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Full text of "Southern Junior College catalogue 1937-38"

Southern Junior College 




1937-1938 

Annual Catalogue 



Collegedale, Tennessee 



McKEE LIBRARY 
Southern Missionary College 
Collecedala. Tennns&n 3731 c 



Calendar For 1937 


SEPTEMBER 


OCTOBER 


NOVEMBER 


DECEMBER 


S M T W T F S 
12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 91011 
12 13 14 15 16 17 18 
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 
26 27 28 29 30 . . 


S M T W T F S 
1 2 


S M T W T F S 
.. 12 3 4 5 6 

7 8 9 10 11 12 13 
14 15 16 17 18 19 20 
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 
28 29 30 


S M T W T F S 
1 2 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 
12 13 14 15 16 17 18 
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 
26 27 28 29 30 31 


3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 
31 .. 


Calendar For 1938 


JANUARY 


FEBRUARY 


MARCH 


APRIL 


S M T W T F S 
1 


5 M T W T F S 
.... 12 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 
27 28 


5 M T W T F S 
.... 12 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 
27 28 29 30 31 . . 


S M T W T F S 
12 


2] 3 4 5*16 7 8 

9510 11 12 '13 14 15 

16117=118 19,*20 21 22 

23;24"25 26-27,28 29 


3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 




MAY 


JUNE 


JULY 


AUGUST 


S M T W T F S 

12 3 4 5 6 7 

8 9 10 11 12 13 14 

15 16 17 18 19 20 21 

22 23 24 25 26 27 28 

29 30 31 


S M T W T F S 
12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 
12 13 14 15 16 17 18 
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 
26 27 28 29 30 . . 


S M T W T F S 
1 2 


S M T W T F S 
.. 12 3 4 5 6 

7 8 9 10 11 12 13 
14 15 16 17 18 19 20 
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 
28 29 30 31 


3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 
31 


SEPTEMBER 


OCTOBER 


NOVEMBER 


DECEMBER 


S M T W T F S 
12 3 

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 
18 19 20 21 22 23 24 
25 26 27 28 29 30 . . 


S M T W T F S 
1 


5 M T W T F S 

.... 12 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 
27'28 29 30 


S M T W T F S 
12 3 

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 
18 19 20 21 22 23 24 
25 26 27 28 29 30 31 


2 3 4 5 6 7 8 

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 

23 24 25 26 27 28 29 

30 31 


Calendar For 1939 


JANUARY 


FEBRUARY 


MARCH 


APRIL 


S M T W T F S 
12 3 4 5 6 7 
8 9 10 11 12 13 14 
15 16 17 18 19 20 21 
22 23 24 25 26 27 28 
29 30 31 


S M T W T F S 
12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 
12 13 14 15 16 17 18 
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 
26 27 28 


S M T W T F S 
12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 
12 13 14 15 16 17 18 
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 
36 27 28 29 30 31 


S M T W T F S 
1 


2 3 4 5 6 7 8 

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 

23 24 25 26 27 28 29 

30 


MAY 


JUNE 


JULY 


AUGUST 


S M T W T F S 
.. 12 3 4 5 6 

7 8 9 10 11 12 13 
14 15 16 17 18 19 20 
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 
28 29 30 31 


S M T W T F S 
12 3 

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 
18 19 20 21 22 23 24 
25 26 27 28 29 30 . . 


S M T W T F S 
1 


5 M T W T F S 
.... 12 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 
27 28 29 30 31 . . . . 


2 3 4 5 6 7 8 

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 

23 24 25 26 27 28 29 

30 31 



5/£>f 

.A/jL 

/J3$ CALENDAR OF EVENTS 

1937—1938 

First Semester 

September 7, Tuesday 

2 P. M „_... .:... Registration 

8 P. M Opening Address 

September 8, Wednesday 

9-12 A. M..- : Registration 

2-5 P. M .....Registration 

September 9, Thursday Instruction Begins 

September 10, Friday 

7:30 P. M .First Vesper Service 

September 11, Saturday 

8 P. M .Faculty-Student Reception 

September 29 — October 1 Examinations for Removal of Conditions 

October 18 — 20 First Period Examinations 

November 25, 26 Thanksgiving Holiday 

November 29 — December 1— Second Period Examinations 

December 22 — January 3 Christmas Vacation 

January 17 — 19 ...Mid-year Examinations 



Second Semester 

January 20 —Registration for Second Semester 

February 16 — 18 ...Examinations for Removal of Conditions 

February 28 — March 2 Fourth Period Examinations 

April 1 — 3 Fifth Period Examinations 

May 17 — 20 Final Examinations 

May 20, Friday 

8 P. M... Senior Consecration Service 

May 21, Sabbath 

11 A. M... Baccalaureate Sermon 

May 22, Sunday 

10 A. M ..Commencement 

2:30 P. M „ Alumni Association Meeting 



114055 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

J. K. Jones, President Decatur, Ga. 

J. C Thompson, Secretary Collegedale, Tenn. 

C. V. Anderson Nashville, Tenn. 

Le Roy Coolidge, M. D Greeneville, Tenn. 

C. O. Franz .Decatur, Ga. 

G. A. Huse Nashville, Tenn. 

R. I. Keate.- .....Atlanta, Ga. 

Lewis E. Lenheim Orlando, Fla. 

H. E. Lysinger ...Charlotte, N. C. 

John R. Mitchell, D.D.S. Atlanta, Ga. 

C. A. Russell Decatur, Ga. 

E. A. Sutherland, M. D Madison College, Tenn. 

W. W. Walker Meridian, Miss. 

E. C. Waller... ..Asheville, N. C 

LOCAL BOARD OF MANAGEMENT 

J. K. Jones, Chairman Decatur, Ga. 

J. C. Thompson, Secretary ...Collegedale, Tenn. 

C. O. Franz Decatur, Ga. 

George N. Fuller Collegedale, Tenn. 

R. I. Keate .Atlanta, Ga. 

C. A. Russell Decatur, Ga. 




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PRINCIPALS OF SOUTHERN TRAINING SCHOOL 

G. W. Colcord 1893-1896 

W. T. Bland . ........ 1896-1898 

C W.Irwin 1898-1900 

N. W. Lawrence 1900-1901 

J. E. Tenny • 1901-1908 

M. B. VanKirk 1908-1912 

C. L Stone 1912-1914 

L. H. Wood 1914-1915 

A. N. Atteberry -. 1915-1916 



PRESIDENTS OF SOUTHERN JUNIOR COLLEGE 

LeoThiel 1916-1918 

L H.Wood 1918-1922 

Leo Thiel 1922-1925 

H. H. Hamilton 1925-1927 

M. E. Cady r 1927-1927 

H. J. Klooster , 1927-1937 

J. C. Thompson 1937- 



THE FACULTY 

1937-1938 

John C. Thompson, A.B., B.S., M.A. 

Washington Missionary College; George Peabody College for Teachers; Univer- 
sity of Maryland; Johns Hopkins University. Instructor Maplewood Academy, 
1917-18. Educational Secretary of Southern Union Conference of Seventh-day 
Adventists, 1918-25. Religious Education, General Conference of Seventh-day 
Adventists, 1925-1937. President of Southern Junior College, 1937— 

ROBERT W. WOODS, A.B., M.A. 

Georgia Institute of Technology,- Emmanuel Missionary College; University of 
Cincinnati. Instructor, Technical High School, Atlanta, Georgia, 1920-1921. In- 
structor, Indiana Academy, 1921-1927. Instructor, Physics and Mathematics, South- 
ern Junior College, 1927 — 

Stanley D. Brown, A.B., M.A. 

Washington Missionary College; University of Maryland. Instructor, English, 
Southern Junior College, 1935 — 

Pearl L Hall, A.B., M.A. 

Emmanuel Missionary College,- University of Michigan. Instructor, Modern 
Languages, Southern Junior College, 1929 — 

Harold E. Snide, A.B., M.A. 

Washington Missionary College,- American University. Instructor, Home Study 
Institute 1932-1934. Instructor, Bible, Washington Missionary College, Summer 
Session, 1934. Instructor, Bible and Greek, Southern Junior College, 1934 — 

Don C. Ludington, A.B., B.S., M.A. 

Emmanuel Missionary College,- George Peabody College. Principal, Battle Creek 
Academy, 1913-1914. Principal, Meiktila Technical School, Burma, 1915-1922. 
Educational Secretary, Florida Conference, 1923-1927. Principal, Forest Lake 
Academy, 1927-1929. Normal Director, Southern Junior College, 1930 — 

Ola K. Gant, B.S., M.S. 

College of Medical Evangelists; George Peabody College; University of 
Colorado. Instructor, Chemistry, Nashville Agricultural and Normal Institute, 
1926-1929. Instructor, Nutrition and Chemistry, Southern Junior College, 1929- 
1930. Dietition, Florida Sanitarium & Hospital, 1930-1932. Dietition, Colorado 
Sanitarium & Hospital, 1932-1934. Instructor, Chemistry and Biology, Southern 
Junior College, 1935 — 



Andrew J. Wheeler, B.S., M.S. 

Kansas State Agricultural College; Union College; University of Tennessee. In- 
structor, Nashville Agricultural Normal Institute. Instructor, Clarksville High 
School. Instructor, Austin Peay Normal. Principal, Madison High School. 
Instructor, Biology and Agriculture, Southern Junior College, 1936 — 

Irma Watt, A.B., M.A. 

Union College; University of Nebraska. Instructor, Nebraska Public Schools, 
1924-1926. Instructor, Bayard City Schools, Nebraska, 1931-1933. Instructor, 
Commerce, Southern Junior College, 1935 — 

Rachel Christman, B.A. 

Washington Missionary College; University of Virginia. Dean of Women, Wash- 
ington Missionary College, Summer Session 1929. Preceptress, Shenandoah Val- 
ley Academy. Dean of Women and Instructor in History, Southern Junior College, 
1936— 

Maude I. Jones, A.B. 

Mississippi State College for Women,- University of Chicago; University of 
Georgia; George Peabody College,- University of Tennessee. Instructor, Mississippi 
Public Schools, 1894-1897. Instructor, Latin, Mississippi State College for Women, 
1899-1905. Instructor, Latin and Mathematics, Higbee'School, Memphis, Tennessee, 
1908-1912. Instructor, English, Southern Junior College, 1917 — 

Myrtle V. Maxwell, A.B. 

Union College; George Peabody College. Instructor, Elementary School, At- 
lanta, Georgia, 1912-1913. Instructor, Elementary School, Valle Crucis, North 
Carolina, 1914-1917. Instructor, Union College, 1927-1928. Critic Teacher, 
Southern Junior College, 1917-1926,1928-1936. Instructor, Education, 1937 — 

Lois J. Walker, A.B. 

