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Full text of "Southern Missionary College Catalogue 1944-45"

JUNIOR COLUtiE 





7Ii« ^outhlanc) £c\oll 

Published monthly by Southern Missionary 
College, Collegedale, Tennessee. 
VOLUME XVI NUMBER 1 



Entered as second-class matter, June 20, 
1929, at the Post Office at Collegedale, 
Tennessee, under the Act of Congress, 
A ugust 24, 1912. 

Catalogue Number 






(Formerly Southern Junior College) 



ANNUAL CATALOGUE 



1944-1945 



COLLEGEDALE, TENNESSEE 



McKEE LIBRARY 
Southern Missionary College 
Colleeedale, Tennessee 37315 



Glendar for 1944 



MAY 


JUNE 


JULY 


AUGUST 


S M T W T F S 
12 3 4 5 6 


S M T W T F S 
12 3 

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 
18 19 20 21 22 23 24 
25 26 27 28 29 30 


S M T W T F S 
1 


S M T W T F S 
.... 12 3 4 5 


7 8 9 10 11 12 13 
14 15 16 17 18 19 20 
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 
28 29 30 31 


2 3 4 5 6 7 8 

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 

23 24 25 26 27 28 29 


6 7 8 9 10 11 12 
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 
27 28 29 30 31 . . 


SEPTEMBER 


OCTOBER 


NOVEMBER 


DECEMBER 


S M T W T F 8 

12 

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 


S M T W T F S 

12 3 4 5 6 7 

8 9 10 11 12 13 14 

15 16 17 18 19 20 21 

22 23 24 25 26 27 28 

29 30 31 


S M T W T F S 
12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 
12 13 14 15 16 17 18 
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 
26 27 28 29 30 . . 


S M T W T F S 

■ 12 

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 
31 





Calendar 


for 1945 




JANUARY 


FEBRUARY 


MARCH 


APRIL 


S M T W T F S 
12 3 4 5 6 

7 8 9 10 11 12 13 
14 15 16 17 18 19 20 
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 
28 29 30 31 


S M T W T F S 
12 3 

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 
18 19 20 21 22 23 24 
25 26 27 28 


S M T W T F S 
12 3 
4 5 6 7 8 9 10 
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 
18 19 20 21 22 23 24 
25 26 27 28 29 30 31 


S M T W T F S 

12 3 4 5 6 7 

8 9 10 11 12 13 14 

15 16 17 18 19 20 21 

22 23 24 25 26 27 28 

29 30 






MAY 


JUNE 


JULY 


AUGUST 


S M T W T F S 
.... 1 2 3 4 5 


S M T W T F S 
1 2 


S M T W T F S 
12 3 4 5 6 7 
8 9 10 11 12 13 14 
15 16 17 18 19 20 21 
22 23 24 25 26 27 28 


S M T W T F S 


6 7 8 9 10 11 12 
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 
27 28 29 30 31 . . 


3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 


5 6 7 8 9 10 11 
12 13 14 15 16 17 18 
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 
26 27 28 29 30 31 


SEPTEMBER 


OCTOBER 


NOVEMBER 


DECEMBER 


S M T W T F S 
1 


S M T W T F S 

..1234 56 

7 8 9 10 11 12 13 

14 15 16 17 18 19 20 

21 22 23 24 25 26 27 

28 29 30 31 


S M T W T F S 
12 3 

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 
18 19 20 21 22 23 24 
25 26 27 28 29 30 . . 


S M T W T F S 
1 


2 3 4 5 6 7 8 

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 

23 24 25 26 27 28 29 


2 3 4 5 6 7 8 

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 

23 24 25 26 27 28 29 

30 31 



First Period 
Second Period 
Third Period 
Fourth Period 
Fifth Period 
Sixth Period 
Seventh Period 
Eighth Period 
Ninth Period 
Tenth Period 
Eleventh Period 
Twelfth Period 



PERIOD SCHEDULE 

May 28 to June 25 4 weeks 

June 25 to July 23 4 weeks 

July 23 to August 20 4 weeks 

August 20 to October 1 6 weeks 

October 1 to October 29 4 weeks 

October 29 to November 26 4 weeks 

November 26 to December 31 5 weeks 

December 31 to January 28 4 weeks 

January 28 to February 25 4 weeks 

February 25 to March 25 4 weeks 

March 25 to April 22 4 weeks 

April 22 to May 20 4 weeks 



Total 



51 weeks 



a? 
&/#/ 

.** 

G<de*ut&i o/ CoetUl 19M-45 

First Semester 

September 3, Sunday 

8:00 P. M Opening Convocation 

September 4, 5, Monday, Tuesday 

9:00 A. M Registration 

September 6, Wednesday 

7:45 A. M Classes Begin 

September 8, Friday 

7:30 P. M First Vesper Service 

September 9. Sabbath 

9:30 A. M Sabbath School 

11:00 A. M Church Service 

8:00 P. M President's Reception 

October 10, 11, 12, 13 First Period Examinations 

October 20-28 Week of Prayer 

November 21, 22, 23, 24 Second Period Examinations 

November 30, December 1 Thanksgiving Vacation 

December 20, 6:00 P. M — January 3, 7:00 P. M Christmas Vacation 

January 9, 10, 11, 12 Mid-Year Examinations 

Second Semester 

January 14 Registration 

February 20, 21, 22, 23 Fourth Period Examinations 

March 17-24—, Spring Week of Prayer 

April 3, 4, 5, 6 Fifth Period Examinations 

May 14, 15, 16, 17 Final Examinations 

May 18, Friday 

8:00 P. M Senior Consecration Service 

May 19, Sabbath 

11:00 A. M Baccalaureate Sermon 

May 20, Sunday 

10:00 A. M Commencement 



114062 



SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGE 



E. F. Hackman, President Decatur, Ga. 

Kenneth A. Wright, Secretary Collegedale, Tenn. 

H. J. Capman Meridian, Miss. 

C. C. Cleveland Collegedale, Tenn. 

I. M. Evans - Atlanta, Ga. 

L. C. Evans - Orlando, Fla. 

C. O. Franz Decatur, Ga. 

H. B. Lundquist Decatur, Ga. 

T. L. Oswald Nashville, Tenn. 

F. O. Sanders Charlotte, N. C 

B. F. Summerour Norcross, Ga. 

E. A. Sutherland, M. D - Madison College, Tenn. 

E. C Waller Asheville, N. C 



Executive Go-mmtftee 

E. F. Hackman, Chairman Decatur. Ga. 

Kenneth A. Wright, Secretary Collegedale, Tenn. 

C. C. Cleveland Collegedale, Tenn. 

C. O. Franz Decatur, Ga. 

I. M. Evans - Atlanta, Ga. 

H. B. Lundquist Decatur, Ga. 



COLLEGEDALE, TENNESSEE 



Kenneth A. Wright President, Business Manager 

Clyde C. Cleveland Treasurer, Accountant 

Stanley D. Brown Librarian 

Ruby E. Lea Registrar, Secretary of Faculty 

Harold F. Lease Dean of Men 

Carolyn Hall-Russell Dean of Women 

Clifford A. Russell Director of Extension 

Matron 



Suft&utU&ti* in Vocational 
£ducalto>n 

Robert N. Bowen College Press 

John W. Gepford Broom Factory, Woodcraft Shop 

Judson S. James - Editor, College Press 

Wilbur S. James Poultry 

George Pearman Superintendent of Maintenance 

John B. Pierson Farm and Dairy 

J. A. Tucker Fruit and Campus 

Esther Holsten-Williams - Laundry 

Matron 



SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGE 



*7<4e faculty 



KENNETH A. WRIGHT, M. S. Ed., President 

A. B., Emmanuel Missionary College 
M. S. Ed., Cornell University 

DANIEL WALTHER, Ph. D., Assistant President, Professor of History 

A. B., College Classique, Lausanne (Switzerland) 
M. A., University of Geneva (Switzerland) 
Ph. D., University of Geneva 

DON C. LUDINGTON, M. A., Director of Summer School, 

"" Principal of Preparatory Department 

A. B., Emmanuel Missionary College 

B. S., George Peabody College for Teachers 
M. A., George Peabody College for Teachers 

J. FRANKLIN ASHLOCK, A. B., Instructor, Bible 

A. B., Union College 

MARCELLA KLOCK-ASHLOCK, R. N., Director of Health Service 

R. N., Washington Sanitarium and Hospital School of Nursing 

OLIVE ROGERS-BATSON, B. Mus., Instructor, Piano and Expression 

A. B., Washington Missionary College 

B. Mus., University of Chattanooga 

ROBERT K. BOYD, M. A., Professor of Business Administration 

A. B., Emmanuel Missionary College 
M. A., Michigan State College 

STANLEY D. BROWN, M. A., Librarian 

A. B., Washington Missionary College 

A. B., in L S., University of North Carolina 

A. B., M. A., University of Maryland 

THERESA ROSE BRICKMAN, M. Com I. Ed., Professor of Secretarial Training 

A. B. ; Union College 

M. Com' I. Ed., University of Oklahoma 

CLYDE C. CLEVELAND, M. B. A., Treasurer, Accountant 

A. B., Emmanuel Missionary College 
M. B. A., Norwestern University 

GEORGE B. DEAN, A. B., Graduate Laboratory Assistant 

A. B., University of Wichita 

OLIVA BRICKMAN-DEAN, M. Ed., Director of Teacher Training 

A. B. ; Union College 

M. Ed., University of Oklahoma 



COLLEGEDALE, TENNESSEE 



MARY HOLDER-DIETEL, M. A., Professor of Modern Langua g e« 

A. B., Washington Missionary College 
M. A. ; University of Maryland 

CLARENCE W. DORTCH, B. Mus., Director of Music 

B. Mus. ; Conservatory of Chicago 

DOROTHY V. EVANS, B. A., Instructor, Piano and Voice 

A. B., Atlanta Union College 

NELLIE R. FERREE, A. B., Elementary Supervisor 

A. B , Washington, Missionary College 

DORA L. GREVE, A. B., Elementary Supervisor 

A. B., Emmanuel Missionary College 

BETTY KLOTZ-HARTER, B. S., Elementary Supervisor 

B. S., Wittenberg College 

WILBUR S. JAMES, A. B., Instructor, Bible and History 

A. B., Union College 

MAUDE I. JONES, A. B., Instructor, English and Latin 

A. B., Mississippi College for Women 

RUBY E. LEA, A. B., Registrar 

A. B., Union College 

HAROLD F. LEASE, A. B., Dean of Men, Instructor, Science and Mathematics 

A. B., Washington Missionary College 

T. KENNETH LUDGATE, A. B., Professor of Theology and Greek 

A. B., Washington Missionary College 

VIOLET E. MORGAN, M. A., Professor of English 

A. B., Emmanuel Missionary College 

B. L. I., Emerson College of Oratory 
M. A., Boston University 

GEORGE J. NELSON, M. S., Professor of Physics and Mathematics 

B. S., Emmanuel Missionary College 
M. S., University of Colorado 

CAROLYN HALL-RUSSELL, A. B., Dean of Women 

A. B., Atlantic Union College 

CLIFFORD A. RUSSELL, Director of Extension, Special Lecturer 
in Elementary Teacher Training 

University of Michigan 

J. A. TUCKER, M. S., Professor of Agriculture 

A. B., Union College 

M. S., Iowa State College 

Instructor in Nursing (to be supplied) 

Instructor in Home Economics (to be supplied) 



SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGE 



£ta*ubUuf Committee^ 



GOVERNMENT 

Kenneth A. Wright 
Clyde C Cleveland 
Ruby E. Lea 
Harold F. Lease 
T. Kenneth Ludgate 
Don. C. Ludington 
Carolyn Hall-RusseH 
Clifford A. Russell 
Daniei Walther 

LIBRARY 

Stanley D. Brown 
J. Franklin Ashlock 
Robert K. Boyd 
Mary Holder-Dietel 
Don C. Ludington 
Violet E. Morgan 
George J. Nelson 
Daniel Walther 
Kenneth A. Wright 

EXTRACURRICULAR ACTIVITIES 

Daniel Walther 
J. Franklin Ashlock 
Olive Rogers-Batson 
Theresa Brickman 
Clarence W. Dortch 
Harold F. Lease 
Don C. Ludington 
George J. Nelson 
Carolyn Hall-Russell 
Clifford A. Russell 

SCHOLARSHIP 

Don C. Ludington 
J. Franklin Ashlock 
Oliva Brickman-Dean 
Mary Holder-Dietel 
Ruby E. Lea 
J. A. Tucker 



RELIGIOUS ACIIVITIES 

T. Kenneth Ludgate 
Clarence W. Dortch 
Harold F. Lease 
Don C. Ludington 
Carolyn Hall-Russell 
J. A. Tucker 
Kenneth A. Wright 

HEALTH 

Marcella Klock-Ashlock 

Harold F. Lease 

Carolyn Hall-Russell 

Matron 

Nursing Instructor 

PUPIL GUIDANCE 

Don C. Ludington 
J. Franklin Ashlock 
Robert K. Boyd 
Oliva Brickman-Dean 
Mary Holder-Dietel 
Maude I. Jones 
Ruby E. Lea 
T. Kenneth Ludgate 
Violet E. Morgan 
Clifford A. Russell 

FINANCE 

Kenneth A. Wright 
Robert K. Boyd 
Clyde C. Cleveland 
John W. Gepford 
George Pearman 

PREMEDICAL ADVISORY 

George J. Nelson 
Ruby L Lea 
T. Kennt'h Ludgate 
Daniel Wahher 
Nursing Instructor 



COLLEGEDALE, TENNESSEE 



Soutlt&ui, MUMowa/uf GoUeqe* 



HISTORY 

The year eighteen hundred ninety-three marked the beginning of 
the educational work of Seventh-day Adventists in the South. At 
that time, a small school, afterward to be known as the Sguthern Train- 
ing School, was established in Graysville, Tennessee. Twenty-three 
years later, there was a change both in name and location, and as 
Southern Junior College at Collegedale, Tennessee, it served the 
denominational constituency of the Southeastern states. 

