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Full text of "Southern College Catalog 1986-87"

1986-87 



, ws 



DA 

COlliCTlOM 





SOUTHERN COLLEGE 

OF SEVENTH-DAY AOVENTISTS 



NOT TO BE TAKEN 
FROM LIBRARY 



/ 



SDA 

COLLECTION 




Collegedale, TN 37315-0370 
Phone: {615)238-2111 



Orlando, FL 32803 
Phone: (305) 898-5381 



Admissions Office . . . (Outside Tennessee) toll free l-(800) 624-0350 



SC welcomes applications from students regardless of race, sex, religion, color, or 
national origin whose principles and interests are in harmony with the ideals and tradi- 
tions of the college as expressed in its objectives and policies. 



McKEE LIBRARY 

Southern College of SDA 

CottetedafeTN 37315 



CONTENTS 

This Is Southern College 5 

Academic Policies, Information, and Services 9 

Courses of Study 35 

Academic Divisions 35 

Departments of Instruction 35 

Art 36 

Behavioral Science 39 

Biology 46 

Business Administration 52 

Chemistry 60 

Communication 64 

Computer Science 70 

Education 75 

English 90 

Health, Physical Education and Recreation 95 

History 100 

Home Economics 104 

Industrial Education Ill 

Library Science 118 

Mathematics 120 

Modern Language 124 

Music 130 

Nursing 140 

Office Administration 158 

Physics 163 

Religion 168 

Interdepartmental Programs 175 

Allied Health 175 

Engineering 178 

General Studies 180 

Medical Technology 181 

Medical Science 183 

Non-degree Pre-professional Programs 184 

Student Life and Services 190 

Admissions, Expenses, and Financial Aid 191 

The Registry 222 

Principals and Presidents 222 

Board of Trustees 223 

College Administration 224 

Faculty Directory 228 

Faculty Committees 238 

Index 240 

Academic Calendar Inside Back Cover 



2 




DEDICATION — MARY ELIZABETH ELAM 

As a college student on this campus Mary Elam studied the Catalog 
and charted her course. For the past twenty years Miss Elam has helped 
chart the courses for thousands of others. A 1951 English major who 
graduated with honors, she returned to Collegedale in 1965 as Assistant 
Director for Admissions and Records. 

Now as the Director of Records, Miss Elam continues to exercise 
attention to details. It is her carefulness that helps make this academic 
guidebook what it is. She pays even greater attention to people. It is Miss 
Elam's caring that helps make Southern College what it is. 

It is to you, Miss Elam, that we dedicate this 1986-1987 edition of the 
Catalog. 



I 




• f 

I f I 



THIS IS 

SOUTHERN COLLEGE 



Southern College is a four-year co-educational institution established 
by the Seventh-day Adventist Church primarily to serve its constituents 
in the southeastern* part of the United States. Its purpose is to provide 
Biblical, liberal arts, professional, pre-professional, vocational, adult 
Studies, and special programs in a Christian setting. 

EDUCATIONAL PHILOSOPHY AND OBJECTIVES 

The purpose of higher education in the Seventh-day Adventist Church 
is rooted in a comprehensive theological understanding of humanity in 
the world. The following is a summary of this understanding: 

(1) Seventh-day Adventists believe that God is the Creator and Sus- 
tainer of the earth and its inhabitants. He is the Source of all 
knowledge. 

(2) Created in the image of God for the purpose of communion with 
Him, man possessed harmonious physical, mental, spiritual, and 
social attributes. 

(3) As a result of sin, these attributes were seriously marred, but God 
in His love provided a redemptive plan for the restoration of His 
image in humanity, thus preparing man for eternal personal fel- 
lowship with God. 

In the context of this theological understanding, education is viewed 
as an essential element of redemption, including an awareness of man's 
^relationship to God and a commitment of service to mankind. Education, 
Consequently, must focus on developing the whole person. Southern 
College attempts to provide a spiritual, intellectual, social, and physical 
environment designed to encourage this development through the fol- 
lowing specific objectives. 

Spiritual 

Students are expected to acquire an understanding of the beliefs and 
value system of Christianity as understood by the Seventh-day Adventist 
Church. Religious instruction in the classroom, religious convocations, 
and a variety of opportunities for Christian fellowship and service pro- 
vide the context in which students are encouraged to make their own 
commitment to these ideals. 

Intellectual 

The faculty constitute a fellowship of Christian scholars engaged in a 
lifelong pursuit of knowledge and wisdom. Academic activities are 
therefore designed to assist students in achieving intellectual and career 



This Is Southern College 



goals and in acquiring skills for future learning. A liberal education 
ft curriculum is designed to develop critical thinking and expression, 

intellectual curiosity, aesthetic appreciation, and cultural awareness to 
help fit students for the realization of their immediate and long-range 
goals. 

Social 

Since social maturity is necessary for successful family and commu- 
nity living, Southern College endeavors to provide for the development 
of healthy interpersonal relations, communication skills, and 
decision-making abilities in an atmosphere marked by personal concern 
and acceptance. 

Physical 

The development of the whole person would be incomplete without 
attention to physical well-being. Principles of healthful living, includ- 
ing a balanced program of exercise, rest, diet, study, work, and recrea- 
tion are promoted through instruction, work experience, and recrea- 
tional facilities. 

HISTORY 

In 1892 the educational venture that developed into Southern College 
had its beginning in the Seventh-day Adventist Church in the small 
village of Graysville, Tennessee. The school became known as Grays- 
ville Academy. In 1896 the name was changed to Southern Industrial 
School and five years later to Southern Training School. 

In 1916, because of limited acreage available for further expansion of 
plant facilities, the school was moved to the Thatcher farm in Hamilton 
County, Tennessee. The name "Collegedale" was given to the antici- 
pated community. At its new location, the school opened as Southern 
Junior College and continued as such until 1944 when it achieved senior 
college status and the name was changed to Southern Missionary Col- 
lege. In 1982 the name was changed to Southern College of Seventh-day 
Adventists. 

SETTING 

Southern College's Collegedale campus is nestled in a valley eighteen 
miles northeast of Chattanooga located on over one thousand acres of 
school property. The quietness and beauty of the peaceful surroundings 
are in keeping with the college's educational philosophy. 

The Orlando Center at the Florida Hospital Medical Center provides 
additional clinical facilities for the associate degree program of the 
Division of Nursing. 

ACCREDITATION AND MEMBERSHIPS 

Southern College is accredited by the Southern Association of Col- 



This Is Southern College 



leges and Schools and by the Seventh-day Adventist Board of Regents. 
Departments of the college are also accredited by various organiza- 
tions. The Associate of Science and Bachelor of Science degree programs 
in nursing, including Public Health Nursing, are accredited by the 
National League of Nursing as surveyed by the Collegiate Board of 
Review. The Division of Nursing is an agency member of the Department 
of Baccalaureate and Higher Degree Programs of the Division of Nursing 
Education of the National League for Nursing. It is also accredited by the 
Tennessee Board of Nursing and is recognized by the Florida State Board 
of Nursing. The Bachelor of Science degree in Education is accredited by 
the Tennessee State Board of Education. 

The college is approved by the Tennessee State Board of Education for 
the preparation of secondary, elementary, and early childhood teachers. 
It is also a member of the Association of American Colleges, the Ameri- 
can Council on Education, the Tennessee College Association, the 
American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education, the National 
Council of Accreditation for Teacher Education (NCATE), and the Na- 
tional Association for Schools of Music. 

ACADEMIC PROGRAM 

The academic program consists of seven divisions offering thirty- 
seven majors and twenty-nine minors in which students may qualify for 
the baccalaureate degree. Students may pursue programs of study lead- 
ing to the Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Science, Bachelor of Business 
Administration, Bachelor of Music, and Bachelor of Social Work de- 
grees. Various pre-professional and terminal curricula are available to 
students wishing to qualify for admission to a professional school and to 
those wishing to take an associate degree program of a technical or 
vocational nature. 

STUDENTS 

Nearly seventy percent of the students of Southern College come from 
the eight states comprising the Southern Union Conference of Seventh- 
day Adventists. However, most of the additional states and 25-30 foreign 
countries are also represented. The student group has a few more women 
than men. 

Former Southern College students are now serving in the ministerial, 
teaching, medical, and other services of the Seventh-day Adventist 
Church at home and abroad. Others are engaged in advanced study, 
business pursuits, government service, research activities, private and 
institutional medical services, and the teaching professions on all levels. 



This college is operated by the Southern Union Conference of Seventh-day 
Adventists, which is comprised of the churches in the states of Alabama, 
Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, and 

Tennessee. 



This Is Southern College 

FACILITIES 

O The following buildings house the academic activities of the college: 

Collegedale Campus 

Brock Hall — Art, Communication, English, Modern Languages, His- 
tory, Business Administration, Office Administration, Instructional 
Media, and FM90.5 WSMC 

DanieJIs HaJJ — Mathematics, Physics, Computer Science 

Hackman HaJJ — Biology and Chemistry 

Herin HaJJ — Nursing 

Led/ord HaJJ — Industrial Education 

McKee Library 

Physical Education Center — Physical Education 

Religion Center (So-Ju-Conian Hall) — Religion 

Student Center — Computer Center, Student Health Service, Cafeteria, 
Testing and Counseling Center, Campus Ministry Office, student 
activity rooms, Teaching Learning Center, K.R/s Place 

Summerour HaJJ — Behavioral Sciences, Education, Home Economics 

Lynn Wood HaJJ 

J. MabeJ Wood HaJJ — Music 

Wright HaJJ — Administration 

Other facilities on or near campus that serve student needs: 
Collegedale Academy — secondary laboratory school 
CoJlegedaJe Seventh-day Adventist Church 
CoJlege PJaza — shopping center with businesses serving the college 

and community 
Recreational Area — tennis courts, a track, playing fields 
Spalding Elementary School — laboratory school 
Student apartments 
TaJge HaJJ — men's residence hall 
Thatcher Hall — women's residence hall 
Trailer parjk; 

WSMC FM90.5 — a 100,000- watt stereo, non-commercial, educational 
radio station affiliated with National Public Radio, The Associated 
Press, and The Adventist Radio Network 

Various auxiliary and vocational buildings house college industries 
and service departments. 

Orlando Center 
Florida Hospital Medical Center (FHMQ 
Linscott Hall — Administration, residence hall 
Seventh-day Adventist Church at FHMC 



ACADEMIC POLICIES, 
INFORMATION, 
AND SERVICES 



ACADEMIC POLICIES 



PLANNING A COURSE OF STUDY 

When planning for college, students should consider in detail the 
course of study which will lead to their desired profession or occupa- 
tion. If a firm decision about the choice of life work has not been made 
before entering college, students may take a general program of study 
exploring several fields of knowledge during the freshman year. This 
approach need not result in loss of credits if carefully planned. 

The college offers programs of study leading to the Bachelor of Arts, 
Bachelor of Science, Bachelor of Business Administration, Bachelor of 
Music, Bachelor of Social Work, Associate of Science and Associate of 
Technology degrees, various pre-professional curricula, and one-year 
occupational certificate programs. 

When planning their course work, students should acquaint them- 
selves with the programs of study and graduation requirements outlined 
in this Catalog. Freshman students may consult faculty members during 
the summer months before the beginning of the fall term. Students 
planning to teach should consult the Department of Education so as to 
include courses in teacher education as a part of their program in order to 
qualify for denominational and state certification. 

Degree candidates are responsible for satisfying all degree require- 
ments. Students may choose to meet the requirements of any one catalog 
in effect during the period of residency. If students discontinue for a 
period of twelve months or more, they must qualify according to a single 
catalog in force subsequent to their return. 

GENERAL DEGREE REQUIREMENTS 

The general degree requirements for a baccalaureate degree are as 
follows: 

► Satisfactory make-up of admissions deficiencies. (See page 198). 

► A minimum of 124 semester hours with a resident and cumulative 

9 



Academic Policies 

grade point average of 2.00 (C) or above.* Students earning the 
| Q Bachelor of Science degree in Nursing must take 130 semester 

hours and those earning the Bachelor of Music degree will need 
132 semester hours. 

► A minimum of 40 hours of upper division credit, to include at least 
14 upper division hours in the major for a B.A. degree and at least 
18 upper division hours in the major for all other degrees. Each 
minor must include at least six upper division hours. 

► Completion of a major and minor (two majors accepted) for a B.A. 
degree or completion of a major for other degrees with a cumulative 
grade point average of 2.25 in the major,* completion of the general 
education requirements, and electives to satisfy the total credit 
requirements for graduation. Courses completed with grades lower 
than a "C -" may not be applied on a major or minor. 

► More than one major may be earned provided all courses required 
for each major and its cognates are completed. Some courses may 
apply to both majors, but a minimum of 20 hours in the second 
major must not overlap with those in the first major. 

A major and minor, with different names, may be earned in the 
same department provided all requirements for both are met. Some 
courses may apply to both, but a minimum of 14 hours in the minor 
must not overlap with those in the major. 

Two emphases of the same major may be earned provided that all 
requirements for both are met and that 14 hours above the number 
ordinarily required for the major are earned. 

► Completion of an examination as required by the department. 

► Students wishing to obtain a second degree will need to complete, 
beyond the 124 minimum hours required, a minimum of 30 hours, 
including 16 hours upper division, and a new major. 

► Completion of three writing emphasis courses including one in the 
major field and one outside the major field. 

The general degree requirements for an associate degree are as fol- 
lows: 

► A minimum of 64 semester hours and a resident and cumulative 
grade point average of 2.00 (C) or above. *Nursing majors need 68 
semester hours. 



*For educational certification, the minimum grade point average (GPA) of 2.5 
must be met both in education and in the field of certification. In elementary 
education, a GPA of 2.25 is required in cognate courses. The music major 
requires a GPA of 2.25 both in applied music and other music courses. The 
nursing major requires a GPA of 2.25 in cognate courses as well as in the major. 
The medical technology major requires minimum grades of C - and a minimum 
average of 2.25 in the major and cognates. 






Academic Policies 

► Completion of a major with a cumulative grade point average of at 
least 2.00, the general education requirements, and electives to 
satisfy the total credit requirements for graduation. Courses com- * 
pleted with grades lower than * 'C -" may not be applied on a major. 

► Students who have completed one associate degree and who wish 
to obtain another associate degree may do so upon completion of 
the curriculum prescribed for the second degree. The work com- 
pleted for the second degree must include at least 24 hours in 
residence over and above the number of hours earned for the first 
degree. If the second associate degree is earned subsequent to the 
first associate degree, the requirements for the second degree will 
be governed by the provisions of the Catalog in effect at the time 
the student re-enters the college for work toward the second de- 
gree. 

► Students who wish to obtain an associate degree at the time they 
receive a baccalaureate degree may do so if the degrees are in 
different fields. If requirements for an associate and a baccalaureate 
degree in the same field are completed at the same time, only the 
higher degree will be conferred. 

ONE-YEAR CERTIFICATE REQUIREMENTS 

► A minimum of 3 2 semester hours which meet the requirements of a 
specific one-year program. 

► A resident and cumulative grade point average of 2 .00 (C) or above. 
Grades in the technical area below "C— " will not be accepted. 

CLASS STANDING 

Freshmen 0-23 semester hours 

Sophomores 24-54 semester hours 

Juniors 55-93 semester hours 

Seniors 94- semester hours 

Eligibility for office requires an acceptable scholastic and citizenship 
record. 

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS 

Degree Candidacy: A student may become a degree candidate when he 
enters upon the school term during which it will be possible to complete 
all requirements for graduation. Formal application for graduation must 
be made during the fall registration of the senior year. 

Dates of Graduation: The date of graduation will be (a) the date of 
commencement for those graduating at the close of each semester or (b) 
for others, the last day of the month in which graduation requirements 
are met. 






Academic Policies 



Transcripts: Before a student will be allowed to graduate, transcripts 
of all correspondence and transfer credits must be received at the Office 
of Records. 

Participation in Graduation Exercises: Students are allowed to par- 
ticipate in commencement exercises only if they have completed all the 
courses they need for graduation. 

In Absentia Policy: Seniors who are enrolled at Southern College 
during the semester in which the commencement exercise is held are to 
be present for the ceremony or an in absentia fee of $30 will be levied. 

Deferred Graduation; Students ordinarily are allowed to graduate 
under the requirements of the Catalog of the year in which they enter the 
college or of any subsequent year in which they are in attendance 
provided they do not discontinue attendance for twelve months or more. 
Students who are studying for a baccalaureate degree and fail to 
graduate within six calendar years (four years for an associate degree), 
must plan to conform to the current Catalog. 

RESIDENCE REQUIREMENTS 

Baccalaureate Degree; Thirty semester hours of credit must be com- 
pleted in residence immediately preceding the conferment of the bac- 
calaureate degree. These hours must include 16 upper division, with 
eight upper division in the major and three upper division in the minor 
fields. 

Associate Degree; Twenty-eight semester hours of credit must be 
completed in residence immediately preceding the conferment of the 
associate degree. Sixteen of these hours must be in the major area of 
study. 

Certificate Programs: Eighteen semester hours of credit must be com- 
pleted in residence immediately preceding the conferment of a one-year 
certificate. 

Transfer Credit: Unless prior arrangements were made with the Vice 
President for Academic Administration, the college will not accept 
transfer credit earned at another college or university during any session 
the student was simultaneously enrolled at Southern College. 

UPPER DIVISION CLASSES 

Students must complete forty semester hours of 100 and 200 level 
courses (lower division) before enrolling in a 300 or 400 level course 
(upper division). The English composition and mathematics require- 
ments must be met before enrollment in upper division classes. 



Academic Policies 

GENERAL EDUCATION 

It is an awesome task to distill from the accumulated human experi- £ j 
ence those stories, histories, thoughts, and skills which can be trans- 
mitted in a classroom setting and at the same time contribute maximally 
and positively to the student's own experience. The choices are many, 
and competition for inclusion is intensive. Yet degree programs do 
necessitate a certain amount of structure so choices have to be made. 
Each department is allowed a great deal of freedom in choosing require- 
ments for the major area of specialization. However, the faculty have 
chosen certain experiences, known as general education requirements, 
to which they feel all degree candidates should have some exposure. 

Underlying all general education requirements are the basic academic 
skills of English and mathematics. Proficiency in these skills is essential 
to the transmission of much of the human experience. 

The faculty of Southern College chooses without apology the religious 
experience as fundamental to a correct understanding of all of man's 
other experiences. The religious experience embodied in the teachings 
of the Seventh-day Adventist Church has been chosen to be transmitted 
to the students. It is recommended as enabling, enriching, and uplifting. 

One builds the present and future upon the past, therefore, it is neces- 
sary that one have a historical perspective. A society which allows its 
members a voice in shaping its political, social and economic institu- 
tions can survive only if these citizens are well versed in mankind's 
history and cognizant of experiences, past and present, with these in- 
stitutions. 

Language, literature, and the arts give expression to thoughts and 
feelings. Acquaintance with these modes of communication enriches 
the life through more effective expression of one's thoughts and feelings 
and through better understanding and appreciation of the thoughts and 
feelings of others. 

A study of the natural sciences develops an inquiring attitude toward 
one's environment. It provides individuals with empirical and rational 
methods of inquiry and an awareness of both the potential and the 
limitations of science and technology in solving problems. 

Social units ranging from the individual through the family, church, 
communities, and nations exert a tremendous influence upon one's life. 
A study of those units and the conditions which affect them positively or 
adversely contributes to individuals' adjustment within their society 
and their opportunity to improve both themselves and society. 

Creative, practical, and recreational skills provide exercise, relax- 
ation, and a sense of well-being and accomplishment. They provide a 
wholesome and healthy diversion from heavy academic programs and 
from work responsibilities later in life. 



Academic Policies 



14 



GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 



Semester Hours 
Assoc. Bach. 



AREA A. BASIC ACADEMIC SKILLS 

All Area A courses must be completed be- 
fore upper division work is undertaken. 

Upper division trans/er students may take 
Area A requirements concurrently with 
upper division classes. 

1. English 

ENGL 101 is required for an associate 
degree; ENGL 101 and 102 for a 
bachelor's degree. Students with ACT 
English score below 13 must take ENGL 
099 before enrolling for ENGL 101. 

2. Mathematics 

Students with a Math ACT score below 
22 must take one of the following: MATH 
103, 104, 114, 215. MATH 099 is required 
of all students with a Math ACT score 
below 12. 

AREA B. RELIGION 

Trans/er students must take 3 hours for each 
year or part thereof in attendance at an SDA 
college with a minimum of 6 hours. 
Bachelor's degree students must take at 
least three hours from each of the sub-areas. 

1. Biblical Studies 
All RELB courses. 

2. Religion 

All RELT courses. (Only one of RELT 
317, 318, 325, will apply.) 

AREA C. HISTORY, POLITICAL AND ECONOMIC 
SYSTEMS 

Students with less than one secondary 
school credit for World History must in- 
clude one of the following: HIST 174, 175, 
364, 365, 374, 375, 386 or 389. 

1. History 

All HIST courses. 

2. Political and Economic Systems 

All PLSC courses; GEOG 204 (elementary 
education majors only); GEOG 306, 
ECON 213, 224, 225. 



3-6 



6-9 



0-3 



0-3 



12 



6 
3 



Academic Policies 



Semester Hours 

Assoc. Bach. 1 *| 



AREA D. LANGUAGE, LITERATURE, FINE ARTS 

Bachelor's degree students must include at 
least 2 hours in each of 3 sub-areas (2 sub- 
areas if required to take 6 hours of foreign 
language}. Students entering Southern Col- 
lege who have less than two secondary 
school credits of foreign language and who 
are pursuing a Bachelor of Arts degree must 
complete the elementary level of a foreign 
language. 

1. Foreign Language 

FREN 101:102, 211:212; GRMN 101:102, 
211:212; SPAN 101:102, 211:212, 344; 
RELL 271:272, 311:312, 471:472. 

2. Literature 

All ENGL literature courses; all SPAN 
literature; MDLG 304. 

3. Music and Art Appreciation 

HMNT 205; MUHL 115, 215, 314, 315; 
ART 218, 318, 344, 345. 

4. Speech 

SPCH 135, 136, 236. 

AREA E. NATURAL SCIENCE 

Bachelor's degree students must take at 
least 3 hours from each of 2 sub-areas. Only 
one of the following may apply: BIOL 325, 
PHYS 3 1 7, 3 1 8. Students who have less than 
two secondary school units in science must 
take 3 hours of science above the usual re- 
quirements; e.g. associate degree students 
must take 6 hours and bachelor's degree 
students must take 9 hours. 

1. Biology 

BIOL 103, 104, 105, 106, 125, 155:156, 
226, 314, 325. 

2. Chemistry 

CHEM 111:112, 113:114, 151:152, 203. 

3. Physics 

PHYS 107, 155, 211:212, 213:214, 317, 
318. 

4. Earth Science 
ERSC 105, 106. 



3-6 



6-9 



Academic Policies 



16 



Semester Hours 
Assoc. Bach, 



AREA F. BEHAVIORAL, FAMILY, 
HEALTH SCIENCES 
Bachelor's degree students must include at 
least 2 hours in each of 2 sub-areas. 

1. Behavioral Science 

All PSYC courses except 326; all SOCI 
courses except 223, 365; SOCW 221, 222, 
316, 375; EDUC 217, 427. 

2. Family Science 

CRTF 226, HMEC 146, 147, 201, 202, 313; 
BUAD 128, SOCI 223, 365; PSYC 233. 

3. Health Science 

HLED 173, 203; FDNT 125. 

AREA G. ACTIVITY SKILLS 

Associate degree students may take a 
maximum of 2 hours in any sub-area; 
bachelor's degree students may take a 
maximum of 3 hours in any sub-area. All 
students must take at least 1 hour/rom G-3. 

1. Creative Skills 

All MUPF courses; ART 104:105, 109, 
110, 215, 235; ENGL 314; CRTF 112, 225, 
312. 

2. Practical Skills 

ACCT 103, 121:122; CPTR 105, 106, 107, 
120, 125, 127, 131, 132, 217, 218; HMEC 
164, 165, 166, 244, 345; FDNT 126, 127, 
317; INDS 145, 149, 154, 155, 174, 175, 
176, 177, 185, 264, 265, 274, 323, 325; 
SECR 104, 105, 114, 115, 214, 218; AGRI 
100; LIBR 125; CRTF 101; EDUC 250. 

3. Recreational Skills 

All PEAC courses; PETH 261. 

ADDITIONAL BACHELOR'S DEGREE REQUIREMENTS 

1. Forty upper division hours. 

2. Three writing-emphasis classes. These 
classes are identified by a "(W)" follow- 
ing the course name, e.g., History of the 
South (W), in the divisional listings. One 
such class must be in the student's major 
field and one must be outside the major 
field. 



: 



5 






Academic Policies 

SOUTHERN SCHOLARS (Honors Program) 

The honors program is designed for students who bring to their bao \ / 
calaureate studies a high degree of motivation and intellectual curiosity. 
Special projects, interdisciplinary studies and designated honors 
courses provide a challenging and intellectually stimulating educa- 
tional experience. Degrees of depth and breadth are attained in this 
experience beyond those normally attained in regular baccalaureate 
studies. 

The program is administered by an honors committee. This committee 
admits students to the program and discontinues honors status of those 
who fail to maintain minimum program standards. Its members also 
advise individual Southern Scholars and continually monitor their 
progress. 

Eligible students will be invited to become Southern Scholars during 
registration. Freshmen are eligible if they have a high school GPA of 3 . 70 
or higher. Other students must have completed at least thirty-one and at 
most sixty-two semester hours with a cumulative GPA of 5.50 or higher. 

To continue as Southern Scholars, students must complete a 
minimum of twelve credits each semester and thirty-one credits each 
calendar year. They must also enroll in appropriate honors sequence 
courses, receive a grade of B (3.00) or higher in each honors sequence 
course and maintain a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.50. AH honors 
students are expected to graduate within a four-year period unless ex- 
tenuating circumstances justify an extension by the honors committee. 

Ordinarily, all courses of the honors sequence must be taken in resi- 
dence. Limited exceptions may be made by the honors committee in the 
case of transfer students. Students already enrolled at Southern College 
who wish to take classes at another institution must secure prior ap- 
proval from the honors committee. 

After successfully completing one year in the honors program, a 
Southern Scholar will be eligible to audit one class per semester without 
charge. In addition, upper division students who have maintained their 
participation in this program for at least one year will receive a reduction 
in their tuition equivalent to the cost of one three-hour class per semes- 
ter. This reduction does not apply during the summer session. 

HONORS STUDIES SEQUENCE 

A. General Education 

Honors students must meet regular general education requirements 
with the following stipulations: 

1. Area B2. One of the following courses must be selected: BIOL 
325, PHYS 317, PHYS 318. 

2. Area Dl. Foreign language competency must be attained at the 
intermediate level. 






Academic Policies 



3. Area D2. One of the following courses must be selected: ENGL 
Jg 445, MDLG304. 

4. Area D3. HMNT 205 must be selected. 

5. AreaE. MATH 115 or MATH 215 and one of the following science 
sequences must be selected: BIOL 155:156; CHEM151:152;PHYS 
211:212 with PHYS 213:214. 

B. Honors Seminar 

A sequence of eight lectures, one each month, September through 
April, taken during the junior or senior year. 

C. Project (2-3 hours, Directed Study) 

A significant interdisciplinary project demonstrating an under- 
standing of the relationship between the student's major field and 
some other discipline. Directed study research, writing, special per- 
formance, appropriate to the major in question. The honors commit- 
tee expects the project to be of sufficiently high quality to justify 
public presentation. The project must be approved by the honors 
committee in consultation with the student and his supervising 
professor. 

GRADUATION WITH HONORS 

Students graduating with a cumulative GPA of 3.50 or above but who 
do not participate in the Southern Scholars Honors Program will have 
the degree conferred as follows: 3.50-3.74, cum laude; 3.75-3.89, magna 
cum laude; 3.90-4,00, summa cum laude. The appropriate designations 
will appear on the diploma. Students completing the honors program 
will, in addition to the above designation, be graduated as Southern 
Scholars. 

HONOR ROLL/DEAN'S LIST 

At the conclusion of each semester of the school year, students who 
have carried a minimum of 12 semester hours and who have attained the 
following grade point averages will be included in the honors group 
indicated. 

3.25 Honor Roll 

3.50 Dean's List 

3.75 Distinguished Dean's List 

MAJOR AND MINOR REQUIREMENTS 

Southern College offers 38 majors and 29 minors for students wishing 
to qualify for a baccalaureate degree. Each major consists of thirty hours 
or more in the chosen field of specialization of which a minimum of 
fourteen for a Bachelor of Arts degree and eighteen for all other 
Bachelor's degrees must be upper division credit. The total semester 
hours required for each major for the Bachelor of Science, Bachelor of 
Business Administration, Bachelor of Music, and Bachelor of Social 



Academic Policies 

Work degrees varies with the field of specialization chosen. 

All minors consist of eighteen semester hours. Six hours of a minor 1 
must be upper division credit. 

The specific requirements for majors and minors are given under the 
respective disciplines in the section "Courses of Study." 

BACHELOR DEGREE PROGRAMS 

Majors offered for the Bachelor of Arts degree are: 

Art History 

Biology International Studies 

Chemistry Mathematics 

Communication Music 

Computer Science Physics 

English Psychology 

French Religion 

German Spanish 
Health, Physical Education 
and Recreation 

Majors offered for the Bachelor of Science degree are: 
Behavioral Science Industrial Education 

Biology Long-Term Health Care 

Business Administration Mathematics 

Chemistry Medical Technology 

Computer Science Nursing 

Elementary Education Office Administration 

Food Service Administration Physics 
Health Science Public Relations 

Home Economics 
The Bachelor of Business Administration degree is available to stu- 
dents who are planning for a professional career in business. Majors are 
available in Accounting and Management. Detailed requirements are 
outlined under the Department of Business. 

The Bachelor of Music degree is available to students planning to 
major in music with special emphasis in music education. The detailed 
requirements for this professional degree are outlined under the De- 
partment of Music. 

The Bachelor of Social Work degree is available to students planning 
on a career in social work. The detailed requirements are outlined under 
the Department of Behavioral Science. 

Minors are offered in most majors and emphases as well as the follow- 
ing: 

Biblical Languages Foods and Food Service 

Fields Related to Library Science 

English Education Practical Theology 



Academic Policies 



20 



ASSOCIATE DEGREE PROGRAMS 

Southern College offers the following associate degrees: 

Accounting Home Economics 

Allied Health Industrial Technology 

Child-Care Administration Media Technology 

Computer Science Nursing 

Food Service Technology Office Administration 
General Studies 

Complete details of course requirements for the associate degrees are 
outlined in the descriptions in the bulletin section "Courses of Study." 

ONE-YEAR CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS 

The college has one-year certificate programs in the following areas: 
Auto Body Repair (Industrial Education) 
Food Service Production (Home Economics) 

Requirements for these programs are given in the appropriate de- 
partmental sections of this Catalog. 

PRE-PROFESSIONAL CURRICULA 

Southern College offers pre-professional and pre-technical programs 
in a wide variety of fields which may prepare students for admission to 
professional schools or to enter upon technical careers. Below are listed 
the pre-professional curricula offered at Southern College. 

Anesthesia Occupational Therapy 

Dental Hygiene Optometry 

Dentistry Osteopathic Medicine 

Dietetics Pharmacy 

Engineering Physical Therapy 

Law Public Health Science 

Medical Record Radiology Technology 

Administration Respiratory Therapy 

Medical Technology Veterinary Medicine 

Medicine 
An A.S. degree in Allied Health is available to students who spend two 
or more years at Southern College while fulfilling pre-professional re- 
quirements in the allied health fields of Dental Hygiene, Dietetics, Medi- 
cal Records Administration, Occupational Therapy, Physical Therapy, 
Radiology Technology, and Respiratory Therapy. Pre-professional and 
technical admission requirements may vary from one professional 
school to another. The student is, therefore, advised to become ac- 
quainted with the admission requirements of the chosen school. 

Detailed requirements for non-degree pre-professional curricula are 
outlined in the section on "Interdepartmental Programs." 



Academic Information 
ACADEMIC INFORMATION 



REGISTRATION 

Students are expected to register during the scheduled registration 
periods designated in the school calendar. The registration process is 
Complete only after all procedures have been met and registration forms 
are returned to the Office of Records. Freshmen are required to partici- 
pate in the orientation activities. 

Late Registration. Permission to register late must be obtained from 
the Director of Records. Students failing to register during the scheduled 
l&gistration periods will be assessed a late registration fee of $25.00. The 
course load of a late registrant will be reduced by one to two semester 
hours for each expired week of instruction. No student should expect to 
register after two weeks of the semester have elapsed. 

Changes in Registration. To avoid changes in registration the student 
should carefully consider the program of courses necessary to meet his 
objectives. To avoid subsequent adjustments, a balance should be main- 
tained between the course load, work program, and extracurricular 
activities. 

To make program changes the student must obtain the appropriate 
change of registration voucher at the Office of Records. After obtaining 
the necessary signatures indicating approval of the change, the student 
must return the form to the Office of Records. Course changes and 
complete withdrawals from the school become effective on the date the 
voucher is filed at the Office of Records. A fee of $10.00 will be assessed 
for each change in program the first week of instruction. 

A student may not change from one course section to another without 
the approval of the instructor and the Director of Records. 

A student may withdraw from a class up to two weeks after mid-term 
and receive a grade of "W" automatically. A student withdrawing from a 
class after that up to two weeks before the last day of classes will be 
signed a grade of "W" or "WF" by the teacher. The grade for any 
withdrawal after that will automatically be "F." 

Auditing Courses. With the approval of the department, students may 
register on an audit basis in courses (other than private lessons) for 
which they are qualified. Auditors are to be admitted to classes of limited 
enrollment only if there are places after all students who wish to enroll 
for credit have been accommodated. Class attendance is expected but 
examinations and reports may be omitted. With the approval of the 
instructor, a student may change a course registration from audit to 
credit or from credit to audit during the first week of instruction only. No 
credit is given for courses audited, and the fee is one-half of the regular 
tuition charge. 



21 



Academic Information 



COURSE LOAD 

&& College courses are expressed in semester hours at Southern College. 

A semester hour consists of one fifty-minute class period per week for 
one semester. Thus, two-semester-hour classes meet two hours a week 
and three-semester-hour classes meet three hours a week. A laboratory 
period of two and one-half to three hours is equal to one class period. 
Students should expect to study between one and one-half and two 
hours outside of class for each fifty-minute period the class meets. Thus a 
sixteen-semester-hour class load should require forty or more hours of 
study each week on the part of the student. Except by permission of the 
Vice President for Academic Administration, a student may not register 
for more than eighteen or less than eight semester hours. 

To qualify for a baccalaureate degree in four years, a student must 
average between fifteen and sixteen hours per semester. The summer 
term may be used to advantage by students wishing to complete degree 
requirements in less than four years or by students having to take re- 
duced programs of studies during the regular academic year. 

Study-Work Program. It is exceedingly important that the student 
adjust the course load to achieve a reasonable balance in study and work. 
During registration the student should confer with his adviser in plan- 
ning the proper balance of study and work. In determining an acceptable 
study-work program, the following will serve as a guide. 

Maximum 
Course Load Work Load 

16 hours 16 hours 

14 hours 20 hours 

12 hours 26 hours 

10 hours 32 hours 

8 hours 38 hours 

FULL-TIME STUDENT 

Students enrolled for twelve or more semester hours and students in 
the last semester of their senior year who are taking all the courses 
required for graduation (but no fewer than eight semester hours) will be 
classified as full-time students according to the standards and practices 
of the college. The completion of nine or more semester hours will 
constitute full-time enrollment for the summer. Students receiving fi- 
nancial aid should consult the Student Finance Office for the definitions 
of a full-time student set up by the various agencies which offer aid. 

GRADING SYSTEM 

Mid-semester and semester grade reports are issued to the student and 
parents of students termed "dependent" for income tax purposes. Only 
semester grades are recorded on the student's permanent record at the 
college. 



Academic Information 

The following system of grading and grade point values is used: 

A 4.0 grade points per hour D 1.0 grade points per hour 23 

A- 3.7 grade points per hour D- 0.7 grade points per hour 
B + 3.3 grade points per hour F 0.0 grade points per hour 
B 3.0 grade points per hour W Withdrawal 
B - 2.7 grade points per hour WF Withdrew Failing 
C+ 2.3 grade points per hour (0.0 grade points per hour) 

C 2.0 grade points per hour AU Audit 
C - 1 .7 grade points per hour I Incomplete 
D+ 1.3 grade points per hour 
A student may receive an "I" (incomplete) because of illness or other 
unavoidable delay. A student who believes he is eligible for an incom- 
plete must secure from the Office of Records the proper form on which he 
may file application with the Vice President for Academic Administra- 
tion to receive an incomplete. Any incomplete which is not removed by 
the end of the following term (Fall, Spring, Summer) will automatically 
become an "F." 

A course in which the student received a grade of "C," "D," or "F" may 
be repeated before he takes a more advanced course in the same field. 
Only the last grade will be counted on repeated courses. No course may 
be repeated more than once without permission from the Vice President 
for Academic Administration. 

The grade point average may be calculated by dividing the total 
number of grade points earned by the hours attempted. 

STUDENT RECORDS 

A student's record is regarded as confidential, and release of the 
record or of information contained therein is governed by regulations of 
the federal law on "Family Educational Rights and Privacy." Only direc- 
tory information, such as a student's name, address, telephone listing, 
birthplace and date, major fields of study, participation in officially 
recognized activities and sports, dates of attendance, degrees and 
awards received, and the most recent previous educational agency or 
institution attended, may be released by the institution without consent 
of the student unless the student has asked SC to withhold such informa- 
tion. 

Parents of students termed "dependent" for income tax purposes are 
entitled to access to the student's educational records. The law also 
provides for the release of information to College personnel who demon- 
strate a legitimate educational interest, other institutions engaged in 
research (provided information is not revealed to any other parties), and 
certain federal and state government officials. 

A student may inspect and review records and is entitled to challenge 
the content of records. 
A more thorough explanation of records may be obtained from the 



Academic Information 



Office of Records. The director of records will further explain and clarify 
24 the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act to students, parents, or 
interested parties upon request. 

ACADEMIC HONESTY 

Morally and spiritually, Southern College is dedicated to scholastic 
integrity. Consequently, both students and faculty are required to main- 
tain high ethical, Christian levels of honesty. 

Faculty Responsibilities: 

1. Teachers must explain clearly the requirements for assignments, 
examinations and projects, such as "open book," "take home/' or "peer 
collaboration." 

2. Teachers may assume Tno collaboration" is the rule unless they 
state otherwise. 

Student Responsibility: 

1 . Students assume responsibility for learning the proper procedures 
for acknowledging borrowed wording, information, or ideas. Otherwise 
students might innocently misrepresent others' material as their own. 

2. Students unfamiliar with procedures for citing sources should 
confer with their teacher. 

3. Students are to assume all course work is "no collaboration" unless 
stated otherwise by the teacher. 

Departmental Policies: 

Some departments, because of the nature of their programs, have 
additional honesty policies which have the same force as those pub- 
lished here. Such policies will be presented to students before im- 
plementation. 

Procedures for Handling Academic Dishonesty: 

1. When a teacher suspects academic dishonesty in some form, such 
as cheating or plagiarizing, the teacher must first confront the student 
with the dishonesty. If the student and teacher cannot resolve the situa- 
tion, or if the student's grade will be affected, then the Vice President for 
Academic Administration must be consulted. 

2. In established instances of academic dishonesty, the usual proce- 
dures for the teacher to follow will be to: 

a. Give the student a failing grade on the exam, assignment or project 
if the magnitude of either is not sufficient for failing the class. 

b. Give the student a failing grade in the class if failing the exam, 
assignment or project would constitute failing the class. 

The teacher will then write up the incident and state the penalty 
administered, giving a copy to both the Vice President for Academic 
Administration and the student. 



3 . Two incidents of academic dishonesty make a student eligible to be 
dismissed from college. However, the student may then appeal the 
action through the established appeal procedures. 



Academic Information 

25 



ACADEMIC PROBATION AND DISMISSAL 

When for any reason a student's Southern College or cumulative grade 
point average falls below 2.00, the student will be placed on academic 
probation and restricted from holding office in any student organization 
or being a member of any touring group sponsored or approved by the 
college. Those on academic probation will not be allowed to participate 
in academic activities causing class absences and will not be allowed to 
participate in on or off campus extracurricular activities including fire 
department duties. 

Any baccalaureate senior with a grade point average of less than 2.25 
in his major will also be placed on academic probation. Candidates for an 
associate of science degree must have a grade point average of at least 
1.95 before being accepted for their final year and at least 2.00 to 
graduate. 

Transfer students should have a grade point average of at least 2.00 in 
order to be eligible for admission to Southern College. 

A student will be subject to academic dismissal when the Southern 
College or cumulative grade point average fails to reach the levels 
indicated below. The academic record will be reviewed by a committee, 
and the Vice President for Academic Administration will notify the 
student in writing of the committee's decision. 



Semester Hours Attempted 


G.PA. /Subject to Dismissal 


6-48 


1.50 


49-64 


1.65 


65-80 


1.75 


81-93 


1.85 


94-up 


1.95 



A student academically dismissed may not be readmitted until two 
sessions (for this purpose the summer is counted as one session) have 
elapsed. Eligibility for readmission shall include successful college- 
level work taken in another institution or other evidence of maturity and 
motivation. 

In order to be eligible for financial aid, recipient must maintain satis- 
factory academic progress. Satisfactory academic progress is defined as 
maintaining a cumulative and resident grade point average of 2.0. If a 
student does not maintain satisfactory academic progress or fails to 
attend classes, prepare and submit required classwork, or take required 
examinations, financial aid will be suspended. 

If a student whose financial aid has been suspended for any of the 
above reasons feels that unusual and unavoidable circumstances led to 



Academic Information 



this suspension, the suspension maybe appealed to the Loan and Schol- 
2f) ^hip Committee. This policy is generally applied to financial aid from 
institutional and private sources as well as federal programs. 

RIGHT OF PETITION 

Students who believe there is a valid reason for requesting variance 
from or exception to an academic policy stated in the CATALOG may 
make a petition to the Vice President for Academic Administration for 
consideration of their case after obtaining the advice and signature of the 
head of their major division. The petition must contain a statement of the 
request and supporting reasons. Students will be notified in writing by 
the Vice President for Academic Administration of the action on peti- 
tions within five working days. Petition forms are available from the 
Records Office information desk in Wright Hall. 

GRIEVANCE PROCEDURE 

Students who believe that their academic rights have been infringed 
upon or that they have been treated unjustly with respect to their 
academic program are entitled to a fair and impartial consideration of 
their cases. They should do the following to effect a solution. 

1. Present the case to the teacher or teachers concerned. 

2. If necessary, discuss the problem with the division chairman. 

3. If justice has not been attained at this* level, submit the matter to the 
Vice President for Academic Administration. 

4. Finally, ask for a review of the case by the Grievance Committee, 
chaired by the Vice President for Academic Administration or his desig- 
nee and including three other faculty members and two students 
selected by the Academic Cabinet. Both the student and the teacher 
involved in the case are entitled to appear before the committee or to 
present a written statement of the case. The decision of the committee 
shall be presented in writing to the individuals involved within three 
days of the committee meeting unless a later time is agreed upon by both 
parties. The decision of the committee is binding and will be im- 
plemented by the teacher involved or the Vice President for Academic 
Administration. 

ABSENCES 

Class. Attendance at class and laboratory appointments is required. 
Absences are dealt with in two ways. Teachers may excuse absences 
themselves or ask their students to submit excuses to the Absence Com- 
mittee. Students are told at the beginning of each semester which of the 
two means will be used in the class. 

Generally speaking , absences will not be excused by either a teacher or 
the Absence Committee for reasons other than illness, authorized school 
trips, or emergencies beyond the student's control. Absences due to 



Academic Information 



illness are not normally excused unless the student contacts Student 

Health Service prior to the absence. Non-emergency medical appoint- O *7 

ments must be scheduled around the class program. 

For classes in which the Absence Committee is used, a completed 
absence excuse form (one for each class) must be placed in the absence 
box, located in the Student Center, no later than noon the first Monday 
following the absence. Absence forms are available at the Student Cen- 
ter, library, switchboard, and residence halls. The Absence Committee 
determines whether or not to excuse the absence and so notifies the 
teacher of its decision. 

Students having absences exceeding in number* twice the number of 
course credit hours (six absences for a three-hour credit course) may, at 
the teacher's discretion and after consultation with the Vice President 
for Academic Administration, be dropped from the class. 

Make-up work is not normally allowed in the case of homework or 
quizzes missed due to absences. Teachers have the option of recording 
homework and quiz averages if the absence is excused. Tests and major 
Assignments missed because of excused absences are made up as ar- 
ranged with the teacher. 



* One and one-half absences are given for missing a 75-minute class, two for 
missing a 100-minute class, etc. 

Examination. Because of problems concerning time, expense and 
fairness, final examinations are rarely rescheduled. Students desiring to 
teschedule final examinations must obtain a request form from the Vice 
President for Academic Administration, fill it out completely, make two 
additional copies and submit all three copies to the teacher involved. 
The teacher will approve or deny the request, return one copy to the 
student and send one to the Vice President for Academic Administra- 
tion. If approved, the rescheduled examination will be given at a time 
convenient to the teacher and a fee of $40 per examination will be 
assessed. The $40 fee will be waived in cases of illness verified by 
Student Health Service or a physician, death in the immediate family, or 
four or more examinations scheduled for one day. 

Chapel. The chapel service is provided for the spiritual and cultural 
benefit of the college family, to promote the interests of Southern Col- 
lege, and to develop and conserve a spirit of campus unity. In essence the 
chapel attendance policy is the same as for class attendance in that no 
absences are permitted except for illnesses, authorized school trips, or 
taiergencies. An excuse must be presented at the office of the Vice 
President for Student Affairs within 48 hours after the absence. It is the 
f&sponsibility of the students to keep track of their chapel absences. 
Students are allowed four unexcused absences from chapel per semes- 
ter. Additional unexcused absences can result in a student's being 
placed on Citizenship Probation. A continued absence problem can 



Academic Information 



disqualify a student from attending Southern College. A satisfactory 
2 ft chapel attendance record is required for readmission. 

WAIVER EXAMINATIONS 

Upon the approval of the department chairman and the Vice President 
for Academic Administration, students may obtain a waiver of curricu- 
lar requirements by successfully completing a comprehensive 
examination — written, oral, manipulative, or otherwise, as determined 
by the division involved. A fee of $35 per examination is charged. 

NONTRADITIONAL COLLEGE CREDIT 

In addition to credit earned in the traditional classroom setting, 
Southern College accepts credit earned by two other means — challenge 
examinations and correspondence courses. 

The goals and objectives of the college emphasize not only facts and 
concepts but also values and attitudes which are not easily transmitted 
through correspondence courses or measured by examinations. These 
values and attitudes can best be developed by the student's interacting 
over a period of time with peers and teachers committed to moral 
excellence, critical thinking, and the pursuit of truth. For this reason, 
most college credits should be earned through class participation. How- 
ever, the college will permit a maximum of one-fourth of the credit 
required for a given degree to be earned by these nontraditional means. 

College Credit by Examination, The college recognizes three types of 
examinations for credit: challenge examinations prepared by a division 
which must be passed at "B" level or above, approved College Level 
Examination Program (CLEP) subject examinations which must be 
passed at the 65th percentile or above, and the Advanced Placement 
Examinations which must be passed with a score of three or better. A 
student may challenge a given course by examination only once. No 
CLEP or challenge exam may be attempted after the student has been 
enrolled in that course beyond the second week of a semester. No course 
may be challenged as part of the last thirty hours of any degree. Grades 
are recorded for divisional challenge examinations and scaled scores are 
recorded for nationally normed examinations. Permission to take a chal- 
lenge examination while in residence must be obtained from both the 
department chairman and the Vice President for Academic Administra- 
tion. 

Credit for challenge and/or validation examinations will not be placed 
on a student's permanent record and is, therefore, not transferable until 
that student has successfully completed twelve semester hours in resi- 
dence at Southern College. 

Fees charged for challenge examination and credit are listed under 
"Special Fees and Charges" in the financial section of this Catalog. 



Academic Information 



Additional information concerning challenge examinations may be 
obtained from the Office of Records or the Counseling and Testing 9Q 
Center. ** a 

Correspondence. A maximum of twelve semester hours of corre- 
spondence or extension credit may apply toward a baccalaureate degree 
program and eight hours toward an associate degree. 

Home Study International of Washington, D.C., is the officially recog- 
nized correspondence school of Southern College. The college recom- 
mends Home Study International for those students needing corre- 
spondence credit and accepts all such credits when the study program is 
approved by the college prior to enrollment. 

A student will be permitted to carry correspondence work while in 
residence only if the required course is unobtainable at the college. 
Correspondence courses, whether taken while in residence or during the 
summer, must be approved in advance by the college. 

Correspondence work may not apply on the upper division require- 
ments of the major or minor. A minimum grade of "B" must be earned to 
apply on the lower division requirements for a major. Correspondence 
credit with a "D" grade is unacceptable and a course in which the 
student earned a grade of "D" or "F" while in residence may not be 
repeated by correspondence. No correspondence credit will be entered 
on the student's record until he has earned a minimum of twelve hours in 
residence with an average of at least "C." Official transcripts must be in 
the Office of Records before a diploma will be ordered. The graduation 
date will be the last day of the month after the official transcript is 
received. 

TRANSCRIPTS 

Official transcripts of a student's academic record may be obtained by 
the student upon a written request to the Office of Records. The request 
must include the student's signature and payment of $2.00 in cash, 
check, or money order for each transcript ordered. Because of legal 
difficulties, telephone requests from students or written requests from 
other members of the student's family cannot be honored. 

A student may receive an unofficial transcript for evaluative purposes 
without charge by applying in person at the Office of Records. Official 
transcripts given directly to a student will be stamped "Student Copy." 
No transcript will be issued for a student whose account is not paid in 
full or who is delinquent in payment of student loans. No exceptions will 
be made. 

SEQUENCE OF COURSES 

A student may not receive credit for a course which is prerequisite to a 
course for which he has already received credit. 



Academic Services 

COURSE NUMBERS 

jjj Each course number consists of three figures as follows: 

(a) The first numeral indicates class year status as follows: 

— remedial (Institutional credit only) 

1 — freshman level 

2 — sophomore level 

3 — junior level 

4 — senior level 

(b) The third numeral indicates the following: 

1 — signifies a course which is first in a sequence 

2 — signifies a course which is second in a sequence and 

presupposes one as a prerequisite 
All other figures have no designation. 

Within a given 100 sequence there is no necessary significance in one 
course number being higher than another. For instance, 265 does not 
necessarily mean that the course is on a higher level than 235. 

Course numbers that stand alone represent courses of one semester 
which are units in and of themselves. Course numbers separated by a 
comma represent units in and of themselves, either one of which may be 
counted for graduation without reference to sequence. 

Course numbers separated by a colon are year courses in which credit 
for the first course is a prerequisite to the second. However, credit may be 
given for the first semester when taken alone. 

Upper division courses are numbered 300 and above. 

ACADEMIC SERVICES 

E. A. ANDERSON LECTURE SERIES 

The E. A. Anderson Lecture Series is an annual feature of the business 
curriculum at Southern College. The series is made possible by the 
generosity of E. A. Anderson of Atlanta, Georgia, for the purpose of 
giving the student a broader understanding of the business world. 

The public is invited to attend the lectures free of charge; however, for 
a fee, continuing education credit is available. All lectures are presented 
at 8 p.m. in Brock Hall on the third floor in the E. A. Anderson Business 
Seminar Room. 

FLORENCE OLIVER ANDERSON LECTURE SERIES 

Each year the Division of Nursing at Southern College of Seventh-day 
Adventists brings nationally recognized experts in the health field on 
campus to address the professional community. 



Academic Services 



Southern College believes education to be a dynamic lifelong process 
and is committed to providing professional nurses with continuing Q1 
education opportunities, as well as exposing student nurses to the im- 
portance of self-initiated education. 

This series of seminars is dedicated to excellence in nursing and is 
made possible by the generosity of the late Florence Oliver Anderson. 

CHAMBER MUSIC SERIES 

Ackerman Auditorium in J. Mabel Wood Hall is the setting for the 
Sunday evening Chamber Music Series. Each semester two or three 
artists and/or ensembles provide a variety of listening experiences for 
students, faculty, and the community. Artists are chosen in such a 
fashion that over a four-year period a student can become acquainted 
with most types of chamber music. 

WSMC FM90.5 

WSMC FM90.5 is a full-power (100,000 watt), noncommercial, fine 
arts radio station licensed to Southern College. 

WSMC provides training for students in the field of broadcasting. The 
station regularly hires between 10 and 1 5 students as on-air announcers, 
or production assistants. The station is an excellent way for the student 
to receive hands-on experience in the field of broadcasting. 

WSMC represents Southern College to the greater Chattanooga com- 
munity, with a coverage area including a 100-mile radius of Chattanoo- 
{ ga. It is the oldest noncommercial fine arts station in southeastern 
fennessee, created in 1961. WSMC was the first radio station in a 
seven-state region to receive satellite capability. The station also exists 
as an outreach of the college — striving to enhance the quality of life in 
the community. 

Programming on WSMC revolves around the phrase "The Classic 

Experience." The station produces high-quality fine arts, informational, 

I educational, and inspirational programs daily. WSMC is affiliated with 

I National Public Radio, American Public Radio, the Associated Press, 

j and the Adventist Radio Network. 

WSMC's broadcast studios are located in Brock Hall The facility 
I includes a studio-quality production room, news room, music library, 
I and on-air studios. 

THE HUMANITIES/PERSPECTIVES FILM SERIES 

Christian education involves the teaching of discretion in society: 
[ how to appreciate human culture while being critical of its content and 
I direction. These films series, sponsored by the Humanities Division and 
I Heligion Division, seek to provide films of a serious, mature, informa- 
I tive, educational, and entertaining nature. They are intended to augment 
the educational experience of students at the college level. 






Academic Services 



The films in these series have been chosen for their societal impact, 
22 historical importance, inspirational depth, classical significance, and 
informative value. Critical notes are provided to strengthen the student's 
awareness of certain elements in the films. 

INSTRUCTIONAL MEDIA 

The Instructional Media Service serves the college administration, 
faculty, staff, and students. The full-time staff includes a director, secre- 
tary, and service technician. 

LIBRARIES 

McKee Library provides both print and nonprint educational mate- 
rials for the students and faculty of the college. Open stacks, pleasant 
areas to read or study, current periodicals, and a large microform collec- 
tion contribute to the enjoyment of learning. Special collections in the 
library include the Curriculum Library, a collection of elementary and 
secondary education materials; Seventh-day Adventist Heritage Collec- 
tion, books and materials by and about the Seventh-day Adventist 
Church, pictures, periodicals, archive material; the Dr. Vernon Thomas 
Memorial Civil War and Abraham Lincoln Collection, books, letters, 
manuscripts, newspapers, pamphlets, pictures, paintings, maps, and 
artifacts of this period in American History. 

The 10,000 volume extension library at the Orlando Center is well- 
known throughout central Florida as an outstanding nursing material 
resource center. 

The combined collection of these libraries contains approximately 
180,000 volumes. More than 1,000 periodicals are currently received 
which include a large number of titles kept permanently on microform. 
McKee Library was the first academic library in Tennessee to go online 
with a computerized card catalog. The data base now includes approxi- 
mately 50% of the collection. The library was also a charter member of 
Ohio College Library Center and Southeastern Library Network auto- 
mated systems. 

The facility has been in use since 1970, and provides seating for 400, 
including 300 individual study carrels. Computer terminals and electric 
typewriters are available for student use. 

PRESIDENT'S LECTURE SERIES 

Initiated last year, the President's Lecture Series brings speakers of 
national or international prominence to the Southern College campus. 
The lecturers address both the general public and the campus commu- 
nity. Lecturers for 1985-86 were: 

Rosalyn Yalow, Physicist, Nobel Laureate 

Chaim Potok, Author, The Chosen and other works 






Academic Services 



STALEY CHRISTIAN SCHOLAR LECTURE SERIES 

The Thomas F. Staley Foundation provides the Division of Religion J^f 
with funds for a speaker to come on campus once a year. This individual 
is the speaker for a chapel service, usually holds a table-talk session 
during the lunch hour at the cafeteria, and serves as guest lecturer at 
leveral religion classes. Recent lecturers have included: J. Edward 
^darns, Director of Advanced Studies at Westminster Theological 
feminary in California and a counselor at the Christian Counseling and 
Educational Foundation; Carl F. H. Henry, founding editor of Christian- 
ity Today, currently lecturer-at-large for World Vision International. 

TEACHING LEARNING CENTER 

The Teaching Learning Center provides a variety of interrelated serv- 
ices for the student. Tutors are available throughout the day to assist in 
paglish, math, science, and many other areas. This service is provided 
free of charge to students. Students are given the opportunity to use a 
fomputer, or they may choose to make use of the numerous books, 
plmstrips, cassettes, and videos the TLC has to offer. 




J0 



\. *<**&* 



COURSES 
OF STUDY 









ACADEMIC DIVISIONS 

For administrative purposes, the departments of instruction are or- 
ganized into divisions. The divisions serve to foster interdepartmental 
activities and unite departments which are part of the same general field 
of knowledge. Listed below are the divisions with their various depart- 
ments, directors, and associated programs. The Division of Adult 
Studies and Special Programs has no courses of its own, but coordinates 

Emtinuing education conventions and workshops and operates the Con- 
rence Center. 

ADULT STUDIES AND SPECIAL PROGRAMS . Marvin Robertson* 
BUSINESS AND TECHNOLOGY 

Business Administration Wayne VandeVere* 

Industrial Education Wayne Janzen 

Office Administration Joyce Cotham 

HUMAN DEVELOPMENT 

Behavioral Science Gerald Colvin 

I Education Cyril Roe 

Health, Physical Education, and Recreation . . Robert Kamieneski* 

I Home Economics Thelma Cushman 

I Library Science Charles Davis 

HUMANITIES 

Art Robert Garren 

I Communication Don Dick 

I JEnglish Barbara Ruf 

History William Wohlers* 

Modern Language Robert Morrison 

Music Marvin Robertson 

NURSING Catherine Knarr* 

RELIGION Gordon Hyde* 

SCIENCE Mitchell Thiel* 

r giology Stephen A. Nyirady 

piemistry Steven Warren 

; Computer Science Tim Korson 

<> Mathematics Lawrence Hanson 

t Physics Ray Hefferlin 



* Indicates division chairman 

35 



Art 



36 



ART 

Robert Garren, M.F.A., Chairman 

Basic to the philosophy of the Department of Art is the provision for 
the quality of environment most conducive to spiritual, aesthetic, and 
technical growth. The instructors desire to help all students become 
aware of their options in the field of art and to prepare them systemati-' 
cally to meet the needs of their respective choices, whether they are 
oriented commercially or aesthetically. 

