class- 
rooms, and an auditorium seating 126. 

suspension — See discipline. 

swimming pool — Located in the Physical Education Building- 
available for both class and leisure time. 

Swinson, Elvie — Associate Professor of Nursing. 



tabernacle — The Tab was used in the early years for the church, 
chapels, and Saturday night programs — later it was the cafeteria. At 
present the music department has partial use of it. 

Talge Hall — Formerly the women's residence hall, this building has 
been converted to accommodate approximately 510 men. This mod- 
ern, fireproof structure was completed in 1961 to house 275 students. 
In 1964 and 1976 new wings were completed to house an additional 
235 students. The spacious and beautiful chapel with adjoining 
prayer rooms, the parlors, and the kitchenette are but a few of the 
attractive features which provide for enjoyable and comfortable 
living. 

Tasba Raya — 1. Means good earth in Misquito. 2. Name of the 
college's mission station in Nicaragua. 

Taylor, Elsie Mae — Receptionist, Wright Hall. Wife of William. 

Taylor, William — Director of Development and Alumni Affairs, 
Associate Professor of Journalism. 

teacher education certification — The College Catalog lists require- 
ments. 

TeHennepe, Sue — Assistant Professor of Home Economics, Director 
of Child Care Center. 

telephones — Each residence hall room is equipped with a telephone. 
The telephones are restricted to local calls. Personal arrangements 
for long distance service may be made with the telephone company 
by paying a deposit. Pay telephones are 
available in the residence halls and in the 
College Plaza. 

television — Sorry, not allowed in the dormi- 
tory rooms. A $25 fine is levied for having it 
in the room. Set will be confiscated. 

tennis courts — The college maintains eight of 
them. 

textiles — 1. Fabric from which clothes are made. 2. A course offered 
at the college. 

Thatcher, Caroline — Instructor of Nursing. 

Thatcher Hall — Thatcher Hall provides facilities for 750 women. 
This three-story building is carpeted and air conditioned throughout 
with a bath between each two student rooms. (Not Caroline's home). 

theology — 1. A study of God and related subjects. 2. An important 
major on campus. 

Thompson. Myra — Instructor of Nursing. 

Thompson, Lois — Secretary to Business Manager. 

Thiel, Mitchell — Professor of Chemistry. Chairman of the Depart- 
ment. 

Thiel, Nancy — Instructor of Nursing. 

Thomas, Carol — Instructor of Nursing. 

tithe and church expense — SMC encourages the payment of tithe and 
church expense by its student workers. In order to facilitate this 




practice, arrangements may be made by the student (except for those 
employed at the McKee Baking Co. and in the Federal Work-Study 
Program) to have ten percent of his school earnings charged to his 
account as tithe and two percent for church expense. These funds are 
then transferred by the College to the treasurer of the Collegedale 
Seventh-day Adventist Church. Tithe on earnings at the McKee 
Baking Company and from the Federal Work-Study Program may be 
withdrawn by the student at the College Student Finance Office and 
paid in cash. 

Title K — No person. . . shall, on the basis of sex, be excluded from 
participation in, be denied the benefits of, or be subjected to dis- 
crimination under any education program or activity receiving Fed- 
eral financial assistance. 

traffic court — A faculty-student appeals court meets periodically to 
hear appeals on citations given for violations of the vehicle code. See 
the Activities Calendar for dates. Usually the last Wednesday of each 
month, or the last Wednesday before a vacation period. 

traffic penalties — See Vehicle Code in Appendix. 

transcripts — Official transcripts of a student's academic record may 
be obtained by the student upon a written request to the Office of 
Admissions and Records. The request must include the student's 
signature and payment of two dollars in cash, check, or money order 
for each transcript ordered. Because of legal difficulties, telephone 
requests from students or written requests from other members of the 
student's family cannot be honored. A student may receive an 
unofficial transcript for evaluative purposes without charge by apply- 
ing in person at the Office of Admissions and Records. Official 
transcripts given directly to a student will be stamped "student 
copy." 

