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Full text of "Souvenir Album of Lake County, Indiana (1906)"

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SOUVENIR ALBUM 

OF LAKE COUNTY 



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Che faculty 




R. C. KING 



e. e. woo: COCK 




HE above photographs present to you the photographer and the printer, who, combining their respective 
experiences of the two arts, have originated, planned and published this unique "Souvenir Album of 
Lake County." Their efforts have not been attained without some obstacles and difficulties, as the under- 
taking seemed a large one to many, but the presentation of the album itself demonstrates that no 
undertaking is so great but what it can be accomplished if properly managed and the confidence of the people is 
secured, all of which has been done in the publication of the album, The modest price of seventy-five cents has been 
made in order that an album may enter every household in Lake County, and the hope of its publishers is that it will be 
fully appreciated for its merits and that the already large demand for copies of it will not cease until all have been supplied. 



INTRODUCTION 




HE "Souvenir Album" does not claim to be an encyclopedia; its authors did not aspire to produce a ponderous history of Lake County. It has tried 
to avoid dreariness and prolixity; to be brief, readable, pleasing, correct; to give the main facts and salient features of this large county; to bring to 
light obscure and interesting things; to paint in light, quick strokes, deftly and interestingly, by pen and camera. 

It tries to show what God has done in Nature, and what men have accomplished, by thought, by enterprise, by perseverance, in industry, in 
education, in art, in commerce, in agriculture, in religion. All these spheres are good and useful. We have tried not to exalt one at the expense of 
the other; to help everybody appreciate them all. For this reason we do not here separate art from industry, religion from trade, play from labor. 
They are all represented on the same pages as they go in life — hand in hand — each supporting, beautifying the other. 

We ask the readers to look at them all — the views, the cuts, the readings, the displays and the advertisements. They represent the work of the same people, 
for the same one great purpose — to make a better country, a happier, richer citizenship. We have shown the same interest and bestowed the same care in 
photographing and writing up a store, a business, a factory, a schoolhouse or a church, because they are all needed in life's broad field. The tact and energy of 
our merchants, manufacturers or politicians are as essential as the devotion and piety of our pastors or the faithfulness of our teachers, and we gladly give them like 
space and care in our "Album." 

This is a unique book; the only one of its kind in Lake County. Buy it; read it; judge it kindly; get one for your friends and send it to them. If they have 
ever been or lived in Lake County they will like it and thank you. 

It is the work of three young men. Their capital is their brains, their pluck and good will; and the kind treatment and generous response of all who have been 
asked to help and have done it. For those we thank Heaven; for this last we thank you. 
If you like the Album, tell your friends and tell us, too. It will help us all. 

We wish to thank especially Mr. Vilmer and Mr. Hay ward, photographers of Crown Point, for their generous loans of several of their fine photographs, 
which many will recognize in our Album. No one can do his life-work alone. We are all dependent on others. We have used what we could and needed of 
the labor of others in the production of this compendium, and we here acknowledge our debt of gratitude to the helpers too numerous to give their names. If the 
reader is one, we mean him. 

E. E. WOODCOCK, Printer. 
CLYDE R. KING, Field Artist. 



— 3- 



LAKE COUNTY 



Lake County was first settled at its highest point of altitude 
on the little Fancher Lake, which is now the center of the Lake 
County Fair Grounds, near Crown Point. This was in 1834. Almost 
simultaneously the "Yankee" or West Creek settlement was started, 
a few miles west of Lowell. The first families were the Fancher, 
Wilson, Hornor, Robinson, Childers, Clark and others. The first 
Court of Justice in Lake County was organized in 1886. The town 
of Liverpool became its first County Seat, but existed only on paper. 
The same year the first postoffice was established at Lake Court 
Flouse, in the store of Solon Robinson, the first store in the county. 
The proceeds of the postoffice for the first three months were $15.00, 
at 25 cents per letter. It all went to paying the postmaster and mail 
carrier vested in one man, Solon Robinson. 

The county was organized in March, 1837. Its first officers 
were: Henry Wells, Sheriff; Solon Robinson, Clerk; William Holton, 
Recorder; William Crooks and William Clark, Judges; Amasi Ball, 
Thomas Wells and Stringham were its first Commissioners. The 
first regular physician of Lake County was Dr. H. D. Palmer. Relig- 
ious services were first held at Solon Robinson's home. The first 
church buildings erected in the county were the M. E. Church in West 
Creek, and the Roman Catholic at St. John, in 1843. The first formal 
organization on record in the county was the Methodist class at 
Pleasant Grove. In 1838 Congress established two mail routes through 
the county — from Laporte to Joliet through Lake Court, now Crown 
Point. The first sawmills were built by Walton, Wood, Dustin and 
Taylor. The northern end of the county furnished much of the pine 
to build Chicago, by being stolen. 

Bridge building began in 1838 over West Creek and Cedar 
Creek; five were built that year for $1,500. In 1839 the County Seat 
became located at Crown Point, where it has been ever since. The 
population of the county was then 1,463. In 1843 the scarlet fever 
entered Crown Point, and brought about the selection of a special 
ground for the first cemetery of the county. 

In 1844 the first Presbyterian Church was organized at Crown 
Point with eighteen members. Two years later, the Methodists and 
Presbyterians both erected their first brick church. 

In 1847, thirteen years after its first settlement, Lake County 



had seven postoffices, five sawmills, two grist-mills, five church 
buildings, five stores, about fifty frame houses, and many more less 
pretentious log houses. There were two lawyers, seven physicians, 
fifteen justices of the peace, five local ministers, one circuit preacher, 
and one Presbyterian preacher. The first railroad to enter Lake 
County was the Michigan Central, in 1851. 

ACHIEVEMENTS 

Lake County has now a population of about 75,000. It has 
twenty-two railroads passing within its boundaries, with a total 
mileage of about 350 miles of main track and 200 miles of side track — 
more than other county in the State. These railroads are assessed 
at $20,000 per mile of roadbed. 

There are about $1,000,000 worth of graveled road in the 
county. There are sixty-six church buildings, and about the same 
number of ministers and priests; one hundred and twenty school- 
houses, two hundred teachers, one hundred physicians, fifty attorneys, 
and fourteen banks. 

Lake County has a taxable property of $34,000,000 ; the appro- 
priation for the running expenses for 1907 is $90,000. It stands at 
the head of all the counties in the State in manufacturing and rail- 
roads, two-thirds of its taxes being derived from these sources. The 
northern portion of the county is best located for manufactures, and 
the southern portion is finest for agriculture. 

The early history of Lake County owes much to the quality 
of its immigrants from New England, for its thrift and intelligence. 
Later on have come other nationalities — German, Bohemian, Irish, 
Swedes, Norwegians, Poles — which by admixture have strengthened, 
enriched and varied the population. 

SOME NOTABLE FEATURES OF LAKE COUNTY 

Lake County has the largest printing and book-binding estab- 
lishment in the world — the Conkey plant at Hammond; the largest 
surgical instrument manufacturing establishment in the world — the 
Betz plant at Hammond; the largest oil refinery in the world — the 



-4^. 



Standard Oil refinery at Whiting; the largest steel plant in the world; 
the two smallest men in the world — the dw.arfs exhibited by Mr. 
Rossow, and the best equipped distillery in the United States, with a 
capacity of 25,000 gallons, located in Hammond. It has the longest 
mileage of railroads of any county in the State; the only self-support- 
ing Boor Farm in the State ; the largest porous tile (terra cotta) fac- 
tory in the State, if not in the country. It has the greatest variety 
and number of manufacturing plants of any county in the State, 
Marion not included. It has the most lake coast, and the best harbor 
of any county in the State. It is the longest county in the State, 
though Vermilion, Knox and Jasper rank close with it in this respect. 
It has one of the largest and most varied foreign-born populations 
of any county in the State. It is the nearest Chicago of any county 
in the State. 

LAKE COUNTY POOR FARM 

No condition of life appeals more strongly to the heart of 
humanity than when, the strength of life having been spent in its 
battles for sustenance and position, life's evening shadows at last 
creep around the combatant, desolate, forsaken and homeless. It is 
to prevent, or at least to ameliorate, such conditions that County 
Poor Farms have been established by statute, and that they are sup- 
ported by the contributions of common citizenship, through taxation. 

Yet the thing that is meant in good, and is the child of noble 
impulse, has been made to result in much evil in practice, and to 
become father to crying abuses. Newspapers, reformers and men of 
honor, heart and courage in high places, have exposed and rebuked 
the abuses that had grown in connnection with the management of 
Poor Farms. They have told how in almost every county in our 
fair State old people were treated neglectfully and shamefully. 

This happily cannot be said of Lake County's Poor Farm. 
Especially during the present administration, which dates from 1898, 
the Farm has made a splendid record, thanks to the humane, sympa- 
thetic, vigilant and business-like management of the big-hearted 
superintendent, Erehart Bixenman, and his noble wife. 

There are, at present writing, 44 inmates in the Lake County 
Poor Farm, ranging in ages from 48 to 95, six of them" being women. 
The fine farm of 310 acres is located four miles directly east of 
Crown Point, on a good gravel road. It has seventy acres of good 



timber, 120 under profitable cultivation; the rest in pasture and pleas- 
ure or ornamental grounds. It is kept strictly neat and productive, 
and is so well managed that it pays its expenses. This can scarcely 
be said of any other Poor Farm in the State. The residence for 
inmates was erected in 1884; it costs $5,000 per year for maintenance. 
It is thoroughly modernized in construction, and two men and two 
women are employed to keep it in attractive order. There are extensive 
barns, horse and cattle sheds, all kept with the same systematic 
care, Mr. Bixenman being himself the hardest worker of all 

The inmates are greatly attached to their "home." The eldest, 
95, has it for her routine to set the table for the inmates, and is as 
jealous and proud of her care as if she were appointed first maid in 
the White Plouse. Mr. Bixenman is as attentive and courteous to 
visitors as he is considerate to inmates, and faithful to his public 
trust. 

FIRST SCHOOL HOUSE OF LAKE COUNTY 

This school house was built in the early spring of 1838, in the 
dawn of the history of Lake County. It was located near the west 
bank of Cedar Creek, on the old Ditmar farm. At the last account 
it served the less dignified purpose of housing horses. Two other 
school houses were built that year in Lake County that dispute its 
right to priority. Hewn logs were its masonry ; the puncheon floor, 
the split log bench against the wails, a slanting board for a teacher's 
desk, a large, smoking chimney, and a screeching door constituted 
its outfit of furniture. Its library consisted principally of blue-back 
spelling books, some worn readers, a dull geography recited in chanted 
lessons, an incomprehensible grammar, and a few broken slates. Its 
first teacher was Mrs. J. A. Ball, mother of Rev T. H. Ball, who, 
depite the care of her home and her own family of five children, found 
time to instruct the budding generation of early Lake County. 

This was before the days of elaborate equipments. There 
were no teachers' institute or licenses then ; no dreaded examinations 
for children or teachers. The curiculum consisted chiefly of the three 
R's — Readin', Ritin' and 'Rithmetic, to the Rule of Three. The grad- 
uating exercises were a "spell-down" exercise of the whole school, 
or quitting by the boys in order to husk corn. 

Out of these primitive schools came those who have attained 
to fame, to greatness, and to true goodness of citizenship. 



CROWN POINT 

Since 1839 Crown Point has been the seat of government for 
Lake County. It stands highest in altitude of any town in the county 
and almost of any in the State, being situated on the Great Divide. 
A shower of rain falling within a mile of Crown Poinl may divide its 
course, till a part will find its way through streams and rivers to the 
Gulf of Mexico, and reappear in sparkling dew on the waving fields of 
Southern plantations ; while the other part of the shower, coursing in 
the opposite direction, will merge with the waters of the Great Lakes, 
plunge with the roaring waters of the Niagara, join the waters of the 





r 



LAKE COUNTY S NEW COURT HOUSE 



St. Lawrence and become crystallized into the icebergs of the Hudson 
Bay. 

Crown Point is essentially a city of homes. Several of its 
broad streets are lined with attractive, elegant residences. It is sup- 
plied with solid banks, well stocked stores of all kinds, good hotels, 
neat churches, large school buildings and a fine court house in the 
center of the city. 



LAKE COUNTY'S OLD COURT HOUSE 



— 6- 





BOARD OF EDUCATION — TOWNSHIP TRUSTEES 
Reading from left to right are: 



Alvin Wild— Ilobart Township. 
C. E. Black— Eagle Creek Township 
W. A. Weis— St. John Township. 
Wm. Kunert — Calumet Township. 
Richard Schaaf— North Township 



IT. Wor ley— Cedar Creek Township. 
W. Wood — Ross Township. 
Fukd Mondernach — Hanover Township. 
Chas. Westboy— Winfieltl Township. 
H. Hathaway — West Creek Township. 



W. R. Curtis— County Superintendent.! C. IT. Meeker— Center Township 



COUNTY OFFICIALS 



Reading from left to right are: 

R. W. Curtis— Superintendent. 

L. E. Bailey — Treasurer. 

D. E. Boone— Prosecuting Attorney. 

MaTHEw Brown — Commissioner 3d Dist. 

Chas. Johnson — Auditor. 

O. A. Krinhill — Commissioner 1st Dist. 

Chas. DauGHERTY — Sheriff. 

W. F. Bridge — Surveyor. 

IT. IT. Wheeler— Clerk. 

John Agnew— Deputy Sheriff. 

S. E. Love — Commissioner 2d Dist. 

H. E. Jones— Recorder. 

Wm. McM ah an— Circuit Judge. 

Chas. Hoskins — Coroner. 



-7- 



CROWN POINT COURT HOUSE 



Crown Point has had four court houses. The first two were 
log buildings, and have disappeared from history and largely from 
memory. The third was a frame building- erected in 1849. Its dimen- 
sions were large for the day — 67x37, and .27 ft. high. There were 
three rooms, one for the court, one for the sheriffs, and the jury 
room. Its architect, George Earl, was allowed $15.00 for drawing 
the plans. The total cost was $10,000. Our artist shows a good view 
of the setting of buildings connected with it. The one on the left was 
used for the recorder and the clerk. The one on the right was used for 
the auditorship and county treasury. This office was blown up by 





A FEW OF CROWN POINTS CHURCHES 

malfaisants who sought to rob it of the $60,000 it contained at the 
time, money stored there for the erection of the new and present 
court house. The building was wrecked, but the money was saved. 
In 1879 the present fine stone court house was erected. What thril- 
ling stories of misdemeanors and crimes, of stern prosecution and 



HIGH SCHOOL BUILDING 



eloquent defense, of learned exposition, and shrewd application of 
law, and of stirring debates where lives or fortunes were at stake, 
these court house walls could tell, if ashes and stones could relate 
sixty years of history which they have witnessed ! 