In the spring of 1944 the General Conference of Seventh-day Ad- 
ventists authorized senior college status for the institution, under the 
name of Southern Missionary College. 

A three hundred thousand dollar building program, to be put into 
effect as soon as government permission is grar/ted, includes tjie ad- 
dition to the school plant of a library building, science buildng, music 
building, a new church, and various other improvements. 

AIMS 

In an effort to carry out the instruction given in the Spirit of prophecy 
as to three-fold education of the youth, Southern Missionary College 
offers training which fits one for work in religious, professional, business, 
or vocational fields. The sincere hope of the institution is that many of 
its students, under the influence of an atmosphere which is permeated by 
Christian faith and Christian ideals, may catch the vision of evangelism 
and be led to devote their lives to the gospel ministry,- that others, under 
the guidance of those who have attained the coveted goal of excellent 
scholarship combined with unaffected piety, may follow the gleam of 
intellectual development, and dedicate their talents to the teaching pro- 
fession,- that still others, because of the stress which is placed upon the 
dignity of labor, may turn their attention to the practical side of life, and 
be led to give consecrated service in the world of industries and of 
business. 



10 SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGE 



This hope is destined to reach its glad fruition only when, from year 
to year, there comes to Southern Missionary College assurance that it 
has instilled into the youth who have sojourned within its walls, prin- 
ciples of such rugged sincerity and fearless integrity that each one, as 
he goes forth to meet the future, will pledge himself unhesitatingly to 
help satisfy "the greatest want of the world, the want of men — of men 
who will stand for right though the heavens fall." 

LOCATION 

Southern Missionary College is located on the Southern Railway be- 
tween Chattanooga and Atlanta, eighteen miles from the former city. 
Trains pass through the college estate,- our station is known as College- 
dale, which is also the postal address. 

CoUegedaU \s three miles from the village of Ooltewah, a \unction 
point of the Atlanta and Knoxville divisions of the Southern Railway. 
Through trains between Washington, Memphis, Birmingham, New Or- 
leans,- between Cincinnati, Atlanta, and Jacksonville, stop at Oolte- 
wah, thus affording splendid railway service. Ooltewah is also on 
the Lee Highway, which connects Washington, D. C, and other eastern 
cities with Chattanooga and other southern points. A hard-surface 
highway reaches from Collegedale to Chattanooga, thus affording 
quick access to this scenic and historic city of one hundred and forty 
thousand people. Motor buses operating between Chattanooga and 
Apison pass in front of the college. As an accommodation to passen- 
gers, they often drive to the dormitories. 

The college is situated on a beautiful nine-hundred acre estate. 

This rural environment has been one of the strongest factors in the 

development of the institution, in that it has furnished the isolation so 
necessary to genuine progress. 

The Chattanooga air field of the Eastern Air Lines is located a few 
miles from the college. 

PURPOSE 

Primary objectives of Southern Missionary College are the develop- 
ment of refined, Christian character and the training of workers for the 



COLLEGEDALE, TENNESSEE 11 



missionary enterprises which the Seventh-day Adventist denomination is 
carrying on in all parts of the world. 

The school is open to all worthy persons of reasonably good health 
who come for the purpose of doing faithful work. Those who have 
little desire to study or who are careless in their deportment are not 
encouraged to enter. 

Young people should remember that this school is a Christian in- 
stitution. Unless they are willing to give due respect to the word of 
God, the Sabbath, worship and other religious exercises, they should 
not apply for admittance. 

ACCREDITATION 

Southern Missionary College is fully accredited as a junior college 
by, or is a member of, the following organizations: Southern Asso- 
ciation of Colleges and Secondary Schools, Tennessee State Depart- 
ment of Education, American Association of Junior Colleges, Southern 
Associaion of Private Schools, Tennessee College Association, Mid- 
South Association of Private Schools, and Seventh-day Adventist Board 
or Regents. 




12 SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGE 



Academic RexjulaiiatU 

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS 

The school is open to young men and young women above the eighth 
grade, of good moral character and of reasonably sound health, who are 
willing to live in harmony with its principles and regulations, and who 
come for the purpose of doing faithful work. While no religious test is 
applied, all are required to show proper respect for spiritual things, 
for the Scriptures, for divine worship, and all are expected to attend 
church services. 

It is distinctly understood that every student who applies for admission 
to the college thereby pledges himself to observe all its regulations. 
If this pledge is broken, it follows that by such infraction he forfeits his 
membership in the school, and is retained only on the forbearance of 
the faculty. It is also a part of the student's contract that he, to the best 
of his ability, will perform all the industrial duties assigned him. 

REGISTRATION 

Registration begins Monday, September 4, 1944, at 9:00 A.M. It 
is highly desirable that all students enter at the beginning of the school 
year. Experience has demonstrated the fact that any student who enters 
school late places upon himself a serious handicap at the outset. This is 
particularly true in such courses as mathematics and first-year language. 
Therefore, students who come more than two weeks late will not be 
enrolled for full class work, and they may be denied entrance to certain 
courses because of the diffculty of making up work. 

The fifteen per cent penalty rule, explained on page fifteen, will 
apply to late registrants in the same manner as it applies to those who 
miss classes during the school year. 

COLLEGE ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS 

Graduates of accredited four-year secondary schools, presenting 
official transcripts, will be granted entrance to the college. 

Graduates of unaccredited schools, presenting official transcript 



COLLEGEDALE, TENNESSEE 13 



of at least sixteen acceptable units, may qualify for college admission by 
passing entrance examinations. 

Students entering college are required to take the special placement 
examinations to be conducted at the time of registration in September and 
January. 

TRANSCRIPTS 

A student planning to enter this college for the first time should request 
the principals of the schools previously attended, to send transcripts of 
all grades direct to the registrar of Southern Missionary College in ample 
time to be evaluated before the opening day of school. Failure to do so may 
result in delayed registration and unsatisfactory classification. Blanks 
for this purpose will be furnished upon request. All transcripts become 
the property of the school. 

Upon completion of a curriculum at Southern Missionary Col lege a state- 
ment of the final grade is issued without charge. For each additional 
transcript, a charge of one dollar will be made. 

No diploma or grade transcript will be issued any student until all 
school bills have been paid. 

STUDENT LOAD 

Four Units in each grade of the College Preparatory Department, 
and thirty-two semester hours in the Collegiate Department, constitute 
full work for a school year of nine months. Requests for more than full 
work may be made to the Registrar,- but not more than five units in the 
College Preparatory Department, nor thirty-six semester hours in the 
Collegiate Department will be allowed any student in an academic year 
of thirty-six weeks,- nor will permission to carry extra work be granted 
to any student whose scholarship is not above average. 

Students who earn part of their expenses while in school should plan 
to deduct credit hours in proportion to the amount of labor performed 
each week. 

Students who enter the college late may not be permitted to register 
for full school work nor for certain courses. 



14 SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGE 



CHANGES IN CLASS SCHEDULE 

Students may change their program without charge, upon approval of 
the registrar and teachers concerned, during the first two weeks of each 
semester. A fee of one dollar will be charged for change of program 
after the first two weeks. 

No student may enter or drop any class without presenting to the in- 
structor of that class a permit from the registrar. This permit must be 
countersigned by the instructor and returned by the student to the regis- 
trar. No student will be considered dropped from a class, and tuition 
will continue, until such a permit has been properly signed and returned. 

A course dropped after the first nine weeks, unless on account of 
illness or other unavoidable circumstances, will be entered on the per- 
manent records as a failure. A course dropped without permission at 
any time will be recorded as a failure. 

No grades will be recorded for a student who has not been properly 
registered for a course. 

ABSENCES AND EXCUSES 

Regular attendance at all classes and chapel is expected of every 
student. 

An academy student will be allowed one unexcused absence per 
class each six-weeks period, but these absences may not be cumulative. 
A college student will be allowed one unexcused absence per credit 
hour in each class up to a maximum of three absences per semester. 

A student missing 15 per cent or more of the total class appoint- 
ments shall receive a grade of "F" in that course. The student may apply 
to the faculty for exemption in case of serious illness or for other causes 
not under his control where the absences would result in a penalty to 
his grade. 

Three tardinesses are counted as one absence, and absence from 
laboratory is considered a class absence. An absence incurred the last 
time a class meets before a vacation, or the first time after a vacation, 
will carry a double penalty. 



COLLEGEDALE, TENNESSEE 15 



Excuses from absences should be submitted the first day the student 
resumes class work and will not be considered if submitted later than 
one week following the absence. 

A re-registration fee of one dollar will be required of all students 
having more than three unexcused absences from chapel, physical edu- 
ation, or study hall. This charge shall be settled before class work is 
continued. 

Absences for sickness shall be reported the first time the student comes 
back to class after the sickness. The health officer shall fill out and 
turn in to the registrar's office all absence blanks for sickness. 

Chapel services are held three times each week. Three absences 
from chapel are allowed in one semester. If a student permits more 
than three unexcused absences from chapel to accumulate, he will be 
asked to pay a penalty fine of one dollar in cash before he is permitted 
to continue his class work. Any absence from classes caused by suspen- 
sion due to irregularity in chapel attendance will be counted. 

GRADE REPORTS 

Reports of scholarship and deportment are made in duplicate to parents 
and students at the close of each school period of six weeks. All se- 
mestergrades are permanently recorded bythe college for future reference. 

The following system of marking is used: A, superior,- B, above average,- 
C, average; D, below average,- E, incomplete,- F, failure,- W, honorable 
withdrawal; DW, dishonorable withdrawal. A passing grade in group 
work — such as orchestra, chorus, and physical education — is recorded 
as C. 

Unless acceptable explanation, such as serious illness, can be given, 
a student whose work is reported unsatisfactory may be asked to withdraw 
from school. 

QUALITY POINTS 

Three quality points are given for each semester hour or unit of credit 
for an A grade, two quality points for a B grade, and one quality point 
for a C grade. D grade carries no quality points. Students completing 



16 SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGE 



any junior college course of study must possess at least as many quality 
points as credit hours. 

HONORS 

A college student of good character whose record at the time of 
graduation shows no grade below C and with an honor-point rating 
of 2.45 or above, will be granted an "Honors" diploma. 

CREDIT EVALUATION 

A "unit" is defined as the amount of credit granted for one high school 
subject satisfactorily pursued during a year of thirty-six weeks, with 
forty-five-minute recitation periods, five days a week, or the equivalent. 

A "semester hour" represents the credit granted when a college subject 
is successfully pursued through a semester of eighteen weeks with one 
sixty-minute hour of recitation a week. 

"INCOMPLETES" AND EXAMINATIONS 

A student who redeems an "incomplete" for the semester will receive 
a grade of "D" unless otherwise voted by the faculty. 

An incomplete becomes a failure if not removed within one year. 

Special examinations are given when justified by circumstances, such 
as sickness or necessary absence from the campus. A fee of one dollar 
is charged for each special examination. Instructors may give such exami- 
nations only upon evidence of properly signed receipts. 

A re-examination is permitted only upon vote of the faculty. 

AUDITING CLASSES 

A student may audit a course only by special permission. No credit 
is given for courses audited. The tuition charge is one-half that of credit 
courses. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Each year a course in physical education is required of all students, 
except those excused by our school nurses. 



COLLEGEDALE, TENNESSEE 17 



CORRESPONDENCE WORK 

Credit will be given for Army training and correspondence work. 
These credits will be evaluated in accordance with accrediting body 
institutions. 

EXTENSION COURSES 

Southern Missionary College offers no extramural instruction,- therefore 
all credits must be earned in residence. 

