(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Susquehanna - Student Newspaper (Vol. 13; Nos. 8-10)"



ti. ' ^ 



(y 



fyt/fo 



I 








i 



j 



P 
















wimm^ 



111 



The Susquehanna... 

ESTABLISHED 1891. 500 CIRCULATION. 

Vol. XIII. APRIL, 1903. No. 8 

CONTENTS. 

LITERARY. PAGK . 

The Birth of Old Glory, 313 

Robert Morris, - « 318 

The Thkes of Poetry, 322 

Juliet, 326 

Signs of the Approach of Spring, - 330 

Beyond the Alps Lies Italy, - - - 333 

SOCIETIES. 

Clionian, 334 

Philosophian, 335 

Y. M. C. A., - - 337 

Y. W. C. A., - * 338 

SoCYETY OF NXTXBAL SciF^CF, - - - 339 

THEOLOGICAL NOTES, 342 

DEPARTMENTS. 

Preparatory, - 343 

Music, 344 

Commercial, 345 

Ladies, 346 

LOCALS AND PERSONALS, ... - 349 

EDITORIAL, 351 

Published each Month of the Scholastic Year by the 

Students' Publishing Association, Susquehanna University. 

SELINSGROVE, PENNA. 



■%- : - •■■ ■" ^-^''- ■-■ ■,;':.- ■.;".: ^o^T^.-r:;.'. . 



■■■■■I 



The Susquehanna... 

Selinsgrove, April, 1903. 



11 



THE BIRTH OF "OLD GLORY. 

IN all the records of man in his tribal relations, we find that 
it has always been characteristic of a people, no matter by 
what ties they are bound together, to have an emblem which 
symbolizes its object or ambition. 

We may consider the flag* of any nation we will, — what it 
is and how it came to be — we soon feel that it is more than an 
ornament made of bits of bright colored cloth. It is actually 
visible history; it is so vitality connected with the past his- 
tory of the people it represents that we cannot help but feel a 
respect for it, if it is a foreign flag - ; or a thrill of love and pa- 
triotism if it is our own "Stars and Stripes." This glorious em- 
blem stands not only for the union of the colonies but also for 
the principles under which they were united. 

The object of this sketch is to set forth a few of the cir- 
cumstances under which "Old Glory" came forth and took its 
place among the banners of the world. 

Whiie the tide of resentment and rebellion in the hearts 
of the oppressed colonists was rising rapidly to the point of 
overflow, a number of banners had been in use for a short time 
only to be superseded by others. The first noteworthy one of 
these was the Rattlesnake Flag with the motto "Don't 
Tread on Me." It was adopted in a spirit of defiance and cer- 
tainly expressed the feelings of the colonists, yet a venomous 
serpent was not the best emblem for a people struggling to 
free itself from the tyranny of a mother country. Although 
Paul Jones, the founder of the American Navy, strongly dis- 
approved of this device he was compelled to fling it out to the 
breezes over his ship the Alfred. It was the first American 

Essay receiving honorable mention in contest instituted by the Conrad 
Wiser chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution. Read Tues- 
day evening, March 10, 1903. 

(313.) 






314 The Susquehanna. 

Flag* shown on a regular man-of-war. This happened in De- 
cember, 1775, and not long- afterwards a newer flag' took the 
place of the boastful Rattlesnake Flag-. The new flag- bore a 
picture of a great pine tree and the words "An Appeal to 
Heaven." In a certain sense there was a beautiful significence 
in this emblem; the lofty pine might easily seem to be bear- 
ing the appeal of an oppressed people to heaven, and itself 
represent progressive vigor, still while the colonists believed 
that in the sight of Heaven theirs was a just cause and even 
though they trusted heaven to help them win, they were 
making preparations for actual warfare. Theirs was surely 
not a faith without works. 

Although it is not certainly known, it is supposed by 
many, that the Pine Tree Flag was the emblem carried by 
the Americans at the Battle of Bunker Hill. The Pine Tree 
Klag enjoyed but a short-lived popularity; it and the blue 
•'Liberty" flag — the first American Flag to appear in the South 
— gave place to the first Union Flag, which was formally dis- 
played for the first time in the American camp by Gen. Wash- 
ington at Cambridge, near Boston, Jan. 2, 1776. This Union 
flag was the most distinctive and appropriate emblem yet 
adopted. It bore thirteen stripes, alternate red and white, to 
represent the union of the colonies. These colonies, however 
had not yet formed a distinct nation and in token of the rela- 
tions still existing with England it retained the English cross 
in the upper left hand corner. 

About six months after this flag was adopted the thirteen 
colonies declared themselves an independent nation and the 
war for Independence was on in good earnest. The colonists 
now felt the necessity of a national emblem. A committee 
was appointed for the purpose of procuring a flag which 
should express precisely the principles by which the union 
was effected and to be maintained. This committee consisted 
of General Washington, Robert Morris and Captain George 
Ross. They met and deliberated and at the suggestion doubt- 
less of Captain Ross called on the widow of his nephew invit- 



«mmmm*Mmi < [immm'Bu mmmtttm eiMmm»m».iu i n . *fliHHHHHBHI 



The Susquehanna. 315 

ing her to make the proposed flag-. She consented to make the 
attempt. Gen. Washington prepared a little sketch for Mis- 
tress Ross to follow; a new device was to be substituted for 
the St. George's cross, and it is generally conceded that Betsey 
Ross suggested the five pointed star for each of the colonies or 
— as they now called themselves — states; it is likely that the 
stars and the blue field were suggested by the coat of arms of 
the Washington family. Other minor changes were proposed 
by Mistress Ross and adopted by the committee. 

Joseph Rodman Drake shows a beautiful conception of the 
significance of the "Red, White and Blue," in the poem which 
begins: 

When Freedom from her mountain height, 
Unfurled her standard to the air, 
She tore the azure robe of night, 
And set the stars of glory there! 
She mingled with its gorgeous dyes 
The milky baldric of the skies, 
And striped its pure celestial white 
With streakings of the morning light, etc. 
There was no time for Betsey Ross to conceive such poetic 
fancies, her mind and hands had an intensely practical task 
to perform, nay even, considered only as a task, a homely and 
tedious one. Those were the days when modern invention had 
not yet introduced the sewing- machine to lighten women's 
labor; and with her own hands she cut out and sewed together 
the parts of the flag. Who can conceive of the love and pa- 
triotism, the sadness and fear, the joy and hope that must 
have been stitched into that famous piece of needle work? It 
may have been moistened with her tears for it represented the 
cause for which her husband had given his life, only six 
months before. 

That the flag- was satisfactory when completed is evident 
for we have no records of any change being made at that time. 
On June 14th, 1777, it was officially adopted by Congress 
in the following resolution: 



316 The Susquehanna, 

Resolved, That the Flag- of theThirteen United States of 
America be Thirteen Stripes, Alternate Red and White; that 
the Union be Thirteen Stars in a Blue Field: Representing 
a New Constellation. 

Resolved, That Captain John Paul Jones be appointed to 
command the ship Ranger. 

Congress most likely had no object in passing- these two 
acts in one resolution, other than saving- time; but Captain 
Jones did not miss the full significance of the fact. He said 
of Old Glory, "That flag- and I are twins, born the same hour, 
from the same womb of destiny. We cannot be parted in 
life or in death. So long - as we can float, we shall float to- 
g-ether. If we must sink we shall g-o down as one." We shall 
see later how closely his career is connected with that of the 
new flag. 

On Aug. 3rd, 1777, "Old Glory 1 ' was flung- to the breezes 
for the first time on land, at Fort Schuyler presumably on the 
first day of the sieg-e of that fort. 

Another flag like the one made by Betsey Ross and second 
in importance to it, held a unique position during- the Revolu- 
tion. It was the one presented to Captain Jones by a number 
of Portsmouth belles. It was made out of the pieces of their 
best silk o-owns and the stars of the new constellation were 
cut from the bridal dress of the wife of a young New Hamp- 
shire officer. When Jones hoisted this flag over his ship the 
Ranger, July 4, 1777. "Old Glory" floated for the first time 
over a man-of-war. When he made his trip to Europe, he 
took his flag with him and it was flyingover the Ranger when 
she entered Breste Roads in the presence of the Grand French 
Fleet. The first division of this fleet which Jones met, was 
under the command of Rear Admiral La Motte Piquet. Cap- 
tain Jones sent a courteous note to him, informing him that 
the Ranger flew the new American flag, and asking if a salute 
would be returned. He received the reply that as senior offi- 
cer of a republican naval force, he would receive the usual 
salute. Accordingly the next day Feb. 13, 1778, a salute was 



The Susquehanna. 317 

lired and tk 01d Glory 1 ' was for the first time recognized by a 
foreign natiOta as the emblem of an independent country. It 
was to this flag that the St. Andrew's and St. George's cross 
was compelled to strike in the first defeat of a British ship by 
an American ship, i. e. when the Ranger conquered the Drake 
off the coast of Ireland. The end of this remarkable flag was 
sad but fitting, it went down waving over the Bon Homme 
Richard, the only ship on record that captured and conquered 
the ship that sunk her. 

When Elizabeth Griscom Ross, the young widow of acon- 
tinental soldier in her humble home, heard and accepted the 
proposition of that committee of illustrious patriots; she re- 
ceived the highest compliment ever paid to an American 
woman either before or since. 

Of all the other noble women of her time she held the 
most honorable position. She was a Daughter of the Amer- 
ican Revolution; she knew what it meant to suffer and sacri- 
fice for the cause of liberty. Her first husband Captain John 
Ross died at his post of duty guarding a magazine. She sub- 
sequently married Captain Joseph Ashburn, also a continental 
soldier, he was taken prisoner by the British and died in Mills 
Prison England. Again she was sought and won by a pa- 
triot, John Claypole who had also been confined in Mill's 
prison. Mistress Ross lived to the ripe old age of eighty- 
four. She died in 1836 after having seen the Stars and Stripes 
floating over a country free and independent and on the high 
road to prosperity. 

The flag which Betsey Ross made had a progeny which 
may be likened to that of the patriarch to whom it was prom- 
ised that his seed should be as the sands of the seashore; for 
there are now American flags by the millions. 

The little house where this patriarch had its birth is No. 
239 Arch St., Philadelphia, and of all the treasures of that 
historic city it is one of the most sacred. 

To trace the career of "Old Glory" from the time of its 
birth to the present time, would be to write a history which 



318 The Susquehanna. 

stands absolutely alone. Suffice it to say, it exists substan- 
tially in its original form the only change having" been made 
in the number of stars to which one has been added for each 
state since admitted to the Union. After the rapid succession 
of the events of a century and a quarter of progress, it is now 
honored and respected as the emblem of a mighty power. It 
is still inspiring- patriots to deeds of valor and heroism un- 
surpassed by other heroes under other flags. From the time 
it was unfurled it has never been trailed in the dust, and as 
long as time shall last may "Old Glory" wave over the most 
glorious country on the face of the earth.' 

F ann ii; M. Jacobs. 



ROBERT MORRIS. 

WE stand out under the heavens at night and looking up 
see the stars twinkling- and shining in the blue 
vault overhead. Some of them seem large and bright; others 
small. Then again there are those stars which seem to grow, 
as the night goes on a pace, till they seem to rival the stars 
of first magnitude in their splendor. So it is with men. 

There are some men whose names become reverenced 
household words before the deeds which have made them 
famous have passed into history. As an example of such men 
we might cite our beloved Washington. Likewise there are 
men who must plod on and on, bearing the cares of a nation 
on their shoulders, and never receive anything near their just 
mete till generations have passed. Such a man was the sub- 
ject of this sketch. 

Robert Morris, the statesman and financier, was born in 
England in 1734 and came, with his father, to America in 
1747. They located in Philadelphia and young Morris en- 
tered upon his business career as a clerk in the establishment 
of Chas. Willing, then one of the leading foreign-traders in 
this country. His rare ability as a financier was so marked 

Prize essay of the contest instituted by the Conrad Wiser Chapter of 
the Daughters of the American Revolution read March io, 1903. 



1 tnw mmmmmmmmm 



The Susquehanna. 319 

that at his coming- of age he was offered a partnership in the 
firm of Willing- and Son. He accepted and from this position 
rose to the headship of the firm. On this as a stepping stone 
Morris built up a magnificent fortune. 

But fate had other than personal uses for the fortune of 
this great, unselfish Pennsylvania!! and other than private 
uses for his great financial engineering ability. 

England imposed on her American Colonies the unjust 
Stamp Act and immediately Morris, to the detriment of his 
business interests, took up the cause of his country and fought 
the odious act. Then came the calling of the Continental 
Congress, to which body Morris was a delegate from 1775-76. 
and the Declaration of Independence. This later act the del- 
egate from Pennsylvania opposed but finally signed and his- 
tory records how true he was to the cause of liberty. 

Then followed the war with all it's financial strain, and 
Congress tried in vain to manage the financial affairs of the 
government. Committees of finance were appointed but to no 
purpose; and as a last resort a new department was formed and 
Robert Morris was chosen head of this bureau of finance. 

We know that he accepted this position with reluctance 
tor in a letter to General Schuyler he calls it a situation 
which causes me to tremble when I think of it. In the same 
letter he says, while speaking further on the same subject, 
4 'which nothing could tempt me to accept but a gleam of hope 
that my exertions may possibly retrieve this poor country 
from a ruin which now tnreatens merely for want of system 
and economy in spending and vigor in raising it's public 
moneys." We all know how faithfully Morris endeavored to 
fulfill this last need and inspite of the disgraceful and disgust- 
ing attacks of Lee and Randolph how successful he was. He 
gave up his business that he might put all his time at the 
service of his country and sacrificed his private funds to the 
cause he loved so dearly and served so well. 

Month after month passed and as the national funds grew 
lower and still lower, as loans became more difficult to obtain, 



mmmmmm 



320 The Susquehanna. 

and the states refused to pay their quotas, Morris dipped 
deeper and deeper into his private funds till we find him say- 
ing - , in a letter to the President of the Pennsylvania Council, 
"unluckily the late movements of the army have so entirely 
drained me of money that I have been obliged to pledge my 
personal credit deeply, besides borrowing- money from my 
friends and advancing- to promote the public service every 
shilling- of my own/' This was true indeed for historical re- 
search shows us that at one time. Morris had pledg-ed his per- 
sonal credit to the immense amount of one million four-hun- 
dred thousand dollars. Pledg-e after pledge had been made 
by him to appease the anxious creditors of the government, 
till this great amount was reached. And yet this man among 
men has no monument to do him honor in any American city. 
This one, who bore the brunt of the struggle, when he had 
given his all to the land of his adoption, received more cen- 
sure than praise. The man who wrote to General Schuyler 
in 17#1 ordering one thousand barrels of flour to be sent to 
Washington's suffering army and saying in reply to the ques- 
tion of payment, "for reimbursement you may take me either 
as a public or private man, for I pledge myself to repay you 
with hard money wholly, if necessary, or part hard and part 
paper." This same man a few years later lay suffering in 
prison because he was unable to pay a debt of a few hundred 
dollars. This was his country's gratitude! A prison for the 
man who had given it his all! 

And his responsibility to his country was not relinquished 
when the war ended and he retired from office. We see this 
in an advertisement which appeared in a Philadelphia paper 
at that time and which stated that all persons holding bills 
on the government on which he had gone as personal security, 
should present them and he would honor them. This was loy- 
alty in the highest interpretation of the word. What would 
America have done without her Morris? Without him Wash- 
ington could never have executed some of his plans; for Mor- 
ris furnished, often out of his personal funds, the means to 
execute these projects. Without him it would have been al- 



■■^■■■■■■■■■■■^■^■■■■■■■■iHiBMHH^^^HBHHHHHHil 



The Susquehanna. 321 

most impossible to obtain foreign loans; for Morris had or- 
ganized the Bank of North America for that very purpose 
and letters from foreign representatives, written at that time 
and concerning- loans, show that they based their trust on 
Morris' great ability. In a word many of the successes of this 
government's early days would have been failures had not 
Morris been their backbone and mainstay. 

But there is a time when every man's life work closes, 
whether he is willing or not, and even great men like Morris 
are not exempt from the levies of death. He died May the 
eighth 1806 with the memory of his country's ingratitude still 
fresh in his mind as he thought of the prison cell which he 
had latelv left. 

Morris may be said to have been contemporaneous with 
Pitt, the younger of England. But he differed widely from 
Pitt in that while Pitt was dragging England deeper and 
deeper into the mire of debt, by his poor judgment, Morris 
was, by the sheer force of his wonderful foresight and wisdom, 
dragging America to the terra tirma of national credit. 

Ah Pennsylvania yours is a happy lot to lookup and say, 
of Morris, "He is ours." No one knows him better than you 
who in whose legislative halls he toiled and whose represent- 
ative he was at the framing of the Federal Constitution and 
the historic body that drew up the Declaration of Independ- 
ence. Well has he served you and nobly has he wrought for 
his country and liberty. 

New England may well boast of her Ethan Allen, we too 
are proud of him; Virginia can with just pride speak of her 
Washington and we join her in praising and honoring the 
father of our country; then can you blame us when, asPenn- 
sylvanians, we say, while our hearts thrill with pride: We 
are happy and proud with you our sister states in the common 
possession of such great and noble men, but let us add to the 
crown of the immortals the keystone gem that bound the land 
together with his life's best interests and with the cement of 






, i tmmiMtmmmmmmmam 



322 The Susquehanna. 

his own gold helped to make this landwh^tit is; the diamond 
of true worth that cut it's way through the dark days of ad- 
versity and trial and came out unblemished — Robert Morris of 
Pennsylvania. E. M. Gkarhart. 



THE TREES OF POETRY. 1 

rROM the earliest periods of history mankind have regarded 
trees with veneration. Primitive man was dependent 
upon them to a larg"e extent for his existence, and sought the 
forest for both food and shelter. The pagan built his altar in 
the seclusion of groves and there offered sacrifice to his gods. 
Hither the philosopher resorted that he might pursue his 
thoughts undisturbed by the noise of the city, and in the soli- 
tude of the woods the poet found inspiration for his noblest 
songs. The cool shade, the leafy aisles, the swaying branches, 
the rugged trunks, and the gnarled roots became his theme, 
and many are the pictures of sylvan charms he has given us. 
The botanist explains the minute distinctions in the forma- 
tion of buds, leaves and flowers in the various families and 
species, but it is the poet who shows us their beauties and 
teaches us to observe and admire nature in the vigorous oak 
as well as in the slender flower that thrives beneath its pro- 
tecting shade. It is he who portrays the swelling bud and 
, the changing leaf, the sturdy defiance of one tree and the 
graceful bowing of another as the storm sweeps their 
branches; he interprets the music of the forest, and again the 
deep stillness of its solitude. To the poet likewise we are in- 
debted for many of the ancient legends of trees and for the 
popular fancies in regard to them. 

Of all forest trees, the oak is probably most frequently 
named by both ancient and modern writers. In Greece we 
meet in very early times with the oracle of Jupiter at the oak 
of Dodoria, and among Roman writers we find frequent men- 
tion of the sacra Jovi quereus. In Gaul and Britain the high- 

*In addition to the authors quoted directly, the writer of this production 
is indebted to the volumes "Our Native Trees," "A Year Among Trees," 
and "Forest Life and Forest Trees" for parts of his material. 



W"*"*^-" 



The Susquehanna. 



323 



est regard was paid to the same tree. The oak is the embod- 
iment of grandeur, strength and endurance, and is almost 
universally recognized "king of the forest." 

"Like the oak of the mountain, deep-rooted and firm, 
Erect when the multitude bends to the storm," 
exclaimed the poet Whittier. Virgil looked with admiration 
upon its majestic appearance, and described it in his inimi- 
table manner: 

"Joves own tree 

That holds the woods in awful sovereignty; 
For lengths of ages lasts his happy reign, 
And lives of mortal men contend in vain. 
Full in the midst of his own strength he stands, 
Stretching his brawny arms and leafy hands, 
His shade protects the plains, his head the hill commands."* 
If to this we add Lowell's description of the tree, 

"What gnarled trunk, what depth of shade is his! 

There needs no crown to mark the forest's king. 

How in his leaves outshines full summer's bliss! 

Sun, storm, rain, dew, to him their tribute bring" 

we may well say with Cowper: 

"It seems idolatry with some excuse 
When our forefather Druids in their oaks 
Imagined sanctity." 
Another tree, much celebrated by the ancient Romans, is 
the poplar. This tree was consecrated to Hercules, and per- 
sons offering sacrifices to Hercules were always crowned with 
branches ot poplar, and all who had gloriously conquered 
their enemies in battle wore garlands of it. Its chief char- 
acteristic noted by poets is the silvery appearance of its 
foliage. The aspen, a tree closely related to the poplar, is 
remarkable because of a pecliarity in the formation of its leaf 
stem, which causes the leaves to quiver with the slightest 

breeze. 

"Far off in highland wilds 'tis said, 
But truth now laughs at f ancy's lore, 
That of this tree the cross was made 
Which erst the Lord of Glory bore; 
And of that deed the leaves confess 
E'er since in troubled consciousness." 8 

'^Translations. 
^Spirit of the Woods. 



324 The Susquehanna. 

The willow is celebrated in romance and romantic his- 
tory. Writers have always assigned this tree to youthful 
lovers, as affording - the most appropriate arbor for their rus- 
tic vows, which would seem to acquire a peculiar sacredness 
when spoken under the shade of this poetical tree. The weep- 
ing willow is a native of Asia. On the banks of the Euphrates, 
near Babylon, it is abundant. It is the tree of which the 

Psalmist speaks: 

"By the rivers of Babylon, 
There we sat down, yea we wept 
When we rembered Zion. 
Upon the willows in the midst thereof 
We hanged our harps." 4 
This tree is considered a tit emblem of elegant sorrow. For- 
merly it was frequently engraved as a design on tombstones, 
and is found growing- in many old cemeteries. The willow is 
also the emblem of despairing love. Shakespeate represents 
Dido lamenting the loss of iEneas: 

"In such a night 
Stood Dido, with a willow in her hand, 
Upon the wild sea banks and waved her love 
To come again to Carthage." 
The beech figures in literature because of its shade; the 
ancient writers from Virgil down were continually sending 
their heroes, seeking rest and recreation, to recline under 
wide-spreading beaches. For example: 

"Beneath the shade which beechen boughs diffuse, 
You, Tityrus, entertain your sylvan muse." 5 
The smooth bark of the beech is admirably adopted for the in- 
scriptions carved upon it. This practice, so common among 
rUvStics of the present day, is also mentioned by the ancients. 
The birch is remarkable for its elegance. Its branches 
are finely divided and often incline to a drooping habit. There 
is a remarkable airiness in its slender, feathery spray, ren- 
dered still more so by its small tremulous leaves. Of it Cole- 
ridge exclaims, 

"Most beautiful 
Of forest trees — the lady of the woods." 



♦Psalms 137. 
translation from Virgil. 



■MPWNMMH 



■ ■ . ■ ■ 



The Susquehanna. 325 

The linden and the sycamore are both classical trees and 
were highly prized by the ancient Latins. Others might be 
mentioned also, but space will be given to only one more — 
the pine, which well deserves a place among the trees of 
poetry. The ''solemn pines" are always associated with wild 
mountain scenery. They climb the steep hillsides, where 
their towering heads add grandeur to the jagged cliffs; and 
on the very mountain-top the shattered trunk still defies the 
blast. The white pine, being a native American tree, has no 
legendery history or classical association, but it is not with- 
out honor in its own country. Our own much loved poets 
united in singing its praises. The lumbermen of our virgin 
forests were envious of the reputation of the oak, and insisted 
that the pine was monarch among trees, because of its great 
height and massive diameter. For a magnificent picture of 
the pine all of Lowell's poem "To a Pine Tree" should be 
read, which begins: 

"Far up on Katahdin thou towerest, 
Purple blue with distance and vast; 
Like a cloud or the lowland thou lowerest, 
That hangs poised on a lull in the blast." 

Pine woods are celebrated for the murmuring sound of 

their leaves when the lofty branches are swayed by the breeze. 

When the South Wind touches the lyre with gentle hand we 

may hear a voice 

"In the pine leaves fine and small, 
Soft and sweetly musical." 6 * 

But when the North Wind seizes the strings he strikes a 

deeper chord; the music swells and the sound rises and falls 

like the roar of ocean waves breaking upon a rocky shore. 

Nor is the music ever out of tune with our own feelings. 

When the poet, in sympathy with one who mourned, wished 

to sing a melancholy song he took his listeners to 

"Where the summer evening breeze 
Moaned sadly through the lonely trees." 7 

But "beneath the tall pine's voiceful shadow," his soul filled 

•Whittier. 
t Lowell. 



mmmmm 



mm 



326 The Susquehanna. 

with melodies and his heart with happiness, he hears only 

"The green trees, whose tops did sway and bend, 
Low singing ever more their pleasant tune." 

Oh, why should we reject such sympathy, be deaf to such 
music, and blind to such charms. Would that we might see 
as the poet sees, hear as he hears, and feel as he feels. Then 
should our lives be filled with happiness and our hearts with 
praise to Him who hath put such loveliness in all His handi- 
work. Silvester. 



"If you would be pungent, be brief; for it is with words 
as with sunbeams — the more they are condensed, the deeper 
they burn." 



JULIET. 

