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Full text of "Southern Missionary College Catalog 1962-63"

SOITIIEO 




I9SM3 



Southern Missionary College 



ANNUAL BULLETIN 



Volume XII May, 1962 Number 1 




ANNOUNCEMENTS 1962-1963 

SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGE 

COLLEGEDALE, TENNESSEE 



McKEE LIBRARY 
Southern Missionary College 
CoJtegedaie, Tennessee 37315 



CORRESPONDENCE 

Inquiries should be directed as follows: 
General Administrative Matters, to the President 

Admissions, to the Admissions Office 

Financial Matters, Student Employment, Student Housing, Student 
Accounts, to the Director of Student Finance 

Scholastic Matters and Summer School, to the Academic Dean 

Transcripts and Academic Records, to the Office of Admissions and 
Records 

Problems of Residence Halls, Room Furnishings, Suitable Wearing 
Apparel and Campus Conduct: 
Of Men Students, to the Dean of Men 
Of Women Students, to the Dean of Women 

Public Relations, Student Activities, Promotion, Counseling, to the 
Dean of Student Avoirs 



TELEPHONE NUMBERS OF ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICES 

Academy Principal EX 6-3181 

Admissions Office EX 6-3237 

Director of Student Finance EX 6-2111 

Business Manager EX 6-2111 

Academic Dean EX 6-2271 

Dean of Men EX6-3141 

Dean of Student Affairs EX 6-2332 

Dean of Women EX 6-3271 

Men's Residence _ EX 6-3131 

President EX 6-2261 

Office of Records - _ EX 6-3161 

Treasurer EX 6-2111 

Women's Residence _ EX 6-2992 



Volume XII "S.JMC" Second Quarter, 1962 No. 1 

Published quarterly by Southern Missionary College, College- 
dale, Tennessee. Entered as second class matter February 12, 1951, 
at Collegedale, Tennessee, under act of Congress August 24, 1912. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Page 

Calendar 4 

Calendar of Events 5 

Board of Trustees 6 

Administration . 7 

Faculty .._ 9 

Committees of the Faculty ..... 14 

General Information _. 15 

Student Life and Services , 21 

AcADEMrc Information 25 

Graduation Standards ._ 33 

Divisions of Instruction 39 

Financial Information 122 

Index _ 135 



1962 



JANUARY 


APRIL 


JULY 


OCTOBER 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


1 2 3 4 5 6 


12 3 4 5 6 7 


12 3 4 5 6 7 


12 3 4 5 6 


7 8 9 10 1 1 12 13 


8 9 10 1112 13 14 


8 9I0III2I3I4 


7 8 9 10 1112 13 


14 15 16 17 18 19 20 


15 16 17 18 19 20 21 


15 16 17 18 19 20 21 


14 15 16 17 18 19 20 


21 22 23 24 25 26 27 


22 23 24 25 26 27 28 


22 23 24 25 26 27 28 


21 22 23 24 25 26 27 


28 29 30 31 


29 30 


29 30 31 


28 29 30 31 


FEBRUARY 


MAY 


AUGUST 


NOVEMBER 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


1 2 3 


12 3 4 5 


12 3 4 


1 2 3 


4 5 6 7 8 9 10 


6 7 8 9 10 II 12 


5 6 7 8 9 10 1 1 


4 5 6 7 8 9 10 


II 12 13 14 15 16 17 


13 14 15 16 17 18 19 


12 13 14 15 16 17 18 


II 12 13 14 15 16 17 


18 19 20 21 22 23 24 


20 21 22 23 24 25 26 


19 20 21 22 23 24 25 


18 192021 22 23 24 


25 26 27 28 


27 28 29 30 3 1 


26 27 28 29 30 31 


25 26 27 28 29 30 


MARCH 


JUNE 


SEPTEMBER 


DECEMBER 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


1 2 3 
4 5 6 7 8 9 10 


I 2 

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 


2 3 4 5 6 7 8 


I 
2 3 4 5 6 7 8 


II 12 13 14 15 16 17 


10 1 1 12 13 14 15 16 


9 10 II 12 13 14 15 


9 10 II 12 13 14 15 


18 19 2021 22 23 24 


17 18 1920 21 22 23 


16 17 18 19 20 21 22 


16 17 18 19 2021 22 


25 26 27 28 29 30 31 


24 25 26 27 28 29 30 


23 24 25 26 27 28 29 


23 24 25 26 27 28 29 






30 


30 31 



1963 



JANUARY 


APRIL 


JULY 


OCTOBER 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


12 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 10 II 12 

13 14 15 16 17 18 19 

20 21 22 23 24 25 26 

27 28 29 30 31 


12 3 4 5 6 

7 8 9 10 1 1 12 13 

14 15 16 17 18 19 20 

21 22 23 24 25 26 27 

28 29 30 


12 3 4 5 6 

7 8 9 1 1 I 1 2 1 3 

14 15 16 17 18 19 20 

21 22 23 24 25 26 27 

28 29 30 31 


12 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 10 1 1 12 

13 14 15 16 17 18 19 

20 21 22 23 24 25 26 

27 28 29 30 31 


FEBRUARY 


MAY 


AUGUST 


NOVEMBER 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


1 2 

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 

10 II 12 13 14 15 16 

17 18 19 2021 22 23 

24 25 26 27 28 


12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 1 1 

12 13 14 15 16 17 18 

19 20 21 22 23 24 25 

26 27 28 29 30 31 


1 2 3 

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 

II 12 13 14 15 16 17 

18 19 20 21 22 23 24 

25 26 27 28 29 30 31 


1 2 

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 

10 II 12 13 14 15 16 

17 18 19 20 21 22 23 

24 25 26 27 28 29 30 


MARCH 


JUNE 


SEPTEMBER 


DECEMBER 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


1 2 
3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
10 1 1 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 
31 


1 

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 

9 10 1 1 12 13 14 15 

16 17 18 1920 21 22 

23 24 25 26 27 28 29 

30 


12 3 4 5 6 7 

8 9 10 1 1 12 13 14 

15 16 17 18 19 20 21 

22 23 24 25 26 27 28 

29 30 


1 2 3 4 5 6 7 

8 9 10 11 12 13 14 

15 16 17 18 19 2021 

22 23 24 25 26 27 28 

29 30 3 1 



*££c? CALENDAR OF EVENTS 

SUMMER SESSION, 1962 

Registration 7:30-12:00 June 11 

Final Examinations August 3 

Graduation : ._ . ... August 4 



FIRST SEMESTER, 1962-63 

Registration and Orientation September 10-12 

Classes Begin September 13 

Alumni Homecoming October 12, 13 

Missions Promotion October 16 

Religious Emphasis Week October 26-November 3 

Mid-term Examinations November 7-9 

Thanksgiving Vacation November- 20 (noon) -25 

Christmas Vacation December 19 (noon) -January 2 

First semester Examinations .. January 21-24 



SECOND SEMESTER, 1962-63 

Registration . January 27 

Classes Begin January 28 

Senior Class Presentation — February 22 

Religious Emphasis Week . . March 8-16 

Mid-term Examinations March 25-27 (noon) 

Spring Vacation March 27 (noon)-April 1 

College Days April 14-16 

Semester Examinations May 27-30 

Graduation May 31 -June 2 



COLLEGE DIRECTORY 



BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

Don R Rees, Chairman ... _ Decatur, Georgia 

C. N. Rees, Secretary Collegedale, Tennessee 

Vernon W. Becker ... Decatur, Georgia 

K. C. Beem Decatur, Georgia 

O. A. Blakb Washington, D. C. 

Desmond Cummings Decatur, Georgia 

E. E. Cossentine Washington, D. C. 

Charles Fleming, Jr Collegedale, Tennessee 

L. J. Leiske — . Meridian, Mississippi 

H. Lester Plymouth, Florida 

E. L. Marlby Nashville, Tennessee 

A. C. McKee Atlanta, Georgia 

Garland Millet Huntsville, Alabama 

M. C. Patten Greenville, South Carolina 

H. V. Reed Charlotte, North Carolina 

H. H. Schmidt Orlando, Florida 

B. F. Summerour Norcross, Georgia 

Don W. Welch .. _ ... Orlando, Florida 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE OF THE BOARD 

Don R. Rees, Chairman C N. Rees, Secretary 

Vernon W. Becker Charles Fleming 

K. C Beem A. C. McKee 

WlLBERT SCHNBIDER 



REGIONAL FIELD REPRESENTATIVES 

Representative-at-large: Vernon W. Beckbr Decatur, Georgia 

For Alabama-Mississippi: William E. Peeke Meridian, Mississippi 

For Florida: Ward A. Scriven Orlando, Florida 

For Georgia-Cumberland: M. E. Erickson Atlanta, Georgia 

For Carolina: George V. Yost Charlotte, North Carolina 

For Kentucky-Tennessee: F. W. Foster Nashville, Tennessee 



OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 

C. N. Rees, Ph.D President 

WilberT M. Schneider, Ph.D Academic Dean 

Wm, H. Taylor, M,A Dean of Student Affairs 

Charles Fleming, Jr., M.B.A Business Manager 

Cyril F. W. Futcher, M.Ed Director of Admissions and Records 

Kenneth Davis, M.A Dean of Men 

Alfreda Costerjsan, M.S Dean of Women 

S. D. Brown, M.A Librarian 



ASSISTANTS IN ADMINISTRATION 

Marian Kuhlman, R.N Director of Health Service 

Robert Merchant, M.B.A Treasurer 

John Schmidt, Jr Director of Food Service 

T. C. Swinyar, M.D College Physician 

(^Roy Thurmon Student ChapJain 

Hazel Thurston Associate Dean of Women, Orlando Campus 

Elizabeth Van Arsdale, B.S Associate Dean of Women 

D. L. West, B.A Director of Student Finance 

Larry Williams Assistant Dean of Men 

Geraldine Foote Assistant Director of Food Service 

Marion Linderman, M.S.L.S. Assistant Librarian 

Marion S. Simmons, M.A Student Educational Consultant 

Myrtle Watrous, B.S. in L.S Assistant Librarian 



AUXILIARY AND VOCATIONAL SERVICES 



Albert J. Wilt Buildings and Grounds 

Charles Carr Custodian 



W. E. Cushman Bindery 

Frank Fogg College Broom Factory 

H. F. Meyer College Press 

Grover Edgmon _ Collegedale Laundry 

John Goodbrad Distributors 

B.J. Hagan College Garage 

Bruce Ringer College Mercantile 

H. A. Woodward College Store 



William J. Hulsey College Cabinets 

O. D. McKee ___. McKee Baking Company 



FACULTY 
INSTRUCTIONAL STAFF 



EMERITI 

Hira T. Curtis, B.S., Professor Emeritus of Business Administration 
B.S., Union College, 1899. 

Mary Holder Dietel, M.A., Associate Professor Emeritus of Modem Languages 
B.A., Washington Missionary College, 1919; M.A., University of Maryland, 
1933; Certificate from L' Alliance Francaise, Paris, 1936. 

Harold A. Miller, M.Music, Professor Emeritus of Music 

B. Music, Otterbein College, 1937; M. Music, Eastman School of Music, 
University of Rochester, 1941. 

PROFESSORS 

Clyde G. Bushnell, Ph.D., Professor of Modern Languages 

B.A., Union College, 1933; M.A., University of Mexico, 1948; Ph.D., 
University of Texas, 1958. 

John Christensen, Ph.D., Professor of Chemistry 

B.A., Union College, 1939; M.A., University of Nebraska, 1946; Ph.D., 
Michigan State University, 1956. 

Otto H. Christensen, Ph.D., Professor of Religion and Biblical Languages 
B.A., Union College, 1938; M.A., S.D.A. Theological Seminary, 1945; 
Ph.D., University of Chicago, 1951. 

Ray Hefferlin, Ph.D., Professor of Physics 

B.A., Pacific Union College, 1951; Ph.D., California Institute of Tech- 
nology, 1955. 

K. M. Kennedy, Ed,D., Professor of Education 

B.A., Valparaiso University, 1946; M.Ed., University of Chattanooga, 1952; 
EdX>., University of Tennessee, 1955. 

HULDRrCH H. Kuhlman, Ph.D., Professor of Biology 

B.A., Emmanuel Missionary College, 1940; M.A., George Peabody College 
for Teachers, 1945; Ph.D., University of Tennessee, 1961. 

C. N. Rees, Ph.D. Professor of Education 

B.A., Union College, 1931; M.A., University of Nebraska, 1937; Ph.D., 
University of Nebraska, 1947. 

Wilbert M. Schneider, Ph.D., Professor of Business Administration 

B.A., Union College, 1940; M.B.A., University of Oklahoma, 1944; Ph.D., 
University of Southern California, 1951. 

Harriet Smith, Ed.D., Professor of Nursing 

B.S., Pacific Union College, 1941; M.A., Teachers' College, Columbia 
University, 1947; Ed.D., University of Southern California, 1959- 

Morris Taylor, D. Mus.A., Professor of Music 

B.A., Atlantic Union College, 1951; M. Mus., Boston University, 1953; 
D.Mus.A., Boston University, 1959. 

Everett T. Watrous, Ed.D., Professor of History 

B.A., Atlantic Union College, 1934; MA.., University of Chicago, 1941; 
Ed.D., University of Tennessee, 1956. 



FACULTY 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS 

Dorothy Evans Ackerman, M. Music, Associate Professor of Music 

B.A., Atlantic Union College, 1940; M.Music, University of Chattanooga, 
19^7. 

J. M. Ackerman, Ed.S., Associate Professor of Education 

B.S., Union College, 1949; M.A., University of Nebraska, 1950; Ed.S., 
George Peabody College for Teachers, 1957. 

Theresa Rose Brickman, M. Com'l Ed., Associate Professor of Secretarial 
Science 
B.A., Union College, 1928; M. Com'l Ed,, University of Oklahoma, 1942. 

Clarence Chinn, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Chemistry 

B.A., Walla Walla College, 1951; M.S., Oregon State College, 1953; 
Ph.D., Oregon State College, 1956. 

Dorothy K, ChriSTensen, M.S., Associate Professor of Home Economics 

B.A., Emmanuel Missionary College, 1955; M.S., University of Tennessee, 
1957. 

Jerome Clark, Ph.D., Associate Professor of History 

B.Th., Atlantic Union College, 1948; M.Ed,, University of Maryland, 1951; 
M.A., S.D.A., Theological Seminary, 195 3; Ph.D., University of Southern 
California, 1959- 

Olivia Brickman Dean, M.Ed., Associate Professor of Education 

B.A., Union College, 1934; M.Ed., University of Oklahoma, 1943. 

Catherine Glatho, M.S., Associate Professor of Nursing 

B.S., College of Medical Evangelists, 1955; M.S., College of Medical 
Evangelists, I960. 

George T. Gott, M.A., Associate Professor of Economics 

B.A., Emmanuel Missionary College, 1944; M.A., University of Nebraska, 
1951. 

Gordon M. Hyde, M.S., Associate Professor of Speech 

B.A., Emmanuel Missionary College, 1942; M.S., University of Wisconsin, 
1957. 

Evlyn Lindberg, M.A., Associate Professor of English 

B.A., Williamette University, 1932; M.A., Texas Christian University, 1952. 

Gordon Madgwick, M.A., Associate Professor of English 

B.A., Washington Missionary College, 1954; M.A., S.D.A. Theological 
Seminary, 1955; M.Ed., University of Maryland, 1958. 

Charles E. Read, M.S., Associate Professor of Secretarial Science 
B.S,, Union College, 1950; M.S., Indiana University, 1952. 

Clifford A. Reeves, B.D., Associate Professor of Religion 

B.Th., Canadian Union College, 1951; M.A,, S.D.A. Theological Seminary, 
1956; B.D., Potomac University — Seminary, 1957. 

Olive Westphal, M.A., Associate Professor of Spanish 

B.A., Pacific Union College, 1929; M.A., University of Southern California, 

1940. 

William H. Taylor, M.A., Associate Professor of Journalism 

B.A., Union College, 1944; M.A., University of Nebraska, 1948. 

10 



FACULTY 

Wayne E. VandeVere, M.B.A., Associate Professor of Business Administration 
B.A., Emmanuel Missionary College, 1954; M.B.A., University of Michigan. 
1956. 

J. Mabel Wood, M.A., Associate Professor of Mush 

B.A., Union College, 1948; M.A., University of Nebraska, 1952, 



ASSISTANT PROFESSORS 

Douglas Bennett, B.A., Assistant Professor of Religion 
B.A., Southern Missionary College, 1951. 

Florence M. Culpan, M.A., Assistant Professor of Nursing 

B. S,, Florida State University, 1958; M.A., Teachers College, Columbia 
University, 1959. 

Kenneth Davis, M.A., Assistant Professor of Religion 

B.A., Emmanuel Missionary College, 1944; M.A., Seventh-day Adventist 
Theological Seminary, 1953. 

Cyril Dean, M.Ed., Assistant Professor of Physical Education 

B.S., Pacific Union College, 1949; M.Ed., University of Maryland, 1950. 

R. E. Francts, M.A., Assistant Professor of Religion 

B.A., Washington Missionary College, 1945; M.A., Andrews University, 
1960. 

Gladys L. Garland, M.P.H., Assistant Professor of Nursing 

B.S., George Peabody College, 1946; M.P.H., University of North Caro- 
lina, 1957. 

Edgar O. GrundsET, M.A,, Assistant Professor of Biology 

B.A., Emmanuel Missionary College, 1947; M.A., Walla Walla College, 
1959. 

Lyle Hamel, M.Mus., Assistant Professor of Music 

B.S., Emmanuel Missionary College, 1949; M.Mus., Vander Cook College 
of Music, 1954. 

Thelma Hem me, M.A,, Assistant Professor of Home Economics 

B.A., Pacific Union College, 1944; M.A., Pacific Union College, 1958. 

Raymond Kuutti, M. Mus.A., Assistant Professor of Musk 

B,S., Minnesota University, 1950; M. Mus.A., Boston University, 1959. 

Elaine Myers-Taylor, M.A., Assistant Professor of Music 

B.A., Walla Walla College, 1946; M.A., Columbia University, 1953. 

Myrtle B. Watrous, B.S. in L.S., Assistant Professor of Library Science 

B.A., Washington Missionary College, 1924; B.S. in L.S., University of 
North Carolina, 1952. 

A. L, Watt, M.A., Assistant Professor of Physics 

B.A., Union College, 1929; M.A., University of Nebraska, 1954. 



INSTRUCTORS 

Barbara Beavers, B.S., Instructor in Nursing 
B.S., Southern Missionary College, I960. 

Del W. Case, B.A., Instructor in Music 
B.A., La Sierra College, I960. 



11 



FACULTY 

Don Crook, B.A., Instructor in Music 

B.A., Southern Missionary College, 1953. 

Eileen Drouault, B.A., Instructor in Modern Languages 
B.A., Washington Missionary College, 1937. 

Helen Emori, B.S., Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., College of Medical Evangelists, 1959. 

ZERrrA Hagerman, B.S., Instructor in Nursing 
B.S., Union College, 1958. 

Mary Waldren, B.S., Instructor in Nursing 
B.S., Union College, 1961. 

Norma Kellams, B.S., Instructor in Secretarial Science 
B.S., Emmanuel Missionary College, 1956. 

Miriam Kerr, M.A., Instructor in Nursing 

B.A., Atlantic Union College, 1936; M.A,, George Peabody College for 
Teachers, 1959- 

Marian Kuhlman, R.N., Instructor in Health Education 
R.N., Florida Sanitarium and Hospital, 1939. 

Ann Parrish, M.A., Instructor in English 

B.A., Atlantic Union College, 1958; M.A., University of Arkansas, 1959. 

Herman C. Ray, B.A., Instructor in Religion 
B.A., Southern Missionary College, 1951. 

Merle Silloway, M.A., Instructor in Library Science 

B.A., Washington Missionary College, 1920; M.A., Columbia University, 
1928. 

Drew Turlington, B.S., Instructor in Industrial Arts 

B.S., Southern Missionary College, 1951. 

Nellie Jo Williams, B.S., Instructor in Art 
B.S., University of Michigan, I960. 

Duane Zimmerman, M.S., Instructor in Mathematics 

B.A., Emmanuel Missionary College, 1957; M.S., University of Minnesota, 
1960. 

Grenith Zimmerman, M.S., Instructor in Mathematics 

B.A., Emmanuel Missionary College, 1958; M.S., University of Minnesota, 
1961. 



LECTURERS 

Ruby JOHNSON, M.S., Lecturer in Dietetics 

B.S., Madison College, 1938; M.S., University of Tennessee, 1957. 

Gertrude H. Muench, R.N., R.P.T., Lecturer in Nursing 

Diploma, Portland Sanitarium and Hospital, 1905; R.P.A., Western Reserve 
School of Physical Therapy, 1927. 

Ted C. SwiNYAR, M.D., Lecturer in Health Education 

B.A., Washington Missionary College, 1949; M.D., College of Medical 
Evangelists, 1952. 

12 



FACULTY 

SUPERVISORY INSTRUCTORS IN SECONDARY EDUCATION 

Kenneth C Stewart, M.A., Principal 

B.A., Columbia Union College, 1951; M.A., Ohio State University, 1957. 

Lorene AuSHERMAN, B.A., Registrar, Health 
B.A., Southern Missionary College, 1953. 

Paul C. Boynton, M.A., Bible 

B.A., Washington Missionary College, 1941; M.A., S.D.A. Theological 
Seminary, 1952. 

Thelma Hemme, M.A., Home Economics 

B.A., Pacific Union College, 1944; M.A., Pacific Union College, 1958. 

Lynn Sauls, B.A., English 

B.A., Southern Missionary College, 1956. 

Olive Westphal, M.A., Spanish 

B.A., Pacific Union College, 1929; M.A., University of Southern Cali- 
fornia. 1940. 

Donald Woodruff, M.A., Mathematics and Science 
MA,, University of Missouri. 



SUPERVISORY INSTRUCTORS IN ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 

Mildred Baldwin, M.Ed., Grades 3, 4 

B.S., Southern Missionary College, 1958; M.Ed,, University of Chattanooga, 
1961. 

Richard Christoph, B.S., Grade 7 

B.S., Emmanuel Missionary College. 

Elmyra Conger, M.Ed., Grades 3-7 

B.S., Southern Missionary College, 1954; M.Ed., University of Chattanooga, 
1957. 

Ruth Sorrell, M.A., Grades 1, 2 

B.S., Southern Missionary College, 1951; M.A., George Peabody College 
for Teachers, 1953. 

Jessie Pendergrass, M.Ed., Grades J, 6 

B.S., Southern Missionary College, 1957; M.Ed., University of Chattanooga, 
1962. 



13 



COMMITTEES 



The President is ex officio member of all faculty committees. The first 
name or officer listed serves as chairman. 

President's Council: C. N. Rees, Chairman; Otto Christensen, Alfreda 
Costerisan, K« R. Davis, Charles Fleming, Ray Hefferlin, K. M. Kennedy, W. M. 
Schneider, Kenneth Stewart, W. H. Taylor, R. B. Thurmon, E. T. Watrous. 

Finance: Charles Fleming, R. W. Merchant, C N. Rees, W. M. Schneider, 
Kenneth Stewart, D. L. West. 

Admissions: W. M. Schneider, Dean of Student Affairs, Director of Admis- 
sions and Records, Alfreda Costerisan, K. R. Davis, H. H. Kuhlman, D, JL West. 

Curriculum and Academic Policies: W. M, Schneider, Director of Ad- 
missions and Records, Heads of Divisions, Heads of Departments by invitation 
for curricula studies. 

College Relations and Development: W. H. Taylor, Charles Fleming, 
George Nickle, C. N. Rees, W. M. Schneider, Morris Taylor. 

Student Affairs: Dean of Student Affairs, Alfreda Costerisan, J. L. Clark, 
K. R. Davis, Cyril Dean, Charles Fleming, G. T. Gott, Edgar Grundset, 
R. W. Merchant, Charles Read, Kenneth Stewart, Morris Taylor, Elizabeth 

Van Arsdale, Myrtle Watrous, A. L. Watt, Larry Williams, Mabel Wood, 
Duane Zimmerman. 

Religious Interests: Otto Christensen, Douglas Bennett, Paul Boynton, Al- 
freda Costerisan, K. R. Davis, R. E. Francis, C N. Rees, W, M, Schneider, 
Kenneth Stewart, R. B. Thurmon, Student Representatives by invitation. 

Library Services: S. D. Brown, John Christensen, Evlyn Lindberg, Marion 
Linderman, W. M. Schneider, Harriet Smith, Wayne VandeVere, Myrtle 
Watrous. 

Health and Safely: Marian Kuhlman, Dorothy Christensen, Harvey Foote, 
T. C. Swinyar, R. B. Thurmon, D. L. West. 

Counseling and Guidance Service: Dean of Student Affairs, J. M. Ackerman, 
Douglas Bennett, Alfreda Costerisan, Don Crook, Florence CuJpan, K. R. Davis, 
R. E. Francis, K. M. Kennedy, W. M. Schneider, Elizabeth Van Arsdale, Everett 
Watrous, Larry Williams. 

Student Loans, Scholarships and Grants: W. M. Schneider, C. N. Rees, 
Alfreda Costerisan, K. R. Davis, Charles Fleming, Dean of Student Affairs, 
D. L. West. Harry Hulsey and K. M. Kennedy by invitation. 

The following special committees function under the general supervision 

of the Academic Dean: Ministerial Recommendations, Medical Student Recom- 
mendations, Teacher Educational Council. 

14 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



AIMS AND OBJECTIVES 



Southern Missionary College is a coeducational Christian college 
operated by the Seventh-day Adventist denomination. Its objectives 
are in harmony with the basic principles and objectives of its govern- 
ing organization. The Bible is accepted as the inspired revelation 
of God to men. Consistent endeavor is made to inspire in the 
student an appreciation of those principles that lead to a high level 
of thinking which in turn leads to Christian character and purposeful 
service to one's fellow men. 

In harmony with this inclusive objective the following statements 
express the specific objectives upon which the policies of the College 
are formulated: 



1. Spiritual — Southern Missionary College desires to establish in 
her students a personal allegiance to the principles of Christian 
faith; to develop in them a Christian philosophy of life as a 
basis for the solution of their personal problems; and to foster 
in them a sense of responsibility which will lead to active 
participation in the program of the Seventh-day Adventist 
Church. 

2. Intellectual — The College provides the student with basic facts 
and principles to the end that independent and creative thinking 
may result in open-mindedness, intellectual curiosity and ef- 
fective means of expression. 

3. Ethical — Southern Missionary College strives to implant in her 
students those concepts of Christian ethics and morality which 
are taught in the Scriptures and teaches them to shun intoler- 
ance of the rights and opinions of others. 

4. Social — The college affords opportunity for the student to develop 
approved social practices through participation in such activities 
as will contribute to the development of a well-balanced per- 
sonality. 



15 



GENERAL INFORMATION 

5. Aesthetic — Southern Missionary College endeavors to develop 
in her students an appreciation for that which is elevating and 
beautiful. To this end she fosters an appreciation of Gods 
handiwork together with the best in the fine arts. Furthermore, 
she desires that in this field her students will not only be 
appreciative but creative. 

6. Civic — Southern Missionary College aims to teach her students 

to be intelligent observers of national and international affairs. 
She desires that they faithfully discharge their duties as citizens 
and work unselfishly for the improvement of their community 
and country. 

7. Health — Southern Missionary College encourages her students 
to learn and practice the principles of healthful living. 

8. Vocational — The College provides opportunity for work experi- 
ence and vocational training as an integral part of the total 

educational experience in order to teach the student that labor 
is God-given, dignified and an aid to character development 
as well as a means of financial support. 

9. Service — Southern Missionary College endeavors to develop in 
her students a spirit of unselfish dedication to the service of God 
and man. 



HISTORY 

Southern Missionary College was founded at Graysville, Tennessee, 
in 1892 under the name of Southern Training School. In 1916 the 
institution was moved to Collegedale, Tennessee, where it opened 
under the name of Southern Junior College. By 1944 senior college 
status was achieved, the first degree candidates being graduated in 1946. 

LOCATION 

The main college campus is located in a pleasing valley eighteen 
miles east of Chattanooga and three miles from Ooltewah on the Lee 
Highway. The Southern Railway line passes through one side of the 
estate. A bus service operated by the Cherokee Lines serves the college 
campus. The post office address is Collegedale. 

The Orlando campus situated in the "Gty Beautiful" at the 
Florida Sanitarium and Hospital provides additional facilities for the 
Division of Nursing. 

16 



Research Project in Physics 



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PLANT FACILITIES 
ACCREDITATION AND CERTIFICATION 

Southern Missionary College is accredited as a liberal arts college 
by the Southern Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools and is 
approved by the Tennessee State Board of Education for the preparation 
of both secondary and elementary teachers for certification. 

The Division of Nursing is accredited by the Tennessee State Board 
of Nursing, is recognized by the Florida State Board of Nurses Registra- 
tion, and is an agency member of the Baccalaureate and Higher Degree 
Granting Programs of the Division of Nursing Education of the 
National League for Nursing. 

In addition to the memberships indicated above the college is a 
member of the Association of Seventh-day Adventist Colleges and 
Secondary Schools, the Association of American Colleges, and the 
Tennessee College Association. 

BUILDINGS AND EQUIPMENT 

Lynn Wood Hall — The administration building, named in honor 
of Dr. Lynn Wood, president of the College from 1918-1922, 
is a three-story structure housing all the administrative offices including 
most of the teachers' offices. The chapel seats approximately 550. 

A. G. Daniells Memorial Library — The A. G. Daniells Me- 
morial Library was completed in 1945. This is a modern library 
containing more than twenty-eight thousand books and about two 
hundred current periodicals conveniently arranged and adequately 
housed for study, reference, and research. A portion of the building is 
used for lecture rooms. The library is located adjacent to the ad- 
ministration building and is readily accessible from the residence halls. 

Earl F.. Hackman Science Hall — Hackman Hall, modern in 
arrangement and appointment, a commodious, two-story, fireproof 
building, contains various well-equipped lecture rooms and laboratories 
of the division of natural sciences. The first phase of this building was 
completed and dedicated in 1951. An addition, comparable in size to 
the first unit, was completed in 1961. 

Harold A. Miller Fine Arts Building — The Harold A. Miller 
Fine Arts Building, completed in 1953, houses the music department. 
This two- story, fireproof building provides studios, practice rooms, and 
an auditorium equipped with a Steinway grand piano and a Schantz 
pipe organ installed in 1962. It was named in honor of Harold 
A. Miller, who for many years headed the Music Department. 

Maude Jones Residence Hall — The construction of a new 
women's residence hall permits the use of Maude Jones residence hall 
as a men's dormitory to provide adequate housing facilities for the 

17 



PLANT FACILITIES 

young men of this campus. Somewhat extensive remodeling of recent 
date has added considerably to the housing capacity and to the attrac- 
tiveness of the building. 

John H. Talge Residence Hall — The primary men's residence 
hall, named for John H. Talge, provides accommodations for 160 men. 
The panelling of the entrance and lounge has added much to the 
attractiveness of the building. 