Students majoring in Art must meet the specific requirements of the 
Art Department (below) and the General Education program (pages 
14-16), For Art and most other programs in the Humanities Division, 
intermediate foreign language is required. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE IN ART 

Major: Thirty-six hours to include ART 104:105, 109, 110, 344, 345, 
499, with not less than 14 hours upper division. Cognate requirements: 
CRTF 225. A foreign language at the intermediate level is required. 

Minor: Eighteen hours including courses ART 104:105, 109, 110, 344, 
with not less than six hours in upper division courses. 

Teaching Endorsement: The following are the minimum require- 
ments. 

ART 104:105 Beginning Drawing I, II 4 hours 

ART 109, 110 Design I, II 6 hours 

Art techniques elective 2 hours 

ART 344 History of Art 3 hours 

Art appreciation elective 2 hours 

Art elective 3 hours 

EDUC 230, 438 Methods - Art _4 hours 

TOTAL 24 hours 

The student must apply to the Department of Education for admission 
to the Teacher Education Program and the professional semester before 
the end of the sophomore and junior years, respectively. 

ART 104:105. Beginning Drawing I, II (G-l) 2,2 hours 

An introductory course in drawing, composition, and design. Emphasis on 
the basic art elements and their functions in composition using various 
media. (Fall, Spring) 

ART 109, 110. Design I, II (G-l) 3,3 hours 

Problems in two-dimensional art, dealing with line, shape, form, color, and 
texture, with emphasis on commercial applications. (Fall, Spring) 



Art 

ART 215. Sculpture (G-l) 3 hours 

Prerequisite: ART 104:105 or permission of instructor. Q7 

Introduction to the problems of form in sculpture and three-dimensional 
design using various media such as clay, plaster, wood, and metal casting. 
Taught odd years. May be repeated for credit. 

ART 217. Printmaking 3 hours 

Prerequisite: ART 104:105 or permission of instructor. 

A course designed to give the art major experience in printmaking media. 

Relief, intaglio, and silk-screen will be covered. May be repeated for credit, 

ART 221:222. Painting I, II 3,3 hours 

Prerequisite: ART 104:105 or permission of instructor. 
A course designed to give the student experience in using painting mate- 
rials applied to compositional organizations. May be repeated for credit. 
(Fall, Spring) 

ART 235. Ceramics (G-l) 3 hours 

Fundamentals of the preparation and use of clay. Methods of fabrication 
from hand building to wheel-thrown wares, chemistry and application of 
glazes, and stacking and firing of kilns. Maybe repeated for credit. A $20 fee 
is applied toward necessary supplies. (Fall) 



ART 311, 312. Painting III, IV 3,3 hours 

Prerequisite: ART 221 or permission of instructor. 

Advanced problems in painting. May be repeated for credit. (Fall, Spring) 

ART 313, 314. Drawing III, IV 3,3 hours 

Prerequisite: 104, 105 or permission of instructor. 

A course designed to give the student increased experience in the applica- 
tion of drawing media to the production of art. This course may be repeated 
for credit. (Fall, Spring) 

ART 295/495. Directed Study (W) 1-3 hours 

For students electing to take ART 295, permission of the teacher must be 
obtained. ART 495 is for majors and minors only. The course is designed for 
students who wish directed study or for a group of students who wish a 
special course not taught under the regular class offering. Students taking 
the class as directed study may choose from art history, ceramics, design, 
drawing, painting, printmaking, and sculpture. (Students must have had 
maximum classes offered in area.) This course also includes credit offered 
by the Art Department on directed study tours. May be repeated for credit up 
to four times. Writing emphasis for ART 495 only. 

ART 499. Senior Project 1 hour 

Major projects in area of interest for seniors and preparation of permanent 
portfolio of college art work. (Spring) 



Art 



38 



ART HISTORY 

ART 218 or 318. Art Appreciation (D-3), (W) 3 hours 

Lecture and travel seminar. One class is offered in the fall semester, with two 
hours per week lecture, and the week of Thanksgiving spent in Washington, 
D.C., and New York City visiting major art museums. When offered in the 
first summer session, there will be one week of two-hour lectures and two 
weeks of travel and museum visits. The summer tour will include 
Washington, D.C., Philadelphia, New York City, Newport, Rhode Island, 
Boston, and the Storm King Art Center in upstate New York. There is an 
additional charge for travel. Students will be required to write a summary 
paper. Students taking the class for upper-division credit will be required to 
write a research paper. 

ART 344. History of Art (D-3), (W) 3 hours 

A study of the arts of western civilization from antiquity to the mid-1 800's 
with an emphasis on pivotal figures in art history. (Fall) 

ART 345. Contemporary Art (D-3), (W) 3 hours 

Nineteenth and twentieth century developments in European and American 
arts. (Spring) 

EDUCATION 

EDUC 230. Elementary Methods in 

Curriculum and Instruction: Art 2 hours 

A study of the aims, philosophy, and methods of teaching art on the various 
levels of the elementary school. 

EDUC 438. Methods of Teaching Art 2 hours 

Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education (secondary program). 
Attention is given to methods and materials of instruction, planning, test- 
ing, and evaluating student performances, the survey and evaluation of 
textbooks. Four lectures each week of the first half of the first semester 
during the senior year. 

(D-3), (G-l), (W) See pages 14-16 for explanation of General Education require- 
ments. 






Behavioral Science 

BEHAVIORAL SCIENCE 



Ben Bandiola, Ph.D. 
Gerald Colvin, Ed.D., Ph.D., Chairman 
Ed Lamb, M.S.S.W., A.C.S.W. 
Larry Williams, M.S.W. 

The Behavioral Science faculty fully support the educational 
philosophy and objectives of Southern College. More specifically, this 
faculty embraces the following beliefs: 

(1) God is not only the Creator and Sustainer of all life, but also the 
ultimate Source of all knowledge. 

(2) Man is created in the image of God, and possesses harmonious 
physical, mental, spiritual, and social attributes. 

(3) A loving God seeks to restore his image in humanity, thus prepar- 
ing them for personal fellowship with Himself. 

We understand a redemptive education must focus on the growth of 
the whole person. The Behavioral Science faculty commits itself, there- 
fore, to achieving the following objectives: 

Spiritual 

Behavioral Sciences majors will acquire an understanding of the basic 
beliefs and values of Christianity as presented by the Seventh-day Ad- 
ventist Church. We, as their teachers, will provide class devotionals, 
Christian-service applications, and the encouragement for them to 
commit themselves to such ideals. 

Intellectual 

Those studying Behavioral Science at this college will perceive them- 
selves as Christian scholars beginning a lifelong pursuit of knowledge. 
We have designed course-related activities and investigations to aid 
them in achieving intellectual and career goals, and in acquiring the 
necessary tools for future learning. The Behavioral Science curriculum 
is structured so as to encourage critical thinking, perceptive discussion, 
intellectual curiosity, and cultural awareness. 

Social 

Behavioral Science students are expected to develop positive inter- 
personal skills, communication techniques, and decision-making ap- 
proaches. The teachers in this program strongly emphasize the attitudes 
of acceptance, caring, patience, and service. 

Physical 

Students in Behavioral Science are encouraged to develop a holistic 
view of mankind in appreciation for the interactive nature of our physi- 
cal, mental, social, and spiritual being. They are expected to establish 
balanced programs of exercise, rest, diet, study, work, and recreation. 



39 



Behavioral Science 

The faculty promotes such positive values and practices through exam- 
ple and instruction. 

Students wishing to prepare for graduate study in community and/or 
family counseling, law, personnel work, psychology and sociology 
should consider a major in a Behavioral Science emphasis or Psycholo- 
gy. The Bachelor of Science in Social Work is also offered for those 
students seeking preparation for later service in child welfare, correc- 
tions, health services, mental health, medical school, and human ser- 
vices social work. Registered nurses will find a major in some area of 
Behavioral Science an excellent foundation for public health and 
psychiatric work. To achieve a complete preparation in these fields, 
however, the student is encouraged to consider further training at the 
graduate level. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE IN PSYCHOLOGY 

Major: Thirty hours including PSYC 124, 128, 225 or 315, 326, 384, 
465, and 495. Cognate requirements are MATH 215 and three hours each 
in biology and computer science. Students planning for graduate study 
in psychology are urged to take beyond the basic 30 hours required. 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE DEGREE IN BEHAVIORAL SCIENCE 

Major: Forty- five hours with a 21 -hour emphasis in Family Studies or 
Sociology, including core requirement courses BHSF 394; PSYC 124, 
128; SOCW 221, 222; SOCI 125, 223, 424. Cognate requirements total 
nine hours: 3 hours in Biology, 3 hours in Economics, and 3 hours in 
MATH 215. Additional requirements for the specific emphases in the 
Behavioral Science major are: 

j Family Studies emphasis: PSYC 233, 315; SOCI 295 or 495, 365; 
* HMEC 147, 201, 202. Remaining course-work will normally be 
chosen from the following courses: PSYC 225, 367, 377; SOCW 375. 

Sociology emphasis: SOCI 427 and 295 or 495. 

Students contemplating graduate study should take as many courses 
as possible in the area of his emphasis. 

Minor — Behavioral Science. Eighteen hours selected from any Be- 
havioral Science areas and including PSYC 124, SOCW 221, and SOCI 
125, with a minimum of six hours of upper division Behavioral Science 
classes. 

Minor — Psychology. Eighteen hours including PSYC 124 and 128. 

Minor — Sociology. Eighteen hours including SOCI 125, 424, and 427. 

BACHELOR OF SOCIAL WORK DEGREE 

Major: Forty-eight hours including BHSF 115, 394; SOCW 221, 222, 
314, 315, 316, 435; PSYC 124, 128, 315; SOCI 125, 223, 424, 495. Cognate 
requirements: any human biology and ECON 213. 






Behavioral Science 



BEHAVIORAL SCIENCE FOUNDATIONS 

BHSF 115. Orientation to the Behavioral Sciences 1 hour 

An examination of career choices, training requirements, employment 
trends in the behavioral sciences. Career and academic guidance will be 
provided for each student. Some visitations and interviewing asked of 
students, (Fall, Spring) 

^HSF 39^. Research Methods (W) 3 hours 

^-Prerequisite: MATH 215. 

An introduction to common research design and methodology. Descriptive, 
relational, and experimental designs are examined. A semester research 
project is expected of each student. (Fall) 

PSYCHOLOGY 

PSYC 124. Introduction to Psychology (F-l) 3 hours 

A beginning course in the basic principles and concepts of psychology. 
Special attention given to the structure and function of the brain and nerv- 
ous system. Recommended as a preliminary to other courses in the field. 
(Fall, Spring) 

PSYC 128. Developmental Psychology (F-l) 3 hours 

A study of life from prenatal through the adult years. Emphasis is placed on 
the emotional, social, physical, motor, and psychological development of 
the individual. No credit will be granted if PSYC 126 or 127 has been taken. 
(Fall, Spring) 

PSYC 224. Social Psychology (F-l) 3 hours 

Study of human behavior 7s affected by group living. Dynamics of groups, 
social roles, communication, and mass behavior are focuses of considera- 
tion. Credit applicable for either psychology or sociology emphasis, but not 
for both. (Spring) 

PSYC 225. Theories of Personality (F-l) 3 hours 

A systematic study of the development, dynamics, and structure of person- 
ality. Methodology and theory are studied in relation to personality de- 
velopment. (Fall) 

PSYC 233. Human Sexuality (F-l or 2) 3 hours 

A study of human sexual behavior, relationships, and values as reflected in 
the Christian cultural setting. 

PSYC 315. Abnormal Psychology (F-l) 3 hours 

Prerequisite: PSYC 124 or 128. 

A study of the etiology of pathological behavior and the factors of good 

adjustment and mental health. (Spring) 

PSYC 326. Physiological Psychology 3 hours 

Prerequisite: Three hours in Biology. 

This course focuses on the physiological substrates of behavior. Specific 



Behavioral Science 



42 



attention is given to the physiological basis of learning and motivation, 
sensation, emotion, neural encoding, and sleep. Further analysis of the 
structural and functional organization of the brain and nervous system. 
(Fall) 

PSYC 355. Organizational Behavior 3 hours 

(See BUAD 355 under Business Administration Department listing.) 

PSYC 349. Aging and Society (F-l) 3 hours 

(See SOCI 349. Aging and Society (F-l) 

PSYC 367. Adolescent Psychology (F-l) 2 hours 

The determinants and implications of behavioral characteristics and de- 
velopmental patterns during adolescence. Content will include the 
psychological and social dynamics underlying the attempted resolution of 
crises ana tasks specific to adolescents in modern society. (Spring) 

PSYC 377. Fundamentals of Counseling (F-l) (W) 3 hours 

Recommended: One course in Psychology. 

This is an introduction to the major theories and practices of individual 

counseling. The dynamics of the helping relationship are analyzed. (Fall) 

PSYC 384. Experimental Psychology (F-l), (W) 4 hours 

Prerequisite: MATH 215. 

The application of experimental methods of research in psychology. Litera- 
ture review, experimental design, data collection and statistical analysis to 
be completed for at least four papers. Three lectures and one laboratory per 
week. (Spring) 

PSYC 415. History and Systems of Psychology (F-l), (W) 3 hours 

Prerequisite: PSYC 124. 

Philosophical and historical backgrounds of psychology leading to a con- 
sideration of contemporary schools and systems of psychology. (Spring) 

PSYC 425. Theories of Learning (F-l) 3 hours 

A review of the current theories and principles related to both learning and 
teaching. Advanced analysis of human proolem-solving, thinking, reason- 
ing and other correlates of human cognition processes. (Spring) 

PSYC 465. Topics in Psychology (F-l) 3 hours 

Selected topics in psychology as chosen from such areas as: group 
dynamics, psychological assessment, individual differences, psychology of 
women, sensation and perception, etc. This course may be repeated for 
credit with an appropriate change in topics. (Spring, alternate years) 

PSYC 495. Directed Study (F-l), (W) 1 hour 

Prerequisite: PSYC 384. 

Completion of an experimental project under the direction of a psychology 
instructor. Students are responsible for developing appropriate research 
options. (Fall, Spring) 






Behavioral Science 



SOCIAL WORK 



SOCW 221. Social Welfare as an Institution (F-l) 3 hours 

Social welfare programs are viewed from both historical and philosophical 
Perspectives. Organizations in which social work is practiced are evaluated. 

SOCW 222. Social Welfare Issues and Policies (F-l) 3 hours 

Prerequisite: SOCW 221 or permission of the instructor. 

A study of contemporary issues and policies that influence the delivery of 

social services. (Spring) 

SOCW 314. Social Work Methods (W) 3 hours 

A course oriented toward problem-solving technologies used in working 
with individuals, groups, and communities. Diagnostic assessments of the 
person-problem-situation, ego supportive procedures, and problem-solving 
processes are emphasized. (Fall) 

SOCW 315. Group Work (W) 3 hours 

A course designed to develop a basic understanding of group theory and 
process from a therapeutic perspective. (Spring) 

SOCW 316. Community Organization and Policy (F-l) 3 hours 

Community organization principles are explored including public policy 
development and implementation. (Fall) 

SOCW 375. Introduction to Family Intervention (F-l) 3 hours 

An introduction to the various theoretical orientations of family interven- 
tion. The family is viewed as a unit, with focus on programs and crisis 
* techniques designed to maintain and re-establish family equilibrium. (Fall) 

SOCW 435. Social Work Practicum 4,4 hours 

Prerequisite: SOCW 314. 

This course provides opportunity for students to apply the combined 
techniques of casework, group work, and/or community organization 
through direct participation in the social service delivery system. Through 
his participation the student becomes familiar with agency structures, func- 
tions, and programs. A minimum of 200 hours will be spent working in an 
agency setting for each four hours of course credit. Course may be repeated 
once. (Fall, Spring, Summer) 

SOCW 295/495. Directed Study 1-3 hours 

Prerequisite: SOCW 221 or permission of the instructor. 
Study of special topics pertinent to the field of social work. Content will vary 
among such topics as child welfare, income maintenance, values and ethics 
of social work practice, etc. The selected topic is pursued for the entire 
semester. This course can be repeated for credit for a total of not more than 
three hours credit. (Fall) 



43 



Behavioral Science 



SOCIOLOGY 






SOCI 125. Introduction to Sociology (F-l) 3 hours 

An objective approach to the analysis and understanding of the social 
world. Consideration is given to the dynamic nature of American society 
and social institutions. Emphasis is placed on the study of social groups 
including the family, its history and current place in society. (Fall, Spring, 
Summer) 

SOCI 223. Marriage and the Family (F-2) 2 hours 

A course in the ethics of human relationships, including the place of the 
family in society and the Christ-centered approach to marital and familial 
conflicts. (Fall, Spring) 

SOCI 224. Social Psychology (F-l) 3 hours 

(See Psychology area listings,) 

SOCI 233. Human Sexuality (F-l or 2) 3 hours 

A study of human sexual behavior, relationships, and values as reflected in 
the Christian cultural setting. 

SOCI 316. Community Organization and Policy (F-l) 3 hours 

(See Social Work area listings.) 

SOCI 349. Aging and Society (F-l) 3 hours 

The course emphasizes the reciprocal impact of societal attitudes on the 
process of aging and the increasing influence of "mature citizens'* in con- 
temporary society. Historical, demographic, and future trends are explored. 
A balance between the theoretical and the applied is sought. (Spring) 

SOCI 356. Minorities in America (F-l) (W) 3 hours 

(See HIST 356 under History listings.) 

SOCI 365. Family Relations (F-2) 3 hours 

A sociological analysis of family structures and functions. Attention will be 
given to courtship, family organization and interaction, family disorganiza- 
tion and reorganization, and the post-parental family. Emphasis will be 
given to findings of recent family studies. (Spring) 

SOCI 374. Criminology (F-l) 3 hours 

This course emphasizes the scientific study of crime as a social phenome- 
non, of criminals, and of penal treatment. The relationship of law and crime 
to other trends in the social order. Research in prevention and treatment of 
crime. (Fall, odd years) 

SOCI 424. Contemporary Social Problems (F-l) 3 hours 

Attention is given to the major forces shaping cultural and subcultural 
changes today. Changes are particularly viewed as to their effectiveness in 
bringing about group and mass adjustment. (Spring) 



Behavioral Science 



SOCI 427. Sociological Theory Development (F-l), (W) 2 hours 

Prerequisite: SOCI 125. # *j 

This course focuses on the emergence of sociology as a systematic disci- 
pline. A critical analysis of sociological theory is made from 1850-1920, 
including Comte, Tocqueville, Spencer, Marx, Weber, Durkheim, Simmel, 
and Pareto. {Fall, even years) 

(F-l), (F-2), (W) See pages 14-16 for explanation of General Education require- 
ments. 

SOCI 295/495. Directed Study (F-l) 1-3 hours 

Prerequisite: SOCI 125 or permission of the instructor. 
Study of special topics pertinent to the area of sociology. Content will vary 
among such topics as the sociology of women, social conflict and change, 
Black America, the sociology of education, etc. The selected topic is pur- 
sued for the entire semester. This course can be repeated for credit for a total 
of not more than three hours credit. (Spring) 

SOCI 296/496. Study Tour 1-3 hours 

Two tours are scheduled annually for the purpose of studying a range of 
behavioral science topics. The fall trip to New York City occurs during 
Thanksgiving vacation and focuses on ethnicity, social problems, urban 
change, and social agencies (1 hour). The spring trip to New England occurs 
during the May summer session and focuses primarily on ethnic studies (3 
hours). A fee is required to cover travel expenses. 



Biology 



46 



■BIOLOGY- 



Edgar Grundset, MA. 

Duane Houck, Ph.D. 

Stephen A. Nyirady, Ph.D., Chairman 

Marcella Woolsey, M.A. 

The study of Biology constitutes one of the most exciting and impor- 
tant fields of scientific investigation since it provides a better under- 
standing of ourselves and the living things around us. Even the casual 
observer of Biology who pauses long enough to take a course, may derive 
a lifetime of pleasure and fulfillment from a hobby such as bird watch- 
ing, shell collecting, or wildflower photography. 

More importantly, a major in Biology is an excellent starting point for 
numerous careers which are both rewarding and challenging. With a 
B.S. degree in Biology, one may pursue graduate study leading to re- 
search in the basic sciences (anatomy, physiology, ecology, ethology, 
cytology, etc.), teaching at the college or graduate level, industrial re- 
search, and environmental applications for either business, industry, or 
government. The B.A. degree is the degree of choice in preparation for 
high-school teaching, medicine, dentistry, optometry, careers in 
wildlife, forestry or zoo management, health education, public health, 
biostatistics, epidemiology, and environmental health, to name a few. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE IN BIOLOGY 

Major: Thirty hours including BIOL 155, 156, 316, 325, 485; ecologi- 
cal course 226 or 317; botany 408 or 419; physiology 418 or 419; includ- 
ing two of the following field courses: 314, 317, 318, 319, 408, 411. Up to 
three hours of CHEM 323 may apply on a major or minor. Cognate 
requirement: CHEM 151:152. A course in general physics is highly 
desirable. A minor in chemistry is recommended. 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE DEGREE IN BIOLOGY 

Major: Forty hours including BIOL 155, 156, 225, 316, 325, 412, 415, 
485; ecological course 226 or 317; botany 408 or 419; physiology 418 or 
419; including two of the following field courses: 314, 317, 318, 319, 
408, 411. Up to three hours of CHEM 323 may apply on a major. Cognate 
requirements: CHEM 151:152; MATH 114 and 215. A course in general 
physics is highly desirable. 

Minor: Eighteen hours including BIOL 155, 156 (or equivalent). A 
course in physiology is strongly recommended. Up to three hours of 
CHEM 323 may apply on a minor. A minimum of six hours must be in 
upper division. 






Biology 

Teaching Endorsement: The student must earn a major in the subject 
area of his first teaching field. He may add the following endorsements Ik 7 
by meeting the number of hours indicated below. 

piology 

BIOL 155, 156 Foundations of Biology 8 hours 

Biology electives J8 hours 

TOTAL 16 hours 

general Science 

BIOL 155, 156 Foundations of Biology 8 hours 

Chemistry and Physics electives J3 hours 

TOTAL 16 hours 

The student must apply to the Department of Education for admission 
to the Teacher Education Program and the professional semester before 
the end of the sophomore and junior years, respectively. 

AGRI 100. Science of Gardening (G-2) 3 hours 

Scientific principles of plant growth with emphasis on food crops. Various 
aspects of gardening culture emphasized are requirements for plant growth, 
soil building, crop nutrition, identification and control of diseases and 
insects, and plant propagation. Two hours lecture and three hours labora- 
tory. (Fall, Spring) 

BIOL 103. Principles of Biology (E-l) 3 hours 

This is a basic general education biology course designed to give the student 
a modern treatment of the fundamental processes and principles of plant 
and animal life. Three lectures each week. Does not apply on a major or 
minor in Biology. (Fall, Spring) 

BIOL 104. Principles of Biology Lab (E-l) 1 hour 

Prerequisites: Previous or concurrent enrollment in BIOL 103. 
Laboratory exercises designed to illustrate the principles learned in BIOL 
103. Three hours of laboratory each week. Does not apply on a major or 
minor in Biology. (Fall, Spring) 

BIOL 105:106. Anatomy and Physiology (E-l) 3,3 hours 

A study of the fundamentals of human anatomy and physiology. Two 
lectures and one laboratory period each week. Does not apply on a major in 
Biology. (Fall, Spring, Summer) 

BIOL 125. Basic Microbiology (E-l) 3 hours 

A study of the principles of microbiology, various types of microorganisms 
and their relation to health and disease. Two lectures and one laboratory 
period each week. Does not apply on major in Biology. (Fall, Spring, Sum- 
mer) 

BIOL 155:156. General Biology (E-l) 4,4 hours 

This is an introductory course in biology open to all college students. The 



Biology 



48 



course is designed to give the non-science student a modern treatment of the 
fundamental processes of plant and animal life as well as to provide a 
satisfactory basis upon which a biology major may build. Three lectures and 
one laboratory period each week. (Fall, Spring) 

BIOL 225. General Microbiology 4 hours 

Prerequisite: BIOL 156 or equivalent. 

A general study of bacteria, yeasts, molds and viruses, considering their 
morphology, physiology, genetics and methods of control. Study will be 
given to immunology topics: antigen-antibody properties, host-antigen in- 
teractions, humoraland cellular immune systems. The importance of mi- 
croorganisms in environmental and applied fields will be considered. Three 
lectures and one laboratory period each week. (Spring) 

BIOL 226. Environmental Biology (E-l) 3 hours 

This very relevant course introduces the student to the very complex inter- 
locking environmental problems facing us today. Beginning with basic 
ecological principles, the course goes on to examine population dynamics, 
energy utilization, resource consumption and the various forms of pollu- 
tion. These issues are all discussed in terms of a balanced and rational 
ecological approach. Three lectures each week. (Spring) 

BIOL 295. Directed Study 1-3 hours 

See BIOL 495, 

BIOL 313. Embryology 3 hours 

Prerequisite: BIOL 155, 156 or consent of instructor. 
An introduction to the development of the vertebrate animal with emphasis 
on the development of the chick. Two lectures and one laboratory period 
each week. (Fall) 

BIOL 314. Ornithology (E-l) 3 hours 

Prerequisite: BIOL 103, or 156 or consent of instructor. 
A systematic study of bird life with special emphasis on external features. 
Taxonomy, nesting, and feeding habits, flight and migratory patterns. Two 
lectures and one laboratory period each week. An extended field trip, which 
applies toward laboratory credit, is planned during spring vacation. There is 
a small additional charge to help cover transportation costs. (Spring) 

BIOL 315. Parasitology (W) 3 hours 

Prerequisite: BIOL 156 or consent of instructor. 

A general survey of the more important parasites of man and domestic 

animals. Two lectures and one laboratory period each week. (Spring) 

BIOL 316. Genetics 3 hours 

Prerequisite: BIOL 125 or 155, or consent of instructor. 
A study of heredity as related to man, domestic plants and animals and an 
investigation of gene structure and function. Two lectures and one labora- 
tory period each week. (Fall) 



Biology 

BIOL 317. Ecology 3 hours 

Prerequisite: BIOL 156 or consent of instructor. AQ 

Ecology is a study of the interrelationships of plants, animals and their 
environment. This course will examine these interactions in the context of 
energy flow, nutrient cycles, limiting factors, succession and population 
dynamics. Field work will introduce various ecological sampling 
techniques and the student will participate in ecological analysis of various 
local communities as well as extended field trips. Two lectures and one field 
trip or laboratory period each week. (Fall) 

BIOL 318. Ichthyology 3 hours 

Prerequisite: BIOL 155, 156 or consent of instructor. 
A systematic study of the fishes found in the local area, with a survey of the 
fishes of other waters. Two lectures and one laboratory period each week. 
(Taught every third year) 

BIOL 319. Herpetology 3 hours 

Prerequisite: BIOL 155, 156 or consent of instructor. 
A systematic study of amphibians and reptiles of the local area, with a 
survey of amphibians ana reptiles of other areas. Two lectures and one 
laboratory period each week. (Taught every third year) 

BIOL 325. Issues of Natural Science and Religion (E-l), (W) 3 hours 

A survey of the theories of origins and the extent of variations among 
animals today. Special attention is given to the factual basis for the theories 
of special creation and evolution. Credit can be applied toward either a 
Biology or a Religion major or minor. Three lectures each week. (Fall) 

BIOL 408. Systematic Botany 3 hours 

Prerequisite: BIOL 156 or consent of instructor. 

A study of flowering plants in their natural environment and detailed 
microscopic study of them in the laboratory. Students will learn to identify 
plants with the aid of botanical keys and to recognize plant families. The 
importance of accurate plant identification is revealed by the study of 
poisonous plants, plants of medical importance, and noxious weeds. Two 
lectures and one field trip or laboratory period each week. (Fall) 

BIOL 411. Mammalogy 3 hours 

Prerequisites: BIOL 155, 156 or consent of instructor. 
A study of the mammals of the world, with emphasis on North America. 
Includes classroom and field study of systematics, distribution, behavior 
and ecology. Two lectures and one laboratory each week. (Taught every 
third year) 



BIOL 412. Cell Biology 3 hours 

Prerequisites: BIOL 155, 156; CHEM 311, 312. 

This course, designed for advanced biology and chemistry majors, deals 
primarily with cell structure and function. Building on cellular principles 
learned in BIOL 155, 156, the student is exposed to methods of cellular 
research while learning about the appearance and operation of cellular 
organelles. The exciting details of cell integration and control provide the 



Biology 



50 



framework for this interdisciplinary study. Three lectures each week. (Fall, 
odd years) 

BIOL 415. Comparative Anatomy 3 hours 

Prerequisite: BIOL 155, 156 or consent of instructor. 
A comparison of the anatomy of the various organ systems of vertebrates. 
The dogfish shark, mud puppy, cat, and/or fetal pig are used for laboratory 
study. Two lectures and one laboratory period each week. (Spring) 

BIOL 417. Animal Histology 3 hours 

Prerequisite: BIOL 155, 156 or consent of instructor. 
A descriptive study of normal tissues, including those of man. The micro- 
scopic identification and characteristics of stained section is emphasized in 
the laboratory. One lecture and two laboratory periods each week. (Fall, 
even years) 

BIOL 418. Animal Physiology 3 hours 

Prerequisite: BIOL 106, 156, or equivalent and CHEM 151:152 or equivalent 
A study of the principles of animal function with special attention to man. 
Two lectures and one laboratory period each week. (Spring) 

BIOL 419. Plant Physiology 3 hours 

Prerequisite: BIOL 155, 156 and CHEM 151:152 or consent of instructor. 
A study of the functions of seed plants. Topics covered include water 
relations, mineral nutrition, photosynthesis, transpiration, translocation, 
respiration, and growth. Two lectures and one laboratory period each week. 
(Spring) 

BIOL 485. Biology Seminar (W) 1 hour 

Open to Biology majors or minors only or with approval of Biology staff. 
Reports are made on some specific problem in the field of Biology and on 
current literature in the field. To be taken in the senior year or with approval 
of Division Chairman. (Fall or Spring) 

BIOL 295/495. Directed Study 1-3 hours 

Prerequisite: BIOL 155, 156 or equivalent. 

BIOL 495 open to Biology majors or minors only. 

Designed for the student who wishes to do private study or research or for a 

group of students who wish a special course not listed in the regular 

offerings. Examples: entamology, economic botany, animal behavior, etc. 

Content and method of study must be arranged for prior to registration. (Fall 

or Spring) 

BIOL 497. Introduction to Research (W) 1-2 hours 

Prerequisite: 20 hours of biology or permission of the instructor. 
Individual research under the direction of members of the staff. Problems 
will be selected according to the interest and experience of the student. Prior 
to registration students are urged to contact all biology staff members with 
respect to the choice of available research problems. This course should be 
taken not later than the first semester of trie senior year. (Fall, Spring) 



Biology 



EDUCATION 



EDUC 438. Methods of Teaching Biology 2 hours 

Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. 

Attention is given to methods and materials of instruction; planning, test- 
ing, and evaluating student performances; and the survey and evaluation of 
textbooks. Four lectures each week of the first half of the second semester 
during the senior year. (Spring) 

(E-l), (G-2), (W) See pages 14-16 for explanation of General Education require- 
ments. 



ROSARIO BEACH MARINE BIOLOGICAL FIELD STATION 

The Rosario Beach Marine Station is a teaching and research facility 
operated by Walla Walla College in affiliation with Southern College 
and other Adventist colleges. Located seven miles south of Anacortes, 
Washington, the station occupies 40 acres of beach and timberland 
including a high hill and canyon. 

In addition to some of the biology courses listed in this catalog, the 
following will be taught during the summer at Rosario Beach: 

BIOL 200. Introduction to Marine Biology 3 hours 

An overview course designed to introduce general education students to the 
biology and ecology of the marine environment. Course not applicable to 
biology majors. 

BIOL 475. Marine Invertebrates 3 hours 

A description of selected groups of marine invertebrates. The course will 
involve extensive collection, classification, and study of the marine inver- 
tebrates of the Puget Sound. 

BIOL 516. Behavior of Marine Organisms 3 hours 

Prerequisites: Animal Behavior or Intro to Psychology. 
A study of intra- and interspecific behaviors of marine animals and their 
behavioral responses to the physical environment. The course involves 
laboratory experiences, field observation, and a research project. 



51 






Business Administration 



52 



BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

Richard Erickson, M.B.A. 

William Richards, Ph.D., Leave of Absence 

Cecil Rolfe, Ph.D. 

Dan Rozell, M.A. 

Wayne VandeVere, Ph.D., Chairman 

The courses and programs offered by the department are designed to! 
prepare students for business-related careers with the church, govern- 
ment, industry, and in long-term health care. 

The objectives of the department are: 

1. To give the student a broad background of knowledge of the free 
enterprise system within a framework of moral and ethical 
guidelines. 

2. To assist the student to develop a sound Christian philosophy 
towards our current economic environment and the ever changing 
business world of the future. 

3 . To provide the student with a quality academic program with basic 
business skills required for initial job placement. 

4. To encourage Seventh-day Adventist students to serve as workers! 
and in positions of business leadership within organizations spon- 1 
sored by this denomination. 

5. To provide the necessary academic background for entrance into 
most graduate degree programs in business. 

The department offers a Bachelor of Business Administration degree! 
(B.B.A.) with majors in accounting and management and a Bachelor of | 
Science degree (B.S.) with majors in Business Administration, and 
Long-Term Health Care. 

For those who desire a two-year program, an Associate of Science 
degree (A.S.) is available in Accounting. 

BACHELOR OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION DEGREE 

The B.B.A. degree requires a basic core of business courses plus a 
major in accounting or management. Basic Core Course requirements are 
as follows: 

ACCT 121:122 Principles of Accounting 6 hours 

ACCT 321 Cost and Managerial Accounting I 3 hours 

ECON 224:225 Principles of Economics 6 hours 

BUAD 313 Business Statistics 3 hours 

BUAD 314 Quantitative Methods for 

Business Decisions 3 hours! 

BUAD 315 Business Finance 3 hours 

BUAD 326 Introduction to Marketing 3 hours 



Business Administration 



BUAD 334 Principles of Management 3 hours 

BUAD 337:338 Business Law 6 hours 

BUAD 488 Seminar in Business Administration . . 1 hour 

SECR 315 Business Communications _3^ hours 

TOTAL 40 hours 
Major — Accounting: 23 hours plus the above B.B.A. Core Require- 
ments: 

ACCT 211:212 Intermediate Accounting 6 hours 

ACCT 317 Federal Income Taxes 4 hours 

ACCT 322 Cost & Managerial Accounting II 3 hours 

ACCT 417 Auditing 4 hours 

Accounting electives 3 hours 

BUAD 357 Business Ethics 

or 3 hours 

BUAD 414 Business Policies _ 

TOTAL 23 hours 

Major — Management: 23 hours plus the above B.B.A. Core Require- 
ments: 

ACCT 211 Intermediate Accounting /. . . 3 hours 

BUAD 344 Human Resource Management 3 hours 

BUAD 353 Management of a Small Business 3 hours 

BUAD 355 Organizational Behavior 2 hours 

BUAD 357 Business Ethics 3 hours 

BUAD 414 Business Policies 3 hours 

BUAD 347 Business and Government 

or 3 hours 

ECON 314 Money & Banking 

Electives in ACCT, BUAD, or ECON . . 3_ hours 

TOTAL 23 hours 

Among the General Education Requirements, the B.B.A. degree stu- 
dent must include SPCH 135, a course in Psychology, and CPTR 127. 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE DEGREES 

Major — Business Administration: Forty-three hours including ACCT 
121:122, 211; BUAD 313, 314, 315, 326, 334, 337, 338, 357, 414, 488; 
ECON 224, 225; plus three hours in ACCT, BUAD, or ECON. Cognate 
§&quirements: CPTR 127 and SECR 315. 

Major — Long-Term Health Care: Forty-seven hours including ACCT 
121:122; BUAD 315, 334, 337, 338, 357, 431, 432, 434, 435, 497; ECON 
224, 225. Cognate requirement: CPTR 127. 

Minor — Business Administration: Eighteen hours including ACCT 
121:122; ECON 213 or 224; BUAD 334 or 344; and six hours of upper 
division courses in Accounting, Economics or Business Administration. 



Business Administration 



ASSOCIATE OF SCIENCE DEGREE 

3*1 Major — Accounting: Thirty hours for the Associate of Science degree, 

including ACCT 121:122, 211:212, 321; BUAD 128, 337; ECON 213 or 
224; plus six hours electives in Accounting, Economics and Business 
Administration. Cognate requirement: CPTR 127, SECR 105, or equiva- 
lent. 

Teaching Endorsements: The student must earn a major in the subject 
area of his first teaching field. He may add the following endorsements 
by meeting the number of hours indicated below. 

Bookkeeping 
ACCT 121:122 



ECON 224 or 
ECON 225 



BUAD 337 or 

338 
BUAD 128 
SECR 315 



Principles of Accounting 6 hours 

Accounting elective 4 hours 

Principles of Economics 3 hours 

Two of the following three 

areas for a total of 6 hours 

Business Law (3) 

Personal Finance (3) 
Business Communications (3) 

TOTAL 19 hours 



Business Law 

ACCT 121 Principles of Accounting 3 hours 

ECON 224 or Principles of Economics 3 hours 

ECON 225 

BUAD 337, 338 Business Law 6 hours 

Business elective 3 hours 

BUAD 128 or Personal Finance (3) 3 hours 

SECR 315 Business Communications (3) 

TOTAL 18 hours 

The student must apply to the Department of Education for admission 
to the Teacher Education Program and the professional semester before 
the end of the sophomore and junior years, respectively. 



ACCOUNTING 

ACCT 103. College Accounting (G-2) 3 hours 

This course covers the fundamental accounting processes dealing with the 
bookkeeping and accounting functions for the small business, professional 
offices, merchandising firms and service organizations. This course does 
not apply towards a bachelor's degree offered by the Division of Business 
and Office Administration. (Spring) 



Business Administration 



ACCT 121:122. Principles of Accounting (G-2) 3,3 hours 

A course designed to introduce the student to the fundamentals of account- 
ing generally recognized as "Generally Accepted Accounting Principles.'* 
The theory of debit and credit, transaction analysis, financial statement 
preparation, analysis of basic balance sheet accounts, income recognition, 
and basic management accounting concepts are covered. (Fall, Spring, 
Summer) 

ACCT 211:212. Intermediate Accounting 3,3 hours 

Prerequisite: ACCT 121:122. 

An advanced course in accounting principles and theory including prepara- 
tion of financial statements, intensive study and analysis of the classifica- 
tion and evaluation of balance sheet accounts and their related income and 
expense accounts. (Fall, Spring) 

ACCT 316. Fund and Institutional Accounting 3 hours 

Prerequisite: ACCT 121:122. 

A course designed to provide an in-depth coverage of the concepts of fund 
accounting as they apply to governmental units and not-for-profit institu- 
tions including schools, hospitals, and churches. Considerable attention 
will be given to accounting principles as used by the various institutions of 
the Seventh-day Adventist Churcn. (Fall) 

ACCT 317. Federal Income Taxes 4 hours 

Prerequisite: ACCT 121:122. 

A course designed to provide an explanation and training in the application 
of personal and corporate Federal income taxes to specific problems. Social 
Security taxes are also included. (Spring) 

ACCT 321. Cost and Managerial Accounting I 3 hours 

Prerequisite: ACCT 122. 

A study of cost accounting fundamentals with emphasis on accounting as a 
managerial tool. Special attention is given to cost-volume-profit relation- 
ships, job-order costing, budgeting, standard costing, capital budgeting, 
cost behavior patterns, transfer pricing, and divisional performance meas- 
urement. (Fall) 

ACCT 322. Cost and Managerial Accounting II 3 hours 

Prerequisites: ACCT 321 and BUAD 313. 

An in-depth study of the more technical aspects of cost accounting systems, 
including cost allocations, joint product and by-product accounting, actual, 
standard, and direct cost methods. Process cost is emphasized. The more 
quantitative aspects of management are covered including decision-making 
under uncertainty, inventory control, cost behavior and regression analysis, 
the variance investigation decision, and mix and yield variances. (Spring) 

ACCT 415. Advanced Accounting 3 hours 

Prerequisite: ACCT 211:212. 

A course designed to study the problems concerned with consolidated 
financial statements, partnerships, business firms in financial difficulty, 
estates and trusts, foreign exchange, and segment reporting. (Spring) 



Business Administration 



56 



ACCT 417. Auditing 4 hours 

Prerequisite: ACCT 211:212. 

A course designed to study auditing and its related types of public account- 
ing work including generally accepted auditing standards, professional 
code of ethics of the AICPA, and auditing procedures. (Fall) 

ACCT 418, 419. C.P.A. Review Problems 3,3 hours 

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 

A course designed to study accounting theory, auditing, accounting prac- 
tice, and business law as exemplified by the official accounting pro- 
nouncements of the AICPA and FASB. (Fall, Spring) 



ECONOMICS 

ECON 213. Survey of Economics (C-2) 3 hours 

A course designed for the general education student. It provides an under- 
standing of the United States* mixed economy through a study of the market 
system, the role of money, the government's fiscal policy, and the impact of 
the foreign sector. This course does not apply on a major in accounting or 
management. No credit is available if ECON 224 or 225 has been taken. (Fall) 

ECON 224, 225. Principles of Economics (C-2) 3,3 hours 

A survey course in the fundamentals of economics; the institutions, forces, 
and factors affecting production, evaluation, exchange, and distribution of 
wealth in modern society. (Fall, Spring) 

ECON 314. Money and Banking 3 hours 

Prerequisite: ECON 224. 

Mediums of exchange, money and credit, banks and their services, the 

Federal Reserve System, and other financial institutions are considered. 

(Spring) 



BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

BUAD 128. Personal Finance (F-2) 3 hours 

A course in basic economic concepts and business terminology and prac- 
tices designed to provide the techniques to manage personal finances. 
Budgeting, consumerism, insurance, home ownership, and investments are 
included in the topics covered. (Fall, Spring, Summer) 

BUAD 313. Business Statistics 3 hours 

Prerequisite: CPTR 127 or MATH 104. 

Descriptive statistics; probability theory and applications including Baye- 
sian revision; the binomial, hypergeometric, Poisson, exponential, normal, 
student's t, chi-square, and F distributions; inferential statistics including 
sampling concepts, confidence intervals, and hypothesis testing; multiple 
regression and correlation; introductory time series analysis. This is an 
applied (rather than mathematical) approach to statistics, and emphasis will 
be placed on statistics as a tool of management for decision-making. (Fall) 



Business Administration 

BUAD 314. Quantitative Methods for Business Decisions 3 hours 

Prerequisite: BUAD 313. tVJ 

Linear programming — simplex method, primal/dual interpretation, trans- 
portation problems. Decision theory under classical and Bayesian statistics. 
Game theory, inventory models and control, queuing theory. Program 
Evaluation and Review Technique (PERT). (Spring) 

BUAD 315. Business Finance (W) 3 hours 

Prerequisite: ACCT 121:122. 

A study of the fundamental principles of financial organization. Emphasis 
on instruments of finance, policies of capitalization, problems pertaining to 
working capital, and corporate expansion and reorganization. (Fall) 

BUAD 326. Introduction to Marketing 3 hours 

A study of the nature and functions of marketing. Includes marketing 
institutions, basic problems in the marketing of commodities and services, 
price policies, and competitive practices. (Spring) 

BUAD 334. Principles of Management 3 hours 

A beginning course designed to study business management including an 
analysis of business policies viewed from the standpoint of the functional 
characteristics of the management process and current ethics. (Fall) 

BUAD 337, 338. Business Law 3,3 hours 

A course designed to study the nature and social functions of law including 
social control through law and the law of commercial transactions and 
business organizations. (Fall, Spring) 

BUAD 344. Human Resource Management 3 hours 

An introduction to the organization, training, motivation, and direction of 
employees with a view to maintaining their productivity and morale at high 
levels. Among topics covered are selection, training, compensation and 
financial incentives, work standards, techniques of supervision and leader- 
ship. (Spring) 

BUAD 347. Business and Government 3 hours 

A study of the ways in which business and economic life are shaped and 
directed by government. The legal framework within which business is 
conducted and the evolution of public policy toward business are 
examined. (Fall) 

BUAD 353. Management of a Small Business 3 hours 

A course on the principles and problems of organizing and operating a small 
business. Topics covered will include a procedural system for establishing a 
new business, providing physical facilities, financing, organizing, and the 
management of the small business. (Spring) 

BUAD 355. Organizational Behavior 2 hours 

This course examines the nature and consequences of human behavior in 
work organizations. Primary emphasis is placed on the interaction between 
employee needs and organizational requirements, and on the role of man- 
agement in facilitating mutual goal attainment. Topics covered include: 



Business Administration 



58 



individual differences, perception and attitude formation, motivation, job 
design, group processes, conflict, leadership, decision making, and change 
and development processes. (Spring) 

BUAD 357. Business Ethics 3 hours 

The ethical and social responsibility of individual managers and the firm are 
examined as they relate to the needs and demands of society in a Christian 
environment. Topical issues include social responsibility, personal rela- 
tions, environmental impact, consumerism, product liability, and discrimi- 
nation. (Spring) 

BUAD 414. Business Policies {W) 3 hours 

Prerequisite: BUAD 334. 

This course of study is designed to give the student experience in 
decision-making and problem-solving through the case method. The atten- 
tion of the student is directed to defining, analyzing, and proposing alterna- 
tive solutions to business problems from management's viewpoint. (Spring) 

BUAD 425. Investment Analysis (W) 3 hours 

Prerequisite: ACCT 121. 

A practical, as well as a theoretical, approach is taken for the potential 
investor of institutional or personal funds through the use of problems, 
readings, and cases. Topics covered will include stocks and bonds in the 
security market, real estate, and fixed equipment investments. (Spring) 

BUAD 431. General Administration of the 

Long-Term Care Facility 3 hours 

A study of management tools and techniques including theories of organiza- 
tion and management, mechanisms for planning, organizing, directing, and 
controlling. Includes review of licensing requirements, insurance, business 
law, human relations, public relations. (Summer) 

BUAD 432. Technological Aspects of Long-Term Care 3 hours 

A detailed study of the technical aspects of long-term care administration 
including a review of the history and philosophy of facilities, the relation- 
ship to other health care facilities in the total health care delivery system, 
and technically related medical relationships and services. (Summer) 

BUAD 434. Financial Management of the 

Long-Term Care Facility 3 hours 

A review of techniques and interpretation of financial information for man- 
agement decision-making in the long-term care facility. (Summer) 

BUAD 435. Human Resource Management and Marketing of the 

Long-Term Care Facility 3 hours 

A study of the organization, training, motivation, and direction of 
employees with a view to maintaining their productivity and morale at a 
high level. Selection, compensation, financial incentives, work standards, 
and leadership are the topics that will be covered. Marketing functions, 
problems, services, and competitive practices will also be covered. (Sum- 



Business Administration 

BUAD 488. Seminar in Business Administration 1 hour 

This course will include the Eugene Anderson Lecture Series in business. ^Q 
Top men and women in their field will present lectures in insurance, real ** ^ 
estate, finance, retailing, production management, etc. Attendance at ten 
lectures will be required. This course may be repeated for credit. (Spring) 

BUAD 295/495. Directed Study 1-2 hours 

Individual research work open only to business majors. Content to be ar- 
ranged. Approval must be secured from Division Chairman prior to registra- 
tion. (Fall, Spring) 

BUAD 497. Long-Term Care Administration Internship 8 hours 

A tailored program of management experience in a selected long-term care 
facility will include 400 clock hours of on-the-job experience. One-third 
regular tuition rate. (Fall, Spring, Summer) 

(C-2), (F-2), (G-2), (W) See pages 14-16 for explanation of General Education 
requirements. 









Chemistry 



■CHEMISTRY- 



Wiley Austin, M.S. 

Mitchell Thiel, Ph.D. 

Steven Warren, Ph.D., Chairman 

Since everything we touch, eat, wear, or use is made of chemicals, the 
study of chemistry is an exciting and yet practical pursuit. A major in 
Chemistry can be your key to a rewarding and challenging career in a 
wide variety of areas such as the basic sciences or industrial research, 
pharmacology, toxicology, chemical engineering, forensic chemistry, 
chemistry education, medical and paramedical careers, as well as many 
business applications such as pharmaceutical and chemical sales, patent 
research and patent law, marketing and consulting, to name just a few. 

The B.S. degree in Chemistry is recommended in preparation for 
graduate study leading to research oriented careers, professional appli- 
cations of chemistry, or post-secondary education. The B.A. degree is the 
preferred degree for high-school teaching, premedicine, or preparamed- 
ical fields and possibly for some of the business applications. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE IN CHEMISTRY 

Major: Thirty hours including CHEM 151:152, 311:312, 313:314, 315, 
321, 485 or 497. CHEM 411:412, 413:414 may be substituted for CHEM 
315, 321. The first course in Calculus is a cognate requirement. CPTR 125 
or 131 is strongly recommended. 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE DEGREE IN CHEMISTRY 

Major: Forty hours including CHEM 151:152, 311:312, 313:314, 315, 
321, 325, 411, 412, 413, 414, 485, and 497 are required. Cognate require- 
ments are: PHYS 211:212, 213:214, MATH 115, 217 or 315, CPTR 125 or 
131. German or French is highly recommended. This course of study is 
designed for the professional chemist. 

Minor: Eighteen hours, six of which must be upper division. 

Teaching Endorsement: The student must earn a major in the subject 
area of his first teaching field. He may add the following endorsements 
by meeting the number of hours indicated below. 

Chemistry 

CHEM 151:152 General Chemistry 8 hours 

Chemistry electives _8 hours 

TOTAL 16 hours 
General Science 

BIOL 155, 156 Foundations of Biology 8 hours 

Chemistry and Physics electives _8 hours 

TOTAL 16 hours 






Chemistry 

The student must apply to the Department of Education for admission 
to the Teacher Education Program and the professional semester before ft 1 
the end of the sophomore and junior years, respectively. " 

CHEM 103. Pre-General Chemistry 2 hours 

Prerequisite: Successful completion of two years of high school algebra or 
MATH 104. 

Basic concepts in chemistry and mathematics as needed to begin General 
Chemistry. Two hours of lecture each week. Does not apply on a major or 
minor in chemistry. Taught second semester only. (Spring) 

CHEM 111:112. Survey of Chemistry (E-2) 3,3 hours 

Prerequisite: A course in high school algebra. A minimum Mathematics 
ACT score of 12 or a minimum grade of "C" in MATH 099 are required. 
A survey course designed to familiarize the student with the basic princi- 
ples of inorganic, organic and biochemistry. Three hours of lecture each 
week. Does not apply to a major or minor in chemistry. (Fall, Spring, 
Summer) 

CHEM 113:114. Survey of Chemistry Laboratory (E-2) 1,1 hours 

Prerequisite: Previous or concurrent enrollment in CHEM 111:112. 
Laboratory material designed to illustrate the material in lectures of CHEM 
111:112. Three hours of laboratory each week. Does not apply on a major or 
minor in chemistry. (Fall, Spring) 

CHEM 151:152. General Chemistry (E-2) 4,4 hours 

Prerequisites: High school chemistry and mathematics through Inter- 
mediate Algebra or Pre-General Chemistry. 

An introduction to the fundamental laws and accepted theories along with 
applications to the various fields of chemistry. Three hours of lecture and 
three hours of laboratory each week. (Fall, Spring) 

CHEM 203. Concepts of Biochemistry (E-2) 4 hours 

Prerequisite: CHEM 111 or successful completion of a high school chemistry 

course. 

A review of basic chemistry and an introduction to the fundamental organic 

chemistry and biochemistry of the body with emphasis on physiological 

chemistry. Three hours of lecture and 2% hours of lab each week. Does not 

apply on a major or minor in chemistry. (Fall, Spring) 

CHEM 311:312. Organic Chemistry 3,3 hours 

Prerequisite: Successful completion of CHEM 151:152 or its equivalent. 
Many of the fundamental functional groups of both aliphatic and aromatic 
carbon compounds are studied. Attention is also given to spectroscopy, 
relative reactivities, reaction mechanisms and physical properties of these 
compounds. There are three hours of lecture each week. (Fall, Spring) 

CHEM 313:314. Organic Chemistry Laboratory 3,3 hours 

Prerequisite: Previous or concurrent enrollment in CHEM 311:312. 
Experiments are done to acquaint the student with the basic organic chemis- 
try laboratory techniques: melting points, boiling points, recrystallization, 



Chemistry 



distillation, separations, etc. The exercises also illustrate reactions that are 
discussed in CHEM 311:312. Four hours of laboratory each week, (Fall, 
Spring) 

CHEM 315. Analytical Chemistry 4 hours 

Prerequisite: CHEM 151:152. 

A study of equilibria in the context of analytical chemistry. Techniques of 
determinations, sampling, handling of data, and the detailed chemistry 
involved is studied in terms of quantitative determinations. Three hours of 
lecture and three hours of laboratory each week. (Fall) 

CHEM 321. Instrumental Analysis 4 hours 

Prerequisite: CHEM 315. 

A study of the theories, techniques and instruments involved in spec- 
trometry, chromatography, electrochemistry and radiochemistry. Three lec- 
tures and one laboratory session per week. (Spring) 

CHEM 323. Biochemistry 4 hours 

Prerequisite: CHEM 311:312. 

The materials, mechanisms, and end products of the processes of life under 
normal and pathological conditions are studied. Four hours of lecture each 
week. (Spring) 

CHEM 325. Organic Qualitative Analysis 2 or 3 hours 

Prerequisite: CHEM 311:312; 313:314. 

Application of solubility principles, classification reactions, and the prep- 
aration of derivatives for the identification of both pure compounds and 
mixtures. Two hours of lecture for nine weeks, and three or six hours of 
laboratory each week. Offered on sufficient demand. (Fall) 

CHEM 333. Advanced Inorganic Chemistry 3 hours 

Prerequisite: CHEM 151:152. 

A systematic discussion of the elements including a study of coordination 
compounds, noble gases, and the current bonding theories. Three hours of 
lecture each week. (Fall, even years) 

CHEM 411. Physical Chemistry 3 hours 

Prerequisites:CHEMl51:152;CPTRl25or218;PHYS211:212;MATH115. 

A study of gases, kinetic theory, liquids, solids, and thermodynamics. Three 
hours of lecture each week. Taught alternate years. (Fall, even years) 

CHEM 412. Physical Chemistry 3 hours 

Prerequisite: CHEM 411. 

A study of electrochemistry and conductivity, reaction kinetics, molecular 
structure, nuclear chemistry, absorption and colloids. Three hours of lecture 
each week. Taught alternate years. (Spring, odd years) 

CHEM 413, 414. Physical Chemistry Laboratory 1,1 hours 

Prerequisites: CHEM 315, also CHEM 411, 412 must be taken concurrently 
or previously. 



Experiments chosen to illustrate material in CHEM 411,412. One laboratory 
period each week. (Fall, Spring) 



Chemistry 
63 



CHEM 485. Chemistry Seminar (W) 1 hour 

Prerequisite: CHEM 311:312. 

Written and oral reports are made on specific topics in the chemistry field. 

To be taken in the junior or senior year. (Fall) 

CHEM 295/495. Directed Study 1-3 hours 

Prerequisite: CHEM 151:152. 

Designed for junior and senior students who wish to do private study or for a 
group of students who wish a special course on topics not taught under the 
regular class offerings. (Fall, Spring) 

CHEM 497. Introduction to Research (W) 1 to 2 hours 

Prerequisite: 20 hours of chemistry or permission of the instructor. 
Individual research under the direction of the members of the staff. Prob- 
lems are assigned according to the experience and interest of the student. 
Prior to registration, two semesters before graduation, students are urged to 
contact all chemistry staff members with respect to choice of available 
problems. Should be taken not later than the first semester of the senior year. 
(Fall, Spring) 

EDUCATION 

EDUC 438. Methods of Teaching Chemistry 2 hours 

Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. 

Attention is given to methods and materials of instruction, planning, test- 
ing, and evaluating student performances, the survey and evaluation of 
textbooks. Four lectures each week of the first half of the second semester 
during the senior year. (Spring) 

Taught at the Orlando Center 
CHEM 203. Concepts of Biochemistry (E-2) 4 hours 

(E-2), (W) See pages 14-16 for explanation of General Education requirements. 



Communication 



64 



COMMUNICATION 

Frances Andrews, M.A. 
Don Dick, Ph.D., Chairman 
Frank Di Memmo, M.S. 
Olson Perry, M.A. 

The objective of the Communication Department is to prepare stu- 
dents to become more effective Christian communicators. The essence of 
the gospel commission is to communicate with all. Therefore, the cur- 
riculum emphasizes flexibility and breadth. Graduates find employment 
in a variety of careers. They work in denominational positions in 
churches, hospitals, schools, offices, and broadcasting stations. Others 
take business or government positions. 

The department offers courses in journalism, radio and television, 
speech, and public relations. An effort is made to place students in 
internships to acquire experience in their chosen fields. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE IN COMMUNICATION 

Major: Thirty hours including basic requirements of CRTF 101, 225, 
226; JOUR 111, 334; SPCH 135, 319; and twelve hours in the Radio-TV- 
Film or the Journalism emphasis. Cognate requirements: INDS 145 and 
six hours intermediate foreign language. Communication majors may 
substitute three hours — six, with approval of the department chair- 
man — of computer science for intermediate foreign language. Recom- 
mended computer science courses are: for three hours, CPTR 120 or 127 
(or 105, 106, 107); for six hours, CPTR 120 and 127 (or 105, 106, 107), or 
CPTR 131 and 132. 

Journalism Emphasis— JOUR 212, 316, 427; CRTF 312 plus two hours 
elected within the overall Communication offerings. This degree 
program is designed to provide the skills and practices needed for a 
career in the print media. Attention is given not only to concepts of 
communicating secular information, but also to sharing the gospel. 

Radio-TV-Film Emphasis— CRTF 112, 313, and 314, plus five hours 
elected within the overall Communication offerings, two of which 
must be in Radio-TV-Film. This degree program is designed to 
prepare the student for a career in audio and video media within the 
church, in business, government, education, and in public or com- 
mercial broadcasting. 

Minor — Communication: Eighteen hours of Communication classes 
including SPCH 135, 319; JOUR 111; CRTF 101, 226; with a minimum of 
six hours of upper division work from overall Communication offerings. 

Minor — Radio-TV-Film: Eighteen hours of Communication classes 
including CRTF 101, 225, 226, 313; SPCH 135, 319; with a minimum of 
six hours within the minor to be upper division in Radio-TV-Film. 



Communication 

Minor — Journalism: Eighteen hours including JOUR 111, 212, 334 
and CRTF 225, 226, with a minimum of six hours in upper division fi^j 
Journalism courses. 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE DEGREE IN PUBLIC RELATIONS 

Major: Forty-five hours including CRTF 101, 225, 226, 312, 313, and 
418; JOUR111, 212, 315, 334, 427, 435, and 495; SPCH 135, 136, and 319; 
and a three-hour Communication elective. Cognate requirements: BUAD 
326, in addition to those listed for the B.A. degree (above). Recom- 
mended are design (ART 109, 110), Art and Ideas (HMNT 205), and 
appropriate classes in history, political science, and literature. 