MANY characters are difficult to understand because of the 
greatness of their work or ability but neither of these 
obscure our vision as we behoid this character. She is great 
in no respect except that she took the course marked out by 
her convictions and willingly paid the price of her life as a 
seal to the genuineness of her conduct. We are nowhere over- 
awed by the greatness of her thought on character, but rather 
by her simplicity. We feel nowhere as in the presence of one 
endeavoring- to make us feel their importance, nor in the least 
self conscious of high position, nor glorying in any rare gifts, 
but rather as in the presence of one doing and daring from an 
innate principle and never even debating whether to do other- 
wise. As we go on with her we are never taken up with her 
into an atmosphere of wealth and nobility, but wholly into 
one of love and passion. While begotten amongst wealth and 
in a mansion, while subsequently the importance of her mar- 
riage is realized yet we lose sight of all her surroundings and 
see but the character itself. Her character placed among any 
class though in the poorest hamlet would mean no less to us. 



The Susquehanna. 327 

As we study this character it is not the character of Juliet 
found in "Romeo and Juliet" that we see, butwesee the class 
of which she is but the type; that class in the world that dis- 
appointed in love are disappointed in life. 

We are in many respects and likewise shall remain as the 
Almighty has made us. No man is responsible for being- born 
an American or an Englishman. So Juliet was what she was 
by birth and by nature and that could not be changed. There- 
fore Shakespeare has been true in this character just so far as 
his production, corresponds not to an imaged Juliet, but to the 
Juliet of actual life and in doing this we believe he has made 
no mistake. 

Love is found in all races and generations. It is the same 
in all people, but because of different characters and disposi- 
tions it reveals itself in different ways. In all ages it has re- 
vealed itself in one class in tearing down and breaking 
through conventionalties and customs. So this character be- 
fore us is by no means a production of man but found in 
actual life. Some have found fault with Juliet because of 
many traits she did not possess, as well as many she did pos- 
sess. But this by no means decreases the truth nor the worth 
of the character. For it has truly been said "it takes all 
kinds of people to make a world." Each class has a part to 
play and also helps to round out the whole mass. We can 
never judge another's acts and words with exact justice, for as 
our dispositions are so different we cannot fully put ourself in 
another's feelings and thoughts. 

Of all Shakespeare's heroines none is more interesting 
nor admired because as one reads, his sympathies and love are 
aroused and not his censure. 

She is brought before us as the sweet and gentle girl of 
not yet fourteen. The world is yet unknown to her and like- 
wise she to the world. We believe her to have been the good 



28 The Susquehanna. 



and obedient child her character would necessitate her to be. 
And surely it is this to a large degree that causes the great 
surprise to her parent^ when she once opposes their wishes as 
^he does in their plan for her marriage. Introduced as she is 
not for any great worth of her own, but as the tool to be used 
for great advantage to a family name, she at once arouses our 
sympathy and we hope for her to overcome the prejudice of 
her parents. 

As white appears the more white upon a dark background 
and as the rose is more beautiful amongst the thorns so this 
character appears the nobler shown among such prejudices 
and iron bound costumes. We cannot help but wish as we 
learn to love and pity her that her lot might have been cast 
among those who would have appreciated her, but had such 
been the case she never would have had the occasion to bring 
forth the nobleness in herself; and besides her life might have 
accomplished very little, but as it was it lived its allotted 
time and yet accomplished very much. Thus far we have but 
the girl. Love is first approached to her by her parents. They 
have chosen a partner for her and now ask her to sanction 
their choice. She in her girlish obedience and untrained in 
the school of love is willing if possible to do as asked. She is 
willing to look and even try to like. But as things always 
happen just in their proper time, she at the very post at which 
she is to behold the one chosen by her parents beholds the one 
chosen by a higher hand, that of Providence. He arouses 
something in her breast which had heretofore remained hid- 
den and dormant. In other words we pass from the girl to the 
lover. 

To say that Juliet loved is hardly strong enough, she is 
love. We forget her as a woman and see her only as a being 
consumed by love. In her denunciation of and opposition to 
the customs of her age and in her heroic efforts against them 
it hardly seems the work of deep thought or contemplation, 
but simply the natural outflow of an ardent love. In this part 
of her character the poet could not have been more true to na- 



The Susquehanna. 329 

ture. Her love is pure and genuine, though left undisturbed 
it would have no doubt remained meek and subdued. Life is 
to her love and to be loved by the one to whom she would give 
that love. All of which she had found in Romeo. 

As she stands that night speaking- aloud her true heart to 
none but Heaven as she thought, she is but true to her char- 
acter; and when she discovers Romeo has heard it all and since 
she has meant them, in her nobleness of heart, she but longs 
to have his response and thus have the outflow of her own 
heart returned. She is not bold for she is willing to take them 
back and have him woo and win if that seem the better to 
him. But her love was not to be left undisturbed. Her 
parents present and insist on the marriage with Paris. Mean- 
while news comes to her of the banishment of Romeo. Many 
possible plans are thus at once rumored which might have 
been resorted to had Romeo been no criminal in the eyes of 
the state. With Romeo gone all was gone and so parents, 
Paris or even the world seemed but nothing to her. And the 
love once given and reciprocated, with the one gone to which 
it was given could only find its bliss in the arms of the eter- 
nal. Thus we pass from the lover to the heroine. 

This she becomes not as a desire or even from an effort, 
but as her second nature. She is rather surprised into this 
part of her character. While we have lost sight of her 
womanhood in her part as a lover, nevertheless it has been 
growing and developing, and nowhere can we find a better ex- 
ample of true womanhood or love than when forsaken by her 
parents, her earthly guardians, and even by the one more fa- 
miliar' than all others to her, the nurse, she at once arises to 
the dignity of the occasion and if the tvorld stands against 
her she will stand against the world. She adopts the plan that 
will unite lover and lover once more. Nor does she do it not 
knowing the danger. No man ever braved the storm of the 
deep nor the flames of fire more calmly than Juliet took the 
sleep giving drug. As she lay upon her couch she sees with 
undimtned eye all the dangers and as she names the last one 



330 The Susquehanna. 

she quietly and with great reserve drains the vial. Parents 
and marriage to Paris may have hastened the deed, but only 
love for Romeo performed it. When this drug- once released 
her from its grasp and she sees dead at her side the one she 
first inquires for at consciousness, then without hesitation or 
fear she joins Romeo in death without whom life would have 
been a slow mental death to which physical death was but a 
shadow. Juliet lost her life because of her love. In others, 
such as the noble Portia, such would never have been the out- 
come. Therefore can we sa}* it was a weakness on her part? 
No. It was her nature thus to do and to have done less would 
have been not a true woman or heroine of one of her charac- 
ter. 

We say she was great only in that, she followed the 
course marked out for her by her convictions and yet that is 
the greatest thing of all. To withstand custom, forsake 
parents and leave the world branded as a suicide to do what 
one believes right takes truer courage and bravery than to 
stand upon any battlefield in the fiercest battle and undergo 
any hardship with nothing but physical pain. 

E. M. M. '03. 



SIGNS OF THE APPROACH OF SPRING. 

WE are told in the Word; "God created the heaven and the 
earth. And the earth was without form, and void; and 
darkness was upon the face of the deep*" "And God said, 
Let there be lights in the firmament of the heaven to divide 
the day from the night; and let them be for signs and for 
seasons, and for days, and for years." 

So carefully, so minutely has He divided the movements 
of the universe, that each season follows in succession with 
precise regularity, and nothing is ever permitted to mar the 
leaving of one, and the approach of another. 

Spring has ever been the favored song of the poets, and 



The Susquehanna. 331 

the dream of the artist. In Greece and Rome poets were in- 
spired by the mild temperature, the pure blue of the sky, the 
soft opening- of the leaves and buds, the thousand delicate 
tints of the flowers o'er hill and valley, that tended to breath 
into their beings, the very breath of thing's divine, that caused 
them to burst forth in songs of sweetest melody, and whose 
echoes have been wafted to our souls with keenest delight. 

As the darkness of night recedes, and the light of another 
day approaches, quietly, cautiously, even so, does Spring with 
its attendant beauties, steal upon us ere we are aware, and 
crowns us with its glory, and casts round o'er all the earth, 
its radiance of beauty and delight, and Frigid Winter seems 
only too glad to retire, to give place to his more adorable 
sister, Spring. 

God in his great wisdom, ordained that His seasons 
should be preceded by indications or signs. All the beauties 
and forces of Nature seem to have been brought into play, to 
reveal to man their appearance, and convice him of their su- 
periority and majesty over other seasons of the year. But 
upon no other has He lavished so much that conveys the most 
suggestive and tender indications of the seasons, than of 
Spring. It seems that all the beauties of heaven were re- 
served for its triumphant entry upon earth. 

While the beautiful snow of the fast retreating winter, 
lingers long upon the high mountain top, or in some secluded 
valley, and while the warmth of the approaching sun seeks 
to drive it from its lair, already, the trees are beginning to 
bud, here and there the soft tender grass of the earth is seen 
to shoot up through the mass of decayed leaves and twigs, 
and touch the earth with welcome spots of living green. 

As our eyes are feasting upon the things of beauty round 
about us, we do not fail to notice the dainty little hepatica 
lifting up to us his smiling face to be admired, nor can we 
overlook the true blue of the violet, or the blue-bell dropped, 
as it were, from the azure sky above, to adorn the lap of 
Mother Earth. But fairest and best of all, our eager eyes are 







332 The Susquehanna. 

searching- through the mass of fallen leaves, for the little 
fragrant red or white trailing arbutns. It seems to send a 
thrill of joy through us, as we behold the beauties of God 
revealed in His fairest, His best, the flowers of the field. 

Already the sap is dripping from the broken boughs of 
the trees, and as we are attracted by its appearance, we be- 
hold the buds full upon the limbs, upon the horse chestnut 
trees thev are beginning to sweat, as if impatient to await 
their time of bursting their bands asunder, and clothe their 
mistress in a robe of snowy whiteness. 

What is that sound that greets our ears in the early morn, 
surely we have heard it before. We look out of our window, 
and lo— up there upon that bough, sits Rooin Red-breast sing- 
ing his first song, announcing his safe arrival from the South 
land. But he is not alone, with him comes the bluebird, and 
how delightful to the eye and ear is his presence, as he sings 
his songs of joyful lays. 

While the flowers, the grass, and the trees are lending 
their influence to beautify the approach of Spring, the insects 
are taking advantage of the opportunities afforded, and are 
coming forth from their hiding places of rest and slumber, are 
stretching their wings and limbs, and preparing themselves 
for their particular part in this busy world, which God de- 
signed for them to do. 

Already the bees and flys are attracted by the warm rays of 
the sun. and are seen flitting about, here and there, gathering 
food for their young, or teaching them the use of their frail 
wings. 

There are many beautiful and useful lessons to be learned 
upon the approach of Spring. Like some of the inferior ani- 
mals who hibernate for the Winter, we too seem to have re- 
laxed our energies, and have gone into places of seclusion to 
await the warming influences of the returning Spring, to call 
us from our state of lethargy, and awaken us to newer duties 
and beauties. 

As God has appointed the seasons to come in their regu- 



The Susquehanna. 333 

lar course, even so has He expected us as His intelligent, and 
higher beings, to take cognizance of these signs, and perform 
our parts in the world with consistency and regularity, and 
contribute to it that which it has the liberty to expect. 



BEYOND THE ALPS LIES ITALY. 

ALL of worth or value must be gained by labor. It is not 
until the painter has toiled long years and time after 
time seen his efforts fruitless that he portrays on canvas a 
soul-stirring picture. God knew that for man to live happily 
and enjoy his blessings, he must know what they cost. 

"Beyond the Alps lies Italy." How expressive! Beyond 
the trials and temptations of this life, lies the goal. 

Many rough paths must be travelled, many difficulties 
overcome before the reward. "Excelsior" should be the motto 
of all who wish to excel. 

Those who wish to excel must toil on regardless of pleas- 
ure and always aim higher. Many things must be denied 
those who wish to become great in this world or in the next. 
Many difficulties appear in the way to a cultivated mind, 
but it should always be remembered that it is the Alps that 
are being crossed, and sooner or later Italy will appear. 

The young student in learning is too apt to fall into the 
error that he can gain the highest distinction as a scholar or 
gentleman, and yet enjoy all the pleasures of life. 

"No cross, no crown" is a universal law. Labor is the 
power that moves the world. 

Napoleon defied the Alpine steeps and pressed on with de- 
termination and gained Italy. All hardships and difficulties 
must be overcome to gain the reward. Could all those whose 
names have come down to us through the ages be assembled 
together they would warn us to surmount the many obstacles 
and reach the goal. The pleasures of this world and those of 
a laborer are not congenial; and he who would enjoy both will 
reap no reward. R. 



334 The Susquehanna. 

Societies. 



CLIONIAIN. 

DR. DAVID A. DAY MEMORIAL SESSION. 

ONE of the most impressive sessions ever held in Clio hall 
was the meeting- of Friday evening-, March 20. The ex- 
ercises of the evening- were devoted to doing- honor to the 
memorv of Dr. David A. Day, who dedicated his life to the 
mission work in Africa. The occasion of the memorial ses- 
sion at this time was the unveiling of a portrait of Dr. Day, 
which the society secured for their hall as the most fitting 
token of remembranoe of this beloved man, who in his college 
days was an active member of the Clionian Literary Society. 
Following- is the program rendered: 

Piano Solo Miss Robison 

Unveiling Address Miss Foster 

Essay Mr. Barry 

Vocal Solo Mr. Tool 

Oration Mr. Sheese 

Reading Miss Krall 

Selection "String Quartette" 

Reading Miss Snyder 

Vocal Solo Mr. Hare 

Recitation Miss Schoch 

Herald Mr. Smith 

David A. Day was born February 8, 1851. At the age of 
eighteen years he entered Susquehanna University (then 
Missionary Institute), where he was a diligent student and 
was highly esteemed by his classmates. He completed the 
Theological Course in 1874. The same year he sailed to take 
charge of the Muhlenburg Mission in Africa, accompanied by 
his faithful wife whom he had married just previous to em- 
barking. The remainder of his life, with the exception of one 
short visit to his native land, was spent in arduous labor at 
this post; until on December 17, 1897, having given twenty- 



The Susquehanna. 335 

three years of loving - service to his Master, he died a martyr 
to the cause for which he lived so nobly. The picture se- 
cured by Clio is a life-size crayon portrait set in a handsome 
gilt frame, and is a worthy adornment for our hall, besides 
serving - to keep alive the memory of one whose life presents 
so many features worthy of imitation. 

Especial thanks are due to Miss Krall, and to Mr. S. B. 
Hare, Esq., of Altoona, for their assistance in the program of 
March 20. Our young- friend, Miss Mildred Schoch also de- 
serves commendation for the creditable manner in which she 
has appeared before the society several times during- the past 
month. W. H. K. '05. 



PHILOSOPHIAN. 

WE hav* now entered again upon the last term of the scho- 
lastic year. As persons to whom this time has been 
entrusted for the building up of ourselves and the helping of 
others, should we not as it were take an inventory of our past 
attainments and our present standing-? Have we measured up 
to all our privileges and meet faithfully all our responsibilities? 
We must remember that not only in religious but even in in- 
tellectual growth we are responsible for our sins of omission 
as well as those of commission. One has well said "tell me 
the good influences a man has shunned and I will thus measure 
for you the depth of his criminality." But surely this principle 
holds true in intellectual advancement as well. The student 
that lives as it were in the very atmosphere of privilege for 
improvement but yet fails to use or avail himself of these 
stands also as faulty and even condemnable. For the core 
of all crime is injustice to our fellow men which unperformed 
is unjust to both. 

But more especially let every member of Philo look for him- 
self or herself just how far they have improved the privileges 
for advancement she offers them. Are we on the same plane 






336 The Susquehanna. 

as last fall when we started this year? If so may we not now 
arouse ourselves and let the past but drive us on to work all 
the harder because of what we have missed? Do you fear it 
will be hard and difficult? If so remember difficulties are 
found everywhere in life. No man in any position has ever 
had perfectly smooth sailing- from the start. Remember the 
greatest men of the world have arisen from the most adverse 
circumstances and have overcome the greatest difficulties. 
What a sad world this would be. as one of preparation for a 
better one. if all the difficulties were removed. For many a 
man is wrecked ou the rock of prosperity and success. See 
the moral wrecks and cowards produced by the accumulation 
of wealth! Seethe calm, deliberate and calculating- mind 
often puffed up and disturbed by success! Life without diffi- 
culties would be as a train descending- a great incline with 
brakes but to be wrecked and totally ruined at the end of the 
descent. But as a fact difficulties do exist and it is for us to 
make the best use af them. Some men master their difficul- 
ties but most men are mastered by them. He that sits and 
weeps because of them is their slave; he that fears to brave 
out, upon life because of them needs yet to learn that all 
things in life are gained by the man who dares to risk and en- 
deavor. He that masters difficulties as they appear one by- 
one finds them disappearing- as such and appearing- as stars 
guiding on to greater achievements. 

No man deserves great credit for doing what is naturally 
pleasing and easy for him to do. Real greatness and success 
are not simply measured by the brightness of their shining 
rays, but are proportionate to the depths from which they 
have arisen and the difficulties they have passed over. There- 
fore let the hardness of the task nor the difficulties to be over- 
come keep no member of Philo from active service. If you are 
weak in this particular then you should work all the harder to 
overcome and strengthen yourself there. 

The following officers were elected since our last writing: 
President. Miss Fannie Jacobs; Vice President, L. F. Gun- 



The Susquehanna. 337 

derman; Secretary, Miss Edna Kline; Corresponding- Secre- 
tary, G. M. Mark; Critics, L. W. Walters, P. H. Pearson; Ed- 
itor, Marian Schoch; Assistant Editor, W. K. Fleck; Monitor, 
Paul Enders. E. M. M. '03. 



Y. M. C. A. 

OUR association was represented at the State Y. M. C. A. 
convention at Lebanon, Pa., by the following delegates, 
Messrs. Richter, Sunday and Bingaman. The report which 
these men brought before our association, clearly proved the 
great feast they received while at Lebanon. 

The concluding numbers of the lecture course were given 
during the closing days of the last term. They were well en- 
joyed and we believe met the expectations of all. The com- 
mittee is to be congratulated upon having such a select course, 
and may this merely be the start for that which is to follow. 

The Missionary convention which was held at Middle- 
burg, Pa., March 27-29 was attended by the following mem- 
bers of our association: Rev. Dr. Yutzy, W. H. Derr, L. R. 
Haus, P. H. Pearson, M. H. Fischer, U. A. Guss, L. P. Gun- 
derman, F. W. Barry, L. W. Walter, and Clay Whitmoyer. 
The Mission Band of the Universit} T took charge of the con- 
vention and furnished music upon several occasions. 

Mr. Miller the College Secretary spent April 1, 2 and part 
of the 3rd among our midst. He addressed our meeting on 
Wednesday, and instructed the new committees how best to 
carry on the work. We hope that Mr. Miller's visit to our 
College will result in great good, and that many, who are yet 
out of our association may be brought within the fold and 
labor earnestly for our Master, "Whose we are and whom we 
serve." 



"Education gives power; hence it is a blessing or a curse 



according to how we use it." 



338 The Susquehanna. 

Y. W. C. A. 

I^WO new members, Miss Fickes and Miss Persing, have 
been added to the Association, and the prospects are 
that we shall have several more. 

Young- ladies should realize the necessity of identifying 
themselves with a Christian organization while away from 
home. Silent but forcible is the influence exerted for good by 
such environment. 

"I could not at the first be born. 
But by another's bitter, wailing pain; 
Another's loss must be my sweetest gain; 
And love, only to gain what I might be, 

Must wet her couch forlorn 
With tears of blood, and sweat of agony. 

Since then I cannot live a week 
But some fair thing must leave the daisied dells, 
The joy of pastures, bubbling springs and wells, 
And grassy murmurs of its peaceful days, 

To bleed in pain, and reek 
And die, for me to tread life's pleasant ways. 

Naked, I cannot clothed be 
But worms must patient wear their satin shroud: 
The sheep must shiver to the April cloud, 
Yielding his one white coat to keep me warm: 

In shop and factory 
For me must weary, toiling millions swarm. 

I fall not on my knees and pray, 
But God must come from heaven, to fetch that sigh, 
And pierced hands must take it back on high, 
And through His broken heart and cloven side 

Love makes an open way 
For me who could not live but that He died. 

0, awful, sweetest life of mine, 
That God and man both serve in blood and tears, 
If on myself I dare to spend 

This dreadful thing in pleasure lapped and reared, 
What am I, but a hideous idol smeared 
With human blood?" 



The Susquehanna. 339 

SOCIETY OF NATURAL SCIENCES. 

ON March 6, Mr. E. H. Diehl discussed thoroughly the sub- 
ject of Photography, giving special attention to Col- 
ored Photography. Mr. Diehl gave a brief history of the art, 
and then showed what wonderful strides had been made during 
the past century. He described in detail several of the vari- 
ous methods and experiments carried on along the line of col- 
ored photography and gave an insight into the new and fasci- 
nating subject. 

On March 20, Mr. E. M. Gearhart read a well written 
paper on the u Harbingers of Spring," after which there was 
a general discussion of that timely subject. 



"harbingers of spring." 



WHEN the chilly blasts of winter are sweeping over the coun- 
try, covering all earth with a snowy mantle, we long for 
the bright and sunny days of Spring with their birds and 
flowers. And every sign that points toward the approach of 
this happy season is looked forward to with pleasure and eager 
expectation. As the weeks pass by as the sun climbs higher 
and higher, and the days grow warmer we begin to notice the 
first harbingers of spring. 

One day while the snow is still on the ground, but the 
warm sun is shedding its livening rays into every corner, out 
of some crevice slowly creeps a rheumatic old fly and begins 
to pace slowly, and apparently painfully, up and down in the 
bright sunlight seeming to gain strength with every minute. 
We hail him with delight for he is about the first of Spring's 
advance skirmishers. Then the snows melt away and down 
every hill side come the angry little brooklets. Each rut 
and furrow adds its quota to the larger stream and by the 
time the foot of the hill is reached we have quite an angry 
little stream of muddy water. Then as the ground gives up 
its frosty moisture to the sun's warm rays the trees begin to 
assume a new appearance. The sap begins to flow freely 






Tht Susquehanna. 

Hgb tbeir ci in and the buds btgv 

If there chances to twig tltt fiuw of toe sap is 

erv nicely demonstrated for, often before the fros i fail 

and the "bleeding , ' of these brOKt^: twi 

of the decline of King Winter's reign. About 

in give its . the kisses of the cool spring 

im be pussy willoir, a:. . jjose second in the 

map TL «vo often ope :r buc scaies a little too 

gentl* caflesset of the spring-time re- 
tinging from the contact with winter 
be .: various poplars, the eimb. and othe~ Staples now 

..-„ avo and butane tht advance g-uan 

..::: Spring weal giants art upon the scene. 

L>eer. budding anc blossoming 
r plants have not Iain dormant. Tht grass has as- 
sumed a greener coat anc every here anc then oh car net 
u its green blades small whitt stars. iikt scattered snow 

fa s . ttl examination shows us that they are not snow flake* 
fees, the tiny blossoms of the chickwee Wc line 
be first flowers of spring often being in bloom be- 
r. all the snow has left the groum Thi> Tear thev wer- 
oy> tht pa ssy -willow. Thf chickweei ;oseiy foi- 

dandeiion. the arbutus tiw violet tht. heart- 
ease, and the anemone One by one they appear and greet 
the watchful observer. Along with them com-, the croc^ 
and the snow -star to glades our hearts and make earth beau- 
tiful. These splendid little heralds o: Snrmgseem toputnew 
e into the world and add ■ new semblance no g teijUi naj 
&s the Spring grows older tht cultivated trees arid plants a 
receive new life and begin an additionally rapid grow: 

Plants whose native homes ar< it tropical countries anc 
which have hern Wop-, in hot-he- Ml or warm rooms seem u 
stand still during tht winter and rermr mfft of dormant 

condition but at the fift ■ -•"'tings of Spring thev raise theit 
wean looking heads, bttrOl asunder the scale cases if theit 
buds and seem to b< »! to make up for lost tin- 



The Susquehanna. 341 

All these are only the botanic harbingers of Spring-, and 
we now turn to observe the waking- of animal life. 

Scarcely has the pussy-willow burst the sheath of its 
winter coat when we hear the chirp and call of the Bohemian 
Waxwing and see him flitting about from twig to twig in 
search of a dinner. Along w T ith him come the wood-peckers 
and the merry din of their busy bills can be heard from morn- 
ing till night. Scarcely have these two early scouts began 
their spring campaign when the robin, the blue-bird, the 
black-bird and the song-sparrow all appear and wake the day 
with their cheery calls. The robins and blue-birds appear in 
straggling numbers ranging in numbers from one to twelve, 
but the black-birds come in great flocks making the air re- 
sound with their chatter. From day to day new species and 
varieties arrive from the sunny South and make the daytime 
merry. However the day time is not the only time for birds 
and the nocturnal birds also have a part in announcing the 
approach of warmer days. The sleepy screech owl appears 
on the scene about March 1st. and lulls us to sleep with his 
doleful hooting. So with song and cry do the birds announce 
the debut of spring. Nor does the heraldry stop here. The 
very presence of the woodpecker and his drilling- on the trees 
tells us that the larvae of the beetle and other insects are 
working toward the bark surface of the trees, spurred on by 
the warmer spring sun. However the insect world seems to 
wake more slowly than the plant world. About the first in- 
sect to make his appearance is the bee, and we usually find 
him droning about the flowers of the red maple and pussy 
willow, but these are the exceptionally wakeful members of 
the bee family; as a family the bees do not appear until the 
wild flowers are well in bloom. It is toward the latter part of 
spring that the beetles, butterflys, and other insects appear. 
This is due to the fact that it requires a certain amount of 
spring sun and a certain time for the larvae to develop before 
the mature insect stage is reached and every cool day sets it 
back a pace. Thus amid the waking of the birds, the bloom- 



j 1 jh inn i«i 



342 The Susquehanna. 

ing of the trees, and the song- of the brooks has Nature's God 
planned to usher in the Spring, and as year follows year we 
look forward to the happy moments and tuneful hours upon 
which we are just entering. 

