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Full text of "Southern Junior College catalogue 1934-35"

Southern Junior 
College 





SDA 

LD 

5101 

„S367 

„A16 

1935 



1934^1935 

Catalogue Number 
of 



COLLEGEDALE - TENNESSEE 



Catalogue Number 
Published quarterly during school session 

and weekly from June to September. 
VOLUME 6 NUMBER 1 

Entered as second-class matter, June 20, 1929, 
at the Post Office at Collegedale, Tennessee. 
Under the Act of Congress August 24, 1912. 



NOT TO BE TAKEN 
FROM LIBRARY 



Southern Junior 
College 




Annual Announcement 
1934-1935 



COLLEGEDALE - TENNESSEE 



Calendar for College Year of 1934-1935 



SEPTEMBER 


S| M| T | W| T 


F | S 


I 1 1 1 


1 


2| 3| 4| 5| 6 


7| 8 


9| 10 J 11 | 12| 13 


14 | 15 


16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 


21 ] 22 


23 | 24 j 25 | 26 | 27 


28 | 29 


30 | | 




OCTOBER 


S| M| T | W| T 


F | S 


1 | 2 | 3 | 4 


5| 6 


7| 8| 9| 10 1 11 


12 | 13 


14 | 15 | 16 1 17 | 18 


19 | 20 


21 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 


26 | 27 


28 | 29 | 30 | 31 | 




NOVEMBER 


S|M|T|W|T|F|S 


l| 2 3 


4| 5| 6| 7| 8| 9|10 


11 | 12 | 13 14 | 15 | 16| 17 


18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 


25 | 26 | 27 | 28 | 29 | 30 | 


DECEMBER 


S| M| T | W| T | F | S 


1 1 


2| 3| 4| 5| 6| 7| 8 


9| 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14| 15 


16 j 17 j 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 


23 | 24 | 25 | 26 j 27 j 28 j 29 


30 1 31 | | | | | 


JANUARY 


S| M| T | W| T | F | S 


| 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 


6| 7| 8| 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 


13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 


20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 


27 | 28 | 29 | 30 | 31 | 



FEBRUARY 


S 


| M 


T | W| T | F 


S 






1 


2 


3 


4 


5| 6| 7| 8 


9 


10 


1 n 


12 | 1 3 I 14 | 15 


16 


17 


1 w 


19 | 20 | 21 | 22 


23 


24 


| 25 


26 | 27 1 28 | 






MARCH 




S 


M 


T | W| T | F 


S 






1 


2 


3 


4 


5| 6| 7| 8 


9 


10 


11 


12 | 13 | 14| 15 


16 


17 


18 


19 | 20 | 21 | 22 


23 


24 


25 


26 | 27 | 28 | 29 


30 


31 




1 






APRIL 




S| M 


T | W| T | F 


S 


1 


2| 3| 4| 5 


6 


7 8 


9| 10 | 11 | 12 


13 


14 


15 


16 | 17| 18 | 19 


20 


21 | 22 


23 | 24 | 25 | 26 


27 


28 


29 


30 1 I | 




MAY 


S 


M 


T | W| T | F 


S 






1| 2| 3 


4 


5 


6 


7| 8| 9| 10 


11 


12 


13 


14 | 15| 16 17 


18 


19 


20 


21 | 22 | 23 | 24 


25 


26 


27 


28 | 29 | 30 | 31 




JUNE 


S 


M 


T | W| T | F 


S 






1 1 1 


1 


2 


3 


4| 5| 6| 7 


8 


9 


10 


11 | 12 | 13 f 14 


15 


16 


17 


18 | 19 | 20 1 21 


22 


23 


24 


25 | 26 | 27 | 28 


29 


30 







ID 

.4/C 

/ft*' 



CALENDAR OF EVENTS 



1934—1935 
First Semester 



September 4, Tuesday 
2:00 P.M. 
8:00 P. M. 

September 5, Wednesday 
9-12 A.M. 
2-5 P. M. 

September 6, Thursday 

September 7, Friday 
7:30 P.M. 

September 8, Saturday 
8:00 P. M. 

October 15, 16, 17 

November 29 

November 26, 27, 28 

December 2 1 — December 3 1 

January 14, 15, 16 



Registration 
Opening Address 

Registration 
Registration 

Instruction Begins 

First Vesper Service 

Faculty-Student Reception 

First Period Examinations 

Thanksgiving 

Second Period Examinations 

Christmas Vacation 

Mid-year Examinations 



Second 


Semester 


January 16 


Registration for Second 
Semester 


February 11 — 15 


Examinations for Removal 
of Conditions 


February 25, 26, 27 


Fourth Period Examinations 


April 8, 9, 10 


Fifth Period Examinations 


May 15, 16, 17 


Final Examinations 


May 17, Friday, 8:00 P. M. 


Senior Consecration Service 


May 18, Sabbath, 1 1 :00 A. M. 


Baccalaureate Sermon 


May 1 9, Sunday 

10:00 A.M. 

3:00 P.M. 


Alumni Day 
Commencement 
Alumni Banquet 



McKEE LIBRARY 
Southern Missionary College 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

S. A. Ruskjer, President Chattanooga, Tenn 

H. J. Klooster, Secretary Collegedale, Tenn. 

C. G. Ortner Chattanooga, Tenn. 

Verner Anderson Nashville, Tenn. 

H. E. Lysinger Atlanta, Ga. 

R. I. Keate Meridian, Miss. 

L. K. Dickson Orlando, Fla. 

G. A. Huse Nashville, Tenn. 

Reed S. Calvert Orlando, Fla. 

John Weaver. Chattanooga, Tenn. 

A. S. Booth . . Charlotte, N. C. 

R. G. Strickland Chattanooga, Tenn. 

H. F. Kirk Chattanooga, Tenn. 

BOARD OF ADMINISTRATION 

S. A. Ruskjer, Chairman Chattanooga, Tenn. 

H. J, Klooster, Secretary Collegedale, Tenn. 

W. A. Benjamin. . . Collegedale, Tenn. 

John Weaver Chattanooga, Tenn. 

H. E. Lysinger Atlanta, Ga. 

C. G. Ortner Chattanooga, Tenn. 

G. N. Fuller Collegedale, Tenn. 



y 

FACULTY OF THE 
COLLEGE DIVISION 



Henry J. Klooster, President 
Head of the Department of Chemistry and Biology 

Harold E. Snide 
Head of the Department of Religious Education 

Elizabeth Tollmann 
Head of the Department of English Language and Literature 

Don. C. Ludington 
Head of the Department of Vocational Education 

J. Cecil Haussler 
Head of the Department of History and Government 

Pearl L. Hall 
Head of the Department of Modern Languages 

D. Robert Edwards 
Head of the Department of Music 

Robert W. Woods 
Head of the Department of Physics and Mathematics 

Ruby Dell McGee 
Head of the Department of Education 

Frank W. Field 
Instructor in New Testament Greek 






114052 



FACULTY OF THE 

COLLEGE PREPARATORY 

DIVISION 

Henry J. Klooster, Principal 

Maude I. Jones 

English and Latin 

Pearl L. Hall 

Spanish 

J. Cecil Haussler 

History and Bible 

Don C. Ludington 

Vocational Education 

D. Robert Edwards 

Music 

Mildred Ruffin-West 

Piano 

Ellen P. Anderson 

Home Economics 

Robert W. Woods 

Mathematics and Physics 

OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 

Henry J. Klooster President 

William A. Benjamin Assistant Manager 

George N. Fuller Treasurer 

Pearl L. Hall Dean of Women 

Walter B. Clark Dean of Men 

Elizabeth Ann Tollmann Librarian 

* Registrar 

Edith Cobe t- Williams College Nurse 

Grace Butler Secretary 



INSTRUCTORS 
COLLEGE DEMONSTRATION SCHOOL 

Myrtle V. Maxwell Critic Teacher 

Mary Gartley Critic Teacher 

* Critic Teacher 

* To be Supplied 



STANDING COMMITTEES 



Religious Activities 

Harold E. Snide 
Frank W. Field 
Pearl L. Hall 
Walter B. Clark 
Don C. Ludington 
Myrtle V. Maxwell 



Student Welfare 

H. J. Klooster 
Walter B. Clark 
Pearl L. Hall 
J. Cecil Haussler 
George N. Fuller 
Robert W. Woods 



Library 

Elizabeth Ann Tollmann 
J. Cecil Haussler 
Myrtle V. Maxwell 
Maude I. Jones 
George N. Fuller 



Social Activities 

Walter B. Clark 
D. Robert Edwards 
Pearl L. Hall 
Myrtle V. Maxwell 
W. A. Benjamin 



Finance 

H. J. Klooster 
W. A. Benjamin 
G. N. Fuller 



Health 

Pearl L. Hall 
Ellen P. Anderson 
Edith Cobet-Williams 
J. Cecil Haussler 



Graduation and Scholarship 

Elizabeth Ann Tollmann 
J. Cecil Haussler 
Grace Butler 
Robert W. Woods 



Principals of Southern Training School 

G.W.Colcord 1893-1896 

W.T.Bland 1896-1898 

C.W.Irwin 1898-1900 

N.W.Lawrence 1900-1901 

J.E.Tenny 1901-1908 

M.B.VanKirk 1908-1912 

C.L.Stone 1912-1914 

L.H.Wood 1914-1915 

A. N. Atteberry 1915-1916 



Presidents of Southern Junior College 

LeoThiel 1916-1918 

L.H.Wood 1918-1922 

LeoThiel 1922-1925 

H. H. Hamilton 1925-1927 

M.E.Cady 1927-1927 

H.J.Klooster 1927- 






FACULTY ADVISERS 

Sabbath School . J. Cecil Haussler 

Missionary Volunteer Society Don C. Ludington 

Junior Class ____Robert W. Woods 

So-Ju-Conians - _ . - W. A. Benjamin 

Ministerial Seminar Harold E. Snide 

Senior Class H. J. Klooster 

Science Club R.W.Woods 

Literary Society Elizabeth A. Tollmann 







OFFICERS OF THE 
COLLEGE INDUSTRIES 



H. J. Klooster 
President 

W. A. Benjamin 
Assistant Manager 

George N. Fuller 
Treasurer 

W. C. Starkey 
Superintendent of the College Press 

H. J. Halvorsen 
Superintendent of the Department of Agriculture 

Eva Maude Wilson 
Superintendent of the College Cafeteria 

Thomas R. Huxtable 
Superintendent of the College Woodcraft Shop 



Superintendent of the College Laundry 

Paul T. Mouchon 
Engineer 

Everett Calhoun 
Superintendent of the College Broom Factory 

W. A. Benjamin 
Superintendent of the College Hosiery Mill 



*To be supplied 






SOUTHERN JUNIOR 
COLLEGE 



— c>~ 



HISTORY 



In 1893 Seventh-day Adventists began educational work 
in the South under the leadership of G. W. Colcord, who opened 
a small school at Graysville, Tennessee. The school grew 
rapidly and was finally taken over by the denomination. In 
February of 1915 one of the dormitories was destroyed by 
fire. The loss of this building together with the needs of a grow- 
ing constituency was the immediate cause for the removal of 
the school from Graysville to its present location at Collegedale. 

The Board of Managers desired a location that would 
provide not only an environment conducive to intellectual 
development, but where industries and agricultural pursuits 
might be developed. After careful consideration the Thatcher 
estate near Ooltewah was purchased, and on October 18, 1916, 
the Southern Junior College opened to receive students in its 
new location. 



OBJECTIVES 

Southern Junior College was founded to serve the young 
people of the constituency of the Seventh-day Adventist 
churches in the southeastern states. The school is, however, 
open to young people of all religious persuasions who are 
willing to live in harmony with its principles. 

The College provides education in an atmosphere that is 
permeated by Christian ideals and Christian faith. It offers 
specific training in religion, teaching its students the contents 
and significance of the Scriptures, helping them to achieve 
moral and religious standards, and establishing in them a 
sense of Christian responsibility to society. 

In an age when greatness is often confused with wealth or 
numbers, Southern Junior College desires to become great 
because of the quality of its faculty and student body, its 
standards of scholarship, culture, and conduct. The College 
therefore does not accept those students whose main purpose 

(id 



1 2 SOUTHERN JUNIOR COLLEGE 

in attending college is to increase their earning capacity, nor 
those who seek primarily social enjoyment or competition in 
intercollegiate sports. It desires rather those students whose 
purpose is to achieve high excellence of scholarship combined 
with a deep and unaffected piety. Under the guidance of the 
institution it is hoped that these students will catch the mis- 
sionary vision of the Church and be led to devote their lives 
to the service of Christ either at home or abroad. 

The College accepts a responsibility for the acquisition and 
maintenance of sound health on the part of its students. It 
has therefore established a health service which requires 
periodical physical examinations, and insures supervision over 
the physical activities of its students. 

The College aims to widen the student's range of interest 
and appreciation by introduction to the main fields of signifi- 
cant knowledge. While the primary emphasis of the education 
provided by the College is cultural rather than vocational, its 
courses do, however, offer to students elementary preparation 
for business or for the following professions: the Ministry, 
Teaching, Nursing, and Medicine. 

A distinctive feature of the work of Southern Junior College 
is the emphasis which is placed on manual labor. All students 
are required to engage in some form of remunerative labor 
while attending the College, and they are taught not only the 
dignity of labor, but also its importance as an educative 
factor, and its value in developing financial independence. 

LOCATION 

Southern Junior College is located two miles southeast of 
Ooltewah, Tennessee, on the main line of the Atlanta Division 
of the Southern Railway. It is situated in the heart of the Cum- 
berland Mountains, eighteen miles due east from Chattanooga. 
The College estate of over seven hundred acres, with its wooded 
ravines and clear streams, furnishes a picture that is both in- 
viting and satisfying and surrounds the student with an en- 
vironment that is conducive to study and mental culture. 

BUILDINGS 

The central building of Southern Junior College is the 
Administration Building, in which are located the chapel, 
library and reading room, department of commerce, depart- 
ment of music, physical, chemical and biological laboratories, 
lecture rooms, and the administrative offices of the institution. 



SOUTHERN JUNIOR COLLEGE 13 

A Normal Building was erected during 1929, which provides 
accommodations for the teacher-training department, and the 
demonstration school. 

There are at present two residence halls, each accommodat- 
ing approximately one hundred students. In addition to these 
there is more than a score of other buildings, which are used 
either to house the various industries of the College or to serve 
as residences. 

EQUIPMENT 

Library: — The College library is located on the second floor 
of the Administration Building. On the shelves of the library 
are more than 4500 bound volumes, and a large number of 
current periodicals is regularly received. The library is classified 
and catalogued according to a standard library system. 

The reading room is a large, pleasant, well-lighted room, 
which is open daily to all the students of the school. 

Laboratories: — The physical, chemical and biological labor- 
atories are located in the Administration Building adjoining the 
lecture rooms. An investment of several thousand dollars has 
been made in this department, which has provided an equip- 
ment entirely adequate for the presentation of the science 
courses now offered by the College, and the equipment is being 
enlarged by definite annual appropriations. 

Printing Department: — The printing classes are conducted 
in a large room provided in the basement of the Administration 
Building. There is also maintained a well equipped commer- 
cial printing department representing an investment of more 
than $20,000, which is housed in a separate building. Students 
who enroll in the printing classes have the advantage of obtain- 
ing a practical experience in commercial work when their 
training justifies their employment in this department. 

Dairy: — A herd of registered Jersey milch cows supplies 
the College cafeteria with milk and cream. The College is a 
member of the Hamilton County Cow Testing Association. 
The dairy herd is regularly inspected by competent inspectors, 
and patrons of the school have the assurance that every effort 
is made to supply dairy products that are clean and whole- 
some. The investment in this department is approximately 
$15,000, and provides the students in agriculture with an 
excellent laboratory for practical work. A modern milk house 
with facilities for pasteurization and refrigeration was added to 
this department in 1929. Cold storage rooms and an abundant 
supply of ice insure fresh garden products and wholesome dairy 
products at all times. 



14 SOUTHERN JUNIOR COLLEGE 

Farm: — This department has nearly four hundred acres 
under cultivation. An orchard of approximately 3,000 trees 
provides an abundant supply of apples, peaches and other fruits. 
Nearly all the fruits and vegetables used in the culinary depart- 
ment, as well as fodder and grain for the stock, are produced 
on the farm. A complete equipment of farm machinery facili- 
tates the work of this department. Students enrolled in agricul- 
ture courses have an excellent opportunity of obtaining a 
practical experience in this department while attending the 
College. 

Bakery: — A well equipped bakery supplies the bread and 
pastry demands of the culinary department and of the College 
community. 

Household Economics: — Two laboratories have been pro- 
vided for this department. The sewing room is equipped with 
cutting tables, electric sewing machines, and individual lockers 
for the students. The cooking laboratory is provided with 
individual lockers and equipment for students, including electric 
plates and ovens. 

Hosiery Mill: — Collegedale Hosiery Mill is fully equipped 
with modern machinery for the manufacture of ladies* full- 
fashioned silk hosiery. More than fifty students defray their 
school expenses by employment in this department. 

Broom Factory: — The College broom shop provides employ- 
ment for approximately twenty young men. Modern power 
machinery is provided, and steady employment for students in 
this department is assured. 

Woodcraft Shop: — The woodcraft department is housed in 
a new building recently erected on the College premises. Ap- 
proximately thirty young men are employed in this depart- 
ment in the manufacture of furniture novelties. The equip- 
ment is modern, and the health of students is safeguarded by 
a modern exhaust system that removes practically all dust 
from the shop. 



ORGANIZATIONS AND ACTIVITIES 

Since the purpose of the College is to give a Christian educa- 
tion and to train men and women for Christian service, it 
is to be expected that the organizations and activities of 
the school shall be contributory influences to these objectives. 



SOUTHERN JUNIOR COLLEGE 15 

THE CHAPEL HOUR 

The daily chapel service, which all students are required 
to attend, provides an interesting and profitable beginning 
for the day's program. The devotional part of the exercise is 
usually followed by a lecture of inspirational, cultural, or 
educational value. 

THE VESPER SERVICE 

The students are given the opportunity of participating 
each week in the Friday evening vesper service, and it has been 
repeatedly demonstrated that this experience is of inestimable 
value to them in maintaining their Christian ideals. 

THE MISSIONARY VOLUNTEER SOCIETY 

This organization aims to direct the attention of the stu- 
dents to the importance of personal devotion and the choice 
of Christian service as a life work. Weekly meetings are held 
on Sabbath afternoons. 

SEMINAR 

The Seminar is a student organization which fosters the 
activities of young men and women who are interested in 
gospel work. The meetings of the organization are held under 
the supervision and counsel of an experienced minister. 

THE BETTER MEN'S CLUB 

The Better Men's Club is an organization of the young 
men of the College who are interested in the problems of mcjdern 
youth and who aspire to ideals of Christian manhood. Weekly 
meetings are heW, which foster a high social standard, and 
which are both entertaining and educational in character. 



THE JOSHI JOTATSU KAI 

The Joshi Jotatsu Kai is an organization for the young 
women of the College similar in aims and plan of organization 
to the men's organization mentioned above. 



