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Full text of "Southern Missionary College Catalog 1952-53"

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CATALOG, 1952-1953 



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Volume II 



No. 1 



The "S.M.C." June, 1952 
F. O. Rittenhouse, Editor 
Published quarterly by Southern Missionary College, College- 
dale, Tennessee. Entered as second class matter February 12, 1951, 
at Collegedale, Tennessee, under act of Congress August 24, 1912. 



WHAT IS A COLLEGE CATALOG FOR? 

Well, the typical college catalog is not written 
with any hope of its becoming a best seller. It is 
of necessity "technical" rather than "popular." 

But the college catalog can be — and often is — 
very helpful to the student who knows what it is 
for and how to use it. 

It is a handbook for ready reference on matters 
of concern to students in their life on the College- 
campus. (The new student should remember that 
the academic requirements published herein will be 
in force for the full period of his college life on 
SMC campus.) 

The principal sub-divisions of this catalog are 
indicated by the headings which are printed opposite 
the arrows on the right margin of this page. Directly 
under each one of these arrows will be found a 
black square which is printed on the right margin of 
the page on which a corresponding heading appears. 
The page is given on the arrow. 

A complete topical index is printed on page 141. 

The owner of this catalog should file it for ready 
reference; and bring it (when needed) to conferences 
with the Dean, the Registrar or the Faculty Coun- 
sellor. 

Keeping this publication revised, and up-to-date 
and meticulously correct calls for the continuous, ac- 
tive cooperation of every college officer and every 
college teacher. The student, too, can help by calling 
attention to errors, inadequacies and inco-ordinations. 

It is hoped that all officers, teachers and students 
will help the Administration to make continuous 
improvements in successive issues of "our" college- 
catalog. 

The signature written below is to identify the 
owner of this catalog. If it should be misplaced 
will the finder please return it to r r _,.. 

Name ...jfa.A.£p!..*ft /Vl/s.OA. 

Post Office _C»{.l...&f.l.t6U& State/.£A/J,.. 

Local "Home" on (or Near) Campus 



Calendar 


^ 


of Events 


Page ^P" 


Board of 


^^ 


Trustees 


Page W^ 


Administra- 


^^ 


tive Staff 


Page W^ 


General 


^ 


Information 


Page 1^^ 


Academic 


^ 


Regulations 


Page W^ 


Degree 
Curriculums 


Page W^ 


Junior College 


^ 


Curriculum 


Page V 


Divisions of 


^ 


Instruction 


Page W^ 


Financial 


^^ 


Plans 


Page Hr 


Graduates 


^ 


'51 J Jan. "52 


Page ^^ 


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General 


^^ 


Index 


Page ^^ 


Campus 
Pictures 


Page ^^ 



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SducatiQtt £a% (^aofrexatCve giving, 

{Democracy Vs. Autocracy} 




Autocracy claims: 

That it can be (and sometimes is) more efficient than 
democracy. 

Democracy claims: 

1. That all who aspire to learn the art of self-government 
by the painful but elemental process of trial and 
error should have an opportunity to do so. 

2. That mere efficiency on the part of a few who rule 
the sullen masses is no satisfactory substitute for the 
inherent right of these masses to le;.rn cooperation — 
and to earn contentment — by participation. 

3. That cooperation and contentment insure ultimate 
efficiency on the highest level of human achievement. 

Autocracy is concerned 

about efficiency, too often for purely selfish ends. 

Democracy is concerned 

about the growth of the individual in the art of serv- 
ing others as well as self. 

Cooperation 

(which is the other name for the Golden Rule in full 
and effective operation) is the essence of all true 
democracy; it means that we must so conduct ourselves 
that others may be able to live happily and to work 
comfortably and effectively with us. 



s4 tfaod 0oUe$e 



is a center for training in the fine art of cooperative- 
living; it is a place where young people — of any age — 
come together to educate themselves and each other 
with the effective help of inspiring teachers. 



Southern Missionary College 



ANNUAL CATALOG 



Volume II June, 1952 Number 1 




ANNOUNCEMENTS 1952-53 

SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGE 

COLLEGEDALE, TENNESSEE 



McKEE LIBRARY 
Southern Missionary College 
Collegedale, Tennessee 37315 



ij> 

.5 367 CALENDAR OF EVENTS 

Summer Session 

Registration . .Monday, June 16 

Instruction Begins _.. .Tuesday, June 17 

Holiday _ _ Friday, July 4 

Final Examinations Wednesday and Thursday, August 13, 14 

Commencement, 8:00 P.M .Thursday, August 14 

Qose of Summer Session _ Friday, August 15 

First Semester 

All students whose applications for admissions have been ap- 
proved will receive by mail at the home address given a full printed 
schedule of all appointments for Orientation, Testing, Counseling, 
and Registration, which will occur between 1:30 P.M., Sunday, 
September 14, and 7:35 A.M. Tuesday, September 16. No student 
who keeps his appointment as announced in the three entries next 
below will be charged the late registation fee indicated on page 127. 

Registration begins for all students (except Freshmen) residing 
in the Collegedale community, 1:30 P.M. Sunday, September 14. 

Registration begins for all new students (including all Fresh- 
men residing in Collegedale community or elsewhere), 7:30 A.M. 
Monday, September 15. 

Registration for all former students above Freshmen level, 
7:30 A.M., Tuesday, September 16. 

Instruction Begins, 7:35 A.M Friday, September 19 

President's Convocation Address, 9:25 A.M., Friday, September 19 

First All-College Vesper Service ....7:30 P.M., Friday, September 19 

All-College Recreation Program in Auditorium 

8:00 P.M., Saturday, September 20 

Fall Week of Prayer Friday, October 3 to Sabbath, October 11 

Annual School Picnic .Wednesday, October 15 

Mid-Semester Examinations, Monday to Friday, November 10 to 14 

3 

114075 



CALENDAR 



1952 



July 



6 M T W T F S 



_. _. 1 2 3—5 
6 7 8 9 10 11 12 
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 
27 28 29 30 31 



August 


S 


M T W T F 


S 


~3 
10 


"4 ~5 6 ~7 8 
11 12 13 14 15 


2 
9 




— 


September 


S 


M T W T F 


S 








— 






14 15 16 17 18 19 20 
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 
28 29 30 


October 


S 


M T W T F 


S 



1 2 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 
12 13 14 15 16 17 18 
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 
26 27 28 29 30 31 .... 



November 


S M T W T F 


S 


~2 ~3 "1 "5 ~6 1 8 

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 






December 


S M T W T F 


S 


_12 3 4 5 

7 8 9 10 11 12 

14 15 16 17 1"^— 


6 
13 





1953 



January 



S M T W T F S 



— 5 6 7 8 9 10 
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 
18 19 20 21 22 23 24 
25 26 27 28 29 30 31 



February 



S M T W T F S 

12 3 4 5 6 7 

8 9 10 11 12 13 14 

15 16 17 18 19 20 21 

22 23 24 25 26 27 28 



March 



S M T W T F S 



12 3 4 5 6 7 

8 9 10 11 12 13 14 

15 16 17 18 19 20 21 

22 23 24 25 26 27 28 

29 30 31 



April 



S M T W T F S 



— 6 7 8 9 10 11 
12 13 14 15 16 17 18 
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 
26 27 28 29 30 



May 



S M T W T F S 



1 2 

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 



June 



S M T W T F S 



— 15 16 17 18 19 20 
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 
28 29 30 



July 



S M T W T F S 

_.._ 12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 
12 13 14 15 16 17 18 
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 
26 27 28 29 30 31 .... 



August 


S M T W T F 


S 


2 3 4 5 6 7 
9 10 11 12 13 14 


1 

8 




— 


__ 


September 


S M T W T F 


S 







13 14 15 16 17 18 19 
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 
27 28 29 30 


October 


S M T W T F 


S 



_ 12 3 

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 

11 12 13 14 15 16 17 

18 19 20 21 22 23 24 

25 26 27 28 29 30 31 



November 


S M T W T F 


S 


12 3 4 5 6 7 

8 9 10 11 12 13 14 

15 16 17 18 19 20 21 


- 30 . _.. 




December 


S M T W T F 


S 


12 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 
13 14 15 16 1 





1954 



January 



S M T W T F J 



3 4 5 6 7 8 1 
10 11 12 13 14 15 II 
17 18 19 20 21 22 2! 
24 25 26 27 28 29 31 
31 





February 


S M 


IWIFi 


._ 12 3 4 5 1 
7 8 9 10 11 12 li 
14 15 16 17 18 19 21 
21 22 23 24 25 26 21 
28 


March 


S M 


T W T F 5 


— 12 3 4 5 1 
7 8 9 10 11 12 I! 
14 15 16 17 18 19 21 
21 22 23 24 25 26 2! 
28 29 30 31 _.. 


April 


S M 


T W T F i 


1 2 : 

4 5 6 7 8 9 11 
11 12 13 14 15 16 1' 
18 19 20 21 22 23 2 
25 26 27 28 29 30 _ 


May 


S M 


T W T F ! 


~2 3 4 5 6 7 1 
9 10 11 12 13 14 1! 
16 17 18 19 20 21 2: 
23 24 25 26 27 28 2! 
30 31 


June 


S M 


T W T F .' 


' i "7 
13 14 

2 °1 

27 Ire 


12 3 4 

8 9 10 11 l: 

15 16 17 18 1! 

22 23 24 25 2 

29 30 



CALENDAR OF EVENTS (Concluded) 

Thanksgiving Recess, 12:00 Noon Tuesday, November 25 

to 7:00 P.M _ Sunday, November 30 

Christmas Vacation, 12:00 Noon Thursday, December 18 

to 7:00 P.M _ Sunday, January 4 

First Semester Examinations, Monday to Friday, January 19 to 23 

Close of First Semester Friday, January 23 

Second Semester 

Registration of New Students 

8:00 A.M. to 5:00 P.M., Sunday, January 25 

Instruction begins Monday, January 26 

Spring Week of Prayer Friday to Sabbath, March 6 to 14 

Mid-Semester Examinations Monday to Friday, March 16 to 20 

Spring Recess, 12:00 Noon Wednesday, April 1 

to 7:00 P.M „ Monday, April 6 

College Days Sunday and Monday, April 19, 20 

Annual College Class Picnics, Wednesday, April 29 

Second Semester Examinations, Monday to Friday, May 25 to 29 

Senior Consecration Service, 8:00 P.M Friday, May 29 

Baccalaureate Sermon, 11:00 A.M Sabbath, May 30 

Commencement, 8:30 P.M „ _ Saturday, May 30 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

V. G. Anderson, President Decatur, Georgia 

Kenneth A. Wright, Secretary Collegedale, Tennessee 

Charles Fleming, Jr., Treasurer Collegedale, Tennessee 

J. M. Ackerman Maitland, Florida 

A. O. Dart . Decatur, Georgia 

Fred H. Dortch Birmingham, Alabama 

I. M. Evans Meridian, Mississippi 

Leighton Hall Orlando, Florida 

H. S. Hanson Decatur, Georgia 

W. B. Higgins — Collegedale, Tennessee 

C H. Lauda Charlotte, North Carolina 

H. Lester Plymouth, Florida 

M. E. Moore Asheville, North Carolina 

G. R. Nash Atlanta, Georgia 

L. M. Nelson Decatur, Georgia 

R. H. Nightingale Orlando, Florida 

J. W. Osborne Hendersonville, Tennessee 

M. C. Patten Greenville, South Carolina 

F. O. Rittenhouse _ Collegedale, Tennessee 

H. E. Schneider Decatur, Georgia 

L. C Strickland Fountain Head, Tennessee 

W. E. Strickland Nashville, Tennessee 

B. F. Summerour Norcross, Georgia 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE FINANCE COMMITTEE 

V. G. Anderson, Chairman Charles Fleming, Jr., Chairman 

Kenneth A. Wright, Secretary G. T. Gott, Secretary 

Charles Fleming, Jr. Kenneth A. Wright 

H. S. Hanson F. O. Rittenhouse 

G. R. Nash R. G. Bowen 

F. O. Rittenhouse W. B. Higgins 

H. E. Schneider 

REGIONAL FIELD REPRESENTATIVES 

Representative-at-large: H. S. Hanson Decatur, Georgia 

For Alabama-Mississippi: Wayne Thurber Meridian, Mississippi 

For Florida: K. D. Johnson „ Orlando, Florida 

For Georgia-Cumberland: Ward Scriven Atlanta, Georgia 

For Carolina: Wayne Foster Charlotte, North Carolina 

For Kentucky-Tennessee: T. A. Mohr Nashville, Tennessee 

6 



ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF 

Kenneth A. Weight, M.SJBd .President 

Floyd O. Rittenhouse, Ph.D _ Dean 

Charles Fleming, Jr., M.B.A Business Manager 

Elva B. Gardner, M.A. Registrar, Secretary of the Faculty 

Stanley D. Brown, M.A., B.A. in L.S Librarian 

Everett T. Watrous, M. A Dean of Men 

Edna E. Stoneburner, B.S., R.N _ Dean of Women 

Thomas W. Steen, Ph.D., .. Director Test, and Counseling Service 

K. M. Kennedy, B.A Principal of the Elementary School 

Richard L, Hammill, Ph.D Coordinator of Student Activities 

William G. Shull, M.D College Physician 

William B. Higgins. M.A Principal of Collegedale Academy 

Marian L. Kuhlman, R.N .Director of Health Service 

G. T. Gott, M.A., ~ Assistant Business Manager 

R. E. Haege, B.A., Asst. Mgr., Collegedale Mercantile Enterprises 

Myrtle Watrous, B.A Assistant Librarian 

R. G. Bowen Treasurer 

R. C Mizelle, B.S Cashier 

INDUSTRIAL SUPERVISORS 

SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGE 

Grover Edgmon .Custodian 

George R. Pearman Maintenance and Construction 

John B. Pierson College Farms 

A. W. Spalding, Jr. „ Fruit, Garden and Campus 

Esther Williams Director of Food Service 

Charles Arthur Williams Traffic Officer 

COLLEGE INDUSTRIES, INC. 

M. E. Connell College Broom Factory 

Ray Olmstead College Wood Products 

E. A. Pender College Press 

J. E. Tompkins _ Collegedale Laundry 

COLLEGEDALE MERCANTILE ENTERPRISES, INC. 

E. S. Anderson, B.S College Creamery 

B. J. Hagan _ _ College Garage 

C. S. Parrish, B.S Southern Mercantile Agency 

F. S. Sanburn, B.S Collegedale Distributors 



SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGE 



FACULTY 



Kenneth A. Wright, M.S. Ed., President. 
B.A., Emmanuel Missionary College, 1923; 
M.S. Ed., Cornell University, 1938. 
Present position since 1943. 

Horace R. Beckner, B.R.E., College Pastor. 
B.R.E., Atlantic Union College, 1933. 
Present position since 1948. 

Ambrose L. Suhrie, Ph.D., Litt.D., LL.D., Resident Educational 
Consultant; Emeritus Professor of {Higher) Education, School 
of Education, New York University. 

Ph.B., John B. Stetson University, 1906; 

M.A., University of Pennsylvania, 1911; 

Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania, 1912; 

LL.D., John B. Stetson University, 1919; 

Litt.D., Duquesne University, 1941. 

Present position since 1945. 



Richard L. Hammill, Ph.D., Professor of Religion and Biblical 
Languages. 

B.Th., Walla Walla College, 1936; 
M.A., S.D.A. Theological Seminary, 1947; 
Ph.D., University of Chicago, 1950. 
Present position since 1946. 

Adrian R. M. Lauritzen, M.Mus. Ed., Professor of Music 

B.Mus.Ed., MacPhail College of Music, 1935; 
M.Mus.Ed., MacPhail College of Music, 1941. 
Present position since 1952. 

Harold A. Miller, M.Mus., Professor of Music. 

B.Mus., Otterbein College, 1937; 

M.Mus., Eastman School of Music, University of Rochester, 1941. 
Present position since 1945. 
E. I. Mohr, Ph.D., Professor of Physics. 

B.A., Union College, 1926; 
M.S., University of Southern California, 1943; 
Ph.D., University of Southern California, 1950. 
Present position since 1949. 

George J. Nelson, Ph.D., Professor of Chemistry and Mathe- 
matics. 

B.S., Emmanuel Missionary College, 1932; 
M.S., University of Colorado, 1939; 
Ph.D., University of Colorado, 1947. 
Present position since 1939. 

Floyd O. Rittenhouse, Ph.D., Professor of History. 

B.A., Emmanuel Missionary College, 1928; 
M.A., Ohio State University, 1932; 
Ph.D., Ohio State University, 1947. 
Present position since 1948. 



SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGE 

Thomas W. Steen, Ph.D., Professor of Education. 
B.A., Emmanuel Missionary College, 1910; 
M.S., Northwestern University, 1932; 
Ph.D., University of Chicago, 1939. 
Present position since 1948. 

fCHARLES JE. Wittschiebe, M.A., Professor of Religion. 

B.R.E., Atlantic Union College, 1931; 
M.A., S.D.A. Theological Seminary, 1946. 
Present position since 1947. 



Edward C. Banks, M.A., Associate Professor of Religion and 

Evangelism. 

B.Th., Emmanuel Missionary College, 1934; 

M.A. in Religion, S.D.A. Theological Seminary, 1948. 

Present position since 1946. 
Gerald W. Boynton, M.A., Associate Professor of Industrial 

Arts. 

B.S., Madison College, 1940; 

M.A., George Peabody College for Teachers, 1943. 

Present position since 1945. 
Theresa Rose Brickman, M. Com'l Ed., Associate Professor of 

Secretarial Science. 

B.A., Union College, 1928; 

M.Com'l Ed., University of Oklahoma, 1942. 

Present position since 1942. 

Stanley D. Brown, M.A., Associate Professor of Bibliography 

and Library Science. 

B.A., Washington Missionary College, 1926; 

B.A. in L.S., University of North Carolina, 1937; 

M.A., University of Maryland, 1935. 

Present position since 1935. 
Olivia Brickman Dean, M.Ed., Associate Professor of Elemen- 
tary Education. 

B.A., Union College, 1934; 

M.Ed., University of Oklahoma, 1943. 

Present position since 1942. 

Rupert M. Craig, M.A., Associate Professor of Economics and 
Business. 

B.A., Atlantic Union College, 1941; 
M.A., Boston University, 1947. 
Present position since 1950. 

Mary Holder Dietel, M.A., Associate Professor of Modern 
Languages. 

B.A., Washington Missionary College, 1919; 
M.A., University of Maryland, 1933. 
Present position since 1938. 

Maude I. Jones, B.A., Associate Professor of English. 

B.A., Mississippi College for Women, 1894. 
Present position since 1917. 

fOn leave during 1952-53. 



10 SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGE 

Norman L. Krogstad, M.Mus., Associate Professor of Music. 

B.S., Kansas State Agricultural College, 1943; 

B.Mus., MacPhail School of Music, 1947; 

M.Mus., Northwestern University, 1949. 

Present position since 1949. 
Huldrich H. Kuhlman, M.A., Associate Professor of Biology. 

B.A., Emmanuel Missionary College, 1940; 

M.A., George Peabody College for Teachers, 1945. 

Present position since 1946. 
Don C. Ludington, M.A., Associate Professor of English. 

B.A., Emmanuel Missionary College, 1913; 

B.S., George Peabody College for Teachers, 1929; 

M.A., George Peabody College for Teachers, 1930. 

Present position since 1947. 
Kathleen Burrows McMurphy, M.A., Associate Professor of 

English and Literature. 

B.A., Pacific Union College, 1939; 

M.A., University of Maryland, 1948. 

Present position since 1932. 
Lbif Kr. Tobiassen, M.A., Associate Professor of History and 

Religion. 

B.A., Emmanuel Missionary College, 1936; 

M.A., S.D.A. Theological Seminary, 1948. 

Present position since 1946. 



Ester Andreasen, M.A., Assistant Professor of Home Economics. 
B.A., Emmanuel Missionary College, 1930; 
MA., University of Wisconsin, 1951. 
Present position since 1952. 

Clyde G. Bushnell, M.A., Assistant Professor of Languages. 
B.A., Union College, 1933; 
M.A., University of Mexico, 1940. 

, Present position since 1952. 

Hira T. Curtis, B.S., Assistant Professor of Accounting and 
Business. 

BjS., Union College, 1899. 
Present position since 1949. 

George B. Dean, M.A., Assistant Professor of Biology and 
Chemistry. 

B.A., University of Wichita, 1928; 
MA., George Peabody College for Teachers, 1947. 
Present position since 1939. 

Blva Babcock Gardner, M.A., Assistant Professor of Education. 
B.A, Union College, 1938; 
M.A., University of Nebraska, 1949. 
Present position since 1950. 

George T. Gott, M.A., Assistant Professor of Economics. 

B.A., Emmanuel Missionary College, 1944; 
M.A., University of Nebraska, 1951. 
Present position since 1947. 



SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGE 11 

William B. Higgins, M.A., Assistant Professor of Education. 
B.A., Emmanuel Missionary College, 1923; 
M.A., University of Maryland, 1937. 
Present position since 1951. 

Elmore J. McMurphy, M.A., Assistant Professor of Religion and 
Speech. 

B.A., Pacific Union College, 1940; 
M.A., S.D.A. Theological Seminary, 1950. 
Present position since 1952. 

Everett T. Watrous, M.A., Assistant Professor of History. 
B.A., Atlantic Union College, 1934; 
M.A., University of Chicago, 1941. 
Present positiion since 1948. 

J. Mabel Wood, B.A., Assistant Professor of Music. 
B.A., Union College, 1948. 
Present position since 1949. 



Albert L. Anderson, B.A., Instructor in Printing. 

B.A., Union College, 1938. 
Present position since 1951. 

Jacqueline Evans Brown, B.A., Instructor in English. 
B.A., Walla Walla College, 1949. 
Present position since 1950. 

Frances Storts Curtiss, B.A., Instructor in Music. 

B.A., Colorado College, 1951. 
Present position since 1951. 

Ruth Garber Higgins, Instructor in Home Economics. 

Emmanuel Missionary College. 
University of Maryland 
Simmons College. 
Present position since 1951. 

Edna E. Stoneburner, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Nursing Educa- 
tion. 

B.S., Washington Missionary College, 1933; 
R.N., College of Medical Evangelists, 1939. 
Present position since 1951. 

Mary M. Zweig, M.A., Instructor in Secretarial Science. 
B.A., Emmanuel Missionary College, 1945; 
MA., Northwestern University, 1948. 
Present position since 1951. 



William G. Shull, M.D., Special Instructor in Health. 
B.A., University of Southern California, 1951; 
M.D., College of Medical Evangelists, 1946. 
Present position since 1949. 

Arthur W. Spalding, B. S., Special Lecturer in Education 

B.S., Battle Creek College, 1901. 
Present position since 1951. 



12 SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGE 

SUPERVISORY INSTRUCTORS IN SECONDARY EDUCATION 

William B. Higgins, M.A., Principal, Social Studies. 
B.A., Emmanuel Missionary College, 1923; 
M.A., University of Maryland, 1937. 
Present position since 1951. 

Paul C. Boynton, M.A., Bible. 

B.A., Washington Missionary College, 1941; 
M.A., S.D.A. Theological Seminary. 1952. 
Present position since 1952. 

Lou B. Hoar, M.C.S., Secretarial Science. 
B.R.E., Atlantic Union College, 1931; 
M.C.S., Boston University, 1949. 
Present position since 1950. 

Paul J. Hoar, M.A., Mathematics and Science. 
B.A., Atlantic Union College, 1939. 
M.A., Boston University, 1950. 
Present position since 1950. 

Betty Brooke Koudele, M.A., English. 
B.A., Emmanuel Missionary College, 1946; 
M.A., University of Nebraska, 1949. 
Present position since 1949. 

Margaret M. Steen, B.A., Spanish. 

B.A., Emmanuel Missionary College, 1909. 
Present position since 1948. 



SUPERVISORY INSTRUCTORS IN ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 

K. M. Kennedy, B.A., Principal, Grades 7, 8. 

B.A., Valparaiso University, 1946. 
Present position since 1951. 

Betty Jo McMillan, B.S. El. Ed., Grades 5, 6. 

B.S., El. Ed., Southern Missionary College, 1951. 
Present position since 1951. 

Thyra E. Bowen, M.A. El. Ed., Grades 3, 4. 

B.A. El. Ed., Washington Missionary College, 1945; 
M.A., El. Ed., George Peabody Colege for Teachers, 1951. 
Present position since 1948. 

Ruth Jones, B.S., Grade 2 

B.S., Southern Missionary College, 1951. 
Present position since 1951. 

Bernice Pittman, M.A. El. Ed., Grade 1. 

B.A. El. Ed., Washington Missionary College, 1943; 

M.A. El. Ed., George Peabody College for Teachers, 1949; 

Present position since 1948. 



SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGE 13 

PROFESSIONAL ORGANIZATION OF THE 
COLLEGE FACULTY 

President Wright, Chairman; Dean Rittenhouse, Vice Chairman; 
Ambrose L. Suhrie, Executive Secretary; Elva B. Gardner, Secretary. 
This is an over-all professional organization which meets once 
every month. Its officers and members are also organized into com- 
mittees for three types of extra-classroom service to the college as 
follows: 

Advisory — to counsel the President on implementation and administra- 
tion of such educational policies as have the official sanction of the College 
Board, or the College Faculty Senate. 

Legislative — to discuss and adopt well-thought-out educational pol- 
icies to govern the effective operation of the college. 

Policy-Forming — to discuss, formulate, and recommend suitable edu- 
cational policies to the Faculty-Senate for its approval (with or without 
modification). 

Below are given .the names of all committees and the list of officers 
serving each committee: 

A. ADVISORY COMMITTEE 

'President's Council: President Wright, Chairman, Dean Ritten- 
house, Vice Chairman; Lou B. Hoar, Secretary 

B. LEGISLATIVE COMMITTEE 

The Faculty Senate: President Wright, Chairman; Dean Ritten- 
house, Vice Chairman; Ambrose L. Suhrie; Executive Secretary, 
K. M. Kennedy, Recording Secretary 

C. 'POLICY-FORMING COMMITTEES 

1. "Curriculum and Academic Standards: Rittenhouse, Chair- 
man; Gardner, Secretary 

2. Student Counselling: Steen, Chairman; Brkkman, Secretary. 

3. Religious Interests: Banks, Chairman; Wood, Secretary 

4. Lyceum and Social Programs: Craig, Chairman; J. Brown, 
Secretary 

(Continued on next page) 



'This Advisory Council has a Sub-Committee on Student Admissions: 
Rittenhouse, Chairman; Fleming, Vice-Chairman; J. Brown, Secretary; also 
a Sub-Committee on Government: President Wright, Chairman; Dean Ritten- 
house, Vice Chairman; Mrs. Hoar, Secretary. 

1 The Chairman of each of these policy-forming committees also per- 
forms or delegates certain administative duties related to the field of services 
in which his committee is engaged. 

' This committee has a Sub-Committee on Ministerial Recommendations: 
Banks, Chairman; Hammill, Secretary. 

* This Committee has a Sub-Committee on Performance Tests in Spoken 
and Written English: Hammill, Chairman; Suhrie, Executive Secretary; 
Mrs. McMurphy, Recording Secretary. 



14 SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGE 

5. Health and Recreation: Kuhlman, Chairman; Stoneburner, 
Secretary 

6. Publications and Public Relation: Tobiassen, Chairman; 
Ludington, Secretary 

7. Library Services: S. Brown, Chairman; M. Watrous, Secretary. 

8. Social Education: Ruth Higgins, Chairman; Zweig, Secre- 
tary 

9. Coordination of Industrial Training: Gott, Chairman; 
Bowen, Secretary 



GENERAL INFORMATION 

HISTORY 

Southern Missionary College, a Seventh-day Adventist institu- 
tion, was founded in 1893 as Southern Training School, at 
Graysville, Tennessee. Twenty-three years later the school was 
moved to Collegedale, Tennessee; and there, in 1916, it was re- 
opened as Southern Junior College. The exigencies of a rapidly 
expanding student body necessitated the extension, in the spring 
of 1944, to senior college status, and the first four-year seniors were 
graduated from Southern Missionary College in 1946. 

Southern Missionary College is incorporated under the laws 
of the State of Tennessee, the Board of Trustees assuming entire 
responsibility for the financial support and management of the 
institution. 

ACCREDITATION AND CERTIFICATION 

Southern Missionary College is fully accredited as a four-year 
institution of higher learning by the Southern Association of Col- 
leges and Secondary Schools, by the Tennessee State Department of 
Education, and by the Seventh-day Adventist Board of Regents. 
The college is a member of the American Association of Junior 
Colleges, the Southern Association of Private Schools, the Ten- 
nessee College Association, and the Mid-South Association of 
Private Schools. 

Southern Missionary College has been approved by the Ten- 
nessee State Board of Education for the certification of elementary 
and secondary school teachers on both the two-year and the four- 
year levels. 

OBJECTIVES 

Basic Denominational Tenets. Seventh-day Adventists believe 
in an infinite Creator as the source of all life and wisdom; they 
regard man as created in God's image and endowed with mental, 
moral, and physical powers capable of growth and development; 
they accept the moral law as binding upon all men and believe in 
personal redemption from sin through Jesus Christ; they accept 
the Bible as God's Word, the inspired revelation of His will to 
men; they believe that through proper education young people may 
be led to practice correct habits of thinking, to develop Christian 
character, and to make diligent preparation for a purposeful life of 
efficient service to their fellow men. 

15 



16 SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGE 

Specific Objectives. Southern Missionary College is a four- 
year co-educational college of arts and sciences operated by the 
Seventh-day Adventist denomination. It's general objectives are those 
of this governing organization. In harmony with these general 
■objectives, the following specific objectives have been adopted: 

1. Spiritual — To establish an unswerving personal allegiance to 
the principles of the Christian faith; to develop a distinctly 
Christian philosophy of life as a basis for the solution of 
all personal and social problems; and to acquire a sense 
of personal responsibility to participate in the mission 
program of the church. 

2. Intellectual — To gain an acquaintance with the basic facts 
and principles of the major fields of knowledge necessaiy 
to independent and creative thinking; to acquire an attitude 
of open-minded consideration of controversial questions; to 
achieve a continuing intellectual curiosity; and to acquire 
the art of effective expression (in spoken and written Eng- 
lish and in the graphic arts). 

3. Ethical — To acquire those ethical and moral concepts which 
are approved by the enlightened conscience of mankind; to 
achieve an attitude of tolerance toward the rights and 
opinions of others; and to accept the social obligation of 
serving humanity and laboring diligently for its welfare. 