SOLON ROBINSON 

One of the men who most powerfully moulded the early political, 
social and religious life of Lake County was Solon Robinson, whose 
splendid bust is here reproduced. Strength and honesty stand out 
prominently in his masculine features as they did in his long, mastei- 
ful life. He was a New Englander by birth. He became one of Lake 
County's energetic pioneers. He made its first map, was its first post- 
master and mail carrier; was its first clerk, and one of its early justices 





LAKE COUNTY JAIL 

of the peace. He wrote much, and was prominently connected with 
all movements for the development of Lake County. He was the 
founder of Crown Point. 

FAIR GROUNDS AND RACE TRACK 

Lake County possesses one of the rare fair grounds which 
Nature herself made ready for man and admirably adapted it to its 
purpose. In its hollowed center is set the beautiful and deep Fancher 
Lake. Around it is the race track, and surrounding this a range of 



LAKE COUNTY ALMSHOUSE 



wooded, gently sloping hills, forming an amphitheater of the exact 
dimensions and incline required. The fair grounds are the scene of 
yearly increasing annual gatherings since its origin in 1858. Its at- 
tendance in 1906 reached in one day to more than 10,000 paid admis- 
sions. 

FIRE DEPARTMENT 

The fire department, of which we present a group, is one of 
Crown Point's prides. It carried the honors in the hose race for the 
county in 190G. 





STREET SCENE WEST SIDE OE PUBLIC SQUARE 



STREET SCENE EAST SIDE OF PUBLIC SQUARE 

BOARD OF EDUCATION 

The Lake County board of education is composed of twelve 
members — eleven trustees and a county superintendent. The cut 
gives a good likeness of them all, with their names. 

LAKE COUNTY JAIL 

This is one building which is best filled when it is entirely 
empty. 

GROUP OF YOUNG LADIES 

From Crown Point have gone daughters of its homes to fill 
important spheres, as wives of physicians, attorneys, consuls, min- 
isters, educators, tradesmen, agriculturists. 



10- 



Refinement, education, womanliness and worth 
are the traits that have attracted to Crown Point men of 
merit. We give here one group of Crown Point's noble 
daughters. 

HIGH SCHOOL 

Crown Point's high school is less noted for the 
material and architecture of its structure, which are not 
of to-day, than for the material which it turns out in pre- 
pared young manhood and womanhood. Its pupils pass 
from its walls to higher schools, or enter the world of 
business and responsibility better prepared for their 
training therein. 




GROUP OF POPULAR YOUNG LADIES OF CROWN POINT 

COUNTY OFFICIALS 

The officers of Lake County, which we present in one group, 
are all young, energetic men, who have won their places by demon- 
strated fitness for it. 

Melvin A. Halsted was born on the Hudson River, in the State 
of New York, in 1821. At sixteen he left high school to strike out 
for the then great West, and fixed his residence in Dayton, Ohio, then 
a small town. In 1845, he left the Miami valley for Lake County, 
where land was cheaper. Here he platted and founded Lowell, nam- 
ing it after its namesake of New England, a city with its waterfalls 
and mills, because he partly found and partly created like conditions 
here. He constructed and ran the first sawmill and grist mill by 
water and stream, and he burnt the first brick, out of which both 
the first church and the first schoolhouse were erected in Lowell, 
amid many discouragements. In the season when he was raging he 



RACK TRACK AND FAIR GROUNDS AT CROWN POINT 



-11 




took the California gold fever and 
crossed the continent ten different 
times overland and by way of Panama 
through many privations. He was a 
leader in every enterprise and improve- 
ment of the town, and country, a man 
of irrepressible activity. Faithful to 
his pioneer instinct, after marrying a 
second time, he moved in 1906 to the 
new part of Nebraska, where, near the 
town of Harrison, he is making a home 
on 640 acres of raw land at the ripe 
age of eighty-six years. 

Rev. Timonthy Horton Ball was born 
in West Springfield, now Agawam, 
Mass., in 1826. His father brought 
the family to Lake County in 1837, 
settling on the west side of Cedar 
Lake. The most of his long life has 
been spent in Lake County in preach- 
ing and writing. He served a num- 
ber of Baptist congregations and has 
written for every paper published in 
the county. He is the author of 
several works of local history and biog- 
raphy. He was married to Martha 
C. Creighton, of Alabama, in 1855, and 
is now revered by two children and 
as many grandchildren. A fuller his- 
tory appears in his History of Lake 
County. 



CROWN POINT FIREMEN 



12 — 



THE FOUNDER OF CROWN TOINT 




SOLON ROBINSON 




Om MM. 





FIRST SCHOOLHUUSE IN THE COUNTY 



GROUP OF LAKE COUNTY PIONEERS 



Top Row. The couple to the left are Rev, T. H. 
Ball and Mrs. Ball, both pioneers and both connected 
with the early educational work of Lake County. 
They live in Crown Point. 

The next to the right is Joseph Schillo, a pioneer 
who settled near Hobart in 1843. He was born in 
Germany in 1828. He has many interesting reminis- 
cences of early life "in the woods" about Hobart. 

The next to the right is C. W. Spencer, who came 
to Lake County in 1847. He is still in business, a reli- 
able, interesting music dealer. 

The last to the right is John Millikan, the oldest 
Odd Fellow in the State and once editor of the Croivn 
Point Register. 



Lowkr Row. Beginning at the left is Melvin A. 
Halsted, whose biography appears more extensively 
written in this album. 

The pair in the center are Wellington Clark and 
his wife. He was born in New York State, in 1815; 
moved to Lake County in 1837. He crossed Chicago 
when it was still an unpromising group of squatty 
houses. He is still in business at a ripe age, and the 
companion of his early age is at his side. 

The last to the right is B. B. Bale, who taught the 
first Sunday-school in Hobart in 1866. 



13- 



HAMMOND 

Rubbing elbows with Chicago, its great and near neighbor, this city 
of northern Indiana, with its 20,000 inhabitants, has been, for some time 
past, shouldering the surplus of industrial burden, which the great Illinois 
metropolis could no longer carry alone. Everywhere about Hammond 
the hum of the industrial wheel can be heard. Each morning the long chains 
of toilers can be seen going towards, and each evening issuing from, the varied 
places of busy employment. 

Although happily located for manufacturing and shipping facilities, 
Hammond did not fall heir to its industries by mere chance. Like all good 
things, they came by wise, persistent, energetic efforts. It is the people of 
Hammond that have made it the humming city that it is. Some years ago a 





CROUP OF HAMMONDS MAYORS SINCE CITY ORGANIZATION 



SUPERIOR COURT BUILDING 



14- 






large packing house thought best to remove its plant elsewhere. It was a 
blow to Hammond, but a blow that woke her up instead of stunning her. Im- 
mediately with her gallant mayor, A. F. Knotts, at the head, Murray Turner, 
John Dyer and others, she planned and prosecuted vigorously her plans for 
capturing other plants even more agreeable and helpful to the town, and 
which would give a variety of more congenial employments. 

In the place of the one that left, thirteen industries came in response 
to solicitations and for business advantages to take its place. A bare enu- 
meration of all Hammond's industries would take more space than we can 
grant. Chief among them are: 

The W. B. Conkey Printing Company 

a perfection of beauty, convenience and efficiency, and largest of its 
class in the world, employing a trained army of 2,000 workmen of 
both sexes. 





N JCW FE. ERA L T, VlU.l NG 



The Simplex Railway Appliance Company 

occupying eight acres of ground, engaged in the manufacture of steel 
trucks for cars and locomotives. It employs 350 skilled labor men at 
high wages and does a business of $3,000,000 a year. 

The Hammond Illuminating Company 

operating both a large gas and electric works, with its ponderous 
machinery, giant boilers and costly improvements furnishing the im- 
portant item of good light to Hammond and its neighboring cities. 



PUBLIC LIBRARY BUILDING 



— 15- 




The Hammond 
Elevator Company 

with its capacity of 
1,000,000 bushels— by 
far the largest eleva- 
tor in the State. It 
can transfer fifty cars 
per day. 

The United States 
Locomotive Company 

occupying fourteen 
acres of ground, fully 
equipped with up-to- 
date tools and work- 
i n g machinery 
through all its de- 
partments. It has a 
complete electric 
lighting plant and 
compressed air plant. 
It is furnished with 
complete boiler 
shops, machine 
shops, iron and blast 
foundry, blacksmith, 
wood- working a n d 
paint shops, store 
house, pattern shop, 
etc. 



HAMMOND S POLICE FORCE 



-16- 




The Chicago Steel Manufacturing 
Company 

occupying thirty acres ; its build- 
ings cover ten acres ; its annual 
business is $1,000,000. Its prod- 
ucts are high carbon, Bessemer 
and crucible steel plates, cut 
steel and iron nails, shovels, 
spades, scoops, padded horse- 
shoes and steel posts. It em- 
ploys 250 men. 

The Mackie Steel Tube Company 

occupies three acres. 

The Hammond Distilling Company 

does a business of $6,000,000 a 
year. 

The Hammond Lumber Company 

occupies ten acres. 

The Piano Works 

The Bed Spring Factory 

The Betz Surgical Appliance 
Manufacturing Company 

with the universe for its field ; 
the large, up-to-date department 



HAM MONO'S FIREMEN 



17 



ftfe McdU&ii^ 



%■ 



AM 




stores ; and not behind any of these, its daily and weekly newspapers, 
enterprising and forceful. Hammond is well supplied with strong 
banks that keep abreast of the times in methods of doing business and 
in getting the attention of the public. 

Hammond's public schools are a marvel in rapidity and excel- 
lency of growth. In eighteen years its number of teachers increased 
from four to sixty-five. They have manual training departments. 
There are besides in Hammond two excellent business colleges. 

Neither is Hammond indifferent to the arts and refinements 





WASHINGTON SCHOOL BUILDING 

of life. It has two pretty parks, a fine Carnegie city library, popular 
theaters and is well supplied with churches and society halls. 

The transportation facilities of Hammond are of the very best. 
Seventeen railroads bring the cargoes of freight and humanity through 
its gates, aside from electric lines which carry passengers every ten 
minutes in all directions. 

With all these and more advantages, with an alert and pro- 



CENTRAL SCHOOL BUILDING 



— 18 



gressive people to push its enterprises, Hammond seems destined to 
hold the rank of one of the largest and busiest cities of the State. 

Some of Hammond's interesting men and places are here repro- 
duced by our artist. No description can do justice to the energy 
represented in the enterprises here mentioned and photographed, nor 
to the iron in the men that created and now push them forward. 
There are no lakes or mountains to enhance the scenery here. All 
in and about Hammond seems to be the handiwork of man determined 
to wrest utility from the wilderness and beauty from barrenness. 





PARK SCENE SHOWING FIREMEN'S HEADQUARTERS 



VIEWS IN HARRISON PARK 

THE SUPERIOR COURT BUILDING 

is Hammond's pride in architecture. It is built of granite and 
surrounded by a swath of verdure, kept fresh by vigilant care. 

THE STREET SCENE 

is one familiar to Hammond's residents and visitors. In the 
evenings pedestrians fill the sidewalks till it is difficult to thread 
one's way through the promenading crowds. 



-19- 



THE LABOR PARADE 

is typical of Hammond. It is labor that made, it is labor that 
sustains Hammond in its present prosperity. 

THE NEW FEDERAL BUILDING 

shown here, is something for which Hammond worked with its 
characteristic energy. The structure is full of dignity and solid- 
ity, suggestive of the stable government it represents. 

THE MAYORS OF HAMMOND 

here shown, have been, fortunately, men with business tact and 
appreciation. They have been leaders for Hammond's progress. 





STREET SCENE SHOWING LABOR DAY PARADE 



POLICE FORCE 

The constant throngs of all nationalities and interests that visit 
or inhabit Hammond require a good police force. Some of Ham- 
mond's police have distinguished themselves for their fearlessness and 
fidelity to duty till they won public approbation. They have con- 
tributed no little to Hammond's good standing by their efficiency in 
troublous times of strikes and lockouts. 



HOHMAN STREET NORTH FROM SUPERIOR COURT BUILDING 



-20 — 




SCENE ON CALUMET RIVER 



SCHOOL BUILDINGS 

It is hard work for architecture to keep pace with the growth of Ham- 
mond and the corresponding increase of the school population. The buildings 
shown by the artist give some estimate of the expenditure, art and science 
that have entered into a fit supply of school facilities for Hammond's youth. 

CALUMET RIVER 

The classical Indian name of Calumet (the pipe of peace) has fortu- 
nately been preserved to the sluggish, peaceful stream that waters and cleanses 
Hammond. The deepening of the Calumet channel, and the equipping of har- 
bor facilities go to make this river a source of great interest and wealth 
to Hammond and to help make it one of the great inland harbors of the 
continent. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 

None can fully appreciate the full 
value of a fire department until the scream 
of anguish and distress out of crackling- 
flames is answered by the rattling of the 
wheels, the wheezing of the hose, the climb- 
ing of the braves up the ladders and the 
saving of lives and property. Hammond 
is proud and appreciative of her fire de- 
partment. 




SIMPLEX RAILWAY APPLIANCE COMPANY 



-21- 



HOBART 

Fifty years ago the spot where now stands this thriving town 
of 1,600 contented people was a humble village, around which lay 
a stretch of virgin prairie and belts of fertile timber land. These were 
peopled with Indians, and over them roved the wild turkeys and 
deer. 

Hobart is in the midst of the richest dairy and stock growing 





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GROUP OF HOBART CHURCHES 



portion of Indiana. It is located on the X formed by the Nickel 
Plate and the Chicago Outer Belt Line railroads. It is near enough 
to Chicago to feel its pulse and profit by its markets, without being 
singed by its fever. It has never been affected by a boom. Its growth 
has been steady, natural, substantial. 

At close proximity of town are found hundreds of acres of the 
best clay land in the State for the production of brick, tile (terra- 
cotta) and pottery, all of a superior quality. This has furnished the 
possibility for Hob art's famous industry, the W. B. Owen's Hollow 



HIGH SCHOOL BUILDING 



- - 22 - 




SCENES TAKEN IN AND ABOUT HOBART 



Porous Clay Tile Works, the chief industrial support of Hobart. 
This plant, which located in Hobart in 1881, after a disastrous fire 
eight years after, and a steady pull upward ever since, is now the 
most noteworthy of its kind in the world. It covers 35 acres of 



ground; it operates 10 enormous kilns, of down-draft construction, 
with a capacity of 80 tons each. The capacity of the plant is 70 tons 
of finished product per day and 125 people are kept busy in its 
employ. As the rich blue clay, from which this fine porous tile is 
made, is in beds of more than 100 feet in thickness, and is practically 
inexhaustible; and as the porous tile, or terra-cotta, from Hobart 
is used by builders over the entire country and considered excellent, 




$* -..m'tt-mm « 



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mm 





INTERIOR OF ONE OF HOBART's CHURCHES 



-23- 




NORTH ON MAIN STREET 



it looks as if Hobart had an industry to keep the present generation 
busy and make them rich. 

