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Full text of "Southern Missionary College Catalog 1960-61"

I 



OUTHERN 





ISSIONARY 




<Metin 1960-61 



CORRESPONDENCE 

Inquiries should be directed as follows: 

General Administrative Matters, to the President 

Admissions, to the Admissions Office 

Financial Matters, Student Employment, Student Housing, Student 
Accounts, to the Assistant Business Manager 

Scholastic Matters and Summer School, to the Dean of the College 

Transcripts and Academic Records, to the Registrar 

Problems of Residence Halls, Room Furnishings, Suitable Wearing 
Apparel and Campus Conduct: 
Of Men Students, to the Dean of Men 
Of Women Students, to the Dean of Women 

Public Relations, Student Activities, Promotion, Counselling, to the 
Dean of Student Affairs 



TELEPHONE NUMBERS OF ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICES 

Academy Principal EX 6-3181 

Admissions Office . . EX 6-3237 

Asst. Business Manager , EX 6-21 1 1 

Business Manager _. _ EX 6-211 1 

Dean of the College EX 6-2271 

Dean of Men EX6-3141 

Dean of Student Affairs ..- - .... EX 6-2332 

Dean of Women _ EX 6-3271 

Men's Residence , EX 6-3131 

President EX 6-2261 

Registrar's Office _ EX 6-3161 

Treasurer . .. EX 6-21 1 1 

Women's Residence EX 6-326i 



Volume X "S.M.C." Second Quarter, I960 No. 3 

Published quarterly by Southern Missionary College, Col lege - 
daJe, Tennessee. Entered as second class matter February 12, 1951. 
at CollegedaJe, Tennessee, und act of Congress August 24, 1912. 



NOT TO BE TAKtN 
FROM LIBRARY 



Southern Missionary College 



ANNUAL BULLETIN 



Volume X May, I960 Number 3 




ANNOUNCEMENTS 1960-1961 

SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGE 

COLLEGEDALE, TENNESSEE 



McKEE LIBRARY 
Southern Missionary Coffege 
Coilegedale< Tennessee 37315 




1 








TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Page 

Map of Campus 2 

Calendar 4 

Calendar of Events 5 

Board of Directors .. 6 

Administration 7 

Faculty 9 

Committees of the Faculty _ 13 

General Information 15 

Student Life and Services - 21 

Academic Standards 25 

Graduation Standards 33 

Divisions of Instruction 40 

Financial Information 123 

Index _ 135 



CALENDAR 



1960 



JANUARY 


APRIL 


JULY 


OCTOBER 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


1 2 
3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
10 1 1 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 
31 


1 2 

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 

10 11 12 13 14 15 16 

17 18.19 20 21 22 23 

24 25 26 27 28 29 30 


1 2 

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 

3! 


2 3 4 5 6 7 J 
9 10 1 1 12 13 14 1! 

16 17 18 19 20 21 2; 

23 24 25 26 27 28 2< 

30 31 


FEBRUARY 


MAY 


AUGUST 


NOVEMBER 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


12 3 4 5 6 

7 8 9 10 1 1 12 13 

(4 15 16 17 18 19 20 

21 22 23 24 25 26 27 

28 29 


12 3 4 5 6 7 

8 9 10 1 1 12 13 14 

115 16 17 18 19 20 21 

22 23 24 25 26 27 28 

29 30 31 


12 3 4 5 6 

7 8 9 10 1 1 12 13 
14 15 16 17 18 19 20 
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 
28 29 30 31 


12 3 4! 

6 7 8 9 10 II i: 

13 14 15 16 17 18 1< 

20 21 22 23 24 25 24 

27 28 29 30 


MARCH 


JUNE 


SEPTEMBER 


DECEMBER 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


12 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 10 1 1 12 

13 14 15 16 17 18 19 

20 21 22 23 24 25 26 

27 28 29 30 31 


12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 1 1 

12 13 14 15 16 17 18 

19 20 21 22 23 24 25 

26 27 28 29 30 


1 2 3 

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 

II 12 13 14 15 16 17 

18 19 20 21 22 23 24 

25 26 27 28 29 30 


i 2 : 

4 5 6 7 8 9 l( 
II 12 13 14 15 16 1' 
18 19 20 21 22 23 2' 
25 26 27 28 29 30 3 



1961 



JANUARY 


APRIL 


JULY 


OCTOBER 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


12 3 4 5 6 7 

8 9 10 II 12 13 14 

15 16 17 18 192021 

22 23 24 25 26 27 28 

29 30 31 


1 
2 3 4 5 6 7 8 

9 10 II 12 13 14 15 
16 17 18 19 20 21 22 
23 24 25 26 27 28 29 
30 


1 

2 3 4 5 6 7 fli 

9 10 II 12 13 14 15 

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 

23 24 25 26 27 28 29 

30 31 


12 3 4 5 6: 

8 9 10 II 12 13 1' 

15 16 17 18 19 20 2 

22 23 24 25 26 27 2( 

29 30 3 1 


FEBRUARY 


MAY 


AUGUST 


NOVEMBER 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 II 

12 13 14 15 16 17 18 

19 20 21 22 23 24 25 

26 27 28 


12 3 4 5 6 

7 8 9 10 II 12 13 

14 15 16 17 18 19 20 

21 22 23 24 25 26 27 

28 29 30 31 


12 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 10 1 1 12 

13 14 15 16 17 18 19 

20 21 22 23 24 25 26 

27 28 29 30 31 


12 3' 
5 6 7 8 9 10 1 
12 13 14 15 16 17 It 
19 20 21 22 23 24 21 
26 27 28 29 30 


MARCH 


JUNE 


SEPTEMBER 


DECEMBER 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


5 M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 II 

12 13 14 15 16 17 18 

19 20 21 22 23 24 25 

26 27 28 29 30 31 


1 2 3 

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 

II 12 13 14 15 16 17 

18 19 20 21 22 23 24 

25 26 27 28 29 30 


1 2 

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 

10 1 1 12 13 14 15 16 

17 18 19 20 21 22 23 

24 25 26 27 28 29 30 


i ; 

3 4 5 6 7 8 < 
10 1 1 12 13 14 15 \( 
17 18 19 20 21 22 1\ 
24 25 26 27 28 29 3( 

M 



^?r& r 



CALENDAR OF EVENTS 



SUMMER SESSION, I960 

Registration 7:30-12:00 June 20 

Classes 1:00-5:00 

Final Examinations ...... „ August 12 

Graduation August 1 3 



FIRST SEMESTER, 1960-61 

Registration September 5-7 

Classes Begin e September 8 

Week of Prayer September 30 to October 8 

Missions Promotion October 18 

Mid-term Examinations . November 7-9 

Thanksgiving Vacation November 22-27 

Christmas Vacation December 20-January 2 

First Semester Examinations January 16-20 



SECOND SEMESTER, 1960-61 

Registration January 22 

Classes Begin January 23 

Senior Class Presentation February 13 

Mid-term Examinations March 20-22 

Spring Vacation _ « March 23-27 

Spring Week of Prayer March 31-April 8 

College Days - . April 16-18 

Semester Examinations — .. May 22-25 

Graduation . .- - May 26-28 



COLLEGE DIRECTORY 



BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

Don R. Rees, Chairman Decatur, Georgia 

C. N. Rees, Secretary _ Collegedale, Tennessee 

K. C. Beem Decatur, Georgia 

Desmond Clmmings Decatur, Georgia 

Fred H. Dortch Birmingham, Alabama 

Charles Fleming, Jr _ , Collegedale, Tennessee 

H. S. Hanson Decatur, Georgia 

C B. Hardin Orlando, Florida 

L. J. Leiske Meridian, Mississippi 

H. Lester Plymouth, Florida 

E, L. Marley .. Nashville, Tennessee 

A. C McKei- ... Atlanta, Georgia 

Garland Millet Huntsville, Alabama 

M. C. Patten Greenville, South Carolina 

H. V. Reed Charlotte, North Carolina 

Wm. Sandborn Madison College, Tennessee 

H. H. Schmidt . Orlando, Florida 

B. F. Slimmerour Norcross, Georgia 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE OF THE BOARD 
Don R. Rees, Chairman C N. Rees, Secretary 

H. S. Hanson Charles Fleming 

K. C. Beem A. C McKee 

Wilbert Schneider 



REGIONAL FIELD REPRESENTATIVES 

Representative-at-large: H. S. Hanson Decatur, Georgia 

For Alabama-Mississippi: O, L. Heinrich Meridian, Mississippi 

For Florida: Ward A. Scriven Orlando, Florida 

For Georgia-Cumberland: V. C. Hoffman Atlanta, Georgia 

For Carolina: George V. Yost Charlotte, North Carolina 

For Kentucky-Tennessee: F. W, Foster Nashville, Tennessee 



OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 

C. N, Rees, Ph.D President 

Wilbert Schneider, Ph.D ■ Academic Dean 

Wm. H. Taylor, M.A „ Dean of Student Affairs 

Charles Fleming, Jr., M.B.A Business Manager 

Theodora Lambeth, B.A _.. Registrar 

Kenneth Davis, M.A — - Dean of Men 

Alfreda Costerisan, M.S Dean of Women 

S. D. Brown, M.A. B Librarian 

ASSOCIATES IN ADMINISTRATION 

J. M. Ackerman, Ed.S Secretary of Admissions 

Director of Testing 

Keith Anderson, M.D College Physician 

Ralph Davidson Treasurer 

E. Stanley Chace, M.Ed Principal, Arthur W, Spalding 

Elementary School 

Geraldine Foote Assistant Director of Food Service 

Aubrey King Assistant Treasurer and Accountant 

Marian Kuhlman, R.N . School Nurse 

H. B. Lundquist, M.A Executive Secretary Alumni Association 

John Schmidt, Jr Director of Food Service 

J. R. Siebenlist, M.A Principal, Collegedale Academy 

Marion S. Simmons, Ed.S. .... Student Educational Consultant 

£Roy Thurmon ._ Student Chaplain 

Myrtle Watrous, B.S. in L.S Assistant Librarian 

D. L. West, B.A Assistant Business Manager 

OFFICERS OF AUXILIARY SERVICES 

Departmental Superintendents 

Perry A. Coulter Buildings and Grounds 

C A, Lang Central Supply 

H. C. Lambeth _ Custodian 

7 



College Industries, Inc. 

Frank Fogg ~ College Broom Factory 

H. F. Meyer ..... College Press 

Grover Edgmon Collegedale Laundry 

Herbert Polk College Creamery 

College Enterprises, Inc. 

John Goodbrad „. . Distributors 

B. J. Hagan College Garage 

Bruce Ringer College Mercantile 

H. A. Woodward _ College Store 

Affiliated Industries 

William J. Hulsey , College Cabinets 

O. D. McKee McKee Baking Company 



FACULTY 



EMERITI 

Hira T. Curtis, B.S., Professor Emeritus of Business Administration 
B.S., Union College, 1899. 

Mary Holder Dietel, M.A., Associate Professor Emeritus of Modern Languages 
B.A., Washington Missionary College, 1919; M.A., University of Maryland, 
1933; Certificate from L'AHiance Francaise, Paris, 1936. 

Maude I. Jones, B.A., Professor Emeritus of English 
B.A.. Mississippi College for Women, 1894. 

Harold A. Miller, M.Music, Professor Emeritus of Music 

B. Music, Otterbein College, 1937; M, Music, Eastman School of Music, 
University of Rochester, 1941. 

PROFESSORS 

Clyde G. Bushnell, Ph.D., Professor of Modern Languages 

B.A., Union College, 1933; M.A., University of Mexico, 1948; Ph,D., 
University of Texas, 1958. 

John Christensen, Ph.D., Professor of Chemistry 

B.A., Union College, 1939; M.A., University of Nebraska, 1946; Ph.D., 
Michigan State University, 1956. 

Otto H. Christensen, Ph.D., Professor of Religion and Biblical Languages 
B.A., Union College, 1938; M.A., S.D.A. Theological Seminary, 1945; 
Ph.D., University of Chicago, 1951. 

Ray Hefferlin, Ph.D., Professor of Physics 

B.A., Pacific Union College, 1951; Ph.D., California Institute of Tech- 
nology, 1955. 

K. M. Kennedy, Ed.D., Professor of Education 

B.A., Valparaiso University, 1946; M.E<1., University of Chattanooga, 1952; 
Ed.D., University of Tennessee, 1955. 

Wilbert M. Schneider, Ph.D., Professor of Business Administration 

B.A., Union College, 1940; M.B.A., University of Oklahoma, 1944; Ph.D., 
University of Southern California, 1951. 

J V, Harriet Smith, Ed.D., Professor of Nursing 

B.S.. Pacific Union College, 1941; M.A., Teachers' College, Columbia 
University, 1947; Ed.D., University of Southern California, 1959- 

Everett T. Watrous, Ed.D., Professor of History 

B.A., Atlantic Union College, 1934; M.A., University of Chicago, 1941; 
Ed.D., University of Tennessee, 1956. 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS 

J. M. Ackerman, Ed.S., Associate Professor of Education 

B.S., Union College, 1949; M.A., University of Nebraska, 1950; Ed.S., 
Peabody College for Teachers, 1957. 

Theresa Rose Brickman, M. Com'l Ed,, Associate Professor of Secretarial 
Science 
B.A., Union College, 1928; M, Com'l Ed., University of Oklahoma, 1942. 



' 



Clarence Chinn, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Chemistry 

B.A., Walla Walla College, 1951; M.S., Oregon State College, 1953; 
Ph.D., Oregon State College, 1956. 



tO ■ Jerome Clark, Ph.D., Associate Professor of History 

B.Th., Atlantic Union College, 1948; M.Ed., University of Maryland, 1951; 
M.A., S.D.A., Theological Seminary, 1953; Ph.D., University of Southern 
California, 1959. 

• *> Olivia Brick man Dean, M.Ed., Associate Professor of Education 

B.A., Union College, 1934; M.Ed., University of Oklahoma, 1943. 

\%- Ralph Davidson, M.S., C.P.A., Associate Professor of Business Administration 
B.S., Madison College, 1934; M.S., University of Tennessee; C.P.A., 
State of Tennessee, 1952. 

'*" George T. Gott, M.A., Associate Professor of Economics 

B.A., Emmanuel Missionary College, 1944; M.A., University of Nebraska, 
1951. 

£$ • Huldrich H. Kuhlman, M.A., Associate Professor of Biology 

B.A., Emmanuel Missionary College, 1940; M.A., George Peabody College 
for Teachers, 1945. 

H. B. Lundquist, M.A., Associate Professor of English 

B.A., Emmanuel Missionary College, 1917; M.A., University of Mary- 
land, 1932. 

Charles E. Read, M.S., Associate Professor of Secretarial Science 
B.S., Union College, 1950; M.S., Indiana University, 1952. 

30 ' Clifford A. Reeves, B.D., Associate Professor of Religion 

B.Th., Canadian Union College, 1951; M.A., S.D.A. Theological Seminary, 
1956; B.D., Potomac University — Seminary, 1957. 

J /, Morris Taylor, D.Mus.A., Associate Professor of Music 

B.A., Atlantic Union College, 1951; M. Mus., Boston University. 1953; 
D.Mus.A., Boston University, 1959- 

William H. Taylor, M.A., Associate Professor of Journalism 

B.A., Union College, 1944; M.A., University of Nebraska, 1948. 

J, Mabel Wood, M.A., Associate Professor of MusJc 

B.A., Union College, 1948; M.A., University of Nebraska, 1952. 






ASSISTANT PROFESSORS 

Dorothy Evans Ackerman, M. Music, Assistant Professor of Music 

B.A., Atlantic Union College, 1940; M. Music, University of Chattanooga, 
1947. 

Henry E. BaaSCH, M.A., Assistant Professor of Religion 

B.A., Southern Missionary College, 1953; M.A., S.D.A. Theological Semi- 
nary, 1954. 

Dorothy K. Christensen, M.S., Assistant Professor of Home Economics 

B.A., Emmanuel Missionary College, 1955; M.S., University of Tennessee, 
1957. 

10 



• Joseph B. Cooper, M.A., Assistant Professor of Physical Education 

B.S., University of Tampa, 1955; M.A., University of Florida, 1956. 

Kenneth Davis, M.A., Assistant Professor of Religion 

B.A., Emmanuel Missionary College, 1944; M.A., Seventh-day Adventist 
Then logical Seminary, 1953. 

• ' Edgar O, Grundset, M.A., Assistant Professor of Biology 

B.A., Emmanuel Missionary College, 1947; M.A., Walla Walla College, 
;*J. 1959. 

I ;. ,Lyle Q. Hamel, M.Mus., Assistant Professor of Music 

B.S., Emmanuel Missionary College, 1949; M.Mus., Vander Cook College 
of Music, 1954. 

$ ■ Gordon Hyde, M.S. in Speech, Assistant Professor of Speech 

B.A., Emmanuel Missionary College, 1942; M.S., University of Wisconsin, 
1957. 

Evlyn Lindberg, M.A., Assistant Professor of English 

B.A,, Willamette University, 1932; M.A., Texas Christian University, 1952. 

.Gordon MADGwroc, M.A., Assistant Professor of English 

B.A, Washington Missionary College, 1954; M.A., S.D.A. Theological 
Seminar)', 1955; M.Ed., University of Maryland, 1958. 

Glenda S. Rolfe, M.S., Assistant Professor of Nursing 

B.S.N.E., Washington Missionary College, 1950; M.S., College of Medical 
Evangelists, 1958. 

Elaine Myers-Taylor, M.A., Assistant Professor of Music 

B.A., Walla Walla College, 1946; M.A., Columbia University, 1953. 

Wayne E. VandeVere., M.B.A., Assistant Professor of Business Administration 
B.A., Emmanuel Missionary College, 1954; M.B.A., University of Michigan, 
1956. 

I Myrtle B. Watrous, B.S. in L.S., Assistant Professor of Library Science 

B.A., Washington Missionary College, 1924; B.S. in L.S., University of 
North Carolina, 1952. 

A. L, Watt, M.A., Assistant Professor of Physics 

B.A., Union College, 1929; M.A., University of Nebraska, 1954. 

Olive Westphal, M.A. 

B.A., Pacific Union College, 1929; M.A., University of Southern Cali- 
fornia, 1940. 

Pf. 

INSTRUCTORS 

Dolores Chapman, B.S,, Instructor in Nursing 
B.S., Union College, 1958. 

7 • Don Crook, B.A., Instructor in Music 

B.A., Southern Missionary College, 1953. 

Helga Forehand, B.A., Instructor in Home Economics 

B.A., Union College; B.S., College of Medical Evangelists, 1932. 

J- Thelma Henime, M.A., Instructor in Home Economics 

B.A., Pacific Union College, 1944; M.A., Pacific Union College, 1958. 

11 



Miriam Kerr, M.A., Instructor in Nursing 

B.A., Atlantic Union College, 1936; M.A., George Peabody College for 

* Teachers, 1959. 

^1/ • 

Christine Kummer, B.S.N.E., Instructor in Nursing 

B.S.N.E., Washington Missionary College, 1956. 
2*\, Merlynd Nestell, M.S., Instructor in Mathematics 

B.A., Emmanuel Missionary College, 1957; M.A., University of Wisconsin, 

1959. 
Nellie Patterson, B.Sc, Instructor tn Art and Physical Education 

B.Sc, University of Michigan, I960. 
Merle Silloway, M.A., Instructor in Library Science 

B.A., Washington Missionary College, 1920; M.A., Columbia University, 

1928. 
Lowell J. Smith, B.A., Instructor in Music 

B.A., Pacific Union College, 1957. 
Drew Turlington, B.Sc, Instructor in Industrial Arts 

B.Sc, Southern Missionary College, 1951. 

SUPERVISORY INSTRUCTORS IN SECONDARY EDUCATION 

J. R. Siebenlist, M.A., Principal, History 

B.A., Union College, 1930; M.A., University of Nebraska, 1953. 
Lorene Ausherman, B.A., Registrar, Health 

B.A., Southern Missionary' College, 1953. 
Paul C. Boynton, M.A., Bible 

B.A., Washington Missionary College, 194 1; M.A., S.D.A. Theological 

Seminary, 195^. J 
Lou B. Hoar, M.C.S., Secretarial Science 

B.R.E., Atlantic Union College, 1931; M.C.S., Boston University, 1949. 
Paul J. Hoar, M.A., Mathematics and Science 

B.A., Atlantic Union College, 1939; M.A., Boston University, 1950. 
Olive Westphal, M.A., Spanish 

B.A., Pacific Union College, 1929; M.A., University of Southern Cali- 
fornia, 1940. 
Rita Tapper, B.A., English 

B.A., Washington Missionary College, I960. 

SUPERVISORY INSTRUCTORS IN ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 

E. S. Chace, M.Ed., Principal, Grade 8 

B.Th., Atlantic Union College, 1948; M.Ed., University of Chattanooga, 

1958. 
Mildred Baldwin, B.S., Grades 3, 4 

B.S., Southern Missionary College, 1958. 
Elmyra Conger, M.Ed., Grades 3-7 

B.S., Southern Missionary College, 1954; M.Ed., University of Chattanooga, 

1957. 
Arnold Otto, M.Ed., Grade 7 

B.A., Emmanuel Missionary College, 1951; M.Ed., University of South 

Carolina, 1958. 
Ruth Sorrell, M.A., Grades 1, 2 

B.S., Southern Missionary College, 1951; M.A., George Peabody College 

for Teachers, 1955. 
Barbara Bottsford, B.S., Grades 5, 6 

B.S., Southern Missionary College, 1957. 

12 



ADMINISTRATIVE COMMITTEES 



L President's Council 

2. Admissions Committee 

3. Finance Committee 

4. Traffic and Safety Committee 



COMMITTEES OF THE FACULTY 

The ten standing committees of the faculty are recommending bodies 
appointed by the President at the beginning of the school year at which 
time the schedule of each committee is announced. The President is a member 
ex-officio of all standing committees. The standing committees are as follows: 

1. Academic Policies 

2. Testing and Counselling Service 

3. Religious Interests 

4. Lyceum and Social Programs 

5. Film Committee 

6. Health and Sanitation 

7. Development and Public Relations 

8. Recreation 

9. Social Education 
10. Library Services 



The following committees function as sub-committees of the Academic 
Policies Committee: Ministerial Recommendations, Medical Student Recom- 
mendations, Teacher Certification, English Improvement, Vocational Education. 



13 



; p 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



AIMS AND OBJECTIVES 



Southern Missionary College is a coeducational Christian college 
operated by the Seventh-day Adventist denomination. Its objectives 
are in harmony with the basic principles and objectives of its govern- 
ing organisation. The Bible is accepted as the inspired revelation 
of God to men. Consistent endeavor is made to inspire in the 
student an appreciation of those principles that lead to a high level 
of thinking which in turn leads to Christian character and purposeful 
service to one's fellow men. 

In harmony with this inclusive objective the following statements 
express the specific objectives upon which the policies of the college 
are formulated: 

1. Spiritual — To develop and maintain a satisfying relation to 
Christ, to develop a Christian philosophy as a basis for the solution 
of personal and social problems, to acquire a sense of personal respon- 
sibility in promoting the mission and objectives of the church. 

2. Intellectual — To gain an acquaintance with the basic facts 
and principles of the major fields of knowledge necessary to creative 
thinking; to acquire an attitude of open-minded consideration of con- 
troversial questions; to achieve a continuing intellectual curiosity and to 
acquire the art of effective expression and communication of ideas in 
both written and spoken form. 

3. Ethical — To acquire those ethical and moral concepts which are 
revealed in the Word of God and approved by the enlightened con- 
science of mankind; to achieve an attitude toward the rights and opin- 
ions of others; to accept the social obligation of serving the less privi- 
leged with selfless devotion. 

4. Social — To develop social practices in harmony with social 
mores of cultured men and women; to acquire social grace, leading to 
the development of a well-balanced personality. 

15 



16 Southern Missionary College Bulletin 

5. Aesthetic — To achieve a sense and appreciation of the beautiful 
whether in language or in the fine arts; to learn to discriminate and to 
choose the beautiful, realizing that such appreciation contributes sig- 
nificantly to the refinement of character sought in the spiritual and 
ethical objectives, 

6. Civic — To develop a willingness to accept the responsibilities of 
citizenship as well as to enjoy its privileges; to recognize and safe- 
guard the constitutional and legal rights of others; to acquire an 
understanding of the foundation principles of our government and 
how to maintain them; to cooperate with fellow citizens for the im- 
provement of society both national and international. 

7. Health — To recognize the obligation of maintaining health, 
not only for personal efficiency, but as a contribution to society; to gain 
an intelligent understanding of the wonderful laws of the physical 
body and how to maintain one's self in optimum condition by proper 
diet, exercise, and recreation. 

8. Vocational — To acquire an appreciation of the true dignity 
of useful labor; to choose intelligently a vocation befitting the student's 
natural aptitudes. 



HISTORY 

Southern Missionary College was founded at Graysville, Tennessee, 
in 1893 under the name of Southern Training School. In 1916 the 
institution was moved to Collegedale, Tennessee, where it opened 
under the name of Southern Junior College. By 1944 senior college 
status was achieved, the first degree candidates being graduated in 1946. 



LOCATION 

The main college campus is located in a pleasing valley eighteen 
miles east of Chattanooga and three miles from Ooltewah on the Lee 
Highway. The Southern Railway line passes through one side of the 
estate. A bus service operated by the Cherokee Lines serves the college 
campus. The post office address is Collegedale. 

The Orlando campus situated in the "City Beautiful" at the 
Florida Sanitarium and Hospital provides additional facilities for the 
Division of Nursing. 



General Information 17 

BUILDINGS AND EQUIPMENT 



Lynn Wood Hall — The administration building is named in 
honor of Dr. Lynn Wood, president of the College from 1918-1922. It 
is a three-story structure housing all the administrative offices including 
most of the teachers' offices. The chapel seats approximately 550. 

Maude Jones Residence Hall — The residence hall for women, 
named for Maude Jones, Associate Professor Emeritus of the College, 
has accommodations for 186 women. In addition to an apartment 
for the dean of women, it houses an infirmary, a spread room, and a 
private parlor. Somewhat extensive remodeling of recent date has 
added considerably to the housing capacity and added to the attrac- 
tiveness of the building. 

John H. Talge Residence Hall — The men's residence hall, 
named for John H. Talge, provides accommodations for 160 men. 
The panelling of the entrance and lounge has added much to the 
attractiveness of the building. 

A G. Daniells Memorial Library— The A. G. Daniells Me- 
morial Library was completed in 1945. This is a modern library 
containing more than twenty-eight thousand books and about two 
hundred current periodicals conveniently arranged and adequately 
housed for study, reference, and research. A portion of the building is 
used for lecture rooms. The library is located adjacent to the ad- 
ministration building and is readily accessible from the residence halls. 

Earl F. Hackman Science Hall — Hackman Hall, modern in 
arrangement and appointment, a commodious, two-story, fireproof 
building, contains various lecture rooms and laboratories of the division 
of natural sciences. This building, completed and dedicated in 1951, 
was named in honor of the late Earl F. Hackman, friend of the 
College and for many years chairman of its board. 

Harold A. Miller Fine Arts Building — The Harold A. Miller 
Fine Arts Building, completed in 1953, houses the music department, 
This two-story, fireproof building provides studios, practice rooms, and 
an auditorium for recital purposes. It was named in honor of Harold 
A. Miller, who for many years headed the Music Department. 



18 Southern Missionary College Bulletin 

Collegedale Tabernacle-Auditorium — The auditorium serves 
as a place of worship for the Collegedale S. D. A. church. The building 
is owned by the Georgia-Cumberland Conference and has a seating 
capacity of 1,200. A Hammond electric organ and a full concert 
Baldwin grand piano are part of the equipment. This building also 
serves as a center for the physical education activities. 

Arthur W. Spalding School — This modern one-story, six-room 
elementary school is one of the most recent buildings to be erected. 
It serves as a vital part of the teacher- training program. 

Home Arts Center — This recently completed building houses 
the Cafeteria and Student Center on one floor and the Home Eco- 
nomics Department on another floor. This building is not only modern 
but beautifully appointed throughout. 

Academy Building — This building contains all the facilities for 
operating the class program of the secondary school. The few resident 
students of the academy are housed separately on the campus. 

Industrial Buildings — The industrial buildings include the Col- 
lege Press, Laundry, Cabinet Shop, Broom Shop, Bakery, Creamery, 
Garage, and College Enterprises. 

Student Apartments — The college maintains a number of hous- 
ing units for students as well as trailer camps. Housing is adequate 
for married students. 

New Women's Residence — At present a new women's residence 
home to house over 300 is in progress. This will contain many 
attractive features that will make for gracious living. 



ACCREDITATION AND CERTIFICATION 

Southern Missionary College is accredited as a liberal arts college 
by the Southern Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools and is 
approved by the Tennessee State Board of Education for the preparation 
of both secondary and elementary teachers for certification. 

The Division of Nursing is accredited by the Tennessee State Board 
of Nursing, is recognized by the Florida State Board of Nurses Registra- 
tion, and is an agency member of the Baccalaureate and Higher Degree 
Granting Programs of the Division of Nursing Education of the 
National League for Nursing. 



General Information 19 

MEMBERSHIPS 

In addition to the memberships indicated above the college is a 
member of the Association of Seventh- day Adventist Colleges and 
Secondary Schools, the Southern Association of Private Schools, the 
Association of American Colleges, the Tennessee College Association, 
and the Mid-South Association of Private Schools. 

STANDARDS OF CONDUCT 

In the light of the objective of the college to develop men and 
women of high standards of scholarship and character, integrity, and 
Christian maturity, those who are accepted thereby pledge themselves 
to the maintenance of these standards. No religious test as such is 
applied, but all students are expected to attend the regular religious 
exercises and to abide by the regulations given in the student handbook 
or announced by the faculty. These regulations are in harmony with 
what experience has demonstrated to be sound standards of Christian 
conduct. 

