(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Southern Missionary College, a school of His planning 1892-1972"

a school of His "planning 

-- y 1892-1972 





Donated from the library 
of 



jjji ..._ 



Edgar O. Grundset. 










■;." 



Southern Missionary College 



A SCHOOL 

OF 

HIS PLANNING 



by Elva B. Gardner 
Revised by J. Mabel Wood 



A narrative of eighty years 

of growth and development of 

SMC 

1892 — 1972 



Published by the Board of Trustees 

Lithographed by 

Starkey Printing Company 

Chattanooga, Tennessee 



McKEE LIBRARY 

Southern AdvsnM \Mvmftf 

Collegedate, TN 37315 




Wright Hall — Administration Building 



We are blind until we see 
That in the human plan 
Nothing is worth the making 
If it does not make the man. 

Why build these cities glorious 
If man unbuilded goes ? 
In vain we build the work, unless 
The builder also grows. 

Edwin Markham 



11 



5 '1 01 
< 5317 



C,3 



/r?* 



ACKNOWLEDGMENTS 



The period covered by this narrative of the founding' and growth 
of Southern Missionary College is not long — eighty years — 1892-1972, but 
those upon whose memories we leaned find that details are not long 
remembered. Some of the facts go up to 1975 ; others are cut off at 1972. 

We appreciate assistance so willingly granted by all who provided 
information or guided to sources or revealed hidden facts. Especially we 
would express indebtedness to A. N. Atteberry, L. H. Wood, Kenneth A. 
Wright, F. 0. Rittenhouse, R. L. Hammill, Leif Kr. Tobiassen, C. E. Witt- 
schiebe, George Fuller, Grace Keith, C. E. Ledford, T. R. Huxtable, Frank 
Washburn, Cecil Coffey, Marian Kuhlman, F. M. Fogg, George Pearman, 
Masie White Jameson, C. A. Woolsey, Jake Conger, Fred Jensen, Ruby Lea 
Carr, Mazie Herin, K. M. Kennedy, Horace Beckner, George Shankel, Morris 
Taylor, John Christensen, Mrs. K. R. Haughey, M. 0. Dart, June Thorpe 
Blue, Noble Vining, and Mr. and Mrs. W. C. Starkey. 

To Dwayne Dickerson and Bruce Kopitzke for their art work, to 
the registrar's office workers for their gracious assistance, and to Gwen 
Fox for many hours of typing, we express sincere thanks. We are grateful 
to those who have read the manuscript and have offered criticism and 
inspiration: Evlyn Lindberg, Myrtle Watrous, Betty Fleming, Olivia Dean, 
Clyde Bushnell, Everett Watrous, and Gordon Hyde. 

For editing the entire manuscript we are deeply indebted to William 
H. Taylor. 

To former President C. N. Rees, who initiated the project, and to 
the Board of Trustees of 1962 who by its action financed the publishing of 
this narrative, we express our sincere appreciation. 



October, 1962 Elva B. Gardner 

Revised, 1975 J. Mabel Wood 



m 




SMC Board of Trustees — Front row, left to right: W. M. Schneider, recording secretary; 
K. C. Beem, C. N. Rees, secretary; Don R. Rees, chairman; Vernon W. Becker and 
Charles Fleming, Jr. Back row, same order: E. L. Marley, H. H. Schmidt, D. W. Welch, 
L. J. Leiske, M. C. Patten, Desmond Cummings, Garland Millet, R. M. Davidson and 
H. V. Reed. 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 
1962 

The College Board of Trustees has made possible, by its action,. the publishing 
of this history. Without its financial support the task could not have been accomplished. 

Don R. Rees, Chairman , Decatur, Georgia 

C. N. Rees, Secretary Collegedale, Tennessee 

W. M. Schneider, Recording Secretary Collegedale, Tennessee 

Vernon W. Becker Decatur, Georgia 

K. C. Beem Decatur, Georgia 

0. A. Blake Washington, D.C. 

Desmond Cummings Decatur, Georgia 

E. E. Cossentine Washington, D.C. 

R. M. Davidson Madison College, Tenn. 

Fred H. Dortch Birmingham, Alabama 

Charles Fleming, Jr Collegedale, Tennessee 

L. J. Leiske Meridian, Mississippi 

H. Lester Plymouth, Florida 

E. L. Marley Nashville, Tennessee 

A. C. McKee Atlanta, Georgia 

Garland Millet Huntsville, Alabama 

M. C. Patten Greenville, South Carolina 

H. V. Reed Charlotte, North Carolina 

H. H. Schmidt Orlando, Florida 

B. F. Summerour Norcross, Georgia 

D. W. Welch Orlando, Florida 



IV 




1 '■<■£' Vi 

SMC Board of Trustees Convenes — The first woman member of SMC's Board of 
Trustees and several members of the Committee of 100 pose with the men of the Board. 
Left to right: William A. lies, president of SMC's Committee of 100; J. Henson White- 
head, secretary of the Board; SMC's general manager Charles Fleming; H. H. Schmidt, 
chairman; Dr. Helen Crawford Burk; Dr. Frank Knittel, president of SMC; Dr. Cyril 
Futcher, academic dean; Vernon Becker, education superintendent of the Southern 
Union. Second row — Elsworth Reile; Dr. Louis Waller; William Wampler; C. B. Rock, 
president of Oakwood College; O. D. McKee, chairman of the board of McKee Baking 
Company; W. S. Banfield. Third row— Dr. Harold Moody; Harold Roll; Don Holland; 
Robert Woodfork; Kimber Johnson; Don Welch; Desmond Cummings; C. L. Paddock, 
Jr. Fourth row— Dr. Jack Ward (C. of 100); B. T. Byrd, Jr. (C. of 100); Dr. Milton 
Norrell (C. of 100); Dr. Ben Wygal, president of Florida College at Jacksonville; Dr. 
Tom Zwemer; Dr. Calvin Willruth (C. of 100); and Oscar R. Johnson. 

(Photo by Gene Louden) 
BOARD OF TRUSTEES 
1972 
The College Board of Trustees has made possible, by its action, the continuance of 
the publishing of this history. Without its financial support the task could not have 
been accomplished. 

H. H. Schmidt, Chairman Decatur, Georgia 

H. F. Roll, Vice Chairman Decatur, Georgia 

J. H. Whitehead, Secretary Decatur, Georgia 

E. A. Anderson Atlanta, Georgia 

W. S. Banfield Decatur, Georgia 

Vernon W. Becker Decatur, Georgia 

Helen Crawford Burks Hendersonville, Tennessee 

T. K. Campbell Bradford, Tennessee 

W. O. Coe Orlando, Florida 

Desmond Cummings Decatur, Georgia 

C. E. Dudley Nashville, Tennessee 

Charles Fleming, Jr Collegedale, Tennessee 

Don Holland Decatur, Georgia 

William lies Orlando, Florida 

K. D. Johnson Madison, Tennessee 

O. R. Johnson Jackson, Mississippi 

Frank A. Knittel Collegedale, Tennessee 

Harold Moody Spartanburg, South Carolina 

Robert Morris Madison, Tennessee 

0. D. McKee Collegedale, Tennessee 

C. L. Paddock, Jr. Nashville, Tennessee 

E. S. Reile Charlotte, North Carolina 

C. B. Rock Huntsville, Alabama 

L. C. Waller Candler, North Carolina 

W. D. Wampler Meridian, Mississippi 

D. W. Welch Orlando, Florida 

R. L. Woodfork Atlanta, Georgia 

Ben Wygal Jacksonville, Florida 

Tom Zwemer Augusta, Georgia 




CO 



CO 

13 

C 
M 



fa 

<K 
M 

"3 
O 

>> 

« 

E 
o 



3 
O 
CO 



VI 




Vll 




VI11 




TO THOSE WHO REMEMBER 

The history of Southern Missionary College is only a whisper away, 
but its echo can be heard around the world. You can hear it now — in the 
lilt of the college song and in the voice of an alumnus. 

You recognize its influence in service retraced in foreign lands. 
You can feel the beat of its heart in the College annual and other publica- 
tions of the school. It is only a whisper away, but it emanates from the 
courageous, devoted lives of those who have been privileged to have part 
in its development. 

In these pages you will see again those who built Southern Mission- 
ary College. You will see the young men and women who walked with 
purpose and with steady, confident step through these halls and on out 
into all parts of the world. Perhaps you will hear again some of their 
voices, for they were courageous young people. 

This is a story of beginnings : of buildings, of equipment, of student 
activities, and of faculties. Here is recorded the guidance of this college 
in character building, culture, and service. Here is the chronicle of the 
preparation of the youth of the Southland for finishing the gospel com- 
mission and for citizenship in the earth made new. 

In recording this history of Southern Missionary College there is 
no disposition to abide or linger in the past, but we must look at the past 
to understand the present, for we are what we are today because of what 
we were and did yesterday. The history of this College assures us once 
more that "We have nothing to fear for the future, except as we shall 
forget the way the Lord has led us." TM, p. 31. 



IX 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Chapter Title Page 

I. A Story of Beginnings 1 

II. The Testing Year .- 6 

III. A General Conference School 11 

IV. Fire! And A New Location for the School 19 

V. Thatcher's Switch 27 

VI. From Graysville to Collegedale 31 

VII. Laying A Foundation 34 

VIII. Two More Feet of Pipe Before Thanksgiving 42 

IX. The Magic Words, "May I Help?" 47 

X. The Year of Do Without 51 

XI. A Problem of Communications Solved 62 

XII. The Lean Years 65 

XIII. The Heart Throbs of the College 77 

XIV. Putting the Earn in Learn 84 

XV. College Plaza 105 

XVI. Two Administration Buildings 112 

XVII. Fire Extinguishers 116 

XVIII. Educating Leaders 124 

XIX. Government — Duties and Patriotism 140 

XX. To Make Man Whole 146 

XXI. The Collegedale Church ..152 

XXII. Here Is Assembled Knowledge 159 

XXIII. The College Grew 166 

XXIV. And Then— Accreditation 209 

XXV. The City of Collegedale 220 

XXVI. Groups Rally To Help SMC 224 

XXVII. Should Auld Acquaintance Be Forgot? 240 

XXVIII. Eighty Years of Growth in Pictures ....255 

Appendix Looking Back 260 

x 



CHAPTER I 

A STORY OF BEGINNINGS 

That there may be a screen or background on which to see more vivid- 
ly the miracle of establishing this "School of His Planning," look for a mo- 
ment at the limited education in the South and the development of the 
Seventh-day Adventist work in this area in the year 1891. 

This was before the days of the free public-school idea. Only subscrip- 
tion or self-supporting schools were available in the South. The pressure 
of toil, the absence of money, the lack of interest, and the inadequate sup- 
ply of even poorly equipped teachers tended to reduce the number of such 
schools. At that time schools were in session from three to four months 
during the year, and then the work done was often of an inferior grade. 

Referring to the great need of schools in the South, as reported in the 
Daily Bulletin of the General Conference, W. T. Bland had this to say: 

The last field to be entered by our denominational workers in this 
country is the South. This field is an interesting one; it is a peculiar one, but 
above all it is a needy one . . . Public schools in the country are not held in 
high favor. 

Activities of the Seventh-day Adventist denomination had spread from 
the Atlantic to the Pacific, but there was only one local conference in the 
Southeastern States, that of the state of Tennessee, established in 1879. 

There is the greatest need of all kinds of missionary work in the South. 
Without delay workers must be prepared for this field. Vol. 9, p. 200 
The cities of the South are to be worked, and for this work the best talent 
is to be secured and that without delay. Vol. 9, p. 214 

Pastor R. M. Kilgore, president of the Cumberland Mission, believed 
that the Seventh-day Adventist youth of the South must have a school 
within their own borders, if they were to build the work in the South. If 
these youth were educated outside, he thought, they would be lost to the 
South. There were no funds to start a school officially. In the Seventh-day 
Adventist Year Book of 1891, page 65, appears this report of the Com- 
mittee on the Southern Schools: 

1. We are favorable to, and would encourage the opening of a school in 
District 2, as soon as there is sufficient encouragement that the patron- 
age will sustain it. 

2. We recommend: that, when the school is started, it begin in a small way; 
that one teacher be employed; and that no considerable outlay of means 
be made, no more than what the friends who are personally interested in 
the school are able to bear. 

3. We recommend that R. M. Kilgore, G. I. Butler, and W. W. Prescott be 
a committee to take this matter into consideration, to look for the most 
favorable location, and to lay and execute plans necessary to the success 
of the enterprise, when it shall be started. 

After study as to where the school would be located, the choice lay 
between Graysville, Tennessee, and Alpharetta, Georgia. Both communities 
offered some inducements — a donated campus, a little money; but Grays- 
ville was chosen as the location for the school. 



2 80 YEARS OF PROGRESS 

In 1885 Mr. E. R. Gillet, a member of the Seventh-day Adventist 
church from Iowa, had moved to Graysville. By the year 1888 other mem- 
bers of the Adventist faith had located in Graysville: Mr. and Mrs. Isaac 
Barstow, Gerald Pierce, Martha and Caledonis Crawley, and Mr. and Mrs. 
Bird Terry; these united to organize the Graysville Church. Mr. Gillett, 
the leader, was a man of sublime faith and unfaltering courage. The little 

Early Pictures of Graysville 





THEY SHALL BE TAUGHT OF GOD 




Professor and Mrs. G. W. Colcord, 1892-1896 

company, having grown to a membership of fifty, built a church free of 
debt, and dedicated it in November, 1890, with Pastor R. M. Kilgore 
delivering the dedication sermon. 

The resources of the General Conference were not counted in dollars 
in 1891, and when Pastor Kilgore called on a veteran educator to come to 
start the school at Graysville, he came at his own expense. Professor G. W. 
Colcord had founded Milton Academy in eastern Oregon. It was the fore- 
runner of Walla Walla College. In the midst of a great national depression, 
he and his wife, a missionary-minded couple, left their newly established 
academy and came to the Southland in the fall of 1891. They came to a 
work of pioneering, sacrifice, and privation under exceedingly discourag- 
ing and embarrassing circumstances. 

For a classroom, Professor Colcord rented a room above a general 
store owned by J. W. Clouse. While he was preparing an outside stairway 
to the classroom and making benches, Mr. Colcord announced that he 
would hold classes in the Seventh-day Adventist church for the first 
month. On February 20, 1892, school opened with twenty-three subscrip- 
tion students present. Each student paid a small tuition of four dollars 
per month. One of those first 23 students was M. W. F. Fox who resided in 
Graysville until his death in the late 1960's. His seatmate for the first 
two years at the Graysville school was A. W. Spalding. 

The first term of school was three months in length with the last 
two months in the classroom over the Clouse General Store. At the 
close of the term the enrollment had increased to thirty-two students. 
During the summer, blackboards were put up and the room was ceiled. 
Most of the summer vacation was spent soliciting students with the result 
that the enrollment reached 65 the next year. 



4 80 YEARS OF PROGRESS 

In recording his impressions of the work of Professor and Mrs. Col- 
cord, Mr. Spalding wrote: 

He came, he saw, he conquered. His wife was one of the sweetest women 
God ever made, and a thorough teacher too. Professor Colcord was a drill 
master; what he gave you got, or you got out, for he hammered it in. "The 
Little Red Grammar," Reed and Kellogg, was next to the Bible, the supreme 
textbook, or so it seemed to me. Professor Colcord set us to watching and 
correcting one another's speech (and incidentally getting our own correct- 
ed) and if I have ever been a critic, I learned it from good old Professor 
Colcord. 

The following year Professor Colcord's nephew, Celian, joined them 
as a teacher. Being unmarried and personable, he was for some time the 
object of adoration by some advanced lady pupils, but he ended specula- 
tion by bringing a bride from the Northwest. 

From its humble beginning over the general store, the Graysville 
school took on greater proportions. Professor Colcord and his nephew were 
men of broad vision, undaunted faith, sterling personal character, and in- 
defatigable labor. The enthusiasm of Professor Colcord was the means of 
interesting church members and workers in establishing a permanent 
school at Graysville. Mr. Fox, owner of a shingle mill, was the chief pro- 
moter. A tract of land of nine acres was donated, but there was no money 
accompanying the gift. Professor Colcord put his own money into the pro- 
ject of erecting an academy building. Pastor Kilgore raised money and 
donated labor, and finally a box-like structure, forty-five feet square with 
two stories above a ten-foot basement, was erected in 1893. The nine-acre 
campus and the building were valued at $3,000. 

In the school year 1893-94, the school moved into the new building and 
became Graysville Academy with an enrollment of 120. The academy had 
but one objective — to provide young people with an education that would 
qualify them for the greatest Christian service to their fellow men and a 
wider service in the life to come. 

In the denominational Year Book for 1893, page 62, is found the re- 
sponse of the General Conference Committee to Professor Colcord's offer 
to turn the school over to the General Conference: 




Graysville Academy 




Bottom row from left to right: Albert Phillips, Sam Moyers, Prof. Tenney, Everett 
Rideout, Will Melendy, Luther Woodall, Lavern Melendy, Fred Greer, Clint Miller. 
Second row: Earl Hall, LaRue Melendy, Earl Tenney, Prof. Charles Kilgore, L. A. 
Jacobs, Hubert Morphew, Ralph Smith, Will Harrison, R. L. Williams, Culley Woodall, 
Prof. Judson Crouse. Back row: Clyde Miller, Harlin Harrison, not identified, Claude 
Dortch, Henry Noble, Harry Miller, Benny Roberts, Will Greer. 1905-06. 

Whereas, the Graysville (Tennessee) Academy which was established by 
Elder G. W. Colcord on his own financial responsibilities, but under the 
advice of the General Conference Committee, has grown to such proportions 
as to require better accommodations to carry on its work, and 
Whereas, Elder Colcord proposes with his own funds to provide such im- 
provements as the present necessities of the school demands; and 
Whereas, the citizens of Graysville propose to deed to the General Confer- 
ence a desh'able and liberal campus; therefore 

Resolved, that we favor such improvements as will best further the develop- 
ment of the school and place it on a permanent basis under the direction 
of the General Conference. 

We recommend that other local schools for white students and colored stu- 
dents be established at such places in the South, and on such a plan, as 
may be deemed best by the General Conference Committee after careful in- 
vestigation of all the circumstances. 

Approved by the General Conference, the school became the training 
school of the South, the parent of the present Southern Missionary College. 
The enrollment of the school in the 1893-94 school year was 120. The 
Colcords continued to give their services and money and the school pros- 
pered. Then came the testing year. 



Do you remember — 

— the native quiet of Cumberland Mountain valley? 

— the double desks used over the Clouse store ? 

— that 1% hours work per day and $100 cash would put a student 
through a year of school at Graysville ? 

— that the students were "classified by examinations, oral and 
written"? 

— the "salt-free" diet recommended by Dr. Kellogg which resulted 
in illness to several students and the departure of a few? 



CHAPTER II 

THE TESTING YEAR 

If a village is judged by the number of its inhabitants, Graysville, 
Tennessee, is of little importance. Measuring the village by the influence 
it has spread through the years into far places, it takes on great signifi- 
cance. 

A number of Seventh-day Adventist families from different parts of 
the state and from neighboring states moved to Graysville in order that 
they might educate their children in this Christian school. Pleasant homes 
were established, and the village soon wore an air of prosperity. 

Before the Graysville Academy building was completely finished in- 
side, classes were held there. Many things were conducive to the success 
of this "School of His Planning"! The pure spring water supply was excel- 
lent ; the general health of the community was good ; extremes of heat and 
cold so often experienced in many places were scarcely known there. Any 
student who came to the school with a desire to make the most of his 
opportunities found it a pleasant home. He was surrounded by an atmos- 
phere of refinement and culture that would fit him to take his place in 
the world and to do the work to which God had appointed him. 

Everything moved along pleasantly until the fall of 1894. Religious 
persecution, which had been felt in the western part of Tennessee, had 
abated with the 1892 cases. However, it broke out again in eastern Ten- 
nessee at Graysville and Dayton in Rhea County late in 1894. 

The following is Ron Graybill's record of the trouble as told in the 
January-February, 1973 issue of Liberty Magazine. (Mr. Graybill is 
research assistant in church history for the Seventh-day Adventist 
Church.) 

Tales of a Tennessee Chain Gang 

Bill Burchard jerked his head up and peered quizzically from among the 
cornstalks. What was that noise? He pushed a crumpled blue bandana 
slowly across his brow and then stood scanning the underbrush forty yards 
away. 

Seeing nothing, he moved to the next stalk and ripped the blades off. 
His family of seven had long since consumed the last of the corn, and now, 
early in September, 1894, he was salvaging the blades to feed his scrawny 
cow. 

Burchard worked five days a week in the Dayton Coal and Iron company 
mine. He ascended from the brutal bowels of the earth to go to church on 
Saturdays, and this schedule left Sunday as his only day to catch up on work 
around his home. 

He straightened up again. He had heard something. A screeching jay 
betrayed two men about to disappear over a low ridge. 

Burchard thought nothing more about the incident until one evening a 
week or two later when he came home to find Sheriff Darwin sitting on his 
front stoop. The sheriff rose slowly as Burchard approached. 



THE TESTING YEAR 




The chain gang. Prof. Colcord and his nephew are on the wagon at the left. The two 
men in the lower center of the picture were criminals. The rest of the prisoners were 
members of the Graysville Church. 



"Help y'all, Sheriff?" Burchard asked. 

Darwin looked down, slipping the four fingers of each hand into his 
front pockets. 

"I'm sorry, Bill," he mumbled, "but I gotta take ya in." 

"Take me in!" Burchard's face paled in shock even under the layer of 
coal dust. "But what in the world for?" 

"Here," said the sheriff, slipping a long folded piece of paper out from 
under his vest, "listen to this." 

"State of Tennessee. To the Sheriff of Rhea County, Greeting: You 
are hereby commanded to take the body of William S. Burchard, if found 
in your county, and him safely keep, so that you have him before the judge 
of our Circuit Court ... at the Courthouse in the town of Dayton, on the 
first Monday in March next, then and there to answer the State on an 
indictment for violating Sabbath. Herein fail not. . . . C. G. Gillespie, 
Clerk." 

By the time Burchard returned home late that night he understood what 
his two secretive visitors had been doing that Sunday. 

Burchard lived four and a half miles from Graysville, Tennessee, in a 
little valley called the Cove. Graysville, a town of 600, was about 20 per 
cent Seventh-day Adventist. The religious community had built up around 
Graysville Academy, a school begun two years earlier by an Adventist 
minister named G. W. Colcord. (The school was later moved and grew into 
what is now Southern Missionary College, near Chattanooga.) 

Now, not only Burchard had been arrested, but also Colcord and two 
of his teachers, along with several other Graysville Adventists, were under 
indictment for violating Tennessee's Sunday law. Burchard was charged 
on two counts — stripping fodder and helping to dig a well on Sunday. Others 
were charged with such crimes as putting chicken wire around a garden or 
carrying a few boards. 



80 YEARS OF PROGRESS 

The trials made obvious that the chief instigator of the trouble was 
an angry coal miner named Wright Rains, who had been refused credit by 
the Adventist proprietor of a local grocery store. Two of his friends had 
slipped out of the services in their church just over the ridge from Burchard's 
cabin to spy on him. 

For more than 15 years Adventists had been subjected to sporadic 
persecution for Sunday-law violations in various States. They believed at 
the time that to rest on Sunday was an admission of Sunday's sacredness, a 
capitulation to a false system of worship. 

By the time of the Graysville cases, fifty-three Adventists had been 
convicted of Sunday violations and thirty had gone to prison. Prior to the 
Supreme Court's "Christian Nation" decision in 1892, Adventists had spent 
thousands on lawyers' fees to escape conviction, usually without success. 
After 1892 they considered the cause hopeless, and spoke the best they 
could in their own defense. 

But though the beleaguered Graysville Adventists had little hope in 
the court, they had plenty of help outside. Liberty's predecessor, the 
American Sentinel, eight years old at the time, sent a reporter to cover the 
trials. 

The newspapers in Dayton, Tennessee, were outspoken in defense of 
the Adventists, and before the Graysville cases finally were resolved, more 
than 250 newspapers across the country would side with the Adventists. 

If the Sentinel reporter had arrived in Dayton by rail on Sunday, 
March 4, the day before the trial began, he could have gathered ample 
evidence that what Adventists faced was religious discrimination rather than 
simple prosecution under the law. 

The fact that one could get to Dayton on a Sunday train was the first 
proof. Then as the reporter strode down the street toward the courthouse 
he doubtless would see three small boys sucking hard candy in front of the 
drugstore and hear the cash-register bell jangle periodically inside. 

From the courthouse he could see the belching smokestack of the 
Dayton Coal and Iron Company. Like a black flag, the smoke signaled that 
400 or more workmen were keeping the furnaces hot on Sunday. The 
Sentinel reporter might even hear the switch engine as it coughed and 
whistled away with its load of slag. But only the Adventists were charged 
with working on Sunday. 

A little investigation by Dayton's local papers revealed that members 
of the grand jury that indicted the Adventists were hiring extra help to 
pick their strawberries on Sundays just as on other days. (Colcord was 
arrested not for working himself but for letting his students wash clothes 
and saw wood on Sunday.) 

Bill Burchard pleaded not guilty to the charges, saying he had not 
violated the Sabbath, because the Bible says Saturday is the Sabbath. 
Colcord — stoop-shouldered, aging, and wearing a giant patriarchal beard 
— appealed to the Declaration of Rights in the Tennessee Constitution, 
which said that "no human authority can, in any case whatever, control or 
interfere with the rights of conscience." The declaration also forbade any 
preference to any religious establishments or mode of worship. 

Judge J. G. Parks was sympathetic, but he said his was a secular and 
not a religious court. The only question for the jury, he said, was what the 
law said and whether it had been violated. He pointed out that he had a 
sworn duty to enforce the law and ensure its respect. 

Judge Parks then argued weakly that the Sunday law was not one that 
protects a particular belief but one that "protects the unanimous belief of 
nearly all Christian denominations." 

Then he presented his dilemma: "But here we have a very respectable 
element of Christian believers who are honest, inoffensive, law-abiding people 
in all matters not conflicting with their sense of duty, who believe they are 
under divine command to observe the seventh day as the Sabbath. ... If 
there were only one of them, he would be entitled not only to his honest 
belief but to the exercise of that belief so long as in so doing he did 



THE TESTING YEAR 

not interfere with some natural rights of his neighbors. ... Do the defend- 
ants in keeping the seventh day and working on the first thereby interfere 
with any natural right of their neighbors ? Or is it an artificial right created 
by human law?" 

Judge Parks left his question unanswered, but it was clear where he 
stood. He said in closing, "I have serious doubts as to the justice of the 
law, but the remedy is not to be found in disobeying it, but in having it 
repealed." 

He fined the defendants $2.50 each, suspended the sentences, but asked 
them to pay court costs. The Adventists refused to pay the costs, choosing 
rather to go to jail. The Sentinel explained their reasons by saying that 
the State had taken them from their homes and work for no just cause, 
and they simply submitted to the powers that be, "but refuse to become 
parties in any degree to the iniquitous proceeding by the payment of a fine." 

They were given prison sentences of twenty to seventy-six days. 

Bill Burchard left behind a note in his daughter's autograph album: 

"Dear Hattie, This is the 6th day of March in the year 1895 A.D., in the 
Cove in Rhea County, Tennessee, in the so-called free America. I go to 
Dayton today expecting to go to jail for the crime (?) of believing the 
Bible. I was found guilty by the court. . . . Yet these things and worse 
happened in all ages to God's people — why not to us? Second Timothy 
3:12 says 'all that live godly in Christ Jesus shall suffer persecution.' I 
want you to be a good girl and live for God and His truth. That is the 
only thing we can live for in this world, that is worth living for. Read and 
meditate on Hebrews 11:32-40 [enumerates the persecutions suffered by 
Old Testament heroes] and you can see what awaits us only a little way in 
the future." 

Jailhouse life was not severe, but there were hardships involved in the 
incarceration. Several of the men were nearly penniless, and their families 
were left without support. Then, too, with three key staff members gone, 
Graysville Academy had to send its one hundred students home two months 
early, some of them without the diplomas they had expected. 

Sheriff Darwin was kind enough to put the men up in the two-story 
house attached to the jail rather than in the cells. The quarters, the 
Adventists reported, were not "offensively dirty." They were allowed to 
have visitors and were given access to the well in the front yard, thus 
escaping the mucky water from the jail-yard pump. 

The citizens of Dayton petitioned the court to release the prisoners, 
but in spite of the uproar in the nation's press, the court denied the petition, 
by a narrow margin. 

Judge Parks recommended to Governor Peter Turney that the prisoners 
be pardoned, and finally the last two still serving sentences were granted 
clemency even though they gave no evidence of repentance. 

Scarcely had they returned home than twenty more indictments were 
out for Graysville Adventists. Burchard and Colcord were arrested again. 

While they waited for the next session of the court in July, the 
Adventists listened for developments in the Tennessee legislature. A bill 
providing exemption from the Sunday law for those who observed a different 
day had been introduced. It cleared the committee but lost on the floor by 
more than two to one. Bill Burchard and his friends knew their chance of 
acquittal this time was slim. 

The court convened in July. Some of the cases were continued, a few 
dismissed, but eight Adventists — including Burchard and Colcord — again 
were convicted. This time, however, their enemies had succeeded in rein- 
stating the county chain gang — a practice that had not been followed for 
several years. 

Shortly before nine o'clock in the morning on July 16, 1895, two heavy 
wagons lumbered out of Dayton loaded with picks, shovels, eighteen 
prisoners, and an equal number of balls and chains. 



10 80 YEARS OF PROGRESS 

Bill Burchard must have thought of his own family as he eyed a. fellow 
convict who had tried to slit his wife's throat. Guarding Adventist and 
assassin alike, Deputy Sheriff Jim Howard cradled a double barreled shot- 
gun in his arms as he rocked back and forth on the high seat. 

The wagons lurched for eighteen miles over the dusty road that ran 
north from Dayton and stopped at an empty house near Spring City, 
Tennessee. 

The afternoon was spent filling straw ticks, making crude tables, and 
attaching old wagon wheels to the upstairs windows "to keep the wild 
prisoners in," as Burchard put it. 

A black convict assigned to kitchen duty delivered cabbage, onions, 
bread, and sugar for supper, and Bill Burchard settled down for fifty days 
"on the hard rock ground." 

After cold biscuits and molasses for breakfast ("and not enough of 
that") the Rhea County chain gang set to work breaking up rock for the 
approaches to a nearby bridge. 

The first full day of work was a Friday, so when the Adventists went 
to bed that night they doubtless had special prayer about the events of the 
next day. 

They probably were w T aiting nervously when Deputy Howard clomped 
into their room the next morning. 

" 'Spose this is the day y'all won't do no work," he said. 

"That's right, sir," Pastor Colcord replied — as politely as he knew 
how. 

"Well, don't make no difference — I just won't count your Saturdays 
against your sentence, and it wouldn't do to have ya work tomorrow 
either." 

The deputy's arbitrary decision was obviously illegal, but it was better 
to keep quiet than create a confrontation over working on Saturday. 

One Adventist had been sick to begin with, but the other seven stood 
the work quite well in spite of their sparse diet. They wouldn't touch the 
hog meat and coffee they were offered, and were glad when a barrel of 
"health foods" arrived from Battle Creek, Michigan, to supplement their 
diet. 

Their short evenings, often enlivened by fights among the other con- 
victs, became almost too exciting when one prisoner grabbed a sleepy 
guard's gun, aimed it at another prisoner, and pulled the trigger. Luckily, 
the gun failed to discharge. Perhaps emboldened by the incident, two non- 
Adventist prisoners slipped past the guard one night and escaped. 

Meanwhile, the Sentinel kept up weekly reports on every phase of the 
prisoners' plight, and newspapers round the country kept up their barrage 
against the bigotry of Tennessee. 

The chain gang Adventists had their share of visitors, including a 
Chattanooga-based reporter for the New York Recorder and a photo- 
grapher from Dalton named Bugler, who snapped several pictures of the 
prisoners. 

Once the Spring City job was done, the chain gang was moved to a 
two-story log house about a mile and a half from Graysville. Burchard 
noted that this was really his first time behind bars, since all the windows 
were equipped with them. The weather was hot, though, so the guard left 
the front door open at night and stood on the porch. 

When the last of the cases came to trial — the ones that had been 
continued from July — Adventists enjoyed the free legal assistance of a 
former congressman from Tennessee and the attorney for the Cincinnati 
Southern Railroad of Chattanooga. The combination of their skill and the 
jury's weariness over the whole affair won acquittals in the remaining cases. 

In Bill Burchard's last report he said: "We are all well, healthy, and 
happy. The sun has been extremely hot today. One big fellow got so hot 
this afternoon he had to stop, but none of us has done that yet. 

"They furnish us plenty to eat now, and as Brother Morgan is cook, 
it is well prepared. My time should be out in a week from today. I must 
close as it is dark, and the workhouse is out of lamp oil." 



CHAPTER III 

A GENERAL CONFERENCE SCHOOL 

When the school was finally reopened in the fall, confidence had not 
been fully restored. The attendance was not as good as it had been in the 
past, but a major crisis had been met with faith. 

+ a. ^ 1895 i*£f ti } le of the sch ° o1 Property, valued at $3,000, was tendered 
to the General Conference Association, free from debt. Professor Colcord had 
labored arduously in the interest of the school. 

He had invested in this school all the money he had, amounting to 
several thousand dollars. Several of his friends likewise invested money in 
the enterprise. American Sentinel, April 9, 1895. 




W. T. Bland, 1896-98 
Principal of Graysville Academy 

On September 9, 1896, the school opened as a General Conference in- 
stitution. At that time there were only seventy-five students enrolled, 
twenty-four of whom were boarding students. Professor Colcord went to 
Hygiene, Colorado, to establish an academy, and Professor W. T. Bland 
was sent to Graysville to be the principal. Frank Lynden, N. W. Lawrence, 
and Minnie Hennig Irwin made up the faculty. Mrs. Bland taught the 
elementary grades and physical culture without remuneration. Later Miss 
Lessie Wilson was added to the faculty to teach music. 

Mr. Bland, writing of his introduction to the school, said: 

We had forty days of continuous rain with croaking frogs in every 
puddle. The roving cows wore deep-sounding bells and kept us awake much 

11 



12 



80 YEARS OF PRO 1RESS 





C. R. Irwin, 1898-1900 
Principal, Southern Industrial School 



N. W. Lawrence, 1900-01 
Principal, Southern Industrial School 



of the nights as they reached over and under the fences for tempting bits of 
grass. Mrs. Bland had 'Southern Fever' and had to be sent to the Battle 
Creek Sanitarium for treatment for several weeks. But we enjoyed our two- 
year stay in Graysville more than any of our other schools. The people were 
friendly and cooperative. 

Because it was Professor Bland's plan to develop industries in which 
the students could earn their way, he changed the name of the school from 
Graysville Academy to Southern Industrial School. 

When Professor Bland became president of Union College in 1898, 
Professor C. W. Irwin took his place at Graysville. Professor Irwin was 
one of the great sponsors of Christian education. At the time he became 
the third principal of the school, he had been on the faculty at Union 
College seven years, both as an instructor and as dean of men. During the 
three years he served as principal his personal life was a tremendous 
influence for good. 

Professor Irwin was called to the Avondale school in Australia in 1900, 
and Professor N. W. Lawrence, a member of the faculty at Southern In- 
dustrial School, filled the vacancy for one year. When he became the fourth 
principal, he had served seven years in denominational educational work. 
This was but the beginning of his long record of denominational service. 

During this school year Ellen G. White paid a visit to Southern 
Industrial School and met all the students personally. 

Because of limited space and equipment, there were no industries in 
connection with the school in those years. In 1904 while Professor J. E. 



A GENERAL CONFERENCE SCHOOL 



13 





J. E. Tenney, 1901-08 
Principal, Southern Training School 



M. B. Van Kirk, 1908-12 
Principal, Southern Training School 



Tenney was principal of the school, the name was changed from Southern 
Industrial School to Southern Training School, the name that was retained 
until 1916. 

Professor Tenney had taught public school in Winona, Minnesota, and 
had taught rhetoric at Battle Creek College, 1896-99, and was the first 
principal of Bethel Academy, 1899-1901. He was called to Graysville in 
1901. 

Temporary medical work was started in two cottages while plans for 
a sanitarium and hospital developed. In 1904 the Graysville Sanitarium and 
Hospital was completed. Closely affiliated with the school, it gave many 
work opportunities to the students. 

In 1907 Professor Tenney enlarged the main academy building, increas- 
ing the capacity to fourteen rooms in order to accommodate more students. 

Professor M. B. Van Kirk came to the Southland in 1908 and served 
as educational secretary of both the Southeastern and Southern Union Con- 
ferences and at the same time was principal of Southern Training School. 
It was during his administration that the boys' dormitory was erected. 
Professor Van Kirk was dearly beloved. His chief concern was centered in 
human values and in persons as such. 

In 1912 Professor C. L. Stone came from Beechwood Academy in Indi- 
ana to be the principal of Southern Training School for two years. He had 
founded Hazel Academy in Kentucky and had taught at Emmanuel Mis- 
sionary College before going to Beechwood Academy. 



14 



80 YEARS OF PROGRESS 




John Grover Clouse of Jasper, 
Tennessee is probably the only 
former student alive in 1974, 
who went to school in Grays- 
ville, when the school that grew 
to be SMC, first opened its 
doors. His father, a Presby- 
terian, and a justice of the peace 
in Graysville, rented the top 
floor of his grocery store to be 
used for the first classroom. 



Professor Stone felt that eventually the school would have to be moved 
from Graysville to more favorable surroundings. A much larger farm was 
needed, and space was needed to start and develop industries. Near the 
town of Graysville were small coal mining towns that presented a problem 
when entertainment for the public was planned because of a rough ele- 
ment in these neighboring towns. Close proximity made it difficult to 
maintain proper discipline in the school. Those who knew Professor Stone 
best have said that the force of his character was for good and lasted 
longer than his days. 




Graysville Sanitarium 
This sanitarium was started in 1903 on Lone Mountain in Graysville, Tennessee by Dr. 
O. M. Hayward. (The picture is a copy of a line drawing made by Dr. M. M. Martinson.) 



A GENERAL CONFERENCE SCHOOL 



15 




C. L. Stone, 1912-14 
Principal, Southern Training School 



L. H. Wood, 1914-15, 1918-22 
Principal, Southern Training School 




The faculty of Southern Training School 1914-15. H. S. Miller, L. A. Hoopes, Lynn 
Wood, Mrs. Wood, J. S. Marshall, Mrs. Marshall, Maude Warren, A. B. Russell, Grover 
Fattic, Rochelle Philmon, Gradye Brooke Summerour, Nellah Harrison. 



16 



80 YEARS OF PROGRESS 




''*P"if 




The above two pictures have been designated by persons who were at Graysville at the 
time that both these groups were at Graysville during the 1915-16 school year. Possibly, 
the top picture is the elementary school group with faculty, while the bottom picture 
is the academy and college group with faculty. If. this supposition is true, then Grays- 
ville had a large enrollment in 1915-16. The administration building and the boys' 
dormitory are in the background- of the top picture. 



A GENERAL CONFERENCE SCHOOL 



17 




The second floor of this building was the first classroom. There was an ouside stair 
and platform in the rear. This picture was made shortly before the building was torn 
down. 




Since these days of 1904-05, SMC social conventions have come almost full circle. Notice 
the mustaches and beards on the older generation, and notice the younger generation 
with its guitars. The picture was taken in front of the women's dormitory in Graysville. 



18 



80 YEARS OF PROGRESS 



Professor Lynn Wood had served at both Washington Missionary Col- 
lege and Union College in the science departments before he was called to 
be the eighth principal of the school. He was a man of vision and of 
spiritual leadership, the one needed at this time of uncertainties at this 
school. Should the school be moved to a larger farm? He weighed the 
matter carefully. The present might be arduous, but the future offered 
promise. 

For twenty-three years the people in Graysville and the Graysville 
church had stood loyally by the school, supporting it and loving it as only 
a parent loves a child. Each person wanted the very best for the school, 
but it was not easy to decide that a move was perhaps the best. 

It was on February 18, 1915, that a tragedy decided the whole matter. 
That night the girls' dormitory burned to the ground. 




Southern Training School twelfth and fourteenth grade graduates in 1914: front row, 
left to right: Nellah Harrison Jeys, Laura Lane, Mrs. C. L. Stone, May Warren Clark, 
Hone Gallemore Sears, Vallah Dillon Webb, Marian Dalby, Angie Foster, Florence 
Whitney Davis; back row, left to right: Clyde Haysmer, Stanley Lee Clark, Alva 
Highsmith, Delbert Jones, Augustus H. Foster, John Cole, Lowell T. Johnson, and 
Robert Case. 



CHAPTER IV 

FIRE! AND A NEW LOCATION FOR THE SCHOOL 

Mr. T. R. Huxtable, a student in the school and a member of the 
school fire department, tells the story of the fire: 

It must have been about 2:30 in the morning, when my roommate, 
Dominski, called to me, 'Get up, Huxtable, the girls' home is on fire!' I 
thought he must be joking and told him so, but he assured me that it was so. 
We dressed, then wet some towels in the water pitcher and hurried out, giving 
the alarm as we went. I shall never forget the sight that presented itself to 
our view as we rushed toward the girls' dormitory! The whole basement of 
the building was on fire. Flames were leaping out through the windows, girls 
were screaming everywhere, hanging out the windows, and coming down fire 
escapes. It didn't take the boys long to put ladders up to the porch roof and 
take down those who were there. There were still a number unaccounted 
for. I helped Glenn Curtis up to the fire escape at the end of the building. I 
went around to the back of the building and climbed another fire escape. We 
entered all the rooms opening on these fire escapes to see if we could find 
anyone. 

Then Glenn Curtis and Charles Bozarth held an extension ladder 
steadily at the base, and I climbed the ladder to the very top rung. I could 
place my hands on the window sill, but just as I was ready to raise myself to 
the window, there was a terriffic explosion on the inside of the building, 
caused by a barrel of kerosene exploding. The building was practically blown 
to pieces. Hot flames and gas blew in my face, setting my hair and clothes on 




The Women's Dormitory at Southern Training School 



19 



20 



80 YEARS OF PROGRESS 




After the fire February 18, 1915 

fire, and throwing me backwards, breaking my hold on the window. I whirled 
and jumped as far as I could, landing on my feet. Glenn and Charles threw 
an arm under each leg, and locked their other arms under my back and ran 
across the campus away from the fire with me. Someone came along with a 
large bucket of water and almost drowned me, for I was still on fire. They 
left me on the porch of the administration building. I watched the girls' 
home go up in smoke. It was a pitiful sight. Fortunately, there was no wind, 
and all the other buildings were saved. No life was lost, and only three were 
hurt. Genevieve Roberts suffered a broken wrist, and another lady suffered 
bruises when she jumped from the third filoor onto the porch roof and rolled 
off onto the ground. 



The burning of the girls' dormitory raised the question as to whether 
the dormitory should be rebuilt or whether a new location should be found 
for the school. New facilities were needed at Southern Training School 
which could not be provided then. The home of Pastor Kilgore was opened 
to the girls for the remainder of the school year of 1914-1915, and a com- 
mittee of men was appointed to look for a suitable location for "A School 
of His Planning." 

Since the burning of the girls' dormitory almost completely settled the 
question of whether or not the school would move, the next question was 
where. 

The new location took the following turns : 

A New Location For The School 

A feud that burned the courthouse records, a committee meeting on 
a pile of railroad ties, a newspaper clipping, the naming of a village that 
did not exist, and purchasing an estate on faith — each was a part of relo- 
cating "A School of His Planning." 



FIRE! AND A NEW LOCATION FOR THE SCHOOL 21 

The Newspaper Clipping 

In the autumn of 1912 the Chattanooga Times published an article 
written by Ernest Haskell, a census taker of East Ridge, Tennessee. The 
article was entitled, "Turkey and the Prophecies," and was based on the 
threat of war in Turkey and the Balkan States. As a result of this article, 
Mr. Haskell received an invitation from the Baptist pastor of Ooltewah to 
be one of the guest speakers at the next Fifth Sunday Convention. Since 
he was not a minister, Mr. Haskell contacted Elder W. H. Branson, presi- 
dent of the Cumberland Conference, and the two attended the two-day con- 
vention at the Baptist Church. 

The six convention speakers were each to speak on the subject, "The 
Signs of the Times," and Elder Branson was to be the first speaker. The 
audience was so deeply impressed with Elder Branson's presentation of 
the subject that he was urged to take the next speaker's time. He preached 
four of the six sermons at the convention. At the close of the session he 
was invited to return to give a series of lectures in Ooltewah. 

A few weeks later Elder Branson returned and started a series of 
studies in the Baptist church and later continued them in a tent. Among 
the firm, whole-hearted believers who accepted the Bible truths were Dr. 
J. M. Webb, who was a practicing physician in Ooltewah, and his wife. The 
warm friendship between the two men brought Elder Branson to the 
Webb home on many occasions. A few years later, Dr. Webb was to play 
an important part in finding a new location for Southern Training School. 

It was in 1915 that a meeting was held in Nashville, Tennessee, for 
the Southern Union Conference and another in Atlanta, Georgia, for the 
Southeastern Union to decide whether to move the school from Graysville. 
Both groups studied these reasons why it would seem that the school 
should be moved: 

1. The new location should be removed from town life. 

2. It should have space for a larger development in agricultural lines. 

3. The space should provide for various industries where the indus- 
tries might become an integral part of education and where worthy 
students could earn their tuition. 

4. It should be near a railroad. 

5. Larger buildings and more space were needed for the rapidly in- 
creasing constituency. 

6. It should be centrally located in the. nine states it was to serve. 

7. It should be a place surrounded by the beauties of nature. 



22 



80 YEARS OF PROGRESS 



At both the union conference meetings it was unanimously voted to 
move the school from Graysville. Elder S. E. Wight and Elder W. H. 
Branson were asked by the school board to spend some time finding a suit- 
able location for the school. They spent several weeks carrying out the 
assignment, visiting sections of Alabama, Georgia, and Tennessee, search- 
ing for a location that would meet the needs of the school. Finding such lo- 
cation was difficult, and they eventually returned to their headquarters. 

Dr. Webb in Ooltewah told Elder Branson that he knew of a farm 
nearby that would be the ideal location for the school. After Elder Bran- 
son and Elder Wight saw the Jim Thatcher farm, they called the mem- 
bers of the two union conference committees together. 










" '-: Hfcl I— *F" V - . .- life; 





The Thatcher Mansion, known until its demise in 1958 as "The Yellow House" or 
"Thatcher Hall" 

Elder G. H. Curtis, who was at that time secretary-treasurer of the 
Southern Union Conference, tells of his trip to the Thatcher farm : 

Several of us went by train to Ooltewah and were met by Dr. Webb. It 
had rained and the roads were muddy. Most of us had to stand up in the 
back of the truck, and we tried to keep from being pitched headlong into 
the mud and water. The truck went as far as it could and stuck in the mud. 
We could not walk in the road, so we all crawled through the wire fence 
onto the railroad right of way, crossed the ditches full of water to the 
railroad track, and walked the rest of the way to Thatcher's Switch. 

The committee looked over the graceful contours of the impressive 
valley. There was an old farm house called "The Mansion," which was 
built before the Civil War. Behind the house was a commissary hardly 
worthy of the name, some slave quarters, and the remains of a building 
that had once been the barn. The few cottages to the east above the lime 
quarry had once housed quarry workmen, but for many years had been 
shelters for cattle. 



FIRE! AND A NEW LOCATION FOR THE SCHOOL 



23 




S. E. Wight, G. H. Curtis, B. W. Brown and W. C. White 



This picture of S. E. 
Wight, G. H. Curtis, 

B. W. Brown and W. 

C. White was taken at 
the spring by Dr. L. 
H. Wood. Just after 
it was snapped Elder 
Curtis sampled what 
he thought was grass 
when Dr. Wood yelled, 
"G. H. what have you 
got in your mouth 
chewing?" It was poi- 
son ivy and he had an 
awful time with his 
mouth and throat. 




Uj 



Tenant Houses 



This farm was ideally located and met the objectives that the commit- 
tee had in mind for establishing the college. The decision was made on the 
spot to acquire possession of it and to move the institution from Graysville 
to Thatcher's Switch. 

The committee assembled in a hotel room in Chattanooga. Although 
they had not purchased the farm, one of the first items of business was 
to give the new location a name. There were already denominational col- 
leges located at villages called "College Place" and "College View." Elder 
Carlyle B. Haynes thought of the valley, and instantly the word "dale" im- 
pressed him. When he proposed "Collegedale" to the committee, it was im- 
mediately accepted and adopted. 



24 



80 YEARS OF PROGRESS 



They had found the ideal location for the college, and the place was 
named, but purchasing the estate owned by Jim Thatcher was another 
matter. There was a note of indebtedness at Graysville of about $20,000 at 
the close of the school year in May, 1916. The North American Division, 
under Elder I. H. Evans, stipulated that this indebtedness must first be 
paid and that the committee was to proceed with purchasing a new location 
only if there was cash in hand to do it. It was estimated that $30,000 
would be needed to pay the debt at Graysville and make the transfer. 

An escrow arrangement was entered into with Mr. Thatcher. One 
hundred dollars was deposited in the bank at Ooltewah, and Mr. Thatcher 
deposited the deed to the property. If $11,000, the price for the farm, was 
deposited at the stated time, the deed to the property was to be delivered 
to the board. Otherwise, the $100 would be forfeited. 

A Feud That Burned A Courthouse 

Two problems had to be cleared before the transaction was complete. 
First, Collegedale was not at that time in Hamilton County. In years gone 
by there had been feuds, and the court house had been burned. All records 
of deeds were destroyed ; therefore, a secure title to the Thatcher estate 
could not be conveyed. The second problem was that the board did not 
have $11,000 to pay for the estate. Their confidence, however, was strong 
that God had led them to this location for the school, and they went for- 
ward in faith. 

In May, 1915, Elder O. O. Montgomery asked Professor A. N. Atte- 
berry to be principal and business manager of Southern Training School. 
Without a doubt the school would be moved to another location, and 
Professor Atteberry was the man chosen to handle the heavy responsibility. 
Professor Atteberry was not only a successful businessman and educator, 
but he was also a trained nurse. At the time he was called to Graysville, 
he was operating treatment rooms in Memphis. 




Judge W. E. Wilkerson 



A. N. Atteberry, 1915-16 



FIRE! AND A NEW LOCATION FOR THE SCHOOL 



25 



After Professor Atteberry was located at Graysville, he, with several 
other conference workers, began making visits to churches, inviting con- 
tributions. Funds came in wonderfully well; soon the indebtedness was 
paid, and attention was turned to accumulating funds for purchasing That- 
cher's Switch. In five months $30,000 was raised. 

Judge W. E. Wilkerson of Chattanooga spent much time interviewing 
the owners of adjoining properties and other old citizens, securing affi- 
davits at to the boundaries of the farm and its ownership, then submitting 
these to the court, finally securing a court order established the bounda- 
ries of the property. Judge Wilkerson presented the board with a secure 
title, and his fee was only $100. He took great pride and interest in the 
college and continued to be its legal advisor and loyal friend until the time 
of his death forty years later. 



A Committee Meeting On A Pile of Railroad Ties 

In August, 1916, members of the school board representing the two 
unions, with some representatives from the General Conference — G. B. 
Thompson, W. T. Knox, W. C. White, and Frederick Griggs — met at That- 
cher's Switch to make final arrangements for purchasing the farm and to 
decide whether to move that fall or whether to wait another year. 




The Locating Committee. G. H. Curtis, W. E. Abernathy, A. N. Atteberry, Leo Thiel, 
Frederick Griggs, W. H. Branson, J. B. Locken, W. H. Heckman, C. N. Sanders, C. G. 
Wiest, J. L. Schuler, N. V. Willess, G. B. Thompson, S. E. Wight, I. H. Evans. 

All the members of this committee were sitting on a pile of railroad 
ties by the track in the shade of a large oak tree near the old mansion. 
Opinions were frankly expressed in a friendly way, but there seemed to 
be no certain conviction as to which plan would be the wiser. After con- 
siderable time had passed, Elder Thompson said, pleasantly but seriously, 
"I think we need some light from heaven." 



26 



80 YEARS OF PROGRESS 



Elder Thompson and two others offered audible prayers. When they 
had finished, someone said he felt that the best thing was to make the 
move as soon as possible and carry on school for the present under very 
"pioneer" conditions. There was almost immediate agreement, and a vote 
to move quickly followed. 

As the meeting came to a close there on the pile of railroad ties, 
each member was confident that the committee had divine guidance and 
that this was indeed to be "A School of His Planning." That committee 
had faith and vision. Did that vision replace the mansion, the tenant 
houses, the dilapidated barn with the beautiful campus we have today? 

But, first, you will want to learn the thrilling history of Thatcher's 
Switch ! 



Do you remember — 

— the H. S. Shaw, who became General Conference treasurer was a 

student at Graysville from 1894-1897? 
— that in 1899 graduation and diplomas were not looked upon with 

favor by the school faculty? 
— that in 1911 the school operated a small greenhouse and a black- 
smith and wagon shop? Three wagons made in that shop were used 

on the Collegedale campus for several years. 
— the year 1912 when board, room, and laundry were $12.25 per month? 
— that in 1913 there was a small printing plant at the school? 
— that in 1914 the dormitory was full, and Jake Conger slept at the 

end of the hall with a curtain as a partition? The charge for his 

"room" was 75 cents per month. 
— that one member of the faculty lived in a "haunted house." 
— that the school calendar said, "It is not a reform school. The incor- 

rigibles are not desired"? 
— that the calendar listed no definite vacations from August 27 to 

June 2? 

— that during the 1915-16 school term there were nine fires? 




Results of the fire from a different angle. 



CHAPTER V 



THATCHER'S SWITCH 



The delightful story of Thatcher's Switch is made of such topics 
as, The Warpath of Indians ; A Touch of the Civil War ; "Ten-I-See Lime" ; 
A Maid from Barcelona; a Mansion; and Gracious Southern Hospitality. 




Thatcher's Switch 

The Warpath of Indians 

Cries of Indians on the warpath were once familiar sounds in this now 
peaceful valley, for the Great Indian War Trail lay directly through Col- 
legedale Gap. This was the main trail that led over White Oak Mountain. 

There was a division in the war trail about three miles away at a large 
tree with an owl's nest in it. The Indians gave this spot their name for 
"Owl's Nest," calling it "Ooltewah." The town which grew up on that site 
was for many years the post office address for Southern Junior College. 

This valley was a meeting place for tribal councils and ceremonials. 
There was a legend that when the Cherokee were being driven to Okla- 
homa from the Smokies by government troops, the Indians hid something 
in the caves on the east side of the campus. When the Cherokee Indians 
were returning to the Smokies about 1925, a delegation visited the cave 
with the aid of an old map. What they found remains a mystery. Some 
believe that certain tribal records were hidden there. 



27 



28 



80 YEARS OF PROGRESS 



The Civil War 

Today tourists in auto- 
mobiles pass through the 
tunnel of Missionary Ridge 
and climb Lookout Mountain, 
and they do not know that 
here around Collegedale dur- 
ing the Civil War guerrillas 
made raids upon the farms, 
carrying away stores of food 
and robbing the people of 
their stock. Those who climb 
White Oak Ridge just back 
of the campus find trenches 
and ruins of stone fortifica- 
tions that some think were 
a part of the Confederate 
defense line. However it is 
more likely that these are 
of the same origin as the 
fortification ruins on Fort 
Mountain in North Georgia. 
No one really knows what 
they are! 

The Mansion 

"The Mansion," better 
known to the alumni of 
the college as "The Yellow 
House," was seventy years 
old when the estate was 
purchased in 1916. Mr. 
Cleveland from Chattanooga 
built the house and gave it 

to his son Major John Cleveland. Originally it was a boarded-up-and-down 
farm house built before the Civil War. At the back of the mansion were 
slave quarters. Grandfather Cleveland engaged in slave trade; hundreds 
of slaves were bought at a time and sold as chattel. 

Major Cleveland fought on the side of the North in the war while his 
brother fought with the South. The brother was wounded, and Major 
Cleveland nursed him back to health in the cave. When he had fully re- 
covered, the brothers saluted each other and returned to their respective 
sides in the war. 

Many of the alumni will remember the stump of a huge tree near the 
mansion to which, legend says, General U. S. Grant once tied his horse. 

During the Civil War the attic of the mansion was used as a hiding 
place for unusual things that were discovered when the house was rebuilt 
by the Thatchers. Among the things that were hidden there, they found 
saddles and harnesses, which the years had destroyed, and buried in ashes 
was enough petrified meat to fill two wagons. 




General U. S. Grant once tied his 
horse to this tree. 



Major Cleveland died in the mansion and is buried in Ooltewah. 



THATCHER'S SWITCH 29 

The Cave 

The cave in the Student Park on the campus runs under the lime for- 
mation several hundred yards. There are various colors of stalagmite and 
stalactite formations. There is a small lake, about twenty feet square, at 
the upper end of the cave. At the lower end of the cave there is a large 
spring thirty feet below the ground where the water comes out. In the 
summer the cool air rushes out of this opening as though a suction fan 
were connected. In the winter warm air rushes out. In the cave there is a 
"Fat Man's Misery," a "Turtle Back," a pool of water large enough for 
swimming a few strokes — and a generous amount of mud! 

"Ten-I-See Lime" 

Jim Thatcher's father had owned property around Ooltewah but had 
lost all of it except the limestone quarry and a right-of-way to it. His two 
sons took over the property and opened up the lime pits on a larger scale. 
Jim Thatcher bought his brother's share and developed a large business. 
At one time he supplied the lime for seventy-five percent of the southern 
cotton mills. Crushed rock used in constructing county roads came from 
this lime quarry. 

Mr. Thatcher developed four or five lime kilns. When the lime stone 
was being produced at full capacity, its annual output was 100,000 barrels. 
The product was known throughout the South as "Ten-I-See Lime." He 
built some small houses near the kilns where his men lived, and in his 
bachelor days he occupied one of these houses. He had a cooper house 
where barrels were made in which to ship the lime. Mr. Thatcher also had 
a commissary where the workers bought supplies; these small houses and 
the commissary were to play an important part in the first year of 
Southern Junior College. 

A Maid From Barcelona 

In the Southern Junior College annual for 1927 Mrs. Ethel M. Dart 
wrote a story in which a squire is telling the local preacher the early 
history of Thatcher's Switch. Here is a portion of the story: 

"One night, havin' nothin' in partickler to do, Jim Thatcher went over to 
set awhile with a neighbor, Mr. Cureton, who lived just across the track. 
They was a young lady visiting there, and somehow after that Jim found 
a lot of excusses for going off to Mr Cureton's. And you couldn' blame him, 
for man, she was pretty — big black eyes with long lashes, coal black hair, 
a clear olive complexion, and a way that won Jim's heart. She was a 
Spaniard from Barcelona. (Mrs. Thatcher was born in Sandusky, Ohio and 
died May 12, 1974, at the age of 99. Her father, Captain Jason Merrill, was 
from Barcelona, Spain.) Her dad had been a contractor in the old country. 
He built the Read House in Chattanooga. Jim was a plain, common sort 
o' chap and she was haughty and proud, but he never lost heart, and little 
by little she got interested too. The upshot was that they was married and 
then he bought the big house and had it remodeled. Jim tore away the 
whole front part and built it new, 'n made the back part two full stories. 
Good times they had in their big, fine house. Mrs. Thatcher was a master 
hand at entertainin' and many's the party or supper she gave to her friends. 
Jim never took much interest in her social affairs, tho, for by this time 
he'd lost clear out in the lime kiln business and gone to farmin'. And when 
a man follows the plow or swings a hoe all day he don't feel much like 
dressin' up an' lookin' purty at night. So when all her fine friends come, 
he'd just up an' go off to bed." 

"Had the Thatchers any children?" 

"Yes, two hoys and a girl. The girl was the very pictui-e of her mother. 
Her father set a heap of store by her. He had a little playhouse built for 
her and she used to play out there by the hour. 



30 



80 YEARS OF PROGRESS 



"Many a time I've seen her sittin' at the door in her little red rockin' 
chair, a wearin' a little blue sunbonnet and a singin' to her dolly. We was 
right good friends and she's always wave at me and when I passed. You'd a 
thought she'd be spoiled, bein' an only girl in the family, but she wasn't, 
not a mite." 

Mrs. Thatcher came to the mansion as a bride in 1895. The couple 
named the mansion "Welcome." For forty years after it became a part of 
Southern Junior College, it was known as "The Yellow House," and in 1952 
it was re-named "Thatcher Hall." Until it was removed in 1958 it was a 
delightful and useful landmark. The present women's residence hall is 
now known as Thatcher Hall. 

Southern Hospitality 

Twenty years before Thatcher's Switch became Collegedale the That- 
cher home was the social center of the community : Southern dinners, par- 
ties, quilting parties, taffy candy pulls ! It was also a spiritual home where 
the community prayer meetings were held. 

Each Christmas the children of the community were invited to a 
Christmas party with one stipulation — they must be clean. On Christmas 
morning the Thatcher children often remarked, "The children are taking 
their annual baths this morning." 

In 1916 Mr. Thatcher's health failed; he sold the estate, and Thatcher's 
Switch became Collegedale. The Thatchers retired in Chattanooga. 




The Doll House, the only remaining landmark of the Thatcher Plantation 



CHAPTER VI 

FROM GRAYSVILLE TO COLLEGEDALE 

Was it a prairie schooner or a mule train that left Graysville, Tenn- 
essee, that October morning in 1916? It looked like both, and yet it was 
neither! The caravan was headed southeast on a sixty-mile trek to take 
it through Chattanooga to Collegedale. 

For three weeks these men and boys had worked eighteen hours a day, 
only stopping for meals and an occasional shave. During those three gruel- 
ling weeks they had not gone to bed before ten o'clock, and just as regularly 
as three o'clock A.M. came, Charles Bozarth's alarm went off, and the boys 
got up and went to work. They worked so hard and had so little time for 
"housekeeping" that they didn't wash a dish as long as one was clean. The 
boys worked for $28.00 per month. The freight cars were loaded, and fur- 
niture, apparatus, and a few farm tools were on their way to Collegedale. 
One of the students, Marion Hurst, started out in one of the five new 
school-made wagons, carrying the poultry. He was sent ahead to assist 
Professor Leo Thiel and to unload the freight as it came. The caravan 
was ready to move, but the boys had to celebrate. Large banners were 
attached to the wagons announcing the destination. 

First in line was Professor A. N. Atteberry in a little rubber-tired 
buggy, driving his Kentucky thoroughbred. Until that morning he had 
been the principal of Southern Training School at Graysville. Now he was 
on his way to Collegedale to become the first business manager of Southern 
Junior College. 

Next in the caravan was a wagon loaded with calves and chickens, 
driven by two students, T. R. Huxtable and Charles Bozarth. Behind this 
wagon was a herd of cattle, and next came the wagon driven by Ralph 
Raymond and Raymond Carlyle. A lad named Foster kept the cattle in 
line behind the first wagon. Two calves in the wagon were to prove an 
encouragement for the cows to "trail" willingly. 




A. N. Atteberry, his Kentucky thoroughbred, and buggy with Southern Training School 
administration building in the background. 

31 



32 80 YEARS OF PROGRESS 

The group decided that to drive a herd of loose cows through a city 
like Chattanooga was out of the question, so the drivers found a wagon 
road which cut across the country and shortened the sixty-mile trek to 
thirty-five miles. However, this route involved a ferry crossing of the 
Tennessee River. 

South of Graysville at a creek bridge, one of the heifers which had 
never crossed a bridge, positively refused to follow the others across. 
Three of the boys used switches, but she was not to be persuaded. Using 
their combined strength, the three boys pushed her off into a deep pool 
of water. She swam to the other side and joined the rest of the herd, and 
from then on she willingly crossed all other bridges. 

In the afternoon there came a veritable cloud burst. The boys in the 
first wagon took refuge under it. A few minutes later they decided that 
if they were to drown, they would prefer clean water rather than that 
which drained down through the wagon. They sought other refuge in the 
downpour of rain, but found it not. 

Later in the afternoon, somewhere near the Tennessee River, they 
found a place to spend the night. It was a little log cabin, and nearby was 
a breezeway between two parts of the barn. The reluctant farmer gave, 
grudgingly, permission for them to spend the night under the breezeway, 
but added the comment that there was no food available. The hungry boys 
finally decided to milk the cows and have some milk to drink with their 
meager lunch, for they hadn't had any food since their four o'clock break- 
fast. The cows decided, however, that they had journeyed far, that they 
were in strange surroundings, and that they didn't approve of lantern 
light. 

Around and around the barnyard Charles and "Hux" chased the ani- 
mals. One of the cows completed the circle with her tail straight out like 
a hoe handle. "Hux" grabbed it, spread out his feet and braced them in the 
red, slick, slimy mountain mud. Then the cow took a short cut to the 
other side of the lot through the middle of the water pond. When she came 
out on the other side, "Hux" still held her tail, but he had concluded in 
the meantime that he didn't want milk for supper anyway. The boys de- 
voured their meager rations, leaving some peanut butter and molasses 
for the morrow. 

One of the boys rubbed his hand over his face, "Humm! I'd better 
shave !" "Me too !" was the comment from the rest of the assembly. During 
the busy crowded days of packing, such "unimportant" items as shaving 
had been neglected. Then followed the search for the razor, the hand 
mirror, and a pan of cold water. The smoky lantern did its best to assist 
in the procedure. 

After prayers, the group retired to a restless, long night in what they 
had hoped was a haymow but which proved to be wild hay brambles and 
blackberry briars. With the first rays of dawn they were on their way to- 
ward the Tennessee River — without breakfast! 

Professor Atteberry went to the home of the ferry boatman to ar- 
range for transportation across the Tennessee River. The hungry boys 
took advantage of the time and opened the jar of peanut butter and took 
generous helpings. They found it difficult to manipulate the large mouth- 
fuls, and so they opened the jug of molasses which would "wash" the pea- 
nut butter down. But the molasses was very thick that October morning 
and didn't wash down anything. In desperation, the boys ran to the Tenn- 
essee River and washed the generous helpings of peanut butter and stiff 
molasses from their mouths. 



FROM GRAYSVILLE TO COLLEGEDALE 



33 




A ferry boat similar to the one used still crosses between Dayton and Birchwood. 



When the ferry boatman arrived, he was of little help in loading the 
cattle onto the ferry, for he had imbibed freely of some "Tennessee Moun- 
tain Dew." The only protection from falling off the ferry was a narrow 
strip of board on each side. Three slow trips were made across the river. 
The frightened cows stayed on, however, and seemed as glad as the boys to 
set foot on the road again. The caravan pushed on through the almost un- 
broken forest. The teams were tired, and the boys wished for the journey's 
end. 

Professor Atteberry pulled over to the side of the road and called a 
council. 

"To get to Collegedale before Sabbath we will have to change our 
route and shorten the miles," he said. 

"That's a good idea! We can't manage these cows much longer any- 
way!" was the response. 

The very tired group and the foot-sore cows turned south to bypass 
Cleveland. 

The cows seemed to catch the spirit and traveled on the soft dirt roads 
faster than before in spite of their sore feet. 

When they reached Ooltewah, Dr. Webb gave them final directions 
for the route to Collegedale. At that time there was only an ungraded 
mountain road cut out on the steep side of White Oak Mountain where 
there now is a paved highway to the college. Ahead was Collegedale! 

On the south veranda of the mansion a large stove had been set up 
with the stove pipe extending out into the yard. Over the stove Mrs. J. H. 
Thorne, the matron, was preparing a delicious hot soup and a hearty meal. 
The caravan was driven around the house to the antiquated barn, the 
calves were unloaded, the stock put up, and the hungry boys returned to 
the mansion to enjoy the best meal they had ever eaten. 

Mattresses had been piled on the floor of the old commissary building, 
known as the "cracker box." After supper the boys went out and crawled 
onto the stack of mattresses, and there they slept their first night at Col- 
legedale. 

The Graysville school had reached its new home. 



CHAPTER VII 



LAYING A FOUNDATION 

This College was destined to be a big thing with a small beginning. Its 
history is recounted in tales of difficulties overcome and hardships endured. 
The moving of the school to an unprepared campus was a testing and trying 
experience. 

The caravan arrived Friday; the next day the first Sabbath School 
was organized with the group assembled in the dining room and parlor of 
the plantation mansion or Yellow House. The first secretary of the 
Sabbath School was Charles Bozarth. 

The First President 

Professor Leo F. Thiel came to the Southland in 1915 to be an educa- 
tional secretary. The following year he became the first president of 
Southern Junior College 
and proved through the 
years to be a strong execu- 
tive. He was a student of 
organization and adminis- 
tration. He was a graduate 
of Union College and had 
done his graduate work at 
the University of Nebraska. 

Registration 

The calendar was turned 
to October 18, 1916; the 
clock was at the hour of 
8:00 and everyone was in 
a hurry, for it was already 
a month later than the 
usual time for beginning 
the school term. It was 
raining, but there was a 
spirit of optimism and en- 
thusiasm. Registration was Leo F. Thiel, 1916-18, 1922-25 




34 



LAYING A FOUNDATION 



35 



over at 10:00 o'clock; then overalls and aprons were put on. During that 
damp day the students over the campus were heard singing, "It isn't 
raining rain to me; it's raining violets down." 



Those who registered the first year were : 

Naomi Anderson 

Grace Appel 

Roy Bowen 

Charles Bozarth 

Barnes Broiles 

John Brooke 

Edward Bumby 

Richard Bumby 

Raymond Carlisle 

Floren Carr 

A. B. Chinnis 

Arthur Coble 

Lottie Coble 

Zader Coble 

Jake Conger 

Charles Cramer 

Alphonso Currier 

Addie Curtis 

Glenn Curtis 

Ella Mae Curtis 

P. C. Ennis 

Clarence Field 

John Gardiner 

Sylvia Gardiner 

Alsie Gray 

Jeanetta Mae Hardin 

Lettie Harrold 

George E. Hermetet 

Van Buren Highsmith 

Carl Holland 

Violet Howard 

Thomas Huxtable 

Ruth Johnson 

Addie Mae Kalar 

Fred Seth Kalar 

Grace Kelsey 

Margaret Locken 

Mayme Marshall 

James McGee 

Sarah Ott 

Edward Parker 

J. Reba Perkins 

Earl Rogers 

Sadie Rogers 

(First student to register — 

matriculate was the word then.) 

Isaac Shreve 

Lillie Swafford 

Duffie Swafford 

Claude Terry 

James H. Thorne 

Norman Waters 

Gwendolyn Widger 

Masie White 

Orelia Wooldridge 

Grace Warren 



Tennessee 

Iowa 

Georgia 

Tennessee 

Alabama 

Georgia 

Florida 

Florida 

Tennessee 

Tennessee 

Kentucky 

Kentucky 

Kentucky 

Georgia 

Tennessee 

Florida 

Georgia 

Georgia 

Tennessee 

Tennessee 

Alabama 

Alabama 

Tennessee 

Tennessee 

Florida 

Ohio 

Tennessee 

N. Carolina 

Arkansas 

Georgia 

Mississippi 

Mississippi 

Michigan 

Tennessee 

Tennessee 

Tennessee 

Tennessee 

Georgia 

Louisiana 

Alabama 

Alabama 



Illinois 

Alabama 

Alabama 

Mississippi 

N. Carolina 

Tennessee 

Kentucky 

Tennessee 

Tennessee 



36 



80 YEARS OF PROGRESS 



W'JI 

■' * i 



'V 



Ml & 



I. 







Students and Faculty, 1916-17 

A busy day of unselfish service ended, and the students assembled in 
the Yellow House for evening worship, conducted by President Thiel. He 
used as his text, Isa. 41:7, 10: "So the carpenter encouraged the gold- 
smith, and he that smoothed with the hammer, him that smote the anvil 
. . . Fear thou not ; for I am with thee, be not dismayed ; for I am thy God ; 
I will strengthen thee ; yea, I will help thee ; yea, I will uphold thee with 
the right hand of my righteousness." 

The First Chapel 

At 8 o'clock Thursday evening the students and faculty gathered in 
the dining room and parlor of the Yellow House for the first chapel exer- 
cise of Southern Junior College. The opening song was sung: 

There is sunlight on the hilltop 
There is sunlight on the sea; 
And the golden beams are sleeping 
On the soft and verdant lea; 
But a richer light is filling 
All the chambers of my heart; 
For Thou dwellest there, my Savior 
And 'tis sunlight where Thou art. 

The prayer was offered by the educational secretary of the Southern 
Union Conference, Lynn H. Wood, who was a guest that night. The Scrip- 
ture reading was Nehemiah 4:6, "So built we the wall, and all the wall was 
joined together unto the half thereof: for the people had a mind to work." 

After short talks by President Thiel and the Bible teacher, Prof. F. W. 
Field, Elder Wood gave the first chapel talk. His remarks were based on 
the scripture reading from Nehemiah. All of the teachers and many of 
the students expressed their desire for spiritual growth and a successful 
school year. Some of the testimonials of that first chapel at Southern 
Junior College are given in the Field Tidings for October 25, 1916. 

Until the commissary was ready to be used as a chapel and class room, 
announcements usually given in chapel were made in the dining room at 



LAYING A FOUNDATION 



37 



meal time. President Thiel, on one occasion, stepped to the dining room 
door and said: 

A meeting will be held in the pea patch immediately following the noon 
meal. It is my desire that all will attend this meeting with pails, baskets, 
and a willingness to work. 




<3 



i 



.,i •.»,,,[ 




The Pea Pickers 



Friday Evening Vespers 

School had been in session four weeks when the commissary was in 
readiness for Friday evening vespers. Elder Field, with a corps of boys, 
spent Friday, November 10, scrubbing the floors, brushing down cobwebs, 
and fixing seats for the first vespers to be held in that building. 

Professor J. S. Marshall had two gasoline lamps ready to give light 
to the room. At 4 :30 the song service began ; there was a season of prayer, 
and Elder Field gave a short study on "The Relation We Should Sustain 
with Our Master While We Are in School." The students expressed the 
desires of their hearts for a close walk with the Master. Several earnest 
prayers closed the meeting. 

Work To Be Done 

Busy days followed; for some, they were days of homesickness. Rare 
indeed was the person who could leave, without heartaches, all the loved 
associations and hallowed memories of home. 

On the farm, in the garden, and in the building program these coura- 
geous students earned their right to an education. In addition to the 
preparation for daily class work, these young folk earned $11,000 of work 
credit that first year to be applied on tuition and living expenses. There 
were no industries, to be sure, but here are some of the work assignments 
that earned that credit: 

Housing had to be provided for teachers and students and for class- 
work. There was much repair work to be done; new roofs and doors to be 
put on ; shanties that had been used as stables had to be cleaned for faculty 
homes ; every shack needed repairs in readiness for the winter which was 
crowding the October calendar. 



38 



80 YEARS OF PROGRESS 




The Commissary 

The old Commissary took on the dignified name of "College Hall"; the 
Yellow House or Mansion was called "The Dormitory" ; Professor Marshall's 
humble cottage became "Pine View," and the president's dwelling was 
"Loneoak." Three tent houses in a row were called "Colporteur Avenue," 
and a cottage where four boys lived boasted of the name "We-like-it." 

A Generous Gift 

In 1916, soon after school work had started, the Southern Union Con- 
ference President, S. E. Wight, sent word to the business manager, Profes- 
sor Atteberry, that a self-supporting school, "Hillcrest," a few miles out of 
Nashville, had decided to close and had turned the property and all its pos- 
sessions over to the conference. The letter informed Professor Atteberry 
that Southern Junior College might have three horses, two mules, ten head 
of Jersey cattle, and three cars of machinery. 

With two students, Charles Bozarth and Raymond Carlyle, Professor 
Atteberry went to the school and loaded the generous and unexpected gifts 
into freight cars and shipped them to Collegedale. Many who were residents 
at that time will remember the faithful work of "Ned" and "Fly," the 
mules on the college farm. The increase in the supply of milk which the 
cows added was a great blessing at that time. 

An Attempted Grand Jury Indictment 

Since Sabbath keeping was new to the people in the community of the 
new college, they resented the work that was done on Sunday. But with the 
student body increasing and additional quarters needing to be improvised, 
six full days of work each week were a necessity in the program of the 
school. Early in the spring of 1917 the neighbors attempted to secure a 
grand jury indictment against Professor Thiel and Professor Atteberry for 
Sunday "desecration." 

Professor Atteberry, a registered nurse, had given a neighbor, a Mr. 
Mullins, help with a bad carbuncle. Doctors were the last resort of these 
people, and several neighbors had come to the friendly nurse for help. As a 



LAYING A FOUNDATION 39 

result of this kindness and successful outcome of the treatment, Mr. Mullins 
came to Professor Atteberry and told him of the effort being made to se- 
cure an indictment for breaking the Sunday law of Tennessee. 

"I'm crossing the county line every day the grand jury is in session," 
said Mr. Mullins. "They can't call me in to testify against you folks." 

Because the man urging the indictment was unable to convince the 
jury that these two men at the head of the new college should be prose- 
cuted, the case was dropped. 

When plans were being made to build the new dormitory and to have 
it ready for the fall term, there was no question but that they would be 
building on Sunday and that it would be noisy for the neighbors. 

Professor Atteberry invited the unfriendly neighbor in for a visit and 
explained to him the necessity of getting the building done by the fall 
term. Then he said, "You are a leader in this community and know quite 
well, no doubt, what would be the attitude of the neighbors if we did build- 
ing on Sunday in order to be ready for the next school year." 

The gentleman who had urged the former grand jury indictment was 
well pleased to be recognized as a leader in the community. His broad smile 
showed his pleasure as he replied, "I do not think they will care too much 
if you go ahead with the building; they would have cared some time ago, 
but now they are a bit acquainted and will not feel offended." 

This was the end of any agitation regarding Sunday work at College- 
dale. 

First Week of Prayer 

The first record found of a week of prayer was the second semester. 
Members of the faculty conducted the first four meetings, and Elder W. H. 
Branson came for the remaining three days. "Consecration," "Victory in 
the Daily Life," and "Prayer" were the titles of his sermons. 

At the close of the sermon Sabbath morning, Elder Branson asked: 
"Who would wish to become charter members of the Collegedale Church ?" 

Fifty students and faculty members asked to be charter members of 
the church, which now carries on its membership list approximately 2800 
names. 

The First Officers of the Collegedale Church 

Elders: Leo Thiel, F. W. Field 

Deacons: A. N. Atteberry, J. P. McGee 

Deaconesses: Mrs. F. W. Field, Mrs. A. N. Atteberry 

Clerk: F. L. Adams 

Treasurer: J. H. Thorne 

Missionary Secretary: Mrs. J. P. McGee 

Music Director: F. L. Adams 

S. S. Superintendent: Mrs. M. B. Marshall 

Asst. Supt.: Sadie Rogers 

Secretary: Ruth Hale 

Asst. Sec: Orelia Wooldridge 

M. V. Leader: Claude Terry 

Asst. Leader: Alonzo Currier 

Secretary: Ralph Raymond 

Asst. Sec: Edward Parker 

Chairman of Executive Committee: J. S. Marshall 



40 



80 YEARS OF PROGRESS 



There was a large crop of corn on the estate when it was purchased, 
and it had to be harvested; fuel for 58 stoves was yet to be cut and brought 
from the woods. The girls also had the job of removing the soot from the 
lamp chimneys and refilling the lamps. 

In the spring there were seven teams of horses at work on the farm, 
breaking land and planting crops. 

The girls worked in the garden, later picked fruit, gathered vegetables, 
and canned them. When the first year had ended, there were 9,600 quarts 
of fruit and vegetables for the winter supply. 

The absence of the comforts and seeming necessities doubtlessly help- 
ed the students appreciate the limited blessings. Doing-without was one of 
those character builders! Those were pioneer days! They have much to 
teach us by the manner in which all inconveniences and discomforts were 
met and smiled away. Deeply implanted in the heart of each one was a 
spirit of love and loyalty that could not be uprooted by hardships. There 
was a contentment which rested upon honest convictions and lofty purpose. 

First Building To Be Erected 

The first permanent building to be erected after the opening of school 
was the store. This was used as the store, post office, and the office of the 
business manager at various times. Later this building was turned and 
remodeled into the brown duplex. The back yard of the building was just 
across Industrial Road from McKee Bakery, Plant No. 1. 

Although there were unsuitable living conditions, students continued 
to ask for admission. As the weeks passed, the boys wrecked some of the 
old cottages and built a boys' dormitory farther up the hill. It was hardly 
worthy of the name, but it provided temporary habitation for the increas- 
ing enrollment. It was a necessary makeshift and an ingenious substitute. 
One wood stove furnished the only heating plant in this crude domicile. 




The First Permanent Building 



LAYING A FOUNDATION 41 

Do you remember — 

— the loose boards on the front porch of the new dormitory that in- 
sisted on flying up when stepped on? 

— the project in gardening when the students rented from the school 
a portion of ground? The school purchased such articles of produce 
as they could use. The gardens were from one fourth to one acre. 

— the delicious fudge the fellows in the tent houses made and sent to 
the women's dormitory, without disclosing that their only cooking 
dish was a wash basin? 

— the carload of wheat donated to the college in 1917 by A. D. Haw- 
kins of Loveland, Colorado ? 

— when you went on the train from Thatcher's Switch at 1:00 a.m. to 
Chattanooga for shopping and returned at 6:00 p.m.? 

— when the girls worked the night shift at the print shop ? 

— the cold winter night when Masie White Jameson slipped in the snow 
and a boy helped her up and walked her to the print shop ? 

— that for this misdemeanor Miss White was campus bound? (How 
times have changed!) 

— that no faculty member owned a car? 

— the New Year's Eve at Southern Junior College when six girls 
celebrated the coming of the new year quietly in one of the girls' 
rooms ? They got out of bed quietly, ate their snack, and as quietly 
went back to bed. Some time later the faculty heard of the celebra- 
tion, and the girls were suspended from school! 

— the fire drills, girls screaming and running downstairs, the boys 
running toward the dormitory at full speed with the hose cart? 
(How welcome the interruption!) 

— the clean-up days when the students and faculty divided into bands? 

— that Cora Pox Woolsey was the first student who worked her entire 
way (tuition, clothes, food, and room) ? 

— that first Thanksgiving dinner was served on the American plan, 
everyone seated at a long table? There was mock turkey and cran- 
berry sauce. 

— that after dinner there were games — three deep, dare base, and drop 
the handkerchief? 