1944 SUMMER SESSION 

It is the plan of t he college during the summer of 1944 to conduct a 
nine weeks summer session from June 19 to August 18. Upper division 
courses in the fifteenth grade will be offered in addition to regular junior 
college and academy subjects. 

EXTRACURRICULAR ACTIVITIES 

The extent to which students may participate in extracurricular activ- 
ities is subject to regulation, in order to help them maintain satisfactory 
standards of scholarship. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION 

1. The minimum requirement for graduation from the College Pre- 
paratory Department is sixteen units, part of which is prescribed and part 
is elective. Details of the courses offered may be found elsewhere in 
this catalogue. The minimum requirement for graduation from junior 
college courses is sixty-six semester hours, including two hours of physical 
education. 

2. Quality points equal to the number of semester hours of work 
covered will be required for graduation from any junior college course. 
College students, therefore, must maintain an average of C or better to 
be eligible for graduation. College Preparatory students must maintain 
an average of C to be recommended for college. 

3. The year preceding a student's graduation must be spent in study 



18 SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGE 



at Southern Missionary College. At least three units or twenty-Four sem- 
ester hours of credit must be earned in residence. 

4. No credit toward graduation is given for one year of language, 
unless two years of another language are completed. 

5. Transcripts of all courses completed in other schools must be on 
file before a student's work can be checked for graduation. College 
entrance requirements must be met as a prerequisite for the completion 
of any college course. 

6. All resident candidates for graduation must be members of the 
senior class. 

7. Since the institution has but one graduation exercise a year, at 
the end of the winter session, candidates completing their requirements 
in the summer will be graduated the following spring. 

JUNIORS 

A member of the junior class must have had, upon completion of the 
courses for which he is registered, at least ninety hours and ninety 
quality points, or eleven units in the academy. 




COLLEGEDALE, TENNESSEE 19 



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Each student entering this college defrays only a part of the actual 
cost of his instruction and maintenance. The total cost of instruction 
and maintenance for each student is not entirely met by the amount of 
cash paid or labor performed in accordance with the requirements of the 
figures set forth in this section. The operating deficit of the college is 
covered by gifts, subsidies, and funds from other sources. The educational 
opportunity afforded each student in Southern Missionary College repre- 
sents a large investment in buildings and equipment averaging more than 
fifteen hundred dollars for each student enrolled. 

ENTRANCE DEPOSITS 

At the time of admission an entrance deposit is required of all students 
as follows: Schoml Home students, $50; resident students, college or 
preparatory, $20,- resident elementary students, $10. 

This deposit is held as a guarantee that each periodic statement will 
be paid when presented. It cannot be drawn upon during the school 
term under any circumstances either for cash or for the payment of a school 
bill or for any personal expenses. It is refunded as a credit on the state- 
ment for the final period of the school year. There is no exception to this 
rule unless special arrangements are made with the management of the 
college and the president of the student's home conference through the 
church pastor or district leader. 





FIXED CHARGES-COLLEGE 








Four 


-Week Per 


iod 






Items 










Women 


Men 


"Tuition (16 semester hours) 








$21.00 


$21.00 


School Home Rent 










12.00 


12.00 


Laundry (minimum) 










3.00 


3.00 


Medical 










1.00 


1.00 


**Board (average) 










18.00 


22.00 


Period Tota I 










$55.00 


$59.00 


Yearly Total 










$509.00 


$546.00 



*Sixteen semester hours is considered full school work. 

**Food prices subject to change without notice depending upon war 

emergency. 



20 



SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGE 























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FIXED CHARGES- 


-ACADEMY 




Items 




Women 


Men 


* Tuition (4 units) 




$15.00 


$15.00 


School Home Rent 




12.00 


12.00 


Laundry (Minimum) 




3.00 


3.00 


Medical 




1.00 


1.00 


**Board (average) 




18.00 


22.00 


Period Total 




$49.00 


$53.00 


Yearly Total (9 Periods) 


$453.00 


$490.00 



* Four units is considered full school work. 

** Food price subject to change without notice depending upon war 

emergency. 

TUITION CHARGES 

The charges for tuition for the regular school year of nine periods 
are as follows: 

College 

Each Period School year 

18 Semester Hours ...23.00 212.75 

*16 Semester Hours 21 .00 194.25 

1 2 Semester Hours- - ..-.1 7.00 1 57.25 

8 Semester Hours 1 3.00... 1 20.25 

*Sixteen semester hours are considered full school work. 

Academy 

5 Units or Subjects -$18.00 $166.00 

*4 Units or Subjects .....1 5.00 1 38.75 

3 Units or Subjects 12.00 111.00 

2 Units or Subjects 9.00 83.25 

*Four units are considered full school work. 

Elementary 

Grades I - I II $ 5 .00 $45 .00 

Grades IV - VI 6.00 54.00 

Grades VII and VIII 7.00 63.00 



22 



SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGE 





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COLLEGEDALE, TENNESSEE 



23 



Assuming that all young people come to Southern Missionary College for 
the express purpose of obtaining an education, and since those working 
their entire way have time for one-half of a full class load, all students 
are urged to carry at least half school work. 

As an encouragement to do this, a minimum charge for tuition will be 
made on that basis. 

Private work is discouraged, and no credit will be given for such 
work unless satisfactory arrangements have been made in advance with 
the registrar. The charge for private work is the same as regular tuition 
plus tutoring fee. 

SEMESTER FEES 

General Fees — Includes both college Laboratory Fees — College classes only 
and academy students,- elementary stu- unless academy is indicated. 



aents oniy wnen inaicetea. 




Bacteriology 


$6.00 


Library 


$2.50 


Chemistry 


6.00 


Lyceum 


1.25 


Ch em i stry — Acad emy 


3.00 


Lyceum — Elementary 


.50 


Clothing and Textiles 


2.50 


Matriculation 


5.00 


Foods and Nutrition 


6.00 


Matriculation — Elementary 


.50 


Manual Arts 


2.50 


School Supplies — Elementary 


.50 


Normal Arts 

Physical Education — College and 


2.50 


Music Fees — Includes both college and 


Academy 


2.00 


academy 




Physics 


6.00 


Band, Choir, Chorus, and Orchestra 


Physics — Academy 


3.00 


without credit 


$2.00 


Physiology 


6.00 


with credit 


4.50 


Printing — Academy 


3.00 


Instrument Rental — (Band and 




Qualitative and Quantitative Anal 


. 6.00 


Orchestra) 


5.00 


Radio 


10.00 


Piano Rent: 




Secretarial Practice 


4.00 


Piano Students 1 hour per day 


6.00 


Typing — Academy — double period 4.50 


2 hours per day 


10.00 


Typing — College — 1 hr. per day 


4.50 


Voice Students 1 hour per day 


4.00 


Typing — College — 2 hrs. per day 


7.50 


2 hours per day 


7.00 


Zoology 


6.00 


OTHER CHARGES 




Period Fees 




Key Deposit 


$1.00 


Expression 


$5.00 


Special Examination 


1.00 


Music Lessons — Instrument, Pipe 




Transcript — (except first one) 


1.00 


Organ, Piano, Voice 


5.00 


Transportation to Chattanooga, 




Music Lessons — Elementary 


2.50 


Regular trip — charge 


.75 


Pipe Organ Rental 


7.00 


Regular trip — cash 


.50 


Special Fees 




Special trip 


2.50 


Change of Program 


$1.00 


Transportation to Ooltewah, 




Diploma 


4.00 


Special trip 


.50 


Entrance Examination 


1.00 


No fees are refundable. 





24 SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGE 



CHARGES FOR MUSIC 

The charge for all private music instruction is $5.00 per four-week 
period, except to children in the first eight grades to whom a special 
price of $2.50 per four-week period for twenty-minute lessons is made; 
Students who enroll for music are expected to continue lessons for at 
least one-half year. 

No refund on lessons will be given to students who drop their work 
during a four-week period. In no case will lessons which are lost on 
account of the student's absence be made up. 

FEDERAL FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT 

In order to comply with the Federal Fair Labor Standards Act, common- 
ly known as the Wage and Hour Law, it is necessary to pay certain mini- 
mum rates per hour in the campus industries. This has necessitated a gen- 
eral raise of wages. Consequently, there has been a corresponding in- 
crease in charges. 

SCHOOL HOME EXPENSE 

A room charge of $3.00 a week is made to each student who resides 
in a school home, except to one occupying a room with private bath in the 
new addition, in which case the charge will be $3.50. On this basis two 
students &rz expected to occupy one room. The charge includes a maxi- 
mum of 120 watts of electric light and steam heat. Laundry is charged 
at the rate of $3.20 per four-week period as a minimum. If the total 
charge for the period on a piece basis exceeds this, the actual charge 
is made rather than the minimum. Medical care is charged at the rate of 
$1.00 per period for boarding students and $.50 for resident students. 
This includes dispensary service and general nursing care not to exceed 
two weeks. The rate quoted does not cover the charge for visits to a 
student made by a physican or for special nursing care, nor calls by the 
school nurse to students living outside the school home. 

No refund from school home expense is made because of absence from 
the campus. 

To prevent loss of garments while being laundered, students should 
have each garment marked with a cloth name tape. The name tapes may 
be secured from the Sterling Name Tape Company, Winsted,^Conn. 



COLLEGEDALE, TENNESSEE 05 



BOARD 

The cafeteria plan of boarding is used, which allows the student the 
privilege of choosing his food and paying only for what he selects. Min- 
imum weekly charge for school home students is $3.75 for young women 
and $4.50 for young men. Due to the war, the average board for young 
women has been about $4.50 per week, and for young men is about 
$5.50 per week. Prices of food are subject to change without notice, 
depending upon the situation growing out of the war emergency. No 
allowance for absence from the campus is made other than during speci- 
fied vacations of one week or more, and in case of emergency. Three 
meals a day are served. Students living in the schohl homes are expected 
to take their meals in the dining room. 

PAYMENT OF ACCOUNTS 

Charges for tuition, school home expense, and board will be made each 
four or five-week period, and a statement will be issued to each student. 
Fifteen days will be allowed after the date of statement for settlement of 
accounts. The college board has made the costs as low as is consistent 
with educational efficiency. The school, therefore, must expect prompt 
payment of all outstanding accounts. Failure to pay promptly may terminate 
the student's connection with the school. 

All students will register at the beginning of each semester, and ac- 
counts must be in balance as a prerequisite to registration. Grade transcripts 
and diplomas are issued only to students whose accounts are paid in full. 

Post-dated checks are not acceptable. 

DISCOUNTS 

A cash discount of 5 percent is allowedJon the balance due the 
school for the current period's expenses if paid within the discount 
period of fifteen days from date of the statements. Where an advance pay- 
ment of at least $1 50 is made, an additional 2 percent discount is allowed. 

Our fiscal year is divided into twelve periods whose closing dates 
are as follow : June 25, July 23, August 20, October 1 , October 29, 
November 26, December 31, January 28, February 25, March 25, 
April 22, and May 20. Statements will bear these dates. 



26 SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGE 



Where there are three or more students from one family a 25 per 
cent discount will be allowed on the accrued charge for the three highest 
tuition rates and any students beyond three will be accepted at no 
further charge. This rate applies only to tuition and is applicable to both 
boarding and resident students. 

Missionaries or dependents of same on furlough are allowed a 50 
percent discount on tuition only, the firstyear of furlough, provided the 
remaining expenses are paid before the close of the discount period. 
The children of foreign missionaries in active service are also granted a 
50 per cent discount on tuition on these same conditions. This conces- 
sion does not apply to students who earn through labor 50 per cent or 
more of their charges. 

PERSONAL EXPENSE 

Students should be provided with sufficient funds, in addition to money 
for school expenses, to cover cost of books, clothing, and all personal 
items. We urge that all prospective students have their eyes tested by a 
competent oculist and necessary dental work cared for before entering 
school. 

All purchases from the college store or from other departments on the 
campus must be paid for in cash. No charge accounts are accepted. 

RATION BOOKS 

The rationing plan as administered by the Government requires stu- 
dents to bring with them all ration books and deposit them with the 
college. The college is required to remove coupons from time to time 
and turn them in to the ration board. Ration books may be loaned to 
students for a one week period to enable them to purchase shoes or 
other commodities which may be designated in the future. Whenever 
a student leaves school he may take his ration books with him except for 
brief visits of less than two weeks. 

CHANGE OF PROGRAM 

When a student drops any of his class work or quits the school, he 
must present to the business office a drop voucher from the registrar's 



COLLEGEDALE, TENNESSEE 27 



office. Tuition will be charged until such voucher is received. Those 
who drop school work later than the first week of any four-week period 
will be charged for the full period. Two weeks will be allowed at 
the beginning of each semester for a change of program without charge. 

COLPORTEUR SCHOLARSHIPS . 

