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Full text of "Southern Missionary College Announcements 1949-50"

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SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGE 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 
1949-50 





COLLEGEDALE, TENNESSEE 



NOT TO Be r*AK£N 
FROM UBRWY 



SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGE 
BULLETIN 




ANNOUNCEMENTS 1949-50 
(Revised) 



COLLEGEDALE, TENNESSEE 



McKEE LIBRARY 
Southern Missionary College 



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Calendar 



1949 



July 



M T W T F S 

„ 1 2 

4 5 6 7 8 9 
11 12 13 14 15 16 
18 19 20 21 22 23 
25 26 27 28 29 30 



August 



M T W T F S 
12 3 4 5 6 
8 9 10 11 12 13 
15 16 17 18 19 20 
22 23 24 25 26 27 
29 30 31 



September 
M T W T F S 
12 3 
5 6 7 8 9 10 
12 13 14 15 16 17 
19 20 21 22 23 24 
26 27 28 29 30 .... 



October 

M T W T F S 

1 

3 4 5 6 7 8 

10 11 12 13 14 15 
17 18 19 20 21 22 
24 25 26 27 28 29 

11 

November 
SI T W T F S 
...12345 
7 8 9 10 11 12 
14 15 16 17 18 19 
!1 22 23 24 25 26 
!8 29 30 

December 
H T W T F S 

1 2 3 

5 6 7 8 9 10 
2 13 14 15 16 17 
9 20 21 22 23 24 
!6 27 28 29 30 31 



1950 



January 


July 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


12 3 4 5 6 7 

8 9 10 11 12 13 14 

15 16 17 18 19 20 21 

22 23 24 25 26 27 28 

29 30 31 


1 

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 

23 24 25 26 27 28 29 

30 31 


February 


August 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 
12 13 14 15 16 17 18 
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 
26 27 28 


12 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 
27 28 29 30 31 


March 


September 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 
12 13 14 15 16 17 18 
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 
26 27 28 29 30 31 .... 


1 2 

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 


April 


October 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


1 

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 

23 24 25 26 27 28 29 

30 


12 3 4 5 6 7 

8 9 10 11 12 13 14 

15 16 17 18 19 20 21 

22 23 24 25 26 27 28 

29 30 31 


May 


November 


S M T W T F S 

.... 12 3 4 5 6 
7 8 9 10 11 12 13 
14 15 16 17 18 19 20 
21 22 23*24 25 26 27 
28 29 30 431 


S M T W T F S 

12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 
12 13 14 15 16 17 18 
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 
26 27 28 29 30 


June 


December 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


12 3 

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 

11 12 13 14 15 16 17 

18 19 20 21 22 23 24 

25 26 27 28 29 30 .... 


1 2 

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 
31 .. .... 



1951 



January 



S M T W T F S 
.... 12 3 4 5 6 
7 8 9 10 11 12 13 
14 15 16 17 18 19 20 
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 
28 29 30 31 



February 


S 


M T W T 


F 


S 




.... 1 


2 


3 



4 5 6 7 8 9 10 
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 
18 19 20 21 22 23 24 
25 26 27 28 



March 


S 


M 


T W T 


F 


S 






1 


2 


3 



4 5 6 7 8 9 10 
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 
18 19 20 21 22 23 24 
25 26 27 28 29 30 31 



April 

S M T W T F S 
12 3 4 5 6 7 
8 9 10 11 12 13 14 
IS 16 17 18 19 20 21 
22 23 24 25 26 27 28 
29 30 



May 

S M T W T F S 

12 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 10 II 12 
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 
27 28 29 30 31 



June 


S 


M 


T W T 


F 


S 








1 


2 



3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 



Calendar of Events 

1949-50 

SUMMER SESSION, 1949 

Registration Tuesday, June 21 

Instruction Begins Wednesday, June 22 

Holiday Monday, July 4 

Final Examinations Monday and Tuesday, August 22, 23 

Close of Summer Session Tuesday, August 23 

FIRST SEMESTER 

Convocation, All New Students, 8:00 P.M., Wednesday, September 14 

Tests and Orientation, All New Students, 

8:00 a.m Thursday, September 15 

to 12:00 Noon, Friday, September 16 

Registration for Both Semesters, Freshmen (A-E), 

2:00 P.M Friday, September 16 

Registration for Both Semesters, Freshmen (F-Z), 

9:00 A.M. to 4:00 P.M Sunday, September 18 

Registration for Both Semesters, All Returned Students, 

8:00 A.M Monday, September 19 

to 12:00 Noon Tuesday, September 20 

Opening Convocation, All Students, 8:00 p.m., Tuesday, September 20 

Instruction Begins, 7:35 a.m Wednesday, September 21 

First Vesper Service, 7:30 p.m Friday, September 23 

Faculty-Student Reception, 8:00 p.m Saturday, September 24 

Fall Week of Prayer, Friday to Friday October 21 to 28 

Mid-Semester Examinations, Monday to Friday November 14 to 18 

Thanksgiving Recess, 12:00 Noon Wednesday, November 23 

to 7:35 a.m Monday, November 28 

Christmas Vacation, 12:00 Noon Tuesday, December 20 

to 7:35 a.m Tuesday, January 3 

First Semester Examinations Monday to Friday, January 23-27 

Close of First Semester Friday, January 27 



LP 

- 5 . 3 f 7 SECOND SEMESTER 

Registration, New Students Monday, January 30 

Instruction Begins Tuesday, January 31 

Spring Week of Prayer Friday to Friday, March 3 to 10 

Mid-Semester Examinations Monday to Friday, March 27-31 

Spring Recess, 12:00 Noon Wednesday, April 5 

to 7:35 a.m Tuesday, April 11 

Second Semester Examinations, Monday to Thursday, May 29 to June 1 

Senior Consecration Service, 8:00 p.m Friday, June 2 

Baccalaureate Sermon, 11:00 a.m Sabbath, June 3 

Commencement, 10:00 a.m Sunday, June 4 



'V 



1 



11407Q 



Board of Trustees 

V. G. Anderson, President Decatur, Ga. 

Kenneth A. Wright, Secretary Collegedale, Tenn. 

Charles Fleming, Jr., Treasurer Collegedale, Tenn. 

Fred H. Dortch Birmingham, Ala. 

I. M. Evans Meridian, Miss. 

H. S. Hanson Decatur, Ga. 

C. H. Lauda Charlotte, N. C. 

H. M. Lodge Maitland, Fla. 

G. R. Nash Atlanta, Ga. 

R. H. Nightingale Orlando, Fla. 

M. C. Patten Greenville, S. C. 

H. E. Schneider Decatur, Ga. 

W. E. Strickland Nashville, Tenn. 

B. F. Summerour Norcross, Ga. 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE FINANCE COMMITTEE 

V. G. Anderson, Chairman Charles Fleming, Jr., Chairman 

Kenneth A. Wright, Secretary G. T. Gott, Secretary 

Charles Fleming, Jr. K. A. Wright 

H. S. Hanson F. O. Rittenhouse 

G. R. Nash R. G. Bowen 
H. E. Schneider 



REGIONAL FIELD REPRESENTATIVES 

Representative-at-large: H. S. Hanson Decatur, Ga. 

For Alabama-Mississippi: M. E. Moore .Meridian, Miss. 

For Florida: Lee Carter Orlando, Fla. 

For Georgia-Cumberland: Ward Scriven Atlanta, Ga. 

For Carolina: Wayne Foster Charlotte, N. C. 

For Kentucky-Tennessee: E. J. Barnes Nashville, Tenn. 



I IT I 



Administration and Faculty 

ADMINISTRATION 

Kenneth A. Wright, M.S.Ed President 

Floyd O. Rittenhouse, Ph.D Dean 

Charles Fleming, Jr., M.B.A Business Manager 

Ruby E. Lea, A.B Registrar, Secretary of the Faculty 

Stanley D. Brown, M.A., A.B. in L.S Librarian 

Everett T. Watrous, M.A Dean of Men 

Ingrid B. Johnson, A.B Dean of Women 

Thomas W. Steen, Ph.D Director Test, and Counseling Service 

Olivia B. Dean, M.Ed Principal of the Elementary School 

Nannie Harper Hambrick Director of Food Service 

William G. Shull, M.D College Physician 

M ^ J. Sorens qn^JVLA Principal of Collegedale Academy 

Marcella Klock Ashlock, R.N., A.B Director of Health Service 

G. T. Gott, A.B Assistant Business Manager 

R. G. Bowen Treasurer 



INDUSTRIAL SUPERVISORS 

- Martin C. Bird Press 

Murrell Connell Broom Shop 

Alger J. Jones Laundry 

Ransom H. F. Luce Store 

Ray Olmstead Wood Products 

George R. Pearman Maintenance 

John B. Pierson Farm and Dairy 

A. W. Spalding Fruit, Garden, and Campus 



THE FACULTY 

Kenneth A. Wright, M.S. Ed., President. 

A.B., Emmanuel Missionary College, 1923; M.S. Ed., 
Cornell University, 1938. Present position since 1943. 

Horace R. Beckner, B.RE., College Pastor. 

B.R.E., Atlantic Union College, 1933. Present position since 1947. 



10 Southern Missionary College 

Ambrose L. Suhrie, Ph.D., Resident Educational Consultant 

Ph.B., John B. Stetson University, 1906; A. M., University of 
Pennsylvania, 1911; Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania, 1912. 
Present position since 1945. 



Elaine Giddings, A.M., Professor of English and Speech 
A.B., Emmanuel Missionary College, 1931; 

A. M., University of Southern California, 1945. 
Present position since 1945 

Harold A. Miller, M.Mus., Professor of Music, 

B. Mus., Otterbein College, 1937; M. Mus., Eastman School of 
Music, University of Rochester, 1941. Present position since 1945. 

George J. Nelson, Ph.D., Professor of Chemistry and Mathematics. 

B.S., Emmanuel Missionary College, 1932; M.S., University of 
■ Colorado, 1939; Ph.D., University of Colorado, 1947. 

Present position since 1939. 

Ployd O. Rittenhouse, Ph.D., Professor of History. 

A. B., Emmanuel Missionary College, 1928; A M., Ohio State 
University, 1932; Ph.D., Ohio State University, 1947. Present 
position since 1948. 

Thomas W. Steen, Ph.D., Professor of Education. 

A.B., Emmanuel Missionary College, 1910; M.S , Northwestern 
University, 1933; Ph.D., University of Chicago, 1939. 
Present position since 1948. 

Charles E. Wittschiebe, A.M., Professor of Religion. 

B.R.E., Atlantic Union College, 1931; A.M., S.D.A. Theological 
Seminary, 1946. Present position since 1947. 

Edward C. Banks, A.M., Associate Professor of Religion and Evangelism. 
B.Th., Emmanuel Missionary College, 1934; A.M. in Religion, 
S.D.A. Theological Seminary, 1948. Present position since 1946. 

Theresa Rose Brickman, M. Com'l Ed., Associate Professor of Secre- 
tarial Science. 

A.B., Union College, 1928; M.Com'l Ed., University of Oklahoma, 
1942. Present position since 1942. 

Stanley D. Brown, A. M., Associate Professor of Bibliography and 
Library Science. 

A.B., Washington Missionary College, 1926; A.B. in L.S , Univer- 
sity of North Carolina, 1937; A.M., University of Maryland, 1935. 
Present position since 1935. 



/?ff^T> 



The Faculty 11 

Olivia Brickman Dean, M.Ed., Associate Professor of Elementary 
Education. 

A.B., Union College, 1934; M.Ed., University of Oklahoma, 1943. 
Present position since 1942. 

Mary Holder Dietel, A.M., Associate Professor of Modern Languages, 
A.B., Washington Missionary College, 1919; A.M., University of 
Maryland, 1933. Present position since 1938. 

Maude I. Jones, A.B., Associate Professor Emeritus of English.. 
A.B., Mississippi College for Women, 1894. 
Present position since 1917. 

Don C. Ludington, A.M., Associate Professor of English. 

A.B., Emmanuel Missionary College, 1913; B. S., George Peabody 
College for Teachers, 1929; A.M., George Peabody College for 
Teachers, 1930. Present position since 1947. 

E. I. Mohr, M.S., Associate Professor of Physics. 

A. B., Union College, 1926; M.S., University of Southern California, 
1943. Present position since 1949. 

Leif Kr. Tobiassen, A.M., Associate Professor of History and Religion. 
A.B., Emmanuel Missionary College, 1936; A.M., S.D.A. Theological 
Seminary, 1948. Present position since 1947. 



James Franklin Ashlock, A.B., Assistant Professor of Religion and 
Homiletics. 
A.B., Union College, 1943. Present position since 1948. 

Marcella Klock Ashlock, R.N., A.B., Assistant Professor of Nursing 
Education. 

R.N., Washington Sanitarium and Hospital School of Nursing, 1925. 
A.B., Southern Missionary College, 1946. Present position since 1949. 

Gerald W. Boynton, A.M., Assistant Professor of Industrial Arts. 

B.S., Madison College, 1940; A.M., George Peabody College for 
Teachers, 1943. Present position since 1945. 

Hira T. Curtis, B. S., Assistant Professor of Business Administration. 
B.S., Union College, 1899. Present position since 1949. 

George B. Dean, A.M., Assistant Professor of Biology and Chemistry. 
A.B., University of Wichita, 1928; A.M., George Peabody College 
for Teachers, 1947. Present position since 1939. 



12 Southern Missionary College 

Charles Fleming, Jr., M.B.A., Assistant Professor of Business Admin- 
istration. 

A.B., Emmanuel Missionary College, 1937; M.B.A., Northwestern 
University, 1940. Present position since 1946. 

♦Richard L. Hammill, A.M., Assistant Professor of Religion and 
Biblical Languages. 

B.Th., Walla Walla College, 1936; A.M., S.D.A. Theological 
Seminary, 1947. Present position since 1946. 

Lois Lucile Heiser, A.M., Assistant Professor of Home Economics. 
A.B., Atlantic Union College, 1943; A.M. in Home Economics 
Education, New York University, 1948. Present position since 1945. 

Norman L. Krogstad, M.Mus., Assistant Professor of Music. 

B.S., Kansas State Agricultural College, 1943; B.Mus., MacPhail's 
School of Music, 1947; M.Mus., Northwestern University, 1949. 

; Present position since 1949. 

Huldrich H. Kuhlman, A.M., Assistant Professor of Biology. 

A.B., Emmanuel Missionary College, 1940; A.M., George Peabody 
College for Teachers, 1945. Present position since 1946. 

Manuel J. Sorenson, A.M., Assistant Professor of Education. 

A.B., Union College, 1931; A.M., University of Nebraska, 1939. 
Present position since 1949. 

Everett T. Watrous, A.M., Assistant Professor of History. 

A.B., Atlantic Union College, 1934; A.M., University of Chicago, 
1941. Present position since 1948. 

J. Mabel Wood, A.B., Assistant Professor of Music 

A.B., Union College, 1948. Present position since 1949. 



Jimmie Lou Westerfield Brackett, B.S. in Sec. Sci., Instructor in 
Secretarial Science. 

B.S. in Sec. Sci., Southern Missionary College, 1949. Present position 
since 1949. 

George T. Gott, A.B., Instructor in Economics. • 

A.B., Emmanuel Missionary College, 1944. 
Present position since 1947. 



*On leave 1949-50 



The Faculty 13 

Harry Ralston Hooper, A.B., Instructor in Industrial Arts. 

A.B., Pacific Union College, 1949. Present position since 1949. 

Ingrid C. Johnson, A.B., Instructor in Physical Education. 
A.B., Emmanuel Missionary College, 1944. 
Present position since 1948. 

Adel Kougl, A.B., Instructor in Home Economics. 

A.B., Union College, 1943. Present position since 1949. 

Eleanor A. Krogstad, B. Mus., Instructor in Music. 
B. Mus., MacPhail's School of Music, 1949. 
Present position since 1949. 

Ora S. Plue, A.M., Instructor in Biblical Language*. _ _. 

A.B., Emmanuel Missionary College, 1937; A.M., S.D.A. Theological 
Seminary, 1948. Present position since 1948. 

Wayne P. Thurber, A.B., Instructor in Voice. 

A.B., Southern Missionary College, 1948. Present position since 
1949. 



Robert E. Lynn, A.B., Special Instructor in Printing. 

A.B., Union College, 1932. Present position since 1947 

Violetta M. Plue, B.S., Special Instructor in Art. 

B.S., Northwestern State Teachers College, Oklahoma, 1937, 
Present position since 1948. 

William G. Shull, M.D., Special Instructor in Health. 

A.B., University of Southern California, 1941; M.D., College of 
Medical Evangelists, 1946. 
Present position since 1949. 



SUPERVISORY INSTRUCTORS IN SECONDARY EDUCATION 

Manuel J. Sorenson, A.M., Principal, Social Studies 

A.B., Union College, 1931; A.M., University of Nebraska, 1939. 

James F. Ashlock, A.B., Bible 
A.B., Union College, 1943. 



14 Southern Missionary College 

Betty Brooks, A.M., English 

A.B., Emmanuel Missionary College, 19-—; 
A.M., University of Nebraska, 1949. 

George B. Dean, A.M., Biology 

A.B., University of Wichita, 1928; 

A.M., George Peabody College for Teachers, 1947. 

Roy L. Morgan, A.B., Science and Mathematics 
A.B., Emmanuel Missionary College, 1949. 

Ora S. Plue, A.M., Bible 

A.B., Emmanuel Missionary College, 1937; 
A.M., S. D. A. Theological Seminary, 1948. 

Margaret M. Steen, A.B., Spanish 

A.B., Emmanuel Missionary College, 1909. 



SUPERVISORY INSTRUCTORS IN ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 

Selma D. Bird, B.S., Grades 5-6. 
B.S., Union College, 1948. 
Present position since 1948. 

Thyra E. Bowen, A.B. El. Ed., Grades 3-4. 

A.B. Ed., Washington Missionary College, 1943. 
Present position since 1948. 

Dora L. Greve, A.M., Grades 7-8. 

A.B., Emmanuel Missionary College, 1942; A. M., George Peabody 
College for Teachers, 1947. 
Present position since 1942. 

Bernice Pittman, A.B. Ed., Grades 1-2. 

A.B. Ed., Washington Missionary College, 1943 
Present position since 1948. 



The Faculty 15 



COMMITTEES OF THE FACULTY 

Administrative Council: Wright, Cbm., Rittenhouse, V-Chm., Lea, 
Sec, Beckner, Fleming, Hambrick, Johnson, Olmstead, Pierson, 
Sorenson, Steen, Suhrie, E. Watrous, Wittschiebe. 

Admissions: Rittenhouse, Chm., Fleming, Johnson, Lea, Sorenson, Steen, 
Watrous, Wright. 

Curriculum and Academic Standards: Rittenhouse, Chm., Lea, Sec, 
M. Ashlock, Boynton, Brickman, O. Dean, Giddings, Heiser, Miller, 
Nelson, Steen, Wittschiebe. 

Health and Recreation: Kuhlman, Chm., M. Ashlock, Sec, Hambrick, 
Heiser, Johnson, Kougl, E. Watrous. 

Library Services: Brown, Chm., M. Watrous, Sec, Fleming, Giddings, 
Miller, Nelson, Rittenhouse, Steen, Tobiassen. 

Ministerial Recommendations: Wittschiebe, Chm., J. Ashlock, Banks, 
Beckner, Plue, Rittenhouse, Steen, Tobiassen, E. Watrous. 

Publications and Public Relations: Tobiassen, Chm., Ludington, 
Sec, Banks, M. Bird, Brown, Dietel, Giddings, Gott, Mohr. 

Religious Interests: J. Ashlock, Chm., O. Plue, Sec, Banks, Beckner, 
G. Dean, Gott, E. Krogstad, Sorenson, Wood. 

Social Activities: Wittschiebe, Chm., Johnson, Sec, Beckner, Boynton, 
J. Brackett, Gott, N. Krogstad, Miller, Sorenson, E. Watrous. 

Student Counseling: Steen, Chm., Giddings, Sec, Kuhlman, Luding- 
ton, O. Plue, E. Watrous, Wittschiebe. 




General Information 



HISTORY 

Southern Missionary College, a Seventh-day Adventist institution, 
was founded in 1893 as Southern Training School, at Graysville, Tennes- 
see. Twenty-three years later the school was moved to Collegedale, Ten- 
nessee; and there, in 1916, it was reopened as Southern Junior College. 
The exigencies of a rapidly expanding student body necessitated the ex- 
tension, in the spring of 1944, to senior college status, and the first 
fcur-year seniors were graduated from Southern Missionary College in 
1946. 

Southern Missionary College is incorporated under the laws of the 
State of Tennessee, the Board of Trustees assuming entire responsibility 
for the financial support and management of the institution. 

OBJECTIVES 

Basic Denominational Tenets. Seventh-day Adventists believe in an 
infinite Creator as the source of all life and wisdom; they regard man 
as created in God's image and endowed with mental, moral, and physical 
powers capable of growth and development; they accept the moral law as 
binding upon all men and believe in personal redemption from sin through 
Jesus Christ; they accept the Bible as God's Word, the inspired revelation 
of His will to men; they believe that through proper education young 
people may be led to practice habits of correct thinking, to develop 
Christian character and to make diligent preparation for a purposeful life 
of efficient service to their fellow men. 

Specific Objectives. Southern Missionary College is a four-year co- 
educational college of arts and sciences operated by the Seventh-day Ad- 
ventist denomination; its general objectives are those of this governing 
organization. In full harmony with these general objectives, the authori- 
ties of the college have further defined its specific institutional objectives 
as follows: 

1. Spiritual — To establish an unswerving personal allegiance to the 
principles of the Christian faith; to develop a distinctly Christian 
philosophy of life as a basis for the solution of all personal and 
social problems; and to acquire a sense of personal responsibility 
to participate in the mission program of the church. 

2. Intellectual — To gain an acquaintance with the basic facts and 
principles of the major fields of knowledge necessary to indepen- 
dent and creative thinking; to acquire an attitude of open-minded 
consideration of controversial questions; to achieve a continuing 
intellectual curiosity; and to acquire the art of effective expression 
(in spoken and written English and in the graphic arts). 

3. Ethical — To acquire those ethical and moral concepts which are 
approved by the enlightened conscience of mankind; to achieve 
an attitude of tolerance toward the rights and opinions of others; 



General Information 17 

and to accept the social obligation of serving humanity and labor 
diligently for its welfare. 

4. Social — To develop an acquaintance with the approved social 
practices of cultured men and women; and to participate heartily 
and comfortably in those recreational activities which contribute 
to the further development of a well-balanced personality. 

5. Aesthetic — To gain an acquaintance with the masterpieces of 
literature and the fine arts and an appreciation of the standards 
and the types of beauty represented by them; and to learn both to 
create and to choose that which is beautiful as well as that which 
is useful. 

6. Civic — To acquire an intelligent understanding of the principles 
of government and to develop a willingness to accept the re- 
sponsibilities and privileges of citizenship; to recognize the con- 
stitutional rights of other individuals and social groups; to know 
the principal domestic and international issues of our time; to 
develop a sincere love for our country and its fundamental 
principles; and to learn to co-operate effectively in the continuing 
improvement of society. 

7. Health — To gain an intelligent understanding of the principles 
which govern the functioning and proper care of the human body; 
to establish habits and practices which foster maximum physical 
vitality and health; to develop a genuine interest in the intelligent, 
many-sided, recreational uses of leisure time and, in co-operation 
with others, in the improvement of the physical well-being of all. 

8. Vocational — To acquire a genuine appreciation of the true dignity 
of useful labor; and to master the knowledge and achieve the 
understanding necessary to the intelligent choice of a vocation that 
is in harmony with individual abilities and patitudes. Preparation 
is provided at Southern Missionary College for the gospel 
ministry, for teaching in elementary and secondary schools, for 
pre-nursing and pre-medical training; for secretarial and business 
positions, and for other vocations. 

LOCATION 

Southern Missionary College is located on a one-thousand-acre estate 
in a valley eighteen miles east of Chattanooga. The Southern Railway 
passes through the institutional estate. 

The campus lies three miles from Ooltewah, junction point of the 
Atlanta and Knoxville divisions of the Southern Railway. Ooltewah is 
also on the Lee Highway No. 11, which connects Washington, D. C, and 
other cities in the East with Chattanooga and other southern points. 

Frequent bus service throughout the day to Chattanooga provides 
students with ample transportation facilities. The Chattanooga airport 
is located only a few miles from the college. 



18 Southern Missionary College 

ACCREDITATION 

The junior college years at Southern Missionary College are fully 
accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Secondary 
Schools, by the Tennessee State Department of Education, and by the 
Seventh-day Adventist Board of Regents. The college is a member of 
the American Association of Junior Colleges, the Southern Association 
of Private Schools, the Tennessee College Association, and the Mid-South 
Association of Private Schools. 

SUMMER SESSION 

The college conducts a nine-week summer session. The normal scho- 
lastic load for the summer term is eight hours; nine hours is the 
maximum load. 

The Summer Session Announcement of Southern Missionary College, 
containing detailed statements of the several courses and information of 
general interest to students, will be sent on application to the Director of 
the Summer Session. 

SPECIAL INFORMATION FOR VETERANS OF WORLD WAR II 

If you are a holder of an honorable discharge from the military 
service of the United States, you are eligible for educational benefits. 
Southern Missionary College is fully recognized as a training center for 
veterans. In general the rules for admission and continued registration 
of veterans are the same as for other students, except that veterans who 
have not finished high school may qualify for admission to certain cur- 
riculums by passing successfully the General Educational Development 
tests at the high school level. 

Most veterans receive educational benefits under the Public Law 
346, commonly known as the G. I. Bill of Rights. A veteran holding a 
medical discharge has the option of receiving benefits under Public 
Law 346 or Public Law 16; others are eligible only under Public Law 346. 

Procedure for Obtaining Benefits 

1. Get in touch with your local veterans service center, or with the 
state office of the Veterans Administration, and obtain a copy of Veterans 
Administration Form 1950. 

2. Fill out Form 1950, and file it, together with the following 
documentary evidence, with your proper state office several weeks, if 
possible, before you plan to come to the college: a certified copy of your 
discharge papers; if you are married, a certified copy of the public record 
of your marriage; and if you have one or more children* a certified copy of 
the birth certificate of one child. You can obtain a certified copy of the 
marriage record from the office of the county clerk of the county in which 
you were married. For information as to the birth certificate, if you do 



General Information 19 

not already have one, write to the registrar of vital statistics, in the 
department of public health, at the state capital. 

3. If you are eligible, you will receive from the Veterans Administra- 
tion Form 1953, Certificate of Eligibility and Entitlement. Preserve this 
document carefully. It is an official authorization of the government to 
us to extend to you the benefits to which you, as a veteran, are entitled. 
No veteran will be enrolled in the college without this document unless 
he has been so recently discharged from the service as to make it im- 
practical for him to obtain it before coming to college. 

4. If you hold an Original or Supplemental Certificate of Eligibility 
issued prior to September 1, 1948, you should contact your local office 
of the Veterans Administration and request them to re-issue it. 

5. Students who may be attending other schools under the G. I. 
Bill of Rights, and who wish to transfer to Southern Missionary 
College, must obtain from the Veterans Administration operating in 
the location of the school where they are now in attendance a supple- 
mental certificate of eligibility. This must be presented to Southern 
Missionary College at the time of entrance. Of course, such students will 
have made prior application to this college for admission. 

6. Veterans holding medical discharges and eligible under Public 
Law 16 should make arrangements for a personal interview with your 
Veterans Administration representative at his local office. There you 
will receive an authorization to enter training at Southern Missionary 
College. Whether you desire to enter training for the first time or to 
transfer to Southern Missionary College, the Veterans Administration must 
grant permission and provide the school with a letter of authorization 
before you can enroll under Public Law 16. 

What the G. I. Bill of Rights Provides 

1. The Veterans Administration will pay direct to the school the 
charges for tuition, fees, required books and supplies. 

The minimum number of college hours for which the veteran may 
draw full subsistence is twelve for a semester; under Public Law 16 a 
veteran must take a full course load unless he has special authorization 
for a reduced program. 