Living in Hobart is almost ideal, A high moral and religious 
sentiment prevails, there being eight prosperous churches in the 
town. Owing to the minimum of vice and crime, the length of the 
three railroads' trackage that pay so much taxes, and the fine quality 
of land, and of land owners in and about the town, the taxes are 
remarkably low, considering its many improvements. 

An important factor in the healthy development of an Ameri- 
can community is its public school system. The advantages of 
Hobart are excellent. Both town and township have a fine public 



school system, with a capable, enterprising school board at the head, 
that spares neither pains nor expense to furnish the means for attain- 
ment to that high mark which public instruction has reached there. 
The public school building of Hobart, of which we offer a photo- 
graph, cost $40,000. It is thoroughly modern and well equipped, 
with laboratories and a library. It has a good water s)^stem, electric 
light plant and good streets. Our artist gives views of its chief 
public buildings and places. 




WEST ON THIRD STREET 



- 25;- 




DEEP RIVER LOOKING SOUTH FROM THIRD STREET BRILGE 

Fraternalism is well represented in Hobart. Aside from the 
various social and recreation clubs for men and women, such as the 
Gun Club, the Lotus and the Woman's Club, there are these orders : 
The Odd Fellows, Foresters, Masons, Knights of Pythias, Maccabees, 
Modern Woodmen, G. A. R. — all flourishing. 

Of the men of the present day who have made Hobart the 
model town it is may be named: W. B. Owen, George Stocker, 



Seward Lightner, N. P. Banks, the late Hon. W. H. Reifenberg, 
Dr. P. P. Gordon, Louis Wettengel, Atty., Dr. H. F, C. Miller, Charles 
Gruel, C. M. Townsend, Charles Borger, William Pyatt, F. M. Smith, 
Dr. Joseph C. Watson, E. H. Guyer. These and others who have 
passed from the field of activity, or are yet enlarging it, have con- 
tributed according to their various callings to the upbuilding of 
Hobart in education, in business, in industry, in morality and in all 
that makes a town or community desirable. 




DEEP RIVER LOOKING NORTH FROM THIRD STREET BRIDGE 



■26- 



LOWELL 



The acknowledged founder of the classic town of Lowell is Melvin A. 
Halsted, whose bust appears among the old settlers of Lake County. Its beginning 
dates of 1850. Lowell's first store was opened in 1853 by Jonas Thorn; soon after, 
came Sigler's and Viant's stores. It has now its principal street, Commercial 
Avenue, lined with special and general stores. Views of some of these appear 
in the commercial department of the album. Lowell has a good system of water- 
works. Its water is justly famous for its coldness and wholesomeness and con- 
tains ingredients of mineral properties which could make of Lowell a mecca for 
health seekers. It has an electric plant, and has long held the reputation of being 





HIGH SCHOOL BUILniNG 



CHURCHES OF LOWELL 

one of the best trading points on its railway line, owing to the excellent farming 
community surrounding it and the high grade of farmers that support it by their 
patronage in trade. 

THE FIRE 

In 1898 Lowell experienced a disastrous fire, as other towns have done, 
which prostrates them for the moment, and becomes the means of more durable 
and better rebuilding. One side of its business street was almost completely swept 
away by the flames, at a loss of $60,000. From the ashes rose a solid block of 
fine brick buildings. The artist shows the street before and after the fire. 



27 ■ 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 

The volunteer fire department of Lowell, of which our artist presents a 
splendid view in uniform, is one of the least paid and most indispensable organi- 
zations of the town. "Jt dates from 1890, starting with twenty members, and 
has now thirty. It gives prompt, efficient, cheerful service, and is worthy of honor 
and regard. Its service being but nominally remunerated, it belongs to the 
heroic and benevolent department, protecting lives and property, day or night, of 
rich or poor alike. Eugene Nafus was its first chief and Lewis Wood its first 
secretary. G. L. Trump, its present chief, and Len W. Ragon, its secretary, 
are two of the four remaining charter members. 

HIGH SCHOOL 

The high school building and grounds are one of the beauties of Lowell. 
All is modern, complete, adapted for its purpose. The first building on the grounds 





Lowell's public square, showing monument 



GROUP OF LOWELL POPULAR YOUNG LALIES 

was erected by Melvin A. Halsted, who made the bricks, broke the ground and 
courageously stood by the enterprise till it was completed, largely at his own 
expense. The present building was erected on the old site in 1896, at a cost 
of $16,000. The present school board is Albert Hull, Pres.; John A. Kimmet, 
Sec'y; Wm. Love, Treas. The faculty for 1906 is Homer B. Dickey, Supt; 
Gertrude Matteson, H. S. Principal; Olga H. Harter, H. S. Ass't; Rose Kimmet, 
Supt of Music. The teachers of the graded school are: E. N. Gragg, seventh and 
eighth grades; Nola Calkins, sixth; Bessie Purdy, fourth and fifth; Mabel Huston, 
second and third; Estella Foster, first. A larger proportion of youth from this 
community enter the high school and pass from it to colleges than from any 
other part of the county. 

OAKLAND PARK 

Another of Lowell's conveniences and beauties is its natural scenery and 
thinly wooded park of thirteen acres. Its conveniences are being added to each 
year by its enterprising park board, and it is being increasingly used for that 
important part of life — recreation. Lowell boasts of a football and a baseball 
team. Its M. C. Wiley band is not outdone in the county in point of musical 
ability and popularity. Lowell has five religious organizations, six secret orders 
for men, and two for women ; an opera house, and two fine elevators which appear 
in our commercial department of the album. Its sidewalks are being rapidly 



— 28 ■ 




LOWELLS BOARD OF TRALE 



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LOOKING WEST ON COMMERCIAL AVENUE 

cemented, much of that work having been clone the present year. It has a beautiful 
granite monument erected to the memory of soldiers of the three wars from the 
three adjoining townships. It has two good telephone systems and two main branch 
railways in reach running into Chicago. These improvements of Lowell have all 
been accomplished mainly in the last nine years, and would have been impossible 
without the support of the intelligent and progressive merchants of Lowell. 

GROUP OF YOUNG LADIES 

The group of young ladies, which were caught in graceful pose and happy 
mood, are a sample of Lowell's vigorous young womanhood that grace every social 
and religious occasion. Coming from many good homes, it is but fair conclusion 
to predict that they will grace those of their own making. The photograph was 
taken by Mr. Hay ward. 



MORNING AFTER LOWELLS BIG FIRE 



-29- 




LOWELL S BASEBALL TEAM 

LOWELL'S BOARD OF TRADE 

We present here a full-faced, front view of Lowell's ancient "board of trade," 
in their uniforms, as they issue forth from their "chamber of commerce," the 
basement of an old shack. These gentlemen and their resort were well known in 
Lowell in their day ; and so were their daily discussions of markets, of weather, 
of the best way to grow rich or die happy, how to kill muskrats and catch minks, 
how to win in a horse trade or at cards, how to run the government or live 
without work, and similar high-level and profound themes in all departments of 
life. Some may be inclined to take this picture as a joke. If so, there will 
be no hard feeling on our part. 

LOWELL'S FOOTBALL TEAM 

Lowell has a splendidly organized football team — swift, scientific and cou- 
rageous. The team was organized three seasons ago through the efforts of Messrs. 
Frank Maloy and Ray Nelson, and while changes have taken place each season, 
the team of the present season is the original organization. From the beginning 
this team has played phenomenal ball. The patient coaching of Mr. Maloy and the 
strict rules observed by Referee Frank L. Hunt have brought the team from the 



crude state and placed it in the ranks of scientific players. It can no longer be 
styled the "beef trust," which term was applied to it by the Hammond News, 
because of a few big, fleshy boys on it. The first manager of the team was Mr. 
Nelson. Last season's team was managed by Dr. P. L. Rigg. This season's team 
is managed by Mr. Bart Moxell. Christopher Hill captained the team for two 
seasons. The present team is captained by Ed Brownell. The team last season, 
with Billy Callahan as the star quarterback, played brilliant ball, and out of seven 
games played with Crown Point, Lyon Serpents, Chicago Minoquas, Hammond 
Iroquois, Pullman Tigers and Renssalaer, Lowell won five, lost one and tied one. 
The illustration shown represents last season's team. 



Line-up of Lowell Football Team of '05 



Viant-L. E. 
Beck-Ray— L. G. 
Hill— L. T. 
Johnson — C. 



Frank Maloy— Ex. H. B. 



Kelsey— R. T. 
Pattee— R. G. 
Ainsworth— R. E. 
Callahan— Q. B. 



Re filler— P. B. 
Trump — h- 11. B. 
Brownell — R. 11. 15. 



Ben Lynch— Ex. Q. B. 




LOWELLS FOOTBALL TEAM 



-30 — 




LOWELL'S BASEBALL TEAM 
FOR '06 

Lowell had a strong baseball team this 
season, with the exception of the battery, mak- 
ing it necessary to employ outside talent. Hel- 
len, of Kankakee; Miller, Parker and Jewell, 
of Chicago, occupied the pitcher's box during 
the season. Hepp, of Lowell, caught a good 
game until he had his wrist broken by being- 
struck by a ball. He was succeeded by Mc- 
Gill, of Chicago. The team was managed by 
Ed Yates, who also played with the team. 
During the season the local team crossed bats 
with strong teams from Chicago, St. Joseph 
College, Chalmers, South Chicago, Brooks and 
Momence. Out of thirteen games played, the 
local team won ten and lost three, losing one 
to St. Joseph College and two to Momence, an 
exceedingly strong team. A photograph of 
the team is presented. 

THE DINWIDDIE CLAN 

One of the oldest and largest families 
of Lake County is the Dinwiddie clan, now 
scattered in every part of the country, but hav- 
ing taken root first in Eagle Creek township. 
As its name indicates, it is an ancient Scotch 
family, tracing back its origin by record for 
300 years, through ten generations, and to 600 
years by connection. Its annual reunions, in- 
augurated in 1894, number 125 to 160 members, 
and its total circle easily exceeds this number 
bv as many more. The chief members of the 
clan living in Lake County are Jerome, Oscar 
and Edwin W. Dinwiddie, brothers, and their 
families; Wra. E. Sweeney, A. Murray and 
Samuel E. Turner, John C. McAlpin, Samuel 
E. Dilley, with friends and connections in 
many states and countries. 



LOWELL VOLUNTEER FIRE DEPARTMENT 



-31- 




THE DINWIDDIE CLAN 



INDIANA HARBOR 

On September 8, 1901, the erection of the Inland Steel Mills 
was begun on the shores of Lake Michigan in the northern part of 
Lake County. In consequence of the creation of this immense indus- 
trial enterprise the town of Indiana Harbor sprung up, and, owing to 
its phenomenal growth, is to-day a flourishing, up-to-date city of 
several thousand people and rapidly increasing in population, wealth 
and commerce. The industries to date aside from the Inland Steel 
Mills are the Standard Forgings Company, Ward, Dickey Company 





LAKE MICHIGAN SCENE 



and U. S. Steel Company's Cement Plant. There is invested in manu- 
facturing and railroad improvements $8,000,000; 900 residences cost- 
ing $1,000,000. The town has fifteen miles of graded streets and seven 
miles of sidewalks. Four thousand men find employment in the in- 
dustries located there. The place is characterized by broad streets 
and avenues, substantial two and three-story business blocks, splendid 
water, electric lighting and sewerage systems, hotels, newspapers, tele- 
phone exchange, fine residences and a well administered public school 
system. The high school building is a model of architectural beauty. 
The churches are scarcely in keeping with the rest of the place, but 
the religious interest is keen and zealous work is being done by those 



HIGH SCHOOL BUILDING 



— 33 — 




INLAND STEEL MILLS 



belonging to the two denominations. There is in course of construc- 
tion at the present time a new church. 

Indiana Harbor is a railroad center of considerable importance, 
the Pennsylvania, the Baltimore & Ohio and the Chicago, Indian- 
apolis & Southern railroads traversing it. Besides the railroads, Indi- 
ana Harbor has a fine lake harbor. The government has expended 
several millions of dollars in deepening the Calumet River. 

Indiana Harbor is not bleak and lonely, nor is it isolated from 
the outside world. It has a direct connection with the entire northern 



part of the county and Chicago by electric railways. As a residence 
place it is desirable, with the picturesque Lake Michigan for a back- 
ground. A broad, beautiful drive runs along the lake shore, bordering 
on which handsome, commodious homes have been erected. Graceful - 
elm trees shade this thoroughfare, adding much to its beauty. Along 
this drive may be seen smart turnouts, automobiles and bicycles, giv- 
ing additional charm to the grandeur of the situation. The people are 
never troubled with mud, owing to the sandy condition of the soil. 

Indiana Harbor is well organized, the town officials and police 
officers being men of courage, who have the best interests of the peo- 
ple at heart and conduct affairs in strict accordance with law. 




— 34- 



LOOKING WEST ON MICHIGAN AVENUE 




The Volunteer Fire Department 
was organized in 1903 with James 
Daugherty as chief, which honorable 
position he still holds. He is very- 
popular. Most of the members of the 
department are employed at the steel 
works. When a fire occurs they are 
permitted to drop their work and re- 
spond to the fire alarm. They are a 
fine set of men physically and took 
first prize, at the tournament of the 
Lake County Volunteer Fire Associa- 
tion, held in Hobart in 1905, for making 
the best appearance. A billy goat, 
which serves as a mascot, is the espe- 
cial pride of the fire laddies. An ex- 
cellent photograph of Indiana Harbor's 
fire department is shown in the album. 

There are six men, identified 
with the history of Indiana Harbor, 
who must take a personal pride in the 
place and for whom there must be a 
warm place in the hearts of the citi- 
zens. They are Messrs. Willis, Coaks, 
Harvey, Craney, Wiger and Johnson. 
To them belongs the honor of being 
the first men to begin the work of 
erecting the steel works. With the ex- 
ception of one, all of these men still 
reside in Indiana Harbor. 

The first hotel erected in the 
place, for the accommodation of the 
men employed in the construction of 
the steel works, still holds a prominent 
position in commercial affairs. 