A student who finds himself out of harmony with the standards 
and objectives of the college, who is unresponsive and not cooperative, 
or who violates his pledge may be asked to withdraw without specific 
charge. 

Disciplinary action is usually not of a summary nature except for 
serious moral offenses. The student has every opportunity to respond 
to cautions, warning, censure, or other action such as probation and 
suspension; but patient dealing should not be interpreted as indulgence 
or toleration of attitudes or actions out of harmony with the regulations. 

A full statement of the regulations is to be found in the student 
handbook, SMC and YOU, which is available to every student upon 
application. 



THE SCHOOL TERMS 

The college operates on the semester plan, the school year con- 
sisting of two semesters and a summer session. The separate announce- 
ment for the summer session is available in May and may be secured 
from the Admissions Office, 



20 Southern Missionary College Bulletin 

LEAVES OF ABSENCE 

Students who reside in the college residence halls are required 
to arrange leaves of absence with the Dean of Men or the Dean of 
Women. If the absence involves missing of class work the signature 
of the Dean of the College is also required on the leave of absence 
blank. 



MARRIAGE 

No student will be given permission to marry during the school 
term. Secret marriage is sufficient reason for dismissal. 



USE OF MOTOR VEHICLES 

Unmarried students are subject to restriction first in the matter of 
bringing motor vehicles to the campus or vicinity and secondly in their 
use even though they may be authorized. These conditions have to do 
with the securing of a permit, registration with the residence hall dean, 
payment of a parking fee of §10 a semester or a storage fee of $10 
a semester for unauthorized cars, proper insurance, etc. Any student 
who desires to bring a motor vehicle should first correspond with the 
dean of the residence hall concerned. 



STUDENT LIFE AND SERVICES 



STUDENT ORGANIZATION 

The extra-curricular program is designed to offer to every student 
opportunity for the development of initiative and leadership. The 
Student Association is a highly organized body which in cooperation 
with the faculty is entrusted with a large responsibility in implement- 
ing the policies and principles which the college represents. The Dean 
of Student Affairs works as liaison officer to coordinate the work of 
the faculty and the Student Association. 



GUIDANCE AND COUNSELLING SERVICE 

The counselling service is organized and directed by the Dean of 
Student Affairs who will arange for the choice of a personal counsel- 
lor for each student. Additional counsel is provided by administrative 
personnel and by the heads of departments who will advise students 
on scholastic questions related to their major field. The Director of the 
Testing Service works in close cooperation with the counselling service 
in providing guidance information to both students and counsellors. 



PLACEMENT 

One of the personnel services is that of assisting graduates in 
securing appointments for service. The placement office distributes 
information concerning each prospective graduate to a wide list of 
prospective employers and acts as liaison office to bring graduates and 
employer together by supplying recommendations and other informa- 
tion necessary. 



RESIDENCE 

All unmarried students who do not live with parents, close relatives, 
or legal guardians are expected to live in the residence halls on the 
campus. If accommodation is not available in the school homes, mature 
students may be granted permission to live in approved community 

21 



22 Southern Missionary College Bulletin 

homes by the President's Council. Information about necessary room 
furnishing to be supplied by the student may be found in the student 
handbook. 



PUBLICATIONS 

The Student Association publishes the bi-weekly Southern Accent 
and the yearbook Southern Memories. The Campus Accent, a single 
sheet publication of announcements for distribution in chapel, is also 
published by the Student Association. These student publications are 
under the sponsorship of the instructor in journalism. 



HEALTH SERVICE 

The health service is directed by the resident school nurse in co- 
operation with the school physician. The Clinic is located on the campus. 
The general fee paid by each student upon entrance covers certain 
medical services without additional charge, A list of these services is 
handed to each student at the time of registration. 



CAMPUS ORGANIZATIONS 

More than thirty campus organizations give ample opportunity 
to develop student initiative and leadership. They may be classified 
under four divisions; namely, church related organizations, social clubs, 
professional clubs, and special interest or hobby clubs. 

The church related organizations are the MV Society, Ministerial 
Seminar, Christ's Foreign Legion, American Temperance Society, the 
Colporteur Club, and the Usher's Club. 

The professional clubs are organized by departments with student 
leadership under the sponsorship of the department or division head. 

The social clubs are organized according to place of residence. 
These are the Married Couples' Forum; Upsilon Delta Phi, the men's 
club; and Dasowakita, the women's club. 



Student Life and Services 23 

ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

Broadly speaking Southern Missionary College is a living institu- 
tion made up of its alumni, faculty, and students. The Alumni Associ- 
ation promotes the interests of the school, fosters a spirit of friendship 
among former students, preserves worthy traditions of the College, and 
serves mankind through the exemplification and advocacy of the ideals 
of their Alma Mater. 

The General Association holds an annual meeting on the day fol- 
lowing Commencement. Local chapters in various sections of the 
country meet several times yearly. The Association publishes the 
Alumni News Bulletin, its official publication. It is distributed free 
to Alumni and friends of the College. 

The Association maintains an office on the college campus which 
keeps the records of its regular members, some 2,000 graduates of 
Southern Missionary College, or of the institutions which preceded it 
(the Graysville Academy, the Southern Training School, the Southern 
Junior College). Associate membership in the organization is also 
granted individuals who have attended this institution at least one 
semester. 



GRANTS-IN-AID 

Grants-in-aid of amounts up to $100 are allotted to students of 
sophomore, junior, or senior standing in case of proved financial need 
provided the citizenship and scholarship are of a high order. Ap- 
plication should be made in writing to the Dean of the College. 

A scholarship loan fund is also maintained by the Alumni Associa- 
tion from which loans are made under conditions similar to the grants- 
in-aid. Applications for scholarships should be made to the Alumni 
Scholarship Committee through the Secretary of the Alumni Associa- 
tion. 



EMPLOYMENT SERVICE 

The College operates a variety of industries which provide con- 
siderable employment for students in financial need. These work 
opportunities provide a training in vocational skills as all work is 
done under trained supervisors. 



24 Southern Missionary College Bulletin 

LYCEUM COURSE 

The College sponsors a lyceum course of high-class material that 
it the same time both educational and \ 
primarily of travelogues, music, and lectures. 



is at the same time both educational and entertaining. This consists 



EXTRA-CURRICULAR ACTIVITIES 

Students may hold extra-curricular offices according to the standards 
as defined in the Student Association Constitution. 

All lists of students chosen for office must be submitted to the 
academic dean for approval before the student may be asked to ac- 
cept the responsibility. 



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ACADEMIC STANDARDS 



ADMISSION 

APPLICATION PROCEDURE 

As a private Christian institution, Southern Missionary College fol- 
lows the policy of determining admission on the basis of character 
and citizenship as well as of scholarship. Formal application is made 
on a blank furnished by the Admissions Office. All correspondence 
concerning admissions should be addressed to the Secretary of Admis- 
sions. Each application should be accompanied by a processing fee of 
$2 which is not refundable. Ordinarily about a month is necessarV 
to process an application. 

The College takes the responsibility of securing transcripts of the 
applicant's previous scholastic record. All transcripts become the 
property of the College. 

ADMISSION PROCEDURE 

A student may be admitted by graduation from a state or regionally 
accredited secondary school without qualifying examination. Ap- 
plicants from unaccredited schools may be admitted on a provisional 
basis upon passing entrance examinations. 

The subject requirements for admission to the various curricula will 
be found on page 36. The student is advised to give emphasis in his 
secondary school to those basic subjects which will prepare for any 
liberal arts curriculum. 

ADMISSION TO ADVANCED STANDING 

A candidate for admission from another regionally accredited col- 
lege may receive credit without examination subject to the following 
requirements: 

a. Receipt of official transcript or transcript of the complete 
previous scholastic record. 

b. A record of entrance tests taken previously and a statement 
of withdrawal with an honorable record. 

c. Evidence of satisfying the entrance requirements of this college. 

25 



26 Southern Missionary College Bulletin 



PROVISIONAL ADMISSION—TRANSFER 

Credit is recorded provisionally at the time of admission but will 
not become part of the student's permanent record until the student 
has satisfactorily completed not less than twelve semester hours in 
this institution. Not more than 72 semester hours or 108 quarter hours 
may be accepted from a junior college. 

ADMISSION BY EXAMINATION 

Applicants over twenty-one years of age who have had at least 
eight solid secondary units may be admitted on the basis of passing 
the General Educational Development tests with a minimum score of 
45 on each test and an average standard score of 50 on the total 
of five tests. 

ADMISSION OF VETERANS 

Veterans are admitted on the same basis as applicants over twenty- 
one years of age referred to in the preceding paragraph. Educational 
credit earned while in service will be evaluated on the basis of the 
recommendations found in the Guide of the American Council on 
Education. 



CLASSIFICATION OF STUDENTS 

The classification for which a student qualifies at his first registra- 
tion ordinarily continues through both semesters. Applications for 
reclassification at the beginning of the second semester may be made 
to the Academic Dean except that officers of classes may not be re- 
classified and a student may not be classified as a senior until he is 
a candidate for graduation in May or August of the current year. All 
students are classified under one of the following categories: 

Freshmen — Graduation from secondary school. 

Sophomores — Those who have completed at least 24 semester 
hours. A sophomore may not take upper biennium courses unless he 
has completed 50 lower biennium hours, except certain sequence courses 
approved by the Dean. 

He may however register for one or more upper biennium courses, 
for upper biennium credit, provided (1) he has earned, with an average 
of "Cr or above, fifty hours including basic freshman and sophomore 
courses already taken, and (2) his current registration completes the 
fulfillment of lower biennium basic and major requirements. 



Academic Standards 27 

Juniors — Those who have at least 56 semester hours with a cu- 
mulative average of C, and who have completed the basic requirements 
as listed on pages 36, 37. 

Seniors — Those who have completed 96 semester hours and are 
candidates for spring graduation. Summer graduates form a separate 
class if they have completed 118 hours at the close of the second 
semester. 

All required freshman courses must have been completed before 
the student reaches senior standing. Required freshman courses left 
until the senior year must be taken without credit. 

Adult Special Student — A mature person who does not meet regular 
admission requirements may be permitted to take lower biennium work 
to a maximum of twelve semester hours. To r~*n mie further he must 
regularize his admission. 

Unclassified Student — A student who is qualified to enter on a regular 
basis but who does not plan to complete a curriculum is registered 
as an unclassified student. 



ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 

REGISTRATION 

Registration will take place September 5-7. Placement and apti- 
tude tests will be given for all new students as a guide to registration. 

A late registration fee of $5 is charged after registration week. 
Students may not register more than two weeks late except by permis- 
sion of the Dean. The course load of a late registrant will be reduced 
one semester hour for each week of lateness. 

CHANGES IN PROGRAM 

Changes in registration may be made during the first two weeks 
of a semester without cost upon the consent of the advisor and the 
Dean. After the second week any change in registration, whether add- 
ing, dropping, or exchanging courses, carries a fee of $2. 

Students may not change from one section of a class to another 
except by permission of the Dean. 

A student may withdraw from a course up to the fourth week of a 
semester with a grade of W. From the fourth week to the twelfth week 
the grade recorded will be W or WF. For withdrawal after the twelfth 



28 Southern Missionary College Bulletin 

week a grade of F will be recorded unless the withdrawal is because 
of unavoidable circumstances approved by the Dean, in which case 
a grade of W will be given. 

CLASS LOAD 

A full-time student is one who is registered for twelve or more 
semester hours. Except by permission of the President's Council a 
student living in the residence halls must carry a minimum of eight 
semester hours. If a student is working to defray expenses, his course 
load will be adjusted according to his scholastic ability. Students of 
superior scholarship may register for a maxium of 18 hours by per- 
mission of the Academic Dean, a 1.5 grade point average being the 
minimum qualification to make such a request. Correspondence work 
is computed as part of the current load. 

No appointment, work assignments, field trips or other activities that 
would interfere with the student's regular schedule of school work may 
be asked of the students without specific arrangement with the Dean 
in advance. 

SCHOLARSHIP STANDARD 

Students who fail to maintain a C average are considered on a pro- 
visional or probationary status. An average of C is the basis of admission 
and a requirement for graduation from all curricula. A student who may 
be admitted with less than a C average must raise his average .2 each 
semester; otherwise, his program will be reviewed for the purpose of 
reducing his class load or labor load or both. Students may not continue 
indefinitely doing less than C average work. Furthermore, a student 
on this status is restricted in the number of extracurricular respon- 
sibilities which he may carry, The maintenance of a high scholastic 
record is considered as a most important consideration for the student's 
own welfare. 

COURSE NUMBERS 

Courses numbered 1 to 49 are lower biennium courses taken mainly 
by freshmen, and 50 to 99 mainly by sophmores; those numbered 
100 to 149 are upper biennium courses open primarily to juniors, and 
150 to 199 open primarily to seniors. 

Course numbers that stand alone (e.g., 56) represent courses of one 
semester which are units in and of themselves. 

Course numbers separated by a hyphen (e.g., 1-2) represent year 
courses, the semesters to be taken in order given. Credit for the first 
semester only will not apply toward graduation from any curriculum. 



Academic Standards 29 

Course numbers separated by a comma (e.g., 41, 42) represent 
units in and of themselves either one of which may be counted for 
graduation without reference to sequence. 

Course numbers separated by a colon (e.g., 11 :12) are year courses 
in which credit for the first course is a prerequisite to the second; how- 
ever, credit may be given for the first semester when taken alone. 

CORRESPONDENCE WORK 

A student will be permitted to carry correspondence work while in 
residence only if the desired course is unobtainable at the College. All 
correspondence work whether taken while in residence or during the 
summer must be approved in advance by the Dean. 

The maximum amount of correspondence which may apply toward 
a degree is twelve semester hours and eight hours for two-year cur- 
ricula. 

Correspondence credit on the upper biennium level may not apply 
toward the student's major or minor. A student may not repeat by 
correspondence a course in which he has received a grade of F in this 
institution. 

Correspondence work must carry a grade of C or above to be 
recorded. C grade correspondence work may not apply toward a major 
unless by a validation examination. However, A or B grade correspond- 
ence may apply toward a major without a validating examination. 

A senior doing correspondence work must have a transcript of his 
final grade in the Registrar's office at least nine weeks before gradua- 
tion. 

No correspondence credit will be entered on the student's record 
until he has earned a minimum 12 hours in residence with an average 
of at least C. 

AUDITED COURSES 

A student may audit only non- laboratory courses. Audited courses 
do not carry credit, the tuition being half the regular charge. In comput- 
ing a student's course load, an audited course counts as half. A student 
may not repeat an audited course for credit. 

ATTENDANCE AT CLASS APPOINTMENTS 

No class absences are allowed except for illness, authorized school 
trips, or emergency; hence the student may incur a reduction in grade 
for any unexcused absence. Excusable absences are those occasioned 



30 Southern Missionary College Bulletin 

by illness, authorized school trips, or emergency, and when so recog- 
nized by the Dean of the college the student may be permitted to make 
up the work lost. Such requests must be presented to the Dean within 
48 hours after the student resumes attendance, and the work must be 
made up within a week after the absence. 

Teachers will send a report to the Dean's office when the number of 
absences in a course equals the number of class appointments for two 
weeks. If the total number of absences in any semester exceeds the 
number of class appointments in a two weeks' period the teacher will 
consult with the Dean as to whether the student will be allowed to 
continue the class or get a grade of FA, Cases of such students may 
be reviewed by the Academic Policies Committee upon petition of the 
student. 

The school nurse or the deans of the school homes will turn in lists 
of ill students to the Dean's office each day before noon. 

All students whether in the dormitory or community must report 
to the school health officer in order to have an absence recognized as 
excusable for the purpose of making up work. 

Absences immediately preceding or following a vacation period, 
announced picnic, field day, or from the first appointment of the second 
semester, by a student in attendance the first semester, carry penalties, 
The penalty for missing each class period shall be equivalent to the 
penalty for missing two regular class periods. 

Tardiness. Students who are late for class must report such fact to 
the instructor before leaving the classroom; otherwise the tardiness 
will count as an absence. At the discretion of the teacher, three reported 
tardinesses may be counted as one absence; also students who leave 
class without permission are counted absent. 

CHAPEL ATTENDANCE 

In principle the chapel absence policy is the same as for class ab- 
sence in that no absences are allowed except for illness, authorized 
school trips, or emergency. If the number of unexcused absences in 
any one semester exceeds the number of chapel periods in one week, 
the student will be asked to reregister at a cash fee of $5.00. Addi- 
tional unexcused absences will subject the student to disciplinary 
action by the President's Council. 

A student leaving chapel after the record has been taken will be 
counted absent. If a student is tardy three times, it will be counted as 
one absence. 



Academic Standards 31 



GRADES AND REPORTS 



Mid-semester and semester reports of the scholastic standing of 
each student are issued to the student and his parent or guardian. 
Semester grades are kept on permanent record by the College. 

The following system of grading is used: 

Grade Points 
per Semester Hour 

A— Superior . 3 

B — Above average 2 

C — Average 1 

D — Below Average 

F — Failure Minus 1 

If a student is found cheating his entire grade to that point becomes F. 
E — Warning for "below passing" scholarship. This grade may be giv- 
en only at the nine weeks period. 
I — Incompletes because of illness of other unavoidable delay. An in- 
complete grade must be removed by the end of the first six weeks 
of the following semester. 

A teacher may not give an incomplete grade without authoriza- 
tion from the Dean, A student who believes he is eligible for an in- 
complete must secure from the Registrar's Office the proper form 
on which he may file application with the Dean to receive an in- 
complete. 

Wf— -Withdrew failing Minus 1 

Au — Audit 

S — Satisfactory (for music organizations only) 

U — Unsatisfactory (for music organizations only) 

FA — Failed because of poor attendance record 

NC — Non -credit 

A grade correctly reported to the Registrar can be changed only 
upon repetition of the course. No grade above a D may be repeated for 
the purpose of raising it. When a course is repeated to raise a grade, 
it must be done before a more advanced course in the same field 
is completed. Credit may not be earned in the course after a more ad- 
vanced course in the same field has been taken. No grades will be 
recorded for a course for which the individual concerned has not reg- 
istered. After a semester grade has been recorded no change in credit 
for the course may be made. 

THE DEAN'S LIST 
The Dean's List consists of those who carry a minimum of twelve 
semester hours and maintain a grade point average of 2.5 or above 
with 3.0 as the possible maximum. 



32 Southern Missionary College Bulletin 

SCHOLARSHIP REPORTS 

Mid- semester and semester reports of scholastic progress are sup- 
plied to the student and his parents or guardian. Only semester grades 
are permanently recorded. 

SPECIAL EXAMINATION 

Special examinations are given when justified by circumstances 
such as illness or necessary absence from the College. Permits are is- 
sued by the Dean at a fee of $2 and presented by the student to the 
teacher concerned. Such examinations must be taken within two weeks 
after student's return to class. 

EXEMPTION BY EXAMINATION 

A student may be exempt from a required course by passing a com- 
prehensive examination with a grade of at least C. The purpose of this 
provision is to allow a student to take advanced work when he has 
already covered the material of a prerequisite course. No hours of 
credit arc allowed on such an examination. Authorization for such 
examinations are by action of the Academic Policies Committee. The fee 
is $2. 

NON-CREDIT COURSES 

Courses may be taken on a non-credit basis in the following areas, 
the tuition charge being the same as for credit. 
Music Organizations 
Applied Music 
Typing 
Physical Education Activity Courses 





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* 3 



GRADUATION STANDARDS 



DEGREES AND CERTIFICATES 

The college confers three degrees: Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor 
of Music, and Bachelor of Science. All require the completion of 
128 hours with an average of C. 

The Bachelor of Arts degree is conferred upon students who have 
fulfilled the basic requirements together with a major field of con- 
centration and a minor of 18 hours. A major or a minor may be 
chosen from any of the following fields, the major usually consisting of 
30 hours and the minor of 18. 



Biology 

Business Administration and 


History 
Mathematics 


Economics 


Music 


Chemistry 
Communications 


Physics 
Religion 


Elementary Teacher Education 
English 


Spanish 
Theology 



In addition to the above fields a minor may be earned in Physical 
Education, Speech, German and Art. 

The Bachelor of Science Degree is conferred in twelve fields 
listed below. The number of semester hours required for the field of 
concentration varies according to the particular field as noted below. 
The minor consists of 18 hours in each field. 

Accounting 48 Natural Sciences _ 36 

Business Administration .... 40 Nursing ..... 62 

Chemistry 40 Physics 40 

Foods & Nutrition __ 30 Secondary Education .... 18-26 

Home Economics 30 Secretarial Science 30 

Medical Secretarial 30 Teacher Education 18-26 

In addition to the above fields a minor may be earned in Physical 
Education, German, and Speech. 

The Bachelor of Music in Music Education and the Bachelor of 
Music in Performance consist of 128 hours, 59-60 of which are in 
various areas of music, but there is no minor. 



33 



34 Southern Missionary College Bulletin 

In addition to the above four-year curricula leading to a degree, 
a number of two-year curricula are offered leading to a diploma. These 
are: 

Bible Instructor Home Economics 

Secretarial Science Medical Secretary 

The pre-professional and pre-technical curricula areas follows: 
Pre-Medical Pre-Optometry 

Pre-Dental Pre-Phanmcy 

Pre- Laboratory Technician Pre-Engineering 

Pre- Physical Therapy Pre-Law 

Pre- X-ray Technician 



GENERAL GRADUATION REGULATIONS 

1. A minimum of 128 semester hours. 

2. A major and a minor or two majors. 

3. A minimum of 40 semester hours of upper biennium credit. 

4. An average of C on the total hours and an average of C on all 
work taken at this college. 

5. Completion of the basic or core requirements for a baccalaureate 
degree. 

A student may graduate under the bulletin of the year in which 
he entered or the one in which he completes his work. If he dis- 
continues for a period of 12 full months or more he must qualify 
according to the bulletin current upon his return. 

A student who qualifies for a degree in one field of concentration 
may qualify for a second degree by meeting the additional require- 
ments. 

GRADUATE RECORD EXAMINATIONS 

All candidates for a baccalaureate degree are required to take the 
graduate record examinations during the last semester of the senior 
year. These examinations are important to the student's record of 
work as many graduate fields are open only to those who can present 
a satisfactory record on these examinations. 



Graduation Standards 35 

CANDIDACY FOR GRADUATION 

To be graduated, a student must have completed all requirements 
for graduation. A student may become a candidate for graduation 
when he enters upon the semester during which it will be possible foe 
him to complete all the requirements for his graduation. Candidates 
for graduation at the close of the ensuing summer session will par- 
ticipate in the summer graduation exercise. 

Formal application for graduation should be made at the Registrar's 
Office during the first semester of the senior year. All resident candi- 
dates for graduation must be members of the senior class. Seniors who 
did not participate in the junior class of the previous year are assessed 
an amount equal to the junior class dues. 

The responsibility for meeting graduation requirements rests pri- 
marily with the student. He should acquaint himself with the published 
requirements and plan his course so as to fulfill them, for he is 
eligible for graduation only when the records in the Registrar's Office 
show he has met all the requirements listed in the college catalog. 

GRADUATION WITH HONORS 

A candidate for graduation with a grade point average of 2.5 or 
above, and whose record shows no grade lower than a M Q" may be 
considered for graduation with honors. The Academic Policies Com- 
mittee recommends the candidate to the faculty for approval of this 
honor. Transfer students must have earned 36 hours in residence to 
qualify for graduation with honors. 

GRADUATION IN ABSENTIA 

Each candidate for graduation must be present to receive his diploma 
unless granted written permission by the President of the College to be 
graduated in absentia. Written application should be made early in the 
second semester of the senior year and permission will be granted only 
in cases of evident necessity. A ten-dollar fee is assessed on all those 
graduating in absentia. 

RESIDENCE REQUIREMENTS 

Not less than 24 hours of the 128 hours must be earned in residence 
in this college, twenty of which must be in the senior year. At least 
six hours in the major field and a minimum of three hours of upper 
biennium credit in the minor must be earned in this college. 



36 Southern Missionary College Bulletin 

THE BACCALAUREATE DEGREES 

ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS 
Graduation from a secondary school with at least a C average. 
The following are the minimum secondary requirements: 

English - . - 3 units 

Language 2 units 

Mathematics (Must include Algebra 1 unit) 2 units 

Natural Science 2 units 

for Bachelor of Arts curricula, otherwise, one unit 

Social Science 2 units 

for Bachelor of Arts curricula, otherwise, one unit 

Religion _.. 1 unit 

for each year of attendance in an academy up to 3 units 

CORE CURRICULUM REQUIREMENTS FOR ALL BACCALAUREATE DEGREES 

These are the same for all degree curricula unless indicated other- 
wise in the write-up of the curriculum concerned and are as follows: 

English 10 hours 

Six hours must be in Freshman English, which is to be taken in the fresh- 
man year. The remaining four hours must be in literature and should be 
taken in the sophomore year. 

Fine Arts 4 hours 

Required; Art 60 or Music 61. 

Foreign Languages 6-14 hours 

1. Six hours of the foreign language in which two units have been earned 
in secondary school. To be taken in the freshman or the sophomore year. 

2. Fourteen hours in one language, if different from the language in 
which two units have been earned in secondary school, should be taken 
if possible in the freshman and sophomore years. 

3. Fourteen hours in one language, if no foreign language or less than two 
units in one foreign language was taken in secondary school, should be 
taken if possible in the freshman and sophomore years. 

4. This requirement may be fulfilled by credit in Greek, Latin, or a mod- 
ern foreign language. 

5. Any student whose mother tongue is not English may be exempted 
from the foreign language requirements if he presents three secondary 
units of his native language on his transcript. 

Health 1 hour 

Required: Health 7, 8, or equivalent. Must be taken in the fresh- 
man or sophomore year. 



Graduation Standards 37 



Natural Sciences — Mathematics 12 hours 

May be selected from the fields of Biology, Chemistry, Mathematics, and 
Physics. Six hours sequence must be selected from a science field with 
laboratory to be completed in the freshman and sophomore years. (Bus. 
Math., Fundamental Concepts or Functional Math., not accepted.) Nu- 
trition 2 may also apply as 2 hours Science credit i( registered for as 
Chemistry 6. 

Religion 12-16 hours 

A student presenting three or more units of credit in Bible from the sec- 
ondary school needs twelve hours; one presenting two units, fourteen hours; 
and one presenting one unit or less, sixteen hours. Approximately half of 
this requirement should be taken in the freshman and sophomore years. 
Transfer students from other colleges will take four hours for each year of 
attendance with a minimum of six hours for graduation. Bible Survey 
required of those who had no religion subjects in secondary school. 

Social Sciences .— ..... ..... 12 hours 

Six hours must be in a history sequence taken in the freshman or sophomore 
year. The remaining six hours may be any courses in history, political 
science, geography, or sociology 20. Those who have not taken World 
History on the secondary level must include Survey of Civilization, six 
hours. 



Applied Arts 4 hours 

Must be chosen from courses in Industrial Arts, Graphic Arts or Home 
Economics. A waiver of the Applied Arts requirement may be granted 
only on the basis of vocational credit earned on a classroom or laboratory 
basis on the college level in an approved institution. 

Two of the following subjects are required of degree candidates: Funda- 
mentals of Education 21, Prophetic Gift 5, Health and Religion 53. 

Note: While it is preferable to take as many of the Core Curricu- 
lum requirements as possible on the freshman and sophomore level, a 
student will not be required to complete all of them before registering 
for upper biennium work. However, the following basic requirements 
must be met before the student registers for any upper biennium course. 

Foreign Language 6 Religion 4-6 

Natural Sciences and Mathematics - 6 History 6 

English 6 



MAJORS AND MINORS 

Major Requirements. The student should choose a major field 
of specialization preferably by the beginning of the second semester 
of the sophomore year. Specific requirements for majors are given 
immediately preceding the description of courses in the several de- 
partments of instruction. 



38 Southern Missionary College Bulletin 



Each major consists of a minimum of thirty semester hours of 
which fourteen must be upper biennium credit and six of these must 
be earned in this college. 

No course in which a student has received a grade of "D" may 
apply on a major or minor. 

Minor Requirements. A student should choose his minor field 
not later than the beginning of the second semester of the sophomore 
year. A minor may not be earned in the field chosen for the major. 
All minors consist of eighteen semester hours except Religion which 
consists of the core curriculum requirements plus six hours, and English 
which is twenty-one. 

Six hours of a minor shall be earned in the upper biennium. A 
niinimum of three hours of upper biennium credit on the minor must 
be earned in this college. 

The fields in which minors may be earned are given below. See the 
appropriate section under "Division of Instruction" (page 47) for 
further information. 



Biblical Language 
Biology 


Mathematics 

Medical Secretarial Science 


Business and Economics 


Music 


Chemistry 
Communications 


Physics 

Physical Education 


Education 

English 

Foods and Nutrition 


Psychology 
Religion 
Secretarial Science 


German 
History 


Spanish 
Speech 



Home Economics 




* 



I 





1 



DIVISIONS OF INSTRUCTION 

APPLIED ARTS AND SCIENCES 41 

COMMUNICATION ARTS 58 

EDUCATION - PSYCHOLOGY - HEALTH 66 

FINE ARTS 81 

NATURAL SCIENCES - MATHEMATICS 89 

NURSING . 102 

RELIGION, THEOLOGY, APPLIED THEOLOGY 107 

SOCIAL SCIENCES 114 

PRE-TECHNICAL CURRICULUMS 117 



40 



APPLIED ARTS AND SCIENCES 



Wilbert Schneider, Chairman; George Gott, Ralph Davidson, 
Dorothy Christensen, Thelma Hemme, Drew Turlington, 
Charles Read, Theresa Brickman. 



HOME ECONOMICS 

The courses in this area are designed to prepare students for a 
career in some field of Home Economics, and at the same time give 
cultural and practical knowledge of the essentials of successful home- 
making. 

A separate sequence of courses is presented for students who wish 
to go into the field of dietetics and institution management. 

Bachelor of Science With a Major in Home Economics 
Course Requirements 

Major (Home Economics) , 30 hours 

Including 1, 2; 5; 21, 22; 25; 41, 42; 132; 181. 