New Women's Residence Hall — This modern fireproof structure 
completed for occupancy in August, 1961, provides living accommoda- 
tions for approximately 275 ladies. New room furnishings, built-in 
closets and chests of drawers, with lavatory facilities in each room, 
provides a home-like atmosphere. 

The spacious and beautiful chapel with adjoining prayer rooms, 
the parlors, the kitchenette and infirmary facilities are but a few of the 
attractive features which provide for enjoyment and comfortable living. 

Oollegedale Tabernacle-Auditorium — The auditorium serves 
as a place of worship for the Collegedale S. D. A. church. The building 
is owned by the Georgia-Cumberland Conference and has a seating 
capacity of 1,200. A Hammond electric organ and a full concert 
Baldwin grand piano are part of the equipment. This building also 
serves as a center for the physical education activities. 

Arthur W. Spalding School — This modern one-story elementary 
school is one of the most recent buildings to be erected. The six class- 
rooms, an auditorium, and recreation room serve as a vital part of the 
teacher-training program. 

Home Arts Center — This recently completed building houses 
the Cafeteria and Student Center on one floor and the Home Eco- 
nomics Department on another floor. This building is not only modern 
but beautifully appointed throughout. 

Academy Building — This building contains all the facilities for 
operating the class program of the secondary school. The few resident 
students of the academy are housed separately on the campus. 

Industrial Buildings — The industrial buildings include the Col- 
lege Press, Laundry, Cabinet Shop, Broom Shop, Bakery, Bindery, 
Garage, and College Enterprises. 

Student Apartments — The college maintains a number of hous- 
ing units for married students as well as a trailer camp. Additional 
facilities may be available in the community. 

18 



GOVERNMENT 
STANDARDS OF CONDUCT 

In the light of the objectives of the college to develop men and 
women of high standards of scholarship, character, integrity, and 
Christian maturity, those who are accepted thereby pledge themselves 
to the maintenance of these standards. No religious test as such is 
applied, but all students are expected to attend the regular religious 
exercises and to abide by the regulations given in the student handbook 
or announced by the faculty. These regulations are in harmony with 
what experience has demonstrated to be sound standards of Christian 
conduct. 

A student who finds himself out of harmony with the standards 
and objectives of the College, who is unresponsive and not cooperative, 
or who violates his pledge may be asked to withdraw without specific 
charge. 

Disciplinary action is usually not of a summary nature except for 
serious moral offenses. The student has every opportunity to respond 
to cautions, warning, censure, or other action such as probation and 
suspension; but patient dealing should not be interpreted as indulgence 
or toleration of attitudes or actions out of harmony with the regulations. 

A full statement of the regulations is to be found in the student 
handbook, SMC and YOU, which is available to every student upon 
application. 



THE SCHOOL TERMS 

The College operates on the semester plan, the school year con- 
sisting of two semesters and a summer session. The separate announce- 
ment for the summer session is available in May and may be secured 
from the Admissions Office. 



LEAVES OF ABSENCE 

Students who reside in the college residence halls are required 
to arrange leaves of absence with the Dean of Men or the Dean of 
Women. If the absence involves missing of class work the signature 
of the Academic Dean is also required on the leave of absence blank. 

19 



GOVERNMENT 

MARRIAGE 

No student will be given permission to marry during the school 

term. Secret marriage is sufficient reason for dismissal. 

USE OF MOTOR VEHICLES 

The free and unrestricted use of automobiles has a definite tendency 
to Interfere with the student's spiritual and scholastic life on the campus 
of Southern Missionary College. For this reason, students residing in 
school homes are encouraged to leave their automobiles at home. 

Unless twenty-one years of age or older, freshmen are not permitted 
to use or park automobiles at the College or in the community. It Is 
therefore imperative that freshmen leave their automobiles at home. 

Students, other than freshmen, who reside in school homes and 
desire to bring automobiles may be granted permission upon application 
to the respective deans. Automobiles must be registered with the resi- 
dence hall deans upon arrival. If satisfactory arrangements are made, a 
permit will be issued and a parking fee of $10.00 a semester, or any 
part of a semester, will be charged. 

Any student who desires to bring a motor vehicle should first 
correspond with the dean of the residence hall concerned. For further 
details see your student handbook. 



20 



STUDENT SERVICES 
STUDENT LIFE AND SERVICES 

STUDENT ORGANIZATION 

The extracurricular program is designed to offer to every student 
opportunity for the development of initiative and leadership. The 
Student Association, as the overall official organization of the College 
student body, working in cooperation with the College administration 
and faculty, assists in the implementation of policies and assumes re- 
sponsibility in giving direction to campus activities entrusted to it. 
The Dean of Student Affairs works as liaison officer to coordinate the 
work of the faculty and the Student Association. 

GUIDANCE AND COUNSELING SERVICE 

The counseling service is organized and directed by the Dean of 
Student Affairs who will arrange for the choice of a personal counse- 
lor for each student. Additional counsel is provided by administrative 
personnel and by the heads of departments who will advise students 
on academic questions related to their major field. The testing service 
works in close cooperation with the counseling service in providing 
guidance information to both students and counselors. 

PLACEMENT 

One of the personnel services is that of assisting graduates in 
securing appointments for service. The placement office distributes 
information concerning each prospective graduate to a wide list of 
prospective employers and acts as liaison office to bring graduates and 
employer together by supplying recommendations and other informa- 
tion necessary. 

RESIDENCE 

All unmarried students who do not live with parents, close relatives, 
or legal guardians are expected to live in the residence halls on the 
campus. Information about necessary room furnishing to be supplied 
by the student may be found in the student handbook. 

21 



STUDENT SERVICES 



PUBLICATIONS 

The Student Association publishes the bi-weekly Southern Accent 
and the yearbook Southern Memories. The Campus Accent, a publi- 
cation of announcements for distribution in chapel, is also published 
by the Student Association. These student publications are under the 
sponsorship of the instructors in English and Journalism. 



HEALTH SERVICE 

The health service is directed by the resident school nurse in co- 
operation with the school physician. The Clinic is located on the campus. 
The general fee paid by each student upon entrance covers certain 
medical services without additional charge. For particulars read the 
announcements appearing in the financial section of the bulletin. 



CAMPUS ORGANIZATIONS 

More than thirty campus organizations give ample opportunity 
to develop student initiative and leadership. They may be classified 
under four divisions; namely, church-related organizations, social clubs, 
professional clubs, and special interest or hobby clubs. 

The church-related organizations are the MV Society, Ministerial 
Seminar, Christ's Foreign Legion, American Temperance Society, the 
Colporteur Club, and the Usher's Club. 

The professional clubs are organized by departments with student 
leadership under the sponsorship of the department or division head. 

The social clubs are organized according to place of residence. 
These are the Married Couples' Forum; Upsilon Delta Phi, the men's 
club; and Sigma Theta Chi, the women's club. 

22 



STUDENT SERVICES 

SCHOLARSHIPS, LOANS, AND 
GRANTS-IN-AID 

Grants and contributions to Southern Missionary College for 
operating purposes, capital expansion, or to the Worthy Student Fund, 
are deductible from income subject to federal income taxes. 

Grants-in-aid, scholarships, and loan funds may be available to 
students who have satisfactory citizenship and scholastic records and 
a proven financial need. Complete details are presented in the financial 
section of the bulletin. 



EMPLOYMENT SERVICE 

The College operates a variety of industries which provide con- 
siderable employment for students in financial need. These work 
opportunities provide a training in vocational skills as all work is 
done under trained supervisors. 



LYCEUM COURSE 

The College sponsors a lyceum series of an educational and enter- 
taining nature. This consists primarily of travelogues, music, and 
lectures. 



FINE ARTS SERIES 

The Fine Arts Department sponsors four or more Sunday evening 
concerts by visiting musicians. Art exhibits by prominent artists in the 
area are opened to the public after the programs, presenting an op- 
portunity to meet the artist. There is a small fee of $2.00 for the 
season. 



EXTRACURRICULAR ACTIVITIES 

Students may hold extracurricular offices according to the standards 
as defined in the Student Association Constitution. 

All lists of students chosen for office must be submitted to the 
Academic Dean for approval before the student may be asked to ac- 
cept the responsibility. 

23 



ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

Southern Missionary College is a living institution made up of its 
alumni, faculty, and students. The Alumni Association promotes the 
interests of the school, fosters a spirit of friendship among former 
students, and preserves worthy traditions of the college, and serves 
mankind through the exemplification and advocacy of the ideals 
of its Alma Mater. 

The General Association convenes at the time of the annual Alumni 
Homecoming. Local chapters in various sections of the country 
meet several times yearly. The Association publishes the Alumni 
News Bulletin, its official publication. It is distributed free to Alumni 
and friends of the college. 

The Association maintains an office on the college campus which 
keeps the records of its regular members, some 2,000 graduates of 
Southern Missionary College, or of the institutions which preceded it 
(the Graysville Academy, the Southern Training School, the Southern 
Junior College). Associate membership in the organization is also 
granted individuals who have attended this institution at least one 
semester. 



24 



ACADEMIC INFORMATION 



ADMISSION 



APPLICATION PROCEDURE 

As a church-related institution, Southern Missionary College fol- 
lows the policy of determining admission on the basis of character 
and citizenship as well as of scholarship. Formal application is made 
on a blank furnished by the Admissions Office. All correspondence 
concerning admissions should be addressed to the Secretary of Admis- 
sions. Each application should be accompanied by a processing fee of 
$2 which is not refundable. Ordinarily about a month is necessarty 
to process an application. 

The College takes the responsibility of securing transcripts of the 
applicant's previous scholastic record. All transcripts become the 
property of the College. 

ADMISSION TO FRESHMAN STANDING 

A student whose principles and interests are in harmony with the 
purposes of the College may be admitted to freshman standing by 
certificate or transcript of at least 18 secondary units or diploma from a 
state or regionally accredited secondary school. In addition, the applicant 
is expected to submit a grade point average of 1.0 (C) in the minimum 
basic (solids) secondary subjects required for admission to the various 
college curricula as noted on page 36. 

Applicants from unaccredited schools may be admitted on a pro- 
visional basis upon passing entrance examinations. 

ADMISSION TO ADVANCED STANDING 

A candidate for admission from another regionally accredited col- 
lege may receive credit without examination subject to the following 
requirements : 

a. Receipt of official transcript or transcript of the complete 
previous scholastic record. 

b. A record of entrance tests taken previously and a statement 
of withdrawal with an honorable record. 

c. Evidence of satisfying the entrance requirements of this College. 

25 



ACADEMIC INFORMATION 

PROVISIONAL ADMISSION— TRANSFER 

Credit is recorded provisionally at the time of admission but will 
not become part of the student's permanent record until the student 
has satisfactorily completed not less than twelve semester hours in 
this institution. Not more than 72 semester hours or 108 quarter hours 
may be accepted from a junior college. 

ADMISSION BY EXAMINATION 

Applicants over twenty-one years of age who have had at least 
eight solid secondary units may be admitted on the basis of passing 
the General Educational Development tests with a minimum score of 
45 on each test and an average standard score of 50 on the total 
of five tests. 

ADMISSION OF VETERANS 

Veterans are admitted on the same basis as applicants over twenty- 
one years of age referred to in the preceding paragraph. Educational 
credit earned while in service will be evaluated on the basis of the 
recommendations found in the Guide of the American Council on 
Education. 



CLASSIFICATION OF STUDENTS 

The classification for which a student qualifies at his first registra- 
tion ordinarily continues through both semesters. Applications for 
reclassification at the beginning of the second semester may be made 
to the Academic Dean except that officers of classes may not be re- 
classified and a student may not be classified as a senior until he is 
a candidate for graduation in spring or summer of the current year. All 
students are classified under one of the following categories: 

Fkeshmen— Graduation from secondary school . 

Sophomores — Those who have completed at least 24 semester 
hours. A sophomore may not take upper biennium courses unless he 
has completed 50 lower biennium hours, except certain sequence courses 
approved by the Academic Dean. 

He may however register for one or more upper biennium courses, 
for upper biennium credit, provided (1) he has earned, with an average 
of "C" or above, fifty hours including basic freshman and sophomore 
courses already taken, and (2) his current registration completes the 
fulfillment of lower biennium basic and major requirements. 

26 



ACADEMIC INFORMATION 

Juniors — Those who have at least 56 semester hours with a cu- 
mulative average of C, and who have completed all secondary require- 
ments for admission. Deficiencies will not be carried over to the junior 
year. 

Seniors — Those who have completed 96 semester hours and are 
candidates for spring graduation and prospective summer graduates 
who will have completed a minimum of 118 hours at the close of the 
second semester. 

Adult Special Student — A mature person who does not meet regular 
admission requirements may be permitted to take 'ower biennium work 
to a maximum of twelve semester hours. To continue further he must 
regularize his admission. 

Unclassified Student — A student who is qualified to enter on a regular 
basis but who does not plan to complete a curriculum is registered 
as an unclassified student. 



ACADEMIC POLICIES 

REGISTRATION 

Students are expected to register for classes and participate in the 
orientation program on the dates designated in the Calendar of Events 
at the front of this bulletin. Placement and aptitude tests will be given 
lor all new and transfer students as a guide to registration and 
counseling. 

A late registration fee of $5 is charged after registration week. 
Students may not register more than two weeks late except by permission 
of the Academic Dean. The course load of a late registrant will be 
reduced by one to two semester hours for each week of lateness. 



CHANGES IN PROGRAM 

To avoid changes in registration the student should give much 
thought at the time of registration to the desired class program. If 
expedient, changes in registration may be made during the first two 
weeks of a semester upon the consent of the curriculum adviser, in- 
structor, and the Academic Dean. A fee of $2 will be charged for any 
change in registration following the first week of school. 

The student's class load as of the close of the second week of 
school becomes the basis of the tuition charge regardless of subsequent 
reductions in the class program. Late additions, if permitted, will be 
reflected in an increase in the tuition charged. 

27 



ACADEMIC INFORMATION 

Students may not change from one section of a class to another 
except by permission of the Academic Dean. 

A student may withdraw from a course up to the fourth week of a 
semester with a grade of W. From the fourth week to the twelfth week 
the grade recorded will be W or WF. For withdrawal after the twelfth 
week a grade of F will be recorded unless the withdrawal is because 
of unavoidable circumstances approved by the Academic Dean, in which 
case a grade of W will be given. 

CLASS LOAD 

A full-time student is one who is registered for twelve or more 
semester hours. Except by permission of the President's Council a 
student living in the residence halls must carry a minimum of eight 
semester hours. If a student is working to defray expenses, his course 
load will be adjusted according to his scholastic ability. Students of 
superior scholarship may register for a maxium of 18 hours by per- 
mission of the Academic Dean, a L5 grade point average being the 
minimum qualification to make such a request. Correspondence work 
is computed as part of the current load. 

No appointment, work assignments, field trips or other activities that 
would interfere with the student's regular schedule of school work may 
be asked of the students without specific advance arrangement with the 
Academic Dean, 

SCHOLARSHIP STANDARD 

Students who fail to maintain a C average are considered on a pro- 
visional or probationary status, An average of C is the basis of admission 
and a requirement for graduation from all curricula. A student who may 
be admitted with less than a C average must raise his average .2 each 
semester; otherwise, his program will be reviewed for the purpose of 
reducing his class load or labor load or both. Students may not continue 
indefinitely doing less than C average work. Furthermore, a student 
on this status is restricted in the number of extracurricular respon- 
sibilities which he may carry. The maintenance of a high scholastic 
record is considered as a most important consideration for the student's 
own welfare. 

CORRESPONDENCE WORK 

A student will be permitted to carry correspondence work while in 
residence only if the required course is unobtainable at the college. All 
correspondence work whether taken while in residence or during the 
summer must be approved in advance by the Academic Dean. 

28 



ACADEMIC INFORMATION 

The maximum amount of correspondence which may apply toward 
a degree is twelve semester hours and eight hours for two-year cur- 
ricula. 

Correspondence credit on the upper biennium level may not apply 
toward the student's major or minor. A student may not repeat by 
correspondence a course in which he has received a grade of F in this 
institution. 

Correspondence work must carry a grade of C or above to be 
recorded. C grade correspondence work may not apply toward a major 
unless by a validation examination. However, A or B grade correspond- 
ence may apply toward a major without a validating examination. 

A student may not begin correspondence work during the second 
semester of his senior year. Transcripts of final grades must be in the 
Office of Records at least four weeks before graduation. 

No correspondence credit will be entered on the student's record 
until he has earned a minimum 12 hours in residence with an average 
of at least C. 



COLLEGE CREDIT BY EXAMINATION 

Recognizing the needs of the exceptionally gifted student, college 
credit by examination' is permitted in curricula pursued in which courses 
are required in sequence. The following rules of order apply: 

a. Application in writing to the Academic Dean with the approval 
of the major professor and department chairman at least four 
weeks in advance of the proposed examination date. 

b. Payment to the accounting office of a special examination fee 
of $25.00. 

c. Sitting for the comprehensive examinations, written, oral, 
manipulative or otherwise as determined by the instructor in 
collaboration with the department chairman, 

d. A grade of "B" must be achieved by the student to have course 
credits recorded as college credit. 



AUDITED COURSES 
A student may audit only non-laboratory courses. Audited courses 
do not carry credit, the tuition being half the regular charge. In comput- 
ing a student's course load, an audited course counts as half. A student 
may not repeat an audited course for credit 

29 



ACADEMIC INFORMATION 

ATTENDANCE AT CLASS APPOINTMENTS 
Attendance is required beginning with the first day of each session. 
Regular attendance at all appointments (lecture, laboratory, etc.) js 
expected. Absences, occasioned by illness, authorized school trips, or 
emergency, and when so recognized by the Academic Dean may be 
excusable and the student will be permitted to make up the work lost. 
Excuse requests must be presented to the Academic Dean within 48 
hours after the student resumes attendance, and the work must be made 
up within two weeks after the absence. 

If the total number of absences in any semester exceeds the 
number of class appointments in a two weeks 1 period, the teacher will 
consult with the Academic Dean as to whether the student will be al- 
lowed to continue the class or get a grade of FA. Cases of such stu- 
dents may be reviewed by the Academic Policies Committee upon peti- 
tion of the student. 

The school nurse or the deans of the school homes will turn in lists 
of ill students to the Academic Dean's office each day before noon. 

All students whether in the dormitory or community must report 
to the school health officer in order to have an absence recognized as 
excusable for the purpose of making up work. 

Absences immediately preceding or following a vacation period, 
announced picnic, field day, or from the first appointment of the second 
semester, by a student in attendance the first semester, carry penalties. 
The penalty for missing each class period shall be equivalent to the 
penalty for missing two regular class periods. 

Students who are late for class must report such fact to the in- 
structor before leaving the classroom; otherwise .the tardiness will 
count as an absence. At the discretion of the teacher, three reported 
tardinesses may be counted as one absence; also students who leave 
class without permission are counted absent. 

CHAPEL ATTENDANCE 

In principle the chapel absence policy is the same as for class ab- 
sence in that no absences are allowed except for illness, authorized 
school trips, or emergency. If the number of unexcused absences in 
any one semester exceeds the number of chapel periods in one week, 
the student will receive a note of advice and counsel. Subsequent 
unexcused chapel absences will disqualify the student as a citizen 
on this campus. 

A student leaving chapel after the record has been taken will be 
counted absent. If a student is tardy three times, it will be counted as 
one absence. 



30 



ACADEMIC INFORMATION 

GRADES AND REPORTS 

Mid-semester and semester reports of the scholastic standing of 
each student are issued to the student and his parent or guardian. 
Semester grades are kept on permanent record by the College. 

The following system of grading is used: 

Grade Points 
per Semester Hour 

A — Superior - 3 

B — Above average 2 

C — Average 1 

D — Below Average 

F — Failure Minus 1 

If a student is found cheating, his entire grade to that point becomes F. 
E — Warning for "below passing" scholarship. This grade may be giv- 
en only at the nine weeks period. 

I — Incomplete because of illness or other unavoidable delay. An in- 
complete grade must be removed by the end of the first six weeks 
of the following semester. 

A student who believes he is eligible for an incomplete must 
secure from the Records Office the proper form on which he may 
file application with the Academic Dean to receive an incomplete. 

Wf — Withdrew failing Minus 1 

Au — Audit 

S — Satisfactory (for music organizations only) 

U — Unsatisfactory (for music organizations only) 

FA — Failed because of poor attendance record 

NC — Non-credit 

A grade correctly reported to the Office of Records can be changed 
only upon repetition of the course. No grade above a D may be raised by 
repeating the course involved. When a course is repeated to raise a grade, 
it must be done before a more advanced course in the same field 
is completed. Credit may not be earned in the course after a more ad- 
vanced course in the same field has been taken. No grades will be 
recorded for a course for which the individual concerned has not reg- 
istered. After a semester grade has been recorded no change in credit 
for the course may be made. 

THE DEAN'S LIST 
The Dean's List consists of those who carry a nvnimum of twelve 
semester hours and maintain a grade point average of 2.5 or above 
with 3.0 as the possible maximum. 



ACADEMIC INFORMATION 

SPECIAL EXAMINATION 
Special examinations are given when justified by circumstances 
such as illness or necessary absence from the College. Permits are is- 
sued by the Academic Dean at a fee of $2 and presented by the stu- 
dent to the teacher concerned. Such examinations must be taken within 
two weeks after student's return to class. 

EXEMPTION BY EXAMINATION 

A student may be exempt from a required course by passing a com- 
prehensive examination with a grade of at least C. The purpose of this 
provision is to allow a student to take advanced work when he has 
already covered the material of a prerequisite course. No hours of 
credit are allowed on such an examination. Authorization for such 
examinations is by action of the Academic Policies Committee. The fee 
is $2. 

NON-CREDIT COURSES 

Courses may be taken on a non-credit basis in the following areas, 
the tuition charge being the same as for credit. 
Music Organizations 
Applied Music 
Typing 
Physical Education Activity Courses 



32 



Study in Anatomy 



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DEGREES 
GRADUATION STANDARDS 

DEGREES AND CERTIFICATES 

The college confers three degrees: Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor 
of Music, and Bachelor of Science. All require the completion of 
128 hours with an average of C. 

The Bachelor of Arts degree is conferred upon students who have 
fulfilled the basic requirements together with a major field of con- 
centration and a minor of 18 hours. A major or a minor may be 
chosen from any of the following fields, the major usually consisting of 
30 hours and the minor of 18. 



Biology 


Mathematics 


Business Administration 


Music 


Chemistry 


Physics 


Communications 


Religion 


English and Literature 


Spanish 


History 


Theology 



The Bachelor of Science degree is conferred in nine fields 
listed below. The number of semester hours required for the field of 
concentration varies according to the particular field as noted below. 
The minor consists of 18 hours in each field; however, no minor is 
required fox Nursing. 



Accounting __ 45 

Chemistry 40 

Elementary Teacher 

Education 32 

Foods & Nutrition 30 



Home Economics 30 

Medical Secretarial 38 

Nursing 64 

Physics 40 

Secretarial Science 30 



The Bachelor of Music in Music Education and the Bachelor of 
Music in Performance consist of 128 hours, 59-60 of which are in 
various areas of music, but there is no minor. 

A certificate is issued for the completion of the Four-year Cur- 
riculum for Bible Instructor as listed in the Department of Religion 
and Theology. 

The fields in which minors may be earned are given below. For 
complete information, see the instructional department concerned. 
Art German 

Biblical Languages History 

Biology Home Economics 

Business and Economics Journalism 

Chemistry Mathematics 

Communications Medical Secretarial Science 

English and Literature Music 

Foods and Nutrition 



33 



Clinical experience in Public Health Nursing 



GRADUATION STANDARDS 

Physics Secretarial Science 

Physical Education Spanish 

Psychology Speech 
Religion 

TWO-YEAR AND ONE-YEAR TERMINAL CURRICULA 
In addition to the above four-year curricula leading to a degree, 
the following two-year curricula are offered leading to a diploma: 

Bible Instructor Medical Secretary 

Home Economics Secretarial Science 

Industrial Arts Clerical Training (one-year) 

See instructional departmental listings for two-year terminal cur- 
ricula requirements. 

PRE-PROFESSIONAL CURRICULA 

Pre-Medical Pre-X-ray Technician 

Pre-Dental Pre-Optometry 

Pre- Dental Hygiene Pre-Pharmacy 

Pre^Laboratory Technician Pre-Engineering 

Pre-Physical Therapy Pre-Law 

Detailed requirements may be seen following the instructional 
departments. 

GENERAL GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS 

1. A minimum of 128 semester hours. 

2. A major and a minor or two majors. 

3. A minimum of 40 semester hours of upper biennium credit. 

4. An average of M C on the total hours and an average of "C" 
on all work taken at this college. No course in which a student has 
received a grade of "D" may apply on a major or minor. 

5 . Completion of the basic or core requirements for a baccalaureate 
degree. 

A student may graduate under the bulletin of the year in which 
he entered or the one in which he completes his work. If he dis- 
continues for a period of 12 full months or more he must qualify 
according to the bulletin current upon his return. 

A student who qualifies for a degree in one field of concentration 
may qualify for a second degree by meeting the additional require- 
ments. 

GRADUATE RECORD EXAMINATIONS 

All candidates for a baccalaureate degree are required to take the 
graduate record examinations during thf last semester of the senior 

34 



GRADUATION STANDARDS 

year. These examinations axe important to the student's record of 
work as many graduate fields are open onJy to those who can present 
a satisfactory record on these examinations. 

CANDIDACY FOR GRADUATION 

To be graduated, a student must have completed all requirements 
for graduation. A student may become a candidate for graduation 
when he enters upon the semester during which it will be possible for 
him to complete all the requirements for his graduation. Candidates 
for graduation at the close of the ensuing summer session will par- 
ticipate in the summer graduation exercise. 

Formal application for graduation should be made at the Office of 
Records during the first semester of the senior year. All resident candi- 
dates for graduation must be members of the senior class. Seniors who 
did not participate in the junior class of the previous year are assessed 
an amount equal to the junior class dues. 

The responsibility for meeting graduation requirements rests pri- 
marily with the student. He should acquaint himself with the published 
requirements and plan his course so as to fulfill them, for he is 
eligible for graduation only when the records in the Office of Records 
show he has met all the requirements listed in the College catalog. 

GRADUATION WITH HONORS 
A candidate for graduation with a grade point average of 2.5 or 
above, and whose record shows no grade lower than a "C," may be 
considered for graduation with honors. The Academic Policies Com- 
mittee recommends the candidate to the faculty for approval of this 
honor. Transfer students must have earned 36 hours in residence to 
qualify for graduation with honors. 

GRADUATION IN ABSENTIA 
Each candidate for graduation must be present to receive his diploma 
unless granted written permission by the President of the College to be 
graduated in absentia. Written application should be made early in the 
second semester of the senior year and permission will be granted only 
in cases of evident necessity. A ten-dollar fee is assessed on all those 
graduating in absentia. 

RESIDENCE REQUIREMENTS 
Not less than 24 hours of the 128 hours must be earned in residence 
in this college, twenty of which must be in the senior year. At least 
six hours in the major field and a minimum of three hours of upper 
biennium credit in the minor must be earned in this College. 

35 



CURRICULUM REQUIREMENTS 

THE BACCALAUREATE DEGREES 

ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS 
The following are the minimum secondary requirements: 

English 3 units 

^Language 2 units 

Mathematics (Must include Algebra 1 unit) 2 units 

Natural Science 2 units 

for Bachelor of Aits curricula, otherwise, one unit 

Social Science _ 2 units 

for Bachelor of Axts curricula, otherwise, one unit 

Religion — —. .. 1 unit 

for each year of attendance in an academy up to 3 units 

CORE CURRICULUM REQUIREMENTS FOR BACCALAUREATE DEGREES 
For exceptions to ihe core curriculum requirements pertaining to 
the bachelor of science degree, the student should consult the depart- 
mental write-up of the specific curriculum concerned and the degree 
sought. 
English 10 hours 

1. Six hours must be in Freshman English, which is to he taken in the 
freshman year. The remaining four hours must be in literature and 
should be taken in the sophomore year. 

2, Beginning with the four-year graduates of 1964, students will be re- 
quired to pass an English usage and spelling test to be administered 
at periodic intervals. The test may first be taken at the close of the 
student's sophomore year or the beginning of the junior year. If not 
successful the first time, the student may take another test after suf- 
ficient time and effort has been devoted to study and review. 

Fine Arts — 4 hours 

Required: Art 60 or Music 61. 

Foreign Languages ._ 6-14 hours 

1. Six hours of the foreign language in which two units have been earned 
in secondary school. To be taken in the freshman or the sophomore year. 

2. Fourteen hours in one language, if different from the language in 
which two units have been earned in secondary school, should be taken 
if possible in the freshman and sophomore years. 

3. Fourteen hours in one language, if no foreign language or less than two 
units in one foreign language was taken in secondary school, should be 
taken if possible in the freshman and sophomore years. 

4. This requirement may be fulfilled by credit in Greek, Latin, or a mod- 
ern foreign language. 

5. Any student whose mother tongue is not English may request a waiver 
of the foreign language requirement if proficiency can be demonstrated 
by oral and written examination. 

* Although language study is encouraged, admission will be granted to 
students who have not taken language subjects on the secondary level. To 
compensate for this deficiency, additional language study on the college level 
will be required as stated under the core curriculum requirements for bac- 
calaureate degrees. 

36 



CURRICULUM REQUIREMENTS 

Physical Education _.... 1 hour 

Required: P. E. 7, 8, or equivalent. Should be taken in the fresh- 
man or sophomore year. 

Natural Sciences — Mathematics 12 hours 

May be selected from the fields of Biology, Chemistry, Mathematics, and 
Physics. Six hours sequence must be selected from a science field with 
laboratory to be completed in the freshman and sophomore years. (Bus. 
Math., Pre-Freshman Math., Fundamental Concepts or Functional Math., 
not accepted.) Nutrition 2 and 2a may also apply as 3 hours science credit 
if registered for as Chemistry 6 and 6a. 

Religion _„„ 12-16 hours 

A student presenting three or more units of credit in Bible from the sec- 
ondary school needs twelve hours; one presenting two units, fourteen hours; 
and one presenting one unit or less, sixteen hours. Approximately half of 
this requirement should be taken in the freshman and sophomore years. 
Transfer students from other colleges will take four hours for each year of 
attendance with a minimum of six hours for graduation. Only courses 
classified as Bible and Religion may be taken to satisfy this requirement. 
Bible Survey required of those who had no religion subjects in secondary 
school. 

Social Sciences 12 hours 

Six hours must be in a history sequence taken in the freshman or sophomore 
year. The remaining six hours may be in economics (Principles of Eco- 
nomics), sociology, social science, or geography. Those who have not taken 
World History on the secondary level must include Survey of Civilization, 
six hours. 

Applied Arts — - 4 hours 

Must be chosen from courses requiring laboratory experience in Industrial 
Arts, Graphic Arts, Home Economics, or Library Science, A waiver of the 
Applied Arts requirement may be granted only on the basis of vocational 
credit earned on a classroom or laboratory basis in an approved institution 
or by examination over the applied arts area in which the student claims 
proficiency. 

