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Full text of "Southern Missionary College Catalog 1957-58"

s duthern 

Missionary 

College 




CATALOG 
1957-1958 



CORRESPONDENCE 

Inquiries should be directed as follows: 

General Administrative Matters, to T. W. Walters, President 

Admissions, to R. A. Underhill, Dean 

Financial Matters, Student Employment, Student Housing, Student 

Accounts, to D. L. West, Assistant Business Manager 
Transcripts and Academic Records, to Elva B. Gardner, Registrar 
Summer Session, to R. A. Underhill, Director 
Problems of Residence Halls, Room Furnishings, Suitable Wearing 

Apparel and Campus Conduct: 

Of Men Students, to J. A. Upchurch, Dean of Men 

Of Women Students, to Edna Stoneburner, Dean of Women 



gOf TO BETA'.-' 



Volume VIII The "S.M.C." Third Quarter, 1957 No. 3 

Published quarterly by Southern Missionary College, College- 
dale, Tennessee. Entered as second class matter February 12, 1951, 
at Collegedale, Tennessee, under act of Congress August 24, 1912. 



Southern Missionary College 



ANNUAL CATALOG 



Volume VII July, 1957 Number 3 




ANNOUNCEMENTS 1957-1958 

SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGE 

COLLEGEDALE, TENNESSEE 




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Purpose of o College Catalog 



The typical college catalog is not written with 
any hope of its becoming a beil seller, It is of 
necessity "technical" rather than "popular." 

But the college catalog can be— and often is- — 
very helpful to the student who knows what it is 
or and how to use it. 

It is a handbook for ready reference on nutters 
of concern to students in their life on the College 
campus. 

The principal subdivisions of this catalog are in- 
dicated hy the headings which are printed on Lhe 
ri^ht margin of this page. 

Complete topical index, page 171. 

The owner of this catalog should file it for ready 
reference and bring it (when needed) to conlerenc.es 
with the Dean, the Registrar or the Faculty Coun- 
selor. 

Keeping this publication revised, and up to date 
and meticulously correct calls for the continuous, ac- 
tive cooperation of every college officer and every 
college teacher. The student, too, can help by calling 
attention to errors, inadequacies, and in-co-ordi nations. 

It is hoped that all officers, teachers, and students 
will help the Administration to make continuous 
improvements in successive issues of "our"" catalog. 



The signature written below is to identify the 
owner. Jf this catalog should be misplaced, will 
the finder please return it to 



Name 



Post Office 



State 



Local "Hume ' on (or Near) Campus. 



Calendar 
of Events 


Page 


5 


Board of 
Directors 


Page 


7 


Administra- 
tive Staff 


Page 


9 


General 
Faculty 


Page 


It 


Objectives 

of College 


Page 


18 


Student Life 
and Services 


Page 


76 


Academic 
Regulations 


Page 


30 


Graduation 
Standards 


Page 


43 


Divisions of 
Instruction 


Page 


45 


Degrees 
Offered 


Page 


47 


Curriculum* 
Offered 


Page 


49 


Applied Arts 
and Sciences Page 


51 


Business Ad- 
ministration 


Page 


65 


Education- 
Health- 
Psychology 


Page 


82 


Fine Arts 


Page 


101 


Languages- 
Literature 


Page 


114 


Sciences- 
Mathematics 


Page 


124 


Religion- 
Theology 


Page 


140 


Sojial 
Sciences 


Page 


148 


Tech. Prof. 
Curriculums 


Page 


152 


Financial In- 
formation 


Page 


159 


General 
Index 


Page 


170 



CALENDAR 

(Vacation Days for 1957 and 1958 are printed in bold) 



1957 


1958 


1959 


JULY 


JANUARY 


JULY 


JANUARY 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


12 3 4 5 6 

7 8 9 10 11 12 13 

14 15 16 17 18 19 20 

21 22 23 24 25 26 27 

28 29 30 31 


12 3 4 
5 6 7 8 9 10 11 

12 13 14 15 16 17 18 

19 20 21 22 23 24 25 
26 27 28 29 30 31 


12 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 

13 14 15 16 17 18 19 

20 21 22 23 24 25 26 

77 28 29 30 31 


1 2 3 

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 

11 12 13 14 15 16 17 

18 19 20 21 22 23 24 

M ?6 27 28 29 30 31 


AUGUST 


FEBRUARY 


AUGUST 


FEBRUARY 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


1 2 3 

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 

11 12 13 14 15 16 17 

18 19 20 21 22 23 24 

25 26 27 28 29 30 31 


I 

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 

23 24 25 26 27 28 


1 2 
3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 
U 25 26 27 28 29 30 
31 


1 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 

8 9 10 11 12 13 14 

15 16 17 18 19 20 21 

22 23 24 25 26 27 28 


SEPTEMBER 


MARCH 


SEPTEMBER 


MARCH 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


12 3 4 5 6 7 

8 9 10 11 12 13 14 
15 16 17 18 19 20 21 
22 23 24 25 26 27 28 
29 30 


1 

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 

23 24 25 26 27 28 29 

^0 31 


12 3 4 5 6 

7 8 9 10 11 12 13 

14 15 16 17 18 19 20 

21 22 23 24 25 26 27 

28 29 30 


12 3 4 5 6 7 

8 9 10 11 12 13 14 

15 16 17 J8 19 20 21 

22 23 24 25 26 27 28 

29 30 31 


OCTOBER 


APRIL 


OCTOBER 


APRIL 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


12 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 

13 14 15 16 17 18 19 

20 21 22 23 24 25 26 

27 28 29 30 31 


12 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 10 11 I? 

13 14 15 16 17 18 19 

20 21 22 23 24 25 26 

17 28 29 30 


12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 

12 13 14 15 16 17 18 

19 20 21 22 23 24 25 

26 27 28 29 30 31 


12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 

12 13 14 15 16 17 18 

19 20 21 22 23 24 25 

^ 27 28 29 30 


NOVEMBER 


MAY 


NOVEMBER 


MAY 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


1 2 

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 

10 11 12 13 14 15 16 

17 18 19 20 21 22 23 

24 25 26 27 28 29 30 


1 2 3 

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 

11 12 13 14 15 16 17 

18 19 20 21 22 23 24 

25 26 27 28 29 30 31 


1 

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 

23 24 25 26 27 28 29 

30 


1 2 
3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 
31 


DECEMBER 


JUNE 


DECEMBER 


JUNE 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


12 3 4 5 6 7 

8 9 10 11 12 13 14 

15 16 17 18 19 20 21 

22 23 24 25 26 27 28 

29 30 31 


12 3 4 5 6 7 

8 9 10 11 12 13 14 
15 16 17 18 19 20 21 
22 23 24 25 26 27 28 
29 30 


1 2 3 4 5 6 
7 8 9 10 11 12 13 1 

14 15 16 17 18 19 20 
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 
28 29 30 31 


12 3 4 5 6 

7 8 9 10 11 12 13 

14 15 16 17 18 19 20 

21 22 23 24 25 26 2^ 

28 29 30 



June 


11 




July 


18, 


19 


July 


21 




July 


22 




August 12, 13 



&/* 

CALENDAR OF EVENTS '*** 

SUMMER SESSION 1957 

June 9, 10 Sunday, Monday, Registration — First Term 

(Six weeks) 
Tuesday, Instruction Begins 
Thursday, Friday, Final Examinations 
Sunday, Registration — Second Term (Three 

weeks) 
Monday, Instruction Begins 
Monday, Tuesday, Final Examinations 
August 13 Tuesday, Commencement, 8:00 P.M. 

FIRST SEMESTER 1957-58 

All students whose applications for admission have been approved 
will receive by mail at the home address designated a full printed 
schedule of all appointments for Orientation, Testing, Counseling, and 
Registration, which will occur between Monday, September 10, and 
Wednesday, September 12, from 7:30 A.M. to 10:00 P.M. 

The testing program begins in the college chapel for all new stu- 
dents at 7:30 A.M., Monday, September 10. Transfer students are 
required to take these examinations unless they present previously, 
along with their transcripts, the scores from similar examinations taken 
elsewhere. 

A student ivho keeps bis appointments as announced above will 
not be charged the late registration fee indicated on page 32. 

September 9-1 1 Registration 

September 12 Instruction begins 

September 24 Annual School Picnic 

September 27 to Week of Prayer 

October 5 

October 22-26 Ministerial Workshop 

November 4 National Education Day — Monday Chapel 

November 5-8 Mid-term Examinations 

November 18-22 Social Education Days — Wednesday and Friday 
Chapels 



Calendar of Events 



November 28 
December 19 to 

January 5 
January 10 
January 14-17 



CALENDAR, 1957-58 

Thanksgiving 
Christmas Vacation 

Capping of Nurses 
Semester Examinations 



SECOND SEMESTER 1957-58 

January 19 Registration, Second Semester 

Student Week of Prayer 
Brotherhood Week — Monday Chapel 
Colporteur Week 
MV Week of Prayer 
Mid-term Examinations 
Spring Vacation 
Home Coming Day 
Father-Son Banquet 
College Days 



January 20-25 
February 17 
February 21-26 
March 7-15 
March 17-20 
March 20-24 
April 4, 5 
April 6 
April 13-15 
May 6 
May 19-22 
May 23-25 



Annual College Class Picnics 
Final Examinations 
Commencement Exercises 



SUMMER SCHOOL, 1958 
June 8-9 Registration 

August 12 Commencement 



COLLEGE DIRECTORY 



BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

Don R. Rets, Chairman Decatur, Georgia 

President, Southern Union Conference 

T. W. Walters, Secretary Collegedale, Tennessee 

President, Southern Missionary College 

R. A. Underhill, Recording Secretary Collegedale, Tennessee 

Dean, Southern Missionary College 

Lewis N. Holm, Jr., Treasurer _ Collegedale, Tennessee 

General Manager, Southern Missionary College 

Ralph Davidson Woodbury, Tennessee 

Certified Public Accountant 

Fred H. Doktch Birmingham, Alabama 

President, Dortch Baking Company 

A. C. Fearing Atlanta, Georgia 

President, Georgia-Cumberland Conference 

Leighton Hall Orlando, Florida 

Business Manager, Florida Sanitarium & Hospital 

H. S. Hanson Decatur, Georgia 

Educational Secretary, Southern Union Conference 

Wm. Sanborn Madison, Tennessee 

President, Madison College 

H. D. Lawson _ Fountain Head, Tennessee 

Principal, Highland Academy 

L. J. Leiske Meridian, Mississippi 

President, Alabama-Mississippi Conference 

H. Lester ..— .— Plymouth, Florida 

Citrus Grower 

E. L. Marley Nashville, Tennessee 

President, Kentucky-Tennessee Conference 

W. E. McClure _.... Maitland, Florida 

Principal, Forest Lake Academy 

7 



Board of Directors 

A. P. McDow r Decatur, Georgia 

Secretary-Treasurer, Southern Union Conference 

Garland Millet Huntsville, Alabama 

President, Oakwood College 

G. R. Nash ... Charlotte, North Carolina 

President, Carolina Conference 

L. M. Nelson Decatur, Georgia 

Youth Secretary, Southern Union Conference 

M, C. Patten Greenville, South Carolina 

Attorney-at-Law and Certified Public Accountant 

H. H. Schmidt Orlando, Florida 

President, Florida Conference 

L. C. Strickland Candler, North Carolina 

Principal, Mt. Pisgah Academy 

B. F. Summerour - Norcross, Georgia 

Cotton Seed Producer 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE OF THE BOARD 

Don R. Rees, Chairman T. W. Walters, Secretary 

R. A. Underhili Lewis N. Holm 

H. S. Hanson A, C. Fearing 

A. P. McDow 

REGIONAL FIELD REPRESENTATIVES 

Representative-at-kirge; H. S. Hanson Decatur, Georgia 

For Alabama-Mississippi; O. L. Heinrich . Meridian, Mississippi 

For Florida: Ward A. Scriven .Orlando, Florida 

For Georgia-Cumberland : V. C. Hoffman Atlanta, Georgia 

For Carolina: George V. Yost Charlotte, North Carolina 

For Kentucky-Tennessee; T. A. Mohr Nashville, Tennessee 



ADMINISTRATION 



T. W. Walters, Ed.D. 
President of the College 

R. A. Underhill, Ph.D. 

Dean of the College 
L. N. Holm, Ed.D. 

General Manager 
Elva B. Gardner, M.A. Registrar 

J. A. Upchurch, B.A. Dean of Men 

Edna Stoneburner, B.S., R.N Dean of Women 

S. D. Brown, M.A _ Librarian 

ASSOCIATES IN ADMINISTRATION 

J. M. ACKERMAN, M.A. 

Secretary of Admissions 
Director of Testing 

Kejth Anderson, M.D. 

College Physician 

R. G. Bowen 

Treasurer 

E. Stanley Chase, B.A. 

Principal, Collegedale Elementary School 

John Goodbrad 

Purchasing Agent 

Assistant Manager in charge of Collegedale Enterprises 

Chas, Fleming, M.B.A. 

Assistant Manager in charge of College Broom Shop 
Mazie Herin, M.A. 

Associate Dean, Division of Nursing 

Paul J. Hoar, M.A. 

Principal, Collegedale Academy 
H. B. LUNDQUIST, M.A. 

Development and Public Relations 
R. C."Mizelle7b.S. "~~ 

Assistant Treasurer and Accountant 

Myrtle Watrous, B.S. 

Assistant Librarian 

D. L. West, B.A. 

Assistant Manager 

Esther Williams 

Director of Food Service 

9 



DEPARTMENTAL SUPERINTENDENTS 
Perry A. Coulter 

Department of Buildings and Grounds 
C. A. Lang 

Central Supply 

Esther Williams 

Director of Food Service 

COLLEGE INDUSTRIES, INC. 
Frank Fogg 

College Broom Factory 

H. F. Meyer 

College Press 

O. D. Tompkins 

Collegedale Laundry 

COLLESEDALE MERCANTILE ENTERPRISES, INC. 
John Goodbrad 

General Manager and Distributor 

Aubrey King 

Treasurer 

B. J. Hagan 

College Garage 

H. A. Woodward 

College Store 

Herbert Polk 

College Creamery 

AFFILIATED INDUSTRIES 
William J. Hulsey 

College Cabinets 

O. D. McKee 

King's Baker** 



10 



The Faculty 

THE FACULTY 

The date in parenthesis indicates year of appointment to the College. 

Thomas W. Walters, Ed.D., President. (1955) 

B.A., Walla Walla College, 1934; M.A., Leland Stanford University, 1950; 
Ed.D., Leland Stanford University, 1955. 

Horace R. Beckner, B.R.E., College Pastor. (1947) 
B.R.E., Atlantic Union College, 1933. 

Eugene A. Crane, B.A., Associate Pastor. (1955) 
B.A., Pacific Union College, 1942. 

Harold A. Miller, M. Music, Professor Emeritus of Musk . (1945) 
B.Music, Otterbein College, 1937; M.Music, Eastman School of Music, 
University of Rochester, 1941. 

Maude 1 Jones, B.A., Professor Emeritus of English (1917) 
B.A., Mississippi College for Women, 1894. 

Edward C. Banks, M.A., Professor of Religion. (1946) 

B.Th., Emmanuel Missionary College, 1934; M.A. in Religion, S.D.A. 
Theological Seminary, 1948. 

Otto H. Christensen, M.A., Ph.D., Professor of Religion and Bib- 
lied Languages. (1955) 

B.A M Union College, 1938; M.A., S.D.A. Theological Seminary, 1945; 
Ph.D., University of Chicago, 1951. 

John Christensen, Ph.D., Professor of Chemistry. (1955) 

B.A., Union College, 1939; M.A., University of Nebraska, 1946. 
Ph.D., Michigan State University, 1956. 

Lewis N. Holm, Ed.D., Professor of Education and Business. (1954) 
B.A., Emmanuel Missionary College, 1928; M.S., Michigan State College, 
1936; Ed.D., Portia Law School, 1953. 

Raymond A. Underhill, Ph.D., Professor of Biology. (1956) 

B.A., Walla Walla College, 1942; M.S., Texas A. and M., 1946; Ph.D., 
Oregon State, 1951. 

J. M. Ackerman, M.A., Associate Professor of Education. (1957) 
B.S., Union College, 1949; MA., University of Nebraska, 1950. 

Theresa Rose Brickman, M.Coml Ed., Associate Professor of Sec- 
retarid Science. (1942) 
B.A., Union College, 1928; M.Com'l. Ed., University of Oklahoma, 1942. 

11 



The Faculty 

Stanley D. Brown, M.A., Associate Professor of Bibliography and 
Library Science. (1935) 

BA., Washington Missionary College, 1926; B.A.L.S., University of North 
Carolina, 1937; BA., University of Maryland, 1934; M.A., University of 
Maryland, 1935; MA., Ohio State University, 1954. 

Clyde G. Bushnell, M.A., Associate Professor of Modem Languages. 
BA., Union College, 1933; MA., University of Mexico, 1948. (1952) 

* Rupert M. Craig, M.A., Associate Professor of Economics and 
Business. (1950) 
B.A,, Atlantic Union College, 1941; MA., Boston University, 1947. 

Olivia Brickman Dean, M.Ed., Associate Professor of Education, 

(1943) 
B.A., Union College, 1934; M.Ed., University of Oklahoma, 1943. 

Ralph Davidson, M.S., C.P.A., Associate Professor of Business Ad- 
ministration. (1955) 

B.S., Madison College, 1934; M.S., University of Tennessee, 1936; C.P.A., 
State of Tennessee, 1952. 

Mary Holder Dietel, M.A., Associate Professor of Modern Lan- 
guages, fffff) MPtf 

B.A., Washington Missionary College, 1919; M.A., University of Mary- 
land, 1933; Certificate from L'AJliance Francaise, Paris, 1936. 

Charles Fleming, M.B.A., Associate Professor of Business. (1946) 

B A. Emmanuel Missionary College, M.B.A., Northwestern University. 

Ray Hefferlin, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Physics. (1955) 

BA., Pacific Union College, 1951; Ph.D., California Institute of Tech- 
nology, 1955. 

Milo Hill, M.Mus., Associate Professor of Musk. (1957) 
B.A., Union College, M.Mus., Northwestern University. 



K. M. Kennedy, Ed.D., Associate Professor of Education. (1951) 
B.A., Valparaiso University, 1946; M.Ed., 
1952; Ed. D., University of Tennessee, 1955 



B.A., Valparaiso University, 1946; M.Ed., University of Chattanooga, 

of *"" 



Irma Jean Kopitzke, M.S., Associate Professor of Secretarial Science. 

(1953) 
B.A., Emmanuel Missionary College, 1950; M.S., University of Wisconsin, 
1953. 

*On leave l957-'58. 
12 



The Faculty 

Huldrich H. Kuhlman, M.A., Associate Professor of Biology. 

(1946) 
B.A., Emmanuel Missionary College, 1940; MA,, George Peabody College 
for Teachers, 1945. 

H. B. Lundquist, M.A., Associate Professor of Religion. (1952) 

B.A., Emmanuel Missionary College, 1917; MA., University of Maryland, 
1932. 

J. Mabel Wood, M.A., Associate Professor of Music. (1949) 
B.A., Union College, 1948; MA., University of Nebraska, 1952. 

Dorothy Evans Ackerman, M.A., Assistant Professor of Music. 

(1957 
B.A., Atlantic Union College, 1940; M,Mus., University of Chattanooga, 
1947. 

Everett T. Watrous, Ed.D., Assistant Professor of History. (1948) 
B.A., Atlantic Union College, 1934; MA., University of Chicago, 194 1. 
Ed.D., University of Tennessee, 1956. 

Clarence Chinn, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Chemistry. (1956) 
B.A., Walla Walla College, 1951; M.Science, Oregon State College, 1953; 
Ph.D., Oregon State College, 1956. 

Dorothy K. Christensen, B.A., Assistant Professor in Home Eco- 
nomics. (1955) 
B.A., Emmanuel Missionary College, 1955. 

Hira T. Curtis, B.S., Assistant Professor of Accounting and Business. 
B.S., Union College, 1899- (1949) 

Edgar O. Grundset, B.A., Assistant Professor of Biology. (1957) 
BA., Emmanuel Missionary College, 1947; M.A., Walla Walla College, 
1957. 

Gordon Hyde, B.A., Assistant Professor of Speech. (1956) 
B.A., Emmanuel Missionary College, 1942. 

Elva B. Gardner, M.A., Assistant Professor of Education. (1950) 
B.A., Union College, 1938; M.A., University of Nebraska, 1949. 

Wayne E. VandeVere, M.A., Assistant Professor of Business Admini- 
stration. (1956) 

B.A., Emmanuel Missionary College, 1954; M.A., University of Michigan, 
1956. 

13 



The Faculty 

Henry E. Baasch, M.A., Assistant Professor of Religion. (1954) 

B.A., Southern Missionary College, 1953; MA., S.D.A. Theological Semi- 
nary, 1954. 

Harry W. Hulsey, M.A.E., Assistant Professor of Industrial Edu- 
cation. (1954) 

B.S., Southern Missionary College, 1953; M.A.E, University of Florida, 
1954. 

Margarita Diet el Merriman, M.Mus., Ass't Professor of Musk. 

(1956) 

B.Mus., University of Chattanooga, 1948; M.Mus., University of Rochester, 
1953- 

Albert L. Anderson, B.A., Instructor in Printing. (1951) 
B.A., Union College, 1938. 

Joseph B. Cooper, M.A., Instructor in Physical Education. (1956) 

M.A., University of Florida, 1956. 

Myrtle B. Watrous, B.S. in L.S., Assistant Professor of Library 
Science. (1948) 

B.A., Washington Missionary College, 1924; B.S.L.S., University of 
North Carolina, 1952. 

Edna E. Stoneburner, B.S. : R.N., Instructor in Nursing Education. 

(1951) 
B.S., Washington Missionary College, 1933; R.N., Loma Linda School of 
Nursing, 1939. 

JiNiO Wilson, B.S , Instructor in Home Vcrmmmrrrr J^\9STyyu*Jo**i/ tew 
B.S. ^ Union College, 1945. 



Supervisory Instructors in Secondary Education 

Paul J. Hoar, M.A., Mathematics and Science. (1950) 

B.A., Atlantic Union College, 1939; M.A., Boston University, 1950. 

I 

Paul C. Boynton, M.A., Bible. (1951Q 

B.A., Washington Missionary College, 1941; M.A., S.D.A. Theological 
Seminary, 1952. 

Lou B. Hoar, M.C.S., Secretarial Science. (1950) 

B.R.E., Atlantic Union College, 1931; M.C.S., Boston University, 1949. 

14 



The Faculty 



Frances E. Andrews, M.A., English. (1953) 
B.A., Southern Missionary College, 1949- 
MA, George Peabody College for Teachers, 1956. 



Supervisory Instructors in Elementary Education 
E. S. Chach, B.A., Principal, Grades 7, 8. 

Ruth Sorrell, M.A., Grades 1, 2. (1951) 

B.S., Southern Missionary College, 1951; M.A., George Peabody College, 
1953. 

Mildred Baldwin, Grades 3, 4. (1956) 

Elmvra Conger, B.S., Grades 3-8. (1953) 
B.S., Southern Missionary College, 1954, 

Ann MaxwellTB.S., Grades 5, 6. (1954) 
B.S., Southern Missionary College, 1955. 



15 



Organization and Committees 

PROFESSIONAL ORGANIZATION OF THE COLLEGE FACULTY 

A. COLLEGE FACULTY AND STAFF 

President Walters, Chairman; Dean Underhill, Vice Chairman; Elva B. 
Gardner, Secretary. This is an over-all professional organization which 
meets once each four-week cycle of term time. Its officers and members 
are also organized into councils and committees for three types of extra- 
classroom service to the College as follows: 

B. THE ADMINISTRATIVE COUNCILS (Advisory) 

1. The President's Council: President Walters, Chairman. 

2. The Council on Admissions: Dean Underhill, Chairman. 

3. The Council on Government: President Walters, Chairman. 

4. The Council on Finance: Dr. Holm, Chairman. 

5. The Council on Traffic and Safety: Mr. West, Chairman. 

Functions: To counsel the President, the Dean of the College, and the 
Business Manager on the implementation and effective administration 
of such educational policies as have had the official approval of the 
College Board of Directors, or of the College Faculty Senate. 

Meetings: Weekly and on call. 

Personnel: Appointed by the President at the first faculty meeting in 

the fall. 

C. THE FACULTY SENATE (Legislative) 

President Walters, Chairman; Dean Underhill, Vice-Chairman; Elva Gard- 
ner, Recording Secretary. 

Functions: To legislate for the General Faculty; to establish or approve 
major policies or regulations, to govern the educational operations of 
the College (as distinct from its business and financial operations). The 
General Faculty has delegated to the Faculty Senate (a widely represen- 
tative general committee) the authority to perform this function. See 
Handbook of Organization. 

Meetings: Once in each four-week cycle of term time. 

Personnel: All major officers and all Chairmen of Standing Committees and 
of Divisions of Instruction. 

D. STANDING COMMITTEES (Policy Recommending) *f 

FUNCTIONS: To discuss, formulate, and recommend to the Faculty Senate 
for its consideration such college-wide educational policies and regulations 
as may seem appropriate. These functions have been allocated among and 
are performed by the nine Standing Committees of the Faculty listed 
below which are appointed annually by the President. See Handbook of 
Organization. 

Meetings: Once in each four-week cycle of term time. 

PERSONNEL: Appointed by the President at the first meeting of the faculty 
in the fall. 



*The Chairman of each of these policy-recommending committees also per- 
forms or delegates certain minor administrative duties related to the field of serv- 
ices in which his committee is engaged. 

fThe President and the Dean are members ex-officio of all standing com- 
mittees. 

16 




V 



i « i :i:i:J 



\ 



I 1:1.1:1 








Organization and Committees 



NUMBERS AND NAMES OF COMMITTEES: 

1. CurricuJum and Academic Standards** 

2. Testing and Counseling Services 

3. Religious Interests 

4. Lyceum and Social Programs 

5. Health and Recreation 

6. Publications and Public Relations 

7. Social Education 

8- Library Services 

9- Co-ordination of Industrial Training 



A well set-up organization in any good educational institution 
is an effective means to the achievement of that institution's well 
conceived purposes. Every really useful staff member is concerned 
to help his fellow workers and his students to plan comprehensively 
for the continuing enrichment of the common life on the campus. 



**This committee has appointed five important sub-committees as follows: 
Ministerial Students' Recommendations, Medical Students' Recommendations, 
Nursing Students' Recommendations, Teacher Certification Recommendations, and 
English Improvement. 

17 



OBJECTIVES OF THE COLLEGE 



GENERAL OBJECTIVES 

Southern Missionary College is a four-year co-educational college 
of arts and sciences operated by the Seventh-day Adventist denomina- 
tion. The general objectives of the college are those of this governing 
organization. 

Seventh-day Adventists believe in an infinite Creator as the source 
of all life and wisdom; they regard man as created in God's image and 
endowed with mental, moral, and physical powers capable of growth 
and development; they accept the moral law as binding upon all men 
and believe in personal redemption from sin through Jesus Christ; 
they accept the Bible as God's Word, the inspired revelation of His 
will to men; they believe that through proper education young people 
may be led to practice correct habits of thinking, to develop Christian 
character, and to make diligent preparation for a purposeful life of 
efficient service to their fellow men. 

In harmony with these general objectives, the following specific 
objectives have been adopted: 

SPECIFIC OBJECTIVES 

1. Spiritual — To establish an unswerving personal allegiance to the 

principles of the Christian faith; to develop a distinctly Christian 
philosophy of life as a basis for the solution of all personal and 
social problems; and to acquire a sense of personal responsibility 
to participate in the mission program of the church. 

2. Intellectual — To gain an acquaintance with the basic facts and prin- 

ciples of the major fields of knowledge necessary to independent 
and creative thinking; to acquire an attitude of open-minded con- 
sideration of controversial questions; to achieve a continuing intel- 
lectual curiosity; and to acquire the art of effective expression (in 
spoken and written English, in foreign languages, and in the 
graphic arts). 

3. Ethical — To acquire those ethical and moral concepts which are 

approved by the enlightened conscience of mankind and taught in 
the revealed Word of God; to achieve an attitude of tolerance 
. toward the rights and opinions of others; and to accept the social 
obligation of serving humanity and laboring diligently for its 
welfare, 

18 



Objectives 

■ 

4. Social — To develop an acquaintance with the approved social prac- 

tices of cultured men and women; and to participate heartily and 
comfortably in those recreational activities which contribute to the 
further development of a well-balanced personality. 

5. Aesthetic — To gain an acquaintance with the masterpieces of lit- 

erature and the fine arts and an appreciation of the standards and 
the types of beauty represented by them; and to learn both to 
create and to choose that which is beautiful as well as that which 
is useful. 

6. Civic — To acquire an intelligent understanding of the principles 

of government and to develop a willingness to accept the responsi- 
bilities and privileges of citizenship; to recognize the constitution- 
al rights of other individuals and social groups; to know the 
principal domestic and international issues of our time; to develop 
a sincere love for our country and its fundamental principles; and 
to learn to co-operate effectively in the continuing improvement of 
society, national and international. 

7. Health — To gain an intelligent understanding of the principles 

which govern the functioning and proper care of the human body; 
to establish habits and practices which foster maximum physical 
vitality and health; to develop a genuine interest in the intelligent, 
many-sided recreational uses of leisure time and, in co-operation 
with others, in the improvement of the physical well-being of all. 

8. Vocational— To acquire a genuine appreciation of the true dignity 

of useful labor; and to master the knowledge and achieve the un- 
derstanding necessary to the intelligent choice of a vocation that 
is in harmony with individual abilities and aptitudes. Preparation 
is provided at Southern Missionary College for the gospel ministry, 
for teaching in elementary and secondary schools, for pre-nursing 
and pre-medical training, for secretarial' and business positions, 
and for other vocations. 






19 



j4*t Ideal 06ni4ticut @oUefe 

is a carefully designed educational environment in which young people 
of high purpose and fervent zeal come together voluntarily and joyfully 
to seek the effective help of devoted, dedicated, inspiring Christian 
teachers while they prepare themselves and help to prepare each other 
for a life of self-effacing Christian service at home and abroad. 



/$« *?«U*l &Ue$e Student 



• Has "purposed in his heart" to keep the commandments of God. 

• Is continuously concerned with the problem of clarifying and bet- 
ter defining his life purposes. 

• Knows why he has come to college and why he has chosen to come 
to this particular college. 

• Is concerned to select his curriculum, his courses, and his work 
assignments wisely because he knows they can be an effective means 
to the achievement of his life purposes. 

• Chooses his college companions with due caution and care because 
he wants to be helpful to them. He knows that the right companions 
can be helpful to him, and he realizes that his best buddies in col- 
lege are likely to be his boon companions for life. 

• Desires to achieve sound scholarship, to maintain high ethical stand- 
ards, and to acquire acceptable social graces. 

• Has retained, in spite of any routine, uninteresting and unprofitable 
teaching he may have had, something of his childhood curiosity "to 
know about things/' 

• Tries to build up his health and to avoid acquiring habits that will 
impair it. 

• Is a good steward of his time, energy, money, and influence. 

• Knows that all true education is self education — that while grades 
may be given and degrees conferred, education must be earned. 

• Understands that self-government is the only kind of government 
under which men can live happily. 

20 



Industries 

WHY INDUSTRIES IN AN EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTION? 

The prevailing pattern of the work-study program in Seventh-day 
Adventist colleges and academies is based upon the educational phi- 
losophy and the counsels of Mrs. Ellen G. White. 

Her reasons for recommending that regular work assignments be 
given to students are clearly expressed in the following paragraphs: 

• "In acquiring an education, many students will gain a most valuable 
training if they will become self-sustaining. 

• "Instead of incurring debts, or depending on the self-denial of 
their parents, let young men and young women depend on them- 
selves. 

• "They will thus learn the value of money, the value of time, 
strength, and opportunities, and will be under far less tempta- 
tion to indulge idle and spendthrift habits. 

"The lessons of economy, industry, self-denial, practical business 
management, and steadfastness of purpose thus mastered, will prove 
a most important part of their equipment for the battle of life. 

"And the lesson of self-help learned by the student will go far 
toward preserving institutions of learning from the burden of 
debt under which so many of them have struggled, and which has 
done so much toward crippling their usefulness." 

During the summer of 1956 and the current academic year (1956- 
57), college and academy students in part-time employment were dis- 
tributed among the following industries and service departments: 

Accounting Office Library 

Broom Shop College Maintenance 

Cabinet Shop Men's Residence Hall 

Cafeteria and Kitchen Miscellaneous 

Campus and Gardens Office Workers 

College Store and Enterprises College Press 

Creamery Registrar's Office 

Garage Women's Residence Hall 

Janitor Service College Cabinet Shop 



• 



• 



Laundry 



21 



INTRODUCTION to SMC 



A BRIEF HISTORY 

Southern Missionary College, a Seventh-day Adventist institution, 
was founded in 1893 as Southern Training School, at Graysville, Ten- 
nessee. Twenty- three years later the school was moved to Collegedale, 
Tennessee; and there, in 1916, it was reopened as Southern Junior 
College. The exigencies of a rapidly expanding student body necessi- 
tated the extension, in the spring of 1944, to senior college status, 
and the first four-year seniors were graduated from Southern Missionary 
College in 1946. 

Southern Missionary College is incorporated under the laws of the 
State of Tennessee, the Board of Trustees assuming entire responsibility 
for the financial support and management of the institution. 



LOCATION 

Southern Missionary College is located on a one-thousand-acre 
estate in a valley eighteen miles east of Chattanooga. The Southern Rail- 
way passes through the institutional estate. The post office address is 
Collegedale, Tennessee. 

The campus Jies three miles from Ooltewah, junction point of the 
Atlanta and Knoxville divisions of the Southern Railway. Ooltewah is 
also on the Lee Highway No. 11, which connects Washington, D. C. 
and< other cities in the East with Chattanooga and other southern points. 

Busses of the Cherokee Lines pass through Collegedale three times 
daily for Chattanooga at 8:15 A.M., 11:45 A.M., and 5:15 P.M. They 
leave Chattanooga from the Greyhound Bus Station at 6:50 A.M., 9:15 
A.M., and at 12:45 P.M. 



BUILDINGS AND -EQUIPMENT 

Lynn Wood Hall 

The administration building is named in honor of Dr. Lynn Wood, 
president of the College from 1918 to 1922. It is a three-story structure, 
housing a major number of classrooms, the Industrial Arts Laboratory 
with excellent facilities for vocational training, the speech department, 
the Academy office, and the office of Academic and Business Adminis- 
tration. The chapel seats approximately 500. 

22 



Buildings and Equipment 

Maude Jones Residence Hall 
The residence hall for women, named for Maude Jones, Associ- 
ate Professor Emeritus of the College, has accommodations for 186 
women. In addition to an apartment for the dean of women, it houses 
the dining room, the culinary department, an infirmary, a spread room, 
and a private parlor. The rooms on the second floor have been refur- 
nished recently with rose and shell metal furniture. 

John H. Talge Residence Hall 
The men's residence hall, named for John H. Talge, provides ac- 
commodations for 160 men. A large worship room is located on the sec- 
ond floor. A spacious lounge is on the first floor; this room is avail- 
able for entertainment during leisure time. 

A. G. Daniels Memorial Library 
The A. G. Daniels Memorial Library, a beautiful brick building, 
was completed in 1945. The student body of S.M.C. is particularly 
fortunate in having on the campus this fine modern library containing 
more than twenty-three thousand books, and about two hundred current 
periodicals conveniently arranged and adequately housed for study, ref- 
erence, and research. A portion of the basement floor is used for lecture 
rooms. The library is located adjacent to the administration building 
and is readily accessible from the residence halls. 

Earl F. Hackman Science Hall 
Hackman Hall, modern in arrangement and appointment, a com- 
modious, two-story, fireproof building, contains various lecture rooms 
4nd laboratories of the division of natural sciences. This building, com- 
pleted and dedicated in 1951, was named in honor of the late Earl F. 
Hackman, friend of the College and for many years chairman of its 
Board. 

Harold A, Miller Fine Arts Building 
The Harold A. Miller Fine Arts Building, completed in 1953, 
houses the Music Department. This two-story, fireproof building 
provides studios, practice rooms, and an auditorium for recital purposes. 
It was named in honor of Harold A. Miller, Professor Emeritus oi 
the College. 

Collegedale Tabernacle- Auditorium 
The auditorium serves as a place of worship for the Collegedale 
S.DA. Church. The building is owned by the Georgia-Cumberland 
Conference and has a seating capacity of 1200. A Hammond electric 
organ is part of the equipment. With the front section curtained off, 
the auditorium serves as a gymnasium. 

23 



Buildings and Equipment 

Elementary School Building 
The elementary school building, with four rooms for grade school 
and one for elementary education classes, serves as a workshop for the 
teachers in training. It also houses a spacious recreation and lecture 
room, a lunch room, and the principal's office. 

The College Store 

The College operates a store from which students may purchase 
books and other supplies. Recently remodeled and expanded, the build- 
ing contains the grocery, drug department, and the snack bar on the 
main floor. The dry goods and book departments, and offices are in 
the basement. The store is the distributing center for health foods, elec- 
tric supplies, furniture and household supplies for the Southern States. 

Student Housing Projects 

The College has erected two important modern housing projects in 
recent years, namely, The Hillside Apartments and The Camp Road 
Apartments. Each of these projects provides for twelve families, There 
are also two trailer camps which provide housing accommodations for 
about forty married couples. The Brookside Apartments provide ac- 
commodations for eleven families. 

Industrial Buildings 

Year by year the College has added to its facilities for offering 
instruction in the skills fundamental to the trades. These buildings and 
equipment have been appointed by the College for educational pur- 
poses — for training young people in vocations by means of which they 
may become self-supporting workers and missionaries. Equipment has 
been provided for the mastery of the principles of printing, dairying, 
laundering, woodworking, auto mechanics, poultry raising, farming, 
and merchandising. In addition to the farm buildings, and a new mod- 
ern maintenance shop, the following are some of the industrial build- 
ings: 

The College Press. The College Press, housed in a large brick 
building, is equipped with two Intertypes, three automatic cylinder 
presses, and one hand-fed cylinder press, a 10x15 Heidelberg platen 
press, an American Type Founders offset press, plate making and 
camera facilities for making offset plates, and other up-to-date equip- 
ment. This industry provides employment for approximately thirty- 
five students and does the printing not only for the College and the 
denomination, but also for many commercial establishments. 

24 



Buildings and Equipment 

The Broom Factory. The Broom Factory Is housed in a large one- 
story building. It offers employment to seventy students who manufac- 
ture approximately 400,000 brooms each year. 

Laundry. A well-equipped laundry, specializing in flat work, offers 
employment for sixty-five students. In addition to the college laundry 
service and work from the community, the laundry is patronized by 
eight hotels and fifty tourist camps in the surrounding area. The laun- 
dry also operates a modern dry-cleaning establishment. 

Maintenance. The Maintenance Building is a new construction 
of masonry sixty by eighty feet. This department provides work for 
approximately thirty-five students. 

College Cabinet Shop. This is a new industrial building sixty 
by one hundred-sixty feet, where custom cabinet work is done. Cabinets 
and church furniture are a specialty. 

ACCREDITATION AND CERTIFICATION 

Southern Missionary College is fully accredited as a four-year insti- 
tution of higher learning by the Southern Association of Colleges and 
Secondary Schools, by the Tennessee State Department of Education, 
and by the Seventh-day Adventist Board of Regents. The College is 
also a member of the Southern Association of Private Schools, the 
Tennessee College Association, and the Mid-South Association of 
Private Schools. 

Southern Missionary College has been approved by the Tennessee 
State Board of Education for the certification of secondary school teach- 
ers and for the certification of elementary school teachers on four-year 
levels. 



25 



STUDENT LIFE AND SERVICES 



STUDENT ORGANIZATION 

Southern Missionary College is dedicated to the task of educating 
leaders. The activities in class and club, in chapel and in the shops, 
in the dormitories and in the library, in the offices and in the Forums, 
and the activities off-campus are all designed to serve this one end — 
the training of the individual student in the attitudes and skills and 
qualities that will make him a leader for God among men. 

The extra-class activities program of the College provides well-or- 
ganized opportunities for development of student initiative and leader- 
ship. In the Student Association, through his elected representative, 
each student has a voice in the formulation of policies and in the ad- 
ministration of college life and activities. Through participating in the 
various student organizations and church activities, the student may 
acquire valuable experience in the art of group living and in working 
for and with his fellows. The college program of extra- class activities 
is under the supervision of the Coordinator of Student Activities. Stu- 
dent clubs are chartered by the Student Association. The plans and 
policies governing the Student Association and the other student organi- 
zations, as well as the program of extra-class activities generally, are 
outlined in the handbook, Our Student Organizations at Work. 