4. Social — To develop an acquaintance with the approved 
social practices of cultured men and women; and to partici- 
pate heartily and comfortably in those recreational activities 
which contribute to the further development of a well- 
balanced personality. 

5. Aesthetic — To gain an acquaintance with the masterpieces 
of literature and the fine arts and an appreciation of the 
standards and the types of beauty represented by them; and 
to learn both to create and to choose that which is beauti- 
ful as well as that which is useful. 

■6. Civic — To acquire an intelligent understanding of the 
principles of government and to develop a willingness to 
accept the responsibilities and privileges of citizenship; to 
recognize the constitutional rights of other individuals and 
social groups; to know the principal domestic and interna- 



SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGE 17 

tional issues of our time; to develop a sincere love for our 
country and its fundamental principles; and to learn to 
co-operate effectively in the continuing improvement of 
society, national and international. 

7. Health — To gain an intelligent understanding of the prin- 
ciples which govern the functioning and proper care of the 
human body; to establish habits and practices which foster 
maximum physical vitality and health; to develop a genuine 
interest in the intelligent, many-sided, recreational uses of 
leisure time and, in co-operation with others, in the im- 
provement of the physical well-being of all. 

8. Vocational — To acquire a genuine appreciation of the true 
dignity of useful labor; and to master the knowledge and 
achieve the understanding necessary to the intelligent choice 
of a vocation that is in harmony with individual abilities 
and aptitudes. Preparation is provided at Southern Mis- 
sionary College for the gospel ministry, for teaching in 
elementary and secondary schools, for pre-nursing and 
pre-medical training, for secretarial and business positions, 
and for other vocations. 

LOCATION 

Southern Missionary College is located on a one-thousand- 
acre estate in a valley eighteen miles east of Chattanooga. The 
Southern Railway passes through the institutional estate. The post 
office address is Collegedale, Tennessee. 

The campus lies three miles from Ooltewah, junction point 
of the Atlanta and Knoxville divisions of the Southern Railway. 
Ooltewah is also on the Lee Highway No. 11, which connects Wash- 
ington, D. C. and other cities in the East with Chattanooga and 
other southern points. 

Frequent bus service throughout the day to Chattanooga pro- 
vides students with ample transportation facilities. The Chattanooga 
airport is located only a few miles from the college. 

BUILDINGS AND EQUIPMENT 

LYNN WOOD HALL 

The administration building is named in honor of Dr. Lynn 

Wood, president of the college from 1918 to 1922. It is a three 

story structure, housing a major number of class rooms, the In- 



18 SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGE 

dustrial Arts Laboratory with excellent facilities for vocational train- 
ing, the music and speech studios, the Academy office and the offices 
of Academic and Business Administration. The chapel seats ap- 
proximately 500. 

MAUDE JONES RESIDENCE HALL 

The residence hall for women, named for Maude Jones, 
Associate Professor Emeritus of the College, has accommodations 
for 140 women. In addition to an apartment for the dean of 
women, it houses the dining room, the culinary department, an 
infirmary, a spread room, and a private parlor. The rooms on the 
second floor have been refurnished recently with rose and shell 
metal furniture. 

JOHN H. TALGE RESIDENCE HALL 

The men's residence hall, named for John H. Talge, provides 
accommodations for 140 men, in addition to eight apartments for 
married couples. A large worship room is located on the second 
floor. A spacious lounge is located on the first floor; this room with 
its furniture and radio is available for entertainment during leisure 
time. 

A. G. DANIELS MEMORIAL LIBRARY 

The A. G. Daniels Memorial Library, a beautiful brick 
building, was completed in 1945. The student body of S.M.C. is 
particularly fortunate in having on the campus this fine modern 
library containing more than nineteen thousand books, and over a 
hundred current periodicals conveniently arranged and adequately 
housed for study, reference and research. A portion of the base- 
ment floor is used for student publications and a lecture room. 
The library is located adjacent to the administration building and 
is readily accessible from the residence halls. 

EARL F. HACKMAN SCIENCE HALL 
Hackman Hall, modern in arrangement and appointment, a 
commodious, two-story, fireproof building, contains various lecture 
rooms and laboratories of the division of natural sciences. This 
building, completed and dedicated in 1951, was named in honor of 
the late Earl F. Hackman, friend of the College and for many years 
chairman of its Board. 

COLLEGEDALE TABERNACLE-AUDITORIUM 
The auditorium serves as a place of worship for the 



SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGE 19 

Collegedale SJD.A. Church. The building is owned by the Georgia- 
Cumberland Conference and has a seating capacity of 1200. A 
Hammond electric organ is part of the equipment. With the 
front section curtained off the auditorium serves as a gynmasium. 
ELEMENTARY SCHOOL BUILDING 

The elementary school building with four rooms for grade 
school and one for elementary education classes serves as a work- 
shop for the teachers in training. It also houses a spacious recreation 
»nd lecture room, a lunch room, and the principal's office. 
THE COLLEGE STORE 

The college operates a store from which students may pur- 
chase books and other supplies. Recently remodeled and expanded 
the building contains the grocery and drug departments and the 
snack bar on the main floor and the dry goods department, the book 
department, and offices in the basement. The store is the distributing 
center for health foods, electric supplies, furniture and household 
supplies for the Southern States. 

STUDENT HOUSING PROJECTS 

The College has erected two important modern housing projects 
in recent years, namely, The Hillside Apartments and The Camp 
Road Apartments. Each of these projects provides for twelve fam- 
ilies. There are also two trailer camps which provide housing accom- 
modations for about forty married couples. (See Married Students 
Housing, page 129.) 

INDUSTRIAL BUILDINGS 

Year by year the College has added to its facilities for offering 
instruction in the skills fundamental to the trades. These buildings 
and equipment have been appointed by the college for educational 
purposes — for training young people in vocations by means of 
which they may become self-supporting workers and missionaries. 
Equipment has been provided for the mastery of the principles of 
printing, dairying, laundering, woodworking, auto mechanics, 
poultry raising, farming, and merchandising. In addition to the 
farm buildings, and a new modern maintenance shop the following 
are some of the industrial buildings: 

The College Press. The College Press, housed in a large 
brick building, is equipped with two intertypes, two automatic cylin- 
der presses, and one hand fed cylinder press, three job presses, a 
New American Type Founders offset press, and other up-to-date 



20 SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGE 

equipment. This industry provides employment for approximately 
thirty students and does the printing not only for the College and 
the denomination but also for many commercial establishments. 

College Wood Products. The College Wood Products is a 
rambling and expansive three story frame building with modern 
equipment for the manufacture of furniture. This industry affords 
part-time employment for approximately one hundred twenty stu- 
dents. 

The Broom Factory. The Broom Factory is housed in a large 
one story building. It offers employment to seventy students who 
manufacture approximately 400,000 brooms each year. 

Laundry. A well equipped laundry, specializing in fiat work, 
offers employment for sixty-five students. In addition to the 
college laundry service and work from the community, the laundry 
is patronized by five hotels and eighteen tourist camps in the sur- 
rounding area. 

SUMMER SESSION 

The college conducts a nine-week summer session. The normal 
scholastic load for the summer term is eight hours; nine hours is 
the maximum load. 

The Summer Session announcement of Southern Missionary 
College, containing detailed statements of the several courses offered 
and information of general interest to students, will be sent on 
application to the Director of the Summer Session. 

INFORMATION FOR VETERANS 

Southern Missionary College cordially welcomes former mem- 
bers of the United States armed forces who have been honorably 
discharged and who wish to continue their formal education in a 
Christian college. Every cooperation will be extended to enable 
the veteran to complete the curriculum of his choice in the shortest 
possible time consistent with approved scholastic standards. 

Southern Missionary College is fully recognized as a training 
center for veterans. In general the rules for admission and con- 
tinued registration of veterans are the same as for other students, 
except that veterans who have not finished high school may qualify 
for admission to certain curriculums by passing successfully the Gen- 
eral Educational Development tests at the high school level. 



SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGE 21 

The G.I. Bill states that a veteran's course of education or 
training "shall be initiated not later than four years after either the 
date of his discharge or the termination of the present war, which- 
ever is the later." Termination of the war, for G.I. Bill purposes, 
was fixed at July 25, 1947, by Public Law 239, 80th Congress. 

There is no cut-off date for starting courses under Public 
Law 16, the Vocational Rehabilitation Act for disabled veterans. 

Disabled veterans may begin training under Public Law 16 at 
any time after discharge, but in time to complete it by the wind-up 
of the program. The wind-up, for World War II veterans, is 
July 25, 1956. For veterans disabled after fighting started in 
Korea, the termination is nine years from the end of the current 
emergency, a date yet to be established. 

If a veteran desires to change his curriculum after entering 
upon training, he must obtain permission from the Veterans Ad- 
ministration. If permission is granted, he will then receive a supple- 
mental certificate of eligibility for transfer to the new curriculum. 

PROCEDURE FOR OBTAINING BENEFITS 

1. The Veteran should contact his local veterans service center, 
or the state office of the Veterans Administration, and obtain a copy 
of Veterans Administration Form 1950. 

2. Form 1950 should be filed together with the following 
documentary evidence, with the proper state office several weeks, 
if possible, before entrance to the college: (1) a certified copy of 
discharge papers; (2) if married, a certified copy of the public re- 
cord of marriage; and (3) a certified copy of the birth certificate of 
one child, (if any) . A certified copy of the marriage record can be 
obtained from the office of the county clerk of the county con- 
cerned. For information as to the birth certificate, one may write 
to the registrar of vital statistics, in the department of public health, 
at the state capital. 

3. A veteran attending another school under the G.I. Bill of 
Rights who wishes to transfer to Southern Missionary College must 
obtain permission from the Veterans Administration. If permis- 
sion is granted, he will then receive a supplemental certificate of 
eligibility authorizing the transfer to this college. This certificate 
must be presented to Southern Missionary College at the time of 
registration. 



22 SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLBGB 

4. Veterans holding medical discharges and eligible under 
Public Law 16 should make arrangements for a personal interview 
with a representative of the Veterans Administration at his local 
office, where he will receive an authorization to enter training at 
Southern Missionary College. 

5. All veterans are urged to take prompt advantage of the 
educational benefits of the G.I. Bill of Rights. 

WHAT THE G. I. BILL OF RIGHTS PROVIDES 

1. The Veterans Administration will pay direct to this college 
the charges for tuition, general fees, required books and supplies. 
Books and supplies are paid for only if they are required of non- 
veterans taking the same course. 

The minimum number of college hours for which the veteran 
may draw full subsistence is twelve for a semester; under Public 
Law 16 a veteran must take a full course load unless he has special 
authorization for a reduced program. 

The general fee does not include the advance deposits which 
must be made by the veteran at his own expense and is credited 
back to his personal account at the close of the school term. 

2. Following are the usual monthly subsistence allotments 
and the maximum amounts of outside earnings allowed in each of 
the three catgories of veterans: 

Max. Other 
Allotments Earnings 

Single $ 75.00 $135.00 

Married (no children) 105.00 165.00 

Married (with children) 120.00 170.00 

From his allotment a veteran is expected to keep up to date 
his obligations to the college for board, room, laundry, and such 
other items as are not paid to the college direct from the Veterans 
Administration. 

CREDIT FOR IN-SERVICE TRAINING 

The Veteran of World War II no longer on active duty may 
apply for high school or college credit by writing directly to the 
Registrar of the college, and by inclosing with his letter a certi- 
fied copy of W.D., A.G.O. Form 100, Separation Qualification 
Record; or Notice of Separation from the Naval Service, NavPers 
553; or U.S.M.C Report of Separation; or Notice of Separation 
from the U. S. Naval Service — Cost Guard, 553. In the case of 



SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGE 23 

Naval commissioned or warrant officers, the Officer's Qualification 
Record Jacket (NavPers 305), a certified copy thereof, or a state- 
ment from the Bureau of Naval Personnel covering the data desired 
should be submitted to the college. 

Any army veteran separated from the service prior to the in- 
stitution of the Army Separation Qualification Record (W. D., 
A. G. O. Form 100) may secure an official statement from the 
Army of his service training and education, excluding courses 
administered by the United States Armed Forces Institute, by 
directing a request to the Adjutant General, Washington 25, D. C. 
Each request should contain the following information: 

1. Full name (given name, middle initial, and surname). 

2. Army Serial Number (enlisted, officer, or both where ap- 
plicable). 

3. Statement of desired information. 

4. Names and locations of service schools attended, date 
entered, name of each course completed, and any additional data 
which would be helpful in the preparation of the desired statement 

GOVERNING STANDARDS 
General. In the light of the objectives of the college the re- 
ligious phase of the student's education is of paramount importance. 
Students applying for entrance to the college thereby pledge them- 
selves to maintain the Christian standards of the institution, to at- 
tend all regularly scheduled religious services, and to give due re- 
spect to things spiritual. 

Any student who does not maintain a satisfactory scholarship 
or industrial record, or who, in the judgment of the Administrative 
Council, is unresponsive or non-cooperative in his relation to the 
objectives of the college, may be dismissed without specific charges. 

Moral Conduct. Students must refrain from indecent or 
disorderly behavior, from profane or unbecoming language, from 
the use of tobacco and alcohol, from reading pernicious literature, 
from playing cards, from visiting pool rooms or gambling places, 
from attending the theater, dances, or any other entertainment not 
approved by the President's Administrative Council. 

Citizenship Standards. At the close of each semester or 
term each student is given a citizenship rating by a committee com- 
posed of representative students and officers of the college. The 



24 SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGE 

ratings given are (1) satisfactory, (2) improvement desired, and 
(3) unsatisfactory. 

Automobiles. The college has adopted and enforces the 
rule that unmarried residence-hall students may not bring to the 
campus or operate a motor vehicle. Residence hall students who 
come to the college with automobiles or motorcycles will be re- 
quired to take them home or sell them before they register. 

Leave of Absence. Permission for ordinary leave of absence 
from the campus is to be obtained from the dean of men or the 
dean of women. The student's handbook should be consulted for 
information regarding week-end and other special leaves. 

Marriages. Any student desiring to marry during the school 
year and remain in school must first receive permission from the 
Administrative Council. Secret marriages are not approved and are 
considered sufficient reason for severing a student's connection with 
the college. 

Residence. All unmarried students who do not live with 
their parents, near relatives, or legal guardians, are expected to 
live in the residence halls on the campus. Exceptions may be made 
occasionally for reasons approved by the Administrative Council. 

Information as to room furnishings to be supplied by the 
student is given in the students' handbook, which is mailed to 
each person who applies for admission, and it is also available 
upon request. 

Announced Regulations. Any regulation adopted by the 
faculty and announced to the student will have the same force as 
if printed in the catalogue or in the handbook, S.M.C., and You. 

EXTRACURRICULAR ACTIVITIES AND SERVICES 
The extra-class activities program of the college provides well 
organized opportunities for development of student initiative and 
leadership. In the Student Association, through his elected re- 
presentative, each student has a voice in the formulation of policies 
and in the administration of college life and activities. Through 
participating in the various student organizations and church ac- 
tivities the student may acquire valuable experience in the art of 
group living and in working for and with his fellows. The college 
program of extra-class activities is under the supervision of the 



SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGE 25 

Coordinator of Student Activities. Student clubs are chartered by 
the Student Association. The plans and policies governing the 
Student Association and the other student organizations, as well 
as the program of extra-class activities generally, are outlined in the 
handbook, Our Student Organizations at Work. 

Testing and Counseling Service. This service provides 
general assistance to all students and also certain professional serv- 
ices for those with special needs. General assistance for all 
students is provided for by a group of personal counselors who de- 
vote some hours each week to individual conferences with students. 
The various officers, Division chairmen and curriculum advisers also 
cooperate in this general advisory program. All students participate 
in the general testing program, which includes measures of scholastic 
aptitude, reading proficiency, social adjustment, vocational pro- 
ficiency and others as the need may require. 

The Director of the Testing and Counseling Service, who is a 
Clinical Phychologist, and the College Physician unite in providing 
a specialized clinical service for those who desire special counsel in 
such matters as the choice of a vocation, emotional and social 
maladjustments, and marital problems. 

Health Service. The health service is under the supervi- 
sion of a resident registered nurse. The college physician attends, 
on a part time basis, and is available on call. Several graduate 
nurses are also available as needed. The health service provides 
physical check-ups and examinations, clinical and infirmary service, 
isolation and protection in the case of infections or contagious 
diseases, health education, and supervision of sanitation. 

Convocation, the Lyceum, Athletics. At various times 
during the school year distinguished speakers address the students at 
the chapel hour. A lyceum course of lectures, travelogues, and 
musical numbers is sponsored by the college. Students of Southern 
Missionary College do not participate in intercollegiate athletics, but 
a program of recreational activities is maintained. 

Financial Aid. In the operation of the college, a large 
volume of employment is offered to students. Under the guidance of 
skilled supervisors, this work affords valuable training, and brings 
a college education within the reach of many who otherwise would 
find it impossible to attend school. 



26 SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGE 

Publications. The Student Association publishes the bi- 
-weekly Southern Accent and the yearbook, Southern Memories. 

Religious Life and Organizations. The local church, the 
Sabbath school, the Missionary Volunteer Society and its auxiliaries, 
the Ministerial Seminar, the Colporteur Club, the mission study 
groups, and the prayer bands contribute to the devotional, mis- 
sionary, and prayer life of the student and afford opportunties for 
training in leadership, teaching, and church endeavors. 

Participation in Extracurricular Activities. In order to 
insure satisfactory scholarship, the extent to which students may 
participate in extracurricular activities is subject to regulation. 



SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGE 
ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

Broadly speaking Southern Missionary College is a living 
institution made up of its alumni, faculty, and students. The 
Collegedale Alumni Association promotes the interests of the 
school, fosters a spirit of friendship among former students, pre- 
serves worthy traditions of the college, and serves mankind through 
the personal exemplification and advocacy of the ideals of Alma 
Mater. 

The General Association holds two meetings annually, one on 
Founders' Day in October and the other on Commencement Day. 
Local chapters in various sections of the country meet several times 
yearly. The Association publishes The Collegedale Alumnus, its 
official publication, four times a year — a quarterly which is dis- 
tributed to Alumni and friends of the college. 

The Association maintains an office on the college campus 
which keeps the records of its regular members, some 2,000 
graduates of the following institutions, the first three of which 
preceded Southern Missionary College: the Graysville Academy, 
the Southern Training School, the Southern Junior College, the 
■CoIJegedale Academy, and the Southern Missionary College. As- 
sociate membership in the organization is also granted individuals 
•who have attended this institution at least one semester. 

The affairs of the Association are managed by its officers who 
are currently: 



SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGE 27 

President Milton Connell 

Vice-President Andrew Chastain 

Secretary Betty Jo McMillan 

Treasurer R. C. Mizelle 

Publicity Secretary Margaret Jo Urick 



THE PREPARATORY SCHOOL 

Connected with the college is Collegedale Academy, a fully 
accredited preparatory school. While this school has a separate 
organization, it shares with the college the facilities of the latter. 
For information, write to the principal of Collegedale Academy. 



28 SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COIXEGB 

GENERAL ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 

ADMISSION 

Southern Missionary College is open to high school or academy 
graduates who, according to the judgment of the Admission Com- 
mittee are qualified to pursue with profit the courses offered by the 
college. Factors in determining eligibility for admission are charac- 
ter, citizenship, reputation, health, scholastic achievement, and in- 
tellectual ability. 

Application Procedure. Application for admission is made 
on a blank supplied by the college. Correspondence concerning 
admission should be addressed to the Secretary of Admissions 
of Southern Missionary College, Collegedale, Tennessee. An ap- 
plicant who has not previously attended Southern Missionary Col- 
lege should inclose with the application a small clear photograph. 

An applicant who expects the college to provide living 
quarters should send with the application the $5.00 room reserva- 
tion fee. This deposit will appear as a credit on the final statement 
of the school year provided the room is left in good order (or will 
be refunded if the applicant is not admitted or if he decides not to 
enter and notifies the college on or before August 1.) 

The application should request the school last attended to send 
directly to the Secretary of Admissions of this College a complete 
official transcript of all previous secondary school and college credits. 
It is the responsibility of the applicant to see that such credentials 
are sent to Southern Missionary College in time for use in the con- 
sideration of his application. No portion of the applicant's scho- 
lastic record may be omitted from the transcript submitted for con- 
sideration and no student may be officially registered until his pre- 
vious transcripts are on hand. 

Transcripts of credit accepted toward admission become the 
property of the college and are kept on permanent file. 

Students may be admitted by transcript (or certificate) of at 
least sixteen units from an accredited high school or academy. As 
the pattern of prerequisite requirements varies those required for 
each curriculum are listed separately. Unless an exception is made 
by the Adminissions Committee the student's secondary record must 
average "C" or above. See "Subject Requirements for Admission" 
page 30 and explanation page 31. 



SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGE 29 

Orientation Days. Two days at the beginning of each school 
year are devoted to the orientation of new students. It is essential 
that all freshmen and transfer students be in attendance. During 
this period placement and aptitude tests and a physical examination 
are given. No charge is made for these examinations if they are 
taken at the apponted time. See announcements, page 3. 

Admission of Veterans on G. E. D. Tests. Admission to 
full freshman standing at Southern Missionary College is possible 
to veterans who, failing to meet the entrance requirements other- 
wise, can qualify on the following points: 1. The candidate must 
have completed elementary school; 2. The candidate must take the 
General Education Development tests (either at Southern Mission- 
ary College or at any other approved testing station) making an 
average standing score of 45 with a minimum score of 35 on each 
test. In case the candidate falls below a score of 35 in any field he 
must register for at least one unit in the secondary school in that 
field. These tests must be taken prior to or during the first month of 
attendance at the college. 

Freshman Standing. Those graduates of accredited four-year 
secondary schools whose scholarship record is acceptable are ad- 
mitted to freshman standing upon properly certified transcript of 
credits, but such students may have subject deficiencies to make 
up. 

Conditional freshman standing may be given to a person 
who has completed fourteen acceptable units. The remaining two 
units shall be earned during the first year of attendance at the 
college. 

Advanced Standing. A candidate for admission to advanced 
standing from another accredited institution of college rank may 
receive credit without examination for such work, subject to the 
following requirements. 

(a) He must have complete official transcripts from each pre- 
vious institution attended. Each transcript should show entrance 
credits, a complete college record including scholarship and credits 
in each subject taken, and a statement of honorable dismissal. 

(b) He must satisfy the entrance requirements of this college. 

(c) Credit is regarded as provisional at the time of the 
applicant's admission. This work will not be recorded and passed 
on by transcript until the applicant has completed satisfactorily in 
this college, not less than twelve semester hours. A maximum of 



50 



SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGE 



seventy-two semester hours, or 108 quarter hours, may be accepted 
from a junior college. 

Admission as an Adult Special Student. Any acceptable 
person twenty-one years of age or over may be admitted as a 
special student (not as a candidate for a degree or a diploma), on 
approval of the Dean and of the instructors in whose course he 
wishes to enroll. Any course taken by an adult special student 
carries lower biennium credit, and a maximum of twenty-four 
semester hours credit may be earned by such student. 

ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS 

Admission by Transcript. Students may be admitted by 
transcript (or certificate) of at least sixteen units from an accredited 
high school or academy. As the pattern of prerequisite require- 
ments varies, those required for each curriculum are listed below 
and explained on the following page. 

The students' secondary record must average "C" or above. 
Exceptions to this rule can be made only by special action of the 
Admissions Committee. 

SUBJECT REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION 

Units Required 



For Degree of: 


Bibl. 


English 


For. 
Lang. 


Math. 


Nat. 
Sd. 


Sec. 
ScL 


Elect. 


Bachelor of Arts 


1-3° 


3 b 


2 cd 


2 e 


2' 


2 b 


9 


B. A. in Theology 


l-3 a 


3 b 


d 


2 e 


1' 


2 h 


g 


Bachelor of Science 


1-3° 


3 b 





1 


1* 


1 






Junior College 






Units Required 






Curriculums: 


BibU English For. Math. Not. Sac. Vec. Elact. 
Lang. Sci. Sci. 


Elem. Teacher Training 


l-3 a 


3 b 


— 


1 


V 


2 h 


— 


g 


Predental 


1-3° 


3 b 


2= 


2» 


2* 


2h 


— 





Predietetics 


l-3 a 


3 b 


2° 


2' 


2J 


2h 


1 


g 


Prenursing 


1-3° 


3 b 


2 C 


2k 


2 m 


1 


— 


g 


Secretarial Science, 
Bible Instructors', 
Home Economics, or 
Industrial Arts 


1-3° 


2 b 




m 








g 


Assoc, in Arts 


Same as for Bach, of Arts above 



KEY TO SYMBOLS USED IN EXHIBIT ABOVE 
», One unit for each year of attendance in an S. D. A. academy, to a total 
of three units. S. D. A. academy graduates must present one unit in 
Bible Doctrines. (Continued next page) 



SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGE 31 

b. Except for candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Science in Secretarial 

Science and a major in Business Administration, Business English 
does not apply on the English requirement. 

c. Both units are required in one language. One unit of credit in a modern 

foreign language is not accepted toward admission unless the second 
unit is earned or the language continued in college. 

d. Candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Arts with a major in Religion 

and candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Arts in Theology (Minis- 
terial Curriculum) have a choice of meeting the entrance requirement 
in language in one of three ways. They may (1) elect to present two 
units in one foreign language as explained in note "c" above, or they 
may (2) elect to take fourteen hours of college Greek rather than 
twelve as required of those who present two entrance units as in- 
dicated under note "c" above, or they may (3) elect to take twelve 
hours of Greek and six hours of Hebrew. 

e. These units may be selected from the following: algebra I or general 

mathematics, plane geometry, algebra II, and trigonometry. Commercial 
mercial or other applied mathematics does not satisfy this requirement 

f . Where one unit only is required this must be a laboratory science, such 

as biology, physics or chemistry. A second unit requirement may 
be met by general science. 

g. Sufficient to make a total of sixteen units. Should be chosen to support 

curriculum to be followed in college. 

h. The social science requirements may be met by presenting two units 
from the following: American History, World History, General 
History, European History, Civil Government, Problems of Democracy, 
Economic Geography, and Economics. One unit must be history. 

i. Algebra and plane geometry. 

j. Biology and one unit of either chemistry or physics. 

k. Shall include one unit of algebra. 

1. Graduation from a secondary school with one unit each of algebra and 
plane geometry is recommended; also, as far a possible, the require- 
ments for admission to the arts and science curriculum. 

m .One unit of physics is strongly recommended. {See page 114.) 

Important Note: The unit pattern given, with graduation from an ac- 
credited secondary school and completion of necessary college courses, 
satisfies the requirements for admission to S.D.A. schools of medicine, 
dentistry, dietetics, and nursing; but inasmuch as requirements for 
admission to other professional schools differ, a student preparing for 
professional training should acquaint himself with the secondary and 
collegiate requirements for admission to the particular school he 
desires to enter, and plan both his secondary school and college pro- 
grams to meet these requirements. 

Entrance Deficiencies: A student who has sufficient total acceptable 
units but lacks specific required units, may be admitted to college and 
may make up entrance deficiencies, except mathematics, by taking college 
work in these subjects. When a college course is taken to remove 
an entrance deficiency, four hours are counted as the equivalent of one 
secondary school unit. These hours apply as elective credit toward grad- 
uation, except that credit in foreign language and Bible applies to- 
ward the basic requirements in these fields. Arrangements for removing 
all entrance deficiencies should be made at the time of first registration. 



32 SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGE 

Admission by Examination. Mature persons (at least 
twenty-one years of age) who have not been graduated from 
high school may be admitted to the college on the basis of scholastic 
aptitude and achievement test results. By means of these tests, given 
during Freshman Week by the director of the Testing Service, the 
candidate must demonstrate his ability to carry college work suc- 
cessfully. 

STUDENTS FROM UNACCREDITED SCHOOLS 
Unless admitted as a veteran and as a result of G. E. D. 
test (see page 20), students from unaccredited high schools and 
academies, in addition to the above requirements, must take ex- 
aminations for college entrance. Entrance examinations are given 
in five fields as follows: Foreign Language, History, English, 
Mathematics, and Science. The student chooses four from these 
five fields. These tests are standardized achievement examinations 
covering the subject matter on the secondary school level. 

Students falling lower than the 30th percentile in one 
field are deemed to have failed in that field and will be re- 
quired to enroll for another secondary unit in that field in order 
"to meet college entrance requirements. 

REGISTRATION 

All students whose applications for admission have been] 
approved will receive by mail at the home address given a full! 
printed schedule of all appointments for Orientation, Testing, j 
Counseling and Registration, which will occur between 1:30 P.M.J 
Sunday, September 14 and 7:30 A.M., Tuesday, September It 
(Seepage 3J. 

Late Registration. A late registration fee of $5.00 is 
charged for first semester registration after September 18 and for 
second semester registration after January 25. 

Any student who enters school late seriously handicaps him- 
self at the outset especially in courses in science, mathematics, 
and foreign language. Students who register more than two weeks 
late will not be enrolled for a full schedule of course work, and 
may not enter certain courses because of the difficulty of making up 
the work. (See Attendance Regulations, page 36.) The course 
registration of a student entering after the first two weeks of a 
semester will be reduced one hour for each week or fraction there- 



SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGE 33 

of missed, including the first two weeks. No student will be ad- 
mitted for the full-course minimum of twelve hours the first 
semester after October 17; the second semester, after March 1. 

Correct Registration. The early completion of the basic 
courses affords the student greater opportunity: 

1. To avoid difficulties in registration because of conflicts in 
schedule; 

2. To specialize during the junior and senior years; 

3. To choose deceives during the junior and senior years; 

4. To follow without loss of time sequences of courses involv- 
ing prerequisites. 

As early as possible the student should plan, in counsel with 
his major professor, the sequence of courses for his major so as to 
complete curriculum requirements in due time. 

Changes in Registration. A student who desires to change 
his course program after he has completed registration files with 
the Registrar a recommendation from his adviser approved by the 
Dean. A change-of-program voucher becomes effective the date 
the adviser's recommendation is received by the Registrar's Office. 

During the week immediately following the registration days 
of each semester a student may alter his course program with- 
out cost. Thereafter any change in registration carries a fee of 
$2.00. 

Change-of-program recommendations for any given semester 
are not valid after the beginning of semester examinations. 

A student who absents himself continuously from class with- 
out cancellation of registration by drop voucher will be considered as 
having failed, and a grade of "F" for the course will be entered on 
the student's permanent scholastic record. 