Canadian Junior College,- Southern Junior College,- Washington Missionary 
College; Emmanuel Missionary College. Instructor, Elementary School, Greenville, 
South Carolina, 1926-1928. Instructor, Elementary School, High Point, North 
Carolina, 1928-1930. Instructor, Elementary School, Maitland, Florida, 1931-1932. 
Instructor, Elementary School, Orlando, Florida, 1932-1933. Critic Teacher, Sou- 
thern Junior College, 1935 — 

Harold A. Miller, B. Mus. 

Otterbein College; Denison University; Eastman School of Music; Von Unschuld 
University. Director, Department of Music, Mount Vernon Academy, 1916-1929, 
1934-1935. Director, Department of Music, Washington Missionary College, 
1929-1934. Director, Department of Music, Southern Junior College, 1935 — 



Theodora Wirak, B. A. 

Union College. Treasurer and Instructor in Bookkeeping, Southern Junior Col- 
lege 1936— 

Betty Klotz-Harter, B.S. 

Western College for Women; Wittenberg College. Instructor/ West Mansfield, 
Ohio Public Schools, 1932-1933. Instructor, Physical Education and Piano, 
Southern Junior College, 1936 — 

Nellie R. Ferree 

Southern Junior College; Emmanuel Missionary College,- Union College. In- 
structor, Elementary School, Cocoa, Florida, 1923-1929. Instructor, Elementary 
School, Orlando, Florida, 1929-1934. Instructor Elementary School, Miami, Florida, 
1934-36. Critic Teacher, Southern Junior College, 1936 — 



SUPERVISORS IN 
VOCATIONAL EDUCATION 

J. C. Thompson .President 

George N. Fuller... -Secretary 

Theodora Wirak Treasurer 

Rachel Christman Dean of Women 

To be supplied ....Dean of Men 

F. O. Rathbun \ College Press 

Albert N. Hall/ 

H. J. Halvorsen \ _ Department of Agriculture 

Andrew J. Wheeler/ 

Eva Maude Wilson Matron 

Paul T. Mouchon .Engineer 

John Gepford Broom Factory 

David T. Carnahan ...Hosiery Mill 

E. Lewell Smith Woodcraft Shop 

Hollis Olsen Bookbindery 



STANDING COMMITTEES 



Library 

The Librarian 
Harold E. Snide 
Pearl L. Hall 
Robert W. Woods 
The President 



Health 

Dean of Women 
Dean of Men 
Walter E. Williams 
Mrs. Walter E. Will 
Eva Maude Wilson 



ams 



Social Activities 

Harold A. Miller 
Dean of Men 
Dean of Women 
George N. Fuller 
Robert W. Woods 
The Registrar 



Religious Activities 

Harold E. Snide 
Dean of Women 
Dean of Men 
Stanley D. Brown 
Don C. Ludington 
Myrtle V. Maxwell 



Finance 

The President 
George N. Fuller 
Theodora Wirak 
Eric Lundquist 



Administration 

The President 
Dean of Women 
Dean of Men 
Eva Maude Wilson 
The Registrar 



SOUTHERN JUNIOR 
COLLEGE 



HISTORY 

In 1893 Seventh-day Adventists began educational work in the 
South under the leadership of G. W. Colcord, who opened a small 
school at Graysville, Tennessee. The school grew rapidly and was even- 
tually taken overbythedenomination. In February of1915 oneofthe dor- 
mitories was destroyed by fire. The loss of this building, together with 
the needs of a growing constituency, was the immediate cause for 
the removal of the school from Graysville to its present location at 
Collegedale. 

OBJECTIVES 

Southern Junior College was founded to serve the young people 
of the constituency of the Seventh-day Adventist churches in the south- 
eastern states. The school is, however, open to young people of all 
religious persuasions who are willing to live in harmony with its princi- 
ples. 

The College provides education in an atmosphere that is permeated 
by Christian ideals and Christian faith. It offers specific training in 
religion, teaching its students the contents and significance of the 
Scriptures, helping them to achieve moral and religious standards, and 
establishing in them a sense of Christian responsibility to society. 

In an age when greatness is often confused with wealth or numbers, 
Southern Junior College desires to become great because of the quality 
of its faculty and student body, its standards of scholarship, culture, 
and conduct. The College therefore does not accept those students 
whose main purpose in attending college is to increase their earning 
capacity, nor those who seek primarily social enjoyment or competition 
in intercollegiate sports. It desires rather those students whose purpose 
is to achieve high excellence of scholarship combined with a deep 
and unaffected piety. Under the guidance of the institution it is hoped 
that these students will catch the missionary vision of the Church, and 

«11» 



be led to devote their lives to the service of Christ either at home or 
abroad. 

The Collese accepts a responsibility for the acquisition and mainte- 
nance of sound health on the part of its students. It has therefore estab- 
lished a health service which requires periodical physical examinations, 
and insures supervision over the physical activities of its students. 

The College aims to widen the student's range of interest and appre-. 
ciation by introduction to the main fields of significant knowledge. 
While the primary emphasis of the education provided by the College 
is cultural rather than vocational, its courses do, however, offer to 
students elementary preparation for business and for the following pro- 
fessions: the ministry, teaching, nursing, and medicine. 

A distinctive feature of the work of Southern Junior College is 
the emphasis which is placed on manual labor. All students are re-' 
quired to engage in some form of remunerative labor while attending 
the College; and they are taught not only the dignity of labor, but 
also its importance as an educative factor, and its value in developing 
financial independence. 

ACCREDITATION 

Southern Junior College is fully accredited by, or is a member of 
the following organizations: Southern Association of Colleges and 
Secondary Schools, Tennessee State College Association, American 
Association of Junior Colleges, American Council on Education, Mid- 
south Association of Private Schools, Seventh-day Adventist Association 
of Colleges and Secondary Schools. 

LOCATION 

Southern Junior College is located two miles southeast of Ooltewah, 
Tennessee, on the main line of the Atlanta Division of the Southern 
Railway. It is situated in the heart of the Cumberland Mountains, 
eighteen miles due east from Chattanooga. The College estate of 
over seven hundred acres, with its wooded ravines and clear streams, 
furnishes a picture that is both inviting and satisfying, and surrounds 
the student with an environment that is conducive to study and mental 
culture. 

«12» 



BUILDINGS 

The central building of Southern Junior College is the Adminis- 
tration Building, in which are located the chapel, library and reading 
room, department of commerce, department of music/physical, chemical 
and biological laboratories, lecture rooms, and the administrative offices 
of the institution. 

A Normal Building provides accommodations for the teacher training 
department and the demonstration school. 

There are at present two residence halls, each accommodating ap- 
proximately one hundred students. In addition to these there are more 
than a score of other buildings, which are used either to house the 
various industries of the College or to serve as residences. 

REGISTRATION 

Registration begins Tuesday, September 7, 1937, at 2 P.'M. It is highly 
desirable that all students enter at the beginning of the school year. Ex- 
perience has repeatedly demonstrated that thisisofgreatadvantageto both 
students and College. Those who enter late frequently find difficulty 
in the organization of a satisfactory program. Special help must be 
given to them; the class is therefore retarded, and such students, fre- 
quently become discouraged under the burdens of accumulating daily 
and back work. For these reasons all students are strongly urged to 
enter at the opening of the school session. Regulations governing students 
entering late will be found under Course of StudyRegulations, page 24. 

Students entering this school for the first time should have the school 
they have previously attended send a transcript of courses completed 
to the Registrar to be evaluated before the opening of school. Students 
entering from private schools will be granted standing only when the 
grades presented are validated by a properly constituted accrediting 
agency, or by entrance examinations. 

All students will be required to take examinations at the time of 
registration in reading, penmanship, spelling, scholastic aptitude, and 
general intelligence. Assignment of students to members of the staff 
who will act as counsellors will be made at the time of registration. 
A physical examination made by the College physician is also required 
of all students at the time of entrance. 

«13» 



ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS 

The school is open to young men and women of good moral character 
and reasonably sound health who are willing to live in harmony with 
its principles and standards. While no religious test is applied, all 
are required to attend church services and to show proper respect for 
the Scriptures. It is distinctly understood that every student who applies 
for admission to the College thereby pledges himself to observe all its 
regulations. If this pledge is broken, it follows that by such infraction 
he forfeits his membership in the school, and if retained longer, it is 
only by the forbearance of the faculty. It is also a part of the student's 
contract that he will, to the best of his. ability, perform all the duties 
assigned to him in the industrial program of the institution. 

Children under fourteen years of age will not be received into 
the dormitories except by previous arrangement with the President, 
but arrangement can be made for their accommodation in approved 
private families residing in the vicinity of the College. 

Employment will not be given to any individual who is not registered 
as a student with the intention of taking class work. 

WHAT TO BRING 

Each student is expected to bring his own bedding — three sheets, 
three pillow cases, one bedspread, a pillow, and blankets or comfor- 
ters,- also hot water bag, towels, dresser scarfs, and cover for study 
table. Those desiring rugs, carpets, wastepaper baskets, or curtains, 
should provide them. Strong, substantial laundry-bags should be pro- 
vided for carrying clothing to and from the laundry. School supplies, 
stationery, and toilet articles may be purchased at the supply store. 

HOW TO REACH THE COLLEGE 

Ooltewah, two miles from Collegedale, is on both the Atlanta 
Division and Knoxville Division of the Southern Railway, fifteen miles 
east of Chattanooga. Fourteen passenger trains each day pass here, 
all but four making regular stops. 

Students coming from west of Chattanooga should take the Southern 
Railway, if possible, to avoid changing stations there. From many points, 
through trains to Ooltewah can be had. Those coming on the N. C. & 
St. L. Railway must change stations in Chattanooga. Tickets should be 
bought to Ooltewah, and baggage checked to that point. 

«14» 



ji 



All students taking the local trains from Chattanooga or Atlanta which 
stop at Collegedale, should buy their tickets and check their baggage 
to that point, and turn their baggage checks with their tickets over to 
the conductor in order to have baggage taken off at Collegedale. 
This will save time and trouble for both the College and the railway 
company. 

Students from the East should take the Southern Railway if possible. 
Connections with this road can be made at Knoxville, Atlanta, and other 
points. Those whoarrive bybus from Chattanooga or Knoxville may get off 
at Ooltewah crossroads. Students should notify the College by letter or 
telegram, stating the hour of their arrival at Ooltewah. If this is done, a 
conveyance will meet them and bring them directly to the College. 

The College office may be called on the telephone through the Chat- 
tanooga exchange by calling County 2602. There is no toll charge for 
calls from Chattanooga. 



.15. 



EXPENSES 



The College classifies its students at the time of admission into two 
groups. Those who are registered for regular class work are designated 
as "matriculated students." Those who are admitted to employment in 
the College industries and who do not carry class work until sufficient 
credit has been accumulated, are known as "employed students." 
Regulations of the school apply to all students alike, regardless of 
classification. 

ENTRANCE DEPOSIT 

At the time of admission an entrance deposit is required of each 
student as follows: matriculated students, $50.00/ employed students, 
$25.00; resident matriculated students, college or preparatory, $20.00; 
resident matriculated elementary students, $10.00. 