RELIGIOUS ORGANIZATIONS 

The local church, the Sabbath school, the Missionary Volunteer 
Society and its auxiliaries, the Ministerial Seminar, the Colporteur 
Club, the mission study groups, and the prayer bands contribute to the 
devotional, missionary, and prayer life of the student and afford op- 
portunities for training in leadership, teaching, and church endeavors. 

PUBLICATIONS 

The Student Association publishes the bi-weekly Southern Accent 
and the yearbook, Southern Memories. These publications serve to report 
campus activities to the student body and patrons. They are prepared, 
edited, and published by students as a part of their training in journal- 
ism. 

MUSIC ORGANIZATIONS 

There is an opportunity for those musically inclined to participate 
in the several music groups such as the college band, the choralists, the 
college choir, trios and quartets both vocal and instrumental, orchestra, 
instrumental ensembles, glee clubs, and oratorio chorus. 

26 



Student Life and Services 

CONVOCATION, THE LYCEUM, ATHLETICS 

At various times during the school year distinguished speakers ad- 
dress the students at the chapel hour. A lyceum course of lectures, 
travelogues, and musical numbers is sponsored by the College. Students 
of Southern Missionary College do not participate in intercollegiate 
athletics, but a program of recreational activities is maintained. 

PARTICIPATION IN EXTRA-CURRICULAR ACTIVITIES 

In order to insure satisfactory scholarship, the extent to which stu- 
dents may participate in extra-curricular activities is subject to regula- 
tion. 



STUDENT SERVICES 

Testing and Counseling Service. This service provides general 

assistance to ail students and also certain professional services for those 
with special needs. General assistance for all students is provided for 
by a group of personal counselors who devote some hours each week to 
individual conferences with students. The various officers, division chair- 
men, and curriculum advisers also cooperate in this general advisory 
program. All students participate in the general testing program, which 
includes measures of scholastic aptitude, reading proficiency, social 
adjustment, vocational proficiency, and others as the need may require. 
The Director of the Testing and Counseling Service, and the college 
physician unite in providing a specialized clinical service for those who 
desire special counsel in such matters as the choice of a vocation, emo- 
tional and social maladjustments, and marital problems. 

COLLEGEDALE CLINIC 

The Collegedale Qinic is located on the campus. Each student, up- 
on registering and paying the general fee, is eligible to certain services 
from the clinic star! without charge. These services are set forth in a 
separate pamphlet provided the student during registration week. The 
clinic is under the supervision of a competent physician. 

STUDENT SELF-HELP 

In the operation of the College, considerable employment is offered 
to students. Under the guidance of skilled supervisors, this work af- 
fords valuable training, and brings a college education, within the 
reach of many who otherwise would find it impossible to attend school. 

27 



Student Life and Services 

REMEDIAL PROGRAMS 

English Improvement. The College provides a number of special 
five-day sections of instruction in English designed for students who 
may have some deficiencies in grammar, spelling, reading rate or com- 
prehension, which might seriously affect their normal rate of progress 
in their college studies. The basic content of their Freshman English is 
the same as that which is included in the three-day sections. The extra 
two days deal with the personal needs of the individual students en- 
abling them to remedy their deficiencies in English. 

Reading Clinic. Under the expert care of instructors trained in 
teaching reading and through the use of the Harvard Reading Films 
and other techniques, students make marked progress in their ability to 
read and to understand. This is very vital in connection with college 
work. 

ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

Broadly speaking Southern Missionary College is a living institu- 
tion made up of its alumni, faculty, and students. The Alumni Associ- 
ation promotes the interests of the school, fosters a spirit of friendship 
among former students, preserves worthy traditions of the College, and 
serves mankind through the exemplification and advocacy of the ideals 
of Alma Mater. 

The General Association holds an annual meeting on the day fol- 
lowing Commencement. Local chapters in various sections of the 
country meet several times yearly. The Association publishes the 
Alumni News Bulletin, its official publication, once a year. It is 
distributed free to Alumni and friends of the College. 

The Association maintains an office on the college campus which 
keeps the records of its regular members, some 2,000 graduates of 
Southern Missionary College, or of the institutions which preceded it 
(the Graysville Academy, the Southern Training School, the Southern 
Junior College). Associate membership in the organization is also 
granted individuals who have attended this institution at least one 
semester. 

The affairs of the Association are managed by its officers: President, 
Ted Graves; Vice-President, John Goodbrad; Secretary, Mabel Wood; 
Publicity Secretary, Frances Andrews; Treasurer, Bruce Ringer; Execu- 
tive Secretary, H, B. Lundquist. 

THE PREPARATORY SCHOOL 

Connected with the College is Collegedale Academy, a fully ac- 
credited secondary school. While this school has a separate organiza- 

28 



Student Life and Services 

tion, it uses the facilities of the College. For information write to the 
principal of Collegedale Academy. 

THE SUMMER SESSION 

The Summer Plan. The Summer Session of nine weeks is di- 
vided into two terms — -the First Term of six weeks, and the Second 
Term of three weeks. Each is a separate unit in itself. The student may 
elect to attend either one or both terms. 

Class Load. A normal full load is six semester hours for the first 
term. In exceptional cases, a maximum of eight hours may be per- 
mitted. The maximum load for the second term is three or four se- 
mester hours. 

The Summer Session announcement of Southern Missionary Col- 
lege, containing detailed statements of the several courses offered and 
information of general interest to all students, will be sent on applica- 
tion to the Director of Admissions. 



29 



THE EDUCATIONAL PROGRAM 



ADMISSION 

Southern Missionary College is open to high school or academy 
graduates who, according to the judgment of the Admissions Committee, 
are qualified to pursue with profit the courses offered by the College. 
Factors in determining eligibility for admission are character, citizen- 
ship, reputation, health, scholastic achievement, and intellectual ability. 

Application Procedure. Application for admission is made on 
a blank supplied by the College, Correspondence concerning admission 
should be addressed to the Secretary of Admissions of Southern Mis- 
sionary College, Collegedale, Tennessee. An applicant who has not 
previously attended Southern Missionary College should enclose with 
the application a small, clear photograph. 

An applicant who expects the College to provide living quarters 
should send with the application the $5.00 room reservation fee. This 
deposit will appear as a credit on the final statement of the school year 
provided the room is left in good order. It will be refunded if the 
applicant is not admitted, or if he decides not to enter and so notifies 
the College before August 1 of the current year. 

The applicant should request the schools previously attended to 
send directly to the Secretary of Admissions of this College a complete 
official transcript of all his secondary school and college credits. 
It is the responsibility of the applicant to see that such credentials are 
sent to Southern Missionary College in time for use in the considera- 
tion of his application. No portion of the applicant's scholastic record 
may be omitted from the transcript submitted for consideration and no 
student may be officially registered until his transcripts are on hand. 

Transcripts of credit accepted toward admission become the prop- 
erty of the College and are kept on permanent file. 

Students may be admitted by transcript (or certificate) of at least 
fifteen units from an accredited high school or academy. As the pattern 
of prerequisite requirements varies, those required for each curriculum 
are listed separately. Unless an exception is made by the Admissions 
Committee the student's secondary record must average "C" or above. 
See "Subject Requirements for Admission" page 32. 

Freshman Standing. Those graduates of accredited four-year sec- 
ondary schools whose scholarship record is acceptable are admitted to 
freshman standing upon receipt of a properly certified transcript of 
fifteen units, but such students may have deficiencies to make up, 

30 



Admission 

Transfer Students. A candidate for admission from another 
accredited institution of college rank may receive credit without ex- 
aminations for such work, subject to the following requirements; 

(a) He must have complete official transcripts from each previous 
institution attended. Each transcript should show entrance 
credits, a complete college record including scholarship and 
credits in each subject taken, and a statement of honorable 
dismissal. 

(b) He must satisfy the entrance requirements of this college. 

(c) Credit is regarded as provisional at the time of the applicant's 
admission. This work will not be recorded and passed on by transcript 
until the applicant has completed satisfactorily in this college, not Jess 
than twelve semester hours. A maximum of seventy-two semester 
hours, or 108 quarter hours, may be accepted from a junior college. 

Admission of Veterans on G. E. D. Tests. Admission to full 
freshman standing at Southern Missionary College is possible to vet- 
erans who, failing to meet the entrance requirements otherwise, can 
qualify on the following points: 1. The candidate must have completed 
elementary school; 2. The candidate must take the General Education 
Development tests numbers 2, 3, and 4 (either at Southern Missionary 
College or at any other approved testing station) making an average 
standard score of 45 with a minimum score of 35 on each test. In case 
the candidate falls below a score of 35 in any field, he must register for 
at least one unit in the secondary school in that field. These tests must 
be taken prior to or during the first month of attendance at the College. 
In addition to these, the applicant must take the American Psychological 
Examination and the Co-operative English test. If satisfactory scores are 
achieved on this battery of tests, the applicant may be admitted to 
freshman standing with the permission of the College Dean. 

'Students from Unaccredited Schools. Unless admitted as a 
veteran and as a result of G.E.D. tests, students from unaccredited high 
schools and academies, in addition to the above requirements, must take 
examinations for college entrance. Entrance examinations are given in 
five fields as follows; Foreign Tanguage, History, English, Mathema- 
tics, and Science. The student choses four from these five fields. These 
tests are standardized achievement examinations covering the subject 
matter on the secondary school level. 

Students falling lower than the 30th percentile in one field are 
deemed to have failed in that field and will be required to enroll for 
another secondary unit in that field in order to meet col lege, en trance 
requirements. 

31 



Admission Requirements 

Admission by Examination. Mature persons (at least twenty-one 
years of age) who have not been graduated from high school may be 
admitted to the College on the basis of scholastic aptitude and achieve- 
ment test results. By means of these tests, given during the Freshman 
Week by the Director of the Testing Service, the candidate must dem- 
onstrate his ability to carry college work successfully. 

Admission As An Adult Special Student. Any acceptable per- 
son, twenty-one years of age or over, may be admitted as a special stu- 
dent (not as a candidate for a degree or a diploma), on approval of the 
Dean and of the instructors in whose courses he wishes to enroll. Any 
course taken by an adult special student carries lower biennium credit, 
and a maximum of twenty-four semester hours credit may be earned 
by such a student. 

Orientation Days. Two days at the beginning of each school 
year are devoted to the orientation of new students. It is essential that 
all freshmen and transfer students be in attendance. During this period 
placement and aptitude tests and a physical examination are given. 
No charge is made for these examinations if they are taken at the ap- 
pointed time. 



SUBJECT REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION 

Units Required for Baccalaureate Degree Curriculums: 





Bible English For. 

Lang. 


Math. 


Nat. 
Sci. 


Soc. 
Sci. 


Elect. 


Bachelor of Arts 


l-3 a 3 


2 bc 


2 e 


2? 


2 L 


k 


B.A. in Theology 


l-3 a 3 


2 bc 


2 e 


2<? 


2* 


k 


Bachelor of Science 


l-3 a 3 


— 


2* 


lg h 


1-2; 


kl 


Units Required for Two-Year Curriculums: 




Bible English For. 
Lang. 


Moth. 


Nat. 
Sci. 


Sac. 
Sci. 


Elect. 


Premedical* 


l-3 a 3 


2bc 


2* 


15 


1) 


k 


Predental* 


l-3 a 3 


d 


2< 


15 


11 


k 


Elem. Teacher Training 


l-3 a 3 


— 


1 


1 


2 [ 


k 



32 



Admissio n Require merits 

♦Important Note: The unit pattern given, with graduation from an accredited 
secondary school and completion of necessary college courses, satisfies the 
requirement for admission to Seventh-day Adventist schools of medicine, 
dentistry, dietetics, and nursing; but inasmuch as requirements for admission 
to other professional schools differ, a student preparing for professional 
training should acquaint himself with the secondary and collegiate require- 
ments for admission to the particular school he desires to enter, and plan 
both his secondary school and college programs to meet these requirements. 

a. One unit for each year of attendance in a Seventh-day Adventist secondary 

school, to a total of three units. Seventh-day Adventist secondary school 
graduates must present one unit in Bible Doctrines. 

b. Both units are required in one language. One unit of credit in a modern 

foreign language is not accepted toward admission unless the second unit is 
earned or the language continued in college. One unit of a modern foreign 
language may be accepted as an elective unit. 

c. A student who has no credit in foreign language may be accepted at S.M.C 

but will be required to take eight more hours of foreign language in college 
than will the student with two foreign language credits from secondary 
schools. 

d. It is highly recommended that prenursing and predental students present two 

units of foreign language, although they may be admitted to some nursing 
or dental schools without it. The student who presents these two units 
thus has the greater freedom, for he may qualify for all schools. 

e. May be selected from the following: Algebra I, Algebra II, General Math- 

ematics, Plane Geometry, Solid Geometry, or Trigonometry. Commercial 
or Applied Mathematics does not satisfy this requirement. Algebra is re- 
quired for a B.S. in Nursing. 

f. Algebra and Plane Geometry. 

g. One unit must be a laboratory science, such as Physics or Chemistry. A second 

unit requirement may be met by General Science or Biology. 
Physics is recommended; Biology, Chemistry, and General Science are ac- 
cepted. A B.S. in Nursing requires 2 units of Natural Science. 

h. For a B. S. in Nursing Physics is recommended; Biology, Chemistry, and 
General Science are accepted. 

i. The Social Science requirements may be met by presenting two units from 
the following: American History, World History, General History, Euro- 
pean History, Civil Government, Problems of Democracy, Economic Geog- 
raphy, and Economics. One unit must be history. 

j. If only one unit of Social Science is required, it should be history. A B.S. in 
Nursing requires 2 units in Social Science one of which must be History. 

k. Sufficient to make a total of fifteen units. Should be chosen to support the 
curriculum to be followed in college. 

1. Nursing students are required to present sixteen units of secondary school 
credit. 

Entrance Deficiencies: A student who has sufficient total acceptable units 
but lacks specific required units, may be admitted to college and may make 
up entrance deficiencies, except mathematics, by taking college work in 
these subjects. When a college course is taken to remove an entrance de- 
ficiency, four hours arc counted as the equivalent of one secondary school 
unit. These hours apply as elective credit toward graduation, except that 
credit in foreign language and Bible applies toward the basic requirements 
in these fields. Arrangements for removing all entrance deficiencies should 
be made at the time of first registration, 

33 



Registration 

REGISTRATION 

All students whose applications for admission have been approved 
will receive by mail, at the home address given, a full printed schedule 
of all appointments for Orientation, Testing, Counseling, and Registra- 
tion, which will occur between Monday, September 9 and Wednes- 
day, September 11, from 7:30 A.M. to 10:00 P.M. All freshmen 
must take the full battery of tests. Transfer students must take these 
tests unless former scores appear with their transcripts. 

Late Registration. A late registration fee of $5.00 is charged 
for first semester registration after September 13, and for second se- 
mester registration after January 23- 

Any student who enters school late seriously handicaps himself at 
the outset especially in courses in science, mathematics, and foreign 
language. Students who register more than two weeks late will not be 
enrolled for a full schedule of course work, and may not enter cer- 
tain courses because of the difficulty of making up the work. The course 
registration of a student entering after the first two weeks of a semester 
will be reduced one hour for each week or fraction thereof missed, in- 
cluding the ^rst two weeks. A student may be admitted to a class after 
three weeks only by permission of the instructor and may not be ad- 
mitted to the class after four weeks of any semester except by special 
permission of the Curriculum and Academic Standards Committee. 

Correct Registration. The early completion of the basic courses 
affords the student greater opportunity: 

1. To avoid difficulties in registration because of conflicts in 
schedule; 

2. To specialize during the junior and senior years; 

3. To choose electives during the junior and senior years; 

4. To follow without loss of time sequences of courses involving 
prerequisites. 

As early as possible the student should plan, in counsel with his 
major professor, the sequence of courses for his major so as to complete 
curriculum requirements in due time. 

Changes in Registration. Changes of registration for sound aca- 
demic reasons may be made during the first week of a semester with 
the consent of the instructor concerned, the adviser, and the Registrar. 
After that time the permission of the Dean must also be secured. A 

34 






Dropping Courses 



change of program voucher becomes effective the date the voucher, 
signed by the proper persons, is received by the Registrar's Office. 

During the week immediately following the registration days of 
each semester, a student may alter his course program without cost. 
Thereafter any change tn registration carries a fee of $2.00. 

Students may not change from one class section to another taught 
by a different teacher without the written consent of the Dean. Ordi- 
narily this permission is granted only in the event of conflicts in the 
class schedule or work program. 

DROPPING COURSES OR WITHDRAWING FROM COLLEGE 

If a two -hour course is dropped within the first four weeks of the 
first or second semester, (first five weeks if a three-hour course, and 
first six weeks If a four-hour course) a H1 W" (withdrawal) is recorded. 

If a course is dropped after the time limit set above, and up to and 
including the ninth week of the semester, a grade of H, WF" or "WP" 
may be given by the instructor depending on the kind of work being 
done at the time; but if after the ninth week a course is dropped for 
any cause except for cases of unavoidable circumstances approved by 
the Academic Standards Committee, an "F' (failure) will be recorded, 

STUDENT STUDY AND WORK LOAD 

Semester Hour. A semester hour represents one fifty-minute 
lecture of recitation per week, or the equivalent, requiring two hours 
of outside study and preparation through a semester of eighteen weeks* 
A three hour laboratory period counts for one semester hour of credit* 

A full-time student, except for Korean veterans, in any semester is 
defined as one who is registered for a course load of twelve hours for 
that semester. If a student is working to defray a portion of his ex- 
penses, his course load will be adjusted accordingly. Since individuals 
vary in capacity, care is taken that each student shall have a reasonable 
balance in his labor-study load. Students who are below average will be 
required to take less work than the following schedule indicates. Those 
with above average ability and scholastic achievement may be permitted 
to attempt a slightly heavier program. These schedules are designed to 
insure sound scholarship and an essential safeguarding of health. 



&bor Hours 


Credit Hours 


Labor Hours 


Credit Hours 


None 


16 


25 to 30 


12 


I to IB 


16 


30 to 35 


8 to 10 


15 to 20 


Not over 16 


35 to 40 


Not over 3 


20 to 25 


14 


Above 40 


Not over 6 






35 



Classification of Students 

In some cases a student, with superior health and ability may, upon 
the recommendation of his adviser and with the approval of the Dean, 
register for 18 semester hours if he has a grade point average of 1.5. 

Except by approval of the Curriculum and Academic Standards 
Committee, no student may receive more than eighteen semester hours 
credit during any semester. Correspondence work in progress and in- 
completes are counted in the current load. 

Once a student's work-study schedule is arranged, and he has en- 
tered upon his duties, his labor foreman may not require extra service 
without proper arrangement with the Dean. 

Conversely, instructors may not require exceptional out-of-elass as- 
signments or appointments that interfere with the regular scheduled 
work program of the student without making proper arrangements 
with the Dean. 

Except by permission of the President's Council, the minimum course 
I6ad of a student living in one of the residence halls is eight hours. 

CLASSIFICATION OF STUDENTS 

Students are classified by the Dean. The classification for which a 
student qualifies at the first semester registration ordinarily continues 
through both semesters. A student who desires reclassification at the 
beginning of the second semester shall make written application to the 
Dean and must meet the full requirements for the particular classifica- 
tion sought except that (1) officers of classes may not be reclassified 
and (2) seniors must remain in the junior class unless they are candi- 
dates for graduation in May or August of the current year. Candidates 
for graduation who did not join the junior class will be required to pay 
to the senior class an amount equivalent to the junior class fee. 

The following schedule governs the classification of students enter- 
ing the first semester and new students the second semester: 

Freshmen. Completion of a four-year high school course, except 
that freshmen may be admitted conditionally on the completion of 
fourteen acceptable units, and on condition that the remaining one 
unit is taken during the first year on the college campus. 

Sophomores, Twenty-four semester hours of earned credit 

Juniors. Fifty -six semester hours "C" average, the hours to include 
basic requirements completed, and the average computed separately on 
hours earned in Southern Missionary College. Registration for the jun- 
ior year shall include any lower biennium basic requirements not already 

36 



Classification of Students 

fulfilled or any deficiencies. 

Seniors 1st Semester 2nd Semester 

For full standing 91 semester hours 128 semester hours 

For summer session 82 semester hours 99 semester hours 

The semester hours prescribed above must be of "C" average or 
in the case of Theology and Teacher Education 1.25. For full standing 
current registration must satisfy all remaining requirements for a 
degree. 

If a course is taken by correspondence during the senior year, the 
transcript of credit must be on file in the Registrar's Office four weeks 
before graduation. Incompletes must be removed by the middle of 
the last term. 

Special. A person at least twenty-one years of age who does not 
meet the minimum entrance requirements. For further information, see 
"Adult Special" under "Admission," page 30. 

Admission of Sophomores to Upper Biennium Courses. A 
sophomore may register for one or more upper biennium courses, for 
upper biennium credit, provided he has earned, with an average of 
"C" or above, fifty hours including basic freshman and sophomore 
courses already taken, and provided, also, that his current registration 
completes the fulfillment of lower biennium basic requirements. 

In exceptional cases, a sophomore may be admitted to an upper 
biennium course for lower biennium credit. A sophomore desiring ad- 
mission to an upper biennium course makes application to the Aca- 
demic Standards Committee. 

Special Hours. On approval of the division chairman and of the 
instructor concerned, and of the Dean, a junior or a senior may earn 
an additional hour of credit in connection with an upper biennium 
course completed or being carried, provided he has completed or is 
currently completing without special registration, not less than fifteen 
hours in the department concerned. 

Auditing Courses. By permission of the Dean, and the instructor 
concerned, a student may audit only a lecture course which does not 
consist entirely or in part of laboratory. He should register as an auditor 
at the time of registration. No credit is given for a course audited. The 
tuition charge is one-half that for credit, and the course counts at half 
value in the student load. A student may not repeat a course for credit 
after he has audited the course. 

37 



Attendance at Appointments 

ATTENDANCE AT CLASS APPOINTMENTS 

1. Prompt and regular attendance at all class appointments is required. 

2. Absences from class due to illness or emergencies may be excused 
by the instructor, in which case the student may be permitted to 
make up written exercises or tests missed- This make-up work may, 
at the discretion of the instructor, be discounted to a maximum of 
20 per cent. A request for permission to make up work must 
be made within one week after the absence occurs and must be 
accompanied by a regular written excuse. Examinations, such as 
unit, mid -semester and semester, may be made up by following the 
regulations published on page 41. 

3. Unexcused absences or an excess number of excused absences will 
lower the student's grade in the course; and if for any reason the 
total number of absences in the semester exceeds one-fourth of the 
class appointments in the course, the credit automatically becomes FA, 
(Failure because of lack of attendance.) 

4. Absences immediately preceding or following a vacation period, 
announced picnic, field day, or from the first appointment of the 
second semester, by a student in attendance the first semester, carry 
penalties. The penalty for missing each class period shall be equiv- 
alent to the penalty for missing two regular class periods. 

5. If a leave of absence from class is necessary, the student should 
make arrangements in advance with the instructor. 

6. Tardiness. Students who are late for class must report such fact to 
the instructor before leaving the classroom; otherwise the tardiness 
will count as an absence. At the discretion of the teacher, three re- 
ported tardinesses may be counted as one absence; also students who 
leave class without permission are counted absent. 

CHAPEL ATTENDANCE 

Chapel attendance three times a week is required of all students. 
Absence from chapel due to illness or emergencies may be excused by the 
Dean if reported to the office within forty-eight hours of the absence. 
The student is allowed three absences each semester for sickness, 
emergency, or any other personal reason. After the third absence 
the student shall be fined $1.00 for each subsequent absence. After the 
sixth such absence the student is subject to disciplinary action by the 
college administration. 

Immediately following each penalized absence a notice will be 
sent to the student, to his parents or guardian, and to the Business 
Office to the effect that the student's account is being charged $1.00. 

A student leaving chapel after the record has been taken will be 

38 



Automobiles — Citizenship 

counted absent. If a student is tardy three times, it will be counted as 
one absence. 



WORSHIP ATTENDANCE 

Regular attendance at morning and evening worship is required 
of all students living in the Residence Halls. The regulations for 
absences from worship are the same as those above for chapel attend- 
ance, except that a student is allowed five absences per month from 
morning or evening worship. The residence deans are responsible for 
issuing the notices for each absence beyond that number. 

THE USE OF AUTOMOBILES BY RESIDENCE-HALL STUDENTS 

Recognizing that the use of an automobile frequently militates 
against a satisfactory school program, the College has adopted and 
enforces a policy which permits only residence- hall students who are 
lower biennium students twenty-one years of age, or more, and those 
of a junior or senior status, to possess or operate an automobile on the 
campus, providing the automobile is properly insured, and that the 
student meets the following requirements: 

1. His scholastic grade point average must not be lower than 1.25 for 
the preceding semester or nine-week period. 

2. His conduct must have demonstrated him to be fully in harmony 
with the standards and regulations of the institution. 

3. His budget as prepared by the Assistant Business Manager must 
show that he can meet his financial obligations to the College as 
well as operate an automobile. 

4. Within 48 hours of his arrival on the campus he will make formal 
application to the Dean of Men for a driving permit, and agree to 
abide by the campus automobile regulations. Copies of these applica- 
tion blanks will be furnished by the residence hall dean upon re- 
quest. 

5. All automobiles not eligible for a permit as provided by the above 
requirements shall be returned home promptly or a $10 per semester 
cash storage fee will be payable in advance. 

All permits are void at the end of the school year {May 31) and 
may be renewed after ]une 1 for the academic year. 

39 



Citizens hip -Governing Standards 

GOVERNING STANDARDS 

General. In the light of the objectives of the College the religious 
phase of the student's education is of paramount importance. Students 
applying for entrance to the College thereby pledge themselves to main- 
tain the Christian standards of the institution, to attend all regularly 
scheduled religious services, and to give due respect to things spiritual. 

Any student who does not maintain a satisfactory scholarship or 
industrial record, or who, in the judgment of the President's Council, 
is unresponsive or non-cooperative in his relation to the objectives of 
the College, may be dismissed without specific charges. 

Moral Conduct. Students must refrain from indecent or disor- 
derly behavior, from profane or unbecoming language, from the use of 
tobacco and alcohol, from reading pernicious literature, from playing 
cards, from visiting pool rooms, bowling alleys or gambling places, 
from attending the theater, dances, or any other entertainment not 
approved by the President's Council. 

Leave of Absence. Permission for ordinary leave of absence from 
the campus is to be obtained from the dean of men or the dean of 
women. The student's handbook should be consulted for information 
regarding week-end and other special leaves. 

Marriages. No student may receive permission to marry during 
the school year. Secret marriages are not approved and are considered 
sufficient reason for severing a student's connection with the College. 

Residence. All unmarried students who do not live with their 
parents, near relatives, or legal guardians, are expected to live in the 
residence halls on the campus. Exceptions may be made occasionally 
for reasons approved by the President's Council. 

Information as to room furnishings to be supplied by the student is 
given in the students' handbook which is mailed to each person who 
applies for admission. It is also available upon request. 

Announced Regulations. Any regulation adopted by the faculty 
and announced to the students will have the same force as if printed in 
the catalog or in the handbook, S.M.C. and You. 

CORRESPONDENCE AND EXTENSION WORK 

Southern Missionary College offers no extra-mural instruction; 
therefore, all credits from this college must be earned in residence. 

The maximum of correspondence and/or extension credit which 
may apply on a four-year curriculum is twelve hours; for a two-year 
curriculum, eight hours. 

40 



Correspondence Work 

Students may not take correspondence work in the upper bien- 
nium on their major or minor. Exceptions to this are granted only 
on approval of the Curriculum and Academic Standards Committee. 
A student may not repeat by correspondence a course in which he 
has received an F. 

In no case may more than eighteen hours of residence work and 
correspondence work be carried in a semester. To count as accepted 
credit, correspondence work must carry a grade of "C" or above, and 
must apply on the curriculum in which the student is enrolled. 

No credit will be accepted from a correspondence school that is 
taken while the student is enrolled in Southern Missionary College, 
unless that course is not being offered by the College. Courses taken 
during the summer vacation must be approved in advance by the Dean 
or they will not be accepted for credit. 

Credit for work taken with any standard correspondence school 
is granted as follows: (1) A grade of "D" on any correspondence 
work may not be recorded, (2) a grade of "C is accepted without 
examination provided it is not to be applied on a major, and (3) a 
grade of "C with validation examination, or of "B" or above without 
examination, is accepted on a major. 

No correspondence credit will be entered on a student's record 
until he has earned twelve semester hours in residence with a scho- 
lastic average of "C". Correspondence credit will not be entered after 
six months from the close of the last semester in residence. 

EXAMINATIONS 

Course Examinations. Examinations are given in all courses at 
mid-semester and the last week of each semester. Students are required 
to take examinations at the time scheduled, unless prevented by illness 
or other unavoidable circumstances. 

For admission by examinations see page 32. 

Exemption Examination. A student may be exempt by examina- 
tion from a specific course requirement for graduation (such as within 
the basic group, or within or accompanying a major or a minor) pro- 
vided he passes with a grade of at least "C" a comprehensive exami- 
nation covering the particular course. The examination for exemption 
shall be authorized by the Curriculum and Academic Standards Com- 
mittee. No hours of credit are given for an exemption examination. 
The fee is $2.00. 

41 



Examinations 

Special Examinations. Special examinations are given when justi- 
fied by circumstances, such as sickness or necessary absence from the 
campus. The fee is $2.00. The student must pay this fee at the Account- 
ing Office and present the receipt to the teacher before being allowed 
to take the examination. In cases where this works an undue hardship 
on the student an appeal may be made to the Curriculum and Academic 
Standards Committee for rebate of fee. Such examinations must be 
made up within three weeks from the time the student returns to classes. 

A re-examination is permitted only by consent of the Curriculum and 
Academic Standards Committee. 

GRADES AND REPORTS 

Mid-semester and semester reports of the scholastic standing of 
each student are issued to the student and his parent or guardian. 
Semester grades are kept on permanent record by the College. 

The following system of grading is used: ^tJtuout 

A — Superior 3 

B — Above average _ 2 

C — Average 1 

D — Below average 

F — Failure Minus 1 

If a student is found cheating his entire grade to that point becomes F. 
E — Warning for "below passing" scholarship. This grade may be giv- 
en only at the nine weeks period. 
I — Incompletes because of illness or other unavoidable delay. An in- 
complete received during the first semester must be removed by the 
end of the second semester or it becomes an F; incompletes re- 
ceived during the second semester or summer session must be re- 
moved before the end of the first semester of the following school 
year. 

A teacher may not give an incomplete grade without authoriza- 
tion from the Dean. A student who believes he is eligible for an in- 
complete must secure from the Registrar's Office the proper form 
on which he may file application with the Dean to receive an in- 
complete. 
Wp — Withdrew passing (Seepage 35) 

Wf— Withdrew failing Minus 1 

Au — Audit 
S— Satisfactory (for music organizations only) 
U — Unsatisfactory (for music organizations only) 

42 



Grades and Reports 

A grade correctly reported to the Registrar can be changed only 
upon repetition of the course. When a course is repeated to raise a 
grade, it must be done before a more advanced course in the same field 
is completed. Credit may not be earned in a course after a more ad- 
vanced course in the same field has been taken. No grades will be 
recorded for a course for which the individual concerned has not reg- 
istered. After a semester grade has been recorded no change in credit 
for the course may be made. 

HONOR ROLL 

An honor roll is compiled twice each semester. It contains the name 
of each student who for the period covered has carried a minimum of 
eight semester hours, has attained a tl B" average, and has received no 
grade of "I," "E," "F," or "Wf." 

GRADUATION STANDARDS 

General Requirements 

A student may qualify for graduation by fulfilling all curriculum 
requirements for the degree or diploma sought and by meeting the 
standards of the College as to character. A student who discontinues his 
attendance at Southern Missionary College for a period as long as two 
consecutive calendar years shall meet the requirements for graduation 
as set forth in one of the catalogs current after his re-entrance. Special 
consideration will be given to students who have been forced to dis- 
continue attendance because of being drafted by the Selective Service 
System. 

A student who has received one bachelor's degree may receive a 
second bachelor's degree provided that all requirements for both de- 
grees are fully met, and provided also that the curriculum offered for 
the second degree includes at least thirty semester hours earned in an 
additional year of residence and not counted for the first degree. 

The responsibility for meeting graduation requirements rests pri- 
marily with the student. He should acquaint himself with the published 
requirements and plan his course so as to fulfill them, for he is eligible 
for graduation only when the records in the Registrar's Office show he 
has met all the requirements listed in the college catalog. 

Graduate Record Examinations 

During recent years an increasing number of graduate and profes- 
sional schools and employers have been requiring applicants for em- 
ployment or admission to file, together with other credentials, their 
scores in the Graduate Record Examinations. To make these scores avail- 
able to graduates as well as to provide a national standard norm by 

43 



Graduation 

which to evaluate the teaching and learning processes at Southern 
Missionary College, these tests are now required to be taken by every 
candidate for a baccalaureate degree during the final semester of his 
senior year. The College administers the tests each year on the Institution- 
al Testing Program whereby the entire senior class writes on the tests 
on the same day. 

Candidacy for Graduation 

To be graduated, a student must have completed all requirements 
for graduation. A student may become a candidate for graduation 
when he enters upon the semester during which it will be possible for 
him to complete all the requirements for his graduation. Candidates 
for graduation at the close of the ensuing summer session are per- 
mitted to participate in the consecration and baccalaureate services with 
the class finishing in the spring, but do not appear as graduation 
candidates at the spring commencement. 

Formal application for graduation should be made at the Registrar's 
Office during the first semester of the senior year. All resident candi- 
dates for graduation must be members of the senior class. Seniors who 
did not participate in the junior class of the previous year are assessed 
an amount equal to the junior class dues. 

Graduation with Honors 

A candidate for graduation with a grade point average of 2.5 or 
above, and whose record shows no grade lower than a "C," may be 
considered for graduation with honors. The Academic Policies Com- 
mittee recommends the candidate to the faculty for approval of this 
honor. Transfer students must have earned 36 hours in residence to 
qualify for graduation with honors. 

Graduation in Absentia 

Each candidate for graduation must be present to receive his diploma 
unless granted written permission by the President of the College to be 
graduated in absentia. Written application should be made early in the 
second semester of the senior year and permission will be granted only 
in cases of evident necessity. A ten-dollar fee is assessed on all those 
graduating in absentia. 



AA 



DIVISIONS OF INSTRUCTION 



The several departments or areas of instruction have been grouped 
by related fields into nine divisions: 

I. APPLIED ARTS AND SCIENCES 

Chairman: R. A. Underhill 

1, Agriculture 4. Industrial Education 

2, Home Economics 5. Vocational Training 

3, Library Science 

II. BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

Chairman: L. N. Holm 

1. Accounting 3. General Business 

2. Economics 4. Secretarial Science 

III. EDUCATION AND HEALTH 

Chairman: K. M. Kennedy 

1. Education 4. Health 

2. Psychology 5. Physical Education 

3. Nursing Education 

IV. FINE ARTS 

Acting Chairman: Milo Hill 

1. Art 2. Music 

V. LANGUAGES AND LITERATURE 

Chairman: C. G. Bushnell 

1. English 3. Foreign Languages 

2. Speech 

VI. NATURAL SCIENCES AND MATHEMATICS 

Chairman: John Christensen 

1. Biology 3. Physics 

2. Chemistry 4. Mathematics 

VII. RELIGION AND APPLIED THEOLOGY 

Chairman: E. C. Banks 

1. Bible 3. Applied Theology 

2. Religion 

VIM. SOCIAL SCIENCES 

Chairman: G. E. Shankel 

1. History 3- Sociology 

2. Political Science 4. Geography 

IX. NURSING 

Chairman: Mazie Herin 

4* 



Divisions of Instruction 

CREDIT HOURS 

One credit hour represents one fifty-minute recitation or lecture 
period per week throughout the semester of eighteen weeks. Each class 
period presupposes an average of two hours of preparation. One labora- 
tory period of approximately three hours is considered equal in value 
to one lecture or recitation period. 

ALTERNATING COURSES 

Of the courses listed, those marked with an asterisk probably will 
not be given in 1957-58, those without this mark wiV. be given if there 
is sufficient demand. The College reserves the right to withdraw 
temporarily any course for which there is not adequate enrollment. 

COURSE NUMBERS 

Courses numbered 1 to 49 are lower biennium courses taken mainly 
by freshmen, and 50 to 99 mainly by sophomores; those numbered 100 
to 149 are upper biennium courses open primarily to juniors, and 
150 to 199 open primarily to seniors. 

Course numbers that stand alone (e.g. 56) represent courses of one 
semester which are units in and of themselves. 

Course numbers separated by a hyphen (e.g., 1-2) represent year 
courses, the semesters to be taken in order given. Credit for the first 
semester only will not apply toward graduation from any curriculum. 

Course numbers separated by a comma (e.g. 41, 42) represent 
units in and of themselves either one of which may be counted for 
graduation without reference to sequence. 

Course numbers separated by a colon (e.g. 11:12) are year courses 
in which the first course is a prerequisite to the second; however, credit 
may be given for the first semester when taken alone. 

A sophomore may register for one or more upper biennium courses, 
for upper biennium credit, provided (1) he has earned, with an average 
of "C" or above, fifty hours including basic freshman and sophomore 
courses already taken, and (2) his current registration completes the 
fulfillment of lower biennium basic and major requirements. In ex- 
ceptional cases, a sophomore who does not fulfill the above require- 
ments may be admitted to an upper biennium course for lower bien- 
nium credit. Application for permission to do this is made in the 
Registrar's Office. 

DEGREES OFFERED 

The College offers three degrees, Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of 
Music Education, and Bachelor of Science. These degrees differ only 
in content of courses. 

46 



Degrees Conferred 

The Bachelor of Arts degree may be earned in the following fields: 

Required Semester Hours Page 

Subject Major Minor 

Biology 30 18 124 

**Business Administration _. 30 18 65 

Chemistry .... 30 18 129 

English 32 18 114 

History _ . _._ 30 18 148 

Music Performance 32 18 103 

Physics 30 18 137 

***Religion .... 30 22* 146 

Social Sciences 42 18 148 

Spanish ....- 30 18 121 

Theology 30 18 145 

The Bachelor of Musk Education Degree: Major, 55; Minor, 18. 

The Bachelor of Science degree may be earned in the following fields: 

Required Semester Hours Page 

Subject Major Minor 

**Business Administration .. 30 18 65 

Chemistry 36-39 18 132 

Foods and Nutrition 30 18 52 

Home Economics 30 18 51 

Industrial Education _. 36 18 57 

Medical Secretarial Science 30 18 74 

Natural Sciences 36 18 136 

Nursing 30 96 

Secretarial Science 30 18 74 

Teacher Education 18 82 

rWO-YEAR CURRICULUMS 

These curriculums are designed primarily for students who wish a 
raining that is practical in that it prepares the individual to work 
iliciently and effectively in some particular area. The student is 
warded a certificate upon the successful completion of one of the 
ollowing curriculums: 



A minor in Religion requires six hours in addition to the basic require- 
ments. Four hours in Applied Theology may count on this minor. 
There is a Business Administration major for Publishing Leaders, and 
one leading to the Certified Public Accountant Examinations. 
Six hours in Applied Theology may count on a major in Religion for 
non-theology students. 

47 



Curriculums and Degree Requirements 

Bible Instructor, see page 146. 
General Office Secretary, see page 75. 
Home Economics, see page 56. 
Industrial Arts, see page 64. 
Medical Secretary, see page 74. 
Printing, see page 64. 

PRE-PROFESSIONAL AND PRE-TECHNICAL CURRICULUMS 

Some students desire to combine their requirements for the under- 
graduate degree with special preparation for professional graduate 
work. The ideal preparation for advanced study is the completion of 
the four-year program leading to the bachelor's degree. This ideal is 
growing out of the experience of students in the professional schools. 
Southern Missionary College offers work in the following: 

Pre-Medical, see page 152. 
Pre-Dental, see page 152. 
Pre-Laboratory Technician, see page 153- 
Pre-Physical Therapy, see page 154. 
Pre-X-ray Technician, see page 155. 
Pre-Optometry, see page 155. 
Pre-Pharmacy, see page 155. 
Pre-Engineering, see page 156. 
Pre-Law, see page 157. 

GENERAL REQUIREMENTS FOR ALL BACCALAUREATE 
DEGREES 

1. Admission to the bachelor of arts curriculum is granted ac- 
cording to the requirements listed on pages 30 and 31. 

2. A minimum of 128 semester hours in courses applicable toward 
this degree. 

3. The total hours for a degree, except for the B.S. in Teacher 
Education, shall include a major and a minor or two majors chosen 
from the lists given below. 

4. A minimum of forty semester hours of upper biennium credit. 

5. An average of one grade point per semester hour on all work 
taken in this college as well as on all transfer credits. 