Course 2 may be taken for Natural Science credit if taken 
as Chemistry 6, but may not be counted on both. 

Minor 18 hours 

Education — Psychology 51 3 hours 

English 1-2 6 hours 

Literature 51, 52 or 61, 62 4 hours 

Fine Arts 60 or 61 required 4 hours 

Health 4, 7, 8 3 hours 

Natural Sciences — Mathematics .*- 12 hours 

Religion 12-16 hours 

Social Science 82 required 12 hours 

Electives — sufficient to make a four-year total 
of 128 semester hours. 

Those who plan to do graduate work in Home Economics should 
include General Chemistry 1-2; Biology 12 and 22; and Economics 71 
and 72. 

Those who wish to prepare for a teaching career should qualify 
for teacher certification. See page 68 onward. 

41 



42 Southern Missionary College Bulletin 

A Bachelor of Arts degree with a major in Home Economics may 
be obtained by meeting the additional requirements given on pages 
36 and 37. 



Bachelor of Science With a Major in Foods and Nutrition 

Course Requirements 

Home Economics majors who wish to meet the requirements for 
hospital dietetic internships approved by the American Dietetic 
Association must meet the following requirements: 

Major (Home Economics) ... 30 hours 

1, 2; 25; 101, 102; Hi, 162; 171, 172. 

Minor _ , 18 hours 

Business Administration 31 ... 3 hours 

Psychology 111; 1 42 - 5 hours 

English 1-2 6 hours 

Literature 51, 52 or 61, 62 -.-. 4 hours 

Fine Arts 60 or 6l required mmt 4 hours 

Health 7, S .. .... .. 1 hour 

Biology 12, 22 .... 7 hours 

Chemistry 1-2; 81; 171-172. 

Religion 12-16 hours 

Social Science S2 required JL -.. 12 hours 

Electives sufficient to make a four-year total of J 28 semester 
hours. 

Suggested electives: Home Economics 26 and 132; Economics: 
Psychology; Education courses. 

To meet the requirements for American Dietetic Association 
membership in other areas of food and nutrition the student must meet 
the specific requirements for American Dietetic Association member- 
ship Plan III. This should be arranged by the individual student in 
consultation with the head of the Home Economics Department. 

Minor: Men and women who are majoring in other fields may 
take a minor or electives in home economics. A minor in home eco- 
nomics requires 18 hours including Home Economics 1, 2; 21, 22; 25. 

A minor in foods and nutrition requires 18 hours including 
Home Economics 1,2; 25; 161. 



Applied Arts and Sciences 43 

Two-year Curriculum in Home Economics 

A two-year curriculum in Home Economics is offered primarily to 
prepare young women for successful homemaking. 

Course Requirements 

Home Economics 1,2; 21,22; 25; 132; 41,42; 181 23 hours 

English 1-2 - 6 hours 

Religion , — .. .— 8 hours 

Social Science 82 required 10 hours 

Fine Arts 60 or 61 required _ .... 4 hours 

Health 4, 7, 8 - 3 hours 

Biology i2 - - - 3 hours 

Industrial Arts 31 2 hours 

Electives ..... 5 hours 



FOODS AND NUTRITION 

1, Foods First semester, 3 hours 
Basic principles of food composition, selection, and preparation. Two 
hours lecture and one laboratory period each week, 

2. Nutrition Second semester, 2 hours 
Principles of nutrition and their application to everyday Jiving. 

2a. Foods and Nutrition Laboratory Second semester, 1 hour 

Calculation of the nutritional value of foods, and principles of food 
preparation, selection and service. A laboratory for nurses and teachers 
taking Nutrition 2, or others not faking Foods I. Three hours laboratory 
each week, 

25. Meal Planning First semester, 3 hours 
Prerequisite: Home Economics 1, 2 or by approval. 

Menu planning, marketing, meal preparation, and table service. Three 
2-hour periods each week. 

26. Food Demonstration Second semester, 2 hours 
Prerequisite: Home Economics 1, 2 or by approval. 

Designed to present purposes, standards, and techniques of food demon- 
strations with application to teaching, business, and conducting cooking 
schools for adult groups. Two 2-hour periods each week. 

101, 102. Experimental Foods Two semesters, 4 hours 

Prerequisite: Home Economics I, 2. 

Individual and class problems in food preparation, calculating costs, pre- 
paring and serving meals for special occasions. One hour lecture and one 
Laboratory period each week. 

161. Advanced Nutrition First semester, 3 hours 

Prerequisites: Home Economics 1, 2, 25, and Chemistry 1 and 2 or by 
approval. 

A study of the principles of normal nutrition as it applies to individuals 
at different ages. Two hours lecture and one laboratory period each week. 



44 Southern Missionary College Bulletin 



162. Diet Therapy Second semester, 3 hours 

Prerequisites: Home Economics 161. 

A study of the principles of nutrition as applied to physiological conditions 
altered by stress, disease, or abnormalities. Two hours lecture and one 
laboratory period each week. 

:i 1 7 1 , 172. Institution Management Two semcster>. 6 hours 

A study of quantity cookery, menu planning, institutional equipment, pur- 
chasing, management-personnel relationships, laboratory experience in 
college food services, and sanitarium and hospital food services. One hour 
lecture each week. Laboratory work by appointment. 



HOME MANAGEMENT AND CHILD CARE 

41. Home Management First semester, 2 hours 
A study of family problems and goals with emphasis on planning personal 
and family schedules, conserving time and energy, financial plans and 
family housing. 

42. Art in Everyday Living Second semester, 2 hours 
The study of principles of art as they are related to everyday problems 
such as house design and decoration, selection of furniture, flower arrange- 
ment, pictures, accessories, and other home furnishings. 

61. Social Ethics First semester, 1 hour 

Principles of Christian courtesy. Prepares for poised family, social and 
business relations. 

•IH. Applied Home Furnishings Second semester, 3 hours 

Laboratory experience in simple upholstering and professional drapery 
making. Two 3-hour combined lecture and laboratory periods, 

132. Child Care and Development Second semester, 3 hours 

A study of the young child, beginning with prenatal care through the years 
of babyhood and early childhood with the family as a background for 
growth and development. The physical, mental, and social development 
studied with special emphasis on nutrition of mother and child. Two 
class periods and three hours home and nursery school observation each 
week. 

181. Practice in Home Management Either semester, 3 hours 

Prerequisites: Home Economics 1, 2, 25, 41. 

Experience in solving problems of family living, care of a home, budgeting, 
laundering, entertaining, planning, marketing, preparing and serving meals 
in the home management apartment for six weeks, projects to be planned 
before and written up after this period. One class period each week. 



TEXTILES AND CLOTHING 

Clothing Selection First semester, 2 hours 

Artistic and economic factors are studied and applied to adult wardrobe 
planning and selection. Special emphasis is placed on wardrobe needs of 
college girls. Two one-hour lectures each week. 



*Not offered 1960-61, 



Applied Arts and Sciences 45 



21. Clothing Construction First semester, 2 hours 

A course in fundamental clothing construction. Basic construction tech- 
niques are demonstrated axid practiced. Use and alteration of commercial 
patterns is studied and practiced. One-hour lecture and three hours labora- 
tory each week. 

22, Clothing Construction Second semester, 2 hours 

A course in fundamental clothing construction with emphasis on fitting 
and techniques of construction using difficult to handle fabrics. One hour 
lecture and three hours laboratory each week. 

*119. Textiles First semester, 2 hours 

A study of textile fibers and fabrics and factors influencing their construc- 
tion, finish, and design. Selection and identification for consumer use. 
Two hours lecture each week. 

121. Flat Pattern Design and Dress Construction First semester, 2 hours 
Prerequisites: Home Economics 21, 22. 

The use of the basic pattern in dress designing and construction with 
emphasis on fitting. One hour lecture and one laboratory period each week, 

122. Tailoring Second semester, 2 hours 
Prerequisites: Home Economics 21, 22 and 121 or by approval. 

A study of the techniques of tailoring and their practical application to 
women's suits and coats. One hour lecture and one laboratory period 
each week. 

141, 142. Home Economics Seminar Two semesters, 2 hours 

A study of problems, research, and trends in the various fields of home 
economics. Registration conditional upon consent of instructor. 

191. Problems in Home Economics Either semester, 1 or 2 hours 

To permit the advanced student majoring in Home Economics to do 
individual work in the field under the direction of a staff member. 



INDUSTRIAL ARTS 

To provide an opportunity for anyone with vocational or a vo- 
cational interest in any of the various subject fields offered to receive 
formalized instruction in terminologies, occupational guidance and 
preferred techniques and practices within that field. 

Due to the variation in the types of content included in these 
courses, the following tabulation is given to indicate the time re- 
quirements for credits. Figures in parenthesis indicate hours in prepara- 
tion: 

1 period per week (2) 18 weeks 1 semester hour 

2 periods per week (1) 18 weeks 1 semester hour 

3 periods per week (0) 18 weeks 1 semester hour 



*Not offered 1960-61 



46 Southern Missionary College Bulletin 



1:2. Mechanical Drawing Two semesters, 4 hours 

Designed to give fundamental training in the use of instruments, and 
in the selection of equipment and drawing materials; training in systems 
of projection and dimensioning practice. One hour lecture and three hours 
laboratory each week. 

II, J 2. Woodworking Two semesters, 4 hours 

The study of hand and machine tool processes, with opportunity for work- 
ing out selected projects in the laboratory. The use and care of tools, 
selection of projects, shop sketching, finishing processes, and finishing, 
designing furniture, matching grain, selection of hardware, and methods 
of displaying finished products. One hour lecture and three hours laboratory 
each week. 

15, 16. Metalworking Two semesters, 4 hours 

Principles and practice of electric and oxy-acetylene gas welding; use of 
cutting tools and other machines, and hand tools used in metal working. 

17. Fundamentals of Typography First semester, 3 hours 

Simple printing fundamentals, typesetting, platen presswork. Essential 
knowledge to prepare a student for employment in the College Press 
the second semester. Students with previous printing experience may be 
employed in the Press concurrently with the first semester's class work. 
Instead of laboratory one may satisfy the laboratory requirement by work- 
ing under supervision with regular pay a total of 255 hours in the Press. 

18. Fundamentals of Typography Second semester, 3 hours 

Prerequisite: Graphic Arts 17. 

Work is concentrated on composition and presswork with special con- 
sideration for proper grouping and spacing of jobs, layout and design, and 
presswork. 

31. Practical Home Arts First semester, 2 hours 

A course designed to prepare teachers in methods and materials used 
in teaching home mechanics, and crafts. Important to all elementary teachers 
for teaching vocational subjects. One hour lecture, three hours laboratory. 

32. Country Living Second semester, 2 hours 

This is a course intended to acquaint students with various phases of 
country living. It is intended especially to be of assistance to those who 
make their homes in the suburbs and country sections even though their 
occupation may not be farming as such. Special attention will be given 
to gardening, landscaping, soil building, horticulture, poultry, and dairy 
husbandry. One hour lecture, three hours laboratory. 

*51, 52. Auto Mechanics Two semesters, 4 hours 

A general course in the fundamental principles of gasoline engines, their 
design, timing, cooling, carburetion, and lubrication; automobile body 
designs, makes and models. On-hour lecture and three hours laboratory 
per week. 

67. Proofreading and Proofroom Techniques First semester, 2 hours 

A survey of the fundamentals of proofreading and copy preparation, the 
study of rules and practices regarding book, magazine, and newspaper 
publishing, and job work. Includes on-the-job practice in handling actual 
proofroom problems. Open to men and women. Credits for this course 
can be applied on an English major. 



*Not offered 1960-63 



Applied Arts and Sciences 47 



79, 80. Building Construction Two semesters, 6 hours 

One hour lecture and six hours laboratory 1 each week. A basic tool kit 
is required. Instruction and practice will be in blueprint reading, building 
layout, foundations, concrete forming, masonry, electrical wiring, plumbing, 
wood framing, finish carpentry, floor, ceiling, and wall surfaces, roofs, 
paints and other protective coverings, erection with components, and 
numerous other aspects of building construction in our technological era. 



48 Southern Missionary College Bulletin 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

Wilbert Schneider, Chairman, Charles Read, George Gott, 

Ralph Davidson. 

"Not one business man now connected with the cause needs to be 
a novice. Men of promise in business lines should develop and perfect 
their talents by most thorough study and training. They should be en- 
couraged to place themselves where, as students, they cm rapidly gain 
a knowledge of right business principles and methods." — Testimonies 
to the Church, Vol 7, page 248. 

Bachelor of Arts With a Major in Business Administration 
and Economics 

Course Requirements 

Major (Business and Economics) 30 hours 

Including 31:32; 71, 72; and 61:62; 102, 112; 
129, 130; 175; or 55, 56; 129, 130; 141; 175. 

Minor .— . 18 hours 

English 1-2 . 6 hours 

Literature 51, 52 or 61, 62 „ 4 hours 

Applied Arts „ 4 hours 

Fine Arts 60 or 61 required 4 hours 

Foreign Language ..... _....„. 6-14 hours 

Health 7, 8 1 hour 

Natural Sciences — Mathematics 12 hours 

Religion 12-16 hours 

Social Science ... 12 hours 

Typewriting 13 (or 1 unit equivalent) 2 hours 

Electives — sufficient to make a four-year total of 128 
semester hours. 

Bachelor of Science in Accounting 

(Leading to Certified Public Accountant Examinations) 

Course Requirements 

Major (Accounting) 48 hours 

Including 31:32; 71, 72; 61:62; 55, 56; 102; 
112; 131:132; 160; 171; 191, 192; 195. 

fMlNOR 18 hours 

English 1-2 6 hours 

Literature 51, 52 or 61, 62; Speech 5 6 hours 

Applied Arts 4 hours 

fDue to the heavy requirements in accounting it is recommended that the 
student minor in religion. 



Applied Arts and Sciences 49 

Fine Arts 60 or 61 required 4 hours 

Health 7, 8 _. i hour 

Natural Science 12 hours 

Religion 12-16 hours 

Secretarial Science 13, 14; 146; 76 7-9 hours 

Social Science 53, 54 8 hours 

Electives — sufficient to make a four-year total of 128 
hours. 

Bachelor of Science With a Major in Business Administration 

Course Requirements 

Major (Accounting and Business) 40 hours 

Including 31:32; 71, 72; 61, 62; 175. Secretarial Science 14, 
146> 76. If emphasis is on Accounting add 102, 112. If em- 
phasis is on Business add 55, 56; 129, 130; 141. 

Minor 18 hours 

English 1-2 6 hours 

Literature 51, 52 or 61, 62 4 hours 

Applied Arts 4 hours 

Fine Arts 60 or 61 required 4 hours 

Health 7, 8 1 hour 

Natural Sciences — Mathematics i2 hours 

Religion „ — 12-16 hours 

Social Science 12 hours 

Electives — sufficient to make a four-year total of 128 
semester hours. 

Students who wish to teach and be endorsed in General Business 
should follow the teacher- training program as noted on page 70. 

Minor: A minor in Business and Economics requires eighteen 
hours, including Accounting 31:32 and Economics 71, 72. 

ACCOUNTING 

11. Secretarial Accounting First semester, 3 hours 

A study of the fundamental principles of accounting as applied to mercan- 
tile and personal service enterprises. Two types of personal service enter- 
prises are taken up, namely, professional and business. This course is 
specifically designed to meet the needs of the secretarial and clerical 
students. Two hours lecture, three hours laboratory, each week. 



50 Southern Missionary College Bulletin 

31:32. Principles of Accounting Two semes ters, 6 hours 

A course in the fundamentals of accounting applied. 

6i:62 Intermediate Accounting Two semesters, 6 hours 

Prerequisite: Accounting 31:32. 

A course in accounting principles applied to merchandising and industrial 
enterprises in the partnership and corporate forms. Two hours lecture, 
three hours laboratory, each week. 

♦67. Principles of Denominational Accounts and Records 

Firs i semester, 2 hours 
A course designed to acquaint the student with the accounting and financial 
records of Seventh-day Advcntist denominational institutions, including 
local churches, conferences, academics, Book and Bible Houses and sani- 
tariums. Credit will not apply on a major in the Business area. 

102. Cost Accounting Second semester, 3 hours 

Prerequisite: Accounting 61. 

The general principles of job order and process cost accounting, including 
the control of burden. Standard costs and budgets are given attention. 

::: ll 2. Advanced Accounting Second semester, 3 hours 

Prerequisite: Accounting 61:62. 

Consideration of problems concerned with consolidated financial statements, 
partnerships, businesses in financial difficulty, estates and trusts. 

is 3: 132. Governmental Accounting Two semesters, 4 hours 

Prerequisite: Accounting 61:62. 

A course designed to show and explain the accounting principles and 
procedures applicable to both state and local governments, including 
counties, townships, cities and villages, school districts, and certain in- 
stitutions such as hospitals, colleges and universities. 

*160- Ai-niTlNG Second semester, 3 hours 

Prerequisite: Accounting 61:62. 

Accepted standards and procedures applicable to auditing and related 
types of public accounting work. 

•171. Federal Income Taxes First semester, 4 hours 

Prerequisite: Accounting 31:32, 

This course of study is designed to provide a comprehensive explanation 
of the Federal Tax structure, and to provide training in the application 
of the tax principles to specific problems. 

The attention of the student is directed mainly to those taxes applicable to 
the Federal Government, which includes the Income Tax, Social Security. 
Estate and Gift Tax. Mention is made of State and Local taxes applicable 
to the State of Tennessee. 

*182. Accounting Systems Second semester, 2 hours 

Prerequisites: Accounting 61 , 102. 

A study of the problems involved in the design and installation of 
accounting systems, including the systematizing and detailing of clerical 
departments of a business. Accounts, forms, reports, charts, and other 
materials needed will be prepared. 

191, 192. C.P.A. Review Problems Two semeaers, 6 hours 

Prerequisite: By permission of instructor. 



*Not offered 1960-61. 



Applied Arts and Sciences 51 



195. Study in Accounting Theory First semester, 3 hours 

Prerequisite: Accounting 61:62. 

A study of accounting concepts in the light of current trends, with 
emphasis on the development of accounting theory as exemplified by the 
accounting research bulletins of the American Institute of Certified Public 
Accountants. 



ECONOMICS AND GENERAL BUSINESS COURSES 

A major requirement is made up of suitable courses in economics, 
accounting, and business. For a detailed statement of the major and the 
minor requirements in this held see pages 59, 60. 

55, 56. Business Law Two semesters, 4 hours 

The nature and social functions of law; social control through law; the 
law of commercial transactions and business organization. 

71, 72. Principles of Economics Two semesters, 6 hours 

A survey course in the fundamentals of economics; the institutions, forces, 
and factors affecting production, evaluation, exchange, and distribution of 
wealth in modern society. 

82. Statistics Second semester, 3 hours 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 1 1 or permission of instructor. 
A general survey of the field of statistical procedures and techniques, with 
major emphasis upon the use and interpretation of statistical data and 
the mechanics of computation. 

*129. 130. Marketing Two semesters, 4 hours 

Prerequisite: Economics 71 required and 72 recommended. 
The first semester includes fundamentals, and emphasis is on the retailing 
area of marketing. The second semester is largely concerned with personal 
selling in the marketing area. 

137. Salesmanship First semester, 2 hours 
A study of the principles underlying the personal selling process in relation 
to modern sales practices. 

1 38. Advertising Second semester, 2 hours 
Prerequisite: Economics 71 

Salesmanship principles as applied to advertising. Analysis and preparation 
of various types of advertising. Study of advertising media. Principles of 
advertising campaign organization. 

139- Money and Banking First semester, 3 hours 

Prerequisite: Economics 71, 72. 

Mediums of exchange, money and credit, banks and their services, the 
Federal Reserve System, and other financial institutions are considered. 

*140. Advanced Business Economics Second semester, 3 hours 

Prerequisite: Economics 71, 72. 

Application of economic analysis to the solution o ( business problems. Con- 
sideration of the nature and function* of business profits, the analysis of 
demand and of costs, the determination of prices, price policies, etc. 



*Not offered 1 960-61. 



52 Southern Missionary College Bulletin 



14 1. Business and Office Management First semester, 3 hours 

Major emphasis is placed on application of business management prin- 
ciples to the problems of the small business man and on the organizing of 
business and secretarial offices. Attention is given to the training of office 
employees, selection of equipment, and flow of work through the office. 

* 142. Business Policy and Management Second semester, 3 hours 

An analysis of business policies viewed from the standpoint of the func- 
tional characteristics of management processes and current ethics. 

* 147. Personnel Administration First semester, 2 hours 

An introduction to the organization, training, motivation, and direction of 
employees with a view to maintaining their productivity and morale at 
high levels. Among topics covered are: selection, training, compensation 
and financial incentives, work standards, techniques of supervision and 
leadership, 

152. Business Finance Second semester, 3 hours 

Prerequisite: Accounting 61:62, 

A study of the fundamental principles of financial organization. Emphasis 
on instruments of finance, policies of capitalization, problems pertaining to 
working capital, and corporate expansion and reorganization. 

156. Principles of Insurance Second semester, 2 hours 

A study of insurance contracts, underwriting organizations, and insurance 
representation and procedures. 

■175. Business Administration Problems First semester, 2 hours 

A seminar course in management problems including budgets and financial 
reports. 



SECRETARIAL SCIENCE 

The courses in this area of study are designed to prepare young 
men and young women for work as office secretaries primarily in 
denominational institutions and for office work in general. 

Bachelor of Science With a Major in Secretarial Science 

Course Requirements 

Major (Secretarial Science) 30 hours 

Including 40, 51, 55, 56; 63, 64, 72, 76, 109 

127 or 112; 128, 146. 
Courses 9, 10, 13, 14 do not apply toward this major. 

Minor .. .... 18 hours 

Business Administration 11 or 31, 32: 71. 72; 141 12 hours 

Education — Psychology 51 - .... 3 hours 

English 1-2 .. . . 6 hours 

Literature 51, 52 or 61, 62 .. 4 hours 

Applied Arts . . — », 4 hours 

Fine Arts 60 or 6l required 4 hours 



*Not orTered 1960-61 



Applied Arts and Sciences 53 

Health 7, 8 1 hour 

Natural Science — Mathematics 12 hours 

Religion 12-16 hours 

Social Science 53, 54 12 hours 

Electives — sufficient to make a four-year total of 128 
semester hours. 



Bachelor of Science Wlih a Major in Medical Secretarial Science 
Course Requirements 

Major (Secretarial Science) 30 hours 

Including 40, 51, 55, 58; 63, 64- 73, 76, 77, 

78, 128, 136, 146, 177, 178. Courses 9, 10, 13, \A do 
not apply toward this major. 

Minor 18 hours 

Business Administration 11 or 31, 32; 71, 72; 141 12 hours 

Education — Psychology 51 3 hours 

English 1-2 6 hours 

Literature 51, 52 or 61, 62 4 hours 

Applied Arts 4 hours 

Fine Arts 60 or 6l required 4 hours 

Health 7, 8, 22 ... 3 hours 

Natural Sciences — Mathematics 11:12; 22 12 hours 

Religion 12-16 hours 

Social Science 53, 54 8 hours 

Electives — sufficient to make a four-year total of 128 
semester hours. 

Two-year Diploma Requirements in Secretarial Science 

Course Requirements 

Secretarial Science; 9t» 10f, I3f> l4f, 40, 51, 55, 56; 

6\ 64; 72, 76 ....... 32 hours 

Business Administration 11 or 31, 32; 55 _«. 5 hours 

Education — Psychology 51 .— . - 3 hours 

English 1-2 ... 6 hours 

Fine Arts 60 or 6l required 2 hours 

Health 7, 8 .... 1 hour 

Religion ....._.„.„........„. ... 6 hours 

Social Science 2 hours 

Electives — sufficient to make a two-year total of 64 
semester hours. 



fThis requirement may be met by having hi^h school equivalents. 



Southern Missionary College Bulletin 



Two-year Diploma Requirements In Medical Secretarial Science 

Course Requirements 

Secretarial Science: 9f, 10f, 13f, ^f, 40, 51, 55, 58; 

63, 64; 73, 76, 77, 78 .... 35 hours 

Biology 11, 12 - 6 hours 

Business Administration 11 or 31, 32 3 hours 

Education — Psychology 51 3 hours 

English 1-2 6 hours 

Fine Arts 60 or 61 required - — 2 hours 

Health 7, 8, 22 3 hours 

Religion 6 hours 

Social Science 2 hours 

Electivcs sufficient to make a two-year total of 64 
semester hours. 

Secretarial Science Minor; Eighteen hours. Required courses: 
Secretarial Science 55, 56, or equivalent, 63, 64, and 72. Secretarial 
Science 9, 10, 13, 14, do not apply. 

Medical Secretarial Science Minor: Eighteen hours. Required 
courses: Secretarial Science 55, 58, or equivalent, 65, 64 7 and 73. Secre- 
tarial Science 9, 10, 13, 14 do not apply. 

9. Shorthand First semester, 4 hours 

Prerequisite: Secretarial Science 13 must be taken concurrently with this 
course unless the student has had the equivalent. 

Fundamental principles of Gregg Shorthand simplified. Five class periods 
each week. 

10. Shorthand Second semester, 4 hours 

Prerequisite: Secretarial Science 9, or equivalent to one unit of high school 
shorthand. Secretarial Science 14 must be taken concurrently with this 
course unless the student has had the equivalent. 70 words a minute 
required. Five class periods each week. 

13- Typewriting First semester, 2 hours 

Five class periods each week. One practice period a week is required. 
Students who have had $§ unit of high school typewriting may receive 
1 hour. Teacher to be consulted for entrance date. 35 words a minute 
required. 

14. Typewriting Second semester, 2 hours 

Prerequisite: Secretarial Science 13, or equivalent of one unit of high school 
typewriting. Five class periods each week. One practice period a week is 
required. 50 words a minute required. 

■j'This requirement may be met by having high school equivalents. 



Applied Arts and Sciences 55 



20. Clerical Practice Second semester, 3 hours 

A course designed to develop office initiative and efficient service. The stu- 
dent will learn to- perform work related to office machines, voice tran- 
scription, mailing, telephoning, and meeting callers as well as personality 
development, good grooming, and etiquette. Three class periods and two 
hours laboratory each week. 

23, 24. Business English Two semesters, 6 hours 

A course designed for the prospective office worker, stressing spelling, 
punctuation, grammar, pronunciation and letter writing. This course may 
not be substituted for English 1, 2. 

40. Filing Either semester, 2 hours 

A course in the theory and practice of modern systems of filing. 

51. Voice Transcription Either semester, I hour 

Prerequisites: Secretarial Science 14; permission. 

A course in the operating of voice-writing equipment with emphasis on 
mailable transcriptions. Three laboratory hours each week. 

55. Intermediate Shorthand First semester, 3 hours 
Prerequisite: "C" standing in Secretarial Science 10; simultaneous regis- 
tration, Secretarial Science 63- Four class periods each week. 90-100 words 
a minute required. 

56. Intermediate Shorthand Second semester, 5 hours 
Prerequisite: Secretarial Science 55 or equivalent; simultaneous registration, 
Secretarial Science 64. Four class periods each week. 100-120 words a 
minute required. 

58. Medical Shorthand Second semester, 3 hours 

Prerequisite: Secretarial Science 55 or equivalent and a speed of 100 
words a minute, simultaneous registration. Secretarial Science 64. 
A study of shorthand outlines for medical terms — their pronunciation, their 
spelling, and their meaning. Four class periods each week. 

63. Sfxretarial Typewriting and Transcription First semester, 2 hours 
Prerequisite: Secretarial Science 14 or two units of high school type- 
writing. Simultaneous registration, Secretarial Science 55. 

A course in rapid transcription from shorthand notes. Emphasis is also 
placed on special letter-writing problems, tabulation, manuscripts. Five 
class periods each week. One practice period is required. 

64. Secretarial Typewriting and Transcription Second semester, 2 hours 
Prerequisite: Secretarial Science 63; Simultaneous registration, Secretarial 
Science 56 or 58. 

Mailable transcripts. Special attention given to practice in preparing type- 
written outlines, reports, theses, and bibliographies. Five class periods each 
week. One practice period is required. 60 words a minute required, 

72. Secretarial Development Second semester, 2 hours 

Prerequisite: Ten hours of Secretarial Science, or the consent of the 
instructor. 
A study of business ethics, procedures, and techniques used by the secretary. 



56 Southern Missionary College Bulletin 

73. Medical Secretarial Development First semester, 2 hours 

Prerequisite: Ten hours of Secretarial Science, or the consent of the 

instructor. 

A course to prepare students to take care of the specialized duties in a 

physician's office. 

76. Business Machines Second semester, 2 hours 

Prerequisite: Secretarial Science 13, or equivalent. 

The theory of and practice in the use of the following office machines: key- 
driven and rotary calculators, full keyboard and ten-key adding listing 
machines, stencil, and direct- process duplicators. One class period and 
three hours laboratory each week, 

77. Laboratory Service and Office Nursing First semester, 2 hours 

Prerequisite: Ten hours of Secretarial Science or the consent of the 

instructor. 

This course is designed to give instruction in office nursing techniques; 

such as sterilization, hypodermics, medicines, contagious diseases, preparing 

patients for examination, and doing simple laboratory tests. One class 

period and two hours laboratory each week. 

78. Clinical Office Practice Second semester, 1 hour 

Prerequisites: Secretarial Science 73 and 77. 

This course is based on supervised practice in handling actual medical 

office routine. Three hours o-f laboratory work each week. 

*109. Shorthand Reporting First semester, 3 hours 

Prerequisite: Twelve hours of Secretarial Science (including courses 55, 
56, 63, and 64 or equivalent). Must be enrolled concurrently in Secretarial 
Science 127. 

Rapid dictation of congressional and other technical materials. 130-140 
words a minute required. 