Withdrawal. A student withdrawing from school should, 
before leaving, clear his scholastic record by filing with the Registrar 
a withdrawal permit obtained from the Dean of the College. 

Semester Hour. A semester hour represents one fifty- 
minute lecture or recitation per week, or the equivalent, through 
a semester of eighteen weeks. 

Student Study and Work Load. A full-time student in 
any semester is defined as one who is registered for a course load 



34 



SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGE 



of twelve hours for that semester. If a student is working to defray 
a portion of his expenses, his course load will be adjusted accord- 
ingly. Since individuals vary in capacity, care is taken that each 
student shall have a reasonable balance in his labor-study load. 
Students who are below average will be required to take less work 
than the following schedule indicates. Those with above average 
ability and scholastic achievement may be permitted to attempt a 
slightly heavier program. These schedules are designed to insure 
sound scholarship and an essential safeguarding of health. 

In exceptional cases a student 
with superior health, ability and pre- 
vious scholastic record may, upon the 
recommendation of his adviser and 
with the approval of the Dean of the 
College, register for eighteen hours. 
See page 138 for further information 
regarding student labor. 

To receive eighteen hours of 
credit for the semester, a student must 
make a grade-point average of 1.5 on 
the eighteen-hour load. If he falls be- 
low this grade-point average, his credit 
will be reduced to sixteen hours, the reduction being made in the 
course in which he received the lowest grade. 

Except by approval of the Curriculum and Academic Standards 
Committee, no student may receive more than eighteen semester 
hours credit during any semester. Correspondence work in progress 
is counted in the current load. 

Once a student's work-study schedule is arranged, and he has 
entered upon his duties, his labor foreman may net require extra 
service without proper arrangement with the Dean of the College. 

Conversely, instructors may not require exceptional out-of -class as- 
signments or appointments that interfere with his regular scheduled 
work program without making proper arrangements with the 
Dean of the College. 

Except by permission of the Administrative Council, the mini- 
mum course load of a student living in one of the residence halls 
is eight hours. 



abor Hours 


Class Hours 


None 


16 


1 to 15 


16 


15 to 20 


Not over 16 


20 to 25 


41 


25 to 30 


12 


30 to 35 


8 to 10 


35 to 40 


Not over 8 


Above 40 


Not over 6 



southern missionary collbgb 33 

Admission of Sophomores to Upper Biennium Courses. 
A sophomore may register for one or more upper biennium courses, 
for upper biennium credit, provided he has earned, with an average 
of "C" or above, fifty hours including basic freshman and sopho- 
more courses already taken, and provided, also, that his current 
registration completes the fulfillment of lower biennium basic 
requirements including the meeting of standards of English per- 
formance. (See page 42.) 

In exceptional cases, a sophomore may be admitted to an 
upper biennium course for lower biennium credit. A sophomore 
desiring admission to an upper biennium course makes application 
on a blank obtainable in the registrar's office. 

Special Hours. On recommendation of his major professor 
and by permission of the Committee on Curriculum and Academic 
Standards, a senior may earn an additional hour in an upper bien- 
nium course completed or being carried in his major field. 

Auditing Courses. By permission of the Dean of the Col- 
lege and the instructor concerned, a student may audit a course 
which does not consist entirely or in part of laboratory, and should 
register as an auditor at the time of registration. No credit is 
given for a course audited. The tuition charge is one-half that for 
credit, and the course counts at half value in the student load. 

Reduction in Credit. A student should fulfill all lower bi- 
ennium course requirements while he is registered in the lower 
biennium. For seniors taking lower biennium required courses the 
credit in these courses will be reduced one-third to one-half the 
regular amount (the reduction not to result in fractional hours). 
This practice reduces the student's total hours' credit but does not 
affect the fulfilling of specific course requirements. 

CLASSIFICATION OF STUDENTS 
Students are classified by the Dean of the College. The classi- 
fication for which a student qualifies at the first semester registra- 
tion ordinarily continues through both semesters. A student who 
desires reclassification at the beginning of the second semester 
shall make written application to the Registrar and must meet 
the full requirements for the particular classification sought except 
that (1) officers of classes may not be reclassified and (2) seniors 
must remain in the junior class unless they are candidates for 
graduation for the current year. 



36 SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGE 

The following schedule governs the classification of students 
entering the first semester and new students the second semester: 

Freshmen. Completion of a four-year high school course, 
except that freshmen may be admitted conditionally on the comple- 
tion of fourteen acceptable units, and on condition that the remain- 
ing two units are taken during the first year on the college campus. 

Sophomores. Thirty hours of "C" average, the hours to 
include basic requirements completed with the average computed 
separately on hours earned in Southern Missionary College. 

Juniors. Sixty-two hours "C" average, the hours to include 
basic requirements completed, and the average computed separately 
on hours earned in Southern Missionary College. Registration for 
the junior year shall include any lower biennium basic requirements 
not already fulfilled. 

Seniors 1st Semester 2nd Semester.. 

For full standing 91 125 

For full standing (Theol.) 103 137 

For summer session 82 99 

For summer session (Theol.) 94 111 

The above hours must be of "C" average, figured separately 
on credits from Southern Missionary College. For full standing 
current registration must satisfy all remaining requirements for a 
degree. 

For membership in the senior class organization the senior 
year's work must have been carried satisfactorily to the time of 
the organization of the class. If a course is taken by correspond- 
ence during the senior year, the transcript of credit must be on file 
in the Registrar's office six weeks before graduation. 

Special. A person at least twenty-one years of age who is not 
working toward the fulfillment of degree requirements. For further 
information, see "Adult Special " under "Admission." See page 28. 

ATTENDANCE REGULATIONS 
Inasmuch as class instruction provides the basis for college 
learning, development, and credit, regular attendance at all classes 
is expected of every student. The record of daily class and laboratory 
attendance is kept by each instructor. Each absence naturally reduces 
automatically the student's grasp of the subject material considered 
and lowers proportionately his mark or grade in the course. 



SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGE 57 

Explanation blanks for class absences due to illness or other 
emergencies are presented to the teacher not later than the second 
class meeting following the absence and only after having the 
approval of the Dean of Men (for all men) or of the Dean of 
Women (for all women). These blanks are necessary to authorize 
the Instructor to permit the student to make up tests or other 
assignments missed because of the absence. Special prior requests in 
writing for unusual class absences will be considered by the 
Government Committee. Cases of repeated absences (ordinarily 
when a student misses two or more class periods in succession) 
are reported to the Dean of Men (for men) or to the Dean of 
Women (for women). These officers will contact the student's 
counselor in an effort to solve the problem. 

Special allowances regarding class attendance are granted 
students on the dean's list who are not subject to reduced marks for 
absences providing the teacher of the course involved consents and 
providing the student satisfactorily meets the scholastic requirements 
of the course. 

Three tardinesses count as one absence. Students entering a 
class late in the semester are regarded as having taken absences dur- 
ing the class periods previously missed. 

CHAPEL ATTENDANCE 
A faithful record of chapel attendance is maintained in the 
Office of the Registrar. The record of attendance at worship and 
at the various regular religious services is kept by the Dean of 
Men and the Dean of Women. Flagrant cases of repeated non- 
attendance will be referred to the President's Administrative Council. 

CITIZENSHIP RECORD 
An item "citizenship" appears on the grade report and on 
the permanent record card of each student. The various criteria 
for determining citizenship are: 

a. General attitude 

b. Faithfulness to social regulations 

c. Dining room conduct 

d. Faithfulness and attitude toward attendance at religious 
services, chapel, worship, vespers, Sabbath school, church 

e. Dormitory conduct 

f. Obedience to campus automobile regulations 



38 SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGB 

g. Personal grooming and room cleanliness 

h. Chapel attendance 

Three citizenship grades (or marks) employed are as follows: 

1. Satisfactory 

2. Improvement desirable 

3. Unsatisfactory 

A committee of representative students and officers of the 
College recommend one of the above three grades for each student 
at the end of each nine-week period and the final mark is authoriz- 
ed by the President's Administrative Council. 

CORRESPONDENCE AND EXTENSION WORK 

Southern Missionary College offers no extramural instruction; 
therefore, all credits from this college must be earned in residence. 

The maximum of correspondence and/or extension credit 
which may apply on a four-year curriculum is sixteen hours; for 
a two-year curriculum, eight hours. 

It is strongly urged that students plan their college course 
schedule so that it will not be necessary to take correspondence 
courses during the senior year. 

Credit earned by correspondence after failure in the same 
course at Southern Missionary College will be accepted only if 
the entire course was taken by correspondence (not taken on a 
review basis). 

In no case may more than eighteen hours of residence work and 
correspondence work be carried in a semester. 

To count as accepted credit, correspondence work must carry 
a grade of "C" or above, must be applicable on the curriculum for 
which the student is enrolled, and must have been taken by per- 
mission of the college during a period of resident attendance, or 
followed by earning in this college twelve hours with a scholarship 
average of "C." 

Credit for work taken with any standard correspondence 
school is granted as follows: (1) A grade of "D" on any corre- 
spondence work may not be recorded, (2) a grade of "C" is ac- 
cepted without examination provided it is not to be applied on a 
major, and (3) a grade of "C" with validation examination, or of 
"B" or above without examination, is accepted on a major. 



SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGE 39 

EXAMINATIONS 

Course Examinations. Examinations are given in all courses 
at the end of each semester. Students are expected to take examina- 
tions at the time scheduled, unless prevented by illness or other 
unavoidable circumstance. 

Entrance Examinations. See page 30. 

Exemption Examination. A student may be exempt by 
examination from a specific course requirement for graduation 
(such as within the basic group, or within or accompanying a 
major or a minor) provided he passes with a grade of at least "C" 
a comprehensive examination covering the particular course. The 
examination for exemption shall be authorized by the Curriculum 
and Academic Standards Committee. No hours of credit are given 
for an exemption examination. The fee is $2.00. 

Special Examinations. Special examinations are given when 
justified by circumstances, such as sickness or necessary absence from 
the campus. 

A re-examination is permitted only by consent of the Curri- 
culum and Academic Standards Committee. 

GRADES AND REPORTS 
Midsemester and semester reports of the scholastic standing of 
each student are issued to the student and his parent or guardian. 
Semester grades are kept on permanent record by the college. 
The following system of grading is used: 

Grade Points 
Grade per Semester Hour 

A — Superior 3 

B — Above average 2 

C — Average 1 

D — Below average 

F — Failure Minus 1 

E — Warning for "below passing" scholarship; 
no grade higher than "D" in the course 
for the semester; becomes "F" if not re- 
moved within a year after date reported. 
I — Incomplete because of illness or other 
unavoidable delay; becomes "F" if not re- 
moved within a year after date reported. 
(Continued on next page) 



40 SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGE 

W — Withdrew passing 

Wf— Withdrew failing Minus 1 

Au — Audit 
A grade correctly reported to the Registrar can be changed 
only upon repetition of the course. When a course is repeated to 
raise a grade, it must be done before a more advanced course in 
the same field is completed. Credit may not be earned in a course 
after a more advanced course in the same field has been taken. 
No grades will be recorded for a course for which the individual 
concerned has not registered. 

DEAN'S LIST 
This honor list, compiled each semester, is composed of the 
names of those juniors and seniors who carried twelve hours or 
more during the preceding semester and who for that semester 
earned a grade of "B" or above in each course carried. 

HONOR ROLL 

An honor roll is compiled twice each semester. It contains the 
name of each student who for the period covered has carried a 
minimum of eight semester hours, has attained a "B" average, and 
has received no grade of "I," "E," "F," or "Wf." 

GRADUATION STANDARDS 

Southern Missionary College offers curriculums leading to 
degrees as follows : Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Arts in Theology, 
Bachelor of Science with majors in Elementary Education, Home 
Economics, Industrial Arts, Religious Education, and Secretarial 
Science. 

Two-year curriculums leading to diplomas are: Bible Instruc- 
tors', Elementary Teacher Training, Secretarial, Predental, Pre- 
dietetic, Industrial Arts, Home Economics, and Associate in Arts. 

GENERAL REQUIREMENTS 

A student may qualify for graduation by fulfilling all cur- 
riculum requirements for the degree or diploma sought and by 
meeting the standards of the college as to character. A student 
who discontinues attendance for a full calendar year must meet the 
requirements for graduation published in a catalogue current after 
his re-entrance. 

A student who has received one bachelor's degree may re- 
ceive a second bachelor's degree provided that all requirements for 



SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLBGB 41 

both degrees are fully met, and provided also that the curriculum 
offered for the second degree includes at least thirty semester hours 
earned in an additional year of residence and not counted for the 
first degree. 

The responsibility for meeting graduation requirements rests 
primarily upon the student. He should acquaint himself with the 
published requirements and plan his courses so as to fulfill them. 

GRADUATE RECORD EXAMINATIONS 
During recent years an increasing number of graduate and 
professional schools and employers have been requiring applicants 
for employment or admission to file, together with other credentials, 
their scores in the Graduate Record Examinations. To make these 
scores available to graduates as well as to provide a national 
standard norm by which to evaluate the teaching and learning 
processes at Southern Missionary College, these tests are now re- 
quired to be taken by every candidate for a baccalaurate degree 
during the final semester of his senior year. The college ad- 
ministers the test each year on the Institutional Testing Program 
whereby the entire senior class writes on the test on the same day. 

National Sophomore Testing Program. The college par- 
ticipates each year in the National Sophomore Testing Program. 
These tests are of general achievement and are valuable in indicat- 
ing the standing of individual students in terms, national norms. 
They also provide the scientific basis for a valid judgment of the 
scholastic standing of the college. 

CANDIDACY FOR GRADUATION 

To be graduated at commencement, a student must have com- 
pleted all requirements for graduation. A student may become a 
candidate for graduation when he enters upon the semester during 
which it will be possible for him to complete all the requirements 
for his graduation. Candidates for graduation at the close of the 
ensuing summer session are permitted to participate in the consecra- 
tion and baccalaureate services with the class finishing in June, but 
do not appear as graduation candidates at the June commencement. 

Formal application for graduation should be made at the Re- 
gistrar's Office during the first semester of the senior year. All 
resident candidates for graduation must be members of one of the 
senior classes. See Standards of English Performance Required, on 
page 42 and see last paragraph, page 69. 



Required Standards of English Performance 

The Committee on Curriculum and Academic Standards has 
set up definitive requirements in English speaking and writing and 
in reading speed and comprehension which must be achieved: 

(1) By each and every individual student who is a candidate 
for promotion from a lower biennium curriculum to 
full and unconditioned standing in an upper biennium 

curriculum. 

(2) By each and every candidate for graduation from any 
one of the two-year or the four-year curriculums of the 
college. 

These requirements will be entirely independent of course 
credits in English grammar, composition, and rhetoric. They can 
not be met merely by passing a formal written examination of the 
conventional type. 

Each student's actual record of spontaneous, habitual, con- 
tinuing performance in English usage will be taken as an indication 
of his real progress at any given time, in measuring up to the 
Committee's clearly defined standards. His actual performance 
(not merely his knowledge) must demonstrate conclusively: 

(1) That he has never had, or that he has successfully over- 
come, long standing habits of (a) incorrect spelling, 
(b) faulty sentence structure, and (c) gross mispronun- 
ciation. 

(2) That he has achieved satisfactory scores (a) in reading 
speed and (b) in reading comprehension (vocabulary) . 

Ever) student will receive, at the time of registration, a printed 
booklet giving these standards and full instructions on how to get 
ready to meet them. If it is necessary, special remedial courses will 
be organized to provide assistance. 

Every teacher in the College is a teacher of English (outside 
of the classroom as well as in it) and is expected: 

(1) To help every individual student in his classes (and 
whenever an appropriate opportunity occurs in informal 
conversation any where else on the campus) to measure 

up, as soon as possible, to the standards outlined in the 
booklet. 

(2) To help the Committee on Curriculum and Academic 
Standards to secure as accurate and adequate a record as 
is possible, at any given time, of each individual student's 
actual performance in speaking and in writing (both 
in and outside of the classroom). See page 69. 



42 



SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGE 45 

GRADUATION WITH HONORS 
A candidate for graduation with a grade point average of 2.35 
or above, and whose record shows no grade lower than a "C" may 
be considered for graduation with honors. Other criteria for this 
distinction shall include such factors as exemplary character, note- 
worthy achievement in student activities, comprehensive examination 
results, and outstanding accomplishments in his major field of study 
or in independent study courses. The initiative in the procedure 
is a suggestion from a student's major professor to the Curriculum 
and Academic Standards Committee which in turn may recommend 
the candidate to the faculty for approval of this honor. 

GRADUATION IN ABSENTIA 
Each candidate for graduation must be present to receive his 
diploma unless granted written permission by the President of the 
College to be graduated in, absentia. Written application should be 
made early in the second semester of the senior year and permission 
will be granted only in cases of evident necessity. 

The chief commencement excercise is held annually in June. 
However, whenever there are approximately eight or more candi- 
dates for summer graduation, a commencement exercise is also 
held in August. Candidates for graduation in August participate in 
all the closing excercises except at the commencement in June. 
No candidate is eligible to receive his diploma or degree until 
his requirements are completed. A candidate who completes his 
work at the close of the first semester may receive his diploma 
in absentia or be graduated with the class at the ensuing commence- 
ment. 

DEGREE CURRICULUMS 
BACHELOR OF ARTS 

GENERAL REQUIREMENTS 

1. Admission to the arts and science curriculum is granted ac- 
cording to the requirements listed on pages 32 and 33. 

2. A minimum of 125 hours in courses applicable toward this 
•degree. 

3. The total hours for a degree shall include a major and a 
minor or two majors chosen from different arts and sciences fields. 
For detailed information see "Major and Minor Requirements", 
page 45. 



44 SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGB 

4. A minimum of forty hours of upper biennium credit. 

5. An average of one grade point per hour on all credits 
applied toward graduation, the grade point average on residence and 
accepted credits being figured independently. 

6. Not less than thirty hours, of which twenty must be in the 
senior year, are required to be earned in residence at this college. 

BASIC REQUIREMENTS 
Note: While it is preferable to take as many of the follow- 
ing basic requirements as possible on the Freshman and Sophomore 
level, a student will not be required to complete all basic require- 
ments before registering for upper-biennium work. However, 
the following basic requirements must be met before the student 
registers for any upper-biennium courses: College Problems, 1; 
English 6; Foreign Language, 6; Social Sciences 6; Religion, 4-6; 
Natural Science and Mathematics, 6; Vocational, 4. 

College Problems 1 hour 

English 10 hours 

Six hours must be in composition, which is to be taken in the freshman 
or the sophomore year. The remaining four hours must be in literature. 

Foreign Languages 6-14 hours 

1. Six hours of the foreign language in which two units have been 
earned in secondary school. To be taken in the freshman or the 
sophomore year. 

2. Twelve hours in one language if different from the language in 
which two units have been earned in secondary school. Should be 
taken in the freshman and sophomore years. 

3. Fourteen hours in one language if no foreign language or less than 
two units in one foreign language was taken in secondary school. 
Should be taken in the freshman and sophomore years. 

4. This requirement may be fulfilled by credit in Greek, Latin, or a 
modern foreign language. 

S Social Sciences 14 hours 

Six hours must be in history taken in the freshman or sophomore 
year. The remaining eight hours may be chosen from the following: 
Economics, 51 and 52; Geography 41, 42; Sociology 20, 21, 22, and 
any courses in history or political science. 

Religion i. 2 " 1 .^ hours 

A student presenting three or more units of credit in Bible from the 
secondary school will take twelve hours; one presenting two units, 
fourteen hours; and one presenting one unit or less, sixteen hours. 
Courses to fulfill this requirement should be taken in the freshman and 
sophomore years. 

Natural Science - Mathematics 12 hours 

May be selected from the fields of biology, chemistry, mathematics, 
and physics. Six hours must be selected from a science field. To 
be completed in the freshman and sophomore years. 



SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGE 45 

Vocational 4 hours 

May be chosen from the courses in agriculture, industrial arts, secre- 
tarial science, physics (Courses 3-4), home economics (Courses 11, 12, 
21, 22), library science (Courses 21-22; 91-92). Accounting 2 may 
apply as vocational credit if not otherwise required in the curriculum. 
In cases where the student can furnish evidence of satisfactory pro- 
ficiency in a trade, the Division Chairman may recommend to the 
Curriculum and Academic Standards Committee that the student be al- 
lowed to omit the vocational requirement and add the four hours to his 
elective group. 

MAJOR AND MINOR REQUIREMENTS 

Major Requirements. The student should choose a major 
field of specialization preferably by the beginning of the second 
semester of the sophomore year. The major and the first minor 
may not be chosen from the same field. Specific requirements for 
majors are given immediately preceding the descriptions of courses 
in the various subdivisions. 

Approximately one-half the number of hours for a major 
shall be in upper biennium credit. 

A minimum of six hours of upper biennium on the major 
(preferably the last six) shall be earned in this college. 

No course in which a student has received a grade of "D" may 
apply on a major. 

Majors leading to the Bachelor of Arts degree, with required 
hours as listed, may be earned in the following fields: 

Hours 

Economics and Business (See pages 71, 120) 30 

Religion (See pages 117-119) 30 

Biology (See pages 105-109) 28 

Chemistry (See pages 109-111) 30 

English (exclusive of English 1:2; see pages 

99-100 26 

Spanish (exclusive of the first course. 

See page 103) 26 

History (See pages 121-124) 30 

Music (See pages 91-98) 34 

Physics (See pages 114-116) 28 

Majors in Home Economics, Industrial Arts, Elementary Edu- 
cation, Religious Education, and Secretarial Science are available in 
specialized curriculums leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science. 
These curriculums are listed in detail on/pages 51 to 60. 



46 SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGE 

Minor Requirements. A student should choose his minor 

field not later than the beginning of the second semester of the 

sophomore year. A minor may not be earned in the field chosen for 

the major. 

Six hours of a minor shall be earned in the upper biennium. 

A minimum of three hours of upper biennium credit on the 

minor must be earned in this college. 

The fields in which minors may be earned and number of hours 

for each minor are given below. See the section on "Divisions of 

Instruction" for further information. 

Hours 

Religion Basic requirement, plus six hours 

Biology 18 

Economics and Business 18 

Chemistry 20 

Education (second minor) 20 

English (exclusive of English 1:2) 14 

French 20 

German 20 

Greek 20 

History 20 

Home Economics 15 

Industrial Arts 18 

Mathematics 1 8 

Music 20 

Physics 16 

Printing 18 

Secretarial Science (exclusive of Secretarial Science 9, 

10, 13, and 14) 18 

Spanish 20 

Speech 16 

SUGGESTED ARTS AND SCIENCES CURRICULUM 
(For those majoring in applied music, see page 47) 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

English 1 : 3 English 2 3 

Foreign Language 3 or 4 Foreign Languages 3 or 4 

History 1 or 13 3 History 2 or 14 3 

Religion 1 or 19 3 Religion 2 or 20 3 

Natural Sciences 3 Natural Science 3 

Sociology 17 1 Elective or 1 

Total 16 or 17 Total 16 



SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGE 47 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 

Foreign Languages .... none or 3 Foreign Languages .... none or 3 

Religion 2 or 3 Religion 2 or 3 

Natural Science or Math 3 Natural Science or Math 3 

Social Science 3 Social Science 3 

Vocational 2 Vocational 2 

Major, Minor, *Elective .. 2 to 6 Major, Minor, *Elective .. 2 to 6 

Total 16 Total 16 

JUNIOR AND SENIOR YEARS 

Literature 2 Literature 2 

Religion 2 or 3 Religion 2 or 3 

Major, Minor, Elective 26 to 29 Major, Minor, Elective 25 to 29 

Total 31 Total 30 

CURRICULUM FOR A MAJOR IN APPLIED MUSIC 

LEADING TO THE B.A. DEGREE 
Because of the special nature of the materials involved it is 
helpful to indicate by years the required offerings of the music 
major. 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

Applied Music 1 Applied Music 1 

Music Appreciation 1 Music Appreciation 1 

College Problems 1 Conducting 1 

Ear Training 1 Ear Training 1 

Composition and Rhetoric .... 3 Composition and Rhetoric .... 3 

Foreign Languages 3 or 4 Foreign Languages 3 or 4 

Bible 3 Bible 3 

Natural Sciences 3 Natural Sciences 3 



Total 16 or 17 Total 16 or 17 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 

Applied Music 2 Applied Music 2 

Harmony 3 Harmony 3 

Bible 2 or 3 Bible 2 or 3 

Education or Psychology 2 Education or Psychology 2 

Foreign Language to 3 Foreign Language to 3 

* Suggested electives: social science, education and psychology and pre- 
requisites for upper biennium courses. 



48 SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGE 

History 3 History 3 

Vocational 2 Vocational 2 



Total 18 Total 18 

JUNIOR AND SENIOR YEARS 

Applied Music 4 Applied Music 4 

Harmony 3 Harmony 3 

History of Music 2 History of Music 2 

Soc. Science 3 Soc. Science 3 

Literature 2 Literature 2 

Religion to 3 Religion to 3 

Natural Sciences or Math 3 Natural Sciences or Math 3 

Major, Minor, and *Elective 11 Advanced Conducting 1 

Major, Minor, and *Elective 11 

Total 31 Total 32 

* Suggested Elective in Education 

MINISTERIAL CURRICULUM (B.A. IN THEOLOGY) 

Any student applying for admission to the ministerial cur- 
riculum should be a person who believes that God has called him 
to devote his life to Christian service as a minister, a missionary, an 
evangelist, or a Bible teacher. He should meet certain standards 
which, briefly stated, deal with his physcial condition, social develop- 
ment, his morals, his character and seriousness of purpose. 

The curriculum is divided into two parts. The first four 
semesters constitute a pre-ministerial section. Only freshmen who 
meet the standards established by the Committee on Ministerial 
Recommendations are granted permission to register for, or to 
continue in, this curriculum. 

At the end of the fourth semester, the Committee on Minis- 
terial Recommendations will consider applications from those 
students who wish to proceed into the upper biennium. 

A student transferring from another college is admitted to the 
ministerial curriculum provisionally. On completion of fourteen 
hours of credit, he may apply to have his status as a ministerial 
student made regular. 

A grade-point average of 1.25 is not only a prerequisite for 
admission to the upper biennium of the ministerial curriculum, but 
must be maintained thereafter. 



SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGE 49 

To qualify for the degree of Bachelor of Arts in Theology 
from this curriculum, a candidate must fulfill the following re- 
quirements: 

1. The general entrance requirements as listed on pages 30 and 
31. 

2. The completion of 137 hours, with a minimum of forty- 
eight hours of upper biennium credit. Not less than thirty hours, 
of which twenty must be in the senior year, are required to be 
earned in residence at this college. 

3. Present evidence of at least three months of successful 
experience in the colporteur ministry. 

COURSE REQUIREMENTS 

Major (Religion) 30 hours 

Required: in lower biennium, Religion 19, 20, 61, 62; in upper 
biennium, Religion 165, 166. Students taking this major in re- 
ligion who have not taken Bible III on the secondary level, will 
be required to take Religion 5. Forty hours is the maximum num- 
ber which may be applied from this field. 

Cognate (Applied Theology) 12 hours 

Required: Personal Evangelism, 4 hours (or Public Evangelism in 
the Field School, 4 hours); Sermon Preparation and Delivery, 4 
hours; Public Worship, 2 hours; Pastoral Methods, 2 hours. Six- 
teen hours is the maximum number of hours which may be taken 
in applied theology. 

Social Sciences 14 hours 

Required: History 1, 2, 151, 152. Recommended: History 6 and 
131. Students taking the major in Religion in this curriculum, 
who have not taken Bible III on the secondary level, will be re- 
quired to take History 6. 

English 10 hours 

Required: English 1:2; literature or journalism, 4 hours. 

Foreign Languages 12 to 14 hours 

Twelve hours in Greek for one who has had two units in one 

foreign language in secondary school; fourteen hours in Greek, or 

twelve hours in Greek and six hours in Hebrew, for one who has 
had less than two units in one foreign language. 

College Problems (Sociology 17) 1 hour 

Music 3 hours 

Recommended: Music 1 and 16. 
Speech 4 hours 

Required: Speech 5 and 6. 
Natural Sciences 6 hours 

This requirement may be met by any six-hour laboratory course. 



50 



SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGB 



Accounting 6 hours 

Required: Accounting 32 and 61. 

Vocational (See page 45) - 4 hours 

Health (Health 61 and 62) 4 hours 

Health 4 and 62. 
Education and/or Psychology _ 6 hours 

Minor and Electives 19 to 25 hours 

A history minor is recommended, ft is recommended that enough 
electives be chosen from education courses to qualify for certification 
for teaching. 

Total Hours 137 

SUGGESTED LOWER BIENNIUM CURRICULUM, 
SCHEDULE. SEQUENCE, Etc.* 
For candidates for the B.A. in Theology who enter without de- 
ficiencies, and expect to carry a full load of class work, the following 
suggested schedule for the first two years of the pre-ministerial 
curriculum is recommended. 

freshman year 



History 1 3 

Religion 19 3 

Natural Sciences (with 

laboratory) 3 

English 1: 3 

Music 1 2 

Sociology 17 1 

Total 15 



History 2 3 

Religion 20 3 

Natural Sciences (with 

laboratory) 3 

English 2 3 

Music 16 1 

Education or Psychology 2 

Elective 2 

Total 



17 



sophomore year 



Elements of N. T. Greek 43 - 3 

Religion 6l 2 

Applied Theology 2 

Vocational 2 

Speech 5 2 

Health 4 2 

Elective 3 

Total 16 



Elements of N. T. Greek 44 .. 3 

Religion 62 2 

Applied Theology 2 

Accounting 32 3 

Vocational 2 

Speech 6 - 2 

Health 62 2 

Total 16 



* For Pre-Ministerial Curriculum. 



SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLBGB 51 

While the student may be quite certain on entrance that he 
intends to take the ministerial curriculum, the increasing accuracy 
in self-evaluation made possible by college life sometimes causes a 
change in his aims and objectives. If specialization is started in 
the freshman year, a shift in course usually means a loss in credits. 
In order, therefore, to give the student time to find himself in terms 
of his life-work, the first year of the pre-ministeral curriculum 
has been arranged as a fitting introduction to any arts and sciences 
curriculum. For this reason, first-year Greek, formerly offered in 
the freshman year, is now placed in the sophomore year. 