16 SOUTHERN JUNIOR COLLEGE 

MUSICAL ORGANIZATIONS 

The inspiration and training which young people obtain 
from association with each other in musical activities is highly 
valuable. The musical organizations of the College consist 
of a chorus, an orchestra, and band, and rehearsals are held 
twice each week. 

SCIENCE CLUB 

Of particular interest to premedical students, and to those 
pursuing science courses is the Science Club. Meetings of this 
organization are held each week. Scientific papers and lectures 
are presented by members of the College staff, and by other 
professional and scientific men. 

LITERARY SOCIETY 

This organization is open to all students enrolled in English 
courses. It is the purpose of the society to foster, through 
student participation in programs and informal discussions, 
an interest in and an appreciation of the aesthetic values of life. 

REGISTRATION 

Registration begins Tuesday, September 4, 1934, at 2 p. m. 
It is highly desirable that all students enter at the beginning 
of the school year. Experience has repeatedly demonstrated 
that this is of great advantage to both students and College. 
Those who enter late frequently find difficulty in the organiza- 
tion of a satisfactory program. Special help must be given to 
them; the class is therefore retarded, and such students fre- 
quently become discouraged under the burdens of accumulating 
daily and back work. For these reasons all students are strongly 
urged to enter at the opening of the school session. Regulations 
governing students entering late will be found under Course 
of Study Regulations, page 35. 

Students entering the school for the first time should have 
the school they have previously attended send a transcript 
to the Registrar to be evaluated before the opening of school. 
Students entering from private schools will be granted stand- 
ing only when the grades presented are validated by a 
properly constituted accrediting agency, or by entrance exam- 
inations. 




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SOUTHERN JUNIOR COLLEGE 17 

All students will be required to take examinations at the 
time of registration in reading, penmanship, spelling, scholastic 
aptitude, and general intelligence. Assignment of students to 
members of the staff who will act as counsellors will be made at 
the time of registration. A physical examination made by the 
College physician is also required of all students at the time 
of entrance. 



WHAT TO BRING 

Each student is expected to bring his own bedding — three 
sheets, three pillow cases, one bedspread, a pillow, and blank- 
ets or comforters; also hot water bag, towels, dresser scarfs, 
and cover for study table. Those desiring rugs, carpets, waste- 
paper baskets, or curtains should provide them. Strong, sub- 
stantial laundry-bags should be provided for carrying clothing 
to and from the laundry. School supplies, stationery, and toilet 
articles may be purchased at the supply store. 



ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS 

The school is open to young men and women of good moral 
character who are willing to live in harmony with its principles 
and standards. While no religious test is applied, all are required 
to attend church services and to show proper respect for the 
Scriptures. It is distinctly understood that every student 
who applies for admission to the College thereby pledges him- 
self to observe all its regulations. If this pledge is broken, 
it follows that by such infraction he forfeits his membership 
in the school, and if retained longer, it is only by the forbear- 
ance of the faculty. It is also a part of the student's contract 
that he will, to the best of his ability, perform all the duties 
assigned to him in the industrial program of the institution. 

Children under 14 years of age will not be received into the 
dormitories except by previous arrangement with the Presi- 
dent, but arrangement can be made for their accommodation 
in approved private families residing in the vicinity of the 
College. 

Excepting regularly employed members of the College staff, 
employment will not be given to any individual who is not 
registered as a student with the intention of taking class work. 



18 SOUTHERN JUNIOR COLLEGE 

HOW TO REACH THE COLLEGE 

Ooltewah is on the Atlanta Division of the Southern Rail- 
way, fifteen miles east of Chattanooga. Five passenger trains 
each day pass here, and nearly all stop. 

Students coming from west of Chattanooga should take the 
Southern Railway, if possible, to avoid changing stations 
there. From many points through trains to Ooltewah can be 
had. Those coming on the N. C. & St. L. Railway must change 
stations in Chattanooga. Tickets should be bought to Ooltewah, 
and baggage checked to that point. 

All students taking the local trains from Chattanooga or 
Atlanta which stop at Collegedale, should buy their tickets 
and check their baggage to that point, and turn their baggage 
checks with their tickets over to the conductor in order to have 
baggage taken off at Collegedale. This will save time and 
trouble for both the College and railway company. 

Students from the East should take the Southern Railway 
if possible. Connections with this road can be made at Knoxville 
and Atlanta. Those who arrive by bus from Chattanooga or 
Knoxville may get off at the Ooltewah crossroads. Students 
should notify the College by letter or telegram, stating the hour 
of their arrival at Ooltewah. If this is done, a conveyance will 
meet them and bring them directly to the College. 

The College office may be called on the telephone through 
the Chattanooga exchange by calling County 2602 between 
the hours of seven A. M. and six P. M. There is no toll charge 
for calls from Chattanooga. 



GENERAL REGULATIONS 



1 1 is the aim of Southern Junior College to develop Christian 
character, as well as scholarship of the best quality; and its 
disciplinary code is designed with this objective in view. 

The atmosphere of the College is such that only the student 
who is in earnest and who desires to work will be happy. The 
following regulations have proved for many years to be sound, 
and will therefore apply to all students enrolled in the College. 

1 . Students are expected to refrain from all improper 
behavior; from profane or unbecoming language; from the use 
of tobacco and alcoholic drinks; from card playing; from attend- 
ance at pool rooms, theaters, dances or places of questionable 
amusement; from having or reading pernicious literature; 
and from having or playing cheap popular music. 

2. Improper associations, flirting, strolling together, sur- 
reptitious meetings, escorting on the campus, loitering about 
the buildings or grounds, cannot be permitted, since these things 
militate against success in school work. Young ladies may 
receive gentlemen callers in the home parlors with the per- 
mission of the Dean and the approval of parents or guardians. 
This privilege is granted only to students who are sufficiently 
mature, and whose general conduct and record of scholarship 
are satisfactory. Note writing and sentimental correspondence 
between students in the College is a violation of the principles 
of the institution. 

3. Whenever, in the judgment of the faculty, the character 
of a student's work is such that attendance is no longer a 
profit to him, or the nature of his conduct is such that he is 
a detriment to the school, the parents or guardians will be 
asked to remove him, or he will be dismissed. 

4. The College forbids the use of its name by students in 
making personal purchases, and hence may not be held respon- 
sible for debts contracted by either students or class organiza- 
tions. Provision is made for the safe keeping of valuables in 
the Business Office, and therefore the College assumes no 
responsibility for loss by students of either money or other 
valuables. 

(19) 



20 SOUTHERN JUNIOR COLLEGE 

5. Regular attendance at all school appointments is expected 
of every student. Those who for justifiable reasons find it 
necessary to miss any school appointment should obtain from 
the President, in advance, permission to be absent. Unavoid- 
able absences will be excused when approved by parents or 
Dean and ratified by the Recording Clerk. On the first day of 
their return to school students should present their excuse 
blanks to the Recording Clerk for approval and indorsement. 
Failure to present this excuse blank will bar the student from 
classes until satisfactory adjustment has been made. For three 
unexcused absences occurring in any one semester students will 
be required to pay $1.00 in cash or to perform five hours of 
labor without compensation, at the discretion of the President. 

6. If the number of absences of a student from any class 
exceeds fifteen per cent of the total appointments for a semester, 
the student will forfeit his grade in that class. Students may 
apply for exemption from this rule in cases of serious illness or 
for other causes not under the students* control. Class standing 
will be granted or forfeited according to the merit of the case. 

7. Absences the last period before or the first period after 
regular holidays or week-end vacations will be unexcused ab- 
sences and will carry double penalty. 

8. Any student who desires to carry on an enterprise for 
the purpose of gain, shall first secure the consent of the Presi- 
dent. 

9. Students are forbidden to use pass keys in any of the 
buildings of the institution except when such keys have been 
issued by the Business Office and proper authority has been 
delegated to the student. A fine of five dollars will be assessed 
against any student who without permission is found on a fire 
esscape or roof of any building, or who enters any room or 
building by window, transom, or by use of pass keys or other 
improper means. 

10. Students are advised against the promiscuous use of 
cameras and kodaks. Unconventional and questionable pic- 
tures do not rightly represent Southern Junior College, and 
therefore the taking of such pictures constitutes a violation of 
its principles. 

11. Attendance at social gatherings is permitted only upon 
approval of the President, and those planning such gatherings 



SOUTHERN JUN IOR COLLEGE 2 1 

should previously confer with him. Requests for all such social 
functions should be submitted long enough in advance to permit 
proper consideration. The names of those desiring to participate 
should be submitted except in cases where general permission 
is given. 

12. All persons are forbidden to cut trees of any kind on 
College property, or to mutilate trees or shrubbery in any way. 
Students are warned against carelessness in the use of fire 
in the timber on the College estate. In all cases where damage 
is done to institutional property by students they will be held 
personally responsible if the offending parties are known. If 
the parties responsible for damage or breakage are not known, 
and where property damage cannot be assessed against the 
individual, assessment will be made against the entire student 
body, 

13. No jewelry such as bracelets, rings, or lockets may be 
worn. All extremes in thin waists, length of skirts or sleeves, 
high heels, and low necks, should be avoided, and in the whole 
wardrobe health, good taste, modesty, and economy should 
be considered. A special leaflet setting forth in detail the dress 
standards of Southern Junior College has been published, and 
should be carefully studied by prospective students. 

1 4. The Board of Managers requires all unmarried students, 
whose parents or legal guardians do not live in the vicinity 
of the College, to reside in the dormitories. Failure to comply 
with these regulations will justify the faculty in declining to re- 
ceive a student for matriculation and classification. Students 
who are able to furnish evidence satisfactory to the Board that 
they are unable to meet the expense of living in the homes will 
be permitted to make approved arrangements with private 
families where they may work for their board and room. This 
plan is, however, not the ideal one, and is therefore not recom- 
mended. 

15. Those who reside in the College community and who 
desire to call upon one of the students or teachers residing in 
the dormitory are requested to confer with the Dean in charge 
immediately upon entering the building. 

16. Attendance is expected at all regular religious services, 
and students will be required to file each week a record of 
their attendance at these services. 



22 SOUTHERN JUNIOR COLLEGE 

1 7. Students are advised not to bring firearms to the College 
since they may not be used on the College premises, nor are 
students permitted to have firearms in their possession in the 
dormitories. 

1 8. Students are advised not to bring automobiles or motor- 
cycles to the College. Experience has demonstrated that in 
many cases irregularities detrimental to the student's progress 
have resulted from the use of automobiles while in school. 
For this reason the College requires that all motor vehicles 
that are brought to the institution by students shall be used 
thereafter only with written permission of the President or 
an officer of the College to whom this responsibility may be 
delegated. Keys to all motor vehicles must be deposited in the 
office. 

19. Any regulation adopted during the year and announced 
to the students will have the same force as though printed in 
this catalogue. 






THE COLLEGE HOMES 

Special care is taken to make the home life not only at- 
tractive, but efficient in the cultivation of those habits of life 
and graces of character which distinguish the refined Christian 
man or woman. Teachers and students share one family life 
with common aims and interests. The regulations are reason- 
able, and are adapted to secure rest, freedom, and the happiness 
incident to ideal family life. The following regulations apply 
specifically to those residing in the College homes: 

1. Study periods should be carefully observed. Quietness 
must be maintained. Loud talking in the halls or in any of the 
rooms, visiting and heavy walking in any part of the building 
distract the industrious student. Students are not to leave 
their own rooms during these hours except in cases of necessity 
and then only by permission of the person in charge. 

2. Absence from the dormitory after evening worship with- 
out permission is considered a serious violation of the regu- 
lations of the College. 

3. Students are expected to care for their own rooms. 

4. Attendance at all regular religious services is expected. If 
a student is ill, or for some other good reason cannot attend these 
meetings, he should obtain from the Dean in charge permission 
to be absent, and he will then be expected to remain quietly 
in his own room. 

5. Students resident in the College homes are not to stain 
or varnish the woodwork in their rooms. Requests for service 
of this kind should be lodged by the students at the Business 
Office. 

6. Students are not permitted to cook food in their rooms, 
and therefore such appliances as chafing dishes, alcohol and 
electric stoves, and other heating appliances are not permitted 
in the College homes. 

7. All necessary dental work should be cared for by the 
student before entering the College, since serious interference 
in school work results from periodic appointments with the 
dentist during the school term. 

8. Students are not permitted to carry dishes or kitchen 
utensils to their rooms without the permission of the matron. 

(23) 



24 SOUTHERN JUNIOR COLLEGE 

9. Permission to make business trips to Ooltewah and 
permission to accept invitations to private homes in the vicinity 
of the College must be obtained by the student from the Dean 
in charge of the dormitory in which the student resides. 

10. Students who desire to make business trips to Chatta- 
nooga must submit a written request to the President, which 
has the approval of the Dean and also of the superintendent of 
the industrial department in which the student is employed. 
Requests for business trips to Chattanooga will be granted not 
more frequently than once in six weeks except in case of 
emergency. 

The College provides bus service to Chattanooga, and all 
students who plan to make business trips to the city are ex- 
pected to use this service. A charge of 75 cents is made for the 
round trip. 

1 1 . Except in cases of emergency students are permitted to 
go to Ooltewah not more frequently than once each week. 

12. Parents are urged not to make frequent requests for their 
children to come home or visit friends, since such absences 
seriously interfere with the student's class work. In all cases 
where parents desire their children to come home, a written 
request on a form provided by the College must be addressed 
to the President direct, and should not be enclosed in a letter 
to the student. Permission for leave of absence will be granted 
not more frequently than once in six weeks except in cases of 
emergency. 

Absences from classes occurring while the student is on leave 
of absence will be considered unexcused except in cases of 
serious illness. 

13. Parents are requested not to send food to their children, 
unless it be fruit. The cafeteria serves regular meals each day, 
and is presided over by a competent dietitian. The College 
cannot be responsible for the health of students who eat ir- 
regularly and without regard to dietary principles. 

1 4. Students are requested not to bring radio sets and phono- 
graphs to the College. 

Entertainment of Guests 

The College welcomes the parents of students enrolled in 
school, to visit the institution frequently. No charge is made for 
rooms occupied by visitors for two or three days. Those stay- 
ing for a week or more will be charged one dollar a day. 



EXPENSES 



UNIT COST PLAN 

The Unit Cost Plan was adopted by the Board of Trustees 
of the College for the school year, 1934-1935, to cover the ed- 
ucational costs of students. 



The Unit Cost Plan was first suggested by a report published 
by the United States Bureau of Education based upon a study 
of the receipts of privately endowed institutions of higher 
learning for the year 1923-1924. At that time a little more than 
one-half of the current expenses of endowed educational in- 
stitutions came from students; one-fourth from the interest 
on endowment, and another one-fourth from gifts and other 
sources; in other words, the students paid less than one-half 
the cost of educating them. Under the Unit Cost Plan students 
who are financially able to pay the cost of their education will 
be expected to do so, while those whose financial circumstances 
make it impossible to pay the full amount will receive the 
benefits of the operating subsidy of the College. The plan in 
brief is as follows: — 



1 . It budgets the College on an adequate but not an extrava- 
gant financial basis. 



2. It fixes the cost of board, room, and tuition of the indivi- 
dual student as one unit cost of the total. 



3. It divides the annual operating expenses of the College 
by the estimated student enrollment, with proper allowance 
for those registered for less than a full program, thus establish- 
ing the unit cost for educating each student. 



4. It makes available the income of the present subsidy for 
reducing the cost of tuition to desirable students who can 
show that they can not pay the full rates. 

25 



26 SOUTHERN JUNIOR COLLEGE 

ENTRANCE DEPOSIT 

Each student who resides in the College dormitories will be 
required to pay an entrance deposit of $50.00. This deposit will 
be held as a reserve to apply on the student's expenses the last 
period he attends school. Resident students in the Elementary 
Department will pay an entrance deposit of $10.00, and stu- 
dents in the Preparatory and College Departments, $20.00. 



PERIOD CHARGES 

The school year is divided into nine periods of four weeks 
each. A charge of $29.50 for boys and $26.50 for girls each 
period is made to all students who reside in the dormitories. 
This charge includes room, laundry, board, and medical fee. 
The medical fee provides for physical examination at the open- 
ing of school, Workmen's Compensation Insurance, and nursing 
care not to exceed three weeks, but does not include physician's 
charges. 



BOARD 

Three meals are served each day in the College cafeteria. 
As far as possible home life at the table is preserved. Students 
residing in the dormitories are expected to take their meals in 
the cafeteria. The charge for board for dormitory students 
is included in the period charge, and is based on $4.00 per week 
for boys and $3.25 for girls. This charge permits students to 
include in their menu an unlimited choice of such foods as are 
produced by the College farm and garden; other foods and 
desserts will be supplied on a cash basis. 



TUITION 

The tuition charge is determined on the Unit Cost Plan, 
described more fully on page 25, adopted in recent years by some 
of the leading educational institutions. This plan divides the 
operating budget of the College by the estimated number of 
students to be accepted. 

The plan fixes the unit cost of each student and eliminates 
those fees which are common to all courses. The charges thus 
determined are as follows: 



EXPENSES 27 

College Department 

Full year's program of 32 semester hours $528.00 

Three-quarter program of 24 semester hours __396.00 

Half program of 1 6 semester hours 264.00 

The above charges are based on a cost for each 
semester hour of 1 6.50 

These charges are payable in nine payments, the entrance 
deposit being reserved to apply on the final or ninth payment. 



Academic Department 

Full year's program as listed in catalogue $480.00 

Three-quarter program — 3 units 360.00 

Half program — 2 units 240.00 

The above charges are based on a unit cost of 120.00 

These charges are payable in nine payments, the entrance 
deposit being reserved to apply on the final or ninth payment. 



Tuition in the Elementary School 
In the elementary school the following charges include 
medical examination, library, manual training, lecture course 
fees, and tuition for the school year: 



First Grade $30.00 

Second Grade 30.00 

Third Grade 30.00 

Fourth Grade 34.50 

Fifth Grade . 41.00 

Sixth Grade 50.00 

Seventh Grade 61 .00 

Eighth Grade 70.00 



These charges are payable in nine payments. 

The College will not employ elementary school pupils. 
Tuition Certificates will not be accepted in payment of these 
tuition charges. 



28 SOUTHERN JUNIOR COLLEGE 

Fees Charged in College Department Each Semester 

Chemistry 30.00 

Manual Arts 6.00 

Printing t . 15.00 

Physiology 15.00 

Zoology 24.00 

Normal Sewing 7.50 

College Physics 1 8.00 

Clothing and Textiles 6.00 

Food and Dietetics 1 5.00 

Typewriting Practice, per semester, 1 hr. a day 9.00 
Typewriting Practice, per semester, 2 hrs. a day 15.00 

STUDENT AID 

Financial assistance to worthy students is made available 
as follows: 

1 . Scholarships : Scholarships will be granted to worthy 
students who are unable to meet the tuition charges, in pro- 
portion to the individual student's need. Those who wish this 
assistance should write to the registrar for a blank on which 
to make application. 