112, Denominational Reporting Second semester, J hours 

Prerequisite: Twelve hours of Secretarial Science (including courses 55, 
56, 63, and 64, or equivalent). Must be enrolled concurrently in Secre- 
tarial Science 128. 

*127, 128. Advanced Transcription First semester, l hour 

Prerequisite: Twelve hours of Secretarial Science (including courses 55, 
56, 63, and 64 } or equivalent). Must be enrolled concurrently in Secretarial 
Science 109, or 112, or 136. 

* 136. Advanced Medical Dictation Second semester, 3 hours 

Prerequisite: Twelve hours of Secretarial Science (including courses 55, 

58, 63, or 64, or equivalent). Must be enrolled concurrently in Secretarial 

Science 128. 

A course emphasizing medical terminology and continuation of special 

medical dictation of technical case histories, medical news articles, and 

lectures. 



*Not offered 1960-61. 



Applied Arts and Sciences 57 



14 1. Business and Office Management First semester, 3 hours 

Major emphasis is placed on application of business management prin- 
ciples to the problems of the small business man and on the organizing of 
business and secretarial offices. Attention is given to the training of office 
employees > selection of equipment, and flow of work through the office. 

146, Business- Communication Second semester, 3 hours 

Prerequisite: English 1-2. 

A study and application of the modern practices in oral and written business 
communication. Accuracy in grammar, spelling, and punctuation, and the 
writing of well-knit sentences and clear paragraphs are taught as a means 
of effective expression in business-letter writing. 

151. Advanced Office Machines First semester, 1 to 3 hours 

A coarse designed for students who wish to specialize on particular office 
machines. One class period and three hours laboratory a week for each 
semester hour of credit. 

174. Applied Secretarial Practice Either first or second semester, 1 to 3 hours 
Prerequisite: For secretarial science majors and prospective business teachers. 
This course is' based on an activity program which provides practical 
experience in representative types of office situations. 

*177. Medical Secretarial Procedures First semester, 2 hours 

Prerequisites: Secretarial Science 73, 77, and 78, or equivalent. 
A course designed to prepare students for advanced duties in a clinical 
office or hospital office. 

178. Medical Work Experience Seminar Second semester, 2 hours 

This course is designed to give actual medical secretarial experience before 
the graduate is called upon for professional performance. To be taken 
either off or on the campus. 

181. Secretarial Problems Either first or second semester, 1 or 2 hours 

Prerequisite: Open only to seniors majoring in Secretarial Science. 
Problems are assigned according to the experience and interests of the 
student. 

One-year Course in Clerical Training 

Course Requirements 

Secretarial Science: 13, 14, 20, 23, 24, 40 15 hours 

Business Administration 11 3 hours 

Religion 4 hours 

Psychology 51 ~— 3 hours 

Speech 5 2 hours 

Physical Education 1 hour 

Electives 4 hours 

This one-year course in Clerical Training is designed to prepare 
students from the secondary schools for general office work. The student 
will receive training in the use of voice-writing machines, adding 
machines, and duplicating machines. 

A certificate will be given upon completion of this course. 



*Not offered 1960-61. 



COMMUNICATION ARTS 



Clyde G. Bushnell, Chamn ( m\ Otto Christensen, Olivia Dean, 
Gordon Hyde, Evlyn Lindberg, Harry Llindquist, 
Gordon Madgwick, William Taylor, Olive Westphal 



ENGLISH 

Major: A major in English shall consist of 34 hours, including 
Freshman Composition, four hours of Communications, Survey of 
American Literature, Survey of English Literature and Advanced Gram- 
mar. In addition, English History or its equivalent is required. Students 
planning to teach are strongly urged to take Problems in the Teaching 
of Reading and the course Directed Observation and Teaching, 

Minor: A minor in English requires 21 semester hours, including 
Freshman Composition, Survey of American Literature, and Advanced 
Grammar. 



Bachelor of Arts With a Major in English 
Course Requirements 

Major (English) 34 hours 

Including: See paragraph above. 

Minor in Education recommended 18 hours 

Fine Arts 60 or 6\ required 4 hours 

Foreign Language 6-14 hours 

Health 7, 8 ....... _ m 1 hour 

Natural Sciences — Mathematics .- 12 hours 

Religion . . , .... 12-16 hours 

Social Science „„. -.... - 12 hours 

Applied Arts - 4 hours 

Elect ives — sufficient to make a four-year total of 1 28 

semester hours. 

1-2. Freshman English Two semesters, 6 hours 

Admission to English I depends upon the student's satisfactory performance 
in the entrance examination sections on mechanics and effectiveness of 
expression. No grade will be given for Freshman Composition unless the 
student has achieved a satisfactory score in reading speed, and compre- 
hension. See the 01 and 02 courses below. A student failing the first se- 
mester will not be permitted to continue with the second semester. 

58 



Communication Arts 59 



01. Basic Grammar First semester, I hour elect tve credit 

Students whose scores on the English placement tests indicate definite 
weakness in mechanics and effectiveness of expression are required to 
register for this class. Concurrent registration in Freshman Composition 
will be temporary until such a time as the student proves, either by his 
work or by subsequent placement tests, his ability to master basic grammar. 
Repetition of the course will be required of anyone who fails the first 
semester, and if enrolled in Freshman English may not continue with the 
second semester. 

02. Reading Techniques Either semester, 1 hour elective credit 

At least one semester of Reading Techniques is required of all students 
who do not reach the standard set for the reading section of the freshman 
placement tests. 

3, 4. English Conversation for Foreign Students Two semesters, 2 hours 
(Does not satisfy English core requirement.) 

5, 6. English Grammar and Composition for Foreign Students 

Two semesters, 4 hours 
(Does not satisfy English core requirement.) 

20-21. Advanced Freshman English Two semesters. 6 hours 

A course designed for those students whose placement tests indicate a 

mature grasp of the fundamentals of English grammar and composition. 
In such cases it substitutes for English 1-2. 

51, 52. Survey Course in American Literature Two semesters, 4 hours 

A study of the chief poets and prose writers in America from pre-Columbian 
times to the present. Attention is directed to the literary achievements 
of the Indians, the Spanish Conquistadors, and the writings of the early 
missionaries on the frontier. 

61, 62. Survey Course in English Literature Two semesters, 4 hours 

A study of the chief British writers from Beowulf to the present. 

53- Journalism — News One semester, 2 hours 

Relation of the press to society and world events. Practice in news writing 
and general reporting of church, school, and other activities for the public 
press. Personal interviews. Feature stories. Revision and correction of 
articles submitted. 

54. Journalism — Copyreading One semester, 2 hours 

This course deals with the writing techniques and editing that are re- 
quired of editors of newspapers, magazines and denominational periodi- 
cals. Instruction will be given in preparing manuscripts and seeing through 
the various aspects of printing. 

*101, 102. Masterpieces of Literature Two semesters, 4 hours 

This is an introduction to great literature and is designed to fit the needs 
of the general Seventh-day Adventist college student. The year is spent 
in careful reading of the great writings from many countries. 

109. Children's Literature First semester, 2 housr 

The course places special emphasis upon the selection and presentation of 
literature suitable for children and offers opportunity to examine many 
types of books for children. 



*Not offered 1960-61. 



60 Southern Missionary College Bulletin 



123. Advanced Grammar First semester, 3 hours 

A course devised to help prospective teachers and writers understand the 
structure of the English language and further develop their powers of 
analysis. 

124- Creative Writing Second semester, 3 hours 

Designed to follow 123 <'ind provide the student with a training which will 
enahle him to write for publication. 

127. Biblical Literature First semester, 3 hours 

A study of the types of literature in the English Bible, particularly empha- 
sizing passages of outstanding literary genius and grandeur. 

135- History of the English Language First semester, 3 hours 

A non-technical treatment of the periods of development of the language 
with special attention given to word study and vocabulary building. 

140. Elizabethan Literature Second semester, 3 hours 

A study of the major English writers of the Elizabethan age. 

142. MiLTON Second semester, $ hours 

The poetry and prose of this outstanding Puritan writer. 

* 147. The Romantic Movement First semester, 3 hours 

Historical and philosophical background of the period, changing attitudes 
in life and literature. Poets from Wordsworth to Keats. Prose writers from 
Lamb to Macaulay. 

*14& The Victorian Period Second semester, J hours 

Continuation of 147. Poets from Tennyson to Kipling, and prose writers 
from Carlyle to Stevenson. 

161. Special Problems in English Either semester, 2 or 2 hours 

The content of this course will be adjusted to meet the particular needs of 
the individual student. Open only to English majors, or minors with the 
approval of the department head. 



COMMUNICATIONS 

The age of mass media of communications has brought to 
increasing prominence the academic field of Communications. To pro- 
vide students with a broad general background upon which later spe- 
cialization can be built, a strong selection of courses has been drawn 
together from a number of academic areas to constitute a Major la 
Communications. The offerings have been drawn largely from Journal- 
ism, Public Relations, and Speech. These in turn are undergirded with 
a widely-based Arts program in the freshman and sophomore years 
particularly. This is in conformity with the prevailing broad cultural 
emphasis which is being given in departments of Communications. 



*Not offered 1960-61. 



Communication Arts 61 

Graduates with a Baccalaureate Degree in Communications, as 
outlined below, will be adequately equipped for positions in the editorial 
and public relations offices of the denomination, or to proceed with a 
program of graduate work in Speech or Journalism with a view to 
teaching on one of the several educational levels. 

Bachelor of Arts With a Major in Conrtmunica+ions 
Course Requirements 

Major (Communications) 30 hours 

Including: Speech 5:6; 76; 113; 117; Journalism 
53, 54; 143:144; Public Relations 166; Economics 
137; 138. 
Minor (English [21 hours], Social Science, Re- 
ligion, Business recommended) 18 hours 

English 1-2 6 hours 

Literature 51 f 52 4 hours 

Foreign Language 6-14 hours 

Fine Arts 60 or 61 required _ 4 hours 

Health 7, 8 1 hour 

Natural Science — Mathematics (Electronics 81 

recommended) 12 hours 

Religion 12-16 hours 

Applied Theology 73 2 hours 

Social Science 1, 2 and 53, 54 12 hours 

Business Administration, Economics 71 required 3 hours 

Vocational 7 hours 

Typing 13 (or 1 year of high school typing) 
Typography 17 
Proofreading 67 
Electives — sufficient to make a four-year total of 128 
semester hours. 

(Recommended: General Psychology, 51; World Geography, 142; 
History of the South, 148; International Relationships, 162; American 
Government 115.) 



JOURNALISM 

53. News One semester, 4 hours 

Relation of the press to society and world events. Practice in news 
writing and general reporting or church, school, and other activities for 
the public press. Personal interviews. Feature stories. Revision and cor- 
rection of articles submitted. 



62 Southern Missionary College Bulletin 



54. CoPYRL'ADiNG One semester, bums 

This course deals with the writing techniques and editing that arc re- 
quired of editors of newspapers, magazines, and denominational periodi- 
cals. Instruction will be gjtven in preparing manuscripts and seeing them 
through the various phases of printing. 

* MV: 144. History and Principles of Journalism 'l'u>» semesters. 6 hours 
The course is a survey of the history of the great newspapers and journalists 
in the United States. Particular emphasis is given to ethics in journalism. 

PUBLIC RELATIONS 

166. Public Relations Second semester, 3 hours 

Designed to give professional competence in the theory and practice of 
public relations, the course is a study of the plans and methods of dissemi- 
nating news from business establishments and from institutions through 
all the media of communications. 

SPEECH 

The course offerings in Speech are intended not only for students 
who may be specializing in Communications, but they are designed to 
be of practical value as "service'* courses to students from all areas of 
the College. It is assumed that any graduate of a liberal arts college 
will desire to develop his ability to express his convictions clearly, 
logically and persuasively. To serve this wider need the courses in 
Fundamentals and in Voice and Diction (Speech 5:6 and 63) may be 
entered without prerequisite. The courses in Oral Interpretation, Ele- 
ments of Radio and TV, and Homiletics may be entered with the con- 
sent of the instructor and with the appropriate academic standing. The 
courses in Persuasion and in Argumentation call also for Speech 5:6 
as a prerequisite. 

Major: While no major is offered in Speech itself, it is now 
possible for a student especially interested in the Speech field to major 
in Communications. This major (as listed on page 72) is strong in 
Speech offerings, and may well prove a more balanced t more practical 
degree than one which concentrates on Speech alone. 

Minor: Whereas it is still possible for a student to build a minor 
of eighteen hours in speech, it is recommended that it be built rather 
in Communications. With the wider range of offerings in that area, no 
student should experience difficulty in arranging his course program 
to include such a minor. 

5:6. Fundamentals or Speech Two semesters, 4 hours 

Establishment of a basic approach to speech, an elementary survey of the 

whole area, and an opportunity to develop speaking ability in various 
speech situations. 

*Not offered 1960-61. 



Communication Arts 63 



♦63. Voice and Diction First seme aw, 2 hours 

A basic study of the voice mechanism, and introduction to successful 
methods of voice improvement, with special attention to individual 
problems. 

*64. Oral Interpretation Second semester, 2 hours 

Theory and practice in the art of conveying to others the fuiJ meaning of 
selected readings, secular and sacred, Special needs of teachers and ministers 
considered. 

76. Elements of Radio and TV Second semester, 3 hours 

An introduction to the medium of radio and the development of basic 
skills in the preparation and presentation of various types of radio programs. 

113. The Psychology of Persuasive Speech First semester, 3 hours 

Analysis of the bases for manipulating the motives of men toward the 
persuader's ends. Practice in the preparation and delivery of persuasive 
speeches. 

*117, Logic in Argumentation First semester, 3 hours 

Emphasis on research methods, logical analysis, propaganda and public 
opinion; on learning to test the validity of evidence and reasoning. Studies 
of masterpieces in argumentation are included, 

119, 120. Homiletics and Pulpit Delivery Two semesters, 4 hours 

Training in the preparation and delivery of the various types of talks and 
addresses the Christian worker or preacher is called upon to present, 

\40. Special Projects in Speech Two semesters, 1 ht*nr 

The content of this course will be adjusted to meet the particular needs ot 
the individual student who is working toward a major or minor in Com- 
munications, or toward a minor in Speech, 



BIBLICAL LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 

Minor Requirement: A minor in Biblical Languages ma)' be 
obtained by 18 hours in Greek or with 14 hours of Greek plus 6 hours 
of Hebrew. 



GREEK AND HEBREW 

31-32. Elements of New Testament Greek Two semesters, 8 hours 

A study of the grammar and syntax of the vernacular koine Greek of New 
Testament times, with readings in the Epistles of John. 

101, 102. Intermediate New Testament Greek Two semesters, 6 hours 

A course in translation of readings from the Gospel of John and Revela- 
tion, with vocabulary building, advanced studies in grammar and syntax, 
with exegetical interpretation of the original text. 

* 121-122. Beginning Hebrew Two semesters, 6 hours 

The elements of Hebrew grammar, including the vowel system, vocabulary, 
writing, and selected reading from the Old Testament. 



•Not offered 1960-61 



64 Southern Missionary College Bulletin 

GERMAN 

Minor: The German minor consists of eighteen hours. 

21-22. Beginning German Two semesters, 8 hours 

A foundation course in grammar, pronunciation, and reading. Not open to 
students who have had two years of German in secondary school. 

83-84. Intermediate German Two semesters, 6 hours 

Prerequisite; German 21-22 or two years of German in secondary school. 
Advanced grammar; intensive and extensive reading of moderately difficult 
prose and poetry; oral and written exercises. 

127:128. German Conversation and Composition Two semesters, 4 hours 
Prerequisite: German 21-22. 

Development of skill in speaking, understanding and writing idiomatic 
German. 

*l4l:l42. Survey of German Literature Two semesters, 4 hours 

Prerequisite: German 83-84. 

History and development of German literature; reading of representative 
works; collateral reading and reports. 

151, 152. German Poetry Two semesters, 4 hours 

Study of versification and the outstanding poets and their writings in the 
different periods of German literature. 



SPANISH 

Bachelor of Ar+s With a Major in Spanish 

Course Requirements 

Major (Spanish) _ . 30 hours 

Including 1-2; 93-94; subsequent courses will be determined 

in consultation with the department head. 

Minor .... 18 hours 

English 1-2 — - _ 6 hours 

Literature - ... 4 hours 

Fine Arts 60 or 61 required - ™. w 4 hours 

Health 7, 8 .--.. , 1 hour 

Natural Sciences — Mathematics - — 12 hours 

Religion _ 12-16 hours 

Social Science 145, 146 ..... 12 hours 

Applied Arts 4 hours 

Electives — sufficient to make a four- year total of 128 

semester hours, 

1-2. Beginning Spanish Two semesters, 8 hours 

A foundation course in grammar, pronunciation, and reading. Not open to 
students who have had two years of Spanish in secondary school. 

*Not offered 1960-61. 



Communication Arts 65 



93-94. Intermediate Spanish Two semesters, 6 hours 

Prerequisite: Spanish 1-2 or two years of Spanish in secondary school. 
Advanced grammar; intensive and extensive reading of moderately difficult 
Spanish texts, oral and written exercises. Not open to Spanish speaking 
persons with three credits in Secondary Spanish. 

* 101: 102. Survey of Spanish Literature Two semesters, 4 hours 

Prerequisite: Spanish 93-94. 

History and development of Spanish-American literature; reading of 

representative works. 

105:106. Survey of Spanish-American Literature Two semesters, 4 hours 
Prerequisite: Spanish 93-94. 

History and development of Spanish-American literature; reading of 
representative works. 

117:118. Spanish Conversation and Composition Two semesters, 4 hours 
Prerequisite: Spanish 93-94. 
(Not open to La tin- American nationals.) 

Development of skill in speaking, understanding, and writing idiomatic 
Spanish. 

* 145-146. The Golden Age of Spanish Literature Two semesters* 4 hours 

Prerequisite: Spanish 93-94. 

A study of the classical period of Spanish literature. 

* 161-162. Spanish Poetry Two semesters, 4 hours 

Prerequisite: Spanish 101:102. 

Study of Spanish versification, selected reading from Spanish and Spanish- 
American authors. 

165, 166. Advanced Spanish Prose Two semesters, 6 hours 

Prerequisite: Spanish 101:102. 
Extended reading from great authors of Spain and Spanish- America. 

179. Problems in Spanish Either semester, 2 hours 

Open to majors, or minors with permission. 

RUSSIAN 

I -2. Beginning Russian Two semesters, 8 hours 

Open to those with basic requirements satisfied in another modern language 
or by special permission of the instructor. 

LIBRARY SCIENCE 

93, 94. The Use of Books and Libraries Two semesters, 4 hours 

Teaches the standard practices in all libraries and the organization of the 
college library in particular. Provides acquaintance with the best books 
(both reference and general) in the various fields of knowledge. Im- 
proves scholarship through a knowledge of how to do research. 

95. Library Administration First semester, 2 hours 

Designed to impart a practical knowledge of how to organize and ad- 
minister a library; how to select, acquire, and catalog books; and how to 
relate the library to the needs of the pupils. Lectures and laboratory 
practice in the college library. 



*Not offered 1960-61. 



EDUCATION - PSYCHOLOGY - HEALTH 



K. M. Kennedy, Chairman; J, M. Ackerman, Olivia B. Dean, 
E. T. Watrous, Joseph B. Cooper, Marian Kuhlman 

The courses offered in this division are both "content" courses, of 
interest to all, and specialized courses of greatest value to teachers and 
other professional workers. 

The offerings in Psychology are all content courses. 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN TEACHER EDUCATION 
(Elementary and Secondary) 

A student who wishes to follow a career of teaching in Seventh-day 
Adventist schools or in the public school system on either the elementary 
or secondary level should enroll in the four-year curriculum leading 
to the Bachelor of Science Degree. The curriculum has been planned 
to enable a student looking forward to teaching to obtain state, as well 
as denominational certification. The program requires a General Edu- 
cation core of studies and a Professional Education core. Students plan- 
ning to teach, whether on the elementary or on the secondary level, all 
take this core curriculum and then specialize in the respective areas. 

The Collegedale Elementary School, the CoIIegedale Academy 
and public elementary and secondary schools of the Collegedale area 
serve as laboratory schools for students preparing to teach, affording a 
rich opportunity for observation and student teaching. 

For admission without deficiency, entrance units as indicated on 
page 44 must be presented. General requirements for students who 
desire a degree from Southern Missionary College are listed on pages 
44 and 45. In addition, it is expected that students planning on teach- 
ing should show seriousness of purpose in order to be admitted to 
this curriculum. 

A student who wishes to receive the Bachelor of Arts Degree must 
fulfill the entrance requirements for a B.A. as listed on page 44, and 
he must use his electives in such a way as to have one of the majors 
listed on page 35 and fulfill the foreign language requirement. 

Minor: A minor in education requires eighteen semester hours 
(twenty- four semester hours are needed for State of Tennessee certifi- 
cation), and 20 hours are needed for denominational certification. 

66 



Education — Psychology — Health 67 

It is recommended that the following professional courses be included: 
5 (for elementary teachers only), 51, 61; at least one of the following: 
150, 180, 107. These courses are required: 21, 111, 133, 134 or 135, 
136: 171, 172 or 173, 174, and 191. - &l 



Bachelor of Science Degree in Secondary Teacher Education 

Course Requirements 

Education and Psychology 18-26 hours 

Including: 21, 51, 61, 111, 135, 136, 191, 173, 

174, and 107, 150, or 180. 

English 1-2 . 6 hours 

Speech ._.. 2 hours 

Literature . . . 4 hours 

Natural Science 12 hours 

Mathematics 1 ...- -- 2 hours 

Social Science (Two fields represented) 12 hours 

Fine Arts 60 or 61 required 4 hours 

Health 7, 8 and Social Science 82 6 hours 

Religion 12-16 hours 

Applied Arts 4 hours 

Eiectives- — to be used to complete two content areas 

for teaching and sufficient to make a four-year total 

of 128 semester hours. 



Bachelor of Science in Elementary Teacher Education 

Course Requirements 
Professional Education ... 18-26 hours 

Including 5, 21, 51, 61, 65-66, 71, 80, 111, 133, 134, 

191, 171, 172. 

English 1-2 6 hours 

Speech - 2 hours 

Literature 52, 109 - 4 hours 

Fine Arts — Art 27, 28, Music 61 4 hours 

Health 7, 8, 22 12 hours 

Including Social Science 82. 
Natural Science — Biology 9, Chemistry 5, 

and Physics 2 - 12 hours 

Mathematics 1, 2 4 hours 

Religion 12-16 hours 

Social Sciences 53, 54, 142, 148 12 hours 



Southern Missionary College Bulletin 

Applied Arts 4 hours 

Electives — sufficient to make four-year total of 128 
semester hours. 



TEACHER CERTIFICATION 

Prospective secondary teachers should use their electives in such a 
way as to certify two areas of instruction as listed below. 

Effective September 1, 1953, the State of Tennessee discontinued 
issuing permanent teaching certificates. From that time onward pro- 
visional, five-year certificates are being granted on the basis of an 
earned bachelor's degree that incorporates certain prescribed courses 
in general and professional preparation. The teacher education pro- 
gram described below fulfills these requirements. 



GENERAL EDUCATION CORE REQUIRED FOR 
TENNESSEE CERTIFICATION GRADES 1-12 

The General Education Core shall consist of not less than 40 
semester hours. Five of the six areas described below in a recommended 
distribution must be included. The Natural Sciences must be repre- 
sented by eight semester hours or by a combination of six semester 
hours of Science and two semester hours of Mathematics. 

a. Communication _____ 6 semester hours 

This area includes experiences in effective reading, writing, speak- 
ing, and listening. 

b. Health, Physical Education, Personal Development, and 

Home and Family Living 6 semester hours 

This area includes experiences from the fields of health, physical 
education, personal development, and home and family living. 
Two fields must be represented as a minimum. 

c. Humanities 8 semester hours 

This area includes literature, foreign languages beyond the first 
college year, art, music, philosophy, religion. Three fields must 
be represented as a minimum. 

d. Natural Sciences & Mathematics ........ 8 semester hours 

This area includes the biological and physical sciences. A biological 
science, a physical science, or a combination may be offered as a 
minimum. 



Education — Psychology — Health 69 

c. Social Studies 8 semester hours 

This area includes history, political science, economics, geography, 
sociology, and anthropology. Two fields must be represented 
as a minimum. 

f. Fundamental Concepts of Mathematics .... 2 semester hours 
This area emphasizes the major concepts of number, measurement, 
function, and proof. Six semester hours credit in college mathe- 
matics may be accepted as a substitute for this area. 

In addition to the above there is specified subject matter required 
for Grades 1-9- This information can be obtained from the Chairman 
of the Division of Education and Psychology. 



Certification for Grades 1-9 

A student completing the four-year curriculum is eligible to receive 
a five-year elementary certificate from the Southern Union Conference, 
and a ten-year Tennessee Teachers Professional Certificate. 



Certification for Grades 7-12 

Students who wish to qualify for teaching in grades 7-12 are ad- 
vised to follow the Teacher Training curriculum outlined below, This 
curriculum leads to endorsement in the Seventh-day Adventist denomi- 
nation as well as in the State of Tennessee. Inasmuch as most states in 
the South follow a program of reciprocity in teacher endorsement, this 
curriculum is the most advantageous for all to follow. 

Those who desire to receive Denominational Certification only, may 
qualify for the five-year Secondary Certificate by completing the follow- 
ing minimum requirements in professional education along with the 
bachelor's degree. 

Fundamentals of Education 21 2 hours 

Education 61 — 2 hours 

Education 111 (Child and Educational Psychology) 3 hours 

Education 135, 136 _ 6 hours 

Directed Observation and Teaching 173, 174 4 hours 

Elective _ — - ,~— 3 hours 



70 Southern Missionary College Bulletin 

CERTIFICATION IN SPECIFIC SUBJECTS, GRADES 7-12 

Denominational Certification 

The Standard Certificate will be issued ONLY in those subject 
fields in which the candidate has a college major or minor — with the 
exception that for vocational subjects the candidate must have a mini- 
mum of 6 semester hours or its equivalent; for business and commercial 
subjects the candidate must have a minimum of 10 semester hours or 
the equivalent; for health and physical education the candidate must 
have a minimum of 6 semester hours or the equivalent; for art } driver 
education, and other subjects of this category the candidate's fitness 
to teach will be appraised by the union educational secretary and the 
secretaries of the General Conference Department of Education. Any 
deviation from this requirement shall be accompanied by a full ex- 
planation. A minor shall be interpreted to mean not less than 15 
semester hours. 

State of Tennessee Certification 

Students may receive state certification to teach in grades 7-12 by 
following the Teacher Training curriculum described above plus an 
additional 6 hours of professional education courses and by taking 
content courses that meet the minimum requirements for endorsement 
in two of the areas described below: 

Business: The applicant shall offer a minimum of 18 semester 
hours, including a core requirement of 12 semester hours in Account- 
ing, Economics and two of the following: Business Law, Introduction 
to Business, Business Mathematics and Business Communication. 

Applicants meeting the above requirements may secure single sub- 
ject endorsements by completion of the hours indicated including hours 
completed in the core: 

General Business _. 6 semester hours 

(including Introduction to Business or Business Prin- 
ciples, Business Law & Business Math.) 

Bookkeeping 10 semester hours 

Typewriting 6 semester hours 

(including 2 hours of advanced typing) 

Shorthand 6 semester hours of Advanced Shorthand 

Business Law 6 semester hours 

Economics 12 semester hours 

(including Principles of Economics) 



Education — Psychology — Health 71 

Secretarial Practice 2 semester hours of office practice 

plus certification in Shorthand and Typewriting 

Salesmanship 6 semester hours 

(selected from salesmanship, marketing, merchandising, adver- 
tising and retailing.) 

Business Machines ._ _ 2 semester hours 

Business English 2 semester hours 

Business Arithmetic 6 semester hours 

(4 in mathematics and 2 in business mathematics or 6 in busi- 
ness mathematics.) 

Office and Clerical Practice 2 semester hours 

(in office, secretarial or clerical practice.) 

English: A minimum of 24 semester hours. An applicant offering 
24 semester hours in English and twelve semester hours in Speech may 
be certified in both. 

Foreign Language: For a single foreign language eighteen se- 
mester hours based upon 2 or more units of high school credit (other- 
wise, twenty-four semester hours). For certification in two foreign 
languages, thirty semester hours are required, with not less than 
twelve semester hours in each if the student has two units of high school 
credit in each language. Where the student does not have two units of 
high school credit, eighteen hours in each language is required. 

HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

The applicant shall offer a minimum of 24 semester hours of health 
and physical education divided as follows: 

Twelve semester hours of health which must include the areas 
listed below: 

1. Foods and nutrition, 

2. Safety education and first aid. 

3. Communicable disease control. 

4. Body use and care, including such areas as personal hygiene, 
diseases and disabilities other than those classed as communicable. 

5. Human relations, including such areas as mental hygiene, family 
relations and community relations. 

6. Sanitation of the home, school and community. 

Twelve semester hours in physical education which must include 
the areas listed below: 

1. Mass gymnastics and conditioning activities. 

2. Informal games and relays. 

3. Singing games and rhythmic activities. 



72 Southern Missionary College Bulletin 

4. Team games. 

5. Individual and dual sports. 

6. Safety skills in outdoor and aquatic activities. 

7. Mimetics and story plays. 

8. Stunts and tumbling. 

9. Modified or adapted activities for the handicapped student. 

Credit on required activity courses and/or military service may 
not apply toward this minimum. 

Home Economics (non-vocational) : A minimum of twenty- four 
semester hours distributed as follows: 

Foods and Nutrition 8 semester hours 

Clothing and Textiles 8 semester hours 

Home Management, Home Furnishings, 

Child Care, and Home Nursing 8 semester hours 

Mathematics: A minimum of eighteen semester hours of college 
mathematics, including College Algebra, Trigonometry, and Analytical 
Geometry. A course in General or Business Mathematics may be included 
in the minimum requirements. If the applicant has not taken Solid 
Geometry in high school, it is recommended that it be included in his 
college program. 