— that after chores were done all came to the commissary chapel for 
an old fashioned "spell-down"? Addie Mae Kalar proved to be the 
best speller. 

— that the celebration ended with a musical program given by Professor 
Adams and his students ? 



CHAPTER VIII 

TWO MORE FEET OF PIPE BEFORE THANKSGIVING 

In the pitifully crude room called a chapel in the cold commissary the 
students enthusiastically planned to raise funds for the prospective dormi- 
tory. This group of students knew poverty and yet they pledged, with an 
altruistic abandon, their time and means to the accomplishment of a glo- 
rious purpose — the laying of the foundation stones of Southern Missionary 
College. One by one they stood and promised their support. 

Having no endowment and no funds to draw from on the conference 
books, the college was wholly dependent upon volunteer gifts, and its future 
development depended upon the liberality of its friends. In Field Tidings, 
July 12, 1916, the College Board of Trustees stated: "There is no debt to 
be incurred as the buildings will be put up no faster than the money is in 
hand with which to do it." 

During the summer of 1917 the campaign for funds continued. Elder 
Branson and Elder Wood went to Colorado to ask for help with the dormi- 
tory. People contributed liberally there. Elder S. E. Wight went to New 
England and to Indiana and received personal gifts of $3,000, $1,000, $6,000, 
and $50 for his trip. Over thirty thousand dollars was raised with which 
to put up the dormitory. 

Dr. Lynn H. Wood designed and superintended the construction of 
all three of the original main buildings on the hill. G. H. Gorich and 
H. A. Shreve worked with the students in building the women's dormitory, 
and Mr. Shreve continued the same work with the men's dormitory. 

The women did much of the lathing and measured lumber. The 
opening of school that fall was delayed until October because of the 
strenuous work in putting up the building by student labor. 

When the second year of Southern Junior College opened that fall, the 
women had moved into the two upper stories of the unfinished building. 




Maude Jones Hall, The Women's Dormitory, Under Construction, 1917 



42 



TWO MORE FEET OF PIPE BEFORE THANKSGIVING 



4 3 



The windows and door casings were not hung; the walls were not plas- 
tered. Sheets were hung up to substitute for windows. There were no 
floors, except the broad planks of sub-flooring with their wide cracks; no 
doors, except an occasional blanket suspended in midair; no heat, save the 
flickering flare of a kerosene lamp ; no water, other than that contained in 
barrels from which the cows all too often had the first drink, but there 
was an uncomplaining manner in which all inconveniences and discomforts 
were met and smiled away, for deeply implanted in the heart of each stu- 
dent was a spirit of love and loyalty that could not be uprooted by hard- 
ships. There were no stairways except rough, splintered, temporary 
ones left by the builders. The stair railings were rough planks. Nor were 
there bathroom fixtures or plumbing, no electric light fixtures, no parlor 
furniture, but the rooms were filled with youthful happy sounds. 

Cold Water and Smoky Stoves 

The women carried large pitchers of cold water from the barrels to 
their rooms where wash basins were used for baths. It was a bitterly cold 
winter. There was one stove in the dining room in the basement, and new 
smoky oil stoves in the halls. It was necessary to carry the oil stoves to 
the worship room, to church, and to the parlor. 

It was hoped that by Thanksgiving the pipes might be connected for 
the heating system. Three days before Thanksgiving all that was needed 
was a two-foot piece of pipe connection. In 1917 the college had not estab- 
lished credit, and the company that was doing the work of connecting the 
steam heat to the dormitory refused to connect the two-foot piece of pipe 
until there was assurance of $2,000 toward its account. Two long distance 
calls were placed, one to the Southern Union Conference at Nashville, and 
the other to the Southeastern Union Conference at Atlanta. Each union 
conference gave assurance of $1,000 toward the amount, and the pipes 
were connected just before Thanksgiving day. 

When the women moved into the new dormitory, the young men 
moved into the vacated second floor of the Yellow House. Starting in the 
fall of 1917, Mrs. J. A. Tucker was the first dean of the women's dormitory. 




The students and faculty, 1917-18 with the new dormitory in the background. 



11 



80 YEARS OF PROGRESS 











f 


ESS 




Lf %*§7 .. $^P| 



These faculty ladies lived in Maude Jones Hall, 1917-18: Josephine Wilson Tucker, 
Addie Mae Kalar, Ruby Lea Carr, Myrtle V. Maxwell, Gradye Brooke Summerour, 
and Maude I. Jones. 

The students were happy because they had caught the vision and had 
set their hands to accomplish a great work. Their dream of a dormitory 
had materialized, although there still remained the inconvenience of no 
light or water system for two or three years ; no walks, for almost a decade. 
How much they could do without and still keep that beautiful spirit of 
contentment! That day in 1917 was indeed a day of real Thanksgiving! 

There were to be many memories of Thanksgiving days in the social 
life of the early students at Southern Junior College, for Old Grindstone 
mountain and Thanksgiving day are synonymous to hundreds of students 
from bygone years. 

Two miles from the Southern Missionary College campus, Old Grind- 
stone rears its wooded head, covered with a light mist. Tradition tells us 
that a pre-Civil War grindstone maker once made exceptionally fine grind- 
stone from the sandstone of this mountain. There still remains the ruins of 
his house, smokestack, and barn that tell the tale of his habitation. The 
mountain which once echoed with the rhythmic beat of the old man's ham- 
mer now lies silent, mourning its lost companion. 

For several years, the students and faculty of the college made an 
annual hike to Old Grindstone on Thanksgiving day. The morning was 
usually spent in Thanksgiving testimonies in the chapel with the students 
and faculty consecrating their lives anew for the coming year. Then came 
the two-mile hike to Old Grindstone. On the first hike to the mountain, 
President Thiel's instructions for the hike were "No intense specialization, 
and change partners every time the whistle blows." 

While the food committee built fires and put the finishing touches 
on the Thanksgiving dinner, the students often had a game of hide and 
seek around the cliffs, boulders, and the old ruins of the grindstone maker's 
home. That section of the mountain was called Rock City because of the 
projecting rocks. 



TWO MORE FEET OF PIPE BEFORE THANKSGIVING 



45 



On President Wood's first Thanksgiving hike to Old Grindstone, he 
proved to be much at home with the frying pan — not a potato was scorched. 
Baked beans, cranberry sauce, sandwiches, celery, fruit, pumpkin pie, and 
cake - and Thanksgiving dinner was ready to be served on Old Grindstone 
Mountain. 

Maude I. Jones, Professor Emeritus 

Miss Maude I. Jones came to Southern Missionary College in 1917 from 
Washington Missionary College. When she retired, she held the record for 
the number of years spent in service on the faculty. Her personal interest 
in each student, her words of encouragement and sympathy, and the exam- 
ple of her consistent Christian life made her the friend and counselor to 
countless young men and women who passed through the portals of the 
college. 

She was particularly concerned about the language of each student — 
"Now, George, say it over" she would say; she was a favorite chaperone; 
she was one to whom the students could open their hearts and tell their 
problems. 

Dr. H. J. Klooster referred to Miss Jones' chapel talks as "events 
of the year." Invariably they were carefully prepared addresses, given a 
characteristic literary polish, and presented without reference to notes or 
manuscript. She probably saw and knew more generations of students than 
any other teacher, and in her quiet but effective way has left a never-to-be 
forgotten impress upon stu- 
dent life. 

Miss Jones never lost 
her first love for the Ad- 
vent message. As years 
came and went, from 
youth through age, she 
enthusiastically upheld its 
principles, and Bible study 
became her absorbing in- 
terest. After retirement 
and until 1950, she taught 
Biblical literature in the 
college. 

In her declining years, 
President Wright coined 
the phrase, "Collegedale's 
Sweetheart," and as long 
as she was able to attend, 
she was always the guest 
of honor at the men's an- 
nual reception for the 
ladies. How she did enjoy 
her special escort and 
orchid each year. 

Miss Jones died on 
Christmas day, 1961, at the 
age of 89. She sleeps in 
Memorial Park overlooking 
her beloved Collegedale. Miss Maude Jones 




46 



80 YEARS OF PROGRESS 




Breaking the ground for Miss Jones' Cottage are Elder Frank Ashlock and Miss Jones. 




Miss Jones' Cottage which was mainly financed by alumni gifts. 



CHAPTER IX 

THE MAGIC WORDS, "MAY I HELP?" 

One rainy day in 1917 there stepped from the train at Ooltewah a 
traveling man inquiring for Southern Junior College. Later, as he was 
being taken to the college, he explained to Mr. Atteberry, the business 
manager, that his name was J. H. Talge and that he was a business man 
from Indianapolis. He had stopped on this trip to see what this new school 
in the hills was like. 

Mr. Talge was the founder of the Talge Mahogany Company in Indian- 
apolis. Through Elder S. E. Wight, the president of the Southern Union, 
Mr. Talge became interested in the school at Collegedale and was making 
his first visit. 




John H. Talge 

President Thiel and Mr. Atteberry showed him over the estate. He 
liked the scenery and the advantages of the location of the school. He 
looked over the women's dormitory, which was nearing completion. Before 
getting into the "hack" to return to the train station, he asked, "Has the 
furniture been purchased for the building? If not, what plans do you have 
for providing it?" 

47 



48 



80 YEARS OF PROGRESS 




Old Talge Hall 




When the dormitory men moved into new Talge Hall, old Talge Hall, built in 1918-19, 
was razed to make room for the McKee Library. 

"We have no furniture," President Thiel admitted, "nor any plans, 
except the faith that God, who has helped us to proceed this far, will pro- 
vide also for this pressing need." 

Quietly, Mr. Talge replied, "Well, perhaps I can help you a little in 
getting some furniture. What is required?" 

The need could be stated very simply: To furnish fifty students 
rooms — a dresser, bed, table, and chair for each woman. 

"I will see that you have this furniture by the time you need it," came 
the quick response. 



THE MAGIC WORDS, "MAY I HELP?' 



49 




Talge Hall was completed in 1961 to house 275 students. In 1964 a new wing was 
added to house an additional 125 students, making a total of 400. The women were 
first to occupy the building and lived there until Thatcher Hall was ready for occupancy, 
then it became the men's dormitory. 

When the young men moved into the new Talge Hall, a plaque was 
fastened to the new building, giving honor to Mr. Talge in the following 
manner : 

TALGE HALL 

Named for 
JOHN H. TALGE 

Whose Generosity 

Spurred the Early Growth 

Of the College 



Through this gentleman who knew the three magic words, "May I 
help?" God had provided for the great need that had so perplexed the ad- 
ministrators of the school. 

A car load of furniture containing everything needed for fifty rooms 
arrived the day before college opened that fall. In 1918 Mr. Talge sent a 
car load of flooring for the women's home. When the women moved into 
the dormitory, the bathrooms were without fixtures. These were another 
gift from this generous benefactor and friend of the college. 

Again, when the men's dormitory was built, Mr. Talge sent complete 
furnishings for it. He also supplied $1,300 for laundry equipment in 1918 



50 80 YEARS OF PROGRESS 

when the need was great. Later, he helped purchase a piece of land, and, 
at another time, supplied part of the kitchen equipment. 

To provide work for women at Southern Junior College, he gave money 
to start the basket industry, helping to erect the building which later was 
a part of the broom factory. Mr. Talge contributed several thousand 
dollars to help build the barn ; he sent shoes and clothing and helped several 
students with expenses through school. All of these gifts were given in 
the days when the school was struggling to survive. During the years Mr. 
Talge and his wife became members of the Seventh-day Adventist Church. 

At the Founder's Day program of October 12, 1951, the men's home 
was named John H. Talge Hall. The 1928 yearbook was dedicated to 

Mr. Talge whose interest in the growth and development of Southern 
Junior College prompted him to support loyally the founders and burden- 
bearers of this institution in those crises where the challenge brought 
from him such abundant and outstanding liberality that the future success 
of the college must always be due in no small measure to his generous 
gifts. 

Mr. Talge died March 12, 1952. 

In 1969, Mr. Talge's daughter, Mrs. Helen Talge Brown, presented 
her father's desk, bookcase, and Bible to SMC to be housed in the new 
McKee Library. 



CHAPTER X 

THE YEAR OF DO WITHOUT 
The Yellow House 




The little boy seated on the veranda of his home is Mr. Jason Thatcher. This "Yellow 
House" was a social center in its early days. It was purchased from the J. D. Thatcher 
family in 1916. 

In the Thatcher mansion there were twelve rooms. The second floor 
was the women's dormitory for the first year. The heating system consisted 
of little stoves in which green wood was burned. One room had no stove, 
and the girls huddled around a large lamp to find a bit of warmth. That 
winter the women carried wood and water to their rooms, built their own 
fires, and used kerosene lamps. At that time there were no bathrooms in 
the dormitory. Water was brought to the Yellow House in barrels. When 
water at the spring was muddy, the boys carried water from the caves. 

The main floor of the house served as the kitchen, dining room, and 
parlor for the entire school. For a time it was also the class room. Fortun- 
ately, the enrollment was small that first year, so the Yellow House served 
four purposes well. 

Faculty Homes 

On the hill above the quarry stood nine dilapidated cabins, which had 
once housed the lime workers' families. Some of the cabins had four or 
five rooms, but these cabins had been abandoned for some time. They 
were minus doors and windows ; horses and cattle had wandered through 
them at will, and, when storms came, had made them their habitation. But 
every semblance of a house was pressed into service by the incoming college 
family. 

Although the quarters for the faculty were to serve only until building 
could be done, the cabins were wholly inadequate. Some teachers lived in 

51 



52 



80 YEARS OF PROGRESS 




Prof. Leo Thiel, the first president of SJC, lived in this house from 1916-18. 

stables. President Thiel and other faculty families cleaned out the shacks, 
filled the openings, mended roofs, moved in, and thanked God for their 
homes. The president's mansion was a small, three-room hut with cracks in 
the walls large enough to give a view of the surrounding scenery. The roof 
was so full of holes that when it rained, every tub and pan had to be drafted 
into service to catch the water that leaked through. The president's first 
office was a chicken coop above the quarry. 

Leo Thiel, the president of Southern Junior College for the first two 
years, wore a happy smile and never seemed the least discouraged. In the 
midst of difficulties of establishing a school with a physical plant composed 
only of houses in various stages of decay or falling down, President Thiel 
facetiously remarked, "We who called ourselves a college, were in reality 
only an academy, and barely escaped being a kindergarten." He saw a 
bright future for the school and endeavored to pattern it after the schools 
of the prophets that it might serve as a refuge for the youth of the South- 
land. 

One of the shacks above the quarry became the abode of Professor 
Marshall, dean of men; another the dwelling place for Professor Adams, 
the music teacher; and one a home for Mr. C. E. Ledford, the farm mana- 
ger. Ventilation in these shacks was as bountiful through the floor as 
through the wall cracks and holes about the windows. 

The largest of the abandoned houses became the home of the college 
press. It burned down in 1936. 

Professor and Mrs. A. N. Atteberry lived in a tenthouse, pitched in 
the field just west of the Yellow House. A few rods from them were two 
tents occupied by Pastor Field, the Bible teacher, and his family. One tent 
served as their living room, the other as bedroom. At times that winter 
the mercury dropped too low for comfortable tent life. They lived there 
until Christmas, while some needed repairs were being done on the little 
tenant house later to be known as "the house by the side of the road." This 
house was formerly used as a barn. It was located on the present site of 
the McKee Bakery, Plant No. 1. 



THE YEAR OF DO WITHOUT 



53 




The Home of F. W. Field— Bible Teacher 



The House by the Side of the Road 

(Could you call it anything but love of the work that would make a teacher 
give up a comfortable urban home and live here for three years while the 
work was starting?) 

There are hermit souls that live withdrawn 

In the place of their self-content; 
There are souls like stars, that dwell apart, 

In a fellowless firmament; 
There are pioneer souls that blaze their paths 

Where the highways never ran — 
But let me live by the side of the road 

And be a friend to man. 

Let me live in a house by the side of the road 

Where the race of men go by — 
The men who are good and the men who are bad, 

As good and as bad as I. 
I would not sit in the scorner's seat 

Or hurl the cynic's ban — 
Let me live in a house by the side of the road 

And be a friend to man. 



I see from my house by the side of the road, 

By the side of the highway of life, 
The men who press with the ardor of hope, 

The men who are faint with strife, 
But I turn not away from their smiles nor their tears, 

Both parts of an infinite plan — 
Let me live in a house by the side of the road 

And be a friend to man. 

— Sam Walter Foss. 



54 80 YEARS OF PROGRESS 







Tent Houses 

The small house across the railroad, known at the Tenant House, took 
in the family of the printer, Mr. J. P. McGee, and also a number of students. 
This house burned down in 1959. 

The faculty lived in these humble dwellings, but there was never a 
word of complaint from the lips of anyone. 

Men's Dormitory 

Professor Marshall was the dormitory dean, but there was no dormi- 
tory. Most of the men lived in buildings that were ready to collapse with 
age and decay; many lived in a street of tent houses, hurriedly pitched, 
half frame and half canvas, each tent housing four students. When it 
rained, umbrellas were opened over the beds in order that the course of 
rain might be sent in another direction. The men were awakened each 
morning by a bugle call to attend worship in the old commissary. 

The attic of the old commissary housed eight men: T. R. Huxtable, 
Raymond Carlyle, Charles Bozarth, Ralph Raymond, Charles Cramer, Mc- 
Duffy Swafford, Glenn Curtis, and George Hermitet. Beds were placed 
under the eaves since the space under the ridgepole was needed for other 
purposes. The fellows gave this attic space the dignified name of "dormi- 
tory." They were never too tired at the end of the day to stop at the spring 
and gather horse-chestnuts (buckeyes) for ammunition for a buckeye bat- 
tle after lights were out. The pillow fights in that attic-dormitory some- 
times left the floor white with feathers. The daily program for the eight 
students began at 3:00 a.m., for there was stock to feed, there were cows 
to milk, and there was a tremendous corn crop yet to be harvested. All the 
men students used the creeks for their Friday afternoon baths. 

Class Rooms 

Partitions were put in the commissary for classrooms. Here in an old 
rickety shack the students were to receive their first training at Southern 
Junior College. Here also was the chapel. One of the doors to the chapel 



THE YEAR OF DO WITHOUT 



55 



was several inches above the floor at one corner, allowing plenty of ventila- 
tion. The space was large enough to admit the pet Persian cat, which regu- 
larly attended chapel, to go to the platform and sleep in Pastor Field's 
lap. On the first floor of the commissary was President Thiel's office, with 
the few library books stacked in for good measure. 







These students came from the Graysville School 
From left to right they are: Addie Mae Curtis, Charles Bozarth, Orelia Woolridge 
Perkins, Jacob R. Conger, Zoa Shreve Gardiner, John Brooks, Ralph Raymond, Prof. 
J. S. Marshall, Ruth Hale, Virle Neale. Front row : Glenn Curtis, Sadie Rogers Walleker. 




Academy Junior Class, 1916-17 
Front row: Lettie Harrold, Orelia Woolridge Perkins, Alsie Gray, Masie White Jameson, 
Zoa Shreve Gardiner, Naomi Anderson. Back row: Clarence Field, Glenn Curtis, 
Charles Bozarth. 



56 



80 YEARS OF PROGRESS 




Men's prayer band leaders 
From left to right: Tom Weed, Allen Wolf, Glenn Curtis, Golden Rambo, J. Reba 
Perkins, Jacob R. Conger, Clarence Giles, Reginald Ross, Paul Stuyvesant, Carl 
Holland, Warren Franklin, Norman Waters. 



Business Office 

Space was at a premium, where would Professor Atteberry hang the 
shingle for his business office ? At the rear of the Yellow House there was 
a weatherworn smoke house, an inexpensive structure of one room. The 
outside was of weatherboard and the floor of rough, unfinished boards. 
With roofing paper serving as covering for the ceiling, walls, and floor, the 
smoke house became the first business office of Southern Junior College. 
A student, Charles Bozarth, was the assistant secretary and bookkeeper. 

In the tent-houses, buildings, and houses, there were fifty-eight small 
sheet-iron heaters. The fuel for these stoves came from near the top of 
the mountain to the west of the campus. The trees were cut and trimmed 
by students and hauled by a sorrel mule, Beck, to a slide. She was a re- 
markable mule, for she controlled the descent of the logs down the slide to 
a spot on the campus where the grounds department is now located. After 
being hitched to a log, she needed no guide, but found her way to the slide 
and either pulled or retarded the log on its journey, as required. The 
fellows said that the only thing Beck would not do was to go back after 
another log without being led back by them. A buzz saw cut the logs into 
stove length. Sometimes the weather outlasted the fuel; then the students 
would double up in the cabins or go out for more wood. 

Water 

The urgent need of the first year was a reservoir with a pumping 
system. From the spring the fellows dipped water, poured it into barrels, 
and a mule plus a student struggled to transport it to the Yellow House. All 
the water, amounting to forty-five barrels each day, had to be carried from 
the spring. 



THE YEAR OF DO WITHOUT 57 

Laundering was done by hand in tubs in tents or at the spring. 

Just below the place where the pump house now stands, was a spring 
house that served as a substitute for a refrigeration plant. There the butter 
and milk supplies were cared for by Masie White Jameson. 

It was a happy day when a small pitcher-pump was installed at the 
pump house with a pipe running up to the Yellow House. Barrels were then 
filled by a "water boy." 




The Laundry 
This was the first building erected to house the laundry. The two laundry workers 
were Carl Aiken and John Speyer. 



58 



80 YEARS OF PROGRESS 




Janitors of the Commissary 
Clarence Field and Sadie Rogers Walleker 

Although conditions were primitive, inconvenient, and often uncom- 
fortable, one never heard a murmur nor a complaint. Each teacher helped 
with the manual tasks as well as with the more professional duties. Both 
the students and teachers felt it a privilege to mold into shape a training 
school for the youth of the South. Those early years had their advantages, 
too, affording training in adaptability, in patience, and in learning to do 
without ! 

God-fearing workers and students were willing to sacrifice, to live in 
tumbledown shacks, old cow stables, and cold tent houses, laboring under 
difficulties to build this School of His Planning. 



Do you remember — 

— "The Hack" that met trains in Ooltewah ? 

— the drivers of "The Hack," Glenn Curtis and Norman Waters ? 

— the time the wagon went to Ooltewah and came back so full of trunks 
that one of the students, Jake Conger, had to stand at the back 
and hold on? The wagon hit a rock, threw Jake off, and he arrived 
at his destination with many bruises and a great deal of clay? 

— that day the Board met and stood around the little stove ? When one 
side was warm, it was right-about-face while the cold side was 
warmed. 

— picking violets in the snow by the Yellow House ? 

— the stone-ground corn bread mixed with salt and water ? 

— when the College depended on the never-failing spring that furnished 
a gallon of water a second ? 



THE YEAR OF DO WITHOUT 



59 




Maude Jones Hall (women's residence hall) was first occupied in 1917-18. It was 
later enlarged and the top floors are still in use as an overflow dormitory for coeds. 



* 




Thatcher Hall was completed in 1969 with room for 510 women. This three-story 
building is carpeted and air conditioned throughout, with a bath between each two 
student rooms. 



Do you remember- 



— those devotional talks that made students seeking higher ground 
want to live better and to live eternally? 

—that you were taught to deal unafraid with the difference between 
what is and what ought to be? 

— the dress standards in the bulletin in 1925-26 that said, "French 
heels, extreme styles of hair dress, thin hosiery, narrow skirts and 
sleeves not covering the elbows — not accepted"? 

— that night in 1920 when Mr. C. E. Ledford was returning from town 
and a short in the wires of his car caused it to burst into flames? 
The car was completely destroyed, but he was near home. 

— how things were accomplished in 1921 ? Two faculty ladies and two 
students calcimined the girls' parlor! The girls sandpapered and 
shellacked the floors. 



60 



80 YEARS OF PROGRESS 




Married student housing in the 1920's. 




Married student housing in the 1960's & 70's. 



THE YEAR OF DO WITHOUT 



61 




SMC's first trailer park came into existence just after World War II. It was back of 
old Talge Hall which has been replaced by McKee Library. 




A small section of the College trailer park in 1975. 



CHAPTER XI 

A PROBLEM OF COMMUNICATIONS SOLVED 

Communication with the world beyond White Oak Ridge was limited 
in 1916-17. Southern Junior College was established before concrete and 
asphalt roads were known in this area. Not a faculty member owned a car; 
perhaps it was just as well for car travel over the roads of the mountain 
tested one's courage and stamina. 

Four trains a day stopped at the Collegedale switch, providing trans- 
portation out of the valley; mules hitched to "The Hack" met trains in 
Ooltewah, and one of the students carried the mail muleback every day. 




The Hack 

Then the first Collegedale telephone was connected with the Ooltewah 
line, solving to a greater degree the communication problem in the com- 
munity; it was only the first step — one in many — that would eventually 
connect Collegedale with outside interests. 

As the months passed, a switchboard with twenty connections was 
put in the new men's dormitory. It was not an ideal arrangement because 
conversations on other lines could be heard. Neither was it successful 
financially. Since employing someone to operate the switchboard did not 
pay, the switchboard was eliminated, and all the telephones were put on 
one line with long and short rings. (See the telephone directory of those 
days.) 

The first step toward a better telephone system was the purchasing 
of a mile of the line between Chattanooga and Ooltewah. Another two miles 
of new line had to be constructed to a point on the Chattanooga-Cleveland 
pike to connect with the Chattanooga line. A few faculty members had 
telephones supplied with switches. By throwing the switch they could call 
Chattanooga; others could ring only campus numbers (if the line was not 
busy.) 



62 



A PROBLEM OF COMMUNICATIONS SOLVED 



63 



M- 



3 ^> 



J 



f 



TELEPHONE DIRECTORY 

LOCAL 

Fire, emergency, or distress call 

All phones answer! 
Accounting Office - - 
Benjamin, W. A., Residence - - - - - 

Benjamin. W. A.. Office ■ 

Boys' Home — 

Broom Factory - 

College Press ■ -^^— 

Dining Room - - 

Fuller. G. N.. Residence 

Garage 

Girls' Home 

Halvorsen. H. J., Residence 

Kirstein, Wm., Residence - 

Huxtable. T. R.. Residence 

Klooster. H.J. .Office 

Klooster. H. J. Residence 

Laundry 

Mouchon. P. T.. Residence 

Normal Building - - 

Store - 

Williams. Mrs. E.. Nurse 

Woodwork Shop - 

LONG DISTANCE 

Chattanooga Exchange: 

Southern Junior College — County 2602 
College Press — County 2602 
Ruskjer. Eld. S. A.— County 2603 
Klooster. Pres. H. J. — County 2604 
Benjamin, W. A. — County 2605 
Southern Union Conference — -2-4659 
Dr. V. F. Shull— 2-6881 



3I© 531 



3! =©(fe) 



The Collegedale Telephone Directory, 1935 



I 




"Number, Please 



In 1938 the cranking of side-winder telephones in Collegedale was re- 
placed by automatic dialing. 

By 1943 the need for a new and larger system was met by a switch- 
board installed in the administration building. Later, in 1947, it was moved 
to Room 118 in Maude Jones Hall. The system consisted of its own line 
and a switchboard with three, later five, trunk lines to Chattanooga and 
a teletype for sending telegrams. Five regular operators and seven relief 
operators answered such questions as: 

"How do you spell 'Puerto Rico'?" 

"When will the president be in his office?" 

"When does the post office close?" 

"Is the boys' laundry ready yet?" 



64 



80 YEARS OF PROGRESS 




Mrs. Elsie Mae Taylor, receptionist and supervisor of the college switchboard since 
it was placed in Wright Hall. 

In 1950 Horace W. Vaughan purchased the franchise right to provide 
telephone service for the Collegedale, Ooltewah, and Apison, Tennessee 
areas. The College furnished the land so that Mr. Vaughan could construct 
a small exchange building and install the latest equipment for the change 
over to the new Dial Telephone System. 

Today, the Collegedale Telephone Co. has a woman president and 
general manager, Mrs. Frances Vaughan Barnes. From the day it was first 
established, with a system of approximately 25 stations, it has expanded 
to a system which now serves over a 1,000 subscribers. 

The telephone company is working on another big expansion and 
building program. The company has received a $500,000 REA loan in order 
to better serve existing subscribers and to provide for anticipated growth. 

A new equipment building has been constructed in the architectural 
design of other buildings on the SMC campus. This building is on the 
corner of Camp Road and old Apison Pike, and houses the additional 
equipment required to provide better service and also provides individual 
telephone service in the dormitories for the students. 

One of the nicest things the Telephone Company is doing for the 
community is burying all the cables underground so that there are no over- 
head telephone wires in Collegedale. 




Telephone Company Building 



CHAPTER XII 

THE LEAN YEARS 

Professor Lynn H. Wood, the second president of Southern Junior 
College, could not keep problems from coming in, but he did not give them a 
chair to sit on. He had served the Southern Training School at Graysville 
as principal in 1914-1915. It was his vision that brought about the move of 
the school from Graysville to Collegedale. 

From the Southern Training School, he went to the Southern Union 
as departmental secretary, and in that capacity he joined Elders S. E. 
Wight and W. H. Branson in locating the present site for Southern Junior 
College and in raising money for the college. Those who worked closely 
with him were conscious of the lasting spiritual mould he gave the college. 
Through the years it has been recognized as a deeply spiritual college. His 
love for the college and his untiring efforts in behalf of the students were 
ever in evidence. 

His humble home of rough, unpainted boards, minus a veranda and 
other adornments, was a home of deep Christian influence. 

This was the third year since the school had been moved to College- 
dale. A reservoir on the mountainside now furnished seventy-five pounds 
of water pressure at the mains, making risk of loss by fire much less. The 
water system replaced the pitchers filled in the basement and carried to 
the third floor. On the site for the barn, a sawmill was placed. A crew of 
students sawed lumber for building purposes ; teams hauled the logs as the 
students cut them in the woods. Here where a barn would someday be built, 
two silos were erected. 




President Wood's Mansion in 1918. 



65 



fifi 



80 YEARS OF PROGRESS 




The Two Silos 




The New Barn 



Mr. E. Coleson of Tekamah, Nebraska, donated the money for one of 
the silos, and Roy Williams of Eaton, Colorado, donated the other. Mr. 
Williams was the father of Charles Williams, who was on the faculty of 
the college for many years. These much-needed silos were to stand alone 
for many months as landmarks until money was in sight for the new barn. 

Two hundred unsolicited applications came in, most of them from stu- 
dents with limited means who asked for work to help defray the expenses 
of an education. To house them, feed them, and provide an education for 
them multiplied the urgent needs. 



THE LEAN YEARS 



67 




One of the Men's Dormitories 



The men still lived in the Yellow House, in tent houses, and in the 
crude make-shift dormitory. During the 1918-19 school year a men's 
dormitory was to be built. Part of the money for it was provided by the 
General Conference, but it was insufficient. World War I had interfered 
in raising funds and in getting necessary help to complete the building in 
time for the opening of the fall school term. 

The two union presidents, Elder Branson and Elder Wight, called in 
most of the workers in the two union conferences for a workers' "bee" to 




This Conference Workers' Bee Helped Build The Men's Dormitory. 



68 



80 YEARS OF PROGRESS 





The Women Helped Build The Men's Dormitory. 

help erect the new building. All who could leave their work came with over- 
alls, hammers, and saws. The fifty who responded lived in tents while 
erecting the new dormitory. These were joined by a. few volunteer work- 
ers. One of the men, who had a broken arm, still did his part by planning 
the work and overseeing the enterprise. No architect was employed. 

The lumber used in the men's dormitory was from the Billy Sunday 
tabernacle in Atlanta, Georgia. The men pulled out the nails, straightened 
pounds of them, and then found they could not use them because they 
could not be driven into the hard wood. It was while these men were build- 
ing the dormitory that they heard the November 11, 1918, Armistice Day 
excitement in Chattanooga, eighteen miles away. 




The Men's Dormitory, The Print Shop and President Wood's Home. 



THE LEAN YEARS 



69 




The Blacksmith Shop 



Not only was the enthusiasm of the workers contagious, but they 
breathed hope and courage into the hearts of those who were under the 
burden of building the institution. 

Before school started in the fall of 1919, the boys moved into the 
unfinished building. They occupied the rooms on the upper floors while the 
first floor rooms were used for class rooms and administrative offices. At 
that time the room on the first floor that was planned to be the men's 
parlor became the college chapel. The chapel benches w£re made of strips 





The Garage. Here The Mechanical Trades Were Taught. 



70 



80 YEARS OF PROGRESS 




The Chapel In The Men's Dormitory. 



of flooring nailed onto standards made of rough boards. This seating 
arrangement was used for several years. 

As the nation was going into the depression of 1920-22, there was a 
great financial strain that seemed destined to destroy all that had been 
accomplished in the life of the struggling college. 

Because the budget for the coming year was $4,000 more than the 
funds available, the Board of Trustees felt that the college should be 
closed. The chairman was about to ask for the vote to close Southern 
Junior College, when President Wood asked if he might meet with the 




These Conference Workers Built The Barn and The Garage. 



THE LEAN YEARS 



71 



faculty before the vote was taken. At Southern Junior College there was, 
from the beginning, a humble spirit of self-sacrifice, manifested not only 
by students but also by the faculty. They had endured tremendous diffi- 
culties and hardships. The faculty members at that meeting raised the 
$4,000 out of their salaries. The business manager offered to work fcr 
nothing if only gasoline would be supplied in order for him to get to and 
from Chattanooga to carry on the college's business. Teachers without 
families volunteered to teach for half-pay. 

Sacrifice of this kind kept the institution operating in the face of 
apparently insurmountable difficulties until Southern Junior College was 
firmly established. 

A herd of twenty-five registered and high grade Jersey cows that had 
been given to the school needed to be housed. Back of the mansion there 

was a barn which was in need of repair. 
It was so full of holes one wondered 
whether to sympathize with the cows 
outside in the cold looking in, or the 
cows inside looking out. 

The students had cut the lumber at 
the sawmill, and then the conference 
workers had another "bee" to build the 
new barn. The conference presidents and 
officers from the two union conferences 
were the volunteers. The secretary- 
treasurer of the Southern Union Confer- 
ence at that time, G. H. Curtis, who had 
been a member of the locating commi- 
tee when the estate was purchased, 
was among the volunteers, and in 1960 
he wrote of the honor he felt that had 
been his forty years before in being one 
of the founders of Southern Missionary 
College and to have worked with the 
"bee" that built the men's dormitory 
and the barn. 

The next building to be erected was 
the garage, then the print shop where 
the science building now stands, the 
basket factory, (the present grounds 
department building), and the presi- 
dent's cottage. The financial depression 
of 1920 slowed building progress for a time. The students erected buildings 
as a part of their training. They went into the woods and cut the timber, 
and teams hauled the logs to the sawmill located where the barn formerly 
stood. 




Looking Out of The Old 
Cow Barn 



A Gift From Mr. Talge 

Mr. Talge of Indianapolis knew and used his three magic words — "May 
I help?" over and over again. His gift was $1,300 for equipment. This in- 
cluded dormitory flooring and bathroom fixtures and help for laundry 
equipment. 



72 



80 YEARS OF PROGRESS 




The First Junior College Graduation, 1920, Was Held In The New Barn. 



The C. C. C. 

The Collegedale Catchum Club launched a campaign on April 1, 1919, 
to raise $3,500 for the completion of the women's dormitory. This was to 
be raised by personal sacrifice, and also by soliciting from friends by letter. 
The academy graduating class of 1919 gave their budget for class pins 
toward the goal. The campaign was successful! 



__ - 


< IK f*\d 

Zr ' * ^P 




The first twelfth grade graduation exercises were held on the lawn of the yellow 
house. There was no administration building or chapel for the exercises. This was 
the Junior-Senior reception, 1917. The faculty standing at the back: Mrs. Fountain, 
Mr. Fountain, Mr. and Mrs. Gorich, Prof, and Mrs. Marshall, President and Mrs. Thiel, 
Mrs. Thome, Ruth Hale, Elder and Mrs. Field, Mrs. Atteberry, Prof. Atteberry, 
H. A. Shreve, Mrs. Adams, Prof. Adams. 



THE LEAN YEARS 



73 



I 











; "tic 




Dr. O. G. Hughes, the first School Physician; Mrs. Tucker, the first Dean of Women in 
Maude Jones Hall; and Leo Thiel, the first President of Southern Junior College, at 
the Founder's Day Program in 1950. 

A School of Standards 

"Where did the college get the title, 'A School of Standards'?" 
"Perhaps it is only a slogan that came about by continued usage?" 
"But there must have been a beginning. I have heard SMC referred 
to as 'A School of Standards' from the West Coast to the East Coast. 
Who gave it the name?" 

"Miss Jones would surely know." 

But Miss Jones said, "Ask Dr. Lynn Wood." He had the answer. 
Only the few who were in a special chapel in 1920 know the origin of 
the slogan that has been synonymous with the name of the college for 
more than fifty years. Those of you who were there and who read this will 
remember that chapel exercise though you may have forgotten other 
chapels. 

Five of your school mates had forgotten about standards and had been 
brought before the discipline committee. Four of the students told one 
story, and one told a different story. Through long sessions with the com- 
mittee the students didn't change their stories, and both stories could not 
possibly be right. 

The president asked if each of the five would be willing to unite in 
prayer, asking God to reveal the truth. Each agreed, and each offered 
prayer. When the prayers ended, one of the four was trembling and asked 
to see the dean of women in the hall. The lone one had been telling the 
truth. 

Because of the nature of the discipline and the questioning of the 
faculty action, the matter was brought before the school in a special chapel 
session. 



74 



80 YEARS OF PROGRESS 




Academy and Junior College Classes, 1921, Graduated In This Tent. 

After the details had been related to the group in the chapel, the youth 
were asked whether they wanted a school where standards were maintained 
or not. The assembly was invited to express its desire, and everyone stood 
by the action of the committee. When the student body knew the facts, 
it stood loyally for having a school of standards. From that time on "A 
School of Standards" became the slogan of the college. 

The caption "A School of Standards" involves scholarship, conduct, 
ethics, and every phase of life as it is known on this campus. Students 
have been counseled to labor earnestly that in their work, their health 
habits, their relationship with others, as well as in scholarship and conduct 
that they may attain the highest standards. These standards have made 
this college, through struggling years, a haven of refuge and a blessing to 
all who have come under its influence. 

For years the Friday evening vesper hours have had much to do with 
making this college a school of standards. When the cares and labor of the 
week ended, the music director ushered in the sacred hours of the Sabbath 
with beautiful music. Then followed an inspiring talk by one of the teach- 
ers and the weekly testimony service. 

As each class goes from this college, it is entrusted with these stand- 
ards — a sacred trust — to demonstrate to the world that this institution is 
still "A School of Standards." 

The lean years continued with the depression years of 1929-34. When 
the National Recovery Act (NRA) was instituted in 1934, the college 
found itself in a dilemma for some of the industries were operating inter- 
state which placed them under wage controls and required them to pay 
time and one-half for time worked over 40 hours a week. Wages in these 
industries were in some cases doubled. The 15-year-olds could stay on, 
but no longer could anyone be hired who was under 16 years of age. 

The administration met the emergency by printing two types of 
tuition certificates. One type was used to pay the difference in the in- 
creased wages to those receiving large wage boosts. The other type of 



THE LEAN YEARS 75 

certificate was a subsidy to those who had no increase in income. This 
arrangement did not hold up long, but it did level things off until the 
administration could revise wages and prices. 

Cash was a precious item ; however, the college did allow students who 
were not in debt to withdraw 10 per cent of their earnings in cash. Arrange- 
ments were also made for those who wished their tithe withheld and 
forwarded to the conference. 

The staff and faculty, for a time, received a portion of their income 
in script, printed at the College Press, which was good at the store and 
dairy. The script was not valid if it had been detached from the script 
book which was non-transferable. 

There was a good spirit among both students and faculty despite the 
shaky economic conditions. 



Do you remember — 

— the two hymns that were always sung for Friday night vespers when 
Professor Wood was president here? "The Evening Prayer" and 
"Abide With Me." 

— the inspiration of those Friday night testimony meetings? 

— that during the influenza-small pox epidemics, sometimes fomenta- 
tion pads were passed from one patient to another, not knowing they 
carried small pox ? 

— that the night watchman heard a noise on the railroad track and 
found a horse caught between the rails on the trestle — and it was 
time for the train to come? The watchman hurried to the smoke 
house, got his roommates and they managed to free the horse and 
get it off the tracks before the freight came through. The watchman, 
Jake Conger, eventually received a small reward from the railroad 
company. 

— that the student wage rate in 1918 was 5c, 12c, and 15c per hour? 

— that the rule in the summer of 1919 was "no worship, no breakfast?" 

— that the commissary was used as a store house for fertilizer after 
the first dormitory was built? 

— that there was no electricity for a couple of years after the dormi- 
tories were built? 

— those smoked lamp chimneys! 

— that Madison College donated 2,000 copies of Christ's Object Lessons 

to the SJC building fund? 

— hearing that Ooltewah and Apison had colleges in the 19th century? 

— that year when fine-tooth combs were so popular in the girls' dormi- 
tory? (and they were needed!) 

— that boys in tent-houses did not complain of the cold or rain? (or 
did they?) 

— the lasting friendships you made in dormitory life? 

— that a lady (Myrtle Maxwell) taught manual training? 

— how skirt lengths were measured ? 

"Measure distance from the middle of the kneecap to the floor when 
student stands in stocking feet. Two thirds of this is the correct 
measuring from the floor to the skirt bottom." 

— that warm hand clasp of Professor Wood when you were a bit dis- 
couraged? 

■ — Elder Field's quiet and devoted service? And Elder Behrens' out- 
standing spiritual leadership? 



76 



80 YEARS OF PROGRESS 




The sawmill was located 
where the barn formerly 
stood which is now the 
site of Thatcher Hall. 



Delmer Miller and the 
delivery wagon in which 
produce was brought 
from the farm to the 
kitchen. 





The house built for Dr. and Mrs. Lynn H. Wood in the early 1920's: Presently it is 
the second house north of the music building. 



CHAPTER XIII 

THE HEART THROBS OF THE COLLEGE 

School publications are the heart throbs of an institution! 

The first edition of the Southern Junior College Bulletin appeared on 
November 8, 1917, as a four-page semi-monthly publication. None of the 
available copies show who edited it. The first issue of the paper states its 
purpose : 

The Southern Junior College Bulletin begins its career with 
this issue. The promoters of this periodical have a very definite 
idea in mind which accounts for its inauguration. We believe that 
there is need for the clear statement of the aims and purposes of 
the Southern Junior College. We believe that this can be best 
obtained by a periodical devoted entirely to this statement. 

The Bulletin seems to have had a short life; only a few issues of it 
have been preserved. 

&mxtlj?rn ilutttnr (EaUeg? Hullettn 



OOLTEWAH, TENN., NOVEMBER 8. 1917 



Foreword 

It is no light thing for the promoters of 
an enterprise to launch a new magazine on 
the already overburdened reading public. 
We often have heard the cry that "We do 
not have time to read the articles we al- 
ready have." This is very true with a large 
number of people. To add to their difficul- 
ties by launching a new periodical is some- 
thing not likely to be thought of. 

Still the Southern Junior College Bul- 
letin begins its career with this issue. The 
promoters of this periodical have a very 
definite idea in mind, which accounts for its 
inauguration. We believe that there is need 
for the clear statement of the aims and 
>urposes of the Southern Junior College. 
We believe that this can be best obtained 
iiv a periodical devoted entirely to this 
statement. 

The Southern Junior College stands for 
very definite things. It stands for the com- 
bined mental, moral, and physical training. 
So part of man is neglected in the training 
it offers its young people; at the same 
rime it also offers a training in self-control 
and discipline which is very valuable. The 
Southern Junior College standsWor educa- 
ion that is to be carried on away from the 
:ities and away from (he confusion and 
zemptations that come K> young people 
■vhose lives are not yet fully established, 
and who live in a town. 

In addition to these, tlie Southern Junior 
College stands for a very definite standard 
fwork. While it is true that very often 
nstitutions set for themselves high ideals 
vhich they endeavor to carry out, but fail, 
he Southern Junior College maintains that 
;very part of its curricula should be bal- 
inced, and that the class work should be 
if the very highest quality. 

We invite those who receive a copy of 
his paper to consider it carefully, as we be- 
ieve it brings a message which can be ob- 
ained through no other periodical. 



Birth of the Southern Junior 
College 

A company of earnest Christian workers 
and educators met several months ago in 
the pastoral room of the Chattanooga, Ten- 
nessee, Y. M. C. A. building to consider the 
great needs of industrial and Christian ed- 
ucation in the Southland. 

It was recognized that the only education 
worth while is that practical kind which 
teaches the student to actually do with his 
hands the things he learns about in his 
books. This makes it imperative, therefore, 
that trades and industries be made an inte- 
gral part of the school curriculum. 

Another advantage was seen in [his meth- 
od of education. It would enable hundreds 
of young men and women who are nut fi- 
nancially able to secure an education (and 
there are thousands o! this class) to earn 
their way through school by working in the 
various industries that could be connected 
with an institution conducted on these lines. 
Out of their strong desire to see these prin- 
ciples of true education carried out, and the 
work of helping worthy young people ac- 
complish, the Southern Junior College was 
born. A large farm of 385 acres situated in 
a beautiful little valley in James County was 
purchased and the school opened its doors 
October 18, 1916, with about 40. young men 
and women in attendance. Before the close 
of the year this increased to sixty. As 
soon as it became known in the South that 
young people of limited means could come- 
here and earn an education by laboring 
with their hands, applications began to 
come in from all directions until at the 
present time, one year trom the date of 
opening, more than 200 applications have 
been received, almost wholly unsolicited. 
Thus far the school has operated in old 
tenement cottages that were already on the 
farm and in tent houses hurriedly pitched 
last fall. These quarters, of course, are 
only temporary, and must be replacedwith 
permanent buildings as soon as funds are.- 



Southern Junior College Bulletin 
Vol. 1, No. 1 

Next a small paper entitled Faith was edited by President Wood and 
first published on January 1, 1919. The first sentence in that issue reads: 
Because here we have the evidence of things not seen, the 
substance of things hoped for, this publication goes forth bearing 
the name it does. 



77 



78 



80 YEARS OF PROGRESS 



Faith 

A Monthly Letter to Our Friends from the Southern Junior College 

Application -nsde forlsntry u sscond-clsss matter. 

Collegedale, Ooltewah, Tennessee, January 1, 1919 



Because here we have "the evidence of things not seen, (he sub- 
stance of things hoped for," this publication goes forth bearing the 
name it does. The Southern Junior College is the outgrowth of the 
work started a number of years ago under the name "Southern 
Training School." With an indebtedness of $14,000, the institution 
stepped out by faith and made the move to its ntw location on Octo- 
ber I, 1916, at Collegedale, near Ooltewah, Tennessee. With the 
blessing of God, in a marvelous way, all the indebtedness was wiped 
out inside of five months, and it is astonishing, as we look about us, to 
see what has been accomplished in a little over two years. We are 
pleased to picture the present situation to our readers. 



IF 



i THE 

SOUTHLAND 



I 



SCROLLl 



S" 25 © 



Closing Exercises of the 1928-1929 
School Term 







A beautiful spot in the woods 
rainbow, an old-time log cabin, and a 
group of senior girl* and boy» presented o 
pleasing picture to those assembled in the 
chapel to enjoy the class night program. 
the first to be given during Comroenee- 

A welcome to all was extended as Mr 
Speyer. the class president, pretended to 



Mft 



the 



tot 



Faith Vol. 1, No. 1 
Southland Scroll Vol. 1, No. 1 



nagined that the seniors were merely 
rehearsing their parts in the woods. 
From the little log cabin » volume of melody 
poured forth as Helen Watts practiced her 
piano solo. Mr Lambert was late in arriv- 
ing at the picnic. He was doubly welcomed 
hec-mise he brought with him a copy of the 
new Southland Annual A happy thought 
struck the group of lour who were to give 
the class history They decided to use the 
Annual along with a stoiy ol the clsss 
to present their class history. It was a fine 
plan, and one quickly agreed upon as fit 
for the final occasion. 

Coralee Russell's trial proved to be a 
successful rendering of a sweetly sod 

Before the rainbow faded Mr Keueter 
gave an oration ol the seven colors, which 
the class had chosen as their emblem. 
Ruth Kneeland was persuaded to practice 
her sob about the "Robin" Walter Ost 
could not resist the temptation to take a 



picture of Ruth standing by the cabin. 
Fuller Whitman went through his cere- 
many of presenting the draperies as a 
gift to the College From the class. In a lew 
words Professor Kloostcr expressed the 
appreciation of the school to the seniors. 
Msbel Cosnell hesitated to give the poem 
which she had composed, but she did well, 
end the class was glad for her expression 
of iheir own feelings. Helen Watts again 
entered the log cabin and accompanied the 
double trio while they bravely did their 
bes! to sing "Good-by Sweet Day" without 
so much as a single mistake As they took 
their seats upon the logs again, a sigh of 
sadness at the thoughts of saying good-by 
seemed to escape each listener While the 
guh rearranged the wild ro>es they hsd 
gathered in their bonnets, and wove daisy 
chains. Grace Pirkle. the valedictorian, 
gave the farewell address. She dreaded 
even to think of saying fsrewell to the 
dear ftudert* and teachers, but our joyous 
school life cannol always last, although we 
can always learn. The suggestion to play 
games again met with approval on all 
sides ard had not Mr Speyer reminded the 
senioia of their class eotig. they might have 
forgoltcn to practice it. With heail and 
soul they voiced their jent intents in blended 
harmony as they sang. "We'll have to leave 
you yet. but O we won't forget our good 
old days at S J C" 



This monthly periodical was a promotion organ and carried no sub- 
scription rate. 

The first student publication appeared May 30, 1920, and it took its 
name Sojuconian from the name of the college, SOuthern JUnior COllege. 
Two students, C. A. Woolsey and Mabel Wood, were the editor and assistant 
editor of this publication, which holds the record for brief existence. There 
was only one issue of it. 

For nine years the college was without a student publication. The 
union conference paper, Field Tidings, carried the college news and served 
as the channel of promotion. 

The Southland Scroll made its debut June 5, 1929, with Edythe 
Stephenson Cothren as the first editor. It became the written voice of 
Southern Junior College for seventeen years. The paper was issued 
monthly without a subscription rate. Its circulation reached 1000 the first 
three weeks and increased to a mailing list of 2000. 

After the college reached senior status, The Southern Accent took 
the place of The Southland Scroll. The first editor of The Southern Accent 

was Frances Andrews, and Dr. Elaine Giddings, head of the English 
department, was its sponsor. As the first subscription paper of the college, 
it was circulated in the homes of the United States as well as many 
foreign countries since the date of its first issue until the fall of 1971, 
when it became a campus paper only. 

The first annual or yearbook, The Southland, was published in 1923. 
Merwin Thurber was the editor of this unique and outstanding yearbook. 
Individual pictures of faculty members and seniors were set in triangles, 



THE HEART THROBS OF THE COLLEGE 79 

the school emblem. These pictures were on a background of scenes of 
building's on the campus. The first annual was dedicated to the first 
president, Leo Thiel. 

In 1926 the annual took the shape of a photo album and was edited by 
W. B. Randall. It marked the end of the first ten years of Southern 
Junior College. 

During the years 1930 through 1937 there were no annuals. Whether 
the financial status of the nation had something to do with this omission 
or whether it was the conviction of the administration that there would 
be no annuals, is an unanswered question. 

The publication of an annual each year was resumed in 1938 with the 
name changed to The Triangle. The editorial staff of 1945 changed the 
name again, this time to Southern Memories, a name it has kept since. 

In 1956 the Joker made its first appearance on the campus. As stated 
on the fly leaf, the purpose was: "to help you get acquainted with your 
student body." In it was a picture of each student, an indication of his 
year in college, and whether he or she lived in the village or a dormitory. 
(If a guy lived in the dorm, that told the girls he was single.) 

Helen Case Durichek was the first editor of the Joker. In 1958, when 
Gary Fowler was editor, pictures of the faculty were also included. 

During the years 1966-67 and 1967-68, the publication was called 
Eccos instead of Joker. 

What delightful memories school publications bring to those who have 
walked these halls! Truly school publications are the heart throb of the 
institution. 

The newest publication on the campus is SMC Southern Columns. It 
was announced as a revised and expanded version of the SMC Alumni 
Bulletin. The format was developed by Bill Cash as a class project. It was 
first published in April, 1972, and is edited by J. Mabel Wood. The emphasis 
is on newsworthy events with coverage of all important events of the 
college, including new academic programs, development of the campus 
plant, faculty news, student news, alumni news, and news of industrial 
development. 

The mailing list includes the alumni, church members in the Southern 
Union, parents of students currently enrolled, SMC's Committee of 100, the 
Board of Trustees, and other special friends of the college. 

(See the Appendix for lists of editors of annuals and school papers.) 



80 



80 YEARS OF PROGRESS 



The Southern Accent 



Being the Expression of the Students 

OF 

Southern Missionary College 



Collegedale, Tennessee, September 28, 1945 



Enrollment Reaches New High 

34% INCREASE IN COLLEGE 
io% INCREASE IN TOTAL 

Faculty Increased by Ten New Members 

On September 10, 1 1. and 12 a total of 176 students registered at Southern 

Missionary College and Collgcdale Academy, according to Miss Ruby E. Lea, 

registrar. The College total of 2M represents a iA per cent increase over that 

of last yeu There were l(i2 Academy students registered, making a total of 

- 376 students, an all-over increase of 

10 per cent. 

The faculty has been increased by 
ten new members, stated President K. 
A. Wright, to meet the demands of in 
enlarged curriculum. 

Professor G. W. Boynton of Madi- 
son College is teaching several of the 
academy classes in biology, chemistry, 
and history, A specialist in architecture 
and landscaping, Mr. Boynton is alio 
faculty sponsor of the Collegedale 
Missionary Volunteer Society. 

From Southwestern Junior College 
comes Professor S. W. Dakc, teacher 
of business administration, and acad- 
emy algebra and geometry. Professor 
Dake was formerly the manager of the 
planing mill at Kerne, Texas. 

Director of the Health Service and 
also physical education teacher is Miss 
Mi!d-ed EVJk of Andre-.-.-, Soutt) GttO- 
lina. Miss Eadie is the sister of Robert 
Badie, business administration student 

Miss Elaine Gicldings from Heldcr- 
bcrg College, South Africa, heads the 




Elder Hare of Burma 
Undergoes 92 Raids; 
Addresses Youth Rally 

"Cod has given .i-.e a piCtUM of the 
end of the world, and 1 feel burdened 
to tell our young people about it,' 
asserted Elder Eric B. Hare, Mission- 
ary Volunteer Secretary of the Pacific 
Union, addressing an audience of neat- 
ly 1,000 people gathered in the Coi- 
legedale Tabernacle for an all-day 
Youthspiration Rally on Sabbath. Sep- 
tember 22, 

The invasion of the Burmese capi- 
tal." explained the speaker, who spent 

ma, 'began in the midst of a baptismal 
service on December 13, 1941. The 
siren began to scream, and the con 
gregation realizing that this was the 
real thing, fell to their knees imploring 
the protection of an omnipotent God." 

Elder Hare continued. "Fortunately, 
no botibs were dropped that day. But 
the evacuations began immediately. 
When no more sirens sounded for ten 
days, we felt comparatively safe, and 
the people who had left the city start- 
ed to come back. 

Then we heard a terrific roar rig* 
over our heads. We saw fifty-one giant 
bombers of the Japanese, and then 
came our Flying Tigers. We saw the 
two air forces meet in the air over out 
heads and we witnessed our first sir 
battle. It was a terrible day— 1,350 
people met sudden death and over 
3,000 people were taken to the hos- 
pital." 

Arrangements were finally complet- 
ed whereby the missionaries' families 
might get passage to Calcutta, but 
the men remained in Rangoon to take 
up ambulance duty. Elder Hare, him- 
self, went through ninety-two air raids 
while a member of the 5t, John's Am- 
bulance Corps. But soon the proximity 
of the enemy forced even the mission- 

The lecturer continued his narra- 
tive, "I feel that God has permitted 
so many of us to pass through these 
experiences and trials in order that we 
might be able to bring to our fellow- 
believers the fact that God has not 
turgottcn His people. 

{Crintinued OH /■*£=■ 51 



Capacity Crowd Hears First Sabbath Sermon 
President Reveals Plans For New Church 

An audience of nearly 700 filled the college chapel and corridors to heat 
President K A Wright's sermon on Sabbath morning. September iy 

According to President Wright, architects are now working on blue-prints 
of a new church that will accommodate not only Collegedale church and com- 
munity, but also hundreds of young 
people from cities nearby. 

The theme of the morning's address 
was honesty" as exemplified in the 
life of Paul, the missionary. The pur- 
pose of a religious school is to instill 
and foster the principles of honesty, 
the ability to see both sides of a ques- 
tion, and the courage to face the truth. 

The person who is honest makes 
no excuses for himself on the basis 
of someone else's failure. "To hide 
behind someone else, you must be 
smaller than he is " The broad-mind- 
ed person who has evaluated himself 
objectively will not fall into the error 
of looking to others, but will, as did 
the apostle Paul, compare himself only 
with the supreme Example. 

' What we would not, that we do" is 
just as truly the complaint of the hon- 
est modern as of the missionary to the 
Romans. Good intentions do not pre- 
vent mistakes; they only make them 
less frequent and repetitious. 



Fire Prevention 
Measures Outlined 

Mr. G. R, Pea man, college fire 
Chief, explained the organization of 

the volunteer fire department in chapel 
Friday morning, September 21. The 
spciic-r outlined the duty of every 
member of the college family in case 
of alarm, and assigned various groups 
to specific locations. 

In his explanation of how to give 
"first aid" to small flames and "second 
aid" to larger fires, Mr. Peaiman in- 
cluded instruction on the use of ex- 
tinguishers and the method of hand- 
ling the man-hose with its water pres- 
sure from the sprinkler system reser- 

At t!>c close of the chapel service a 
practice drill was held, students and 
faculty members marching in orderly 
haste to the designated locations. 



President's Reception 
Inaugurates New Term 

The President's Reception,. tradition- 
al first appointment on the social cal- 
endar, was held Saturday evening, 
September IV in Lynn Wood Hall 

Main purpose of the reception, at- 
cotding to President Wright, was to 
give students and faculty members an 
uppuituuity to become better acquaint- 
ed. 

The enlarged instructional staff ex- 
tended nearly two-thirds of the way 
around the auditorium. After the fac- 
ulty members had personally greeted 
every member of the student body, 
they presented a short, formal pro- 
gram. 

President Wright, Dr Ambrose 
Suhric. and Elder F. B. Jensen wel- 
comed the students to Southern Mis- 
sionary College Miss Elaine Giddings. 
head of the College speech depart- 
ment, brought to the large audience 
one of the familiar Shakespearean son 

Musical numbers on the evening's 
program included a portion of Roger's 

Suite played by Organist Betty Klotz 
Hartcr. Mr. Dortch sang "Duna," and 
M.ss Evans presented a vocal inter- 
pretation of "Into the Night," and 
"Sing a Song of Sixpence." Conclud- 
ing the program. Prof. H. A Miller 
played the tone poem by Ware, The 
Song of the Sea." 



Extension Offering 
Double Last Year's; 
$850 For New Work 

The Missions Extension offering for 
the Collegedale church this year a- 
mounted to over $850, more than one 
hundred per cent gain over last yea.''* 
excellent record. 

Many feel that tfK reason why this 
offering was so large is that the mem- 
bers of our church ate especially thank- 
ful that the war has ended. Another 
reason for Collcgedale's special inter- 

est in the Missions Extension offering 
this year is the fact that a number of 
the projects for 1945 are institutions 
in which the faculty and students of 
^...r-rn Mi"inn ar y Collar pre per- 
sonally interested. 

Elder Rebok, a former president of 

Southern Junior College, and friend of 

many of the students, spent several 

years in the China Training Institute, 

58,000 for labor: 



t fro 



derberg College in South Afr 
receive $9,800, which will purchase 
ncw land. Miss Giddings, the head of 
our English and Speech departments, 
came to us from Helderberg College. 

India's Assam Training School, 
where Elder Ashlock was a pioneer in 
the early days of that institution, is to 
receive Si, 000, to help to build a new, 
much-needed girls' dormitory. 

Of the offering this year, (10,000 
is to be used for a new south wing for 
the Sural Hospital in the Western In- 
dia Union. Elder Ludgatc was among 
those who helped to establish this hos- 
pital. 

Several of our students have come 
from the Inter-American Division, 
where a large portion of the Missions 
Extension Offering, given by the 
church members of North America, 
will be used this year. 



Department of English and Speech, 
this fund. Hcl- The similarity of the school at South- 



ing 



)thc 



and good fellowship. Though Dr, 
Suhrie quoted a college president as 
distinguishing sophomores by the fact 
that, contrary to the freshman, the) 1 did 
not "offer me dead fish" as a hand- 
shake, few freshmen were recognizable 
by the limpness -of their greeting. 



Bakery Produces 
150 Loaves Daily 

More than 1 50 loaves of bread have 
been baked daily since the beginning 
of school, stated Mrs. Jake Conge.-, 
Director of Food Service, a few days 
ago. 

Milton C.onnell, Bill Shakespeare, 
and Violet Stewart, constitute the per- 
sonnel in the bakery. These students 
must begin work long before day- 
light, Mrs. Conger explained, in order 
to have each day's supply of bf.ked 
goods ready for consumption. 

Coeds living above this adjunct to 
the kitchen report that the delicious 
atomas wafting upward proclaim the 
unpublished schedule for pastries and 



ern Missionary College to that of 
Helderberg was noted by Miss Gid- 
dings as one of her first reasons for lik- 
ing Collegedale. Physical culture is the 
hobby of the English department head 

Coming from New York State to 
head the Department of Home Eco- 
nomics is Miss Lois Lucile Heiser. A 
graduate of Atlantic Union College, 
Miss Heiser stresses the importance of 
both young men and young women 
learning the fundamentals of home 
economics. An enthusiastic sport fan, 
Miss Heiser particularly enjoys roller 
skating. 

"1 feel that the Bible Department at 
Southern Missionary College, due to 
the excellent spirit, splendid scholar- 
ship, and radiant personality of its 
tcjihcrs, is potentially as strong and 
well equipped to tram our youth for 
world-wide service as any of the major 
colleges with which I have been as- 
sociated," stated Elder F. B, Jensen, 
head of the Department of Theology, 
Elder Jensen comes to Collegedale 
Jroin Pacific Union College, 

Returning to Collegedale after an 
absence of three years is Pianist H. A. 
Miller of the Department of Music. 
Well-known throughout the denomina- 
tion both for his virtuosity and com- 
position, Mr. Miller's presence on the 
campus gives promise of an enjoyable 
year for music lovers. 

Mr, Linton G Sevrens completed 
his twentieth year at Atlantic Union 
College before coming to head the 
Department of Chemistry at College- 
dale, Possessing the traditional green 
thumb, Mr. Sevrens expects to begin 
work on a garden next spring, al- 
though the Tennessee soil differs con- 
siderably from that around South Lan- 



{Cnntnttted on $>dgc -1} 



The Southern Accent, Vol. 1, No. 1 



THE HEART THROBS OF THE COLLEGE 



81 



&f)e Collegebale &lummt£ 



Volume II 



COLLEGEDALE, TENNESSEE, MARCH, 1951 



Number 1 



S. M. C. Receives Accreditation 




President Wright and Dean Hittenhouse are 
shown as they discussed plans that led to the 
accreditation of Southern Missionary College. 



Elder Branson Dedicates 
Earl Hackman Hall 

By F. O. Rittenhouse, Dean, 
Southern Missionary College 

A truly inspiring occasion and certainly one 
of the highlights of the present school year 
was the dedication service, February 21, of 
the new natural science building. Timed to 
take place in conjunction with the 1951 quad- 
rennial session of the Southern Union Con- 
ference of S.D.A. held in Chattanooga, the 
convocation drew an audience estimated at 
nearly 1,400, which filled the tabernacle audi- 
torium to the doors. As the conference sessions 
were suspended for the afternoon, the dele- 
gates, many of whom are former students of 
the college, attended in force. 

Highlights of the program included a 
splendid address by Elder W. H. Branson, 
General Conference President, and the brief 
but moving response by Mrs. Earl Hackman. 
The musical selections were especially appro- 
(Continued on page 2, column 1) 



PRESIDENT WRITES LETTER 
ON RECENT HIGHLIGHTS 

Dear Friends of Graysville and Collegedale, 

Your editor requested me to call to your 
attention the recent accreditation of Southern 
Missionary College. I feel certain you have 
already learned that the Southern Association 
of Colleges granted us membership on De- 
cember 7, 1950, at the Richmond, Virginia, 
meeting. Naturally, we rejoice at this mile- 
stone and especially so when we realize full 
accreditation has not in any way affected the 
fundamental principles of the School of 
Standards. 

This standing, however, does permit pre- 
medical students to take all of their work here 
prior to entering Loma Linda. It will make it 
possible for our graduates to receive teacher's 
certificates in the various states and to attend 
the graduate school of their choice. 

Never could accrediting mean more than 
at the present time with the war clouds hang- 
ing so low and the possibility so great that 
many of our college men will be called to the 
service. 

Another important milestone is that we 
have enrolled over 500 college students during 
the current regular school term, exclusive of 
the summer school enrollment. During the 
past quadrennial period the net worth of the 
institution has been doubled as has been the 
dollar volume of tuitions and industries. 
(Continued on page 2, column 2) 



ANNUAL ALUMNI BREAKFAST 

COLLEGE CAFETERIA 

June 3, 8:00 A. M. 

Honoring Class of '26 



The First Alumni Paper. This is Vol. 1, No. 1, even though it is labeled Vol. 11. The 
1952 paper is also numbered Vol. 11, so someone evidently caught the mistake. 



82 



80 YEARS OF PROGRESS 




The First Southern Memories, The Yearbook, was brought out in 1945, The First Year 
of Senior College Status. The College also had a new name — Southern Missionary 
College. 






THE HEART THROBS OF THE COLLEGE 



83 




hern 



COLUMNS 



Volume 22 



Collegedale, Tennessee, April 1972 



Number 3 



Groups Reevaluate SMC 



A team of eight members of the General Confer- 
ence of Seventh-day Adventists Board of Regents 
inspected and evaluated Southern Missionary College 
recently. 

Also, reevaluating SMC after a 10-year period was 
a team of 12 professors from the Southeast, acting 
for the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools. 
A full report on their findings and the reaffirmation 
of accreditation of SMC will be reported in a future 
edition. 

The Board of Regents is a body set up within the 
General Conference to evaluate the work of Adven- 
tist educational institutions and to maintain their 
established moral and academic standards. 

The objective of the visiting team was to evaluate 
SMC in light of current General Conference policies 
regarding the administration, instructional staff, finan- 
cial operations, student affairs, and religious activities 
on campus. 

The team observed attitudes of the SMC students, 
faculty, and board members. They met with faculty 
representatives, and later a luncheon was held with 
various student representatives. 

Headed by Dr. Lewis J. Larson, dean of academic 
affairs at Southwestern Union College, Keene, Texas, 
who served as chairman of the team, the group was 
composed of the following seven individuals: 

Dr. N. W. Rowland, academic dean of Union Col- 
lege, Lincoln, Nebraska. 

Dr. Cecil Gemmel, of the education department 
of Andrews University, Berrien Springs, Michigan. 

Dr. John Cannon of the General Conference de- 
partment of education. 

Dr. G. J. Millet, also of the General Conference 
department of education. 

Dr. L. W. Mauldin, chairman of the English depart- 
ment at Columbia Union College, Takoma Park, 
Maryland. 

Elder |, C. Kozel of the General Conference 
treasury department. 

Miss Mazie Herin of the General Conference de- 
partment of health. 




The Administration Building at 
President Kenneth A. Wright. 

Collegedale Experiences Growth 

The City of Collegedale experienced a year of 
development in 1971 as a new addition to the Arthur 
Spalding Elementary School was completed, two 
new housing subdivisions were begun and new police 
equipment was purchased. 

There was also a political contest during 1971 in 
which William Hulsey was elected to the post of city 
commissioner. The young city, incorporated in the 
fall of 1968, also had on its commission L. D. Housley 
and Mayor Fred Fuller. 

The recently completed elementary school addi- 
tion was made at a cost of $89,000 and, according to 
Mayor Fuller, included four new classrooms and four 
new restrooms. It is hoped that within the next five 
years another four room addition will be made to 
the school to accommodate increasing pupil enroll- 
ments, according to Mayor Fuller. 

Construction on a new central office and equip- 
ment building for the Collegedale Telephone Co. 
was begun in 1971. The structure will cost an esti- 
mated $122,000 and will house equipment designed 
to give the entire city private line telephone facilities. 

(Continued on page 2) 



This is the first issue of the enlarged, redone Alumni Bulletin, which now goes to 
the entire constituency of the Southern Union as well as to all alumni. The volume 
and number apply to several publications, rather than to the Southern Columns alone. 



CHAPTER XIV 

PUTTING THE EARN IN LEARN 

One of the purposes in moving- the school from the campus at Grays- 
ville to the spacious location at Collegedale was to provide a place for voca- 
tional training, a way for students to earn part of their expenses. The work 
experience program is far more than earning expenses ; it gives the student 
a respect for work, ability to co-operate with others, a feeling of self-re- 
liance, and pride in accomplishment. 

At Southern Missionary College there is preparation of students for 
good citizenship and successful living in the world as it is today and for 
preparation for the world to come. The ideal underlying the program in 
the college from its beginning has been, "Not to be ministered unto, but 
to minister." 

The Farm and Dairy 

In 1918 from Beechwood Academy in Indiana came the first farm 
manager of Southern Junior College, Mr. C. E. Ledford. He served the 
college for fifteen years and was known as the most diversified farmer in 
the county. He came in those early days when suitable housing for faculty 
was unknown, but he and his wife were willing to live in one of the tenant 
houses above the lime quarry. 

Mr. Ledford had charge of the farm and the dairy and with both he 
did outstanding work. He put the college on the honor roll of the Dairy 
Herd Improvement Association. 

All the hay and grain were raised for fourteen mules and horses and 
fifty cows. From twelve to fifty students were employed each year, and 




Threshing 



84 



PUTTING THE EARN IN LEARN 



85 



no outside help was used at any time. The garden produced the vegetables 
needed for the school, and the women were busy during the summer doing 
the canning. 

In 1920 Mr. C. H. Moyers gave the money to set out a sixteen-acre 
peach orchard on the hill back of the faculty houses on old Ajjison Pike. 
Later the peach orchard was moved on top of the same hill. Some years 
the yield reached 3000 bushels. Also Mr. Ledford set out three acres of 
pears, five acres of apples, four acres of strawberries, and other fruits. 

In 1931 the cannery put up 333 gallons of spinach, 150 gallons of beets, 
75 gallons of sauerkraut, besides blackberries and green beans. One 
hundred gallons of peach butter, five tons of grapes put up in half gallon 
tins of juice, and 320 bushels of potatoes were set aside for the kitchen 
that year. 

In 1922 Mr. Ledford lost his right arm while working with the corn 
shredder, but the tenth day after the tragedy, he was back at his work and 
finished the harvesting of the fall crop. For eight years he continued as 
farm manager with the use of his left arm only. 

In 1930, when a student working with him misunderstood instructions; 
Mr. Ledford lost his left arm, also in the shredder. Never a word of com- 
plaint was heard in the remaining three 
years he continued as farm manager 
without either arm. It is such a spirit 
of sacrifice that has built Southern 
Missionary College. He retired from 
active service for the college in 1933. 
He lives in the community and sets an 
outstanding example by making his 
home and its surroundings beautiful. 

In 1938 the college owned 940 acres 
of land with 200 acres of it under culti- 
vation. There was a herd of 70 Jersey 
cows. 

Mr. H. J. Halvorsen was the farm 
manager from 1934 to 1940. Mr. John 
Pierson came to the college as farm 
manager in 1941. By 1949 the college 
had a dairy herd of 90 purebred Jersey 
and Holstein cows. Soon the dairy 
buildings were enlarged, shrubbery was 
planted, and white board fences took 
the place of barbed wire to beautify 
C. E. Ledford the grounds around the dairy. 

Dr. L. N. Holm who served as business manager and later as general 
manager, was here from 1954-58. He truly believed in farming but was 
forced to conclude that due to growing mechanization of farms it was no 
longer possible to carry it on here at the college without losing money. 
First the farm was phased out, then the cattle were sold, and finally the 
creamery was sold to Happy Valley Farms. 




8(5 



80 YEARS OF PROGRESS 



The lumber and other materials in the barn were given to Laurelbrook 
School in return for taking the building down and hauling it to their 
campus on the mountain above Dayton, Tennessee. The lumber was used in 
some of its academy buildings. 

Thatcher Hall is now located about where the old barn and creamery 
stood. Since that time the remaining acreage has been rented periodically 
to cattle raisers and horse owners. 

The College Press 




First Home of the College Press 

The College Press has had three homes on the Collegedale campus. 
Mr. J. P. McGee started the press in one of the tenant houses above the 
quarry. Three papers were issued : The Southern Union Worker, Field 
Tidings, and The Southern Junior College Bulletin. When the College 
Press was moved from its first home, the building became a residence for 
some time, and then it burned. 

The second home of the College Press was the new building erected 
by the conference workers "bee" and was located where Hackman Hall is 
now. 

The Southern Publishing Association in Nashville had put in new 
equipment, and, as a result, gave several pieces that it had on hand to the 
College Press. Included in the gift were a Monotype typesetting machine, 
a No. 2 Miehle cylinder press, two job presses, a power cutter, a stitcher, 
and numerous pieces of minor equipment. Before this, all type was set 
by hand. 

In 1925, Mr. W. C. Starkey came to take charge of the printing and 
put it on a commercial basis. No outside help was employed, and it pro- 
vided work for twenty-five to forty students. 

Because of limited space, printing classes were held in the basement 
of the administration building, and the press work was done in the new 
press building. Mr. Starkey continued as manager of the press until 1934. 



PUTTING THE EARN IN LEARN 



87 




The Second College Press — Exterior 




Interior View 



The second home of the press was turned into the "Press Apart- 
ments." This building was later removed from the campus when plans 
were made for construction of the science building. 

In 1944 the hosiery mill was discontinued, and the building that had 
been erected for it became the third home of the College Press. During the 
twenty-seven years that the press has been there, it has done commercial 
work and has provided employment for many students. 

For many years Mr. B. F. Summerour, a faithful supporter of SJC 
and a long-time board member, entrusted the press with very large print- 
ings for his widely known cotton seed business. 



88 



80 YEARS OF PROGRESS 




The Present Press 

At the present time the College Press sales are close to one-half 
million dollars a year. The press enjoys a reputation for quality work and 
is one of the larger printers in the Chattanooga-Cleveland area. It is well 
stocked with some of the latest graphic arts equipment. 

A graphic arts training program in the College now gives those 
specializing in this course actual on-the-job experience in many phases of 
the graphic arts, as well as awarding an A.D. diploma. 

The College Press during its years of expansion and growth has been 
blessed with a number of very capable and ingenious managers. Following 
Mr. Starkey, the late Mr. William Kierstein managed the Press. At various 
times since then the following have managed this operation: Mr. Albert 
Hall, Mr. Ben Wood, Mr. B. M. Preston, Mr. H. F. Meyer, Mr. Walter 
Herrell, and Mr. Noble Vining twice. Mr. Vining is the present manager, 
and the future of this operation looks bright. 




PUTTING THE EARN IN LEARN 



89 



The Basket Factory 

To provide work for women to earn their expenses, Mr. Talge provided 
machinery and money for a building to start a basket factory. Mr. W. E. 
Bailey was the manager of this new industry. The sweet gum, black gum, 
and tupelo logs were shipped from Mississippi. The basket factory location 
is now occupied by the grounds department; however, the first operations 
in preparing the logs was done in the barn. A boiling vat for logs was 
installed. There were troughs for steaming the splints while an old tractor 




■<£: 



•*f "JDIh." - * 





^mtf 









Mr. M. R. Trammell beside the truck that moved baskets to market. 




The old basket factory building which later became the broom factory, is now occupied 
by the grounds department. 



90 



80 YEARS OF PROGRESS 



furnished the power. The mules hitched to the wagons hauled water from 
the creek, and the work of basket weaving was on its way. A large 
electrically operated machine in the barn took the huge logs and peeled 
them into long strips of veneer. 

In the basket factory, the young women nimbly braided the baskets 
and shaped the handles, while in another section the young men fashioned 
banana hampers for the market. When a hundred dozen baskets were on 
hand, they turned their attention to market baskets. 

As early as December 14, 1921, a car load of baskets was shipped from 
the college, and the following July two car loads stood on the tracks. 

The basket industry seems to have thrived only a few years. 

The Service Station 

The service station was built by the conference workers "bee" in 1919 
at the time the barn was built. It was first used as a blacksmith shop by 
Mr. B. J. Fountain. But, as the college grew and cars multiplied on the 
campus, tanks were installed to dispense gasoline. Acetylene welding had 
replaced the work of the blacksmith, and the blacksmith shop became a 
service station. 

Mr. Harmon Starr took care of the sale of gasoline for some time. For 
one summer a student, Joe Gardner, was in charge of it, and then Mr. C. A. 
Lang from the Carolina Conference followed him in 1949. One section of 
the building was used as a shoe repair shop operated by Mr. Barney Hagan. 
In later years a barber shop in that room filled a community need. 

Mr. Lang was needed at the maintenance department, and then Mr. 
Barney Hagan gave kindly, courteous service at the garage. 

In 1962, construction was started on a new service station along with 
the building of the College Plaza. The shopping center and service station 
were opened in April of 1963. Mr. Victor Taylor served the college as 
manager of the service station from then until 1965 when he transferred 
to the engineering department as the mechanic for all the school vehicles. 
The service station was then leased to Mr. Beecher Smith who had just 
moved to Collegedale from Birmingham, Alabama. 




The College Store, Post Office, and Service Station, 1940-63. 



PUTTING THE EARN IN LEARN 



91 




Barney looks for trouble. 




The College Service Center 



A certain Mr. Schroeder in Kentucky wanted his son, Bill, to have a 
Christian education. But money was scarce, and the work he did best 
wasn't one of the industries at the new school at Collegedale. Thus, in 
addition to his personal luggage, Bill loaded into the wagon one of the old 
type broom presses, winders, and clippers — all operated by hand. The rest 



92 



80 YEARS OF PROGRESS 



of the wagon he loaded with broom corn. His father assured Bill that if he 
could make enough brooms to earn his expenses, there was no doubt but 
that the college would help him sell them. Doubtlessly, Bill never knew 
that he had bequeathed to the college one of its most productive industries. 

The first broomshop operated by the college started in 1924 and was 
located where the Central Heating Plant now stands. When it was moved 
to the old laundry building, a motor was added to make the manufacturing 
of brooms easier and faster. The industry grew and expanded and was 
moved in 1930 to the building now occupied by the grounds department. 

In this industry 45 or 50 students work all or part of their way each 
year. In 1960 students earned $43,637.06 in the broom factory. Mr. Frank 
Fogg, the manager, now deceased, gave these figures concerning the 
quantities of materials used in a year: 

260 tons of broom corn 
13 tons of broom wire 
6,000 lbs. of twine 

4 car loads of broom handles 

"And how many brooms does that make?" you ask. 

"Twenty-six thousand brooms," comes the reply. 

"What a lot of dirt would go before that many brooms!" 

"Has any student made an outstanding record in piece work?" is the 
next question. 

"Yes, Nat Halverson, working on piece work, made an outstanding 
record — 300 dozen brooms in one week!" 

The College Broom Factory is not only one of the oldest industries on 
the campus, but one of the most profitable. In 1969 the Broom Factory was 
honored with beautiful new quarters on McKee Road. Since moving into 




Interior of New Broom Factory 



PUTTING THE EARN IN LEARN 



93 




~ ■ . . 



The College Broom Factory 

new quarters, the operation has expanded rapidly and closed the fiscal year 
1971-72 with over a million dollars in sales. This included the sales of its 
subsidiary, Supreme Broom and Mop, which is a rack- jobbing operation, 
marketing brooms, mops, and brushes on specially designed racks in 
supermarkets. 

In October, 1970, Mr. Frank Fogg resigned as manager because of ill 
health. He had served for 20 years and provided over a million dollars in 
student labor and approximately $350,000 in profits to the school. At that 
time Mr. Don Spears took over as manager and Mr. Jake Westbrook has 
continued as sales manager. 

The Puffery 

Tucked away in the side of the hill that rises up behind Jones Hall 
was a brown and white wooden building that was known as "The Puffery." 
There two young men operated the guns that shot puffed wheat every six 




94 



80 YEARS OF PROGRESS 








Frank Fogg, manager of the College Broom Shop from 1954-70. Don Spears, left be- 
came manager in 1970 and is still manager. 




Furniture made by College Wood Products which was in operation from 1931-56. 



PUTTING THE EARN IN LEARN 95 

minutes. It was an industry established in 1938 to provide work for women 
and was under the direction of Mr. Ray Olmsted. 

The women made cellophane wraps, filled them with wheat puffs, 
and sealed the sacks. Five women packaged 100 dozen sacks each day. 
There were five salesmen employed to sell "that tempting, crispy, tasty 
cereal known as Golden Grain Puffed Wheat." 

Pecan Shelling 

Two carloads of pecans were ordered from Texas to start a new indus- 
try. This industry was doomed from its beginning. Those in the pecan 
shelling business in the South received 10c per hour while the students 
were to receive 25c per hour in the new industry. The pecans were too 
small for the shelling machines, and the machines had to be discarded. The 
short duration of the new industry came to an end when it was discovered 
that the two carloads of pecans had spoiled. 

The Hosiery Mill 

In the basement of the Normal Building in 1931, the Bryan Hosiery 
Mill Company set up its equipment and employed sixty-eight workers. The 
student pay roll amounted to $475 per week. This was a year-round industry 
and gave employment to a large number of women. 

In 1934 the mill was employing more students and producing 425 dozen 
pairs of hose each week. Some operated the machines that knit the hose; 
others worked in the sewing department where the hose were looped and 
seamed while others mended the imperfect ones. The mill at Collegedale 
manufactured the hose, which were dyed and finished in Chattanooga. 

In 1937 a modern brick building was erected to house this industry 
for which the company paid the college $200 rent per month. This building 
is now the College Press. 

In its later years on the campus the mill produced 47,000 dozen hose 
each year. In October, 1944, the Hosiery Mill made its last pair of hose. 