INDIANA HARBOR VOLUNTEER FIRE DEPARTMENT 



-35- 



GARY 

The youngest daughter of Lake County is the town of Gary. 
The town that scarcely existed even in the vision of its founder, and 
had no place on any map at the date of the last decennial census, 
may, when the next census is taken, appear as the greatest industrial 
center of Indiana, with a population utterly overshadowing older 
cities. 

The creation of Gary is a twentieth century edition of the tale 
of Arabian Nights. It is a town made to order, and the order was 
issued from a billion dollar corporation, the U. S. Steel Co. Its com- 
prehensive plans, the fabulous wealth of $1,600,000,000 backing up 
these plans, the army of men actually and prospectively employed 
to carry them out, the detailed precision in which all has been foreseen, 
mapped out and fixed before-hand with the foresight of genius and the 







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BROADWAY LOOKING SOUTH, SHOWING POST-OFFICE, 
THE FIRST FRAME BUILDING 



largeness of experience, show that it is a dream, but one of practical 
beauty and results. 

A few months ago Gary was a series of sand dunes ; to-day it 
is a cam j) of tents sheltering an army of busy workers. A few years 
hence it is destined to be a large, populous city clustered around the 
largest steel plant in the world. In five years, as the plans prophesy, 
the plant will cover five square miles or 3,000 acres already bought 
for it; it will have cost $75,000,000 and will employ 18,000 to 20,000 



Gary's busy street 



•36 - 



men, with a pay roll of $20,000,000 a year ; it will revolutionize the 
iron and steel market of this country and affect those of foreign lands. 
The history of Gary is brief. On May 4, 1906, Thomas E. 
Knotts, of Hammond, brother of Hon. A. F. Knotts, former mayor of 
Hammond and founder of Gary, came with his family in a furniture 
wagon across the plains of jackoaks, and, pitching his tent on the 
bank of the Grand Calumet River, became Gary's first settler. This 
was the material and geographical beginning of Gary. Since then 
over one thousand men and teams are grading the streets of the new 
city and building its sewers and 800 model dwellings are rising into line 





VIEW SHOWING SITE OF THE LARGEST STEEL WORKS 
IN THE WORLD 

by the fiat of the corporation that orders things. Ere long it will have 
model churches, and schoolhouses with playgrounds. It will permit 
no crowded tenement quarter. It will require model homes to be 
erected and kept with sanitary fittings. It will permit no out-build- 
ings to mar its beauty or endanger health. It will have wide, airy 
streets, promenading boulevards and esplanades along the river, paved 
with granitoid. It will have cheap gas for fuel, and electricity for 
light. It will be a city of good homes, clean streets, and business- 
like, twentieth century government. 



BROADWAY LOOKING NORTH 



— '67- 



EAST CHICAGO 

The name of East Chicago was given to a little group of 
houses in the northwestern corner of Lake County, in 1888, where 
the Penman family settled as first residents. It was not an attractive 
place, a swampy growth of brushes and shapeless sand ridges consti- 
tuting its only scenery. But it was out of Chicago and near Lake 
Michigan. These two things and the fact that it was on the highway 
of commerce, made in a few years, as if by magic, of this uncanny 
spot, the present thrifty East Chicago, with all its industries, con- 
veniences and population. East Chicago is a part of what is sure to 
be some clay "Greater Chicago" — when all the plans for the extension 
of industrial settlement and rapid transit have fully developed and 





CHICAGO AVENUE LOOKING EAST 



been realized in practice all along the southern shore of Lake Mich- 
igan. Meantime East Chicago is a thriving, energetic, populous 
center. Its chief street, Chicago Avenue, is one of the very finest 
and cleanly business streets in Lake County. East Chicago has a 
fine park with shade trees, grass lawns and resting seats, and children 
and tired people, as well as pleasure seekers, make it popular. 

The Catholics have a good parochial school at East Chicago, 
and other churches are doing an excellent, strenuous work there. 
East Chicago has various industries that employ each from 200 to 400 
men. It has a fine fire department, a picture of which is shown, taken 
by our artist. 



HIGH SCHOOL BUILDING 



— 38- 



WHITING 

Whiting, the oldest of the trio of young cities that have sprung up on the 
outskirts of Chicago on the round south edge of Lake Michigan, is surrounded 
by East Chicago, Indiana Harbor, Hammond and Lakes Michigan. In 1872 Whiting 
was a flag station on the Michigan Southern, with fifteen families for its population. 
It was surrounded with sand banks and unproductive farms, and was without 
prospect of further growth. In 1881). the giant Standard Oil Company bought land, 
erected huge brick buildings and set its mammoth refinery there. Whiting sprung 
into fame, and now counts 5,000 inhabitants, with a valuation of five and a half 
millions in property. It has broad business and residence streets with fine blocks 
on them, fine homes for employees and labor and pay for toilers. Although 
it closely elbows its neighbors, its area being less than two square miles, it still 
has some room to grow and reason for growing. Chief among the early real 
estate men that helped to boom Whiting were Smith and Boder, the Davidson 





119th street looking east 



Bros, and the Fishrupps. Others came later and shared in the. harvest of real estate 
men. Attorney Gavit did the pushing on the legal aspect of things. Whiting is 
proud of its fire department, which has so far prevented any spreading conflagration. 
It has an efficient police force of four uniformed men, with Patrick Lawler as 
chief, all good guardians of the peace. It has a fine school system, with John C. 
Hall, its hard-working superintendent, at its head. It has good churches and 
active fraternal societies. By energetic efforts of Gavit, Greatrake and others, it 
has secured a fine Carnegie library. Its industries are chiefly the refinery and 
branch manufactures, which produce all the various extractions of oil found on the 
markets. The refinery, which is under management of W. E. Warwick; the petroleum 
paint factory, of Star StOwell; the Westrumite Co., which makes sprinkling oils 
for streets and roads, and the Hornicker Motor Co., sum up Whiting's industries. 
Whiting has three newspapers, the Sun, the News and the Call. The laborers of 
Whiting are well organized in unionism under the tactful and honest leadership 
of Mr. Nedge. With such a brilliant, short past. Whiting feels confident of a still 
better future. 



the whiting oil works 



-40 — 



DYER 

Dyer, a station on the Monon railroad, is a modest vil- 
lage of some 200 inhabitants. It was platted in 1855. It 
has a good warehouse, a flour and feed mill, a good school and 
church. It is also a good trading point. Dyer has one of the 
three Catholic churches in the township. 

Here was built the oldest M. E. church building in the 
county. Mr. Keilman was Dyer's first postmaster and its most 
prominent business man and banker. There are four churches 
at Dyer, and the people are much attached to them. It is one 
of the oldest and most peaceable towns and localities in the 
county. 




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CATHOLICISM IN LAKE 
COUNTY 

The history of Catholicism in Lake 
County is one of encouragement for the 
people of this faith. In some of the town- 
ships of Lake County Catholicism is 
practically absent, while in others of the 
north central part, as St. John and Han- 
over townships, Catholicism predomi- 
nates almost to unanimity. No other 
denomination than the Catholics ever or- 
ganized in St. John township, where it 
has three thrifty churches. 

The parent church of Catholicism 
in Lake County is the Church of St. John 
the Evangelist, at St. John. Its building 
is located on the highest ground of any 
church in the county. In earlier days it 
has seen the largest congregations of any 
church in the county. Having contributed of its membership and strength 
to other congregations, it has now left only ninety families in the parish and 
seventy children in school. It was organized as a church in 184? and had 
existed before as a mission. Rev. Anton Heitman, the retired pastor, who 
still resides at St. John, was pastor at that parish for about forty years. Rev. 
Charles F. Keyser, of Lowell, is now the pastor. 



DYER CHURCH 



DYER SCHOOL BUILDING 



-41 — 



There are eighteen Catholic churches, with 1,610 families, in 
Lake County, served by pastors whose cuts appear in the album. The 
largest congregation is that of St. Joseph's at Hammond, with 250 
families. The smallest are at Lowell and at Kinmary, with thirty 
families each. There is one Catholic hospital, St. Margaret's, at Ham- 
mond, with twenty Sisters of St. Francis, and Rev, Henry Plaster, 
chaplain. There are in all fifty-five teaching and nursing sisters in 
Lake County and 1,865 children in the schools. 

The Rt. Rev. H. Joseph Alerding, D. D., of Fort Wayne, Ind., is 





ST. JOHN CHURCH AND SCHOOL BUILDING 

the bishop of this diocese, whose territory comprises the northern half 
of the State of Indiana. 

The days of aggressive religious and denominational opposition 
have happily passed in Lake County, having now served their purpose. 
Protestants of different denominations and Catholics worship and 
work peacefully and harmoniously side by side without opposing each 
other. Each recognizes that there are excellent qualities and some de- 
fects in themselves md in the others, in membership and in aclministra- 



HANOVER CHURCH AND SCHOOL BUILIING 



-42- 



tions. All know that they do good, even though each prefer their 
own methods; and all are striving toward the same end with varying 
success. Toleration has succeeded opposition, as it is hoped that co- 
operation will still further improve on toleration. We think we see the 
signs and gladly hail them. 

ST. JOHN 

The Catholics in religion, and the Germans in nationality, pre- 
dominate in and about St. John. They ,have a large, flourishing 
parish and the oldest priest in service in the county. 





GROUP OF LAKE COUNTY S CATHOLIC MINISTERS 



Reading from right to left, top row: 

Peter Kaheeep, St. Cassemer's Church, Hammond. 

Rev. Kaub, Wheeling, W. Va. 

Rev. Kansen, Hobart. 

Rev. Heitman, St. John. 

Rev. Koenig, L,ottaville. 

Rev. Berg, Schererville. 

Rev. Plaster, Hammond, 

Rev. Steter, Kentland. 

Rev. ZumbuEETE, Hanover Center. 

Rev. Feack, Dyer. 

Rev. Baichert, Wanatah. 



CHURCH, SCHOOL AND SISTERS* HOUSE AT TURKEY CREEK 



— 43 — 



SHELBY 

The passing of the first train on the Monon railway through Lake County, 
in 1882. and the crossing of it the following year by the "Three I," was the 
origin of the village of Shelby at this crossing, Shelby is the most southern town 
in Lake County. Unlike its northern sister cities on Lake Michigan, its population 
has not increased by kangaroo leaps. It has remained modest in its pretensions to 
wealth, industries and all that goes with the loud acclaim of booming cities. It has 
a church, a good school of three rooms, a hotel, and a citizenship proud of itself 
and of its county. 





PICNIC TRAIN ARRIVING AT CEDAR LAKE 



SCENE ON CEDAR LAKE NORTH FROM DEPOT 



CEDAR LAKE 

Cedar Lake has long, widely and deservedly been known as Lake County's 
prettiest summer resort. To the tired body or brain, nothing surpasses the rest- 
fulness of Nature's beauty, grandeur or placidity. The combination of woods, 
hills and a large body of fresh, wholesome, navigable water is what gives Cedar 
Lake its attractiveness to the crowds that come there each summer from surround- 
ing towns and country, and especially in excursions from Chicago. They come 
to escape dust, worry and overwork. They come to picnic, to visit, to row or 
take a launch ride on the lake; to let the children paddle near the shore or take 
a plunge themselves ; to fill their lungs with fresh air and the eye with a sense 



— 44- 




SCENE AT KANKAKEE RIVER 





FISHING SCENE AT KANKAKEE RIVER 

of fresh beauty ; to enjoy the freedom and healthfulness of outdoor life, in solitude or 
in crowds, as one may prefer. Extensive provision has been made to receive visitors 
at Cedar Lake. Commodious hotels with modern accessories are kept on either side 
of the lake, besides many other smaller boarding-houses. The residents are hospi- 
table and friendly and accustomed to crowds. There are all manner of boats, large 
and small, to be hired with or without pilot, on either side of the lake. When the 
busy summer season is over at Cedar Lake the quiet of the environments, together 
with the varicolored robe of the woods on the surrounding slants and hills, make 
it a spot of delight and charm, and home parties go out nutting and squirrel hunting. 
In the winter time, when the trees have pulled on their white hoods and Jack Frost 
has put his icy lid on the lake, two large ice-plants at either end of the lake 
keep a body of men busy in storing up the cooling, crystal blocks in the capacious 
ice-houses till summer's scorching rays shall bring them out for the sick, the fevered 
and the sweltering. Our artist shows us cuts of several of Cedar Lake's beautiful 
spots and places. 
-45 — 



A HOT WEATHER SCENE AT CEDAR LAKE BATHING BEACH 




HON. EDGAR DEAN CRUMPACKER 

Was born on a farm in Laporte County, Indiana, and was edu- 
cated in the public schools and in the Male and Female College of Val- 
paraiso. When twenty-two years of age, he left the farm to enter upon 
the study of law in Valparaiso, and took the senior year in the law 
department of the State University. He began the practice of law in 
Valparaiso in 1879, was elected prosecuting attorney for the Thirty- 
first judicial district in 1884 and 1886, was appointed one of the first 
judges of the appellate court by Governor Hovey in March, 1891, and 
served upon that bench for about two years. In 1896 he w r as elected 
to Congress for the Tenth district and has been re-elected from time to 
time ever since, and is now a candidate upon the Republican ticket for 
a sixth term. 

During the years of his service in Congress many questions of 
unusual importance have been up for consideration. He was actively 
identified with all these important measures and particularly with the 
constructive legislation for the government of Porto Rico and the Phil- 
ippine Islands. He is now chairman of the Committee on Census in 
the House and the ranking member of the Committee on Insular Affairs. 
The Congressional Record shows the character and extent of the work 
he has done since he has been a member of the National legislature. 
During the recent session of Congress he took an active part in all the 
important measures that were up for consideration, and presided over 
the House at the designation of the Speaker more than any other member 
of that body aside from the Speaker himself. 

Congressman Crumpackers recent renomination by enthusias- 
tic acclamation speaks loudly what his supporters think of him. He 
lives in the heart of the people he represents, because they and their 
interest lie in his heart. He is a broad, conservative, judicious states- 
man, possessing eminently the qualities of pleader and jurist ; an excep- 
tionally pure public man, moving in an atmosphere far above political 
corruption and removed from petty quarreling; a conscientious, pains- 
taking and industrious worker for the public good, with the gift of 
mastery of subjects in the public eye. He belongs to the sort of men 
the country always needs and always will insist on having at the front 
and top. 