Mathematics and Physical Science: When endorsement in 
Mathematics and Physical Science is sought in combination, the appli- 
cant shall present a minimum of fourteen semester hours in Mathematics 
(including College Algebra, Trigonometry, and Analytical Geometry) 
and a minimum of twenty -four semester hours in the Physical Sciences 
(including at least eight semester hours in Chemistry, eight semester 
hours in Physics, and eight semester hours in Geography and Astron- 
omy) plus twelve hours selected from related fields in Mathematics 
and/or Physical Science. 

Music: The applicant may apply for endorsement in School 
Music, and/or Instrumental Music. 

The applicant for either endorsement in music shall offer a mini- 
mum core of music theory and harmony. 12 semester hours; applied 
music, 12 semester hours; conducting, 2 semester hours; history and 
appreciation, 2 semester hours; a minimum total of 28 semester hours. 

The applicant for the School Music endorsement shall meet 



Education — Psychology — Health 73 

the core music requirements listed above, and shall offer 6 semester 
hours of appropriate methods and materials of teaching, grades 1-12, 
and shall offer 2 semester hours class instruction in instruments, a min- 
imum total of 36 semester hours. 

The applicant for the Instrumental Music endorsement shall meet 
the core music requirements listed above, and shall offer 6 semester 
hours of applied music beyond the 12 semester hours in core, and 2 
hours of appropriate methods and materials of teaching, 6 semester 
semester hours of instrumentation and orchestration, a minimum total 
of 42 semester hours. 

The applicant for endorsements in both School Music and Instru- 
mental Music may present a minimum of 6 semester hours in appro- 
priate methods and materials provided both areas are represented. 

Science: The applicant shall offer a minimum of 32 semester 
hours of credit in the sciences ( biological science, chemistry, physics) 
with the three areas represented. The applicant will be certified to teach 
those sciences in which he has completed a minimum of 8 semester 
hours of work. When any two endorsements representing both the 
physical and the biological science fields appear on the certificate the 
holder will be certified to teach general science. If survey or inte- 
grated courses in the biological or physical science fields are provided 
by the training institution these may be included in the required 32 
hours. (See Mathematics and Physical Science.) 

For endorsement in a single subject such as Biology, Chemistry, or 
Physics, sixteen semester hours are required, three of which may be in 
a survey course. 

For endorsement in General Science, sixteen semester hours are 
required which must include General Biology and Physical Science, with 
a minimum of 6 semester hours in each. 

History: A minimum of eighteen semester hours to be distributed 
as follows: 

1. American History __._. 6 semester hours 

2. European or World History 6 semester hours 

3. Electives - — 6 semester hours 

Speech: A minimum of fourteen semester hours in Speech to in- 
clude such courses as Fundamentals of Public Speaking, Oral Interpre- 
tation, Debate, etc. 



74 Southern Missionary College Bulletin 



Bible: A minimum of twelve semester hours in the literature of the 
Bible, such as Old Testament Prophets, Pauline Epistles, Daniel and 
Revelation, or Teachings of Jesus. 



EDUCATION 



For instruction regarding teacher education and certification, both 
state and denominational, see pages 79-83. 



General 

5. Introduction to Teaching First semester, 2 hours 

The student is given opportunity to become acquainted with the needed 
personal and professional traits, duties, and responsibilities of the teacher. 
Observation and participation in classroom and play activities at all grade 
levels. Two class periods per week plus special assignments. 

21. Fundamentals of Education Either semester, 2 hours 

A survey of the basic principles of education. The course examines the 
fundamental philosophy of Christian education. 

61. School Organization and Administration First semester, 2 hours 

This course is designed to help elementary and secondary students develop 
a better understanding of the organization and administration of the school. 
Some topics considered are: problems of prospective teachers, professional 
relations, reports and records, the teacher's relationship with other school 
personnel and working with other agencies. 

138. Audio-Visual Aids Second semester, 2 hours 

The survey of aims, methods, and materials involved in use and evaluation 
of audio-visual instruction aids. 

140. Problems in Teaching Reading Second semester, 2 hours 

The purpose of this course is to give a comprehensive view of reading 
problems, and to plan programs which meet the needs of individual pupils. 
Diagnostic and remedial procedures for grades 7-12 will be stressed, and 
experience in the use of the various types of materials and equipment 
available. Recommended for all secondary education majors. 

191. History and Philosophy of Education First semester, 2 hours 

A study of the historical, philosophical, and sociological foundations of 
education. 

193. Directed Study Either semester, 2 hours 

This course permits the advanced student with adequate preparation to 
pursue independent study in special fields. 



Education — Psychology — Health 75 

Elementary 

^5-66. Elementary School Music Two semesters, 2 hours 

A course designed to prepare teachers to direct the music activities in the 
elementary school. Laboratory experience required. 

71. Teaching of Reading First semester, 2 hours 

A study of objectives, methods, and procedures in the teaching of reading 
in the elementary school. Opportunity to observe the teaching of reading 
in the laboratory school will be scheduled. 

SO. Directed Observation and Teaching Second semester, 2 hours 

Prerequisite: At least one course in elementary methods. Observation of 
lessons taught by the supervisors; teaching in the campus elementary 
school; conferences with the supervisors and with the director of student 
teaching. 

133. Materials and Methods of Teaching in the Elementary School 

First semester , 3 hours 
Emphasis is placed on the teaching of language arts, Bible, and arithmetic. 
One hour observation a week will be scheduled. 

134. Materials and Methods of Teaching in the Elementary School 

Second semester, 3 hours 
Emphasis is placed on the teaching of health, social studies, science, and 
the arts. One hour of observation a week will be scheduled. 

171, 172. Student Teaching, Grades 1-9 4-6 hours 

Prerequisite: Education 61, 111, 133, and 134 with a grade point of 1.00 
in all professional subjects. 

Directed observation and participation in classroom activities, including 
actual teaching in the campus and off-campus laboratory schools. 

197. Workshop in Elementary Education Summer only, 2 hours 

Opportunity is provided for students to work under supervision on curri- 
culum problems. 



Secondary 

M5. The Secondary School Curriculum First semester, 2 hours 

A study of the purposes and organizations of the secondary school curri- 
culum and some of the promising practices in curriculum development. 

136. Materials and Methods of Secondary Teaching 

Second semester, 3 hours 
A study of learning activities with desired outcomes; methods of planning, 
organizing, stimulating and directing classroom activities; organization of 
courses; selection of appropriate materials for classroom teaching. This 
course covers all areas of endorsement, but in the second semester one 
hour a week will be devoted to special methods in specific areas, such as 
Bookkeeping, Shorthand, Languages, Mathematics, Home Economics, 
Music, etc. 









16 Southern Missionary College Bulletin 



*162. Administrative and Personnel Work of Deans 

Second semester, 2 hours 
A basic professional course In the administration of the school home. 
(Offered on demand.) 

173, 174. Student Teaching, Grades 7-12 4-6 hours 

Prerequisite: A grade point of 1.00 in professional subjects; Education 111, 
135, 136, and Methods in the subject to be taught (the latter two courses 
may be taken concurrently with supervised teaching). 
Teaching may be done in the secondary school in one or more of the 
following fields: 

Bible, Bookkeeping, English, Home Economics, Mathematics, Modern 
Foreign Language, Music, Natural Science, Shorthand, Social Sciences, 
Typewriting. Registration should be for the supervised teaching course, by 
number, followed by the letter designating the particular field in which 
the supervised teaching is to be done. 

Note: At Jeast two semester hours of student teaching must be completed 
under the supervision of Southern Missionary College by candidates for 
degrees, regardless of the amount of similar credits received elsewhere. 
A computed minimum of four to six hours is required for recommendation 
for certification. 

PSYCHOLOGY 

51. General Psychology Either semester, 3 hours 

An introduction to the study of the problems of human behavior, and of 
the mental processes and their development. This is a foundation course 
designed to help the student understand and explain the behavior of others 
and thereby be better able to predict and control his own life and influence 
the lives of others. 

107. Tests and Measurements First semester, 2 hours 

A study of the various types of educational tests and examinations, and 
modern methods in their construction and use; also mastery of the most 
useful statistical techniques, with practice in working and interpreting 
problems involving educational and psychological data. The course includes 
some time given to the administration and interpretation of tests of 
intelligence, vocational interests, and personality. 

111. Child and Educational Psychology First semester, 3 hours 

This course deals with the physical, social, emotional, and intellectual 
growth and development of children and adolescents in the home and 
community. Special emphasis will be given to the psychological factors 
which underlie and influence the learning process. 

*141. Social Psychology First semester, 2 hours 

Prerequisite: Psychology 51. 

A study of the interrelations of individuals in social situations, how the 
individual is influenced by others, and how in turn he affects the behavior of 
others. Does not apply toward professional requirements in teacher edu- 
cation. 

142, Applied Psychology Second semester, 2 hours 

Prerequisite: Psychology 51. 

This is a study of psychology in business, industry, public speaking, publi- 
cations, politics, religion, and various other phases of everyday human 
activity. Does not apply toward professional requirements in teacher 
education. 



: Not offered 1960-61. 



Education — Psychology — Health 77 



*150. Personality and Mental Hygiene Second semester, 3 hours 

Prerequisite*. Psychology 51. 

A study of the incidence, causes, and methods, of preventing maladjust- 
ments and mental illness. Consideration is given to the meaning, importance, 
and conditions that affect the growth of personality, and methods of its 
improvement. 

180. Guidance and Counseling Second semester, 3 hours 

A survey of the current aims of counseling and guidance in school and 
community. Basic principles, procedures, and policies of counseling and 
guidance are emphasized. Directive and non-directive methods are stressed 
with the untrained or slightly trained teachers. 



HEALTH COURSES 

4. Home Nursing Second semester, 2 hours 

Lecture and demonstrations will be based on the American Red Cross 
textbook in home hygiene and care of the sick. Red Cross Home Hygiene 
Certificates are issued to those successfully completing the course. In addi- 
tion, hydrotherapy will be given. 

22. Safety and First Aid Second semester, 2 hours 

'The nature and causes of accidents, safety measures for the precaution of 

common accidents of the home, school, industry, transportation, and 

recreation. The standard and advanced Red Cross Certificates will be issued 

to those completing the required work in first aid. 

82. School Health Problems Second semester, 2 hours 

The function of the teacher in the school health program as an aid in the 
medical examination, screening, hygiene environment, control of contagion, 
health of teacher, and methods of correlating health instruction with 
other subjects of the curriculum. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND RECREATION 

The courses in this department are designed to improve human 
relations through cooperative group activity; to improve the physio- 
logical functions of the individual through proper exercise and an in- 
creased knowledge of body functions in relationship to activity; to foster 
the spirit of fair play which is democracy in action; to teach the values 
of physical education and recreation in the enrichment of the Christian 
life. 

Course Requirements for Minor in Health 

and Physical Education 

P. E. Major and Minor Activities 4 hours 

P. E. 75 - « 2 hours 



*Not offered 1960-61. 



78 Southern Missionary College Bulletin 

P. E. 85 2 hours 

P. E. 128 2 hours 

P. E. 145 -....- 1 hour 

P. E. 188 3 hours 

Health 22, 51 -- 4 hours 

Total Semester Hours 18 hours 

Cognate requirements — Anatomy and Physiology 11 



ACTIVITY COURSES 

The activities program, elective in nature, is set up to provide a 
variety of subjects. 

Students enrolled in activity courses must wear regulation suits 
and shoes to all class appointments, No credit will he given unless this 
requirement is complied with. 

All physically qualified students must take the required basic 
course. 

A student may not sign up for more than one activity per semester 
unless given permission by the Dean or the Department Head. 

The "beginning" courses will deal with lowest nomenclature and 
special techniques of the activity, as well as considerable time spent in 
actual participation in the activity. Advanced courses are an extension of 
the same courses, but will be limited to those who display superior 
ability in the beginner courses. 

7, 8. Freshman Physical Education Two semesters, 1 hour 

Required of all Freshmen. 
Body mechanics, games, skill tests, etc. 

9, 10. Adapted Physical Education Two semesters, 1 hour 

A course offered for those physically unable to take part in the basic 
required program. A "B" medical rating automatically upon registration, 
classifies the student for this part of the program. 

11. Major Sports Activities First semester, 2 hours 

A required course for physical education minors. Major sports such as 
flagball, basketball, baseball are studied. Class organization, teaching 
methods, rules, and skills are emphasized. One hour lecture and three 
hours laboratory per week. 

12. Minor Sports Activities Second semester, 2 hours 

A required course for physical education minors. Minor sports such as 
tennis, archer)', badminton, softball, volleyball, etc. are studied. Class 
organization, teaching methods, rules, and skills are emphasized. One 
hour lecture and three hours laboratory per week. 

13. Basketball First semester, y 2 hour 
Dribbling, passing, defense, scoring plays, rules, skill drills, etc. 



Education - — Psychology — Health 79 



20, Tennis Second semester, §| hour 

Serving, strokes, scoring, strategy, skill drills, tests, round robin, and 
ladder tournament. Class size Jimited to facilities. 

23, 24. Co-recreational Activities First and Second semesters, 1 hour 

An area of the program whereby men and women may play together. 
Badminton and shuffleboard are the two activities offered. 

50. Camping and Hiking Either semester, i/ 2 b° lir 

A course designed to promote outdoor recreation and provide experience 
for those who are interested in Pathfinder summer-camp work, Campouts, 
hikes, practice in camping techniques, etc. 

64. Archery — Co-educational Second semester, {§ hour 

Fundamentals of shooting, skill drills, tournaments, safety are presented. 
Class size limited. 

67, 68. Tumbling Two semesters, 1 hour 

Accent on rolls, stunts, pyramids, self-testing activities. Conditioning 
heavily emphasized. 

71, 72. Apparatus (men only) Either semester, % hour 

Parallel bars, rings, high bar work. 

73. Beginning Trampoline First semester, f| hour 

*74. Advanced Trampoline Second semester, l / 2 hour 



THEORY COURSES 

•75< Introduction to Health, Physical Education, and Recreation 

First semester, 2 hours 
A study into the aspect of Physical Education as a career, its relationship 
to related fields of education, general principles and philosophies, historical 
background, and professional preparation. 

&x Methods and Materials of Teaching Physical Education 

in the Elementary School First semester, 2 hours 

This course is designed primarily for elementary teachers and minors in 
Physical Education. Methods and materials, graded activities in games of 
low organization, team games, self-testing, and rhythmic activities, and 
safety measures. 

*I0(). Theory of Play Second semester, 2 hours 

A course designed to give a theoretical explanation of recreational activity 
and to show the need of activity in modern life and its place in education. 

128. Organization and Administration of Physical 

Education and Recreation Second semester, 2 hours 

The relationship of the field of Physical Education to modern educational 
theory. Details of the organization of physical education activities, organi- 
zation and classification of pupils, and emphasis on the arrangement and 
construction of equipment and planning of school programs suitable to 
denominational schools. 



•Hot offered 1960-61. 



80 Southern Missionary College Bulletin 

145. Officiating First or Second semester, 1 hour 

Study of rules, officiating techniques, practice. Each student will be as- 
signed a definite number of hours of officiating in the Intramural program 
for practical experience. One hour lecture per week and two hours practice. 

188. Recreation Leadership Second semester, 3 hours 

A study of principles, organization, and administration of community re- 
creation, with emphasis placed on the development of recreational leader- 
ship. Students will he required to work in conjunction with the Master 
Guide program or other youth programs available in the area. 



FINE ARTS 



Morris Taylor, Chairman; Dorothy Ackerman, Olivia Dean, 
J. Mabel Wood, J. Don Crook, Lyle Q. Hamel, Elaine 
Taylor 

The aim of this division is to provide for the student a means of 
self-expression through forms of beauty and to prepare him for living 
a richer life individually, socially, and professionally. 

ART 

1:2. Fundamentals of Drawing and Design 'Each semester, 2 hours 

An introductory course in drawing, composition, design, color organi- 
zation and basic lettering. Emphasis on the basic art elements and their 
functions in composition. 

51, 52. Beginning Painting Each semester, 1 or 2 hours 

Recommended prerequisite: Art 1, 2. 

Introduction to water color, oil paint, and pastel painting, landscapes, 
still life, and flowers; originality will be stressed. 

7, 8. Sculpture Each semester, 2 hours 

The various expressions in three dimensional forms are studied. Portrait 
sculpture, building up in soft materials as well as direct plaster techniques. 

27, 28. Art Education and Crafts Two semesters, 2 hours 

A study of the fundamental arts and crafts principles adapted to the needs 
of children. Laboratory work in the use of various art and craft media for 
elementary school teachers. 

165, 166. Advanced Painting Each semester, 2 hours 

Prerequisite: Art 3, 4. 

Here a student may desire to study further the use of the various media, 
also explore the relationships of abstract representation to realism. Instruc- 
tion in clothed figure painting; landscapes and animal life. 

ART HISTORY 

60. Survey of Art Second semester. 2 hours 

An introductory course to art experience. A survey of art media with 
illustrated lectures, discussion, and analysis of important mastenvorks. 

*143:144. History of Art Second semester, 4 hours 

Recommended prerequisite: Art 60. 

A study of the arts of western civilization from antiquity to the present 
with an emphasis on the pivotal figures in art history. Representative ex- 
amples of painting, sculpture, and architecture will be studied as well as 
some examples from the graphic and decorative arts. 

♦Not offered 1960-61. 

81 



82 Southern Missionary College Bulletin 

Minor: A minor in Art consists of 18 hours, including 1:2, 60; 
143:144; painting, 6 hours; elective — 2 hours. 

MUSIC 

Southern Missionary College offers three curriculums in music, 
a Bachelor of Music with a major in performance or in music educa- 
tion, and the Bachelor of Arts with a major in music, 

The Bachelor of Music degree is designed to prepare the student 
as a professional musician. The B.M. with a major in performance 
meets the need of the student who wishes to concentrate in an applied 
music field and to prepare for advanced work in the scholarly branches 
of music. 

The Bachelor of Music with a major in music education meets the 
specifications of the State of Tennessee and most other state education 
departments as well as the requirements for certification from the Gen- 
eral Conference to teach music on the secondary level. See under the 
Education Department for further details with regard to certification. 

The Bachelor of Arts degree with a major in music allows the 
student to obtain a broad background in the liberal arts along with his 
solid core of professional music subjects, The liberal arts student may 
choose the field of music as his minor. 



Bachelor of Music in Music Education 

Course Requirements 

Major (Music) 59 hours 

Applied Music: Major instrument or voice — 12 
hours: minor instruments and/or voice — 4 
hours; senior recital — 1 hour; music organiza- 
tions — 2 hours; music ensemble — 2 hours. 
Music Theory: 3:4; 45:46; 101:102; 171:172; 

electives — 4 hours. 
Music History: 62 or 63; 141:142. 
Music Education: 161 or Education 65-66; 181; 
materials and methods electives — 6 hours. 
Education 61; 135 or 191; 171, 172 or 173, 174 .. 8 hours 

Psychology 51; 111 6 hours 

Health and Family Living 6 hours 



Fine Arts 83 

Including: Marriage and the Family — 2 hours; 

Physical education — 1 hour; electives — -3 hours. 

English 1-2 - 6 hours 

Literature 51, 52 or 61, 62 _.;..._ 4 hours 

Fine Arts 60 - 2 hours 

jMathematics 1 -...._. 2 hours 

Natural Science — Mathematics 8 hours 

Religion 12-16 hours 

Social Science 20 and sequence 8 hours 

Electives — sufficient to make a four-year total of 

128 semester hours. 



Bachelor of Music in Performance 

Course Requirements 

Major (Music) 60 hours 

Applied Music: Major instrument or voice — 16 
hours; senior recital — 1 hour; minor instrument 
or voice — 4 hours; music organizations — 2 
hours; music ensemble — 2 hours. 
Music Theory: 3:4; 45:46; 101:102; 171:172; 

electives — 4 hours. 
Music History: 62; 63; 141:142. 
Music Education: Materials and methods in major 
instrument or voice — 2 hours; electives— 4 
hours. 

English 1-2 ... 6 hours 

Literature 51, 52 or 61, 62 4 hours 

Foreign Language — French or German 

recommended - 6-14 hours 

Fine Arts 60 2 hours 

Health 7, 8 - - 1 hour 

Natural Science — Mathematics 6 hours 

Religion 12-16 hours 

Social Science 1, 2 and 20 - - 8 hours 

Psychology 51 ~~ - 3 hours 

Electives — sufficient to make a four-year total of 
128 semester hours. 



fThis requirement may be waived by examination. 



84 Southern Missionary College Bulletin 

Bachelor of Arts With a Major in Music 
Course Requirements 

Major (Music) 37 hours 

Music Theory: 45:46; 101:102; and four hours of 

upper division electives. 
Applied Music: Major instrument or voice — 12 
hours; senior recital — 1 hour; music organiza- 
tions — 2 hours. 
History of Music: 62 or 63; 141:142. 

Minor „__ 18 hours 

English 1-2, Literature 51, 52 or 61, 62 10 hours 

Fine Arts 60 2 hours 

Foreign Language 6-14 hours 

Health 7, 8 1 hour 

Natural Sciences — Mathematics 12 hours 

Religion 12-16 hours 

Social Science 12 hours 

Electives- — sufficient to make a four-year total of 
128 semester hours. 

Minor: A minor in Music consists of eighteen hours, including 
45:46; 141:142; applied instrument or voice — 4 hours; music organi- 
zations — 2 hours. 



THEORY 

25:26. EAR TRAINING AND Solkkcigio Two semesters, 2 hours 

The development of rhythmic, melodic, and harmonic perception. A waiver 
may be granted by examination. This course should be taken concurrently 
with 45:46. This class will meet two periods per week. 

45:46. Harmony I Two semesters, 6 hours 

Construction and function of scales and intervals; triads and dominant 
seventh chords, root position and inversions; modulation; use of non- 
harmonic tones, correlated analysis and keyboard harmony. 

101:102. Harmony 11 Two semesters, 4 hours 

Prerequisite: Music 45:46. 

Construction and function of ninth, eleventh, and thirteenth chords, altered 
chords and modulation, correlated analysis, and keyboard harmony. 

171:172. Counterpoint Two semesters, 4 hours 

Prerequisite: Music 45:46; 101:102 concurrently. 

Species counterpoint in two or more parts: imitation, double counterpoint, 
canon and correlated analysis. 



Fine Arts 85 

*174. Orchestration Second semester, 2 hours 

Scoring and arranging for the instruments of the modern symphony orchestra 
and the concert band. 

•114 Composition Second semester, 2 hours 

Prerequisites: Music 101:102; 171:172 recommended. 
Principles of composition in the smaller forms; written work modeled 
on the analysis of such forms as the chorale, the art song, and the rondo. 



MUSIC HISTORY 

61:62. Survey of Music Literature Two semesters, 4 hours 

The impact of musical thought on western civilization during the past one 
thousand years. Illustrated lectures, discussions, and recordings. 
Music majors may not register for Music 61 except as an elective. One 
listening period per week is required. 

141 : 142, History of Music Two semesters, 6 hours 

Recommended prerequisite: Music 62 or 63- 

Cultural and musical-technical aspects of the style and form of musical 
thought from antiquity to the present time. Two listening periods per week 
are required. 

CHURCH MUSIC 

74 Principles of Conducting Second semester, 2 hours 

Basic concepts of notation, the study and application of principles of song 
leadership. This class meets three periods per week. 

63. Survey of Church Music First semester, 2 hours 

A course designed to meet the needs of religion majors and church musi- 
cians. A study of church music from Biblical times to the present. One 
listening period per week is required. 



MUSIC EDUCATION 

The studies in methods and materials involve not only development 
in actual performance ability and evaluation of available teaching ma- 
terials; but also, and pre-eminently, a quest for pedagogical soundness 
and understanding of how to help individuals solve their musical 
problems. 

*130. Piano Materials and Techniques Second semester, 2 hours 

Methods, materials, and procedures for private and group piano instruction. 

132. Vocal Materials and Techniques Second semester, 2 hours 

Principles of voice production and testing and classification of voices. 
The examination of suitable literature for ensemble and solo use. 

*134. String Materials and Techniques Second semester, 2 hours 

A study of the stringed instruments in class and a survey of teaching ma- 
terials for class and private instruction. 



♦Not offered 1960-61. 



86 Southern Missionary College Bulletin 



136. Percussion Materials and Techniques Second semester, 1 hour 
The use of percussion instruments in the band and orchestra. Techniques of 
performing all percussion instruments. Interpretation of band scores, 
balance and special effects of the percussion section. 

137. Brass Materials and Techniques First semester. 2 hours 
A study of tone production, embouchure, fingerings, and practical pedagogic 

technique. A survey of the literature for the instruments and evaluation of 
teaching methods. 

: M39. Woodwind Materials and Techniques First semester, 2 hour* 

A study of tone production, embouchure, fingerings, and practical pedagogic 
technique. Survey of the literature for the instruments and evaluation of 
teaching methods. 

*l6l. Secondary School Music First semester. 2 bvun 

Curriculum, organization, and administration of choral, instrumental, and 
general music classes in the junior and senior high school. 

*18L Conducting Techniques First semester, 2 hotn-^ 

This course is designed to give the music student the requisite skills for 
conducting choral and instrumental groups. 



APPLIED MUSIC 

f3, 4. Two semesters, 2 hours 

Private instruction in voice, piano, organ, or orchestral instrument. 

15, 6. Two semesters, 2 hours 

Class instruction in voice, piano, or orchestral instruments. This course is 
designed for the beginning student who would like to take applied music in 
small groups of from two to iive at a reduced fee from the private lesson 
rate. 

21, 22. Two semesters, 2 hours 

Prerequisite: Examination for freshman standing. 
Private instruction in voice, piano, Organ, or orchestral instrument. 

•f'53, 54. Two semesters, 2 hours 

Prerequisite: Music 3, 4 or 5, 6. 
Private instruction in voice, piano, or orchestral instrument. 

71, 72. Two semesters, 2 hours 

Prerequisite: Music 21, 22. 
Private instruction in voice, piano, organ, or orchestral instrument. 

121, 122. Two semesters, 4 hours 

Prerequisite: Music 71, 72. 
Private instruction in voice, piano, organ, or orchestral instrument. 

151, 152. Two semesters, 4 hours 

Prerequisite: Music 121, 122. 
Private instruction in voice, piano, organ, or orchestral instrument. 

*Not offered 1960-'6l 
fSee note on next page. 



Fine Arts 87 

192, Senior Recital i hour 

The recital must be memorized with the exception of organ or instruments 
performing ensemble literature not generally memorized. 

f Courses 3, 4; 5, 6; 53, 54 are open to any student of the college 
as elective credit toward the B.A. or B.S. degree. The music major or 
minor may elect these courses only toward his minor performance. 

Courses 21, 22; 71, 72; 121, 122; and 151, 152 are courses pri- 
marily for the music major and minor, but they may be elected by 
anyone who passes the examination for freshman standing. 

Instruction in voice, piano, organ, or orchestral instruments is 
offered both privately and in small classes. The following performance 
areas may be studied: violin, viola, cello, string bass, flute, oboe, clari- 
net, saxophone, bassoon, trumpet, French horn, trombone, baritone, 
marimba, and percussion instruments. 

One semester hour will be allowed for a minimum of 15 half- 
hour lessons with four hours of practice per lesson. Participation in 
and attendance at student recitals, public and studio, will be considered 
a part of the regular work. Music majors and minors are required to 
attend a large percentage of the concerts and recitals on the campus, 
and each is urged to take advantage of the outstanding musical events 
sponsored by the SMC Lyceum Committee, the Fine Arts Series, the 
Community Concerts, and the Chattanooga Symphony. 

Freshman standing for the music major or minor will be given by 
the music faculty at the time of the first semester examinations. Each 
student majoring in music must appear before the music faculty at the 
end of each semester to present a prepared program of technic and 
memorized compositions as his final examination. 

All music majors are required to pass an examination in piano. The 
student must be able to play hymns and moderately easy accompani- 
ments at sight and play the major scales. At the time of the regularly 
scheduled semester examinations the student is to play before a com- 
mittee of the music faculty. The piano examination should be passed as 
early as possible, but no later than the end of the junior year. 

The major in music education and the liberal arts student will 
present a joint senior recital in which he plays 30 minutes. The perfor- 
mance major will present a full-length, memorized recital. The stu- 
dent may elect to have an assisting soloist or assisting small ensemble in 
which he participates. 



88 Southern Missionary College Bulletin 

MUSIC ENSEMBLES 

Although there is no charge for participation in music organizations 
if credit is not desired, yet students should register for entrance in the 
organization. All students pursuing a music major must participate in 
a music organization each year of residence. 

Each musical organization meets two periods per week and offers 
one-half hour credit each semester. Admission to any musical organiza- 
tion is by audition. Regular attendance at rehearsals is required. 

Ensembles on campus are organized and sponsored by members 
of the staff. 

9> 10. Campus Band 

11, 12. Concert Band 

13, 14. Orchestra 

15, 16. College Choir 

17, 18. Men's Chorus 

19, 20. Collegiate Chorale 

153:154. Piano Ensemble Two semesters, 2 hours 

Prerequisite: Music 54 or 72. 

This course is designed to give the piano and organ major coaching and 
experience in accompanying and playing in a chamber ensemble. 

155:156. Vocal Ensemble Two semesters, 2 hours 

Prerequisite: Music 54 or 72. 

This course is designed to give the voice major coaching and experience 
in organization and participation in small vocal ensembles. The literature 
of the vocal and chamber music repertoire will be studied, 

157:158, Instrumental Ensemble Two semesters, 2 hours 

Prerequisite: Music 54 or 72. 

This course is designed to give the instrumental major coaching and ex- 
perience in organizing and participating in small instrumental ensembles 
such as the string trio or quartet, the woodwind quintet, etc. The chamber 
music literature will be studied. 