PREPARATION FOR SECONDARY TEACHING 
Because of the increasing number of students interested in 
preparation for secondary or high school teaching, several changes 
have been made in order more adquately to meet these needs. 
All students planning to do secondary teaching will be enrolled 
as candidates for the Bachelor of Arts degree. Any such student 
will select a major and minor in his teaching fields and a second 
minor of twenty hours in Education and Psychology so as to certify 
for teaching. 

Students desiring General Conference Certification or who ex- 
pect to certify for teaching in the public school system of any state 
where no more than fifteen hours in Education are required may 
limit their courses in this Division to fifteen hours and qualify for 
certification, although the second minor is recommended because 
some states require as high as eighteen or twenty hours of Education 
and Psychology. 

Candidates for secondary teaching may, by careful course selec- 
tion, secure content majors and minors in the fields in which they 
plan to teach. In this way candidates can often qualify to teach in 
three or four different fields, which greatly increases their op- 
portunities to find suitable positions. 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 
(With a major in Elementary Education) 
The four-year curriculum in elementary education is designed to 
meet the needs of students desiring a college degree with parti- 
cular preparation for teaching in the elementary field. It is recom- 
mended to those who are looking forward to supervisory work in 
elementary education. 

The Collegedale Elementary School, a well-equipped school 



52 SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGE 

of five rooms, serves as a laboratory school for the department. 
It affords opportunities for observation and student teaching. 

Admission: For admission without deficiency, entrance units 
as indicated on pages 30 and 31 must be presented. 

Major and Minor: This curriculum provides for a major 
in elementary education of not less than thirty hours and a minor in 
a field chosen by the student in counsel with the director of 
elementary education. See list of minors in the section on require- 
ments for a Bachelor of Arts degree. 

For this curriculum, the requirements as to total hours, minimum 
upper biennium credit, senior residence, grade point average, and 
residence credit and grade point average on the major and the 
minor, are the same as for a Bachelor of Arts degree. For specific 
information see "Graduation Standards." 

A student completing the first two years of this curriculum, 
with fulfillment of the admissions, residence, and grade point re- 
quirements for graduation, will receive a diploma in elementary 
education. 

The curriculum for the first two years as outlined makes for 
the student a very heavy course program, and it is strongly urged 
that the work be distributed over a summer and two years. 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

English 1 : 3 English 2 3 

Geography 41 r 3 Edu. 10 (Tech. Lang. Arts), 

or Other Methods 2 

Edu. 9 (Child. Rdg. & Lit.) 2 Edu. 16 (Principles) 2 

Edu. 17 (Org. and Admin. Edu. 20 (Math, for Ele. 

of the Elem. School) 2 Teachers) 2 

Edu. 35 (Appr. and School Edu. 36 (Appr. and School 

Music) 2 Music 2 

Art 31: or Art Appr 1 Edu. 40 (Dir. Obs. & Teach.) 1 

*Religion 3 *Religion 3 

Sociology 17 1 Art 32 or Art Appr 1 

Total **17 Total 16 



*A student entering without academy credits in Old and New Testament 
History is counselled to take Bible Survey the first year and Fundamentals of 
Christian Faith the second year, thus necessitating attendance at one 
summer session. 

♦♦Since 17 hours constitute a heavy program, Art 31 and 32, or 
Edu. 35 and 36, and Home Economics 15 and 16 are suggested for summer 
study. 



SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGE 53 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 

History 1 or 13 3 History 2 or 14 3 

Science Elective 3 Science Elective 3 

♦♦English 41 2 **English 42 2 

Home Ec. 61 (Nutr.), or Health 44 (Games for Child.) 1 

Child Care or Child 

Diseases 2 Child Psychology 4 2 

General Psychology 1 2 Geography 42 3 

Edu. 23 (Sch. Health Probs.) 2 H. Ec. 16 (Practical Arts) .... 1 

H. Ec. 15 (Practical Arts) .... 1 Health 21 (Safety Ed. and 

Edu. 40 (Dir. Obs. & Teach.) 1 First Aid) 1 

Health 43 (Games for Child.) 1 

Total 17 Total 16 

**Two hours of credit in Public Speaking may be substituted for two 
hours of American Literature. 

JUNIOR AND SENIOR YEARS 

Religion 6 to 10 

fDirected Observation and Teaching 171-172 4 

Education (upper biennium) 12 

Natural Science or Math 6 

Literature 0-2 

Vocational 4 

Minor and Electives 23 to 29 



To a Total of 61 

t A student graduating from the two-year curriculum must take in 
Southern Missionary College the two hours of directed teaching in that 
curriculum; one graduating from the four-year curriculum shall take 
in the senior year at Southern Missionary College a minimum of two 
hours of directed teaching. 

ELEMENTARY TEACHER CERTIFICATION 

Upon completion of the first year of the curriculum in elemen- 
tary education, a student is eligible to receive a one-year denomina- 
tional elementary certificate. 

A student completing the first two-years of the curriculum in 
elementary education qualifies for a three-year elementary certificate 
from the Southern Union Conference Department of Education, and 
a Tennessee permanent professional certificate. 

A student finishing the four-year curriculum is eligible to 



54 SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGE 

receive a five-year elementary certificate from the Southern Union 
Conference Department of Education. 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

(With a major in Home Economics) 

Admission. For admission to this curriculum see entrance 
requirements as listed on pages 30 and 31. 

Major: This curriculum provides for a major of thirty hours 
in home economics. Thirteen hours of the major shall be of upper 
biennium credit, six hours of which shall have been earned in 
this college. No course with a grade of "D" applies on the major. 

Minor: For information as to fields from which the minor 
may be chosen and the requirements for a specific minor, see the 
section on minor requirements for a Bachelor of Arts degree. 

For graduation from this curriculum the student will fulfill 
the same requirements as to total hours, senior residence, minimum 
upper biennium credit, grade points, and residence credit and grade 
point average on the major and the minor, as for the Bachelor of 
Arts degree. For information concerning any one of these, refer 
to the particulur item under "Graduation Standards." 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

English 1: 3 English 2 3 

Religion 1 or 19 3 Religion 2 or 20 3 

Chemistry 1 or 7 3 or 4 Chemistry 2 or 8 3 or 4 

Home Economics 1 or 21 .... 3 Home Economics 2 or 22 .... 3 

Sociology 17 1 Elective 3 

Elective 1 Total 16 

Total 15 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 

Religion 2 or 3 Religion 2 or 3 

History 1 or 13 3 History 2 or 14 3 

Biology 1 or 11 3 Biology 2 or 12 3 

Home Economics 3 to 5 Home Economics 3 to 5 

Minor and Elective 2 to 5 Minor and Elective 2 to 5 



Total 16 Total 16 



SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGE 55 

JUNIOR AND SENIOR YEARS 

Religion 0-6 

Literature 4 

Social Sciences 6 

Food Chemistry, 161-162 4 

Health 2 

Home Economics (upper biennium, 13 hours) .... 14 to 18 

Minor and Electives 22 to 32 

Total 62 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 
(With a major in Industrial Arts) 
To qualify for the degree of Bachelor of Science with a major 
in Industrial Arts, a candidate must fulfill the following require- 
ments: 

GENERAL REQUIREMENTS 

1. For admission to the Industrial Arts curriculum see en- 
trance requirements as listed on page 32 and 33. 

2. The completion of 125 hours as outlined in the curriculum 
below, which provides for a major of thirty hours in industrial arts 
and a minor of sixteen to twenty hours in one field of natural 
sciences or in mathematics. 

3. A minimum of thirteen hours of upper biennium credit 
on the, major. Six hours of upper biennium credit on the major 
(preferably the last six) and three on the minor shall be earned 
in this college. No course in which a grade of "D" has been 
received may apply on the major. 

4. A minimum of forty hours of upper biennium credit, of 
which thirteen hours shall be in the major. 

5. An average of one grade point per hour on all credits 
applied toward graduation, this average being computed separately 
on residence and accepted credits. 

6. Twenty-four hours of the senior year's work must be taken 
in this college. 

COURSE REQUIREMENTS 

Major (Industrial Arts) 30 hours 

Within the hours for a major the following courses are required: 
Industrial Arts 1-2, 77-78, 91-92, 123-124, 193, 194, 195-196. 



36 



SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGfi 



Minor 16-20 hours 

Sociology (College Problems) 1 hour 

Social Sciences (History, six hours) 12 hours 

Religion , 12-16 hours 

English 10 hours 

Six hours in composition, four hours in literature. 
Education and Psychology 5 hours 

Education 16 and Psychology 110 recommended. 

Accounting 6 hours 

Health 2 hours 

Electives 19-27 hours 

Total 125 hours 

freshman year 



Religion 1 to 19 3 

English 1: 3 

Mechanical Drawing 1- 3 

Industrial Arts 11 or 33 -- 2 

♦Natural Sciences or Math 3 

Sociology 17 1 

Total 15 



Religion 2 or 20 3 

English 2 3 

Mechanical Drawing 2 3 

Industrial Arts 12 or 34 2 

♦Natural Sciences or Math 3 

Education or Psychology 2 

Total 16 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Religion (Course 62 

suggested) 2 

♦Natural Sciences or Math 3 

History 2 or 14 3 

Principles of Accounting 2 .... 3 

Industrial Arts 77- and 91- - 3 Industrial Arts 78 and 91 .... 3 

Education 16 2 Elective 2 



Religion (Course 61 

suggested) 2 

♦Natural Sciences or Math 3 

History 1 or 13 3 

Introduction to Business 1 .... 3 



Total 



16 



Total 



16 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Health 2 

♦Natural Science or Math 3 

English 41, 51, or 161 2 

Industrial Arts 123- 1 

Industrial Arts Elective 1 

Electives 7 

Total 16 



Religion 2-6 

♦Natural Science or Math 3 

English 42, 52 or 162 2 

Industrial Arts 124 1 

Industrial Arts Elective 1 

Elective 2-6 

Total 15 



♦Courses which apply on the minor should be chosen. 



SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGE 57 

SENIOR YEAR 

Social Science 3 Social Science 3 

Industrial Arts 183 and 195- - 3 Industrial Arts 194 and 196 .. 3 

Industrial Arts Elective 2 Industrial Arts Elective 2 

Electives 8 Electives 7 



Total 16 Total 15 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 
(With a major in Religious Education) 

This curriculum is intended to prepare young women for work 
as Bible instructors in connection with the evangelistic activities of 
the Seventh-day Adventist denomination. 

Admission: For admission to this curriculum see entrance re- 
quirements as listed on pages 30 and 31. 

Major and Minor: This curriculum provides for a major of 
thirty hours in Religion and a minor chosen from the list of 
minors in the section on requirements for a Bachelor of Arts 
degree. Thirteen hours of the major and six hours of the minor 
shall be upper biennium credit, with six hours and three hours 
of this, respectively, earned in this college. 

For graduation, the requirements as to total hours ; senior resi- 
dence, minimum upper biennium credit, grade points, residence 
credit, and grade point average on the major and the minor, are 
the same as for the Bachelor of Arts degree. For specific informa- 
tion concerning any one of these, refer to the particular item under 
"Graduation Standards." 

Beginning with the class graduating in 1952, it is recommended 
that women graduating with a major in religion be able to present 
evidence of three months, not necessarily consecutive, in the colpor- 
teur work. 

freshman year 

English 1 3 English 2 3 

Religion 1 or 19 3 Religion 2 or 20 3 

Natural Science 3 Natural Science 3 

Home Economics 1 3 Home Economics 2 3 

Psychology 2 Education 16 2 

Applied Music 1 Applied Music 1 

Sociology 17 1 Elective 1 

Total 16 Total 16 



58 SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGE 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 

Religion 2 Religion 2 

History 1 3 History 2 3 

Music 1 2 Health 4 2 

Religion 5 2 History 6 2 

Speech 5 2 Speech 6 2 

Applied Music 1 Applied Music 1 

Elective 3 Psychology 2 

Elective 2 



Total 15 Total 16 

JUNIOR AND SENIOR YEARS 

Religion (13 hours upper biennium, including Religion 

165 and 166) 16 ' 

Literature 4 

History 151 and 152 6 

Home Economics 6 

Social Sciences 4 

Applied Theology 89, 90 4 

Minor and Elective 22 



Total 62 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 
(With a major in Secretarial Science) 

This curriculum is intended to prepare young men and women 
for work as secretaries in denominational offices, stenographers, 
clerical workers, and teachers of commerical subjects. 

The first two years of this curriculum may constitute a terminal 
curriculum leading to a diploma. 

For graduation from either the two-year or the four-year cur- 
riculum the same minimum residence and grade point average are 
required as for the arts and science curriculum; and for the four- 
year curriculum, the minimum residence for the major and the 
minor, the scholarship requirement in the major, and the minimum 
upper biennium hours required, are the same as for a Bachelor of 
Arts degree. 

Those preparing to teach in secondary schools should take 
eighteen hours in education. The State of Tennessee requires, be- 



SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGE 59 

sides six hours of elective in education, the following courses for 
certification to teach high school secretarial subjects: Educational 
Psychology, three hours; Principles of Secondary Education, three 
hours; Methods in Teaching Commercial Subjects and Supervised 
Teaching, six hours. 

To qualify for the degree of Bachelor of Science from this 
curriculum with a major in Secretarial Science, a candidate must 
fulfill the following requirements: 

1. The entrance requirements as listed on pages 32 and 33. 

2. A minimum of 125 hours in courses applicable toward this 
degree. 

3. A minimum of forty hours of upper biennium credit. 

4. Completion of a minor. Suggested minors: religion, home 
economics, English, music. See requirements for these in 
the section on a Bachelor of Arts degree. 

COURSE REQUIREMENTS 

Major (Secretarial Science) 30 hours 

Required: in lower biennium, Secretarial Science 31, 40, 55, 56, 63, 
64, 71, 75, and in upper biennium Secretarial Science 109, 127, 128; 
or 135, 127, or 128, 109 or 112; and a minimum of five hours from 
141, 174, and 181. No course with a grade of "D" may apply on 
the major. Courses 9, 10, 13, and 14 do not count on this major. 

Accounting and Business 6 hours 

Economics 9 hours 

Education 2 hours 

English 10 hours 

. Six hours must be in comppsition, which is to be taken in the freshman 
or the sophomore year. The remaining four hours must be in litera- 
ture. 
History 6 hours 

Natural Sciences or Mathematics 6 hours 

Psychology 4 hours 

Heligion 14 hours 

Health (Required in Med. Sec. Tr. Curric.) 4 hours 

Sociology 17 (College Problems) 1 hour 

To be completed in the freshman year. 
Minor and Electives 37 hours 

Suggested Electives: 

a. Home Economics d. English 

b. Education e. Accounting 

c. Music f. Health 

(Continued on next page) 



60 SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGE 

g. Economics j. Speech 

h. Foreign Language k. History 

i. Religion 1. Political Science and 

Sociology 

PREMEDICINE 

Nearly all medical colleges now require a bachelor's degree of 
all candidates. Therefore students who expect to transfer later to a 
medical college should register as arts and sciences students selecting 
suitable majors and minors which will qualify them for a Bachelor 
of Arts degree. All other essentials for entrance to a medical 
college can be met by selecting proper electives. 

Students planning to transfer to the College of Medical Evan- 
gelists, Loma Linda, California, should select entrance courses as 
outlined in the current bulletin issued by that college. Currently 
these essential courses include: 

Semester hours 

General Chemistry 1-2 8 

Biology 8 

Foreign Language (French, German, or Spanish) 6-18 

Organic Chemistry 53-54 8 

Physics 1-2 8 

Freshman Composition 1:2 6 

American Government 15 2 

General Embryology 145 2 

Quantitative Analysis 102 3 

and a minimum of four hours of religion for each year of college 
work offered for entrance. 

The quality of scholarship required for entrance demands that 
a grade-point average in natural sciences and other subjects, 
figured separately, should be not less than 1.5 and a higher grade- 
point average is desirable. Students who do not reach this grade- 
point average will not be recommended. 

JUNIOR COLLEGE CURRICULUMS 

In the lower biennium, or the junior college level, two kinds 
of curriculums are offered. Each of the first type is known as a 
"transfer" curriculum, whereas the second type is "terminal." Each 
two-year curriculum leads to a diploma. The regular two-year 
transfer curriculums are predental, predietetics, and that leading to 



SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGE 61 

the Associate in Arts diploma. The terminal curriculums are Bible 
instructors', elementary teacher training, secretarial, medical secre- 
tarial, home economics, and industrial arts. Terminal curriculums 
are of a vocational nature and serve the needs of students who 
wish to complete their college training thereby. Each of these 
curriculums leads to a diploma and requires a "C" average for 
graduation. Students graduating from terminal curriculums have 
less rigid prerequisites and often must make up specific entrance 
and lower biennium requirements if they decide later to qualify for a 
baccalaureate degree. 

For graduation from any junior college curriculum the same 
requirements as to character and grade-point average are maintained 
as for a bachelor's degree. At least sixteen hours in residence are 
required of all two-year graduates. 

TRANSFER CURRICULUMS 

The following transfer curriculums are designed to prepare the 
student for admission to the upper biennium of a liberal arts college 
or to a professional school. A student preparing for professional 
training should acquaint himself with the specific requirements for 
admission to the particular school he intends to enter and should 
plan his secondary school and college programs to meet these re- 
quirements. 

Entrance requirements for each curriculum are indicated on- 
pages 30 and 31. 

ASSOCIATE IN ARTS CURRICULUM 

This is an Arts and Sciences transfer curriculum designed to 
prepare the student for admission to the upper biennium of this or 
any other accredited Liberal Arts College. 

Admission: See page 28. 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

English 1 3 English 2 3 

Foreign Languages 3-4 Foreign Languages 3-4 

Math, or Nat. Sc 3 Math, or Nat. Sc 3 

Religion 1 or 19 3 History 2 or 14 3 

History 1 or 13 3 Religion 2 or 20 3 

Sociology 17 1 

Total 16 or 17 Total 15 or 16 



62 



SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGE 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Religion 2 or 3 

Soc. Science or Ed 3 

For. Language or Elect 3 

Math, or Nat. Sc 3 

♦Elective 2 or 3 

Speech, Lit., or Journalism .... 2 
Total 16 



Religion 2 or 3 

Soc. Science or Ed 3 

For. Language or Elect 3 

Math, or Nat. Sc 3 

♦Elective 2 or 3 

Speech, Lit., or Journalism .... 2 
Total 



16 



THE TWO-YEAR PREDENTAL CURRICULUM 



Class A dental colleges require for admission two years (sixty 
hours) of college work, including certain prescribed courses. 
Students planning to enter a particular college of dentistry should 
consult its bulletin, since admission requirements vary, and frequently 
credit for art, music, expression, commerce, education, and vocational 
courses may not be included in the minimum for admission. 

Admission: See page 28. 

FRESHMAN YEAR 



English 1: 3 

Religion 1 or 19 3 

Chemistry 1- 4 

Mathematics 1 3 

Sociology 17 1 

♦Elective 2 

Total 16 



English 2 3 

Religion 2 or 20 3 

Chemistry 2 4 

Mathematics 2 3 

♦Elective 3 



Total 



16 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Chemistry 53- 4 

Physics 1- .' 4 

Biology 45 4 

Religion 2 

History 2 

Total 16 



Chemistry 54 4 

Physics 2 4 

Biology 46 4 

History 2 

Elective 2 

Total 16 



THE TWO-YEAR CURRICULUM IN PREDIETETICS 

Admission: See page 28. Consult the catalogue of the School 
of Dietetics of the College of Medical Evangelists for information 
concerning admission requirements to that school. 



♦Social science or psychology recommended. 



SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGE 



6J 



FRESHMAN YEAR 



English 1 3 

Religion 1 or 19 3 

Chemistry 1 4 

Home Economics 1 3 

Sociology 17 1 

Psychology 1 2 

Total 16 



English 2 3 

Religion 2 or 20 3 

Chemistry 2 4 

Home Economics 2 3 

Sociology 20 3 



Total 



16 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Religion 2 Religion 2 

Biology 11 3 

Economics 51 3 

Political Science 15 2 

Elective 6 

Total 



16 



Biology 12 3 

Psychology 110 3 

Education 16 2 

Elective 6 

Total 



16 



TERMINAL CURRICULUMS 
THE TWO-YEAR BIBLE INSTRUCTORS' CURRICULUM 
Admission: See page 28. 

FRESHMAN YEAR 



English 1 3 

Religion 19 3 

Home Economics 3 

Sociology 17 1 

Natural Science 3 

First Aid 2 

Elective 1 

Total 16 



English 2 3 

Religion 20 3 

Home Economics 3 

Applied Music 1 

Natural Science 3 

Education 16 or Psychology .. 2 

Elective 1 

Total 



16 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Religion 2 

History 3 

Music 1 2 

Gift of Prophecy 2 

Speech 5 - 2 

Applied Music 1 

Applied Theology 89 2 

Health 61 2 

Total 16 



Religion 2 

History 3 

Modern Adventism 2 

Speech 6 2 

Applied Music 1 

Applied Theology 90 2 

Health 62 2 

Elective 2 

Total 16 



64 



SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGE 



THE TWO-YEAR SECRETARIAL TRAINING CURRICULUM 
Admission: See page 30. 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

Religion 1 or 19 3 Religion 2 or 20 3 



English 1 3 

Sec. Sci. 9 (Shorthand) 4 

Sec. Sci. 13 (Typewriting) .... 2 

Psychology 2 

Sociology 17 1 

Elective 1 

Total 16 



English 2 3 

Sec. Sci. 10 (Shorthand) 4 

Sec. Sci. 14 (Typewriting) .... 2 

Sec. Sci. 40 (Filing) 2 

Electives 2 

Total 16 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Sec. Sci. 55 (Adv. Shorthand) 3 
Sec. Sci. 63 (Typing and 

Trans.) 2 

Sec. Sci. 71 (Sec. Practice) .. 2 

Secretarial Accounting 3 

Religion 2 

Sec. Sci. 31 (Voice Trans.) .. 1 
Hist., Soc, Pol. Sci., or 

Home Economics 3 

Elective 2 

Total 18 



Sec. Sci. (Adv. Shorthand) .. 3 
Sec. Sci. 64 (Typing and 

Trans.) 2 

Business Communications 3 

Sec. Sci. 75 (Bus. Mach.) .... 2 
History, Soc, Pol. Sci., . 

or Home Economics 3 

Elective 3 



Total 



16 



TWO-YEAR MEDICAL SECRETARIAL TRAINING CURRICULUM 

Graduates of the Medical Secretarial Training curriculum who 
desire a degree of Bachelor of Science with a major in Secretarial 
Science may do so by completing the requirements listed on page 
60. 

FRESHMAN YEAR 



Religion 1 or 19 3 

English 1 3 

Sec. Sci. 9 (Shorthand) 4 

Sec. Sci. 13 (Typewriting) .... 2 

Psychology 2 

Health Ed. 4 (Health Prin.) 2 
Total 16 



Religion 2 or 20 3 

English 2 3 

Sec. Sci. 10 (Shorthand) 4 

Sec. Sci. 14 (Typewriting) .... 2 

Sec. Sci. 40 (Filing) 2 

Psychology 2 

Total 16 



SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGE 



65 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Sec. Sci. 55 (Adv. Shorthand) 3 
Sec. Sci. 63 (Typing and 

Trans.) 2 

Sec. Sci. 73 (Med. Sec. 

Practice) 2 

Biology 10 (Anat. and Phys.) 3 
Health Ed. 21 (First Aid) .... 1 
Sec. Sci. 31 (Voice Trans.) .... 1 

Phys. Education 5 l / 2 

Electives 3V2 

Total 16 



Sec. Sci. 58 (Med. Shorthand) 3 
Sec. Sci. 64 (Typing and 

Trans.) 2 

Health Ed. 74 (Lab. Service 

and Office Nursing) 2 

Biology 11 (Anat. and Phys.) 3 
Sec. Sci. 75 (Bus. Machines) 2 

Secretarial Accounting 3 

Phys. Ed. 6 l/ 2 

Elective y 2 

Total 16 



THE TWO-YEAR CURRICULUM IN HOME ECONOMICS 
Admission. See page 28. 



FRESHMAN YEAR 



Religion 1 or 19 3 

English 1 3 

Foods and Cookery 1 3 

Sociology 17 1 

Elective 2 

First Aid 21 2 

Nutrition 61 2 



Total 



16 



Religion 2 or 20 3 

English 2 3 

Foods and Cookery 2 3 

Health Principles 4 2 

Elective 3 

Education or Psychology 2 



Total 



16 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Religion 2 or 3 

History or Econ 3 

Elect: Science 3 

Clothing 21 3 

Practical Arts 15 2 

Elective 3 



Religion 2 or 3 

History or Econ 3 

Sociology 20 3 

Clothing 22 3 

Practical Arts 16 2 

Elective 2 



Total 



16 



Total 



16 



66 SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGE 

THE TWO-YEAR INDUSTRIAL ARTS CURRICULUM 
Admission: See page 28. 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

Religion 1 or 19 3 Religion 2 or 20 3 

English 1 3 English 2 3 

History 31 3 Principles of Accounting 2 .... 3 

Woodworking 11 2 Woodworking 12 2 

Mechanical Drawing 1 3 Mechanical Drawing 2 3 

Sociology 17 1 Education or Psychology 2 

Elective 1 



Total 16 Total 16 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 

Religion 2 Religion 2 

Hist, or Pol. Sc 3 Hist, or Pol. Sc 3 

Science or Math 3 Science or Math 3 

Industrials Arts 6 Industrials Arts 6 

Elective 2 Elective 2 



Total 16 Total 16 

THE TWO-YEAR ELEMENTARY TEACHER TRAINING CURRICULUM 
Admission: See page 28. 

The first two years of the curriculum leading to a Bachelor of 
Science, with a major in elementary education, constitute this curri- 
culum. See pages 51 and 53 for information as to course and certifi- 
cation requirements. 

SPECIAL INTERESTS 

In addition to the four-year baccalaureate curriculums and the 
two-year lower biennium curriculums, two special interest offerings 
deserve particular notice. The Prenursing Curriculum is a one-year 
offering and the Medical Cadet Training is but a part of a one- 
year curriculum. 

PRENURSING 

The following prerequisites satisfy the admission requirements 
of most schools of nursing. Since there is some variation in ad- 
mission requirements, a student looking forward to nurses' train- 



*To be selected in counsel with student's adviser. 



SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGE 67 

ing should familiarize himself or herself with the particular re- 
quirements of the school in mind. 

Admission requirements for many schools of nursing specify 
the following sixteen units and graduation from an accredited 
secondary school with a high "C" average: 

English 3 Bible (one unit for each year of 

Foreign Language (both units attendance at a Seventh-day Ad- 

must be in the same language) 2 ventist academy to the extent of 

Mathematics (shall include one three units; one unit for high 

unit of algebra and does not school graduates) 1-3 

include commercial or other ap- Science (one unit must be 

plied mathematics) 2 physics) 2 

History ™_ 1 Sufficient electives to make a total 

of sixteen units. 

Many schools of nursing also require for admission one unit 
of physics from the secondary school. 

Upon entrance, college prenursing students are given tests in 
arithmetic for nurses and reading comprehension and speed. Re- 
medial work in arithmetic and reading will be required of all those 
who do not pass these tests with satisfactory standing. 

The college prenursing work leads to a certificate instead of a 
diploma. It is strongly urged that these courses be taken in two 
semesters and a summer term, or in two years. Students may do 
some of this work by correspondence in order to restrict residence to 
one year. Such correspondence credit should be earned prior to 
attendance at Southern Missionary College. 

ONE- YEAR PRENURSING CURRICULUM 

English 1 3 English 2 3 

Religion Religion, or History 6 2 

(Course 5 recommended) .. 2 Chemistry 8 3 

Chemistry 7 3 Biology 12 3 

Biology 11 3 Sociology 32 1 

Sociology 31 2 Biology 22 4 

Health 1 2 Health 6 l/ 2 

Sociology 17 1 

Health 5: V 2 



Total I6I/2 Total l6l/ 2 

MEDICAL CADET TRAINING 

Because the present tension in international relations points 
toward the possibility of another "all out" world conflict, Southern 



68 SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGE 

Missionary College has reactivated the Medical Cadet Corps. The 
benefits of this training are effective in peace-time disasters as well 
as in war. Briefly stated, the objectives of the program are: 

1. To provide immediately available, efficient, and well-trained 
medical assistants in time of national emergency. 

2. To facilitate the transition of draftees from civilian to 
military life. 

3. To teach Adventist standards regarding non-combatancy 
principles. 

The course is divided into three units as follows: (1) Dis- 
mounted drill and Physical Training. (2) Instruction and practice 
in First Aid and its extension and adaptation to field conditions. 
(3) Military medical duties of Seventh-day Adventists including 
non-combatancy principles and related subjects. 

The plan of the organization, credit granted, time involved, 
eligibility, cost of membership, and the certification of completion 
are outlined as follows: 

1. Plan of organization. There will be semi-military organiza- 
tion with the essential staff and cadet officers. Uniforms 
are required. Military order, drill, and procedure will be 
followed. 

2. Credit earned. College students who complete the course 
will be granted two semester hours of lower biennium credit. 

3. Eligibility. Membership in the Cadet Corps will be re- 
stricted to physically able college men and to academy boys 
who are in their junior (or senior) years in Collegedale 
Academy or have passed their seventeenth birthday. Cadet 
Corps will be counted on the student's current course load. 

4. Time involved. Approximately 108 hours are required to 
complete the course. 

5. Time and place of meeting. The schedule requires a meet- 
ing of one and a half hours one evening a week throughout 
the school year. This is exclusive of the medical cadet 
corps techniques, First Aid and Non-Combatancy Principles, 
which will be given as a separate one-hour course in the 
regular school program. The location of formations is at 
the discretion of the Commanding Officer. 

6. Cost of membership. Tuition will be charged according 
to the credit allowed. Members purchase their complete uni- 



SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGE 69 

forms, which are the regulation army sun-tan khaki with 
matching overseas cap and tie and army tan footwear. In- 
signia, epaulets, and MMC pins will also be purchased by 
the trainee. 
7. Certificate. Upon completion of the course requirements a 
certificate of competence shaped to fit the army service 
packet so that it may readily be presented for filing upon 
induction will be issued. Standard and Advanced Red Cross 
certificates will be given those who meet successfully all of 
the First Aid requirements. 

STUDENTS FROM NON-ENGLISH SPEAKING COUNTRIES 

The Required Standards of English Performance set forth on 
page 42 are obviously inappropriate for students from non-English- 
speaking countries who are planning to return to their homes in 
such countries. The pattern of requirements in English usage is, 
therefore, altered to fit the needs of all such students. 