Fees include the following: registration, laboratory, music and 
others. Fees do not include the advance deposits, as explained later, 
which must be made by the veteran at his own expense. 

Books and supplies are paid for only if they are required of 
nonveterans taking the same courses. 

2. Following are the usual monthly subsistence allotments and 
the maximum amounts of outside earnings allowed the three categories 
of veterans: 



20 Southern Missionary College 

Maximum Outside 
Allotments Earnings 

Single $ 75.00 $135.00 

Married (no children) 105.00 165.00 

Married (with children) 120.00 170.00 

From his allotment a veteran is expected to keep up to date his 
obligations to the college for board, room, laundry, and such other items 
as are not paid to the college direct from the Veterans Administration. 

3. Veterans attending school under Public Law 16 are expected to 
attend all regular school sessions the year around, including the summer 
session, until their course is completed. As a rule, veterans under Public 
Law 16 do not have the freedom of choice or the freedom of interrupting 
school work for vacation periods as other veterans do. Public Law 16 in 
many cases is more generous with the veterans than is Public Law 346. 
Students eligible under Public Law 16 should determine beforehand 
which law is of the greatest personal advantage to them. 

The Advance Deposit 

This is not a fee, and therefore, is not paid by the Veterans Adminis- 
tration. It is expected of all students who enter the school and is payable 
upon registration. Veterans should not expect the school to wait for this 
deposit until the living allotment starts, which will likely be the first week 
in November for those who enter in the fall term of 1948, and probably 
the first of July or the first of August for those who enter the summer 
term. 

As has already been explained, the living allotment is adequate to 
keep up current expenses under careful management. The advance deposit 
is ,not a current expense and must be provided prior to the opening of the 
school term along with other necessities for entering college. 

Like the advance deposit of all other students this one is "figured back" 
to the veteran's personal account at the close of the school term. 

Credit for In-Service Training 

Veterans who are contemplating a period of training under the pro- 
visions of the G.I. Bill of Rights should have sent to the college for 
consideration with their application for admission, their application for 
credit for educational achievement during military service. 

Veterans of World War II no longer on active duty may apply for 
high school or college credit by writing directly to the Registrar of the 
college, and by inclosing with their letter a certified copy of W.D., A.G. 
O. Form 100, Separation Qualification Record; or Notice of Separation 
from the Naval Service, NavPers 553; or U.S.M.C. Report of Separation; 
or Notice of Separation from the U. S. Naval Service—Coast Guard, 553. 
In the case of Naval commissioned or warrant officers, the Officer's Quali- 



General Information 21 

fication Record Jacket (NavPers 305), a certified copy thereof, or a state- 
ment from the Bureau of Naval Personnel covering the data desired 
should be submitted to the college. 

The Army Form (A.G.O. Form 100, Separation Qualification Re- 
cord,) indicated in the above paragraph has been in use only since the 
establishment of Army Separation Centers. Persons discharged before 
these centers were in operation will not have available A.G.O. Form 100 
and few of them will have made arrangements to file a USAFI Form 47, 
Application for Credit for Educational Achievement During Military 
Service. 

Army veterans separated from the service prior to the institution of 
the Army Separation Qualification Record (W. D., A. G. O. Form 100) 
may secure an official statement from the Army of their service training 
and education, excluding courses administered by the United States 
Armed Forces Institute, by directing a request to the Adjutant General, 
Washington 25, D. C. Each request should contain the following informa- 
tion: 

1. Full name (given name, middle initial, and surname). 

2. Army Serial Number (enlisted, officer, or both where applicable) 

3. Statement of desired information. 

4. Names and locations of service schools attended, date entered, 
name of each course, and any additional data which would be helpful 
in the preparation of the desired statement. 

GOVERNING STANDARDS 

In the light of the objectives of the college the religious phase of 
the student's education is of paramount importance. Students applying for 
entrance to the college thereby pledge themselves to maintain the Christian 
standards of the institution, to attend all regularly scheduled religious 
services, and to give due respect to things spiritual. 

Any student who does not maintain a satisfactory scholarship or in- 
dustrial record, or who, in the judgment of the administrative council, is 
unresponsive or non-cooperative in his relation to the objectives of the 
college, may be dismissed without specific charges. 

Moral Conduct. Students must abstain from indecent or disorderly 
behavior, from profane or unbecoming language, from the use of tobacco 
and alcohol, from reading pernicious literature, from playing cards, from 
visiting pool rooms or gambling places, from attending the opera, the 
motion picture theater, dances, or any other entertainment not approved 
by the college. 

Automobiles. The college has adopted and enforces the rule that 
unmarried residence-hall students may not bring to the campus or operate 
a motor vehicle. 



22 Southern Missionary College 

Leave of Absence. Permission for ordinary leave of absence from 
the campus is to be obtained from the dean of men or the dean of women. 
The Student's Handbook should be consulted for information regarding 
week-end and other special leaves. 

Marriages. A student marrying during the school year is requested 
to withdraw. A clandestine marriage may disqualify an applicant for 
acceptance as a student, or may be cause for his dismissal if learned of 
after he has enrolled. 

Announced Regulations. Any regulation adopted by the faculty 
and announced to the students will have the same force as those printed 
in the catalogue or in the Student 's Handbook. 

EXTRACURRICULAR SERVICES AND ACTIVITIES 

Testing and Counseling Service. This service provides general 
assistance to all students and also certain professional services for those 
with special needs. General assistance for all students is provided for 
by eight personal counselors who devote some hours each week to in- 
dividual conferences with students. The various officers, division chair- 
men and curriculum advisers also cooperate in this general advisory 
program. All students participate in the general testing program, which 
includes measures of scholastic aptitude, reading proficiency, social ad- 
justment, vocational proficiency and others as the need may require. 

Highly personalized counseling and testing services are provided for 
students with special needs. The chairman of the Division of Education 
and the college physician unite in providing this specialized clinical service 
for those who desire special counsel concerning such matters as the choice 
of a vocation, emotional and social maladjustments, and marital problems. 

Residence. All unmarried students who do not live with their par- 
ents, near relatives, or legal guardians, are expected to live in the residence 
halls on the campus. Exceptions may be made occasionally for reasons 
approved by the Administrative Council. 

Information as to room furnishings to be supplied by the student is 
given in the Student's Handbook, which is mailed to each person who 
applies for admission, and it is also available upon request. 

Health Service. The health service is under the supervision of a resi- 
dent registered nurse. It includes physical check-ups and examinations, 
clinical and infirmary service, isolation and protection in the case of 
infectious or contagious diseases, health education, and supervision of 
sanitation. 



General Information 23 

Convocation, the Lyceum, Athletics. At various times during 
the school year distinguished speakers address the students at the chapel 
hour. A lyceum course of lectures, travelogues, and musical numbers is 
sponsored by the college. Students of Southern Missionary College do 
not participate in intercollegiate athletics, but a program of recreational 
activities is maintained. 

Financial Aid. In the operation of the college, a large volume of 
employment is offered to students. Under the guidance of skilled super- 
visors, this work affords valuable training, and brings a college education 
within the reach of many who would otherwise find it impossible to 
attend school. 

Publications. Under the direction of a sponsor appointed from the 
faculty, the students edit and publish biweekly The Southern Accent, 
which gives the news of the campus and vicinity. Southern Memories, 
the yearbook of the college, is published by a student staff under the 
supervision of a faculty adviser. 

Religious Life and Campus Organizations. The local church, 
the Sabbath school, the Missionary Volunteer society and its auxiliaries, 
the Gospel Workers' Seminar, trie colporteur band, the mission study 
groups, and the prayer bands contribute to the devotional and prayer life 
of the student and afford opportunities for training in leadership, teach- 
ing, and church endeavors. Various other scholastic and cultural organi- 
zations meet the needs of different campus groups. 

Participation in Extracurricular Activities. The extent to 
which students may participate in extracurricular activities is subject to 
regulation, in order to help them maintain satisfactory standards of schol- 
arship. 



THE PREPARATORY SCHOOL 

Connected with the college is Collegedale Academy, a fully accredited 
preparatory school. While this school has a separate organization, it shares 
with the college the facilities of .the latter. For information, write to the 
principal of Collegedale Academy. 



General Academic 
Regulations 



ADMISSION 

Southern Missionary College is open to high school or academy 
graduates who, according to the judgment of the Admissions Committee, 
are qualified to pursue with profit the courses offered by the college. 
Factors in determining eligibility for admission are character, citizen- 
ship, reputation, health, scholastic achievement, and intellectual ability. 

Application Procedure. Application for admission is made on 
a blank supplied by the college. Correspondence concerning admission 
should be addressed to the Secretary of Admissions, Collegedale, Ten- 
nessee. An applicant who has not previously attended Southern Mis- 
sionary College will inclose with the application a small clear photograph. 

An applicant who expects the college to provide living quarters 
should send with the application the $5.00 room reservation fee. This 
will be credited to the first month's statement; or will be refunded if the 
applicant is not admitted, or if he decides not to enter and notifies the 
college not later than August 1. (July 1 for married students expecting 
to occupy college housing.) 

The applicant should request the school last attended to send directly 
to the Secretary of Admissions a complete official transcript of all pre- 
vious secondary school and college credits. It is the responsibility of 
the applicant to see that such credentials are sent to Southern Missionary 
College in time for use in the consideration of his application. No 
portion of the applicant's scholastic record may be omitted from the 
transcript submitted for consideration. 

Transcripts of credit accepted toward admission become the property 
of the college and are kept on permanent file. 

Applications from veterans are considered on the same basis as 
those from other students. Since many service units have only tem- 
porary existence, it is the responsibility of the veterans to obtain and 
submit official certificates of any service-school education for which credit 
is desired. Requests for the evaluation of such credits should be ad- 
dressed to the Registrar. 



General Academic Regulations 25 

Orientation Days. Two days at the beginning of each school 
year are devoted to the orientation of new students. It is essential that 
all freshmen and transfer students be in attendance. During this period 
placement and aptitude tests and a physical examination are given. No 
charge is made for these examinations if they are taken at the appointed 
time. 

Admission On G. E. D. Tests. Admission to full freshman stand- 
ing at Southern Missionary College is possible to candidates, both veterans 
and non-veterans, who, failing to meet the entrance requirements other- 
wise, can qualify on the following points: 1. The candidate must have 
completed elementary school; 2. The candidate must take the General 
Education Development tests (either at Southern Missionary College or at 
any other approved testing station) making an average standard score of 
45 with a minimum score of 35 on each test. In case the candidate 
falls below a score of 35 in any field he must register for at least one 
unit in the secondary school in that field. For non-veterans the minimum 
age limit for eligibility to sit for G. E. D. tests is twenty-one years. 
These tests must be taken prior to or during the first month of atten- 
dance at the college. 

Freshman Standing. Those graduates of accredited four-year 
secondary schools whose scholarship record is acceptable are admitted 
to freshman standing upon properly certified transcript of credits, but such 
students may have subject deficiencies to make up. 

Conditional freshman standing may be given to a person who has 
completed fourteen acceptable units. The remaining two units should 
be earned during the first year of attendance at the college. 

Veterans who have not been graduated from high school may qualify 
for admission to certain curriculnms, on scholarship probation, by 
passing successfully the General Educational Development tests. For 
further information concerning admission of veterans, see the section, 
"Special Information for Veterans of World War II." 

Advanced Standing. A candidate for admission to advanced stand- 
ing from another accredited institution of college rank may receive credit 
without examination for such work, subject to the following require- 
ments: 

(a) He must have an official transcript sent from the institution 
from which he comes, showing his entrance credits at that institution, his 
complete college record including grade of scholarship in each subject 
taken, and a statement of honorable dismissal. 

(b) He must satisfy the entrance requirements of this college. 



26 



Southern Missionary College 



(c) Credit is regarded as provisional at the time of the applicant's 
admission. This work will not be recorded and passed on by transcript 
until the applicant has completed satisfactorily in this college, not less 
than twelve semester hours. A maximum of seventy-two semester hours, 
or one hundred and eight quarter hours, may be accepted from a junior 
college. 

Admission as an Adult Special Student. Persons twenty-one years 
of age or over may be admitted occasionally as special students (not 
candidates for a degree or a diploma), on approval of the Dean and of 
the instructors in whose course they wish to enroll. Any course taken by an 
adult special student carries lower biennium credit, and a maximum of 
24 semester hours credit may be earned by such students. 

ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS 

Admission by Transcript 

Students may be admitted by transcript (or certificate) of at least 
sixteen units from an accredited high school or academy. As the pattern 
of prerequisite requirements vary those required for each curriculum are 
listed on the following two pages. 

Unless an exception is made by action of the Admissions Committee 
the students' secondary record must average "C" or above. 




c^gg 



General Academic Regulations 



27 



SUBJECT REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION 
Degree Units Required 



CURRICULUMS 


For. 
Bible English Lang. Math. 


Nat. 
Sci. 


Soc. 

Sci. Voc. Elect. 


Arts and Science 


1-3* 


3 b 


2cd 


2 e . 


2*. 


2h 


— 


g 


B.A. in Theology 


l-3 a 


3 b 


d 


2 e 


1* 


2 h 


— 


g 


Business Administration 


l-3 a 


3 b 





2 e 


1' 


2 h 


— 


g 


Education, Elementary 


l-3 a 


3 b 


— 


|em 


1* 


2 h 


— 


g 


Education, Secondary 


l-3 a 


3 b 





|em 


1' 


2 h 


— 


g 


Home Economics 


1-3° 


2 b 





m 





— 


— 


g 


Industrial Arts 


l-3 a 


2 b 





m 





— 


1 


g 


Religious Education 


l-3 a 


3 b 


— 


m 





— 


— 


g 


Secretarial Science 


l-3 a 


3 b 


— 


m 





— 


— 


g 



Junior College 
Curriculums 



Elem. Teacher Training 


l-3 a 


3 b 


— 


1 


1' 


2^ 


— 


g 


Predental 


1-3° 


3 b 


2 C 


2' 


2) 


2 h 


— 


g 


Predietetics 


l-3 a 


3 b 


,2 C 


2 1 


2i 

/ 


2h 


1 


g 


Prenursing 


1-3° 


3 b 


2 C 


2 k 


2 n 


1 


— 


g 


Secretarial Science 


1-3° 


2 b 


— 


m 


— 


— 


— 


g 



a. One unit for each year of attendance in an S. D. A. academy, to a total of 

three units. S. D. A. academy graduates must present one unit in Bible 
Doctrines. 

b. Except for candidates for the degrees of Bachelor of Science in Business 

Administration and of Bachelor of Science in Secretarial Science, Business 
English does not apply on the English requirement. 

c. Both units are required in one language. One unit of credit in a modern 

foreign language is not accepted toward admission, unless the second unit 
is earned or the language continued in college. 



2b Southern Missionary Collegb 

d. Candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Arts with a major in Religion and 

candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Arts in Theology (Ministerial 
Curriculum) have a choice of meeting the entrance requirement in language 
in one of three ways. They may (1) elect to present two units in one foreign 
language as explained in note "c" above or they may (2) elect to take six- 
teen hours of college Greek rather than twelve as required of those who 
present two entrance units as indicated under note "c" above, or they may 
(3) elect to take twelve hours of Greek and six hours of Hebrew. 

e. These units may be selected from the following: algebra I or general mathe- 

matics, algebra II, plane geometry, and trigonometry. Commercial or other 
applied mathematics does not satisfy this requirement except for candidates 
for the degree of Bachelor of Science in Business Administration. 

f. Where one unit only is required this must be a laboratory science, such as 

biology, physics or chemistry. A second unit requirement may be met by 
general science. 

g. Sufficient to make a total of sixteen units. Should be chosen to support 

curriculum to be followed in college. 

h. The social science requirement may be met by presenting two units from the 
following: Amerjcan^jiistoxy,-. World History, General History, European 
History, Civil Government, Problems of T5emocracy, Economic Geography 
and Economics. 

i. Algebra and plane geometry. 

j. Biology and one unit of either chemistry or physics. 

k. Shall include one unit of algebra. 

m. Graduation from a secondary school with one unit each of algebra and plane 
geometry is recommended; also, as far as possible the requirements for 
admission to the arts and science curriculum. 

n. One unit of physics is strongly recommended. (See page 58.) 

Important Note: The unit pattern given, with graduation from an 
accredited secondary school and completion of necessary college courses, 
satisfies the requirements for admission to S. D. A. schools of medicine, 
dentistry, dietetics, and nursing; but inasmuch as requirements for admission 
to other professional schools differ, a student preparing for professional 
training should acquaint himself with the secondary and collegiate require- 
ments for admission to the particular school he desires to enter, and plan 
both his secondary school and college programs to meet these requirements. 

Entrance Deficiencies: A student who has sufficient total acceptable 
units but lacks specific required units, may be admitted to college and may 
make up entrance deficiencies, except mathematics, by taking college work in 
these subjects. When a college course is taken to remove an entrance de- 
ficiency, four hours are counted as the equivalent of one secondary school 
unit. These hours apply as elective credit toward graduation, except that 
credit in foreign language and Bible applies toward the basic requirements in 
these fields. Arrangements for removing all entrance deficiencies should be 
made at the time of first registration. 

STUDENTS FROM UNACCREDITED SCHOOLS 

Unless admitted as a result of G. E. D. tests (see page 25) students 
from unaccredited high schools and academies, in addition to the above 



General Academic Regulations 29 

requirements, must take examinations for college entrance. Entrance ex- 
aminations are given in five fields as follows: Foreign Language, History, 
English, Mathematics, and Science. The student chooses four from these 
five fields. These tests are standardized achievement examinations cover- 
ing the subject matter on the secondary level. 

Students failing, in one or more fields, to place higher than the 
25th percentile are deemed to have failed in that field and will be 
required to enroll for another secondary unit in that field in order to 
meet college entrance requirements. 

REGISTRATION 

Orientation and registration for both semesters, of freshmen and 
other new students, begins at 8:00 a.m., Thursday, September 15. 
Freshmen and others entering this college for the first time take the 
placement examinations given by the college at this time. 

Registration for both semesters, of returning sophomores and upper 
biennium students, is scheduled for September 19 and 20. 

Late Registration. A late registration fee of $5.00 is charged to 
a student who registers after September 22. 

Experience has demonstrated that any student who enters 
school late accepts a serious handicap at the outset. This is particularly 
true in courses in science, mathematics, and foreign language. There- 
fore, students who come more than two weeks late will not be enrolled 
for full course work, and may be denied admission to certain courses be- 
cause of the difficulty of making up the work. See section regarding 
absences, page 32. 

The course registration of a student entering after the first two 
weeks of a semester will be reduced one hour for each week or fraction 
thereof missed, including the first two weeks. No student will be admitted 
for the full-course minimum of twelve hours the first semester after 
October 24; the second semester, after March 13. 

Changes in Registration. A student who desires to change his 
course program after he has completed registration, files with the 
Registrar a recommendation from his adviser and approved by the Dean. 
The Registrar will then issue a change-of -program voucher effective the 
date the adviser's recommendation was received by the Registrar's Office. 

Although the autumn registration is for both semesters, a student 
may alter his course program without cost during the first week of 
either semester. Thereafter any change in registration carries a fee of 
$2.00. 

Change-of-program recommendations for any given semester are 
not valid after the beginning of semester examinations. 



30 Southern Missionary College 

A student who absents himself permanently from class without can- 
cellation of registration by drop voucher will be considered as having 
failed, and a grade of "F" for the course will be entered on the student's 
permanent scholastic record. 

Withdrawal. A student withdrawing from school should, before 
leaving, clear his scholastic record by filing with the Registrar a with- 
drawal permit obtained from the Dean. 

Semester Hour. A semester hour represents one fifty-minute lecture 
or recitation per week, or the equivalent, through a semester of eighteen 
weeks. 

Student Study and Work Load. A full-time student in any 
semester is defined as one who is registered for a course load of twelve 
hours for that semester. If a student is working to defray a portion of his 
expenses, his course load will be adjusted accordingly. Since individuals 
vary in capacity, care is taken that each student shall have a reasonable 
balance in his labor-study load. Students who are below average will 
be required to take less work than the following schedule indicates. Those 
-with above average ability and scholastic achievement may be permitted 
to attempt a slightly heavier program. These schedules are designed to 
insure sound scholarship and an essential safeguarding of health: 

Labor Hours Class Hours 

In exceptional cases a student with super- 
ior health, ability and previous scholastic 
record may, upon the recommendation of 
his adviser and with the approval of the 
Dean, register for eighteen hours. See page 
121 for further information regarding 
student labor. 

Except by approval of the Academic Standards Committee no student 
may receive more than eighteen semester hours credit during any semester. 
Correspondence work in progress is counted in the current load. 

Once a student's work-study schedule is arranged, and he has entered 
upon his duties, his labor foreman may not require extra services with- 
out proper arrangement with the College Dean. Conversely, instructors may 
not require exceptional out-of-class assignments or appointments that in- 
terfere with his regularly scheduled work program without making proper 
arrangements with the College Dean and the work supervisor. 

Except by permission of the Administrative Council, the minimum 
course load of a student living in one of the residence halls is eight 
hours. 



None 


16 


1 to 15 


16 


15 to 20 


Not over 16 


20 to 25 


14 


25 to 30 


12 


30 to 35 


8 to 10 


35 to 40 


Not over 8 


Above 40 


Not over 6 



General Academic Regulations 31 

Admission of Sophomores to Upper Biennium Courses. A sopho- 
more may register for one or more upper biennium courses, for upper bi- 
ennium credit, provided he has earned, with an average of "C" or above, 
fifty hours including basic freshman and sophomore courses already taken, 
and provided, also, that his current registration completes the fulfillment 
of lower biennium basic requirements. 

In exceptional cases, a sophomore may be admitted to an upper 
biennium course for lower biennium credit. 

A sophomore desiring admission to an upper biennium course makes 
application on a blank obtainable from the registrar's office. 

Special Hours. On recommendation of his major professor and by 
permission of the Academic Standards Committee, a senior may earn an 
additional hour in an upper biennium course completed or being carried in 
his major field. 

Auditing Courses. A student may audit a course only bv permis- 
sion of the Dean and the instructor concerned, and should register 
as an auditor at the time of registration. No credit is given for a 
course audited. The tuition charge is one-half that for credit, and the 
course counts at half value in the student load. 



CLASSIFICATION OF STUDENTS 

Students are classified by the Registrar. The classification for which a 
student qualifies at the first semester registration usually continues through 
both semesters. For reclassification at the beginning of the second 
semester, the student shall make written application and shall meet the 
first semester requirement for the particular classification sought, plus an 
additional twelve hours of "C" average. 

The following schedule governs the classification of students entering 
the first semester, and new students the second semester: 

Freshman. Completion of a four-year high school course, except 
that a freshman may be admitted conditionally on the completion of 
fourteen acceptable units, the remaining two units to be taken during the 
freshman year. 

Sophomore. Thirty hours of "C" average, the hours to in- 
clude basic requirements completed, and the average to be computed 
separately on hours earned in Southern Missionary College. 



32 Southern Missionary College 

Junior. Sixty-two hours of "C" average, the hours to include 
basic requirements completed, and the average computed separately on 
the hours earned in Southern Missionary College. Registration for the 
junior year shall include any lower division basic requirements not already 
fulfilled. 

Senior. Ninety-four hours of "C" average (this average separately 
on credits from Southern Missionary College) at the beginning of the 
first semester, with current registration to satisfy all remaining require- 
ments for a degree. (For candidates for a degree in the Ministerial 
Curriculum 106 hours are needed for senior standing.) 

For membership in the senior class organization the senior year's 
work must have been carried satisfactorily to the time of the organization of 
the class. If a course is taken by correspondence during the senior year, the 
transcript of credit and the report that the validation examination has 
been passed must be on file in the Registrar's office before the student is 
eligible for membership in the senior class. 

Adult Special. A person at least twenty-one years of age who is not 
working toward the fulfillment of degree requirements. For further in- 
formation, see "Adult Special" section under "Admission." 

ATTENDANCE REGULATIONS 

Regular attendance at all classes is expected of every student. With 
the exception of those on the Dean's List, no provision is made for 
absences from regular classes. 

Absence s totaling during any seme ster more th atuJhe. number of 
class terihas per week irdfei ' diur~res"tftl in Jorjeiture of credit in the 
cuurse involved. This forf eited"l:redlt"""m"ay be restored entirely or "in 
parE if ^s^fKJactp^ explanations of absences have been filed by; *he 
student. Persistent recurrence of absences will be considered by "the 
Committee on Curriculum and Academic Standards. — 

Absences in each course up to and including a maximum equal to 
the number of class meetings per week per semester constitute a matter 
between the student and the teacher of the course involved. (For example, 
for a class meeting three days a week, three absences per semester are 
allowed without loss of credit hours.) Penalties for these absences are 
handled by the teacher through a lowering of the grade mark. 

Special allowances regarding class attendance are granted students 
on the Dean's List; they are not subject to cut credit for absences pro- 
viding the teacher of the course involved consents, and providing the 
student satisfactorily meets the scholastic requirements of the course. 



General Academic Regulations 33 



Three tardinesses count as one absence. An absence from a class 
immediately prior to and immediately after regularly scheduled vacations 
counts as a double absence. Students entering a class late in the semester 
are regarded as having taken absences during the class periods previously 
missed. 

Chapel Absences. Three unexcused absences from chapel without 
penalty are allowed in a semester. The fourth unexcused absence neces- 
sitates the payment in cash of a fine of $1.00 which cancels only one 
absence, leaving three unexcused. The next unexcused absence brings 
the student's name to the administrative council for consideration. 

Three tardinesses to chapel are counted as one absence. 

To be acceptable, an excuse for absence from chapel is to be filed 
in the office of the College Dean within 48 hours after the date of the 
absence. 

Excuses for absences caused by illness are to be approved by the 
Health Service, but it is the student's responsibility in every instance to 
file his excuse at the office of the College Dean. 

CORRESPONDENCE AND EXTENSION WORK 

Southern Missionary College offers no extramural instruction; there- 
fore all credits from this college must be earned in residence. 

The maximum of correspondence and/or extension credit which may 
apply on a four-year curriculum is twelve hours; for two-year curriculums, 
six. 

It is strongly urged that students plan their college course schedule so 
that it will not be necessary to take a course by correspondence during 
the senior year. 

Credit earned by correspondence after failure in the same course at 
Southern Missionary College will be accepted only if the entire course 
was taken by correspondence (not taken on a review basis). 

In no case may more than eighteen hours of residence work and cor- 
respondence work be carried in a semester. 

Within the limits outlined above, the acceptance of credit earned by 
correspondence is dependent on the following- 

1. The student must pass the validation examination over the course, 
given by the college. The fee is $1.00 for each validation test. 

2. The grade earned by correspondence shall be at least a "C." 

3 The credit must be applicable on the curriculum in which the stu- 
dent is enrolled. 



34 Southern Missionary College 

4. The correspondence course must have been taken by permission of 
the college during a period of resident attendance, or followed by 
earning in this college twelve hours with a scholarship average of "C." 

EXAMINATIONS 

Course Examinations. Examinations are given in all couises at the 
end of each semester. Students are expected to take examinations at the 
time scheduled, unless prevented by illness or other unavoidable cir- 
cumstance. 

Entrance Examinations. See pages 28 and 29. 

Exemption Examination. A student may be exempt by examina- 
tion from a specific course requirement for graduation (such as within the 
basic group, or within or accompanying a major or a minor) provided he 
passes with a grade of at least "C" a comprehensive examination covering 
the particular course. The examination for exemption shall be prepared 
and administered under the direction of the Academic Standards Com- 
mittee. No hours of credit are given for an exemption examination. The 
fee is $2.00. 

Special Examinations. Special examinations are given when justi- 
fied by circumstances, such as sickness or necessary absence from the cam- 
pus. 

A re-examination is permitted only upon the vote of the Academic 
Standards Committee. 

Validation Examinations. See section on correspondence work. 



GRADES AND REPORTS 

Midsemester and semester reports of the scholastic standing of each 
student are issued to the student and his parent or guardian. Semester 
grades are kept on permanent record by the college. 