Wood Products 

In 1931 a new industry was started on the main floor of the Normal 
Building, the manufacturing of wicker-ware ferneries, flower stands, lamp 
stands, foot stools, and sewing baskets, with Mr. E. E. Bacus in charge. 
Eight students assembled Gilman Deck Rockers that year at the rate of 
100 chairs per day. 

The following year the Wood Products had an order for 7,000 pieces 
of six different articles of furniture it was making. In 1933 a shop was 
built with a basement to provide a storage place for dry lumber and a sec- 
tion for heavy furniture; on the main floor were assembly benches and a 
light finishing machine, while on the second floor was the paint shop. 

Mr. T. R. Huxtable, a 1922 graduate of Southern Junior College, had 
taught manual training, and was in charge of Wood Products from 1934-37. 

Additional space and new machinery were added in 1939 at a cost of 
$5,000. That year Wood Products was turning out ironing boards, step lad- 
ders, kitchen stools, lawn chairs, and Venetian blinds, using a car load of 
lumber each month. The production amounted to $20,000 per month. 



80 YEARS OF PROGRESS 




Interior view of College Wood Products 




Wood Products 

In 1940 Wood Products was turning out dressers, book racks, sewing 
tables, and cabinets. The following year several thousand pieces of un- 
finished furniture were manufactured under the direction of Mr. John 
Gepford. That year the building was enlarged with two additions. Forty- 
three students were employed in 1941. By 1951, over 125 students were 
earning their way in this industry. 

Through the years churn dashers, butter molds, picture frames, stools, 
chairs, and bookcases were made. 

The industry that had provided the earning for much learning at 
Southern Missionary College was completely destroyed by fire July 3, 1956. 
The insurance from this loss was invested in erecting the building for the 
McKee Bakery, Plant No. 1. 



PUTTING THE EARN IN LEARN 



97 




The Wood Products in Flames, 1956 

Dixie Co-op 

This was the married students answer to the problem of cutting the 
cost of food. The Dixie Co-op was started by Robert Haege, a World War 
II veteran, and aided by Lawrence Scales, president of the Student 
Association. 

Students paid in 50^ a week to belong to the organization and in return 
could buy their groceries at cost. It was open only certain hours during 
the day. 

After a time the College Store took it over because by buying in larger 
quantities, it received more discount and was able to mark up a six percent 
profit and still sell as cheap as the Co-op. 



Auto Expediter 

This business was started in Mr. Charles Fleming's office in 1949, after 
the war when automobiles were in short supply. Under fleet contract these 
were plus cars for the dealers who sold them to the college at a small 
margin of profit. The college in turn sold them to denominational workers. 

This business lasted for about two years on a strong basis and then 
ran for three or four more years. In June 1950, 286 cars were sold. The 
business made around $17,000 profit a year. 



98 



80 YEARS OF PROGRESS 




The first laundry, built in the school year 1918-19. 

Laundry 

Mr. Talge gave the first laundry equipment to the college. That 
laundry simply took care of the students needs and did no commercial work 
at all. 

The modern laundry plant was built in 1947 and has since been re- 
modeled several times. Mr. Grover Edgmon was manager of the laundry 
from 1960-70, the longest anyone has served in that capacity. Mr. Robert 
Adams joined the school as manager of the laundry in 1970 and diligently 
promoted the linen service plan to hospitals and nursing homes, greatly 




The Collegedale Laundry. This building has been remodeled since this picture was made. 



PUTTING THE EARN IN LEARN 



99 



enlarging the volume of business. The plant has been highly automated 
during the 1971-72 fiscal year, and also during this period a smaller 
laundry and dry cleaning plant, together with a public outlet for personal 
work, was constructed and opened in the College Plaza. The older plant 
is now used entirely for commercial work. 

The commercial laundry rental service supplies linens for a number 
of area hospitals, nursing homes, and motels. The hospital services have 
gone from $11,000 in 1970 to $21,000 in 1972. The laundry has purchased 
a 22-foot diesel van for delivery. The soiled linen is brought from the 
hospitals in fiber glass carts, which are also sterilized before being returned 
with the sterile linen. 

During the 1971-72 school year, 15 students were employed part time 
and a number of student wives were employed full time. Two thousand 
seven hundred dollars was paid for student labor for the month of April 
that year. The year before it was $1700 for April. 

Collegedale Bindery 

There is no clank of machinery, dust, or smoke in such an industry as 
bookbinding. This industry was started at SMC in 1936 in the northwest 
corner of the old Normal Building with Mr. Hollis Olsen in charge. The 
equipment for it was built here on campus. 

During the time the bindery was in operation, it did work for the 
University of Chattanooga and also bound books for the Medical Society. 
Its eye-catching advertising slogan read, "Bound to Please." 

Later the College Press took over the operation and ran it on a small 
scale but not commercially. Then its operation was discontinued, but was 




Former Collegedale Bindery now Film/Sound Productions Building. 



100 



80 YEARS OF PROGRESS 



re-opened in 1962 in beautiful new quarters on Industrial Road under the 
leadership of Mr. W. E. Cushman. 

Following Mr. Cushman's retirement, Mr. Ivan Groulik managed the 
business for a number of years. Mr. Groulik then moved to Wyoming, and 
Mr. Wayne Barto, who had been production manager, took over as manager 
until 1973. The operation provided a great deal of student labor. Through 
the years the salesmen added new books to their line of sales and also 
promoted the sale of the National Geographic pamphlets that are catalogued 
under 52 sub-titles. 

Operation of the bindery ceased for the second time in January, 1973. 
The building is now occupied by Film/Sound Productions. 

Collegedale Interiors 

On January 1, 1971, Collegedale Interiors was born. Its growth was 
rather erratic, and as of July 1, 1972, was taken over as the carpet and 
furniture division of Collegedale Distributors. It is now operated privately. 

Collegedale Hydroponics 

Early in 1972 the college inaugurated Collegedale Hydroponics. This 
is a process of growing vegetables without soil, in troughs which contain 
sterile pea gravel and nutrient solution. 

Mr. Don Spears who is manager of the broom shop is also manager 
of hydroponics. Mr. Noble Kearney is the agronomist who is overseeing 
the production and selling of the tomatoes. It also provides other growers 
with plants, greenhouses, and nutrients. 



\\ 




A portion of the Commercial Greenhouse in which tomatoes are produced for sale. 



PUTTING THE EARN IN LEARN 



101 



Maintenance and Construction 

From catching mice in Maude Jones Hall to repairing leaky faucets, 
the men from the maintenance department have worked anywhere on the 
campus. Through the years, students 
have gained experience in being car- 
penters, bricklayers, plumbers, elec- 
tricians, painters, campus-face-lifters, 
or just handy fixers! 

The maintenance department once 
occupied a space 32x80 feet in the 
basement of the men's dormitory. At 
that time there was a ramp on the 
south end of the building. Mainte- 
nance services were moved to Lynn 
Wood Hall. 

Later a small space in the base- 
ment of the College Store, with 
entrance from the back, was the 
maintenance department. Mr. George 
Pearman was superintendent, and 
Mr. C. A. Lang was in charge of 
electrical problems, plumbing, and 
building supplies, At a cost of $600 
the space under the store was en- 
larged to 4,200 square feet. 

In 1950 the maintenance building was erected. It included a metal 
work shop, a welding shop, and a woodworking shop. At that time twenty- 
five students were employed in this service organization. 

In the years between 1953 and 1956 the maintenance service grew 
from fixing faucets to services including construction, buildings and 




George Pearman 




Engineering Department 



102 



80 YEARS OF PROGRESS 



grounds, central heat, cabinet work, 
central supply, central trucking, a 
hardware store, the fire department, 
and maintenance of the telephone 
lines and power lines. Mr. Pearman 
supervised all the building and con- 
struction on the campus. 

Following Mr. Pearman's depar- 
ture to build a new academy near 
Calhoun, Ga., Mr. Perry Coulter took 
over as manager of the maintenance 
and construction department in 1955. 
Mr. Coulter continued in this ca- 

rpacity until 1962 when Mr. Francis 
Costerisan took over what is now 
known as the engineering department 
and has continued until the present 
time. Under Mr. Costerisan's tenure, 
the College has constructed the 
College Plaza, the wing on Talge Hall, 
Thatcher Hall, Wright Hall, the Mc- 
Kee Library, the Physical Education 
Center, the new Summerour Hall, the P>room Factory, and the new student 
center-cafeteria. 

Grounds 

In January, 1970, Mr. Charles Lacey came to SMC as superintendent 
of grounds. Mr. Lacey had his own landscaping business, nursery, and 
garden center in Missouri before coming to SMC. The beautiful campus is 
a living, growing testimonial to the success of his offorts. He also runs 
a nursery business for the college, and is cooperating with the community 
in making Collegedale a beautiful city. 




Mr. Francis Costerisan, head 
of engineering department since 1962. 




Randall Dodd, Mr. Lacey and Ken Wilson 



PUTTING THE EARN IN LEARN 



103 



A New Approach To Student Work Opportunities 

During the 1950's it became increasingly apparent that the need for 
additional buildings and equipment in both the instructional and industrial 
areas far exceeded the supply of funds available. Early in 1956 the College 
Board took action, looking with favor toward the establishment on or near 
the campus of industries operated privately by individuals sympathetic 
with the college's objectives. Such industries would employ students, allow- 
ing the college to direct its available funds toward much needed expansion 
of instructional facilities. 

Sanborn Spring Company now Newcomb Springs Company 




Previous to the Board's action, Mr. Robert H. Sanborn had started 
a spring company that employed a few students. After getting underway 
in 1954, he began to employ more students, one of his objectives being to 
help students through the college. The firm employed from 15 to 20 
students each year, his total number reaching 40. 

In 1968 Mr. and Mrs. Robert Sanborn sold out their operation to the 
Newcomb Springs Company and moved to Avon Park, Fla. Their succes- 
sors have continued to employ a few students and some full-time personnel 
from the community. 

Collegedale Cabinets, Inc. 




Born in a department of the college, Collegedale Cabinets grew up 
in one room of the housing for Buildings and Grounds. Eventually, it 
expanded to constructing cabinets for new buildings on and off the campus. 
On July 1, 1955, the shop was set up as a separate department. Ten months 
later, in harmony with the philosophy above, Collegedale Cabinets was sold 



104 



80 YEARS OF PROGRESS 




McKee Baking Company Plant No. 1. 

to a corporation owned by Mr. Charles Fleming, Jr. and Mr. William J. 
Hulsey. Mr. Hulsey took over the management when Mr. Fleming re- 
turned to his former position as business manager of the college in 1958. 

Collegedale Cabinets has continued to grow, restricting its output to 
laboratory furniture and hospital case work. Annual sales now approach 
two million dollars a year and are still growing. 

McKee Baking Company 

Mr. and Mrs. 0. D. McKee took over King's Bakery, Inc., in Chatta- 
nooga in 1951. The business prospered and soon outgrew its building. In 
1956 arrangements were made between the McKees and the college where- 
by a plant was built by the college on its property and leased to the 
McKees. 

Ever since the McKees moved to Collegedale, their business has grown 
fantastically each year. They now have 285,000 square feet of floor space 
in two plants. The new plant at the east end of McKee Road is one of the 
most highly automated snack cake-baking plants in the world. In 1972 
they were producing over four million Little Debbies per day and had 
1,000 employees on their payroll. Forty completely air-conditioned tractor- 
trailers hauled these cookies into 42 different states. On their return trips 
two-thirds of them brought back materials used by the bakery or fresh 
farm produce. 



CHAPTER XV 

COLLEGE PLAZA 

In 1963 the 26,000 sq. ft. red brick shopping center had its grand 
opening. Dignitaries gave short speeches, the band played, and the crowd 
squinted in the sunlight. This center, built by the college construction 
crew, supervised by Mr. Francis Costerisan, had covered walks, air con- 
ditioning, background music, and parking space for 98 cars. 

Strolling from the north end, one passed the College Market, Credit 
Union, Collegedale Distributors, Southern Merchantile, and the Campus 
Kitchen. Turning left (roofed, but allowing three bench-encompassed 
trees to spread their branches) one passed the barber shop and washateria, 
crossed over to the beauty shop and Collegedale Insurance Company, the 
Book and Bible House, turned the corner and ended in the United States 
Post Office. 

Either the thinking was not big enough or the money was in short 
supply, anyway it was not long until most of the businesses needed more 
floor space. So in 1971, the new Village Market, valued at $350,000 and 
located at the south end of the plaza, was opened with special ceremonies. 
It is nearly two and one-half times as large as the former College Market. 
It has ten wide aisles as compared with the four aisles in the former 
market. 

The Village Market has been described as "the most unique market in 
Tennessee." The fully carpeted store has low ceilings between the gon- 
dolas, contrasting with the high ceilings around the perimeter. The store 
includes: a health and natural foods section; a courtesy counter where 




The New Village Market and Clifford C. Myers the manager. 



105 



106 



80 YEARS OF PROGRESS 



you may cash checks, obtain money orders, pay utility bills, etc.; central 
paging system throughout the market and parking lot; and an outlet for 
the Village Bakery which is run by Mr. Ivan Lyzenchuk. 

With the new Village Market came a shift in the other shops. South- 
ern Mercantile now occupies the building vacated by College Market. The 
State Farm Insurance Company moved into new quarters between the 
Village Market and the Post Office. The Campus Shop, a new business 
geared to students' needs, is located in the former mercantile building. 
Before this, the American National Bank East County Branch was added 
to the north end of the plaza. 

Going back a few years, the college store began in the 1916-17 school 
year in the first building erected on the campus. (This building was 
across the street from the McKee Bakery. The volunteer fire department 
burned it down in about 1967 as a practice project in fire fighting as it 
was to be torn down anyway.) 

The college store was later moved to the basement of Lynn Wood Hall 
where it remained until 1940 when it was moved into a building of its 
own. This building was located about in front of Wright Hall. The store 
remained there from 1940-63. 

A number of different persons have managed the store during the 
past years, but Mr. H. A. Woodward held the job longer than any 
of the others. He started in 1954 and even though officially retired now, 
he still works in the store. 




Mr. H. A. Woodward 



COLLEGE PLAZA 



107 



Mr. William Burkett became manager when the new market was 
opened in 1971. The next month after the opening of the market, the 
Burkett family were held all night as hostages while robbers were trying 
to open the safe. The robbers escaped with $10,000 in cash and checks but 
were apprehended and the money recovered. The younger men involved 
in the robbery were given eleven-year sentences. The older man, who 
planned the robbery, was sent to a psychiatric hospital. 

The new Village Market was not made of red brick as the other 
buildings were, but is white with aqua trim. When it was finished, it 
looked so good that the whole shopping center has been re-done to match it. 

Mr. Clifford Myers Jr. is the present manager of the Village Market, 
and Mr. Dan Boyce is associate manager. 




The old College Store and Service Station which served until 1963. 
The Campus Shop 

When the new Village Market was opened for business, the old College 
Market building was remodeled and occupied by Merchantile which left 
the former Mercantile building for remodeling and occupancy by a new 
business known as the "Campus Shop." It opened June, 1972, with Mrs. 
Kathryn Hammond as manager. The modern, artistic look was provided 
by Mrs. Betty Fleming, the interior decorator. 

The merchandise handled by the store is geared to student needs, 
such as: ready-to-wear, luggage, gift items, Hallmark cards, school sup- 
plies, all textbooks, paperback books, records, etc. 



108 



80 YEARS OF PROGRESS 



Southern Mercantile 

Southern Merchantile was started in Mr. Charles Fleming's office in 
1946. It consisted of a contract to sell Admiral appliances. Evan Richards, 
who became the manager, moved the business into the Press Apartments 
and expanded it. John Wilson was the next manager. He moved the 
business from the Press Apartments into a corner of the old store, but it 
still did not have room enough. 

Mr. Fleming suggested that he would buy the house he was living in 
for $10,000, if the College Board would let him use the money to make a 
complete basement under the store building to house Southern Mercantile. 
The Board agreed, and the basement was constructed. 

Mr. Bruce Ringer became manager in 1957 and still holds the same job. 
The business has grown from $50,000 a year to over $500,000 in 1972. 

When the College Plaza was enlarged, Mercantile was split into two 
organizations: Campus Shop and Southern Mercantile. Mercantile was 
moved into the former market which increased its floor space by about 
two-thirds. Because of the increased floor space it has been able to offer 
new lines for sale, such as: small hardware, expanded notions and appli- 
ances, etc. Mercantile now carries five lines of major appliances. 

Some of the early student managers of Mercantile were T. L. Brackett, 
Craig Parrish, Dick Northrop and George Yonce. 



Distributors 

Collegedale Distributors is a business that sells health foods to Dorcas 
Societies, super markets, health food stores, Book and Bible Houses, etc. 
They also handled tires and small appliances until recently. 

This business started on the campus in 1948 in the back of the old 
garage with Robert Haege as manager. When the basement of the old 
store was finished, Distributors shared some of the space with Mercantile. 
When the College Plaza was constructed, it had a section of its own. 



Mr. John Goodbrad was manager of Distributors from 1957-73. 
Don Glass became manager in 1973. 



Mr. 





Mr. Bruce Ringer, manager Southern 
Mercantile, 1957- 



Mr. John Goodbrad, manager Distribu- 
tors 1957-73. 



COLLEGE PLAZA 



109 



The territory covered by Distributors is all of the eastern United 
States. When a truck takes health foods to Minnesota, on the return trip 
it brings back flour. When a driver trucks health foods to New York, he 
returns with health foods from Europe. 

Distributors handle, to name a few, Loma Linda Foods, Elams, 
Wagners, Cedar Lakes, Joshua Company, Worthington, Madison, and 
Battle Creek (the latter three have been bought out by Miles Laboratories.) 

Distributors sold nearly $3 million worth of health foods in 1973. 

In 1975 Distributors was sold to the Landstrom Co., of California, but 
continued as Collegedale Distributors, Inc. under the same management. 

Credit Union 

Mr. George N. Fuller and Mr. Charles Fleming, Jr. were the founders 
of the Collegedale Credit Union in 1952. Flossie Rozell Smoot was treasurer 
and took care of all the office work on a part-time basis. She was followed 
by David Hess. 

By this time the Credit Union had grown until a full-time manager 
was needed. Mrs. Catherine Bushnell became the manager and served 
until 1969 when Mrs. Carol Herrell succeeded her. 

The Collegedale Credit Union, in 1973, had a membership of approx- 
imately 2000. It is open to members of the Seventh-day Adventist Church 
for savings and loans. In 1973 there were four full-time employees, and 
its assets were over two and a quarter million dollars. The Credit Union 
has been able to give top dividend rates for many years on its savings or 
shares. 

Some of the presidents of the board have been George Fuller, Don 
West, Bill Hulsey, and currently, Wayne VandeVere. 




Mrs. Catherine Bushnell, Mrs. Carol Herrell, manager Mrs. Kathryn Hammond, 
manager of Credit Union Collegedale Credit Union manager Campus Shop since 
1959-69. since 1969. 1972. 



110 



80 YEARS OF PROGRESS 
Views of the College Plaza 







?35Pf 






^ •-- 111 





COLLEGE PLAZA 



111 



(Top Picture) The Dairy Bar 
about 1956. 



(Middle) The Campus Kitchen 
when first built. 



(Bottom) The Campus Kitchen 
after being remodeled. 




CHAPTER XVI 

TWO ADMINISTRATION BUILDINGS 




Lynn Wood Hall 

When Professor Leo Thiel returned to Southern Junior College in 1922, 
dormitories for the students were nearing completion. They had served not 
only as homes for the students, but as classrooms, offices, a chapel, and 
library. Now the great need of Southern Junior College was an administra- 
tion building. 

The General Conference Spring Council, April 8, 1923, voted $25,000 
toward the building. Without a doubt it would cost at least $70,000, but 
with the assurance of $25,000 in hand, the first shovel of earth was turned 
for the foundation. 

When the new building was ready for the plaster, the student organi- 
zation, the Sojuconians, put on a campaign to raise $5,000 for a heating 
system. It was a tremendous undertaking for a student body with very 
little of this world's goods! Their one thought was to succeed in putting 
across the campaign — this was their school! No one in that student body 
will forget the joy that was felt when the campaign ended — a success. 

During President Thiel's second term, the porch was put on the men's 
dormitory, the barn was enlarged and the dairy building and the Normal 
Building were erected. Later the Normal Building became the Academy 
Building and has since been replaced by the new home economics building. 

112 



TWO ADMINISTRATION BUILDINGS 



113 



Several major changes in Lynn Wood Hall have been made through 
the years. When the science building was erected, the space used by the 
chemistry laboratory at the south end of the main floor provided more 
office space. The physics laboratory moved out of the basement, making 
more classrooms available. The store and post office, housed in the base- 
ment, were eventually moved, and more classrooms were added. 

"Soft Seats Campaign" 

In 1956, the chapel of the administration building was remodeled and 
enlarged. The Student Association put on a drive for new seats, which 
was known as the "Soft Seats Campaign." 

The students were divided into three groups: Deep South, Border 
States, and Independents, depending on where your home was located. 




Before 



The above picture shows the enlarged and remodeled Lynn Wood Hall chapel with 
the new drapes and new organ. A closer look discloses the fact that the first rows 
are folding chairs and the rest are old seats. The picture below shows the new seats. 



After 




114 



80 YEARS OF PROGRESS 



Soft seats became a reality when chapel convened on January 4, 1957. 
The money for the seats came by asking, begging, cajoling and even dig- 
ging into one's own pockets ; and also by appropriation from the Southern 
Union Conference. The seats had dark maple backs with light red cushions. 
There were two main aisles instead of the former one main aisle and two 
outside aisles. With the balcony, the chapel seated 545 persons. 

The administration building was called Lynn Wood Hall in remem- 
brance of the deep spiritual mold Dr. Wood gave to Southern Junior 
College, "A School of His Planning." 

Kenneth A. Wright Hall 

In 1967, Wright Hall, the new administration building, was completed 
and all the administrative offices were moved out of Lynn Wood Hall into 
the new building. This move furnished more classroom space and offices 
for teachers in Lynn Wood Hall. The old chapel was divided into two 
classrooms and several offices for teachers. 

The new building houses the offices of the president, the academic 
dean, the business manager, the director of college relations and alumni, 
the dean of student affairs, the business offices, the admissions personnel, 
and counseling and testing. 






Wright Hall, The Administration Building 



TWO ADMINISTRATION BUILDINGS 



115 



The third floor has a lounge area and the main dining room for the 
cafeteria. Connected to this building from the back, is the new cafeteria 
and student center. 

The plaque on Wright Hall reads : 

KENNETH A. WRIGHT HALL 

NAMED FOR 

KENNETH A. WRIGHT 

WHOSE PRESIDENCY 

OF THE COLLEGE FROM 1943 TO 1955 

WAS MARKED BY A DEDICATION 

TO CHRISTIAN EDUCATION, BY THE ACHIEVEMENT 

OF FACULTY AND ACADEMIC EXCELLENCE, 

AND BY ATTAINING SENIOR STATUS 

WITH FULL ACCREDITATION 

FOR THE COLLEGE. 



' '«| I 




President's Office 




Business Manager's Office 



CHAPTER XVII 

Fire Extinguishers 

Eighteen miles to the nearest water main ! Collegedale had no help in 
case of fire. Through the early days of the history of Southern Junior 
College, students were trained in fire drills, but fire-fighting equipment 
was scarce. 

It was during the chapel hour in 1921 that the women interrupted the 
speaker with, "There is a fire above the quarry." 

Sparks from a passing train had started the fire. At the time, no one 
was living in the house, but the Marshall family and later the Ledford 
family had lived in it. That morning it went on record as the first fire on 
the campus. 

After the College Press was moved from the tenant house above the 
quarry, it was used as a dwelling for some time. It burned to the ground 
and was recorded as fire number two. At that time, there was little fire- 
fighting equipment in or near Collegedale. 

The third fire was the "house by the side of the road," where Elder 
Field had lived. At the time it burned, it was being used as a store house. 

Plans were made to build a 30,000-gallon reservoir on the ridge back 
of the women's dormitory in the school year of 1919-20. The tank was to 
be built high on the ridge to give water pressure. The first plan was to 
build a cable to take the material up to the top of the ridge. The gravel for 
the tank was to be taken from the creek below and the two horses, "Ned" 
and "Fly," were informed that they were to cart gravel from the creek to 
the top of the ridge for the 30,000-gallon tank. The plan for the cable 
proved to be only a hope. "Ned" and "Fly" took their time to think about 
the trips from the creek up that steep incline. 




'Ned" and "Fly" 



116 



FIRE EXTINGUISHERS 



117 




Fire Drill 



Some exceptionally fine farm wagons had been built at Graysville, 
and three of them were brought to the Southern Junior College campus. 
"Ned" and "Fly," assisted by the mules "Beck," "Maude," "Bell," and 
"Dick," hitched to the wagons, had much to do in the building of the tank. 
The engineers (doubtlessly slightly influenced by the horses and mules) 
decided to build the tank somewhat below the top of the ridge. Water from 
the spring was piped to the reservoir on the mountain side, a distance of 
2,700 feet. The completed reservoir furnished a 75-pound water pressure 
at the mains near the buildings, making the risk of loss from fire much 
less. 

Eventually this tank developed a serious leak, and a second tank was 
built on the hill back of the tabernacle in 1932. This reservoir holds 40,000 
gallons and is connected with the sprinkler system. The first reservoir was 
replaced in 1936 and enlarged to a capacity of 90,000 gallons. 

Mr. Paul Mouchon, the college engineer, organized a fire department 
in 1930. It was composed of a fire chief with two assistants in general 
command and five companies. There were two hose companies with five 
men assigned to each hose cart, two ladder companies, and one company in 
charge of fire extinguishers. 

Soon the fire alarm sounded to give the new department a trial. Such 
a dashing about! The hoses were connected, and a huge stream of water 
was played on the women's dormitory where the fire was supposed to be. 
Although the school was equipped with sprinkler system, everyone felt 
more secure with the "hook and ladder groups." 

Two or three small fires were put out by the sprinkler system, but no 
major fire called for attention for the next twelve years. 

It was on a Friday evening in 1942 when the students were ready 
for vesper service that the fire whistle sounded. Fire had started in the 
dry kiln in the College Industries. The boys gathered forty or fifty fire 



118 



80 YEARS OF PROGRESS 



extinguishers, and the girls brought buckets. The fire spread rapidly. The 
fire truck arrived from a near-by town, but soon its supply of water was 
low. The girls formed two lines from the creek to the truck to get a bucket 
brigade in action. The boys used the fire extinguishers, and the main 
building with much of the lumber was saved. 

In 1945 a small fire was accidentally started at the pre-school building 
when Mr. A. C. Williams was destroying a wasp nest on the porch. Since 
the building was off campus on the Apison Pike, the only fire-fighting 
equipment was a leaky hose, some buckets, and a one-inch pipe of water. 
It was quickly extinguished. 

The campus water system was connected with city water about 1947. 

Fire in the Tabernacle 



The next fire was on January 24, 1948, one of those rare occasions 
when the ground was white with snow. The superintendent was at the 
desk to announce that the Sabbath School classes would separate for study 
when Elder Beckner stepped to the desk and quietly announced that there 
was a fire in the furnace room of the tabernacle. 

"Will each one take his chair and leave quietly and in order from 
the tabernacle?" the pastor asked. A group of men came to the front and 
carried out the piano; others carried out the public address system. There 
was no panic ; everyone left the building in order, each carrying his chair. 

Fire extinguishers were put to work. The conflagration was confined 
to the boiler room. Thirty minutes after the fire started it was out, and 
the congregation went home to change clothes and warm wet feet. The 
damage was about $3,000. 




- ■ fW^ 




An Early Fire Truck at Collegedale 



FIRE EXTINGUISHERS 



119 



Tri-Community Fire Department 

In 1952, the Junior Chamber of Commerce in Collegedale appointed 
a fire prevention committee headed by Mr. Robert Sanborn. Mr. Sanborn 
donated a Ford oil truck for the project. The truck was given a coat of 
red paint and was converted into a water tanker, fitted with a pump and 
a rack for hose. A new Chevrolet truck was purchased in December, 1954, 
by public subscription. Today this truck is used as a reserve unit. 

A 500 gallon-a-minute pumper-tanker, the approximate cost of which 
was $19,000, was purchased by the fire department board in 1967. 




Collegedale Mayor Fred Puller accepts the keys for the Tri-Community Fire Depart- 
ment's Saulsbury pumper-tanker from Allen Saulsbury. Fire officers are (1. to r.) 
Lt. Fred Krall, Lt. Phillip Proctor, Capt. Duane Pitts, Asst. Chief Doug Hilhard, 
Chief C. Edward Avant. 




Ward-LaFrance Pumper Tanker 



120 



80 YEARS OF PROGRESS 




The 1968 Fire Department Officers 
Left to right: Robert H. Sanborn, chairman of the board; Robert G. Swofford, chief; 
Edward C. Avant, assistant chief; John Hayes, captain. Second row: Steve Hayes, 
training officer; Ted Palmer, lieutenant; Duane Pitts, lieutenant. 



Mr. Fred Fuller became chairman of the fire department board in 
1968, when Mr. Sanborn moved to Florida, which position he still holds. Mr. 
Kenneth Spears is the secretary and Mr. Ellsworth McKee is treasurer. 
Dr. H. H. Kuhlman is the only original member of the board who still 
serves. The board consists of two representatives from each of the follow- 
ing;: Ooltewah, Apison, Collegedale, SMC, two fire department officers, and 
the pastor of the Collegedale Church. 

Presently the fire department has eight units of fighting equipment. 
There are 38 volunteer firemen and four paid firemen. Mr. Edward Avant 
is the fire chief, Mr. Douglas Hilliard is the assistant chief, and a dis- 
patcher is on duty 24 hours a day. 

The present equipment includes a new custom-built American-La- 
France pumper-tanker for $26,000, another for $21,000, and a Ward- 
LaFrance custom built and factory rebuilt pumper-tanker. 

The fire station is just inside the campus and was erected by donated 
labor, mainly by the volunteers of the fire department. An office and a 
day room were added to the back of the fire house. There is also a fire 
substation on Highway 58 which has a two-man crew. 

In 1972 the fire department went into the ambulance business. Some 
months they have as many as 45 calls from the East County area. A 
registered nurse goes on every call. There are 48 volunteers in the 
ambulance personnel. 



FIRE EXTINGUISHERS 



121 







Ambulance service inaugurated in 1972. 
A $256,000 Fire! 

A rapidly spreading fire that started in a spray booth destroyed the 
furniture factory operated by Southern Missionary College on July 3, 1956. 
The fire started from a spark caused by a short circuit in the wires of a 
lighting fixture in a booth in the finishing room where a young man was 
spraying furniture. The flames spread so rapidly that fire extinguishers 
were unable to control the blaze. (See picture on page 97.) 

The Tri-Community Fire Department and the East Brainerd Fire 
department fought the blaze, which spread so fast that their combined 
efforts had no effect. The entire building was in flames in less than a 
quarter of an hour. Explosions caused by barrels of stain, varnish, and 
lacquer aided the flames. None of the fifty-seven employees was injured. 

The property loss amounted to $256,000. The plant was partially 
covered by insurance. The insurance was used in building a bakery, now 
occupied by the McKee Baking Co., and operated by an alumnus of 
Southern Junior College, O. D. McKee, '28. 

An Oil Tank Farm Fire 

The most spectacular fire that the Tri-Community Fire Department 
was called on for help, was the Southern Facilities gasoline tank farm 
fire in 1972. In appreciation for their efforts in fighting the large oil blaze, 
the firm presented the fire department with a check for $10,000 which was 
used to help purchase a new tanker-truck and pay for the repairs to an 
engine damaged when one of the tanks exploded into a ball of fire. 

Eliminate Fire Hazards and Come up with Smoke Problems 

Some of the fire hazards of the early days of the College were grad- 
ually taken care of. With the arrival of electricity the kerosene lamps 
were retired from service and in 1917, just before Thanksgiving Day, 



122 



80 YEARS OF PROGRESS 




Air pollution from the central heating 
plant. 



the two-foot piece of missing pipe 
was connected and the girls' new 
dormitory had steam heat for the 
first time. So the smoky oil stoves 
and the wood-burning heater in the 
basement dining room were no 
longer needed and no longer a fire 
threat. 

Each new building, as it was 
added to the campus, had its own 
furnace room for steam heat. 

In 1947, Mr. Fleming, the busi- 
ness manager, was able to secure 
four 150 horsepower locomotive- 
type boilers from the Federal 
Banks Agency. These were donated 
outright to the College. They had 
been set up for the Quaker Oats 
plant and were used about six 
weeks. One was given to Highland 
Academy and the other three be- 
came SMC's central heating plant. 
This was just before the days of 
air pollution consciousness. On 
some days, just to pass in front of 
Jones Hall on the sidewalk, sent 
girls to the ladies' lounge to scrub 
their feet and stockings with paper 
towels and soap to remove the soot. 



Two new boilers were ordered in 1963, and, although they would be 
fired by coal, they were guaranteed not to have any of the "fall out" 
that the previous boilers had. One of the long-awaited boilers was de- 
livered to the campus in good shape and was ready to be put into use to 
carry the heating load for the campus, and the second was on its way up 
from the south via Ringgold, Georgia. 

Evidently, the driver had been told of the shortcut from Ringgold to 
Collegedale, but he missed the first railroad crossing which was on level 
ground, and took the second one which was uphill. The boiler was being 
hauled on what is called a lowboy (see picture), and the driver failed to 
estimate that the lowboy would not clear the track. 

As he tried to cross over, the lowboy hit a high center and the brand 
new boiler was left high and dry on the tracks, and the tractor rig was 
unable to pull it off or back it up. It was almost time for the fast passenger 
train, the Georgian, southbound from Chicago to Atlanta, to arrive at 
this point. 

The driver took off on the run to a little filling station just north of 
the crossing, only to see the Georgian round the turn north of him and 
approximately three-fourths of a mile away. It was impossible for him 
to telephone now. So he ran down the track and tried to flag the train. 
It had so much momentum, traveling about 70 mph, that it could not stop. 
It plowed into the boiler, sending the trailer with the boiler on one side 
of the track and the tractor rig on the other. The locomotive was derailed 
and rolled over on its side, and the passenger cars were derailed with 



FIRE EXTINGUISHERS 



123 



people being thrown hither and yon in the cars. Not one person was hurt 
seriously, but the train damage and the boiler damage ran into the hundreds 
of thousands of dollars. 

When the replacement arrived and was duly installed, much to every- 
one's disgust, there was still air pollution. To solve this problem the 
boilers were converted from coal burners to gas, and the air pollution 
was ended. All the newer buildings are heated and cooled by electric air 
conditioning. 




The first boiler arrived safely. 




The second boiler after the train hit it. Also shown is the lowboy on which it was 
being transported. 



CHAPTER XVIII 

EDUCATING LEADERS 

The Collegedale Catchum Club (CCC) was a student club, organized 
April 1, 1919, with two goals in mind. The women's dormitory had been 
built by gift subscriptions, and to finish it $3,500 more was needed. The 
CCC took this as their first project and wrote letters to prospective donors. 
The arrival of the mail was the event of the day. The project was a success. 

The second goal of the club was to increase the enrollment of Southern 
Junior College. This goal was another letter-writing project and was also 
continued through personal contacts during the summer vacation. 

The Sojuconians (SOuthern JUnior COllege), organized in the school 
year of 1922-23 and continued for many years, was made up of the entire 
student body. Jere D. Smith was the first president. Their goal was 250 
students. The actual enrollment that fall was 228 students. 

Unfortunately, the only record of the organization is through news 
notes in the school papers, and consequently a complete, accurate record is 
not available. (See other material about S. A. in appendix, Page 268) 



President 

1922-23 Jere D. Smith 

1923-24 B. A. Wood 

1924-25 John S. Murchison 

1925-26 Carl Aiken 

1926-27 Clifford M. Bee 

1927-28 Millard C. Bradley 

1928-29 S. Horton McLennan 

1929-30 LaVeme Smith 

1930-31 Ottis Walker 

1931-32 Clarence Murphy 

1932-33 Albert Hall 

1933-34 John Duge 

1934-35 Menton Medford 

1936-37 Emery Brown 

1938-39 Evan Richards 

1939-40 James McLeod 

1941-42 Burgess Goodbrad 



Projects 



250 students 



A $5,000 project, putting the heating 
system in the administration building 



$1,000 improvement of the campus 

$1,500 for a concert piano for the 
chapel 

Improvement of the dining room, 
steam tables, new floor, men's en- 
trance 
$1,500 for library books 

Finishing the dining room 

Sponsored the first Youth Congress 

Furnishings for dormitories, linole- 
ums for floors, treads for stairs, etc. 

$712.75 

Porch on the women's dormitory, 
chairs, book cases for women's rooms, 
and new chairs for the men's parlor 



124 



EDUCATING LEADERS 



125 




%:f,..f,li 



The first union-wide Youth Congress 

The Sojuconians also built the sidewalk between the two dormitories 
and were responsible for the first unionwide Youth Congress ever held in 
North America. It was held in the tents pitched on the campus of 
Southern Junior College, May 22-25, 1933. 

A total of one thousand young people came from the eight states com- 
prising the Southern Union Conference. 

Elder C. H. Watson, president of the General Conference, Elder O. 0. 
Montgomery, Elder M. E. Kern, and Elder C. L. Bond came from the 
General Conference. Other guests were Miss Lora Clement, editor of the 
Youth's Instructor, Miss Lizzie Gregg of the Home Study Institute, Elder 
W. H. Anderson of Africa, Dr. B. G. Wilkinson, and President H. H. 
Hamilton of Washington Missionary College. 

Women's Dormitory Club 

The first women's club was organized in 1923, and for twenty years 
it was called Joshi Jotatsu Kai. This was a Japanese title meaning Ladies' 
Self-Improvement Society and was suggested by Mrs. F. W. Field, the 
wife of the Bible instructor. Pastor and Mrs. Field were former mission- 
aries to Japan. 

The Joshi Jotatsu Kai Club made a careful study of the usages of good 
society and proved to be a means of bringing out the talents for leadership 
to be found among the dormitory women. Occasional social gatherings, 
marches, and entertainments made possible a helpful and wholesome asso- 
ciation of the residents of both dormitories. For many years the girls had 
"Friendship Friends." 

In 1943 the name of the club was changed to Dasowakita, an Indian 
word meaning "Loyal hearts banded together in friendship for a purpose." 
It retained this name for eighteen years. 

The purposes of the club were to instill the principles of kindness 
and courtesy; to be immune to all things crude, unrefined or uncouth; to 
broaden the mental outlook; and to give helpful hints along the lines of 
culture and right living, smoothing away the rough edges of character, and 
leaving them as "a corner stone polished after the similitude of a palace." 

In recent years the dormitory women had as a project an interest 
in an orphanage. Each prayer band sponsored an orphan, and at Christmas 
time the club gave a party for the children. The club also sponsored 
a girl at Spicer College in India. Miss Edna Stoneburner had served as 
dean of women for many years, and, when she went to India in mission 
service in 1959, the women's club shared in her mission service by sponsor- 
ing an Indian girl at Spicer College. 



126 



80 YEARS OF PROGRESS 




Sigma Theta Chi, the dormitory women's club, sent 70 boxes, totaling over 800 pounds 
of clothes, toys, trinkets, soap, etc. to Vietnam. 

In 1961 the name of the club was changed to the Greek letters, Sigma 
Theta Chi, meaning Wisdom, Courage, Charm. 

The objectives of the Sigma Theta Chi are to provide programs of 
an interesting nature that will be entertaining as well as enlightening; to 
activate the spiritual life of each woman in the dormitory by organizing 
prayer bands and special dormitory activities; and to emphasize the de- 
velopment of the social graces. 

Some of their projects have been the donation of recreational equip- 
ment to the Moccasin Bend Hospital ; the annual Orphans Christmas Party ; 
bridal fashion shows; guest speakers on the care and styling of hair; 
talks and demonstrations on flower arranging; Easter egg hunts for under- 
priviledged children : a delicate mixture of information and entertainment 
aimed to make a lady a bit wiser, more courageous, and charming. 

Men's Dormitory Club 

In the early days of Southern Junior College the Better Men's Society 
was the first club organized in the men's dormitory. Club meetings were 
held each week and provided opportunity for developing leadership, for 
training in the social graces, for spiritual growth, and for entertainment. 

In 1926 this club put on a campaign, soliciting funds from parents 
and friends for improving the dormitory parlor. The club also raised 
money for a refrigerator for the dormitory. 



EDUCATING LEADERS 



127 



The club was re-organized in 1939 and named the Triangle Club. Its 
aim was to cultivate in its members the triangle of essentials of Christian 
manhood: the physical, mental, and spiritual powers. The club was to have 
hikes, pictures, and programs on an exchange basis with the women's club. 

In 1953, the club took the Greek letters Upsilon Delta Phi as its 
name and restated its aims: to foster a spirit of co-operation and leader- 
ship ; to promote an understanding of parliamentary practices ; to organize 
its members into positive action toward the development of Adventist 
ideals in the college; and to provide recreational activities and social 
functions. 

However, at a later date the club re-evaluated its purposes. Upsilon 
Delta Phi now endeavors to promote, through social activities, a spirit of 
Christian fellowship and co-operation based on true Adventist ideals. 

The club has coin-operated washers and dryers in the dormitory. The 
money from this is used for Christmas parties for children from a 
Chattanooga orphanage and is also used for dormitory improvements, 
such as the sauna bath. 




Xtc-, . 






The men of Upsilon Delta Phi gave a Christmas party for children from an orphanage. 



128 



80 YEARS OF PROGRESS 



Swimming Pool Campaigns 

On November 22, 1943, a campaign was begun by the students to 
raise funds for the health and recreation department. The money was for 
"a drinking fountain in the girls' home, new furnishings for the men's 
home, and last but not least, a swimming pool." 

In answer to the letters written, $3464.90 was received by March 
1944, which was $464.90 over the goal. 

The swimming pool progressed as far as having the hole dug for it. 
This was located at the foot of the hill behind Lynn Wood Hall. Unex- 
pected problems developed, and further progress was not possible. After 
some years the hole was filled in and that was the end of that swimming 
pool. However, there was approximately $2000 left over from the cam- 
paign. Students wondered if they would ever have a swimming pool. 

In the 1964-65 school year, the students again had a campaign for 
a swimming pool. This time the pool was to be inside the new gymnasium. 
Letters were written, bands played, and extra days of vacation were 
temptingly dangled, but the percentage of non-swimmers was high. A 
plan to "go now-pay later" was inaugurated, and the campaign ended with 
$30,000 raised for the pool. The $2,000 had helped to complete successfully 
the drive! 




EDUCATING LEADERS 



129 





To SvccuJ < 





^'i»'." ^* 



■■^■■■■■^■^■H 



*«t* ••> ra 



"Absorhinj" - 5 °" r/zer " ^«:«if 

"Well direCteil"— Student Movement 

"A SpldShJng SUCCeSS"— Southern Mish Mash 







Looking forward to the time when (he swimming pool will be available, 



130 



80 YEARS OF PROGRESS 



Backing up a few years and filling in a little history of the presidents 
of SJC and SMC, the history will then pursue another angle of educating 
leaders, namely, the growth and development of the Student Association. 

In 1925 Professor H. H. Hamilton came from Auburn Academy to be 
president of Southern Junior College. He was the only one of the presidents 
of this college who was a native son of Tennessee. He was born in Glass, 
Tennessee, in 1879. Professor Hamilton's ability to place himself in the 
experience of others endeared him to both faculty and students. 

When President Hamilton came in the fall of 1925, the administration 
building was not quite finished but was put to use. The administrative 
offices were moved from the men's dormitory, providing some much needed 
dormitory space. 

President Hamilton was called to Washington Missionary College in 
January, 1927, and Professor M. E. Cady came to fill out the year. Profes- 
sor Cady had taught at Union College and at Battle Creek College. He had 
been president of three denominational colleges, and he spent his later 
years in writing and lecturing. 







: i 



i 



>">imlM t ; 



The Administration Building and students, 1924 



EDUCATING LEADERS 



131 




H. H. Hamilton, 1925-27 
President 



H. 



J. Klooster, 1927-37 
President 



Professor Henry J. Klooster came to Southern Junior College in 1927 
to be its president for more than ten years of outstanding growth and 
progress. It was during his term of service that the college became 
accredited as a junior college; the broom industry began; construction was 
completed on a building for elementary teacher training; the hosiery mill 
was put into operation ; a post office, a refrigeration plant, a chair factory, 
and a puffery were added. 




Lynn Wood Hall Chapel 



132 



80 YEARS OF PROGRESS 








Junior College and Academy Graduates, 1934 

.'.>iamjh r w? m w. f^wi^/ y w„, iBr" ifm ^m 

r 







■ hi SrE &=■ ha irEw 

Junior College and Academy Graduates, 1935 




The Board of Trustees, 1939 



EDUCATING LEADERS 



133 



The College had Elder D. E. Rebok on its faculty as president in 
1942-43 and as dean in 1955-56. His administration was characterized 
with both spiritual leadership and material growth. 

At the commencement exercises of 1943, President Rebok handed to 
Prof. Kenneth A. Wright the keys to the office of the president of Southern 
Junior College. Professor Wright was president of both Southern Junior 
College and of Southern Missionary College. During President Wright's 
administration, the junior college grew to senior status, and in 1950 
was fully accredited. Many building projects were undertaken by the 
College during these years, in addition to the normal growth attendant on 
change to senior college status. He guided the College through twelve 
years of adaptation, development, and progress. His greatest strength lay 
in the spiritual force he brought to his work. He knew how to build around 
himself a loyal, devoted faculty, each of whom contributed to the growth 
and success of the college. 

President Wright came to the College during World War II when 
the United States was in a desperate fight to maintain the freedom for 
which its forefathers had fought. Men of college age were in the armed 
services, and student enrollment had dropped. 

The students, mostly women, were drafted into every industry which 
the College operated at that time. Student participation and recreation 




K. A. Wright, 1943-55 
President 



D. E. Rebok, 1942-43, 1955-56 
President, Dean 



134 



80 YEARS OF PROGRESS 




The Student Senate, 1949-50 

were indeed at a low ebb. The school paper was being edited only often 
enough to preserve the mailing permit, and the yearbook was only a fair- 
sized magazine. 

When the Armistice was a reality, and World War II came to an 
end, the students returned to what had now become Southern Missionary 
College. The veterans came with wives and families, and the enrollment 
exceeded five hundred. The need for immediate changes was apparent; 
changes were made, but not quickly enough to satisfy some of the 
restless veterans. These young men were accustomed to action, and action 
seemed to be one of their basic needs. 



Student organizations, legitimate and otherwise, suddenly sprouted 
everywhere in every direction. President Wright encouraged any organiza- 
tion which could and would become officially approved. Seemingly over- 
night, a trailer camp, a student store, and the Southern Accent came into 
being. Many projects and organizations were born prematurely, but they 
were born and living, nevertheless. 

Some of the ambitious veterans banded together and published an 
unofficial news sheet, aimed mostly at the administration and faculty of 
the college. A veterans' club, a wives' club, and other organizations came 
into existence without proper organization and without faculty approval. 
The administration of the college saw the need for a Student Association 
and some methods of bringing the organizations together. 

President Wright had a background of experience in student organi- 
zations, and just at the time the need for such an organization on the 



EDUCATING LEADERS 



135 



Southern Missionary College cam- 
pus became apparent, Dr. Am- 
brose Suhrie came to Collegedale 
as educational consultant for the 
college. He had spent many years 
organizing students in teachers' 
colleges. Probably no better help 
could have been found to meet 
the current campus need. 

Dr. Suhrie's contribution to the 
development of the college em- 
braced all phases of the institu- 
tion and invigorated every student 
and every teacher with it. Two 
distinct features of Southern Mis- 
sionary College testify today to 
his constructive influence: the 
democratic system of a faculty- 
wide participation in college 
policy-making by which each 
member of the staff shares in the 
development of the college as a 
whole, and the system of student- 
leadership training through the 
various units of the Student 
Association. 

Dr. Suhrie was a truly great 
man, of a greatness that towers 
over the common like a peak beck- 
oning on the struggling wanderer, 
giving him new courage. Such 
was his way through life; a 
master among the strong, a fear- 
less defender among the weak. 
His country, his profession, his 
church all honored him. 

The first semblance of a stu- 
dent co-operative government or- 
ganization was the Student Per- 
sonnel Committee of 1946-47. 
Although the committee did not 
have many duties, it helped lay 
the groundwork for the Student 
Senate. 




Dr. Ambrose A. Suhrie 



The Student Senate, as organized by Dr. Suhrie, was accepted by 
the majority of students, faculty, and board members. The frame- 
work of the organization is much the same today as it was when first 
organized, although some additional area provisions have been created 
to meet certain specific needs. As it is today, the Student Senate was the 
central governing body of the association. 



136 



80 YEARS OF PROGRESS 




The Student Senate, 1961-62 

The Student Senate 

Lawrence Scales acted as the Senate's first president; Dr. Suhrie 
served as the sponsor of the Senate for the first two years. Of Dr. Suhrie's 
leadership, Mr. Scales said, "Dr. Ambrose Suhrie radiated confidence in 
young people, inspired them to intellectual attainments, and pointed them 
to potential paths of student leadership." 

The Student Association Constitution was formulated in 1950 under 
the presidency of Joe Lambeth and with the active participation of Fred 
Veltman, Bill Dysinger, and Raymond Woolsey, the three members of the 
committee on the constitution: 

1. All student organizations were chartered by the Student Asso- 
ciation and served as subdivisions of the general association. 

2. The student periodicals were under the general supervision of 
the Student Association, and their budgets were formulated by 
the Student Senate and voted by the association as a whole. 

3. The various standing committees of the Student Association, 
each reporting to the Student Senate, corresponded to and co- 
operated with the standing faculty committees. 

4. The student Association fees, including the subscription fees, 
were collected by the college and made available for the use of 
the association treasurer. 

The Student Association engages in great enterprises. One is College 
Days, the annual event each spring, when four or five hundred high school 
and academy seniors are housed, informed, inspired, and entertained. 
The planning and the administration of these events are done by the 
Student Association. 



EDUCATING LEADERS 
Two Student Association Activities 



137 




College Day Parade 




Lighting the Christmas Tree 



138 



80 YEARS OF PROGRESS 




V. 




The first intercollegiate workshop 

The main objectives of the Student Association are to foster a spirit 
of co-operation among the students and faculty, provide well-organized 
channels for such co-operation, facilitate development of student activities 
and leadership, and publish the student periodicals : The Southern Accent, 
Southern Memories, the Campus Accent, and the Joker. 

The Student Senate investigates, crystallizes, and represents student 
opinion concerning college affairs. The Senate regulates and coordinates 
student activities. It sponsors the different student committees and 
forums, organizes the all-college picnic, the annual "College Days," and may 
make helpful suggestions to the faculty concerning college problems. 

The Southern Missionary College Student Association, under the 
presidency of Joe Lambeth in 1950, took the initiative in organizing an 
annual Intercollegiate Workshop for Student Associations for the Seventh- 
day Adventist Colleges in Eastern North America. Six colleges responded 
with gratifying results from exchanges of ideas. The success of these 
workshops was limited until recently when an Inter-College Secretariat 
was inaugurated. 

Leif Kr. Tobiassen 

Professor Tobiassen brought to Southern Missionary College the 
international flavor it needed. He provoked students to greater heights 
of scholarship and achievement. While serving as coordinator of the 



EDUCATING LEADERS 



139 




Dr. Lief Kr. Tobiassen 



Student Association, he guided the first 
Inter-Collegiate Workshop for Seventh-day 
Adventist Colleges. He made a worthwhile 
contribution to the academic and cultural 
growth of the college. 

The student organization is dedicated 
to the task of educating leaders. President 
Wright once said, "The few minutes between 
the time a college graduate receives his de- 
gree and the time, later in the day, when he 
assumes his conference assignment, is not 
time enough to train him for responsibility. 
He must be trained as a student, and there 
is no better way than the experience of Stu- 
dent Association leadership as it is set up on 
the Southern Missionary College campus." 



Do you remember- 



— that Dean Clark left a white card in the men's rooms if the room 
was in first-class order, a blue card if it was to some degree untidy, 
and a red card was left as a danger signal if the room was out of 
order ? 

— that the post office address of Southern Junior College was E.F.D., 
Ooltewah ? 

— that college students were required to take a class in spelling if 
their grade was below 90 percent in the entrance test in that im- 
portant subject? 

— the room fitted for hydrotherapy in the basement of the administra- 
tion building? 

— the tragic death of the guest speaker, Elder W. F. Martin, the day 
of graduation, 1929? 

— that the bulletin said, "Bring one wool dress and wool hose and 
warm underwear"? 

— the 4,000 concrete blocks made from limestone on the school farm 
in 1929? 



— that students were given $■ 
they brought in September? 



for each five students (new recruits) 
that Mr. Swain and his boys erected the Normal Building in 1929 ? 



CHAPTER XIX 

GOVERNMENT— DUTIES AND PATRIOTISM 

The Post Office 

For many years the postal address for Southern Junior College was 
Ooltewah, Tenn. The mail was delivered five days a week by the rural 
carrier. On Sunday, a student, George Fuller went over White Oak Ridge 
by mule back and brought the week end mail which was handled in the 
dormitories. 

When the brown duplex was built for the business office and store, 
the school mail was given out there. Later letter boxes were moved into 
the basement of the present Lynn Wood Hall, then the administration 
building. 

In 1929 Collegedale was granted its own post office, and Mr. C. A. 
Rottmiller was appointed the first postmaster. A month later Mr. George 
N. Fuller became the postmaster and held that office through the 
years with the exception of 1932-36 when Mr. Walter Clark was the 
postmaster. 

The passenger trains threw off first class mail and picked up a first 
class pouch from the mail crane as they went by. The post office boy 
walked up and down the hill to meet each train. 

The post office owned a cart with two wheels measuring about five 
feet across, which was used to transport not only the parcel post but also 
the Tidings. 

The press boys vied with each other to see who would get to go over 
to the post office and get the cart to take the Tidings to the train. 

One student subscribed to his home town paper, The Atlanta Journal. 
The early evening edition was placed in a bag by itself by the publishers 
and put on the train. When occasionally the train stopped at Collegedale 
to drop off one lone bag with one newspaper in it for a couple of boys to 
transport up the hill in the cart, the subscriber would proffer his special 
thanks for such good service. 

The students who have attended this college since 1929 remember Mr. 
Fuller as the kindly postmaster. The friends at Standifer Gap remember 
him as their church elder for almost thirty years. His friends at Apison 
think of him as the man who brought the Advent message to them. But 
the students of 1918 remember George as a classmate who rode muleback 
to Ooltewah each Sunday to bring back the mail. 

Those who were building the school in 1918 soon learned that this 
young man was filled with many abilities. He was first assigned the job 
of currying Dick, the mule. Dick left no question as to whether he approved 
of the beauty treatment or not. The student assigned to curry or harness 
Dick was due some surprises. 

George was asked to fix the gasoline engine that was so urgently 
needed to fill the silos — and he fixed it. He superintended the cutting of 
the firewood that winter for fifty-eight stoves; he worked in the print 

140 



GOVERNMENT— DUTIES AND PATRIOTISM 



141 




Mr. Fuller, a long-time resident of 
Collegedale. 



shop ; he did the wiring for the first tele- 
phone system; he was in charge of the 
cannery where students took care of the 
products Mr. C. E. Ledford raised on the 
farm. When anything on the campus 
needed fixing, George did it. 

After graduation Mr. Fuller was at 
various times bookkeeper, cashier, and 
assistant manager of the college. Few 
there are who know that he planned the 
system of denominational insurance, which 
was eventually adopted and is now used 
by the General Conference. 

The genuineness of his Christian ex- 
perience has been demonstrated in his 
giving free room and board to nearly 
thirty students, thus helping make it 
possible for each to receive a Christian 
education. 



Mr. Fuller retired from the post office Dec. 31, 1964, and moved to 
Maitland, Fla. where he is still residing. Mr. Fuller's sister-in-law, Mrs. 
Florence Harmon West, became the postmaster Jan. 1, 1965, which job she 
held until 1973. Dick Wodzenski is the present postmaster. 

The post office is now housed in the College Plaza. Before this last 
move, it was in the old College Store building. 



The Flagpoles 

The first flagstaff from which Old Glory floated on the Southern 
Junior College campus was a seventy-five foot poplar pole cut out in the 
forest by students in 1920. They brought it to the shop, placed proper 
struts on it, and with due ceremony, raised it into place directly in front 
of the site for the administration building. 

After appropriate "Flag Day" chapel exercises and patriotic songs, 
the returned veterans of World War I carried Old Glory through the lines 
of students and hoisted it to its proper place — there to float over the 
campus. 

After some years of service, the original pole and flag were granted 
honorable discharge. 

In the fall of 1928, while the United Fruit Line boat was in port in 
Mobile, Alabama, Mr. Peder Dahl Jansen, one of the long-time employees 
of that line, found in his mail a letter from his son John. The letter was 
postmarked Collegedale, Tennessee. 

"Dear Dad: Could you ....?" Now what did John want! Mr. Jansen 
read on to the end of the letter. Well, perhaps he could. 

John, a student at Southern Junior College, had started a campaign 
for a new flagpole for the college. Now all that was needed was a large, 
beautiful flag to wave in the breeze. Could Dad possibly donate one of 



142 



80 YEARS OF PROGRESS 



those large American flags that had been used on a United Fruit Line boat ? 

Mr. Jansen selected a beautiful flag that had flown on one of the 
United Fruit Company ships to South America. 

The newest flag pole on campus is located directly in front of Wright 
Hall. It was a gift from Gentry Steel Co. of Chattanooga and is a tilt or 
hinged type pole and flies a fifty-star flag. 

The old flagpole that was in front of Lynn Wood Hall has been moved 
to Daniells Hall and supports the aerial for the short wave radio station. 




Returned soldiers carried Old Glory to the flagpole. 







, ; ,,. 


P^^W^^^P^^BI^^^^Tp 


* ^-^^^B 




^ * i**-. J> '"'.■ 




hjfbi ^J|t M 




'■»*' J^L, ^91 B*>" SltKmfc-- . 


P^' 






■ 






*.' W^F " JfcJ^**** »*W' 



Raising the flag — 1920 



GOVERNMENT— DUTIES AND PATRIOTISM 



US 




'<>■*■ 



Dedication of the flagpole, 1928 




The present College flagpole 



John C. Thompson 

President of 

Southern Junior College 

1937-42 



144 



80 YEARS OF PROGRESS 



tAt 



?$& 



-frit 



J* *i 

r^ y% ~^c*&c ifc"*£$r ~*k"*Ar TAnfcnAr^H 

^ y ■: . . . . v v v y 

iii**^ ****** 

J****^*^^-*^ 
*****^r ***^r**| 

< ■■"\. ■■,-.•■;■?•."' v:r-v '■'"'■.'■ 



y-\ 



>r x ;< 




V: 






******** 
*****-fr>rir 

>V /: /■: >>■>' > 
*******' 

******: 
* ^ -a Vc >^ •/;• > r 

•*•'' 

y y >-/ 

The Service Flag 

The service flag which hung in Lynn Wood Hall was evidence that 
many Southern Junior College boys served their country in World War II. 
Some of the boys gave their full measure of devotion. There is only a 
partial record of those who sacrificed their lives, but tribute is paid to all 
the Southern Junior College students who made the supreme sacrifice. 

John Bugbee died following an operation. 

Glenn I. Dickerson was killed in a plane crash nearing California. 

Evan Hughes was missing in action in the South Pacific. 



GOVERNMENT— DUTIES AND PATRIOTISM 145 

Thomas Hackleman was killed in a plane crash in Karachi, India. 

James Hines was killed in a plane crash in the South Pacific. 

Tim Maxwell (a former elementary school student) was killed in 
France after the war ended in 1945. 

Franklin Ray was killed (place unknown). 

James Whisenant was killed in Belgium during the German counter- 
offensive. 

The Medical Cadet Corps 

When America entered World War II, it was a serious time for Seventh- 
day Adventist young men. Those who were called into the military service, 
of their country were expected and trained to take human life. Of course, 
military necessities paid little or no attention to religious obligations or 
the observance of a day of rest. 

Because this denomination believes in fulfilling its obligation to its 
country, the General Conference Committee, with conference and college 
presidents, assembled at the Fall Council in 1939 and gave serious study 
to ways in which Seventh-day Adventist boys could be of service. 

It was during President John C. Thompson's administration that the 
Medical Cadet Corps was started. President Thompson has the distinction 
of having taken his elementary school work at Southern Training School 
at Graysville, the precursor of the college of which he was one day to be 
the president. 

In October, the Board of Trustees of Southern Junior College was in 
session to consider the recommendations of the Fall Council. As a result, 
the Medical Cadet Corps at Southern Junior College was instituted. It 
was a short concentrated course. The program of training consisted of 
basic and disciplinary fundamentals of the army, first aid to wounded 
soldiers, defense in case of attack, instruction in map reading, signal 
communications, and denominational principles of Seventh-day Adventists. 
Four hours of each day were spent in close order drill. 

From 85-100 cadets enrolled each year for training. Col. E. N. Dick, a 
pioneer of Medical Cadet Corps work and General Conference director of 
the work in the United States, visited Southern Junior College during this 
training period This program proved its value to the boys in the service 
of their country. 




The Medical Cadet Corps 



CHAPTER XX 

TO MAKE MAN WHOLE 

The Health Service 

Everyone was so busy doing his part to establish the school that 
perhaps there was no time for aches and pains. It was fortunate that there 
was no serious illness or epidemic that first year on the Collegedale campus, 
for the health service department was not in existence. Students took care 
of each other in any emergency. 

During the summer of 1917, Mrs. J. A. Tucker arrived to be dean of 
women in the new, unfinished dormitory. Ruby Lea was her student 
assistant, and together they took care of the girls when there was illness. 

A serious need for a health service came with the 1918 school term. 
One girl arrived on campus that fall with a slight illness which was 
diagnosed as chicken pox. The malady evidently was a mild case of small- 
pox. One girl contracted the disease from the first case in a more severe 
form and was quartered in the "Doll House" which was used as a "pest 
house." Dr. 0. G. Hughes was called in to vaccinate all students. 

President Wood assisted in moving the second patient into isolation, 
and he also contracted smallpox in a light form. Mr. McGee, superintendent 
of the print shop, required all women working for him to move out of the 
dormitory. So some of the dormitory girls took their quilts and went to 
live in a shack on the campus, but one of them, Cora Fox Woolsey, was so 
ill from the vaccination that she had to return to the dormitory. 



The doll house, the last remaining building of the Thatcher plantation, was used as a 
"pest house" for a smallpox patient. 

146 



TO MAKE MAN WHOLE 



147 



Before the smallpox was over, the Spanish influenza epidemic of 1918 
arrived, and classes had to be discontinued to allow the few who were well 
to help Mrs. Tucker care for the many who were ill. 

When seven other girls became ill with smallpox, they were put in a 
tent house. It was winter time, and the tent was heated and kept warm 
by a little wood stove. Later, while the tent was being fumigated with 
sulphur, it caught fire and burned down. 

The wife of Professor H. A. Johnston was a nurse, but she was the 
first one to get the influenza ; her husband, the dean of men, was the next 
patient, so Mrs. Tucker took care of the 55 sick students. She worked night 
and day. Those able to help were passing fomentations from one patient to 
another, not suspecting that some had smallpox and some influenza. Dr. 
Hughes came twice each day during the epidemic, and at times he de- 
spaired of the lives of some of the young people. That was a period of time 
which is still very real to Mrs. Tucker although 53 years have passed. 

The next tragic epidemic was typhoid fever in 1923 which took the life 
of one of the students, Evelyn Abbott. This time the third floor of the 
women's dormitory was turned into a hospital, and many of the well 
students went home until the epidemic was over. 

Later in 1923, a young man brought measles to the school and within 
a few days eight men and eight women had contracted the affliction. C. A. 
Woolsey was the men's nurse. Food had to be carried so far that it was 
cold by the time he had transported it to the dormitory, and some of the 
students still recall that their diet seemed to consist of cold baked potatoes 
and olives. The girls fared better since the cafeteria was in the basement 
of their dormitory. To isolate the patients during the epidemic of measles, 
wet sheets were hung over the doorways so that no dust or scales from the 
measles could be air-born. The record does not list the names of those 
responsible for keeping the sheets wet. 

On this campus the Health Service has grown from the hot fomenta- 
tion days of the influenza epidemic to a community Medical Center with a 
resident physician. 




The Hydrotherapy Class, 1928 



148 



80 YEARS OF PROGRESS 




Edythe Williams, R.N., director of the Health Service, 1935 



Mr. Walter E. Williams, R.N., was in charge of the Health Service 
from 1937-43. Mrs. Edythe Cobet Williams, also an R.N., instructed the 
pre-nursing students. With the growing-up of the college into senior 
status, Mrs. Marcella Klock Ashlock, R.N., became the director of Health 
Service, and Mrs. Louise H. Gish, R.N. was director of nursing education. 

While Mrs. Mildred Eadie Oakes, R.N., was director of Health Service 
from 1945-49, she made laboratory facilities available on the campus. 
Several acute surgical cases were practically diagnosed by way of telephone, 
and emergency surgery was done soon after the patient had been admitted 
to the hospital. A good immunization program was started through co- 
operation with the Public Health Service and has been continued through 
the Health Service. 

For many years the college secured the services of doctors from off 
campus who came to the Health Service a half day each week. Dr. 0. G. 
Hughes, first of Ooltewah then later of Brainerd, came for a number of 
years, then Dr. W. G. Shull of Chattanooga, and Dr. E. M. Ryan from 
Ooltewah served. 

In April, 1952, the Collegedale Medical Center was opened. The school 
nurses were no longer expected to make house calls to the community, 
students, and faculty. 

The Health Service has occupied various places on the campus but in 
1970 it was moved into its new quarters in Wright Hall, the administration 
building. It is newly furnished and equipped at a cost of $41,500. The 
4,000 sq. ft. facility contains seven semi-private rooms separated by an 



TO MAKE MAN WHOLE 



149 



out-patient department in the center. It is conveniently located near the 
cafeteria, classrooms, and residence halls. 

The Health Service is designed to serve as an intermediate facility 
between a dormitory room and a hospital, if need be. 



The staff is headed by Mrs. Marian Kuhlman, B.S. in nursing, director 
of health service for the past 20 years. In addition, three senior student 
nurses work shifts of 12-16 hours per week. 




Mrs. Marian Kuhlman, R.N., B.S., director of Health Service since 1951. 




One of the seven semi-private rooms in the new Health Service facility in Wright Hall. 



150 



80 YEARS OF PROGRESS 







I 



Dr. T. C. Swinyar 

Dr. T. C. Swinyar, the college physician, made daily visits to the 
health service. He developed a good liaison between the clinic and 
specialists in Chattanooga, and students were readily referred to these 
doctors. The specialists sent summaries of their findings back to Dr. 
Swinyar so that their efforts could be coordinated. Most of Dr. Swinyar's 
laboratory work was done in his office. New x-ray and cardiograph ma- 
chines were installed. The latter is hooked up by phone to Chattanooga 
so that a cardiograph reading can be obtained from a heart specialist. 

Dr. Swinyar gave up his practice to Dr. Waldemar Kutzner in 1974 
because of illness. Dr. Swinyar's untimely death in January, 1975, was 
mourned by the college family and his many friends. 

Dr. Kutzner, a Canadian, is a brother of Dr. Arno Kutzner, director 
of admissions and records. 





Collegedale Medical Center 



TO MAKE MAN WHOLE 151 

Health Service Nurses 

1919-20 Mrs. H. A. Johnston 

1925-27 Mrs. A. N. Atteberry (Hydrotherapy) 

1927-28 Gladys Andress Jones 

1928-30 Stella Beauchamp 

1930-31 Mrs. D. R. Edwards 

1931-33 Dorothy I. McCuean 

1933-34 Miriam Bruce 

1934-35 Edythe Cobet Williams 

1935-37 Mable Parish Reynolds 

1937-43 W. E. Williams 

1943-45 Marcella Klock Ashlock 

1945-49 Mildred Eadie Oaks ; assistant, Katherine Maxfield, 1948-49 

1949-50 Marcella Klock Ashlock; assistants, Marian Kuhlman and Leta 
Banks 

1950-51 Dorothy Henri Douglas; assistant, Marian Kuhlman 

1951- Marian Kuhlman; assistants, Helen Mizelle, 1951-55; Virginia 
Nelson, 1963-66, 1969-74. 

Collegedale Physicians 

1953-54 Dr. M. J. Anderson 
1954-56 Dr. James Van Blaricum 
1956-60 Dr. Keith Anderson 
1960-74 Dr. T. C. Swinyar 
1974- Dr. Waldemar Kutzner 



CHAPTER XXI 

THE COLLEGEDALE CHURCH 



w. 




The Tabernacle built in 1934. Note the wooden shutters in place of windows; the 
building was two-thirds its present length, and there was no veranda. 

The Georgia-Cumberland Conference erected a tabernacle on the 
Southern Junior College campus in 1934 to be used for the camp meeting 
services. Mr. B. F. Wrenn supervised the construction, and the work was 
done by conference employees. The original building cost was $6500. 

Since camp meetings were held in late spring or summer, no provision 
was made for heating the building. Wooden shutters filled the need for 
windows, keeping out the rain and much of the light. Light for evening 
meetings was provided by electric bulbs suspended on cords from the 
ceiling. Sawdust substituted for a floor. It was about 1936 or 1937 that a 
cement floor took the place of the sawdust floor. 

The college arranged with the conference to use the tabernacle for a 
gymnasium in exchange for the use of dormitory rooms during the camp 
meeting season. The gym classes and the camp meeting guests rejoiced; 
as for the absence of heat during the winter months, the gym students 
endured the cold! 

Many social evenings took place in the tabernacle. Marches were a 
favorite entertainment, and some students and faculty became well known 
for their expertise in leading out, often culminating the evening in a 
confusing serpentine. 

152 






THE COLLEGEDALE CHURCH 



153 




The Tabernacle after extensive remodeling 

Probably more favored were the skating periods which were popular 
even though the skaters and spectators became gray in minutes from the 
concrete dust ground into the air from the steel-wheel skates. At first 
glance it looked like a parade of grandparents as the students went toward 
the dormitories. Later hardwood floors were added, and the concrete dust 
was eliminated. 

In 1945 a small room was built onto the back of the tabernacle in the 
space where the musician's room was later located, and in this outside room 
a hot-air heating system was installed. Large pipes on the ceiling of the 
tabernacle conducted the heat into the building. 

It was into this building that the college and the community church 
membership moved when they had out-grown the capacity of Lynn Wood 
Chapel. In September, 1946, the first church service was held in the 
Georgia-Cumberland camp meeting tabernacle. Each Friday the hymn 
books were gathered in the chapel and transported to the tabernacle for 
the weekend meetings and returned on Sunday. 



It was felt that organ music would give a deeper sense of worship in 
the bare hall, so organ music was brought to the tabernacle by remote 
control. From the tabernacle Mr. Howard Harter directed the organist in 
the administration building chapel by telephone : "Ready, begin," "A little 
slower, please," "They are singing the last stanza now." When the public 
address system was perfected, the organist could hear Professor Dortch 
lead the singing. The system worked very well until 1950, when a concert 
electronic organ was purchased for the tabernacle. 



154 



80 YEARS OF PROGRESS 







M 

e 
- 

c. 
A 
re 



9 

< 



- 
3 

re 

h 
t> 

P 



THE COLLEGEDALE CHURCH 



155 




Elder Horace R. Beckner 

First Pastor of the Collegedale 

Church, 1947-60 



Elder Roy B. Thurmon 
Pastor, 1960-68 




John R. Loor, Sr. 
Pastor, 1968-71 



Gary B. Patterson 
Pastor, 1971- 



156 



80 YEARS OF PROGRESS 



From the time that the Collegedale Church was organized in 1917, the 
chairman of the Religion Department acted as the part-time pastor. In 
1947, Horace R. Beckner became the first full-time pastor. He served from 
June, 1947, until February, 1960. The Collegedale District from 1947 to 
1950 included Cleveland, Athens, Standifer Gap, and Collegedale. 

Conference workers came in 1949 and joined Pastor Beckner and local 
church members in enlarging the tabernacle. It was made one-third larger, 
and at the same time the basement was built. 

Mr. George Pearman, who was in charge of college maintenance, 
made the beautiful communion table to match the new pulpit and chairs 
that had been provided by the Georgia-Cumberland Conference. The table 
runner and chancel rail cover were donated by Elder and Mrs. J. S. James. 
The Dorcas ladies made the monk's cloth draw drapes for the platform and 
presented them to the church. 

When the Collegedale Church was organized in 1917, there were 50 
charter members. Their first meeting place was the "Yellow House," and 
from there they went to the commissary, Jones Hall Chapel, old Talge 
Hall Chapel, Lynn Wood Hall Chapel, the Tabernacle, and finally to a 
building erected especially for it. 

The Collegedale Seventh-day Adventist Church was completed in 1965, 
49 years after the church was organized. The official opening services 
were held Friday night, December 17, which featured a sacred concert, and 
the Sabbath morning sermon was given by Elder E. W. Dunbar. The 
church was dedicated free of debt, April 8, 1967. 

The membership of the church is presently 2800, and, since the church 
seats 1850, two church services are required each Sabbath during the 
school year to accommodate the congregation. 




n II f 




The Collegedale Church 



THE COLLEGEDALE CHURCH 



157 



The total cost of the building was $638,000, which included the build- 
ing itself; air conditioning; special Sabbath School rooms on two levels; 
offices for the pastor and associate pastor ; parking area ; landscaping ; and 
a new Rodgers Organ costing $23,000. 

The building is an architecturally modern structure. The interior front 
is asymmetrical — the baptistry is to the left and the choir loft is to the 
center and to the right. The color scheme is aqua and gold, with aqua 
hymnals and walls, and gold drapes and sound shell. 

The following is a list of the pastors, and the associate and assistant 
pastors : 

F. W. Field 

J. H. Behrens 

Bruce H. Shaw 

H. E. Snide 

Paul Quimby 

J. Franklin Ashlock 

F. B. Jensen 

Horace R. Beckner, Pastor, 1947-60 
Lawrence G. Scales 
Wesley Spiva, 1952-53 
Ted Graves, 1953-54 
E. A. Crane, 1955-57 
Chester Damron, 1956-57 
Hoyt Hendershot, 1957-60 

Roy B. Thurmon, Pastor, 1960-68 
Robert Larsen, 1960-61 
Lewis Wynn, 1961-63 
Paul Gates, 1963-64 
Walter A. Marshall, 1964-65 
W. G. Ambler, 1965-66 
Rankin Wentland, 1966-68 

John R. Loor Sr., Pastor, 1968-71 
Rankin Wentland 1968-69 
R. M. Ruf, 1969-71 
Allen Williamson, 1970-71 

Gary Patterson, Pastor, 1971- 
R. M. Ruf, 1971- 
Desmond Cummings, Jr., 1971- 
John T. Garner III, 1971-73 
Ronald B. Rodgers, 1972- 
James M. Clark, 1972-73 
Robert R. Bretsch, 1972-73 "The Chimes" 




64 



158 



80 YEARS OF PROGRESS 




Interior View of the Church 



Do you remember — 



1946 

1947 
1948 



1949 
1950 



1952 



1954 



1956 

1959 
1960 

1961 
1965 

1971 



Chattanooga Blowpipe Company put in a heating system at a 
cost of $3,000. 

Pastor Beckner introduced the 2 percent plan for church expense. 
New communion service equipment was purchased. Until that 
time, 11 kinds of towels and 14 types of basins had been used 
in the communion service. 

Central heat was connected with the tabernacle. 
Windows replaced the shutters; fluorescent lights were installed. 
A new public address system was purchased. At the church 
service, Armistice Day, the Veterans Club, in uniform, presented 
the beautiful American flag to the church. Elder Spalding read 
his poem, "The Furnace." The color guard and MCC were in 
uniform. 

Hardwood flooring was laid. The college raised half the cost, 
and the congregation raised half. Pine paneling covered the 
walls. 

Dr. Suhrie, Pastor Beckner, and laymen planted the dogwood 
trees. Cement walks were built from the front and side doors 
to the back of the tabernacle. The platform was enlarged. 
The porch was added to the front of the building; the congre- 
gation paid for new metal chairs. 

A new Baldwin concert grand piano was purchased. 
The Collegedale Church completed building the Arthur W. 
Spalding Elementary School. 

A pastor's study was built at the end of the porch. 
The north end of the tabernacle became housing for the band 
and orchestra with offices for their directors. 
The rest of the tabernacle was temporarily occupied by the cafe- 
teria from the summer of 1971 until the new cafeteria building 
was completed in 1973. 



CHAPTER XXII 

HERE IS ASSEMBLED KNOWLEDGE 

President Thiel's office for the first months at Southern Junior 
College was somewhat of a "mess." For a while it was crowded into the 
Doll House, but eventually a small room in the Commissary was called the 
president's office. The reason for the unkempt condition of this important 
office had to do with the college library. 

The library from Southern Training School had arrived at Collegedale 
in boxes. At that time there was no room in which the library books 
could be arranged on shelves, but the books were needed for classwork. 
Someone must be in charge of the book collection, and, since the president 
was also the English teacher, the one thousand books were stacked on the 
floor around his desk. Each time a book was needed, chaos was evident. 
Everyone was busy, and some things had to take precedence over others. 
Finding the president's desk, at times, and stepping over a thousand books 
were some of the problems of the first weeks at Southern Junior College. 
Eventually the books were stacked in a room across from the president's 
office, and Juanita Hibben became the first student custodian. 

When the women's dormitory was nearing completion, the president's 
office was moved to the first floor of the new building, and things began 
taking on a delightful semblance of order. Later, when the first floor of 
the new dormitory for men became the "office building," the library 
made its home there. When the administration building was completed, 
the library and reading room were located at the north end of the second 
floor. 




The Lynn Wood Hall Library, 1925-47. 



159 



160 80 YEARS OF PROGRESS 



/ 







^•*> 



i 

L h - 




Stanley Brown Mrs. Myrtle Watrous 

Librarian, 1935-68 Assistant Librarian, 1949-64 

Through these years and until 1940 the librarian was always a teacher 
with other duties. During the summers of 1928 and 1931 work was done 
on classifying the library. 

Miss Elizabeth Ann Tollman, the English teacher in 1933 and 1934, 
reorganized the library and put it on the sound basis on which its future 
growth was built. She standardized and catalogued the library. Miss Toll- 
man is due credit for putting the library in order. 

Professor Stanley Brown came to Southern Junior College in 1935 to 
teach English and to be the librarian. At that time the library consisted of 
5,139 books. Mr. Brown was a tireless worker and what he did for the 
library is invaluable. He passed away in November, 1975 after a short 
illness. He had served the college for 39 years, which was longer than any 
other person. 

A step toward accreditation of the college required a full-time 
librarian and a building for the library. In a short time the ground was 
broken for the new library building. 

Elder Carlyle B. Haynes gave the address at the dedication of the 
library May 4, 1947. His subject was, "The Library — the Inmost Heart of 
College Life." During the service a picture of Elder A. G. Daniells was 
unveiled. 

Mrs. Myrtle Watrous came in 1949 as assistant librarian and cata- 
logued more than 16,000 new books. She built up an important film service 
and promoted the acquisition of audio-visual materials, including microfilm 
and microcard readers. She also taught Library Science, thus contributing 
in training the student staff. In 1961 the library listed 35,000 books. 

When the college grew from an enrollment of around 600 in 1960 to a 
present enrollment of over 1700, (and is still growing) the library became 
increasingly inadequate. There was not enough shelf space for the new 
accessions, not enough reference reading room area, and not enough private 
study carrells. It was found that major alterations would be necessary. 
In view of this fact, it was decided that a new building was the best 
solution to the problem, and so the McKee Library was planned. 



HERE IS ASSEMBLED KNOWLEDGE 



161 




The former A. G. Daniells Memorial Library, now Daniells Hall, houses the Physics, 
Mathematics, and Computer Science Departments. 




The former A. G. Daniells Memorial Library Reference Room. 



162 80 YEARS OF PROGRESS 

THE McKEE LIBRARY 

Construction on the new library began in the summer of 1968 with the 
razing- of old Talge Hall, the original men's dormitory. The library was 
officially named and opened September 24, 1970. 

The plaque installed at the entrance to the library reads: "McKee 
Library, 1970. To commemorate and honor their devotion to truth, their 
interest in Christian education, and their unstinting generosity, Southern 
Missionary College gratefully dedicates this library to Mr. and Mrs. 0. D. 
McKee with their sons and wives : Mr. and Mrs. Ellsworth McKee and Mr. 
and Mrs. Jack McKee." 

McKee library has a seating capacity of 516 including 316 study 
carrells which allow for individual, undisturbed studv. Students who wish 
to study together have access to tables in the Student Center in Wright 
Hall. 

The library has a present capacity of over 100,000 books and with the 
purchase of additional shelves 300,000 volumes could be held. There are 
three full levels and a partial fourth level which could be expanded into a 
full fourth level as needed. The library catalogued its 100,000th volume in 
1975. 

Architects for the McKee Library were Bianculli and Tyler, Inc. of 
Chattanooga. The construction was done by Plant Engineer Frances 
Costerisan with his team of workers. They also built the shopping center, 
the women's residence hall, and the administration building. 

The total cost of the library was $694,000. The cost was kept low by 
not installing such things as marble walls or three-inch wood paneling. 

The exterior is constructed of cement block overlaid with brick. The 
new library is completely air conditioned and carpeted. 




McKee Library 



HERE IS ASSEMBLED KNOWLEDGE 



163 



The big move from the old library to the McKee Library came July 
6, as 60,000 volumes started rolling- on the journey across campus. Mr. 
Charles Davis, the librarian, described the tremendous task of keeping the 
books in order from their original shelves until they were again in place. 
"We took the books off the shelves in order and placed them on carts. 
Then we wheeled the carts into a van, keeping the carts in order, drove 
to the new library and rolled them into the new shelving area where they 
were again placed on shelves, still in order. 

The 1970 senior class presented $1300 worth of books in memory of 
three members of SMC's school family who died that year — Dr. Everett 
Watrous, former professor of history; Linda Lee Reile and Terrie Jean 
McAlexander, SMC nursing students killed in an automobile accident. 

The A. G. Daniells Memorial Library building has become Daniells 
Hall and now houses, with a minimum of alterations, three departments: 
— physics, mathematics, and computer science. 