70 SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGB 

DIVISIONS OF INSTRUCTION 

Courses of instruction are arranged in seven divisions: 

I Applied Arts III Fine Arts 

II Education and Psychology IV Languages and Literature 
V Natural Science and Mathematics 
VI Religion and Applied Theology 
VII Social Sciences 

Of the courses listed, those marked with an asterisk prob- 
ably will not be given in 1952-53, those without this mark will 
be given if there is sufficient demand. The college reserves the right 
to withdraw temporarily any course for which there is not adequate 
enrollment. 

Course Numbers: Courses numbered from 1 to 99 are lower 
biennium courses, taken mainly by freshmen and sophomores; those 
numbered 100 or above are upper biennium courses, open to juniors 
and seniors. 

A sophomore may register for one or more upper biennium 
courses, for upper biennium credit, provided (1) he has earned, 
with an average of "C" or above, fifty hours including basic fresh- 
man and sophomore courses already taken, and (2) his current 
registration completes the fulfillment of lower biennium basic and 
major requirements. In exceptional cases, a sophomore who does 
not fulfill the above requirements may be admitted to an upper 
biennium course for lower biennium credit. Application for per- 
mission to do this is made on a blank in the registrar's office. 

Course numbers separated by a hyphen (e.g., 1-2) represent 
year courses, the semesters to be taken in order given. Credit for 
the first semester only will not apply toward graduation from any 
curriculum. 

Course numbers separated by a colon (e.g., 11:12) are year 
courses, of which either semester may be taken first, but both semes- 
ters must be taken before the credit may apply toward graduation 
from any curriculum. 

Majors and Minors: Available majors and minors, with 
requirements for each, are listed in their respective sections. In- 
formation concerning majors may be found in the section on 
curriculums. 



SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGE 71 

I. APPLIED ARTS 

Rupert M. Craig, Chairman 
Albert L. Anderson Stanley D. Brown 

Thyra E. Bowen H. T. Curtis 

Gerald W. Boynton George T. Gott 

Theresa Brickman ■ Mary M. Zweig 

ACCOUNTING AND BUSINESS 

Students may major in Economics and Business in Arts and 
Sciences. The major requirement is made up of suitable courses in 
economics, accounting, and business. For a detailed statement of the 
major and minor requirements in this field see page 120. 
32. Principles of Accounting Second semester, three hours 

A course in the fundamentals of accounting applied to a 
single proprietorship. 
51. Secretarial Accounting First semester, three hours 

An introductory course in accounting specifically designed for 
secretarial science students. Consideration is given to the keeping of 
records of a variety of small businesses. 
61-62. Intermediate Accounting Both semesters, six hours 

A course in accounting principles applied to merchandising in 
the partnership and corporate forms, and as applied to industrial 
enterprises. 
109. Denominational Organization and Policies 

First semester, three hours 

A thorough examination of denominational organization, finan- 
cial problems, and conference and institutional finance. 
121. Office Management First semester, three hours 

Prerequisite: A major or minor program in Secretarial Science 
or Business and Economics. 

Problems involved in planning and directing office activity to 
accomplish management objectives; selection and training of office 
workers; duties of office management personnel; matters concerning 
office plans and specifications, equipment, supplies and routine pro- 
cedures. 
131. Cost Accounting Second semester, two hours 

The general principles of cost accounting, labor and production 
expense, and the control of overhead and process costs. Standard 
costs and budgets are given attention. 



72 SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGE 

*132. Auditing Second semester, two hours 

Use of working papers and methods of conducting audits. At- 
tention is given to accounting principles and practices underlying 
audit theory. 

141. Business Management First semester, three hours 
A course designed to present various types of business manage- 
ment according to the purpose of each and dealing with their inter- 
nal system and external relationships. This course is directed toward 
the problems of the small businessman. 

142. Business Policy Second semester, three hours 
An analysis of business policies as related to ethics, responsi- 
bilities, procedures, techniques, and facilities. 

175. Business Administration Problems First semester, two hours 
A seminar course in management problems including budgets 
and financial reports. 

AGRICULTURE 

1-2. General Agriculture Both semesters, four hours 

A survey of the various phases of plant production and animal 
husbandry. This course satisfies the vocational requirement for a 
degree. Laboratory as arranged. 

10. Bee Culture Second semester, two hours 

A beginning course in bee culture including the organization 
and care of a bee colony and marketing of honey. One hour lecture, 
three hours laboratory, each week. 

31. Landscape Art First semester, two hours 

Planning the development and beautification of home and 
school grounds. A study of plants, trees, shrubs, and flowers, adapted 
to local surroundings; their selection, planting, and care. Two 
hours lecture, two hours laboratory, each week. 

*34. Vegetable Gardening Second semester, two hours 

Proper selection of the home garden site, its preparation and 
cultivation; methods of control of plant diseases and insect pests; 
instruction in the preparation of fresh vegetables and the preserva- 
tion of food. Two hours lecture, two hours laboratory, each week. 



•Probably will not be given 1952-53. 



SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGE 7J 

HOME ECONOMICS 

The courses in this department are designed to give cultural 
and practical knowledge of the essentials of successful homemaking. 

Major: A major in home economics, which applies toward a 
Bachelor of Science in Home Economics, requires thirty hours of 
college credit; thirteen hours of upper biennium credit are 
required, of which a minimum of six hours must be earned in this 
college. The major shall include the following courses: Home 
Economics 1, 2; 21, 22; 41 and 42, and Sociology 132. Sociology 42 
or 142 may apply on this major. 

A student majoring in home economics is required to take six 
hours of biological science; ten hours in Chemistry including courses 
1-2 or 7-8; Food Chemistry, 4 hours. Industrial Arts 33 and 34 
are strongly recommended. 

Minor: A minor in home economics requires fifteen hours, 
exclusive of Course 15, 16, and including six hours of upper bien- 
nium credit. Three hours of the upper biennium credit shall be earn- 
ed in this college. Economics 42 and Sociology 132 may apply on 
this minor. 

I, 2. Food and Cookery Both semesters, six hours 

A study of food selection, preparation, and service, with em- 
phasis on the selections of a healthful diet. Laboratory practice in 
the basic principles of cookery. Two hours lecture, three hours lab- 
oratory, each week. Credit for Course 1 is prerequisite for Course 2. 

II, 12. Practical Cookery Both semesters, four hours 

A course designed for young men, to acquaint them with the 
principles of cooking and meal planning, and with the fundamentals 
of healthful diet. One hour lecture, three hours laboratory, each 
week. 

15, 16. Practical Arts Both semesters, two hours 

Gardening, crafts, home mechanics, sewing and home arts, 
woodworking. Three hours laboratory each week. 

21, 22. Clothing Both semesters, six hours 

A course in the selection and construction of clothing; funda- 
mental principles of garment construction; color design, psychology 
of dress. Two hours lecture, three hour's laboratory, each week. 
Credit for Course 21 is prerequisite to Course 22. 



74 SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGE 

41, 42. Interior Decorating Both semesters, six hours 

Study and application of the principles governing the selection 
and arrangement of furniture, textiles, pictures, and other home 
furnishings; instruction and practice in upholstering furniture and in 
making draperies and other practical decorations. Open to both 
men and women. Two hours lecture, three hours laboratory, each 
week. 
61-62. Nutrition Both semesters, four hours 

A basic course in nutrition to recognize and give limited in- 
struction and supervision to a balanced diet in the home; methods 
for promoting adequate nutrition practices in the home and among 
school children; sanitation and food handling. 
101, 102. Advanced Cookery Both semesters, six hours 

Prerequisite: Home Economics 1 and 2, or 11 and 12. 

Problems in advanced foods, menu planning, calculating costs, 
marketing, experimental cookery, preparing and serving meals for 
all occasions. Open to both men and women. Two hours lecture, 
three hours laboratory, each week. 
121-122: Dress Design and Construction Both semesters, six hours 

Prerequisite: Home Economics 21 and 22. 

Pattern designing; special problems in fitting; construction of 
woolen garments. Further creative experience in costume design 
and construction of dresses. Two hours lecture, three hours labora- 
tory, each week. 
*171. Institutional Management First semester, two hours 

The study of administrative duties and problems in institu- 
tional work including those of organization, equipment, personnel, 
costs, marketing, and service. Open to both men and women. 

*172. Quantity Cookery Second semester, two hours 

Prerequisite: Home Economics 1 and 2, or 11 and 12. 
The study of preparation and service of food in large quan- 
tities. Laboratory work by appointment in the college cafeteria. 
Open to both men and women. 
190. Problems in Home Economics 

One or two semesters, one or two hours 
Prerequisite: A major or a minor in home economics; senior 
standing. 



•Probably will not be given 1952-53. 



SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGE 75 

A course designed to give opportunity for individual study 
of some special interest or need in this field. 

INDUSTRIAL ARTS 

The purpose of the courses in industrial arts is to provide 
opportunity for students to learn at least one trade; to train teachers 
of industrial arts and develop supervisors and plant managers for 
home and foreign mission enterprises. 

Major: A major in industrial arts in the Arts and Sciences cur- 
riculum leading to a Bachelor of Science, requires thirty hours, 
including Industrial Arts 1-2, 77-78, 91-92, 123-124, 193, 194, 
195-196. Thirteen hours of the major shall be in upper biennium 
credit, six hours of which shall be earned in this college. No course 
in which a "D" has been received may apply on the major. 

Minors: A minor in industrial arts and another in printing in 
the Arts and Sciences curriculum requires eighteen hours. They shall 
include six hours each of upper biennium credit, three of which shall 
be earned in this college. Courses 91 and 92 are recommended for 
a minor in industrial arts. A minor in printing can be taken with 
majors in other fields. 

1-2. Mechanical Drawing Both semesters, six hours 

Designed to give fundamental training in the use of instru- 
ments, and in the selection of equipment and drawing materials; 
training in the various processes; orthographic projection, revolu- 
tions, surface development, lettering, shading and dimensioning. 

11. General Woodworking First semester, two hours 
The study of hand and machine tool processes, with opportunity 

for working out selected projects in the laboratory. The use and 
care of tools, selection of projects, shop sketching. One hour 
lecture and two hours laboratory each week. 

12. General Woodworking Second semester, two hours 

The study of hand and machine tool processes, with op- 
portunity for working out selected projects in the laboratory. The 
use and care of tools, selection of projects, shop sketching, finishing 
processes, and finishing, designing furniture, matching grain, 
selection of hardware, and methods of displaying finished products. 
One hour lecture, two hours laboratory, each week. 



76 SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGE 

15-16. Welding Both semesters, four hours 

Principles and practice of electric and oxy-acetylene and gas 
welding. 

33, 34. Household Mechanics Both semesters, four hours 

Instruction and experience in the repair and upkeep of house- 
hold equipment. One hour lecture, two hours laboratory, each week. 

51. Auto Mechanics First semester, two hours 

A general course in the fundamental principles of gasoline 
engines, their design, timing, cooling, carburetion, and lubrication; 
automobile body designs, makes, and models. One hour lecture, 
two hours laboratory, each week. 

52. Auto Mechanics Second semester, two hours 

A general course in the fundamentals of gasoline engines and 
automobile design and repair; automotive electricity, power flow, 
servicing, and trouble shooting; field trips. One hour lecture, two 
hours laboratory, each week. 
61-62. Fundamentals of Typography Both semesters, six hours 

A survey of the graphic arts field with a brief history of print- 
ing, the study of types and type composition, proofreading, type 
design and balance, and simple platen presswork. Also an introduc- 
tion to the production of paper, its use, how to compute and cut 
paper for a job, and the use of bindery equipment. Two hours lec- 
ture, three hours laboratory, per week. 
63-64. Advanced Typography and Design 

Both semesters, six hours 

A study of type faces and their use, the study of the principles 
governing layout and design, advanced work in composition and 
imposition and lockup for book, magazine, and newspaper work and 
job work. Detailed practice in the operation and printing of forms 
on automatic cylinder presses. Printshop mathematics with reference 
to copy fitting, paper cutting. Use of ink and color printing. Two 
hours lecture, three hours laboratory. Prerequisite: Course 61-62 or 
equivalent. 
67. Proofreading and Proofroom Techniques 

First semester, two hours 

The fundamentals of proofreading and copy preparation. The 
study of rules and practices regarding book, magazine, and news- 
paper publishing, and job work. On-the-job practice in handling 
actual proofroom problems. 



SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGE 77 

68. History of Printing Second semester, two hours 

The history of printing from the invention of paper and type 
to the present time, including the growth and development in the 
field of letterpress, offset, and other processes. 
77-78. Architectural Drawing Both semesters, jour hours 

Prerequisite: Industrial Arts 1-2, or a beginning course in 
Mechanical Drawing. 

A survey of the field in its various phases, and the acquisition 
of a working knowledge of technique, symbols, materials, plan 
reading, tracing, and blue-printing. 
81-82. Intermediate Mechanical Drawing Both semesters, six hours 

Basic instruction in the fundamental processes of mechanical 
drawing. 
91 or 92. Industrial Arts Problems 

Either semester, one to three hours 

A study of particular problems in the industrial arts field. A 
term paper is required. 

101-102. Advanced Mechanical Drawing Both semesters, four hours 
Prerequisite: Industrial Arts 1-2 or equivalent. 
The processes to be studied are: isometric drawing, oblique 
drawing, intersections, and sectional views, map and topographical 
drawing, seacraft and aircraft drawing, details and tracings. 

111. Fundamentals in Linotype Operation. 

First semester, three hours 

The function, maintenance and operation of the linecasting 

machine in straight matter composition. For those who desire a 

working knowledge of the linotype. Prerequisite: Printing 61-62, 

63-64. Two hours lecture, three hours laboratory each week. 

112. Advanced Linotype Mechanics and Operation 

Second semester, three hours 
The maintenance and repair of the linotype. How to set more 
complicated composition such as tabular work, ads for newspapers 
and magazines. Special emphasis on speed and skill in operation. 
Prerequisite: Courses 61-62, and 63-64, and 111. One hour lecture, 
six hours laboratory each week. 
121-122. Structural and Finish Carpentry 

Both semesters, four hours 
Prerequisite: Industrial Arts 11 and 12 or equivalent. 



78 SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGE 

Required hand tools: rip saw, cross grain saw (ten point), 
hammer, wrecking bar, l/ 2 " anc ^ 1" chisels, framing square, try 
square, block plane, and jack plane. 

The course is designed to give the student a knowledge of 
various types of structures, finishing materials, trimming, and 
finishing, and of interior and exterior decoration. Laboratory time 
will be spent either in construction of models or of full-size 
dwellings. One hour lecture, two hours laboratory, each week. 

123. Materials of Construction First semester, one hour 
The study of materials and their use in construction; the effects 

of cold, heat, and other factors on various types of building ma- 
terials. 

124. Structure Design Second semester, one hour 
The study of private and public building construction, types 

of architecture, and the history behind architectural, furniture, and 
equipment design. 

133-134. Advanced Woodworking 

Both semesters, two to jour hours 

Prerequisite: Industrial Arts 11 and 12, or a course in hand 
tool operations. 

The study and use of machine tools, machine processes, and 
mill work. 

141-142. Electric and Oxy-Acetylene Welding 

Both semesters, two to four hours 

Designed to give advanced skill in the process, use, and 

fusing of metals, their characteristics under cold and heat, various 

technical designs and use of tin plates, servicing and care of 

equipment. One hour lecture, two hours laboratory, each week. 

143. Machine Shop Either semester, one to three hours 

Fundamentals of machine shop practices, with a special 
emphasis given to the milling, fitting, and processing of metals. 
Study of pattern making, sheet metal, plumbing, and wiring. One 
hour lecture, one to four hours laboratory, each week. 

153, 154. Advanced Auto Mechanics Both semesters, four hours 

Prerequisite: Auto Mechanics 51, 52. 

Involves a study of advanced techniques of automobile motor 
rebuilding; interior and exterior repair and refinishing. Field trips. 



SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGE 79 

191-192. Advanced Architectural Drawing 

Both semesters, four hours 

Prerequisite: Industrial Arts 1-2, 77-78, or their equivalent. 

Students will be expected to work out for a full-size structure 
a complete set of plans, details, specifications, bill of materials and 
labor, and total costs. 

193. Trade Analysis First semester, two hours 
The study of trades. Each student is required to analyze his 

own trade, set it up on cards in knowing and doing units, with the 
best references attached. A copy of the full set of cards of the 
trade analyzed is to be turned in upon completion of the course. 

194. Field Problems Second semester, two hours 
Class time is to be devoted to visiting industrial arts set-ups 

and to a study of the particular problems of administration in the 
field of industrial arts. A term paper is required. 

195-196. History and Philosophy of Industrial Arts 

Both semesters, two hours 
The study of the development and proper place of industrial 
education; planning of better teaching materials and methods. 

BIBLIOGRAPHY AND LIBRARY SCIENCE 

93.-94. Library Methods Both semesters, six hours 

The basic elements of library science and school library meth- 
ods. Designed to impart a practical knowledge of how to organize 
and administer a library, how to select, acquire, and catalog books, 
and how to relate the library to the needs of the pupil. Lectures and 
laboratory practice in the college library. 

SECRETARIAL SCIENCE 

The courses in secretarial science are designed to serve three 
classes of students: those who desire to become clerical workers or 
secretaries, those who expect to teach commercial subjects in a 
secondary school, and those who desire the training for personal 
use. 

Major: A major in secretarial science, which applies on a 
Bachelor of Science degree, requires thirty hours. 

Required in the lower biennium: Courses 31, 40, 55, 56, 63, 
64, 71, 75; in the upper biennium: Courses 109, 112, 127, 128; 



80 SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGE 

or the following: 109 or 112, 127 or 128, 135, and a minimum 
of five hours chosen from Courses 174 or 181. Thirteen hours 
of the major shall be of upper biennium credit, six hours of which 
shall be earned in this college. No course with a grade of "D" 
may apply on this major. 

It is suggested that students majoring in secretarial science 
minor in Religion, home economics, English, or music. See the 
requirements for these minors in the section on a Bachelor of Arts 
degree. 

Minor: A minor in Secretarial Science which may apply on 
a Bachelor of Arts degree, requires eighteen hours. It shall in- 
clude Secretarial Science 55, 56, 63, 64; 71 or 75; and Secretarial 
Science 109, 112, 127, and 128, or a choice of six hours from the 
following: Secretarial Science 135, 174, and 181. 

9. Shorthand First semseter, four hours 

Prerequisite: Secretarial Science 13 must be taken concurrently 
-with this course unless the student has had the equivalent. Not 
applied on the major. 

Fundamental principles of Gregg Shorthand, simplified. Five 
class hours each week. 

10. Shorthand Second semester, four hours 
Prerequisite: Secretarial Science 9, or equivalent to one unit 

of high school shorthand. Secretarial Science 14 must be taken con- 
currently with this course unless the student has had the equivalent. 
Development of rapid writing and reading habits. Speed 70 
to 90 words a minute. Five class hours each week. 

13. Typewriting First semester, two hours 

Mastery of the keyboard and the technique of touch typing. 
Not applied on the major. Speed 30 to 40 words a minute, or 
other satisfactory attainment. Five class periods each week. One 
practice period is required. 

14. Typewriting Second semester, two hours 

Prerequisite: Secretarial Science 13, one unit of high school 
typing, or equivalent. 

Further development in speed and accurancy, with emphasis 
on the practical application of typewriting and the care of the 
machine. Speed requirements 40 to 50 words a minute, or other 



SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGE 81 

satisfactory attainment. Five class periods each week. One practice 
period is required for those who need it. 

31. Voice Transcription First and second semester, one hour 

Prerequisite: Secretarial Science 14 or equivalent, permission. 
A course in the operation of voice writing equipment with 

emphasis on mailable transcriptions. Three laboratory hours each 

week. 

40. Filing First and second semester, two hours 

Forty-period Library Bureau course in filing. The course 
includes theoretical instruction and practice. 

55. Advanced Shorthand First semester, three hours 

Prerequisite: "C" standing in Secretarial Science 14; simul- 
taneous registration, Secretarial Science 63. 

Rapid writing and reading of Gregg Shorthand. Speed 90 to 
100 words a minute. Four class periods each week. 

56. Advanced Shorthand Second semester, three hours 

Prerequisite: Secretarial Science 55 or equivalent; simultaneous 
registration, Secretarial Science 64. 

Rapid dictation of letters and general material. A study of 
special denominational forms and a large volume of practice work. 
Speed from 100 to 120 words per minute. Three class hours each 
week. 

58. Medical Shorthand Second semester, three hours 

Prerequisite: Secretarial Science 55 or equivalent, 
registration, Secretarial Science 64. 

A study of shorthand outlines for medical terms — their pro- 
nunciation, their spelling, and their meaning. Medical dictation in 
volume. Speed from 90 to 100 words a minute. Three class hours 
each week. 

63. Secretarial Typewriting and Transcription 

First semester, two hours 

Prerequisite: Secretarial Science 14 or two units of high school 
typewriting. Simultaneous registration, Secretarial Science 55. 

A course in rapid transcription from shorthand notes. Trans- 
scription speed requirement 15 to 25 words a minute. Emphasis 
is also placed on special letter writing problems, tabulation, manu- 



82 SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGE 

scripts. Typing speed 50 words a minute. Five class periods each 
week. One practice period is required. 

64. Secretarial Typewriting and Transcription 

Second semester, two hours 

Prerequisite: Secretarial Science 63. 

Mailable transcripts, transcription speed 25 to 40 words a 
minute. Special attention given to practice in preparing typewritten 
outlines, reports, theses, and bibliographies in accordance with 
acceptable standards of form and appearance. Typewriting speed 
60 words a minute. Five class periods each week. One practice peri- 
od is required. 

71. Secretarial Practice First semester, two hours 

Prerequisite: Ten hours of secretarial science, and permission 
of instructor. 

A study of procedure, business ethics, telephone technique, 
office callers, and preparing reports, manuscripts, minutes of meet- 
ings, and itineraries. 

73. Medical Secretarial Practice First semester, two hours 

Prerequisite: Ten hours of secretarial science, and the consent 
of the instructor. 

A study of medical office routine, keeping the doctor's schedule, 
stationery and forms used in a doctor's office, insurance in medical 
practice, receiving the patients, clinical office procedures, book- 
keeping systems especially designed for doctor's office and medical 
terminology. 

75. Business Machines First and second semester, two hours 

Prerequisite: Secretarial Science 13, or equivalent. 
The theory of and practice in the use of the following office 
machines: Key and crank-driven calculators, full keyboard and ten- 
key adding listing machines; stencil, gelatin, and direct process 
duplicators; and switchboard. One class period, three hours 
laboratory, each week. 

*109. Shorthand Reporting First semester, three hours 

Prerequisite: Twelve hours of Secretarial Science (including 

courses 55, 56, 63, and 64, or equivalent). Must be enrolled con- 



♦Probably will not be given 1952-33. 



SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGB 83 

currently in Secretarial Science 127. 

Rapid dictation of Congressional and other technical materials. 
Speed requirements 130-140 words per minute on official Gregg 
tests. Three class periods each week. 

112. Denominational Reporting Second semester, three hours 

Prerequisite: Twelve hours of Secretarial Science (including 
courses 55, 56, 63, and 64, or equivalent). Must be enrolled con- 
currently in Secretarial Science 128. 

This course deals with denominational vocabulary and re- 
porting techniques. Speed requirements 130-150 words a minute. 
Three class periods a week. 

127, 128. Advanced Transcription Both semesters, two hours 

Prerequisite: Twelve hours of Secretarial Science (including 
courses 55, 56, 63, and 64, or equivalent). Must be enrolled 
concurrently in Secretarial Science 109, 112, or 135. Two class peri- 
ods a week. 

135. Medical Secretarial Training First semester, three hours 

Prerequisite: Twelve hours of Secretarial Science (including' 
courses 55, 56, 63, and 64, or equivalent.) 

A course emphasizing medical terminology and the work of the 
medical secretary, vocabulary study, speed dictation, and transcrip- 
tion of medical terms. Three class periods a week. 

174. Applied Secretarial Practice 

Second semester, two or three hours 

Prerequisite: For secretarial science majors and prospective 
teachers of business. 

This course is based on an activity program which provides 
practical experience in representative types of office situations. 
Particular attention is given to sources of information on business 
subjects; preparation of manuscripts, briefs, and reports; relation of 
the private secretary to the employer; job analyses; improvement of 
transcription; setting up office files; and supervision of correspond- 
ence. Ninety hours of actual office experience are required. 

181. Secretarial Problems First semester, one or two hours 

Prerequisite: Open only to seniors majoring in secretarial 
science. 



84 SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGE 

II. EDUCATION AND PSYCHOLOGY 

Thos. W. Steen, Chairman 

Thyra E. Bowen W. B. Higgins Betty Jo McMillan 

Paul C. Boynton Ruth Jones Harold A. Miller 

Theresa R. Brickman K. M. Kennedy Bernice Pittman 

Olivia B. Dean Betty Brook Koudele Arthur W. Spalding 

Mary H. Dietel H. H. Kuhlman Ambrose L. Suhrie 

Elva Gardner E. T. Watrous 

The purpose of this division is to aid in the training of 
teachers for elementary and secondary schools and to provide a 
general understanding of educational work for those who plan to 
enter lines of service other than teaching. Opportunity is provided 
for directed teaching in the elementary and secondary schools with 
the regular instructors as supervisory teachers. 

In addition to providing professional courses in education for 
future elementary and secondary teachers, this division offers courses 
in psychology, — general, adolescent, educational, etc., — and in prin- 
ciples of education for students preparing for the ministry and for 
various other vocations. See Certification, page 15. 

GENERAL COURSES 

1, 2. General Psychology Both semesters, two or four hours 

An introduction to the study of the problems of human be- 
havior, and of the mental processes and their development. The 
aim of the course is to acquaint the student with the fundamental 
laws on which the educative process is based, and to open to him 
the possibility of scientific education. 

4. Child Psychology Second semester, two hours 

A study of child life; methods of child study; outstanding types 
of differences observed in child development; development of in- 
terests; factors influencing normal personality development of chil- 
dren. 

16. Principles of Christian Education 

Offered each semester, two hours 
A study of the fundamental principles of education as set 
forth in the books, Education, Counsels to Parents and Teachers, and 
Fundamentals of Christian Education. 



SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGE 85" 

107. Tests and Measurements First semester, two hours 

Methods of preparing, administering, and interpreting tests. 

110. Educational Psychology Second semester, three hours 

Prerequisite: Psychology 1, 2 recommended. 

A study of man as a learner with emphasis on the child and 
adolescent. The significance of psychology in various teaching pro- 
cedures. 

115. Psychology of Adolescence First semester, two hours 

Prerequisite: Psychology 1, 2, or instructor's approval. 
Significant problems in adolescent development with special 

emphasis on the psychological principles that govern their behavior. 

150. Personality and Mental Hygiene Second semester, two hours 
Origins, development, and modifications of human behavior and 
the basic principles of mental hygiene. Detailed consideration of the 
meaning, importance, and conditions which influence the growth 
and methods of improving personality. 

177. Curriculum Problems First semester, three hours 

A study of the foundation principles of curriculum construc- 
tion, with practical work in building curricula in the elementary or 
the secondary field. 

180. Guidance and Counseling Second semester, two hours 

The application of psychological principles and technics in the 
determination of interests, aptitudes and abilities. The uses of spe- 
cialized tests and interviews in counseling older children and youth. 

186. School Administration Second semester, two hours 

Prerequisite: Education 133 or instructor's approval. 
A course which presupposes some acquaintance witR problems 

of administration and supervision. An intensive study of the more 

important problems in constructive organization of education and 

the improvement of instruction. 

PREPARATION FOR ELEMENTARY TEACHING 

Note the explanations and requirements as outlined on pages 
51, 52, and 53 in this bulletin. 

ELEMENTARY MATERIALS, METHODS, AND DIRECTED TEACHING 

9. Children's Reading and Literature First semester, two hours 

It is the purpose of this course to give the student a survey of 



86 SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGE 

the field of children's literature, and to provide him with ample 
opportunity to observe the teaching of reading and literature in 
the elementary school. 

10. Teaching of the Language Arts Second semester, two hours 
Methods and materials used in the teaching of reading, spell- 
ing, handwriting, and language usage in the elementary school. 

11. Early Childhood Education First semester, three hours 

Study of the unfolding intelligence of the little child; the home 
as a school; the preschool as a model. Nature study, story and song 
in early education, story-telling, art expression. Observation of pre- 
school. Case studies. 

12. Preschool Methods and Nature Study 

Second semester, three hours 
Program, problems, and discipline of the preschool. Practice 
work. Parent-teacher relations. Social development of the child, 
health, nature study, class, laboratory, and field work. Gardening. 

17. Organization and Administration of the Elementary School 

First semester, two hours 
A course designed to give the prospective teacher a knowl- 
edge of the management and organization related to classroom 
teaching. Opportunity is given for observation in the elementary 
school. 

20. Mathematics for Elementary Teachers 

Second semester, two hours 
Thorough review of the fundamental processes of arithmetic; 
development of a mature understanding of arithmetic. 

23. School Health Problems First semester, two hours 

A study of health problems in the school and the community. 
Emphasis on material and methods for health instruction in the 
elementary school. 

35, 36. Appreciation and School Music Two semesters, four hours 
A course designed to prepare teachers to direct the music 
activities in the elementary school. 

40. Directed Observation and Teaching One or two hours 

Prerequisite: At least one course in elementary methods. 
Observation of lessons taught by the supervisors; teaching of 

classes in the elementary school; study and measurement of children 



SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGE 87 

as individuals and in groups; conferences with the supervisors of 
directed teaching and with director of elementary teacher training. 
77. Teaching of Bible in the Grades First semeter, two hours 

A study of subject matter and methods to be used in the 
teaching of Bible to children in the elementary grades. 
120. Teaching of the Social Studies Second semester, two hours 

This course will be based upon the textbooks and "units" 
used in the elementary school. Demonstrations and observation to 
accompany the study of the best methods of teaching geography 
history, and civics. 
171-172. Directed Observation and Teaching 

Both semesters, four hours 

Prerequisite: Education 15 and at least two courses in ele- 
mentary methods. 

The student teacher observes, participates in class activities, 
assists pupils privately, makes plans, corrects papers, assists in extra- 
curricular activities, and engages in teaching under supervision. The 
minimum amount of actual teaching for four hours credit is ninety 
clock hours. 

SECONDARY TEACHING 
Note carefully the statement concerning the preparation of 
secondary teachers on page 51. 