NATURAL SCIENCES - MATHEMATICS 



John Christensen, Chairman; H. H. Kuhlman, Clarence E. 
Chinn, Ray Hefferlin, E. O. Grundset, Merlynd Nestell, 
A. L. Watt 

The Division of Natural Sciences and Mathematics is organized 
for the purpose of giving training in the fundamental sciences of Bi- 
ology, Chemistry, Mathematics, and Physics. Many of the courses of- 
fered in these departments are basic for professional training in medi- 
cine, dentistry, optometry, nursing, other medical-related professions, 
and professional engineering. These must be taken before entrance into 
the training for a chosen profession. 

Training for professional careers in Biology, Chemistry, Mathe- 
matics, and Physics may be had by taking majors in these fields. Minors 
in related fields are taken which contribute to the background of the 
student. 

The foundation and survey courses are designed to give the general 
student an appreciation and understanding of the impact of the scien- 
tific discoveries and the scientific method of thinking upon our mod- 
ern civilization. 

Relative, to spiritual values the following quotation reflects the 
philosophy of the division of Natural Sciences and Mathematics: 

"All true science is but an interpretation of the handwriting of God 
in the material world. Science brings from her research only fresh evi- 
dences of the wisdom and power of God. Rightly understood, both the 
book of nature and the written word make us acquainted with God by 
teaching us something of the wise and beneficent laws through which 
He works." Ellen G. White, Patriarchs and Prophets, page 599. 

BIOLOGY 
Bachelor of Arts With a Major in Biology 

The courses in this subdivision are intended to give students a 
practical and cultural knowledge of this field of science, and to meet 
the needs of those planning to enter professional training in advanced 
biology, medicine, dentistry, nursing, and related fields. It is recom- 
mended that students majoring in biology minor in chemistry. 



89 



90 Southern Missionary College Bulletin 

Major: a major in biology consists of thirty semester hours, and 
must include Biology 1, 22, 45, 46, 110 and 128. 

Minor; a minor in biology requires eighteen hours. 



Course Requirements 

Major (Biology) .... 30 hours 

Including 1, 22, 45, 46; 110, 128. 

Minor: Chemistry recommended 18 hours 

English 1-2, Literature 51, 52 or 61, 62 10 hours 

Applied Arts 4 hours 

Fine Arts, 60 or 6l required 4 hours 

Foreign Language .._ - 6-14 hours 

Health 7, 8 1 hour 

Religion 12-16 hours 

Social Science 12 hours 

Electives — sufficient to make a four-year total 

of 128 semester hours. 

Pre-medical students majoring in Biology will add Physics 51-52, 
Mathematics 11:12, Chemistry 1-2, 63, 102, 113-114, General Embry- 
ology 145. 

The courses in Biology are intended to give the student funda- 
mental and accurate information as a basis for the development of a 
sound scientific philosophy and as preparation for professional training. 

1. General Biology First semester, 3 hours 
A study o f biological principles and of the classification of the plant king- 
dom. Two hours lecture, three hours laboratory, each week. 

2. General Biology Second semester, 3 hours 
Consideration of biological principles as related to animal life. Study of 
typical members of each phylum in the animal kingdom. Two hours lecture, 
three hours laboratory, each week. 

9. Nature Study and Conservation First semester, 3 hours 

This course is planned for elementary teachers who wish to use nature 
materials furnished by their environment in their teaching. It includes con- 
servation of natural resources, the study of birds, insects, flowers, trees, and 
related areas. Two hours lecture, three hours laboratory each week. This 
course is a methods course and is restricted to teacher training students. 



Natural Sciences — ■ Mathematics 91 



11, 12. Anatomy and Physiology Two semesters, 6 hours 

A study of the fundamentals of human anatomy and physiology. Two hours 
lecture, three hours laboratory, each week. 

22. Microbiology Either semester, 4 hours 

A study of micro-organisms; their relation to the production of disease in 
man and their modes of transmissions; methods used in specific prevention 
or treatment of disease. Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory, each 
week. 

45, 46. General Zoology Two semesters, 8 hours 

A study of the general biological principles of all animal life including 
their general structure, physiology, habitat, classification, and life history. 
Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory, each week. 

*100. Field Biology First semester or Summer session, 3 hours 

Prerequisite: Biology 1 and 2 or equivalent. 

A study of the life of plants and animals in the natural environment. One 
hour lecture, five to six hours laboratory each week. 

105. Mammalogy First semester, 3 hours 

Prerequisite: Biology 2 or 46 or equivalent. 

Classification, distribution, life history and population of mammals. Two 
hours lecture and three hours laboratory or field trip each week. 

107. Parasitology First semester, J hours 
Prerequisite: Biology 2, or 45, or equivalent. 

A general survey of the more important parasites of man and domestic 
animals. Two hours lecture, three hours laboratory, each week. 

108. Ornithology Second semester or Summer session, 3 hours 
Prerequisite; General Biology, 1, 2 or 45, 46. 

An introduction to the external structure, classification, behavior, nesting, 
migration, and phylogeny of birds. Laboratory periods are spent studying 
birds in the field. Two hours lecture, three hours laboratory work each week. 

*109. Entomology First semester or Summer session. 3 hours 

Prerequisite: Biology 1, 2 or 45, 46. 

An introduction to the study of insects with emphasis on development and 
behavior. Classification of important orders and families and the use of 
insect keys will be stressed in laboratory work. Two hours lecture and 
three hours laboratory work each week. 

110. Genetics Second semester, 3 hours 

Prerequisite: Biology 1 and 2 or equivalent. 

A study of heredity as related to man and some domestic plants and animals. 
Two hours lecture, three hours laboratory, each week. 

122. Bryology Second semester, 3 hours 

Prerequisite: Biology 1 or equivalent. 

A study of liverworts, mosses, and ferns of this area. Two hours lecture and 
three hours field or laboratory work, each week. 

128. Systematic Botany Second semester,, 3 hours 

Prerequisite: Biology 1 or equivalent. 

The identification of seed plants of the Collegedale area with a view of 
the acquisition of familiarity with the distinguishing features of the great 
plant groups. Two hours lecture, three hours laboratory, each week. 



*Not offered 1960-61 



92 Southern Missionary College Bulletin 



145. Genteral Embryology First semester, 3 hours 
Prerequisite: Biology 2, 45, or 46> or equivalent. 

An introduction to the development of the vertebrate animal •with emphasis 
on the development of the chick. Two hours lecture, three hours laboratory, 
each week. 

146. Comparative Anatomy Second semester, 3 hours 
Prerequisite: Zoology 45 and 46. 

A comparison of the anatomy of the various organ systems of vertebrates. 
The dogfish shark, mud puppy, cat, and /or fetal pig are used for labora- 
tory study. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory each week. 
(Credit will not be given for both this course and the former Zoology 104.) 

* 177. Microtechnique First semester) 3 hours 

Prerequisite: Biology 1, 2 or equivalent. 

Preparation, mounting, and staining of various plant and animal tissues on 
slides for microscopic study. One hour lecture, six hours laboratory, 
each week. 

* 178. Anmmal Histology Second semester, 3 hours 

Prerequisite: Biology 2, 45 or 46 or equivalent. 

A descriptive study of normal tissues, including those of man. The micro- 
scopic identification and characteristics of stained sections is emphasized 
in the laboratory. One hour lecture, six hours laboratory, each week. 

191 or 192. Problems in Biology / to 4 hours, 1 or 2 hours a semester 

This course is for biology majors and minors only; individual research 
work in some field of biology. Content and method of study to be arranged. 



CHEMISTRY 

It is intended in this subdivision to give students a practical and a 
cultural knowledge of this field of science, and to provide for the needs 
of those planning to become chemists or to enter professional training 
in medicine, dentistry, nursing, and related fields. 



Bachelor of Arts With a Major in Chemistry 

A minor in Physics or Biology is recommended, and Mathematics 
through Calculus, and Physics 51-52 are advised. 

A major or^minor)in Chemisjxy must include Chemistry 102 and 
114 except for Home Economics or Dietetics students minoring in 
chemistry. - 

This degree does not necessarily prepare for graduate work in 
chemistry unless Chemistry 151, 152 are included. 



*Not offered 1960-*6l 



Natural Sciences — Mathematics 93 

Course Requirements 

Major (Chemistry) 30 hours 

Including: 1-2; 63, 113-114; *102, 144, 190. 
Minor in Mathematics, Physics, or Biology 

recommended 18 hours 

English 1-2, Literature 51, 52 or 61, 62 10 hours 

Applied Arts 4 hours 

Fine Arts, including 60 or 61 required ... 4 hours 

Foreign Language (German recommended) 6-14 hours 

Health 7, 8 1 hour 

Religion 12-16 hours 

Social Science 12 hours 

Mathematics 11:12 - 8 hours 

Electi ves — sufficient to make a four-year total of 

128 semester hours. 
Pre-medical students will add Biology 45-46 and 145, Physics 
51-52, Mathematics 11:12. They should include in the major Chemistry 
113-H4 and 102. 

Bachelor of Science Wtth a Major in Chemistry 

This degree is a preparation for graduate work in chemistry or for 
a professional career in chemistry. 

Course Requirements 
Major (Chemistry) 40 hours 

Including: 1-2; 63; 102 (3 hours); 113-114; 

121; 134; 144; 151, 152. ft 
Minor should be chosen from Math., Physics, Biology, 

or Foods and Nutritionftt 18 hours 

English 1-2 .-.- - ----- - . 6 hours 

Literature 51, 52, 61 or 62 — 2 hours 

Applied Arts 4 hours 

Fine Arts 60 or 61 required 2 hours 

Foreign Language — German 6-14 hours 

Health 7, I , 1 hour 

Mathematics 11:12; 99, 100 16 hours 

Physics 51-52 8 hours 

Religion 12-16 hours 

r;: 5 hour 1 ; 
tfStudents planning to do graduate work in Biochemistry should also elect 
171:172 as part of the major and should also take Biology 22, 45 and 46. 
ftt Students minoring in Foods and Nutrition should also elect 171:172 as 
part of the major. 



94 Southern Missionary College Bulletin 

Social Science _ 9 hours 

Electives — sufficient to make a four-year total of 128 
semester hours. 

1-2. General Chemistry Two semesters, 8 hours 

Prerequisites: High school Algebra and either high school Physics or 
Chemistry or the instructor's permission. (It is recommended that Math 
11:12 be taken concurrently.) 

An introduction to the elements and their principal compounds; the funda- 
mental laws and accepted theories of chemistry. Three hours lecture, three 
hours laboratory, each week. 

•■$. Introduction to Chemistry First semester, 3 hoars 

This course is designed specifically for students preparing for elementary 
school teaching. It consists of simple demonstrations of chemical principles, 
using materials available in the home or school and a discussion of the 
basic principles involved; emphasis is laid on application to home situations 
and on relationships to other sciences. Training is also given in the use of 
chemical illustrations to demonstrate character lessons. This course carries 
credit only toward a degree in elementary education. Two hours lecture, 
three hours laboratory. 

6. Nutrition Second semester, 2 hours 

Sec foods and nutrition, course No. 2. (Docs not apply on a major or a 
minor.) 

6a. Foods and Nutrition Laboratory Second semester, 1 hour 

Sec foods and nutrition course No. 2a. (Does not apply on a major or a 
minor.) 

7-8. Survey of Chemistry Two semesters, 6 hours 

Prerequisites: High school algebra, and either high school physics or 
chemistry, or instructor's permission. 

A survey course designed to familiarize the student with the basic principles 
of chemistry. Attention is given particularly to solutions, chemistry of nu- 
trition, digestion, and metabolism. Of special interest to students who need 
a survey course in chemistry. It will also fulfill the natural science require- 
ment. It is a terminal course and may not be used as a prerequisite for 
advanced chemistry courses. Two hours lecture, three hours laboratory, 
each week. 

63. Qualitative Analysis First semester, 2 hours 

Prerequisites: Chemistry 1-2, Mathematics 11:12 or equivalent. 
A study of the principles and methods for the separation and identification 
if inorganic ions; analysis of several unknowns. Two hours lecture (one 
hour of which is laboratory instruction requiring no homework), two 
hours laboratory, each week. 

81. Organic Chemistry First semester, 4 hours 

A brief study of simple organic compounds, both aliphatic and aromatic 
and their reactions. Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory, each week. 



*Not offered l%0-'6l 



Natural Sciences « — Mathematics 95 

102. Quantitative Analysis Second semester,^, or 3 hours 

Prerequisites: Chemistry 1-2, 63. 

This course includes the study of typical volumetric and gravimetric 
methods, quantitative determinations of acidity, alkalinity, and percentage 
composition of a variety of unknowns. Two hours lecture for nine weeks, 
three or six hours laboratory, each week. 

113-114. Organic Chemistry Two semesters, 8 hours 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 1-2. 

A study of the aliphatic and aromatic compounds of carbon and their 
reactions. The laboratory work includes typical syntheses of various com- 
pounds. Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory, each week. 

121. Organic Qualitative Analysis First semester, 2 or 3 hours 
Prerequisite: Chemistry 113-114. 

Application of solubility principles, classification reactions and the 
preparation of derivatives to the identification of both pure compounds and 
mixtures. Two hours of lecture for nine weeks, and three or six hours of 
laboratory each week. 

122. Advanced Organic Chemistry Second semester, 3 horns 
Prerequisite: Chemistry 113-114. 

Laboratory principles and practice in the synthesis of various organic com- 
pounds and other selected topics. Two hours of lecture, and three hours of 
laboratory work each week. 

134. Advanced Quantitative Analysis Second semester, 2 hours 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 102. 

A study of some additional methods of analysis beyond those considered in 
Chemistry 102. Special attention is given to spectrophotometry, potentio- 
metric and conductometric titrations and other instrumental techniques. 
One hour lecture and three hours laboratory each week. 

144. Laboratory Glass Blowing Either semester, I or 2 hours 

Training is given in the manipulation of glass for the fabrication of 
laboratory apparatus. Three or six hours laboratory each week. This course 
does not count on basic science requirements nor on the 30 hours of the 

major. 

151:152. Physical Chemistry Two semesters, 8 hours 

Prerequisites: Chemistry 102, Physics 51-52, Mathematics 11:12. Calculus 
advised for 151, and required for 152. 

A study of the facts, laws, theories, and problems relating to gases, liquids, 
solids, solutions, equilibrium, thermo- chemistry, electro-chemistry, and 
atomic structure. Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory, each week. 

171:172. Biochemistry Both semesters, 6 hours 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 113-114. 

The materials, mechanisms, and end-products of the processes of life under 
normal and pathological conditions are studied. Two hours lecture, three 
hours laboratory, each week. 

190. Introduction to Research Either semester, I to 3 hours 

Prerequisite: 20 hours of Chemistry. 

Individual research under the direction of the members of the staff. 
Problems are assigned according to the experience and interest of the 
student. 



96 Southern Missionary College Bulletin 

MATHEMATICS 

The objectives of this subdivision are to acquaint the student with 
the meaning, scope, methods, and content of Mathematics, and to show 
some of the relationships and contributions of this science to modern 
civilization and culture. 

Major: A major in Mathematics requires 30 hours (exclusive ot 
Mathematics 1 and 2), and includes Mathematics 11:12; 99; 100; and 
at least 15 hours chosen from courses 111, 112; 121:122; 151:152. 

Minor: A minor in Mathematics requires eighteen hours (exclu- 
sive of Mathematics 1, 2), and includes Mathematics 11:12; 99; 100; 
and at least 3 hours chosen from courses 111, 112; 121:122; 151:152. 

Bachelor of Arts With a Major in Mathematics 

Course Requirements 

Major (Mathematics) 30 hours 

Including: 11:12; 99; 100. 
Minor (Physics or Chemistry recommended) .... 18 hours 

English 1-2 6 hours 

Literature 51, 52 or 61, 62 4 hours 

Applied Arts — . ._ 4 hours 

Fine Arts 60 or 61 required 4 hours 

Foreign Language 6-14 hours 

Religion 12-16 hours 

Social Science 12 hours 

Electives — sufficient to make a four-year total of 128 

semester hours. 

1. Fundamental Concepts of Mathematics First semester, 2 hours 
This course is designed for the teacher education program. It emphasizes 
the major concepts of number, measurement, function, and proof which 
help man to understand the quantitative relationships in his natural and 
social environment. 

2. Functional Mathematics Second semester, 2 .hours 
Prerequisite: Mathematics \. 

A thorough review of fundamental processes of arithmetic; development 
of a mature understanding of arithmetic. 

4. Introduction to Mathematics Second semester, 3 hours 

A unified course consisting of topics from different areas of modern mathe- 
matics. The emphasis is on mathematical ideas rather than drill in the 
manipulation of mathemathical symbols. This course is designed to apply 
on the 12 hours basic science requirement. (Not a preparation for General 
Physics or General Chemistry.) 



Natural Sciences — Mathematics 97 

11:12. Freshman Mathematics Two semesters, 8 hours 

Prerequisites: One unit of secondary algebra and one unit of secondary 
geometry. 

A unified course consisting of topics from college algebra, trigonometry, 
and analytic geometry. 

51. Analytic Geometry First semester, 2 hours 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 11:12. 

This course is primarily for those students who have transferred from 
other colleges and wish to take calculus and have not had a course equiv- 
alent to Mathematics 11 and 12 or those students who have taken 
Mathematics 11 and 12 prior to the academic year 1959-60. Equations of 
curves in rectangular and polar coordinates. Study of the properties of the 
straight line and the conies, (Offered only on sufficient demand.) 

82. Statistics Second semester, J hours 

See Economics 82. 
Does not apply on a mathematics major or minor. 

99. Differential Calculus First semester, 4 hours 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 11:12. 
Elementary functions, ordinary and partial derivatives, applications. 

100. Integral Calculus Second semester, 4 hours 

Prerequisites: Mathematics 11:12; 99. 

Indefinite integrals, definite and multiple integrals, infinite series, appli- 
cations. 

111. Differential Equations First semester, 3 hours 
Prerequisite: Mathematics 99:100. 

Classification and solution of common types of ordinary differential equa- 
tions. Applications to problems arising in the physical sciences. 

112. Methods of Applied Mathematics Second semester, $ hours 
Prerequisite: Mathematics 111. 

Vector analysis, introduction to complex variables, characteristic value 
problems, Laplace transforms, Bessel functions. 

* 121: 122. Advanced Calculus Two semesters, 6 hours 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 99:100. 

Introduction to point set topology, continuity, uniform continuity, inte- 
gration, improper integrals, convergence, uniform convergence, sequences 
of functions, infinite series. 

151:152. Introduction to Modern Algebra Two semesters, 6 hours 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 99:100. 

Groups, rings, fields, integral domains, vector spaces, matrices, algebraic 

solution of equations. 

Bachelor of Science With a Major in Natural Science 

Course Requirements 

Major (Natural Sciences) ., 36 hours 

This major is designed especially for teachers to enable them to 
receive a wider, more diversified training in the whole area of Natural 

♦Not offered 1960-61. 



98 Southern Missionary College Bulletin 

Sciences. (Biological Science, Chemistry, Physics, Mathematics.) It 
consists of thirty-six semester hours, eighteen of which must be in one 
area (six of which must be upper biennium), and a minimum of eight 
hours each in two others. Open only to prospective teachers. 

Minor in Education (see page 77) 24 hours 

Literature 51, 52 or 61, 62 4 hours 

Speech 5:6 4 hours 

Applied Arts 4 hours 

Fine Arts 60 or 61 required 4 hours 

Health 7, 8 .... ..__. 1 hour 

Religion 12-16 hours 

Social Science 12 hours 

jElectives sufficient to make a four-year total of 128 
semester hours. 



PHYSICS 

The courses in this subdivision are intended to present Physics as a 
typical science, and to acquaint students with its relation to other sciences 
and with some of its applications in the fields of research, engineering, 
radio communication, medicine, and dentistry. 



Bachelor of Ar+s With a Major in Physics 

Major: A major in Physics requires thirty hours. Mathematics 
through differential equations is indispensable. 

Minor: A minor in Physics requires eighteen hours. 



Course Requirements 

Major (Physics) 30 hours 

(Physics 51-52, 181, 182**; Math. 11:12; 99, 100; 

111 are required; Chemistry 1-2 is recommended; 

Chemistry 151:152 may count on the physics 

major) 
Minor .„„ _ — — 18 hours 



fElectives to be selected to meet denominational and state certification. 
**Students who have worked in the department research project as research 
assitants may, with the approval of the department, waive an equivalent part 
of this requirement. 



Natural Sciences — Mathematics 9 

English 1-2 6 hours 

Literature 51, 52 or 61, 62 4 hours 

Applied Arts 4 hours 

Fine Arts, including 60 or 61 required 4 hours 

Foreign Language (German or French 

recommended) . 6-14 hours 

Health 7, 8 1 hour 

Religion 12-16 hours 

Social Science ■ 12 hours 

Electives — sufficient to make a four-year total of 128 

semester hours. 
Pre-medical students will add Biology 45, 46 and 145 an< 
Chemistry 1-2, 63, 102, 113-114. 



Bachelor of Science With a Major in Physics 

(For students planning graduate work in physics) 

Course Requirements 

Major (Physics) _ 40 hours 

Including: Physics 51-52; 181, 182**. The re- 
maining hours may be selected from any offering 
in the Physics Department, except Physics 2, 
from Physical Chemistry (Chemistry 151:152) 
and from Methods of Applied Mathematics 
(Math. 112) 

Mathematics _. ._ 21 hours 

Including: Math. 11:12; 99, 100; 111. 

Chemistry 1-2 .... .... 8 hours 

Cognate requirement for major . 4 hours 

Industrial Arts 1, 2; 15, 16; 51, 52. 

English 1-2 .. — 6 hours 

Literature 51, $Z, 61 or 62 2 hours 

Fine Arts 60 or 61 required .. 2 hours 

Foreign Language: German 21-22; 83-84 _ 6-14 hours 

(This requirement can be adjusted for those 
having started French or Russian.) 
Health 7, 8 - 1 hour 



** Students who have worked in the department research project as research 
assistants may, with the approval of the department, waive an equivalent part 
of this requirement. 



100 Southern Missionary College Bulletin 

Religion — 12-16 hours 

Social Science 10 hours 

Electives — sufficient to make a four-year total of 128 
semester hours. 

*2. Introduction to Physics Second semester, 3 hours 

This course is designed specifically for students preparing for elementary 
school teaching. Simple demonstrations of physical principles, using 
materials available in the home or school, and discussion of basic ideas 
involved; emphasis is laid on application (to home appliances, automobile, 
and such things) and on the perception of character lessons in the material. 
Open only to students in elementary education curriculum. Two hours 
lecture, three hours laboratory, each week. 

51-52. General Physics Two semesters, 8 hours 

Prerequisite: Math. 11:12 or equivalent. 

An introduction to the traditional fields of physics using a combination of 
everyday experiences with automobiles, musical instruments, etc., and the 
tools of algebra and trigonometry. Discussion of modern physics: atomic 
physics, x-rays, nuclear physics, earth satellites, and the like. Three hours 
lecture, three hours laboratory each week. 

53-54. Extra Hour of General Physics for Majors and Engineering 

Students Two semesters, 2 hours 

Prerequisite: Math. 11:12 or equivalent- 
One class period per week on advanced problems and derivations relevant 
to the coursework in Physics 51-52. Open only to physics majors and pre- 
engineering students; must be taken concurrently with Physics 51-52, 

61:62. Descriptive Astronomy Two semesters, 6 hours 

An elementary study of our solar system and its relation to the stellar 
universe. Two hours lecture, three hours laboratory each week, 

*81. Electronics First semester, 4 hours 

Prerequisite: One unit of secondary mathematics. 

A non-mathematical treatment of common receivers, transmitters, and 
transducers as the microphone, speaker, and antenna. Three hours lecture, 
three hours laboratoy each week. 

*92. Intermediate Astronomy — stellar structure Second semester, 3 hours 
Prerequisites: Math 11:12; Physics 51; Physics 52 concurrently. 
Experimental information about the light from the stars is studied using 
the concepts developed in General Physics. The possibility that the energy 
emitted by the stars is of nuclear origin is thoroughly considered. The 
material in this couxse does not depend heavily upon that of Descriptive 
Astronomy, and hence Physics 61 is not prerequisite to this course. 

102. Physical Optics Second semester, 4 hours 

Prerequisites: Physics 51-52; Math. 99, 100. 

Refraction, reflection, interference, and absorption of light are shown to 
follow from the principles introduced in General Physics. Three hours 
lecture, and three hours laboratory, each week. 



*Not offered 1960-'6l 



Natural Sciences — Mathematics 101 



103. Kinetic Theory First semester, 3 hours 

Prerequisites: Physics 51-52; Math. 99, 100. 

Many properties of gases, liquids, and solids can be derived from the 
assumption that matter is composed of small particles in motion. Three 
hours lecture each week. 

*123. Atomic Physics First semester, 3 hours 

Prerequisites: Physics 51-52; Mathematics 111 concurrently. 
Analysis of atomic spectra from the Bohr-Sommerfeld model of the atom. 
Introduction to the wave mechanics. 

124. Nuclear Physics Second semester, 3 hours 

Prerequisites: Physics 51-52; Math. Ill concurrently. 

The contributions of each of several models of the nucleus to our under- 
standing of radioactivity, fusion and fission. Discussion of the source of 
stellar energy. 

126. Nuclear Physics Instruments Laboratory Second semester, 1 hour 
Prerequisite: Physics 52. 

Electromagnetic measurements and radiation measurements; gamma ray 
intensity and absorption; dosimetry. Three hours laboratory each week. 

151:152. Analytic Mechanics Two semesters, 6 hours 

Prerequisites: Physics 51-52; Mathematics 111 concurrently. 
The mechanics of general physics is reformulated in more advanced terms, 
and problems such as that of the gyroscope are discussed. Introduction to 
the theory of relativity. Vectors are discussed as needed. 

161:162. Electricity and Magnetism Two semesters, 8 hours 

Prerequisites: Physics 51-52; Math. Ill or concurrently. 
The electromagnetic principles of general physics are reformulated in 
advanced terms so that problems may be discussed such as wave guides. 
Vectors are introduced as needed. Three hours lecture and three hours 
laboratory each week. 

181. Spectroscopy Either semester, Up to 4 hours 

The student takes part in the research project under way in the Physics 

department and becomes familiar with research procedure and reporting. 
This course is limited to majors and minors. 

191. Problems in Physics Either semester, I hour 

Individual research work in some field of Physics elected by the student. 



*Not offered 1960-'6l 



NURSING 



Harriett Smith, Chairman 

Glenda Rolfe, Dolores Chapman, Helga Forehand, Miriam 
Kerr, Christine Kummer Merle Silloway 



PHILOSOPHY 

The philosophy and objectives of Christian education as stated 
by Southern Missionary College are fundamental to the philosophy 
of the Division of Nursing. 

This division acknowledges its unique responsibility for promot- 
ing complete nursing service and therefore curriculum offerings are 
planned to develop the Christian professional nurse. A professional 
nurse is acknowledged as one who gives complete nursing care; uses 
basic communication skills in organizing, planning, and directing the 
work of others; co-operates democratically with allied professional 
and citizen groups for the improvement of the total health services; 
maintains personal identity; and attains individual satisfactions in daily 
life at the same time he serves the community. The professional nurse 
accepts his responsibility by contributing to research, upholding pro- 
fessional ideals and standards, and working toward continued improve- 
ment and growth. 

Christian nursing is essentially a service to one's neighbor. The 
nurse's neighbor is anyone, anywhere, who needs her care. This care 
includes the betterment of health, the preservation of life, and the 
prevention of disease. Such care is accomplished through remedial 
measures, health teaching, and through a living example in the life 
and health of the nurse himself. 



OBJECTIVES 

Curriculum offerings are planned to help the student: 

1. To develop ability to function in beginning positions in nursing, 
including public health. 

2. To develop understanding and ability in providing compre- 
hensive nursing care. 

3. To develop an appreciation and vision for missionary service. 

4. To develop an awareness of professional responsibility. 

102 



Natural Sciences — Mathematics 103 

Bachelor of Science in Nursing 

Major (Nursing) 62 hours 

Including 27, 29, 54, 56, 60, 91, 95, 97, 145, 192, 
193, 341, 450, 451, 141, 180, 189. 

Education and Psychology 12 hours 

Including 51, 180, 245, 442. 

Language and Literature 10 hours 

Including Freshman English 1-2, Speech 5, Liter- 
ature 51 or 52 or 61 or 62. 

Sociology 6 hours 

Including Sociology 20, Marriage and Family 82, 
Cultural Patterns 61. 

Biology - 10 hours 

Including Anatomy and Physiology 11, 12; Mi- 
crobiology 22. 

Chemistry 6 hours 

Including Survey of Chemistry 7, 8. 

Health 1 hour 

Including Physical Education 7, 8. 

Home Economics 4 hours 

Including Foods and Nutrition 2; Social Ethics 
61. 

Religion _ 12 hours 

Including Teachings of Jesus 11, 12; Ministry of 
Healing and World Religion 54; Bible Doctrines 
and Personal Evangelism 95. 

History 3 hours 

Including American History 53 or 54. 

Electives ~.~ 2 hours 

RELIGIOUS HISTORY 

The Division reserves the right to ask any student, who gives 
evidence that in any phase of work or social life he is out of harmony 



104 Southern Missionary College Bulletin 

with the philosophy of the school or whose progress is in general 
unsatisfactory, to withdraw or transfer to another field. 

The curriculum covers four academic years in which the student 
completes approximately half his work in liberal arts and science courses, 
and half in the major field, with a total of 128 semester hours. 

The student spends the freshman academic year and the first se- 
mester of the sophomore year on the Coll eged ale campus. Following 
this, the student registers on the Orlando campus. The second 
semester of the senior year he spends on the Collegedale campus, com- 
pleting the major in nursing. 

Students from other colleges having completed the prescribed 
curriculum for registration on the Orlando campus may be eligible to 
register in the sophomore year of the curriculum in nursing. The faculty 
reserves the right to make curriculum changes at any time in harmony 
with current trends in education. 