2. Tuition Certificates: A tuition certificate will be given 
each month to those students who are employed by the College 
or in affiliated industries where the rate of compensation is 
less than forty-five cents per hour. 

a. The tuition certificate granted will have value according 
to the number of hours of labor the student has performed 
during the month, multiplied by the difference between the 
maximum rate of the department and forty-five cents per hour. 

6. Tuition certificates will be accepted in payment of 
tuition and class fees, and only to the value of two-thirds of 
the total tuition and fee expense of the student. The other 
one-third must be paid in cash or by labor credit. 

PAYMENT OP ACCOUNTS 

Statements, each of which will present the charges for one 
four-week period, are sent out the first of each month beginning 
October 1, 1934. Students are then allowed fifteen days in 
which to make satisfactory settlement of their accounts. 
Failure to make prompt settlement within the period specified 
may terminate the student's connection with the school. 



EXPENSES 29 

The College has made its charges as low as will permit 
educational efficiency. It must, therefore, expect prompt pay- 
ment of all outstanding accounts; and to encourage prompt 
payment, a discount of ten per cent will be allowed on that 
part of each period's school expenses (board, room, laundry, 
and tuition) which has not been paid by labor credit. All 
accounts that remain unpaid thirty days after statement is 
presented will bear six per cent per annum interest. Students 
will be permitted to write mid-year or final examinations 
only when their accounts are settled, or satisfactory arrange- 
ments have been made with the Finance Committee. Grade 
transcripts and diplomas will be issued only to students whose 
accounts are paid in full. 



TRANSPORTATION 

Free transportation to and from Ooltewah will be provided 
the first three days of each semester and the last three days of 
the school term. At intermediate times a charge of 50 cents 
will be made. 



GENERAL FEES 

Change of Program 1 .00 

Entrance and Special Examinations 1 .00 

Key Deposit 1.00 

Diploma 3.50 

Tool Checks .50 

Chorus, Band or Orchestra per semester 3.50 



SCHOLARSHIPS 

Through the courtesy of the Southern Publishing Associa- 
tion the following scholarship is made available to prospective 
students: 

(a) The student is required to put in 500 canvassing hours 
during the summer months and deliver at retail prices $750 
worth of the publications of the Association. 

(b) When the $750 is paid to the Book and Bible House, a 
credit of $400 will be transferred to the College, and in addition 
the student will receive from the Publishing House a cash bonus 
of $75. 



30 SOUTHERN JUNIOR COLLEGE 

A student who earns his scholarship in this way will be given 
in addition, scholarship aid sufficient to cover tuition for a full 
college or college preparatory program. 

This plan will not only meet all the regular school expenses 
of the student, but provides also the cash necessary for clothing 
and incidental expenses. 

A proportionate part of the scholarship will be applied each 
month on the student's expenses, and if there is a balance un- 
paid the student will be expected to settle the account month 
by month. 



TUITION SCHOLARSHIPS 

Each year the College awards several $50 cash scholar- 
ships to be applied on tuition. These scholarships are awarded 
on the basis of scholarship, character, personality, and promise 
of leadership. Details may be had by writing the College. 
Announcement is made at the annual convocation of the stu- 
dents to whom such scholarships have been awarded. 



CHARGES FOR MUSIC 

Students who enroll for music are expected to continue 
taking lessons for at least a half-year. 

College Preparatory students are charged at the rate of one 
academic unit for each lesson taken per week. College students 
will be charged on the basis of four semester hours. The use of 
a piano for practice is included in this charge. 

No refund on lessons will be given to students who drop their 
work during a semester, except in cases of illness or withdrawal 
from the College. The music teacher sometimes finds that the 
hour set aside for a lesson is lost because the pupil fails to 
appear. For this reason the student will be expected to take 
the lesson at the hour assigned. In no case will lessons which 
are lost on account of the student's absence be made up. 

DISCOUNTS 

No reduction from charges will be made for absence of a few 
weeks during any part of the year, unless in the judgment of the 
Treasurer such absence is absolutely necessary. 

All charges will be made out for even weeks, so that a fraction 
of a week is counted as a week. 



EXPENSES 31 

In case of illness the actual cost of providing a physician , 
and a small sum for the tray service of meals sent to student- 
rooms, will be charged to the student's account. 

A discount of 10 per cent will be given for prompt payment 
of board, room, laundry and tuition. 

A discount of 5 per cent will be given on the tuition and 
room rent of a student when paid in advance for the year. If 
there are two students from the same family, a discount of 7 
per cent is allowed on tuition and rent, if paid in advance for 
the year. If the expenses of three students who are not depen- 
dent upon the College to supply work in excess of 50 per cent of 
the monthly charge are met by one individual, a discount on 
tuition and room rent of 10 per cent will be allowed for the 
prompt monthly settlement of account. An additional 5 per 
cent will be given for each additional student up to a maximum 
of 25 per cent. This discount will be given only when the pay- 
ment of the account is received on or before the settlement 
date. No discount will be allowed for payment made by post- 
dated checks. 



LABOR 

Many letters are received from prospective students asking 
for work sufficient to pay all their expenses. Since the work of 
the school is performed by students, we are glad to give to those 
who prove themselves willing and capable, all the work that 
they can well undertake without neglecting their class work. 
Only those students who have proven themselves to the manage- 
ment in previous years' attendance will be allowed to attempt 
to work their entire way through school, and then only on a 
restricted class program. 

Students who apply for admission to the College with the 
intention of obtaining employment by which to accumulate 
a labor credit with which to meet school expenses will be re- 
quired to pay an entrance deposit of twenty-five dollars. This 
deposit cannot be withdrawn but must be applied on school 
expenses. Students should not plan to register for a semester's 
class work until they have accumulated a credit of at least 
one hundred dollars. 

No cash may be drawn from the Business Office on accounts. 
Parents may deposit money in the Business Office, where it will 
be kept in the safe to be drawn on by the students for personal 
expenses. 



32 SOUTHERN JUNIOR COLLEGE 

Students who are working their entire way through school 
and who have a credit balance may draw ten per cent of their 
earnings in cash for incidental expenses, and may authorize 
the payment of an additional ten per cent to the church treasurer 
for tithe if they so desire. 

A student who has a credit balance, as the result of labor, 
at the time of graduation or departure from the College, may 
transfer this credit to a member of his immediate family, but 
may not draw more than ten per cent in cash. 

All purchases at the College Store should be paid for in 
cash. When exceptions to this rule are made, a carrying charge 
of 10 per cent will be added to the account. 

Believing that work is of practical value and conducive to 
health and study, the school requires each student to perform 
six hours of work per week. There is no work required for which 
the student is not paid. The following regulations will apply 
to students in industrial work: 



1. Students must refrain from conversation that hinders 
their faithful performance of the work in the shortest time 
consistent with thoroughness. 

2. Any student who finds it necessary to be absent from 
assigned labor, must find a substitute to perform his work, 
and then arrange with the department head for the substitu- 
tion. In case of sudden illness, the student should notify the 
department superintendent. No work may be reassigned to 
another student. 

3. No student should come depending on working a major 
part of his expenses without definite arrangement with the 
management, as the school makes no guarantee of furnishing 
work beyond the six hours per week required of each student. 
The rate paid for student labor varies somewhat according to 
the character of the work and the efficiency of the student. 
As far as possible students are employed on a piecework basis. 

4. Those who register for full class work will be permitted to 
work not more than 20 hours per week, and those registering 
for three-fourths class work will be limited to 30 hours per 
week. In no case will a student be paid for additional hours of 
work except upon approval of the faculty. 



COURSE OF STUDY 
REGULATIONS 



1. Students are expected to make themselves familiar with 
all regulations regarding the course of study. 

2. Four units in grades 9 and 1 0, and four and one-half 
units in grades 11 and 12 of the College Preparatory depart- 
ment or thirty-two semester hours in the College departments 
constitute a full year's work. Requests for more than full work 
may be made to the Scholarship Committee; but not more than 
five units in the College Preparatory department, or thirty-six 
semester hours in the College department will be granted to 
any student in an academic year of thirty-six weeks, nor will 
permission to carry extra work be granted to any student who 
has not maintained a B average in scholarship the preceding 
semester. 

3. Students entering the College for the first time should re- 
quest the principals of schools previously attended to send a 
transcript of all grades direct to the Registrar of Southern 
Junior College before date of registration. 

4. Students who cannot show official credits from accredited 
schools or colleges upon entering the College will be admitted 
as special students, but will not be eligible to graduation 
except by examination in those subjects for which they 
cannot furnish official credits. 

5. No individual connected with the College shall receive 
private lessons or engage in teaching except by permission of 
the President. 

6. Examinations for the removal of delayed credit grades 
received the first semester will be held in February and at the be- 
ginning of the next College year; for delayed credit grades re- 
ceived in the second semester, examinations will be held at the 
beginning of the next College year and the following February. 
Delayed credit grades may not be removed by examinations at 
any other time. 

(33) 



34 SOUTHERN JUNIOR COLLEGE 

A student who redeems a delayed credit grade will receive 
a grade of "D" only, except when for special reason the faculty 
shall vote otherwise, upon the application of the student. 

7. No student shall enter or drop any class without present- 
ing to the instructor of that class a permit from the Registrar. 
This permit should be countersigned by the instructor and filed 
by the student in the Business Office. 

8. Reports of scholarship and deportment are made in 
duplicate to parents and students at the close of each school 
period. The grades obtained by a student at the close of each 
semester are permanently recorded for future reference. 

9. No diplomas or grade transcripts will be issued until 
financial obligations have been settled or satisfactorily arranged. 
Students will not be permitted to write mid-year or final 
examinations who have not made satisfactory financial arrange- 
ments in the Business Office for the payment of their accounts. 

10. Upon the completion of a course, a complete statement 
of a student's grades is issued without charge. If additional 
copies of the transcript are requested, there will be a charge 
of one dollar for each transcript issued. 

1 1. A "unit" is defined to be the amount of credit granted 
for one subject satisfactorily pursued during a year of thirty- 
six weeks, through forty-five minute recitation periods, five 
days a week; or the equivalent. 

12. A "semester-hour" represents the credit granted when 
a subject is successfully pursued through a semester of eighteen 
weeks with one sixty-minute hour of recitation per week. 

13. After the first two weeks, any request for a change in 
the student's program will be referred to the Scholarship 
Committee. A fee of one dollar must accompany requests for 
change of program. The fee is refunded if the request is denied. 

14. Correspondence work with other schools may not be 
carried on while in residence except by special permission. 

15. The following system of marking is used: A, Superior, 
94-100; B, Above Average, 88-93; C, Average, 81-87; D, 
Below Average, 75-80; E, Delayed Credit; F, Failure; W, 
Honorable Withdrawal. 



COURSE OF STUDY REGULATIONS 35 

1 6. A student whose work is reported unsatisfactory in two or 
more classes in any school period will not be permitted to remain 
in school unless a satisfactory explanation can be given such as 
serious illness, etc. In such cases the student may be reclassified. 

17. The extent to which students may participate in extra- 
curricular activities is subject to definite regulation in order 
to encourage students in maintaining satisfactory standards 
of scholarship. The details may be obtained by applying to 
the Registrar. 

18. Students who enter the College late will not be permitted 
to register for full work, but their program of studies will be 
arranged according to the ability of the student as revealed by 
his past scholastic record. 

19. Students who register for first year College courses will 
be required to take an examination in the fundamentals of 
English at the time of registration. Those who show themselves 
to be deficient will be required to take the course in Introduc- 
tory English, for which no credit is given. 



REQUIREMENTS FOR 
GRADUATION 



1 . Credit toward graduation will not be given for partially 
completed courses. 

2. Transcripts for all work completed in other schools must 
be on file before a student is checked for graduation. 

3. The minimum requirement for graduation from the 
College Preparatory course is sixteen units, part of which is 
prescribed, and part of which is freely elective. Details of the 
courses offered may be found under the Summary of Courses. 
The minimum requirement for graduation from Junior College 
courses is sixty-four semester hours. 

4. Students graduating from any course must meet the 
standard prescribed by the Faculty in spelling, penmanship, 
and grammar. 

5. No credit toward graduation is given for less than two 
years in either an ancient or a modern language. 

6. Honor credits equal to the number of hours or units of 
work covered will be required for graduation from any course. 
These honor credits are granted as follows: For a grade of A, 
three honor credits; for a grade of B, two honor credits; for 
a grade of C, one honor credit; grades below C, no honor credits. 
Hence students in both College and Preparatory departments 
must maintain an average of C or better in order to be eligible 
for graduation. 

7. Students whose record at the time of graduation shows 
an average grade of B or better will be granted Honors diplomas. 

8. No College student will be admitted to the senior class 
who lacks more than 24 honor credits, or who will, upon the 
completion of the classes for which he is then registered, lack 
more than eight hours of completing the course from which 
he is being graduated. 

(36) 



REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION 37 

9. No student will be admitted to the junior class who 
will, upon completion of the classes for which he is then register- 
ed, lack more than five units or thirty-six hours of completing 
the course from which he wishes to be graduated. 

10. Summer school graduation is limited to students com- 
pleting College courses. Such graduates must complete their 
work in the summer school following their graduation, and must 
be short only such courses as are offered in the summer school. 

The summer school graduate may participate in all class 
functions, but is not eligible to election as class president. 

11. No student will be granted a diploma who has 
not spent the year preceding graduation in attendance at 
Southern Junior College, and who has not earned three units 
of credit while in residence. 



COLLEGE ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS 

Students who apply for admission to any junior college 
course must have met the college preparatory requirements 
as outlined in this catalogue, or must hold a high school diploma 
from an accredited secondary school and must present in official 
transcript the following specific courses as a part of the sixteen 
required units: 

English, 3 units 
Mathematics, 2 units 
Social Science, 2 units 
Science, 1 unit 
Vocational Education, I unit 
Language, 2 units 

In addition to these specific requirements there are certain 
departmental prerequisites the student will be required to 
meet. Details may be had by applying to the Registrar. 



EXTENSION COURSES 

Southern Junior College offers no extramural instruction; 
therefore all work for which credit is given must be completed 
in residence. 



DEPARTMENT OF 
THEOLOGY and MISSIONS 

Harold E. Snide and Frank W. Field 



The importance of a knowledge of the Bible as a part of 
a liberal education need not be emphasized. The College 
maintains the Department of Theology with a larger objective 
in view than that of familiarizing the student with the literary 
masterpieces of the Scriptures. A systematic and intelligent 
study of the Scriptures is encouraged primarily because of the 
value of such study upon the development of character, and 
secondly to give students a vision of their responsibility in 
Christian service. 



Courses 1 and 2 The Teachings of Jesus 

A careful study of the teachings of Jesus Christ as given 
in the four Gospels. Attention will be given to the application 
of His teachings to the problems of His age and succeeding ones. 

Two semesters. Four hours. 



Course 3 The Book of Acts 

The study of the rise and development of the early Christian 
church as given in the New Testament Book of Acts. 

First semester. Three hours. 



Course 4 The Pauline Epistles 

A study of the establishment of the Gentile Christian churches 
by the Apostle Paul and his co-workers. A critical study is made 
of the founding of these churches, the character of their mem- 
bers, and the questions which disturbed them, etc. 

Second semester. Three hours. 
(38) 



DEPARTMENT OF THEOLOGY AND MISSIONS 39 

Course 5 The Prophecies of Daniel 

"No sublimer study can occupy the mind than the study 
of books in which He who sees the end from the beginning, 
looking forward through all the ages, gives through His in- 
spired prophets a description of coming events for the benefit 
of those whose lot it would be to meet them.*' Such a study is 
found in the Prophecies of Daniel. The student is expected 
to familiarize himself with the general and detailed expressions 
of this book. Research work establishing the historical setting 
of the prophetic portions of the book is required. 
Not given 1934-1935. First semester. Three hours. 

Course 6 The Revelation 

The book of Revelation is analyzed, problems of inter- 
pretation are investigated, and the spiritual lessons applicable 
to all time are suggested. Second semester. Three hours. 

Not given 1934-1935. 

Course 7 Pastoral Training I 

This course is designed for those who plan definitely to 
enter the gospel ministry. The organization of the church, a 
study of accepted evangelistic methods, and a study of a stan- 
dard text on homiletics are included in this course. 

Two semesters. Four hours. 

Course 8 Ministerial Field Work I 

This course should be taken in conjunction with Pastoral 
Training I. The student is expected to carry on actual minis- 
terial work under the supervision of the Dean and his assistants. 
Periodic conference hours will be held for the discussion of 
methods and practice in evangelistic service. No credit will 
be given unless the course is pursued through two semesters. 

Two semesters. Two hours. 

Course 9 Pastoral Training n 

A continuation of Course 7 above. A study of the plan 
and structure of the sermon, the effective organization of 
material, the art of illustration, and treatment of texts, the 
minister as a preacher, pastor and administrator. 

Two semesters. Four hours. 



40 SOUTHERN JUNIOR COLLEGE 

Course 10 Ministerial Field Work II 

This course should be taken in conjunction with Pastoral 
Training II. The course consists of the practice of preaching 
in churches in the vicinity of the College with criticism by the 
instructor. No credit will be given unless the course is pursued 
through two semesters. Two semesters. Two hours. 

Courses 11 and 12 Public Speaking and Reading 

The development of personal power through oral inter- 
pretation of masterpieces of literature and through preparation 
and delivery of short sermons and addresses, correction of 
mannerisms, development of effective mental, physical, and 
vocal habits of speaking and reading. 

Two semesters. Four hours. 

Courses 13 and 14 Bible Worker's Training 

This course is designed for young women who plan to enter 
the Bible work. Students are prepared to assist in evangelistic 
campaigns and for private Bible work. Preparation and 
presentation of Bible readings in class, study of methbd in 
both public and private work, preparation of candidates for 
baptism, and careful outlining of the doctrinal truths of the 
Scriptures. Two semesters. Six hours. 

For other courses offered students in Theology see the out- 
line of courses under the Departments of English, Languages, 
History, and Science. 



DEPARTMENT OF 
HISTORY 



J. Cecil Haussler 

"Let history be considered from the divine point of view. 

Such study will give broad, comprehensive views 

of life. It will help the youth to understand something of its 
relations and dependencies, how wonderfully we are bound 
together in the great brotherhood of society and nations.'* 
— "Education," p. 238. 

Courses 1 and 2 Survey of European History 

A general survey of the history of Europe from the Roman 
Empire to Modern Times with major attention to the social, 
cultural, economic and religious interests and movements. 
The Decline and Fall of Rome, the rise of the Papacy, The 
Holy Roman Empire, the Crusades, the development of Western 
European nations, the Reformation, the French Revolution, 
and the World War with its results will be studied. 
Not given 1934-1935. Two semesters. Six hours. 

Courses 3 and 4 Survey of Ancient History 

In these courses a study is made of the historical background 
of the Old Testament in the light of the results of recent research 
and excavations in the valleys of the Nile, Euphrates, and Tigris 
rivers, which throw new light on historical hypotheses and con- 
firm the Scriptural record. A careful study is also made of the 
history of Greece and Rome from the early beginnings of these 
kingdoms to the beginning of the Christian era. 

Two semesters. Six hours. 