During the summer of 1973 a very significant gift was presented to 
Southern Missionary College's McKee Library. 

Dr. Vernon Thomas of Keene, Texas, because of a personal friendship 
with Dr. Frank Knittel, SMC's president, donated a major collection of 
Civil War books, manuscripts, and memorabilia to the College. He also 
gave the John W. Fling, Jr.'s Lincolniana, considered to be the last major 
Lincoln collection not yet controlled by an academic library or public 
museum. Added to this is Dr. Thomas' own personal books and records. 




* 



■ ■ Bad 


>iinii\ WM 

mil mi op 




llllll" 


^**Hfc. «rw« -«" 



Interior views of the McKee Library 



164 



80 YEARS OF PROGRESS 




Stanley Brown, Librarian from 1935-68, and Charles Davis, Librarian since 1968, 
in the Foyer of the new McKee Library. 

A section of McKee Library is reserved to house the two special collec- 
tions and will be named the "Dr. Vernon Thomas Memorial Civil War and 
Abraham Lincoln Library." The Civil War group contains 1400 books, 
2,000 letters, manuscripts, newspapers, pamphlets, pictures, and maps. 
The Lincoln group contains 2,000 books, letters, manuscripts, newspapers, 
pamphlets, pictures, maps, and artifacts. A bank check signed by Lincoln 
in 1857 is a valuable collector's item as is an original check signed by 
James Madison in 1813. 

Librarian Charles Davis is also enthusiastic about the further gift 
of Dr. Thomas' personal library. Although exact numbers are still in- 
complete, the total number of volumes exceeds 30,000, and the McKee 
Library will realize probably 20,000 volumes added to the general book 
area. This gift is strong in the field of fine arts and humanities. The 
10,000-item record library is basically classical, but does contain some 
early historical recordings. 



HERE IS ASSEMBLED KNOWLEDGE 



165 




The McKee Family, whose gifts provided for much of the construction of the Library, 
pose on the staircase in the main lobby. Left to right: Mr. and Mrs. Jack McKee, 
Mr. and Mrs. Ellsworth McKee, and Mr. and Mrs. O. D. McKee. The McKees also 
gave the money for the Ledford Industrial Education Building. 




Librarian Charles Davis and Assistant Librarian Peggy Bennett pictured with the 
Lincoln Collections. 



CHAPTER XXIII 

THE COLLEGE GREW 

Making Southern Junior College a stronger institution and even- 
tually an accredited senior college was a long-range plan. All tremendous 
achievements are dreams before they are realities, and someone has looked 
beyond the horizon to larger things. When Southern Junior College cast 
off its cocoon to become Southern Missionary College, no one was more 




I 





Dr. 



Daniel Walther, 1942-46 
Academic Dean 



Linton Sevrens, 1946-48 
Academic Dean 



pleased or helpful than Dr. Daniel Walther. His wide teaching, administra- 
tive and cultural background, and experience were of inestimable value to 
the college. At first his extra duties were that of vice president, then 
vice president-dean. When he was called to the General Conference Semi- 
nary ; Dean L. G. Sevrens took his place. 

The Spring Council of the General Conference in 1944 approved the 
request of the Southern Union Conference to raise the status of Southern 
Junior College to that of a sixteen-grade institution. 

In its academic growth, Dean L. G. Sevrens made a contribution as 
the school lifted itself from the thinking of a junior college to that of a 
senior college. 

The expansion program outlined by the board called for an expedi- 
ture of approximately $300,000 to be spent largely for new buildings and 
equipment. A library (the A. G. Daniells Memorial), a science building 
(Earl Hackman Hall), a music building (Harold Miller Hall), a general 
store, and post office were built. 

When the name of the college was changed, Elder Hackman announced 
that the new name for the college was "a grand name, a descriptive 
symbol of an institution dedicated to the training of workers for God — 
Southern Missionary College — a missionary, one sent forth to preach the 
gospel, the first duty of every Christian. Many will go to foreign lands, 
but all may be missionaries in whatever calling they pursue." In May, 1946, 
a class of six participated in the first senior college graduation. 



166 



THE COLLEGE GREW 



167 




Marcella Klock Ashlock Joseph Archie Crews Juanita Mathieu Norrell 




Ruby Aikman Shields Louise Olsen Walther Clarence Delmar Wellman 

The first senior college class to graduate — 1946 




The Senior Class of 1949 



168 



80 YEARS OF PROGRESS 



The Dream of Accreditation as a Senior College 

The next dream to be realized was accreditation. One of the greatest 
contributions in the academic area of Southern Missionary College was 
made by Dr. Ambrose Suhrie. The insight that he gave to President 
Wright, the great help to the young faculty members in guiding their 
thinking in committees, the faculty meetings 
that he organized — all these were stimuli to- 
ward professional improvement and growth. 

The discussions in faculty meetings during 
the years of preparation for accreditation were 
enriching to the whole staff and helped its 
members to incline their thinking toward what 
one would expect in the faculty of a senior 
college. 

Dr. F. 0. Rittenhouse had been through the 
experience of college accreditation at Washing- 
ton Missionary College and knew the methods, 
procedures, and nomenclature. He came to 
Southern Missionary College for "such a time 
as this" — the years of preparation for accredit- 
ing as a senior college with the Southern Associ- 
ation of Colleges and Schools. Dr. Rittenhouse 
was an able and tireless worker who added stature and standards to the 
academic faculty as its dean. 




Dr. F. O. Rittenhouse, 1948-52 
Academic Dean 




Standing on the steps of Hackman Hall are the members of the first and only mid-year 
graduating class in Southern Missionary College history. (1952) 



THE COLLEGE GREW 



169 








Leo Thiel, first president of Southern Junior College, and Kenneth A. Wright, first 
president of Southern Missionary College. 



170 



80 YEARS OF PROGRESS 



When President Wright came to Southern Junior College, there was 
one faculty member with a Ph.D. degree. Looking ahead toward accre- 
ditation, when at least eight such degrees must head the divisions, it was 
his conviction that this college should develop its own faculty rather than 
to lure those with the needed degrees from other colleges. In this way, a 
relatively large number of instructors were given opportunity for study 
and research. President Wright had the ability to select and attract some 
of the strongest and most experienced educators in the denomination : Floyd 
0. Rittenhouse, Leif Kr. Tobiassen, Lewis N. Holm, Fred B. Jensen, 
Richard Hammill, Charles Wittschiebe, and others. 

Southern Missionary College grew rapidly, and those who dreamed 
were to see, in a short time, their dream of accreditation a reality. 

Before sharing that moment with them, follow the growth of the 
departments from "required" courses to majors worthy of accreditation. 

Art 

A course in arts and crafts has been offered for elementary teachers 
through all the years. In 1949, Mrs. Violetta Plue taught a class in paint- 
ing for college students, and later Mrs. Charlotte Nelson taught a class in 
drawing and one in painting. The two years, 1955-57, that Mrs. Gina 
Plungian, a visiting instructor of art, came to the campus, the art depart- 
ment developed into an area of self expression in painting, sculpture, and 
appreciation. A minor in art was then offered. 

Mrs. Olivia Dean has encouraged the growth of this department for 
many years and was the head of the art department from 1956-67. Mrs. 
Nellie Williams was an instructor in the department from 1960-67 and 
Mrs. Ruth Zoerb from 1966-68 and 1972-73. 

Art is the most recent baccalaureate major, having been offered for 
the first time in 1970-71. Mrs. Eleanor Jackson was head of the depart- 
ment from 1967 and was succeeded by Robert Garren who has been in the 
department since 1968. The art department occupies most of the basement 
and a section of the first floor of Jones Hall. 

Behavioral Sciences 

"Psychology" first appeared in an SMC catalogue as a course offering 
in the 1919-20 school year. Another course offered that same year was 




Eleanor Jackson 

1967-73 

Chairman, Art Dept. 



Robert Garren 

1973- 

Chairman. Art Dept. 



Dr. Alma Chambers After 

1965-72 

Chairman. Behavioral 

Science Dept. 



Dr. Gerald Colvin 

1972- 

Chairman, Behavioral 

Science Dept. 



THE COLLEGE GREW 171 

called "Child Study," which included physiology and psychology of child- 
hood. These courses were listed in the education department, and, as new 
courses were added, they all remained in the education department until 
1966-67 when a behavioral science department was set up with Dr. Alma 
Chambers as the department head. 

In 1966-67, the degree offered was a B.S. in Community Services. In 
1967-68 the degree offered was changed to a B.S. in Behavioral Sciences 
with an emphasis in psychology or an emphasis in social work and dean's 
work. The degree is the same at the present time. Dr. Gerald Colvin is 
the new head of the department, beginning in the 1972-73 school year. 

Natural Sciences 

When the classrooms were moved from Jones Hall in 1919, Professor 
W. D. Leech, the science teacher, moved all of the science equipment from 
the old classroom to the new men's dormitory in a wheelbarrow! At that 
time, each teacher helped with the industries of the school, and Professor 
Leech helped with the care of the cattle. 

The telescope, which belonged to the physics department, was built 
by Dr. Robert Woods. He ground the mirror and made the structural 
parts. Dr. George Nelson in later years improved the telescope by attach- 
ing a synchronized motor. The telescope served its purpose until 1963. 

In the old administration building the physics department occupied an 
area in the basement. At that time Professor Harold Lease, dean of men, 
taught all the physics classes. 

The chemistry and biology laboratories, in the south end of the 
administration building on the first floor, were separated by an eight-foot 
plywood partition. It was not uncommon to find frogs in the chemistry 
laboratory or chemicals in the biology laboratory. There was no locker 
space, so each student in microbiology kept his supplies in a shoe box, and 
these were stored in a little closet under the stairway. The department 
had only ten microscopes, so two or three students worked with one micro- 
scope. 

The facilities were meager indeed, and the space was inadequate. As 
the college prepared for senior status and accreditation, equipment costing 
thousands of dollars, was purchased and installed in the new science build- 
ing. The new building was dedicated February 21, 1951, and named Earl 
F. Hackman Hall in honor of the late Southern Union Conference president. 
Elder W. H. Branson was the speaker at the dedication service. 

In 1961, an addition to Hackman Hall was supposed to take care of all 
increases in the biology, chemistry, mathematics and physics departments 
for years to come. However, in about five years the mathematics depart- 
ment was obliged to move out to make room for office space for the re- 
maining three departments. In 1970, the physics department was moved 
to the former A. G. Daniells Memorial Library, now Daniells Hall, and 
Hackman Hall belonged exclusively to the biology and chemistry depart- 
ments. 

Biology 

The biology department has grown from a one man-department when 
first started by Dr. H. H. Kuhlman in 1946 to a four-man department. The 
space occupied was at the south end of Lynn Wood Hall — a laboratory 
room large enough to hold 24 students. Today, laboratory facilities can 



172 



80 YEARS OF PROGRESS 




The chemistry laboratory in the Administration Building 




Dr. Kuhlman gives inside information about "Oscar" in the Science Building. 



THE COLLEGE GREW 



173 




Dr. Woods' Invention, 1929 



174 



80 YEARS OF PROGRESS 






a 



R-i? -. 




Hackman Hall 




A new section was added to Hackman Hall. 



THE COLLEGE GREW 175 

handle 160 students at one time in four fully-equipped laboratory rooms 
which are carpeted wall-to-wall. 

Biology graduates from SMC can be spotted over many parts of the 
globe, helping to carry the Gospel to the world. 

SMC graduates between 8 and 12 majors with various emphases in 
biology every year. In addition many whose main interest is biology, go 
into dentistry, medical technology, etc. where no B.A. major is required. 

Chemistry 

An interesting incident occurred during the first winter the new 
addition was occupied. One noon, Dr. John Christensen, chairman of the 
natural science division and the chemistry department, came back from 
lunch to find water coming from the ceiling in a steady stream. Marcille 
Hall and Marshallann Weeks, his office girls, were running back and forth 
barefooted and soaked to the skin, rescuing his books. There was almost 
an inch of water on the floor in the office. A defective connection on the 
sprinkler system had frozen and broken, letting a flood of water out 
in the attic. 

The biology department has suffered several such floods as a result of 
sinks stopped up in the chemistry laboratory. These are the things that 
promote "good will" among departments. 

The chemistry department has added equipment until it is one of the 
best equipped college chemistry departments in the denomination. The 
latest addition has been a nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer. 

The department since 1950 has graduated 87 chemistry majors with 
a B.A. degree and 11 with a B.S. degree. The B.S. degree first became 
available in 1959. Nine graduates have completed their Ph.D. degrees in 
some area of chemistry. Thirty-nine have completed an M.D. degree. 

Some research has been conducted in the chemistry department. Re- 
search grants from Petroleum Research Fund has totaled approximately 
fifteen thousand dollars for work on periodic acid oxidation. Dr. Norman 
Peek also had a grant from the same source to work on Grignard reactions. 

Physics 

Today, the physics, mathematics, and computer departments are 
housed in Daniells Hall. The SMC physics department has introduced 
several innovations to the college program. They are : a course by WSMC 
radio transmission with credit by examination, a course on the interaction 
of religion with another discipline (physics), the use of the computer in 
instruction and research, and student involvement in a group research 
situation. 

Beginning in 1956 the physics department has done research in the 
atomic spectroscopy of thermal plasmas. Some $80,000 was solicited from 
the Research Corporation, the National Science Foundation, and the 
Tennessee Academy of Science for the purchase of equipment and supplies, 
and for student and technician salaries. Contributions to our understand- 
ing of radiative transfer in hot gasses, and to our knowledge of how atoms 
radiate, were presented in several dozen scientific papers and journal 
articles. The department has two large spectrographs and uses the 1130 
computer. 



176 



80 YEARS OF PROGRESS 




Dr. John Christensen, 1955-73 
Chairman, Chemistry Dept. 



Dr. Ray Hefferlin, 1955- 
Chairman, Physics Dept. 



There has also been a study of physics and religion — object lessons, 
illustrations, and more subtle areas such as miracles and proofs of the 
existence of God. Several editions of a source book have been prepared, 
excerpts of one of which appeared in the Journal of Adventist Education. 

Students of the department now serve as teachers in academies and 
colleges, as dentists and doctors, and in research capacities. 

Dr. Ray Hefferlin, chairman of the physics department, has been here 
at the college since 1955. Dr. Henry Kuhlman, who is an associate in the 
department has been here since 1968. 

Short Wave Radio 

In searching through the old catalogues of SJC, the year 1937-38 has 
the first course listed dealing with radio. It was called "Practical Elec- 
tronics" and listed in the Physics Department. 

The Triangle, the yearbook for 1938, contained an article on radio and 
its prominent part in the life of modern man. It mentions that the SJC 
laboratory was well equipped, but that the real center of interest was the 
short wave transmitter. The station operated in the well-known bands 
under the call W4EHG by two operators, W4EHG and W4EYB. The article 
closed by saying that it provided "the pleasure of engaging in the intrigu- 
ing hobby of amateur radio, handling messages for students to parents and 
friends, and was ever ready to be of service in time of disaster or emerg- 
ency." Dr. Robert W. Woods, on the staff from 1928-39, was responsible 
for securing the equipment and starting the course. 

When Dr. Woods left SJC, Dr. George Nelson, on the staff from 1939- 
55, became his successor in this field. During World War II there was an 
interruption in the program due to the war. It was picked up again later, 
and at the time that Dr. Nelson left, he had dismantled the transmitter 
altogether and was planning to overhaul it. 

After Dr. Ray Hefferlin arrived in 1955, war surplus equipment was 
secured, Dr. Hefferlin received a license to operate, and the station was in 
business again. 



THE COLLEGE GREW 



177 



In 1960 when Mr. A. L. Watt came to SMC to teach in the physics 
department, he began pushing for money for new equipment. In 1962, 
Jerry Bartram, president of the radio club, with assistance from the college 
and the Student Association, succeeded in purchasing a Collins 75S-3 re- 
ceiver, a 32S-1 transmitter, and a 1000 watt linear amplifier, which gave 
the radio club one of the finest amateur stations. Presently, the operators 
keep in touch once a week with SMC's student missionaries in Nicaragua. 

Mathematics 

A minor was first offered in mathematics in 1945-46, and 14 years 
later a major in mathematics was added to the curriculum. The interest 
in mathematics has undergone a revival in recent years. Could it be that 
modern math was the spark that kindled it? There are three teachers in 
the department at the present time : Dr. Lawrence Hanson, chairman ; Mr. 
C. E. Davis, and Dr. Arthur Richert. 

Computer Science 

Courses in computer science were first offered in 1968-69. The theory 
was taught on campus, and the practical part was done on computers at 
Dixie Yarns, Inc. in Chattanooga, and at Dalton Community College. 

The next year, SMC leased an IBM 1130 computer, and it was no 
longer necessary to go off campus. When this machine was no longer 
adequate, a Hewlett-Packard 2000F was rented and continues to be used. 

A minor in computer science, which requires 18 hours in that field 
of study, has been offered since 1970. 

Robert McCurdy came to SMC in 1967 to teach physics and mathe- 
matics. The next year he started the computer science department and 
was chairman of the department until it was merged with the physics 
department in 1973. 






CiAdii 



Dr. Lawrence Hanson 

1966-Chairman 

Mathematics Dept. 



Robert McCurdy 
1968-73 Chairman 
Computer Science 



Dr. Robert Morrison 

1967-Chairman 
Modern Language Dept. 



178 80 YEARS OF PROGRESS 

Modern Languages 

When SMC was still on the Graysville campus, Latin, Spanish, and 
German were among the course offerings. Latin disappeared from the 
curriculum in the 1920's, after the school was on this campus. Miss Maude 
I. Jones taught Latin and Spanish in the early days of SJC. Miss Pearl 
Hall taught Spanish and French from 1929-38, and was followed by Mrs. 
Mary Dietel who was here from 1938-58. 

The first foreign language major was offered in 1944-45, in Spanish, 
with minors in French, German, and Spanish. Today, majors are offered 
in Spanish and German, and minors in Spanish, German, and French. 

Dr. Clyde Bushnell served as chairman of the modern language de- 
partment from 1952-66. 

Dr. Robert Morrison is chairman of the modern language department 
and has been here since 1967. 

The language department has a modern, well-equipped laboratory, 
operated by remote control, which uses either tapes or cartridges. Cor- 
responding to each of the 30 positions is a tape recorder on which a student 
may record his own voice to see how he performed in comparison with the 
master tape. The equipment is also used for oral comprehension tests. 
Student monitors are selected who are proficient in the languages taught 
at the college. 

Teacher-sponsored class trips to Mexico and Europe are also an 
integral part of modern language study at SMC. 

Counseling and Testing 

The Southland Scroll of December 25, 1929, says that an intelligence 
test was given in chapel to obtain an index which would show the native 
intelligence of each student, so that the faculty might know whether normal 
progress was being made. 

Twenty years later Dr. T. W. Steen was director of the counseling 
and testing service. Along with other tests, he gave a scholastic aptitude 
test to the entering freshman. Dr. Steen did individual diagnostic work 
also. 

In this department, Dr. L. N. Holm will long be remembered for his 
years of valuable counseling, for the help he gave in solving problems, and 
for the assurance that problems were in safe keeping. 

Dr. J. M. Ackerman was director of testing from 1957-70. Since that 
time Mr. Kenneth Davis, who was at SMC from 1959-66, has returned to 
SMC and is serving as director of counseling and testing, and coordinator 
for the Student Association. He was previously dean of men and dean of 
student affairs. 

For many years now, psychological and personality tests have been 
given to all freshman. The guidance service has grown with the college. 
Problems of student life are matters of special concern to the dean of 
student affairs and the dormitory deans. 



THE COLLEGE GREW 



179 




Dr. Clyde Bushnell 

1956-65 English 
Modern Languages 



K. R. Davis 

1959-1966, 1970-Director of 

Counseling and Testing 

Music 



Dr. Marvin Robertson 
1966-Chairman Music Dept. 



The early records of subjects taught at the Graysville school include 
music. The first faculty list on Southern Junior College campus gives Mr. 
F. L. Adams as the music director. Mrs. Gradye Brooke Summerour taught 
music the second year. Dr. Glenn H. Straight was next, and teaching with 
him was Mrs. Bernice Williams Curtis. 

As the school became established, Miss Iva Dell Kirk taught piano and 
Mr. J. Lowell Butler was the voice instructor. It was Mr. Butler who made 
the Doll House into a music studio. The Doll House was originally built for 
the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Thatcher. 

In the record of the school year 1930-31 there is a reference to a 
thirty-piece band under the direction of Mr. D. Robert Edwards. 

Prof. Harold A. Miller came to the college in 1935 and was here 
until 1942 and came back in 1945 until 1953, making a total of 15 years. 
The music department expanded and in 1945-46 a B.A. with a major in 
music was offered for the first time. Those added to the department who 
helped develop the professional standing were Professors Clarence Dortch, 
Dorothy Evans Ackerman, and Mabel Wood. 

During the years that Dr. Adrian Lauritzen was chairman of the Fine 
Arts Division, 1952-57, a degree program in the field of music education 
was initiated. 

Music Department chairmen since the college was raised to senior 
college status have been Prof. C. W. Dortch, Prof. H. A. Miller, Dr. 
Adrian R. M. Lauritzen, Prof. Milo Hill, Dr. Morris Taylor, and Dr. Marvin 
Robertson. 

In 1972, under Dr. Robertson's guidance, the music department has 
been promoted to full membership in the National Association of Schools 
of Music. SMC had held associate membership since 1968. 

When the administration building was erected in 1923-24, the studios 
of the music department were located in the rooms behind the chapel plat- 
form and in rooms above the platform. As the college looked forward to 



180 



80 YEARS OF PROGRESS 



accreditation, one of the important needs was a fine arts building. When 
the Georgian-Colonial building was completed, it was a far cry from the 
Doll House studio of 1923. It contained seventeen practice rooms, seven 
studios, a chapel, and a music library. The building was dedicated February 
10, 1954, to Mr. Harold A. Miller. At the dedication, four of Professor 
Miller's own compositions were presented by student musicians. 




At the dedication of Harold A. Miller Music Hall, Front Row: Professor and Mrs. 
Miller; back row: Dr. Charles Wittschiebe, Dr. Richard Hammill, Elder V. G. Ander- 
son, President Wright, Dr. Everett Watrous. 



THE COLLEGE GREW 



181 






a (VfiT** 1 ^^ 



..itfife,. 




The College Choir and Collegiate Chorale, Mrs. Dorothy Ackerman, Director. 




Prof. Dortch at the first SMC Organ — A rebuilt Wurlitzer Theater Organ. 



182 



80 YEARS OF PROGRESS 



PROGRAM 

On The Lawn By 

The Southern Junior College Band 
May 16, 1925 - - 7:45 



Band 


? 




Triumph March 


• 




The Avenger March 






American Beauty Waltz 


By all 




Reading — By request 
How the La Rue Stakes were Lost 


Band 




Miss Martha Minnick 


Dance of the Imps 


Schottische 


Band 


Over the Stars 


Waltz 


Evening Shadows Serenade 
Water Lillies Waltz 


A Story 




The Victor March 


The Old School Days 




Reading 


M. R. Trammel! 


The Stolen Commencement Dress 






Miss Jean Wingate 


Band 




Band 


Love's Way 


Waltz 


Airy Fairy Caprice 
Crawley's March 


Myrtle 

The Conqueror 


Waltz 
Overture 



INSTRUMENTATION 



.ale. 






First Cornet 

Second Cornet 

Second Cornet 

Clarinet 

Saxophone 

Baritone 

Bass 



Julian Coggin 

Clifford Bee 

Alton Lorren 

Merril Dart 

Dorris McKee 

Clay Millard 

Carl Aiken 



Director 
George N. Fuller 






-^ 



Program presented by the College Band in 1925. 



THE COLLEGE GREW 



183 




The College Ensemble, 1920, Dr. Glenn Straight, Director 



♦ ' 







,p „ rV 






The College Band, 1951-52, Norman Krogstad, Director 



.,-*t ... ■ . MIL ,,»' 






184 



80 YEARS OF PROGRESS 




Professor Miller in his studio 

Mr. B. D. Ackley of the Rodeheaver Music Company said, "Harold 
Miller is the greatest writer of beautiful sacred melodies that I have ever 
known." His music will occupy a lasting place in the denomination. Till 
the end of time his 250 sacred songs and choruses will lead hearts of men 
and women all over the world to Christ. 




Miller Hall 



THE COLLEGE GREW 



185 




Collegiate Chorale, 1973 — Dr. Robertson, Director 




The College Band in 1928 



186 



80 YEARS OF PROGRESS 



Ten of his songs are in the "Church Hymnal," one of which has the 
tune name "Collegedale," This hymn is "Dear Saviour, We Would Know," 
page 147. Some of his best loved sacred songs are: 

"The Captain Calls for You" 

"Like Jesus" 

"My Prayer" 

"To See Thy Face" 

"Power of Heaven" 

"Will You Meet Me in the Kingdom?" 

He will be remembered best for the beautiful song services which he 
conducted each Friday evening preceding the vesper service. They 
brought peace and contentment to many a tired and troubled heart, and 
contributed much to the experience of making Southern Missionary College 
a deeply spiritual school. 

Male Quartets 

Male quartets have long been popular on the campus. The Adelphian 
Quartet was one of the better known of the numerous quartets. It was 
composed of Don Crook, Jack Veazey and John and Wayne Thurber. This 
quartet remained intact from 1949 through 1952. 

In 1955, The King's Men Quartet was composed of two of the Adel- 
phian Quartet, John Thurber and Jack Veazey, plus Jim McClintock and 
Duane Stier. The first three of these have been or are presently members 
of the Voice of Prophecy Quartet. More recently, John Ramsey, a 1969 
graduate of SMC, has become a member of the VOP, joining Jack Veazey 
and Jim McClintock who are still members. 

Other Musical Organizations 

For years now, SMC has had the following organizations for which 
course credit is granted : the Collegiate Chorale, the Concert Band, and the 
Symphonic Orchestra. The chorale is directed by Don Runyan; the Band 
by Dr. Jack McClarty; and the Orchestra by Orlo Gilbert. 




King's Men Quartet: Duane Stier, John Thurber, Jack Veazey, Jim McClintock 



THE COLLEGE GREW 187 

Health, Physical Education, and Recreation 

Some of the students in the earlier days of the college recall an 
occasional chapel period when all the students were marched outdoors and 
put through calisthenic exercises. This was an extracurricular activity 
for which no credit was given. 

The first course in physical education listed in the catalogue was in 
the 1935-36 school year. It was about this time that a cement floor was 
put in the tabernacle, and the building was used as a gymnasium. 

When J. B. Cooper became head of the physical education department 
in 1956, a minor was offered for the first time. Dr. Cyril Dean replaced Mr. 
Cooper in 1962, and in 1964 a major in physical education was given. 

On September 30, 1965, the SMC Committee of 100 officially opened 
the new Physical Education Building, which they had made financially 
possible. 

The gymnasium houses classrooms, offices, storage rooms, two large 
locker rooms, three basketball courts, an Olympic-size swimming pool, and 
a handball court. The pool was financed by a student campaign during 
which $30,000 was raised. One of the main features of the gymnasium 
is its maple parquet floating floor. A local foundation provided $25,000 
for the building wing housing the swimming pool. 

From 1970-72, Mr. Nelson Thomas was acting head of the physical 
education department, and in the fall of 1972 Dr. Delmar Lovejoy became 
department head. 

Business Administration and Office Administration Departments 

The earliest records available show that typing, shorthand, and book- 
keeping were regularly taught on the Graysville campus in the early 
1900's. These same subjects continued to be taught and in 1922 accounting 
was added and the next year commercial law. 

Among the early teachers who may be mentioned were Hanserd 
Presley, Robert V. Cory, L. A. Jacobs, M. J. Halvorsen and Mrs. Gradye 
Brooke Summerour. Mrs. Summerour taught music and secretarial from 
1912 until the school was moved to Collegedale and then taught on this 
campus in 1917-18. 

H. H. Hamilton, who was president from 1925-27, influenced the 
growth of the department as his interests were in that area having been 
a very capable court reporter in his earlier years. 

For many years Miss Theresa Brickman and her associates were 
responsible for an excellent secretarial department. Dr. L. N. Holm, who 
headed the business administration department and Mr. Ralph Davidson, 
a certified public accountant, added strength as the department grew. 

An increased number of courses have been offered until presently 
what started out as the commercial department is now two departments — 
business administration and office administration. Dr. Wayne VandeVere 



188 



80 YEARS OF PROGRESS 




Front Row: John Thurber, Wayne Thurber, Dean Kinsey; Second Row: Dannie Lewis, 
Floyd Matula; Top: Roy Battle. 



THE COLLEGE GREW 



189 





Dr. Delmar Lovejoy 




190 



80 YEARS OF PROGRESS 




This was the Normal Building from 1928-58. From 1958-70 it housed the Collegedale 
Academy. It was torn down and replaced by the Home Economics Building, 1971. 




Physical Education Building 



THE COLLEGE GREW 



191 




Richard C. Stanley 

1964-Chairman 

Office Administration 



Dr. Wayne VandeVere 

1962-Chairman Business 

Administration Dept. 



Theresa Brickman 
1942-57 Chairman 
Secretarial Science 



is chairman of the business administration, and Mr. Richard Stanley is 
chairman of the office administration (former secretarial science) depart- 
ment. 

Education 

When Professor Colcord opened the classroom above the Klouse 
grocery store in Graysville in 1892, well-trained teachers were not plentiful. 
The earliest record of the school at Graysville indicates that a few of the 
students were given instruction in teaching and went out as teachers. 

In later years a normal training course was an important part of the 
program at the Southern Training School in Graysville. 

A teacher training program was a part of the curriculum at Southern 
Junior College from its beginning. In 1928 the Normal Building was 
erected as a demonstration school. Mrs. Marian Bissett Marshall was the 
first normal director. Those who have headed this department since were 
Mrs. J. A. Tucker, Mrs. Mable Behrens, Mr. Kay M. Adams, Mr. Don C. 
Ludington, Miss Ruby Dell McGee, Miss Myrtle Maxwell, Mrs. Grace 
Evans Lundquist, Mr. Ira M. Gish, Mrs. Olivia Brickman Dean, Dr. T. W. 
Steen, Dr. Lewis N. Holm, Dr. K. M. Kennedy and Dr. Stuart Berkeley. 

Mrs. Lundquist organized the first Future Teachers Club in 1939. 

In 1958, the A. W. Spalding Elementary School was built. The College- 
dale Academy next occupied the Normal Building. 

In October, 1955, the State of Tennessee Department of Education 
gave approval to the college for certification on work done toward Ele- 
mentary and Secondary Teacher Education. The present program leads to 
a B.S. degree in elementary education and certification in secondary 
education. 

In 1967, the elementary program was accredited by the National 
Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education. The year, 1972, the 



192 



80 YEARS OF PROGRESS 




Dr. K. M. Kennedy 

1956-72 Chairman 

Education Dept. 



Dr. Stuart P. Berkeley 

1972-Chairman 

Education Dept. 



Olivia B. Dean 

1942-56 Chairman 

Education Dept. 

Chairman Art Dept. 1956-67 



total program, that is the elementary and secondary education programs, 
came up for reevaluation by the National Council for the Accreditation of 
Teacher Education. 

Word came in July that SMC's program in teacher education has been 
fully accredited for the next five years by the National Council for Accredi- 
tation of Teacher Education (NCATE). This means that SMC's teacher 
training program on both the elementary and secondary levels is of the 
highest caliber, matching those of similar institutions in the United States 
so accredited. It also means that SMC graduates are accepted for certifica- 
tion in approximately 30 states and are given favorable consideration in 
many others. 

Collegedale Academy 

Until the school year 1944-45 the academy at SJC was an integral part 
of the college. The students were housed in the same dormitories, taught 
by the same faculty, used the same classrooms, and graduated in the same 
class with the junior college students. 

It was evident for some time that a change was becoming necessary, 
so in 1944, Prof. D. C. Ludington became the first principal of the College- 
dale Academy, and, although many things remained the same, it was the 
beginning of its existence as a separate entity. 

In 1958, when the A. W. Spalding Elementary School building was 
completed, the academy moved into the Normal Building, which the 
elementary school had just vacated. The academy boarding students lived 
in such places as the top floor of the Normal Building, the white duplex 
down the hill from the Fine Arts Building, and, of course, in the college 
dormitories if there was room. 

When the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools placed the 
Collegedale Academy on notice that its accreditation could not continue 
beyond 1970 unless adequate plant facilities were provided, the Academy 
Board had to act immediately. 



THE COLLEGE GREW 



195 



V^W 




Arthur W. Spalding Elementary School has eleven classrooms, an auditorium and a 
recreation room. 




The New Collegedale Academy, 1970 

By February, 1969, plans were drawn up for the church to take over 
the academy and the A. W. Spalding Elementary School and run them as 
the Greater Collegedale Schools. The plan called for a new academy build- 
ing east of the Collegedale Church, and a new addition to the elementary 
school building. 

In October, 1969, cash on hand for the project was $305,000 with a 
projected $480,000 yet to be raised. The plan was to have it paid out by 
1973, with the Collegedale Church, the Georgia-Cumberland Conference, 
and the Southern Union Conference contributing. Plans were completed 
for construction to begin in the spring of 1969. 

The new Collegedale Academy Building was completed in time for the 
1970 graduation exercises to be held there. The building is 480 feet long 
by 240 feet wide. It contains eight classrooms, two science laboratories, a 
home economics department with eight kitchens, a multi-media area 
(library), an auditorium that seats 560, a band rehearsal room, three 
practice rooms, and two studios. 



194 



80 YEARS OF PROGRESS 



Collegedale Academy ceased receiving boarding students, thus becom- 
ing a day academy, when the Georgia-Cumberland Academy came into 
existence in 1964. 

The following is a list of the academy principals and their terms of 



J. R. Siebenlist, 1959-61 
Kenneth C. Stewart, 1961-64 
F. H. Hewitt, 1964-68 
Ronald Barrow, 1968- 



service : 

Don C. Ludington, 1944-47 
James C. Gaitens, 1947-49 
M. J. Sorenson, 1949-51 
William B. Higgins, 1951-57 
Paul J. Hoar, 1957-59 

History — Political Science 

The Southern Training School bulletin for the year 1911-12 shows that 
eight courses were offered in history that year. The school at that time 
was offering some work above the twelfth grade, and no doubt some of 
these courses gave college credit. During the early years of Southern 
Junior College only three history courses appear on the class schedule. 
The Church History class fluctuated between the Social Science and Re- 
ligion Divisions. 

Dr. Daniel Walther, chairman of the division in 1945-46, added five 
courses in Social Science and from that point on additions have been 
gradual. 

Since becoming a senior college, there have been excellent chairman of 
the Social Science Division. Dr. Daniel Walther was chairman at the junior 
college level and at the time the college reached senior college status. 
Since 1946 the division chairmen have been Dr. F. 0. Rittenhouse, Dr. Leif 
Kr. Tobiassen, Dr. George Shankel, Dr. E. T. Watrous, Dr. Jerome Clark, 
and Floyd Greenleaf. 

The history department now offers a major and a minor, which include 
history and political science. There are between 8 and 13 graduates each 
year with a history major, and these enter mainly the following fields: 
teaching, medicine, dentistry, and law. 

Nursing 

Southern Junior College offered a one-year pre-nursing course begin- 
ning in 1934-35. The students were then accepted at the Florida Sani- 
tarium in Orlando to complete their nursing education. 




/ i 





Mazie A. Herin 

1956-60 Chairman 

Nursing Dept. 



Dr. Everett Watrous 
1959-67 Chairman History 
and Political Science Dept. 



Floyd Greenleaf 

1974-Chairman History and 

Political Science Dept. 



THE COLLEGE GREW 



195 



The Florida Sanitarium, which had originally been built for a tubercu- 
losis sanitorium and abandoned before the furnishings were unpacked, was 
secured by the Seventh-day Adventist denomination in 1908. Dr. Lydia E. 
Parmele was the first medical superintendent. 

Five persons completed a three-year course in 1913, but it was not 
until 1918 that the nursing education was organized on a sound basis. In 
1920, the school received state accreditation, and in 1952 it was given 
temporary accreditation by the National Nursing Accrediting Service. 

In 1953 the Florida Sanitarium worked out with SMC a program that 
would lead to a B.S. degree in nursing. The possibility was first discussed 
in 1950. 

In 1956, Miss Mazie Herin was invited by Southern Missionary 
College to plan a curriculum in which the student would spend the first 
three semesters on the Collegedale campus, four semesters under the 
direction of college teachers at the Florida Sanitarium and its affiliates, 
and the last semester on the Collegedale campus. 

A revised plan which was adopted in 1961 called for the student to be 
on the main campus at Collegedale for the first three semesters, then go 
to the Florida campus for three semesters and return to Collegedale for 
both semesters of the senior year. Currently, students spend only the 
junior year on the Florida campus. 

The last diploma class in nursing was graduated in December, 1958, 
and the first class to be graduated with a B.S. degree in nursing was in 
1960 with eleven members in the class. 

Miss Mazie Herin accepted a call to the Medical Department of the 
General Conference, and Dr. Harriet Smith Reeves took her place as head 
of the nursing department. From 1967-69 Miss Catherine Glatho was 
acting head of the department and in 1969, Dr. Carl Miller became the head 
of the four-year nursing department. 

The associate of science degree was first offered at SMC in the 1965-66 
school year. Those registered for this two-year course spent one year on 
the SMC campus and the second year on the Madison campus. Starting in 
the 1970-71 school year the whole program was offered on the Collegedale 
campus. In 1975 the Madison campus was in use again and will continue 
to be used. 




Ina Longway 

1975-Chairman 

Combined Nursing Dept. 



Del La Verne Watson 

1964-72 Chairman 

Two- Year Nursing Dept. 



Christine Shultz 

1972-75 Chairman 

Two- Year Nursing Dept. 



196 



80 YEARS OF PROGRESS 



Mrs. Del La Verne Watson was the chairman of this department from 
its inception in 1964 until 1972. Mrs. Christine Shultz has been the chair- 
man since that time. 

Beginning in the 1975-76 school year Mrs. Ina Longway will be 
chairman of the combined departments. All nursing students will be 
given exactly the same training for the first two years and may sit for 
their state boards at the end of the two years. 

At that point the program provides for all to continue for another 
two years to obtain advanced training and receive a B.S. degree in nursing 
if desired. 




The new Nursing Building. 




Progress of Nursing Building. 



THE COLLEGE GREW 



197 



Home Economics 

The most experienced cook on the Southern Junior College campus 
was the matron, and, since the faculty was limited, the matron taught the 
cooking class in the kitchen of the Yellow House. In 1923-24 Mrs. George 
Fuller taught sewing; Miss Rose Watt, the voice teacher in 1926-27, taught 
domestic science; the following year Mrs. Nina Atteberry taught the 
sewing class in the administration building; in 1929, Mrs. L. P. West 
taught a class in foods and nutrition, and thus the home economics depart- 
ment grew with the college. 

During the time Dr. T. W. Walters was president of SMC, plans were 
made for a building to house the home economics department, the cafeteria, 
and the student lounge. This building was completed in 1958. The home 
economics part was known as Ellens' Hall being named for Ellen G. White 
and Ellen Richards who pioneered the home economics work in the United 
States. This building was torn down in the spring of 1971 because it was 
more economical to erect a new building than to repair and remodel that 
one. 

The new home economics building is named Summerour Hall and 
is located on the site of the old normal building. It is modern, convenient, 
and lovely to look at. The department moved into it in the fall of 1971. 

The department offers a B.S. degree in home economics with an 
emphasis on general home economics or interior design and a B.S. degree 
with a major in foods and nutrition. Later, the interior design major was 
moved to the art department. 

An interesting feature of the foods laboratory is that it is not the 
kitchen type at all but is the scientific type. Students check out their 
equipment as needed. 

The landscaping around the building is done with the idea that there 
will be flowers grown for use in floral arrangements. 





; 



Lois Heiser Jacobs 

1945-51 Chairman 

Home Economics Dept. 



Thelma Hemme Cushman 

1957-Chairman 

Home Economics Dept. 



Gerald Boynton 

1945-56 Chairman 

Industrial Education Dept. 



198 



80 YEARS OF PROGRESS 




Dr. Ola Gant taught home economics in Lynn Wood Hall in the middle 1930's. 

There are now two full time staff members and two part time. Mrs. 
Thelma Hemme Cushman is the chairman of the department. 

Previous heads of the department were: Lois Heiser Jacobs, Ruth 
Garber Higgins, Leola Castle Starkey, Dorothy Christensen and Harriette 
Hanson. 



t .' 




A corner of the home economics department in 1962. 



THE COLLEGE GREW 



199 




Mrs. A. N. Atteberry's Sewing Class about 1925. 




The Home Economics Class of 1927. 



200 



80 YEARS OF PROGRESS 




Interior view of Summerour Hall — The Home Economics Building 




Exterior view of Summerour Hall — 1971. 



THE COLLEGE GREW 



201 



Industrial Education 

In the early days of the college, manual training classes were taught 
only in the academy. Mr. T. R. Huxtable taught classes in wood-working 
from 1922-24. Mr. E. R. Swain was another of the early manual training- 
teachers. 

During the 1946-47 school year, industrial education was first offered 
in the college. It was a two-year curriculum leading to a diploma, with the 
plan to develop a four-year course leading to a B.S. degree in industrial 
education. Mr. Gerald Boynton, who worked to have this program, was on 
the staff from 1945-56. In 1954 he was joined by Mr. Harry Hulsey who 
was head of the department from 1957 to 1960. 

In 1948-49, a major was offered for the first time and this offering 
continued until the 1959-60 school term. In 1961-62 the two-year diploma 
course was again listed in the catalogue, and in 1965-66 it was possible to 
receive a major, minor, or two-year diploma. 

At the present time there are five full-time teachers in the depart- 
ment: Mr. Drew Turlington, head of the department, who has been here 
on the industrial education staff since 1960; Dr. Wayne Janzen since 1967; 
Mr. John Durichek, 1969; Mr. Robert Warner, 1972, and Mr. Thomas 
Grindley, 1973. 

The industrial arts building was completed in the summer of 1964 and 
was a gift of the McKee Baking Company. The building was first called 
McKee Hall, but when the new library was completed and was named Mc- 
Kee Library, the name of the industrial arts building was changed to 
Ledford Hall in honor of Mr. C. E. Ledford. Mr. Ledford was farm manager 
and taught agriculture at SMC from 1918 to 1933. 

Ledford Hall is a modern, well-equipped, one-story brick structure 
containing offices for teachers, a classroom, and laboratories for auto 
mechanics, welding, drafting, machine shop, and printing. An addition is 
under construction now. 




Students Bill Wood and Jim Buckner with industrial arts department Chairman Drew 
Turlington. 



202 



80 YEARS OF PROGRESS 








The Woodwork Class of 1925: Wm. Draper, Buren Allen, Bill Hall, Prof. R. F. Oilman, 
Ira Thompson, Herman Woodall, C. Fountain, Ed. Larimer, Frank Humphries and 
Norman Hickman. 




Mr. Swain's woodwork class which met in old Talge Hall basement, 1928. 




The class in woodwork built a teacher's cottage each year. 



THE COLLEGE GREW 



203 



In the area of construction technology, students are taught home 
building and are prepared to sit for the contractor's building license exam- 
inations at the end of the two years. This curriculum has been offered 
since the 1972-73 school year. One house was erected that first year and 
sold, and during the two succeeding years three houses were built. These 
houses are in the $60,000 price range. 




A Spanish style house built by the students and located just across the street from 
the house pictured below. 




The first house built by the construction technology classes in 1972-73 school year. 
This and other houses built by the classes are in the Hiawatha Estates, a housing 
development in a rural area just north of Ooltewah. 



204 



80 YEARS OF PROGRESS 




"1 -'Ifcipfc ■ 

- 

■ 

Industrial Arts Building first known as McKee Hall but later changed to Ledford 
Hall when the Library was named McKee Library. 



Religion 

Because it has been, from the beginning, a Christian school, one of the 
courses offered and required as a subject through all the years has been 
the study of the Bible. 

When Southern Junior College published its early bulletins, a diploma 
and a certificate in theology were among the first offerings. Elder F. W. 
Field, a missionary returned from Japan, was the first Bible instructor. 
In the 1920 bulletin Elder J. H. Behrens had joined him in the theology 
department. Both were godly men, exerting a tremendous influence for 
good in the spiritual building of the college. 




T. K. Ludgate 

1942-46 Chairman of 

Bible Dept. 



Dr. Douglas Bennett 
1970-Chairman 
Religion Dept. 



Dr. Gordon Hyde 

1962-68 Chairman 

Communications Dept. 



THE COLLEGE GREW 205 

T. K. Ludgate was the first chairman of the religion department 
after the college was raised to senior college status. He was followed the 
next year by Frederick B. Jensen. 

The men selected to teach in this department were men who not only 
taught Bible as a subject, but men who could give it meaning in the modern 
world of the Seventh-day Adventist young person. 

Elder Edward Banks excelled as a teacher of evangelism. His field 
school of evangelism was a model of what could be done at the college level. 
The field school, conducted each summer, was a part of the ministerial 
course. 

Others who have been the head of the religion department since the 
college was accredited are Dr. Charles E. Wittschiebe, Dr. Otto Christen- 
sen, Elder Bruce Johnston. Dr. Gordon Hyde, and at the present time, Dr. 
Douglas Bennett. 

Currently the religion department offers a major with a choice of 
ministerial emphasis or teaching emphasis. 

Communications 

In 1962-63 the new communications department offered a major with 
a choice of two areas of emphasis — journalism or speech. In 1970-71 the 
offerings were expanded to include broadcasting. 

Communications students have opportunities in practical learning ex- 
perience at the college's educational, 100,000 watt radio station. WSMC-FM 
is stereo, non-commercial and is one of the most powerful in the nation. It 
came into operation in 1959 as approved by the Federal Communications 
Commission and expanded to 80,000 watts in 1967, then to 100,000 in 1974. 

The studios are in Lynn Wood Hall and are equipped with the latest 
electronic components. There are three control rooms, studios, record 
library, and offices. 

The Collins transmitter and the 200-foot tower are located on White 
Oak Mountain about three miles south of the campus, on land made 
available by Dr. Dewitt Bowen, an alumnus and a member of SMC's 
Committee of 100. 

The news releases from the College Relations office, and the editing 
of the Associated Press teletype news service for WSMC-FM, and the 
Student Association publications — Campus Accent, Southern Accent, South- 
ern Memories, and the Joker all provide varied opportunities in journalism. 

Dr. Gordon Hyde was the first chairman of the department and the 
current chairman is Dr. Don Dick. 

Radio Station WSMC-FM 

In 1959-60, with Mr. William H. Taylor as sponsor and Barry Cobb as 
student manager, equipment for the 10 watt radio station, WSMC-FM, 
was purchased and licensing to operate was authorized by the Federal 
Communications Commission. 

In 1960, when Dr. Gordon Hyde returned to the campus, he became 
sponsor and John LeBaron was the manager of WSMC-FM. Dr. Hyde 
remained sponsor of the station until 1965, when James Hannum became 
general manager and Allen Steele the station manager. 



206 



80 YEARS OF PROGRESS 



On March 21, 1967, WSMC-FM increased its signal to 80,000 watts 
which made it possible to broadcast as far away as Atlanta and Birming- 
ham. Special guest speaker for the ceremonies which marked the occasion 
was Congressman Bill Brock who flew down from Washington. The 
station's power now is 100,000 watts. 

With the growth of the station more full-time help was needed, and 
Mr. Don Self, now general manager, is spending some of his time in fund 
raising and development and Mr. Milford Crist is taking over some of 
Mr. Self's work as operations manager. David Brooks is director of 
development for the station. 

Students still carry heavy responsibilities, but they do it over smaller 
segments of time. 

The following is a list of students who have managed the station in 
the past: 



1959-60 
1960-61 
1961-62 
1962-63 
1963-64 
1964-65 
1965-66 


Barry Cobb 
John LeBaron 
John Vogt 
Ed Motschiedler 
Des Cummings 
Ed Phillips 
Allen Steele 


1966-67 

1967-67 

1967-68 

1968-69 
1969-70 
1970-71 


Allen Steele 

(Sept. 1966-Jan. 1967) 

Jack Boyson 

(Jan. 1967 to May 1967) 

Curtis Carlson 

(May 1967-May 1968) 

John Robinson 

Ray Minner 

Don Self 


^ 

















Dr. C. N. Rees signing the application for an increase in power for WSMC-FM. 
Looking on are Dr. Gordon Hyde, then head of the communications department; 
SMC instructor James Hannum and Professor Ray Shirley, Manager of WUOT at UT 
and engineer-consultant for WSMC-FM. 



THE COLLEGE GREW 



207 




Looking at SMC's first radio transmitter WSMC-FM's 200 Ft. tower on top of 
are Dr. Gordon Hyde, Don Wilson, Dick White Oak Mountain. 
Toler, Bert Barnes and Dr. Ray Hefferlin. 



208 



80 YEARS OF PROGRESS 





Dr. Elaine Giddings, 1945-51 
Chairman English Dept. 



Dr. Wilma McClarty, 1972- 
Chairman English Dept. 



English Language and Literature 

A "required course in English" is to be found in the earliest catalogues. 
From a few courses in rhetoric and literature, the department eventually 
expanded to include creative writing, speech, journalism, and foreign 
languages, and was called "Communication Arts." 

Miss Maude Jones, whose own English was fluent and flawless and 
spoken with a beautifully soft southern accent, was an English teacher 
from the early days of SJC and even after retiring she continued to teach 
Biblical literature until 1950. 

Today, the former Communication Arts Division is divided into three 
departments: English and Literature, Communications, and Modern 
Languages. 

Dr. Elaine Giddings came to SMC in 1945 when SMC first became a 
four-year college and remained here until 1951 as head of the department. 
Others who have served as head of the department are Dr. Kathleen 
McMurphy, Dr. Clyde Bushnell, Dr. Gordon Madgwick, Dr. Lynn Sauls, and 
Mr. Bruce Gerhart. Dr. Wilma McClarty is the present holder of that 
office. 

The English department faculty all have offices on the south end 
of the first floor of Jones Hall with classrooms in Lynn Wood Hall. 

SMC is offering college English classes at Madison and Forest Lake 
Academies. The courses are acceptable at any accredited college. 

This program came into being when it was noticed that many academy 
seniors were taking only two classes to finish their high school require- 
ments. By adding a college class it was felt the students would make 
better use of their time. 



CHAPTER XXIV 

AND THEN— ACCREDITATION 

As the work grew in the South and the need for trained workers 
became greater, it was apparent to the workers in the Southern Union that 
the time had come when the college should be accredited. Accreditation 
would permit pre-medical students to take all their work at Southern Miss- 
ionary College before entering the medical college at Loma Linda; it would 
make it possible for graduates to receive teacher certification in the var- 
ious states and to attend the graduate schools of their choice. 

Application for accreditation was preceded by seven years of plan- 
ning and building at the college. President Wright contacted Dr. J. Robin- 
son, secretary-treasurer of the Southern Association, who graciously helped 
to outline a plan of procedure which involved a new library, a new science 
building, and the general raising of academic standards and faculty quali- 
fications. After Dr. Robinson's death, Dr. M. C. Huntley and later Dr. J. 
M. Goddard were most helpful. These men outlined what the college would 
need for its forward step. 

During the years of preparation several faculty members earned 
doctoral degrees, and the library, science building, and music hall were 
erected. This was a period during which the college advanced at a rapid 
tempo. 

As a result of the vision of President Wright, the team work of the 
faculty, and the financial support of the Board of Trustees and the South- 
ern Union Conference, official application for accreditation was made in 




SMC Executive Officers and Inspection Committee: J. M. Goddard, K. A. Wright, 
Seated; F. O. Rittenhouse, Omar Carmichael, Gordon Stips, Charles Fleming, Jr. 



209 



210 



80 YEARS OF PROGRESS 



September, 1949. President Wright, Dean Rittenhouse, and Business Man- 
ager Fleming represented the college at the Houston, Texas, meeting where 
the application was discussed, and a formal request for a special study was 
made. 

On October 2 and 3, 1950, the college was inspected by a committee 
made up of Dr. J. M. Goddard, executive secretary of the Southern Associa- 
tion; Prof. Omar Carmichael, superintendent of schools in Louisville; and 
Prof. Gordon Stips, vice president of Emory University in Atlanta. The 
object of their inspection was to determine the educational standards and 
to investigate such areas as student organizations, general administrative 
policies, and dormitory life. 

During the inspection Dr. Goddard was quite impressed during his 
session with the Student Association senators, the twenty-five freely elect- 
ed representatives of the student body. Dr. Goddard spent more than an 
hour and a half in conversation with the senators and said, after the meet- 
ing, that nothing had impressed him more than the intimate way in which 
these student leaders identified themselves with the college and its ideals 
and purposes — their loyalty to the college administration and the devotion 
with which they adhered to the peculiar ideals and practices of the institu- 
tion. 

Dr. Goddard was also impressed with the personal support that 
President Wright had with the officers of the Student Association, and 
that the president gave a senior member of the faculty a reduced teaching 
load to serve as coordinator and sponsor of the student organization and 
included that sponsor in his immediate circle of administrative associates. 

President Wright, Dean Rittenhouse, and Business Manager 
Fleming attended the meeting of the Southern Association in Richmond, 
Virginia, December 7, 1950. The men who had made the inspection of the 
college came from their committee room across the lobby and congratulated 
President Wright. One of the committee members said, "We felt we could 
believe every word you said." 

Southern Missionary College was accredited upon its first applica- 
tion. The accreditation of this college completed the list of accredited 
Seventh-day Adventist senior colleges in the United States. 




Dr. Thomas W. Walters 
President, 1955-58 



Dr. Conard N. Rees 
President, 1958-67 



Dr. Wilbert M. Schneider 

Academic Dean, 1960-63 

President, 1967-71 



AND THEN — ACCREDITATION 



211 



Transition and Expansion 

A few months after Southern Missionary College received accredita- 
tion, Dr. Rittenhouse was called to Andrews University, and Dr. Richard 
Hammill became the fourth academic dean of the college. Dr. Hammill's 
work with the Student Association was outstanding. President Wright had 
this to say of Dr. Hammill: "He could chop wood and permit the chips to 
fall as they would because of his guileless sincerity and devotion to the 
cause of Christian education." 

Because of his impaired health, President Wright asked to be re- 
leased from his work in 1955. That same year Dr. Hammill accepted a call 
to the Education Department of the General Conference. Elder Rebok 
returned to the Southland to carry the dean's work for a year, and Dr. T. 
W. Walters was asked to be the eighteenth president of the college. Dr. 
Walters, an alumnus of Walla Walla College, earned his Ed.D. at Leland 
Stanford University. It was during his administration that further expan- 
sion was planned. 

Dr. Ray A. Underhill came from the west coast to be academic dean 
in 1956. His vivid descriptions of nature were most inspiring, while his 
pictures, taken with loving care, showing the marvels of bird, flower, 
mountain, and dell, were a blessing to everyone. He prepared the syllabus 
and course of nature study for the Southern Union. 

In 1958 Dr. Conard N. Rees came from Southwestern Junior College 
to be the nineteenth president of Southern Missionary College. He is an 
alumnus of Union College and did his graduate work at the University of 
Nebraska. 




Cafeteria and Home Arts Center built in 1957-58. This building has been replaced 
by a new Cafeteria-Student Center built in 1972-73. 



212 



80 YEARS OF PROGRESS 




Cafeteria — Student Center Building, 1973. 

The first of Dr. Rees' immediate goals was to strengthen the faculty 
through wise selection of new members, further education of many, and 
reduction of heavy work loads for others. 

Secondly, he had architects draw up an over-all plan for the improve- 
ment of the physical plant, resulting in the use of the lower campus as a 
living area and as a physical education area, which includes Talge Hall, 
the men's dormitory, and Thatcher Hall, the women's residence hall, as 
well as the Physical Education Building. He also planned the building that 
became Wright Hall, the administration building. 

Under President Rees' direction the college underwent its second 
rapid expansion program, which was similar to President Wright's era. 
During President Rees' administration the college enrollment went from 
500-1200. 

Dr. George Shankel was asked to be the academic dean in 1958. His 
was a background of many years of successful administrative service. He 
was dean of Atlantic Union College, president of Helderberg College in 
Africa, dean of West Indies College in Jamaica, and lecturer at Andrews 
University. 

As a classroom teacher and dean of the college, Dr. Shankel's 
scholarly approach deeply impressed his students, and his Christ-like life 
was an inspiration to all. 

Dr. Wilbert Schneider joined the Southern Missionary College 
faculty as academic dean in 1960. Of his work as dean, it has been said 
that "he carries the work so well because he is able to think objectively 
and independently. The logic of his counsel is sincerely appreciated in 
faculty as well as student affairs." 

Dr. Schneider is a graduate of Union College, and earned an M.A. 
degree at the University of Oklahoma and his Ph.D. at the University of 



AND THEN — ACCREDITATION 



213 





Dr. Richard Hammill, 

1952-55 

Academic Dean 



Dr. Ray A. Underhill, 

1956-58 

Academic Dean 



Dr. George Shankel, 

1958-60 

Academic Dean 



Southern California. He served as academic dean at Emmanuel Missionary 
College and at Walla Walla College, and was treasurer of Loma Linda 
Foods at the time he was called to be academic dean at SMC. In 1967 he 
was academic dean at Pacific Union College and from there he returned to 
SMC when he was elected to the presidency to succeed Dr. Rees who had 
suffered a stroke. Dr. Schneider continued the progress that had been 
started by the Rees administration, including building of the McKee 
Library and starting the new home economics center. The enrollment sur- 
passed 1300 during his presidency. 

Dr. Frank Knittel who had served as boys' dean at Campion 
Academy, as dean of men at the University of Colorado, as English pro- 
fessor and vice president for student affairs at Andrews University, was 
elected academic dean of SMC in 1967. Dr. Knittel's undergraduate degree 
is from Union College and his masters and Ph.D. degrees are from the 
University of Colorado. 

Upon Dr. Schneider's resignation as president in 1971, the board of 
trustees invited Dr. Knittel to be president of SMC. His contagious en- 
thusiasm and zest for the advancement of education at SMC have infected 
the student body and faculty. The enrollment now stands at over 1700. 

When Dr. Knittel was elected president, Dr. C. F. W. Futcher, the 
director of admissions and records, was promoted to academic dean. An 
Englishman, Dr. Futcher had served in England and Australia before com- 
ing to the United States. His doctorate is from the University of Maryland, 
and his specialties are geography, mathematics, and history. 

Dr. J. W. Cassell succeeded Dr. Schneider as academic dean, which 
office he held from 1963-67. Dr. Cassell has a B.A. from Columbia Union 
College, a masters from the University of Maryland and a Ph.D. from 
Michigan State University. During his tenure the faculty was enlarged 
and adjustments made in salaries according to the General Conference 
policies. After leaving SMC he was academic dean at Pacific Union College 
and is presently the president there. 



214 



80 YEARS OF PROGRESS 



Mr. Fleming served as assistant manager in 1942 and as business 
manager from 1946-56. He was in business with Mr. William Hulsey, 
developing Collegedale Cabinets for two years, and then he has served as 
business manager and general manager for finance and development since 
1958. 

New Office of Dean of Student Affairs 

The Board of Trustees invited Mr. William H. Taylor to join the faculty 
as the first dean of student affairs as well as director of public relations, 
in 1958, when Dr. Rees assumed the presidency. Before coming to SMC, 
Mr. Taylor had been director of public relations and a teacher at Union 
College. He had also been Dean-Registrar at Southwestern Junior College 
and director of public relations. He holds a B.A. degree from Union College 
and a masters degree from the University of Nebraska. 

In 1962, the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools recom- 
mended that SMC divide its student affairs office and the department of 
college relations. 

When Mr. K. R. Davis was elected dean of student affairs at the 
time of the re-accreditation of the college in 1962, Mr. Taylor was asked 
to take over the newly reconstructed department of college relations which 
included public relations, alumni, development, and student recruitment. 

Elder Davis had served as a pastor, Bible teacher, and as a principal 
before he became dean of men at SMC. He not only served as dean of 
student affairs, but was also dean of men at the same time. He received 
his B.A. degree from Andrews University and his masters degree from 
Boston University, with further study in counseling and guidance. He 
served as dean of students from 1962-65. Elder Davis returned to SMC 
from Atlantic Union College in 1970 to serve as director of counseling and 
testing. 

Mr. Gordon Madgwick came to SMC in 1958 as a teacher in the 
English department, and was promoted eventually to chairman of that 
department. After serving there for several years, he was elected dean of 




Dr. Gordon Madgwick, Dr. Delmar Lovejoy, 1965- Kenneth Spears, 1963- 

1958-67, Dean of Student Dean of Student Affairs, Dean of Student Affairs, 

Affairs, English Chairman Physical College Manager, Director 

Education Student Finance 



AND THEN — ACCREDITATION 



215 



student affairs to succeed Elder Davis. Mr. Madgwick held the bachelor 
of arts degree from Columbia Union College and a masters from the Uni- 
versity of Maryland. When he left SMC in 1967 he went to Columbia 
Union College as dean of students. 

Following Mr. Madgwick, Dr. Delmar Lovejoy, a teacher in the 
physical education department, was elected to be dean of student affairs. 
Dr. Lovejoy had served as a counselor to academy young men and as vice 
principal in academy and teacher of physical education. He holds a 
bachelors degree from Columbia Union College, a masters from the Uni- 
versity of Maryland and a doctorate from Michigan State University. 

Following Mr. Lovejoy, Mr. Kenneth Spears was elected dean of 
student affairs, and he has served in this capacity since 1970. Mr. Spears 
has a bachelors degree from SMC and a M. Bus. Adm. from Middle Ten- 
nessee State University. He was director of student finance for several 
years and was college manager. 




K. A. Wright's home while president of SMC 




Built for Dr. Van Blaricum in 1954, this house was the home of President Walters, 
and later of Presidents Rees and Knittel. 



216 



80 YEARS OF PROGRESS 



Re-Evaluation of Scholastic Standing 

During 1961 and 1962 Southern Missionary College conducted a self- 
study program in co-operation with the Southern Association of Colleges 
and Schools, the accrediting agency of which this college is a member. Dr. 
K. M. Kennedy directed the study. 

The self-study was designed by the Southern Association to aid col- 
leges in taking a systematic look at their past, present, and future plans. 
The Southern Association re-affirmed the accreditation of the college. 

Also, the National League for Nursing extended recognition to 
Southern Missionary College's Division of Nursing with full accreditation, 
the highest a division of nursing can receive. 

And now ten years later the college initiated another year of self- 
study in order to meet the requirements for re-accreditation. This time 
Dr. M. D. Campbell of the chemistry department led out in the study. The 
committee from the Association came March 26-29. The results were 
announced December 13, 1972. SMC was re-accredited for another ten 
years. 

The four-year nursing program was re-accredited in the spring of 
1972 for another eight years. 

The two-year nursing program was accredited in late 1967 by the 
National Council on Associate Degree Programs for the National League 
of Nursing. 

The elementary teacher education program was accredited in 1967 
and re-accredited in 1972 for another five years, by the National Council of 
Accreditation for Teacher Education. 

The secondary teacher education program was also accredited by 
the National Council of Accreditation for Teacher Education in 1972 for 
five years. 

In November, 1972, the music department was promoted to full 
membership in the National Association of Schools of Music; SMC had 
previously held associate membership since 1968. 

When SMC was still a junior college, the 1937-38 catalogue first 
makes the statement that SJC was a fully accredited member of the 
Southern Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools. 




This house, built by Charles Fleming, Jr., was afterward the home of President 
Schneider from 1967-71 and was the home of President Knittel from 1971-75. 



AND THEN — ACCREDITATION 



217 




J. W. Cassell, 1963-67 
Academic Dean 



Frank A. Knittel, 1967- 
Academic Dean, President 



Cyril F. W. Futcher, 1962- 

Director of Admissions and 

Records, Academic Dean 



Mr. Charles Fleming Jr., was graduated from Emmanuel Missionary 
College with a B.A. in business administration in 1937. He earned a 
masters degree in business administration from Northwestern University 
with a major in accounting in 1940. He has served as treasurer of Forest 
Lake Academy, as treasurer of Georgia-Cumberland Conference, and he 
has been in business for himself when he has not been business manager 
or general manager of Southern Missionary College. 

His background of culture has made him accepted by the business 
world and deeply appreciated by the student body. No student, business 
associate, or faculty member has been known to leave Mr. Fleming's office 
without the confidence that he has been in conversation with an under- 
standing Christian gentleman. 





Charles Fleming, Jr., 1946- 

Business Manager, General 

Manager 



W. H. Taylor, 1958- 

Dean of Student Affairs, 

Director of College 

Relations 



K. R. Davis, 1959-66, 1970- 

Dean of Men, Dean of 

Student Affairs, Testing 

and Counseling 



218 80 YEARS OF PROGRESS 

While Charles Fleming, Jr. was business manager of the college, he 
was assigned the task of also overseeing and directing the building activ- 
ities. When the high enrollments came in 1959 and 1960, it was imperative 
that he supervise the building of various structures on the campus, and 
plant engineer, Francis Costerisan, came about that time to help in this. 

With the increased enrollment, the student financial problems were 
becoming a large business item. Mr. Don West was asked to be assistant 
business manager, with his duties including student labor, student finances, 
and student accounts. 

When Mr. West joined McKee Baking Company as personnel manager, 
Mr. Kenneth Spears became director of student finance. This was a newly 
created department, to take care of the many ramifications of this area, in- 
cluding loans, grants, etc. Following his promotion to college manager, 
Mrs. Laurel Wells, who had been working for him, was asked to assume 
this responsibility. 

The work has grown and now all the accounts, labor, and background 
materials are on the computer so that her office can have ready access to 
any information they need. 

During Dr. Rees' administration, Mr. Robert Merchant was asked to 
become treasurer of the college. He took over these responsibilities from 
Mr. R. M. Davidson, who had succeeded Mr. R. G. Bowen. After awhile, the 
college called Miss Louesa Peters to assist him. 

Since the college was needing to construct new buildings and to add 
to its facilities and because of the ever increasing enrollments, the college 
called Elder Dwight Wallack, who had been in public relations work 
in Colorado, to serve as director of development. One of his early contacts 
was with the Kresge Foundation that gave $50,000 for the new nursing 
building. 

Over the years, SMC has had many deans of men and women. Several 
that are remembered are as follows : Miss Edna Stoneburner, who served for 
the longest time, was dean on the SMC campus for seven years and dean 
on the Florida campus for another seven years, making a total of 14 years ; 
Mrs. Grieta DeWind Tallios was dean for 8 years; Mrs. Fae Rees has also 
served for eight years and is beginning her ninth year in 1975. This year 
she is dean on the Florida campus. Mr. Kenneth Davis was dean of men 
for seven years and Mr. Lyle Botimer for five years. 

The deans in 1975 are Mrs. Florence Stuckey, who had been dean at 
Columbia Union College and Mr. Everett Schlisner, who had been dean at 
Andrews University. They have several associates in their departments 
and their names are listed in the appendix of this history. 

When Mr. Fleming announced his retirement plans for 1975, Elder 
Mills, who had been serving as college manager, was asked to take over 
as business manager. Elder Mills had wide experience in accounting, 
treasurer's work, and comptroller's work in the Southern Union and 
overseas. 



AND THEN — ACCREDITATION 



219 





*f*L 




Arno Kutzner, 1971- 

Director of Admissions and 

Records 



Mary Elam, 1965- 

Assistant Director of 

Admissions and Records 



R. C. Mills, 1970- 
Business Manager 





Robert Merchant, 1961- 
Treasurer 



Louesa Peters, 1964- 
Assistant Treasurer 



Laurel Wells, 1964- 

Director of Student 

Finance 





Dwight S. Wallack, 1974- 
Director of Development 

Norman Peek, 1963- 
Director of Audio-Visual 



Everett Schlisner, 1974- 
Dean of Men 



Hilda Fern Remley, 1975- 
Student Recruitment 





Don L. West, 1955-63 

Asst. Business Manager 

Director of Student Finance 



;s7 

Florence Stuckey, 1972- 
Dean of Women 



CHAPTER XXV 



THE CITY OF COLLEGEDALE 



In 1968 when much discussion was being carried on in Chattanooga 
and through its newspapers about metropolitan government and with the 
gradual annexation of the whole county into the city of Chattanooga, the 
citizens of Collegedale became concerned. 

The concensus of the Collegedale community was that it should in- 
corporate as a city in order to preserve its identity as a community and also 
to avoid Chattanooga's Sunday law. 

On Nov. 5, 1968, a town meeting was called in the old tabernacle, with 
Fred Fuller as chairman, in which the question of incorporation was 
discussed pro and con. 

A second meeting was held Nov. 25, 1968, the day before the election, 
in order to further discuss it ; Charles Fleming was chairman of this meet- 
ing. 

The election was held Nov. 26, 1968, and the results were: 216 voted 
for incorporation and 74 against it. 

Jan. 28, 1969, was election day for selecting three commissioners. 
Eight people ran for the three offices with the highest votes going to Fred 
Fuller, William Hulsey and L. D. Housley. The three commissioners in 
turn voted that Fred Fuller be the mayor and William Hulsey, vice mayor. 
The three then met and appointed Dr. J. M. Ackerman as city manager. 

One of the first items of business was building a city hall. A 
prominent citizen supplied money to remodel the fire hall and build an 



kg^^^^^^^^^^jj^yt*^ 




""" * 


II 




^m 



College Municipal Building 



220 



THE CITY OF COLLEGEDALE 



221 



addition to it for use as the city municipal building. The remodeling and 
building came to a total of $92,600. It was at first rented and is now being 
bought and paid for in installments. 

The city hall consists of a court room, offices for the city manager, 
the police chief and the fire chief, a dispatch office, a reception area, rest 
rooms, and one jail cell. 

Court is held twice a month if there are enough cases to warrant it, 
with a judge from Chattanooga presiding. This is held at 9:00 a.m. the 
second and fourth Wednesdays of the month. 

The court room is also used for city commission meetings which are 
held the second Thursday evening of each month and are open meetings 
that anyone may attend. A number of defensive driver-training classes 
have been conducted in the court room. It is also used for fire department 
meetings, elections, and other public meetings. 




^■L. "^ jfl : ,^fl 4 "T^^^'**/3§h 


B -*""-> ^^m 


_ ^^^r i£ ^^^^^^ 




^ J J _ 





"The City Fathers" 1969-73 
Front row 1. to r. Commissioner L. D. Housley, Mayor Fred Fuller, Vice Mayor 
William Hulsey. Back row, City Attorney Glen McColpin, City Judge Ray Dodson, 
City Manager Dr. J. M. Ackerman. 



222 



80 YEARS OF PROGRESS 




Collegedale police force in 1969: (from 1. to r.) Eddie Sherman, Ken Brown, Charles 
Allen, W. W. Piatt (Chief of police), Lin Robertson, Carl Atkins, Robert Allen. 




Collegedale Airport 

The Collegedale Airport has undergone a complete renewal. The 
total cost was expected to run in the neighborhood of $310,000, half of 
which is to be paid by the Tennessee Aeronautics Association. 

The former runway was a sod strip, 2300 feet long. The new runway 
is a paved strip 3300 feet long and 75 feet wide. The airport is able to 
accommodate most any small plane, and possibly could accommodate the 
Lear Jet. New hangars and operations building are also a part of the 
new facility. 



THE CITY OF COLLEGEDALE 223 

Wastewater Treatment Facilities 

Southern Missionary College has provided modern facilities for treat- 
ing wastewater from the major establishments located on the college 
campus. Construction of the treatment facilities was started in the fall 
of 1962 and completed to start operation in June, 1963. These facilities 
replace septic tanks and other obsolete disposal methods that have been 
troublesome and inadequate for handling satisfactorily the increased volume 
of wastewater resulting from progressive growth in the school enrollment 
and expansion of facilities at the college. 

The project included construction of sewer lines to serve newly- 
constructed buildings such as the women's dormitory, cafeteria, and 
shopping center and to intercept existing sewerage facilities serving other 
principal buildings on the campus. They have been designed and planned 
to permit future extensions to other areas of the campus as the need there- 
for develops. Flow is by gravity to an outfall sewer that passes under 
Apison Pike and the Southern Railroad tracks and extends to a treatment 
plant located on the south side of Wolftever Creek. Tunneling through 
solid rock was required to construct the sewer under the railroad. 

Treatment facilities have been designed to purify the wastewater by 
the process of extended aeration. The liquid is retained in a large concrete 
tank for 24 hours while an abundant supply of air is introduced continu- 
ously to provide an ideal environment for microbes and other living organ- 
isms to thrive. In much the same manner that decomposition is accom- 
plished in nature, these organisms reduce the organic contents of the 
wastewater into gas, liquid, and inert nonpollutional ash. After treatment 
by oxidation the liquid is clarified and sterilized through prolonged contact 
with chlorine to produce an effluent that can be discharged safely into the 
receiving stream. This type of plant was considered preferable to other 
conventional treatment systems because of its greater ability to operate 
efficiently with a minimum of esthetic and nuisance problems. It is 
expected to contribute substantially to a better quality of water in 
Wolftever Creek. 

The completed project cost was $165,000. Brown Brothers of Chatta- 
nooga constructed the outfall sewer and treatment plant. Plans and 
specifications were prepared by Schmidt Engineering Company, Inc., of 
Chattanooga and approved by the Tennessee Department of Health. 

The McKee Baking Company also has a wastewater treatment facility 
for their two plants. This is located adjacent to the college one. 



CHAPTER XXVI 

GROUPS RALLY TO HELP SMC 

The Nicaraguan Mission Project 

The Nicaraguan Mission Project was begun in 1971, jointly sponsored 
by the M.V. Society and the Student Association. 

The goal of the project is for the student missionaries to build a new 
mission station in the jungle about 75 miles from the eastern coastal town 
of Puerto Cabezas, in a little village named Francia Sirpi. 

The area has a tropical rain~y~cfimate — a region of swampy, low plains 
that are drained toward the Caribbean Sea by three rivers. It is a land 
inhabited by the Miskito Indians. The student missionaries have named 
the mission outpost, "Dawan Pleska," meaning "The Place of God," in the 
Miskito language. 

The Miskito Indians originally lived in an area to the northeast of 
their present location. (See map) Their land bordered on Honduras to the 
north. They lived and kept their cattle on the south side of the Rio Coco 



VtT£ 




Ready to leave for their mission post in Nicaragua, via San Antonio, Texas, in the 
double cab, recycled logging truck are, left to right: Milford Crist, Gladstone Simmons, 
Judy Bentzinger, Mrs. Genevieve McCormick, John Durichek, Raymond Wagner, and 
Don Pate. Not shown in the picture are Christine Pulido and David E. Smith. 



224 



GROUPS RALLY TO HELP SMC 



225 



and did their farming on the north side of the river since they knew noth- 
ing about fencing in the cattle and besides they had nothing with which 
to make fences. 

There were constant border disputes between the Miskito Indians and 
the Indians of Honduras. The United Nations settled the dispute by 
declaring the river the boundarv between the two countries. This made 
it necessary to relocate the Miskito IncUans-m^o an area of dense jungle. 
It was into this situation that SMC's student missionaries entered to help. 

A house for the student missionaries and the SMC faculty sponsors 
was the first part of the project to be/ completed. 

The summer of 1973 the clinic building was completed and formally 
opened with the Minister of Public Health, Dr. F. Valle Lopez, present to 
cut the ribbon and Dr. R. Mejia Ubilla, the director of IAN, the government 
agricultural agency working closely with the SMC students. Because of 
Dr. Mejia's influence in the government, the project has been saved 
thousands of dollars. 

The plan is to have three smaller clinic buildings in three other 
Miskito Indian villages. Eventually the sponsor, Dr. Rudolf R. Aussner, 
plans for a 12-bed hospital, an elementary school, an academy, an experi- 
mental farm and some industries. The title to the land for the whole 
project has been turned over by the Nicaraguan government to the sponsor. 

The mission emphasis is being placed on spiritual enlightenment, 
medical work, and agricultural improvement. It will be financed and staffed 
as an SMC missionary project. 




The Francia Sirpi Clinic on the opening day with typical Indian houses in the back- 
ground. 



226 



80 YEARS OF PROGRESS 



The summer of 1973, John Durichek and Nat Halverson set up a 
broom shop in Puerto Cabezas. The equipment was donated to the mission 
project by the SMC Broom Shop. The Miskito Indians are being taught to 
raise broom corn to sell to the shop which in turn will export the brooms 
to the USA. Arrangements have already been made to care for the 
exporting, importing, and wholesale selling of the brooms. 

A concrete block church building, which was started in the summer 
of 1974, seats 350. 

During two months of the summer of 1973, the young people at the 
mission, three of whom are nurses, took care of 1000 patients before the 
new clinic was opened, and 345 patients were seen on mobile clinic trips 
made in the station wagon donated by the Ellsworth McKees. Also 
emergency runs were made to the Moravian Hospital in Bilwaskarme, on 
an average of five a week. 

The mission has sponsored six Miskito Indian students at the academy 
in Puerto Cabezas. All six have been baptized since attending the school. 

The group members who were at the station for the school year 
1973-74 included Christine Pulido, Harvey Oetman, Mrs. Bonnie Oetman 
and Leslie Smart. The two women are both graduate nurses. 

Mr. William lies, a member of the SMC Board of Trustees and president 
of the SMC Committee of 100, took a group of students from Forest Lake 
Academy to the Nicaragua Mission project from July 1-11, 1973. They 
flew from Miami to Puerto Cabezas, taking their own food with them and 
paying their own expenses. They were excellent help in building the new 
clinic, and their services were greatly appreciated. 




The summer and permanent groups of student missionaries and the McKee family in 
front of the Junta Office in Managua, Nicaragua, May, 1973. 



GROUPS RALLY TO HELP SMC 



227 




Dr. R. R. Aussner shaking; hands with General Anastasio Somoza, President of 
Nicaragua, and Dr. R. Mejia Ubilla, Director of Agriculture. 




■■ 



House built for the student missionaries 



228 



80 YEARS OF PROGRESS 















H^^BI WF 


i-yji 




K** '^H 






r ] 


■ 




r^^ 




- ij 


\ 


\ B 


■ -^ 






1 ■ 


N Wi 


VjLt'' "■"- y \ 




7f%S 


\ 




Ste^i 


if 





Dr. R. R. Aussner, SMC's mission project sponsor, receiving the title to the land for 
the mission. Dr. J. Canton, in the Health Dept., Dr. F. Valle Lopez, Minister of 
Health, and Dr. R. Mejia Ubilla, Director of IAN (Agriculture), present the deed. 




PROYECTO DE DESARfiCLLO INTEGRAL ubicacion CEL 
" TASBA RAYA PftOYECTD 



Map of Nicaragua 
The blacked-in area is called "Tasba Raya," meaning "New Earth." This land was set 
aside by the government for relocation of the Miskito Indians. They had formerly 
occupied the land on each side of the Coco River, to the northeast. 