DORMITORY CHARGES 

A charge of $3.25 each week is made to all students who reside 
in the dormitories. This charge includes room, laundry, and medical fee. 
The medical fee provides for physical examination at the opening of 
school, workmen's compensation insurance, and nursing care not to 
exceed three weeks,- but does not include physician's charges. 

No refunds are made from room rent for absence of a few weeks 
except when property is withdrawn and the room released. 

BOARD 

Three meals are served each day in the College cafeteria. As far as 
possible, home life at the table is preserved. Students residing in the 
dormitories are expected to take their meals in the cafeteria. The mini- 
mum charge for board for dormitory students is $3.00 per week for 
girls, and $3.75 per week for boys. 

TUITION 

The charge for tuition for a semester is placed on the first statement 
issued at the beginning of each semester. The yearly charges are: 

«16» 



Elementary Department 

Grades I to III ...$30.00 

Grades IV -to VI... 43.00 

Grades VII and VIII 63.00 

In the elementary school, the tuition charges include medical exami- 
nation, library, manual training, lecture course fees, and tuition for 
the school year. 

Preparatory Department 

Tuition for the year 4 units... ....^....$1 30.00 

Tuition for the year 3 units r .... 100.00 

Tuition for the year 2 units 70.00 

Tuition for the year __1 unit 40.00 

These tuition charges include all fees. 

College Department 

Tuition for the year.. 32 sem. hrs $130.00 

Tuition for the year. 24 sem. hrs. 100.00 

Tuition for the year 16 sem. hrs... 70.00 

Tuition for the year 8 sem. hrs 40.00 

Fees Charged in College Department Each Semester 

Bacteriology $10.00 

Chemistry 10.00 

Radio ,.._ 10.00 

Manual Arts 2.00 

Printing..... 5.00 

Physiology 5.00 

Zoology 8.00 

Normal Sewing... : - - 2.50 

■ College Physics.... - 6.00 

Clothing and Textiles -- 2.00 

Foods and Dietetics — - - 5.00 

Medical (non-resident students) 5.00 

Typewriter rent, per semester, 1 hr. a day 3.00 

Typewriter rent, per semester, 2 hrs. a day 5.00 

Piano rent, per semester, 1 hr. a day - - 3.00 

Piano rent, per semester, 2 hrs. a day - - — - 5.00 

«17» 



REFUNDS 

No tuition or class fee refunds will be made for classes dropped 
after the first six weeks' period. During the first period, a refund of 
two-thirds of the tuition or class fee charged will be made when change 
in the student's program is approved by the Registrar. 

PAYMENT OF ACCOUNTS 

Statements, each of which will present the charges for one four-week 
period, are sent out the first of each month beginning October 1, 1937. 
Students are then allowed fifteen days in which to make satisfactory 
settlement of their accounts. Failure to make prompt settlement within 
the period specified may terminate the student's connection with the 
school. 

The College has made its charges as low as consistent with educational 
efficiency. It must, therefore, expect prompt payment of all outstanding 
accounts,- and to encourage prompt payment, a discount of ten per cent 
will be allowed on that part of each period's school expenses (board, 
room, laundry, and tuition) which has not been paid by labor credit. 
All accounts that remain unpaid thirty days after statement is presented 
will bear six per cent per annum interest. Students will be permitted to 
write mid-year or final examinations only when their accounts are settled, 
or satisfactory arrangements have been made with the Finance Committee. 
Grade transcripts and diplomas will be issued only to students whose 
accounts are paid in full. 

GENERAL FEES 

Change of Program $1 .00 

Entrance and Special Examinations 1.00 

Key Deposit 1 .00 

Diploma 3.50 

Tool Checks 50 

Chorus, Band, or Orchestra per semester 3.50 

TRANSPORTATION 

Free transportation^) and.|from[;Ooltewah will be provided the first 
three days of each semester and the last three days of the school term. 
At intermediate times a charge of 75 cents will be made. 

«18» 



SCHOLARSHIPS 

Through the courtesy of the Southern Publishing Association, scholar- 
ships are available which will pay the entire cost of attendance at the 
College, by the sale of publications of the Southern Publishing Associa- 
tion equivalent to one and six tenths times the total cost of school atten- 
dance. The student is awarded a scholarship in full payment of his 
school expense. 

TUITION SCHOLARSHIPS 

Each year the College awards $50 cash scholarships to be applied 
on tuition. These are awarded on the basis of scholarship, character, 
personality, and promise of leadership. Announcement is made at the 
annual convocation of the students as to whom such scholarships have 
been awarded. 

CHARGES FOR MUSIC 

Students who enroll for music are expected to continue taking lessons 
or at least a half-year. 

College Preparatory students are charged at the rate of one academic 
unit for each lesson taken per week. College students are charged on 
the basis of four semester hours. 

No refund on lessons will be given to students who drop their work 
during a semester, except in cases of illness or withdrawal from the Col- 
lege. In no case will lessons which are lost on account of the student s 
absence be made up. 

DISCOUNTS 

No reduction from charges will be made for absence of a few weeks 
during any part of the year, unless in the judgment of the Treasurer such 
absence is absolutely necessary. 

All charges will be made out for even weeks, so that a fraction of a 
week is counted as a week. 

A discount of 10 per cent will be given for prompt payment of board, 
room, laundry, and tuition. An additional discount of 5 per cent will 
be given on the tuition and room rent of the student when paid in 
advance for the year. If there are two students from the same family, a 
discount of 7 per cent is allowed on tuition and rent, if paid in advance 

«19» 



for the year. If the expenses of three students who are not dependent 
upon the College to supply work in excess of 50 per cent of the monthly 
charge are met by one individual, a total discount on tuition and room 
rent of 20 per cent will be allowed for the prompt monthly settlement of 
accounts. An additional 5 per cent will be given for each additional 
student up to a maximum of 35 per cent. This discount will be given only 
when the payment of the account is received on or before the settle- 
ment date. No discount will be allowed for payment made by post- 
dated checks. 

EMPLOYMENT OF STUDENTS 

The College endeavors through employment in its industrial organi- 
zations to assist students in defraying their school expenses. Many 
students who are mature and frugal succeed in earning the entire cost 
of their education. Only students of mature years should expect to 
receive such consideration and then only on a restricted class program. 

Students who apply for admission to the College with the intention 
of obtaining employment by which to accumulate a labor credit, 
will be required to pay an entrance deposit of twenty-five dollars. 
This deposit cannot be withdrawn, but must be applied on school 
expenses. Students should not plan to register for a semester of class 
work until they have accumulated a credit of at least one hundred dollars. 

No cash may be drawn from the business office on accounts. Deposit 
accounts for those who wish to put their funds in safe keeping, subject 
to withdrawal in person only, may be opened at the business office. 

Students who are supplied work in the various departments of the 
school or affiliated industries, and who have a credit balance as a result 
of such labor, may authorize the payment to the church treasurer for tithe 
of 10 per cent of their earnings if they so desire. The remainder of 
their earnings must be used for tuition, class fees, and board. No student 
who is neither employed nor matriculated, is permitted to remain at 
the College. 

A student who has a credit balance, as a result of labor, at the time 
of graduation or departure from the College, may transfer this credit 
to a member of his immediate family, but in no case will cash be paid 
for labor in excess of the allowance granted in the preceding paragraphs. 

All purchases at the College store must be paid for in cash. No charge 
accounts are accepted. 

«20» 



Believing that work is of practical value and conducive to health and 
study, the school requires each student to perform six hours of work 
per week. There is no work required for which the student is not paid. 

No student should come planning to work a major part of his 
expenses without previous arrangement with the management, as the 
school makes no guarantee of furnishing work beyond the six hours per 
week required of each student. The rate paid for labor varies somewhat 
with the character of the work and the efficiency of the student. 
As far as possible, students are employed on a piecework basis. 

Those who register for full class work will be permitted to labor not 
more than 20 hours per week, and those registering for three-fourths 
class work will be limited to 30 hours per week. A student will 
not be paid for additional hours of work except upon approval of the 
faculty. 

SUMMARY OF EXPENSES 

PREPARATORY COLLEGIATE 

Boys Girls Men Women 

Tuition -$130.00 $130.00 $130.00 $130.00 

Fees 15.00 15.00 

Room, Laundry, & 

Medical Fee 120.25 120.25 120.25 120.25 

Board Minimum.... 138.75 111.00 138.75 111.00 

$389.00 $361.25 $404.00 $376.25 

A ten per cent discount from the above charges is made for 
prompt monthly settlement of account. These figures are minimum 
charges. The board of some students will run as high as $50.00 above 
these minimums. Students who work 20 hours per week throughout 
the year, may earn approximately $180.00 of the expense listed above. 



«21> 



COURSE OF STUDY 
REGULATIONS 



1. Students are expected to make themselves familiar with all regula- 
tions regarding the course of study. 

2. Four units each in grades 9 and 10, and four and one-half units 
each in grades11 and12oftheCollege Preparatory department, orthirty- 
two semester hours in the Collegiate department, constitute a full year's 
work. Requests for more than full work may be made to the Registrar,- 
but not more than five units in the College Preparatory department, nor 
thirty-six semester hours in the Collegiate department will be allowed 
any student in academic year of thirty-six weeks; nor will permission 
to carry extra work be granted to any student who has not main- 
tained a B average in scholarship the preceding semester. 

3. Students entering this College for the first time should request 
the principals of schools previously attended to send a transcript of all 
grades direct to the Registrar of Southern Junior College before date 
of registration. 

4. Students who cannot show official credits from accredited schools 
upon entering this College, will be admitted as special students 
but will not be eligible to graduation except by examination in those 
subjects for which they cannot furnish official credits. 

5. No individual connected with the College shall receive private 
lessons or engage in private teaching except by permission of the President. 

6. Examinations for the removal of delayed credit grades received 
the first semester will be held in February and at the beginning of the 
next school year; for delayed credit grades received in the second 
semester, examinations will be held at the beginning of the next college 
year and the following February. Delayed credit grades may not be re- 
moved by examinations at any other time. 

A student who redeems a delayed credit grade will receive a grade 
of D except when for special reason the faculty votes otherwise. 

«22» 



7. No student shall enter or drop any class without presenting to 
the instructor of that class a permit from the Registrar. This permit should 
be countersigned by the instructor and filed by the student in the busi- 
ness office. 

8. Reports of scholarship and deportment are made in duplicate to 
parents and students at the close of each school period. The grades 
obtained by a student at the close of each semester are permanently 
recorded by the College for future reference. 

9. No diplomas or grade transcripts will be issued until financial 
obligations have been settled or satisfactorily arranged. Students who 
have not made satisfactory financial arrangements in the business office 
for the payment of their accounts, will not be permitted to write 
mid-year or final examinations. 

10. Upon the completion of an entire course, a complete statement 
of a student's grades is issued without charge. If additional copies of 
the transcript are requested, there will be a charge of one dollar for 
each transcript issued. 