The following system of grading is used: 

Grade Points 
Grade per Semester Hour 

A — Superior - 3 

B — Above average 2 

C — Average 1 ' 

D — Below average 0. 

F— Failure Minus 1 _ 



General Academic Regulations 35 

E — Warning for below passing scholarship; no grade 
higher than "D" in the course for the semester; be- 
comes "F" if not removed within a year after date re- 
ported. 

I — Incomplete because of illness or other unavoidable 
delay; becomes "F" if not removed within a year 
after date reported. 

W — Withdrew passing 

Wf — Withdrew failing Minus 1 

Au — Audit ' " 

A grade correctly reported to the Registrar can be changed only upon 
repetition of the course. When a course is repeated to raise a grade, it 
must be done before a more advanced course in the same field is Com- 
pleted. Credit may not be earned in a course after a more advanced course 
in the same field has been taken. No grades will be recorded for a course 
for which the individual concerned has not registered. 

DEAN'S LIST 

This honor list, compiled each semester, is composed of the names 
of those juniors and seniors who carried twelve hours or more during 
the preceding semester and who for that semester earned a grade of "B" 
or above in each course carried. 

A student on the dean's list may, at the discretion of the instructor, 
be excused from class attendance so long as his standing in each course is 
"B" or above. 

HONOR ROLL 

An honor roll is compiled twice each semester. It contains the name 
of each student who for the period covered has carried a minimum of 
eight semester hours, has attained a "B" average, and has received no 
grade of "I," "E," "F," or "Wf." 



Graduation Standards 

/ 

/ Southern Missionary College offers curriculums leading to degrees a«» 

follows: Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Arts in Theology, Bachelor of 
Science in Business Administration, in Elementary and Secondary Educa- 
tion, in Home Economics, in Industrial Arts, in Religious Education, and 
in Secretarial Science. 

Junior college curriculums leading to diplomas are elementary teacher 
training, secretarial, premedical, predental, and predietetics. 

GENERAL REQUIREMENTS 

A student may qualify for graduation by fulfilling all curriculum re- 
quirements for the degree or diploma sought and by meeting the standards 
of the college as to character. A student who discontinues attendance for 
g £atir Calendar year must meet the requirements for graduation pub- 
— Iished in a catalogue current after his re-entrance. 

A student who has received one bachelor's degree may receive a second 
bachelor's degree provided that all requirements for both degrees are 
fully met, and provided also that the curriculum offered for the second 
degree includes at least twenty-four semester hours earned in an additional 
year of residence and not counted for the first degree. 

The responsibility for meeting graduation requirements rests primar- 
ily upon the student. He should acquaint himself with the published 
requirements and plan his college course so as to fulfil these requirements. 

CANDIDACY FOR GRADUATION 

To be graduated at commencement a student must have completed 
all requirements for graduation. A student may become a candidate for 
graduation when he enters upon a semester during which it will be pos- 
sible for him to complete all the requirements for graduation. Formal 
application for graduation should be made at the registrar's office during 
the first semester of the senior year. 

All resident candidates for graduation must be members of the senior 
class. 

GRADUATION WITH HONORS 

A student of good character whose record shows no grade below "C" 
and whose grade point average is 2.50 or above will be graduated with 
honors. 

GRADUATION IN ABSENTIA 

Each candidate for graduation must be present to receive his diploma, 
unless granted written permission by the president of the college to be 



Graduation Standards 37 

graduated in absentia. Written application should be made early in the 
second semester of the senior year and permission will be granted only 
in cases of evident necessity. 

Since the college has but one commencement annually, at the close of 
the academic year, a student who expects to complete graduation require- 
ments during the following summer session participates in part in these 
commencement exercises but receives his diploma upon completion of the 
requirements. A candidate who completes his work at the close of 
the first semester may receive his diploma in absentia or be graduated 
with the class at the ensuing commencement. 

/ DEGREE CURRICULUMS 

BACHELOR OF ARTS 
General Requirements 

1. Admission to the arts and science curriculum is granted according 
to the requirements listed on pages 27 and 28. 

2. A minimum of 125 hours in courses applicable toward this degree. 

3. The total hours for a degree shall include a major and a minor, or 
two majors chosen from different arts and science fields. For detailed 
information see "Major and Minor Requirements" below. 

4. A minimum of forty hours of upper biennium credit. 

5. An average of one grade point per hour on all credits applied 
toward graduation, the grade point average on residence and accepted 
credits being figured independently. 

6. Twenty-four hours of the senior year's work must be earned in 
residence in this college. 

Basic Requirements 
College Problems 1 hour 

English 10 hours 

Six hours must be in composition, which is to be taken in the freshman or 
the sophomore year. The remaining four hours must be in literature. 

Foreign Language 6-14 hours 

1. Six hours of the foreign language in which two units have been earned 
in secondary school. To be taken in the freshman or the sophomore year. 

2. Twelve hours in one language if different from the language in which 
two units have been earned in secondary school. Should be taken in the 
freshman and sophomore years. 

3. Fourteen hours in one language if no foreign language or less than two 

units in one foreign language was taken in secondary school. Should be 
taken in the freshman and sophomore years. 



38 Southern Missionary College 

4. This requirement may be fulfilled by credit in Greek, Latin, or a modern 
foreign language. 

Social Sciences 12 hours 

Six hours of history, which is to be taken in the freshman or sophomore 
year; the remaining six hours may be chosen from courses in economics 
(Courses 51 and 52), geography, history, political science, sociology. 

Religion 12-16 hours 

A student presenting three or more units of credit in Bible from the 
secondary school will take twelve hours; one presenting two units, fourteen 
hours; and one presenting one unit or less, sixteen hours. Courses to fulfill 
this requirement may be chosen from courses in Bible and theology. Eight 
hours of this requirement should be taken in the freshman and sophomore 
years. 

Natural Sciences-Mathematics 12 hours 

May be selected from the fields of biology, chemistry, mathematics (except 
Course 25), and physics. Six hours must be selected from a science field. 
To be completed in the freshman and sophomore years. 

Vocational 4 hours 

May be chosen from the courses in agriculture, industrial arts, secretarial 
science, physics (Courses 3-4), home economics (Courses 1-2, 11-12, 21-22), 
library science (Courses 21-22, 91-92). Accounting 1 and 2, or 1, 4, and 
6 may apply as vocational credit if not otherwise required in the curriculum. 
In cases where the student can furnish evidence of satisfactory proficiency 
in a trade, the Division Chairman may recommend to the Academic 
Standards Committee that the student be allowed to omit the vocational 
requirement and add the four hours to his elective group. 

Major and Minor Requirements 

Major Requirements. The student should choose a major field of 
specialization preferably by the beginning of the second semester of the 
sophomore year. The major and the first minor may not be chosen from the 
same field. Specific requirements for majors are given immediately 
preceding the descriptions of courses in the various subdivisions. 

Approximately one-half the number of hours for a major shall be in 
upper biennium credit. 

A minimum of six hours of upper biennium on the major (preferably 
the last six) shall be earned in this college. 

No course in which a student has received a grade of "D" may apply 
on a major. 

Majors on Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science in Education 
degrees may be earned in the following fields, twenty-six hours being re- 
quired for a second major on the curriculum in secondary education, and 
the number of hours specified below for a major in the arts and science 
curriculum. 



Graduation Standards 39 

Hours 

Business. ,Adrainistt*tieft-4See--pgW"6()»6l) 36 

Religion (See pages 103-107) 30 

Biology (See pages 92-96) 28 

Chemistry (See pages 96-98) 30. 

English (exclusive of English 1:2; see pages 85-87) 26 

Foreign Language, exclusive of the first-year course; see 

pages 87-91) 26 

History (See pages 110-112) 30 

HDrnc- ^coMoini^s (See -p ages ( i^t jf j rT. 30 

Music (See pages 79-84) 36 

Physics (See pages 101-103) 28 

Minor Requirements. A student should choose his minor field not 
later than the beginning of the second semester of the sophomore year. 
The first minor may not be earned in the field chosen for the major. 

Six hours of a minor shall be earned in the upper biennium. A mini- 
mum of three hours of upper biennium credit on the minor must be earned 
in this college. 

The fields in which minors may be earned and number of hours 
for each minor are given below. See the section, on "Divisions of Instruc- 
tion" for further information. 

Hours 

Religion Basic requirement, plus six hours 

Biology 18 

Business Administration 18 

Chemistry 20 

Economics 18 

Education (second minor) 15 

English (exclusive of English 1:2) 14 

Foreign Language (exclusive of the first-year course) 12 

History 20 

Home Economics 15 

Industrial Arts 18 

Mathematics (exclusive of Mathematics 25) 18 

Music 20 

Physics 16 

Political Science 20 

Secretarial Science (exclusive of Secretarial Science 9, 10, 

13. and 14) 18 

Speech (including one English course) 18 



40 Southern Missionary College 

SUGGESTED ARTS AND SCIENCE CURRICULUM 

The early completion of the basic courses affords the student greater 
opportunity: 

1. To avoid difficulties in registration because of conflicts in schedule; 

2. To specialize during the junior and senior years; 

3. To choose electives during the junior and senior years; 

4. To follow without loss of time sequences of courses involving 
prerequisites. 

As early as possible the student should, in counselvwith his major 
professor, plan the sequence of courses for his major so Vs to complete 
curriculum requirements in due time. 

Freshman Year 

English 1: 3 English 2 3 

Foreign Language 3 or 4 Foreign Language 3 or 4 

History 1 or 13 3 History 2 or 14 3 

Religion"! or 19 3 Religion 2 or 20 3 

Natural Science 3 Natural Science 3 

Sociology 17 1 Elective 1 or 

Total 16 or 17 Total 16 

Sophomore Year 

Foreign Language to 3 Foreign Language to 3 

Religion 2 or 3Reh'gion 2 or 3 

Natural Science or Math 3 Natural Science or Math. 3 

Social Science — i 3 Social Science ... ..C..'. 3 

Vocational 2Vocational 2 

Major, Minor, *Elective — - 6 to 2 Major, Minor, *Elective .... 6 to 2 
Total 16 Total 16 

Junior and Senior Years 

Literature 2 Literature -- - - 2 

Religion to 3 Religion 0to3 

Major, Minor, Elective 29 to 26 Major, Minor, Elective 28 to 25 

Total 31 Total 30 



* Suggested electives: Courses to remove college entrance deficiencies, courses 
in education and psychology, and prerequisites for upper biennium courses. 



Graduation Standards 4l 



MINISTERIAL CURRICULUM (B.A. IN THEOLOGY) )'( 

Students applying for admission to the ministerial curriculum should 
be only those who believe that God has called them to devote their lives 
to Christian service as ministers, missionaries, evangelists or Bible teachers. 
Therefore character, health, missionary attitude and scholarship should 
justify their admission and insure their continuance as ministerial students. 

The curriculum is divided into two parts. The first four semesters 
constitute a pre-ministerial section. Successful completion of this section 
including the maintenance of a grade point average of 1.0 in all courses 
taken in the major (Religion) and the cognate requirement (Applied 
Theology). Since no course with a grade of "D" may apply on the 
major, any course in the major field with a "D" grade which has been 
included in the average for the first two years shall be repeated before 
further work in the major is taken, or else replaced by another course. 
Any required course shall be repeated before a more advanced course 
in the major is taken. At the end of the fourth semester, the Committee 
on Ministerial Recommendations will consider applications from those 
students who feel called by God to proceed into the upper biennium 
ministerial section comprising the last five semesters. This committee will 
approve for admission into the upper biennium such students as seem 
well adapted for future ministerial service in respect to spiritual ideals, 
missionary attitude, health, social relations, etc. An average of 1.0 must 
be maintained in the major for the remainder of the curriculum. In 
the upper biennium no course with a "D" grade can apply on the major 
or the required cognate. 

To qualify for the degree of Bachelor of Arts in Theology from 
this curriculum, a candidate must fulfill the following requirements: 

1. The general entrance requirements as listed on page 37. 

2. The completion of one hundred thirty-seven hours, with a 
minimum of forty-eight hours of upper biennium credit. Twenty- 
four hours of the senior year's work must be taken in this college. 

Course Requirements 
Major (Religion) 30 hours 

Required: in lower biennium, Religion 19, 20, 61, 62. The selection 
of electives must be approved by the chairman of the division. Forty hours 
is the maximum number which may be applied on this major. 

Note: Students not having had Old and New Testament History in 
secondary school will be expected to take Religion 1 and 2. This will not 
count toward the major. This requirement may be waived for those who, 
on entrance, pass an exemption examination in the field. 



42 Southern Missionary College 

Cognate (Applied Theology) ...., 12 hours 

Required: Personal Evangelism, 4 hours; Sermon Preparation and Delivery, 
4 hours; Public Worship, 2 hours; Pastoral Methods, 2, hours. Twenty 
hours is the maximum number of hours which may be taken in applied 
theology. 

Social Science , , 14 hours 

Required: History 1, 2, 151, 152. Recommended: History 6, 80, 131. 
Note: Sociology 17 does not apply toward this requirement. 

English 10 hours 

Required: English 1:2; literature or journalism, 4 hours. 

Foreign Language 12 to 18 hours 

Twelve hours in Greek for one who has had two units in one foreign 
language in secondary school; fourteen hours in Greek, or twelve hours 
in Greek and six hours in Hebrew, for one who has had less than two 
units in one foreign language. 

College Problems (Sociology 17) 1 hour 

Music 3 hours 

Speech 4 hours 

Required: Speech 5 and 6. 

Natural Science 6 hours 

This requirement may be met by any six-hour laboratory course. 

Accounting 6 hours 

Required: Accounting 1, 4, and 6. 

Vocational (See page 38.) 4 hours 

Health 2 hour* 

Health 4 or 62, or equivalent. 

Education and/or Psychology 6 hours 

Minor and Electtves 21 to 27 hours 

For those intending to teach it is recommended that electives be chosen 
from education courses leading toward a secondary teaching certificate. 
A history minor is recommended. A different minor may be selected upon 
the counsel of the divisional chairman. 

Total Hours 137 

For students entering without deficiencies, and expecting to carry a 
full load of class work, the following is a suggestive schedule for the two 
years of the pre-ministerial curriculum. 



Graduation Standards 43 

Freshman Year ■'{ 

History 1 3 History 2 3 

Religion 19 3 Religion 20 3 

Natural Science (with Natural Science (with 

laboratory) 3 laboratory) 3 

English 1: 3 E , n S lish , 2 3 

w • , t Music 16 1 

Mu?icl 2 HeaIth 4 of 62 2 

Soaolo «y 17 _^ Education 16 . 2 

Total 15 Total 17 

Sophomore Year 

Elements of N. T. Greek 43- .... 3 Elements of N. T. Greek 44 3 

Religion 61 2 Religion 62 2 

Applied Theology 89 2 Applied Theology 90 2 

Accounting 1 3 Accounting 4 and 6 3 

Vocational 2 Vocational 2 

Speech 5 2 Speech 6 2 

History 2 History 80 2 

Total 16 Total 16 

(While the student may be quite certain on entrance that he intends 
to take the ministerial curriculum, the increasing accuracy in self- 
evaluation made possible by college life sometimes causes a change in 
his aims and objectives. If specialization is started in the freshman year, 
a shift in course usually means a loss in credits. In order, therefore, to 
give the student time to find himself in terms of his life-work, the first 
year of the pre-ministerial curriculum has been arranged as a. fitting 
introduction to any liberal arts course. For this reason, first-year Greek, 
formerly offered in the freshman year, is now placed in the sophomore 
year. ) 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

Admission. For admission without deficiency, the entrance units 
as listed on pages -S7-arrd-2S_must be presented. 

For this curriculum, the requirements as to total hours, senior resi- 
dence, minimum upper biennium credit, grade points, and residence credit 
and grade-point average on the major and the minor, are the same as for 
a Bachelor of Arts degree. For specific information concerning any one 
of these, refer to the particular item under "Graduation Standards." 



44 Southern Missio nary College 

Freshman Year 

/English 1: >£ English 2 >3 

•Religion 1 or 19 3 Religion 2 or 20 >*3 

^Natural Science or Math ..... ($ .Natural Science or Math 3 

genomics 11 3 vE conomics 46 >3 

Vocational 2 vr ,.• , „ 

Secretarial Science 13 1 f ocahona i 1 - -- -™ 2 

Sociology 17 .^ Secretarial Science 14 .7>1 

Total 16 Total 15 

Sophomore Year 

"Religion , 3 Religion 3 

^English 11 or 41 2 English 12 or 42 2 

•History 1 or 13 3 History 2 or 14 3 

-Accounting 1 .- 3 Accounting 2 > 3 

Economics 51 3 Economics 52 3 

Elective ::* 2 Elective ^r>»2 

Total 16 Total 16 

Junior Year 

Religion to 2 Religion to 2 

Economics 151 3 Economics 130 or 140 3 

Accounting 105 3 Accounting 120 or Econ. 166 .... 3 

Minor and *Electives 9 to 7 Minor and *Electives 10 to 8 

Total 15 Total 16 

y -~' Senior Year 
Economics 179 3 Mathematics 170 or Acct. 176 3 

Accounting 127 or Economics 184 2 

Economics 181 2 . 

Economics 195 1 or 2 Mmor an ^ *Electives 10 

Minor and *Electives 1 or 9 

Total 16 Total 15 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION 

Two curriculums are offered leading to a Bachelor of Science in 
Education; one with a major in elementary education, die other with 
majors in secondary education and a liberal arts field. Students preparing 
for teaching are counselled to register in the curriculum which will pre- 
pare them for the field of teaching they plan to enter. 



♦Suggested elect! ves: Sophomore year — General Psychology, Principles of 
Education, Speech; Junior year — Office Management, Minor requirements; (if 
planning to teach) Principles of Secondary Education, Educational Psychology; 
Senior year, Minor requirements; (if planning to teach) Methods in Teaching, 
Supervised Teaching. 



Graduation Standards 45 

CURRICULUM IN ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 

The four -year curriculum in elementary education is designed to meet 
the needs of students desiring a college degree with particular preparation 
for teaching in the elementary field. It is recommended to those who are 
looking forward to supervisory work in elementary education. 

Admission. For admission without deficiency, entrance units as 
indicated on pages 27 and 28 must be presented. 

Major and Minor. This curriculum provides for a major in ele- 
mentary education, and a minor in a field chosen by the student in counsel 
with the director of elementary education. See list of minors in the section 
on requirements for a Bachelor of Arts degree. 

For this curriculum, the requirements as to total hours, minimum 
upper biennium credit, senior residence, grade point average, and resi- 
dence credit and grade point average on the major and the minor, are the 
same as for a Bachelor of Arts degree. For specific information see 
"Graduation Standards." 

A student completing the first two years of this curriculum, with 
fulfillment of the admission, residence, and grade point requirements for 
graduation, will receive a diploma in elementary teaching training. 

The curriculum for the first two years as outlined makes for the 
student a very heavy course program, and it is strongly urged that the 
work be distributed over a summer and two years. 



Freshman Year 

English 1: 3 English 2 3 V " 

Geography 41 T Edu. 10 (Teach. Lang. Arts), ; 

Edu. 9 (Child Rdg..& Lit.) .... 2 or Other Methods 2 

Edu. 15 (Tech. of Teach.), or Edu. 16 (Principles) 2 

School Management, or Edu. 20 (Math, for Ele. 

Equivalent 2 Teachers) 2 

Edu. 35 (Appr. and School Edu - 36 ( A PP r - and Schooi 

v vv Music) 2 

Edu. 40 (Dir. Obs. & Teach.) 1 



Music) 2 



* Rel f 0n ■-■ :■ 3 *Reiigion .....' : "... 3 

Art 31: or Art Appr 1 Aft * 2 Qf Aft Appf x 

Health 43: (Games for Health 44 (Games for 

Children) - V 2 Children) l/ 2 

Total l6i/ 2 Total l6i/ 2 



46 Southern Missionary College 

5 <5 . Sophomore Year 
-.7.. 1/ 
i^hrs .History 13 3 History 14 3 

%" , Biology Elective 3 Biology 70 (Nature) 3 

'**English4l 2 ;i,«f£ n „ lish 42 .. 2 

Home Ec. 61 (Nutr.), or Child TT ,° . , TT . . . . , 

Care or Child Diseases 2 Health 4 ( Health Pnn ) 2 

Psychology 1 (Gen.) 2 Psychology 4 (Child) 2 

Edu. 23 (Sch. Health Probs.) Geography 42 3 

or School Hygiene 2 H. Ec. 16 (Practical Arts) .... 1 

?j EC ; 1 ^ P ?!i tiCal ^JT * Health 6 (Phys. Ed.) l/ 2 

Edu. 40 (Dir. Obs. & Teach.) 1 K ' ' . /2 

Health 5: (Phys. Ed.) l/ 2 

Total l6i/ 2 Total l6y 2 

Junior and Senior Years 
Religion 6 to 10 

fDirected Observation and Teaching 171-172 4 

Education (upper division) 12 

Literature — - - - 0-2 

-Vocational 4 

Minor and Electives 35-29 



Total 61 

Elementary Teacher Certification 

Upon completion of the first year of the curriculum in elementary edu- 
cation, a student is eligible to receive a two-year denominational elemen- 
tary certificate. 

A student completing the first two years of the curriculum in elemen- 
tary education qualifies for a three-year elementary certificate from the 
Southern Union Conference Department of Education, and a Tennessee 
permanent professional certificate. 

A student finishing the four-year curriculum is eligible to receive a 
five-year elementary certificate from the Southern Union Conference De- 
partment of Education. 



* A student entering without academy credits in Old and New Testament His- 
tory is counselled to take Bible Survey the first year and Fundamentals of Chris- 
tian Faith the second year, thus necessitating attendance at one summer session. 
**Two hours of credit in public speaking or English literature may be 
substituted for two hours of literature. 

t A student graduating from the two-year curriculum must take in Southern 
Missionary College the two hours of directed teaching in that curriculum; one 
graduating from the four-year curriculum shall take in the senior year at Southern 
Missionary College a minimum of two hours of directed teaching. 



Graduation Standards 47 

CURRICULUM IN SECONDARY EDUCATION 

The four-year curriculum in secondary education is planned to meet 
the needs of students desiring a college degree with particular prepara- 
tion for teaching in Seventh-day Adventist intermediate schools and 
academies; therefore, the student should prepare for certification in 
two or more subjects or teaching areas. 

To encourage a broad professional training, the college recommends 
that each student plan, with the help of his adviser, a program which 
will give adequate preparation in at least three fields of teaching. In 
addition to preparation for teaching, the student should also plan 
to become acquainted with the entire secondary school program. Oppor- 
tunity will be provided for him to spend sufficient time in the various 
aotivities of the secondary school to become familiar with this phase 
of the educational program. 

Admission. For admission without deficiency, entrance units as 
listed on pages 27 and 28 must be presented. 

Major Requirements: Two majors are required. The first major, 
in education, consists of twenty hours in education, including Education 
16, 140, two courses chosen from Education 141 to 161, and Education 
165; and six hours in psychology, including Psychology 72. The second 
major, twenty-six hours, shall be chosen from the fields in which 
majors are offered to apply on a Bachelor of Arts or on a Bachelor 
of Science in a particular field. 

Each major shall include a minimum of eleven hours of upper 
biennium credit, six of which shall be earned in this college. No 
course with a grade of "D" may apply on either major. 

Minor Requirements. Sixteen hours in one field, except religion 
and foreign language, constitutes a minor on this curriculum. It shall 
include six hours of upper biennium credit, three of which shall be 
earned in this college. 

For this curriculum, the requirements as to total hours, senior 
residence, minimum upper biennium credit, grade points, and residence 
credit and grade-point average on each major and each minor are the same 
as for a Bachelor of Arts degree. For specific information concerning any 
one of these, refer to the particular item under "Graduation Standards." 

COURSE REQUIREMENTS 
Sociology 17 (College Problems) 1 hour 

To be taken in freshman year. 

Health 2 hours 

To be completed in the freshman or the sophomore year. 



48 Southern Missionary College 
English 10 hours 

Six hours must be in composition, which is to be taken in the freshman or 
the sophomore year. The remaining four hours must be in American or 
English literature. 

History 6 hours 

Religion 12-16 hours 

A student presenting three or more units of credit in Bible from the 
secondary school will take twelve hours; one presenting two units, fourteen 
hours; and one presenting one unit or less, sixteen hours. Courses to fulfill 
this requirement may be chosen from the Bible and Theology sections in the 
division on Religion and Ethics. Eight hours of this requirement should be 
taken in the freshman and sophomore years. 

Natural Science (with laboratory) 6 hours 

Vocational 4 hours 

Education 20 hours 

♦Required courses: Education 16, 140, 165, and a minimum of two courses 
from Education 141-161. 

Psychology 6 hours 

Required course: Psychology 72. 

Optional Courses: Choose two of the following fields, one of which, 
but not both, may apply on the liberal arts major or minor. 

a. Foreign Language, 12-16 hours in one language. 

b. Natural Science, 6 hours. 

c. Mathematics, 10 hours. 

d. Religion, 2-6 hours. 

e. Vocational, 6-10 hours. 

f. Music, 6 hours. 

g. Home Economics, 4-12 hours, 
h. Secretarial Science, 4-14 hours. 

i. Accounting or Economics, 8 hours. 

j. English Composition and Literature, 8 hours. 

k. Library Science, 12 hours. 

1. Social Science, 6 hours. 

Elective, sufficient to make a total of 125 hours. 

Freshman Year 

Sociology 17 1 Health 4 2 

English 1: 3 English 2 3 

Religion 1 or 19 3 Religion 2 or 20 3 

**Natural or Social Science 3 * *Natural or Social Science 3 

Education 16 2 Vocational 2 

Vocational 2 ***Optional Group or Elective.. 3 

***Optional Group or Elective.. 1 

Total 15 Total 16 



*In addition to the upper biennium courses specified, sufficient other upper 
biennium courses to make a total of eleven hours are to be chosen. 

**Six hours in each field are required. 

***Two fields from the optional group are to be chosen, one of which, 
but not both, may apply on the liberal arts major or minor. 



Graduation Standards 



49 



Sophomore Year 



Religion 2 or 3 

Education Elective 2 

English 11 or 41 2 

♦Natural or Social Science 3 

** Optional Group or Elect. 7 to 6 



Religion 2 or 3 

Psychology 72 2 

English 12 or 42 2 

♦Natural or Social Science .... 3 
** Optional Group or Elect. 7 to 6 



Total 



16 



Total 



16 



Junior and Senior Years 

Religion 2 to 8 

Psychology 4 

Education 140 3 

Methods in Major and Minor Fields 2 to 4 

Education 165 3 

Majors, Minor, Optional Group, and Electives .... 48 to 40 

Certification 

For a five-year secondary certificate issued by the General Conference 
Department of Education fifteen hours of credit in education are re- 
quired, chosen from the following list: Hours 

Principles of Education 2 

Educational Psychology 3 

General Secondary Methods 3 

Methods in Major Field 2 

Secondary Practice Teaching (is required) 3 

Educational Measurements 2 

History of Education 2 

Psychology of Adolescence 2 

Secondary School Administration .....3 

Since state requirements for certification vary, it is advised that the 
student ascertain the number of hours and particular courses in education 
necessary for certification in the state of his teaching choice. 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN HOME ECONOMICS 

Admission. For admission to this curriculum see entrance require- 
ments as listed on pages 27 and 28. 

Major. This curriculum provides for a major of thirty hours in 
home economics. Thirteen hours of the major shall be of upper biennium 
credit, six hours of which shall have been earned in this college. No 
course with a grade of "D" applies on the major. 



*Six hours in each field are required. 

**Two fields from the optional group are to be chosen, one of which, but 

not both, may apply on the liberal arts major or minor. 



50 Southern Missionary College 

Minor. For information as to fields from which the minor may be 
chosen and the requirements for a specific minor, see the section on 
minor requirements for a Bachelor of Arts degree. 

For graduation from this curriculum the student will fulfill the same 
requirements as to total hours, senior residence, minimum upper biennium 
credit, grade points, and residence credit and grade point average on the 
major and the minor, as for the Bachelor of Arts degree. For information 
concerning any one of these, refer to the particular item under "Gradua- 
tion Standards." 