GROUPS RALLY TO HELP SMC 



229 










E 






o ^ 














--_L1~T 1 't 














~"1 

1 










- ttb';" 




~~~\ — r~"^ S— 




























~-~XA """" a 


















I] 






1 p I 

J 1 


a-riJ-^^J^ 


























Li P 






















JTp 


c ' »$t— •-/ 












; 1 " 








^A—~lL ~\\T~^ 






n 














j 3 




D® "^B4^U 


X 






]« H—tLLI 








■ l$ri 




IT 


"! -X 










d 


L _ 










POBLAOOS 






« 


it \\ 

ij y ] — 
























^^8J£JW 






(T) TASBA PAIN "■" ■ '" "**=*!*■ 














© FRANCIA 3IRPE V.. _ 








© SANTA CLARA ^ijto ^ \*\ 

(4) WISCONSIN ^* ==!! ^fe V-L. 1 






E»e 1 10 0,000 ^cs^ 5 *™*^ 






PROYECTO DE DESARROLLO INTEGRAL 


PRIMERA 




"tasba raya" 


ETA PA 


INBTITUTO ABRARIO DE NICARAOUA 






Progr amotion , Edudloi 


"* """' 



Map of the "Tasba Raya" (New Earth) enlarged and with details. 

The four blacked-in areas are four villages occupied by the Indians. Francia Sirpi 
is the village in which SMC students have built a house for the student and faculty 
missionaries, a clinic, and have started a church building. The mission was given 21 
acres in this village. 

The C.E.F.A.T. area is where the government has given the project the most 
land — around 1551 acres. The Nicaraguan government has planned that this area be 
a center for the four villages which makes it an ideal place for a mission hospital, 
elementary school, academy and industries. 

Seven acres of land have been given in each of the other three villages for the 
mission project. 



230 



80 YEARS OF PROGRESS 



Ingathering Report 

Over the years, the students of Southern Missionary College, 
Collegedale Academy and the Spalding Elementary School have helped in 
the world-wide work of the church by the annual Missions Promotion 
program and appeals. 

Paramount of these has been the one-day drive, usually in early 
October, for funds to help in this endeavor. The records go back to 1957 
and they show that SMC and its other schools have done remarkably well. 
The program is usually conducted by the public relations department with 
religion majors serving as leaders of the groups and with from 600-800 
students from the various schools participating. 

The results have been as follows: 



ooooooooooooooooooooo 
oooooooooooooooooooo 

© ©_ ©^ ©_ ©_ ©^ ©^ ©^ ©_ ©_ ©^ ©_ © ©^ ©^ ©_ ©^ ©_ ©_ ©_ 

i-T N W ^" a" » t- 00 » o" H N M Tf a" » f" oo" ft ©" 

Cry - t/J CrJ" QV C/J C/J' \fj' C/D" C/J ^H i~H i~^ t~H i—i tH ^H i^H t~H r~H OJ 

Wr t/J try try t/J try ffr tfr try try try 



$4,500 




$19,080 
$19,154 



Harvest Ingathering Graph 



Besides the thousands of dollars that have come in for the mission 
and welfare work of the church, many Bible correspondence enrollment 
cards have been given out and hundreds of visits have been made with 
interested people showing a desire for further information. 



GROUPS RALLY TO HELP SMC 



231 




Mr. W. H. Taylor, director of college relations and organizer of Harvest Ingathering 
Field Day each year since 1962, is shown chalking up the Harvest Ingathering band 
reports as they came in. 




Harvest Ingathering in 1954: Ted Graves, Elder Horace Beckner, Elder H. B. Lundquist, 
R. G. Bowen, and Lester Rilea. 



232 80 YEARS OF PROGRESS 

The United Fund Drive 

Since 1955, SMC has supported whole-heartedly the annual United 
Fund drive. 

The United Fund serves some 30 agencies in the Chattanooga area, 
such as the Orange Grove School, the Senior Neighbors, etc. This is the 
one charity that Southern Missionary College endorses and recommends 
to its employees each year. Per capita giving for the administration and 
faculty has been somewhere around $12 a year. 

The following graph shows the most recent campaigns at the top of 
the chart, and the campaign that started the participation at the bottom of 
the chart, running from 1955 to 1974. 

Several of the administrative officers have served on some of the 
committees of the United Fund. Presently, Ellsworth McKee, president 
of the McKee Baking Company, is on the Board of Directors of the Greater 
Chattanooga Area United Fund. 



United Fund 

*1974 ^MM^^^^HHHHi^^^BM^Mi *$2150.00 

i^lH^^^HBBi^l^^^i^^^^^^^HB $3339.00 
■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■i^BI^BMi $3129.00 
■Hiii^H^^HHaHiHIMIHiBH $2892.00 
1970 I^^^^HBMB^B^H^^M^^HM^HM^ $2675.00 

1969 I^HMBMH^HMnHaHB^aMHiai^^^H $2552.00 

1968 ^^^^^"^"^^^^^^^^^M^^" $2293.00 

1967 ^^^^^^^^^^™""""i^^"^ $2155.00 

1966 wmm^^m^mmmm^^^m^ma^mm $2010.00 

1965 ■■^■■^^■■^■■■■■■B $1742.00 

1964 lmm^m^m^m^mm^mm $1416.00 

1963 ^^^^^^B^H^^Ml $1351.00 * Until 1974 the McKee 

1<qq2 m^m^^^^^mmmmm^m $1238 00 Baking Company supervisory 
employees were participating 

1961 ^^^^^^^^^^^^^™ $1136.00 j n tjjg campaign each year 

I960 wmmmtmmm^ $722.00 as a P art of SMC's program 

^^^^^_^^^^^_ „ „„ of solicitation. 

1959 $897.00 fo m4 McRee Baking 

1958 M^^^^^H $696.00 Company had a completely 

1957 H^H $382.00 separate campaign. 

1956 ^HMM $471.00 

1955 HM1 $243.00 

OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOo 

OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOo 

<NTjl(©OOON-«i<tOOOOI>l'0<SOOOO<NTi< 

i-li-<r-li-liHC4C4e]e4C4CQCQcO 



GROUPS RALLY TO HELP SMC 



233 




John Fowler and Dr. J. M. Ackerman in charge of the Temperance Booth at the 
Hamilton County Fair in 1963. 




Student missionary band singing at the Oak Manor Nursing Home. 




Student story hour at the East Chattanooga Housing Project. 



234 



80 YEARS OF PROGRESS 




Dr. Wilbert M. Schneider presenting a thousand dollar check to the 365 Club of the 
Siskin Rehabilitation Foundation for use in the foundation's operation. The money 
came from a benefit program put on by SMC students. Front row: Terence Futcher, 
student association president, seated between two little patients at the center. Standing, 
Mose Siskin, Dr. Schneider, Garrison Siskin, Charles Fleming, general chairman of the 
benefit program entitled, "Man, O Man." 



GROUPS RALLY TO HELP SMC 235 

THE COMMITTEE OF 100 FOR SMC, INC. 

In 1962, the College was faced with some hard choices. It did not 
have classroom space; the gymnasium (Tabernacle) was inadequate for 
even the physical education classes that needed to be conducted there; 
and the gymnasium was also inadequate for the activities of the church 
and for social events. 

In order to fill the need for a gymnasium that would be adequate 
for a college with a fast-growing enrollment that had already reached 
756 by 1962, the College initiated a program whereby it would ask its 
constituency to build the new structure. 

Dr. C. N. Rees, then president of the College, Academic Dean Wilbert 
Schneider, General Manager Charles Fleming, Jr., and Dean of Students 
and Public Relations Director William H. Taylor, worked on a plan whereby 
the College would ask each of 100 members of its constituency to provide 
$500 a year over a minimum of three years in order to build the new 
gymnasium. 

The Board of Trustees approved the plan, and the presidents of the 
various conferences in the South gave the College administration names 
of their constituents who would probably be interested in such a plan. 

The then president of the Southern Union, Elder LeRoy J. Leiske, 
and his Public Relations Director Elder Oscar L. Heinrich, along with 
the four men mentioned above, and the new Academic Dean J. W. 
Cassell, Jr., recruited the members for the Committee of 100 for SMC, Inc., 
as it was named. 

By the time the groundbreaking was held in September of 1963, 
the College and the Union had recruited 100 men and women to help the 
College. It was interesting to note that the 100th member was recruited 
on the morning the groundbreaking was held. About half the members 
were in attendance for the groundbreaking, and many tributes were 
given to the members of the Committee of 100 for their foresightedness 
in helping the College with such a project. 

The first cost had been estimated at roughly $150,000, but some 
changes were made, and some things were added that brought the cost up. 

The construction was started on the gymnasium immediately, and 
the committee members kept supporting the project until it was com- 
pletely paid for at a total cost of $280,000 in the early 1970's. 

In connection with the Physical Education Center campaign, the 
students took on the project of raising money for the swimming pool, 
and they were assisted by the Benwood Foundation of Chattanooga which 
gave $25,000 for the project, and the students raised the other $25,000 
to build the swimming pool. 

Also, the Georgia-Cumberland Conference gave $50,000 to the project 
because of its use of the gymnasium for campmeeting each year. 

Recently, the gymnasium was air conditioned so that large gatherings 
would benefit. Many large meetings and Lyceum and Fine Arts Series 
are held in the gymnasium. 

It not only has the gymnasium floor which will accomodate three 
basketball teams, but it also has a handball court, a large classroom, 
storage area, offices for both the men and women teachers, and locker 
rooms for both men and women. 



236 80 YEARS OF PROGRESS 

Adjacent to the gymnasium is a three-hole golf course, a quarter-mile 
track, tennis courts, and softball diamonds. 

SMC's Committee of 100 did not stop with the gymnasium. They 
wanted to assist the College in other ways, and so they became the 
vehicle for financing the enlargement of the shopping center. The shopping 
center now has the Village Market, Book and Bible House, Beauty Shop, 
Washateria, Campus Kitchen, Campus Shop, Collegedale Interiors, Fuller 
Insurance Agency, Florist, Southern Mercantile, Collegedale Credit Union, 
Hulsey Real Estate, Barber Shop, Investors Diversified Service, and the 
American National Bank, as well as the College Service Center for auto- 
mobiles. 

This expansion was handled in such a way that it amortizes itself, and 
the Committee of 100 has guaranteed the mortgage until such amortization 
is completed. 

In order to help the College further in its industrial program, SMC's 
Committee of 100 took on the project of providing the funds that the 
College borrowed to build a new Broom Shop. 

Under the direction of Don Spears and Jake Westbrook, the Broom 
Shop and the Supreme Sales that handles the products from the Broom 
Shop, as well as other products, has succeeded beyond the expectations 
of the College administration. 

The move from the old facilities that were completely outdated 
and outmoded was made possible only by the financing provided by the 
Committee of 100. 

The next project to be taken up by the Committee of 100 was the new 
nursing building on the campus. Over the years, the nursing department 
has grown from 49 students in 1958 when Miss Mazie Herin organized it, 
to 503 registered for the school year 1974-75. It became imperative that 
classroom space and offices be made available to this large department, 
which was to become a division of the College. Mrs. Ina Longway from the 
teaching staff of Loma Linda University joined the faculty at SMC and 
started the reorganization of the two departments into one on the ladder 
concept. 

The Committee of 100 adopted the nursing building as its project and 
started providing the funds with one of its members donating $65,000. 
The total cost of the project was set at $400,000. 

Also, Elder Dwight Wallack, director of development, visited and 
solicited the Kresge Foundation for funds for the building. He wrote the 
proposal for a gift from the foundation. 

The Kresge Foundation responded in August of 1975 with a gift of 
$50,000 which concluded the financing of the new project. 

The Committee of 100 over the years has been not only a financial 
resource of the College, but has also been an advisory group which meets 
periodically with the Board of Trustees as well as in its own annual meet- 
ings, to provide advice and counsel for the College on many matters. Many 
of the ideas proposed by the Committee of 100 have been initiated and 
followed through with by the College. Over the years, the development 
of the College would not have been possible without the advice and help 
of the Committee, both on academic and financial matters. 



GROUPS RALLY TO HELP SMC 



237 



William A. lies, insurance executive of Orlando, Florida, has been 
president of the corporation since its inception. Other officers over the 
years have been the following: 

First Vice President — Sam Martz, Louis Waller, MD, Kenneth Wright, 
George T. Mills, MD, Dewitt Bowen, DDS. 

Vice President and Secretary — 0. D. McKee, Jack McKee, John A. 
Sines, DDS 

Vice President and Treasurer — William Hulsey 
Current and past members are as follows : 



E. A. Anderson 
H. L. Anderson 

H. E. Artress, DDS 
Irvin Bainum 
Mrs. Sue Baker 
Warren Belding, MD 
Wilber A. Bishop 
Linnie Black 
S. M. Boskind 
Elmer Bottsford, MD 
T. G. Bouland, MD 
Dewitt Bowen, DDS 
Mrs. R. G. Bowen 
William A. Bryant, MD 
W. T. Buchanan, MD 
Thomas Bullock, DO 

A. E. Butterfield, MD 

B. T. Byrd, Jr. 
Ray Campbell 

Eldon E. Carman, DDS 
Sarah Carter 
David L. Castleberg, MD 
Andrew Chastain 
Chalmer Chastain, MD 
R. V. Cockrell, DDS 
L. E. Coolidge, MD 

F. B. Cothren, MD 
Dan Cressler 
John Q. Croker, Jr. 

C. G. Cross 
Joe Cruise, MD 
Robert Cushman 
M. 0. Dart, MD 
L. H. Delony 

J. P. Dietrich, MD 



Stephen Dobias, MD 
Verne Dortch, DDS 
John Duge, MD 
M. B. Elliston 
Hillis F. Evans, MD 
P. L. Fisher, MD 
Charles Fleming, Jr. 
J. D. Foley, MD 
Augustus Foster, MD 
Fred Fuller 
Paul Garner 
Mrs. Lucy Hilton Giles 
Charles Gillit, MD 
Noel Goggans 
H. H. Goggans 
John Goodbrad, Sr. 
John Goodbrad, Jr. 
Charles Graves, MD 
Albert Hall 
David Hamilton 
Lyndon B. Harder, DDS 
David Henricksen, MD 
Robert Hoover, MD 
William J. Hulsey 
William A. lies 
Leslie Jacobs, DDS 
Williams James, DDS 
Wayne Janzen, EdD 
Inez Johnson 
Francis Killen 
Don Kirkman 
F. C. Knight, MD 
Frank Knittel, PhD 
Frank Kurzynske 
James T. Ladd, MD 



Lloyd Lawing 
0. M. Ledford 
J. H. Leland, MD 
Harley Lester 
D. E. Loveridge 
Rollin Mallernee, MD 
Gerald Martin 
Sam Martz 
H. C. McClure, MD 
J. C. McElroy, Jr. 
Earl McGhee, MD 
Bessie McGuffey 
Ellsworth McKee 
Jack McKee 
0. D. McKee 
J. R. McKinney, MD 
H. J. Michals, MD 
George Mills, MD 
Harold Moody, MD 
R. F. Nicholas 
Mark Nivison 
Milton Norrell, MD 
J. A. Oliver, MD 
L. W. Payne 
John Pifer, DO 
Frank W. Potts 
Jack Powell, MD 
Winton Preston 
Malcolm C. Prewitt 
John Rauch 
Charles S. Ricks, DDS 
L. Wayne Rimmer, OD 
L. F. Roberts, Jr. 
Herb Rogers 
Kenneth Rothrock 



238 



80 YEARS OF PROGRESS 



J. A. Oliver, MD 
L. W. Payne 
John Pifer, DO 
Frank W. Potts 
Jack Powell, MD 
Winton Preston 
Malcolm C. Prewitt 
John Rauch 
Charles S. Ricks, DDS 
L. Wayne Rimmer, OD 
L. F. Roberts, Jr. 
Herb Rogers 
Kenneth Rothrock 
E. A. Schmidt 
William E. Severs, DDS 
Leslie Sheffield 
L. W. Simkin 
John Sines, DDS 
Francis W. Slate, MD 
Lewis Sommerville, MD 
Thomas A. Stanford, MD 
W. C. Starkey 
Claude E. Steen, Jr., MD 
Ernest J. Stevens, MD 
John Stevens 



Elmyra Stover 

B. F. Summerour 
Brooke Summerour, MD 
T. C. Swinyar, MD 
Mary F. Taylor 
William H. Taylor 

J. C. Thames 

James A. Thomas, MD 

Robert Trimble 

Walter Turner 

James Van Blaricum, MD 

Kenneth Wagner 

Dwight S. Wallack 

C. Louis Waller, MD 
Jack P. Ward, MD 
Jack Webb 

G. G. Welch 
Don West 
Ira Wheeler 
Lucille White 
James Williams 
Calvin Willruth, DDS 
Kenneth Wright 
J. H. Young, MD 
Vernon Young 




Placing the 1970 United Fund campaign award plaque in place at SMC is Kathy 
Steadman, student coordinator, and Dr. W. M. Schneider, president. The goal of $2675, 
six percent higher than the year before, was surpassed. 



J. MABEL WOOD TRIBUTE 



239 



Miss J. Mabel Wood, 74, associate professor emeritus and co-author of 
this book, died Sunday, January 18, 1976. 

Miss Wood had been on the faculty of SMC for 27 years, serving in 
the music department, where she taught organ and piano, until her official 
retirement in 1967. After her teaching career, she was appointed assistant 
director of alumni rela- 
tions and editor of the 
"Southern Columns," the 
alumni and constitutency 
magazine, published 
quarterly by SMC. 

Her service for the 
Seventh-day Adventist 
educational system total- 
ed 52 years. She taught 
in the elementary grades 
in New Orleans, High 
Point, N.C., and Shreve- 
port, La. Her experience 
also included teaching in 
high school at Winyah 
Lake Academy, Fla. 

Her college training 
experience included work 
at Southwestern Union 
College, Keene, Tex., and 
Union College, Lincoln, 
Neb., as well as SMC. 

Miss Wood was born 
in Natalbany, La., where 
her father ran a general 
store. She was graduated from Hammond High School, Hammond, La. 
SMC graduated her when it was Southern Junior College; then she went 
on to receive her bachelor's degree from Union College and the master's 
degree from the University of Nebraska. 

She also attended Newcomb College and Tulane University, both in 
New Orleans, taking advanced work in music. 

She taught organ and piano to hundreds of young people; she toured 
with vocal groups as accompanist all over the South ; and she served as 
Collegedale Church organist during most of her teaching career at SMC. 

Her service as executive secretary for the SMC Alumni Association 
began in 1965 when she actually started a new career, giving her new work 
as much attention and time as she had her music teaching. 

Miss Wood completely revised and rewrote this history of Southern 
Missionary College, entitled, "A School of His Planning." The history had 
originally been written by Mrs. Elva Gardner, former registrar. This work 
alone required almost two years in revision and printing. 

She was honored several times by the SMC Alumni Association, the 
latest being at Alumni Homecoming in October, 1975, when she was given 
a plaque and flowers for her exceptional service for the association and the 
college. 




CHAPTER XXVII 

SHOULD AULD ACQUAINTANCE BE FORGOT? 

"The Strength of a College Lies in Its Alumni!" 

Not only the Southland, but the entire world field has felt the in- 
fluence of this "School of His Planning." Its alumni carry responsibilities 
in all parts of the world, filling positions of leadership in the work of God. 

Those who have walked these halls and left through these doors 
have gone out in all types of service for the denomination in this country. 
Add to this those who have gone to the far places of the earth as mission- 
aries, and the influence of this college encircles the earth. 

The Alumni Association of Southern Junior College was organized 
in 1927 with Walter B. Clark, '27, as its first president. The charter which 
is found in the Southland Scroll, August 16, 1934, gave as its objectives: 

"The binding of the graduates of Southern Junior College to their 
Alma Mater and to each other in order that the social, intellectual, and 
spiritual influence and traditions which were acquired and set in motion 
at the college may continue unbroken after graduation, and that these 
influences may be felt in a tangible manner between the college and its 
graduates." 

The First Homecoming 

At the first Homecoming held in May, 1957, the graduates who had 
gone out in foreign mission service were honored. A Book of Remembrance 
was prepared to provide for a permanent recording of mission service by 
the alumni of the college. The names of missionaries recorded in the Book 
of Remembrance were arranged by world divisions. Each year thereafter 




A Book of Remembrance 
of Alumni in Foreign Service 



Walter B. Clark, '27 

First President of 

The College Alumni 

Association 



240 



SHOULD AULD ACQUAINTANCE BE FORGOT? 



241 



the names of those who had gone into mission service that year were 
added to the list. After a few years this plan was replaced and the names 
were recorded on the printed Homecoming program, which plan has been 
followed ever since. 

The Big Homecoming 

The Alumni Homecoming in the fall of 1970 was the largest that the 
college had experienced up until that date. It not only marked the 50th 
year since the graduation of the first class, but it also featured one of the 
largest number of missionaries who had left the homeland. 

Also during the weekend, the Voice of Prophecy quartet appeared 
and several of the original members of the Voice of Prophecy quartet came 
back to sing with them. The speaker on the Sabbath was a former student 




SMC's Well-Known String Quartet: Orlo Gilbert (Substituting for Louis Luding- 
ton, M.D.) Don West, Clifford Ludington, M.D., and Brooke Summerour, M.D. 




The Adelphian Quartet (1949-52): 
Veazey. 



John Thurber, Don Crook, Wayne Thurber, Jack 



242 



80 YEARS OF PROGRESS 



of SMC, the president of the general Conference, Elder Robert H. Pierson. 
Elder J. F. Ashlock of the class of 1925, was the speaker for the Friday 
evening service during which the alumni gave over $3,000 to the student 
missionary project in Nicaragua. 

Besides the Sabbath afternoon program of sacred music featuring 
many of the students who had been here over the years, there was also a 
business meeting and supper provided by the Collegedale Chapter. 

Over 3,000 people gathered in the Physical Education Center to hear 
the variety program entitled, "Through the Years," with Charles Fleming, 
Jr. as master of ceremonies. The following program will indicate the 
variety of talent and the large number of alumni who were featured 
in the program, as well as on Friday night and Sabbath. 




The Southern Crusaders Quartet (1949) and the King's Heralds Quartet From L. to R.: 
Bob Edwards, Jack Just, James McHan, Jerry Patton, Eugene Wilson, Jack Veazey, 
Morris Wilson, and Jim McClintock. 



SHOULD AULD ACQUAINTANCE BE FORGOT? 243 

SMC THROUGH THE YEARS 

College Gymnasium, 8:30 p.m. 

October 17, 1970 

Charles Fleming, Jr., Master of Ceremonies 

WAY WAY BACK 

Adelphian Quartet John Thurber, '56, Don Crook, '53, Wayne Thurber, '48, 

Jack Veazey 

Violin Solo — "Romance" — Johan Svendsen Gunter Koch, '45 

Vocal Solo — "Summertime" — Gershwin Marilyn Dillow Cotton 

Trumpet Solo — "Willow Echoes" — Simon James McHan 

Vocal Solo — "Prologue" (Pagliacci) — Leoncavallo Charles Pierce, '51 

Piano Solo — "Un Sospiro" — Liszt J. D. Bledsoe, '53 

Ladies' Trio — "Tumbleweed" Marilyn Dillow Cotton 

Mary Ellen Carden Byrd, '52, Frances Bumby Smith 

Vocal Solo — "Arrivederci, Roma" (Goodby to Rome) Jack Veazey 

Reading — -"The Three Stages of Matrimony" Olive Braley 

Southern Crusaders Quartet — "Quartet" (Rigoletto) — Verde James McHan 

Jack Just, '48, Eugene Wilson, Morris Wilson 

WAY BACK 

Keyboard and Instrumental Stylings James O. Rhodes, '59 

Vocal Solo — "Serenade" — Sigmund Romberg J uc ty Fowler LeBaron, '63 

Vocal Duet — "The Singing Lesson"- — Squire Lynda Whitman Cockrell, '66 

Charles Q. Lindsey, '67 

Accordion Solo — "Glowworm" Freeman Ward, '64 

Vocal Solo— "What a Wonderful World"— Weiss & Thiele Larry Blackwell 

HERE AND NOW 

Vocal Solo — "And This Is My Beloved" — Forrest Selma Martin 

Chorale — "What Color Is God's Skin?" Chorale and Danny Stevens 

Vocal Solo — "Tonight" — Bernstein 

"My Cup Runneth Over" — Schmidt Russell Davis 

WHAT'S COMING 

Vocal Solo — "Come to the Fair" — Easthope Martin Evan Chesney 

(Son of Richard Chesney, '53) 

Marimba Ensemble — "Medley" Phyllis Lane, Janet Neier, Donna Kuebler, 

LaRene Davis, Randy Cox, Mrs. Jane Cox 

FINALE 

Reading — "A Better College" adapted from Edgar A. Guest Olive Braley 

Duo — "America the Beautifr" — Ward Olive and Brad Braley 

Organ music before the program furnished by James Rhodes, '59 

Accompanists 
Carolyn McHan Lourene Preston James Teel 

Charles Pierce Marvin Robertson Alice Thomas 



244 



80 YEARS OF PROGRESS 




Friday night Vespers culminated in an offering for SMC's student missionaries which 
totaled $3000. Some of those on the program were: Wayne Thurher, Elwood Foote, 
Verne Dortch, Glen McColpin, Robert H. Pierson, E. C. Banks, John Thurber, Frank 
Ashlock, and VV. M. Schneider, President of SMC. 




A partial view of the SMC entrance gate — A gift of the Alumni Association. Total 
cost was $1135. The gate was erected in 1967. 



SHOULD AULD ACQUAINTANCE BE FORGOT? 245 

Alumni Chapters 

Through the years several active alumni chapters have been in 
operation and report through the Alumni Bulletin of their meetings and 
activities. New chapters are in the process of being organized. 

Projects of the Alumni Association 

The Alumni Association has experienced periods of great activity 
as well as inactivity. While record has not been made of all the projects 
carried on by the Association, the first project is known to be a scholar- 
ship fund for a worthy student to be presented at the close of a school year. 
This was continued at least through 1933. While Mrs. B. F. Summerour was 
president, the project was to raise money for an infirmary, and during the 
first year $1,100 was raised. This project was continued through 1942 when 
it was deferred because of the war. 

In 1945-46 the Alumni co-operated with the college in raising money 
to erect a cottage in which Miss Maude Jones was to make her home. 

An Alumni Directory was compiled in 1946-47 when Mrs. Louise 
Walther, '46, was the alumni president. 

In 1953 the Alumni Association took as its project the decorating 
of the Bible classroom. Three hundred and fifty dollars was raised to re- 
finish the floor, paint the walls, install Venetian blinds, and refinish the 
chairs. 

Since 1958, scores of students have been given assistance by the 
Alumni Association through grants from $100 to $200 apiece. This scholar- 
ship money is returned to the fund as soon as the student is on remunera- 
tive employment. 

During the years 1959 to August, 1970, the funds given by alumni 
and associate alumni totaled $308,825. Gifts to the McKee Library 
amounted to $174,938. Alumni and associate alumni gave through the 
Committee of 100 in the amount of $67,368, which money was used for the 
new gymnasium. The entrance gate to the college was another alumni 
project which cost $1135. Fifty-five thousand dollars was given for the 
Ledford Industrial Arts Building and around $7,000 was given to the 
worthy student fund. 

Alumni News 

Alumni news was featured in the Southland Scroll and in the Southern 
Accent for many years. 

In 1951 The Collegedale Alumnus came into existence. From 1952-56 
the paper was called SMC Collegedale Alumni Association News Bulletin. 
In 1956 it was SMC Alumni News Bulletin and from 1957-72 it was SMC 
Alumni Bulletin. 

In 1972, the SMC Alumni Bulletin was expanded into SMC Southern 

Columns, a paper covering all college news, including alumni news. This 
paper is published every three months and is sent to all alumni and every- 
one on the mailing list of the Southern Union Conference paper, Southern 
Tidings. 



246 80 YEARS OF PROGRESS 

The Doll House 

The Doll House and its history will ever be dear to the hearts of 
the alumni. The dolls that once inhabited the little Doll House would have 
marveled if they could have looked into the future and foreseen many 
different activities which would be housed in their house after plantation 
days. 

In its original setting the tiny house was a play house built for 
Evadne Thatcher by her father. The doll house sat at the edge of the apple 
orchard about 150 feet back of the plantation mansion. 

After the plantation was purchased for the college, the Doll House 
served for a time as the president's office. Grace Kelsey Keith, the presi- 
dent's secretary, says: 

"The doll house was barely large enough for the president's roll-top 
desk, a tiny pot-bellied stove, (not even twenty-five inches tall), a corner 
stand for my typewriter, and one extra chair. We almost had to go outside 
to turn around." 

When a larger room was available for the president's office, the 
little Doll House was moved over the hillside to the place where the Hick- 
man residence is now located, and there it was used for keeping bee hive 
supplies. 

Sometime afterward, the Doll House was moved back to a spot on 
the campus. When someone contracted small pox, the Doll House was used 
for a "pest-house." Later a shoe repair shop was operated in it. 

For a short time it was used as a dormitory for several of the women 
and stood where the A. G. Daniells Hall now stands. Next it was a prayer 
room. The voice teacher, Professor J. L. Butler, took it in hand and had 
several measures of music painted on the front of it — "Brighten the corner 
where you are." He added a handle to the side of the building and it became 
known as the "Grafanola." It was used as his music studio for one year, 
1924-25. 

When the Doll House had served its time as the music conservatory, 
it was moved beyond the present site of the tabernacle, and there it was 
used as a storehouse for seed and later as a store house for tools. It re- 
mained in this location for many years. In 1946 it was the residence of a 
student from Jamaica who was studying under the farm manager. In 1947 
the little house again took a trip and was placed next door to the adminis- 
tration building. There it became a store house for old furniture, and later 
it was the WSMC radio station. 

In 1973 the education department made a little red schoolhouse of 
it and put it in the college mall for College Days. Since then it is still on 
wheels, in a parking lot. 



SHOULD AULD ACQUAINTANCE BE FORGOT? 



247 




SMC Alumni in Southern Asia in 1956 




The Former Doll House 
Front Row, I. to r.: Walter Williams, Carl Barefoot, J. L. Butler, George Schultz, B. J. 
Jameson, Ralph S. Watts. Back Row: A. J. Sharp, Herman Slate, Donald Hunter, Carl 
Aiken, W. Paul Bradley, Carol Randall. 



248 



80 YEARS OF PROGRESS 




Professor and Mrs. D. C. Ludington 




Participants in the first Founders' Day program at SMC, October 18, 1950, stand on 
the steps of Daniells Hall. Back Row, 1. to r.: President and Mrs. K. A. Wright, Mr. 
Wayne Thurber, Mr. Paul Thatcher, Judge W. E. Wilkerson, Elder S. E. Wight 
(First President of the Board of Trustees), Charles Fleming, Mrs. J. F. Ashlock, Mrs. 
Leo Thiel, Elder J. F. Ashlock, Professor Leo Thiel (First President of SJC), Mrs. 
V. G. Anderson. Front Row: Mrs. Mary Dietel, Mrs. Ruby Lea Carr, Mrs. and Mr. 
Jason Thatcher, Miss Mabel Wood, Miss Maude Jones, Mrs. Edythe Stephenson Cothren, 
Dr. F. O. Rittenhouse, Elder V. G. Anderson, (Chairman of the Board of Trustees). 



SHOULD AULD ACQUAINTANCE BE FORGOT? 



249 




Alumni punch is a welcome thirst quencher after the ordeal of granduation exercises. 
Pictured are Mike Foxworth, Warren Hammond, Glenn McColpiri and Mrs. Minon I lamm. 




One of the original kerosene lamps used in the dormitories 
available. The early alumni will remember this. Pictured at 
Student Park. 



before electricity was 
right: A scene in the 



250 80 YEARS OF PROGRESS 

A School of His Planning 

Semesters have come and gone with clock-like regularity, and the 
years of Southern Missionary College have lengthened themselves into 
four score of distinguished service in the field of Christian education 
in the South. Eighty years is a long time in the life of an individual, 
but it barely marks the coming of age of an institution such as Southern 
Missionary College. 

This college stands as a monument to the faith of the pioneers. It 
is built on a solid foundation of academic and moral standards. Here, there 
is tested learning ; here, progress is the approach to more spiritual ideals ; 
it is a school where the Bible is the greatest textbook, where it shines as 
the truth that makes men free, that makes men brothers. 

The foundation stones of this college are the belief in the reality of 
Christian principles, in sound academic preparations, in the dignity of 
useful work, in simplicity of living, summed up in the words of the Master 
Teacher, "Not to be ministered unto but to minister." Its students have 
received a greater vision of world needs, have responded to that vision, 
and have gone to the ends of the earth. 

The college pays honor to the unselfish service of those men and 
women who built this institution. Privations are usually transient and 
temporary, but there has been a wealth of assets found in the young people 
eager for intellectual and spiritual growth. 

The late Elder W. H. Branson, who had a part in founding the 
college wrote: 

"I have never doubted that the Lord guided in selecting the present 
location for the school, and I am sure that the wonderful success that has 
attended this school is ample evidence of His leadership in this undertaking. 
It brings great satisfaction to the hearts of those of us who had to do with 
its founding to see the wonderful development and advancement that has 
been through the years." 

In Collegedale, where God's great lesson book of nature is illustrated 
on every side, where the beauties of nature run rampant in a little valley 
between the mountains, one becomes captive, bound hand and heart with 
the cords of love to this "School of His Planning." 

This is the eightieth anniversary of Southern Missionary College. 
It now enters its eighty-first year, but a school never "arrives." As one 
goal is achieved, another is already on the horizon — a goal often times 
more important than the one just fulfilled. 



SHOULD AULD ACQUAINTANCE BE FORGOT? 



251 



Rain — often 

Snow — seldom 










*LT~ ZA 


■ J 


T '-"" 


y , ' 


a A| <« 


,"»» 








N^' 




p 




n 


n 


Bi 

Bl 




1 


* ? t 


V= ^ 










i 


* 


»i» i 


. 




1* 


t 




..'#« ^^Mikfl 


■ i- 7 








■ f *^*" 


P! 






^J 



252 



80 YEARS OF PROGRESS 








<&M&$ 



The first cafeteria was in the basement of Jones Hall from 1917-58 






fc!9taf**/*. -fcjii* ,, 


j 


1 . 


I ^B yi 


- -^~~ ""'■» ■ 'jpBspBH 


~s 




9LH 


' ftr 


r 








:L 


■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ¥-M WWmun CHjj^^BB^^H H^^Mft 




i7|j|i||W^H J € 


' "*5SPMi 


1 


liiiSi^/iftiSlii^ 







The second cafeteria was on the top floor of the above building from 1959-71. 




Interior view of the present cafeteria. 



SHOULD AULD ACQUAINTANCE BE FORGOT? 



253 




The temporary cafeteria while the second cafeteria building was being torn down 
and rebuilt. Affectionately known as the "Tabeteria" since it was in the south portion 
of the Tabernacle, 1971-73. 




The entrance to the Student Lounge. On the floor beneath is the third cafeteria, 1973- 




The main dining room in the second cafeteria, 1973-. 



254 



80 YEARS OF PROGRESS 




The first Student Lounge. 




The new Student Lounge. 



CHAPTER XXVIII 

EIGHTY YEARS OF GROWTH IN PICTURES 




Pierson House 
The house where Mr. John Pierson lived while he was farm manager. It was located 
on what is now Pierson Drive. 




Campus - 1947 



255 




MAP 

COLLE.GEDALE, TENN 

AND 

SOUTHERN JUNIOR COLLEGE FARM 



SCALE OP FEET 



CONTOUR INTERVAL IO FT. 
SURVEYED 11-1917 

COLLCSfDALC 



LYNN M.WOOD 
i es--5'-S"e & SS-S'-zo5». 



e x 



258 



80 YEARS OF PROGRESS 




Campus - 1952 




Campus - 1962 




Campus - 1970 



EIGHTY YEARS OF GROWTH IN PICTURES 



259 




Lookout Mountain in Chattanooga, just 18 miles away, famous for its Civil War "Battle 
Above the Clouds." 




Charles Fleming, Jr. gives a tour of the campus to the students from the Southern 
Union who were attending College Days. 



APPENDIX — LOOKING BACK 

THE CORPORATE SEAL 

When Southern Junior College prepared its Charter Corporation in 
1919, the seal to be used by the college was described in this way: 

"The corporate seal shall consist of two concentric triangles 

between which is the name of "Southern Junior College"; in 

the center is an eagle carrying a scroll to the world, around 

which is draped a ribbon." 

When the college attained senior status, the only change made in 
the seal was the altering of the word Junior to Missionary. 

For sometime the administrative officers of SMC had been wanting 
to up date the college seal, changing it to a more modern design with a 
clear indication of the purposes and objectives of the college. 

The new design carried the name of the college in large bold 
letters with the date of the founding, which had been corrected to read 
"1892," instead of "1893." The new design also showed the Holy Bible 
with the shield of faith, the helmet of salvation, and the sword of the 
spirit. Over this drawing were the words, "Veritas vincit," or "truth 
conquers." 

This new seal was voted by the Board of Trustees, Jan. 21, 1963, 
approved by the constituency, and written into the by-laws, April 26, 1963. 

The seal is placed on all legal papers from the college and on each 
official transcript. The registrar is custodian of the seal. 





BIOGRAPHIES 
PRINCIPALS AND PRESIDENTS 

George W. Colcord 

1892-1896 

George W. Colcord was born in 1843. He was the first president of 
the Upper Columbia Conference. He started Milton Academy which became 
the forerunner of Walla Walla College and Graysville Academy which be- 
came Southern Missionary College. He also founded an academy in Hy- 
giene, Colorado. 

It was in the spirit of the Great Teacher that Mr. Colcord came to 
Tennessee. By his Christian devotion he infused the Graysville Academy 
with those vital Christian principles that assured all of those interested in 



260 



APPENDIX— LOOKING BACK 261 

Christian education in the Southland, that this was indeed "A School of 
His Planning." 

Mr. Colcord left behind him a legacy of influence as an educator. It 
enriched the past and the present of the Southland, which he loved so truly 
and served so well. He died in 1902. 

W. T. Bland 

1896-1898 

The General Conference in 1896 asked Professor W. T. Bland to be 
the principal of the Southern Industrial School at Graysville. He was born 
in Illinois, Jan. 16, 1862, and took his secondary school work at Oakland 
High School and Lee's Academy at Iowa, Illinois. He attended college two 
years at Danville, Indiana, and then taught five years in public schools and 
one year in college. He taught English four years at Battle Creek College, 
and in 1892 became its president. He was married to Flora Cook in 1890. 

He started Mount Vernon Academy in 1893, and three years later 
he was asked to become principal of the school at Graysville, which had 
recently been turned over to the denomination by Professor Colcord. Prof- 
essor Bland was at Graysville two years, and during that time helped in 
founding Oakwood College in Alabama. 

He was president of Union College from 1898 to 1901. At the time 
that the General Conference headquarters were moved from Battle Creek 
to Washington, D.C., Professor Bland was the acting treasurer of the Gen- 
eral Conference. He served in denominational work a total of eighteen 
years and died August 11, 1953. 

C. W. Irwin 

1898-1900 

Professor C. W. Irwin was born Nov. 4, 1868, near Mount Vernon, 
Ohio, After graduation from Mount Vernon Academy and Battle Creek 
College, he joined the faculty of Union College. His wife was Minnie Hen- 
nig before her marriage to Mr. Irwin in 1895. 

Before answering the call to the industrial school at Graysville, he 
received the M. A. degree from the University of Nebraska. After three 
years at Graysville he went to the Avondale school in Australia and served 
there nine years. In 1909, he became the first president of Pacific Union 
College. Twelve years later he joined the staff of the General Conference 
educational department as an associate secretary. In 1930 he became head 
of the educational work. 

The young men and women who have been influenced by Professor 
Irwin's personal life and teachings are legion in all parts of the world. He 
served in denomination work forty-one years. He died in 1934. 

N. W. Lawrence 
1900-1901 

Professor N. W. Lawrence gave sixty years of faithful service to the 
denomination. He served in editorial, educational, and ministerial fields. 
For a time he edited the Youth's Instructor; he was principal of three aca- 
demies and president of two colleges. One of these academies was the In- 
dustrial School at Graysville. 

Professor Lawrence was born in Rochester, Michigan, in 1867 and 
died in Los Angeles, July 3, 1954. He was married to Leila Ranson in 1892. 
He was ordained to the ministry in 1902 and served as educational and 
M. V. department secretary of four conferences and two unions. 



262 80 YEARS OF PROGRESS 

J. Ellis Tenney 
1901-1908 

Professor J. Ellis Tenney was born in Adam County, Wisconsin, in 
1861. In 1887 he was married to Charlotte Starkweather at Clayton, Minne- 
sota. The four children born into this family are Betty, Gordon, Vera and 
Earl. 

From 1908 until the time of his death in 1911 in Lincoln, Nebraska, 
Professor Tenney traveled for the Howard Severance Publishing Company 
of Chicago. Professor Tenney served in denominational work ten years. 

Marshall B. Van Kirk 
1908-1912 

Professor Marshall B. Van Kirk was born into a Seventh-day Adven- 
tist home in southern Minnesota in 1870. He taught public school two 
years and then accepted a ministerial license and assisted in tent efforts. 
In 1890 he was married to Florence Presnell. He was ordained to the 
ministry and remained in service of the denomination until his death in 
1943. 

In 1908 he became principal of the Southern Training School and 
served in that capacity for four years. At the same time he served as 
educational secretary of both the Southeastern and Southern Union 
Conferences. In 1912 he went to the Central Union as educational secre- 
tary and later transferred to the Northern Union Conference. 

In later years he was the president of the Oklahoma Conference, the 
Colorado Conference, and the Southwestern Union Conference. For several 
years he was chaplain of the Porter Sanitarium. At his passing it was truly 
said, "A prince in Israel has fallen." 

C. L. Stone 
1912-1914 

Professor C. L. Stone, the seventh principal of the school at Grays- 
ville, was born in Indiana in 1871. He was reared in a Seventh-day Adven- 
tist home and was educated in Battle Creek College. He served in denomi- 
national work for thirty years. 

He was principal of the Southern Training School for two years. 
Those who knew him best have said that the force of his character was for 
good and lasted longer than his days. He was dearly beloved. 

Professor Stone was the principal of Mt. Vernon Academy, of Cana- 
dian Junior College, and of the Inter-American Training School in the 
Canal Zone. In 1931 lie earned his master's degree at George Washington 
University. He died in Takoma Park in 1946. 

Lynn H. Wood 
1914-1915 1918-1922 

Lynn H. Wood was born in 1887 in Lamar, Missouri. His father was 
the first collegiate graduate of the old Battle Creek College. He graduated 
from Ann Arbor High School, and in 1909 from the University of Michigan 
as an architectural engineer. In the fall of 1909 he joined the faculty of 
Washington Missionary College as science and mathematics teacher. 

Professor Wood married Maude Guilford in 1911. The following 
year he became head of the science department at Union College. In 1914 
he was elected principal of the Southern Training School in Graysville. 

In 1918 Professor Wood was elected president of Southern Junior 
College. He designed and superintended the construction of the three 



APPENDIX— LOOKING BACK 263 

original main buildings on the hill, that is the two dormitories and Lynn 
Wood Hall, which was named for him. 

In 1922 Professor Wood went to the Australian Missionary College 
and spent six years there; later he went to England as principal of Stan- 
borough College. In 1930 he was called to be president of Emmanuel 
Missionary College. He completed his graduate work for his Ph.D. in 1934 
and occupied the chair of Archaeology and Ancient Bible History at the 
Seventh-day Adventist Seminary in Washington until 1952. 

Dr. Wood completed 43 years in denominational service. Only eter- 
nity will reveal the countless number of lives that have been enriched and 
inspired by contact with his life. He is now retired and makes his home in 
California. 

A. N. Atteberry 
1915-1916 

Professor Atteberry was born in Keenville, Illinois, in 1882. He at- 
tended Battle Creek College and worked for the Good Health Publishing 
Co. It was during his stay there that the Review and Herald and Sanita- 
rium fires occured in 1902. The college was moved to Berrien Springs. 
Professor Atteberry took the nursing course at the Battle Creek Sani- 
tarium. He was married to a graduate nurse, Nina B. Haysmer. They 
went to Birmingham, Alabama, to start treatment rooms and later moved 
to Nashville, where they were successful with their treatment rooms. 

He became principal of the Southern Training School in 1915. In 
the months that followed Professor Atteberry made preparations to move 
the school to its new location at Collegedale. He was the first business 
manager of Southern Junior College. He taught at Canadian Union College 
two years ; he was principal of Gem State Academy three years ; he was a 
student and teacher at Walla Walla College; in 1924 he returned to 
Southern Junior College to teach; for eight years he taught at Oakwood 
College, and he was business manager of Broadview Academy. 

From 1936 until his retirement Professor Atteberry was a district 
pastor in the Kentucky-Tennessee Conference. 

Leo F. Thiel 
1916-1918 1922-1925 

Leo F. Thiel was born in Alexandria, South Dakota, November 16, 
1888. He attended Union College from 1907 to 1911 and graduated as presi- 
dent of his class. He did graduate work at the University of Nebraska 
while he was head of the English department of Union College. In 1913 he 
married Myrtle Andrews. Five children were born to this family : Dorothy, 
John, Mitchell, Francis, and Janet. 

Professor Thiel came to the Southland in 1915 to be educational 
secretary. The following year he became the first president of Southern 
Junior College. During his first term the women's dormitory was built. 

In 1918 Professor Thiel joined the faculty at Walla Walla College, 
but he returned to Southern Junior College in 1922. It was during his 
second term that the administration building was erected. He was presi- 
dent of Union College from 1925 to 1928 and head of the English depart- 
ment at Oakwood College from 1928 to 1930. In 1931 he received a 
master's degree from the University of Nebraska and then went to Wash- 
ington Missionary College as head of the English department. He became 
book editor at the Southern Publishing Association in 1947. 

Through thirty-seven years of service in the denomination he proved 
to be an untiring worker. He retired and lived in Nashville until his death 
in 1964. 



264 80 YEARS OF PROGRESS 

H. H. Hamilton 
1925-1927 

Professor H. H. Hamilton is the only one of the presidents of this 
college who is a native son of Tennessee. He was born in Glass, Tennessee, 
in 1878. He graduated from the Jonesboro, Arkansas, high school and at- 
tended the University of Arkansas. Professor Hamilton was a law reporter 
in Memphis, Tennessee, for some years. 

After his conversion he went to Keene, Texas, to teach business 
and commerce in the academy for twelve years. In 1917 he went to Walla 
Walla College where he graduated and also taught business administration 
from 1917 to 1922. He served as principal of Auburn Academy from 1922 
to 1925, and then was called to Southern Junior College to be its president. 
During his administration a bakery was added and a laundry was built. 

Professor Hamilton's ability to place himself in the experience of 
others endeared him to both faculty and students. He was called to Wash- 
ington Missionary College, and the day he left Collegedale the school was 
dismissed and the entire village went to Ooltewah to see him off on the 
train. In 1935 Professor Hamilton went to Southwestern Junior College as 
president, and in 1944 he retired after thirty-nine years in denominational 
employment. He lived in La Sierra, California until he died. 

Marion E. Cady 
1927 

Professor Cady was the author of the Bible Nature textbooks used 
by the denomination. He compiled materials for Fundamentals of Christian 
Education from the Spirit of Prophecy and compiled and wrote several 
other books. For twenty-one years he helped to lay the educational founda- 
tion of Christian education on the Pacific Coast. He was field secretary 
of the General Conference for four years. 

Marion E. Cady was born in Poy Sippi, Wisconsin, October 20, 1866. 
He was baptized at the age of sixteen and entered Battle Creek College in 
1866. He was teacher and preceptor of the Minnesota Conference Academy. 
In 1893 he graduated from Battle Creek College, and the following year he 
was married to Minnie Case. He taught science at Union College and at 
Battle Creek College. While he was president of Healdsburg College, he was 
also educational secretary for the Pacific Union. He was president of Walla 
Walla College for six years and of Washington Missionary College for four 
years. 

Professor Cady came to Southern Junior College in 1927 to fill out 
the year when Professor Hamilton was called to Washington Missionary 
College. He spent his later years in writing and lecturing. Professor Cady 
passed to his rest July 6, 1948, at San Marino, California. 

Henry J. Klooster 
1927-1937 

Henry J. Klooster was born in Chicago near the close of the century. 
He completed his secondary education at Emmanuel Missionary College in 
1913 and earned the B. A. degree at the same college in 1917. After his 
marriage to Evelyn Eglin, he was called to the Illinois Conference as a tent 
master. That fall he went to Alberta Academy at Lacombe, Alberta, to 
teach. He earned his Ph.D. at the University of Colorado. He was principal 
of Canadian Junior College until 1927, when he was called to Southern 
Junior College as president. 

In 1937 Dr. Klooster was called to Emmanuel Missionary College as 
its president and served there until 1943. He then transferred to Pacific 



APPENDIX— LOOKING BACK 265 

Union College and served as president for two years. From 1946 to 1950 
he served as assistant professor of chemistry at the University of Colorado, 
and, later was coordinator in basic science at the Denver Center at which 
place he was working at the time of his death. 

John C. Thompson 
1937-1942 

John C. Thompson has the distinction of having taken his elementary 
school work at the Southern Training School at Graysville, the precursor 
of the college of which he was one day to be president. His father, Charles 
Thompson, was a union conference president for many years and his uncle, 
George B. Thompson, was one of the founders of the college. 

John C. Thompson was born in Illinois in 1896. His secondary school 
work was completed at Union College ; he received a B. A. degree at Wash- 
ington Missionary College; a B. S. degree at George Peabody College; a 
L.L.B. degree from Woodrow Wilson College of Law; an M. A. degree 
from the University of Maryland; and a Ph.D. degree from Peabody 
College. 

In 1923 he was married to Sue Dale Gilliland, a classmate of Union 
College days. They have one daughter, Carolyn. 

Dr. Thompson was in denominational service forty-years : a teacher 
at Maplewood Academy; educational and M. V. secretary of the Southern 
Union Conference ; president of the Alabama-Mississippi Conference ; pres- 
ident of Southern Junior College ; and a leader in War Service Commission 
of the General Conference. 

For nine years, 1942 to 1951, Dr. Thompson did outstanding work 
for the United States Army in the European Theatre. 

D. E. Rebok 
1942-1943 

Elder Rebok was born in Newbury, Pa., and received his early edu- 
cation in that state. He completed his academic work and earned a B. A. 
degree at Washington Missionary College. He has an M. A. degree from 
Emmanuel Missionary College and one from Columbia University. While he 
was a missionary in China, Elder Rebok did graduate study in international 
relations. 

He was married to Florence Kneeland on May 28, 1917. They spent 
twenty-three years in China. Elder Rebok was department secretary for 
the South China Union Mission two years, and for the next fourteen years 
he was president of Shanghai Missionary College. From 1933 to 1940 he 
was educational and M. V. secretary there. 

In the years that followed, Elder Rebok taught Bible at Washington 
Missionary College; was president of Southern Junior College; was presi- 
dent of the Theological Seminary in Washington; was chairman of the 
Board of Trustees for the Ellen G. White Publications ; was dean of South- 
ern Missionary College, and was secretary of the General Conference. In 
1957 he joined the faculty of La Sierra College. Since retirement, he has 
been teaching at a private school. 

Kenneth A. Wright 
1943-1955 

Kenneth A. Wright was born in Buffalo, New York, in 1903, and 
attended public school for his early education. He graduated from Fern- 
wood Academy and from Lancaster Junior College, and received his B. A. 
degree from Emmanuel Missionary College. His master's degree was earned 



266 80 YEARS OF PROGRESS 

at Cornell University. He married Clara Nosworthy, a classmate of Lan- 
caster Junior College, in 1924. They have four children: June, Burton, 
Walter, and Kenneth. 

Professor Wright served the denomination in the following fields of 
service: departmental secretary, New England Conference; preceptor and 
teacher, Union Springs Academy; preceptor and manager, Union Springs 
Academy; departmental secretary, Florida Conference; principal, Forest 
Lake Academy ; departmental secretary, Southern Union Conference ; pres- 
ident, Southern Junior College, 1943- 1944; president, Southern Missionary 
College, 1944-1955. The outstanding characteristic of his work was the 
comprehensive system of democratic faculty participation in policy making 
that he built up through the years. It was during his tenure of office that 
SMC received accreditation in 1950. 

The new administration building at SMC is named in his honor. 

Thomas W. Walters 
1955-1958 

Thomas W. Walters came to the college in the South from California. 
He was born in Oakland, California, finished his secondary school work at 
Elsinore High School. He earned the B. S. degree at Walla Walla College 
in 1934 and his Ed. D. degree at Leland Stanford University in 1955. He 
married a classmate of Walla Walla College, Lois Silver, in 1934. They 
have two boys, Thomas and Kenneth. 

Dr. Walters has served the denomination in the following places 
and capacities: 1934-1940, dean of boys and teacher at Laurelwood 
Academy; 1940-1943, principal of Gem State Academy; 1943-1949, princi- 
pal of Laurelwood Academy; 1950-1955, departmental secretary of the 
Washington Conference; 1955-1958, president of Southern Missionary 
College; 1958, Educational Superintendent in the North Pacific Union. 

In 1959 he accepted an appointment as dean of students at Walla 
Walla College. Presently he is a departmental secretary in the North 
Pacific Union Conference. 

Conard N. Rees 
1958-1967 

Four children were born into the home of D. D. Rees, the man who 
did such outstanding work through the Christian Record for the blind. The 
youngest of four children, Conard N. Rees, was the nineteenth president 
of the college. He graduated from Union College Academy in 1926 and 
from Union College in 1931. His M. A. degree and his Ph. D. degree were 
conferred upon him by the University of Nebraska. 

Dr. Rees was dean of boys at Shenandoah Valley Academy and 
principal of Takoma Academy in Maryland. In 1949 he was head of the 
department of education at Washington Missionary College. Three years 
later he was academic dean at the same college. 

In 1954 he went to Southwestern Junior College as president, and 
in 1958 was asked by the Board of Trustees of Southern Missionary College 
to be president. Dr. Rees retired in 1967 after a severe illness. 

Dr. Rees was married to Fae Cowin in 1937. He has served in 
denominational work for thirty-two years. 



APPENDIX— LOOKING BACK 267 

Wilbert M. Schneider 
1967-1971 

Dr. Wilbert M. Schneider was born (1918) and reared on an Okla- 
homa wheat farm near Loyal, Oklahoma, and received his early education 
at East Cooper Elementary School. He also attended Kern Union Academy, 
Shafter, California, and Southwestern Junior College, Keene, Texas. He re- 
ceived a B.A. degree from Union College in 1940; a M.B.A. from the 
University of Oklahoma in 1944; and a Ph.D. in economics from the 
University of Southern California in 1952. 

Dr. Schneider is married to the former Ardith Maxine Chase, a 
registered nurse, and they are the parents of four children: Douglas, 
Shirley, Christine and Sara. 

Since graduating from Union College, Dr. Schneider has been dean 
of boys at Campion Academy, 1940-41 ; accountant at White Memorial 
Hospital, 1941-42; chairman of the department of business administra- 
tion at Southwestern Junior College, 1942-45, Walla Walla College, 1945- 
53, and Emmanuel Missionary College, 1953-55. He has been treasurer of 
Loma Linda Foods, 1958-60; academic dean at Emmanuel Missionary 
College, 1955-58; Southern Missionary College, 1960-63; Pacific Union 
College, 1963-67; and president of SMC from 1967-71. 

In 1971 Dr. Schneider became Educational Secretary of the Pacific 
Union Conference. 

Frank A. Knittel 
1971- 

Dr. Frank A. Knittel came to Southern Missionary College in 1967 
as academic dean, which position he held until he was asked to accept the 
presidency of SMC in 1971. 

Dr. Knittel was born in Dinuba, California in 1927 and received his 
elementary education in Dinuba Elementary School. He completed his high 
school work at Southwestern Junior College Academy in Keene, Texas. 
His B.A. degree is from Union College in 1947, with majors in English and 
mathematics; Dr. Knittel holds an M.A., received in 1955, and a Ph.D. in 
1960, both from the University of Colorado with majors in English. 

Dr. Knittel taught elementary school in the Arkansas-Louisiana 
Conference in 1944-45, and was dean of boys at Enterprise Academy in 
1947-51. His stint in the army was from 1951-53 where he served as an 
army instructor with the rank of first lieutenant. After the army he was 
dean of boys from 1953-55 at Campion Academy, during which time he 
worked on his masters degree. When it was completed, he was assistant 
dean of men at the University of Colorado while he studied for his Ph.D., 
1955-59. From 1959 to 1967 he taught at Andrews University, becoming 
vice president for student affairs while he was there. 

Dr. Knittel's wife is the former Helen Dean of Plainview, Texas, 
who is an assistant professor of English at SMC. They have two children, 
Jeffrey and Sherry. 



268 80 YEARS OF PROGRESS 

PRESIDENTS, SPONSORS, AND PROJECTS OF THE 
STUDENT ASSOCIATION 

1947-48 

Lawrence Scales, president Ambrose Suhrie, sponsor 

Arbor Day and campus clean-up ; ushering organization developed 

1948-49 

Roscoe Mizelle, president Ambrose Suhrie, sponsor 

Campus clean-up ; campus beauty spots ; funds for Hackman Hall 

1949-50 

Kenneth Mensing, president Leif Kr. Tobiassen, sponsor 

Arbor Day ; Woolsey and Veltman sent to Europe for World Congress. 

Southern Accent and Southern Memories tied closely to the Association 

1950-51 
Joe Lambeth, president Leif Kr. Tobiassen, sponsor 
Radio station WSMC; first Intercollegiate Workshop; student association 
constitution drafted and voted 

1951-52 

Chester Jordan, president Richard Hammill, sponsor 

Courtesy Week ; help lay floors in tabernacle ; improved tennis courts 

1952-53 

Arthur Butterfield, president Rupert Craig, sponsor 

Courtesy Week; improvement in cafeteria service 

1953-54 

Grady Smoot, president Fred Sanburn, sponsor 

Courtesy Week; books sent to Africa 

1954-55 

James Ray McKinney, president Leif Kr. Tobiassen, sponsor 

Freshman orientation week; Candlelight Hour initiated, 

Student Park developed 

1955-56 

Dean Kinsey, president L. N. Holm, sponsor 

1956-57 

John Culp, president E. T. Watrous, sponsor 

Collection of funds for flu vaccine project 

1957-58 
Ronald Haupt, president E. C. Banks, sponsor 
Suhrie Memorial; publication of first "Joker"; Courtesy Week; polio 
injections; project, $15,000 to remodel Lynn Wood Hall chapel 

1958-59 

Donald Wilson, president William H. Taylor, sponsor 

$5,000 for student lounge, erection of several bill-boards ; 

construction started on WSMC-FM 

1959-60 

Donald Crane, president William H. Taylor, sponsor 

Courtesy Week; Thanksgiving basket project; creating of school flag 



APPENDIX— LOOKING BACK 269 

PRESIDENTS, SPONSORS, AND PROJECTS OF THE 
STUDENT ASSOCIATION (Cont.) 

1960-61 

Julius Garner, president K. R. Davis, sponsor 

Courtesy Week; $750 for Chiapas Mission 

1961-62 

Bruce Freeman, president K. R. Davis, sponsor 

Revitalized WSMC-FM on air ; drive for scholarship excellence ; 

Courtesy Week 

1962-63 

Ronald Numbers, president K. R. Davis, sponsor 

1963-64 
David Osborne, president K. R. Davis, sponsor 

1964-65 

Bert Coolidge, president K. R. Davis, sponsor 

$25,000 for swimming pool 

1965-66 
Lloyd Erickson, president Gordon Madgwick, sponsor 

1966-67 
Don Volmer, president Kenneth Spears, sponsor 

1967-68 

Rollin Mallernee, president Delmar Lovejoy, sponsor 

Patio in front of cafeteria — joint project by S.A. and senior class 

1968-69 
Jim Davis, president Delmar Lovejoy, sponsor 

1969-70 
Terence Futcher, president Delmar Lovejoy, sponsor 

1970-71 
Elton Kerr, president, Kenneth Spears, sponsor 

1971-72 
Stan Rouse, president K. R. Davis, sponsor 

1972-73 

Reggie Tryon, president K. R. Davis, sponsor 

Nicaragua Mission Project 

Money for a shelter in the Student Park 

1973-74 

LeClare Litchfield, president K. R. Davis, sponsor 

Nicaragua Mission Project 

Money for a shelter in the Student Park 

1974-75 

Gail Jones, president K. R. Davis, sponsor 

Nicaragua Mission Project 

Money for a shelter in the Student Park 



270 



80 YEARS OF PROGRESS 



SMC GRADUATES WORK IN OTHER LANDS 

These left SMC halls of learning for unselfish service in other lands. 

Some of you are penetrating dense jungles, fording swollen streams, or 
listening to the threats of war. You are followed by the earnest prayers 
of those back home. You are still a definite part of Southern Missionary 
College. 



Samuel Alberro, '52 
Rose Meister Allen, '21 
Rene Ramiro Alonso, '52 
Waldina L. Alonso, '52 
Barbara Hoar Arena, '64 
Patrice Diane Artress, '72 
J. Franklin Ashlock, '25 
Marcella Klock Ashlock, '46 
Thomas M. Ashlock, '50 
Henry E. Baasch, '53 
Wm. H. J. Badenhorst, '55 
Marie Guinn Bailey, '49 
Sharon Olsen Barnes, '61 
Linda Limberis Batto, '73 
Virgil Norris Beauchamp, '52 
Ercel Bradley Bennett, '36 
Martin C. Bird, '38 
Donna Weber Bohannon, '54 
Jack B. Bohannon, '57 
John E. Bottsford, Jr., M.D., '57 
Barbara Shook Bottsford, '57 
Ronald C. Bottsford, '61 
Harvey Bowen, M.D., '43 
Miriam Bruce Boyd, '26 
Charles Arthur Boykin, '28 
Paul C. Boynton, Sr., '38 
Ruth Beck Boynton, '53 
Melinda McRae Boyson, '64 
Mildred Emmanuel Bradley, '25 