11. A "unit" is defined as the amount of credit granted for one 
subject satisfactorily pursued during a year of thirty-six weeks, through 
forty-five minute recitation periods, five days a week; or the equivalent. 

12. A "semester-hour" represents the credit granted when a subject 
is successfully pursued through a semester of eighteen weeks with one 
sixty-minute hour of recitation per week. 

13. A fee of one dollar must accompany requests for change of pro- 
gram after the first two weeks. The fee is refunded if the request is 
denied. 

14. Only by special permission may correspondence work with 
other schools be carried on while in residence. 

15. The following system of marking is used: A, Superior, 94-100; 
B, Above Average, 88-93; C, Average, 81-87; D, Below Average, 
75-80; E, Delayed Credit; F, Failure; W, Honorable Withdrawal. 

16. Unless a satisfactory explanation can be given, such as seri- 
ous illness, a student whose work is reported unsatisfactory in two 
or more classes in any school period will not be permitted to re- 
main in school. In cases of acceptable explanation, the student may 
be reclassified. 

«23» 



17. The extent to which students may participate in extra-curricular 
activities is subject to definite regulation in order to encourage students 
in maintaining satisfactory standards of scholarship. 

18. Students who enter the College late will not be permitted to 
register for full work, but their program of studies will be arranged 
according to the ability of the student as revealed by his past scholastic 
record. 

19. Students who register for first year College courses will be 
required to take an examination in the fundamentals of English at the 
time of registration. Those who show themselves to be deficient will 
be required to take the course in Introductory English, for which no 
credit is given. 



«24» 



REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION 



1. Credit toward graduation will not be given for partially completed 
courses. 

2. Transcripts of all courses completed in other schools must be 
on file before a student's work is checked for graduation. 

3. The minimum for graduation from the College Preparatory course 
is sixteen units, part of which is prescribed, and part of which is freely 
elective. Details of the courses offered may be found under the Summary 
of Courses. The minimum requirement for graduation from Junior College 
courses is sixty-six semester hours, including two hours of physical educa- 
tion. 

4. Students graduating from any course must meet the standard pre- 
scribed by the faculty in spelling, penmanship,' and grammar. 

5. No credit toward graduation is given for less than two years 
of either an ancient or a modern language. 

6. Honor credits equal to the number of hours or units of work 
covered will be required for graduation from any course. These honor 
credits are granted as follows: For a grade of A, three honor credits,- 
for a grade of B, two honor credits,- for a grade of C, one honor credit; 
grades below C, no honor credits. Hence students in both Collegi. 
ate and Preparatory departments must maintain an average of C or 
better in order to be eligible for graduation. 

7. Students whose record at the time of graduation shows an average 
grade of B or better will be granted Honors diplomas. 

8. No College student will be admitted to the senior class who lacks 
more than twenty-four honor credits, or who will lack, upon the com- 
pletion of the classes for which he is then registered, more than eight 
hours of finishing his course. 

9. No student will be admitted to the junior class who will lack, 
upon completion of the classes for which he is then registered, more 
than five units or thirty-six hours of finishing his course. 



>25» 



10. Only graduates from collegiate courses are allowed to finish 
their work in summer school. These may participate in the May grad- 
uation exercises immediately preceding the completion of their course, 
and subject thereto. 

While the summer school graduate may participate in all class func-' 
tions, he is not eligible to election as class president. 

11. The year preceding a student's graduation must be spent in study 
at Southern Junior College. At least three umits or twenty-four semes- 
ter hours of credit must be earned while in residence. 

COLLEGE ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS 

Students who apply for admission to Junior College courses must 
have met the College Preparatory requirements as outlined in this cata- 
logue, or must hold a high school diploma from an accredited secondary 
school, and must present in official transcript the following specific 
courses as a part of the sixteen required units: 

English, 3 units. 
Mathematics, 2 units 
Social Science, 2 units 
Science, 1 unit 
Language, 2 units 
Vocational Education, 1 unit 

In addition to these specific requirements there are certain depart- 
mental prerequisites which the student will be required to meet. 
Details may be had by applying to the Registrar. 

EXTENSION COURSES 

Southern Junior College offers no extramural instruction,- therefore 
all work for which credit is given must be completed in residence. 



«26» 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 



The following pages list the courses offered by the various departments 
in this College. Not all the courses are given each year, however. 
Unless otherwise stated, the number of recitations each week is the 
same as the number of hours of credit indicated in parenthesis follow- 
ing each title. Courses bearing double numbers (like 101-102) are 
year courses, and must be continued throughout the year. A printed 
schedule is issued during the latter part of the summer, giving com- 
plete information as to instructors, sections, days, hours, and rooms 
for the courses offered during the following year. 



ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 



100. Introductory English (3). 

All students entering first-year College courses will be required to take an entrance 
examination in the fundamentals of English grammar and composition. Those who 
fail to pass the examination must take the course in Introductory English. No credit 
is given, but the regular charge for tuition is made. 

101-102. College Rhetoric (3). 

A study of the organization of materials and the modes of paragraph development, 
followed by special work in description, narration, exposition, and argumentation. 
Collateral reading with reports will be required. 

103-104. Advanced Composition (2). 

The structure and art of advanced writing, the preparation of manuscript for the 
press, and proof reading will be studied in this course. Collateral reading to ac- 
quaint the students with the styles of the best writers will be required. 

105-106. Survey of English Literature (3). 

A study of the types and masterpieces of English literature and the historical 
background which produced them. An evaluation is made of the great literary 
productions in the light of Christian ideals. 

«27» 



107-108. Library Science (1). 

Most college course assisnments require library work. This can de done efficiently 
only if the student knows how to examine a book, locate books by the Dewey de- 
cimal classification scheme, intelligently consult a dictionary or a card catalogue, 
select a particular reference book which will answer a specific question, and pre- 
pare a bibliography according to accepted form. The purpose of this course is to 
give such training early in the student's career. 

109-110. Public Speaking (2). 

The development of personal power through oral interpretation of masterpieces 
of literature, and through preparation and delivery of addresses; correction of man- 
nerisms,- development of effective mental, physical, and vocal habits of speaking 
and reading. 



PHYSICS AND MATHEMATICS 

101. Plane Trigonometry (3). 

Trigonometric functions. Solution of right and of oblique triangles by natural 
functions and by logarithms. Applications to surveying, physics, astronomy, including 
simple harmonic motion and wave motion. Graphic and analytic treatment of trigo- 
nometric functions. Inverse and exponential functions, and trigonometric equations. 

102. College Algebra (3). 

The algebraic number system. The notions of variable and function, and their 
geometrical representation. Variation. Equations of the first degree, and determinants. 
Quadratic equations, equations of higher degree, elements of theory of equa- 
tions of higher degree, and elements of theory of equations. Fractional and negative 
exponents, exponentials, and logarithms. Mathematical induction, the binomial 
theorem, progressions, permutations, and combinations. 

103. Plane and Solid Analytic Geometry (3). 

Rectangular, oblique, and polar co-ordinates in the plane. The relation between 
a curve and its equation. The algebra of a variable pair of numbers and the geometry 
of a moving point. Specific applications to the properties of straight lines, circles, 
conic sections, and certain other plane curves. 

Given on demand. 

105-106. Calculus (3). 

Infinitesimals, differentials, ante-differentials, differentiation, ordinary' functions, 
geometrical and physical applications, successive integration, and special topics 
relating to curves, also infinite series, Taylor's Theorem, hyperbolic functions, and 
indeterminate forms. 

Given on demand. 

«28» 



107-108. General Physics (4). 

This course is an advanced study of the mechanics of solids, liquids, and gases; 
properties of matter and its internal forces; wave motion and sound, heat, magnetism, 
electrostatics, electric currents, radio-activity, and light. 

109-110. Practical Electronics (2). 

Fundamental electrical principles,- alternating currents and high frequency,- vacuum 
tube theory and design,- fundamental vacuum tube circuits; radio receiver theory and 
design; transmitter theory and design,- power supplies; input and output devices for 
audio systems; photo-electricity; test instruments and measurements; wave fundamen- 
tals and radiation; relay applications; cathode ray television. 

Given on demand. 

CHEMISTRY AND BIOLOGY 
101-102. General Chemistry (4). 

The non-metallic elements and their compounds, fundamental laws, principles, 
formulas, equations, calculations, chemical equilibrium, modern theory of solutions, 
and elementary qualitative analysis. 

103. Analytical Chemistry (4). 

This is a course in qualitative analysis dealing with the chemistry of analytical 
reactions. Analysis of both metal and non-metal radicals, amalgams, alloys, mixtures, 
and commercial products. 

105-106. Organic Chemistry (3). 

A survey of the compounds of carbon, including the aliphatic and the aromatic 
series. Organic laboratory technique, including typical syntheses and reactions. 
Introduction to organic analysis. 

107-108. General Zoology (4). 

A thorough study of a number of invertebrate types, the comparative anatomy of 
vertebrates. Introduction to heredity and genetics. 

109-110. Physiology (3). 

A study of the physiology of the muscles, nerves, digestion, and nutrition; also 
the physiology of the blood, lymph, circulation, respiration, ductless glands, and 
special senses. 

111-112. Bacteriology (2). 

Lecture and laboratory instruction in the fundamental principles of bacteriology, 
and their applications to industry and hygiene. 

113-114. Nurses' Chemistry (3). 

A course designed to familiarize the prospective nurse with the basic principles 
of chemistry. Solutions, chemistry of nutrition, digestion, and metabolism. 

«29» 



AGRICULTURE 

101. Field Crops (3). 

Includes a survey of the characteristics, adaptations, culture and uses of the more 
important crop plants of the farm. 

102. Soils (3). 

Includes origin, chemical and mechanical composition, and classification of soil 
material; soil air, moisture, texture; effect of climate, organic matter, lime, fertilizers, 
tillage, upon the physical properties of soils. General chemistry should precede 
or parallel this course. 

103. Economic Entomology (3). 

The principles underlying the control of the important insect pests of the farm, 
garden, orchard, and household, based on knowledge of structure, life history 
and habits. 

104. Beekeeping (3). 

The fundamental principles of beekeeping. Includes a study of the various races 
of bees, general apiary practices, beekeeping in relation to horticulture and brood 
diseases. 

All courses require two recitations and one double period per week. 

LANGUAGES 

101-102. Spanish I (4). 

Fundamentals of grammar, pronunciation, composition, and reading of easy Spanish 
prose. 

103-104. Spanish II (3). 

A thorough review of grammar and the principles of pronunciation, together 
with the reading of standard Spanish authors and selections from Spanish periodicals. 
Development of freedom in the use of conversational Spanish. 

105-106. French I (4). 

The foundation principles of easy French reading, grammar, and pronunciation, 
including a knowledge of phonetics. 

107-108. French II (3). 