6. Not less than twenty-four semester hours, of which twenty 
must be in the senior year, are required to be earned in residence at 
this college, 

48 



Degree Requirements 

MAJORS AND MINORS 

Major Requirements. The student should choose a major 
field of specialization preferably by the beginning of the second 
semester of the sophomore year. Specific requirements for majors 
are given immediately preceding the descriptions of courses in the 
several departments of instruction. 

Each major consists of a minimum of thirty semester hours of 
which fourteen must be upper biennium credit and six of these 
must be earned in this college. 

No course in which a student has received a grade of tl D" may 
apply on a major or minor. 

Minor Requirements. A student should choose his minor field 
not later than the beginning of the second semester of the sophomore 
year. A minor may not be earned in the field chosen for the major. 
All minors consist of eighteen semester hours except Religion which 
consists of the basic requirements plus six hours. 

Six hours of a minor shall be earned in the upper biennium. A 
minimum of three hours of upper biennium credit on the minor 
must be earned in this college. 

The fields in which minors may be earned are given below. See 
the appropriate section under "Division of Instruction" (page 43) 
for further information. 



Biblical Language 


German 


Physics 


Biology 


History 


Printing 


Business and Economics 


Home Economics 


Religion 


Chemistry 


Industrial Education 


Secretarial Science 


Education 


Mathematics 


Spanish 


English 


Music 


Speech 


French 







BACHELOR OF ARTS 

(With majors in eleven different fields) See page 45. 

Core Curriculum Requirements 

English 10 hours 

Six hours must be in Freshman English, which is to be taken in the fresh- 
man year. The remaining four hours must be in literature and should be 
taken in the sophomore year. 

Fine Arts . 4 hours 

Required: Art 61 or Music 62. 

Foreign Languages ._ 6-14 hours 

1, Six hours of the foreign language in which two units have been earned 
in secondary school. To be taken in the freshman or the sophomore year. 

49 



Degree Requirements 

2. Fourteen units in one language, if different from the language in 
which two units have been earned in secondary schooj, should be taken 
if possible in the freshman and sophomore years. 

3. Fourteen units in one language, if no foreign language or less than two 
units in one foreign language was taken in secondary schooj, should be 
taken if possible in the freshman and sophomore years. 

4. This requirement may be fulfilled by credit in Greek, Latin, or a mod- 
ern foreign language. 

5. Any student whose mother tongue is not English may be exempted 
from the foreign language requirement if he presents three secondary 
units of his native language on his transcript. 

Health . l hour 

Required: Health 7, 8, or equivalent. Must be taken in the fresh- 
man or sophomore year. 

Natural Sciences — Mathematics 12 hours 

May be selected from the fields of Biology, Chemistry, Mathematics, and 
Physics. Six hours sequence must be selected from a science field with laboratory 
to be completed in the freshman and sophomore years. (Bus. Math., Funda 
mental Concepts, or Functional Math., not accepted.) 

Religion 12-16 hours 

Required: Religion 51. 

A student presenting three or more units of credit in Bible from the sec- 
ondary school needs twelve hours; one presenting two units, fourteen hours; 
and one presenting one unit or less, sixteen hours. Approximately half of 
this requirement should be taken in the freshman and sophomore years. At 
least four semester hours should be of upper biennium credit. 

Social Sciences ... 14 hours 

Six hours must be in a history sequence taken in the freshman or sopho- 
more year. The remaining eight hours may be chosen from the following: 
Economics 71, 72; Geography 14 1; and any courses in history or politi- 
cal science. 

Vocational . 4 hours 

May be chosen from the courses in Agriculture, Industrial Education (voca- 
tional in nature), Secretarial Science (Courses 13 and 14), Home Economics 
(Courses 1, 2, 21, 22), Education 34, Printing (Courses 17, 18, 67, and 
68), or any vocational training program. (See page 61). In cases where the 
student can furnish evidence of satisfactory proficiency in a trade, the 
Division Chairman may recommend to the Curriculum and Academic Stand- 
ards Committee that the student be allowed to omit the vocational require- 
ments and add the four hours to his elective group. Students with a major 
or a minor in Chemistry or Physics will have met the vocational require- 
ment. 

Note: While it is preferable to take as many of the Core Curricu- 
lum requirements as possible on the freshman and sophomore level, a 
student will not be required to complete all of them before registering 
for upper biennium work. However, the following basic requirements 
must be met before the student registers for any upper biennium course. 

Foreign Language 6 Religion 4-6 

Natural Sciences and Mathematics .. 6 History . 6 

English 6 

50 



APPLIED ARTS and SCIENCES 



R, A, Underhill, Chairman 

AGRICULTURE 

Like the land grant colleges of an earlier period, Southern 
Missionary College believes in the educational values of practical work 
on the land and in the shop. At present, we offer but one course In 
the area of agriculture and that to meet a specific need. 
1, 2, Country Living Each semester, 2 hours 

This is a course intended to acquaint students with various phases 
of country living. Tt is intended especially to be of assistance to those 
who make their homes in the suburbs and country sections even though 
their occupation may not be farming as such. Special attention will be 
given to gardening, landscaping, soil building, horticulture, poultry, and 
dairy husbandry. 

HOME ECONOMICS 

Dorothy Kocher Chrjstensen 

The courses in this area are designed to prepare students for a 
career in some field of Home Economics, and at the same time give 
cultural and practical knowledge of the essentials of successful home- 
making, 

A separate sequence of courses is presented for students who wish 
to go into the field of dietetics and institution management, 

Bachelor of Science With a Mapr in Home Economics 
Course Require iM en ts 

Major (Home Economics) „„„...,. 30 hours 

Including: 1, 2; 21, 22; 41, 42; 132; 101, 102 or 121, 
122 (14 hours of which must be upper biennium). 

Education — Psychology 51 - 2 hours 

English 1-2 ~ 6 hours 

Literature 31-32 or 41-42 ...... 4 hours 

Fine Arts 61 or 62 ... 4 hours 

Health 4, 7, 8 _„„ 3 hours 

Natural Sciences — Mathematics — — 12 hours 

Religion— BibJe 51 12-16 hours 

Social Science - 8 hours 

Elective* — sufficient to make a four-year total 
of 128 semester hours. 
Those who plan to do graduate work in Home Economics should 

51 



Foods and Nutrition Courses 

include General Chemistry 1, 2; Biology 12 and 22; and Economics 71 
and 72. 

Those who wish to prepare for a teaching career should qualify 
for teacher certification. See page 82. 

Bachelor of Science With a Major in Foods and Nutrifion 

Course Requirements 
Home Economics majors who wish to meet the requirements for 
graduate internships offered by the American Dietetics Association 
must meet the requirements listed. 

Major (Home Economics) 30 hours 

Including: 1, 2; 101, 102; l6l, 162; 171, 

172 
Minor (Chemistry— including 1-2; 83; 171: 

172) * „ 18 hours 

Business Administration 31 - 3 hours 

Psychology 51 --- 2 hours 

English 1-2 ....- 6 hours 

Literature 31-32, or 41-42 4 hours 

Fine Arts 61 or 62 4 hours 

Health 7, 8 - 1 hour 

Biology 11, 22 7 hours 

Religion (51 repired) .. ..._ 12-16 hours 

Social Science 82 . 14 hours 

Electives sufficient to make a four-year total of 128 se- 
mester hours. 

FOODS AND NUTRITION 

1, 2. Foods and Nutrition Each semester, 3 hours 

Basic principles of food composition, selection and preparation, 
meal planning and service, and nutrition. Students not majoring in 
Home Economics may take Nutrition the second semester without a 
laboratory. Two lectures and three hours laboratory each week. 
101, 102. Experimental Cookery Each semester, 2 hours 

Individual and class problems in food preparation, calculating 
costs, preparing and serving meals for special occasions. Prerequisite: 
Home Economics 1, 2. One lecture and three hours laboratory each 
week. 

161. Advanced Nutrition First semester, 3 hours 

A study of the principles of normal nutrition as it applies to in- 
dividuals at different ages. Prerequisites: Home Economics 1, 2; and 
Chemistry 1 and 2 or by approval. 

52 



Home Management and Child Care Courses. 

162. Diet Therapy Second semester, 3 hours 

A study of the principles of nutrition as applied to physiological 
conditions altered by stress, disease or abnormalities. Prerequisite: 
Home Economics 161. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory 
each week. 

171:172. Institution Management Each semester, 3 hours 

A study of quantity cookery, menu planning, institutional equip- 
ment, purchasing, management-personnel relationships, laboratory ex- 
perience in college food services, and sanitarium and hospital food 
services. One lecture each week. Laboratory work by appointment. 

HOME MANAGEMENT AND CHILD CARE 

41. Interior Decoration First semester, 2 or 3 hours 
Study and application of principles governing the selection of fur- 
niture, textiles, pictures, flower arrangements, accessories and other 
home furnishings. A comprehensive study of period furnishings. May 
be taken with or without laboratory. Two hours lecture and three hours 
laboratory each week. 

42. Home Management Second Semester, 2 hours 
A study of family problems and goals with emphasis on planning 

personal and family schedules, conserving time and energy, financial 
plans and family housing. 

131. Home Furnishings Second semester, 2 hours 
A study of the factors influencing the planning and furnishing the 

home from the standpoint of comfort, beauty, and economy. Prerequi- 
sites: Home Economics 41 or equivalent. Two hours lecture each week. 

132. Child Care and Guidance Second semester, 3 hours 
A study of the child, beginning with prenatal care through the 

years of babyhood and early childhood. The family as a background for 
growth and development. Experience with babies and preschool ob- 
servation and participation to be arranged. Two hours lecture and 
three hours laboratory by arrangement each week. 



TEXTILES AND CLOTHING 

21. Clothing Construction and Textiles First semester, 3 hours 

A course in fundamental clothing construction. Basic textile prin- 
ciples are studied. Color, line, and design as related to the iigure are 
studied. Use and alteration of commercial patterns. Two hours lecture, 
three hours laboratory each week. 

53 



Sequence for Major in Home Economics 

22. Clothing Construction and Selection Second semester, 3 hours 
A study of the factors essential to intelligent selection and care of 
clothing with emphasis on suitability of dress, buying of clothes and 
planning a suitable wardrobe. Fundamentals of construction and fitting 
are also emphasized. Two hours theory, three hours laboratory each 
week. 

119- Textiles First semester, 2 hours 

A study of textile fibers and fabrics and factors influencing their 
construction, finish and design. Selection and identification for con- 
sumer use. Two hours lecture each week. 

121. Flat Pattern Design and Dress Construction 

First semester, 2 hours 

The use of the basic pattern in dress designing and construction 

with emphasis on fitting. Prerequisite: Home Economics 21, 22 and 

119- Course 119 may be taken concurrently. One lecture and three hours 

laboratory each week. 

122. Tailoring Second semester, 2 hours 
A study of the techniques of tailoring and their practical applica- 
tion to women's suits and coats. Prerequisite: Home Economics 21, 22 
and for majors 119, and 121. 

141, 142. Home Economics Seminar Each semester, 1 hour 

A study of problems, research, and trends in, the various fields of 
home economics. Registration conditional upon consent of instructor. 

Recommended Sequence for Major in Home Economics 



FIRST YEAR 








I6V2 Hrs. 


First Semester 


I6I/2 


Hrs. 


Second Semester 


Sem. Hrs. 


Courses 


Sem. 


Hrs. 


Courses 


3 


Foods and Nutrition 1 




3 


Foods and Nutrition 2 


2 


General Psychology 51 




2 


Home Nursing 4 


2 


Religion 1 or 11 




2 


Religion 2 or 12 


2-3 


Interior Decoration 41 




2 


Home Manag. 42 


3 


Freshman Comp. 1 




3 


Freshman Comp. 2 


3 


Elective 




2 


Social Science 


SECOND 


Physical Education 7 
YEAR 




2 


Elective 

Physical Education 8 


16 Hrs. 


First Semester 


16 Hrs. 


Second Semester 


Sem. Hrs. 


Courses 


Sem, 


Hrs. 


Courses 


3 


Cloth. Construction 21 




3 


Cloth. Construction 22 


3 


Prim of Chr. Living 51 




3 


Religion 


2 


Marriage and Fam. 82 




2 


Fine Arts 


2 


Fine Arts 




3 


Amer. Hist & Inst. 54 


3 


Amer. Hist. & Inst. 53 




3 


Surv. of Chemistry 8 


3 


Surv. of Chemistry 7 




2 


Elective 



54 



Sequence for Major in Foods and Nutrition 



THIRD YEAR 

16 Hrs. Fjrst Semester 

5tw, Hrs, Courses 

2 Literature 

2 Fund, of Chr, Faith 59 

3 Natural Sciences 

4 Home Economics 

5 EJect ives 

FOURTH YEAR 



16 Hrs. 

3 
4 
9 



First Semester 
Courses 
Social Science 
Home Economics 
Electi ves 



16 Hrs. 
Sem, Hrs. 

2 

2 

3 

3 

6 



16 Hrs. 
Sem. Hrs. 
3 

10 



Second Semester 
Courses 
Literature 

Fund. Chr. Faith 60 
Natural Sciences 
Home Economics 
Electi ves 



Second Semester 
Courses 
Social Science 
Home Economics 
Elect ives 



Recommended Sequence for Major in Foods and Nutrition 

To qualify for a graduate internship approved by the American 
Dietetic Association. 



FIRST YEAR 








151/2 Hrs. 
Sem, Hrs, 


First Semester. 
Courses 


Sem. 


Hrs. 
Mrs. 


Second Semester 
Courses 


3 
4 
2 
3 
3 
Vi 


Foods and Nutrition 1 
General Chemistry I 
Religion 1 or 1 1 
Freshman Comp. I 
History 1 or 53 
Physical Education 7 




3 
A 

2 

3 

3 

¥2 


Foods and Nutrition 2 
General Chemistry 2 
Religion 2 or 12 
Freshman Comp, 2 
History 2 or 54 
Physical Education S 


SECOND YEAR 








16 Hrs. 
Sem, Hrs, 


First Semester 
Courses 


16 Hrs. 
Sem. Hrs. 


Second Semester 
Courses 


4 
3 
2 
2 
2 
3 


Organic Chemistry S3 

Prin. of Accounting 31 

Religion 

Literature 31 or 41 

Interior Decoration 41 

Anatomy 11 




4 

: 
3 
2 

3 
2 


Microbiology 22 

Social Science 

Pnn. of Chr* Living 31 

Literature 32 or 42 

Physiology 12 

Electives 


THIRD YEAR 








16-17 Hrs, 
Sem. Hrs, 


First Semester 
Courses 


16-17 Hrs, 
Sem, Hrs, 


Second Semester 
Courses 


2 
3 
2 
2 
2 
3 
2-3 


Fine Arts 
Biochemistry 171 
Hxper. Cooking 101 
Gen Psychology 51 
Fund. Chr, Faith $9 
Prin. of Economics 71 
Electives-Home Econ. 


2 
3 

2 
2 

2 

3 

2-3 


Fine Arts 
Biochemistry 172 
Expcr. Cookery 102 
Gen. Phychology 52 
Fund. Chr. Faith 60 
Pnn. or Economics 72 
Electives-Home Econ, 



55 



Two-Year Curriculum* in Home Economics, Library Science 



FOURTH 


YEAR 








16 Hrs. 


First Semester 


16 


Hrs. 


Second Semester 


Sem. Mr j. 


Coursei 


Sem. 


Hrs. 


Courses 


3 


Adv. Nutrition 161 




3 


Diet Therapy 162 


3 


Inst Management 171 




3 


Inst. Management 172 


2 


Danid 165 




2 


Revelation 166 


5 


Electives 




2 


Sociology 182 


3 


Principles, Materials & 




3 


Elect ives 




Methods of Secondary 




3 


Principles, Materials # 




Teaching 135 






Methods of Secondary 
Teaching 136 



Recommended Sequence for the two-year curriculum in Home 
Economics 



FIRST YI 


iAR 








151/2 Hrs, 


First Semester 


tm 


Hrs 


Second Semester 


Sem. Mrs. 


Courses 


$em< 


Mrs. 


Courses 


3 


Freshman Com p. 1 




3 


Freshman Comp. 2 


j 


Health and Hygiene 5 




A 


Microbiology 22 


3 


Foods and Nutrition 1 




2 


Home Nursing 4 


2 


Social Science 




3 


Foods and Nutrition 2 


2-3 


Interior Decoration 4 \ 




2 


Home Manag. 42 


2 


Religion 1 or 11 




2 


Religion 2 or 12 


] /2 

SECOND 


Physical Education 7 

YEAR 




Vi 


Physical Education 8 


16 Hrs- 


First Semester 


16 


Mrs. 


Second Semester 


Sem. Hrs. 


Courses 


S#m. 


Mrs, 


Courses 


3 


Cloth. Construction 21 




3 


Cloth. Construction 22 


2 


Marriage and Fam. 82 




3 


Child Ore, Guid> 132 


2 


Fine Arts 




2 


Fine Aris 


3 


Prin. of Chr. Living 




3 


Religion 


6 


Elect ives 




2 

5 


General Psychology 52 
Physiology 12 



LIBRARY SCIENCE 

93 , 94. Library Methods Both semesters, 6 hours 

The basic elements of library science and school library methods. 
Designed to impart a practical knowledge of how to organise and ad- 
minister a library; how ro select, acquire, and catalog books; and how 
to relate the library to the needs of the pupils. Lectures and laboratory 
practice in the college library. 

INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION 

Harry Hulsey, Albert L. Anderson 

The purpose of the courses in Industrial Education is to provide 
opportunity for students to learn at least one trade; to train teachers 
of industrial arts and to develop supervisors and plant managers for 
home and foreign mission enterprises. 

56 



Industrial Education 

Bachelor of Science with a Major In Industrial Education 
Course Requirements 
Major (Industrial Education) ............. 36 hours 

Including: 1, 2 Or 4; 17; 98-99; 91 or 

102; 121; 193, 194; 195, 196* 

Minor (Education) 18 hours 

Business Administration — Accounting ....... 6 hours 

English 1-2 6 hours 

Literature 31-32 or 41-42 .... „. 4 hours 

Fine Arts 61 or 62 .. 2 hours 

Health 7, 8, 22 , ... 3 hours 

Natural Sciences — Mathematics ...„.„. 12 hours 

Religion 51 1^-16 hours 

Social Science 53, 54; 14 hours 

Electives — sufficient to make a Four-year total 

of 128 semester hours. 

Mjnor: A minor in Industrial Education in the Arts and Sciences 
curriculum requires eighteen hours. Courses 91 or 102 ace recom- 
mended providing one or more first-year laboratory courses have been 
taken. A minor in printing in the Arts and Sciences curriculum re- 
quires eighteen hours- In the Vocational Training program as outlined 
on pages 61, 62, credit to a total of five semester hours may be earned 
to apply on the printing minor. 

Club: AJ1 majors and minors are urged to participate in the extra- 
curricular activities of the Industrial Education Club. 

All Industrial Education majors and pre-eng. students are required 
to own a drawing kit consisting of suitable drawing instruments — tri- 
angles, scales, T-square, and drawing board. 

Ehie to the variation in the types of content included in these 
courses, the following tabulation is given to indicate the time require- 
ments for credits. Figures in parentheses indicate hours in preparation; 

1 period per week (2) 18 weeks 1 semester hour 

2 periods per week ( 1 ) 18 weeks 1 semester hour 

3 periods per week (0) IS weeks 1 semester hour 
6 periods per week ( ) 9 weeks 1 semester hour 

12 periods per week (0) 9 weeks 2 semester hours 
10 periods per week (2) 9 weeks 2 semester hours 

57 



Mechanical, Architectural Drafting, Construction and Design 

MECHANICAL AND ARCHITECTURAL DRAFTING 

1. Instrumental Drawing First semester, 3 hours 

Designed to give fundamental training in the use of inst rumen ts J 
and in the selection of equipment and drawing materials; training in 
systems of projection and dimensioning practice. 

2. Mechanical Drawing Second semester, 3 hours 

Designed to acquaint students with basic machine elements, special 
practices and fields. Prerequisite: Instrumental Drawing 1. 

4. Architectural Drawing Second semester, 3 hours 

Prerequisite: Instrumental Drawing I, or a beginning course in 
Mechanical Drawing. A survey of the field in its various phases, and 
the acquisition of a working knowledge of technique, symbols, materi- 
als, plan reading, tracing, and blue-printing. 

* 103 -104. Advanced Mechanical Drawing Each semester, 3 hours 

Prerequisite: Instrumental and Mechanical Drawing 1, 2, or equiva- 
lent. 

The processes to be studied are: isometric drawing, oblique draw- 
ing, intersections, and sectional views, map and topographical draw- 
ing, seacraft and aircraft drawings, detail and tracings. 

191-192. Architectural Drawing Each semester, 3 hours 

Prerequisite: Instrumental and Architectural Drawing I, 4, or their 

equivalent. 

Students will be expected to work out for a full-size structure a 

complete set of plans, details, specifications, bill of materials and 

labor, and total costs* 

CONSTRUCTION AND DESIGN 

II* General Woodworking First semester, 2 hours 

The study of hand and machine tool processes, with opportunity 
for working out selected projects in the laboratory. The use and care 
of tools, selection of projects, shop sketching, 

12. General Woodworking Second semester, 2 hours 

The study of hand and machine tool processes, with opportunity 
for working out selected projects in the laboratory. The use and care 
of tools, selection of projects, shop sketching, finishing processes, and 
finishing, designing furniture, matching grain, selection of hardware, 
and methods of displaying finished products. 



*WiIl be offered on demand, 
58 



Graphic Arts Courses 

*85 , 86. General Electricity Each semester, 2 hours 

Designed to give the student a practical knowledge of the basic 
fundamentals of electricity, including elect ro - mag net is m, induction, 
a.c. and d.c. current, transformers, solenoids, motors, appliances, and 
house wiring. 

121. Building Technology First semester, 3 or 4 hours 
Study of various types of structures; natural and manufactured 

building materials; architectural expression and basic mechanical and 
electrical structural installations. A notebook will be required. 

122. Building Technology Second semester t 3 or 4 hours 
Prerequisite 121 

Specific study of building assembly, finishing and decor; application 
techniques of various materials, heating, lighting, ventilation. Labora- 
tory time will be spent either in construction of models or of full-size 
buildings. 

*133, 134, Cabinet and Furniture Making Each semester, 2 hours 

Prerequisite: General Woodworking 11 and 12, or equivalent. 

GRAPHIC ARTS 

17. Fundamentals of Typography First semester t 3 hours 
Simple printing fundamentals, typesetting, platen presswork. Es- 
sential knowledge to prepare a student for employment in the College 
Press the second semester. Students with previous printing experience 
may be employed in the Press concurrently with the first semester s 
class work. Instead of laboratory he will be required to earn one hour 
laboratory credit by working under supervision with regular pay a total 
of 255 hours in the Press, 

18. Fundamentals of Typography Second semester, 3 hours 
Prerequisite; Printing 17, 

Work is concentrated on composition and presswork with special 
consideration for proper grouping and spacing of jobs, layout and 
design, and presswork, 

*63- Ad tranced Typography First semester \ 2 hours 

One class period a week, one hour credit each semester. One hour 

labor credit for 255 hours work each semester. 

Prerequisite: Courses 17, 18. This will be more intensive study of 

practices concerned with intricate composition, layout and design. 



•Will be offered on demand. 

59 



Metals and Mechanical Arts Courses 

*64* Advanced Press work Second semester, 2 hours 

A study of presswork principally concerned with automatic presses 
both letterpress and offset, 

67. Proofreading and Proofroom Techniques First semester, 2 hours 
A survey of the fundamentals of proofreading and copy prepara- 
tion, the study of rules and practices regarding book, magazine, and 
newspaper publishing, and job work. Includes on-the-job practice in 
handling actual proofroom problems. Open to men and women. Credits 
for this course can be applied on an English major. 

68, History of Printing Second semester, 2 hours 
The history of printing from the invention of paper and type to 

the present time, including the growth and development in the held 
of letterpress, offset, and other processes* 

111. Fund amen iais of Linotype Operation First semester, 3 hours 
Prerequisite or concurrently: Courses 17, 18, 

Function and maintenance and keyboard operation of the linotype. 

112. Fundamentals of Linotype Operation Second semester, 1 hour 
Continued practice in keyboard operation, 

* 1 1 3* Printing Processes First semester } 2 hours 

Prerequisites: Courses 17; 63-64; ill, 112. This course will include 
the study of layout for silk screen and offset or lithography; plate- 
making, engravings, ink, color printing, and bindery work. 

* 114, Shop Management Second semester, 2 hours 

Prerequisites: Courses 17, 18; 63-64; 111, 112; 113- Department 
supervision, cosr and estimating, personnel management, and over-afi 
management problems attacked. 

METALS AND MECHANICAL ARTS 

15, 16 Genera! Metals Each semester, 2 hours 

Principles and practice of electric, oxy-acetylene and other gas weld- 
ing; use of cutting tools and other machines, and hand tools used in 
metal working, 

51. Auto Mechanics First semester, 2 hours 
A general course in the fundamental principles of gasoline engines, 

their design, timing, cooling, carburetion and lubrication; automobile 
body designs, makes and models. 

52. Auto Mechanics Second semester, 2 hours 
A general course in the fundamentals of gasoline engines and 

automobile design and repair; automotive electricity, power flow, 
servicing, and trouble shooting; held trips. 



*WiIl be offered on demand. 
60 



Industrial Arts Teacher Training — Vocational Training 

**l4l, 1 42, Electric and Oxy- Acetylene Welding 

Both semesters, 6 or S hours 

Designed to give advanced skill in the process, use, and fusing of 
metals, their characteristics under cold and heat, various technical 
designs and use of tin plates, servicing and care of equipment. Pre- 
requisite: Courses 15, 1 6, or equivalent 
*I43, 144. Machine Shop Both semesters, 4 hours 

Instruction in the operation, and maintenance of power hack saws, 
engine lathes, shapers, milling machines, and drill presses, together 
with hand tools used in this trade, including forming and tempering in 
the forge, studies in pattern making and casting, with several field 
trips. 

INDUSTRIAL ARTS TEACHER TRAINING 

98-99. Appreciation of Design Each semester, 2 hours 

This course is designed to give special attention to appreciation 
and design as applied to Industrial Education in general. 
91 or 102, Industrial Arts Problems 

first or second semester, 1 or 2 hours 

A study of particular problems in the industrial arts field. A term 
paper is required. 

193. Trade Analysis first semester, 2 hours 
The study of trades, Each student is required to analyze his own 

trade, set it up on cards in knowing and doing units, with the best 
references attached, A copy of the full set of cards of the trade analyzed 
is to be turned in upon completion of the course. 

194. Industrial Education Methods Second semester, 2 hours 
A study of the particular problems of administration in the field of 

Industrial Education. A term paper is required. 

195. 196. History and Philosophy of Industrial Arts 

Each semester, 2 hours 
The study of the development and proper place of Industrial Educa- 
tion; planning of better teaching materials and methods- The student 
formulates and presents in written form his own personal philosophy of 
Industrial Education, 

VOCATIONAL TRAINING 

The vocational training program was established for the pur- 
pose of giving opportunity to students to learn a trade while working 
in the College Industries to pay for their formal education. It is also 
designed to be of interest to those students who do not desire to go 

• Offered on demand. 
**Summer Session 

tii 



Vocational Training 

all the way through college, but who want to broaden their social and 
intellectual experience for several years beyond the high school level. 

A total of eight semester hours of credit will be counted on a four- 
year degree curriculum, four hours of which will apply on the vocational 
requirement, and the other four as electives. A total of six hours will 
be counted toward a printing minor. Six hours will also be counted 
on the two-year industrial arts curriculum. 

For each semester hour of credit, the student will have to present 
a cumulative record in his trade book of 270 hours of supervised work 
in the respective industry. Tuition charges will be at the same rate as 
for other academic credits. Work done by the students in the industrial 
or service departments will receive the tegular rate of pay. 

In addition to the required supervised work, each student will be 
assigned collateral readings and be required to render reports covering 
subjects related to the industry in which he is earning credit. Regular 
on-the-job conferences with the supervisor, as well as specially arranged 
formal conferences or lectures are also required. Passing grades 
are given for the prompt fulfillment of collateral assignments, faith- 
fulness in meeting work appointments, and an ever increasing skill in 
the trade which the student is studying, 

The following vocational training classes will be offered in 1957- 
58. A maximum of two hours may be earned in each. 

MAINTENANCE AND CONSTRUCTION 

Note for the Following Couhsks One class period per week 

270 Jogged hours of supervised work per semester. 

3, 4. Plan! Maintenance Each semester, 1 hour 

It is highly recommended that the student take Mechanical Draw- 
ing previously or concurrently. 

5, 6. Plumbing Installation and Maintenance Each semester, 1 hour 

7, 8. Electrical Installation and Maintenance Each semester, 1 hour 

9> L0. Carpentry Each semester, 1 hour 

PKJNTINC 

85 y 86\ Presswork Each semester, \ or 2 hours 

87, 88, Advanced Composition Each semester , I or 2 hours 

185, 1S6\ Advanced Presswork Either semester } 1 hour 

62 



Sequence for Major in Industrial Education 

Recommended Sequence for Major In Industrial Education 
FIRST YEAR 



iWl Hrs. 


First Semester 


l6Vi Hrs. 


Second Semester 


$em. Hrs, 


CtfftrJ*?/ 


Ssm. Mrs. 


Courses 


3 


Freshman Comp. 1 


3 


Freshman Comp. 2 


2 


Ind. Educ. 11 or 15 


7 


Ind. Educ. 12 or 16 


3 


Inst t Drawing 


3 


Ind. Educ. 2 or 4 


3 


NaL Science or Math, 


3 


Nat, Science or Math. 


2 


Religion 1 or 1 1 


2 


Religion 2 or 12 


Vi 


Physical Education 7 


Vi 


Physical Education 8 


3 


Electives 


3 


Electives 


SECOND 


YEAR 






17 Hrs. 


First Semester 


16 Hrs, 


Second Semester 


$em< Mrs, 


Courses 


Sew, Mrs. 


Courses 


3 


Amcr. Hist. & Inst. 53 


3 


Amer. Hist. & Inst. 54 


3 


Fund, of Typography 17 


> 


Ind, Educ. 91 or 102 


3 


Prin. of Economics 71 


2 


Social Science 


2 


Appreciation & Des. 98 


2 


Appreciation & Des. 99 


3 


Nat. Science or Math, 


3 


Nat. Science or Math. 


5 


Prin. of Chr. Living 51 


2 


Religion 






2 


Electives 


THIRD YEAR 






Ifi Hrs. 


First Semester 


16 Hrs, 


Second Semester 


Sem. Mrs. 


Courses 


$em* Mr j. 


Courses 


2 


Literature 31 or 41 


2 


Literature 32 or 42 


3 


Build, Technology 121 


2 


Marriage and Fam, 82 


2 


Fund, Chr. Faith 59 


2 


Fund. Chr. Faith 60 


9 


Electives 


2 


Safety, First Aid 22 






3 


^Electives 


FOURTH YEAR 






N Hrs, 


First Semester 


16 Hrs. 


Second Semester 


Sew. Ifrj, 


Courses 


Sem t Hrs> 


Courses 


2 


Trade Analysis 193 


?. 


Ind. Educ Meth. 194 


2 


Hi*t. & PhiL of 


:. 


Hist. & Phil, of 




Industrial Arts 195 




Industrial Arts 196 


3 


Prin, of Economics 71 


3 


Prin. of Economics 72 


9 


* Electives 


9 


^Electives 



*To be used to mee: Major requirements. 



63 



Industrial Atts—Pr'ml'tng 



INDUSTRIAL ARTS— TWO-YEAR CURRICULUM 



FIRST YEAR 

l5 j /2 Hrs, Fjrst Semester 16V2 Hr *- 

Sem. Hrs. Courses Sem. Hrs, 
3 Prin. of Accounting 31 3 

3 Freshman Composition 1 3 

3 Instrumental Drawing 1 3 

2 Religion 1 Or 11 2 

2 ** Vocational Training 2 * 

2 * General Woodworking 11 2 

Vi Physical Education 7 Vz 



Second Semester 

Course* 

Business Mathematics 42 
Freshman Composition 2 
Mechanical Drawing 2 
Religion 2 or 12 
* Vocational Training 
^General Woodworking 12 
Physical Education 8 



SECOND YEAR 

16 Hrs. First Semester 
Sem, Hrs. Courses 

3 Pri nc i pi es of Eco no m its 7 1 

2 General Psychology 51 

3 Prin, of Chr. Living 51 

2 **Vocational Training 

3 Science or Mathematics 
3 Industrial Arts Elective 



16 Hrs. Second Semester 

Sem. Hffr Courses 

3 Principles of Economics 72 

2 Ind. Arts Problems 91 

3 Religion 

2 ** Vocational Training 

6 Electives 



PRINTING— TWO.YEAR CURRICULUM 



FIRST YE 


AS 




15J/2 Hrs. 


First Semester 


UVz Hrs. 


Sem, Hrs. 


Courses 


Sem. Hrs. 


3 


Prin. of Accounting 31 


2 


3 


Freshman Composition 1 


2 


3 


Fund, of Typography 17 


3 


2 


Proof.. Proof. Tech. 67 


3 


2 


Religion 1 or 11 


2 


2 


Electives 


2 


$ 


Physical Education 7 


2 


SECOND YEAR 




16 Hrs. 


First Semester 


15 Hrs. 


Sem. Hrs. 


Courses 


Sem. Hrs. 


3 


Principles of Economics 71 


3 


2 


Elements of Journalism 53 


3 


3 


Prin. of Chr. Living 51 


^ 


3 


Fund. Linotype Oper. Hi 


i 


2 


Adv. Typography 63 


2 


I 


Industrial Educ Electives 


5 



Second Semester 

Business Mathematics 42 
Safety, First Aid 22 
Freshman Composition 2 
Fund, of Typography 18 
History of Printing 68 
Religion 2 or 12 
Electives 
Physical Education 8 



Second Semester 

Courses 

Principles of Economics 72 

Industrial Educ. Electives 

Religion 

Advanced Linotype 112 

Adv, Typography £4 

Electives 



*Those working in the Maintenance Department could substitute Industrial 
Education 15-16 (General Metals). 

** Vocational training credit is given in connection with the vocational training 
program described on pages 6L, 62. 



64 



BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 



L. N. Holm, Chairman, Ralph Davidson 

Wayne VandeVere, Irma Jean Kopitzke, Theresa Brickman 

"Not one business man now connected with the cause needs to be a 
novice. Men of promise in business lines should develop and perfect 
their talents by most thorough study and training. They should be en- 
couraged to place themselves where, as students, they can rapidly 
gain a knowledge of right business principles and methods." Testi- 
monies to the Church, Vol. 7, page 248. 

Bachelor of Arts with a Major in Business Administration 
and Economics 

Course Requirements 

Major (Business and Economics) 30 hours 

Including: 31, 32; 71, 72; and 61, 102, 
112, 129> 130; 175; or 55,56; 129, 130; 141, 175 

Minor 18 hours 

English 1-2 - 6 hours 

Literature 31-32 or 41-42 4 hours 

Fine Arts 61 or 62 4 hours 

Foreign Language 6-14 hours 

Health 7, 8 1 hour 

Natural Sciences — Mathematics 12 hours 

Religion 51 12-16 hours 

Social Science 8 hours 

Vocational Typewriting 13 or 14 4 hours 

Electives — sufficient to make a four-year total 
of 128 semester hours. 

Bachelor of Science with a Major in Business Administration for 
Publishing Leaders 

Young men who wish to prepare themselves for the publishing 
ministry, either as colporteurs, Publishing Department Secretaries, or 
Book and Bible House Secretaries in the Seventh-day Adventist denom- 
ination should plan their courses in such a way as to earn a Bachelor of 
Science Degree with a major in Business and Economics and a minor in 
Religion. 

Course Requirements 

Major (Accounting and Business) 30 hours 

Including 31, 32; 61; 71, 72; 129, 130; 
137, 138, 141. 

65 



Accounting Courses 

Minor in Religion (Applied Theo. 173 Req.) 18 hours 
English 1-2; Literature 31-32 or 41-42; Speech 

5-6, 119, 120 18 hours 

Fine Arts 61 or 62 4 hours 

Health 7, 8 1 hour 

Natural Sciences — Mathematics 12 hours 

Psychology 51 > 2 hours 

Social Science 8 hours 

Vocational Typewriting 13 or 14 4 hours 

Electives — sufficient to make a four-year total 
of 128 semester hours. 

Bachelor of Science with a Major In Business Administration 
Course Requirements 

Major (Accounting and Business) 30 hours 

Including: 31, 32. If emphasis is on Ac- 
counting add 61, 71, 72, 102, 112, 
175. If emphasis is on Business add 55, 
56; 71, 72; 129, 130; 175. 

Minor 18 hours 

English 1-2 6 hours 

Literature 31-32, or 41-42 4 hours 

Fine Arts 61 or 62 4 hours 

Health 7, 8 1 hour 

Natural Sciences — Mathematics 12 hours 

Religion 51 - 12-16 hours 

Secretarial Science 13, 14; 74, 75; 141 12 hours 

Social Science 8 hours 

Vocational Typewriting 13 or 14 4 hours 

Electives — sufficient to make a four-year total 
of 128 semester hours. 
Students who wish to teach and be endorsed in General Business 
should follow the teacher-training program as noted on page 82. 

Minor: A minor in Business and Economics requires eighteen 
hours, including Accounting 31, 32 and Economics 71, 72. 

ACCOUNTING 

11. Secretarial Accounting First semester, 3 hours 

A study of the fundamental principles of accounting as applied to 
mercantile and personal service enterprises. Two types of personal 
service enterprises are taken up, namely, professional and business. 
This course is specifically designed to meet the needs of the secretarial 
and clerical students. Two hours lecture, three hours laboratory, each 
week. 

66 



Accounting Courses 

31, 32. Principles of Accounting Both semesters, 6 hours 

A course in the fundamentals of accounting applied. ; 

61. Intermediate Accounting First semester, 4 hours 

A course in accounting principles applied to merchandising and in- 
dustrial enterprises in the partnership and corporate forms. Three hours 
lecture, three hours laboratory, each week. 

*102. Cost Accounting Second semester, 3 hours 

The general principles of job order and process cost accounting, 
including the control of burden. Standard costs and budgets are given 
attention. Offered even years. 

112. Advanced Accounting Second semester, 3 hours 

Consideration of problems concerned with consolidated financial 
statements, partnerships, businesses in financial difficulty, estates and 
trusts, insurance and governmental accounts. Offered odd years. 

160. Auditing Second semester, 3 hours 

Accepted standards and procedures applicable to auditing and 
related types of public accounting work. Offered odd years. 

* 1 31, 132. Governmental Accounting Both semesters, 4 hours 

A course designed to show and explain the accounting principles 
and procedures and applicable to both state and local governments, in- 
cluding counties, townships, cities and villages, school districts, and 
certain institutions such as hospitals, colleges and universities. Offered 
even years. ^ ^ 

171. Federal Income Tax First semester, 4 hours 

This course of study is designed to provide a comprehensive ex- 
planation of the Federal and State Tax structure, and to provide train- 
ing in the application of the tax principles to specific problems. 

The attention of the student is directed mainly to those taxes 
applicable to the Federal Government, which includes the Income Tax, 
Social Security, Estate and Gift Tax. State and Local taxes include 
pertain of those applicable to the State of Tennessee. Offered odd years. 

*182. Accounting Systems Second semester, 2 hours 

A study of the problems involved in the design and installation of 
accounting systems, including the systemizing and detailing of clerical 
departments of a business. Accounts, forms, reports, charts, and other 
materials needed will be prepared. Prerequisite: Accounting 61 and 
102. Offered even years. 



Not offered l957-'58. 

67 



Economics and General Business Courses 

191, 192. Senior C.P.A. Seminar Both semesters, 6 hours 

ECONOMICS AND GENERAL BUSINESS COURSES 

A major requirement is made up of suitable courses in economics, 
accounting, and business, tor a detailed statement of the major and the 
minor requirements in this field see pages 65, 66. 

55, 56. Business Law Both semesters, 4 hours 

The nature and social functions of law; social control through law; 
the law of commercial transactions and business organization. Offered 
odd years. 

71, 72. Principles of Economics Both semesters, 6 hours 

A survey course in the fundamentals of economics: the institutions, 
forces, and factors affecting production, evaluation, exchange, and 
distribution of wealth in modern society. 

*82. Statistics Second semester, 3 hours 

A general survey of the field of statistical procedures and tech- 
niques, with major emphasis upon the use and interpretation of sta- 
tistical data rather than upon the mechanics of computation. Offered 
even years. 

129, 130. Marketing Both semesters, 4 hours 

Prerequisite: Economics 71 and 72 recommended; or junior stand- 
ing. 

The first semester includes fundamentals, and emphasis is on the 
retailing area of marketing. The second semester is largely concerned 
with personal selling in the marketing area. Offered odd years. 