Course 5 Constitutional History 

This course traces the building with English and colonial 
elements of the basic principles of American government, the 
framing and adoption of the Federal Constitution, and its 
later development. Fundamental constitutional rights are 
considered. Not given 1934-1935. 

First semester. Three hours. 
(41) 



DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH 



Elizabeth Tollmann 



The value of a thorough training in the use of the English 
language cannot be over-emphasized. The aim in all courses 
will be to master the art of expression both in speaking and in 
writing. Since, to a large degree, "language is caught rather 
than taught/' there will be a sustained effort toward the main- 
tenance of high standards in oral English. Accuracy of pro- 
nunciation, correctness of construction, and purity of diction 
are the qualities that will be sought. 



Introductory English* All students entering first-year college 
courses will be required to take an entrance examination in the 
fundamentals of English grammar and composition. Those who 
fail to pass the examination must take the course in Introduc- 
tory English. No credit is given, but the regular charge for 
tuition will be made. 

One semester. Three hours class recitation. 



Courses 1 and 2 College Rhetoric 

Prerequisite: Three years of high school English. This 
course will be devoted to a study of the organization of materials 
and the modes of paragraph development, followed by special 
work in description, narration, exposition, and argumentation. 
Collateral reading with reports will be required. 

Two semesters. Six hours. 



Courses 3 and 4 Advanced Composition 

Prerequisite: College Rhetoric. The structure and art of 
advanced writing, the preparation of manuscript for the press, 
and proof reading will be studied in this course. Collateral 
reading to acquaint the students with the style of the best 
writers will be required. Two semesters. Four hours. 

(42) 



DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH 43 

Courses 5 and 6 Survey of English Literature 

A study of the types and masterpieces of English literature 
and the historical background which produced them. An 
evaluation is made of the great literary productions in the 
light of Christian ideals. 
Given on demand. Two semesters. Six hours. 

Courses 7 and 8 Library Science 

A practical course in the use, classification and manage- 
ment of school libraries. One recitation and four hours labora- 
tory. Enrollment limited. Two semesters. Four hours. 



DEPARTMENT OF 
LANGUAGES 

Pearl L. Hall and Frank W. Field 

Two great aims of a modern language course are to give an 
appreciation of the civilization of the country whose language 
is studied and to cultivate the ability to speak and understand 
that language. For the latter reason, oral work is stressed from 
the beginning in the courses here offered. 

Courses 1 and 2 Spanish I 

Fundamentals of grammar, pronunciation, composition, 
and reading of easy Spanish prose constitute the work of the 
first year. Two semesters. Eight hours. 

Courses 3 and 4 Spanish II 

This course consists of a thorough review of grammar and 
the principles of pronunciation, together with the reading of 
standard Spanish authors and selections from Spanish periodi- 
cals. It is intended to develop additional freedom in the use 
of conversational Spanish. Two semesters. Six hours. 

Courses 5 and 6 French I 

The foundation principles of easy French reading, grammar, 
and pronunciation, including a knowledge of phonetics, are 
offered in this course. Two semesters. Eight hours. 

Courses 7 and 8 French n 

In this course a thorough grammar review will be given, 
combined with the reading of selected French works and se- 
lections from French periodicals. Special emphasis will be 
placed upon oral work, and some translation and original 
compositions, both oral and written, will be required. 
Not given 1934-1935. Two semesters. Six hours, 

(44) 



DEPARTMENT OF LANGUAGES 45 

Courses 9 and 10 Greek I 

A thorough study of the essentials of grammar, pronuncia- 
tion, acquisition of a vocabulary, drill on common irregular 
verbs, and exercises in translation. 

Two semesters. Eight hours. 

Courses 11 and 12 Greek II 

A review of grammar and syntax. Especial emphasis is 
placed on the mastery of the inflection, tense, and mood force 
of the verb. The first epistle of John is read; also selections 
from the Gospels, the Acts of the Apostles, and the Epistles 
of Paul. Two semesters. Six hours. 



DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS 
and MATHEMATICS 



Robert W. Woods 



A working knowledge of mathematical principles is essential 
to every individual for the successful conduct of the necessary 
activities of life. Moreover, the mental discipline provided 
through necessarily meeting standards of clearness , precision, 
and accuracy of thought, power of organization, and logical 
habits of reasoning, is invaluable. 

Course 1 College Algebra 

The algebraic number system. The notions of variable and 
function, and their geometrical representation. Variation. 
Equations of the first degree, and determinants. Quadratic 
equations, equations of higher degree, and elements of theory 
of equations. Fractional and negative exponents, exponentials, 
and logarithms. Mathematical induction, the binomial theorem, 
progressions, permutations, and combinations. 

First semester. Three hours. 

Course 2 Plane Trigonometry 

Trigonometric functions. Solution of right and of oblique 
triangles by natural functions and by logarithms. Applications 
to surveying, physics, astronomy, including simple harmonic 
motion and wave motion. Graphic and analytic treatment of 
trigonometric functions. Inverse and exponential functions, 
and trigonometric equations. Second semester. Three hours. 

Course 3 Plane and Solid Analytic Geometry 

Rectangular, oblique, and polar co-ordinates in the plane. 
The relation between a curve and its equation. The algebra 
of a variable pair of numbers and the geometry of a moving 
point. Specific applications to the properties of straight lines, 
circles, conic sections, and certain other plane curves. 
Given on demand. Two semesters. Six hours. 

(46) 



DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS & MATHEMATICS 47 
Courses 4 and 5 Calculus 

Pre-requisite: College Algebra and Trigonometry, or Analytic 
Geometry. 

Infinitesimals, differentials, ante-differentials, differentia- 
tion, ordinary functions, geometrical and physical applica- 
tions, successive integration, and special topics relating to 
curves, also infinite series, Taylor's Theorem, hyperbolic 
functions, and indeterminate forms. 
Given on demand. Two semesters. Six hours. 

Courses 6 and 7 College Physics 

Prerequisite: Trigonometry. This course is an advanced 
study of the mechanics of solids, liquids and gases, properties 
of matter and its internal forces, wave motion and sound, heat, 
magnetism, electrostatics, electric currents, radio-activity, 
and light, The student is required to solve a large number of 
problems. Laboratory requirement, 4 hours per week. 

Two semesters. Eight hours. 



DEPARTMENT OF 
CHEMISTRY and BIOLOGY 

Henry J. Klooster 

The purpose of these studies is to encourage the student to 
observe the actual operation of natural law, and to explain 
scientifically any facts which confront him in everyday life. 
Thus the student may become a lover and interpreter of nature 
and come to see at last that nature is but a "thought of God.** 

Course 1 General Chemistry 

A study of non-metallic elements and their compounds, 
fundamental laws, and principles, formulas, equations, cal- 
culations, classroom demonstrations of typical reactions and 
laboratory methods. Three hours attendance. Four hours 
laboratory. First semester. Four hours. 

Course 2 General Chemistry 

A continuation of Course 1 dealing with the metals and their 
compounds. Introduction to atomic structure, chemical 
equilibrium, modern theory of solutions, organic compounds, 
six weeks devoted to qualitative analysis. Three hours attend- 
ance. Four hours laboratory. Second semester. Four hours. 

Course 3 Analytical Chemistry 

This is a course in qualitative analysis dealing with the 
chemistry of analytical reactions. Analysis of both metal and 
non-metal radicals ; amalgams ; alloys ; mixtures and commercial 
products. Two hours attendance. Seven to ten hours labora- 
tory. Not given 1934-1935. First semester. Four hours. 

Courses 4 and 5 Organic Chemistry 

A survey of the compounds of carbon, including the ali- 
phatic and the aromatic series. Organic laboratory technique, 
including typical synthesis and reactions. Introduction to 
organic analysis. Two hours attendance. Seven to ten hours 
laboratory. Two semesters. Six hours. 

(48) 



DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY & BIOLOGY 49 
Course 6 Invertebrate Zoology 

This course is designed for those who desire a course in 
anatomy as a foundation for a better understanding of physio- 
logy. A thorough study of a number of invertebrate types will 
be completed. Three hours attendance. Four hours laboratory. 

First semester. Four hours. 



Course 7 Vertebrate Zoology 

This is essentially a course in comparative anatomy of 
vertebrates. Considerable collateral reading will be required. 
Introduction to heredity and genetics. Critical analysis of 
the theory of evolution. Three hours attendance. Four hours 
laboratory. Second semester. Four hours. 



Course 8 Physiology 

A study of the physiology of the muscles, nerves, digestion 
and nutrition. The hygiene of the human body and its won- 
derful adaptation of means to ends, the harmonious action and 
dependence of the various organs. Two hours attendance. 
Four hours laboratory. First semester. Three hours. 



Course 9 Physiology 

The physiology of the blood, lymph, circulation, respiration, 
ductless glands and special senses. Two hours attendance. 
Four hours laboratory. Second semester. Three hours. 



Courses 10 and 11 Bacteriology 

Lecture and laboratory instruction in the fundamental 
principles of bacteriology and their applications to industry 
and hygiene. Required in pre-nurse's course and recommended 
as an elective for premedical and general science students. 
One lecture and three hours of laboratory work per week. 

Two semesters. Four hours. 



DEPARTMENT OF 
EDUCATION 



"To the teacher is committed the most important work, 
a work which he should not enter without careful and thorough 
preparation." 

All teaching should stand for complete development, and the 
department will have as its aim for both teachers and pupils, 
"the harmonious development of the physical, the mental, 
and the spiritual powers.** 

All students expecting to do practice teaching in this de- 
partment will be required to take a review course in the common 
branches, or by examination show proficiency in these subjects. 

As a prerequisite to the vocational methods classes, the 
young women should have had household economics; the 
young men should have had manual training. 

At the time of registration and admission to the Normal 
course, students will be required to take standard examina- 
tions in arithmetic, grammar, geography, physiology, United 
States history, and Bible as regularly prescribed for Grade 
VIII. Students who show by these examinations that they are 
deficient in these fundamental subjects will be required to take 
courses 18 and 19 without credit. 

Course 1 Principles of Education 

Under this subject are studied such topics as the following: 
aim of education, principles of true Christian education, the 
Bible as an educator, and character building. 

Texts: White, "Education," "Counsels to Teachers," and 
"Fundamentals of Education." First semester. Three hours. 

Course 2 General Psychology 

This course will be devoted to a general view of the mental 
processes and their development, including such topics as the 
nervous system and its functions, responses, instincts and emo- 
tions, memory, imagination, personality. 

Second semester. Three hours. 
(50) 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 51 

Course 3 Technique of Instruction 

A study of the principles of method and the various types 
of class room exercises. Students will be given an opportunity 
to observe the application of these principles in the Demon- 
stration School. First semester. Two hours. 

Course 4 School Organization and Management 

A study of the organization of the church school as a unit 
in the denominational educational system, and its control 
in the light of the aims of education. Such topics as the follow- 
ing will be considered: Plan of organization; supervision; 
reporting; the teacher; grading and promotion; daily pro- 
gram; study period; discipline. First semester. Three hours. 

Course 5 Teaching of Bible 

A study of successful methods of presenting the Bible sub- 
jects in grades one to eight. First semester. Two hours. 

Course 6 Teaching of Beading 

This course give a brief survey of the psychology and 
pedagogy of reading in the elementary school, including such 
topics as evaluation of methods and materials of reading; 
phonics; mechanical aids; motivation; individual differences. 

First semester. Three hours. 

Course 7 Nature 

This course brings the student in touch with the nature 
materials of his immediate environment and considers methods 
of making such materials a vital influence in the life of the chilo 1 . 

Second semester. Two hours. 

Course 8 Observation and Teaching I and n 

These courses afford the student an opportunity to observe 
the work of the teachers connected with the Demonstration 
School, and to participate in teaching under the direction of 
experienced supervisors. Carefully prepared plans will be 
required for each lesson taught. 

No credit will be given unless the student completes the 
entire course extending through the second semester of each of 
the two years of the Normal course. 

Second semester. Three hours. 



52 SOUTHERN JUNIOR COLLEGE 

Course 9 Art 

A course designed to aid the teacher in presenting art work 
in the grades. Topics: Free-hand pencil drawing; crayola 
work; cardboard construction; clay modeling; water colors; per- 
spective; design; picture study; blackboard sketching. 

Two semesters. Two hours. 

Course 10 Psychology of Childhood 

In this course the physical and mental development of the 
child is studied with special reference to the principles of 
teaching involved. Particular attention is given to the general 
laws of growth, inherited and acquired tendencies, influence 
of nutrition on mental and physical growth, characteristics 
at different stages of development, exceptional children. 

First semester. Three hours. 

Course 11 Health Education and School Hygiene 

A survey of the materials and methods of health teaching 
in the grades with special emphasis on the establishing of health 
habits by teachers and pupils. Also a study of the factors 
essential to conserving and promoting the health of the school 
child. Such topics as the following will be considered: Location 
of school building, lighting, heating, ventilation, school 
grounds, mental hygiene. Second semester. Three hours. 

Course 12 Teaching of Music 

A course designed to prepare teachers to give instruction 
in music in the elementary grades. Consideration will be 
given to such topics as the child voice, rote songs, sight reading, 
treatment of monotones, music appreciation. 

Second semester. Two hours. 

Course 13 Teaching of English in the Grades 

A study of the development of desirable attitudes and 
correct habits of oral and written language, including the 
teaching of the elements of grammar. 

First semester. Two hours. 

Course 14 Teaching of History and Civics 

A course dealing with the presentation of the social studies 
in all grades of the elementary school. 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 53 

Topics: Present aims in teaching social studies, materials 
and methods for primary grades; Junior M. V. work and com- 
munity civics; library equipment, use of textbooks; teaching 
pupils to study ; correlation with geography ; special methods for 
seventh and eighth grades. Second semester. Two hours. 



Course 15 Teaching of Arithmetic 

This course deals with the aims, content, and methods 
of arithmetic teaching in the grades. Special attention will 
be given to such topics as the teaching of the fundamental 
operations in the primary grades, fractions, percentage and 
its applications, drill methods, problem solving, problem 
material, diagnosis of difficulties in arithmetic, remedial 
instruction, testing arithmetic. First semester. Two hours. 

Course 16 Teaching of Geography 

A course devoted to the study of classroom procedure 
and materials to be used in teaching geography in the grades. 

Topics : home geography, elementary field work ; use of 
maps, graphs, and library materials; selection of subject 
matter; illustrative materials; present-day types of geography 
teaching. Second semester. Two hours. 

Course 17 A Teaching of Sewing 

This course deals with the materials and methods of teach- 
ing sewing in grades five to eight covering such work as the 
stitches and their application in simple models, planning, 
cutting, and making of garments, use and care of the sewing 
machine, study of common textiles. First semester. Two hours. 



Course 17 B Teaching of Cooking 

A course dealing with the various methods of teaching cook- 
ing in grades seven and eight. First semester. Two hours. 



Course 17 C Teaching of Woodwork 

This course presents the materials and methods of wood- 
work instruction in grades five to eight 

First semester. Two hours. 



54 SOUTHERN JUNIOR COLLEGE 

Courses 18 and 19 Reviews in Fundamental Subjects 

These courses are required of all prospective teachers who 
fail by examination to show proficiency in the subjects taught 
in the elementary grades. They are also open to mature students 
pursuing other courses but who desire to strengthen their foun- 
dation work in any or all of these subjects. 

Subjects: Arithmetic; grammar; geography; physiology; 
U. S. History; Bible. Two semesters. No credit 



DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC 



D. Robert Edwards and Mildred Ruffin West 

The importance of music as a part of a liberal education 
can hardly be over-emphasized. Whether it be considered 
from a social, educational, commercial, or religious viewpoint 
its value is clearly apparent. Those who engage in the ministry 
or other branches of Christian service will find it a most valuable 
asset. 

The College offers instruction in Piano, Violin, and Voice. 
The course of instruction in each of these branches of music 
is divided into six years: four of which are preparatory, and 
the remaining two are collegiate. A talented, diligent student 
may complete this preparatory course in less than four years. 
Students who enroll in this department will receive credit for 
previous study, their classification to be determined by exam- 
ination. 

Afternoon student-recitals are given frequently and all 
students enrolled for music are required to attend. Two public 
recitals will be given during the year. 

Students are advised to begin their musical training early, 
since one rarely achieves distinction in the field of music who 
begins his preparation late in life. Diplomas will be granted 
only to those who complete the required literary work, as well 
as the courses outlined in music. 

Students who desire to do so, may select music as an elective 
in the College Preparatory course, but not more than two units 
will be accepted toward graduation. For credit in Music I 
in the College Preparatory course the student must complete 
the following: 

(a) Applied Music: upon recommendation of the Director 
of Music, a student may receive credit for Piano, Violin, or 
Voice. One lesson per week is required of all students receiving 
credit in Music I. 

(b) Music theory, four forty-five minute periods per week 
for eighteen weeks. Principles of notation; symbols, abbrevia- 
tions, signs, embellishments; scales, intervals, chords, cadences; 
measure, tempo, dynamics; forms, styles. 

Text: Elson, "Theory of Music." 

(55) 



56 SOUTHERN JUNIOR COLLEGE 

(c) Harmony, four forty-five minute periods per week for 
eighteen weeks. Primary and secondary chords and dominant 
7th, in fundamental and inverted positions; harmonization of 
melodies. 

Text: "Tone Relations," by Goetschius. 

(4) Either Band, Chorus, Glee Club or Orchestra, one period 
of forty-five minutes per week for thirty-six weeks. 

For credit in Music II in the College Preparatory Course 
the student must complete the following: 

(a) Applied Music: Upon recommendation of the Director 
of Music, a student may receive credit for Piano, Violin or 
Voice. One lesson per week is required of all students receiving 
credit in Music II. 

(b) Harmony II, four forty-five minute periods per week 
for eighteen weeks. Secondary 7ths, and their inversions; 
altered chords, and chromatic harmony; easy mpdulations. 

Text: "Tone Relations,'* by Goetschius. 

(c) Music Appreciation and History, four forty-five minute 
periods per week for eighteen weeks. The correlation of music 
with the study of general historical movements, primitive 
music, folk songs in the middle ages, church music, classic 
composers, opera, romantic composers, modern music, American 
music. 

Text: "Music History," by Pratt. 

(d) Ether Band, Chorus, Glee Club or Orchestra, two 
periods per week for thirty-six weeks. 

DIPLOMA COURSES IN MUSIC 

Graduation from an accredited high school or its equivalent 
is required for admission to diploma courses. 

High school graduation is assumed to imply sixteen units 
of high school work, of which fourteen should be in subjects 
of general educational value and of which two may be in the 
study of music. 

The musical knowledge required for the admission to the 
diploma courses should consist of the completion of Music I 
and II, as prescribed above. 

It is further understood that students who are able to pass 
examinations showing that they have completed work beyond 
that of the entrance requirements may receive advanced stand- 
ing in the subject or subjects in which they pass examinations; 
provided that such credits have not already been used to satisfy 
entrance requirements. 



DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC 57 

PIANO REQUIREMENTS 

A. Requirements for Entrance. 

To enter the two-year diploma course in piano the student 
should be grounded in correct touch and reliable technique. 
He should play all major and minor scales correctly in moder- 
ately rapid tempo, also broken chords in octave position 
in all keys and should have acquired systematic methods of 
practice. 