In this course a thorough grammar review will be given, combined with the read- 
ing of selected French works and selections from French periodicals. Special em- 
phasis will be placed upon oral work, and some translation and original composi- 
tions, both oral and written, will be required. 

«30» 



109-110. Greek I (4). 

A thoroush study of the essentials of grammar, pronunciation, acquisition of a 
vocabulary, drill on common irregular verbs, and exercises in translation. 

111-112. Greek II (3). 

A review of grammar and syntax. Special emphasis is placed on the mastery of 
the inflection, tense, and mood force of the verb. The first epistle of John is read; 
also selections from the Gospels, the Acts of the Apostles, and the Epistles of Paul. 

EDUCATION 

100. Reviews in Fundamental Subjects (5). 

These courses are required of all prospective teachers who fail by examination 
to show proficiency in the subjects taught in the elementary grades. They are also 
open to mature students pursuing other courses, but desiring to strengthen their 
foundation work in any of these subjects. 

Subjects: Arithmetic, grammar, geography, physiology, United States History, 
Bible. No credit. 

101. Principles of Education (3). 

The basic principles of the process of education, character building, and efficient 
citizenship as an educational problem. 

102. General Psychology (3). 

This course is devoted to a general view of the mental processes and their devel- 
opment including such topics as the nervous system and its functions, responses, 
instincts and emotions, memory, imagination, personality. 

103-104. Methods I (3). 

A survey of the materials and methods in the teaching of English, reading, and 
Bible. 

105. Classroom Management (3). 

A study of the organization of the elementary school as a unit in the denomina- 
tional system, and its control in the light of the aims of education. The following 
topics will be considered: plan of organization, supervision, reporting, the teacher, 
grading, promotion, daily programs, study period, discipline. 

106. Childhood Education (3). 

A study of the physical, mental, social, emotional, and spiritual aspects of the 
child nature together with their educational implications. 

107. Art (2). 

A course designed to aid the teacher in presenting art instruction in the grades. 
Topics: free-hand pencil drawing, crayola work, cardboard construction, clay 
modeling, water colors, perspective, design, picture study, blackboard sketching. 

«31» 



108. Supervised Student Teaching (2). 

This course affords the student an opportunity to observe the work of the teachers 
connected with the Demonstration School, and to participate in teaching under the 
direction of experienced supervisors. Carefully prepared plans will be required 
for each lesson taught. 

109-110. Methods II (2). 

A survey of the materials and methods in the teaching of arithmetic, history, 
civics, and geography. 

111. Educational Psychology (3). 

Lectures covering the major types of learning, and the conditions which effect 
learning. The course affords opportunity to become familiar with the laboratory 
technique of educational psychology. 

112. Supervised Student Teaching (2). 

A continuation course, giving the student experience in teaching under the 
supervision of the critic teachers of the Demonstration School. 

113. Music Methods (2). 

A course designed to prepare teachers to give instruction in music in the elemen- 
tary grades. Consideration will be given the following topics: the child voice, 
rote songs, sight reading, treatment of monotones, music appreciation. 

114. Nature (2). 

This course familiarizes the student with the nature materials of his immediate 
environment, and presents methods of making such material of vital interest in the 
life of the child. 

115-116. Manual Arts (1). 

This course presents methods of teaching sewing, cooking, and woodwork in 
grades five to eight. 

117-11 8. Survey of Nursing Education (2). 

This course familiarizes the student with the history of nursing, and presents a 
brief introduction to the social and economic aspects of illness. 

MUSIC 

101-102. Analysis (2). 

Prerequisite: harmony I and II (see page 48). An analysis of the harmonic structure 
of compositions, both classic and modern; practical applications of the laws of har- 
mony. Form analysis of Homophoric forms and of the Bach Fugues is also included 
in this course. 

«32» 



103-104. Counterpoint and Composition (2). 

A study of counterpoint, both strict and free. Simple compositions are attempted. 

105-106. Sight Singing and Conducting (1). 

Fundamentals, such as time, rhythm, pitch are studied, followed by easy melody 
and part studies. Directins of church music. 

HOME ECONOMICS 

101-102. Foods and Dietetics (3). 

Study of food products, marketing, food preservation, menu building, computation 
of diets for individual needs, dietetic treatment of certain diseases, nutritional re- 
quirements of the body, child nutrition, invalid cookery, advanced work in food 
preparation. 

103-104. Clothing and Textiles (3). 

Hygienic and economic aspect of modern dress; psychology of clothes; principles 
of design and color as applied to dress,- drafting of foundation patterns; the commer- 
cial pattern; principles of fitting; garment construction; detailed study of the principal 
fibers, their analysis, properties, and use; principles of design and color as ap- 
plicable to fabrics. 



HISTORY 

101-102. Survey of European History (3). 

A general survey of the history of Europe from the Roman Empire to Modern Times, 
with major attention to the social, cultural, economic, and religious interests and 
movements. The Decline and Fall of Rome, the rise of the Papacy, the Holy Roman 
Empire, the Crusades, the development of Western European nations, the Refor- 
mation, the French Revolution, and the World War, with its results, will be studied. 

103-104. Survey of Ancient History (3). 

A study of the historical background of the Old Testament in the light of the 
results of recent research and excavations in the valleys of the Nile, Euphrates, and 
Tigris rivers, which throw new light on historical hypotheses and confirm the Scrip- 
tural record. A careful study is also made of the history of Greece and Rome from the 
early beginnings of these kingdoms to the beginning of the Christian era. 

105-106. Constitutional History (1). 

This course traces the building with English and colonial elements of the basic 
principles of American government, the framing and adoption of the Federal Con- 
stitution, and its later development. Fundamental constitutional rights are considered. 

«33» 



107-108. Contemporary Problems (2). 

The purpose of this course is to give the student an intelligent interest in and 
understanding of current world problems. Class discussions are based upon reports 
taken from current periodicals and newspapers. A historical background is supplied 
by lectures and individual research. 

110. Sociology (3). 

A study of man's relationship to society, dealing with such topics as the family 
and its relation to the community, making a living, recreation, crime, education, 
morals and religion, and their influence in developing a society. 

RELIGIOUS EDUCATION 

101-102. Introductory Bible (2). 

A comprehensive survey of Bible history and doctrine, designed for those having 
insufficient factual knowledge of the Bible to enter with profit the advanced Bible 
courses. This course or its equivalent is prerequisite to courses 103-104 and 
105-106. An entrance examination in the fundamentals of Bible history and doc- 
trine will be given at the beginning of the school year to determine the proper 
placement of students. 

103-104. Hebrew Prophets and Their Teachings (3). 

Study of the work of the early prophetic historians. Emphasis will be given to 
the religious experiences of the great literary prophets of the Hebrews, with special 
reference to the books of Daniel and of the Revelation. 

105-106. The Great Doctrines of the Scriptures (2). 

A study of the major principles of the Scriptures, and their application to human 
life and destiny. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 
101-102. Physical Education for Men (2). 

Under the direction of a competent physician and the College nurse, a course in 
first aid and a program of physical education, including athletics, is offered. 

103-104. Physical Education for Women (2). 

Under the direction of the College nurse, a program of physical education and 
athletics for women is offered. 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 
101-102. Accounting Principles (3). 

A study of the character and purpose of financial statements; of accounting prin- 
ciples and methods as illustrated in the accounts of mercantile, industrial, and finan- 
cial concerns. Bookkeeping is a prerequisite to this course. 

«-34» 



103-104. Shorthand Principles (3). 

This course presents the fundamental principles of .Gregg Shorthand. 
105-106. Typewriting (2). 

A course in the principles of touch-typewriting. 
107-108. Economics (3). 

The development of natural resources; occupations and the division of labor; 
production, exchange, and distribution of wealth; utility and value,- wages, interest, 
rent, and profits; nature and uses of money; domestic and foreign exchange; history 
and theory of banking; protection and free trade; trusts and trade unions. 

Origin of money; early forms of currency; metallic money; credit money; monetary 

• history of the United States; the gold standard; relation of money and credit to the 

general level of prices; nature and use of credit; domestic and foreign exchange; 

history and theory of banking; national, state, and private banks,- the Federal Reserve 

Act. 

109. Advanced Accounting (3). 

A course in advanced theory of accounting. Some of the special topics considered 
are: valuation of assets, capital vs. revenue expenditures, balance sheets, trading 
and profit and loss statements, depreciation, reserves and reserve funds, sinking funds, 
realization and liquidation accounts, good will, dissolution of partnership, con- 
solidations. 

110. Corporation and Cost Accounting (3). 

This course sets forth the procedure in maintaining a set of corporation records 
and accounts, and in determining factory costs. After solving certain problems in- 
cident to incorporating manufacturing enterprises, a study is made of the connected 
transactions which enable one to understand and exhibit the cost of the goods pro- 
duced. 

111-112. Advanced Dictation (2). 

A course designed for those who have mastered the principles of Gregg Short- 
hand. A drill in rapid and accurate transcription of shorthand notes. 

113. Business Law (3). 

This course gives a survey of the principles of law governing business transactions. 
Some of the subjects studied are contracts, agency, negotiable par>er, partnership, 
corporations, and the sale of personal property. 

114. Office Training (3). 

This course is designed to broaden the secretarial student's knowledge of business 
procedure, including laboratory projects in solving secretarial problems, 

«35» 



115. Typewriting (2). 

An advanced course designed for the secretarial student who has already mastered 
the fundamentals of typewriting, but who wishes to develop speed and accuracy. 

116. Salesmanship (2). 

A study of the theory and practice of salesmanship and merchandising methods. 

117-118. Penmanship 

A rapid legible style of business writing is developed. Students who attain a 
sufficient degree of proficiency will receive a certificate. No credit 

119-120. Spelling 

Spelling, diacritical markings, definitions, prefixes, suffixes, roots, special rules, 
synonyms, homonyms, abbreviations, and a study and general knowledge of 
technical words. No credit 



<36» 



SUMMARY OF COURSES 



ASSOCIATE IN ARTS 

JUNIOR YEAR 

First Semester 

Rhetoric 
Language I 
Religious Education 
Library Science 
Public Speaking 
Electives 
Physical Education 

Second Semester 

Rhetoric 
Language I 
Religious Education 
Library Science 
Public Speaking 
Electives 
Physical Education 

SENIOR YEAR 
First Semester 

Language II 

Science 

Religious Education 

Survey of European History 

Electives 

Physical Education 

Second Semester 

Language II 

Science 

Religious Education 

Survey of European History 

Electives 

Physical Education 



3 hours 

4 

2 

1 

2 

4 

Vi 

3 hours 
4 
2 
1 
2 
4 
M 



3 hours 

3 

3 

3 

4 

3 hours 

3 

3 

3 

4 



Students who are preparing for the ministry, or who are planning to complete 
a four-year Liberal Arts course with majors in English, history, language, or music, 
should register in the Associate in Arts curriculum. 

At the time of registration students will be guided in the choice of electives by 
counsel with the Registrar. 