Two of the following subjects are required of degree candidates; Funda- 
mentals of Education 21, Prop hen c Gift 5, Principles of Heahh and Hy- 
giene 53. 

Note: While it is preferable to take as many of the Core Curricu- 
lum requirements as possible on the freshman and sophomore level, a 
student will not be required to complete all of them before registering 
for upper biennium work. However, the following basic requirements 
mrnt be met before the student registers for any upper biennium course. 

Foreign Language 6 Religion 4-6 

Natural Sciences and Mathematics - 6 History 6 

English 6 



MAJORS AND MINORS 
Major Requirements. The student should choose a major field 
of specialization preferably by the beginning of the second semester 

37 



CURRICULUM REQUIREMENTS 

of the sophomore year. Specific requirements for majors are given 
immediately preceding the description of courses in the several de- 
partments of instruction. 

Each major consists of a minimum of thirty semester hours ot 
which fourteen must be upper biennium credit and six of these must 
be earned in this College. 



Minor Requirements. A student should choose his minor field 
not later than the beginning of the second semester of the sophomore 
year. A minor may not be earned in the field chosen for the major. 
All minors consist of eighteen semester hours except Religion which 
consists of the core curriculum requirements plus six hours, and English 
which is twenty-one. 

Six hours of a minor shall be earned in the upper biennium. A 
minimum of three hours of upper biennium credit on the minor must 
be earned in this College. 



38 



DIVISIONS OF INSTRUCTION 



For administrative and instructional purposes the several depart- 
ments and areas of instruction have been organized by related fields 
into divisions as indicated below. 

I. APPLIED ARTS AND SCIENCES 

Chairman: Wilbert M. Schneider 

I, Business Administration. 2. Home Economics. 3. Industrial 
Arts— Library Science. 4. Secretarial Science. 

II. COMMUNICATION ARTS 

Chairman: Clyde G. Bushnell 

1. Communications. 2. English and Literature. 3. Modern Lan- 
guages and Literature. 

III. EDUCATION-PSYCHOLOGY-HEALTH AND 
PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Chairman: Kenneth M. Kennedy 

I. Education and Psychology. 2. Health and Physical Education. 

IV. FINE ARTS 

Chairman: Morris Taylor 
1. Art. 2. Music. 

V. NATURAL SCIENCES-MATHEMATICS 

Chairman: John Christensen 

1. Biology. 2. Chemistry. 3. Mathematics. 4. Physics. 

VI. NURSING 

Chairman: Harriet Smith 

VII. RELIGION, THEOLOGY AND RELATED STUDIES 

Chairman: Otto Christensen 

1, Religion and Theology. 2. Biblical Languages. 

VM. SOCIAL SCIENCES 

Chairman: Everett T. Watrous 

1. History. 2. Political Science. 3. Sociology. 

For convenience of reference the instruction courses are listed 
alphabetically by departments and related areas throughout the follow- 
ing pages. 

39 



DEPARTMENTS AND AREAS OF INSTRUCTION 
AND COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



COURSE NUMBERS 

Courses numbered 1 to .49 are lower biennium courses taken mainly 
by freshmen, and 50 to 99 mainly by sophmores; those numbered 
100 to 149 are upper biennium courses open primarily to juniors, and 
150 to 199 open primarily to seniors. 

Course numbers that stand alone (e.g., 56) represent courses of one 
semester which are units in and of themselves. 

Course numbers separated by a hyphen (e.g., 1-2) represent year 
courses, the semesters to be taken in order given. Credit for the first 
semester only will not apply toward graduation from any curriculum. 

Course numbers separated by a comma (e.g., 41, 42) represent 
units in and of themselves either one of which may be counted for 
graduation without reference to sequence. 

Course numbers separated by a colon (e.g., 11:12) are year courses 
in which credit for the first course is a prerequisite to the second; how- 
ever, credit may be given for the first semester when taken alone. 

Course numbers followed by a letter (e.g., l65r., I66r) may be 
repeated for credit, because of difference in subject matter. 

ALTERNATING COURSES 

Throughout the following section, courses which are not offered 
during the school year 1962-63, will be starred to the left of the course 
number (e. g. *57, 58). This arrangement of offering courses in 
alternate years (generally on the upper biennium level), makes pos- 
sible the enrichment of curricula without a proportional increase of 
instructural expense. 



DEPARTMENT OF ART 

Olivia Dean 
Morris Taylor Nellie Jo Williams 

The aim of this department is to provide for the student a means of 
creative self-expression through forms of beauty and to prepare him 
for living a richer life individually, socially, and professionally. 

Minor: A minor in Art consists of 18 hours, including 1:2, 60; 
143:144; Applied Art, 8 hours, including 2 hours of advanced painting. 

40 



ART 

ART 

1:2. FUNDAMENTALS OF DRAWING AND DESIGN Two semesters, 4 hours 

An introductory course in drawing, composition, design, color organi- 
zation and basic lettering. Emphasis on the basic art elements and their 
functions in composition. 

51, 52. BEGINNING PAINTING Two semesters, 2 or 4 hours 

Recommended prerequisite: Art 1, 2. 

Introduction to water color, oil paint, and pastel painting, landscapes, 
still life, and flowers; originality will be stressed. 

7r, 8r. SCULPTURE Two semesters, 4 hours 

The various expressions in three dimensional forms are studied. Portrait 
sculpture, building up in soft materials as well as direct plaster techniques. 

27, 28. ART EDUCATION AND CRAFTS Two semesters, 2 hours 

A study of the fundamental arts and crafts principles adapted to the needs 
of children. Laboratory work in the use of various art and craft media for 
elementary school teachers. 

I65r., 166r, ADVANCED PAINTING Two semesters, 4 hours 

Prerequisite: Art 51, 52. 

Here a student may desire to study further the use of the various media, 
also explore the relationships of abstract representation to realism. Instruc- 
tion in clothed figure painting; landscapes and animal life. 

ART HISTORY 

60. SURVEY OF ART Second semester, 2 hours 

An introductory course to art experience. A survey of art media with 
illustrated lectures, discussion, and analysis of important masterworks. 

143:144. HISTORY OF ART Two semesters, 4 hours 

Recommended prerequisite: Art 60. 

A study of the arts of western civilization from antiquity to the present 
with an emphasis on the pivotal figures in art history. Representative ex- 
amples of painting, sculpture, and architecture will be studied as well as 
some examples from the graphic and decorative arts. 



DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGY 

H. H. Kuhlman E. O. Grundset 

The courses in this department are intended to give students a 
practical and cultural knowledge of this field of science, and to meet 
the needs of those planning to enter professional training in advanced 
biology, medicine, dentistry, nursing, and related fields. It is recom- 
mended that students majoring in biology minor in chemistry. This is 
important if graduate study is pursued. 

Major: A major in biology leading to a Bachelor of Arts degree, 
consists of thirty semester hours, including Biology 1, 22, 45, 46, 111 
and 128. Chemistry 171 may count toward a major in Biology. 

Minor: a minor in biology requires eighteen hours. 

41 



BIOLOGY 

Course Requirements 

Major (Biology) .__. 30 hours 

Including 1; 22; 45, 46; 111, 128. 

Minor: Chemistry recommended 18 hours 

English 1-2, Literature 51, 52 or 61, 62 10 hours 

Applied Arts .„. 4 hours 

Fine Arts, 60 or 61 required 4 hours 

Foreign Language (German recommended) 6-14 hours 

P,E. 7, 8 1 hour 

Religion 12-16 hours 

Social Science 12 hours 

Electives — sufficient to make a four-year total 

of 128 semester hours. 

Pre-medical students majoring in Biology wiJl add Physics 51-52; 
Mathematics 5:6 or 11:12; Chemistry 1-2; 63; 102; 113-114; General 
Embryology 145. 



The courses in Biology are intended to give the student funda- 
mental and accurate, information as a basis for the development of a 
sound scientific philosophy and as preparation for professional training, 

1. GENERAL BIOLOGY First semester, 3 hours 

A study of biological principles and of the classification of the plant king- 
dom. Two hours lecture, three hours laboratory, each week. 

2. GENERAL BIOLOGY Second semester, 3 hours 

Consideration of biological principles as related to animal life. Study of 
typical members of each phylum in the animal kingdom. This course 
(Biology 2) will not apply toward a biology major. Two hours lecture, 
th-ee hours laboratory, each week. 

9. NATURE STUDY AND CONSERVATION First semester, 3 hours 

This course is planned for elementary teachers who wish to use nature 
materials furnished by their environment in their teaching. It includes con- 
servation of natural resources, the study of birds, insects, flowers, trees, and 
related areas. Two hours lecture, three hours laboratory each week. This 
course is a methods course and is restricted to teacher training students. 

11, 12. ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY Two semesters, 6 hours 

A study of the fundamentals of human anatomy and physiology. Two hours 
lecture, three hours laboratory, each week. 

42 



BIOLOGY 

22. MICROBIOLOGY Either semester, 4 hours 

A study of micro-organisms; their relation to the production of disease in 
man and their modes of transmissions; methods used in specific prevention 
or treatment of disease. Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory, each 
week. 

45, 46. GENERAL ZOOLOGY Two semesters, 8 hours 

A study of the general biological principles of all animal life including 
their general structure, physiology, habitat, classification, and life history. 
Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory, each week. 

*105. MAMMALOGY First semester, 3 hours 

Prerequisite: Biology 2 or 45 or equivalent. 

Classification, distribution, life history and population of mammals. Two 
hours lecture and three hours laboratory or field trip each week. 

107. PARASITOLOGY First semester, 3 hours 
Prerequisite: Biology 2, or 46, or equivalent. 

A general survey of the more important parasites of man and domestic 
animals. Two hours lecture, three hours laboratory, each week. 

108. ORNITHOLOGY Second semester or Summer session, 3 hours 
Prerequisite: Biology 1, 2 or 45, 46. 

An introduction to the external structure, classification, behavior, nesting, 
migration, and phylogeny of birds. Laboratory periods are spent studying 
birds in the field. Two hours lecture, duee hours laboratory work each week. 

110. ENTOMOLOGY Second semester or Summer session, 3 hours 

Prerequisite: Biology 1, 2 or 45, 46. 

An introduction to the study of insects with emphasis on development and 
behavior. Classification of important orders and families and the use of 
insect keys will be stressed in laboratory work. Two hours lecture and 
three hours laboratory work each week. 

111. GENETICS First semester, 3 hours 
Prerequisite: Biology 1 and 2 or equivalent. 

A study of heredity as related to man and some domestic plants and animals, 
Two hours lecture, three hours laboratory, each week. 

120. ECOLOGY Second semester, 3 hours 

Prerequisite: Biology 1 and 2 or equivalent. 

A study of plants or animals in relation to their natural environment. 

Two hours lecture and thiee hours field work each week. 

*127. CRYPTOGAM 1C BOTANY First semester, 3 hours 

Prerequisite: Biology 1 or equivalent. 

A study of the non-flowering plants of the Collegedale area. Two hour 
lecture and three hours field work each week. 

128. SYSTEMATIC BOTANY Second semester, 3 hours 

Prereauisite : Biology 1 or equivalent. 

The identification of seed plants of the Collegedale area with a view of 
the acquisition of familiarity with the distinguishing features of the great 
plant groups. Two hours lecture, three hours laboratory, each week. 

43 



BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

145. GENERAL EMBRYOLOGY First semester, 3 hours 

Prerequisite: Biology 45, and 46, or equivalent. 

An introduction to the development of the vertebrate animal with emphasis 
on the development of the chick. Two hours lecture, three hours laboratory, 

each week. 

*146. COMPARATIVE ANATOMY Second semester, 3 hours 

Prerequisite: Biology 45 and 46. 

A comparison of the anatomy of the various organ systems of vertebrates. 
The dogfish shark, mud puppy, cat, and/or fetal pig are used for labora- 
tory study. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory each week. 
(Credit will not be given for both this course and the former Zoology 104.) 

*177. MICROTECHNIQUE First semester, 3 hours 

Prerequisite: Biology 1, 2 or equivalent. 

Preparation, mounting, and staining of various plant and animal tissues on 
slides for microscopic study. One hour lecture, six hours laboratory, 
each week. 

*178. ANIMAL HISTOLOGY Second semester, 3 hours 

Prerequisite: Biology 45, and 46 7 or equivalent. 

A descriptive study of normal tissues, including those of man. The micro- 
scopic identification and characteristics of stained sections is emphasized 
in the laboratory. One hour lecture, six hours laboratory, each week. 

191, 192. PROBLEMS IN BIOLOGY Either semester, up to 4 hours 

This course is for biology majors and minors only; individual research 
work in some field of biology. Content and method of study to be arranged. 
Approval must be secured from the department head prior to registration. 



DEPARTMENT OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

Wayne VandeVere 
George Gott Wilbert Schneider 



"Not one business man now connected with the cause needs to be 
a novice. Men of promise in business Jines should develop and perfect 
their talents by most thorough study and training. They should be en- 
couraged to place themselves where, as students, they can rapidly gain 
a knowledge of right business principles and methods." — Testimonies 
to the Church, Vol. 7, page 248. 

44 



BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

Bachelor of Arts With a Major in Business Administration 

Course Requirements 

Major __ 32 hours 

Including 31:32; 61:62; 71„ 72 and fourteen 
hours of upper biennium credit in economics and 
business courses selected with the assistance of 
the adviser. 

Minor -.._ 18 hours 

English 1-2 6 hours 

Literature 51, 52 or 61, 62 4 hours 

Applied Arts -... 4 hours 

Fine Arts 60 or 61 - 4 hours 

Foreign Language 6-14 hours 

P.E. 7, 8 - 1 hour 

Natural Sciences — Mathematics ~ 12 hours 

Religion 12-16 hours 

Social Science (Prin. of Econ. included) 12 hours 

Typewriting 14 or equivalent — . 2 hours 

Eiectives — sufficient to make a four-year total of 128 
semester hours. 



Bachelor of Science with a Major in Accounting 

Course Requirements 

Major __ _ 45 hours 

Including 31:32; 61:62; 71, 72; 102; 112; 
131; 155, 156; 160; 171, and five hours elective 
credits in accounting, general business or eco- 
nomics courses chosen with the assistance of the 
adviser. Students interested in preparing for the 
C.P.A. examinations may wish to elect 191, 192 
— C.P.A. Review Problems. 

Minor 18 hours 

English 1-2 6 hours 

Literature 51, 52 or 61, 62 4 hours 

Applied Arts .. 4 hours 

Fine Arts 60 or 61 4 hours 

P.E. 7, 8 1 hour 

Natural Sciences — Mathematics 12 hours 

Religion 12-16 hours 

45 



BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

Social Science (Prin. of Econ. included) 12 hours 

Secretarial 14 (or equivalent), 76 4 hours 

Electives — sufficient to make a four-year total of 128 
semester hours. 

Students who wish to teach and be certified in General Business 
should follow the teacher-training program. 

Minor: A minor in Business and Economics requires eighteen 
hours, including Accounting 31:32 and Economics 71, 72. 

ACCOUNTING 

IT. SECRETARIAL ACCOUNTING First semester. 3 hours 

A study of the fundamental principles of accounting as applied to mercan- 
tile and personal service enterprises. Two types of personal service enter- 
prises are taken up, namely, professional and business. This course is 
specifically designed to meet the needs of the secretarial and clerical 
students. Two hours lecture, three hours laboratory, each week. 

31:32. PRINCIPLES OF ACCOUNTING Two semesters, 6 hours 

A course in the fundamentals of accounting theory. 

61:62. INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING Two semesters, 6 hours 

Prerequisite: Accounting 31:32. 

Accounting principles and theory. Preparation of statements. Intensive study 
and analysis of the classification and evaluation of balance sheet accounts. 
Two hours lecture, three hours laboratory each week. 

67. PRINCIPLES OF DENOMINATIONAL ACCOUNTS AND RECORDS 

First semester, 2 hours 

A course designed to acquaint the student with the accounting and financial 
records of Seventh-day Adventist denominational institutions, including 
local churches, conferences, academies, book and Bible houses and sani- 
tariums. Credit will not apply on a major in the Business area. 

102. COST ACCOUNTING Second semester, 3 hours 

Prerequisite: Accounting 61. 

The general principles of job order and process cost accounting, including 

the control of burden. Standard costs and budgets are given attention. 

Ml 2. ADVANCED ACCOUNTING Second semester, 3 hours 

Prerequisite: Accounting 61:62. 

Consideration of problems concerned with consolidated financial statements, 

partnerships, businesses in financial difficulty, estates and trusts. 

131. GOVERNMENTAL ACCOUNTING First semester, 3 hours 

Prerequisite: Accounting 61:62. 

A course designed to show and explain the accounting principles and 
procedures applicable to both state and local governments, including 
counties, townships, cities and villages, school districts, and certain in- 
stitutions such as hospitals, colleges and universities. 

*160. AUDITING Second semester, 3 hours 

Prerequisite: Accounting 61:62. 

Accepted standards and procedures applicable to auditing and related 

types of public accounting work. 

46 



BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

171. FEDERAL INCOME TAXES First semester, 4 hours 

Prerequisite: Accounting 31:32. 

This course of study is designed to provide a comprehensive explanation 
of the Federal Tax structure, and to provide training in the application 
of the tax principles to specific problems. The attention of the student is 
directed mainly to those taxes applicable to the Federal Government, which 
includes the Income Tax, Social Security, Estate and Gift Tax. Mention is 
made of state and local taxes applicable to the State of Tennessee. 

182. ACCOUNTING SYSTEMS Second semester, 2 hours 

Prerequisites: Accounting 61, 102. 

A study of the problems involved in the design and installation of 
accounting systems, including the systematizing and detailing of clerical 
departments of a business. Accounts, forms, reports, charts, and other 
materials needed will be prepared. 

*191, 192. C.P.A. REVIEW PROBLEMS Two semesters, 6 hours 

Prerequisite: By permission of instructor. 

Includes a study of accounting theory as exemplified by the accounting 
research bulletins of the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants. 



ECONOMICS AND GENERAL BUSINESS COURSES 

57. SALESMANSHIP First semester, 2 hours 

A study of the principles underlying the personal selling process in relation 
to modern sales practices. 

71, 72. PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS Two semesters, 6 hours 

A survey course in the fundamentals of economics; the institutions, forces, 
and factors affecting production, evaluation, exchange, and distribution of 
wealth in modern society. 

82. STATISTICS Second semester, 3 hours 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 5:6 or 11, or permission of instructor. 
A general survey of the field of statistical procedures and techniques, with 
major emphasis upon the use and interpretation of statistical data and 
the mechanics of computation. 

*129. 130. MARKETING Two semesters, 4 hours 

Prerequisite: Economics 71 required and 72 recommended. 
The first semester includes fundamentals, and emphasis is on the retailing 
area of marketing. The second semester is largely concerned with personal 
selling in the marketing area. 

138. ADVERTISING Second semester, 2 hours 

Salesmanship principles as applied to advertising. Analysis and preparation 
of various types of advertising. Study of advertising media. Principles of 
advertising campaign organization. 

139. MONEY AND BANKING First semester, 3 hours 

Prerequisite: Economics 71, 72. 

Mediums of exchange, money and credit, banks and their services, the 

Federal Reserve System, and other financial institutions are considered. 

141. BUSINESS AND OFFICE MANAGEMENT First semester, 3 hours 

Major emphasis is placed on application of business management prin- 
ciples to the problems of the small business man and on the organizing of 
business and secretarial offices. Attention is given to the training of office 
employees, selection of equipment, and flow of work through the office. 

47 



CHEMISTRY 

*142. BUSINESS POLICY AND MANAGEMENT Second semester, 3 hours 
An analysis of business policies viewed from the standpoint of the func- 
tional characteristics of management processes and current ethics. 

*147. PERSONNEL ADMINISTRATION First semester, 2 hours 

An introduction to the organization, training, motivation, and direction of 
employees with a view to maintaining their productivity and morale at 
high levels. Among topics covered are: selection, training, compensation 
and financial incentives, work standards, techniques of supervision and 
leadership. 

152. BUSINESS FINANCE Second semester, 3 hours 

Prerequisite: Accounting 61:62. 

A study of the fundamental principles of financial organization. Emphasis 

on instruments of finance, policies of capitalization, problems pertaining to 
working capital, and corporate expansion and reorganization. 

155, 156. BUSINESS LAW Two semesters, 6 hours 

The nature and social functions of law; social control through law; the 
law of commercial transactions and business organization. 

*175. BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION PROBLEMS Either semester, 2 hours 

A seminar course in management problems including budgets and financial 
reports. 



DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY 

John Ghristensen Clarence E. Chinn 

It is intended in this department to give students a practical and a 
cultural knowledge of this field of science, and to provide for the needs 
of those planning to become chemists or to enter professional training 
in medicine, dentistry, nursing, and related fields. 

Bachelor of Arts With a Major in Chemistry 

A minor in Physics or Biology is recommended, and Mathematics 
through Calculus and Physics 51-52 are advised. 

A major or minor in Chemistry must include Chemistry 102 and 

114 except for Home Economics or Dietetics students minoring in 
chemistry. 

This degree does not necessarily prepare for graduate work in 
chemistry unless Chemistry 151,152 are included. 

48 



Home Management Class En+er+ains 







•: r- 




Cyl* 




CHEMISTRY 

Course Requirements 

Major (Chemistry) 30 hours 

Including: 1-2; 63; 113-114; 102 (4 hours); 144; 190. 
Minor in Mathematics, Physics, or Biology 

recommended _ 18 hours 

English 1-2, Literature 51, 52 or 61, 62 10 hours 

Applied Arts _ 4 hours 

Fine Arts,, including 60 or 6l 4 hours 

Foreign Language (German recommended) 6-1 4 hours 

P.E. 7, 8 1 hour 

Religion 12-16 hours 

Social Science 12 hours 

Mathematics 11:12 8 hours 

Electives — sufficient to make a four-year total of 

128 semester hours. 
Pre-medical students will also take Biology 45, 46; 145; and 
Physics 51-52. Calculus recommended. 

Bachelor of Science With a Major In Chemistry 

This degree is a preparation for graduate work in chemistry or for 
a professional career in chemistry. 

Course Requirements 
Major (Chemistry) 40 hours 

Including: 1-2; 63; 102 (4 hours); 113-114; 

121; 133; 144; 151, 152; 190. f 
Minor should be chosen from Math., Physics, Biology, 

or Foods and Nutritionf f 18 hours 

English 1-2 6 hours 

Literature 51, 52, 61 or 62 2 hours 

Applied Arts 4 hours 

Fine Arts 60 or 61 .. 2 hours 

Foreign Language — German 6-14 hours 

P.E. 7, 8 -.- 1 hour 

Mathematics 11:12; 99, 100 16 hours 

Physics 51-52 — . 8 hours 

Religion 12-16 hours 

Social Science ~ 9 hours 



fStudents planning to do graduate work in Biochemistry should elect 
171:172 as part of the major and should also take Biology 22, 45 and 46. 
■ffStudents minoring in Foods and Nutrition should also- elect 171:172 as 
part of the major. 

49 



CHEMISTRY 

Electives — sufficient to make a four-year total of 128 
semester hours. 



1-2. GENERAL CHEMISTRY Two semesters, 8 hours 

Prerequisites: High school algebra and either high school physics or 
chemistry or the instructor's permission. (It is recommended that Math 
11:12 or 5:6 be taken concurrently.) 

An introduction to the elements and their principal compounds; the funda- 
mental laws and accepted theories of chemistry. Three hours lecture, three 
hours laboratory, each week, 

*5. INTRODUCTION TO CHEMISTRY First semester, 3 hours 

This course is designed specifically for students preparing for elementary 
school teaching. It consists of simple demonstrations of chemical principles, 
using materials available in the home or school and a discussion of the 
basic principles involved; emphasis is laid on application to home situations 
and on relationships to other sciences. Training is also given in the use of 
chemical illustrations to demonstrate character lessons. This course carries 
credit only toward a degree in elementary education. Two hours lecture, 
three hours laboratory. 

6. NUTRITION Second semester, 2 hours 

See foods and nutrition, course No. 2. (Does not apply on a major or a 
minor.) 

6a. FOODS AND NUTRITION LABORATORY Second semester, I hour 

See foods and nutrition course No. 2a. (Does not apply on a major or a 
minor.) 

7-8. SURVEY OF CHEMISTRY Two semesters, 6 hours 

Prerequisites: High school algebra, and either high school physics or 
chemistry, or instructor's permission. 

A survey course designed to familiarize the student with the basic principles 
of chemistry. Attention is given particularly to solutions, chemistry of nu- 
trition, digestion, and metaDolism. Of special interest to students who need 
a survey course in chemistry. It will also fulfill the natural science require- 
ment. It is a terminal course and may not be used as a prerequisite for 
advanced chemistry courses. Two hours lecture, three hours laboratory, 
each week. 

63. QUALITATIVE ANALYSIS First semester, 2 hours 

Prerequisites: Chemistry 1-2, Mathematics 11:12 or 5:6 or equivalent. 
A study of the principles and methods for the separation and identification 
of inorganic ions; analysis of several unknowns. Two hours lecture (one 
hour of which is laboratory instruction requiring no homework), two 
hours laboratory, each week. 

81. ORGANIC CHEMISTRY First semester, 4 hours 

A brief study of simple organic compounds, both aliphatic and aromatic 
and their reactions. Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory, each week. 

102. QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS Second semester, 3 or 4 hours 

Prerequisites: Chemistry 1-2, 63. 

This course includes the study of typical volumetric and gravimetric 
methods, quantitative determinations of acidity, alkalinity, and percentage 
composition of a variety of unknowns with the related theory and problems. 
Two hours lecture, three or six hours laboratory, each week. 

50 



CHEMISTRY 

113-114. ORGANIC CHEMISTRY Two semesters, 8 hours 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 1-2. 

A study of the aliphatic and aromatic compounds of carbon and their 
reactions. The laboratory work includes typical syntheses of various com- 
pounds. Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory, each week. 



121. ORGANIC QUALITATIVE ANALYSIS First semester, 2 or 3 hours 
Prerequisite: Chemistry 113-114. 

Application of solubility principles, classification reactions and the 
preparation of derivatives to the identification of both pure compounds and 
mixtures. Two hours of lecture for nine weeks, and three or six hours of 
laboratory each week. 

122. ADVANCED ORGANIC CHEMISTRY Second semester, 3 hours 
Prerequisite: Chemistry 113-114. 

Laboratory principles and practice in the synthesis of various organic com- 
pounds and other selected topics. Two hours of lecture, and three hours of 
laboratory work each week. 



133. INSTRUMENTAL ANALYSIS First semester, 2 or 3 hours 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 102. 

A study of the theories, techniques and instruments involved in spectro- 
photometry, potentiometry, conductimetry, electrodeposition, radiochemistry 
and polarography. One hour lecture and three or six hours laboratory 
each week. 



144. LABORATORY GLASS BLOWING Second semester, I or 2 hours 

Training is given in the manipulation of glass for the fabrication of 
laboratory apparatus. Three or six hours laboratory each week. This course 
does not count on basic science requirements nor on the 30 hours of the 
major. 



151. 152. PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY Two semesters. 8 hours 

Prerequisites: Chemistry 102, Physics 51-52, Mathematics 11:12. Calculus 
required for 151, and advised for 152. 

A study of the facts, laws, theories, and problems relating to gases, liquids, 
solids, solutions, equilibrium, thermo-chemistry, electro-chemistry, and 
atomic structure. Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory, each week. 



171:172. BIOCHEMISTRY Both semesters, 6 hours 

Prerequisite; Chemistry 113-114 or 81. 

The materials, mechanisms, and end-products of the processes of life under 
normal and pathological conditions are studied. Two hours lecture, three 
hours laboratory, each week. 



190. INTRODUCTION TO RESEARCH Either semester, up to 3 hours 

Prerequisite: 20 hours of Chemistry. 

Individual research under the direction of the members of the staff. 
Problems are assigned according to the experience and interest of the 
student. 

51 



DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNICATIONS 

Gordon M. Hyde 
Douglas Bennett William H. Taylor 

'The age of mass media of communications has brought to 
increasing prominence the academic field of Communications. To pro- 
vide students with a broad general background upon which later spe- 
cialization can be built, a strong selection of courses has been drawn 
together from a number of academic areas to constitute a Major in 
Communications. The offerings have been drawn largely from Journal- 
ism, Public Relations, and Speech. These in turn are undergirded with 
a widely-based Arts program in the freshman and sophomore years 
particularly. This is in conformity with the prevailing broad cultural 
emphasis which is being given in departments of Communications. 

Graduates with a Baccalaureate Degree in Communications, as 
outlined below, will be adequately equipped for positions in the editorial 
and public relations offices of the denomination, or to proceed with a 
program of graduate work in Speech or Journalism with a view to 
teaching on one of the several educational levels. 

Radio Station WSMC-FM— Communications students at Southern 
Missionary College have a unique challenge to educational experience 
by participation in the programming and directing of the educational 
radio station, WSMC-FM. The studios and electronic equipment are a 
part of 'the laboratory of the Communications Department. They arc- 
adequate for high-quality programming of considerable versatility. 

Owned by Southern Missionary College, Inc., and operated by the 
Student Association, the station is under the supervision and sponsorship 
of the Communications Department. The station operates on a wave- 
length of 88.1 mc. and a present power of 10 watts. Its signal reaches 
the Chattanooga, Collegedale, and Cleveland communities. 



Bachelor of Arts Wifh a Major in Communications 

Course Requirements 

Major (Communications) 30 hours 

Including: Speech 5:6; 76; 113; 117; Journalism 
53, 54; 143:144; Public Relations 16*6; English 
124. 

Minor (English [21 hours], Social Science, Re- 
ligion, Business recommended) 18 hours 

English 1-2 6 hours 

Literature 51, 52 4 hours 



52 






COMMUNICATIONS 

Modern Foreign Language 6-14 hours 

Fine Arts 60 or 6l 4 hours 

P.E. 7, 8 1 hour 

Natural Science — Mathematics (Electronics 81 

recommended) - 12 hours 

Religion 12-16 hours 

Applied Theology 73 - -— - 2 hours 

Social Science 1, 2 and 53, 54 - 12 hours 

Business Administration 137; 138 - 4 hours 

Vocational 8 hours 

Typing 13 (or 1 year of high school typing) 

Typography 17:18 
Electives — sufficient to make a four-year total of 128 

semester hours. 



(Recommended: General Psychology, 51; World Geography, 142; 
History of the South, 148; International Relationships, 162; American 
Government 115.) 

Minor: A minor in Communications requires 18 semester hours 
of courses in Journalism and Speech, including News, 53; Copyreading, 
54; and Fundamentals of Speech, 5:6. Six hours must be in the upper 
biennium courses. 



JOURNALISM 

The offerings in the field of Journalism are being augmented to 
make possible a minor in this vital segment of communications. Modern 
methods of institutional administration, of evangelism, and of business, 
necessitate personnel in those areas who have a knowledge of news,, 
its writing, and its dissemination to all communications media. This, 
minor in Journalism is designed to provide a background for such. 
personnel. 