He should have studied some of the standard etudes, such 
as Czerny, Op. 299, Book I ; Heller, Op. 47 and 46 (according 
to the individual needs of the pupil); Bach, Little Preludes; 
a few Bach two-part Inventions and compositions corresponding 
in difficulty to — 

Haydn, Sonata No. 11, G Major No. 20 (Schirmer). 

Mozart, Sonata C Major No. 3, F Major No. 13 
(Schirmer). 

Beethoven, Variations on Nel cor Piu, Sonata Op. 
49, No. h 

Schubert, Impromptu, Op. 142, No. 2, etc. 

B. End of Second Year. 

At the end of the second year the student should have ac- 
quired a technique sufficient to play scales and arpeggii in rapid 
tempo, to play scales in parallel and contrary motion, in thirds 
and sixths and in various rhythms. He should have acquired 
some octave technique and should have studied compositions of 
at least the following grades of difficulty: 

Bach, some three-part Inventions. 

Bach, at least two preludes and fugues from Well 
Tempered Clavichord . 

Bach, dance forms from French suites and partitas. 

Beethoven, sonatas or movements from sonatas such 
as Op. 2, No. 1 ; Op. 14, Nos.l and 2; Op. 10, Nos. 1 or 2; Op. 
26, etc. 

Haydn, Sonata E flat, No. 3 (Schirmer), Sonata 
D Major. 

Mozart, Sonatas Nos. 1, F Major, or 16, A Major 
(Schirmer ed.). 

Mendelssohn, Songs Without Words — such as "Spring 
Song/' "Hunting Song," etc. 

Lizt, "Liebestraum," transcriptions such as "On 
Wings of Song," "Du Bist die Ruh." 

Schubert, Impromptu B Flat. 

Chopin, Polonaise C sharp Minor, Valse E Minor, 
Nocturne Op. 9, No. 2, Nocturne F Minor, Op. 55, No. I, 



58 SOUTHERN JUNIOR COLLEGE 

Nocturne B Major, Op. 31, No. 1. 

Schumann, Nocturne F Major, Novelette F Major, 
Fantasiestuecke, "Bird as a Prophet." 

Some compositions by standard modern composers of 
corresponding difficulty. 

The student should demonstrate his ability to read at sight 
accompaniments and compositions of moderate difficulty. 



VOICE REQUIREMENTS 

A. Entrance Requirements. 

To enter the two-year diploma course in voice the student 
should be able to sing on pitch with correct phrasing and 
musical intelligence standard songs in good English (the simpler 
classics are recommended). He should also demonstrate his 
ability to read a simple song at sight, and a knowledge of he 
rudiments of music. Some knowledge of piano is urgently 
recommended. 

B. End of Second Year. 

At the end of the second year the student should have 
acquired a knowledge of breath control, principles of enunciation 
and pronunciation as applied to singing, tone placement, and the 
essentials of interpretation. He should demonstrate his ability 
to sing major, minor, and chromatic scales, arpeggii, contrasting 
exercises for agility and for sustaining tone, and the classic 
vocal embellishments. He should demonstrate a knowledge of 
recitative, and the ability to sing one or more of the less exacting 
arias of opera and oratoria and several standard songs from 
memory. He should also have acquired knowledge of one 
language in addition to English. 



VIOLIN REQUIREMENTS 

A. Entrance Requirements. 

To enter the two-year diploma course in violin the student 
should have an elementary knowledge of the pianoforte. 

He should have the ability to perform etudes of the difficulty 
of the Kxeutzer Etudes, Nos. 1 to 32, and works of the difficulty 
of the Viotti Concerto, No. 23, and the de Beriot concert! , Nos. 
7 and 9. 

B. End of the Second Year. 

At the end of the second year the student should have ac- 
quired the ability to perform works of the difficulty of the 
A Major Concerto of Mozart and Concerto No. 8 of Rode. 



DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC 59 

The student should also give evidence of his ability to read 
at sight compositions of moderate difficulty, and should demon- 
strate sufficient ability in ensemble to take part in the perfor- 
mance of easier string quartets and symphonic works. He 
should have acquired sufficient pianistic ability to play simple 
accompaniments. 
Analysis 

This course is designed as a complement to the preparatory 
studies in Harmony I and 1 1 . An analysis of the harmonic 
structure of compositions, both classic and modern, acquaints 
the student with practical applications of the laws of harmony. 
Form analysis of Homophoric forms and of the Bach Fugues 
is also included in the course. 

Two Semesters. Four hours. 

Counterpoint and Composition 

A study of counterpoint, both strict and free, completes the 
study of theory. Simple compositions in this style of writing 
are attempted, and a representative amount of original work 
on the part of the student is expected in the field of composition. 

Two Semesters. Four hours. 

Sight Singing 

It is the aim of the drill in this work first to cover the fun- 
damentals such as time, rhythm, pitch, etc., then to take up easy 
melody and part studies. The class will meet once a week. 

One semester. One hour. 

Chorus 

A chorus will be organized, which will first review briefly the 
elements of sight singing and then take up some standard 
cantata. This class is open to all students who have had sight 
singing, or have a fair knowledge of music. 

Two semesters. One hour. 

Conducting 

The object of this course is to develop the ability to lead 
in congregational singing. Thorough drill in the rudiments 
of music and development of rhythm in various forms. Applied 
work in beating time to the movements of different signatures, 



60 SOUTHERN JUNIOR COLLEGE 

including hymns and simple chorals. Methods for inspiring 
congregational singing, and the organization of choirs. The 
class meets one hour each week. Two semesters. One hour. 

Orchestra 

Each year an orchestra is organized, and has proved to 
be an increasingly important factor in the musical activities 
of the College. This organization provides a splendid oppor- 
tunity for students who desire to obtain a practical experience 
in public playing. The orchestra is under the leadership of 
an experienced director, and recitals are given at periodic 
intervals during the school year. Two semesters. One hour. 

Band 

The College band is traditionally a men's organization. 
Recitals and stirring selections as special features of social 
programs make up the offerings of this organization. An ex- 
perienced bandmaster is in charge, giving instruction on all 
instruments and in ensemble playing. Two semesters. One hour. 



DEPARTMENT OF 
VOCATIONAL EDUCATION 

Don C. Ludington and Ellen P. Anderson 

It is a fundamental policy of the College that its students 
shall not only be thoroughly trained in the literary and scienti- 
fic branches of study, but that they shall also be encouraged to 
acquire proficiency in some trade. With this object in view the 
College has organized its industries to employ student help 
and offers formal instruction in a limited number of vocational 
occupations. For those who may not be able to enroll in a 
formal course for instruction in some vocational study, and to 
encourage all students to take a vital interest in discharging 
efficiently their responsibilities in the industrial departments, 
a non-credit vocational curriculum has been developed. The 
student will be assigned readings in various texts and will be 
expected to report for conference once each week with the 
superintendent of the industrial department to which he has 
been assigned. Periodic assignment of themes on selected 
topics will be made. While students are not obligated to carry 
these studies, yet as an encouragement to those students who 
show a definite interest in their work and increased efficiency 
resulting from such study, an increased rate of compensation 
will be paid for the work performed in the various industrial 
departments. 

PRINTING 

Printing I 

The first year of printing is devoted to a study of general 
principles based on a standard text book. Type calculation, 
proof reading, use and care of mitering machines, trimmers, 
and lead cutters. The laboratory work will consist entirely 
of straight hand and job composition. It is expected that the 
student will develop speed and accuracy in composition work. 

Two semesters. One unit Six hours. 

Printing n 

Composition of advertising, advanced job composition; 

(61) 



62 SOUTHERN JUNIOR COLLEGE 

a careful study of the care and operation of the platen press, 
locking up forms, imposition. It is expected that the student 
will develop a satisfactory degree of speed and accuracy in 
platen press work. Not given 1934-1935. 

Two semesters. One unit. Six hours. 



Printing m 

The third year of printing will be devoted to a study of 
estimating costs, figuring overhead expense, depreciation, 
and the theory and practice of cylinder press work. The student 
will spend practically all of his laboratory time on the various 
phases of cylinder press work. 
Given on demand. Two semesters. Six hours. 



Printing IV 

The final year of printing is devoted to study and practice 
in the operation of the monotype. The student is expected 
to develop an acceptable degree of proficiency and skill in the 
operation of the monotype on a variety of types of composition. 
Not given 1934-1935. Two semesters. Six hours. 

AGRICULTURE 



Agriculture I 

This course includes recitations, lectures, supervised study 
and general laboratory and field work. The subject matter 
of the first unit in agriculture includes plant production, and 
animal husbandry. Seed testing and stock judging will be 
emphasized. Notebooks must be kept, reporting in full all 
laboratory and field work. Five double recitation periods 
a week. Two semesters. One unit. 



Agriculture n 

The subject matter of this course includes horticulture, 
poultry, dairying and farm management. This course affords 
practice in {mining, spraying, and milk testing. Laboratory 
and field work as for Agriculture I. 

Two semesters. One unit. 



DEPARTMENT OF VOCATIONAL EDUCATIONAL 63 
MANUAL TRAINING 

These courses correlate mechanical drawing and woodwork. 
During the first twelve weeks the work consists of drawings 
in projections, sections, and development, and working draw- 
ings. The remainder of the first semester and all of the second 
semester will be devoted to woodwork. 

The courses are definitely prescribed, and students are not 
permitted to make any projects which are not specified in 
the course, or upon which the approval of the instructor has 
not been received. The use of power driven machinery, other 
than lathes, is restricted to students of the second year. 



Manual Training I 

This course includes drafting, cabinet work and wood turn- 
ing 

Drafting — The use and care of drafting room equipment, 
lettering, conventions, projection drawings, detail and assem- 
bly drawings for a special piece of furniture to be made in the 
shop. 

Cabinet work — To include the following elements of 
joinery: housed joint, mortise and tenon, dovetail and miter 
joints; also rabbeting, grooving, assembly of parts, smoothing 
and finishing and fitting hardware. The work will consist of 
some simple models involving the elements of joinery, besides 
a more elaborate piece of furniture, which has been designed 
by the student, and made from his own drawings. 

Wood turning — Simple spindle turning and face plate 
turning. Each student should make at least one finished piece 
of work in the lathe, in addition to the necessary practice 
turning. It may be a candlestick, ring tray, or circular tabouret, 
or set of table legs. Two semesters. One uniL 



Manual Training n 

This course will include drafting, cabinet work, wood turn- 
ing, and carpentry. 

Drafting — Projection drawing, including sections and 
developments, isometric drawing, plan and elevations for 
simple building, such as a garage, barn, etc. 



64 SOUTHERN JUNIOR COLLEGE 

Cabinet work — To continue the work of Manual Train- 
ing I, more difficult projects will be undertaken by students 
of the second year. Working drawings must be made by the 
student of all projects to be made in the shop. 

Wood turning — Advanced projects in face plate turn- 
ing, spindle turning, projects involving the use of the chuck. 

Carpentry — Roof construction, window framing, door 
construction, stair building, uses of the steel square, brief 
study of lumbering, estimate of quantities and costs. 

Two semesters* One unit 



HOME ECONOMICS 

Home Economics I 

Home courtesies; the house — selection, care, and use of 
furnishings and equipment; the family laundry; child care; 
health of the family; personal grooming; care of clothing; 
construction of undergarments and school dress; preparation 
and serving of breakfasts and of suppers or luncheons; the 
normal diet. Two semesters. One unit 



Home Economics H 

Study of food preservation; planning, preparation and serv- 
ing of dinners; formal dinners; budgets and accounts; con- 
struction of afternoon dress, and of tailored dress; selecting, 
financing, and caring of the house; child care. 

Two semesters. One unit 



Foods and Dietetics 

Study of food products, marketing, food preservation, menu 
building, computation of diets for individual needs, dietetic 
treatment of certain diseases, nutritional requirements of the 
body, child nutrition, invalid cookery, advanced work in food 
preparation. Two semesters. Eight hours. 



DEPARTMENT OF VOCATIONAL EDUCATION 65 

Clothing and Textiles 

Hygienic and economic aspect of modern dress; psychology 
of clothes; principles of design and color as applied to dress; 
drafting of foundation patterns; the commercial pattern; 
principles of fitting; garment construction; detailed study of 
the principal fibers — their analysis, properties, and use; 
principles of design, and color as applicable to fabrics. Not 
given 1934-1935. Two semesters. Eight hours. 

Survey of Nursing Education 

This course familiarizes the student with the history of 
nursing, and presents a brief introduction to the social and 
economic aspects of illness. Two semesters. Four hours. 



DEPARTMENT OF 
COMMERCE 



Students who desire to enter this department and who 
desire to secure a diploma upon its completion, must present 
evidence that they have completed not less than twelve grades. 
Those who cannot meet this requirement and who desire to 
take the course will be required to write entrance examinations. 
If these are found to be satisfactory, students will be admitted 
to the course, but will not be eligible to graduation. 

It is not recommended that a student enter without having 
met the entrance requirement. Experience has proven that a 
broad, general education is essential in connection with the 
more specific training of a commercial course. 

Courses 1 and 2 Accounting I 

An introductory course designed to furnish such knowledge 
of accounts as will be of value to the business manager and 
also serve as a foundation for the work of the professional ac- 
countant. Emphasis is placed upon the various kinds of ac- 
counts and their relation to each other, the character and pur- 
pose of financial statements. A study is made of accounting 
principles and methods as illustrated in the accounts of mer- 
cantile, industrial, and financial concerns. Bookeeping is a 
prerequisite to this course. Two semesters. Eight hours. 

Course 3 Accounting II 

A course in advanced theory of accounting. Some of the 
special topics considered are: The valuation of assets, capital 
vs. revenue expenditures, balance sheets, trading and profit 
and loss statements, depreciation, reserves and reserve funds, 
sinking funds, realization and liquidation accounts, good will, 
dissolution of partnership, consolidations, cost accounting, etc. 

First semester. Four hours. 

Course 4 Business Law 

It is the purpose of this course to give a survey of the prin- 
ciples of law governing business transactions. Some of the 
subjects studied are contracts, agency, negotiable paper, 
partnership, corporations, and the sale of personal property. 

Second semester. Three hours . 
(66) 



DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE 67 

Courses 5 and 6 Principles of Economics 

The development of natural resources; occupations, and the 
division of labor; production, exchange, and distribution of 
wealth; utility and value; wages, interest, rent, and profits; 
nature and uses of money; domestic and foreign exchange; 
history and theory of banking; protection and free trade; 
trusts and trade unions. 

Origin of money; early forms of currency; metallic money; 
credit money; monetary history of the United States; the gold 
standard; relation of money and credit to the general level 
of prices; nature and use of credit; d'omestic and foreign ex- 
change; history and theory of banking; national, state and 
private banks, and the Federal Reserve Act. Not given 1934- 
1935. Two semesters. Six hours. 

Course 7 Typewriting 

Touch Typewriting is taught. Stress is laid upon neatness 
and accuracy of typewritten work. Students who present one 
unit of typewriting credit in their entrance record may elect 
to take typewriting in the Business Course, and may receive 
four hours of credit for the completion of the prescribed number 
of lessons in "Gregg Typing Techniques & Projects, Complete 
Course," and the attainment of a net speed of fifty words per 
minute for fifteen minutes with not more than five errors. 
Two practice periods per day are required. 

Two semesters. Four hours. 

Course 7A 

Students who have not previously taken typewriting may 
elect this course, and upon the completion of the prescribed 
number of lessons in "Gregg Typing Techniques & Projects, 
Book I," and the attainment of a net speed of forty words a 
minute for fifteen minutes with not more than five errors, will 
receive two hours credit on the Business Course. Two practice 
periods per day are required. Two semesters. Two hours. 

Course 8 Office Training 

This course is designed to broaden the secretarial student's 
knowledge of business procedure. Laboratory projects in 
solving secretarial problems add definitely to the student's 
equipment as an effective business worker. 

First semester. Three hours. 



68 SOUTHERN JUNIOR COLLEGE 

Course 9 Corporation and Cost Accounting 

This course sets forth the procedure in maintaining a set of 
corporation records and accounts and in determining factory 
costs. After solving certain problems incident to incorporating 
manufacturing enterprises, a study is made of the connected 
transactions which enable one to understand and exhibit the 
cost of the goods produced. Second semester. Four hours. 



SUMMARY OF COURSES 



LITERARY COURSE 



First Tear 
Bible 

College Rhetoric 
Principles of Education 
Survey of Ancient History 
Language I 
Elective 


Hours of Credit 
First Second 

Sem. Sem. 

3 3 

3 3 

3 

3 3 

4 4 
3 


Second Tear 
Bible 

Language II 
Science 
Elective 


3 
3 
3 
7 


3 
3 
3 
7 


HOME ECONOMICS COURSE 




First Tear 


Hours of 

First 

Sem. 


Credit 

Second 

Sem. 


Inorganic Chemistry 
Clothing and Textiles 
College Rhetoric 
Principles of Education 
Elective 


4 
4 
3 
3 
2 


4 
4 
3 

5 


Second Tear 






Bible 

Organic Chemistry 

Physiology and Hygiene 

Food and Dietetics 

Elective 


3 
3 
3 
4 
3 


3 
3 
3 
4 
3 



(69) 



70 



SOUTHERN JUNIOR COLLEGE 
NORMAL COURSE 





Hours 


of Credit 


First Year 


First 


Second 




Sem. 


Sem. 


Teaching of Bible 




2 


Principles of Education 


3 




Technique of Instruction 


2 




General Psychology 




3 


School Organization & Management 


3 




Teaching of Reading 


3 




Nature 




2 


Observation and Teaching I 




3 


Art 


1 


1 


Rhetoric 


3 


3 


•[Teaching of Music 




2 


Elective: 


2 




♦Penmanship 






Second Tear 






Daniel & Revelation 


3 


3 


Psychology of Childhood 


3 




Health Education & School Hygiene 




3 


Observation and Teaching 1 1 




3 


Teaching of English 


2 




Teaching of History and Civics 




2 


Teaching of Geography 




2 


Teaching of Sewing, Cooking, or Woodwork 


in 




the Grades 


2 




Teaching of Arithmetic 


2 




Physiology or Biology 


3 


3 


♦Penmanship 







fStudents who have not mastered the rudiments of sight- 
singing will be required to take a course in sight-singing as 
an extra non-credit course. See page 50 for additional re- 
quirements. 



♦Students enrolled in the Normal Course will be required to 
hold a Palmer certificate in penmanship or to take a course 
leading to such a certificate. 



SUMMARY OF COURSES 


71 


THEOLOGICAL COURSE 




First Year 


Hours of 
First 
Sem. 


Credit 

Second 
Sem. 


Bible 

College Rhetoric 

Survey of Ancient History 

Greek I 

Pastoral Training I 

Ministerial Field Work I 


3 
3 
3 
4 
2 
1 


3 
3 
3 
4 
2 
1 


Second Year 






Bible 

Greek II 

Pastoral Training II 

History 

Ministerial Field Work II 

Public Speaking 

Conducting 

Elective 

BIBLE WORKER'S 


3 
3 
2 
3 
1 
2 

COURSE 


3 
3 
2 
3 
1 
2 

V2 


First Year 


Hours of 
First 
Sem. 