For the encouragement of the colporteur work, the college, together 
with the local conference, book and Bible house, and publishing house 
offer a very liberal scholarship bonus. In addition, the regular cash dis- 
counts offered by the school are applicable to the student's cash earn- 
ings. 

In order to qualify for the scholarship it is required that men work only 
a minimum of 400 hours and women 350 hours. Because of these financial 
aids it is possible for the colporteur to meet the cash requirements of 
Plan I for the college by selling only $578.52 worth of subscription 
books. The acadmey student may meet the cash requirements of Plan I 
by selling only $504 of subscription books. This is worked out in the 
following schedule: 

College Academy 
Cash earnings 50 per cent of sales shown above; $289.26 $252.02 
Scholarship 123.97 108.01 

10 per cent discount in cash earning 21.77 18.97 

To fill cash requirements of Plan I $435.00 $379.00 

If the earnings are less than that required for a full scholarship, the 
bonus and discount are proportionately smaller. Labor credit may be 
earned at the college to make up the additional amount required for 
any of the regular plans. 

TUITION SCHOLARSHIPS 

Each year the college, in conjunction with the several local confer- 
ences of the Southern Union, awards eleven $50 cash scholarships to be 
applied on tuition: $25 at the end of the first semester and $25 at the end 
of the second. The method of choice is as follows: The faculty of each 
designated school nominates its candidate, which nomination must be 
approved by the school board and recommended to the educational 
board of the local conference, which has final choice. The selection 



28 SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGE 



of nominees must be based on character, scholarship, personality, and 
promise of future leadership. The names of the winners are announced 
at the time of commencement at the college. The following schools are 
eligible to participate in this plan: 

Asheville Agricultural School 

Atlanta Union Academy 

Birmingham Junior Academy 

Forest Lake Academy (2) 

Fountain Head Rural School 

Louisville Junior Academy 

Memphis Junior Academy 

Nashville Junior Academy 

Pewee Valley Academy 

Pine Forest Academy 

Pisgah Institute 

Sand Mountain Junior Academy 

Southern Missionary College Preparatory Department 

The Southern Union Conference Executive Committee has adopted the 
following recommendation covering the school year 1944-1945: 

VOTED, That we recommend to each local conference the providing 
of fifty-dollar scholarships to Southern Missionary College for thestudents 
from each conference who are completing the second semester of the 
Teacher Training Course, and who otherwise arz not financially able to 
complete the year's work, upon the following conditions: 

a. Are recommended by the president and the director of Teacher 
Training of Southern Missionary College. 

b. Are recommended by the educational committee of the 'local 
conference and approved by the conference committee. 

c. Are pledged to give two consecutive years of teaching service in 
their own conference. 

EDUCATIONAL FUND 

Many promising young people are deprived of the privilege of attend- 
ing college because of a lack of necessary means. To aid these, an earnest 
effort has been made to obtain donations for the establishment of an 
educational fund, from which students worthy of help may borrow money 



COLLEGEDALE, TENNESSEE 29 



for a reasonable length of time. Faithfulness in refunding these loans will 
make it possible for the same money to assist many students in school. 
There have been some gifts, and they have been expended in such a way 
as to help several promising young men and women to complete their 
work; but the needs of this class of students have been greater than the 
amount of funds on hand, and it has consequently been impossible to 
render the desired assistance to as many as should be helped. It, accord- 
ingly, has been determined to invite the attention of patrons and friends 
of the school to these facts and to ask them to give such means as they may 
desire, to be used for this purpose. We should be glad to correspond 
with any who think favorably of this plan, and shall continue to use the 
utmost caution in the use of the means donated, that the wishes of the 
donors may be fully carried out, and that the best results may be obtained. 

"In each conference a fund should be raised to lend to worthy poor 
students who desire to give themselves to the missionary work; and in 
some cases they should even receive donations. When the Battle Creek 
College was first started, there was a fund placed in the Review and 
Herald office for the benefit of those who wished to obtain an education, 
but had not the means. This was used by several students until they could 
get a good start; then from their earnings they would replace what they 
had drawn, so that others might be benefited by the fund. The youth 
should have it plainly set before them that they must work their own way 
as far as possible and thus partly defray their expenses. That which costs 
little will be appreciated little. But that which costs a price somewhere 
near its real value will be estimated accordingly." — "Testimonies," 
Vol. 6, pp. 21 3, 214. 

EMPLOYMENT OF STUDENTS 

The college endeavors through its numerous vocational opportunities 
to open the way for student self-help — a valuable part of a training 
for life. Due to the war emergency, however, which is affecting our 
school industries, we urge upon all parents and guardians the importance 
of reducing the number of hours for each student to be spent in manual 
labor and of increasing the amount to be paid in cash. 

Then, too, in the interest of a better balanced program of study, work, 
exercise, and rest, the college recommends that students in general 
follow Plans Number I and II. This is more in harmony with the 
instruction given us in "Counsels to Teachers" and 'Education." 



30 SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGE 



A limited number of students who are very industrious and frugal by 
carrying certain kinds of work do succeed in earning the entire cost of thek 
education. We find that only those with a serious purpose and a grim 
determination should expect to be thus successful, and then only on a 
restricted class program. 

Many letters come to us asking whether students can work for their 
expenses, wholly or in part. All we can promise is that we furnish, to 
those who prove themselves efficient and worthy,such work as is avail- 
able. Since the work of the college is performed mainly by students, 
those who are willing and capable will probably find all the labor that 
their school program will allow them to perform. The school will assign 
students to departments where work is available and cannot shift stu- 
dents from one department to another merely by request. It should be 
understood that once a student is assigned work in a given department, 
that he will remain there for the entire school year except in rare cases 
where recommended by the school nurse, or at the discretion of the college. 

Students who apply for admission to the college with the intention 
of working their way, will be required to pay an entrance deposit of 
$50. This deposit cannot be withdrawn during the school year, but 
must be applied on school expenses. 

BOOK RENTAL PLAN 

Commencing with the fall term all academy textbooks will be on a 
rental basis. The charge will be ninety cents per subject for the school 
year. This does not include workbooks which must be purchased for 
cash. It is expected that all textbooks will be returned in good con- 
dition to the college at the close of the school year; otherwise, a book 
damage charge will be made. 

College textbooks will not be included in the above plan, but will 
continue to be purchased for cash as in the past. 

CASH WITHDRAWALS 

Students who may wish to place surplus funds in safe keeping, subject 
to withdrawal in person only, may open deposit accounts at the business 
office. 

Students who are given work in the various departments of the school, 
or affiliated industries, may authorize the payment of 10 per cent of their 
earnings to the church treasurer as tithe on a current period basis only. 

No cash can be withdrawn on account by students except that amount 
in excess of a $25 credit balance on their statement. 



COLLEGEDALE, TENNESSEE 31 



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ojf Anti Jbepiee 

The four-year liberal arts curriculum leading to the Bachelor of Arts 
degree requires the completion of at least 128 semester hours, of 
which at least forty hours must be upper division. The basic pattern 
of studies leading to this degree is presented directly below. In ad- 
diton, the student should select not later than the beginning of the 
junior year his major and minor field of concentration. The student 
must mantain a C average in both Fields of concentration, and no course 
in which the student receives a D grade may be counted in the require- 
ments for a major. 

The following basic pattern is required of all candidates for the 
Bachelor of Arts degree. 

English 12 hours 

Six hours must be composition, and the remaining six must be literature. 

Foreign Language 6-14 hours 

Fourteen hours will be required of all who begin a new language in college; 
six hours of those who continue the same language studied For two years on the 
secondary level. 

Social Science 12 hours 

This may be selected from courses in economics, history, political science, and 
sociology, Six hours of the above must be history. 

Theology 12-16 hours 

A student presenting three or more units of credit in Bible from the second- 
ary school will take twelve hours,- one presenting two units, fourteen hours; 
and one presenting one unit or less, sixteen hours. 

Science-Mathematics 12 hours 

This may be selected from the fields of biology, chemistry, mathematics, and 
physics. Six hours must be selected from a science field. 

Physical Education 2 hours 

This is required in the freshman and sophomore years. 



32 SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGE 



MAJORS AND MINORS 

A student may elect to major in one of the following fields: Business 
administration, English, history, languages, and theology. An English 
major shall consist or thirty-two hours, and the requirements for the 
other fields shall be thirty hours each. 

A minor may be selected from the following fields: Biology, busi- 
ness administration, chemistry, education, English, history and sociol- 
ogy, languages, mathematics, music, and theology. A minor consists 
of fifteen hours with the following exceptions: English, twenty-one 
hours,- language and theology each six hours in addition to prescribed 
requirement. 

PROGRAM OUTLINE FOR SPECIFIC MAJORS 

Candidates for the Bachelor of Arts degree shall meet the basic re- 
quirements set forth above, and shall have one major and one minor. 

Those preparing for the ministry will major in theology and minor in 
history. They will elect Greek for their foreign language requirement. 



COLLEGEDALE, TENNESSEE 33 



The following pages list the courses offered in the various departments 
of this college. Not all courses, however, are given each year. 
The number of recitations each week is the same as the number of hours 
of credit listed for each semester, unless otherwise stated. Courses 
bearing double numbers (like 1-2) are year courses — they continue 
hrougb both semesters. 

AGRICULTURE 

1. Poultry Husbandry. 

This is a first course in poultry. The principles of poultry production and care 
as applied to the farm flock will be especially emphasized. Some work will be done 
in the study of feeding, cullins, the raising of young chicks, and the growing of 
young stock. One semester. Three hours. 

2. Dairy Husbandry. 

This will be an elementary course in the study of dairying and its relation to agri- 
culture as a whole. Selection and care of the dairy herd, secretion and composition 
of milk, the problem of feeding the dairy cown and the growing herd, the care of 
cream and milk, Babcock testing, and the marketing of dairy products will be cov- 
ered in this course. One semester. Three hours. 

3. Landscape Art. 

In this course emphasis will be placed on home and school beautification. A study 
of plant materials, their selection, planting, and care will be included. Planning and 
development of the home and school grounds will also be discussed. An acquaint- 
ance with trees, shfubs, and flowers adapted to local surroundings will be one of 
the objectives of this course. One semester. Three hours. 

4. Vegetable Gardening. 

In this course special emphasis will be upon the home garden. Production and 
care of garden produce and its preparation for use of the family both as fresh veg- 
etables and for food preservation will be studied. The proper selection of the gar- 
den site and its preparation and cultivation will also be included. Some work will be 
done in the control of diseases and insect pests. 

One semester. Three hours. 

Additional Courses. 

If there is demand, other courses in Soils, Horticulture, Animal Husbandry, Field 
Crops, Animal Nutrition, and Farm Management can be arranged. 



34 SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGE 



BIOLOGY 

1-2. Anatomy and Physiology. 

Open to all college students, but especially designed for students looking forward 
to nursing, dietetics/ and home economics. The course includes the structure and func- 
tions of tissues, organs, and systems in the human body. Two hours recitation,- three 
hours laboratory. Two semesters. Six hours. 

3-4. Bacteriology. 

A study of the fundamental principles of microbiology, introducing the control 
of disease,- immunology,- and serological procedures. One hour recitation,- three 
hours laboratory. Two semesters. Four hours. 

5-6. General Zoology. 

An introduction to fundamental biological phenomena and principles,- a thorough 
study of some typical invertebrates; and the comparative anatomy of vertebrates. 
Three hours recitation; four hours laboratory. Two semesters. Eight hours. 



BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION AND SECRETARIAL SCIENCE 

1-2. Accounting Principles. 

Introduction to accounting,- books of original entry; ledgers/ trial balances; profit 
and loss statements,- partnerships; corporations,- business forms and papers; controlling 
accounts. Two hours recitation; three hours laboratory. 

Two semesters. Six hours- 

3. Intermediate Accounting. 

A course in advanced theory of accounting. Problems of single entry; preparation 
of working papers, balance sheets, and profit and loss statements; advanced part- 
nership and corporation problems,- valuation of assets,- depreciation; reserves and 
reserve funds; sinking funds; consignment and installment accounting. Prerequisite, 
Business Administration 1-2. One semester. Three hours. 

4. Cost Accounting. 

General principles and importance of cost records; classification of costs,- job order 
and process accounting; accounting for materials, labor and manufacturing expense; 
preparation of analytical statements. Prerequisite: Business Administration 1-2. 

One semester. Three hours. 

5. Consumers' Economics. 

A course, open to the non-business student, devoted to the analysis of economic 
institutions from the consumers' viewpoint. Particular attention is given to the rela- 
tion of the consumer to advertising; adulteration of products,- installment selling,- 
monopolistic practices; government economic and revenue policies. The student 
is made familiar with various agencies for consumer protection. 

One semester. Two hours. 



COLLEGEDALE, TENNESSEE 35 



6. Business Law. 

A survey course of the principles of law governing business transactions. Some 
of the topics studied are contracts, agency, negotiable papers, partnerships, cor- 
porations, and sale of personal property. One semester. Three hours. 