Intended to prepare the student for a career in public relations in 
institutions or business firms, this degree program provides a 
background in public relations, journalism, print communication, pub- 
lic speaking, audio and video, and interpersonal communication. 

ASSOCIATE OF SCIENCE DEGREE IN MEDIA TECHNOLOGY 

This two-year curriculum is especially designed for the technically 
oriented student interested primarily in the production and operational 
aspects of media. Students completing this degree can continue and 
complete a baccalaureate degree in Communication (Radio-TV-Film 
emphasis) without loss of educational time. 

Major: Thirty hours including CRTF 101, 112, 217, 225, 313, 418, plus 
five hours in departmental electives; INDS 145, 274; CPTR 120, 125, or 
127 (or 105, 106, and 107); LIBR 333; with general education courses to 
meet CATALOG requirements and sufficient electives to make a total of 64 
semester hours. Cognate requirement: ENGL 102. 

Radio Station 

Communication students at Southern College have opportunities for 
realistic learning experiences in connection with the college radio sta- 
tion, WSMC FM90.5, and those who include Radio-TV-Film courses in 
their preparation are encouraged to participate in the many aspects of its 
total program. 

College Publications 

The journalistic output of the Public Relations office of the college, the 
editing of the Associated Press broadcast wire service copy in addition to 
gathering and writing local news for WSMC FM90.5 and the Student 
Association publications — Campus Chatter, Southern Accent, Southern 
Memories, and Joker — all provide students with varied opportunities to 
put journalistic principles into practice. 

On-the-job Training in Journalism, Public Relations, and Radio-TV- 
Film 

A program of journalism and public relations on-the-job training for 



Communication 



selected communication majors has been developed. This program 
fifi (which has been approved by the General Conference of Seventh-day 
Adventists) calls for a student to associate with a church publishing 
house or an educational or medical institution for an arranged period 
working directly with the institution in its editing, publishing, or public 
relations activities. A scholarship is provided for the student and a 
proportionate amount of academic credit is available in JOUR 495. 

A program of broadcasting and audio-visual media on-the-job training 
is also available. This program calls for a student to associate with a 
commercial or noncommercial broadcasting or production organization 
for an arranged period, working directly with professionals in various 
phases of radio or TV station operation or production. A scholarship is 
occasionally provided for the student and a proportionate amount of 
academic credit is available in CRTF or JOUR 495. 

RADIO-TV-FILM 

CRTF 101. Audio Production I (G-2) 1 hour 

Operation of mixing consoles, tape recorders, turntables, microphones, etc., 
focusing on the basic audio production techniques of mixing, recording, 
and editing. Meets two hours each week for lecture and demonstration 
during the first half of each semester. Reservations for two hours per week of 
individual control room practice and production time made at registration. 
Supplies fee $7.00. (Fall, Spring) 

CRTF 112. Audio Production II (G-l) 1 hour 

Prerequisite: CRTF 101. (CRTF 112 follows CRTF 101 the second nine weeks 

of each semester.) 

Advanced editing and mixing, multi-channel recording, microphone 

Slacement for music, signal processing, analyzing audio, audio dramas, 
1m sound-tracks, etc. Meets two hours weekly for lecture and demonstra- 
tion during second half of semester. Two hours per week of individual 
studio production time arranged. Supplies fee $7.00. (Fall, Spring) 

CRTF 217. Radio Station Operations 2 hours 

Prerequisite: Current or previous enrollment in CRTF 101. 
A laboratory course where the student becomes familiar with the day-to-day 
operations of a radio station. The course covers control room procedures, 
announcing, production, automation, teletype, copy editing, traffic, music 
programming, etc. Taught in conjunction with WSMC FM90.5. (Spring) 

CRTF 225. Introduction to Photography (G-l) 2 hours 

Standardized procedures for camera and meter use, film exposure and 
development, negative enlargement and print finishing, and basic lighting 
and composition. Students must have their own 35mm camera with adjust- 
able f-stops and shutter speeds. One hour of lecture, three hours of labora- 
tory each week. Supplies made available to class members at cost, approxi- 
mately $50. (Fall, Spring, Summer) 



Communication 



CRTF 226. Survey of Mass Communication (F-2) 3 hours 

A study of the communication process in the mass communication indus- ft 7 
tries of modern society, with special consideration of the Christian segment ** * 
of society, both as consumers and dispensers of information. Each student 
will establish criteria for his own choices from among products of the mass 
media. Supplies fee $10.00. (Spring) 

CRTF 312. Advanced Photography (G-l) 2 hours 

Prerequisite: CRTF 225 or equivalent. 

Advanced photographic techniques in camera handling, composition, ex- 
posure, and developing with special emphasis on creativity, darkroom 
techniques, and preparation for exhibit and publication. Students must 
have their own camera with adjustable f-stops and shutter speeds. One hour 
of lecture, three hours of laboratory each week. Supplies made available to 
class members at cost, approximately $75. (Fall, Spring) 

CRTF 313. Television Production 3 hours 

Prerequisites: CRTF 101 and 225. 

Camera, switcher, special effects generator, and videotape recorder opera- 
tion. Elementary TV lighting, scripting, production and direction. Study of 
TV graphics, picture composition, and storyboard preparation. Two hours 
of lecture and three hours of laboratory each week. (Spring) 

CRTF 314. Writing For Radio-TV (W) 3 hours 

Prerequisites: CRTF 101, 112, 313, and SECR 105 or equivalent. 
Emphasis on writing news for broadcast and persuasive spot announce- 
ments: commercials, religious spots, and public service announcements. 
May apply on Journalism emphasis. Supplies are made available to students 
at cost. (Spring) 

CRTF 414. Advanced TV Production 3 hours 

Prerequisite: CRTF 313. 

Writing, producing, and directing video productions of various types, 
utilizing ooth single camera with post-production editing, and multi- 
camera production in real-time. Advanced students provide leadership for 
beginning TV students. Two hours lecture and three hours lab each week. 
Supplies fee, $15. (Spring) 

CRTF 418. Multi-Image Production 3 hours 

Pre- or Co-requisite: CRTF 101 and 225. 

Instruction in conceptualizing, formating, scripting, visual composition, 
taking and developing color transparencies; titling and graphics, making a 
synchronized sound track, plus programming and operation of dissolve 
units and slide projectors. Goal: Creation of projector slide shows using 1-6 
projectors. Supplies made available to class at cost (approximately $50 per 
student). (Fall) 

CRTF 295/495. Directed Study 1-4 hours 

Four types of options are offered: 1) As demand is developed for certain 
specialized class instruction, the topic to be offered in a given term will be 
publicized prior to registration. 2) Individual projects in various aspects of 
communication on an independent study basis may be arranged. 3) This 



Communication 



course provides opportunity, among other options, for on-the-job training. 
4) This course also includes credit offered by the Communication Depart- 
ment on directed study tours. Proposals must be submitted to the Division 
Chairman for approval before registering. Course may be repeated. Up to 
four hours may apply on a Communication major or minor. (Fall, Spring, 
Summer). See also JOUR 295/495. (See page 69). 

JOURNALISM/PUBLIC RELATIONS 

JOUR 111. News Reporting 3 hours 

Prerequisite: ENGL 102, and SECR 105 or equivalent. 
Practice in newswriting and general reporting of church, school, and com- 
munity affairs for the public press. Study is given to the duties of the reporter 
in newsgathering and to his relationship to editorial requirements. (Fall, 
Summer) 

JOUR 212. News Editing 2 hours 

Prerequisite: JOUR 111. 

Instruction is given in copy editing, headline writing, layout, and other 
editorial responsibilities through the various phases of newspaper produc- 
tion from copy to final print form. (Spring) 

JOUR 315. Layout and Design of Publications 3 hours 

Prerequisite: INDS 145. 

Editorial techniques and problems from the arrival of the manuscript in the 
editor's office until the publication reaches the reader. Relationships with 
authors, manuscript handling, payment, layout and illustrations; relation- 
ships with art, composing, proofreading, and press rooms; circulation and 
distribution problems as they affect the editor. (Fall) 

JOUR 316. Magazine Article Writing (W) 3 hours 

Prerequisite: ENGL 102, and SECR 105 or equivalent. 

Preparation and marketing of feature and religious articles for newspapers 

and magazines, market analysis, writing for specialized markets. (Spring) 

JOUR 334. Public Relations 3 hours 

Designed to give professional competence in the theory and practice of 
public relations, the course is a study of the plans and methods of dis- 
seminating information from business establishments and from institutions 
through all the media of communication. (Fall) 

JOUR 427. Communication Law 3 hours 

The nature and social functions of the major forms of communication laws 
and regulations and especially as pertains to the mass media: libel, slander, 
copyright, FCC and FTC Rules and Regulations, etc. This course may apply 
to the Radio-TV-Film emphasis. (Spring, odd years) 

JOUR 435. Case Studies in Public Relations 3 hours 

Prerequisite: JOUR 334. 

An examination of the characteristics of successful public relations cam- 
paigns. Emphasis is given to public relations planning and evaluating, as 



Communication 
69 



well as to advanced techniques in news publicity, controlled media public- 
ity, and media relations. Professional practitioners frequently lecture as 
guest specialists. (Spring, even years) 

JOUR 295/495. Public Relations Practicum-Internship 1-4 hours 

Students work full time at a journalistic, public relations, or broadcasting 
enterprise. Students must apply to the employing organization and (for 3 
credits) be accepted to work for ten weeks under the direction of a profes- 
sional. Grading is by a departmental instructor based on a daily journal and 
on evaluation by the professional. Requirements for enrollment include 
adequate background, at least junior standing, and consent of the instructor. 
(Fall, Spring, Summer). See also CRTF 295/495. (See page 67). 

SPEECH 

SPCH 135. Introduction to Public Speaking (D-4) 3 hours 

Preparation and presentation of short informative and persuasive speeches 
with emphasis on the selection and organization of material, reasoning, 
methods of securing interest, persuasive strategies, and the elements of 
delivery. (Fall, Spring, Summer) 

SPCH 136. Interpersonal Communication (D-4) 2 hours 

Introducing the process of informal transactional communication, this 
course emphasizes a quality of communication rather than a communica- 
tion setting, namely personal involvement through emphatic listening and 
self-disclosure. The course utilizes readings and learning activities to help 
students understand the theory of interpersonal communication and apply 
it in realistic transactions. (Fall, Spring) 

SPCH 236. Oral Interpretation (D-4) 2 hours 

Theory and practice in the art of conveying to others the full meaning of 
selections in literature of various types via reading and interpreting orally. 
(Fall, Spring) 

SPCH 319. Communication Theory (W) 3 hours 

Prerequisites: SPCH 135 and ENGL 102. 

Introducing the study of communication transactions in all arenas — 
intrapersonal, interpersonal, small group, public speaking, and mass 
media — this course gives attention to models of communication and to the 
psychology, sociology, semantics, and ethics of the communication proc- 
ess. This course may apply to the Journalism minor. (Fall) 

SPCH 295/495. Directed Study 1-4 hours 

See 295/495 listings under CRTF and JOUR. (Fall, Spring, Summer) 

(D-4), (G-l), (G-2), (W) See pages 14-16 for explanation of General Education 
requirements. 



Computer Science 



70 



-COMPUTER SCIENCE- 



John Beckett, B.A. 
Lawrence Hanson, Ph.D. 
Timothy Korson, M.S., Chairman 
Merritt MacLafferty, M.A. 

Computer Science deals with the control programs that govern the 
behavior of modern digital computers. In modern society, it is rare that a 
day passes without the average person interacting, in some way, with 
computers. From the tiny microcomputers that govern the fuel con- 
sumption of automobiles to the huge machines that process the millions 
of transactions in the marketplace, the computer has become an insepar- 
able part of modern life. 

With the burgeoning use of computers, however, comes the alarming 
fact that there will continue to be a shortage of computer professionals. 
Formerly, companies were willing to hire and train applicants with 
minimal formal computer knowledge. In today's high technology soci- 
ety, however, employers expect applicants to already possess substan- 
tial skills and knowledge, such as are gained by earning a B.S. degree in 
Computer Science at Southern College. Once an individual has acquired 
these skills, the opportunities in industry, education, and research are 
excellent. 

The Southern College graduate will be well qualified to assume the 
responsibilities of an entry level programmer. Furthermore, he will have 
the training necessary for career advancement into positions such as 
Data Base Administrator, Systems Analyst, Systems Programmer, Team 
Leader, and Data Processing Administrator. 

CODE OF COMPUTER CONDUCT 
AT SOUTHERN COLLEGE 

1. Users must use only those computer accounts which have been 
authorized for their use. 

2. Users must use their computer accounts only for the purposes for 
which they were authorized, as arranged with the Computer Serv- 
ice Department. 

3. Users should minimize the impact of their work on the work of 
other users. It is the responsibility of the user to learn efficient 
means of utilizing the computer. 

4. Users must not attempt to subvert the restrictions associated with 
their computer accounts. 

5. Users must not attempt to access information concerning the data 
or jobs of other users except as provided by techniques arranged for 
that purpose by the Computer Service Department. 



Computer Science 

6. Student users shall not exceed default parameters for priority fac- 
tors except in cases where published policy provides for differ- 7 1 
ences. 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE DEGREE IN COMPUTER SCIENCE 

Major: Forty hours consisting of CPTR 127, 131, 132, 217, 219, 317, 
318, 319, 323, 409 or 410, 485 and nine hours of computer electives, 
three of which must be upper division. Cognates required: MATH 114, 
215 or BUAD 313, 334. 

Those electing a B.S. in computer science will recognize that they 
need an area of application and should thus plan substantial course work 
in another area, e.g., business, psychology, mathematics, or physics. To 
be well prepared for an immediate job, a double major should be consid- 
ered. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE IN COMPUTER SCIENCE 

Major: Thirty hours consisting of CPTR 127, 131, 132, 217, 219, 317, 
318, 319, 323, 485 and two hours of upper division computer electives. 
Cognates required: MATH 114, 215 or BUAD 313, 334. 

Minor: Eighteen hours including: CPTR 131, 132, 318. Of the remain- 
ing nine elective hours, three must be upper division. 

The minor is an excellent background for those whose profession is 
outside of data processing, but who will have to use the computer in 
their job, or work closely with DP personnel. The minor is also appro- 
priate for any student who simply has an interest in computers. 

ASSOCIATE OF SCIENCE DEGREE IN COMPUTER SCIENCE 

Major: Twenty-four hours in computer science consisting of: CPTR 
127, 131, 132, 217, 219, 317, 318, 319. Cognates required: ACCT 121, 
122, 321; BUAD 334. 

Students planning to do graduate work in computer science or desir- 
ing a more technical program should consult a computer science teacher 
as early as possible. 

CPTR 105. Word Processing (G-2) 1 hour 

Prerequisite: A typing course or permission of instructor. 
Word processing on a microcomputer including techniques for creating 
form letters, and using an electronic dictionary to check spelling. This 
course does not apply on a major and may not be taken for credit if credit has 
been received for CPTR 127. (Spring) 

CPTR 106. Financial Applications (G-2) 1 hour 

The use of spreadsheet software on a microcomputer as an aid to financial 
planning and management. This course does not apply on a major and may 
not be taken for credit if credit has been received for CPTR 127. (Spring) 



Computer Science 



72 



CPTR 107. Data Base Applications (G-2) 1 hour 

A course using microcomputers as electronic filing cabinets. Information 
retrieval, report generation, adding, deleting, and updating information. 
This course does not apply on a major and may not he taken for credit if 
credit has been received for CPTR 127. (Spring) 

CPTR 120. Introduction to Computer-Based Systems (G-2) 3 hours 

An overview of computer information systems. This survey course intro- 
duces computer hardware, software, procedures, systems, and human re- 
sources and explores their integration and application in business and other 
segments of society. The fundamentals of computer problem solving and 
programming in a hieher-level programming language are discussed and 
applied. This course aoes not apply on a major in Computer Science. (Fall, 
Spring) 

CPTR 125. BASIC Programming Language (G-2) 3 hours 

An introduction to the BASIC programming language. The student will be 
introduced to proper techniques of program design, coding, documentation 
and testing of the computer. No prior knowledge of data processing or 
computer programming is required. This course does not apply on a major. 
(Fall, Spring) 

CPTR 127. Micro Tools (G-2) 3 hours 

A hands-on course designed for those who anticipate using a micro in their 
place of employment. Software packages in database management, spread- 
sheet analysis, and word processing will be covered as well as basic 
hardware concepts and common terminology. No student may receive cred- 
it for CPTR 105, 106, or 107 if he has credit for CPTR 127. (Fall) 

CPTR 131. Fundamentals of Programming I (G-2) 3 hours 

Control structures, data types, data representation, compiling, debugging, 
modularity, and standard programming algorithms are introduced via Pas- 
cal. (Fall, Spring) 



CPTR 132. Fundamentals of Programming II (G-2) 3 hours 

Prerequisite: CPTR 131; Pre- or corequisite: SECR 105 or typing speed of 35 

wpm. 

An introduction to software technology for the development of reliable, 

modifiable programs. (Spring) 

CPTR 217. COBOL Programming Language (G-2) 3 hours 

Prerequisite: CPTR 131. 

Semantics and syntax of COBOL. Emphasis is placed on business problems 

using the COBOL Language. (Fall) 

CPTR 218. FORTRAN Programming Language (G-2) 3 hours 

Prerequisite: MATH 114. 

Syntax and semantics of arithmetic expressions and statements. Precedence 
hierarchy of arithmetic operations and relational operators. Global proper- 
ties of algorithmic languages including scope declarations, storage alloca- 
tion, grouping of statements, and subroutines. This course does not apply on 
a major. (Fall) 



Computer Science 

CPTR 219. Symbolic Assembler Language 3 hours 

Prerequisite: CPTR 131. 7Q 

Computer structure, machine language, instruction execution, addressing 
techniques, and digital representation of data. Computer systems organiza- 
tion, symbolic coding and assembly systems and program segmentation and 
linkage. Systems and utility programs, programming techniques, and recent 
developments in computing. Several computer projects to illustrate basic 
machine structure and programming techniques. (Spring) 

CPTR 250. RPG II 3 hours 

Prerequisite: CPTR 131. 

Editing data, control breaks, computation, files, records, comparing records, 
matching records, exception reports, array and table processing, and se- 
quential and indexed sequential file processing in RPG II. (Fall) 

CPTR 317. Introduction to File Processing 3 hours 

Prerequisite: CPTR 217. 

Tape and disc operations. Includes coverage of sequential and random 
access files and processing techniques. Development of programs and sys- 
tems of programs for batch and interactive environments using COBOL. 
(Spring) 

CPTR 318. Data Structures 3 hours 

Prerequisites: CPTR 132, MATH 114. 

Stacks, recursions, queues, lists, trees, graphs, sorting and searching. (Fall) 

CPTR 319. Data Base Management Systems 3 hours 

Prerequisites: CPTR 318, 217. 

Introduction to relational, hierarchical, and network approaches. Design, 

implementation, and management issues. (Spring) 

CPTR 323. Structured Systems Analysis and Design 3 hours 

Prerequisite: CPTR 319 or 317. 

System development life cycle, system documentation through the use of 
both classical and structured tools/techniques for describing process flows, 
data flows, file designs, input and output. Logical design of processes and 
databases. Structured techniques for dealing with complexity in the de- 
velopment of computer based information systems. Issues in implementa- 
tion, testing, project management. (Spring) 

CPTR 360. Computer Hardware and System Software Concepts 3 hours 

Prerequisites: CPTR 219, 132. 

Computer systems components, main storage organization, instruction sets 
and data representation, program translation concepts, operating system 
concepts, secondary storage concepts, multi-processor systems, micropro- 
gramming, and array processors. (Fall) 

CPTR 370. Introduction to IBM Software 3 hours 

Prerequisite: CPTR 319. 

An introduction to some of the software tools available in the IBM environ- 
ment. (Spring) 



Computer Science 



74 



CPTR 405. Organization of Programming Languages 3 hours 

Prerequisites: CPTR 131, 217, 219. 

Develops understanding of the organization of programming languages and 
their run time behavior. A comparative study, introducing the student to a 
variety of languages. (Spring) 

CPTR 409. Software Development Internship 3 hours 

Prerequisites: CPTR 323 or permission of instructor. 
A minimum of 120 hours of programming experience. The Computer Sci- 
ence Department may prearrange some practicums with commercial data 
processing departments. These positions must be applied for six weeks 
prior to registration. Students, however, are encouraged to be responsible 
for setting up their own practicums. This must be done within the 
guidelines of the department (see instructor), and arrangements should be 
completed six weeks prior to the start of the practicum. (Summer) 

CPTR 410. Applied Software Development Project 3 hours 

Prerequisite: CPTR 323. 

Students will be involved in a semester-long programming project starting 
with information requirements analysis and ending with testing and instal- 
lation. (Fall) 

CPTR 485. Computer Science Seminar (W) 1 hour 

Prerequisite: CPTR 318 and 3 hours of CPTR credit numbered 319 or above. 
Written and oral reports are made on specific topics treated in current 
computer science literature. (Fall) 

CPTR 290/490. Topics in Computer Science 1-3 hours 

Prerequisite: Permission of Computer Science staff. 

Topics selected from areas of computer science not covered in other courses. 

May be repeated with permission to a maximum of six hours. 

CPTR 295/495. Directed Study 1-3 hours 

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor and division head. 

Individual or group work adjusted to meet particular needs of computer 

science students. May be repeated for credit up to six hours. 

(G-2) See pages 14-16 for explanation of General Education requirements. 









Education 



-EDUCATION' 



Ben Bandiola, Ph.D. 

Melvin Campbell, Ph.D. 

Gerald Colvin, Ed.D., Ph.D. 

Desmond Rice, Ed.D., Associate Chairman 

Cyril Roe, Ed.D., Chairman 

Jeanette Stepanske, M.A. 

Methods Teachers and Student Teacher Supervisors: Education fac- 
ulty, Joyce Cotham, Thelma Cushman, Charles Davis, Robert Garren, 
Floyd Greenleaf, Wayne Janzen, Robert Kamieneski, Robert Moore, 
Robert Morrison, Helmut Ott, Marvin Robertson, David Smith, Ron 
Springett. 

The teacher education programs are founded upon a liberal arts de- 
mand for breadth and depth of knowledge and experience and on the 
idea that a teacher should be a good example in health, intellect, and 
character. 

The Education program offers courses leading to the Bachelor of 
Science in Elementary Education with an optional endorsement for 
kindergarten teaching. Furthermore, in cooperation with other subject 
areas, the following secondary certification programs are available: Art, 
Bible, Business (Office Administration), English, Foreign Languages, 
Health and Physical Education, History, Home Economics (non- 
vocational SDA only), Industrial Education, Mathematics, Music, and 
Science (Biology, Chemistry, and Physics). It must be noted that the 
above endorsements are under review and may be modified. 

Tennessee endorsement for School Librarian is available to all cer- 
tified teachers. 

The National Teachers Examination (NTE) is required for certifica- 
tion. It is necessary that teacher education students apply at the Testing 
and Counseling office to take the core battery and specialty areas of this 
examination during the last semester of the senior year. 

Accreditation 

Southern College's programs in teacher education are approved by the 
Tennessee State Board of Education, the Department of Education of the 
General Conference of Seventh-day Adventists, the American Associa- 
tion of Colleges for Teacher Education, and the National Council for 
Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE). 

Southern College's teacher education programs prepare the indi- 
vidual for certification to teach in North American Seventh-day Advent- 
ist schools and public schools. 

The student who completes Southern College's approved program 
and is recommended for certification will have indicated on the tran- 



75 



Education 



script that his program was NCATE approved. This recognition makes 
7q certification in many states much easier. 

Each student will be responsible for determining additional courses 
required for certification in any state he desires such recognition. 

Application for state and denominational certification is made 
through the Teacher Certification Officer in the Department of Educa- 
tion. To he eligible for certification the teacher education student must 
always meet the most current Tennessee certification requirements. 

Aims 

Courses in Education are offered to provide the necessary professional 
preparation to meet certification requirements for public and church- 
related kindergarten, elementary, and secondary classroom teaching, to 
afford a general understanding of the school as a social institution for 
those entering services other than teaching, and to serve as preparation 
for graduate programs. 

Requirements 

The criteria for admission to Teacher Education, outlines of teaching 
majors in secondary education, and policies and procedures related to 
student teaching may be obtained from the Department secretary in 
Summerour Hall. Outlines of courses of teaching majors in secondary 
education are also listed in the Catalog under the respective academic 
divisions. 

I. ADMISSION TO THE TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAM 

A. The first semester of the sophomore year but no later than the 
second semester of the sophomore year, the student should file 
a formal application. This applies to both elementary and 
secondary teacher education candidates. Transfer students 
wishing to enter the Teacher Education program later than the 
sophomore year should file an application the first semester in 
residence. 

B. Teacher education institutions are charged with the responsi- 
bility of assuring that students approved for entrance into 
teacher preparation programs demonstrate competency in the 
verbal and quantitative skills at an approved performance 
level. As a requirement for admission to the Teacher Education 
Program, all students must demonstrate this competency by 
obtaining a specific score on the Pre-Professional Skills Test 
(PPST), a standardized test approved by the State Board of 
Education. Inquiries concerning this test may be made with the 
Department secretary in Summerour Hall or at the Testing and 
Counseling office. 

C. The Education faculty, along with other personnel, evaluate 



Educalio 



the candidates and recommend them to the Teacher Education 
Council. The Council will then admit competent individuals 
who also meet the following criteria: 

1. Be in residence at the College. 

2. Have an overall grade point average of 2.25. 

3. Have completed ENGL 101:102 with a minimum of C-. 

4. Show evidence of physical, mental, and moral fitness. 

5. Indicate professional commitment to education at time of 
interview with the Education faculty. 

6. Have successfully completed the following classes: EDUC 
125 and 134. 

7. Have passed the Pre-Professional Skills Test (PPST) which 
is the entrance competency test required by the State of 
Tennessee. 

8. Have taken the 16-Personality Factor Questionnaire. 

D. The student will be informed in writing as to the status of the 
application for admission following the action of the Teacher 
Education Council. 

E. Upon admission into the Teacher Education program students 
will be permitted to take education courses numbered 200 or 
above. 

II. ADMISSION TO PROFESSIONAL SEMESTER 

A. A formal application must be filed with the Department 
Chairman prior to the end of the junior year. A later applica- 
tion may delay the student teaching experience. 

B. Applicant's qualifications: 

1. Before applicants may be admitted to the professional 
semester, they must have completed all lower division pro- 
fessional education courses, plus at least 8 hours in 
methods courses for the elementary school majors. Student 
teaching is regarded as the culmination of the Teacher 
Education program. 

2. Elementary education applicants must have a grade point 
average of at least 2.5 in the professional core and a 2.25 
grade point average in required non-major subjects. 
Secondary teacher education applicants must have a 
minimum grade point average of 2.5 in the professional 
core subjects and a minimum grade point average of 2.5 for 
subject area endorsements both overall and at SC. 

3. All applicants must show evidence of good physical and 
mental health. 

4. All applicants must adhere to the standards and objectives 
of Southern College and the teacher education program. 



Education 



5 . All applicants must be approved by action of the Education 
7« faculty and the Teacher Education Council. 

C. The student will be informed in writing as to his status in the 
teacher education program. 

III. RETENTION IN THE TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAM 

A. The progress of each prospective teacher will be reviewed after 
each nine-week period by the Department Chairman or a dele- 
gated member of the Education faculty. 

1. Criteria include: 

a. Adequate academic progress including maintenance of 
the academic standard required for admission to the 
teacher education program. 

b. Consistent personal representation of the standards and 
objectives of Southern College and the teacher educa- 
tion program. 

B. The teacher education faculty reserves the option to disqualify 
a person at any point in his teacher education program if it 
becomes evident that standards for admission are not being 
upheld. The student has the right to appeal any such decision 
through the Teacher Education Council with the Vice Presi- 
dent for Academic Administration in consultation. 

C. The required courses for graduation may be altered during the 
student's program at any time to meet revised certification 
standards of either the denomination or the state. It is the 
responsibility of each student to check periodically with the 
certification officer to ensure requirements are being met. 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE DEGREE IN ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 

Major: Forty-one hours including EDUC 125, 134, 217, 230 or 231, 
240, 332, 333, 356, 427, 443, 453, 454, 455, 456, 457, 467. Cognate 
requirements include HLED 203; GEOG 204; LIBR 325; ENGL 218. 

Teaching Endorsements — Elementary Education Majors: 

A. Kindergarten: Students desiring a kindergarten endorsement must 
include in their program of studies EDUC 426, 466, and PSYC 128. 

B. School Librarian: Students certifying in elementary education may 
receive the School Librarian Tennessee endorsement by including 
in their program of studies 18 hours of Library Science, LIBR 125, 
226, 314, 325, 333, 416, 425. 

Professional Semester: One semester of the senior year is a profes- 
sional semester. Its required curriculum includes the following: 
First part of the semester: 

EDUC 356 Tests and Measurements 2 hours 



Education 



EDUC 427 Current Issues in Education 2 hours 

EDUC 443 Classroom Competencies 3 hours 

Second part of the semester: 

EDUC 467 Student Teaching . . 8 hours 

Because of time commitments during the student teaching experi- 
ence, employment will not be permitted and additional course work will 
be by permission only. 

The Education faculty will endeavor to provide the opportunity for 
student teachers to teach in off-campus student teaching centers. 

Correspondence credit will be accepted to the extent of one-fourth of 
the credit required for the certificate provided that no more than four 
semester hours in education are applied on the professional education 
requirement. If personal circumstances demand a correspondence 
course, a petition must be filed with the Teacher Education Council and 
its approval obtained before registering for the course. The course must 
be completed and the grade filed in the Records Office before student 
teaching is begun. 

Subject Matter Requirements: Even though the Elementary Education 
student may elect to take a major and a minor in teaching fields rep- 
resented in the elementary school curriculum, he or she must also satisfy 
the following Tennessee requirements for certification: 

A. Basic Academic Skills 

College Composition 101:102 6 hours 

Mathematics 6 hours 

B. Religion 12 hours 

Christian Beliefs 155, Adventist Heritage 238 and 6 

hours of RELB. 

C. History Political Science/Economics 

American History 154, 155 6 hours 

World Geography 204 3 hours 

D. Language/Literature/Fine Arts 
Listening to Music 115 and Art 

Appreciation 218 or Humanities 205 3-5 hours 

Literature 6 hours 

Speech 3 hours 

E. Science 

Biology 4 hours 

Chemistry or Physics 4 hours 

Earth Science 4 hours 

F. Behavioral and Family Science 
Intro to Sociology 125 or 

Family Relations 365 3 hours 



Education 



Health and Life 173 . , . . 2 hours 

Safety Education 203 2 hours 

G. Skills 

Library Materials for Children 325 3 hours 

Physical Education activity courses 4 hours 

Physical Education in the Elem. Sch. 463 2 hours 

SECONDARY EDUCATION TEACHING CERTIFICATE 

1. Professional Education Requirements: 26 semester hours. 
The following are required courses: 

A. Must be taken prior to admission into Teacher Education Pro- 
gram. 

EDUC 125 Foundations of Education 3 hours 

EDUC 134 Principles of Christian Education 2 hours 

B. To be taken only after admission into Teacher Education Pro- 
gram. 

EDUC 217 Psychological Foundations of Education 3 hours 
EDUC 240 Education for Exceptional 

Children and Youth 2 hours 

EDUC 432 Reading in the Secondary School 2 hours 

C. To be taken during the professional semester. 

EDUC 356 Tests and Measurements 2 hours 

EDUC 427 Current Issues in Education .......... 2 hours 

EDUC 437 Curriculum and General Methods 2 hours 

EDUC 438 Special Methods Grades 7-12 2 hours 

EDUC 468 Student Teaching Grades 7-12 6 hours 

In addition to the above, all English majors seeking secondary 
education endorsement will be required to take EDUC 332 or 333. 

All students seeking certification in Religion must take Special 
Methods of Teaching Bible (EDUC 438) regardless of whether they have 
other special methods courses. 

Students who are planning to be dormitory deans are advised to take 
EDUC 355 and EDUC 415. 

All candidates for a teaching certificate are required to take the core 
battery and the appropriate specialty area of the National Teacher 
Examination, usually in their senior year. 

In order to meet Seventh-day Adventist certification requirements for 
secondary teaching the student must also take in addition to the above: 

RELB Biblical Studies 6 hours 

RELT 255 Christian Beliefs 3 hours 

RELT 138 Adventist Heritage 3 hours 

HLED 173 Health and Life 2 hours 



Education 

2. Professional Semester: 

One semester of the senior year is a professional semester. 
Some secondary methods classes are taught only first or second 
semester. Consult class schedule for current offerings. 

Courses marked in section 1C above should be taken in the 
following sequences: 

First part of the semester: 

EDUC 356 Tests and Measurements 2 hours 

EDUC 427 Current Issues in Education 2 hours 

EDUC 437 Curriculum and General Methods 3 hours 

EDUC 438 Special Methods Grades 7-12 2 hours 

Second part of the semester: 

EDUC 468 Student Teaching Grades 7-12 (full day) 6 hours 

Because of time commitments during the student teaching experi- 
ence, employment will not be permitted and additional course work will 
be by permission only. 

The Education faculty will endeavor to provide the opportunity for 
student teachers to teach in off-campus student teaching centers. 

Correspondence credit will be accepted to the extent of one-fourth of 
the credit required for the certificate provided that no more than four 
semester hours in education are applied on the professional education 
requirement. If personal circumstances demand a correspondence 
course, a petition must be filed with the Teacher Education Council and 
its approval obtained before registering for the course. The course must 
be completed and the grade filed in the Records Office before student 
teaching is begun. 

It is expected that any student entering the professional semester will 
have completed all course materials up to that point. Specifically, no 
student will be allowed to enter Special Methods of Teaching (EDUC 
438) or Curriculum and General Methods (EDUC 437) with any incom- 
pletes on their transcript. 

ADDITIONAL TEACHING CERTIFICATES 

In order for a person to obtain an additional teaching credential, the 
classwork for that credential may not be completed before the original 
credential is issued. 

1. PROGRAM FOR ELEMENTARY ENDORSEMENT FOR INDIVIDU- 
ALS MEETING REQUIREMENTS FOR SECONDARY CERTIFICA- 
TION. Eighteen semester hours (listed on the following pages) are 
required. A minimum of 12 semester hours from these courses must 
be completed after the date the applicant became eligible for a profes- 
sional certificate endorsed in a subject area in grades 7-12 or in a 
subject area in grades K-12. 



Education 

A. Required Courses: 

fJ2 EDUC 332, Teaching of Reading 2 hours 

EDUC 333, Developmental Reading 2 hours 

EDUC 453, Mathematics Methods in 

the Elementary School 2 hours 

EDUC 454, Science and Health Methods in 

the Elementary School 2 hours 

EDUC 455, Bible Methods in 

the Elementary School 2 hours 

EDUC 456, Language Arts Methods in 

the Elementary School 2 hours 

EDUC 457, Social Studies Methods in 

the Elementary School 2 hours 

B. Four semester hours to include two of the following three areas: 
EDUC 230, Elementary Methods in 

Curriculum and Instruction: Art 2 hours 

EDUC 231, Elementary Methods in 

Curriculum and Instruction: Music 2 hours 

PETH 463, Physical Education in 

the Elementary School 2 hours 

C. Two semester hours must be in Survey of Exceptional Children if 
not previously successfully completed. If Survey of Exceptional 
Children or any of the above required courses in Section A or 
Section B have been previously completed, the remaining semes- 
ter hours must be taken from the following courses: 

a. Children's Literature c. Health 

b. Tennessee History d. Geography 

D. Two to three semester hours of student teaching. 

2. PROGRAMS FOR SECONDARY ENDORSEMENT FOR INDIVIDU- 
ALS MEETING REQUIREMENTS FOR ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 
CERTIFICATION. Ten semester hours of credit after the date the 
original certificate was earned. Six semester hours of the ten must be 
in specialized professional education appropriate to grades 7-12 and 
must include a minimum of 2 semester hours of appropriate methods. 
The credit for at least one area of endorsement in grades 7-12 may 
have been earned at any time prior to the application for adding the 
endorsement. 

1. Meet the State of Tennessee requirements for endorsement in at 
least one teaching field (this will vary from 18 to 51 hours). 

2. A minimum of six semester hours of professional education in- 
cluding: 

A. EDUC 437 or EDUC 438. 

B. Any other courses designated by the Department of Education. 

3. Four semester hours of electives in addition to the Elementary 
Education degree requirements. 



Education 



3. APPROVED PROGRAM IMPLEMENTATION BY STATE BOARD OF n 
EDUCATION OO 

Procedures for securing SC's recommendation for state certification 
of students from institutions located out of the state: 

1 . Application is made to the teacher certification officer through the 
Records Office accompanied by an official transcript and a rec- 
ommendation from the applicant's school. 

2. Assessment of deficiencies will be made by the Teacher Certifica- 
tion Officer and approved by the Department and the Teacher 
Education Council. 

3. The Teacher Certification Officer will inform the applicant of any 
deficiencies. - 

4. A fee of twenty-five dollars ($25) will be charged for this service, to 
be refunded upon completion of courses at Southern College. 

ASSOCIATE OF SCIENCE DEGREE IN CHILD CARE 
ADMINISTRATION 

Major: Twenty-five hours including EDUC 125, 134, 230 or 231, 275; 
FDNT 126, 127; HLED 203; HMEC 201, 202; HMEC 146 or BUAD 128; 
PSYC 128; general education and other electives to make a total of 64 
semester hours. 

Child Care Administration A. S . degree requirements in general educa- 
tion: 

A. Basic Academic Skills: 9 hours 
ENGL 101, 102 

MATH 103 

B. Religion: 6 hours 
RELT 255 
RELT 238 

C. History; 6 hours 

HIST 154, 155, or GEOG 204 

D. Language, Literature, Fine Arts: 6 hours 
ENGL 213, 214, 215, or 216 

E. Natural Sciences; 6-8 hours with lab, with two areas represented 
below: Biology, Chemistry, or Physics electives with lab. 

F. Behavioral, Family, Health Sciences: 3 hours 
(Plenty with 24-hour major) plus HLED 173 

G. Activity Skills: 3 hours 

(FDNT 126, 127 already required) 

Montessori Option: Child Care Administration majors may earn an 
additional Child Care Certification by selecting the Montessori option. 
Students selecting this option will substitute EDUC 284 and EDUC 285 



Education 

for EDUC 125 and EDUC 134. The Montessori Methods courses will be 

M taught off campus by a certified Montessori instructor and include a paid 
practicum. 

COURSES IN EDUCATION 

EDUC 100. Student Orientation 1 hour 

A course designed to introduce and facilitate adjustment to college life. 
Topics covered include college level study skills, time management, on- 
campus student services, and an introduction to various divisions of study 
regarding career planning. 

EDUC 125. Foundations of Education 3 hours 

An orientation to early childhood, elementary and secondary education. 
Included in this course are 20 hours of observation in child care, elementary 
and secondary classrooms and a study of the history and organization of 
education, as well as an introduction to professional literature. The student 
is required to take all screening tests for admission to the teacher education 
program, as well as completing application forms. (Only two hours credit 
available if the student already has credit for EDUC 123.) (Fall, Spring) 

EDUC 134. Principles of Christian Education 2 hours 

An overview of the purposes, administrative organizations and operations 
of school systems, identified as Christian in purpose, with particular em- 
phasis on the Seventh-day Adventist educational system. (Not open to 
students who already have credit for EDUC 133.) (Fall, Spring) 

Students taking Education courses numbered 200 and above must 
have credit for EDUC 125 and 134 and be admitted to the Teacher 
Education program. Exceptions may be granted by permission of the 
Department of Education chairman. 

EDUC 217. Psychological Foundations of Education (F-l) 3 hours 

Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education or permission of the Depart- 
ment of Education chairman. 

A study of the processes of human growth, development, and learning, 
joined to the practical application of this knowledge to teaching. 

EDUC 230. Elementary Methods in Curriculum 

and Instruction: Art 2 hours 

Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education 

A study of the aims, philosophy, and methods of teaching art on the various 
levels of the elementary school. Observation and participation in art ac- 
tivities with elementary students will be scheduled. 

EDUC 231. Elementary Methods in Curriculum 

and Instruction: Music 2 hours 

Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education, MUCT 100 (or permission of 

instructor) or MUHL 115. 

A course designed to prepare teachers to direct the music activities in the 



elementary classroom. The content includes appreciation, singing, 

and rhythmic activities with attention to current methods including O] 

Kodaly, and movement education. Observation and participation in the 

music program of the elementary school is required. (Fall, Spring, alternate 

Summers) 



Education 
85 



EDUC 240. Education for Exceptional Children and Youth 2 hours 

Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. 

A course in the education of exceptional children in the regular classroom. It 
includes a study of the wide range of factors contributing to the exceptional- 
ity, the identification of exceptional children and youth by the classroom 
teacher and the consequent classroom implications. (Fall, Spring, alternate 
Summers) 

EDUC 250. Computers in the Classroom (G-2) 2 hours 

Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. 

The course is an introduction to the use and evaluation of computers in the 
elementary and secondary classroom. Experience and evaluation will be 
given to a wide range of educational software such as records, gradebooks, 
word processing, accounts, and computer assisted instruction. 

EDUC 275. Child Care Practicum 2 hours 

Prerequisite: EDUC 125, 134, 217, 240; HLED 173, 203; BUAD 128. 
The student devotes at least 80 hours of on-the-job practice under the 
supervision of a certified elementary education director. Experiences 
should include: registration and advertising, program design and manage- 
ment, budgeting, preschool instruction, and parent consultation. 

EDUC 284:285. Montessori Methods I and II 2,2 hours 

A detailed study of the Montessori philosophy, materials, and activities. 
This course is taught in a Montessori School off campus by a certified 
Montessori instructor and includes a paid practicum. Students must pass a 
written exam and correctly demonstrate the use of Montessori materials as 
part of the final exam. 

Both sections should be completed satisfactorily for Montessori Certifica- 
tion. 

EDUC 332. Teaching of Reading 2 hours 

Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. 

Survey of the materials and methods used in teaching reading in the elemen- 
tary grades. It emphasizes the approaches to teaching reading including 
phonics instruction. The course involves approximately three hours of 
supervised practicum along with one hour of lecture each week. (Fall) 

EDUC 333. Developmental Reading (W) 2 hours 

Prerequisite: EDUC 332 and Admission to Teacher Education. 
A detailed study of the development of vocabulary, comprehension, and 
study/reference skills in the elementary grades. Causes of reading problems, 
assessment procedures, and organization of a sound reading program are 
stressed. (Spring and Summers on demand) 



Education 



EDUC 355. Administrative and Personnel Work of Deans 2 hours 

A basic professional course in the administration of the school home. (Of- 
fered on demand.) (Spring) 

EDUC 356. Tests and Measurements 2 hours 

Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education or permission of the depart- 
ment chairman. 

An evaluation of classroom learning and teacher-made tests as well as an 
overview of selected ability, achievement, interest, and personality tests. 
Principles of effective test construction and selection are studied, particu- 
larly as they apply to sampling, validity, reliability, and norming. (Fall, 
Spring) 

EDUC 415. Secondary School Homes Practicum 2 hours 

Prerequisite: EDUC 355. 

This course is designed to provide resident experience in secondary school 
home administration under the supervision of a successful dean. Usually 
taken concurrently with student teaching. (Fall, Spring) 

EDUC 426. Kindergarten Methods 3 hours 

Prerequisites: EDUC 125, 134, 217, 240 and admission to Teacher Educa- 
tion. 

Designed to give the student an understanding of administration, program 
planning, materials, and strategies for teaching in preschool. Emphasis is 
given to application of the principles of child development and learning to 
promote harmonious physical, mental, social, and emotional growth. Ob- 
servation and participation required. (Fall, Spring) 

EDUC 427, Current Issues in Education (F-l), (W) 2 hours 

Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. 

An analysis of social and philosophical forces influencing American educa- 
tion today, with special emphasis on the schools as social institutions. (Not 
open to students who already have credit for EDUC 425.) 

EDUC 432. Reading in the Secondary School 2 hours 

Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. 

This course will help teachers focus on those reading skills essential for the 
needs of secondary school pupils. It will include the teaching of reading in 
the content areas of one's major field, the program elements with procedures 
and processes involved along with their classroom applications. (Fall) 

EDUC 437. Curriculum and General Methods, Grades 7-12 2 hours 

Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. 

This course will include the secondary curriculum content — factors that 
influence change, the most important current practices, and critical cur- 
riculum issues racing educators today. It will provide general knowledge of 
current teaching methods, strategies of learning, and evaluation proce- 
dures. (Fall, Spring) 

EDUC 438. Special Methods of Teaching, Grades 7-12 2 hours 

Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. Course EDUC 437 and EDUC 
438 comprise a block and should be taken the same semester. 



Student must have completed fifteen semester hours in the teaching area to 
qualify for admission. 

The areas which offer methods courses are: Art, Bible, Business (Office 
Administration), English, Foreign Language, Health and Physical Educa- 
tion, History, Home Economics, Industrial Arts, Mathematics, Music, Sci- 
ence (Biology, Chemistry, and Physics). 

The course will be offered the first half of that semester designated by the 
student's major department. The class will meet four class periods per week. 
Directed observation in selected schools and attendance at local profes- 
sional meetings are considered part of this course. 

Among the student's responsibilities will be the collection and organization 
of a file of teaching materials, the preparation of lesson plans, and evalua- 
tion of textbooks. Directed observation in selected schools and attendance at 
selected local professional meetings are considered a part of the course. 
(Fall, Spring) 

EDUC 443. Classroom Competencies 3 hours 

Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education and completion of at least 
two upper division methods courses. 

This course provides opportunity for the student to develop skills and 
knowledge related to concepts of classroom organization and management, 
audio-visual aids and techniques, discipline, public relations and ethics. 
Although all school settings will be considered, emphasis will be given to 
small schools. Classroom experience may be required. (Fall, Spring, Sum- 
mer on demand) 

EDUC 453. Mathematics Methods in the 

Elementary School 2 hours 

Prerequisites: EDUC 125, 134, 217, 240 and admission to Teacher Educa- 
tion. 

Includes curriculum organization, materials, methods, and instructional 
aids with emphasis on multi-grade classrooms. Attention is given to the 
sequential skill development and to changes in the mathematical contents, 
technology and pedagogy. Observation and micro-teaching required. 
(Spring, Summer on demand) 

EDUC 454. Science and Health Methods in the 

Elementary School 2 hours 

Prerequisites: EDUC 125, 134, 217, 240 and admission to Teacher Educa- 
tion. 

Includes curriculum organization, methods, materials and equipment with 
emphasis on multi-grade classrooms. Techniques and materials are 
examined using basic principles of the scientific method. Observation and 
micro-teaching required. Two-day field trip is required. A lab fee is charged. 
(Fall, Summer on demand) 

EDUC 455. Bible Methods in the Elementary School 2 hours 

Prerequisites: EDUC 125, 134, 217, 240 and admission to Teacher Educa- 
tion. 

A course to develop teaching objectives, materials, and strategies in Biblical 
education with emphasis on the Christ-centered curriculum and integration 
of faith and learning. Special attention will be given to multi-grade class- 



Education 
87 



Education 



88 



rooms. Observation and micro-teaching required. (Fall, Summer on de- 
mand) 

EDUC 456. Language Arts Methods in the 

Elementary School 2 hours 

Prerequisites: EDUC 125, 134, 217, 240 and admission to Teacher Educa- 
tion. 

Curriculum organization, methods, materials and instructional aids with 
emphasis on multi-grade classrooms. Strategies for instruction in writing, 
spelling, grammar, literature and composition are developed. Observation 
and micro-teaching required. (Spring, Summer on demand) 

EDUC 457. Social Studies Methods in the 

Elementary School 2 hours 

Prerequisites: EDUC 125, 134, 217, 240 and admission to Teacher Educa- 
tion. 

A course to develop teaching objectives, instructional strategies, materials 
and methods when integrating social studies, geography and the world- 
wide mission of the church. Special attention will be given to multi-grade 
classrooms. Observation and micro-teaching required. (Fall, Summer on 
demand) 

EDUC 466. Student Teaching, Kindergarten 2-4 hours 

Prerequisites: EDUC 426 and Admission to Professional Semester. 
This course is offered the first half of each semester and is available during 
the summer term to teachers with previous experience if suitable classes can 
be found. (Fall, Spring, Summer) 

EDUC 467. Student Teaching, 1-8 8 hours 

Prerequisite: Admission to Professional Semester. 

This course is offered each semester and is available during the summer 

term to teachers with previous experience. The student will oe assigned a 

half-day each week of classroom observation and participation the first half 

of the semester. A weekly seminar is held in the first nine weeks of the 

semester. 

The second half of the semester will be used for full-time student teaching in 

on-campus or selected off-campus elementary schools. Group conferences 

of two periods each week will be scheduled. A minimum of two hours credit 

must be earned in residence. 

Student teachers are expected to provide their own transportation to their 

teaching centers and to follow the school calendars where they are assigned. 

(Fail, Spring) 

EDUC 468. Student Teaching, Grades 7-12 6 hours 

Prerequisite: EDUC 217, 437, 438, and admission to professional semester. 
Music majors must have completed MUPF 479. 

This course is offered each semester and the summer session in selected 
areas. The student teachers will be assigned to the cooperating teacher near 
the beginning of the semester and will be expected to spend a minimum of 
three hours per week in observation and participation. These hours will 
count toward the required student teaching allotment. One-half semester of 
full time directed observation, participation and full-day classroom teach- 



ing is required in on-campus or selected off-campus secondary schools. 
Conferences of two class periods each week will be scheduled. 
A minimum of two hours credit must be earned in residence by degree 
candidates. Student teachers are expected to provide their own transporta- 
tion to their teaching centers and to follow the school calendars where they 
are assigned. (Fall, Spring) 



Education 
89 



EDUC 475. Workshop in Education (Methodology) 1-3 hours 

Experienced teachers are given opportunity to work under supervision on 
curriculum problems. Credit is also available for preservice students as an 
elective. (Summer) 

EDUC 485. Workshop in Education (Content) 1-3 hours 

Experienced teachers are given opportunity to develop new skills and 
gather new facts in content fields at various levels. Credit is also available for 
preservice students as an elective. (Summer) 

EDUC 295/495. Directed Study 1-2 hours 

Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. 

This course permits the advanced student with adequate preparation to 

pursue independent study in special fields. (Fall, Spring, Summer) 

(F-l), (W) See pages 14-16 for explanation of General Education requirements. 









English 






ENGLISH- 

Ann Clark, M.A.T. 
Jan Haluska, M.A. 
Wilma McClarty, Ed.D. 
Barbara Ruf, Ph.D., Chairman 
David Smith, M.A. 

The English Department offers two categories of classes that view 
man's search for truth and its most convincing expression through a 
Christian perspective. Language courses aid students in developing 
ease, confidence, and competence in the art of effective communication 
and in acquiring knowledge of the science of language; literature 
courses develop the ability to discern and appreciate the best literary 
works. 

Students majoring in English must meet the specific requirements of 
the English Department (below) and the General Education program 
(pages 16-21). For English and most other programs in the Humanities 
Division, intermediate foreign language is required. 

Some English majors elect a year of study at England's Newbold College, 
because of its proximity to numerous sites of literary and historical importance. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 

Major: Thirty-one hours excluding Basic Writing and College Com- 
position, but including ENGL 215, 216, 218, 314, 315 and 335; plus six 
hours from ENGL 214, 333, or 334; plus nine hours from ENGL 336, 337, 
338, 444, or 445. Required cognates: HIST 374, HMNT 205, intermediate 
foreign language. 

Minor: Nineteen hours, excluding Basic Writing and College Compo- 
sition, including ENGL 218, 315; ENGL 214 or 333 or 334; ENGL 215, 
314; six hours of English electives to include one additional literature 
class. 

Minor in Fields Related to English Education (Available only to 
English Majors): Eighteen hours including LIBR 125; HIST 374; SPCH 
135, 236; JOUR 111; and four (two upper division) hours from the 
following electives: PSYC 124; SECR 105, 115, or 214; EDUC 333; any 
Communication course; any Library Science course. 

Teaching Endorsement: The following are the minimum require- 
ments. 

ENGL 218 Principles of Grammar 2 hours 

ENGL 315 Introduction to Linguistics 2 hours 

Two of the following three: 6 hours 

ENGL 214 Survey of American Literature (3) 



English 



ENGL 333 American Literature: Colonial through 

Romantic Periods (3) 
ENGL 334 American Literature: Realism to the Present (3) 

ENGL 215 Survey of English Literature 3 hours 

ENGL 314 Creative Writing 3 hours 

One of the following three: 3 hours 

ENGL 336 Medieval and Renaissance Literature (3) 
ENGL 337 Nineteenth Century British Literature (3) 
ENGL 444 Restoration and Eighteenth Century Literature (3) 

ENGL 445 World Literature 3 hours 

LIBR 425 Library Materials for Young Adults and Adults 2 hours 

One of the following two: 2 hours 

EDUC 332 Teaching of Reading (2) 
EDUC 333 Developmental Reading (2) 

EDUC 432 Reading in the Secondary School (2) 2 hours 

TOTAL 28 hours 

Students anticipating secondary teaching should meet state certifica- 
tion requirements (see Secondary Education requirements under DE- 
PARTMENT OF EDUCATION), should consider taking a minor in Fields 
Related to English Education, and should obtain experience working on 
the Southern Accent staff, Southern Memories staff, and/or a programs 
committee of one of the student organizations. 

The student must apply to the Department of Education for admission 
to the Teacher Education Program and the professional semester before 
the end of the sophomore and junior years, respectively. 

ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND COMPOSITION 

ENGL 099. Basic Writing 3 hours 

Prerequisite: Students whose first language is not English must have a score 
of 90 or above on the Michigan English Language Institute Test. 
Focuses on development of those writine skills necessary for successful 
entry into ENGL 101. Students whose English ACT score is 12 or below are 
required to register for this class. Students successfully completing this 
course will earn three institutional elective credits and may enroll in ENGL 
101. This course does not count toward an English major or minor. (Fall, 
Spring) 

ENGL 101:102. College Composition (A-l) 3,3 hours 

ENGL 101 is prerequisite to ENGL 102. 

A two-semester course focusing strongly on the writing process, especially 
revision. ENGL 101 emphasizes specific writing skills and principles which 
readily apply to most writing tasks. ENGL 102 reinforces the proficiencies 
developedin ENGL 101 while focusing on rhetorical and reasoning skills 



English 



which apply to various persuasive and research writing activities. This 
QO course does not count toward an English major or minor. (Fall, Spring, 

v" Summer) 

ENGL 218. Principles of Grammar 2 hours 

Prerequisite: ENGL 101. 

A detailed survey of descriptive grammar as it pertains to parts of speech, 
sentence structure, punctuation, and usage. Designed to aid any student 
who wishes to strengthen his skills in grammar analysis, it is also especially 
helpful for prospective teachers and writers. (Fall) 

ENGL 295. Directed Study 1-3 hours 

The content of this course will be adjusted to meet the particular needs of the 
student, including requests for credit for such activities as projects done 
during student missionary terms. This course also includes credit offered by 
the English Department on directed study tours. Open only to students 
approved by the division director in consultation with the prospective 
instructor. 

ENGL 314. Creative Writing (G-l), (W) 3 hours 

Prerequisite: Three hours of literature or permission of instructor. 

A study of the principles, techniques, and types of personalized writing, 

providing the student with opportunity to develop his own style and to find 

possible markets for his manuscripts that may be worthy of publication. 

(Spring) 

ENGL 315. Introduction to Linguistics 2 hours 

Prerequisite: ENGL 218. 

Provides a background in the history of the English language, etymology 
and the processes of word formation, dialectology and syntax analyses, and 
relates these learnings to the teaching of contemporary English. (Spring) 

LITERATURE 

ENGL 214. Survey of American Literature (D-2) 3 hours 

Prerequisite: ENGL 102. 

A study of representative selections from major American authors, colonial 
through modern, with emphasis on ideas, attitudes, and trends having 
individual, national, and universal interest. Major writers will include, 
among others, Cooper, Hawthorne, Twain, Frost, and Hemingway. (Fall, 
Spring, and usually Summer) 

ENGL 215. Survey of English Literature (D-2) 3 hours 

Prerequisite: ENGL 102. 

A study of representative selections by British writers, with special em- 
phasis on the author's philosophy as compared or contrasted with Bible- 
based thinking, and a review of literary trends and influences from the late 
Roman period to the present. Among writers receiving strong attention are 
Chaucer, Shakespeare, Donne, Milton, Wordsworth. (Fall, Spring) 



ENGL 216. Approaches to Literature (D-2) 3 hours 

Prerequisite: ENGL 102. 
The study and appreciation of selected works, with special emphasis on 
literary terms and on the critical qualities that distinguish such basic literary 
types as the short story, the drama, the novel, and the poem. (Fall) 



English 
93 



ENGL 333. American Literature From Colonial Through 

Romantic Periods (D-2), (W) 3 hours 

A reasonably comprehensive, chronological study of the works of major 
American writers with special emphasis on Bradford, Taylor, Franklin, 
Edwards, Irving, Cooper, Poe, Emerson, Thoreau, Hawthorne, Melville, 
Longfellow, and Whitman. (Spring, even years) 

ENGL 334. American Literature From 

Realism to the Present (D-2), (W) 3 hours 

A continuation of ENGL 333, from the mid-nineteenth century through 
some of the more recent writers, including Dickinson, Twain, James, Crane, 
Robinson, Frost, Fitzgerald, Hemingway, Faulkner, Williams, Warren, and 
Bellow. (Spring, odd years) 

ENGL 335. Biblical Literature (D-2), (W) 3 hours 

A survey of the Bible's literary masterpieces from an archetypal perspective. 
The Bible is viewed as one story, the double quest: man, searching for a lost 
Eden, and Christ, the great Questor, seeking the restoration of His world and 
His family. This story, reinforced by its central theme of redemption and by 
the universal archetypal symbols centering in Christ the Word made flesh, 
actually permeates all imaginative literature. Biblical genres studied in- 
clude tne story of origins, heroic narrative, epic, idyl, lyric poetry, wisdom 
literature, gospel, epistle, and apocalypse. (Fall) 

ENGL 336. Medieval and Renaissance Literature (D-2), (W) 3 hours 

From Chaucer through Shakespeare, the men and their times. Readings in 
Canterbury Tales, Middle English romance, allegory, play, and meditation 
in translation; in sixteenth century prose, Elizabethan poetry and dramatic 
literature, with study of genre, conventions, and trends. Specific attention to 
moral and religious issues. (Spring, even years) 

ENGL 337. Nineteenth Century British Literature (D-2), (W) 3 hours 

A study of British writers from the Romantic or Victorian periods (1785- 
1901), with special emphasis upon Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, 
Shelley, Keats, Austen, Tennyson, Dickens, Arnold, Browning, Carlyle, and 
Wilde. This course may be taught only alternate years. (Fall) 

ENGL 338. Twentieth Century Writers (D-2), (W) 3 hours 

A study of twentieth century writers with an emphasis on American and/or 
British works, although world literature in translation may be included. 
This course may be taught only alternate years. (Spring) 

ENGL 444. Restoration and 

Eighteenth Century Literature (D-2), (W) 3 hours 

English life and letters in ferment through the Enlightenment and the 



English 



94 



decline of Neo-classicism: Milton, Dryden, Swift, Pope, Johnson. Special 
attention to moral and religious issues and trends. This course may be 
taught only alternate years. (Fall) 

ENGL 445. World Literature (D-2), (W) 3 hours 

Beginning with the three great epics which underlie the literature of the 
Western World — the Iliad, The Odyssey, and The Book of Job — the class will 
consider a range of classical and medieval works from the Greeks to the 
Italian Renaissance. Collateral emphasis will be on enhancing the student's 
ability to differentiate the pagan from the Christian in the thematic mix of 
individual works. Students desiring a complete sequence in world literature 
may follow this course with MDLG 304. (Fall) 

ENGL 495. Directed Study 1-3 hours 

The content of this course will be adjusted to meet the particular needs of the 
student. This course also includes credit offered by the English Department 
on directed study tours. Open only to English majors or minors with the 
approval of the division director in consultation with the prospective in- 
structor. 