Minor: A minor in Journalism requires 18 semester hours of" 
the courses described below, of which the following are required: 
News, 53; Copyreading, 54; Typography, 17:18; Advertising, 138;; 
and History and Principles of Journalism, 143: 144. 

17:18. TYPOGRAPHY Two semesters, 6 hours. 

A study of the common processes of typesetting, hand and machine com- 
position, presswork with special consideration for proper grouping and 1 
spacing of jobs, layout, and design. The second semester's work will' 
lead into the fundamentals of proofreading and copy preparation, the- 
study of rules and practices regarding book, magazine, and newspaper ■ 
publishing and job work. On-the-job practice in handling^ proofroom i 
problems. Open to men and women. 

53 



COMMUNICATIONS 

53. NEWS One semester, 2 hours 

Relation of the press to society and world events. Practice in news 
writing and general reporting of church, school, and other activities for 
the public press. Personal interviews. Feature stories. Revision and cor- 
rection of articles submitted, 

54. COPYREAD1NG One semester, 2 hours 

This course deals with the writing techniques and editing that are re- 
quired of editors of newspapers, magazines, and denominational periodi- 
cals. Instruction will be given in preparing manuscripts and seeing them 
through the various phases of printing, 

124. CREATIVE WRITING Second semester, 3 hours 

Designed to give the journalism student experience in writing features, 
short stories, essays, etc., for publications. 

138. ADVERTISING Second semester, 2 hours 

Salesmanship principles as applied to advertising. Analysis of various 
types of advertising. Study of advertising media. Principles of adver- 
tising campaign organization, 

143:144. HISTORY AND PRINCIPLES OF JOURNALISM 

Two semesters, 6 hours 
The course is a survey of the history of the great newspapers and journalists 
in the United States. Particular emphasis is given to ethics in journalism. 

166. PUBLIC RELATIONS Second semester, 3 hours 

Designed to give professional competence in the theory and practice of 
public relations, the course is a study of the plans and methods of dissemi- 
nating news from business establishments and from institutions through 
all the media of communications. 

SPEECH 

The course offerings in Speech are intended not only for students 
who may be specializing in Communications, but they are designed to 
be of practical value as "service" courses to students from all areas of 
the College. It is assumed that any graduate of a liberal arts college 
will desire to develop his ability to express his convictions clearly, 
logically and persuasively. To serve this wider need the courses in 
Fundamentals and in Voice and Diction (Speech 5:6 and 63) may be 
entered without prerequisite. The courses in Oral Interpretation and 
Elements of Radio and TV may be entered with the consent of the 
instructor and with the appropriate academic standing. The courses in 
Persuasion, in Discussion and in Homiletics call also for Speech 5:6 
as a prerequisite. 

Major: While no major is offered in Speech itself, it is now 
possible for a student especially interested in the Speech field to major 
in Communications which is strong in Speech offerings. 

Minor: A minor In Speech requires 18 semester hours including 
Fundamentals of Speech, 5:6; Oral Interpretation, 64; Elements of 
Radio and TV, 76; Psychology of Persuasive Speech, 113; Discussion 

54 



EDUCATION 

.nd Leadership, 117; Homiletics and Pulpit Delivery, 119, 120; or 
/oice and Diction, 63; and Special Projects in Speech, 140. 

>:6. FUNDAMENTALS OF SPEECH Two semesters, 4 hours 

Establishment of a basic approach to speech, an elementary survey of the 
whoJe area, and an opportunity to develop speaking ability in various 
speech situations. 

63. VOICE AND DICTION First semester, 2 hours 

An introductory study of the speech mechanism and the improvement of 
its functioning, with special attention to individual problems. 

14. ORAL INTERPRETATION Second semester, 2 hours 

Theory and practice in the art of conveying to others the full meaning of 
selected readings, secular and sacred. Special needs of teachers and ministers 
considered, 

76. ELEMENTS OF RADIO AND TV Second semester, 3 hours 

An introduction to the media of radio and television and the development of 
basic skills in the preparation and presentation of various types of programs. 

113. PSYCHOLOGY OF PERSUASIVE SPEECH First semester, 3 hours 

Prerequisite: Speech 5:6. 

A study and development of the art of discovering all the available means 
of persuasion in a variety of communication situations, both religious and 
secular. 

'117. DISCUSSION AND LEADERSHIP First semester, 3 hours 

Prerequisite: Speech 5:6. 

Analysis of the role of discussion in modern society and the church, and 
development of the attitudes and skills essential to its useful practice. 

119, 120. HOMILETICS AND PULPIT DELIVERY Two semesters, 4 hours 

Prerequisite; Speech 5:6. 

Training in the preparation and delivery of the various types of talks and 
addresses the Christian worker or preacher is called upon to present. 

r 140. SPECIAL PROJECTS IN SPEECH Two semesters, I hour 

The content of this course will be adjusted to meet the particular needs of 
the individual student who is working toward a major or minor in Com- 
munications, or toward a minor in Speech. 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 
AND PSYCHOLOGY 

Kenneth M. Kennedy 
'ames M. Ackerman Marion S. Simmons 

)LivrA B, Dean Everett T, Watrous 

» 



EDUCATION 

Supervisory Instructors — Secondary 

Paul C. Boynton Kenneth C. Stewart 

Thelma Hemme Drew Turlington 

Norma Kellams Olive Westphal 

Lynn Sauls Donald Woodruff 

Supervisory Instructors — Elementary 

Mildred Baldwin Ruth Sorrell 

Richard Christoph Jessie Pendergrass 

Elmyra Conger. 

The courses offered in this division are both "content" courses 
of interest to all and specialized courses of value to teachers and other 
professional workers. 

The offerings in Psychology are all content courses. 

Departmental Aims 

The courses in education have two aims: 

1. Professional preparation for elementary and secondary school 
teachers in meeting certification requirements. 

2. To provide a general understanding of the school as a social 
institution for those entering services other than teaching. 

The preparation of teachers is recognized as one of the important 
phases of the educational program of Southern Missionary College. 
The Department of Education offers a program which will help quali- 
fied persons to develop into competent teachers. The courses are de- 
signed to meet certification requirements and to provide a foundation 
for graduate study. The department offers work in both the elementary 
and the secondary fields. 

For admission without deficiency, entrance units as required of 
all students must be presented. General education core requirements 
for students who desire a degree from Southern Missionary College are 
listed on pages 36, 37. 

Admission, Evaluation, and Recommendation Criteria 

Students should identify themselves as to interest in the teacher 
education curriculum as early in their college career as possible, and 
by all means, not later than the junior year. If, however, the student 
develops an interest beyond this point, it may take a longer time for 

56 



EDUCATION 

him to complete the degree and certification requirements. The se- 
quence of courses is the same regardless of when he enters. 

The Tennessee regulation for certification of teachers now places 
the responsibility of recommending students for certification upon the 
institution which provides the training. Because much more is involved 
in successful teaching than meeting the college and state requirements 
for credit hours, endorsement areas, and grade point averages, the 
Teacher Education Council with membership from the Department of 
Education and the content areas, has been established to evaluate the 
likelihood of the student's success in teaching. The following kinds 
of data, furnished by the student and his instructor, will be used as 
a basis of evaluation: scholastic achievement, academic aptitude, physical 
and mental health, speech, interest and motivation for teaching, and 
personality adjustment. 

A grade point average of 1.25 in courses of the content major, 
minor, and professional education courses, and a recommendation by 
the Teacher Education Council will be required for admission into the 
student teaching experience. 

As an aid to the above evaluation procedures, at least two se- 
mester hours of student teaching must be completed under the super- 
vision of the Department of Education at Southern Missionary College 
by candidates for degrees, regardless of the amount of similar credits 
received elsewhere. A computed minimum of six to eight hours is 
required for recommendation for certification. 



Laboratory Experience 

The Arthur W. Spalding Elementary School and the Collegedale 
Academy serve as campus laboratory schools. Selected public elementary 
and secondary schools of the Collegedale area also serve as laboratory 
schools for students preparing to teach. These units afford a rich op- 
portunity for observation and student teaching. 

Teaching Areas 

The teaching areas in which the college has sufficient facilities 
and staff to develop approved programs for endorsement in grades 7-12 
are: Bible, General Business, (including secretarial offerings), English 
(including speech), Foreign language (including German and 
Spanish), Health and Physical Education, History, Home Economics 
(non- vocational), Mathematics, Mathematics and Physical Science, 
Music Education (School Music and Instrumental music, grades 1-12), 

57 



EDUCATION 

and Science (including general science and separate sciences of biology, 
chemistry, and physics) . 

Detailed information concerning all courses needed for endorse- 
ment in any of the teaching areas can be obtained from the Director 
of Teacher Education. 

Certification 

A student completing the four year degree curriculum in ele- 
mentary education or the degree requirements to meet secondary ed- 
ucation certification will be eligible to receive state and denominational 
certification. 

Students planning to teach in states other than Tennessee should 
consult the Director of Teacher Education as to specific requirements 
to be met. Under proper guidance a student may complete require- 
ments for certification in any of the fifty states. Below are listed the 
curricula that meet the certification requirements for Tennessee and 
the General Conference of Seventh -day Adventists. 

Teacher Education Programs 

The teacher education programs are approved by the State of 
Tennessee Department of Education and the Department of Education 
of the General Conference of Seventh-day Adventists. 

Students in secondary education will be expected to major and 
minor in content fields in which they plan to teach. The content of 
the major is to be assigned to meet the subject matter needs of teachers. 
Those who plan to teach on the elementary education level must major 
in elementary education and have a minor in a minimum of one con- 
tent field. One may work toward the Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of 
Music, and the Bachelor of Science degree (see requirements page 
33), while concurrently meeting certification requirements. 

Bachelor of Science Degree for Elementary Education Major 

Professional Education 33 hours 

Including Education course requirements 5, *2l, 
71, 142, 163, 171, 191, Psychology **51, 
107, and 112. 

Minor 18 hours 

General and specialized education core: 

English 1, 2 6 hours 

Speech - — . 2 hours 

58 



EDUCATION 

Literature 52, 109 — - 4 hours 

Fine Arts, Art 27, 28; 65, 66 6 hours 

Physical Education 7, 8; Health 22; Soc. 

Science 82 12 hours 

Natural Science, Biology 9, Chemistry 5, 

Physics 2 - ----- - 12 hours 

Mathematics 1, 2 .- 4 hours 

Religion _. - 12-16 hours 

Social Science 142, 148 12 hours 

Applied Arts (Industrial arts 31, 32 

recommended) .... 4 hours 

Eleotives — sufficient to include a minor with a four year total of 
128 hours. 



Secondary Program 

Minimum degree requirements for secondary school certification. 

Course Requirements: 

Professional Education 26 hours 

including Education *21 7 142, 165, 167, 173, 
and 191; Psychology **51, 112, (107, or 150 
or 180). 

Content Major .„. (See department requirement) 

Content Minor (See department requirement) 

General Education Core: 

English 1, 2 6 hours 

Speech 2 hours 

Modern Language (required for B.A. degree) 6-14 hours 

Literature - 4 hours 

Natural Science 12 hours 

Mathematics 1 (or equivalent) 2 hours 

Social Science (two fields represented) 12 hours 

Fine Arts (art 60 or music 61) - 4 hours 

P. E. (including 7, 8) and Social Science 82 .... 6 hours 

Religion 12-16 hours 

Applied Arts 4 hours 

Electives — sufficient to make a four year total of 
L28 semester hours. 



* Education 21 not accepted for state certification. 
** Psychology 51 not accepted for denominational certification. 



59 



EDUCATION 

It is the philosophy of Southern Missionary College that the 
basic pattern of General and professional education needed for teaching 
should follow a sequence. The time for the courses to be taken is 
indicated under the section Course Numbers. 



COURSES IN EDUCATION 
General 

5. INTRODUCTION TO TEACHING First semester, 2 hours 

The student is given an opportunity to become acquainted with the needed 
personal and professional traits, duties, and responsibilities of the teacher. 
Observation and participation in classroom and play activities at all grade 
levels. Two class periods per week plus special assignments. 

21. FUNDAMENTALS OF EDUCATION Either semester, 2 hours 

A survey of the basic principles of education. The course examines the 
fundamental philosophy of Christian education. 

138. AUDIO-VISUAL EDUCATION Second semester, 2 hours 

The survey of aims, methods, and materials involved in use and evaluation 
of audio-visual instruction aids. 

140. PROBLEMS IN TEACHING READING Second semester, 2 hours 

The purpose of this course is to give a comprehensive view of reading 
problems, and to plan programs which meet the needs of individual pupils. 
Diagnostic and remedial procedures for grades 7-12 will be stressed, and 
experience in the use of the various types of materials and equipment 
available. Recommended for all secondary teachers. 

142. SCHOOL ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION 

Second semester, 2 hours 

This course is designed to help elementary and secondary students develop 
a better understanding of the organization and administration of the school. 
Some topics considered are; problems of prospective teachers, professional 
relations, reports and records, the teacher's relationship with other school 
personnel and working with other agencies. 

191. HISTORY AND PHILOSOPHY OF EDUCATION First semester, 2 hours 
This course is offered the first nine weeks, double periods - A study of 
the historical, philosophical and sociological foundations of education. 

193. DIRECTED STUDY Either semester, 2 hours 

This course permits the advanced student with adequate preparation to 
pursue independent study in special fields. 



Elementary 

65-66. ELEMENTARY SCHOOL MUSIC Two semesters. 4 hours 

A course designed to prepare teachers to direct the musk activities in the 
elementary school. Laboratory experience required. 

71. TEACHING OF READING First semester, 3 hours 

A study of objectives, methods, and procedures in the teaching of reading 

60 



EDUCATION 

in the elementary school. Opportunity to observe the teaching of reading 
in the laboratory school will be scheduled. Two semester hours lecture, 
one hour laboratory work. 

163. MATERIALS AND METHODS OF TEACHING IN THE ELEMENTARY 
SCHOOL First semester, 6 hours 

This course will be offered the first nine weeks of the semester. Double 
periods are required. Emphasis is placed on general methods and ma- 
terials for the teaching of arithmetic, Bible, language arts, social studies, 
health and science. Two hours of observation each week will be scheduled. 

171. STUDENT TEACHING, GRADES 1-9 First semester, 8 hours 

Prerequisite: Education 142, 163; Psychology 112; grade point average 1.25. 
This course is offered the second nine weeks of the first semester. Directed 
observation and participation in classroom activities, including full day 
classroom teaching in campus and off-campus laboratory schools. 

197. WORKSHOP IN ELEMENTARY EDUCATION Summer only, 2 Hours 

Opportunity is provided for students to work under supervision on curri- 
culum problems. 



Secondary 

162. ADMINISTRATIVE AND PERSONNEL WORK OF DEANS 

Second semester, 2 hours 
A basic professional course in the administration of the school home. 
(Offered on demand.) 

165. THE SECONDARY SCHOOL CURRICULUM First semester, 2 hours 

This course will be offered the first nine weeks, double periods. A study 
of the purposes and organization of the secondary school curriculum and 
some of the promising practices in curriculum development. 

167. METHODS AND MATERIALS OF SECONDARY TEACHING 

First semester, 3 hours 
This course will be offered the first nine weeks, double periods. Methods 
of planning, organi2ing, stimulating and directing classroom activities. 
Organization of courses, selection of appropriate materials for classroom 
teaching. This course covers all areas of endorsement, methods in spe- 
cific areas are studied after an introduction to general methods. Two 
hours of observation each week will be scheduled in special areas. 

173. STUDENT TEACHING, GRADES 7-12 First semester, 6 hours 

Prerequisite: Education 165, 167; grade point average 1.25 in teaching 
areas and professional subjects. 

This course to be offered the second nine weeks of the first semester. 
Directed observation and participation in classroom activities, including full 
day classroom teaching in campus and off-campus laboratory schools. 



COURSES IN PSYCHOLOGY 

A minor in psychology includes 18 hours from the courses listed 
in psychology plus a two-hour course in Statistics (Business Ad- 
ministration 82.) 

61 



EDUCATION 

51. GENERAL PSYCHOLOGY Either semester, 3 Hours 

An introduction to the study of the problems of human behavior, and of 
the mental processes and their development. This is a foundation course 
designed to help the student understand and explain the behavior of others 
and thereby be better able to predict and control his own life and influence 
the lives of others. 

*92. SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY Second semester, 2 hours 

Prerequisite: Psychology 51. 

A study of the interrelations of individuals in social situations, how the 
individual is influenced by others, and how in turn he affects the behavior of 
others. Does not apply toward professional requirements in teacher edu- 
cation. 

107. EDUCATIONAL EVALUATION First semester, 2 hours 

A study of the various types of educational tests and examinations, and 
modern methods in their construction and use; also mastery of the most 
useful statistical techniques, with practice in working and interpreting 
problems involving educational and psychological data. The course includes 
some time given to the administration and interpretation of tests of 
intelligence, vocational interests, and personality. 

112. CHILD AND EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY Second semester, 3 hours 
This course deals with the physical, social, emotional, and intellectual 
growth and development of children and adolescents in the home and 
community. Special emphasis will be given to the psychological factors 
which underlie and influence the learning process. 

131. ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY First semester, 3 hours 

Prerequisite: Psychology 51 and 112. 

A course dealing with abnormal adjustment, causes, and symptoms of 
personality disturbances and mental disorders. 

142. APPLIED PSYCHOLOGY Second semester, 2 hours 

Prerequisite: Psychology 51. 

This is a study of psychology in business, industry, public speaking, publi- 
cations, politics, religion, and various other phases of everyday human 
activity. Does not apply toward professional requirements in teacher 
education. 

*150. PERSONALITY AND MENTAL HYGIENE Second semester, 3 hours 

Prerequisite: Psychology 51. 

A study of the incidence, causes, and methods, of preventing maladjust- 
ments and mental illness. Consideration is given to the meaning, importance, 
and conditions that affect the growth of personality, and methods of its 
improvement. 

180. GUIDANCE AND COUNSELING Second semester, 3 hours 

Prerequisite: Psychology 51. 

A survey of the current aims of counseling and guidance in school and 
community. Basic principles, procedures, and policies of counseling and 
guidance are emphasized. Directive and non-directive methods are stressed 
with the untrained or slightly trained teachers. 

62 



DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH LANGUAGE 
AND LITERATURE 

Gordon Madcwick 
Clyde G. Bushnell Evlyn Lindbi-rc 

Olivia Dean Ann Parrish 



As its chief aim, the English Department regards the teaching of a 
correct usage of the language in all its facets of oral and written dis- 
course. In the study of literature, students are introduced to ideas and 
social backgrounds by contact with rewarding prose and poetry. 

Major: A major in English shall consist of 34 hours, including 
Freshman Composition, four hours of Communications, Survey of 
American Literature, Survey of English Literature and Advanced Gram- 
mar. In addition, English History or its equivalent is required. Students 
planning to teach are strongly urged to take Problems in the Teaching 
of Reading and the course Directed Observation and Teaching. 

Minor: A minor in English requires 21 semester hours, including 
Freshman Composition, Survey of American Literature, and Advanced 
Grammar. 



Bachelor of Arts With a Major in English 
Course Requirements 

Major (English) ._ - 34 hours 

Including: See paragraph above. 

Minor in Education recommended 18 hours 

Fine Arts 60 or 6l required 4 hours 

Foreign Language 6-14 hours 

P.E. 7, 8 1 hour 

Natural Sciences — Mathematics 12 hours 

Religion 12-16 hours 

Social Science 12 hours 

Applied Arts - — .. 4 hours 

E I ectives— sufficient to make a four-year total of 128 

semester hours. 

1-2. FRESHMAN ENGLISH Two semesters, 6 hours 

Admission to English I depends upon the student's satisfactory performance 
in the entrance examination sections on mechanics and effectiveness of 
expression. No grade will be given for Freshman Composition unless the 

63 



ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 

student has achieved a satisfactory score in reading speed and com pre- 
hension. See the 01 and 02 courses below. A student failing the first se- 
mester will not be permitted to continue with the second semester. 

01. BASIC GRAMMAR One semester, I hour elective credit 

Students whose scores on the English placement tests indicate definite 
weakness in mechanics and effectiveness of expression are required to 
register for this class, Concurrent registration in Freshman English may be 
possible if the result of the test in mechanics indicates that, with the 
additional help in grammar, the student will be able to meet the require- 
ments of the Freshman English course. Repetition of Basic Grammar will 
be required of anyone who fails the semester's work, and in that case the 
student may not continue in Freshman English. 

02. READING TECHNIQUES Either semester, I hour elective credit 

At least one semester of Reading Techniques is required of all students 
who do not reach the standard set for the reading section of the freshman 
placement tests, 

20-21. ADVANCED FRESHMAN ENGLISH Two semesters, 6 hours 

A course designed for those students whose placement tests indicate a 

mature grasp of the fundamentals of English grammar and composition. 
In such cases it substitutes for English 1-2. 

51. 52. SURVEY COURSE IN AMERICAN LITERATURE 

Two semesters, 4 hours 
A study of the chief poets and prose writers in America from pre-Columbian 
times to the present. Attention is directed to the literary achievements 
of the Indians, the Spanish Conquistadors, and the writings of the early 

missionaries on the frontier. 

61, 62. SURVEY COURSE IN ENGLISH LITERATURE Two semesters, 4 hours 
A study of the chief British writers from Beowulf to the present. 

53. JOURNALISM — NEWS One semester, 2 hours 

Relation of the press to society and world events. Practice in news writing 
and general reporting of church, school, and other activities for the public 
press. Personal interviews. Feature stories. Revision and correction of 
articles submitted . 

54. JOURNALISM — COPYREADING One semester, 2 hours 
This course deals with the writing techniques and editing that are re- 
quired of editors of newspapers, magazines and denominational periodi- 
cals. Instruction will be given in preparing manuscripts and seeing through 
the various aspects of printing. 

101. 102. MASTERPIECES OF LITERATURE Two semesters, 4 hours 

This is an introduction to great literature and is designed to fit the needs 
of the general Seventh -day Adventist college student. The year is spent 
in careful reading of the great writings from many countries. 

109. CHILDREN'S LITERATURE First semester, 2 hours 

The course places special emphasis upon the selection and presentation of 
literature suitable for children and offers opportunity to examine many 
types of books for children. 

123. ADVANCED GRAMMAR First semester, 3 hours 

A course devised to help prospective teachers and writers understand the 
structure of the English language and further develop their powers of 
analysis. 

64 



Women's Residence Hall room facilities 




■h HHHHB| 



■M 






HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

124. CREATIVE WRITING Second semester, 3 hours 

Designed to follow 123 and provide the student with a training which will 
enable him to write for publication. 

127. BIBLICAL LITERATURE First semester, 3 hours 

A study of the types of literature in the English Bible, particularly empha- 
sizing passages of outstanding literary genius and grandeur. 

134. CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE 2 hours 
A study of outstanding writers, both English and American, since 1900, 
with special consideration of works showing the trends of the time. 

135. HISTORY OF THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE First semester, 3 hours 
A non-technical treatment of the periods of development of the language 
with special attention given to word study and vocabulary building. 

140, ELIZABETHAN LITERATURE Second semester, 3 hours 

A study of the major English writers of the Elizabethan age. 

142. MILTON Second semester, 3 hours 

The poetry and prose of this outstanding Puritan writer. 

*147. THE ROMANTIC MOVEMENT First semester, 3 hours 

Historical and philosophical background of the period, changing attitudes 
in life and literature. Poets from Wordsworth to Keats. Prose writers from 
Lamb to Macaulay. 

*148. THE VICTORIAN PERIOD Second semester, 3 hours 

Continuation of 147. Poets from Tennyson to Kipling, and prose writers 
from Carlyle to Stevenson. 

161. SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN ENGLISH Either semester, I or 2 hours 

The content of this course will be adjusted to meet the particular needs of 
the individual student. Open only to English majors, or minors with the 
approval of the department head. 



DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, 
PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND RECREATION 

Cyril Dean Marian Kuhlman 



The courses in this department are designed to improve human 
relations through cooperative group activity; to improve the physio- 
logical functions of the individual through proper exercise and an in- 
creased knowledge of body functions in relationship to activity; to foster 
the spirit of fair play which is democracy in action; to teach the values 
of physical education and recreation in the enrichment of the Christian 
life, 

65 



HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Course Requirements for Minor in Health 

and Physical Education 

P. E. (selected from activity courses 1 to 49) 4 hours 

P. E. 35 2 hours 

P. E. 57, 58 4 hours 

P. E. 85 or 86 2 hours 

P. E. 128 2 hours 

P. E. 143 2 hours 

P. E. 147 2 hours 

P. E. 22, 53 - 4 hours 

Total Semester Hours 20 hours 

Cognate requirements — Anatomy and Physiology 11, 12. 



ACTIVITY COURSES 






The activities program, elective in nature, is set up to provide a 
variety of subjects. 

Students enrolled in activity courses must wear regulation suits 
and shoes to all class appointments. Regulation gym wear for both 
men and women will be available at the college store, Southern 
Mercantile. For full particulars, see your respective dormitory dean 
or the director of physical education. No credit will be given unless this 
requirement is complied with. 

All physically qualified students must take the required basic 
course. 

A student may not sign up for more than one activity per semester 
unless given permission by the Dean or the Department Head. 

The "beginning" courses will deal with lowest nomenclature and 
special techniques of the activity, as well as considerable time spent in 
actual participation in the activity. Advanced courses are an extension of 
the same courses, 

7, 8. FRESHMAN PHYSICAL EDUCATION Two semesters, I hour 

Required of all Freshmen. 

Body mechanics, games, skill tests, etc, 

9, 10. ADAPTED PHYSICAL EDUCATION Two semesters, 1 hour 

A course offered for those physically unable to take part in the basic 
required program. A "B" medical rating automatically upon registration, 
classifies the student for this part of the program. 

66 



HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

I BASKETBALL First semester, Vi hour 

Dribbling, passing, defense, scoring plays, rules, skill drills, etc. 

I. TENNIS Second semester, '/z hour 

Serving, strokes, scoring, strategy, skill drills, tests, round robin, and 
ladder tournament. Class size limited to facilities. 

I, 24. RECREATIONAL ACTIVITIES Two semesters, I hour 

An area of the program whereby men and women may play together. 
Designed to include various recreational activities. 

I 28. TUMBLING AND GYMNASTICS Two semesters, I hour 

Accent on rolls, stunts, pyramids, self-testing activities. Conditioning 
heavily emphasized. 

■ ARCHERY— CO-EDUCATIONAL Second semester, '/a hour 

Fundamentals of shooting, skill drills, tournaments, safety are presented. 
Class size limited. 

). CAMP EDUCATION Either semester, A hour 

A course designed to promote outdoor recreation and provide experience 
for those who are interested in Pathfinder summer-camp work. Campouts, 
hikes, practice in camping techniques, etc. 

7. 58. TECHNIQUES OP PHYSICAL ACTIVITIES Two semesters, 4 hours 

A study of mechanics, progression and officiating of selected physical 
activities. 

I, 72. APPARATUS (MEN ONLY) Either semester, '/a hour 

Parallel bars, rings, high bar work. 

3. BEGINNING TRAMPOLINE First semester, Vi hour 

74. ADVANCED TRAMPOLINE Second semester, '/? hour 



THEORY COURSES 

. HOME NURSING Second semester, I hour 

Lecture and demonstrations will be based on the American Rsd Cross 
textbook in home hygiene and care of the sick. Red Cross Home Hygiene 
Certificates are issued to those successfully completing the course. In addi- 
tion, hydrotherapy will be given. 

2. SAFETY EDUCATION Either semester, 2 hours 

The nature and causes of accidents, safety measures for the precaution of 
common accidents of the home, school, industry, transportation, and 
recreation. The standard and advanced Red Cross Certificates will be issued 
to those completing the required work in first aid. 

5. INTRODUCTION TO HEALTH, PHYSICAL EDUCATION. AND 

RECREATION First semester, 2 hours 

A study into the aspect of Physical Education as a career, its relationship 
to related fields of education, general principles and philosophies, historical 
background, and professional preparation. 

67 



HISTORY 

53. PRINCIPLES OF HEALTH & HYGIENE First or second semester, 2 hour 
A study of physiology, hygiene, and principles of healthful living an 
its relation to the Christian life. Special emphasis is also placed on d< 
nominational health standards pertaining to diet and temperance as coj 
roborated by scientific research today. 

35. METHODS AND MATERIALS OF TEACHING PHYSICAL EDUCATIOl 
IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL First semester, 2 hour 

This course is designed primarily for elementary teachers and minors i 
Physical Education. Methods and materials, graded activities in games c 
low organization, team games, self-testing, and rhythmic activities, an 

safety measures. Observation and teaching of elementary school childre 

will be scheduled. 

86. METHODS AND MATERIALS OF TEACHING PHYSICAL EDUCATIOl 
IN THE SECONDARY SCHOOLS Second semester, 2 houi 

This course is designed primarily for secondary teachers and minors i 
Physical Education. Methods and materials, graded activities in game 
of low organization, team games, self-testing, and rhythmic activities, an 
safety measures. Observation and teaching of secondary school studem 
will be scheduled. 

128. ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION OF PHYSICAL 

EDUCATION AND RECREATION Second semester, 2 houi 

The relationship of the field of Physical Education to modern education: 
theory. Details of the organization of physical education activities, organ 
zation and classification of pupils, and emphasis on the arrangement an 
construction of equipment and planning of school programs suitable t 
denominational schools. 

*143. HISTORY OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION First semester, 2 houi 

A study of the philosophical and activity background of physical educatioi 

*I48. PRINCIPLES OF HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Second semester, 2 houi 
An examination of the principles underlying current concepts of healt 
and physical education. 



DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY 
AND POLITICAL SCIENCE 

E. T. Watrous Clyde G. Bushnel 

James Ackerman Jerome Clark 

The objectives of the Department of History and related area 
are to aid in the application of divine ideals to all human relationships 
to foster an appreciation of true social and political culture, local I) 
nationally, and internationally; to develop an intelligent understands 
of the relationship between history and Biblical prophecy; and -to pre 
pare teachers in the social sciences. 



68 



HISTORY 

The purpose of the social studies is to assist the student in under- 
mding the complexities of modern society and how the providence of 
od has influenced history. It is designed to enable him to prepare him- 
lf and others for the service of mankind here and for the life hereafter. 



HISTORY 

Bachelor of Arts With a Major in History 

Course Requirements 

Major (History) 30 hours 

Including: 1, 2; 53, 54; 115; 182; 183. 

Minor 18 hours 

English 1-2 6 hours 

Literature 51, 52 or 61, 62 4 hours 

Fine Arts 60 or 61 -... 4 hours 

Foreign Language 6-14 hours 

P. E. 7, 8 - 1 hour 

Natural Sciences — Mathematics 12 hours 

Religion 12-16 hours 

Applied Arts 4 hours 

Electives — sufficient to make a four-year total of 128 

semester hours. 