7-8. Principles of Economics. 

A survey course in the fundamentals of economics; the institutions, forces, and 
factors affecting production, exchange, and distribution of wealth in modern industria I 
countries. Two semester. Four hours. 

9-10. Shorthand. 

A study of the fundamentals of Gregg shorthand, mastery of vocabulary and all 
brief forms and special forms with a high degree of speed, dictation of business letters 
and literary material, and machine transcription at satisfactory speeds. Must be enrolled 
concurrently in Business Administration 13-14. Four hours recitation; one hour 
laboratory. Two semesters. Eight hours. 

11-12. Advanced Dictation. 

Emphasis on rapid dictation of letters and literary material, and transcription on the 
typewriter. Special attention is given to the learning of shorthand forms for denom- 
inational terms and dictation of material typical of denominational correspondence. 
A minimum requirement of two hundred mailable letters must be met. Three hours 
recitation; one hour laboratory. Prerequisite; Business Administration 9-10. 

Two semesters. Six hours. 

13-14. Typewriting. 

Touch mastery of the keyboard and manipulation of the machine; a study of letter 
writing, manuscript, reports, rough drafts, tabulation, billing, and legal documents, 
five hours recitation; three hours laboratory. Two semesters. Four hours. 

15-16. Secretarial Practice. 

To acquaint the prospective office worker with information that is important in his 
field. A study of office procedure, English mechanics, business ethics, job analyses, 
filing, and laboratory practice, including the operation of the various office machines. 
Voice Transcription, Mimeograph, Mimeoscope, Monroe Calculator, Sundstrand 
Adding Machine, Remington Rand Printing Calculator, etc. Two hours recitation, 
three hours laboratory. Prerequisite: Business Administration 13-14. 

Two semesters. Six hours. 

101. Economic Problems. 

A course dealing with some of the vital problems of modern economic life in 
connection with the concentration of industrial and labor power; public utilities; 
agriculture; money and banking, government finance; and foreign trade. Recent legis- 
lation in each of these fields is reviewed and analyzed. 

One semester. Three hours. 



36 SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGE 



102. Business Management. 

A survey course in the organization and management of a business enterprise. 
Study is given to the production and marketing of a product; the financing of a busi- 
ness; and the control of a business through budgets,- and the analysis of accounting 
data. One semester. Three hours. 

CHEMISTRY 

1-2. Inorganic Chemistry. 

An introduction to the elements and their principal compounds; the fundamental 
laws and accepted theories of chemistry. Three hours recitation; four hours labora- 
tory. Two semesters. Eight hours. 

3. Qualitative Analysis. 

A study of methods for the separation and identification of inorganic ions; analysis 
of several unknowns. One hour recitation; six hours laboratory. Prerequisite: 
Chemistry 1-2. One semester. Three hours. 

4. Quantitative Analysis. 

This course includes the study of typical volumetric and gravimetric methods; 
quantitative determinations of acidity, alkalinity and percentage composition of a 
variety of unknowns. One hour recitation; six hours laboratory. Prerequisite: 
Chemistry 3. One semester. Three hours. 

5-6. Organic Chemistry. 

A survey of the aliphatic and aromatic compounds of carbon. The laboratory in- 
cludes typical organic syntheses. Especially designed for science students. Three 
hours recitation; four hours laboratory. Prerequisite: Chemistry 1-2. 

Two semesters. Eight hours. 
7-8. General Chemistry. 

A survey course designed to familiarize the student with the basic principles of 
chemistry. Attention is given particularly to solutions, chemistry of nutrition, diges- 
tion, and metabolism. Especially designed for pre-nursing students. Two hours re- 
citation; three hours laboratory. High School chemistry is highly desirable* 

Two semesters. Six hours. 

EDUCATION 

1 . General Psychology. 

An introduction to the study of the problems of human behavior and conduct, 
including the mental processes and their development. The aim of the course is to 
Acquaint the student with the fundamental laws on which the educative process 
is based, and to open up to him the possibilities of scientific education. 

One semester. Two hours. 



COLL EGED ALE, TENNESSEE 37 



2. Educational Psychology. 

A continuation of Education 1, with special emphasis on the application of psy- 
chology to the problems of teaching, including such topics as motivation, learning, 
transfer, individual differences, and the measurement of achievement. 

One semester. Three hours. 

3. Principles of Geography. 

A study of the mutual relationships between man and major elements of natural 
environment with special emphasis upon types of climate and some of the adjustments 
which man makes to climatic conditions in selected regions. 

One semester. Three hours. 

4. Geography of Latin America. 

A study of the physical environments and their relation to economic, political 
and social developments in the various regions of Latin America. 

One semester. Three hours. 

5. Principles of Education. 

A study of the fundamental principles of education as set forth in the books "Edu- 
cation," "Counsels to Parents and Teachers," and "Fundamentals of Christian Edu- 
cation." One semester. Two hours. 

7. Teaching of Bible. 

A study of subject matter and methods to be used in the teaching of the Bible to 
children in the elementary grades. One semester. One hour. 

8. Teaching of Arithmetic. 

A course dealing with the aims, principles, methods and materials involved in the 
successful teaching of arithmetic. An effort is made to bring each student to a 
desired skill in the use of arithmetical principles and processes. 

One semester. Two hours. 

9. Children's Reading and Literature. 

In this course a study is made of the problems involved in the teaching of reading 
in all grades of the elementary school. Literature for children will be studied. 

One semester. Two hours. 

11. Technique of Teaching. 

A course designed to give the prospective teacher a working knowledge of the 
principles and procedures of teaching in an elementary school. Opportunity is given 
for observation in the training school. One semester. Two hours. 

12. School Hygiene. 

This course is designed to familiarize the student with problems of hygiene in the 
school and the community. One semester. Two hours. 

1 4. Nature. 
This course familiarizes the student with the nature - materials of his immediate 



38 SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGE 



environment, and presents methods of making such materials of vital interest in the 
life of the child. One semester. Two hours. 

16. School Music. 

A course designed to prepare teachers to give instruction in music in the elementary 
grades. Consideration will be given the following topics: The child voice, rote 
songs, sight reading, treatment of monotones, music appreciation. 

One semester. Two hours. 

17. Practical Arts. 

This course presents methods of teaching sewing, cooking, and woodwork in 
grades five to eight. One semester. Two hours. 

18. Art. 

A course designed to aid the teacher in presenting art instruction in the grades. 
Topics: Free-hand pencil drawing, crayola work, cardboard construction, clay model- 
ing, water colors, perspective, design, picture study, blackboard sketching. 

One semester. Two hours. 

19-20. Directed Teaching. 

This course includes the teaching of classes in the training School, the observation 
of lessons taught by the supervisors, the study and measurement of children as indi- 
viduals and in groups, meeting with the supervisors of directed teaching and with 
the director of the training School. Prerequisite: An average of C in college 
courses previously taken. Two semesters. Four hours. 

29-30. Music Pedasogy. 

Class discussion of teaching problems in addition to supervised practice teaching. 

Two semesters. Two hours. 

101 Elementary School Curriculum. 

A course designed to give the student an understanding of profitable learning ex- 
periences in the elementary school. Prerequisite: Technique of teaching, and jun- 
ior standing. One semester. Two hours. 

102. Tests and Measurements. 

A course dealing with methods of building, administering, and interpreting re- 
liable and valid tests. One semester. Two hours. 

103. Teaching of Shorthand. 

A study of methods and problems of teaching Gregg shorthand in secondary 
schools. Prerequisite: Secretarial Science 9 and 10. 

One semester. Two hours. 

104 Teaching of Typewriting. 

Methods of teaching typewriting in the secondary school are considered. Pre- 
requisite: Secretarial Science 13 and 14. One semester. One hour. 



COLLEGEDALE, TENNESSEE 39 



ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 

1-2. Composition and Rhetoric. 

Intensive study of the fundamentals of English grammar and usage, the principles of 
effective composition, required outside reading and class study of literary models, 
regular practice in the writing of various types of themes. 

At the end of the first six weeks of the school year, all students in this class must 
take a qualifying examination in English fundamentals, based on material that has been 
reviewed previously. Students who fail this examination are not allowed to continue 
in the class unless they enroll in the course in Introductory English. Credit for the 
Semester's work in composition and rhetoric will not be given until the student 
completes satisfactorily the course in Introductory English. Two semesters. Six hours. 

3. Introductory English. 

This course is required of those who prove deficient in the fundamentals of English 
grammar and usage, and are unable to attain the standard required for passing the 
course in Composition and rhetoric without more intensive drill than is provided in 
that course. The class meets two hours a week during the last eleven weeks of the 
first semester. Students are allowed to add this course to a full program. Tuition is 
charged at the rate of one hour per semester, but no credit is given for the course. 

5-6. Survey of English Literature. 

A study of selected masterpieces and of literary history by periods, authors, repre- 
sentative works, and types. Lectures, anthology, collateral reading, and class reports. 

Two semesters. Six hours. 

7-8. American Literature. 

Representative selections and characteristic tendencies in the development of 
American literature, with emphasis on personal appreciation. 

Two semesters. Four hours. 

101-102. Literature of the English Bible. 

A study of the English Bible, emphasizing its literary aspects and the inPuence it 
has had upon the language and the lives of our great writers. Rapid survey reading 
of portions of the Bible is included as well as the study of the various literary types: 
Narrative, history, poetry, oratory, and prophecy. Prerequisite: English 1-2, and 
5-6 or 7-8. Two semesters. Four hours. 

103-104. Journalism. 

A study of the current types of news writing, features, and editorials, with definite 
outlets in the "Southland Scroll" and the local newspapers. The mechanics of the 
newspaper — copy reading, proofreading, headline writing, and page make-up 
will be stressed in the laboratory phase. Prerequisite: English 1-2. 

Two semesters. Four hours. 



40 SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGE 



HEALTH EDUCATION 

1-2. Health Principles. 

Fundamental, scientific laws governing health and hygiene; application of 
principles of health and personal hygiene in daily living habits. 

Two semesters. Two hours. 

3-4. History or Nursing. 

Introduction of pre-nursing student to the long and splendid history of nursing and 
to the great leaders who have established its traditions and ideals; practical methods 
of studying with application to the mastery of the art of nursing. 

Two semesters. Four hours. 

5-6. Physical Education. 

The purpose of this course is to familiarize the student with the fundamental princi- 
ples governing the development and maintenance of a good physique; to cor- 
rect certain anatomical defects prevalent among young people, and to provide an 
opportunity for wholesome recreation. Two semesters. One hour. 

7-8. Home Nursing and Hygiene. 

A course of instruction in the treatment of those illnesses which properly can be 
cared for in the home, including protective measures, diet for the patient, and 
simple hydrotherapy treatments. One hour recitation; two hours laboratory. 

Two semesters. Two hours. 

HISTORY AND SOCIAL SCIENCE 

1-2 Survey of European History. 

A general survey of the history of Western Europe from the Roman Empire to mod- 
ern times. Stress is laid on social, cultural, economic, and religious movements. 
Lectures, reports. Two semesters. Six hours. 

3-4. Survey of Ancient History. 

A study of the historical background of the Old Testament in the light of historical 
research. The Scriptural record is confirmed by a study of recent researches and 
excavations in the valley of the Nile and in Mesopotamia. Brief survey of Ancient 
Persia, Phoenicia, Greece, and Rome. Two semesters. Four hours. 

5-6. Constitutional History. 

A study of the basic principles of American government. Comparison with con- 
stitutions of others countries. The framing of the American Constitution, its adop- 
tion, and later development. Two semesters. Two hours. 

7-8. American History. 

The history of the rise and development of America. The colonial background; 



COLLEGEDALE, TENNESSEE 41 



the great figures of early America. Study of the nineteenth and twentieth centur- 
ies in America. Two semesters. Six hours . 

10. Sociology. 

This course studies man's relations to society; his duties and rights. Various 
aspects of American society are carefully studied, such as the family, races, religious 
groups, industry, education. One semester. Three hours. 

101-102. Church History. 

A history of the Christian church from the apostolic times to our day. Study of 
doctrines, events, movements, personalities. Role of the Papacy. Protestantism 
Modern religious movements. Two semesters. Six hours. 

103-104 Era of the French Revolution. 

Causes of the French Revolution. Social, political, and religious aspects of that 
important period. The time of Napoleon. Two semesters. Six hours. 



HOME ECONOMICS 

1-2. Foods and Nutrition. 

A study of the chemical and biological standards used in the selection, preparation 
and service of foods. Laboratory practice in the basic principles of cookery. Two 
hours recitation; three hours laboratory. Two semesters. Six hours. 

3-4. Clothing. 

An elementary course in selection and buying of clothing; fundamental principles 
of garment construction; color design; psychology of dress. Two hours recitation; 
three hours laboratory. Two semesters. Six hours. 