Ubeologtcal Botes- 



DR. YUTZY occupied the pulpit of Rev. M. H. Havice, 
Milton, Mar. 15th. the latter having an attack of La 
Grippe. He on the 29th addressed the Snyder County Mis- 
sionary Union in the morning, subject "Surrender of Self 
and in the evening on ''The Church Asleep." 

J. A. Richter preached at Berrysburg, Mar. 8th, Lairds- 
ville, 15th, four times. At Orange ville, 22nd, conducted the 
funeral services of Mrs. Whitmover. and at Mill ville on the 
29th. 

Chas. Lambert preached at Muncy Creek and at Danville 
on Mar. 15th and 22nd, respectively. 

H. W. B. Carney preached as the regular supply at Mill- 
ville on the 15th. 

L. P. Young was called home during the month on ac- 
count of sickness. 

W. H. Derr, U. A. Guss, M. H. Fischer and L. R. Haus. 
of the Department, Mar. 27-29th, were at Middleburg taking 
part in the Missionary Union. 

L. M. Brownmiller while home preached for his father 
Mar. 29. 

P. H. Pearson represented the C. E. of Trinity Lutheran 
Church at the Missionary Union 27-29th. 

D. J. Snyder preached for Rev. S. N. Carpenter and for 
Rev. H. C. Michael while on the Glee Club trip. Mar 15th 
and 29th he occupied the Oak Grove Charge as the regular 



The Susquehanna. 343 

supply. Also at Muncy Valley in the Moreland and Mt. Zioti 
Charges. April 5th, he preached at Danville. 

Geo. W. Fritch, W. L. Price, Geo. W. Scheese, H. 0. 
Reynolds and I. Z. Fenstermacher spent the Spring- vacation 
at their respective homes. 

Departments. 



PREPARATORY DEPARTMENT. 

WE are always glad to see a kindly spirit existing between 
individuals in our department like that displayed by 
Williams the evening- of the U. P. Basket Ball Game. 

W. R. Camerer, of Jersey Shore, has left school and does 
not expect to return. Sorry to miss you "Pete." 

Fetterlof and Smith remained at the institution during the 
recent vacation. 

Of late Shollenberger has been hanging*about the "dorm" 
a great deal, which by the way, is a bad habit. If anyone 
asks him what he is doing* he sajs, "I want to talk with sis- 
ter. M This is all true enough but it is generally some one else's 
sister he wants to talk with. 

Since Games' has become a ladies man he spends an hour 
a day curling his hair. 

W. E. Sunday, of Pennsylvania Furnace, Centre County, 
is a new student in our department. We are always glad to 
welcome any one from Centre County. 

Roberts has been making frequent trips to one of the 
brown stone mansions fronting the river. It is said k -Bobby" 
is going into the retail ice business. 

During Commencement week an afternoon is devoted to 
Field Sports at which time the various departments of the in- 
stitution compete for a banner. We have a number of capable 



The Susquehanna. 

men in our Department who should come out for track work 
and thus be fitted to uphold our Department at the Commence- 
ment Meet. Not only for this reason should our men come 
out for track work, but also to gain the physical development 
;tnd vigor, which track work is sure to give if intelligently un- 
dertaken. S. A. M. 



MUSIC DEPARTMENT. 

''Sweet music's power — 
One chord doth make us wild. 
But change the strain we weep as little child.*' 

MUSIC is a language of emotions affecting- the mind in dif- 
ferent directions: how it exercises its power on our sen- 
sitive nerves is a problem to be solved. Desponding - hearts 
have been consoled by melodious strains; the martial tones of 
the trumpet have animated soldiers to brave deeds. Simple 
melodies at times have greater effect to rescue lost souls than 
the most eloquent words. 

The music department was organized on Feb. VK 1903. 
The colors are pale blue and pink, anil the flower is a pink 
rose-bud. MissGrace Brown is President; Miss Bertha Meiser. 
Vice-President; Miss Fannie Ellis, Secretary: Miss Lucy 
Houtz. Treasurer. 

On Saturday evening. [March 21, L90S,] this department 
gave the last recital for the winter term. The following pro- 
gramme was rendered: 



PART 1. 

Piano Trio— Barber of Seville 

Misses Meiser. Arbogast and Houtz. 
Vocal Solo — Violets 

Miss Brown. 
Piano Solo— Waltz— Faust 

Miss Ellis. 
Vocal Solo— The Whispered Vow 

Miss Arbogast. 



Rosin: 

E. Marks 

La*g* 

H. Jones 



The Susquehanna. 345 

Piano Duet — Selected — Misses Krall and Milliner. 

Piano Solo — The Second Mazurka .... Godard 

Miss Robison. 
Piano Solo— The Butterfly - - Greig 

Miss Meiser. 
Chorus— Pretty Primrose Flower - - - Pinsuti 

part II. 

String Quartette — Selected — Misses Robison, Enders, Krall, and Ellis. 
Duett— Polonaise ...... Chopin 

Misses Krall and Brown. 
Vocal Solo — Crown of Glory - Tours 

Miss Zimmerman. 
Piano Solo — Schergo ------ Chopin 

Miss Brown. 
Vocal Solo— Without Thee ... D. Hardelot 

Miss Houtz. 
Maiden Chorus — Tell me Pretty Maiden. - - Florodora. 

Ladies— Misses Robison, Meiser, and Arbogast Gentlemen- 
Messrs. Ellis, Zimmerman, and Krall. 

I. M. R. 
F. M. E. 



COMMERCIAL DEPARTMENT. 

rHERE are many brilliant young people who are sighing 
to-day because their talents are not appreciated, and 
are even dying- of ennui because they cannot succeed with 
their diurnal duties. 

We have often said that knowledge is power, but knowl- 
edge in itself is not power. It is applied knowledge that is 
power. 

Money is valuable, but it is only valuable of the use people 
make of it; so with the young person who wishes to succeed — 
and every young person with the right idea in life wishes to 
do so — can push himself up the ladder of fame by taking a 
Commercial Course and by assimilating the knowledge he 
possesses and concentrating his thoughts upon the work it 
offers. 



fin Sn04HflfcM*fl 

I i I •• .'r:; : 

- ■ es • • ■ . no ta ... .. . - l .-i- 

- 

■: - md inclines i 

. .: • . enl u o /ercoun 

luring uur journey 
e now entered • •• . • 

: : rear and should tal • • u a] 

Serena n-v students have em 
writing and the prospects an .- • ■ . nnn . 

is follows: Chas. Arbograst. Snaintmn D\t~ Ra. 1 - 
Divide. Pa.: H. F. Conrad. Sehcn .-- - - 3 

irtmer, Salem. Pa.: Roth Lvto Sunbnr : 



-.-. -i- 



LADIES DEPARTMENT. 
i 
\ IISS ADA SNYDER spent pan o :, .. . dt ioi no S -:_ 

i umberland, with M&» Bertha d Mis- - d a* 
parts i^ti exceptional^ . . ■•• . ■ •. 
friend 

\ aca lions over, and ... 

V • ire plad to s;u thi memh • , •• . 

. returned, aftei i fen i i ol 

Miss Atntu Ihitinnr ;, .- — . j among 

friend iteai Pittubnrgti has mom* • 

Milton lii-it wppU 
Piir. ij.'p;. -.-mi. Mr, ha* bee* •• 
ladies, in fcta person* 6 v w* ; , - v .;»*.-.: 

H all W eltttfft ' to *m 

•• ;.'<.-u Hfloi yooi Basw bo^me 



The Susquehanna. 347 

TOUR OF THE MUSIC CLUBS. 

THE Musical Club? have returned and. according to all re- 
ports, have had a fine time and did good work for the 
school The trip this year was the most extended and most 
successful the clubs have ever taken. The cities of Pitts- 
burgh and Altoona and the intermediate towns were visited 
and everywhere the boys were greeted with large audiences 
and royally entertained. The usual number of jokes were 
played on the boys by their fellow musicians and the usual 
number of "jollies" were participated in by all save the 
"unjollyable Reefer." Aside from the concerts and pleasures 
of the trip the boys enjoyed several receptions and dinners: 

When the boys appeared on the stage at Williamsburg 
they were greeted with a large audience but what they ap- 
preciated most was the fact that the senior class of the Penn- 
sylvania College for Women attended in a body and graced 
the audience with their presence. This certainly was an un- 
expected and highly appreciated honor. 

Friday afternoon. Feb. 27th. in spite of a heavy rain, the 
boys met at the Union Depot and took car to Heinz's Pickle 
Works. Here they were shown "the only clean spot mP'vtts- 
burg." And it was certainly a treat. After passing thro the 
building and seeing and having explained the different pro- 
cesses the boys heartily enjoyed the luncheon served to them 
in the lunch room of the establishment. But this did not 
end the pleasures of the day. In the evening, the boys hav- 
ing given a very successful concert at East Liberty, were ten- 
dered a reception by Miss Bertie Barry and Mr. Bliss Barry 
at their home at 1525 Cliff Street. Pittsburg. The boys are 
loud in their praise of the pleasures of the evening. The 
Barry's certainly know how to entertain and at an early hour 
1 in the morning) the boys (some with girls and some with- 
out) started homeward. But even here the pleasure did not 
end as some of the boys will testify. Shirt fronts were made 
to do service as registers and now, to keep from getting the 
addresses mixed, the fellows consult these impromptu direc- 



348 The Susquehanna. 

tories. The clubs join in expressing- their thanks to their 
host and hostess for the pleasures of the evening-. 

The next surprise in store for the boys was a dinner serv- 
ed by Rev. and Mrs. S. N. Carpenter at their home in Brush- 
ton. The boys thoroughly enjoyed their dinner and their ap- 
preciation of it was made manifest by the way in which they 
caused the good things to disappear. 

"Tideldy" joined us at Blairsville and has since become 
a great favorite with the clubs. He and (t Peck" make a fine 
pair. 

The trip closed Friday evening, March 6th, with the 
New Bloomfield date and here another pleasant evening 
awaited the boys. Rev. and Mrs. C. M. Nicholas tendered a 
reception to the members of the clubs in the parlors of the 
parsonage. It was good to again have "Nick" and his wife 
with us as they used to be when they were at Susquehanna. 
To|say that the evening was pleasantly spent is to put the 
expression mildly. Some of the boys look forward to the 
daily mails so it is evident that the evening was not spent in 
vain. 

This is a short account of the most enjoyable events of 
the trip and but lightly expresses the feelings of those who 
participated in them. To all who extended to us the hearty 
welcome everywhere we extend thanks and hope that in the 
future our paths may often cross and that. the crossing- may 
always be in the sunlight of friendship. 

the schedule: 

Feb. 20, Mt. Vernon. Feb. 28, Wilmerding. 

Feb, 21, Bellwood. March 1, Wilmerding-. 

Feb. 22 and 23, Altoona. March 2, East Liberty. 

Feb. 24, Portage. March 3, Tarentum. 

Feb. 25, Wilkinsburg. March 4, Freeport. 

Feb. 26, Brushton. March 5, Blairsville. 

Feb. 27, East Liberty. March 6, New Bloomfield. 



The Susquehanna. 349 

ILocaUJpersonaL 



THE campus is growing- beautiful under the influence of 
welcomed Spring. 

Prof Houtz preached at Danville on Sunday, March 29. 

Work is nicely progressing on the new gymnasium. 

The Piano and Song Recital given by Miss Krall and her 
pupils on Saturday evening, March 21, in the Music Hall of 
Seibert Memorial Building was largely attended and much 
appreciated by those present. Each number was well rendered, 
while the production of the Maiden chorus — "Tell me Pretty 
Maiden," from Floradora, was especially well given. 

Prof. T. B. Birch rilled the pulpit at Bloomsburg on Palm 
Sunday. 

The U. P. Basket ball game was one of the great events 
of the season. In such a manner did the game proceed and 
close that the visiting team won the hearts of the people of 
the University and Selinsgrove. We feel honored in having 
so gentlemanly a class of young men come into our midst, and 
surely in the minds of all, University of Pennsylvania shoufd 
be proud of those who represent her in the Basketball world. 

Work has been begun preparatory to the construction of 
Prof. Allison's new home. The location is a very desirable 
one, it being between the residences of Prof. Fischer and Mr. 
Ulrich, and opposite the property of Rev. Zimmerman. 

Rev. Warner lately visited Mifflintownand Harrisburg in 
the interests of the Institution. 

The Base ball season has opened with splendid prospects. 
Manager Weis should be congratulated on his success in ar- 
ranging so superior a schedule. He and Captain Wagen- 
seller should be staunchly supported by the students and 
friends in their efforts to make the season a success. Mr. J. 
E. Eby has been secured as coach. He comes to us with a 
good record on the diamond. 



*5 C 



50 The Susquehanna. 



The University was lately presented with copies of the 
New Lutheran Hymnal for chapel use. The doner is Mrs. 
Sarah Sell, of East Berlin, Pa., who has so kindly presented 
them in memory of her husband, Rev. Daniel Sell. 

The Conrad Weiser Chapter I). A. R. Historical Prize 
Contest was held on Tuesday evening- March 10. Each his- 
torical composition showed skill both in historical research 
and manner of expression. The prize was awarded to Mr. E. 
M. Gearhart whose theme was "Robert Morris." Miss Fannie 
Jacobs received honorable mention with her production en- 
titled "Old Glory." 

Those from the College Department attending- the Mis- 
sionary Convention at Middleburg, March 27-29, were, L. W. 
Walters, L. F. Gunderman, F. W. Barry, Clay Whitmoyer, 
Miss Eliza Foster, and Miss Katherine Focht. 

After the exciting- and hotly contested game between the 
Basket ball teams of University of Pennsylvania and Susque- 
hanna University, the members of the two teams were royally 
entertained at a reception given by Miss Mary Alleman. After 
social enjoyment was indulged in for some time, delicious re- 
freshments were served in a most pleasing- manner. Among- 
those who assisted Miss Alleman in entertaining were her 
parents, Mr. and Mrs. Alleman, Mr. I. C. Schoch, Miss Ethel 
Schoch and Miss Edith Potter. 



''Justice is the idea of God, the ideal of man, the rule of 
conduct writ in the nature of mankind." 



"The true University of these days is a collection of 
books." 



"It is better to know much of few things than a little of 
many things." 



The Susquehanna 

Selinsgrove, April, 1903. 



••• 



(Entered at the Selinsgrove Postofhce as Second Class matter.) 
Terms— 75 cents, strictly in advance. Single copies 10 cents. 



C. 0. Frank, '03, Editor-in-Chief. E. M. Geakhakt, '08, Bus. Mgr. 

Clay Whitmoyeu, '05, Locals and Personals. 

Levi P. Younu, '01, '04, Alumni. 

John C. Showers, '05; Exchange. 

Fred. W. Berry, '04, Mg. Editor. 0. E.Sunday, '0«, | Asst Bu8 M|tr 

Minnie L. Kline/04. } 

The Susquehanna is published each month of the college year by the Students 
Publishing Association of SusQuehanna University. 

The editors solicit contributions and items of interest to the college from students 
and alumni. 

All business matters and correspondence should be addressed to The Susque- 
hanna, Selinsgrove, Pa. Exchanges should be sent to the same address. 

The journal will be issued about the 12th of each month. All matters for publi- 
cation must reach the managing editor on or before the first of each month. 

Any subscriber not receiving the journal, or changing address, should notify tin* 
manager at once. 

Subscribers are considered permanent until notice of discontinuance is received 
and all arrearages paid. 



EMtorfal. 



THE demonstration on the part of the stucfent body some- 
what less than a year ago has not proven fruitless. Altho 
the clause "said gymnasium be erected and thoroughly equipp- 
ed by April 1, 1903" has not been literally lived to. yet we 
can see that the demonstration had the grand effect of open- 
ing- the eyes of the proper authorities to our needs. They 
have been nobly responding ever since. The gymnasium is 
in course of erection and from present appearances promises 
to be a building- of which Susquehanna can well feel proud 
and one adequate to all her needs along that line. 

The completion of the gymnasium in addition to the new 
buildings lately erected upon our campus gives the place quite 
an imposing appearance. These new additions will surely do 
their part in drawing the public to the consideration due us 

351 



, ■■■ .-■..,:,, . 



350 



The Susquehanna. 



The University was lately presented with copies of the 
New Lutheran Hymnal for chapel use. The doner is Mrs. 
Sarah Sell, of East Berlin, Pa., who has so kindly presented 
them in memory of her husband, Rev. Daniel Sell. 

The Conrad Weiser Chapter D. A. R. Historical Prize 
Contest was held on Tuesday evening March 10. Each his- 
torical composition showed skill both in historical research 
and manner of expression. The prize was awarded to Mr. E. 
M. Gearhart whose theme was "Robert Morris." Miss Fannie 
Jacobs received honorable mention with her production en- 
titled "Old Glory. " 

Those from the College Department attending- the Mis- 
sionary Convention at Middleburg, March 27-29, were, L. W. 
Walters, L. F. Gunderman, F. W. Barry, Clay Whitmoyer, 
Miss Eliza Foster, and Miss Katharine Focht. 

After the exciting and hotly contested game between the 
Basket ball teams of University of Pennsylvania and Susque- 
hanna University, the members of the two teams were royally 
entertained at a reception given by Miss Mary Alleman. After 
social enjoyment was indulged in for some time, delicious re- 
freshments were served in a most pleasing manner. Among 
those who assisted Miss Alleman in entertaining were her 
parents, Mr. and Mrs. Alleman, Mr. I. C. Schoch, Miss Ethel 
Schoch and Miss Edith Potter. 



"Justice is the idea of God, the ideal of man, the rule of 
conduct writ in the nature of mankind." 



"The true University of these days is a collection of 
books." 



"It is better to know much of few things than a little of 
many things." 






THE SUSQUEHANNA... 

Selinsgrove, April, 1903. 



( Entered at the Selinsgrove Postofflce as Second Class matter. 
Terms — 75 cents, strictly in advance. Single copies 10 cents. 



C. 0. Frank, '03, Editor-in-Chief. E. M. Gearhakt, '03, Bus. Mgr. 

Clay Whitmoyer, '05, Locals and Personals. 

Levi P. Young, '01, '04, Alumni. 

John C. Showers, '05; Exchange. 
Fred. W. Berry, '04, Mg. Editor. Q,E. Sunday, '06 ) Asst . Buja> Mgr 

Minnie L. Kline, '04. j 

The Susquehanna Is published each month of the college year by the Students 
Publishing Association of Susquehanna University. 

The editors solicit contributions and items of interest to the college from students 
and alumni. 

All business matters and correspondence should be addressed to The Susque- 
hanna, Selinsgrove, Pa. Exchanges should be sent to the same address. 

The journal will be issued about the 12th of each month. All matters for publi- 
cation must reach the managing editor on or before the first of each month. 

Any subscriber not receiving the journal, or changing address, should notify the 
manager at once. 

Subscribers are considered permanent until notice of discontinuance Is received 
and all arrearages paid. 



fibftorfal. 



THE demonstration on the part of the student body some- 
what less than a year ago has not proven fruitless. Altho 
the clause "said gymnasium be erected and thoroughly equipp- 
ed by April 1, 1903" has not been literally lived to, yet we 
can see that the demonstration bad the grand effect of open- 
ing the eyes of the proper authorities to our needs. They 
have been nobly responding ever since. The gymnasium is 
in course of erection and from present appearances promises 
to be a building of which Susquehanna can well feel proud 
and one adequate to all her needs along that line. 

The completion of the gymnasium in addition to the new 
buildings lately erected upon our campus gives the place quite 
an imposing appearance. These new additions will surely do 
their part in drawing the public to the consideration due us 



351 



352 The Susquehanna. 

on the grounds of growth, fuller and more adequate equip- 
ment and richer and fuller opportunities for improvement 
along- all lines. 



The Susqukhanna wishes to extend its hearty thanks to 
the kind donor of the new hymnals now in use in our chapel. 
We surely appreciate the kindly spirit shown by this close 
friend of our institution to us in this much-to-be-appreciated 
manner. The gift has been a timely one and a much felt 
need. May many more such friends of Susquehanna beget a 
deeper interest in her and show their love to her in such a 
substantial and helpful manner as Mrs. Sarah Sell has. Then 
can the institution surely but firmly build itself up in power 
and influence and make itself the living and real factor for 
good its founders wished it to be. 



NEW BOOKS. 

Ready May 1st — The Best American Orations of Today, price 
SI. 25. Compiled and arranged by Harriet Blackstone, 
compiler of kk New Pieces for Prize Speaking Contests." 

Ready May 1st — Select Readings from the Most Popular 
Sovels, price SI. 00. Compiled and arranged by William 
Mather Lewis, Instructor of Oratory, Illinois College. 

Ready April 15th — A Broader Elementary Education, price 
$1.25 by J. P. Gordy, author of Gordy's New Psychology, 
Professor of Pedagogy, New York University. 

Ready May 1st — The Groundwork of Psychology, price SI. 25, 
by G. F. Stout, author of Stout's Manual of Psychology. 

HINDS & NOBLE, New York. 



M*tt«MNMMflflHIHHH^HHIH^HMMIi^H^flMH^B^HHi^lHl^^^l 



Patronize Our Advertisers. 353 



«r»The Greatest Place ia Pennsylvania to Buy** 

...CLOTHING... 

BR0SI0U5 BROTHERS, 

^^SUNBURY, PA. 

Sunbury Steam Dyeings Scouring and 

«£*£Dry Cleaning Works, 

MARKET STREET, SUNBURY, PA. 

All kinds of Ladies' and Gents' Wearing Apparel cleaned or dyed and 
neatly pressed on the shortest notice. 
Telephone 2402. WALTER GLENON, Proprietor. 



Rensselaer ^ 



* 



<& 



% 
Polytechnic^ 

\%- Institute, 

V Troy, N.Y. 

Local examinations provided for. Send for a Catalogue. 



H. L. PHILLIPS, 

The College Tailor, 

One Door North of Post Office. 



RIPPEL'S STUDIO, 

356 Market St., Sunbury, 

For all the latest Photographs. 
An endless variety of Pic- 
tures and Frames. 



Shoes and Hardware. 

Queen Quality, Walk-Over, Packard and the Freed Bro.'s Shoes 

a Specialty at 

M. S. SHROYER'S RSXM&K?" E - 

H.H. LIVINGSTON, 
AH Furniture at Lowest Prices. 

SPECIAL DISCOUNTS TO STUDENTS. 

UNDERTAKING AND EMBALMING A SPECIALTY. 



IBUi*«.». " ' 



" " • ' '"■"■ " 



354 



Patronize Our Advertisers. 



F. J. WAQENSELLER, M.D. 

PHYSICIAN AND 
SURGEON..*.* 

Eyes Treated and Glasses Adjusted. 
SOUTH MARKET STREET, SELINSGROVE. 



N 



EW FIRM, 
EW GOODS 




LATEST STYLES, 
OWEST PRICES. 



FOR MEN AND 
BOYS 



Keeley Block, 



CLOTHING 

Keeley <Sr 



Gents' Furnishing 
Goods in General ," 



SELINSGROVE, Pa 



Patronized «£ 

City Restaurant. 

Students' Headquarters. Popular Lunches at Popular Prices 
Ice Cream, Oysters and Hot Lunches all hours : : : : : 

J. F. BUCHER, Proprietor. 

ji W. PONTIUS, ~ 

Wh ales ale and Retail Dealer in 

ICE CREAMand CONFECTIONERY 

231 Market Street, Sunbury, Pa. 



No. \ 6 S. Market St., 

Q.R.HENDRICKS&SON 

Dealers in 

Hardware, Glass, Oils, Paints 

Farming; Implements, 

Sporting- Goods. . . 

News Depot Attached. 
Telephone Connection. Lowesi prices 
Sole Agents for Spalding's Sport- 
ing Goods. 



PAY YOUR SUBSCRIPTION 

PROMPTLY ] 

AND HELP THE MANAGER 
MAKE ENDS MEET. 



B.F.WAGENSEUER,M.D. 

PHYSICIAN and " 
SURGEON . . 

Office opposite First National Bank, 

SELINSGROVE, PA. 



J, W. DAUGHERTY, 

The Popular 

Photographer* 

Photographic work of all kinds. 
Finishing for Amatures. 

East Market St., Sunbury, Pa. 









Patronize Our Advertisers. 



! 55 



aT^o W Crl^^ h 



[EADQUARTERS FOR 

DRY GOODS, CARPETS, OIL CLOTHS, WINDOW 
SHADES, GENTS' FURNISHING GOODS, Etc. 



QO TO 

c . E. lutz'S Peter Klingler.PLD. 
TONSORIAL PARLORS s ' 



FOR A 

have ( 
Opposite the Keystone Hotel, 



First-Class Shave or Hair Cut | DRUGGIST* 

M1P Hotel ■ ^w ^^ '^-hw * j 



SELINSGROVE. 



A. R. POTTEIGER, V. S. student's Headquarter. 



PROPRIETOR OF 



Potteiger's Livery, 

Special Rates toTraveling* Men 
Telephone No. 272. Selinsgrove, Pa. 



COVERT'S 

Fashion Livery, 

Board, Sale and Exchange Stable, 

Safe Horses, 

Good Buggies. 

Careful Drivers, 

Charges Moderate 
Rear of Keystone, Selinsgrove. 



At the old Ulsh Stand. 

