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Full text of "Sri Sai Baba`S:Charters And Sayings"

TWENTY-SEVENTH TALK         553

perfect you have no feelings that can be hurf. But
most of us are not perfect. We are still a long way from
perfection, and therefore evil gossip still hurts us.
It is a weakness trfat the person can be hurt, but you
have to consider that fact after all that it does not
excuse you from provoking this evil among you.

As to superstition—yes, of course it is obvious tnat
that leads to all sorts of trouble. History shows us
the frightful things that have been caused by supersti-
tion. I suppose the dictionary would define it as
c< false and foolish belief". The President very
frequently says it is the taking of the unessential for
the essential—the magnifying of the unessential into
the essential. Well, so it is. It is a very good
definition though, perhaps, it does not cover the
whole ground. You know how that has worked out
in history. What frightful persecutions there have
been because of the delusions of superstition. The
whole of the work of the Inquisition, the whole of the
extraordinary abominations which were committed in
its name, came from this superstition that people
must believe and must act in a certain way and in that
way only. It is difficult for us to believe that the
horrors of the Inquisition could have been permitted
by men with any spark of proper feeling or decent
thought anywhere about them. Yet you know they
were the logical result of their own horrible supersti-
tions. They had this superstition, which cannot be
characterised in words strong enough to describe it, •