5. Food Economics and Meal Planning. 

The planning and preparing of typical diets for the individual and family under 
varying economic and social conditions. One hour recitation,- three hours laboratory. 

One semester. Two hours. 

6. Household Economics. 

A course dealing with consumer problems in relation to present economic con- 
ditions, and the relationship of the buyer to the problem of production, distribu- 
tion, and consumption. One semester. Two hours. 

101. Tailoring. 

This course comprises a study of the techniques of ladies' tailoring, drafting, and 
fitting. Projects include a suit or coat. Prerequisite: Home Economics 3-4. 

One semester. Two hours. 



42 SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGE 



LANGUAGES 

1-2; Beginning French. 

A foundation course in grammar, pronunciation, and reading designed to develop 
the ability to read and understand easy French prose. 

Two semesters. Ten hours. 

3-4. Intermediate French. 

Advanced grammar, intensive and extensive reading of moderately difficult French 
texts,- composition; practice in simple French conversation. Prerequisite: Beginning 
French or two years of French in the preparatory department. 

Two semesters. Six hours. 
5-6. French Conversation. 

A purely conversational course to develop skill in speaking and understanding 
idomatic French. Prerequisite: Beginning French or its equivalent. 

Two semesters. Four hours. 

7-8. Beginning Spanish. 

A foundation course in grammar, pronunciation and reading designed to develop 
ability to read and undersatnd easy Spanish prose. 

Two semesters. Ten hours. 

9-10. Intermediate Spanish. 

Advanced grammar, intensive and extensive reading of moderately diffcult Spanish 
texts,- composition; practice in simple Spanish convesation. 

Two semesters. Six hours. 

11-12. Spanish Conversation. 

A purely conversational course to develop skill in speaking and understanding 
idomatic Spanish. Prerequisite: Beginning Spanish or its equivalent. 

Two semesters. Four hours. 

13-14. Greek I. 

A thorough study of elementary New Testament Greek grammar, building a vo- 
cabulary, and the mastery of the regular verb. Special attention is given to the Greek 
participle. Extensive exercises in translation are required, and a portion of John's 
Gospel is read. Machen's "New Testament Greek for Beginners" is the basic text. 

Two semesters. Eight hours. 

15-16. Greek ll. 

A thorough grammar and vocabulary review, followed by the translation of I John 
and selected chapters in John, Revelation, Luke, and Acts. Constant parsing is required. 
Some problems of textual criticism are studied, and a familiarity is gained with the 
works of G. Adolph Deissman, A. T. Robertson, and others. 

Two semesters. Six hours. 



COLLEGEDALE, TENNESSEE 43 



17-18 Greek and Latin Etymology. 

An extremely useful course to science students and all those who wish to increase 
rapidly their vocabulary and understand seemingly difficult or technical words through 
learnins Greek and Latin roots. Two semesters. Two hours 

101-102. Survey of French Literature. 

An outline course in the history and development of French literature with read- 
ing of representative works from various periods; collateral reading and reports. 

Two semesters. Six hours. 

103-104 Survey of Spanish Literature. 

An outline course in the history and development of Spanish literature with reading 
of representative work from various periods,- collateral reading and reports. 

Two semesters. Six hours. 



LIBRARY SCIENCE 

71-72. Introductory Library Science. 

Adapted to acquaint the student with the resources of libraries and the eFficien 
use of them, and to serve as an exploratory training for those contemplating future serv- 
ice as librarians. The major emphasis is placed on methods in research, reference 
work, bibliography, and book selection, but some elementary instruction is given in 
all the essential library routines, such as classification, cataloging, and circulation 
procedures. Lectures, discussion, and laboratory work in the college library. 

Two semesters. Two hours. 

101-102. Library Administration. 

Designed to give training in library management, with school libraries expecially 
in view, and to impart a practical knowledge of how to organize and administer a 
library, how to select, acquire, and catalog books, and how to relate the library to 
the needs of the pupil. Prerequisite: Introductory Library Science, or the two may 
be taken simultaneously. Two semesters. Four hours. 



MATHEMATICS 

1. College Algebra. 

The algebraic number system, including complex numbers,- variations,- rational 
functions of first, second, and higher degrees with geometrical interpretations; 
derivatives,- maximum and minimum; theory of equations,- partial fractions; linear systems 
and determinants,- permutations, combinations, probability; conic sections,- theory of 
exponents; exponentials; applications to physics. 

One semester. Three hours. 



44 SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGE 



2. Plane Trigonometry. 

Trigonometric functions) solution of right and of oblique triangles by natural 
functions and by logarithms; graphic and analytic treatment of trigonometric functions/ 
inverse and exponential functions; trigonometric identities and equations; applications 
to surveying, astronomy, mechanics, and navigation. Prerequisite: Geometry. 

One semester. Three hours. 

3. Plane Analytical Geometry. 

Rectangular, oblique and polar coordinates in the plane,- the relation between a 
curve and its equation; the algebra of a pair of variables, and the geometry of a moving 
point; straight lines; conic sections, and certain other curves. Prerequisite: College 
Algebra. 

Given on Demand. One semester. Three hours. 

4. Solid Analytical Geometry. 

Rectangular and oblique coordinates in space; lines, planes, and surfaces of 
revolution. Prerequisite: Plane Analytics. 
Given on Demand. One semester. Three hours. 

5. Differential Calculus. 

Infinitesimals; variation,- differentiation of algebraic and transcendental functions; 
interpretation of the successive derivatives with applications to physics,- differentials; 
partial derivatives. Prerequisite: College Algebra. 

Given on Demand. One semester. Four hours. 

6. Integral Calculus. 

Integration of algebraic and transcendental functions; summation,- geometrical and 
physical interpretation; series,- successive integration; simple differential equations. 
Prerequisite: Differential Calculus. 

Given on Demand. One semester. Four hours. 

MUSIC 

1-2. Harmony I and Ear Training. 

Major and minor scales, intervals, primary and secondary triads in their inversions 
The dominant seventh and its inversions, harmonizing melodies, the larger chord 
formations, modulations, and the singing and playing of many of these harmonies in 
class as a group for the purpose of ear training. Prerequisite: At least one year of 
piano. Two semesters. Four hours. 

3-4. Hamony II and Ear Training. 

After a review of Harmony I, a more extensive study of modulation no secondary 
triads and seventh chords is taken up, also mixed chords with all their various 
alterations. In addition to the above, the student writes some original composition 
material. Two semesters. Four hours. 



COLLEGEDALE, TENNESSEE 45 



5-6 Conducting and Sight Singing. 

Music Fundamentals. Reading in various keys. Fundamentals of conducting con- 
gregational and choir music. Two semesters. Two hours, 

7. History and Appreciation of Music. 

This course deals with the development of music from its early beginnings to the 
present day. Music appreciation is woven into the class instruction. 

One semester. Two hours. 

8. Theory and Appreciation. 

The study of sound, acoustics, overtones, tempered scale, orchestra and band 
instruments, rhythm, tempo, musical terms, embellishments, music form, sonata move- 
ments, ancient and modern dance forms, and vocal and instrumental counterpoint. 
Music appreciation is continued in this class since it follows History of Music. 

One semester. Two hours. 

Piano. 

Private and class instruction is adapted to the needs of each student. The class in- 
struction is restricted to small children and taught by one who has especially pre- 
pared for this particular field of instruction. Students have opportunity to take part 
in public recitals. 

Voice. 

Posture, correct breathing, diction, tone production, songs, interpretation, and 
public experience in recitals and other functions. 

Violin and Wind Instruments. 

Instruction on the violin and wind instruments is provided if there is sufficient 
demand. 

Men's Chorus and Women's Chorus. 

Membership depends upon satisfactory audition with the director. 

Two semesters. One hour. 

A Cappella Choir 

This being the leading vocal organization of the college, each member is selected 
by individual private audition. In addition to doing approximately all of the church 
choir work, this organization gives a Christmas and spring concert, radio broadcasting, 
and goes on tour to our larger churches when transportation is available. 

Two semesters. Two hours. 

Orchestra. 

Membership for those who are able to play an instrument sufficiently well to be 
•dmitted. Public performances are given. Two semesters. One hour. 



46 SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGE 



Various smaller vocal and instrumental ensembles also Function 
throughout the school year. 

Applied Music Credit. 

Piano, Voice, Violin, and other instruments. 
One lesson a week with five hours' practice. Two semesters. Two hours. 

Two lessons a week with ten hours' practice. Two semesters. Four hours. 

Music Organizations. 

With the exception of the A Cappella Choir, all music organizations will give one 
hour maximum credit in one year even though a student may be in more than one. 
Two hours maximum credit is given to the A Cappella Choir. 

College credit will be granted only to those who, in the judgment oF the music 
department head, have had sufficient background — a maximum of six hours in either 
applied or theoretical music, and not more than ten hours in both. 

The six hours of applied music may include credit for two hours in music organiza- 
tions. 

PHYSICS 

1-2. General Physics. 

An advanced study of the mechanics of solids, liquids, and gases; properties of 
matter and its internal forces; wave motion and sound; heat; magnetism; electrostatics; 
current electricity; alternating current theory; communication; radio activity,- light. 
Three hours recitation; four hours laboratory. Prerequisite: Trigonometry. High 
School Physics is advised. Two semesters. Eight hours. 

3-4. Principles of Radio Communication. 

Fundamental electrical principles; alternating currents and high frequency; vacuum 
tube theory and design,- fundamental vacuum tube circuits; radio receiver theory and 
design; transmitter theory and design; test instruments; fundamentals of cathode 
ray television,- wave fundamentals and radiation; industrial and medical uses ol 
vacuum tubes; relay applications. Prerequisite: High School Physics. 

Two semesters. Four hours. 

THEOLOGY 
1-2. Bible Survey. 

A survey course in the Old and New Testaments emphasizing fundamentals of 
the plan of salvation and tracing the fulfillment of certain Messianic prophecies. 
Open to students who have had no previous courses in Bible. This course may not 
be applied toward a major in Bible. 

Two semesters. Four hours. 



COLLEGEDALE, TENNESSEE 47 



4. Gift of Prophecy and Denominational History. 

A study of the scriptural background of the Spirit of prophecy, its earliest revela- 
tions, its relation to the relisious development of the Hebrew race and to the rise 
and progress of the early christian church. A survey is made of the development 
of the Seventh-day Adventist church contemporary with the modern manifestation 
of the Spirit of prophecy. One semester. Two hours. 

5-6. Advanced Bible Doctrines. 

Those doctrines of the Holy Scriptures are stressed which are vital to Christian 
experience and which distinguish Christianity from other religions. Emphasis is 
placed upon the ethical implications of religious belief. This course fs especially 
valuable for those who plan to enter Christian service. Because of its advanced na- 
ture, a minimum of two years of preparatory Bible is highly desirable. 

Two semester. Six hours. 

7. Daniel. 

This Old Testament apocalypse is studied verse by verse to get the lessons appli- 
cable to the present day. Unrestricted class discussion of all points is encouraged. 
Considerable attention is given to the introduction; modern theories regarding 
the time, place, and authorship of the book are evaluated in the light of the best 
recent scholarship. This course offers an excellent opportunity for students to 
learn and apply correct methods of historical research. One semester. Two hours. 

8. Revelation. 

The Book of Revelation is studied in its entirety. Correct methods of interpretation 
are stressed; its deep spiritual values are searched and applied. Due emphasis 
is placed on those fundamental truths of the book which have always been prominent 
in the characteristic message of Seventh-day Adventists. There is cultivated a reverent 
and scholarly reserve regarding the exact details of unfulfilled prophecy, and an atti- 
tude of Christian tolerance toward those who hold varying opinions regarding non- 
essentials. One semester. Two hours. 

9-10. Pastoral Training. 

Emphasis is given to methods in personal evangelism and to the duties of a pastor. 
This course also includes the study of the principles that constitute the foundation 
for sermon preparation and delivery. Two semesters. Six hours. 

101. Teachings of Jesus. 

A study of the life and teachings of Jesus touching the vital points of faith and prac- 
tical experiences of the student. The Gospels, "Desire of Ages," and related 
material are used in this course. One semester. Three hours. 

102. New Testament Epistles. 

A study of the book of Acts and the Pauline epistles. Consideration is given to the 
circumstances under which each epistle was written and the special problems and 
teachings of each book. One semester. Three hours. 



48 SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGE 



104. Survey of Missions. 

A study of the growth of the missionary activity of God's church from the time of 
Christ to its present world-wide status. The problems, methods, and policies of mis- 
sion work, including actual foreign mission life, are considered. 

One semester. Two hours. 

SPEECH 

1. Public Speaking. 

The development of personal power through oral interpretation of masterpieces 
of literature, and through preparation and delivery of addresses,- correction of man- 
nerisms; development of effective mental, physical, and vocal habits of speaking and 
reading. One semester. Two hours. 

