(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Children's Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Stamering And Cognate Defects Of Speech Vol - Ii"

MODES OF ENUNCIATION, ETC.           173

Milton, is, In a critical point of view, the favorite object of

my system." J

"Att impMm®ni$ are best surmounted (even in what relates
to the primary requisites of facility and intelligibleness) by
aiming at the highest graces of rhetorical emphasis and Aar-
itumic inflection." *

11 In my own particular practice, I have derived considerable
assistance from an application of the principles of musical
inflection and proportion"9

Thus we see that TMwall employed rhythm more
than a century ago- But even Thclwail was antici-
pated, for C&lius Aurelianus4 recommended a form
of rhythm& a quarter of a century before Thelwall
treated Ms first case of stammering.

This historical review may seem Irrelevant but we
cite the facts to show how utterly baseless (and base)
are the pretensions of a number of modern "speech
specialists1* to have invented the rhythmic "systems"
that they ply.

And what of the efficacy of rhythm ?

It must be admitted that with slow, drawling,
rhythmic speech,, stammering diminishes or disappears
in a majority of cases* Therefore, if the stammerer
will carry a metronome and catefully wind the in*
strament before speaking* and, whilst speaking,

* Lot. cH.» p. 150.       * Lot* cUn p, 337*       s LOG. cit., p. 231.
4 De morbift            ct chronids llbri octo.   Job. C. Amman recen-

sult emacwitvit   Amsielied&ml 1775.
s The rhythm of clcclmwtoiy speech*