James B. Brenneman, '68 
Nancy Hopwood Brenneman, '69 
Esther Kephart Bruce, '46 
Elsie Landon Buck, '41 
Ann Maxwell Burchard, '55 
Robert W. Burchard, '59 
C. Rees Callicott, '12 
Vesta Moyers Callicott, '12 
Manuel M. Carballal, '49 
Fernando Cardona, Jr., '59 
Rosalina Rivera Cardona, '49 
Betty Jane Carey, '72 



Nicholas Chaij, '52 
Freida Mae Clark, '40 
Betty Staben Collins, '53 

E. Dale Collins, '53 
Edward M. Collins, '51 
Lettie Sibley Collins, '35 
Marc Denis Cools, '66 
Arthur Ray Corder, '51 
B. Ann Couden, '69 
Donald Eugene Crane, '60 
Joseph A. Crews, '46 
Milford G. Crist, '71 
Kenneth S. Crofoot, '36 
Ivan T. Crowder, '37 
Chester H. Damron, '57 
Mary Jean Brown Damron, '53 
Mary Tunison Darnell, '45 
Robert C. Darnell, Jr., '48 
Clifton L. Davis, '61 

Robert Dean Davis, '55 

Dora Gambetta Drachenberg, '52 

R. R. Drachenberg, '55 

Eileen Mulford Drouault, '33 

Peter D. Durichek, Jr., '57 

Violet Starr Durichek, '55 

Paul Wm. Dysinger, M.D., '51 

John R. Eggers, '68 

M. Lloyd Erikson, '66 

Nellie Ferree, '28 

Clyde O. Franz, '32 

Lois Mae Clark Franz, '34 

James G. Fulfer, '50 

F. La Verne Fuller, M.D., '50 
Lola M. Genton, '54 

Jon W. Gepford, '62 
Norman R. Gulley, '55 
Gen .d Gutekunst, '54 
Robert A. Hamm, '48 
Kenneth Harding, '53 
Charles P. Harris, Jr., '52 
John F. Harris, '55 



APPENDIX— LOOKING BACK 



271 



SMC GRADUATES WORK IN OTHER LANDS (Cont.) 



Patricia Thames Harris, '53 

Billy Page Haskell, '47 

Hazel A. Hauck, '68 

Glenn F. Henriksen, '47 

Benjamin E. Herndon, M.D., '42 

June Snide Hooper, '42 

John M. Howard, '56 

Howard D. Huenergardt, M.D., '53 

Michael Kline Huitt, '71 

Donald W. Hunter, '24 

T. R. Huxtable, '22 

Bradley Garth Hyde, '71 

Ruth M. Ingram, '31 

Kathryn Ann Ippisch, '72 

Jamile Jacobs, '51 

Paul L. Jensen, '59 

A. J. Johanson, '49 

Harold S. Johnson, '58 

Marjorie Connell Johnson, '53 

Wm. E. Jones, '52 

James L. Joiner, '53 

Mable Mitchell Joiner, '53 

Alice Perkins Kimber, '47 

Jacqueline Kinsman, '60 

Bruce Kopitzke, '63 

Gerald N. Kovalski, '63 

Sandra Collier Kovalski, '62 

Helen Elliott Krall, '60 

W. E. Kuester, '29 

Irene Cross Kuist, '58 

Richard C. Larsen, M.D., '60 

Alice Jean Lemon, '71 

G. G. Lowry, '08 

Betty Ludington, '54 

Clifford Ludington, '41 

Louis G. Ludington, '40 

Janet McCandless, '69 

Terry G. McComb, '63 

H. E. McClure, '27 

Nellie Nash McClure, '25 

Warner E. McClure, '25 

Linda Stefanson McKee, '65 

Richard L. McKee, '66 

Wolfgang von Maack, '72 

Nancy Ann Marsh, '68 

Kathleen Johnson Martin, '69 

Jack Martz, '53 

Benjamin C. Maxson, '71 



Mary Louise Holmes Maxson, '70 

Daryl Louis Meyers, '66 

Kerstin Pettersson Meyers, '67 

Bessie Mount, '14 

Esther Brassington Nelson, '42 

La Verne Hughes Northrope, '53 

Robert E. Northrope, '53 

William W. Oakes, '49 

Martha Montgomery Odom, '24 

W. Walker Oliphant, M.D., '38 

Jessie Mae Hawman Olson, '52 

Joane Swie Ong, '69 

Phillip A. Parker, '38 

Leslie D. Pendleton, '59 

F. C. Petty, '41 

Barbara Benson Pfiefle, '64 

Felicia LeVere Phillips, '65 

William Lamar Phillips, '63 

Alta E. Philo, '60 

Charles L. Pierce, '51 

Dollis Smith Pierson, '50 

F. Clifford Port, '68 

Judie Martin Port, '68 

Eunice Bell Reiber, '38 

Eugene T. Remmers, '58 

Wilfred Felan Reyna, '60 

Andres S. Riffel, '52 

Ruth M. Riffel, '52 

David M. Rouse, '64 

Susan Rozell Pettibone, '66 

Beverly Jean Runnels, '72 

Jack Sager, '50 

Dorothy Jean Graves Salhany, '49 

Phaize J. Salhany, '50 

Ruth Carterette Sands, '42 

Valentin W. Schoen, '55 

Donald A. Short, '59 

Janice Black Short, '61 

Carl Jackson Smith, '42 

Douglas T. Smith, '72 

Rollin F. Snide, M.D., '40 

Joseph A. Soule, '48 

William A. Sowers, '31 

Vernon C. Sparks, M.D., '58 

Thomas W. Staples, '58 

Allen R. Steele, '67 

Jeanne Dorsette Stoodley, '49 

Ann McGhinnis Taylor, '66 



272 



80 YEARS OF PROGRESS 



SMC GRADUATES WORK IN OTHER LANDS (Cont.) 



David Charles Taylor, '66 
Bertha Wolfe Terry, '26 
Hollis T. Taylor, '26 
William Tol, '51 
Ethel Cochran Tolhurst, '43 
George N. Tolhurst, M.D., '42 
Mary Coulson Tavenner, '48 
Alice Dean Trubey, '57 
Norman L. Trubey, '57 
Gloria McComb Tyndall, '64 
William E. Tyndall, M.D., '64 
Fred Veltman, '51 
Irene Pearman Veltman, '49 
Edward Vick, '55 
John F. Vogt, III, M.D., '62 
Betty Jean Walker, '66 
Louise Olson Walther, '46 
Marsha Ann Watson, '65 



Paul M. Watson, M.D., '50 
Ruth Risetter Watson, '49 
Barbara Holland Wear, '62 
Ben D. Wheeler, '49 
Ann Morgan Wheeler, '46 
Charles L. Williams, '69 
Suzy Shaklett Williams, '68 
Alice Fowler Willsey, '62 
Barbara Wilson, '54 
Fred E. Wilson, '54 
Robert H. Wood, '47 
C. A. Woolsey, '23 
Cora Fox Woolsey, '23 
Raymond H. Woolsey, '51 
Burton L. Wright, '51 
Faydette Smith Youngs, '24 
Alexander A. Zegarra, M.D., 
W. Forrest Zill, '51 



'51 



ENROLLMENT STATISTICS, 1916-75 
Southern Junior College and Southern Missionary College 



1916-17 
1917-18 
1918-19 
1919-20 
1920-21 
1921-22 
1922-23 
1923-24 
1924-25 
1925-26 
1926-27 
1927-28 
1928-29 
1929-30 
1930-31 
1931-32 
1932-33 
1933-34 
1934-35 
1935-36 
1936-37 
1937-38 
1938-39 
1939-40 
1940-41 
1941-42 
1942-43 
1943-44 
1944-45 
1945-46 



9 


1946-47 


1M 


1947-48 


7 


1948-49 


11 


1949-50 


2(5 


1950-51 


15 


1951-52 


25 


1952-53 


37 


1953-54 


54 


1954-55 


48 


1955-56 


40 


1956-57 


52 


1957-58 


62 


1958-59 


68 


1959-60 


71 


1960-61 


75 


1961-62 


45 


1962-63 


64 


1963-64 


108 


1964-65 


123 


1965-66 


150 


1966-67 


145 


1967-68 


133 


1968-69 


172 


1969-70 


189 


1970-71 


171 


1971-72 


134 


1972-73 


124 


1973-74 


177 


1974-75 


258 





503 

472 

481 

456 

517 

575 

515 

564 

491 

515 

535 

52 

597 

626 

646 

802 

868 

975 

1043 

1202 

1211 

1295 

1368 

1400 

1436 

1516 

1544 

1741 

1844 



APPENDIX—LOOKING BACK 273 

PROFESSORS EMERITI 

Theresa Rose Brickman, M.Ed., Associate Professor Emeritus of Secretarial 
Science, 1942-63 
B.A., Union College, M.Ed., University of Oklahoma. 

Stanley D. Brown, M.A., Associate Professor Emeritus of Library Science, 
1935-74 B.A. Columbia Union College, B. A. in Library Science, Uni- 
versity of North Carolina; M.A., University of Maryland; M.A. Ohio 
State University. 

Ruby E. Lea Carr, B.A., Registrar Emeritus, 1917-26, 1944-51. 
B.A. Union College. 

John Christensen, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Chemistry B.A. Union 
College; M.A. University of Nebraska; Ph.D., Michigan State University. 
1955-1975 

Hira T. Curtis, Assistant Professor Emeritus of Accounting and Business, 
1949-58. B.S., Union College. 

Olivia Brickman Dean, M.Ed., Associate Professor Emeritus of Education. 
1938-74 B.A., Union College; M.Ed., University of Oklahoma. 

Mary Holder Dietel, Associate Professor Emeritus of Modern Languages, 
1938-59. B.A., Columbia Union College; M.A. University of Maryland; 
Certificate from L'Alliance Francoise. 

Maude I. Jones, B.A., Associate Professor Emeritus of English, 1917-61. 
B.A., Mississippi College for Women. 

D. C. Ludington, M.A., Associate Professor Emeritus of English, 1930-53. 
B.A., Andrews University; B.S., George Peabody College for Teachers; 
M.A., George Peabody College for Teachers. 

Harold A. Miller, M.Mus., Professor Emeritus of Music, 1935-42, 1945-53. 
B.M., Otterbein College; M.Mus., Eastman School of Music. 

Ambrose L. Suhrie, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Education and Educa- 
tional Consultant, 1945-56 

Ph.B., John B. Stetson University, M.A., University of Pennsylvania; 
Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania. 

Olive Westphal, M.A., Associate Professor Emeritus of Modern Languages, 
1960-67 B.A., Pacific Union College; M.A., University of Southern 
California. 

J. Mabel Wood, M.A., Associate Professor Emeritus of Music, 1949- 
B.A., Union College; M.A., University of Nebraska. 



274 



80 YEARS OF PROGRESS 



FOUR-YEAR GRADUATES 



Year 


No. of 


Total 


Year 


No. of 


Total 




Grad. 


Grad. 




Grad. 


Grad. 


1946 


6 


6 


1961 


71 


716 


1947 


13 


19 


1962 


63 


779 


1948 


2.°, 


12 


1963 


91 


870 


1949 


30 


72 


1964 


88 


958 


1950 


53 


125 


1965 


107 


1065 


1951 


63 


188 


1966 


140 


1205 


1952 


M 


242 


1967 


131 


1339 


1953 


77 


319 


1968 


150 


1489 


1954 


42 


361 


1969 


166 


1655 


1955 


52 


413 


1970 


193 


1848 


1956 


37 


450 


1971 


198 


2046 


1957 


47 


497 


1972 


188 


2234 


1958 


42 


539 


1973 


185 


2419 


1959 


39 


578 


1974 


157 


2576 


1960 


67 


645 









TWO-YEAR GRADUATES 



Year 


No. of 


Total 


Year 


No. of 


Total 




Grad. 


Grad. 




Grad. 


Grad. 


1920 


2 


2 


1948 


10 


395 


1921 


5 


7 


1949 


16 


411 


1922 


3 


10 


1950 


13 


424 


1923 


7 


17 


1951 


10 


434 


1924 


15 


32 


1952 


16 


450 


1925 


11 


16 


1953 


17 


467 


1926 


13 


59 


1954 


14 


481 


1927 


10 


69 


1955 


11 


492 


1928 


9 


78 


1956 


11 


503 


1929 


11 


92 


1957 


9 


512 


1930 


17 


109 


1958 


19 


531 


1931 


17 


126 


1959 


4 


535 


1932 


11 


137 


1960 


•1 


539 


1933 


5 


142 


1961 


7 


546 


1934 


7 


149 


1962 


8 


554 


1935 


7 


156 


1963 


16 


570 


1936 


24 


180 


1964 


11 


581 


1937 


21 


201 


1965 


K) 


591 


1938 


33 


234 


1966 


12 


603 


1939 


11 


248 


1967 


:;i 


634 


1940 


13 


261 


1968 


25 


659 


1941 


12 


273 


1969 


35 


694 


1942 


27 


300 


1970 


50 


744 


1943 


21 


321 


1971 


38 


782 


1944 


21 


342 


1972 


5:; 


835 


1945 


16 


358 


1973 


88 


923 


1946 


11 


369 


1974 


105 


1028 


1947 


16 


385 









APPENDIX— LOOKING BACK 275 



PRESIDENTS OF MEN'S CLUB 

1924-25 John S. Murchison 

1925-26 Thomas Strickland, Walter Martin 

1926-27 John Speyer 

1927-28 William Kuester, Charlie Boykin 

1928-29 William Giles, S. Horton McLennan 

1929-30 William Giles 

1933-34 Elmer Leitner 

1935-36 Bob Cone, Ivan Crowder 

1936-37 Ivan Crowder 

1937-38 Coyne Knight 

1938-39 Charles Plyer, Louis Waller 

1939-40 John Palmer, Bob Spangler 

1940-41 Warren Oakes, Wayne Foster 

1941-42 Darrell Chisolm 

1942-43 Theodore Lysek, Leonard Evans 

1943-44 Leonard Evans, Roland Semmens 

1944-45 Otis Graves, Charles Pierce 

1945-46 Paul Haynes 

1946-47 Morris Wilson 

1947-48 Craig Parrish, Floyd Matula 

1948-49 Maurice Abbott, Al Blevins 

1949-50 Jack Price, Allen Curtis 

1950-51 Lawrence Hughes, Ferdinand Wuttke 

1951-52 Bob Ammons, Sam Croft 

1952-53 Jack Facundus, Billy Mack Read 

1953-54 William Severs 

1954-55 Dan Hart, Bob Green 

1955-56 Martin Hollingsworth, Sonny Wurl 

1956-57 Gerald Swayze, Bryan Wilcox 

1957-58 Vernon Sparks, Richard Green 

1958-59 Dan Rozell 

1959-60 Bernard DeVasher 

1960-61 Jon Gepford 

1961-62 James Wolcott 

1962-63 Tui Pitman 

1963-64 Bailey Winsted 

1964-65 Larry Caviness 

1965-66 Paul Martz 

1966-67 David Steen 

1967-68 Chester Tyson 

1968-69 David Castleberg 

1969-70 Stanley Rouse 

1970-71 Don Pate 

1971-72 Robert R. Bretsch 

1972-73 Wayne Liljeros 

1973-74 Michael Cauley 

1974-75 Jesse Landess 



276 80 YEARS OF PROGRESS 

PRESIDENTS OF WOMEN'S CLUB 

1922-23 Dorothy Peppers Mouchon 

1923-24 Martha Minnick, Allene Gooch 

1924-25 Sarah Edwards, Dorothy Peppers Mouchon 

1925-26 Thelma Jones, Elaine Yeast 

1926-27 Mary Ann Gatlin 

1927-28 Edythe Stephenson Cothren, Nellah C. Smith, Helen Watts 

1928-29 Frances Rilea 

1929-30 Dorothy Ulmer 

1930-31 Frances Maiden, Mary Gartley 

1931-32 Jewell Johnson 

1932-33 Eileen Mulford Drouault 

1933-34 Mary Byers, Mary Lucas 

1934-37 Martha Brown Shain 

1938-39 Tui Knight 

1939-40 Tui Knight, Betty Nordan 

1940-41 Mattie Mae Carter, Maisie Franz Duge 

1941-42 Ruth Carterette 

1942-43 Jean Duke 

1943-44 Ruth Risetter Watson, Claudine Hopkins Boyle 

1944-45 Rachel Atkins Millard, Eddie Frances Greek Hamilton 

1945-46 Ruth Peterson 

1946-47 Dixie Reeder Wilcox 

1947-48 Miriam Hilton Russell, Carol Russ Herrell 

1948-49 Sue Callis Westcott, Ruby Teachey Campbell 

1949-50 Dorothy Graves Salhany, Helen Terry 

1950-51 Betty Park, Betty Grounds 

1951-52 Catherine Brown 

1952-53 Elsie Simmonds, Louise Ringer 

1953-54 Joan Hedgepeth Kilgore, Jerry Hawk 

1954-55 Donna Weber Bohannon, Kathryn Wooley Hinson 

1955-56 Joya Lynn Schoen, Daphine Lyle 

1956-57 Ingrid Christensen, Patty Bell 

1957-58 Lucy Watkins, Carolyn Hoofard Cooper 

1958-59 Marolyn Miller Sayre-Smith, Diane Ludlam Crane 

1959-60 Julia Boyd Swarner, Pat McCollum Elliott 

1960-61 Alice Fowler Willsey, Marilee Easter Cothren 

1961-62 Jo Anne Schuler Hoffer, Linda Mundy Pumphrey 

1962-63 Sandria Keller, Candy Scott 

1963-64 Patricia Chu Clark 

1964-65 Patricia Osborne Kirstein 

1965-66 Lynda Whitman Cockrell, Phyllis Chu 

1966-67 Charlotte McKee Taylor, Beth Mensing Landers 

1967-68 Lucy Rascon Medford, Anne Grotheer 

1968-69 Gail Bosarge, Linda Wagner 

1969-70 Margaret Pierce, Sandy Cavanaugh 

1970-71 Judith Osborne Crabtree, Sharon f.willey 

1971-72 Carol Jean Barrett 

1972-73 Judy Gerst 

1973-74 Marti Baum 

1974-75 Laurel Ladish 



APPENDIX— LOOKING BACK 277 

ACADEMIC DEANS 

1945-46 Daniel Walther 1958-60 George E. Shankel 

1946-49 L. G. Sevrens 1960-63 Wilbert M. Schneider 

1949-52 Floyd 0. Rittenhouse 1963-67 J. W. Cassell, Jr. 

1952-55 Richard L. Hammill 1967-71 Frank A. Knittel 

1955-56 D. E. Rebok 1971- Cyril F. W. Futcher 

1956-58 Ray Underhill 

DEANS OF STUDENT AFFAIRS 

1958-62 William H. Taylor 1967-70 Delmer Lovejoy 

1962-65 Kenneth R. Davis 1970- Kenneth Spears 

1965-67 Gordon Madgwick 

DIRECTORS OF PUBLIC AND COLLEGE RELATIONS 

1942-46 C. A. Russell 1958- William H. Taylor 

1956-58 H. B. Lundquist 1966-76 J. Mabel Wood, asst. dir. 

alumni relations 

BUSINESS MANAGERS AND ASSISTANTS 

From 1892-1916 the principals of Southern Industrial School and 
Southern Training School were the business managers. From 1922-46 the 
presidents were the business managers, and the treasurers were assistant 
business managers, unless otherwise stated. 

1916-18 A. N. Atteberry, business manager 

1918-19 Lynn H. Wood, president and business manager 

1918-19 J. K. MacMillan, assistant business manager 

1919-22 John R. Kennedy, business manager 

1922-25 Leo Thiel, president and business manager 

1922-25 Roy L. Carr, treasurer 

1925-27 H. H. Hamilton, president and business manager 

1925-26 Roy L. Carr, treasurer 

1926-27 Carl Rottmiller, treasurer, assistant manager 

1927-37 H. J. Klooster, president and business manager 

1927-29 Carl Rottmiller, treasurer, assistant manager 

1929-32 George N. Fuller, secretary-treasurer 

1932-35 W. A. Benjamin, assistant business manager 

1935-36 George N. Fuller, treasurer 

1936-37 Theodora Wirak Lambeth, treasurer 

1937-42 J. C. Thompson, president and business manager 

1937-38 Theodora Wirak Lambeth, treasurer 

1938-41 Fred L. Green, treasurer 

1941- Charles Fleming, Jr., treasurer 

1941-42 Melvin Howard, treasurer 

1942-46 Clyde C. Cleveland, treasurer 

1946-54 Charles Fleming, Jr., business manager 

1946-47 Clyde C. Cleveland, treasurer 

1947-50 George T. Gott, assistant business manager 

1950-51 Roy Crawford, assistant business manager 

1951-53 George T. Gott, assistant business manager 

1953-54 John Goodbrad, assistant business manager 

1954-56 Charles Fleming, Jr., general manager 

1954-55 L. N. Holm, business manager 

1955-56 Don L. West, business manager 

1956-58 L. N. Holm, general manager 

1956-58 Charles Fleming, Jr., asst. business manager (part time) 

1956-58 Don L. West, assistant business manager 



278 



80 YEARS OF PROGRESS 



1958-67 

1961- 

1958-62 

1962-63 

1964- 

1963-67 

1967- 

1967-70 

1967- 

1970- 



1916-18 
1918-26 
1926-28 
1928-33 
1934-36 
1936-37 
1937-43 
1943-44 



BUSINESS MANAGERS AND ASSISTANTS (Cont.) 

Charles Fleming, Jr., business manager 

Robert Merchant, treasurer 

Don L. West, assistant business manager 
Don L. West, director of student finance 
Louesa R. Peters, assistant treasurer 
Kenneth Spears, director of student finance 

Charles Fleming, Jr., general manager of finance and develop- 
ment. 

Kenneth Spears, college manager 
Laurel Wells, director of student finance 
Robert Mills, college manager, business manager 

REGISTRARS, DIRECTORS OF ADMISSIONS AND 
RECORDS, AND ASSISTANTS 



Grace Kelsey Keith 1944-51 

Ruby Lea Carr 1951-58 

A. N. Atteberry 1958-62 

Edythe S. Cothren 1962-71 

Grace Butler 1965-71 

Blanche Black Ost 1971- 

Theodore W. Lambeth 1971- 
Grace Kelsey Keith 



Ruby Lea Carr 
Elva B. Gardner 
Theodore W. Lambeth 
Cyril F. W. Futcher 

Mary E. Elam, asst. 
Arno Kutzner 

Mary E. Elam, asst. 



DEANS OF MEN 

Associates and Assistants 



1903-04 

Thomas D. Howe 

1904-05 

Kenneth R. Haughey 

1905-06 

Henry Howard 

1907-11 

G. H. Baber 

1911-13 

Thomas D. Rowe 

1913-15 

Grover R. Fattic 

1915-18 

J. S. Marshall 

1918-22 

H. A. Johnston 

1922-23 

N. L. Ingram 

1923-26 

E. L. Parrish 

1926-27 

R. M. Falk 

1927-30 

Lawrence West 

1930-36 

Walter B. Clark 



1936-37 

E. J. Barnes 

1937-41 

Rudolph Johnson 

1941-42 

Daniel Walther 

1942-48 

H. F. Lease 

1948-52 

E. T. Watrous 

1952-54 

Fred S. Sanburn 

1954-56 

James Edwards 

1956-59 

Jack A. Upchurch 

1959-66 

Kenneth R. Davis, 

1961-63 

Larry Williams 

1963-66 

Bruce Freeman 

1966-67 

Jack A. Upchurch, 

1966-67 

Bruce Freeman 



1967-69 

Harold E. Kuebler, dean 

1967-69 

Eris W. Kier 

1967-68 

Floyd Powell 

1968-69 

Don Taylor 
1969-74 
Lyle Botimer, dean 

1969-72 

Don Taylor 

1969-70 

Merlin Wittenberg 

1970-73 

Ted Winn 

1972-74 
dean W. G. Nelson 

1973- 

Warren Halversen 

1974- 

Everett Schlisner, dean 

1974- 
dean Ted Evans 

1973- 

Warren Halversen 



APPENDIX— LOOKING BACK 



279 



DEANS 

Associates 

1903-04 Mettie Sharp Lenker 

1904-06 Mrs. M. C. Kenyon 

1906-67 Mrs. Henry Howard 

1907-08 Mrs. G. H. Baber 

1908-09 Mrs. M. A. Farnsworth 

1909-11 Mrs. G. H. Baber 

1911-13 Mrs. Mabelle Rowe 

1913-14 Cora B. Hicks 

1914-16 Bertha Phelps 

1916-17 Mrs. J. W. Thorne 

1917-19 Josephine Wilson Tucker 

1919-20 Mrs. E. Taylor 

1920-21 Mable N. Behrens 

1921-22 Alma DuBois 

1922-24 Mrs. I. D. Richardson 

1924-26 Myrtle V. Maxwell 

1926-33 Lorena Wilcox 

1933-36 Pearl Hall 

1936-38 Rachel Christman 

1938-39 Olga Oakland 

1939-42 Mary Carter Champion 

1942-43 Mary Holder Dietel 

1943-46 Carolyn Hall Russell 

1946-48 Eliza Parfitt 

1948-50 Ingrid Johnson 

1950-51 Dora Greve 

1951-58 Edna Stoneburner 

1958-62 Alfreda Costerisan, dean 

1959-61 Evelyn E. Carmen 
(Orlando) 



OF WOMEN 

and Assistants 

1961-62 Elizabeth Van Arsdale 

1961-62 Hazel Thurston 
(Orlando) 

1962-64 Maybell E. Vandermark, dean 

1962-63 Elizabeth Van Arsdale 

1962-63 Hazel Thurston 
(Orlando) 

1963-64 Ann Wilcox 

1963-64 Edna Stoneburner 
(Orlando) 

1964-67 Evaline West, dean 

1964-67 Mary Mooy 

1966-67 Grieta DeWind 

1966-67 Ina McFarland 

1964-67 Edna Stoneburner 
(Orlando) 

1967-72 Grieta DeWind, dean 

1967-68 Ina McFarland 

1967-72 Fae Rees 

1968-70 Doris Irish 

1970-72 Haziel Henderson 

1971-72 Joyce Cotham 

1968-70 Linda Pumphrey 
(Madison) 

1967-70 Edna Stoneburner 
(Orlando) 

1970-72 Lois Palmour 
(Orlando) 

1972- Florence Stuckey 

1972- Fae Rees 

1972- Joyce Cotham 

1972-74 Blanche E. Jones 



280 



80 YEARS OF PROGRESS 



HEALTH SERVICE NURSES 

1919-20 Mrs. H. A. Johnston 

1925-27 Mrs. A. N. Atteberry 

1927-28 Gladys Andress Jones 

1928-30 Stella Beauchamp 

1930-31 Mrs. D. R. Edwards 

1931-33 Dorothy McCuean Cowdrick 

1933-34 Miriam Bruce Bovd 

1934-35 Edythe Cobet Williams 

1935-37 Mable Parrish Reynolds 

1937-43 W. E. Williams 

1943-45 Marcella Klock Ashlock 

1945-49 Mildred Eadie Oaks 
1948-49 Katherine Maxfield, assistant 

1949-50 Marcella Klock Ashlock 
1949-50 Marian Kuhlman, assistant 
1949-50 Leta Banks, assistant 

1950-51 Dorothy Henri Douglas 
1950-51 Marian Kuhlman, assistant 

1951- Marian Kuhlman 
1951-55 Helen Mizelle, assistant 
1963-66 Virginia H. Nelson, assistant 
1969-74 Virginia H. Nelson, assistant 



ALUMNI PRESIDENTS 



1927-31 Walter B. Clark 1956-57 

1931-32 Robert E. Cowdrick 1957-58 

1932-34 George Fuller 1958-59 

1934-35 T. R. Huxtable 1959-60 

1936-38 Albert Hall 1960-61 

1938-40 Mrs. B. F. Summerour 1961-63 

1940-42 Mrs. R. K. Boyd 1963-64 

1942-44 Clare Botimer 1964-66 

1944-46 J. Franklin Ashlock 1966-67 

1946-47 Mrs. Daniel Walther 1967-68 

1947-48 Edward Banks 1968-69 

1948-50 Lawrence Scales 1969-70 

1950-51 Ross Hughes 1970-71 

1951-52 Milton Connell 1971-72 

1952-53 Roscoe Mizelle 1972-73 

1953-55 Paul Boynton 1973-74 

1955-56 Roscoe Mizelle 1974-75 



Ted Graves 
Roscoe Mizelle 
Ellsworth McKee 
Don Crook 
Bill Hulsey 
Harry Hulsey 
Glen^McColpin 
Don Crook 
Dewitt Bowen 
Lynn Sauls 
Wallace Blair 
Glen McColpin 
D. L. West 
Warren Hammond 
Floyd Greenleaf 
Douglas Bennett 
Ellsworth McKee 



CLASS PRESIDENTS 



1920 Clarence S. Field 1931 

1921 Frederick E. Fuller 1932 

1922 Thomas R. Huxtable 1933 

1923 Frederick E. Fuller 1934 

1924 Ralph S. Watts 1935 

1925 Donald Walter Hunter 1936 

1926 Hollis T. Terry 1937 

1927 Walter B. Clark 1938 

1928 Leslie Butterfield 1939 

1929 John F. Speyer 1940 

1930 Eva Maude Wilson Martin 1941 



La Verne Smith 
Walter M. Ost 
Bruce Thomas Benjamin 
Mary Lucas Turner 
Lowell H. Byers 
Martha Brown Shain 
Carl Frank Romans 
John Raymond Morphew 
Louis Clinton Waller 
James O. McLeod 
Burgess Goodbrad 



APPENDIX— LOOKING BACK 



281 



CLASS PRESIDENTS (Cont.) 



1942 Malcom Emory Rogers 1959 

1943 John Edgar Keplinger 1960 

1944 George V. Fuller 1961 

1945 Alan F. Bush 1962 

1946 Joseph Archie Crews 1963 

1947 Milton C. Connell 1964 

1948 Lawrence G. Scales 1965 

1949 Donald L. West 1966 

1950 Wilber J. Ostman 1967 

1951 Homer Douglas Bennett 1968 

1952 Robert Eugene Haege 1969 

1953 Kenneth Harding 1970 

1954 Fred Eugene Wilson 1971 

1955 Joseph Grady Smoot 1972 

1956 John W. Thurber 1973 

1957 LaDon Winston Homer 1974 

1958 Carl Jansen 



Robert W. Burchard 
William G. Straight 
Daniel W. Rozell 
William Charles Mundy 
Lindley B. Richert 
John W. Fowler 
Arthur Richert, Jr. 
Robert Leslie Potts 
James Russell Williams 
David Arthur Steen 
Thomas Edward Hamilton 
Robert George Hunter 
Robert Earl Peeke 
Paul May 

Douglas Earl Bricker 
William Dean Shelly 



CLASS MOTTOES 



1920 Not at the top, but climbing 

1921 Where Thou callest 

1922 Not for self but others 

1923 In His steps 

1924 Achieve for Him 

1925 Victory through Him 

1926 As the Master shall choose 

1927 All for Him 

1928 Into the furrow of the world's needs 

1929 Forsaking all, I take Him 

1930 Into the Master's vineyard 

1931 God first, by this we conquer 

1932 Given to service 

1933 Onward, upward 

1934 For Christ, not fame 

1935 Others 

1936 Finishing to begin 

1937 Deeds not words 

1938 Loyalty of heart, purity of life 

1939 Serve Jesus constantly 

1940 Jesus, our pilot 

1941 To be and not to pretend 

1942 Service, the proper fruit of knowledge 

1943 For God and country 

1944 Not at the top, but climbing 

1945 His life, our guiding star 

1946 Service measures consecration 

1947 Determine to succeed 

1948 Serve more courageously 

1949 Service measures success 

1950 Keep looking up 

1951 Save to serve 

1952 Character, not fame 

1953 Unhesitating service 



282 80 YEARS OF PROGRESS 

CLASS MOTTOES (Cont.) 

1954 Uphold the Word 

1955 To reflect Christ, the light of the world 

1956 Ministering to others for eternity 

1957 Conquering with Christ 

1958 Consecrated service 

1959 Receiving to give 

1960 Forgetting that which is behind 

1961 A changeless purpose in a changing world 

1962 To know Christ 

1963 The immensity of truth 

1964 Perfection throughout infinity 

1965 Christ our security 

1966 By God's will 

1967 Providence our guide 

1968 Following — yet leading 

1969 In His steps to greater horizons 

Mottoes have not been chosen since 1969 

TO KEEP IN REMEMBRANCE 
CLASS GIFTS 

1925 Landscape picture for chapel 

1926 Sign over entrance to campus 

1927 Dictionary stand 

1928 Sign near the railroad 

1929 First chapel drapes and emblem 

1930 Electric system connected with dormitories 

1931 Altar rail on chapel platform 

1932 $100 for missions 

1933 Offering to missions 

1934 Picture, Christ in the Garden 

1935 Pair of urns for chapel 

1936 California incense cedar 

1937 Ceiling lights for library 

1938 Flood lights on chapel platform 

1939 Chromium-plated clock 

1940 Large world globe on mahogany stand (library) 

1941 Drinking fountain, second floor administration building 

1942 Library books 

1943 Large movie screen 

1944 Bronze plaques on gate pillars 

1946 Neon sign at entrance walk to administration building 

1947 Drinking fountain 

1948 Library fountain 

1949 Money for class chimes 

1950 Chapel drapes 

1951 Steps to the library 

1952 Sidewalk to the library 

1953 Cement lawn seats 

1954 Cement walk to the library 

1955 Platform in student park 

1956 Lamp posts - library, music building, science building 

1957 Chapel pulpit 

1958 Clock, Lynn Wood Hall 



APPENDIX— LOOKING BACK 283 

CLASS GIFTS (Cont.) 

1959 Microfilm reader, library 

1960 School flag 

1961 Desk for the new church 

1962 Map and mission board to show Alumni service 

1963 Directory board in Lynn Wood Hall 

1964 Directory board in Lynn Wood Hall 

1965 Sundial for the Mall 

1966 Drapes, curtains and back drop for the P.E. Center 

1967 Drapes, curtains and back drop for the P.E. Center 

1968 Patio by the cafeteria 

1969 Senior class loan fund 

1970 Books for the library in memory of Dr. Watrous, 
Linda Reile and Terri McAlexander 

1971 Truck and jeep for the Nicaragua Mission Station 
(Student missionary project) 

1972 Money given to build a clinic at the Nicaragua Mission 

1973 Money sent to finish the Nicaragua Mission Clinic 

1974 Money for tools for the Nicaraguan Mission 

As an institution grows, the need for and usefulness 
of some of the class gifts are unfortunately removed. 

EDITORS OF THE SCHOOL PAPERS 

SOUTHLAND SCROLL 

1929-32 Edythe Stephenson Cothren 

1932-33 Edythe Stephenson Cothren, Eileen Mulford Drouault, Ellen 

Lundquist Franklin 
1933-34 Ellen Lundquist Franklin 
1934-35 Ellen Lundquist Franklin, Grace Butler 
1935-36 Grace Butler 

1936-37 Grace Butler, Pearl Hall, Blanche Black Ost 
1937-38 Blanche Black Ost, Irma Osteen Horning, Standish Hoskins, 

Margarete Seilaz Petersen 
1938-39 Margarete Seilaz Petersen, Frieda M. Clark 
1939-40 Standish Hoskins, Nellie Jane Smith MacDonald, John D. 

Irwin 
1940-41 Nellie Jane Smith MacDonald, Drew Murphy, Ferrell 

McMahon Mathieu, Benjamin E. Herndon 
1941-42 Benjamin E. Herndon, Virginia Westermeyer 
1942-43 Juanita Carithers, Mary Frances Linderman, Ted A. 

Church, Jr. 
1943-44 Ted A. Church, Jr., Catherine Farrell Ritchie 
1944-45 John S. Darnall, G. Paul Haynes 

SOUTHERN ACCENT EDITORS 

1945-46 Frances Andrews, Ramira Steen 

1946-47 Otis Graves, Myron Skinner, Frank Jobe, Wendell Spurgeon 

1947-48 Genevieve Derden, Sanford Graves, G. B. Ellis, Eugene 

Wilson 

1948-49 Cecil Coffey, Bill Lewis 

1949-50 Fred Veltman, David Henriksen 

1950-51 Raymond Woolsey, David Henriksen, Fred Veltman 

1951-52 Floyd Greenleaf 

1952-53 James Joiner, Charles Morgan 

1953-54 Norman Trubey 



284 



80 YEARS OF PROGRESS 



SOUTHERN ACCENT EDITORS (Cont.) 

1954-55 Vinson Bushnell 

1955-56 Johnny Culp 

1956-57 Joya Lynn Schoen 

1957-58 Anna Jean Robinson Allen 

1958-59 Donald A. Short 

1959-60 Stanley Showalter 

1960-61 David Parker, Sanford Lewis, Sue Johnson Kinzer 

1961-62 Gerald Kovalski 

1962-63 Gilbert M. Burnham 

1963-64 J. Donald Dixon 

1964-65 Robert Murphy, Jr. 

1965-66 William S. Nelson 

1966-67 Rodney Craig Bryant 

1967-68 Mary Sue McNeal Hancock 

1968-69 V. Lynn Nielsen 

1969-70 R. William Cash 

1970-71 Lynda Hughes Seidel 

1971-72 Randy Elkins 

1972-73 Judy Strawn 

1973-74 Duane Hallock, Richard Carey, Steve Grimley 

1974-75 Everett Wilhelmsen, Yetta Levitt Foote 



EDITORS OF YEARBOOKS 

(The first yearbook was published in 1923) 
(No yearbooks were published 1930-37) 

THE SOUTHLAND 



1923 


Merwin Thurber 


1927 


L. F. Cunningham 


1924 


B. A. Wood 


1928 


Dorothy Seyle 


1925 


J. S. Cowdrick 


1929 


Stella Mae Beauchamp 


1926 


W. B. Randall 










THE TRIANGLE 


1938 


Irma Lee Osteen 


1942 


Wayne Foster 


1939 


John D. Irwin 


1943 


Juanita Jo Carithers 


1940 


Jubert Anderson 


1944 


Claudine Hopkins 


1941 


Lorabel Peavey 








SOUTHERN MEMORIES 


1945 


B. P. Haskel 


1961 


Lamar Phillips 


1946 


Jack Darnall 


1962 


Mary Ann Bogovich 


1947 


John A. Wilson 


1963 


Maryanne Deakins Roberts 


1948 


Jack S. Darnall 


1964 


Gilbert M. Burnham 


1949 


Frances Andrews 


1965 


Janet Lauterhahn Davis 


1950 


Margaret Jo Urick 


1966 


Albert Gordon Dittes 


1951 


David Henricksen 


1967 


Edwin Michael Shafer 


1952 


James Joiner 


1968 


Phillip W. Whidden 


1953 


Grady Smoot 


1969 


Kathleen Johnson Martin 


1954 


Billy Mack Read 


1970 


Marjorie D. Roof 


1955 


David Bauer 


1971 


Carol Elizabeth Smart 


1956 


Paul Kilgore 


1972 


Sandra Kay Lechler 


1957 


Carolyn Hoofard 


1973 


Rose Shafer Fuller 


1958 


Tom Walters 


1974 


Harry T. Haugen 


1959 


Carolyn Luce 


1975 


Joseph Nelson Rudd, Jr. 


1960 


Gary Fowler 







APPENDIX— LOOKING BACK 
DEDICATIONS OF YEARBOOKS 

THE SOUTHLAND 



285 



1923 President Leo Thiel 

1924 Maude I. Jones 

1925 F. W. Field 

1926 Our Fathers and Mothers 



1927 John H. Talge 

1928 W. H. Heckman 

1929 President H. J. Klooster 



THE TRIANGLE 



1938 


President J. C. Thompson 


1941 


Our Parents 


1939 


R. W. Woods 


1943 


No Dedication 


1940 


Maude I. Jones 


1942 


Students in Service Khaki-Clad 




SOUTHERN MEMORIES 


1944 


D. C. Ludington 




Elder H. E. Baasch 


1945 


Olive Braley 


1960 


Dr. E. T. Watrous 


1946 


C. A. Russell 


1961 


Dr. John Christensen 


1947 


Clarence Dortch 


1962 


Dr. K. M. Kennedy 


1948 


Dr. Ambrose L. Suhrie 


1963 


Evlyn Lindberg 


1949 


President Kenneth Wright 


1964 


Gordon A. Madgwick 


1950 


Dr. F. 0. Rittenhouse 


1965 


Stanley D. Brown 


1951 


C. E. Wittschiebe 


1966 


Charles Fleming, Jr. 


1952 


H. A. Miller 


1967 


Dr. C. N. Rees 


1953 


Dr. Richard Hammill 


1968 


Dr. John Christensen 


1954 


The Faculty 


1969 


Carolyn V. Luce 


1955 


E. C. Banks 


1970 


Edgar O. Grundset 


1956 


Mary Dietel 


1971 


Dr. Ray A. Hefferlin 


1957 


Our Parents 


1972 


None 


1958 


Hira T. Curtis 


1973 


None 


1959 


Dr. G. E. Shankel, 


1974 


None 



EDITORS OF THE JOKER 

1956-57 Helen Case Durichek 

1957-58 Carolyn Luce 

1958-59 Gary Fowler 

1959-60 Lamar Phillips 

1960-61 Marilee Easter Cothren 

1961-62 Dwight Hilderbrandt 

1962-63 Lamar Phillips 

1963-64 Frederick Petty 

1964-65 Rodney Bryant 

1965-66 Paul Martz 

1966-67 Larry Bogar (Called "Eccos" instead of "Joker") 

1967-68 Pat Horning (Called "Eccos" instead of "Joker") 

1968-69 John Lauer 

1969-70 Bob Stafford 

1970-71 Jim Cress 

1971-72 Judy Strawn 

1972-73 Carol Adams Swinyar 

1973-74 Edna Imogene Scott 

1974-75 Donald Alan Bogar 



286 



80 YEARS OF PROGRESS 



STUDENT SENATORS 



1947-1948 

Lawrence Scales, president 
Cecil R. Coffey, vice president 
Mildred Bullock, secretary 
Roscoe C. Mizelle, treasurer 
Jack Darnall 
Harold Sheffield 
Jack Sager 
Carolyn Pichler 
Lanny Parsons 

1948-1949 

Roscoe C. Mizelle, president 

Kenneth Mensing, vice president 

Frances Andrews, secretary 

Donald West, treasurer 

Ben Wheeler 

Esther Hirst 

Rainey Hooper 

Wallace Welch 

Fred Veltman 

Margaret Motley Brownlow 

Cecil R. Coffey 

1949-1950 

Kenneth Mensing, president 

Fred Veltman, vice president 

Margaret Motley Brownlow, sec. 

Fred Sanburn, treasurer 

Pansy Parker Dameron 

Wilbur Ostman 

Barbara Kirschner 

Dale Fischer 

Betty Cummings Phillips 

Wallace Welch 

Phaize Salhany 

Florence Rozell Smoot 

Bill Dysinger 

Ruby Teachey Campbell 

1950-1951 

Joe Lambeth, president 

Bill Dysinger, vice president 

Ruby Teachey Campbell, secretary 

Floyd Matula, treasurer 

Craig Parrish 

Bonnie Eaves 

Phillipe Raab 

Bill Strickland 

William Wampler 

Adolph Skender 

Layton Sutton 

Wallace Welch 

Mary Elam 

Raymond Woolsey 



Kenneth Mathews 

Jimmie Lou Westerfield Brackett 

Douglas Bennett 

Kline Lloyd 

Ray Weeks 

Eugene Wilson 

Ambrose Suhrie, coordinator 

C. E. Wittschiebe, acting coordinator 



Ann Ashlock 

Thomas Hansen 

Betty Cloyton Scott 

Elizabeth Kistler Lechler 

Sam Longley 

Jimmie Lou Westerfield Brackett 

Walter Maxey 

Marilyn Olmstead 

Betty Hardy Peterson 

Ambrose L. Suhrie, coordinator 



Calvin Acuff 

Margaret Jo Urick Bledsoe 

Walter Maxey 

Ella Mae Clapp 

Elbert Goodner 

Taylor Hill 

Bettv Joe Boynton McMillan 

Joe Lambert 

Dorothy Dortch Abbott 

Duane Pierson 

Beverly Jean Dillion Pierson 

Dr. Ambrose Suhrie, coordinator 

Leif Kr. Tobiassen, acting coordinator 



David Henriksen 

Andy Saphiloff 

Loren Bishop 

Meredith Munroe Matula 

Chester Jordan 

Clvde Springfield 

Ted Dortch 

Mike Petricko 

Thomas Mostert 

Hugh Leggett 

Jack Martz 

Arthur Butterfield 

Leif Kr. Tobiassen, coordinator 



APPENDIX—LOOKING BACK 



287 



STUDENT SENATORS (Cont.) 



1951-1952 



Chester Jordan, president 

Arthur Butterfield, vice president 

Layton Sutton, secretary 

Jack Martz, treasurer 

Larry Hawkins 

Roy Battle 

Glenn Coon 

Jack Price 

Bob Amnions 

John Harlan 

Grady Smoot 

James Joiner 

Dewey Urick 

Floyd Greenleaf 



Charles Harris 

Johnny Harris 

Lynne Jensen 

C. L. Beason 

Euretha Coffey 

Charles Morgan 

Ruby Teachey Campbell 

John Gregory 

Ferdi Wuttke 

Ted Dortch 

Rolando Drachenberg 

Carol Jean Whidden Smith 

R. L. Hammill, coordinator 



1952-53 

Arthur Butterfield, president 

Johnny Harris, vice president 

Florence Rozell Smoot, secretary 

Charles Morgan, treasurer 

James Joiner 

Grady Smoot 

Frank McMillan 

C. E. Beason 

Olavi Weir 

Ruby Lynn Phalen 

Ted Graves 

Larry Hawkins 

Jack Facundus 

Fred Wilson 

Bill Ingram 

Chester Damron 

Jim Alexander 



Harry Danielson 
Roy Battle 
Catherine Brown 
Glenn Coon 
Robert East 
Floyd Greenleaf 
Robert McCumber 
James Savage 
Alfred McClure 
Mabel Mitchell Joiner 
Mildred Whitaker 
Harry Hulsey 
Elmer Taylor 
Bobby Bowers 
Howard Kennedy 
R. M. Craig, coordinator 



1953-54 

Grady Smoot, president 
Ferdi Wuttke, vice president 
Lynne Jensen, secretary 
Frank McMillan, treasurer 
Donna Weber Bohannon 
Carl Ashlock 
Fred Wilson 

Francis Killen 

Norman Trubey 

Jack Bohannon 

Fred Fuller 

William Severs 



Dean Kinsey 

James Ray McKinney 

Larry Hawkins 

Robert Fulghum 

James Alexander 

Peggy Dillard 

Billy Mack Read 

Frank Wilson 

Ted Graves 

Carolyn Haines Weir 

Fred Sanburn, coordinator 



288 



80 YEARS OF PROGRESS 



1954-55 

James Ray McKirmey, president 

Chester Damron, vice president 

Kathrine Wooley Hinson, secretary 

Norman Trubey, treasurer 

Vinson Bushnell 

Walter Ward 

David Bauer 

Francis Killen 

Dwaine Mcintosh 

Jack Bohannon 

Johnny Culp 

Joan Hedgepeth Kilgore 

Mike Kabool 

1955-56 

Dean Kinsey, president 

Don Bethea, vice president 

Joann Ausherman Rozell, secretary 

Robert Addison, treasurer 

Johnny Culp 

David Hess 

Paul Kilgore 

James McClintoch 

Herman Bauman 

Donald Crane 

Joya Lynn Schoen 

Dick Northrop 

Kenneth Wynn 

Carol McClure 

1956-57 

Johnny Culp, president 

Loel Wurl, vice president 

Joyce Larsen McClure, secretary 

Ronnie Rodgers, treasurer 

Carolyn Hoofard Cooper 

Bob Jobe 

Larry McClure 

Joya Lvnn Schoen 

Dick Wuttke 

Carl Jansen 

Ronnie Haupt 

1957-58 

Ronald Haupt, president 

Don Wilson, vice president 

Helen Case Durichek, secretary 

Bob Ingram, treasurer 

Tom Walters 

Leslie Pendleton 

Anna Jean Robinson Allen 

Brian Wilcox 

Dick Kenfield 

Caryl Maddox Morey 

Nick Limberis 

Don Silver 



STUDENT SENATORS (Cont.) 



Dean Davis 

Joann Ausherman Rozell 

Joel Tompkins 

Cecil Abernathy 

Rebecca Binkley Bethea 

Alex Clark 

Floyd Greenleaf 

Paul Kilgore 

Howard Urick 

Gerald Swayze 

Don Bethea 

Joyce Larsen McClure 

Leif Kr. Tobiassen, coordinator 



Stewart Crook 

Arvo Schoen 

Donald Silver 

Carol Hoofard Cooper 

Wayne Taylor 

Bob Ingram 

Walter Ward 

Gene Ballenger 

Jerry Williams 

Ronnie Rodgers 

Carl Jansen 

Joanne Schimek 

L. N. Holm, coordinator 



Don Wilson 

June Neely Wilcox 

Helen Case Durichek 

Paul Jensen 

Ingrid Christensen 

Patty Bell 

Gerald Swayze 

Brian Wilcox 

Nat Halverson 

Romayne Godwin Pratt 

E. T. Watrous, coordinator 

Bruce Kopitzke 

Don Crane 

Gail Stringer 

Cliff Burgeson 

David Hamilton 

Dave Pauls 

Lucy Watkins 

Carolyn Hoofard Cooper 

Jan Rushing 

Check del Valle 

E. C. Banks, coordinator 



APPENDIX— LOOKING BACK 



289 



STUDENT SENATORS (Cont.) 



1958-59 



Don Wilson, president 

Don Crane, vice president 

Romayne Godwin Pratt, secretary 

Don Hall, treasurer 

Ronnie Shealy 

Wilfred Reyna 

Dick Toler 

Don Culp 

Bill Jones 

Orville Swarner 

1959-60 

Don Crane, president 

Dick Toler, vice president 

Jolena Taylor King, secretary 

Don Hall, treasurer 

Gary Fowler 

Julius Garner 

Pat Mathers Orange 

Bruce Freeman 

Pat McCollum Elliott 

Orville Swarner 

Bruce Kopitzke 

David Hamilton 

1960-1961 

Julius Garner, president 

Jack Krall, vice president 

Don Hall, secretary 

James Culpepper, treasurer 

David Parker 

Ken Kissinger 

Lamar Phillips 

Bruce Freeman 

George Pickel 

Alice Fowler Willsey 

Jon Gepford 

Pat McCollum Elliott 

1961-1962 

Bruce Freeman, president 
David Osborne, vice president 
Alice Fowler Willsey, secretary 
Jon Gepford, treasurer 
Harold Walker 
Norman Elliott 
Ronnie Pickel 
James Dunn 
Bob Hale 
Ronnie Numbers 
Judy Edwards Osborne 
Marvin Elliott 
John Vogt 



Anne Davidson Pettey 

Don Short 

Elaine Sullivan Giles 

Norman Peek 

Ted Anderson 

Carolyn Luce 

Jolena Taylor King 

Leslie Pendleton 

Douglas Bethea 

William H. Taylor, coordinator 



Cliff Davis 

Chuck del Valle 

Carolyn Luce 

Dick Larsen 

Berry Cobb 

Bernard de Vasher 

Ronnie Watson 

Ollie Mae Metts Giles 

James King 

Winford Tate 

William H. Taylor, coordinator 



Terry McComb 
Fred Haerich 
Marvin Elliott 
Pat Mathers Orange 
David Osborne 
Richard Brunk 
John LeBaron 
John Vogt 
Ronnie Watson 
Sandra Swain Peterson 
K. R. Davis, coordinator 



Terry McComb 

James King 

Linda Mundy Pumphrey 

James Wolcott 

Gerald Kovalski 

Darrell Cross 

Mary Ann Bogovich 

James Culpepper 

Bill Mundy 

Bruce Kopitzke 

David Rouse 

Bill Kirstein 

K. R. Davis, coordinator 



290 



80 YEARS OF PROGRESS 



STUDENT SENATORS (Cont.) 



1962-63 



Ronnie Numbers, president 
Jim Wolcott, vice president 
Linda Mundy, secretary 
Linda Bryant, secretary 
Dwight Hilderbrandt, chaplain 
Wayne VandeVere, financial advisor 

Programs Committee 

Nolan Darnell 
Roy Thompson 
Ron Case 
Richard Wagner 
Dana Ulloth 
Stephanie Humphreys 
Bill Fulton 

Scholarship Committee 

Mary Janice Dunn 
Jim Dunn 
Patty Chu 
Jack Leitner 
Cecil Petty 
Ed Phillips 



Social Education Committee 

Frances Tarte 
Ava Anderson 
Marilee Easter 
George Cox 
Judy Edwards 
Betty Belew 
Tui Pitman 

Health and Labor Committee 

Polly Dunn 
Paul Viar 
Judy Woodruff 
Mike Clark 
Richard McKee 
Linda Stefan sen 
Phil Wilson 

Recreation Committee 

Wayne McNutt 
Frances Tarte 
Bailey Winsted 
Donna Chalmers 
Phil Wilson 



1963-64 

David Osborne, president 
Jim Boyle, vice president 
Bert Coolidge, treasurer 

1964-65 

Bert Coolidge, president 
Don Dixon, vice president 
Jan Lee, treasurer 
Liz Travis, secretary 



Judy Edwards, secretary 
Desmond Cummings, general 
manager of WSMC-FM 



Mary Davis, assistant secretary 
Harry Spring, pastor 
K. R. Davis, sponsor 
Robert Merchant, sponsor 






1965-66 

Lloyd Erickson, president 
Steve Hall, vice president 
Mariellen Davis, secretary 
Sue McNeal, assistant secretary 
Arnold Clapp, treasurer 

Programs Committee 
Rollin Mallernee 
Charlene Sublett 
Wayne Strickland 
Margie Littell 
Dick Siebenlist 



Ruben Ryckman 

Don Vollmer 

Tom Turner 

E. 0. Grundset, sponsor 

Scholarship Committee 
Jim Walters 
Janine Winsted 
Ellis Adams 
Rollin Mallernee 
Don Volmer 
Woody Whidden 
Bobbi Sue Graves 



APPENDIX— LOOKING BACK 



291 



STUDENT SENATORS (Cont.) 



Public Relations Committee 

Bill Wood 
Jim Luke 
Roger Gardner 
Marybeth Watkins 
Tom McDonald 
Susie Pruette 

Recreation Committee 

Terry Snyder 
Don Watson 

1966-67 

Donald E. Vollmer, president 

Rollin Mallernee, vice president 

Sue McNeal, secretary 

Priscilla Philips, assistant secretary 

Ed Reifsnyder, treasurer 

Billy Peeke, chaplain 

Kenneth Spears, sponsor 

Social Committee 

Warner Swarner 
Jane Travis 
Mary Louise Holmes 
Becky Wilkes 
Fred Tolhurst 
Prissy Philips 
Audrey Allen 
Kathleen Johnson 
Jackie Salyers 

Recreation Committee 

Don Pervis 
Bonnie Gadbois 
Linda Roll 

1967-68 

Rollin Mallernee, president 

Warner Swarner, vice president 

Jackie Salyers, secretary 

Mark Weigley, parliamentarian 

Rudy Bata, treasurer 

Bonnie Gadbois, assistant secretary 

Scholarship Committee 

Annette Palm 
Robert Waller 
Clyde Garey 
Beverly Eldridge 



Susie Pruette 

Jeanie Stamper 

Delmar Lovejoy, advisor 

Social Committee 

Kay Cherry 

Joyanne Berkey 

David Steen 

Ina Dunn 

Mary Sue McNeal 

Mariellen Davis 

Louesa Peters, advisor 



lb Murderspach 

Delmar Lovejoy, sponsor 

Scholarship Committee 

Bob Fulfer 
John Waller 
Phillip Whidden 

Public Relations Committee 

Bonnie Murphree 
Mike Foxworth 
Phillip Whidden 
Martha Whitley 
Janene Hudgins 
Larry Coleman 

Programs Committee 

Albert Dittes 

Bob Summerour 

Darlene Gadbois 

Joe Ann Newman 

Charlene Sublett 

Genevieve McCormick, sponsor 

Gordon Hyde, sponsor 



Public Relations Committee 

Ron Hand 
John Lauer 
Molly Jacobs 
Ann Cone 
Doug Foley 
Wayne Eastep 

Senators 

Warner Swarner 
Mark Weigley 
Jackie Salyers 



292 



80 YEARS OF PROGRESS 



STUDENT SENATORS (Cont.) 



Eddie Towles 
Tim Bainum 
Sandy Cavenaugh 
Kathy Ippisch 
Brenda Bom 
Irene Banks 
Jim Walters 
Judee Osborne 

1968-69 

Jim Davis, president 

Mark Weigley, vice president 

Jane Travis, secretary 

Phil Brooks, treasurer 

Andy McRae, pastor 

Marti Whitley, assistant treasurer 

Marton Durkin, parliamentarian 

Scholarship Committee 
Dwight Evans 
Cindy Davis 
Judy Osborne 
Don Thurber 

Recreation Committee 

Heinz Wiegand 

Judy Salyers 

Bennie Ray Vinson 

Charles Allen 

Jim Pleasants 

Nelson Thomas, sponsor 

1969-70 

Terrence Futcher, president 

Colleen Smith, vice president 

Danny Stevens, pastor 

Mark Codington, treasurer 

Terry Zollinger, parliamentarian 

Suzanne Jackson, secretary 

Recreation Committee 

Rick Stevens 

Bonnie Iversen 

Sandy Cavanaugh 

Ernie Stevens 

Marilyn Lowman, sponsor 

Nelson Thomas, sponsor 

Social Committee 

Tim Bainum 

Ann Cone 

Rick Tryon 

Mary Montgomery 

Jim Morris 

Louesa Peters, sponsor 



Andy McRae 
Cora Marina 
Bob Martin 
Nancy Vollmer 
George Powell 
Elise Schermerhorn 
David Patterson 
Kenneth Spears, sponsor 



Public Relations Committee 

Doug Foley 
JoAnna Mohr 
Gary Gryte 

Programs Committee 

Elise Schermerhorn 

Jim Steen 

John Robinson 

JoAnna Mohr 

Genevieve McCormick, sponsor 

Social Committee 

Jackie Salyers 

Doug Powell 

Robert McAlpine 

Marsha Drake 

Mary Wahl 

Jeanie Walker 

Louesa Peters, sponsor 

Public Relations Committee 
Daryl Burbach 
Cindy Laue 
Gary Garner 

Scholarship Committee 
Ken Mathews 
Larry Bicknell 
Elaine Robinson 
Bob MacAlpine 

Programs Committee 

Jim Cress 

Dennis Shafter 

Marilyn Leitner 

Bev Moon 

Sharon Wyatt 

JoAnna Mohr 

Bachman Fulmer 

Candy Connor 

Cliff Myers 

Marsha Duncan 

Mike Foxworthy 

Genevieve McCormick, sponsor 



APPENDIX— LOOKING BACK 



293 



STUDENT SENATORS (Cont.) 



1970-71 



Elton Kerr, president 
Bill Boyle, vice president 
Bill Richards, treasurer 
Suzanne Jackson, secretary 

Committee Chairmen 

Linda Ryals, social education 

Stanley Rouse, recreation 

Ben Davis, pastor 

Dwight Nelson, student services 

Ken Mathews, scholarship 

Marilyn Leitner, programs 

Kathy Steadman, public relations 

Senators 
Jim Cress 



Karen Edgar 
Charles Ferguson 
Jim Link 
Mindi Miller 
Cliff Myers 
Bob Peeke 
Gail Schmidt 
Leslie Smart 
Wayne Swilley 
Tammie Trimble 
Bev Trivett 
Dennis Ward 
Joyce Wright 
Terry Zollinger 
Lewis Sommerville 
Suzanne Jackson 
Bill Boyle 



1971-72 



Stan Rouse, president 

Ron Nelson, vice president 

Jim Morris, treasurer 

Carol Adams, secretary 

Paulette Goodman, assist, secretary 

Maurice Witt, chaplain 

Jesse Landess, parliamentarian 



Committee Chairmen 
Paul May, scholarship 
Linda Ryals, public relations 
Lois Hilderbrandt, social 
Wayne Lijeros, recreation 
Richa Rowlands, student services 
Doug Smith, programs 



1972-73 



Reggie Tryon, president 
Tammie Trimble, president 
Les Hess, vice president 
Pam Maize, secretary 
Jess Landess, parliamentarian 
K. R. Davis, sponsor 
Robert Merchant, sponsor 

Senators 

Ric Carey 
Lynn Carpenter 
Connie Clayburn 
Marji Costerisan 
Lee Davidson 
Peggie Davis 



Kay Farrell 
Donna Gepford 
Lannie Hadley 
Duane Hallock 
Lylene Henderson 
Nancy Hill 
Larry Holland 
Bob Houchins 
Janet Ippisch 
Gail McKay 
Mark Nicholson 
John Smith 
Linday Taylor 
Gary Tidwell 
Abdy Vence 
Debbie Winters 



294 



80 YEARS OF PROGRESS 



STUDENT SENATORS (Cont.) 



1973-74 

LeClare Litchfield, president 
Robert Zima, vice president 
John Smith, vice president 
Connie Clayburn, secretary- 
Steve Jones, parliamentarian 
K. R. Davis, sponsor 
Robert Merchant, sponsor 

Senators 
Mike Bradley 
Hale Burnside 
Jim Clark 
Becky Collver 
Jim Donaldson 



Jim Eldred 
Debbie Fillman 
Linda Firpi 
Larry Holland 
Jess Landess 
Sandi Liles 
John McLarty 
John Maretich 
Roland Marsh 
Susan Mills 
Karen Oswald 
Barbara Palmer 
Jill Slate 
Judy Wade 
Haskell Williams 



1974-75 

Gail Jones, president 

Grenville Foster, vice president 

Gloria Perkins, secretary 

Ed Jackson, treasurer 

Judy Wade, social director 

John Cress, religious vice president 

Senators 

Cris Cannon 
Pam Fennel 
Sue Harrington 
Duane Hallock 
Doug Haynes 
Julie Haynes 



Debra Hyde 
Lester Keiser 
Andrew McDonald 
Mary Martinez 
Mary Mosley 
Verbalee Nielson 
Ken Rogers 
Donna Russel 
Dan Solis 
Steve Torgerson 
Linda Vanderlaan 
Everett Wilhemsen 
Dennis Woods 
Karen Zill 



APPENDIX— LOOKING BACK 295 

WHO'S WHO IN AMERICAN UNIVERSITIES AND COLLEGES 



Milton Claude Connell 
John Spencer Darnall 
Robert C. Kistler 
Ruth Peterson 



Mildred Bullock 
John Spencer Darnall 
Robert C. Kistler 



Melvin G. Hickman 
Kenneth M. Mathews 



1945-46 

Max Lee Ritchie 
Lawrence G. Scales 
Wayne Thurber 

1946-47 

Ruth Risetter Watson 
Ben D. Wheeler 

1947-48 

Lawrence G. Scales 
John Allen Wilson 



1948-49 

Frances E. Andrews 

Jimmie Lou Westerfield Brackett 

Cecil Reeves Coffey 



Betty Hardy Peterson 
Donald Leroy West, Sr. 



Homer Douglas Bennett 
Catherine Fauser 
Roscoe C. Mizelle 



Paul William Dysinger 
Mary Elizabeth Elam 
Betty Jo Boynton McMillan 



Margaret Motley Brownlow 
Floyd L. Greenleaf 
Robert Eugene Haege 
James L. Joiner 



Arthur E. Butterfield 
Roy W. Crawford 
Ted N. Graves 
Floyd L. Greenleaf 



Walter D. Fenz 
James Ray McKinney 
Lester C. Rilea 
Joseph Grady Smoot 



James Thomas Alexander 
John E. Bottsford 
Floyd L. Greenleaf 
Michael F. Kabool 
James Ray McKinney 



1949-50 

Frederick Veltman 
William Forest Zill 

1950-51 

Roscoe C. Mizelle 
Raymond H. Woolsey 

1951-52 

Chester L. Jordan 
Layton Ray Sutton 
Dewey J. Urick 
Wallace D. Welch 

1952-53 

Kenneth Harding 
James L. Joiner 
Carol Jean Whidden Smith 
Flossie Rozelle Smoot 

1953-54 

Olavi Edward Weir 
Mildred Whitaker 
Ferdinand Wuttke 

1954-55 

Frank McMillan 
Joseph Grady Smoot 
Olavi Edward Weir 
Ferdinand Wuttke 



296 



80 YEARS OF PROGRESS 



WHO'S WHO IN AMERICAN UNIVERSITIES AND COLLEGES (Cont.) 



Robert Addison 
Herman Bauman 
Vinson Clair Bushnell 
John Harry Culp, Jr. 
Paul Edward Kilgore 
Jeanette G. Maas 



1955-56 



Patrick O'Day 
Victor O'Day 
Wayne Taylor, Jr. 
Norman Lee Trubey 
Walter C. Ward 



Julian T. Coggin 
Joyce Larsen McClure 
Ronald Brent Rodgers 
Arvo Schoen 



1956-57 



Joya Lynn Schoen 
June Neely Wilcox 
Richard Wuttke 



Helen Case Durichek 
Ronald A. Haupt 
Robert Stanley Ingram 
Paul L. Jensen 
Robert G. Pierson 



1957-58 



Romayne Godwin Pratt 
Joann Ausherman Rozell 
Thomas Lloyd Walters 
Donald Wallin Wilson 



Phyllis Finney Bame 
Donald Eugene Crane 
Donald Eugene Hall 
Carolyn Virginia Luce 
Amy Bushnell Seitz 



1958-59 



Norman Eugene Peek 
Anne Davidson Pettey 
Jule Ausherman Romans 
James Allen Tucker 



Thomas Berry Cobb 
David Williams Hamilton 



1959-60 

Richard Carl Larsen 



Julius Matthew Garner 
Donald Eugene Hall 
Will John Henson 
Jolena Taylor King 
Suzanne Johnson Kinzer 



1960-61 



Mary Ann Shanko Marshall 
Jeanne Pettis Miller 
Julia Boyd Swarner 
Orville Ward Swarner, Jr. 
William Richard Toler 



Edward Sanford Bergholt 
John Thomas Bridges 
Bruce G. Freeman 
Jon W. Gepford 
Ollie Mae Metts Giles 



1961-62 



William Charles Mundy 
Harold Lloyd Walker 
William Ronald Watson 
Alice Fowler Willsey 



Marilee Easter Cothren 
Margaret Davis Darnell 
Dwight Lamar Hilderbrandt 



1962-63 



Thomas Joseph Mostert, Jr. 
Ronald Leslie Numbers 



APPENDIX— LOOKING BACK 



297 



WHO'S WHO IN AMERICAN UNIVERSITIES AND COLLEGES (Cont.) 



Barbara Hoar Arena 
Gilbert Miracle Burnham 
Patricia Chu Clark 
William LeRoy Coolidge 
Frances Tarte Hale 



Elizabeth Travis Albritton 
Jerry Samuel Albritton 
Herbert Everett Coolidge 
John Donald Dixon 
Jerry Allen Gladson 
James Calvin Hannum 
Patricia Osborne Kirstein 
Larry LaVerne Leas 
Luane Sue Logan 

Howard Ellison Adams 
Martha Woodruff Benson 
James Boyle 
Gerry Cabalo 
Cheryle Ann Chisholm 
Phyllis Jean Chu 
Arnold Basil Clapp 
Lynda Whitman Cockrell 
Shirley Bremson Crowson 
Melvin Lloyd Erickson 



Glenna Faye Foster Ahl 
Glenda Jansen Brown 
Robbie Wiggins Burke 
Rodney Craig Bryant 
Randall Eugene Crowson 
Albert Gordon Dittes 
Judy Whitman Elliston 
Barbara DuPuy George 
lb Bernhardt Muderspach 
Patricia Kay Murphy 
Naomi Piatt Nichols 



Ernest Ted Ahl 
Ron B. Bentzinger 
Curtis Keith Carlson 
Patricia Mooney Dittes 
E. Bruce Elliston 
Virginia Anne Grotheer 
Mary Sue McNeal Hancock 
Anette Palm Johnson 
Charles E. Kuhlman 
Beth Mensing Landers 
Rollin E. Mallernee 



1963-64 

Anne Boyce Murphy 
Judy Edwards Osborne 
Barbara Benson Pfiefle 
Barbara Clemens Ponce 

1964-65 

Robert Bruce Murphy 
Linda Mundy Pumphrey 
Robert Franklin Pumphrey 
Arthur Richert 
Joyce Cunningham Richert 
Arlene Moore van Rooyen 
Harry Don Spring 
Beverly Shacklett Winsted 
Allen Edson Workman 

1965-66 

Hilde Hasel 
Dolores Rolls Moulton 
William Steen Nelson 
Robert Leslie Potts 
Kenneth Edward Spears 
David Charles Taylor 
Rex Michael Ward 
Janice Lee Willis 
Philip Wayne Wilson 
Judy Woodruff Wilson 

1966-67 

Ralph Herman Ruckle 
Dennis Franklin Steele 
Robert Brooke Summerour 
Charlotte McKee Taylor 
Paul Elvis Viar 
John Louis Waller 
Woodrow Wilson Whidden 
Carol Neidigh Williams 
James Russell Williams 
Betty Green Willis 

1967-68 

Nancy A. Marsh 
Marvin Leon Peek 
Judie Martin Port 
Edward A. Pumphrey 
Ernest G. Raines 
Ruth Couch Self 
Edwin M. Shafer 
David A. Steen 
Linda Bicknell Steen 
Cheryle A. Tribble 
Marva Shugars Young 



298 80 YEARS OF PROGRESS 

WHO'S WHO IN AMERICAN UNIVERSITIES AND COLLEGES (Cont.) 



Rudolph Andrew Bata, Jr. 
James Wayland Davis 
Kathleen Johnson Martin 
Eugene Lee Kuykendall 
Gerald Arnold Linderman 
Jean Hagen Lomino 
Betty Jean Ramsey Frederick 



1968-69 



John Dean Ramsey 
William Luke Strong 
Warner Blake Swarner 
Steven Wayne Thompson 
Donald Wayne Thurber 
Leslie Lamont Weaver 
Ellen Yvonne Zollinger 



1969-70 



Tim Ewing Bainum 
Gail Annette Bosarge 
Mark Russell Coddington 
Ann Elizabeth Cone Vining 
Martin Walter Durkin 
Patricia Foster Eastep 
Dwight Charles Evans 
Terence John Futcher 
John Albert Lauer 
Raymond Lindsey Lilly 
Sharon Cassada Lindsey 



Barrv Mitchell Mahorney 
Edward C. Neal 
Harry C. Nelson 
Paul Eugene Penno 
Joseph Perry Priest 
Elaine McDowell Robinson 
Marjorie Delilia Roof 
Lloyd George Sutter 
Donna June Taylor 
Carol Johnson Tol 
Jane Travis Tolhurst 



1970-71 



Judy Lee Bentzinger 
John William Boyle 
Marjorie Svfert Campbell 
R. William Cash III 
James Andrew Cress 
Douglas Gregory Foley 
Wayne Harris Hicks 
Lynda Hughes Seidel 
Elton Robert Kerr 
Shirley Ann Kinsman 
Michael Brian Lilly 
Robert Thomas MacAlpine 



Evan W. Richards, Jr. 
Edwin Ashton Sammer 
Gail June Schmidt 
Shirley Schneider Ruckle 
Colleen Smith Garber 
Susan Spears Loor 
Richard Edmund Stanley 
Don Steinweg 
Edith Marie Stone 
Teresa Earlaine Trimble 
Clyde D. Walters 
Terrell Wayne Zollinger 



1971-72 



Dannv Ray Bentzinger 
Fred Martin Bischoff 
Delynne Kristina Durham 
Beverly Ann Eldridge 
Susan Kay Galey 
James Robert Goff 
Kathryn Ann Ippisch 
John Howard Kissinger 
Robert Matthew Korzynowski 
Victor Marshall Kostenko 
Ruth Linderman Saunders 
John R. Loor 



Kenneth Milton Matthews 
Paul W. May 
Pierce Jones Moore 
James A. Neubrander 
Stanley Merle Rouse 
Judy Ann Socol 
Daniel William Stevens 
Dennis Alva Taylor 
Keith Daryl Walters 
Dennis Roy Ward 
Nadine P. Wheeler 



APPENDIX— LOOKING BACK 



299 



WHO'S WHO IN AMERICAN UNIVERSITIES AND COLLEGES (Cont.) 



1972-73 



Clarence Dixon Blue 
Beverly Spurgeon Bretsch 
Robert Ray Bretsch 
Caryn Joy Carman 
Sharon Allene Cossentine 
Michael Benjamin Couillard 
Robert Lee Davidson II 
Wynene Preston Fenderson 
Lydia Paulette Goodman 
Richard Lee Griffin 
Ronald Albert Hagen 
Leslie Alvin Hess 



•James David Jenks 
Jane Lee 

Stuart Blair Murphy 
Mitchell Paul Nicholaides 
Sidney Dale Nixon 
Sandra Lechler Pate 
Donna Stone Spurlock 
Carol Adams Swinyar 
James Edward Teel 
Reginald L. Tryon 
Andrew Price Wooley III 



1973-74 



Janet Taylor Ambler 
Mark Edmund Bainum 
Warren St. Clair Banfield 
Bruce Allison Closser 
Harold Mark Dalton 
Austin Charles Goodwin 
Kristine Beaulieu Greene 
John Laurence Holland 
Donald Reid Lechler 
Larry L. Lichtenwalter 
C. Edward Loney, Jr. 
Michael Wayne Maddox 



Pamela Lou Maize 
Anna Erwin Moler 
Karen Oswald Nelson 
Charles Lawrence Rahn 
Ron Dean Reading 
Warren Butler Ruf 
Gregory Grant Rumsey 
Wayne Fremont Salhany 
William Dean Shelly 
Cheryl Berkeley Smith 
Paula Cummings Wade 
Herbert Haskell Williams 



300 



80 YEARS OF PROGRESS 



ALPHABETICAL LIST OF STAFF MEMBERS 

1892-1972 



ACKERMAN, DOROTHY EVANS 

Music, 1944-49, 1957- 
ACKERMAN, J. M. 

Education, Testing, Audio- 
Visual, Admissions, 1957-70 
ADAMS, F. L. 

Music, 1916-17 
ADAMS, K. M. 

Education, 1924-26 
ADAMS, Mrs. K. M. 

Education, 1925-26 
ADAMS, Robert 

Laundry, 1970- 
ADKINS, GRANT 

Religion, 1893-94 
ADKINS, LILLIE 

1893-94 
AGER, ALMA CHAMBERS 

Psychology, 1965-72 
ALDRIDGE, ANNA MARY 

Food Service, 1939 
ALLEE, HATTIE 

Education, 1899-1901 
ALLEN, MRS. ZEKE 

Executive Secretary, 1964- 
AMMONS, ROBERT H. 

Store, 1954-55 
ANDERSON, ALBERT L. 

Printing, 1951-57 
ANDERSON, MRS. ALBERT L. 

Academy Registrar, 1951-56 
ANDERSON, ELLEN P. 

Home Economics, 1933-35 
ANDERSON, KEITH 

Physician, 1956-60 
ANDERSON, MERLIN 

Physician, 1953-54 
ANDREASON, ESTER 

Home Economics, 1952-53 
ANDRESS, GLADYS (Mrs. Jones) 

Director Health Service, 1927-28 
ANDREWS, FRANCES E. 

English, 1954-59 
ASHLOCK, J. F. 

Religion, 1943-47, 1948-50 
ASHLOCK, MARCELLA KLOCK 

Director Health Service, 1943-45, 1949-50 
ASHTON, BRUCE 

Music, 1968- 
ATTEBERRY, A. N. 

President, Business Manager, Bible, 

History, Science, Mathematics, 

1914-18, 1924-28 
ATTEBERRY, MRS. A. N. 

Hydrotherapy, Home Economics, 1924-28 
AUSHERMAN, LORENE, (Mrs. Nelson) 

Academy Registrar, 1956-66 
AUSSNER, RUDOLPH 

Modern Languages, 1964- 
AVERY, W. L. 

History, 1914-15 
BAASCH, HENRY 

Religion, 1954-60 
BABBITT, WESTON 

Elementary Supervisory 

Teacher, 1972- 



BABER, G. H. 

Dean of Men, Business Manager, 

1903-14 
BABER, MRS. G. H. 

Preceptress, 1907-11 
BAESSLER, IRVA NOTTINGHAM 

Education, 1946-48 
BAILEY, MRS. O. 

Nursing, 1959-60 
BAILEY, W. E. 

Basket Factory, 1921-25 
BAINUM, STEWART 

Business Administration, 1970-71 
BAIZE, K. C. 

Accounting, Enterprises, 1951-56 
BAKER, JOHN 

Elementary Supervisory Teacher, 

1964-69 
BAKER, SUE TAYLOR 

English, 1971- 
BALDWIN, MILDRED 

Elementary Supervisor Teacher, 

1956-63 
BANKS, EDWARD C. 

Religion, 1946-59 
BANKS, LETA (Mrs. E. C. Banks) 

Assistant Director Health Service, 

1949-50 
BARNES, E. J. 

Dean of Men, History, 1936-37 
BARNES, IVA FAIRCHILD 

Critic Teacher, 1936-37 
BARTLETT, MARTHA MINNICK 

Education, 1925-26 
BARROW, RONALD 

Academy Principal, 1968- 
BARTO, WAYNE 

Bindery, 1967-73 
BATTLE, ROY 

Academy Counseling and Guidance, 

1964- 
BEAUCHAMP, STELLA 

Health Service, 1928-30 
BEAVERS, BARBARA 

Nursing, 1961-63 
BECKNER, HORACE R. 

Pastor, 1947-60 
BEHRENS, J. H. 

Religion, 1920-32 
BEHRENS, MABLE N. 

Education, Preceptress, 1920-32 
BEHRENS, VERA (Mrs. Robert Bickett) 

Critic Teacher, 1920-21 
BENJAMIN, W. A. 

Assistant Manager, 1932-35 
BENNETT, DOUGLAS 

Religion, 1961- 
BENNETT, PEGGY 

Assistant Librarian, 1971- 
BERGER, BONNIE 

Nursing, 1971- 
BERKELEY, STUART P. 

Education, 1971- 
BERNAL, MERCEDES 

Spanish, 1971-72 
BILBO, JOAN ROWELL 

Elementary Supervisory Teacher 

1969-70 



APPENDIX— LOOKING BACK 



301 



STAFF MEMBERS (Cont.) 



BIRD, MARTIN 

Press, 1948-50 
BIRD, SELMA 

Critic Teacher, 1948-50 
BISCHOPF, J. H. 

Religion, 1951-52 
BLACK, BLANCHE 

Registrar, 1936-37 
BLAND, W. T. 

President, 1896-98 
BLAND, MRS. W. T. 

Education, 1896-97 
BOTIMER, LYLE 

Dean of Men, 1969- 
BOTTSFORD, BARBARA SHOOK 

Elementary Supervisory Teacher, 

1959-61 
BOWEN, R. G. 

Treasurer, Business Office, 1946-61 
BOWEN, R. N. 

Press, 1944-46 
BOWMAN, GENEVA 

Nursing, 1964-73 
BOYD, MRS. C. J. 

Food Service, Home Economics, 

1918-19 
BOYD, R. K. 

Business Administration, 1938-44 
BOYNTON, GERALD 

Industrial Arts, 1945-56 
BOYNTON, PAUL C. 

Religion, 1952-63 
BRACKETT, JIMMIE L, WESTERFIELD 

Business Administration, 1949-51 
BRADBURN, JOAN 

Physical Education, 1963-65 
BRADLEY, W. P. 

Science, Mathematics, 1923-25 
BRICKMAN, THERESA 

Office Administration, 1942-63 
BRIDGES, ASTRID 

Lazaration, Nursing, 1971-72 
BROOKE, FRANCES ANN (Mrs. Cullen) 

Business Administration, 1938-39 
BROOKE, MARIAN (Mrs. Thomas Little) 

English, 1920-21 
BROWN, EVERETT 

Creamery, 1953-56 
BROWN, HILDA 

Music, 1932-33 
BROWN, JACQUE EVANS 

English, 1950-53 
BROWN, JANE (Mrs. Stanley Brown) 

Secretary to President, 1953- 
BROWN, STANLEY D. 

Librarian, 1935- 
BROWN, V. CLIFFORD 

Academy Religion, 1963-67 
BRUCE, MIRIAM (Mrs. Boyd) 

Health Service, Nursing, 1933-34, 

1963-69 
BRUECHNER, KURT E. 

Hosiery Mill, 1942-44 
BUGBEE, JOHN 

Farm, Dairy, 1939-40 
BURKE, ROBBIE WIGGINS 

Elementary Supervisory 

Teacher, 1970-71 



BURKE, KENNETH IBER 

Chemistry, 1963-66, Nutrition, 1972-74 
BURKETT, WILLIAM 

Manager Village Market, 1970-73 
BUSHNELL, C. G. 

English, Modern Languages, 

1953-65, 1970-73 
BUTLER, GRACE 

Registrar, 1934-36 
BUTLER, J. L. 

Music, 1923-25 
CADY, M. E. 

President, Business Manager, 1927 
CALDWELL, DELLA TINSLEY 

Home Economics, 1903 
CALHOUN, EVERETT 

Broom Factory, 1934-36 
CALHOUN, RITA 

Nursing, 1959-60 
CALLICOTT, VESTA MOYERS 

Secretarial Science, 1912 
CAMPBELL, M. D. 

Chemistry, 1968- 
CANNON, GUY 

Laundry, 1947-49 
CARLSON, CURTIS 

Communications, 1970-74 
CARMEN, EVELYN 

Assistant Dean of Women (Orlando), 

1960-61 
CARNAHAN, DAVID T. 

Hosiery Mill, 1936-42 
CARR, CHARLES W. 

Custodian, 1962-64 
CARR, ROY L. 

Assistant Business Manager, 

Accounting, 1920-28 
CASE, DEL 

Music, 1960-64 
CASE, R. W. 

Social Science, 1917-18 
CASEBEER, JACQUELINE 

Physical Education, 1972- 
CASSELL, J. W. 

Academic Dean, Education, 1963-67 
CASTLE, LEOLA (Mrs. W. C. Starkey) 

Home Economics, 1954-55 
CEMER, WILLIAM 

Academy Supervisory 

Teacher, 1972- 
CHACE, E. STANLEY 

Principal Elementary School, 1956-61 
CHAMPION, MARY CARTER 

Dean of Women, Science, 1939-42 
CHAPMAN, DOLORES 

Nursing, 1960-61, 1962-63 
CHILDERS, MALCOLM 

Art, 1974- 
CHINN, CLARENCE 

Science, 1956-67 
CHRISTENSEN, MRS. A. L. 

Modern Languages, Home Economics, 

1947-48 
CHRISTENSEN, JOHN 

Chemistry, 1955-74 
CHRISTENSEN, OTTO 

Religion, 1955-63 
CHRISTENSEN, MRS. OTTO 

Home Economics, 1955-63 



302 



80 YEARS OF PROGRESS 



STAFF MEMBERS (Cont.) 



CHRISTMAN, RACHEL 

Dean of Women, Social Science, 

1936-38 
CHRISTOPH, NATALIE 

Nursing, 1963 
CHRISTOPH, RICHARD 

Elementary Supervisory Teacher, 1961- 
CLAPP, WILLARD 

Elementary Supervisory Teacher, 

1966-71 
CLARK, ANN RORABAW 

(Mrs. Jerome Clark) English, 1965- 
CLARK, GLENDA TRIPP 

(Mrs. Glenn Clark) Academy Home 

Economics, English, 1970- 
CLARK, JEROME 

Social Science, 1959- 
CLARK, MYRTLE J. 

Laundry, 1931-34 
CLARK, W. B. 

Dean of Men, Printing, 1927-36 
CLEVELAND, CLYDE C. 

Treasurer, 1942-47 
CLYMER, U. S. 

Mathematics, 1914-15 
COBOS, PATRICIO 

Music, 1963-64 
COLCORD, ADA 

1892-96 
COLCORD, CELIAN 

1893-95 
COLCORD, G. W. 

Principal of SIS, 1892-96 
COLCORD, MAGGIE 

1893-95 
COLVIN, DALLAS 

Assistant Manager Broom Shop, 

1957-60 
COLVIN, GERALD 

Behavioral Science, 1972- 
CONGER, ELMYRA SUDDUTH 

(Mrs. Stover) Food Service, 

Elementary Supervisory Teacher 

1945-48, 1953-67 
CONNELL, IVA RUTH 

(Mrs. M. E. Connell) Music, 1946-47 
CONNELL, M. E. 

Broom Factory, 1946-54 
CONNER, GLENDON M. 

Hydroponics, 1973- 
COOK, CHARLES 

Art, 1963-64 
COOPER, J. B. 

Physical Education, 1956-62 
CORNWELL, A. W. 

Engineer, Watchman, 1918-20 
CORNWELL, MRS. A. W. 

Laundry, 1918-20 
CORY, R. V. 

Business Administration, 1908-13 
CORY, MRS. R. V. 

Education, 1908 
COSSENTINE, F. R. 

Music, 1954-56 
COSTERISAN, ALFREDA 

Dean of Women, 1958-62 
COSTERISAN, FRANCIS 

Plant Maintenance, Construction, 1962- 



COTHAM, JOYCE SPEARS 

Assistant Dean of Women, 1971- 
COTHREN, EDYTHE STEPHENSON 

Registrar, Music, 1929-33 
COTHREN, FRED 

Store, 1929-31 
COULTER, PERRY 

Buildings and Grounds, 1954-62 
COWDRICK, ELIZABETH 

Assistant Librarian (Madison), 1967-70 
COWLES, CLIFTON 

Music, 1952-54 
COX, J. M. 

Store, 1932 
CRAGO, LORELLA (Mrs. Howard) 

Nursing, 1970- 
CRAIG, R. M. 

Business Administration, 1951-55 
CRANE, A. E. 

Associate Pastor, 1955-57 
CRAWFORD, ROY 

Assistant Business Manager, 1950-51 
CRIST, NANCY GILBERT 

Nursing, 1972- 
CROOK, J. DON 

Music, Public Relations, Academy Bible, 

1958- 
CROOK, STEWART 

Music, 1964-68 
CROOK, SYLVIA MOAK (Mrs. Don 