EDUCATION 

EDUC 438. Methods of Teaching English 2 hours 

Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. 

Attention is given to methods and materials of instruction, planning, test- 
ing, and evaluating student performances; the survey and evaluation of 
textbooks is also included. Four lectures each week of the first half of the 
semester. (Spring) 

(A-l), (D-2), (G-l), (W) See pages 14-16 for explanation of General Education 
requirements. 






Health, Physical Education 
and Recreation 



HEALTH, PHYSICAL EDUCATION, 

AND RECREATION 

Ted Evans, M.Ed. 

Philip Garver, M.S. 

Steve Jaecks, M.S. 

Robert Kamieneski, Ed.D., Chairman 

The courses in Health, Physical Education, and Recreation propose to 
acquaint students with principles of healthful living, to help each stu- 
dent develop physical efficiency through participation in supervised 
activity, to develop wholesome recreational habits by helping the stu- 
dent acquire interest, knowledge, and skills in several recreational ac- 
tivities, and to contribute to preparation for a career in health, physical 
education, and recreation. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE IN HEALTH, PHYSICAL EDUCATION 
AND RECREATION 

Major: Thirty hours including HLED 314, 315; PETH 121, 122, 221, 
222, 265, 266, 363, 364, 495; and excluding HLED 203. Required cog- 
nates: BIOL 105, 106. 

No general education activity courses, except PEAC 255, Water Safety 
Instructor, may apply on the major. Competency required in PEAC 143, 
Beginning Tumbling and PEAC 254, Lifesaving. 

Skill deficiencies in each PETH 121, 122, 221, or 222 activity unit will 
be indicated by grade of C- or less. Deficiencies for these units must be 
met by taking for no credit the corresponding general education activity 
course. 

Intramural participation is recommended. 

Majors training for teaching positions must meet the NCATE certifica- 
tion requirements set forth by the Division of Education and Human 
Sciences. 

Minor: Eighteen hours including PETH 121, 122, 221, 222, 265, 266, 
364. 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE DEGREE IN HEALTH SCIENCE 

Major: Forty-five hours including HLED 314, 315, 373, 470, 473; PETH 
374, 495; PEAC 125; CHEM 151:152; MATH 215; BIOL 105, 106, 125; 
FDNT 125. 

Teaching Endorsement, Grades 1-12: 

HLED 173 Health and Life 2 hours 

HLED 373 Care and Prevention of Athletic Injuries 2 hours 
HLED 314 Kinesiology 4 hours 



Health, Physical Education 
and Recreation 



HLED 315 Physiology of Exercise 4 hours 

PETH 364 Principles and Administration of 

Physical Education and Recreation . . 3 hours 
PETH 463 Physical Education in the 

Elementary School 2 hours 

PETH 265, 266 Officiating Sports Analysis 4 hours 

PETH 121, 122; 

221, 222 Professional Skills courses _8 hours 

TOTAL 29 hours 

The student must apply to the Department of Education for admission 
to the Teacher Education Program and the professional semester before 
the end of the sophomore and junior years, respectively. 

GENERAL EDUCATION ACTIVITY COURSES 

PEAC 123. Volleyball (G-3) 1 hour 

Development of skills necessary for enjoyable and successful play. (Spring, 
Fall) 

PEAC 124. Basketball (G-3) 1 hour 

Team activity skills developed that may be used in the individual's leisure 
time. (Fall) 

PEAC 125. Conditioning (G-3) 1 hour 

The learning of basic training and aerobic principles followed by a personal 
long-range conditioning program. May be repeated for credit. 

PEAC 126. Softball (G-3) 1 hour 

Development of skills necessary for enjoyable and successful play. (Fall) 

PEAC 131. Badminton (G-3) 1 hour 

Strokes, rules, and playing situations included with physical conditioning 
for badminton. (Spring) 

PEAC 133. Racquetball (G-3) 1 hour 

Activities with emphasis on recreational carry-over values. (Fall, Spring) 

PEAC 134. Basic Tennis (G-3) 1 hour 

Basic tennis skills including the strokes, rallying, and volleying. (Fall) 

PEAC 136. Basic Golf (G-3) 1 hour 

A basic course for the beginning golfer; includes use of all clubs and course 
play. (Fall) 

PEAC 137. Cycling (G-3) 1 hour 

Emphasizing various types of cycling, repairs, and safety factors. Students 
are to provide their own bicycles. (Spring) 






Health, Physical Education 
and Recreation 



PEAC 138. Intermediate Golf (G-3) 1 hour 

Play on a variety of courses for the bogie golfer. (Spring) 

PEAC 139. Intermediate Tennis (G-3) 1 hour 

For the advanced player with emphasis on playing strategy, doubles, and 
mixed doubles. (Fall) 

PEAC 143. Basic Tumbling (G-3) 1 hour 

Mat tumbling leading to gymnastic free-exercise routines. (Fall, Spring) 

PEAC 144. Basic Apparatus (G-3) 1 hour 

Basic skills emphasized on trampoline, P-bars, rings, unevens, and balance 
beam. (Fall, Spring) 

PEAC 151. Scuba Diving (G-3) 1 hour 

Leads to basic certification by N.A.S.D.S. or N. A.U.I. Lab fees in addition to 
tuition. Lab fee required. (Fall, Spring) 

PEAC 153. Basic Swimming (G-3) 1 hour 

Both beginning and intermediate swimming, and aquatic safety skills will 
be included. (Fall, Spring, Summer) 

PEAC 243. Tumbling Team (G-3) 1,1 hour 

Admission will be based on satisfactory performance of try-out require- 
ments for team membership. (Fall, Spring) 

PEAC 253. Intermediate Swimming (G-3) 1 hour 

Review of swimming strokes, diving, and conditioning. (Fall, Spring) 

PEAC 254. Lifesaving (G-3) 1 hour 

Prerequisite: PEAC 253 or equivalent. 

Leads to Red Cross Advanced Life Saving certification. (Spring) 

PEAC 255. Water Safety Instructor (G-3) 1 hour 

Prerequisite: PEAC 254 or equivalent. 

Leads to Red Cross Water Safety Instructor certification. (Spring) 

PEAC 259. Special Activities (G-3) 1 hour 

Courses with various structured content may be offered under this topic 
heading. Included are courses in water skiing, sailing, small craft, snow 
skiing, rock climbing, spelunking, aerobics, and sailplaning. This course 
may be repeated with the varying subject matter. Lab fees in addition to 
tuition are usually charged, by approximately $50-$75, 

HEALTH EDUCATION 

HLED 173. Health and Life (F-3) 2 hours 

A study of current subjects vital to healthful living. Integrating healthful 
living and Christianity with today's scientific research. Not open to nursing 
students. (Fall, Spring, Summer) 



Health, Physical Education 
and Recreation 



HLED 203. Safety Education (F-3) 2 hours 

t|Q The nature and causes of accidents, safety measures for the prevention of 

common accidents of the home, school, industry, transportation, and recrea- 
tion. The standard and advanced Red Cross Certificates will be issued to 
those completing the required work in first aid. (Fall) 

HLED 314. Kinesiology 4 hours 

Prerequisite: BIOL 105, 106 or equivalent. 

A study of the anatomical and mechanical variables influencing movement, 

including adaptive activities for the handicapped person. (Fall) 

HLED 315. Physiology of Exercise (W) 4 hours 

Prerequisite: BIOL 105, 106 or equivalent. 

Emphasizing the physiological effects of muscular exercise, massed gym- 
nastics, and physical conditioning. Significance of these effects for health 
and for skilled performance. (Spring) 

HLED 373. Care and Prevention of Athletic Injuries 2 hours 

Prerequisite: HLED 314. 

The study of treatment and prevention of athletic injuries. (Spring, even 

years) 

HLED 470. Current Issues in Health 2 hours 

This course emphasizes lifting the Great Healer through health ministry. 
Principles found in the Bible and Spirit of Prophecy are used as the basis for 
optimum health habits. Learning of health for an evangelistic tool and for 
optimal personal health are the two-fold objectives for the course. (Spring) 

HLED 473. Health Education 2 hours 

Prerequisite: HLED 173 or HLED 470. 

A study of the theoretical and scientific basis of health education with 
emphasis on the development and organization of the school health instruc- 
tion program. (Spring, odd years) 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION THEORY 

PETH 121, 122. Professional Skills, Team Activities 2,2 hours 

Development of professional skills including performance and teaching 
techniques for softball, football, volleyball, basketball, hockey, and soccer. 
For majors and minors only. (Fall, odd years; Spring, even years) 

PETH 221, 222. Professional Skills, Individual Activities 2,2 hours 

Development of professional skills including performance and teaching 
techniques for golf, tennis, badminton, gymnastics, conditioning, recrea- 
tional activities, track and field. Taught in alternate years for HPER majors 
and minors only. (Fall, Spring) 

PETH 261. Introduction to Recreation (G-3) 2 hours 

A course designed to promote outdoor recreation and provide experience 
for those interested in preparing for different phases of camp life, outdoor 
living and activities. (Spring, Summer) 



Health, Physical Education 
and Recreation 



PETH 265, 266. Officiating Sports Analysis 2,2 hours 

An introduction to administration of and participation in the organization 
of officiating in team and individual recreational activities. (Fall, Spring) 

PETH 363. An Introduction to Measurements and 

Research of Physical Education 3 hours 

A survey of tests used in Physical Education and an introduction to statisti- 
cal procedures for analyzing data and how it may be applied to research. 
(Spring) 

PETH 364. Principles and Administration of 

Physical Education and Recreation 3 hours 

An integrated study of the principles and administrative concepts of Physi- 
cal Education and Recreation. (Fall) 

PETH 374. Motor Learning and Development 2 hours 

The course based on physical anthropometrics and the neurological de- 
velopment of the child, adolescent related to his motor behavior. Taught in 
alternate years. (Spring) 

PETH 463. Physical Education in the Elementary School 2 hours 

This course is designed primarily for elementary teachers, physical educa- 
tion majors and minors. Objectives for this course include: a comprehensive 
review of motor learning and development stages, methods and materials, 
graded activities in games and rhythmic activities, self-testing and safety 
measures. Observation and teaching of elementary school children will be 
scheduled. (Spring, alternate Summers) 

PETH 490. Senior Seminar (W) 2 hours 

An exploration of philosophical and historical contributions to the field. 
Discussion of current topics, issues and research pertinent to the field and 
the interests of the students. Research and/or writing required as a portion of 
the class. (Fall) 

PETH 295, 495. Directed Studies (W) 1-3 hours 

An introduction to research and discussion on problem areas in the disci- 
pline. Limited to Physical Education majors. Writing emphasis credit for 
PETH 495 only. (Fall, Spring, Summer) 

EDUCATION 

EDUC 438. Methods of Teaching Health and 

Physical Education 2 hours 

Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. 

Attention is given to methods and materials of instruction, planning, test- 
ing, and evaluating student performances, the survey and evaluation of 
textbooks. The first half of the first semester during the senior year. (Fall) 

(F-3), (G-3), (W) See pages 14-16 for explanation of General Education require- 
ments. 



History 



100 



•HISTORY- 



Floyd Greenleaf, Ph.D. 
Benjamin McArthur, Ph.D. 
William Wohlers, Ph.D., Chairman 

History is the study of the human experience. It investigates man- 
kind's ideas, institutions, and accomplishments. In examining the 
reasons for mankind's experience, history courses at Southern College 
emphasize the Christian view of humanity. The Christian concept of 
human nature recognizes both the potential and the limitation of human 
endeavor and thereby permits broader comprehension of the past and 
present, and greater hope for the future. 

Approval of study programs for history majors. Departmental ap- 
proval is necessary for all programs. A student majoring in history must 
plan his entire study program with a member of the history faculty. 
Approval is then considered on an individual basis and is granted on the 
following conditions: 

1 . Compliance with graduation requirements as explained elsewhere 
in the Catalog. 

2. Fulfillment of the professional and individual needs of the student, 

3. Embodiment of academic balance and continuity. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE IN HISTORY 

Major: Thirty hours including HIST 154, 155; 174, 175; 499. Six hours 
of political science may apply to the major. The intermediate level of a 
foreign language is required. At least two courses are to be taken in each 
of the following areas: 

Area I: American History, HIST 354, 355, 356, 357, 359; PLSC 254. 

Area II: European History, HIST 374, 375, 366, 389; PLSC 389; either 
HIST 364 or 365. 

History as a preprofessional degree: A student majoring in history 
who plans to enter a professional school in an area such as medicine or 
law must present a balanced program of general education classes and 
electives that will support the professional objectives. 

History as a preparation for teaching: A student majoring in history 
who plans to teach will automatically have the 24 semester hours re- 
quired for certification in the area of the first teaching field. It is strongly 
recommended that the student also earn teaching credentials in a field 
outside of history. No specific supporting field is required but art, 
behavioral science, business, English, modern languages, and religion 
are recognized as intimately related to the study of history. A student 
may receive certification to teach history as a second area by completing 
a minor in history. See under Minor below. Students planning to teach 



History 

must follow procedures spelled out by the Education Department for 
admission into the teacher education and student teaching programs. J 1 

Minor: Eighteen hours including HIST 174, 175. The additional 
twelve hours will be chosen from remaining history courses, six hours of 
which must be upper division. A minimum of three hours must be 
chosen from each of the American and European areas. Three hours of 
political science maybe taken in lieu of three hours of history. A student 
planning to minor in history in order to obtain a second teaching area for 
certification must take all eighteen hours in history and must include 
HIST 154, 155. 

History as general education: Freshman and sophomore students 
earning general education credit in history should take courses from the 
100 and 200 level. Junior and senior students meeting general education 
requirements in history should select courses from the 300 and 400 level. 

HISTORY 

HIST 154, 155. American History and Institutions (C-l) 3,3 hours 

An introductory survey of the nation from colonial times to the present. The 
development ot its politics, government and social institutions is covered in 
each semester of the sequence. This course is recommended as general 
education for freshmen and sophomores. (Fall, Spring, Summer) 

HIST 174, 175. Survey of Civilization (C-l) 3,3 hours 

An introductory consideration of the ancient, classical, and medieval con- 
tributions to our own civilization and a consideration of modern and current 
developments. This course is recommended as general education for 
freshmen and sophomores. (Fall, Spring) 

HIST 354. Latin America (C-l), (W) 3 hours 

A survey of Latin America offering brief backgrounds from the colonial, 
independence, and early national periods, but focusing on twentieth- 
century trends in selected republics. 

HIST 355. History of the South (C-l), (W) 3 hours 

A study of the Old South from the discovery through the war between the 
states, the reconstruction and the subsequent developments, and recent 
changes, including the current scene. 

HIST 356. Minorities in America (C-l), (W) 3 hours 

A view of American minorities with particular emphasis on their history, 
changing problems, and current relationship to American life. Special at- 
tention is devoted to the American Black. 

HIST 357. Modern America (C-l), (W) 3 hours 

A study of American History from 1900 on with special examination of the 
progressive era, normalcy, the depression, the New Deal, and the role of the 
United States in world affairs. (Fall) 



History 



HIST 359. Transformation of American Culture (C-l) (W) 3 hours 

1 J* ^ topical approach to nineteenth and twentieth century American history, 

focusing on the modernization of life. Among the topics that may be covered 

are entertainment, the media, urban culture, social relations, transportation, 

and art and architecture. 

HIST 364. Christian Church I: From the Early Church 

Through the Middle Ages (C-l), (W) 3 hours 

A study of the history of western Christianity from the end of the apostolic 
period to the end of the Middle Ages, emphasizing both institutional and 
theological development. (Fall) 

HIST 365. Christian Church II: From the Reformation 

Through the Twentieth Century (C-l), (W) 3 hours 

A study of the reorientation of western Christianity, beginning with the 
Protestant Reformation and culminating with contemporary religious 
trends. (Spring) 

HIST 374. History of England (C-l), (W) 3 hours 

A survey of the history of Great Britain from Roman times to the twentieth 
century, emphasizing political, cultural, and economic developments 
which have influenced western civilization as a whole. 

HIST 375. Ancient World (C-l), (W) 3 hours 

A study of the three stages of ancient civilization, the Ancient Near East, 
Greece, and Rome, and the contribution each has made to the development 
of western culture. 

HIST 386. Foundations of Modern Culture: Europe in 

the Middle Ages and Renaissance (C-l), (W) 3 hours 

A study of European history from the fall of Rome to the beginning of the 
modern age, focusing on those developments which have influenced the 
institutions and values of modern western civilization. The chronological 
emphasis is on the eleventh through the sixteenth centuries. 

HIST 389. Vienna to Vietnam (C-l), (W) 3 hours 

A study of major historical developments affecting international relations 
since the Napoleonic Era. The class treats antithetical forces such as peace 
and war, power and weakness, sovereignty and dependence, as well as 
others, in their historical setting. Students may earn either history or politi- 
cal science credit, depending on individual assignments. 

HIST 295/495. Directed Study (C-l), (W) 1-3 hours 

A course emphasizing individual directed study. The instructor to whom a 
student is assigned will determine whether credit is upper or lower divi- 
sion. This course also includes credit offered by the History Department on 
directed study tours. Writing emphasis credit for HIST 495 only. Approval 
of the department is required prior to registration. 

HIST 499. Research Methods in History (C-l), (W) 3 hours 

Historical theories, procedures, and research methods are examined in 
conjunction with the preparation of a research project. (Fall) 






History 



POLITICAL SCIENCE 



PLSC 254. American National and State Government (C-2) 3 hours 

An examination of the operation of the executive, legislative, and judicial 
branches of government of the national, state, and local levels. 

PLSC 389. Vienna to Vietnam (C-2), (W) 3 hours 

See HIST 389 for course description. 

GEOGRAPHY 

GEOG 204. World Geography 3 hours 

(C-2 credit for elementary education majors only). 

Maps, land forms, soil, mineral resources, weather, and climate are consid- 
ered. Man's adjustment to various physiographic regions is studied. (Fall) 

GEOG 306. Cultural Geography (C-2) 3 hours 

This course is open only to those students who have spent a minimum of six 
months in residence in a country other than the United States, or its Ad- 
ministrative Territories. It is understood that students may not write about 
their native land or a country in which they have lived for a long period. The 
credit will be earned by the presentation of an essay with supporting mate- 
rials. The class is under the jurisdiction of the World Geography teacher. 
The course is non-repeatable, One-third regular tuition rate. 

HUMANITIES 

HMNT 205. Arts and Ideas (D-3) 3 hours 

A cultural appreciation class tracing the historical evolution of intellectual 
movements in western civilization. Ideas from leaders in philosophy and 
the arts will be studied with appropriate works from music, art, and litera- 
ture. Students may participate in activities involving specific art forms. 
Resource persons may assist as available. This course is also taught as part of 
the European study tour program during selected summer sessions. 

EDUCATION 

EDUC 438. Methods of Teaching History 2 hours 

Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. 

Attention is given to methods and materials in instruction, planning, test- 
ing, and evaluating student performances, the survey and evaluation of 
textbooks. Four lectures each week of the first half of the semester. (Spring) 

(C-l), (C-2), (W) See pages 14-16 for explanation of General Education require- 
ments. 






103 



Home Economics 



104 



HOME ECONOMICS- 

Thelma Cushman, M.A., Chairman 
Roy Dingle, A.S. 
Earl Evans, B.S. 
Diane Fletcher, M.A. 

Home Economics programs are designed to prepare men and women 
for careers dealing with home and family life, food and nutrition, textiles 
and clothing, and teaching of non-vocational Home Economics in sec- 
ondary and elementary schools. 

Flexibility of programs allows a choice of concentration to fit the 
preparation needed for the chosen Home Economics profession. 

Emphasis is placed upon the Seventh-day Adventist philosophy for 
home and family living and preparation for professional, church, and 
community leadership. 

All Home Economics programs are planned with a member of the 
Home Economics faculty. Approval is then considered on an individual 
basis and is granted on the following conditions: 

1 . Compliance with graduation requirements as explained elsewhere 
in the Catalog. 

2. Fulfillment of the professional and individual needs of the student. 

3. Embodiment of academic balance and continuity. 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE DEGREE IN HOME ECONOMICS 

Home Economics can complement other disciplines. The following 
academic combinations are possible: Home Economics and Business for 
a career as a home economist in business; Home Economics and Social 
Work for a career in gerontology; Home Economics and Education for a 
teaching career; Home Economics and Child Care for a career in day care 
supervision; Home Economics and the sciences for pre-pro/essional 
preparation /or medical school Employment opportunities abound for 
those who pursue advanced degrees in one of the areas of Home 
Economics. 

Major: Forty hours including FONT 125, 126, 127, 317, 325; HMEC 
146, 147, 148, 164, 165, 166, 201, 202, 349, 415, 485. Cognate require- 
ments: PSYC 124; HLED 203. 

Home Economics majors and candidates for secondary certification 
are encouraged to attend two approved professional meetings each 
semester. 

Minor — Home Economics: Eighteen hours, six hours of which must be 
upper division. 

Minor — Foods and Food Service: Eighteen hours including six hours 
of upper division. 









Home Economics 



Teaching Endorsement Requirements: 

Foods and Nutrition courses 8 hours J. |Jd 

Textiles and Clothing courses including HMEC 315 ... 8 hours 

Home Management courses including HMEC 146 8 hours 

Total 24 hours 



Before the end of the sophomore year, the student must apply to the 
Division of Human Development for admission to the Teacher Education 
Program. Before the end of the junior year, the student must apply to the 
Division of Human Development for admission to the professional 
semester. Read carefully the instructions after EDUC 134 on page 84. 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE DEGREE 

IN FOOD SERVICE ADMINISTRATION 

(Pending approval of the Board of Higher Education) 

The purpose of the four-year bachelor of science in food service ad- 
ministration is to provide the student with advanced skills in institu- 
tional food service including supervision and administration. A minor 
in Business Administration is required for this degree. 

Major: Fifty-two hours including FDNT 111, 112, 113, 114, 125, 126, 
127, 129, 219, 220, 239, 317, 325, 328; BUAD 355; FDNT415; HMEC 495; 
FDNT 497. Cognate requirements: CPTR 120, BIOL 125, PSYC 124 or 
128. 

Minor — Business Administration: Eighteen hours including ACCT 
121, 122, ECON 213; BUAD 334, 344 and three additional hours in 
Accounting, Economics or Business Administration. Recommended: 
BUAD 353. 

ASSOCIATE OF SCIENCE DEGREE IN HOME ECONOMICS 

The purpose of the two-year curriculum is to prepare the student for a 
successful family experience as well as for service to his community . All 
specified courses will apply toward a Bachelor's degree in Home 
Economics. 

Major: Twenty-four hours including courses FDNT 125, 126, 127, 317; 
HMEC 146, 147, 148, 165, 201, plus electives to make a total of 24 hours 
in Home Economics; HLED 203; general electives to make a total of 64 
semester hours. 

Home Economics majors and candidates for secondary certification 
are encouraged to attend two approved professional meetings each 
semester. 



Home Economics 

ASSOCIATE OF TECHNOLOGY DEGREE IN FOOD SERVICE 

IUu The purpose of the two-year associate of technology program is to 
provide the student with advanced skills in institutional food service 
production operations including management of special functions. 

Major: Thirty-seven hours including FONT 111, 112, 113, 114, 125, 
126, 127, 129, 219, 220, 239, 317. Cognate requirements: HMEC 146 or 
BUAD 128; SPCH 136; PSYC 124 or 128. General education require- 
ments include: ENGL 101, general education math requirements, six 
hours B-l or B-2, and electives for a total of 64 semester hours. Work 
experience in the food service and/or bakery is required. 

CERTIFICATE PROGRAM IN FOOD SERVICE PRODUCTION 

The purpose of the one-year certificate program is to provide the 
student with the basic production skills necessary for institutional food 
service. Course requirements are FDNT 111, 112, 113, 114, 127, 129, 
HMEC 146 or BUAD 128; SPCH 136; MATH 099; B-l or B-2 (three hours), 
and electives to complete a total of 32 semester hours. Work experience 
in the food service is required. 

FOODS AND NUTRITION 

FDNT 111:112. Principles of Quantity Food Service I, II 2,2 hours 

Classroom instruction in physical and chemical principles of institutional 
food preparation including the principles of sanitation and safety. (Fall, 
Spring) 

FDNT 113:114. Quantity Food Service Production Laboratory 6,6 hours 

Prerequisite or corequisite: FDNT 111:112. 

Experience in food service production operations to illustrate and apply the 
principles presented in lectures of FDNT 111:112. Three five-hour labora- 
tory periods each week. (Fall, Spring) 

FDNT 125. Nutrition (F-3) 3 hours 

An introduction to the basic principles of human nutrition. Includes study 
of the nutrients and the requirements for different age groups and normal 
physiological conditions. Attention will be given to religious and sociologi- 
cal influences, taking particular note of the counsel of E. G. White. (Fall, 
Spring) 

FDNT 126. Foods (G-2) 2 hours 

Basic principles of food science including food composition, food selection, 
and physical and chemical principles of food preparation. Two hours of 
lecture each week. Home economics majors must take concurrently with 
FDNT 127. (Fall) 

FDNT 127. Food Preparation (G-2) 1 hour 

Principles of quality food preparation. Efforts will be made to meet the 



Home Economics 
107 



specific needs and interests of the group. One three-hour discussion and 
laboratory per week. Home economics majors must take concurrently with 
FDNT 126. (Fall) 

FONT 129. Institutional Baking Techniques 3 hours 

Lecture and experience in principles of commercial institutional bakery 
production and operation, including purchasing, equipment layout, 
maintenance, and sanitation. One hour of lecture and five hours of labora- 
tory each week. (Fall) 

FDNT 151. Creative Cuisines 1 hour 

An introductory laboratory course in food preparation. Emphasis will be on 
practical cookery for today's lifestyle. The course will include microwave 
cooking; baking, including whole wheat and fancy breads; preparation of 
convenience and manufactured foods; and preparation of vegetarian en- 
trees, utilizing unprocessed foods available in the supermarket. NOT avail- 
able to majors. (Spring, Summer) 

FDNT 219, 220. Advanced Food Service Production 3,3 hours 

Prerequisites: FDNT 111:112, 113:114. 

Lecture and experience in recipe development, menu planning, and man- 
agement of banquets and special functions. One hour of lecture and five 
hours laboratory each week. (Fall, Spring) 

FDNT 239. Advanced Institutional Baking Techniques 3 hours 

Prerequisite: FDNT 129 

Lecture and laboratory experience in advanced principles and techniques of 
commercial and institutional bakery production and operation. One hour 
lecture and five hours of laboratory each week. (Spring) 

FDNT 317. Meal Management (G-2) 3 hours 

Prerequisites: FDNT 125, 126, 127, or approval of instructor. 
Experience in planning, costing, and serving meals to family-sized groups; 
problems in consumer economics and art of home food service. Two lectures 
and three hours of laboratory each week. (Spring) 

FDNT 325. Demonstration Techniques 2 hours 

Prerequisites: FDNT 125, 126, 127, or approval of instructor. 
Purposes, standards, and techniques of giving demonstrations with applica- 
tion to education and business settings. There will be a fee for supplies. 
(Spring, even years) 

FDNT 328. Foods and Nutrition Seminar (W) 1 hour 

Studies in a variety of current topics relating to foods and nutrition. Topics, 
announced in advance, will be chosen to meet student need and interest, 
(Fall) 

FDNT 415. Practicum in Special Functions 3 hours 

Prerequisites: FDNT 219, 220, 239, 317, 315, 328. 

Hands-on experience in all phases of catering for banquets and a variety of 

special functions. 140 clock nours of laboratory experience required. (Fall) 



Home Economics 

FDNT 497. Internship in Food Service Administration 4 hours 

108 Prerequisites: FDNT 219, 220, 317, 325, 328, 415. 

A tailored program in a selected food service facility, will include 400 clock 
hours of on-the-job experience in production, supervision, and administra- 
tion. One-third regular tuition rate. (Summer) 

HOME MANAGEMENT 

HMEC 146. Consumer Education (F-2) 2 hours 

A basic course in consumer education from the standpoint of purchasing 
and money management as related to the home and its personal needs. 
(Spring) 

HMEC 147. Family Resource Management (F-2) 3 hours 

A study of the achievement of family goals through management of personal 
and family resources including time, money, energy, and health. (Fall) 

HMEC 148. Orientation to Home Economics 1 hour 

Orientation in the areas of Home Economics and a study of the field in terms 
of history, philosophy, and professional opportunities. (Spring, odd years) 

HMEC 201. Parenting I (F-2) 2 hours 

A basic course in preparation for parenthood and the dynamics of parent- 
infant interaction. Particular emphasis will be given to family planning, the 
childbirth experience, and care of the infant. (Fall) 

HMEC 202. Parenting II (F-2) 2 hours 

An examination of a variety of specific techniques for developing com- 
munication and working relationships between parents and children. Dis- 
cussion of common problems of young children and of methods of modify- 
ing behavior. Special emphasis will be given to discipline, communication 
skills, and understanding and relating to children's individual characteris- 
tics. (Spring) 

HMEC 225. Life Skills 2 hours 

A basic course presenting a variety of skills necessary for successful living 
in today's world. NOT available for Home Economics majors and minors. 
(Fall) 

HMEC 244. Household Equipment (G-2) 2 hours 

Evaluation, use, and care of household appliances and equipment. (Spring, 
even years) 

HMEC 349. Interior Design (F-2) 3 hours 

A basic design course dealing with the principles of applied art in the home. 
Two lectures and three hours of laboratory each week. (Spring) 

HMEC 354. Home Management Seminar 1 hour 

Studies in a variety of current trends relating to home management. Topics, 
announced in advance, will be chosen to meet student need and interest. 
(Spring) 



Home Economics 



HMEC 415. Practicum in Home Management 2 hours 

Prerequisites: Twenty hours in Home Economics including HMEC 147 and 
349, and FDNT 317, or approval of the instructor. 

Experience in solving problems of family living. Laboratory will include 
personal management as well as working in the community. Registration 
required at the division office one semester in advance. (Spring) 

TEXTILES AND CLOTHING 

HMEC 164. Textiles (G-2) 3 hours 

A study of basic fibers and fabrics including properties, construction, selec- 
tion, uses, and care. Three lectures per week (Fall) 

HMEC 165. Basic Clothing (G-2) 2 hours 

Basic principles of clothing construction as applied to individual garments. 
Three hours combination lecture/laboratory each week. Three hours of addi- 
tional sewing experience required each week. (Fall, Spring) 

HMEC 166. Intermediate Clothing (G-2) 2 hours 

Principles of wardrobe planning, selection, and care for the individual. 
Emphasis is given to the relationship of the art principles to clothing. Two 
lectures and two hours of additional sewing experience required each week. 
(Spring) 

HMEC 313. Clothing and Human Behavior (F-2), (W) 2 hours 

Clothing as it relates to self-expression and to the individual's adjustment to 
the physical and social environment. The Seventh-day Adventist phi- 
losophy of dress is studied. (Spring, odd years) 

HMEC 315. Pattern Design 3 hours 

Prerequisite: HMEC 165 or approval of instructor. 

Clothing design and practice in creating designs through flat pattern and 
draping techniques. Two lectures and three hours of laboratory each week. 
(Spring, odd years) 

HMEC 316. Tailoring for Men and Women 3 hours 

Prerequisite: HMEC 165 or approval of instructor. 

Evaluation and use of various tailoring methods as applied in selection, 

fitting and construction of tailored garments. (Fall, odd years) 

HMEC 345. Upholstery and Drapery (G-2) 3 hours 

Laboratory experience in simple upholstering and professional drapery 
making. Two three-hour combined lecture and laboratory periods. Tnere 
will be a fee for supplies. (Spring, even years) 

HMEC 485. Home Economics Seminar (W) 2 hours 

Prerequisite: Twenty hours completed in Home Economics. 

Recent trends in Home Economics and related professional fields. Required 

of and limited to majors. (Spring, odd years) 



Home Economics 



HMEC 295/495. Directed Study 1-3 hours 

To permit the advanced student majoring in Home Economics to do indi- 
vidual work in the field under the direction of a staff member. By divisional 
approval which must be obtained before the semester begins. 

EDUCATION 

EDUC 438. Methods of Teaching Home Economics 2 hours 

Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. 

Attention is given to methods and materials of instruction, planning, testing 
and evaluating student performances, the survey and evaluation of 
textbooks. Four lectures each week of the first half of the semester. (Fall) 

(F-2), (F-3), (G-2), (W) See pages 14-16 for explanation of General Education 
requirements. 















■INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION 

John Durichek, M.A. 



Industrial Education 

111 



Francis Hummer 

Wayne Janzen, Ed.D., Chairman 

Industrial Education is a broad term used to describe a variety of 
learning activities that have as their core material conversion into usable 
products and the design, use and development of techniques that permit 
energy and power to be effectively utilized. The programs below de- 
velop the knowledge by which this information is conveyed from con- 
ception to implementation. 

Southern College Industrial Education classes may be used to earn a 
trade competency certificate, an Associate of Science degree or a 
Bachelor of Science degree. Many classes serve to enrich the curricula of 
other disciplines. 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE DEGREE IN INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION 

Major: Forty-eight hours including (a) INDS 145, 149, 154, 174, 184, 
265, 274, 275, 314, 324, 325; ART 104; seven hours of electives, and (b) 
the courses listed below for an Industrial or Secondary Teaching em- 
phasis. Cognate requirements are CHEM 111, MATH 104, and PHYS 
107. 

Secondary Teaching Emphasis — INDS 415 and 485, plus the 24 
semester hours of professional education subjects required to meet the 
NCATE-approved program for certification. 

Industrial Emphasis — INDS 176. This program prepares students 
for employment in fabricating and manufacturing industries and 
plant and institutional maintenance. The student will be proficient in 
several areas upon completion of the program. 

Minor: Eighteen hours including six hours upper division. 

Teaching Endorsement: 

Teaching endorsements are granted by the state to those who complete 
additional courses beyond the following classes: INDS 149, 325, 274, 
145, 174, 154, 265 and ART 104. 

Drafting 

Drafting endorsement requires 2 hours Woods, Metals, or Industrial 
Crafts elective. 

Industrial Arts 

Industrial Arts endorsement requires 4 hours Woods, Metals, or In- 
dustrial Crafts elective. 

Metals 
Metals endorsement satisfied by INDS 314 which is required. 



Industrial Education 

Power Mechanics 

Power Mechanics endorsement requires 4 hours Woods, Metals, or 
Industrial Crafts elective. 

Woods and Construction 

Woods and Construction endorsement requires 2 hours Woods elec- 
tive plus 2 hours Woods, Metals, or Industrial Crafts elective. 

The student must apply to the Department of Education for admission 
to the Teacher Education Program and the professional semester before 
the end of the sophomore and junior years, respectively. 

ASSOCIATE OF SCIENCE DEGREE IN INDUSTRIAL TECHNOLOGY 

This two-year curriculum is designed for those who would like a 
broad background in materials and processes of industry with an em- 
phasis towards plant and institutional maintenance. The requirements 
are as follows: INDS 154, 174, 175, 176, 184, 265, 274, 275, 278, 314. 
Cognates: Six hours to be chosen from PHYS 107, MATH 104, and CHEM 
111. 

DIPLOMA PROGRAM 
Auto Body — Repair and Refinishing 

The auto body program is designed to teach panel repair, refinishing, 
estimating, frame straightening, and major collision repair. The typical 
student upon completion of the course should have gained sufficient 
skill and experience to obtain employment in the trade. 

Inasmuch as tradespeople provide their own hand and air tools, the 
student will be expected to purchase a skeleton set for personal use 
during the course. The department will assist the student in the pur- 
chase of these tools which will cost approximately $300. Tuition for this 
one-year program will be $2,000 (nonrefundable). 

Students must receive approval of the department for admission into 
this program. See the department chairman for the special cost of the 
Auto Body Repair. 

The requirements are as follows: INDS 110, 112, 114, 116, 118, 120, 
265; three hours from B-l or B-2 courses.. 

INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION 

INDS 110. Panel and Spot Repair 5 hours 

Course is the first introduction to body repair. Student will learn how to 
straighten small dents, prepare panel for body fillers, prime and block ready 
for painting. (Fall) 

INDS 112. Painting and Refinishing 6 hours 

An introductory study of vehicle preparation and painting. Student will 



progress to doing complete refinish job himself. Student must purchase his 
own respirator and spray gun. Costs average $125. (Fall) 



Industrial Education 

113 



INDS 114. Oxy-Acetylene Welding 1 hour 

Gas welding and brazing of sheet metal in preparation for typical body shop 
welding jobs. Personal goggles required. (Fall) 

INDS 116. Collision Repair I 4 hours 

Introduction to a major collision job. Students will probably work in pairs. 
Body alignment, frame straightening, panel replacement, and dent repair 
are involved. (Fall) 

INDS 118. Collision Repair II 4 hours 

Continuation of experience in collision repair, emphasizing body align- 
ment, frame straightening, glass work, fiber glass repair, and body section 
replacement. There is no lecture component to this class, but rather is 
composed of four 3 period labs per week. (Spring) 

INDS 120. Collision Repair HI 5 hours 

A repetition of work experiences of Collision Repair I and II, but on an 
individual basis. Students will learn estimate writing, parts and supplies 
purchasing, shop management, and equipment maintenance. (Spring) 

INDS 145. Graphic Arts (G-2) 4 hours 

Special emphasis is given to offset methods of copy preparation, camera 
techniques, platemaking and press work. Basic instruction in screen print- 
ing is also included. A supplies fee will be charged for projects produced in 
class. Average cost of projects approximately $50. 

INDS 149. Engineering Graphics (G-2) 3 hours 

A basic course in drafting, training the student in the use of instruments and 
the principles of orthographic projection, surface development, sectioning, 

Eictorial representation, and dimensioned working drawings. Six periods 
iboratory each week. Lecture as announced by the instructor. Instruments 
cost approximately $40 (also used for INDS 325). (Spring) 

INDS 154. Woodworking (G-2) 4 hours 

A study of hand and machine tools, joinery, and proper methods of furniture 
construction. Two periods lecture, six periods laboratory each week. A 
supplies fee will be charged for the cost of the materials used in project 
construction. Generally, the costs have exceeded $100 or $200 it large 
furniture items were constructed. (Fall, Spring) 

INDS 155. Creative Crafts (G-2) 2 hours 

A study of various craft area associated with materials such as plastics, wood 
and metal. Silk screening and other graphic techniques are included. Project 
costs variable but approximately $35. (Fall, Spring) 



Industrial Education 



INDS 174. General Metals (G-2) 4 hours 

1 1 A Designed to acquaint the student with the many aspects of the metal work- 

M M "■ j n g i n d us t r y t Instruction will be given in the areas of forging, foundry, heat 

treatment, sheet metal, welding, plus hand- and power-operated metal- 
cutting equipment. Two periods lecture and six periods laboratory each 
week. Project expenses average $100. Each student must purchase his own 
safety glasses, welding gloves and goggles. (Fall) 

INDS 175. Refrigeration and Air Conditioning (G-2) 3 hours 

Fundamental principles of refrigeration and air conditioning. Emphasis 
will be placed on troubleshooting and servicing of both domestic and 
commercial units. One period lecture and six periods laboratory each week. 
Optional tool expense of $25 to $30. (Spring) 

INDS 176. Electric and Oxy- Acetylene Welding (G-2) 3 hours 

A very practical course in arc and acetylene welding, teaching the student to 
weld skillfully in all positions: flat, vertical, and overhead. In addition, the 
student will learn to use the Tig and Mig industrial welders. One period 
lecture and six periods laboratory each week. Safety glasses and gloves cost 
approximately $25. (Fall, Spring) 

INDS 177. Electrical Wiring (G-2) 3 hours 

A study of wiring procedures approved by the National Electrical Code. This 
course is designed to prepare the student for the licensure examination. Two 
periods lecture and tnree periods lab per week. (Spring) 

INDS 184. Industrial Safety Education 1 hour 

This course covers the major areas of industrial safety. It is not a study of 
safety rules, rather an overview of the social, physiological and philosophi- 
cal approach toward safety in industry. (Fall) 

INDS 219. Offset and Quick Print Operation 2 hours 

This course is designed to prepare the student to work in a quick print 
business operation oy operating equipment typical of large corporation 
in-house printing systems. 

INDS 264. Car Care (G-2) 2 hours 

A course designed to help the car owner become knowledgeable in matters 
of car care and operation. Does not apply toward a major or minor. One 
period lecture and three periods laboratory each week. (Fall) 

INDS 265. Automotive Fundamentals (G-2) 4 hours 

A course designed to give basic understanding of the automobile. Main 



emphasis is given to power plant and drive train design, operation, and 
service. Two periods lecture and six periods laboratory each week. Each 
student is expected to supply his own basic hand tools and coveralls. Tools 



service. Two periods lecture and six periods laboratory each week. Each 
student is expected to supply his own basic hand tools and coveralls. Tools 
may be rented or purchased from the department. (Minimum tool set costs 



approximately $200.) All lab learning experiences are on actual cars either 
from the community or personal vehicle. (Fall, Spring) 



Industrial Education 

115 



INDS 274. Electricity/Electronics (G-2) 4 hours 

A basic course in the principles of electricity and electronic circuitry — D.C, 
and A.C., with emphasis on resistors, capacitors, diodes, transistors, vac- 
uum tubes, amplifiers, and oscillators. Two periods lecture and six periods 
laboratory each week. Variable project expense involved. (Fall) 

INDS 275. Machine and Tool Maintenance 2 hours 

A study of the principles and methods of machine repair and preventative 
maintenance or equipment found in an industrial shop. The time will be 
divided between metalworking and woodworking equipment. One period 
lecture and three periods laboratory each week. Taught in alternate years. 
(Fall) 

INDS 278. Plant Maintenance 6 hours 

This course will include two periods of lecture per week dealing with such 
areas as: plumbing, carpentry, electrical wiring and heating systems, etc. 
Laboratory experience will entail working with a tradesman in each of the 
above areas. Twelve periods of laboratory per week. One-third regular 
tuition rate. (Spring) 

INDS 314. Machine Shop 4 hours 

Prerequisite: INDS 174 or permission of instructor. 
A course designed to provide in-depth experiences in the use of metal 
machinery andfabrication equipment. Provision is made for extensive per- 
sonal or large group produced projects. Two periods lecture, six periods 
laboratory each week. A IV2 ton floor jack will be built as the beginning 
project which costs approximately $125. Other project expenses are vari- 
able. 

INDS 315. Offset Lithography 3 hours 

An advanced study of graphic communications which will give the student 
actual operating experience with process cameras, darkroom techniques, 
stripping, plate making, contacting, and a variety of offset press equipment. 
One period lecture and six periods laboratory each week. A supplies fee will 
be charged. Taught in alternate years. (Spring) 

INDS 317. Engine Rebuilding 2 hours 

Prerequisite: INDS 265 or equivalent. 

This course is designed to provide experience in internal combustion en- 
gine overhaul. Each student will individually remove from car, overhaul, 
and re-install one engine. Six periods of laboratory including indi- 
vidualized instruction. Taught in alternate years. (Fall) 

INDS 318. Automotive Tune-up 3 hours 

Prerequisite: INDS 265. 

Automotive troubleshooting and tune-up. Course emphasis directed to- 



Industrial Education 



m wards the automobile electrical and fuel system. One period lecture and six 

periods laboratory each week. (Spring) 

INDS 323. Auto Body Repair (G-2) 3 hours 

An introductory course designed to acquaint the student with the principles 
and techniques used in repair of damaged body panels. Preference will be 
given for class admission to those who have experience in doing automotive 
work and who have gas welding skills. Each student will need his own basic 
hand tools which cost approximately $100. One period lecture and six 
periods laboratory per weeK. (Spring) 

INDS 324. Manufacturing Processes (W) 3 hours 

A study of manufacturing processes and management. Students will simu- 
late line production, visit area manufacturers, and do individual research 
projects. (Fall) 

INDS 325. Architectural Drafting (G-2) 3 hours 

A study of architectural details and methods of construction relative to 
frame and masonry veneer residential dwellings. Emphasis is placed on 
residential planning and design principles. Each student will design and 
draw all details necessary in the construction of a home. Six periods labora- 
tory each week. Lectures as announced by the instructor. Instruments cost 
approximately $50 (also used for INDS 149). (Fall) 

INDS 354. Furniture Construction 3 hours 

Prerequisite: INDS 154. 

Emphasis will be placed on construction of a piece of furniture of the 

student's choice. Two periods lecture and six periods laboratory each week. 

Students must underwrite the costs of materials. Taught in alternate years, 

(Spring) 

INDS 415. Laboratory Operation and Supervision 2 hours 

A course designed for students planning to be instructors. It will provide 
experiences such as tool maintenance, materials purchasing, project evalua- 
tion, and student assistance. This course must be preceded by completion of 
basic courses in each content area, such as drafting, graphic arts, woods, 
metals, and mechanics. Each student, in counsel with the instructor, will 
decide in which of three areas he will divide his time. One period lecture, 
three periods laboratory each week. Taught in alternate years. (Spring) 

INDS 485. Seminar 1 hour 

A discussion of problems related to the industrial education teaching pro- 
fession. One period discussion each week. Open only to Industrial Arts 
majors. (Spring) 

INDS 295/495. Directed Study 1-3 hours 

The study of a specific problem in the field of Industrial Education. A 
written report of the problem may be required by the supervising instructor. 
Open only to Industrial Education majors and minors. Offered on demand. 
(Fall, Spring) 



Industrial Education 



EDUCATION 

EDUC 438. Methods of Teaching Industrial Arts 2 hours 

Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. 

Attention is given to methods and materials of instruction, planning, test- 
ing, and evaluating student performance, and the survey and evaluation of 
textbooks. Four lectures each week of the first half of the first semester 
during the senior year. (Fall) 

(G-2), (W) See pages 14-16 for explanation of General Education requirements. 



117 



































































































Library Science 



118 



LIBRARY SCIENCE 



Peggy Bennett, M.S.L.S. 
Loranne Grace, M.L.S. 
Patricia Morrison, M.L.S. 



Minor: Eighteen hours. 

A school librarian K-12, Tennessee endorsement is available to cer- 
tified teachers who complete the 18 hours of Library Science provided 
by this minor. 

Teaching Endorsement: If a student meets the requirements for a first 
teaching field he may add the following endorsement by meeting the 
number of hours indicated below. 

LIBR 125 Reference 3 hours 

LIBR 226 Libraries and Librarianship 2 hours 

LIBR 314 Cataloging and Classification 3 hours 

LIBR 325 Library Materials for Children 3 hours 

LIBR 333 Instructional Media 2 hours 

LIBR 416 School Library Media Center 

Administration 3 hours 

LIBR 425 Library Materials for Young 

Adults and Adults _2 hours 

TOTAL 18 hours 

The student must apply to the Department of Education for admission 
to the Teacher Education Program and the professional semester before 
the end of the sophomore and junior years, respectively. Read carefully 
the instructions after EDUC 134 on page 84. 

Schedule of Course Offerings: 

86 86-87 87 87-88 88 88-89 

Summer Summer Summer 

1st 314 125 226 125 314 125 

Sem. 325 314 325 226 416 226 

333 

2nd 416 325 325 325 

Sem. 333 425 416 

416 

LIBR 125. Reference (G-2) 3 hours 

Presents basic concepts, selection and use of general and specialized refer- 
ence material for all levels of school libraries. Useful for the general student 
who desires to know how better to use the library. Required for all student 
assistants working in McKee Library. (Fall) 

LIBR 226. Libraries and Librarianship 2 hours 

Introduces the aspects of the library profession and the areas of service of 



Library Science 



various types of libraries. Develops the career possibilities of librarianship. 
(Fall) 

LIBR 314. Cataloging and Classification 3 hours 

Prerequisite: LIBR 125, 226. 

Examines the basic concepts and strategies for instituting and operating the 
cataloging area of the school library or media center. Involves the student in 
the basic methods of cataloging, classification, and other technical proce- 
dures integral to the retrieval of information. (Fall) 

LIBR 325. Library Materials for Children 3 hours 

Presents to the student a knowledge of a wide variety of books and related 
materials for children, grades 1-8. Develops an appreciation for books and 
reading that can be enthusiastically transmitted to young readers through 
criticalevaluation and selection of books and materials. Correlates the use of 
books and materials to the specific needs and interests of young readers. 
(Spring) 

LIBR 333. Instructional Media 2 hours 

A laboratory course in the selection, operation, and use of audio-visual 
equipment and materials. Preparation of transparencies, flat pictures, 
graphics, and audio materials will be required. One hour lecture and three 
hours laboratory per week. (Spring) 

LIBR 416. School Library Media Center Administration 3 hours 

Prerequisites: LIBR 125, 226, 314. 

Presents the basic concepts and organizational procedures for the adminis- 
trative personnel of the school library or media center so that this resource 
will become involved with the total program of the school. (Spring) 

LIBR 425. Library Materials for Young Adults and Adults 2 hours 

Gives emphasis to the variety of books and related materials for grades 9-12. 
Correlates critical evaluation and selection to the interests, use, and specific 
needs of the young adult as he develops his reading habits and skills. 
Develops an appreciation for books and reading that can enthusiastically 
involve both young adults and adults. (Spring) 

(G-2) See pages 14-16 for explanation of General Education requirements. 









Mathematics 



120 



■MATHEMATICS 



Lawrence Hanson, Ph.D., Chairman 
Robert Moore, M.S., Study Leave 
Art Richert, Ph.D. 

Throughout recorded history mathematics and mathematical think- 
ing have influenced man's culture to an extent that even many well- 
educated people fail to appreciate. The Elements of Euclid, the invention 
of a place-value numeration system, the invention of the calculus, and 
more recently the development of statistical inference, to name just a 
few, are mathematical contributions to civilization which have signifi- 
cantly affected the philosophies, commerce, science, and technology of 
mankind. 

The Mathematics Department seeks to transmit this mathematical 
heritage to the students of Southern College by (1) introducing students 
to mathematical concepts and techniques and the disciplined, logical 
thinking required to successfully apply them to a variety of problem- 
solving experiences, (2) providing a stage of the formal education of 
professional mathematicians, (3) educating teachers of mathematics, 
and (4) providing appropriate courses for users of mathematics. 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE DEGREE IN MATHEMATICS 

Major: Forty hours including MATH 317, 318, 319, 411, 412, and 485. 
Cognate requirements are CPTR 218; PHYS 211:212, 213:214. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE IN MATHEMATICS 

Major: Thirty hours including MATH 318, 319, 411, 412 and 485. 
CPTR 218 is a cognate requirement. For those with two majors or secon- 
dary certification the only prescribed upper division course require- 
ments are MATH 318 and 411. 

Minor: Eighteen hours including MATH 115 and six hours of upper 
division courses. 

Teaching Endorsement: In addition to meeting the requirements for a 
first teaching field, the student may add the following endorsement by 
meeting the number of hours indicated below: 

MATH 114 Elementary Functions and Relations . 4 hours 

MATH 115 Calculus I 4 hours 

Math elective credit including 

six hours numbered 300 or above . . 10 hours 

TOTAL 18 hours 

The student must apply to the Department of Education for admission 
to the Teacher Education Program and the professional semester before 






Mathematics 



the end of the sophomore and junior years, respectively. Please see the 

note on page 84 between EDUC 134 and 217. |2 ] 

MATH 099. Basic Mathematics (A-2) Non-Credit 

This course concentrates on the skills of arithmetic and beginning algebra 
and their application to everyday life situations. Calculated as 1 hour for 
determining class loads. Students with ACT mathematics standard score of 
12 or above are exempt from this course. There is a $50 charge for this 
course. (Fall, Spring, Summer) 

MATH 103. Survey of Mathematics (A-2) 3 hours 

Prerequisite: MATH 099 or exemption. 

Basic concepts from the following topics: sets, mathematical logic, numera- 
tion systems, number theory, probability, statistics, algebra, geometry, met- 
ric system, consumer mathematics. This course does not apply on a major or 
minor in mathematics. (Fall, Spring, Summer) 

MATH 104. Intermediate Algebra (A-2) 3 hours 

Prerequisite: MATH 099 or exemption. 

Number systems and their properties, exponents and radicals, equations 
and inequalities, polynomial functions and their graphs, systems of equa- 
tions, logarithms. This course does not apply on a major or minor in 
mathematics. (Fall, Spring, Summer) 

MATH 114. Elementary Functions and Relations (A-2) 4 hours 

Prerequisite: MATH 104 or two years of high school algebra. 

The real and complex number systems; the elementary functions and their 

graphs, including polynomial and rational functions, exponential and 

logarithmic functions, trigonometric functions and their inverses; analytic 

geometry. Only two hours apply toward a major in mathematics. (Fall, 

Spring) 

MATH 115. Calculus I 4 hours 

Prerequisite: MATH 114 or four years of high school mathematics which 
include at least one semester of trigonometry and some analytic geometry. 
Differential and integral calculus of the elementary functions including 
limits, continuity, the derivative, computation of derivatives, applications 
of the derivative, the definite integral, the fundamental theorem of calculus, 
computation of antiderivatives, applications of the definite integral. (Fall, 
Spring) 

MATH 215. Statistics (A-2) 3 hours 

Prerequisite: An ACT mathematics standard score of 22 or above, or two 
years of high school algebra with a B average, or MATH 104, or MATH 103. 
Elementary probability; organization and analysis of data; the binomial, 
normal, student's t, and chi-square distributions; sampling; hypothesis test- 
ing; nonparametric statistics; regression and correlation; analysis of var- 
iance. (Fall, Spring) 

MATH 216. Set Theory and Logic 2 hours 

Prerequisite: MATH 115. 

An introduction to some of the basic ideas, terminology, and notation of 



Mathematics 



122 



logic and sets. The concept of a mathematical proof will be emphasized. 
(Spring) 

MATH 217. Calculus II 3 hours 

Prerequisite: MATH 115. 

Precise definitions of limits, further topics in differential calculus, estimat- 
ing definite integrals, polar coordinates, parametric equations, sequences, 
infinite series, Taylor series, functions of two variables, partial derivatives, 
directional derivatives. (Fall) 

MATH 218. Calculus III 3 hours 

Prerequisite: MATH 217. 

Algebraic operations or vectors, multiple integrals, vector calculus includ- 
ing Green's theorem, Stokes's theorem, and the divergence theorem. 
(Spring) 

MATH 314. Applied Finite Mathematics 3 hours 

Prerequisite: MATH 215 or BUAD 313. 

Linear programming — simplex method, primal/dual interpretation, trans- 
portation problems. Decision theory under classical and Bayesian statistics. 
Game theory, inventory models and control, queuing theory. Program 
Evaluation and Review Technique (PERT). (Spring) 

MATH 315. Differential Equations 3 hours 

Prerequisite: MATH 217. 

Classification and solution of common types of ordinary differential equa- 
tions, power series solutions, systems of linear differential equations, the 
Laplace transform, applications to problems in the physical sciences. 
(Spring) 

MATH 316. Mathematics of Physics 3 hours 

Prerequisite: MATH 315. 

Partial differential equations, Fourier series, boundary value problems, Bes- 

sel functions, Legendre polynomials. (Fall, even years) 

MATH 317. Complex Variables 3 hours 

Prerequisite: MATH 216, 218. 

An introduction to the theory of analytic functions of a complex variable, 
including mappings by elementary functions, complex integration, the 
Cauchy-Goursat theorem, Cauchy's integral formula, power series, Laurent 
series, the theory of residues, aha conformal mapping. (Spring, odd years) 

MATH 318. Algebraic Structures 3 hours 

Prerequisite: MATH 216, 218. 

The structure of groups, rings, integral domains, and fields. (Fall, even 

years) 

MATH 319. Linear Algebra 3 hours 

Prerequisite: MATH 115, 216. 

Finite dimensional vector spaces and the attendant concepts of systems of 



Mathematics 



linear equations, linear transformations, matrices, determinants, eigen- 
values and eigenvectors. (Spring, odd years) 

MATH 405. Numerical Analysis 3 hours 

Prerequisites: MATH 218, 315, and a knowledge of Fortran. 
Interpolation and approximation, numerical differentiation and integra- 
tion, numerical methods of solving algebraic and differential equations, 
error analysis. (Spring, even years) 

MATH 411, 412. Advanced Calculus 3,3 hours 

Prerequisite: MATH 216, 218. 

The real number system, sequences, limits and metric spaces, continuity, 
uniform continuity, introduction to point set topology, properties of the 
derivative and integral, convergence and uniform convergence of sequences 
and series of functions, the Lebesque integral, Fourier series. (Fall, odd 
years, and Spring, even years) 

MATH 415. Geometry 3 hours 

Prerequisite: MATH 115, 216. 

Topics selected from the following: foundations of Euclidean geometry, 

finite geometries, advanced Euclidean geometry, non-Euclidean geometry, 

fjeometric transformations, the geometry of inversion, projective geometry. 
Fall, odd years) 

MATH 485. Mathematics Seminar (W) 1 hour 

Prerequisite: Permission of Mathematics staff. 

Written and oral reports are made on a variety of topics in mathematics and 

current literature. May be repeated for credit. (Fall, odd years) 

MATH 295/495. Directed Study 1-3 hours 

Prerequisite: Approval by division faculty. 

Individual reading and problem solving in a held chosen in consultation 

with an instructor. (On demand) 

EDUCATION 

EDUC 438. Methods of Teaching Mathematics and Physics 2 hours 

Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. 

Attention is given to methods and materials of instruction, planning, test- 
ing, and evaluating student performance, and the survey and evaluation of 
textbooks. Four lectures each week of the first half of the semester. (Spring) 

(A-2), (W) See pages 14-16 for explanation of General Education requirements. 