Minor: Many states require eighteen hours in Education and 
Pyschology, and some require twenty hours. All who expect to teach 
in secondary schools should plan for a minor of twenty hours in 
this department. The required courses are: 

1,2 General Psychology 2 or 4 hours 

16 Principles of Christian Education 2 hours 

110 Educational Psychology 3 hours 

135 Principles of Secondary Teaching 3 hours 

141-161 Methods in Major or Minor 2 hours 

165 Directed Teaching 3 hours 

Other courses in this department 3 to 5 hours 

Total 20 hours 

Students wishing to qualify for Denominational Certification 
only, will complete a minimum of fifteen semester hours. Courses 
16, 135 and 165 are required, and a minimum of 2 or 3 hours each 
in Psychology and Specific Methods. 



88 SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGE 

Certification in Specific Subjects: The Division of Education 
can provide students with the regulations of the Denomination 
and of the Southern States governing certification in English, history, 
and the other teaching fields. A student who plans his program 
carefully can usually qualify to teach in other fields related to his 
major and first minor. 

SECONDARY MATERIALS, METHODS, 
AND SUPERVISED TEACHING 

135. Principles of Secondary Teaching First semester, three hours 
The objectives of the secondary school; problems of teaching; 
learning activities with desired outcomes; methods of planning, or- 
ganizing, stimulating, and directing classroom activities. 

141. Methods of Teaching Bible First semester, one or two hours 
Prerequisite: A major or a minor in Bible. This course may be 

taken concurrently with Course 165. 

Objectives and methods of teaching Bible in the secondary 

school. 

143. Methods of Teaching Secondary English 

First semester, one or two hours 

Prerequisite: A major or a minor in English. This course 
may be taken concurrently with Course 165. 

The content of courses, aims, and methods of teaching com- 
position and literature. 

145. Methods of Teaching Modern Foreign Language 

First semester, one or two hours 

Prerequisite: A major or minor in a modern foreign language. 
This course may be taken concurrently with Course 165. 

Discussion of methods; observation of foreign language 
teaching in the secondary school. 

147. Methods of Teaching Home Economics 

First semester, one or two hours 

Prerequisite: A major or minor in home economics. This 
course may be taken concurrently with Course 165. 

A study of methods, procedures, and organization of courses 
in home economics with particular emphasis on those on the 
secondary level. Should be taken in the first semester of the senior 
year. 



SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGE 89 

151. (a.) Methods of Teaching Shorthand First semester, one hour 

Prerequisite: Major or minor in secretarial science, Education 

16. This course may be taken concurrently with Education 165 and 

is required of all majors in secretarial science obtaining certification. 

151. (b) Methods in Teaching Typewriting 

First semester, one hour 
Prerequisite: Major or minor in either business administration 
or secretarial science; Education 16 and Secretarial Science 14. This 
course is required of all majors in secretarial science obtaining cer- 
tification, and it may be taken concurrently with Education 165. 

151. (c) Methods in Teaching Bookkeeping 

First semester, one hour 

Prerequisite: Major or minor in either business administration 

or secretarial science and Education 16. This course may be taken 

concurrently with Education 165 and is required of all majors in 

business administration and secretarial science obtaining certification. 

153. Methods of Teaching Music First semester, one or two hours 
Prerequisite: A major in music, or permission of the instructor; 

Psychology 110, Education 16 and 135. This course may be taken 

concurrently with Course 165. 

Methods and principles of teaching music. Required of students 

majoring in music. 

159. Methods of Teaching Mathematics First semester, one hour 
This course may be taken concurrently with Course 165. 
Aims, objectives, and methods of teaching mathematics in 

the secondary school. 

161. Methods of Teaching Natural Sciences 

First semester, one or two hours 

Prerequisite: A major or minor in biology, chemistry, or 
physics. This course may be taken concurrently with Course 165. 

Principles and methods of teaching science in secondary schools. 
A student may register for one field, to a maximum of two hours, 
provided he meets the prerequisite in the field. 

165. Supervised Teaching in the Secondary School 

Either semester, three hours 
Prerequisite: Satisfactory scholarship; Psychology 110, Educa- 
tion 16, 135, and methods in the subject to be taught (the latter 



90 SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGE 

two courses may be taken concurrently with supervised teaching). 

Teaching may be done in the secondary school in one or more 
of the following fields. Registration should be for the supervised 
teaching course, by number, followed by the letter designating the 
particular field in which the supervised teaching is to be done. 



a. Bible 


g. Music 


b. Bookkeeping 


h. Natural Science 


c. English 


i. Shorthand 


d. Home Economics 


j. Social Sciences 


e. Mathematics 


k. Typewriting 


f . Modern Foreign Language 





168. Methods in Industrial Arts Second semester, one or two hours 
Prerequisite: A major or a minor in Industrial Arts. This 
course may be taken concurrently with Course 165. 



SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGE 91 

III. FINE ARTS 

Harold A. Miller, Chairman, (First Semester) 
Adrian R. M. Lauritzen, Chairman, (Second Semester) 
Frances S. Curtiss Olivia B. Dean 

J. Mabel Wood 

ART 

5. Fundamentals of Drawing First semester, one hour 

The principles of line, color, and perspective; artistic arrange- 
ment in pictures; freehand drawing, sketching, charcoal work, and 
pastels. Three hours laboratory. 

6. Beginning Oil Painting Second semester, one hour 

Landscape and still life painting; techniques of mixing colors 
and applying them to the canvas. Special emphasis placed on natural- 
ness and reality in art. Three hours laboratory. 

*12. Pottery Second semester, two hours 

An introduction to methods of using clay to create functional 
pottery. Mold making, decorating, glazing, and firing of kilns are 
studied. One hour lecture, two hours laboratory, each week. 

31:32. Elementary Art Both semesters, two hours 

A course designed to aid the teacher in presenting art instruc- 
tion in the grades. Topics: drawing, painting, color study, design, 
posters, finger painting, picture study. Three hours laboratory each 
week. 

MUSIC 

The aim of this subdivision is to provide for the student an 
emotional outlet and a means of self expression through forms of 
beauty; to prepare him for living a fuller life individually, socially, 
or professionally. 

Major: A major in music requires thirty-four hours distributed 
as follows: sixteen hours in theory; four hours in history of music; 
fourteen hours in one field of applied music. 

A maximum of two hours for the student's recital may be in- 
cluded in the sixteen hours of applied music. Sixteen hours of the 

♦Probably will not be given 1952-53. 



92 SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGE 

major shall be in upper biennium courses, six hours of which shall 
be taken in this college. See "Piano Major Requirements" and 
"Voice Major Requirements" for further information. 

Students majoring in music are required to participate in 
ensemble music activities during at least two years. Education 16, 
153, 165, and Psychology 110 are required. 

If voice, organ, or violin is chosen as the applied music field 
for a major, the student must demonstrate sufficient pianistic ability 
to meet the entrance requirements outlined for the piano course. 

Minors: Those wishing to minor in piano, voice, or organ 
must meet the same entrance requirements as stated for the major 
field. A minor in music consists of twenty hours, including 
eight hours in one of the following fields of applied music: piano 
organ, voice, instruments. A minimum of six hours of the minor 
must be in upper biennium courses, three of which shall be earned 
in this college. 

Electives in Music: Electives in music or any curriculum may 
not exceed ten hours, six of which may be in either theoretical or 
applied music; the applied music credit may include two hours of 
credit for participation in group music. 

A maximum of two hours for participation in music organ- 
izations may apply toward graduation from the various college 
curriculums. See "Applied Music" for additional information. 

Theory, History, and Appreciation 

1. Fundamentals of Music First semester, two hours 

Music notation; scale, interval, and chord construction; music 
terms; practical application of the above in sight-singing drill. 

2. Sight-Singing Second semester, one hour 

This course is designed to provide the initial knowledge neces- 
sary to read at sight. Other fundamentals are included. 

3-4. Ear Training Both semesters, two hours 

Includes the study of chord recognition, melodic phrase, 
rhythm, the minor mode, chromatic progressions, and modulation. 

16. Principles of Conducting Second semester, one hour 

Prerequisite: Music 1 or equivalent. 

Study and application of the principles of song leadership 
adapted to evangelistic and church music. 



SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGE 93 

33-34. Appreciation of Music Both semesters, two hours 

A listening course in directed hearing. A survey of the develop- 
ment of music, with emphasis upon an understanding and apprecia- 
tion of the beauties of music in its various forms. This course is 
particularly adapted to the college student who wishes to be able to 
listen to music intelligently. 

♦45-46. Beginning Harmony Both semesters, six hours 

Prerequisite: At least one year of piano. 
Intervals, scales, triads, cadences, harmonizing melodies, etc. 

115. Evangelistic and Church Music First semester, two hours 
Discussion of appropriate church music and the better forms of 

evangelistic music. A study of hymns, specials, and appeal songs. 

116. Hymnody Second semester, two hours 
Study of the development of our modern hymns through the 

successive stages from the early church to that of today. 
*118. Advanced Conducting Second semester, one hour 

Technique with and without baton, organizing choirs, testing 
voices, blending and balancing parts, etc. 

*141-142. History of Music Bath semesters, four hours 

A study of the development of music to present-day composi- 
tion, with an examination of the influence of different composers on 
its growth. 

145-146. Advanced Harmony Both semesters, six hours 

Prerequisite: Music 45-46. 

Dominant sevenths, larger chord formations, harmonizing 
chorales, modulations, some original work. 

171. Counterpoint First semester, two hours 

Prerequisite: Music 45-46 and 145-146. 

The art of writing two or more melodies which, when com- 
bined, agree with each other. Reharmonization of Bach chorales 
and writing of two and three part inventions. 

*172. Composition Second semester, two hours 

Prerequisite: Music 45-46 and 145-146. Music 171 advised. 
Melody construction, simple accompaniments, originals in the 

smaller forms. 



♦Probably will not be given 1952-53. 



94 SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGB 

Applied Music 

Applied Music Credit: For instruction in piano, voice, 
violin, organ, or other instrument, one hour of credit will be allowed 
for one lesson a week with a minimum of three hours practice 
weekly for one semester; two hours credit for two lessons each week 
with a minimum of six hours practice weekly for one semester. Ap- 
plications for credit may be reviewed by the music committee. Se- 
mester examinations will be given on material covered. 

Participation in and attendance at student recitals, public and 
studio, will be considered a part of the regular work. 

A maximum of two hours of credit in music organizations may 
apply toward graduation; with the exception of credit for The 
Chapel Singers, not more than one hour may be applied from any 
one year. 

The following piano and voice requirements are not to be 
construed as outlines for a course of study, but merely indicate 
the comparative degrees of advancement to be attained at the 
various stages of the course. These requirements correspond largely 
to those given in the approved curriculums of the National As- 
sociation of Schools of Music. 

Piano Major Requirements (Minimum) 

A. Requirements for Entrance: To enter the college 
curriculum for a major in piano the student should be grounded in 
correct touch and reliable technique. He should play all major and 
minor scales correctly in moderate tempo, also broken chords in 
octave position in all keys, and should have acquired systematic 
methods of practice. 

He should have studied some of the standard etudes, such as 
Czerny, Opus 299, Book I; Heller, Opus 46 and 47 (according to 
the individual needs of the pupil) ; Bach, Little Preludes, and 
compositions corresponding in difficulty to Haydn, Sonata No. 11, 
G major No. 20 (Schirmer) ; Mozart, Sonata C major No. 3 
(Schirmer) ; Beethoven, Sonata Opus 49, No. 1. He should be able 
to read at sight most of the hymns in the Church Hymnal. 

B. End of First Year: At the close of the first year the 
student should be able to play all major, minor, and chromatic 



SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGB 95 

scales, to the extent of two octaves, four notes to an eighty-four 
metronome beat; arpeggios to the extent of two octaves, four notes 
to a sixty metronome beat; further work in Czerny, Opus 299. 
He should have studied compositions as difficult as the following: 
Bach, Arioso, several two-part inventions; Bach, K.E.P., Solfeggio 
in C minor; Beethoven, Minuet in E flat; also other compositions of 
approximately the same difficulty by standard composers. Regular 
assignments in sight reading will be made. 

C. End of Second Year: At the end of the second year the 
student should have acquired a technique sufficient to play scales 
and arpeggios in moderately rapid tempo, about four notes to a 
ninety-two metronome beat; to play scales in parallel and contrary 
motion, four notes to a seventy-two metronome beat. He should 
have acquired some octave technique, and should have studied 
compositions as difficult as the following: Bach, other two-part 
inventions, and at least two preludes and fugues from "Eighteen 
Preludes and Fugues," edited by Buonamici (Schirmer) ; Beethoven, 
Adagio Sostenuto, from Opus 27, No. 2, and Andante from Opus 
28; Haydn, Sonata in C major, No. 2 (Cotta ed.) ; Mozart, Fantasie 
in D minor; Mendelssohn, Songs Without Words, such as "Confi- 
dence," "Venetian Gondola Song" Nos. 1 and 2, and "Hope"; 
Schubert, Impromptu, Opus 142, No. 2; Grieg, "Butterfly," Opus 
43, No. 1, and "Notturno," Opus 54, No. 4; Chopin, Mazurkas, 
Opus 7, No. 2; Opus 33, No. 4; Preludes, Opus 28, Nos. 1, 10, 
and 21; also other selections of equal grade by this composer. 

The student should be able to play compositions by modern 
composers, of comparable difficulty to the above selections, and 
should demonstrate his ability to read at sight simple accompani- 
ments and compositions of medium grade. 

D. End of Third Year: At the end of the third year the 
student must have acquired a firmer grasp of those qualities which 
make for musicianship. He should be able to play all major an J 
minor scales to the extent of four octaves, four notes to a metronome 
beat of one hundred eight, and arpeggios to the extent of four 
octaves, four notes to an eighty-eight metronome beat. He should 
have studied other pieces by Bach, and of the "Eighteen Preludes 
and Fugues" edited by Buonamici (Schirmer) ; Mozart, sonatas, 
or movements from sonatas, such as Sonata in G major, No. 2, 



96 SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGE 

or F major, No. 6 (Cotta ed.); Beethoven, appropriate movements 
from sonatas; Schubert, Impromptus, Opus 90, Nos. 2 and 3; 
moment Musicales, Opus 94, Nos. 2 and 6; Chopin, mazurkas, 
waltzes, nocturnes, of appropriate grade. He should have had 
further exercise in sight-reading and accompanying by assisting in 
school functions. 

E. End of Fourth Year: At the end of the fourth year the 
student must have acquired the principles of tone production and 
greater velocity, and their application to scales, arpeggios, chords, 
octaves, and double notes. His list of studied pieces should include 
representative works by Bach, still others of the "Eighteen Preludes 
and Fugues" edited by Buonamici (Schirmer) and several from 
"Well Tempered Clavichord," Beethoven sonatas, or movements 
from sonatas, such as Opus 2, No. 1; Opus 14, Nos. 1 and 2; Opus 
10, No. 1; Haydn, Sonata in E flat, No. 3 (Schirmer); Sonata in D 
major; Mozart, Sonata No. 6, F major (Cotta ed.), or No. 16, 
A major (Schirmer) ; Mendelssohn, Songs Without Words, such as 
"Spring Song," "Hunting Song," and others; Liszt, "Liebestraum," 
and transcriptions such as "On Wings of Song" and "Du Bist die 
Ruh;" Schubert, Impromptu in B flat; Chopin, Polonaise C sharp 
minor, Valse E minor, Nocturne, Opus 9, No. 2; Nocturne F 
minor, Opus 55, No. 1; Nocturne B major, Opus 31, No. 1; 
Schumann, Nocturne F major, Fantasiestuecke, "Bird as a Prophet"; 
some compositions of corresponding difficulty by modern composers. 

The student should have acquired the ability to play at sight, 
accompaniments of moderate difficulty and to provide acceptable 
piano support for congregational and evangelistic singing. 

Voice Major Requirements (Minimum) 

A. Entrance Requirements: To enter the four-year curri- 
culum for a major in voice, the student should be able to sing on 
pitch with correct phrasing and musical intelligence standard songs 
in good English. The simpler classics are recommended. He should 
demonstrate a knowledge of the rudiments of music and his ability 
to read a simple song at sight. Some knowledge of the piano will 
be necessary, as approved by the instructor. 

B. For Completion of Four Year Curriculum: The 
student should have acquired a knowledge of breath support, of 



SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGE 97 

the principles of enunciation and pronunciation as applied to 
singing, and of the essentials of interpretation. He should demon- 
strate his ability to sing major, minor, and chromatic scales, arpeg- 
gios, contrasting exercises for agility and sustaining tone, and the 
classic vocal embellishments. He should demonstrate a knowledge of 
recitative, and the ability to sing several of the less exacting arias 
from oratorio and several standard songs from memory. He should 
also have acquired a knowledge of one language in addition to 
English. 

1,2. Voice Class Each semester, one hour 

Adapted to beginners, emphasizing the underlying principles 
of singing. A class for men and one for women will be made 
available. 

3, 4. Piano Class Each semester, one hour 

Class instruction in piano. May be adapted to beginners. 

5, 6. Piano or 105, 106 Each semester, one or two hours 

Individual instruction. 

7, 8. Voice or 107, 108 Each semester, one or two hours 

Individual instruction. 

9, 10. Organ Each semester, one or two hours 

Prerequisite: Pianistic ability, as approved by the instructor. 
Individual instruction. 

11, 12. Orchestra Each semester, one-half hour 

Placement upon audition. 

13, 14. Band Each semester, one-half hour 

Placement upon audition. 

15. Instrumental Ensembles Each semester, one-half hour 
Type of organization and personnel dependent upon available 

performers. 

16. Male Chorus Second semester, one-half hour 
Membership upon satisfactory audition. 

17. Women's Chorus Second semester, one-half hour 
Membership upon audition. 

18. String or Wind Instruments Each semester, one hour 
Individual instruction. 



98 SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGE 

19, 20. The Chapel Singers Each semester, one hour 

Membership by individual audition. This group functions 
primarily as the church choir and makes an annual spring tour 
to churches off the campus. 

21. Oratorio Chorus First semester, one-half hour 

Presentation of the oratorio, The Messiah, near the close of the 
semester by a mixed chorus of selected voices. Open to all who 
can qualify by voice test. 

24. Male Quartette Either semester, one-half hour 

26. Women's Trio Either semester, one-half hour 

118. Senior Recital Second semester, two hours, maximum 

A recital is optional in the field of applied music which the 
student has chosen in his major. The amount of credit is determined 
after the recital, upon recommendation of his major professor. 



SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGE 99 

IV. LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 

Kathleen B. McMurphy, Chairman 
Jacqueline E. Brown Don C Ludington 

Mary H. Dietel Elmore J. McMurphy 

Richard L. Hammill Margaret M. Steen 

Maude I. Jones 

ENGLISH 
Major: A major in English requires twenty-six hours in ad- 
dition to English 1:2 and shall include English 41, 42, 51, and 52; 
111 or 122; 141, 147, 148; 161 or 162 and two hours in Speech. 
In addition, History 111, 115, or 116 should be elected. Eleven 
hours of the major shall be in upper biennium courses, six hours 
of which shall be taken in this college. No course with a grade of 
"D" may apply on the major. 

Minor: A minor in English requires fourteen hours above 
English 1:2 and shall include English 41, 42, 51, and 52. The 
minor shall include six hours of upper biennium credit, three hours 
of which shall be earned in this college. 

1 :2. Composition and Rhetoric Both semesters, six hours 

Special classes are offered for those whose proficiency in read- 
ing and language skills is below the minimum essential for com- 
petency in college courses. These classes, for which a semester fee 
of $5.00 is charged, meet twice each week. Validation of any grade 
in Freshman Composition is contingent upon the achievement of 
satisfactory proficiency rating in these skills. 

41, 42. Masterpieces in American Literature 

Both semesters, four hours 

51, 52. Masterpieces in English Literature 

Both semesters, four hours 

53,54. Journalism Both semesters, four hours 

74. Business Communication Second semester, three hours 

A study and application of the modern practices in oral and 
written business communication. Accuracy in grammar, spelling, and 
punctuation, and the writing of well-knit sentences and clear para- 
graphs are taught as a means of effective expression in business 



100 SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGE 

letterwriting. Business letters, report writing, and dictation to sten- 
ographer are emphasized. 

111. Advanced Journalism First semester, two hours 

Entrance by permission of instructor. 

12 or 112. English Literature and Diction 

Second semester, two hours 
A course designed primarily for Spanish speaking students. 
Objectives are to extend a knowledge of the best literature in Eng- 
lish and to improve speech and diction. 

122. Creative Writing Second semester, two hours 

131, 132. World Literature Both semesters, four hours 

141. Elizabethan Literature First semester, two hours 

144. Milton and His Age Second semester, two hours 

*147. The Romantic Movement First semester, three hours 

*148. The Victorian Period Second semester, three hours 

161, 162. Biblical Literature Both semesters, four hours 

*174. English Grammar and Style Second semester, three hours 

185. Contemporary Literature First semester, three hours 

186. Southern Literature Second semester, three hours 

*193. Principles of Research First semester, three hours 

195. Problems in English One or two hours 

An opportunity for the advanced student to pursue special in- 
terests under the guidance of the head of the department. 

FRENCH 

Minor: A minor in French requires twelve hours above French 
11-12. It shall include six hours of upper biennium credit, three of 
which must be earned in this college. 

11-12. Beginning French Both semesters, eight hours 

A foundation course in grammar, pronunciation, and reading 
designed to develop the ability to read and understand easy French 
prose. Not open to one who has had two years of French in second- 
ary school. 

•Probably will not be given 1952-53. 



SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGE 101 

13-14. Intermediate French Both semesters, six hours 

Prerequisite: French 11-12 or two years of French in second- 
ary school. 

Advanced grammar; reading of moderately difficult French 
texts; oral and written exercises. 

17-18. French Conversation and Composition. 

Both semesters, four hours 

Prerequisite: French 11-12. 

Development of skill in speaking, and understanding simple, 
idiomatic French. 

* 131-132. Survey of French Literature Both semesters, six hours 

Prerequisite: French 13-14. 

The history and development of French literature; reading of 
representative works; 

*136. French Civilization Second semester, two hours 

Prerequisite: French 13-14. 

Geography, history, life, and selected literary works of France. 

GERMAN 
Minor: For a minor in German, twelve hours above German 
21-22 are required. The minor shall include six hours of upper bi- 
ennium credit, three of which must be earned in this college. 

21-22. Beginning German Both semesters, eight hours 

A foundation course in grammar, pronunciation, and reading. 
Not open to students who have had two years of German in second- 
ary school. 

23-24. Intermediate German Both semesters, six hours 

Prerequisite: German 21-22 or two years of German in second- 
ary school. 

Advanced grammar; intensive and extensive reading of mod- 
erately difficult prose and poetry; oral and written exercises. 

*27, 28. German Conversation Both semesters, four hours 

Prerequisite: German 21-22. 

Development of skill in speaking and in understanding, simple, 
idiomatic German. 



♦Probably will not be given 1952-53. 



102 SOtTHBRN MISSIONARY COLLEGE 

•141-142. Survey of German Literature Both semesters, six hours 

Prerequisite: German 23-24. 

History and development of German literature; reading of 
representative works; collateral reading and reports. 

*146. German Civilization Secortd semester, two hours 

Prerequisite: German 23-24. 
Geography, history, life, and selected works of Germany. 

GREEK 
Minor: A minor in Greek requires 18 hours, four of which 
shall be earned in this college. 

43-44. Elements of New Testament Greek Both semesters, six hours 
This course is designed to give students a working knowledge 
of New Testament Greek. 

45-46. Intermediate New Testament Greek 

Both smesters, six hours 

f 151. Exegesis of First and Second Peter from the Original Greek 

First semester, two hours 

fl52. Exegesis of Hebrews from the Original Greek 

Second semester, two hours 

*153. Exegesis of First Corinthians from the Original Greek 

First semester, two hours 

*154. Exegesis of Galatians, James, and Ephesians from the 

Original Greek Second semester, two hours 

HEBREW 
131-132. Beginning Hebrew Both semesters, six hours 

Prerequisite: Two years of Greek. 

The essentials of Hebrew grammar, vocabulary building, and 
reading; written assignments; drills in pronunciation, translation, 
and use of a concordance. 

LATIN 
*58. Latin Etymology Second semester, one hour 

A study of the Latin roots of many English words, as a basis 
for understanding a technical vocabulary. 



•Probably will not be given 1952-53. 

tPrerequistte Greek 45-46. Mar be elected for Bible credit. 



SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGE 103 

SPANISH 

Major: The requirement for a major in Spanish is twenty-six 
hours above Spanish 1-2 or equivalent. Fourteen hours of the major 
shall be in upper biennium credit, including six hours of upper 
biennium credit earned in this college. 

Minor: A minor in Spanish requires twelve hours above Span- 
ish 1-2; it includes six hours of upper biennium credit, three of 
which must be earned in this college. 

1-2. Beginning Spanish Both semesters, eight hours 

A foundation course in grammer, pronunciation, and reading. 
Not open to students who have had two years of Spanish in second- 
ary school. 

3-4. Intermediate Spanish Both semesters, six hours 

Prerequisite: Spanish 1-2 or two years of Spanish in secondary 
school. 

Advanced grammar; intensive and extensive reading of mod- 
erately difficult Spanish texts; oral and written exercises. 

7, 8. Spanish Conversation Both semesters, four hours 

Prerequisite: Spanish 1-2 or equivalent. 

101-102. Survey of Spanish Literature Both semesters, six hours 
History and development of Spanish literature; reading of rep- 
resentative works. 

105-106. Survey of Spanish-American Literature 

Both semesters, six hours 

Prerequisite: Spanish 3-4. 

History and development of Spanish- American literature; read- 
ing of representative works. 

111-112. Advanced Spanish Conversation and Composition 

Prerequisite: Spanish 3-4, 7 and 8, or special permission based 

on scholarship. 

A course designed to prepare students to speak Spanish fluently. 

115-116. The Golden Age of Spanish Literature 
Prerequisite: Spanish 101-102. 
A study of the classical period of Spanish literature. 

119. Spanish Civilization First semester, two hours 

Prerequisite: Spanish 3-4. 



104 SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGE 

The geography, history, life, and selected literature of Spain. 

SPEECH 

Minor: A speech minor requires fourteen hours of which six 
must be in the upper biennium. 
5, 6. Fundamentals of Speech Both semesters, four hours 

A beginning course in the practical problems of speaking and 
reading before audiences, audibly and conversationally. 

13. Voice and Diction First semester, two hours 

Principles and practice of effective use of the vocal instrument; 
special attention to individual problems. 

14. Oral Interpretation First semester, two hours 
Practice in reading selected passages for lecture and sermon 

helps — Scripture, masterpieces of literature, and great orations. 

113. Logic in Argumentation First semester, three hours 

Prerequisite: Speech 5 and 6, or permission of instructor. 

116. The Psychology of Persuasive Speech 

Second semester, three hours 

122. Evangelistic Preaching Second semester, two hours 

131. Radio Techniques First semester, two hours 
Prerequisite: Speech 5, 6, and 13 or permission of instructor. 
The theory and practice of radio broadcasting techniques, espe- 
cially in announcing, interviewing, round table discussion, and sim- 
ple documentaries. 

132. Religious Broadcasting Second semester, two hours 
Prerequisite: Speech 131. 

Arranging and broadcasting of religious programs. 



SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGE 103 

V. NATURAL SCIENCES AND MATHEMATICS 

G. J. Nelson, Chairman 
G. B. Dean H. H. Kuhlman 

E. I. Mohr Edna Stoneburner 

BIOLOGY 

The courses in biology are intended to give the student funda- 
mental and accurate information as a basis for the development of a 
sound scientific philosophy and as preparation for professional 
training. 

Major: A major in biology requires twenty-eight hours; it 
shall include at least twelve hours of credit in upper biennium 
courses, six of which shall be earned in this college. The major 
should include the following courses: Biology 1, 2, 22, 110, or 
Biology 1, 22, 45 and 110. (Biology 2 does not count on a major 
or minor if Biology 45 and 46 are taken.) Cognate courses suggested 
are Chemistry 1-2. No course with a grade of "D" may apply on 
the major. It is recommended that students majoring in biology 
take a minor in chemistry. 

Minor: A minor in biology requires eighteen hours; it shall 
include a minimum of six hours of upper biennium credit, three 
hours of which shall be earned in this college. 

1. General Biology First semester, three hours 

A study of biological principles and of the classification of the 
plant kingdom. Economic importance of the different types of plants 
is emphasized. Two hours lecture, three hours laboratory, each 
week. 

2. General Biology Second semester, three hours 

Consideration of biological principles as related to animal life. 
Study of typical members of each phylum in the animal kingdom. 
Two hours lecture, three hours laboratory, each week. 

3. 4. Survey of Natural Science Both semesters, six hours 

A survey of biology, geology, astronomy, chemistry and phy- 
sics. Especially designed for elementary school teachers. Does not 
apply on major or minor in biology, chemistry or physics. Does not 
meet laboratory science requirement in any other degree curriculum. 
Two hours lecture, three hours laboratory each week. 



106 SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGE 

11. Anatomy and Physiology First semester, three hours 

A study of the structural and functional relationships for cor- 
relation and co-ordination of internal activities of the human body. 
Two hours lecture, three hours laboratory, each week 

12. Anatomy and Physiology Second semester, three hours 

Further study of the structural and functional relationships for 
correlation and co-ordination of internal activities of the human 
body. Two hours lecture, three hours laboratory, each week. 

22. Microbiology Second semester, four hours 

A study of micro-organisms; their relation to the production 
of disease in man and their modes of transmissions; methods used 
in specific prevention or treatment of disease. Three hours lecture, 
three hours laboratory, each week. 

45. General Zoology First semester, four hours 
A study of the structure, physiology, habits, life history, and 

classification of typical invertebrates. Three hours lecture, three 
hours laboratory, each week. 

46. General Zoology Second semester, four hours 
A study of the structure, physiology, habits, life history, and 

classification of typical vertebrates. Three hours lecture, three 
hours laboratory, each week. 

48. Mammalian Anatomy Second semester, two hours 

Prerequisite: Biology 45 and 46, or equivalent. 
The cat is studied as a typical mammal, with some reference 
made to other animals. One-half hour lecture, five and one-half 
hours laboratory work, each week. 

*97. Field Botany First semester, alternate years, three hours 

Prerequisite: Biology 1 or equivalent. 

The aims of this course are to develop a knowledge of plants 
in their natural habitats; to develop the use of botanical manuals, 
such as Gray's; and to acquaint the student with the more important 
principles of ecology. Two hours lecture, three hours laboratory 
work, each week. 