*137. Salesmanship First semester, 2 hours 

Prerequisites: Marketing and Principles of Economics. 
A study of the principles underlying the personal selling process 

in relation to modern sales practices. Offered even years. 

*138. Advertising Second seinester, 2 hours 

Salesmanship principles as applied to advertising. Analysis and 
preparation of various types of advertising. Study of advertising me- 
dia. Principles of advertising campaign organization. Offered even years. 

*139- Money and Banking First semester, 3 hours 

Mediums of exchange, money and credit, banks and their services, 
the Federal Reserve System, and other financial institutions are con- 
sidered. Offered even years. 



+ Not offered 1957-'58. 
68 



Economics and General Business Courses 

*140. Business Economics Second semester, 3 hours 

Application of economic analysis to the solution of business prob- 
lems. Consideration of the nature and functions of business profits, 
the analysis of demand and of costs, the determination of prices, price 
policies, etc. Offered even years. 

*104. Advanced Business Law Second semester, 2 hours 

Prerequisite: Courses 55, 56. 

This course by directed study is designed to complete the require- 
ment for endorsement in Business Law for the State of Tennessee cer- 
tification. 

*141. Business and Office Management First semester ; 3 hours 

Major emphasis is placed on application of business management 
principles to the problems of the small business man and on the organ- 
izing of business and secretarial offices. Attention is given to the training 
of office employees, selection of equipment, and flow of work through 
the office. Offered even years. 

142. Business Policy and Management Second semester, 3 hours 

An analysis of business policies viewed from the standpoint of the 
functional characteristics of management processes and current ethics. 
Offered odd years. 

152. Business Finance Second semester, 3 hours 

A study of the fundamental principles of financial organization. 
Emphasis on instruments of finance, policies of capitalization, problems 
pertaining to working capital, and corporate expansion and reorganiza- 
tion. Offered odd years. 

175. Business Administration Problems First semester, 2 hours 

A seminar course in management problems including budgets and 
financial reports. Offered odd years. 



* Not offered in 1957-'58 

69 



Bachelor of Arts in Business Administration 

BACHELOR OF ARTS WITH A MAJOR IN BUSINESS 
ADMINISTRATION AND ECONOMICS 

Recommended Sequence for a Major In Business and Economics 

FIRST YEAR 



151/2 Hrs. 


First Semester 


15V 2 Hrs. 


Sem. Hrs. 


Courses 


Sem. Hrs. 


3 


Freshman Comp, 1 


3 


3 


Prin. of Accounting 31 


3 


2 


Genera] Psychology 51 


2 


2 


Bible 1 or 11 


2 


2 


Typewriting 13 


2 


3 


Anc. & Med. CiviJ. l 


5 


Vi 


Physical Education 7 


y 2 



Second Semester 
Courses 

Freshman Comp. 1 
Prin. of Accounting ■ 
Functional Math. 2 
Bible 2 or 12 
Typewriting 14 
Modern Civil. 2 
Physical Education 8 



SECOND YEAR 



16 His. 


First Semester 


16 Hrs. 


Second Semester 


Sem. Hrs. 


C^;/rj"fj" 


Sew. Hrs. 


Courses 


4 
2 
3 
3 
4 


Foreign Language 
Literature 31 or 4 1 
Prin. of Econ. 71 
Prin. of Chr. Living 51 
*Inter. Account. 61 


4 

2 
3 
2 
2 
3 


Foreign Language 
Literature 32 or 4l 
Prin. of Econ. 72 
Social Science- 
Fine Arts 
Business Commun. 74 


THIRD 


YEAR 






17 Hrs. 


First Semester 


16 Hrs. 


Second Semester 


Sem. Hrs. 


Courses 


Sem. Hrs. 


Courses 


2 
3 
2 
3 
2 
2 
3 


Business Law 55 
Foreign Language- 
Fund. Chr. Faith 59 
Natural Science 
Fine Arts 

Marriage and Fam. 82 
Electives 


2 
3 
2 
3 
3 
3 


Business Law 56 
Foreign Language 
Fund. Chr. Faith 60 
Natural Science 
-Adv. Accounting 112 
Electives 



FOURTH YEAR 



16 Hrs. 


First Semester 




16 His. 


Second Semester 


Sem. Hrs. 


Courses 




Sem. Hrs. 


Courses 


3 


Religion 




3 


*Cost Accounting 102 


3 


Money and Bank. 


139 


3 


Natural Science 


3 


Natural Science 




2 


Secretarial 


3 


Bus. & Off. Man. 


141 


2 


Bus. Admin. Prob. 175 


2 


Marketing 129 




2 


Marketing 130 


2 


Electives 




4 


Electives 



♦Students desiring to place their emphasis on Economics instead of Accounting 
may substitute upper division courses in Economics. 



70 



Bachelor of Science in Business Administration 



Recommended Sequence for Bac 
Administration for Publishing 
FIRST YEAR 

n l /2 Hrs. First Semester 

Stnt. Hrs. Courses 

3 Freshman Corn p. 1 

3 Prin. of Account. 31 

2 General Psychology 51 

2 Religion 1 or 11 

2 Typewriting 13 

3 Anc. Med. Civil. 1 
Vl Physical Education 7 

SECOND YEAR 

16 Hrs. First Semester 

$tm. Hrr. Courses 

2 Literature 31 or 41 

3 Prin. of Economics 71 

3 Prin. of Chr. Living 51 
2 Fine Arts 

4 )nter. Account. 61 
2 Business Law 55 

THIRD YEAR 

\6 Hrs. First ScMESTiR 

$em. Hrs. Courses 

2 Fund, of Chr. Faith 59 

3 Bus. & Off. Man. 141 
3 Natural Science 
2 Fund, of Speech 5 
2 Secretarial 
2 Marketing 129 

2 Electives 

FOURTH YEAR 

16 Hrs. First Semester 

Sem. Hrs. Courses 

3 Religion 131 or 151 
2 Salesmanship 137 
2 Theory Pub. Add. 119 

2 Prin. Pers. Evang. 173 

3 Natural Science 

4 Electives 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE WITH 

AND ECONOMICS 
Recommended Sequence for a Ma 
FIRST YEAR 

15 l /2 Hrs. FrRST Semester 

Sem. Hrs. Courses 

3 Freshman Comp. 1 

3 Prin. of Account. 31 

2 Religion 1 or 1 1 

2 Typewriting ;3 

3 Anc. Med. Civil. 1 

2 General Psychology 51 

Vl Physical Education 7 



heJor of Science in Business 
Leaders 

15V2 Hrs. Second Semester 

Sem. Hrs. Courses 

3 Freshman Comp. 2 

3 Prin. of Account. 3? 

2 Functional Math. 2 

2 Religion 2 or 12 

2 Typewriting 14 

3 Modern Civil. 2 
1/2 Physical Education S 

16 Hrs. Second Semester 
Sem. Hrs. Courses 

2 Literature 32 or 42 

3 Prin. of Economics 72 
2 Social Science 

2 Fine Arts 

3 Business Commun. 74 
2 Business Law 56 
2 Electives 

17 Hrs. Second Semester 
Sem. Hrs. Courses 

2 Fund, of Chr. Faith 60 

2 Marriage and Fam. 82 

3 Natural Science 

2 Fund, of Speech 6 

3 Cost Accounting 102 

2 Marketing 130 

3 Electives 



16 Hrs. Second Semester 

Sem. Hrs. Courses 

3 Religion 132 or 152 

2 Advertising 138 

2 Theory Pub. Add. 120 

3 Adv. Accounting 112 
3 Natural Science 

3 Electives 

A MAJOR IN BUSINESS 



jor in Business Administration 

151/2 Hrs. Second Semester 

Sem. Hrs. Courses 

3 Freshman Comp. 2 

3 Prin. of Account. 32 

2 Religion 2 or 12 

2 Typewriting 14 

3 Mod. Civil. 2 

2 Functional Math. 2 

1/2 Physical Education 8 



71 



Bachelor of Science m Business Administration 



SECOND YEAR 






16 Hrs. 


First Sbmestbr 


16 Hrs. 


Second Semester 


Sem. Hrs. 


Courses 


Sem. Hrs. 


Courses 


2 


Literature 31 or 4l 


2 


Literature 32 or 42 


3 


Prin. of Economics 71 


3 


Prin. of Economics 72 


3 


Prin. of Chr. Living 51 


2 


Social Science 


2 


Fine Arts 


2 


Fine Arts 


4 


Inter. Accounting 61 


3 


Business Commun. 74 




Filing 40 


2 


Marriage and Family 82 






2 


Electives 


THIRD YEAR 






16 Hrs. 


First Semester 


17 Hrs. 


Second Semestbr 


Sem. Hrs. 


Courses 


Sem. Hrs. 


Courses 


2 


Business Law 55 


2 


Business Law 56 


3 


Amer. Hist. & Inst. 53 


3 


Amer. Hist. & Inst. 54 


2 


Fund. Chr. Faith 59 


2 


Fund. Chr. Faith 60 


3 


Natural Science 


3 


Natural Science 


4 


Electives 


3 


♦Adv. Account. 112 


2 


Marketing 129 


2 


Marketing 130 






2 


Electives 


FOURTH ^ 






16 Hrs. 


First Semester 


16 Hrs. 


Second Semester 


Sem. Hrs. 


Courses 


Sem. Hrs. 


Courses 


3 


Religion 


3 


*Cost Accounting 102 


3 


Money & Bank. 139 


3 


Business Econ. 140 


3 


Natural Science 


2 


Business Machines 75 


2 


Bus. Admin. Prob. 175 


8 


Electives 


5 


Electives 







Recommended Sequence for Bachelor of Science in Business 
Administration (Leading to Certified Public Accountant 
Examinations) 

FIRST YEAR 



151/2 Hrs. 


First Semester 


15 l / 2 Hrs. 


Second Semester 


Sem. Hrs. 


Courses 


Sem. Hrs. 


COiDSt) 


3 


Prin. of Account. 31 


3 


Pan. of Account. 32 


3 


Freshman Comp. 1 


3 


Freshman Comp. 2 


2 


Religion 1 or 11 


2 


Religion 2 or 12 


2 


Typewriting 13 


2 


Typewriting 14 


3 


Prin. of Economics 71 


3 


Prin. of Economics 72 


2 


Gen. Psychology 51 


2 


Functional Math. 2 


Vl 


Physical Education 7 


Vl 


Physical Education 8 


SECOND 


YEAR 






16 Hrs. 


Fjrst Semester 


16 Hrs. 


Second Sbmester 


Sem. Hrs. 


Courses 


Sem. Hrs. 


Courses 


4 


Inter. Accounting 6l 


2 


Filing 40 


2 


Business Law 55 


2 


Business Law 56 


3 


Prin. of Chr. Living 51 


3 


Statistics 82 


3 


Amer. Hist. & Inst. 53 


3 


Amer. Hist. & Inst. 5- 


2 


Fine Arts 


2 


Fine Arts 


2 


Literature 31 or 41 




Literature 32 or 42 






2 


EJectives 



♦Students desiring to place their emphasis on Economics instead of Accounting 
may substitute upper division courses in Economics. 



72 



Bachelor of Science in Business Administration 



THIRD YEAR 






17 Hrs. 
Sem. Hrs. 


FiasT Semester 


16 Hrs. 
Sem. Hrs. 


Second Semester 
Courses 


2 
2 
2 
3 
2 
3 
3 


Marketing 129 
Salesmanship 137 
Govern. Account. 131 
Money and Bank. 139 
Fund. Chr. Faith 59 
Bus. and Off. Man. 141 
EJectives 


3 

2 
2 
2 
2 
3 
2 


Cost Accounting 102 
Marketing 130 
Advertising 138 
Govern. Account. 132 
Fund. Chr. Faith 60 
Auditing 160 
Business Machines 75 


FOURTH YEAR 






16 Hrs. 
Sem. Hrs. 


First Semester 
Courses 


16 Hrs. 
Sem. Hrs. 


Second Semester 
Courses 


A 
3 
2 

3 
2 
2 


Fed. Income Tax 171 
C.P.A. Seminar 191 
Daniel 165 
Natural Science 
Electfves 
Speech 5 


3 
2 

3 
2 
3 
3 
2 


Adv. Accounting 112 
Account. Systems 182 
C.P.A. Seminar 192 
Revelation 166 
Natural Science 
Electives 
Speech 6 



Note — In order for a student desiring to get a C.P.A. to keep his curricu- 
lum within the 128 semester hour requirement it will be necessary for him to 
have a major in Business and a minor in Religion, and his program will not 
permit much election. 



73 



Secretarial Science . .... 

SECRETARIAL SCIENCE 

This department is designed to prepare young men and young 
women for work as office secretaries primarily in denominational insti- 
tutions and for office work in general. The entrance requirements are 
the same as for college students in all departments. 

Bachelor of Science with a Major in Secretarial Science 

Course Requirements 
Major (Secretarial Science) 30 hours 

Including: 31, 40, 55, 56; 63, 64; 72, 74, 75, 109, 
127 

Courses 9, 10, 13, 14 do not apply toward a major. 

Minor IS hours 

Business Administration 11 or 31, 71, 72; 141 12 hours 

Education — Psychology 51 - 2 hours 

English 1-2 6 hours 

Literature 31-32 or 41-42 4 hours 

Fine Arts 6l or 62 ...... ... ___ 4 hours 

Health 7, 8, 22 3 hours 

Natural Sciences — Mathematics 12 hours 

Religion 51 12-16 hours 

SociaJ Science 53, 54 and elective 8 hours 

Electives — sufficient to make a four-year total 

of 128 semester hours 

Bachelor of Science with a Major in Medical Secretarial Science 
Course Requirements 

Major (Secretarial Science) 30 hours 

Including: 31, 40, 55, 58; 63, 64; 73, 74, 

75, 77, 78, 128, 136, 177, 178. Courses 9, 

10, 13, 14 do not apply toward this major. 

Minor 18 hours 

Business Administration 11 or 31, 71, 72; l4l 12 hours 

Education — Psychology 51 2 hours 

English 1-2 6 hours 

Literature 31-32 or 41-42 4 hours 

Fine Arts 61 or 62 4 hours 

Health 7, 8, 22 3 hours 

Natural Sciences 11, 12; 22 12 hours 

Religion 51 12-16 hours 

Social Science 53, 54 and elective 8 hours 

Electives — sufficient to make a four-year total 

of 128 semester hours 

74 



Secretarial Science Courses 

The two-year curriculums in General Office Secretarial work and in 
Medical Secretarial work consist of the first two years of the respective 
four-year Secretarial Curriculums. 

Minor: Eighteen hours. Required courses: Secretarial Science 
55, 56, or equivalent, 63, 64, and 72. Secretarial Science 9, 10, 13, 14, 
do not apply on Secretarial Science minor. 

Minor: Eighteen hours. Required courses: Secretarial Science 5 5, 
58, or equivalent, 63, 64, and 73. Secretarial Science 9, 10, 13, 14 do 
not apply on Medical Secretarial Science Minor. 

0. Shorthand First semester , 4 hours 

Prerequisite: Secretarial Science 13 must be taken concurrently with 

this course unless the student has had the equivalent. 

Fundamental principles of Gregg Shorthand simplified. Five class 

periods each week. 

10. Shorthand Second Semester, 4 hours 

Prerequisite: Secretarial Science 9, or equivalent to one unit of 
high school shorthand. Secretarial Science 14 must be taken concurrent- 
ly with this course unless the student has had the equivalent. 

Development of rapid writing and reading habits. Five class periods 
each week. 

13- Typewriting First semester, 2 hours 

Five class periods each week. One practice period a week is required. 

14. Typewriting Second semester, 2 hours 

Prerequisite: Secretarial Science 13, or equivalent of one unit of 
high school typing. Five class periods each week. One practice period 
a week is required. 

31. Voice Transcription Either semester, 1 hour 

Prerequisite: Secretarial Science 14 or equivalent, permission. 
A course in the operating of voice-writing equipment with emphasis 

on mailable transcriptions. Three laboratory hours each week. 

40. Filing Either semester, 2 hours 

A course in the theory and practice of modern systems of filing. 

5 5. Intermediate Shorthand {Advanced) First semester, 3 hours 

Prerequisite: "C" standing in Secretarial Science 10; simultaneous 
registration, Secretarial Science 63. Four class periods each week. 

56. Intermediate Shorthand (Advanced) Second semester, 3 hours 
Prerequisite: Secretarial Science 55 or equivalent; simultaneous 
registration, Secretarial Science 64. Four class periods each week. 

75 



Secretarial Science Courses 

58. Medical Shorthand Second semester, 3 hours 

Prerequisite: Secretarial Science 55 or equivalent, simultaneous 
registration, Secretarial Science 64. 

A study of shorthand outlines for medical terms — their pronun- 
ciation, their spelling, and their meaning. Three class periods each week. 

63. Secretarial Typewriting and Transcription 

First semester, 2 hours 
Prerequisite: Secretarial Science 14 or two units of high school 

typewriting. Simultaneous registration, Secretarial Science 55. 

A course in rapid transcription from shorthand notes. Emphasis 

is also placed on special letter-writing problems, tabulation, manuscripts. 

Five class periods each week. One practice period is required. 

64. Secretarial Typewriting and Transcription 

Second semester, 2 hours 

Prerequisite: Secretarial Science 63. 

Mailable transcripts. Special attention given to practice in preparing 
typewritten outlines, reports, theses, and bibliographies in accordance 
with acceptable standards of form and appearance. Five class periods 
each week. One practice period is required. 

70. Clerical Practice Second semester, 3 hours 

A laboratory course designed to develop office initiative and efficient 
service. The student will learn how to perform work related to office 
machines, filing, mailing, telephoning, and meeting callers. Experience 
will be given in the handling of common business forms. The course 
further emphasizes personality development, good grooming, and 
business etiquette. 

72. Secretarial Practice Second semester, 2 hours 
Prerequisite: Ten hours of Secretarial Science. 

A study of business ethics, procedures and techniques used by the 
secretary. 

73. Medical Secretarial Practice First semester, 2 hours 
Prerequisite: Ten hours of Secretarial Science, or the consent of the 

instructor. 

A course to prepare students for the specialized duties of the 
physician's office. The students are trained in receiving patients, 
in handling correspondence, in keeping accounts for physicians, in 
keeping the doctor's schedule, in professional behavior, in typing 
patient's histories, in making collections, in office maaagement, in 
medical ethics, and jurisprudence. Two cI^lss periods a week. 

76 



Secretarial Science Courses 

74. Business Communication Second semester, 3 hours 
Prerequisite: English 1-2. 

A study and application of the modern practices in oral and written 
business communication. Accuracy in grammar, spelling, and punctua- 
tion, and the writing of well-knit sentences and clear paragraphs are 
taught as a means of effective expression in business-letter writing. 
Business letters, report writing, and dictation to stenographers are 
emphasized. 

74a, 74b. Business English Both semesters, 6 hours 

A course designed to increase the student's vocabulary. It includes 
drills in spelling, pronunciation syllabication, definitions, grammar, 
punctuation. Attention is also given to the value of expressing ideas, 
either in writing or speaking, in simple, clear, understandable lan- 
guage — an important asset to the prospective office worker. 

75. Business Machines Either semester, 2 hours 
Prerequisite: Secretarial Science 13, or equivalent. 

The theory of and practice in the use of the following office 
machines: key-driven and rotary calculators, full keyboard and ten-key 
adding listing machines; stencil, gelatin, and direct-process duplicators. 
One class period and three hours laboratory each week. 

77. Laboratory Service and Office Nursing First semester, 2 hours 
Prerequisite: Ten hours of Secretarial Science or the consent of the 

instructor. 

This course is adapted especially for those following the medical 
secretarial curriculum, and is designed to give instruction in office 
nursing techniques; such as sterilization, hypodermics, medicines, con- 
tagious diseases, preparing patients for examination, and doing simple 
laboratory tests. One class period and two hours laboratory each week. 

78. Clinical Office Practice Second semester, 1 hour 
Prerequisite: Secretarial Science 73 and 77. 

This course is based on supervised practice in handling actual medi- 
cal office routine. Three hours of laboratory work per week. 

*109. Shorthand Reporting First semester, 3 hours 

Prerequisite: Twelve hours of Secretarial Science (including 
courses 55, 56, 63, and 64 or equivalent). Must be enrolled con- 
currently in Secretarial Science 127. 

Rapid dictation of congressional and other technical materials. 
Three class periods each week. Offered even years. 



♦Not offered in 1957-'58. 

77 



Secretarial Science Courses 

112. Denominational Reporting Second semester. 3 hours 

Prerequisite: Twelve hours of Secretarial Science (including courses 

5 5, 56, 63, and 64, or equivalent). Must be enrolled concurrently in 

Secretarial Science 128. Three class periods a week. Offered odd years. 

127, 128. Advanced Transcription Both semesters, 2 hours 

Prerequisite: Twelve hours of Secretarial Science (including 
courses 55, 56, 63, and 64, or equivalent). Must be enrolled concurrent- 
ly in Secretarial Science 109, 112, or 135. Two class periods a week. 
Offered odd years. 

* 136. Advanced Medical Dictation Second semester, 3 hours 

Prerequisite: Twelve hours of Secretarial Science (including 
course 55, 58, 63, and 64, or equivalent). Must be enrolled concur- 
rently in Secretarial Science 127. Offered even years. 

A course emphasizing medical terminology and a continuation of 
special medical dictation of technical case histories, medical news arti- 
cles, and lectures until facility is acquired in writing medical dictation 
at a high speed. Three class periods a week. 

* 1 50. Advanced Office Machines Second semester, 1 to 3 hours 

This course is for students who wish to specialize on particular 
offices machines. Three hours laboratory a week for each semester hour 
of credit. Offered even years. 

174. Applied- Secretarial Practice Second semester, l to 3 hours 

Prerequisite: For secretarial science majors and prospective teachers 
of business. 

This course is based on an activity program which provides practi- 
cal experience in representative types of office situations. Offered odd 
years. 

* 1 77. Medical Secretarial Procedures First semester, 2 hours 

Prerequisite: Secretarial Science 73, 77, and 78, or equivalent. 

The aim of this course is to prepare students for the specialized 
duties in a clinical office. Two class periods each week. Offered even 
years. 

* 1 78. Applied Medical Secretarial Procedures 

Second semester, 2 hours 

Prerequisite: Secretarial Science 177. 

This course is designed to give practical experience in a medical 
office either on or off the campus. Six hours of supervised laboratory 
work per week. Offered even years. 



* Not offered in 1957-58. 
78 



Sequence in Secretarial Science 

181. Secretarial Problems First semester 1 or 2 hours 

Prerequisite: Open only to seniors majoring in Secretarial Science. 
Offered odd years. 

Recommended Sequence for a Major in Secretarial Science 
FIRST YEAR 



\^y 2 Hrs. First Semester 

Stw. Hrs. Courses 

3 Freshman Comp. 1 
2 Social Science 

2 Religion 1 or 1 1 

4 Shorthand 9 

2 Typewriting 13 

Vl Physical Education 

2 Electives 



151/2 Hrs. 


Second Semester 


Sem. Hrs. 


Courses 


3 


Freshman Comp. 2 


2 


Filing 40 


2 


Religion 2 or 12 


4 


Shorthand 10 


2 


Typing 14 


2 


Safety and First Aid 22 


! /2 


Physical Education 8 



SECOND YEAR 



17 Hrs. First Semester 

SiW. Hrs. Courses 

3 Accounting 11 or 31 

2 General Psychology 51 

3 Prin. of Chr. Living 51 
3 Inter. Shorthand 55 

2 Typing Trans. 63 

2 Business Machines 75 

2 Fine Arts 



16 Hrs. 


Second Semester 


Sem. Hrs. 


Courses 


3 . 


Business Commun. 74 


2 


Fine Arts 


1 


Voice Transcription 31 


3 


Inter. Shorthand 56 


2 


Typewriting Trans. 64 


2 


Secretarial Practice 72 


3 


EJectives 



THIRD YEAR 



StrU/. 



Hrs. 


First Semester 


16 Hrs. 


Second Semester 


Hrs. 


Courses 


Sem. Hrs. 


Courses 


2 


Fund. Chr. Faith 59 


2 


Fund. Chr. Faith 60 


3 


Shorthand Report. 109 


3 


Amer. Hist. & Jnst. 


1 


Advanced Transcr. 127 


2 


Literature 32 or 42 


3 


Amer. Hist. & Inst. 53 


3 


Prin. of Economics 


2 


Literature 31 or 4\ 


3 


Natural Science 


3 


Prin. of Economics 71 


3 


Electives 


3 


Natural Science 







54 



72 



FOURTH YEAR 



16 Hrs. First Semester 

Sem. Hrs. Courses 

3 Natural Science 

3 Bus. & Off. Man. 141 

2 Secretarial Prob. 181 

8 Electives 



15 Hrs. Second Semester 

Sem. Hrs. Courses 

3 Natural Science 

1-3 Adv. Office Mach. 150 

1-3 Applied Sec. Pract. 174 

6-10 Electives 



79 



Sequence in Medical Secretarial Science 

Recommended Sequence for Major in Medical Secretarial Science 



FIRST YEAR 






151/2 Hrs. 
Sem. Hrs. 


First Semester 
Courses 


I5V2 Hrs. 
Sem. Hrs. 


Second Semester 
Courses 


3 
2 
2 
4 
2 
2 

Vi 


Freshman Comp. 1 
Health and Hygiene 5 
Religion 1 or 11 
Shorthand 9 
Typewriting 13 
Social Science 
Physical Education 7 


3 
2 
2 
4 
2 
2 
l /2 


Freshman Comp. ; 
First Aid 22 
Religion 2 or 12 
Shorthand 10 
Typewriting 14 
Filing 40 
Physical Education 



SECOND YEAR 

17 Hrs. First Semester 

Sem. Hrs. Courses 

3 Anatomy 1 1 

3 Accounting 11 or 31 

3 Shorthand 55 

2 Typewriting-Trans. 63 

2 Med. Sec. Practice 73 

2 Business Machines 75 

2 Lab. Serv. and Office 
Nursing 77 



16 Hrs. Second Semester 

Sem. Hrs. Courses 

3 Physiology 12 

1 Voice Trans. 31 

3 Med. Shorthand 58 

2 Typewriting-Trans. 64 

3 Business Commun. 74 
1 Clinical Off. Pract. 78 
3 Prin. of Chr. Living 51 



THIRD YEAR 



16 Hrs. 


First Semester 


16 Hrs. 


Second Semester 




Sem. Hrs. 


Courses 


Sem. Hrs. 


Courses 




2 


Fine Arts 


2 


Fine Arts 




3 


Prin. of Economics 71 


3 


Prin. of Economics 


72 


2 


Literature 31 or 41 


2 


Literature 32 or 42 




3 


Amer. Hist. & Inst. 53 


3 


Amer. Hist. & Inst. 


54 


2 


Gen. Psychology 51 


4 


Microbiology 22 




3 


Shorthand Report. 109 


2 


Electives 




1 


Adv. Transcription 127 









FOURTH YEAR 

16 Hrs. First Semester 
Sem. Hrs. Courses 

2 Med. Sec. Proced. 177 

3 Bus. & OS. Man. l4l 
3 Old Test. Proph. 131 

or Pauline Epistles 151 
2 Nat. Science or Math. 

6 Electives 



16 Hrs. Second Semester 

Sem. Hrs. Courses 

2 Med. Sec. Proced. 178 

3 Old Test. Prophets 132 
or Pauline Epist. 152 

2 Doctrine of Atone. 160 

3 Adv. Med. Diet. 136 
1 Adv. Transcription 128 
5 Electives 



80 



Sequence in Clerical Training 



One-Year Course in Clerical Training 



I6I/2 Hrs. 


First Semester 


I6V2 Hrs. 


Second Semester 


Sem. Hrs. 


Courses 


Sem. Hrs. 


Courses 


2 


Bible 1 or 11 


2 


Bible 2 or 12 


| 


Business English 74a 


3 


Business English 74b 


2 


Typewriting 13 


2 


Typewriting 14 


2 


Filing 40 


3 


Clerical Practice 70 


> 


Sect. Accounting 11 


2 


Business Machines 75 


9 


Gen. Psychology 51 


1 


Voice Transcription 1 


M 


Physical Education 7 


V? 


Physical Education 8 


2 


Electives 


3 


Electives 



This one-year course in Clerical Training is designed to equip gradu- 
ates from the secondary school for work in business offices. It does not 
give shorthand, but prepares the student for the use of dictaphone and 
typewriter to meet the needs in many modern offices. 



81 



EDUCATION - PSYCHOLOGY -HEALTH 



K. M. Kennedy, Chairman; J. M. Ackerman, Olivia B. Dean, 
E. T. Watrous, Joseph B. Cooper 

The courses offered in this division are both "content" courses, of 
interest to all, and specialized courses of greatest value to teachers and 
other professional workers. 

The offerings in Psychology are all content courses. 

Minor: A minor in education requires eighteen semester hours 
(twenty-four semester hours are needed for State of Tennessee certifica- 
tion). It is recommended that the following professional courses be 
included: 5, 61, or l6l; 111; at least one of the following: 150, 180, 
107, and 190, 192. These courses are required: 133, 134 or 135, 136; 
171, 172 or 173, 174. 

Prospective teachers should use their electives in such a way as to 
certify in three areas of instruction as listed below. 

TEACHER CERTIFICATION 

Effective September 1, 1953 the State of Tennessee discontinued 
issuing permanent teaching certificates. From that time onward pro- 
visional, five-year certificates are being granted on the basis of an 
earned bachelor's degree that incorporates certain prescribed courses 
in general and professional preparation. The teacher education pro- 
gram described below fulfills these requirements. 

Certification for Grades 1-9 
A student completing the four-year curriculum is eligible to receive 
a five-year elementary certificate from the Southern Union Conference, 
and a five-year Tennessee Teachers Provisional Certificate. Those com- 
pleting the first two years of the curriculum will be eligible for a three- 
year elementary certificate from the Southern Union Conference, in 
harmony with the General Conference Department of Education. 

Certification for Grades 7-12 
Students who wish to qualify for teaching in grades 7-12 are advised 
to follow the Teacher Training curriculum outlined below. This cur- 
riculum leads to endorsement in the Seventh-day Adventist denomina- 
tion as well as in the State of Tennessee. Inasmuch as most states in 
the South follow a program of reciprocity in teacher endorsement, this 
curriculum is the most advantageous for all to follow. 

82 



Teacher Certification 

Those who desire to receive Denominational Certification only, may 
qualify for the five-year Secondary Certificate by completing the follow- 
ing minimum requirements in professional education along with the 
bachelor's degree. 

Education 161 . 2 hours 

Education 111 (Child and Educational Psychology) .... 3 hours 
Education 135, 136 (Principles, Materials and 

Methods of Secondary Teaching) 6 hours 

Directed Observation and Teaching 173, 174 4 hours 

Elective _ 4 hours 

Certification in Specific Subjects: Regulations of the Seventh -day 
Adventist denomination governing certification in English, History, and 
other teaching fields may be obtained from the Chairman of the Divi- 
sion or the Dean. 

Students may receive state certification to teach in grades 7-12 by 
following the Teacher Training curriculum described above plus an 
additional 6 hours of professional education courses and by taking con- 
tent courses that meet the minimum requirements for endorsement in 
three of the areas described below: 

Business: Eighteen semester hours including twelve hours in Gen- 
eral Business as follows: Accounting (3), Typewriting (2), Business 
Law (2), Economics (3), Business Mathematics (2), Business Manage- 
ment (3). 

An applicant endorsed (certified) in General Business may secure 
additional single subject endorsement for the following subjects by 
completing the hours indicated (including any subjects taken in the 
general requirements listed above). 

Bookkeeping 10 semester hours 

Typewriting _ 6 semester hours 

(including 2 hours of advanced typing) 

Shorthand 6 semester hours of Advanced Shorthand 

Business Law 6 semester hours 

Economics - 12 semester hours 

(including Principles of Economics) 
Secretarial Practice 2 semester hours of office practice 

plus certification in Shorthand and Typewriting 

English: A minimum of thirty semester hours. Of this total, six 
hours may be in Speech or Journalism. An applicant offering twenty- 
four semester hours in English and twelve semester hours in Speech may 
be certified in both. 

83 



Teacher Certification 

Foreign Language: For a single foreign language eighteen sem- 
ester hours based upon 2 or more units of high school credit (other- 
wise, twenty-four semester hours). For certification in two foreign 
languages, thirty semester hours are required, with not less than 
twelve semester hours in each if the student has two units of high 
school credit in each language. Where the student does not have two 
units of high school credit, eighteen hours in each language is required. 

Home Economics (non-vocational): A minimum of twenty-four 
semester hours distributed as follows: 

Foods and Nutrition _ 8 semester hours 

Clothing and Textiles 8 semester hours 

Home Management, Home Furnishings, 

Child Care, and Home Relations 8 semester hours 

Industrial Education: A minimum of thirty semester hours 
distributed in the areas listed below, with not more than ten semester 
hours in any one area and not less than four semester hours in Ap- 
preciation and Design: 

1. Graphic Arts (includes drawing, printing, photography) 

2. Woods and Construction (includes furniture, carpentry, finish- 
ing, upholstering, concrete, masonry) 

3. Metals (includes sheet, forging, foundry, welding, and art 
metals) 

4. General Electricity (includes communications, power, light, and 
household) 

5. Crafts (includes general, pottery, weaving, plastics, woods, and 
metals) 

6. Mechanics (includes auto, home, aircraft, and general shop) 

7. Art (includes appreciation, design, color, decoration, and paint- 
ing) 

Mathematics: A minimum of eighteen semester hours of college 
mathematics, including College Algebra, Trigonometry, and Analyti- 
cal Geometry. A course in General or Business Mathematics may be 
included in the minimum requirements. If the applicant has not taken 
Solid Geometry in high school, it is recommended that it be included 
in his college program. 

Mathematics and Physical Science: When endorsement in 
Mathematics and Physical Science is sought in combination, the appli- 
cant shall present a minimum of fourteen semester hours in Mathematics 
(including College Algebra, Trigonometry, and Analytical Geometry) 

84 



Education Courses 

and a minimum of twenty-four semester hours in the Physical Sciences 
(including at least eight semester hours in Chemistry, eight semester 
hours in Physics, and eight semester hours in Geography and Astro- 
nomy) plus twelve hours selected from related fields in Mathematics 
and/or Physical Science. 

Natural Sciences: The applicant shall offer a minimum of thirty- 
six semester hours of credit in the sciences (Biological Science, Chem- 
istry, Physics, and Mathematics) with at least three areas represented. 
The applicant will be certified to teach those sciences in which he has 
completed a minimum of eight semester hours of work. Survey courses 
in the Biological or Physical Sciences may be included in the required 
thirty-six hours. 

For endorsement in a single subject such as Biology, Chemistry, or 
Physics, sixteen semester hours are required, three of which may be in 
a survey course. 

For endorsement in General Science, sixteen semester hours are 
required which must include General Biology and Physical Science. 

History: A minimum of eighteen semester hours to be distributed 
as follows: 

1. American History 6 semester hours 

2. European or World History 6 semester hours 

3. Electives 6 semester hours ( 

Speech: A minimum of fourteen semester hours in Speech to in- 
clude such courses as Fundamentals of Public Speaking, Oral Interpre- 
tation, Debate, etc. 

Bible: A minimum of twelve semester hours in the literature of the 
Bible, such as Old Testament Prophets, Pauline Epistles, Daniel and 
Revelation, or Teachings of Jesus. 

EDUCATION 

For instruction regarding teacher education and certification, both 
state and denominational, see pages 82 to 84. 

4. The Study Laboratory Either semester, 2 hours 

External conditions favorable for study; the preparation of an as- 
signment; making an effective schedule for study; the techniques of note 
taking; the use of the library; techniques for increasing speed and com- 
prehension in reading. Each student will be carried through a com- 
plete, individual counseling program. 

85 



Education Courses 

5. Introduction to Teaching First semester, 2 hours 

An introductory course in the principles and problems of teaching; 
a discussion of the teacher's school and community relationships; pro- 
fessional ethics; a study of the teaching career with numerous opportun- 
ities for observation of classroom teaching. 

61 or 161. School Organization and Administration 

First semester, 2 hours 
A course designed to give the prospective teacher a knowledge of the 
management and organization related to classroom teaching. Oppor- 
tunity is given for observation. 

34. Practical Home Arts Second semester, 2 hours 

A course designed to prepare teachers in methods and materials used 
in teaching home mechanics, homemaking and gardening. Important 
to all elementary teachers for teaching vocational subjects. 

66. Elementary School Music Second semester, 2 hours 

A course designed to prepare teachers to direct the music activities 
in the elementary school. 

71. Teaching of Reading First semester, 2 hours 

A study of objectives, methods, and procedures in the teaching of 
reading in the elementary school. Opportunity to observe the teaching 
of reading in the laboratory school will be scheduled. 

80. Directed Observation and Teaching Second semester, 2 hours 

Prerequisite: At least one course in elementary methods. Observa- 
tion of lessons taught by the supervisors; teaching in the campus ele- 
mentary school; conferences with the supervisors and with the director 
of student teaching. One hour credit may be earned in off-campus as- 
signment. 

133. Materials and Methods of Teaching in the Elementary School 

First semester, 3 hours 
Emphasis is placed on the teaching of language arts, Bible, and 
arithmetic. One hour observation a week will be scheduled. 

134. Materials and Methods of Teaching in the Elementary School 

Second semester, 3 hours 
Emphasis is placed on the teaching of health, social studies, science, 
and the arts. One hour of observation a week will be scheduled. 

;135, 136. Principles, Materials and Methods of Secondary Teaching 

Each semester, 3 hours 
A study of learning activities with desired outcomes; methods of 

.86 



Psychology Courses 

planning, organizing, stimulating and directing classroom activities; 
organization of courses; selection of appropriate materials for classroom 
teaching. This course covers all areas of endorsement, but in the second 
semester one hour a week will be assigned to teaching in specific areas, 
such as Bookkeeping, Shorthand, Languages, Mathematics, Home Eco- 
nomics, Music, etc. 

13S. Audio-Visual Aids Second semester, 2 hours 

The survey of aims, methods and materials involved in use and 
evaluation of audio-visual instruction aids. 

140. Secondary School Music Second semester, 2 hours 

Students planning to teach in secondary schools will take this 
course instead of course 1 36. 

171, 172. Directed Observation and Teaching in Grades 1-9. 

Each semester, 2 hours 

Prerequisite: Education 6l, 111, 133, and 134 with a grade point 
of 1.00 in all professional subjects. 

Directed observation and participation in classroom activities, in- 
cluding actual teaching in the campus and off-campus laboratory schools. 

173, 174. Directed Teaching in Grades 7-12 Each semester, 2 hours 
Prerequisite: A grade point of 1.00 in professional subjects; Edu- 
cation 111, 135, 136, and Methods in the subject to be taught (the 
latter two courses may be taken concurrently with supervised teaching). 
Teaching may be done in the secondary school in one or more of 
the following fields: 

Bible, Bookkeeping, English, Home Economics, Mathematics, 
Modern Foreign Language, Music, Natural Science, Shorthand, Social 
Sciences, Typewriting. Registration should be for the supervised teach- 
ing course, by number, followed by the letter designating the particular 
field in which the supervised teaching is to be done. 

190. Philosophies of Education Either semester, 2 hours 

Historical and philosophical survey of trends in education with 
emphasis as to their influence on modern educational practices. 

192. Foundations of American Education Second semester, 2 hours 
A study of the historical, philosophical, and sociological foundations 
of American education. 

PSYCHOLOGY 

51, 52. General Psychology Both semesters, 2 or 4 hours 

An introduction to the study of the problems of human behavior, 

87 



Sequence for Teacher Education 

and of the mental processes and their development. This is a found- 
ation course designed to help the student understand and explain the 
behavior of others and thereby be better able to predict and control his 
own life and influence the lives of others. 

*107. Tests and Measurements First semester, 2 hours 

A study of the various types of educational tests and examinations, 
and modern methods in their construction and use; also mastery of the 
most useful statistical techniques, with practice in working and inter- 
preting problems involving educational and psychological data. The 
course includes some time given to the administration and interpre- 
tation of tests of intelligence, aptitudes, vocational interests, and 
personality. 

111. Child and Educational Psychology First semester, 3 hours 

This course deals with the physical, social, emotional and intellec- 
tual growth and development of children and adolescents in the home 
and community. Special emphasis will be given to the psychological 
factors which underlie and influence the learning process. 
150. Personality and Mental Hygiene Second semester, 2 hours 

Prerequisite: Psychology 51 or 52. 

A study of the incidence, causes, and methods of preventing malad- 
justments and mental illness. Consideration is given to the meaning, 
importance, and conditions that affect the growth of personality, and 
methods of its improvement. 