46 — 



ALBERT MAACK 



ERNEST L. SHORTRIDGE 



Albert Maack was born at 
Brunswick, Lake County, Septem- 
ber 24, 1862, his parents being Mr. 
and Mrs. Peter Maack. Albert at- 
tended school in his native town 
until he was nineteen years old, 
applying himself diligently to his 
studies. He went to Crown 
Point to finish his education in the 
high schools. He followed up 
commercial pursuits, locating in 
Lowell, where he was actively en- 
gaged as a clerk, later going into 
business for himself. He was at 
all times a courteous and accom- 
modating gentleman and was 
popular in both a business and 
social way. He was united in 
marriage September 10, 1889, to 
Miss Helen Kobelin, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Kobelin, of 
Lowell. To this union two daughters were born. Mr. Maack was 
elected town clerk and treasurer of Lowell in 1886, which position he 
filled with satisfaction. 

Mr. Maack and family moved to Hammond, where he was ap- 
pointed assistant postmaster, which position he holds to-day, and vir- 
tually has full charge of the postal affairs of that city. Being an 
ardent Republican, he took an active part in politics, and for several 
years did valuable service as secretary of the Lake County Republi- 
can Central Committee. As a party worker he is active and clean. 
Four years ago he aspired to the candidacy for county treasurer, but 
failed to secure it. Nothing daunted and being of the "true-blue" type 
of Republicanism, he accepted defeat gracefully and "threw off his 
coat" for the cause. At the county convention held at Crown Point in 
March of the present year he was unanimously nominated for the 
office of county treasurer. 




Ernest L. Shortridge is 
another Lowell boy, who, by 
energy, perseverance and intelli- 
gence, has to his credit the honor 
of being one of the best court 
reporters in the State of Indiana. 
Pie was born on a farm near 
Lowell, June 11, 1873, and re- 
ceived his education in the public 
schools of that place, after which 
he went to Valparaiso College 
and took a thorough course of 
stenography and business train- 
ing. He took up his residence in 
Hammond, where he has taken 
an active part in commercial and 
political affairs and come promi- 
nently before the public eye. In 
1901 he was appointed court sten- 
ographer of the Superior Court of Lake, Porter and Laporte counties, 
which position he holds at the present time. 

Mr. Shortridge was bred a Republican and has taken an active 
part in the campaigns for his party's cause since 1892 in such a stren- 
uous manner that he was made chairman of the Republican Central 
Committee in 1902, which position he held until 1904, his conduct of 
the campaign during that period giving satisfaction to the party. So 
highly w r as he held in the esteem of his party friends that when, in the 
campaign now on, he announced himself as a candidate for the office 
of county clerk, he had no opposition and received his nomination by 
acclamation. Mr. Shortridge was married to Miss Misha Mathis, of 
Hammond. They have one daughter, five years of age, living, and one 
bright little daughter whom death reaped a short time ago. 




— 47 — 



DAVID BOONE 



W. F. BRIDGE 




Whether David Boone, the prosecuting attorney of Lake and Porter Counties, 
is a descendant of Daniel Boone, the courageous Kentuckian, we do not know; 
but certain it is that he has the same kind of grit and courage possessed by Daniel 
in his younger days, when the Indians and wolves were howling around. David 
Boone is a resident of Hammond, and until he was elected, two years ago, to 
his present office, he practiced law. He is an eloquent pleader before a court. His 
promise to the people of the two counties, when he was asking them for their 
suffrage, that should he be elected he would be the prosecutor in reality as well 
as in name, and that law-breakers would have to hunt their holes or get nipped, has 
been made good. He personally conducts all important cases, especially murder 
cases. So vigorously did he prosecute the murderer, Donahue, that a verdict of 
murder in the first degree was rendered, and he was sentenced to hang. Governor 
Hanly commuted the sentence to life imprisonment. A bitter feeling was engendered 
against Mr. Boone on the part of Donahue's friends, and after receiving a number 
of threatening letters an unsuccessful attempt was made to blow his house up 
with dynamite. Mr. Boone is the most tireless, energetic and willing Republican 
worker in Lake County. He is an eloquent, forceful and logical political speaker. 




W. F. Bridge, surveyor of Lake County, living at Hammond, 
Ind., was born in Carroll County in 1884. After graduation from 
high school he attended Wabash College. He spent four years in the 
State of Colorado making land surveys, platting towns, and being 
engaged in mining engineering; then came back, and located in Ham- 
mond in 1890, where he has been active in his chosen line ever since. 
He has served a number of years as city engineer for Hammond and 
has done a large share of the work in laying out the neighbor cities of 
East Chicago and Whiting. He was one of the board of police com- 
missioners of Hammond appointed by Governor Durbin and served in 
this capacity from 1901 to 1903, when he resigned. He has been secre- 
tary of the Commercial Club of Hammond and one of its directors 
since its organization. He is affiliated with the following orders : 
Masons, K. of P., Elks and National Union. 



LAWRENCE COX 



EDWARD SIMON 




Lawrence Cox, candidate for sheriff of Lake County, has 
been a resident of Lake County for a number of years, and has all 
through these years been a consistent and zealous Republican. 
After acting as deputy sheriff under George Lawrence, he filled 
the office of chief of police in Hammond, and has proved a firm, 
shrewd, vigilant and efficient officer. He is well known and liked 
through the entire county. 



Edward Simon, of Hobart, Demo- 
cratic candidate for representative of 
Lake County, was born in Buffalo, N. 
Y., thirty-three years ago. He was edu- 
cated in the public schools and St. 
Joseph College of that city. It was 
there he learned the cigar-making trade. 
In 1892 he went to Chicago, where he 
engaged in the restaurant business for 
a year, when he came to Lake County, 
and opened a cigar factory at Liver- 
pool. His business increased so rap- 
idly that he sought a larger place, and 
located at Hobart, where to-day he em- 
ploys fourteen people in his factory. It 
is his individual and manly efforts, 
hustle and business tact and square 
dealing that have brought his estab- 
lishment creditably before the public. 
Mr. Simon, who, since his residence in 
Hobart, has been an energetic member 
of the volunteer lire department, advo- 
cated and worked for the organization 
of a society of the volunteer depart- 
ments of the county, and was instru- 
mental in forming the Lake County 
Volunteer Firemen's Association, two 
years ago, and was selected as its 
first president, and the first annual 
tournament was held at Hobart. At 
the last meeting of the association, 
which now embraces the volunteer de- 
partments of the Tenth Congressional 
district, Mr. Simon was re-elected presi- 
dent. He is an ardent Democrat and a 
faithful worker for his party, and soon after going to Hobart he was made 
township chairman, and two years ago was selected as county chairman 
of the Democratic Central Committee, because of his faithful, energetic work, and 
he was thus brought in close touch with the Democratic leaders of the county. 
While the nomination for representative came without any solicitation, he never- 
theless appreciates the honor. 




ED. SIMON 

Democratic Candidate for Rep- 
resentative and Maker of 
the La Vendor Cigar 



-40- 



CHARLES L. SURPRISE 



W. E. VILMER 




Charles L. Surprise, deputy clerk of the United States District 
and Circuit Courts at Hammond, Ind., was born near Lowell on Nov. 
11, 1884. During his infancy his parents, Oliver and Carlinda Sur- 
prise, moved to town, where they still reside. In 1903 he was grad- 
uated from the Lowell high school ; the same year he won the county 
oratorical contest at Hammond, gaining honors for himself and his 
school. The following fall he attended Northwestern' University. 
Then he clerked and studied law in Atty. S. C. Dwyer's office until 
his appointment in August, 1906, to the deputyship at Hammond. Mr. 
Surprise' is also an employee of Knotts & Bomberger, corporation 
lawyers of Hammond. lie is an active member of the M. E. Church, 
a Republican, and in good favor with his wide acquaintance in the 
county. 




W. E. Vilmer, photographer of high rank, began his busi- 
ness career in 1886, at Crown Point, where he is still located. He 
is a member of both the National and State Associations of Photo- 
graphers, and also of the Indiana Art League. He has just been 
elected president of the State Association, in which he previously 
served three years as its secretary. 

In 1904 he was commissioned by a Pennsylvania art concern, to 
go to Indianapolis and make a series of photographs of Vice-President 
Fairbanks. He is owner and publisher of several copyrighted pictures 
sold extensively in the art stores of the country, and is possessor of 
numerous medals given by both the State and National Associations. 



H. V. WEAVER 

H. V, Weaver was born on a 
farm near Reading, Hillsdale Co., 
Mich., Aug. 16, 1856, his parents 
being H. H. and Hattie Weaver. 
Young Weaver attended the pub- 
lic schools of Reading until he 
was eighteen years old, when he 
left the parental roof and went 
forth to see some of the world. 
Later, having satisfied his desire 
for travel, he took up the study of 
undertaking and embalming as a 
profession. He also studied med- 
icine and his being associated 
with medical men aided ma- 
terially in his proficiency in 

his chosen work. Mr. Weaver graduated from Clark's College of 
Embalming at Cincinnati, Ohio, and has his diploma from that institu- 
tion. He also has a license issued by the State Board of Health of 
Indiana, and one from the State Board of Health of Illinois. He 
is acknowledged to be one of the best funeral directors in this or 
any other locality, performing his duties with a quiet ease and cour- 
tesy that have won for him many warm friends and supporters, who 
readily recognize and appreciate his valuable services. At present he 
is connected with the mercantile firm of Hoevet & Ruge, of Lowell. 
Mr. Weaver was united in marriage Nov. 11, 1891, to Miss Hat- 
tie Flynn, of Rensselaer, and to them have been born three children, 
two boys and one girl. He and his family are held in high esteem by 
all for their many rare qualities. 




GEORGE F. WOOD 

This prince of good fellows is 
a product of Crown Point. He 
was born April 29, 1870, his par- 
ents being Martin and Susan 
Wood. Martin Wood was one of 
the pioneer lawyers of Lake 
County, having practiced in Crown 
Point for over forty years. He 
served one term in the State Leg- 
islature. He died in 1892, but his 
wife survives, aged seventy-eight 
years, and makes her home with 
her children, of whom she has 
eight, three daughters living in 
Hammond and one in Kansas ; one 
son in Topeka, Kansas ; one in 
New York City; one in Kansas 
City, and Geo. F., who resides in 
Crown Point. 

George attended the public schools of his town, and later 
entered his father's office and read law, and later studied in the office 
of J. Frank Meeker, and was admitted to the bar of the Lake County 
Circuit Court. Twelve years ago Mr. Wood was made county con- 
stable of Lake County, which position he has filled conscientiously 
and fearlessly. In his uniform of blue that he wears at all times, he 
looks the officer that he is. He is familiar with every nook and crook 
in Lake County and has rendered valuable services to sheriffs and 
their deputies in apprehending law-breakers. He is highly respected 
by all, even crooks, because, while he is firm, he is very congenial. 
The accompanying photograph shows Officer Wood in full uniform 
and is a striking likeness. George always carries his trademark with 
him — the best disposition of any man in Lake County. 




•51 - 



DR. FREDERIC CASTLE 



OSCAR A. KRINBILL 




Dr. Frederic Castle is an old resident of Lowell. He has 
devoted fifty years to the study of violin tone-problems — the philoso- 
phy of violin peculiarities, excellencies and defects. Violins come 
to him from various parts of the country for test, valuation or reforma- 
tion. His interesting experiences and valuable conclusions to violin 
students, as to production, modification and preservation of violin 
tones, are set forth in his unique way of lectures to a mythical club, 
and published in his book, "Violin Tone Peculiarities," from which the 
doctor derives both deserved reputation and revenue. 




Oscar A. Krinbill, of Hammond, 
county commissioner from the First dis- 
trict, is a man of wide business ex- 
perience, made so by a long association 
with men of affairs in Lake County and 
by reason of being actively engaged in 
business himself. His entire life has been 
spent in Lake County, with the excep- 
tion of two years in Kansas. Mr. Krin- 
bill was born in Crown Point, August 
8, 1863, his parents being George and 
Marie Krinbill, natives of Pennsylvania. 
They came to Indiana in 1851, locating 
at Cedar Lake, but later went to Crown 
Point, where they now reside. Oscar is 
one of eight children, six of whom are 
living. He received his education in the 
public schools, after which he studied 
pharmacy, and for a number of years 
was a drug-clerk in Hammond, and 
for ten years conducted a drug store 
of his own, retiring in September, 1003, to become manager of the Hammond 
Telephone Company, which position he still holds. On June 15, 1893, Mr. Krinbill 
was united in marriage to Miss Edith Weaver, daughter of Adam and Anna Weaver. 
By this union one daughter, Josephine Krinbill, was born. Mr. Krinbill is a stanch 
Republican. His knowledge of public affairs has well fitted him in the capacity 
of county commissioner, which position he has filled in a conservative manner and 
for the best interests of the county. He has been eminently fair toward all 
localities, and through him and his associates many improvements have been made 
in Lake County. 






— 52- 



HON. SCHUYLER COLFAX DWYER 



THOMAS GRANT 



Hon. Schuyler Colfax Dwyer was 
born in Washington, D. G, July 23, 
1869. He was named for that eminent 
Indiana statesman, Schuyler Colfax, of 
whom he still treasures a photograph 
with autograph. At an early age 
Schuyler's parents moved to Lake 
County, Ind., where he received most 
of his early schooling in Crown Point 
and Lowell. He pursued the prepara- 
tory course at Depauw, and the high 
school course at Washington City, where 
his father held a government position. 
Here he was a member of the famous 
Cadet Corps. He taught one term of 
school in Lake County, and returning to 
Washington, took the first year of his 
law course at Georgetown University. 
There he had the inestimable privilege 
of studying law in the office of Mr. 
Barnard, now one of the District Court judges in Washington. Mr. Dwyer com- 
pleted his college and law course at Depauw University in 1889. In 1890 he was 
married to Miss Sylvia Bacon. Two daughters, Portia and Helen, grace this union. 
Pie has been engaged in the practice of law since his graduation. In 1893 he located 
in Lowell, where he enjoys a pleasant and lucrative business and a comfortable 
home. He is the recipient of the unanimous nomination on the Republican ticket 
for Joint Representative for Lake and Newton Counties. Mr. Dwyer is physically, 
intellectually, morally and socially equipped for exacting public service. He is well 
known among the fraternal orders, especially the Knights of Pythias and Odd 
Fellows. He is respecteel for his ability and fairness at the bar and for his public 
spirit in his own town. 