Freshman Year 

English 1: 3 English 2 3 

Religion 1 or 19 3 Religion 2 or 20 3 

Chemistry 1- or 7- 3 or 4 Chemistry 2 or 8 3 or 4 

Home Economics 1 or 21 3 Home Economics 2 or 22 3 

Sociology 17 1 Elective 3 

Elective 1 

Total 13 Total 16 

Sophomore Year 

Religion 2 or 3 Religion 2 or 3 

History 1 or 13 3 History 2 or 14 3 

Biology 1 or 11 3 Biology 2 or 12 3 

Home Economics 3 to 5 Home Economics 3 to 5 

Minor and Electives 5 to 2 Minor and Electives 5 to 2 

Total 16 Total 16 

Junior and Senior Years 

Religion 0-6 

i ( Literature 4 

Sj Social Science 6 

F«' Health 2 

I Home Economics (upper biennium, 13 hours) 14 to 18 

Minor and Elective 36 to 26 

Total 62 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN INDUSTRIAL ARTS 

To qualify for the degree of Bachelor of Science in Industrial Arts, 
a candidate must fulfill the following requirements: 
General Requirements 

1. For admission to the Industrial Arts curriculum see entrance re- 
quirements as listed on pages 27 and 28. 

2. The completion of 125 hours as outlined in the curriculum below, 
which provides for a major of thirty hours in industrial arts and a 
minor of sixteen to twenty hours in one field of natural science or in 
mathematics. 

3. A minimum of thirteen hours of upper biennium credit on the 
major. Six hours of upper biennium credit on the major (preferably the 



Graduation Standards 51 

last six) and three on the minor shall be earned in this college. No 
course in which a grade of "D" has been received may apply on the 
major. 

4. A minimum of forty hours of upper biennium credit, of which 
thirteen hours shall be in the major. 

5. An average of one grade point per hour on all credits applied 
toward graduation, this average being computed separately on residence 
and accepted credits. 

6. Twenty-four hours of the senior year's work must be taken in 
this college. 

Course Requirements 
Major (Industrial Arts) 30 hours 

Within the hours for a major the following courses are required: 

Industrial Arts 1-2. 77-78, 91-92, 123-124, 193, 194, 195-196. 

Minor (Biology, Chemistry, Mathematics, or Physics) 16-20 hours 

Sociology (College Problems) 1 hour 

Social Science (History, six hours) 12 hours 

Religion 12-16 hours 

English 10 hours 

Six hours in composition, four hours in literature. 
Education and Psychology 5 hours 

Education 16 and Psychology 72 recommended. 

Accounting 1 and 2 6 hours 

Vocational 4 hours 

Health 2 hours 

Electives 19-27 hours 

Total 125 hours 

Freshman Year 

Religion 1 or 19 3 Religion 2 or 20 3 

English 1: 3 English 2 3 

Instrumental Drawing 1- 3 Instrumental Drawing 2 3 

Industrial Arts 11 or 33 2 Industrial Arts 12 or 34 2 

♦Natural Science or Math 3 *Natural Science or Math 3 

Sociology 17 1- Education or Psychology 3 

Total 15 Total 17 
Sophomore Year 

Religion (Course 61 suggested) 2 Religion (Course 62 suggested) 2 

♦Natural Science or Math 3 *Natural Science or Math 3 

History 1 or 13 - 3 Hist 2 or l4 3 

Principles of Accounting 1 3 „ . . . , . . 

Industrial Arts 77- and 91- 3 Pr >™ples of Accounting 2 3 

Industrial Arts Elect 1 Industrial Arts 78 and 92 3 

Education 16 2 Industrial Arts Elective 1 

Total 17 Total i~5 



♦Courses which apply on the minor should be chosen. 



52 Southern Missionary College 

Junior Year 

Health 2 Bible or Theology 3 

♦Natural Science or Math 3 *Natural Science or Math 3 

English 11, 41, or 161 2 English 12, 42, or 162 2 

Industrial Arts 123 3 Industrial Arts 124 3 

Industrial Arts Elective 1 Industrial Arts Elective 1 

Electives 4 Electives 3 

Total 15 Total 15 

Senior Year 

Social Science 3 Social Science 3 

Industrial Arts 193 and 195- .... 3 Industrial Arts 194 and 196 .... 3 

Industrial Arts Elective 2 Industrial Arts Elective 2 

Electives 8 Electives 7 

Total 16 Total 15 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN RELIGIOUS EDUCATION 
This curriculum is intended to prepare young women for work as 
Bible instructors in connection with the evangelistic activities of the 
Seventh-day Adventist denomination. 

Admission. For admission to this curriculum see entrance require- 
ments as listed on pages 27 and 28. 

Major and Minor. This curriculum provides for a major of 
thirty hours in Religion and a minor chosen from the list of 
minors in the section on requirements for a Bachelor of Arts 
degree. Thirteen hours of the major and six hours of the minor shall 
be upper biennium credit, with six hours and three hours of this, re- 
spectively, earned in this college. 

For graduation, the requirements as to total hours, senior residence, 
minimum upper biennium credit, grade points, residence credit, and grade 
point average on the major and the minor, are the same as for the 
Bachelor of Arts degree. For specific information concerning any one 
of these, refer to the particular item under "Graduation Standards." 

Freshman Year 

English 1: 3 English 2 3 

Religion 1 or 19 3 Religion 2 or 20 3 

Natural Science 3 Natura i Science 3 

Home Economics 1 3 TT - 

Psychology 1 2 Home Economics 2 3 

Applied Music 1 Education 16 2 

Sociology 17 1 Applied Music 1 

Total " 16 Total 15 



♦Courses which apply on the minor should be chosen. 



Graduation Standards 53 

Sophomore Year 

Religion 2 Religion 2 

History 1 3 History 2 3 

Music 1 2 !! e f th ^ 2 

„ ,. . „ History 6 2 

Religion 5 2 Speech 6 2 

Speech 5 2 Applied Music 1 

Applied Music 1 Psychology 4 2 

Elective 4 Elective 2 

Total 16 Total 16 

Junior and Senior Years 

Religion (13 hours upper biennium, including Religion 

165 and 166) 16 

Literature 4 

History 151 and 152 6 

Home Economics 6 

Social Science 4 

Applied Theology 89, 90, 107 6 

Minor and Elective 20 

Total 62 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN SECRETARIAL SCIENCE 

Admission. For admission to this curriculum see entrance require- 
ments as listed on pages 27 and 28. 

The first two years of this curriculum may constitute a terminal cur- 
riculum leading to a diploma. 

For graduation from either the two-year or the four-year curriculum 
the same minimum residence and grade point average are required as for 
the arts and science curriculum; and for the four-year curriculum, the 
minimum residence for the major and the minor, the scholarship require- 
ment in the major, and the minimum upper biennium hours required, 
are the same as for a Bachelor of Arts degree. 

Students following the four-year curriculum should take in the second 
year six hours of History 1 and 2, or 13 and 14, and take Secretarial 
Science 71, 75, and 76 in the third year. 

Those preparing to teach in secondary schools should take eighteen 
hours in education. The State of Tennessee requires, besides six hours of 
elective in education, the following courses for certification to teach high 
school secretarial subjects: educational psychology, three hours; principles 
of secondary education, three hours; methods in teaching commercial 
subjects and supervised teaching, six hours. 



54 Southern Missionary College 

Major: For this degree a major of thirty hours is required in 
secretarial science, exclusive of Courses 9, 10, 13, 14, and including 
thirteen hours in the upper biennium. Related courses in accounting and 
economics are required as listed in the curriculum outline. Six hours of 
the upper biennium credit shall be earned in this college. No course with 
a grade of "D" may apply on the major. 

Minor: It is suggested that students majoring in secretarial science 
minor in Religion, home economics, English, or music. See the require- 
ments for these minors in the section on a Bachelor of Arts degree. 

Freshman Year 

Religion 1 or 19 3 Religion 2 or 20 3 

English 1: 3- English 2 3- 

Sec. Sci. 9 (Begin. Shorthand).. 4 Sec sd 1Q (Inter shorthand) .. 4 

Sec. Sci. 13 (Begin. Typing) .... 1 . . 

Hist., Soc. or Pol. Sci. Sec Sci - l4 ( Inter - T 5T m g) -" l 

Edu., Home Ec 3 Hist > Soc - or Po1 - Sci., 

Sociology 17 (College Prob.) .... 1 Edu., Home Ec 3 

♦Elective 1 Sec. Sci. 40 (Filing) 1 

Total 16 Total 16 

Sophomore Year 
Sec. Sci. 55 (Adv. Shorthand) .... 3 Sec. Sci. 56 (Adv. Shorthand) .... 3 
Sec. Sci 57 (Shorthand Sec. Sci. 58 (Shorthand 

Transcription) 1 Transcription) 1 

c c • / a j t • \ , Sec. Sci. 62 (Adv. Typing) 1 

Sec. Sci. (Adv. Typing) 1 Sec sd 31 \ Voia / F 

Accounting 1 3 Transcription) 1 

**Sec. Sci. 71 (Sec. Practice) .... 2 Accounting 2, or 4 and 6 3 

**Sec. Sci. 75 (Bus. Machines).. 1 **Sec. Sci. 76 (Bus. Machines) 1 

Economics 51 (Prin. of Econ.).. 3 Religion 2 

Elective 2 Elective 4 

Total 16 Total 16 

Junior and Senior Years 
fReligion 3 to 8 

Natural Science or Mathematics .'. 6 

Secretarial Science 109-110 (Adv. Dictation) 4 



♦Students finishing the two-year curriculum only may take electives instead of 
Economics 52. 

** Students following the four-year curriculum should take six hours of history 
in the sophomore year instead of secretarial practice, business machines, and 
electives. 

fA student presenting three or more units of credit in Bible from the secondary 
school will take twelve hours; one presenting two units, fourteen hours; and 
one presenting one unit or less, sixteen hours. 



Graduation Standards 55 

Secretarial Science 127-128 (Adv. Transcription) 2 

History 6 

Literature 4 

Economics 140 (Advertising) 3 

Secretarial Science 141 (Office Management) 2 

Secretarial Science 174 (Applied Sec. Prac.) 3 

Secretarial Science 181 (Sec. Problems) .'. 1 or 2 

♦Minor and Electives 27 to 21 

Total 6T~ 

PREMEDICINE 
Nearly all medical colleges now require a bachelor's degree of all 
candidates. Therefore students who expect to transfer later to a medical 
college should register as arts and science students selecting suitable majors 
and minors which will qualify them for a Bachelor of Arts degree. All 
other essentials for entrance to a medical college can be met by selecting 
proper electives. 

Students planning to transfer to the College of Medical Evangelists, 
Loma Linda, California, should select entrance courses as outlined in the 
current bulletin issued by that college. Currently these essential courses 
include: Semester Hours 

General Chemistry 8--^ 

General Zoology i. 8*-' 

Foreign Language 6-18 k ' * k 

Organic Chemistry 6 -^ 

Physics 11-12 8 ^ 

Freshman Composition 1-2 6 "' 

American Government 57-58 4 > 

Vertebrate Embryology 113 4-? 

Quantitative Analysis 4 --S " 

and a minimum of four hours of religion for each year of college work 
offered for entrance. L> ■+ 'i- - 1 y 3 

The quality of scholarship required for entrance demands that a 
grade-point average in science subjects and nonscience subjects, figured 
separately, should be not less than 1.5 and a higher grade-point average 
is desirable. Students who do not reach this grade-point average will not 
be recommended. 

JUNIOR COLLEGE CURRICULUMS 

Terminal and pre-professional curriculums are offered on the junior 
college level. Each curriculum, except prenursing, leads to a diploma; but 
since many of the courses in each curriculum are of professional or voca- 

* Suggested electives: Principles of Secondary Education, General Psychology, 
Educational Psychology, Supervised Teaching, Methods in Commerce, Health 
Principles, Piano, Voice. 



£ 



56 Southern Missionary College 

tional .nature, a student graduated from one of these curriculums usually 
has lower division basic requirements to make up if he transfers to the 
curriculum leading to a Bachelor of Arts degree and will need to spend 
more than the usual four years to qualify for this degree. 

GENERAL REQUIREMENTS 

Entrance requirements for each curriculum are indicated on pages 
27 and 28. The following pattern, with graduation from an accredited 
secondary school and completion of the necessary college courses, satisfies 
the requirements for admission to many schools of dietetics, dentistry, 
and nursing; but inasmuch as requirements for admission to professional 
schools differ, a student preparing for professional training should 
acquaint himself with the secondary and collegiate requirements for 
admission to the particular school he desires to enter, and plan both 
his secondary school and college program to meet these requirements. 

For graduation, the same requirements as to character, senior residence, 
and grade-point average, as for a Bachelor of Arts degree, apply to each of 
these curriculums. 

ELEMENTARY TEACHER TRAINING 

Admission. See pages 27 and 28. 

The first two years of the curriculum leading to a Bachelor of Science 
in Education, with a major in elementary education, constitute this 
curriculum. See pages 44 and 45 for information as to course and certi- 
fication requirements. 

SECRETARIAL TRAINING 
Admission. See pages 27 and 28. 

For the outline of this curriculum which leads to a diploma, see the 
first two years of the curriculum leading to a Bachelor of Science in Secre- 
tarial Science. 

PREDENTAL 

Class A dental colleges require for admission two years (sixty hours) 
of college work, including certain prescribed courses. Students planning 
to enter a particular college of dentistry should consult its bulletin, since 
admission requirements vary, and frequently credit for art, music, ex- 
pression, commerce, education, and vocational courses may not be in- 
cluded in the minimum for admission. 

Admission. See pages 27 and 28. 



Graduation Standards 



57 



English 1: 3 

Religion 1 or 19 3 

Chemistry 1- 4 

Mathematics 1 3 

Sociology 17 1 

*Elective 2 

Total 16 



Freshman Year 

English 2 



Religion 2 or 20 3 

Chemistry 2 4 

Mathematics 2 3 

*Elective 3 

Total 16 



Chemistry 53- 4 

Physics 1- 4 

Biology 45 4 

Religion 2 

Elective 2 

Total 



Sophomore Year 

Chemistry 54 4 

Physics 2 4 

Biology 46 4 

Elective 4 

Total 16 



16 



PREDIETETICS 

Admission. See pages 27 and 28. Consult the catalogue of the School 
of Dietetics of the College of Medical Evangelists for information con- 
cerning admission requirements for that school. 



English l: 3 

Religion 1 or 19 3 

Chemistry 1- 4 

Home Economics 1 3 

Sociology 17 1 

Psychology 1 : 2 

Total 



Freshman Year 

English 2 3 

Religion 2 or 20 3 

Chemistry 2 4 

Home Economics 2 3 

Sociology 20 3 

Total 16 



16 



Sophomore Year 



Religion 2 

Biology 11 3 

Economics 51 3 

Political Science 15 2 

Elective .'. 6 

Total 16 



Religion 2 

Biology 12 3 

Psychology 72 3 

Education 16 2 

Elective 7 

Total 16 



♦Suggested electives: English, social science, mathematics, modern foreign 
language, natural science, Latin. 



58 Southern Missionary College 



PRENURSING 

The following units, with high school graduation and completion 
of the college prenursing courses, satisfies admission requirements of 
many schools of nursing; but inasmuch as requirements for admission 
to professional schools differ, a student looking forward to nurses' training 
should acquaint herself with the requirements for admission to the par- 
ticular school she desires to enter, and plan both the secondary and the 
college program to meet these requirements. 

Admission requirements for many schools of nursing specify the fol- 
lowing sixteen units and graduation from an accredited secondary school 
with a high "C" average: 

English 3 Bible (one unit for each year of 

Foreign Language (both units must attendance at a Seventh-day Ad- 
be in the same language) 2 ventist academy to the extent of 

Mathematics (shall include one unit three units ; on e uni ' f ° r hi 8 h 

of algebra, and does not include school graduates) ......: 1-3 

commercial or other applied math- Science (one unit must be physics) .. 2 

ematics) 2 Sufficient electives to make a total 

History 1 of sixteen units. 

Beginning in 1950, many schools of nursing expect to require for 
admission one unit of physics from the secondary school. 

Upon entrance, college prenursing students are given tests in arith- 
metic for nurses and reading comprehension and speed. Remedial work 
in arithmetic and reading will be required of all those who do not pass 
these tests with satisfactory standing. 

The college prenursing work leads to a certificate instead of a 
diploma. It is strongly urged that these courses be taken in two semesters 
and a summer term, or in two years. Students may do some of this 
work by correspondence in order to restrict residence to one year. Such 
correspondence credit should be earned prior to attendance at Southern 
Missionary College. 

Curriculum Outline 

--English 1: 3 "English 2 3 

Religion, Course 5 recommended 2 ^Religion, or History 6 2 

Chemistry 7- 3 Chemistry 8 3 

"Sociology 31 2 „ . f ,_ 

^ Health. 1. 2 -Sociology 32 1 

./Sociology 17 1 -Biology 22 4 

^Health 5: l/ 2 ^Health 6 V 2 

Total i6y 2 Total l6y 2 



Divisions of Instruction 

Courses of instruction are arranged in several divisions, as follows: 

I Applied Aits 

II Education, Philosophy and Psychology 

III Fine Arts 

IV Languages and Literature 

V Natural Sciences and Mathematics 
VI Religion and Applied Theology 
VII Social Sciences 

Of the courses listed, those marked with an asterisk probably will 
not be given in 1949-50; those without this mark will be given if 
there is sufficient demand. The college reserves the right to withdraw 
temporarily any course for which there is not adequate enrollment. 

Course Numbers. Courses numbered from 1 to 99 are lower 
biennium courses, taken mainly by freshmen and sophomores; those num- 
bered 100 or above are upper biennium courses, open to juniors and 
seniors. 

A sophomore may register for one or more upper biennium courses, 
for upper biennium credit, provided ( 1 ) he has earned, with an average of 
"C" or above, fifty hours including basic freshman and sophomore courses 
already taken, and (2) his current registration completes the fulfilment 
of lower biennium basic and major requirements. In exceptional 
cases, a sophomore who does not fulfill the above requirements may be 
admitted to an upper biennium course, for lower biennium credit. 

A sophomore who desires admission to an upper biennium course 
makes application on a blank obtainable in the registrar's office. 

Course numbers separated by a hyphen (e.g.1-2) represent year 
courses, the semesters to be taken in order given. Credit for the first 
semester only will not apply toward graduation from any curriculum. 

Course numbers separated by a colon (e.g.ll:12) are year courses, of 
which either semester may be taken first, but both semesters must be 
taken before the credit may apply toward graduation from any curriculum. 

Majors and Minors: Available majors and minors, with require- 
ments for each, are listed in their respective sections. Information con- 
cerning majors may be found in the section on curriculums. 



60 



Southern Missionary College 



I. APPLIED ARTS 

G. W. Boynton, Acting Chairman 



Thyra E. Bowen 
Theresa Brickman 
Stanley D. Brown 
H. T. Curtis 
George T. Gott 



Lois L. Heiser 
Harry R. Hooper 
Adel Kougl 
Robert E. Lynn 
Jimmie Lou Brackett 



ACCOUNTING 

The fundamental aims of the courses in this subdivision are to assist 
students to understand and interpret aright the economic forces at work 
in human society, and to give a preparation for various types of employ- 
ment in the field of business. 

Major: A major in business administration, which applies toward a 
Bachelor of Science in Business Administration, requires thirty-six hours 
in accounting and economics. The major shall include a minimum of 
sixteen hours of upper biennium credit, six of which shall be earned in 
this college. No course in which a "D" has been received may apply on 
this major. See pages 43 and 44. 

Minor : A minor in business administration requires eighteen hours in 
accounting and economics, including a minimum of six hours of upper 
biennium credit, three of which shall be earned in this college. 



1. Principles of Accounting 



First semester, three hours 



Introduction to accounting; books of original entry; ledgers; trial 
balances; profit and loss statements. Two hours lecture, three hours 
laboratory, each week. 



2. Principles of Accounting Second semester, three hours 

Prerequisite: Accounting 1. 

Introduction to partnerships, corporations, theory of accounting for 
manufacturing; voucher system; departmental accounting. Two hours 
lecture, three hours laboratory, each week. 



Divisions of Instruction 61 

4. Denominational Accounting Second semester, two hours 

Prerequisite: Accounting 1. * 

Brief introduction to partnerships and corporations; principles of 
accounting as applied to Seventh-day Adventist denominational institu- 
tions. 

6. Denominational Financial Policies Second semester, one hour 

Prerequisite: Accounting 1 recommended. 

A practical study of denominational organization; workers' personal 
finance problems; mission program, church, and conference finance. 

105. Intermediate Accounting First semester, three hours 

Prerequisite: Accounting 1 and 2. 

Additional experience in the preparation of working papers; balance 
sheets, and profit and loss statement; problems of single entry; valuation of 
assets; depreciation; reserves and reserve funds; sinking funds; corporation 
problems and installment accounting. 

*120. Advanced Accounting Second semester, three hours 

Prerequisite: Accounting 105. 

A course in advanced theory of accounting. Advanced partnership and 
corporation problems; statement analysis; consignments; consolidated state- 
ments; statement of affairs, receivership and some principles of actuarial 
science. 

*127. Cost Accounting First semester, two hours 

Prerequisite: Accounting 1 and 2. 

General principles and importance of cost records; classification of 
cost; job order and process accounting; accounting for materials, labor 
and manufacturing expense; preparation of analytical statements. 

*128. Cost Accounting Problems Second semester, one hour 

Prerequisite: Accounting 127. 

Accounting for standard costs; analysis of variances; control of dis- 
tribution cost; cost reports for executive control and capacity costs. 

176. Auditing Second semester, three hours 

Prerequisite: Accounting 120. 

A summary course in accounting theory. Kinds of audits, and methods 
of conducting each kind; systems of accounts; preparation of working 
papers and reports. 

♦Probably will not be given 1949-50. 



62 Southern Missionary College 

AGRICULTURE 

1-2. General Agriculture Both semesters, four hours 

A survey of the various phases of plant, production and animal hus- 
bandry. This course satisfies the vocational requirement for a degree. 
Laboratory as arranged. 

31. Landscape Art First semester, two hours 

Planning the development and beautification of home and school 
grounds. A study of plants, trees, shrubs, and flowers adapted to local 
surroundings; their selection, planting, and care. Two hours lecture and 
two hours laboratory per week. Fee, $3.00. 

*34. Vegetable Gardening Second semester, two hours 

Proper selection of the home garden site, its preparation and cultiva- 
tion; methods of control of plant diseases and insect pests; instruction in 
the preparation of fresh vegetables and the preservation of foods. Two 
hours lecture and two hours laboratory per week. Fee, $3.00. 

HOME ECONOMICS 

The courses in this department are designed to give cultural and 
practical knowledge of the essentials of successful homemaking. 

Major: A major in home economics, which applies toward a Bache- 
lor of Science in Home Economics, requires thirty hours exclusive of 
Course 20; thirteen hours of upper biennium credit are required, of which 
a minimum of six hours must be earned in this college. The major shall 
include the following courses: Home Economics 1-2, 21-22, 42, and 
Sociology 132. Economics 41 may apply on this major. See pages 49 
and 50. 

A student majoring in home economics is required to take six hours 
of biological science; ten hours in Chemistry including Courses 1-2 or 7-8; 
Food Chemistry, 4 hours; it is strongly recommended that she take Indus- 
trial Arts 33 and 34. 

Minor: A minor in home economics requires fifteen hours, exclu- 
sive of Course 15, 16, and including six hours of upper biennium credit. 
Three hours of the upper biennium credit shall be earned in this college. 
Economics 42 and Sociology 132 may apply on this minor. 

1, 2. Foods and Cookery Both semesters, six hours 

A study of food selection, preparation, and service, with emphasis on 
the selection of a healthful diet. Laboratory practice in the basic prin- 
ciples of cookery. Two hours lecture, three hours laboratory, per week. 
Fee $8.00 each semester. Credit for Course 1 is prerequisite for Course 2. 

*Probably will not be given 1949-50. 



Divisions of Instruction 63 



11, 12. Practical Cookery Both Semesters, four hours 

A course designed for young men, to acquaint them with the 
principles of cooking and meal planning, and with the fundamentals of 
healthful diet. Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory, per week. 
Fee, $8.00 each semester. 

15, 16. Practical Arts Both semesters, two hours 

Gardening, crafts, home mechanics, sewing and home arts, wood- 
working. Three hours laboratory each week. Fee, $5.00 each semester. 

21, 22. Clothing Both semesters, six hours 

A course in the selection and construction of clothing; fundamental 
principles of garment construction; color design, psychology of dress. Two 
hours lecture, three hours laboratory, per week. Fee, $2.50 each 
semester. Credit for Course 21 is prerequisite to Course 22. 

41. Interior Decorating First semester, three hours 

Study and application of the principles governing the selection and 
arrangement of furniture, textiles, pictures, and other home furnishings; 
instruction and practice in upholstering furniture and in making dra- 
peries and other practical home decorations. Open to both men and 
women. Two hours lecture, three hours laboratory, per week. Fee for 
material, $3.00. 

61. Nutrition First semester, two hours 

A basic course in nutrition to recognize and give limited instruction 
and supervision to a balanced diet in the home, in school cafeterias, and 
in lunch boxes; methods for promoting adequate nutrition practices in the 
home and among school children; sanitation and food handling. 

101, 102. Advanced Cookery Both semesters, six hours 

Prerequisite: Home Economics 1 and 2 or 11 and 12; and 101 
for 102. 

Problems in advanced foods, menu planning, calculating costs, 
marketing, experimental cookery, preparing and serving meals for all 
occasions. Open to both men and women. Two hours lecture, three hours 
laboratory, per week. Fee, $8.00 each semester. 



64 Southern Missionary College 

♦121-122. Dress Design and Construction Both semesters, six hours 

Prerequisite: Home Economics 21 and 22. 

Pattern designing; special problems in fitting; construction of woolen 
garments. Further creative experience in costume design and construction 
of dresses. Two hours lecture, three hours laboratory, per week. Fee 
$2.50 each semester. 

171. Institutional Management First semester, two hours ■ 

The study of administrative duties and problems in institutional 
work including those of organization, equipment, personnel, costs, 
marketing, and service. Open to both men and women. 

172. Quantity Cookery Second semester, two hours 

Prerequisite: Home Economics 1 and 2, or 11 and 12. 

The study of preparation and service of food in large quantities. 
Laboratory work by appointment in the college cafeteria. Open to both 
men and women. 

190. Problems in Home Economics 

One or two semesters, one or two hours 

Prerequisite: A major or a minor in home economics; senior standing. 

A course designed to give opportunity for individual study of some 
special interest or need in this field. 

INDUSTRIAL ARTS 

The purpose of the courses in industrial arts is to provide oppor- 
tunity for students to learn at least one trade; to train teachers of in- 
dustrial arts and develop supervisors and plant managers for home and 
foreign mission enterprises. 

Major: A major in industrial arts, which applies on the curriculum 
leading to a Bachelor of Science in Industrial Arts, requires thirty hours, 
including Industrial Arts 1-2, 77-78, 91-92, 123-124, 193, 194, 195-196. 
Thirteen hours of the major shall be in upper biennium credit, six hours 
of which shall be earned in this college. No course in which a "D" has 
been received may apply on the major. See pages 50 to 52. 

Minor: A minor in industrial arts on the Liberal Arts curriculum 
requires eighteen hours, including Industrial Arts 1-2. It shall include 
six hours of upper biennium credit, three of which shall be earned in this 
college. 



♦Probably will not be given 1949-50. 



Divisions of Instruction 65 

1-2. Instrumental Drawing Both semesters, six hours 

Designed to give fundamental training in the use of instruments, and 
in the selection of equipment and drawing materials; training in the vari- 
ous processes; orthographic projection, revolutions, surface development, 
lettering, shading and dimensioning. Fee, $6.00 each semester. 

1 11. General Woodworking First semester, two hours 

The study of hand and machine tool processes, with opportunity for 
working out selected projects in the laboratory. The use and care of 
tools, selection of projects, shop sketching. One hour lecture and two 
hours laboratory each week. Fee, $6.00. 