*180. Guidance and Counseling Second semester, 2 hours 

A survey of the current aims of counseling and guidance in school 
and community. Basic principles, procedures and policies of counsel- 
ing and guidance are emphasized. Directive and non-directive methods 
are stressed with the untrained or slightly trained teachers. 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN TEACHER EDUCATION 
(Elementary and Secondary) 

A student who wishes to follow a career of teaching in Seventh-day 
Adventist schools or in the public school system on either the elemen- 
tary or secondary level should enroll in the four-year curriculum lead- 
ing to the Bachelor of Science Degree. The curriculum has been planned 
to enable a student looking forward to teaching to obtain state, as well 
as denominational certification. The program requires a General Edu- 
cation core of studies and a Professional Education core. Students plan- 
ning to teach, whether on the elementary or on the secondary level, all 
take this core curriculum and then specialize in the respective areas. 

The Collegedale Elementary School and the Collegedale Academy 

*Not offered 1957-58. 
88 



Sequence for Teacher Education 

serve as laboratory schools for students preparing to teach, affording a 
rich opportunity for observation and student teaching. 

For admission without deficiency, entrance units as indicated on 
page 30 must be presented. General requirements for students who 
desire a degree from Southern Missionary College are listed on pages 
49 and 50. In addition, it is expected that students planning on teach- 
ing should show seriousness of purpose in order to be admitted to 
this curriculum. 
Recommended Sequence for Bachelor of Science in Teacher 

Education [Courses required of those preparing to teach in 

grades I to 9) 

FIRST YEAR 



16 Hrs. 


First Semester 


16 Hrs. 


Second Semester 


Sem. Hrs. 


Courses 


Sem. Hrs. 


Courses 


3 


Freshman Comp. 1 


3 


Freshman Comp. 2 


2 


Fund. Con. of Math 1 


2 


Functional Math. 2 


2 


Religion 1 or 1 1 


2 


Religion 2 or 12 


3 


Natural Science 


3 


Natural Science 


2 


Fine Arts 




Sociology 20 


2 


Intro, to Teaching 5 


2 


Safety and First Aid 22 


2 


Art Educ. & Crafts 15 


2 


Practical Home Arts 34 


SECOND YEAR 






I6V2 Hrs. 


First Semester 


151/2 Hrs. 


Second Semester 


Sem. Hrs. 


Courses 


Sem. Hrs. 


Courses 


3 


Amer. Hist. & Inst. 53 


3 


Amer. Hist. & Inst. 54 


2 


Gen. Psychology 51 


2 


Gen. Psychology 52 


2 


Phy. Educ. for Elem. 


2 


School Health Prob. 82 




Schools 85 


2 


School Music 66 


2 


Teach, of Reading 71 


2 


Fund, of Speech 6 


2 


Fund, of Speech 5 


2 


Student Teaching 80 


2 


School Org. Adm. 61 


? 


Marriage and Fam. 82 


3 


Prin. of Christ. Living 51 


Vi 


Physical Education 8 


Vi 


Physical Education 7 






THIRD YEAR 






16 Hrs. 


First Semester 


16 Hrs. 


Second Semester 


Sem. Hrs. 


Courses 


Sem. Hrs. 


Courses 


2 


Literature 31 or 4 2 


2 


Literature 32 or 42 


6 


Mat. Meth. Teach. 


3 


History of South 148 




Elem. School 133, 134 


2 


Audio Visual Aids 138 


3 


Child. Educ. Psych. Ill 


2 


Vocational 


2 


Fund. Chr. Faith 59 


7 


Fund. Chr. Faith 60 


3 


World Geog. l4l 


2 


Music Appreciation 62 






3 


Electives 


FOURTH YEAR 






L6 Hrs. 


First Semester 


16 Hrs. 


Second Semester 


Sem. Hrs. 


Courses 


Sem. Hrs. 


Courses 


4 


Direct. Obs. Teaching 


2 


Psychology 107, 150, or 




Grades 1-9 171, 172 




180 


3 


Field Biology 98 or 100 


2 


Found, of Am. Ed. 192 


? 


Children's Lit. 109 




or Phil, of Ed. 190 


Elective (Health & 


3 


Conservation 99 or 101 




Religion) 


9 


Electives 



89 



Sequence for Teacher Education 



Recommended Sequence for Bachelor of Science in Teacher 
Education (Courses required of those preparing to teach 
grades 7 to 12) 



16 Hrs. 


FrRST Semester 


16 Hrs. 


Second Semester 


Sem. Hrs. 


Courses 


Sem. Hrs. 


Courses 


3 


Freshman Comp. 1 


3 


Freshman Comp. 2 


3 


Natural Science 


3 


Natural Science 


2 


Intro, to Teaching 5 


2 


Health Elective 


2 


Religion 1 or 11 


2 


Religion 2 or 12 


2 


Fine Arts 


2 


Fine Arts 


2 


Vocational 


2 


Vocational 


2 

SECOND 


Concepts of Math. 1 
YEAR 


2 


Intro, to Sociology 20 


Sem. Hrs. 


Courses 


l6l/ 2 Hrs. 


Second Semester 


16V 2 Hrs. 


First Semester 


Sem. Hrs. 


Courses 


3 


Amer. Hist. & Inst. 53 


3 


Amer. Hist. & Inst. 54 


2 


Gen. Psychology 51 


2 


Gen. Psychology 52 


2 


Fund, of Speech 5 


2 


Fund, of Speech 6 


3 


Prin. of Ch. Living 51 


2 


Marriage and Fam. 82 


2 


Literature 31 or' 4 1 


2 


Literature 32 or 42 


y 2 


Physical Education 7 


y 2 


Physical Education 8 


4 


*Electives 


5 


*Electives 


THIRD YEAR 






16 Hrs. 


First Semester 


16 Hrs. 


Second Semester 


Sem. Hrs. 


Courses 


Stfftf. f/rj. 


Courses 


3 


Anc. Med. Civil. 1 


3 


Modern Civil. 2 


3 


Child and Ed. Psy. Ill 


2 


School Org., Adm. 1 6 1 


3 


Prin. Mat. & Meth. 


3 


Pnn. Mat. & Meth. 




Sec. Teach. 135 




Sec. Teach. 136 


2 


Fund, of Chr. Faith 59 


2 


Fund, of Chr. Faith 60 


2 


Health — Elective 


6 


:i: Electives 


3 


*EJectives 






FOURTH YEAR 






16 Hrs. 


FrRST Semester 


16 Hrs. 


Second Semester 


Sem. Hrs. 


Courses 


Sem. Hrs. 


Courses 


3 


Natural Science 


3 


Natural Science 


4 


Education 173, 174 


4 


Religion or Elective 


9 


*Electives 


2 


Psychology 107, 150, 
or 180 






2 


Education 190 or 192 






5 


*Electives 



A student who wishes to receive the Bachelor of Arts Degree will 
take one of the above curricula onJy; he must fulfill the entrance re- 
quirements for a B.A. as listed on page 32, and he must use his elec- 
tives in such a way as to have one of the majors listed on pages 47 and 
49 to fulfill the foreign language requirement. 



^Prospective teachers should use their electives in such a way as to certify in rwo 
areas of instruction as listed on pages 83-85. 

90 



Health Courses 

HEALTH COURSES 

4. Home Nursing Second semester, 2 hours 

Lecture and demonstrations will be based on the American Red 
Cross textbook in home hygiene and care of the sick. Red Cross Home 
Hygiene Certificates are issued to those successfully completing the 
course. In addition, hydrotherapy will be given. 

5. Health and Hygiene First semester, 2 hours 

A study of the principles governing community and personal health 
and how these principles may be successfully applied to daily living. 
Special emphasis is placed on denominational standards. 

22. Safety and First Aid Second semester, 2 hours 

The nature and causes of accidents, safety measures for the pre- 
caution of common accidents of the home, school, industry, transporta- 
tion and recreation. The standard and advanced Red Cross Certificates 
will be issued to those completing the required work in first aid. 

82. School Health Problems Second semester, 2 hours 

The function of the teacher in the school health program as an aid 
in the medical examination, screening, hygiene environment, control of 
contagion, health of teacher, and methods of correlating health instruc- 
tion with other subjects of the curriculum. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND RECREATION 

The courses in this department are designed to meet the following 
objectives: 

1. To improve human relations through cooperative group activity. 

2. To develop activity skills, resulting in more efficient physiological 
functions and more effective movement of the body. 

3. To provide physical recreation skills for more efficient use of 
leisure time. 

4. To provide release from tension. 

5. To provide opportunities for joy and satisfaction in movement. 

6. To provide opportunity for the development and improvement 
of democratic behavior. 

7. To teach the values of physical education and recreation in the 
enrichment of the Christian life. 

Students enrolled in Activity courses must wear regulation suits and 
shoes to all class appointments. No credit will be given unles this re- 
quirement is complied with. 

Physical Education Minors may receive more credit while taking an 
activity course by extra work as assigned by your minor professor. 

91 



Activity Courses 

All physically qualified students must take the Required Basic 
Course, and a minimum of one elective Activity Course, a total of one 
semester hour of physical education activities. 

Course Requirements for Minor in Physical Education 

*P. E. — Minor Activities 2 hours 

*P. E. — Major Activities 2 hours 

P. E. — 67, 68, 71, 73, 74 3 hours 

P. E. — 75 _ 2 hours 

P. E. — 85 - 2 hours 

p. e. _ 127 2 hours 

P. E. — 140-141 _ 6 hours 

P. E. — 145 - 1 hours 

P. E. — 180 3 hours 

Total Semester Hours 23 

Cognate requirements — Anatomy and Physiology 11 and 12. 

ACTIVITY COURSES 

The activities program is set up to provide variety and are elective 
in nature. 

A student may not sign up for more than one activity per semester 
unless given permission by the Dean or the Department Head. 

The "beginning" courses will deal with lowest nomenclature and 
special techniques of the activity, as well as considerable time spent in 
actual participation in the activity. Advanced courses are an extension of 
the same courses, but will be limited to those students who display 
superior ability in the beginner courses. 

7, 8. Freshman Physical Education Both semesters, 1 hour 

Required of all Freshmen. 
Body mechanics, games, skill tests, etc. 

9, 10. Adapted Physical Education Both semesters, 1 hour 

A course offered for those physically unable to take part in the basic 
required program. A "B" medical rating automatically upon registra- 
tion, classifies the student for this part of the program. 

11. Flagball First semester, J/ 2 hour 

A version of touch football. Kicking, passing, running, rules, self- 
testing activities are stressed throughout the semester. 

13- Basketball First semester, y 2 hour 

Dribbling, passing, defense, scoring plays, rules, skill drills, etc. 

*These activities must be planned with the faculty or minor advisor. 

92 



Activity Courses 

14. Baseball Second semester, i/ 2 hour 

Batting, pitching, infield play, outfield play, rules, strategy are 
thoroughly dealt with. 

16. Softball Second semester, i/ 2 hour 

Batting, pitching, infield and outfield play, tests, skill drills, inter- 
squad games. 

18, 19- Volleyball Men — First semester, l/ 2 hour 

Women — Second semester, l/ 2 hour 

20. Tennis Second semester, l/ 2 hour 
Serving, strokes, scoring, strategy, skill drills, tests, round robin, 

and ladder tournament — Class size limited to facilities. 

21. Soccer First semester, y 2 hour 
Footwork and ball handling emphasized, offensive and defensive 

methods, skill drills, intersquad play. 

22. Track and Field Second semester, l/ 2 hour 
100 yard dash, 440, broad jump, running broad jump, and various 

other activities stressed throughout syllabus. 

23. 24. Co-Recreational Activities First and Second semester, 1 hour 
An area of the program whereby boys and girls may play together. 

Badminton and shuifleboard are the two activities offered. 

25. V addle Tennis First semester, l/ 2 hour 

A lead-up game to tennis, played indoors. All of the skill of tennis 
are stressed. 

31. Hiking — Co -educational Either semester, l/ 2 hour 

Offered only on Sunday afternoons. Climbing local hills and hik- 
ing trails in environs. Some special trips to local state parks for variety. 
Class size limited. 

4 1, 42. Weight Lifting First and Second semesters, 1 hour 

Methods of handling weights, importance of muscular development 
in relation to maintenance of maximum good health stressed. 

43, 44. Weight Reduction Both semesters, 1 hour 

Designed for those students, faculty, staff, and community women 
who wish to reduce body weight, and learn proper ways to main- 
tain optimum health in terms of weight control. Class size limited. 

49 > 50. Roller Skating (Co-educational) Both semesters, 1 hour 

Fundamentals to fancy figure skating taught. Safety, skill tests, pro- 
gram planning, are to be dealt with. 

93 



Theory Courses 

60. Water Skiing Offered in summer only, l/ 2 hour 

Fundamentals, form, safety are stressed. Class size limited. 

62. Beginning Swimming Second semester, l/ 2 hour 

A class for those who cannot swim, only. Class size limited. Time 
to be arranged. 

64. Archery — Co-educational Second semester, l/ 2 hour 

Fundamentals of shooting, skill drills, tournaments, safety are 
presented. Class size limited. 

67, 68. Tumbling Both semesters, 1 hour 

Accent on rolls, stunts, pyramids, self-testing activities. Conditioning 
heavily emphasized. 

71, 72. Apparatus {men only) Either semester, l/ 2 hour 

Parallel bars, rings, high bar work. 

73. Beginning Trampoline First semester, i/ 2 hour 

74. Advanced Trampoline Second semester, l/ 2 hour 

THEORY COURSES 

75. Introduction to Health, Physical 

Education and Recreation First semester, 2 hours 

A study into the aspect of Physical Education as a career, its rela- 
tionship to related fields of education, general principles and philoso- 
phies, historical background, and professional preparation. 

85. Methods and Materials of Teaching Physical 

Education in the Elementary School First semester, 2 hours 

This course is designed primarily for elementary teachers and minors 

in Physical Education. Methods and materials, graded activities in 

games of low organization, team games, self-testing, and rhythmic 

activities, and safety measures. 

100. Theory of Play Second semester, 2 hours 

A course designed to give a theoretical explanation of recreational 
activity and to show the need of activity in modern life and its place 
in education. 

127. Organization and Administration of Physical 

Education and Recreation Second semester, 2 hours 

The relationship of the field of Physical Education to modern edu- 
cational theory. Details of the organization of physical education activi- 

94 



Theory Courses 

ties, organization and classification of pupils, and emphasis on the 
arrangement and construction of equipment and planning of school 
programs suitable to denominational schools. 

140-141. Minor and Major Sport Activities Both semesters, 6 hours 
Lecture, practice, and discussion of programs of minor and major 
sports activities. Intramural tournaments, schedule making, awards. 
Teaching and methods of coaching the fundamental skills and tech- 
niques of flagball, basketball, baseball, track, badminton, tennis, 
shuffleboard, etc. Four hours per week. 

145. Officiating First and Second semester, l hour 

Study of rules, officiating techniques, practice. Each student will be 
assigned a definite number of hours of officiating in the Intramural pro- 
gram for practical experience. One hour lecture per week. Two hours 
per week — 1 hour credit. 

180. Kinesiology Second semester, 3 hours 

A study of the interaction of bones and muscles in the human body, 
or the mechanism of muscular movement. Anatomy and Physiology 
I prerequisite. Two hours lecture, three hours laboratory each week. 

187. Recreation Leadership Second semester, 3 hours 

A study of principles, organization and administration of community 
recreation, with emphasis placed on the development of recreational 
leadership. Students will be required to work in conjunction with the 
iMaster Guide program or other youth programs available in the area. 

130. Campcraft and Management Time to be arr. } 3 hours 

A course to help in the preparation of competent summer camp 
leaders. Two lectures per week, with laboratory work in the form of 
junior group leading on occasion. 

191. Leadership in Camping and Campcraft Time arr., 2 hours 

A class for those interested in advanced work in this field. These 
students will act as laboratory instructors for those \a course 130. Pre- 
requisite: 130 and permission of instructor. 



95 



NURSING EDUCATION 



Mazie A. Herin, Chairman, Helga Forehand, Christine Kummer, 
Gertrude Muench, Stanley Sargeant, Merle Silloway, 
Leonora Trimmer, Alice Mae Wheeler 

The Division of Nursing is accredited by the Tennessee State Board 
of Nursing, is recognized by the Florida State Board of Nurse Registra- 
tion, and is approved by the Board of Regents of Seventh-day Ad- 
ventists. 

The curriculum covers four academic years and two summers in 
which the student completes approximately half his work in liberal 
arts and science courses, and half in the professional field, with a total 
of 128 semester hours. 

The student spends the freshman academic year and the first se- 
mester of the sophomore year on the College campus. Following this, 
the student transfers to the Orlando campus and spends two years at the 
cooperating institution. The second semester of the senior year is spent 
on the Coilegedale campus, completing the major in nursing. 

Students from other colleges having completed the prescribed 
curriculum for registration on the Orlando campus may be eligible to 
register in the sophomore year of the curriculum in nursing. Any stu- 
dent entering the program will be expected to meet the requirements of 
the current college catalogue. The faculty reserves the right to make 
curriculum changes at any time in harmony with current trends in edu- 
cation. The completion of the entire program and the passing of the 
State Board Examination for Registered Professional Nurses is nec- 
essary before the degree is conferred. 

Bachelor of Science in Nursing 

COLLEGEDALE CAMPUS 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

Freshman Composition 1-2 6 hours 

Teach, of Jesus 11, 12 or Bible Sur. 1, 2 4 hours 

Anatomy and Physiology 11, 12 6 hours 

Survey of Chemistry 7, 8 6 hours 

Introduction to Sociology 20 2 hours 

General Psychology 51, 52 4 hours 

Introduction to Nursing 23 1 hour 

Physical Education 7, 8 1 hour 

Foods & Nutrition 2 3 hours 

Total 33 hours 

96 



Nursing Education 

96. Operating Room Nursing Fall, 2 hours 

Principles of aseptic surgery and techniques used in the operating 
room, correlated with experience in the operating room. Laboratory 
practice includes eight weeks in the operating room. 

100. Tuberculosis Nursing Fall, 2 hours 

Instruction in history, cause, treatment, and prevention of tuber- 
culosis with special attention given to the comprehensive nursing care. 
Laboratory practice includes four weeks experience. 

110. Obstetrical Nursing, Fall, winter, spring, summer, 6 hours 

The study of normal and abnormal pregnancies, stages of labor, 
complications, and nursing care of the mother and baby during and 
after delivery. Instruction is given during the twelve weeks laboratory 
practice in the obstetrical department. 

120. Family and Health Teaching Fall, 2 hours 

A short history and progress of the Seventh-day Adventist health 
program, including principles of teaching as applied in the Red Cross 
Instructors course in home nursing. Experience is given in conducting 
home nursing classes. 

130. Psychiatric Nursing Fall, winter, spring, summer, 6 hours 

A twelve week course dealing with the etiology, symptomatology, 
treatment, special therapy and nursing care of the more common types 
of mental diseases. Principles of mental hygiene in preventing illness, as 
well as the role of the nurse in promoting community programs in 
mental health, is discussed. 

140. Public Health Science Spring, Fall, 2 hours 

The study of the principles and activities of public health nursing 
basic to effective family health service, organization, and administration 
of public health nursing. 

1 44. Public Health Nursing Spring, summer, fall, winter, 6 hours 

Eight weeks of supervised field practice. Conferences, clinics, family 
visits, and school visits, illustrate the role of the nurse as a citizen in 
group planning for better community health. 



150. Pediatric Nursing Spring, summer, fall, winter, 6 hours 

A twelve week course including the mental and physical develop- 
ment of normal children, the principle diseases and abnormalities of 
faufancy and childhood and infant feedings. 

99 



Nursing Education 

180. Professional Relations Fall, l hour 

A study of nursing organizations. Methods of parliamentary proce- 
dure are demonstrated and practiced in preparation for a place in these 
organizations. Legal responsibilities are considered in the light of prac- 
tical professional problems. 

190. Seminar in Administration Fall, 5 hours 

A study of the interpersonal relationships inherent in team nursing 
from the standpoint of the team leader; principles of organization and 
administration as applied to the team leaders and the nurse in charge 
of a unit; demonstration and practice of advanced procedures. In the 
light of the senior student's experiences, comprehensive nursing is re- 
viewed in a final major case study. Laboratory consists of eight weeks 
on the medical and surgical units. 

192. Seminar in Nursing Second semester, 2 hours 

The development of nursing, trends in nursing; opportunities for 
ithe graduate nurse; job selections, and placement after graduation. 



100 



FINE ARTS 



Milo Hill, Chairman, Gina Plunguian, J. Mabel Wood, Olivia 
B. Dean 



ART 

1. Fundamentals of Drawing First semester, 2 hours 

The underlying principles of pencil drawing as basic to future work 
of art; principles of perspective and proportion. 

2. Design and Composition Second semester, 2 hours 

Rhythm and balance of designs; study of color as applied to com- 
position. Uses of various media as poster painting and colored ink. 

3. 4. Beginning Painting Bach semester, 2 hours 

Introduction to water color, oil paint and pastel paintings, land- 
scapes, still life and flowers; originality will be stressed. 

55, 56. Advanced Fainting Bath semester, 2 hours 

Here a student may desire to study further the use of the various 
media, also explore the relationships of abstract representation to real- 
ism. Instruction in clothed figure painting; landscapes and animal. 

7-8. Sculpture Each semester, 2 hours 

The various expressions in three dimensional forms are studied. Por- 
trait sculpture, building up in soft materials as well as direct plaster 
techniques. Each student in the above art classes is given the work and 
guidance that will meet his individual art needs. 

16. Art Education and Crafts Second semester, 2 hours 

A study of the fundamental arts and crafl:: principles adapted to 
the needs of children. Laboratory work in the use of various art and 
craft media for elementary school teachers. 

61. Survey and Appreciation of Art First semester, 2 hours 

A study of the expression man has made of his culture through 
the ages by means of painting, sculpture, and architecture from the 
Egyptian period to the present day. Illustrated lectures and discussions. 

101 



Bachelor of Music Education 

MUSIC 

The aim of this subdivision is to provide for the student an emo- 
tional outlet and a means of self expression through forms of beauty 
and to prepare him for Jiving a fuller life individually, socially, anfi 
professionally. 

Southern Missionary College offers two curriculums in music lead- 
ing either to the Bachelor of Arts Degree with music as a major cr to 
Bachelor of Music Education Degree. The Bachelor of Arts Degree 
with music as a major is designed to stress a broad general education, 
the Bachelor of Music Education Degree is designed to stress special- 
ized areas pertinent to the training of music teachers in the schools. 

In determining the student's qualifications for admission to one of 
the degree courses in this subdivision, it is imperative that he demon- 
strate sufficient ability and skill to pursue successfully both the core of 
the curriculum and the courses in other academic fields. A jury will ad- 
minister examinations in determining his levels of musical attainment. 
Entrance requirements and standards of attainment are based upon the 
approved curriculums of the National Association of Schools of Music. 

BACHELOR OF MUSIC EDUCATION 

Course Requirements 

Major (Music) 55 hours 

Including: Performance 22 hours; Theory 
22 hours; Music History 4 hours; Music 
Education 7 hours. 

Minor in Education — Psychology 51; 61; 

111; 135; 140; 173; 174 _.... 18 hours 

English 1-2 6 hours 

Literature 31-32 or 41-42 4 hours 

Fine Arts 6l and 62 4 hours 

Health 7, 8 1 hour 

Natural Science — Mathematics 6 hours 

Religion 51 and electives 12-16 hours 

Social Science 14 hours 

Electives — sufficient to make a four-year total 

of 128 semester hours. 

102 



Music Performance — Theory 

BACHELOR OF ARTS WITH A MAJOR IN MUSIC 
PERFORMANCE 

Course Requirements 

Major (Music) 32 hours 

Including: Theory 16 hours; Performance 
12 hours; History of Music 4 hours 

Minor 18 hours 

English 1-2, Literature 31, 32 or 41, 42 10 hours 

Fine Arts 61 or 62 and electives 4 hours 

Foreign Language 6-14 hours 

Health 7, 8 1 hour 

Natural Sciences — Mathematics 12 hours 

Religion 51 and electives 12-16 hours 

Social Science 14 hours 

Vocational 4 hours 

Electives — sufficient to make a four-year total 
of 128 semester hours. 

Majors: A major in Music requires thirty-two hours distributed as 
follows: Sixteen hours in Theory; four hours in History of Music; twelve 
hours in one field of performance with option to elect two of these 
twelve hours in a related performance area. See "Performance Require- 
ments" for further information. 

Students majoring in Music are required to participate in en- 
semble activities. 

Minor: Those wishing to minor in piano, voice, instruments, or 
organ must meet the same entrance requirements as stated for the major 
field. A minor in Music consists of eighteen hours, including eight 
hours in one of the offered fields of performance, six hours in Harmony 
45-46, fours hours in History of Music 141-142, and two hours in 
electives from the upper biennium. 

A maximum of two hours elective credit for participation in music 
organizations may apply toward graduation from any of the several 
college curriculums. See "Performance Requirements" for additional 
information. 

THEORY 

*1. Fundamentals of Music First semester, 1 hour 

Basic music foundation prerequisite to any further theory courses. 

*Does not apply toward major or minor in music. A waver may be granted by 
examination. 

103 



Theory — Music History Courses 

3-4, Ear Training and Solfeggio Both semesters, 2 hours 

Sight singing and dictation. Development of harmonic, melodic 
and rhythmic perception. A waver may be granted by examination. 

45-46. Theory I Both semesters, 6 hours 

Prerequisite: Music 1 or equivalent. 

An appreciative, executive and creative study of melody, principal 
and secondary chord structures, sevenths, simple modulation and har- 
monization. 

85-86. Theory II Both semesters, 4 hours 

A continuation of Music 45-46. Introduction of ninth, eleventh, 
and thirteenth chords, altered chords and extended modulations, har- 
monization and creative work. 

171. Counterpoint Both semesters, 2 hours 
Prerequisite: Music 85-86. 

Strict: A study of the five species in two parts. 
Free; 16th and 18th century polyphony in the styles of Palestrina 
and Bach. 

172, 173. Composition and Arranging Both semesters, 4 hours 
Original writing in the smaller forms. 

174. Orchestration Second semester, 2 hours 

Prerequisite: Harmony 85-86. Music 171-172 strongly recom- 
mended. 

Writing and arranging for all of the instruments of the modern 
symphony orchestra. 

184. Form in Music Second semester, 2 hours 

Designed to lead to a clear understanding of the principles of 
musical texture and form from motif through symphony. Score read- 
ing and analysis. 

MUSIC HISTORY 

*62. Survey and Appreciation of Music Second semester, 2 hours 

The impact of musical thought on western civilization during the 

past one thousand years. Illustrated lectures, discussions and recordings. 

141-142. History of Music Both semesters, 4 hours 

Cultural and musical-technical aspects of the style and form of 
musical thought from antiquity to the present time. 



♦Does not apply toward major or minor in musk. 
104 



Church Music — Musk Education Courses 

CHURCH MUSIC 

16. Principles of Conducting Second semester, 1 hour 

Prerequisite: Music 1 or equivalent. 

Study and application of the principles of song leadership adapted 
to evangelistic and church music. 

115. History of Church Music First semester, 2 hours 
A study of developmental trends in the music of the Christian 

Church — liturgical and nonsurgical. Music of Protestant movements 
emphasized. 

116. Hymnody Second semester, 2 hours 
The great hymns of the Christian Church; their function in worship 

and praise. 

MUSIC EDUCATION 

The studies in methods and materials involve not only development 
in actual performance ability and evaluation of available teaching 
materials; but also, and pre-eminently, a quest for pedagogical soundness 
and understanding of how to help individuals solve their musical 
problems. 

133- Vocal Materials and Techniques First semester, 1 hour 

Principles of voice production. Testing and classification of voices. 
Examination of suitable literature for choral, ensemble and solo use. 

134. String Materials and Techniques Second semester, 1 hour 

A study of the stringed instruments in class. Survey of teaching 
materials for class and private instruction. 

137. Brass Materials and Techniques First semester, 1 hour 
Stresses tone production, embouchure, fingerings and practical ped- 
agogic technique; application in performance. 

138. IVoodivind Materials and Techniques Second semester, 1 hour 
The study of problems of tone production, embouchure, fingerings, 

and other problems of woodwind playing. Comparison and evaluation 
of various class methods. 

143. Percussion Materials and Techniques First semester, 1 hour 
The use of percussion instruments in the band technique, and 
techniques of playing all percussion instruments. Interpretation of 
band scores, balance and special effects of the percussion section. 

105 



Performance Requirements 

181. Conducting Techniques and Organization First semester, 2 hours 

Fundamentals of conducting; techniques of secondary choral and 
instrumental organization and performance. 

192. Administrative Seminar Second semester, one-half hour 

The secondary school music program; its place in the total school 
curriculum; how to operate it; how to expand and intensify its in- 
fluence in the musical growth of individuals and the entire school. 

PERFORMANCE REQUIREMENTS 

For credit in piano, voice, violin, organ, or other instruments, one 
semester hour will be allowed for a minimum of 15 lessons with four 
hours of practice per lesson. Applications and examinations for fresh- 
man or advanced standing will be reviewed by a jury of the music 
faculty. Semester examinations will be given on materials covered. 

Participation in and attendance at student recitals, public and studio, 
will be considered a part of the regular work. 

Beginning instruction (Performance 3) is available to students for 
credit. Continuing instruction on varying levels of attainment is offered 
to students interested in specific areas of performance. Credit may be 
arranged in the following courses: Performance 3 (Preparatory — credit 
not applicable to music major or minor); Performance 21 (First year); 
Performance 51 (Second year); Performance 121 (Third year); Per- 
formance 151 (Fourth year). Any repetition of courses may be granted 
upon recommendation of the instructor. 

The following courses in performance are offered for music majors. 
It is recommended that piano, organ, and violin majors must, as a mini- 
mum requirement, begin with a technical proficiency and reading ability 
at the fourth-grade level. Voice majors should be able to sing with 
musical intelligence standard songs in English (such as the simpler 
classics) and should be able to sing a simple song at sight. An elemen- 
tary playing knowledge of the piano is urgently recommended. In- 
strumental majors should be able to procure musical tone and demon- 
strate true potential for technical mastery. 

PIANO 

3. Piano Either or both semesters, one or two hours, but not ap- 
plicable on a music major or minor. 

Instruction for those who do not qualify for freshman standing. 
106 



Piano — Organ Courses 

21. Piano Both semesters, 4 hours 

Prerequisite: Examination for freshman standing. 
Bach inventions, suites; sonatas by Haydn, Mozart, and Beetho- 
ven; shorter works by Schubert, Mendelssohn, Schumann and Chopin; 
less difficult works of late 19th and early 20th centuries. Major and 
minor scales and arpeggios. 

51. Piajio Both semesters, 4 hours 

Prerequisite: Piano 21: four hours. 

Bach Well-Tempered Clavier, suites, partitas, a concerto; con- 
tinuing sonatas and shorter pieces as in Piano 21, but including Scarlat- 
ti, Brahms and Liszt. Major and minor scales in thirds, sixths, and 
tenths. 

121. Piano Both semesters, 4 hours 

Prerequisite: Piano 51, four hours. 
Continued study of Bach's works; Beethoven sonatas Op. 53 to 

111; more demanding works of romantic and impressionistic periods; 
contemporary composers; a second concerto. Major and minor scales 
in double thirds; planned technique. 

151. Piano Both semesters, 2 hours 

Prerequisite: Piano 121, four hours. 

Fulfillment of minimum repertory requirements, i.e., two full pro- 
grams and two complete concertos. One program, acceptable to music 
faculty, to be performed publicly as a senior recital. 

ORGAN 

3- Organ Either or both semesters, one or two hours, but not ap- 
plicable on a music major or minor. 
Instruction for those who do not qualify for freshman standing. 

21. Organ Both semesters, 4 hours 

Prerequisite: Examination for freshman standing. 
Selected studies for manuals and pedals; Bach Eight Little Preludes 
and Fugues, chorale preludes (The Liturgical Year), Six Organ Chor- 
ales (Schubler); selected recital and church compositions; hymns. 

51. Organ Both semesters, 4 hour* 

Prerequisite: Organ 21, four hours. 

Bach chorale preludes (The Liturgical Year), chorale preludes 
(Schubler); larger preludes and fugues; selections from Bonnet's 
Historical Recital Series Vol. I; selected recital and church composi- 
tions; hymns. 

107 



Voice Courses 

121. Organ Both semesters, 4 hours 

Prerequisite: Organ 51, four hours. 

Bach Chorale Preludes (The Liturgical Year), sonatas, larger pre- 
ludes and fugues; works by Franck, Mendelssohn, Guilmant, Karg- 
Elerr, Widor, Handel, Mailing, Mozart, and others. 

151. Organ Both semesters, 2 hours 

Prerequisite: Organ 121, four hours. 

Continued study of Bach chorale preludes, preludes and fugues, 
sonatas; works by Mendelssohn, Rheinberger, Widor, Franck, Karg- 
Elert, Edmonson, Vierne, and others. Presentation of senior recital. 

VOICE 

1, 2. Voice Class Each semester, 1 hour 

Adapted to beginners, particularly those having little or no previous 
purposeful musical experience. 

3. Voice Either or both semesters, one or two hours, but not ap- 
plicable on a music major or minor. 

Instruction for those who do not qualify for freshman standing. 
21. Voice Both semesters, 4 hours 

Prerequisite: Examination for freshman standing. 

Voice diagnosis; study of fundamentals of voice production in mat- 
ters of breath control, resonance and diction; application to songs in 
English and Classical Italian. 

51. Voice Both semesters, 4 hours 

Prerequisite: Voice 21, four hours. 

Study of songs in English, Italian and another language with con- 
centration on techniques and emphasis on the musical style. Basic 
knowledge of Oratorio and the recitative. Participation in recitals. 

121. Voice Both semesters, 4 hours 

Prerequisite: Voice 51, four hours. 

Advanced technical study. More advanced songs from the entire 
field of vocal literature including the less demanding arias from ora- 
torio and opera. Presentation of a junior recital. 

151. Voice Both semesters, 2 hours 

Prerequisite: Voice 121, four hours. 

Continuation of Voice 121 with emphasis on repertoire. Preset 
ration of senior recital. 

108 



Violin — Cornet — Trumpet Courses 

VIOLIN 

3. Violin Either or both semesters, one or two hours, but not ap- 
plicable on a music ma] or or minor. 

Instruction for those who do not qualify for freshman standing. 
21. Violin Both semesters } 4 hours 

Prerequisite: Examination for freshman standing. 

Scales in three octaves, varied rhythms and bowings; Etudes of 
Fiorillo and Kreutzer; Concertos of Viotti, DeBeriot, Vivaldi and 
Tartini; Sonatas of Corelli and Vivaldi; recital solos. 

51. Violin Both semesters, 4 hours 

Prerequisite: Violin 21, four hours. 

Scales in three octaves, varied rhythms and bowings; Etudes of 
Kreutzer; Concertos of Viotti, Bach; Sonatas of Handel, Mozart, 
Vivaldi; recital solos. 

121. Violin Both semesters, 4 hours 

Prerequisite: Violin 51, four hours. 

Scales in octaves and thirds, varied tempi and bowings; Etudes 
of Rode; Concertos of Bruch, Mozart and Bach; recital solos. 

151. Violin Both semesters, 2 hours 

Prerequisite: Violin 121, four hours. 

Scales in octaves, tenths and thirds, varied tempi and bowings; 
Etudes of Rode and Dont; Concertos of Wieniawski, Mozart, Mendel- 
ssohn and Vieuxtemps; Bach Sonatas for solo violin; recital solos. 

CORNET AND TRUMPET 

3. Cornet Either or both semesters, one or two hours, but not ap- 
plicable on a music major or minor. 
To be elected by students who do not qualify for cornet or trumpet 

21. Cornet Both semesters, 4 hours 

Prerequisite: Examination for freshman standing. 

Arban Method; Etudes such as Hering's 32 Etudes for cornet or 
trumpet. Pares Foundations Studies for Cornet or Trumpet. 

51. Cornet Both semesters, 4 hours 

Prerequisite: Cornet 21, four hours. 

Studies such as Williams, Vol. II; World's Method for Cornet. 
Emphasis in legato technique, lip slurs, and tone production in various 
registers. Solos such as Haydn Concerto for Trumpet. 

109 



Trombone Courses 

121. Comet Both semesters, 4 hours 

Prerequisite: Cornet 51, four hours. 

p ^des of Clark and Smith; studies of orchestral literature. Solos 
such as Williams Concertos. Performance of at least half of a public 
recital. 

151. Comet Both semesters, 2 hours 

Prerequisite: Cornet 121, four hours. 

Continued studies in Clark and Smith Etudes, Etudes of Brandt, 
special studies in range and flexibility. Solos such as Giannin Concerto 
for Trumpet; Sonatas by Tuthill, Sowerby and Hindemith. 

TROMBONE 

3. Trombone Either or go lb semesters, one or two hours, but not ap- 
plicable on a musk major or minor. 
To be elected by students who do not qualify for trombone 21. 

21. Trombone Both semesters, 4 hours 

Prerequisite: Examination for freshman standing. 
Arban, Cornette, and Schlossberg studies. Kopprasch Book I, 

and special studies in tone and legato playing. 

51. Trombone Both semesters, 4 hours 

Prerequisite: Trombone 21, four hours. 

Arban, Kopprasch studies. Mueller Vol. I; Rochut, Melodious 
Etudes for Trombone, Vol. I. Solos such as Morceau Symphonique by 
Guilmant; GaJliard Sonatas. 

121. Trombone Both semesters, 4 hours 

Prerequisite: Trombone 51, four hours. 

MudJer Vol. II; Koppdasch Vol U; Rochut Vol. II; Tyrrell 40 
Progressive etudes. Studies in tenor clef. Solos such as Rimsky-Korsakov 
Concerf.o for trombone; Sanders, Sonata in E-flat; Barat, Andante and 
Allegrc-. 

151. Trombone Both semesters, 2 hours 

Prerequisite: Trombone 121, tour hours. 

Blazevitch Clef Studies; Rochut, Vol. UL] Mueller, Vol. III. 
Studies in Orchestral Literature. Solos such as Hindemith Sonata for 
trombone and piano; Grafe, Grand Concerto; Mozart, Concerto for 
Trombone (transcribed by Ostrander). 

110 



Ensemble Music Courses 

COURSES IN ENSEMBLE MUSIC 

Credit one-half hour each semester 

Although there is no charge for participation in music organiza- 
tions if credit is not desired, yet students should register for entrance in 
the organization. 

Admission to any musical organization is by audition. Regular at- 
tendance at rehearsals is required. 

11. Orchestra 

13. Band 

15. Small bistrumenlal Ensembles 

17. The College Choir 

19. Glee Clubs 

23. Oratorio Chorus 

25. The Ch oralis is 

21. Small Vocal Ensembles 

BACHELOR OF MUSIC EDUCATION CURRICULUM 
Recommended Sequence for Music Education 



FIRST YEAR 






15 Hrs. 


First Semester 


17 Hrs. 


Second Semester 


Sem. Hrs. 


Courses 


Sem. Hrs. 


Courses 


3 


Freshman Comp. 1 


3 


Freshman Comp. 2 


3 


Anc. & Med Civ. or 


3 


Modern Civilization or 




Amer. Hist. & Inst. 




Amer. Hist. & Inst. 


2 


Teachings of Jesus 11 


2 


Teachings of Jesus 12 


2 


Major Performance — 


2 


Major Performance — 




Instrument or Voice 




Instrument or Voice 


3 


Harmony I 45 


3 


Harmony I 46 


1 


Ear Training 3 


1 


Ear Training 4 


Vi 


Ensemble 


V? 


Ensemble 


Vi 


Physical Education 7 


2 


Social Science 






Vi 


Physical Education 8 


SECOND 


YEAR 






L7 Hrs. 


FfRST Semester 


\6 Hrs. 


Second Semester 


Son. Hrs. 


Courses 


S<m. Hrs. 


Courses 


2 


Major Performance 


2 


Major Performance 


1 


Minor Performance 


1 


Minor Performance 


2 


Harmony JI 85 


2 


Haru.ony 11 86 


9 


Literature 


? 


Literature 


Vi 


Ensemble 


Vi 


Ensemble 


3 


Natural Science 


3 


Natural Science 


2 


Gen. Phychology 51 


3 


Pi in. o'' Chr. Living 51 


i 


Elcm. SchooJ Music 66 


Vi 


Physical Education 8 


Vi 


Physical Education 7 


2 


Hist, and App. of Music 


2 


School Org. & Adm. 61 







111 



Sequence for Music Education 



THIRD YEAR 



16 Hrs. 


First Semestbr 


I6I/2 Hrs. 


Second Semester 


Sem. Hrs. 


Courses 


Sem. Hrs. 