Major: A major in history requires thirty hours. It shall include 
[istory 1, 2; 53, 54; 115; and 182; 183. History majors should choose 
le of the following fields for the minor: Business and Economics, 
; Religion. 

Minor: For a minor in history eighteen hours are required includ- 
\g History 1, 2; 53, 54. It should include three hours of upper bi- 
inium political science credit. The remainder of the requirement 
lould be in the fields of history and political science. 

2. SURVEY OP WESTERN CIVILIZATION Two semesters, 6 hours 

An introductory consideration of the ancient classical and medieval con- 
tributions to our own civilization, and a consideration of modern and 
current developments. 

!. CURRENT AFFAIRS First semester, 2 hours 

A course in current political developments of significance both domestic 
and international. Newspapers and current periodicals are used as materials. 

1. 54. AMERICAN HISTORY AND INSTITUTIONS Two semesters, 6 hours 
A study of the development of the character and civilization of the Ameri- 
can people, including their politics and social institutions, and reaching 
to the present time. 

69 



HISTORY 

*110. MEDIEVAL EUROPE Second semester, 3 hou 

Prerequisite: History 1 or equivalent. 
European History from 500-1200 A.D. 

*111, 112. RENAISSANCE AND REFORMATION Two semesters, 4 hou 

Prerequisite: History 1, 2. 

An analysis of the revival of learning, from medieval to modern conditior 

and of the causes, substance, and effects of the Reformation and Count 

Reformation. 

*131. HISTORY OF ANTIQUITY First semester, 3 hou 

Prerequisite: History 1, or equivalent. 

A study of the ancient nations, chiefly Babylonia, Assyria, Egypt, Persi 
and Israel. 

*132. HISTORY OF THE CLASSICAL WORLD Second semester, 3 hou 

Prerequisite: History 1, or equivalent. 

A consideration of Greek cuJture, of Alexander's Hellenistic empire, ( 
Roman institutions, and of the impact of Christianity upon the anciei 
world. 

145, 146. HISTORY OF LATIN AMERICA Two semesters, 4 hou 

Prerequisite: History 53 and 54, or equivalent. 

A survey of the colonial period, and a careful analysis of the politica 
economic, social, religious, and cultural development of the Latin-America 
Republics, and their present relation to world affairs. 

148. HISTORY OF THE SOUTH Second semester, 3 houi 

A study of the Old South from the discovery through the war betwee 
the states, the reconstruction and the subsequent developments and recei 
changes, including the current scene. 

50 or 150. SOUTHERN HISTORY BACKGROUNDS Field School, 3 houi 
A study of the cultural, political, social, and military history of the are 
south of the Ohio and east of the Mississippi by means of a guided toi 
to a number of the historical sites within this region. For upper bienniui 
credit, registration must be for course number 150. 

151, 152. ENGLISH HISTORY Two semesters, 4 hour 

Prerequisite: History 1, 2. 

An analysis of the political, social, economic, religious and cultural dc 
yelopmexit of Great Britian and its contributions to the world especiall 
in constitutional and democratic institutions. 

*153. EARLY AMERICAN BACKGROUNDS Field school, 3 hour 

An on the ground study of the development of social, cultural, religiou 
and political institutions covering significant places and events from Vii 
ginia to New England. 

*154. MODERN AMERICA First semester, 3 hour 

Prerequisite: History 54. 

A study of American history from 1900 to the present with particula 
emphasis on social, cultural, intellectual, and political developments. 

*155, 156. HISTORY OF CHRISTIANITY Two semesters, 6 hour 

A study of the development of the Christian Church from its apostoli 
origin to the present time with emphasis on the internal problems tha 
eventually formed the background for present-day Christianity and it 
various divisions. 

70 



HISTORY 

'158. THE REVOLUTIONARY ERA One semester, 3 hours 

Prerequisite: History 2. 

An analysis of the social, political, religious, cultural, and economic move- 
ments during the revolutionary period, 1789-1815. 

161. MODERN EUROPE First semester, 3 hours 

Historical developments in Europe since the rise of the new imperialism 
and the unification of Italy and Germany, with particular emphasis on the 
political, economic, and social implications for the second half of the 
20ih century. 

M82. HISTORIOGRAPHY First semester, I hour 

Required of History majors this course examines the various theories of 
history writing and procedures culminating with the Christian philosophy 
of history. 

183. RESEARCH METHODS IN HISTORY Second semester, 1 hour 

Prerequisite: History 182. 

Historical research methods, procedures and materials are examined in 
conjunction with the preparation of a research project. Required of all 
History majors. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 

115. AMERICAN NATIONAL AND STATE GOVERNMENT 

First semester, 3 hours 
The establishment and operation of the Federal Constitution; the national 
and local judiciary; state, county, and local governments. 

116. AMERICAN DIPLOMATIC HISTORY Second semester, 3 hours 

Significant developments in American Diplomatic History from the Rev- 
olutionary Period to the present are examined with emphasis on trends 
since 1930. 

*162. CONTEMPORARY INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS 

Second semester, 3 hours 

Prerequisite: History 1 and 2 or 53 and 54 or equivalent. 
A critical analysis of the chief factors influencing present-day world affairs, 
with special emphasis on the ideological and religious background of 
current conflicts. 

SOCIOLOGY 

20. INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY Either semester, 2 hours 

A study of the problems of society and group behavior patterns. 

61. CULTURAL PATTERNS First semester, 2 hours 

A study of cultural development based on regional environment, the factors 
that create certain cultural patterns. The origin and nature of contemporary 
cultures. 

B2. MARRIAGE AND THE FAMILY Either semester, 2 hours 

A course in the ethics of human relationships including the place of the 
family in society, a Christian approach to the problem of marriage and 
family life and the inter-relation of parents and children. 

M56. FIELD OF SOCIAL WORK Second semester, 3 hours 

The historical background, methods, and functions of public and private 
programs in the field of social welfare. 

71 



HOME ECONOMICS 

GEOGRAPHY 

142. WORLD GEOGRAPHY Second semester, 3 hou 

Maps, land forms, soil, mineral resources, weather, and climate are co 
sidered. Man's adjustment to various physiographic regions is studied, 



DEPARTMENT OF HOME ECONOMICS 

Dorothy Christensen Thelma Hemw 

The courses in this area are designed to prepare students for 
career in some field of Home Economics, and at die same time gn 
cultural and practical knowledge of the essentials of successful horn 
making. 

A separate sequence of courses is presented for students who wi< 
to go into the field of dietetics and institution management. 

Bachelor of Science With a Major in Home Economics 

Course Requirements 

Major (Home Economics) 30 hours 

Including 1, 2; 5; 21, 22; 25; 41, 42; 131; 181. 
Courses 2 and 2a may be taken for Natural Science credit 
if taken as Chemistry 6 and 6a, but may not be counted 
on both. 

Minor 18 hours 

Psychology 51 3 hours 

English 1-2 6 hours 

Literature 51, 52 or 61, 62 4 hours 

Fine Arts 60 or 61 4 hours 

Health 4; P. E. 7, 8 2 hours 

Natural Sciences — Mathematics 12 hours 

Religion 12-16 hours 

Social Science 82 12 hours 

Electives — -sufficient to make a four-year total 
of 128 semester hours. 

Those who plan to do graduate work in Home Economics shoul 
include General Chemistry 1-2; Biology 12 and 22; and Economics 7 
and 72. 

Those who wish to prepare for a teaching career should qualiJ 
for teacher certification. See page 68 onward. 

72 



HOME ECONOMICS 

A Bachelor of Arts degree with a major in Home Economics may 
be obtained by meeting the additional requirements given on pages 
36-38. 



Bachelor of Science With a Major in Foods and Nutrition 
Course Requirements 

Home Economics majors who wish to meet the requirements for 
hospital dietetic internships approved by the American Dietetic 
Association must meet the following requirements: 

Major (Home Economics) 30 hours 

1, 2; 25; 101, 102; l6l, 162; 171, 172. 

Minor ._ 18 hours 

Business Administration 31 and 147 6 hours 

Psychology 112 _ _ 3 hours 

English 1-2 6 hours 

Literature 51, 52 or 61, 62 4 hours 

Fine Arts 60 or 61 4 hours 

P. E. 7, 8 1 hour 

Biology 12, 22 7 hours 

Chemistry 1-2; 81; 171 15 hours 

(Chemistry 172 required for chemistry minor) 
Religion 12-16 hours 

Social Science . 12 hours 

Electives sufficient to make a four-year total of 128 semester 
hours. 

Suggested electives: Home Economics 26 and 131; Economics; 
Psychology; Education courses. 

To meet the requirements for American Dietetic Association 
membership in other areas of food and nutrition the student must meet 
the specific requirements for American Dietetic Association member- 
ship Plan III. This should be arranged by the individual student in 
consultation with the head of the Home Economics Department. 

Minor: Men and women who are majoring in other fields may 
take a minor or electives in home economics. A minor in home eco- 
nomics requires 18 hours including Home Economics 1, 2; 21, 22 
or 5; 25. 

A minor in foods and nutrition requires 18 hours including 
Home Economics 1,2; 25; l6l. 

73 



HOME ECONOMICS 

Two-year Curriculum in Home Economics 

A two-year curriculum in Home Economics is offered primarily to 
prepare young women for successful homemaking. 

Course Requirements 

Home Economics 1,2; 21,22; 25; 41,42; 131; 181 22 hours 

English 1-2 6 hours 

Religion 8 hours 

Social Science 82 ._ 10 hours 

Fine Arts 60 or 61 4 hours 

Health 4, P. E. 7, 8 2 hours 

Biology 12 — 3 hours 

Industrial Arts 31 - 2 hours 

Electives - 7 hours 

FOODS AND NUTRITION 

1. FOODS First semester, 3 hours 

Basic principles of food composition, selection, and preparation. Two 
hours lecture and one laboratory period each week. 

2. NUTRITION Second semester, 2 hours 

Principles of nutrition and their application to everyday living. 

2a. FOODS AND NUTRITION LABORATORY Second semester, I hour 

Calculation of the nutritional value of foods, and principles of food 
preparation, selection and service, A laboratory for nurses and teachers 
taking Nutrition 2, or others not taking Foods 1. Three hours laboratory 
each week. 

25. MEAL PLANNING First semester, 3 hours 

Prerequisite: Home Economics 1, 2 or by approval. 

Menu planning, marketing, meal preparation, and table service. Three 

2 -hour periods each week. 

26. DEMONSTRATION TECHNIQUES Second semester, 2 hours 

Prerequisite: Home Economics 1, 2 or by approval. 

Designed to present purposes, standards, and techniques of demon- 
strations with application to teaching, business, and conducting cooking 
schools for adult groups. Two 2-hour periods each week. 

101. 102. EXPERIMENTAL FOODS Two semesters, 4 hours 

Prerequisite: Home Economics 1, 2. 

Individual and class problems in food preparation, calculating costs, pre- 
paring and serving meals for special occasions. One hour lecture and one 
laboratory period each week. 

161. ADVANCED NUTRITION First semester, 3 hours 

Prerequisites: Home Economics 1, 2, 25, and Chemistry 1 and 2 or by 

approval. 

A study of the principles of normal nutrition as they apply to individuals 

at different ages. Two hours lecture and one laboratory period each week. 

74 



HOME ECONOMICS 

162. DIET THERAPY Second semester, 3 hours 

Prerequisite: Home Economics 161. 

A study of the principles of nutrition as applied to physiological conditions 
altered by stress, disease, or abnormalities. Two hours lecture and one 
laboratory period each week. 

*171. QUANTITY COOKERY First semester, 3 hours 

A study of quantity food, purchasing, production, and service, with ex- 
perience in the college cafeteria. One hour lecture each week. Laboratory 
work by appointment in the various areas of food preparation. 

*172, INSTITUTION MANAGEMENT Second semester, 3 hours 

A study of equipment selection, maintenance and layout, and management 
and personnel relationships in institution food service. Laboratory experi- 
ence in college and hospital food services. One hour lecture each week. 
Laboratory by appointment. 

HOME MANAGEMENT AND CHILD CARE 

41. HOME MANAGEMENT First semester, 2 hours 

A study of family problems and goals with emphasis on planning persona] 
and family schedules, conserving time and energy, financial plans and 
family housing, 

42. ART IN EVERYDAY LIVING Second semester, 2 hours 

The study of principles of art as they are related to everyday problems 
such as house design and decoration, selection of furniture, flower arrange- 
ment, pictures, accessories, and other home furnishings. 

61. SOCIAL ETHICS First semester, I hour 

Principles of Christian courtesy. Prepares for poised family, social and 
business relations. One and one-half hours a week. 

Ml 2. APPLIED HOME FURNISHINGS Second semester, 3 hours 

Laboratory experience in simple upholstering and professional drapery 
making. Two 3-hour combined lecture and laboratory periods. 

131. CHILD CARE AND DEVELOPMENT First semester, 3 hours 

A study of the young child, beginning with prenatal care through the years 
of babyhood, childhood, and adolescence with the family as a background 
for growth and development. The physical, mental, and social development 
studied with special emphasis on nutrition of mother and child. Two 
class periods and three hours home and nursery school observation each 
week, 

181. PRACTICE IN HOME MANAGEMENT Either semester, 3 hours 

Prerequisites: Home Economics I, 2, 25, 41. 

Experience in solving problems of family living, care of a home, budgeting, 
laundering, entertaining, planning, marketing, preparing and serving meals 
in the home management apartment for six weeks, projects to be planned 
before and written up after this period. One class period each week. 

TEXTILES AND CLOTHING 

5. CLOTHING SELECTION First semester, 2 hours 

Artistic and economic factors are studied and applied to adult wardrobe 
planning and selection. Special emphasis is placed on wardrobe needs of 
college girls. Two one-hour lectures each week. 

75 



INDUSTRIAL ARTS 

21:22. CLOTHING CONSTRUCTION Two semesters, 4 hours 

A course in fundamental clothing construction. Basic construction tech- 
niques are demonstrated and practiced. Use and alteration of commercial 
patterns is studied and practiced. Second semester, emphasis on fitting and 
techniques of construction using difficult to handle fabrics. One hour 
lecture and three hours laboratory each week. 

*m. TEXTILES First semester, 2 hours 

A study of textile fibers and fabrics and factors influencing their construc- 
tion, finish, and design. Selection and identification for consumer use. 
Two hours lecture each week. 

121. FLAT PATTERN DESIGN AND DRESS CONSTRUCTION 

First semester, 2 hours 
Prerequisites: Home Economics 21, 22. 

The use of the basic pattern in dress designing and construction with 
emphasis on fitting. One hour lecture and one laboratory period each week, 

122. TAILORING Second semester, 2 hours 
Prerequisites: Home Economics 21, 22 and 121 or by approval. 

A study of the techniques of tailoring and their practical application to 
women's suits and coats. One hour lecture and one laboratory period 
each week. 

141, 142. HOME ECONOMICS SEMINAR Two semesters, 2 hours 

A study of problems, research, and trends in the various fields of home 
economics. Registration conditional upon consent of instructor. 

191. PROBLEMS IN HOME ECONOMICS Either semester, I or 2 hours 

To permit the advanced student majoring in Home Economics to do 
individual work in the field under the direction of a staff member. 



DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRIAL ARTS 

Drew Turlington 

The courses in Industrial Arts are designed to train teachers, pro- 
vide an opportunity for students to learn at least one trade, train stu- 
dents for positions as maintenance engineers, and to give those stu- 
dents majoring in other fields an opportunity to learn to work with 
their hands, and pursue one or more of these courses as a leisure 
time hobby. 

Two-Year Terminal Curriculum Leading to a Diploma 

General Requirements 

English 1-2 _ 6 hours 

Religion .. 8 hours 

Social Science ._.. 6 hours 

Health Education 53 ..— -- — 2 hours 

76 



INDUSTRIAL ARTS 

PI,7, 8 1 hour 

Speech 5:6 (recommended) 4 hours 

Field of Concentration 20 hours 

Electives -- — - -- 17 hours 

Total 64 hours 



Fields of Concentration 
MECHANIC ARTS 

1:2. MECHANICAL DRAWING Two semesters, 4 hours 

A basic course in drafting, training the student in the use of instruments 
and the principles of orthographic projection, surface development, section- 
ing, pictorial drawings and dimensioning working drawings. Four hours 
laboratory each week. Lectures as announced by the instructor. 

15:16. GENERAL METALS Two semesters, 4 hours 

Designed to acquaint the student with the many aspects of the metal - 
working industry. Instruction will be In the use of metal cutting and 
farming tools, forging, tempering, sheet metal, art metal and welding. 
One hour lecture and three hours laboratory each week. 

41:42. ELECTRIC AND OXY-ACETYLENE WELDING Two semesters, 4 hours 
A very practical course in arc and acetylene welding, teaching the student 
to weld skillfully in all positions: flat, vertical and overhead. One hour 
lecture, three hours laboratory each week. 

51:52. AUTO MECHANICS Two semesters, 4 hours 

A general course in the fundamentals of the internal combustion engine, 
automobile design and repair; automotive electricity, power flow, servicing, 
and trouble shooting; field trips. Two hours lecture, two hours laboratory 
each week, 

*1 43:144. MACHINE SHOP Two semesters, 4 hours 

Fundamentals of machine shop practice, instruction in the operation and 
maintenance of power hack saws, metal-turning lathes, shapers, milling 
machines and drill presses, together with hand tools used in machine shop 
work. Forging, tempering and casting are also included in this course. 
One hour lecture, three hours laboratory each week. 



BUILDING TRADES 

*3. MASONRY First semester, 2 hours 

A fundamental course in concrete work, mortar, concrete block and brick 
laying, footing, foundations, floors, sills, walks. One hour lecture, three 
hours laboratory each week. 

*6. PLUMBING Second semester, 2 hours 

Instruction in code requirements, procedures in dwelling house plumbing, 
waste, maintenance, proper methods of sewage disposal, soil pipe and clay 
tile work. One hour lecture, three hours laboratory each week. 

77 



INDUSTRIAL ARTS 

*8. HOUSE WIRING Second semester, 2 hours 

Instruction In the National Electric Code, basic electrical principles, com- 
plete instruction and practice in residential wiring, including electric 
heating. Some industrial wiring techniques will also be included. One hour 
lecture, three hours laboratory each week. 

11:12. WOOD WORKING Two semesters, 4 hours 

The study of hand and machine tools, joinery and proper methods of cabinet 
making. Wood turning and finishing. Opportunity to make projects of your 
choice. One hour lecture, three hours laboratory each week. 

77:78. ARCHITECTURAL DRAWING Two semesters, 4 hours 

Prerequisite: Industrial Arts 1:2, or a beginning course in mechanical 
drawing. A survey of the field in its various phases and the acquisition 
of a working knowledge of technique, symbols, materials, plan reading, 
tracing, and blue-printing. One hour lecture and three hours laboratory 
each week. 

79:80. CARPENTRY Two semesters, 6 hours 

Instruction and practice in blueprint reading, building layout, foundations, 
wood framing, finish carpentry, floors, ceilings and walls, roof coverings, 
protective finishes, new methods of construction and latest building ma- 
terials. A basic tool kit is required. One hour lecture and six hours 
laboratory each week. 

*1 33:1 34. ADVANCED CABINET AND FURNITURE MAKING 

Both semesters, 4 hours 

Prerequisite: Industrial Arts 11 and 12 or equivalent. 
One hour lecture, three hours laboratory each week. 

*1 91 :1 92, ADVANCED ARCHITECTURAL DRAWING Both semesters, 4 hours 
Prerequisite: Industrial Arts 77, 78 or equivalent. 

Students will be expected to work out for a full -sized structure a com- 
plete set of plans, details, specifications, bill of materials and labor, and 
total costs. The structure will be designed by the student. 

*1 03:1 04. ADVANCED MECHANICAL DRAWING Both semesters, 4 hours 
Prerequisite: Mechanical Drawing 1,2 or equivalent, 

Emphasis will be placed on drawing parts of machinery, assembly drawings, 
using orthographic projection, isometric, oblique, perspective, and free 
hand sketching. 



LIBRARY SCIENCE 

93:94. THE USE OF BOOKS AND LIBRARIES Two semesters, 4 hours 

Teaches the standard practices in all libraries and the organization of the 
college library in particular. Provides acquaintance with the best books 
(both reference and general) in the various fields of knowledge. Im- 
proves scholarship through a knowledge of how to do research. 

95. LIBRARY ADMINISTRATION First semester, 2 hours 

Designed to impart a practical knowledge of how to organize and ad- 
minister a library; how to select, acquire, and catalog books; and how to 
relate the library to the needs of the pupils. Lectures and laboratory 
practice in the college library. 

78 



MATHEMATICS 

MISCELLANEOUS COURSES 

17:18. TYPOGRAPHY Two semesters, 6 hours 

A study of the common processes of typesetting, hand and machine com- 
position, presswork with special consideration for proper grouping and 
spacing of jobs, layout, and design. The second semester's work will lead 
into the fundamentals of proofreading and copy preparation, the study 
of rules and practices regarding book, magazine, and newspaper pub- 
lishing and job work. On-the-job practice in handling proofroom problems. 
Open to men and women. 

31. PRACTICAL HOME ARTS First semester, 2 hours 

A course designed to prepare teachers in methods and materials used in 
teaching home mechanics and crafts. Important to all elementary teachers 
for teaching vocational subjects. One hour lecture, three hours laboratory 
each week. 

32. PRACTICAL HOME GARDENING AND LANDSCAPING 

Second semester, 2 hours 

This course will also include school gardening on the elementary level. 
Special attention will be given to gardening, landscaping, soil building, 
fertilizers, horticulture, and organic gardening. One hour lecture, three 
hours laboratory each week. 



DEPARTMENT OF MATHEMATICS 

Duane Zimmerman Grenith Zimmerman 

The objectives of this department are to acquaint the student with 
the meaning, scope, methods, and content of Mathematics, and to show 
some of the relationships and contributions of this science to modern 
civilization and culture. 

Major: A major in Mathematics requires 30 hours (exclusive of 
Mathematics 1 and 2; 4; 5:6) and includes Mathematics 12; 100; and 
at least 15 hours chosen in consultation with the department head. 

Minor: A minor in Mathematics requires 18 hours (exclusive of 
Mathematics 1 and 2; 4; 5:6) and includes Mathematics 12; 100; and 
at least 3 hours chosen in consultation with the department head. 

Bachelor of Arts With a Major in Mathematics 
Course Requirements 

Major (Mathematics) 30 hours 

Including: 11:12; 99; 100. 

Minor (Physics or Chemistry recommended) .... 18 hours 

English 1-2 6 hours 

Literature 51, 52 or 61, 62 4 hours 

79 



MATHEMATICS 

Applied Arts 4 hours 

Fine Arts 60 or 61 _. 4 hours 

Foreign Language 6-14 hours 

Religion 12-16 hours 

Social Science — 12 hours 

Electives — sufficient to make a four-year total of 128 
semester hours. 

1. FUNDAMENTAL CONCEPTS OF MATHEMATICS First semester, 2 hours 

This course is designed for the teacher education program. It emphasizes 
the major concepts of number, measurement, function, and proof which 
help man to understand the quantitative relationships in his natural and 
social environment. 

2. FUNCTIONAL MATHEMATICS Second semester, 2 hours 

Prerequisite; Mathematics 1. 

A thorough review of fundamental processes of arithmetic; development 

of a mature understanding of arithmetic. 

4. INTRODUCTION TO MATHEMATICS Second semester, 3 hours 

Prerequisites: Two years of high school mathematics. 
A unified course consisting of topics from different areas of modern mathe- 
matics. The emphasis is on mathematical ideas rather than drill in the 
manipulation of mathemathical symbols. This course is designed to apply 
on the 12 hours basic science requirement. (Not a preparation for General 
Physics or General Chemistry.) 

5:6 PRE-FRESHMAN MATHEMATICS Two semesters, 6 hours 

Prerequisite: Two units of secondary mathematics composed of topics from 
algebra and geometry. 

A unified course built on topics in algebra, geometry, and trigonometry 
which are commonly taught in secondary schools for students who- take 
more than two units of mathematics. (Satisfies the mathematics require- 
ment for General Physics. Does not apply on science requirement.) 

11:12. FRESHMAN MATHEMATICS Two semesters, 8 hours 

Prerequisite: The equivalent of Mathematics 5:6. 

A unified course built on material selected from topics in algebra, trigo- 
nometry, and analytic geometry which are commonly taught in beginning 
college mathematics courses. Emphasizes deductive reasoning and funda- 
mental concepts and is taught from a contemporary point of view. 

51. ANALYTIC GEOMETRY First semester, 2 hours 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 11:12. 

This course is primarily for those students who have transferred from 
other colleges and wish to take calculus and have not had a course equiv- 
alent to Mathematics 11 and 12 or those students who have taken 

Mathematics 11 and 12 prior to the academic year 1959-60. Equations of 
curves in rectangular and polar coordinates. Study of the properties of the 

straight line and the conies. (Offered only on sufficient demand.) 

82. STATISTICS Second semester, 3 hours 

See Economics 82. 
Does not apply on a mathematics major or minor. 

99:100. CALCULUS Two semesters, 8 hours 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 11:12. 

Elementary functions, ordinary and partial derivation, application, anti- 
derivatives, definite and multiple integrals, infinite series, applications. 

80 



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MODERN LANGUAGE 

111. DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS First semester, 3 hours 
Prerequisite: Mathematics 99:100. 

Classification and solution of common types of ordinary differential equa- 
tions. Applications to problems arising in the physical sciences. 

112. METHODS OF APPLIED MATHEMATICS Second semester, 3 hours 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 111. 

Vector analysis, introduction to complex variables, characteristic value 

problems, Laplace transforms, Bessel functions. 

*121:122. ADVANCED CALCULUS Two semesters, 6 hours 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 99:100. 

Introduction to point set topology, continuity, uniform continuity, inte- 
gration, improper integrals, convergence, uniform convergence, sequences 
of functions, infinite series, 

131:132. INTRODUCTION TO STATISTICS & PROBABILITY 

Two semesters, 6 hours 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 99:100. 

Mathematical probability, distribution and sampling problems, theory of 
estimation including the method of maximum likelihood, tests of hy- 
potheses, including likelihood ratio tests. 

151:152. INTRODUCTION TO MODERN ALGEBRA Two semesters, 6 hours 
Prerequisite: Mathematics 99:100. 

Groups, rings, fields, integral domains,, vector spaces, matrices, algebraic 
solution of equations. 



DEPARTMENT OF MODERN LANGUAGE 
AND LITERATURE 

Clyde G. Bushnell 
Eileen Drouault Olive Westphal 

Realizing the necessity of a broad cultural background and an 
ability to communicate with those who speak a language other than 
our own, in order to avoid provincialism the Modern Language De- 
partment strives not only to familiarize the student with a foreign 
language but also to instill in him an appreciation of the contributions 
to civilization made by other peoples and cultures. 

SPANISH 
Bachelor of Arts With a Major in Spanish 

Course Requirements 

Major (Spanish) 30 hours 

Including 1-2; 93-94; subsequent courses will be determined 
in consultation with the department head. 

81 



MODERN LANGUAGE 

Minor 18 hours 

English 1-2 6 hours 

Literature . 4 hours 

Fine Arts 60 or 61 4 hours 

P.E. 7, 8 1 hour 

Natural Sciences — Mathematics 12 hours 

Religion 12-16 hours 

Social Science 145, 146 — 12 hours 

Applied Arts 4 hours 

Electives — sufficient to make a four-year total of 128 

semester hours. 
Minor: A minor in Spanish consists of 18 hours. 

1-2. BEGINNING SPANISH Two semesters, 8 ho. 

A foundation course in grammar, pronunciation, and reading. Not open 
students who have had two years of Spanish in secondary schooj. 

93-94. INTERMEDIATE SPANISH Two semesters, 6 hoi 

Prerequisite: Spanish 1-2 or two years of Spanish in secondary school. 
Advanced grammar; intensive and extensive reading of moderately diffic 
Spanish texts, oral and written exercises. Not open to Spanish speaki 
persons with three credits in Secondary Spanish. 

*101 f 102. SURVEY OF SPANISH LITERATURE Two semesters, 4 ho. 

Prerequisite: Spanish 93-94. 

History and development of Spanish literature; reading of representat: 
works. 

105, 106. SURVEY OF SPANISH-AMERICAN LITERATURE 

Two semesters, 4 hot 
Prerequisite: Spanish 93-94. 

History and development of Spanish-American literature; reading 
representative works. 

117:118. SPANISH CONVERSATION AND COMPOSITION 

Two semesters, 4 hot 
Prerequisite: Spanish 93-94. 
(Not open to La tin- American nationals.) 

Development of skill in speaking, understanding, and writing idioma 
Spanish. 

*I45, 146. THE GOLDEN AGE OF SPANISH LITERATURE 

Two semesters, 4 hoi 
Prerequisite: Spanish 93-94. 
A study of the classical period of Spanish literature. 

M61-162. SPANISH POETRY Two semesters, 4 hoi 

Prerequisite: Spanish 101:102. 

Study of Spanish versification, selected reading from Spanish and Spani; 

American authors. 

*165, 166. ADVANCED SPANISH PROSE Two semesters, 6 hoi 

Prerequisite: Spanish 101:102. 

Extended reading from great authors of Spain and Spanish-America. 

*179. PROBLEMS IN SPANISH Either semester, 2 hoi 

Open to majors, or minors with permission. 

82 



MUSIC 

GERMAN 
Minor: The German minor consists of eighteen hours. 

21-22. BEGINNING GERMAN Two semesters, 8 hours 

A foundation course in grammar, pronunciation, and reading. Not open to 
students who have had two years of German in secondary school. 

33-84. INTERMEDIATE GERMAN Two semesters, 6 hours 

Prerequisite: German 21-22 or two years of German in secondary school. 
Advanced grammar; intensive and extensive reading of moderately difficult 
prose and poetry; oral and written exercises. 

127:128. GERMAN CONVERSATION AND COMPOSITION 

Two semesters, 4 hours 
Prerequisite: German 21-22. 

Development of skill in speaking, understanding and writing idiomatic 
German. 

*141, 142. SURVEY OF GERMAN LITERATURE Two semesters, 4 hours 

Prerequisite: German 83-84. 

History and development of German literature; reading of representative 

works; collateral reading and reports. 

*T5T, 152. GERMAN POETRY Two semesters, 4 hours 

Study of versification and the outstanding poets and their writings in the 
different periods of German literature. 

FRENCH 

1-2. BEGINNING FRENCH Two semesters, 8 hours 

A foundation course in grammar, pronunciation, and reading. Not open to 
students who have had two years of French in a secondary school 

73-74. INTERMEDIATE FRENCH Two semesters, 6 hours 

Prerequisite: French 1-2 or two years of French on the secondary level. 
Advanced grammar; intensive and extensive reading of moderately difficult 
prose and poetry; oral and written exercises. 



DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC 

Morris Taylor Lyle Hamel 

Dorothy Ackerman Raymond Kuutti 

Del Case Elaine Taylor 

Don Crook J. Mabel Wood 



The music department aims to afford each student the oppor- 
tunity to participate actively in the performance of music and to pro- 
vide both secular and religious music of quality on the campus. Through 
the medium of music the student may find cultural enrichment, self- 
expression, and professional growth. Courses in this department stimu- 

83 



MUSIC 

late imaginative thought and promote an understanding of Western 
culture. Basic music skills are offered in such areas as orchestral and 
band instruments, piano, organ, voice, conducting, and music theory. 

Southern Missionary College offers three curriculums in music, 
a Bachelor of Music with a major in performance or in music educa- 
tion, and the Bachelor of Arts with a major in music. 

The Bachelor of Music degree is designed to prepare the student 
as a professional musician. The B.M. with a major in performance 
meets the need of the student who wishes to concentrate in an applied 
music field and to prepare for advanced work in the scholarly branches 
of music. 

The Bachelor of Music with a major in music education meets the 
specifications of the State of Tennessee and most other state education 
departments as well as the requirements for certification from the Gen- 
eral Conference to teach music on the secondary level. See under the 
Education Department for further details with regard to certification. 

The Bachelor of Arts degree with a major in music allows the 
student to obtain a broad background in the liberal arts along with his 
solid core of professional music subjects. The liberal arts student may 
choose the field of music as his minor. 



Bachelor of Music in Music Education 

Course Requirements 

Major (Music) 59 hours 

Applied Music: Major instrument or voice — 12 
hours: minor instruments and/or voice — 4 
hours; senior recital — 1 hour; music organiza- 
tions — 2 hours; music ensemble — 2 hours. 
Music Theory: 25:26; 45:46; 101:102; 171:172; 

electives — 4 hours. 
Music History: 62 or 63; 141:142. 
Music Education: l6l or Education 65-66; 181; 
materials and methods electives — 6 hours. 
Education 142; 135 or 191; 171, 172 or 173, 174 8 hours 

Psychology 51; 112 6 hours 

Health and Family Living 6 hours 

Including: Marriage and the Family — 2 hours; 
Physical education — l hour; electives — 3 hours. 
English 1-2 6 hours 

84 



MUSIC 



Literature 51, 52 or 61, 62 4 hours 

Fine Arts 60 - 2 hours 

fMathematics 1 2 hours 

Natural Science — Mathematics 8 hours 

Religion - 12-16 hours 

Social Science 20 and sequence 8 hours 

Electives — sufficient to make a four-year total of 
128 semester hours. 

Bachelor of Music in Performance 

Course Requirements 

Major (Music) 6l hours 

Applied Music: Major instrument or voice — 16 
hours; senior recital — 1 hour; minor instrument 
or voice — 4 hours; music organi2ations — 2 
hours; music ensemble — 2 hours. 
Music Theory: 25:26; 45:46; 101:102; 171:172; 

electives — 4 hours. 
Music History: 62; 63; 141:142. 
Music Education: Materials and methods in major 
instrument or voice — 2 hours; electives — 4 
hours. 

English 1-2 6 hours 

Literature 51, 52 or 61, 62 . . 4 hours 

Foreign Language — French or German 

recommended 6-14 hours 

Fine Arts 60 2 hours 

P.E, 7, 8 1 hour 

Natural Science — Mathematics 6 hours 

Religion 12-16 hours 

Social Science 1, 2 and 20 8 hours 

Psychology 51 3 hours 

Electives — sufficient to make a four-year total of 
128 semester hours. 

Bachelor of Arts With a Major in Music 
Course Requirements 

Major (Music) 37 hours 

Music Theory: 45:46; 101:102; and 4 hours of 



[■This requirement may be waived by examination. 

85 



MUSIC 

upper division electives. 

Applied Music: Major instrument or voice — 12 
hours; senior recital — 1 hour; music organiza- 
tions — 2 hours. 

History of Music: 62 or 63; 141:142. 

Minor 18 hours 

English 1-2, Literature 51, 52 or 61, 62 10 hours 

Fine Arts 60 2 hours 

Foreign Language 6-14 hours 

P.E. 7, 3 1 hour 

Natural Sciences — Mathematics 12 hours 

Religion 12-16 hours 

Social Science 12 hours 

Electives — sufficient to make a four-year total of 

128 semester hours. 

Minor: A minor in Music consists of eighteen hours, including 
45:46; 141:142; applied instrument or voice — 4 hours; music organi- 
zations — 2 hours. 

MUSIC THEORY 

25:26. EAR TRAINING AND SOLFEGGIO Two semesters, 2 hours 

The development of rhythmic, melodic, and harmonic perception. A waive: 
may be granted by examination. This course should be taken concurrently 
with 45:46. This class will meet two periods per week, 

45:46. HARMONY I Two semesters, 6 hours 

Construction and function of scales and intervals; triads and dominant 
seventh chords, root position and inversions; modulation; use of non- 
harmonic tones, correlated analysis and keyboard harmony. 

101:102. HARMONY II Two semesters, 4 hours 

Prerequisite: Music 45:46. 

Construction and function of ninth, eleventh, and thirteenth chords, altered 
chords and modulation, correlated analysis, and keyboard harmony. 

171:172. COUNTERPOINT Two semesters, 4 hours 

Prerequisite: Music 45:46; 101:102 concurrently. 

Species counterpoint in two or more parts: imitation, double counterpoint 
canon and correlated analysis. 

*174. ORCHESTRATION Second semester, 2 hours 

Scoring and arranging for the instruments of the modern symphony orchestra 
and the concert band. 

176. COMPOSITION Second semester, 2 hours 

Prerequisites: Music 101:102; 171:172 recommended. 
Principles of composition in the smaller forms; written work modeled 
on the analysis of such forms as the chorale, the art song, and the rondo. 

86 



MUSIC 

MUSIC HISTORY 

61:62. SURVEY OF MUSIC LITERATURE Two semesters, 4 hours 

The impact of musical thought on western civilization during the past one 
thousand years. Illustrated lectures, discussions, and recordings. 
Music majors may not register for Music 61 except as an elective. One 
listening period per week is required. 

141:142. HISTORY OF MUSIC Two semesters, 6 hours 

Recommended prerequisite: Music 62 or 63. 

Cultural and musical-technical aspects of the style and form of musical 
thought from antiquity to the present time. Two listening periods per week 
are required, 

CHURCH MUSIC 

24. PRINCIPLES OF CONDUCTING First semester, 2 hours 

Basic concepts of notation, the study and application of principles of song 
leadership. This class meets three periods per week. 

63. SURVEY OF CHURCH MUSIC Second semester, 2 hours 

A course designed to meet the needs of religion majors and church musi- 
cians. A study of church music from Biblical times to the present. One 
listening period per week is required, 

MUSIC EDUCATION 

The studies in methods and materials involve not only development 
in actual performance ability and evaluation of available teaching ma- 
terials; but also, and pre-eminently, a quest for pedagogical soundness 
and understanding of how to help individuals solve their musical 
problems. 

*130. PIANO MATERIALS AND TECHNIQUES Second semester, 2 hours 

Methods, materials, and procedures for private and group piano instruction. 

132. VOCAL MATERIALS AND TECHNIQUES Second semester, 2 hours 

Principles of voice production and testing and classification of voices. 
The examination of suitable literature for ensemble and solo use. 

*134. STRING MATERIALS AND TECHNIQUES Second semester, 2 hours 
A study of the stringed instruments in class and a survey of teaching ma- 
terials for class and private instruction. 

136. PERCUSSION MATERIALS AND TECHNIQUES Second semester, 1 hour 
The use of percussion instruments in the band and orchestra. Techniques of 
performing all percussion instruments. Interpretation of band scores, 
balance and special effects of the percussion section. 

137. BRASS MATERIALS AND TECHNIQUES First semester, 2 hours 
A study of tone production, embouchure, fingerings, and practical pedagogic 

technique. A survey of the literature for the instruments and evaluation of 
teaching methods. 

*139. WOODWIND MATERIALS AND TECHNIQUES 

Second semester, 2 hours 
A study of tone production, embouchure, fingerings, and practical pedagogic 

87 



MUSIC 

technique. Survey of the literature for the instruments and eva]uation of 
teaching methods. 

*161. SECONDARY SCHOOL MUSIC First semester, 2 hours 

Curriculum, organization, and administration of choral, instrumental, and 
general music classes in the junior and senior high school. 

*181. CONDUCTING TECHNIQUES First semester, 2 hours 

This course is designed to give the music student the requisite skills for 
conducting choral and instrumental groups. 

APPLIED MUSIC 

f3, 4. Two semesters, 2 hours 

Private instruction in voice, piano, organ, or orchestral instrument. 

f5, 6. Two semesters, 2 hours 

Class instruction in voice, piano, or orchestral instruments. This course is 
designed for the beginning student who would like to take applied music in 
small groups of from two to five at a reduced fee from the private lesson 
rate. 

21, 22. Two semesters, 2 hours 

Prerequisite: Examination for freshman standing. 
Private instruction in voice, piano, organ, or orchestral instrument. 

fSBr., 54r. Two semesters, 2 hours 

Prerequisite: Music 3, 4 or 5, 6. 
Private instruction in voice, piano, organ, or orchestral instrument. 

71 , 72. Two semesters, 2 hours 

Prerequisite: Music 21, 22. 
Private instruction in voice, piano, organ, or orchestral instrument. 

121, 122. Two semesters, 4 hours 

Prerequisite: Music 71, 72. 
Private instruction in voice, piano, organ, or orchestral instrument. 

151, 152. Two semesters, 4 hours 

Prerequisite: Music 121, 122. 
Private instruction in voice, piano, organ, or orchestral instrument. 

192. SENIOR RECITAL I hour 

The recital must be memorized with the exception of organ or instruments 
performing ensemble literature not generally memorized. 

f Courses 3, 4; 5, 6; 53, 54 are open to any student of the college 
as elective credit toward the B.A. or B.S. degree. The music major or 
minor may not apply these toward his major performance area. 

Courses 21, 22; 71, 72; 121, 122; and 151, 152 are courses pri- 
marily for the music major and minor, but they may be elected by 
anyone who passes the examination for freshman standing. 

Instruction in voice, piano, organ, or orchestral instruments is 
offered both privately and in small classes. The following performance 
areas may be studied: violin, viola, cello, string bass, flute, oboe, clari- 

88 



MUSIC 

net, saxophone, bassoon, trumpet, French horn, trombone, baritone, 
marimba, and percussion instruments. 

One semester hour will be allowed for a minimum of 15 half- 
hour lessons with four hours of practice per lesson. Participation in 
and attendance at student recitals, public and studio, will be considered 
a part of the regular work. Music majors and minors are required to 
attend a large percentage of the concerts and recitals on the campus, 
and each is urged to take advantage of the outstanding musical events 
sponsored by the SMC Lyceum Committee, the Fine Arts Series, and 
the Community Concerts or the Chattanooga Symphony. 

Freshman standing for the music major or minor will be given by 
the music faculty at the time of the first semester examinations. Each 
student majoring in music must appear before the music faculty at the 
end of each semester to present a prepared program of technic and 
memorized compositions as his final examination. A music minor should 
pass freshman standing as well as take the applied examination at the 
completion of his applied music credit. 

All music majors except those concentrating in keyboard instru- 
ments are required to pass an examination in piano. The student must 
be able to play hymns, moderately easy accompaniments and the major 
scales. At the time of the regularly scheduled semester examinations 
the student is to play before a committee of the music faculty. The 
piano examination should be passed during the freshman year or the 
student must register for applied piano instruction. 

The major in music education and the liberal arts student will 
present a joint senior recital in which he plays 30 minutes. The perfor- 
mance major will present a full-length, memorized recital. The stu- 
dent may elect to have an assisting soloist or assisting small ensemble in 
which he participates. 



MUSIC ENSEMBLES 

Although there is no charge for participation in music organizations 
if credit is not desired, yet students should register jot entrance in the 
organization. All students pursuing a music major must participate in 
a music organization each year of residence. 

Each musical organization meets two periods per week and offers 
one-half hour credit each semester. Admission to any musical organiza- 
tion is by audition. Regular attendance at rehearsals is required. 

Ensembles on campus are organized and sponsored by members 
of the staff. 

89 



NURSING 

llr., 12r. CONCERT BAND 

13r., 14r. ORCHESTRA 

15r„ 16r. COLLEGE CHOIR 

17r., IBr. MEN'S CHORUS 

19r., 20r. COLLEGIATE CHORALE 



Two semesters, 2 hours 



153:154. PIANO ENSEMBLE 

Prerequisite: Music 54 or 72. 

This course is designed to give the piano and organ major coaching and 

experience in accompanying and playing in a chamber ensemble. 

155:156. VOCAL ENSEMBLE Two semesters, 2 hours 

Prerequisite: Music 54 or 72. 

This course is designed to give the voice major coaching and experience 
in organization and participation in small vocal ensembles. The literature 
of the vocal and chamber music repertoire will be studied. 

157:158. INSTRUMENTAL ENSEMBLE Two semesters, 2 hours 

Prerequisite: Music 54 or 72. 

This course is designed to give the instrumental major coaching and ex- 
perience in organizing and participating in small instrumental ensembles 
such as the string trio or quartet, the woodwind quintet, etc. The chamber 
music literature will be studied. 



DIVISION OF NURSING 



Harriet Smith 
Catherine Glatho 
Barbara Beavers 
Florence Culpan 
Helen Emori 
Gladys Garland 



Zerita Hacerman 
Miriam Kerr 
Christine Kummkk 
Merle Silloway 
Mary Waldron 



PHILOSOPHY 

The philosophy and objectives of Christian education as staled 
by the college, being based on a belief in God and Jesus Christ as the 
Creator and Redeemer, emphasizes the brotherhood and individual 
worth of man. It is on this basis that the philosophy and objectives of 
the Division of Nursing are built; therefore, the faculty of the Division 
accepts the responsibility for promoting the development of the 
physical, mental and spiritual wholeness of the student. 



90 



NURSING 

The curriculum is built on the premise that education for the 
practice of nursing is best accomplished by a combined liberal arts and 
professional program. Throughout the curriculum an effort is made to 
promote learning through observation and individual investigation and 
to guide the student in obtaining and applying knowledge in an 
atmosphere which seeks to stimulate a spirit of inquiry. 

The faculty believes that Christian professional nursing is a 
service that contributes to the betterment of health, the preservation of 
life and the prevention of disease. Such care is directed toward restoring 
man to wholeness and may be implemented through remedial measures, 
health teaching and the exemplary life of the nurse. 

The Division has as its aim the preparation of the graduates for 
beginning positions in all areas of nursing, including public health. 

OBJECTIVES 

Curriculum offerings are planned to assist the student in 
developing: 

1. Understanding of principles underlying nursing care thereby 
enabling the student to carry out necessary measures adequately and 
safely after sufficient orientation in policies and procedures of the 
agency. 

2. Ability to identify spiritual, physical, social and emotional needs 
and assist in satisfying such needs. 

3. Beginning skills in leadership. 

4. Interest and ability to participate in health education. 

5. Interest in continuous professional growth. 

6. Ability to identify his role in the health team and function 
effectively. 



Bachelor of Science in Nursing 

Major (Nursing) 64 hours 

Including 27, 29, 54, 60, 104, 105, 110, 111, 120, 

130, 140, 160, 165, 170, 192. 

Applied Arts, Home Economics 6l and 131 4 hours 

Communication Arts 10 hours 

English 1-2; Speech 5; Literature 51, 52, 61 or 62. 
Education-Psychology-Health 7 hours 

Psychology 51, 112; P.E. 7, 8. 
Fine Arts 2 hours 



91 



NURSING 

Natural Sciences 19 hours 

Biology 11-12; 22; Chemistry 6, 6a, 7, 8. 

Religion _ 12 hours 

Religion 11, 12; 54; 93; 95. 

Social Science 9 hours 

Sociology 20; 61; 82; History 53 or 54. 

The curriculum covers four academic years and one summer session 
in which the student completes approximately half his work in liberal 
arts and science courses, and half in the major field, with a total of 
130 semester hours. 

The student spends the freshman academic year and the first 
semester of the sophomore year on the Collegedale campus. Following 
this, the student registers on the Orlando campus. The senior year is 
spent on the Collegedale campus, completing the major in nursing. 

Students from other colleges having completed the prescribed 
curriculum for registration on the Orlando campus may be eligible 
to register In the sophomore year of the curriculum in nursing. The 
faculty reserves the right to make curriculum changes at any time in 
harmony with current trends in education. 

Specific Entrance Requirements: 

English 3 units 

Mathematics (one of which must be Algebra; Busi- 
ness Math, not accepted) 2 units 

Natural Science (one laboratory science required) 2 units 

Social Science 2 units 

Religion (one unit for each year in an academy, 

up to 3 units) -. 3 units 

The Division reserves the right to ask any student who gives 
evidence that in any phase of work or social life he is out of harmony 
with the philosophy of the school or whose progress is in general 
unsatisfactory to withdraw or transfer to another field. 

27. INTRODUCTION TO NURSING First semester, 3 hours 

A brief orientation to the field of nursing and the responsibilities of the 
nurse as a member of the health team. This course is designed to help the 
student to become aware of his own health needs and those of the public. 
It includes an introduction to some basic principles and skills of assessing 
a person's health status. 

29. INTRODUCTION TO NURSING FUNCTIONS First semester, 2 hours 

An introduction to nurse-patient and nurse-co-worker relationships and to 
professional communication techniques. 

92 



NURSING 

|54. NURSING I Either semester, 6 hours 

An introduction to the care of patients manifesting common nursing 
problems. Emphasis is pjaced on the principles underlying the care given 
to all patients including comfort, hygenic, and rehabilitative measures. 
Some consideration is given to diet therapy, pharmacology and physical 
therapy. 

1-55. NURSING II Either semester, 6 hours 

A continuation of Nursing L The student is introduced to the nursing 
diagnosis through the care of selected patients with acute medical-surgical 
problems. Emphasis is placed on beginning ability to cooperate with the 
health team in providing for continuity of patient care in the home, 
hospital, and other agencies. 

60. NURSING PROBLEMS A Either semester, 2 hours 

Common components of the science of nursing are considered. Emphasis 

is also given to the professional development and relationships of the 
nurse with patients and co-workers. 

1104. NURSING III Either semester, 6 hours 

A continuation of Nursing II with emphasis on assisting the student to 
assess and plan in meeting more complex nursing needs of patients. In- 
creased emphasis is given to individual patient health instruction. 

fl05. NURSING IV Either semester, 6 hours 

Instruction includes nursing in disaster, out-patient departments, and se- 
lected medical-surgical specialties. The student is given an opportunity 
to become increasingly self-directed in giving and planning patient care. 

110. NURSING PROBLEMS B Either semester, 2 hours 
A continuation of 60 Nursing Problems A. 

111. NURSING PROBLEMS C Second semester, 2 hours 
A continuation of 110 Nursing Problems. 

fl20. MATERNITY NURSING Either semester, 6 hours 

Prerequisite: Nursing I. 

The study of pregnancy, labor, delivery, the post partum period and care 
of the newborn. Emphasis is placed on understanding and meeting total 
family health needs. 

+130. NURSING OF CHILDREN First and second semesters, 5 hours 

Prerequisite: Child Growth and Development, Nursing I. 
Includes instruction in the principles of the nursing management of the 
sick child and the rehabilitative, preventative and control aspects as relating 
to disease and disabilities. Recognition is given to the role of the nurse in 
providing emotional support for the child and family. 

1140. ORIENTATION TO NURSING LEADERSHIP Summer, 2 hours 

Principles of team leadership and the administration of a nursing unit 
are considered. Includes investigation of pertinent questions which arise in 
the care of selected patients. Guided experience is provided in team lead- 
ership and in related activities. 

160. PUBLIC HEALTH SCIENCE First semester, 2 hours 

The study of the principles, trends, organization and administration of 
community health service. The epidemiology and control aspects of disease 
and environmental health principles are included. 

93 



PHYSICS 

1165. PUBLIC HEALTH NURSING Either semester, 6 hours 

Includes study of the history and development of public health nursing 
and the responsibilities and activities of the nurse in such a program. 
Application of these principles are made to health programs sponsored 
by the Seventh-day Adventist Church. Practice 'm a public health agency 
includes conferences, clinics, family and school visits. 

|170. PSYCHIATRIC NURSING Either semester, 6 hours 

Instruction covers knowledge, understanding, skills and attitudes essential 
to the nursing care of patients with psychiatric disorders, Preventative and 
rehabilitative aspects are included. 

192. NURSING HISTORY AND TRENDS Second semester, 2 hours 

The development of nursing, including the progress of the Seventh-day 
Adventist health program; trends in nursing; opportunities for the graduate 
nurse; job selection; and placement after graduation. 



DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS 

Ray Hiifferlin A. L. Watt 



The courses in this subdivision are intended to present Physics as a 
typical science, and to acquaint students with its relation to other sciences 
and with some of its applications in the fields of research, engineering, 
radio communication, medicine, and dentistry. 



Bachelor of Arts With a Major in Physics 

Major: A major in Physics requires thirty hours. Mathematics 
through differential equations is indispensable. 

Minor: A minor in Physics requires eighteen hours. 



Course Requirements 

Major (Physics) 30 hours 

(Physics 51-52; Cognate requirement: Math. 11:12; 
99, 100; 111, 112 may count on major) 

Minor 18 hours 



tCourse includes correlated laboratory practice or field work. A semester hour 
of credit for laboratory practice or field work is defined as a three- or four-hour 
period of weekly practice for one semester or approximately eighteen weeks. 

94 



PHYSICS 

English 1-2 — 6 hours 

Literature 51, 52 or 61, 62 4 hours 

Applied Arts 4 hours 

Fine Arts, including 60 or 61 4 hours 

Foreign Language (German or French 

recommended) 6-14 hours 

P. E. 7, 8 _._ 1 hour 

Religion 12-16 hours 

Social Science 12 hours 

Electives — sufficient to make a four-year total of 128 

semester hours. 
Pre-medical students will add Biology 45, 46\ and 145; and 
Chemistry 1-2, 63, 102, 113-114. 

Bachelor of Science With a Major in Physics 

(For students planning graduate work in physics) 

Course Requirements 

Major (Physics) 40 hours 

Including: Physics 51-52; 181, 182**. The re- 
maining hours may be selected from any offering 
in the Physics Department, except Physics 2, 
from Physical Chemistry (Chemistry 151:152) 
and from Methods of Applied Mathematics 
(Math. 112) 

Minor 20 hours 

Mathematics 21 hours 

Including: Math. 11:12; 99, 100; 111. 

Chemistry 1-2 8 hours 

Applied Arts .„.. __ 4 hours 

Industrial Arts 1:2; 15:16; 51:52 recommended 

English 1-2 - 6 hours 

Literature 51, 52, 61 or 62 2 hours 

Fine Arts 60 or 6l 2 hours 

Foreign Language: German 21-22; 83-84 6-14 hours 

(This requirement can be adjusted for those 
having started French or Russian.) 
P, E. 7, 8 1 hour 



♦♦Students who have worked in the department research project as research 
assistants may, with the approval of the department, waive an equivalent part 

of this requirement, 

95 



PHYSICS 

Religion _ 12-16 hours 

Social Science — - 10 hours 

Electives — sufficient to make a four-year total of 128 
semester hours. 



*2. INTRODUCTION TO PHYSICS Second semester, 3 hours 

This course is designed specifically for students preparing for elementary 
school teaching. Simple demonstrations of physical principles, using 
materials available in the home or school, and discussion of basic ideas 
involved; emphasis is laid on application (to home appliances, automobile, 
and such things) and on the perception of character lessons in the material. 
Open only to students in elementary education curriculum. Two hours 
lecture, three hours laboratory, each week. 

51-52. GENERAL PHYSICS Two semesters, 8 hours 

Prerequisite: Math. 11:12 or 5:6 or equivalent. 

An introduction to the traditional fields of physics using a combination of 
everyday experiences with automobiles, musical instruments, etc., and the 
tools of algebra and trigonometry. Discussion of modern physics: atomic 
physics, x-rays, nuclear physics, earth satellites, and the like. Three hours 
lecture, three hours laboratory each week. 

53-54. EXTRA HOUR OF GENERAL PHYSICS FOR MAJORS AND 

ENGINEERING STUDENTS Two semesters, 2 hours 

Prerequisite: Math. 99, 100 concurrently. 

One class period per week on advanced problems and derivations relevant 
to the coursework in Physics 51-52. Open only to those who have taken 
or are taking Physics 51-52 and Math. 99, 100. 

61-62. DESCRIPTIVE ASTRONOMY Two semesters, 6 hours 

An elementary study of our solar system and its relation to the stellar 
universe. Two hours lecture, three hours laboratory each week. 

*81. ELECTRONICS First semester, 4 hours 

Prerequisite: One unit of secondary mathematics. 

A non-mathematical treatment of common receivers, transmitters, and 
transducers as the microphone, speaker, and antenna. Three hours lecture, 
three hours laboratoy each week. 

91. INTRODUCTION TO INDUSTRIAL SPECTROSCOPY Summer, 2 hours 
Lectures, laboratory work, and field trips designed to introduce the student 
to the field of industrial spectroscopy. May be offered in the summer as 
a two-week "fast course" for convenience of those attending from Ion/* 
distances. 

*92. ASTROPHYSICS Second semester, 3 hours 

Prerequisites: Math 11:12; Physics 51; Physics 52 concurrently. 
Experimental information about the light from the stars is studied using 
the concepts developed in General Physics. Various states of matter; diffu- 
sion and scattering of radiation through matter. The material in this course 
does not depend heavily upon that of Descriptive Astronomy, and hence 
Physics 61 is not prerequisite to this course. 

96 



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PHYSICS 

M02. PHYSICAL OPTICS Second semester, 4 hours 

Prerequisites: Physics 51-52; Math, 99, 100. 

Refraction, reflection, interference, and absorption of light are discussed 
from the standpoint of the particle and especially of the wave theories of 
light. The modern concept of the photon and of matter waves are used. 
Three hours lecture, and three hours laboratory each week, 

103. KINETIC THEORY First semester, 3 hours 
Prerequisites: Physics 51-52; Math. 99, 100. 

Many properties of gases, liquids, and solids can be derived from the 
assumption that matter is composed of small particles in motion. Three 
hours lecture each week. 

104. NUCLEAR PHYSICS Second semester, 3 hours 
Prerequisites: Physics 51-52; Math. 100 concurrently. 

The contributions of each of several models of the nucleus to our under- 
standing of radioactivity, fusion and fission. Discussion of the source of 
stellar energy, and of age dating the universe. The inductive nature of our 
understanding of the nucleus will be stressed. 

*123. ATOMIC PHYSICS One semester, 3 hours 

Prerequisites: Physics 51-52; Mathematics 100. 

Analysis of atomic spectra from the Bohr — Sommerfeld-vector model of 
the atom. 

*124. WAVE MECHANICS One semester, 3 hours 

Prerequisites: Physics 51-52; Mathematics 111. 

"Derivation," application of boundary conditions, and solutions of 
Schroedinger's equation. 

126. NUCLEAR PHYSICS INSTRUMENTS LABORATORY 

Second semester, I hour 
Prerequisite: Physics 52. 

Electromagnetic measurements and radiation measurements; gamma ray 
intensity and absorption; dosimetry. Three hours laboratory each week. 

*1 51:1 52. ANALYTIC MECHANICS Two semesters, 6 hours 

Prerequisites: Physics 51-52; Mathematics 111 concurrently. 
The mechanics of general physics is reformulated in more advanced terms, 
and problems such as that of the gyroscope are discussed. Introduction to 
the theory of relativity. Vectors are discussed as needed. 

161:162. ELECTRICITY AND MAGNETISM Two semesters, 8 hours 

Prerequisites: Physics 51-52; Math. Ill or concurrently. 
The electromagnetic principles of general physics are reformulated in 
advanced terms so that problems may be discussed such as wave guides. 
Vectors are introduced as needed. Three hours lecture and three hours 
laboratory each week. 

181, 182. SPECTROSCOPY Either semester, Up to 4 hours 

The student takes part in the research project under way in the Physics 
department and becomes familiar with research procedure and reporting. 
This course is limited to majors and minors. 

191. PROBLEMS IN PHYSICS Either semester, I hour 

Individual research work in some field of Physics elected by the student. 

97 



Radio Station WSMC-FM 



DEPARTMENT OF RELIGION 

Otto Christensen 

Douglas Bennett Gordon Hyde 

Kenneth Davis Herman Ray 

Robert Francis Clifford Reeves 



The course in theological training at Southern Missionary College 
is integrated with the curriculum of the School of Religion at Andrews 
University, Berrien Springs, Michigan. This program requires live years, 
the first four of which are taken at this college and the fifth at the 
School of Religion, A total of 128 semester hours leading to the Bach- 
elor of Arts Degree will be taken on the undergraduate level, and the 
fifth year in Religion will be taken on the graduate level. 

Approval for entrance into, and continuance in, the ministerial 
curriculum of Southern Missionary College is to be secured from the 
tmb-committee on Ministerial Recommendations, which is guided by the 
standards and procedures expected of each theology student. These 
standards and procedures for obtaining a degree in this field will be 
obtainable at the time of registration or from the Division of Religion 
office. Each theology student will be held responsible for obtaining 
this information. 



ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE SCHOOL OF RELIGION 

Those students planning to attend the School of Religion at 
Andrews University should closely observe the following list of re- 
quirements and recommended courses. 

Semester Hours 

Religion and Applied Theology 36 hours 

At least 26 hours in Bible 

Greek 12 hours 

English, Literature, Speech 16 hours 

History, Social Studies 16 hours 

Natural Sciences 6 hours 

Psychology, Education 7 hours 

Health and Religion 2 hours 

Total 95 hours 

Electives to meet major, minor, and department re- 
quirements as well as the total hours required for 
the bachelor's degree. 

98 



RELIGION 

It is recommended that the above minimum entrance requirements 
nclude the following courses or subjects: 

Religion and Applied Theology 

Life and Teachings of Jesus 

Bible Doctrines 

Daniel and the Revelation 

The Spirit of Prophecy 

Introduction to the Ministry (6 semester hours) 

English, Literature, Speech 
Composition 

Literature (World Literature preferred) 
Fundamentals of Speech 

History 

European Civilization 
The Ancient World 

Social Studies 

Sociology or Political Science (a minimum of 3 semester hours) 

Psychology, Education 

General or Child Psychology (a minimum of 2 semester hours) 
Principles of Education (a minimum of 2 semester hours) 
Elementary School Administration (a minimum of 2 semester 

hours) 
(To a total of 7 hours) 



Bachelor of Arts With a Major In Theology 

Course Requirements and Recommendations 

Major (Religion and Bible) 30 hours 

Required: Bible 11, 12, 165, 166; Religion 
5, 59, 60. 

Applied Theology 6 hours 

Required: Introduction to the Ministry 175, 176; 
Recommended: Personal Evangelism 73. 

Minor ~ 18 hours 

Psychology -.... - 7 hours 

99 



RELIGION 

Required: Education 21, 51, 142. 
English 1-2, Literature 51, 52 or 61, 62 10 hours 

Speech 8 hours 

Required: 5:6. 119-120. 