transfer of credit — Students wishing to transfer to SMC from another 
accredited college or university must follow the same application 
procedure as other students. Transfer credits may be applied toward 
the requirements for a degree when the student has satisfactorily 
completed a minimum of twelve semester hours in residence. A 
maximum of seventy-two semester hours may be accepted from a 
junior college. Background deficiencies revealed by transcripts and 
entrance examinations will be given individual attention. Students 
transferring from non-accredited institutions of higher education are 
given conditional status until the level of their academic performance 
in residence warrants promotion to regular status. Grades of less than 
"C" from such institutions will not be accepted toward meeting 
graduation requirements. A student who has been dismissed from 
another institution because of poor scholarship or citizenship, or who 
is on probation from that institution, is not generally eligible for 
admission until he can qualify forreadmission to the institution from 
which he has been dismissed. 

transfer students — See transfer of credit. 

Trustees, Board of — A group of men that run the college. 

tuition and fees — See College Catalog. 

tuition refund — A student may drop all classes within one week after 
registration with a tuition charge not to exceed $75. After the first 
week a student dropping all classes will have the tuition refunded on 
a 16-week prorated basis. Refunds will be calculated according to the 
official date of completed drop voucher and the return of the stu- 
dent's ID card to the Student Finance Office. During the first week 
following registration, students may make necessary changes in their 
class programs without charge. A fee of $5 will be assessed for each 
change in the course program after the first week following registra- 
tion. No reduction in tuition charges will be made for program 
changes made after three weeks following registration. 

Turlington, Drew — Associate Professor of Industrial Arts. 

two-year terminal course — See the College Catalog. 

Turner, David — Assistant Professor of Industrial Arts. 

u 

UAP — 1. Abbreviation for Undergraduate Assessment Program. 2. 
A new name for the Undergraduate Record Examinations. 3. An 
examination required of all graduating seniors. 



IX 



VandeVere 



VandeVere, Wayne — Professor of Business Administration. Chair- 
man of the Department. 

vehicle code — Note Appendix under Automobile. 

veteran — 1. One who has been in the military. 2. Veterans or other 
eligible persons are required to attend classes in order to be eligible 
for educational benefits. Southern Missionary College is required to 
report promptly to the V.A. the last day of attendance when an 
eligible person withdraws or quits attending classes regularly. A 
veteran or eligible person may not be certified for any course or 
subject that does not fulfill requirements for his stated degree and 
major. Audited courses, non-credit courses (except for a required 
remedial course), and correspondence work cannot be certified. 
Educational benefits will be discontinued when the veteran or eligi- 
ble person ceases to make satisfactory progress. According to V.A. 
regulations, a student will be considered to 
be making unsatisfactory progress when he 
accumulates twelve semester hours of un- 
satisfactory grades or when he is subject to 
academic dismissal. Failing grades and D 
grades in the major, minor, and courses re- 
quired for educational certification are con- 
sidered unsatisfactory. Benefits may be re- 
sumed only after the individual has obtained 
V.A. counseling and approval. 3. Ques- 
tions or problems dealing with Veterans' Af- 
fairs should refer to the Office of Admis- 
sions. 

village residence — See Residence. 

Vining, Noble — Manager, College Press. 




Noble Vining 



w 



warning — See discipline. 

Warren, Karen — Instructor of Nursing. 

weather — A daily occurrence in Collegedale — includes sunshine, 

rain, fog and a little snow. 
Webb, Krma — Assistant Professor of Nursing. Orlando Campus. 
Webb, Jere — College pastor. 
Weeks, Martha — Assistant Professor of 

Nursing. 
Week of Spiritual Emphasis — Five days of 

special chapels and joint worships presenting 

talks of inspirational nature. 
Wells, Harley — Custodian. 
Wells, Laurel — Director of student finance. 
White, Margret — Assistant Professor of 

Nursing. 
White, Randall — Manager of Southern Mer- 
cantile. 
whom to consult — Note Whom to Consult in Randall White 

the appendix. 
Winters, Judy — Assistant Professor of Nursing. 
withdrawal — A student who contemplates withdrawing from college 

is encouraged to obtain counsel from one or more of the following 

individuals: 

Residence Hall Dean Faculty Counselor 

Registrar Chaplain 

Dean of Students Guidance and 

Academic Dean Counseling Office 




Zuill 

If, after obtaining counsel, it still seems advisable to withdraw, the 
following procedure should be carried out: 

1 . Secure and complete a drop voucher at the Registrar's Office. 