Credit 

Second 

Sem. 


Bible 

College Rhetoric 

Survey of Ancient History 

Principles of Education 

Clothing and Textiles 

Sight Singing 

Elective 


3 
3 
3 
3 

4 


3 
3 
3 

4 
1 
2 


Second Year 






Bible 

Bible Worker's Training 

Public Speaking 

Foods and Dietetics 

Physiology and Hygiene 

Elective 


2 
3 
2 
4 
3 
2 


2 
3 
2 
4 
3 
2 



72 



SOUTHERN JUNIOR COLLEGE 
BUSINESS COURSE 



fSee below for prerequisite. 








Hours 


of Credit 


First Tear 


First 


Second 




Sem. 


Sem. 


Bible 


2 


2 


College Rhetoric 


3 


3 


Accounting Principles 


4 


4 


Office Training 


3 




Psychology 




3 


Business Law 




3 


Elective 


4 


1 


Second Tear 






Bible 


3 


3 


Advanced Accounting 


4 




Cost Accounting 




4 


Economics 


3 


3 


Public Speaking 


2 


2 


Elective 


4 


4 



^Typewriting 
*Penmanship 

fit is recommended that students complete one year in ele- 
mentary bookkeeping before enrolling for this course. 

JA11 students who have not previously acquired a knowledge 
of typewriting will be required to take it as an elective (2 to 4 
hours). 

*Penmanship certificates will be required of all students in 
the Business Course. 

PREPARATORY NURSING COURSE 

It is required by Seventh-day Adventist schools of nursing 
that applicants must have completed the following one-year 
course before entering the training school: 

Hours of Credit 
First Second 
Sem. Sem. 
Physiology or Zoology 3 3 

Bacteriology 2 2 

Chemistry 4 4 

Bible 2 2 

College Rhetoric 3 3 

Survey of Nursing Education 2 2 



SUMMARY OF COURSES 73 

PREPARATORY MEDICAL COURSE 







Hours of 


Credit 




First Year 


First 


Second 






Sem. 


Sem. 


Bible 




2 


2 


Inorganic Chemistry 




4 


4 


College Algebra 




3 




Trigonometry 






3 


Zoology 




4 


4 


""Language I 


Second Year 


4 


4 


Organic Chemistry 




3 


3 


College Physics 




4 


4 


Language II 




3 


3 


Constitutional History 




2 




College Rhetoric 




3 


3 


Elective 




1 


3 



*Students who present two units of high school language will 
take Language 11,6 hours, and will omit language in the second 
year, selecting 10 hours of electives. 

For students who do not plan on medicine, a scientific course 
may be arranged at the time of registration. This course pro- 
vides greater latitude in choice of electives. 

COLLEGIATE MUSIC COURSE 





Hours of 


Credit 


First Year 


First 


Second 




Sem. 


Sem. 


Bible 


3 


3 


Applied Music (Piano, Violin, Voice) 


3 


3 


Form and Analysis 


2 


2 


Sight Singing 




1 


Chorus, Orchestra, or Band 


v% 


Yt. 


College Rhetoric 


3 


3 


Language I 


4 


4 


Second Tear 






Applied Music (Piano, Violin, Voice) 


3 ' 


3 


Counterpoint and Composition 


2 


2 


Psychology 




3 


Language II 


3 


3 


Survey of Ancient History 


3 


3 


Chorus, Orchestra, or Band 


X A 


H 


Conducting 


l 




Elective 


JH 


2V 2 


fStudents who complete the Collegiate 


Music Course are 


required to present a public graduation recital in the senior year. 



COLLEGE PREPARATORY 
SCHOOL 

There is maintained as a separate department of the College 
a preparatory school corresponding to the four years of the 
standard high school. Students who are admitted to the College 
departments must complete a preparatory course as outlined 
below, or must present evidence that they have completed a 
four year course in an accredited high school. Students whose 
preparatory work has been taken in unaccredited schools will 
be required to write entrance examinations as prescribed by 
the College. 

BIBLE 

Bible I — New Testament History 

This course is devoted to a connected study of the life 
of Christ as set forth in the four Gospels, and to the study of 
the history of the early Christian church as given in the Acts 
of the Apostles. Text: Kern, "New Testament History." 
References: White, "Desire of Ages" and "Acts of the Apos- 
tles." Two semesters. One unit. 

Bible n— Old Testament History 

This course deals with the history and literature of the 

Hebrew race as set forth in the Old Testament scriptures, from 

creation to the end of the Babylonian captivity. 
Text: McKibbin, "Old Testament History." 
References: White, "Prophets and Kings" and "Patriarchs 

and Prophets." Not given 1934 — 35. Two semesters. One unit 

Bible m — Denominational History and Christian Ethics 

During the first half of this course a careful study will be 
made of the rise and progress of the Seventh-day Adventist 
denomination. The course will be based on such works as 
Olsen's "Origin and Progress of Seventh-day Adventists" 
and Andross's "Story of the Advent Movement." 

The second semester's work will consist of a careful study 
of the origin and divine authority of the Spirit of Prophecy 
and a study of its principal teachings. The course is based 
on "Messages to Young People" and other assignments in 
the Spirit of Prophecy. 

Two semesters. One-half unit. 
(74) 



COLLEGE PREPARATORY SCHOOL 75 

Bible IV— Bible Doctrines 

It is the aim during this course to set before the student 
a clear, concise outline of the fundamental doctrines of the 
Bible. Special attention is given to the unity or harmony of 
the doctrines taught in both the Old and New Testaments. 

Texts: The Bible; Wearner, "Fundamentals of Bible Doct- 
rine." Two semesters. One-half unit. 

HISTORY 

World History 

This course is required of all students in the College 
Preparatory course. The aim of the course is to introduce 
the student to a historical view of life. The great characters 
and movements of world history will be evaluated from the 
Christian point of view. 

Text: Elson, "Modern Times and Living Past." 

Two semesters. One unit. 
American History and Problems of Democracy 

Consideration will be given to the important phases and 
periods of our history. The development of our colonial and 
national governments is stressed; the principles upon which 
they were founded, the relations and functions of their various 
departments, together with our individual duties and privileges 
as American citizens, being especially noted. 

Texts: Muzzey, "American History;" Greenan and Mere- 
dith, "Everyday Problems in American Democracy." 

Two semesters. One unit. 

ENGLISH 

English I 

This course consists of a review of English grammar, and 
a study of the fundamentals of oral and written composition. 

In connection with the course, assigned reading is required 
in selected literary classics that will inspire an appreciation 
of good literature. 

Text: Clark-Starnes-Neu-Stigler, "The Highway to Eng- 
lish," Book 1 ; selected classics. Two semesters. One unit. 

English II 

This course is a continuation of English I, and consists of 
two parts: an advanced study of the principles and practices 
of composition, and a study of a selected group of English and 
American classics. 

Text: Clark-Starnes-Neu-Stigler, "The Highway to Eng- 
lish," Book II; selected classics. Two semesters. One unit. 



76 SOUTHERN JUNIOR COLLEGE 

English IQ 

Two-thirds of the work in English III is devoted to the 
field of English literature; the remaining one-third is devoted 
to oral and written composition, and to the elimination of 
fundamental errors in use of language. 

Texts: Halleck, "New English Literature;" Cross-Smith- 
Stauffer, "Good Readings for High Schools, English Writers." 

Two semesters. One unit. 



English IV 

Advanced study of grammar and language structure, train- 
ing in parliamentary practice, letter writing, and other written 
and oral composition comprise one-third of the work in English 
IV. The remaining two-thirds of the course is devoted to a 
study of American literature, with a survey of its history. 

Texts: Halleck, "History of American Literature;" Cross- 
Smith-Stauffer, "Good Readings for High Schools." 

Two semesters. One unit 



MATHEMATICS 



Algebra I 

Prerequisite: the completion of eighth grade arithmetic. 
Fundamental operations; integral equations; factoring; frac- 
tions; simultaneous equations with graphs; involution and evo- 
lution; theory of exponents and quadratics are studied in this 
course. 

Text: Hawkes, Louby and Touton, "New First Course in 
Algebra." Two semesters. One unit. 



Algebra II 

A rapid review of the principles of Algebra I; continuation 
of algebra to include: surds, simultaneous quadratics, progres- 
sions, logarithms, infinite series, binomial theorem, permuta- 
tions and combinations, etc. 

Text: Hawkes, Louby and Touton, "Advanced Algebra." 

Two semesters. One unit. 



COLLEGE PREPARATORY SCHOOL 77 

Plane Geometry 

Prerequisite: Algebra I. The five books of plane geometry 
are covered thoroughly. A large number of original problems 
are required. Close attention is given to the logical develop- 
ment of every proof, and special emphasis is placed upon in- 
dividual reasoning. 

Text: Wentworth and Smith, "Geometry." 

Two semesters. One unit. 

SCIENCE 

General Science 

The course aims at a broad acquaintance with the field 
of natural phenomena regarded as a related whole, and hence 
serves as a suitable introduction to the more specialized courses 
to be taken later. The course covers a study of the following: 
measurement, air, water, life, energy, the earth's crust, solar 
system. Three recitations, two laboratory periods a week. 

Text: Wood and Carpenter, "Our Environment," Book III. 

Two semesters. One unit. 

Physics I 

Prerequisite: Algebra I, Algebra II, and Plane Geometry. 
This course is introductory to general physics and consists 
of recitations, laboratory work and classroom demonstrations. 
The mechanics of fluids and solids, heat, molecular physics, 
sound, light, magnetism, and electricity, are studied. Three 
recitations, two laboratory periods per week. 

Text: Carhart and Chute, "Practical Physics." 

Two semesters. One unit 

Chemistry I 

This course should be elected by those students who plan 
to take nurse's training. 

An elementary course covering the chemistry of the common 
non-metallic elements, fundamental theories and laws of 
chemistry. Introduction to the chemistry of the common 
metals and their compounds. Three recitations, two laboratory 
periods a week. 

Text: Black and Conant, "Practical Chemistry." 

Two semesters One unit 



78 SOUTHERN JUNIOR COLLEGE 

Biology 

The course in biology is primarily a course in pure science, 
and includes a study of the leading divisions in the animal 
and plant kingdoms. An intensive study is to be made of 
typical representatives, and a more general study of related 
forms, with a view to discovering the chief characteristics 
of each division. The morphology and physiology of plants 
is stressed and requires extensive experimental and microscopic 
work. In zoology a fairly complete life history of each type 
studied is presented, and includes: food habits; mode of loco- 
motion; sense organs and nervous system; processes of digestion; 
circulation and respiration; environmental relationships. The 
adaptation of plants and animals to their surroundings is 
stressed throughout the course. Three recitations, two labora- 
tory periods per week. 

Texts: Linville, Kelley, Van Cleave, "General Zoology;*' 
Campbell, "General Elementary Botany/* 

Two semesters. One unit. 

LANGUAGE 

Latin I 

A beginner's course in Latin. Drill in vocabulary, grammar 
and syntax. Translation from English to Latin and Latin 
to English. Emphasis is placed upon the relation between 
the Latin and English. 

Text: Smith, "Elementary Latin.*' Two semesters. One unit 

Latin II 

The early part of the course is devoted to a review of prin- 
ciples of Latin I. Translation and drill in syntax. 
Text: Walker, "Caesar's Gallic Wars." 

Two semesters. One unit 

Spanish I 

A beginner's course, with drill in grammar, principles of 
pronunciation, and easy reading. 

Text: Friedman-Arjona-Carvajal, "Language, Literature 
and Life Series, Spanish Book One.*' 

Two semesters. One unit. 

Spanish: H 

Review of fundamental principles, intermediate Spanish 
reading, and composition. 

Text: Friedman-Arjona-Carvajal, "Language, Literature and 
Life Series, Spanish Book One." Two semesters. One unit. 



COLLEGE PREPARATORY SCHOOL 79 

COMMERCE 
Bookkeeping 

This course begins with the rudiments of the subject 
and develops step by step into double entry bookkeeping. 
The pupil becomes familiar with the use of receipts, checks, 
notes, drafts, and invoices. He learns how to journalize and 
explain transactions, and how to post from journal and cash 
book to ledger; how to take trial balances, and how to make 
out balance sheets, profit and loss statements, and how to 
close and rule ledger accounts. 

Text: "Twentieth Century Bookkeeping," 17th ed. 

Two semesters* One unit, 

♦Shorthand I 

The fundamental principles of Gregg shorthand are mastered 
in the first year's work. Correct transcription of simple business 
letters dictated at 60 words a minute is required. 

Text: * 'Gregg Shorthand Manual," Anniversary ed. 

Two semesters. One unit 

Shorthand II 

A review of the theory principles, development of correct 
transcription habits, and the attainment of speed in writing 
cover the second year's work. The student must be able to 
transcribe correctly, material dictated at a minimum speed 
of 120 words a minute. He is required to earn the Complete 
Theory and O. G. A. certificates given by the Gregg Company. 

Two semesters. One unit 

*It is recommended that students complete twelve grades 
of work before electing shorthand. If, however, a student 
desires to take shorthand in the eleventh and twelfth grades, 
he may do so; but no credit toward graduation will be allowed 
for less than two units. 

For the work in shorthand as outlined above, six hours of 
credit may be elected in the Business Course. No credit will 
be allowed toward graduation from this course for less than 
two years of shorthand. 



80 SOUTHERN JUNIOR COLLEGE 

♦Typewriting 

Touch typewriting is taught. Two periods a day through 
two semesters, and the successful completion of a prescribed 
amount of work, are required for one unit of credit. A net speed 
of forty words per minute for fifteen minutes, with not more 
than five errors, must be attained* 

Text: "Gregg Typing Techniques and Projects, Book I. M 

Two semesters* One unit 

♦Credit toward graduation is not allowed for more than 
one unit in typewriting. 

For other elective courses in the College Preparatory Course, 
consult the outline of Printing, Home Economics, Manual 
Training and Agriculture in the Department of Vocational 
Education and the outline of Music I and 1 1 in the Department 
of Music. 



SOUTHERN JUNIOR COLLEGE 
COLLEGE PREPARATORY COURSE 
Grade Nine 



New Testament History 
English I 
Algebra I 
General Science 



Grade Ten 



Old Testament History 
English II 
World History 
Elect one unit: 



*Home Economics 
Manual Training I 
Algebra II 
Biology 
Music I 

Grade Eleven 
Bible III 
English III 
Geometry 
Elect two units: 

Home Economics II 

Manual Training II 

Music I or II 

Printing I 

Bookkeeping 

Chemistry 

Latin I 

Physics 

Shorthand I 

Typing 

Grade Twelve 
Bible IV 
English IV 

American History and Problems of Democracy 
Elect two units: 

Bookkeeping 

Chemistry 

Physics 

Home Economics II 



81 



Units 
1 
1 

1 



H 



82 COLLEGE PREPARATORY SCHOOL 

Units 
Latin II 1 

Shorthand II I 

Music I or II 1 

Printing II 1 

*Required of girls. 

It is essential that students make a careful selection of the 
elective courses which form a part of the Preparatory Course. 
The student should determine if possible by the beginning of 
the third year of the course what his life work is to be so that at 
the time of registration he can be advised what electives to 
choose in order to coordinate properly the Preparatory Course 
with the College work which he may plan to take later. 



ALUMNI OF THE 

Southern Training School 

Gray svi lie, Tenn. 



Haughey, Rachel Vreeland- 


Normal & Business 


1905 


Hollingsworth, Elsie M. 


Normal 


1905 


Jacobs, Bertha Lea- 


Normal 


1905 


Light, Amy Eloise 


Normal 


1905 


Lowery, Bertha Burrow- 


Normal 


1905 


Maddox, Robert Fera 


Business 


1905 


Mitchell, John Russell 


Business 


1905 


Morphew, Hurbert 


Business 


1905 


Moyers, Flora Dortch- 


Normal 


1905 


Payne, De Etta Marie 


Business 


1905 


Roberts, Benjamin Lee 


Literary 


1905 


Van Voorhis, Margaret Hildebrand- Normal & Business 


1905 


Webb, Howard 


Business 


1905 


Woodall, Marion Luther 


Business 


1905 


Brickey, Collin Perish 


Scientific 


1906 


Mitchell, John Russell 


Scientific 


1906 


Tenney, Earl 


Scientific & Business 


1906 


Brooke, Howell 


Business 


1907 


Callicott, Beulah 


Normal 


1907 


Cornish, Martha 


Literary 


1907 


Dixon, Nellie Travis- 


Normal 


1907 


Emmerson, Nina Reynolds- 


Literary 


1907 


Light, Amy Eloise 


Literary 


1907 


*Moyers, Samuel 


Business 


1907 


Summerour, Gradye Brooke- 


Literary 


~ 1907 


Wade, Leslie 


Business 

(83) 


1907 



84 



SOUTHERN JUNIOR COLLEGE 



Ambs, Etta Reeder- 


Scientific 


1908 


Gray, Agnes Sinclair- 


Business 


1908 


Hamilton, Bettie 


Business 


1908 


Hewitt, Carl 


Scientific 


1908 


Lowry, Gentry G. 


Literary 


1908 


Maxwell, Carl 


Scientific & Normal 


1908 


Schultz, Otto 


Literary 


1908 


Spear, Lawrence 


Business 


1908 


Spire, Mrs. E. C. 


Literary & Business 


1908 


Summerour, Gradye Brooke- 


Music 


1908 


Van Voorhis, Lawrence D. 


Literary 


1908 


Wade, Edith 


Literary 


1908 


Brown, Grace M. Craw- 


Literary 


1909 


Dortch, Ciaude L. 


Business 


1909 


♦Hetherington, Alice J. 


Scientific 


1909 


Hetherington, Marie Van Kirk- 


Literary 


1909 


Melendy, Leslie S. 


Business & Stenographic 


1909 


Reeder, Edna Travis- 


Stenographic 


1909 


Cochran, Claude M. 


Business 


1910 


Davis, Florence Whitney- 


Stenographic 


1910 


Kozel, Rosa M. 


Scientific 


1910 


Presley, Jenet E. 


Business 


1910 


♦Smith, Parizetta F. 


Literary 


1910 


Webb, Benjamin F. 


Business 


1910 


Beugnet, Harold V. 


Stenographic 


1911 


Brown, Grace M. Craw- 


Scientific 


1911 


Dillen, Daniel W. 


Ministerial 


1911 


Foster, Augustus H. 


Commercial 


1911 


♦Harrison, Harlan 


Commercial 


1911 


♦Harrison, Elizabeth Van Voorhis- 


Literary 


1911 


Jacobs, Burton L. 


Scientific 


1911 


Smith, Mabel F. Mitchell- 


Literary 


1911 


Smith, Nannie Mae 


Elementary Normal 


1911 


Vick, Mary Vreeland- 


Music 


1911 


Webb, Valah C. Dillen- 


Stenographic 


1911 


Wright, Lynne Rainwater- 


Ad. Normal & Stenographic 


1911 


Wright. John F. 