2. Public Speaking. 

A continuation of the preceding course, which is prerequisite to this. 

One semester. Two hours. 

3-4. Expression. 

This work is planned with a two-fold purpose: The first is the development of the 
speaking voice for private as well as public conversation; the second is the devel- 
opment of technique in voice, gesture, and poise for platform and public reading. 
Breath control, musical quality of voice and tone, systematic training for careful 
articulation, audibility, volume, reading of verse and prose, are some of the funda- 
mentals in this course. Individual instruction. 

At least one formal night recital is held each semester. 

Two semesters. No credit. 

101-102. Platform Personality. 

To develop personality and platform manners, and cultivate appreciation of the 
fine arts. Two semesters. Two hours. 




COLLEGEDALE, TENNESSEE 49 



ASSOCIATE IN ARTS 

first Year 



Composition and Rhetoric... 

Language 

Survey of European History- 
Religious Education 

Science 

Physical Education 



Language 

Religious Education.. 
Physical Education.... 
*Electives 



Hours 


of Credit 


Per 


Semester 


1st. 


2nd. 


3 


3 


4 


4 


3 


3 


2 


2 


3-4 


3-4 



Second Year 



3 


3 


2 


2 


H 


X 


11 


11 



Third Year 

Students entering college as juniors should counsel with their Faculty advisor or 
the registrar concerning their curriculum. 

Students who are preparing for the ministry, or who are planning to complete a 
four-year Liberal Arts Curriculum with majors in English, history, or language, should 
register in the Associate in Arts Curriculum. 

At the time of registration, students will be guided in the choice of electives by 
counsel with the Registrar and the teachers concerned. 

Students presenting credit for two years of high school French or Spanish need 
take only one additional year in the same language. 

Students having two years of ancient language only, will take two years of modern 
language. 

*The student is required to select at least one six-hour course from the following 
group: History, survey of English literature, economics, psychology, principles of 
education. 

*ln addition to the science studied during the first year, the student is required to 
select six hours of work from the following group: General chemistry, zoology, 
physiology, mathematics, physics, organic chemistry, bacteriology. It is recommended 
that the student's total work in science include one full year course of at least six 
hours in each of two of the following broad fields: Biological science, physical 
science, mathematics. It is generally advisable for the student to select a further six 
hours from one of the foregoing groups. 



50 SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGE 



*Special permission may be granted for a different selection of electives. As a 
general rule, however, such permission should not be granted to students who plan 
to attend a senior college and finish a course in the arts and sciences. Such permission 
may be granted for definite reasons to those students who do not plan to proceed 
beyond the fourteenth grade. 

THEOLOGICAL CURRICULUM 

First Year 

Hours of Credit 
Per Semester 
1st. 2nd. 

Composition and Rhetoric 3 3 

Public Speaking - 2 2 

Greek I.... 4 4 

Survey of Europe.. 3 3 

Daniel and Revelation 2 2 

Electives 2 2 

Physical Education Yi Yi 

Second Year 

Greek II 2 2 

Pastoral Training 3 3 

Bible Doctrines 3 3 

Music Conducting 1 1 

Science 3 3 

*Electives._ 4 4 

Physical Education Yi Yi 

Third Year 

Survey of Missions 2 

Teachings of Jesus 3 

Pauline Epistles 3 

Church History. 3 3 

Science or Mathematics 3 3 

Electives.— 7 5 

*Theological students are advised to elect Principles of Accounting in the second 
year. 



COLLEGEDALE, TENNESSEE 51 



BIBLE WORKERS' CURRICULUM 

First Year 



Composition and Rhetoric 

Public Speaking 

Survey of Europe 

Daniel and Revelation 

Gift of Prophecy and Denominational History- 
Health Principles 

Electives 

Physical Education - - 



Second Year 



American History 

Pastoral Training 

Bible Doctrines 

Principles of Education- 
Educational Psychology- 
Music Conducting 

Electives 



Physical Education.. 



Hours of Credit 
Per Semester 
1st. 2nd. 
3 3 


2 


2 


3 


3 


2 


2 


2 




1 


1 


3 


5 


H 


v% 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 






3 


1 


1 


3 


3 


H 


J* 



52 SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGE 



BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

First Year 



Composition and Rhetoric 

Religious Education 

Principles of Accounting 

Typewriting 

Electives 

Consumer's Economics, 2 
General Psychology, 2 



Second Year 



Hours of Credit 


Per Semester 


1st. 


2nd 


3 


3 


2 


2 


3 


3 


2 


2 


6 


6 



Religious Education 2 2 

Principles of Economics.. 2 2 

Intermediate and Cost Accounting 3 3 

Business Law 3 

Electives 6 9 

Third Year 

Applied Economics - 3 

Business Management 3 

*Business Teaching Methods 3 

Electives 13 10 

The student should consult his faculty advisor conserning the third year curriculum. 
*Required for those expecting to teach. 



COLLEGEDALE, TENNESSEE 53 



SECRETARIAL SCIENCE 

First Year 

Hours of Credit 
Per Semester 

1st. 2nd. 

Composition and Rhetoric 3 3 

Religious Education „. 2 2 

Shorthand 4 4 

Typewriting 2 2 

Electives 5 5 

Consumers Economics, 2 
General Psychology, 2 

Second Year 

Religious Education » 2 2 

Principles of Economics _ 2 2 

Principles of Accounting 3 3 

Advanced Dictation 3 3 

Secretarial Practice 3 3 

Business Law 3 

Electives _ 3 



54 



SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGE 



ELEMENTARY TEACHER TRAINING 

First Year 

Hours of credit 
per semester 
1st. 2nd. 

Composition and Rhetoric 3 3 

*Religious Education (Daniel and Revelation) 2 2 

Physiology 3 3 

Principles of Education 2 

Educational Psychology.. 3 

General Psychology 2 

Teaching of Arithmetic 2 

Children's Reading and Literature 2 

Art 2 

Teaching of Bible 1 

Health Principles 1 1 

Handwriting No Credit 

Physical Education J£ }/% 

Second Year 

American History 3 3 

Survey of American Literature 2 2 

Principles of Geography 3 

Geography of Latin America 3 

Technique of Teaching 2 

School Hygiene 2 

Nature 2 

Practical Arts 2 

School Music 2 

Directed Teaching 2 

*Gift of Prophecy 2 

Physical Education X A }/% 

*Students entering without credits in Bible will take Bible Survey for the first year, 
and Daniel and Revelation the second year. 



Certification 

A student finishing the teacher training curriculum as outlined, is granted a denom- 
national three-year elementary certificate. 

Students completing this course are also eligible to receive an elementary certifi- 
cate from the State of Tennessee. 



COLLEGEDALE, TENNESSEE 



55 



MUSIC 

First Year 

Hours of Credit 
Per Semester 
1st. 2nd. 

Daniel and Revelation 2 2 

Language. 5 5 

Composition and Rhetoric 3 3 

Harmony I and Ear Training 2 2 

Conducting and Sight Singing - 1 1 

Applied Music. 3 3 

Physical Education 3^ M 

Second Year 

Religious Education.— 2 2 

Language 3 3 

Harmony II and Ear Training 2 2 

History of Music and Appreciation 2 

Theory of Music and Appreciation 2 

Music Pedagogy 1 1 

Applied Music 4 4 

A Cappella Choir 1 1 

Elective 1 1 

Physical Education r A. V% 

Students presenting credit for two years of high school French or Spanish need take 
in college only one additional year in the same. An elective can be taken instead. 

Students having two years of ancient language only, will take two years of moden 
language. 

Students majoring in music are required to take two lessons a week with two hour's 
practice a day or ten hours a week. 



56 . SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGE 

SCIENCE 

First Year 

Hours of Credit 
Per Semester 
/ 1st 2nd 

'Composition and Rhetoric - 3 3 

•Religious Education 2 2 

** Chemistry 4 4 

Mathematics _ 3 3 

t^Electives other than Science 4 4 

Physical Education - J^ J3 

Serond Year 

Religious Education _ 2 2 

Organic Chemistry _ 4 4 

•Science Electives _ 8 8 

Electives other than Science 2 2 

Physical Education „. Y 2 % 

Students who are preparing for medicine, dentistry, nursing, dietetics or home 
economics, and science majors, should register in the science curriculum. 

Students preparing for medicine will elect mathematics, six hours; zoology, eight 
hours; physics, eight hours; constitutional history, two hours. 

Pre-medical students having no foreign language credit must take fifteen hours in 
French and present seventy-three semester hours of credit for graduation. 

Students presenting credit for two years of high school French or Spanish need 
take in college only one additional year in the same. 

Students having two years of ancient language only, will take two years of modern 
language. 

Students preparing for nursing will elect physiology, six hours; bacteriology, four 
hours; history of nursing, four hours; health principles, two hours. 

Students preparing for dietetics will elect constitutional history, two hours,- eco- 
nomics, five or six hours; foods and dietetics, six hours; principles of education, 
two hours; psychology, five hours; sociology, three hours, physiology, six hours- 

*Students looking forward to majoring in science will elect physical science, 
eight hours; biological science, eight hours. 



So-idU&ut Mi644ana/uf GoU&cje 



PREPARATORY DEPARTMENT 



1944-1945 



ACCREDITED BY: 

Seventh-day Adventist Board of Regents 

Tennessee State Department of Education 

Southern Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools 



58 SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGE 



College Pn&fuzsiatosuf, ^b&fiGAtme*t£ 

There is maintained as a separate department of the college a pre- 
paratory school corresponding to the four years of the standard high 
school. Students who are admitted to the college curriculums must 
complete a preparatory course as outlined below, or must present 
evidence that they have completed a four-year course in an accredited 
high school. Students whose preparatory work has been taken in un- 
accredited schools will be required to write entrance examinations as 
prescribed by the college. 

BIBLE 
Bible I — Early Church History. 

A connected study of the life of Christ as set forth in the four gospels, and the 
study of the history of the early Christian church as given in the Acts of the Apostles. 

Two semesters. One unit. 
Bible II — Ancient Hebrew History. 

This course deals with the history and literature of the Hebrew race from creation 
to the end of the Babylonian captivity, as set forth in the Old Testament Scriptures. 

Two semesters. One unit. 

Bible III — Denominational History and Christian Ethics. 

An elementary study of the great epochs and movements of church history, with 
special attention to the rise and development of the Seventh-day Adventist denomina- 
tion, followed by a study of social ethics from the Christian viewpoint. Mrs. E. G. 
White's "Messages to Young People" is the basis of this latter work. 

Two semesters. One unit. 
Bible IV— Bible Doctrines. 

A clear, concise outline of the fundamental doctrines of the Bible. Special 
attention is given to the unity and harmony of the doctrines taught in both the Old 
and the New Testament. Two semesters. One unit. 

COMMERCE 

Bookkeeping. 

This course begins with the rudiments of the subject, and develops step by step 
into double-entry bookkeeping. The pupil becomes familiar with the use of receipts, 
checks, notes, drafts, and invoices. He learns how to journalize and explain trans- 
actions; to post from journal and cash book to ledger; to take trial balances; to make 
out financial statements; and to close and rule ledger accounts. Five recitations, five 
laboratory periods. Two semesters. One unit. 



COLLEGEDALE, TENNESSEE 59 



General Business. 

A course in general business training designed to yield the following outcomes: 
ability to handle personal business affairs,- more satisfactory choice of a vocation,- 
preparation for vocational study; try-out and exploratory experiences; social under- 
standing; and civic intelligence. Two semesters. One unit. 

Typewriting. 

Theory and practice of touch typing is taught. Secretarial typing is studied in detail. 
Five recitations, five laboratory periods. Two semesters. One unit. 

ENGLISH 

English I. 

A review of English grammar, drill in correct English habits, the fundamentals of 
composition, frequent themes and speeches, class study of selected literary classics, 
and cultivation of the habit of reading worth-while books. Six lessons in the use 
of the library are included. Two semesters. One unit. 

English II. 

A continuation of English I with the work more advanced in character. Six more 
lessons in the use of the library are included. Two semesters. One unit. 

English III. 

The work in English III is devoted to the field of English literature, to oral com- 
position, and to the elimination of fundamental errors in the use of language. Col- 
lateral reading is required. Two semesters. One unit. 

English IV. 

The greater part of this course is devoted to American literature with an outline 
survey of its history. The remainder is given to an advanced study of grammar, 
language structure, and oral composition. Collateral reading is required. 

Two semesters. One unit. 

HISTORY 

World History. 

The aim of this course is to introduce the student to a historical view of life. 
The great characters and movements of world history will be evaluated from the 
Christian point of view. Two semesters. One unit. 

American History and Problems of Democracy. 

Consideration will be given to the important phases of our colonial and national 
governments, the principles upon which they were founded, the relations and func- 
tions of their various departments, and our individual duties and privileges as American 
citizens. Two semesters. One unit. 