«37» 



TEACHER TRAINING CURRICULUM 



Religious Education 

Rhetoric 

Principles of Education 

Methods I 

Classroom Management 

Art 

Physical Education 



JUNIOR YEAR 
First Semester 



Second Semester 



Religious Education 

Rhetoric 

General Psychology 

Methods I 

Childhood Education 

Supervised Student Teaching 

Physical Education 



2 
3 
3 
3 
3 
2 



hours 



Physiology or Zoology 
History 
Methods II 

Educational Psychology 
Religious Education 
Music Methods 
Manual Arts 
Physical Education 



SENIOR YEAR 

First Semester 



Second Semester 



Physiology or Zoology 

History 

Methods II 

Supervised Student Teaching 

Religious Education 

Nature 

Manual Arts 

Physical Education 



3 
3 
2 
2 
3 
2 
1 



3 hours 

3 " 

2 " 

2 " 

3 " 
2 " 
1 " 



«38» 



BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 






JUNIOR YEAR 






First Semester 




Rhetoric 

Accounting Principles 

Shorthand Principles 

Typewriting 

Economics 

Religious Education 

Physical Education 


Second Semester 


3 hours 
3 " 
3 " 

2 " 

3 " 
2 " 

K " 


Rhetoric 

Accounting Principles 
Shorthand Principles 
Typewriting 
Economics 
Religious Education 
Physical Education 


SENIOR YEAR 
First Semester 


3 hours 
3 " 

3 " 

2 " 

3 " 
2 " 

X " 


Advanced Accounting 
Advanced Dictation 
Business Law 
Psychology 
Religious Education 
Public Speaking 
Typewriting 
Physical Education 


Second Semester 


3 hours 

2 " 

3 " 
3 " 
3 " 
2 " 
2 " 


Cost Accounting 
Advanced Dictation 
Office Training 
Public Speaking 
Religious Education 
Salesmanship 
Physical Education 




3 hours 

2 " 

3 " 

2 " 

3 " 
2 " 



Students who are not interested in secretarial work may, with the approval of 
the Registrar, substitute electives for shorthand, advanced dictation, and advanced 
typewriting. 

All students are required to take the drill courses in penmanship and spelling. 

«39» 



SCIENCE CURRICULUM 

JUNIOR YEAR 

First Semester 



Religious Education 2 hours 1 

Chemistry 4 " *• 

Rhetoric 3 " 

Science or Mathematics Electives 3-5 " 

Electives other than Science ' 1-4 

Physical Education H 

Second Semester 

Religious Education 2 hours 

Chemistry 4 

Rhetoric 3 

Science or Mathematics Electives 3-5 

Language or Social Science 1-4 

Physical Education % 

SENIOR YEAR 
First Semester 

Religious Education 2 hours 

Organic Chemistry 3 

Science Electives 8 

Electives other than Science 3 

Physical Education }4 

Second Semester 

Religious Education 2 hours 

Organic Chemistry 3 

Science Electives 8 

Electives other than Science 3 

Physical Education }/% 



Students should register in the Science curriculum who are preparing for medi- 
cine, dentistry, nursing, dietetics or home economics, and science majors. 

Students preparing for medicine will elect mathematics, six hours; zoology, eight 
hours; physics, eight hours,- constitutional history, two hours. 

Students presenting credit for two years of high school French or Spanish will 
take only one additional year in the same. 

Students having two years of ancient language only will take two years of modern 
language. 

«40» 



Students having no foreign language credit will take fifteen hours in French or 
Spanish, and present seventy-three semester hours of credit for graduation. 

Students preparing for nursing will elect physiology, six hours; bacteriology, 
four hours; survey of nursing education, four hours. 

Students preparing for dietetics will elect American History or Constitution, two 
hours; economics, three hours; foods and dietetics, six hours; physiology, six hours; 
principles of education, three hours; psychology, three hours; sociology, three 
hours. 



.41. 



Southern Junior College 



Preparatory Department 



1937-1938 



ACCREDITED WITH 

Tennessee Department of Education 

Seventh-day Adventist Board of Regents 

Southern Association of Secondary Schools 



COLLEGE PREPARATORY 
SCHOOL 



There is maintained as a separate department of the College a pre- 
paratory school corresponding to the four years of the standard high 
school. Students who are admitted to the College departments must 
complete a preparatory course as outlined below, or must present 
evidence that they have completed a four year course in an accredited 
high school. Students whose preparatory work has been taken in un- 
accredited schools will be required to write entrance examinations as 
prescribed by the College. 

BIBLE 

Bible I — New Testament History 

This course is devoted to a connected study of the life of Christ as set forth in the 
four Gospels, and to the study of the history of the early Christian church as given 
in the Acts of the Apostles. Not given 1937-1938. Two semesters. One unit, 

Bible II— Old Testament History 

This course deals with the history and literature of the Hebrew race as set forth 
in the Old Testament scriptures, from creation to the end of the Babylonian capti- 
vity. Two semesters. One unit. 

Bible III — Denominational History and Christian Ethics 

During the first half of this course a careful study will be made of the rise and pro- 
gress of the Seventh-day Adventist denomination. The course will be based on such 
works as Olsen's "Origin and Progress of Seventh-day Adventists," and Andross' 
"Story of the Advent Movement." 

The second semester's work will consist of a careful study of the origin and divine 
authority of the Spirit of Prophecy and a study of its principal teachings. The course 
is based on "Messages to Young People" and other assignments in the Spirit of 
Prophecy. Two semesters. One-half unit. 

Bible IV— Bible Doctrines 

It is the aim during this course to set before the student a clear, concise outline 
of the fundamental doctrines of the Bible. Special attention is given to the unity or 
harmony of the doctrines taught in both the Old and New Testaments. 

Two semesters. One-half unit 

«44» 



HISTORY 

World History 

This course is required of all students in the College Preparatory course. The aim 
of the course is to introduce the student to a historical view of life. The great char- 
acters and movements of world history will be evaluated from the Christian point 
of view. Two semesters. One unit. 

American History and Problems of Democracy 

Consideration will be given to the important phases of our history; the develop- 
ment of our colonial and national governments; the principles upon which they were 
founded; the relations and functions of their various departments; and our individual 
duties and privileges as American citizens. 

Two semesters. One unit. 

ENGLISH 
English I 

This course consists of a review of English grammar, and a study of the fundamentals 
of oral and written composition. 

In connection with the course, assigned reading is required in selected literary 
classics that will inspire an appreciation of good literature. Two semesters. One unit. 

English II 

This course is a continuation of English I and consists of two parts: an advanced 
study of the principles and practices of composition, and a study of a selected group 
of English and American classics. Two semesters. One unit. 

English III 

Two-thirds of the work in English III is devoted to the field of English literature; 
the remaining one-third is devoted to oral and written composition, and to the elimi- 
nation of fundamental errors in use of language. Two semesters. One unit. 

English IV 

Advanced study of grammar and language structure, training in parliamentary 
practice, letter writing, and other written and oral composition comprise one-third 
of the work in English IV. The remaining two-thirds of the course is devoted to a 
study of American literature, with a survey of its history. Two semesters. One unit. 

MATHEMATICS 
Algebra I 

Prerequisite: the completion of eighth grade arithmetic. Fundamental operations; 
integral equations; factoring; fractions; simultaneous equations with graphs; involu- 
tion and evolution; theory of exponents and quadratics are studied in this course. 

Two semesters. One unit. 

«45» 



Alegbra II 

A rapid review of the principles of algebra I; continuation of algebra to include: 
surds, simultaneous quadratics, progressions, logarithms, infinite series, binomial 
theorem, permutations and combinations, etc. Two semesters. One unit. 

Plane Geometry 

Prerequisite: algebra I. The five books of plane geometry are covered thoroughly. 
A large number of original problems are required. Close attention is given to the 
logical development of every proof, and special emphasis is placed upon individual 
reasoning. Two semesters. One unit. 

SCIENCE 

General Science 

The course aims at a broad acquaintance with the field of natural phenomena re- 
garded as a related whole, and hence serves as a suitable introduction to the more 
specialized courses to be taken later. The course covers a study of the following: 
measurement, air, water, life, energy, the earth's crust, solar system. Three recitations, 
two laboratory periods a week. Two semesters. One Unit. 

Physics I 

Prerequisite: algebra and plane geometry. This course is introductory to general 
physics, and consists of recitations, laboratory work, and classroom demonstrations. 
The mechanics of fluids and solids, heat, molecular physics, sound, light, magnetism, 
and electricity are studied. Three recitations, two laboratory periods per week. 

Two semesters. One unit. 

Chemistry I 

This course should be elected by those students who plan to take nurses' training. 

An elementary course covering the chemistry of the common non-metallic elements, 
fundamental theories and laws of chemistry. Introduction to the chemistry of the com- 
mon metals and their compounds. Three recitations, two laboratory periods a week. 

Two semesters. One unii 

Biology 

The course in biology includes a study of the leading divisions in the animal and 
planl kingdoms. An intensive study is to be made of typical representatives, and a 
more general study of related forms, with a view to discovering the chief character- 
istics of each division. The morphology and physiology of plants is stressed, and 
requires extensive experimental and microscopic work. In zoology a fairly complete 
life history of each type studied is presented, and includes: food habits, mode of 
locomotion, sense organs and nervous system, processes of digestion, circulation 
and respiration, environmental relationships. The adaptation of plants and animals 
to their surroundings is stressed throughout the course. Three recitations, two labora- 
tory periods per week. Two semesters. One unit. 

«46» 



I "*wpl 



LANGUAGE 

Latin I 

A beginner's course in Latin. Drill in vocabulary, grammar, and syntax. Translation 
from English to Latin and Latin to English. Emphasis is placed upon the relation 
between the Latin and English. Two semesters. One unit. 

Latin II 

The early part of the course is devoted to a review of principles of Latin I. Transla- 
tion and drill in syntax. Two semesters. One unit. 

Spanish I 

A beginner's course, with drill in grammar, principles of pronunciation, and easy 
reading. Two semesters. One unit. 

Spanish II 

Review of fundamental principles, intermediate Spanish reading, and composition. 

Two semesters. One unit. 

COMMERCE 

Bookkeeping 

This course begins with the rudiments of the subject, and develops step by step 
into double entry bookkeeping. The pupil becomes familiar with the use of receipts, 
checks, notes, drafts, and invoices. He learns how to journalize and explain trans- 
actions, to post from journal and cash book to ledger, to take trial balances, to 
make out balance sheets, profit and loss statements, and to close and rule ledger 
accounts. Two semesters. One unit. 

Typewriting 

Touch typewriting is taught. Two periods a day through two semesters, and the 
successful completion of a prescribed amount of work, are required for one unit 
credit A net speed of forty words per minute for ten minutes, with not more 
than five errors, must be attained. Two semesters. One unit. 