Specific Entrance Requirements: 

Mathematics (one of which must be Algebra; 

Business Math, not accepted) 2 units 

Natural Science 2 units 

Social Science 2 units 

23. Introduction to Nursing I First semester, 1 hour 

A brief orientation to the field of nursing and the responsibilities of the 
nurse as a member of the health team. Emphasis is on communication skills 
essential in carrying out comprehensive nursing care. Offered only 1960-61, 

25. Introduction to Nursing II First semester, 2 hours 

This course is designed to help the student to become aware of his own 
health needs and those of the public. It includes an introduction to the 
basic principles and skills of general nursing care. Offered only 1960-61. 

27. Introduction to Nursing First semester, 2 hours 

A brief orientation to the field of nursing and the responsibilities of the 
nurse as a member of the health team. This course is designed to help 
the student to become aware of his own health needs and those of the public. 
It includes an Introduction to the basic principles and skills of general 
nursing care. 

29. Introduction to Nursing Functions First semester, 3 hours 

An introduction to nurse-patient and nurse-co-worker relationships and to 
professional communication techniques. 

54. Fundamentals of Nursing Second semester, 5 hours 

An introduction to the care of patients manifesting the more common 
nursing care problems. The aspects of comprehensive nursing care are 



Natural Sciences — Mathematics 105 



utilized to give the student an understanding of the scope of these problems, 
a/id to provide opportunity for the development of beginning skills in 
problem solving as it relates to patient care. Classes are correlated with 
laboratory experience; in the departments of a general Seventh-day Ad- 
ventist hospital. The course extends for a six-week period. 

56. Medical and Surgical Nursing I First and second semesters, 8 hours 

This course is designed to introduce the student to problems of patients 
with specific disease entities. Consideration is first given to the effects of 
chronic illness as it alters an individual's way of living. Further considera- 
tion is given to the comprehensive nursing care of patients with respiratory, 
gastrointestinal, and circulatory disorders. Classes are correlated with 
laboratory experience in the Medical and/or Surgical departments of a 
Seventh-day Adventist hospital. The course extends for a twelve-week 
period. 

60. Professional Relations Second semester, 1 hour 

An introduction to the professional relationships with patients and co- 
workers in nursing and related professions. Emphasis is placed on methods 
of problem solving and critical thinking to aid the student in making 
decisions. 

91. Medical and Surgical Nursing II First semester, 5 hours 

A continuation of Medical and Surgical Nursing I, considering the com- 
prehensive nursing care of patients with endocrine, urological, neurologi- 
cal, gynocological and orthopedic disorders. Classes are correlated with 
laboratory experience in the medical and/or surgical departments of a 
Seventh-day Adventist hospital. The course extends for a six-week period. 

95. Obstetrical Nursing Either semester, 6 hours 

A study of obstetrics as related to the comprehensive nursing care of the 
mother and baby. Classes are given in conjunction with 12 weeks of 
laboratory experiences. 

97. Family and Health Teaching Either semester, 2 hours 

Instructors' course in Red Cross Home Care of Sick. Experience in con- 
ducting home nursing classes prepares the student as a certified instructor. 

14 1. Public Health Science First semester, 2 hours 

The study of the principles, trends, organization, and administration of 
public health nursing basic to effective family health service in any 
community. 

145. Public Health Nursing Vim semester, 6 hours 

Classes are correlated with eight weeks of supervised field practice. Con- 
ferences, clinics, family visits, and school visits help the nurse to func- 
tion more effectively as a citizen in group planning for better community 
health. 

180. Professional Relations Second semester, 1 hour 

A study of nursing organizations. Methods of parliamentary procedure are 
demonstrated and practiced in preparation for a place in these organizations. 
Legal responsibilities are considered in the light of practical professional 
problems. 



106 Southern Missionary College Bulletin 



189. Medical and Surgical Nursing III First semester, 2 hours 

A continuation of Medical and Surgical Nursing II, developed through 
a problem approach to patients with communicable diseases, eye, ear, nose, 
and throat, and dermatological disorders. Laboratory experience will be 
provided when available in conjunction with the laboratory experience for 
193 Comprehensive Nursing Care. 

193. Comprehensive Nursing Care First semester, 6 hours 

A study of the interpersonal relationships inherent in team nursing from 
the standpoint of the team leader; principles of organization and admin- 
istration as applied to the team leaders. The problem solving technique 
is utilized in preparing a final paper dealing with a problem in nursing 
care. Classes are correlated with laboratory experience in team nursing. 
The course extends for a ten-week period. 

192. Seminar in Nursing Second semester, 3 hours 

The development of nursing, including the progress of the Seventh-day 
Adventist health program; trends in nursing; opportunities for the graduate 
nurse; job selection; and placement after graduation. 

Courses Taken on the University of Florida Campus 

NSG. ill. Introduction to Nursing Functions 3 hours, 3 credits f 

Open to University College students. A required course for nursing students. 
Offered 2. An exploration of the role of the nurse in health promotion and 
care of the sick. Introduction to nurse-patient and nurse-co-worker relation- 
ships and to professional communication techniques. Offered only 1960-61. 

NSG. 34 1. Pediatric Nursing Laboratory 8 hours laboratory, 4 credits] 

Offered 2. Prerequisites: NSG. 330 and NSG. 331. Provides opportunities 
for clinics, conferences, and practice in the nursing care of children in the 
hospital and outpatient clinic. 

NSG. 450. Psychiatric Nursing 3 hours, 3 credits] 

Prerequisites: NSG. 230. Offered 1, 2. 

This course is concerned with the knowledge, understanding, skills, and 
attitudes essential to the nursing care of patients with psychiatric disorders. 
Designed to broaden and deepen understandings already gained in relation 
to mental health. 

NSG. 451. Psychiatric Nursing Laboratory 6 hours, 3 credits] 

Prerequisites or corequisite: NSG. 450. 

Provides opportunity for conferences, clinics, and practice in the care of 
psychiatric patients. 

EDF. 245. Human Growth and Development 4 hours, 3 credits] 

Offered 1, 2, 3- A first course in professional education designed to acquaint 
students with a basic understanding of the nature and dynamics of human 
behavior. Particular attention will be given to the effects of physical growth, 
the family, peer relationships, and the school on the development of 
adequate personalities. Experiences will include observation of children 
in the P. K. Yonge Laboratory and/or School. 

442. Educational Psychology 3 hours, 3 credits f 

An understanding of the applications of psychological principles to the 
educational process. It treats such topics as individual differences, princi- 
ples of learning, transfer of training, and the nature of reasoning. 

fCredits are equivalent to semester hours. 



RELIGION, THEOLOGY, APPLIED THEOLOGY 



Otto H. Christensen, Chairman; Clifford A. Reeves, Gordon 
Hyde, Henry Baasch 

The course in theological training at Southern Missionary College 
is integrated with the curriculum of the School of Religion at Potomac 
University, Berrien Springs, Michigan. This program requires five years, 
the first four of which are taken at this college and the fifth at the 
School of Religion. A total of 128 semester hours leading to the Bach- 
elor of Arts Degree will be taken on the undergraduate level, and the 
Master of Arts Degree in Religion will be taken on the graduate level. 

Approval for entrance into, and continuance in, the ministerial 
curriculum of Southern Missionary College is to be secured from the 
sub-committee on Ministerial Recommendations, which is guided by the 
standards and procedures expected of each theology student. These 
standards and procedures for obtaining a degree in this field will be 
obtainable at the time of registration or from the Division of Religion 
office. Each theology student will be held responsible for obtaining 
this information. 



ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE SCHOOL OF RELIGION 

Those students planning to attend the School of Religion should 
closely observe the following list of requirements and recommended 
courses. 

Semester Hours 

Religion and Applied Theology .. ... 36 hours 

At least 26 hours in Bible 

Greek _.. 12 hours 

English, Literature, Speech ...... - 16 hours 

History, Social Studies - - - 16 hours 

Natural Sciences 6 hours 

Psychology, Education _. - 7 hours 

Health and Religion - - - -- 2 hours 

Total - 95 hours 

Electives to meet major, minor, and department re- 
quirements as well as the total hours required for 
the bachelor's degree. 

107 



108 Southern Missionary College Bulletin 

It is recommended that the above minimum entrance requirements 
include the following courses or subjects: 

Religion and Applied Theology 

Life and Teachings of Jesus 

Bible Doctrines 

Daniel and the Revelation 

The Spirit of Prophecy 

Introduction to the Ministry (6 semester hours) 

English, Literature, Speech 
Composition 

Literature (World Literature preferred) 
Fundamentals of Speech 

History 

European Civilization 
The Ancient World 

Social Studies 

Sociology or Political Science (a minimum of 3 semester hours) 

Psychology, Education* 

General or Child Psychology (a minimum of 2 semester hours) 
Principles of Education (a minimum of 2 semester hours) 
Elementary School Administration (a minimum of 2 semester 

hours) 
(To a total of 7 hours applying toward the three-year elementary 

teacher certificate) 



Bachelor of Arts With a Major in Theology 

Course Requirements and Recommendations 

Major (Religion and Bible) 30 hours 

Required: Bible 11, 12, 165, 166; Religion 
5, 59, 60. 






*Stu dents who plan to teach at the secondary level and to secure the iive- 
year secondary certificate from the Department of Education of the General 
Conference of Seventh-day Adventists should take a minimum of 15 semester 
hours of professional training in education in the senior college or otherwise 
secure such credits before entering the profession of teaching. 



Religion, Theology, Applied Theology 109 

Applied Theology 6 hours 

Required: Introduction to the Ministry 175, 176; 
Recommended: Personal Evangelism 73. 

Minor . 18 hours 

Psychology 8 hours 

Required: Education 21, 51, 61. 

English 1-2, Literature 51, 52 or 61, 62 10 hours 

Speech 8 hours 

Required: 5:6. 119-120. 

Fine Arts 60 or 6l required 6 hours 

Recommended: Music 63 and 24. 

Foreign Language 14 hours 

Required: Greek 31-32; 101, 102, 

Health . 3 hours 

Required: 7, 8, 53. 

Natural Science — Mathematics 12 hours 

(Six hours must be a science with laboratory) 

Social Science 16 hours 

Required: 1, 2; Recommended: 6, 82, 151, 152. 

Applied Arts 4 hours 

Recommended Secretarial Science 13. 

Electives — sufficient to make a four-year total of 128 
semester hours. 



Bachelor of Arts With a Major in Religion 

Only students with a double major, pre-medical students, women, 
or male students above 35 years of age at the time of their registration 
will be permitted to take a major in religion without meeting the other 
requirements of the theological curriculum. 



110 Southern Missionary College Bulletin 



Course Requirements 

Major (Religion and Bible) 30 hours 

Required: 5, 11, 12, 59, 60, 165, 166. 

Minor in Religion 18 hours 

(Applied Theology does not count) 

English 1, 2; Literature 51, 52 or 61, 62 . 10 hours 

Fine Arts 60 or 6l required 6 hours 

Foreign Language 6-14 hours 

Health 7, 8 - 1 hour 

Natural Science — Mathematics 12 hours 

Social Science 1, 2 12 hours 

Applied Arts , 4 hours 

Vocational 4 hours 

One of the following courses is required: 

Education 21; Health and Religion 53 2 hours 

Electives — sufficient to make a four-year total of 

128 semester hours 

Four-year Curriculum for Bible Instructor 

Students who desire to take a four-year course of studies in prepara- 
tion for the work of a Bible Instructor will be expected to meet the same 
admission requirements and scholastic performance as required of all 
candidates for the Bachelor of Arts degree. 

In general they will follow the above recommended sequence for 
the Major in Religion under the direction of the curriculum advisor. 
Students in this course will choose studies in the field of Home Eco- 
nomics, Music, and Applied Theology as their class load and ability 
indicates. 

BIBLE 

I, 2. Bible Survey Two semesters, 4 hours 

An introduction to the Scriptures, required of those who have not had 
Old or New Testament history in the secondary school. Exemption may be 
obtained by examination. Credit for this course does not apply on a major 
in religion. 

II, 12. Life and Teachings of Jesus Two semesters, 4 hours 

The inter-tcstamental background of the times of Jesus, as well as a 
chronological study of Jesus* life and teachings, as found in the four 
Gospels. Also included are the spiritual lessons from this study. 

51, 52. Survey of Bible Prophecy Two semesters, 4 hours 

Introductory study of the great lines of Bible prophecy with special em- 
phasis on the book Daniel and the Revelation. 



Religion, Theology, Applied Theology 111 



131, 132. Old Testament Prophets Two semesters, 6 hours 

A survey of the major and minor prophets of the Old Testament including 
a background of their lives and teaching, with the application of their 
messages for modern man, 

151, 152. Pauline Epistles Two semesters, 6 hours 

An exegetical study of the Pauline epistles in the order of their composition, 
including a background survey of the book of Acts. 

165. Daniel First semester, 2 hours 
Prerequisite: Social Science 1, 2 or 131, 132. 

A comprehensive study of the great prophecies of the book of Daniel and 
their lessons for our day, including a survey of its background and historical 
setting. Special attention is given to the defense of the book against 
modern critics. 

166. Revelation Second semester, 2 hours 
Prerequisite: Social Science 1, 2 or 131, 132. 

A study of the prophecies and symbolisms of this book with their historical 
fulfillments and their intimate relationships to the prophecies of the book 
of Daniel, 



RELIGION 

5. Prophetic Gift First or second semester, 2 hours 

A study of the Scriptural background of the Spirit of Prophecy in the Old 
and New Testament with special emphasis on its manifestation in the 
remnant church in harmony with prophetic predictions. Objections and 
problems connected with its manifestation will be given consideration. 

53. Health and Religion One semester, 2 hours 

A study of the origin, development, and principles of healthful living 
and its relation to the Christian life, both in diet and temperance, as set 
forth in the Spirit of Prophecy. Special emphasis is placed on denomina- 
tional health standards and their harmony with scientific research today. 

f59, 60. Fundamentals of Christian Faith Two semesters, 4 hours 

A study of the doctrines of the Christian Faith and their application to life. 

155. Christian Apologetics First semester, 2 hours 

A study of the defense of the Christian faith and Biblical doctrines of a 

polemical nature such as predestination, the problem of suffering, the 
nature of Christ, etc. 

f 160. Doctrine of the Atonement Second semester, 2 hours 

A study of the great underlying principles of the plan of salvation as illus- 
trated to Israel by the sanctuary service. 

fl74. Manuscripts of the Bible Second semester, 2 hours 

A study of the ancient sacred writings of Israel and their preservation and 
development into our present Bible, with emphasis on the discovery and 
classification of manuscripts and the various versions and revisions. 

184. Eschatology Second semester, 2 hours 

A study of the concepts in prophetic literature that pertain to the end of 
the world and the consummation of the Christian hope. 



fWill not apply for State Teacher Certification. 



112 Southern Missionary College Bulletin 



fl94. Problems in Religion Second semester, 2 hours 

Guided research in religious problems. Open only to religion majors with 
20 semester hours credit in religion. 

Religion Courses Offered on the Orlando Campus 

54. Ministry of Healing and World Religion Second semester, 2 hours 
A study of the principles of Christian living and the work of Christ as the 
Great Medical Missionary. A brief survey of the major religious beliefs 
of the world with emphasis on the responsibilities of the nurse in caring 
for patients with varying religions, 

93. Bible Doctrines and Personal Evangelism First semester, 2 hours 

Prerequisite: Personal Evangelism 91. 

A course in the fundamental doctrines of the Bible and the beliefs of 
Seventh-day Adventists, including the practice of giving Bible studies. 
For 1960-61 only. 

95. Bible Doctrines and Personal Evangelism First semester, 4 hours 

A course in the fundamental doctrines of the Bible and the beliefs of 
Seventh-day Adventists, including the study of the principles and methods 
for doing personal work in winning men to Christ, and the practice of 
giving Bible studies. 

APPLIED THEOLOGY 

73. Principles of Personal Evangelism Firs; semester, 2 hours 

A study of methods for doing personal work in winning men to Christ, 
including the preparation and art of giving Bible studies. Credit for this 
course can apply on a major or minor in religion for all students except 
theology students. 

119, 120. Homiletics and Pulpit Delivery Two semesters, 4 hours 

Training in the preparation and delivery of the various types of talks and 
addresses the Christian worker or preacher is called upon to give. 

174. EVANGELISTIC METHODS Second semester or summer, 2 hours 
A general consideration of the procedures involved in conducting various 
types ot evangelistic campaigns and revivals. 

175. Introduction to the Ministry First semester, 3 hours 
A study of the man who performs as a minister, including the call to the 
ministry, intellectual and spiritual qualification and ways in which he should 
be prepared in order to render successful service to the church, 

176. Introduction to the Ministry Second semester, 3 hours 
A study of the various duties and responsibilities of a minister and how 
to perform them. 

RELIGIOUS HISTORY 

6. History of the Seventh-day Adventist Church 

Second semester, 2 hours 
A survey of the rise and progress of the Seventh-day Adventist church. 
Factors such as the objectives, philosophy, and policies of the denomina- 
tion are examined. Does not apply on State Teachers' Certification. 



tWill not apply for State Certification. 



Religion, Theology, Applied Theology 113 

151. Ancient and Medieval Christianity First semester, 3 /hours 
Prerequisite: History l, or equivalent. 

A survey of movements, tendencies, doctrines, and personalities in the 
Christian church from Apostolic days to the modern era. 

152, Modern Christianity Second semester, 3 hours 
Prerequisite: History 2, or equivalent. 

A study of the reformatory movements in various countries and the de- 
velopment of the modern and current religious situation. 

Two-year Curriculum for Bible Instructor 

For admission requirements see page 44. 

This curriculum is intended to prepare young women for work as 
Bible instructors in connection with the evangelistic activities of the 
Seventh-day Adventist denomination. 

Religion 1, 2 (or 11, 12) 5, 59, 60 12 hours 

English 1-2 . - 6 hours 

Applied Theology 73 - 2 hours 

Natural Science .... , 6 hours 

Social Science 1 ? 2, 82 .... 8 hours 

Home Economics 1, 2 6 hours 

Speech 5:6 - 4 hours 

Health 7, 8, Health & Religion 53 3 hours 

Fine Arts 60 or 61 required 4 hours 

Education 51 3 hours 

Electives — .. 10 hours 



SOCIAL SCIENCES 



£. T. Watrous, Chairman; Jerome Clark, James Ackerman 

The objectives of the Division of Social Sciences are to aid in the 
application of divine ideals to all human relationships; to foster an ap- 
preciation of true social and political culture, locally, nationally, and 
internationally; to develop an intelligent understanding of the rela- 
tionship between history and Biblical prophecy; and to prepare teachers 
in the social sciences. 

The purpose of the social studies is to assist the student in under- 
standing the complexities of modern society and how the providence of 
God has influenced history. It is designed to enable him to prepare him- 
self and others for the service of mankind here and for the life hereafter. 



HISTORY 

Bachelor of Arts With a Major in History 
Course Requirements 

Major (History) , 30 hours 

Including: 1, 2, 53, 54, 184 

Minor 18 hours 

English 1-2 — . 6 hours 

Literature 51, 52 or 61, 62 - 4 hours 

Fine Arts 60 or 61 required 4 hours 

Foreign Language 6-14 hours 

Health 7, 8 - — . 1 hour 

Natural Sciences — Mathematics — ~ 12 hours 

Religion 12-16 hours 

Applied Arts 4 hours 

Electives — sufficient to make a four-year total of 128 

semester hours. 

Major: A major in history requires thirty hours. It shall include 
History 1, 2, 53, 54, and 184, and may include six hours of upper bi- 
ennium political science credit. History majors should choose one of the 
following fields for the minor: Economics, Secondary Education, 
Religion. 

114 



Social Sciences 115 

Minor: For a minor in history eighteen hours are required includ- 
ing History 1, 2, 53, 54. It should include three hours of upper bi- 
ennium political science credit. The remainder of the requirement 
should be in the fields of history and political science. 

1, 2. Survey of Civilization Two semesters, 6 hours 

An introductory consideration of the ancient classical and medieval con- 
tributions to our own civilization, and a consideration of modern and 
current developments. 

51, 52. Current Affairs Two semesters, 2 hours 

A course in current political developments of significance both domestic 
and international. Newspapers and current periodicals are used as materials. 
Prerequisite; History 1, 2 or 53, 54. 

53. 54. American History and Institutions Two semesters, 6 hours 

A study of the development of the character and civilization of the Ameri- 
can people, including their politics and social institutions, and reaching 
to the present time. 

*U1, 112. The Renaissance and the Reformation 

Two semesters, 4 hours 
Prerequisite: History 1, 2. 

An analysis of the revival of learning, of the social changes from medieval 
to modern conditions, and of the causes and courses of the Protestant 
Reformation which was followed by the Counter Reformation. 

* 131. History of Antiquity First semester, $ hours 

Prerequisite: History 1, or equivalent. 

A study of the ancient nations, chiefly Babylonia, Assyria, Egypt, Persia, 

and Israel. 

*132. History of the Classical World Second semester, 3 hours 

Prerequisite: History 1, or Equivalent, 

A consideration of Greek culture, of Alexander's Hellenistic empire, of 
Roman institutions, and of the impact of Christianity upon the ancient 
world. 

145, 146. History of Latin America Two semesters, 4 hours 

Prerequisite: History 53 and 54, or equivalent. 

A survey of the colonial period, and a careful analysis of the political, 
economic, social, religious, and cultural development of the Latin-American 
Republics, and their present relation to world affairs. 

* 148, History of the South Second semester, 3 hours 

A study of the Old South from the discovery through the war between 
the states, the reconstruction and the subsequent developments and recent 
changes, including the current scene. 

153. Early American Backgrounds Field school, 3 hours 

Prerequisite: History 53, 54. 

An on the ground study of the development of social, cultural, religious 
and political institutions covering significant places and events form Vir- 
ginia to New England. 



*Not offered 1960-'<$I 



116 Southern Missionary College Bulletin 



151, 152. English History Ttuo semesters, 4 hours 

Prerequisite: History 142. 

An analysis of the political, social, economic, religious and cultural de- 
velopment of Great Britian and its contributions to the world especially 
in constitutional and democratic institutions, 

161. Modern Europe 3 hours 

Historical developments in Europe since the rise of the new imperialism 
and the unification of Italy and Germany, with particular emphasis on the 
political, economic, and social implications for the second half of the 
20th century. 

183. Seminar in History First semester, 1 hour 

Open only to majors in history. Problems of historical research, materials, 
and methods. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 

115. American National and State Government First semester, 3 hours 
The establishment and operation of the Federal Constitution; the national 
and local judiciary; state, county, and local governments. 

116. American Diplomatic History Second semester, 3 hours 
Significant developments in American Diplomatic History from the Rev- 
olutionary Period to the present are examined with emphasis on trends 
since 1930. 

*162. Contemporary International Relations Second semester, 3 hours 
Prerequisite: History 1 and 2 or 53 and 54 or equivalent. 
A critical analysis of the chief factors influencing present-day world affairs, 
with special emphasis on the ideological and religious background of 
current conflicts. 

SOCIOLOGY 

20. Introduction to Sociology Either semester, 2 hours 

61. Cultural Patterns First semester, 2 hours 

A study of cultural development based on regional environment, the factors 
that create certain cultural patterns. The origin and nature of contemporary 
cultures. 

82. Marriage and the Family Either semester, 2 hours 

A course in the ethics of human relationships including the place of the 
family in society, a Christian approach to the problem of marriage and 
family life and the inter-relation of parents and children. 

156. Field of Social Work Second semester, 3 hours 

The historical background, methods, and functions of public and private 
programs in the field of social welfare. 

GEOGRAPHY 

142. World Geography Second semester, 3 hours 

Maps, land forms, soil, mineral resources, weather, and climate are con- 
sidered. Man's adjustment to various physiographic regions is studied. 

*Not offered 1960-'6l 



PRE-TECHNICAL CURRICULUMS 



Southern Missionary College offers pre-professional and pre- 
technical currieulums in a wide variety of fields. These open the way 
for students to enter professional schools of their choice for more 
specific training, or to enter upon a career as technicians. 

The College is prepared to cooperate with students desiring to enter 
fields not listed below, and will work out special sequences of courses 
needed to meet the entrance requirements to such institutions as may 
be chosen. 



PRE-MED1CAL 

Nearly all medical colleges now require a bachelor's degree of all 
candidates. Therefore students who later expect to enter a medical 
college should register as candidates for a Bachelor of Arts Degree, 
sejecting suitable majors and minors. 

Students planning to transfer to the College of Medical Evange- 
lists, Loma Linda, California, or any other medical college, should select 
entrance courses as outlined in the current bulletin issued by that college. 
Currently these essential courses include: 

Semester Hours 

Biology 45, 46; and 145 ... .. - 11 

English 1-2 6 

Foreign Language ... 6-14 

Chemistry 1-2; 63; 102; 113-114 20 

Mathematics 11:12 8 

History 53, 54 _ 6 

Physics 51-52 - 8 

Religion _. 12-16 

The quality of scholarship required for entrance demands that a 
grade-point average in natural sciences and other subjects, figured sep- 
arately, should be not less than 1.5 and a higher grade- point average is 
desirable. Actually the College of Medical Evangelists is not now 
accepting any candidates with less than a 1.7 grade-point average. 
Students who do not reach this grade-point average will not be re- 
commended. 



117 



118 Southern Missionary College Bulletin 

PRE-DENTAL 

Admission: See page 36. 

Class A dental colleges require a minimum of two years (sixty 
hours) of college work, including certain prescribed courses. Students 
planning to enter the Dental School of the College of Medical Evan- 
gelists, Loma Linda, California, should plan on three years of college 
work, to include the following courses: 

Semester Hours 

Biology 45, 46 and 145 11 

Chemistry 1-2; 113-114 16 hours 

English 1-2 _ 6 

Mathematics 11:12 8 

Physical Education 7, 8 - .... 1 

Physics 31-52 8 

Religion ._ 8 

PRE-LABORATORY TECHNICIAN 

Southern Missionary College prepares students for admission to the 
School of Laboratory Technique of the College of Medical Evangelists. 
Admission requirements to this pre-medical technology curriculum are 
the same as for curriculums leading to the Bachelor of Science Degree 
(See page 36). Three years of college, totaling 96 semester hours, are 
required as preparation for entrance to a school of medical techno log)'. 
The 96 hours must include: 

Semester Hours 

History 53 or 54 3 

American National and State Government 115 3 

Mathematics 11:12 8 

Physics 51-52 .. 8 

Biology 11, 12; 22; 45, 46 18 

Chemistry 1-2; 63; 102; 113-114; 171 23 hours 

Religion 1 2 

English 1-2 6 

Psychology 51 - 3 

Foreign Language (German, French, Spanish, 

or Greek) 8 

A student presenting two units of the same foreign language from the 
secondary school may be exempted from this requirement. 

Biology 104 may be substituted for Biology 11. 






Pre-Technical Cltrriculums 119 

Further information regarding the requirements of the School of 
Laboratory Technique, College of Medical Evangelists, Loma Linda, 
California, may be obtained from the bulletin of that school. Students 
who complete the above courses in college plus the one-year laboratory 
technician's curriculum in the School of Laboratory Technique at the 
College of Medical Evangelists will receive the Bachelor of Science 
Degree from that institution. 



PRE-X-RAY TECHNICIAN 

Admission: See page 36. 

Thirty semester hours are needed for admission to the College, of 
Medical Evangelists School of X-ray Technique. The following courses 
should be taken: 

Semester Hours 

Anatomy and Physiology 11, 12 6 

Chemistry 7-8 ... 6 

Mathematics 11:12 8 

General Physics 51-52 8 

Religion - 6 



PRE-OPTOMETRY 

Admission: See page 36. 

The optometry course usually consists of a five-year curriculum, 
the first two years of which may be taken in an accredited college. 
The following courses which should be included in the two years' 
work will fulfill the requirements in most colleges of optometry. The 
student, however, should check with the requirements of the school 
of his choice. 

Semester Hours 

Biology 45, 46 8 

Chemistry 1-2 _ 8 

English 1-2 6 

Mathematics 11:12; 99, 100 16 

Physical Education 7, 8 1 

Physics 51-52 8 

Psychology 5 1 3 

Religion . 6 



120 Southern Missionary College Bulletin 

PRE-PHARMACY 

One year of college work is required for admission to schools of 
pharmacy. Trie Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy may be obtained at the 
University of Tennessee and most other universities in three additional 
years after completing the following courses in Southern Missionary 
College. Only students having an average of C are admitted to schools 
of pharmacy. The following courses should be, included: 

Semester Hours 

Biology 1, 2 ... 6 

Chemistry 1-2 - ..... 8 

English 1-2 ... . 6 

Mathematics 11:12 8 

Physical Education 7, 8 1 

Religion 1, 2, or 11, 12 . 4 



PRE-PHYSICAL THERAPY 

The College of Medical Evangelists requires two years of college 
work for admission. The following courses should be Included in the 
curriculum. 

Semester Hours 

Religion .... 8 

History 53 or 54 3 

Political Science 115 -.- 3 

Psychology 51 and electives „ 6 

English 1-2 ...- - 6 

Speech 5:6 4 

Physical Education 7, 8 and elective ... 2 

tBioIogy 22, 45, 46 - _ 12 

Chemistry 7-8 (or 1-2) _ 6 

Electives from any field to make total of 62 sem. hrs. 



PRE-DENTAL HYGIENE 

Students planning to take the Pre-dental Hygiene Curriculum at 
the College of Medical Evangelists should take two years of college 
work (64 semester hours) and include the following: 

jOther Biology courses may be substituted but Human Anatomy and Phys- 
iology will not apply. General Zoology is recommended. 