12. General Woodworking Second semester, two hours 

The study of hand and machine tool processes, with opportunity for 
working out selected projects in the laboratory. The use and care of 
tools, selection of projects, shop sketching, finishing processes, and 
finishing, designing furniture, matching grain, selection of hardware, and 
methods of displaying finished products. One hour lecture and two 
hours laboratory each week. Fee, $6.00. 

15-16. Welding Both semesters, jour hours 

Principles and practice of electric, acetylene and gas welding. Fee, 
$6.00. 

33, 34. Household Mechanics Both semesters, jour hours 

Instruction and experience in the repair and upkeep of household 
equipment. One hour lecture, two hours laboratory, each week. Fee, 
$4.00 each semester. 

51. Auto Mechanics First semester, two hours 

A general course in the fundamental principles of gasoline engines, 
their design, timing, cooling, carburetion, and lubrication; automobile 
body designs, makes, and models. One hour lecture, two hours laboratory, 
each week. Fee, $6.00. 

52. 'Auto Mechanics Second semester, two hours 

A general course in the fundamentals of gasoline engines and 
automobile design and repair; automotive electricity, power flow, servic- 
ing, and trouble shooting; field trips. One hour lecture, two hours lab- 
oratory each week. Fee, $6.00. 



66 Southern Missionary College 

61-62. Survey of Printing Both semesters, four hours 

The elements of printing, including history, type composition, type 
faces, layout, proofreading, publication make-up, platen presswork. Ad- 
vanced work given to students who have had previous experience in 
printing. One hour lecture, three hours laboratory per week. Fee, $3.00 
each semester. 

65-66. Linotype Both semesters, four hours 

The maintenance, function, and operation of the machine. One lecture 
and three hours laboratory each week. Fee, $5.00 each semester. 

73-74. Advanced Woodworking Both semesters, two hours 

Prerequisite: Industrial Arts 11 and 12, or a course in hand tool opera- 
tions. 

The study and use of machine tools; machine processes, and mill work. 

77-78. Architectural Drawing Both semesters, four hours 

Prerequisite: Industrial Arts 1-2, or a beginning course in Mechanical 
Drawing. 

A survey of the field in its various phases, and the acquisition of a 
working knowledge of technique, symbols, materials, plan reading, tracing 
and blue-printing. Fee, $6.00 each semester. 

81-82. Mechanical Drawing Both semesters, six hours 

Basic instruction in the fundamental processes of mechanical drawing. 
Fee, $3.00 each semester. 

91-92. Industrial Arts Problems Both semesters, two hours 

A study of particular problems in the industrial arts field. A term 
paper is required. 

*101-102. Advanced Mechanical Drawing Both semesters, four hours 

Prerequisite: Industrial Arts 1-2 or equivalent. 

The processes to be studied are, isometric drawing, oblique drawing, 
intersections, and sectional views, map and topographical drawing, sea- 
craft and aircraft drawing, details and tracings. Fee, $6.00 each semester. 



♦Probably will not be given 1949-50. 



Divisions of Instruction 



* 121 -122. Structural and Finish Carpentry Both semesters, four hours 

Prerequisite: Industrial Arts 11 and 12 or equivalent. 

Required hand tools, rip saw, cross grain saw (ten-point), hammer, 
wrecking bar, l/ 2 " and 1" chisels, framing square, try square, block plane, 
and jack plane. 

The course is designed to give the student a knowledge of various 
types of structures, finishing materials, trimming, and finishing, and of 
interior and exterior decoration. Laboratory time will be spent either 
in construction of models or of full-size dwellings. One hour lecture 
and two hours laboratory each week. Fee, $6.00 each semester. 

* 123-124. Structure and Design Both semesters, two hours 

The study of materials and their use in construction; the effects of 
cold, heat, and other factors on various types of building materials. 

* 141-142. Electric and Acetylene Welding Both semesters, tivo hours 

Designed to give advanced skill in the processes, use and fusing of 
metals, their characteristics under cold and heat, various technical designs 
and use of tin plates, servicing and care of equipment. One hour lecture 
and one hour laboratory each week. Fee, $6.00 each semester. 

143-144. Machine Shop Both semesters, two hours 

Fundamentals of machine shop practices, with a special emphasis 
given to the milling, fitting, and processing of metals. Study of pattern 
making, sheet metal, plumbing, and wiring. One hour lecture and one 
hour laboratory each week. Fee, $4.00 each semester. 

*191-192. Advanced Architectural Drmving Buth semesperj, jmrr tnrm-s- 
Prerequisite: Industrial Arts 1-2, 77-78, or their equivalent. 
Students will be expected to work out for a full-size structure a 

complete set of plans, details, specifications, bill of materials and labor, 

and total costs. Fee, $6.00 each semester. 

193. Trade Analysis First semester, two hours 

The study of trades. Each student is required to analyze his own 
trade, set it up on cards in knowing and doing units, with the best 
references attached. A copy of the full set of cards of the trade 
analyzed is to be turned in upon completion of the course. 

194. Field Problems Second semester, two hours 

Class time is to be devoted to visiting industrial arts set-ups and to 
a study of the particular problems of administration in the field of 
industrial arts. A term paper is required. Fee, $6.00. 

♦Probably will not be given 1949-50. 



68 Southern Missionary College 

* 195-196. History and Philosophy ,of Industrial Arts 

Both semesters, two hours 

The study of the development and proper place of industrial educa- 
tion; planning of better teaching materials and methods. 

BIBLIOGRAPHY AND LIBRARY SCIENCE 

21-22. Using Books and Libraries Both semesters, two hours 

An introductory course, of value to all college students, in library 
techniques. Since the major emphasis is placed on methods in biblio- 
graphy, research, book selection, and the use of reference books, skills 
are fostered which the student will use in future college work and in 
all subsequent scholarly endeavors. 

*91-92. School Library Administration Both semesters, four hours 

Prerequisite: Library Science 21-22, or the two may be taken si- 
multaneously. 

Designed to give training in library management, with school libraries 
especially in view, and to impart a practical knowledge of how to organ- 
ize and administer a library, how to select, acquire, and catalog books, and 
how to relate the library to the needs of the pupil. 

SECRETARIAL SCIENCE 

The courses in secretarial science are designed to serve three 
classes of students: those who desire to become clerical workers or 
secretaries, those who expect to teach commercial subjects in secondary 
school, and those who desire the training for personal use and cultural 
background. 

Major: A major in secretarial science, which applies toward a 
Bachelor of Science in Secretarial Science, requires thirty hours exclusive 
of first-year shorthand and typewriting, and including thirteen hours of 
upper biennium credit, six hours of which shall be earned in this college. 
Related courses in accounting and economics are required, as listed in 
the secretarial science curriculum. No course with a grade of "D" may 
apply on the major. See pages 53 to 55. 

Minor: A minor in Secretarial Science which may apply on a 
Bachelor of Arts degree, requires eighteen hours exclusive of Secretarial 



♦Probably will not be given 1949-50. 



Divisions of Instruction 69 

Science 9, 10, 13, and 14. It shall include Secretarial Science 55, 56, 57, 
71, 76; and Secretarial Science 109-110 and 127-128, or Secretarial 
Science 141, 174, and 181. 

9. Beginning Shorthand First semester, four hours 

Prerequisite: Secretarial Science 13 must be taken concurrently with 
this course unless the student has had the equivalent. Not counted toward 
a degree until the student has completed Course 10. 

Fundamental principles of Gregg Shorthand. Five class hours per 
week. 

10. Intermediate Shorthand Second semester, jour hours 

Prerequisite: Secretarial Science 9, or equivalent to one year in high 
school. Secretarial Science 14 must be taken concurrently with this course 
unless the student has had the equivalent. 

Development of rapid writing and reading habits. Speed 70 to 90 
■words a minute. Five class hours per week. 

13. Beginning Typewriting First semester, one hour 

Mastery of the keyboard and the technique of touch typing. Not 
counted toward a degree until the student -has completed Course 14. Speed 
25 to 35 words a minute, or other satisfactory attainmeut-Eour class hours 
per week. Fee, $6.00. 

14. Intermediate Typewriting Second semester, one hour 

Prerequisite: Secretarial Science 13, one year in high school type- 
writing, or equivalent. 

Further development in speed and accuracy, with emphasis on the 
practical application of typewriting and the care of the machine. Speed 
requirements 40 to 50 words a minute, or other satisfactory attainment. 
Four class periods per week. Fee, $6.00. 

21. Shorthand Review First semester, two hours 

Prerequisite: Secretarial Science 9, or one year of shorthand in acad- 
emy or high school. Credit applies only on secretarial science curriculums, 
and is not counted until the student has completed Course 22. 

Review of the basic principles of Gregg Shorthand. Three class 
hours per week. 

22. Shorthand Review Second semester, two hours 
Prerequisite: Secretarial Science 9 or 21. Secretarial Science 14 must 

be taken concurrently with this course unless the student has had the 
equivalent. Credit applies only on secretarial science curriculums. 

Development of rapid writing and reading habits; transcription 
practice. Speed 80 to 90 words a minute. Three class hours per week. 



70 Southern Missionary College 

31. Voice Transcription First or second semester, one hour 

Prerequisite: Secretarial Science 14 or equivalent, permission. 
A course in the operation of voice writing equipment with emphasis 

on mailable transcriptions. Three laboratory hours per week. Fee, $3.00. 

40. Filing Second semester, two hours 

Forty-period Library Bureau course in filing. The course includes 
theoretical instruction and practice. Fee, $3.00. 

55. Advanced Shorthand First semester, three hours 

Prerequisite: "C" standing in Secretarial Science 10 and 14; simul- 
taneous registration, Secretarial Science 57. 

Rapid writing and reading of Gregg Shorthand. Speed 90 to 100 
words a minute. Four class periods per week. 

56. Advanced Shorthand Second semester, three hoxrs 

Prerequisite: Secretarial Science 55 or equivalent; simultaneous reg- 
istration, Secretarial Science 58. 

Rapid dictation of letters and general material. A study of special 
denomination*! forms and a large volume of practice work. Speed from 
i©e ro 120 words per minute. Four class hours per week. 

57. Shorthand Transcription First semester, one hour 

Prerequisite: Secretarial Science 14; simultaneous registration, Secre- 
tarial Science 55. 

A course in rapid transcription from shorthand notes including the 
proficient use of punctuation, spelling and capitalization. Transcription 
speed requirement 25 to 30 words a minute. Three hours laboratory 
per week. Fee, $3.00. 

58. Shorthand Transcription Second semester, one hour 

Prerequisite: Secretarial Science 57; simultaneous registration, Sec- 
retarial Science 56. 

Transcription speed 30 to 40 words per minute. Three hours labora- 
tory per week. Fee, $3.00. 

6l. Advanced Typewriting First semester, one hour 

Prerequisite: Secretarial Science 14, or two years of high school 
typewriting. 

Emphasis upon increasing speed and accuracy, special letter writing 
problems, tabulation, manuscript writing, office forms and stencil cutting. 
Three class hours per week. Fee, $6.00. 



Divisions of Instruction 71 

62. Advanced Typewriting Second semester, one hour 

Prerequisite: Secretarial Science 61. 

Special attention given to practice in preparing typewritten outlines, 
reports, theses, and bibliographies in accordance with acceptable standards 
of form and appearance. Also further training to increase speed and ac- 
curacy. Three class hours per week. Fee, $6.00. 

71. Secretarial Practice First semester, two hours 

Prerequisite: Ten hours of secretarial science, and permission of 
instructor. 

A study of office procedure, business ethics, telephone technique, 
office callers, and preparing reports, manuscripts, minutes of meetings, 
and itineraries. 

75. Business Machines First semester, one nour 

Prerequisite: Secretarial Science 13 and 14, or equivalent. 

The theory of and practice in the use of the following office ma- 
chines: Key and crank-driven calculators, full keyboard and ten-key 
adding listing machines; stencil, gelatin, and direct process duplicators; 
and switchboard. Three hours laboratory per week. Fee, $4.00. 

76. Business Machines Second semester, one hour 

Prerequisite: Secretarial Science 13 and 14, or equivalent. Secretarial 
Science 75 recommended. 

Development of skill in the use of office machines and equipment 
not used in Course 75. Three hours laboratory per week. Fee, $4.00. 

109-110. Advanced Dictation Both semesters, four hours 

Prerequisite: Twelve hours of Secretarial Science (including courses 
55 and 56, or equivalent). Must be enrolled concurrently in Secretarial 
Science 127-128. 

127-128. Advanced Transcription Both semesters, two hours 

Prerequisite: Twelve hours of Secretarial Science (including courses 
57 and 58, or equivalent). Must be enrolled concurrently in Sec- 
retarial Science 109-110. Fee, $3.00. 

*141. Office Management First semester, two hours 

Prerequisite: A major or minor in Secretarial Science. 

Problems involved in planning and directing the functions of business, 
professional, and denominational offices; executive duties and responsibili- 



*ProbabIy will not be given 1949-50. 



72 Southern Missionary College 

ties of the office manager, private secretary, and supervising stenographer; 
selection and training of office workers; selection and care of office equip- 
ment and supplies; office plans and specifications; routine procedures, 
such as reporting conferences, interviewing callers, and handling of the 
office mail. 

*174. Applied Secretarial Practice Second semester, three hours 

Prerequisite: For secretarial science majors and prospective teachers 
of business. 

This course is based on an activity program which provides practical 
experience in representative types of office situations. Particular attention 
is given to sources of information on business subjects; preparation of 
manuscripts, briefs, and reports; relation of the private secretary to the 
employer; job analyses; improvement of transcription; setting up office 
files; and supervision of correspondence. Ninety hours of actual office ex- 
perience are required. 

181. Secretarial Problems First semester, one or two hours 

Prerequisite: Open only to seniors majoring in secretarial science. 

II. EDUCATION, PHILOSOPHY AND PSYCHOLOGY 

T. W. Steen, Chairman 

James F. Ashlock Olivia B. Dean Roy L. Morgan 

Thyra E. Bowen Mary H. Dietel Bernice Pittman 

Theresa R. Brickman Dora L. Greve Ora S. Plue 

Betty Brooke Lois L. Heiser M. J. Sorenson 

Selma D. Bird H. H. Kuhlman Margaret M. Steen 

Geo. B. Dean H. A. Miller E. T. Watrous 

The purpose of this division is to aid in the training of teachers 
for elementary and secondary schools and to provide a general under- 
standing of educational work for those who plan to enter lines of service 
other than teaching. Opportunity is provided for directed teaching in the 
elementary and secondary schools with the regular instructors as super- 
visory teachers. 

Major Requirements. A major on the Bachelor of Science in 
Education curriculum may be earned in either elementary or secondary 
education. The requirements in each field are as follows: 

Major in Elementary Education. The courses in education included 
in the four-year elementary education curriculum. Sixteen hours of the 
major shall be chosen from courses in the upper biennium and shall 
include Education 171-72. Six hours of the upper biennium credit, in- 

*Probably will not be given 1949-50. 



Divisions of Instruction 73 

eluding two hours of credit in directed teaching, shall be earned in this 
college. No course with a grade of "D" may apply on the major. 

Major in Secondary Education. Twenty hours in education, including 
Education 16, 140, 165, and two courses chosen from Courses 141-161; 
six hours in psychology, including Psychology 72. Eleven hours of the 
major shall be in upper biennium courses, six hours of which, including 
Education 165, shall be taken in this college. No course which carries 
a grade of "D" may apply on the major. 

For a Bachelor of Science in Education with a major in secondary 
education, an arts and science major of twenty-six hours and an arts and 
science minor of sixteen hours are required. Eleven hours of the major and 
six hours of the minor must be upper biennium credit, of which six 
hours and three hours respectively, shall be taken in this college. 

Minor: A minor in education, requiring fifteen hours, applies as a 
second minor forT Bachelor of Arts degree. It shall include six hours 
of upper biennium credit, three of which must be earned in this college. 

EDUCATION 
General Courses 

16. Principles of Education Offered each semester, two hours 

A study of the fundamental principles of education as set forth in the 
books, "Education," "Counsels to Parents and Teachers," and "Funda- 
mentals of Christian Education." 

71. History of Education First semester, two hours 

A study of the chief educational ideals of mankind in relation to 
social and historical conditions, with emphasis on modern educational 
development. 

*107. Tests and Measurements First semester, two hours 

Methods of preparing, administering, and interpreting tests. 

133. Principles of Secondary Education First semester, two hours 

Prerequisite: Psychology 72. 
The development, scope, and function of secondary education. 

177. Curriculum Problems First semester, three hours 

A study of the foundation principles of curriculum construction, with 
practical work in building curricula in the elementary or the secondary 
field. 



*Probably will not be given 1949-50. 



74 Southern Missionary College 

178. Curriculum Workshop Second semester, three hours 

The purpose of this course is to provide facilities, materials, and 
guidance for groups and individuals working on problems in curriculum 
improvement. 

*179. Trends in Contemporary Education Second semester, two hours 

A course designed to give the student an understanding and apprecia- 
tion of present-day education. 

*180. Principles of Guidance Second semester, two hours 

A course designed to emphasize principles, methods, organization, 
and aims in the educational, vocational, and general guidance of 
students on the elementary and secondary level. 

186. School Administration Second semester, three hours 

Prerequisite: Education 133. 

A course which presupposes some acquaintance with problems of 
administration and supervision. An intensive study of the more important 
problems in constructive organization of education and the improvement 
of instruction. 

Elementary Materials, Methods, and Directed Teaching 

9. Children's Reading and Literature First semester, two hours 

It is the purpose of this course to give the student a survey of the field 
of children's literature, and to provide him with ample opportunity to 
observe the teaching of reading and literature in the elementary school. 

10. Teaching of the Language Arts Second semester, two hours 

Methods and materials used in the teaching of reading, spelling, hand- 
writing, and language usage in the elementary school. 

15. Technique of Teaching First semester, two hours 

A course designed to give the prospective teacher a working knowledge 
of the principles and procedures of teaching in an elementary school. 
Opportunity is given for observation in the training school. 
20. Mathematics for Elementary Teachers Second semester, two hours 

Thorough review of the fundamental processes of arithmetic; devel- 
opment of a mature understanding of arithmetic. 

23. School Health Problems First semester, two hours 

A study of health problems in the school and the community. Em- 
phasis on material and methods for health instruction in the elementary 
school. 



♦Probably will not be given 1949-50. 



Divisions of Instruction 73 

35, 36. Appreciation and School Music Two semesters, four hours 

A course designed to prepare teachers to direct the music activities in 
the elementary school. 

40. Directed Observation and Teaching One or two hours 

Prerequisite: At least one course in elementary methods. 

Observation of lessons taught by the supervisors, teaching of classes in 
the training school; study and measurement of children as individuals 
and in groups; conferences with the supervisors of directed teaching and 
with the director of elementary teacher training. Fee, $1.00. 

77. Teaching of Bible in the Grades First semester, two hours 

A study of subject matter and methods to be used in the teaching of 
Bible to children in the elementary grades. 

120. Teaching of the Social Studies Second semester, two hours 

This course will be based upon the textbooks and "units" used in the 
elementary school. Demonstrations and observation to accompany the 
study of the best methods of teaching geography, history, and civics. 
171-172. Directed Observation and Teaching 

Both semesters,, four hours. 

Prerequisite: Education 15 and at least two courses in elementary 
methods. 

The student teacher observes, participates in class acti/ities, assists 
pupils privately, makes lesson plans, corrects papers, assists in extracur- 
riculum activities, and engages in teaching under supervision. The mini- 
mum amount of actual teaching for four hours of credit is ninety clock 
hours. 

Secondary Materials, Methods, and Supervised Teaching 

140. General Secondary Methods Second semester, three hours 

Prerequisite: Education 16 and Psychology 72. 

Fundamentals of the theory and technique of teaching* Learning 
activities, nature and meaning of teaching, proper physical conditions of 
the classroom, group control, directing study, lesson planning, and. types 
of teaching procedure are considered. Particular attention is given to 
the development of the unit as a teaching procedure. Two hours lecture, 
three hours laboratory, per week. 

141. Methods of Teaching Bible First semester, one or two hours 

Prerequisite: A major or a minor in Bible. This course may be taken 
concurrently with Course J, 65. r 

Objectives and methods of teaching Bible in the secondary school. 



16 Southern Missionary College 

143. Methods of Teaching Secondary English 

First semester, one or two hours 

Prerequisite: A major or a minor in English. This course may be 
taken concurrently with Course 165. 

The content of courses, aims, and methods of teaching composition 
and literature. 

145. Methods of Teaching Modern Foreign Language 

First semester, one or two hours 

Prerequisite: A major or minor in a modern foreign language. 
This course may be taken concurrently with Course 165. 

Discussion of methods; observation of foreign language teaching 
in the secondary school. 

147. Methods of Teaching Home Economics 

First semester, one or two hours 

r Prerequisite: A major or minor in home economics. This course 
may be taken concurrently with Course 165. 

A study of methods, procedures, and organization of courses in 
home economics with particular emphasis on those on the secondary 
level. Should be taken in the first semester of the senior year. 

151. Methods of Teaching Commerce Either semester, one to three hours 

Prerequisite: This course may be taken concurrently with Course 165. 

A study of modern methods for the teaching of typewriting, short- 
hand, and bookkeeping "in secondary schools. One-third of the time 
to be devoted to teach each subject. A student may enroll for one hour 
credit by selecting any of the divisions of the course and meeting the 
prerequisite in the particular field chosen. 

153. Methods of Teaching Music First semester, one or two hours 

Prerequisite: A major in music, or permission of the instructor. 
This course may be taken concurrently with Course 165. 

Methods and principles of teaching music. Required of students 
majoring in music. 

15(7. Methods of Teaching the Social Sciences. 

First semester, one or two hours 

Prerequisite: Open only to students majoring or minoring in history 
or political science. This course may be taken concurrently with Course 
165. 

An intensive study of the principles and techniques in the teaching 
of social sciences in the modern secondary school. 



Divisions of Instruction 77 

159. Methods of Teaching Mathematics First semester, one hour 

Prerequisite: This course may be taken concurrently with Course 165. 

Aims, objectives, and methods of teaching mathematics in the 
secondary school. 

16 1. Methods of Teaching Natural Sciences 

First semester, one to three hours 

Prerequisite: A major or minor in biology, chemistry, or physics. 
This course may be taken concurrently with Course 165. 

Principles and methods of teaching science in secondary schools. 
A student may register for one field, to a maximum of two hours, 
provided he meets the prerequisite in the field. 

165. Supervised Teaching in the Secondary School 

Either semester, one to four hours 

Prerequisite: Satisfactory scholarship; Psychology 72, Education 
16, 140, and methods in the subject to be taught (the latter two courses 
may be taken concurrently with supervised teaching) . 

Teaching may be done in the secondary school in one or more 
of the following fields. Registration should be for the supervised 
teaching course, by number, followed by the letter designating the 
particular field in which the supervised teaching is to be done. 

a. Bible g. Music 

b. Bookkeeping h. Natural Science 

c. English i. Shorthand 

d. Home Economics j. Social Sciences 

e. Mathematics k. Typewriting 

f. Modern Foreign Language 

PHILOSOPHY 

*178. Philosophy of Religion Second semester, two hours 

Examination of the philosophical evidences of the authenticity and 
credibility of the Christian faith. 

*186. Philosophy of Education Second semester, three hours 

Principles, concepts, and problems of education, ancient and modern; 
consideration of the influence of social and historical conditions on educa- 
tion. 



♦Probably will not be given 1949-50. 



78 Southern Missionary College 

PSYCHOLOGY 

1, 2. General Psychology Both semesters, four hours 

An introduction to the study of the problems of human behavior, and 
of the mental processes and their development. The aim of the course is 
to acquaint the student with the fundamental laws on which the educative 
process is based, and to open to him the possibility of scientific education. 

4. Child Psychology Second semester, two hours 

A study of child life; methods of child study; outstanding types of 
differences observed in child development; development of interests; 
factors influencing normal personality development of children. 

72. Educational Psychology Second semester, three hours 

Prerequisite: Psychology 1 recommended. 

A study of psychology, with applications to the problems of teaching. 
Consideration of such topics as motivation, learning transfer, individual 
differences, and the measurement of achievement. 

115. Psychology of Adolescence First semester, two hours 

Prerequisite: Psychology 1 or 72. 

A study of adolescent behavior, leading to facility in understanding 
and teaching secondary school pupils. 

m. FINE ARTS 

Warold A. Miller, Chairman 

Olivia B. Dean ' ' Violetta M. Plue 

Eleanor Krogstad Wayne Thurber 

Norman Krogstad J. Mabel Wood - 1 

ART 

5. Fundamentals df- Drawing , 'First semester, one hour 

The principles of line; color,' arid [perspective; artistic arrangement in 
pictures; freehand drawing, sketching, charcoal work- and' pastels. Three 
hours .laboratory, .."•:•,../' w.,,: 5 .. .'■■-,■■• •■,••■■■'■ 

6. Beginning Oil Pointing ' ; ' ;,; Second' 'semester, one hour 

Landscape and still life painting; techniques of mixing colors and 
applying them to the canvas. Special emphasis placed on naturalness and 
reality in art. Three hours laboratory,., ; Fee,j2. 50. 



Divisions of Instruction 79 

12. Pottery Second semester, two hours 

An introduction to methods of using clay to create functional pottery. 
Mold making, decorating, glazing, and firing of kilns are studied. One 
hour lecture, two hours laboratory, each week. Fee, $3-00. 

31:32 Elementary Art Both semesters, two hours 

A course designed to aid the teacher in presenting art instruction 
in the grades. Topics: drawing, painting, color study, design, posters, 
finger painting, picture study. Three hours laboratory each week. Fee, 
$2.00 each semester. 

MUSIC 

The aim of this subdivision is to provide for the student an emotional 
outlet and a means of self expression through forms of beauty; to prepare 
him for living a fuller life individually, socially, or professionally. 

Major: A major in music requires thirty-six hours distributed as fol- 
lows: sixteen hours in theory; four hours in history of music; sixteen 
hours in one field of applied music. Sixteen hours of the major shall be 
in upper biennium courses, six hours of which shall be taken in this college. 
See "Piano Major Requirements" and "Voice Major Requirements" for 
further information. 

Students majoring in music are required to participate in ensemble 
music activities during at least two years. Education 16, 140, 153, 165, 
and Psychology 72 are required. 

If voice, organ, or violin is chosen as the applied music field for a 
major, the student must demonstrate sufficient pianistic ability to meet the 
entrance requirements outlined for the piano course. 

Minor. A minor in music consists of twenty hours, including eight 
hours in one field of applied music. A minimum of six hours of the minor 
must be in upper biennium courses, three of which shall be earned in this 
college. 

Electives in Music: Electives in music on any curriculum may not 
exceed ten hours, six of which may be in either theoretical or applied 
music; the applied music credit may include two hours of credit for par- 
ticipation in group music. 

A maximum of two hours for participation in music organizations may 
apply toward graduation from the various college curriculums. See 
"Applied Music" for additional information. 

Theory, History, and Appreciation 
1. Fundamentals of Music First semester, two hours 

Music notation; scale, interval, and chord construction; music terms; 
practical application of the above in sight-singing drill. 



80 Southern Missionary College 

16. Conducting Second semester, one hour 

Prerequisite: Music 1 or equivalent. 

Study and application of the principles of song leadership adapted to 
evangelistic and church music. 

33-34. Appreciation of Music Both semesters, two hours 

A listening course in directed hearing. A survey of the development 
of music, with emphasis upon an understanding and appreciation of the 
beauties of music in its various forms. This course is particularly adapted 
to the college student who wishes to be able to listen to music intelligently. 

45-46. Beginning Harmony Both semesters, six hours 

Prerequisite: At least one year of piano. 
Intervals, scales, triads, cadences, harmonizing melodies, etc. 

115. Evangelistic and Church Music First semester, two hours 

Discussion of appropriate church music and the better forms of evan- 
gelistic music. A study of hymns, specials, and appeal songs. 