Modern Languages 



MODERN LANGUAGES 

Robert Morrison, Ph.D., Chairman 
Helmut Ott, EdLD. 

This department offers the opportunity for students to discover 
French, German, and Spanish not only as living languages but also as 
reflections of the cultures, customs, and peoples they represent. The 
aim, then, is to provide both an aesthetic background and a practical tool 
in the event the student becomes an overseas traveler or worker. 

The ability to communicate with people is increasingly essential in 
today's shrinking world, and an acquaintance with a foreign culture 
should be part of the background of educated persons, particularly those 
with a sense of world mission. The Department of Modern Languages 
aspires toward helping Christians fulfill this responsibility to dem- 
onstrate good will, whether as travelers and business people or as re- 
spondents to the Master's gospel commission. 

Students whose mother tongue is a language other than English and 
who wish to major in their native language obviously begin with certain 
basic skills already achieved. These skills are reasonably expected to be 
at least equivalent to the intermediate level. Such students will be asked 
to demonstrate these skills through a qualifying examination which, 
when successfully completed, will constitute a waiver of the six inter- 
mediate credits. These six credits are to be replaced by three hours of 
advanced English grammar (ENGL 218) and three hours from Master- 
pieces in Translation (MDLG 304), American or English literature, or 
American history. The foreign language major for students majoring in 
their mother tongue may thus be considered to consist of 30 hours but to 
include a substitution of six hours. 

FOREIGN STUDY 

Adventist Colleges Abroad. Southern College is a member of the 
consortium of colleges and universities which, under the auspices of the 
General Conference of Seventh-day Adventists, supports the Adventist 
Colleges Abroad program. ACA provides an opportunity for students of 
French, German, or Spanish to achieve proficiency in the foreign lan- 
guage amid the added advantages of an authentic cultural setting. 

The following institutions are affiliates of ACA: In Austria, Seminar 
Schloss Bogenhofen, Braunau; in France, Seminaire Adventiste, 
Collonges-sous-Saleve; and in Spain, Colegio Adventista de Sagunto, 
Sagunto. 

Students participate in the ACA program to obtain such goals as a 
language major with a speaking proficiency; a language minor with a 
speaking proficiency; general education credit, especially in such fields 
as history, humanities, religion, art, and music in an overseas setting; 






Modern Languages 

broader perspectives through foreign travel and experience, without 
loss of academic time; foreign study at reasonable cost; and insights into 
the global nature of the Seventh-day Adventist Church. 

Most ACA students return with a minor in the language. Some, espe- 
cially if they have completed the intermediate year before leaving for 
Europe, return with enough credits for a major. A major or minor in the 
foreign language is not automatic, however; ACA students intending to 
fulfill major or minor requirements must counsel with the Modern 
Languages staff before drafting their overseas program. 

Needed for admission to the ACA program are: 

1. Admission as a regular student at Southern College. 

2. Competence in the language. (The intermediate level is recom- 
mended; one year in college or two in secondary school may some- 
times be accepted.) 

3. A record free from academic and citizenship probation. 

4. The special ACA application form, submitted to the Admissions 
Office. 

5. Compliance with the financial requirements. (See page 224. Costs, 
including transportation, are comparable to those at Adventist 
colleges in the United States.) 

The University o/Montemorelos. By arrangement with the University 
of Montemorelos in Nuevo Leon, students may apply for an intensive 
summer course in Spanish in Mexico. An academic-year program is also 
available to a limited number of students. Credit for both plans is vari- 
able. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE IN FRENCH, GERMAN, OR SPANISH 

Major — French, German or Spanish: Thirty hours for the Bachelor of 
Arts degree, excluding course 101:102 but including course 211:212. 
Because the number of hours available on the Southern College campus 
is limited, especially in French and German, students are expected to 
earn a large portion of their major through ACA or the Montemorelos 
affiliation. Students not interested in foreign study are referred to the 
International Studies major (below). 

Minor — French, German or Spanish: Eighteen hours excluding 
course 101:102 but including course 211:212 and six hours of upper- 
division courses. Because advanced courses in French and German are 
not at present offered on the Southern College campus, the student 
desiring a minor in French or German must plan either a year in the ACA 
program or two summer terms in an intensive language program previ- 
ously approved by this department. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN INTERNATIONAL STUDIES (INST) 

Major — International Studies: This major is intended to offer basic 



Modern Languages 



language and literature within a framework of international cultural 
dimensions. Such a program is sometimes considered a "humanities 
major." Only a Spanish emphasis is at present available on the Southern 
College campus. The French or German emphasis, however, may be 
available to ACA students who complete sufficient language, culture 
and literature courses overseas. For the International Studies major, 
thirty hours are required, as listed below. A cognate requirement of 
RELT 368, Comparative Religions (3 hours), may be taken as one of the 
required general education courses (area B). 
SPAN (or GRMN or FREN) 211:212 — 

Intermediate Level 6 hours 

SPAN (or GRMN or FREN) 344 — Composition and 

Conversation 3 hours 

SPAN (or GRMN or FREN) 354 — Culture and Civilization 3 hours 

ENGL 445 — World Literature 3 hours 

MDLG 304 — Masterpieces in Translation 3 hours 

ART 344 (or MUHL 115) — History of Art 

(or Listening to Music) 3 hours 

HIST 386, 389 (or 354) — Foundations of Modern Culture 

or Vienna to Vietnam (or History of Latin America) 3 hours 

Additional hours from language and literature, world geog- 
raphy, a second foreign language, or ART 344 or MUHL 115 
(whichever is not taken above) 6 hours 

* Students desiring certification in Spanish, French or German must 
take these six hours in that language. 

TOTAL 30 hours 

Teaching Endorsement: 

1. For students with successful completion of 2 years Foreign Lan- 
guage study in high school: 

a. One language endorsement — a minimum of eighteen hours in 
that language. 

b. Two or more foreign languages — a minimum of thirty semester 
hours with a minimum of twelve semester hours in each of the 
languages. 

2. For students with no evidence of two years of high school credit: 

a. One language endorsement — a minimum of twenty-four hours 
in that language. 

b. Two or more foreign languages — a minimum of eighteen semes- 
ter hours in each of the languages. 

The student must apply to the Department of Education for admission 
to the Teacher Education Program and the professional semester before 
the end of the sophomore and junior years, respectively. 



* 



SPECIAL COURSES 



IMDLG 304. Masterpieces in Translation (D-2) 3 hours 

A survey of great literary works from France, Germany, Spain, and Spanish 
America, from the seventeenth century to modern times. Students desiring a 
complete survey of world literature may first enroll for ENGL 445, World 
Literature, which covers the centuries up to the seventeenth. Applies to- 

Ithe 



Modern Languages 



127 



ward general education requirements in literature but not toward the major 
in French, German or Spanish. (Spring, even years) 



IMDLG 295/495. Directed Study 1-6 hours 

The content of this course will be adjusted to meet the particular needs of the 
individual student. This course also includes credit offered by the Modern 
Languages Department on directed study tours. Approval of the instructor 
must be obtained prior to registration for the course. 

FRENCH 

FREN 101:102. Elementary French (D-l) 3,3 hours 

A foundation course in the basic skills. May be waived by examination. 
Laboratory work is required. No credit will be allowed for elementary 
modern language if credit has already been received for it at the secondary 
level. (No credit may be earned for this course by students whose mother 
tongue is French.) 

FREN 211:212. Intermediate French (D-l) 3,3 hours 

Prerequisite: FREN 1 01 : 102, or two years of French in secondary school, or a 
satisfactory score on a standardized examination. 

Advanced grammar; intensive and extensive reading of moderately difficult 
material; oral and written exercises. Laboratory work is required. (No credit 
may be earned for this course by students whose mother tongue is French. 
FREN 211 is offered Fall even years; 212, Spring odd years.) 

GERMAN 

GRMN 101:102. Elementary German (D-l) 3,3 hours 

A foundation course in the basic skills. May be waived by examination. 
Laboratory work is required. No credit will be allowed for elementary 
modern language if credit has already been received for it at the secondary 
level. (No credit may be earned for this course by students whose mother 
tongue is German.) 

GRMN 211:212. Intermediate German (D-l) 3,3 hours 

Prerequisite: GRMN 101:102, or two years of German in secondary school, or 
a satisfactory score on a standardized examination. 
Advanced grammar; intensive and extensive reading of moderately difficult 
material; oral and written exercises. Laboratory work is required. (No credit 
may be earned for this course by students whose mother tongue is German. 
GRMN 211 is offered Fall odd years; 212, Spring even years.) 



Modem Languages 



128 



RUSSIAN 



RUSS 101. Elementary Russian 3 hours 

A foundation course in the basic skills. May be waived by examination. 
Laboratory work is required. No credit will be allowed for elementary 
modern language if credit has already been received for it at the secondary 
level. (No credit may be earned for this course by students whose mother 
tongue is Russian.) 

SPANISH 

SPAN 101:102. Elementary Spanish (D-l) 3,3 hours 

A foundation course in the basic skills. May be waived by examination. 
Laboratory work is required. No credit will be allowed for elementary 
modern language if credit has already been received for it at the secondary 
level. (No credit may be earned for this course by students whose mother 
tongue is Spanish). 

SPAN 211:212. Intermediate Spanish (D-l) 3,3 hours 

Prerequisite: SPAN 101 :102, or two years of Spanish in secondary school, or 

a satisfactory score on a standardized examination. 

Advanced grammar; intensive and extensive reading of moderately difficult 

Spanish texts; oral and written exercises. Laboratory work is required. (No 

credit may be earned for this course by students whose mother tongue is 

Spanish). 

SPAN 344. Composition and Conversation (D-l), (W) 3 hours 

Prerequisite: SPAN 211:212 or equivalent. 

Development of skill in speaking, understanding, and writing idiomatic 
Spanish. (Open to Spanish or Latin-American nationals only by permission 
of instructor. Fall, odd years) 

SPAN 354. Hispanic Culture and Civilization 3 hours 

Prerequisite: SPAN 211:212 or equivalent. 

Backgrounds of the social, religious, political, economic, artistic, and intel- 
lectual scene in the Spanish-speaking world. (Fall, even years) 

SPAN 365. Spanish Linguistics 3 hours 

Prerequisite: SPAN 211:212 or equivalent. Recommended: SPAN 344. 
Introduction to the morphological, syntactic, and phonemic structure of the 
Spanish language. Practice in sounds, intonation, and transcription; reme- 
dial pronunciation drills. The course includes a brief survey of the history of 
the language. (Spring, odd years) 

SPAN 376. Masterpieces of Spanish Literature (D-2) 3 hours 

Prerequisite: SPAN 211:212 or equivalent. 

History and development of Spanish literature; reading of representative 

works. No credit allowed if SPAN 3 36 credit has been awarded. (Spring, odd 

years) 



Modern Languages 



SPAN 436. Masterpieces of Spanish-American 

Literature (D-2) 3 hours |29 

Prerequisite: SPAN 211:212 or equivalent. 

History and development of Spanish-American literature; reading of rep- 
resentative works* (Spring, even years) 

EDUCATION 

EDUC 438. Methods of Teaching Modern Languages 2 hours 

Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. 

Learning and teaching a foreign language, in both theory and practical 
application, with special attention to goals, planning, classroom 
techniques, selection and utilization of materials ana aids, and evaluation of 
student performance. Four lectures each week of the first half of the first 
semester during the senior year. 

(D-l), (D-2), (W) See pages 14-16 for explanation of General Education require- 
ments. 









Music 



130 



MUSIC 



J. Bruce Ashton, D.M.A. 

Orlo Gilbert, M.Mus. Ed. 

Judith Glass, M.Mus. 

Marvin L. Robertson, Ph.D., Chairman 

Don Runyan, Ph.D. 

Patricia Silver, M.A. 

The faculty of the Department of Music believes that music is one of 
the arts given to man by his Creator to be used in the worship of God and 
to enhance the quality of man's life. In harmony with this philosophy, 
course work is offered which meets the needs of the general college 
student as well as music majors and minors. 

The Department of Music offers two baccalaureate degrees, the 
Bachelor of Music degree in music education and the Bachelor of Arts 
degree in music. Both degrees require courses in music theory and 
history, as well as a high level of achievement in a major performance 
area. In addition, the Bachelor of Music degree emphasizes the skills 
necessary for teaching music, with special emphasis on the training of 
teachers for the Seventh-day Adventist school system. 

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS 

Music majors must fulfill all the general admission requirements of 
the college. In addition, a prospective music major is required to take 
written and aural entrance examinations in music theory and a perform- 
ance examination in the applied concentration. To obtain freshman 
standing as a music major the student must qualify for MUCT 111 and 
MUPF 189. 

Further information regarding the entrance examinations may be ob- 
tained by writing the chairman of the Department of Music. 

GENERAL REQUIREMENTS 

Functional Piano: All music majors must pass a functional piano 
examination or pass four hours of piano secondary. (The latter may not 
be used as part of the applied music requirement in the Vocal/General 
Endorsement for teacher certification.) The functional piano examina- 
tion includes the playing of hymns, scales, triads, arpeggios, several 
moderately easy compositions and accompaniments, and the harmoni- 
zation of simple folk melodies. The functional piano examination 
should be passed during the first week of the first semester in residence 
or the student must register for applied piano instruction. 

Applied Music Credit: One semester hour of credit will be given for 
thirteen half-hour lessons with a minimum of four hours of practice per 
lesson. Applied music concentration grades are assigned following a 
jury examination at the end of each semester. 



Music 

Concert and Recital Attendance: Full-time music majors are required 
to attend twelve Department approved concerts per semester, except for 1 Q 1 
the student teaching semester. Attendance shall include faculty and 
senior recitals in the student's applied concentration area. Failure to 
meet this requirement will nullify music major status. 

Music Ensemble Participation: All music majors are required to par- 
ticipate in a music ensemble every semester in full-tiijie residence (12 or 
more hours). During the student teaching semester, students are ex- 
empted from this requirement. 

Senior Recital: The candidate for the Bachelor of Music degree or the 
Bachelor of Arts degree will present a senior recital. The student must be 
registered for private instruction while preparing for the senior recital. 
Upon music faculty approval the senior recital requirement may be 
partially fulfilled through a conducting or chamber music performance. 

A faculty audition of the complete program must be scheduled at least 
three weeks before the recital date. Unsatisfactory performance at this 
audition will result in a rescheduling of the recital date. 

JUNIOR STANDING 

Music majors must apply for junior standing at the end of the sopho- 
more year. The requirements for junior standing are as follows: 

a. An overall grade point average of 2 . for the Bachelor of Arts degree 
and 2.25 for the Bachelor of Music degree. 

b. A grade point average of 2.5 in all music courses. 

c. Completion of the functional piano requirement. 

d. Completion of MUCT 111:112, 121:122. 

e. Completion of four hours of credit in the student's applied music 
concentration area. 

Faculty evaluation of the application for junior standing will result in 
the student receiving one of the following classifications: (a) Pass, 
Bachelor of Music; (b) Pass, Bachelor of Arts; (c) Probation; (d) Fail. 
Junior standing requirements must be met at least two semesters before 
graduation. 

BACHELOR OF MUSIC CURRICULUM 

The Bachelor of Music degree in music education is an NCATE ap- 
proved degree which meets state and denominational certification re- 
quirements. Students must apply for admission to the Teacher Educa- 
tion Program, through the Department of Education, prior to taking 
education courses. Each student will be responsible to determine the 
additional courses that may be required for certification in the state of his 
choice. This information can be obtained at the Department of Educa- 
tion. 



Music 



The following general education requirements apply only to students 
| Q 2 pursuing a Bachelor of Music degree: 

A. Basic Academic Skills 9 hours 

1. English 6 hours 

2. Mathematics 3 hours 

B. Religion 12 hours 

1. Biblical Studies (RELB) 6 hours 

2. Religion: RELT 155, 238 6 hours 

C. History, Political and Economic Systems 9 hours 

1. History 6 hours 

2. Political Science and Economics 3 hours 

D. Language, Literature, Fine Arts 3 hours 

1. Foreign Languages 

(Intermediate level) 0-3 hours 

2. Literature 0-3 hours 

E. Natural Sciences 6 hours 

1. Biology 0-3 hours 

2. Chemistry 0-3 hours 

3. Physics 0-3 hours 

F. Behavioral, Family, Health Sciences 2 hours 

1. Health Science: HLED 173 2 hours 

G. Activity Skills 4 hours 

1. Recreational Skills 4 hours 

TOTAL 45 hours 

Music Core: 

MUCT 111, 112 Music Theory I, II 6 hours 

MUCT 121, 122 Aural Theory I, II 2 hours 

MUCT 211, 212 Advanced Music Theory IK, IV 6 hours 

MUCT 221, 222 Advanced Aural Theory III, IV 2 hours 

MUHL 314, 315 History of Music 8 hours 

MUPF 477 Instrumental Conducting Techniques 3 hours 

MUPF 478 Choral Conducting Techniques 3 hours 

MUPF 313 Orchestration & Arranging _3 hours 

TOTAL 33 hours 

Keyboard proficiency must be demonstrated by passing a piano profi- 
ciency examination. Four (4) hours of keyboard secondary may be used 
in lieu of the proficiency examination. The four hours of keyboard may 
not be used as part of the applied music requirement in the Vocal/ 
General Endorsement. 

Vocal/General Endorsement 

A. Applied Music Concentration Voice 

Applied Concentration 14 hours 



Music 



Appropriate Ensemble(s) 8 hours 

Vocal and General Methods including: 

MUED 231 Music Methods in Elem. School 2 hours 

MUED 317 Voice Pedagogy 2 hours 

MUED Elective 2 hours 

MUED 439 Student Teaching Seminar 1 hour 

Music Elective _4 hours 

TOTAL 33 hours 

B. Applied Music Concentration Keyboard 

* Applied Concentration (Piano or Organ) 14 hours 

Applied Concentration (Voice) 4 hours 

Appropriate Ensemble(s) 8 hours 

Vocal and General Methods including: 

MUED 231 Music Methods in Elem. School 2 hours 

MUED 317 Voice Pedagogy 2 hours 

MUED 316 Piano Pedagogy (Piano Concentration) 

or 
MUED 318 Organ Pedagogy (Organ Concentration) 2 hours 
MUED 439 Student Teaching Seminar _1 hour 

TOTAL 33 hours 

*1. Organ majors must take two hours of MUPF 279, Service 
Playing, in lieu of two hours of MUPF 289. 

*2. Piano majors may take two hours of MUPF 378, Instru- 
mental Ensemble Experience (Accompanying), in lieu 
of two hours of MUPF 389. 

Instrumental Endorsement 

Applied Music Concentration 

(one instrument: wind, string, or percussion) 14 hours 

Appropriate Ensemble(s) 8 hours 

Secondary Instrument Instruction 

(must include at least two areas, excluding keyboard) 6 hours 

Instrumental Music Methods and Materials 6 hours 

MUED 439 Pre-Student Teaching Seminar _1 hour 

TOTAL 35 hours 

Vocal/General and Instrumental Endorsement 

An applicant for endorsements in both areas above may complete a 
minimum of ten semester hours in methods and materials, provided 
both are represented. 

Education Core: (Before taking education courses, the student must 
apply to the Education Department for admission to the Teacher 
Education Program. Before the end of the junior year, the student must 



133 



Music 



apply to the Education Department for admission to the professional 
| fl JJ semester.) 

EDUC 125 Foundations of Education 3 hours 

EDUC 134 Principles of Christian Education 2 hours 

EDUC 217 Psychological Foundations of 

Education 3 hours 

EDUC 240 Education of the Exceptional Student 2 hours 

EDUC 356 Tests and Measurements 2 hours 

EDUC 427 Current Issues in Education 2 hours 

EDUC 432 Reading in Secondary School 2 hours 

EDUC 468 Student Teaching, 7-12 ^6 hours 

22 hours 

MUSIC EDUCATION 

MUED 439 Pre-Student Teaching Seminar 1 hour 

MUED 231 Music Methods in Elementary School 

Pedagogy, or Materials and Methods . _6 hours 

7 hours 

BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE IN MUSIC 

The Bachelor of Arts in music is a non-professional degree designed to 
give the student a broad understanding of the musical heritage of man. 

Major: Forty hours including fourteen upper division hours and the 
following: 

Music Theory including MUCT 111:112; 121:122; 

211:212; 221:222 19 hours 

MUHL 314:315 —History of Music to 1750/1750 to Present 8 hours 

MUPF 189, 389 — Concentration 8 hours 

Music Ensembles 5 hours 

A student must complete all general education requirements of the 
College. 

The foreign language recommended is either French or German. 
Music Minor: Eighteen hours including the following: 

MUCT 111:112 — Music Theory I and II 6 hours 

MUHL 115 — Listening to Music 3 hours 

MUPF 179 — Concentration 2 hours 

MUPF 477 or 478 — Instrumental or Choral Conducting 

Techniques 3 hours 

Music Course Electives (including three hours upper 

division) .• _4 hours 

18 hours 






Music 



MUSIC THEORY 



MUCT 100. Introduction to Music Theory 2 hours 

A study of the rudiments and basic vocabulary of music theory. Does not 
apply toward a music major or minor. This is a computer assisted course. 
(Spring, Summer) 






MUCT 111:112. Music Theory I and II 3,3 hours 

Prerequisite: MUCT 100 or examination. 

A study of the elements which render music of all periods aurally and 

visually comprehensible, within simple forms and a variety of textures from 

one to four voices. Music Theory I may not be repeated more than once. (Fall, 

Spring) 

MUCT 121:122. Aural Theory I and II 1,1 hours 

A laboratory for the development of keyboard and sight-singing skills re- 
lated to the materials introduced in MUCT 111:112. Music majors must take 
this concurrently with MUCT 111:112. This is a computer assisted course. 
(Fall, Spring) 

MUCT 211:212. Advanced Music Theory III and IV 3,3 hours 

Prerequisite: MUCT 111:112. 

An expanded and intensified study of the structure of music as begun in 

MUCT 111:112. In MUCT 212, contemporary music is emphasized. (Fall, 

Spring) 

MUCT 221:222. Advanced Aural Theory III and IV 1,1 hours 

Keyboard and sight-singing applications of materials studied in MUCT 
211:212. Music majors must take this concurrently with MUCT 211:212. 
This is a computer assisted course. (Fall, Spring) 

MUCT 313. Orchestration and Arranging 3 hours 

Prerequisite: MUCT 111:112. 

The ranges, capabilities and limitations, and transpositions of orchestra and 
band instruments. Idiomatic scoring of short works for vocal and instrumen- 
tal chamber groups, small orchestra, and band. Performance of exercises and 
analysis of scores is emphasized. (Spring) 

MUCT 413. Analysis of Music Form 3 hours 

Prerequisite: MUCT 211:212 or permission of instructor. 

An analytical study of musical structure from the smallest units of form to 

the more complex music of all historical periods. (Spring) 

MUCT 295/495. Directed Study 1-3 hours 

Individual study open to music majors and other qualified students. Content 
to be arranged. Approval must be secured from the division chairman prior 
to registration. May be repeated up to a total of three hours. (Fall, Spring, 
Summer) 



135 



Music 



136 



MUSIC HISTORY 



MUHL 115. Listening to Music (D-3) 3 hours 

A course designed to acquaint the student with the major composers, musi- 
cal styles, and forms of Western music. Two listening periods per week are 
required. Does not apply toward a music major. (Fall) 

MUHL 215. Music in the Christian Church (D-3) 2 hours 

An historical and philosophical survey of music in the Christian Church 
with particular emphasis on hymnology. (Spring) 

MUHL 314. History of Music to 1750 (D-3), (W) 4 hours 

Prerequisite: MUHL 115, MUCT 111:112, or permission of instructor. 
A study of music literature from antiquity to 1750 including cultural 
backgrounds, development of music form and style, and analysis of rep- 
resentative masterworks from each major period of music history. A unit of 
non-Western music is also included. Two listening periods per week are 
required. (Fall: even numbered years) 

MUHL 315. History of Music, 1750 to Present (D-3), (W) 4 hours 

Prerequisite: MUHL 115, MUCT 111:112 or permission of instructor. 
A study of music literature from 1750 to the present, including cultural 
backgrounds, development of music form and style, and analysis of rep- 
resentative masterworks from each major period, of music history. Two 
listening periods per week are required. (Spring: odd numbered years) 



MUSIC EDUCATION 

MUED 136. String Materials and Methods 2 hours 

A study of the stringed instruments, including methods and materials for 
class and private instruction. Observation of classroom and private instruc- 
tion is required. (Spring: even numbered years) 

MUED 146. Brass Materials and Methods 2 hours 

A study of tone production, performance techniques, embouchure, finger- 
ings, practical pedagogic technique, and simple repairs. A survey of litera- 
ture for the instruments and evaluation of teaching methods. Observation of 
classroom and private instruction is required. (Fall: even numbered years) 

MUED 156. Woodwind Materials and Methods 2 hours 

A study of tone production, embouchure, fingerings, practical pedagogic 
technique, and simple repairs. A survey of the literature for the instruments 
and evaluation of teaching methods. Observation of classroom and private 
instruction is required. (Spring: odd numbered years) 

MUED 166. Percussion Materials and Methods 2 hours 

A study of percussion instruments, including methods and materials for 
class and private instruction. Observation of classroom and private instruc- 
tion is required. (Fall: odd numbered years) 






Music 



MUED 231. Music Methods in the Elementary School 2 hours 

Prerequisite: MUCT 100 (or permission of instructor) or MUHL 115. 
A course designed to prepare teachers to direct the music activities in the 
elementary school. The content includes fundamentals, appreciation, sing- 
ing, playing, and rhythmic activities. Observation and participation in the 
music program of the elementary school is required. Two hours lecture and 
one hour laboratory work per week. (Fall, Summer) 

MUED 316. Piano Pedagogy 2 hours 

Prerequisite: Two hours of MUPF 179 or equivalent. 
Methods, materials, and procedures for private and class piano instruction; 
planning a complete program for pupils on various grade levels including 
technic, repertoire, and musicianship. Observation and teaching is re- 
quired. (Fall: odd numbered years) 

MUED 317. Voice Pedagogy 2 hours 

Prerequisite: Two hours of MUPF 179 or equivalent and permission of 
instructor. 

Methods, materials, and procedures for private and class voice instruction; 
testing and classification of voices; physiological and psychological prob- 
lems of voice production and diction. Observation and teaching is required. 
(Spring: odd numbered years) 

MUED 318. Organ Pedagogy 2 hours 

Prerequisite: Two hours of MUPF 179 or equivalent. 
Methods, materials, and procedures for instruction in organ; accompani- 
ment of church services; registration of organ literature on various types of 
organs. Observation and teaching is required. (Fall: even numbered years) 

MUED 439. Pre-Student Teaching Seminar 1 hour 

Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. 

A seminar in which the student is oriented to student teaching, including 
curriculum, lesson planning, professional relationships, and other matters 
related to student teaching. (Spring) 

APPLIED MUSIC 

MUPF 108. Group Instruction (G-l) 1-2 hours 

Beginning voice and beginning piano only. A minimum of four hours of 
practice and/or listening outside of class is required. (Fall, Spring) 

MUPF 129. Secondary (G-l) 1-2 hours 

Private instruction in voice, piano, organ, or orchestral instrument. One-half 
hour lesson and a minimum four hours practice per week are required for 
each hour of credit granted. (Fall, Spring, Summer) 

MUPF 189. Concentration (G-l) 1-2 hours 

Prerequisite: Performance examination for freshman standing. 
Private instruction in voice, piano, organ, or orchestral instrument. One-half 
hour lesson and a minimum four hours practice per week are required for 
each hour of credit granted. (Fall, Spring, Summer) 



Music 



MUPF 279. Service Playing (G-l) 1 hour 

138 Prerequisite: Two hours MUPF 189 (organ) or permission of instructor. 

The development of skills requisite to playing both liturgical and non- 
liturgical services, including hymn playing, choral and solo accompanying, 
conducting from the console, improvisation and modulation, and selection 
of appropriate preludes, offertories, and postludes. Performance experience 
required. (Fall, Spring) 

MUPF 329. Secondary (G-l) 1-2 hours 

Private instruction in voice, piano, organ, or orchestral instrument. One-half 
hour lesson and a minimum four hours practice per week are required for 
each hour of credit granted. (Fall, Spring, Summer) 

MUPF 389. Concentration (G-l) 1-2 hours 

Prerequisite: Four hours MUPF 189. 

Private instruction in voice, piano, organ, or orchestral instrument. One-half 
hour lesson and a minimum four hours practice per week are required for 
each hour of credit granted. (Fall, Spring, Summer) 

MUPF 477. Instrumental Conducting Techniques (G-l) 3 hours 

Prerequisite: MUCT 112 or permission of instructor. 
Basic conducting techniques including beat patterns, cues, and expressive 
gestures, and vocal problems. Experience in conducting choral ensembles is 
included. (Fall: odd numbered years) 

MUPF 478. Choral Conducting Techniques (G-l) 3 hours 

Prerequisite: MUCT 112 or permission of instructor. 
Basic conducting techniques including beat patterns, cues, and expressive 
gestures, and vocal problems. Experience in conducting choral ensembles is 
included. (Spring: even numbered years) 

Courses MUPF 108, 1 29, and 329 are open to any student of the College 
as elective credit toward the B.A. or B.S. degree. The music major or 
minor may not apply these toward his applied music concentration. 
Students desiring to study organ must pass the Functional Piano Exami- 
nation. 

Courses MUPF 189 and 389 are courses primarily for the music major 
and minor, but they may be elected by anyone who passes the examina- 
tion for freshman standing. Jury examinations are required with these 
course numbers. 

The following performance areas may be studied: voice, piano, classi- 
cal guitar, folk guitar, organ, violin, viola, cello, double bass, flute, oboe, 
clarinet, saxophone, bassoon, trumpet, French horn, trombone, baritone 
tuba, and percussion instruments. 

CHORAL ENSEMBLES 

Choral ensembles are open to all college students through audition. 
Each ensemble meets three periods per week and offers one hour credit 



Music 



each semester. Regular attendance at performances and rehearsals, in- 
eluding dress rehearsals, is required. J 3{J 

Voice majors are required to sing in the Southern College Concert 
Choir or Chamber Singers for two years. 

Ensembles for which academic credit is granted are organized and 
sponsored by the members of the music faculty. 

MUPF 118/318. 1 Cantatrici Ladies' Chorus (G-l) 1 hour 

A female-voice choir which performs music of all styles and style periods, 

MUPF 148/348. Chamber Singers (G-l) 1 hour 

A mixed-voice choir which performs choral music appropriate to the 
Chamber Choir. 

MUPF 158/358. Die Meistersinger Male Chorus (G-l) 1 hour 

A male-voice choir which performs music of all styles and style periods. 

MUPF 168/368. Southern College Concert Choir (G-l) 1 hour 

A mixeii-voice choir which performs music of all style periods. 

MUPF 188/388. Vocal Ensemble Experience (G-l) 1 hour 

A course designed to provide credit for participants in major choral works, 
musical productions, and other department-sponsored vocal activities. This 
course does not fulfill the music ensemble requirement for music majors. 
(Fall, Spring) 

INSTRUMENTAL ENSEMBLES 

Instrumental ensembles are open to all college students through audi- 
tion. Each ensemble meets three periods per week and offers one hour 
credit each semester. Regular attendance at rehearsals is required. 

Course numbers MUPF 178 and 378 do not fulfill the music ensemble 
participation requirement for music majors except those taking a 
keyboard concentration. Music majors other than those taking a 
keyboard concentration who wish Instrumental Ensemble Experience 
credit, must be registered concurrently in Concert Band or Symphony 
Orchestra. 

Ensembles for which academic credit is granted are organized and 
sponsored by members of the music faculty. 

MUPF 128, 328. Concert Band (G-l) 1 hour 

(Fall, Spring) 

MUPF 138, 338. Symphony Orchestra (G-l) 1 hour 

(Fall, Spring) 



Music 

MUPF 178, 378. Instrumental Ensemble Experience (G-l) 1 hour 

1 4 II A course designed to provide credit for chamber ensembles or, in the case of 

keyboard majors, significant accompanying experience. (Fall, Spring) 

(D-3), (G-l), (W) See pages 14-16 for explanation of General Education require- 
ments. 


















Nursing 



NURSING- 



Catherine Knarr, M.S.N., Chairman 



141 



Orlando 

Flora Adams, B.S. 
Nancy Crist, B.S. 
Deborah Edgerton, B.S. 
Flora Flood, M.S.N. 
Johanna Neubrander, B.S. 
Hazel Rice, Ed.S. 
Cheryl Thompson, M.S.N. 
Erma Webb, M.S. 
Marlene Young, M.S.N. 



Collegedale 

Colleen Barrow, B.S. 
Ruby Birch, M.S.N. 
Susan Davidson, B.S. 
Betty Garver, M.S.N. 
Dorothy Giacomozzi, M.S. 
Leona Gulley, M.H.Sc. 
Kathy Hammond, B.S. 
Dorothy Hooper, M.S. 
Shirley Howard, M.S.N. 
Bonnie Hunt, M.S.N. 
Beth Jedamski, B.S. 
Marie Krall, B.S. 
Katie Lamb, M.S.N. 
Terri Martin, B.S. 
Caroline McArthur, M.S. 
Laura Nyirady, M.S.N. 
Charlene Robertson, M.S.N. 
Frances Robertson, B.S. 
Patsy Rushing, B.S. 
Lola Scoggins, M.P.H. 
Elvie Swinson, M.S. 
Nancy Thiel, B.S. 

PHILOSOPHY 

God is the One in whom we live and move and have our being. In the 
beginning when God created man in His image it was His purpose that 
man should throughout his life ever more fully reveal the image of his 
Creator. But sin brought about in man feelings of distrust of his fellow- 
man and of God, and a great sense of personal insecurity, Sin also 
weakened his physical powers, lessened his psychosocial capacity, and 
dimmed his spiritual vision. Man then became subject to various health 
problems. Those health problems have created a need for intervention 
from the health-related professions. 

Nursing as a health profession is a progressive science and art, utiliz- 
ing knowledge from many physical and psychosocial disciplines in 
assisting individuals and groups to solve health problems. While nurs- 
ing shares with other health care providers the goals of maintaining and 
promoting optimal health, it is unique in that it provides for the ac- 
tivities of daily living through its nurturing role and coordinates the 
health care according to observations of behavioral response of the 
patient/client. Nursing also includes preventive and creative roles in 
meeting the needs of the whole individual. The nurse can most effec- 



Nursing 



tively fill these roles through a consistent relationship with Christ which 
| £2 enables the nurse to assist others to live, move, and have being (Acts 
R ^** 17:28). 

As the roles of the nurse have become more complex, the differentia- 
tion of responsibilities of nurses has created a need for nursing person- 
nel with different levels of preparation. The implication for nursing 
education is that it must provide curricula to educate a clearly defined 
practitioner on each level of practice. To meet this need, students in the 
articulated baccalaureate program receive an associate of science degree 
after the second year with the option to halt their education or continue 
upper division nursing. The person who exits at this level will primarily 
provide nurturing and coordinating aspects of nursing in a cir- 
cumscribed setting. This nurse will apply the nursing process in assess- 
ing the level of wellness of the patient/client using predetermined 
criteria and techniques, will plan and implement predetermined inter- 
ventions, and will function in predetermined leadership roles. These 
roles will include management of care for groups of patient/clients and 
direction of auxiliary personnel. 

In a variety of settings the baccalaureate graduate will provide preven- 
tive, creative, coordinative, and collaborative aspects of nursing. The 
nurse practicing at this level will act as a change agent utilizing the 
research orientation to the nursing process which includes the system- 
atic gathering of data, considering alternatives, implementing pre- 
determined and/or creative interventions, evaluating outcomes, and as- 
suming accountability for actions. On completion of the program the 
graduate will have competence in a variety of practice settings and 
beginning expertise in at least one area. The graduate will be equipped to 
move quickly into beginning leadership roles and will have the theory 
and practice base in behavioral and physical sciences for graduate study 
in nursing. 

DESCRIPTION OF PROGRAM 

The articulated program leads to a baccalaureate degree in nursing 
with the option to exit at the associate degree level. The holders of an 
associate degree from a state approved program in nursing may progress 
into upper division nursing. Licensed diploma graduates will be 
evaluated on an individual basis. 

The curriculum in the lower division leads to an Associate of Science 
degree in nursing which may be completed in two academic years, plus 
summer courses. At this time the student is eligible to write state board 
examinations to become a registered nurse. 

A well-equipped learning center and skills laboratory are provided to 
assist students in learning experiences. One semester of lower division 
is spent at the Orlando Center. 



COLLEGEDALE-BASED ASSOCIATE AND BACCALAUREATE 
PROGRAMS 

The students are based on the Collegedale campus with one semester 
of the lower division spent at the Orlando Center. 

The curriculum in the upper division provides the student an in-depth 
study in clinical nursing in addition to prescribed courses. All students 
will be required to participate in validation procedures designed to 
evaluate and improve the individual student and the program of study. 

A new class begins in lower division each semester with a limited size 
of 60 students due to available clinical facilities and teachers. The upper 
division class is not limited in size and a new class is admitted each 
semester. 

CONSORTIUM BACCALAUREATE PROGRAM 

The program enables registered nurses employed on a full-time basis 
at a member hospital to obtain a baccalaureate degree on a part-time 
basis. All upper division nursing classes are offered in the evening. One 
course is offered each fall and winter semester and one course during a 
summer session for a given group. This program is offered in Col- 
legedale and Orlando. 

Admission and progression criteria are the same as the campus-based 
baccalaureate program with the following exceptions: 

1. Math requirement: Math requirement is waived for RN/BS stu- 
dents. 

2. Residence requirements: The requirement that the last thirty (30) 
semester hours must be taken in residence has been adjusted to 
allow the consortium students to take general education courses, 
with the exception of Christian Ethics, at another college concur- 
rently with clinical nursing courses, 

3. Transfer work: Seventy-four (74) semester hours from a junior 
college is allowed which will include 68 hours for the equivalent of 
an Associate Degree plus six semester hours of Biochemistry. 

4. Religion: Three hours are permitted to be taken at a local college or 
university. Three hours Christian Ethics must be taken at Southern 
College. 

5. Writing courses: Only two writing emphasis courses rather than 
three will be required. 

POLICIES 

Students who are admitted to Nursing are considered adequately 
mature to realize the importance of accepting personal responsibility for 
their learning and professional behavior. 

The Division of Nursing Student Handbook contains the policies of 
the division. Each student contracts to abide by the regulations as out- 
lined. The faculty reserves the right to withdraw or revise policies as 



Nursing 



Nursing 

deemed necessary. The Collegedale- and Orlando-based programs are 
1 Ik IX 8 overne d by the same policies. 

Transportation for clinical appointments is not provided for the stu- 
dents enrolled in upper division nursing courses. Students will be 
expected to provide their own transportation or make arrangements to 
share this expense with fellow students in the same course. 

Because regular tuition charges and fees cannot cover the total cost of 
nursing education, an additional fee is charged as a "Nursing Education 
Fee" each semester to help offset the cost (see bulletin section Admis- 
sions, Expenses and Financial Aid). 

ACCREDITATION 

The program in nursing is fully accredited by the Board of Review for 
Baccalaureate and Higher Degree Programs and Associate of Science 
Degree Programs of the National League for Nursing. It is accredited by 
the National League for Nursing to admit registered nurse students to the 
curriculum. It is recognized by the Board of Regents of the Department of 
Education of the General Conference of Seventh-day Adventists, and it is 
approved by the Tennessee Board of Nursing. 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE DEGREE IN NURSING 

Major: Thirty-seven hours for the Bachelor of Science degree after 
completion of the Associate of Science degree at Southern College or the 
equivalent* including NRSG 324, 325, 327, 335, 387, 389, 394, 425, 484, 
485. Required cognates: RELT 373, CHEM 111, 203, and three hours 
upper-division Behavioral Science. BHSF 215 Statistics is a required 
course but is not considered a cognate. General education requirements 
include an additional three hours Area B, three hours Area C or D, three 
hours Area D, and elective credit to make a total of 130 semester hours of 
which 40 hours are upper division, 

* Graduates of a state approved associate degree nursing program will be con- 
sidered to have met the general education requirements for the first two years of 
the program. If an Area C-l course was not included in the associate degree 
program, however, it must be taken in fulfillment of the Bachelor of Science 
degree general education requirements of "3 hours Area C or D. ' ' A maximum of 
72 semester hours will be accepted from a junior college. 

ASSOCIATE OF SCIENCE DEGREE IN NURSING 

Major: Thirty-five hours for the Associate of Science degree including 
NRSG 105, 116, 117, 215, 216, 217, 218, 223. Required cognates: BIOL 
105, 106, 125, PSYC 128, SOCI 125, FDNT 125. General education 
courses for Areas A, B , C, E, and F are the same as for the other disciplines 
of the College. Students are exempt from general education courses for 
Areas D and G. A total of 68 semester hours is required for the Associate 
of Science degree. 



Nursing 

LOWER DIVISION ADMISSION AND 

PROGRESSION REQUIREMENTS 145 

Admission and progression requirements are the same for both Col- 
legedale- and Orlando-based programs. Minimum requirements for ad- 
mission to the clinical area of the Division of Nursing are listed below. 
The final decision on acceptance and continuation in nursing is made by 
the Division of Nursing. Declaration as a nursing major is not the equiva- 
lent of acceptance to the Division of Nursing. 

1. Acceptance to Southern College and hold a diploma from a four- 
year accredited high school or the equivalent. 

2. High school grade point average of 2.50* minimum on solids 
(math, science, English, history, foreign language). 

3. A grade of "G" or better in each semester of high school chemistry. 
A student who does not meet the high school chemistry require- 
ment may remove this deficiency by taking CHEM 111 and earning 
a "C" or better. 

4. Minimum ACT standard score of 17 in English and composite. 

5 . A student who does not meet the high school grade point average or 
ACT requirements may take a minimum of twelve semester college 
hours in required courses leading to nursing, with a current and 
cumulative grade point average of at least 2.50* before being con- 
sidered for clinical nursing courses. 

6. No more than two courses may be repeated. Only one may be a 
nursing course. 

7. A grade of at least C (2.00) is required in each nursing course for 
progression and/or graduation. A grade of at least "C-" is required 
in each nursing cognate with a minimum cumulative grade point 
average of at least 2.25* in the cognates for admission and progres- 
sion in nursing. (Cognate courses are Anatomy and Physiology, 
Nutrition, Developmental Psychology, Microbiology, Sociology, 
and Introduction to Psychology [for Orlando-based program on- 
ly]). 

8. A cumulative grade point average of at least 2.25 is required both in 
nursing and in the cognates for graduation. 

9. Students with previous college work must have a minimum cur- 
rent and cumulative grade point average of 2.50* before being 
considered for clinical nursing courses. 

10. Students whose native language is other than English must 
achieve at least 90 on the Michigan English Proficiency Test or its 
equivalent. 

11. Achieve a score of 20th percentile on the Nelson-Denny reading 
test prior to admission. If the score falls between the 20-34th 
percentile level, the student will be admitted on probation. 

12. , Students are required to demonstrate satisfactory performance on 



Nursing 



standardized tests. Remedial work and/or delay in progression in 
the program will be required if performance level is not achieved. 
Failure to achieve the required score on the comprehensive exami- 
nations (see Nsg 223, Nsg-Seminar) will result in delay in gradua- 
tion and the writing of the N-CLEX-RN examination. 

13. Following application to the Nursing Admissions Committee, 
transfer students from another major or another college will be 
evaluated individually and accepted on a space available basis. 

1 4 . Any cognate course taken off campus during the time the student is 
enrolled at Southern College (school year or summer) must be 
approved by the Nursing Progressions Committee. 

15. The applicant must show evidence of physical, mental, and moral 
fitness. Further references or information may be required regard- 
ing character, attitude, or coping ability in case of a question in 
these areas. 

16. A licensed practical nurse or ex- Army medic may challenge Basic 
Nursing I, NRSG 105. Arrangements to challenge must be made 
with the coordinator of the first year of the program. Challenge 
involves clinical and theory evaluation. 

The following should be sent to the Director of Admissions by March 1 
for the fall class and by October 1 5 for the winter class: (1) application to 
the College, (2) application to the Division of Nursing, (3) transcripts, (4) 
ACT scores. Students who for various reasons are not able to complete a 
semester or do not progress with their class, cannot be assured place- 
ment in their choice of subsequent class. 



* On a 4.00 scale 

CURRICULUM (First and Second Year) 

Completion of these requirements leads to an Associate of Science 
degree and eligibility to sit for state board examinations. 

COLLEGEDALE-BASED PROGRAM 

Number of Hours Required: 
Nursing 35 Natural Science 12 

Behavioral Science 6 General Education 15 



Sample Sequence: 

Summer 


1st 
Sem 


2nd 
Sem 


BIOL 105 Anatomy 


_3 




First Year 






BIOL 106 Physiology 

PSYC 128 Developmental Psychology 


3 


3* 



Nursing 



FDNT 125 


Nutrition 


NRSG 105 


Basic Nursing I 


NRSG 116 


Basic Nursing II 


NRSG 117 


Basic Nursing II 


ENGL 101 
RELT 
ENGL 102 


College Composition 

Religion 

College Composition 




TOTAL 


Summer 




NRSG 215 


Basic Nursing III 


Second Year 




BIOL 125 


Microbiology 


RELT 


Religion 


NRSG 216 


Basic Nursing III 


NRSG 217 


Basic Nursing III 


NRSG 218 


Basic Nursing IV 


SOCI 125 


Sociology 


HIST 


AreaC-1*** 


NRSG 223 


Nursing Seminar 




TOTAL 



3 



3 
3* 

17 



_3* 

16 



4 
4 



14 



3 
J, 

14 



"Offered in Collegedale and Orlando. 
**Offered only in Orlando. 

***A European history course must be taken if World History was not taken in 
high school. 

NRSG 050. Nursing Therial Course (non-credit) 6 hours 

This course is designed to review and consolidate theoretical and clinical 
components of the First two years of the nursing program. The experiences 
focus upon medical-surgical, obstetrical, mental nealth, and the nursing of 
children. The student is expected to perform satisfactorily on examinations 
and in the clinical area following each rotation. Failure to meet the require- 
ments in any rotation results in termination from the nursing program. 

NRSG 105. Basic Nursing I: Foundations 5 hours 

Prerequisite: Chemistry (high school or equivalent). 

Co-requisites: FDNT 125, BIOL 106. 

This course is an introduction to the physical, psychosocial, and spiritual 

aspects of health care. The student develops an understanding of the roles of 

the nurse, utilizes the nursing process, and acquires basic nursing skills 

common to all areas of nursing with an emphasis on gerontology (three 

hours theory, two hours clinical). (Fall, Spring) 

NRSG 116. Basic Nursing II: Medical-Surgical 5 hours 

Prerequisite: BIOL 105, FDNT 125, NRSG 105. 

Must meet college math requirements. 

This course provides students with the theory and practice of nursing in 

dealing with selected basic needs of adults at various points on the 

wellness-illness continuum. This includes focusing on those with selected 



Nursing 



148 



medical-surgical problems. The nursing process is utilized to promote 
physical, psychosocial, and spiritual health, intervene in illness, and assist 
in rehabilitation (two and three-fourths hours theory, two and one-fourth 
hours clinical). (Fall, Spring) 

NRSG 117. Basic Nursing II: The Childbearing Family 5 hours 

Prerequisite: BIOL 105, FDNT 125, NRSG 105. 

Must meet college math requirements. 

This course provides nursing students with theory and practice in the care 

of childbearing families. This includes promoting physical, psychosocial, 

and spiritual health of expectant mothers and their infants before, during, 

and immediately following delivery, utilizing the nursing process (three 

hours theory, two hours clinical). (Fall, Spring) 

NRSG 215. Basic Nursing III: Parent-Child 4 hours 

Prerequisite: PSYC 128; NRSG 116, 117; BIOL 106. 

Co-requisite: BIOL 125. 

This course provides nursing students with the theory and practice of 

family-centered care of children at different points on the wellness-illness 

continuum (two and three-fourths hours theory, one and one-fourth hours 

clinical). (Fall, Spring, Summer) 

NRSG 216. Basic Nursing III: Medical-Surgical 4 hours 

Prerequisite: NRSG 116, 117; BIOL 106, PSYC 128. 
Co-requisite: BIOL 125. 

This course provides students with the theory and practice of nursing in 
continuing to deal with selected basic needs of adults at different points on 
the wellness-illness continuum. This includes focusing on nursing process 
as applied to individuals who are experiencing select medical/surgical 
interferences; promoting physical, psychosocial, and spiritual health; in- 
tervening in illness; and assisting in rehabilitation. (Two and one-fourth 
hours theory, one and three-fourths hours clinical). (Fall, Spring, Summer) 

NRSG 217. Basic Nursing III: Mental-Health 4 hours 

Prerequisites: NRSG 116, 117; BIOL 106, PSYC 128. 

Co-requisite: BIOL 125. 

This course provides students with the opportunity to utilize the nursing 

process in intervening with clients throughout the life span with emphasis 

on specific psychosocial needs at different points on the wellness-illness 

continuum (Two and one-half hours theory, one and one-half hour clinical), 

(Fall, Spring, Summer) 

NRSG 218. Basic Nursing IV: Medical-Surgical 7 hours 

Prerequisite: BIOL 125, NRSG 215, 216, 217. 
This course provides students with the theory and practice of utilizing the 
nursing process in dealing with complex needs related to psychosocial, 
physical, and spiritual aspects of individuals who have medical-surgical 
interferences. The impact of historical events and current trends upon the 
future of nursinc is considered as well as the problems and responsibilities 
of the registered, nurse. The student is introduced to leadership concepts 
(three hours theory, four hours clinical). (Fall, Spring) 






Nursing 



NRSG 223. Nursing Seminar 1 hour 

This course is designed to aid the student in validating and consolidating 1 4 U 
previous learning experiences. The seminar will include intensive review of 
all areas of nursing. A series of comprehensive examinations will be given at 
the culmination or the seminar. The student must perform at a pre-specified 
level on each area of the comprehensive examination. If a student fails to 
achieve this level, a grade of "I" or incomplete will be given for the course. 
Removal of this "I" will necessitate the student's successful completion of 
the non-credit therial course NRSG 050. 

UPPER DIVISION ADMISSION AND 
PROGRESSION REQUIREMENTS 

Minimum requirements for admission to upper division nursing are 
listed below. The final decision on acceptance and continuation in 
nursing is made by the Division of Nursing. Declaration as a nursing 
major is not the equivalent of acceptance to the Division of Nursing. 

1. Acceptance to Southern College. 

2. Minimum grade point average of 2.25 for lower division courses in 
nursing. 

3. Minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.25 with no grade 
below "C— " for lower division cognate courses. 

4. Students whose native language is other than English must pass an 
English proficiency test. If the student fails the English proficiency 
test, he must take remedial work in written and spoken English and 
repeat the proficiency test with a passing grade before entering 
nursing. 

5. Students are required to demonstrate satisfactory performance on 
standardized tests. Remedial work will be required if performance 
level is not achieved. 

6. Following application to the Nursing Admissions Committee, 
transfer students from another major or another college will be 
evaluated individually and assisted in fitting into the program. 

7. Any cognate course taken off campus during the time the student is 
enrolled at Southern College (school year or summer) must be 
approved by the Nursing Progression Committee. 

8. The applicant must show evidence of moral, physical, social, and 
intellectual maturity. Further references or information may be 
required regarding character, attitude, or coping ability in case of a 
question in these areas. 

9. Students will maintain a current CPR certificate throughout their 
upper division program. 

10. Eligibilty for Licensure: 

Applicants to be considered for admission to junior standing in 
nursing must either have a current license to practice as a regis- 
tered nurse in the U.S. or, if a new graduate or foreign student, must 



Nursing 



be eligible to sit for state boards. A student must pass state board 
1 5 examinations before registering for senior clinical nursing courses. 

11. Experience: 

A. Student who has graduated within five years prior to applica- 
tion. 

1, Satisfactory clinical performance and character references 
are required from basic nursing program. 

2. Satisfactory work performance and character references are 
required from employer(s). Students who have graduated 
within the previous twelve months will be exempt from the 
work requirement. 

B. Student who has graduated more than five years prior to appli- 
cation. 

1. Minimum of one year satisfactory work experience in nurs- 
ing for each five years since graduation and one year must be 
in the last five years. 

2. Satisfactory work performance and character references are 
required from employer(s). 

12. Nursing Credit: 

A. Associate Degree Graduate. 

Graduates of a state approved associate degree nursing pro- 
gram will have met nursing requirements for the first two years 
of the program. 

B. Diploma Graduate. 

Graduates of a state approved diploma program will be 
evaluated on an individual basis. A maximum of thirty-five 
semester hours of nursing credit may be given which is equal to 
the requirements of the first two years of nursing at Southern 
College. 

13. General Education and Cognates: 

A. Associate Degree. 

Graduates of a state approved associate degree program will 
be considered to have met general education requirements for 
the first two years of the program, including history and 
mathematics requirements. (If an Area C-l course was not in- 
cluded in the associate degree program, it must be taken in 
fulfillment of the Bachelor of Science degree general education 
requirements of "3 hours Area C or D.") 

B. Diploma Graduate. 

1 . Credit is acceptable for courses comparable to those required 
at Southern College if received from an accredited senior or 
junior college or by examination according to the policy 
stated in the bulletin. 

2. All cognates for the first two years must be completed before 



Nursing 

entering junior nursing courses. General education re- 
quirements may be taken concurrently. Ill 
C. CHEM 111 must be completed before entering junior level 
nursing courses. 
14. Progression: 

A. No more than two courses may be repeated. Only one may be a 
nursing course. 

B. A grade of at least C (2.00) is required in each nursing course for 
progression and graduation. A grade of at least "C — " is re- 
quired in each nursing cognate with a minimum cumulative 
grade point average of at least 2.25* in the cognates for admis- 
sion, progression, and graduation in nursing. (Cognate courses 
are CHEM 111 and 203, Selected Concepts in Biochemistry; 
RELT 373, Christian Ethics.) 

C. Students are required to demonstrate satisfactory performance 
on standardized and validating tests. Remedial work will be 
required if performance level is not achieved. 



*On 4.00 scale. 

CURRICULUM (Third and Fourth Years) 

The Division of Nursing reserves the right to withdraw or revise 
courses as deemed necessary. All hour values are in semester hours. 

Students must take a total of 1 30 hours required for graduation includ- 
ing 40 hours upper division. 

Number of hours required after completion of the associate degree in 

nursing: 
Nursing 37 Natural Sciences 7 

Behavioral Science 6 General Education 12 

Sample Sequence 





Prerequisite: CHEM 111 


_3 

3 








1st 


2nd 


Third Year 




Sem 


Sem 


NRSG 324 


Professional Nursing 








Perspectives 


1 




NRSG 325 


Advanced Physiology 




4 


NRSG 327 


Nursing Assessment 


4 




NRSG 335 


Community Health 




6 


CHEM 203 


Concepts of Biochemistry 


4 




MATH 215 


Statistics 


3 




RELT 373 


Christian Ethics 


3 




BHSF 


*Area F-l, Upper Division 
Behavioral Science 










3 






Nursino 



152 



* Area C or D — An area C course is re- 
quired unless an Area C course was 





included in the associate degree 




_3 




TOTAL 


15 


16 


Summer 










Area D* 


3 




Fourth Year 








NRSG 387 
NRSG 389 
NRSG 394 
NRSG 425 
NRSG 484 
NRSG 485 


Home Health/Gerontology 
Pharmacology 
Nursing Research Methods 
Advanced Nursing Concepts 
Advanced Nursing Practice I 
Advanced Nursing Practice II 
*Religion 

TOTAL 


3 
2 
3 
4 

15 


6 

4 

10 



fc One of the general electives must be a writing course. 



NRSG 324. Professional Nursing Perspectives 1 hour 

A course designed to assist the registered nurse student in the transition of 
learning from an associate degree or diploma program to the baccalaureate 
approach to nursing. Study will be focused upon the Division of Nursing's 
pnilosophy and conceptual framework, nursing theories and models, pro- 
fessional nursing, and related concepts. Students will be evaluated in both 
theory and skills to identify weak areas. (One hour theory). (Fall, Spring) 

NRSG 325. Advanced and Pathologic 

Principles of Human Physiology 4 hours 

Prerequisite: CHEM 203. 

This course assists the student to integrate principles of physiology with 
clinical practice, to correlate physical manifestations with pathologic inter- 
ferences, and to move toward more independent predictive care of patient/ 
client. (Four hours theory). (Arranged as needed for Consortium students). 
(Fall) 

NRSG 327. Nursing Assessment 4 hours 

Co-requisite: NRSG 324. 

This course provides opportunities for creativity in the utilization of the 
expanding role of the clinical practitioner and enables the student to de- 
velop advanced skills in utilizing the nursing process through history 
taking, physical examination, health planning, and counseling of the 
patient/client. (Three hours theory, one hour clinical). (Arranged as needed 
for Consortium students). (Fall, Spring) 

NRSG 335. Community Health Nursing 6 hours 

Prerequisite: NRSG 327; BHSF 215 (desirable). 

A course which includes concepts and practice of the nursing process with 



Nursing 

emphasis on moving individuals, families, and communities toward their 
optimal level of functioning on the wellness-illness continuum. This course 4 £ Q 
combines community and mental health concepts (three hours theory, three J| J| J 
hours clinical). (Fall, Spring) 

NRSG 346. Community Health Nursing 3 hours 

Prerequisite: NRSG 327; BHSF 215 (desirable). 

A course which includes concepts of community health, with emphasis on 
community assessment and working with groups, (two hours theory, one 
hour clinical). (Arranged as needed for Consortium students). 

NRSG 347. Community Health Nursing 3 hours 

Prerequisite: NRSG 327, 346; BHSF 215 (desirable). 
A course which includes concepts and practice of the nursing process with 
emphasis on moving individuals, families and communities toward their 
optimal levels of functioning on the wellness-illness continuum. This 
course combines community and mental health concepts (one hour theory, 
two hours clinical). (Arranged as needed for Consortium students). 

NRSG 387. Home Health/Gerontology 3 hours 

Prerequisite: NRSG 327. 

A course providing the registered nurse student with theories and practice 
of carinc for the client (ages cover the life span) requiring skilled nursing 
care in tne home. Content will also include in-depth study of the active and 
non-active older adult. (Two hours theory, one hour clinical). (Beginning 
Fall 1987). 

NRSG 389. Pharmacology 2 hours 

Prerequisite: CHEM 111 and CHEM 203. 

Study of pharmacologic concepts. Focus will include major classifications, 
pharmacokinetics, drug interactions, and nursing consideration. (Two 
nours theory). (Beginning Fall 1987). 

NRSG 394. Nursing Research Methods (W) 3 hours 

Prerequisite: BHSF 215. 

Scientific methods of inquiry are applied to nursing problems including 
framework for practice, principles of data treatment, and analysis. The 
student plans a research proposal. The course is designed to give the student 
the concepts, methods, and tools for intelligent participation in and applica- 
tion of research and evaluation. In addition to the research component, this 
course orients the student to the goals and philosophy of professional 
practice. (Three hours theory). (Spring; Arranged as needed for Consortium 
students). 