*99. Field Zoology First semester, alternate years, three hours 

Prerequisite: Biology 2 or 45 or equivalent. 



♦Probably will not be given 1952-53. 



SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGE 107 

The purpose of this course is to develop an intelligent field 
knowledge of animals so that one can better understand the outdoor 
world. Field excursions will be made in the Collegedale area. Two 
hours lecture, three hours laboratory, each week. 

*106. Plant Physiology Second semester, three hours 

Prerequisite: Biology 1 or equivalent. 

A study of the structure and functions of roots, stems, leaves, 
flowers, and fruits of some of the more common plants. Two hours 
lecture, three hours laboratory, each week. 

107. Parasitology First semester, three hours 

Prerequisite: Biology 2, or 45, or equivalent. 

A general survey of the more important parasites of man and 
domestic animals. The course consists of lectures, recitations, and 
reports. Laboratory work consists of practical recognition studies 
and certain clinical methods. Two hours lecture, three hours 
laboratory, each week. 

109. General Entomology Summer term, four hours 
Prerequisite: Biology 2, 45, or equivalent. 

An introduction to insects with emphasis on structure, develop- 
ment and behavior. Classification of important orders and families 
and the use of insect keys will be stressed in laboratory work. Three 
hours lecture, three hours laboratory work, each week. 

110. Genetics Second semester, three hours 
Prerequisite: Biology 1 and 2 or equivalent. 

This course introduces the student to the more important laws 
of heredity and their application in the improvement of plants, ani- 
mals, and human beings. Laboratory work is mainly with fruit flies. 
Two hours lecture, three hours laboratory, each week. 

*119. Medical Entomology First semester, three hours 

Prerequisite: Biology 2, or 45, or equivalent. 

A study of morphological features, distribution, life history, 
and control of arthropods that parasitize animals or that serve as 
vectors of disease-producing organisms. Two hours lecture, three 
hours laboratory, each week. 

*122. The Liverworts, Mosses, and Ferns Summer term, two hours 
Prerequisite: Biology 1 or equivalent. 



♦Probably will not be given 1952-53. 



108 SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGE 

A course in which a student will become more familiar with 
the bryophytes and pteridophytes of this area. One hour lecture, 
three hours laboratory, each week. Offered summers only. 

127. Systematic Botany First semester, three hours 

Prerequisite: Biology 1. 

The identification of seed plants and ferns of the Collegedale 
area with a view of the acquisition of familiarity with the distin- 
guishing features of the great plant groups. Two hours lecture, 
three hours laboratory, each week. 

145. General Embryology First semester, three hours 

Prerequisite: Biology 2, 45, or 46, or equivalent. 
A course designed to present the more important facts of the 
cell and cell division, the germ cells and their formation, matura- 
tion, fertilization, and cleavage. These general studies will be fol- 
lowed by a study of the early stages of development of selected 
chordates such as the amphioxus, the frog, and the chick with spe- 
cial emphasis on the chick. Two hours lecture, three hours lab- 
oratory, each week. 

*146. Vertebrate Embryology Second semester, two hours 

Prerequisite: Biology 145. 

A study of the development of the chick and pig embryo by 
organ systems. Comparison is made with the human embryo. One 
hour lecture, three hours laboratory, each week. 

164. Human Physiology Second semester, three hours 

Prerequisite: Biology 11 and 12, or 45 and 46, or equivalent. 
A study of the structure and functions of the human body. 

Three hours lecture each week. 

177. Methods in Plant Histology First semester, two hours 
Prerequisite: Biology 1. 

A study of various methods of killing, fixing, embedding, 
sectioning, staining, and mounting plant material for microscopic 
study. One hour lecture, three hours laboratory, each week. 

178. Methods in Animal Histology 

Second semester, two hours 
Prerequisite: Biology 2, 45, or 46, or equivalent. 



*Probably will not be given 1952-53. 



SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGE 109 

A course dealing with the technique of slide making of animal 
tissue. Open to majors and minors. One hour lecture, three hours 
laboratory, each week. 

191 or 192. Problems in Biology 

One to four hours, one or two hours a semester 
This course is for biology majors and minors only; individual 
research work in some field of biology. Content and method of 
study to be arranged. 

CHEMISTRY 

It is intended in this subdivision to give students a practical 
and a cultural knowledge of this field of science, and to provide 
for the needs of those planning to become chemists or to enter pro- 
fessional training in medicine, dentistry, nursing, and related fields. 

Major: Thirty hours are required for a major. Thirteen hours 
of the major shall be upper biennium, including a minimum of six 
hours of upper biennium earned in this college. 

A minor in physics or biology is recommended and mathematics 
through calculus and Physics 1-2 are advised. 

Minor: A minor in chemistry requires twenty hours, including 
at least six hours of upper biennium credit, three of which shall be 
-earned in this college. 

1-2. General Chemistry Both semesters, eight hours 

An introduction to the elements and their principal compounds; 
•the fundamental laws and accepted theories of chemistry. Three 
hours lecture, three hours laboratory. 

7-8. Survey of Chemistry Both semesters, six hours 

Prerequisite: High school chemistry is highly desirable. 
A survey course designed to familiarize the student with the 
basic principles of chemistry. Attention is given particularly to solu- 
tions, chemistry of nutrition, digestion, and metabolism. Especially 
helpful to prenursing students. Two hours lecture, three hours 
laboratory. 

.33. Qualitative Analysis First semester, three hours 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 1-2. 
A study of methods for the separation and identification of in- 



110 SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLBGB 

organic ions; analysis of several unknowns. One hour lecture, six 
hours laboratory, each week. 

53-54. Organic Chemistry Both semesters, eight hours 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 1-2. 

A survey of the aliphatic and aromatic compounds of carbon. 
The laboratory includes typical organic synthesis. Three hours lecture, 
three hours laboratory. Occasionally by special arrangement for ex- 
tra work upper division credit may be earned in the course. 

102. Quantitative Analysis Second semester, two or three hours 
Prerequisite: Chemistry 1-2. 

This course includes the study of typical volumetric and gravi- 
metric methods, quantitative determinations of acidity, alkalinity, 
and percentage composition of a variety of unknowns. One hour 
lecture, six hours laboratory. 

121. Organic Qualitative Analysis 

First semester, two or three hours 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 53-54. 

Application of the classification reactions and specific properties 
of organic compounds in the identification of a number of sub- 
stances. One hour lecture, six hours laboratory, each week. 

122. Organic Preparations Secoiid semester, two or three hours 
Prerequisite: Chemistry 53-54. 

The course is designed to develop skill in the synthesis of 
representative compounds. One hour lecture, six hours laboratory, 
each week. 

144. Laboratory Glass Blowing Either semester, one or two hours 
Training is given in the manipulation of glass for the fabri- 
cation of laboratory apparatus. Three hours laboratory each week. 

151, 152. Physical Chemistry Both semesters, sj ft hours 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 102, Physics 1-2, Mathematics 1 and 2; 
calculus advised. 

A study of the facts, laws, theories, and problems relating to 
gases, liquids, solids, solutions, equilibrium, thermo-chemistry, elec- 
tro-chemistry, and atomic structure. Two hours lecture, three 
hours laboratory. Given on demand. 

161-162. Food Chemistry Both semesters, four hours 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 1-2 or Chemistry 7-8. 



SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGE 111 

This course is a study of carbohydrates, fats, proteins, vita- 
mins, and related food materials. The course includes the processing 
of food materials for consumption and the transformation during 
cooking, digestion, and assimilation by the living organism. 

190. Special Problems in Chemistry 

One to three hours, either semester 
Individual research under the direction of the members of the 
staff. Problems are assigned according to the experience and interest 
of the student. 

HEALTH EDUCATION 

1. Health Principles for Nurses First semester, two hours 

Fundamental laws and principles of health and personal hy- 
giene; the application of these principles in the daily living habits. 
This course is especially designed for the prenursing student. Credit 
is not allowed for this course if Health 4 is taken for credit. 

4. Health Principles Either semester, two hours 

This course is designed for the general college student. Funda- 
mental principles of personal and community health; the application 
of these principles in daily living habits. Credit is not allowed for 
this course if Health 1 is taken for credit. 

5:6. Physical Education One-half hour per semester 

maximum credit, two hours 
Fundamental principles governing the development and main- 
tenance of a good physique; correction of certain anatomical defects 
prevalent among young people; wholesome recreation. 

21. Safety Education and First Aid 

Either semester, one or two hours 
Study of accidents, their cause and nature; safety measures for 
the prevention of common accidents in home, school, industry, 
transportation, and recreation. A Red Cross instructors' first aid 
certificate will be issued to each one completing the required work 
in first aid. Two hours laboratory each week. 

43:44. Games for Children Both semesters, two hourt 

Open only to students enrolled in the elementary teacher 

training curriculum. Opportunity to assist in the organization and 



112 SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGE 

leadership of physical education activities and play periods in the 
elementary school. Certain periods will be devoted to discussion. 

62. Health and Hygiene Second semester, two hours 

The principles of healthful living; practical instruction in 
hydrotherapy, sitz baths and fomentations, and the care of the 
sick. One hour lecture, three hours laboratory, each week. 

74. Laboratory Service and Office Nursing 

Second semester, two hours 

Prerequisite: Secretarial science 73. 

This course is adapted especially for those following the 
medical secretarial curriculum, and is designed to give instruction 
and practice in clinical office procedures and such nursing techniques 
as sterilization, preparing patients for examination and treatment, 
and doing simple laboratory tests. 

*101. Health Evangelism First semester, two hours 

A study of the importance and service of medical work in the 
field of evangelism. 

MATHEMATICS 

The objectives of this subdivision are to acquaint the student 
with the meaning, scope, methods, and content of mathematics, and 
to show some of the relationship, and contributions of this science 
to modern civilization and culture. 

Minor: Eighteen hours are required for a minor in mathe- 
matics. Six hours of the minor shall be from upper biennium 
courses, three hours of which shall be taken in this college. 

1. College Algebra First semester, three hours 

Prerequisite: One year high school algebra. Credit for college 
algebra cannot be granted students with two units credit in high 
school algebra. 

The algebraic number system, including complex numbers; 
variations; rational functions of first, second, and higher degrees with 
geometrical interpretations; maximum and minimum; theory of 
equations; partial fractions, linear systems and determinants; permu- 
tations, combinations, probability, conic sections; theory of expo- 
nents; applications to physics. 

•Probably will not be given 1952-53. 



SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGE 113 

2. Plane Trigonometry Second semester, three hours 

Prerequisite: Math I and plane geometry. 

Trigonometric functions, solution of right and of oblique 
triangles by natural functions and by logarithms; graphic and 
analytic treatment of trigonometric functions; inverse and exponen- 
tial functions; trigonometric identities and equations; applications 
to surveying, astronomy, mechanics, and navigation. 

3-4. Analytical Geometry Both semesters, four to six hours 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 1 and 2. 

Rectangular, oblique, and polar coordinates; the relation be- 
tween a curve and its equation; the algebra of a pair of variables, and 
the geometry of a moving point; straight lines; conic sections and 
certain other curves; lines, planes, and surfaces of revolution. Given 
on demand. 

105. Differential Calculus First semester, four hours 
Prerequisite: Mathematics 1, 2, 3, and 4. 

Infinitesimals; variation; differentiation of algebraic and trans- 
cendental functions; interpretation of the successive derivatives with 
applications to physics; differentials; partial derivatives. Given on 
demand. 

106. Integral Calculus Second semester, four hours 
Prerequisite: Mathematics 105. 

Integration of algebraic and transcendental functions; sum- 
mation; geometrical and physical interpretation; series; successive 
integration; simple differential equations. Given on demand. 

*109. Advanced Algebra First semester, three hours 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 1 and 2. 

Discussion of advanced algebraical topics, including permuta- 
tions and combinations, theory of equations, inequalities, mathemati- 
cal induction, determinants, infinite series. 

*110. Differential Equations Second semester, three hours 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 105, 106. 
The ordinary differential equations and their applications. 

♦170. Statistics Second semester, three hours 

Prerequisite: An understanding of algebra; college algebra 
recommended. 



♦Probably will not be given 1952-53. 



114 SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGE 

A study of the technique of the collection of data and of the 
proper arrangement of the data for analysis; actual experience in 
chart making, and in determining averages, dispersion variation, and 
trends; consideration of various applications of statistics to business. 

Credit for this course does not apply on a mathematics major 
or minor. 

108. Special Topics in Mathematics 

Either semester, one or two hours 
For properly qualified students under the direction of the 
instructor. 

PHYSICS 

The courses in this subdivision are intended to present physics 

as a typical science, and to acquaint students with its relation to 

other sciences and with some of its applications to the fields of 

research, engineering, radio communication, medicine, and dentistry. 

Major: Twenty-eight hours, exclusive of Courses 3-4, are 
required for a major. Thirteen hours of the major shall be from 
the upper biennium, including a minimum of six hours of upper 
biennium credit earned in this college. Mathematics through Cal- 
culus is indispensable, a minor in mathematics is advised. 

Minor: A minor in physics requires sixteen hours exclusive 
of Courses 3-4. Six hours of upper biennium credit are required, 
three of which shall be taken in this college. 

1-2. General Physics Both semesters, eight hours 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 2. High school physics is advised. 
An advanced study of the mechanics of solids, liquids, and 

gases; properties of matter and its internal forces; wave motion 

and sound; heat; magnetism; electrostatics; current electricity; 

alternating current theory; communication; radioactivity; light. Three 

hours lecture, four hours laboratory, each week. 

3-4. Principles of Radio Communication Both semesters, six hours 

Prerequisite: High school physics. 

Fundamental electrical principles; alternating currents and high 
frequency; vacuum tube theory and design; fundamental vacuum 
tube circuits; radio receiver theory and design; transmitter theory 
and design; test instruments; fundamentals of cathode ray television; 
wave fundamentals and radiation; industrial and medical uses of 



SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGE 115 

vacuum tubes; relay application. This course is not applicable on a 
major or minor in physics. Two hours lecture, three hours laboratory, 
each week. 

51-52. Descriptive Astronomy Both semesters, four hours 

A descriptive course comprising a study of general topics, but 
with special emphasis on acquiring an understanding of the solar 
system. A ten-inch reflecting telescope is available for observation. 
Two hours lecture; observation hours arranged. 

105-106. Analytical Mechanics Both semesters, six hours 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 105 and 106. 

The principles of statics and dynamics are given from a mathe- 
matical viewpoint. Three hours lecture. 

115. Heat Either semester, three hours 

Prerequisite: Physics 1-2. 

This course is a study of the laws of expansion, thermometry, 
change of state, transfer of heat, and laws of thermodynamics. Two 
hours lecture, three hours laboratory, each week. 

♦121-122. Electricity and Magnetism Both semesters, six hours 
Prerequisite: Physics 1-2, and Mathematics 105 and 106. 
Principles of magnetism, direct current and alternating current 

electricity, with applications of the principles studied. Two hours 

lecture, three hours laboratory, each week. 

*132. Electronics Second semester, four hours 

Prerequisite: Physics 1-2. 

The theory and application of electronic devices, such as multi- 
element electron tubes, photoelectric cells and cathode-ray tubes and 
associated apparatus is given. Three hours lecture, three hours 
laboratory, each week. 

*l4l. Physical Optics Either semester, four hours 

Prerequisite: Physics 1-2. 

The theory and application of the laws of refraction, reflection, 
interference of light and related phenomena are given. Three hours 
lecture, three hours laboratory, each week. 

144. Laboratory Glass Blowing Either semester, one or two hours 
(Same listing as in Chemistry section) 



•Probably will not be given 1952-53. 



116 SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGE 

171. Atomic Physics Either semester, three hours 
Prerequisite: Physics 1-2. 

This course treats on the structure of the atom and the physical 
phenomena related to the subatomic particles. Three hours lecture 
each week. 

172. Nuclear Physics Either semester, three hours 
Nuclear structure, natural and artificial radioactivity, nuclear 

transformations. 

181, 182. Physical Measurements, Either semester, one to three hours 
Properly qualified students may undertake problems for in- 
vestigation according to their experience, under the direction of the 
instructor. 



SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGE 117 

VI. RELIGION AND APPLIED THEOLOGY 

♦Charles E. Wittschiebe, Chairman 
Edward C Banks, Acting Chairman 
Richard L. Hammill D. C. Ludington 

Elmore T. McMurphy Leif Kr. Tobiassen 

It is the purpose of this division to assist the student in un- 
derstanding the value of religion in human experience; to inculcate 
a deep appreciation of the place of the Bible in discovering the 
true philosophy of life; to apply the teachings of Jesus to present-day 
problems; and to provide training for candidates for the ministry 
and for Bible teaching. 

Major in Religion: For ministerial students and for majors 
in religion in the arts and sciences curriculum. This major consists 
of thirty hours of credit in Religion. Religion 19 and 20, 61 and 
62, 165 and 166, are required. (See page 49.) Religion 1 and 2, 
and courses in applied theology do not apply. Fifteen hours shall 
be upper biennium credit, of which at least the last six hours shall 
be taken in this college. 

The specific requirements of the ministerial curriculum are to 
be found on page 48. 

The committee on Ministerial Recommendations has established 
standards of evaluation by which to judge the fitness of any candi- 
date to enter, or to continue in, the ministerial curriculum or the 
major in religion in the arts and sciences curriculum, and has set up 
procedures by which these may be applied. See page 48. 

Any student registered in the ministerial curriculum or regis- 
tered for a religion major will be required to have spent three 
months, not necessarily consecutive, in the colporteur work. This 
requirement may be met at any time prior to graduation. 

Minor in Religion: A Minor in Religion requires six hours 
in addition to the basic requirement; it shall include six hours of 
upper biennium credit (three earned in this college) and does not 
include credit in applied theology. 

Bible Instructors' Curriculum: Women seeking prepara- 
tion for the Bible Instructor's work are advised to follow a course of 
study leading to a Bachelor of Science degree with a major in Re- 
ligion and a minor in Home Economics. Other minors and electives 

* On leave 1952-53. 



118 SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGE 

should be planned in counsel with curriculum adviser. Where circum- 
stances will make it unwise for a person to pursue a full four-year 
college course, arrangement can be made to take a two-year course. 

RELIGION 

1, 2. Bible Survey Two semesters, four hours 

An introductory study of the Scriptures. The first semester 
course is required of those who have not had Old Testament history 
in the secondary school; the second semester course is required of 
those who have not had New Testament history in the secondary 
school. Exemption from either may be obtained by examination. 
Credit for this course does not apply on a major in religion. 

5. Gift of Prophecy First semester, two hours 

A study of the Scriptural basis and historical background of 
the Spirit of prophecy, and a survey of its relationship to the prog- 
ress and development of the Seventh-day Adventist Church. 

19, 20. Fundamentals of Christian Faith Both semesters, six hours 
A systematic and comprehensive study of the doctrines of the 
Christian religion. 

61, 62. Teachings of Jesus Both semesters, four hours 

101, 102. New Testament Epistles Both semesters, six hours 

115. Ancestry of the Bible First semester, two hours 

131, 132. Old Testament Prophets Both semesters, six hours 

fl51. Exegesis of First and Second Peter from the Original Greek 

First semester, two hours 

f 152. Exegesis of Hebrews from the Original Greek 

Second semester, two hours 

f*153. Exegesis of First Corinthians from the Original Greek 

First semester, two hours 

f*154. Exegesis of Galatians, fames, and Ephesians from the Orig- 
inal Greek Second semester, two hours 

155. Evidences of Christianity First semester, two hours 

165. Daniel First semester, three hours 



♦Probably will not be given 1952-53. 

f Prerequisite: Greek 45-46. May be elected for Greek minor. See Greek. 



SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGE 119 

166. Revelation Second semester, three hours 

*192. Ethics Second semester, two hours 

Seventh-day Adventist standards are studied with particular em- 
phasis on their relation to the general pattern of Protestant ethics. 

194. Problems in Religion Second semester, one or two hours 

Prerequisite: English 193. 
Guided research in religious problems. Thesis required. 

APPLIED THEOLOGY 
*78. Mission Problems Second semester, two hours 

An orientation course for students looking forward to mission 
work. 

89, 90. Principles of Personal Evangelism 

Both semesters, four hours 
Theory and practice in the development and presentation of 
Bible studies, with emphasis on soul-winning through individual 
contact. 

111. Church Organization First semster, two hours 

119, 120. Sermon Preparation and Delivery 

Both semesters, four hours 
Prerequisite: Religion 19 and 20. 

122. Evangelistic Preaching Second semester, two hours 

Credit also allowed in speech. See page 104. 

*126. Public Evangelism Second semester, two hours 

Not open to one taking Applied Theology 128 for credit. 

175. Public Worship and Special Services First semester, two hours 

176. Pastoral Methods Second semester, two hours 

COUSSES OFFERED IN FIELD SCHOOL OF EVANGELISM, 
SUMMER OF 1953 

101. Medical Evangelism Two hours 

115. Evangelistic and Church Music Two hours 

128. Public Evangelism Four hours 

175. Pastoral Methods Two hours 

A two-hour course in Religion or Applied Theology will be offered, the 
choice to be determined largely by the need of the student personnel regis- 
tered for the Field School. 

* Probably will not be given 1952-53. 



120 SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGE 

VII. SOCIAL SCIENCES 

Floyd O. Rittenhouse, Chairman 

R. M. Craig Ambrose L. Suhrie 

George T. Gott Leif Kr. Tobiassen 

William B. Higgins Everett T. Watrous 

H. T. Curtis 

The objectives of the division of social sciences are to aid in 
the application of divine ideals to all human relationships; to foster 
ah appreciation of true social and political culture, locally, nation- 
ally, and internationally; to develop an intelligent understanding 
of the relationship between history and Biblical prophecy; and to 
prepare teachers in the social sciences. 

The purpose of the social studies is to assist the student in 
understanding the complexities of modern society and how the pro- 
vidence of God has influenced history. It is designed to enable 
him to prepare himself and others for the service of mankind here 
and for the life hereafter. 

ECONOMICS 
As indicated on page 45, students may major in Economics 
and Business in the Arts and Sciences curriculum. 

Major: A major in economics and business requires thirty 
hours exclusive of American Economic History 31. The major shall 
include a minimum of sixteen hours of upper biennium credit, six 
of which shall be earned in this college. No course in which a "D" 
has been received may apply on this major. 

Minor: A minor in Economics and Business requires eighteen 
hours including a minimum of six hours of upper biennium 
credit, three of which shall be earned in this college. 

11. Economic Resources First semester, two hours 

A study of world-wide distribution of economic goods. Manu- 
facturing centers and sources of raw materials will be considered 
in the light of their international economic importance. 

31. American Economic History First semester, three hours 

{See History 31.) 

55, 56. Business Law Both semesters, four hours 



SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLJLEGB 121 

71, 72. Principles of Economics Both semesters, six hours 

A survey course in the fundamentals of economics: the insti- 
tutions, forces, and factors affecting production, evaluation, ex- 
change, and distribution of wealth in modern society. 

129, 130. Marketing Both semesters, four hours 

Prerequisite: Economics 71 and 72 recommended; or junior 
standing. 

A detailed study of exchange problems. The problems of dis- 
tribution will be analyzed both from the viewpoint of the producer 
and consumer. The usual topics of assembling, grading, sorting, 
transporting, financing, and selling goods, and risk assumption will 
be given consideration. Emphasis is on the retailing area of market- 
ing. 

140. Money and Banking First semester, three hours 
Mediums of exchange, money and credit, banks and their ser- 
vices, the Federal Reserve System, and other financial institu- 
tions are considered. 

141. Business Economics Second semester, three hours 
Application of economic analysis to the solution of business 

problems. Consideration of the nature and functions of business 
profits, the analysis of demand and of costs, the determination of 
prices, price policies, etc. 

*174. Economic Problems First semester, two hours 

A seminar in the practical application of .economic problems. 

GEOGRAPHY 

41. Principles of Geography First semester, three hours 
Maps, land forms, soil, mineral resources, weather, and climate 

are considered. Man's adjustment to various physiographic regions 
is studied. 

42. Geography of a Continent Second semester, three hours 
Prerequisite: Geography 41. 

A survey course of one continent is followed by an analysis 
of the geographic aspects of each of its countries. 

HISTORY 
Major: A major in history requires thirty hours. It shall 



♦Probably will not be siren 1952-53. 



122 SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGE 

include History 1, 2, 13, 14, and 134, and may include six hours 
of upper biennium political sciences credit. Thirteen hours of the 
major must be in upper biennium courses, six of which shall be 
earned in this college. 

Credit in English 193 is required of those majoring in history. 

Minor: For a minor in history twenty hours are required, in- 
cluding History 1, 2, 13, and 14. Six hours of the minor, which 
shall be chosen from the upper biennium, may include three hours 
of upper biennium political science credit. Three hours of upper 
biennium credit shall be earned in this college. 

A minor in political science requires twenty hours, including 
Political Science 15 and Sociology 20. Of the six hours of upper 
biennium credit required in the minor, three hours may be history. 
Three hours of the upper biennium credit shall be earned in this 
college. 

1, 2. Survey of Civilization Both semesters, six hours 

A study of human civilization from creation to modern times, 
including its religious, social, political, cultural, and economic 
aspects. 

6. Modern Adventism Second semester, two hours 

A survey of the rise and progress of the Seventh-day Adventist 
church. Responsible factors, such as the objectives, philosophy, and 
policies of the denomination, are examined. 

13, 14. American History Both semesters, six hours 

A study of the development of the character and civilization of 
the American people, including their politics and social institutions 
and reaching to the present scene. 

31. American Economic History First semester, three hours 

A study of the growth of American economic life arranged to 
develop an understanding of modern institutions and economic 
problems. 

SO. Missions Second semester, two hours 

A survey of the work and progress of Christian missions from 
the apostolic age to the present time. Special emphasis is placed up- 
on the world-wide missionary program of Seventh-day Adventists. 



SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGE 123 

111, 112. The Renaissance and Reformation 

Both semesters, four hours 

Prerequisite: History 1, or equivalent 

An analysis of the enlightenment and of the causes of the 
great Protestant revolt against the Catholic Church, and the counter 
reformation. 

*115. The Revolutionary Era First semester, three hours 

Prerequisite: History 2, or equivalent. 

An analysis of the religious, social, political, cultural, and 
economic movements during the revolutionary period 1789-1815. 

*116. "Nineteenth Century Europe Second semester, three hours 

Prerequisite: History 2, or equivalent. 

Political and social developments in Europe 1815-1918, in their 
world setting, are studied in the light of Biblical prophecy. Cultural, 
economic, and religious aspects are critically analyzed. 

*131. History of Antiquity First semester, three hours 

Prerequisite: History 1, or equivalent. 

A study of the ancient nations, Babylonia, Assyria, Egypt, Persia, 
and Israel, to provide the historical background for an intelligent 
understanding of the Old Testament. 

*132. History of the Classical World Second semester, three hours 

Prerequisite: History 1, or equivalent. 

A consideration of Greek culture, of Alexander's Hellenistic 
empire, of Roman institutions, and of the impact of Christianity 
upon the ancient world. 

141. World Religions First semester, two hours 

A study of the founders, historical setting, basic teachings, and 
rituals of existing religions; emphasis upon the needs of the non- 
Christian world. 

*145, 146. History of Latin America Both semesters, four hours 

Prerequisite: History 13 and 14. 

A survey of the colonial period; an intensive study of the rite 
of the various Latin-American nations. The second semester deals 
with the Latin- American republics, with special attention to Argen- 
tina, Brazil, Chile, and Mexico; their present status. 



♦Probably will not be given 1952-53. 



124 SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGE 

147, 148. History of the South Both semesters, four hours 

The first semester of this course is a study of the Old South 
from discovery to I860. The second semester is a study of recon- 
struction and the subsequent developments of the South, its role in 
national affairs and recent changes including the current scene. 

151. Ancient and Medieval Christianity First semester, three hours 
Prerequisite: History 1, or equivalent. 

A survey of movements in the Christian church from apostolic 
days to the modern era. Doctrines and personalities are analyzed in 
the light of Biblical teachings. 

152. Modern Christianity Second semester, three hours 
Prerequisite: History 2, or equivalent. 

A study of the reformatory movements in various countries 
and the development of the modern religious situation. Special 
attention given to present-day problems. 

184. Seminar in History Second semester, one hour 

Prerequisite: English 193. Open only to majors in history. 
Problems of historical research, materials, and methods. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 

15, 16. American National and State Government 

Both semesters, four hours 
The establishment and operation of the Federal Constitution; 
the national judiciary; state, county, and local governments. 

127. Problems of World Politics First semester, three hours 

Prerequisite: History 1 and 2, or 13 and 14, or equivalent. 
An intensive study of world politics 1918-1952, analyzing the 
forces that determined recent world conditions in the religious, 
political, economic, cultural, and social fields. Special study will be 
given to the formation and progress of the United Nations. 

162. Contemporary International Relations 

Second semester, three hours 

Prerequisite: History 1 and 2, or 13 and 14, or equivalent. 

A critical analysis of the chief factors influencing present-day 
affairs, with emphasis on the ideological and religious backgrounds 
to current conflicts. 



SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COIXEGB 12) 

SOCIOLOGY 

17. College Problems First semester, one hour 

Principles of learning, social standards, vocational guidance, 
adjustment to a college environment. Required of first-year college 
students. 

20. Introductory Sociology Second semester, three hours 

A study of such important aspects of American society as the 
family, races, religious groups, industry, and education. 

21, 22. Current Affairs Both semesters, two hours 

A basic course in present, day-to-day events of significance in 
domestic and international affairs. Newspapers and current periodi- 
cals are used as sources. 

31. Social Aspects of Nursing First semester, two hours 

This course is intended to acquaint the student with the social 
responsibilities of the nursing profession. It includes history of 
nursing and consideration of contemporary movements in the 
nursing profession. 

32. Social Aspects of Nursing Second semester, one hour 

A study of the basic concepts of sociology as related to the 
nursing profession and to the community as a whole. 

42. Marriage and the Family Second semester, two hours 

A course in the ethics of human relationships including the 
place of the family in society, a Christian approach to the problems 
of marriage and family life and the inter-relation of parents and 
children. (By special arrangement to do extra work this course may 
carry upper division credit as Sociology 142.) 

132. Child Care and Development Second semester, two hours 
Physical, mental, and social development of the child, with 
emphasis on problems of dealing with children and training in 
child guidance. 



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SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGE 127 

EXPENSES 

Each student entering college, after having met the full 
financial and labor requirement, has actually covered only part of 
the full cost of his instruction and maintenance. The operating 
deficit is covered by gifts, subsidies, and funds from other sources. 
The educational opportunity afforded each student in Southern 
Missionary College represents a large investment in buildings and 
equipment, averaging more than two thousand dollars for each 

student enrolled. 