Courses 


1 


Brass Mat. & Tech. 137 


1 


Woodwind Materials 


1 


Perc. Mat. & Tech. 143 




and Technique 138 


2 


Major Performance 


2 


Major Performance 


1 


Minor Performance 


1 


Minor Performance 


2 


Counterpoint 171 


2 


Counterpoint 171 


1 


Vocal Mat. & Tech. 133 


2 


Form in Music 184 


Vi 


Ensemble 


Vl 


Ensemble 


2 


Fund, Chr. Faith 59 


2 


Fund. Chr. Faith 60 


3 


Child & Educ. Psy. Ill 


2 


Sec. School Music 140 


3 


Prin., Mat. & Meth. of 


} 


String Mat. & Tech. 134 




Sec. Teaching 135 


3 


Electives 


FOURTH YEAR 






\6V 2 Hrs. 


First Semester 


15 Hrs. 


Second Semester 


Sem. Hrs. 


Courses 


Sem. Hrs. 


Courses 


2 


Cond. Tech. & Org. 181 


1 


Major Performance 


1 


Major Performance 


2 


Orchestration 174 


2 


Composition 172 


2 


History of Music 142 
Ensemble 


2 


History of Music l4l 


Vl 


Vl 


Ensemble 


2 


Directed Teaching in 


2 


Directed Teaching in 




Grades 7-12 174 




Grades 7-12 173 


2 


Revelation. 166 


2 


Daniel 165 


3 


20th Cent. History 117 


3 


19th Cent. History 116 


2 


Social Science 


2 


Elective (Art) 


Vi 


Admin. Seminar 192 



Recommended Sequence in Music Performance 
FIRST YEAR 



16I/2 Hrs. 


First Semester 


17V2 Hrs. 


Second Semester 


Sem. Hrs. 


Courses 


Sem. Hrs. 


Courser 


1 


Applied Music 


1 


Applied Music 


2 


Bible Survey 1 or 


2 


Bible Survey 2 or 




Teachings of Jesus LI 




Teachings of Jesus 12 


1 


Ear Training 3 


1 


Ear Training 4 


3 


Freshman Comp. 




Freshman Comp. 2 


4 


Foreign Language 


4 


Foreign Language 


3 


Natural Science 


3 


Natural Science 


Vl 


Physical Education 7 


1 


Conducting 16 


2 


Electives (Social Science) 


Vi 


Physical Education 8 






2 


Electives 


ECOND 


YEAR 






17 Hrs. 


First Semester 


15 Hrs. 


Second Semester 


Sem. Hrs. 


Courses 


Sem. Hrs. 


Courses 


1 


Applied Music 


1 


Applied Music 


3 


Prin. of Chr. Living 51 


3 


Bible or Religion 


3 


Harmony I 45 


3 


Harmony I 46 


2 


Health and Hygiene 5 


3 


Foreign Language 




or Safety & First Aid 22 


3 


Social Science 


3 


Foreign Language 


2 


Masterpieces of Lit. 


3 


Social Science 




or 42 


2 


Masterpieces of Lit. 31 
or 41 







32 



112 



Sequence for Music Education 



THIRD AND FOURTH YEARS 



30 Hrs. 


First Semester 


31 h 


Irs. 


Second Semester 


'em. Hrs. 


Courses 


Sem. Hrs. 


Courses 


4 


Applied Music 


4 




Applied Music 


2 


Harmony II 85 


2 




Harmony 11 86 


2 


History of Music 141 


2 




History of Music 142 


4 


Vocational 


2 




Art 


3 


Nat. Science or Math. 


3 




Nat. Science or Math. 


3 


Social Science 


3 




Social Science 


3 


Religion or Bible 


3 




Religion or Bible 


9 


Electives 


1 
2 
9 




Conducting 181 
Social Science 
Electi ves 



113 



LANGUAGES AND LITERATURE 



Clyde G. Bushnell, Chairman, Olivia B. Dean, 

Irma Jean Kopjtzke, Otto H. Chrjstensen, Mary H. Dietel 

ENGLISH 

Major: A major in English requires thirty-two hours. It shall in- 
clude a minimum of four hours and a maximum of eight hours of 
speech, four hours of lower biennium literature and nine hours of upper 
biennium literature. In addition, English History, or its equivalent, and 
the course in reading techniques are required. The latter course, 
besides the benefits it affords to the individual, will enable him to 
understand more clearly the problems of retarded readers he may meet 
in his classes subsequently. Other courses in history are to be selected 
in consultation with the student's major professor. It is recommended 
that all English majors take courses in History of Music and Art. and 
if planning to teach, the course in Directed Observation and Teaching 
173, 174. 

Minor: A minor in English requires eighteen semester hours, in- 
cluding four hours of lower biennium literature and at least six hours 
of upper biennium literature and composition. Four hours of either 
speech or news writing may apply on the minor. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS WITH A MAJOR IN ENGLISH 

Course Requirements 

Major (English) 32 hours 

Including: Speech 5, 6, and Reading Techniques 02. 

Minor in Education recommended 18 hours 

Fine Arts 6l or 62 4 hours 

Foreign Language 6-14 hours 

Health 7, 8 ... 1 hour 

Natural Sciences — Mathematics 12 hours 

Religion 51 - 12-16 hours 



Social Science 14 hours 

Vocational 4 hours 

Electives — sufficient to make a four-year total 
of 128 semester hours. 



114 






English Courses 

1-2, Freshman Composition Both semesters, 6 hours 

Admission to English I depends upon the student's satisfactory per- 
formance in the entrance examination sections on mechanics and effec- 
tiveness of expression. No grade will be given for Freshman Composi- 
tion unless the student has achieved a satisfactory score in reading 
speed and comprehension. See the 01 and 02 courses below. 

01. Basu Grammar First semester, 1 hour elective credit 
Students who do not reach the 30th percentile of the English place- 
ment test sections on mechanics and effectiveness of expression are re- 
quired to register for this class, which meets on Tuesdays and Thurs- 
days. Those who fail to reach the 30th percentile will be registered 
temporarily for the Freshman Composition class. At the end of 9 
weeks a second placement test will be given, after which those who 
pass may drop Basic Grammar, receiving one hour of credit, and become 
permanent members of the Freshman Composition group; and those 
v^ho do not may continue Freshman Composition only at the discretion 
of the teacher. Those who take Basic Grammar all semester and pass 
the entrance test repeated at the end of the semester will be given one 
hour of elective credit— credit, that is, which will not apply towards 
the English requirements for giaduation. Students who do not pass 
in one semester will have to repeat the course until they do pass. No 
more than one hour of credit may be earned for this course. 

02. Reading Techniques Either semester, 1 hour 
This class meets two days a week and carries one hour of elective 

credit. At least one semester of reading improvement is required of all 
sudents who do not reach the 30th percentile of the reading section 
of the placement tests. All who can should take it the first semester, 
but those whose score is not too low may, by special permission of the 
English department, be permitted to take it the second semester. 

3. 4. English Conversation for Foreign Students 

Both semesters, 2 hours 

5, 6. English Grammar and Composition for Foreign Students 

Both semesters, 4 hours 

31-32. Survey Course in American Literature Both semesters, 4 hours 
A study of the chief poets and prose writers in America from Co- 
lonial times to the present. 

*4l-52. Survey Course in English Literature Both semesters, 4 hours 
A study of the chief British writers from Beowulf to the present. 



Not offered in 1957-58. 

115 



English Courses 

53, 54. Elements of Journalism Both semesters, 4 hours 

Relation of the press to society and world events. Practice in news 
writing and general reporting of church, school, and other activities for 
the public press. Personal interviews. Feature stories. Revision and cor- 
rection of articles submitted. 

101: 102 Masterpieces of Literature Both semesters, 4 hours 

This is an introduction to great literature and is designed to fit the 
needs of the general Seventh-day Adventist college student. The first 
six weeks arej devoted to the study of how to understand poetry. The 
rest of the year is spent in careful reading of a few of the greatest 
writings from many countries and all the major periods. Emphasis 
will be given to composition and grammar. 

17 or 107. Special Projects in English Both semesters, I or 2 hours 
The content of this course will be adjusted to meet the particular 

needs of the individual student. 

Note: Admission requirements for all upper biennium literature 

courses marked 100 or above: four hours of sophomore literature or 

special permission of the department chairman. 

109- Children's Literature First semester, 2 hours 

A study is made in the field of literature for children with emphasis 

upon the selection and presentation of specimens. This course is open 

only for teachers in elementary education. 

* 141. Elizabethan Literature First semester, 3 hours 

A study of the major English writers of the Elizabethan age. 
135, 136 History of the English Language Both semesters, 4 hours 

A non-technical treatment of the periods of development of the 
language with special attention given to word study and vocabulary 
building. 
*144. Milton First semester, 2 hours 

His poetry and prose works. 

*145. The Seventeenth Century and Neo-classical Period 

Second semester, 3 hours 
Introduction to the chief writings of the seventeenth and eighteenth 
centuries of English literature, excluding Milton. 

147. The Romantic Movement First semester, 3 hours 
Historical and philosophical background of the period, changing 

attitudes in life and literature. Poets from Wordsworth to Keats. Prose 
writers from Lamb to Macaulay. 

148. The Victorian Period Second semester, 3 hours 
Continuation of 147. Poets from Tennyson to Kipling, and prose 

writers from Carlyle to Stevenson. 

* Not offered in 1957-58. 

116 






Speech Courses 

122. Advanced Grammar and Composition First semester, 3 hours 

A course designed to help prospective teachers and writers under- 
stand the structure of the English language and further develop the 
composition skills. 

SPEECH 

It is assumed that a graduate of a liberal arts college should be 
able to express his convictions clearly, logically and persuasively. This 
is essential to those who have to compete with and utilize the modern 
media of communication. To this end, basic courses in fundamentals, 
and voice and diction, (Speech 5-6, and 63) may be elected without 
prerequisite. They are designed to serve students majoring in a wide 
variety of areas requiring communication skills, such as teaching, 
business administration, personnel work, salesmanship, law and the 
ministry — and, increasingly, the medical and dental professions. 

The courses in Oral Interpretation, Persuasion, Argumentation, 
Discussion, Homiletics, and Elements of Radio and TV, may be 
entered with the consent of the instructor, and required academic stand- 
ing. 

Minor: A speech minor requires eighteen semester hours. Labora- 
tory facilities and direction are available to all speech students, provid- 
ing opportunity for concentration on individual needs. 
5:6. Fundamentals of Speech Both semesters, 4 hours 

Establishment of a basic approach to speech, an elementary survey 
of the area, and opportunity to develop speaking ability under various 
speech situations. 
63- Voice and Diction First semester, 2 hours 

A basic study of the voice mechanism, and introduction to success- 
ful methods of voice improvement, with special attention to individual 
problems. 
64. Oral Interpretation Second semester, 2 hours 

Theory and practice in the art of conveying to others the meaning of 
selected readings, secular and sacred. Special needs of teachers and 
ministers considered. 

*1 13- The Psyshology of Persuasive Speech First semester, 3 hours 

Analysis of the bases for manipulating the motives of men toward 

the persuader's ends. Practice in preparation and presentation of 

persuasive speeches. 

*ll6. Logic in Argumentation Second semester, 3 hours 

Emphasis on research methods; logical analysis; propoganda and 

public opinion. Study of masterpieces in argumentation. 



* Not offered in 1957-58. 

117 



Sequence for English Major 

119, 120. Homilelics and Pulpit Delivery Both semesters, 4 hours 

Training in the preparation and delivery of the various types of 
talks and addresses the Christian worker or preacher is called upon to 
give. 

125. Discussion Leadership First semester, 3 hours 

Development of skill in discussion; planning and conducting 
various types of public discussion; parliamentary procedure; discussion 
in education and democratic process. 

132. Elements of Radw and TV Second semester, 3 hours 

An introduction to the medium of radio and the development of 
basic skills in the preparation and presentation of various types of radio 
programs. Laboratory hours will be arranged to suit group needs and 
schedules. 



Recommended Sequence for Major in English 



FIRST YEAR 

i5y 2 Hrs 
Sem. Hrs 

3 
4 
3 
3 
"> 

Vi 



First Semester 
Courses 

Freshman Comp. 1 
Foreign Language 
History L or 53 
Natural Science 
Religion 1 or 11 
Physical Education 



SECOND YEAR 

16 Hrs. First Semester 

Sem. Hrs. Courses 

3 Foreign Language 

2 Fine Arts 

3 Prin. of Chr. Living 51 
3 Adv. Gram. Comp. 122 
2 Literature 

2 Fund, of Speech 5 

1 Elective (Health) 

THIRD YEAR 

15 Hrs. First Semester 
Courses 
Eng. History 161 



Sem. Hrs. 
2 

2 
2 
3 
3 
2 



Fund. Chr. Faith 59 
Gen. Psychology 51 
Period Literature 
Natural Science 
History of English 
Language 
Masterpieces of Lit. 



I6V2 Hrs. 
Sem. Hrs. 

3 
4 
3 
3 
2 
1 
Vl 



16 Hrs. 
Sem. Hrs. 

3 
2 
3 
2 
2 
2 
2 



17 Hrs. 
Sem. Hrs. 
2 
2 
2 
3 
2 
3 
2 



Second Semester 
Courses 

Freshman Comp. 2 
Foreign Language 
History 2 or 54 
Natural Science 
Religion 2 or 12 
Elective (Health) 
Physical Education 8 



Second Semester 

Courses 

Foreign Language 

Fine Arts 

Religion 

Social Science 

Literature 

Fund, of Speech 6 

Electives 



Second Semester 
Courses 
Social Science 
Fund. Chr, Faith 60 
Gen. Phychology 52 
Period Literature 
Oral Interpretation 64 
Natural Science 
History of English 
Language 
Masterpieces of Lit. 



118 



Greek — Hebrew Courses 

FOURTH YEAR 

16 Hrs. First Semester 16 Hrs. Second Semester 



Sem. Hrs. 


Courses 


Sem. h 


frs. Courses 


3 


Period Literature 


3 


Period Literature 


3 


Child & Ed. Phych. Ill 


2 


Vocational 


2 


Voc. (Typ. suggested) 


11 


Electives 


2 


Social Science 






6 


Electives 







BIBLICAL LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 

Minor Requirement: A minor in Biblical Languages may be ob- 
tained by 18 hours in Greek or with 14 hours of Greek plus 6 hours 
of Hebrew. 

GREEK AND HEBREW 

31-32. Elements of New Testament Greek Both semesters, 8 hours 
A study of the grammar and syntax of the vernacular koine Greek 
of New Testament times, with readings in the Epistles of John. 

81-82. Intermediate New Testament Greek Both semesters, 6 hours 
A course in translation of readings from the Gospel of John and 
Revelation, with vocabulary building, advanced studies in grammar and 
syntax, with exegetical interpretation of the original text. 

* 101. Corinthians First semester, 2 hours 

Reading and exegetical interpretation of the Greek text, with special 
emphasis on the historical, syntactical and grammatical points where the 
Greek is of special significance. 

*102. Galatians and the Prison Epistles Second semester, 2 hours 

(Explanation same as for No. 101). 

*103- Romans First semester, 2 hours 

(Explanation same as for No. 101). 

*104. Hebrews Second semester, 2 hours 

(Explanation same as for No. 101). 

121-122. Beginning Hebrew Both semesters, 6 hours 

The elements of Hebrew grammar, including the vowel system, 
vocabulary, writing, and selected reading from the Old Testament. 

GERMAN 

Minor: The German minor, which consists of eighteen hours, must 
include courses 83-84; 127, 128; 141-142. The elementary course, Be- 
ginning German, 21-22, may be included in the minor only \i the 
student has an equivalent preparation in another language. 

♦These courses may be substituted for Bible 151, 152. 

119 



German Courses 

21-22. Beginning German. Both semesters, 8 hours 

A foundation course in grammar, pronunciation, and reading. Not 
open to students who have had two years of German in secondary 
school. 

83-84. Intermediate German Both semesters, 6 hours 

Prerequisite: German 21-22 or two years of German in secondary 

school. 

Advanced grammar; intensive and extensive reading of moderately 

difficult prose and poetry; oral and written exercises. 

* 127, 128. German Conversation and Composition 

Both semesters, A hours 
Prerequisite: German 21-22. 

Development of skill in speaking, understanding and writing idio- 
matic German. 

*14 1-142. Survey of German Literature Both semesters, 6 hours 

Prerequisite: German 83-84. 

History and development of German literature; reading of repre- 
sentative works; collateral reading and reports. 

* 191 -192. Advanced German Prose Both semesters, 6 hours 

Prerequisite: German 141-142. 

Extended reading from the great German authors. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS WITH A MAJOR IN SPANISH 
Course Requirements 

Major (Spanish) 30 hours 

Including: 93-94; 117, 118; 101-102 or 
105-106. Exclusive of 1-2. 

Minor 18 hours 

English 1-2 Literature 10 hours 

Fine Arts 61 or 62 4 hours 

Health 7, 8 1 hour 

Natural Sciences — Mathematics 12 hours 



* Not offered l957-'58. 
120 



Major m Spanish 

Religion 51 12-16 hours 

Social Science 145, 146 14 hours 

Vocational — Secretarial Science 13, 14 4 hours 

Electives — sufficient to make a four-year total 
of 128 semester hours. 

History of Latin America is required of all majors in Spanish. 

Minor: A minor in Spanish requires eighteen semester hours. 

The elementary course, Beginning Spanish 1-2 may be included in 
the major or minor only if the student has an equivalent preparation in 
another language. 

1-2. Beginning Spanish Both semesters, 8 hours 

A foundation course in grammar, pronunciation, and reading. Not 
open to students who have had two years of Spanish in secondary 
school. 

93-94. Intermediate Spanish Both semesters, 6 hours 

Prerequisite: Spanish 1-2 or two years of Spanish in secondary 
school. 

Advanced grammar; intensive and extensive reading of moderately 
difficult Spanish texts, oral and written exercises. Not open to Span- 
ish speaking persons with three credits in Secondary Spanish. 

117, 118. Spanish Conversation and Composition 

Both semesters, 4 hours 

Prerequisite: Spanish 1-2 or equivalent. Not open to Latin-Ameri- 
can nationals with three credits in Secondary Spanish. Development of 
skill in speaking, understanding, and writing idiomatic Spanish. 

* 10 1-102. Survey of Spanish Literature Both semesters, 6 hours 

Prerequisite: Spanish 93-94. 

History and development of Spanish-American literature; reading of 
resentative works. 

* 105-106. Survey of Spanish-American Literature 

Both semesters, 6 hours 

Prerequisite: Spanish 93-94. 

History and development of Spanish- American literature; reading of 
representative works. 

121 



Spanish Courses 

145-146. The Golden Age of Spanish Literature 

Both semesters, 4 hours 

Prerequisite: Spanish 93-94. 

A study of the classical period of Spanish literature. 

* 161-1 62. Spanish Poetry Both semesters, 4 hours 

Prerequisite: Spanish 101-102. 

Study of Spanish versification, selected reading from Spanish and 
Spanish-American authors. 

*l65, 166. Advanced Spanish Prose Both semesters, 6 hours 

Prerequisite: Spanish 101-102. 

Extended reading from great authors of Spain and Spanish- 
America. 



Recommended Sequence for Major in Spanish 

(Minor in German for ihe purpose of reaching 
modern languages) 



FIRST YEAR 



15V 2 Hrs. 


First Semester 


15 y 2 Hrs. 


Second Semester 


Sem. Hrs. 


Courses 


Sem. Hrs. 


Courses 


3 

2 
2 
2 
3 
3 

y 2 


Freshman Comp. 1 
Religion 1 or 11 
Gen. Psychology 51 
Social Science 
Natural Science 
*Inter. Spanish 93 
Physical Education 7 


3 
2 
2 
2 
3 
3 
J / 2 


Freshman Comp. 2 
Religion 2 or 12 
Gen. Psychology 52 
School Organiz. 22 
Natural Science 
* Inter. Spanish 94 
Physical Education 8 


SECOND 


YEAR 






17 Hrs. 


First Semester 


16 Hrs. 


Second Semester 


Sem. Hrs. 


Courses 


Sem. Hrs. 


Courses 


3 
3 
2 
3 
2 
4 


Amer. Hist. & Inst. 53 

Anatomy 11 

Fine Arts 

Prin. of Chr. Living 51 

Sp. Conv. & Comp. 117 

German 21 

■d 1957-58. 


3 
3 

2 
2 

2 
4 


Amer. Hist. & Inst. 54 

Physiology 12 

Fine Arts 

Social Science 

Sp. Conv. & Comp. 118 

German 22 


♦Not offere 




122 









Sequence for Spanish Major 



THIRD YEAR 



18 Hrs. 


First Semester 


18 Hrs. 


Sem. Hrs. 


Courses 


Sem. Hrs. 


2 


Literature 


2 


3 


Surv. of Span. Lit. 101 


3 


3 


Adv. Span. Prose 165 


3 


3 


German 83 


\ 


2 


Hist, of Lat, Amer. 145 


2 


3 


Prin. Mat. & Math. 


3 




of Sec. Teaching 135 




2 


Typewriting 13 


2 


FOURTH 


YEAR 




18 Hrs. 


First Semester 


17 Hrs. 


Sem. Hrs. 


Courses 


Sem. Hrs, 


3 


Religion 


3 


3 


Sur. Sp.-Am. Lit. 105 


3 


2 


Spanish Poetry 161 


2 


3 


German 14 1 


3 


2 


German 127 


2 


3 


Child & Educ. Psy. Ill 


2 


2 


Directed Teaching 


2 




Grades 7-12 173 


"'Prerequisite 



Second Semester 

Courses 

Literature 

Surv. of Span. Lit. 102 

Adv. Span. Prose 166 

German 84 

Hist, of Lat. Amer. 146 

Prin. Mat. & Math. 

of Sec. Teaching 136 

Secretarial Science 1 4 



Second Semester 

Courses 

Religion 

Sur. Sp.-Am. Lit. 106 

Spanish Poetry 162 

German 142 

German 128 

Psych. 107, 150 or 180 

Education 174 

Two years of high 



school Spanish or beginning Spanish 
in college. 



123 



NATURAL SCIENCES - MATHEMATICS 



JOHN Christensen, Chairman, H. H. Kuhlman, R. A. Underhill, 
Clarence E. Chinn, Ray Hefferun, E. O. Grundset 

The Division of Natural Sciences and Mathematics is organized 
for the purpose of giving training in the fundamental sciences of Bi- 
ology, Chemistry, Mathematics, and Physics, Many of the courses of- 
fered in these departments are basic for professional training in medi- 
cine, dentistry, optometry, nursing, other medical-related professions, 
and professional engineering. These must be taken before entrance into 
the training for a chosen profession. 

Training for professional careers in Biology, Chemistry, and Phys- 
ics may be had by taking majors in these fields. Minors in related fields 
are taken which contribute to the broader background of the student. 

The foundation and survey courses are designed to give the general 
student an appreciation and understanding of the impact of the scien- 
tific discoveries, and the scientific method of thinking upon our mod- 
ern civilization. 

Relative to spiritual values the following quotation reflects the 
philosophy of the division of Natural Sciences and Mathematics: 

"All true science is but an interpretation of the handwriting of God 
in the material world. Science brings from her research only fresh evi- 
dences of the wisdom and power of God. Rightly understood, both the 
book of nature and the written word make us acquainted with God by 
teaching us something of the wise and beneficent laws through which 
He works." Ellen G. White, Patriarchs and Prophets, page 599. 

BIOLOGY 

Bachelor of Ar+s with a Major in Biology 

The courses in this subdivision are intended to give students a 
practical and cultural knowledge of this field of science, and to meet 
the needs of those planning to enter professional training in advanced 
biology, medicine, dentistry, nursing, and related fields. It is recom- 
mended that students majoring in biology minor in chemistry. 

Major: a major in biology consists of thirty semester hours, and 
must include Biology 1, 22, 45, 46, 110, and 127. 

Minor: a minor in Biology requires eighteen hours. 

Course Requirements 

Major (Biology) 30 hours 

Including 1, 22, 45, 46; 110, 127 

Minor: Chemistry recommended 18 hours 

124 



Biology Courses 

English 1-2, Literature 31-32 or 41-42 10 hours 

Fine Arts 61 or 62 4 hours 

Foreign Language 6-14 hours 

Health 7, 8 1 hour 

Religion (51 required) 12-16 hours 

Social Science 14 hours 

Electives — sufficient to make a four-year total 
of 128 semester hours. 

Pre-medical students majoring in Biology will add Physics 51-52, 
Algebra 11, Trigonometry 12, Organic Chemistry 113-114, Quantitative 
Analysis 102, General Embryology 145, and Political Science 115. 

The courses in Biology are intended to give the student funda- 
mental and accurate information as a basis for the development of a 
sound scientific philosophy and as preparation for professional training. 

1. General Biology First semester, 3 hours 

A study of biological principles and of the classification of the 
plant kingdom. Two hours lecture, three hours laboratory, each week. 

2. General Biology Second semester, 3 hours 

Consideration of biological principles as related to animal life. 
Study of typical members of each phylum in the animal kingdom. Two 
hours lecture, three hours laboratory, each week. 

11, 12. Anatomy and Physiology Both semesters, 6 hours 

A study of the fundamentals of human anatomy and physiology. 
Two hours lecture, three hours laboratory, each week. 

22. Microbiology Either semester, 4 hours 

A study of micro-organisms; their relation to the production of 
disease in man and their modes of transmissions; methods used in 
specific prevention or treatment of disease. Three hours lecture, three 
hours laboratory, each week. 

45, 46 General Zoology Both semesters, 8 hours 

A study of the general biological principles of all animal life 
including their general structure, physiology, habitat, classification and 
life history. Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory, each week. 

125 



Biology Courses 

94 or 104. Mammalian Anatomy Either semester, 2 hours 

Prerequisite: Biology 45 and 46, or equivalent. A junior or senior 

may register for this course for upper biennium credit. 

The cat is studied as a typical mammal. One-half hour lecture, five 

hours laboratory work each week. May be offered first semester also if 

required by five or more students. 

98 or 100. Yield Biology Summer Session, 3 hours 

Prerequisite: Biology 1 and 2 or equivalent. A study of the life of 
plants and animals in the natural environment. One hour lecture, five to 
six hours laboratory each week. 

*99 or 101. Conservation Summer Session, 3 hours 

Prerequisite: Biology 1 and 2 or equivalent. A study of our natural 
resources and their conservation. Two hours lecture, three hours labora- 
tory each week. Required for Elementary Teacher Certification. 

*106. Plant Physiology Second semester, 3 hours 

Prerequisite: Biology 1 or equivalent. 

A study of the structure and functions of roots, stems, leaves, flow- 
ers, and fruits of some of the more common plants. Two hours lecture, 
three hours laboratory, each week. 

*107. Parasitology First semester, 3 hours 

Prerequisite: Biology 2, or 45, or equivalent. 

A general survey of the more important parasites of man and domes- 
tic animals. Two hours lecture, three hours laboratory, each week. 

*109- Entomology Summer Term, 4 hours 

Prerequisite: Biology 2, 45, or equivalent. 

An introduction to insects with emphasis on structure, development 
and behavior. Classification of important orders and families and the 
use of insect keys will be stressed in laboratory work. Three hours lec- 
ture, three hours laboratory work, each week. 

110. Generics Second semester, 3 hours 

Prerequisite: Biology 1 and 2 or equivalent. 

A study of heredity as related to man and some domestic plants and 
animals. Two hours lecture, three hours laboratory, each week. 

* 1 19. Medical Entomology First semester, 3 hours 

Prerequisite: Biology 2, or 45, or equivalent. 

A study of morphological features, distribution, life history, and 
control of arthropods that parasitize animals or that ser've as vectors of 

*Not offered 1957-'58. 
126 



Biology Courses 

disease-producing organisms. Two hours lecture, three hours laboratory, 
each week. 

*122. The Liverworts, Mosses , and Ferns Summer term, 2 hours 

Prerequisite: Biology 1 or equivalent. 

A study of the liverworts, mosses, and ferns of this area. One hour 
lecture, five hours field work, each week. 

*127. Systematic Botany Second semester, 3 hours 

Prerequisite: Biology 1. 

The indentihcation of seed plants of the Collegedale area with a 
view of the acquisition of familiarity with the distinguishing features 
of the great plant groups. Two hours iecture, three hours laboratory, 
each week. 

145. General Embryology First semester, 3 hours 

Prerequisite: Biology 2, 45, or 46, or equivalent. 

An introduction to the development of the vertebrate animal with 
emphasis on the development of the chick. Two hours lecture, three 
hours laboratory, each week. 

*l46. Vertebrate Embryology Second semester, 2 hours 

Prerequisite: Biology 145- 

A study of the development of the chick and pig embryo by organ 
systems. Comparison is made with the human embryo. One hour lec- 
ture, three hours laboratory, each week. 

*l64. Human Physiology Second semester, 3 hours 

Prerequisite: Biology 11 and 12, or 45 and 46, or equivalent. 
A study of the structure and functions of the human body. Two 

hours lecture and three hours laboratory, each week. 

177. Microtechnique First semester, 3 hours 
Prerequisite: Biology 1, 2. 

Preparation, mounting and staining of various plant and animal 
tissues on slides for microscopic study. One hour lecture, six hours 
laboratory, each week. 

178. Animal Histology Second semester, 3 hours 
Prerequisite: Biology 2, 45 or 46 or equivalent. 

A descriptive study of normal tissues, including those of man. The 
microscopic identification and characteristics of stained sections is em- 



*Not offered 1957-'58. 

127 



Sequence for Major in Biology 



phasized in the laboratory. One hour lecture, six hours laboratory, each 
week. 

191 or 192. Problems in Biology 

I to 4 hours, I or 2 hours a semester 
This course is for biology majors and minors only; individual re- 
search work in some field of biology. Content and method of study to 
be arranged. 

Recommended Sequence for a Major in Biology 



■TRST YEAR 






15I/2 Hrs. 


First Semester 


16V 2 Hrs. 


Second Semester 


Sent. Hrs. 


Courses 


Sem. Hrs. 


Courses 


3 


Freshman Comp. 1 


3 


Freshman Comp. 2 


4 


Foreign Language 
College Algebra 11 


4 


Foreign Language 


3 


3 


Trigonometry 12 


3 


General Biology 1 


4 


Microbiology 22 


2 


Religion 1 or 11 


2 


Religion 2 or 12 


V2 

ECOND 


Physical Education 7 
YEAR 


V2 


Physical Education 8 


17 Hrs. 


First Semester 


18 Hrs. 


Second Semester 


Sem. Hrs. 


Courses 


Sem. Hrs. 


Courses 


0-3 


^Foreign Language 


0-3 


* Foreign Language 


4 


General Zoology 45 


4 


General Zoology 46 


4 


Genera] Chemistry 1 


4 


General Chemistry 2 


2 


Social Science 


3 


Prin. of Chr. Living 51 


2 


Gen. Psychology 51 


2 


Gen. Psychology 52 


3 


Anc. Med. Civil. 1 


3 


Modern Civil. 2 


2 


Fine Arts 


2 


Fine Arts 



THIRD YEAR 

16 Hrs. First Semester 
Sem. Hrs. Courses 



16 Hrs. Second Semester 
Sem. Hrs. Courses 



3 


Amer. Hist. & Inst. 53 


3 


Amer. Hist. & Inst. 54 


2 


Literature 31 or 41 


2 


Literature 32 or 42 


2 


Fund. Chr. Faith 59 


2 


Fund. Chr. Faith 60 


3 


Gen. Embryology 145 


3 


Syst. Botany 127 


2 


Other Elect. — Ed. Ill 


2 


Mam. Anat. 94 or 104 


4 


Elect. (Physics 51 rec.) 


4 


Elect. (Physics 52 rec.) 


FOURTH YEAR 






16 Hrs. 


First Semester 


16 Hrs. 


Second Semester 


Sem. Hrs. 


Courses 


Sem. Hrs. 


Courses 


2 


Daniel 165 


2 


Revelation 166 




Social Science 


3 


Social Science 


3 


Biol., El. 


3 


Biol., El. 


9 


Electives (must include 


3 


Genetics 110 




Minor) 


5 


Electives (must include 
Minor) 



*If language is taken, the History should be taken in junior year. 

Note — Students majoring in Biology who are taking pre-medicine must plan 
on taking General Physics 8 hours, Organic Chemistry 8 hours, and Qualitative 
and Quantitative Analysis during their junior and senior years. 

128 





|WBK 1 


>/ ^ 1 

_ 


^^^ 



(•? 



.*». 






• 




Chemistry 



CHEMISTRY 



It is intended in this subdivision to give students a practical and a 
cultural knowledge of this field of science, and to provide for the needs 
of those planning to become chemists or to enter professional training 
in medicine, dentistry, nursing, and related fields. 

A minor in Physics or Biology is recommended, and Mathematics 
through Calculus, and Physics 51-52 are advised. 

A major or minor in Chemistry must include Chemistry 102 and 
114 except for Home Economics or Dietetics students minoring in 
chemistry. 

This degree does not necessarily prepare for graduate work in 
chemistry unless Chemistry 151, 152 are included. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS WITH A MAJOR IN CHEMISTRY 

Course Requirements 

Major (Chemistry) 30 hours 

Including: 1-2; 63, 83-84; or 113-114; 
*102, 144. 

Minor in Mathematics, Physics, or Biology 

recommended 18 hours 

English 1-2, Literature 31-32 or 41-42 10 hours 

Fine Arts 61 or 62 4 hours 

Foreign Language 6-14 hours 

Health 7, 8 1 hour 

Religion 51 12-16 hours 

Social Science 14 hours 

Mathematics 11, 12 6 hours 

Electives — sufficient to make a four-year total 
of 128 semester hours. 

Pre-medical students will add Biology 45-46 (or 1, 2, and 94) and 
145, Physics 51-52, Algebra 11, and Trigonometry 12. They should 
include in the major, Chemistry 83-84 (or 113-114) and 102, Political 
Science 115. 

1-2. General Chemistry Both semesters, 8 hours 

Prerequisites: High school Algebra and either high school Physics 
or Chemistry or the instructor's permission. (It is recommended that 
Math. 11 and 12 be taken concurrently.) 

* 3 hours 

129 



Chemistry Courses 

An introduction to the elements and their principal compounds; 
the fundamental Jaws and accepted theories of chemistry. Three hours 
lecture, three hours laboratory, each week. 
7-8. Survey of Chemistry Both semesters, 6 hours 

High school algebra, and either high school physics or chemistry, 
or instructor's permission. 

A survey course designed to familiarize the student with the basic 
principles of chemistry. Attention Is given particularly to solutions, 
chemistry of nutrition, digestion, and metabolism. Especially helpful to 
nursing students and to students taking chemistry for science require- 
ment only. Two hours lecture, three hours laboratory, each week. 

63. Qualitative Analysis First semester, 2 or 3 hours 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 1-2, Mathematics 11, 12 or equivalent. 
A study of the principles and methods for the separation and identi- 
fication of inorganic ions; analysis of several unknowns. Two hours 
lecture (one hour of which is laboratory instruction requiring no home- 
work), two or hve hours laboratory, each week. 

83-84. (or 113-114) Organic Chemistry Both semesters, 8 hours 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 1-2. 

A study of the aliphatic and aromatic compounds of carbon and 
their reactions. The laboratory work includes typical syntheses of vari- 
ous compounds. Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory, each week. 

102. Quantitative Analysis Second semester , 2 or 3 hours 

Prerequisites: Chemistry 1-2, 63. 

This course includes the study of typical volumetric and gravimetric 
methods, quantitative determinations of acidity, alkalinity, and percent- 
age composition of a variety of unknowns. Two hours lecture for nine 
weeks, three or six hours laboratory, each week. 

121. Organic Qualitative Analysis First semester, 2 or 3 hours 
Prerequisite: Chemistry 83-84. 

Application of solubility principles, classification reactions and the 
preparation of derivatives to the identification of both pure compounds 
and mixtures. Two hours of lecture for nine weeks, and three or six 
hours of laboratory each week. 

122. Advanced Organic Chemistry Second semester, 3 hours 
Prerequisite: Chemistry 83-84. 

Laboratory principles and practice in the synthesis of various organic 
compounds and other selected topics. Two hours of lecture, and three 
hours of laboratory work each week. 

144. Laboratory Glass Blowing Either semester, I or 2 hours 

Training is given in the manipulation of glass for the fabrication of 

130 



Sequence for Chemistry Alajor 

laboratory apparatus. Three or six hours laboratory each week. This 
course does not count on basic science requirements nor on the 30 hours 
of the major. 

151:152. Physical Chemistry Both semesters, 8 hours 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 102, Physics 51-52, Mathematics 11 and 12. 
Calculus advised for 151, and required for 152. 

A study of the facts, laws, theories, and problems relating to gases, 
liquids, solids, solutions, equilibrium, thermo-chemistry, electro-chem- 
istry, and atomic structure. Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory, 
each week. 

171:172. Biochemistry Both semesters, 6 hours 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 83-84, (or 113-114). 

The materials, mechanisms, and end-products of the processes of 
life under normal and pathological conditions are studied. Two hours 
lecture, three hours laboratory, each week. 

190. Special Problems in Chemistry Either semester ) 1 to 3 hours 

Individual research under the direction of the members of the 
staff. Problems are assigned according to the experience and interest of 
the student. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS WITH A MAJOR IN CHEMISTRY 

Recommended Sequence with a Major in Chemistry '■ 

(Chemistry Major to meet pre-medical requirements) 



FIRST YI 


■ar 






151/2 Hrs. 
Sem. Hrs. 

3 

3 

4 
3 
2 

Vi 


First Semester 
Courses 

Freshman Comp. 1 
AJgebra 11 
General Chemistry 1 
Language II 
Religion 1 or 11 
Physical Education 7 


15!/ 2 Hrs. 
Sem. Hrs. 

3 

3 

4 
3 

2 

y 2 


Second Semester 
Courses 

Freshman Comp. 2 
Trigonometry 12 
General Chemistry 2 
Language II 
Religion 2 or 12 
Physical Education 8 


SECOND 


YEAR 






17 Hrs. 


First Semester 


16 Hrs. 


Second Semester 


Sem. Hrs. 


Courses 


Sem. Hrs. 


Courses 


3 
4 
4 
3 
3 


Qual. Analysis 63 

General Physics 51 

General Zoology 45 

History 

Prin. of Chr. Living 51 


3 

4 
4 
3 
2 


Quant. AnaJ. 102 
General Physics 52 
General Zoology 46 
History 
Religion 



131 



Bachelor of Science in Chemistry 

THIRD YEAR 

16 Hrs. First Semester 15-16 Hrs. Second Semester 
Sem. Hrs. Courses Sem. Hrs. Courses 

2 Literature 31 or 4 1 2 Literature 32 or 42 

2 Social Science 1-2 Glass Blowing 144 

4 Org. Chem. 83 (U3) 4 Org, Chem. 84 (114) 

4 Calculus 71 4 Calculus 72 

2 Religion 2 Religion 

2 Fine Arts 2 Fine Arts 

FOURTH YEAR 

17 Hrs. First Semester 15 Hrs. Second Semester 
Sem. Hrs. Courses Sem. Hrs. Courses 

"> Amer. Government 115 3 Social Science 

4 **Chem. (Upper Div.) 4 Chem. (Upper Div.) 

2 Daniel 165 2 Revelation 166 

3 Embryology 145 6 *Electives 

5 *EIectives 

Note: Students without Foreign Language take Language I 8 hours and 
Language II 6 hours in the freshman and sophomore years. This increases the 
total hours for graduation to 134. 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE WITH A MAJOR IN CHEMISTRY 

This degree is a preparation for graduate work in chemistry or foe 
a professional career in chemistry. 

Course Requirements 

j Major (Chemistry) 36-39 hours 

Including: 1-2; 63, 102, 113-114; 121, 
144, 151, 152, 122 or 171, 172 if stu- 
dent is interested in Biochemistry 
Minor should be chosen from Math., Physics, Biology 

or Foods and Nutrition 18 hours 

English 1-2 6 hours 

Literature 31-32, or 41-42 4 hours 

Fine Arts 61 or 62 4 hours 

Foreign Language — German 83, 84 6 hours 

Health 7, 8 1 hour 

Natural Sciences — Mathematics, Biology 22*** 
45***, 46***; Physics 51-52; Math. 11, 12, 
71, 72 34 hours 

*A minor should be chosen in one of the following fields by using electives as 
foIJows: Math. 4 hours, Biology 7 hours, or Physics 10 hours. 

**Chemistry majors are urged to take 1-2 hours of Chemistry 190. 

*** Required only for students planning to do graduate work in Biochemistry. 

132 



Sequence for Chemistry Major 

Religion 51 12-16 hours 

Social Science 11 hours 

Electives — sufficient to make a four-year total 
of 128 semester hours. 

Recommended Sequence for Bachelor of Science in Chemistry 
[For students planning graduate work in Chemistry) 



FIRST YEAR 






\6Vi Hrs 


First Semester 


I6V2 Hrs. 


Second Semester 


Sera. Hrs. 