Literary 


191! 


Callicot, Rees 


Literary 


1912 


Callicot, Vesta 


Literary 


1912 


Lacey, Flora Dawson 


Scientific 


1912 


Maxwell, Myrtle V. 


Scientific 


1912 



ALUMNI 85 

Clark, Stanley 1915 

Franklin, Josephine 1915 

Gray. Alice 1915 

Grounds, John 1915 

Highsmith. Alvah 1915 

Hightower, Mamie 1915 

Hoskins, Bessie Seagraves 1915 

Howard Ellis 1915 

Jews, Earl 1915 

Jews. George 1915 

Jones, Gladys And r ess- Academic 1 924 

Lea, Ruby 1915 

Lorren, Cloie Elizabeth Ashby- Normal 1931 

Mount, Bessie 1915 

♦Washburn, Erne Nelson 1915 

*Deceased 



ALUMNI OF 

Southern Junior College 
Collegedale, Tenn. 



Aiken, George Carl 


Academic 


1924 


Allen, Addie Marie 


College Preparatory 


1931 


Amacker, Janet Catherine 


Academic 


1930 


Anderson, Clara Mae 


Academic 


1930 


Anderson, Ansel A. 


College Preparatory 


1933 


Andre, Lois Juanita Pittman- 


College Preparatory 


1932 


Arnold, Emory Monroe 


College Preparatory 


1931 


Artress, Lynn 


College Preparatory 


1931 


Ash lock, J. Franklin 


Theological 


1925 


Ashlock, Marcella IClock- 


Academic 


1919 


Backus, James T. 


Preparatory Medical 


1931 


Banks, Edward C. 


Theological, Honors 


1931 


Barrow, Marguerite 


College Preparatory 


1931 


Bartlett. Martha Minnick- 


Normal 


1925 


Barto, Robert E. 


College Preparatory 


1932 


Barto, Leonard W. 


College Preparatory 


1932 


B as com, Lewis A. 


Pre-medical, Honors 


1930 


Beaty, Patsy Louise 


Academic 


1930 


Beauchamp, By mice Inez 


Academic 


1930 


Bee, Clifford 


Academic 


1926 


Bee, Clifford 


Theological 


1929 


Bender, Thomas William 


Academic 


1928 


Benjamin, Bruce Thomas 


Preparatory Medical, Honors 


1933 


Benjamin, Lois Ruth 


College Preparatory 


1934 


Bird, Ellen Gould 


Academic 


1921 


Bird, Ellen Gould 


Normal 


1923 


Bird, Bobbie Elena 


Academic Music 


1934 


Bishop, Forest L. 


Theological 


1927 


Bonner, Mary Grace 


Normal 

(86) 


1925 



ALUMNI 



87 



Boswell, Frances Thelma 

Botimer, Clare 

Botimer, Clare 

Botimer, Christel Kalar- 

Boyce, Anne M. 

Boyd, Maurine Shaw- 

Boyd, Talmadge 

Boyd, Vivian 

Boykin, Charlie A. 

Boykin. Helen Watts 

Bradley, Millard C. 

Bradley, Walter Hoffman 

Bradley, Mildred Emanuel- 
Bradley, Mildred Emanuel- 
Braddock, H. A., Jr. 
Braddock. Jennie Clarke- 
Braddock, Jennie Clarke- 
Brooke, Maude M. 
Brown. Letha Litchfield- 
Brown. Lula Hilda 
Brown, M. Gordon 
Bruce, Miriam 
Burdick, J. Gordon Jr. 
Burke. Thyra Doreen 
Burke, Thyra Doreen 
Burtz, India Virginia 
Butterfield, Leslie A. 
Byrd, Arthur 

Carter, Minnie Lee 
Carter, Minnie Lee 
Case, Alice T. 
Case, Alice T. 
Casey, Lillian Emerson- 
Chambers, Dorothy Arline 
Chambers, Dorothy Arline 
Chambers, James Richard 
Chapman, Grace Coppage- 
Chapman, Opal Lee 
Chapman, Vaughtie Elizabeth 
Clark, Lucile Cherrie White- 
Clark, Lucile Cherrie White- 
Clark, Walter B. 
Clark. Walter B. 
JClark. Lois Mae 
Clymer. Irma Halliday- 



College Preparatory 


1933 


Academic 


1925 


Theological 


1926 


Academic 


1922 


College Preparatory 


1933 


Collegiate 


1927 


Academic 


1927 


College Preparatory 


1931 


Theological 


1928 


Academic 


1929 


Collegiate 


1928 


Academic 


1924 


Academic 


1923 


Normal 


1925 


Academi " 


1930 


Academic 


1928 


Normal, Honors 


1930 


Academic 


1922 


Normal 


1921 


Academic 


1921 


Collegiate 


1926 


Normal 


1926 


College Preparatory 


1934 


Academic 


1927 


Collegiate Commercial 


1929 


Academic 


1929 


Normal 


1928 


Academic 


1925 


Academic 


1927 


Literary 


1930 


Academic 


1920 


Academic Normal 


1920 


Academic Normal 


1918 


Academic 


1929 


Normal 


1931 


College Preparatory 


1933 


Academic 


1927 


College Preparatory 


1934 


College Preparatory 


1934 


Academic 


1924 


Bible Workers 


1927 


Academic 


1925 


Collegiate 


1927 


Normal, Honors 


1934 


Academic 


1921 



88 



SOUTHERN JUNIOR COLLEGE 



Clymer, Irma Halliday- 


Academic Music 


1921 


Cobb, Maybelle Harrold- 


Academic 


1929 


Coggin, Bonnie Catherine 


Academic 


1930 


Coggin, Charles Benjamin 


Academic 


1925 


Coggin, Nanette McDonald- 


Academic 


1925 


Conger, Jake R. 


Academic 


1919 


Cooksey, Annie Bird- 


Academic Commercial 


1925 


Cooper, James Lamar 


Theological 


1923 


Corrigan, Joseph, Jr. 


Preparatory Medical, Honors 


1931 


Cowdrick, Elizabeth 


Collegiate 


1923 


Cowdrick, Jesse Stanton 


Collegiate 


1925 


Cowdrick, Mary Ruth 


College Preparatory 


1933 


Cowdrick, Robert E. 


Collegiate 


1923 


Crowder, Katharyn Anderson 


Academic 


1926 


Cruise, Joseph S. 


College Preparatory 


1934 


Curtis, Glenn 


Academic 


1918 


Curtis, Helen L. 


Academic 


1923 


Curry, Lillian Louisa 


Academic 


1927 


Dart, Ethel May 


Normal 


1927 


Dart, Merrill Oren 


Academic 


1925 


Davis, Eloise Hoskins- 


Academic 


1918 


Davis, Lester S. 


Academic 


1927 


Davis, Lyda Ruth Leach- 


Academic Commercial 


1926 


Deyo. Ruth 


Academic 


1927 


Dickerson, Lottie 


Academic 


1928 


Dickerson, Lottie Gertrude 


Normal 


1930 


Dickerson, Marjorie E, Riggs- 


College Preparatory 


1931 


Dickman, Lyda Mae 


College Preparatory 


1933 


Dobbs, Joseph D. 


Academic 


1930 


Dobbs, Joseph D. 


Theological, Honors 


1931 


Doering Klarissa 


Academic 


1929 


Dortch, Virginia Veach- 


Academic 


1928 


Duge, John Frederick 


Preparatory Medical 


1931 


Dunham, Evelin Esther 


Academic 


1929 


Dunham, Gerald Oscar 


College Preparatory 


1932 


Edwards, Bern/ard Elmo 


College Preparatory 


1931 


Egger, Selma 


College Preparatory 


1931 


Eldridge, Elaine Yeast- 


Collegiate 


1926 


Ellis, Helen Mae 


Academic 


1929 


Elmore, Vincent M. Jr. 


Pre-medical, Honors 


1930 


Elmore, Winona Hawthorne 


College Preparatory 


1932 


Farley, Mary Earle 


Academic 


1923 


Ferree, Nellie 


Normal 


1928 



ALUMNI 


89 


Ficklen, Beatrice Ardell 


College Preparatory 


1931 


Field, Clarence S. 


Academic 


1918 


Field, Clarence S. 


Theological 


1920 


Fields, Marjorie Lucile 


Academic 


1929 


Finley, Josephine 1 1 au tense 


Academic 


1929 


Flanagan, Laurene Allee 


Normal 


1929 


Foley, M, Elaine 


College Preparatory 


1934 


Foshee, Earline 


Normal 


1930 


Ford Robert R. 


Academic 


1930 


Foster, Minard Irwin 


College Preparatory 


1931 


Fountain, Katie Mae 


Academic 


1924 


Fox, Lorene Estelle Furches- 


Collegiate 


1925 


Frank, Belva Grace 


College Preparatory 


1934 


Franklin, Joseph Warren 


Academic 


1920 


Franklin, Joseph Warren 


Theological 


1927 


Franz, Clyde 0. 


Secretarial, Honors 


1932 


Franz, Mildred Elizabeth 


College Preparatory 


1933 


French, Richard C. 


Academic 


1930 


Freeze, Opal Augusta 


College Preparatory 


1934 


Friberg, August 


Academic 


1926 


Fuller, Frederick E. 


Academic 


1921 


Fuller, Frederick E. 


Printing 


1923 


Fuller, George Newton 


Collegiate 


1925 


Gardiner, Zoa Shreve- 


Academic Normal 


1918 


Gartly, Mary 


Literary 


1931 


Gartly, Carey 


College Preparatory 


1931 


Gatlin, Mary 


Academic 


1921 


*Gattis, Alice Lillian 


Academic Normal 


1928 


Geeting, Tiny Violet Priest- 


Academic 


1925 


Gibbs, Bernice Audree Hollister- 


Academic Normal 


1923 


Gibbs, Bernice Audree Hollister- 


Normal 


1924 


Goddard, Eber Roland 


Theological 


1922 


Gooch, Homer L. 


Academic 


1930 


Gordon, James L. 


Academic 


1920 


Gosnell, Mabel Viola 


Academic 


1929 


Graves, Cecil F. 


Academic 


1923 


Graves, Lucile Whiteneck- 


Academic 


1922 


Groth, Wilber H. 


Academic 


1930 


Groth, Evelyn Vivian 


College Preparatory 


1931 


Guenterberg, Bernard 


Academic 


1926 


Haddad, Simonne 


College Preparatory 


1934 


*Hair, Martha Ivy 


Academic 


1930 


Hall, Albert N. 


College Preparatory 


1932 


Hall, Thomas 


Academic 


1930 



90 



SOUTHERN JUNIOR COLLEGE 



Hall, J. Thomas 
Hammond, Paul 
Hampton, Lucile 
Harding, Leta Leon 
Harding, Leta Leon 
Hassenpflug, Edward 
Hayes, J. W. 
Hayward, Joseph Clausen 
Harvey, Roberta 
Hazelton, La Vanne 
Heacock, Loretta Ellen 
Hendershot, Paul Kenneth 
Hickman, Bobbie Louise 
Higgins, Dorothy 
Hilderbrandt, Mildred 
Hogan, Charles A. 
Holland, James Carl 
Holland, James Carl 
Hollar, Richard Lee 
Home Earline Taylor- 
Home, Herbert Nicholas 
Hoskins, Lea Lucille 
Hughes, Mamie Jane Songer- 
Hubbell, Alfred 
Humphries, Frank 
Hunter, Donald Walter 
Hunter, Donald Walter 
Huxtable, Thomas R. 

Inabinet, Julia E. 
Inabinet, Julia E. 
Ingram, Ellen 
Ingram, Ellen Elizabeth 
Ingram, Martyn Clarise 
Ingram, Ruth Marguerite 
Ingram, Ruth 

Jacobs, Carl L. 
Jacobs, Ray Lester 
Jaeger, Euphemia Macaulay- 
Jameson, Maisie White- 
Jameson, Maisie White- 
Jameson, Viola Hervey- 
Jansen, John Muller 
Jansen, John Muller 
Jansen, John M. 



Theological 


1934 


Collegiate 


1926 


Academic 


1926 


College Preparatory 


1932 


Normal, Honors 


1934 


Business 


1931 


Academic 


1922 


Academic 


1928 


Academic 


1928 


Academic 


1928 


Normal 


1924 


Academic 


1929 


College Preparatory 


1932 


Academic 


1930 


Academic 


1930 


College Preparatory 


1932 


Academic 


1923 


Theological 


1925 


Academic 


1927 


Academic 


1929 


Academic 


1927 


Normal, Honors 


1930 


Academic 


1929 


Academic 


1926 


Academic 


1928 


Collegiate 


1924 


Theological 


1925 


Theological 


1922 


Academic 


1920 


Collegiate 


1922 


Academic 


1928 


Commercial 


1930 


College Preparatory 


1933 


Academic 


1929 


Normal, Honors 


1931 


Academic 


1927 


Academic 


1927 


Normal 


1921 


Academic Normal 


1918 


Normal 


1923 


Normal 


1931 


Academic 


1925 


Theological 


1927 


College Preparatory 


1932 



AL 

Jensen, Mabel Graves- 


UMNI 

Academic 


91 

1924 


Johnson, Beulah Beatrice 


Academic 


1926 


Johnson, Beulah Beatrice 


Normal 


1928 


Johnson, Frankie 


College Preparatory 


1933 


Johnson, Frankie 


Business, Honors 


1933 


Johnson, Jewell 


Academic 


1928 


Johnson, Jewell B. 


Normal 


1931 


Johnson, Oscar 


Academic 


1928 


Jorgensen, Mamie Jones- 


Academic Normal 


1920 


Jones, Thelma 


Normal 


1926 


Jones, Gertrude Louise 


Academic 


1929 


Kalar, Addie May 


Academic Normal 


1917 


Keck, Harold Irving 


Academic 


1925 


Kenny, E. Fisher 


Academic 


1928 


Kenny, Edna May Carlisle- 


Academic 


1928 


Kenny, E. Levon 


Academic 


1929 


Kenney, Hazel Geraldine 


Normal 


1932 


Killen, Nobia Allen 


Academic Music 


1921 


King. Ruby B. 


College Preparatory 


1932 


*King, Eleanor Winnogene 


Academic 


1927 


King, Elmer Richard 


Academic 


1929 


King, Elmer R. 


Preparatory Medical 


1932 


King, Elton B. 


Academic Commercial 


1927 


King, Elton B. 


Collegiate 


1929 


King, Ruth L. 


College Preparatory 


1934 


Kirstein, Doris Barbara 


Academic 


1930 


Kjos, Emma M. 


College Preparatory 


1932 


Kneeland, Ruth Evelyn 


Academic 


1929 


Kuester, William E. 


Academic 


1927 


Kuester, William E. 


Collegiate Commercial 


1929 


Lambert, John Letson 


Academic 


1927 


Lambert, John Letson 


Normal 


1929 


Lawson, Ida Marguerite Moore- 


Academic 


1930 


Leach, Paul H. 


Academic 


1924 


Leach, Virginia Ann 


Academic 


1927 


Leach, Virginia Ann 


Normal 


1929 


Lickey, Brent Zachary- 


Collegiate 


1924 


Lilly, Gladys Alois 


Academic 


1925 


Lilly, Lewie John 


Academic 


1925 


Lohr, Metha Welma 


Academic 


1921 


Lorren, Felton 


Academic 


1930 


Lorren, Robert Eddie 


Academic 


1929 


Lorren, Ruby L. 


College Preparatory 


1932 


Lorren, Thos. Alton 


Academic 


1929 


Lorren, Vivian Etherton- 


Academic 


1929 


Louis, Carolyn 


Academic 


1927 



92 



SOUTHERN JUNIOR COLLEGE 



Louis, Carolyn 


Normal 


1929 


Loyd, Monroe F. 


Academic 


1928 


Loyd, Monroe Franklin 


Scientific 


1930 


Lucas, Mary M. 


College Preparatory 


1932 


Lucas, Mary M. 


Preparatory-Dietetics, 


Honors 1934 


Lucas, Susannah H. 


College Preparatory 


1934 


Lundquist, Ellen H. 


College Preparatory 


1932 


Lundquist, Lorene Clark- 


Academic 


1925 


Lundquist, Eric 


Academic 


1928 


Luttrell, Margie Pauline 


Academic 


1930 


Macy, Albert Hayne 


Music, Honors 


1930 


Maddox, Nellie Lee Henderson- 


Academic 


1924 


Maiden, Frances 


College Preparatory 


1931 


Maiden, Roger Mae 


College Preparatory 


1933 


Manous, N. Levern 


College Preparatory 


1931 


Marshall, Minna H. 


Academic 


1930 


Martin, Walter C. 


Theological 


1926 


*Martin, Cecil Branson- 


Academic-Normal 


1920 


*Martin, Cecil Branson- 


Normal 


1922 


Martin, Anita 


Collegiate 


1924 


Mashbum, Mary Ellen 


Academic 


1929 


Mashburn, Mary Ellen 


Scientific 


1932 


Maxwell, Myrtle Vivian 


Normal 


1924 


Medford, Menton A. 


College Preparatory 


1934 


Meister, Harold L. 


Collegiate 


1925 


Meister, Rose A. 


Academic Normal 


1920 


Meister, Rose A. 


Normal 


192! 


Meyer, Cleo Adams- 


Academic 


1926 


Millard, Clay 


Literary 


1930 


Miller, Dora 


Academic 


1928 


Miller, Opal Lucille 


Music, Honors 


1932 


Miller. Ruth McNight 


Collegiate 


1924 


Minnick, S. Fulton 


Academic 


1924 


Minnick, Martha Harrold- 


Academic 


1924 


Morgan, Bessie Lee 


Academic 


1920 


Morgan, Bess'e Lee 


Normal 


1921 


Morrow, Irmie Lee 


Academic 


1930 


Mouchon, Dorothy Peppers- 


Academic 


1927 


Mulford, Eileen Fern 


College Preparatory 


1931 


Mulford, Eileen Fern 


Normal, Honors 


1933 


Mulholland, Mabel Branson- 


Academic 


1920 


Mulliken, Ethel L. 


Academic 


1920 


Murchison, John S. 


Collegiate 


1924 


Murchison, John S. 


Theological 


1925 


Murphy, Clarence E. 


Theological, Honors 


1932 





ALUMNI 


93 


Murphy, Rosalind Fae 


Academic Commerical 


1928 


Murrell, Mae B. 


Academic 


1926 


Murrell, Mae B. 


Normal 


1928 


McBrayer, Ruth 


Academic 


1926 


*McCaughan, Virginia 


Academic 


1926 


McLeod, John P. U. 


Preparatory Medical, Honors 


1933 


McClure, Alfred V. 


Collegiate 


1928 


McClure, Edith Bird- 


Academic Commercial 


1928 


McClure, Howard Everett 


Collegiate 


1927 


McClure, Warner E. 


Collegiate 


1924 


McClure, Warner E. 


Printing 


1925 


McClure, Nellie Nash- 


Collegiate Music 


1925 


McClure, Carolyn 


Academic 


1930 


McClure, Martha Carolyn 


Bible Worker's, Honors 


1932 


McClure, Herbert Cecil 


Literary, Honors 


1930 


McGhie, Audley H. 