2. Obtain signatures as designated on the voucher. 

3 . Check out with the residence hall dean within 24 hours after steps 

one and two have been completed. 
Until the above steps have been completed, students who have 
discontinued participation in classroom activities will continue to be 
charged for tuition and room rent. See also Academic Probation, 
discipline. 
Wohlers, William — Associate Professor of History. 
Wooley, Marianne — Assistant Professor of Library Science. 
work-study — It is exceedingly important that the student adjust the 
course load to achieve a reasonable balance in study and work. 
During registration the student should confer with his adviser or 
major professor in planning the proper balance of study and work. In 
determining an acceptable study-work program, the student's intel- 
lectual capacity and previous scholastic record are considered. Ex- 
ceptions to the following schedule of study and work must receive 
the approval of the Academic Dean. 

Maximum 
Course Load Work Load 

16 hours 16 hours 

1 4 hours 20 hours 

1 2 hours 26 hours 

10 hours 32 hours 

8 hours 38 hours 

Students of average scholastic ability are 
advised to plan a study-work program in- b^^»» 
volving less than the maximum hours of 
labor permitted. Freshmen in particular need 
more time for orientation and adjustment to 
the college academic program. 
worship — 1. Act of honoring and giving rev- 
erence to God. 2. A dormitory convocation. 
See residence hall worships. 
Wright Hall — Administration building, . 

named after one-time president, Kenneth * 

Wright. 
WSMC — The call letters for the college's 
100,000 watt FM radio station. 



y'all come! — An invitation to a place or event. 
Y'ole Time Keeper — E. O. Grundset. 
you — The reason SMC exists. 



Zackrison, Edwin — Associate Professor of 
Religion. 

Zackrison, Jolene — Instructor in Office Ad- 
ministration. 

Zimmerman, Ernestine — Instructor of Nurs- 
ing. 

Zimmerman, Steven — Assistant Professor of 
Behavioral Science. 

zip — 37315 

Zuill, Charles — Associate Professor of Art. 





E. Zimmerman 



19 



_. 



APPENDIX 



PHILOSOPHY 

Seventh-day Adventists recognize that God is not only 
the Creator and Sustainer of the earth and the entire uni- 
verse, but also the source of knowledge and wisdom. 
Although many values common to classical and modern 
humanism are accepted at Southern Missionary College, it 
is held that these secular values are reflections of the mind 
of the Creator, the Author of all truth, transcending both 
space and time. 

In His image God created man perfect — sufficient to 
have stood, though free to fall. Because of sin, this man 
who bore a likeness to his Creator in his physical, mental, 
and spiritual nature has become separated from God, los- 
ing most of his similarity to his Maker. 

To restore in man the image of his Creator — to promote 
the development of body, mind, and soul that the divine 
purpose in his creation might be realized — is the object of 
Christian education, the great object of life. 

Believing man to be God's crowning act of creation, 
Seventh-day Adventists accept as reality the Biblical con- 
cept of man's body as the temple of God. Consequently, 
principles of health are emphasized that the student may 
more effectively carry out God's purpose, that he may 
respect the paramount work of the Creator, and that he 
may live the rewarding and abundant life promised in the 
Scriptures to those who do His will. 

Another aspect of having been created in the image of 
God is that every human being is endowed with a power 
akin to that of the Creator — individuality, the power to 
think and to do. It is the work of true education to develop 
this power, to train youth to be thinkers and not mere 
reflectors of other men's thoughts; it is the purpose of this 
college to send forth men and women who possess breadth 
of mind, clearness of thought, and courage of conviction. 

Seventh-day Adventists believe that knowledge of a 
personal God can never be derived by human reason 
alone, but that God has communicated His nature, pur- 
poses, and plans through divine revelation. They further 
believe that the Bible — both Old and New Testaments — 
was given by inspiration of God, contains a revelation of 
His will to men, and constitutes the only unerring rule of 
faith and practice. The purpose of Christian education is to 
assist the students in knowing and doing, with Christ's 
help, the will of God more perfectly. Only through Christ 
can man be restored fully as he was created in the image of 
God. 