Courses 


Sem. Hrs. 


Courses 


3 


Freshman Comp 1 


3 


Freshman Comp. 2 


4 


Begin. German 21 


4 


Begin. German 22 


3 


Algebra 11 


3 


Trigonometry 12 


2 


Religion 1 or 1 1 


2 


Religion 2 or 12 


4 


General Chemistry 1 


4 


General Chemistry 2 


SECOND 


Physical Education 7 
YEAR 


Vl 


Physical Education 8 


16 Hrs. 


First Semester 


16 Hrs. 


Second Semester 


Sem. Hrs. 


Courses 


Sem. Hrs. 


Courses 


3 


Principles of Chr. Living 


3 


Religion 


3 


Qua!. Analysis 63 


3 


Quant. Aanalysis 102 


4 


GeneraJ Physics 51 


4 


General Physics 5 2 


3 


History 


3 


History 


3 


Inter. German 83 


3 


Inter. German 84 



For students planning to do graduate work in Physical, Analytical, 
Inorganic, or Organic Chemistry: 



THIRD YEAR 

17 Hrs. First Semester 
Courses 

Organic Chemistry 113 
Diff. Calculus 71 
Religion 

Art Appreciation 6l 
Literature 
'* Physics or Mathematics 
Electives: (upper bien- 
nium) 

FOURTH YEAR 

First Semester 
Courses 

Physical Chemistry 151 
Org. Qual. Anal. 121 
Intro, to Sociology 20 
Physics or Math. Elect. 
* Electives 

Lab. Glass Blowing 144 
Special Probs. 190 



Sem. Hrs. 
4 
4 
2 
2 
2 
3 



17 Hrs. 
Sem. Hrs. 
4 
3 
2 
3 
3 
1 
1 



17 Hrs. 


Second Semester 


Sem. Hrs. 


Courses 


4 


Organic Chemistry 114 


4 


Integral Calculus 72 


2 


Religion 


2 


Music Elective 


2 


Literature 


3 


** Physics or Mathematics 




Electives: (upper bien- 




nium) 


17 Hrs. 


Second Semester 


Sem. Hrs. 


Courses 


4 


Physical Chemistry 152 


3 


Advanced Organic 122 


3 


Social Science 


3 


Phys. or Math. Elect. 


2 


Electives 


1 


Lab. Glass Blowing 144 


1 


Special Probs. 190 



*Religion 2 hours if less than 3 units in Academy. 
**It is recommended that these courses be chosen from the following: Atomic 
Physics, Thermodynamics, Optics, Electricity and Magnetism or upper 
division Mathematics. 



133 



Sequence for Chemistry Major 

For students planning to do graduate work in Biochemistry 

It is recommended that Microbiology be taken previous to this 
during one of the first two years. 

THIRD YEAR 



16 Hrs. 
Sem. Hrs. 
4 
4 

2 
2 
4 



First Semester 
Courses 
Chemistry 113 
Diflf. Calculus 71 
Religion 
Literature 
General Zoology 



45 



FOURTH YEAR 

17 Hrs. First Semester 
Sem. Hrs. Courses 

4 Physical Chemistry 151 

3 Org. Qual. Anal. 121 

3 Biochemistry 171 

1 Special Probs. 190 

2 Social Science 
I 2 **DanieJ 165 

2 Electives 

Hours to complete a 
minor: Biology 8*, 
Physics 10, Mathe- 
matics 4, or Foods 
and Nutrition 18. 



IS Hrs. Second Semester 

Sem. Hrs. Courses 

4 Chemistry 114 

4 Integral Calculus 72 

2 Lab. Glass Blow. 144 

2 Religion 

2 Literature 

4 General Zoology 46 



15-17 Hrs. Second Semester 

Sem. Hrs. Courses 

4 Physical Chemistry 152 

3 Biochemistry 172 

1 Special Probs. 190 
3 Social Science 

2 **Revelation 166 
2-4 EJectives 

Hours to complete a 
minor in Biology 8*, 
Physics 10, Mathe- 
matics 4, or Foods 
and Nutrition 18. 



MATHEMATICS 

The objectives of this subdivision are to acquaint the student with 
the meaning, scope, methods, and content of Mathematics, and to 
show some of the relationships and contributions of this science to 
modern civilization and culture. 

Minor: A minor in Mathematics requires eighteen hours (exclusive 
of Mathematics 1-2). 

1. Fundamental Concepts of Mathematics First semester, 2 hours 
This course is designed for the teacher education program. It em- 
phasizes the major concepts of number, measurement, function and 
proof which help man to understand the quantitative relationships in his 
natural and social environment. 

2. Functional Mathematics Second semester, 2 hours 

A thorough review of fundamental processes of arithmetic; develop- 
ment of a mature understanding of arithmetic. 



*If Microbiology has been taken previously, otherwise 12 hours are needed. 
For the 8 hours, Physiology and Genetics are recommended. 
**If Jess than 3 Academy units. 



134 



Mathematics Courses 

11. College Algebra First semester, 3 hours 
Prerequisite: One year of high school Algebra. 

Students with two years of high school Algebra may not receive 
credit for this course. 

A review of fundamental operations; first and second degree equa- 
tions; determinants; imaginary numbers; binomial theorem; theory of 
equations. 

12. Plane Trigonometry Second semester, 3 hours 
Prerequisite: Math. 11, and Plane Geometry. 

A study of the six trigonometric functions, and of logarithms; their 
use in the solution of the triangle. 

15. Slide Rule Either semester, 1 hour 

Prerequisite: Math. 12 advised. Offered upon demand. 

51, 52. Analytical Geometry Both semesters, 4 hours 

No credit may be received for the above courses if Math. 71 and 72 

has been taken previously. 

Equations of useful curves in rectangular and polar coordinates; 

plotting of complex numbers; methods of finding the equations for 

experimental curves. Some calculus is introduced and used. 

71, 72. Differential and Integral Calculus Both semesters, 8 hours 
Prerequisite: Math. 11 and 12. Math. 71 is required for enrollment 

in Math. 72. Upper biennium students may receive upper biennium 

credit for this course. 

The methods of the Calculus with extensive applications in the 

fields of Chemistry and Physics. 

111. Differential Equations First semester, 3 hours 

Prerequisite: Math. 71 and 72. 

Introduction to the differential equations to be encountered in 
advanced work In Physics or Chemistry. Solutions for simple boundary 
conditions. 

*112. Theory of Statistics and Probability Second semester, 3 hours 
Prerequisite: Math. 71 and 72. 

*114. Vector Analysis Second semester, 3 hours 

Prerequisite: Math. 71 and 72. 
Representation of geometric and physical quantities in a form inde- 



*Not offered 1957-*58. 

135 



Major in Natural Science 

pendent of the coordinate system. Fundamental physical equations trans- 
ferred from one set of coordinates to another. 

*115. Complex Numbers and Mapping First semester, 3 hours 

Prerequisite: Math. 71 and 72. 

Analysis of alternating current circuits and similar oscillatory phe- 
nomena with the use of complex numbers; mapping of fields and flow 
on the complex plane. 

*120. Problems in Mathematics Either semester, 3 hours 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE WITH A MAJOR IN NATURAL 
SCIENCE 

Course Requirements 

Major (Natural Sciences) 36 hours 

This major is designed especially for teachers to enable them to 
receive a wider, more diversified training in the whole area of Natural 
Sciences. (Biological Science, Chemistry, Physics, Mathematics.) It 
consists of thirty-six semester hours, eighteen of which must be in one 
area (six of which must be upper biennium), and a minimum of eight 
hours each in two others. Open only to prospective teachers. 

Education— Psychology 5, 51, 52, 111, 135. 
136, 173, 174; 190 or 192; 107, 150 or 

180 (This gives a minor in Education) 24 hours 

English 1-2 6 hours 

Literature 31-32, or 41-42 4 hours 

Speech 5-6 4 hours 

Fine Arts 61 or 62 4 hours 

Health 7, 8 6 hours 

Religion, Required 51 12-16 hours 

Social Science 14 hours 

**Electives — sufficient to maks a four-year total 
of 128 semester hours. 

PHYSICS 

The courses in this subdivision are intended to present Physics as a 
typical science, and to acquaint students with its relation to other 
sciences and with some of its applications in the fields of research, 
engineering, radio communication, medicine, and dentistry. 

**Electives to be selected to meet denominational and state certification. 
*Not offered 1957-'58. 

136 



Physics Courses 

Major: A major in Physics requires thirty hours. Mathematics 
through Differential equations is indispensable. Industrial Education 
1-2 is suggested for the vocational requirement for students who do 
not follow the pre-medical curriculum. 

Minor: A minor in Physics requires eighteen hours. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS WITH A MAJOR IN PHYSICS 

Course Requirements 
Major (Physics) 30 hours 

(Chemistry 1-2; Math. 11, 12, 51, 52, 

71, 72, 111 are recommended) 

Minor 18 hours 

English 1-2 6 hours 

Literature 31-32 or 41-42 4 hours 

Fine Arts 61 or 62 4 hours 

Foreign Language 6-14 hours 

Health 7, 8 1 hour 

Religion (51 required) 12-16 hours 

Social Science 14 hours 

EJectives — sufficient to make a four-year total 

of 128 semester hours. 

51-52. General Physics Both semesters, 8 hours 

Prerequisite: Math. 11 and 12. 

An introductory course in mechanics and heat; wave motion and 
sound; magnetism and electricity; light and modern physics. Three 
hours lecture, three hours laboratory, each week. 

62. Descriptive Astronomy First semester, 3 hours 

Prerequisite: Math. 11 and 12, (or 2 units of secondary math). 
An elementary study of our solar system and its relation to the 
stellar universe. A student with the necessary background in Physics 
and Mathematics may, upon the advice of the division chairman, receive 
upper biennium credit by doing additional and more advanced work. 

*81. Electronics First semester, 4 hours 

Prerequisite: Math. 11 and 12. 

Three hours lecture, and three hours laboratory, each week. Upper 
biennium students may receive upper biennium credit by doing addition- 
al work. 

*Not offered l957-'58 

137 



Physics Courses 

**102. Physical Optics First semester, 4 hours 

Prerequisite: Physics 51-52; Math. 71 and 72. 

Refraction, reflection, interference, and absorption of light axe 
shown to follow from the principles introduced in General Physics. 
Three hours lecture, and three hours laboratory, each week. 

** 122. Atomic and Molecular Spectroscopy Second semester 3 hours 

Prerequisite: Physics 51-52, Math. 71-72. 

Experimental techniques and theoretical interpretations of the re- 
sults. This course is of definite value for the student contemplating 
work in industry. Two hours lecture, three hours laboratory, each week. 

123- Atomic Physics First semester, 3 hours 

Prerequisite: Physics 51-52; Mathematics 111. 

Analysis of atomic spectra from the Bohr-Sommerfeld model of 
the atom. Introduction to the wave mechanics. 

124. Nuclear Physics Second semester, 3 hours 

Prerequisite: Physics 123. 

The contributions of each of several models of the nucleus to our 
understanding of radioactivity, fusion and fission. Discussion of the 
source of stellar energy. 

* * 1 51 -1 52, Analytic Mechanics Both semesters, 6 hours 

Prerequisite: Physics 51-52, Math. 71, 72. Math. Ill advised. 
The mechanics of general physics is reformulated in more advanced 
terms, and problems such as that of the gyroscope are discussed. Intro- 
duction to the theory of relativity. Vectors are discussed as needed. 

161- 162. Electricity and Magnetism Both semestei'S, 6 hours 

Prerequisites: Physics 51-52; Math. 71, 72; 111. 

The electromagnetic principles of general physics are reformulated 
in advanced terms so that problems may be discussed such as wave 
guides. Vectors are introduced as needed. Three hours lecture, or occas- 
ionally, two hours lecture and three hours laboratory, each week. 

*181, 182. Problems in Physics Either semester, 3 hours 



*Wi)] be offered on demand. 
**Not offered 1957-'58. 

138 



Sequence for Major in Physics 

Recommended Sequence with a Major in Physics** 
(Physics Major to meet pre-medical requirements) 



■IRST 


YEAR 




I6V2 Hrs. 


First Semester 


I6V2 Hrs. 


Sem. Hrs. 


Courses 


Sem. Hrs. 


2 
3 
3 
4 
4 
Vz 




Religion 1 or 11 
Freshman Comp. 1 
AJgebra 11 
General Chemistry 1 
General Zoology 45 
Physical Education 


2 
3 

3 

4 

4 

Vz 



SECOND YEAR 

18 Hrs. FrRST Semester 



Second Semester 
Courses 

Religion 2 or 12 
Freshman Comp. 2 
Trigonometry 12 
General Chemistry 2 
General Zoology 46 
Physical Education 8 



18 Hrs. Second Semester 



Sem. Hrs. 


Ctftfrjtfj- 


Sem. Hrs. 


cT^z/r-f^ 


3 
4 
4 
3 
2 
2 


Prin. of Chr. Living 51 
Calculus 71 
General Physics 51 
Amer. Hist. & Inst. 53 
Fine Arts 
Electives 


3 
4 
4 
3 
2 
2 


Religion 
Calculus 72 
General Physics 52 
History 54 
Social Science 
Fine Arts 


THIRD YEAR 






15-16 Hrs. 


First Semester 


17 Hrs. 


Second Semester 


Sem. Hrs. 


Courses 


Sem. Hrs. 


Courses 


2-3 
3 
4 
3 
3 


Qualitative Analysis 63 
Diff. Equations 111 
Electronics 81 
Language II 
Amer. Government 115 


2-3 
3 
2 
3 
3 
3 


Quan. Analysis 102 
Physical Optics 102 
Social Science 
Language II 
History 
Electives 


FOURTH 


YEAR 






16 Hrs. 


First Semester 


16 Hrs. 


Second Semester 


Sem. Hrs. 


Courses 


5<ew. HrJ. 


Courses 


3 
3 
4 
2 
2 
2 


Atomic Physics 123 
Electromagnetism 161 
Organic Chemistry 83 
Literature 31 or 4l 
Daniel 165 
Physics Electives 


3 

3 

4 
2 
2 
2 


Nuclear Physics 124 
Electromagnetism 162 
Organic Chemistry 84 
Literature 32 or 42 
Revelation 166 
Electives 



** Arranged for students with no Religion in Secondary School, but who have 
had language. 

Note: Mathematics minor may be completed by an additional 3 hours of 
upper biennium work. 



139 



ELIGION, THEOLOGY, APPLIED THEOLOGY 



Edward C. Banks, Chairman; Otto H. Christensen, Henry 
Baasch, Gordon M. Hyde 

The course in theological training at Southern Missionary College 
is integrated with the curriculum at the Seventh-day Adventist 
Theological Seminary in Takoma Park, Washington, D. C. This 
program requires five years, the first four of which are taken at this 
college and the fifth at the Theological Seminary. A total of 128 se- 
mester hours leading to the Bachelor of Arts Degree will be taken on 
the under-graduate devel, and the Master of Arts Degree in Religion 
will be taken on the graduate level. 

Approval for entrance into, and continuance in, the ministerial cur- 
riculum of Southern Missionary College is to be secured from the sub- 
committee on Ministerial Recommendations, which is giiided by the 
following standards and procedures: 

I. STANDARD OF EVALUATION 

The student who pJans to enter the ministry should meet the following quali- 
fications: 

1. He should give evidence of a deep spiritual experience and manifest a sen- 
sible and sound balance in Christian Jiving. 

2. He should be physically sound and in good health, maintaining an accept- 
able standard of personal hygiene. 

3. He should be well-adjusted socially and show promise of normal maturity. 

4. He should possess a pleasing personaliy, a talent for leadership, and give 
promise of ability in public speaking. 

5. He should give evidence of industry, initiative, punctuality, dependability, 
and neatness. 

6. He should be co-operative, adaptable, and able to get along with others. 

7. He should be a man of integrity in business matters. 

8. He should indicate his ability to maintain a home on the income nf an intern 
or a minister. 

9. Morally he should be above reproach in his relations with men and women, 
and in his own private conduct. 

10. If married, he should have a home life in keeping with the ideals of a 
Christian. If contemplating marriage, he should be expected to maintain, 
high standards in his courtship and selection of a wi c e. 

11. He should feel, and be able to give evidence, that he has been called to 
the ministry, and that no other type of work for God can, or will, satisfy 
him. 

12. He should be an active participant in the missionary endeavors of his church 
and his Missionary Volunteer Society; he should be able loyally and intelli- 
gently to take his part in organized group activity; he should become pro- 
gressively more conversant with organizational procedures and committee 
techniques. 

13- He should achieve a grade-point average of 1.25 in the lower biennium be- 
fore applying for admission to the ministerial curriculum or to the upper 
biennium of the arts and sciences curriculum with a major in religion, 

140 



Bachelor of Arts with a Major in Theolagy 

a. It is understood that failure to reach the grade-point average specified bars 
him from admission. If he elects to make a second attempt, repetition in 
low-grade courses is limited to 25 per cent of the total hours earned up 
to the time of the application, and no course may be repeated twice. 

b. An applicant not admitted to the upper biennium because of a low grade- 
point average shall not lose his draft status unless he exceeds the limits 
set in the paragraph preceding. 

c. A grade-point average of 1.25 must be maintained in the upper biennium. 

II. PROCEDURES 

1. A freshman is provisionally enrolled in the pre-ministerial curriculum (lower 
biennium) at the beginning of his first semester. At the end of the first nine 
weeks, he is to apply to the Sub-committee on Ministerial Recommendations 
for confirmation of the enrollment. 

a. A freshman who ranks in the lowest third of the national norms of the 
battery of entrance tests must present to the sub-committee a request for 
special consideration. 

b. A freshman giving evidence of emotional instability, unchristian char- 
acter, or social maladjustment, is not to be admitted, even provisionally, 
to the curriculum mentioned above. 

2. A student hoping to enter the ministerial curriculum, must on completing his 
sophomore requirements, apply for admission to the upper biennium. 

a. Applications may De presented at the end of the summer session, and at the 
mid-term of each semester. 

b. Candidates denied permission to major (admission to the upper biennium) 
may build a minor in religion. 

3. A student transferring from another college is to be admitted provisionally. 
On comDletion of fourteen hours of credit, the student is to apply for perma- 
nent admission. Admission will be granted if a grade-point average of 1.25 
has been maintained, and if the student meets the other qualifications deemed 
necessary by the Sub-committee on Ministerial Recommendations. 

4. Each semester each pre-ministerial and ministerial student is requested to 
report his participation in missionary and church activities to the chairman of 
the Sub-committee on Ministerial Recommendations. 

It is recommended that the student spend one summer in organized 
soul-winning evangelistic work, preferably by spending 350 hours in 
literature evangelism. 



BACHELOR OF ARTS WITH A MAJOR IN THEOLOGY 

Course Requirements and Recommendations 

Major (Religion and Bible) 30 hours 

Required: Bible 11, 12, 165, 166; 

Religion 51, 59, 60 
Applied Theology 6 hours 

Required: Introduction to the Ministry 

175, 176; Recommended: Personal 

Evangelism 73 



141 



Sequence for Major in Religion 

Minor 18 hours 

Psychology 8 hours 

Required: Education 51, l6l 

English 1-2, Literature 31, 32 or 41, 42 10 hours 

Speech 8 hours 

Required: 5-6, 119-120 
Fine Arts 6 hours 

Required: Fundamentals of Music 1 

Recommended: 16, 61 or 62 
Foreign Language 14 hours 

Required: Greek 31-32; 81-82 
Health 1 hour 

Required: 7, 8 
Natural Science - 12 hours 

(Six hours must be a science with laboratory) 
History, Social Studies 16 hours 

Required: History 1, 2; Recommended: 

Sociology 82, History 6, 151, 152 
Vocational 4 hours 

Recommended Secretarial Science 13 
EJectives — sufficient to make a four-year 

total of 128 semester hours. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS WITH A MAJOR IN RELIGION 

Only students with a double major, pre-medicai students, women, 
or male students above 35 years of age at the time of their registration 
will be permitted to take a major in religion without meeting the 
other requirements of the theological curriculum. Six hours of Applied 
Theology may count on this major. 

Course Requirements 

Major (Religion and Bible) 30 hours 

Including: 11, 12, 59, 60, 165, 1 66 

Minor - 18 hours 

English 1-2, Literature 31-32 or 41-42 10 hours 

Fine Arts 4 hours 

Foreign Language 6-14 hours 

142 



Sequence for Major in Religion 

Health 7, 8 1 hour 

Natural Science — Mathematics 12 hours 

Social Science 1, 2, 82 12 hours 

Vocational 4 hours 

Electives — sufficient to make a four-year 
total of 128 semester hours. 

BIBLE 

I, 2. Bible Survey Both semesters, 4 hours 

An introduction to the Scriptures, required of those who have not 
had Old or New Testament history in the secondary school. Exemption 
may be obtained by examination. Credit for this course does not apply 
on a major in religion. 

II, 12. Life and Teachings of Jesus Both semesters, 4 hours 
The inter-testamental background of the times of Jesus, as well as a 

chronological study of Jesus' life and teachings, as found in the four 

Gospels. Also included are the spiritual lessons from this study. 

151, 152. Pauline Epistles Both semesters } 6 hours 

An exegetical study of the Pauline epistles in the order of their 
composition, including a background survey of the book of Acts. (See 
Biblical Languages, 101-104). 
131, 132. Old Testament Prophets Both semesters, 6 hours 

A survey of the major and minor prophets of the Old Testament in- 
cluding a background of their lives and teaching, with the application 
of their messages for modern man. 

165. Darnel First semester, 2 hours 
A comprehensive study of the great prophecies of the book of Dan- 
iel and their lessons for our day, including a survey of its background 
and historical setting. Special attention is given to the defense of the 
book against modern critics. 

166. Revelation Second semester, 2 hours 
A study of the prophecies and symbolisms of this book with their 

historical fulfillments and their intimate relationship to the prophecies 
of the book of Daniel. 

RELIGION 

*51. Principles of Christian Living Either semester, 3 hours 

This course is required of all students. It begins with the Biblical 

prophets and the significance of their messages, follows through to 

*Will not appjy on State Teacher Certification. 

143 



Religion Courses 

Divine guidance for Christian living today with emphasis on counsel 
on health and education for Seventh-day Adventists. 
*59, 60. Fundamentals of the Christian Faith 

Both semesters, 4 hours 
A study of the doctrines of the Christian Faith and their application 
to life. 

* 155. Evidences of Christianity First semester, 2 hours 

A critical study of the great themes or problems of the Christian 
religion for qualifying the prospective Christian worker to meet the 
challenge of his faith. 
*160. Doctrine of the Atonement Second semester, 2 hours 

A study of the great underlying principles of the plan of salvation 
as illustrated to Israel by the sanctuary service. 
*174. Manuscripts of the Bible Second semester, 2 hours 

A study of the ancient sacred writings of Israel and their preserva- 
tion and development into our present Bible, with emphasis on the 
discovery and classification of manuscripts and the various versions and 
revisions. 

* 194. Problems in Religion Second semester, 2 hours 

Guided research in religious problems. Open only to religion majors 
with 20 semester hours credit in religion. 

RELIGION COURSES — Offered on the Orlando Campus 

54. Ministry of Healing and World Religion Second semester, 2 hours 
A study of the principles of Christian living and the work of 
Christ as the Great Medical Missionary. A brief survey of the major 
religious beliefs of the world with emphasis on the responsibilities 
of the nurse in caring for patients with varying religions. 
91-92. Bible Doctrines and Personal Evangelism 

Both semesters, 4 hours 
A comprehensive course in the fundamental doctrines of the Bible 
and a consideration of the beliefs of Seventh-day Adventists. A study 
of methods for doing personal work in winning men to Christ, in- 
cluding the preparation and art of giving Bible studies. 

APPLIED THEOLOGY 

73- Principles of Personal Evangelism Second semester, 2 hours 

A study of methods for doing personal work in winning men to 
Christ, including the preparation and art of giving Bible studies. Credit 
for this course can apply on a major or minor in religion for all 
students except theology students. 



*Will not apply for State Teacher Certification. 
144 



Sequence for Major in Theology 

112. Church Polity and Organization Second semester, 2 hours 

A survey of the problems of church polity and an analysis of the 
Seventh-day Adventist system of church and denominational manage- 
ment. 

175. Introduction to the Ministry First semester, 3 hours 
A study of the man who performs as a minister, including the call 

to the ministry, intellectual and spiritual qualification and ways in 
which he should be prepared in order to render successful service 
to the church. 

176. Introduction to the Ministry Second semester, 3 hours 
A study of the various duties and responsibilities of a minister and 

how to perform them. 



Recommended Sequence for Major in Theology 



FIRST YEAR 



16V2 Hrs. 


First Semester 


I6V2 Hrs, 


Sem. Hrs. 


Courses 


Sem. Hrs. 


2 


Teachings of Jesus 11 


2 


3 


Freshman Comp. 1 


3 


3 


Nat. Sci. (Biology 1 
recommended) 


3 


3 


Ancient Civilization 1 


3 


2 


Vocationa) (Secretarial 
Science 13 recommended) 


2 


1 


General Psychology 51 




V2 


Physical Education 7 


Vi 


1 


Elective 


2 
1 


SECOND 


YEAR 




16 Hrs. 


First Semester 


17 Hrs. 


Sem. Hrs. 


Courses 


Sem. Hrs. 


1 


Fundamentals of Music 1 


1 


4 


Elem. N. T. Greek 31 


4 


2 


Fund, of Speech 5 


2 


2 


Fund, of Christ. Faith 59 


2 


3 


Natural Science 


3 


2 


Literature 31 or 4l 


2 


2 


Fine Arts 


3 


THIRD YEAR 




16 Hrs. 


First Sbmestbr 


16 Hrs. 


Sem. Hrs. 


Courses 


Sem. Hrs, 


2 


School Org. & Admin. 


2 


2 


Sermon Prep. & De\. 119 


2 


3 


Old Test. Prophets 131 or 
Pauline Epistles 151 


3 


2 


Soc. Sci. (or Sociology 82 


2 




recommended) 


3 


3 


Inter. Greek 81 


4 


4 


Elective 





Second Semester 
Courses 

Teachings of Jesus 12 
Freshman Comp. 2 
Nat. Sci. (Biology 2 
recommended) 
Modern Civilization 2 
Vocational (Secretarial 
Science 14 or Auto Mech. 
52 recommended) 
Physical Education 8 
Fine Arts 
Elective 



Second Semester 
Courses 

Conducting 16 (recom.) 
Elem. N. T. Greek 32 
Fund, of Speech 6 
Fund, of Christ. Faith 60 
Natural Science 
Literature 32 or 42 
Principles of Christ. Liv. 



Second Semester 
Courses 

Prin. of Per. Evangel. 73 
Sermon Prep. & Del. 120 
Old Test. Prophets 132 or 
Pauline Epistles 152 
SDA Church History 6 
Inter. Greek 82 
Elective 



145 



Curriculum for Bible Instructor 



FOURTH YEAR 






16 Hrs. 


First Semester 


16 Hrs. 


Second Semester 


Sein. Hrs. 


Courses 


Sem. Hrs. 


C<9ftr.f£.r 


2 


Daniel 165 


2 


Revelation 166 


3 


Intro, to Ministry 175 


3 


Intro, to Ministry 176 


3 


O. T. P. or Paul. Epistles 


3 


O. T. P. or Paul. Epistles 


2 


MSS of the Bible 174 


2 


Doctrine of Atone. 160 


3 


Anc. & Med. Chr. 151 


3 


Modern Chr. 152 


3 


Elective 


3 


Elective 



Recommended Sequence for Major in Religion 
FIRST YEAR 



151/2 Hrs. 


First Semester 


151/2 Hrs. 


Second Semester 


Sem. Hrs. 


Courses 


Sem. Hrs. 


Courses 


3 
4 
3 
2 
3 
1/2 


Freshman Comp. 1 
Foreign Language 
Ancient Civilization 1 
Teachings of Jesus 11 
Natural Science (lab) 
Physical Education 7 


3 
4 
3 
2 
3 

Vi 


Freshman Comp. 2 
Foreign Language 
Modern Civilization 2 
Teachings of Jesus 12 
Natural Science (Jab) 
Physical Education 8 


SECOND 


YEAR 






16 Hrs. 


Fjrst Semester 


16 Hrs. 


Second Semester 


Sem. Hrs. 


Courses 


Sem. Hrs. 


Courses 


3 

2 
3 
2 
2 
2 
2 


Amer. Hist. & Inst. 53 
Fund, of Speech 5 
Foreign Language 
Fine Arts 

Literature 31 or 41 
♦Fund, of Chr. Faith 59 
Spirit of Prophecy 


2 

2 

3 
2 
2 
2 
1 


♦Hist, of Seventh-day 
Adventist Church 6 
Fund, of Speech 6 
Foreign Language 
Fine Arts 

Literature 32 or 42 
Fund, of Chr. Faith 6( 
Amer. Hist. & Inst. 54 


THIRD YEAR 






1.6 Hrs. 


First Semester 


16 Hrs. 


Second Semester 


5tf.w. Hrj\ 


Courses 


Sem-. Hrs. 


Courses 


2 
3 
3 
3 
2 
3 


Gen. Psychology 51 
Old Test. Prophets 131 
Pauline Epistles 151 
Natural Science Elect. 
Vocational 
Electives 


2 
3 
3 
3 
2 
3 


Marriage and Family 81 
Old Test. Prophets 132 
Pauline Epistles 152 
Natural Science Elect. 
Vocational 
EJectives 


FOURTH 


YEAR 






16 Hrs. 


First Semester 


16 Hrs. 


Second Semester 


Sem. Hrs. 


Courses 


Sem. Hrs. 


Courses 


3 
2 
2 
9 


Anc. & Med. Chr. 151 

Daniel 165 

Evid. of Christianity 155 

Electives 


3 
2 
2 
9 


Mod. Christianity 152 
Revelation 166 
Bible Manuscripts 174 
Electives 



*Do not apply toward teacher certification by State of Tennessee. 
146 



Curriculum for Bible Instructor 

TWO-YEAR CURRICULUM FOR BIBLE INSTRUCTOR 

For admission requirements see page 30. 

This curriculum is intended to prepare young women for work as 
Bible instructors in connection with the evangelistic activities of the 
Seventh-day Adventist denomination. 



FIRST YEAR 






I6I/2 Hrs. 


First Semester 


l6i/ 2 Hrs. 


Second Semester 


Sem. Hrs. 


Courses 


Sem. Hrs. 


C7o«rX^j- 


1 
2 
3 
3 
3 
2 

V2 

2 


Applied Music 
General Psychology 51 
freshman Comp. 1 
Foods and Nutrition 1 
Natural Science 
Religion 1 or 11 
Health 7 
Electives 


1 
2 
3 
3 
3 
2 

Vi 

2 


Applied Music 
General Psychology 5: 
Freshman Comp. 2 
Foods & Nutrition 2 
Natural Science 
Religion 2 or 12 
Health 8 
Electives 


SECOND 


YEAR 






16 Hrs. 


Fjrst Semester 


16 Hrs. 


Second Semester 


Sem. Hrs. 


Courses 


Sem. Hrs. 


Courses 


1 
2 
3 
1 
2 
2 
2 
3 


Applied Music 

Personal Evang. 73 

Anc. & Med. Civil. 1 

Music 1 

Fund, of Chr. Faith 59 

Fund, of Speech 5 

Social Science 

Prin. of Christ. Living 


1 
2 
3 

2 

2 
2 
4 


Applied Music 
Social Science 82 
Mod. Civilization 2 
Hist, of Seventh-day 
Adventist Church 6 
Fund, of Chr. Faith 60 
Fund of Speech 6 
Electives 



147 



SOCIAL SCIENCES 



G. E. Shankel, Chairman; E. T. Watrous 

The objectives of the Division of Social Sciences are to aid in the 
application of divine ideals to all human relationships; to foster an ap- 
preciation of true social and political culture, locally, nationally, and 
internationally; to develop an intelligent understanding of the rela- 
tionship between history and Biblical prophecy; and to prepare teach- 
ers in the social sciences. 

The purpose of the social studies is to assist the student in under- 
standing the complexities of modern society and how the providence of 
God has influenced history. It is designed to enable him to prepare him- 
self and others for the service of mankind here and for the life hereafter. 

Major in Social Sciences. A major in social sciences shall in- 
clude forty-two hours: twenty-four hours of history and eighteen hours 
from any of the following fields, not more than nine hours from any 
one field: economics, geography, political science, sociology. The fol- 
lowing courses are required: Principles of Economics, six hours; Ameri- 
can State and National Government, three hours; Contemporary Inter- 
national Relations, three hours; Introduction to Sociology, two hours. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS WITH A MAJOR IN HISTORY 
Course Requirements 

Major (History) 30 hours 

Including: 1, 2, 53, 54, 184 
Minor - 18 hours 

English 1-2 6 hours 

Literature 31-32 or 41-42 4 hours 

Fine Arts 61 or 62 4 hours 

Foreign Language 6-14 hours 

Health 7, 8, 1 hour 

Natural Sciences — Mathematics 12 hours 

Religion 51 12-16 hours 

Vocational 4 hours 

Electives — sufficient to make a four-year total 
of 128 semester hours. 

HISTORY 

Major: A major in history requires thirty hours. It shall include 
History 1, 2, 53, 54, and 184, and may include six hours of upper bt- 
ennium political science credit. 

148 



History Courses 

Minor: For a minor in history eighteen hours are required, includ- 
ing History 1, 2, 53, 54. It should include three hours of upper bi- 
ennium political science credit. 

1, 2. Survey of Civilization Both semesters, 6 hours 

An introductory consideration of the ancient classical and medieval 
contributions to our own civilization, and a consideration of modern and 
current developments. 

**6. History of the Seventh-day Adventist Church 

Second semester, 2 hours 

A survey of the rise and progress of the Seventh-day Adventist 
church. Factors such as the objectives, philosophy, and policies of the 
denomination are examined. 
53, 54. American History and Institutions Both semesters, 6 hours 

A study of the development of the character and civilization of the 
American people, including their politics and social institutions, and 
reaching to the present time. 
Ill, 112. The Renaissance and the Reformation 

Both semesters, 4 hours 

An analysis of the revival of learning, of the social changes from 
medieval to modern conditions, and of the causes and courses of the 
Protestant Reformation which was followed by the Counter Reforma- 
tion. 
115. The Revolutionary Era Second semester, 3 hours 

An analysis of the social, political, religious, cultural, and eco- 
nomic movements during the revolutionary period 1789-1815. 

131. History of Antiquity First semester, 3 hours 
Prerequisite: History 1, or equivalent. 

A study of the ancient nations, chiefly Babylonia, Assyria, Egypt, 
Persia, and Israel. 

132. History of the Classical World Second semester, 3 hours 
Prerequisite: History 1, or equivalent. 

A consideration of Greek culture, of Alexander's Hellenistic em- 
pire, of Roman institutions, and of the impact of Christianity upon the 
ancient world. 

**145, 146. History of Latin America Both semesters, 4 hours 

Prerequisite: History 5 3 and 54, or equivalent. 

A survey of the colonial period, and a careful analysis of the 
political, economic, social, religious, and cultural development of the 
Latin-American Republics, and their present relation to world affairs. 



*Does not apply on State Teachers Certification 

**Not offered I957-'58. 



149 



Political Science Courses 

**l48. History of the South Second semester, 3 hours 

A study of the old South from the discovery through the war be- 
tween the states, the reconstruction and the subsequent developments 
and recent changes, including the current scene. 

**151. Ancient and Medieval Christianity First semester, 3 hours 

Prerequisite: History 1, or equivalent. 

A survey of movements, tendencies, doctrines, and personalities in 
the Christian church from Apostolic days to the modern era. 

**152. Modern Christianity Second semester, 3 hours 

Prerequisite: History 2, or equivalent. 

A study of the reformatory movements in various countries and the 
development of the modern and current religious situation. 

**184. Seminar in History Second semester, \ hour 

Open only to majors in history. Problems of historical research, 
materials, and methods. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 

.115. American National and State Government 

> First semester, 3 hours 

Xhe establishment and operation of the Federal Constitution; the 
national and local judiciary; state, county, and local governments. 

**162. Contemporary International Relations Second semester, 3 hours 
Prerequisite: History 1 and 2 or 53 and 54 or equivalent. 
A critical analysis of the chief factors influencing present-day world 
affairs, with special emphasis on the ideological and religious back- 
ground of current conflicts. 

SOCIOLOGY 

20. Introduction to Sociology Either semester, 2 hours 

82. Marriage and the Family Either semester, 2 hours 

A course in the ethics of human relationships including the place 
of the family in society, a Christian approach to the problem of mar- 
riage and family life and the inter-relation of parents and children. 
(By special arrangement to do extra work, this course may carry upper 
,biennium credit as Sociology 182.) 

.156. Field of Social Work Second semester, 3 hours 

The historical background, methods, and functions of public and 
private programs in the field of social welfare. 

**Not offered l957-"58. 
150 



Sociology, Geography Courses 



GEOGRAPHY 



141. World Geography Second semester, 3 hours 

Maps, land forms, soil, mineral resources, weather, and climate are 
considered. Man's adjustment to various physiographic regions is stud- 
ied. 



Recommended Sequence for a Major in History 



FIRST YEAR 






151/2 Hrs. 


First Semester 


15!/2 Hrs. 


Second Semester 


Sem. Hrs. 


Courses 


Sem. Hrs. 


Courses 


2 


Religion 1 or 11 


2 


Religion 2 or 12 


3 


Freshman Comp. 1 


3 


Freshman Comp. 2 


3 


Survey of Civil. 1 


3 


Survey of Civil. 2 


4 


Foreign Language 


4 


Foreign Language 


3 


Natuxal Science 


3 


Natural Science 


Y2 


Physical Education 7 


*/2 


Physical Education 8 


SECOND 


YEAR 






17 Hrs. 


First Semester 


16 Hrs. 


Second Semester 


Sem. Hrs. 


Courses 


Sem. Hrs. 


Courses 


3 


Amer. Hist. & Inst. 53 


3 


Amer. Hist. & Inst. 54 


2 


Intro, to Sociology 20 


2 


Fine Arts 


2 


Fine Arts 


2 


Vocational 


3 


Nat. Science or Math. 


3 


Nat. Science or Math. 


3 


Prin. of Chr. Living 51 


2 


Marriage and Fam. 82 


2 


Literature 31 or 4l 


2 


Literature 32 or 42 


2 or 3 


Elective or Language 


2 or 3 


Elective or Language 



THIRD YEAR 



16 Hrs. 


First Semester 


16 Hrs 


Sem. Hrs. 


Courses 


Sem. Hrs. 


2 


Fund, of Chr. Faith 59 


2 


3 


History 131 or 151 


3 


3 


History 6 or 145 


2 


2 


Vocational 


3 


6 
: OURTH 


Electives 
YEAR 


6 


16 Hrs. 


First Semester 


16 Hrs 


Sem. Hrs. 


Courses 


Sem. Hrs. 


2 


Daniel 165 


2 


2 or 3 


History 111 or 
Pol. Sci. 115 


2 or 3 


llorl2 


Electives 


Uorl2 



Second Semester 

Courses 

Fund, of Chr. Faith 60 

History 132 or 152 

History 112 or 146 

History 132 or 148 

Minor, electives 



Second Semester 

Courses 

Revelation 166 

Pol. Sci 162 or Hist. 112 



Electives 



151 



PRE-TECHNICAL CURRICULUMS 



Southern Missionary College offers pre-professional and pre-tech- 
nical curriculums in a wide variety of fields. These open the way for 
students to enter professional schools of their choice for more specific 
training, or to enter upon a career as technicians. 

The College is prepared to cooperate wirh students desiring to enter 
fields not listed below, and will work out special sequences of courses 
needed to meet the entrance requirements to such institutions as may 
be chosen. 

PRE-MEDICAL 

Nearly all medical colleges now require a bachelor's degree of all 
candidates. Therefore students who later expect to enter a medical 
college should register as candidates for a Bachelor of Arts Degree, se- 
lecting suitable majors and minors. 

Students planning to transfer to the College of Medical Evange- 
lists, Loma Linda, California, or any other medical college, should select 
entrance courses as outlined in the current bulletin issued by that college. 
Currently these essential courses include: 

Semester Hours 

Biology 45, 46, or 1, 2, 94 8 

English 1-2 6 

Foreign language (French, German, or Spanish) .... 6-18 

General Chemistry 1-2 8 

General Embryology 145 - 2 

History 53 or 54, Political Science 115 6 

Chemistry 83-84 (or 113-114) 8 

Physics 51-52 8 

Quantitative Analysis 102 _ 3 

Religion (51 required) 12-16 

The quality of scholarship required for entrance demands that a 
grade-point average in natural sciences and other subjects, figured sep- 
arately, should be not less than 1.5 and a higher grade point average is 
desirable. Actually the College of Medical Evangelists is not now ac- 
cepting any candidates with less than a 1.7 grade-point average. Stu- 
dents who do not reach this grade-point average will not be recom- 
mended. 