NRSG 425. Advanced Nursing Concepts 4 hours 

Prerequisites: All junior level nursing courses and cognates. 
This course teaches the process of conceptualization. It provides part of the 
theory base for the advanced nursing practice courses and explores in-depth 
concepts, including the principles of administration, management and edu- 
cation. Current issues facing the professional baccalaureate nurse are 
explored. Each student is required to develop and present concepts in order 
to gain experience in applying and integrating his knowledge and demon- 



Nursing 



154 



strate his understanding. Students are expected and encouraged to make 
clinical and scholastic application of course content in their nursing prac- 
tice. (Four hours theory). (Fall, Spring; Arranged as needed for Consortium 
students). 

NRSG 484. Advanced Nursing Practice I 

(Primary Care with Research Component) (W) 6 hours 

Pre- or co-requisite: NRSG 425. 

This course provides opportunity for the student to select an area of 
specialized interest in which to develop a broader scope of clinical compe- 
tence. The choices of clinical areas may be limited due to the number of 
students in the semester. Content will focus on updating major theoretical 
areas and clinical skills. The scientific method of inquiry will be utilized in 
conducting a research project (two hours theory, four hours clinical). (Fall, 
Spring; Arranged as needed for Consortium students). 

NRSG 485. Advanced Nursing Practice II 

(Management With Research Component) 4 hours 

Pre- or co-requisite: NRSG 425, 484. 

This course provides the opportunity for the student to use independent 
judgment in developing clinical competence and management skills. This 
goal will be accomplished primarily through the leadership modes of re- 
search, management and administrative experiences in selected clinical 
areas. (One hour theory, three hours clinical). (Fall, Spring; Arranged as 
needed for Consortium students). 

NRSG 295/495. Directed Study 1-3 hours 

Prerequisite: Approval of division chairman. 

Individual study in an area of choice shall be worked out with the depart- 
ment prior to registration. Either upper or lower division credit may be 
earned. The area of directed study wul appear on the transcript. No more 
than six hours directed study may be applied toward a degree. 

(W) See pages 14-16 for explanation of General Education requirements. 

THE ORLANDO CENTER 

General Information 

Southern College of Seventh-day Adventists offers at its Orlando 
Center an alternative to its main campus nursing program. It is adminis- 
tered by an associate chairman for the nursing division, and an associate 
dean of students. The program at the Orlando Center is dedicated to the 
same Seventh-day Adventist ideals and philosophies that guide the 
main campus. Like the main campus, the Orlando Center employs pro- 
fessionally trained, high quality staff members. Only nursing and gen- 
eral education classes are offered, and these are all part of the two degree 
programs at the center: an Associate in Science in Nursing and the 
Bachelor of Science in Nursing. The latter is a part-time program primar- 
ily for employees of Florida Hospital Medical Center who want to up- 
grade their degree. The National League for Nursing accreditation status 



I 



Nursing 



of the main campus applies fully to the Orlando Center. The center has 
approval from the Florida State Board of Nursing and the Florida State 1 R R| 
Board of Independent Colleges, A tl *J 

Facilities 

All facilities normally associated with the education and training of 
nurses are available at the Orlando Center. The college's main building, 
Linscott Hall, houses on the ground floor the administrative and 
teachers' offices, the library, a skills lab and a large classroom; on the 
second and third floors the residence hall. Other classrooms, lab 
facilities, the cafeteria, and recreation areas are located in the immediate 
vicinity. Clinical experience is available mainly at the Florida Hospital 
Medical Center which is located in close proximity to the main building 
of the college. 

Financial Information 

Tuition charges and residence hall rates are the same as on the main 
campus and are listed, along with other applicable financial policies, in 
the appropriate section of the catalog. Financial aid is available on the 
same basis at the Orlando Center as on the main campus. All charges for 
tuition and room rent are paid to the main campus office. Jobs are 
available at the Orlando Center to help students defray the cost of their 
education. 

Student Services 

Residence Hall Living. Located on the campus of Florida Hospital 
Medical Center and overlooking beautiful Lake Estelle, the residence 
hall provides a place for students to enjoy meeting life with capability 
and equanimity. Orlando and Central Florida are noted for their diverse 
cultural and recreational opportunities. Students who take at least three 
semester hours of work may live in the residence hall or annex. No 
obligation is assumed by Southern College for married student housing. 

Student Association. The Student Association, through its elected 
officers, provides an active social life for the campus. Students are also 
appointed to serve on several staff and nursing committees. 

Campus Chaplain. Orlando Center residents enjoy the association of a 
campus chaplain who ministers to the needs of the students in church- 
related activities such as Friday evening vespers, worships in the resi- 
dence hall and Christian fellowship organizations. 

Guidance and Counseling. Students who desire assistance and coun- 
seling in any area of social, academic or personal problems have availa- 
ble the services of a qualified counselor. 

Health Service. Health service is made available to the student 
through the Family Practice Center of Florida Hospital. The college 
assists the students by paying up to 50% of the deductible amount of the 

(mrance coverage provided by the college. 
-— — — 



Nursing 



Hospital Medical Center. Meal charges are placed on the student's 
1 £ft monthly statement. There is no minimum charge. 

Admissions and Progression for Associate Degree Program 

Students are admitted to and based at the Orlando Center for the entire 
program. One class limited to 40 students, is admitted each fall semester 
of the academic year. 

Admission and Progression requirements are the same as for the 
nursing program based in Collegedale (see pages 156-160 of this bulle- 
tin) with the following exceptions: 

1 . All application forms and materials are sent to the Orlando Center. 

2. The student who successfully challenges Basic Nursing I will be 
accepted to begin nursing courses in January (spring semester) on a 
space available basis. 

3. Students may transfer between the Orlando Center program and 
the Collegedale program with special permission only. 

4. Students who withdraw in good standing are eligible to return on a 
space available basis only. 

5. Applications, transcripts from high school, other colleges (if 
applicable) and all other supporting documents must be received 
by March 1 for the fall class. Please send to: 

Admissions and Records 

Southern College of Seventh-day Adventists 

Division of Nursing 

711 Lake Estelle Drive 

Orlando, FL 32803 

6. Applicants will be notified of acceptance by April 1. 

7. Completed medical and dental forms must be received one month 
prior to enrolling in the first clinical nursing course. This is be- 
cause a health clearance is necessary before beginning care of 
patients. 

The philosophy and objectives for the nursing program are the same as 
the Collegedale-based program (see section on nursing, pages 154-155). 
Identical courses are required in both programs with the exception that 
an additional course, Introduction to Psychology, PSYC 124, is required 
at the Orlando Center because of a requirement by the Florida State 
Board of Nursing, Thus 71 hours are required for graduation rather than 
the 68 required of nursing students at Collegedale. Other graduation 
requirements are identical. All diplomas are issued from the main cam- 
pus. 

Applicants wishing to attend general education courses only will be 
admitted to these classes on a space available basis. 

ASSOCIATE OF SCIENCE DEGREE IN NURSING 

Orlando-based Program: 
Major: Thirty-five hours for the Associate of Science degree including 



Nursing 

NRSG 105, 116, 117, 215, 216, 217, 218, 223. Required cognates: BIOL 

105, 106, 125, PSYC 124, 128, SOCI 125, FDNT 125. General education 1 J7 

requirements: Area A, B, C, E, and F as required for other disciplines of * ** 

the College. Students are exempt from general education requirements 

for Areas D and G. A total of 71 semester hours is required for the 

Associate of Science degree. 

CURRICULUM (First and Second Year) 

The Division of Nursing reserves the right to withdraw or revise 
courses as deemed necessary. AH hour values are in semester hours. 
Completion of these requirements leads to an Associate of Science de- 
gree and eligibility to sit for state board examinations. 

ORLANDO-BASED PROGRAM 
Number of Hours Required: 

Nursing 35 Natural Science 12 

Behavioral Science 9 General Education 15 

Pre-entrance Requirements: BIOL 105 and PSYC 124 are required 
prior to admission to the fall semester nursing classes either by transfer 
credit or course credit at Southern College, Orlando Center. 



Sample Sequence: 

Summer 


1st 
Sem 


2nd 

Sem 


BIOL 105 
PSYC 124 


Anatomy 

Introduction to Psychology 
TOTAL 


3 

6 




First Year 








BIOL 106 
ENGL 101 
FDNT 125 
NRSG 105 
NRSG 116 
NRSG 117 
PSYC 128 
RELT 125 


Physiology 
College Composition 
Nutrition 
Basic Nursing I 
Basic Nursing II 
Basic Nursing II 
Developmental Psychology 
Religion 
TOTAL 


i 

3 
5 

14 


5 

5 

3 

_3 

16 


Summer 








NRSG 217 
SOCI 125 


Basic Nursing III 
Introduction to Sociology 
TOTAL 


4 
_3 

7 




Second Year 








BIOL 125 
ENGL 102 
NRSG 215 


Microbiology 
College Composition 
Basic Nursing III 


3 
3 

4 





Nursing 



NRSG 216 Basic Nursing III 4 

NRSG 218 Basic Nursing IV 7 

NRSG 223 Nursing Seminar 1 

RELT Religion 3 

HIST AreaC-1* J J3 

TOTAL 14 14 

*If World History is not taken in high school, a European history course is 
required. 

Admission and Progression for the Bachelor of Science Program 

For information about this part-time program, contact the Associate 
Chairman of the Nursing Division, 711 Lake Estelle Dr., Orlando, FL 
32803. 







































Office Administration 



OFFICE ADMINISTRATION 

Joyce Cotham, M.B.Ed., Chairman 
Evonne Richards, Ed.D. 



The Office Administration program is designed to train students for 
the many aspects of secretarial and office work in the modern office. 

The curriculum includes intensive study in business subjects and 
current secretarial practices which, combined with general education 
courses, provides a well-balanced program. 

The department offers two degrees: 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE graduates in Office Administration plan to 
become office managers, administrative assistants, executive sec- 
retaries, or word processing managers. Students majoring in Business 
Education plan to teach business subjects and accompany their program 
with a sequence of courses from the Department of Education. 

ASSOCIATE OF SCIENCE degree is a two-year program offered for 
students who desire a shorter, more concentrated period of secretarial 
training which, together with general education subjects, prepares the 
student to work as a secretary or in general office work. An emphasis of 
Executive, Medical, or Word Processing may be chosen. 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE DEGREE IN OFFICE ADMINISTRATION 

Major: Forty-six hours including SECR 104, 114, 115, 213, 214, 216, 
218, 221, 223, 315, 317, 323, 324; ECON 213 or 224; BUAD 334 and three 
hour elective of upper division in Business and Office Administration. 
Cognate requirements include ACCT 121:122, and CPTR 120 or equiva- 
lent. 

Those students wishing to receive teacher certification in Office Ad- 
ministration must also satisfy the professional teacher education re- 
quirements. (See Education listing.) 

Minor: Eighteen hours including SECR 214 and fifteen hours from 
courses in Office Administration, six of which must be upper division. 

ASSOCIATE OF SCIENCE DEGREE IN OFFICE ADMINISTRATION 

Two-year Associate of Science degree majors in Office Administration 
with ACT scores below 22 in Math may fulfill general education re- 
quirement (A-2) with SECR 218 (Business Math and Calculating 
Machines). Those with scores below 12 must take MATH 100. 

Major — Executive Option: Thirty-four hours for the Associate of Sci- 
ence degree, including SECR 104, 114, 115, 213, 214, 216, 218, 221, 223, 
315, 317, 323. Cognates required: ACCT 103 or 121; ENGL 102. 

Major — Word Processing Option: Thirty hours including SECR 115, 
213, 214, 216, 218, 221, 223, 315, 317, 323, 324; plus two hours elective 



159 



Office Administration 



in Office Administration. Cognates required: ACCT 103 or 121; ENGL 

160 102; CPTR 120 or e 9 uivalent 

Major— Medical Option: Thirty hours including SECR 115, 213, 214, 
216, 218, 221, 223, 316, 317, 323, 333; plus two hours elective in Office 
Administration. Cognates required: ACCT 103 or 121; BIOL 105; ENGL 
102; CPTR 120 or equivalent. 

Business Education Certification: Core requirements for Business 
Education certification include the following thirty-five semester hours: 

A. BUAD 121:122 Principles of Accounting 6 hours 

Principles of Economics 6 hours 

Business Law 3 hours 

Business Communications 3 hours 

Business Math & Calculating Machines 2 hours 

Beginning Typewriting 3 hours 

Computer-Based Systems 3 hours 

Personal Finance 3 hours 

Principles of Management 3 hours 

Business Finance _3 hours 

TOTAL 35 hours 

B. EDUC 438 Methods of Teaching Business 2 hours 

Additional Hours Required for Cluster Endorsements: 
Basic Business 

BUAD 338 Business Law 3 hours I 

ECON 328 Managerial Economics 3 hours | 

ECON 213 Survey of Economics _3 hours 

TOTAL 9 hours 



ECON 224:225 
BUAD 337 
SECR 315 
SECR 218 
SECR 105 
CPTR 120 
BUAD 128 
BUAD 334 
BUAD 315 



Accounting 

ACCT 211:212 

Data Processing 

CPTR 125 
CPTR 127 



MATH 104 

Office Technology 

SECR 214 
SECR 223 
SECR 323 



Intermediate Accounting _6 hours 

TOTAL 6 hours 

BASIC Programming Language 3 hours 

Micro Tools 3 hours 

or two of the following: 

CPTR 105, 106, or 107 2-3 hours 

Intermediate Algebra _3 hours 

TOTAL 8-9 hours 



Advanced Typewriting 3 hours 

Concepts of Word Processing 2 hours 

Word Processing Text-Editing 3 hours 



Office Administration 

161 



SECR 213 Records Management 2 hours 

SECR 317 Secretarial Procedures 3 hours 

SECR 104 Shorthand I 4 hours 

SECR 114 Shorthand II _4 hours 

TOTAL 21 hours 

The student must apply to the Department of Education for admission 
to the Teacher Education Program and the professional semester before 
the end of the sophomore and junior years, respectively. 

OFFICE ADMINISTRATION 

SECR 104. Shorthand I (G-2) 4 hours 

This course presents the fundamental principles of Gregg Shorthand, using 
the individual progress method. Reading and writing of shorthand outlines 
and longhand transcription are emphasized. Five class periods a week. 
(Fall) 

SECR 105. Beginning Typewriting (G-2) 3 hours 

Five class periods each week. One hour of laboratory a week is required. 
Basic keyboard fundamentals; development of manipulative techniques; 
development of speed and accuracy on straight copy material and problems; 
introduction to business letters; simple tabulation. For students with little 
or no previous training in typewriting. Students with one year of high 
school typewriting receive no credit. Thirty-five words a minute for three 
minutes is required. (Fall) 

SECR 114. Shorthand II (G-2) 4 hours 

Prerequisites: SECR 1 05 or high school equivalent, and SECR 1 04 with grade 
of C or above or consent of instructor. 

A continuation of individual progress instruction in which students pro- 
gress at their own rates in building shorthand skill. Transcription on the 
typewriter is introduced with increased emphasis on speed building. Five 
class periods a week. (Spring) 

SECR 115. Intermediate Typewriting (G-2) 3 hours 

Prerequisite: SECR 105 or equivalent. 

Three class periods plus additional laboratory time each week. Continua- 
tion of SECR 105; improvement of basic skills; business letter production; 
tabulated reports; manuscripts; special business forms. (Students with two 
years of high school typewriting may waive this course by examination.) 
(Fall) 

SECR 213. Records Management 2 hours 

Basic principles and procedures of control and storage of records. A simula- 
tion involving a study of rules for alphabetic filing and projects on five 
methods. An overview of automated filing systems and criteria by which 
records are created, stored and transferred. (Fall) 

SECR 214. Advanced Typewriting (G-2) 3 hours 

Prerequisite: SECR 115 or equivalent. 

Three class periods plus additional laboratory time each week. Preparation 



Office Administration 



162 



of final copy from rough drafts; typing of financial statements; complex 
statistical and tabulated reports, and representative problems from techni- 
cal and professional offices. (Spring) 

SECR 216. Business English 3 hours 

Pre- or co-requisite: ENGL 101 or consent of instructor. 
An intensive study of elementary grammar, punctuation, vocabulary, spell- 
ing, and word usage as necessary tools for effective written and spoken 
communication. (Fall) 

SECR 218. Business Mathematics and 

Calculating Machines (G-2) 2 hours 

Prerequisite: MATH 099 or ACT score of 12 or above. 
The electronic calculator is used to solve common business problems which 
include: basic arithmetic operations, fractions, percentage, interest, dis- 
counts, merchandising, payrolls, depreciation and the use of credit. 
(Spring) 

SECR 219. Offset and Quick Print Operations 2 hours 

This course is designed to prepare the student to work in a quick print 
business operation by operating equipment typical of large corporation 
in-house printing systems. (Fall, Spring) 

SECR 221. Office Transcription 2 hours 

Prerequisite: ENGL 101, SECR 216. 
Pre- or corequisites: ENGL 102, SECR 214. 

Development of skill in producing mailable office transcription. Proficiency 
in business grammar, punctuation, word usage, and document styles. Em- 
phasis is placed on speed and accuracy in producing mailable copy, using 
machine transcription. Also, a study of current methods of office repro- 
graphics. 

SECR 223. Concepts of Word Processing 2 hours 

Introduces the total concept of word/information processing. Through lec- 
tures, films and field trips, the student will learn terminology, practices, 
procedures, and controls used in modern office environments. This course 
is designed to acquaint the student with new roles of office workers, new 
office career opportunities, and electronic office equipment and systems. ! 
The student will develop skill in using an electronic memory typewriter. 
(Spring) 

SECR 315. Business Communications (W) 3 hours 

Prerequisite: ENGL 101:102. 

A study and application of the modern practices in oral and written business 
communications. Accuracy in grammar, spelling, and punctuation, and the 
writing of well-knit sentences and clear paragraphs are taught as a means of 
effective expression in business-letter writing. (Fall, Spring) 

SECR 316. Medical Terminology 3 hours 

Prerequisite: SECR 214 or 316; BIOL 105 or consent of instructor. 

A study of medical terms — their pronunciation, spelling, and meaning, and 



their application to medical secretarial work. Open only to students who are 
enrolled in a medical emphasis program. (Fall) 



Office Administration 

163 



SECR 317. Secretarial Procedures 3 hours 

Prerequisite: SECR 115 or consent of instructor; SECR 223. 
An integration of skills learned in previous secretarial courses, together 
with emphasis on decision-making ability, judgment, business ethics, and 
initiative used in the secretarial profession. Lectures/simulations. (Spring) 

SECR 323. Word Processing Text Editing 3 hours 

Prerequisite: SECR 223. 

Introduces the student to the text editing capabilities of modern dedicated 
word processing equipment. The student will complete the self-paced train- 
ing materials for the Dictaphone System 6000 as well as other supplemen- 
tary projects. (Fall) 

SECR 324. Advanced Word Processing and Transcription 3 hours 

Prerequisite: SECR 323. 

Continued skill and knowledge in the use of dedicated text editing equip- 
ment. In addition, the student is introduced to word processing software in a 
general purpose microcomputer and minicomputer environment. (Spring) 

SECR 333. Advanced Medical Terminology 

and Transcription 3 hours 

Prerequisites: SECR 223 and 316. 

For medical secretarial majors only. Continued emphasis on increasing 
medical vocabulary, with skill and knowledge developed in the transcrip- 
tion techniques and procedures of medical dictation. Three class periods 
per week. (Spring) 

SECR 295/495. Directed Study 1-2 hours 

Open only to majors in Office Administration. Research studies relating to 
the field of Office Administration are assigned according to the experience 
and interests of the student. Length of project determines credit. 

EDUCATION 

EDUC 438. Methods of Teaching Business 2 hours 

Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. 

A study of the status, disciplines, and curricular structure of business 
education, the psychology of skill development and measurement, and 
lesson development of specific classes. An investigation of instructional 
materials and resources for the business education classroom. Emphasis 
placed on professional development for this area of teaching. (Spring) 

(G-2), (W) See pages 14-16 for explanation of General Education requirements. 



Physics 






■PHYSICS- 



Ray Hefferlin, Ph.D., Chairman 
Henry Kuhlman, Ph.D. 

Physics bridges the gap between mathematics and logic on one hand, 
where absolute certainty can be obtained about abstract ideas, and most 
of human thinking on the other hand, where only tenuous knowledge 
exists about the solutions to very real and pressing problems. Physics 
attempts to obtain progressively more precise solutions to clearly de- 
fined problems more and more representative of the real world. This 
attempt includes modeling, simulation, and control using numerical, 
analytical, analog, and experimental methods. It not only presents the 
possibility of a challenging career but also contributes heavily to the 
life-experience of non-technical people. 

The staff is concerned with the preparation of technically-minded 
students for challenging careers in pure Physics or in Physics applied to 
other fields. It also attempts to demonstrate to non-technical students the 
value of using Physics in their areas of interest. It is committed to 
exploring with all students the areas where Physics touches on religious 
and ethical values. Throughout, it makes extensive use of the excellent 
digital computer facilities at Southern College. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE IN PHYSICS 

Major: Thirty hours including PHYS 213:214, 310, 317, 318, 480, and 
CPTR 125, 131, or 218. 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE DEGREE IN PHYSICS 

Major: Forty hours including CPTR 125, 131, or 218, and PHYS 480. 

Minor: Eighteen hours, including six hours upper division. CPTR 131 
may be included. 

Teaching Endorsement: The student must earn a major in the first 
teaching field. He may add the following endorsements by meeting the 
number of hours indicated below. 

Physics 

PHYS 211:212 General Physics 6 hours 

Physics electives 8 hours 

PHYS 213:214 General Physics Laboratory _2 hours 

TOTAL 16 hours 
General Science 

BIOL 155:156 General Biology 8 hours 

Chemistry and Physics electives _8 hours 

TOTAL 16 hours 






Physics 

The student must apply to the Department of Education for admission 
to the Teacher Education Program and the professional semester before || 

the end of the sophomore and junior years, respectively. Please see the 
note on page 84 between EDUC 134 and 217. 

PHYS 107. Introduction to Physics (E-3) 3 hours 

A general education course stressing the methods of physics, the applica- 
tion of physics and laboratory work which can be done with simple mate- 
rials. Laboratories include the use of calculators and the computer to do 
arithmetic, the estimation of numerical quantities and errors, and the con- 
struction of apparatus with which to make observations. Does not apply on 
major or minor in physics. Two hours lecture, three hours laboratory each 
week. (Spring) 

PHYS 155. Descriptive Astronomy: 

Creation vs. Evolution (E-3) 3 hours 

Constellations and eclipses, astronomical instruments, time and the date 
line and calendars, astronomical objects with their motions and distances, 
energy processes in stars and quasars and pulsars, black holes, the infinity 
(?) and expansion (?) of the universe. Cosmology, the formation and sub- 
sequent histories of the solar system and the earth, radioactive and radiocar- 
bon age dating. Life on other worlds. Astronomy and the Bible. This course, 
dealing as it does with the physical aspects of the history of the earth and 
universe, complements BIOL 325, which deals with the biological aspects. 
Three hours fecture each week, with the occasional substitution of an 
observation period. (Spring) 

PHYS 211:212. General Physics (E-3) 3,3 hours 

Prerequisite: MATH 114. 

The algebraic and trigonometric treatment of mechanics, heat, sound, light, 
electricity and magnetism, and "modern physics." Applies on the basic 
science requirement as a non-laboratory science if taken alone and as a 
laboratory science if taken with PHYS 213:214. (Fall, Spring) 

PHYS 213:214. General Physics Laboratory (E-3) 1,1 hours 

Prerequisite: Previous or concurrent enrollment in PHYS 211:212. 
Laboratory experience designed to illustrate the material in lectures, to 
familiarize the student with useful measuring apparatus, and to encourage a 
systematic development of scientific curiosity, caution, and method. (Fall, 
Spring) 

PHYS 310. Modern Physics 3 hours 

Prerequisite: PHYS 211:212; MATH 115. 

Continuation and conclusion of PHYS 211:212. Relativity, atomic structure, 
nuclear properties and radiations, and wave mechanical calculations in one 
dimension, and other areas of 20th century physics. Three hours lecture 
each week. Research experience is available in PHYS 495. (Fall) 

PHYS 311:312. General Physics Calculus Applications 1,1 hours 

Prerequisites: MATH 115 and previous or concurrent enrollment in PHYS 

211:212. 

Derivations and problems in General Physics using differential and integral 



Physics 



166 



calculus will be studied. Students completing PHYS 211:212 and PHYS 
311:312 will have taken the equivalent of General Physics with calculus. 
One class period per week. (Fall, Spring) 

PHYS 313. Physical Optics 3 hours 

Prerequisites: PHYS 211:212; MATH 115. 

Refraction, reflection, interference, and absorption of light are discussed 
from the standpoint of the ray and especially of the wave theories of light. 
Laboratory experience is available in PHYS 495. (Spring) 

PHYS 314. Thermodynamics 3 hours 

Prerequisites: PHYS 211:212; MATH 115. 

A systematic introduction to thermodynamics, kinetic theory, and statisti- 
cal mechanics of solids, liquids, and gases. 

PHYS 317. Issues in Physical Science and Religion I (E-3) 3 hours 

Prerequisite: One year of high school physics or chemistry or one semester 
of college physics or chemistry. 

The extent to which mathematics and the physical sciences are true because 
they conform to the real world, or because they are derived from axioms, or 
botn. Non-logical factors in the acceptance of scientific statements as au- 
thoritative. (Spring, odd years) 

PHYS 318. Issues in Physical Science and Religion II (E-3) 3 hours 

Prerequisites: One year of high school physics or chemistry or one semester 
of college physics or chemistry. 

The argument for the existence of God from design. The relationship of 
design to comprehensibility and to causality. Causality in the everyday 
world and on the subatomic scale. Miracles as associated with awe or with 
the unknown (by determinists), or with boundary conditions (as in solving 
problems mathematically), or with God's continual upholding of natural 
process. (Spring, even years) 

PHYS 410. Analytic Mechanics 3 hours 

Prerequisites: PHYS 310; MATH 315 (MATH 218, 316, 317, and 319 desira- 
ble). 

The motion of a particle in gravitational and other classical fields is attacked 
using the techniques of differential equations. The behavior of systems of 
particles, solids, and liquids is discussed. Special functions, vector 
theorems, transforms, and tensors are introduced as needed. (Spring) 

PHYS 411:412. Electricity and Magnetism 3,3 hours 

Prerequisites: PHYS 310; MATH 315 (MATH 218, 316, 317, and 319 desira- i 
ble). 

Analysis of electrical circuits. Electrostatic and magnetostatic fields, and 
the motion of charges therein. Maxwell's equations and the consequent 
prediction of electromagnetic waves. Applications to modern atomic and 
nuclear theory are stressed. Complex mapping, vector theorems, transforms, 
and special functions may be used after being introduced or reviewed. 
Laboratory experience is available in PHYS 495. (Fall, Spring) 






Physics 

PHYS 418, 419. Advanced Modern Physics 3,3 hours 

Prerequisites: PHYS 310, 410, and 411:412; MATH 316 and 317 (previously | {{J 

or concurrently; MATH 319 desirable). In the event that the student fails to * " * 

meet these prerequisites, permission of instructor must be obtained. 

An advanced treatment of atomic and nuclear physics, elementary particles, 

wave mechanics, relativity, and other topics on the frontiers of physics. 

Research experience is available in PHYS 495. (Fall, Spring) 

PHYS 480. Scientific Writing (W) 1 hour 

Principles and techniques of writing for news releases, periodicals, and 
research journals. The student must have done some original research of an 
experimental, computational, or theorem-proving nature before enrolling in 
this course. PHYS 295/495 exists to fulfill this requirement. 

PHYS 295/495. Directed Study 1-3 hours 

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 

This course consists of individual or group work adjusted to meet particular 
needs in Physics. Approval must be secured from the instructor prior to 
registration. May be repeated for credit up to six hours. (Fall, Spring) 

EARTH SCIENCE 

ERSC 105. Earth Science (E-4) 3 hours 

A non-mathematical and qualitative introduction, for non-science majors, 
to the areas of astronomy, geology, and meteorology. Special consideration 
is given to the following current issues: (1) the environment — conservation 
and pollution of natural resources; (2) space science — exploration and uses; 
(3) cosmology — special creation and evolution. (Fall) 

ERSC 106. Earth Science Laboratory (E-4) 1 hour 

Prerequisite: Previous or concurrent enrollment in ERSC 105. 
Laboratory to accompany ERSC 105. (Fall) 

EDUCATION 

EDUC 438. Methods of Teaching Mathematics and Physics 2 hours 

Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. 

Attention is given to methods and materials of instruction, planning, testing 
and evaluating student performances, the survey and evaluation of 
textbooks. Four lectures each week of the first half of the semester. (Spring) 

(E-4), (W) See pages 14-16 for explanation of General Education requirements. 



Religion 



168 



■RELIGION- 



Douglas Bennett, Ph.D. 
Jack Blanco, Th.D. 
Jerry Gladson, Ph.D. 
Norman Gulley, Ph.D. 
Gordon Hyde, Ph.D., Chairman 
Ronald Springett, Ph.D. 

The Division of Religion offers one major with several minors to 
provide for the diversified interests and ambitions of students. The 
Bachelor of Arts degree in Religion serves candidates for the ministry of 
the Seventh-day Adventist Church, providing the undergraduate 
academic preparation for the Theological Seminary of Andrews Univer- 
sity, Berrien Springs, Michigan. The Bachelor of Arts degree in Religion 
is also a suitable degree for students who may be preparing to serve as 
secondary Bible teachers, Bible instructors, chaplains' assistants, and for 
those who may be preparing for various other professions, such as 
medicine, dentistry, and law. All majors must arrange their programs 
with a teacher in the Division of Religion and have that program ap- 
proved by the division. Each program will be individualized for the 
student and approval will be granted on the following considerations: 
first, evidence of a program having both balance and diversity; second, 
the needs of each student professionally and individually considered; 
and third, all general education and major requirements fulfilled. 

Beyond these considerations, the division is endeavoring to help both 
major and non-major students develop a personal religious life of com- 
mitment and service and to enhance their understanding and apprecia- 
tion of God as Creator and Redeemer. It also seeks to enlarge the student's 
comprehension and appreciation of the Bible as the infallible rule of 
faith and practice for the Christian and to foster an understanding of and 
a loyalty to the mission of this college and of the Seventh-day Adventist 
Church. 

Students who wish to be admitted to the religion program in prepara- 
tion for the ministry must file a formal application with the Division of 
Religion during the first semester of their sophomore year. All sopho- 
more or transfer ministerial students must take a battery of vocational 
tests before being recommended to ministerial training. The time for the 
test will be announced by the division. (Upper class transfer students 
must file an application during the first semester in residence.) The 
applicant must have an overall cumulative grade point average of 2.25, 
demonstrate competence in English communication skills, and show 
evidence of moral, physical, social, and intellectual fitness, emotional 
maturity, and professional commitment. Only those who complete the 
requirements will be recommended by the division as prospective 
ministerial employees, and those students who plan to attend Andrews 



Religion 



University Seminary must have a cumulative GPA at the time of gradua- 
tion of no less than 2.50. 

Religion majors are required to attend professional chapels for the 
information and inspiration provided. If at any time after being admitted 
to the ministerial program, students provide evidence of failing to live 
up to the stated criteria, they may forfeit the division's recommendation. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE IN RELIGION 

Major: Thirty hours to include RELB 125, 345, 346, 425, 426, 435, 436; 
RELT 138, 484, 485. Additional requirements for the Ministerial Tracks 
and Teacher Education Track are as follows: 

Ministerial Track — Seminary: A Biblical Languages minor and the 
following cognate courses: HIST 364, 365; RELP 321, 322. 

Ministerial Track — Non-Seminary: A Practical Theology minor and 
the following cognate courses: HIST 364, 365; SPCH 135; RELL 271, 272. 

Teacher Education Track: Professional and general education courses 
as outlined in the Educational section of the catalog and a minor of the 
student's choice. EDUC 438, Special Methods of Teaching Bible, must be 
included. 

The Division of Religion strongly recommends that ministerial stu- 
dents choose the seminary track. The division further recommends that 
they broaden their professional training by selecting from the following 
courses to fulfill general education requirements: PSYC 128 (F-l); BUAD 
128 (F-2); SOCI 223 (F-2); CPTR 105, 106, 107, 120, 127 (G-2); and from 
the following as electives: ACCT 103; BUAD 334, 344; INDS 175, 177, 
185, 264. 

Directed field education provided by the Division of Religion is re- 
quired of ministerial students. Participation in these experiences, which 
are designed to enhance professional development, is necessary in order 
for the student to be granted a ministerial recommendation by the divi- 
sion. The division will keep majors informed of the requirements to be 
met. 

Evangelism field schools may be conducted under the auspices of the 
division and offer up to five hours of academic credit. Additional pro- 
grams for individual students and student teams may be available by 
approval of the division to accommodate requests from the conferences 
of the Southern Union. Satisfactory prior arrangements must be made 
with the Division of Religion. 

Details concerning the field school and associated programs are avail- 
able through the Division of Religion. 

Minor — Religion. Eighteen hours including six upper division hours 
and RELT 138, 255. No more than one course may be selected from the 
following: RELT 317, 318, 325. 



Religion 



170 



Minor — Biblical Languages. Eighteen hours including RELL 2 71 :2 72 ; 
311:312; 471:472. 

Minor — Practical Theology. Eighteen hours including RELT 236; 
RELP 321:322; 351:352; 455; SPCH 136, EDUC 134. 

Minor — Denominational Teaching Endorsement: The student must 
earn a major in the first teaching field. He may add denominational 
certification in Religion by taking the following minor. RELB 125; RELT 
138, 236, 255, and 3 hours selected from each of RELB, RELT courses. 

Tennessee State Certification 

Students seeking Tennessee State Certification only must take 12 
hours selected from the following: RELB 125, 345, 346, 425, 426, 435, 
436, and RELT 368. Note that RELT 236 will not be accepted by the state 
for certification and RELT 368 will not be accepted by the denomination. 

Students who wish to obtain teacher certification must apply to the 
Department of Education before the end of their sophomore year to be 
admitted to the teacher education program and before the end of their 
junior year to be admitted to the professional education semester. 

BIBLICAL STUDIES 

RELB 125. Life and Teachings of Jesus I (B-l) 3 hours 

A study of the life, ministry, and teachings of Jesus with special emphasis 
upon His teachings as they apply to the personal, social, and religious 
problems of the individual. (Fall, Spring, Summer) 

RELB 345, Pentateuch and Writings (B-l) (W) 3 hours 

An introduction to the Pentateuch and Writings, the first and third major 
divisions of the Old Testament. Attention will be given to the structure, 
theme, theology, and historical setting of this literature. (Fall, alternate 
Summers) 

RELB 346. Prophets (B-l) (W) 3 hours 

An introduction to the Prophets, the second division of the Old Testament. 
Attention will be given to the structure, theme, theology, and historical 
setting of this literature. (Spring, alternate Summers) 

RELB 425. Studies in Daniel (B-l) (W) 3 hours 

Recommended: HIST 174, 175. 

A study of selected historical and prophetic portions of Daniel to discover 

their meaning and relevance for today. (Fall, alternate Summers) 

RELB 426. Studies in Revelation (B-l) (W) 3 hours 

Recommended: HIST 174, 175. 

A study of the prophecies and symbolisms of Revelation with their histori- 
cal fulfillments. Special attention will be given to discovering its special 
message for our day. (Spring, alternate Summers) 



Religion 

LB 435. New Testament Studies I (B-l) (W) 3 hours 

An exeeetical study of the following epistles in order of their composition: 1 171 
and 2 Tnessalonians, 1 and 2 Corinthians, Galatians, and James. Includes a * * ■*> 
background survey of the book of Acts. (Fall, alternate Summers) 



LB 436. New Testament Studies II (B-l) (W) 3 hours 

An exegetical study of Romans, the Prison, Pastoral, and General epistles, 
(excluding James) and Hebrews. (Spring, alternate Summers) 

RELB 295/495. Directed Study (B-2) 1-3 hours 

This course is limited to Religion and Theology majors and must be ap- 
proved by the chairman of the Division of Religion. Occasionally the course 
may be conducted as a seminar and published in the schedule of classes. 
(Fall, Spring, Summer) 

RELIGION 

RELT 138. Adventist Heritage (B-2) 3 hours 

A study of the worldwide advent emphasis of the early nineteenth century 
and the subsequent development of the Seventh-day Adventist Church and 
faith, and of the contributory role played by Ellen G. White in its develop- 
ment. (Fall, Spring, Summer) 

RELT 225. Last-Day Events (B-2) 3 hours 

Prerequisite: One college Biblical Studies or Religion course. 
Last-Day Events is a Biblical, theological and historical study of eschatology 
rooted in its Christ-centered focus. It considers the unique Seventh-day 
Adventist contribution over against that made by leading scholars both in 
the past and present. (Fall, Spring, Summer) 

RELT 236. Biblical Interpretation (B-2) 3 hours 

An introduction to the theory and practice of biblical exegesis and her- 
meneutics. Designed to enrich anyone wishing to learn how to read and 
understand the Scriptures, the course will focus on the nature of the biblical 
text, available resources for interpretation, and the proper procedures in- 
volved in adequate exegesis. Some consideration will also be given to the 
interpretation of the writings of Ellen G. White. (Fall, Spring) 

RELT 255. Christian Beliefs (B-2) 3 hours 

Christian Beliefs is a study of Adventist doctrines in a Christ-centered 
context. This course will involve a study of the major teachings, with a view 
to enhancing the student's understanding and ability to provide Biblical 
support for his faith. (Fall, Spring, Summer) 

*RELT 317. Issues in Physical Science and 

Religion (B-2, E-3) 3 hours 

(See Division of Mathematical Sciences PHYS 317.) 

*RELT 318. Issues in Physical Science and 

Religion II (B-2, E-3) 3 hours 

(See Division of Mathematical Sciences PHYS 318.) 



eligion 



*RELT 325. Issues in Natural Science and 
1 79 Religion (B-2, E-l), (W) 3 hours 

(See Division of Natural Science listings, BIOL 325.) 

KELT 326. Dynamics of Salvation (B-2), (W) 3 hours 

The study of the underlying principles of the plan of salvation as revealed in 
the sanctuary services of the Old Testament. (Spring) 

KELT 367. Philosophy of Religion (B-2), (W) 3 hours 

A study of the basic concepts of religion from a philosophical viewpoint. 
Attention will be given to such major questions as religious experience, 
reason and faith, theism and atheism, religious language, and the problem of 
evil. (Spring) 

RELT 268/368. Comparative Religions (B-2), (W) 3 hours 

A study of several major Christian and non-Christian religions of the world, 
including a survey of the history and the distinctive characteristics of each. 
RELT 268 is offered on the Orlando campus only and does not carry writing 
emphasis, (Fall) 

RELT 373. Christian Ethics (B-2) 3 hours 

A foundation course in moral decision-making with case studies taken from 
bio-ethics. The objective is to discover timeless norms by which to make 
basic ethical decisions across the professional spectrum. These norms are 
then applied to personal and social issues relevant to the student. Limited to 
nursing students or students with Junior/Senior class standing. (Fall, 
Spring, Summer) 

RELT 465. Historical Theology (B-2), (W) 3 hours 

An introduction to the major theological thought systems and leaders be- 
ginning with the early Church Fathers to the present as a backdrop for better 
understanding the current theological climate. Also special emphasis will 
be given to the ways in which such theological activities and church coun- 
cils dramatized God's hand in history within the conflict between good and 
evil. (Spring) 

RELT 484. Christian Theology I (B-2) 3 hours 

Christian Theology I and II examine the major locif of Christian beliefs. 
Christian Theology I takes up Prolegomena, Doctrine of God, Christology, 
and Pneumatology; and in the process covers a portion of the 27 Seventn- 
day Adventist fundamental beliefs. Acceptable for denominational certifi- 
cation. (Fall) 

RELT 485. Christian Theology II (B-2) 3 hours 

Prerequisite; RELT 484. 

Christian Theology II examines Anthropology, Soteriology, Ecclesiology, I 
and Eschatology, covering the rest of the 27 Seventh-day Adventist funda- 
mental beliefs. Acceptable for denominational certification. (Spring) 

RELT 295/495. Directed Study (B-2) 1-3 hours 

This course is limited to Religion and Theology majors and must be ap- 



Religion 



proved by the chairman of the Division of Religion. Occasionally the course 
may be conducted as a 
(Fall, Spring, Summer) 



may be conducted as a seminar and published in the schedule of classes. 1 *7 O 
11, Spring, Summer) I/O 



* One of the "Issues" courses can apply to General Education natural science 
requirement for majors, to Religion for nonmajors. 

PRACTICAL THEOLOGY 
Lay Leadership 

RELP 127. Student Missions Orientation 2 hours 

A course designed to help students better understand cultural differences, 
interpersonal relationships, health care for others and themselves, social 
and monetary problems, personal qualifications for service and relevant 
denominational policies for overseas service. The course is required by the 
General Conference of Seventh-day Adventists for those under appointment 
as student missionaries. One-third regular tuition rate. (Spring) 

RELP 204. Principles of Self-Supporting Work 2 hours 

The objectives of this course are to set forth principles from the Spirit of 
Prophecy; review the history and successes and failures of self-supporting 
institutions; study plans and methods of operation and set before the stu- 
dent the needs and call for active involvement as lay members to help finish 
the work of the church. (Fall) 

RELP 206. Christian Salesmanship 2 hours 

Teaches the psychology, techniques and methods of selling Christian litera- 
ture. 

Pastoral Leadership 

RELP 321. Homiletics I 2 hours 

Prerequisite: SPCH 135. 

An introduction to sermon development and delivery. Attention will be 

given to the sermon structure and the preparation of biographical and 

topical sermons. Opportunity will be given to preach and analyze sermons. 

One lecture and two laboratories each week. To be taken in the junior year. 

(Fall) 

RELP 322. Homiletics II 2 hours 

Prerequisites: SPCH 135 and RELP 321. 

Expository, textual, and evangelistic sermon types will be considered. One 
field trip will be required. Opportunity will be provided to develop profi- 
ciency in preaching. One class lecture and two laboratories each week. To be 
taken in the junior year. (Spring) 

RELP 351:352. Pastoral Ministry I and II 2:2 hours 

An introduction to the practice of pastoral ministry, this course focuses on 
the theology of ministry, ministerial ethics, the relationship of the minister 
to denominational polity, the community, and the local church. Considera- 



Religion 



174 



tion is given the various professional tasks of the pastor, such as pastoral 
care, administration, leadership in worship, etc. Laboratory work in area 
churches will be required. (Fall, Spring) 

'RELP 455. Evangelistic Methods 3 hours 

Attention will be given to concepts and methods involving ways of creating 
witnessing opportunities; the giving of Bible studies; obtaining a decision 
for Christ; the conducting of Revelation Seminars; and public evangelism. 
Where possible, Revelation Seminars will be conducted concurrent with the 
class. (Fall, occasional Summers) 



* RELP 455 may be applied to General Education requirements, Area B-3, for up 
to three hours of credit. 

BIBLICAL LANGUAGES 

RELL 271:272. Elements of New Testament Greek (D-l) 4:4 hours 

A study of the grammar and syntax of the vernacular koine Greek of New 
Testament times, with readings in the epistles of John. Laboratory work 
required. (Fall, Spring) 

RELL 311:312. Intermediate New Testament Greek (D-l) 3:3 hours 

A course in advanced studies, grammar, ancL syntax of koine Greek with 
translation of readings from the Gospel of John, the Synoptics, and the 
Pauline Epistles. (Fall, Spring) 

RELL 471:472. Biblical Hebrew (D-l) 2:2 hours 

A foundation course in the grammar, syntax, and lexicography of classical 
biblical Hebrew, with an emphasis on reading skills. Laboratory work re- 
quired. (Fall, Spring) 

EDUCATION 

EDUC 438. Methods of Teaching Bible 2 hours 

Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. EDUC 133. 
Attention is given to methods and materials construction, planning, testing 
and evaluating student performances, the survey and evaluation of 
textbooks. Four lectures each week of the first half of the second semester 
during the senior year. (Spring) 

(B-l), (B-2), (B-3), (D-l), (E-l), (E-3), (W) See pages 14-16 for explanation of 
General Education requirements. 









• 



INTERDEPARTMENTAL 
PROGRAMS 

ALLIED HEALTH 
PROFESSIONS 

The Allied Health Professions are rapidly growing areas of specializa- 
tion within the health care industry. Job openings are plentiful and pay 
scales are comparable to other professionals in health care. The As- 
sociate of Science degree in Allied Health Professions prepares the 
student for admission to professional programs at Loma Linda Univer- 
sity or Andrews University. Admission to any professional school is 
dependent on meeting the GPA and prerequisite requirements of the 
individual school. Students desirous of admission to other professional 
programs should check the bulletin of that school to ascertain the re- 
quirements. 

General Education requirements for the Associate of Science degree 
are listed on pp. 14-16 of the Catalog. General education requirements 
for admission to professional schools at Loma Linda University are 
summarized as follows. For specific requirements, consult pp. 185-189 
of this Catalog or the appropriate Bulletin for the professional school of 
your choice. 

ENGL 101:102 College Composition 6 hours 

Religion/Bible 9 hours 

Speech 2-3 hours 

Humanities* 

(including Speech) total 8-12 hours 

Social Sciences* total 8-12 hours 

electives and general education to total 

64 semester hours 

* Specific options in these areas listed in College Catalog and in Bulletins for 
professional schools. Some of these requirements may be met by required 
professional courses. 

There are seven emphases in the Allied Health Professions degree: 
pre-Dental Hygiene, pre-Dietetics, pre-Medical Record Administration, 
pre-Occupational Therapy, pre-Physical Therapy, pre-Radiology 
Technology, and pre-Respiratory Therapy. Requirements for each are 
given. 

175 



Allied Health Professions 



PRE-DENTAL HYGIENE 

Advisor: Steven Warren 

BIOL 105:106 Anatomy and Physiology 6 hours 

BIOL 125 Microbiology 3 hours 

CHEM 111:112 Survey of Chemistry 6 hours 

CHEM 113:114 Survey of Chemistry Lab 2 hours 

PSYC 124 Intro to Psychology 3 hours 

SOCI 125 Intro to Sociology J* hours 

TOTAL 23 hours 

PRE-DIETETICS 

Advisor: Diane Fletcher 

MATH 104 Intermediate Algebra 3 hours 

FDNT 125 Nutrition 3 hours 

FDNT 126 Foods 2 hours 

FDNT 127 Food Preparation 1 hour 

FDNT 317 Meal Management 3 hours 

ACCT 103 College Accounting 3 hours 

ECON 213 Survey of Economics 3 hours 

BIOL 105:106 Anatomy and Physiology 6 hours 

(BIOL 105 may be waived if ACT in 
Nat. Sci. is high enough and with 
approval of advisor) 

BIOL 125 Microbiology 3 hours 

CHEM 111:112 Survey of Chemistry 6 hours 

CHEM 113:114 Survey of Chemistry Lab 2 hours 

(those planning on graduate work in 
nutrition or dietetics should take 
CHEM 151:152, CHEM 311:312, 
and CHEM 323) 

PSYC 124 Introduction to Psychology 3 hours 

SOCI 125 Introduction to Sociology 3 hours 

(students applying to AU should take 
Psychology OR Sociology and 
should include CPTR 125 Intro, to 

Computers) 

TOTAL 41 (38) hours 



PRE-MEDICAL RECORDS ADMINISTRATION 

Advisor: Joyce Cotham 

BIOL 105:106 Anatomy and Physiology 6 hours 

MATH 104 Intermediate Algebra 3 hours 

PSYC 124 Introduction to Psychology 3 hours 



Allied Health Professions 



SECR 315 Business Communications 3 hours 

BIOL 155:156 Foundations of Biology RECOM- 
MENDED. (A full sequence of science 
may be substituted.) 6-8 hours 

Typing proficiency of 50 wpm for 10 
minutes 0^5 hours 

TOTAL 21-28 hours 



177 



PRE-OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY 

Advisor: Steven Warren 

INDS 154 Woodworking 4 hours 

INDS 155 Creative Crafts 2 hours 

ART 235 Ceramics I 3 hours 

BIOL 105:106 Anatomy and Physiology 6 hours 

BIOL 125 Microbiology 3 hours 

CHEM 111:112 Survey of Chemistry 6 hours 

CHEM 113:114 Survey of Chemistry Lab 2 hours 

(a full sequence of physics or math 

may be substituted for chemistry; 

e.g., PHYS 211:212 or MATH 114 

and 115) 

PSYC 124 Introduction to Psychology 3 hours 

PSYC 128 Developmental Psychology 3 hours 

SOCI 125 Introduction to Sociology _3 hours 

TOTAL 35 hours 

PRE-PHYSICAL THERAPY 

Advisor: Marcella Woolsey 

PHYS 107 Introduction to Physics 3 hours 

BIOL 105:106 Anatomy and Physiology 6 hours 

(BIOL 155:156 Found, of Biology 8 
hrs. may be substituted) 

BIOL 125 Microbiology 3 hours 

CHEM 111:112 Survey of Chemistry 6 hours 

CHEM 113:114 Survey of Chemistry Lab 2 hours 

PSYC 124 Introduction to Psychology 3 hours 

PSYC 128 Developmental Psychology _3 hours 

TOTAL 26 hours 

PRE-RADIOLOGY TECHNOLOGY* 

Advisor: Henry Kuhlman 

PHYS 107 Introduction to Physics 3 hours 

BIOL 105:106 Anatomy and Physiology 6 hours 



Allied Health Professions 



CHEM 111:112 Survey of Chemistry 6 hours 

1 7ft CHEM 113:114 Survey of Chemistry Lab 2 hours 

* * ** MATH 104 Intermediate Algebra 3 hours 

PSYC 124 Introduction to Psychology 3 hours 

OR SOCI 125 Intro, to Sociology _ 

TOTAL 23 hours 

PRE-RESPIRATORY THERAPY* 

Advisor: Marcella Woolsey 

PHYS 107 Introduction to Physics 3 hours 

BIOL 105:106 Anatomy and Physiology 6 hours 

(BIOL 155:156 Found, of Biology may 
be substituted) 

BIOL 125 Microbiology 3 hours 

CHEM 111:112 Survey of Chemistry 6 hours 

CHEM 113:114 Survey of Chemistry Lab 2 hours 

MATH 104 Intermediate Algebra . . 3 hours 

PSYC 124 Introduction to Psychology 3 hours 

(SOCI 125 Intro, to Sociology may be 

substituted) _ 

TOTAL 26 hours 

* Admission to professional programs in Radiology Technology and Respiratory 
Therapy require 32 semester hours of prerequisites. The student choosing this 
option would not receive an A.S. degree from Southern College. 












•ENGINEERING- 

Advisor: Larry Hanson 



Engineering 
179 



Southern College of Seventh-day Adventists has established an affilia- 
tion in engineering with Walla Walla College (WWC) whereby the first 
two years of the engineering program may be taken at Southern College 
and the remaining work at WWC. Students desiring a Bachelor of Sci- 
ence in Engineering degree can choose from three areas of concentra- 
tion: civil, electrical, mechanical. The WWC engineering program is 
fully approved by the Accreditation Board for Engineering and 
Technology, the only nationally recognized organization which regu- 
larly evaluates professional engineering curricula. The total engineering 
enrollment consists of approximately 400 students, many of whom are 
on various SDA college campuses for their first year or two. 

In addition to the above professional degree programs, a pre- 
professional degree program in bioengineering is available. 
The following courses are required: 

Humanities/Social Studies* 6 hours 

Physical Education 2 hours 

Religion/Bible* 6 hours 

ENGL 101:102 6 hours 

INDS 149 3 hours 

MATH 115, 217, 218, 315 13 hours 

CHEM 151:152 , 8 hours 

CPTR 218 3 hours 

PHYS 211:212; 213:214; 311:312 10 hours 

The Humanities/Social Studies category includes courses such as art, 
literature, music, economics, history, behavioral science. See the en- 
gineering advisor for details. 

ENGR 211. Engineering Mechanics: Statics 3 hours 

Prerequisite: MATH 115. 

Two and three dimensional equilibria employing vector algebra; friction; 

centroids and centers of gravity; moments of inertia. 

ENGR 212. Engineering Mechanics: Dynamics 3 hours 

Prerequisites: MATH 115; ENGR 211. 

One and two dimensional kinetics and kinematics of rigid bodies by vector 
calculus; dynamics of rotation, translation and plane motion; relative mo- 
tion; work and energy; impulse and momentum. 

ENGR 214. Circuit Analysis 3 hours 

Prerequisites: MATH 115; PHYS 211. 

Circuit variables and parameters; KirchofF s laws and circuit solution; 
sinusoidal steady-state; phasors and impedance; frequency characteristics; 
Thevenin's theorem and maximum power theorem; transients and complete 



Engineering 

response. Laboratory covers basic electrical measurements using DC and AC 
1 Oil meters, potentiometers, recorders and bridges. 



Obtain advisor* s approval before taking courses in this category. 
















































1 



General Studies 

GENERAL STUDIES — — t ^ 

f Of 

Advisor: Carole Haynes 

Southern College offers the Associate of Science degree with a major 
in General Studies. Many students have not made a career decision at the 
time they enter college, This degree offers them an opportunity to earn a 
large part of the general requirements for a baccalaureate degree while 
leaving approximately 20 semester hours free for exploration in the area 
of their choice. 

ASSOCIATE OF SCIENCE DEGREE IN GENERAL STUDIES 

AREA SEMESTER HOURS 

A-l English 6-9 

A-2 Mathematics 3 

B Religion 6 

C History/Government/Economics 6 

D Language/Literature/Fine Arts 6 

E Natural Science 6 

F Behavioral/Family/Health Science 3 

G Activity Skills 6 

Electives 19-22 

Area C. At least 3 hours must be history. 
Area D. Must include at least 2 sub-areas. 
Area E. Must include at least 2 sub-areas. 
Area G. Must include at least 2 sub-areas with not more than 3 hours 

in any one sub-area. 

Elective credit is to be selected from not more than four 

subject areas. 






182 



Medical Technology 

MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY 

Advisor: Henry Kuhlman 

This program, leading to a bachelor of science degree with a major in 
medical technology, consists of three years of prescribed study at South- 
ern College and a 12- to 13-month senior year in a hospital-based medi- 
cal technology program accredited by the Committee on Allied Health 
Education and Accreditation (CAHEA) of the American Medical Associ- 
ation. Hospital programs affiliated with Southern College include Er- 
langer Memorial Hospital, Florida Hospital Medical Center, and Ketter- 
ing Medical Center. Internship in other CAHEA-accredited programs 
requires prior college approval. 

Acquiring this degree in medical technology qualifies a person to take 
a number of national certifying examinations, including those offered by 
the Board of Registry of the American Society of Clinical Pathologists 
(ASCP) and the National Accrediting Agency for Clinical Laboratory 
Sciences (NAACLS). Certified laboratory professionals work in hospi- 
tals, clinics, physicians' offices, public health agencies, private 
laboratories, pharmaceutical firms, and research institutions. 

The curriculum prescribed by Southern College is designed to meet 
the requirements of the college and of the Committee on Allied Health 
Education and Accreditation (CAHEA). Affiliated hospitals may have 
additional requirements. Students should consult the brochures or ad- 
visers of the specific hospitals for those requirements. 

Occasionally pre-dental students, pre-medical students, and graduat- 
ing seniors in biology or chemistry may wish to become certified Medi- 
cal Technologists. This is possible if the student plans his courses to 
fulfill the requirements of the college and the hospital program. 

During the fall semester of the third year, students must apply for 
admission to an affiliated hospital-based medical technology program. 
Acceptance of the individual student to the senior year program is 
determined by the hospital. To be eligible for admission, a student must 
complete all of the college course requirements prior to beginning the 
senior year. The over-all grade point average must be acceptable to the 
college for graduation. Most hospital programs do not accept students 
with less than a 2.75 cumulative average on a 4.0 system. Although 
hospital acceptances are granted during the junior year, they are condi- 
tional, pending satisfactory completion of the stated admission criteria. 

Written information about each of the affiliated hospital-based medi- 
cal technology programs is available through the college medical 
technology adviser. The student should be aware that acceptance 
criteria, pre-clinical course requirements, application procedures, tui- 
tion for the senior year, and program formats may vary at each affiliated 






Medical Technology 

hospital. Southern College charges a $50 recording fee for the senior 

year. Jg3 

Candidates for the Bachelor of Science degree from Southern College 
with a major in medical technology must complete the following re- 
quirements: 

MAJOR 2 

MDTC 225. Introduction to Medical Technology 2 hours 

This course is designed to acquaint prospective medical technologists with 
the profession. The history and standards of medical technology and 
employment opportunities will be surveyed. Elementary clinical laboratory 
procedures will be taught and laboratory tours will be conducted. 

COGNATES 42 

*BIOL including 225, 155, 156, 315 16 

*CHEM including 151, 152, 311, 313 16 

CPTR 120, 125 or 131 3 

MATH 114 4 

BUAD 334 3 

* These must be courses which could apply to a Biology or 
Chemistry major. 

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 35 

A. 1. ENGL 101, 102 6 

2. (See Cognates) 

B. Religion 9 

C. History, Political Science, and Economics 6 

D. Language, Literature and Fine Arts 6 

E. (See Cognates) 

F. Behavioral, Family or Health Sciences 3 

G. Activity Skills 5 

Twenty hours of upper division, including two writing courses are 

required — one (W) course must be in a cognate area and one in a non- 
cognate area. 

ELECTIVES 14 

Recommendations include: 
BIOL 316, 415, 417, 418 
CHEM 312, 314, 315, 321, 323, 324 
MATH 215 
PHYS 211, 212, 213, 214 

TOTAL PRE-CLINICAL CREDIT HOURS 93 

HOSPITAL CLINICAL (SENIOR) YEAR Variable 

Individual affiliated hospital programs should be consulted for their 



Medical Science 



specific courses and credits. Approximately forty credit hours are given 
1 841 * n *^ e * we ^ ve " to fifteen-month clinical programs. Courses taught in 

affiliate programs include: 

Introduction to Medical Laboratory Science, Urinalysis, Hematol- 
ogy, Hemostasis, Immunology, Immunohematology, Clinical Mi- 
crobiology, Clinical Mycology, Clinical Parasitology, Clinical Bio- 
chemistry, Instrumentation, Research. 

2+2 MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM 

The 2 +2 ladder program in medical technology permits an individual 
possessing an associate degree from an accredited college plus certifica- 
tion as a medical laboratory technician [MLT (ASCP) or CLT (NCA)] to 
earn a baccalaureate degree in medical technology without duplicating 
previous work. For this program, students spend their junior year at 
Southern College completing general education and science require- 
ments. They spend their senior year at Kettering Medical Center in 
Dayton, Ohio, studying advanced topics in clinical laboratory science. 