PERFUMES, 
TOILET and 

FANCY ARTICLES 
CIGARS, Etc. 

Seunsgrovb, Pa, 



IRWIN B. ROMIG, 

GRAYING and HACKS^ 

All Kinds of Work Done. 
SUPERIOR FACILITIES. LOWEST PRICES 



Don't 



INSURE until you Have Rates & Estimates from 

H. HARVEY SCHOCH, 

Special Agent, Selinsgrove, Penna., 

The Fidelity Mutual Life Company, Philadelphia, Pa* 

" Prove all things; Hold fast that which is good." 



■ 



_ — , 



356 



Patronize Our Advertisers. 



The Book Emporium 

Headquarters for 

Newspapers, Periodicals, 
Bibles, Books, Stationery and 
a variety of Fancy Goods. 

L A BENSON* 



H- E. MILLER, 

Dealer in 

General Merchandise, 

CONFECTIONS and 
STATIONERY. 

26 North Market Street. 



F. E. DOEBLER, 

PROPRIETOR OF 

The People's Restaurant 

Ice Cream, 

Hot and Cold Lunches served. 

No. 6 Market Street, 

SELINSGROVE. PA. 



A.C SPANGLER.D.D.S. 

Dentist, 

SELINSGROVE, PENNA. 



J. G. STAUFFER, 

SHOEMAKER. 

First-class Work. Repairing- 
a specialty. 

Students will save money by calling. 



TRICES ALWAYS RIGHT • 



R. L. ULRICH, 

Photographer 

SELINSGROVE. Pa. 

General Photographer and frame 
store. Everything in the picture line. 
Amateur supplies always on hand. 
Developing and printing neatly and 
cleanly done. 



The Lutheran 

PUBLICATION BOUSE, 

No. 1424 Arch St., Philadelphia. 
Acknowledged Headquarters for 

Anything and Everything in 
the way of 

BOOKS FOR CHURCHES 

AND FAMILIES, and 

LITERATURE FOR 

SUNDAY SCHOOLS. 

PLEASE REMEMBER 

That by sending your orders to us you 
help ouild up and develop one of the 
Church's institutions, with pecuniary 
advantage to yourself. 
Address orders to 

HENRY S. BONER, Supt. 
No. 1424 Arch St., Philadelphia. 



Geo. C Wagenseller, 

DRUGS,^ 

CHEHICALS, 

MEDICINES, 

Fancy | Toilet Articles. 

Sponges, Brushes, Perfumery, Etc. 
Physicians' Prescriptions carefully 
compounded, and orders answered 
with care and dispatch. 

Manufacturer of all grades of 

Roller Flour, and dealer in 

COAL, GRAIN, 
SEEDS, FEED, 
SALT, Etc. 

SELINSGROVE, PENNA. 



.. namii— -'-■■ 



Patronize Our Advertisers. 



33 i 



X™ S1 Shoesat^EconomicalChestnut" 

SUNBURY. 

You can get the very latest, swellest, down to the minute styles in foot- 
wear. High grade and all at low cash cut prices. '* Walk-over," "Wawk-well," 
men's and ladies Shoes equal to any #5.00 shoe made, cost $3.50 at "Econom- 
ical," Sunbury. 

J. G. CHESTNUT, M'gV. 

We take pleasure to announce 

That we are able to furnish any Fraternity Pin or 
Charm made. 

We are Specialists 

For Lenses for the eyes— Free examination. 



The Leading Jeweler and Optician, Sunbury, Pa. 



11 niiiilf 



PHOTOGRAPHS- 

OF ALL KINDS: CRAYONS 

WATER COLORS AND PASTELS, 

GUARANTEED TO GIVE 

SATISFACTION. 
OUR MOTTO j*jM 

Beauty of Pose and Excellence of Finish* 

F. B. LUCE, 

ARTIST AND PHOTOGRAPHER. 

429 Market Street, Sunbury, Pa, 

Enlarging- from Small Pictures a Specialty. 



ED. L HEFFELFINGER, j Arthur D, Carey, 

Merchant 
Tailors 

Selinsgrove, Pa., 

Opposite Postoflice. 

Workmanship Guaranteed. 



Fine Groceries, Provisions, 
Tobaccoes and Cigars. . . . 

Fruits and Confectionery 
a Specialty 

Selinsgrove, Pa. 



m Tf 






" 



358 



Patronize Our Advertisers. 



A, Q. Spalding & Bros. 

LARGEST MANUFACTURERS IN 
THE WORLD OF OFFICIAL 
ATHLETIC SUPPLIES 



Base Ball 
Lawn Tennis 

Golf 

Field Hockey 

official Athletic 



— ...... w *ti»*\* 



Implements 




Spalding's Catalogue of all Athletic Sports .'-ailed Free to any Address 



A. G. SPALDING & BROS. 



New York 



Chicago 



Denver 



Buffalo 



Baltimore 



AUSTIN WILVERT^ 

Fine^c 

Commercial Printing 

257 Market Street, 
9 South Third Street, 

SUNBURY, - - PENNA- 



Subscribe for** 

THE^e 



SUSQUEHANNAMUNJ 



50 YEARS' 
EXPERIENCE 




Trade Marks 
Designs 
t?" Copyrights Ac. 

Anyone sending a sketch and description may 
quickly ascertain our opinion free whether an 
invention is probably patentable. Communica- 
tions strictly confidential. Handbook on Patents 
sent free. Oldest agency for securing patents. 

Patents taken through Munn & Co. receive 
special notice, without c harg e, in the 

Scientific American. 

A handsomely illustrated weekly. Largest cir- 
culation of any scientific journal. Terms, $3 a 
year ; four months, $ 1. Sold by all newsdealers. 



& Co.* 6 f **■*"» New Yoik 

Branch Office, 625 F St.. Washington, D. C. 



Patronize Our Advertisers. 359 



Pica 



THE 




By GELETT BURGESS and WILL IRWIN 

SHOULD BE READ BY 

EVERY COLLEGE MAN 

This is honestly, one of the smoothest and richest things that ever happened. It 
is a gingery, " coast " story and quite strong enough to make you forget many things 
you don't want to remember. Full of excitement, change of scene, and clever 
reminiscence. It is sad and sweet, wild and adventurous, and filled with a keen shcv 
of humor that is entirely irresistible. Lend it your eye. 

The story or series of stories runs for twelve months, altho' you may read any 
one story of the series and feel that all is completed; but better begin at the begin- 
ning and we will trust you to get the entire thing before you are thro'. 

AN INTERNATIONAL SPY 

gives a series of most astounding revelations of modern times. He shows up the 
inner workings of The Telegram Which Je»an the Boer War, The Blowing Vp of 
The Maine, The Mystery of Captain Dreyfus, etc., etc , etc. These articles are of 
such a serious nature that it is not possible to make known the name of the author 
and thus expose him to grave danger at the hands of foreign governments whose 
secret crookedness he has so vividly revealed. 

SIR HENRY MORGAN 

THE LAST OF THE BUCCANEERS 
By CYRUS TOWNSEND BRADY 

This is a masterpiece, showing as it does the most skillful handling of characters 
engaged in the blackest of black and cruel deeds and leading the reader ere he is 
aware, in to an atmosphere of love and pathos, the effect of which is a most fascinating 
harmony. READ THESE IN 

PEARSON'S 

10 CENTS ALL NEWSDEALERS 

ONE DOLLAR, will give you a year's subscription to PEARSON'S in which 
during the coming year will be presented some of the best literature ever published. 
There are in course of preparation one or two very sensational articles based upon 
certain existing evils. These will be most thrilling in their fearless treatment of the 
men concerned in the scandals exposed. 



L £AR.S0N PVB. CO., 19 ASTOR PLmCE. NEW YORK 



* ^ swpflPHET 



360 Patronize Our Advertisers. 



SUSQUEHANNA^ 

UNIVERSITY, 

Pres. GEO. W. ENDERS, D. D., 

OFFERS excellent facilities for a splendid education under 
wholesome influences and at very low terms. 
The institution has the following- departments: 

L THEOLOGICAL, with a full three years' course. 
II. COLLEGIATE, Classical and Scientific Courses. 

III. LADIES COURSE, leading to a degree. 

IV. MUSIC, Vocal and Instrumental, full course lead- 

ing to a degree. 

V. ELOCUTION, a fully arranged course leading to 

graduation and a degree. 

VI. TEACHERS' COURSE leading to graduation. 
VII. PREPARATORY of three years. 

VIII. BOOK-KEEPING, Type-Writing and Short-Hand. 

IX. QVIL ENGINEERING. 

The curriculum of each course is comprehensive and up to 
date. The instruction is thorough. The instructors take 
the deepest personal interest in the students. The location 
is healthful, the buildings comfortable, and the terms very 
low. 

For Catalog-ue and further particulars write to 

JOHN I. WOODRUFF, A. M., Dean, 

Selinsgrove, Pa., 

or to Rev, A. N. Waknek, Registrar. 

Notk. — There is also a six weeks Summer Term, 
offering work in the various departments. 






Patronize Our Advertisers. 



361 



299 Pianos. 

The New England Conservatory of, 
Music, Boston, whose premiership 
among institutions of its class is a 
matter of common knowledge, when in 
the market for pianos twenty years ago, 
after exhaustive trials of the then cele- 
brated makes, decided upon the 

Ivers & Pond 

and ordered 50. That the decision was 
wise would be implied from their sub- 
sequent purchases of this make, until 
lately 268 had been bought. Now, when 
moving into its beautiful new building, 
the Conservatory looks over the piano 
market again, and finding its choice still 
that of twenty years ago, orders 31 Ivers 
& Pond Pianos, making a total of 299 as 
follows : 

1882 
1884 
1886 
1887 
1888 
1889 
1890 
1894 

Total 299 Pianos. 

Can more conclusive evidence of con- j 
tinuity in sustaining and advancing an 
artistic standard be given than the 
above remarkable record ? Ivers & Pond 
Pianos, embodying half a century's ex- 
perience in scientific piano-building, 
were never so perfect as to-day. As 
exclusive representatives for their sale, 
in this locality we invite your inspec- 
tion of these remarkable instruments. 

C. C. SEEBOLD, 

34 North Third St., Sunbury, Pa. 
Near P. R. R. Depot. 



50 Pianos. 


1895 . . 20 Pianos. 


6 *' 


1896 . . 15 " 


i7 ;; 


1897 . . 12 " 


a " 


1898 . . 12 " 


6 " 


1899 . . 12 " 


u " 


1900 . . 15 " 


73 " 


1901 . . 2 " 


15 " 


1902 . . 31 " 



ISONttl 

M r 
ALL 
J M .« 

LcotitUi; 



[HANI 

NEW 

I30NCJ 



:M1?0K 






Hinds & Noble, Publishers, 31 W.'isth St., 
N.Y.City t wifl send you any 0} these books sub- 
ject to approval. Enclose this advertisement. 



Songs of A II the Colleges - • 
Songs of the Eastern Colleges • 
Songs of the Western Colleges • 
New Songs for Olee Clubs • 
New Songs for Male Quartette! • 
New Songs for Church Quartettes 
Pieces That Have Taken Prizes • 
New Pieces That Will Take Prizes 
■Pieces for Every Occasion • • . 

3 Minote Declamations fur College Moa 
3-Miuute Readings for College Girls 
How to Attract and Hold an Audienco 
Palmer's New Parliamentary Manual 
Pros and Cons, (Complete Debates) 
Commencement Parts (Orations, Essays, etc 
Gunnison's New Dialogues and Play* 



i 



1.50 

.) 1.50 

1.50 



Your Subscriptions 
*£*£*£is Due 



m 

m 
m 

m 
m 
m 
m 

UNI 






m 



U-PI-DEE. 

A new Co-ed has alighted in town, 

U-pi-dee, U-pi-da ! #W+ 

In an up-to-datest tailor-made gown,U-pi-de-i-da ! ft ft 
The^boys are wild, and prex is, too, 
You never saw such a hulla-ba-loo. 

chorus. — U-pi-dee-i-dee-i-da I etc. 

Her voice is clear as a soaring lark's, 
And her wit is like those trolley-car sparks ! 
When 'cross a muddy street she flits, 
The boys all have conniption fits ! 

The turn of her head turns all ours, too. 
There's always a strife to sit in her pew ; 
'Tis enough to make a parson drunk, 
To hear her sing old co-ca-che-lunk I 

The above, and three other NEW verses to U-PI-DEE, 
and NEW words, catchy, up-to-date, to many 
others of the popular old familiar tunes ; be- 
sides OLD FAVORITES ; and also many NEW SONGS. 

SONGS OF ALL THE COLLEGES. 

JJWJ Copyright Price, $1.50, postpaid. 



1900. 



INI 



HINDS & NOBLE, Publishers, New York City 

Schoolbooks of all publishers at one store. 



m 
m 
m 
m 
m 

M 
M 

INI 

m 



\& -K ^ jf^ Jt, jc -e^ -c 



-f^ ^ .£> \ 
2R: a\- *t ! 



362 Patronize Our Advertisers, 

WANTED— FAITHFUL PERSON TO TRAVEL for well 
established house in a few counties, calling- on retail 
merchants and agents. Local territory. Salary $1024 a year 
and expenses, payable $19.70 a week in cash and expenses ad- 
vanced. Position permanent if desired, or for summer season. 
Business successful and rushing. Standard House, Educa- 
tional Department, Caxton Bldg., Chicago. 



e^The Horace Partridge Co.^ 

supply the best 

ATHLETIC GOODS 

at most reasonable prices. . 

Color, Quality and Durability 

Guaranteed. 

When in need of Supplies consult the Physical Director. 



I 



A 



i 



H'. > V 



7kgW3 




L_ 



V 



The Susquehanna... 

ESTABLISHED 1891. 500 CIRCULATION. 

Vol. XIII. MAY, 1903. No. 9 

— '—■■■■■ ■ ' ... . i -■ . i ... — i. —i. i— .ii.i. — — — i i ... i- i i—.— -. -i-,- — 

CONTENTS. 

POETRY. page. 

The Flowers, 353 

LITERARY. 

The Flight of the Eagle, 354 

Self Control, 357 

Tim American "Navy during the Revolution, 359 

SOCIETIES. 

Philosophian, 365 

Clionian, 367 

Y. M. C. A., - 368 

Y. W. C. A., 369 

Historical, 370 

THEOLOGICAL NOTES, 371 

ATHLETICS, 372 

DEPARTMENTS. 

Preparatory, - 374 

Music, 375 

Commercial, 376 

LOCALS AND PERSONALS, .... 377 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

Students Conference at Northfield, - - 379 

BOOK REVIEW, 380 

Paid Subscription List of "Susquehanna," 381 

EXCHANGES, 382 

EDITORIAL, 384 

Published each Month of the Scholastic Year by the 

Students' Publishing Association, Susquehanna University. 

SELINSGROVE, PENNA. 



^■■■^■^■■MHHi 



JpB* 



s _JE 



-■ «*53 



The Susquehanna... 

Selinsgrove, May, 1903. 

THE FLOWERS. 

Halt man and look where you have trod 
Upon the gems of God's green sod! 
The violet 's crushed beneath your tread 
And droops to earth it's bruised head. 
The slender star-grass tries in vain 
It's upright poise again to gain. 
Naught but destruction is your lot, — 
Say, tell me this: have you forgot 
That on each blade of grass that grows 
On every weed, and thorn, and rose 
God's hand has rested in caress? 
'Twas He that gave them perfect dress. 
Pause then in this your heedless pace 
To ponder o'er His works a space. 
If He would clothe the aster blue 
Think of the love He bears for you 
That in this earth He placed to bless 
The flower, — the gems of Nature's dress. 
His holy fingers only traced 
The colors in these jewels placed, 
His breath to each gave it's perfume, 
He bade them in the world to bloom. 
Ah wonder then as passing bye ! 
'Twix God and us these are the tie 
That binds us to His heart of love 
And speak of brighter things above. 
'Tis sweeter far, this earth of ours, 
Because He decked it with the flowers, 
Because He placed them everywhere 

(858) 



354 The Susquehanna. 

And with their perfume filled the air. 

And when Heav'ns portals open wide 

Beyond the river's swelling tide, 

Along the path-way to the throne 

We'll see the flowers that we have known. 

Their fragrance sweet will fill the air 

And float about the Master there. 

I think the crown upon His brow, 

Rid of the cruel thorns now, 

Will be these tiny friends of ours, — 

A circlet of His own blessed flowers. 

"Carrie." 

THE FLIGHT OF THE EAGLE. 

AMID the shouts of the people and the ringing- of bells there 
came into the world, in 1776, a young - eaglet. Clumsy 
looking and awkward, this immature thing- gave little prom- 
ise of the great and majestic bird whose pinions were, scarcely 
a century later, to over-shadow nearly the entire circumfer- 
ence of the globe. 

Sheltered for a time in the parental nest at Independence 
Hall and protected from the buffeting-s of the wind and pelt- 
ing of the rain of civil strife, it grew. And as it grew, the 
spirit of liberty grew and became the ruling- passion of it's 
heart. So strong- did this spirit become that this eaglet of 
but a few years, tired of being- imposed on, by another nation, 
bearded the "Lion of the East" in his den, the sea; with the 
result that the proud "Mistress of the Seas" was compelled to 
bend the knee to the young-est nation of the world. 

The first flig-ht seemed to have instilled a new life into 
the very being of this young nation and from that first spas- 
modic fluttering dates the active life of this nation as seen 
from a foreign point of view. The new life which was en- 
thused by this victory was not to die dormant but rather to 



The Susquehanna. 355 

grow and we find America becoming- more and more a factor 
in the concourse of nations as each year rolled on. Commerce 
grew, manufacturies increased and were improved, agricnl- 
ture progressed and prosperity began to smile on the land. 
The west had been thrown open and was fast becoming* one 
of the great treasure-houses of the land. The eagle's wings 
grew stronger and anything that was antagonistic to liberty 
had to fall before it's advance. 

But there was within our own confines a great blot on the 
fair name of freedom. The slavery which had in past years 
became so profitable in the South had began to prove a curse. 
The very pride of our land, our liberty, was but a myth! But 
the day came when again the roar of the cannon was heard 
through the land and once again the season of the eagle pro- 
claimed freedom to all. Though the land was drenched in 
fraternal blood, still the union was preserved and freedom 
guaranteed to all within our confines. 

It required years for our nation to recover from the effects 
of this great war but, contrary to the prophecies of many, we 
did and that right nobly. The mechanic who had been in 
the army returned to his bench, the clerk to his desk, the 
farmer to his field, and all forgot the art of war in the pur- 
suit of their various industries. 

Now came a golden era. The nation had not only re- 
gained a firm footing but was fast pushing to the front. 
American goods began to under-sell foreign goods in their 
own market and American manufactured goods fast began to 
out-class those of the rest of the world. 

But in her own prosperity this nation was not arrogant 
and selfish. And when the atrocities practiced by the Span- 
ish on their colonies became too great to ignore, this nation 
was stirred to it's foundation and once more the eagle began 
to be restless. 

The world could no longer pretend not to see these hor- 
rors. Peaceful valleys that had once been dotted with happy 
homes were desolated and the owners of those homes lay dead 



356 The Susquehanna. 

beside their ruined haciendas. Magnificent sugar plantations 
that had once been highly productive and profitable now lay 
in ruins. This had gone on for a century, the landing of Cor- 
tez had been the signal for it's beginning, and it is probable 
that it would have continued for a century longer had not an 
incident occurred which "capped the climax." 

One clear February night while the United States Bat- 
tleship Maine lay in the harbor of Havana, she was blown up 
and over three hundred brave Americans hurled into eternity. 
This hastened the end. The eagle now stirred beyond all 
endurance spread his mighty pinions and for the first time 
in it's eventful life turned it's flight seaward. In this flight 
it paused not 'till the shadow of it's wings rested on the palms 
of the far-off Philippines and Cuba alike. Wherever that 
shadow went there were the sons of Columbia striving to lift 
the yoke of tyranny and cast out the lash of slavery. Their 
success is attested to today by the changed appearance of 
those lands. Instead of desolation, prosperity is dawning. 
Not only are the people again returning to their homes but a 
new and happy epoch has opened. The children are being 
taught modern ideas and are no longer under the control of 
the pedagogue-monks, railroads are threading the wilderness, 
and every where peace is smiling. Not only are exports and 
imports at home increasing under this new regime but those 
in the newly freed domains show a like increase. The eagle 
has once more folded his wings and retired to his peaceful 
eyrie, from whence he can view the results of past years; but 
to the world it is evident that his flight is not yet complete 
and now more, than ever it seems that the old prophecy is 
coming true which runs 

"Westward the course of empire takes it's sway, 
The first four acts already past 
The last shall close the drama with the day 
Time's noblest offering is the last." 

E. G. 



The Susquehanna. 357 

SELF CONTROL. 

SHAKESPEARE draws a glowing- picture when he makes 
Hamlet say, "What a piece of work is man! how noble in 
reason! how infinite in faculties! in form and moving-, how 
express and admirable! in action how like an angel; in ap- 
prehension, how like a god!" 

Man, we are told, "made a little lower than the angels, 
created in the imag-e of God," in power of mind made to excel 
all creatures, to him was given rule of all the earth, and a 
command to subdue; and that man might be able to obey, to 
him was given reason and a will to carry out the dictates of 
reason. 

Instinct governs the beast and all animals are true to that 
instinct. The birds of the air, the beasts of the field, the 

trees of the woods are true to their nature and fulfill the pur- 
pose for which they were created. But man blest with richer 
gifts — such as God alone can give — is alone of all created un- 
true to his trust and debases himself in proportion to his 
blessing. 

Man, created to rule the earth, finds in himself the most 
difficult subject to control and his greatest hindrance in the 
command of others; for that man who fails to control his pas- 
sion, to check the evil tendencies of his nature — in short, the 
man who fails to govern himself — is not fitted to lead or com- 
mand for the welfare of others. 

There is liothing more worthy of admiration than a self- 
possessed, well g-overned man; a man who has the ability to 
govern and who does govern himself. Such a man is great, 
whether he be a Washington, a Lincoln or a Grant, whether 
he be crowned and wreathed in glory or whether his life be 
clouded by obscurity. He is great in that he is a man. A 
man is not great because he is gifted above his fellowmen. 
The intellect of Poe shone with the splendor of noonday; yet 
to be great we would not follow him; he died as the common 
drunkard dies. Burns flashed with the light of a meteor, but 
he, too, offered up his genius on the altar of Bacchus. 



358 The Susquehanna. 

The measure of a man's success or failure in life depends 
upon his ability- to control himself. Alexander, a world's con- 
queror, could not command himself and died of debaucheries. 
Napoleon, the world's greatest general, could not govern his 
own mad ambitions and wasted away his life on St. Helena. 
The sensulist, the debauchee, often know that they are com- 
mitting- sure and rapid suicide, but are unable to stop them- 
selves on the road to ruin. 

Above all others, self control is the safeguard of a man's 
faculties; it is the fortress that stands between him and ruin; 
it is the power that enables man to say whom he shall serve 
and whom he shall not serve, that enables man to follow the 
divine teaching of wisdom, to cherish a love for the beautiful, 
the pure and the good in life, that enables one to play the 
part of a man when beset by difficulties, w T hen harassed by 
temptations to rise above them and be made stronger and bet- 
ter by the conflict. 

Men admire those who in the time of danger meet unhes- 
itatingly and uncomplainingly trials such as test the very 
soul. They honor those who in the hour of temptation have 
the strength to stand firm, to remain true and loyal to their 
principals of right. But what regard for the man without 
will? He is a moral weakling, a chip moving along on the 
current of life. Obedient to every passing impulse, he is 
tossed now this way, now that; a plaything of chance, he is 
powerless for sustained good and a slave to evil. 

It is important that we exercise self control at all times. 
A man has small excuse for giving himself up to unreason- 
able conduct; and when he does so, it is an acknowledgement 
that he lacks one of the chief characteristics of a man, that 
he is an irresponsible creature swayed by blind impulse, that 
he has misused one of God's most precious gifts to man. 

Self control is not acquired in a month nor in a year; 
neither is it lost by a single act, but, yet, neither is it neces- 
sary to do anything especially wicked to lose control of self. 
To lose control of self, we need only to drift, to indulge our 



The Susquehanna. 359 

fancies, cater to the impulse of the moment; and when the 
critical hour comes, we find that we lack the streng-th of will 
that a course of self denial would have provided; that we can- 
not resist and we g-o down before the evil that confronts us. 

The power of self control is a most precious possession 
and oug-ht to be cultivated. It is the bulwark of our freedom 
and oug-ht to be g-uarded with a zealous care, that we be mas- 
ters and not slaves. 

We oug-ht to strive to be the being-s that God created us 
to be, to use our powers rig-htly, to place ourselves under the 
g-uide of reason, and at all times to adhere to reason and to 
reasonable conduct. L. M. D. 



THE AMERICAN NAVY DURING THE REVOLUTION. 

IN military prowess and naval intrepidity America stands 
preeminent among- modern nations. Whenever she has 
measured her strength with that of another power , her arms 
have been victorious. She has always met her foes with a 
valor that knows no yielding. Her internal troubles and 
problems have been faced with a heroism that knows no de- 
feat. This courag-e, so natural to her, is innate. The spirit 
of bravery and fortitude is connatural with her foundation. 

The American soldier and sailor of the Revolution were 
the very embodiment of patriotism and valor. Tho untrained 
to cope with reg-ulars and not in any way fitted to measure 
streng-th favorably with the "Mistress of the Seas," yet we 
rind American courage and fortitude in the end victorious and 
handing- down to posterity a priceless heritag-e of g-lorious 
achievement unsurpassed in the world's history. 