11 6. Advanced Conducting Second semester, one hour 

Technique with and without baton, organizing choirs, testing voices, 
blending and balancing parts, etc. 

141-142. History of Music Both semesters, four hours 

A study of the development of music to present-day composition, with 
an examination of the influence of different composers on its growth. 

145-146. Advanced Harmony Both semesters, six hours 

Prerequisite: Music 45-46. 

Dominant sevenths, larger chord formations, harmonizing chorales, 
modulations, some original work. 

171. Counterpoint First semester, two hours 

Prerequisite: Music 45-46 and 145-146. 

The art of writing two or more melodies which, when combined, agree 
with each other. Reharmonization of Bach chorales and writing of two 
and three part inventions. 

172. Composition Second semester, two houn 

Prerequisite: Music 45-46 and 145-146. Music 171 advised. 

Melody construction, simple accompaniments, originals in the smaller 
forms. 



Divisions of Instruction 81 

Applied Music 

Applied Music Credit. For instruction in piano, voice, violin, 
organ, or other instrument, one hour of credit will be allowed for one 
lesson a week with five hours practice weekly for one semester; two hours 
of credit for two lessons each week with ten hours practice weekly for 
one semester. Applications for credit may^Be reviewed by the music 
committee. Semester examinations will be given on material covered. 

Participation in and attendance at student recitals, public and studio, 
will be considered a part of the regular work. 

A maximum of two hours of credit in music organizations may apply 
toward graduation; with the exception of credit for The Chapel Singers, 
not more than one hour may be applied from any one year. 

The following piano and voice requirements are not to be construed 
as outlines of a course of study, but merely indicate the comparative de- 
grees of advancement to be attained at the various stages of the course. 
These requirements correspond largely to those given in the approved 
curriculums of the National Association of Schools of Music. 

PIANO MAJOR REQUIREMENTS (MINIMUM) 

A. Requirements for Entrance: To enter the college curriculum 
for a major in piano the student should be grounded in correct touch 
and reliable technique. He should play all major and minor scales cor- 
rectly in moderate tempo, also broken chords in octave position in all 
keys, and should have acquired systematic methods of practice. 

He should have studied some of the standard etudes, such as Czerny, 
Opus 299, Book I; Heller, Opus 46 and 47 (according to the individual 
needs of the pupii) ; Bach, Little Preludes, and compositions correspond- 
ing in difficulty to Haydn, Sonata No. 11, G major No. 20 (Schirmer); 
Mozart, Sonata C major No. 3 (Schirmer) ; Beethoven, Sonata Opus 49, 
No. 1. He should be able to read at sight most of the hymns in the 
Church Hymnal. 

B. End of First Year: At the close of the first year the student 
should be able to play all major, minor, and chromatic scales, to the 
extent of two octaves, four notes to an eighty-four metronome beat; ar- 
peggios to the extent of two octaves, four notes to a sixty metronome beat; 
further work in Czerny, Opus 299. He should have studied compositions 
as difficult as the following: Bach, Arioso, several two-part inventions; 
Bach, K.E.P., Solfeggio in C minor; Beethoven, Minuet in E flat; Krause, 
Sonatas Opus 1, Nos. 2 and 3; also other compositions of approximately 
the same difficulty by standard composers. Regular assignments in sight 
reading will be made. 



82 Southern Missionary College 



C. End of Second Year: At the end of the second year the student 
should have acquired a technique sufficient to play scales and arpeggios 
in moderately rapid tempo, about four notes to a ninety-two metronome 
beat; to play scales in parallel and contrary motion, four notes to a sev- 
enty-two metronome beat. He should have acquired some octave tech- 
nique, and should have studied compositions as difficult as the following: 
Bach, other two-part inventions, and at least two preludes and fugues 
from "Eighteen Preludes and Fugues," edited by Buonamici (Schirmer); 
Beethoven, Adagio Sostenuto, from Opus 27, No. 2, and Andante from 
Opus 28; Haydn, Sonata in C major, No. 2 (Cotta ed.); Mozart, Fantasie 
in D minor; Mendelssohn, Songs Without Words, such as "Confidence," 
"Venetian Gondola Song" No. 1 and 2, and "Hope"; Schubert, Im- 
promptu, Opus 142, No. 2; Grieg, "Butterfly," Opus 43, No. 1, and 
"Notturno," Opus 54, No. 4; Chopin, Mazurkas, Opus 7, No. 2; Opus 
33, No. 4; Preludes, Opus 28, Nos. 1, 10, and 21; also other selections 
of equal grade by this composer. 

The student should be able to play compositions by modern composers, 
of comparable difficulty to the above selections, and should demonstrate 
his ability to read at sight simple accompaniments and compositions of 
medium grade. 

D. End of Third Year: At the end of the third year the student 
must have acquired a firmer grasp of those qualities which make for 
musicianship. He should be able to play all major and minor scales to 
the extent of four octaves, four notes to a metronome beat of one hun- 
dred eight, and arpeggios to the extent of four octaves, four notes to an 
eighty-eight metronome beat. He should have studied such pieces as 
Bach, other of the "Eighteen Preludes and Fugues" edited by Buonamici 
(Schirmer); Mozart, sonatas, or movements from sonatas, such as Sonata 
in G major, No. 2, or F major, No. 6 (Cotta ed.) ; Beethoven, appropriate 
movements from sonatas; Schubert, Impromptus, Opus 90, Nos. 2 and 3; 
Moment Musicales, Opus 94, Nos. 2 and 6; Chopin, mazurkas, waltzes, 
nocturnes, of appropriate grade. He should have had further exercise 
in sight-reading and accompanying by assisting in school functions. 

E. End of Fourth Year: At the end of the fourth year the student 
must have acquired the principles of tone production and greater velocity, 
and their application to scales, arpeggios, chords, octaves, and double 
notes. His list of studied pieces should include such works as Bach, 
still others of the "Eighteen Preludes and Fugues" edited by Buonamici 
(Schirmer) and several from "Well Tempered Clavichord"; Beethoven, 
sonatas, or movements from sonatas, such as Opus 2, No. 1; Opus 14, 
Nos. 1 and 2; Opus 10, No. 1; Haydn, Sonata in E flat, No. 3 (Schirmer); 
Sonata in D major; Mozart, Sonata No. 6, F major (Cotta ed.), or No. 
16, A major (Schirmer); Mendelssohn, Songs Without Words, such as 
"Spring Song," "Hunting Song," and others; Liszt, "Liebestraum," and 



Divisions of Instruction 83 

transcriptions such as "On Wings of Song" and "Du Bist die Ruh"; 
Schubert, Impromptu in B flat; Chopin, Polonaise C sharp minor, Valse 
E minor, Nocturne, Opus 9, No. 2; Nocturne F minor, Opus 55, No. 1; 
Nocturne B major, Opus 31, No. 1; Schumann, Nocturne F major, Fan- 
tasiestuecke, "Bird as a Prophet"; some compositions of corresponding 
difficulty by modern composers. 

The student should have acquired the ability to play at sight, accom- 
paniments of moderate difficulty and to provide acceptable piano support 
for congregational and evangelistic singing. 

VOICE MAJOR REQUIREMENTS (MINIMUM) 

A. Entrance Requirements: To enter the four-year curriculum for 
a major in voice, the student should be able to sing on pitch with correct 
phrasing and musical intelligence standard songs in good English (the 
simpler classics are recommended.) He should demonstrate a knowledge 
of the rudiments of music and his ability to read a simple song at sight. 
Some knowledge of th; piano will be necessary, as approved by the in- 
structor. 

B. For Completion of Four Year Curriculum. The student 
should have acquired a knowledge of breath support, of the principles of 
enunciation and pronunciation as applied to singing, and of the essentials 
of interpretation. He should demonstrate his ability to sing major, minor, 
and chromatic scales, arpeggios, contrasting exercises for agility and 
sustaining tone, and the classic vocal embellishments. He should dem- 
onstrate a knowledge of recitative, and the ability to sing several of the 
less exacting arias from oratorio and several standard songs from memory. 
He should also have acquired a knowledge of one language in addition 
to English. 

Organ One or two hours per semester 

Prerequisite: Pianistic ability, as approved by the instructor. 
Individual instruction. Since only one instrument is available, the 

number of students who can be accepted for organ lessons is limited. 

Piano One or two hours per semester 

Individual instruction. 

Piano Class One hour per semester 

Class instruction in piano. May be adapted to beginners. 

Voice One or two hours per semester 

Individual instruction. 



84 Southern Missionary College 

19, 20. Voice Class One hour per semester 

Adapted to beginners, emphasizing the underlying principles of sing- 
ing. A class for men and one for women will be made available. 

String or Wind Instruments One hour each semester 

Individual instruction. 
Orchestra One-half hour per semester 

Placement upon audition. 
Band One-half hour per semester 

Placement upon audition. 

Instrumental Ensembles One-half hour each semester 

Type of organization and personnel dependent upon available per- 
formers. 

Male Chorus One-half hour second semester 

Membership upon satisfactory audition. 
Women's Chorus One-half hour each semester 

Membership upon audition. 

The Chapel Singers One hour each semester 

Membership by individual audition. This group functions primarily 
as the church choir and makes an annual spring tour to churches off the 
campus. 

Oratorio Chorus First semester, one-half hour 

Presentation of the oratorio, The Messiah, near the close of the 
semester by a mixed chorus of selected voices. Open to all who can 
qualify by voice test. 

IV. LANGUAGES AND LITERATURE 

Elaine Giddings, Chairman 

Mary H. Dietel Maude I. Jones 

fRichard L. Hammill Don C. Ludington 

Ora S. Plue 

The objectives of this division are twofold: (1) through the 
courses in English and speech to develop in the student ease, confidence, 



•(■Absent on leave 1948-49. 



Divisions of Instruction 85 

and competence in the art of effective communication; to foster discern- 
ment of and appreciation for the best in books and people; and to 
stimulate the desire for personal growth, intellectual and spiritual; and 
(2) through the courses in foreign languages, prepare workers for foreign 
service by acquainting the student with the mechanics of a language; 
by laying a firm foundation for fluency and accuracy in reading, writ- 
ing, understanding, and speaking a foreign language; and by intro- 
ducing the student to the life, literature, ideals, customs, and culture 
of a foreign land; and to establish a practical and cultural background 
for travel and research, as well as for better understanding of the English 
language and of one's own environment. 

ENGLISH 

Major: A major in English requires twenty-six hours in addition to 
English 1:2, and shall include English 11 and 12; 41 and 42 or 151; 
111 or 122; 141, 147, 148; 161 or 162 and two hours in Speech. In 
addition, History 111, 115, or 116 should be elected. Eleven hours of the 
major shall be in upper biennium courses, six hours of which shall be 
taken in this college. No course with a grade of "D" may apply on the 
major. 

Minor: A minor in English requires fourteen hours above English 
1:2, and shall include English 11, 12, 41, and 42. The minor shall in- 
clude six hours of upper biennium credit, three hours of which shall be 
earned in this college. 

1:2. Composition and Rhetoric Both semesters, six hours 

An introduction to the use of the library, dictionary study — with parti- 
cular emphasis on vocabulary enlargement, the technique of the research 
paper, and a comprehensive survey of the principles of clear, accurate, 
and unlabored communication, both written and oral. 

*11. English Literature before 1800 First semester, two hours 

*12. English Literature after 1800 Second semester, two hours 

41. American Literature before 1850 First semester, two hours 

42. American Literature after 1850 Second semester, two hours 

53. Journalism First semester, two hours 

The theory and practice of writing up straight news, interviews, 
speeches, weather stories, publicity, and features in modern journalistic 
style. Reporting for The Southern Accent is encouraged. 



♦Probably will not be given 1949-50. 



86 Southern Missionary College 

54. Journalism Second semester, two hours 

Prerequisite: English 53, or high school journalism. 
Headline techniques, editing, make-up, and proof-reading. 

*111. Advanced Journalism First semester, two hours 

Entrance by permission of instructor. 

Practical experience in writing for denominational magazines, in 
handling church and school publicity in local newspapers, and in editorial 
work on The Southern Accent. Work must be accepted by at least two 
publications in addition to The Southern Accent. 

122. Creative Writing Second semester, two hours 

Practice in writing the short story, light verse, and simple dramatiza- 
tion, according to individual aptitudes. Writing for publication en- 
couraged. 

131. World Literature First semester, two hours 

Greek and Latin masterpieces, in translation, with reference to their 
bearing upon English and American literature. 

*132. World Literature Second semester, two hours 

Italian, French, and German classics, in translation. 

*141. Elizabethan Literature First semester, two hours 

A study of selected masterpieces of the period. 

*144. Milton and His Age Second semester, two hours 

The philosophy and ideals of the period as reflected by its major 
writers. 

147. The Romantic Movement First semester, three hours 
The triumph of individualism, imagination, and the heart in Words- 
worth, Keats, and others. A study of the Romantic Revival in relation 
to the contemporary scene. 

148. The Victorian Period Second semester, three horns 

Study of the prose of Carlyle and Ruskin, and the poetry of Tennyson, 
Browning, and their contemporaries. 

*151. Masters in American Literature First semester, three hours 

Study of the outstanding authors; oral reports and a research paper. 



*Probably will not be given 1949-50. 



Divisions of Instruction 87 



161. Biblical Literature First semester, two hours 

A study of the Bible with emphasis on its literary aspects including 
drama, lyric poetry, Biblical history, and epic. 

162. Biblical Literature Second semester, two hours 

A continuation of the study of the various literary types with stress 
on oratory, wisdom literature, prophecy, and rhapsody. 

In both semesters, careful attention will be given to form as related to 
interpretation. 

*174. English Grammar Second semester, three hours 

An intensive study of sentence elements, usage, syntax, and punctua- 
tion, designed especially for students planning to teach English. 

185. Contemporary Literature First semester, three hours 

Selections illustrating themes and styles of representative modern 
writers, American and English. 

193. Principles of Research First semester, one hour 

A study of the principles governing the selection of topics, the 
gathering and organization of materials, and the writing of a thesis. 

FRENCH 

Minor: A minor in French requires twelve hours above French 
11-12. It shall include six hours of upper biennium credit, three of which 
must be earned in this college. 

11-12. Beginning French Both semesters, eight hours 

A foundation course in grammar, pronunciation, and reading designed 
to develop the ability to read and understand easy French prose. Not 
open to one who has had two years of French in secondary school. 

13-14. Intermediate French c.-v, '. ■ ■ '.■ ■ . ;>! . : Both semesters, six hours 

Prerequisite* French \ 1-1 2 or two years of French in secondary school. 

Advanced grammar; intensive and extensive reading of moderately 
difficult French texts ;• oral and, wxitteixi exercises: i , ! ; . 



♦Probably will not be given 1949-50. 



88 Southern Missionary College 

*17-18. French Conversation and Composition, Both semesters, jour hours 

Prerequisite: French 13-14. 

Development of skill in speaking, understanding, and writing simple, 
idiomatic French. 

♦131-132. Survey of French Literature Both semesters, six hours 

Prerequisite: French 13-14. 

The history and development of French literature; reading of repre- 
sentative works; collateral reading and reports. 

*135. Fre'nch Phonetics and Diction First semester, two hours 

Prerequisite: French 13-14. 

Study of the international phonetic alphabet; reducing French selec- 
tions to phonetic symbols; drill in oral reading and memory work for 
mastery of French diction. 

♦136. French Civilization Second semester, two hours 

Prerequisite: French 13-14. 

Geography, history, and life of France. Lectures, research papers, 
reading of selected literary works and periodicals. 

GERMAN 

Minor. For a minor in German, twelve hours above German 21-22 
are required. The minor shall include six hours of upper biennium credit, 
three of which must be earned in this college. 

♦21-22. Beginning German Both semesters, eight hours 

A foundation course in grammar, pronunciation, and reading designed 
to develop the ability to read and understand easy German prose. Not 
open to one who has had two years of German in secondary school. 

23-24. Intermediate German Both semesters, six hours 

Prerequisite: German 21-22 or two years of German in secondary 

school. 

Advanced grammar; intensive and extensive reading of moderately 

difficult prose and poetry; oral and written exercises. 

♦27-28. German Conversation Both semesters, four hours 

Prerequisite: German 23-24. 

Development of skill in speaking, understanding, and writing simple, 
idiomatic German. 



♦Probably will not be given 1949-50. 



Divisions of Instruction 89 

♦141-142. Survey of German Literature Both semesters, six hours 

Prerequisite: German 23-24. 

History and development of German literature; reading of represen- 
tative works; collateral reading and reports. 

*146. German Civilization Second semester, two hours 

Prerequisite: German 23-24. 

Geography, history, and life of Germany. Readings, research papers, 
lectures. 

GREEK 

43-44. Elements of New Testament Greek Both semesters, six hours 

This course is designed to give students a working knowledge of 
New Testament Greek. 

45-46. Intermediate New Testament Greek Both semesters, six hours 

This course is a more advanced study for students able to read Greek 
with fair ability. 

151, 152. Greek Exegesis Each semester, two hours 

This course presupposes a working knowledge of New Testament 
Greek and is open only to those who have taken Intermediate New Testa- 
ment Greek. 



HEBREW 

*131-132. Beginning Hebrew Both semesters, six hours 

Prerequisite: Two years of Greek. 

The essentials of Hebrew grammar, vocabulary building, and read- 
ing; written assignments; drills in pronunciation, translation, and use of 
a concordance. 



LATIN 
*58. Latin Etymology Second semester, one hour 

A study of the Latin roots of many English words, as a basis for un- 
derstanding a technical vocabulary. 



♦Probably will not be given 1949-50. 



90 Southern Missionary College 

SPANISH 

Major: The requirement for a major in Spanish is twenty-six hours 
above Spanish 1-2 or equivalent. Fourteen hours of the major shall be in 
upper biennium credit, including six hours of upper biennium credit earned 
in this college. 

Minor: A minor in Spanish requires twelve hours above Spanish 1-2; 
it includes six hours of upper biennium credit, three of which must be 
earned in this college. 

1-2. Beginning Spanish Both semesters, eight hours 

A foundation course in grammar, pronunciation, and reading designed 
to develop the ability to read and understand easy Spanish prose. Not 
open to one who has had two years of Spanish in secondary school. 

3-4. Intermediate Spanish Both semesters, six hours 

Prerequisite: Spanish 1-2 or two years of Spanish in secondary school. 

Advanced grammar; intensive and extensive reading of moderately 
difficult Spanish texts; oral and written exercises. 

7. Spanish Conversation First semester, two hours 

Prerequisite: Spapisji 1-2 or equivalent. 

A course designed rtb develop ease aqd skill in speaking , and under- 
standing simple idiomatic Spanish. May be taken after, or concurrently 
with, Spanish 3-4. 

8. Spanish Conversation .? Second semester, two hours 

Prerequisite:. Spanish, il -2, or equivalent. » 

Practice and training in conversing in Spanish on a somewhat more 
advanced level than in Course 7, in that more originality is expected. 



Divisions of Instruction 91 

*101-102. Survey ,of Spanish Literature Both semesters., six hours 

Prerequisite: Spanish 3-4. 

An outline course in the history and development of Spanish literature; 
reading of representative works; collateral reading and reports. 

105-106. Survey of Spanish-American Literature 

Both semesters, six hours 

Prerequisite: Spanish 3-4. 

An outline course in the history and development of Spanish-Ameri- 
can literature; reading of representative works; collateral reading and 
reports. 

*111-112. Advanced Spanish Conversation and Composition 

Both semesters, four hours 

Prerequisite: Spanish 3-4, 7 and 8, or special permission based on 
scholarship. 

A course designed to prepare students for work in Spanish countries 
or for language teaching. 

*115-ll6. The Golden Age of Spanish Literature 

Both semesters, four hours 

Prerequisite: Spanish 101-102. 

A study of the classical period of Spanish literature, with appropriate 
readings and assigned topics. 

*119. Spanish Civilization First semester, two hours 

Prerequisite: Spanish 3-4. 

The geography, history, and life of Spain. Readings, research papers, 
lectures. 

*120. Spanish-American Civilization Second semester, two hours 

Prerequisite: Spanish 3-4. 

The geography, history, and life of Spanish-American countries. Lec- 
tures, readings, research papers. 



♦Probably will not be given 1949-50. 



92 Southern Missionary College 

SPEECH 

5. Fundamentals of Speaking First semester, two hours 

A beginning course in the practical problems of speaking and reading 
before audiences, audibly and conversationally. 

6. Public Speaking Second semester, two hours 

Prerequisite: Speech 5 or equivalent. 

Persuasive speaking approached through study of audience psychology, 
selected great speeches and sermons, and practice in composition and 
delivery. 

*115. The Short Speech Fir it semester, two hours 

Prerequisite: Speech 5 and 6, or permission of the instructor. 
Practice in the construction and delivery of short speeches for special 

occasions. 

*116. Persuasive Speech Second semester, two hours 

Prerequisite: Speech 5 and 6, or permission of the instructor. 
Study and practice in the art of persuasion through ethical, emotional, 

and logical appeal. 

132. Religious Broadcasting Second semester, two hours 

A study of microphone technique, radio voice and personality; the 
arranging and broadcasting of religious programs. Prerequisite: Speech 
5 and 6. Fee, $5.00 

*145. Oral Interpretation First semester,, two hours 

Practice in reading effectively selected passages for lecture and sermon 
help — Scripture, masterpieces of literature in poetry and anecdote, and 
great orations. 

151. Radio Speaking Either semester, thre-e hours 

Prerequisite: One speech course. 

Training and practice in all types of radio speech programs and 
techniques: extempore talks, round tables, announcing, interviews, and 
simple dramatizations. 

V. NATURAL SCIENCES AND MATHEMATICS 

G. J. Nelson, Chairman 

G. B. Dean E. I. Mohr H. H. Kuhlman 

BIOLOGY 

The courses in biology are intended to give the student fundamental 
and accurate information as a basis for the development of a sound 
scientific philosophy and as preparation for professional training. 

♦Probably will not be given 1949-50. 



Divisions of Instruction 93 

Major. A major in biology requires twenty-eight hours; it shall in- 
clude at least twelve hours or credit in upper biennium courses, six of 
which shall be earned in this college The major should include the follow- 
ing courses: Biology 1, and/or 2, 22, 45 and/or 46; 110, 164. (Biology 2 
does not count on a major if Biology 45 and 46 are taken.) Cognate 
courses suggested are Chemistry 1-2. No course with a grade of "D" may 
apply on the major. It is recommended that students majoring in biology 
take a minor is chemistry. 

Minor. A minor in biology requires eighteen hours; it shall include a 
minimum of six hours of upper biennium credit, three hours of which shall 
be earned in this college. 

1. General Biology First semester, three hours 

A study of biological principles and of the classification of the plant 
kingdom. Economic importance of the different types of plants is 
emphasized. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory each week. 
Fee, $6.00. 

2. General Biology Second semester, three hours' 

Consideration of biological principles as related to animal life. Study 
of typical members of each phylum in the animal kingdom. Two hours 
lecture and three hours laboratory each week. Fee, $6.00. 

11. Anatomy and Physiology First semester, three hours 

A study of the structural and functional relationships for correlation 
and co-ordination of internal activities of the human body. Three hours 
lecture, including demonstrations, each week. 

12. Anatomy and Physiology Second semester, three hours 

Further study of the structural and functional relationships for cor- 
relation and co-ordination of internal activities of the human body. Three 
hours lecture, including demonstrations, each week. 

22. Microbiology Second semester, jour hours 

A study of micro-organisms; their relation to the production of 
disease in man and their modes of transmission; methods used in specific 
prevention or treatment of disease. Three hours lecture and three hours 
laboratory each week. Fee, $6.00. 

45. General Zoology First setnester, four hours 

A study of the structure, physiology, habits, life history, and classi- 
fication of typical invertebrates. Three hours lecture and three hours 
laboratory each week. Fee, $6.00. 



94 Southern Missionary College 

46. General Zoology Second semester, four hours 

A study of the structure, physiology, habits, life history, and classi- 
fication of typical vertebrates. Three hours lecture and three hours labora- 
tory each week. Fee, $6.00. 

48. Mammalian Anatomy Second semester, two hours 

Prerequisite: Biology 45 and 46, or equivalent. 

The cat is studied as a typical mammal, with some reference made 
to other animals. One-half hour lecture and five and one-half hours 
laboratory work each week. Fee, $10.00. 

70. Nature Second semester, two hours 

This course is planned for those who wish to become more intelli- 
gently informed concerning the nature materials found in their environ- 
ment. The laboratory work consists of the study of birds, insects, flowers, 
and trees. One hour lecture and three hours laboratory per week. Fee, 
$6.00. 

*97. Field Botany First semester, alternate years, three hours 

Prerequisite: Biology 1 or equivalent. 

The aims of this course are: to develop a knowledge of plants in 
their natural habitats; to develop the use of botanical manuals, such 
as Gray's; and to acquaint the student with the more important principles 
of ecology. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory work each 
week. Fee, $6.00. 

99. Field Zoology First semester, alternate years, three hours 

Prerequisite: Biology 2 or 45 or equivalent. 

The purpose of this course is to develop an intelligent field knowledge 
of animals so that one can better understand the outdoor world. Field 
excursions will be made in the Collegedale area. Two hours lecture and 
three hours laboratory work each week. Fee, $6.00. 

*106. Plant Physiology Second semester, three hours 

Prerequisite: Biology 1 or equivalent. 

A study of the structure and functions of roots, stems, leaves, flowers, 
and fruits of some of the more common plants. Two hours lecture and 
three hours laboratory work each week. Fee, $6.00. 



♦Probably will not be given 1949-50. 



Divisions of Instruction 95 

107. Parasitology First semester, three hours 

Prerequisite: Biology 2, or 45, or equivalent. 

A general survey of the more important parasites of man and domestic 
animals. The course consists of lectures, recitations, and reports. Labora- 
tory work consists of practical recognition studies and certain clinical 
methods. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory per week. Fee, 
$6.00. 

109. Entomology Summer term, three hours 
Prerequisite: Biology 2, 45, or equivalent. 

This course introduces the student to the insects more important econo- 
mically in the household, on the farm, and their other important habitats. 
Laboratory work consists of field trips. A significant course for students 
preparing to teach in the elementary and secondary schools. Two hours 
lecture and three hours laboratory work each week. Fee, $6.00. 

110. Genetics Second semester, three hours 

Prerequisite: Biology 1 and 2 or equivalent. 

This course introduces the student to the more important laws of 
heredity and their application in the improvement of plants, animals, and 
human beings. Laboratory work is mainly with fruit flies. Two hours 
lecture and three hours laboratory per week. Fee, $6.00. 

*122. The Liverworts, Mosses, and Ferns Summer term, two hours 

Prerequisite: Biology 1 or equivalent. 

A course in which a student will become more familiar with the 
bryophytes and pteridophytes of this area. One hour lecture and three 
hours laboratory work each week. Offered summers only. Fee, $6.00. 

129. Plant Pathology First semester, three hours 

Prerequisite: Biology 1 or equivalent. 

A study of the common diseases of plants. Laboratory work stresses 
the study of plant diseases of this locality. One hour lecture and three 
hours of laboratory work each week. Fee, $6.00. 

145. Embryology First semester, three hours 

Prerequisite: Biology 2, or 45, or 46, or equivalent. 
A course designed to present the more important facts of human 

development based on a laboratory study of the embryology of the chick 

and the pig. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory work a week. 

Fee, $6.00. 



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96 Southern Missionary College 

*164. Human Physiology Second semester, three hours 

Prerequisite: Biology 11 and 12, or 45 and 46, or equivalent 

A study of the structure and functions of the human body. Three 
hours lecture per week. 

177. Micrology One or two hours, one hour a semester 

Prerequisite: Biology 1 and 2, or 45 and 46, or equivalent. 

A study of the various methods of killing, fixing, embedding, section- 
ing, staining, and mounting on slides, plant and animal tissues for 
microscopic study. Three hours laboratory work each week. Fee, $6.00. 

191 or 192. Problems in Biology 

Up to four hours, one or two hours a semester 

This course is for biology majors and minors only. Individual re- 
search work in some field of biology. Content and method of study to be 
arranged. 