60 SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGE 



HOME ECONOMICS 

Home Economics. 

The house, its selection and care; home courtesies; personal grooming; selection 
and care of clothing; construction oF simple garments; the normal diet; preparation 
and serving of breakfasts, suppers, and luncheons. Five double periods a week. 

Two semesters. One unit. 
Home Economics II. 

The planning, preparation and serving of dinner; budgets and accounts; financing 
and care of the home; construction of an afternoon and a tailored dress; child care; 
invalid cookery. Five double periods a week. Two semesters. One unit. 

INDUSTRIAL ARTS 

Manual Training I. 

Includes drafting, cabinet work, and wood turning. Drafting: The use and care 
of drafting room equipment, lettering, conventions, projection drawings, and the 
making of blue prints. Cabinet work: The work will consist of some simple models 
involving the elements of joinery, besides a more elaborate piece of furniture which 
has been designed by the student and made from his own drawings. Wood turning: 
Simple spindle and face-plate turning including table legs, candlesticks, and trays. 

Two semesters. One unit. 
Manual Training II. 

Continues the work of Manual Training I with the addition of simple carpentry. 

Drafting: Projection drawing, including sections and developments, isometric 
drawing, and plans and elevations for a simple building. Cabinet work: More 
difficult projects will be undertaken by students of the second year. Working draw- 
ings must be made by the student of all projects to be made in the shop. Wood turn- 
ing: Advanced projects in face-plate turning, spindle turning, and projects in- 
volving the use of the chuck. Carpentry: Simple roof construction, window framing, 
door construction, stair building, uses of the steel square, a brief study of lumbering, 
and estimating quantities and costs. Two semesters. One unit. 

Printing I. 

A study of general principles, including proof reading, type calculations, straight 
hand and job composition. The laboratory work will consist of hand composition, 
with an introduction to the feeding of platen presses. It is expected that the student 
will develop speed and accuracy in composition work. Five double periods a 
week. Two semesters. One unit 

Printing II. 

Composition of advertising, advanced job composition, a careful study of the care 
and operation of the platen press, locking up forms, imposition. The student is re- 
quired to develop a satisfactory degree of speed and accuracy in platen press work. 
Five double periods a week. Two semesters. One unit. 



COLLEGEDALE, TENNESSEE 61 

LANGUAGES 

French II. 

Grammar, reading, composition and conversation. 

Given on demand. Two semesters. One unit. 

Latin i 

A beginner's course in Latin. Drill in vocabulary, grammar, and syntax. Translation 
from English to Latin and Latin to English. Emphasis is placed upon the relation 
between the Latin and English. Two semesters. One unit. 

Latin II. 

The early part of the course is devoted to a review of principles of Latin I. Transla- 
tion and drill in syntax. Two semesters. One unit. 

Spanish I. 

A beginner's course, with drill in grammar, principles of pronunciation, and eas> 
reading. Two semesters. One unit. 

Spanish II. 

Review of fundamental principles, intermediate Spanish reading, and composition- 
Two semesters. One unit. 

MATHEMATICS 

Algebra I. 

Fundamental operations: integral equations; factoring,- fractions,- simultaneous 
equations with graphs; involution and evolution; theory of exponents; quadratics. 

Two semesters. One unit. 

Algebra II. 

A rapid review of the principles of Algebra l ; continuation of algebra to include 
surds, simultaneous quadratics, progressions, logarithms, infinite series, binomial 
theorem, permutations and combinations. Two semesters. One unit. 

Plane Geometry. 

Prerequisite: Algebra I. The five books of plane geometry are covered thoroughly 
A large number of original problems is required. Close attention is given to the 
logical development of every proof, and special emphasis is placed upon individual 
reasoning. Two semesters. One unit. 

MUSIC 

Students who desire may select music as an elective in the College Preparatory 
Curriculum, but not more than two units will be accepted toward graduation. 



62 SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGE 



Students who are looking toward a music major upon entering college are 
strongly urged to take one or both of these courses. 

Music I. 

For credit in Music I in the College Preparatory Curriculum, the student must 
complete the following: 

(a) Applied Music: Upon recommendation of the music director, a student may 
receive credit for piano, voice, or violin. A voice and violin student must have 
the equivalent of one year of piano, or be required to study piano during his Music 
I course. 

(b) Music Theory: Four forty-five minute periods a week for thirty-six weeks. Music 
fundamentals and harmony. 

(c) Either Orchestra orChorus: One period of at least forty-five minutes a week 
for thirty-six weeks. Two semesters. One unit. 

Music II. 

For credit in Music II in the College Preparatory Curriculum, the student must 
complete the following: 

(a) Applied Music: An additional year of piano, voice, or violin — one lesson each 
week. 

(b) Music Appreciation and History: Four forty-five minute periods a week for 
eighteen weeks. Harmony the second semester. 

(c) Either Orchestra or Chorus: Two periods a week for thirty-six weeks. 

Two semesters. One unit. 

SCIENCE 
Biology. 

The course in biology includes a study of the leading divisions in the animal and 
the plant kingdom. An intensive study is made of typical representatives, and a 
more general study of related forms, with a view to discovering the chief character- 
istics of each division. The morphology and physiology of plants is stressed, and 
extensive experimental and microscopic work is required. In zoology a fairly complete 
life history of each type studied is presented, and includes: food habits, mode of 
locomotion, sense organs and nervous system, processes of digestion, circulation 
and respiration, environmental relationships. The adaptation of plants and animals 
to their surroundings is stressed throughout the course. Three recitations, two labora- 
tory periods a week. Two semesters. One unit. 

Chemistry. 

An elementary course covering the chemistry of the common non-metallic elements 
fundamental theories and laws of chemistry. Introduction to the chemistry of the com- 
mon metals and their compounds. Three recitations, two laboratory periods a week. 

Two semesters. One unit 



COLLEGEDALE, TENNESSEE 



63 



Physics- 

Prerequisite: algebra and plane geometry. This course consists of recitations, 
laboratory work, and classroom demonstration. The mechanics of fluids and solids, 
heat, molecular physics, sound, light, magnetism, and electricity are studied. Three 
recitations, two laboratory periods a week. 

Two semesters. One unit. 




<34 



SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGE 



COLLEGE PREPARATORY CURRICULUM 



Grade Nine 



English I 

Algebra I 

Biology 

Early Church History 



Grade Ten 



English II 
World History 
Ancient Hebrew History 
Elect one unit: 

■ "Home Economics 

Manual Training I 

Algebra II 

Musicl 



Grade Eleven 



English III 

Language I 

Geometry 

Elect one unit: 

**Biblelll 

Home Economics II 
Manual Training II 
Music I or II 
Printing I or II 
Bookkeeping 
General Business 
Chemistry 
Physics 
Typewriting 



Grade Twelve 

English IV 

Language II 

American History and Problems of Democracy 

Bible IV 



•Required of girls. 

** Required of students transferring to this grade from non-Adventist secondary 
schools. 

Physical Education is required each year. 



COLLEGEDALE, TENNESSEE 



65 



It is essential that students make a careful selection of the elective courses 
which form a part of the College Preparatory Curriculum. The student should de- 
termine, if possible, by the beginning of the third year what his life work is to be, 
so that at the time of registration he can be advised what electives to choose in 
order to coordinate properly his preparatory course with the college work which 
he may plan to take later. 




66 



SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGL 



GRADUATES OF 1944 



Ruby John Aikman 
Leonard Lamar Bretcher 
Mary Elizabeth Brooke 
Chalmer Chastain, Jr. 
Joseph Archie Crews 
Georgette Marie Damon 
Harriet Russell Echols 
James Leonard Evans 
James Frederick Ford 
George Virley Fuller 

Elouise 



Junior College Seniors 

Ellen Marie Guinn 
Claudin'e W. Hopkins 
Mattie (Catherine Kessell 
Pansy Penelopa Parker 
Alice Mae Perkins 
Grace Marie Schneider 
Elizabeth Jane Summerour 
Lula Ann Tunison 
Clarence D. Wellman 
June Loraine Wright 
Carlton Wynn 



College Preparatory 



Roland S. Blackburn 
Betty Jane Bottomley 
Leta Evelyn Brown 
Helen Barbara Chase 
John DeNoyer 
Margarita Leonor Dietel 
Corinne Winifred Dortch 
Muriel Ann Falkner 
Mynatt Godsey 
Bonnie Imogene Gordon 



Melvin G. Hickman 
Olena Johnson 
Mary Sue Keele 
Beatrice Oletha Manuel 
Wilma Hope Pearman 
Naomi Alpha Smith 
Alice Marie Umlauf 
Elizabeth Ann Walters 
Thetis Lenore Webster 
Harold Lee Wood 



Theresa Carolyn Haskins 



Alease Eugenia Benbow 
Lucille Marthine Bliss 
Mildred Bullock 
Jov Vida Caldwell 



Pre-Nursing 



Sara Mae Conger 
Margie Harrelson 
Marian Miles 
Mildred Virginia Moore 



Byrl Arlyn Clayton 



INDEX 



Absences 1 4 

Accounts, Payment of 25 

Accreditation 1 1 

Admission Requirements 12 

Aims 9 

Agriculture Courses 33 

Associate in Arts Curriculum 49 

Auditing Classes 16 

Bible Courses, Preparatory 58 

Bible Workers' Curriculum _ 51 

Biology Courses, College 34 

Board... 25 

Board of Trustees 4 

Book Rental Plan 30 

Business Administration Courses 34 

Business Administration Curriculum 52 

Calendar for College Year 2 

Calendar of Events 3 

Cash Withdrawals 30 

Change of Program 14,26 

Charges for Music 24 

Chemistry Courses 36 

College Entrance Requirements 12 

College Preparatory Curriculum 64 

College Preparatary Dept 58 

Colporteur Scholarships 27 

Commerce Courses, Preparatory 58 

Committees of Faculty 8 

Correspondence Work 17 

Courses of Instruction 33 

Credit Evaluation 16 

Dentistry 56 

Deposit on Entrance 19 

Dietetics 56 

Diplomas 23 

Discounts 25 

Education Courses 36 

Educational Fund.... 28 

Elementary Teacher's Curriculum 54 

Employment of Students 29 

English Courses, Preparatory School.. 59 
English Language and Literature 

Courses, College 39 

Entrance Deposit 19 

Examinations 16,25 

Excuses 1 4 

Executive Committee 4 

Expenses 19-23, 26 

Expression 48 

Extension Courses 17 

Extra-Curricular Activities 17 

Faculty 6 

Federal Fair Labor Standards Act.... 24 

Fees 23 

Financial Plans 20,22 

General Academic Regulations 12 

Grades 1 5 

Graduation Requirements 17 

Health Education, Courses 40 

History of School 9 

History Courses, College 40 

History Courses, Preparatory 59 



Home Economics Courses, College.. 41 

Home Economics Courses, Prep 60 

Honors Diplomas 16 

Industrial Arts, Preparatory School.... 60 

Incompletes 16 

Junior Class Requirements 18 

Lab^r 29 

Language Courses, College 42 

Language Courses, Preparatory.. 61 

Library Science Courses 43 

Location of School 10 

Manual Training, Preparatory 60 

Mathematics Courses, College—..;— 43 
Mathematics Courses, Preparatory—. 61 

Medicine 56 

Music Charges 24 

Music Courses, College 44 

Music Courses, Preparatory School.. 61 

Music Curriculum, College 55 

Nursing 56 

Officers of Administration 5 

Payments of Accounts 25 

Physical Education Courses-- 16 

Physics Courses, College 46 

Printing Courses, Preparatory School 60 

Private Lessons 23 

Public Speaking 48 

Purpose 10 

Quality Points 15 

Ration Books 26 

Refunds 23 

Registration 1 2 

Regulations, General Academic 12 

Registration, Late 12 

Requirements for Admission 12 

Requirements for B. A. degree 31 

Requirements for Graduation 17 

School Home Charges... 24 

Scholarships 27 

Science Curriculum 56 

Science, Preparatory School 62 

Secretarial Science Curriculum 53 

"Semester-hour" Defined 16 

Sociology 40 

Speech 48 

Standing Committees of Faculty 8 

Student Load 13 

Summer Session.. 17 

Summary of Curriculums 49 

Summer School Graduates 18 

System of Grading 15 

Teacher Training Curriculum 54 

Theological Courses, College .-- 46 

Theological Curriculum - 50 

Transcripts 1 3 

Transportation 23 

Tuition, Elementary Department 21 

Tuition, Preparatory 21 

Tuition, Collegiate 21 

Tuition Scholarships 27 

"Unit" of Credit Defined- 16 

Vocational Supervisors 5 



For Reference 

Not to be taken 
from this library 



SOUTHERN COLLEGE MCKEE LIBRARY 




FROM LIBRARY 

m