ROOM DEPOSIT 

Dormitory rooms may be reserved by mailing a $5.00 room 
deposit to the Secretary of Admissions at the college between May 1 
and September 1. This deposit will appear as a credit on the final 
statement of the school year provided the room is left in good order. 

In case the student's application is not accepted, or if notice 
of nonattendance is given the college by August 1, the room deposit 
will be refunded at once by check. 

LATE REGISTRATION 

For late registration $5.00 

See italicized paragraph page seven for statement of the exact day and 
hour when each student is expected to present himself for registration. 

ADVANCE DEPOSIT AND MATRICULATION FEE 

Advance Guarantee Deposits are expected of all students 
including veterans whose total charges from the college are 
not covered by the G.I. Bill of Rights. 

The guarantee deposit is charged only once during the year, and 
is payable on or before the date of registration. It will be credited 
on the final statement of the school year, or at withdrawal. 

For a married couple, each enrolled for eight hours or more 
of school work, the regular advance guarantee deposit will be re- 
quired from each. For a combined total fifteen semester hours 
or less, the charge will be the same as for one person. 

Students registering for music only are not required to pay any 
guarantee deposit or general fee. However, a rental will be levied 
for use of piano or organ. 

The amount of advance guarantee deposit required is deter- 
mined as follows: 

A. Those being charged housing, tuition, and board ....$65.00 

B. Those being charged any two of the three above $50.00 

C. Those being charged any one of the three above $35.00 



Semester 


Tuition 


Hours 


Per Sem. 


1 


14.00 


2 


28.00 


3 


42.00 


4 


56.00 


5 


70.00 


6 


84.00 


7 


98.00 


8 


112.00 


9 


126.00 


10 


140.00 


11 


154.00 


12 


168.00 


13 


173-00 


14 


178.00 


15 


183.00 


16 


188.00 


17 


193.00 


18 


198.00 



25.00 


53.00 


25.00 


81.00 


25.00 


109.00 


25.00 


137.00 


25.00 


165.00 


25.00 


193.00 


25.00 


221.00 


25.00 


249.00 


32.50 


284.50 


32.50 


312.50 


32.50 


340.50 


32.50 


368.50 


32.50 


378.50 


32.50 


388.50 


32.50 


398.50 


32.50 


408.50 


32.50 


418.50 


32.50 


428.50 



128 SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGE 

TUITION AND FEES 
For 1952-53 Fiscal Year 

Tuition Gen. Fee Total 

28.00 
56.00 
84.00 

112.00 

140.00 

168.00 

196.00 

224.00 

252.00 

280.00 

308.00 

336.00 

346.00 

356.00 

366.00 

376.00 

386.00 

396.00 

The charge indicated above as "tuition" includes and/or re- 
places all laboratory fees, all music rentals (piano, organ, instru- 
ments), all charges for musical organizations, graduation expenses 
such as caps and gowns, and diplomas, counselling and guidance 
service, etc. 

The General Fee shall be paid at registration. It shall include 
charges for lyceum programs, Southern Accent, Student Association 
fee, library fee, physical examination, and matriculation expense. 
A student withdrawing on or before the completion of the first 
semester will receive a refund of $11 (1-8 semester hours) or 
$12.50 (9 hours or more). 

Tuition charges are made in four equal installments for each 
semester, monthly, beginning with the statement for October. 

It is assumed to be the earnest purpose of each student to 
secure an education, and since even those working their entire way 
have time for as much as one-half of a full class load, each student 
is urged to carry at least that much school work. Except by per- 
mission of the administrative council, the minimum course load a 
residence hall student may carry is eight hours. 

A full-time student in any one semester is defined as one who 
is registered for a course load of twelve hours for that semester. 



SOUTHBRN MISSIONARY COLLEGE 129 

MUSIC TUITION 

The charge for any private music instruction is $24.00 per 
semester, or $48.00 for the year, for a minimum of 15 lessons per 
semester. This charge is made in eight installments of $6.00 each, 
in the same manner as the regular tuition. In addition to private 
instruction in voice, classes of from two to five students are arranged 
at a cost per student of $18.00 per semester. All students who wish 
to take music must enroll for it at the registrar's office. There are 
no refunds for specified vacation periods or lessons missed because 
of the student's absence. 

Students who enroll late, or who withdraw before the end of 
the semester, are charged at the rate of $1.60 per week up to a 
maximum of $24.00 for one lesson a week. Withdrawal is made 
by means of a drop voucher obtained at the registrar's office. 

BOARD CHARGES 

The cafeteria plan of boarding is used, which allows the student 
the privilege of choosing his food and paying only for what he 
selects. The minimum monthly charge for dormitory students r 
$17.00. This covers a full calendar month. The average costs run 
higher than these figures, totaling around $210.00 per year for 
women and $280.00 for men. 

No allowance is made for absence from the campus except for 
specified vacations of one week or more, and in cases of emergency. 
Three meals a day are served. Students living in Maude Jones HalJ 
or John Talge Hall are expected to take their meals in the dining 
room. 

MARRIED STUDENTS' HOUSING 
The College operates approximately one-hundred apartments, 
including trailers, for married students. These range in size from 
one room to four rooms — some furnished and some unfurnished 
Rents range from $15 per month to $40 per month. Prospective 
students are invited to write to the Business Manager for details. 
A reservation fee of $10 is charged. This is refunded on the stu- 
dent's final statement of the school year pending satisfactory clear- 
ance of housing. 

There are fifty or more apartments in the Collegedale commu- 
nity. These also are available to students. Information may be sup- 
plied by the Business Manager upon request. 



130 SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGB 

RENT IN RESIDENCE HALLS 
A room charge of $16.00 per calendar month is made to each 
student residing in a school home. This charge provides for steam 
heat, lights, and medical service as specified below. On this basis 
two students occupy one room. If three occupy one room, the charge 
is reduced to $14.00 each per month. The rate for rooms with ad- 
joining bath is $18.00 for each student. No refund is made because 
of absence from the campus either for regular vacation periods or 
for other reasons. 

LAUNDRY AND DRY CLEANING SERVICE 
The College operates a modern laundry and dry cleaning plant. 
Students are invited to patronize this service. Charges for service 
rendered will be entered on the student's account to be settled 
monthly. There is no minimum charge. 

MEDICAL SERVICE 

The medical care provided through the room charge includes 
dispensary service and general nursing care not exceeding two weeks. 
An extra charge of ten cents per tray is made each time tray service is 
required. There will be an extra charge for calls by a physician and 
for special nursing. Medical service provided to other than dor- 
mitory residents will be charged according to the service rendered. 

All prospective students should have their eyes tested by a 
competent oculist, and have any necessary dental work cared for 
before entering school. 

TITHE AND CHURCH EXPENSE 
Southern Missionary College encourages the payment of tithe 
and church expense by its student workers. In order to facilitate 
this practice, arrangements may be made for each student to have 
charged to his account ten per cent of his school earnings for tithe, 
and two per cent for church expense. These funds are then trans- 
ferred by the college to the treasurer of the Collegedale S. D. A. 
Church. 

FUND FOR PERSONAL EXPENSES 
Students should be provided with sufficient funds, in addition 
to money for school expenses, to cover cost of books, clothing, and 
all personal items. They may open deposit accounts at the business 
office, subject to withdrawal in person only, and these funds are 
available at any time, as long as there is a credit remaining of what 



SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGE 131 

the student has deposited. These deposit accounts are entirely sepa- 
rate from the regular students' expense accounts. 

Purchases from the college store or from other departments on 
the campus are made only by cash. At the beginning of each semes- 
ter, a student may purchase from the business office a store voucher 
which may be used at the store for the purchase of books. 

PAYMENT OF ACCOUNTS 
Statements will be issued to students as of the last day of each 
calendar month, covering the month's expenses and credits. This 
billing is subject to discount when paid by the 15th of the following 
month. The gross billing is due on the 25th of the same month. 
Should a student's account be unpaid by the 5th of the succeeding 
month, he is automatically dropped from class attendance until satis- 
factory arrangements are made. 

EXAMPLE OF CREDIT POLICY 

Period covered by statement October 1-31 

Approximate date of billing November 5 

Discount period ends November 15 

Gross amount due November 25 

Class attendance severed if still unpaid December 5 

This schedule of payment must be maintained since the budget 
is based upon the 100 per cent collection of student charges within 
the 30-day period following date of billing. 

Transcripts of credits and diplomas are issued only when stu- 
dents' accounts are paid in full. 

STUDENT LABOR REGULATIONS 
Believing in the inspired words that "systematic labor should 
constitute a part of the education of youth," 1 Southern Missionary 
College has made provision that every student enrolled may have the 
privilege of organizing his educational program on the "work-study" 
plan. "Jesus the carpenter, and Paul the tent-maker, . . . with the 
toil of the craftsman linked the highest ministry, human and 
divine." 2 The college not only provides a work-study program, but 
strongly recommends it to each student enrolled. 

1. Ellen G. White, Fundamentals of Christian Education, p. 44, Na*h- 
ville, Tennessee, Southern Publishing Association, 1923. 

2. Ellen G. White, Education, p. 217, Mountain View, California, Paci- 
fic Press Publishing Association, 1903. 



132 SOUTHBRN MISSIONARY COLLEGE 

Inasmuch as the student's labor constitutes a part of his edu- 
cation, participation in the work program is graded, and a report 
issued to him. This grade is based upon the following: 

Ability to learn Leadership and Initiative 

Quality of work Punctuality 

Quantity of work Integrity 

Safety habits Dependability 

Interest Efficiency 

Cooperation and Compatibility 

A record of vocational experience and efficiency is also kept, by 
semesters, for each student in which is listed the type of work in 
which he has engaged and his degree of efficiency. This information 
will be available to potential employers. 

The college will assign students to departments where work is 
available and cannot shift students from one department to another 
merely upon request. It should be understood that once a student is 
assigned to work in a given department, he will remain there for the 
entire school year except in rare cases where changes are recommend- 
ed by the school nurse, or are made at the discretion of the college. 

Should a student find it necessary to be absent from work, he 
must immediately make arrangements with his work superintendent. 
In cases of illness, he will also inform the health service. Any stu- 
dent who drops his regularly scheduled work without proper ar- 
rangements with his work superintendent will be suspended from 
class attendance until he returns to work or is excused therefrom. 

COLPORTEUR BONUS 

That students might have adequate work opportunities of a. 
profitable nature (both financially and spiritually) during the sum- 
mer months, the College, together with the Southern Publishing 
Association and the several local conferences and Bible houses 
throughout the Southern Union, have banded together to offer a 
bonus to students selling Bibles and denominational books or mag- 
azines. 

Students may make arrangements with one of the several Bible 
houses to sell books or magazines in a designated territory. The 
commission to students, as well as to full-time colporteurs, is 50 
per cent of the total dollar volume of literature sold. In addition to 



SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGE 133 

this commission the organizations indicated above will pay to the 
student colporteur a liberal bonus. 

The operation of this plan might well be pictured as follows: 

Total books delivered $1,400.00 

Cost of books delivered 700.00 



Commission earned on sales 700.00 

Colporteur bonus 300.00 



Total funds deposited at S.M.C. for 

educational purposes of student colporteur 1,000.00 



It is evident from these illustrative figures that the bonus 
paid is very liberal. It amounts to 43 1/7 per cent of the regular 
commissions ($700) or 30 per cent of the total amount ($1,000) 
deposited to the student's credit at the College by the contributing 
organizations. In actual practice the bonus is computed in this way: 

Divide sum turned over to Bible House by student colpor- 
teur by .70 ($700 divided by .70 equals $1,000) and the 
quotient equals the amount deposited to the student's 
credit at the College. Subtract from this total the commis- 
sions ($700) which the student remitted to the Bible 
House ($1,000 — $700 equals $300) and you have the 
amount of the bonus. 
There are various other regulations that pertain, such as: 

1. A student must spend a minimum of 350 (300 for 
women) hours in the colporteur work during the summer 
in order to qualify. 

2. The colporteur bonus will be granted only to such stu- 
dent colporteurs as actually use both commissions and 
bonus for educational expenses at S.M.C. 

(Note) These provisions and others are explained in detail in a 
separate pamphlet which is available on request at the College or 
at any of the Bible houses. 

Tuition Scholarship. Each year the college, in conjunction 
with the several local conferences of the Southern Union Conference, 
awards eleven $50 cash scholarships to be applied on tuition: $25 



134 SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGE 

at the end of the first semester and $25 at the end of the second. 
The following schools are eligible to participate in this plan: 

Asheville Agricultural School Madison College Academy 

Collegedale Academy (2) Little Creek Academy 

Forest Lake Academy (2) Pine Forest Academy 

Highland Academy Mt. Pisgah Academy 

The candidates are chosen as follows: The faculty of each designated 
school nominates its candidate; the name, if approved by the school 
board, is recommended to the educational board of the local con- 
ference, for final approval. The selection of nominees is based on 
character, scholarship, personality, and promise of future leadership. 

EDUCATIONAL FUND 

Many young people are deprived of the privilege of attending 
college because of a lack of necessary means. To aid these, an 
earnest effort has been made to obtain donations for the establish- 
ment of an education fund, from which students worthy of help 
may borrow money for a reasonable length of time. Faithfulness in 
refunding these loans will make it possible for the same money to 
assist many students in school. There have been some gifts, and they 
have been used to help several young men and women complete their 
work in this college. But the needs of worthy students have been 
greater than the funds on hand; consequently it has been impossible 
in many instances to render the needed assistance. It has therefore 
been decided to direct the attention of patrons and friends of the 
school to these facts and to invite them to give such means as they 
may desire to devote to this purpose. The college will be glad to 
correspond with any who think favorably of this plan, and will 
continue to use the gifts so that the wishes of the donors may be 
fulfilled and the best results obtained. 

"In each conference a fund should be raised to lend to worthy 
poor students who desire to give themselves to the missionary work; 
and in some cases they should receive donations. When the Battle 
Creek College was first started, there was a fund placed in the 
Review and Herald office for the benefit of those who wished to 
obtain an education, but had not the means. This was used by 
several students until they could get a good start; then from their 
earnings they would replace what they had drawn, so that others 



SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGE 135 

might be benefited by the fund. The youth should have it plainly 
set before them that they must work their own way as far as possible 
and thus partly defray their expenses. That which costs little will 
be appreciated little. But that which costs a price somewhere near 
its real value will be estimated accordingly."— Testimonies, Vol. VI, 
pages 213, 214. 

Nurses' Scholarship Plan: In response to the heavy demand 
for trained nurses, the Southern Union Conference, the Florida 
Sanitarium and the Southern Missionary College have worked out a 
cooperative scholarship plan for young people who can qualify 
for nursing and who desire to take the year of prenursing at 
Southern Missionary College and then complete their nurses' train- 
ing at the Florida Sanitarium. 

Young people who are accepted on this scholarship plan will 
be credited with $75.00 during the first semester and another $75.00 
during the second semester of their prenursing year at Southern 
Missionary College. After admission to the Florida Sanitarium 
School of Nursing the student will be credited with another $75.00. 
For each $75.00 granted the student will sign a promissory note 
for that amount to the institution concerned. Upon successful 
graduation of the student from the Florida Sanitarium and Hospital 
School of Nursing these notes will be destroyed. In case the 
student for any reason discontinues the nurses' training program 
the notes already signed become payable at once. 

This plan is designed to encourage qualified young people, 
whose financial support otherwise would be inadequate, to enter 
this field of preparation and service. Young people interested in 
this plan should address inquiries to the Dean of Southern Mis- 
sionary College. 



136 SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGE 

GRADUATES 

JUNE CLASS, 1951 

ELEMENTARY TEACHER TRAINING 
Marjorie Ethel Connell Ruth Louise Kummer 

Emery Floyd Hoyt Raymond Joseph Pons 

Christine Elizabeth Kummer 

SECRETARIAL SCIENCE 

Caroline Mae Gibson Doris Mae Patterson 

Elaine Marie Henson Doris Evelyn Tipton 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

Kenneth Chandler Baize Weldon Dale Martin 

Loren Everett Bishop Craig Sanford Parrish 

Thomas Lee Brackett Frederick Stanley Sanburn 

Clyde Franklin Brooks Andranik Walters Saphiloff 

Kenneth K. Hamilton Kenneth E. Scott 

Malone H. Hendry Henry Wooten, Jr. 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 

Betty Jo Boynton Ruth M. Jones 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN SECONDARY EDUCATION 

Warren G. Hammond Francis Martin Miller 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN INDUSTRIAL ARTS 

Ernest Stanley Anderson John Baker Tigert 

Jerald E. Bromback Drew Munroe Turlington 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN SECRETARIAL SCIENCE 

Betty Walters Miller 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN THEOLOGY 

Homer Douglas Bennett Lloyd Wendell Pleasants 

Edward Milton Collins Philipe Bruce Raab 

Robert Dale Fisher James Housten Sinclair 

Rainey Howard Hooper Frederick Veltman 

Joe Earl Lambeth William Dean Wampler 
Chauncey Frederick Laubach Burton Lamont Wright 

James Jamile Jacobs William Forrest Zill 
Thomas Joseph Mostert 



SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGE 137 

BACHELOR OF ARTS 

James William Blankenship Walter Charles Holland 

Carmen Cartabianca Paul McMillan, Jr. 

Richard Llewellyn Coon Betty Imogene Park 

Arthur Ray Corder Charles Lef elia Pierce 

William Paul Dysinger Herman Carlyle Ray 

Mary Elizabeth Elam H. Edward Schneider III 

George Burton Ellis Lester Andrew Smith 

Joseph Leland Gardner William Tol 

Elbert Wade Goodner Raymond H. Woolsey 

Carl David Henriksen Dorothy Beatrice Zill 



AUGUST CLASS, 1951 
ELEMENTARY TEACHER TRAINING 

Vilida Audrey Bergman Sara Kathleen East 

Mrs. Elmira Conger 

SECRETARIAL SCIENCE 
Sara Ann Hubbard 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN THEOLOGY 
Wilbur D. Brass 

BACHELOR OF ARTS 
Calvin Clifford Acufr Hubert Lee Williams 

Owie Eric Hanna Alexander Zegarra 

Noble Kenneth Shepherd 

JANUARY CLASS, 1952 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION I 

William Jones Kline Lloyd ^ 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN THEOLOGY 
Harold Armstrong Hugh Leggett 

Virgil Beauchamp Sherman Peterson 

BACHELOR OF ARTS 
Lester Park Andres H. Riffel 



138 SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGE 

SUMMARY OF ENROLLMENT, 1951-52 

Summer Session, 1951 

Men Women Totals 

Seniors 23 1 24 

Juniors 32 9 41 

Sophomores 29 22 51 

Freshmen 43 49 92 

Special, Postgraduates, 

and Unclassified 8 8 16 

Total for summer 135 89 224 

First and Second Semesters, 1951-1952 

Seniors 40 8 48 

Juniors 66 16 82 

Sophomores 81 29 110 

Freshmen 135 146 281 

Special, Postgraduates, 

and Unclassified 4 46 50 

Totals 326 245 571 

Gross Total 461 334 795 

Less Duplicate Names 88 24 112 

Net Total 373 310 683 



SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGE 



139 



GEOGRAPHICAL DISTRIBUTION OF 
COLLEGE ENROLLMENTS JUNE 1, 1951 TO MAY 31, 1952 



States 

Alabama 11 

Arkansas 3 

California 5 

Colorado 2 

Connecticut 1 

Dist. of Columbia 1 

Florida 35 

Georgia .. 12 

Illinois 2 

Indiana 6 

Iowa 1 

Kansas 4 

Kentucky 10 



Summer Semesters 
1951 1951-52 



27 

8 

20 

5 

1 

1 

104 

31 

8 

8 

2 

4 

19 

6 

2 

6 

2 

7 



Louisiana 1 

Maine 1 

Maryland 1 

Massachusetts .... 

Michigan 5 

Minnesota 

Mississippi 5 

Missouri ...i 1 

Nebraska „... 2 

Nevada 

New Hampshire 

New Mexico ...... 

New York 6 

North Carolina .. 20 

North Dakota .... 1 

Ohio 8 19 

Oklahoma 3 9 



States 

Oregon 1 

Pennsylvania 5 

South Carolina .... 

South Dakota 1 

Tennessee 44 

Texas 11 

Virginia 3 

Washington 1 

West Virginia .... 

Wisconsin 1 

Foreign Countries 

Argentina 

British West 

Indies 

Canada 

Chile 

Costa Rica 

Cuba 5 

Egypt 

England 

India 

Jamaica 1 

Lebanon 

New South Wales 

Peru 1 

Puerto Rico 2 



Summer Semesters 
1951 1951-52 



Totals 224 

Combined total 

enrollment .. 
Less duplicates .. 
Net enrollment 

(June '51-May '52) 



5 

9 

12 

2 

109 

21 

12 

2 

4 

6 



1 
4 
1 
1 
10 
1 
1 
2 
1 
1 
1 

3 
571 

795 
112 

683 



SOUTHBRN MISSIONARY COLLEGE 



141 



GENERAL INDEX 



A. G. Daniels Memorial 

Library 18, 147 

Absences 36-37 

Academic Regulations 28-40 

Accounting, Courses in . 71 

Accounts, Payment of 131 

Accreditation 15 

Admissions 28-32 

Advanced Standing 29 

Application Procedures 28 

Entrance Examinations 32 

Entrance Requirements 30-31 

Freshman Standing 36 

G. E. D. Tests 29 

Orientation 29 

Special Students 30, 36 

Transcripts 28 

Unaccredited Schools, Students 

from 32 

Agriculture, Courses in 72 

Alumni Association 26-27 

Announced Regulations 24 

Application Procedure 28 

Applied Arts, Division of 71-83 

Art, Courses in 91 

Athletics 25 

Attendance Regulations 36-37 

Auditing Classes 35 

Autocracy iv 

Automobiles 24 

Bible, Courses in 117-119 

Bible Instructors' Course .... 117-118 

Biennium Courses 35 

Biology, Courses in 105-109 

Board of Trustees 6 

Executive Committee 6 

Finance Committee 6 

Broom Factory 20 

Buildings and Equipment 17 

"C" Average 70 

Calendar, July 1952-June 1954 .. 5 

Calendar of Events 4, 6 

Campus Organizations 24-25 

Campus S. M. C. (Picture) _.... 150 

Catalog, The College i 

Certification 15, 53 

Chapel Attendance 37 

Chemistry, Courses in 109-111 

Citizenship 23, 37-38 

Classification of Students 35-56 

College, A Good iv 

College, An Ideal Christian ii 

College Press 19 

College Store 19 

College Wood Products .._ 20, 148 
Collegedale Academy ._ 27 



Collegedale Industries 7 

Collegedale Mercantile Enterprises 7 
Collegedale Tabernacle- 

• Auditorium 18-19 

Conduct, Moral 23 

Convocations 25 

Co-operation iv 

Correspondence Work 38 

Course Numbers 70 

Counseling 25 

Credit Policy 131 

Credit Reduction 35 

Curriculums, Degree 43-60 

Curriculums, Junior College ....60-67 

Dean's List 40 

Degree Curriculums 43-60 

Democracy iv 

Earl F. Hackman Science 

Hall iii, 18, 149 

Economics, Courses in 120-121 

Education and Psychology, 

Division of 84-90 

Elementary School 19 

English, Courses in 99-100 

English Performance, Required 

Standards of 42, 69 

Enrollment 1 38 

Entrance Deficiencies 31 

Entrance Requirements 28-31 

Evangelism, Courses in 119 

Examinations 39 

Admission by 32 

Entrance 32 

Exemption by 39 

Special 39 

Expenses, see Financial Plans .. 126 

Extension Work 38 

Extracurricular Activities 24-26 

Faculty 7-1 3 

Adminstrative Staff _. 7 

Organization of 13 

Fees, see Financial Plans 126 

Financial Plans 126-135 

Aids 132-135 

Colporteur Bonus 132-133 

Loans, Educational 

Fund 1 34-1 35 

Nurses' Scholarship 135 

Tuition Scholarships ....133-134 

Employment Opportunities 25 

Expenses 127-130 

Advance Deposit 127 

Board 129 

Housing, Married Students -129 
Late Registration 127 



142 



SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGE 



Laundry and Dry Cleaning ..130 

Matriculation Fee 127 

Medical 1 30 

Music . 129 

Rent, Residence Halls 130 

Room Deposit 127 

Tuition and Fees 128 

Summary Chart 126 

Payment of Accounts 131 

Personal Expenses 130-131 

Tithe and Church Expense ....130 

Fine Arts, Division of 91-98 

Foreign Languages, 

Courses in 100-104 

Foreign Students 69 

Freshman Standing 36 

G. E. D. Tests 29 

General Information 15 

Geographical Distribution of 

Enrollment 1 39 

G. I. Bill of Rights 21-23 

Governing Standards 23 

Grades and Reports 39-40 

Grade Points 39 

Graduates: June, 1951 to 

January, 1952 136-137 

Graduation Standards 40-60 

Bachelor of Arts, Degree 

Curriculums 43-5 1 

Applied Music 47-48 

Arts and Sciences 46-48 

Secondary Education 51 

Theology 48-51 

Bachelor of Science, Degree 

Curriculums 51-60 

Elementary Education ....51-53 

Home Economics 54-55 

Industrial Arts 66 

Premedicine 60 

Religious Education 57-58 

Secretarial Science 58-60 

Candidacy for Graduation 41 

Diploma Fees 128 

English Performance, 

Required Standards 42 

Graduate Record Examinations 41 

Honors 43 

In Absentia 43 

Junior College Curriculums, 60-66 

Associate in Arts 61 

Bible Instructor 63 

Elementary Teacher 

Training 51-54 

Home Economics 65 

Industrial Arts 66 

Medical Secretarial 64-65 

Predental 62 

Predietetics 62-63 



Secretarial 64 

Major and Minor 

Requirements 45-46 

see also: 

Biology 105 

Chemistry 109 

Economics 120 

English 99 

French (Minor only) 100 

German (Minor only) 101 

Greek (Minor only) 102 

History 12 1-122 

Home Economics 73 

Industrial Arts 75 

Mathematics (Minor only) 112 

Music 9 1 -92 

Physics 114 

Printing (Minor only) 75 

Religion 117 

Secretarial Science 79-80 

Secondary Teaching 

(Minor only) 87 

Spanish 103 

Speech (Minor only) 104 

Health Service 25 

History of the College 15 

History, Courses in 121-124 

Home Economics, Courses in ..73-74 

Honor Roll 40 

Hour, Semester 33 

Housing, Married Students 129 

Industrial Arts, Courses in ....75-79 

Industrial Supervisors 7 

Instruction, Division of 70-125 

see also Graduation, 

Standards of 40-60 

Applied Arts 71-83 

Accounting and Business ..71-72 

Agriculture 72 

Bibliography and Library 

Science 79 

Home Economics 73-74 

Industrial Arts 75-79 

Secretarial Science 79-83 

Education, and Psychology ..84-90 

Elementary Teaching 85-87 

General Courses 84-85 

Secondary Teaching 87-90 

Fine Arts -91-98 

Art 91 

Music 91-98 

Language and Literature ....99-104 

English 99-100 

French 100-101 

German 101-102 

Hebrew 1 02 

Latin 102 

Spanish 103-104 



SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGE 



143 



Speech 104 

Natural Sciences and 

Mathematics 105-1 16 

Biology 103-109 

Chemistry -.109-1 1 1 

Health Education 111-112 

Mathematics 112-114 

Physics 114-116 

Religion and Applied 

Theology 117-119 

Applied Theology 119 

Bible Instructors' 

Course 117-118 

Religion 118-119 

Social Sciences 120-125 

Economics 120-121 

Geography 121 

History 1 2 1- 1 24 

Political Science 124 

Sociology 125 

John H. Talge Residence Hall .. 18 
Junior College Curriculums ....60-67 

Junior Standing 36 

Labor Regulations ....33-34, 131-132 
Languages and Literature, 

Division of 99-104 

Late Registration 32-33 

Laundry, The College 20 

Leave of Absence 24 

Library Science, Courses in 79 

Location of the College 17 

Lookout Mountain 145, 146 

Lower Biennium Curriculum .... 70 

Lyceum 25 

Lynn Wood Hall 17 

Major Requirements 45 

Marriages 24 

Mathematics, Courses in ....112-114 

Maude Jones Residence Hall 18 

Medical Cadet Training ..66, 67-69 

Medical Service 25 

Minor Requirements 46 

Music, Courses in 91-98 

Natural Science and Mathematics 

Division of 105-116 

Non-English Speaking Students, 

Standards for 69 

Objectives of the College 16-17 

Officers of Administration 7 

Orientation Days 29 

Physics, Courses in 114-116 

Predental 62 

Predietetics 62-63 

Premedicine 60 

Prenursing 66-67 

Preparatory School 27 

Printing, Courses in 76-77 



Psychology, Courses in 84-85 

Publications 26 

Reduction in Credit 35 

Religion and Applied Theology, 

Division of 117-119 

Regional Field Representatives .. 6 

Registration 32-33 

Changes in Registration 33 

Drop Vouchers 33 

Late Registration 32, 127 

Work-Study Load 33-34 

Regulations, Academic 28-30 

Regulations, New 24 

Religious Education 57-58 

Religious Life and 

Organizations 26 

Residence Regulations 24 

Scholarships 1 34-1 35 

Secretarial Science, 

Courses in 79-83 

Semester Hours 33 

Senior Standing 36 

Service Training, Credit for ..22-23 
Seventh-day Adventist Tenets 

of Faith 15 

Social Sciences, 

Division of 120-125 

Sophomore Standing 36 

Sophomore Testing 41 

Special Student, Adult 30, 36 

Student Housing Projects 19 

Study and Work Load 33-34 

Subject Requirements for 

Admission 30-31 

Summary of Enrollment 138 

Summer Session 20 

Tardiness 37 

Teacher Training, 

Elementary 51-54, 85-87 

Teacher Training, 

Secondary 51, 87-90 

Tennessee River 145 

Terminal Curriculums 63-66 

Testing and Counseling Service -25 

Theology 48-5 1 

Tithe and Church Expense 130 

Transcripts 28 

Transfer Curriculums 61-63 

Transfer of Credit 29 

Upper Biennium, Admission of 

Sophomores to 35, 42, 70 

Veterans, Information for 20 

Veterans, Admission on 

G.E.D. Test 29 

Withdrawals 33 

Work-Study Schedule 34 



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