Thomas Grant, of the mercantile firm 
of Grant Brothers, of Lowell, is one of 
the prominent representative citizens of 
his home community, in a business, polit- 
ical and social way. He is also prom- 
inent in the affairs of the south part of 
Lake County and is well known over the 
entire county. He was born in Lowell 
on the 13th day of September, 1865, and 
is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas 
Grant, the elder Grant being born in 
Scotland, and coming to this country, lo- 
cated in Chicago, but in I860 he came to 
Lowell, where he identified himself with 
the building interests. He died in the 
South when his son Thomas was only 
nine years old, leaving a mother and a 
number of other children to be cared 
for. Being thrown upon his own re- 
sources, young Grant went to work on 
a farm and later worked on the Monon 
railroad as a section hand. By energy, 
honesty and economy he forged ahead, 
took a business course at Valparaiso 
University and became a contracting carpenter, which he followed until seven years 
ago, when he and his brother James opened their big mercantile establishment. He 
served four years as trustee of Cedar Creek township, during which time he brought 
about great improvements in the way of good roads and bridges. He is an ardent 
Republican and a splendid party worker. Pie was a candidate for the nomination 
of sheriff at the spring convention, but was defeated by Mr. Lawrence Cox. In 1893 
Mr. Grant was united in marriage to Miss Grace Nichols, daughter of William C. 
and Mary Nichols. To this union one son was born, named Byrl. Mr. Grant 
is a member of the Knights of Pythias, Masonic and Odd Fellow lodges and 
takes an active interest in fraternal work. 




-53- 



A. F. KNOTTS 



A. M. HOOTMAN 






Hon. A. F. Knotts was 
born in Highland County, Ohio, 
Feb. 29, I860. He was brought 
up on a farm near Medaryville, 
Ind., and received his early educa- 
tion in the country school. He 
afterwards taught country schools 
and the Medaryville town school. 
He entered the Valparaiso Nor- 
mal, and in five years was grad- 
uated in the scientific, classical, 
engineering and law departments. 
Fie was president of the Central 
Indiana Normal School and Busi- 
ness College at Ladoga for two 
years, after which he was elected 
county surveyor of Porter County 
in 1886. 

He had now laid the foun- 
dation for his larger life in his 
thorough school and business 
training. He began vigorously 
the practice of law in Hammond in 1887. He was elected Joint Rep- 
resentative of Lake and Jasper Counties in 1898. Through the Legis- 
lature, he succeeded in having a court house built in Hammond, and 
thus having practically a new county seat for his (the north) end of 
the county. On his return to Hammond he was elected mayor in 1902 
at a time when strikes, riots, lockouts, graft and moral degeneracy, 
together with the sudden loss of the packing house, Hammond's main 
industry, made the sky look heavy for Hammond. There were now 
but three industries left. In a short time this city recognized that its 
mayor was awake, hopeful, practical, busy and tactful — a man that 
did things. Eleven new industries were planted in Hammond during 
the two years he was mayor, and the throngs of busily employed men 
learned that work at good wages was better than quarreling in idle- 
ness and want. Employees and employers shook hands and congrat- 
ulated their mayor and his co-workers. 

(Continued on page S3) 





A. M. Hootman was born in Jeromeville, Ohio, Sept, 22, 1857. During his 
infancy his parents moved to. Defiance County, Ohio, where young Hootman grew 
to manhood amid the forest, on the farm and in the blacksmith shop. At seventeen 
years of age, he taught his first school. He attended a select school, Hicksville 
high school, Bryan College and Valparaiso University, graduating in two courses^ 

He married Miss Carrie Elliott of Defiance, Ohio! in 1883, that year teach- 
ing at Aurora, Ill.,in Jenning's Seminary. His first wife bore him one child, Claudia, 
and after four years of married life died. Fie was again married to Miss Delia 
Simpson, a teacher in Eureka, 111., now the mother of his four children. Mr. 
Hootman was a teacher seven years in the Metropolitan Business College of 

(Continued on page 55) 



A. M. HOOTMAN 
(Continued from page $4 ) 
Chicago. He served four years as police judge 
of Western Springs ; two years as secretary 
of the Board of Education of that village in 
Cook Co., III. He was pastor and evangelist 
at Valparaiso two years ; pastor at Lowell, 
Ind., four years; at Union City, Ind., four 
years; at Towanda, N. Y., Broad Street 
Church, two and one-half years ; at Logan sport, 
Ind., three years; he was president of the State 
Missionary Society in New York two years; 
president of the Second, Fourth and Sixth dis- 
tricts in Indiana. He is a graduate of Wel- 
mer's School of Suggestive Therapeutics, and 
is at present secretary and director in the South 
Bend Life Insurance Company at South Bend, 
Ind. 



A. F. KNOTTS 

(Continued from page 54 ) 
LI is reputation for doing things 
won for him the attention of Judge 
Gary of the U. S. Steel Corpora- 
tion, and was the flag that stopped 
the train of opportunity at his 
station, which he promptly boarded, 
and on which he has been taking 
others with him, on a straight, 
broad-gauge track, on fast time, at 
his new and daring creation, the 
city of Gary. The pages of his 
numerous public acts constitute 
the book of his interesting biog- 
raphy. His name is written on 
the industries of Hammond, as it 
will be engraved on the very foun- 
dations at Gary. 




three bright children : Theres 



ARTHUR J. BOWSER 

Was born at Valparaiso in 1862. He was 
educated at St. Paul's Academy, Valparaiso 
high school and Valparaiso Normal. Lie 
learned the printers' trade and newspaper 
business in Springfield, Ills., and in Grand 
Rapids, Mich. He engaged at once in his 
chosen profession, and started Valparaiso's 
first daily in 1882 — the Daily Advertiser. 
Lie started the Vidette in 1883, and the 
Chesterton Tribune in 1884, of which he is 
still the progressive editor and genial 
proprietor. In 1893-4 he was receiver for 
the Porter Land Company and American 
Brass Company, with Chicago offices, and 
paid out dollar for dollar from what had 
been considered hopeless assets. He was 
made reading clerk of the Indiana Senate 
in 1889, an office which Senator Beveridge 
had held ten years before, and from which 
he was elected U. S. Senator. Mr. Bowser 
served four years in the county council. 
During his term in this office Porter 
County's tax was reduced twenty-five cents 
lower than ever before. His public career 
has been clean throughout. He is now can- 
didate for Joint Representative of Porter 
and Lake Counties on the Republican 
ticket. He was married in 1882 to Nettie 
Drago, by whom he is the happy father of 
Frances and Arthur J., Jr. 




MR. AND MRS. S. E. SWAIM 

Publishers of the Hammond Daily News, 
Hammond, Indiana. 




HOEVET & RUGE y GENERAL MERCHANDISE 

HESE two young men, having been raised on a farm and 
reared to hard labor, lost none of the energy and zeal 
there attained, but being filled with good, old stock Ger- 
man tenacity they put their lifelong earnings and sav- 
ings together and clasping hands swore eternal fidelity 
and confidence one to the other. They purchased the 
mercantile business of F. E. Nelson & Son. This stock 
consisted of Dry Goods, Boots and Shoes, Hats, Caps and Gents' 
Furnishings, Groceries, Queensware and Furniture. The copartner- 
ship once formed, they set to work, not only to maintain the standing 
of their predecessors, but 1o improve stock and extend patronage. 
By constant application to business both stock and customers were 
soon doubled and the close of the first year found them among the 
most prosperous business men of Lake County. 

Conceiving the idea that a realistic department store was the 
most convenient and economical, as well as the most pleasing way 
to handle and show goods, they at once set to work to arrange and 
rearrange stock, until now each line is in a department by itself. 

On Nov. 1, 1905, they added a new department to their already 
extensive business, that of undertaking. This business added to 
the furniture department makes it one of the best equipped furni- 
ture and undertaking establishments in northern Indiana. 

Securing the services of Mr. H. V. Weaver, a practical funeral 
director and embalmer, also an experienced furniture man, who 
was given entire charge of the furniture and undertaking depart- 
ment, the results have been most encouraging. 

Rejoicing in the fact that they are prospering, they are looking 
forward to the time when they will be able to install a manager in 
each and every department, making it the model business establish- 
ment in northern Indiana. 

With their business tactics and untiring energy, we bespeak for 
them unbounded success, for, as you enter their place, the very air 
seems impregnated with cordiality, good will and welcome. 

Mr. Geo. J. Hoevet, senior member of the firm of Hoevet & 
Ruge, and son of Mathias and Mary Hoevet, was born at Grant 
Park, 111., Nov. 12, 1870, where he resided with his parents on a 



HOEVET & RUGE y GENERAL MERCHANDISE 

farm until young manhood, when, like many another young, indus- 
trious fellow, wishing to exercise his own independence, he sought for 
and obtained a situation in the grocery store of A, H. Guritz of 
Chicago, 111., where he worked for two years. He then resigned 
his position and entered the employ of the North Side Fair Store, 
where he remained for one year. Severing his connection with 
this firm he opened up a grocer business for himself. This busi- 
ness he carried on very successfully for two years, when he closed 
it out at a fair profit and came to Lowell. 

Mr. Hoevet then entered the employ of E. R. Lynch, a very 
successful and progressive young business man of this place and 
in whose employ Mr. Hoevet remained for one year, when, tiring of 
a clerical life, he sought his first love, the farm, and remained for 
nine years. 

On Feb. 20, 1896, Mr. Hoevet was united in marriage to 
Miss Emma Selke. To this union has been born two bright, beau- 
tiful little girls, making home a paradise for a tired business man. 

Mr. Emil H. Ruge, junior member of the firm of Hoevet & 
Ruge, was born at Beecher, Will Co., 111., Nov. 18, 1876, the son 
of Carl and Minnie Ruge. 

Mr. Ruge remained with his parents on the farm until he was 
thirteen years of age, when he went to Chicago, and lived there for 
three and one-half years. Moving from there to Lowell, Ind., he 
entered the employ of W. Fay Lynch, successor to E. R. Lynch, 
and conducting a very large and prosperous mercantile business. 
Here Mr. Ruge commenced his business education. He remained 
with Mr. Lynch for three years. At the expiration of this time he 
severed his connection with this firm and became connected with 
the firm of J. H. Spindler & Co., working for them for one year. 
At this time a new firm (that of Grant Bros.) sprang into existence 
and Mr. Ruge accepted a clerkship with them until entering into 
business with Mr. Geo. J. Hoevet Jan. 28, 1905. 

Mr. Ruge launched his bark on the sea of matrimony on the 
10th day of May, 1899, with Miss Pearl E. Nichols, and to them 
has been born one child, a sweet, affectionate little girl, to whose 
every wish he caters with delight. 



- 56 - 




Ere l!?ou Untetesteb 

in 

IReal Estate 



ir 



"N southern Lake County, 
Newton and Jasper Counties? 
If so, you should not fail to con- 
sult James Dickey, of Shelby, Ind., 
an acknowledged authority on 
every foot of land, improved and 
unimproved, in the great Kanka- 
kee River region, and his broad 
experience and extensive deals easily make , him the foremost 
real estate dealer in his section. He began in this line of business 
at Monon In 1887, and by keen foresight, square dealing and a con- 
genial disposition has gained the confidence of all with whom he 
has come in contact. His operations are on a large scale, vast 
acres of improved and unimproved lands being placed in his hands 
for disposal. He is in a position at all times to give prompt attention 
to real estate deals and solicits correspondence. 



IPostoffice Bfcfcress 



Sbelbs, 1nt>. 




WILLIAM SHEETS 



WILLIAM SHEETS 

— — -PROPRIETOR OF THE 



OLD RELIABLE FURNI- 
TURE and UNDERTAKING 
ESTABLISHMENT * + * 

Was first closely identified with 
the educational interests of the 
county and the state. He was 
for several years superintendent 
of Lowell's schools, when his health having" failed he 
was forced into other spheres of occupation. 

He bought out and has sincg successfully con- 
ducted the Martin Schur firm of 3i years' standing 
and is therefore in the line of one of the oldest estab- 
lishments in his line in the county. 

While thus reading back in history the firm also 
brings its line constantly up to date, as his large and 
varied line of fine furniture proves. He has associated 
with him John Castle, a licensed embalmer, a young 
scion of an old Lowell family, who has already shown 
himself an adept in his work. 



WILLIAM SHEETS, 



Lowell, Indiana 




THE LOWELL SQUAB FARM 

BREEDERS OF SQUABS FOR THE MARKET 



Number One Squabs 
Our Specialty- 



Special Attention Given 
to Family Orders 



Telephone, Lowell If 12 



l A. DINWIDDIE, Manager 



Interior of DriscoIVs Drug Store 

LOWELL, INDIANA 




The above cut will give you an idea of the neat appearance of 
Driscoll's drug store, where you will find a complete line of 

DRUGS MEDICINES 

BOOKS STATIONERY 

and SCHOOL SUPPLIES 

In fact, everything that is kept in an up-to-date drug store. In the 
rear is kept a full line of 



WALL PAPER 



PAINTS 



GLASS 



Etc. 



58- 



G. W. HUNTER, 

HAMMOND, IJSfD. 



Majnvifacctvirers* Agent for the latest improved 

AUTOMOBILES 

MOTORCYCLES 

and BICYCLES 

Dealer in Bicycle Sundries, Best equipped repair 

Guns, Ammunition, Etc. shop in the State 

AX/TOMO'BI LE GAUAG E 

Compressed Air Free Bowser Gasoline System 



'Phone 122 HUEHN BLOCK 

91 South Hohman St. 

— 59 — 



ZARTMAN'S LIVERY 



JOHN ZARTMA1SF, Proprietor 



Lowell, Indiana 




LIVERY, FEED, SALE and 
BOARDING STABLE 



If you drive with Zartman you get the benefit of 
his fine stock, good buggies, closed carriages, three- 
seated rigs, buses, etc. Everything for the convenience 
of the traveler, and the satisfaction of dealing with a 
man that appreciates your patronage. 




DECK WRIGHT, JR.-39239 

This pure-bred stallion is a bright bay and stands 1 6 hands high. He is 
owned by Joseph Heiser, of Lowell. He was foaled in 1903 by Deck Wright, 
Sr., 24754, holding a pacing record of 2:09%; he by Quilna Chief, 3875 and Kate 
C. Deck Wright, Jr/s dam is Nellie Park wood, by Parkwood, 12335; grand dam 
Amarilla, by Adjustant 1 888, etc. He was bred by Mat Boney, of Hammond. At 
the late county fair Deck Wright, Jr. received the first premium in the three- 
year-old class. The accompanying photograph represents him at two years old. 
His present season was very successful. Correspondence solicited. 




Miss Lena Kimmet' s Millinery 

^P^HE two-story brick corner building 
£ occupied by Miss Lena Kimmet's 
\m millinery store is one of Lowell's 
landmarks. The building was erected in 
1891. It has been occupied by the Wiggins 
Bank, the State Hank and Dr. J. E. Davis. 
The artist shows the building as it now looks 
across the street. It is owned by Mr. John 
A. Kimmet, father of the present occupant, 
in which she displays her extensive stock in 
all modern and best styles of ladies' hats. 