The statesman, the soldier, alike deserve honor for the 
manner in which they acquitted themselves in the common 
cause. Each in their respective capacities served their cause 
so well that one cannot in any way determine which one 
proved himself most true and helpful in securing- his country's 
freedom. But the man who left home, scoured the seas in 



360 The Susquehanna. 

search of the enemy, whom, when he had found, he attacked 
with such daring - and fearlessness as to gain for this new-born 
nation a prestige abroad, has least been honored by the his- 
torian's pen and his deeds seldom rehearsed before the people. 
It is with a view of presenting- some of the doing-s of this 
branch of our service in the early part of our history that we 
will turn our attention to for a short time. 

The work of the American marine during- the period of 
our revolution should be considered under three phases as the 
maritime power of the Atlantic Coast consisted of as many 
branches. The first branch was under the direct control of 
the several colonial provinces and was the one to take the in- 
itiative. Privateers occupy relatively a far more prominent 
and important position in the interesting- recital of our early 
maritime history. But the branch that has covered itself 
with most g-lory and since proved itself to be the true and liv- 
ing- g-erm of our modern powerful and well organized navy, 
was that founded by Congress and org-anized for a great part 
under the supervision of the immortal John Paul Jones. To 
this branch of the service too much credit cannot be given for 
the help it rendered in making- America's streng-th known 
abroad and in bring-ing- about a chang-e in the political aspect 
of Europe in favor of the strug-g-ling- colonies. This influence 
will be treated more fully in later paragraphs. 

"The elements of a great navy exists in our people, all 
that is wanted to develop them is imminent peril." This 
prophecy by one of our early naval historians has since been 
proven to be true in letter and spirit. The development of 
the navy has been slow but sure and its beginning's may have 
been extremely weak, but they were well rooted. It was the 
policy of England in her wars to attack the colonies of the 
nations, with whom she was at variance. This policy placed 
before the youth of our colonies an excellent schooling in 
nautical affairs. The Navigation Laws, so harmful as a 
whole, had the one beneficial feature of rendering those liv- 
ing near the coast a golden opportunity to become able sea- 



The Susquehanna. 361 

men. So well did the colonies respond to these opportunities 
that by the year 1750 the tonnage per capita of the American 
colonies was equal to that of England. In order to protect 
this colonial maritime industry from pirates and hostile ships, 
a small navy was necessary. This gave rise to the respective 
colonial naval armaments. Massachusetts being the leading 
colony in commerce and ship-building naturally led and regu- 
larly had several cruisers in her service. Pennsylvania al- 
ways possessed a proportional naval force. Virginia had 
built a small marine and South Carolina had organized a 
minature navy consisting of three vessels. Other colonies 
supported naval armaments proportionately efficient as their 
commercial relations were extensive. This rise of maritime 
power was insignificant in itself, but in forming a school for 
the training of seamen and a nucleus from which sprung the 
Continental Navy, it occupies a not unimportant place in the 
later development of our present sea power. 

One exploit of a vessel belonging to this class is especially 
worthy of note. On June 17, 1776, Capt. Harding, in com- 
mand of Connecticut Colony brig Defence 14, while cruising 
in the eastern part of Long Island Sound hailed a British 
transport bound for New York and forced her to surrender. 
During the following morning an additional transport was 
captured. The capture of these two ships placed into the 
hands of the Americans 500 Regulars and Lieut. Campbell of 
the British Army. This with additional similar captures 
helped the young cause by bringing a restraint upon the 
cruelties offered Americans in British hands and later became 
an effective agent in the institution of a cartel between the 
two countries. 

These exploits though not involving large numbers nor 
deciding critical issues, were however far from being unim- 
portant. But the place occupied relatively by the privateer 
was far more important and stands for far more than is gen- 
erally conceded by the historian. The first legislation con- 
cerning privateering, indeed, the first aggressive action to- 



362 The Susquehanna. 

wards founding- a navy was brought on by the ruthless de- 
struction of Falmouth, Maine, and the news concerning- the 
enlisting of German mercinaries. For in the Congressional 
minutes for Nov. 25, 1775, the following entry is recorded — 
"that all armed vessels and all transport vessels in the same 
service (British) to whomsoever belonging, might be confis- 
cated." This action was followed on Dec. 5th by a resolution 
ordering the seizure of merchantmen in British service to be 
held "until further orders by Congress." This latter action 
was the direct result of Lord Dunmore's actions in aiding the 
Tories of Maryland and Virginia to trade with the West 
Indies. Letters of Marque and Reprisal had early been 
granted, and these two additional acts stimulated the daring 
mariner to his utmost. 

Glory won by a noble service to his country and a hope 
of gain at the expense of the "Mistress of the Seas" were the 
motives of his ready and prompt response to the call of duty. 
How well the American seaman responded is splendidly 
shown by the record he made for himself. Time permits only 
a brief general statement of his doings. Manly's capture of 
the brigatine Nancy by his privateer Lee and is only the first 
of a lengthy list of important captures. Attention, however, 
should be turned to the fact that the munitions of war se- 
cured from this prize were very opportune; for the 2,000 mus- 
kets, 8,000 fuses, thirty-one ton of musket-balls, 3,000 solid 
shot and 26 cannon proved themselves invaluable in the fur- 
therance of the seige of Boston. One authority writing rel- 
ative to the effect of this capture on England confesses, say- 
ing — "The loss of the ship was much resented in England. " 
Capture after capture was made by these brave seadogs. By 
the 1st of Feb. 1777, 250 sail with cargoes aggregating $10,- 
000,000 had been captured. During this year 173 privateers 
carrying 2556 guns and manned by 13,840 seamen were in ac- 
tive service. They spread terror into the heart of every Brit- 
ish seaman. English merchants were in despair. The colo- 
nies dependent on her shipping for supplies were on the verge 



The Susquehanna. 363 

of starvation. An account from Granada says, "God knows 
if this American war continues much longer, we shall all die 
of starvation." Of a fleet of sixty sail bound from Ireland to 
the West Indies, thirty-five fell prey to the American priva- 
teer. Such an onslaught on England's main source of wealth 
was not without effect. Privateering in conjunction with the 
exploits of our infant navy occupied a very important part in 
the acknowledgement and final attainment of our independ- 
ence. 

The American privateer had brought England's proud 
boast that "Not a sail but by her permission spreads" to a 
very low tone, but the marvelous deeds of our poorly equipped 
and more poorly organized regular navy brought this vain as- 
sertion to nothing more than a sickening whisper. Marvel- 
ous, indeed, is it that this organization, so poorly equipped, 
and as a rule so poorly officered should have made for itself 
such an enviable record against the odds England presented. 

The work of beginning the organization of the navy was 
put into the hands of a "commission" consisting of Paul 
Jones and four experienced merchant captains with Robert 
Morris as ex-offlcio Chairman. Jones, bending all the tre- 
mendous energy of his nature to this work, assumed the lead- 
ership from the start and put the rest of the commission so 
much in the shade by his labors that it is hardly now possi- 
ble to identify his other four colleagues except one — Nicholas 
Biddle. Considering the odds against which his commission 
labored, their work was surely commendable. But owing to 
the superior British force always in America waters, the navy 
as organized at home was not a success. For against the 
American force along our eastern coast consisting of 14 ships 
and carrying 332 guns, the English Ministry sent a force of 
89 ships carrying 2576 guns. 

However our small squadron did not fail to worry the 
British even against such odds. Only one engagement of any 
import to the American cause was carried on along our bor- 
ders between hostile fleets. Gen. Arnold, in a small and 



364 The Susquehanna. 

hastily constructed flotilla engaged a superior force of the 
British on Lake Champlain on the 11th and 13th of Oct. 1776 
in so spirited a manner, that although losing the battle, he 
showed the British enough spirit to make them lose interest 
in their purpose. For "it served to head off a victorious 
British army bound for Albany and the subjugation of north- 
ern New York." 

But as our naval force was too insignificant as a whole to 
act in force, her influence on the outcome of the Revolution 
must be taken from the actions of these individual ships who 
by their numerous victories and brave conduct astonished the 
world. Among the individual names who made English Lion 
Vr^mbtevn Yns -vety den, Biddle, Wickes, Manly, Conyngham 
and Jones stand out illustrious and worthy of the highest 
honor. These men carried with them despair to every Brit- 
ish sailor and hugged Brittania's Coast so audaciously as to 
place England in a most deplorable position. English Earls 
were no longer safe in their castles. The enrollment of Brit- 
ish sailors increased from the annual enrollment of 132 for 
1774 to 41,784 in the year 1777. "The news of the brilliant 
American achievements electrified France and appalled Eng- 
land." Commercial insurance rose as high as twenty-five per 
cent. "Effectually alarmed England had prevented the great 
fair at Chester." Conditions had become such "that at one 
time 40sail of French ships were lading in the Thames." An 
instance never before known. 

But as a fitting climax to these marvelous exploits of 
Conyngham, Wickes and Manly, the far famed victory of the 
immortal Jones over the Serapis stand forth as a magnificent 
memento to the daring and interpidity of America's represen- 
tative naval hero. Of it a historian of no less note than 
Dwight Hamilton Mabie says, "Its moral effect was epoch 
making. John Paul Jones was the hero of the day, and 
Europe showered honors upon him. The American flag was 
hailed as a rival to that of England on the seas and all Europe 
was encouraged to unite against England and force her to 



The Susquehanna. 365 

abate her arrogant pretentions and accede to a more liberal 
and just code of International Maritime law than had before 
prevailed. In views of this latter fact, the battle must be 
ranked among- the three or four most important in the naval 
history of the world. 

"It is battle that inspired Catherine of Russia to enunciate 
the doctrine of rights of neutrals in maritime affairs; the 
tardy acquiescence of England eighty years later to that now 
universal principal was brought about by the blow struck by 
John Paul Jones of Plamborough Head, September the twen- 
ty-third, 1779." 

Societies. 



PHILOSOPHIAN. 

GROWTH is a true sign of life; wherever there is life there 
is growth. It is slow and steady. This is true of all 
things whether in nature, animal or human organization. 
At first or in youth it is more rapid and noticeable, but from 
middle life it is not marked so much by increase as by steady 
and continued existence. Wear and waste in connection with 
decay often get control over growth and then decrease sets in. 
Therefore the mere existence of things shows growth and con- 
tinued existence, with growth controlling all wear and waste, 
shows great growth. 

Again growth can be viewed as annual and perennial. 
Or that which grows but a short time and then must start 
from the beginning again, and on the other hand that which 
endures year by year and constantly increases upon all the 
growth of the past. Under the first of these can be classed 
the growth of literary societies. 



The Susquehanna. 

eg< literary societies <:• ' -.- ' ■-■:: Y - _■ 

( flourish upon anything: no matter how grc .:' tie 
Also no society shot *\ ber strong infill ~ | 

all the work. For at the sann "Lztzg-.ztzs 

r already strong member- -he in - trauriaar asd bririT- 

ig forth others to take their j " -~ : "--- l ~-~- 

ber becomes the most useful . * . *■. >-^ — 

:' real life. 

As in a nation so in our soc ieties T: r?r gT.1 : : the 

:ole is directly proportionate to that of tie iDCrrici i - -at 
. mpose it. Every generatior : \z -:-'. z\::: 

id those before it or that nati :: ■&-:! !>:•:•: rtt: rrcf* . 
T. can evisA on \W suengv:, -. . -. > ' - - . - t. it: -. - 
>. This is. if possible, ever ztcre ""- : z z.i - 
work. For here the color of our ct "•.-.. - ~ . ~ - ." : zz'zt 
. - c a generation but year by tai 7:-.- : :-..:■*- 
OS it behooves all of us whe '• :c: >.>: aflty otiLi toonr 

tearts to work, even though it maj not tetbt best ihhz vt 

prow and thus fill in the coming . - . aces efa 
cant bj evtry departing class, Tv v i r :»cr vort :$ 
B a| but a A -.•.-. Xo :r.a::c r.a:i wf mtj 1 e 

ent ability we all must st,-vt .-.; : e > : ; . •. i: : £TO"w 

. eater usefulness Trues -. .. .-.-:;: Mbtr* 

- ol a natural more ft < .-•.:-.. -t 

• • entetnbef no on* need * -* - - - '<-'■ 

• '- *w deprived ol bj birtli &s . . • L rt n - t. n 

- £• but ••• v g uu thet! 0* •• & es I . : ; t : ; t i 

I i k« gait) what 'v , el nee.. Arc 

• ; " ' BJ i'av IK \\W ■■■ i - • I I ;i. •-: - aw 

s g - some 

• ntuth ntol ..... saw 

! *it« fortuno • m*w \ n ■ g be*? n 

■" ■ ■•»« ntenl '■ ■> ... ssin$ v • £ 

■•■ ■■ .■ v g j . » . ■ as a 



The Susquehanna. 367 

The following officers were elected for the new term of 
office: President, Morgan; Vice President, Miss Ellis; Re- 
cording- Secretary, Frontz; Corresponding Secretary, Phillips; 
Critics, Fisher, Wagenseller; Editor, Miss Leyter; Assistant 
Editor, Hock; Pianist, Marie Snyder; Monitor, Walters. 

We also had the great pleasure to welcome into our mem- 
bership as active members of Philo the following: Miss Stet- 
ler, Shamokin Dam; Miss Persing, Sunbury, Miss Ryan, 

; Miss Rice, ; Mr. Cornelius, New Berlin: 

Mr. Oldt, Middleburg; Miss Schnure, Messrs. Meek, Milner, 
Conrad, Selinsgrove. E. M. M. '03. 



CLIONIAIN. 

THE Spring Term has brought among us many new faces, 
some of whom have found their way into our society haU 
and by their presence have helped to give zest to our work. 
One of the main conditions upon which the life of oursociety 
work depends is a good attendance at the weekly sessions. A 
gathering- of any sort is usually judged by the size of the 
crowd present. Thus visitors coming into our hall and see- 
ing only a small attendance of the members, will naturally 
think at once that there is little attraction there; and the 
most excellently rendered program will scarcely be sufficient 
to change this impression. Moreover, no performer, no mat- 
ter how well prepared, can do his best when facing empty 
chairs. He needs to feel the stimulus of an audience to arouse 
in him that spirit which will enable him to acquit himself 
creditably. If all members would bear in mind that they owe 
their presence at every session of the society, much better re- 
sults could be obtained from the work. 

To the many new students who have seen fit to unite with 
us we extend a most hearty welcome, and hope that they may 
find their labors along this line both pleasant and profitable. 
To all students, whether members or not, our doors are open 



368 The Susquehanna. 

and we are glad to have their presence at our Friday evening- 
sessions. 

The following- new members have been received during 
the past month: Herbert Games, Selinsgrove; Wm. E. Sun- 
day, Pine Grove Mills; Thomas Shultz, Wm. Shultz, Lycom- 
ing- county; Miss Irving-, Pennsylvania Furnace; Benjamin 
Houseworth, Selinsgrove; H. H. Benner, McAlisterville; F. 
S. Gingrich, Evandale; L. A. Fuhrman, Ritter; G. H. Oldt, 
Middleburg; C. D. Haines, Cocolamus; Henry S. Leitzel, 
Kratzerville; Earl Hummel, Shreiner; Ellis Persing-, Snyder- 
town; Harry Holshue, McClure; 1. 1. Gearhart, Middlesworth; 
A. F. Haug-h, York county; and Charles Garman. Miss Stover 
and George Erdman have been reinstated. 

Since last report the following new officers were elected: 
President, Whitmoyer; Vice President, Bingaman; Secretary, 
Miss Ada Snyder; Critic, Gearhart; Assistant Critic, Barry; 
Editor, Clark; Assistant Editor, Thomas Uber; Factotum, 
Sheese. Reporter. 



Y. M. C. A. 

THE first meeting of this term was well attended. After a 
short devotional service, Mr. Young introduced the 
speaker for the evening. 

Mr. Rev. W, H. Dolbeer, Belleville, Pa., after singing a 
beautiful hymn addressed us upon the following passage: 
"Peter walking on the sea." He proved that two thing's 
were necessary for him to walk. First, he had to have God's 
word for it; second, he had to have faith in that promise of 
God. Again he showed to us that it was not a lack of faith 
that men cannot walk upon the sea, but they do not have 
God's promise for it, consequently they are unable to walk, 
and sink beneath the shade of their own perils. 

The President's Conference was held this year at Buck- 
nell College, Lewisburg, Pa. Mr. Walter, our newly elected 



The Susquehanna. 369 

President, was there, and we trust that he there received many 
suggestions, which will be helpful to our association, and a 
blessing in his own life. 

Another year has almost come to a close, and as we stand 
upon the eve, and watch the sinking sun, let us not be satisfied 
with what we have achieved. Let us all remember even 
though the shades of night are fast approaching there is yet 
some one to whom we can speak a kind word. If we cannot 
preach like Paul or Apollos, we can tell them of the love of 
Jesus, we can bring sunshine to a troubled soul, while the days 
are going by. 



Y W. C. A. 

"Write your own epitaph in high-flown phrases, 
Extol your merits with the loudest praises; 
Paint every virtue in the brightest hue, 
Then — live a life that shall approve it true." 

ON the evening of April the twenty-seventh, a special 
meeting was held, it being the occasion of the first an- 
niversary of the Association. We were fortunate in having 
with us at this time our State Secretarv, Miss Strong, who, 
by her remarks, encouraged us greatly in our work. Inter- 
esting parts of the programme were a piano duet by the 
Misses Ellis and Robison, a sacred solo by Miss Brown and a 
recitation by Miss Minnie Kline. 

The following new members have been received this term: 
Misses Krall, Adams, Kelly, Swartz, Irvin, Rice, Straub, 
Beale, Rine, Gussie Edmunds, Tacy Edmunds, Meiser, Arbo- 
gast, Gemberling, Hoffman, Fetterhof. We are pleased to 
report that nearly every young lady boarding in Seibert Hall 
is now a member of the Association. 

The following officers have been elected for the ensuing 
year: President, Miss Fannie Ellis; Vice-President, Miss 
Clare Krall; Secretary, Miss Lulu Smith; Treasurer, Miss 
Anna Beaver; Pianist, Miss Martha Shollenberger. 



Do not wU to dr;i w p . , . . . v ■: i: -s--\ 

: - ■ -r, g<rt heatlt ) of ioul, ;, r . •; v . : .> ' ' v < —.■-, ivr :: ; ~ 
x You have been ^rlriinjc to vr^.- :«> i - ■*: - . -. -_ - 

Ooe altogether lovely, f)o not :• • -- ir.i-.i: 

v. be .ome like (iod, and that - , ~ t * • »• 

not so common that men pans it car*".*' 

fine, is to be sought if you ^-> > -- : •.«;:».. i * - r'i: 

e of the word, every Christian .: . : :e. — :•: ■•- : :r ; ; 
be sought except to do God's will, and ttai asarESe tid'ffirr: Ike 
» ht that will come to you a :■ : :: - ^; : - - 

"Be what thou see: ; .-. • •.:•->•:. 

HoW up to earth :h t :z ■; ■ :. -if- 
^e \\Y\a\ \Wi pr^ - - - ->. "^i£.£- 
Let the great Master? Mfeji - ' ~ - ' 



~z>±~ 



HISTORICAL SOCJETV 

H 'STORY repeats itself; a^i.- ~ t :i: l n<- - " c : :- 
owing 1 to the press of work :'_- : h~-~i:: v- - - 
After attending to some rout:-- ■•;-? '.- ~ El 3 
gave us an illustrated "Post -Carts :■;---•; • - - : : ,; ~__:± 

in Germany. The information thus £-: *•-:•: v.- n i ; \ i;r- • 
. ited, but the time was too sher: ■ • . - • , , ; , : - ■ ■ ■ ■_-. 
: -. It is however unfortunate that m«." ' :j : to: ; i ;Ser- 

- \es of such opportunities - ■. m. •.-■-. - i - izi 

U convenient to meet with us w\t > — 



The Susquehanna. 371 

GbeoloQical Botes. 



DJ. SNYDER, April 12, preached at Danville; April 19th, 
• Huntersville and White Church; April 26th, Crafton; 
and May 3rd, at Bloomsburg. 

G. W. Scheese, April 26th, preached at Muncy Creek and 
on May 3rd, at Mt. Carmel. 

U. A. Guss, M. H. Fischer and L. R. Haus, of the depart- 
ment were with the Mission Band which held a series of meet- 
ing's in Grace Lutheran Church of Sunbury, April 26. L. R. 
Haus spent Easter Sunday at his home. M. H. Fischer, May 
?>x&, ^was \ookvng aitet a. cWcg£ vnBet^nck. 

L. M. Brownmiller preached German at Spies Church, 
April 26th. He also preached at Montgomery, May 3rd. 

Prof. Woodruff, Easter Sunday assisted Rev. M. H. 
Havice with Holy Communion, Milton, Pa. 

W. H. Derr preached at the reg-ular place, Emanuels, 
Apri) 12th and 2hth. Apri) 19ib he preached at the Church oi 
the Redeemer Williamsport and May 3rd at Trinity and St. 
James Church, Huntersville. 

Prof. T. C. Houtz rendered W. H. Derr assistance with 
the Holy Communion on Easter. 

W. H. B. Carney preached at the following places since 
last issue of the Susquehanna, April 12th Millville, April 19th 
Orang-ville, April 26th Sunbury Zion Lutheran Church, and 
May 3rd Danville. 

J. A. Richter preached April 5th Minersville, and April 
26th Lairdsville. 

G. W. Fritch has been preaching- in the Plum Creek 
charge where he nas been unanimously elected pastor. 

L. P. Young* preached in his home town April 5th in the 
Presbyterian Church, he also preached at Danville April 26th. 

Dr. Yutzy assisted Rev. J. H. McGann on Easter with 
the Holy Communion Lewisburg", Pa. 



372 The Susquehanna. 

I. Z. Fenstermacher since last number of this paper 
preached at Lairdsville. He was also home a few days last 
month. 

Charles Lambert is now the regular supply at Oak Grove 
east of Milton. He preached in that charge Easter and on 
April 26th. 

Htblettcs. 



OWING to the poor condition of our athletic field the team 
have entered upon their schedule with but short prepar- 
ation for the work before them. However they have mani- 
fested great improvement in their playing and we hope to 
realize our expectations of their ability to play well. The 
games played upon the home grounds have been unusually 
well attended, and the student body have shown their inten- 
tion to support the team in defeat as well as in victory. 

Coach Eby deserves credit for his conscientious work un- 
der difficulties. He has been compelled to select most of his 
men from youthful material, but has shown much ability in 
choosing men for the positions, they are best able to fill. 
Above all, his gentlemanly spirit has won the goodwill of the 
team and the respect of all. It is hoped that his face will 
long continue to be familiar upon the campus. 

Susquehanna played the first game of the season with 
Ursinus on home grounds on April 10th, and was defeated by 
a score of 8 to 3. Score by innings: 

Susquehanna 1 1 1—3 

Ursinus 2 2 2 1 1—8 

Syracuse University vs. Susquehanna at Selinsgrove, 
April 13. Score by innings: 



The Susquehanna. 



373 



Syracuse 

Susquehanna 

April 29. Susquehanna 
score 16 to 3. 

WILLIAMSPORT. 

R. H. O. A. E. 

Shultz, 3b 3 I O 3 2 

Mait'd, 2b 3 2 2 o 

Scud'r, ib 2 2 7 1 

Sand'r, ss 2 1 o 3 1 

Early, cf 2 2 2 o 

Hass't, If 2 3 o o 

Bress'r, rf 1 3 1 1 

Booth, c 1 o 10 1 

Lush, p 2 1 1 

Maley, p o 1 

Dono'n, c o 4 o o 



4 4 11 0—10 
20000100 0—3 

played at Williamsport and lost, 



SUSQUEHANNA. 

R. H. O. A. E. 

Benf er, cf 1 1 o o 

Wagenseller, ss... 1 1 4 o 

O/dt, 3b i r 3 1 3 

Reyn's, ib o 1 10 o 1 

Eby, c o 2 10 o 1 

Roberts If 00 1 1 o 

Hoch, 2b 00 1 2 o 

Wert, rf , p 00 2 1 2 

Fercht, p,ri 000 3 o 



Totals. 



3 6 27 12 7 



Totals 16 16 27 10 4 

Williamsport 1 6 1 2 2 o 1 3—16 

Susquehanna o o o o o 3 o — 3 

Gettysburg- defeated Susquehanna on home grounds on 
May 1st. Score: 



GETTYSBURG. 

R. H. O. 

Rowe, If I O O 

Floto, cf i 1 1 

Thomas, p 1 1 2 

Plank rf, 1 2 2 

Bing'n, c 1 1 7 

Fish'r ib 1 1 11 

KaufFn, ss o o 

James, 2b o 2 

Leiter, 3b 1 1 2 



A. 


E. 


O 


O 


O 





7 














I 








1 





3 












SUSQUEHANNA. 

R. H. O. A. E' 

Benfer, rf 1 o 4 o o 

Wagenseller, ss... 000 5 1 

Reynolds, ib 1 7 o o 

Eby ; c o o 6 1 o 

Roberts, If o 1 1 o o 

Clyde, cf o 1 1 1 

Oldt, 3b 00 5 3 o 

Hock, 2b 00 3 3 1 

Wert, p o 3 o 



Totals 



Totals 7 8 27 11 1 totals 1 3 27 15 3 

Susquehanna 1 o o o o — 1 

Gettysburg 00002022 1 — 7 

Earned runs — Susquehanna, 1; Gettysburg, 4. Three-base hit— Plank. 
Stolen base— Benfer. Struck out— By Wert, 4; Thomas, 6. Bases on balls 



\\\f Susquehanna. 