Fine Arts 24 and 63 required 4 hours 

Foreign Language 14 hours 

Required: Greek 31-32; 101, 102. 

Health 3 hours 

Required: P.E. 7, 8; Health 53. 

Natural Science — Mathematics 12 hours 

(Six hours must be a science with laboratory) 

Social Science 16 hours 

Required: 1, 2; Recommended: 6, 82, 155, 156. 

Applied Arts 4 hours 

Electives — sufficient to make a four-year total of 128 

semester hours. 



Bachelor of Arts With a Major in Religion 

Only students with a double major, pre-medical students, women 
or male students above 35 years of age at the time of their registration 
will be permitted to take a major in religion without meeting the othe 
requirements of the theological curriculum. 

Course Requirements 

Major (Religion and Bible) 30 hours 

Required: 5; 11,12; 59,60; 165; 166. 
Minor 18 hours 

(Applied Theology does not count, except course 73) 
English 1, 2; Literature 51, 52 or 61, 62 10 hours 

100 



RELIGION 

Fine Arts 60 or 61 _ 6 hours 

Foreign Language 6-14 hours * 

P. E. 7, 8 1 hour 

Natural Science — Mathematics 12 hours 

Social Science 1, 2 12 hours 

Applied Aits ~ 4 hours 

One of the following courses is required: 

Education 21; Health and Religion 53 - 2 hours 

Electives — sufficient to make a four-year total of 

128 semester hours 

Minor: For a minor in religion 18 hours in Bible and Religion 
are required, of which 6 hours must be upper division. Applied Theol- 
ogy (except course 73) and religious history do not count. 



Four-year Curriculum for Bible Instructor 

Students who desire to take a four-year course of studies in prepara- 
tion for the work of a Bible Instructor will be expected to meet the same 
admission requirements and scholastic performance as required of all 
candidates for the Bachelor of Arts degree. 

Course Requirements 

Major (Religion and Bible) 30 hours 

Required: Bible 11,12; 165, 166; Religion 5; 53; 

59; 60; Applied Theology 73. 

Minor . 18 hours 

English 1, 2; Literature 51, 52 or 61,62 . ... 10 hours 

Fine Arts 60 or 63; and at least 2 hours or its 

equivalent in piano or organ recommended 6 hours 

Foreign Language (Greek recommended) 6-14 hours 

Health 4; P.E. 7, 8 3 hours 

Home Economics 1, 2; 41; Recommended: 25, 

26; 61 10 hours 

Natural Science — Mathematics; 12 hours 

(Six hours must be a science sequence with laboratory) 
Social Science: Required: 1, 2; 82; 

Recommended: 6; 155, 156 12 hours 

Speech 5:6 4 hours 

Electives sufficient to make a four-year total of 128 semester 

hours. 



101 



RELIGION 

BIBLE 

1, 2. BIBLE SURVEY Two semesters, 4 hours 

An introduction to the Scriptures, required of those who have not had 
Old or New Testament history in the secondary school. Exemption may be 
obtained by examination. Credit for this course does not apply on a major 
in religion. 

IT, 12. LIFE AND TEACHINGS OF JESUS Two semesters, 4 hours 

The inter-testamental background of the times of Jesus, as well as a 
chronological study of Jesus' life and teachings, as found in the four 
Gospels. Also included are the spiritual lessons from this study. 

**51, 52. SURVEY OF BIBLE PROPHECY Two semesters, 4 hours 

Introductory study of the great lines of Bible prophecy with special em- 
phasis on the books Daniel and The Revelation. 

131, 132. OLD TESTAMENT PROPHETS Two semesters, 6 houn 

A survey of the major and minor prophets of the Old Testament including 
a background of their lives and teaching, with the application of their 
messages for modern man. 

151, 152. PAULINE EPISTLES Two semesters, 6 hours 

An exegetical study of the Pauline epistles in the order of their composition, 

including a background survey of the book of Acts. 

165. DANIEL First semester, 2 hours 
Prerequisite: Social Science 1, 2 or 131, 132. 

A comprehensive study of the great prophecies of the book of Daniel and 
their lessons for our day, including a survey of its background and historical 
setting. Special attention is given to the defense of the book against 
modern critics. 

166. REVELATION Second semester, 2 hours 
Prerequisite: Social Science 1, 2 or 131, 132. 

A study of the prophecies and symbolisms of this book with their historical 
fulfillments and their intimate relationships to the prophecies of the book 
of Daniel. 



RELIGION 

5. PROPHETIC GIFT First or second semester, 2 hours 

A study of the Scriptural background of the Spirit of Prophecy in the Old 
and New Testament with special emphasis on its manifestation in the 
remnant church in harmony with prophetic predictions. Objections and 
problems connected with its manifestation will be given consideration. 

53. ARCHAEOLOGY AND THE BIBLE First semester, 2 hours 

A survey of archaeological methods and its discoveries in relation to the 
Bible, involving its historical backgrounds and confirmation. 

f 59, 60. FUNDAMENTALS OF CHRISTIAN FAITH Two semesters, 4 hours 
A study of the doctrines of the Christian faith and their application to life. 

155. CHRISTIAN APOLOGETICS First semester, 2 hours 

A study of the defense of the Christian faith and Biblical doctrines of a 



** Students taking course numbers 51, 52 will not be permitted to earn credit 
in course numbers 165 and 166. 

102 



RELIGION 

polemical nature such as predestination, the problem of suffering, the 
nature of Christ, etc, 

1160. DOCTRINE OF THE ATONEMENT Second semester, 2 hours 

A study of the great underlying principles of the plan of salvation as illus- 
trated to Israel by the sanctuary service. 

fl74, MANUSCRIPTS OF THE BIBLE Second semester, 2 hours 

A study of the ancient sacred writings of Israel and their preservation and 
development into our present Bible, with emphasis on the discovery and 
classification of manuscripts and the various versions and revisions. 

184. ESCHATOLOGY Second semester, 2 hours 

A study of the concepts in prophetic literature that pertain to the end of 
the world and the consummation of the Christian hope. 

1194, PROBLEMS IN RELIGION Second semester, 2 hours 

Guided research in religious problems. Open only to religion majors with 
20 semester hours credit in religion. 



APPLIED THEOLOGY 

73. PRINCIPLES OF PERSONAL EVANGELISM First semester, 2 hours 

A study of methods for doing personal work in winning men to Christ, 
including the preparation and art of giving Bible studies. Credit for this 
course can apply on a major or minor in religion for all students except 
theology students. 

119, 120. HOMILETICS AND PULPIT DELIVERY Two semesters, 4 hours 

Prerequisite: Speech 5:6. 

Training in the preparation and delivery of the various types of talks and 

addresses the Christian worker or preacher is called upon to give. 

174. EVANGELISTIC METHODS Second semester or summer, 2 hours 
A specialized course in the procedures of public evangelism and revivals 
generally offered in the summer under the direction of the Southern 
Union Conference evangelist. This will include learning and laboratory 
participation with college credit. 

175. INTRODUCTION TO THE MINISTRY First semester, 3 hours 
A study of the man who performs as a minister, including the call to the 
ministry, intellectual and spiritual qualification and ways in which he should 
be prepared in order to render successful service to the church. 

176. INTRODUCTION TO THE MINISTRY Second semester, 3 hours 

A study of the various duties and responsibilities of a minister and how 
to perform them. 

RELIGIOUS HISTORY 

16, 7. AMERICAN CHURCH HISTORY Two semesters, 4 hours 

The first semester involves a study of the Advent Movement as it grew 
and reached a climax in the nineteenth century and developed into the 
Great Second Advent Movement. 

The second semester is a study of the various modern denominations as 
they took form here in America, and their doctrines. This will include 



fWill not apply for State Teacher Certification. 

103 



RELIGION 

such movements as Modernism and its allied philosophies, as well as the 
various smaller sects. 

155. 156. HISTORY OF CHRISTIANITY Two semesters 6 hours 

A study of the development of the Christian Church from its apostolic 
origin to the present time with emphasis on the internal problems that 
eventually formed the background for present-day Christianity and its 
various divisions. 



Two-year Curriculum for Bible Instructor 

For admission requirements see page 36. 

This curriculum is intended to prepare young women for work as 
Bible instructors in connection with the evangelistic activities of the 
Seventh-day Adventist denomination. 

Religion 1, 2 (or 11, 12); 5; 59, 60 12 hours 

English 1-2 6 hours 

Applied Theology 73 - 2 hours 

Natural Science 6 hours 

Social Science 1, 2, 82 8 hours 

Home Economics 1, 2 5 hours 

Speech 5:6 4 hours 

P.E. 7, 8; Health & Religion 53 3 hours 

Fine Arts 60 or 63 4 hours 

Psychology 51 3 hours 

Electives 10 hours 



Religion Courses Offered on the Orlando Campus 

54. PRINCIPLES OF SPIRITUAL THERAPY AND WORLD RELIGION 

Either semester, 2 hours 
An understanding and use of the basic principles of Christianity as taught 
and applied in the medical ministry of Christ. A survey of the non- 
Christian religions with a more detailed study of the major Christian 
religions emphasizing how a knowledge of these beliefs may assist the 
nurse in professional relationships. 

93. FUNDAMENTAL BIBLE PRINCIPLES Either semester, 2 hours 

A study of the teaching of the Bible as related to modern life. 

95. PERSONAL EVANGELISM Second semester, 2 hours 

Basic Bible truths and methods of sharing these truths effectively with others 
are studied with special consideration given to recognizing and developing 
opportunities for spiritual ministry in Christian nursing service. 

104 



BIBLICAL LANGUAGE 

BIBLICAL LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 

Minor Requirement: A minor in Biblical Languages may be 
obtained by 18 hours in Greek or with 14 hours of Greek plus 6 hours 
of Hebrew. 

GREEK AND HEBREW 

31-32. ELEMENTS OF NEW TESTAMENT GREEK Two semesters, 8 Hours 

A study of the grammar and syntax of the vernacular koine Greek of New 
Testament times, with readings in the Epistles of John. 

101. 102. INTERMEDIATE NEW TESTAMENT GREEK Two semesters, 6 hours 
A course in translation of readings from the Gospel of John and Revela- 
tion, with vocabulary building, advanced studies in grammar and syntax, 
with exegetical interpretation of the original text. 

*121-122. BEGINNING HEBREW Two semesters, 6 hours 

The elements of Hebrew grammar, including the vowel system, vocabulary, 
writing, and selected reading from the Old Testament, 



DEPARTMENT OF SECRETARIAL SCIENCE 

Charles Read 
Theresa Brickman Norma Kellams 



The courses in this area of study are designed to prepare young 
men and young women for work as office secretaries primarily in 
denominational institutions and for office work in general. 

Bachelor of Science With a Major in Secretarial Science 

Course Requirements 

Major (Secretarial Science) 30 hours 

Including 40; 51; 55; 56; 63; 64; 72; 76; 109 or 

112; 127 or 128; 141; 146. 

Courses 9, 10, 13, 14 do not apply toward this major. 

Minor 18 hours 

Business Administration 11 or 31:32; 55, 56; 

71, 72 13 hours 

Education— Psychology 51 3 hours 

105 



SECRETARIAL SCIENCE 

English 1-2 6 hours 

Literature 51, 52 or 61, 62 4 hours 

Applied Arts — . ....... 4 hours 

Fine Arts 60 or 61 4 hours 

RE. 7, 8 - .. ... 1 hour 

Natural Science — Mathematics ... 12 hours 

Religion 12-16 hours 

Social Science - - :.. 12 hours 

Electives — sufficient to make a four-year total of 128 
semester hours. 



Bachelor of Science With a Major in Medical Secretarial Science 

Course Requirements 

Major (Secretarial Science) */. 38* hours 

Including 4d( 5? 5*C 5& 58; 63, 64; 73, 76, 77, 
78, 128, 136, 141, 146, 177, 178. Courses 9, 10, 
13, 14 do not apply toward this major. 

Minor .. l$- hours 

Business Administration 11 or 31:32; 55, 5&; 

71, 72 13 'hours 

Education — Psychology 51 3 hours 

^-English 1-2 6. hours 

Literature 51, 52 or 61, 62 4 hours 

Applied Arts 4 hours 

Fine Arts 60 or 61 4 hours 

Health 22; P.E. 7, 8 3 hours 

Natural Sciences — Biology 11:12;"22 12 hours 

ty Religion 12-16 hours 

<;- Social Science ........... 8 hours 

Electives — sufficient to make a four-year total of 128 ft 7 
semester hours. 

Two-year Diploma Requirements in Secretarial Science 

Course Requirements 

Secretarial Science: 9f, 10f, 13f, l4f, 40, 51, 55, 56; 

63, 64; 72, 76 32 hours 

Business Administration 11 or 31:32 3 hours 

Education — Psychology 51 3 hours 

fThis requirement may be met by having high school equivalents. 

106 






SECRETARIAL SCIENCE 

English 1-2 — - ~ 6 hours 

Fine Arts 60 or 61 ,__ ... 2 hours 

P.E. 7 7 8 1 hour 

Religion 6 hours 

Social Science __ 2 hours 

Electives — sufficient to make a two-year total of 64 
semester hours. 



Two-year Diploma Requirements in Medical Secretarial Science 

Course Requirements 

Secretarial Science: 9f, 10f, 13f, l4{, 40, 51, 55, 

56, 58; 63, 64; 73, 76, 77, 78 - 36 hours 

Biology 11, 12 _. 6 hours 

Business Administration 11 or 31:32 3 hours 

Education — Psychology 51 - 3 hours 

English 1-2 6 hours 

Fine Arts 60 or 61 required 2 hours 

Health 22; P.E. 7, 8 3 hours 

Religion - 6 hours 

Social Science 2 hours 

Electives sufficient to make a two-year total of 64 

semester hours. 
Secretarial Science Minor: Eighteen hours. Required courses: 

Secretarial Science 55, 56, or equivalent, 63, 64, and 72. Secretarial 

Science 9, 10, 13, 14, do not apply. 

Medical Secretarial Science Minor: Eighteen hours. Required 
courses: Secretarial Science 55, 58, or equivalent, 63, 64 , and 73. Secre- 
tarial Science 9, 10, 13, 14 do not apply. 

9. SHORTHAND First semester, 4 hours 

Prerequisite: Secretarial Science 13 must be taken concurrently with this 
course unless the student has had the equivalent. 

Fundamental principles of Gregg Shorthand simplified. Five class periods 
each week. 

10. SHORTHAND Second semester, 4 hours 

Prerequisite: Secretarial Science 9, or equivalent to one unit of high school 
shorthand. Secretarial Science 14 must be taken concurrently with this 
course unless the student has had the equivalent. 70 words a minute 
required. Five class periods each week, 

107 



SECRETARIAL SCIENCE 

13. TYPEWRITING First semester, 2 hours 

Five class periods each week. One hour laboratory a week is required. 
Students who have had l/ 2 unit of high school typewriting may receive 
1 hour. Teacher to be consulted for entrance date. 35 words a minute 
for 5 minutes required. 

14. TYPEWRITING Second semester, 2 hours 

Prerequisite: Secretarial Science 13, or equivalent of one unit of high school 
typewriting. Five class periods each week. One hour laboratory a week is 
required. 50 words a minute for 10 minutes required. 

20. CLERICAL PRACTICE Second semester, 3 hours 

A course designed to develop office initiative and efficient service. The stu- 
dent will learn to perform work related to office machines, voice tran- 
scription, mailing, telephoning, and meeting callers as well as personality 
development, good grooming, and etiquette. Three class periods and two 
hours laboratory each week. 

40. FILING Either semester, 2 hours 

A course in the theory and practice of modern systems of filing. 

51. VOICE TRANSCRIPTION Either semester, I hour 

Prerequisites: Freshman Composition; typing speed of 60 words a minute; 
permission of the department. 

A course in the operating of voice-writing equipment with emphasis on 
mailable transcriptions. Three laboratory hours each week. 

55. INTERMEDIATE SHORTHAND First semester, 3 hours 

Prerequisite: "C standing in Secretarial Science 10; simultaneous regis- 
tration, Secretarial Science 63- Four class periods each week. 90-100 words 
a minute required. 

56. INTERMEDIATE SHORTHAND Second semester, 3 hours 

Prerequisite: Secretarial Science 55 or equivalent; simultaneous registration, 
Secretarial Science 64. Four class periods each week. 100-120 words a 
minute required. 

58. MEDICAL SHORTHAND Second semester, 3 hours 

Prerequisites: Secretarial Science 55, or equivalent, simultaneous registra- 
tion, Secretarial Science 56 and 64, and permission of the department. 
A study of shorthand outlines for medical terms — their pronunciation, their 

spelling, and their meaning. Four class periods each week. 

63. SECRETARIAL TYPEWRITING AND TRANSCRIPTION 

First semester, 2 hours 
Prerequisite: Secretarial Science 14 or two units of high school type- 
writing. Simultaneous registration, Secretarial Science 55. 
A course in rapid transcription from shorthand notes. Emphasis is also 
placed on special letter- writing problems, tabulation, manuscripts. Five 
class periods each week. One practice period is required, 

64. SECRETARIAL TYPEWRITING AND TRANSCRIPTION 

Second semester, 2 hours 
Prerequisite: Secretarial Science 63; Simultaneous registration, Secretarial 
Science 56 or 58. 

Mailable transcripts. Special attention given to practice in preparing type- 
written outlines, reports, theses, and bibliographies. Five class periods each 
week. One practice period js required. 60 words a minute for 10 minutes 
required. 

108 



SECRETARIAL SCIENCE 

72. SECRETARIAL DEVELOPMENT Second semester, 2 hours 

Prerequisite: Ten hours of Secretarial Science, or the consent of the 

instructor. 

A study of business ethics, procedures, and techniques used by the secretary. 

73. MEDICAL SECRETARIAL DEVELOPMENT First semester, 3 hours 

Prerequisite: Ten hours of Secretarial Science, or the consent of the 

instructor. 

A course to prepare students to take care of the specialized duties in a 

physician's office, 

76. BUSINESS MACHINES Either semester, 2 hours 

Prerequisite: Secretarial Science 13, or equivalent. 

The theory of and practice in the use of the following office machines: key- 
driven and rotary calculators, full keyboard and ten-key adding listing 
machines, stencil, and direct-process duplicators. Six hours laboratory 
each week. 

77. MEDICAL ASSISTANT TECHNIQUES First semester, 2 hours 

Prerequisite: Ten hours of Secretarial Science or the consent of the 

instructor. 

This course is designed to give instruction in office nursing techniques; 

such as sterilization, hypodermics, medicines, contagious diseases, preparing 

patients for examination, and doing simple laboratory tests. Two 2-hour 

periods of lecture and laboratory each week. 

78. CLINICAL OFFICE PRACTICE Second semester, I hour 

Prerequisites: Secretarial Science 73 and 77. 

This course is based on supervised practice In handling actual medical 

office routine. Three hours of laboratory work each week. 

*109. SHORTHAND REPORTING First semester, 3 hours 

Prerequisite: Twelve hours of Secretarial Science (including courses 55, 
56, 63, and 64 or equivalent). Must be enrolled concurrently in Secretarial 
Science 127. 

Rapid dictation of congressional and other technical materials. 130-140 
words a minute required. 

112. DENOMINATIONAL REPORTING Second semester, 3 hours 

Prerequisite: Twelve hours of Secretarial Science (including courses 55, 
56, 63, and 64 t or equivalent). Must be enrolled concurrently in Secre- 
tarial Science 128. 

127. ADVANCED TRANSCRIPTION First semester, I hour 
Prerequisite: Twelve hours of Secretarial Science (including courses 55, 
56, 63, and 64, or equivalent). Must be enrolled concurrently in Secretarial 
Science 109 or 136. 

128. ADVANCED TRANSCRIPTION First semester, I hour 
Prerequisite: Twelve hours of Secretarial Science (including courses 55", 
56; 63; 64; or equivalent). Must be enrolled concurrently in Secretarial 
Science 112 or 136. 

136. ADVANCED MEDICAL DICTATION Second semester, 3 hours 

Prerequisite: Twelve hours of Secretarial Science (including courses 55, 
58, 63, or 64, or equivalent). Must be enrolled concurrently in Secretarial 
Science 128. 

A course emphasizing medicai terminology and continuation of special 
medical dictation of technical case histories, medical news articles, and 
lectures. 

109 



SECRETARIAL SCIENCE 



141. BUSINESS AND OFFICE MANAGEMENT First semester, 3 hours 

Major emphasis is placed on application of business management prin- 
ciples to the problems of the businessman and on the organizing of 
business and secretarial offices. Attention is given to the training of office 
employees, selection of equipment, and flow of work through the office 

146. BUSINESS COMMUNICATION Second semester, 3 hours 

Prerequisite: English 1-2. 

A study and application of the modern practices in oral and written business 
communication, Accuracy in grammar, spelling, and punctuation, and the 
writing of well-knit sentences and clear paragraphs are taught as a means 
of effective expression in business-letter writing. 

151. ADVANCED OFFICE MACHINES First semester, I to 3 hours 

A course designed for students who wish to specialize on particular office 
machines. One class period and three hours laboratory a week for each 
semester hour of credit. 

174. APPLIED SECRETARIAL PRACTICE 

Either first or second semester, I to 3 hours 
Prerequisite: For secretarial science majors and prospective business teachers. 
This course is based on an activity program which provides practical 
experience in representative types of office situations. 

*178. MEDICAL WORK EXPERIENCE Second semester, 2 hours 

This course is designed to give actual medical secretarial experience before 
the graduate is called upon for professional performance. To be taken 
either off or on the campus. 

181. SECRETARIAL PROBLEMS Either first or second semester, I or 2 hours 
Prerequisite: Open only to seniors majoring in Secretarial Science. 
Problems are assigned according to the experience and interests of the 
student. 

185. MATERIALS AND METHODS IN TEACHING SECRETARIAL SCIENCE 

First semester, 1-3 hours 

A study of the specialized methods and procedures, observation, and demon- 
stration of teaching techniques in shorthand, typewriting, or bookkeeping. 

One-year Course in Clerical Training 
Course Requirements 

Secretarial Science: 13, 14, 20, 40 9 hours 

Business Administration 11 3 hours 

English 1, 2 6 hours 

Religion 4 hours 

Psychology 51 3 hours 

Speech 5 2 hours 

Physical Education 1 hour 

Electives 4 hours 

This one-year course in Clerical Training is designed to prepare 
students from the secondary schools for general office work. The student 
will receive training in the use of voice-writing machines, adding 
machines, and duplicating machines. 

A certificate will be given upon completion of this course. 

110 









PRE-PROFESSIONAL CURRICULUMS 



Southern Missionary College offers pre-professional and pre- 
technical curriculums in a wide variety of fields. These open the way 
for students to enter professional schools of their choice for more 
specific training, or to enter upon a career as technicians. 

The College is prepared to cooperate with students desiring to enter 
fields not listed below, and will work out special sequences of courses 
needed to meet the entrance requirements to such institutions as may 
be chosen. 



MEDICINE 

Nearly all medical colleges now require a bachelor's degree of all 
candidates. Therefore students who later expect to enter a medical 
college should register as candidates for a Bachelor of Arts Degree, 
selecting suitable majors and minors. 

Students planning to transfer to the Loma Linda University 
Medical School, or any other medical college, should select entrance 
courses as outlined in the current bulletin issued by that college. Cur- 
rently these essential courses include: 

Semester Horns 

Biology 45, 46; and 145 - - 11 

English 1-2 _ 6 

Foreign Language - _ 6-14 

Chemistry 1-2; 63; 102; 113-114 20 

Mathematics 5:6 or 11:12 6 

History 6 

Physics 51-52 8 

Religion 12-16 

The quality of scholarship required for entrance demands that a 
grade-point average in natural sciences and other subjects, figured sep- 
arately, should be not less than 1.5 and a higher grade-point average is 
desirable. 



DENTAL 

Class A dental colleges require a minimum of two years (sixty 
hours) of college work, including certain prescribed courses. Students 
planning to enter the Loma Linda Dental School should plan on three 
years of college work, to include the following courses: 

111 



PRE-PROFESSIONAL 

Semester Hours 

Biology 45, 46 and 145 11 

Chemistry 1-2; 113-114 16 

English 1-2 ..... 6 

Mathematics 5:6 or 11:12 .„ 6 

Physical Education 7, 8 1 

Physics 51-52 8 

Religion 8 



MEDICAL LABORATORY TECHNOLOGY 

Southern Missionary College prepares students for admission to the 
School of Medical Laboratory Technology of the Loma Linda Univer- 
sity. Admission requirements to this pre-medical technology curriculum 
are the same as for curriculums leading to the Bachelor of Science 
Degree. Three years of college, totaling 96 semester hours, are required 
as preparation for entrance to a school of medical technology. The 96 
hours must include: 

Semester Hours 

History 53 or 54 3 

American National and State Government 115 — 3 

Mathematics 5:6 or 11:12 6 

Physics 51-52 8 

Biology 11, 12; 22; 45, 46 18 

Chemistry 1-2; 63; 102; 113-114; 171 24 

Religion 12 

English 1-2 - - 6 

Psychology 51 3 

Foreign Language 8 

A student presenting two units of the same foreign languap? r rom the- 
se cond a ry school may be exempted from this requirement. 

Biology 146 may be substituted for Biology 11. 

Further information regarding the requirements of the School of 
Laboratory Technique, Loma Linda University, Loma Linda, California, 
may be obtained from the bulletin of that school. Students who com- 
plete the above courses in college plus the one-year laboratory techni 
cian's curriculum in the School of Laboratory Technique at the Loma 
Linda University will receive the Bachelor of Science Degree from thai 
institution. 



112 



PRE-PROFESSIONAL 

X-RAY TECHNOLOGY 

Thirty semester hours are needed for admission to the Loma Linda 
University School of X-ray Technique. The following courses should 
be taken: 

Semester Hours 

Anatomy and Physiology 11, 12 6 

Chemistry 7-8 - - - 6 

Mathematics 5:6 or 11:12 - - 6 

General Physics 51-52 . 8 

Religion . 6 

The requirements for entrance into schools for X-ray technicians 
vary greatly. The student must acquaint himself with the specific re- 
quirements of the school of his choice. A list of approved schools for 
X-ray technicians can be obtained by writing to The American Society 
of X-ray Technicians, 16 Fourteenth Street, Fond du Lac, Wisconsin. 
Although martriculants of shorter training courses with less require- 
ments are free to enter the field in competition with highly-skilled 
workers, their deficiencies are soon apparent and it is likely to become 
a disappointing experience. The growing demand for better-trained 
technical workers is tending toward still higher pre-training require- 
ments, and to eliminate short-cuts and poorly supervised training 
courses. 



OPTOMETRY 

The optometry course usually consists of a five-year curriculum, 
the first two years of which may be taken in an accredited college. 
The following courses which should be, included in the two years' 
work will fulfill the requirements in most colleges of optometry. The 
student, however, should check with the requirements of the school 
of his choice. A list of approved colleges may be secured by writing 
to The American Optometry Association, 4030 Chouteau Avenue, St. 
Louis 10, Missouri. 

Semester Hours 

Biology 45, 46 8 

Chemistry 1-2 8 

English 1-2 6 

Mathematics 11:12; 99:100 16 

113 



PRE-PROFESSIONAL 

P.E. 7, 8 1 

Physics 51-52 8 

Psychology 51 - 3 

Religion . 6 

PHARMACY 






Two years of college work are required for admission to schools of 
pharmacy. The student must learn the specific requirements from the 
pharmacy school of his choice. A list of accredited colleges of phar- 
macy may be secured by writing to the American Pharmaceutical Asso- 
ciation, 2215 Constitution Avenue, N.W., Washington 7, D.C., The 
Bachelor of Science degree in Pharmacy may be obtained at the Uni- 
versity of Tennessee and most other universities in three additional 
years after completing the following courses at Southern Missionary 
College. Only students having an average of "C are admitted to schools 
of pharmacy. The following courses are required by the University of 
Tennessee : 

Semester Hours 

English 1-2 6 

Speech . - 2 

Literature or foreign language ... 2 

Zoology 45, 45 (or equivalent) 8 

Physics 51-52 ... 8 

Mathematics 11:12 or 5:6 6 to 8 

General Chemistry 1-2 8 

Economics 3 

Political Science, Sociology or History 3 

Electives to make a total of at least 60 semester hours. 

The electives should be scheduled in Business Administration or 
the social or natural sciences. Quantitative Analysis is recommended. 



PHYSICAL THERAPY 
OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY 

The Loma Linda University requires two years of college work 
for admission. The following courses should be included in the pre- 
physical therapy curriculum. 

114 



PRE-PROFESSIONAL 

Semester Hours 

Religion 8 

History 53 or 54 „ „ 3 

Political Science 115 - 3 

Psychology 51 and electives 6 

English 1-2 - — 6 

Speech 5:6 - - 4 

P.E. 7, 8 and electives 2 

fBiology 22; 45, 46 12 

Chemistry 7-8 (or 1-2) 6 

The Pre-Occupational Therapy requirements are the 

same as the Pre-Physical Therapy requirements with 

the exception of the following: 

Sociology .. 3 

Psychology 51 and electives 

(Child, Adolescent, Abnormal) ... 6 

Electives from any field to make total of 62 sem. hrs. 

DENTAL HYGIENE 

Students planning to take the Dental Hygiene Curriculum at 
Loma Linda University should take two years of college work (64 
semester hours) including the following: 

Semester Hours 

Anatomy and Physiology 6 

Zoology or Biology - 4 

Chemistry 6 

English Composition and Literature - 6 

Speech _ _ 2 

Psychology _ .._.. __._ 9 

Sociology - 3 

American History and Constitution 6 

Religion . 4 

Electives to total _ _ _ 60 



ENGINEERING 

Although Southern Missionary College does not offer an engineer- 
ing degree, a two-year preparatory curriculum is offered, the completion 
of which enables students to transfer to an engineering school without 



fOther Biology courses may be substituted but Human Anatomy and Phys- 
iology will not apply. General Zoology is recommended. 

115 



PRE-PROFESSIONAL 

loss of time. For the first two years all engineering students take approxi- 
mately the same natural sciences, mathematics, and core-curriculum 
courses. The following embodies the basic requirements. 

Semester Hours 

Chemistry 1-2 - 8 

English 1-2 6 

Mathematics 11:12; 99:100 16 

P.E. 7, 8 1 

Physics 51-52; 53-54; 81 14 

Industrial Arts 1:2 4 

Religion 8 



LAW 

The program below has been fashioned to meet the. requirements 
of the Law School of the University of Tennessee and others accredited 
by the National Association of American Law Schools. Students who 
complete 96 semester hours with a grade-point average of 1.0 or better 
may receive the Bachelor of Arts Degree from Southern Missionary 
College upon satisfactory completion of 32 semester hours in the law 
school provided: 

1. That the last year of pre-professional work be taken in residence at 
Southern Missionary College. 

2. That application for this degree be made before entering the law 
school. 

3. That the student maintain up to the, time of his graduation a pattern 
of living and conduct compatible with the aims and objectives of 
Southern Missionary College. 