Miss Kimmet has taken a thorough course in her trade 
in the trade school in Chicago. Her courtesy to custom- 
ers has already drawn to her apartment a long list of 
valuable patronage, which her knowledge in the most 
approved and correct forms will steadily increase. 



The KEILMAN & CO. 



Is one of Lowell's large and old established firms. 
It was established in 1880 under the name of Du- 
Breuil & Keilman, an elevator being built that and 
the following year with a capacity of 60,000 bushels. 
In 1889 a grist-mill was added with a capacity of 
75 barrels per day. John A. Kimmet, the present 
efficient manager, has been connected with the firm 
since 1881. In 1892, DuBreuil having died, Mr. 
Kimmet became a partner and has been the prac- 
tical head of the company since. 





In 1902 a large lumber shed was added 
to the equipment. They now handle grain, 
tile, brick, cement, lumber, glass, paints, in 
fact, anything that enters into the con- 
struction of a modern building. Their trade 
is extensive and far-reaching. They make 
frequent shipments to Chicago, Chicago 
Heights, Frankfort, Madison and various 
other points north and south, east and 
west. 

The artist has reproduced an interior and 
exterior view, with Mr. Kimmet at his desk. 



The KEILMAN &> CO. 



-61- 




COLLEGE BUILDINGS 

Bethel College, Library 
and Gymnasium, Russellville, Ky. 



HOTELS 

Park Hotel, Hot Springs, Ark. 
Bliss Hotel, Bluffton, Ind. 



WILEY BROS. 

BUILDERS 



1305 Chamber of Commerce Bldg, 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

Partial List of Buildings Erected 
by this firm 

OPERA HOUSES 

Neenah, Wis. 
Racine, Wis. 
Tipton, Ind. 
Bluffton, Ind. 

Connersville, Ind. 
Urbana, Ohio 
Russellville, Ky. 

BANKS 

Commercial Bank, Crown Point, Ind. 
Commercial Bank, Blue Island, 111. 
Citizens' Bank, Russellville, Ky. 



RESIDENCES 

M E. Tischenor, Chicago 
R. J. McLaughlin, Chicago 
Geo. Hamlin, Chicago 

Hunter W. Finch, Chicago 
Logan Hay, Springfield, III. 
Dr. C. E. Greenfield, Chicago 
H. W. Law, St. Joseph, Mich. 







pii 


kgJmMpm 


■ '■ •■ 


PKIllBf 


;f«wJ.|| 


1 1 WEmI 


-3 I'll 


U JPSw* --'"5 p*™? 



FACTORIES 

National Guano Plant, Aurora, 111. 
Tuthill Spring Co., Chicago 

Knickerbocker Ice Co., Chicago 
Amberg File Index Co., Chicago 
H. W. Caldwell £? Son. Chicago 

Steger & Sons Piano Co., Steger, 111. 



Twenty-three buildings alone erected in Lake County by this firm— in Crown Point, Hammond and Lowell 

The Wiley Brothers formerly resided in Lowell, Indiana 



^4 Few of Lowell } s Residences Built by 

———J. CLAUD RUMSEY 



CONTRACTOR AND BUILDER 



* 



el* 



LOWELL, INDIANA 



A Timely Suggestion 

TITfl ^EN contemplating the 
^^" erection of a residence, 
business block, barn and, in fact, 
anything in the building line, 
consult Mr, Rumsey as to plans, 
specifications and estimates — it 
will be to your interest to do so. 
He will be pleased to show you 
his designs of handsome buildings, 
or will design one in accordance 
with your own plans. 




Cement and Concrete Work 

/TEMENT walks/bridge abut- 
^■* ments, piers, foundations, etc., 
contracted for. Large and diffi- 
cult jobs a specialty. The use of a 
steam concretemixer is employed, 
which greatly facilitates the work. 



During the present season 
20,000 feet of cement walk has 
been built in Lowell by Mr. 
Rumsev. 



READING FROM LEFT TO RIGHT— FIRST RESIDENCE OWNED AND OCCUPIED BY J. < 
RUMSE\ J SECOND, OWNED BY A. HULL; THIRD, MRS. L. PRATT J FOURTH, F. L. WEAKLY 



THERE IS NO PLACE LIKE HOME, SWEET HOME— WHEN BUILT <BT RUMSEY 



THE WILBUR LUMBER COMPANY 



Furnish 



House 



and 



LOWELL, 



INDIANA 




Barn 



Bills 



Complete 



PROM BASEMENT TO CUPOLA 

Our stock is well assorted and of superior quality, at prices that defy competition. We also keep in stock TELEPHONE POLES, CEDAR 
POSTS, CRUSHED STONE, LIME, CEMENT, VITRIFIED and SHERIDAN BRICK, CONRAD BUILDING STONE, LADDERS, Etc. 



4. J. NIOXELL, 
Manager 



HARD and SOFT COAL 

We are prepared to supply the public with all kinds of hard and soft coal. 
Prompt delivery and full weight. A man at all times to load your wagon. 



'PHONE 72 



-64 — 




AHLGRIM PARK 



ON THE KANKAKEE RIVER 
AND MONON ROUTE 

Picnic, Fishing and Hunting Parties furnished with 
GOOD BOATS, BAIT and GUIDES 



Ideal place for family, society, lodge and town 
picnics, all of which is given free use of 



M. J. AHLGRIM, Prop. 



Shelby, Ind. 



r *4^' 






m ~ 



r... SIGLER HOUSE... 

• ■— ^ T * 

Cedar LaKe» Ind. 



THE SIGLER HOUSE 

TTHE most beautifully located and one of the most 
^^ popular hotels in northern Indiana, situated on the 
brow of a hill overlooking Cedar Lake. One gets a magnifi- 
cent view of the lake from the veranda. 

Excellent fishing, boating and bathing make this an 
ideal place to spend your vacation. 

When you begin to lose your appetite, feel nervous and 
irritable try a few days with Mr. and Mrs. Sigler, and if 
you don't go home feeling better you should see a doctor 
at once. 




AH. MAXWELL 

Hardware, Implements 
and Buggies 

LOWELL, 




Man can achieve no great degree of 
success without the real, or make- 
believe, past record. Success, real 
or supposed, must he shown . . . 



I 



N Anda H* Maxwell's past record he fig- 
prominently among the business 



ures 



men of Lowell* He was born while the 
smoke of the Rebellion was still hanging 
over us, and the push, energy and stability 
so necessary at that time has remained a 
feature in his business career* 



INDIANA 

Although not yet at his best, eighteen 
years have been devoted to Hardware, Im- 
plement and Buggy lines, three years of 
which were in the capacity of traveling sales- 
man for Implement and Vehicle Factories* 
This road work was an education, getting 
him in . close touch with factories, dealers 
and consumers* Since purchasing the brick 
building which he now occupies it locates 
him permanently and gives facilities for car- 
rying a more complete stock than is usually 
found in the retail trade* 



-66- 




Cbomas flriwtt 



Cbe Leading furniture Man 
of Lowell, Indiana ^ .* 



"We carry in stock at 
all times as fine an 
assortment of 

FURNITURE 
CARPETS 



RUGS 

MATTRESSES 
SPRINGS 
and HOUSE 
FURNISHINGS 




THOMAS ARNOTT 



We make our selec- 
tions direct from the 
best factories in the 
country and know what 
we are getting. 



"We can furnish your 
entire house, or can fix 
you out with odd piece-. 

If you want anything 
extra fine in our line 
we have them. 





as can be found in Lake County 

Why not "feather your nest" by buying your furniture of us? 

fc UPHOLSTERING DEPARTMENT 

We have one of the best equipped Upholstering and Picture Frame Departments in 

northern Indiana. Correspondence solicited 




07 - 




OAKLAND 

STOCK 

FARM 

^*HE Oakland Stock Farm, of 
^* Wm. Coy is situated in West 
Creek Township and is one of the 
most beautiful places in northern 
Indiana. It is a summer and winter 
resort for high-class horses. Wealthy 
Chicagoans send their horses there 
during the winter or when they go 
abroad. Here you will find all L classes 
•of horses, including imported French 
and German coachers, Kentucky 
bred driving horses, fast race horses, 
Shetland ponies and gentle family 
horses. 

Mr. Coy . established this resort 
five years ago. He has 160 acres of 
land, with fine pastures, shady 
lanes and picturesque surrounding's. 
There are two barns on the place, 
the largest one being*- 75x40 feet, and 
is fitted up with box stalls and other 
conveniences. He has three good 
assistants and horses are well cared 
for. 

The illustration shows Mr. Coy's large barn 
and some of the horses he has boarded. 



-68- 




E. C. Minas Go. 

HAMMOND, INDIANA 

Largest Department Store in the State 

We Sell Everything 
27 Different Departments aii under one roof 



Special Attention Given to Mail and Telephone Orders 



Mailed Free 0ur WeeKl3r ***** 



ASK FOR IT 



We pay freight on all orders of $10.00 or over 



FRED B. AULT 

LOWELL, IND. 

Plumbing 
Heating 
Tin Work 
and 
Roofing 

After, several years' ex- 
perience with some of the 
best plumbing establish- 
ments in the United 
States I am prepared to 
do all "work in my line in 
a workmanlike manner 
and guarantee satisfaction 

This Will Save You Money 

I handle a Hot-air Furnace fully guaranteed to run on one-third 
less coal than any other furnace on the market. I also have a Hot-water 
Furnace that requires only one-half the amount of coal consumed by 
other makes, which is a point not to be overlooked by those intending to 
put in a furnace. 

Bear in mind that I am the only SANITARY PLUMBER 
in the south part of Lake County and will furnish any information 
desired in mv Hue of business. 




69 — 




jfceide'a Store 

Crown ZPoint, Snd. 



Uhe best place to buy your J&o/iday China, 
Queensware, Stassware, SSoots and Shoes. 
jigent for the Cldridge light~running Sewing 
< 77?achine and JEonophone KJal/cinty vffaehines, 

2l/est of Court Jfcouse 



Telephone, Store, 39 



Telephone, Residence, 224 



S. LINTON £y SON 

CROWN point; ind. 

Furniture and Undertaking 




Couches, Carpets, Rugs, Window 

Shades, Glass and other things 

to be found in a first-class 

Furniture Store 



Before sending your orders and money to the Chicago mail order 
houses for things in our line call and inspect our goods and let us 
show you that we can and do undersell the mail order houses, 
quality considered. 



-70- 



LOWELL NATIONAL BANK 



=LOWELL, INDIANA^ 



CAPITAL 



$25,000.00 



^£#5"^^ 




THE FIRST DEPOSIT IS A MAGNET 



j|T DRAWS to itself the small change 
11 which you formerly scattered. lr 
starts a^rowin^ bank account 
and creates a fund which will final]y> 
niakeyou independent. MAKE THAT 

FIRST DEPOSIT TODAY WBSUm 



F. K. Nelson, 
President 



OFFICKKS: 

G. B. Bailey, 
Vice-Pres. 



B. H.Wood, 

Ass't Cashier 



We Solicit Your Banki 



i K B 



iisiiiess 



/\T\UR increase in growth and patronage during the past year makes 
^■^ us better prepared than ever to care for the interests of our 
customers. If you are not already a patron of this bank we extend 
our invitation to become one. 



TO SAVE MONEY 



^ It's not the amount of your income that makes you ; 
independent. It's the amount that you save, and by 
depositing your savings at the 

STATE NATIONAL BANK 

ON OUR 

Two Per Cent Certificates 

^ You will be starting on the road to prosperity. Safety 
and accommodation is our true purpose at all times, 
and by strict observance to conservative banking 
methods we offer you every protection. 
Cf If your patronage and influence have in any way 
contributed to the success of our business, we thank 
you for it. If as yet you are not a patron, let this be 
your invitation to become one. 



STATE NATIONAL BANK 

CAPITAL STOCK - - $50,000.00 
LOWELL, INDIANA 



PAUL E. RAASCH 



Flour 

and 

Feed 




Lime 
Cement 
Pulp 
Plaster 



Telephone 139 



Crown Point, Ind. 



HARDWARE 



I carry a full line of 

HARDWARE 
CUTLERY 
TOOLS 
STOVES, Etc. 

Now is the time to buy a good 
HEATING STOVE , 



GEO. BERG, LOWELL. IND. 



GEO. HEILIG 

Bakery and Restaurant 

LOWELL, INDIANA 

BREAD 
PIES 

CAKES 

and FRUITS 

at all times 

Fine Cigars, Pipes and 
Tobaccos 

Always glad to see you 




ED. BRONELL, 



GRAPHO- 

PHONES 



I handle the best make of 
Graphophones on the market, 
and sell on the installment 
plan. Call in and get prices 
before buying. 

Lowell, Ind. 



MRS. PAUL ELLIS 



THE MILLINER 



LOWELL, IND, 



SCHMAL'S 



HOTEL- 



F. W. SCHMAL, - Proprietor 
LOWELL, INDIANA 



JSr 



X P E R I E N C E 
having taught me just 
what the trade demands, I 
make my selections in Ladies', 
Misses' and Children's hats 
with great care. Prices con- 
sistent with quality. Call and 
examine my stock. 



Everything Up to date 

Service First class 



The Best Place to Bat 
in the State 



■72- 



GRANT BROTHERS 



DEALERS IN /^ J 

(jreneral 


Merchandise 


LOWELL, 


INDIANA 



Everything found in a well-stocked department 
store can be secured in this big Emporium of 
Trade. A complete line of high grade, 
seasonable DRY GOODS, BOOTS and 
SHOES, RUBBER GOODS, HATS, CAPS, 
CLOAKS and FURNISHING GOODS. 

OUR GROCERT 
DEPARTMENT 



Is a feature not to be overlooked. Our stock 
is full, fresh and choice. Bring your produce. 
The big and constantly increasing crowds that 
trade with us is our best advertisement. 
Bring the children. 



OUR MOTTO: 



COURTEOUS TREATMENT, PROMPT 
ATTENTION, RIGHT PRICES :-: :-: 



THE BOSTON STORE 

CROWN POINT, INDIANA 



To our patrons, and especially those not familiar 
with our goods, we desire to state that the goods we 
offer are unsurpassed for durability and style. It 
is our aim to attain the highest standard of excellence. 

CLOTHIERS OF 
MANKIND 

The phenomenal success of our clothing and shoe 
business is attributed to the business principle that 
we advocate. We endeavor to not only sell the 
most reliable goods at the lowest possible price 
but show the choicest selections. 

CLOTHIERS OF 
WOMANKIND 

By our excellent store service, always showing the 
most superior line of dress goods, ready-made 
garments, millinery and shoes, we have established 
ourselves in the hearts of the ladies as the leaders 
at the county seat. 