—Wen. . . 4 ■ '-' : '< 

; ■:.-.— r.i;. Umpire Morgi 

Penn Park vs. Sasqt* .-.-.. -. pi :— :~: 

- -e: 

QUEHAHWA. 

R. H. O. A. j . . 

' CT, rf i r r Wajpstf, ■ j : 

gC Heller, ss... I 2 r 4 r , i i : 

Reynolds, cf I I I Mil - . ; : : 

Dressier, ib i i g 1 Unci-. • 

Eby, c 0092: :: :; 

Roberts. If o 1 o 1 Hs.v " 1 ® 3 

-d:. 5b 1 c c . : 1 , - : : : : 

Hocb, 2b 01210 ,...._ , - , : 

: --.'. ".:.*.. p o c 1 3 ; : : : : 

Totals 3 6 24 1; 6 Totria :- 3 J 

Sasquehanna : : : : 1 :— 

?r~- Fark :::::- : — :'- 

Earned runs— Susquehanna. 1: Peon ;-"■-.- - ises — W-±\&lz 

. BiV.e:. :: Clay. Hanks. Two-base Hi:— Lizcernan. TbwiTui " 
Vi\ w'.. : . Home runs— Billet, Dressier Srruck :»:- -3 - Upp. . I 
-':-;::.. Bases on balls— Off Lipp. 2 ; ~ Fercn:. •. H'.t :? iixinai -«^ 
.: Umpire locamp. rime- - A::2--«4Br- :*-c. 

♦Department*. 

PRI PARA I 0R1 in PARTVIEM 

I I front ot ihv- ehftueli iusta : :'v \ ; ov 

;V.\ diil 

\'.v!iu- K \\ alu iv Ol S\w j . •. .rtyfaff 

- . J . --M UlMlU 



The Susquehanna. 



37; 



John F. Dale, of Hartleton, has entered the Sub-Freshman 
Class. 

"Fat" Williams is the proud possesssor of a new Panama 
hat which he delights to wear about the campus. 

Wert, the new pitcher is a student in our department. 

Shollenberger enjoyed a visit home the last day of April. 

The Selinsgrove Post Office is considerably richer from the 
facts that Fleck writes almost hourly letters, to some one in 
Huntingdon. 

Games was home for a few days the past month on account 
of sickness. 

Messrs. William and Thomas Schultz, of Lycoming County, 
are new students "Vv> no nave entered tne SuVFteslvnvau Class. 

Keefer who is noted for his beauty says he maintains his del- 
icate complexion in perfection order by sleeping two hours a day 
through the week and staying up all Saturday and Sunday night. 

Roberts and Minnich went to Milton on April 28 to see the 
baseball game between Milton and Bucknell. S. A. M. 



MUSIC DEPARTMENT 

Of all the arts beneath the heaven, 
That man has made or God has given, 
None draws the soul so sweet away 
As music's melting, mystic lay. 

THE course in music has been changed and advanced one year 
by the present teacher, Miss Clare Krall. 
The Juniors in music have organized into a class, consisting 
of the following members: Instrumental, Misses Meiser, Arbo- 
gast, Ellis, and Robison; Vocal, Misses Zimmerman and Houtz. 
We are very glad to see so many of the new students en- 
rolled in this department. Among our new members are Misses 
Rice, Rine, Kelley, Swartz, FetterhofT, Houseworth, Herman, 
Wormeldorf, and Jesse and I v ee Wilson. 

The number of students is increasing so rapidly that it is nec- 
essary to get a new piano. 



376 The Susquehanna. 

Miss Grace Brown made several trips to Sunbury recently in 
preparation for commencement. She also received a lovely 
piano from her mother. 

The music Freshman Class, the music Junior Class, and the 
music Senior Class, will render their programmes separately at 
commencement time. 

The members of the music department are very proud of 
their new pins, a recent acquisition. 

We are planning to give "A Trip Around the World" in 
which the music scholars will represent the largest countries of 
the world. 

Upon the evening of the twenty -eighth of April, the Junior 
class in music tendered a most delightful reception to the college 
Juniors. The following musical and elocutionary programme 
was very charmingly rendered : 
Piano Duet.. "Charge of the Uhlans".. Misses Ellis and Robison 

Vocal Solo "The Whispered Vow" Miss Arbogast 

Dramatic Reading. . . . "Mary's Night Ride". ........ .Miss Krall 

Piano Solo Serenade Miss Meiser 

Reading ."Mary" Mr. Swank 

The guests of honor were Misses Krall and Enders, also 
Messrs. Morgan and Weis of the Senior class of College. A three 
course supper was served. The toasts, prophecy and poem were 
very interesting and appropriate. 

Miss Krall is busily engaged in rehearsing choruses and in- 
strumental work for commencement. I. M. R. 

F.M. E. 



COMMERCIAL DEPARTMENT. 

THERE never has been a time in the history of the world when 
education received so much attention as is being paid it to- 
day by all civilized peoples. Education has come to be regarded, 
in this country at least, as a necessity, and to take rank next to 
food, clothing and shelter. This is the age of vast material de- 
velopment and enterprise. The characteristic of the century is 



HHHBaH 



The Susquehanna. 377 

the marvelous expansion of the subtle and mighty forces that 
have given us a new civilization, which in their many applica- 
tions have transformed and reconstructed the relations of men 
and nations. 

The taking of a Business Course will not only enable the 
students to grasp the details of any business, but is the founda- 
tion for future business experience, knowledge and success, which 
enables them to rise rapidly to higher positions of responsibility 
and profit, much faster than those who have not had such ad- 
vantages. The graduate of a good business training school is as 
well fitted to practice business as the graduate of the medical col- 
lege is to practice medicine. The graduates of a Business 
Course consider the time and money it cost the greatest invest- 
ment of their lives. 

Mr. W. D. Brown, who represented this department at the 
Intercollegiate debate at Huntingdon, Pa., reports that the occa- 
sion was a grand one, and does not regret his trip. 

Since the last writing the following new students have en- 
rolled with us: Messrs. John O. Bingaman, Penns Creek, Pa. ; 
Edgar C. Keiser, Asherton, Pa. ; Ray E. Tressler, Malta, Pa. , 
and Miss Hattie Houseworth, Selinsgrove, Pa. G. E. O. 

I 

1Local==personaL 

— 



THE desks have recently beee removed from the Chapel and 
in their stead new seating has been placed which adds to 
the beauty and also capacity of the Chapel. 

The Athletic Field has lately been leveled and improved. 

Prof. Houtz preached for Rev. C. R. Harman, of Rebersburg 
on May 3. 

Rev. Brosius, of Grace Church, Sunbury, paid the Institu- 
tion a friendly call on April 27. 

Miss Lucy Houtz who has been seriously ill for some days is 
convalescing. 



378 The Susquehanna. 

W. W. Young spent May 3, and 4, with friends at Bucknell. 

Dean J. I. Woodruff spent Easter Sunday with Rev. H. M. 
Havce, of Milton. 

H. Merrill Thompson, of Philadelphia, was a visitor of his 
, many friends at the University during the Easter vacation. 

C. P. Swank visited his parents at Elysburg on April 25 and 
26. 

C. 0. Frank spent April 18 and 19 very pleasantly with his 
brother and friends in Harrisburg. 

Prof. T. B. Birch assisted Dr. Weber, of Sunbury, in his 
services on Easter Sunday. Prof. Birch also filled the pulpit of 
Dr. John Wagner, of Hazleton on Sunday, May 3. 

It was with deep sorrow that we learned of the death of Mrs. 
I. C. Schoch, wife of Treasurer Schoch. Mrs. Schoch was a 
warm friend of the University and was always solicitous of its 
welfare. To the bereaved husband and family we extend our 
most sincere sympathies. 

Miss Mildred Focht, of Bryn Mahr College visited her par- 
ents, Dr. and Mrs. Focht, during the Easter season 

Since the opening of this Spring Term, about seventy new 
students have enrolled, most of whom are pursuing the Normal 
Course. The dormitories and class rooms are filled to their ut- 
most which fact should be very encouraging to the authorities 
and friends of the Institution. Under these crowded conditions 
the college feels badly in need of a new boys' dormitory. 

Miss Minnie Gortner, of the Berwick High School recently 
spent a few days with her mother and friends of Selinsgrove. 

The brick -layers have completed their work on the new 
gymnasium, while the carpenters will also soon have their work 
under way. Arrangements are being made to dedicate this hand- 
some and useful structure during commencement week. 

The Music Juniors, composed of the Misses Robinson, Ellis, 
Arbogast and Meiser, entertained the members of the College 
Junior Class on Tuesday evening, April 28. A very interesting 



M 



The Susquehanna. 379 

Musical and Literary program was rendered by the young ladies, 
in the parlor of Seibert Hall which was tastefully decorated for 
the occasion, in colors of the two classes,— pink and blue, red 
and white. A three course supper was also served in fine style. 
There were present as invited guests, Miss Krall and Miss 
Enders, also two of the members of the College Senior Class, 
Messrs. Morgan and Weis. 

The Intercollegiate debate between Juniata College and Sus- 
quehanna University took place on Friday evening, April 17. 
Our debaters were Messrs. Frank S. Wagenseller and L. M. 
Daubenspeck, with E. M. Gearhart as alternative. Although 
Juniata won the debate, our representatives showed splendid 
skill in argument and fluency in oratory. The Juniata students 
did all in their power to welcome to their college our debaters 
and those who accompanied them. The kindness shown them 
will not soon be forgotten by Susquehanna. Those who accom- 
panied the debaters were: Mr. Geo. Wagenseller, father of 
Frank S. Wagenseller, Prof. L. P. Young, E. R. Wingard, Chas. 
Lambert, W. S. Price, W. K. Fleck, W. D. Brown and L. V. 
Minick. C. W. 



STUDENT CONFERENCE AT NORTHFIFLD. 

PLANS are being perfected for the conduct of the Student 
Summer Conference of Young Men's Christian Associa- 
tions of Canada and the East to be held at East Northfleld, 
Mass., June 26th to July 5th. 

Meetings at Northfield are held each morning and evening 
in the auditorium and at sunset out of doors on "Round 
Top," the hill on which the grave of Mr. D. L. Moody is found. 
In the list of speakers who will address the Conference this year 
are: Mr. Robert E. Speer, Rev. G. Campbell Morgan, Rev. 
George Jackson, of Edinburgh, Rev. William F. McDowell, 
D. D., Prof. Edward I. Bosworth, Dr. Frank K. Sanders, Rev. 
Anson Phelps Stokes, Jr., Hon. S. B. Capen, and Mr. John R. 
Mott, who will preside. 



380 The Susquehanna- 

The sunset meetings will be devoted to the presentation of 
the claims of various Christian callings which need college men 
of ability. Among the callings which will be considered are the 
Christian ministry, city missions, foreign missions, Young Men's 
Christian Association work and Christian work by laymen. 

Each morning a Missionary Institute is held to consider the 
promotion of missionary life and activity in college, while a nor- 
mal class in mission study will train leaders of mission study 
classes in college. The various other phases of Christian activ- 
ity in the institutions of higher learning will be carefully dis- 
cussed by representatives from the different institutions who have 
gained experience in this important work. 

Normal Bible classes to help leaders of student classes or 
groups will be conducted each day under the leadership of Henry 
B. Wright and Dr. Frank K. Sanders, of Yale, Prof. R. A. Fal- 
coner, oi Halifax, N. S., Prof. Edward I. Bosworth, of Oberlin, 
and W. D. Murray and C. C. Michener, of New York City. 

J6ook IReview. 



ii \ BROADER Elementary Education" is a work by Dr. 
/A Gordy which has just made its appearance in the educa- 
tional world. It is a book overflowing with sane truth and 
worthy ideas for all men having as their aim the attainment of a 
happy and helpful education. The healthy purpose of the book, 
the high standard of its truth and the concise, logical statement 
of all the author has to tell us can be best shown by a few short 
paragraphs taken from its pages. 

For example, his estimate of the true end of education is 
laudable. 

"This, then, is one of the ends which education shall set before itself; 
the development of the power to think — not simply as a means to other ends, 
but because the exercise of thought is intrinsically good, a thing to be de- 
sired for itself alone." 



The Susquehanna. 



381 



In another of his striking paragraphs he well outlines the 
true marks by which you can distinguish the educated man from 
the book-worm. 

"These four, then, knowledge, discipline, a true estimate of the value of 
things, an effective will, are the constituents of rational living. He who ap- 
prehends the great ends of life, who knows the facts in those departments 
of knowledge in which he is obliged to act in order to attain those ends, and 
the principles that underlie them; who has the ability to apply those princi- 
ples to the various cases that present themselves in the course of his daily 
life; whose emotional nature is so trained that his love for things is in pro- 
portion to their proper worth, and whose will impels him to control his 

actions accordingly he alone is the educated man, for he alone is capable 

of Jiving rationally. " 



PAID SUBSCRIPTION LIST OF "SUSQUEHANNA. 



»» 



THE following Is 
Is your name 
Rev. M. M. Albeck, 
Prof. H A. Allison, 
S. Bruce Burkhart, 
Rev. D. U. Bair, 
Rev. C. R. Bottsford, 
F. W. Barry, 
M. L. Brownmiller, 
Jacob Bulick, 
Prof T. B. Birch, 
N. J. Catherman, 
W. R. Camerer, 
W. H. Derr, 
A. M. Dimm, 
Rev. G. W. Enders, D 
Ira Fenstermacher, 
W. Fleck, 
Prof. O. C. Gortner, 
L. F. Gunderman, 
Prof. R. N. Hartman, 
L. C. Hassinger, 
W. H. Hard, 
W. J. Horton, 
John Kistner, 



a list of subscribers who are paid up to date 

among them? If not why not? 

Rev. J. M. Anspach, 

Mary Burkhart, 

Dewit Bowdine, 

Prof.E. M.Brungart, 

Prof. N. C. Barbaherm, 

I. W. Bingaman, 

Grace Brown, 

W.DBvow, 

Anna Beaver, 

Rev. S. N. Carpenter, 

Dr. C. H. Dimm, 

E. H.Diehl, 

Rev. H. C. Erdman, 
. D„ C. O. Frank, 

V. E. Fritz, 

Lester Fuhrman, 

Rev. M. Grossman, 

Hon. J. P, S. Gobin, 

Rev. H. C. Haithcot, 

Rev. H. D. Hoover, 

W. W. Houtz, 

A. S. Hoch, 

W. H. Kempher, 



382 



The Susquehanna. 



Minnie Kline, 
Rev. W. Lohr, 
Dr. A. F. Meyers, 
D. B. Moist, 
M. V. Minnich, 
P, H. Pearson, 
Rev. W. M. Rearich, 
Rev. M. S. Romig, 
Geo. Remensnyder, 
Rev J. F. Statley, 
Rev. W. G. Slonaker, 

C. O. Stribley, 

W. W. Spigelmeyer, 

D. J. Snyder, 
Rev. R. R. Startor, 
C. P. Swank, 

F. G. Schoch, 

E. W. Snyder, 
E. R. Wingard, 
Rev. I. H. Wagner, 
Prof. A B. Wallize, 
Prof L. P. Young, 
Prof. W. I. Zechman. 



Rev. G. A. Livingston, 
Rev. H. C. Michaels, 
Geo. Miller, 

E. M. Morgan, 
Rev. D. E. McLain, 
W. L. Price, 

Rev. J. M. Rearich, 

D. K. Ramey, 
W. C. Rinehart, 
J. C. Showers, 
Rev. L. F. Snyder, 
Rev. J. W. Shannon, 

F. H. Schrader, Jr., 
Chas. Steele, 

W. W. Stauffer, 
Prof. A. C. Smith, 

E. K. Shollenberger, 
M. L. Wagenseller, 
Prof. B. M. Wagenseller, 
L. V. Williams, 

O. M. Winemiller. 
W. W. Young, 



te£ <J£ 



JEicbanoes- 



THE Students' Herald, a weekly from the Kansas State Agri- 
cultural College comes more regularly than any other ex- 
change. This paper well deserves a prominent place among 
college weeklies. 

The Lebanon Valley Forum contains several interesting pro- 
ductions. The most interesting perhaps is, "A Glimpse at 
Thoreau's Philosophy." 

The Stylus contains a very good production entitled, "The 
Monument's Story." \Ye are anxious to read the remainder. 



The Susquehanna. 383 

The Free Lance of March contains more literary matter than 
usual. ''The Wife — under Feminine Glasses" will be especially 
enjoyed by all who read it. 

The Touchstone contains a number of good productions and 
two especially good short poems. 

"Among the Shadows," is an excellent short story in The 
Idealist. 

A very thoughtfully written production entitled, "The 
Sphere of Conscience," appears in The Wittenberger oi April 8th. 

"An Ideal" in The Thielensian is a very good production. 
The writer is optimistic in his views and gives ample proof that 
the world is steadily getting better instead of worse as many think. 

The Argis is to be commended for its fine arrangement and 
spicy material. It also contains a cut of Houston, Texas, High 
School which shows that it is by no means a slow place. 

In literary qualities The Tuftonian is well up to the stand- 
ard. But for some reason the magazine does not publish an ex- 
change and local and persona.] column. 

We are glad to welcome a new neat and well arranged paper 
called The Scio Collegian from Scio, Ohio. J. C. S. 



The Susquehanna... 

Selinsgrove, May, 1903. 



(Entered at the Selinsgrove Postofflce as Second Class matter.) 
Terms— 75 cents, strictly in advance. Single copies 10 cents. 



0. O. Frank, '03, Editor-in-Chief. E. M. Gearhart, '03, Bus. Mgr. 

Clay Whitmoyer, '05, Locals and Personals. 

Levi P. Young, '01, '04, Alumni. 

John C. Showers, '05; Exchange. 

, Fred. W. Berry, '04, Mff. Editor. O. E. Sunday, '0(5, j^sst Bus M er 

Minnie L. Kline, '04. } 

The Susquehanna is published each month of the college year by the Students 
Publishing Association of Susquehanna University. 

The editors solicit contributions and items of interest to the college from students 
and alumni. 

All business matters and correspondence should be addressed to The Susque- 
hanna, Selinsgrove, Pa. Exchanges should be sent to the same address. 

The journal will be issued about the 12th of each month. All matters for publi 
cation must reach the managing editor on or before the first of each month. 

Any subscriber not receiving the journal, or changing address, should notify the 
manager at once. 

Subscribers are considered permanent until notice of discontinuance is received 
and all arrearages paid. 



Cbftorial. 



THE end is fast approaching. All are soon to gather the fruits 
of their labors. Those who have faithfully responded to 
the appeals of duty soon will enjoy the intense pleasure and sat- 
isfaction of having completed another cycle of their educational 
preparation for life duties. Their past effort has been a daily 
prayer for the attainment of their heart's desire, and they are 
now about to enter into the joy of having their continual heart- 
longing filled. 

But to those who through carelessness or for some other 
reason have not fully lived up to their daily opportunity and 
privilege, this time proves to be one of trial and dread. It should 
not be so. But everyone who is conscientious in this matter can 
even at this late hour make up to some extent at least for the 
short coming of preceding days. They cannot make up for all 



:wi 



The Susquehanna. 385 

lost time. That is utterly impossible. But in so far as the dread 
for the final issue is concerned, that can almost wholly be allayed. 
This however should not be the object for turning over a new 
leaf. If no higher motive exists than this such opportunity for 
redeeming past error is far more hurtful than beneficial. Days 
of grace they are, but they are only truly so to those who take 
them as a God-send to help them to a firmer, more staple footing. 
Only do they avail themselves of their true purpose when the 
past mistakes are taken as warning hand-boards not to enter that 
way again or the failures as stepping stones to help them to 
higher, better things. 

Let these few last days be to each what they are meant to be. 
Let each enter into his or her work with a new and more steady 
determination. It will prove to be the first step in the formation 
of a habit of most potent and increasing diligence and faithfulness 
to duty if only perseverence is used in carrying out your new de- 
termination. 



^The Horace Partridge Co.^ 

supply the best 

ATHLETIC GOODS 

at most reasonable prices. 

Color, Quality and Durability 

Guaranteed. 

When in need of Supplies consult the Physical Director. 



, » 



386 Patronize Our Advertisers. 

8^ The Greatest Place in Pennsylvania to Buy*^ 

...CLOTHING... 

BROSIOUS BROTHERS, 

j^^SUNBURY, PA. 

Sunbury Steam Dyeing, Scouring and 

^^eDry Cleaning Works, 

MARKET STREET, SUNBURY, PA. 

All kinds o£ Ladies' and Gents' Wearing; Apparel cleaned or dyed and 
neatly pressed on the shortest notice. 
Telephone 2402. WALTER QLENON, Proprietor. 

Rensselaer \ 
/^Polytechnic^ 
<%, Institute, 

% Troy,N.Y. 

Local examinations provided for. Send for a Catalogue. 



H. L. PHILLIPS, 

The College Tailor, 

One Door North of Post Office. 



RIPPEL'S STUDIO, 

356 Market St., Sunbury, 

For all the latest Photographs. 
An endless variety of Pic- 
tures and Frames. 



Shoes and Hardware. 

Queen Quality, Walk-Over, Packard and the Freed Bro/s Shoes 

a Specialty at 

M. S. SHROYER'S $K4™ RE ' 

H.H. LIVINGSTON, 
All Furniture at Lowest Prices. 

SPECIAL DISCOUNTS TO STUDENTS. 
UNDERTAKING AND EMBALMING A SPECIALTY. 



Patronize Our Advertisers. 



387 



S. WEIS, 



HEADQUARTERS FOR 

DRY GOODS, CARPETS, OIL CLOTHS, WINDOW 
SHADES, GENTS' FURNISHING GOODS, Etc. 



QO TO 

C E, LUTZ'S 

TONSORIAi PARLORS 

FOR A 

First-Class Shave or Hair Cut. 
Opposite the Keystone Hotel, 



Peter KlingleT,PhX). 

DRUGGIST, 



A. R. POTTEIGER, V. S. student's Headquarter: 



PROPRIETOR OF 



Potteiger's Livery, 

Special Rates toTraveling" Men 
Telephone No. 272. Selinsgrove, Pa. 



COVERT'S 

Fashion Livery, 

Board, Sale and Exchange Stable, 

Safe Horses, 

Good Buggies. 

Careful Drivers, 

Charges Moderate 
Rear of Keystone, Selinsgrove. 



At the old Ulsh Stand. 

PERFUMES, 
TOILET and 

FANCY ARTICLES 
CIGARS, Etc. 

Seunsgrove, Pa, 



IRWIN B, ROMIG, 

GRAYING and HACKS^e 

All Kinds of Work Done. 
SUPERIOR FACILITIES. LOWEST PRICES 



Don't 



INSURE until you Have Rates & Estimates from 

H. HARVEY SCHOCH, 

Special Agent, Selinsgrove, Penna., 

The Fidelity Mutual Life Company, Philadelphia, Pa< 

" Prove all things; Hold fast that which is good." 



• 



386 Patronize Our Advertisers. 

s^The Greatest Place in Pennsylvania to Buys^ 

...CLOTHING... 

BR0SI0U5 BROTHERS, 

jM.2*.*SUNBURY, pa. 

Sunbury Steam Dyeings Scouring and 

^«^Dry Qeaning Works, 

MARKET STREET, SUNBURY, PA. 

Ail kinds of Ladies' and Gents' Wearing: Apparei cleaned or dyed and 
neatly pressed on the shortest notice. 
Telephone 2402. WALTER QLENON, Proprietor. 

Rensselaer \ 
/.Polytechnic'^ 
SS* Institute, 

€ % Troy,N.Y. 

Local examinations provided fox. Send fox a Catalogue. 



M. L. PHILLIPS, 

The College Tailor, 

One Door North of Post Office. 



RIPPEL'S STUDIO, 

356 Market St., Sunbury, 

For all the latest Photographs. 
An endless variety of Pic- 
tures and Frames. 



Shoes and Hardware. 

Queen Quality, Walk-Over, Packard and the Freed Bro.'s Shoes 

a Specialty at 

M. S. SHROYER'S RgK> o T T 0RE ' 

H.H. LIVINGSTON, 
All Furniture at Lowest Prices. 

SPECIAL DISCOUNTS TO STUDENTS. 

UNDERTAKING AND EMBALMING A SPECIALTY. 



Patronize Our Advertisers. 



387 



5. WEIS, 



HEADQUARTERS FOR 
DRY GOODS, CARPETS, OIL CLOTHS, WINDOW 
SHADES, GENTS' FURNISHING GOODS, Etc. 



QO TO 

G E. LUTZ'S 

TONSORIAL PARLORS 

FOR A 

Fir st-Class Shave or Hair Cut* 
Opposite the Keystone Hotel, 

SELINSGROVE. 



Peter Klingler,PhX). 

DRUGGIST, 



A. R. POTTEIGER, V. Student's Headquarters 

PROPRIETOR OF 

Pottdger's Livery. ' A< (he oid uisb stand - 



Special Rates toTraveling Men 
Telephone No. 272. Selinsgrove, Pa. 



COVERT'S 

Fashion Livery, 

Board, Sale and Exchange Stable, 

Safe Horses, 

Good Buggies. 

Careful Drivers, 

Charges Moderate 
Rear of Keystone, Selinsgrove. 



PERFUMES, 
TOILET and 

FANCY ARTICLES 

CIGARS, Etc. 

I 

Selinsgrove, Pa. 



IRWIN B. ROMIG, 

GRAYING and HACKS^e 



All Kinds of Work Done. 



SUPERIOR FACILITIES. 



LOWEST PRICES 



MJ j_ INSURE until you Have Rates & Estimates from 
J H. HARVEY SCHOCH, 

Special Agent, Selinsgrove, Penna., 

The Fidelity Mutual Life Company, Philadelphia, Pa, 

" Prove all things; Hold fast that which is good." 