MEDICAL SCIENCE 

Advisor: Stephen A. Nyirady 

Southern College will confer a Bachelor of Science Degree in Medical 
Science upon students not already in possession of a bachelor's degree 
who satisfy the following two conditions: 

1. Complete 93 semester hours in an accredited undergraduate col- 
lege program of which at least the last 30 were taken in residence at 
Southern College and at least 12 of which are at the upper division 
level. 

2. Provide certification from an accredited professional school of 
dentistry, medicine, or optometry that the first year of the respec- 
tive professional program has been successfully completed and 
that the applicant is eligible to continue. 

Request for the conferral of this degree should be made to the Director 
of Records. 






Non-Degree 
Pre-Professional Programs 



NON-DEGREE 



PRE-PROFESSIONAL PROGRAMS 

Pre-professional and pre-technical curricula are offered in a wide 
variety of fields. Below are listed the curricula most frequently chosen. If 
other pre-professional programs are desired, faculty advisors are pre- 
pared to assist the student in working out a satisfactory sequence of 
courses needed to meet the admission requirements of the chosen pro- 
fessional school. 

ANESTHESIA 

Advisor: Katie Lamb 

Registered nurses who are comfortable working in critical care areas 
may be interested in becoming registered nurse anesthetists. Graduation 
from an approved program of nursing and a valid nursing license is 
required. Additional requirements may be determined by consulting the 
Division of Nursing. 

DENTISTRY 

Advisor: Duane Houck 

Because of competition for admission to schools of Dentistry, most 
applicants have completed a four-year college degree rather than the 
required minimum of two years of college. Some may be accepted after 
three years. 

Successful applicants to Dental School must make satisfactory scores 
on the Dental Admissions Test in addition to meeting G.P.A. and per- 
sonal qualifications. For a reasonable chance of admission to Loma 
Linda University (LLU), it is recommended that the student maintain a 
minimum G.P.A. of 3.0 in both science and non-science courses. Satis- 
factory performance on the Dental Dexterity Test is also required. 

The following courses must be included to meet the minimum re- 
quirements for admissions to the LLU School of Dentistry: 

BIOL 155, 156 8 hours 

BUAD 334 3 hours 

CHEM 151:152, 311:312, 313:314 16 hours 

ENGL 101:102 6 hours 

MATH 114 4 hours 

PHYS 211:212, 213:214 8 hours 

PSYC 124 3 hours 

Physical Education 1 hour 

Religion 9 hours 

Electives 8 hours 



185 



Non-Degree 
Pre-Professional Programs 



The following courses are strongly recommended: 

186 FONT 125 3 hours 

INDS 174 4 hours 

ACCT 103 3 hours 

MATH 115 3 hours 

An additional Psychology course 

LAW 

Advisor: William Wohlers 

The student interested in the study of law as a profession should 
become acquainted with the entrance requirements of various law 
schools. This will make possible the planning of a pre-professional 
program which will qualify the student for admission to several schools. 
It is a general requirement that students complete a bachelor's degree 
before entering law school. Although no particular major is required, 
four fields should be especially considered by the student serious about 
law school. These are: Business, history, English, and behavioral sci- 
ence. Certain courses recommended by all law schools include Ameri- 
can history, freshman composition, principles of accounting, American 
government, principles of economics, English history, business law, 
creative writing, and mathematics. Pre-law students should concentrate 
on developing their analytical and verbal skills. 

Information about preparation for law school may be obtained from 
the Section of Legal Education and Admissions to the Bar, American Bar 
Association, 1155 East 60th Street, Chicago, Illinois 60637. For informa- 
tion about the Law School Admissions Test write the Law School Ad- 
missions Service, P.O. Box 2000, Newtown, Pennsylvania 18940. 

MEDICINE 

Advisor: Stephen A. Nyirady 

Medical colleges, as a rule, require the completion of academic re- 
quirements for a baccalaureate degree. Along with the completion of 
stated admission requirements, a broad college program of liberal educa- 
tion is preferred to give balance to professional studies and later service. 

Applicants for admission to the Loma Linda University School of 
Medicine should maintain a grade point average of at least 3.50 in both 
science and non-science courses. The following courses must be in- 
cluded in the applicant's academic program. Classes with asterisks in 
biology, chemistry, and mathematics are recommended. 

BIOL 155, 156, 313*, 316*, 417* 11 hours 

CHEM 151:152, 311:312, 313:314, 323* 16 hours 

ENGL 101:102 6 hours 



Non-Degree 
Pre-Professional Programs 



MATH 114, 115* 8 hours 

PHYS 211:212, 213:214 8 hours 

Religion 12 hours 

OPTOMETRY 

Advisor: Ray Hefferlin 

The admission requirements to colleges of optometry vary, so the 
student should follow the catalog from the school of his or her choice. 
However, all place emphasis on biology, chemistry, mathematics and 
physics. Additional courses in the areas of fine arts, language, literature, 
and the social sciences are usually necessary. 

A minimum of two years of preoptometric study is required. However, 
additional study increases the prospects of acceptance into professional 
training. 

Following is a list of pre-optometry courses required by most schools: 

BIOL 225 and 155:156 11 hours 

CHEM 151:152 8 hours 

ENGL 101:102 6 hours 

MATH 114, 115, 215 12 hours 

PHYS 211:212, 213:214 8 hours 

PSYC 124 3 hours 

Direct individual inquiries are welcomed by the American Optometric 

Association, Division of Education and Manpower, 243 North 

Lindbergh Blvd., St. Louis, Missouri 63141. 

OSTEOPATHIC MEDICINE 

Advisor: Stephen A. Nyirady 

An alternative to allopathic medical schools, which grant the M.D. 
degree, are the osteopathic medical schools whose graduates receive the 
D.O. degree. 

Many Seventh-day Adventists have attended the Kansas City School 
of Osteopathic Medicine, one of twelve osteopathic medical colleges in 
this country. 

Courses for admission are basically the same as those for Loma Linda 
University. 

For a reasonable chance of acceptance, a minimum grade point aver- 
age of 3.0 should be maintained in both science and non-science sub- 
jects. 

PHARMACY 

Advisor: Mitchell Thiel 

The bachelor's degree program in pharmacy normally requires 5 
years, the first two years of which may be taken at Southern College. 



Non-Degree 
Pre-Professional Programs 



188 



Admission requirements to colleges of pharmacy are somewhat vari- 
able so the student should consult the catalog of the school of his choice 
for specific course recommendations. 

Minimum admission requirements to the University of Tennessee 
College of Pharmacy at Memphis are: 

ACGT 121 3 hours 

BIOL 155:156 8 hours 

CHEM 151:152, 311:312, 313:314 16 hours 

ENGL 101:102 6 hours 

PHYS 211, 213 4 hours 

Additional requirements include: 

Literature or Foreign Language 4 hours 

Social Sciences: 

Psychology 2 hours 

Other 4 hours 

Speech 2 hours 

Electives 12 hours 

A minimum grade of "C M must be obtained for each required pre- 
pharmacy class. A higher grade point average will, of course, increase 
the chance of acceptance into pharmacy school. In addition, a satisfac- 
tory score must be achieved on the National Pharmacy College Admis- 
sion Test. 

PUBLIC HEALTH SCIENCE 

Advisor: Dorothy Giacomozzi 

Today there is an increasing demand for programs that promote health 
and disease prevention. Two major factors influencing this demand are 

(a) an effort to slow down or decrease the rising costs of medical care and 

(b) emphasis on improving the quality of life. The undergraduate pro- 
gram in public health science at Loma Linda University (LLU) provides 
an opportunity to emphasize the prevention of illness and the promotion 
of health. The first two years of the program are offered at Southern 
College after which the student transfers to LLU to complete the work to 
receive the bachelor's degree in public health science. The following 
courses should be included in the pre-public health science curriculum 
to qualify for admission to LLU. Students not having had high school 
physics must enroll in college physical science. 

ENGL 101:102 6 hours 

Humanities (include at least two areas: speech (highly 
recommended), fine arts, foreign language, HMNT 

205, literature, philosophy) 9 hours 

BIOL 105, 106 or 155, 156, and 125 9-11 hours 

CHEM 111:112, 113, 114 8 hours 






Non-Degree 
Pre-Professional Programs 



MATH 104 3 hours 

PSYC 124, SOCI 125, ECON 225 9 hours 

Religion 9 hours 

Electives sufficient to make a total of 64 hours chosen in 
consultation with advisor. 

The Allied Health Professions Admission Test is required. 

VETERINARY MEDICINE 

Advisor: Edgar Grundset 

Competition for admission to colleges of veterinary medicine is very 
keen. Consequently, most successful applicants have completed a de- 
gree rather than the required minimum of two years of college. It should 
also be noted that it is almost impossible to be accepted in any veterinary 
institution other than the school in the state where the applicant resides. 
The applicant must make a satisfactory score on the Veterinary Ap- 
titude Test in addition to meeting grade point average and personal 
qualifications for admission. Professional training entails another four 
years of school beyond college. 

Minimum admission requirements to the University of Tennessee 
College of Veterinary Medicine in Knoxville are: 

BIOL 125, 155:156 11 hours 

CHEM 151:152, 311:312, 313:314, 323 20 hours 

ENGL 101:102 6 hours 

MATH 114, 115 9 hours 

PHYS 211:212, 213:214 8 hours 

Additional requirements include: 

Humanities 8 hours 

Social Sciences 8 hours 

Speech 2 hours 

Animal Science (not offered at Southern College) 9 hours 

(Some schools will accept a full year of general biology 

or zoology in lieu of Animal Science — one needs to 

check with the institution.) 



* 





STUDENT LIFE 
AND SERVICES 



A college is not only classroom instruction, but also a mode of associa- 
tion. The effectiveness of the college program is enhanced if students 
develop their interests and meet their needs through participation in the 
nonacademic activities provided. Students are encouraged to take ad- 
vantage of the facilities and opportunities planned for their cultural, 
social, and spiritual growth. 

RESIDENCE HALL LIVING 

Living in a college residence hall with its daily "give and take" 
prepares the student to meet life with equanimity, teaches respect for the 
rights and opinions of others, and offers a firsthand experience in adjust- 
ing to a social group. 

To assure students this beneficial experience, the college requires 
those students who take more than three semester hours of classwork 
and who are unmarried, under 23 years of age, and not living with their 
parents or other close relatives in the vicinity to reside in one of the 
residence halls. 

REHABILITATION ACT (1973) Section 504: Services for Students with 
Special Needs 

Southern College is dedicated to the elimination of architectural and 
prejudicial barriers which prevent any qualified person from attending. 
All applications are welcomed. Students who anticipate the need for 
special services are encouraged to arrange with the Admissions Office 
for a visit to the campus at which time the applicant will receive informa- 
tion concerning all features of campus life and can share with the college 
officials any information pertinent to personal needs. 

DINING 

For the promotion of student health and enjoyment, Southern College 
provides a complete cafeteria service, organized to serve the students' 
needs. The spacious dining hall is an inviting center of social and 
cultural life at the college, and service by the cafeteria staff is available 
for the many student and faculty social functions. Auxiliary dining 
rooms are available for meetings of various student or faculty organiza- 
tions. . 

191 



Student Life and Services 



HEALTH SERVICE 

The Health Service is administered by a nurse director in cooperation 
with a college physician and the Vice President for Student Services. 
The director uses the physician's standing orders and maintains regular 
office hours. The college physician holds regular clinic hours each 
weekday morning. 

An infirmary is provided and staffed in the evenings and at night on an 
on-call basis by live-in A.D. nurse graduates who are continuing for the 
B.S. degree. 

The Health Service is available to all dormitory occupants and all 
students taking eight or more hours (three hours in the summer). The 
infirmary is available to all dormitory occupants. There is no charge for 
seeing a nurse or using the infirmary. There is a minimal charge to cover 
costs of equipment used in some treatments. Medications given are 
charged by the pharmacy. 

All students taking eight hours or more must purchase the Student 
Accident and Sickness Insurance Plan or show proof of adequate cover- 
age by another policy. Spouses of students and those taking less than 
eight hours may also purchase the plan. A policy brochure describing 
complete benefits and terms is given to each student at registration. In 
case of major illness, students may be referred to off-campus hospital 
facilities. 

GUIDANCE AND COUNSELING SERVICE 

During registration each student is assigned an academic adviser who 
will assist in program planning and give advice and guidance on 
academic questions throughout the school year. Students may also seek 
counsel concerning academic or personal problems from any member of 
the faculty. 

Students with personal problems who wish assistance from a profes- 
sional counselor should consult the Vice President for Student Services 
or Director of Counseling Services. Personnel trained in psychology and 
counseling are available to those with serious social and personal prob- 
lems. 

The testing service works in close cooperation with the counseling 
service in providing guidance information to both students and coun- 
selors. Students are urged to take advantage of the testing service as a 
means of obtaining information useful in choosing a profession or occu- 
pation. 

ORIENTATION PROGRAM 

Southern College has a personal interest in the success of the student 
desiring a college education. There is much that the student must do for 
himself in getting acquainted with the academic, social, and religiout 
life of the college by perusing this bulletin and the Southern College 



Student Life and Services 

Student Handbook. Instruction and counsel are given which will help 

the student better understand the college program and what is expected 1 Q Q 

of him as a citizen of the college community. 

Orientation for new freshman students is held prior to the opening 
week of the fall term. It includes examinations and instruction helpful in 
course planning. The student is introduced to the facilities, purposes, 
and functions of the college. Social occasions are also provided when 
students may meet faculty members and fellow students. All new 
freshman students are required to attend the orientation program. 

STUDENT EMPLOYMENT SERVICE 

Southern College encourages every student enrolled to organize his 
educational program on the study-work plan. It is a policy of the college 
to give students first priority for jobs. If a student wants to work, is 
physically and emotionally able to work, and has arranged his class 
schedule to accommodate a reasonable work schedule, he should be able 
to obtain employment on campus. Students seeking employment should 
contact Student Employment Office located in the Student Center. 

SENIOR PLACEMENT SERVICE 

One of the personnel services of the college is that of assisting 
graduates in securing appointments for service. The Placement Service 
distributes information concerning senior students to a wide list of 
prospective employers. The Job Placement Office serves as the liaison 
officer in bringing graduate and employer together. 

STUDENT ASSOCIATION 

Every student at Southern College who is taking eight or more semes- 
ter hours of classwork is a member of the Student Association with 
voting privileges in the election of officers. Opportunities for leadership 
development and for cooperation in achieving the objectives of South- 
ern College are afforded by the Association. The Association assists the 
college administration and faculty in the implementation of policies and 
assumes responsibility in giving direction to campus activities en- 
trusted to it. 

The Association's activities are coordinated and communicated 
through the Student Senate and Cabinet and their several committees. 
The activities include the publishing of the weekly newspaper, South- 
ern Accent; the yearbook, Southern Memories; the announcement sheet, 
Campus Chatter; and the student-faculty directory, Joker. 

The activities and responsibilities of officers and the detailed organi- 
zation of the Student Association are outlined in the Student Associa- 
tion Constitution and By-laws. 



Student Life and Services 



CAMPUS ORGANIZATIONS 

1 94 Aside from the Student Association and its committees, more than 
thirty campus organizations provide opportunity for enrichment, lead- 
ership training, and enjoyment. They include church-related 
organizations — Campus Ministry, Student Ministerial Association, Col- 
legiate Adventists for Better Living, and Literature Evangelists Club; 
clubs related to academic interests sponsored by the divisions; social 
clubs — Married Couples' Forum, Sigma Theta Chi, and Upsilon Delta 
Phi; and special interest or hobby clubs. 

Students may join any of the clubs but must have a cumulative grade 
point average of 2.25 or a grade point average of 2.50 for the previous 
semester to hold any elected office. 

CONCERT-LECTURE SERIES 

Each year a concert-lecture series featuring distinguished artists, lec- 
turers, and film travelogues is provided for students, generally on Satur- 
day or Sunday nights. The cost of season tickets issued to students is 
partially included in the tuition. 

STANDARDS OF CONDUCT 

In harmony with the objectives of the college, high standards of 
behavior are maintained to encourage the development of genuine 
Christian character. Mature Christian students of sound spiritual and 
social integrity delight in standards that elevate and ennoble. Admission 
to Southern College is a privilege that requires the acceptance of and 
compliance with published and announced regulations. Only those 
whose principles and interests are in harmony with the ideals of the 
college and who willingly subscribe to the social program as ordered are 
welcomed. It therefore follows that since students at Southern College 
receive an education subsidized by the Seventh-day Adventist Church, 
those who engage in activities designed to be detrimental to the church 
on or off campus will not be knowingly accepted or retained. 

A student who finds himself out of harmony with the social policies of 
the college, who is uncooperative, and whose attitudes give evidence of 
an unresponsive nature may be advised to withdraw without specific 
charge. The use of tobacco or alcoholic beverages, the improper use of 
drugs, theater attendance, card playing, dancing, profane or vulgar 
language, hazing, and improper associations are not tolerated. 

Each student is expected to acquaint himself with the standards of 
conduct published in the Southern College Student Handbook. The 
handbook includes levels of social discipline and the appeal route. A 
copy may be obtained from the Office of the Vice President for Student 
Services. Interim announcements of policies adopted by the faculty are 
of equal force with those listed in official publications. 






Student Life and Services 



CHAPEL AND WORSHIP SERVICES 

In private parochial education it has been well known that elimination fQ 5 
of residence halls convocations and all school convocations is the first 
step toward the separation of the school from its sponsoring church. 
Convocation exercises in the residence halls and for the entire student 
body serve educational and religious purposes. They also provide an 
element of unity which is one of the most desirable features of private 
education such as is found at Southern College. 

The religious emphasis weeks and the weekend church services assist 
in the spiritual growth of the students comprising the college commu- 
nity. Students are required to attend these services regularly. Failure to 
do so will jeopardize the student's current status and readmission 
privileges. 











■XI 




1 




ADMISSIONS, 
EXPENSES, AND 
FINANCIAL AID 



ADMISSIONS 

Southern College welcomes applications from students, regardless of 
race, sex, religion, or national origin, whose principles and interests are 
in harmony with the ideals and traditions of the college as expressed in 
its objectives and policies. Although religious affiliation is not a re- 
quirement for admission, all students are expected to abide by the 
policies and standards of the college as a Seventh-day Adventist institu- 
tion, 

PREPARATION FOR FRESHMAN STANDING 1 

Applicants for regular admission as freshmen must submit three satis- 
factory recommendations to the Admissions Office and satisfy one of the 
following three conditions by the time of enrollment: 

Regular Acceptance 

A. Graduate from an approved secondary school, including Home 
Study International, with a grade point average (GPA) of at least 
2.00 (on a 4.00 scale) in major subjects 2 and have a minimum 
composite score of 15 on the American College Test (ACT). 

B. Pass the General Education Development (GED) test, have a com- 
posite score of 15 on the ACT, and be eighteen years old by June 1 
(prior to admission). 

C. Complete a minimum of eighteen secondary school units, fourteen 
of which must be in major subjects 2 , with a minimum GPA of 3.00 
in the major subjects, and have a minimum composite score of 15 
on the ACT. 

Southern College must have received a final high school transcript or 
GED scores from each new student before he will be admitted to regis- 
tration. 



*Those planning to enter professions such as nursing or music education should 
consult divisional admissions requirements. 

2 Bible, English, mathematics, natural science, social science, and foreign lan- 
guage. 

197 



Admissions 



Acceptance on Academic Probation 
1 98 ^ ^ either the high school GPA or ACT composite score is below the 
minimum requirements as stated above, the student may be ac- 
cepted on academic probationary status. 
B. Students accepted on academic probation may take no more than 
12 semester hours during the first semester. 

If both the high school GPA and the ACT composite score are below 
the minimum requirements (2.00 and 15 respectively), it will be neces- 
sary for the student to take a minimum of six semester hours (in solid 
courses) and maintain a college GPA of 2.25 before being accepted at 
Southern College. These six hours may be taken at Southern College 
during the summer (last session excluded) or at another accredited 
college. 

Applicants to freshman standing are expected to have the following 
minimum subjects in their secondary program: 

1. Three units of English, excluding journalism and speech. 

2. Two units of mathematics, including algebra. 

3. Two units of science. A college class in biology, chemistry, or 
physics must be taken in addition to general education require- 
ments if this condition is not met. 

4. Two units of social studies. If one of these two units is not World 
History, HIST 174, 175, 364, 365, 374, 375, 386 or 389 must be taken 
as part of the general education requirements. 

5. Two units in a foreign language for a B.A. degree are required. If 
deficient, one year of a foreign language at the college level will be 
required. 

6. One unit in typing is strongly recommended. 

ADMISSION TO THE NURSING DIVISION 

Students who wish to be admitted to nursing courses as freshmen or as 
transfer students should refer to the Nursing section of the Catalog for 
admission requirements. 

ADMISSION OF TRANSFER STUDENTS 

Students wishing to transfer to Southern College from another accred- 
ited college or university must follow the same application procedure as 
other students. Transfer credits may be applied toward the requirements 
for a degree when the student has satisfactorily completed a minimum of 
twelve semester hours in residence. Credit by examination taken at other 
colleges will be accepted according to Southern College standards (see 
pages 28 and 29). A maximum of seventy-two semester hours may be 
accepted from a junior college. Background deficiencies revealed by 
transcripts and entrance examinations will be given individual atten- 
tion. 



Admissions 

Credit will be granted for courses taken at institutions which are not 
regionally accredited only after the student has completed at least 16 | Qfl 
semester hours at Southern College with a 2.00 or better average. Only 
those courses that are comparable to Southern College courses, and for 
which the student has earned a "C" or better grade, will be accepted. 

A student who has been dismissed from another institution because of 
poor scholarship or citizenship, or who is on probation from that institu- 
tion, is not generally eligible for admission until he can qualify for 
readmission to the institution from which he has been dismissed. Trans- 
fer students must submit both their college and high school transcripts 
to the Admissions Office before being admitted to registration. 

ADMISSION OF SPECIAL STUDENTS 

Mature individuals who do not meet the above college admission 
requirements and who do not wish to become degree candidates or 
otherwise-qualified students who may desire limited credit for transfer 
to another institution of higher learning may register as special students. 

ADMISSION OF INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS 

An international student making application to Southern College 
must have completed the equivalent of a United States high school 
(secondary) education. The student is required to list only the institu- 
tions and dates attended on the application forms, but will not be 
accepted to Southern College until the college has received original 
records or official copies of all credits, degrees, diplomas and other 
credentials, with validation by school or national officials. These should 
be in the original language, accompanied by a translation (not an in- 
terpretation) in English, and certified by an American Embassy official if 
possible. 

The Vice President for Admissions of Southern College will evaluate 
academic documents received for international students based on the 
recommendations found in the World Education series of booklets pub- 
lished by the American Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admis- 
sions Officers and Patterns of Seventh-day Adventist Education, pub- 
lished by the General Conference of Seventh-day Adventists. 

Students from countries which administer the G.C.E, (General Certifi- 
cate of Education) examinations must have earned five (5) or more "0" 
level academic subject passes (generally at one sitting, with marks 1 
through 6 or A through D). Subjects must include English, a natural 
science, and three others selected from a second language, mathematics, 
science and social studies. 

Proficiency in English, both written and oral, must be proven before 
admission. This may be done by taking the English Language Profi- 
ciency Test (ELI) or Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). 
Students whose ELI score is below 90 or TOEFL score is below 550 will 



Admissions 



be required to take an eight (8) week Basic English Language Seminar 
O fill during the previous summer. Students must reach the above stated score 
* to be admitted to the college for the regular academic year. If admitted, 

after taking the Basic English Language Seminar students will be re- 
quired to enroll in ENGL 099. Southern College is not a bilingual institu- 
tion. 

In addition to the regular college expenses, there are other expenses 
for an international student. (Please refer to the Financial Information 
section of the Catalog.) 

International students should realize that according to U.S. Immigra- 
tion laws, overseas students are not permitted to work more than 20 
hours per week and may not be employed except on the college campus. 

It is important that an international student not leave his homeland 
until he or she receives an official letter of admission from Southern 
College. Such a letter will be issued only if the student's academic 
credentials are satisfactory, surety advance deposit has been made, and 
he is able to demonstrate his ability to finance his education at Southern 
College. Then the (Immigration) 1-20 form will be issued. 

When the student departs his homeland, he should have in his posses- 
sion: 

1. An admissions letter of acceptance from Southern College; 

2. 1-20 form; 

3. A valid passport; 

4. A valid visa to enter the United States; 

5. Sufficient funds for the first year at Southern College (in addition to 
the international surety deposit required of all non-U.S. citizens). 

APPLICATION PROCEDURE FOR ADMISSION 

► Prospective students should request application forms from the 
Office of Admissions. 

► Completed applications, budget sheets, and medical forms should 
be returned to the Office of Admissions with an application fee of 
$15 if the application is received at least six weeks before the 
beginning of the semester and $20 if after that. 

► It is the student's responsibility to request any former schools (high 
school and college) to forward transcripts to the Office of Admis- 
sions in support of the application. These will become the property 
of the college. NO TRANSCRIPT WILL BE ACCEPTED DIRECTLY 
FROM AN APPLICANT. 

► To permit a more effective program of counseling for admission, 
students transferring from another college or university with fewer 
than 55 semester hours and other students who have no college 






Admissions 

composition and/or mathematics courses will be required to take 

the ACT (American College Test) prior to registration at Southern 201 

College. 

► Upon receipt and evaluation of the application, transcripts of cred- 
its, recommendations, and test scores, the Admissions Committee 
will notify the applicant of the action taken. 

WHEN TO APPLY OR REAPPLY 

New students are urged to submit applications not later than the last 
term of the senior year of high school. Applications submitted at the 
beginning of the senior year will sometimes enable the college to suggest 
ways of strengthening the student's preparation. Because of the diffi- 
culty sometimes encountered during the summer months in obtaining 
necessary transcripts, test scores, and recommendations, more time will 
be necessary for processing late applications. 

Students in residence may submit re-applications without charge 
until April 30. Thereafter the regular application fee of $15 will be 
required until July 15, after which the fee becomes $20. 









Expenses 



202 



EXPENSES 

FINANCIAL BUDGET AND CAMPUS EMPLOYMENT 

Southern College strives to give every student the opportunity to 
obtain a Christian education. The administrators and Financial Aid 
Office personnel will make every effort to assist students in meeting 
their financial obligations in order to reach this goal. 

The Director of Financial Aid will assist in financial planning by 
helping students to obtain employment on the Collegedale campus (see 
labor regulations on page 211) and financial aid in the form of grants, 
loans, and scholarships. Before each registration EACH student must 
submit a payment agreement to the Student Accounts Office showing 
how he will finance his college expenses. 

Information on student costs and means of paying those costs is given 
below to assist the student in financial planning. 

STUDENT COSTS 

Tuition 1986-87: 

Tuition charges range from $1 79 to $198 per hour. Students taking one 
to twelve semester hours will be charged at the rate of $198 per hour. 
Students taking over twelve hours will be charged as follows: 



Total Hours 


Approximate Average 


Tuition Charge 


Per Semester 


Hourly Rate Per Semester 


Per Semester 


13 


194 


2520 


14 


189 


2644 


15 


184 


2768 


16 


181 


2892 


17 


180 


3062 


18 


180 


3232 


19 


179 


3402 


20 


179 


3572 



ESTIMATED STUDENT BUDGET 

Average Costs for Students One Both 

in Residence Halls: Semester Semesters 

Tuition (based on fifteen hours 

per semester) $2768 $5536 

Books, supplies, and miscellaneous 180 360 

Resident Hall 532 1064 

Food ($165 per month average) 700 1400 

TOTAL $4180* $8360* 
*Personal expenses not included. 



Expenses 



FAMILY REBATE 



When two students from the same immediate family are in attendance 
at SC each taking eight semester hours or more and having the same 
financial sponsor, a tuition rebate of 5 percent will be applied to each 
statement. A 10 percent rebate will be applied when three or more 
students have the same financial sponsor and are taking eight or more 
semester hours each. Application forms for this rebate will be available 
at the Student Accounts Office. 



MUSIC 

Private music lessons are offered for academic credit by the music 
faculty of Southern College and qualified teaching instructors (contract 
teachers) from the Chattanooga area. Private lessons without academic 
credit are offered through the prep program of the Music Division to 
elementary and secondary students in the area. Teaching in the prep 
program is done by contract teachers and Southern College music stu- 
dents. 

Enrollment for all music instruction must be for a full semester 
whether or not credit is desired. A minimum of twelve one-half hour 
lessons will be provided. No refund of tuition or lesson fees will be made 
after four weeks following registration. 

MUSIC LESSON FEES 

Private music lessons may be taken on a credit or noncredit basis. A 
student will receive thirteen half-hour lessons per semester for one hour 
of credit. The cost of such lessons is the regular tuition plus a $90 music 
lesson fee per semester. 

The noncredit music lesson fee is $210 for thirteen half-hour lessons 
per semester. 

Teachers are not expected to make up lessons missed because of 
unexcused absences. 

Music majors who have obtained Freshman standing in their major 
performance area, who are taking or have completed MUCT 111:112; 
and who are in good and regular standing as music majors will have the 
music lesson fee waived. 

Prep program students must register at the Department of Music 
office, pay in full at the Cashier's Office, and bring the receipt to the 
Music Department office prior to scheduling lessons. 

SPECIAL FEES AND CHARGES 

The following special fees and charges are assessed separately inas- 
much as they may not apply to all students nor do they occur regularly: 



203 



Expenses 



Application for admission (not refundable) $15.00 

2flJ[ Automobile parking fee (per semester) — dormitory 30.00 

fcilf 1 Automobile parking fee (per semester) — village 20.00 

Motorcycle parking fee 20.00 

Change of program 10.00 

Credit by examination (per hour) Recording Fee 25.00 

Examinations: 

Challenge or waiver 40.00 

CLEP v 30.00 

Rescheduling mid-term or final * 50.00 

Graduation in absentia 40.00 

Incomplete 5.00 

Industrial Education 

(approximate amount for tools and equipment) 200.00 

Insufficient funds check 15.00 

Late Registration 25.00 

Late return of organizational uniform 15.00 

(The full cost will be charged if irreparably 
damaged or not returned.) 

Scuba .■ 85.00 

Student insurance 115.00 

Spouse insurance 172.50 

Child/children insurance 172.50 

Nursing education fees*: 

Associate degree (per semester) 162.50 

Baccalaureate degree 

(after completing Assoc. Degree) (per year) 150.00 

* Declared nursing majors enrolled in a nursing class. 
STATEMENT CHARGES 

The following items may be charged to the student's account: 

a. Books and required school supplies (maximum $200 first semes- 
ter and $160 second semester). When a student reaches the 
maximum during the semester, all further books and supplies 
must be paid in cash. 

b. Private music instruction. Enrollment for all music instruction 
must be made through the Admissions Office for a full semester 
whether or not credit is desired. One semester hour of private 
music instruction consists of twelve one-half hour lessons. Re- 
funds will be granted only when the instructor is not available for 
lessons. 









HOUSING 

Residence HaJJ Costs 

Dormitory accommodations for single students cost $1064 for the 
eight-month school year and are charged on a semester basis in August 
and January. Room charges are based on two students occupying one 
room and include health and infirmary care. 

A student may, upon application to the residence hall dean, be al- 
lowed to room alone at an additional cost of $120 per semester if suffi- 
cient rooms are available. 

No refunds are made for vacation periods or absences from the cam- 
pus. If a student drops classwork, a prorated portion of the semester 
charge beginning with the date of nonoccupancy of the room will be 
refunded. 

Room Deposits 

A $100 room deposit, paid at time of application, is required of each 
dormitory student enrolling at Southern College. It should be paid 
initially by July 1 in order to insure a specific room reservation. The 
deposit will then be held by the college for the entire period including 
summers during which the student lives in a residence hall while at- 
tending the college and will insure a room for the student when he 
returns each fall. 

If a student gives notice before July 1 that he will not be attending, his 
room deposit will be refunded. The room deposit will not be refunded 
after August 1. Damage or cleaning charges may also be charged to the 
student's account at the end of each academic year if necessary. 

Married Student Housing Costs 

College-owned apartments and mobile homes may be rented by mar- 
ried students taking a minimum of six hours each semester. The apart- 
ments range in size from two to six rooms and are unfurnished. Rents 
range from $100 to $220 per month. Trailer space is available at $75 per 
month in the College Mobile Home Park for married students with their 
own trailer. Moving and parking charges are the responsibility of the 
owner. Storage facilities are available for an additional $8 per month. 

Rent charges are based on the date of issue and return of keys and 
proper clearance with the Housing Manager (Business Manager's Of- 
fice). Married students renting either an apartment or a trailer from the 
college will be required to pay a housing deposit of $125 of which $50 is 
due with the housing application and the remaining $75 at the time the 
apartment or trailer is rented. This deposit will be refunded after ap- 
proval by the Housing Manager if the apartment or trailer is left clean 
and undamaged. 



Expenses 
205 



Expenses 






FOOD SERVICE 

The cafeteria plan of boarding allows the student the privilege of 
choosing food and paying for what is selected. Board charges for stu- 
dents vary greatly. Students are encouraged to eat healthfully by avoid- 
ing between-meal snacks and by eating at the cafeteria or the Campus 
Kitchen where balanced meals are provided. Dormitory students will be 
charged a minimum of $75 per month. Maximum allowable cafeteria 
charge will be $190 per month. Exceptions must be cleared through the 
Student Accounts Office. 

ADVANCE PAYMENTS 

Regular: An advance payment of $750 is required before registration. 
For students residing in any dormitory housing, an additional $100 is I 
due before moving in. For new students entering second semester the 
advance payment is $500, and all other appropriate charges are applica- j 
ble. When a married couple enrolls for a combined total of seventeen 
semester hours or less of classwork, they will be charged only one 
advance payment. The advance payment is credited back to the stu- i 
dent's March account The advance payment with interest at the rate of 
9% per annum from the date of payment will be credited to the student's ] 
account when the payment is refunded 

International Students: In addition to the regular advance payment j 
listed above, international students are required to pay the following: 
Supplemental International Student Payment: $3,000 is required ! 
to be paid before an Immigration 1-20 form will be issued. It will be 
held until the student terminates study at Southern College. This 
deposit is not a part of, but in addition to, the regular deposit required 
of all students entering Southern College. 

Nursing Students: Upon acceptance to the clinical nursing program, 
students are required to send a nursing deposit of $175. If a student 
applies for the nursing program but does not attend the college, or 
changes their major, the deposit is refundable if the Division of Nursing 
is notified by August 1. After August 1, the nursing deposit is not 
refundable. 

ADVENTIST COLLEGES ABROAD FINANCIAL POLICY 

Students wishing to study abroad under the Adventist Colleges 
Abroad (ACA) program must pay $100 with their admission application 
and sign the payment agreement in the Student Accounts Office stating 
that the required ACA charges for the year will be paid to Southern 
College before departure from the states. 



Expenses 



METHOD OF PAYMENT 

Community students and residence hall students may choose one of 
the three methods of payment below. 

Payment Plan I. Cash in Advance. When the total estimated charges 
for tuition (minimum 6 hours), room, and board for a semester are paid in 
cash at registration, a discount of FIVE percent is allowed on this cash 
payment. Amounts paid as a result of student loans, grants, or scholar- 
ships are excluded from the amount on which the discount is allowed. 
Students choosing to pay cash in advance must bring with them at 
registration time the full amount required by the plan for the semester, 
less any advance payments or credits. They will also need to bring 
sufficient funds for purchase of books and personal items. 

Payment Plan II. Contract with Southern College. Students desiring to 
pay educational expenses in installments on a monthly basis may choose 
this plan. 

Monthly statements will be issued about the fifth day of each calendar 
month. Cafeteria charges will be charged through the last day of each 
month. Accounts are due and payable upon receipt of statement accord- 
ing to the following schedule: 



207 



August statement 



September statement 



October statement 



ONE-THIRD of (total charges less 
financial aid) less credits upon 
receipt of statement 

ONE-HALF of (total charges less fi- 
nancial aid) less credits upon re- 
ceipt of statement 

TOTAL BALANCE of statement is 
due in full BEFORE semester 
examination permits will be is- 
sued. 



Past Due Date 



September 20 



October 20 



November 20 



Students with unpaid accounts on the 20th of the month will be 
subject to cancellation of registration and/or ID cards invalidated until 
account is current. 

The above schedule of payment must be maintained since the college 
budget is based upon 100 percent collection of student charges. 

A student cannot take semester examinations or register for a new 
semester until the account is current according to the preceding regula- 
tions. No transcript will be issued for a student whose account is not paid 
in full or who is delinquent in payment of student loans. No exceptions 
will be made. 

The second semester statements and payment schedule will follow the 
same procedure as the first semester with the student's advance payment 
applied to the March statement. 



Expenses 



Past Due Date 



Oil ft January statement ONE-THIRD of (total charges less 

&*"** financial aid) less credits upon 

receipt of statement February 20 

February statement ONE-HALF of (total charges less fi- 

nancial aid) less credits upon re- 
ceipt of statement March 20 
March statement TOTAL BALANCE of statement is 

due in full BEFORE semester 
examination permits will be is- 
sued. April 20 

Payment Plan III. Contract with New Insured Tuition Payment Plan or 
Tuition Plan, Inc. Students and parents desiring to pay educational 
expenses in monthly installments and to have the advantages of cash 
payment with the college may select a low-cost deferred payment pro- 
gram available through either the New Insured Tuition Payment Plan or 
Tuition Plan, Inc. The student's education is protected with life and 
disability insurance on the parents. For more information about the Plan, 
write to the Director of Student Financial Aid. 

After considering the discount allowed by the college, the following 
benefits are realized at little, if any, cost to those entering under either 
plan: 

1. A five percent cash discount is allowed each student entering 
under Payment Plan III if the college receives payment for the 
student at its regular disbursement time each semester. 

2. The payments may be reduced to a minimum by being spread over 
12 months or, in the case of a four-year contract, up to 96 months. 

3. The contract may be cancelled at any time without penalty. 

4 . The account may be insured. In the event of death or total disability 
of the person responsible for payments, the balance of an insured 
contract is paid in full. 

At the time of figuring the contracts, students may choose to include in 
their contract sufficient cash to cover books, fees, school supplies, etc. 
Any items not included in the contract plan chosen must be paid for in 
cash at the time they are received or arranged. 

The plan is open to employed parents and bona fide sponsors, and all 
arrangements should be made several months before registration in 
order to be assured of the five percent discount. Sufficient cash must also 
be brought to cover items not included in the contract. 

Those desiring further information covering these deferred payment 
plans may contact the Director of Student Financial Aid. 

REFUND POLICY 

Complete Withdrawal from Classes 

A student who withdraws from all schoolwork during the semester 



Expenses 

will receive a tuition refund based on the date the completed withdrawal 
form with all the required signatures is filed with the Records Office. 2HQ 
Tuition refunds are calculated as follows: " ** 

First five (5) school days of the semester 95% 

Sixth through 37th school day of the semester 3% less per day 

No refunds after the 37th school day of the semester. 

Registration Changes 

Refunds of tuition for semester hours dropped are made according to 

the date the drop form with all the required signatures is filed with the 

Records Office. Tuition refunds are calculated as follows: 
First five (5) school days of the semester 95% 

Sixth through 24th school day of the semester 5% less per day 

No refunds after the 24th school day of the semester. 

Shortened School Term (Summer or Other) Withdrawals and Changes 
Tuition refunds for classes dropped in a summer, or other session less 
than a semester in length, will be prorated on a base of one-half of the 
number of school days in the school term. 

CREDIT REFUND POLICY 

Credit balances are refundable, on request, 30 days after the monthly 
statement is received for the last month the student was in school in 
order to be certain that all charges have been processed. For example , if a 
student drops out of school in December, a full credit refund would not 
be made until after the January statement is prepared during the first 
week of February. When the credit balance is large, a portion may be 
refunded earlier upon request to the Student Accounts Office. 

If the student has received financial aid during the current semester, 
any credit balance will be credited to the aid funds, according to the 
Financial Aid Refund Policy (see page 217). Cash refunds will not be 
made to the student without authorization from the parent or financial 
sponsor. 

COLLECTION POLICY 

Students completing or terminating their studies with the college are 
requested to make arrangements for payment of unpaid accounts. If 
arrangements are not made within 120 days after a student leaves South- 
ern College, the unpaid account balance will be turned over to a collec- 
tion agency or attorney. Prompt payment of accounts build credit ratings 
which will be important to you in the future, since the college will report 
delinquent accounts to the Credit Bureau systems. 



Expenses 



INTEREST 

Currently enrolled students will be charged interest at a rate of % of 1 % 
per month (9% APR) on any past-due balance still outstanding by the 
end of the month wherein payment is due. 

A carrying charge of 1% per month (12% APR) will be added to all 
unpaid balances of 60 days or more for students not enrolled in school. 

HEALTH INSURANCE 

Southern College requires that students be covered by health insur- 
ance. Students who are already covered with a similar insurance plan 
may during registration make a request of Health Service to be excluded i 
from the student group health insurance. Such students will need to \ 
supply, at that time, written evidence ;from their parent's employer or 
local insurance agent which contains the company name and policy 
number under which they are covered, otherwise, coverage must be j 
purchased through the college health insurance plan. 

BANKRUPTCY 

Recognizing that the discharge of a debt through bankruptcy proceed- I 
ings prohibits a creditor from subsequently pursuing the collection of J 
the debt, the college, upon notification of such discharge of a student's 1 
current school or loan account(s), complies with this legal prohibition. I 
At the same time such discharge in bankruptcy does not require further 
performance of service by the creditor and, therefore, a student who has 
had debts to the college discharged in this manner may not receive a 
transcript of academic work or additional Financial Aid at the college 
until the debt is paid. 

TRANSCRIPTS, DIPLOMAS AND TEST SCORES 

It is the policy of the college to withhold transcripts, diplomas, test : 
scores, certificates of completion, and other records if a student has an 
unpaid account at the school, or any unpaid account for which the 
college has co-signed. To expedite the release of these documents, the | 
student should send a money order or certified check to cover the 
balance of the account when requesting the documents. Under provi* I 
sions of federal loan programs Southern College withholds any records 
when payments for these loans become past due or in default. 



NON-LIABILITY FOR PERSONAL EFFECTS 

When determining what to bring on campus, please remember that the 
college is not responsible for the personal effects of any student even 
though such effects may be required by the college for student use, or 



Expenses 

required by the college to be stored in a designated location. College- 
carried insurance does not insure the personal effects of any individual. 1 
The college recommends that students consider carrying insurance to 
cover such losses. 

WORKER'S COMPENSATION INSURANCE 

As provided by the laws of the State of Tennessee, the college carries 
worker's compensation insurance to protect all employees in case of 
work-connected accidents. 

BANKING AND CASH WITHDRAWALS 

The Accounting Office operates a no-charge deposit banking service 
for the convenience of the student. Financial sponsors should provide 
students with sufficient funds through the banking service to cover the 
cost of personal items of an incidental nature and travel expenses off 
campus including vacation periods. Withdrawals may be made by the 
student in person only as long as there is a credit balance. These deposit 
accounts are entirely separate from the student's regular school expense 
account. 

Each student should bring approximately $180 for books and miscel- 
laneous supplies at the beginning of each semester if he desires to pay 
cash for these items. 

STUDENT LABOR REGULATIONS 

Work opportunities for students are available in departments and 
industries operated by the college and local private businesses. These 
employing agencies must serve their customers daily, necessitating a 
uniform work force. Student employees are responsible for meeting all 
work appointments, including during examination weeks, and to main- 
tain satisfactory job performance. Work superintendents reserve the 
right to dismiss students if their service and work record is unsatisfac- 
tory. Should a student find it necessary to be absent from work, he must 
make arrangements with his work superintendent and Student Health 
Service if he is ill. 

Residence hall students are given preference in the assignment of 
work. Student Employment Office personnel will assist students in 
finding jobs providing the student arranges a class schedule that allows 
"blocks" of time for work, is physically able and willing to accept any job 
offer since the college is unable to provide "preference" work. Students 
must be enrolled for a minimum of six semester hours to be eligible for 
campus work. 

When a student accepts employment, he is expected to retain it for the 
entire semester except in cases where changes are recommended by the 



Expenses 

school nurse or Student Employment Office. Should a student receive 
212 °PP° r * :un i t i es f° r rciore favorable employment during a school term, the 
transfer must be made through the Student Employment Office and the 
two employing organizations. If a student's financial plan requires him 
to work, he must NOT drop his work schedule without making proper 
arrangements with the Student Employment Office. To do so could 
result in suspension from class attendance and invalidation of ID card 
until proper arrangements are made. 

The student pay rate is not less than student rates set by the govern- 
ment wage-hour law. It may be higher if a student possesses special 
skills or training and shows responsibility and consistency. 

The following table is an example of earnings for students who work 
30 weeks during the school year. 



Hours Worked 


Wage 


Total Earnir 


Per Week 


Per Hour 


For Year 


10 


$3.35 


$1,005 


10 


$3.50 


$1,050 


10 


$4.00 


$1,200 


10 


$4.35 


$1,305 


15 


$3.35 


$1,507 


15 


$3.50 


$1,575 


15 


$4.00 


$1,800 


15 


$4.35 


$1,958 


20 


$3.35 


$2,010 


20 


$3.50 


$2,100 


20 


$4.00 


$2,400 


20 


$4.35 


$2,610 



Students may also work off campus with permission from the Vice j 
President for Student Services. Permission will not be granted for off- 
campus employment that could be detrimental to a student's health or 
character development. 

WORK INCENTIVE SCHOLARSHIP 

In order for a student to qualify for a $200.00 work incentive scholar* 
ship, the student must meet the following criteria: 

1. Work at least 12 hours per week and 180 hours per semester be- 
tween the hours of 6:00 a.m. and 12:00 noon. 

2. All work must be performed in at least 3-hour blocks at an on- 
campus employer or at an off-campus non-profit agency (wortei 
study). 

3. The student must take at least 8 hours of academic credit (whiclj 
can be anytime of the day) at Southern College. 



I 



Expenses 



4. All academic course work for the semester in addition to the 8 
hours must also be taken at Southern College. 

5. The bonus must be applied for at the end of the semester and 
approved by the work superintendent. 

6. The approval of this bonus will be processed by the labor office and 
also approved by the Financial Aid Office. 

7. This bonus is based on the assumption that a job is available and the 
student meets all of the above criteria. 

8. The work incentive scholarship is in addition to the regular hourly 
wage received. 

9. Southern College in no way guarantees that there will be enough 
jobs to meet the criteria of 1 and 2. Since there are a limited number 
of jobs in the morning, it is up to the student and the work superin- 
tendent to work out a work schedule that satisfactorily meets these 
criteria. 

LABOR FOR FOREIGN STUDENTS 

Foreign students on non-immigrant visas are required by law to secure 
permission before accepting any off-campus employment. Foreign stu- 
dents with student visas are allowed to work on campus up to twenty 
hours a week. Wives may work only if they have student visas of their 
own or have immigrant visas. 

STUDENT TITHING 

SC encourages the payment of tithe and church expense by its student 
workers. In order to facilitate this practice, arrangements may be made 
by the student (except for those employed in the Federal Work-Study 
Program) to have ten percent of his school earnings charged to his 
account as tithe and two percent for church expense. These funds are 
then transferred by the college to the treasurer of the Collegedale 
Seventh-day Adventist Church. 

HALF-PRICE TUITION PLAN 

A special half-price tuition plan has been established for bac- 
calaureate graduates who wish to continue studies at Southern College 
in order to pursue another major, enter a pre-professional program, or 
update their skills. The provisions that apply are: 

1. To be eligible for tuition at half price, students must have earned a 
bachelor's degree from an accredited college or university and have 
a clear transcript, with accounts and loan payments up to date with 
the college or university. 

2. Regular admission criteria apply to this program. Completed ap- 



Financial Aid 



plications, college transcripts, and recommendations must be on 
file in the Admissions Office of Southern College no later than two 
weeks prior to the beginning of the semester for which the graduate 
is applying. 

3. Students wishing financial aid must apply through the Financial 
Aid Office. 

4. This plan is applicable to classes where space is available and 
where the hiring of new faculty or staff is not required. The half- 
price offer does not include private music lessons, independent 
study, directed study, student teaching, internships, or a program 
where a tuition discount is already in effect. 

5. Since the half-price offer is for tuition only, it does not apply to lab 
fees, surcharges for applicable courses, dormitory charges, or 
cafeteria charges. 

6. Southern College reserves the right to discontinue this special 
tuition offer at the discretion of the college administration. 



FINANCIAL AID 

Southern College provides financial aid for students in the form of 
loans, grants, scholarships, and employment. No applicant for financial 
aid will be denied assistance on the basis of sex, race, color, national 
origin, or ethnic group. The Financial Aid Office follows established 
procedures and practices which will assure equitable and consistent 
treatment of all applicants. 

Students are urged to contact the Director of Student Financial Aid, 
P.O. Box 370, Collegedale, Tennessee 37315-0370, for information about 
and applications for financial aid. Applications received by May 30 will 
be given preference. Applications received after May 30 will be proc- 
essed as long as time and funds permit. 

General Requirements. Financial aid awards are made for one 
academic year to students who are accepted for admission, plan to take at 
least twelve semester hours of classwork each semester, and dem- 
onstrate financial need. Class load exceptions must be approved by the 
Financial Aid Office. Recipients of government aid must hold U.S. 
citizenship or a permanent visa. (Visa documents must be presented 
upon request.) Students desiring aid must reapply each year. 

Financial Need Requirements. The financial aid program is adminis- 
tered in conjunction with the nationally-established policy and 
philosophy which is that the parents are the primary and responsible 
source for helping a student to meet his educational costs. Financial aid 
is available to help fill the gap between the student's own resources 



Financial Aid 



(parental contribution, summer earnings, and savings) and the total cost 
of attending Southern College. The amount of parental contribution is 
based on the family's net income, number of dependents, allowable 
expenses, indebtedness, and assets. The Family Financial Need 
Analysis from the American College Testing Program or College Schol- 
arship Service is used in determining a student's eligibility for financial 
aid. 

Exceptions to the financial need requirements are private scholar- 
ships awarded on the basis of academic achievement 

Academic Requirements. In order to be eligible for financial aid, 
recipient must maintain satisfactory academic progress. Satisfactory 
academic progress is defined as maintaining a cumulative and resident 
grade point average of 2.0. If a student does not maintain satisfactory 
academic progress or fails to attend classes, prepare and submit required 
classwork, or take required examinations, financial aid will be sus- 
pended. 

If a student whose financial aid has been suspended for any of the 
above reasons feels that unusual and unavoidable circumstances led to 
this suspension, the suspension may be appealed to the Loan and Schol- 
arship Committee. This policy is generally applied to financial aid from 
institutional and private sources as well as federal programs. 



SOUTHERN COLLEGE ACADEMIC PROGRESS FOR 
FEDERAL AND INSTITUTIONAL STUDENT FINANCIAL AID 

To be eligible for Federal and/or Institutional financial aid, a student 
must maintain measurable satisfactory academic progress. Students are 
expected to: 

1 . Complete a minimum of 25 semester hours per award year, (July 1 - 
June 30). This will allow up to 5 years maximum for completion of a 
4-year degree, and 3 years maximum to complete a 2-year degree. 

2. Maintain a minimum Southern College and cumulative GPA of 
2.00. 

Financial Aid Academic Probation Policy 

1. Students who fail to maintain "Satisfactory Academic Progress" 
will be placed on financial aid probation the following semester. 
The recipient must appear before a financial aid counselor before 
aid will be released for the probationary semester. This aid is 
subject to adjustment or cancellation. 

2. A minimum Southern College and cumulative 2.00 GPA must be 
attained by the end of the probation semester or financial aid will 
be suspended. 



Financial Aid 






Procedure for Appeal and Reinstatement 0/ Financial Aid 

Students may submit a written appeal to the Financial Aid Committee 
describing the circumstances which attributed to their failure to make 
academic progress. This appeal must also include an outlined program 
of commitment to meet measurable satisfactory academic requirements. 
When financial aid is suspended, a request for reinstatement may be 
made when the student has completed a minimum of 12 additional 
semester hours with a minimum 2.50 GPA, or when Southern College 
and overall GPA has been brought up to 2.00. 

Provisions for Transfer Students 

Financial aid for students transferring from other institutions will be 
determined by their academic standing, which will be calculated on all 
hours they have attempted. A student with a minimum grade point 
average of 2.00 will be eligible for aid. Students with an average below 
2.00 will be on financial aid probation provided they were eligible for 
continuing aid at the, institution from which they transferred. 

If financial aid had been suspended at the previous institution, they 
must follow Southern College procedure for appeal and reinstatement of 
financial aid. 

FINANCIAL AID APPLICATION PROCEDURES 

To apply for all types of financial aid, the following documents must 
be submitted annually for the federal, state, and institutional aid pro- 
grams: 

1. The Family Financial Statement (FFS) of the American College 
Testing Program or the Financial Aid Form (FAF) of the College 
Scholarship Service. 

2. The Southern College application for financial aid. 

3. Southern College admissions application. 

4. The financial aid transcript (required only of students who at- 
tended other colleges or universities before coming to Southern 
College). 

5. Copies of parents' income tax return (exact signed copies of all 
schedules and W-2 forms sent to IRS) for the preceding calendar 
year. (Required of dependent students only). 

6. Copies of student income tax return including W-2 forms. 

7. Guaranteed Student Loan applications from home town lender. 
(Southern College has arranged for last resort lenders for students 
whose home town lenders do not participate in the GSL program or 
for any reason refuse to make the loan), 

Applications are available in January of each year and may be obtained 
by contacting Southern College Financial Aid Office. Students are urged 
to complete applications as early as possible after the family income tax 






Financial Aid 



returns have been completed. Income tax returns only have to be com- 
pleted, not necessarily mailed to IRS before submitting the financial aid 217 
application. 

Financial Aid Award Procedures 

Financial aid awards are made on a rolling basis, as long as funds are 
available, with the neediest students receiving priority of funds. The 
financial aid award package will usually consist of: 1) work, 2) loan, 3) 
grant or scholarship. 

An official award notice will be sent to each applicant. To confirm and 
reserve the funds offered, the student must return the signed acceptance 
of the award within ten days of receipt of award letter. 

Disbursement of Financial Aid Funds 

Financial aid awards are disbursed equally at the beginning of each 
semester. Students must sign vouchers, and other documents necessary 
to have funds released to statements, at the disbursement office in 
Wright Hall. Funds cannot be credited to student statements until this 
procedure is followed. 

Financial Aid Overatvards 

When financial aid recipients receive additional resources not in- 
cluded in the financial aid award letter, they must be reported to the 
Office of Student Financial Aid. Federal Regulations prohibit "over- 
awards" therefore, when total of all resources exceed the allowable 
student budget, financial aid awards must be adjusted. When financial 
aid funds have already been credited to the student's statement, any 
refunds due or overawards will be charged to the student's account. 

STUDENT FINANCIAL AID REFUND AND REPAYMENT POLICIES 

Financial Aid Re/und Policy 

The refund policy for students withdrawing from classes is outlined 
on pages 208 and 209. 

Since financial aid is considered to be used first for direct educational 
costs (tuition, books, room, and board), when a student withdraws from 
classes and under the refund policy receives a refund of tuition and room 
rent, the refund will be used to reimburse the financial aid credited to the 
student account. The allocation of the refund will be applied as follows 
(according to the refund formula): 

1. SUPPLEMENTAL EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITY GRANT 

2. NATIONAL DIRECT STUDENT LOAN 

3. GUARANTEED STUDENT LOAN 

4. PARENT STUDENT LOAN 

5. PELL GRANT 

6. STATE GRANT 



financial Aid 



218 



7. INSTITUTIONAL SCHOLARSHIPS AND LOANS 

8. PRIVATE SCHOLARSHIPS 

9. PARENTS/STUDENT 

Refund Formula: 

Total amount of Federal and State financial aid 
(excluding employment) awarded for period 

Total amount of all financial aid awarded for 
period (excluding employment) 

Rationale for Allocation of Refund and Repayment Formula 
According to the order of allocation: 

1. Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant — These funds are 
very limited and can be re-awarded to needy students who may 
have had to take two loans due to the lack of grant funds. 

2. National Direct Student Loan — To reduce the amount of debt to 
the student, and the recovery of funds can be re-awarded to other j 
needy students. 

3. Guaranteed Student Loan — It is to the student's advantage to 
reduce the amount of debt that will have to be repaid. 

4. Parent Loans — These loans are obtained by parents generally to 
offset or reduce their expected contribution. 

5. Pell Grants are from an entitlement program and cannot be re- 
awarded. 

6. Recipients of State Grants are generally recipients of Pell Grants, i 

7. Institutional scholarships and loan funds are very limited, there- 
fore these funds can be re-allocated to other students. 

8. Private scholarships are usually based on achievement and not 
need. 

9. Parents and students are primarily responsible for educational 
expenses. 

Financial Aid Repayment Policy 

There are specific repayment policies for students who withdraw and ] 
have received financial aid in excess of direct educational costs. An 
example would be the student who received Guaranteed Student Loan, j 
and did not use the full amount for educational costs. A student owing a 
repayment to any Federally funded student aid program cannot receive 
any type of Federal student aid for future enrollment periods until 
repayments have been made. 

VETERANS 

Southern College is approved for the training of veterans as an accred* 
ited training institution. Those who qualify for educational benefits 
should contact the nearest Veterans Administration office. 

Veterans or other eligible persons are required to attend classes in 



Financial Aid 



order to be eligible for educational benefits. Southern College is required 
to report promptly to the V.A. the last day of attendance when an eligible 
student withdraws or stops attending classes regularly. 

A recipient may not receive benefits for any course that does not fulfill 
requirements for his stated degree and major. Audited courses, non- 
credit courses (except for a required remedial course), and correspond- 
ence work cannot be certified. 

Educational benefits will be discontinued when the recipient accumu- 
lates twelve semester hours of failing and "D M grades in the major, 
minor, and courses required for educational certification or when he is 
subject to academic dismissal. (See page 28.) Benefits may be resumed 
only after the individual has obtained V.A. counseling and approval. 

TYPES OF FINANCIAL AID 

Scholarships 

General Institutional Scholarships 

Southern College institutional scholarships are awarded from 29 dif- 
ferent scholarship funds to students who have financial need, are 
achieving academically, and are working part time. These awards usu- 
ally range from $200 to $1,000 per year depending upon the student's 
need and availability of funds. 

The following scholarships are awarded to eligible students regard- 
less of financial need: 

ACADEMIC SCHOLARSHIPS are awarded to incoming freshmen who 
graduate with a 3.50 or higher GPA from academies or secondary 
schools, are recommended by their faculty, and enroll at Southern Col- 
lege for a minimum of twelve semester hours. 

LEADERSHIP SCHOLARSHIPS of $400 are awarded to incoming 
freshmen who have served as S.A. President, S.A. Vice-President, S.A. 
Spiritual Vice-President, Senior Class President, Yearbook Editor, 
School Paper Editor, and enroll at Southern College for a minimum of 
twelve semester hours. A student who has held more than one leader- 
ship position will receive one leadership award of $500. 