CHEMISTRY 

It is intended in this subdivision to give students a practical and a 
cultural knowledge of this field of science, and to provide for the needs 
of those planning to become chemists or to enter professional training in 
medicine, dentistry, nursing, and related fields. 

Major: Thirty hours are required for a major. Thirteen hours of the 
major shall be upper biennium, including a minimum of six hours of 
upper biennium earned in this college. 

A minor in physics is recommended and mathematics through Calculus 
and Physics 1-2 are advised. 

Minor: A minor in chemistry requires twenty hours, including at 
least six hours of upper biennium credit, three of which shall be earned 
in this college. 



♦Probably will not be given 1949-50. 



Divisions of Instruction 97 

1-2. General Chemistry Both semesters, eight hours 

An introduction to the elements and their principal compounds; the 
fundamental laws and accepted theories of chemistry. Three hours lecture, 
three hours laboratory. Fee, $6.00. 

7-8. Survey of Chemistry Both semesters, six hours 

Prerequisite: High school chemistry is highly desirable. 

A survey course designed to familiarize the student with the basic 
principles of chemistry. Attention is given particularly to solutions, 
chemistry of nutrition, digestion, and metabolism. Especially helpful to 
prenursing students. Two hours lecture, three hours laboratory. Fee, $6.00. 

33. Qualitative Analysis First semester, three hours 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 1-2. 

A study of methods for the separation and identification of inorganic 
ions; analysis of several unknowns. One hour lecture, six hours laboratory 
per week. Fee, $6.00. 

53-54. Organic Chemistry Both semesters, eight hours 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 1-2. 

A survey of the aliphatic and aromatic compounds of carbon. The 
laboratory includes typical organic syntheses. Three hours lecture, three 
hours laboratory. Fee, $6.00. 

102. Quantitative Analysis Second semester, three hours 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 1-2. 

This course includes the study of typical volumetric and gravimetric 
methods, quantitative determinations of acidity, alkalinity and percentage 
composition of a variety of unknowns. One hour lecture, six hours lab- 
oratory. Fee, $6.00. 

121. Organic Qualitative Analysis First semester, three hours 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 53-54. 

Application of the classification reactions and specific properties of 
organic compounds in the identification of a number of substances. One 
hour lecture, six hours laboratory, per week. Fee $6.00. 



98 Southern Missionary College 

122. Organic Preparations Second semester, three hours 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 53-54. 

The course is designed to develop skill in the synthesis of representa- 
tive compounds. One hour lecture, six hours laboratory, per week. 
Fee, $6.00. 

XAA. Laboratory Glass Blowing Either semester, one or two hours 

Training is given in the manipulation of glass for the fabrication of 
laboratory apparatus. Three hours laboratory per week. Fee, $6.00. 

*151-152. Physical Chemistry Both semesters, six hours 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 102, Physics 1-2, Mathematics 1 and 2; 
calculus advised. 

A study of the facts, laws, theories, and problems relating to gases, 
liquids, solids, solutions, equilibrium, thermo-chemistry, ele,ctro-chemis : 
try, and atomic structure. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory. 
Fee, $6.00. 

HEALTH EDUCATION 

1. Health Principles for Nurses First semester, two hours 

Fundamental laws and principles of health and personal hygiene; the 
application of these principles in the daily living habits. This course is 
especially designed for the prenursing student. Credit is not allowed for 
this course if Health 4 is taken for credit. 

4. Health Principles Second semester, two hours 

This course is designed for the general college student. Fundamental 
principles of personal and community health; the application of these 
principles in daily living habits. Credit is not allowed for this course if 
Health 1 is taken for credit. 

5:6. Physical Education One-half hour per semester; 

maximum credit, two hours 

Fundamental principles governing the development and maintenance 
of a good physique; correction of certain anatomical defects prevalent 
among young people; wholesome recreation. Fee, $3.00. 



♦Probably will not be given 1949-50. 



Divisions of Instruction 99 

21. Safety Education and First Aid First semester, one bour i 

Study of accidents, their cause and nature; safety measures for the 
prevention of common accidents in home, school, industry, transporta- 
tion, and recreation. A Red Cross instructors' first aid certificate will be 
issued to each one completing the required work in first aid. Two hours 
laboratory per week. 

43:44. Games for Children Both semesters, one hour 

Open only to students enrolled in the elementary teacher training 
curriculum. Opportunity to assist in the organization and leadership of 
physical education activities and play periods in the elementary school. 
Certain periods will be devoted to discussion. 

62. Health and Hygiene Second semester, two hours 

The principles of healthful living; practical instruction in hydrother- 
apy and simple treatments in the care of the sick. One hour lecture, two 
hours laboratory, per week. Fee, $1.00. 

MATHEMATICS 

The objectives of this subdivision are to acquaint the student with the 
meaning, scope, methods, and content of mathematics, and to snow some 
of the relationships and contributions of this science to modern civiliza- 
tion and culture. 

Minor: Eighteen hours are required for a minor in mathematics. Six 
hours of the minor shall be from upper biennium courses, three hours of 
which shall be taken in this college. 

1. College Algebra ^ First semester, three hours 

Prerequisite: One year of high school algebra. 

The algebraic number system, including complex numbers; variations; 
rational functions of first, second, and higher degrees with geometrical 
interpretations; derivatives; maximum and minimum; theory of equations; 
partial fractions; linear systems and determinants; permutations, combina- 
tions, probability; conic sections; theory of exponents; exponentials; ap- 
plications to physics. 

2. Plane Trigonometry Second semester, three hours 

Prerequisite: Plane geometry. 

Trigonometric functions; solution of right and of oblique triangles by 
natural functions and by logarithms; graphic and analytic treatment of 
trigonometric functions; inverse and exponential functions; trigonometric 
identities and equations; applications to surveying, astronomy, mechanics, 
and navigation. 



100 Southern Missionary College 

3-4. Analytical Geometry Both semesters, jour to six hours 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 1. 

Rectangular, oblique, and polar coordinates; the relation between a 
curve and its equation; the algebra of a pair of variables, and the geometry 
of a moving point; straight lines; conic sections and certain otfo'r curves; 
lines, planes, and surfaces of revolution. Given on demand. 

v 

105. Differential Calculus FiM semester, jour hours 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 1. 

Infinitesimals; variation; differentiation of algebraic and transcen- 
dental functions; interpretation of the successive derivatives wrh appli- 
cations to physics; differentials; partial derivatives. Given on demand. 

106. Integral Calculus Second semester, jour hours 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 105. 

Integration of algebraic and transcendental functions; summation; 
geometrical and physical interpretation; series; successive integration; 
simple differential equations. Given on demand. 

*109. Advanced Algebra First semester, three hours 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 1 and 2. 

Discussion of advanced algebraical topics, including permutations and 
combinations, theory of equations, inequalities, mathematical induction, 
determinants, infinite series. 

*110. Differential Equations Second semester, three hours 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 105, 106. 
The ordinary differential equations and their applications. 

*170. Statistics Second semester, three hours 

Prerequisite: An understanding of algebra; college algebra recom- 
mended. 

A study of the technique of the collection of data and of the proper 
arrangement of the data for analysis; actual experience in chart making, 
and in determining averages, dispersion variation, and trends; considera- 
tion of various applications of statistics to business. 

Credit for this course does not apply on a mathematics major or minor. 



♦Probably will not be given 1949-50. 



Divisions of Instruction 101 



PHYSICS 

The courses in this subdivision are intended to present physics as a 
typical science, and to acquaint students with its relation to other sciences 
and with some of its applications to the fields of research, engineering, 
radio communication, medicine, and dentistry. 

Major: Twenty-eight hours, exclusive of Courses 3-4, are required 
for a major. Thirteen hours of the major shall be from the upper 
biennium, including a minimum of six hours of upper biennium credit 
earned in this college. Mathematics through Calculus is indispensable; a 
minor in mathematics is advised. 

Minor: A minor in physics requires sixteen hours exclusive of 
Courses 3-4. Six hours of upper biennium are required, three of which 
shall be taken in this college. 

1-2. General Physics Both semesters, eight hours 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 2. High school physics is advised. 

An advanced study of the mechanics of solids, liquids, and gases; 
properties of matter and its internal forces; wave motion and sound; heat; 
magnetism; electrostatics; current electricity; alternating current theory; 
communication; radioactivity; light. Three hours lecture, four hours 
laboratory per week. Fee, 6.00 each semester. 

3-4. Principles of Radio Communication Both semesters, six hours 

Prerequisite: High school physics. 

Fundamental electrical principles; alternating currents and high fre- 
quency; vacuum tube theory and design; fundamental vacuum tube cir- 
cuits; radio receiver theory and design; transmitter theory and design; 
test instruments; fundamentals of cathode ray television; wave funda- 
mentals and radiation; industrial and medical uses of vacuum tubes; relay 
applications. This course is not applicable on a minor in physics. Fee, 
$10.00 each semester. 

*51-52. Descriptive Astronomy Both semesters, four hours 

A descriptive course comprising a study of general topics, but with 
special emphasis on acquiring an understanding of the solar system. A 
ten-inch reflecting telescope is available for observation. Two hours 
lecture; observation hours arranged. Fee, $2.00. 



♦Probably will not be given 1949-50. 



102 Southern Missionary College 

*105. Analytical Mechanics First semester, three hours 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 105 and 106 advised. 

The principles of statics and dynamics are given from a mathematical 
viewpoint. Three hours lecture. 

115. Heat Either semester, three hours 

This course is a study of the laws of expansion, thermometry, change 
of state, transfer of heat, and laws of thermodynamics. Two hours lecture, 
three hours laboratory, per week. 

*122. Electricity and Magnetism Second semester, four hours 

Prerequisite: Physics 1-2, Mathematics 1 and 2. Mathematics 105 and 
106 advised. 

Principles of magnetism, direct current and alternating current elec- 
tricity, with applications of the principles studied. Three hours lecture, 
three hours laboratory per week. Fee, $6.00. 

133-134. Electronics Both semesters, four hours 

The theory and application of electronic devices, such as multi- 
element electron tubes, photoelectric cells and cathode-ray tubes and 
associated apparatus is given. One hour lecture, three hours laboratory, 
per week. 

141. Light Either semester, three hours 

The theory and application of the laws of refraction, reflection, inter- 
ference of light and related phenomena are given. Two hours lecture, 
three hours laboratory, per week. 

144. Laboratory Glass Blowing Either semester, one or two hours 

(Same listing as in Chemistry section) 

151-152. Physical Chemistry Both semesters, six hours 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 1-2, Physics 1-2, Mathematics 1 and 2, 
Calculus advised. 

A study of the facts, laws, theories, and problems relating to gases, 
liquids, solids, solutions, equilibrium, thermo-chemistry, electro-chemistry, 
and atomic structure. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory. 



♦Probably will not be given 1949-50. 



Divisions of Instruction 103 

172. Atomic Physics Either semester, three hours 

This course treats on the structure of the atom and the physical 
phenomena related to the subatomic particles. Three hours lecture per 
week. 



VI. RELIGION AND APPLIED THEOLOGY 

Charles E. Wittschiebe, Chairman 

James Franklin Ashlock f Richard L. Hammill 

Edward C. Banks Ora S. Plue 

Leif Kr. Tobiassen 
It is the purpose of this division to assist the student in understanding 
the value of religion in human experience; to inculcate a deep appreciation 
of the place of the Bible in discovering the true philosophy of life; to 
apply the teachings of Jesus to present-day problems; and to provide 
training for candidates for the ministry and for Bible teaching. 

Major in Religion for Theological Students: This major con- 
sists of thirty hours of credit in Religion. Religion 19 and 20, 61 and 62, 
are required. Courses in applied theology and any course with a grade of 
"D" do not apply on this major. Fifteen hours of the major shall be upper 
biennium credit, six of which (perferably the last six) shall be taken in 
this college. 

Related courses are required, as shown in the Ministerial curriculum 
in the section on "Degree Curriculums." 

Major in Religion for Non-Theological Students: This 
major requires thirty hours of credit in Religion (for candidates for a 
Bachelor of Science in Education, twenty-six hours). Credit for Ethics 
173 and 192 may apply on this major; any course in religion with a grade 
of "D", and courses in applied theology, do not apply. 

Of the thirteen hours of upper biennium credit required, six shall 
be earned in this college. 

Minor: A minor in Religion requires six hours in addition to the 
basic requirement; it shall include six hours of upper biennium credit 
(three earned in this college) and does not include credit in applied 
theology. 



•(■Absent on leave 1949-50. 



104 Southern Missionary College 



RELIGION 

1. Bible Survey First semester, three hours 

An introductory study of the Old Testament Scriptures, including 
their origin, development, and purpose. A survey is made of the history 
of God's chosen people from creation to the appearing of the promised 
Redeemer. This course is open to those who have not had Old Testa- 
ment History in the secondary school. 

2. Bible Survey Second semester, three hours 

A brief survey of the New Testament writings with special emphasis 
on the life and times of Christ. This course is open to students who have 
not had New Testament History in the secondary school. 

'5. Gift of Prophecy First semester, two hours 

A study of the Scriptural background of the Spirit of prophecy, its 
earliest revelations, its relation to the Hebrew race and to the rise and 
progress of the early Christian church. A survey of the manifestations 
of the Spirit of prophecy in the remnant church, and its relationship to the 
progress and development of the Seventh-day Adventist Church. 

19. Fundamentals of Christian Faith First semester, three hours 

A systematic and comprehensive study of the doctrines of the 
Christian religion. 

20. Fundamentals of Christian Faith Second semester, three hours 

A study of the Christian doctrines not considered in Course 19. 

61. Teachings of Jesus First semester, two hours 

A study of the life and teachings of Jesus, touching the vital points 
of faith and their practical application to the experience of the student. 

62. Teachings of Jesus Second semester, two hours 

A study of the life and teachings of Jesus as presented in the 
Gospels not studied in Course 61. 

101. New Testament Epistles First semester, three hours 

An exegetical study of the epistles of the New Testament, with 
attention to their authorship, historical background, purpose, and doctrinal 
teachings. 



Divisions of Instruction 105 

102. New Testament Epistles Second semester, three hours 

An exegetical study of Paul's prison epistles, dealing with the prob- 
lem and nature of sin and the doctrine of faith as a means of salvation, 

*115. Ancestry of the Bible First semester, two hours 

The development of the. English Bible is traced from the earliest 
known records and manuscripts to the latest versions. 

131. Old Testament Prophets First semester, three hours 

An exegetical study of the books of the major and minor prophets 
and the application of their messages to their own times, to the first 
advent, and finally to the present day. Consideration is also given to 
the lives of the prophets and the conditions and circumstances under which 
they wrote. 

132. Old Testament Prophets Second semester, three hours 

A further study of the writings of the Old Testament prophets with 
continued emphasis upon their historical and spiritual significance. 

155. Evidences of Christianity First semester, two hours 

A study of the evidence supporting the unique claims of Christianity 
in the fields of history, science, archaeology, social progress, and morality. 

165. Daniel First semester, three hours 

A study of the book of Daniel — authenticity, historical background, 
gospel message, apocalyptic character, Messianic prophecies, and relation 
to the book of Revelation. 

166. Revelation Second semester, three hours 

A study of the New Testament church in its world mission, as de- 
picted in the book of Revelation. 

194. Problems in Religion Second semester, one or two hours 

Content and method of study to be arranged. 

APPLIED THEOLOGY 

89- Principles of Personal Evangelism First semester, two hours 

Theory and practice in the development and presentation of Bible 
studies, with emphasis on soul-winning through individual contact. 



♦Probably will not be given 1949-50. 



106 Southern Missionary College 



90. Principles of Personal Evangelism Second semester, two hours 

Theory and practice in the development and presentation of Bible 
studies not considered in Course 89. 

107. Methods in Religious Instruction First semester, two hours 

A study of the relationship of personal workers to the church organi- 
zation and to public evangelism. Practice in the use of audio-visual aids 
(moving pictures, sound mirrors, public address systems, projectors, 
flannel-graphs, cutouts, etc.) as used in religious instruction. 

*111. Church Organization First semester, two hours 

A study of the organization of the Seventh-day Adventist church. 

119. Sermon Preparation and Delivery First semester, two hours 

• Prerequisite: Religion 19 and 20. 

A study of the preparation and delivery of sermons. Sermon out- 
lines and practice preaching are required. 

120. Sermon Preparation and Delivery Second semester, two hours 
Prerequisite: Religion 19 and 20. 

Further study of the preparation of sermons, with practice in preach- 
ing under supervision. 

126. Public Evangelism Second semester, two hours 

A study of plans and methods for reaching the public with the 
gospel message. Careful study will be given to the procedure in organizing 
and conducting a public evangelistic campaign. Laboratory field ex- 
perience will be given in connection with this course. Not open to one 
who takes Evangelism 128 for credit. 

128. Public Evangelism Summer, four hours 

This course is a more comprehensive consideration of the principles 
of evangelism studied in Course 126 and will be offered only in connection 
with a regular summer evangelistic campaign. Open for two hours credit 
only to one who has credit in Evangelism 126. 

*173. New Testament Ethics First semester, two hours 

A study of the moral requirements of Christianity, with a correlation 
of the teachings of Jesus and the Ten Commandments against the back- 
ground of faith and grace. 



•Probably will not be given 1949-50. 



Divisions of Instruction 107 

175. Pastoral Methods First semester, two hours 

Consideration of the pastoral work of the minister, including 
personal visitation, church administration, and his relationship to the 
various departments of the church. 

176. Public Worship and Special Service Second semester, two hours 

Consideration of the true philosophy of worship, the essential quali- 
fications for leadership in worship, and the place of worship. Detailed 
attention is given to such special services as weddings, baptisms, funerals, 
and the ordinances of the Lord's Supper. 

180. Mission Problems Second semester, two hours 

The purpose of this course is to acquaint the student with the prob- 
lems connected with foreign mission work and to assist him in qualifying 
for successful service in the field to which he may be called. Consideration 
is given to the methods and policies practiced by the mission boards. 

192. Seminar in Ethics Second semester, two hours 

Seventh-day Adventist standards are studied with particular emphasis 
on their relation to the general pattern of Protestant ethics. 



Vn. SOCIAL SCIENCES 

Floyd O. Rittenhouse, Chairman 

G. T. Gott Leif Kr. Tobiassen 

Dora Greve Everett T. Watrous 

Lois L. Heiser Leonard Woods 
M. T. Sorenson 

The objectives of the division of social sciences are to aid in the 
application of divine ideals to all human relationships; to foster an 
appreciation of true social and political culture, locally, nationally, and 
internationally; to develop an intelligent understanding of the relationship 
between history and Biblical prophecy; and to prepare teachers in the 
field. 

The purpose of the social studies is to lead the student into an under- 
standing of complex modern society and of how the providence of God 
has influenced its history, so as to enable him effectively to make an indi- 
vidual contribution toward preparing himself and mankind for the 
kingdom of God. 



108 Southern Missionary College 

Those looking toward teaching social sciences in the secondary school 
should acquaint themselves with the requirements for the certification of 
teachers and plan their course program so as to fulfill these requirements. 

Major: A major in history requires thirty hours. It shall include 
History 1, 2, 13, 14, and 184, and may include six hours of upper 
biennium political science credit. Thirteen hours of the major must be in 
upper biennium courses, six of which shall be earned in this college. 

Credit in English 193 is required of those majoring in history. 

Minors: For a minor in history twenty hours are required, including 
History 1, 2, 13j and 14. Six hours of the minor, which shall be chosen 
from the upper biennium, may include three hours of upper biennium 
political science credit. Three hours of upper biennium credit shall be 
earned in this college. 

A minor in political science requires twenty hours, including Political 
Science 15 and Sociology 20. Of the six hours of upper biennium credit 
required in the minor, three hours may be history. Three hours of the 
upper biennium credit shall be earned in this college. 

A minor in Economics requires 18 hours of which six hours must 
be upper biennium credit. 

i ECONOMICS 

11. Economic Resources First semester, three hours 

A study of the world-wide distribution of economic goods. Manu- 
facturing centers and the sources of raw materials will be considered in 
the light of their international economic importance. 

42. Household Economics Second semester, two hours 

A course dealing with the problems of the consumer in relation to 
present economic conditions, and the relationship of the buyer to the 
problems of production, distribution, and consumption. 

46. Business Law Second semester, three hours 

A survey of the principles of law governing business transactions. 
Topics considered include contracts, negotiable instruments, sales, agency, 
landlord and tenant, bailments, partnerships, corporations, and real 
and personal property. 

51. Principles of Economics First semester, three hours 
A survey course in the fundamentals of economics: the institutions, 

forces and factors affecting production, evaluation, exchange and distri- 
bution of wealth in modern society. 

52. Principles of Economics Second semester, three hours 
Prerequisite: Economics 51 recommended. 

Introduction to labor economics; the principles of consumption and 
saving; government financing; comparative study of economic systems. 



Divisions of Instruction 109 

*130. Marketing Second semester, three hours 

Prerequisite: Economics 51 and 52 recommended; or junior standing. 

A detailed study of exchange problems. The problems of distribution 
will be analyzed both from the viewpoint of the producer and consumer. 
The usual topics of assembling, grading, sorting, transporting, financ- 
ing, and selling goods, and risk assumption will be given consideration. 

140. Advertising Second semester, two or three hours 

Salesmanship principles as applied to advertising; analysis and prepara- 
tion of various types of advertisement; scheduling of advertisements; 
principles of advertising campaign organization. 

Attendance will be the same whether taken for two or three hours. 
The difference will be in laboratory material required. 

*151. Applied Economics First semester, three hours 

Prerequisite: Economics 51 and 52. 

A study of the application of economic principles to the problems of 
economic life; analysis of present economic institutions leading to sugges- 
tions for a reconstruction program. 

*166. Money [and Banking Second semester, three hours 

A study of the classical theories of money and its function as ex- 
change media and a standard of value; banking technique and the stabiliz- 
ing effect of banks in our national economy. 

*179. Business Finance First semester, three hours 

Business and public expenditures; revenues and credit; taxation prin- 
ciples and methods; proposed suggestions for reconstruction of finance 
policies. 

181. Advanced Economic Theory First semester, two hours 

Prerequisite: Economics 151. 

A comparative analysis of the principal comprehensive plans of social 
organization, such as liberalism, fascism, etc.; consideration of the theories 
of the classical economists, the principles of economic planning for gen- 
eral welfare, and the principles of democracy. 

*184. Business Management Second semester, two hours 

Prerequisite: Senior standing or permission of the instructor. 

A survey course in the organization and management of a business 
enterprise. Study is given to the production and marketing of a product; 
the financing of a business; the control of a business through budgets; 
the analysis of accounting data. 

♦Probably will not be given 1949-50. 



110 Southern Missionary College 

195. Seminar in Business Administration One or tiMo hours 

Prerequisite: Open only to seniors majoring in business administra- 
tion. 

A comprehensive survey of the major field, with reports and discus- 
sions on special assigned problems. A thesis may be required. 

The maximum credit of two hours may be earned in one semester, 
or may be divided equally between the two semesters. 

GEOGRAPHY 

41. Principles of Geography First semester, three hours 

A beginning course in geography giving attention to maps, land 
forms, soil and mineral resources, weather and climate and climatic 
regions. Special emphasis on the physiographic regions and man's adjust- 
ment to them. 

42. Geography of a Continent Second semester, three hours 

A survey course on one of the continents as a whole followed by an 
analysis of the geographic aspects of each of its countries. Approximately 
one third of the time will be spent on general geographic principles and 
world geography in their relation to the particular continent under 
study. 

HISTORY 

1. Survey of Civilization First semester, three hours 

A general study of the various factors influencing the development of 
human civilization from creation to the beginning of modern times. 

2. Survey of Civilization Second semester, three hours 

A general study of the factors responsible for modern civilization, 
stressing its religious, social, political, cultural, and economic aspects. 

6. Denominational History Second semester, two hours 

A survey of the rise and progress of the Seventh-day Adventist 
church. Responsible factors, such as the objectives, philosophy, and policies 
of the denomination, are examined. 

13. American History, 1492-1865 First semester, three hours 

A study of the economic, social, literary, and spiritual forces that 
influenced the formation of the character of the American people and 
shaped their political institutions and activities. 



Divisions of Instruction 111 

14. American History, 1865-1947 Second semester, three hours 

Reconstruction; political parties; social and economic trends; World 
War I and its aftermath; the New Deal; World War II. 

*80. History of Missions Second semester, two hours 

A survey of the work and progress of Christian missions from the 
apostolic age to the present time. Consideration is given to the pioneers 
of the great modern missionary movement which began about the year 
1800, and special emphasis is placed upon the world-wide missionary 
program of Seventh-day Adventists. 

*111. History of the Renaissance First semester, two hours 

Prerequisite: History 1 and 2, or equivalent. 

An analysis of the movements that carried civilization forward from 
medieval times into the modern era, preparatory to the great Reformation 
and the revolutions of later times. 

*112. History of the Reformation Second semester, two hours 

Prerequisite: History 1 and 2, or equivalent. 

An intensive study of the causes and the course of the great Protestant 
revolt against the Catholic church, and the Counter Reformation. 

115. The Revolutionary Era First semester, three hours 

Prerequisite: History 2, or equivalent. 

An analysis of the religious, social, political, cultural, and economic 
movements during the revolutionary period 1789-1815. 

116. Nineteenth Century Europe Second semester, three hours 
Prerequisite: History 2, or equivalent. 

Political and social developments in Europe 1815-1918, in their world 
setting, are studied in the light of Biblical prophecy. Cultural, economic, 
and religious aspects are critically analyzed. 

131. History of Antiquity First semester, three hours 

Prerequisite: History 1, or equivalent. 

A study of the ancient nations, Babylonia, Assyria, Egypt, Persia, and 
Israel, to provide the historical background for an intelligent understand- 
ing of" the Old Testament. 



•Probably will not be given 1949-50. 



112 Southern Missionary College 

*132. History of the Classical World Second semester, two hours 

Prerequisite: History 1, or equivalent. 

A consideration of Greek culture, of Alexander's Hellenistic empire, 
of Roman institutions, and of the impact of Christianity upon the ancient 
world. 

*l4l. World Religions First semester, two hours 

A study of the founders, historical setting, basic teachings and rituals, 

of existing religions; emphasis upon the needs of the non-Christian world. 

145. History of Latin America First semester, two hours 

Prerequisite: History 13. 

A survey of the colonial period; an intensive study of the rise of the 
various Latin-American nations, and of their world relationships and 
present problems. 

146. History of Latin America Second semester, two hours 

Prerequisite: History 14. 

The Latin-American republics, with special attention to Argentina, 
Brazil, Chile, and Mexico. 

151. Ancient and Medieval Christianity First semester, three hours 

Prerequisite: History 1, or equivalent. 

A survey of movements in the Christian church from apostolic days to 
the modem era. Doctrines and personalities are analyzed in the light of 
Biblical teachings. 

152. Modern Christianity Second semester, three hours 

Prerequisite: History 2, or equivalent. 

A study of the reformatory movements in various countries and the 
development of the modern religious situation. Special attention given to 
present-day problems. 

*154. History of Religion in America Second semester, two hours 

Prerequisite: History 2 and 152. 

A survey of American religious movements and their interrelationships 
with social, cultural, and political forces. Special attention given to recent 
developments toward federation, the expansion of Catholicism, and prob- 
lems of religious freedom. 

184. Seminar in History Second semester, one hour 

Prerequisite: English 193. Open only to majors in history. 
Problems of historical research, materials, and methods. 



♦Probably will not be given 1949-50. 



Divisions of Instruction 113 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 

15. American Constitution and Government First semester, two hours 

Colonial charters; the making, ratification, and further development 
of our federal constitution. 

127. Problems of World Politics First semester, three hours 

Prerequisite: History 1 and 2, or 13 and 14, or equivalent. 

An intensive study of world politics 1918-1948, analyzing the forces 
that determined recent world conditions in the religious, political, eco- 
nomic, cultural, and social fields. Special study will be given to the forma- 
tion and progress of the United Nations. 

*140. United States Foreign Relations Second semester,, three hours 

Prerequisite: History 1 and 2, or 13 and 14, or equivalent. 