Our educational philosophy is, then, that true education 
means more than the pursual of a certain course of study or 
a preparation for the life that is now. It encompasses the 



whole being and the whole period of existence possible to 
man. It is the harmonious development of the physical, 
mental, social and spiritual powers, preparing the student 
for the joy of service in this world and in the world to 
come. 



GENERAL PHILOSOPHY OF BEHAVIOR 

Southern Missionary College subscribes to the 
philosophy that education and redemption are one and the 
same. To this end the resources of the college are dedi- 
cated. From time to time there are students who are 
struggling to overcome serious problems such as those 
relating to alcohol, narcotics, drugs, and sex (homo and 
hetero). The college is eager to help these students in their 
fight for victory over sin. Personnel are available for 
counseling either on campus or on a referral basis off 
campus. 

If, however, a student by choice does not approach 
these problems with a determination to overcome them or 
if the student is defensive of his own persistence to partici- 
pate in actions relating to moral difficulties, the resources 
of the college are of no benefit to the student, who then 
will be asked to leave the college until such a time as there 
is evidence on the part of the student of distinct Christian 
desires and growth. 



PROBLEMS RELATING TO SEX 

Southern Missionary College and the Seventh-day Ad- 
ventist Church which sponsors it do not subscribe to the 
current, growing philosophy that all matters relating to 
sexual conduct are totally private and should not bear the 
scrutiny of the Church or society. The college insists upon 
its right to make decisions regarding admission and reten- 
tion of students based upon matters relating to the stu- 
dent's sexual conduct along with conduct in other matters. 
Sexual immorality cannot be condoned and places a stu- 
dent subject to dismissal. Conduct leading to dismissal 
includes homosexuality and illicit heterosexual activities, 
on or off campus. It also includes the possession of pru- 
rient materials which are made available for scrutiny of 
others. Suggestive language and a coarse public attitude 
relating to sex will not be tolerated. 

Occasionally a person makes the decision to change sex 
and embarks upon an emotional and sometimes medical 
course of action relating to sexual transformation. Since 



20 



people in these circumstances have an uncertain sexual 
role, it will not be possible for students claiming to un- 
dergo sexual changes to remain in school. People engaged 
in sexual changes need an environment more suitable for 
them to work out their unique problems than a crowded 
college campus. 

A student who undergoes sexual transformation will 
normally be ill at ease on a campus as a student and usually 
should not return even after the person involved believes 
the transformation has been completed. 



STUDENT VEHICLE CODE 

The use of motor vehicles on campus is considered to be 
a privilege. Motor vehicle privileges may be suspended at 
the discretion of the Judiciary Committee, the residence 
hall deans, or the Dean of Students. 

All Southern Missionary College students are held re- 
sponsible for acquainting themselves with and conducting 
themselves according to the following motor vehicle code: 

Section I — Motor Vehicle Privileges 

1 . Definition of motor vehicle privileges: Motor 
vehicle privileges as understood in this code 
means the possession or use of a motor 
vehicle — motor scooters, motor bikes, motorcy- 
cles, automobiles. 

2. Due to the limited parking facilities, individuals 
who have satisfactory citizenship and meet any 
one of the following stipulations qualify for motor 
vehicle privileges: 

a. Completion of a minimum of 24 semester 
hours . 

b. Twenty-one years of age or older. 

c. Off-campus resident. 

d. Freshmen may bring an automobile. How- 
ever, it is to be used for home leaves only. The 
plate(s) and keys are to be turned in to the 
Security Officer. 

3. Lending or borrowing of motor vehicles is dis- 
couraged. 

4. Disqualified Vehicles: 

Unless previous arrangements have been made 
with a dean of men or a dean of women , residence 
hall students who do not qualify for motor vehicle 
privileges are not permitted to bring a motor vehi- 
cle to the College or to the greater Chattanooga- 
Cleveland area. Students who violate this regula- 
tion will be disciplined and may be required to 
return their vehicle to their home immediately. 