MUSIC 

Students who desire to do so, may select music as an elective in the College Pre- 
paratory course, but not more than two units will be accepted toward graduation. 
For credit in Music I in the College Preparatory course the student must complete 
the following: 

(a) Applied Music: upon recommendation of the Director of Music, a student 
may receive credit for piano, violin, or voice. One lesson per week is required 
of all students receiving credit in Music I. 

(b) Music theory, four forty-five minute periods per week for eighteen weeks. 
Principles of notation/ symbols, abbreviations, signs, embellishments,- scales, intervals, 

«47» 



chords, cadences; measure, tempo, dynamics; forms, styles. 

(c) Harmony I, four forty-five minute periods pet week for eighteen weeks. Primary 
and secondary chords and dominant 7th, in fundamental and inverted positions; 
harmonization of melodies. 

(d) Either band, chorus, glee club, or orchestra, one period of forty-five minutes 
per week for thirty-six weeks. 

For creidt in Music II in the College Preparatory course the student must complete 
the following: 

(a) Applied Music: upon recommendation of the Director of Music, a student 
may receive credit for piano, violin, or voice. One lesson per week is required of 
all students receiving credit in Music II. 

(b) Harmony II, four forty-five minute periods per week for eighteen weeks. 
Secondary 7ths, and their inversions; altered chords, and chromatic harmony; easy 
modulations. 

(c) Music Appreciation and History, four forty-five minute periods per week for 
eighteen weeks. The correlation of music with the study of general historical move- 
ments, primitive music, folk songs in the middle ages, church music, classic composers, 
opera, romantic composers, modern music, American music. 

(d) Either band, chorus, glee club, or orchestra, two periods per week for thirty- 
six weeks. 

HOME ECONOMICS 
Home Economics I 

Home courtesies; the house — selection, care, and use of furnishings and equip- 
ment; the family laundry; child care,- health of the family; personal grooming; care 
of clothing; construction of undergarments and school dress; preparation and serving 
of breakfasts and of suppers or luncheons; the normal diet. Two semesters. One unit. 

Home Economics II 

Study of food preservation; planning, preparation and serving of dinners; formal 
dinners; budgets and accounts; construction of afternoon dress, and of tailored dress; 
selecting, financing, and caring of the house; child care. Two semesters. One unit. 

PRINTING 

Printing I 

The first year of printing is devoted to a study of general principles based on a 
standard textbook. Type calculation, proof reading, use and care of mitering machines, 
trimmers, and lead cutters. The laboratory work will consist entirely of straight 
hand and job composition. It is expected that the student will develop speed and 
and accuracy in composition work. Two semesters. One unit 

Printing II 

Composition of advertising, advanced job composition; a careful study of the care 
and operation of the platen press, locking up forms, imposition. It is expected that 
the student will develop a satisfactory degree of speed and accuracy in platen press 
work. Two semesters. One unit. 

«48» 



MANUAL TRAINING 
Manual Training I 

These courses correlate mechanical drawing and woodwork. During the first 
twelve weeks the work consists of drawings in projections, sections, and develop- 
ment, and working drawings. The remainder of the first semester and all of the 
second semester will be devoted to woodwork. 

The courses are definitely prescribed, and students are not permitted to make any 
projects which are not specified in the course, or upon which the approval of the 
instructor has not been received. The use of power driven machinery, other than 
lathes, is restricted to students of the second year. 

This course includes drafting, cabinet work, and wood turning. 

Drafting — The use and care of drafting room equipment, lettering, conventions, 
projection drawings, detail and assembly drawings for a special piece of furniture 
to be made in the shop. 

Cabinet work — To include the following elements of joinery: housed joint, 
mortise and tenon, dovetail and miter joints; also rabbeting, grooving, assembly 
of parts, smoothing and finishing and fitting hardware. The work will consist of some 
simple models involving the elements of joinery, besides a more elaborate piece of 
furniture, which has been designed by the student, and made from his own drawings. 

Wood turning — Simple spindle turning and face plate turning. Each student 
should make at least one finished piece of .work in the lathe, in addition to the 
necessary practice turning. It may be a candlestick, ring tray, circular taboret, 
or set of table legs. Two semesters. One unit. 

Manual Training II 

This course will include drafting, cabinet work, wood turning, and carpentry. 

Drafting — Projection drawing, including sections and developments, isometric 
drawing, plan and elevations for simple building, such as a garage, barn, etc. 

Cabinet work — To continue the work of manual training, more difficult projects 
will be undertaken by students of the second year. Working drawings must be made 
by the student of all projects to be made in the shop. 

Wood turning — Advanced projects in face plate turning, spindle turning, projects 
involving the use of the chuck. 

Carpentry — Roof construction, window framing, door construction, stair building, 
uses of the steel square, brief study of lumbering, estimate of quantites and costs. 

Two semesters. One unit. 

AGRICULTURE 
Agriculture I 

This course includes recitations, lectures, supervised study and general labora- 
tory and field work. The subject matter of the first unit includes dairying, small 
fruit and vegetable gardening. The course affords practice in milk-testing and 
in judging dairy cows. Note books must be kept in which laboratory and field 
work is reported. Three double periods and two single periods per week. 

Two semesters. One unit. 

«49» 



Agriculture II 

The subject matter of this course includes field crops, animal husbandry, and poul- 
try. Laboratory work will include seed selection, seed-testing, grading and inocu- 
lation, judging stock and poultry. Note books will be required. Three double 
periods and two single periods per weeek. Two semesters. One unit 



«50» 



COLLEGE PREPARATORY COURSE 

Grade Nine 

New Testament History 1 

Enslish I 1 

Algebra I 1 

General Science 1 

Grade Ten 

Old Testament History 
Enslish II 
World History 
Elect one unit: 

*Home Economics I 

Manual Training I 

Algebra II 

Biology 

Music I 

Agriculture 

Grade Eleven 

Bible III Yi 

English III 
Geometry 
Elect two units: 

Home Economics II 

Manual Training II 

Music I or II 

Printing I 

Bookkeeping 

Chemistry 

Language I 

Physics 

Typewriting 

Agriculture I or II 

Grade Twelve 

Bible IV M 

English IV 

American History and Problems of Democracy 

Elect two units: 

Bookkeeping 

Chemistry 

Physics 

Home Economics II 

Language II 

Agriculture I or II 

Music I or II 

Printing II 
*Required of girls. 

«51» 



It is essential that students make a careful selection of the elective courses which 
form a part of the Preparatory course. The student should determine if possible by 
the beginnins of the third year of the course what his life work is to be, so that at 
the time of registration he can be advised what electives to choose in order to coor- 
dinate properly the Preparatory course with the College work which he may plan 
to take later. 

Students who do not seek college entrance may obtain a diploma upon completion 
of a course of not less than seventeen units, of which four must be English. A wide 
range of electives may be selected under counsel of the Registrar. 



.52. 




ROSTER OF STUDENTS 
1936-1937 
Second-year College Students 



Bell, Eunice Georgia 

Bird, Martin Florida 

Brizendine, Lucille Indiana 
Clymer, Genevieve Walker- 
Washington, D. C. 

Cowdrick, Mary Tennessee 

Crouch, joy Colorado 

Crowder, Ivan Florida 

Daughtrey, Fay Florida 

Davis, Doris Mississippi 

Deaux, Walter Alabama 

Esquilla, Agnes Baessler- Florida 

Goodbrad, John Alabama 

Hackleman, Thomas Ohio 

Hale, Georgia Kentucky 

Hall, Wentzie Georgia 

Herin, Mazie Georgia 

Hutsetl, Dorothy Tennessee 

Johnson, Howard Kentucky 

Lavender, Lora Florida 

Lester, Flora Florida 

Lester, Vesta Florida 

Levering, Irad Tennessee 



Lukat, Robert 
McAlpine, Nena May 
Medford, Menton 
Morphew, Raymond 
Newman, Leslie 
Oliphant, Walker 
Osteen, Irma Lee 
Prenier, Barbara 
Reese, Henry 
Reiber. Verlie 
Reynolds, William 
Romans, Carl 
Ruskjer, Violet 
Sheddan, William 
Simmons, Robin 
Steward, Maggie Lou 
Sudduth, Lynne 
Thompson, Anna Mae 
Thomson, Ella May 
Thomson, Thelma 
Ward, Lucile 
Wilson, Woodrow 



Kentucky 

Alabama 

North Carolina 

Indiana 

North Carolina 

Mississippi 

Florida 

Washington, D. C. 

Pennsylvania 

Tennessee 

South Carolina 

Kentucky 

Kentucky 

Florida 

California 

Florida 

Georgia 

Florida 

Florida 

Florida 

Alabama 

South Carolina 



First-Year College Students 



Aebersold, Charles 
Baessler, Doris 
Barrett, Everett 
Beck, Ruth 
Bennett, Harry 
Bird, Lorita 
Boyd, Charles 
Boynton, Paul 
Britt, Evelyn 
Brown, Mittie 
Bruce, Minnie Sue 
Bugbee, John 
Bugbee, Thad 
Bunch, Luke 
Butler, Lucius 
Bvrd, B. T. 
Chambers, Alma 
Chapman, Pauline 
Cleaves, Richard 
Cone, Robert 
Conner, Glendon 
Cordell, Sara 
Covington, Edytrie 
Crabtree, Ira 
Davis, Arthur 
Davis, Josephine 
Davis, Pearl 
Dodo, Flora 
Douglass, Helen 



Kentucky 

Florida 

Georgia 

Virginia 

Illinois 

Florida 

Tennessee 

Tennessee 

Georgia 

Tennessee 

South Carolina 

Michigan 

Michigan 

Missouri 

North Carolina 

Georgia 

Tennessee 

Georgia 

Florida 

Washington, D. C. 

Ohio 

North Carolina 

Mississippi 

Alabama 

Virginia 

Kentucky 

Tennessee 

Georgia 

Florida 



Douglass, Jones 
Douglas, Wesley 
Eadie, Mildred 
Elmore. Langdon 
Fairchiid, Genevieve 
Fairchild, Lucille 
Felts, Maurice 
Fields, Grace 
Foley, Dayton 
Follis, Maxine 
Ford, Carroll 
Fowler, Cortez 
Gammon, Howard 
Gardner, William 
Goodner, Elbert 
Gray, Doris 
Griffin, Sibyl 
Hammond, Evelyn 
Hardy, Helen 
Haysmer, Mary 
Hickman^ James 
Hicks, Charles 
Hicks, Gladys 
Hoskins, Standish 
Irwin, J. D. 
Kindgren, Curtis 
King, Ruby 
Lewis, Vernon 
Lighthall, Byron 



Florida 

Georgia 

South Carolina 

Alabama 

Ohio 

Michigan 

Florida 

Tennessee 

Florida 

Tennessee 

Tennessee 

Alabama 

Minnesota 

Mississippi 

Alabama 

Washington, D. C. 