- 


Mrs. J. A. Warner 


IN Shelby, Indiana, lives a woman whose lineage is inter- 
1 esting — Mrs. J. A. Warner, a second cousin of Mrs. 
Hettie Green, the world's richest woman, possessing a re- 
puted fortune of $50,000,000. Mrs. Warner was born on the 
shore of Lake Champlain, in Vermont. She came with her 
father, Dr. J. B. Hoag, to Starke County, Indiana, in 1855. 
When still a child her mother died and an aunt cared for her. 
She came to Lake County in 1862. She taught school at six- 
teen years of age. She married J. A. Warner, a merchant of 
Hammond. Five years ago she located in Shelby, where she 
has prospered as a restaurant keeper. The trade is ac- 
commodated early and late and her lunches and coffee are 
relished by her patrons. All the hungry and thirsty travelers 
or residents are invited to stop at Mrs. Warner's restaurant 


CHARLES STOMMEL 


GEJVE'RA.L ME'RCHAJSf- 
DISE, TAIJSfTS, OILS, ^ 
VA'RJVISHES, Mty n? v^ 
GOODS, JVOTIOJVS and 
FA/fCy GOODS ^ v« 


DYER, INDIANA 


W. 



THINK MORE AND SPEND LESS M0NE2 
A SAFE PLACE FOR TOUR SAVINGS 

ftbe Citi3cns' German 
IRational JSank 



OF. HAMMOND, 
INDIANA 



Arrangements have been completed for the opening of a 
Savings Department, which will be under the inspection of 
the United States Government. 

On January and July 1st of each year three per cent in- 
terest will be paid on deposits remaining with us three 
months. Interest compounds every six months and your 
account is credited with the amount earned. One dollar will 
open an account with us. A bank account helps you realize 
the value of money. 



The Only National Savings Bank in Hammond 

Four Months Old Sept.. 8, igo6. Sept. 4, 1906, Total Resources, $260, 159.71 



WE SOLICIT YOUR ACCOUNTS IN ALL BRANCHES 



CHAS. C. SMITH, Pres. 

GEO. M. EDER, Cashier 



WM. D. WEIS, Vice-Pres. 

E, S. EMERINE, Asst. Cashier 



PAUL E. ELLIS 

Manufacturer of ' ■ u 1 

Fine Cigars 



NOTHING BUT THE CHOICEST 
OF IMPORTED AND DOMESTIC 
TOBACCO USED ^ ■*• ^ 

LOWELL SPECIAL 5c 

A firve blend of Havana 
and domestic tobacco ^ 

ELLIS SPECIAL 10c 

Nothing better 
All clear Havana 



Lowell, 



Indiana 



Zhc <3covqc rift. 5)eatb 
Ibarfcware Mouse ^^^= 

Makes a specialty of 

i 

HIGH GRADE HARDWARE 
HIGH GRADE STOVES 
HIGH GRADE RANGES 

HIGH GRADE SILVERWARE 

THE MALLEABLE RANGE leads all others 

THE STEWART line of hard coal burners has no equal 

THE COLE'S HOT BLAST for soft coal has no competition 

OUR 1847 SILVERWARE is superior to any silverware on 

the market 



Come and let us show you thru. 



Respectfully Yours, 



<5eo. /lib. 2>eatb, Xowell, flnb. 



VALPARAISO UNIVERSITY 

======= VALPARAISO, INDIANA - 

One of the largest universities in the United States, 
opened its 34th year September 4, 1906, with a larger 
attendance than that of any previous year. This bids 
fair to be the most successful year in the history of 
the institution. :-: :-: :-: :-: 



The past year has been, by far, the 
most prosperous in the history of the 
Institution. The coming year will open 
under the most favorable auspices. 

THE THREE NEW BUILDINGS, 

Medical, Musical and Dormitory, which 
are now under process of construc- 
tion, will be completed in the early 
autumn. Many other improvements 
have been made, so tha' the Institution 
will give, during the coming year, 

MANY ADVANTAGES NEVER 
OFFERED BEFORE. 

Departments:— Preparatory, Teachers, 
Kindergarten, Primary, Psychology and 
Pedagogy, Manual Training, Scientific, 
Biology, Civil Engineering, Classical, 
Higher English, German, French, Span- 
ish, Italian, Elocution and Oratory, 
Music, Fine Arts, Law, Pharmacy, 
Medicine, Dentistry, Commercial, 
Shorthand and Typewriting, Review. 

THE DENTAL DEPARTMENT 

of the school is the well-known Chicago 
College of Dental Surgery, one of the 



oldest and best equipped dental schools 
in the country, Dr. Truman W. Brophy, 
Dean. 

Notwithstanding all the improve^ 
merits and the additional ad van- 
tages offered, the expenses are 
practically no greater than 
they have been heretofore. 
Tuition, $15 per quarter, or $50 per year. 
Board and furnished room; $1.50 to 
$1.90 per week. 

Address, H. B. BROWN, Pres., or 
O. P. KINSEY, Vice-Pres. 



CALENDAR 

The year will consist of four terms 
of twelve weeks each and will open as 
follows: September 4, 1906; November 
27, 1906; February 19, 1907; May 14, 
1907. In addition to these there will be 
two Mid-term openings as follows: 
Spring or First Mid-term April 2, 1907, 
which will continue 10 weeks; Summer 
or Second Mid-term June 11, 1907, 
which will continue 9 weeks. 



7 fi- 



A Model 
Livery Stable 



Jn^ERIT KELSEY, of Lowell, with an experience in 
the livery 1 msiness of over eight years, has completed a 
new two-story brick building 88x80 feet on Commercial 
A venue and has opened one of the best arranged and 
equipped livery, feed and sale stables in northern Indiana. 
In the real estate Mr. Kelsey has invested $5,400.00, and in 
the equipments $2,500.00. The basement is fitted up for 
fourteen head of horses, while on the first floor is space for 
sixteen more head; on this floor space has also been provided 
for vehicles, buggy-washing, harness, etc. An elevator to 
hoist vehicles to the upper floor will be provided. At 
present Mr. Kelsey has eight brand-new single buggies, two 
surreys, one three-seated vehicle and one 7 bus, and is pre- 
pared to take care of weddings, funerals and social parties 
on short notice. A share of your patronage is solicited by 
Mr. Kelsey. 



Lowell Telephone 11-120 



Northwestern Telephone lO 



EDWIN L. SANDERS 



L O W E L L , 1 N I) I A N A 

PLUMBING 

T TT^ A T^TTVr 1 Official City Plumber fur 

and SHEET the Town of Lowell j» 

METAL WORK 

Robinson Tubular Furnaces 

Fairbanks, Morse & Co.'s Gasoline Engines 

Scales and Windmills 

HOT WATER HEATERS, RADI- 
ATORS, BOILERS, PUMPS 
AND FITTINGS 



Engine Trimmings and Repairs, Eave 
Spouting*, Tin Roofing, Etc., Etc., Etc. 



GOSTLIN, MEYN & Co. 

92 STATE STREET HAMMOND, IND. 


Commercial Bank 

HAMMOND, INDIANA 


Capital Stock . . . . . . $100,000.00 

Surplus and Undivided Profits . . 60,000.00 


Confines Itself to a Strictly 

Legitimate Banking 

Business 

THOMAS HAMMOND, President 

CHAS. E. FORD, Vice-President 

JNO. W. DYER, Cashier 


IReal JEetate 

IN ALL ITS BRANCHES 


CHOICE INCOME PROPERTY A SPECIALTY 


3 Per Cent Interest Paid on Time Deposits 
Safety Deposit Boxes to Rent — $3.00 per year and up 



jftrst IRational Bank 



HAMMOND, INDIANA 



UNITED STATES DEPOSITORY 



Capital and Surplus $138,000.00 



A. M. TURNER, President 
W. C. BELMAN, Cashier 



E. C. MINAS, Vice-Pres. 

W. F. MASHINO, Asst. Cashier 



A. M. Turner 

W. C. Belman 



BOARD OF DIRECTORS 
P. W. Meyn 

J. N. Beckman 



E. C. Minas 
W. F. Mashino 



Me pay 3 per Cent Interest on Gime Deposits 



BUSINESS IS BUSINESS 

// Can be Done in Different JVays 



TTIE BELIEVE that you like to do your 

\jL I business where it is appreciated; where 
^ ^ you can know everybody, and where 
everybody is glad to know you; where you. need 
not feel backward about asking for what you 
want, and where it will be cheerfully given, or 
courteous and sufficient reason furnished why it 
cannot be given — in short, where you will find a 
business home. .:. .:. .:. .:. .:. 



THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK 



DYER, 



I N D I ANA 



HENRY L. KEILMAN, President. AUGUST W. STOMMEL, Cashier. 

Directors 

H. L. KEILMAN H. C. BATTERMAN J. A. KIMMIT 

WM. KEILMAN J. L. KEILMAN 



WE ISSUE INTEREST-BEARING CERTIFICATES 



-79- 

















ROBBINS $ LONGSHORE 
Buyers of Live Stock 






j£. Jfeilman dc Son 




Senerai 7/ferehandtse 

*Dry Soods 

Ciothing 

33oots and Shoes 


Dealers in 

Fresh and Salt Meats 
Groceries and Provisions 


Fruits in their season 

Produce taKen in exchange 


*Dyer, - Sndiana 


HOBART, - INDIANA 




( 









- 80 - 



JOHN BROWN, President JOHN E. LUTHER, Vice-President 

A. A. SAUERMAN, Cashier J. H. LEHMAN, Ass't Cashier 



Cbe first Rational Bank 

O F CROWN POINT, INDIANA 



Capital . - - $50,000 Surplus 



$SO y OOO 



ESTABLISHED IN 1874 



Transacts a General Ranking Business 



We respectfully solicit accounts and offer to our patrons 
every accommodation consistent with conservative banking 



j& 



DIRECTORS: 

NEIL BROWN JOHN BROWN W. B. BROWN 

JOHN E. LUTHER A. A. SAUERMAN 



LION STORE 



KAUFMAN N & WOLF, 



Hammond, Indiana 



Northern Indiana's 



Largest 

Mercantile 

Bs tablishmen t 



DRY GOODS 
MILLINERY 
SHOES 
LIQUORS 
CIGARS 



Our Departments 

NOTIONS FANCY GOODS 

CLOAKS, SUITS FURNISHING GOODS 
CLOTHING HOUSEHOLD GOODS 
DRUGS GROCERIES 

FURNITURE CARPETS 



HIGHEST STANDARD 

LOWEST PRICES 



-si - 



DicKeys Big Bargain Store 



General Merchandise 



Always there witH tHe Goods 



Call and see us and investigate our profit-sharing' plan 



SHELBY, 



INDIANA 



T^oiir Distance 'Phone 247 



FRED A. RUF 



WHOLESALE CONFECTIONER 



Craekerjack 
Chewinar Gum, Etc, 



CROWN POINT, IND. 



H WLovb to tbe TKHtee 
ITs Sufficient 

*i|AAVING paid a handsome sum for your piano, 
"J you should not expose it to dampness by leaving 
it open when not in use. Neither should you neglect 
to have it tuned and put in proper shape. 

I visit Lowell at regular intervals, and will put your 
piano or organ in first-class condition at reasonable 
charges. Best of references furnished. 

Respectfully, 

OTTO BRAUN 



H. D. ALYIA 



■ PROPRIETOR- 



%tven> t 3feefc> 
anfc> Sale Stable 

The best of equipments 
and prompt service at 
reasonable rates :-: :-: 

Rigs for wedding and 
funeral parties furnished 
on short notice :-: :-: 



S.WALTON LATTA 



One of our energetic, enter- 
prising mechanics; 

An up-to-date brick layer and 
plasterer; 

His work speaks for him 
louder than we could; 

See a view of the building that 
our artist has reproduced in 
the Industrial Dept. of our 
Album, the Turkey Creek 
School House, built by 

Potvelt tSL Latta, 
'Builders, Lowell, Ind. 



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LASSEN BROTHERS' PAVILION 


A55EN BROS,' PAVILION. . 

Cedar Lake, lad. Jj^^H^K 




/ JJT^ k AVE you ever had the pleasure of attending the 
^J^j dances given by the Lassen Brothers at their Pavil- 
c C ion? This is a unique dance hall, built for the 
sole purpose of catering to the fickle-minded, pleasure- 
seeking public, and is the only one of its kind in the state. 
If you have been there on the occasion of one of their popular 
dances did it not appeal to you as being THE place to spend 
a pleasant evening? 

CfConld one conceive of a, more desirable evening's enter- 
tainment than a dance upon their fine, large floor, accompa- 
nied by the best of music? A promenade upon the wide 
verandas, getting a beautiful view of the lake at every turn? 
A trip across the lake in one of the Dewey launches, or to sit 


and listen to the splashing waves keeping time to the 
music and patter of feet within ? 

€|It is superb! Look about you; see how all are enjoying themselves like one great, good-natured family — not a ripple in 
the program to mar the evening's entertainment. 

tj This is all due to the good management, strict discipline and congeniality of the Lassen Brothers, the only restriction 
being placed upon their patrons is that they must act gentlemanly and ladylike — their motto reading. "Have all the fun 
you want, but don't get gay." 

€jj If you have never been to Lassen's, you should seize the first opportunity to do so. It will be well worth your while; and 
While you are there don't fail to see the renowned Dewey Family — Grandpa and Grandma Dewey, Big Dewey, Little 
Dewey, Steamer Dewey and Baby Dewey — all on exhibition daily at the Pavilion, located 300 feet west of the east shore 
of Cedar Lake. 

For further information see any one of their many patrons, or address Lassen Brothers, Cedar Lake, Indiana. 



-S3- 



MAJVl/EL SSL MAJVl/EL 



S'ttc censors to W. L>. Handle y 



CEVAH LAKE. IJVDIAJVA 



If there is a place in the vicinity of Cedar Lake where you can buy cheaper, or find a better 

assortment of DRY GOODS. BOOTS and SHOES, HARDWARE, GENTS' 

FURNISHINGS, CHINA WARE, GROCERIES and MEATS 

you Will Ha-de to Shotv V^ 

Z> I*REC TO'R y 

WHEN HUNGRY, remember we carry a fine line of groceries, meats, 

canned goods, frviit, etc. ....... GO TO MANUEL'S 

WHEN THE NORTH WIND BLOWS, WHEN YOU ARE WET AND 
COLD, yovi need warm \mderclothes, water-proof boots, warm 
caps and mitts or gloves . . . . . . . - -GO TO MANUEL'S 

WHEN YOU HAVE VISITORS, and haven't enough dishes to set 

the table . . . ... . . . GO TO MANUEL'S 

WHEN THE BABY HAS COLIC, you need paregoric, or other drugs GO TO MANUEL'S