Section II — Motor Vehicle Registration 

1 . Any motor vehicle that is subject to the use of a 



student must be registered with the College in the 
student's name at registration time or within 48 
hours of its arrival in the vicinity. 

2. Temporary registration for motor vehicles 
brought to the campus for a short period of time 
must be made with the residence hall dean. 

3. Secreting a motor vehicle, undeclared and unreg- 
istered with the College, or failure to register 
one's motor vehicle is considered a serious infrac- 
tion of College rules. (Fines for unauthorized 
vehicles is $50.00). 

4. A student may not register a motor vehicle which 
is owned or operated by another student. 

5. Registration stickers (decals) are available for 
dormitory students at the residence halls and for 
community students at the Dean of Students' Of- 
fice during the school year. Please place in lower 
left of rear window. 

6. Registration sticker or decal is to be attached to 
the rear bumper on the driver's side. 

Section III — Parking 

1. For each semester residence hall students are 
charged a parking fee of $20.00 for automobiles 
and $15.00 for two-wheeled motor vehicles. Stu- 
dents who bring cars during the course of a semes- 
ter will be charged on a pro-rated basis. No refund 
on parking fees will be made. 

2. Residence hall student vehicle parking is re- 
stricted to assigned parking in the respective resi- 
dence hall parking lots and to non-restricted park- 
ing areas on campus. 

3 . Students who live off campus are charged a park- 
ing fee of $7.50 per semester for either an au- 
tomobile or motorcycle. 

4. Students who live off campus may park vehicles 
in areas approved for community student use dur- 
ing the school day. 

Section IV — Driving 

1. A residence hall student must have permission 
from his residence hall dean for use of a motor 
vehicle after residence hall closing time, and be- 
tween Friday evening sunset and 1:00 p.m. Sab- 
bath afternoon. 

2. Motor vehicles are not permitted to be driven on 
lawns, sidewalks or other places not intended for 
vehicular use. 

Section V — Penalties for Violations: 

1. Parking violations are subject to a fine of $5.00 
for the first and second tickets and $ 15 .00 thereaf- 
ter. Failure to pay a fine within the time pre- 



21 



scribed on the ticket will result in a $2.00 sur- 
charge along with fine on the statement. 

2. Violations of the campus traffic code such as 
speeding and failure to observe stop signs will 
result in a fine of $10.00. 

3. Secreting or failure to register a motor vehicle 
with the College will result in a $50.00 fine and 
possible disciplinary action. 

4 . In the event of continued violations of the campus 
traffic code, disciplinary action may be neces- 
sary. 

5. All fines must be paid in cash to the Cashier's 
office by the date specified on the ticket. Failure 
to pay by this time automatically cancels the stu- 
dent's registration. 

Section VI — Out-of-State Vehicles: 

A student from a state other than Tennessee should 
check with the State Highway Patrol in Chattanooga 
to determine whether the vehicle license issued by his 
home state is valid in the state of Tennessee. Pur- 
chase of a Tennessee State vehicle license is neces- 
sary where reciprocity agreements do not exist which 
validate the home state license during residence in the 
State of Tennessee. 



Section VII — Damage, Loss or Theft: 

Southern Missionary College assumes no responsi- 
bility for loss resulting from theft or accident, van- 
dalism, fire and other causes for damage of any 
vehicle or its accessories on College property. Au- 
tomobile parts or tools left outside of automobiles 
may be hauled away without notice. 

Section VIII — Bicycles: 

1. All bicycles should be locked when not in use. 

2. Bicycles are not to be ridden on campus sidewalks 
or on grassed areas of the campus. 

3 . Bicycles are to be stored only in designated areas. 

Section IX — Inoperable Vehicles: 

1 . Except by permission of a residence hall dean or 
the Dean of Students , inoperable vehicles may not 
be parked on the campus. Such vehicles parked 
without permission will be towed away at the 
owner's expense. 

Section X — Traffic Court: 

1. A faculty-student appeals court meets periodi- 
cally to hear appeals on citations given for viola- 
tions of the vehicle code. See the Activities 
Calendar for dates. 






22 



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