PRE-DENTAL 

Admission: See page 30. 

Class A dental colleges require for admission two years (sixty 

152 



Pre-Dental, Pre-Laboratory Technology 

hours) of college work, including certain prescribed courses. Students 
planning to transfer to the Dental School of the College of Medical 
Evangelists, Loma Linda, California, should select courses as outlined 
in the current bulletin issued by that college. Currently these essential 
courses are included in the suggested program of study below: 

FIRST YEAR 

16 Hrs. First Semester 16 Hrs. Second Semester 

Sem. Hrs. Courses Sem. Hrs. Courses 

4 ^General Zoology 45 4 ^General Zoology 46 

4 General Chemistry 1 4 General Chemistry 2 

3 Freshman Comp. 1 3 Freshman Com p. 2 

3 College Algebra 11 3 Trigonometry 12 
2 Religion 1 or 11 2 Religion 2 or 12 

SECOND YEAR 

15^2 Hrs. First Semester 15V2 Hrs. Second Semester 

Sem. Hrs. Courses Sem. Hrs. Courses 

4 Organic Chemistry 83 4 Organic Chemistry 84 

2 General Psychology 51 3 Prin. of Chr. Living 51 
4 General Physics 51 4 General Physics 52 

3 American Government 2 Intro, to Sociology 20 

115 1/2 Physical Education 8 

V2 Physical Education 7 2 Electives 

2 Electives 

PRE-LABORATORY TECHNICIAN 

Southern Missionary College prepares students for admission to the 
School of Laboratory Technique of the College of Medical Evangelists. 
Admission requirements to this pre-medical technology curriculum are 
the same as for curriculums leading to the Bachelor of Science Degree 
(See page 30.) Three years of college, totaling 96 semester hours, are 
required as preparation for entrance to a school of medical technology. 
The 96 hours must include: 

Semester Hours 

History 53 or 54 _ 3 

American National and State Government 115 3 

College Algebra 11 3 

Plane Trigonometry 12 3 

Physics 51-52 8 

Biology 45, 46; 94 or 104; 164, 22 17 

Chemistry 1-2, 63, 102; 83-84; 171 22 

English 1-2 6 



*The student may take Biology 1, 2, and 94. 



153 



Pre-Physical Therapy 

Foreign Language (German, French, Spanish, or Greek) b 

A student presenting two units of the same foreign language from 
the secondary schooJ may be exempted from this requirement 

Psychology 51, 52 4 

Religion (required 51) 12-16 

A student presenting three, or more, units of Bible from the sec- 
ondary school will take 12 hours; one presenting two units, 14 
hours; and one presenting one unit, or less, 16 hours. 

Further information regarding the requirements of the School of 
Laboratory Technique, College of Medical Evangelists, Loma Linda, 
California, may be obtained from the bulletin of that school. Students 
who complete the above courses in college plus the one-year laboratory 
technician's curriculum in the School of Laboratory Technique at the 
College of Medical Evangelists will receive the Bachelor of Science 
Degree from that institution. 

PRE-PHYSICAL THERAPY 

The School of Physical Therapy of the College of Medical Evange- 
lists requires an applicant to have taken ninety (90) semester hours of 
college work (three years) in an accredited institution.* At least 
twenty-six (26) of these hours must be in upper biennium courses. The 
following program incorporates the required courses of that school as 
well as for most others: 

Requirements for Students Planning to enter Physical Therapy Training'. 

Semester Hours 

Religion 51 and Electives 8 

History 53, 54 6 

History 115 3 

Psychology 51, 52 and Electives in Psychology 6 

English 1-2 6 

Speech 5, 6 4 

Physical Education 7, 8 1 

(Not required of veterans.) 

Zoology 45, 46 and Microbiology 22 12 

Chemistry 7, 8 6 

Electives from any field to make total of 62 sem. hours. 



^Occasionally a student with unusual qualifications may be admitted with 
only 60 semester hours. Sometimes graduates from an accredited school of nurs- 
ing are accepted without further work. 

154 



Pre-X-ray Technician, Pre-Optometry, Pre-Pharmacy 

PRE-X-RAY TECHNICIAN 

Admission: See page 49. 

Thirty semester hours are needed for admission to the College of 
Medical Evangelists School of X-ray Technique. The following courses 
should be taken: 

Anatomy and Physiology 11, 12 6 

Chemistry 7, 8 6 

College Algebra and Plane Trigonometry 11, 12 6 

General Physics 51, 52 8 

Religion (required 51) 6 

PRE-OPTOMETRY 

Admission: See page 49. 

The optometry course usually consists of a five-year curriculum, the 
first two years of which may be taken in an accredited college. The fol- 
lowing sequence of courses is recommended for the first and second 
years: 

FIRST YEAR 

16 Hrs. First Semester 16 Hrs. Second Semester 

Sem. Hrs. Courses Sem. Hrs. Courses 

2 General PhychoJogy 51 2 General Psychology 52 

3 Freshman Comp. 1 3 Freshman Comp. 2 

3 College Algebra 11 3 Plane Trigonometry 12 

4 Chemistry 1 4 Chemistry 2 

2 Social Sctence 20 2 Marriage and Fam. 82 

2 Religion 1 or 11 2 Religion 2 or 12 

SECOND YEAR 

i5 l /2 Hrs. First Semester 16V2 Hrs. Second Semester 

Sem. Hrs. Courses Sem. Hrs. Courses 

3 Anatomy 11 3 Physiology 12 

4 General Physics 51 4 General Physics 52 

2 Analytical Geometry 51 2 Analytical Geom. 52 

4 General Zoology 45 4 General Zoology 46 

2 Fine Arts 61 or 62 3 Religion 51 

y-i Physical Education 7 Vi Physical Education 8 

PRE-PHARMACY 

One year of college work is required for admission to schools of 
pharmacy. The Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy may be obtained at the 
University of Tennessee and most other universities in three additional 
years after completing the following courses in Southern Missionary 
College. Only students having an average of C are admitted to schools 
of pharmacy. 

155 



Pre-Engmeering, Pie-Pharmacy 



"IRST YEAR 






151/2 Hrs. 


First Semester 


15V4 His. 


Second Semester 


5>/«. H*\r. 


Courses 


Sem. Hrs. 


Courses 


3 


English I 


3 


English 11 


4 


General Chemistry 1 


4 


General Chemistry 2 


3 


Prin. of Economics 71 


3 


General Biology 2 


3 


College Algebra 11 


2 


Religion 2 or 12 


2 


Religion 1 or 11 


y 2 


Physical Education 8 


y 2 


Physical Education 7 


3 


Elecrives: Am. Hist.. 
Am. Govt, or Sociology 



PRE-ENGINEERING 

Although Southern Missionary College does not offer an engineer- 
ing degree, a two-year preparatory curriculum is offered, the comple- 
tion of which enables students to transfer to an engineering school 
without loss of time. For the first two years all engineering students take 
approximately the same natural sciences, mathematics, and core-curric- 
ulum courses. The following embodies the basic requirements. 

Recommended Sequence for the Pre-Engineering Curriculum 

Students coming in with two years of algebra: 



FIRST YEAR 




141/2 Hrs. 


First Semester 


141/2 Hrs. 


Sem. Hrs. 


Courses 


Sem. Hrs. 


4 


Chemistry or Electronics 


4 


3 


Freshman Composition 


3 


3 


Instrumental Drawing 


3 


2 


Religion 


2 


2 


Analytical Geometry 


2 


V 2 


Physical Education 


Vi 



Second Semester 

Courses 

Chemistry or Electronics 

Freshman Composition 

Mechanical Drawing 

Religion 

Analytical Geometry 

Physical Education 



SECOND YEAR 



15 H 


JL-S. 


Fjrst Semester 




15 His. 


Second Semester 


Sem. Hi 


rs. 


Courses 


Se 


m, Hrs. 


Courses 


4 




Calculus 




4 


Calculus 


4 




Electronics or Chemistry 




4 


Electronics or Chemistry 


3 




Ad. Mech. Drawing 




3 


Ad. Mech. Drawing 


4 




General Physics 




4 


General Physics 



156 



Pre -Law 



Students coming in tvith one year algebra and one year of science: 



FIRST YEAR 

17 Hrs. First Semester 17 His. 

Sem. Hrs. Courses Sem. Hrs. 

3 Algebra 3 

4 Chemistry or Electronics 4 
3 Freshman Composition 3 
3 Instrumental Drawing 3 
2 Religion 2 
2 Analytical Geometry 2 



Second Semester 

Courses 

Algebra 

Chemistry or Electronics 

Freshman Composition 

Mechanical Drawing 

Religion 

Analytical Geometry 



SECOND YEAR 

15 l /2 Hrs. First Semrster i5 l /2 Hrs. 

Sem. Hrs. Courses Sem. Hrs. 

4 Calculus 4 

4 Physics 4 

4 Electronics or Chemistry 4 

3 Ad. Mech. Drawing 3 

V2 Physical Education 1/2 



Second Semester 

Calculus 

Physics 

Electronics or Chemistry 

Ad. Mech. Drawing 

Physical Education 



PRE-LAW 

The program below has been fashioned to meet the requirements 
of the Law School of the University of Tennessee and others accredited 
by the National Association of American Law Schools. Students who 
complete 96 semester hours with a grade-point average of 1.0 or better 
may receive the Bachelor of Arts Degree from Southern Missionary Col- 
lege upon satisfactory completion of 32 semester hours in the law school 
provided: 

1. That the last year of pre-professional work be taken in residence at 
Southern Missionary College. 

2. That application for this degree be made before entering the law 
school. 

3. That the student maintain up to the time of his graduation a pattern 
of living and conduct compatible with the aims and objectives of 
Southern Missionary College. 

Recommended Sequence: 



FIRST YEAR 






17 Hrs. 


First Semester 


17 Hrs. 


Second Semester 


Sem. Hrs. 


Courses 


Sem, Hrs. 


Courses 


3 


Freshman Comp. 1 


3 


Freshman Comp. 2 


3 


Natural Science 


3 


Natural Science 


3-4 


Foreign Language 


3-4 


Foreign Language 


2 


Fine Arts 


2 


Fine Arts 


2 


Religion 1 or 11 


2 


Religion 2 or 12 


3 


Economics 71 


3 


Economics 72 



157 



Pre-Law 



SECOND YEAR 



16V 2 Hrs. 


First Semester 


15!/ 2 Hrs. 


Second Semester 


Sem. Hrs. 


Courses 


Sem. Hrs. 


Cfliwej- 


3 


Foreign Language or 


3 


Foreign Language or 




Elective 




Elective 


2 


Business Law 55 


2 


Business Law 56 


3 


American History 53 


3 


American History 54 


3 


^Natural Science 


3 


^Natural Science 


2 


Literature 


2 


Literature 


3 


Prin. of Chr. Living 51 


2 


Social Science 


V2 


Physical Education 7 


V2 


Physical Education 7 


THIRD YEAR 






17 Hrs. 


First Semester 


15 Hrs. 


Second Semester 


5&OT. //fJ. 


Courses 


Sem. Hrs. 


Courses 


3 


Religion 131 or 151 


3 


Religion 132 or 152 


2 


English History l6l 


2 


Adv. Business Law 101 


3 


Psychology 111 


2 


Marriage and Fam. 82 


2 


Speech 5 


2 


Psychology 150 or 180 


2 


Vocational (Typing 13 


2 


Speech 6 




recommended) 


4 


*EIectives 


5 


*Electives 






♦Upper Division 





158 



FINANCIAL INFORMATION 



EXPENSES 

Having met the full financial and labor requirements the student 
has actually covered only part of the full cost of his instruction and 
maintenance. The operating deficit is covered by gifts, subsidies, and 
funds from other sources. The educational opportunity afforded each 
student in Southern Missionary College represents a large investment 
in buildings and equipment, averaging more than two thousand dol- 
lars for each cf udent enrolled. 

BASIC COSTS 

RENT IN RESIDENCE HALLS 

one room. Where three students occupy one room, the monthly charge 
per student is reduced by $2.00. No refund is made because of absence 
from the campus either for regular vacation periods or for other rea- 
sons. 

A room charge of $19.00 per calendar month is made to each stu- 
dent residing in a school home. The rate for rooms with adjoining 
bath is $21.00 for each student. On this basis two students occupy 

MARRIED STUDENTS' HOUSING 

The College provides approximately thirty-five apartments for mar- 
ried students. These range in size from two room to four rooms and are 
unfurnished. Rents range from $20.00 per month to $45.00 per month. 
Prospective students are invited to write to the Assistant Business Man- 
ager for details. A reservation fee of $10.00 is charged. This is refunded 
on the student's final statement of the school year pending satisfactory 
clearance of housing. 

There are fifty or more privately owned apartments in the Col- 
legedale community. These also are available to students. Information 
may be supplied by the Assistant Business Manager upon request. 

BOARD CHARGES 

The cafeteria plan of boarding is used, which allows the student 
the privilege of choosing his food and paying only for what he 
selects. The minimum monthly charge for dormitory students is $20.00 
for women and $24.00 for men. This covers a full calendar month. 
Board charges for students vary greatly. The average monthly charge 
of the past school year was approximately $40.00 for men and $30.00 
for women. However, individual charges varied from $17.00 to $66.12 
for men and from $17.00 to $48.92 for women. 

No reduction of the minimum charge is made for absence from the 
campus except for specified vacations of one week or more, and in 

159 



Basic Costs 

cases of emergency. Three meals a day are served. Students living in 
the residence halls are expected to take their meals in the dining room. 

ADVANCE DEPOSIT AND MATRICULATION FEE 

Advance guarantee deposits are required of all students including 
veterans and those expecting colporteur or teaching scholarships. 

The guarantee deposit is charged only once during the year, and 
is payable on or before the date of registration. This deposit, will be 
refunded on the final statement of the school year, or at the time of 
withdrawal. 



CHEMISTRY LABORATORY DEPOSIT 

All students registered for a chemistry course will be charged a 
$5.00 deposit before they will be assigned to a chemistry locker. This 
deposit will be refunded to the student at the close of the course or 
upon dropping the course, provided the student cleans his locker and 
equipment in a manner prescribed by the Chemistry Department. Any 
breakage, however, will be deducted from the advance deposit. 

For a married couple, each enrolled for eight hours or more of 

school work, the regular advance guarantee deposit will be required 

from each. For a combined total fifteen semester hours or less, the 
charge will be the same as for one person. 

Students registering for music only are not required to pay any 
guarantee deposit or general fee, but there is a $2.00 registration fee 
for all such music students. However, a rental will be levied for use 
of piano or organ. 

The amount of advance payment required is determined as fol- 
lows. 

A. Those being charged housing, tuition, and board Si 50.00 

B. Those being charged any two of the three above 125.00 

C Those being charged any one of the three above 100.00 

STUDENT ASSOCIATION 

The Student Association of Southern Missionary College publishes 
the school paper, The Southern Accent, and the annual, The Southern 
Memories. The Student Association also has other financial obligations 
such as the payment of major offices, school projects, etc, To cover 
the costs of these various endeavors a fee of $11.00 per student per 
year is required. This fee, appearing on the first statement, is included 
in the advance payment and is not refundable. 

160 



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Tuition and Fees 
TUITION AND FEES — For l957-'58 fiscal Year 



Semester 


Tuition 








Hours 


Per Sem. 


Tuition 


Gen. Fee 


Total 


1 


$27.00 


$54.00 


$ 5.00 


$59.00 


2 


48.00 


96.00 


10.00 


106.00 


3 


67.00 


134.00 


15.00 


149.00 


4 


88.00 


176.00 


32.00 


208.00 


5 


109.00 


218.00 


32.00 


250.00 


6 


125-00 


250.00 


32.00 


282.00 


7 


162.00 


324.00 


42.00 


366.00 


8 


162.00 


324.00 


42.00 


366.00 


9 


162.00 


324.00 


42.00 


366.00 


10 


216.00 


432.00 


42.00 


474.00 


11 


216.00 


432.00 


42.00 


474.00 


12 


216.00 


432.00 


42.00 


474.00 


13 


228.00 


456.00 


42.00 


498.00 


14 


228.00 


456.00 


42.00 


498.00 


15 


240.00 


480.00 


42.00 


522.00 


16 


240.00 


480.00 


42.00 


522.00 


17 


250.00 


500.00 


42.00 


542.00 


18 


260.00 


520.00 


42.00 


562.00 



Tuition charges are made in four equal installments for each semes- 
ter, monthly, beginning with the statement for October. 

It is assumed to be the earnest purpose of each student to secure an 
education, and since even those working their entire way have time for 
as much as one-half of a full-class load, each student is urged to carry 
at least that much school work. Except by permission of the President's 
Council, the minimum course load a student may carry is eight hours. 

The General Fee, which is included in the advance payment 
will appear on the first statement issued. It includes charges for 
lyceum programs, library fee, laboratory fees, charges for musical 
organizations, graduation expense, matriculation expense, all musical 
rentals (piano, organ, instruments), and medical and psychological 
services as set forth in a separate pamphlet provided students upon 
registration. 

A 50 per cent refund on General Fee will be credited to any student 

161 



Music Tuition— Room Deposit 

withdrawing on or before the completion of the first nine weeks. No 
refund will be granted thereafter. 

For those entering the second semester, the General Fee shall be 
70 per cent of the yearly charge. A 25 per cent refund will be given 
to those entering second semester but withdrawing during the first five 
weeks of the second semester. 

MUSIC TUITION 

The charge for any private music instruction is $36.00 per semester, 
or $72.00 for the year, for a minimum of 15 lessons per semester. This 
charge is made in eight installments of $9.00 each, in the same manner 
as the regular tuition. In addition to private instruction in voice, classes 
of from two to five students are arranged at a cost per student of $22.00 
per semester. All persons who wish to take music must enroll for it at 
the Registrar's Office even if they are not taking it for credit or if music 
is all they are taking. There is a $2.00 registration fee for those who 
are taking music only. 

Students who enroll late, or who withdraw before the end of the 
semester, are charged at the rate of $2.40 per week up to a maximum of 
$36.00 for one lesson a week. Withdrawal is made by means of a drop 
voucher obtained at the Registrar's Office. There are no refunds for 
specified vacation periods or lessons missed because of the student's 
absence. 

ROOM OR HOUSING DEPOSIT 

Dormitory rooms may be reserved by mailing a $5.00 room deposit 
to the Secretary of Admissions at the College. The deposit for married 
students housing is $10.00. This deposit will appear to the credit of the 
student at the time of his departure provided the accommodation is 
left in good order. 

Since the deposit serves not only as a reservation fee but also as a 
guarantee that the accommodation will be left in good order, all stu- 
dents registered and living in college housing will be charged this 
deposit. 

In case the student's application is not accepted; or if notice of 
nonattendance is given the College three weeks before the opening of 
the term, the deposit will be refunded. 

LATE REGISTRATION 

For late registration $5.00 

See page 32 for statement of the exact day and hour when each student is 
expected to present himself for testing and/or registration. 

162 



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Payment of Accounts 

LAUNDRY AND DRY CLEANING SERVICE 

The College operates a modern laundry and dry cleaning plant. 
Students are invited to patronize this service. Charges for service ren- 
dered will be entered on the student's account to be settled monthly. 
There is a minimum charge for dormitory students of $2.00 a month 
for women and $3.00 a month for men. 

TITHE AND CHURCH EXPENSE 

Southern Missionary College encourages the payment of tithe and 
church expense by its student workers. In order to facilitate this prac- 
tice, arrangements may be made for each student to have charged to 
his account 10 per cent of his school earnings for tithe, and 2 per 
cent for church expense. These funds are then transferred by the Col- 
lege to the treasurer of the Collegedale Seventh-day Adventist Church. 

FUND FOR PERSONAL EXPENSES — PLEASE NOTE 

Students should be provided with sufficient funds, in addition to 
money for school expenses, to cover cost of books, clothing, and all 
personal items. They may open deposit accounts at the Business Office, 
subject to withdrawal in person only, and these funds are available at 
any time, as long as there is a credit remaining of what the student has 
deposited. These deposit accounts are entirely separate from the regular 
student's expense accounts. 

Each student should bring $20 to $30 for books and supplies at the 
beginning of each semester. Books and supplies are sold at the College 
Store. 

PAYMENT OF ACCOUNTS 

Statements will be issued to students as of the last day of each calen- 
dar month, covering the month's expenses and credits. This billing is 
subject to discount when paid by the 20th of the following month. 
Should a student's account be unpaid by the 10th of the succeeding 
month, he may not expect to continue in class until satisfactory arrange- 
ments are made. The College is unable to carry student accounts for 
any length of time. Arrangements should be made for some other plan 
of financing. 

164 



Student Labor Regulations 

EXAMPLE OF CREDIT POLICY 

Period covered by statement October 1-31 

Approximate date of billing November 5 

Discount period ends November 20 

Class attendance jeopardized if still unpaid December 10 

This schedule of payment must be maintained since the budget is 

based upon the 100 per cent collection of student charges within the 

thirty-day period following date of billing. 

Transcripts of credits and diplomas are issued only when students' 

accounts are paid in fuJL 

STUDENT LABOR REGULATIONS 

Believing in the inspired words that "systematic labor should con- 
stitute a part of the education of youth," 1 Southern Missionary College 
has made provision that every student enrolled may have the privilege 
of organizing his educational program on the 'work-study" plan. 
"Jesus the carpenter, and Paul the tent-maker, . . . with the toil of the 
craftsman linked the highest ministry, human and divine." 2 The College 
not only provides a work-study program, but strongly recommends it 
to each student enrolled. 

Inasmuch as the student's labor constitutes a part of his education, 
participation in the work program is graded, and a report thereon is 
issued to him. This grade is based upon the following: 

Quality of work Leadership and Initiative 

Quantity of work Punctuality 

Safety habits Dependability 

Cooperation Efficiency 

Compatabiliry 

A record of vocational experience and efficiency is also kept, by 
semesters, for each student in which is listed the type of work in which 
he has engaged and his degree of efficiency. This information will be 
available to potential employers. 

The College will assign students to departments where work is avail- 
able and cannot shift students from one department to another merely 
upon request. It should be understood that once a student is assigned 
to work in a given department, he will remain there for the entire school 
year except in rare cases where changes are recommended by the school 
nurse, or are made at the discretion of the College. 

1. Ellen G. White, Fundamentals of Christian Education, (Nashville, Ten- 
nessee: Southern Publishing Association, 1923), p. 44. 

2. Ibid. 

165 



Scholarships 

Should a student find it necessary to be absent from work, he must 
immediately make arrangements with his work superintendent. In cases 
of illness, he will also inform the Health Service. Any student who de- 
sires to terminate his regularly scheduled work program or transfer 
to another work department may be required to give two weeks' advance 
notice to his work superintendent. Failure to comply with this regula- 
tion will constitute grounds for suspension from class attendance until 
he returns to work or is excused therefrom. 

During the first two weeks of school, it is not always possible to 
get everyone into a work program, but by the end of September, usually 
every one has a job. This means that it may be necessary to work an 
extra hour a week to make up for the time lost in September before 
it was possible to get everyone placed in a work activity. 

BIRTH CERTIFICATE 

All students who expect to work and are under twenty years of age 
must present a Birth Certificate upon registration. This certificate must 
be left on file in the Assistant Business Manager's office. No student will 
be per milted to work unlit the Birth Certificate is on file at the College. 
This is imperative under the laws of the State of Tennessee. 

WORK PERMIT 

Whenever a student fifteen years of age or under is accepted, the 
parent or guardian is supplied a Tennessee Employment Certificate. 
This must be signed and on file at the College before a student may 
start work. 

SCHOLARSHIPS 

COLPORTEUR SCHOLARSHIP 

That students might have adequate work opportunities of a profit- 
able nature (both financially and spiritually) during the summer 
months, the College, together with the Southern Publishing Association 
and the several local conferences and Bible Houses throughout the 
Southern Union, have banded together to offer a bonus to students sell- 
ing Bibles and denominational books or magazines. 

Students may make arrangements with one of the several Bible 
Houses to sell books or magazines in a designated territory. The com- 
mission to students, as well as to full-time colporteurs, is 50 per cent of 
the total dollar volume of literature sold. In addition to this commis- 
sion the organization indicated above will pay to the student colporteur 
a liberal bonus. 

166 



Scholarships 

The operation of this plan might weli be pictured as follows: 
Total books delivered $1,400.00 

Cost of books delivered 700.00 

Commission earned on sales 700.00 

Colporteur bonus 300.00 



Total funds deposited at Southern Missionary College 

for educational expenses of the student colporteur. $1000.00 

It is evident from these illustrative figures that the bonus paid is 
very liberal. It amounts to 43 1/7 per cent of the regular commissions 
(8700) or 30 per cent of the total amount ($1,000) deposited to the 
student's credit at the College by the contributing organizations. In 
actual practice the bonus is computed in this way: 

Divide sum turned over to Bible House by student colporteur 
by .70 (S700 divided by .70 equals $1,000) and the quotient 
equals the amount deposited to the student's credit at the Col- 
lege. Subtract from this total the commissions ($700) which 
the student remitted to the Bible House (XI ,000 — $700 equals 
S300) and you have the amount of the bonus. 
There are various other regulations that pertain, such as: 

1. A student must spend a minimum of 350 (300 for women) 
hours in the colporteur work during the summer in order to 
qualify. 

2. The colporteur bonus will be granted only to such student 
colporteurs as actually use both commissions and bonus for edu- 
cational expenses at Southern Missionary College. 

(Note) These provisions and others are explained in detail in a separate 
pamphlet which is available on request at the College or at any of the 
Bible Houses. 

TUITION SCHOLARSHIP 

Each year the College, in conjunction with the several local con- 
ferences of the Southern Union Conference, awards eleven $50 cash 
scholarships to be applied on tuition: $25 at the end of the first se- 
mester and $25 at the end of the second. The following schools are 
eligible to participate in this plan: 

Asheville Agricultural School Madison College Academy 

Collegedale Academy (2) Little Creek Academy 

Forest Lake Academy (2) Pine Forest Academy 

Highland Academy Mt. Pisgah Academy 

The candidates are chosen as follows: The faculty of each designated 

167 



Educational Fund 

school nominates its candidate; the name, if approved by the school 
board, is recommended to the educational board of the local confer- 
ence, for final approval. The selection of nominees is based on charac- 
ter, scholarship, personality, and promise of future leadership. 

SCHOLARSHIPS IN TEACHER EDUCATION 

In order to help young people of good moral character who possess 
talents and interest in the field of elementary school teaching, scholar- 
ships amounting to $200 each are available through the benefkience of 
the Southern Union and local conferences of Seventh-day Adventists. 
Southern Missionary College will provide opportunity for students on 
these scholarships to work $300 of their remaining school expenses. 
For further details write to the Educational Secretary of the local con- 
ference where you reside in the Southern Union. If you reside outside 
the Southern Union, write to the Union Secretary of Education, Box 
849, Decatur, Georgia. 

EDUCATIONAL FUND 

Many young people are deprived of the privilege of attending col- 
lege because of a lack of necessary means. To aid these, an earnest ef- 
fort has been made to obtain donations for the establishment of an 
education fund, from which students worthy of help may borrow 
money for a reasonable length of time. Faithfulness in refunding these 
loans will make it possible for the same money to assist many students 
in school. There have been some gifts, and they have been used to help 
several young men and women complete their work in this college. But 
the needs of worthy students have been greater than the funds on hand; 
consequently it has been impossible in many instances to render the 
needed assistance. It has therefore been decided to direct the attention 
of patrons and friends of the school to these facts and to invite them 
to give such means as they may desire to devote to this purpose. The 
College will be glad to correspond with any who think favorably of this 
plan, and will continue to use the gifts so that the wishes of the donors 
may be fulfilled and the best results obtained. 

"In each conference a fund should be raised to lend to worthy poor 
students who desire to give themselves to the missionary work; and in 
some cases they should receive donations. When the Battle Creek Col- 
lege was first started, there was a fund placed in the Review and Her- 
ald office for the benefit of those who wished to obtain an education, 
but had not the means. This was used by several students until they 
could get a good start; then from their earnings they would replace 

168 



Educational Fund 

what they had drawn, so that others might be benefited by the fund. 
The youth should have it plainly set before them that they must work 
their own way as far as possible and thus partly defray their expenses. 
That which costs little will be appreciated little. But that which costs 
a price somewhere near its real value will be estimated accordingly." — 
Testimonies, Vol. VI, pages 213, 214. 



169 



General Index 



GENERAL INDEX 



A. G. DanieJs Memorial Library .. 23 

Absences 38, 39 

Academic Regulations 30-44 

Accounting, Courses in 66, 61 

Accounts, Payment of 164 

Accreditation 25 

Administrative Staff 9, 10 

Admissions 30, 31 

Agriculture Courses 51 

Alternating Courses 46 

Alumni Association 2S 

Announced Regulations 40 

Application Procedure 30 

Applied Arts, Division of 51-64 

An, Courses in 101 

Athletics 27, 91-95 

Attendance Regulations 38, 39 

Auditing Courses 37 

Automobiles 39 

Bachelor of Arts Degrees, Require- 
ments for 

Biology 47, 124 

Business Administration and 

Economics 47, 65 

Chemistry _ 47, 129 

English 47, 114 

History 47, 148 

Music Performance 47, 103 

Physics 47, 137 

Religion _ 47, 146 

Social Sciences 47, 148 

Spanish _ 47, 121 

Theology 47, 145 

BacheJor of Music Education, 

Requirements for 47 

Bachelor of Science Degrees, Re- 
quirements for 

Business Administration 47, 65' 

Business Administration for 

Publishing Leaders 47, 65 

Chemistry 47, 1 32 

Foods and Nutrition 47, 52 

Home Economics 47, 51 

Industrial Education 47, 57 

Medical Secretarial Science .. 47, 74 

Natural Science 47, 136 

Nursing 47, 96 

Secretarial Science 47, 74 

Teacher Education 47, 82 

Basic Courses, Requirements 49 

Bible, Courses in 143 

Bible Instructor, Two-year 

Curriculum 146 

Biblical Languages 119 



Biology, Courses in 125 

Board of Directors 7 

Executive Committee 8 

Broom Factory 9, 25 

Buildings and Equipment 22, 25 

Business Administration, Division 

of . 47, 65-81 

Business, Courses in 68, 69 



"C" Average .... 30, 36, 37, 41, 42, 44 
Calendar, July, 1957-June, 1959 .... 4 

Calendar of Events 5, 6 

Campus Organizations 26 

Candidacy for Graduation 44 

Certification of SMC 2> 

Cerliikatum. Teacher 82-S* 

Change^ in Registration 54 

Chapel Attendance ^8 

Chemistry, Courses in 1 :9 

Church Music Courses 105 

Citizenship 40 

Class Appointments, Attendance .. 38 

Class Standing 37 

Classification of Students 36, 37 

Clerical Training, Course in 81 

College, An Ideal Christian 20 

College Directory 7 

College Press 24 

College Store 24 

College Student, An Ideal 20 

CoJIegeJale Academy 28, 29 

Collegedale Clinic 2" 

Coliegedale Industries, Inc 9, ?;■ 

Collegedale Mercantile, Inc 9, 24 

Collegedale Tabernacle-Auditorium 23 

Colporteur Bonus 166, 1 67 

Conduct, Moral 40 

Construction and Design, 

Courses in 58 

Convocations 27 

Core Curriculum 49, 50 

Cornet. Courses in 109 

Correspondence Work 40 

Counveling 27 

Course Numbers 46 

Course Requirements, Basic 49-50 

Courses of Instruction 51-158 

Credit, Additional Hour of 37 

Credit Hour 46 

Credit Policy 165 

Curriculums, Degree 47 

Curriculums, Pre-Professional and 

Pre-Technical 48, 152-158 

Curriculums, Two-year 47, 48 



170 



General Index 



Deficiencies, Entrance 31 

Degree Requirements, Basic 48-50 

Degrees Offered 46, 47 

See Bachelor of Arts 

See Bachelor of Music Education 

See Bachelor of Science 

Basic Course Requirements .. 49, 50 

Major and Minor Requirements 49 

Directors, Board of 7 

Divisions of Instruction 51-158 

Drop Vouchers 35 

Earl F. Hackman Hall 23 

Economics, Courses in 68, 69 

Education, Courses in 85-87 

Education, Psychology, Health, 

Division of 82, 95 

Educational Program 30-44 

Elementary School 24 

English, Courses in 115-117 

Ensemble Music Ill 

Entrance Deficiencies 31 

Entrance Requirements 30, 31 

Examinations 40 

Admission by 32 

Course 4l 

Entrance 5, 32 

Exemption by _ 41 

Special 42 

Expenses, see Financial Plans 163 

Extension Work 40 

Extracurricular Activities and 
Service 27 

Faculty 11-15 

Organization of 16 

Fees, see Financial Plans 

Financial Information 159-169 

Financial Plans 163 

Aids 27, 168, 169 

Colporteur Bonus 167 

Loans, Educational Fund 168 

Teacher Scholarships 168 

Tuition Scholarships 167 

Credit Policy 165 

Employment Oppor- 
tunities 21, 24, 25 

Expenses 159-162 

Advance Deposit 160 

Board 159 

Housing, Married Students .. 159 

Late Registration 162 

Laundry and Dry Cleaning .. 164 

Matriculation Fee 1 60 

Music Tuition 162 

Rent, Residence Halls 159 

Room or Housing Deposit .. 162 

Tuition and Fees 161, 1 62 

Payment of Accounts 164 

Personal Expenses 164 



Student Association Fee 160 

Summary Chart 163 

Tithe and Church Expense 164 

Fine Arts, Division of .... 45, 101-113 

Art Courses - 101 

Music Courses 102-110 

First Semester 5 

Food and Nutrition Courses .... 52, 53 
Foreign Languages, Courses in 119-122 

Foreign Students 44 

Freshman Standing 30 

G. E. D. Tests 31 

General Business, Courses in .. 68, 69 
General Requirements for 

Graduation 43 

Geography, Courses in 151 

German, Courses in 120, 121 

General Index 170-173 

Governing Standards 40, 41 

Grades and Reports 42. 43 

Grade Points - ^2, 43 

Griduate Record 

Examinations 43 

Graduation Standards 43-44 

Graphic Arts Courses 59> 60 

Greek, Courses in 119 

Harold A. Miller Fine Arts 

Building 23 

Health, Courses in 91, 92 

Health Service 27 

Hebrew, Courses in .. - 119 

History of the College 22 

History. Courses in 148-150 

Home Economics, Courses in .... 52-54 
Home Economics, Curriculums .. 54-56 
Home Economics, Two-year 

Curriculum 56 

Home Management — Child Care 

Courses 5 3 

Honor Roll 43 

Honors, Graduation with 44 

Hour, Semester 46 

Hour, Special 37 

Housing, Married Students .... 24, 159 

In Absentia, Graduation 44 

Incompletes 42 

Industrial Arts Teacher Training 

Courses 61 

Industrial Arts. Two-year 

Curriculum 64 

Industrial Education, Courses in 58-61 
Industrial Education, 

Curriculum 63, 64 

Industrial Buildings 24 

Industrial Superintendents 10 

Industries 21 

Industries, Why 21 



171 



General Index 



Instruction, Divisions of 45-158 

John H. Talge Residence Hall 23 

Junior Standing ._J36 

Labor Regulations 165-166 

Birth Certificate 166 

Work Permit 166 

Labor-Class Load 35 

Languages and Literature, 

Division of 45, 114-123 

Late Registration 34 

Laundry, The College 25 

Law, Sequence in 157 

Leave of Absence 40 

Library Science, Course in 56 

Loans 168, 169 

Location of the College 22 

Lyceum 27 

Lynn Wood Hall 22 

Maintenance Building 25 

Major and Minor 

Requirements 47, 49 

See also: 

Biology 125 

Business Administration .... 65, 66 

Chemistry 129. 130 

Economics 68, 69 

Education and Psychology .... 82 

English 114 

Foods and Nutrition 55 

German 120 

History 148 

Home Economics 54 

Industrial Education 57 

Mathematics 134 

Medical Secretarial Science .... 74 

Music 102 

Natural Science 136 

Nursing 96 

Physics 136 

Printing 62 

Religion 140 

Secretarial Science 74 

Spanish . 121 

Speech 117 

Teacher Education 82-85 

Theology 140 

Marriages 40 

Mathematics. Courses in 134 

Maude Jones Residcnre Hall 23 

Mechanical and Architectural 

Drafting Courses 58 

Medical Secretary 74 

Medical Service 25 

Metal and Mechanical Arts 

Courses 60, 61 

Ministry, Standards of Evalua- 
tion for 140 



Minor Requirements 49 

Moral Conduct 40 

Music 102 

Courses in 103 

Curriculum 103 

History Courses 104 

Organizations 26 

Tuition 162 

Music Education Courses 105 

Music Performance Requirements 103 

Natural Science and Mathematics, 
Division of 124 

Nursing Education 96 

Courses in 99 

Curriculum 96 

Objectives of the College 18, 19 

Office Secretary, General 79 

One-year Course Clerical Training 81 

Organ, Courses in 107 

Orientation Days 5, 32 

Physical Education, Courses in 92 

Physics, Courses in 136 

Piano, Courses in 106 

Political Science, Courses in 150 

Prc-Dcntal 152 

Pre-Engineering 156 

Pre-Laboratory Technician 153 

Pre-Law 157 

Pre-Medical 152 

Pre-Nursing, See Nursing 96 

Pre-Optomctiy 155 

Pre-Pharmacy 155, 156 

Pre-Physical Therapy 154 

Pre- Pro Sessional and Pre- 

Technical Curricujums 152 

Pre-X-ray Technician 155 

Preparatory School 28 

Printing, Courses in 62 

Two-year Curriculum 64 

Professional Curricular, See Pre- 

Psychology, Courses in 87 

Publications 26 

Publishing Ministry, Prepara- 
tion for 65 

Regional Field Representatives 8 

Registration 34, 35 

Regulations, Academic 30-46 

Regulations. Announced 40 

Religion and Applied 

Theology 140 

Religion. Courses in 143 

Religious Organizations 26 

Remedial Programs 28 

Requirements, Basic Course 48-50 

Residence Halls 23 

Residence Regulations 40 



172 



General Index 



Scholarships 1 66 

Second Semester 6 

Secretarial Science, Courses in ... . 75-78 
Secretarial Science, Curriculum .... 74 

Self-Help, Student 27 

Semester Hours 35 

Senior Standing 37 

Sequence for Majors in: 

Biology 128 

Business Administration 70 

ForCP.A 72 

And Economics 70 

For Publishing Leaders 71 

Chemistry 131-133 

English 118 

Foods and Nutrition 55 

History 151 

Home Economics 54 

Industrial Education 63 

Medical Secretarial Science 80 

Music Education Ill, 112 

Music Performance 112, 113 

Physics 139 

Religion 146 

Secretarial Science 79 

Spanish - 123 

Teacher Education, Grades 1-9 - 89 
Teacher JEdu cation, Grades 7-12 90 

Theology ... — 145 

Seventh-day Adventist Tenets 

of Faith : 18 

Social Sciences, Division of 148 

Sociology, Courses in 150 

Sophomore Standing 37 

Southern Missionary College, 

Indutsrial Superintendents 10 

Spanish. Courses in 121, 122 

Special Hours 37 

Special Student, Adult 32, 37 

Speech, Courses in 117 

Student, An Ideal 20 

Student Housing Projects 24, 159 

Student Life and Services 26-29 

Student Organizations 26 

Stndem Special 32, 37 



Study and Work Load 35 

Subject Requirements for 

Admission 32, 33 

Summer Session 5, 29 

Tardiness 38 

Teacher Certification 82-85 

Teacher Education 82-85 

Testing and Counseling Service .... 27 
Textiles — Clothing Courses .... 53, 54 

Theology, Courses in 144 

Applied 144, 145 

Curriculum 141 

Evaluation Standards 140, 14 1 

Theory, Music Courses in .... 103, 104 

Tithe and Church Expense 164 

Transcript 30 

Transfer of Credit 31 

Transfer Students 31 

Trombone, Courses in 110 

Tuition and Fees 159-164 

Two-year Curriculums, 
Sequence for; 

Bible Instructor 47, 48, 146 

General Office Secretary 75 

Home Economics 56 

Industrial Arts 64 

Medical Secretary 74 

Printing 64 

Unaccredited Schools 31 

Upper Biennium, Admission of 

Sophomores to 37 

Veterans, Admission on 

G.E.D. Test 31 

Veterans, Information for 1-61-163 

Violin, Courses in 109 

Vocational Training Program .... 61, 62 
Voice. Courses in 108 

Withdrawals 35 

Work-Study Schedule 35 

Worship Attendance 39 



173 



For Reference 

Not to be taken 
from this library 



SOUTHERN COLLEGE MCKEE LIBRARY 

■IIIIIIIIII 

TMS073480 



TO BE TAKEN