NATIONAL ACADEMIC RECOGNITION AWARDS are awarded to 
finalists in the National Merit contest in the amount of $1,200 and 
semi-finalists are awarded $800. Students must enroll at Southern Col- 
lege for a minimum of twelve semester hours. A student who is a 
recipient of a NARA will not be eligible to also receive an academic 
scholarship. It will be one or the other — whichever is greater, plus $100. 

ACT SCHOLARSHIPS — Incoming freshmen with a composite score 
of 25-28 are eligible for a $600 award if they maintain a college GPA of 
3.00 each semester of the first year they are enrolled at Southern College. 
Incoming freshmen with a composite score of 29-36 are eligible for a 



Financial Aid 



$750 award if they maintain a college GPA of 3.25 each semester of the 
first year they are enrolled at Southern College. Students must enroll at 
Southern College for a minimum of twelve semester hours. An ACT 
Scholarship will be given only if the student does not qualify for an 
Academic Scholarship. 

SUMMER CAMP SCHOLARSHIPS — Students participating in 
conference-sponsored summer camp programs will receive credit from 
Southern College for 33.33 percent of the net amount receipted to the 
student's statement. 

Grants 

THE PELL GRANT PROGRAM is a federal program which provides 
grant assistance directly to eligible first-degree undergraduate students. 
A student's eligibility for a Pell Grant is based on a congressionally- 
approved formula which considers family financial circumstances. 

SUPPLEMENTAL EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITY GRANT — Lim- 
ited funds are available to students with exceptional financial need. 

STATE STUDENT INCENTIVE GRANTS — These grants are made 
possible from federal and state funds to the residents of Alaska, Connect- 
icut, Delaware, District of Columbia, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, 
New Jersey, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Tennessee, Ver- 
mont, Washington, and West Virginia. Check with your state grant 
agency for additional information. 

Loans 

NATIONAL DIRECT STUDENT LOAN — Under this program, stu- 
dents can borrow money from the federal government, through the 
school. Repayment and 5 percent interest begin six months after a 
student graduates, leaves school, or drops below half-time enrollment. 

FEDERAL NURSING STUDENT LOANS are available to nursing stu- 
dents only. Repayment and six percent interest begin six months after a 
student graduates, leaves school, or drops below half-time enrollment. 

GUARANTEED STUDENT LOANS are available through lending 
agencies in each of the states. A student may borrow from a bank, savings 
and loan association, credit union, or other lender, and the state agency 
will guarantee the loan. A student whose family adjusted gross income is 
$30,000 or less may, without undergoing a financial needs test, borrow 
up to $2,500 per year to a total of $12,500 for undergraduate study. When 
income levels are greater than $30,000 the student must meet a "needs" 
test, The federal government pays the interest on the loan while the 
student is in school. Repayment and 8 percent interest begin six months 
after a student graduates, leaves school, or drops below half-time en- 
rollment. 

PARENT LOANS (PLUS) — A parent or self-supporting student may 
borrow from a bank or other lender and a state or private non-profit 






Financial Aid 



agency will guarantee the loan. A parent may borrow $3,000 per year to a 

limit of $15,000. Repayment and 12 percent interest being 60 days 221 

following the date of loan disbursement. 

Repayment Example 

Amount Monthly 

of loan Based on Payments* 

1st year $3,000 5 yrs. $ 66.73 

2nd year $3,000 7 yrs. $105.91 

3rd year $3,000 10 yrs. $129.12 

4th year $3,000 10 yrs. $172.16 
* Monthly payment includes cumulative principle and interest. 

Work 

COLLEGE WORK-STUDY PROGRAM — Under the work-study pro- 
gram, the employer pays a small part of the student's wages, and the 
government pays the rest. Most work-study positions are on campus. 
Students can work part time while they are in school, and they can work 
full time during the summer and other vacation periods. The basic pay 
rate is usually the current minimum wage; this may vary depending on 
the skill and experience needed for the job. 

OTHER GRANTS, LOANS, AND SCHOLARSHIPS 

The following grants, loans, and scholarships are available to students 
meeting the above requirements or having exceptional academic 
achievement. Details concerning amounts and qualifications for recip- 
ients of these funds can be obtained from the Director of Student Fi- 
nance. 

Alumni Worthy Student Fund for juniors and seniors. 

Alvin Christensen Memorial Loan Fund for junior or senior biology or 
natural science majors. 

Appalachian Nursing Scholarship Fund for nursing students from the 
Appalachian Mountain region. 

Anton Julius Swenson Loan Fund. 

Burdick Scholarship Fund. 

Business Administration Scholarship Fund. 

Cartinhour Foundation Scholarship and Loan Fund. 

Chatlos Foundation Scholarship Fund for Florida nursing students. 

Conger Memorial Fund for education majors or minors. 

D. W. Hunter Scholarship and Loan Fund for theology students. 

Daina Griffin Nursing Scholarship Fund. 

DeWitt and Josie Bowen Scholarship Fund for graduating seniors from 
Bass Memorial Academy. 



Financial Aid 



Doctor Ambrose L. Suhrie Scholarship for elementary teachers. 

Dora McCJeJJan Brown Scholarship Fund for theology majors. 

Dorothy and Harold Moody Scholarship Award for junior or senior 
history majors. 

Edith Munn Nursing Loan Fund for nursing students from Kentucky- 
Tennessee Conference. 

Edythe Stephenson Cothren Vocal Music Scholarship Fund for 
junior/senior voice majors or minors. 

Southern College Century II Endowment Fund. 

Frankie Collins Loan Fund for ministerial students. 

George Alden Nursing Scholarship Fund for Massachusetts nursing 
students. 

George B. and Olivia Dean Scholarship Fund for education majors. 

George White Scholarship Fund. 

Harry H. Goggans Scholarship Fund. 

Henson Nursing Scholarship Fund. 

Irad C. Levering Loan Fund for elementary and secondary education 
major$. 

Joseph Schermerhorn Memorial Loan Fund for students planning to 
serve as doctors, nurses, ministers, or teachers. 

K. W. Grader Nursing Scholarship Fund for Florida nursing students. 

Linda Beardsley Stevens Memorial Loan Fund for nursing students. 

Louise Hurt Memorial Scholarship Fund. 

Ludington Memorial Fund. 

Mitzel/elt Band Scholarship Fund for band members. 

1969 Alumni Loan Fund for juniors and seniors. 

Nursing Magazine Scholarship Fund for nursing majors. 

O. D. and Anna Ruth McJCee Scholarship Fund. 

Office Administration Scholarship Fund. 

Otto Christensen Fund for potential Bible instructors or theology 
majors. 

Paul Fisher Scholarship Fund. 

Penna S. S. Chong Memorial Scholarship Fund for Florida nursing 
students. (Preference for Far East resident students of Asiatic ori- 
gin.) 

Reile-McAlexander Memorial Loan Fund for nursing students. 

Sanford and Martha Ulmer Scholarship Fund. 

Sudduth Memorial Fund for potential teachers. 

Tait Scholarship Fund. 

Theresa Brickman Scholarship Fund for office administration majors. 

William lies Scholarship Fund. 



THE REGISTRY 



PRINCIPALS AND PRESIDENTS, 1892-1984 

Principals of the Southern Industrial School 

George C. Colcord 1892-1896 

W. T. Bland 1896-1898 

C. W. Irwin 1898-1900 

N. W. Lawrence 1900-1901 

Principals of Southern Training School 

J. E. Tenney 1901-1908 

M. B. Van Kirk 1908-1912 

C. L. Stone 1912-1914 

L. H. Wood . . 1914-1915 

A. N. Atteberry 1915-1916 

Presidents of Southern Junior College 

Leo Thiel 1916-1918 

L. H. Wood 1918-1922 

Leo Thiel 1922-1925 

H. H. Hamilton 1925 - Jan. 1927 

M. E. Cady Jan. 1927 - May 1927 

H. J. Klooster 1927-1937 

J. C. Thompson 1937-1942 

D. E. Rebok 1942-1943 

K. A. Wright 1943-1945 

Presidents of Southern Missionary College 

K. A. Wright 1945-1955 

T. W. Walters 1955-1958 

C. N. Rees 1958-1967 

Wilbert Schneider 1967-1971 

Frank A. Knittel 1971-1982 

Presidents of Southern College of Seventh-day Adventists 

Frank A. Knittel 1982-1983 

John Wagner 1983-1986 

Donald R. Sahly 1986- 

223 



Board of Trustees 



224 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



A. C. McClure, 
William Allen, 



E. A, Anderson 
Mardian Blair 
T. K. Campbell 
Richard Center 
Edythe Cothren 
Merrill Dart 

C. E. Dudley 

J. A. Edgecombe 
Robert Folkenberg 
W. A. Geary 
M. D. Gordon 

D. K. Griffith 
R. B. Hairston 
William Hulsey 
William lies 

O. R. Johnson 



Chairman 
Secretary 

J. C. McElroy, Jr. 

Bill McGhinnis 

Ellsworth McKee 

Denzil McNeilus 

Harold Moody 

Harvey Murphy 

William Murphy 

Winton Preston 

Donald R. Sahly 

Clinton Shankel 

Ward Sumpter 

Tom Werner 

J. Henson Whitehead 

Bonnie Wilkens 

Alumni Association President 






HONORARY TRUSTEES 

Charles Fleming, Jr. 
O. D. McKee 






Forrest Preston 
Martha Ulmer 



SC EXECUTIVE BOARD 






A. C. McClure, Chairman 

Richard Center Ellsworth McKee 

W. A. Geary Donald R. Sahly 

D. K. Griffith Ward Sumpter 






ADVISORY COMMITTEE 



William Allen 






Kenneth Spears 



College Administration 

COLLEGE ADMINISTRATION 






225 

PRESIDENT 

Donald R. Sahly, Ed.D. (1986) President 

Jeanne Davis (1970) President's Secretary 

ACADEMIC SERVICES 

William Allen, Ph.D. (1984) Vice President for 

Academic Administration 

Records 

Mary Elam, M.A. (1965) Director of Records 

Library 

. Director of Libraries and Archivist 

Peggy Bennett, M.S.L.S. (1971) Assistant Librarian 

Loranne Grace, M.L.S, (1970) Assistant Librarian 

Kayte Hunt, M.S.L.S. (1976) Director, Angel Program 

Patricia Morrison, M.L.S. (1981) Assistant Librarian 

Marianne Wooley, M.S.L.S. (1966) Assistant Librarian 

(Orlando Campus) 

Instructional Media 

Frank Di Memmo, M.S. (1980) Director, Instructional Media 

Teaching Learning Center 

Carole Haynes, M.Ed. (1982) . Director, Teaching Learning Center 

ADMISSIONS AND PUBLIC RELATIONS 

Ronald Barrow, Ph.D. (1979) Vice President for 

Admissions and College Relations 
Merlin Wittenberg, M.Ed. (1984) Admissions Advisor 

Public Relations 

Vinita Sauder, B.A. (1983) . . . Director, Public Relations/Marketing 

Student Finance and Accounts 

Laurel Wells (1964) Director, Student Finance 

Randall White, B.S. (1978) Director, Student Accounts 






College Administration 



BUSINESS SERVICES 
226 Kenneth Spears, M.B.A. (1963) Vice President for Finance 

Financial and Accounting Services 

Robert Merchant, M.B.A., C.P.A. (1961) Treasurer 

Louesa Peters, B.A. (1964) . Chief Accountant, Assistant Treasurer 

Commercial Auxiliaries 

Roy Dingle, A.S. (1974) Bakery Manager, Village Market 

Dan McBroom (1957) Associate Manager, The College Press 

Allen Olsen (1984) Manager, The College Press 

Larry Rice (1959) Superintendent, The College Press 

Don Spears (1984) Manager, Supreme Broom Company 

Judith Walker, B.S. (1981) Manager, Campus Shop 

Charles Whidden (1984) Manager, Village Market 

Computer Services 

John Beckett, B.A. (1975) Director, Computer Services 

Judy DeLay Analyst/Programmer 

William Estep (1979) Computer Operations Manager 

Service Auxiliaries 

Charles Lucas (1984) Director, Physical Plant 

Earl Evans, B.S. (1977) Director, Food Service 

C. R. Lacey (1970) Director, Grounds 

William McKinney (1974) Director, Motor Pool 

Clarence McCandless (1979) Director, Custodial Services 

WSMC FM90.5 

Olson Perry, M.A. (1974) General Manager, WSMC FM90.! 

STUDENT SERVICES 

*Everett Schlisner, M.A. (1974) Vice President for 

Student Services 

Residence Halls 

Reed Christman, B.A. (1979) Dean of Men 

Stan Hobbs, B.A. (1985) Assistant Dean of Men 

Ron Qualley, B.S. (1980) Associate Dean of Men 

Denise Rogers (1984) Assistant Dean, Orlando Center 

Dorothy Somers, B.A. (1972) Dean of Women 

Norma Swinson (1981) Dean, Orlando Center < 

Assistant Dean of Women ; 






College Administration 

Counseling 

K. R. Davis, M.A. (1970) Director of Counseling and Testing 227 

Rhea Rolfe, M.A. (1972) Counselor ** * 

Health Service 

Eleanor Hanson, R.N. (1966) Director, Health Service 

Waldemar Kutzner, M.D. (1974) College Physician 

Security 

Clifford Myers, Sr. (1968) Director, Security 

DEVELOPMENT AND ALUMNI RELATIONS 

Jack McClarty, Ed.D. (1972, 1980) Vice President 

for Development and Alumni Relations 
William H. Taylor, M.A. (1958) . . Director, Endowment Campaign 

COLLEGE PASTORS 

Gordon Bietz, D.Min. (1981) Pastor 

James Herman, B.A. (1976) College Chaplain 

G. H. (Gerry) Morgan, M.A. (1980) Youth Pastor 

Rolland Ruf, B.A. (1969) Associate College Pastor 

Ed Wright, M.Div. (1985) Family Ministries Pastor 



Faculty Directory 



22 



FACULTY EMERITI 



Dorothy Evans Ackerman, M.Music, Associate Professor Emerita of 
Music 

B.A., Atlantic Union College; M.Mus., University of Chattanooga. 

Theresa Rose Brickman, M.Ed., Associate Professor Emerita of 
Secretarial Science 

B.A., Union College; M.Ed., University of Oklahoma. 

Olivia Brickman Dean, M.Ed., Associate Professor Emerita of 
Education 

B.A., Union College; M.Ed., University of Oklahoma. 

Charles Fleming, Jr., M.B.A., Business Manager Emeritus 

B.A., Emmanuel Missionary College; M.B.A., Northwestern Univer- 
sity. 

R. E. Francis, B.D., Professor Emeritus of Religion 

B.A., Columbia Union College; M.A., Andrews University; B.D., 
Andrews University. 

Cyril F. W. Futcher, Ed.D., Vice-President Emeritus of Academic Ad- 
ministration 

B.A., Andrews University; Diploma in Theology, Newbold College; 
Diploma of Education, University of Western Australia; M.Ed., 
Maryland University; Ed.D., Maryland University. 

K. M. Kennedy, Ed.D., Professor Emeritus of Education 

B.A., Valparaiso University; M.Ed., University of Chattanooga; 
Ed.D., University of Tennessee. 

H. H. Kuhlman, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Biology 

B.A., Emmanuel Missionary College; M. A., George Peabody College 
for Teachers; Ph.D., University of Tennessee. 

Evlyn Lindberg, M.A., Associate Professor Emerita of English 

B.A., Willamette University; M.A., Texas Christian University. 

Drew Turlington, M.S., Associate Professor Emeritus of Industrial Edu- 
cation 

B.S., Southern Missionary College; M.S., University of Tennessee. 






Faculty Directory 



FACULTY DIRECTORY 

Flora Adams, B.S., Instructor of Nursing 

B.S., Walla Walla College; B.S. Loma Linda University. (1983) 

tWilliam Allen, Ph.D., Vice President for Academic Administration, 
Professor of Chemistry 

B.S., La Sierra College (Loma Linda University); Ph.D., University of 
Maryland. (1984) 

Frances Andrews, M.A., Associate Professor of Communications 

B.A., Southern Missionary College; M.A., George Peabody College 
for Teachers. (1975) 

J. Bruce Ashton, D.M.A., Professor of Music 

B.Mus., Capital University; M.Mus., American Conservatory of 
Music, D.M.A., University of Cincinnati. (1968) 

Wiley Austin, M.S., Associate Professor of Chemistry 

B.S., Pacific Union College; M.S., Stanford University. (1977) 

Ben Bandiola, Ph.D., Professor of Education and Psychology 

B.S.E., M.A., Philippine Union College; Ph.D., University of Iowa. 
(1984) 

Colleen Barrow, B.S., Instructor of Nursing 
B.S., Columbia Union College. (1976) 

tRonald Barrow, Ph.D., Vice President for Admissions and CoJiege Rela- 
tions 

B.A., Columbia Union College; M.A., Loma Linda University; Ph.D., 
Walden University. (1979) 

John Beckett, B.A., Director of Computer Services, Instructor of Compu- 
ter Science 

B.A., Southern Missionary College. (1974) 

Douglas Bennett, Ph.D., Professor of Religion 

B.A., Southern Missionary College; M.A., Andrews University; 
B.D., Andrews University; Ph.D., Bowling Green State University. 
(1961) 

Peggy Bennett, M.S.L.S., Associate Professor of Library Science 

B.S., Southern Missionary College; M.S.L.S., Florida State Univer- 
sity. (1971) 

Ruby Birch, M.S.N., Assistant Professor of Nursing 

B.S., Madison College; B.A., Union College; M.S.N., Vanderbilt 
University. (1975) 

Jack Blanco, Th.D. f Professor of Religion 

B.A., Union College; M.A., SDA Theological Seminary; B.D., SDA 
Theological Seminary; M.Th., Princeton Theological Seminary; 
Th.D., University of South Africa. (1983) 



229 



Faculty Directory 

Melvin D. Campbell, Ph.D., Professor of Education 
23(1 B-A. t Union College; M.Ed., University of Tennessee; Ph.D., Purdue 

**** University. (1968) 

Ann Clark, M.A.T., Associate Professor of English 

B.A., Southern Missionary College; M.A.T., University of Tennes- 
see, Chattanooga. (1965) 

Gerald Colvin, Ph.D., Ed.D., Professor of Education and Psychology 
B.A., Union College; M.Ed., Ed.D., University of Arkansas; Ph.D., 
University of Georgia. (1972, 1984) 

Joyce Cotham, M.B.Ed., Assistant Professor of Office Administration 
B.S., Southern Missionary College; M.B.Ed., Middle Tennessee 
State University. (1971) 

Nancy Crist, B.S., Instructor of Nursing 
B.S., Pacific Union College. (1982) 

Thelma Cushman, M.A., Associate Professor of Home Economics 
B.A., Pacific Union College; M.A., Pacific Union College; M.A., 
Michigan State University. (1957) 

Susan Davidson, B.S., Instructor of Nursing 
B.S., New York External Degree. (1984) 

Charles Davis, M.S.L.S., Librarian and Archivist 

B.A., Union College; M.A., Kansas State University; M.S.L.S., Uni- 
versity of Southern California. (1968) 

tKenneth R. Davis, M.A., Assistant Professor of Religion 

B.A., Emmanuel Missionary College; M.A., Andrews University; 
M.A., Boston University. (1970) 

Don Dick, Ph.D., Professor of Communication 

B.A., Union College; M.A., University of Nebraska; Ph.D., Michigan 
State University. (1968) 

Frank Di Memmo, M.S., Director of Instructional Media 

B.S., Columbia Union College; M.S., Shippensburg University. 
(1980) 

Roy Dingle, A.S., Instructor of Home Economics; Bakery Manager, Vil- 
lage Market 

A.S., Southern Missionary College. (1974) 

John Durichek, M.A., Associate Professor of Industrial Education 
B.S., Southern Missionary College; M.S., George Peabody College 
for Teachers. (1969) 

Debra Edgerton, B.S.N., Instructor of Nursing 

B.S., Southern College of Seventh-day Adventists. (1984) 

Richard Erickson, M.B.A., Assistant Professor of Business 
B.S., M.B.A., Austin Peay State University. (1984) 



Faculty Directory 



Earl Evans, B.S., Director of Food Services; Instructor of Home 
Economics 
B.S., Andrews University. (1977) 

Ted Evans, M.Ed., Assistant Professor of Physical Education 

B.S., Andrews University; M.Ed., University of Tennessee, Chat- 
tanooga. (1974) 

Diane Fletcher, M.A., Assistant Professor of Home Economics 
B.S., Avondale College; M.A., Pacific Union College. (1985) 

Flora Flood, M.S.N., Assistant Professor of Nursing 

B.S., Columbia Union College; M.S.N., Medical College of Georgia. 
(1983) 

Robert Garren, M.F.A., Professor of Art 

B.S., Atlantic Union College; M.F.A., Rochester Institute of 
Technology. (1968) 

Betty Garver, M.S.N., Associate Professor of Nursing 

B.S., Union College; M.S.N,, University of Tennessee. (1977) 

Philip G. Garver, M.S., Associate Professor of Physical Education 
B.S., Southern Missionary College; M.S., Eastern Michigan Univer- 
sity. (1976) 

Dorothy Giacomozzi, M.S., Associate Professor of Nursing 
B.S., Union College; M.S., University of Colorado. (1979) 

Orlo Gilbert, M.Mus. Ed., Professor of Music 

B.M.E., La Sierra College; M.Mus.Ed., Madison State Teachers Col- 
lege. (1967) 

Jerry Gladson, Ph.D., Professor of Religion 

B.A., Southern Missionary College; M.A., Vanderbilt University; 
Ph.D., Vanderbilt University. (1972) 

Judith Glass, M.Mus., Associate Professor of Music 

B.Mus., University of Texas at Austin; M.Mus., University of Texas 
at Austin. (1975) 

Loranne Grace, M.L.S., Associate Professor of Library Science 

B.S., Walla Walla College; M.L.S., University of Washington. (1970) 

Floyd Greenleaf, Ph.D., Professor of History 

B.A., Southern Missionary College; M.A., George Peabody College 
for Teachers; Ph.D M University of Tennessee. (1966) 

Edgar O. Grundset, M.A., Associate Professor of Biology 

B.A., Emmanuel Missionary College; M.A., Walla Walla College. 
(1957) 

Leona Gulley, M.H.Sc, Associate Professor of Nursing 

B.S., Columbia Union College; M.A., Philippine Union College 
Seminary, M.H.Sc, Philippine Union College. (1978) 



Faculty Directory 

Norman Gulley, Ph.D., Professor of Religion 

Diploma in Theology, Newbold College; B.A., Southern Missionary 
College; M.A., Andrews University; B.D., Andrews University; 
Ph.D., Edinburgh University. (1978) 

Jan Haluska, M.A., Associate Professor of English 

B.S., Pacific Union College; M.A., Andrews University. (1981) 

Kathy Hammond, B.S., Instructor of Nursing 
B.S., Southern Missionary College. (1985) 

Lawrence E. Hanson, Ph.D., Professor of Mathematics 

B.A., California State University; M.A., University of California; 
Ph.D., Florida State University. (1966) 

Carole Haynes, M.Ed., Director of Teaching Learning Center 

B.S., Southern Missionary College; M.Ed., University of Tennessee 
at Chattanooga. (1982) 

Ray Hefferlin, Ph.D., Professor of Physics 

B.A., Pacific Union College; Ph.D., California Institute of Technol- 
ogy. (1955) 

Dorothy Hooper, M.S., Assistant Professor of Nursing 

B.S., Southern Missionary College; M.S., Loma Linda University. 
(1975) 

Duane F. Houck, Ph.D., Professor of Biology 

B.A., Emmanuel Missionary College; M.A., University of North 
Carolina; Ph.D., Iowa State University. (1973) 

Shirley Howard, M.S.N., Associate Professor of Nursing 

B.S., Walla Walla College; M.S.N., University of Tennessee. (1974) 

Francis Hummer, Instructor of Industrial Education (1979) 

Bonnie Hunt, M.S.N., Associate Professor of Nursing 

B.S., Loma Linda University; M.S.N., University of Tennessee. 
(1977) 

Kayte Hunt, M.S.L.S., Director, ANGEL Program 

B.S., Southern Missionary College; M.S.L.S., University of Tennes- 
see. (1976) 

Gordon Hyde, Ph.D., Professor of Religion 

B.A., Andrews University; M.A., University of Wisconsin; Ph.D., 
Michigan State University. (1982) 

Steven Jaecks, M.S., Assistant Professor of Physical Education 

B.A., Loma Linda University; M.S., University of Tennessee. (1980) 

Wayne Janzen, Ed.D. Professor of Industrial Arts 

B.S., Andrews University; M.A., Western Michigan University; 
Ed.D., Texas A. & M. (1967) 



Faculty Directory 

Beth Jedamski, B.S., Instructor of Nursing 

B.S. Southern Missionary College. (1983) ?^l^l 

Robert Kamieneski, Ed.D., Professor of Physical Education 

B.S., La Sierra College; M.Ed., Boston University; Ed.D., Brigham 
Young University. (1980) 

Catherine Knarr, M.S.N., Assistant to the Vice President for Academic 
Administration and Associate Professor of Nursing 

B.S., Columbia Union College; M.S.N., University of Tennessee. 
(1974) 

Timothy Korson, M.S., Associate Professor of Computer Science 
M.S., Ohio University. (1984) 

Marie E. Krall, B.S., Instructor of Nursing 
B.S., Columbia Union College. (1973) 

Henry Kuhlman, Ph.D., Professor of Physics 

B.A., Emmanuel Missionary College; M.A., Western Michigan Uni- 
versity; Ph.D., Purdue University. (1968) 

Edward L. Lamb, M.S.S.W., A.C.S.W., Associate Professor of 
Social Work and Family Studies 

B.S., Union College; M.S.S.W., University of Tennessee. (1972) 

Katie A. Lamb, M.S.N., Associate Professor of Nursing 

B.S., Union College; M.S.N., University of Central Arkansas. (1972) 

Merritt MacLafferty, M.A., Associate Professor of Computer Science 
B.A., Union College; M.A., Pacific Union College. (1980). 

Ben McArthur, Ph.D., Associate Professor of History 

B.A., Andrews University; M.A., University of Chicago; Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Chicago. (1979) 

Caroline McArthur, M.S., Assistant Professor of Nursing 

B.S., University of Mississippi; M.S., Emory University. (1979) 

tjack McClarty, Ed.D., Vice President for Development and Alumni 
Relations 

B.M.Ed., University of Montana; M.M.Ed., Andrews University; 
Ed.D., University of Montana. (1972) 

Wilma McClarty, Ed.D., Professor of English 

B.A., Andrews University; M.A., Andrews University; Ed.D., 
University of Montana. (1972) 

tRobert W. Merchant, M.B.A., C.P.A., Treasurer 

B.A., Emmanuel Missionary College; M.B.A., University of Arkan- 
sas. (1961) 

*Robert Moore, M.S., Associate Professor of Mathematics 

B.A., Southern Missionary College; M.S., University of North 
Carolina. (1979) 



Faculty Directory 

Patricia C. Morrison, M.L.S., Assistant Professor of Library Science 
2 34 B.S., East Carolina University; M.L.S. , Vanderbilt University. (1981) 

Robert R. Morrison, Ph.D., Professor of Modem Languages 

B.A., George Washington University; M.A., Middlebury College; 
Ph.D., University of Florida. (1967) 

Johanna Neubrander, B.S., Instructor of Nursing 
B.S., Southern Missionary College. (1983) 

Laura Nyirady, M.S.N., Assistant Professor of Nursing 

B.S., Loma Linda University; M.S.N., Boston University. (1986) 

Stephen A. Nyirady, Ph.D., Professor of Biology 

B.A., Atlantic Union College; M.S., Loma Linda University; Ph.D., 
Loma Linda University. (1986) 

Helmut K. Ott, Ed.D., Professor of Modem Languages 

B.A., Loma Linda College of Arts and Sciences; M.A., Inter- 
American University; M.A., Andrews University; Ed.D., Andrews 
University. (1971) 

fOlson Perry, M.A., General Manager, FM90.5 WSMC 

B.A., City College of New York; M.A., Andrews University. (1977) 

Desmond Rice, Ed.D., Professor of Education 

B.A., Avondale College; M.A., San Francisco State University; 
Ed.D., University of Southern California. (1979) 

Hazel Rice, Ed.S., Professor of Nursing 

B.S., Columbia Union College; M.S., University of Colorado; Ed.S., 
University of Colorado. (1978) 

*E. Williams Richards, Jr., Ph.D., C.P.A., C.M.A., C.I.A., C.D.P., C.C.P., 
C.C.A., Professor of Business Administration 

B.S., Southern Missionary College; Ph.D., Michigan State Univer- 
sity. (1977) 

Evonne Richards, Ed.D., Assistant Professor of Office Administration 
B.S., Pacific Union College; M.A., Loma Linda University; Ed.D., 
University of Tennessee. (1983) 

Arthur Richert, Ph.D., Professor of Mathematics 

B.A., Southern Missionary College; M.A. and Ph.D., University of 
Texas. (1971) 

Charlene Robertson, M.S.N., Associate Professor of Nursing 

B.S., Southern Missionary College; M.S., University of Alabama. 
(1977) 

Frances Robertson, B.S., Instructor of Nursing 
B.S., Southern Missionary College. (1984) 



Faculty Directory 

Marvin L. Robertson, Ph.D., Professor of Music 

B.Mus., Walla Walla College; M.A., University of Northern Col- 0%K 
orado; Ph.D., Florida State University. (1966) **%»** 

Cyril E. Roe, Ed.D., Professor of Education 

B.A., Pacific Union College; M.A., Pacific Union College; Ed.D., 
University of the Pacific. (1976) 

Cecil Rolfe, Ph.D., Professor of Business Administration 

B.A., Columbia Union College; M.B.A., University of Maryland; 
Ph.D., University of Maryland. (1964) 

Daniel Rozell, M.A., Associate Professor of Business Administration 
B.S., Southern Missionary College; M.A., Central Michigan Univer- 
sity. (1978) 

Barbara Ruf, Ph.D., Pro/essor of English 

B.A., Atlantic Union College; M.A., Boston University; Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Tennessee. (1969) 

Don Runyan, Ph.D., Professor of Music 

B.M.E., Union College; M.M.Voice, University of Indiana; Ph.D., 
George Peabody College for Teachers at Vanderbilt. (1968) 

Patricia Rushing, B.S., Assistant Pro/essor of Nursing 
B.S. (1982) 

tDonald R. Sahly, Ed.D., President 

B.S., Andrews University; M.A., Andrews University; Ed.D., Uni- 
versity of the Pacific. (1986) 

tEverett Schlisner, M.A., Vice President of Student Services 
B.S., Union College; M.A., Andrews University. (1974) 

Lola Scoggins, M.P.H., Assistant Professor of Nursing 

B.S., Columbia Union College; M.P.H., Loma Linda University. 
(1984) 

Patricia Silver, M.A., Associate Professor of Music 

B.S.C., Madison College; M.A., George Peabody. (1982) 

David Smith, M.A., Associate Professor of English 

B.A., Andrews University; M.A., Andrews University. (1981) 

tKenneth Spears, M.B.A., Vice President for Finance 

B.S., Southern Missionary College; M.B.A., Middle Tennessee State 
University. (1963) 

Ronald Springett, Ph.D., Pro/essor of Religion 

B.A., Columbia Union College; M.A. and B.D., Andrews University; 
Ph.D., University of Manchester. (1969) 

Jeanette Stepanske, M.A., Associate Pro/essor of Education 

B.S., Andrews University; M.A., Ohio State University. (1979) 



. 



Faculty Directory 

Elvie Swinson, M.S., Associate Professor of Nursing 
9^lft B.S.N.E., Columbia Union College; M.S., Loma Linda University. 

£*%w (1973) 

tWilliam H. Taylor, M.A., Director, Endowment Campaign 
B.A., Union College; M.A., University of Nebraska. (1958) 

Mitchell Thiel, Ph.D., Professor of Chemistry 

B.A., Union College; M.S., University of Maryland; Ph.D., Univer- 
sity of Maryland. (1966) 

Nancy Thiel, B.S., Instructor of Nursing 
B.S., Columbia Union College. (1978) 

Cheryl K. Thompson, M.S.N., Instructor of Nursing 

B.S., Southern Missionary College; M.S.N., University of Florida. 
(1982) 

Wayne E. VandeVere, Ph.D., C.P.A., Professor of Business Admin- 
istration 

B.A., Andrews University; M.B.A., University of Michigan; Ph.D., 
Michigan State University. (1956) 

Steven E. Warren, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

B.S., Andrews University; Ph.D., Arizona State University. (1982) 

Erma Webb, M.S., Assistant Professor of Nursing 

B.S., Union College; M.S., Loma Linda University. (1976) 

Larry Williams, M.S., Associate Professor of Social Work and Family 
Studies 

M.S., University of Georgia. (1983) 

William Wohlers, Ph.D., Professor of History 

B.A., Walla Walla College; M.A., Andrews University; Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Nebraska. (1973) 

Marianne Wooley, M.S.L.S., Assistant Professor of Library Science 
B.S., Andrews University; M.S.L.S., University of Southern Califor- 
nia. (1966) 

Marcella Woolsey, M.A., Instructor of Biology 

B.S., Southern Missionary College; M.A., Loma Linda University. 
(1981) 

Marlene Young, B.S., Instructor of Nursing 
B.S., Union College. (1982) 



Dates in parentheses indicate the beginning year of employment at Southern 

College. 
* Study leave 
t Administration 



Faculty Directory 



ADJUNCT FACULTY 






Education 

Faculty of Collegedale Academy 
Faculty of Spalding Elementary School 

Southern Union Elementary Supervisors and Superintendents: 

Carolina Conference 
Florida Conference 
Georgia-Cumberland Conference 
Gulf States Conference 
Kentucky-Tennessee Conference 
South Atlantic Conference 
South Central Conference 
Southeastern Conference 

Medical Technology 

Florida Hospital; 

Rodney Holcomb, M.D., Medical Director 

Patricia Rogers, B.S., MT (ASCP), Program Director 

Kettering Hospital: 

Glenn Bylsma, M.D., Medical Director 
Suzanne Columbus, B.S., MT (ASCP), Program Director 
Mary Beth Fannon, M.A., MT (ASCP), Academic Education Coor- 
dinator 
Beverly Schieltz, M.S., MT (ASCP), Clinical Education Coordinator 



237 



Nursing 

Collegedale 



Wanda Bunce 
Carol B. Burhenn 
Judy Compton 
Donna Day 
Ellen Gilbert 
Carol J. Harris 
Beverly Jackson 
Kathy Davidson 

Jacobson 
Joe B. Lasseter 
Pam Lowe 
Jill Morgan 
Cindy Nipp 
Cheri Terrell 
Dotty Volz 
Juanita Weddle 



Orlando 
Center 



Betty Barker 
Dorothy Brown 
Connie Hamilton 
Kathy Hinson 
Brucie Huffman 
Mary Lou Jones 
Marion Kierstead 
Gail Nausbaum 
Rosann Reilly 



Faculty Committees 



238 



FACULTY COMMITTEES 

ACADEMIC CABINET: William Allen, Chairman; Mary Elam, Division Direc- 
tors. 

ABSENCE COMMITTEE: Wilma McClarty, Chairman; Dorothy Hooper, Ron 
Qualley, Asst. Dean of Women, Larry Williams. 

ADMISSIONS COMMITTEE: Ron Barrow, Chairman; Gordon Hyde, Wiley Aus- 
tin, Reed Christman, Helmut Ott, Dorothy Somers, Randy White, Merlin Witten- 
berg. 

ADVISEMENT COMMITTEE: Mary Elam, Chairman; William Allen, Ron Bar- 
row, K. R. Davis, Carole Haynes, Ben Bandiola, Doug Bennett, Merritt MacLaf- 
ferty, Marvin Robertson, Dan Rozell, Elvie Swinson. 

COMPUTER SERVICES COMMITTEE: Ken Spears, Chairman; William Allen, 
John Beckett, Melvin Campbell, Don Dick, Mary Elam, Tim Korson, Henry 
Kuhlman, Katie Lamb, Louesa Peters, Ron Springett, Wayne VandeVere, Laurel 
Wells, one student. 

FACULTY AFFAIRS COMMITTEE: Floyd Greenleaf, Chairman; Wayne Van- 
deVere, Ron Barrow, Peggy Bennett, Robert Kamieneski, Katie Lamb, David 
Smith. 

FACULTY SENATE: Don Sahly, Chairman; William Allen, Ron Barrow, Douglas 
Bennett, Gerald Colvin, K. R. Davis, John Durichek, Mary Elam, Richard 
Erickson, Betty Garver, Jerry Gladson, Jan Haluska, Larry Hanson, Carole 
Haynes, Ray Hefferlin, Shirley Howard, Katie Lamb, Robert Morrison, Allen 
Olsen, Helmut Ott, Desmond Rice, Evonne Richards, Charlene Robertson, Bar- 
bara Ruf, Dean of Students, David Smith, Ken Spears, Ron Springett, Jeanette 
Stepanske, Elvie Swinson, Laurel Wells, Larry Williams, Marcella Woolsey, Bill 
Bass, Teresa Rogers. 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE: Don Sahly, Chairman; William Allen, Ken Spears, 
Dean of Students, Larry Hanson, Secretary, Des Rice, David Smith, Jeanette 
Stepanske. 

FINANCIAL ADVISORY COMMITTEE: Ken Spears, Chairman; Richard 
Erickson, Earl Evans, Wayne Janzen, Allen Olsen. 

GENERAL EDUCATION COMMITTEE: Jack Blanco, Chairman; Jerry Gladson, 
Gerald Colvin, Cathy Knarr, Wayne Janzen, Ben McArthur, Des Rice. 

HONORS COMMITTEE: Jerry Gladson, Chairman; Bill Wohlers, Floyd Green- 
leaf, Evonne Richards, Art Richert, Cecil Rolfe, Steve Warren. 

INSTRUCTIONAL RESOURCES COMMITTEE: Bonnie Hunt, Chairman; Frank 
Di Memmo, Carole Haynes, Loranne Grace, Ann Clark, Don Runyan, Mitchell 
Thiel. 

RECRUITMENT AND RETENTION COMMITTEE: Ron Barrow, Chairman; 
Carole Haynes, K. R. Davis, Dean of Students, Mitchell Thiel, Wilma McClarty, 
Ron Qualley, Dorothy Somers, Joyce Cotham, John Durichek, Robert Morrison, 
one student. 



Faculty Committees 

SOCIAL AND RECREATIONAL COMMITTEE: Thelma Cushman, Chairman; 
Frances Andrews, Dorothy Giacamozzi, Earl Evans, Nancy Thiel. 9^1Q 

TEACHER EDUCATION COUNCIL COMMITTEE: (All ex officio). Cyril Roe, 
Chairman; William Allen, Howard Kennedy, Dean Maddock, Education De- 
partment Faculty, Dean of Students, and supervisors for student teachers for 
each department. 

WRITING COMMITTEE: Gerald Colvin, Chairman; William Wohlers, Bruce 
Ashton, Ray Hefferlin, Duane Houck, Pat Morrison, Ron Springett, David Smith. 

STUDENT SERVICES: Dean of Students, Chairman; Ron Barrow, Reed Christ- 
man, Helmut Ott, Dorothy Somers, Stephen Nyirady. The following members of 
this committee are mandated as ex officio by the Faculty Handbook: Don Dick, 
Edgar Grundset, James Herman, Pat Silver, Laurel Wells, and three students. 

ARTIST ADVENTURE/PROGRAMS: Edgar Grundset / William Wohlers, Co- 
Chairmen; Frank Di Memmo, Earl Evans, Bob Garren, Betty Garver, Orlo Gilbert, 
Stan Hobbs, Steve Jaecks, Jack McClarty, Olson Perry, Dorothy Somers, Nancy 
Thiel, Dean of Students, and four students. 

DISCIPLINE POOL COMMITTEE: Ruby Birch, Phil Garver, Art Richert, Judy 
Glass, Leona Gulley, Wayne Janzen, Evonne Richards, Marcella Woolsey, and 
four students. 

FILMS SUBCOMMITTEE: Don Dick, Chairman; Reed Christman, Earl Evans, 
Shirley Howard, Robert Merchant, Lola Scoggins, Dorothy Somers, Dean of 
Students, and two students. 

LOANS AND SCHOLARSHIP SUBCOMMITTEE: Laurel Wells, Chairman; Wil- 
liam Allen, Stan Hobbs, Marie Krall, Asst. Dean of Women, Randy White, two 
students, and Dean of Students. 

RELIGIOUS LIFE COUNCIL SUBCOMMITTEE: James Herman, Chairman; 
Norman Gulley, Larry Hanson, Stan Hobbs, Vinita Sauder, Dorothy Somers, 
Dean of Students, and four students. 

SCREENING COMMITTEE: Pat Silver, Chairman; Ted Evans, Diane Fletcher, 
Ron Qualley, Dorothy Somers, two students, and Dean of Students. 

STUDENT PERSONNEL COMMITTEE: Dean of Students, Chairman; Reed 
Christman, K. R. Davis, Earl Evans, Eleanor Hanson, James Herman, Stan Hobbs, 
Cliff Myers, Ron Qualley, Becky Rolfe, Dorothy Somers, and Asst. Dean of 
Women. 



INDEX 



Absences 26 

Academic Calendar Inside back 

Academic Divisions 35 

Academic Honesty 24 

Academic Information 21 

Academic Probation and Dismissal ... 25 

Academic Services 30 

Accounting, Courses in 54 

Accounts, Statements and Billing 204, 207 
Accreditation and Memberships . 6, 7, 144 

Administration Building 8 

Administrative Staff 225 

Admissions 197 

Admission to Teacher Education 76 

Advance Payment 206 

Adventist Colleges Abroad 

Financial Policy 206 

Allied Health Professions 175 

E. A. Anderson Lecture Series 30 

FlorenceOliverAndersonLectureSeries 30 

Anesthesia 185 

Application Procedure 200 

Art, Courses in 36 

Associate Degree Programs 20 

Accounting 54 

Child Care Administration 83 

Computer Science 71 

Food Service 106 

General Studies 181 

Home Economics 105 

Industrial Technology 112 

Media Technology 65 

Nursing 144 

Office Administration 159 

Attendance Regulations 26 

Auditing Courses 21 

Auto Body, Diploma Program 112 

Baccalaureate Degree Programs 19 

Bachelor of Arts 19 

Art . 36 

Biology 46 

Chemistry 60 

Communication 64 

Computer Science 71 

English 90 

French 125 

German . 125 

Health, Physical Education 

and Recreation 95 

History 100 

International Studies 125 

Mathematics 120 

Music 134 

Physics 164 

Psychology 40 

Religion 169 

Spanish 125 

Bachelor of Business Administration . 52 

Bachelor of Music 131 

Bachelor of Science 19 

Behavioral Science 39 

Family Studies 40 

Sociology 40 



Biology 46 

Business Administration 53 

Chemistry 60 

Communication: Public Relations . . 65 

Computer Science . . 71 

Education 

Accreditation 75 

Elementary 78 

Professional Semester 77 

Secondary 80 

Food Service Administration 105 

Health Science 95 

Home Economics 104 

Industrial Education Ill 

Long-Term Health Care 53 

Mathematics 120 

Medical Science 184 

Medical Technology 182 

Nursing 144 

Office Administration 159 

Physics 164 

Social Work 40 

Banking and Cash Withdrawals 211 

Bankruptcy 210 

Behavioral Science, Courses in 39 

Biblical Language, Courses in 174 

Biblical Studies, Courses in 170 

Biology, Courses in 46 

Board of Trustees 224 

Executive Board 224 

Brock Hall 8 

Business Administration, 

Courses in 52 

Business and Technology, 

Division of 35 

Campus Organizations 194 

Certification 6, 75 

Challenge Exams 28 

Chamber Music Series 31 

Changes in Registration 21 

Chapel Attendance 27, 195 

Chemistry, Courses in 60 

Class Attendance 26 

Class Standing 11 

CLEP Exams 28 

Collection Policy 209 

College Plaza 8 

College Publications 65 

Collegedale Church 8 

Commercial Auxiliaries Managers 226 

Communication, Courses in 64 

Computer Center 8 

Computer Science, Courses in 70 

Concert-Lecture Series 194 

Conduct 194 

Correspondence Work 29 

Counseling 192 

Course Load 22 

Course Numbers 30 

Course Sequence 29 

Daniells Hall 8 

Dean's List 18 



Degree Requirements, Basic 9 

Degrees Offered 19 

Associate Degrees 20 

Bachelor of Arts 19 

Bachelor of Music 131 

Bachelor of Science 19 

Bachelor of Business 

Administration 52 

Bachelor of Social Work 40 

General Education 

Requirements 14 

Major and Minor 

Requirements 18 

Dental Hygiene 176 

Dentistry 185 

Dietetics 176 

Dining Services 191 

Dismissal 25 

Distinguished Dean's List 18 

Divisions, Academic 35 

Earth Science, Courses in 167 

Economics, Courses in 56 

Education, Courses in 84 

Elementary Education 78 

Employment Service 193 

English, Courses in 90 

Proficiency in 199 

Engineering 179 

Examinations 

Attendance 26 

Credit by 28 

CLEP 28 

Special 28 

Expenses 202 

Facilities 8 

Faculty 

Committees 238 

Directory 228 

Financial Information 202 

Aid 214 

Grants 220 

Loans ,. 220 

Satisfactory Academic 

Progress for 215 

Scholarships 219 

Veterans 218 

Banking and Cash Withdrawals 211 

Expenses 

Advance Payments 206 

Application Fee 200 

Food Service 206 

Housing 205 

International Student Deposit ... 206 

Late Registration 204 

Student Tithing 213 

Tuition and Fees 202 

Tuition Refunds 208 

Family Rebate 203 

Methods of Payment 207 

FM90.5WSMC 31 

Food and Nutrition, Courses in 106 



Food Service, One- Year 

Certificate Course 106 

Foreign Study 124 

French, Courses in 127 

Freshman Standing 197 

Full-Time Student 22 

Gardening, Course in 47 

General Education, Purpose of . . 13 

General Education Requirements 14 

General Studies 181 

Geography, Courses in 103 

German, Courses in 127 

Grading System 22 

Graduation in Absentia * 12 

Graduation Requirements 11 

Graduation with Honors 18 

Greek, Courses in 174 

Grievance Procedure 26 

Guidance and Counseling 192 

HackmanHall < 8 

Health Education, Courses in , . 97 

Health Insurance 210 

Health, Physical Education and 

Recreation, Courses in 95 

Health Service 192 

History of the College 6 

History, Courses in 100 

Home Economics, Courses in 104 

Home Management, Courses in 108 

Honor Roll 18 

Honors, Graduation with 18 

Honors Program 17 

Honors Studies Sequence 17 

Housing 205 

Deposit 205 

Humanities, Course in 103 

Humanities, Division of 35 

Humanities/Perspectives Film Series . 31 

Incompletes 23 

Industrial Education, Courses in Ill 

Instructional Media 32 

Interest 206 

International Students 199 

Journalism, Courses in 68 

Labor Regulations 211 

Foreign Students 213 

Labor-Class Load 212 

Late Registration 204 

Law 186 

Ledford Hall 8 

Libraries 32 

Library Science, Courses in 118 

Loans 220 

Major and Minor Requirements 18 

Mathematics, Courses in 120 

Mazie Herin Hall 8 

McKee Library 8, 32 



Medical Records Administration 176 

Medical Science 184 

Medical Technology, Course in 183 

Medicine 186 

Minors 

Art 36 

Behavioral Science 40 

Biblical Languages 174 

Biology 46 

Business Administration 53 

Chemistry 60 

Communication 64 

Computer Science 71 

English 90 

English Related Fields 90 

Foods and Food Service 104 

French .V. 125 

German 125 

Health, Physical Education, 

and Recreation . • 95 

History : 101 

Home Economics 104 

Industrial Education Ill 

Journalism 64 

Library Science 118 

Mathematics 120 

Music 134 

Office Administration 159 

Physics 164 

Practical Theology 170 

Psychology 40 

Radio-TV-Film 64 

Religion 169 

Sociology 40 

Spanish 125 

Modern Languages, Courses in 127 

Montessori Option 83 

Music, Courses in 135 

Curricula 

Bachelor of Music 131 

Bachelor of Arts 134 

Ensembles 139 

Fees 203 

Nursing, Courses in 141 

Accreditation 144 

Admission Requirements . 145, 149, 198 

Curricula 146, 151 

Expenses 204 

Loans 220 

Scholarships 221 

Objectives of the College 5 

Occupational Therapy ... 177 

Office Administration, Courses in 159 

On-the-Job Training 65 

One- Year Certificates 1 1, 20 

Auto Body, Repair and Refinishing 112 

Food Service 106 

Optometry 187 

Organizations 194 

Orientation Program 192 

Osteopathic Medicine 187 

Overseas Study 124 



Petition 26 

Pharmacy 187 

Philosophy 5 

Physical Education Building 8 

Physical Education, Courses in 95 

Physical Therapy 177 

Physics, Courses in 164 

Placement 193 

Political Science, Courses in 103 

Practical Theology, Courses in 173 

Pre-professional and 

Technical Curricula 20, 175, 185 

Anesthesia 185 

Dental Hygiene 176 

Dentistry 185 

Dietetics 176 

Engineering 179 

Law 186 

Medical Records Administration ... 176 

Medical Technology 182 

Medicine 186 

Occupational Therapy 177 

Optometry 187 

Osteopathy 187 

Pharmacy 187 

Physical Therapy 177 

Public Health Science 188 

Radiology Technology 177 

Respiratory Therapy 178 

Veterinary Medicine 189 

President's Lecture Series 32 

Probation 25 

Programs of Study 9 

Psychology, Courses in 41 

Public Health Science 188 

Publications 65, 193 

Radiology Technology 177 

Radio Station, FM90.5 WSMC .... 31, 65 

Radio-TV-Film, Courses in 66 

Rebate, Family 203 

Refund Policy 208 

Credit Refund 209 

Financial Aid Refund Policy 217 

Registration 21 

Rehabilitation Act 191 

Religion Center 8 

Religion, Courses in 168 

Religious Organizations 194 

Residence Halls 191 

Residence Requirements 12 

Respiratory Therapy 178 

Right of Petition 26 

Satisfactory Academic Progress 215 

Scholarships 219 

Scholastic Probation 25 

Science, Division of 35 

Secondary Education ; . . 80 

Senior Placement Service 193 

Sequence of Courses 29 

Service Auxiliaries, Managers 226 

Setting of College 6 

SC Principals and Presidents 223 



SC Students 7 

Bachelor of Social Work 40 

Social Work, Courses in 43 

Sociology, Courses in 44 

So-Ju-Conian Hall 8 

Southern Scholars 17 

Arthur W. Spalding School 8 

Spanish, Courses in 128 

Special Student 199 

Special Fees and Charges 203 

Speech, Courses in 69 

Staley Christian Scholar 

Lecture Series 33 

Standards of Conduct 194 

Student Association 193 

Student Center 8 

Student Employment Service 193 

Student Life and Services 191 

Study and Work Load 22 

Subject Requirements 

for Admission 197 

Summerour Hall 8 

Talge Hall 8 

Teacher Education Certification 80 



Teaching Learning Center 33 

Textiles and Clothing, Courses in .... 109 

Thatcher Hall 8 

Theology, Courses in Practical 173 

Tithe and Church Expense 213 

Transcripts 29, 210 

Transfer of Credit 12, 199 

Transfer Students 198 

Trustees, Board of 224 

Tuition and Fees 202 

Tuition Refunds 208 

Upper Division 12 

Veterans 218 

Veterinary Medicine 189 

Waiver Examinations 28 

Withdrawals 211 

Lynn Wood Hall 8 

J. Mabel Wood Hall 8 

Work-Study Schedule 22 

Worship Services 195 

Wright Hall 8 



In publishing this catalog, every reasonable effort has been made to be 
factually accurate. The publisher assumes no responsibility for editorial, 
clerical, or printing errors. The information presented is, at the time of 
printing, an accurate description of course offerings, policies, and re- 
quirements of Southern College. The provisions of this catalog, how- 
ever, are not to be regarded as an irrevocable contract between the 
college and the student. The college reserves the right to change any 
provision or requirement at any time, without prior notice. 



1986 







JULY 










AUGUST 










SEPTEMBER 






s 


M 


T W T 


F 


S 


S 


M 


T W T 


F 


S 


S 


M 


T W T 


F 


S 






1 2 3 


4 


5 








1 


2 




1 


2 3 4 


5 


6 


6 


7 


8 9 10 


11 


12 


3 


4 


5 6 7 


8 


9 


7 


8 


9 10 11 


12 


13 


13 


14 


15 16 17 


18 


19 


10 


11 


12 13 14 


15 


16 


14 


15 


16 17 18 


19 


20 


20 


21 


22 23 24 


25 


26 


17 


18 


19 20 21 


22 


23 


21 


22 


23 24 25 


26 


27 


27 


28 


29 30 31 
OCTOBER 






24 

31 


25 


26 27 28 
NOVEMBER 


29 


30 


28 


29 


30 
DECEMBER 






S 


M 


T W T 


F 


S 


S 


M 


T W T 


F 


S 


S 


M 


T W T 


F 


S 






1 2 


3 


4 










1 




1 


2 3 4 


5 


6 


5 


6 


7 8 9 


10 


11 


2 


3 


4 5 6 


7 


8 


7 


8 


9 10 11 


12 


13 


12 


13 


14 15 16 


17 


18 


9 


10 


11 12 13 


14 


15 


14 


15 


16 17 18 


19 


20 


19 


20 


21 22 23 


24 


25 


16 


17 


18 19 20 


21 


22 


21 


22 


23 24 25 


26 


27 


26 


27 


28 29 30 


31 

I 




23 
30 


24 


25 26 27 


28 


29 


28 


29 


30 31 











JANUARY 




I 


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n 


iCitrrciH 


x 






MARCH 




S 


M 


T W T 

1 


F 














M 
2 


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3 4 5 6 


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7 


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5 


6 7 8 


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9 


10 11 12 13 


14 


11 
18 


12 
19 


13 14 15 
20 21 22 


ie 

2Z 




Not to be taken 




16 
23 


17 18 19 20 
24 24 26 27 


21 
28 


25 


26 


27 28 29 
APRIL 


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30 


31 
JUNE 




S 


M 


T W T 
1 2 


F 




from this library 




M 

1 


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2 3 4 5 


S 
6 


5 


6 


7 8 9 


1 














8 


9 10 11 12 


13 


12 


13 


14 15 16 


1 














15 


16 17 18 19 


20 


19 


20 


21 22 23 


2 














22 


23 24 25 26 


27 


26 


27 


28 29 30 
JULY 






24 

31 


25 


26 27 28 29 
AUGUST 


3U 


zo 


29 


30 
SEPTEMBER 




S 


M 


T W T 
1 2 


F 
3 


S 
4 


S 


M 


T W T F 


S 

1 


S 


M 


T W T F 
12 3 4 


S 
5 


5 


6 


7 8 9 


10 


11 


2 


3 


4 5 6 7 


8 


6 


7 


8 9 10 11 


12 


12 


13 


14 15 16 


17 


18 


9 


10 


11 12 13 14 


15 


13 


14 


15 16 17 18 


19 


19 


20 


21 22 23 


24 


25 


16 


17 


18 19 20 21 


22 


20 


21 


22 23 24 25 


26 


26 


27 


28 29 30 
OCTOBER 


31 




23 
30 


24 
31 


25 26 27 28 
NOVEMBER 


29 


27 


28 


29 30 
DECEMBER 




S 


M 


T W T 


F 


S 


S 


M 


T W T F 


S 


S 


M 


T W T F 


S 






1 


2 


3 


1 


2 


3 4 5 6 


7 






12 3 4 


5 


4 


5 


6 7 8 


9 


10 


8 


9 


10 11 12 13 


14 


6 


7 


8 9 10 11 


12 


11 


12 


13 14 15 


16 


17 


15 


16 


17 18 19 20 


21 


13 


14 


15 16 17 18 


19 


18 


19 


20 21 22 


23 


24 


22 


23 


24 25 26 27 


28 


20 


21 


22 23 24 25 


26 


25 


26 


27 28 29 


30 


31 


29 


30 






27 


28 


29 30 31 





1986-87 ACADEMIC CALENDAR 



1986 Summer Sessions* 
1st 2nd 3rd 4th 



May 5 June 3 June 30 July 27 

July 27 

May 5 June 3 June 30 July 28 

May 6 June 4 July 1 July 28 

May 7 June 5 July 2 July 30 
July 4 

May 16 June 13 July 11 Aug. 8 

May 23 June 20 July 18 Aug. 15 

May 26 

May 30 June 27 July 25 Aug. 21 



Registration 
Freshmen Orientation 
Classes begin 
Late registration fee 
Last day to add course/fee 

for class change 
Independence Day Holiday 
Last day to drop and 

automatically receive a "W" 
All withdrawals after this 

date receive "F" 
Memorial Day Holiday 
Classes end 



* The Southern College summer term consists of 
four 4-week sessions. Students in attendance dur- 
ing the 1985-86 school year may register at any 
time during the week Immediately preceding the 
session. 





1st Semester 


2nd Semester 




1986-87 


1986-87 


Faculty Colloquium 


Aug. 14-17 




ACT and CLEP Exams 


Aug. 22, 24 




Registration by appointment 


Aug. 25, 26 


Jan. 5 


Freshmen Orientation 


Aug. 25 




Classes begin 


Aug. 27 


Jan. 6 


Late registration fee 


Aug. 27 


Jan. 6 


Fee for class change 


Sept. 3 


Jan. 14 


Last day to add course 


Sept. 9 


Jan. 20 


Senior Class organization 


Sept. 25 


Jan. 28 


Mid-term 


Oct. 16 


Feb. 26 


Mid-semester vacation 


Oct. 17-19 


Feb. 27 - Mar. 8 


Alumni Homecoming 


Oct. 31 - Nov. 2 




Last day to drop and 






automatically receive a "W M 


Oct. 30 


Mar. 12 


Advisement Period 


Nov. 3-14 


Mar. 16-27 


Thanksgiving Vacation 


Nov. 26-30 




Senior deadline for 






correspondence/incompletes 


Dec. 3 


Apr. 6 


All withdrawals after this 






date receive "F" 


Dec. 5 


Apr. 10 


College Dai 




Apr. 5, 6 


Semester E: SOUTHERN COLLEGE 
Commence; f f ff ff I fffff fffflff 1 Ifll Iff f fff f f f i 


llll Hill Hill lllll fill Illl 


Apr. 27-30 
May 3 


Christmas 1 1 llllllll Hill ff|f| ||| ||||ff| 


llllllll 

4682 




TMS08 





NOT TO BE TAKEN 
FROM LIBRARV 



Nonprofit Organization 


U.S. POSTAGE 


PAID 


Permit No. 6 


Coiegwfal*, TN 37315