388 



Patronize Our Advertisers. 



The Book Emporium 

Headquarters for 
Newspapers, Periodicals, 
Bibles, Books, Stationery and 
a variety of Fancy Goods. 

L>A BENSON. 



H* E. MILLER, 

Dealer in 

General Merchandise, 

CONFECTIONS and 
STATIONERY. 

26 North Market Street. 



F. E. DOEBLER, 

PROPRIETOR OF 

The People's Restaurant 

Ice Cream, 
Hot and Cold Lunches served. 
No. 6 Market Street, 

StLINSGROVE. PA. 



J. Q. STAUFFER, 

SHOEMAKER. 

First-class Work. Repairing- 
a specialty. 

Students will save money by calling. 



A. C SPANGLEP.UD.S. 

Dentist, 

SELINSGROVE, PETTO A. 



"PRICES ALWAYS RIGHT » 



The Lutheran 

PUBLICATION HOUSE, 

No. 1424 Arch St., Philadelphia. 
Acknowledged Headquarters for 

Anything and Everything in 
the way of 

BOOKS FOR CHURCHES 

AND FAMILIES, and 

LITERATURE FOR 

SUNDAY SCHOOLS. 

PLEASE REMEMBER 

That by lending your orders to us you 
help ouild up and develop one of the 
Church's Institutions, with pecuniary 
advantage to yourself. 
Address orders to 

HENRY S. BONER, Supt. 
No. 1424 Arch St., Philadelphia. 



R. L. ULRICH, 

Photographer 

SELINSGROVE. Pa. 

General Photographer and frame 
store. Everything in the picture line. 
Amateur supplies always on hand. 
Developing and printing neatly and 
cleanly done. 

Geo. C Wagenseller, 

DRUGS,^ 

CHEHICALS, 

MEDICINES, 

Fancy | Toilet Articles. 

Sponges, Brushes, Perfumery, Etc. 
Physicians' Prescriptions carefully 
compounded, and orders answered 
with care and dispatch. 

Manufacturer of all grades of 

Roller Flour, and dealer in 

COAL, GRAIN, 
SEEDS, FEED, 
SALT, Etc 

SELINSGROVE, PENNA 



Patronize Our Advertisers. 38 ( > 

tTbIy^Xe AYSI Shoes at "Economical Chestnut" 

SUNBURY. 

You can get the very latest, swellest, down to the minute styles in foot- 
wear. High grade and all at low cash cut prices. ''Walk-over," "Wawk-well," 
men's and ladies Shoes equal to any #5.00 shoe made, cost #3.50 at "Econom- 
ical," Sunbury. 

J. G. CHESTNUT, M'g'r. 

We take pleasure to announce 

That we are able to furnish any Fraternity Pin or 
Charm made. 

We are Specialists 

For Lenses for the eyes — Free examination. 



The Leading Jeweler and Optician, Sunbury, Pa. 



PHOTOGRAPHS 



1 inliiir 



OF ALL KINDS: CRAYONS 

WATER COLORS AND PASTELS, 

GUARANTEED TO GIVE 

SATISFACTION, 
OUR MOTTO **& 

Beauty of Pose and Excellence of Finish* 

R B. LUCE, 

ARTIST AND PHOTOGRAPHER. 

429 Market Street, Sunbury, Pa. 

Enlarging- from Small Pictures a Specialty. 



ED. I, HEFFELFINGER, 
Merchant 
Tailor.^ 

Selinsgrove, Pa., 

Opposite Postoffice. 
Workmanship Guaranteed. 



Arthur D* Carey, 

Fine Groceries, Provisions, 
Tobaccoes and Cigars. . . . 

Fruits and Confectionery 
a Specialty 

Selinsgrove, Pa. 



390 



Patronize Our Advertisers. 



A* Q. Spalding & Bros. 

LARGEST MANUFACTURERS IN 
THE WORLD OF OFFICIAL 
ATHLETIC SUPPLIES 



Base Ball 
Lawn Tennis 

Golf 

Field Hockey 

official Athletic 

Implements 




Spalding's Catalogue of all Athletic Sports Mailed Free to any Address 



A. G. SPALDING & BROS. 



New York 



Chicago 



Denver 



Buffalo 



Baltimore 



AUSTIN WILVERTjft 

Finest 

Commercial Printing 

257 Market Street, 
9 South Third Street, 

SUNBURY, - - PENNA- 



50 YEARS' 
EXPERIENCE 



'ATENTS 



Subscribe for.. 

THE^e 
SUSQUEHANNA 



v '"■■'• 



Trade Marks 
Designs 
Copyrights &c. 

Anyone sending a sketch and description may 
quickly ascertain our opinion free whether an 
invention is probably patentable. Communica- 
tions strictly confidential. Handbook on Patents 
sent free. Oldest agency for securing patents. 

Patents taken through Munn & Co. receive 
special notice, without charge, in the 

Scientific American. 



A handsomely illustrated weekly. Largest cir- 
culation of any scientific journal. Terms, $3 a 
year ; four months, | L Sold by all newsdealers. 

MUNN &Co. 36 ' B '°^ New York 

Branch Office, 626 F St., Washington, D. C. 



Patronize Our Advertisers. 



391 



F. J. WAOENSELLER, M.D. 

PHYSICIAN AND ' 
SURGEON.*.* 

Eyes Treated and Glasses Adjusted. 
SOUTH MARKET STREET, SELINSGROVE. 



N 



EW FIRM, 
EW GOODS 




LATEST STYLES, 
OWEST PRICES. 



FOR MEN AND 
BOYS 



CLOTHING 



Gents' Furnishing 
Goods in General. 



Keeley Block, 



Keeley «Sr Son, 

SELINSGROVE, Pa 



Patronized ^ 

City Restaurant. 

Students' Headquarters. Popular Lunches at Popular Prices 
Ice Cream, Oysters and Hot Lunches all hours : : : : : 

J. F. BUCHER, Proprietor. 

A WT PONTIUS, 

Vv h vlesale and Retail Dealer in 

ICE CREAMand CONFECTIONERY 

231 Market Street, Sunbury, Pa. 



No* 16 S, Market St,, 

G.R.HENDRICKS&SON 

Dealers in 
Hardware, Glass, Oils, Paints 
Farming Implements, 
Sporting- Goods. . . 
News Depot Attached. 
Telephone Connection. Lowesi prices 
Sole Agents for Spalding's Sport- 
ing Goods. 



PAY YOUR SUBSCRIPTION 

PROMPTLY ; 

AND HELP THE MANAGER 
MAKE ENDS MEET. 



B. F. WAOENSELLER, M. D. 

PHYSICIAN and 
SURGEON . . 

Office opposite Fin;t National Bank, 
SELINSGROVE, PA. 



J. W. DAUGHERTY, 

The Popular 

Photographer* 

Photographic work of all kinds. 
Finishing for Amatures. 

East Market St., Sunbury, Pa. 



392 Patronize Our Advertisers. 



SUSQUEHANNA^^ 



UNIVERSITY, 



O 



Pres. GEO. W. ENDERS, D. D., 

FFERS excellent facilities for a splendid education under 
wholesome influences and at very low terms. 
The institution has the following- departments: 



I. THEOLOGICAL, with a fall three years 9 course. 

II. COLLEGIATE, Classical and Scientific Courses. 

III. LADIES COURSE, leading to a degree. 

IV. MUSIC, Vocal and Instrumental, full course lead- 

ing" to a degree* 

V. ELOCUTION, a fully arranged course leading to 

graduation and a degree. 
VI. TEACHERS' COURSE leading to graduation. 
VII. PREPARATORY of three years. 

VIII. BOOK-KEEPING, Type- Writing and Short-Hand. 

IX. QVIL ENGINEERING. 

The curriculum of each course is comprehensive and up to 
date. The instruction is thorough. The instructors take 
the deepest personal interest in the students. The location 
is healthful, the buildings comfortable, and the terms verv 
low. 

For Catalogue and further particulars write to 

JOHN I. WOODRUFF, A. M., Dean, 

Selinsgrove, Pa., 

or to Rev, A. N. Warner, /Registrar. 

Note. — There is also a six weeks Summer Term, 
offering work in the various departments. 



Patronize Our Advertisers. 393 

THE 



Picaroons 



By GELETT BURGESS and WILL IRWIN 

SHOULD BE READ BY 

EVERY COLLEGE MAN 

This is honestly, one of the smoothest and richest things that ever happened. It 
is a gingery, " coast " story and quite strong enough to make you forget many things 
you don't want to remember. Full of excitement, change of scene, and clever 
reminiscence. It is sad and sweet, wild and adventurous, and filled with a keen show 
of humor that is entirely irresistible. Lend it your eye. 

The story or series of stories runs for twelve months, altho' you may read any 
one story of the series and feel that all is completed ; but better begin at the begin- 
ning and we will trust you to get the entire thing before you are thro'. 

AN INTERNATIONAL SPY 

gives a series of most astounding revelations of modern times. He shows up the 
inner workings of The Telegram Which Began the Boer War, The Blowing Vp of 
The Maine, The Mystery of Captain Dreyfus, etc., etc., etc. These articles are of 
such a serious nature that it is not possible to make known the name of the author 
and thus expose him to grave danger at the hands of foreign governments whose 
secret crookedness he has so vividly revealed. 

SIR HENRY MORGAN 

THE LAST OF THE BUCCANEERS 
By CYRUS TOWNSEND BRADY 

This is a masterpiece, showing as it does the most skillful handling of characters 
engaged in the blackest of black and cruel deeds and leading the reader ere he is 
aware, in to an atmosphere of love and pathos, the effect of which is a most fascinating 
harmony. READ THESE IN 

PEARSON'S 

10 CENTS ALL NEWSDEALERS 

ONE DOLLAR will give you a year's subscription to PEARSON'S in which 
during the coming year will be presented some of the best literature ever published. 
There are in course of preparation one or two very sensational articles based upon 
certain existing evils. These will be most thrilling in their fearless treatment of the 
men concerned in the scandals exposed. 



PEARSON PVB. CO.. 19 ASTOR PLACE. NEW YORK 



394 Patronize Our Advertisers. 

..FRANK GASKINS.. 

Practical Jeweler and Optician 

DBALKK IN 

Watches, Clocks Jewelry, Diamonds, 

Silverware, Novelties, Cut Glass, Etc. 

All repairing* done carefully and prices moderate. 

249 Market Square, near Court House, SUNBURY, PA, 



RANTED— FAITHFUL PERSON TO { TRAVEL for well 
established house in a few counties, calling on retail 
merchants and agents. Local territory. Salary $1024 a year 
and expenses, payable $19.70 a week in cash and expenses ad- 
vanced. Position permanent if desired, or for summer season. 
Business successful and rushing. Standard House, Educa- 
tional Department, Caxton Bldg., Chicago. 



Alumni! Students! Friends! 

Do you want something to bring back your pleas- 
ant times at College ? Do you want something by 
which to remember your Alma Mater? Buy 

"The Lanthorn," 

published by class of '04. Price One Dollar ($1.00.) 

CALVIN P. SWANK, Bus. Mgr. 



Patronize Our Advertisers. 



395 



299 Pianos. 

The New England Conservatory of 
Music, Boston, -whose premiership 
among institutions of its class is a 
matter of common knowledge, when in 
the market for pianos twenty years ago, 
after exhaustive trials of the then cele- 
brated makes, decided upon the 

Ivers & Pond 

and ordered 50. That the decision was 
wise would be implied from their sub- 
sequent purchases of this make, until 
lately 268 had been bought. Now, when 
moving into its beautiful new building, 
the Conservatory looks over the piano 
market again, and finding its choice still 
that of twenty years ago, orders 31 Ivers 
& Pond Pianos, making a total oi 299 as 
follows : 




1882 . . 50 Pianos. 


1895 . . 20 Pianos. 


1884 . . 6 " 


1896 . . 15 " 


1886 . . 17 " 


1897 . . 12 ** 


1887 . . 2 " 


1898 . . 12 *' 


1888 . . 6 M 


1899 . . 12 M 


1889 . . 12 " 


1900 . . 15 " 


1890 . . 72 " 


1901 . . 2 " 


1894 .. 15 " 


1902 . . 31 " 



Total 299 Pianos. 

Can more conclusive evidence of con- 
tinuity in sustaining and advancing an 
artistic standard be given than the 
above remarkable record ? Ivers & Pond 
Pianos, embodying half a century's ex- 
perience in scientific piano-building, 
were never so perfect as to-day. As 
exclusive representatives for their sale 
in this locality we invite your inspec- 
tion of these remarkable instruments. 

C. C. SEEBOLD, 

34 North Third St., Sunbury, Pa. 
Near P. R. R. Depot. 



Your Subscriptions 
SSSis Due 



Hinds & Noble, Publishers, 3/ IV.'istk St., 
N r .V '.City, will send you any 0} these books sub- 
ject to approval. Enclose th is ad7>ertise»rent. 



Songs of A U the Colleges - • - 

Songs of the Eastern Colleges • • 

SoDgs of the Western Colleges • • 

New Songs for Gfoo Clubs » • • 
New Songs for Male Quartettes • • 
New Songs for Church Quartettes • 

Pieces That Have Taken Prizes • • 

New Pieces That Will Take Prize* 
Pieces for Every Occasion • « . • 

5 Minute Declamations fur College Men ■ 
3-Minute Readings for College Girls 
How to Attract tund. HdU an Avdieiic* • 
Pahner's New Parliamentary Manual • 
Pros and Cons, (Complete Debates) • 
C©BH&«BCM»M&P&TVs{07»l>ta», Essays^ fit. 
Gunnison's New Dialogues and Play* 



1.25 
1.25 

.60 
.60 
.25 
1.25 
1.25 
1.25 
1.00 
1.00 

Uft 

-.75 

1.50 

» 5.50 

1.50 



( 



J 



III1HIIE 




EFFORTS 

FOR ALL OCCASIONS 

Orations, addresses, es- 
says,valedictories, sala- 
tatories, class poems, ivy 
poemsj class mottoes, 
after-dinner speeches, 
flag-days, national holi- 
days, class-day exercises. 
Models for every possible 
occasion in high-school 
and college career ; each 
and every "effort" being I 
what some fellow has | 
* 'stood on his feet " and 
actually delivered on a 
similar occasion. 

Price, $1.50 Postpaid. 
Cloth— 640 Pages. 

KINDS & NOBLE 

4-5-6-12-13-14 Cooper Institnte, N. Y. City 

* ScJioolbooks of all publisJxts at on* store. 




3% 



Patronize Our Advertisers. 



Do You Want to Make Money? 



■yi; yrrf < ' * ? ,i» P.. ' .» ^ 1 8 — "w Tl T-crTf* *' ' I — I k"* * 




DO YOU WANT TO 
MAKE IT QUICKLY 
AND EASILY? 

DO YOU WANT VERY 
PROFITABLE WORK 
FOR A SHORT TIME? 

DO YOU WANT PER- 
MANENT AND PRO- 
FITABLE EMPLOY- 
MENT? 



NO CAPITAL REQUIR- 
ED, NO RISK TO 
RUN. 



You can make your vacation 
worth $25 to $35 per week. 

WRITE US FOR FULL INFORMATION. 

PARIS PERFUHE CO., Jersey City, N. J. 












L 



i 



I 



J" 



yyvtlfo - 




\ 



L 



- 




I 



The Susquehanna... 

ESTABLISHED 1891. 500 CIRCULATION. 

Vol. XIII. JUNE, 1903. No. 10 

CONTENT S. 

LITERARY. PAGE . 

Salutatory, 397 

Valedictory, - - 399 

National Evolution, 401 

With Your Shield or Upon It, - 405 

The Perpetual Demand, - - - - 408 

The Image of God, 412 

The Effect of Machinery Upon the 

Laboring Classes, 414 

A Growing Menace to Our Nation, - - 416 

Abraham Lincoln, 421 

SOCIETIES. 

Clionian, 423 

ATHLETICS, 424 

DEPARTMENTS. 

Commercial, 425 

EDITORIAL, 426 

Published each Month of the Scholastic Year by the 

Students* Publishing Association, Susquehanna University. 

SELINSGROVE, PENNA. 




CLASS OF 1 1903 



The Susquehanna... 

Selinsgrove, June, 1903. 



SALUTATORY. 

IN PURSUANCE of an ancient custom, established with the 
English Colleges in the 13th Century, are we here to-day. 
Six hundred years ago we find the Colleges of Oxford holding 
their commencements, and the whole people of the Thames 
were present to see their sons graduated. This was the cus- 
tom in old England, and when our pilgrim ancestors left their 
fatherland to seek a new home they carried with them the 
rights and ceremonies of their "Almae Matres." So in Amer- 
ica as in England we have the close of the scholastic year 
marked with the final meeting of the Senior class and the 
conferring of degrees by the Faculty. And we, the class of 
1903, salute you and welcome you to this, our final meeting. 
Turning back the cycle of our lives four years, we find our- 
selves just starting out over the mountain of our college life. 
Looming up, way in the distance we saw this, the time of our 
graduation. This was the goal toward which we worked and 
for which we contended with the many trials that beset our 
pathway. For four years our diplomas were the wreaths of 
victory for which we strove. But now, when at last that goal 
has been reached, we find that as a phantom it has vanished. 
And in its stead lies the broad plane of our after life, and in- 
stead of to-day being the end toward which we worked, we 
find it to be but the beginning of what is to follow, and, our 
college life was but a preparation for that beginning. When 
those four years stood in the future, they seemed to embrace 
a long, long time. But when viewed retrospectively they 
seem short enough. For steadily as the sun in its course 
through the heavens passed those years, and at each record- 
ing of the cycle we found ourselves one year nearer our one 
time goal. 

Many and varied were the transitions that we passed 

(397) 



398 The Susquehanna. 

through during- these years. And sudden, at times, were our 
changes from the pinnacle of hope to the depths of despair. 
What joy and griefs; what rapture and despair were ours is 
known only to one having- passed throug-h the same course. 
But this, in colleg-e, is now passed for us, and our dreams of 
conquest and our fears of defeat must, with this day, give 
way to the cold reality of facts that will from now on beset us. 

But 

"Let him not boast who puts his armor on 
As he who puts it off, the battle won." 

And this is our position. Our battles lie not in the past 
but in the future. And to join with us in our outstarting- to 
fight these battles, we greet you now and bid you welcome. 

Occasions like this are always redolent with a spirit of hap- 
piness and also with a feeling- of sadness. Happiness for the 
work we have done, and regret that we have not done more. 

This year the class of 1903 has the centre of the stage 
but it will be only one year until another class shall have 
taken our place, and a few years after that we shall have 
forgotten and your places as under graduates, will have been 
taken by others. 

You, who as friends of the students and the university 
have met here from year to year in the past, with God-speeds 
towards the outgoing classes, you we welcome here to-day. 
You, who as teachers, led our bewildered feet through learn- 
ing's maze, the past years, you, who toiled with us through 
the bogs that faced us on every side, you who made our suc- 
cess your success; our failure your failure; you, who by your 
precept and your example have been the guiding light of 
classes past, present, and will be to those yet to come, you, 
we salute and greet and wish you eternal God-speed. 

Those of you with whom we have been associated as fel- 
low students; and those of you who will take our places as we 
leave these portals, you, as the future graduates of our Alma 
Mater, and the defenders of her honor, to you we surrender 



The Susquehagna. 399 

our tasks and pleasures, and you have our best wishes for the 
future and our welcome here to-day. 

You all who have done us the honor of being- present to- 
day to witness our final parting; you all we greet and on be- 
half of the class of 1903, we bid you, one and all, a hearty 
welcome. F. S. W. 



VALEDICTORY. 

STANDING upon the shore of life's rolling sea, we pause a 
moment, ere launching our bark upon its boisterous 
waves, to bid adieu to our friends and relatives. 

Citizens of Selinsgrove and friends: Our sojourn among 
you has been most pleasant. Your hospitality and kindness 
to us can only be equalled by the generosity of the hearts that 
have prompted it. We, indeed, feel highly grateful to all for 
the kindly spirit you have shown us and bid you all a hearty 
farewell. 

We also desire to express our deep sense of gratitude to 
the congregation and its pastor who has always so unselfishly 
ministered to us in spiritual things. The kindness of the 
pastor and flock in so generously granting us all the privil- 
eges and opportunities we so freely enjoy at their hands is 
surely appreciated by all and we leave you with only the best 
wishes for continued prosperity in your noble work. 

And to you fellow students: — You, with whom we have 
had so many things in common that we are indeed but as so 
many members of the same great family. Side by side we 
have struggled with you. Your triumphs have been our tri- 
umphs, and the success that shall crown our efforts shall in 
no small measure redound to your welfare. The petty strifes 
and differences that have come between us in times past have 
only served to bind us closer in the bonds of college friend- 
ship. Your encouraging words and cheers have done an in- 
estimable service in making our college days our pleasantest. 



400 The Susquehanna. 

We leave you, but in leaving-, our hearts still cling- reluctant- 
ly to the past, and now as we look for the last time in your 
familiar faces to bid you a tender farewell, the thoug-hts of 
past pleasures almost overwhelm us. But we must pass on 
to make room for those that are to follow; so, farewell. 

We would not leave these halls without expressing- our 
most intense gratitude to you the members of the Board of 
Directors. Into your hands has been placed the vast respon- 
sibility of conducting the practical affairs of our institution. 
In spite of inadequate means and in the face of almost insur- 
mountable dificulties you have performed the educational 
world no small service. Deeply grateful for all theprivileg-es 
we have enjoyed because of your efforts, we, in parting- wish 
you the hig-hest possible achievement in your difficult and 
trying- labors, and pray that your efforts may be crowned with 
still greater success for our Alma Mater. 

And now, to the honored members of our beloved Faculty, 
we, as a class, wish to pay our tribute of respect and bid them 
a last farewell as we are about to leave these college walls. 
You have been faithful in the performance of every duty re- 
lating- to your chosen profession. By kind words you have 
helped to make pleasant the otherwise arduous and tedious 
hours of mental toil. By your assistance and encourag-ement 
you have helped us to become masters of our! difficulties. 
Your ardent love and desire for truth has beg-otten in us a 
hunger and thirst for knowledge that compells us to intensify 
our efforts along- all lines of educational work. Your devoted 
and unselfish interest in our improvement and fuller prepara- 
tion for service in the world, has heig-htened our ideals, en- 
nobled our ambition and enriched our character. Your care 
over us has been paternal; your interest in our hig-hest wel- 
fare, unselfish; and your effort in developing- the best in us, 
devoted. Your profession is a noble one. Its opportunities 
for exerting- a helpful influence on mankind unlimited. And 
realizing- this fact, we as a class, wish you the highest possi- 



The Susquehanna. 401 

ble success in your future efforts and bid you a last fond fare- 
well and a God-speed in your highly honored calling. 

Finally, metnDers of my beloved class, it becomes my 
painful necessity to bid farewell to you. To-day we stand upon 
the threshold of real life. Four years have been spent to- 
gether in self improvement and preparation. Kindred trials, 
mutual struggles and joint pleasures have knit our hearts in 
such firm bonds of friendship that naught can sever our mu- 
tual interests in one another's welfare. Turning our minds 
in fond reminiscence, we recall our past pleasures and strug- 
gles, regretting that we must so soon part and enter alone 
into the stern realities of life. College life with its successes 
and failures, its hopes and disappointments, its sunshine and 
shadow, its defeats and triumphs, is a thing of the past. In 
fond recollection and hallowed memory only does it live. And 
may each loyal member of 1903 ever hold in loving rememb- 
rance the happiest, brightest and most helpful days of his 
life and strive continually to make life a commentary true to 
the spirit our dear Alma Mater has been so faithfully striving 
to inculcate. I bid you all a most tender farewell and a God- 
speed in whatever line of duty the world has waiting for you. 



NATIONAL EVOLUTION. 

A COMPROMISE between two extreme factions in a contro- 
versy is the best solution of the differences. And the ab- 
sence of concession in drawing up the governments of antiquity 
was the chief cause of their failure. While the compromise ar- 
rived in drawing up our constitution, the willingness of the ex- 
treme factions to grant mutual concessions has been the chief 
cause of that instruments success. 

Governments in their nature may be either monarchial, 
aristocratic, or Republican. And these three forms are radically 
different in their composition as well as in their workings. And 
each has its characteristic attribute. The first, power; the second, 



402 The Susquehanna. 

wisdom: and the third, justice. Looking at the characteristics, 
prima facie, the government imbued with the spirit of justice 
would seem to be the most prone to success. Hut history will 
not bear this out. Turning to the evolution of Grecian govern- 
ment and noticing the various changes effected by time, one is 
led to the conclusion that none of their systems in their strict 
forms was successful. 