Pre-Technical Curriculums 121 

Semester Hours 

Accounting 11 __.._ ..... 3 

Biology 2, 11, 12, 22 13 

Chemistry 1-2, 81 .... . ... 12 

English 1-2 ... ..... ... 6 

History 53, 54 6 

Nutrition 2 - 2 

Physical Education , - 2 

Psychology 51 .— — - - 3 

Secretarial Science 13 - - 2 

Sociology 20 - - -— 2 

Speech 5:6 - 4 

Religion 8 



PRE-ENGINEERING 

Although Southern Missionary College does not offer an engineer- 
ing degree, a two-year preparatory curriculum is offered, the completion 
of which enables students to transfer to an engineering school without 
loss of time. For the first two years all engineering students take approxi- 
mately the same natural sciences, mathematics, and core-curriculum 
courses. The following embodies the basic requirements. 

Semester Hours 

Chemistry 1-2 8 

English 1-2 __ ....- _ _ - 6 

Mathematics 11:12; 51; 99, 100 18 

Physical Education 7, 8 _ 1 

Physics 51-52; 53-54; 81 14 

Mechanical Drawing 4 

Religion _ 8 



PRE- LAW 

The program below has been fashioned to meet the requirements 
of the Law School of the University of Tennessee and others accredited 
by the National Association of American Law Schools. Students who 
complete 96 semester hours with a grade-point average of 1.0 or better 
may receive the Bachelor of Arts Degree from Southern Missionary 
College upon satisfactory completion of 32 semester hours in the law 
school provided: 



122 Southern Missionary College Bulletin 

1. That the last year of pre-professional work be taken in residence at 
Southern Missionary College. 

2. That application for this degree be made before entering the law 
school. 

3. That the student maintain up to the time of his graduation a pattern 
of living and conduct compatible with the aims and objectives of 
Southern Missionary College. 

4. That the student fulfills the requirements for a major and a minor. 

The courses as outlined below should be in the three-year curric- 
ulum necessary for entrance to a law school. 

Semester Hours 

English 1-2; 31, 32 or 41, 42 10 

Language - — - 6-14 

Religion 12 

Science 12 

Social Science 53, 54, 115 -~ 9 

Business Law 55, 56 - 4 

Psychology .. 3 

Speech 5:6 4 



in*; 








FINANCIAL INFORMATION 



EXPENSES 

Having met the full financial and labor requirements the student 
has actually covered only part of the full cost of his instruction and 
maintenance. The operating deficit is covered by gifts, subsidies, and 
funds from other sources. The educational opportunity afforded each 
student in Southern Missionary College represents a large investment 
in buildings and equipment, averaging more than two thousand dollars 
for each student enrolled. 



BASIC COSTS 

RENT IN RESIDENCE HALLS 

Residence Hall accommodations are rented for the school year and 
charged to the student in nine equal payments September through May. 
Should a student discontinue school before the end of the term his 
room charge shall end with the close of the month during which he 
leaves. The basic room charge is §21.00 per month per student. The 
rate for rooms with adjoining bath is $23.00 for each student. This 
charge is based on two students occupying a room. Where three 
students occupy one room, the monthly charge per student is reduced 
by $2.00. No refund is made because of absence from the campus 
either for regular vacation periods or for other reasons. 



MARRIED STUDENTS' HOUSING 

The College provides approximately thirty-five apartments for 
married students. These range in size from two rooms to four rooms and 
are unfurnished. Rents range from $26.00 per month to $45.00 per 
month. Prospective students are invited to write to the Assistant Busi- 
ness Manager for details. A reservation deposit of $10.00 is charged. 
This is refunded on the student's final statement of the school year 
pending satisfactory clearance of housing. 

123 



124 Southern Missionary College Bulletin 

There are fifty or more privately owned apartments in the College- 
dale community. These also are available to students. Information may 
be supplied by the Assistant Business Manager upon request. 

BOARD CHARGES 

The cafeteria plan of boarding is used, which allows the student 
the privilege of choosing his food and paying only for what he selects. 
The minimum monthly charge for dormitory students is $20.00 for 
women and $24.00 for men. This covers a full calendar month. Board 
charges for students vary greatly. The average monthly charge of the 
past school year was approximately $40.00 for men and $30.00 for 
women. However, individual charges varied from minimum to over 
$70.00 for men and from minimum to nearly $60.00 for women. 

No reduction of the minimum charge is made for absence from the 
campus except for specified vacations of one week or more, and in 
cases of emergency. Three meals a day are served. Students living in the 
residence halls are expected to take their meals in the dining room. 

ADVANCE PAYMENT 

An advance payment on or before the date of registration is re- 
quired of all students including veterans and those expecting colporteur 
or teaching scholarships. Included in this advance payment is a deposit 
which is refunded at the close of the school year or upon withdrawal 
from school. 

The amount of this advance payment is determined as follows: 

A. Those being charged housing, tuition, and board $175.00 

B. Those being charged any two of the three above 150.00 

C. Those being charged any one of the three above 125.00 

Students registering for music only are not required to pay any 

advance deposit or general fee, but there is a $2.00 registration fee 
for all such music students. However, a rental will be levied for use 
of piano or organ. 

The advance payment is distributed as follows: 

A. Student Association Fee $12.00 

B. Medical — including Blue Cross-Blue Shield and 

services of school physician and nurse as set 

forth in a separate pamphlet 20.00 

C. General Fee 50.00 

D. Balance to be refunded on the final statement of 

the school year. 



Financial Information 125 

BREAKAGE DEPOSIT 

Students registered in certain laboratory classes will be charged 
a $5.00 Breakage Deposit at the time they are assigned a laboratory 
locker and issued supplies and/or equipment. This amount, less any 
breakage, will be refunded to the student at the close of his course 
provided he cleans his locker and equipment in the manner prescribed 
by the laboratory department involved. 



STUDENT ASSOCIATION 

The Student Association of Southern Missionary College publishes 
the school paper, The Southern Accent, and the annual, The Southern 
Memories. The Student Association also has other financial obligations 
such as the payment of major offices, school projects, etc. To cover 
the costs of these various endeavors a fee of $12.00 per student per 
years is required. This fee is included in the advance payment and is 
not refundable. 

In the case of married students both attending school only one 
student association fee is charged per family. However, a charge will 
be made for the extra photo required for the annual. 

TUITION AND FEES— For 1960-1961 Fiscal Year 



Semester 


Tuition 


Tuition 


General 


Hours 


Per Sern. 


Per Year 


Fee 


1 


$ 22.00 


$ 44.00 


$ 5.00 


2 


44.00 


88.00 


10.00 


3 


66.00 


132.00 


15.00 


4 


88.00 


176.00 


35.00 


5 


110.00 


220.00 


35.00 


6 


13200 


264.00 


35.00 


7 


154.00 


308.00 


50.00 


8 


176.00 


352.00 


50.00 


9 


198.00 


396.00 


50.00 


10 


220.00 


440.00 


50.00 


11 


234.00 


468.00 


50.00 


12 


248.00 


496.00 


50.00 


13 


262.00 


524.00 


50.00 


14 


276.00 


552.00 


50.00 


15 


290.00 


580.00 


50.00 


16 


304.00 


608.00 


50.00 


17 


318.00 


636.00 


50.00 


18 


332.00 


664.00 


50.00 



126 



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Financial Information 127 

Tuition charges are made in four equal installments for each 
semester, monthly, beginning with the statement for October. 

It is assumed to be the earnest purpose of each student to secure an 
education, and since even those working their entire way have time for 
as much as one half of a full-class load, each residence hall student is 
urged to carry at least that much school work. Except by permission of 
the President's Council, the minimum course load a student may carry 
is eight hours. 

The College assumes no responsibility to provide work to students 
enrolled for less than eight semester hours of class load. 

The General Fee is included in the advance payment. It includes 
charges for lyceum programs, library fee, laboratory fees, charges for 
musical organizations, graduation expense, matriculation expense, and 
rentals on pianos, organs, musical instruments, and typewriters for those 
whose classes require the use of such. 

A 50 per cent refund on the General Fee will be credited to any 
student withdrawing on or before the completion of the first nine weeks. 
No refund will be granted thereafter. 

For those entering the second semester, the General Fee shall be 
70 per cent of the yearly charge. A 25 per cent refund will be given 
to those entering second semester but withdrawing during the first five 
weeks of the second semester. 

No separate charges are levied for laboratory, music organiza- 
tions, library, lyceum, or equipment rentals. 



MUSIC TUITION 

The charge for any private music instruction is $36.00 per semester, 
or $72.00 for the year, for a minimum of 15 lessons per semester. This 
charge is made in eight installments of $9.00 each, in the same manner 
as the regular tuition. In addition to private instruction in voice, classes 
of from two to five students are arranged at a cost per student of $22.00 
per semester. All persons who wish to take music must enroll for it at 
the Registrar's Office even if they are not taking it for credit or if music 
is all they are taking. There is a $2.00 registration fee for those who 
are taking music only. 

Students who enroll late, or who withdraw before the end of the 
semester are charged at the rate of $2,40 per week up to a maximum of 
$36.00 for one lesson a week. Withdrawal is made by means of a drop 



128 Southern Missionary College Bulletin 

voucher obtained at the Registrar's Office. There are no refunds for 
specified vacation periods or lessons missed because of the student's 
absence. 



ROOM DEPOSIT FOR SINGLE STUDENTS 

Single students not living with their parents or close relatives are 
required to reside in one of the College Residence Halls. A residence 
hall room may be reserved by mailing a $10,00 room deposit to the 
Secretary of Admissions at the college. This deposit will be refunded on 
the September statement of each student registered. 

This deposit is not refundable to students who do not register 
unless notice of nonattendance is received by the College on or before 
August 15 (approximately 3 weeks before registration). 



HOUSING DEPOSIT FOR MARRIED STUDENTS 

Married students accepted for the ensuing term should contact 
the Assistant Business Manager of the College should they desire to 
reserve housing from the college. Once housing accommodation is 
agreed upon, it can be reserved by mailing a $10.00 room deposit to 
the attention of the Assistant Business Manager. 

This deposit will appear to the credit of the student at the 
time of his departure provided the accommodation is left in good order. 

Since the deposit serves not only as a reservation fee but also as a 
guarantee that the accommodation will be left in good order, all students 
registered and living in college housing will be charged this deposit. 

In case the student's application is not accepted; or if notice of 
nonattendance is given the College three weeks before the opening of 
the term, the deposit will be refunded. 



LATE REGISTRATION 

For late registration — $5.00 

See page 33 for statement of the exact day and hour when each student is 
expected to present himself for testing and/or registration. 



MARRIED COUPLES AS STUDENTS 

For a married couple, enrolled for a total of eighteen hours or 
more of school work, the regular advance payment, general fee, and 
schedule of tuition charges shall apply to each. 



Financial Information 129 

When a married couple enrolls for a combined total of seventeen 
hours or less of school work, they shall be charged as one person 
in the areas mentioned above. 



ESTIMATE OF EXPENSES ON THE ORLANDO CAMPUS 
OF THE DIVISION OF NURSING 

The Division of Nursing offers part of its program on the College- 
dale campus and part on the Orlando campus at the Florida Sanitarium 
and Hospital. Charges for tuition and other expenses follow the same 
schedule as for any college work. The expenses on the Orlando campus 
which vary are: 

Blue Cross-Blue Shield: Our group coverage does not include the 
Florida campus. The charge included in the General Fee for the cover- 
age will be refunded to those registered on the Florida campus. 

Expenses on University of Florida Campus: Expenses during the 
one semester (junior year) on the University of Florida campus shall 
be n accordance with the University Catalog. These charges are paid 
in advance by SMC and prorated on the monthly student statements. 
The total charges while on the University campus are approximately 
equal to those on the Orlando campus. 

Uniforms and Cape: Approximately $56.00 will be needed for 
uniforms and $25.00 for cape if cape is desired. The uniform will be 
purchased the first semester of the sophomore year while the student is 
on the Collegedale campus. The cost will be required at the time 
the uniforms are ordered. 



LAUNDRY AND DRY CLEANING SERVICE 

The College operates a modern laundry and dry cleaning plant. 
Students are invited to patronize this service. Charges for service ren- 
dered will be entered on the student's account to be settled monthly. 
There is a minimum charge for dormitory students of $2.00 a month 
for women and $3.00 a month for men. 



TITHE AND CHURCH EXPENSE 

Southern Missionary College encourages the payment of tithe and 
church expense by its student workers. In order to facilitate this practice, 
arrangements may be made for each student to have charged to his 



130 Southern Missionary College Bulletin 

account 10 per cent of his school earnings for tithe and 2 per cent 
for church expense. These funds are then transferred by the College 
to the treasurer of the Collegedale Seventh-day Adventist Church. 



FUND FOR PERSONAL EXPENSES— PLEASE NOTE 

Students should be provided with sufficient funds, in addition to 
money for school expenses, to cover cost of books, clothing, and all 
personal items. They may open deposit accounts at the Business Office, 
subject to withdrawal in person only, and these funds are available at 
any time, as long as there is credit remaining of what the student has 
deposited. These deposit accounts are entirely separate from the regular 
student's expense accounts. 

Each student should bring $20.00 to $30,00 for books and supplies 
at the beginning of each semester. Books and supplies are sold at the 
College Store. 



PAYMENT OF ACCOUNTS 

Statements will be issued to students as of the last day of each 
calendar month, covering the month's expenses and credits. This billing 
is subject to discount when paid by the 20th of the following month. 
Should a student's account be unpaid by the 15th of the succeeding 
month, he is automatically dropped from class attendance until satis- 
factory arrangements are made. The College is unable to carry student 
accounts for any length of time. Arrangements should be made for 
some other plan of financing. 



EXAMPLE OF CREDIT POLICY 

Period covered by statement October 1-31 

Approximate date of billing _ November 5 

Discount period ends ...- ... November 20 

Class attendance severed if still unpaid December 15 

This schedule of payment must be maintained since the budget is 
based upon the 100 per cent collection of student charges within the 
thirty-day period following date of billing. 

Transcripts of credits and diplomas are issued only when students' 
accounts are paid in full. 



Financial Information 131 

STUDENT LABOR REGULATIONS 

Believing in the inspired words that "systematic labor should con- 
stitute a part of the education of youth, " J Southern Missionary College 
has made provision that every student enrolled may have the privilege 
of organizing his educational program on the "work-study" plan. 
"Jesus the carpenter, and Paul the tent-maker, . . . with the toil of the 
craftsman linked the highest ministry, human and divine." 2 The College 
not only provides a work-study program, but strongly recommends it 
to each student enrolled. 

The College will assign students to departments where work is 
available and cannot shift students from one department to another 
merely upon request. It should be understood that once a student is 
assigned to work in a given department, he will remain there for the 
entire school year except in rare cases where changes are recommended 
by the school nurse or are made at the discretion of the College. 

Should a student find it necessary to be absent from work, he must 
make prior arrangements with his work superintendent. In cases of 
illness, he will also inform the Health Service. 

In order to provide work opportunities to students, industries are 
operated by the College and its subsidiary corporations. These in- 
dustries must serve their customers daily, necessitating a uniform 
working force. To continue these industries in operation students as- 
signed thereto must continue their work schedules to the end of the 
term. (Preparation for tests should be a day-by-day matter.) Any 
student who drops his work schedule without making proper arrange- 
ments will be suspended from class attendance until proper arrange- 
ments are made. 

During the first two weeks of school, it is not always possible to 
get everyone into a work program, but by the end of September usually 
everyone has a job. This means that it may be necessary to work an 
extra hour a week to make up for the time lost in September. 



BIRTH CERTIFICATE 

All students who expect to work and are under twenty years of age 
must present a Birth Certificate upon registration. This certificate must 
be left on file in the Assistant Business Manager's office. No student will 

1. Ellen G. White, Fundamentals oj Christian Education, (Nashville, Ten- 
nessee: Southern Publishing Association, 1923), p. 44. 

2. Ibid. 



132 Southern Missionary College Bulletin 

be permitted to work until the Birth Certificate is on file at the College. 
This is imperative under the laws of the State of Tennessee, 



WORK PERMIT 

Whenever a student seventeen years of age or under is registered, 
the college issues a Tennessee Employment Certificate. This must be 
signed and on file at the College before a student may start work. 

SCHOLARSHIPS 

COLPORTEUR SCHOLARSHIP 

That students might have adequate work opportunities of a profit- 
able nature (both financially and spiritually) during the summer 
months, the College, together with the Southern Publishing Association 
and the several local conferences and Bible Houses throughout the 
Southern Union, have banded together to offer a bonus to students 
selling denominational books or magazines. 

Students may make arrangements with one of the several Bible 
Houses to sell books or magazines in a designated territory. 

The regular colporteur commission accrues to the student's credit 
plus a bonus to those students meeting certain basic requirements. 
This bonus is approximately 43 per cent of the regular commission. 
A complete explanation of the student colporteur program including 
bonus information is available in pamphlet form from any of the 
Book and Bible Houses. 



TUITION SCHOLARSHIP 

Each year the College, in conjunction with the several local con- 
ferences of the Southern Union Conference, awards eleven $50 cash 
scholarships to be applied on tuition; $25 at the end of the first 
semester and $25 at the end of the second. The following schools are 
eligible to participate in this plan: 

Asheville Agricultural School Madison College Academy 

Collegedale Academy (2) Little Creek Academy 

Forest Lake Academy (2) Pine Forest Academy 

Highland Academy Mt. Pisgah Academy 



Financial Information 133 

The candidates are chosen as follows: The faculty of each designated 
school nominates its candidate; the name, if approved by the school 
board, is recommended to the educational board of the local conference, 
for final approval. The selection of nominees is based on character, 
scholarship, personality, and promise of future leadership. 



SCHOLARSHIPS IN TEACHER EDUCATION 

In order to help young people of good moral character who possess 
talents and interest in the field of elementary school teaching, scholar- 
ships amounting to $200 each are available through the beneficience of 
the Southern Union and local conferences of Seventh-day Adventists. 
Southern Missionary College will provide opportunity for students on 
these scholarships to work $300 of their remaining school expenses. 
For further details write to the Educational Secretary of the local con- 
ference where you reside in the Southern Union. If you reside outside 
the Southern Union, write to the Union Secretary of Education, Box 849, 
Decatur, Georgia. 



SCHOLARSHIPS, GRANTS-IN-AIDS, AND AWARDS IN NURSING 

Student Loan Fund: A student loan fund has been established to 
aid a limited number of qualified students. Requests for the loan should 
be made to the Chairman of the Division of Nursing. 

Southern Union Grants -in -Aid: This fund provides $150 for the 
freshman year and $300 for the sophomore year. This amount will be 
advanced by the Southern Union Conference and will be paid directly 
to SMC. The student receiving this financial aid will agree to enter 
nursing service at the F. S. H. after graduation for one year. This one 
year of service at the regular rate paid graduate nurses will amortize 
the grant-in-aid. Students who are interested should consult with the 
Chairman of the Division of Nursing. 



MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIPS 

JAMES HICKMAN MEMORIAL FUND 

The amount of $100 is available each year to Freshman or Senior 
students of outstanding scholarship, social competence and character. 



134 Southern Missionary College Bulletin 

DOCTOR AMBROSE L SUHRIE 
ELEMENTARY TEACHERS SCHOLARSHIP 

The amount of at least $200 is available each year to worthy 

students in training in Elementary Education. 

WILLIAM ILES SCHOLARSHIP FUND 
This fund of $250 is applied in behalf of needy students of 
promise. 

LOAN FUNDS 

ALUMNI LOAN FUND 

A fund of approximately $1,000 a year maintained by the alumni 
of the college. Allocations are made to working students in the junior 
or senior year on the basis of proved need, character, leadership po- 
tential, good scholarship. Loans are limited to $100 to a student. 

EDUCATIONAL FUND 

Many young people are deprived of the privilege of attending 
college because of a lack of necessary means. To aid these, an earnest 
effort has been made to obtain donations for the establishment of an 
education fund, from which students worthy of help may borrow money 
for a reasonable length of time. Faithfulness in refunding these loans 
will make it possible for the same money to assist many students in 
school. There have been some gifts, and these have been used to help 
several young men and women complete their work in this college. But 
the needs of worthy students have been greater than the funds on hand; 
consequently it has been impossible in many instances to render the 
needed assistance. It has therefore been decided to direct the attention 
of patrons and friends of the school to these facts and to invite them 
to give such means as they may desire to devote to this purpose. The 
College will be glad to correspond with any who think favorably of this 
plan, and will continue to use the gifts so that the wishes of the donors 
may be fulfilled and the best results obtained. 

"In each conference a fund should be raised to lend to worthy poor 
students who desire to give themselves to the missionary work; and in 
some cases they should receive donations. When the Battle Creek Col- 
lege was first started, there was a fund placed in the Review and Herald 
office for the benefit of those who wished to obtain an education, but 
had not the means. This was used by several students until they could 
get a good start; then from their earnings they would replace what they 
had drawn, so that others might be benefited by the fund. The youth 
should have it plainly set before them that they must work their own 
way as far as possible and thus defray their expenses. That which 
costs little will be appreciated little. But that which costs a price some- 
where near its real value will be estimated accordingly." — Testimonies, 
Vol. VI, pages 213, 214. 



GENERAL INDEX 



A. G. Daniells Memorial Library .. 17 

Absentia, Graduation in 35 

Absences — 29 

Academic Regulations .— - 27 

Accounting, Courses in 49 

Accounts, Payment of 130 

Accreditation 18 

Administrative Staff .— - 7 

Admission — 25 

Advanced Standing 25 

Aims of the School .. ... 15 

Alumni Association — .. 23 

Application Procedure — 25 

Applied Arts, Division of 41 

Art, Courses in .— 81 

Athletics .. . 78 

Attendance Regulations _ 29 

Auditing Courses — 29 

Automobiles .„ - - 20 

Baccalaureate Degree 

Requirements 36 

Bachelor of Arts — .. 36 

Biology 89 

Business Admin, and Economics 48 

Chemistry -.. 92 

Communications 60 

Engl ish - - 58 

History - 114 

Mathematics 96 

Music - 82 

Physics - 98 

Religion - 107 

Spanish - 64 

Theology 107 

Bachelor of Music - - 33 

Education — - - - 82 

Performance — . — - 83 

Bachelor of Science 33 

Accounting 48 

Business Administration mmmm ._ 48 

Chemistry ... . 93 

Foods and Nutrition .. 42 

Home Economics — - — 41 

Medical Secretarial Science 53 

Natural Sciences 97 

Nursing .. 103 

Physics ..- 99 

Secretarial Science 52 

Teacher Education 66 

Basic Courses, Requirement 36 

Bible, Courses in 110 

Bible Instructor, Two-year 

Curriculum 113 



Biblical Languages 63 

Biology, Courses in 90 

Board of Directors 6 

Executive Committee 6 

Buildings and Equipment 17 

Business Administration, 

Division of ~ 48 

Business, Courses in 51 

Calendar _ _. 4 

Calendar of Events 5 

Campus Organizations 22 

Candidacy for Graduation 35 

Certification of SMC 18 

Certification, Teacher 68 

Changes in Registration 27 

Chapel Attendance 30 

Chemistry, Courses in 94 

Class Appointments, Attendance.... 29 

Class Load 28 

Class Standing 32 

Classification of Students 26 

Clerical Training, Course in 57 

College Directory 6 

Collegedale Academy 18 

Collegedale Clinic 22 

Collegedale Industries, Inc. 18 

Collegedale Tabernacle-Auditorium 18 

Colporteur Scholarships ... 132 

Communications, Division of .... 58 

Conduct, Moral .. 19 

Core Curriculum 36 

Correspondence Work _ 29 

Counselling 25 

Course Numbers 28 

Course Requirements, Basic 36 

Courses of Instruction 41-116 

Credit Policy 130 

Currioulums, Degree 33 

Curriculums, Pre-Professional 

and Pre-Technlcal 117 

Curriculums, Two-Year 34 

Dean's List 31 

Degree Requirements, Basic 36 

Degrees Offered 33 

See Bachelor of Arts 
Bachelor of Music 
Bachelor of Science 
Basic Core Requirements 
Major and Minor Requirements 

Directors, Board of 6 

Division of Instruction 41-122 

Drop Vouchers 27 



135 



Earl F. Hackman Hall ...„„...„..„ 17 

Economics, Courses in 51 

Education, Courses in _ 74 

Education, Psychology, Health 

Division of 66 

Elementary Education 61 

Elementary School 18 

Employment Service 23 

English. Courses in 59 

Entrance Requirements 36 

Examinations 

Admission by - 25 

Entrance — 25 

Exemption by 32 

Special 32 

Expenses, See Financial 

Information 123 

Extracurricular Activities 24 

Faculty 9 

Committees 13 

Fees, See Financial Information 

Financial Information 123 

Financial Plans 126 

Aids 

Colporteur Scholarships 1 32 

Loans, Educational Fund 134 

Teacher Scholarships 134 

Tuition Scholarships 132 

Credit Policy 130 

Employment Opportunities .... 23 

Expenses 135 

Advance Payment 124 

Board 124 

Housing 12R 

Late Registration 128 

Laundry and Dry Cleaning .... 129 

Music Tuition 127 

Room or Housing Deposit .... 128 

Tuition and Fees .. 126 

Payment of Accounts 130 

Personal Expenses 130 

Student Association Fee 125 

Summary Chart 126 

Tithe and Church Expense 129 

Fine Arts, Division of 81 

Food and Nutrition, Courses in .... 43 

Foreign Languages, Courses in .... 64 

Freshman Standing 26 

G. E. D. Tests 26 

General Business, Courses in ... 51 

General Index 135 

General Requirements for 

Graduation 34 

Geography, Courses in 116 

German, Courses in 64 

Grade Points 28 

Grades and Reports 31 

Graduate Record Examinations .... 34 



Graduation in Absentia 35 

Graduation Standards 33 

Grants-in-Aid 23, 132 

Graphic Arts, Courses in 46 

Greek, Courses in 63 

Guidance and Counselling 21 

Harold A. Miller Fine 

Arts Building 17 

Health, Courses in 77 

Health Service 22 

Hebrew, Courses in 63 

History of the College 16 

History, Courses in 115 

Home Economics, Courses in 44 

Home Economics, Currieulums ........41 

Home Economics, 

Two- Year Curriculum 43 

Home Management- Chi Id Care 

Courses 44 

Honors, Graduation with 35 

Housing, Married Students 123 

Incompletes . 31 

Industrial Education, Courses in..- 46 

Industrial Buildings ... 18 

Industrial Superintendents 7 

Instruction, Division of 40 

John H. Talge Residence Hall .... 21 

Journalism 61 

Junior Standing 33 

Labor Regulations 131 

Birth Certificate 131 

Work Permit 132 

Labor-Class Load 126 

Late Registration - 27 

Law, Sequence in 131 

Leave o^ Absence 20 

Library Science, Courses in 65 

Loans 134 

Location of the College 16 

Lyceum 24 

Lynn Wood Hall 17 

Major Requirements — See 

Bachelors Degrees 

Major and Minor Requirements .... 37 

Marriages 20 

Mathematics, Courses in 96 

Maude Jones Residence Hall .... 17 

Medical Secretary 53 

Medical Service 22 

Memberships 19 

Minors 

Biblical Languages 63 

Biology 89 



136 



Business Administration 48 

Chemistry . 92 

Communications ... 60 

Education . 38 

English 58 

Foods and Nutrition 43 

German 64 

History . _ 115 

Home Economics 41 

Mathematics 96 

Medical Secretarial Science 53 

Music 82 

Physical Education 38 

Physics - ... 98 

Psychology 38 

Religion 103 

Secretarial Science 52 

Spanish 64 

Speech .. 38 

Moral Conduct 19 

Motor Vehicles 20 

Music 82 

Courses in 84 

Curriculums 82 

Organizations 88 

Tuition - 127 

Natural Science ajnd Mathematics 
Division o c 89 

Nursing 102 

Courses in 104 

Curriculum 103 

Scholarships 133 

Objectives of the College 15 

One- Year Clerical Training 57 

Physical Education, Courses in — . 77 

Physics, Courses in 100 

Placement 21 

Political Science, Courses in 116 

Pre- Professional and 

Pre-Technical Curriculums .... 117 

Pre-Dental 118 

Pre-Dental Hygiene 120 

Pre-Engineering 121 

Pre- Laboratory Technician 118 

Pre-Law 121 

Pre-Medical 117 

Pre-Optometry 119 

Pre-Pharmacy 120 

Pre-Physical Therapy 120 

Pre-X-Ray Technician 119 

Preparatory School 18 

Printing, Courses in 46 

Probationary Status 28 

Psychology, Courses in 76 

Publications 22 



Regulations, Academic 27 

Religion and Applied Theology.... 103 

Religion, Courses in 110 

Religious Organizations 22 

Requirements, Basic Course ........ 36 

Residence Halls 17 

Residence Regulations 35 

Russian, Course in 65 

Scholarship , „ 28 

Scholarship Reports 32 

Scholarships 132, 133 

Secondary Education 67 

Secretarial Science, Courses in .... 54 
Secretarial Science, Curriculum 52, 53 

Senior Standing 27 

Social Sciences, Division of 114 

Sociology, Courses in 116 

Sophomore Standing 26 

Spanish. Courses in 64 

Special Examinations 32 

Special Student 27 

Speech, Courses in 62 

Standards of Conduct 19 

Student Housing Projects 123 

Student Life and Services 21 

Student Organizations 21 

Study and Work Load 126 

Subject Requirements 

for Admission 36 

Summer Session 5, 19 

Table of Contents 3 

Tardiness 30 

Teacher Certification 68 

Teacher Education 66 

Terms, School 19 

Testing and Counselling Service .. 21 

Textiles-Clothing Courses 45 

Theology, Courses in 112 

Applied 112 

Curriculum 108 

Tithe and Church Expense 129 

Transcript 25 

Transfer of Credit 26 

Transfer Students 26 

Tuition and Fees 125 

Two- Year Curriculums, Sequence for 

Bible Instructor 113 

Home Economics 43 

Medical Secretary 53 

Unaccredited Schools 25 

Upper Biennium, Admission of 

Sophomores to 26 

Veterans, Admission on 
G.E.D. Test 



26 

Regional Field Representatives .... 6 Withdrawals 27 

Registration 27 Work-Study Schedule 126 



137 






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