Crook) 

Academy Languages, Registrar, 1968- 
CROUSE, JUDSON 

Music, Language, 1905-06 
CRUTCHER, A. L. 

Industrial Arts, 1933-34 
CRUZE, JOHN 

Agriculture, 1912 
CULPAN, FLORENCE 

Nursing, 1961-65 
CULVER, CLARA 

Assistant Librarian, 1946-47 
CUMMINGS, MARY LOU PARKER 

Assistant Dean of Women (Madison) 

1967-68 
CUMMINGS, D. D., JR. 

Associate College Chaplain, 1971- 
CUNNINGHAM, L. F. 

Store, 1928-29 
CURTIS, H. T. 

Business Administration, Library, 

1949-58 
CURTIS, HAROLD TILDEN 

Communications, 1970-71 
CURTISS, FRANCES 

Music, 1951-53 
CUSHMAN, THELMA HEMME 

Home Economics, 1957- 
CUSHMAN, W. E. 

Bindery, 1961-64 
CUTTS, VERNA B. 

English, 1908-09 
DAHLBECK, R. M. 

Physical Education, 1952-55 
DAKE, S. W. 

Business Administration, 1945-49 
DAMRON, CHESTER H. 

Assistant Pastor, 1956-57 



APPENDIX— LOOKING BACK 



303 



STAFF MEMBERS (Cont.) 



DART, MRS. 0. L. 

Spanish, Education, 1913-14, 1923-29 
DAVIDSON, LENNA LEE CHASE 

Nursing, 1968- 
DAVIDSON, RALPH 

Business Administration, 1955-62 
DAVIDSON, ROBERT 

Academy Science, Mathematics, 1968- 
DAVIS, C. E. 

Mathematics, 1963- 
DAVIS, CHARLES 

Librarian, 1968- 
DAVIS, DORIS (Mrs. C. E. Davis) 

Nursing, 1963- 
DAVIS, JEANNE (Mrs. K. R. Davis) 

Executive Secretary, 1959-66, 1970- 
DAVIS, KENNETH R. 

Dean of Men, Dean of Student 

Affairs, Testing and Counseling, 1959- 

66, 1970- 
DEAN, CYRIL 

Physical Education, 1962-72 
DEAN, GEORGE B. 

Science, 1939-53 
DEAN, OLIVIA BRICKMAN 

Education, Art 1938- 
DERN, ARTHUR 

Dairy, 1952-53 
DETHORBE, FLORENCE 

Science, Nursing, 1905 
DeWIND, GRIETA (Mrs. Tallios) 

Dean of Women, 1967-72 
DICK, DONALD 

Communications, 1968- 
DICK, JOYCE (Mrs. Donald Dick) 

Academy English, 1970 
DICKERSON, S. R. 

Maintenance, 1951-54 
DIETEL, MARY HOLDER 

Modern Languages, English, Dean of 

Women, 1938-59 
DILLON, KATHRYN 

Nursing, 1965-67 
DOCK, MRS. T. S. 

English, 1912 
DORTCH, C. W. 

Music, 1942-47 
DORTCH, J. H. 

Business Manager, 1901 
DOUGLAS, DOROTHY HENRI 

Health Service, 1950-51 
DROUAULT, EILEEN MULFORD 

Assistant Librarian, 1960-62- 1965- 
DuBOIS, ALMA 

Preceptress, 1921-22 
DUNN, HERBERT 

Industrial Arts, 1959-60 
DUNN, KENNETH 

Printing, 1957-59 
DURICHEK, JOHN 

Industrial Arts, 1964-66, 1969- 
EDGMON, GROVER 

Custodian, Sheriff, Laundry, 1949- 
EDMISTER, ELFA 

Nursing, 1963-67 
EDWARDS, D. R. 

Music, 1930-36 
EDWARDS, MRS. D. R. 

Health Service, 1930-31 



EDWARDS, JAMES 

Dean of Men, 1955-57 
ELAM, MARY E. 

Assistant Director of Admissions and 

Records, 1965- 
ELMORE, LANGDON 

Cashier, 1945-49 
EMORI, HELEN 

Nursing, 1961-63 
ERVIN, L. C. 

Custodian, 1956-58 
EVANS, TED 

Assistant Dean of Men, 1974- 
FALK, R. M. 

Dean of Men, 1926-27 
FARNSWORTH, MERTON A. 

Dean of Men, Mathematics, 1908 
FARNSWORTH, MRS. MERTON A. 

Dean of Women, Home Economics, 1908 
FARROW, ANN 

Collegedale Interiors, 1971-72 
FATTIC, G. R. 

Dean of Men, Education, 1913-15 
FATTIC, MRS. G. R. 

Social Science, 1914-15 
FENDERSON, LYNDA 

Nursing, 1971- 
FERGUSON, DORCAS 

Behavioral Science, 1974- 
FERREE, NELLIE 

Education, 1936-38, 1940-46 
FIELD, A. D. 

Science, Mathematics, 1921-22 
FIELD, C. S. 

Printing, English, History, 1923-24 
FIELD, F. W. 

Religion, Greek, 1916-36 
FLEMING, CHARLES 

General Manager, Business Manager, 

1941, 1946- 
FLERL, JUDY 

Nursing, 1973- 
FOGG, FRANK 

Broom Factory, 1954-73 
FOLKENBERG, BARBARA 

Spanish, 1966-67 
FOOTE, GERALDINE 

Assistant in Food Service, 1960-63 
FORRESTER, RICHARD 

Physical Education, 1955-56 
FOSTER, KATHERINE 

Music, 1907-08 
FOUNTAIN, B. J. 

Blacksmith, 1918-26 
FOX, CALVIN 

Elementary Supervisory 

Teacher, 1974- 
FOX, FRANCES 

Elementary Supervisory 

Teacher, 1974- 
FRANCIS, ROBERT E. 

Religion, 1960- 
FRANK, OTTILIE (Mrs. Stafford) 

English, History, 1947-49 
FREEMAN, BRUCE 

Assistant Dean of Men, 1963-67 
FREMBLING, CAROL 

Nursing, 1972-74 



304 



80 YEARS OF PROGRESS 



STAFF MEMBERS (Cont.) 



FULLER, FORREST LaVERNE 

Mercantile, Bookkeeping, 1949-51 
FULLER, GEORGE N. 

Accountant, Treasurer, Postmaster, 

1923-25, 1929-36 
FULLER, ROSE SHAFER 

Academy Health & P.E. 
FUTCHER, CYRIL F. W. 

Director of Admissions and Records, 

Academic Dean, 1962- 
FUTCHER, GLADYS HYDE 

Executive Secretary, 1962- 
GAITENS, PEARL HARTWELL 

Business Administration, 1947-49 
GAITENS, JAMES C. 

Academy Principal, 1947-49 
GAMMENTHALER, JANICE 

Associate Dean of Women, 1974- 
GANT, OLA K. 

Science, Nutrition, 1929-30, 1935-41, 

1943-44 
GARBER, WILLIAM 

Journalism, 1970- 
GARDNER, BETTY 

Academy Librarian, 1967-70 
GARDNER, ELVA B. 

Registrar, Alumni Secretary, 1949-58 
GARDNER, JOE 

Garage, 1947-48 
GARNER, JOHN 

Education, 1954-55 
GARREN, ROBERT 

Art, 1968- 
GARTLEY, MARY (Mrs. C. C. Kott) 

Critic Teacher, 1934-35 
GASKELL, DUANE 

Science, Mathematics, 1954-55 
GATES, MERALDINE 

Nursing, 1971-72 
GEACH, PATRICIA SULLIVAN 

Elementary Supervisory Teacher, 1946- 

47, 1971-74 
GEARHART, BERNICE 

English, Academy Librarian, 1964-67 
GEBERT, PAUL 

Chemistry, 1974- 
GEPFORD, JOHN 

Broom Factory, Wood Products, 

1937-47 
GERHART, BRUCE 

English, 1965-66, 1969- 
GIDDINGS, ELAINE 

English, Speech, 1945-48, 1949-50 
GIFFORD, ED 

Broom Factory, 1912 
GILBERT, ELLEN (Mrs. Orlo Gilbert) 

Nursing, 1967- 
GILBERT, ORLO 

Music, 1967- 
GILES, JUANITA (Mrs. Clevenger) 

Nursing, 1968-69 
GILLET, PATRICIA 

Nursing, 1967-68 
GILMAN, R. F. 

Industrial Arts, 1925-27 
GISH, I. M. 

Education, Science, 1941-42, 1944-47 



GISH, LOUISE (Mrs. I. M. Gish) 

Home Economics, Nursing, 1944-46 
GJORDING, J. C. 

Field Representative, 1947-48 
GLADSON, JERRY 

Religion, 1972- 
GLASS, DON 

Collegedale Distributors, 1972- 
GLATHO, CATHERINE 

Nursing, 1961-65, 1966-69 
GODDARD, GERRY SADLER 

Music, 1946-47 
GOODBRAD, JOHN 

Purchasing Agent, Distributors, 

Enterprises, 1953-1972 
GOODGE, R. F. 

Printing, 1938-41 
GORICH, G. H. 

Construction, 1916-17 
GOODWIN, JOANNE 

Nursing, 1972-74 
GORMAN, JUNE 

Elementary Supervisory Teacher, 

1970-71 
GOTT, GEORGE T. 

Credit Manager, Business Administra- 
tion, Assistant Business Manager, 

1947-54, 1960-61 
GOTT, ROSELLA (Mrs. G. T. Gott) 

Academy Algebra, Typing, 1947-48 
GOULARD, CHERRIE 

Nursing, 1972- 
GRACE, LORANNE 

Assistant Librarian, 1970- 
GRAHAM, LOIS 

Nursing, 1972-73 
GRANGE, RONALD 

College Cafeteria, 1972- 
GRAY, AGNES 

Secretary to President, 1917-18 
GRAY, ALSIE (Mrs. Ward) 

Food Service, Home Economics, 1917-18 
GREEN, FRED L. 

Treasurer, Assistant Manager, 1938-41 
GREEN, GRACE EVANS (Mrs. H. B. 

Lundquist) 

Education, 1938-41 
GREENLEAF, FLOYD L. 

History, 1966- 
GREVE, DORA L. 

Elementary Supervisory Teacher, 

1942-50 
GREVE, ROBERT 

Academy Supervisory Teacher, 1974- 
GREY, CALLIE 

Food Service, 1907 
GRINDLEY, THOMAS 

Industrial Arts', 1973- 
GROGER, SARAH JANE KING 

Nursing, 1967-69 
GROULIK, IVAN 

Bindery, 1964-67 
GROVE, H. N. 

Nursing,1960-61 
GRUNDSET, EDGAR 

Science, 1957- 
GUNTER, HULDA 

Pharmacology, 1970-71 



APPENDIX— LOOKING BACK 



305 



STAFF MEMBERS (Cont.) 



HAGEN, B. J. 

Garage, Farm, Dairy, Store, 1942-49, 

1951- 
HAGERMAN, ZERITA 

Nursing, 1961-73 
HALE, RUTH B. 

Education, 1916-18 
HALL, ALBERT N. 

Printing, Broom Salesman, 1935-44 
HALL, PEARL L. 

Dean of Women, Modern Languages 

1929-38 
HALL, WILMA, (Mrs. J. T. Hall) 

Executive Secretary to Business 

Manager, 1954-55 
HALVORSEN, MARGARET (Mrs. N. E. 

Halvorsen) 

Elementary Supervisory Teacher, 1971- 
HALVORSEN, H. J. 

Agriculture, 1934-40 
HALVORSEN, M. J. 

Bookkeeping, 1915-17 
HALVORSEN, WARREN 

Assistant Dean of Men, 1973- 
HAMEL, CAROL 

Assistant Director Food Service, 

1964-66 
HAMEL, LYLE 

Music, 1959-64 
HAMILTON, H. H. 

President, 1925-27 
HAMILTON, MARION 

Nursing, 1967-68 
HAMBRICK, NANNIE HARPER 

Food Service, 1949-50 
HAMM, MINON 

English, 1966- 
HAMMILL, RICHARD 

Academic Dean, Social Science, 

Religion, Greek, Hebrew, 1946-55 
HAMMOND, KATHRYN 

Campus Shop, 1972- 
HAMPTON, R. C. 

Broom Factory, 1932-37 
HAMPTON, MRS. R. C. 

Food Service, 1933-34 
HANNUM, JAMES 

Communications, 1965- 
HANSEN, DONNA MOBLEY 

Nursing, 1967-69 
HANSEN, LIEF 

Modern Languages, 1966-67 
HANSON, HARRIETTE B. 

Home Economics, 1963-69 
HANSON, LAWRENCE E. 

Mathematics, 1966- 
HARRISON, A. F. 

Canvassing, 1899-1901 
HARRISON, HARLAN 

Band Director, 1911-12 
HARRISON, NELLAH (Mrs. Jeys) 

Education, 1914 
HARTER, BETTY KLOTZ 

Critic Teacher, Music, Physical 

Education, 1936-37, 1939-49 
HARTER, HOWARD 

Service Department, 1946-49 
HARTLEY, MARY ELLEN 

Music, 1947-49 



HASEL, GERHARD 

Religion, 1963-66 
HAUGHEY, KENNETH 

Dean of Men, 1905 
HAUSSLER, J. C. 

Social Science, 1928-35 
HAUSSLER, MRS. J. C. 

Music, 1928-32 
HAYTON, HOPE 

Modem Languages, 1959-60 
HAYWARD, O. M. 

Science, Health, 1913 
HAYWARD, MRS. O. M. 

Science, 1913 
HEFFERLIN, INELDA PHILLIPS 

Home Economics, 1962-63 
HEFFERLIN, RAY 

HEISER,'LOIS (Mrs. Jamile Jacobs) 

Home Economics, 1945-51 
HELLGREN, NANCY 

Nursing, 1972- 
HENDERSHOT, H. V. 

Associate Pastor, 1958-60 
HENDERSON, HAZIEL (Mrs. Lyle 

Henderson) 

Assistant Dean of Women, 1970- 
HERIN, MAZIE ALICE 

Nursing, 1956-60 
HERRELL, WALTER 

Press, 1963- 
HETHERINGTON, A. J. 

Education, 1908-09 
HEWITT, HERBERT 

Academy Principal, 1964-68 
HEWITT, PAUL 

Music, 1938 
HICKS, CORA B. 

Preceptress, Science, 1913-14 
HIERS, SUE 

Nursing, 1968-69 
HIGGINS, W. B. 

Academy Principal, 1951-57 
HIGGINS, MRS. W. B. 

Home Economics, 1951-57, 1965-74 
HILDEBRAND, MINNIE 

Education, 1906-08, 1911-13 
HILL, MILO 

Music, 1957-58 
HINSON, KATHRYN WOOLEY 

Nursing, 1963- 
HINTON, MAMBERT 

Education, 1934-35 
HOAR, PAUL 

Academy Principal, Science, 1951-61 
HOAR, MRS. PAUL 

Secretarial Science, 1951-61 
HOEHN, DAVID 

Physician, 1948-49 
HOLBROOK, FRANK 

Religion, 1964- 
HOLDEN, CAMILLE LLOYD 

Critic Teacher, 1950-51 
HOLLADAY, LILLIAN 

English, Home Economics, 1907 
HOLM, L. N. 

General Manager, Business Manager, 

Economics, 1954-58 



306 



80 YEARS OF PROGRESS 



STAFF MEMBERS (Cont.) 



HOLTKAMP, GLENN 

Assistant General Manager, 1971- 
HOOPER, H. R. 

Industrial Arts, 1949-51 
HOOPES, L. A. 

Religion, 1912-17 
HOUCK, DUANE F. 

Biology, 1973- 
HOWARD, HENRY 

Preceptor, Education, 1906 
HOWARD, MRS. HENRY 

Preceptress, 1906 
HOWARD, MELVIN 

Treasurer, 1941-42 
HOWARD, SHIRLEY 

Nursing, 1971- 
HUGHES, LAWRENCE 

Science, Mathematics, 1954-55 
HULSEY, HARRY W. 

Industrial Arts, 1954-60, 1966-67 
HULSEY, WILLIAM 

Manager College Subsidiary 

Corporations, 1968-70 
HUNT, ALLENE (Mrs. Wiesner) 

Nursing, 1970- 
HUNTER, NELLIE 

Food Service, 1911-13 
HUNTER, STELLA 

Nursing, 1969-70 
HUTCHERSON, JOSEPH 

Physics, 1967-68 
HUXTABLE, T. R. 

Industrial Arts, Salesman, 1922-24, 

1934-37, 1938-39 
HUXTABLE, MRS. T. R. 

English, 1917-18 
HYDE, GORDON 

Religion, Speech, 1956-70 
INGRAM. ELLA P. 

Critic Teacher, 1919-23, 1925-26 
INGRAM, MARTYN (Mrs. J. W. 

MacFarland) 

Secretary to President, 1937-38 
INGRAM, N. L. 

Preceptor, 1922-23 
INGRAM, RUTH 

Critic Teacher, 1936-37 
IRWIN, C. W. 

Principal, Religion, Mathematics, 

1898-1900 
IRWIN, MINNIE HENNIG 

Food Service, Preceptress, 1895-97, 

1899-1900 
IRISH, DORIS (Mrs. Lacks) 

Assistant Dean of Women, 1968-70 
IRWIN, BERNADINE 

Nursing, 1974- 
ISSAK, DeLANE 

English, 1968-69 
JACKSON, BURTON L. 

Music, 1957-59 
JACKSON, EDWINA 

Music, 1957-59 
JACKSON, ELEANOR 

Art, 1967-73 
JACOBS, BERTHA LEA 

Critic Teacher, 1926-27 



JACOBS, L. A. 

Education, Secretarial Science, 

1912-14, 1926-28 
JAMES, JEAN 

Elementary Supervisory Teacher, 

1965-66 
JAMES, W. S. 

Physical Education, Social Science, 

Religion, 1944-47 
JANZEN, WAYNE 

Industrial Arts, 1967- 
JARVIS, THEDA 

Elementary Supervisory Teacher, 1968-72 
JENSEN, F. B. 

Religion, 1945-48 
JENSON, BERNICE NELSON 

Home Economics, 1946-47 
JOHNSON, BONNIE 

Nursing, 1973- 
JOHNSON, ELSIE ORTNER 

Secretarial Science, 1937-38, 1939-42 
JOHNSON, INGRID 

Dean of Women, Physical Education, 

1948-50 
JOHNSON, MARILYN 

Home Economics, 1969-72 
JOHNSON, RUDOLPH 

Dean of Men, Social Science, 1937-41 
JOHNSTON, BRUCE J. 

Religion, 1963-68 
JOHNSTON, HARLAN A. 

Dean of Men, Social Science, 1918-22 
JOHNSTON, MRS. H. A. 

Hydrotherapy, 1919-21 
JONES, A. J. 

Laundry, 1949-51 
JONES, BLANCHE E. 

Assistant Dean of Women 

(Orlando Campus), 1972-74 
JONES, DAVID 

Communications, 1970-71 
JONES, JOAN HOLDEN 

Library, 1963-65 
JONES, JOHN O. 

Science, 1941-42 
JONES, MAUDE I. 

English, Mathematics, Languages, 

1917-55 
KABIGTING, ADELA 

Nursing, 1969-70 
KALAR, ADDIE MAE 

English, 1917-18 
KANNA, DONNA 

Academy Music, 1965-67 
KEELE, A. W. 

Buildings and Grounds, Construction 

Foreman, Mill Foreman, 1956- 
KEITH, GRACE K. 

Registrar, 1943-44 
KELLAMS, NORMA 

Secretarial Science, 1961-62 
KELSEY, GRACE W. 

Secretarial, Home Economics, 1916-17 
KENNEDY, ETHELWYN C. 

Elementary Supervisory Teacher, 

1962-63 
KENNEDY, FRANCES 

Education, 1909-10 



APPENDIX— LOOKING BACK 



307 



STAFF MEMBERS (Cont.) 



KENNEDY, HOWARD 

Principal Elementary School, 1969- 
KENNEDY, JAMES 

Manager Campus Kitchen, 1963-64 
KENNEDY, J. R. 

Business Manager, 1919-22 
KENNEDY, K. M. 

Education, Psychology, 1951- 
KENNEDY, THERESA WRIGHT 

Nursing, 1966- 
KENYON, MRS. M. C. 

Preceptress, 1905-07 
KERR, MIRIAM 

Nursing, 1959-65, 1970- 
KEWLEY, JOAN 

Education, Languages, 1952-53 
KIER, ERIS W. 

Assistant Dean of Men, 1967-69 
KILGORE, CHARLES L. 

Business Administration, 1903-06 
KILGORE, MARY 

Music, 1899-1900 
KILGORE, ROCHELLE PHILMON 

Education, English, 1909-17 
KINDSVATER, GEORGANN 

Nursing, 1969-71 
KING, AUBREY 

Enterprises, Accountant, 1957-62 
KING, GLEE H. 

Business Administration, 1928-29 
KING, LYNELLE 

Nursing, 1963-64 
KING, MARGARET 

Elementary Supervisory Teacher, 1971-72 
KINSMAN, JACQUELINE 

Nursing, 1970-71 
KIRK, IVA DELL 

Music 1921-29 
KIRSTEIN, PATRICIA OSBORNE 

Nursing, 1966-70 
KIRSTEIN, W. 

Printing, 1934-35 
KLEIN, A. E. 

Southern Mercantile, 1956 
KLOOSTER, H. J. 

President, Business Manager, 1927-37 
KNECHT, DAVID 

Academy English & Speech 

Supervisory Teacher, 1972- 
KNIGHT, ANNIE 

Nursing, Home Economics, 1899-1900 
KNIGHT, TUI A. 

Secretary to President, 1938-39 
KNITTEL, FRANK A. 

Academic Dean, President, 1967- 
KNITTEL, HELEN (Mrs. Frank A. 

Knittel) 

English, Hostess Student Lounge, 1970- 
KNOLL, M. D. 

Science, 1929-31 
KOUDELE, BETTY BROOKE 

English, 1949-52 
KOUGL, ADEL 

Home Economics, 1949-51 
KROGSTAD, NORMAN 

Music, 1949-57 
KROGSTAD, Eleanor Cowles 
Music, 1949-52, 1953-57 



KROSCHEL, RUTH 

Physical Education, 1966-67 
KUEBLER, HAROLD E. 

Dean of Men, Academy History and 

Religion, 1967- 
KUHLMAN, HENRY 

Physics, 1968- 
KUHLMAN, H. H. 

Science, Mathematics, 1946- 
KUHLMAN, MARION LUNDY 

Health Service, 1949- 
KUMMER, CHRISTINE 

Nursing, 1956-62, 1969- 
KUTZNER, ARNO 

Director of Admissions and Records 

1971- 
KUTZNER, WALLY 

College Physician, 1974- 
KUUTTI, RAYMOND 

Music, 1961-64 
LACY, CHARLES R. 

Grounds, 1970- 
LaFEVRE, HOMER O. 

Printing, 1920 
LAMB, EDWARD 

Behavioral Science, 1971- 
LAMBERT, JOY MILLER 

Nursing, 1969-70 
LAMBETH, H. C. 

Custodian, 1959-62 
LAMBETH, THEODORA WIRAK 

Registrar, Treasurer, 1937-43, 1959-62 
LANG, C. A. 

Maintenance, Central Supply, 1950-62 
LANT, THOMAS 

Nursing (Orlando Campus), 1973-74 
LARSEN, ROBERT 

Associate Pastor, 1960-61 
LAURITZEN, ADRIAN R. M. 

Music 1952-57 
LAURITZEN, MRS. ADRIAN R. M. 

Music 1953-57 
LAWLESS, GLADYS LEE (Mrs. Fowler) 

Executive Secretary, 1961-72 
LAWRENCE, ADDIE E. 

Food Service, 1899-1900 
LAWRENCE, LEILA 

Education, 1895-97 
LAWRENCE, L. L. 

Business Manager, Secretarial, 1899-1900 
LAWRENCE, N. W. 

Principal, 1899-1901 
LAZARATION, ASTRID 

Nursing, 1971-72 
LEA, RUBY (Mrs. R. L. Carr) 

Registrar, Secretarial, Library, 

1917-26, 1944-51 
LEASE, ALICE HOGUE 

Education, 1945-48 
LEASE, HAROLD F. 

Science, Dean of Men, 1942-48 
LEBEDOFF, CATHERINE 

Modern Languages, 1965-66 
LEBEDOFF, VICTOR 

History, 1965-66 
LEDFORD, C. E. 

Agriculture, 1918-33 
LEDFORD, MRS. C. E. 
Business Administration, 1930 



308 



80 YEARS OF PROGRESS 



STAFF MEMBERS (Cont.) 



LEE, WILTON 

Social Work, 1970-72 
LEECH, W. D. 

Science, History, Mathematics, 1919-21 
LEIGHTON, RUBY 

Home Economics, 1910 
LENKER, METTIE SHARP 

Preceptress, 1901-04 
LEWIS, KAREN 

Academy English, 1969-70 
LICKEY, L. D. 

Music, Secretarial Science, 1913-14 
LIEN, JERRY M. 

Communications, 1973- 
LIERSCH, ALBERT 

Religion, 1974- 
LILLEY, L1LAH LAWSON 

English, Education, Academy Dean of 

Women, 1952-54, 1965-71 
LINDBERG, EVLYN 

English, 1959- 
LINDERMAN, JERRY 

Elementary Supervisory Teacher, 1973- 
LINDERMAN, MARION 

Associate Librarian, 1962- 
LINEBAUGH, JOAN 

Elementary Supervisory Teacher, 1970-72 
LINSLEY, SHARON 

Nursing, 1969-70 
LOOR, JOHN R., SR. 

College Chaplain, Church Pastor, 

1968-71 
LOOR, JUNE (Mrs. John R. Loor) 

Nursing, 1971 
LOUGHRIDGE, ALICE 

Nursing, 1968-70 
LOVEJOY, DELMAR 

Physical Education, Dean of Student 

Affairs, 1965- 
LOVELL, A. I. 

Science, 1910-11 
LOWMAN, MARILYN 

Physical Education, 1968-71 
LUCE, CAROLYN V. 

English, 1964-70 
LUCE, RANSOM 

Store, Food Service, 1949-50, 1963-72 
LUDGATE, T. K. 

Religion, Greek, 1942-46 
LUDINGTON, D. C. 

Education, English, Industrial Arts, 

Social Sciences, Academy Principal, 

1930-53 
LUDINGTON, LOUIS 

Music, 1939-40 
LUNDQUIST, ERIC 

Cashier, Accountant, 1939-42 
LUNDQUIST, H. B. 

Religion, Languages, Public Relations, 

Alumni Secretary, 1952-60, 1967-70 
LYNDEN, FRANK 

1895-96 
LYNN, OPAL ROGERS 

Academy Bible, 1946-47 
LYNN, R. E. 

Industrial Arts, 1946-51 
MacMILLAN, J. K. 

Secretarial Science, Assistant Business 

Manager, 1918-20 



MADGWICK, GORDON 

English, Dean of Student Affairs 

1958-67 
MAMLOCK, THEODORE 

Music, 1954-55 
MARSHALL, J. S. 

Preceptor, History, 1913-18 
MARSHALL, MARIAN BISSETT 

Education, English, 1913-18 
MARSHALL, MRS. SIDNEY M. 

English, 1929-30 
MARTIN, VIRGINIA 

Nursing, 1973- 
MARTINSON, ELSIE M. 

Science, Nursing, Physical Education, 

1902-04 
MATHIEU, JUANITA (Mrs. Norrell) 

Critic Teacher, 1943-44 
MAXFIELD, KATHERINE 

Assistant Health Service, 1948-49 
MAXWELL, C. A. 

Preceptor, History, Industrial Arts, 

1911-13 
MAXWELL, MYRTLE 

Preceptress, Education, Critic Teacher 

1917-26, 1928-39 
McBROOM, DAN 

Assistant Manager Press, 1957- 
McCAULEY, DOREETA 

Nursing, 1972-74 
McCLARTY, JACK 

Music, 1972- 
McCLARTY, WILMA 

English, 1972- 
McCOLPIN, GLEN 

Business Administration, 1963-70 
McCORMICK, GENEVIEVE 

Communications, 1966- 
McCUEN, DOROTHY 

Health Service, 1931-33 
McCURDY, ROBERT 

Computer Science, 1967- 
McFARLAND, INA DUNN 

Assistant Dean of Women, 1966-68 
McGEE, JAMES 

Music, 1965- 
McGEE, J. P. 

Printing, 1916-20 
McGEE, RUBY DELL 

Education, 1934-36 
McGHEE, EDWIN 

Academy Music, 1963-65 
McKEE, LINDA STEFANSON 

Elementary Supervisor Teacher, 1965-66 
McKEE, O. D. 

College Store, McKee Baking Co. in 

Collegedale, 1948-49, 1959- 
McMILLAN, BETTY JO BOYNTON 

Elementary Supervisor Teacher 1951-53 

McMillan, frank 

Mercantile, 1953-54 
McMURPHY, ELMORE J. 

Religion, Speech, 1951-56 
McMURPHY, KATHLEEN B. 

English, 1951-56 
McNETT, ADELINE 

Home Economics, Food Service, 1914 
MEDFORD, MENTON 

Dairy and Farm, 1948 



APPENDIX— LOOKING BACK 



309 



STAFF MEMBERS (Cont.) 



MENTZ, GLADYS 
Nursing, 1956-57 
MERCHANT, ROBERT 

Treasurer, 1961- 
MERRIMAN, MARGARITA DIETEL 

Music, 1956-58 
MERRY, JOHN 

Secretarial Science, 1963-69 
MESSINGER, HAROLD 

Creamery, 1956-57 
METCALF, WILLIAM H. 

Electrician, 1956- 
MEYER, H. F. 

Printing-, 1953-63 
MEYERS, JANET 

Nursing, 1973- 
MILLER, CARL 

Nursing, 1964- 
MILLER, GERALDINE 

Elementary Supervisory Teacher, 1971- 
MILLER, GRACE PURDHAM. 

Physical Education, English, 1938-39, 

1945-47 
MILLER, HAROLD A. 

Music, 1935-42, 1945-53 
MILLER, H. S. 

Science, Mathematics, 1907-15 
MILLER, ROGER 

Physical Education, 1971- 
MILLS, R. C. 

College Manager, 1970- 
MITCHELL, MRS. E. E. 

Music, 1901 
MIZELLE, HELEN LUNDY 

Health Service, 1951-55 
MIZELLE, R. C. 

Accountant, 1953-59 
MOFFAT, JOHN 

Communications, 1964-65 
MOHR, E. I. 

Mathematics, 1949-54 
MOHR, MARJORIE 

Home Economics, 1953-54 
MONTGOMERY, LOUISE 

Nursing, 1966-67 
MONTGOMERY, MARILYN 

Nursing, 1965-66 
MONTGOMERY, MARTHA (Mrs. Leo 

Odom) 

Acting Registrar, 1924-25 
MOON, DONALD 

Physical Education, 1972- 
MOORE, MYRL 

Store, 1948-49 
MOOY, MARY 

Assistant Dean of Women, 1964-67 
MORGAN, VIOLET 

English, 1944-45 
MORRISON, PATRICIA 

Academy Librarian, 1970- 
MORRISON, ROBERT R. 

Modern Languages, 1967- 
MOUCHON, PAUL 

Engineer, 1927-42 
MOUNTZ, DELORES 

Nursing, 1973- 
MOYERS, C. H. 

Business Manager, 1907-09 
MOYERS, S. 

Agriculture, 1909 



MUENCH, GERTRUDE 

Nursing, 1957-59 
MUNDY, WILLIAM 

Physics, 1963-69 
MURDOCH, CHRISTINE 

Modern Languages, 1968-71 
MURDOCH, FLOYD 

History, 1968-72 
MYERS, CLIFFORD 

Village Market, 1971- 
MYERS, CLIFFORD G. 
Security Officer, 1968- 
NEIDIGH, ROGER V. 

Science, 1966-67 
NELSON, CHARLOTTE 

Art, 1953-54 
NELSON, GEORGE 

Science, Mathematics, 1939-55 
NELSON, MATILDA 

Accounting Office, 1918-20 
NELSON, VIRGINIA HERNDON 

Health Service, 1963-66, 1969- 
NELSON, W. G. 

Assistant Dean of Men, 1972-74 
NESTELL, MERLYND 

Mathematics, 1959-61 
NEWMYER, C. B. 

History, 1922-23 
NEWMYER, MRS. C. B. 

Sewing, 1922-23 
NICHOLS, NAOMI PLATT 

Nursing, 1967-71 
NICKEL, MARGARET E. 

Education, Home Economics, 1928-32 
NOONER, DENNIS 

Academy Science and Mathematics, 

1966-68 
NORTHROP, RICHARD D. 

Southern Mercantile, 1956-57 
OAKES, MILDRED EADIE 

Health Service, Physical Education, 

1945-49 
OAKLAND, OLGA 

Dean of Women, Mathematics, 1938-39 
OLMSTEAD, RAY O. 

Food Factory, Wood Products, 

1937-38, 1947-54 
OSBORNE, ELIA 

Education, 1907 
OTT, HELMUT 

Modern Languages, 1971- 
OTTO, ARNOLD 

Education, 1959-61, 1963-65 
PAGE, MAXINE 

Nursing, 1965- 
PALMOUR, LOIS 

Assistant Dean of Women (Orlando), 

1970 
PARFITT, ELIZA 

Dean of Women, 1946-48 
PARISH, MABEL (Mrs. W. O. Reynolds^ 

Health Service, 1935-37 
PARRISH, ANN 

English, 1961-64 
PARRISH, E. L. 

Dean of Men, History, 1023-27 
PARRISH, RUTH STARR 

Education, 1926-27 
PATTERSON, GARY 

College Pastor, 1971- 



310 



80 YEARS OF PROGRESS 



STAFF MEMBERS (Cont.) 



PAYNE, CHRISTINE 

Nursing, 1971-72 
PAYNE, DORIS 

Nursing. 1968- 
PAYNE, LaVETA 

Education, Psychology, 1966- 
PEARLMAN, JOSEPH 

Music, 1952-54 
PEARMAN, GEORGE R. 

Maintenance, 1943-56 
PEEK, NORMAN 

Chemistry, Audio-Visual, 1963- 
PENDER, E. A. 

Printing, 1950-52 
PENDERGRASS, JESSIE 

Critic Teacher, 1961-64 
PENNER, JON 

Speech, 1965-70 
PERKINS, CHRISTINE 

Nursing, 1971- 
PETERS, LOUESA 

Assistant Treasurer, 1964- 
PFISTER, MRS. G. 

Academy English, 1959-60 
PHELPS, BERTHA 

Preceptress, Latin, Physiology, 1914-16 
PHELPS, LINDA CASE 

Nursing, 1965-66 
PHILLIPS, CLARA 

Home Economics, Secretarial Science, 

Mathematics, 1899-1901, 1909-11 
PHILO, ALTA 

Elementary Supervisory Teachei-, 

1958-59 
PIERCE, DEAN 

Wood Products, 1954-56 
PIERCE, H. W. 

Blacksmith, 1910-12 
PIERSON, JOHN 

Farm and Dairy, 1941-56 
PITTMAN, BERNICE 

Education, 1948-53, 1962-65, 1966-68 
PITTON, MARLENE TURNER 

Laundry, 1938-40 
PLATT, BARBARA 

Nursing, 1973- 
PLATT, W. W. 

Security Officer, 1963-69 
PLUE, O. S. 

Religion, Greek, 1948-50 
PLUE, VIOLETTA 

Art, 1948-50 
PLUNGIAN, GINA 

Art, 1955-57 
POLK, HERBERT 

Creamery, 1957-61 
POTTER, Carol 

Library, 1947-48 
POWELL, KARYLEE 

Nursing, 1971-72 
PRESLEY. HANSEN K. 

Secretarial Science, 1910-12 
PRESTON, B. M. 

Printing, 1947-48 
PRESTON, W. R. 

Printing, 1950-55 
PUMPHREY, LINDA MUNDY 

Asst. Dean of Women (Madison) 

1968-70 



QUIMBY, PAUL 

Religion, Pastor, 1940-43, 1964-65 
RABUKA, GLADYS 

Education, 1953-54 
RAETTIG, WILMA JARA 

Nursing, 1974- 
RAFPERTY, L. E. 

Industrial Arts, 1937-38 
RAINWATER, ALBERTA REIBER 

Food Service, 1938-40 
RAINWATER, JOE 

Chef, 1938-40 
RATHBUN, F. O. 

Printing, 1936-38 
RAY, HERMAN C. 

Religion (Orlando), 1962-66 
RAY, W. F. 

Industrial Arts, 1924-25 
RAYMOND, FRANK O. 

Mathematics, 1905 
READ, CHARLES E. 

Office Administration, Academy 

Commercial, 1959-64, 1969- 
READ, JOHN 

Academy Music, 1960-61 
REBOK, D. E. 

President, Academic Dean, 1942-43 

1955-56 
REDMAN, SHARON 

Nursing, 1968-69 
REES, C. N. 

President, 1958-67 
REES, FAE COWIN (Mrs. C. N. Rees) 

Associate Dean of Women, 1964- 
REEVES, C. A. 

Religion, 1958-67 
REEVES, Harriet Smith 

Nursing, 1960-67 
RETD, NELDA MITCHELL 

Executive Secretary, 1969- 
RENNARD, CHARLES 

Academy Supervisory Teacher, 1974- 
RHODES, NORMA 

Food Service, Home Economics, 1941-43 
RICE, GEORGE 

Religion, 1970-72 
RICE, LARRY 

Printing, 1959- 
RICHARDSON, MRS. I. D. 

Dean of Women, 1922-24 
RICHERT, ARTHUR 

Mathematics, 1970- 
RTCKS, RAYMOND 

Laundry, 1954 
RILEY, BRENDA BOTTS 

Nursing, 1964-69 
RINGER, BRUCE 

Auto Expediter, Distributors, 1953- 
RITTENHOUSE, F. O. 

Academic Dean, Social Science, 1938-39 

1948-52 
RITTENHOUSE, RUTH 

Education, 1929-31 
ROACH, RUBY 

Education, 1905 
ROBB, JUDY 

Nursing, 1973- 
ROBBINS, MILDRED 

Nursing, 1972- 



APPENDIX— LOOKING BACK 



311 



STAFF MEMBERS (Cont.) 



ROBERSON, LOUISE 

Academy, 1958-60 
ROBERTS, HERMAN 

English, 1964-65 
ROBERTS, LANA UMLAUF 

Nursing, 1970-71 
ROBERTSON, CHARLES 

Science, Mathematics, 1969- 
ROBERTSON, FRANCES HARTWELL 

Nursing, 1966-68 
ROBERTSON, MARVIN L. 

Music, 1966- 
ROBINSON, ELAINE 

Elementary Supervisory Teacher, 1972- 
ROBINSON, JACKIE 

Nursing, 1966-68 
ROBINSON, JOHN 

Communications, 1969-70 
ROGERS, WAVA 

Music, 1930 
ROLFE, CECIL 

Business Administration, 1964- 
ROLFE, GLENDA 

Nursing, 1956-61 
ROLFE, RHEA 

Behavioral Science, Education, 

Counselor, 1970- 
ROTTMILLER, C. O. 

Treasurer, Business Manager, 1926-30 
ROTTMILLER, ELLEN 

Accounting, 1928-30 
ROWE, KERMISE 

Academy Physical Education, 1969-70 
ROWE, MAYBELLE 

Preceptress, Home Economics, 1903-04, 

1911-13 
ROWE, THOMAS D. 

Preceptor, History, 1911-13 
ROWELL, Lois 

Music, Assistant Librarian, 1966-70 
RUF, BARBARA 

English, 1969- 
RUF, R. M. 

Associate College Chaplain, 1969- 
RUNYAN, DON 

Music, 1968- 
RUSHING, JAN 

Business Administration, 1971- 
RUSSELL, C. A. 

Director of Extension, 1942-45 
RUSSELL, CAROLYN HALL 

Dean of Women, 1943-46 
RUTLEDGE, CHRISTINE 

Secretary to President, 1941-42 
SALDANA, CAROLYN REED 

Driver Education, 1971-72 
SALHANY, MARVIN 

Laundry, 1955-56 
SANBURN, FREDERICK S. 

Dean of Men, Distributors, 1951-54 
SANDS, A. J. 

Wood Products, 1939-40 
SAULS, HELEN BRAAT 

Elementary Supervisory Teacher, 1963- 

64, 1966-69 
SAULS, LYNN 

English, 1961-69 
SCARR, ROY 

Music, 1963-64 



SCHLISNER, EVERETT 

Dean of Men, 1974- 
SCHMIDT, JOHN 

Food Service, 1959-63 
SCHNEIDER, WILBERT 

Academic Dean, President, 1960-63, 

1967-71 
SCHOEPFLIN, JAMES 

Music, 1965-69 
SCHOEPFLIN, JUDY 

Music, 1966-69 
SCHROEDER, ANITA 

Modern Languages, 1967-69 
SCHULTZ, OTTO 

Agriculture, 1907 
SCHUTT, MABEL 

Nursing, 1970-71 
SCHUTTE, THOMAS 

Education, 1955-56 
SCZEKAN, MARJORIE 

Nursing, 1967-68, 1973- 
SEAGRAVES, BESSIE (Mrs. Hoskins) 

Food Service, Home Economics, 1918-22 
SELF, DONALD 

Communications, 1971- 
SEVRENS, L. G. 

Academic Dean, Science, 1945-49 
SHAFFER, EDWARD C. 

Associate Store Manager, 1962-66 
SHAFFER, GRACE DUFFIELD 

Education, 1962-66 
SHANKEL, GEORGE E. 

Academic Dean, History, 1956-60 
SHATZKIN, MERTON 

Music, 1955-57 
SHAW, B. H. 

Religion, 1929-34 
SHOOK, Aletha 

Home Economics, 1948-49 
SHORT, LEAMON 

Communications, 1967-70 
SHREVE, H. A. 

Industrial Arts, 1918-20 
SHREVE, O. R. 

Carpentry, 1919-21 
SHULL, HELEN M. 

Food Service, Home Economics, 1922- 

28 
SHULL, WILLIAM 

Physician, 1950 
SHULTZ, CHRISTINE 

Nursing, 1966- 
SIEBENLIST, JEANINE 

Elementary Supervisory Teacher, 1974- 
SIEBENLIST, J. R. 

Academy Principal, 1959-61 
SILLOWAY, MERLE 

Assistant Librarian (Orlando), 

1956-66 
SIMMONS, MARIAN 

Educational Consultant, 1960-62 
SIMPSON, ANN (Mrs. Duggin) 

Nursing, 1958-59 
SKENDER, IRENE 

Critic Teacher, 1950-51 
SLOAN, THYRA BOWEN 

Critic Teacher, 1948-56, 1966- 
SMITH, CARL 

Maintenance, 1950-53 



312 



80 YEARS OF PROGRESS 



STAFF MEMBERS (Cont.) 



SMITH, FAYDETTE (Mrs. Youngs) 

Critic Teacher, 1927-28 
SMITH, HUBERT 

Chef, Service Dept., 1957-74 
SMITH, LOWELL 

Music, 1959-60 
SMITH, NELLIE J. 

Critic Teacher, 1947-48 
SMITH, Q. E. 

Industrial Arts, 1932-33 
SMOOT, FLORENCE ROZELL 

Secretary to Business Manager, 1954-55 
SMOOT, IRMA KOPITZKE 

Secretarial Science, 1953-59 
SNIDE, H. E. 

Religion, Greek, Social Science, 

Education, 1934-42 
SNYDER, VIVIAN 

Nursing, 1972-74 
SORENSON, M. J. 

Social Science, Academy Principal, 

1949-51 
SORRELL, RUTH JONES 

Critic Teacher, 1951-52, 1953-63 
SOWDER, STEVE 

Computer, 1971- 
SPALDING, A. W. 

Secretarial Science, 1901-03 
SPALDING, A. W., JR. 

Grounds, 1948-53 
SPARKS, CUSH 

Printing, 1921-25 
SPEARS, DON 

Broom Factory, 1970- 
SPEARS, KENNETH 

Director Student Finance, College 

Manager, Dean of Student Affairs, 

1963- 
SPEARS, MILDRED 

Education, 1964- 
SPEARS, SHIRLEY 

Nursing, 1971- 
SPRINGETT, JEAN 

Nursing, 1969- 
SPRINGETT, RONALD 

Religion, 1969- 
SPURLOCK, DONNA STONE 

Nursing, 1973- 
STAMPER, HARRIET 

Academy Dean of Girls, 1961-63 
STANAWAY, BARBARA 

Elementary Supervisory Teacher, 1972- 
STANLEY, RICHARD C. 

Office Administration, 1964- 
STARKEY, W. C. 

Printing, 1925-34 
STATHAM, MRS. W. D. 

Laundry, 1925-27 
STEELE, BEVERLY 

Nursing, 1968-69 
STEEN, DAVID 

Biology, 1974- 
STEEN, MARGARET 

Language, 1948-55 
STEEN, NANCY 

Nursing, 1966-67, 1968-69 
STEEN, RAMIRA 

Modern Languages, 1945-47 
STEEN, THOMAS W. 

Education, Psychology, 1948-55 



STEPP, BETH 

Nursing, 1973-74 
STEWARD, MARY A. 

English, Music, 1903-04 
STEWART, C. G. 

Industrial Arts, 1926-27 
STEWART, KENNETH C. 

Academy Principal, 1961-64 
STONE, C. L. 

Religion, President, 1912-14 
STONE, MRS. C. L. 

Art, 1912-14 
STONE BURNER, EDNA 

Dean of Women, Social Science, 

1951-58, 1963-70 
STRAIGHT, BARBARA 

Nursing, 1972- 
STRAIGHT, GLENN H. 

Music, Physics, 1918-20 
STRICKLAND, MRS. M. G. 

Laundry, 1934-35 
STUCKEY, FLORENCE 

Dean of Women, 1972- 
STURDEVANT, C. E. 

Preceptor, 1893-95 
SUHRIE, A. L. 

Educational Consultant, Social Science 

1945-56 
SUMMEROUR, GRADY BROOKE 

Music, Secretarial Science, 1911-18 
SWAIN, E. R. 

Industrial Arts, 1927-32 
SWANSON, GORDON 

Elementary Supervisory Teacher, 1970- 
SWILLEY, BILL WAYNE 

Elementary Supervisory Teacher, 1971- 
SWINSON, CHARLES 

Secondary Supervisory Teacher, 1970- 
SWINYAR, T. C. 

Physician, 1960-74 
SWOFFORD, J. M. 

Farm, Dairy, 1919-22 
SWOFFORD, ROBERT 

Buildings, 1960- 
TAFT, MATTIE B. 

English, 1909-10 
TAPPER, MARIA ELIZABETH 

English, 1960-61 
TARR, E. W. 

Social Science, 1955-56 
TAYLOR, DONALD RAY 

Assistant Dean of Men, 1969-72 
TAYLOR, MRS. LUCY E. 

Preceptress, 1919-20 
TAYLOR, ELAINE MYERS 

Music, 1959-66 
TAYLOR, MRS. JENNIE 

Education, 1935-36 
TAYLOR, MORRIS 

Fine Arts, 1959-66 
TAYLOR, W. H. 

Dean of Student Affairs, Public 

Relations, 1958- 
TENNANT, DIANNE 

Elementary Supervisory Teacher, 1969- 
TENNEY, J. ELLIS 

President, Religion, 1901-08 
THIEL, LEO 

President, English, 1916-18, 1922-25 



APPENDIX— LOOKING BACK 



313 



STAFF MEMBERS (Cont.) 



THIEL, MITCHEL 

Chemistry, 1966- 
THOMAS, NELSON 

Physical Education, 1967- 
THOMPSON, JOHN C. 

President, Business Manager, 1937-42 
THORNE, MRS. J. H. 

Food Service, Preceptress, Home 

Economics, 1916-17 
THORNTON, JOYCE 

Nursing, 1963-66, 1969-73 
THURBER, JOHN 

Music, 1956-57 
THURBER, WAYNE 

Music, 1949-52 
THURMON, ROY 

Pastor, 1960-68 
THURSTON, HAZEL (Mrs. Randall) 

Associate Dean of Women (Orlando), 

1961-63 
TOBIASSEN, LIEF KR. 

Social Science, 1946-56 
TOBIASSEN, RUTH 

Languages, 1946-47, 1948-49 
TOLLMAN, ELIZABETH 

English, Librarian, 1932-35 
TOMPKINS, J. E. 

Laundry, 1951-55 
TOMPKINS, O. D. 

Laundry, 1955-59 
TRAMMEL, HOWELL 

Quarry, 1928-29 
TRAMMEL, M. R. 

Basketry, 1923-30 
TRAYLOR, ZAHN 

Store, 1953-54 
TUCKER, BEATRICE 

Music, 1909-10 
TUCKER, J. A. 

Mathematics, Education, Agriculture 

1944-49 
TUCKER, JOSEPHINE WILSON 

Preceptress, Education, 1917-20 
TURLINGTON, DREW 

Industrial Arts, 1960- 
TWOMBLY, MARGARET 

Nursing, 1971-72 
TYGRET, PATRICIA RAMSEY 

Nursing, 1965-69 
UNDERHILL, RAY 

Academic Dean, 1956-58 
UPCHURCH, J. A. 

Dean of Men, 1956-59, 1965-66 
UPCHURCH, MARILYN (Mrs. J. A. 

Upchurch) 

Secretary to Academic Dean, 1956-57 
VAN ARSDALE, ELIZABETH 

Assistant Dean of Women, 1961-63 
VAN BLARICUM, JAMES 

Physician, 1954-56 
VANDERMARK, MAYBELLE 

(Mrs. Goranson) 

Dean of Women, Social Science, 

Religion, 1962-64 
VANDEVERE, WAYNE 

Business Administration, 1956- 
VAN KIRK, MARIE 

Language, 1911-12 



VAN KIRK, M. B. 

President, Religion, Social Science, 

1907-12 
VAN ROOYEN, ARLENE MOORE 

Nursing, 1966-67 
VAN ROOYEN, SMUTS 

Religion, 1966-72 
VIAR, POLLY DUNN 

Nursing, 1966-68 
VINING, ANN CONE 

Elementary Supervisory Teacher, 1971-72 
VINING, N. B. 

Press, 1937-38, 1946-47, 1966- 
VIXIE, H. M. 

Business Administration, 1929-32 
VOGEL, ELLEN 

Home Economics, 1930-32 
VON HENNER, CHARLES M. 

Health and Life, 1971-72 
WALDRON, MARY 

Nursing, 1962-69 
WALKER, ELEANOR 

Office Administration, 1969-74 
WALKER, GEORGE 

Art, 1973-74 
WALKER, LOIS 

Critic Teacher, 1935-38 
WALKER, STANLEY 

Music, 1969- 
WALLACK, DWIGHT S. 

Director of Development, 1974- 
WALLEKER, BEULAH 

Critic Teacher, 1924-25 
WALTERS, T. W. 

President, 1955-58 
WALTHER, DANIEL 

Social Science, Greek, Dean of Men, 

1941-46 
WARREN. MAUDE 

Music, 1911-14 
WARNER, BERNICE 

Enterprises, 1961-62 
WARNER, DARWIN 

Creamery, 1956-57 
WARNER, ROBERT 

Music, Industrial Arts, 1969- 
WASHBURN, HARRY 

Religion, Social Science, 1906 
WASHBURN, MRS. H. A. 

Science, 1906 
WATROUS, E. T. 

Dean of Men, Social Science, 

Counseling, 1948-70 
WATROUS, MYRTLE 

Assistant Librarian, 1948-64 
WATSON, DEL LA VERNE PARKINS 

Nursing, 1964-73 
WATSON, RUTH RISETTER 

Cashier, 1949-50 
WATT, A. L. 

Science, 1960-69 
WATT, CARRIE M. 

Food Service, 1943-44 
WATT, IRMA (Mrs. Minium) 

Business Administration, 1935-38 
WATT, ROSE B. 

Music, Home Economics, 1925-27 
WATTS, HELEN (Mrs. Charles Boykin) 

Music, 1927-29 



314 



80 YEARS OF PROGRESS 



STAFF MEMBERS (Cont.) 



WEAVER, JOHN E. 

Field Representative for SJC, 1935-37 
WEDEL, JANICE THOMPSON 

Nursing, 1967-68 
WELLS, HARLEY 

Custodian, 1964- 
WELLS, LAUREL 

Secretary, Director of Student Finance, 

1964- 
WENTLAND, RANKIN 

Associate College Chaplain, 1966-69 
WESCOTT, ELBERT 

Biology, 1962-73 
WEST, D. L., SR. 

Assistant Business Manager, Director 

Student Finance, 1955-63 
WEST, EVALINE 

Dean of Women, 1964-67 
WEST, LAWRENCE P. 

Dean of Men, 1927-30 
WEST, MRS. L. P. 

Home Economics, 1927-30 
WEST, MILDRED RUFFIN 

Music, 1934-35 
WESTERMYER, H. E. 

History, 1952-53 
WESTPHAL, OLIVE 

Modern Langriage, 1960-67 
WHARY, HELEN 

Elementary Supervisory Teacher, 

1963-64 
WHEELER, ALICE MAE 

Nursing-, 1960-62 
WHEELER, A. J. 

Agriculture, 1 936-38 
WHEELER, OLIVE S. 

Home Economics, 1938 
WHITE, LUCILE 

Office Administration, 1962- 
WHITE, MRS. OBIE 

Education, 1923-24 
WHITTAKER, J. T. 

Bakery, 1928-32 
WILCOX, LORENA 

Preceptress, Food Service, 1926-33 
WILKINSON, W. J. 

Education, 1931-32 
WILLIAMS, BERNICE, (Mrs. Curtis) 

Music, 1919-21 
WILLIAMS, C. A. 

Farm, Dairy, Store, Sheriff, 

1940-48, 1951-54 
WILLIAMS, MRS. C. A. 

Food Service, Laundry, 1940-47, 

1950-59 
WILLIAMS, EDYTHE COBET 

Health Service, Nursing Education, 

1934-35, 1936-43 
WILLIAMS, G. A. 

Store, 1907-08 
WILLIAMS, LARRY W. 

Assistant Dean of Men, 1961-63 
WILLIAMS, NELLIE JO PATTERSON 

Art, Physical Education, 1960-67 
WILLIAMS, W. E. 

Health Service, Physical Education, 

1936-43 
WILLIAMSON, ALLAN 

Associate College Chaplain, 1969-71 



WILLIS, PEARL 

Laundry, 1927-28 
WILSON, EVA MAUDE (Mrs. Martin) 

Laundry, Food Service, 1928-30, 

1934-38 
WILSON, JOAN (Mrs. Morris Wilson) 

Nursing, 1968-69 
WILSON, LESSIE 

Music, 1895-97 
WILT, JACK 

Buildings and Grounds, Enterprises, 

1961-64 
WINKLER, EUPHEMIA 

Food Service, Home Economics, 1901 
WINKLER, LINDSAY 

Science, 1955-56 
WINN, TED 

Associate Dean of Men, 1970-1973 
WINSTED, BEVERLY SHACKLETT 

Nursing, 1969-71 
WINTER, CHARLES E. 

Science, Mathematics, 1942-43 
WINTER, JUDY 

Nursing, 1972-74 
WITTSCHIEBE, C. E. 

Religion, 1946-54 
WOHLERS, WILLIAM 

History, 1973- 
WOOD, ANN 

Nursing, 1969-71 
WOOD, B. A. 

Press, 1928-29, 1941 
WOOD, J. MABEL 

Music, Alumni, 1949- 
WOOD, LOIS MARIE (Mrs. McColpin) 

Critic Teacher, 1954-55 
WOOD, LYNN H. 

President, Science, 1914-15, 1918-22 
WOOD, MAUDE G. 

English, German. 1914-15, 1918-20 
WOODRUFF, DONALD 

Academy Mathematics, Science, 1961-66 
WOODRUFF, ELMER E. 

Agriculture, 1903-08 
WOODS, ROBERT W. 

Science, Mathematics, 1928-39 
WOODWARD, H. A. 

Laundry, Store, 1954- 
WOOLEY, MARIANNE EVANS 

Assistant Librarian (Orlando), 1966- 
WRIGHT, KENNETH A. 

President, Business Manager, 1943-55 
WYNN, LEWIS 

Associate Pastor, 1961-63 
YOST, DONALD 

Journalism, 1965-67 
YOST, LOIS 

English, 1965-66 
YOUNG, MARVA (Mrs. W. G.) 

Elementary Supervisory Teacher, 1968-69 
YOUNG, WILLIAM 

Music, 1964-68 
ZACHARY, BRENT (Mrs. Butler) 

Music, 1923-25 
ZACHARY, MALVINA (Mrs. Taylor) 

Music, 1923-30 
ZACKRISON, EDWIN 

Religion, 1972- 



APPENDIX— LOOKING BACK 



315 



STAFF MEMBERS (Cont.) 



ZEIGLER, JAMES 
Biology, 1965- 

ZELMER, E. E. 
Garage, 1946-47 

ZIEGENBALG, MARY LOU 
Nursing, 1973- 

ZIMMERMAN, DUANNE 
Mathematics, 1961-63 

ZIMMERMAN, GRENITH 
Mathematics, 1961-63 



ZIMMERMAN, W. E. 

Science, Business Administration 

1930-32 
ZOERB, RUTH 

Art, Home Economics, 1962-63, 

1966-68, 1972- 
ZOLLINGER, ELLEN 

Home Economics, 1971- 
ZOLLINGER, RUTH 

Nursing-, 1965-66 
ZWEIG, MARY 

Secretarial Science, 1951-53 



316 



80 YEARS OF PROGRESS 



GRADUATES OF SOUTHERN TRAINING SCHOOL 
SOUTHERN JUNIOR COLLEGE AND 
SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGE 

1904-73 

May you who read these pages imagine that you are surrounded by 
faces you would again like to see and voices you would again like to hear. 



Rochelle Philmon Kilgore 



Rachel Vreeland Haughey 
John Russell Mitchell 



Colin Parish Brickey 



Martha Cornish 



Carl Hewitt 
Gentry G. Lowry 
Carl Maxwell 
Etta Reeder Olmstead 
Otto Schultz 



Alice J. Hetherington 

Rosa M. Kozel 

Burton L. Jacobs 
Mabel Mitchell Smith 

Rees Callicott 

Vesta Moyers Callicott 

Augustus H. Foster 
Ilene G. Gallemore 
Nellah Harrison Jeys 

May Warren Clark 
Stanley Lee Clark 

The accuracy of the above 
are lacking. 



1904 

1905 

Benjamin Lee Roberts 

1906 

Earl Tenney 

1907 

Nina Reynolds Emmerson 

1908 

Mrs. E. C. Spire 

Gradye Brooke Summerour 

Lawrence D. Van Voorhis 



1909 

Marie Van Kirk Hetherington 

1910 

Parizetta Smith McCollery 

1911 

Mary Vreeland Vick 
John F. Wright 

1912 

Flora Dawson Lacey 

1913 

Lowell T. Johnston 
Mrs. C. L. Stone 

1915 

Valah Dillen Webb 
Bessie Mount 

names cannot be vouched for as the records 



APPENDIX— LOOKING BACK 



317 



Charles S. Field 



GRADUATES (Cont.) 

1920 

J. Mabel Wood 



Rose Meister Allen 

Bessie Lee Morgan Appleby 

Letha Litchfield Brown 



1921 



Eber Roland Goddard 
Euphemia Macauley Jaeger 



Thomas R. Huxtable 
Cecil Branson Martin 



Ellen Bird Carron 
James Lamar Cooper 
Elizabeth Cowdrick 
Robert E. Cowdrick 



Bernice Hollister Gibbs 
Ruth McKnight Miller Gibson 
Loretta Ellen Heacock 
Donald Walter Hunter 
Brent Zachary Lickey Butler 
Anita Martin 
Myrtle Vivian Maxwell 
John S. Murchison 



J. Franklin Ashlock 
Martha Minnick Bartlett 
Mildred Emmanuel Bradley 
Jesse Stanton Cowdrick 
Lorene Furches Fox 
George Newton Fuller 
James Carl Holland 



Thelma Jones Bellew 
M. Gordon Brown 
Miriam Bruce Boyd 
Elaine Yeast Eldridge 
Paul Hammond 
Walter C. Martin 



Forrest L. Bishop 
Maurine Shaw Boyd 
Lucille White Clark 
Walter B. Clark 
Ethel May Dart 



1922 

Julia Inabinet Pound 

1923 

Frederick E. Fuller 
Masie White Jameson 
C. A. Woolsey 

1924 

Martha Montgomery Odom 

Alice Hubbell Schultz 

George E. Schultz 

Jere Dyer Smith 

Minnie Lee Matthews Ward 

Benjamin A. Wood 

Faydette Smith Youngs 

1925 

Donald Walter Hunter 
Nellie Nash McClure 
Warner E. McClure 
Harold L. Meister 
John S. Murchison 
Grace Bonner Scarborough 
Jean Wingate Schill 

1926 

Fred M. Palmer 
Ruth Starr Parrish 
Evelyn Hamilton Shephard 
William H. Shephard 
Bertha Wolfe Terry 
Hollis T. Terry 

1927 

Sarah Edwards Strickland 
Joseph Warren Franklin 
John Muller Jansen 
Howard Everett McClure 
Bertha Statham Wade 



318 



80 YEARS OF PROGRESS 



GRADUATES (Cont.) 



Charles A. Boykin 
Millard Calvin Bradley 
Leslie Butterfield 
Nellie Ferree 
Beulah Beatrice Johnson 



Clifford Merle Bee 
Thyra Burke Reins 
Laurene Allee Flanagan 
Elton B. King 
William E. Kuester 
John Letson Lambert 
Virginia Leach Thatcher 

Lewis A. Bascom 
Jennie Clark Braddock 
Minnie Lee Carter 
Lottie Dickerson Dickman 
Vincent M. Elmore, Jr. 
Leah Lucille Hoskins 
Ellen Elizabeth Ingram 
Monroe Franklin Loy 
Albert Haynes Macy 



James T. Backus 
Edward C. Banks 
Joseph Corrigan, Jr. 
Albert Lee Dickerson 
Joseph Dobbs 
Jewell Johnson DuBose 
John Frederick Duge 
Edward Hassenpflug 
Ruth Ingram 



1928 

Alfred V. McClure 
Oather Dorris McKee 
Mae Murrell Summer 
Wendell Wolfe 

1929 
Carolyn Louis Sellars 
Frances Rilea Foggarty 
John F. Speyer 
Eva Victoria Teed Beugnot 
Edna Mae Trammell Duff 
Ethel Sheldt Wildes 
Leslie Albert Wildes 

1930 

Eva Maude Wilson Martin 
Earline Forshee Massaia 
Herbert Cecil McClure 
A. D. McKee 
Clay Millard 
Wava Aline Rogers 
Coralee Russell Sullivan 
Malvina Zachary Taylor 

1931 

Viola Hervey Jameson 
Elmer R. King 
Mary Gartley Kott 
Cloie Ashby Lorren Massengill 
H. Raymond Sheldon 
Grace Pirkle Travis 
Dorothy Chambers Wade 
Irene Pointek Woodall 



1932 



Clyde 0. Franz 

Mary Ellen Mashburn 

Opal Lucille Miller 

Clarence E. Murphy 

Walter Ost 

Martha Carolyn McClure Paxton 



Bruce Thomas Benjamin 
John P. U. McLeod 
Eileen Mulford Drouault 



Leta Harding Hornyak Blotz 
Mary Philmon Byers 
Lois May Clark Franz 
J. Thomas Hall 



Carol Christian Randall 

Jesse N. Rhew 

Ward B. Shaw 

Alberta Marie Pines Spanos 

Hazel Kenny Stevens 

1933 

Frankie Johnson Philpott 
Ottis Walker 

1934 

Frances Maiden 

Anna Marjorie Randall Silverstein 

Mary Lucas Turner 



APPENDIX— LOOKING BACK 



319 



GRADUATES (Cont.) 



Lowell H. Byers 
Lettie Sibley Collins 
Vivian Boyd Goddard 
Albert N. Hall 



Audrey Strail Klaus Beale 
Ercel Mae Bradley Bennett 
Maxine Brown 
J. Gordon Burdick, Jr. 
James Richard Chambers 
Kenneth Stanley Crofoot 
Joseph S. Cruise 
Ann Brooke Cullens 
Victor William Esquilla 
Evelin Dunham Franz 
Lora Lavender Hazard 
Paul K. Hendershot 



Dorothy Ray Hutsell Burger 
Joy Crouch Churchward 
Genevieve Walker Clymer 
Ivan T. Crowder 
Edwin Fay Daughtry 
Lucille Brizendine Davis 
Walter E. Deaux 
Georgia Hale Greene 
Anna Thompson Hall 
Thelma Thomson Hartwell 
Mazie Alice Herin 



Charles Aebersold 
Doris Davis Albock 
Lenore Artress 
Doris Baessler Payne 
Martin Bird 
Ruth Beck Boynton 
Paul Carlton Boynton, Sr. 
Verlie Reiber Carron 
Richard Cleaves 
Mary R. Cowdrick 
Violet Ruskjer Downing 
Grace Fields 
Dayton Foley 
A. Carroll Ford 
William C. Gardner 
John Goodbrad 
Thomas Hackelman 



Irva Nottingham Baessler 
Jean Hadley Dortch 
Mary Glidewell Gill 



1935 

Roger Maiden Leach 
Zella Flora Savelle 
Albert C. Smith 

1936 

Opal Freeze Hewitt 
Virginian Wier Hibbard 
Helen Brown Kickliter 
Vera Fay Lester 
Eric Lundquist 
Martyn Ingram MacFarland 
Bernice Meacham 
Blanche Black Ost 
Roberta Bird Quinn 
Martha Brown Shain 
E. Lewell Smith 
Margaret Deaux Taylor 

1937 

Irad Clete Levering 
Robert Timon Lukat 
Lucille Ward Lukat 
Nena McAlpine Lovingood 
Menton Amos Medford 
Henry Lionel Reese, Jr. 
William Osbourne Reynolds 
Carl Frank Romans 
Robin Everett Simmons 
Ella Mae Thomson Sorenson 

1938 

Irma Lee Osteen Horning 
Standish Greek Hoskins 
Flora Edith Lester 
Vesta Lester 

Eleanor McAlpine Robinson 
Raymond Morphew 
Walker W. Oliphant 
Philip Albert Parker 
Pauline Chapman Porter 
Eunice Bell Reiber 
Milton T. Reiber 
James Roddy 
G. Lester Stauffer 
Lynne Sudduth Wiederkehr 
Sue Bruce Waller 
Woodrow McKendre Wilson 

1939 

Alyce Marie Ivy 
Byron W. Lighthall 
Pierce Jones Moore, Jr. 



320 



80 YEARS OF PROGRESS 



GRADUATES (Cont.) 



Inez Beck Nestell 
Clarence Eugene Newman 
Maxine Follis Pedersen 
Margaret Seilaz Peterson 



Evelyn Britt 

Quinette Maxwell Carlson 

Alma Clyde Chambers 

Frieda M. Clark 

John D. Irwin 

Ruby Tripp Irwin 

Louis G. Ludington 



Elsie Landon Buck 
Gladys Purdie Copeland 
Paul Gaver 
Burgess Goodbrad 
Hoyt V. Hendershot 
Clifford Ludington 



1939 (Cont.) 

Katherine Chambers Philpott 
Irwin H. Schroader 
Louis Clinton Waller 
Wallace L. Wellman 

1940 

Nellie Jane Smith McDonald 
James 0. McLeod 
Leslie H. Pitton 
Hazel Brooks Snide 
Rollin Fred Snide 
Mildred Hust Wellman 

1941 

Mattie Mae Carter McLeod 
Lorabel Peavey Midkiff 
Juanita Mathieu Norrell 
Frederick Cecil Petty, Sr. 
Jack Sheddan 
T. J. Shelton 



Hubert T. Anderson 
Doris June Hale Bryant 
Annie Mae Chambers 
Charles Arthur Davis, Jr. 
Maisie Franz Duge 
Talietha Belz Foust 
Floy Hazel Brooks Greer 
Benjamin E. Herndon 
June Snide Hooper 
Opal Johnson Lobdell 
Ferrell Fay McMahen Mathieu 
Lois Lorraine Mauldin 
Catherine Fox Mizelle 
Esther Brassington Nelson 



Elaine Williams Barrett 
June Thorpe Blue 
John Harvey Bowen 
Juanita Jo Carithers 
Lorraine Davis Fox 
Jean Rebok Heinrich 
Edgar Randall Howard 
Elvine Jones 
John E. Keplinger 
Dorothy Ida McCullough 
William Lamar McDaniel 



Marie Guinn Bailey 
Claudine Hopkins Boyle 



1942 

Milton G. Norrell, Jr. 
Virginia Hubbell Patrick 
John William Ray 
Malcolm Emory Rogers 
Ruth Carterette Sands 
Thyra Bowen Sloan 
Carl Jackson Smith 
Hazel Brooks Snide 
Marie Romedy Steadman 
George Monroe Tolhurst, Jr. 
Esther Carterette Trummer 
Sarah Hooper Wax 
Donald Leroy West, Sr. 

1943 

Lois Evelyn McKee 
Miriam Grace Moore Miracle 
Drew Bennett Murphy 
Marilyn Estelle Byrd Oates 
William M. Schomburg 
Eileen Conger Seeley 
Dorothy Reed Stephenson 
Ethel Cochran Tolhurst 
Grayce Marquis Williamson 
Merlyn Jane Parks Winters 

1944 

Leonard Lamar Bratcher 
Chalmer Chastain, Jr. 



APPENDIX— LOOKING BACK 



321 



GRADUATES (Cont.) 



Georgette Damon Collier 
Joseph Archie Crews 
Lula Ann Tunison Crews 
Pansy Parker Dameron 
Harriet Russell Echols 
James Leonard Evans 
James Frederick Ford 
June Wright Frame 
George Virley Fuller 

Mamie Yancey Echols Bean 
Helen Shirley Bush Boer 
Alan Floyd Bush 
Mary Lucy Tunison Darnell 
Verne Clarence Dortch 
Doris Bethea Graham 
Eddie Frances Greek Hamilton 
Mary Riley Henderson 

Marcella Klock Ashlock 
Joseph Archie Crews 
Juanita Mathieu Norrell 



1944 (Cont.) 

Alice Mae Perkins Kimber 
Elizabeth Brooke Koudele 
Katherine Kessel MacMillan 
Jane Summerour Ralls 
Ruby Aikman Shields 
Elouise Wynn Smith 
Grace Schneider Turner 
Clarence D. Wellman 



1945 

Gunter Werner Koch 
Dorothy Davis Lund 
Margaret Wrenn Rinehart 
Roland Robert Semmens 
Lyle Marie Wallace Stockdale 
Alice Marie Irwin Wareham 
Ruth Risetter Watson 
Lillian Jewell Johnson Woolever 

1946 

Ruby Aikman Shields 
Louise Olsen Walther 
Clarence Delmar Wellman 



1946 _ 2-YEAR 



Esther Kephart Bruce 
Helen Barbara Chase 
Corinne Dortch Burns 
Elaine Jensen Hickman 
Margarita Dietel Merriman 
Clara Dennis Pearson 



Milton Claude Connell 
James Leonard Evans 
Otis Marvin Graves 
Jack E. Griffith 
Billy Page Haskell 
Orville Rogers Henderson 
Glenn Frederick Henriksen 



1947 



Lucille Reed Barrera 
Goldie Pines Connell 
Phyllis Mae Marsh England 
Robert T. Hoover 
Mabel Parfitt Maguire 
Myron Leroy McCumber 
Wilma Cornell McDonnell 
Betty Jo Boynton McMillan 



Robert Samuel Bishop 
Elmer Lee Black 



Virginia Olive Spooner 
Joan Perkins Stevens 
Bernice Edna Purdie Vito 
Ann Morgan Wheeler 
Joyce Shirley Young Wood 

1947 

Earl Fisher Kenny 
Alice Perkins Kimber 
Rheva Groat Liu 
Max Lee Ritchie 
Grace Schneider Turner 
Robert Haskel Wood 

— 2-YEAR 

Nanette Clay McPherson 
Jessie Hawman Olson 
Betty Hardy Peterson 
Voncile Petty Purviance 
Catherine Ferrell Ritchie 
Ruth Naomi Schroeder 
Ruby Marie Shreve 
Betty Jane Bottomley Wood 

1948 

Wendell Lloyd Coble 
John Spencer Darnall 



322 



80 YEARS OF PROGRESS 



GRADUATES (Cont.) 



Miriam Ditzel Darnall 
Robert Carter Darnell 
Robert Allan Hamm 
Melvin Gene Hickman 
Jack Alfred Just 
J. B. Kinder 
Robert Charles Kistler 
Theodore Michael Lysek 
Kenneth Milton Mathews 
Evan Williams Richards 



Clyde Franklin Brooks 
Louise Gracey Brooks 
Ross V. Cockrell 
Donald Eugene Lilley 
James Thomas Linderman 



1948 (Cont.) 

James Richard Rimmer 
Robert Albert Roach 
Lawrence Garnett Scales 
Roland Robert Semmens 
Joseph Allen Soule 
Robert Gladstone Swofford 
Wayne Putney Thurber 
John Ivan Wilbur 
John Allen Wilson 



1948 



2-YEAR 

Harold Norman Sheffield 
Ervin Benjamin Stewart 
Edna Stewart Swain 
Mary Lynn Coulson Tavenner 
Dixie Reeder Wilcox 



1949 



Frances Evelyn Andrews 

Jacob Lawrence Atkins 

Marie Guinn Bailey 

Jimmie Lou Westerfield Brackett 

Charles Lee Cannon 

Manual M. Carballal 

Rosalina Rivera Cardona 

Andrew Fitch Chastain 

Robert Leach Chism 

Earl M. Clough 

Cecil Reeves Coffey 

Lorin Oswald Cook 

Robert W. Geach 

Thomas Eugene Hansen 

Robert Guy Harder 



1949 



Fern Wheeler Anderson 
Daniel Robert Bottomley 
Dewitt Bowen 
Barbra Benton Coffey 
Joyce Spears Cotham 
Lola Marie Genton 
Margaret Baker Kerbs 
Thelma Cramer Litchfield 



George S. Ashlock 
Thomas Morton Ashlock 
Glenn Edward Beagles 
Margaret Jo Urick Bledsoe 
Kenneth Elmer Boynton 
Thomas Edison Bullock 
Robert Lee Carrico 
Daniel L. Chavez 



Johannes Alf Johanson 
Elizabeth Kistler Lechler 
Mabel Parfitt Maguire 
John Morgan, Jr. 
William Warren Oakes 
Jean Kuster Ott 
Gordon Schlenker 
Elizabeth Clayton Scott 
Jeanne Dorsette Stoodley 
Ruth Risetter Watson 
Donald Leroy West, Sr. 
Ben David Wheeler 
Betty Jane Bottomley Wood 
Philip Samuel Young, Jr. 

— 2-YEAR 

June Loach McGlawn 
Virginia Ostman 
Dorothy Morgan Pierce 
Dorothy Jean Graves Salhany 
Maurice Godwin Van Sickle 
Irene Pearman Veltman 
Hazel Callender Werner 
Verna Ruth Wade Wood 

1950 

Richard Lowell Clapp 
Charles Lewis Cutter 
Pansy Parker Dameron 
Charles DeArk 
Maurice Alvin Dunn 
Harold Lewis Flynt 
James Grey Fuller 
Forrest La Verne Fuller 



APPENDIX— LOOKING BACK 



323 



GRADUATES (Cont.) 



Clarence Henry Hager 
Amos Lee Harrelson 
George Paul Haynes 
Charles P. Hill, Jr. 
Camille Lloyd Holden 
Avolt B. Just 
Harold Wayne Keplinger 
Robert LeClear Mathews 
Walter Leon Maxey 
Keigwin Blake Maxfield 
Kenneth Edward Mensing 
Roscoe Conkling Mizelle, Jr. 
Mason Francis Moore 
Ernest Milford Morgan 
Billy Edward Morrison 
Curtis Reid Morton 
Raymond Herbert Nasvall 



1950 (Cont.) 

Harris Edward Nelson 
Wilbur James Ostman 
Betty Hardy Peterson 
Garland Charles Peterson 
George Edward Petty 
Harold Roger Phillips 
Carroll Leslie Prather 
Harold Robert Robbins 
Charles Jack Sager 
Phaize Jean-Pierre Salhany 
Walter Leon Schwab 
James Harold Turner 
David Edward Wagner 
Paul Peyton Ward, Jr. 
Paul Morris Watson 
Henry Armond Wilmot 
Preston Donald Woodall 



Marlene Marie Avery 
Margaret Motley Brownlow 
Ann Maxwell Burchard 
Billie Turnage Caudill 
Ella Mae Sanderford Clapp 
Bobra Morgan Crosby 
Annie Mae Hope 



1950 — 2-YEAR 

Letha Mabel Howard 

Lola Mae Hammond Newman 

Betty Cummings Phillips 

Dollis Mae Smith Pierson 

Nelda Mitchel Reid 

Carol Potter Sturgis 



1951 



Calvin Clifford Acuff 
Ernest S. Anderson 
Kenneth Chandler Baize 
Homer Douglas Bennett 
Loren Everett Bishop 
James William Blankenship 
Thomas Lee Brackett, Jr. 
Wilbur Devaughn Brass 
Jerald E. Bromback 
Clyde Franklin Brooks 
Carmen Cartabianca 
Edward Milton Collins 
Richard Llewellyn Coon 
Arthur Ray Corder 
Paul William Dysinger 
James Leroy Edwards 
Mary Elizabeth Elam 
George Burton Ellis 
R. Dale Fisher 
Joseph Leland Gardner 
Elbert Wade Goodner 
Kenneth K. Hamilton 
Warren G. Hammond 
Ovvie Eric Hanna 
Russell Worden Hartwell 
Malone H. Hendry 



Carl David Henriksen 
Charles Walter Holland 
Rainey Howard Hooper 
James Jamile Jacobs 
Joe Earl Lambeth, Sr. 
Chauncey F. Laubach 
Weldon Dale Martin 
Betty Jo Boynton McMillan 
Paul McMillan, Jr. 
Bette Walters Miller 
Frances Martin Miller 
Thomas Joseph Mostert, Sr. 
Betty Imogene Park 
Craig Sanford Parrish 
Charles Lefelia Pierce 
Lloyd Wendell Pleasants 
Philipe Bruce Raab 
Herman Carlyle Ray 
Frederick Stanley Sanburn 
Andranik Walters Saphiloff 
Edward Herman Schneider IV 
Kenneth Eugene Scott 
Noble Kenneth Shepherd 
James Houston Sinclair 
Lester Andrew Smith 
Ruth Jones Sorrell 



324 



80 YEARS OF PROGRESS 



GRADUATES (Cont.) 
1951 (Cont.) 



Dorothy Zill Susleck 
John Baker Tigert 
William Tol, Sr. 
Drew Munroe Turlington 
Frederick Veltman 
William Dean Wampler 



Raymond Harvey Woolsey 
Henry Wooten, Jr. 
Burton Lamont Wright 
Alexander A. Zegarra 
William Forrest Zill 



1951 — 2-YEAR 



Emory Floyd Hoyt 
Audrey Bergman Hulett 
Marjorie Connell Johnson 
Christine Elizabeth Kummer 
Ruth Kummer Leach 



Esther P. Alberro 
Samuel Alberro 
Rene Ramiro Alonso 
Waldina L. Alonso 
Harold Elbert Armstrong 
Virgil N. Beauchamp 
Margaret Motley Brownlow 
Ruby Teachey Campbell 
Nicolas Chaij 
James Brandon Davis 
Peter William Donesky 
Dora Drachenberg 
Rolando Drachenberg 
Marie Wrenn East 
Elaine Higdon Groves 
Robert Eugene Haege 
William Stanley Hancock 
Charles P. Harris, Jr. 
Gerald A. Haun 
John William Hiser 
Emory Floyd Hoyt 
Richard Lee Huff 
Lawrence D. Hughes 
William Edward Jones 
Donald E. Kenyon 
David E. Kribs 
Hugh Vernon Leggett, Sr. 



Doris Patterson Moore 
Caroline Gibson Morris 
Doris Tipton Pierce 
Raymond Joseph Pons 
Elmyra Conger Stover 

1952 

Aubrey H. Liles, Jr. 
Kline Lloyd 
Ruben Armando Lopez 
Don B. Martin 
Joyce Cobb May 
Van Siebert McGlawn 
Jessie Hawman Olson 
Patricia Champion Owens 
Lester E. Park 
Wilford H. Patsel 
Sherman Peterson 
Lawrence W. Pitcher 
Joseph R. Poole 
Arthur J. Price 
Andress H. Riffel 
Ruth M. Riffel 
Juan R. Rodriguez 
Raymond C. Russell 
John W. Ryals 
Marilou Parker Schriber 
John R. Stanley, Jr. 
Thomas S. Stone 
Victor W. Stuyvesant 
Walter S. Sutherland 
Layton Ray Sutton 
Dewey J. Urick, Jr. 
Wallace D. Welch 



1952 — 2- YEAR 



Mary Frances Allen 
Bernice E. Baker 
Grace Lyon Byram 
Helen Hoover Burtnett 
Mary Ellen Carden Byrd 
Laura Hancock Dupper 
Glenda Porter Foster 
Lilia Chacon Hetrick 



Lois Highsmith 
Vernon Calvin Hill 
Jeanne McWilliams Lowe 
Sara P. Mahn 
Madge Cazalas Robinson 
Earl Henry Salhany 
Helen Braat Sauls 
Royalyn Hastings Whitley 



APPENDIX— LOOKING BACK 



325 



GRADUATES (Cont.) 



Walter Maurice Abbott 

Fred E. Acuff 

Henry E. Baasch 

Roy F. Battle 

C. L. Beason 

Wallace N. Blair 

J. D. Bledsoe 

Velma Boyd 

Ruth Beck Boynton 

Koy Thomas Brown 

Willard R. Brown 

Harmon C. Brownlow 

Richard Chesney 

Rose Schroeder Chesnut 

Betty Staben Collins 

Edwin Dale Collins 

Glenn Coon 

Roy W. Crawford 

J. Donald Crook 

Mary Crooker 

Merrill Webster Crooker 

Hazel Lowman Crowley 

Marie (Culveyhouse) Culvey 

Ada Ruth Woolsey Elder 

Everett Edwin Erskine 

Jack P. Facundus 

Verda Lee Fletcher 

Archie G. Fox 

Alvin Galutia 

John T. Garner 

William Randolph Hall 

Kenneth Harding 

John Harlan 

T. J. Harper 

Ruth Garber Higgins 

Howard D. Huenergardt 

Robert E. Huey 

Winnie Hughes 

Harry Wakefield Hulsey, Jr. 



1953 



Frances Inez Clark 
Mary Jean Brown Damron 
Ruby Martin Eberhart 
Dolly Darbo Fillman 
Carolyn Jameson Fisher 
Betty Jo Wallace Griffin 
Patricia Thames Harris 
Harold S. Johnson 
Annie Philips Jordan 

Bernice E. Baker 
Marion Barrera 



1953 

William A. Hust 

Marjorie Connell Johnson 

James L. Joiner 

Chester L. Jordan 

Lilah Lawson Lilley 

Jack Martz 

Floyd H. Matula 

Robert C. McMillan 

Charles Meade 

J. J. Millet 

Douglas Milliner 

Alfred B. Mitchell 

Mable Mitchell Joiner 

Charlotte Nelson 

Lorene Ausherman Nelson 

James B. Nick 

Robert Ellsworth Northrop 

Albert Roland Parker 

Ruby Jean Lynn Phalen 

Jack L. Price 

Wayne Rimmer 

Bruce L. Ringer 

Elmon H. Roy 

Clark Salyer, Sr. 

James Ernest Savage 

Joyce Sinclair 

Adolph J. Skender 

Richard Sloan 

Florence Rozell Smoot 

H. Wesley Spiva 

Clyde Springfield 

Lloyd N. Sutter 

Delmon Duane Swanson 

Elmer W. Taylor 

Relious Leroy Walden 

Albert Wilt 

Eugene R. Wood 

Lewis A. Wynn 

— 2-YEAR 

Martha Schmidt Kinsey 
Winifred Metz Knowling 
Charlotte Mills Lawson 
Viola Turnage Mitchell 
La Verne Hughes Northrop 
Charles William Pettingill, Jr. 
June Neely Wilcox 
I. Benjamin Young 

1954 

Bryant L. Barrington 
Mary E. Beans 



326 



80 YEARS OF PROGRESS 



GRADUATES (Cont.) 



1954 (Cont.) 



Robert Thomas Bond 
Arthur Eugene Butterfield 
Nobel A. Carlson 
Robert East 
Carl Edwin Everett 
Walter D. Fenz 
Lola Marie Genton 
Obed Octavus Graham 
Theodore Nelson Graves 
Gerard Gutekunst 
Lawrence Richard Hawkins 
Wilfred S. Henderson 
John William Henson III 
Gerald Rogers Kenyon 
Betty Ludington 
Alfred McClure 
Lois Marie Wood McColpin 
Robert Allen McCumber 
Ellsworth McKee 



Jerry F. Medanich 
Robert Walter Melius 
Viola Turnage Mitchell 
Maria Lusia Moreno 
Choon Soo Oh 
Oluf Edwin Olsen 
Billy Mack Read 
Joseph G. Reams, Jr. 
Marvin Edward Rogers 
Carol Jean Whidden Smith 
Juanita Coble Sparks 
Milford Forrest Spruill 
Elmyra Conger Stover 
Alvin B. Tripp 
Arthur Leroy Watrous 
Elden R. Wilson 
Fred Eugene Wilson 
Walter Frederick Wright 
Melvin D. Yoder 



1954 — 2-YEAR 



Frances Motley Ammons 
Donna Weber Bohannon 
Coretta Graham 
Mary Thomas Hawthorne 
Marie Frances Holloway 
Lynne Jensen 
Virginia Lynd Orr 



Fawzi Jawdat Abu-el-haj 
James Thomas Alexander 
Adolphe E. Amedee 
Robert Henley Ammons 
Wallace T. Anderson 
William H. Badenhorst 
Mamie Echols Bean 
Thomas Henry Bledsoe 
Iris Maxwell Burchard 
Emma G. Burdette 
Ryan E. Burdette 
Elizabeth N. Carawan 
Edward J. Carlson 
Hugo W. Christiansen 
Robert Dean Davis 
Arlene Detamore Dever 
Rheba Goggins Dortch 
Roberto Drachenberg 
Glenda Porter Foster 
Rene A. Gonzalez 
Floyd L. Greenleaf 
Norman Rich Gulley 
John Frederick Harris 



Florine Daniel Maye 
Betty Brisson McKee 
Pauline Nosworthy Pierson 
Annetta Boyles Sterner 
Barbara Sammons Stubbs 
Barbara Wilson 
Celia V. Youmans 



1955 



Paul K. Hendershot 
Russell Samuel Hieb 
Letha Mabel Howard 
William Joseph Hulsey 
Maryan Nelson Jessen 
Mark Leeds 
Delvin E. Littell 
Daniel You-Chi Loh 
Lawrence L. Marvin 
James Ray McKinney 
Frank Mace McMillan 
Harold Miler 
John N. Oliver 
John F. Pifer 
Donald H. Polen 
Peter Read 

La Sina Harrison Rilea 
Lester C. Rilea 
Normalou Sanborn 
Valentin W. Schoen 
D. James Scott 
William Edward Severs 
Richard H. Shepard 



APPENDIX— LOOKING BACK 



327 



GRADUATES (Cont.) 



Joseph Grady Smoot 
Lenwood Stockton 
Joel Tompkins 



Rose Marie Grosboll Bailey 
Rebecca Binkley Bethea 
Lynda Mudford Brown 
Reba Faye Cates Crutcher 
Marianne Robbins Dortch 
Violet Starr Durichek 



C. Cecil Abernathy 
Gene Ballenger 
David H. Bauer 
Peggy Elizabeth Bennett 
Donald Bethea 
W. Joe Butterfield 
James E. Duke 
M. George Gager 
Genevevo Gonzalez 
Jewell Mohr Groome 
Robert Dean Groome 
Vernon Calvin Hill 
Donald E. Holland 
John Maxwell Howard, Jr. 
William E. Ingram 
Lynne Jensen 
Michael F. Kabool 
Herbert Dean Kinsey 
Betty Jeanne Lewis 



Flonnie Anderson 
Sue Lasseter Beckner 
Helen Case Durichek 
Margie Gentry 
Mary Hoehn Homer 
Patricia Martin Kabool 



Jack Bruce Bohannon 
Barbara Shook Bottsford 
John E. Bottsford 
Robert Gene Bowers 
Frank Clayton Burtnett 
Billie Turnage Caudill 
Julian T. Coggin 
John Harry Culp, Jr. 
Chester H. Damron 
Homer H. Dever 
Walter DeVries 
Peter Durichek, Jr. 



1955 (Cont.) 

Edward Vick 
Olavi E. Weir 
Ferdinand P. Wuttke 

1955 — 2-YEAR 

Carol Hollingsworth Eldridge 
Kathryn Wooley Hinson 
Nancy Matthews McMillan 
Carolyn Haynes Weir 
Iris Mull Westcott 

1956 

Lester William Maas 
James William McClintock 
Carol McClure 
Ivan Namihas 
Richard D. Northrop 
Carol Stern O'Day 
Patrick O'Day 
Richard Lynn Sauls 
Elmer I. Stone 
Marjorie Hansen Stone 
Wayne Taylor, Jr. 
John W. Thurber 
Charles Tan Tran 
Elizabeth Maurice Urick 
Kenneth Clovd Vance 
Walter C. Ward 
Herold D. Weiss 
Ralph C. Workman 

1956 — 2-YEAR 

Jane Liles King 
Jean Kenny Longley 
Carol Smith Palsgrove 
Charlotte Eller Tullock 
Clara Farley Watrous 
Lela Eunice Whorton 

1957 

Fred Eberhart 
Richard G. Fischer 
David Bruce Hall 
Richard C. Hasty 
Alma Loy Hilton 
La Don Winston Homer 
Bob Lee Jobe 
Howard M. Kennedy 
Paul Edward Kilgore 
Edward Francis Killen 
Alice Lai-Wen Loh 
James C. Lynn 



328 



80 YEARS OF PROGRESS 



GRADUATES (Cont.) 



Jeannette G. Maas 
Joyce Larsen McClure 
Laurence Ramon McClure 
Glen T. McColpin 
David W. Messinger 
Harold E. Messinger 
Rachel Atkins Millard 
Charles Frank Moore 
Gad Ronald Noble, Jr. 
Jessie Strassner Pendergrass 
Elsie E. Peterson 
Carlos Ramon Reyes 

1957 
Constance Moffett Arnett 
Mary Louise Lundquist Evers 
Joycelyn Speyer Hess 
Darlyne Ballard Jarrett 
Barbara Navy Oliver 



Juan Acevedo 
Paul L. Allen 
Silco Alvarez 
Richard Arthur 
Mildred Marie Baldwin 
Richard J. Belz 
Joseph Arthur Bishop 
Clifford C. Burgeson 
Mary Sue Estes Burke 
Vinson Clair Bushnell 
Sally Wonderly Caudill 
Frances Inez Clark 
Bob L. Collins 
Carolyn Hoofard Cooper 
Joshua Ira Dennison 
Helen Case Durichek 
John T. Durichek 
Ronald A. Haupt 
Inelda Phillips Hefferlin 
David H. Hess 
Robert Stanley Ingram 
Carl Jansen 



1957 (Cont.) 

Ronald B. Rodgers 
Zella Flora Savelle 
Joya Lynn Schoen 
Duane 0. Stier 
Ava Sunderland Peek 
Neil Campbell Tarr 
Norman Lee Trubey 
Franco Rosa Vega 
Ralph H. Walden 
June Neely Wilcox 
Joseph Jerry Williams 



2-YEAR 

Delphyne Ballard Reece 
Alice Dean Trubey 
Lillian McDonell Wilkinson 
Marilyn Dortch Wurl 



1958 



David L. Jarrett 
Harold S. Johnson 
Clifton Keller 
Irene Cross Kuist 
Robert Kenneth LeBard 
Clymera Anderson Lorren 
Anne Lowe 
John F. McClellan 
Jerome W. Niswonger 
Ruth Elliott Nuckols 
James D. Peel, Jr. 
Elmer Dean Pierce 
Robert G. Pierson 
Eugene T. Remmers 
Joann Ausherman Rozell 
Jan Orland Rushing 
Gilbert 0. Smith 
Vernon C. Sparks 
Thomas W. Staples 
Gerald A. Swayze 
Aida Acosta Weiss 
Fred Williams 



Ann Elliott Griessbach 



Helen Andrade 
Shirley Tice Bryne 
Gwen Gardner Fox 
Sally Daugherty Haight 
Gertrude Thomas Hansen 



1958 _ 2-YEAR 

1958 — NURSING 
Diploma Class 

* Ella Hyde Harden 
Gwen Higdon 
Anne Boothe Johnson 
Bertha Kingsbury 
Dorothy Dye Luttrell 



APPENDIX— LOOKING BACK 



329 



GRADUATES (Cont.) 



1958- 
Yvonne Noel 
Anne Shroyer Paston 
Dorothy Post 
Jeanette Hostetler Roberts 



Katie Mae Baker 
Marilyn Biggs Sykes 
Robert W. Burchard 
Kenneth Iber Burke 
Marcus Eugene Burke 
Fernando Cardona 
George Alfred Deloney 
Paul Daniel Gates 
Romayne Godwin Pratt 
Sherman Roy Holdridge 
Leta Harding Blotz 
Leah Lucille Hoskins 
Paul L. Jensen 
Orley Franklin Johnson 
William Roy Jones, Jr. 