4. That the student fulfills the requirements for a major and a minor 

The courses as outlined below should be in the three-year curric- 
ulum necessary for entrance to a law school. 

Semester Hours 

English 1-2; 51, 52 or 61, 62 . 10 

Language 6-14 

Religion 12 

Science 12 

Social Science 53, 54, 115 9 

Business Administration 55,. 56 4 

Psychology 3 

Speech 5:6 4 

116 



FINANCIAL INFORMATION 



EXPENSES 

Having met the full financial and labor requirements the student 
has actually covered only part of the full cost of his instruction and 
maintenance. The deficit is covered by gifts, subsidies, and funds from 
other sources. The educational opportunity afforded each student in 
Southern Missionary College represents a large investment in land, 
buildings and equipment, averaging nearly seven thousand dollars 
for each student enrolled, 



BASIC COSTS 

RENT IN RESIDENCE HALLS 

Residence Hall accommodations are rented for the school year and 
charged to the student in nine equal payments September through May. 
Should a student discontinue school before the end of the term his 
room charge shall end with the close of the month during which he 
leaves. The basic monthly room charge is as follows: 

New Women's Residence Hall $25.00 

Talge Hall and Maude Jones Hall — men 21.00 

Room with adjoining bath 23.00 

This charge is based on two students occupying a room. A student 
may be granted the privilege of rooming alone when sufficient rooms 
are available. The surcharge for this arrangement is $5.00 monthly. 
Where three students occupy one room, the monthly charge per student 
is reduced by $2.00. No refund is made because of absence from the 
campus either for regular vacation periods or for other reasons. 

MARRIED STUDENTS' HOUSING 

The college provides approximately forty-five apartments for 
married students. These range in size from one room to four rooms and 
most are unfurnished. Rents range from $20.00 per month to $45.00 per 
month. Prospective students are invited to write to the Direotor of 
Student Finance for details. A reservation deposit of $10.00 is charged. 
This is refunded on the student's iinal statement of the school year 
pending satisfactory clearance of housing. 

117 



FINANCIAL 

There are fifty or mare privately owned apartments in the College- 
dale community. These also are available to students. Information may 
be supplied by the Director of Student Finance upon request. 

BOARD CHARGES 

The cafeteria plan of boarding is used, which allows the student 
the privilege of choosing his food and paying only for what he selects. 
The minimum monthly charge for dormitory students is $20.00 for 
women and $24.00 for men. This covers a full calendar month. Board 
charges for students vary greatly. The average monthly charge of the 
past school year was approximately $40.00 for men and $30.00 for 
women. However, individual charges varied from minimum to over 
$70.00 for men and from minimum to nearly $60.00 for women. 

No reduction of the minimum charge is made for absence from the 
campus except for specified vacations of one week or more, and in 
cases of emergency. Three meals a day are served. Students living in the 
residence halls are expected to take their meals in the dining room. 

ADVANCE PAYMENT 

An advance payment on or before the date of registration is re- 
quired of all students including veterans and those expecting colporteur 
or teaching scholarships. Included in this advance payment is a deposit 
which is refunded at the close of the school year or upon withdrawal 
from school. 

The amount of this advance payment is determined as follows: 

A. Those being charged housing, tuition, and board $175.00 

B. Those being charged any two of the three above 150.00 

C. Those being charged any one of the three above 125.00 

Students registering for music only are not required to pay any 

advance deposit or general fee, but there is a $2,00 registration fee 
for all such music students. However, a rental will be levied for use 
of piano or organ. 

The advance payment is distributed as follows: 

General Fee _ _. „ $50.00 

Student Association Fee .— - - - 15«flj 

Medical __ _.... .. up to 30.00 

Breakage charges ..... Actual 

Refunded at close of year .„. . _ Balance 

General Fee — The General Fee is included in the advance pay- 
ment. It includes charges for lyceum programs, library fee, laboratory 
fees, charges for musical organizations, graduation expense, martricu- 
lation expense, and rentals on pianos, organs, musical instruments, and 
typewriters for those whose classes require the use of such. 

118 



FINANCIAL 

A 50 per cent refund on the General Fee will be credited to any 
student withdrawing on or before the completion of the first nine weeks 
No refund will be granted thereafter. 

For those entering the second semester, the General Fee shall be 
70 per cent of the yearly charge. A 25 per cent refund will be given 
to those entering second semester but withdrawing during the first five 
weeks of the second semester. 

No separate charges are levied for laboratory, music organiza- 
tions, library, lyceum, or equipment rentals. 

Student Association Fee — The Student Association of Southern 
Missionary Gollege publishes the school paper, The Southern Accent, 
and the annual, The Southern Memories. The Student Association also 
has other financial obligations such as school projects, the payment of 
minimum stipends to a few students holding major offices, etc. To cover 
the costs of these various endeavors a fee of $15.00 per student per 
year is required. This fee is included in the advance payment and is 
not refundable. 

In the case of married students both attending school only one 
student association fee is charged per family. However, a charge will 
be made for the extra photo required for the annual. 

Medical Fee — 

A. Blue Cross-Blue Shield (required of dormitory 
students not covered by equivalent insurance 
elsewhere) $15.00 

B. Medical examination (required of all students 
who have not submitted the medical examination 
form fully completed by a competent physician 

before registration) 5.00 

C. Infirmary care (for dormitory students only) 10.00 

Balance of the advance payment will be refunded on the final 

statement of the school year. 

TUITION AND FEES— For 1962-63 Fiscal Year 



Semester 


Tuition 


Tuition 


General 


Hours 


Per Sem. 


Per Year 


Fee 


1 


$ 23.00 


$ 46.00 


$ 5.00 


2 


46.00 


92.00 


10.00 


3 


69.00 


138.00 


15.00 


4 


92.00 


184.00 


35.00 


5 


115.00 


230.00 


35.00 


6 


138.00 


276.00 


35.00 


T 


161.00 


322.00 


50.00 



119 



FINANCIAL 








8 


184.00 


368.00 


50.00 


9 


207.00 


414.00 


50.00 


10 


230.00 


460.00 


50.00 


11 


245.00 


490.00 


50.00 


12 


260.00 


520.00 


50.00 


13 


275,00 


550.00 


50.00 


14 


290.00 


580.00 


50.00 


15 


305.00 


610.00 


50.00 


16 


320.00 


640.00 


50.00 


17 


335.00 


670.00 


50.00 


18 


350.00 


700.00 


50.00 



Tuition charges for the first semester arc made in four monthly 
installments beginning with the month of September. Tuition charges 
for the second semester are also made in four monthly installments, 
February through May. The student's class load as of the close of the 
second week of school becomes the basis of the tuition charge regard- 
less of subsequent reductions in the class program. Late additions, if 
permitted, will be reflected in an increase in the tuition charged. 

It is assumed to be the earnest purpose of each student to secure an 
education, and since even those working their entire way have time for 
as much as one half of a full-class load, each residence hall student is 
urged to carry at least that much school work. Except by permission of 
the President's Council, the minimum course load a student may carry 
is eight hours. 

The College assumes no responsibility to provide work to students 
enrolled for less than eight semester hours of class load. 

MUSIC TUITION 

The charge for any private music instruction is $42.00 per semester, 
or $84.00 for the year, for a minimum of 15 lessons per semester. This 
charge is made in eight installments of $10.50 each, in the same manner 
as the regular tuition. In addition to private instruction in voice, classes 
of from two to five students are arranged at a cost per student of $22.00 
per semester. All persons who wish to take music must enroll for it at 
the Office of Records even if they are not taking it for credit or if music 
is all they are taking. There is a $2.00 registration fee for those who 
are taking music only. 

Students are expected to enroll for private lessons or class in- 
struction in an instrument or voice by the semester. Each student 
will receive a minimum of 15 lessons per semester. After the second 
full week of school, refunds will be permitted only in cases of pro- 
longed illness or withdrawal from school. 

120 



FINANCIAL 



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121 



FINANCIAL 

BREAKAGE DEPOSIT 

Students registered in certain laboratory classes will be charged 
a $5.00 Breakage Deposit at the time they are assigned a laboratory 
locker and issued supplies and/or equipment. This amount, less any 
breakage, will be refunded to the student at the close of his course 
provided he cleans his locker and equipment in the manner prescribed 
by the laboratory department involved. 



ROOM DEPOSIT FOR SINGLE STUDENTS 

Single students not living with their parents are required 
to reside in one of the College Residence Halls. A residence hall 
room may be reserved by mailing a $10.00 room deposit to the 
Director of Admissions and Records at the college. This deposit will 
be refunded on the final statement of the school year if the room has 
been left in good repair and clean. To receive a refund of the room 
deposit, the student on leaving must fill in the appropriate check-out 
form provided for this purpose, having it approved by the residence 
hall dean and submitting it to the Business Office. 

This deposit is not refundable to students who do not register 
unless notice of nonattendance is received by the College on or before 
August 15. 



HOUSING DEPOSIT FOR MARRIED STUDENTS 

Married students accepted for the ensuing term should contact 
the Director of Student Finance of the College should they desire to 
reserve housing from the College. Once housing accommodation is 
agreed upon, it can be reserved by mailing a $10.00 room deposit to 
the attention of the Director of Student Finance. 

This deposit will appear to the credit of the student at the 
time of his departure provided the accommodation is left in good order. 

Since the deposit serves not only as a reservation fee but also as a 

guarantee that the accommodation will be left in good order, all students 
registered and living in college housing will be charged this deposit. 

In case the student's application is not accepted; or if notice of 
nonattendance is given the College three weeks before the opening of 
the term, the deposit will be refunded. 

122 



FINANCIAL 

LATE REGISTRATION 
For late registration $5.00 



MARRIED COUPLES AS STUDENTS 

For a married couple, enrolled for a total of eighteen hours or 
more of school work, the regular advance payment, general fee, and 
schedule of tuition charges shall apply to each. 

When a married couple enrolls for a combined total of seventeen 
hours or less of school work, they shall be charged as one person 
in the areas mentioned above. 

ESTIMATE OF EXPENSES ON THE ORLANDO CAMPUS 
OF THE DIVISION OF NURSING 

The Division of Nursing offers part of its program on the College- 
dale campus and part on the Orlando campus at the Florida Sanitarium 
and Hospital. Charges for tuition and other expenses follow the same 
schedule as for any college work. The expenses on the Orlando campus 
which vary are: 

Travel Expense: Students of nursing are responsible for trans- 
portation expense incurred while traveling to and from clinical practice 
assignments. 

Uniforms and Cape: Approximately $56.00 will be needed for 
uniforms and $25,00 for cape if cape is desired. The uniform will be 
purchased the first semester of the sophomore year while the student is 
on the Collegedale campus. The cost of the uniforms only may be 
charged to the student's account if desired. 

LAUNDRY AND DRY CLEANING SERVICE 

The College operates a modern laundry and dry cleaning plant. 
Students are invited to patronize this service. Charges for service ren- 
dered will be entered on the student's account to be settled monthly. 



MISCELLANEOUS CHARGES 

The following expense items may be charged to the student's 
account upon request: 

a. Books and school supplies, including music and art supplies. 

b. Approved uniforms for physical education classes and recreation. 

123 



FINANCIAL 

c. Subscription to Today's Secretary for secretarial students — 
present cost $2.25. 

d. Fee of $1.00 for the late return of an organizational uniform, 
or the full cost if irreparably damaged or not returned, 

e. $1.00 per semester dormitory club dues. 

f. American Temperance Society dues of $1.00 per year at the 
election of the student. 

g. Transportation charges for students of nursing traveling to and 
from clinical practice assignments in vehicles provided by 
the college. 

TRANSCRIPT OF CREDITS 

Transcripts of credits will be mailed from the registrar's office 
at the student's request,, provided his financial account is on a current 
basis. No charge is made for the first transcript. Subsequent transcripts 
will be provided at $1.00 each. 

TITHE AND CHURCH EXPENSE 

Southern Missionary College encourages the payment of tithe and 
church expense by its student workers. In order to facilitate this practice, 
arrangements may be made for each student to have charged to his 
account 10 per cent of his school earnings for tithe and 2 per cent 
tor church expense. These funds are then transferred by the College 
to the treasurer of the Collegedale Seventh -day Adventist Church. 

FUND FOR PERSONAL EXPENSES 

Students should be provided with sufficient funds, in addition to 
money for school expenses, to cover cost of all personal items. They 
may open deposit accounts at the Business Office, subject to withdrawal 
in person only, and these funds are available at any time, as long as 
there is credit remaining of what the student has deposited. These 
deposit accounts are entirely separate from the regular student's expense 
accounts. 

Each student should bring $20.00 to $30.00 for books and supplies 
at the beginning of each semester, if he desires to pay cash for these 
items. 

PAYMENT OF ACCOUNTS 

Statements will be issued to students as of the last day of each 
calendar month, covering the month's expenses and credits. This billing 
is subject to discount when paid by the 20th of the following month. 
Should a student's account be unpaid by the 15th of the succeeding 

124 



FINANCIAL 

month, he Is automatically dropped from class attendance until satis- 
factory arrangements are made. The College is unable to carry student 
accounts for any length of time. Arrangements should be made for 
some other plan of financing. 

EXAMPLE OF CREDIT POLICY 

Period covered by statement - . October 1-31 

Approximate date of billing November 5 

Discount period ends November 20 

Class attendance severed if still unpaid December 15 

This schedule of payment must be maintained since the budget is 
based upon the 100 per cent collection of student charges within the 
thirty-day period following date of billing. 



STUDENT LABOR REGULATIONS 

Believing In the inspired words that "systematic labor should con- 
stitute a part of the education of youth," 1 Southern Missionary College 
has made provision that every student enrolled may have the privilege 
of organizing his educational program on the "work-study" plan. 
"Jesus the carpenter, and Paul the tent-maker, . . . with the toil of the 
craftsman linked the highest ministry, human and divine." 2 The College 
not only provides a work-study program, but strongly recommends it 
to each student enrolled. 

The College will assign students to departments where work is 
available and cannot shift students from one department to another 
merely upon request. It should be understood that once a student is 
assigned to work in a given department, he will remain there for the 
entire school year except in rare cases where changes are recommended 
by the school nurse or are made at the discretion of the College. 

Should a student find it necessary to be absent from work, he must 
make prior arrangements with his work superintendent. In cases of 
illness, he will also inform the Health Service. 

In order to provide work opportunities to students, industries are 
operated by the College and its subsidiary corporations. These in- 
dustries must serve their customers daily, necessitating a uniform 
working force. To continue these industries in operation students as- 



i. Ellen G. White, Fundamentals of Christ ran Education, (Nashville, Ten- 
nessee: Southern Publishing Association, 1923), p. 44. 
2. Ibid, 

125 



FINANCIAL 

signed thereto must continue their work schedules to the end of the 
term. (Preparation for tests should be a day-by-day matter.) Any 
student who drops his work schedule without making proper arrange- 
ments will be suspended from class attendance until proper arrange- 
ments are made. 

During the first two weeks of school, it is not always possible to 
get everyone into a work program, but by the end of September usually 
everyone has a job. This means that it may be necessary to work an 
extra hour a week to make up for the time lost in September. 

BIRTH CERTIFICATE 

All students who expect to work and are under twenty years of age 
must present a Birth Certificate upon registration. This certificate must 
be left on file in the Assistant Business Manager's office. No student will 
be permitted to work until the Birth Certificate is on file at the College. 
This is imperative under the laws of the State of Tennessee. 

WORK PERMIT 

Whenever a student seventeen years of age or under is registered, 
the college issues a Tennessee Employment Certificate. This must be 
signed and on file at the College before a student may start work. 

SCHOLARSHIPS, LOANS, AND GRANTS-IN-AID 

Grants and contributions to Southern Missionary College for oper- 
ating purposes, capital expansion, or to the Worthy Student Fund, are 
deductible from income subject to federal income taxes. 

SCHOLARSHIP FUNDS 

COLPORTEUR SCHOLARSHIP 
That students might have adequate work opportunities of a profit- 
able nature (both financially and spiritually) during the summer 
months, the College, together with the Southern Publishing Association 
and the several local conferences and Bible Houses throughout the 
Southern Union, have banded together to offer a bonus to students 
selling denominational books or magazines. 

Students may make arrangements with one of the several Bible 
Houses to sell books or magazines in a designated territory. 

The regular colporteur commission accrues to the student's credit 
plus a bonus to those students meeting certain basic requirements. 
This bonus is approximately 43 per cent of the regular commission. 
A complete explanation of the student colporteur program including 

126 









FINANCIAL 

bonus information is available in pamphlet form from any of the 
Book and Bible Houses. 



TUITION SCHOLARSHIP 

Each year the College, In conjunction with the several local con- 
ferences of the Southern Union Conference, awards $50 tuition scholar- 
ships to students graduating from the Southern Union academies on 
the following basis: one scholarship for each academy senior class 
of twenty-five graduates or less, and for each additional twenty-five 
graduates or major fraction thereof, another $50 scholarship is offered. 
These scholarship funds will be credited to the student's account at 
the rate of one-half at the close of each semester. The following schools 
are eligible to participate in this plan: 

Bass Memorial Academy Highland Academy 

Collegedale Academy Little Creek Academy 

Fletcher Academy Madison College Academy 

Forest Lake Academy Mt. Pisgah Academy 

Greater Miami Academy Pine Forest Academy 

The candidates are chosen as follows: The faculty of each desig- 
nated school nominates its candidate; the name, if approved by the school 
board, is recommended to the educational board of the local conference, 
for final approval. The selection of nominees is based on character, 
scholarship, personality, and promise of future leadership. 



SCHOLARSHIPS IN TEACHER EDUCATION 

In order to help young people of good moral character who possess 
talents and interest in the field of elementary school teaching, scholar- 
ships amounting to $200 each are available through the beneficience of 
the Southern Union and local conferences of Seventh-day Adventists. 
Southern Missionary College will provide opportunity for students on 
these scholarships to work $300 of their remaining school expenses. 
For further details write to the Educational Secretary of the local con- 
ference where you reside in the Southern Union. If you reside outside 
the Southern Union, write to the Union Secretary of Education, Box 849, 
Decatur, Georgia. 



JAMES HICKMAN MEMORIAL FUND 

The amount of $100 is available each year to Freshman or Senior 
students of outstanding scholarship, social competence and character. 

127 



FINANCIAL 

DOCTOR AMBROSE L SUHRIE 
ELEMENTARY TEACHERS SCHOLARSHIP 
The amount of at least $200 is available each year to worthy 
students in training in Elementary Education. 

WILLIAM ILES SCHOLARSHIP FUND 
This fund of $250 is applied in behalf of needy students of 
promise. 

A. E. DEYO MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIPS 
Each year the faculty of the Division of Nursing selects a senior 
student to receive this award of $50. The student who is selected 
must have given evidence of good scholastic standing and Christian 
character and show promise of making a contribution to the Seventh- 
day Adventist medical work. 

W. B. CALKINS STUDENT OF THE YEAR AWARDS 
Each year an award of $150 is made to an outstanding senior 
student and a $50 award is made to an outstanding junior student. 
The selection of the recipients is made by the faculty in cooperation 
with representatives of the student group. The selection is based on 
character, scholarship, personality, and promise of future leadership. 

SOUTHERN UNION GRANTS-IN-AID 
FOR STUDENTS OF NURSING 
This fund provides $150 for the freshman year and $300 for 
subsequent years. This amount will be advanced by the Southern Union 
Conference and will be paid directly to SMC. The student receiving 
this financial aid will agree to enter nursing service at the Florida 
Sanitarium and Hospital for one year after graduation. This one year 
of service at the regular rate paid graduate nurses will amortize the 
grant-in-aid. Students who are interested should consult with the 
Chairman of the Division of Nursing. 

LOAN FUNDS 

NATIONAL DEFENSE STUDENT LOAN FUND 
The Federal Government has made available loan funds under 
the National Defense Student Loan Program for the purpose of pro- 
viding financial assistance to qualified students seeking a college 
education. For complete information and application forms, please 
see the Academic Dean. 

ALVIN CHRISTENSEN MEMORIAL LOAN FUND 
This fund of $300 has been made available by Dr. and Mrs. L. N. 
Chris tensen for loan purposes to a college junior or senior majoring 

128 



FINANCIAL 

in biology or related fields who gives evidence of Christian sincerity, 
industry, satisfactory scholarship, and financial need. The interest rate 
of three per cent becomes effective one year after the borrower severs 
relationship with the College and the principal with interest is due 
and payable within three years. 

ALUMNI LOAN FUND 

A fund of approximately $1,000 a year maintained by the alumni 
of the college. Allocations are made to working students in the junior 
or senior year on the basis of proved need, character, leadership po- 
tential, good scholarship. Loans are usually limited to $100 to a student. 

THE LEVERING WORTHY STUDENT LOAN FUND 

The Student Loans and Scholarships Committee will determine 
eligibility of applicants. Satisfactory character references, acceptable 
scholastic achievement, and financial need must be in evidence. 

The applicant will be asked to sign a non-interest bearing note 
with the promise to repay following graduation or when remunerative 
employment is secured, 

NURSES LOAN FUND 

A student loan fund has been established to aid a limited number 
of qualified students of nursing. Requests for the loan should be made 
to the Chairman of the Division of Nursing. 

EDUCATIONAL FUND 

Many young people are deprived of the privilege of attending 
college because of a lack of necessary means. To aid these, an earnest 
effort has been made to obtain donations for the establishment of an 
education fund, from which students worthy of help may borrow money 
for a reasonable length of time. Faithfulness in refunding these loans 
will make it possible for the same money to assist many students in 
school. There have been some gifts, and these have been used to help 
several young men and women complete their work in this college. But 
the needs of worthy students have been greater than the funds on hand; 
consequently it has been impossible in many instances to render the 
needed assistance. It has therefore been decided to direct the attention 
of patrons and friends of the school to these facts and to invite them 
to give such means as they may desire to devote to this purpose. The 
College will be glad to correspond with any who think favorably of this 
plan, and will continue to use the gifts so that the wishes of the donors 
may be fulfilled and the best results obtained, 

129 



FINANCIAL 

"In each conference a fund should be raised to lend to worthy poor 
students who desire to give themselves to the missionary work; and in 
some cases they should receive donations. When the Battle Creek Col- 
lege was first started, there was a fund placed in the Review and Herald 
office for the benefit of those who wished to obtain an education, but 
had not the means. This was used by several students until they could 
get a good start; then from their earnings they would replace what they 
had drawn, so that others might be benefited by the fund. The youth 
should have it plainly set before them that they must work their own 
way as far as possible and thus defray their expenses. That which 
costs little will be appreciated little. But that which costs a price some- 
where near its real value will be estimated accordingly." Testimonies, 
Vol. VI, pages 213, 214. 



130 



GENERAL INDEX 



A. G. Daniells Memorial Library 17 

Absences 30 

Academic Policies 27 

Academy Building 18 

Accounting, Courses in 46 

Accounts, Payment of 124 

Accreditation 17 

Administrative Staff ._ . 7 

Admission 25 

Aims of the School 15 

Alumni Association 23 

Application Procedure 25 

Applied Arts, Division of 39 

Art, Courses in 40 

Arthur W. Spalding School .._ 18 

Attendance Regulations . . 30 

Audited Courses 29 

Automobiles — - 20 

Baccalaureate Degree 

Requirements 36 

Bachelor of Arts 33 

Biology ..— — 41 

Business Administration 45 

Chemistry 48 

Communications 52 

English „ 63 

History 69 

Mathematics 79 

Music - 85 

Physics 94 

Religion 100 

Spanish _ 81 

Theology 99 

Bachelor of Music 

Education 84 

Performance 85 

Bachelor of Science 33 

Accounting 45 

Chemistry 49 

Elementary Teacher Education 58 

Foods and Nutrition ..... 73 

Home Economics . 72 

Medical Secretarial Science 106 

Nursing 91 

Physics 95 

Secondary Education 59 

Secretarial Science 105 

Bible, Courses in 102 

Bible Instructor, Four- Year 101 

Bible Instructor, Two- Year —..... 104 

Biblical Languages 105 

Biology, Courses in 42 

Board of Directors 6 

Executive Committee 6 

Buildings and Equipment 17 

Business, Courses in 47 

Calendar 4 

Calendar of Events - 5 



Campus Organizations 22 

Certification, Teacher „... -- 58 

Changes in Registration 27 

Chapel Attendance 30 

Chemistry, Courses in 50 

Class Attendance 30 

Class Load 28 

Class Standing 25 

Classification of Students 26 

Clerical Training, Course in 110 

Colporteur Scholarships 126 

Communications Arts, Division of 39 

Conduct - 19 

Core Curriculum — — 36 

Correspondence Work 28 

Counseling ..._ - 21 

Course Numbers 40 

Credit Policy - - 125 

Dean's List 31 

Degree Requirements, Basic 33 

Degrees Offered 33 

See Bachelor of Arts 33 

Bachelor of Music 84 

Bachelor of Science 33 

Basic Core Requirements .. 36 
Major and Minor 

Requirements 37 

Departments of 

Art - - 40 

Biology ----- 41 

Business Administration 44 

Chemistry 48 

Communications 52 

Education and Psychology 55 

English, Language and 

Literature ...._ 63 

Health, Physical Education 

and Recreation 65 

History and Political Science 68 

Home Economics - 72 

Industrial Arts 76 

Mathematics 79 

Modern Language and 

Literature — 81 

Music -.....- 83 

Nursing 90 

Physics - 94 

Religion .... 98 

Secretarial Science 105 

Divisions of Instruction 39 

Drop Vouchers 27 

Earl F. Hackman Hall 17 

Economics, Courses in 47 

Education, Courses in 60 

Education, Psychology, Health, 

Division of 39 

Elementary Education 60 

Employment Service 23 



131 



English, Courses in 64 

Entrance Requirements 36 

Examinations 

Admission by 26 

Credit by - 29 

Exemption 32 

Special 32 

Expenses, See Financial 

Information „ 117 

Extracurricular Activities 23 

Faculty 9 

Committees 14 

Financial Information 117 

Financial Plans 121 

Credit Policy .,... 125 

Employment Opportunities 125 

Expenses 117 

Advance Payment 118 

Board 118 

Housing 117 

Late Registration 122 

Laundry and Dry Cleaning .. 123 

Music Tuition 120 

Payment of Accounts 124 

Student Association Fee 119 

Tithe and Church Expense .. 124 

Tuition and Fees 119 

Loans - 128 

Alumni Loans 129 

Educational Loans 129 

National Defense Student 

Loans 128 

Nurses' Loans 129 

Scholarships 126 

Colporteur Scholarships 126 

Nurses' Scholarships 128 

Teacher Scholarships 128 

Tuition Scholarships 131 

Fine Arts, Division of 39 

Food and Nutrition, Courses in .. 74 

Foreign Languages, Courses in .... 82 

Freshman Standing 26 

G. E. D. Test 26 

German, Courses in _ 83 

Grades and Reports 31 

Graduation in Absentia 35 

Graduate Record Examinations .. 34 

Graduate Requirements 34 

Graduation with Honors 35 

Greek, Courses in 105 

Guidance and Counseling 21 

Harold A. Miller 

Fine Arts Building 17 

Health, Courses in ._ 67 

Health Service 22 

Hebrew, Courses in 105 

History of the College 16 

History, Courses in - 69 

Home Arts Center 18 

Home Economics, Courses in .... 74 



Home Economics, Curriculums .... 72 
Home Economics, 

Two-Year Curriculum 74 

Honors, Graduation with 35 

Housing, Married Students 117 

Incompletes 31 

Industrial Arts, Courses in 77 

Industrial Buildings 18 

Industrial Superintendents 7 

John H. Talge Residence Hall .... 18 

Journalism 53 

Junior Standing ... ........ 27 

Labor Regulations .. 125 

Birth Certificate 126 

Work Permit 126 

Labor-Class Load 121 

Late Registration 122 

Leaves of Absence 19 

Library Science, Courses in 78 

Loans 128 

Location of the College 16 

Lyceums - - . 23 

Lynn Wood Hall 17 

Major Requirements — 

See Bachelors Degrees . 37 

Marriage 20 

Mathematics, Courses in 80 

Maude Jones Residence Hall 17 

Medical Service 22 

Minors - 33 

Art 40 

Biblical Languages 105 

Biology 41 

Business Administration 45 

Chemistry 49 

Communications .. .. 52 

Education 58 

English 63 

Foods and Nutrition 73 

German 83 

History 69 

Home Economics 72 

Mathematics 79 

Medical Secretariat Science .... 107 

Music -- 86 

Physical Education 66 

Physics 94 

Psychology 61 

Religion 101 

Secretarial Science 107 

Spanish 82 

Speech 54 

Moral Conduct 19 

Motor Vehicles 20 

Music 

Courses in 86 

Curriculums ... 84 

Organizations 89 

Tuition ... 120 



132 



Natural Science and Mathematics, 

Division of 

New Women's Residence Hall ... 
Nursing, Division of ., 

Courses in 

Curriculum . 

Scholarships 

Objectives of the College 

Physical Education, Courses in ... 

Physics, Courses in . 

Placement ... 

Political Science, Courses in 
Pre-Professional and 

Technical Curriculums 

Dental 

Dental Hygiene 

Engineering 

Laboratory Technician 

Law 

Medical 

Optometry 

Pharmacy ... ... 

Physical Therapy ..... 

X-Ray Technician - .. 

Printing, Courses in 

Psychology, Courses in 

Publications 



39 
18 
90 
92 
91 
126 

15 

66 
96 
21 

71 

111 
111 
115 

115 

112 

116 

111 

113 

114 

114 

113 

19 

61 

22 



Regional Field Representatives .... 6 

Registration 27 

Religion and Applied Theology 98 

Religion, Courses in 102 

Religious Organizations 22 

Requirements, Basic Course 36 

Residence Halls 17 

Residence Regulations 21 

Scholarship 28 

Scholarships 23, 126 

Secondary Education 61 

Secretarial Science, Courses in .... 107 

Senior Standing 27 



Social Sciences, Division of 39 

Sociology, Courses in -.. 71 

Sophomore Standing 26 

Spanish, Courses in .... « 82 

Special Student ... . -- 27 

Speech, Courses . 54 

Standards of Conduct 19 

Student Life and Services 21 

Student Organizations .21 

Study and Work Load 121 

Subject Requirements 

for Admission 36 

Summer Session 5, 19 

Tabernacle-Auditorium 18 

Table of Contents 3 

Tardiness 30 

Teacher Certification 56 

Teacher Education 56 

Terms, School 19 

Theology, Courses in 102 

Applied 103 

Curriculum _ 99 

Tithe and Church Expense 124 

Transcripts 124 

Transfer of Credit 26 

Transfer Students .. 26 

Trustees, Board of 6 

Tuition and Fees „., 119 

Two-Year Curriculums 34 

Bible Instructor -.... 104 

Home Economics 74 

Industrial Arts 76 

Medical Secretary 107 

Secretarial Science 106 

Typography 53, 79 

Unaccredited Schools 25 

Veterans 26 

Withdrawals 28 

Work-Study Schedule 121 



133 



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