Academic 


1928 


McKee, A. D. 


Academic 


1927 


McKee, A. D. 


Theological, Honors 


1930 


McKee, Jeanetta M. Hardin- 


Academic 


1920 


McKee, Oather Dorris 


Academic 


1927 


McKee, Oather Dorris 


Collegiate Commercial 


1928 


McLennan, San ford Horton 


Academic 


1928 


McNett, Viola Leone 


Academic 


1928 


McSwain, Ninette E. 


College Preparatory 


1931 


Nail, Nansie Christine 


Academic Commercial 


1925 


Nethery, Ronald Jay 


Academic 


1927 


Nethery, Raymond 


Academic 


1928 


Newton, Ruth Louzene 


Academic 


1927 


Null, Gladys Lavinia 


Academic 


1930 


0' Berry, Alma Lucile 


College Preparatory 


1931 


O'Brien, Thelma Wallace- 


Academic 


1925 


*0dom, Lela Perry- 


Academic 


1924 


Odom, Robert Leo 


Academic 


1924 


Odom, Martha Montgomery- 


Academic 


1922 


Odom, Martha Montgomery- 


Collegiate 


1924 


Orenduff , Novella Mae 


College Preparatory 


1933 


Ost. Walter M. 


Academic 


1929 


Ost, Walter M. 


Preparatory Medical, Honors 


1932 


Palmer. Fred M. 


Academic Commercial 


1925 


Palmer. Fred M. 


Normal 


1926 


Parrish, Ruth Starr- 


Academic 


1925 


Parrish, Ruth Starr- 


Normal 


1926 


Philmon, Mary L. 


Preparatory-Dietetics, Honors 


1934 



94 



SOUTHERN JUNIOR COLLEGE 



Pierce, Alice Lay 


Academic 


1923 


Pillsbury, Ruth Iva 


Academic 


1928 


Pines, Alberta Marie 


Normal, Honors 


1932 


Pirkle, Nelle Grace 


Academic 


1929 


Pirkle, Grace 


Normal, Honors 


1931 


Pointek, Irene 


Academic 


1929 


Pointek, Irene 


Normal 


1931 


Porter, Grace M 


Academic 


1924 


Porter, Grace M. 


Academic Commercial 


1925 


Porter, Forrest Fred 


Academic 


1927 


Porter, Elizabeth Ewell Bell- 


College Preparatory 


1931 


Quimby, Dorothy Lucille Bailey- 


Academic 


1924 


Rainwater, Alberta Reiber- 


Academic Commercial 


1927 


Randall, Carol Christian 


Academic 


1926 


Randall, Carol Christian 


College Preparatory 


1932 


Randall, Carol Christian 


Literary, Honors 


1932 


Randall, Winslow 


Academic 


1924 


Randall, Anna Marjori? 


Academic 


1930 


Randall, Anna Marjorie 


Normal, Honors 


1934 


Randall, Shirley Louise Ashton- 


College Preparatory 


1933 


Ray, Willard Franklin 


Academic 


1924 


Raymond, Ralph 


Academic 


1917 


Reese, Henry Lionel, Jr. 


College Preparatory 


1931 


Reiber, Evelyn 


Academic 


1926 


Rhew, Jesse N., Jr. 


Literary 


1932 


Richardson, Jeanette Harriet 


Academic 


1921 


Rilea, Frances E. 


Normal 


1929 


Ritter. Mildred M. 


College Preparatory 


1932 


Robertson, Ollie Mae 


Academic 


1925 


Rogers, Samuel Earl 


Academic Commercial 


1924 


Rogers, Verna McRae- 


Academic Commercial 


1924 


Rogers, Wava Alene 


Academic 


1928 


Rogers, Wava Alene 


Music, Honors 


1930 


Russell, Eva 


Academic 


1919 


Russell, Coralee, C. 


Academic 


1929 


Russell, Coralee C. 


Bible Worker's 


1930 


Rutledge, Dorothy Ellen 


College Preparatory 


1933 


Sammer, Harold H. 


Academic 


1927 


Sarrett, Annie Lou 


Academic 


1923 


Sarrett. Polly 


Academic 


1926 


Savelle, Velma 


Academic 


1929 


Sawers, Helen Jeanne 


Academic 


1921 


Scales, Ewell D. Jr. 


College Preparatory 


1934 


Schmehl, Nondes 


Academic 


1928 





ALUMNI 


95 


Schultz, Alice Hubbell- 


Normal 


1924 


Schultz, George E. 


Collegiate 


1924 


Schutter, Emma Frances 


Academic 


1929 


Scoles, Bernice Wilson- 


Academic 


1921 


Scott, Forest W. 


College Preparatory 


1931 


Shaw, Ward B. 


Academic 


1930 


Shaw. Ward B. 


Scientific 


1932 


Sheddan, Dorothy 


College Preparatory 


1931 


Sheffield, Lester A. 


College Preparatory 


1932 


Shelden, H. Raymond 


Scientific, Honors 


1931 


Shephard, William 


Collegiate 


1926 


Shephard, Evelyn Hamilton- 


Normal 


1926 


Shull, Dale Hayward- 


Academic 


1925 


Slate, Herman Ivan 


Academic 


1925 


Smith, Alice Marie 


Secretarial 


1933 


Smith, Alvan M. 


Academic 


1930 


Smith, E. Lewell 


Academic 


1930 


Smith, Jere Dyer 


Theological 


1924 


Smith, Nellah 


Academic 


1928 


Smith, F. LaVerne 


Academic 


1928 


Smith, F. LaVerne 


Business, Honors 


1931 


Speyer, John F. 


Academic 


1927 


Speyer, John F. 


Normal 


1929 


Stafford, Errol G. 


Academic 


1927 


Stagg, Arthur Ritchey 


Academic 


1925 


Stagg, Jennie 


Academic 


1928 


Steinman, Donald V. 


Academic 


1927 


Stephenson, Edythe O. 


College Preparatory 


1931 


Stephenson, George B. 


College Preparatory 


1932 


Stephenson, Kathryn Alberta 


College Preparatory 


1933 


Straight, Alfred 


Academic 


1927 


Strickland. Thomas D. 


Academic 


1927 


Strickland, Sarah Edwards- 


Academic 


1924 


Strickland, Sarah Edwards- 


Normal 


1927 


Strickland, Mona Deyo- 


Academic 


1924 


Stromberg, Ross 


College Preparatory 


1931 


Sutter, Ramona Stephenson- 


Academic 


1931 


Swain, J. Marshall 


Academic 


1929 
1929 


Taylor, Malvina Zachary- 


Academic 


1929 


Teed, Eva Victoria 


Normal 


1925 


Terry, Hollis T. 


Academic 


1926 


Terry, Hollis T. 


Collegiate 


1921 


Terry, Bertha Wolfe- 


Academic 


1926 


Terry, Bertha Wolfe- 


Collegiate 


1929 


Thurber, Evelyn Lucile 


Academic 


1926 



96 



SOUTHERN JUNIOR COLLEGE 



Timmons, Beatrice E. 


Academic 


1929 


Trammell, Edna Mae 


Academic 


1924 


Trammell, Edna Mae 


Normal 


1924 


Travis, Joe V. 


Academic 


1929 


Travis, Frances Marie Webb- 


Academic 


1928 


Treece, Eva A. 


College Preparatory 


1931 


Treece, Mabel Agnes 


Academic 


1927 


Turbeyville, Roza le Morton- 


Academic 


1926 


Turner, A. Marlete % 


College Preparatory 


1932 


Ulmer, Sanford Horton 


Academic 


1923 


Ulmer, Dorothy May 


Academic 


1930 


Ulrich, John Lanton 


College Preparatory 


1932 


Wade, Bertha Statham- 


Collegiate 


1927 


Wade, Thelma Gaskell- 


Academic 


1928 


Wade, Verda Maurine 


College Preparatory 


1931 


Walker. Beryl 


Academic 


1928 


Walker, Ottis 


Preparatory Medical, Honors 


1933 


Walleker, Sadie Rogers- 


Academic Normal 


1917 


Ward, Edna 


Academic 


1919 


Watts, Ralph S 


Academic 


1924 


Weaver, Billie 


Academic 


1930 


Weaver, Freda Belle 


Academic 


1927 


Webb, Eleanor Merry- 


Academic 


1921 


Webster, Vesta Jay 


Academic 


1929 


Webster, Frederick C 


College Preparatory 


1934 


Westcott, Albert G. 


Academic 


1928 


Wheeler, Alice Mae 


College Preparatory 


1931 


White, N. B. 


College Preparatory 


1933 


Whitehead, LeVitae Henson 


College Preparatory 


1934 


Whiteneck, Delores 


Academic 


1928 


Whitman, Fuller 


Academic 


1929 


White, Mary Eulala 


Academic 


1930 


Wildes, Leslie Albert 


Normal 


1929 


Wildes, Ethel Sheldt 


Normal 


1929 


Wiler, Dorothy Virginia Davis- 


Academic 


1929 


Williams, Mildred Olinger- 


Academic 


1923 


Williams, Walter E. 


Academic 


1930 


Williams, Edythe Cobet- 


Academic 


1930 


Wilson, Eva Maude 


Academic 


1927 


Wilson, Eva Maude 


Normal, Honors 


1930 


Wingate, Jean 


Normal 


1925 


Woodall, Hermon N. 


Academic 


1929 


Wood, J. Mabel 


Collegiate 


1920 


Wood, Benjamin A. 


Collegiate 


1924 



ALUMNI 



97 



Wood, Rosabelle 


Academic 


1922 


Woods, Cecil 


Academic 


1922 


Woolsey, C. A. 


Collegiate 


1923 


Woolsey, Cora Fox- 


Academic 


1922 


Woolsey, Cora Fox- 


Academic Commercial 


1923 


Wolfe, Wendell 


Collegiate 


1928 


Young, Faydette Yvonne Smith- 


Normal 


1924 


Zachary, Dema Malvina 


Literary, Honors 


1930 



* Deceased. 



INDEX 



Absences - _. 20. 23. 24 

Accounting I and II 66 

Accounts. Payment of 25 

Admission Requirements 17 

Advanced Composition 42 

Agriculture I and II 62 

Alcoholic drinks 19 

Algebra I and II 76 

Algebra, College — — 46 

American History and Problems of Democracy 75 

Alumni - 83-96 

Analytical Chemistry 48 

Ancient History. Survey of , 41 

Applied Music 55, 56 

Arithmetic. Teaching of 53 

Art 52 

Association, Improper 19 

Attendance at religious services 20, 22 

Automobiles 22 

B 

Bacteriology. — — 49 

Bakery 14 

Band - 60 

Better Men's Club 15 

Bible I. N. T. History 74 

Bible II. O. T. History... ._ r 74 

Bible III, Christian Ethics and Denominational History 74 

Bible IV. Bible Doctrines 75 

Bible Workers' Course — 71 

Bible Workers' Training 40 

Biology 78 

Board - - ~~ 26 

Board of Administration 4 

Board of Trustees 4 

Bookkeeping 79 

Book of Acts 38 

Broom Factory 14 

Buildings of School 12 

Business Course 72 

Business Law 66 



Calculus — - - - - 47 

Calendar for College Year 2 

Calendar of Events 3 

Card Playing -- 19 

Care of Rooms 23 

(98) 



INDEX 99 

Chapel Hour 15 

Charges for Music __ 30 

Chemistry, Analytical v 48 

Chemistry I 77 

Chemistry, General 48 

Chemistry, Organic_ 48 

Chorus „ 56, 59 

Christian Ethics - 74 

Civics, Teaching of 52 

Clothing and Textiles 65 

College Algebra 46 

College Entrance Requirements. . 37 

College Homes 23, 24 

Collegiate Music Course 73 

College Physics 47 

College Physiology _ 49 

College Preparatory Course 81,-82 

College Preparatory School 74 80 

College Rhetoric 42 

Committees of Faculty 7 

Conditions 33, 34 

Conducting 59 

Constitutional History 41 

Cooking in private rooms . 23 

Cooking, Teaching of 53 

Corporation and Cost Accounting 68 

Correspondence work 34 

Counterpoint and Composition 59 

Course of Study Regulations 33-35 

Credits „ 36 

Credits in Music _ 55, 56 



D 



Dairy 13 

Damage to school property 21 

Daniel, Prophecies of 39 

Denominational History 74 

Dental Work _. 23 

Department of Chemistry and Biology 48, 49 

Department of Commerce 66-68 

Department of Education 50-54 

Department of English 42, 43 

Department of History 41 

Department of Languages 44, 45 

Department of Music _.. 55-60 

Department of Physics and Mathematics 46, 47 

Department of Theology and Missions 38, 39 

Department of Vocational Education _„ 61-65 

Deposit, on entrance 26 

Diplomas _ , 34 

Diploma Courses in Music 56 

Discounts 30 

Dress regulations 21 

Drop vouchers _ 34 



100 SOUTHERN JUNIOR COLLEGE 

E 

Economics, Principles of 67 

Education, Principles of 50 

English I, II, III, IV 75, 76 

English Literature, Survey of 43 

Entertainment of guests 24 

Entrance Deposit 26 

Equipment of College 13 

Estimated Expense 27 

European History, Survey of 41 

Expenses - 25-32 

Extension Courses 37 



Faculty 5, 6 

Faculty advisers 9 

Faculty committees ...__ 7 

Farm Department 14 

Fees 28,29 

Field Work, Ministerial 39, 40 

Finance Committee 7 

Firearms 22 

Foods and Dietetics __ _ _ 64 

French I and II 44 

Full work, Academic and College 33 



General Chemistry 48 

General Fees 29 

General Psychology..- 50 

General Regulations 19-22 

General Science 77 

Geography Teaching 53 

Geometry, Plane — - 77 

Geometry, Plane Analytic 46 

Grades 34,36 

Graduation Requirements . 36, 37 

Graduation and Scholarship Committee 7 

Greek I and II 45 

Guests 24 



H 

Harnony I and II 56 

Health Committee..- 7 

Health Education.. 52 

History of School 1 1 

History, Teaching of 52 

Home Economics I and II 64 

Home Economics Course _ 69 

Honor credits , , , _ -. , - 36 



INDEX 101 

Hosiery Mill . 14 

Household Economics 14 

How to reach the College.- 18 

Hygiene, School 52 



I 

Industrial Faculty 10 

Industries ___ 13, 14 

Inorganic Chemistry __ 48 

Instructors of College Demonstration School 6 

Introductory English 42 

Invertebrate Zoology _ _ _ _ 49 



Jewelry _ 21 

Joshi Jotatsu Kai T 15 

Junior Class requirements 37 



Labor 31,32 

Labor requirement 24, 28 

Laboratories __ 13 

Latin I and II , 78 

Library 13 

Library Committee 7 

Library Science 43 

Literary Course 69 

Literary Society 16 

Location of School _„ 12 



M 

Manual Training I and II 63 

Marking, System of 34 

Ministerial Field Work I and II... . 39, 40 

Missionary Volunteer Society 15 

Motorcycles 22 

Music Appreciation and History _ 56 

Music, Cheap popular, 19 

Music charges 30 

Music Course, Collegiate 73 

Music credits 55, 56 

Musical Organizations 16 

Music, Teaching of 52 

Music Theory 55 



102 SOUTHERN JUNIOR COLLEGE 

N 

Nature 51 

New Testament History... 74 

Normal Course 70 

O 

Objectives of School 1 1 

Observation and Tracking I and II 51 

Officers of Administration 6 

Office Training _ 67 

Officers of the College Industries 10 

Old Testament History 78 

Orchestra _ 56, 64 

Organic Chemistry 40 

Organizations and Activities 14 

Outside students _ _ 21 



Pastoral Training I and II 39 

Pauline Epistles 38 

Payment of Accounts _ 28 

Penmanship _ 70 

Period Charges 26 

Physiology, College 49 

Physics I 77 

Physics, College 47 

Piano Course, College 57 

Piano Requirements 57 

Plane Analytic Geometry 41 

Plane Geometry _ 77 

Plane Trigonometry 46 

Preparatory College Course 81-82 

Preparatory Medical Course 73 

Preparatory Nurses' Course 72 

Presidents of Southern Junior College 8 

Principles of Economics _ 67 

Principles of Education _ 50 

Principals of Southern Training School 8 

Printing I, II. Ill and IV 61. 62 

Printing Department „_.. 13 

Private Lessons : 33 

Profane language 19 

Prophecies of Daniel 39 

Psychology of Childhood _ 52 

Psychology, General 50 

Public Speaking and Reading _ 40 

Purpose of School _ - 1 1 

R 

Radio sets 24 

Reaching the College 18 

Recitals - 55 



■■■*. 



INDEX 103 

Registration.... _ _ , 16 

Regulations of Course of Study 33-35 

Regulations, General „_: 19-22 

Religious Activities Committee 7 

Religious Services* Attendance at 21, 23 

Requirements for Admission 17 

Requirements for Graduation 36, 37 

Revelation _ _ __ 39 

Reviews in Fundamental Subjects 54 



Scholarships - 28, 29 

School Hygiene 52 

School Organization and Management 51 

Science Club„_ 16 

"Semester-hour" defined 34 

Seminar 15 

Sewing, Teaching of „ 53 

Shorthand I and II 79 

Sight Singing 59 

Social Activities Committee 7 

Social gatherings _ 20 

Spanish I, II 44. 78 

Special students 33 

Standing committees of faculty 7 

Study periods 23 

Student Aid 28 

Student recitals 55 

Student Welfare Committee 7 

Summary of Courses ._ 69-73 

Summer School graduates 37 

Survey of Ancient History 41 

Survey of English Literature 43 

Survey of European History 41 

Survey of Nursing Education 65 

System of grading 34 



Teaching of Arithmetic 53 

Teaching of Bible 51 

Teaching of Cooking -_ 53 

Teaching of English in the Grades 52 

Teaching of Geography _ 53 

Teaching of History and Civics __ _ 52 

Teachings of Jesus 38 

Teaching of Music 52 

Teaching of Reading 51 

Teaching of Sewing _ 53 

Teaching of Woodwork __„ _ .„ 53 

Technique of Instruction - _ _ _ 51 

Theater going 19 

Theological Course _ 71 



104 SOUTHERN JUNIOR COLLEGE 

Theory of Music _._ 55 

Tobacco using 19 

Transportation 29 

Trigonometry, Plane 46 

Trips to Ooltewah and Chattanooga 24 

Tuition Certificates 28 

Tuition in Elementary School 27 

Tuition, College and Academic 27 

Tuition Scholarships 30 

Typewriting 67, 80 

U 

Unit Cost Plan _ _ 25 

"Unit" of credit defined 34 

V 

Valuables, to be deposited __ - 19 

Vertebrate Zoology 49 

Vesper Service 15 

Visitors 24 

Violin Requirements 58 

Voice Requirements ___ 58 

W 

What to Bring 17 

Woodcraft Shop _. 14 

Woodwork, Teaching of 53 

World History ...__: 75 

Z 

Zoology, Vertebrate and Invertebrate 49 









For Reference 

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ILLEGE MCKEE LIBRARY 

II III! Jill II II 

MS073466