Richard Charles Kenfield 
Dorothy Evelyn Kulisek 
Caryl Maddox Morey 
Edward Obie McCoun 
Norman Eugene Peek 



Susan Arnold del Valle 
Sandra Collier Kovalski 



1959 



-Nursing (Cont.) 

Myrna Lou Roberts 
Joanne Schimek 
Barbara Dalton Taylor 
Georgianna Thompson 

1959 

Leslie Donald Pendleton 
Anne Davidson Pettey 
Alexander Henry Pfister 
James Ohlen Rhodes 
James Pierce Rogers 
Jule Ausherman Romans 
Robert Claude Romans 
George L. Sarver, Jr. 
Ronald Craig Shealy 
Donald Albert Short 
Leonard Frederick Vonhof 
Woodson Lee Walker, Jr. 
Frances Richardson White 
Violette Orlene White 
Donald Eugene Wilkinson 
Lillian McDonell Wilkinson 
Donald Wallin Wilson 
Izora Shurley Wood 
Richard Arnold Young 

— 2-YEAR 

Joan Marie Dierks 
Patricia Mathers Orange 



1960 



Phyllis Finney Bame 

Laura Vance Barnes 

Barbara Jean Beavers 

George J. Bogovich 

Ann Cunningham Burke 

Louis Lamar Butler 

Thomas Berry Cobb 

Dallas Colvin 

Royce George Cookson 

Donald E. Crane 

Bernard Danzel DeVasher 

Phyllis Moore Dickerhoff 

Percy E. Dunagin, Jr. 

Donald James Dykes 

Mary Louise Lundquist Evers 

Judson C. Filler 

Elwood M. Foote 

Gary Neal Fowler 

Ann Elliott Griessbach 

Grant Doyal Gunter 

Ruth Tyler Haas 

David Williams Hamilton 



Marie Frances Holloway 
Don Ruben Keele 
Sang Yong Kim 
Roger Symon King 
Arne Klingstrand 
Helen Elliott Krall 
Robert Leroy Kriigel 
Ruth Louise Kummer 
Kenneth Marvin Lake 
Pearlie M. Lamb 
Richard Carl Larsen 
James Charles Leeper 
Betty Martin Litchfield 
Theodore Wendell Litchfield 
Carolyn Virginia Luce 
Albert Eugene Luttrell 
Betty Jean Martin 
Charles Esten Myers, Jr. 
Ramona McCurdy McCoun 
James C. McElroy, Jr. 
David Allen McFaddin 
Charles Alvin Nicholas 



330 



80 YEARS OF PROGRESS 



GRADUATES (Cont.) 



Truman Royce Parrish 
Alta Eloise Philo 
Carol Rozell Pickel 
Marie Powell 
Wilfred Felan Reyna 
Harold Lane Schmidt 
Amy Bushnell Seitz 
Roy A. Shouppe 
Charles Donald Silver 
Shirley Gunter Smith 
William G. Straight 
Winford N. Tate 



Joanne Leitner Anderson 
Jewel Rose Edwards 



Leland R. Tetz 
Joseph V. Travis, Jr. 
Esther Virginia Tyler 
Charles G. del Valle, Jr. 
Jerry DeWayne Vanerwegen 
Norma Grubb Watkins 
Violet C. Weiss 
Roberta M. Wery 
LaRue Landers Williams 
Virginia Anderson Wortham 
Joan Mclntyre Young 



I960 — 2-YEAR 



Wilbur Donald Alfaro 
William Hunter Arbour 
John E. Baker 
Sharon Olson Barnes 
William Stanley Berry 
Marilyn Downs Bottomley 
Ronald C. Bottsford 
Frances Jane Brewer 
Janet Beckner Brock 
Richard Lee Brunk 
Quinton Murray Burks 
Ann Rorabaw Clark 
Donald Eugene Clark 
Elizabeth Carawan Cline 
David Lynn Coggin 
Ben Eugene Crawford 
Nettie Allen Culp 
Clifton Lafayette Davis 
Merald Dwayne Dickerson 
Carolyn Trawick Facundus 
Randall Hood Fox 
Sarah Whitt French 
Roy K. Frith 
Julius M. Garner 
Ann Richman Gearhart 
Roger Bruce Gerhart 
Charles Henry Giles 
Richard Edward Green 
Elaine Sullivan Giles 
Donald Eugene Hall 
Will John Henson 
John Thomas Hines 
Janice Davis Hudson 
Mary Ruth Seibert Hughes 
Jolena Taylor King 
Suzanne Johnson Kinzer 



Beverly Schmidt Garner 
Rosalind Ann Hendron 



1961 



Kenneth C. Kissinger 
Franklin E. Lamb, Jr. 
John Holmes LeBaron 
John R. Lonberg 
Carol Burchard Magboo 
Sylvia O'Brien Mahrle 
Ann Shanko Marshall 
John Lewis Marshall 
Joy Tanner McElroy 
Regina Page Micklewright 
Jeanne Pettis Miller 
Danny Richard Minnick 
Ronald E. Mitchell 
William Herbert Nuckols 
Ward Hopkins Oliver 
Everett Earl Oxberger 
Leonard Harold Ponder 
Gloria Crews Ponder 
Richard Charles Rial 
Daniel Willis Rozell 
Marvin Nicholas Salhany 
Janice Black Short 
Martha Sue Silver 
Eva Lysell Spain 
Melvin Lee Stanaway 
Larry Ben Stephens, Sr. 
Gene Elmer Stone 
Julia Boyd Swarner 
Orville Ward Swarner, Jr. 
Mary Lou Facemyer Tavares 
William Richard Toler 
Sara Brown Torres 
James David Vye 
Charles L. Watkins 
Marvin E. Weedman 
Ross William Weldon 



APPENDIX— LOOKING BACK 



331 



GRADUATES (Cont.) 
1961 — 2-YEAR 



Bertha Caughron Begley 
Linda Landers Davis 
Patricia McCollum Elliott 
Gladys Lee Lawless 



Robert George Adams 
James L. Allen 
Alton Glenn Anderson 
Eugene Forrest Anderson 
Joanne Leitner Anderson 
Ron Arden 
Elmer Carrol Baker 
Dorothy Kroneck Bergholt 
Edward Sanford Bergholt, Jr. 
Lillian D. Bolton 
John Thomas Bridges 
Joyce Tomes Bridges 
Norman E. Brown 
Carolyn Clark Buckingham 
Lewis C. Bush 
Robert D. Channell 
Betty Davis Chapin 
Ruth Lutz Cheneweth 
Shirley Kurtz Clark 
Roy Clifford Colson, Jr. 
Donna Dunham Crandell 
James Clark Culpepper 
Troy F. Daniel 
Barbara Foster Duska 
Barbara Schmidt Fowler 
Florence Fox 
Ronald Lee Fox 
Bruce G. Freeman, Jr. 
Glenn Arthur Fuller 
Jon William Gepford 
Ollie Mae Metts Giles 
Stanley Allen Giles 
Lucille Peterson Graham 
Joseph Charles Green, Jr. 
Robert Eugene Hansen 
June B. Hart 



1962 



Audrey Delores Crittenden 
Shirley Hunger Eisner 
Donna Jean Faltin Garner 
Patricia Ruth Gepford 
Dolores Marie Ham 



Audrey Klaus Beale 
James Rupert Beale 
Charles Thomas Begley 



Lynne Price Martin 
Sandra Swain Petersen 
Faye Rolling Vye 



1962 

Rosemary Hayes 
Sandra Elliott Haynes 
Ralph M. Hendershot 
Paul Howard Holden 
Joan Kistler Jones 
Gene Harold Kendall 
Sandra Collier Kovalski 
Larry Dean Larsen 
William C. Lord 
Carol Ann Meyer Marlow 
Wilmer Benjamin Moore 
William Charles Mundy 
Patricia Mathers Orange 
Annetta Caroline Owens 
David Wallace Parker 
Marilyn Garrison Parker 
Wesley Earl Paul 
Gordon Blain Pendergrass 
Galen Alvin Pettey 
Andrew R. Rivera 
Nancy Reid Rucker 
Richard C. Roberts 
Marolyn Miller Sayre-Smith 
John Siemens, Jr. 
Kenneth Edward Straw 
Margie Sue Temples 
James A. Tucker 
David Villemain 
Sandra J. Vinson 
John Floyd Vogt III 
Harold Lloyd Walker 
William Ronald Watson 
Barbara Holland Wear 
Winnona Nadyne Whetstone 
Alice Fowler Willsey 

— 2-YEAR 

Eleanor Gilreath Holland 
Linda Paternostro Terranova 
Anne Louise Senseman 
Carol Jane Villemain Turner 



1963 

Fred Howard Berger 
John David Bevis 
Patricia Hall Black 



332 



80 YEARS OF PROGRESS 



GRADUATES (Cont.) 



1963 (Cont.) 



Judith Falls Blanton 
Robert Kenneth Blanton 
Harold K. Brown 
Joyce Russell Bush 
Kenneth Ryon Case, Jr. 
Lois Vipond Case 
Ruth Painter Case 
Edward J. Casewell 
Marilee Easter Cothren 
Darrell Keith Cross 
Kay Sands Crowson 
Margaret Davis Darnell 
Wayne Maurice Darnell 
Dolores Hieb Delong 
Robert B. Dickinson 
Donald Clay Farmer 
Leonard Noel Fillman 
A. David Fogg 
Geraldine Presteen Foote 
Harvey E. Foote 
Ha Mae Fristad 
Joel Woolsey Gearhart 
Rogene Louise Goodge 
David Raymond Grantier 
Donna Walker Haerich 
Frederic Donald Haerich 
Nathaniel E. Halverson 
Nildo J. Harper 
Andrew Hamilton Heckle 
Judie Ann Henderson Phillips 
Dwight L. Hilderbrandt 
Geraldine Donak Hollis 
John Martin Jansen 
Lenora Purvis Jones 
Jean Schmidt Kingry 
Bruce Harvey Kopitzke 
Gerald Niel Kovalski 
James Herman Lambeth 
Dorothy Moise Langford 
Judith Fowler LeBaron 
Terry Gene McComb 
Robert Nicholas McCurdy 
Sylvia Fowler Marchant 



1963 



Marilyn Richards Caughron 
Edwina Jenkins Darnell 
Margaret Davis Darnell 
Mary Janice Dunn 
Dahlia Harriet Fish 
Shirley Dianne Greene 
Constance Bryant Hickman 
Stephanie Humphries Jansen 



Richard A. Martin 
Ethelyn Taylor Mayes 
Rachel Atkins Millard 
Earline Miller 
Jo Ann Miller 
Susan Boyd Miller 
Thomas Joseph Mostert, Jr. 
Edward Motschiedler, Jr. 
Lorenzo Dudley Nichols 
Carol Smith Noyes 
Ronald L. Numbers 
Anna Mae Parker 
Richard Pendleton 
William Lamar Phillips 
Irving George Pickel 
May Sue Pierson 
Carolyn Wilkinson Reese 
Lindley B. Richert 
Brenda Botts Riley 
Margaret Burkhalter Riley 
Benjamin Leroy Ringer 
John Marion Robbins 
Beverly Jan Roberts 
Helen Braat Sauls 
Ronald Lee Servoss 
Sue Anne Boynton Servoss 
Myrna Woolsey Smith 
Jeanine Perry Solomon 
Harriet Russell Stamper 
Ernest Albert Stevens 
John Jay Stiles 
Virginia Caldwell Stiles 
Robert Strukoff 
Edward A. Swanson 
Virginia Leach Thatcher 
Jeraldine Owen Tranum 
Dana Royal Ulloth 
Betty Bentzinger Villemain 
Josef Gene Weiss 
Lela Eunice Whorton 
Jon E. Williams 
Jo Ann Winkler 



2-YEAR 

Willie Joyce Nichols 
Barbara Stinchfield Piatt 
William Watkins Piatt, Jr. 
Mary Sue Branch Rhoney 
Damaris Crittenden Robinson 
Dorothy Hedrick Starr 
Elizabeth Holmes Steele 
Glenda Shoemaker Walker 



APPENDIX— LOOKING BACK 



333 



GRADUATES (Cont.) 



1964 



Barbara Hoar Arena 

Raymond Willis Bartles 

Walter E. Brown 

Homer Dexter Buell, Jr. 

Gilbert M. Burnham 

Julianne Wak Cagle 

Patricia Chu Clark 

Gary Martin Cobb 

William Leroy Coolidge 

Robert E. DuBose 

James Robert Dunn 

Henry Alason Fish 

John W. Fowler 

Frank Y. Gamble 

LaVoy Thomas Garner 

Berniece Woolsey Gearhart 

Katherine Allen Goodwin 

Lovenia Mitchell Greer 

Frances Tarte Hale 

Robert Hale 

Lovick Pierce Haley III 

Joy Colburn Hall 

Rosalind Ann Hendren 

Lloyd Myron Johnston 

Gerald Byron Kelley 

James Harold King 

Helene Annis Knight 

Gwendolyn Elaine Lambeth 

Dorothy Louise Longley 

Daniel H. McClellan 

Mary Elizabeth Wilson McConnell 

Robert Duane McEndree 

Melinda Belford McRae 

Walter Armstrong Marshall 

Charles Neal Martin, Jr. 

Sara Cunningham Martin 

Betty Jane Fail Mills 

Don Gilbert Mills 

Richard Walter Mitzelfelt 

Lorin W. Mixon 

Sylvia Sellers Moyer 

David Eugene Mullinax 

Anne Denslow Murphy 

Myrlene Liles Murray 



David Arthur Myers 
Alex Nischuk 
David D. Osborne 
Judy Edwards Osborne 
Vera Beale Parker 
Rebecca Woods Perry 
Barbara Benson Pfiefle 
Evan Carl Pitts 
Barbara Clemens Ponce 
Sylvia Allen Powers 
Linda Draper Pritchett 
Gary E. Randolph 
Ila May Respess 
Mary Ann Deakins Roberts 
Maximo Diaz Rojas 
David Rouse 
Darken Davis Sanford 
Ruby Marie Shreve 
Dana Boyd Dale Slater 
Barbara Maxwell Smith 
Barbara Nell Zilke Spencer 
Evelyn Elaine Strawn 
Donald Warren Strong 
Donald Alvin Swayze 
James Richard Terrell 
Frederick Lee Thompson 
William Treanton 
Terrence Lynn Trivett 
Patricia Ramsey Tygret 
Gloria McComb Tyndall 
William Edward Tyndall 
S. C. Ullom 

Sara Satterthwaite Ulloth 
Jan C. Smuts Van Rooyen 
William Freeman Ward 
Lanier A. Watson 
Thomas Roger Whitehouse 
Alice Genton Whitt 
Charles Harold Wilson 
Bailey Emerson Winsted 
Norma Ake Witter 
James Franklin Wolcott 
Linda Comer Wolcott 
Corrine Young 



1964 — 2-YEAR 



Wilberta Griffith Burnside 
Sharon Kay Doyle 
Sandra Jean Flora 
Carole Branch McCracken 
Lynda England McCurdy 
Janella Walker Moulton 



Gayly Killion Mullinax 
Diane Mills Numbers 
Sue Darlene Snyder 
Shirley Colls Suffridge 
Carolyn Garrick Thompson 
Edith Grace Vigil Walker 



334 



80 YEARS OF PROGRESS 



GRADUATES (Cont.) 



Clark Mason Acker 
Elizabeth Travis Albritton 
Jerry Samuel Albritton 
Emma Brown Avery 
Lewis H. Bame, Jr. 
Wayne Bert Benson 
Barbara Ann Botts 
Suzanne Wassell Boyer 
Lloyd Thomas Caudill 
Roy Clarence Caughron 
Larry Leroy Caviness 
Carolyn McCoun Cherry 
Monte Alan Church 
John L. Coble, Jr. 
Jack Jaudon Combs 
Herbert Everett Coolidge 
Richard Hollis Coston 
Doris Cone Crandell 
Billie Flowers Cross 
Pamela Smith Cross 
Desmond Duane Cummings, Jr. 
Mary Lou Parker Cummings 
E. Douglas Day 
Robert Weldon Dickinson 
Kathryn Marie Dillon 
John Donald Dixon 
Jerry Lynn Evans 
Molly Vigil Evans 
Jerry Allen Gladson 
Laura Hayes Gladson 
Charran Glendenning Graham 
Elaine Anderson Granke 
Ava Anderson Greene 
John Frank Greene, Jr. 
Sarah Jane King Groger 
James Calvin Hannum 
Donna Mobley Hansen 
Marie Wetmore Hissong 
Jean Carol James 
William Joseph Kealy 
Patricia Osborne Kirstein 
Sylvia von Pohle Klein 
Klaus Willfried Kowarsch 
Larry L. Leas 
Sharon Ann Linsley 
Luane Sue Logan 
Joan Aitken Martin 
Linda Stefanson McKee 
Sharon Sue McLaughlin 
Donald Wayne McNutt 
Gwendolyn Ruth Maples 
Irma Smith Masters 
George Arnold Miller 
Caroline Ruth Moore 



1965 

David Russell Moulton 

Robert Bruce Murphy, Jr. 

Patricia Eastwood Myers 

Philip Vernon Neal 

William S. Nesbit 

Margaret Lynn Norton 

Donald Ray Parrish 

Frederick Cecil Petty, Jr. 

Mary Hudak Petty 

Linda Case Phelps 

Louis Edgel Phillips 

Felicia LeVere Phillips 

Tui DeVere Pitman 

James Larry Pritchett 

William Gary Pritchett 

Linda Mundy Pumphrey 

Robert Franklin Pumphrey 

Anita Beulah Jackson Rauf 

Lynda Fikes Rees 

Candyce Wynona Reiber 

Arthur J. Richert 

Joyce Cunningham Richert 

Carol Olsen Ringer 

Frances Hartwell Robertson 

Linda Louise Robison 

Melba Gretchen Rogers 

Glenda Starkey Salsberry 

John Hugh Samuels 

Lydia Ruth Saunders 

Robert Harding Schwebel 

Nelda DeMoss Scoggins 

Kathleen Detamore Smith 

Ronald Melvin Smith 

Charles Linwood Stanford 

Sylvia Taylor Stanford 

Nancy Sue Steadman 

Clarence Edward Stevens 

Janice LaVerne Suggs 

Betty Bishop Swafford 

William Goldsborough Swafford, III 

Mildred Dianne Tennant 

Margaret Joanne Tetz 

Arlene Moore van Rooyen 

Douglas Allen Walker 

Marsha Ann Watson 

Charles Edward Wheeling 

Kingsley Pierce Whitsett 

Nancy Wendell Whitsett 

Larry Walter Williams 

William Harris Willis, Jr. 

Beverly Shacklett Winsted 

Allen Edson Workman 

Ruth Annetta Zoerb 



APPENDIX—LOOKING BACK 



335 



GRADUATES (Cont.) 



Barbara Gallner Adams 
Gienda Jansen Brown 
Donna Kay Thrall Church 
Douglas Glenn Clark 
Rebecca Skender Dixon 



Howard Elison Adams, Jr. 
Martha Woodruff Benson 
James Wilbur Boyle 
Paul Carlton Boynton, Jr. 
Kay Cherry Buckner 
Gerry Cabalo 
Jeanette Gayle Carruth 
Richard Park Center 
Cheryle Ann Chisholm 
Arnold Basil Clapp 
Daisy Welch Clark 
Michael Davis Clark 
Judith Ann Clausen 
Patricio Vegara Cobos 
Lynda Whitman Cockrell 
Vann Dudley Cockrell 
Harry James Colson 
James Wayne Coulter 
Elva Dreos Cox 
Marilyn Mary Crooker 
Garland Ray Cross 
Shirley Bremson Crowson 
Nolan Bryant Darnell 
Janet Lauterhahn Davis 
John Charles Dykes 
Marchie Lee Edgmon 
Harold Eugene Elkins 
Patricia McCollum Elliott 
Melvin Lloyd Erickson 
Lloyd Herbert Fisher 
Gladys Lawless Fowler 
William Lowry Fulton, III 
Roger Leland Gardner 
Kenneth Lloyd Garner 
Paul Henry Gebert 
John Davis Goodbrad 
Beverly Wingate Griffin 
Byron Kent Griffin 
Wilbur Neil Griffith 
Betty Belew Grogg 
Minon A. Hamm 
Hilde Schaefer Hasel 
Joyce Cuilla Hawkes 
Stephen E. Hayes 
Bonny Koobs Heinz 
Kenneth York Henderson 
Rebecca Stanley Hodges 



1965 — 2-YEAR 

Cheryl Randolph Kingsfield 
Linda Cherry Sammer 
Carol Dietrich Solomon 
Jane Meade Ulloth 
Alfred D. Wiik 

1966 

Silas Wilson Hodges 
Grady McArthur Huff 
Larry Patrick Kelley 
Kenneth Alan Kirkham 
Carolyn Louise Knight 
Clyde Gerald Kopp 
Ronald Eugene Lambeth 
Zadie Garner Leach 
John Earle Leitner 
Marvin Gerard Lowman 
Charles Arthur McCutchen 
Ina Dunn McFarland 
Richard Laverne McKee 
Ronald Malloch 
Jack Paul Martz 
Daryl Anderson Mayberry 
Margarita Rose Medina 
Daryl L. Meyers 
Rudolph Benjamin Mixon, Jr. 
Dolores Rolls Moulton 
Heide-Traude Susi Mundy 
Elaine English Myers 
Thomas Michael Myers 
William Steen Nelson 
John Herbert Newbern 
Eleanor Dean Oakes 
Donnie Vance Olis 
Frank Merriam Palmour 
Marion Susan Rozell Pettibone 
Robert Leslie Potts 
Stephen Earle Powers, IV 
Ruth Bolton Prosser 
Mary Ellen Purdie 
Dianne McBroom Rey 
Roger Nixon Rey 
James Leslie Roberts 
Norma Purvis Roddy 
Carol Dietrich Solomon 
Dale Edward Solomon 
Elizabeth Holmes Steele 
Claude Earl Steen, III 
Donna Chalmers Steen 
H. Wayne Strickland 
Anne Jensen Swayze 
Ann McGhinnis Taylor 
David Charles Taylor 
Linda Claire Thomson 



336 



80 YEARS OF PROGRESS 



GRADUATES (Cont.) 



Polly Dunn Viar 
Rex Michael Ward 
Janice Thomson Wedel 
Sharon June Wenger 
Thomas George Whitsett 



Jean Meyers Allen 
Marlene Weigle Davis 
Margarita Rose Medina 
Georgine Gantz Norris 

Gerald Earl Bartram 
Mary Christine Bartram 
Samuel Benton Basham 
Bert Wayne Bolan 
James Roy Buckner 
Frances I. Carroll 
Ingrid Christiansen 
Phyllis Jean Chu 
Willard J. Clapp 
Marc Denis Cools 
Barbara Kay Friesen 
Carol Margaret Futcher 
Judith Burke Heald 
Jeanette Reid Hayes 
JoAnn Schuler Hoffer 
Jerry Donald Hoyle 
Irma E. Hyde 
Jimmy V. James 



1966 (Cont.) 

Janice Lee Willis 
Judy Woodruff Wilson 
Phillip Wayne Wilson 
Richard William Winters, 
William Lewis Wood 

1966 — 2-YEAR 

Gwendolyn Young Piatt 
Bonnie Jean Schwerin 
Joyce Larcom Stringer 

1966 — SUMMER 



Jr. 



Janice Hilton Jackson 



Carl Henry Adkins 
Faye Foster Ahl 
Robert Stanley Allen 
Paul Edward Anderson 
Michael Oliver Anthes 
Phylis Ann Austin 
Leonard Wayne Barto 
Joan Rowell Bilbo 
Velda Jean Bloodworth 
Robert Mack Bolton 
Bill Eugene Boston 
Beverly Babcock Botten 
Carolyn Ladd Boyer 
Jack Keith Boyson 
Glenda Jansen Brown 
Kenneth Wayne Brown 
Sandra Edwards Brown 
Don Irwin Brunner 
Rodney Craig Bryant 



Leslie Jennings Knight 
JoAnne Wassell Lafever 
J. C. Linebaugh 
Irene Johnson McDonell 
Joseph Michael McDermott 
Donald Kenneth Maples 
Dean Ellis Maddock 
Herbert Louis Marchant 
John Edward Mayhew 
Marshall Gene Mitchell 
Nancy Grotheer Renk 
Harry Arthur Rhodes 
Sandra Gayle Sievert 
Betty Walker Smith 
Kenneth Edward Spears 
Henry Arthur Swinson 
James Earl Thurmon 
Barry Gustave Ulloth 

SUMMER — 2-YEAR 

LuWana Lyle Kumalae 

1967 

Willie Delia Cartabianca 
Myra Sue Center 
Carolyn Lord Christensen 
Douglas Glenn Clark 
Gary L. Cockrell 
Randall Eugene Crowson 
Beth Ray Stephens Dempsey 
Albert Gordon Dittes 
Judy Whitman Elliston 
George Thomas Evans 
Gary Austin Ford 
Judith May Foulkes 
Carol Lee Gelsinger 
Barbara DuPuy George 
Elizabeth Ann Goodge 
Laraine Paula Graham 
James Arthur Greene 
Roger Albert Hall 
Stephen Anthony Hall 



APPENDIX— LOOKING BACK 



337 



GRADUATES (Cont.) 



William Clark Herren 
Jack Edward Hissong 
Benjamin Russell Holt 
Sherry Fortner Housley 
Leslie Troy Jacobs 
David George Jewett 
C. V. Jones, Jr. 
Reta Mae Knight 
John Cecil Leach 
Linda Parker Ledbetter 
Juanita Sossong Lesko 
Charles Quinn Lindsey 
John Richard McLeod 
Timothy David Manning 
Lorraine Meyer Massey 
Vernon Lee Menhennett 
Patricia Horworth Miller 
lb Bernhardt Muderspach 
George Joseph Murphy III 
Patricia Miller Murphy 
William Edward Murphy 
John Edmond Neff 
Naomi Piatt Nichols 
Carol Jean Nivison 
Gary M. Pearson 
Karen Fleming Petty 
Linda Anderson Randolph 
George Edward Reid 
John Gaylord Reid 
Edward Filbert Reifsnyder III 
Elvira Reyes 
Lana Umlauf Roberts 
Earl Lewellyn Robertson 
Linwood Alan Robertson 
Dianne Parker Ruckle 
Ralph Herman Ruckle 



1967 (Cont.) 

Charles Thomas Rule 
Charles David Scarbrough 
Thomas Samuel Schutte, Jr. 
Mary Ellen Davis Silverstein 
Allen Lamar Sinclair 
Elizabeth Boyle Sinclair 
Eva Stokely Smith 
George Elbert Smothermon 
Allen Richard Steele 
Dennis Franklin Steele 
George A. Steiger 
Ernest David Steiner 
John M. Strickland 
Joseph Thomas Strock 
Robert Brooke Summerour 
Charlotte McKee Taylor 
Phyllis Anne Thacker 
Donald Gene Trawick 
Patricia Ann Tucker 
Charles Wesley Turner, Jr. 
Judith Marie Vance 
Gerald Young Van Hoy 
Paul Elvis Viar 
Donald Evans Vollmer 
John Louis Waller 
Barbara Suggs Whidden 
Woodrow Wilson Whidden II 
Carole Neidigh Williams 
Gary Gene Williams 
James Russell Williams 
Mary Pogue Williamson 
Betty Green Willis 
Donovan Dean Wilson 
Janet McKee Wood 
Carol Lewis Wood 



Linda Davis Boggs 
Karen Faye Campbell 
Nellie R. Campbell 
Pamela Richards Coble 
Linda Hulsey Dittmar 
Patricia Fowler Evans 
Paula Walker Jewett 
James L. Marcum 
Cathie Lemke Maxson 
Virginia Carol Meert 
Violet Patricia Morgan 



Paull Errett Dixon III 
Earnest Lynn Elkins 
Lawrence Bradford Evans 



1967 — 2-YEAR 

Jo Ann Zent Nelson 
Marietta Andrus Nelson 
Sandra Willsey Rule 
Evelyn Hedrick Starr 
Sylvia Sorensen Sue 
Carol Ruth Swanson 
Diane Irene Tewis 
Paula Elizabeth Thum 
Judith Leitner Wood 
Melinda Allen Workman 
Suzanne Angel Zagorsky 

SUMMER 1967 

John Malcolm Fowler 
Robert Thorne Fulfer 
Ellen Mauldin Herman 



338 



80 YEARS OF PROGRESS 



GRADUATES (Cont.) 



SUMMER 
James Kenneth Herman, Jr. 
Rodney James Hyde 
Faith McComb Jacobs 
Kenneth Leon Jones 
Lenette Lester Lesko 
Margaret Ruth Littell 
Charles Henry McElroy 
Thomas Ray McFarland 
Ronald Frank Neu 
Gerald Marshall Owen 



1967 (Cont.) 
Donald Lane Piatt 
Joan Bouton Schaefer 
Ernest Silva 
David Douglas Singer 
Irene Capps Van Cleave 
Clifford Ashworth Vickery III 
Carole Rollins Williams 
Larry Wayne Williams 
Harold Doyce Worthy 



SUMMER — 2-YEAR 
Marcia E. Abernathy Neil Raymond McPherson 

Kathryn Elizabeth Bellware Mary Esther Negley 

Ruth Cranston Fuller Laneta M. Scoggins 

Janye Duane Gardner James Samuel Small 

Anne Bird McGhinnis 



1968 



Ernest Theodor Ahl, Jr. 
C. Edward Avant 
Murdnal Catheline Baker 
Ramona Lively Bentz 
Ronald Bruce Bentzinger 
Norman E. Bernal 
Larry Paul Bogar 
James Joseph Booth 
James Bernard Brenneman 
James Ralph Bryant 
Curtis Keith Carlson 
Evelyn Erickson Castleberg 
Jacinto Vergara Cobos 
Byron Comp 

Frances Joseph Costerisan, Jr. 
Sylvia Moak Crook 
Sara Catherine Deverell 
Patricia Mooney Dittes 
Erwin Bruce Elliston 
John Richard Eggers 
James Edward Erwin 
Sharyn Hall Ferree 
Darlene Susan Gadbois 
Clyde Richard Garey, Jr. 
Sharron Richman Gilbert 
Alvan Leon Graham, Jr. 
Carol Baker Granberry 
V. Anne Grotheer 
Hazel Alice Hauck 
Mary Sue McNeal Hancock 
Gary Warren Hartman 
Arlene Martone Hermann 
David Lee Holland 
Dorothy June Hooper 
Evelyn Elaine Holt 



Patricia June Horning 
Stella Waggoner Hunter 
Patricia Pierce Jameson 
Gail Speaker Janke 
Anette Palm Johnson 
Ramona Jopling 
Charles Edward Kuhlman 
Barbara Byrd Kuna 
Jeanette Faye Krueger 
Bernard A. LaLone 
Phyllis Bryant Labrenz 
Hugh Vernon Leggett, Jr. 
Arthur Jon Lesko 
Vivian Faye Lester 
William Vernon Lewis 
Mary Garrick Link 
Sue Hall Lyons 
Mabel Skeels Maier 
Nancy Ann Marsh 
Vincent George Melashenko 
Kerstin Pettersson Meyers 
Parlia Moore 
Paul Ting-Kai Mui 
Arthur Stephen Patrick 
Sharon Marie Pearson 
Marvin Leon Peek 
John William Peeke 
Forest Clifford Port 
Judie Martin Port 
Floyd Herman Powell 
George Allen Powell 
Maureen Sykes Powell 
Lucia Jane Rascon 
Ramona Kathleen Reiber 
Rozann Hall Reilly 



APPENDIX— LOOKING BACK 



339 



GRADUATES (Cont.) 



Gordon LeRoy Retzer 
Lynne Alison Riley 
Allen Wayne Robinson 
Nobert Harold Sammer 
Bonnie Jean Schwerin 
Ruth Couch Self 
Edwin Michael Shafer 
John Ronald Shoemaker 
Harriet Finney Snyder 
Steven Ray Sowder 
Vivian Lawton Stark 
David Arthur Steen 
Linda Bicknell Steen 
Ronald Dale Stephens 
Ann Sample Stewart 
Richard Erwin Stewart 
Anita Faye Straley 
Carolyn Berry Strickland 
John Philip Sue 
David J. Swinyar 



Bevin Lee Brown 
Jean Dickinson Crittenden 
Beverly Boyle Duckett 
Cynthia Snell Fardulis 
Angeline Bernice Frith 
Betty Anderson Garey 
Reba Carol Hall 
Linda Miller Hindman 
Judith Stafford Holt 
Harriet Sivley Jones 
Sylvia Kallam 
Donna Mills Long 



1968 (Cont.) 

Ramon L. Torres-Cardona 
George W. Tranum 
Oli Isfeld Traustason 
Lynda Maxey Trawick 
William Wayne Tucker 
Estela Villarreal 
Ronnie Marshall Vincent 
James William Walters 
Cora Marina Waters 
Donald Ray Watson 
William Rylant Webb 
Donald LeRoy West, Jr. 
Ivan Louis Whidden 
Patricia Tidwell Whitworth 
Alfred Dewain Wiik 
Richard Lee Wilkin, Jr. 
Walton Alfred Williams 
James Dean Woods 
Marva Shugars Young 

1968 — 2-YEAR 

Joyce Jasper Mitchell 
Rosanne Ahl Norman 
Mary Patricia Player 
Linda Cumbo Ravassipour 
Wanda Mae Turner Scarbrough 
Roby Angelina Sherman 
Barbara T. Sherrill 
Mary Sohaski Sweeney 
Donna Wetmore Swinyar 
Vivian Bernard Thompson 
Danny Joe Wiggins 
Gloria Thornton Williams 



SUMMER — 1968 



Gary Lee Anderson 
Glenda Ham Anderson 
Darleen Bradwell Boyle 
Robbie Wiggins Burke 
Wallace Roy Burns 
Rodney Lyle Carlson 
Glenda Tripp Clark 
Mary Lular Cochran 
Linda Williams Crowson 
Edward Lamar Dennis 
Nancy Ann Fulfer 
Thomas Crawford Gibbs 
Carol Chatterton Harrison 
Hoyt Lewis Hendershot 
Cheryl Petty Herbert 
Loren Paul Herbert, Jr. 
Walter Ernest Hickok 
Joseph Houston Hodges 



Richard J. Judson 
George Allen Reiser 
Elizabeth Mensing Landers 
Jacquelyn Dardeau Morrow 
Bonny Clifton Murphy 
Suzanne Wintter Parks 
Lucille Whitehead Phelps 
Edward Allen Pumphrey 
Sharon DeRosia Quinn 
John Edgar Robinson 
Sharon Elaine Roscoe 
Ted Allen Schoonard 
Ruby Ryckman Sheets 
Amy Manous Sheffield 
Imogene Bandy Sheram 
Nancy Strang Smith 
Theodore Allan Teeters 
Catherine Thrall 



340 



80 YEARS OF PROGRESS 



Chester Jene Tyson 
Arthur L. Watrous 



Freda Ruth Lewis 



GRADUATES (Cont.) 

SUMMER 1968 (Cont.) 

Sue Shacklett Williams 
Charles William Witter 

SUMMER 1968 — 2-YEAR 



1969 



Virginia Holmes Anderson 
Jan Karl Artress 
Carolyn Martin Barringham 
Genevieve Brannan Bata 
Rudolph Andrew Bata, Jr. 
David Bruce Beardsley 
Jean Tarte Bentley 
Joyanne Berkey 
Linda Roll Bernal 
Gayle Thornton Boehm 
Roy Richard Boehm 
Nancy Hopwood Brenneman 
Philip Brian Brooks 
Douglas Wilford Brown 
Candice Cummings Burke 
Wesley James Burke 
Linda Jo Burris 
Otho Richard Caldwell 
Judith Vining Campbell 
Cheerie Lou Capman 
Richard Gwynn Carey 
Esther M. Carr 
David Lee Castleberg 
Glenn Louis Cavanaugh 
Barbara Castleberg Chalker 
Byron LeRoy Chalker 
Sandra Simmons Costerisan 
Gary Rowe Councell 
Cynthia Beth Davis 
James Wayland Davis 
Margaret Buck Davis 
Carolyn Swain DeWitt 
Frances Linda Dittes 
Mary Elizabeth Dreos 
Johannes Marthinus Dry 
Elizabeth Louise Dunlap 
Robert Karl DuPuy 
Doris Faye Dyer 
Harvey Wayne English 
Judith Ann Fessler 
Betty Ramsey Frederick 
Virginia Piatt Foxx 
George Stephen Fuller 
Janice Elaine Gammenthaler 
Lenetta Paddock Gee 
Anita Louise Giebell 
Mary Beard Guthrie 



Diane Wilson Hall 

Dora Pons Hallock 

Lloyd Edwin Hallock 

Jackie Salyers Hamilton 

Thomas Edward Hamilton 

Charles Franklin Hindman 

James Roy Hughes 

Connie Arnold Jackson 

Marion Thomas Jackson 

Vicki Ann Jasperson 

William Hasson Johnston 

Ethelwyn Carey Kennedy 

Carol Schneider Knight 

Edson Andrew Knight 

Steve Edward Knight 

Eugene Lee Kuykendall, Jr. 

Louise C. Lee 

Gerald Arnold Linderman 

Joan Mayer Linebaugh 

Janet F. Lockhart 

James Edward MacAlpine 

Sharryn Hughes Mahorney 

Kathleen Johnson Martin 

Janet McCandless 

Suzanne Mizelle McClellan 

Willis Theophilus McGhinnis, Jr. 

Deannie Ruth Smith 

Lonnie F. Melton 

Anna Ruth Mercer 

Sylvia Dianne Mizelle 

Ellen Seasly Mullis 

Betty Watkins Newman 

V. Lynn Nielsen 

William Garrett Nutt 

Joane Swie Kie Ong 

Floyd Wayne Owens 

Harry Alexander Pawly 

Lola Christine Payne 

Carolyn Lucinda Pettengill 

James Glenn Purdham 

John Dean Ramsey 

Gerald Ray Rickaby 

Wilbur L. Rilea 

Ina Miller Ring 

Joseph Walter Ring 

Ralph Leonard Ringer 

Gerald Roy Rivers 



APPENDIX— LOOKING BACK 



341 



GRADUATES (Cont.) 



1969 

John Wiley Robinson 

Carmen Julia Rodriguez 

Teresa Ann Rogers 

Joseph Oquendo Saladino 

Meredith Ruth Sammer 

Elizabeth Ann Schermerhorn 

Kathleen Sloan Schmehl 

Kathryn Sue Schneider 

Betty Harris Schoonard 

Karl-Heinz Schroeder 

Elita Carolyn Seeley 

Robert David Self 

Albert Ramez Sewbaluck 

Marian Anita Shelton 

Donald Thomas Shelton 

Carl Elwyn Smith 

Alton Marshall Steen 

Jimmie Cain Story 

Ellen Kristin Peterson Thompson 

Steven Wayne Thompson 



(Cont.) 

Verle Burton Thompson, Jr. 
Donald Wayne Thurber 
Bill Tol, Jr. 
Jackie Hiser Tucker 
Linda Marie Wagner 
David Lee Waller 
Leslie LaMont Weaver 
Carmen More j on Weiss 
Linda Carol White 
William Henry Wiist 
Patricia Martz Wilcox 
Jerry W. Willis 
Charlene Paden Wilson 
William Quentin Wolcott 
Judith Leitner Wood 
Maurice Alexander Wyckoff 
Linda Ann Youngs 
Newton Harrison Zanes 
Ellen Yvonne Zollinger 



2-YEAR 



Jacque Lee Adams 
JoAnn Ballington 
Cecile Joy Beltz 
Rebecca Susan Bottone 
John P. Brownlee, Jr. 
Faye Devroy Chilson 
Linda King Clark 
Janice Keller Denslow 
Shirley Y. Devine 
Blanche Williams Ford 
Patricia Hickman Goodge 
DeLinda Hess Grigsby 
Pamela Rose Johnson 
Rebecca Gwendolyn Knight 
Carolyn Olivia Laster 



Frances Elaine Montgomery 
Mary Frances Nix 
Claudia Mountain Payne 
Joyce Dee Piercy 
D. James Ramsey 
Patricia Mclntyre Reed 
Marilyn Daly Robinson 
Linda Joy Stringer 
Sherrie Storie Taylor 
Mary Irene Turner 
Marlene Rojas Walsson 
Betty McKee Waterhouse 
Mildred Faye Weigley 
Louise Jones Willis 
Joy Hemberger Zanes 



SUMMER 1969 



Edwin Gene Brooks 
Richard Irwin Cavanaugh 
Beatrice Ann Couden 
Jeannie E. Dickinson 
Ruth Cole Dickinson 
Henry Elsworth Farr 
Charles William Flach 
Larry Dean Groger 
Mary Margaret Halverson 
Janet Keoughan Harvey 
Lloyd L. Harvey 
Charles William Hesler 
Art Allan Kanna 
William Bruce Lane, Jr. 
Beverly Jean Laubach 



William Anderson McRae 
Arthur L. Miles 
Donald Herbert Miller 
Voncile Petty Purviance 
James Norman Ramsey 
Orville Raymond Ruckle 
Ida Kincaid Sapp 
Rolland Malcolm Schmehl 
Andrea Nelson Scribner 
John Phillip Shadwick 
Jeanette Muriel Singleton 
Edwin Dale Strang 
Dixie Halvorsen Strong 
William Luke Strong 
Abda Rebecca Velez 



342 



80 YEARS OF PROGRESS 



GRADUATES (Cont.) 

SUMMER 1969 (Cont.) 
Diana Morton White Lloyd Dean Young 

Emma Louise Wortham 



Connie Storie Durkin 
Diann Wade Foster 
Barbara Jane Giles 



George William Adams 
Charles Everett Allen 
Lillian Ray Ambrose 
James Caulay Anderson 
Charles Winston Armistead 
Ariel Diane Simmons Avant 
Timothy Ewing Bainum 
Dave Basaraba 
Candace Hardy Berkey 
William Salderus Berkey, Jr. 
Michael Brion Bodtker 
Linda Capman Booth 
Gail Annette Bosarge 
Kathie Faye Botts 
Ellen Carlene Bremson 
Martha Kelley Brooks 
Connie Jo Respess Bryant 
Daryl Marvin Burbach 
Stephen Dixon Burger 
Lynn Susan Chabra 
Mark Russell Codington 
Jo Anna Mohr Codington 
Daryl Eugene Costerisan 
Lorella Marie Crago 
John Quinton Croker, Jr. 
Anita Maxson Curtis 
James William Daily III 
Loren Milford Davis 
Mary Jo Davis 
Martin Walter Durkin 
Patricia Foster Eastep 
Harry Wayne Eastep, Jr. 
James Carlyle England 
Dwight Charles Evans 
Lauren C. Fardulis 
David Ray Finley 
Gilbert B. Floyd, Jr. 
Michael Eugene Foxworth 
Terrence John Futcher 
Arlene West Futcher 
Homer Lowe Gallimore, Jr. 
Linda Marie Martone Gallimore 
Harold Douglas Garner 
Robert Gary Garner 
Violet Faye Garner 



2-YEAR 

Linda Voss Herman 
Annie Beatrice Robinson 

1970 

Marc Ernest Genton 
Paul Donovan Gilbert 
Flint Cornelius Gullett 
Linda Louise Hagenbaugh 
Ronald Milton Hand 
Joseph Hamilton Hare 
Mildred Katheryn Harmon 
Carole A. Haynes 
Dixie Mae Helms 
Beverly Solomon Horky 
Luta Pillgreen Hudson 
William Fletcher Huggins 
Robert George Hunter 
Dale DeForest Ingersoll 
Ertis Lee Johnson, Jr. 
Larry Gene Johnson 
Sonja Royalty Johnson 
Linda Chapman Kang 
Margaret Ann King 
Mary Laura King 
Jacqueline Linda Kinsman 
Carl Herman Koester 
Marian Lundy Kuhlman 
Shirlee Jean Myers Lambeth 
John Albert Lauer, III 
Nadine Amos Lauer 
Daniel Gene Lewis 
Julie Ann Sifert Lewis 
Raymond Lindsay Lilly, Jr. 
Sharon Cassada Lindsey 
Linwood Arthur Lothrop 
Wade Tanner Loveless 
Robert E. Martin 
Vera Cartabianca Martin 
Joyce Cook Manzano 
David L. Maxson 
Mary Louise Holmes Maxson 
Nancy Schwerin McBride 
Ellis Everett Miler 
Anne Cruise Millet 
Ray Deane Minner 
Peggy Nell Morgan 
Edward Clare Neal 
John Jay Negley 
Harry Charles Nelson 



APPENDIX— LOOKING BACK 



343 



GRADUATES (Cont.) 



James Wayne Norton 

Cheryl Louise Orser 

Patricia Jean Owen 

Margaret Allen Palmour 

David Wayne Patterson 

Paul Eugene Penno, Jr. 

M. Christene Perkins 

Richard Ray Perry 

Richard Earl Pleasants, III 

Robert Ernest Powell 

Joseph P. Priest 

Linda Grace Purdie 

Vilma Jara Raettig 

Sandra Smith Regal 

James Theodore Richardson, Jr. 

Heather Mae Richter 

Linda Hallock Rickaby 

Donna Prelog Roberts 

Elaine McDowell Robinson 

Marjorie Delilia Roof 

Mark Arnold Sagert 

Donald Claude Shaw 

John Albert Shull 

Elaine McDonald Skender 

Kathleen Perrin Snider 

Terry E. Snyder 

Jane Christensen Socol 

Ernest James Stevens, Jr. 

Joseph Lee Story 

Katrina Annette Long Stultz 

Judy Janes Suarez 



1970 (Cont.) 

Michael Shaen Sutherland 

Lloyd George Sutter 

Sharren Anderson Sutter 

George Gordon Swanson 

Donna June Taylor 

John Benton Taylor 

Mary Ward Teeters 

Carol Johnson Tol 

George Frederick Tolhurst 

Jane Travis Tolhurst 

George Wendell Tollerton 

Josephine Arlene Troxel 

Charles Ray Tygret 

Chester Jene Tyson 

Stephen Edward Davis VanBuren 

Ann Cone Vining 

Kathryn Simmons Walls 

William Hart Waters, Jr. 

Diana James Weaver 

Juanita Starling Weddle 

Allene Roberta Hunt Weisner 

Evelyn Ann Welch 

Heinz E. Wiegand, Jr. 

Emma Clarice Wilkes 

Charles Lloyd Williams 

Jimmy Allen Williams 

Nan Taylor Williams 

Judith Ann Broderson Winters 

David Stanford Wood 

Marleen Genton Young 

Daniel Rudolph Robert Zeman 



1970 — 2-YEAR 



Katherine Anne Blanton 

Betsy Blodgett 

Celia Bolarte 

Edna Strandquist Bowen 

Marsha Lee Mabry Coe 

Marjorie Yvonne Cook 

Jaymee Jo Dale 

Peggy Eugenia Daniel 

Juanita Kay Daniels 

Brenda Eloise Driskell 

Alyce June Dunn 

Lydia Vernice Earle 

Nanci Judd English 

Susan Marie Gardner 

Linda Lucille Durocher Gentry 

Mary Ann Grugel 

Jane Ellen Cale Hancock 

Annette Hanna 

Laura May Hedden 

Nancy Blow Howell 

Donna Sue Hulsey 



Andrea Lee Kole 
Gloria Diane Lee 
Gladys Burdine Lincoln 
Melanie Victoria Lyon 
Betty Louise Marquardt 
Brenda Sharon Martone 
Gladys Lovenia Mason 
Virginia Davis McFarland 
Brenda Sue Murray 
Lois Ann Peckham 
Linda Colls Peterson 
Alberta Pumphrey Phelps 
Cynthia Twing Richardson 
Carolyn Sue Roach 
Christine Davis Sammer 
Virginia Fardulis Small 
Jerry W. Smith 
Marilynn Grace Smith 
Narcissa Smith Saladino 
Jeanette Stephens 
Cecilia Holliman Vincent 



344 



80 YEARS OF PROGRESS 



Nancy Lee Wardle 
Helen Mock Whary 



GRADUATES (Cont.) 

1970 _ 2-YEAR (Cont.) 

Nancy Beisker Wood 

Johnnie Marie Williams Zollinger 



SUMMER — 1970 



Bernard Lanier Bowers 
Wallace Eugene Brewer 
John Orsen Carey, Jr. 
Chester A. Caswell 
Franklin Vergara Cobos 
William Lorraine Crofton, Jr. 
Ildefonso Cruz Portalatin 
Gerald 0. Dunham 
Bonnie Block Evans 
Philip George Garver 
Robert Willard Geach, Jr. 
Dennis Paul Greenawalt 
Russell Gilbert Hardaway 
Jonathan Daniel Hayes 
Gene A. Hughes 
Jutta Edit Janke 
Constance Marie Kallam 
Sandra Mae Lawrence 
Jean Hagen Lomino 
David Bryan McBroom 
Lora Sharon McKee 



Barry Mitchell Mahorney 
Judith Neil Salyers 
Clarence Henry Small 
Shirley Ellen Spears 
Rose Marie Stampfli 
Barbara Sears Stanaway 
Elizabeth McElroy Stephens 
Daryl Christy Taylor 
Donna Jean Dickson Thurber 
Eddie Christopher Towles 
Bennie Ray Vincent 
Mark Edward Weigley 
Danny Joe Wiggins 
Lila Toomey Wiik 
Cynthia Paulson Wilkinson 
Merlin M. Wittenberg 
Ronald Wayne Wood 
Kathleen Lauranne Woods 
Elizabeth Lillie Yeaton 
Stephen James Yost, III 



SUMMER — 1970 2-YEAR 



Carolyn Chambers Bowman 
Lawrence Dale Loveless 



B. Ronald Atkins 
Vikki Hansen Bainum 
Barbara Ann Banks 
Linda Sue Barrett 
Dave Basaraba 
Judy Lee Bentzinger 
Bonnie Jean Berger 
John William Boyle, III 
Frederick M. Brannan 
Kathryn Johnson Brannan 
Larry Eugene Bucher 
Helen Johnson Cain 
Marjorie Syfert Campbell 
Norma Jean Young Carlson 
Robert William Cash, III 
Sandra Rose Cavanaugh 
Susan M. Corn 
Dominic Cotta, Jr. 
Constance Lynette Crabb 
Judith Kaye Osborne Crabtree 
Shirley Kay Craig 
James Andrew Cress 
Milford Gerald Crist 



Donna Kay Maples 
Lois Wierts Myers 



1971 



Dale DuWayne Cross 
Lou Ellen Cruzen 
Richard Franklin Daley 
Leland Wray Davis 
Marlene Olfert Deakins 
Kenneth Jerome DeFoor 
Linda Dowden De Long 
Carleton Harrold Denslow, III 
Randall Wilson Dodd 
Roy Albert Dunn 
Harold Lee Dunning 
Mary Ann Edmister 
Kaye Davis Edmonds 
C. Russell Edwards 
Valerie Jean Eiken 
Steven Lee Farrell 
Douglas Gregory Foley 
Beverly Chase Foster 
Michael Lewis Foxworthy 
Robert G. Foxx 
John Marvin Fullbright 
Bradley James Galambos 
Colleen Smith Garber 



APPENDIX- LOOKING BACK 



345 



GRADUATES (Cont.) 



1971 (Cont.) 



Cynthia Fowler Gaver 
Jeffrey Lee Gaver 
Donald Evertt Giles 
Michael David Greene 
Naomi Strickland Gustafson 
Brenda Joy Hall 
Burton Arthur Hall 
Vicki Hoehn Hall 
Penny Nielson Hawkins 
Lynn Hayner 

Lyle Franklyn Herrmann, Jr. 
Wayne Harris Hicks 
Charlotte Patricia Hill 
Douglas Albert Hilliard 
Forrest Hughes Hilton 
Charles V. Hooper 
Bradley Garth Hyde 
Bonnie Lou Iversen 
Cheryl June Jetter 
Cameron L. Johnston 
Albert Gordon Juhl 
Mary Agnes Kempenich 
Elton Robert Kerr 
Shirley Ann Kinsman 
Linda M. L. Koh 
Oliver K. S. Koh 
Chana Aileen Kagels Kostenko 
Linda Lexine Lane 
Astrid Diana Lazaration 
Clyde Lindsay Leeds 
Rosemary Botts Leggett 
Marilyn Ann Leitner 
Alice Jean Lemon 
Richard Stanley Leonard 
Daniel Philip Lesko 
Thomas William Lighthall 
Michael Brian Lilly 
Joseph Wayne Lomino 
June Howes Loor 
Susan Spears Loor 
Robert Thomas MacAlpine 
Carl Benjamin Magoon 
Daniel Wayne Manzano 
Marga Louis Martin 
Benjamin Carl Maxson 
Dona Mary Miller Meert 
Judith Kay Merchant 
George Thomas Mills, Jr. 
Teddric Jon Mohr 
Charles Edward Mullis 
Clifford Carrol Myers 
Hazel Marie Neufeld 
James Thomas Nichols, Jr. 



Sharon Anita O'Bryant 

Harry Jarrett Pappas 

Sheila Geraldine Moretz Patterson 

Robert Earl Peeke 

Candice Lee Connor Penno 

Rodney Craig Peterson 

Margaret Rose Pierce 

Elsie-Rae Pike 

Nancy Pleasants 

Sharon Swinson Priest 

Peggy Jo Reep 

Gerald Nelson Retzer 

Evan Williams Richards, Jr. 

Sharon Ann Wentzelman Robberson 

James Leslie Roberts 

Sandra Rogers Root 

Shirley Schneider Ruckle 

Edwin Ashton Sammer 

Donald Clifford Schmidt 

Gail June Schmidt 

Kenneth L. Scribner 

Lynda Hughes Seidel 

Donald Ray Self 

Reba Lowe Oliver Smith 

Vivian Lee Galey Snyder 

Jean Southerland 

Wendell Paul Spurgeon 

Coleen Amber Seitz Stanley 

Richard Edmund Stanley 

James Fuller Steen 

Don Steinweg 

Richard Allan Stepanske 

Richard Adams Stevens 

Sylvia Deborah Stickrath 

Edith Marie Stone 

Valinda Jeanne Stonebrook 

C. Edward Stover, Jr. 

Roger William Swanson 

Victoria Grace Swanson 

Bill Wayne Swilley 

Barbara Sue Day Taylor 

Donald Ray Taylor 

Flora Bich Ngoc Tran 

Teresa Earlaine Trimble 

Rickey Lee Tryon 

Don Earl Tucker 

Susanne Elizabeth Underhay 

Janet Patricia Hoke Vigil 

Raymond William Wagner 

Clyde D. Walters 

Merrie Zumstein Walters 

Theodore Robert Wardle 

Eloise Carruth Waters 



346 



80 YEARS OF PROGRESS 



GRADUATES (Cont.) 



Dulcie Evelyn Webster 
Clarice Elaine Wilkinson 
Mary Ellen Willis 
David Robert Winters 



1971 (Cont.) 

Sharon Marie Wittenberg 
Linda Sue Nantt Worth 
William Francis Worth, Jr. 
Terrell Wayne Zollinger 



1971 _ 2-YEAR 



Donnalene Gerald Beardsley 

Patricia Anne Brock 

Kay Lorene Bullock 

Vicki Lynn Fults 

Gayla Lynn Gardner 

Donna Rene Gruver 

Helen Ruth Berecz Hicks 

Bonnie Lynn Pumford Hogan 

Martha Jane Gerace Hopps 

Sharon Doneva Howard 

Verna Elaine Johnson 

Teresa Gail Carris Kingsnorth 

Joleen Marie Leland 

Alice Jean Lemon 

Dianne Renee Weeks Martin 

Gwendolyn Vertelle Martin 

Meredith Ann Jennings May 

Rhonda G. Merickle 



M. Marie Meyer 
Linda Gayle Arnold Miles 
Lois Lacy Mohr 
Margaret Elaine Mote 
Sandra Sue Welch Peeke 
Janice Celeste McElroy Phelps 
Terry Justin Phillips 
Judith Jo Ratzlaff 
Karen Ann Rutledge 
Becky Jean Heath Soapes 
James Melvin Stewart 
Sandra Faye Mayes Sweeney 
Sharon Elaine Swilley 
Nancy Colleen Trefz 
Janet Kreger Truman 
Barbara Frances Ward 
Brenda Sue Brooks Woods 
Sylvia Anita Youngberg 



SUMMER — 1971 



Jeffery M. Albright 
Larry Wayne Bartel 
Margaret Buchannan Bennett 
Donald Joel Bohannon 
Daniel Gene Bowman 
Roger Dwight Cain 
Willis Dewayne Callahan 
Philip James Castleberg 
Janet Elizabeth Cheney 
John Frank Cooper 
Richard Earl Davis 
Judith Dean DuBose 
Robert Charles Evans 
Thomas L. Ford 
Sharon Pendleton Garner 
Melvina Wahl Goff 
Tanya Gorman Hart 
Catherine Lucile Hartley 
Frances Juanita Highsmith 



Peggy Jean Hough 
Clayton Patrick Howell 
Nancy Blow Howell 
Elven M. Hudson 
Michael Kline Huitt 
Prudence I. Hutchinson 
Martha Louise Kendall 
Larry Joseph Leech 
Patricia Cate Leonard 
Marion Allen McFarland 
Dennis Joel Raettig 
Dennis Wayne Randolph 
Linda Creed Rollins 
Susan Janice Rolls 
Ella Ruth Strang 
Dorothy Rima Stumpfrock 
Virginia Nettie Taylor 
Patricia Ann Thornton 
Ella McComas Wickham 



SUMMER 1971 — 2-YEAR 



Elsie Loretha McDaniel 



Cheryl Lynn Allen 
Lynnda Naomi Armstrong 
Michael Allen Barto 
Jerry Ann Carr Bassler 



Brenda Sue Townsend 

1972 

Geneva Anderson Beardsley 
Danny Ray Bentzinger 
Richard A. Berent 
Frederick Martin Bischoff 



APPENDIX— LOOKING BACK 



347 



GRADUATES (Cont.) 



1972 (Cont.) 



Arthur Douglas Black 
Kenneth Douglas Bonaparte 
Donald D. Bowman 
Donald Ray Boyer 
Robert Leland Brannan 
Patricia Anne Brenneman 
Gary Ronald Brooks 
Ronald Clifford Brown 
Helen Kilpatrick Burch 
Judith McNeal Butzman 
Gail Ann Calkins 
Allan Chalmer Chastain 
Evelyn Augusta Chexnayder 
Dennis Allen Clark 
Shirley Ledbetter Clark 
Edwin Eldene Cook 
James Ray Cox 
Darrelyn Hope Craddock 
Edward Lewis Croker 
Gerald Marion Cross 
Catherine Josephine Daily 
Alvin Stanley Dalton Jr. 
Donald Lee Davis 
Paulette Lourdes De Lumban 
Marsha Elaine Drake 
Terrance Michael Duke 
Sylvia Helen Dunn 
Delynne Kristina Durham 
Leon Eldon Everett 
Charles Rayburn Ferguson 
Dorothy Peterson Ford 
Carol Smith Fox 
Daniel Paul Frederick 
August Russell Friberg Jr. 
Bachman Pickett Fulmer Jr. 
Marie Schoeps Fulmer 
Susan Kay Galey 
Hugo Jose Garcia 
Jon Michael Gearhart 
John Thomas Gilbert III 
Evelin Harper Gilkeson 
Jerrell Estle Gilkeson 
James Robert Goff 
Winnifred Hoehn Gohde 
Joanne Ramsey Goodwin 
Brenda Craig Gray 
Lynn Lesley Gross 
Mary Ann Guinn 
Robert Floyd Hagar 
Mary Louise Harp 
William Alvin Haupt 
Laura May Hedden 
Linda Ryals Herbert 
Sharon Nogle Herbey 



Michael Lawrence Hicks 
Lois Elaine Hilderbrandt 
Richard George Hodder 
Danny Eldon Hogan 
Linda Ann Holland 
Rose Marie Hoist 
Clifford Eugene Ingersoll 
Sharon Irene Ingram 
Kathryn Ann Ippisch 
Samuel Thomas James 
Charles Thomas Jenkins 
Ronald Lee Johnson 
Margaret L. Jones 
John Howard Kissinger III 
Connie Thore Knight 
Derwin Henry Koleada 
Robert Matthew Korzyniowski 
Victor Marshall Kostenko 
Sharon Kathleen Kunsman 
Beecher F. Lafever Jr. 
Carolyn Frances Lanfear 
Paula Livingston Lawrence 
Marilyn McKee Lee 
Fred Rolfe Levoy 
Alonzo Gary Liebelt 
Levin Gail Long 
John Robert Loor Jr. 
Eugene Earl Louden 
Brenda Kaye Luster 
Mary Ellen Martin 
Richard Harold Martin 
Kenneth Milton Mathews Jr. 
Paul Wesley May 
Michael Wayne McRight 
Shirley Jean Meyers 
Patsy Rosen Middaugh 
Dennis Sumner Millburn 
Pierce Jones Moore III 
James Olin Morris 
Kenneth Eugene Nelson 
Ronald Alan Nelson 
James Arthur Neubrander 
Fritz Murray Newman 
Linda Marie Nilsen 
Annette Marie Norcliffe 
Cheryl Eileen Parish 
Johannes Penz 
Judith Carol Peterson 
Charles Laurence Pierce 
Jerrell Glen Pilon 
Barbara Jean Piatt 
James Lee Pleasants 
Ronald Dale Riffel 



348 



80 YEARS OF PROGRESS 



GRADUATES (Cont.) 



Harry Benjamin Rimer 
Donald Edward Robbins 
Stanley Merle Rouse 
Velda Bentj en Ruby 
Beverly Jean Runnals 
Adan Ruiz Saldana 
Patricia Ann Sampson 
Ruth Linderman Saunders 
Edwin Noel Santos 
Mary Kathleen Schaefer 
Judy Delene Schenck 
James Edmund Seeley III 
Janice Kathleen Seeley 
Pamela Stoner Seeley 
Larry Jay Servoss 
Robert Joseph Skender 
Alice Fleming Smith 
Steven Paris Snyder 
Judith Ann Socol 
Sharon Ruth Starr 
Beverly Eldridge Stevens 
Daniel William Stevens 
Richa Rowlands Stevens 



1972 (Cont.) 



Sarah Mae Stimpson 
Sharon Beck Straw 
Claudia Jo Sutherland 
George Edward Swanson 
Karen Taylor Swilley 
Dennis Alva Taylor 
Marsha Dunkin Teel 
Brenda Martone Thoresen 
Carl Daniel Tolas Jr. 
Phyllis Ann Underwood 
Gwyn Lamar VanCleave 
David L. Vining 
Wolfgang von Maack 
Robert Alan Wade 
Keith Daryl Walters 
Dennis Roy Ward 
Ruth Anne Wasson 
Cecil Odell Wear 
Nadine Pearl Wheeler 
Rachel Thompson Wiegand 
Mary Helen Woodruff 
Frederick Karl Wuerstlin 
Carol Smart Yonehiro 



1972 —2-YEAR 



Patrice Diane Artress 
Rebecca Stirk Aufderhar 
Bonnie Kay Campbell 
Betty Jane Carey 
Elaine Arendt Chitwood 
Mary Elizabeth Cook 
Andrew Seburn Crawford 
Jenny Williams Cross 
Patricia Dawn Dickinson 
Teresa Louise Donaldson 
Joy Christian Dutton 
Yolanda Sutherland Elkins 
Eleanor Anne Erskine 
Donna Lee Faulkingham 
Joan Harp Franklin 
Doris Ann Freeman 
Robert Bruce Gammon 
Ursula M. Gust 
Roberta Lee Parker Hagar 
Susan Mills Hornbeck 
Janviere Jenadayle James 
Varenda Walker Kennedy 
Julianne Renee LaFave 
Brenda Cheryl Lamb 
Carol Easley McFarland 



Esther Elaine Maxwell 
Dorenda Kay Moore 
Patricia Brokaw Moore 
Esther Lynn Morris 
Betty Roof Myers 
Selma Martin Neubrander 
Bonnie Campbell Oetman 
Jean Allen Price 
Susan Elizabeth Rhodes 
Fairra Ann Roddy 
Linda Nannette Sanderson 
Rachel Elaine Self 
Bonnie Jean Stevens 
Kathleen Beaulieu Thurmon 
Cindy Reile Tarr 
Beverly Faye Trivett 
Carole Ann Vining 
Shirley May Voss 
Linda Mignon Walker 
Sherry Sagert Ward 
Vicki Crist Weddle 
Debra Kay Weeks 
Bonnie Haefner Weron 
Gloria Howell Wickham 
Jacquie Marie Zytkoskee 



APPENDIX— LOOKING BACK 



349 



GRADUATES (Cont.) 
SUMMER — 1972 



Ronald Lee Adams 

David Lincoln Atkins 

Kent Linden Benedict 

James D. Brighton Sr. 

Norman James A. Burlingame 

Norene Joye Currie 

Gary Andrew Edmons 

David Allan Ertel 

David Lamar Fardulis 

Wynene Preston Fenderson 

Ronald Van Fowler 

Lyle Monroe Henderson Jr. 

Kay Duncan Geach 

Bruce Lee Herbert 



Wilson Horsley 

Thelma L. Johnson 

Allan Arthur Kennedy 

Beverly Herbrandson Koester 

Lois Marie Mohr 

Harold Claude Reynolds Jr. 

Robert Eldon Roberts 

David R. Silverstein 

Frank John Smith 

Donald Eugene Stair 

Joan Murphy Taylor 

Glen Alan Walker 

James Merton Wilkinson 



SUMMER 1972 — 2- YEAR 



Lynda Eadie Fowler 
Doris Ann Halvorsen 



Sharon Tralece Ja'anini 
Joan Hedges Sterndale 



1973 



Betty Williams Allen 
Barbara Kabanuk Anderson 
Elizabeth Adams Baird 
Linda Jean Bankes 
Linda Limberis Batto 
Jeannie Marie Benedict 
Terry Lynn Blough 
Clarence Dixon Blue 
Rhonda Huffaker Bolton 
Beverly Spurgeon Bretsch 
Robert Ray Bretsch 
Douglas Earl Bricker 
Kathleen Brown Bricker 
Lawrence Charles Brooks 
Donna Sue Brown 
Linda Thomsen Brown 
Ann Elise Burke 
Mary Cook Byard 
Cheryl L. Camara 
Caryn Joy Carman 
Lynn Bernice Carpenter 
Carole Hunt Chapman 
William Charles Christiansen 
Maerici Dante Ciuffardi 
Paul Estes Clark 
Harold James Colburn 
Charles Sparks Cook, Jr. 
Cheri Giles Cook 
Sharon Allene Cossentine 
Marji Louise Costerisan 
Michael Benjamin Couillard 
David Henry Cox 



Winsome Dianne Mae Croker 
Glenda Maxson Davidson 
Robert Lee Davidson 
Susan Cheryl Diener 
Edward Lowell Dininger 
Joyce Wright Doherty 
Elizabeth R. Dorchester 
George Emerson Dutton 
Karen Ann Edgar 
Randy Dean Elkins 
Ruben Fernandez, Jr. 
Teresa Ann Fifield 
Rita Jeanne Fillman 
Jorge David Flechas 
Judy Gail Fieri 
Mark Edward Franklin 
Rose Shafer Fuller 
Elizabeth Ann Gatsch 
Judith La Verne Gerst 
Lydia Paulette Goodman 
Mary (Maria) Lee Gow 
Bettie Chastain Griffin 
Richard Lee Griffin 
Lanny Carroll Hadley 
Wesley James Hallman 
Barbara K. Harold 
Douglas Paul Haynes 
Lyleen Marie Henderson 
Julia Eidson Hendon 
Mary Seeley Herrman 
Leslie Alvin Hess 
Lee Dudley Holland 



350 



80 YEARS OF PROGRESS 



GRADUATES (Cont.) 



1973 (Cont.) 



Sharon Johnson Holland 
Suzanne Jackson 
Jamile Douglas Jacobs 
Karen Freya Jansen 
Carlos Alberto Japas 
James David Jenks 
Winifred I. Johnson 
Robert Bruce Kimball 
Benjamin Douglass Kochenower 
Ching-Yen (Jane) Lee 
Sue Meers Liner 
Nicki Lynn Linton 
Richard Kenneth Linton 
Leslie David Louis 
Lynn Ray Ludden 
Arlene Potter Ludington 
Darryl Louis Ludington 
Edgar Ross Lyman 
Peter Gunther Malgadey 
Roger Allen Martin 
Gail Karen McKay 
Marie Ellen McNeilus 
Charles Henning Mills 
Dwight Kirkwood Nelson 
Mindi Miller Nelson 
Mitchell Paul Nicholaides 
Mark Keith Nicholson 
Sidney Dale Nixson 
Eileen Walper Oakley 
Harvey Earl Oetman 
Florence Sue Oliphant 
Peggy Newman Ownsby 
Fred Abel Parker 
Sandra Lechler Pate 
Janice Marie Patrick 
Carl Norman Pederson 
Thorkild B. R. Pederson 
Vicky Johnson Pederson 
Elmer Stanley Pennington 
Brenda Lett Peterson 
Geneva Carnahan Pfeiffer 
Richard Eugene Pomeroy 



Richard Lee Rawson 
Robert Jerry Reefman 
Helene Radke Riggs 
Eva Lou Rogers 
Karl Frederick Root, Jr. 
Francis Dean Saunders 
Karen Maureen Schaefer 
Janeth Leigh Schleifer 
Janey Ballard Schneider 
Paul Eugene Shamblin 
Leslie Albert Smart III 
David Edward Smith 
Virginia Belle Smith 
Wilfred Leeweir Smith, Jr. 
Carol Hamm Sommerville 
Lewis Cass Sommerville, Jr. 
Donna L. Stone 
Vonnie Louise Straughan 
Brian Eugene Strayer 
Gloria Nies Sutherland 
Carmen Darlene Swigart 
Carol Adams Swinyar 
Gary Thomas Swinyar 
Gene Bryson Tarr 
Robert Laurence Taylor 
James Edward Teel 
Tamara Lynn Trimble 
Sharon Sue Trower 
Christine Pulido Vargas 
Abdias Rudolph Vence 
Betty Thomsen Wallace 
Florabelle Graham Wear 
Susan Beth Whitaker 
Kathleen Sue Wiehn 
Charles Joseph Wiesner 
Donald Lloyd Wilson 
Thomas Rapheal Wilson 
Deborah Ann Winters 
Evelyn Wireman 
Brenda Sue Wood 
Andrew Price Woolley III 
Barbara Wiesen Zbar 



1973 _ 2-YEAR 



Bernice Annabelle Anderson 
Shirley Wilson Anderson 
Teresa Barton 
Terry Louise Batto 
Sandra Faye Blosser 
Shirley Bunt Breece 
Joy Arlene Bullock 
Vicki Gale Byrd 



Margaret Sue Castleberg 
Penny Pritchard Clark 
Ellen Mcintosh Cobos 
Janet Ranee Coe 
Judy Christiansen Colburn 
Cheryl Dudley Cotta 
Larry Jo Dailey 
Peggy Jeanel Davis 



APPENDIX— LOOKING BACK 



351 



GRADUATES (Cont.) 



1973 - 2 Year (Cont.) 



Donna Jo Deeter 
Rosanna Mae Delinger 
Nancy Ann Eck 
Ida Lytle Edick 
Frederick Leslie Elmendorf 
Marlene Dorothy Everett 
Kathleen Jean Ewald 
Kay Farrell 
Anne Gust FitzGerald 
Connie Lee Foster 
Patricia Tyson Foster 
Susonya Kay Galutia 
Patricia Davidson Garner 
Linda Mae Gerald 
Judith LaVerne Gerst 
Sharon Elaine Gerst 
Judy-Ann Patterson Gibson 
Eileen Rutledge Glass 
Sue Finney Gonzalez 
Donald Burgess Goodbrad 



Marilyn Stroman Gray 
Betty Jo Hadly 
Joyce Ingersol Hallman 
Lettie LuAnne Hallock 
Darlene Strayer Hempel 
Linda Syfert Henderson 
Ellene Dahlberg Hunt 
Nancy Jean Ingersol 
Mary Alice Ingle 
Terrilee Swab Jenks 
Sharon Waters Johnson 
Patricia Carbajal Jones 
James Robert Kennedy 
Susan Ruth Knable 
Mary Louise Leslie 
Sharon Hardie Linam 
Constance Eiken Ludden 
Judy Marie Luttman 
Judith Lacks Maddox 



SUMMER — 1973 



Polly Dickey Bee 
Joseph Franklin Branson 
Joanne D. Brunk 
Alma Mae Butler 
Doris Matta Clayton 
Lathleen Nielsen Couch 
Robert Miller Couch, Jr. 
Diane Temple Cramer 
Melissa Chapman DeFoor 
John Robert Eggenberger 
James Ernest Wayne Fenderson 
Wynene Preston Fenderson 
Madelyn Warner Foster 
Richard L. Halversen 
Diana Adams Hartfield 
James Carlyle Ingersoll 
Conway Bryan Johnson 



James W. Kennedy 
Kenneth Elwyn Kennedy 
David E. Lawrence 
Malcolm George MacKenzie 
Randall Gary Maddox 
Linda Anderson McDonald 
Stuart Blair Murphy 
Sheila Rae Myers 
George Edward Newmyer 
Timothy Carver Peckham 
M. Renee Rebman 
Wilfred Eugene Starr 
Rosalie Ann Stevens 
Eva Hall Tuttle 
Sharon Swilley Vandenberghe 
Cheryl Oliver Wilson 
Kenneth Evan Wilson 



SUMMER 1973 — 2-YEAR 
Pamela Susan Cordone Harold Alvin Moulton 



Faye Irene Acuff 
Willie Mae Affleje 
George Alton Alder 
Janet Taylor Ambler 
Mark Edmond Bainum 
Ruth Wilson Baker 
Warren S. Banfield, Jr. 
Bryan L. Bassler 
Charles Roger Bird 
Sarah Kuehn Blackwell 



1974 

Johannes Max Boehme, Jr. 
Kathleen Kay Boma 
Timothy A. Boundy 
Michael Wayne Brandt 
William Bohler Broome III 
Gerald BroWn 
Donald Ray Byard II 
Janet Louise Cagle 
Donna Cockran Caswell 
Roger Allen Chandler 



352 



80 YEARS OF PROGRESS 



GRADUATES (Cont.) 



1974 (Cont.) 



Cheryl Durham Christie 
Sherry Alford Clapp 
James M. Clark 
Bruce Allison Closser 
Carolyn Sue Coleman 
Amos Henry Cooper 
Bernard Augustus Corbett III 
Joyce Spears Cotham 
Rolland M. Crawford 
Hervey Cross 
Maruo Esteban Cruz 
Michael Allen Cummings 
Harold Mark Dalton 
Teresa Barrera Deindoerfer 
Stephen Adair Dennis 
Waunita Bonjour Dennis 
Joan Krogstad Dillon 
Robert F. Dillon 
Joyce Ann Dobias 
Robin Winfred Erwin, Jr. 
Donna Sue Farrar 
Patsy Holland Ferguson 
Linda Marie Fifield 
Evelyn Loretta Folger 
Madelyn Warner Foster 
Charles Drexel Freeman 
Donna Sue Gepford 
Kathryn Preston Gooch 
Austin Charles Goodwin 
Kristine Beaulieu Greene 
Beverly LaVerne Grundset 
Ronald Albert Hagen 
James Alton Hawkins 
Sandra Seeley Hawkins 
Gerald Mitchell Hazelkamp 
Laurence John Holland 
John Stuart Holley 
Nancy Lee Hughes 
Constance Schlehuber Hunt 
Loren P. Hunt 
Alma Stewart James 
Garye Dale Jensen 
Andrea Dickinson Johnson 
Stephen Jonathan Jones 
Virginia Neff Lazarus 
Donald Reid Lechler 
Linda Carnes Lechler 
Bonny Thomas Lee 
Leonard Chee Leung Lee 
Katherine Baasch Lichtenwalter 
Larry Lee Lichtenwalter 
Deborah Joan Lintner 
C. Edward Loney, Jr. 



Michael Wayne Maddox 
Julie Hope Marchant 
John Clinton Maretich 
Sharon Freeland Mattison 
Phyllis Ellena McClusky 
Karl Erich Mehner 
Paul David Merling 
Dianna Kay Miller 
Anna Erwin Moler 
Karen Oswald Nelson 
Donna Moore Nicholas 
Rosa Anne Norman 
Wayne Daniel Okimi 
Charles Lawrence Rahn 
Ronald Dean Reading 
Charles Gregory Reaves 
Charles Edwin Rennard 
Eva Lynne Zollinger Rennard 
Warren Butler Ruf 
Gregory Grant Rumsey 
Shirley Voss Rumsey 
Raymond Randolph Russell 
Wayne F. P. Salhany 
Phyllis Elsie Saunders 
Suzanne Irene Schermerhorn 
Sandra Faye Schlenker 
Roxie ReNae Schultz 
Edna Imogene Scott 
William Dean Shelly 
Marilyn Cundiff Sliger 
Gerald L. Small 
Brenda Rose Smith 
Cheryl Berkeley Smith 
Richard C. Snyder, Jr. 
Luvon Marie Stout 
Melanie S. Thompson 
Nelson Locksley Thoresen 
Annie Mae Watkins Tripp 
Reginald Lynn Tryon 
Warren Jay Voegele 
Paula Cummings Wade 
Linda Mignon Walker 
Wanda Lee Weikum 
James David Wheatley, Jr. 
David Erald Wheeler 
Mary Pamela White 
William Edward White 
Herbert Haskell Williams 
Lucynthia Mathiesen Williams 
Darlene Lucille Wilson 
Shirley West Wodzenski 
Nannette Orlena Wolcott 
Robert Gene Zima 



APPENDIX— LOOKING BACK 



353 



GRADUATES (Cont.) 



1974 _ 2-YEAR 



Ruth Joyce Adler 
Becky S. Aeh 
Willie Mae Aflleje 
Robert C. Ambler 
Gary Steven Barber 
Debra Angelini Bass 
Constance Renee Beck 
Mary Darleen Whary Beck 
Melony Elaine Blalock 
Patricia Ann Blue 
Colleen Joyce Bock 
Sharla Closser Bogar 
Robyn Meinhardt Bowman 
Alexa Truax Broome 
Bonnie Louise Burch 
Anna Marie Burnsed 
Robert D. Carney 
Nancy Freda Casil 
Sharon Lynette Clifton 
Marjorie Hofmann Compton 
Patricia Louise Conger 
Patricia Spencer Corbett 
Debra Jeanne Cornell 
Kathryn Lorren Cummings 
Judy Stuber Dailey 
Frances Ann Damazo 
Carolyn Johnson Darcy 
Allen Orville Davis 
Karen Wrona Edmondson 
Lucinda Lu Fleming 
Martha Ann Franz 
Norma Jean Freeman 
Peggy Sue Funkhauser 
Carol Trivett Garner 
Daniel Ray Geach 
Mary Jane Gilbert 
Virginia Pearl Goodwin 
Debra Waters Gravell 
Susan Kay Hakes 
Phyllis Taylor Hall 
Jon Elizabeth Harold 
Mary Christine Haven 
Bonnie Erickson Haviland 
Katie Jo Herber 
David Arthur Hickok 
Carol Brown Howard 
Cynthia Babbitt Howard 
Karen Hallman Ingersoll 
Sandra Strong Jacobs 
Nancy Ray Jeter 



Rayleen D. Juhl 

Gary Arthur Kagels 

Sandra Lynn Kunza 

Richard Othello Leet 

Beth Patricia Lenzen 

Lou Ann Liers 

Judy Crawford Maretich 

Anne Caldwell McKenzie 

Janice Lynn McPherson 

Perry Keith Meador 

Linda Gay Michaelis 

Pamela Sue Millar 

Kathleen Louise Mixell 

Roland Moler 

Wendell Meredith Swallen Moses 

Brenda Kay Neal 

Susan Marie Neher 

Charlotte Diane Nelson 

Kathryn Estelle Nelson 

Johan Andre Newman 

Alvina Marie Nordvick 

Joy Ellen Peters 

Monica Ruth Pierson 

Sharon Rose Prather 

Gerald Woodrow Priest 

Doreen Retzer Rose 

Gloria Reynolds Rouse 

Karen Leone Ruggles 

Darlene Mae Rusk 

Deborah Aydelotte Salter 

Roy L. Stafford 

Doris Davenport Stevens 

Pamela Diane Swatek 

Shirley Tucker Swilley 

Constance Clayburn Thomas 

Daniel Timothy Thomas 

Pamela Ann Thomson 

Carolyn Cotham Toomey 

Fred Lee Turner 

Marcia Brown Turner 

Juanita Cannon Tyson 

Sharon Elaine Underhill 

Sallie Atkinson Van Deusen 

John Millar Ward 

Wendell Key Ward 

Linda Louise Wheeler 

Carol Jean Wickham 

Paula J. Wierts 

Flora Mae Williams 

Judy Ann Wuttke 



354 



80 YEARS OF PROGRESS 



GRADUATES (Cont.) 
SUMMER — 1974 



Jacqueline Jeanette Andrews 
Ronald Ramon Andrus 
Myrta Rivera de Anglada 
Kathleen Elaine Belknap 
Howard Arthur Brown 
Jack Wayne Francisco 
Robert LaVerne Fuller 
Roy Walter Haines 
Mary Mahn Hedrick 
Randall Hugh Herrman 
Judith Clark Herrmann 
Melvin Pat Jackson 
Waldemar Janke 
John Harvey Willmonte Kendall 
Nancie Jo Lance 
Wayne Frank Liljeros 



Max Paul Marschner 
Norman Ford McCauley 
Evelyn Chapman Nicholaides 
Mary Wahl Nielsen 
Thorkild B. R. Pedersen 
Janet Nelson Penner 
Pamela Maize Ramsey 
Donald Richard Sands 
Kathleen Stephan Saxton 
Roby Hirst Sherman 
John Edward Soule 
B. Pauletta Stines 
Judith A. G. Sullivan 
Martha Brooks Wheeler 
James Albert Wyche, Jr. 



SUMMER 1974 — 2-YEAR 



David Lewis Denmark 
Zola Ann Driggers 
Patricia Ann Gepford 



Joni Irene Anderson 
Bruce Allen Bacheller 
Catherine Dutton Bacheller 
Joseph Bruce Baird 
Sharon Ann Beard 
John Allen Beckett 
Paul Irving M. Benson 
Harry Douglas Best 
Krystal Lyn Bishop 
Marilyn Kay Blecha 
Jill Dianne Bloodworth 
Hans-Peter Boksberger 
Herbert N. Borgthorsson 
Susan Lynn Bossenberry 
David Neil Bowers 
Charles David Brannaka 
Nancy H. Brannaka 
Nancy Sue Bremson 
Florence M. Brent 
Susan Gail Brougham 
Kenneth Bryant 
Dennis E. Burke 
Richard Neal Carey 
Martha Cheryl Carlton 
Gayle Denise Carpenter 
Michael F. Cauley 
Daniel Yee-Yan Chin 
Edward Kenneth Chitwood 
Barbara Kitchun Choi 
Mei-Ying Ancy Choi 



Debbie Virginia Johnson 
Susan Elizabeth Mills 



1975 



Kenneth Lee Chrispens 
James Douglas Clarke 
Chris Randolph Cockrell 
Deborah Lynn Cockrell 
Carol Elizabeth Coppock 
Donna M. Couden 
Joseph Thomas Crabb 
Jennifer Sue Crutcher 
John Paul Davis 
Peggy Janelle Davis 
Sheila Keller Davis 
George Wenworth Deal 
Rolando D. DeLeon 
Ardella Diann Dockter 
James Scott Donaldson 
Terrance George Dunder 
David Alan Durham 
Debra Kay Eberhardt 
Judith Cherie Eberhardt 
James Patrick Eldred 
Pamela Jean Erskine 
Debra Sue Fillman 
Yetta Levitt Foote 
Patricia Lynn Ford 
Robert Malcolm Foster 
Paula Jo Furr 
Patricia Ann Galey 
Cynthia Tandy Gearhart 
Letitia Diane Gearhart 
Gregory L. Gimbel 



Hi 



APPENDIX— LOOKING BACK 



355 



GRADUATES (Cont.) 



Nancy Tarte Goodbrad 
Steven Roy Grimsley 
Gary Allen Gryte 
Sharon Elizabeth Haines 
David Lee Hakes 
Richard Clark Hale 
Debra Marie Hall 
Karen Lorraine Halvorsen 
William Allen Hamilton, Jr. 
James Richard Hardaway 
Leslie Willard Hardin 
Paul David Haynes 
Rebecca Jean Hayward 
Rolf Morgan Hellgren 
James Francis Henderson 
James Dwight Herod 
Cynthia Ann Hills 
Scotty Dean Hodges 
Debra Kay Howard 
Michael Steven Howard 
John Charles Huskins 
Deborah Hyde 
Edward Jackson 
Barbara Davis James 
David Carlton James 
Angel David Jimenez 
Karen Sue Johnson 
Bruce Teel Juhl 
Shirley Kutzner Juhl 
Lloyd Douglas Knowlton 
David Carl Koobs 
Susan Jean Kupiec 
Jesse Earl Landess 
Karen Lanz 
Francis Dale Larson 
Philip L. Lawless 
Bradley Arnett Lewis 
James Edward Link 
Reba Lewis Lough 
Pamela Lou Maize 
Roland Timothy Marsh 
John Harold H. Mathews 
Emma L. McCall 
Jacqueline McLaren 
Beverly Jean McLarty 



Roger Norman Aasheim 
Georgia Susan Adams 
Alicia Kay Alderman 
Susan Marie Altman 
Nancy Lee Andress 
Vickie Dawn Avery 



1975 (Cont.) 

Thomas A. McNeilus 

Darlene Meyer 

Robert Crumley Moore 

Brownie Marie Murphy 

Judith Ann Neet 

Steven Ruben Neuharth 

Connie Jane Noble 

Karen Lyles Palmer 

Dennis Lyle Parrish (Posthumous) 

Janice Lynette Phillips 

Jewell R. Morris 

Margaret Sprayberry Moyers 

Ronald Dean Powell 

Kenneth Michael Powers 

Elizabeth A. Primero 

Ruth Arceo Primero 

Aage Rendalen 

John Thomas Richards 

Krista Ann Riffel 

Angela Kaye Robertson 

Joseph Nelson Rudd, Jr. 

Sheryl Lynne Runyon 

Rene Ruttimann 

Terry Ann Sheldt 

Michael Charles Sheriff 

Charles Aubrey Shields 

Rose Lynn Simpson 

Larry Steven Spears 

Linda Louise Taylor 

Mary Brown Taylor 

William H. Taylor II 

Nancy Faith Thompson 

Brenda Marie Vance 

Susan Kababuk Vence 

Lois Vining 

Douglas Von Kriegelstein 

Pamela Patten Walker 

Dwight Elmer Waterhouse 

Herbert Weise 

Kenneth Lamar Will 

Marvin Russel Williams 

John William Wolfe, Jr. 

Ted Edward Zegarra 

Karen Alice Zill 

Louis Lawrence Zumstein, Jr. 

1975 _ 2- YEAR 

Nancy Ellen Bacheller 
Betty Anne Beaulieu 
Judith Marie Bennett 
Thomas Warren Bischoff 
Charles Edwin Bishop, Jr. 
Bali Jeanne Boling 



356 



80 YEARS OF PROGRESS 



GRADUATES (Cont.) 



1975— 2- Year (Cont.) 



Linda Kay Breece 
Deborah Ann Buchholz 
Karen Jean Cansler 
Denise Hornbeck Carney 
Kathy Sue Castillo 
Dorothea Bradwell Cauley 
Cathy Lori Childs 
Daina Kathleen Clark 
Deborah Jeannette Clark 
Judith Ann Clayburn 
Cheryl Ann Cox 
Lucia Jane Crevasse 
Delby Louise Crook 
Jacqueline Rae Cruze 
Jan Davies 

Lorraine A. Drachenberg 
Sarah Mae Enevoldson 
Carolynne Kay Fekete 
Lucy Jeannine Finley 
Robin Lynn Finnel 
Rebecca Jean Foster 
Christine Freedman 
Tanya Lynne Frith 
Jay Arthur Garrison 
Judy Lynn Gershon 
Diane Thelma Gilmore 
Darlene LaVonne Griffith 
Kathline Grimes 
Kathryn Jenene Hadley 
Alyse Hamilton 
William Nelson Hammond 



Neufeld, Patricia Jean 
Nielsen, Susan Ward 
O'Neal, Lyndell Murphy 
Peltier, Penny Gaynell 
Perry, Gregory Scott 
Pichler, Bonnie Kay 
Pineiro, Edward Efraly 
Porter, Mary Kay Anderson 
Pruitt, Lynda Ringer 
Puraphrey, Marilyn Sue 
Puraphrey, Marlene Louise 
Reynolds, Cynthia Jane 
Rimmer, Neita Carris 
Roberts, Susan Kay 
Rogers, Nora Gail 
Schlender, Donald Richard 
Serns, Marilee Ruth 
Sharley, Harry Joseph, II 
Skinner, Sheryl Dell 
Smith, David 
Smith, Elizabeth Dittes 



Ulla S. Hansen 
Daniel Joseph Hanson 
Elizabeth Lewis Hardison 
Karolyn Kay Hartwig 
Linda Sue Haus 
Debra Lynn Henderson 
Marian Thornton Hickok 
Jennifer Dianne Hicks 
Cathy Ann Hill 
Larry John Hunt 
Christine S. Jenkins 
Darlene Deborah Jones 
Mary Beth Kramer 
David Eugene Kratzer 
Louise Ann Kuna 
David Edwin Latham 
Pamela Elaine LeGere 
Anita Gail Leland 
John Edwin Lindstrom 
Kevin Joseph Lipscomb 
Linda Gail Lowe 
Laurence Michael Mader 
Susan Camille Maretich 
Shirley Fay Mathieu 
Bette Henderson McKenzie 
Elizabeth R. Mellor 
Deborah Swinson Metcalf 
Karen Moe 

Joan Elizabeth Montross 
LeAnn E. Moore 
Martha Carolyn Mullins 



Smith, Gail Copsey 

Smith, Sunshine Susan 

Soper, Lori Jeanne 

Stone, Dixie Lee Clark 

Sutherland, Christopher Edward 

Taylor, Marilyn Kae 

Townsend, David Clifton 

Turner, Denny Allan 

Urick, Cynthia Faye 

Walker, Gail Alice 

Walker, Nathan Seth 

Walls, Connie Regal 

Walls, Karen Ann 

Walston, Maria Worley 

Ward, Patricia Jolene 

Warner, Terry Roy 

Wentland, Cynthia Drenae 

Wilke, Juliann 

Wohlers, Mar i jane Tupes 

Zegarra, Susan Kay 



SDA LD 5101 .S367 A6 1975 

c.5 
Gardner, Elva Babcock. 

Southern Missionary College, 
a school of His planning 



Mole 
Soulwn Adventist University 
Coiegtdale, TN 37315 



DATE DUE 



msem>3aSiJ^mmS\ 




I 



TMS085762