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Full text of "Stamering And Cognate Defects Of Speech Vol - Ii"

MODES OF ENUNCIATION, ETC.           109

" f What color m milk ?' — * Milk Is white.9
11' What is white ? ' — * if Ok Is white/
"*Name five objects that are generally white/ — * IfMk,
ric€j the lily, the swan, and plaster are white/ "

In more advanced work the pupils relate anecdotes,
make short speeches, describe travels, and so on.

An Austrian teacher recommends that advanced
pupil* be frequently Interrupted by questions and
requests to repeat™and that they be thus tested
by any artificial difficulties the teacher is able to
devise.

In most institutions the students are required to
associate and converse with strangers to a consider-
able extent during the latter part of the training*
This intercourse sometimes           by the name of

** stranger-practice."

So much for the various unembelUshed exercises.
It will be understood, of course, that the curriculum

of no one institution embraces all of the verbal exer-
described. Some systems embrace a majority
of them, and others but a few; the number and
nature of the exercises employed being determined
by the theories of the person employing the sys-
tem. Concerning the value of the exercises little
need be said. There is no inherent virtue In the
themselves; benefit can be derived only
from the principles enjoined* These principles have
already been discussed. Let us as$umef however,