Skip to main content

Full text of "Stamering And Cognate Defects Of Speech Vol - Ii"

See other formats


MODES OF ENUNCIATION, ETC.           109

" f What color m milk ?'  * Milk Is white.9
11' What is white ? '  * if Ok Is white/
"*Name five objects that are generally white/  * IfMk,
ricj the lily, the swan, and plaster are white/ "

In more advanced work the pupils relate anecdotes,
make short speeches, describe travels, and so on.

An Austrian teacher recommends that advanced
pupil* be frequently Interrupted by questions and
requests to repeatand that they be thus tested
by any artificial difficulties the teacher is able to
devise.

In most institutions the students are required to
associate and converse with strangers to a consider-
able extent during the latter part of the training*
This intercourse sometimes           by the name of

** stranger-practice."

So much for the various unembelUshed exercises.
It will be understood, of course, that the curriculum

of no one institution embraces all of the verbal exer-
described. Some systems embrace a majority
of them, and others but a few; the number and
nature of the exercises employed being determined
by the theories of the person employing the sys-
tem. Concerning the value of the exercises little
need be said. There is no inherent virtue In the
themselves; benefit can be derived only
from the principles enjoined* These principles have
already been discussed. Let us as$umef however,