A detailed study of the foreign policies of the United States which 
have guided our international relations during particular periods of our 
history. 

*162. Contemporary International Relations Second semester, three hours 

Prerequisite: History 1 and 2, or 13 and 14, or equivalent. 

A critical analysis of the chief factors influencing present-day affairs, 
with emphasis on the ideological and religious backgrounds to current 
events. Special study will be given to international problems of religious 
freedom and missions advance. 

SOCIOLOGY 

17. College Problems First semester, one hour 

Principles of learning, social standards, vocational guidance, adjust- 
ment to a college environment. Required of first-year college students. 

*20. Sociology - Second semester, three hours 

A study of such important aspects of American society as the family, 
races, religious groups, industry, and education. 

31. Social Aspects of Nursing First semester, two hours 

This course is intended to acquaint the student with the social respon- 
sibilities of the nursing profession. It includes history of nursing and con- 
sideration of contemporary movements in the nursing profession. 



♦Probably will not be given 1949-50. 



114 Southern Missionary College 



32. Social Aspects of Nursing Second semester, one hour 

A study of the basic concepts of sociology as related to the nursing 
profession and to the community as a whole. 

132. Child Care and Development Second semester, two hours 

Physical, mental, and social devolpment of the child, with emphasis 
on problems of dealing with children and training in child guidance. 



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Expenses 



Each student entering college, after having met the full financial and 
labor requirement, has actually covered only a part of the full cost of his 
instruction and maintenance. The operating deficit is covered by gifts, 
subsidies, and funds from other sources. The educational opportunity 
afforded each student in Southern Missionary .College represents a large 
investment in buildings and equipment, averaging more 'than two thou- 
sand dollars for each student enrolled. 

ROOM DEPOSIT 

Dormitory rooms may be reserved by mailing a $5.00 room deposit to 
the Secretary of Admissions at the college between May 1 and September 
1. This deposit will appear as a credit on the first statement of the first 
semester. 

In case the student's application is not accepted, or if notice of non- 
attendance is given the college by August 1, the room deposit will be 
refunded at once by check. 

ADVANCE DEPOSIT AND MATRICULATION FEE 
Both Due on Registration Day 

Dormitory Non-boarding Community 

Advance Deposit $50.00 $35.00 $25.00 

Matriculation Fee 12.00 12.00 12.00 

Advance Deposits are expected of all students including veterans 
whose total charges from the college are not covered by the G. I. Bill of 
Rights. 

The advance deposit is charged only once during the year, and is 
payable on or before the date of registration. It will be credited on the 
final statement of the school year, or at the time of withdrawal. 

The matriculation fee includes the fees for library, lyceum, school 
paper, and year book, and is charged each semester. It is not refundable, 
except in case of withdrawal within the first two weeks of the semester, in 
which case one-half will be refunded. 

For a married couple, each enrolled for eight hours or more of school 
work, the regular advance deposit and matriculation fee will be required 
from each. For a combined total of fifteen semester hours or less, the 
charge will be the same as for one person. 

Students registering for music only are not required to pay any advance 
deposit or fees, except as specified under "Music." 



Expenses 117 

COLLEGE TUITION CHARGES 

1 Semester Hour $11.00 10 Semester Hours 110.00 

2 Semester Hours 22.00 11 Semester Hours 121.00 

3 Semester Hours 33.00 12 Semester Hours 125.00 

4 Semester Hours 44.00 13 Semester Hours 129.00 

5 Semester Hours 55.00 14 Semester Hours 133.00 

6 Semester Hours 66.00 15 Semester Hours 137.00 

7 Semester Hours 77.00 16 Semester Hours 141.00 

8 Semester Hours 88.00 17 Semester Hours 145.00 

9 Semester Hours 99.00 18 Semester Hours 149.00 

These charges are made in four equal installments for each semester, 
monthly, beginning with the statement for October. 

It is assumed to be the earnest purpose of each student to secure 
an education, and since even those working their entire way have 
time for as much as one-half of a full class load, each student is urged to 
carry at least that much school work. Except by permission of the ad- 
ministrative council, the minimum course load a residence hall student 
may carry is eight hours. 

A full-time student in any one semester is defined as one who is 
registered for a course load of twelve hours for that semester. 

Private work is discouraged, and no credit will be given for it unless 
satisfactory arrangements have been made in advance with the College 
Dean. The charge for private work is the same as for the regular tuition, 
plus tutoring fee. 

Tuition charges terminate only upon presentation of a drop voucher 
obtained at the registrar's office. A proportionate charge will be com- 
puted as of the end of the week in which the drop voucher, recommended 
by the student's adviser, is filed at the registrar's office. 

Students entering late will be charged tuition from the beginning of 
the semester, unless they have been attending school elsewhere to the time 
of their enrollment and no make-up work is necessary. One week will be 
allowed at the beginning of each semester for a change of program with- 
out charge. The regular charge is $2.00. A late registration fee of $5.00 
is charged a student who registers later than the registration days. 



118 Southern Missionary College 



MUSIC TUITION AND RENTALS 

The charge for any private music instruction is $24.00 per semester, 
or $48.00 for the year, for one lesson per week. This charge is made in 
eight installments of $6.00 each, in the same manner as the regular 
tuition. In addition to private instruction in voice, classes of from two to 
five students are arranged at a cost per student of $18.00 per semester. 
All students who wish to take music must enroll for it at the registrar's 
office. There are no refunds for specified vacation periods or lessons 
missed because of the student's absence. 

Students who enroll late, or who withdraw before the end of the 
semester, are charged at the rate of $1.60 per week up to a maximum of 
$24.00 for one lesson a week. Withdrawal is made by means of a drop 
voucher obtained at the registrar's office. 

MUSIC FEES 

Per Semester 

Band, choir, chorus, and orchestra $2.50 

(When taken for credit, tuition is extra) 

Piano rental for piano students, one hour per day 6.00 

two hours per day 10.00 

Piano rental for voice students, one hour per day 4.00 

two hours per day 7.00 

Instrument rental (band and orchestra) 5.00 

Per Month 
Pipe organ rental, one hour per day $7.00 

SEMESTER FEES 

Agriculture Mammalian Anatomy $10.00 

Landscape Art $3.00 Microbiology 6.00 

Vegetable Gardening 3-00 Micrology 6.00 

Art Nature 6.00 

Elementary Art 2.00 Parasitology 6.00 

Beginning Oil Painting .... 2.50 Plant Pathology 6.00 

Pottery 3.00 Plant Physiology 6.00 

Biology Chemistry 

Biology, General 6.00 General Chemistry 6.00 

Embryology 6.00 Laboratory Glass Blowing 6.00 

Entomology 6.00 Organic Chemistry 6.00 

Field Botany 6.00 Organic Preparations 6.00 

General Zoology 6.00 Organic Qualitative 

Field Zoology 6.00 Analysis 6.00 

Genetics 6.00 Physical Chemistry 6.00 

Liverworts, etc 6.00 Survey of Chemistry 6.00 



Expenses 



119 



Qualitative Analysis $6.00 

Quantitative Analysis 6.00 

Education 

Directed Observation and 

Teaching 40 1.00 

Health Education 

Physical Education 5, 6 .... 3.00 

Health and Hygiene 1.00 

Home Economics 

Advanced Cookery 8.00 

Clothing 2.50 

Dress Design and 

Construction 2.50 

Foods and Cookery 8.00 

Interior Decorating 3.00 

Practical Arts 5.00 

Practical Cookery 8.00 

Industrial Arts 

Architectural Drawing .... 6.00 

Adv. Arch. Drawing 6.00 

Adv. Mech. Drawing 6.00 

Auto Mechanics 6.00 

Electric and Acetyl. Weld. 6.00 

Field Problems 6.00 

Welding 6.00 

General Woodworking .... 6.00 

Household Mechanics 4.00 

Instrumental Drawing .... 6.00 

Linotype 5.00 



Machine Shop $4.00 

Mechanical Drawing 3.00 

Printing 3.00 

Struct, and Finish Carp. .. 6.00 

Physics 

Descriptive Astronomy .... 2.00 

Electricity and Magnetism 6.00 

Electronics 6.00 

General Physics 6.00 

Heat 6.00 

Light 6.00 

Principles of Radio 

Communication 10.00 

Secretarial Science 

Business Machines 4.00 

Filing 3.00 

Typing 13, 14, 61, or 62 6.00 
Transcription 57, 58, 127, 

or 128 3.00 

Voice Transcription 3-00 



Speech 

Religious Broadcasting 



5.00 



Theology 

Use of Equipment (Lower 
Division Students) 1.00 

Use of Equipment (Upper 
Division Students) .... 2.00 



These fees are charged on the basis of the student's program as of the 
beginning of each semester (allowing one week for program changes without 
charge). These fees are not refundable after one week has passed. Unavoidable 
cases of program changes may be considered and special refund allowed by the 
Dean of the College, but a minimum charge of $1.00 shall remain even in 
such cases. 

DIPLOMA FEES 

The fee for a degree diploma is five dollars; that for a diploma from 
any of the two-year curriculums is four dollars. 

BOARD CHARGES 

The cafeteria plan of boarding is used, which allows the student the 
privilege of choosing his food and paying only for what he selects. The 
minimum monthly charge for dormitory students is $17.00. This covers a 



120 Southern Missionary College 

full calendar month. The average costs run higher than these figures, total- 
ing around $210.00 per year for women and $280.00 for men. 

No allowance is made for absence from the campus except for speci- 
fied vacations of one week or more, and in cases of emergency. Three 
meals a day are served. Students living in the school homes are expected 
to take their meals in the dining room. 

DORMITORY RENT AND LAUNDRY 

A room charge of $16.50 per calendar month is made to each student 
residing in a school home. This charge provides for steam heat, light up to 
150 watts, medical service (as specified below), and laundry not exceed- 
ing $2.00. On this basis, two students occupy one room. If three occupy 
one room, the charge is reduced to $14.50 per month. The rate for 
rooms in the new additions to the dormitories, with private bath, is 
$18.50 for each student. No refund is made because of absence from the 
campus either for regular vacation periods or for other reasons. If the 
laundry charge exceeds $2.00 per month, the excess will be added. 

MEDICAL SERVICE 

The medical care provided through the room charge includes dis- 
pensary service and general nursing care not exceeding two weeks. An 
extra charge of ten cents per tray is made each time tray service is re- 
quired. There will also be an extra charge for calls by a physician and 
special nursing care. Medical services provided to other than dormitory 
residents will be charged according to the service rendered. 

All prospective students should have their eyes tested by a competent 
oculist, and have any necessary dental work cared for before entering 
school. 

TITHE AND CHURCH EXPENSE 

Southern Missionary College encourages the payment of tithe and 
church expense by its student workers. In order to facilitate this practice, 
arrangements are made for students to have charged to their accounts ten 
per cent of their school earnings for tithe, and two per cent for church 
expense. These funds are then transferred by the college to the treasurer 
of the Collegedale S. D. A. Church. 

FUND FOR PERSONAL EXPENSES 

Students should be provided with sufficient funds, in addition to 
money for school expenses, to cover cost of books, clothing, and all personal 
items. They may open deposit accounts at the business office, subject to 
withdrawal in person only, and these funds are available at any time, as 
long as there is a credit remaining of what the student has deposited. 



Expenses 121 

These deposit accounts are entirely separate from the regular students' 
expense accounts. 

Purchases from the college store or from othej departments on the 
campus are made only by cash. At the beginning of each semester, a 
student may purchase from the business office a store voucher which may 
be used at the store for the purchase of books and school supplies only. 

PAYMENT OF ACCOUNTS 

Statements will be issued to students as of the last day of each 
calendar month, covering the month's expenses and credits. 

The college board has made the costs as low as is consistent with 
educational efficiency. The school, therefore, must expect prompt payment 
of all accounts. Failure in this respect may terminate a student's connec- 
tion with the school. 

Transcripts of credits and diplomas are issued only when students' 
accounts are paid in full. 

Post dated checks are not acceptable. 

STUDENT LABOR REGULATIONS 

Believing in the inspired words that "systematic labor should consti- 
tute a part of the education of youth," 1 Southern Missionary College has 
made provision that every student enrolled may have the privilege of 
organizing his educational program on the "work-study" plan. "Jesus 
the carpenter, and Paul the tent-maker, . . . with the toil of the craftsman 
linked the highest ministry, human and divine." 2 The college not only 
provides a work-study program, but strongly recommends it to each stu- 
dent enrolled. 

Inasmuch as the student's labor constitutes a part of his education, 
participation in the work program is graded, and a report issued to him. 
This grade is based upon the following: 

Interest Integrity Initiative 

Leadership Dependability Comparability 

Punctuality Cooperation Efficiency 

A record of vocational experience and efficiency is also kept, by se- 
mesters, for each student in which is listed the type of work in which he 



1 Ellen G. White, Fundamentals of Christian Education, p. 44, Nashville, 

Tennessee, Southern Publishing Association, 1923. 

2 Ellen G. White, Education, p. 217, Mountain View, California, Pacific Press 

Publishing Association. 1903. 



122 Southern Missionary College 

has engaged and his degree of efficiency. This information will be avail- 
able for potential employers. 

The college will assign students to departments where work is avail- 
able and cannot shift students from one department to another merely 
upon request. It should be understood that once a student is assigned to 
work in a given department, he will remain there for the entire school 
year except in rare cases where changes are recommended by the school 
nurse, or are made at the discretion of the college. 

Should a student find it necessary to be absent from work, he must 
immediately make arrangements with his work superintendent. In cases 
of illness, he will also inform the health service. Any student who drops 
his regularly scheduled work without proper arrangements with his work 
superintendent will be suspended from class attendance until he returns 
to work or is excused therefrom. 

SCHOLARSHIPS 

Colporteur Scholarships. For the encouragement of colporteurs, 
the college, together with the local conference, Book and Bible House, and 
publishing house, offers a very liberal scholarship bonus. 

No additional regular cash discounts are allowed in cases where a 
colporteur scholarship bonus is granted. 

In order to qualify for this scholarship, a man needs to spend in 
the colporteur work a minimum of 400 hours; a woman, 350 hours. 
Through the benefits of a colporteur scholarship, it is possible for a 
college student to meet the cash requirement of Plan I by selling only 
$1030.40 worth of subscription books. 

Cash earnings (50% of sales shown above) $515.20 

Scholarship bonus 220.80 

Total cash requirement 736.00 

This covers the following items of school expense for students 
residing in the dormitory: 

Matriculation, two semesters 24.00 

Tuition, sixteen hours 282.00 

Room, laundry, medical service, etc 150.00 

Board, average for men 280.00 

$736.00 

If the earnings are less than required for a full scholarship, the bonus 
will be proportionately smaller. 

Any extra expenses not provided for in the scholarship may be covered 
by labor or cash from other sources. 



Expenses 123 

Tuition Scholarships. Each year the college, in conjunction with 
the several local conferences of the Southern Union Conference, awards 
eleven $50 cash scholarships to be applied on tuition: $25 at the end 
of the first semester and $25 at the end of the second. The candidates 
are chosen as follows: The faculty of each designated school nominates 
its candidate; the name, if approved by the school board, is recommended 
to the educational board of the local conference, for final approval. 
The selection of nominees is based on character, scholarship, personality, 
and promise of future leadership. The following schools are eligible to 
participate in this plan: 

Asheville Agricultural School 
Atlanta Union Academy 
Collegedale Academy (2) 
Forest Lake Academy (2) 
Highland Academy 
Madison College Academy 
Pewee Valley Academy 
Pine Forest Academy 
Pisgah Institute 

Prospective Teachers' Scholarships. The Southern Union Con- 
ference Executive Committee has adopted the following recommendation 
which became effective in the fall of 1943: 

Voted: that we recommend to each local conference the setting up of three 
$100.00 scholarships annually to help provide for the first year normal work of 
prospective church school teachers who have completed their secondary education, 
the beneficiaries to be selected by each local conference educational committee, 
and that they be required to teach at least two consecutive years following gradua- 
tion in the conference granting such scholarship. In the event that the beneficiary 
does not fulfill his part of the agreement, the scholarship will become a debt 
payable to the conference immediately. 

In addition to the above, we recommend the continuation of scholarships by 
the conferences to the sum of $100.00 instead of $30.00 as formerly, to Southern 
Missionary College, for students from each conference who are completing the 
second semester of the final year of the Teacher Training Curriculum, and who 
otherwise are not financially able to complete the year's work, upon the following 
conditions: 

1. Are recommended by the President and the Chairman of the Department 
of Education of Southern Missionary College. 

2. Are recommended by the Educational Committee of the local conference 
and approved by the conference committee. 



124 Southern Missionary College 

3. Are pledged to give two consecutive years of teaching service in their own 
conference. 

It is understood that in the case of any beneficiary receiving both scholarships, 
the teaching service required will be only a total of two years. 

EDUCATIONAL FUND 

Many young people are deprived of the privilege of attending college 
because or a lack of necessary means. To aid these, an earnest effort has 
been made to obtain donations for the establishment of an educational 
fund, from which students worthy of help may borrow money for a 
reasonable length of time. Faithfulness in refunding these loans will 
make it possible for the same money to assist many students in school. 
There have bean some gifts, and they have been used to help several 
young men and women complete their work in this college. But the 
needs of worthy students have been greater than the funds on hand; con- 
sequently it has been impossible in many instances to render the desired 
assistance. It has therefore been decided to direct the attention of patrons 
and friends of the school to these facts and to invite them to give such 
means as they may desire to devote to this purpose. The college will be 
glad to correspond with any who think favorably of this plan, and will 
continue to use the gifts so that the wishes of the donors may be fulfilled 
and the best results obtained. 

"In each conference a fund should be raised to lend to worthy poor 
students who desire to give themselves to the missionary work; and in 
some cases they should receive donations. When the Battle Creek Col- 
lege was first started, there was a fund placed in the Review and Herald 
office for the benefit of those who wished to obtain an education, but 
had not the means. This was used by several students until rhey could 
get a good start; then from their earnings they would replace what they 
had drawn, so that others might be benefited by the fund. The youth 
should have it plainly set before them that they must work their own way 
as far as possible and thus partly defray their expenses. That which cost* 
little will be appreciated little. But that which costs a price somewhere 
near its real value will be estimated accordingly." — Testimonies, Vol. 6, 
pages 213, 214. 



X 



Graduates, May 30, 1948 

ELEMENTARY TEACHER TRAINING 
Mary Lynn Coulson Dixie Jauthenia Reeder 

SECRETARIAL SCIENCE 
Louise Brooks Edna Earle Stewart 

PREDENTAL 

Clyde Franklin Brooks f Donald Eugene Lilley 

Ross VanBuren Cockrell James Thomas Linderman 

Ervin Benjamin Stewart 

PREMEDICAL 
Harold Norman Sheffield 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

Robert Samuel Bishop Evan Williams Richards 

John Allen Wilson 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN THEOLOGY 

Wendell Lloyd Coble Kenneth Milton Mathews 

•Robert Charles Kistler James Richard Rimmer 

John Ivan Wilbur 

BACHELOR OF ARTS 

Elmer Lee Black J. B. Kinder 

John Spencer Darnall Theodore Michael Lysek 

Robert Carter Darnell Robert Albert Roach 

Miriam Ruth Ditzel Lawrence Garnett Scales 

Robert Allan Hamm Roland Robert Semmens 

♦Melvin Gene Hickman Joseph Allen Soule 

Jack Alfred Just Robert Gladstone Swofford 
Wayne Putney Thurber 



•Graduation with honors. fin absentia. 



Summary of Enrollment, 1948-49 

Semesters Men Women Totals 

Seniors 12 10 22 

Juniors 38 4 42 

Sophomores 98 31 129 

Freshmen 133 117 250 

Specials, Postgraduates, and 

Unclassified 2 36 38 



Total for semesters 283 198 481 

Summer Session, 1948 

Seniors 7 4 11 

Juniors 13 5 18 

Sophomores 27 22 49 

Freshmen 26 34 60 

Specials, Postgraduates, and 

Unclassified 6 23 29 



Total for summer 79 88 167 

Gross total 362 286 648 

Less duplicate names 62 17 79 

Net Total 300 269 569 



Enrollment 



127 



GEOGRAPHICAL DISTRIBUTION OF COLLEGE ENROLLMENT 

of 1948-49 



Alabama 31 

Arkansas 3 

California 18 

Connecticut 2 

District of Columbia 4 

Florida 86 

Georgia 27 

Illinois 11 

Indiana 12 

Iowa 4 

Kansas 1 

Kentucky 11 

Louisiana 9 

Maryland 5 

Michigan 19 

Mississippi 14 

Missouri 1 

Nebraska 2 

New Hampshire 3 

New Jersey 2 



New York 8 

North Carolina 41 

North Dakota 1 

Ohio 11 

Oklahoma 7 

Pennsylvania 15 

South Carolina 6 

South Dakota 1 

Tennessee 86 

Texas 10 

Virginia 11 

West Virginia 1 

South Africa 1 

Bahamas 1 

Cuba 7 

Honduras 1 

India 1 

Norway 1 

Puerto Rico 5 



Total 



.481 



INDEX 



Absences 

From Campus (See Handbook) .. 22 

Chapel 33 

Late Registration 29 

Unexcused 32 

Accounting Courses 60 

Accounts, Payment of 121 

Accreditation 18 

Administration, Officers of 9 

Admission 

Summary of Subject Requirements 27 

To the College 24 

To Upper Biennium Courses 25 

Adult Special 26, 32 

Advance Deposit 20, 116 

Advanced Standing 25 

Agriculture Courses 62 

Aims (See Objectives) 

Announced Regulations 22 

Application Procedure 24 

Applied Arts, Division of 60 

Applied Music 81 

Art 78 

Athletics 23 

Attendance Regulations 

Class 32 

Chapel 33 

Auditing Courses 31 

Automobiles : 21 

Bachelor of Arts 37 

Bachelor of Arts in Theology 41 

Bachelor of Science 

Business Administration 43 

Education 44 

Home Economics 49 

Industrial Arts 50 

Religious Education 52 

Secretarial Science 53 

Bible 

Courses 104 

Major 39, 103 

Minor 39, 103 

Biology 

Courses 92 

Major 39, 93 

Minor 39, 93 

Board Charges 119 

Board of Trustees 8 

Books and Supplies 121 

Business Administration 

Curriculum 43 

Major 60 

Minor 39, (50 

Calendar 5, 6 

Campus Organizations 23 

Certification 46, 49 

Changes in Registration 29 



Chapel Attendance 33 

Classification of Students 31 

Chemistry 

Courses 97 

Major 39, 96 

Minor 39, % 

Collegedale Academy 23 

Clubs 23 

Conduct 21 

Correspondence Courses 

(See Extension Work) 

Counseling 22 

Course 

Dropped 29 

Load 30 

Numbers 59 

Repetition of 35 

Curriculums, Degree 37-55 

Curriculums, Junior College 55-58 

Dean's List 35 

Deficiencies, Entrance 28 

Degree Requirements 

Bachelor of Arts 37 

Bachelor of Arts in Theology 41 

Bachelor of Science in 

Business Administration 43 

Bachelor of Science in Education 44 
Bachelor of Science in Home 

Economics 49 

Bachelor of Science in Industrial 

Arts 50 

Bachelor of Science in 

Religious Education 52 

Bachelor of Science in Secre- 
tarial Science 53 

Diploma Fees 119 

Divisions of Instruction 

Applied Arts 60 

Education, Philosophy, and 

Psychology 72 

Fine Arts 78 

Languages and Literature 84 

Natural Sciences and 

Mathematics 92 

Religion and 

Applied Theology 103 

Social Sciences 107 

Drop Vouchers 29 

Economics Courses 108 

Education 

Courses 73 

Curriculums 45, 47 

Major 45, 47 

Minor 39, 47 

Educational Fund 124 

Elementary Teacher Training 45 

Employment 122 



English 

Courses 85 

Major 39, 85 

Minor 39, 85 

Enrollment 

Geographical Distribution 127 

Summary 126 

Entrance Deficiencies 28 

Entrance Deposit 116 

Evangelism Courses 105 

Examinations 

Course 34 

Entrance .'. 28 

Exemption 34 

Special 34 

Validation 34 

Executive Committee 9 

Expenses 116 

Extension Work 33 

Extracurricular Activities 22 

Faculty 9 

Farm 17 

Fees .118 

Financial Aid 23, 121-124 

Financial Plans 115 

Foreign Languages 

Courses 87 

One Unit 27 

Reciuirement 37 

French 

Courses 87 

Minor 39, 87 

Freshman 

Admission 24 

Definition of 25 

Full-time Student 30, 117 

General Information 16 

Geographical Distribution 127 

Geography Courses 110 

German 

Courses 88 

Minor 39, 88 

Governing Standards 21 

Grade Points 34 

Grades 34 

Graduates 125 

Graduation 

Candidacy for 36 

In Absentia 36 

With Honors 36 

Requirements 36-58 

Student's Responsibility 

Concerning 36 

Health 

Courses 9* 

Service 22 



Hebrew Courses 89 

History 

Courses 110 

Major 39, 108 

Minor 39, 108 

Of the College 16 

Homiletics Courses ..10 s 

Home Economics 

Courses 62 

Curriculum 49 

Major 62 

Minor 39, 62 

Honor Roll 36 

Honors, Graduation with 36 

Hour, Semester 30 

Industrial Arts 

Courses 65 

Curriculum 50 

Major 51, 64 

Minor 39, 64 

Industrial Supervisors 9 

Instructional Staff 9 

Junior College 

Credit 26 

Curriculums 55 

Junior, Defined 32 

Labor 121 

Late Entrance 29 

Latin Course 89 

Laundry Charges 120 

Leave of Absence 22 

Library Science Courses 68 

Location 17 

Lower Biennium Courses, Defined - 59 
Lyceum 23 

Major Requirements (See also 
curriculum outline and pre- 
ceding course descriptions) 39 

Marriages 22 

Mathematics 

Courses 99 

Minor 39, 99 

Matriculation Fee 116 

Medical Service 120 

Minor Requirements (See also 
curriculum outlines and pre- 
ceding course descriptions) 39 

Music 

Applied 81 

Courses 79 

Major 39, 79 

Minor 39, 79 

Tuition and Fees 118 

Objectives 
College 16 



Courses (See preceding course 
descriptions) 
Curricular (See various curriculums) 

Officers of Administration 9 

Orientation 

College Problems Course 113 

Days 6, 25 

Personal Expense 120 

Philosophy Courses 77 

Physics 

Courses 101 

Major 101 

Minor 39, 101 

Political Science 

Courses 11 3 

Minor 39, 108 

Predental Curriculum 56 

Predietetics Curriculum 57 

Premedical Curriculum 55 

Prenursing Curriculum 58 

Preparatory School 23 

Printing Course 66 

Private Work 117 

Psychology Courses 78 

Publications 23 

Regional Field Representatives 8 

Registration 

Cancellation of 29 

Changes in 29 

Dates 6, 29 

Fee 29, 116 

Late 6, 29 

Regulations, Announced 22 

Religious Services 23 

Repetition of Courses 35 

Residence 

Campus 22 

Senior 37 

Room 

Deposit 24, 116 

Rent 120 

Reservation 24, 116 



Scholarships 122, 123 

Secretarial Science 

Courses 69 

Curriculum 54 

Major 54, 68 

Minor 39, 54, 68, 

Semester 

Fees 118 

Hour 30 

Senior, Defined 32 

Social Science Courses 107 

Sociology Courses 113. 

Sophomore, Defined 31 

Spanish 

Courses 90 

Major , 39, 90 

Minor 39, 90 

Special Hours 31 

Special Student 26, 32 

Student Load 30, 117 

Summer Session 18 

Theology 

Courses 105 

Curriculum in 41 

Tithe 120 

Transcript 24 

Transportation 17 

Tuition 117 

Upper Biennium Courses 

Admission to 31 

Definition of 59 

Minimum for Degree 37 

Veterans 

Admission of 18, 24, 25 

Credit for In-Service Training 20 

Vocational Requirement 

(Consult particular curriculum 

for information desired.) 

Withdrawal 30 



For Reference 

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