Florida 

Kentucky 

Georgia 

Minnesota 

Tennessee 

Tennessee 

Tennessee 

Alabama 

Florida 

Minnesota 

Tennessee 

North Carolina 

Minnesota 



«53» 



Lowry, Roscoe 
McAlpine, Elenora 
Manz, Alfred 
Marquis, Grayce 
Maxwell, Quinnette 
Meister, Harold 
Mundy, Carl 
Murphy, Bruce 
Murphy, Richard 
Myers, Russell 
Neece, Silas 
Newman, Clarence 
Nix, Edna 
Olsen, Hollis 
Owen, Christine 
Page, Marie 
Parker, Philip 
Petty, Clayton 
Pierce, Evelyn 
Reiber, Milton 
Roddy, James 
Rolls, Iva Earle 
Roth, Alden 
Rubsch, George 



India 

Alabama 

New York 

North Carolina 

Georgia 

Florida 

North Carolina 

North Carolina 

North Carolina 

Tennessee 

North Carolina 

North Carolina 

Tennessee 

Wisconsin 

Kentucky 

Texas 

Florida 

Alabama 

Tennessee 

Tennessee 

Tennessee 

Alabama 

California 

Kentucky 



Rutledge, Christine 
Shoemaker, Nina 
Schroader, Irvin 
Smith, Carl 
Spaeth, Loretta 
Specker, Mary Jane 
Starkey, G oldie 
Stauffer, Lester 
Stearns, Hugh 
Terry, Daisy 
Thomas, Allen Gene 
Thomas, Roger ' 
Trawick, Clarence 
Trawick, Jewel Swain- 
Troyanek, Geneva 
Vining, Noble 
Walker, Charles 
Waller, Louis 
Walsh, Sallie Mae 
Watt, Everett 
Wellman Wallace 
Williams, Jack 
Williams, Walter 
Wilson, Mildred 



North Carolina 

Alabama 

Georgia 

Alabama 

New Jersey 

Texas 

Florida 

Pennsylvania 

Illinois 

Georgia 

Tennessee 

Kentucky 

Louisiana 

Alabama 

Tennessee 

Georgia 

Ohio 

North Carolina 

North Carolina 

Nebraska 

Tennessee 

Alabama 

Tennessee 

South Carolina 



ROSTER OF STUDENTS 

1936-1937 

Preparatory Department 

Seniors 



Austin, James 
Barnes, Bertram 
Barrow, Annette 
Bowen, Emory 
Boynton, Ruby Jean 
Bradley, Edgar 
Chambers, Katherine 
Crutcher, Lois 
Dill ard, Eugene 
Dunham, Catherine 
Edmister, Melvin 
Hendershot, Hoyt 
Hilderbrandt, Edward 
Hilderbrandt, Henry 
Hust, Mildred 
Huxtable, Evelyn 
Klooster, Carol 
Linderman, Mary Evelyn 
Lysinger, Peirce 
McCary, Ruby 



Allen, Marian 
Baart. Marie 
Bradley, Dorothy 
Brown, Cecil 



Canada 

Arkansas 

Georgia 

Florida 

Georgia 

Florida 

Tennessee 

Florida 

Tennessee 

Maryland 

Tennessee 

Mississippi 

Alabama 

Alabama 

New Mexico 

Tennessee 

Tennessee 

Alabama 

Georgia 

Maryland 



McCaughan, Jack 
Mclver, Lillian 
Mann, Forrest 
Mitchell, Ruth 
Nordan, Bettie 
Oakes, Grantham 
Porter, Charles 
Duge, Karl 
Purdie, Gladys 
Pursley, Norma 
Savelle, W. C. 
Smalley, Edward 
Steward, Quentin 
Strickland, Marguerite 
Strickland, Shirley 
Swenson, Bernice 
Tutton, Pauline 
Walton, Dale 
Wheeler, Joseph 



Juniors 



Alabama 

Georgia 

Tennessee 

Alabama 



Brown, Harry 
Bush, Percy 
Edgmon, Eunice 
Fant, Nadine 



Alabama 

Louisiana 

Ohio 

Massachusetts 

Alabama 

Mississippi 

Tennessee 

North Carolina 

Mississippi 

Oregon 

Mississippi 

Mississippi 

Florida 

Tennessee 

Tennessee 

Missouri 

Georgia 

Tennessee 

Tennessee 



Alabama 

Mississippi 

Georgia 

Arkansas 



«54» 



Fox, Larry 
Gass, Dorothy 
Goocfbrad, Burgess 
Hess, Melvin 
Hermann, John 
Holland, Sherman 
Hughes, Evan 
Keith, Evelyn 
Kilcer, William 
Lear, Jean 
Ludington, Louis 
Lundy, Helen 
McConnell, Jonathan 
McMillan, Flora 
Mills, George 
Montgomery, Lowell 
Parsley, Lucille 
Payne, Lawrence 



Kentucky 

Alabama 

Tennessee 

Kentucky 

Indiana 

Florida 

Tennessee 

Kentucky 

Florida 

Kentucky 

Tennessee 

Florida 

Georgia 

Tennessee 

Tennessee 

Florida 

Virginia 

Tennessee 



Perez, Arturo 
Pervis, Harold 
Pitton, Evelyn 
Pitton, Leslie 
Rainwater, Joe 
Richey, Dorothy 
Rutledge, Rebecca 
Schlinkert, Jack 
Scherer, Louise 
Shain, Martin 
Shorter, Roland 
Snide, Rollin 
Steele, Beth 
Stewart, Ruth 
Summerour, Brooke 
Taylor, Lucille 
Wilson, Adeana 
Wilson, Robbie 



Cuba 

Florida 

Florida 

Florida 

Tennessee 

Tennessee 

North Carolina 

Kentucky 

Georgia 

Tennessee 

Mississippi 

Tennessee 

Montana 

Arkansas 

Georgia 

North Carolina 

Michigan 

Mississippi 



Sophomores 



Beach, Clarence 
Brizendine, James 
Chambers, Annie Mae 
Cunningham, James 
Davis, Lorraine 
Hall, Arthur 
Halvorsen, Forest 
Hardin, Jewel 
Harter, Howard 
Holland, Ina Mae 
Lawrence, Warren 
Ludington. Clifford 
Massengill, William 
Miller, Lora 
Morris, Mary 
Oakes, Warren 



Ohio 

Tennessee 

Tennessee 

Tennessee 

Tennessee 

Georgia 

Tennessee 

Georgia 

Ohio 

Florida 

Tennessee 

Tennessee 

New York 

Tennessee 

Tennessee 

Mississippi 



Palmer, John 
Prince, Robert 
Rogers, Earl 
Sheddan, Jack 
Smith, Wilfred 
Stewart, Nellie 
Sype, Minita Belle 
Thomas, Virginia 
Valentine, Harold 
Vining, Briscoe 
Watkins, Willard 
Wheeler, Ira 
Williams, Mark 
Williams, Russell 
Wood, Karl 



Ohio 

Michigan 

Tennessee 

Florida 

Tennessee 

Arkansas 

Alabama 

Tennessee 

Georgia 

Georgia 

Tennessee 

Tennessee 

Tennessee 

Tennessee 

Michigan 






-=« - 

m 



Aikman, Elizabeth 
Boyd, Edith 
Carter, Hattie 
Carter, Lyman 
Foust, Oliver 
Frederick, Charles 
Hall, Doris 
Hardin, Emmett 
Hickman, Jefferson 
Lane, Frederick 



Freshmen 

Tennessee McDaniels, Willie May Florida 

Tennessee Miller, Lucille Tennessee 

Tennessee Nyberg, Miles Florida 

Tennessee Rogers, Emory Tennessee 

Tennessee Scnievelhud, Bettie Tennessee 

Tennessee Smith, Tom D. C. Tennessee 

Alabama Snide, June Tennessee 

Georgia Starkey, Glen Tennessee 

Kentucky Vause, Rabon Florida 

Tennessee Woodcock, Lillian Georgia 



<55» 



INDEX 



Accounts, Payment of 18 

Admission Requirements 14 

Agriculture Courses, Preparatory 

School - 49 

Associate in Arts Curriculum ...- 37 

Biology and Chemistry Courses, 

College— 29 

Board..- 16 

Board of Management — :.. 4 

Board of Trustees ~ 4 

Buildings of School 13 

Business Administration Courses 34 

Business Administration Curriculum .. 39 

Calendar for College Year 2 

Calendar of Events.- : 3 

Charges for Music 19 

Chemistry and Biology Courses, 

College 29 

College Entrance Requirements 26 

Commerce Courses, Preparatory 

School 47 

Committees of Faculty 10 

Correspondence Work 23 

Course of Study Regulations 22 

Courses of Instruction 27 

Dentistry 40 

Deposit on Entrance 16 

Dietetics — 40 

Diplomas '- 23 

Discounts 19 

Dormitory Charges 16 

Education Courses 31 

English Courses, Preparatory School 45 
English Language and Literature 

Courses, College 27 

Entrance Deposit 16 

Expenses 16 

Extension Courses 26 

Faculty 6 

Fees - 16,18 

Grades— — ...23,25 

Graduation Requirements 25 

History of School 11 

History Courses, College — 33 

History Courses, Preparatory School 45 
Home Economics Courses, College 33 
Home Economics Course, Preparatory 

School 48 

Honor Credits — 25 

How to Reach the College 14 

Junior Class Requirements — 26 

Labor 20 

Language Courses, College — 30 

Language Courses, Preparatory 

School 47 

Location of School 12 



Manual Training, Preparatory School 49 

Marking, System of 23 

Mathematics and Physics Courses, 

College 28 

Mathematics Courses, Preparatory 

School 45 

Medicine 40 

Ministerial Work 37 

Music Charges 19 

Music Courses, College 37 

Music Courses, Preparatory School ..' 47 
Nursing 40 

Objectives of School 11 

Officers of Administration 4 

Payments of Accounts 18 

Physical Education Courses 34 

Physics and Mathematics Courses, 

College 28 

Preparatory College Course 51 

Presidents of Southern Junior 

College — 5 

Principals of Southern Training 

School 5 

Printing Courses, Preparatory 

School 48 

Private Lessons .— 22 

Refunds 18 

Registration 13 

Regulations of Course of Study 22 

Religious Education Courses, 

College 34 

Religious Education Courses, 

Preparatory School 44 

Requirements for Admission 14 

Requirements for Graduation 25 

Reviews in Fundamental Subjects 31 

Roster of Students 53 

Scholarships ~ 19 

Science Curricu|um — 40 

"Semester-hour" Defined 23 

Special Students - 22 

Standing Committees of Faculty 10 

Summary of Courses 37 

Summary of Expenses 21 

Summer School Graduates 26 

System of Grading 23 

Teacher Training Curriculum — 38 

Transportation 18 

Tuition in Elementary Department 17 

Tuition, College and Preparatory. 17 

Tuition Scholarships ~ 19 

"Unit" of Credit Defined 23 

Vocational Supervisors — 9 

What to Bring 14 



For Reference 

Not to be taken 
from this library 



SOUTHERN COLLEGE MCKEE LIBRARY 



MS084309