When first we find the Greeks settling the territory around 
the Aegean sea, their civilization was of the most crude form. 
Their government was the same as that of the Northern European 
tribes and their chief was the head authority in their state. But 
after they had thrown open their harbors to the trade of the 
Phoenicians, their life was gradually changed. They soon em- 
braced the civilization of the strangers and their government 
was greatly altered. He who in barbarity had been the chieftain 
of this tribe, was now transformed into the regal splendor of a 
king. Soon we find these many little tribes transformed into al- 
most as many petty kingdoms. Hereditary succession of king- 
ship was their mode of procedure and absolute monarchy was the 
form of their government. But this was doomed to an early 
death. As the people learned more of the higher arts, the greater 
grew their desire for freedom and soon their one-time kings were 
cast aside and we have the republics of Greece. Here the people 
were sovereign and they wanted no more rulers. They thought 
that they could govern themselves, but great was their mistake. 
For an unwieldly government without a strong executive could 
never cope with the laud-grabbing neighbors that dwelt about 
them. Discord and disintegration set in until the pulse of the 
intellectual world became almost a nonentity and he who was 
successful in arms was made the head of the state. Gradually he 
wrested the authority from the people and assumed it himself. 
As the people lost in influence he gained until, at last he, the once 
true champion of liberty, became the tyrant of this people. 
Thus their government fluctuated. First they have an absolute 
monarchy, then the people rule themselves |in an almost pure 
democracy. Then a tyrant springs up and he is sole ruler. At 



The Susquehanna. 403 

several stages of their growth an aristocracy held the reins of 
state. Here we find all the forms of government known to man, 
each succeeding each other and each in its turn failing. Why 
could not the wisdom incident to an aristocratic government pre- 
vail against the clamors of the people? Why could not the power 
of a monarch overcome all external dangers? And why could 
not the justice of a democracy withstand the dangers of internal 
disintegration? Of a truth, these are the questions that over- 
whelm the student of ancient history. Greece, the bulwark of 
universal learning failed. So what is to be the fate of the less 
fortunate countries? This was the question Caesar asked when 
at the height of his glory and justly might it overwhelm him. 
Rome, the eternal city was clamoring for one of two forms of 
government. On the one hand we have the absolute authority of 
a Caesar, on the other the government of the people. And which 
of these was to prevail? The voice of the one or the will of the 
many? Is the individual or are the people to be trusted most in 
times of national danger? 

Turn to your history. First we find that Man of God, 
Moses, leading the dissatisfied children of Israel through the 
wilderness. Here, was it the voice of one guided by God, or the 
clamoring of the masses that was right. Then we find Christ, 
persecuted by his own people, whom He had come to save, and at 
last nailed to a cross with a crown of thorns upon His brow. 
Who was right here? Then we find Columbus setting out in 
spite of the superstition of the Middle Ages to find a new 7 world- 
Well do we know how he was scoffed at and branded a fool for 
his convictions. And who was right here? 

Then we come to our own immortal Lincoln, scoffed at by 
the whole South and distrusted by many in the North, issuing 
his Proclamation for the freedom of the negro: Who was to be 
trusted the more, we the people or that champion of universal 
freedom? Who best saw the effects of that instrument and whom 
must we honor for it? Truly, turning to history for precident, 
we can only conclude, that the individual, weighing all sides of 
the question and looking at it from his high office is the one to be 
trusted in the case of emergency. 



404 The Susquehanna. 

England had her Charles the First as an example of a mon- 
arch's power. And she had her Cromwell, championing the 
freedom of his church and it is hard to tell which of the two was 
the most despotic — Charles killing the round-heads for their re- 
ligion, or Cromwell doing away with aristocracy for their blood. 

Now let us ask, why have none of these forms of govern- 
ment succeeded? Why do we no longer have the monarchy 
of a Charles or the democracy of the Greeks? The answer 
comes back because of the absence of concession. Years ago 
when the champions of Liberty gained control of their states, 
they handed all the authority over to the people; and the people 
knew not what to do with it. Their government was too un- 
wieldly and hasty action in case of emergency was impossible. 
And when the adherents of monarchy were victorious, they 
ground their subject into unbearable suppression. Each party, 
when victorious, would grant nothing to the other and this was 
their cause of ill success. 

Looking today at the governments that prevail upon the 
earth, we find a great change. Rome and Greece are dead. Eng- 
land has a limited monarchy with all the power in the hands of 
parliament — the people. The United States, starting out with 
the idea that the people were sovereign, has today given the Pres- 
ident more authority than King Edward enjoys and how does 
this come? Was not our government established to get rid of the 
tyranny of King George? Did not our people want to rule them- 
selves and grind down the executive? Yes. But a change has 
taken place. The president of the "Fathers of the Constitution' ' 
has vanished and in his place we have a Jefferson, who bought 
Louisiana without at first consulting the people, and a Lincoln 
who freed the slaves by right of an executive decree. Had the 
framers of the Constitution ever dreamt of so much power in the 
executive, they would have shuddered at the idea. But things 
have changed since then and it has been for the better. Our gov- 
ernment today is composed of a happy mingling, of the three dif- 
ferent forms. The President represents the Monarch; the Sen- 
ate, the Aristocracy and the House, the Republic. Ours is a gov- 



The Susquehanna. 405 

eminent of compromises. And the better it is for being such. 
Power, wisdom and justice are each represented in our system. 
And neither can encroach upon the other. True it is that our 
President is more powerful than formerly, but he has to be. A 
nation's government is like the fluctuating of the earth's line of 
absides, touching power, wisdom and justice in the course of its 
revolution. But the final stopping place and the one most neces- 
sary to National welfare is powers. As was true when the masses 
scoffed at Noah and when Christ was considered an impostor, the 
individual was right and the masses were wrong. Jefferson, Lin- 
coln and McKmley were right, and, although they assumed more 
authority than was the original intention of the constitution, our 
government remains practically the same. When all our terri- 
tory was included in the thirteen original colonies, we did not need 
the same foreign policy we do to-day for that dominion upon 
which the sun never sets. 

Once we were a hermit; but now we have thrown aside our 
solitude, and looking about us, every people galled by the yoke 
of oppression receives our philanthropic aid. 

The infant nation of the eighteenth century is no more and 
in her place stands the Champion of Universal Freedom. The 
America of the past is dead and in her place we have the regen- 
erated America, that has been rocked by the storms of foreign 
invasion and swept by the winds of civil dissention and stood for 
a century and a quarter while her principles remained unaltered. 

F. S. W. 



WITH YOUR SHIELD OR UPON IT. 

Junior Prize Oration. 

SPARTA was noted for its valor. Tho small, the only proper de- 
fence of that Grecian state was the martial valor of its citizens 
in which they took great pride. For a soldier to leave his shield 
upon the battle-field and flee denoted cowardice, and was an act 
which reflected his honor, disgrace and degredation upon the 
whole family. When a mother's only boy was brought home, 



406 The Susquehanna. 

his last battle fought, she would view the beloved corpse with a 
comforted sorrow and submission, when told that he died while 
bravely fighting. This innate love of country prompted the 
mother to instil patriotism in the mind of her boy, and bidding 
him good bye, she admonished him : "Return with your shield 
or upon it." 

Life is an endless campaign of mental and martial warfare. 
Not a single morning sun peers over your eastern hill, but we 
stand in another day, and face not only new theories, but stern 
realities. These must be confronted. The enemy is at hand. 
Pride and selfishness, public opinion and criticism and censure 
fill the smoky air of battle. 

Today our fair land is stained by social and political crime. 
Men of social circles are easily led to yield to the influences of 
bribery, because of their greediness for distinction : men in politi- 
cal life, by their love of gold and political honor. Is not this a 
crimson stain on fair wool ? Yes, and what is far worse, every 
ysax \vv\wk<i<ls> ^i \\tf\oesY\\, cVvaracteire aie s&mficed on the a\Yar of 
the "Pride of the Union". "The Keystone State", our state ; be- 
cause too many drop their shields and flee. They think more of 
their lives than their honor and character: Instead of opposing 
the monster — selfishness and greed — they surrender to their 
bribes, and live their remaining lives in the caves of treachery, 
fearing lest the light of truth shine upon them. If this be a 
man's choice — afraid to battle for what he knows to be just the 
right — he is a coward of the lowest type: The martial coward 
saves his own life, but such an one ruins others while he murders 
his own conscience. 

America needs brave sons. Society is seeking for them, and 
politics is corrupt because of the lack of them. Men are wanted, 
men like Spartans, — men who prefer an honorable death to a dis- 
honored life. True men : The mountains break forth the cry and 
the rivers carry it to the sea, — such men as the Spartan of old 
pled for before the gladiators of Greece: "Is Sparta dead? Is 
the old Grecian spirit frozen in your veins, that you do crouch 
and cower like belabored hounds beneath their master's lash ? 



The Susquehanna. 407 

Oh, Comrads ! Warriors ! Thracians ! If we must fight, let 
us fight for ourselves ! If we must slaughter, let us slaughter 
our oppressors ! If we must die, let it be under the clear sky, 
by the bright waters, in noble, honorable battle!" 

We want men who are true to their convictions, men like 
Huss and Savonarola, a Paul or a Luther, a Washington or a 
Lincoln of our own fair land. These were men of brave deter- 
mination, and today history honors them because they were true 
to their sense of duty. They were those who bore their shields 
proudly as conquerors, or died in the attempt and were born 
home upon them. What good is a man to his flag, society, or 
himself, if he is found wanting when needed ? What good are a 
man's friends if they desert him in time of trouble and want ? 
What good is any man, if he drops his shield and flees " 

The first goal must be that of true manhood, then loyalty to 
it. Man is prone to err and disloyalty. Every man is his own 
free moral agent: with as much liberty to choose evil as good. 
The results of evil and error are too well known, but the results of 
good and true manly virtue are inestimable. The latter can 
only be attained by a Divine help and influence. If this be not 
man's purpose, his life will be in a vain. It matters not in what 
avenue of life he enters, his stay will be that of an existance, not 
true living ; for the man who truly lives has a higher aim and am- 
bition. He cannot command the influence of his neighbors, 
much less the respect of his community. If he would be a true 
man and a loyal soldier, let him make virtue and honor his goal. 
This neglected, all will be lost. Multitudes are entering the 
field, not as true soldiers and have not proper uniforms ; they are 
vacillating and unstable in character and career. They spend 
their energy quarreling among themselves. Such beget misery 
for themselves and are an abomination to the true progress of 
man, and when calamity picks them off, being no loss, society 
gives a sigh of relief and moves on. 

There is a monument and a clump of trees on our Gettys- 
burg battle-field which represents the "High Water Mark" and 
does honor to the brave men men who fell there. The Confede- 



403 The Susquehanna. 

rates were advancing, — but a few moments and the Federal ranks 
would be driven from the field. Something must be done. A 
company of men are choosen — the bravest and the best on the 
field. They knew that death was certain, but that their fight- 
ing and death would check the enemy till reinforcements could 
come. They fought bravely, as only heroes can. They were 
nearly all slain, but they saved the day for the nation, and to-day 
we look with pride on our dear old battle-field and cherish it as 
the dearest of our national trophies. 

Each must be true to his cause. He may know what to do, 
but unless he does it, his life will be of little influence. It takes 
practice as well as theory to win battles. Arnold Winkelried 
grasped an arm full of spears and died ; but it was a means of 
victors- fox 1\\?> trowrades. The men at the ''High Water Mark" 
did not die in vain. Not all is lost when a good, honest, effort 
fails. Many lives in this world are not crowned with victory, 
but are light-houses on the shores of time. If you are but a 
light-house, saving some poor vessel from wrecking, you are do- 
ing a great work. 'Tis no disgrace to die in a noble cause, but a 
most honorable reward. Let there be no surrender, but let be, 
if need be, upon your shield your return. 

Let fidelity to your Creator and loyalty to self be the kings to 
which true honor bows. ''Better to serve in Heaven than rule in 
Hell." Stand firmly by your convictions ! Be moral Spartans ! 
"Return with your shield or upon it !" By so doing you will be 
true to your countiy, yourself, and your God. 

C. P. Swank, '04. 



THE PERPETUAL DEMAND. 

(Honor graduate of Preparatory Department.) 

IF one turns to the business world, if one enters the political 
arena, or if he takes a look into the realm of science, how 
greatly is he impressed by the vastness of the unexplored regions 
which stretch away as far as the mind can reach. The observer 
is surprised to see how few are journeying to these realms whose 



The Susquehanna. 409 

riches are as yet unknown. But turning his eyes in the other 
direction he sees the vast hordes of humanity seething, struggling, 
and jostling one and another for a bare existence until he turns 
away with a heavy heart. Why is it the lower positions are 
crowded but the front ranks are sadly in need of recruits. Ah! 
that is the question of the ages and the only answer that can be 
given is, Men! The world demands men to enter into and possess 
these rich domains and how few are able to answer this call. 
Real men, it must be admitted are hard to find. The great ma- 
jority of so-called men lack the qualities of true manhood. It is 
our purpose to discuss some of the qualities which the world 
needs to make it purer and nobler. 

In all ages there have been great men and the masses have 
been willing to follow in their footsteps. But how dangerous is 
such a course, for great men with all their greatness are but 
human. Joaquin Miller, the poet of the Sierras has shown the 
deceitfulness of man's character on these simple lines, — 
"In those whom men pronounce as ill, 

I find so much of goodness still; 

In those whom men pronounce divine, 

I find so much of sin and blot, 

I hesitate to draw the line, 

When God has not." 
Alexander , the conqueror oi trie yjot\& oAed Vn a drunken carousal. 
Napoleon in many respects was a monster. And since it is 
human nature to imitate the vices rather than the virtues in a 
man's character, a real man must think and act for himself al- 
though the whole world should be arrayed against him. Such a 
one was the aged Polycarp when he stood before the stern Romans 
and refused to do honor to the pagan gods although a horrible 
death stared him in the face. The reason that so many men of 
today are but the creatures of circumstances is because they have 
not the courage to stand for their own convictions. A real man 
is never the creature of circumstances, they are his servants. But 
still it may be said many a man thinks for himself but is afraid 
to act. That is but a half truth for we believe that conscious 



410 The Susquehanna. 

thought is power. Sooner or later a man's belief will order his 
whole life. Many people have good intentions which are shad- 
owy and indistinct in their minds, but totally lack that force and 
clearness of thinking which causes men to act. The world de- 
mands men in whom, thought and action go hand in hand. 

There is another needed quality which is lacking in most in- 
dividuals and that is the virtue of doing more than is absolutely 
necessary. Many a man has been living in ■ 'shallows and mis- 
eries' ' all his life because he has been continually waiting for the 
whistle to blow. Go among the common laborers, those who are 
trodden down by the heel of the capitalist, and you will find in 
ninety-nine cases out of a hundred that they are doing merely 
enough work to draw their wages. Observe a particular class 
the hod carriers, for example, when a great building is being 
erected and you will find them continually wrangling about the 
number of bricks they are to carry. They bemoan their hard lot 
but do you wonder that they carry the hod all their lives? Come 
up higher in the scale of life, to the student who enjoys the priv- 
ileges of a liberal education. You will find in many cases, that 
he is afraid of work that he never does more than will enable him 
to pass through the recitation. He cheats, puts on a bold front, 
leans on some one rather than exert himself to explore the realms 
of truth. No wonder that he is weak when he leaves school; no 
wonder that college graduates are held in contempt; no wonder 
that many a college man goes down in the battle of life. From 
every calling comes a demand for men who are not afraid of work. 

But far above these good qualities is one which must be the 
cornerstone in the character of every true man. It must be su- 
preme or the usefulness of the life will be sadly marred. This 
virtue of virtues is unselfishness and great is the world's need for 
unselfish men, men who will give their best days in the service 
of truth. But how hard it is to find such men! How much of 
selfishness there is in the human race and what a monster it is! 
It leads men to sell their lives, their characters, their all. It 
leads men to amass great fortunes even though the fatherless and 
widow are trampled to the ground in the getting. Indeed what 
evil can be found which does not have its beginning in selfish- 
ness! The world demands men of a different stamp, men who 



The Susqnehanna. 411 

will not be lured by the gleam of money or the prospect of honor. 
It needs men who will work to enlighten the masses, to dispel 
the superstitions which are still so prevalent. Woman crys ont 
for some one who will free her from many of fashions barbarous 
customs. The poor and unfortunate are asking help. Mankind, 
in general is in need of men who will bring the human race 
nearer to its God by a generous outpouring of their life's blood. 
The unselfish man the one who is bent on making the world bet- 
ter for his having lived in it can expect to be unpopular, to be 
jeered at by the masses. But he has the consolation that by his 
course he is fulfilling the highest law of God, and though he may 
sleep in an unmarked grave, the truth which he advocated will 
go sweeping on until it has overwhelmed error. The influence 
of such a man lives on and on in the movement of which he was 
a part. In every hamlet and city the cry goes up for unselfish 
men — men who will spend their lives for the good of humanity. 
These are a few of the qualities which must be found in a 
man of power. But what can be said of the outlook since the 
world's need is so great. It is the duty of everyone who would 
claim the title of man to expend at least part of his energy for 
the good of the race. Only in so doing will he reach his highest 
development and happiness. Mammon has its charms. Commer- 
cialism has its attractions. Honor still extends her wreath but 
these are vain when compared with desire to raise men to a 
higher life. One can gain all the honors and riches which this 
world can bestow and yet have missed the greatest blessing of all 
happiness. The world demands men — men mighty in integrity 
and unselfishness. Peace will spread her wings over all when 
such men shall hold the reins of power. Then shall the great 
social evils disappear. Then shall many perplexing questions 
be solved. What an honor it will be to help in this great work 
for humanity. The call comes to everyone but especially to the 
young. May it be the purpose of each one of us who is begin- 
ning life, first of all to be a man. Riches and honors may be ac- 
quired but when the time comes to die these are cast aside and 
forgotten. The influence of a man can never die. Let us then 
develop manhood in ourselves which is the noblest work in which 
mortals can engage. Samuel E. Smith, '07. 






412 The Susquehanna. 

"THE IMAGE OF GOD." 

Abstract of the Baccalaureate sermon delivered before the graduating classes in 
the college church, Sunday, June 14th, by President Enders, D. I). 

SUCCESS is the goal toward which all men strive, and for 
which men give their lives. This is attained as we 
thoroughly understand the tasks which come to our hands, 
and adjust ourselves to the circumstances. In it all, educa- 
tion, not of the intellect alone, but of body, mind and soul 
must form the basis of our proper development. This consists 
in a right understanding of the origin and nature of things. 
Secondly we must have a right and proper understanding of 
the relation of things to each other, and thirdly we must know 
how to adjust ourselves to the various circumstances growing 
out of the things which God has placed upon the earth. 

To go back to the first point, let us study the origin of 
our own natures. If we take the Word of God and compare 
it with science, we find that they do not disagree, but each 
confirms the other in the natural mysteries which fill the earth, 
From the Holy Book we learn that we are made of God, — and 
from nature we can see that we have been created with a wis- 
dom and forethought infinitely above the mind of any creat- 
ure. The body in its wonderful structure makes each part 
serve the other, showing so plainly the design of an all wise 
Creator that no reasoning man can hesitate in attributing 
glory to God. 

In the second place, it has been noticed that people grow 
like their thoughts. Holy writ says, "As a man thinketh in 
his heart so he is," and we find instances in practical life 
which prove the statement beyond a doubt. Some scientists 
even go so far as to assert that people grow to look like each 
other by constant association. Be this as it may with regard 
to form and features, we know that people grow to think and 
speak alike with but little contact, while the dispositions of 
people have not only been modified but completely changed 
by the influence of friends. 



The Susquehanna. 413 

Thirdly we are made in the image of God. It is a favor- 
ite theme of some writers to suggest that humanity is a de- 
velopment of the ape, and some even spend considerable time 
in trying to find the missing link between the monkey and 
human kind. Such attempts however are futile and always 
will be, for God has made man in his own image, forming 
him from the dust of the ground and breathing into his nos- 
trils the breath of life. It is not here claimed that man has 
the physical form of God, for who can conceive of the infinite, 
but it is claimed that man is in the form of God in soul unitv, 
in trinity and eternity. In the mind of God the first concep- 
tion of man found life. We are mortal in time, but in the 
thought and purposes of God we have had our creation in past 
eternity, and shall exist externally in futurity. We are im- 
mortal in the economy of God, working here for a brief age, 
and then when prepared for futurity we go to the place of our 
own choosing to live eternally. 

In the ages of time three great changes have come to the 
state of man, and in a measure the influence of these periods 
still operate in every individual. Briefly they are Formation* 
Deformation and Reformation. In Eden's land of flowers the 
first influence was felt, and man came from the hand of God 
a perfect creature in body, soul and spirit. The second in- 
fluence came to that same spot of perfect beauty when Satan 
beguiled the woman and she did eat, to have her eyes opened 
of the devil, and to be deformed by sin and misery, and made 
to endure pain and sorrow as a result of disobedience. The 
third period came 2000 years ago when the Son of God took 
upon himself the form of sinful flesh, and, as the gift of God's 
grace, endured the agony of Gethsemane and Golgotha bring- 
ing redemption to man, thereby reforming and transforming 
him again into the image of God. 

As the redeemed of God we have like offices with him, 
and glorify Him as we perform them. We have in us creative 
power, not that with raan's/fl/ things assume form and life, 



414 The Susquehanna. 

but using the created substances of God we can by our invent- 
ive genius create things of wonderful usefulness and power. 
Secondly as instruments of righteousness we can and must do 
our duty in man's redemption. To man has been given the 
destiny of the world, and under the Holy Spirit's guidance 
man must bring the world to the foot of the Christ. Thirdly 
in sanctification man must attain to the image of God. Not 
that man is or can in this life be absolute perfection, but thru 
the Spirit's power he attains to the fullness of God when the 
toils of mortality are laid aside to assume robes of immortal- 
ity. Finally man is the creature of destiny. "I go to pre- 
pare a place for you" and again, 'We shall be like him' point 
us to realms of heavenly joy, purity and perfection. We 
dare not stop with present attainments, or bind our eyes to 
things earthly, but looking to the Author of life and light 
and love follow his leading, seeking to attain to power in 
time and bring much fruit into God's garner for eternitv. 



THE EFFFCT OF MACHINERY UPON THE LABORING 

CLASSES. 

WITH the introduction of machinery we see a vast change 
in the condition of the Laboring Classes. One of the 
rirst great changes was that of drawing the people from the 
country districts into the manufacturing districts. This has 
become so evident that every town of any size or ambition 
offers through their trade boards inducements to manufac- 
turing concerns that they may come to set up their business 
within its limits. They say the only way to have our town 
grow is to have several manufactories well established. This 
simply means that many people will follow the manufactures 
and this will add to the size of the town and increase the busi- 
ness of the same. The country for a time suffers from this 
drain then machinery comes into the outlying districts and 



The Susquehanna. 415 

supplies the vacancies. A steam plow turning- as many as six 
or eight furrows at a time does away with six or eight teams of 
horses and one man does the work of the six. With the in- 
troduction of machinery of this kind on the farm the produc- 
tion of the farm has been increased and thus we note this ef- 
fect also upon the laborer who has not the advantages of such 
helps. 

Another effect which has been brought to the front by 
the pessimist is that the morals of the people so brought to- 
gether have become very low. Close investigation of this 
matter has not been able to find this to be the fact unless it be 
in regard to the sweat shop system of labor, but, as this is not 
the normal condition of the working class it must be dis- 
carded as an untenable statement. 

The effect upon the finances of the workman has been 
quite significant. He who worked for 50 cents per day upon 
the farm before the spread of mechanical inventions now is 
able to make from $1.50 to $5.00 per day as a mechanic. 
Women and children who before could not support themselves 
have been added to the class of producers and of course re- 
ceive their respective wages. Machinery thus has greatly 
added to the comforts of such and relieved society of support- 
ing so many from the charities. 

As the effect of machinery was to increase the finances 
of the workman so the finances of the workman have enabled 
him to secure a vastly greater number of the comforts of life. 
He is enabled to live better, to enjoy more comforts, and 
better rights, to see more, to improve his leisure hours, to 
beautify his home, in fact machinery has supplied him with 
thousands of comforts and advantages which he would never 
have heard of were it not for its existence. 

The effect of moving so great a number of people to the 
town and cities has added to the educational facilities. The 
boy or girl who would have left home to get more than a com- 
mon school education is now permitted to gain a high educa- 
tion in his home town and with these increased advantages 



■■ 



416 The Susquehanna. 

and the increase of wealth above mentioned many more are 
afforded the facilities of a college education. 

With the introduction of machinery the imperfections of 
the same were discovered. This fact became a source of in- 
vestigation and invention followed invention until the great 
and magnificent machines of the day came into existence. 
You might ask what this has to do with the laborer but it has 
the most to do as we find that the laborer is the man that, by 
the use of an imperfect machine is incited to rise beyond the 
instrument in hand and invents something w 7 hich will im- 
prove it. He may not himself be the inventor but he may call 
the attention of some one who is. to the needs, and thus the 
whole of society is improved. The workman in either case 
does not work as hard as he did before for the new machine is 
made to do some of the work. The workman is again im- 
proved. When we examine the advances of science we find 
that great advances have been made through the introduction 
of machinery. It might be objected this does not effect the 
workman but this is a mistake as it does for the reason that 
the laborer has through the improved press an opportunity of 
learning of the same and we find that the laboring- classes 
have been improved by these scientific investigations and also 
by the great educational medium of the public press. The 
press today would be an impossibility if we had no such ma- 
chines to set type and carry on the vast amount of work that 
such a matter requires. 

It is true that many men have been thrown out of work 
bv the introduction of machinery but for all who have been 
so deprived of work a great number more opportunities for 
work have been opened. So that on the whole society and 
especially the laborers has been greatly improved by all that 
we get from machines. 



A GROWING MENACE TO OUR NATION. 

AS we consider the great nations of the world today, it is 
with feelings of delight and satisfaction that we think 
of the creatress of our own beloved land. Our ears tingle 



The Susquehanna. 417 

with joy when we hear men say, that, among- the nations of 
the world, the United States of America stands second to 
none. We speak of her freedom, of her resources, and of her 
peculiar people; we boast of her military strength and of her 
commerciol power; we think of her schools, her colleges and 
her universities; and we pride ourselves in this, — that we call 
her Christian. But hold! is it all so fair and lovely, so calm 
and clear? Are we ever brought face to face with another 
picture? 

True, we believe in looking- on the brig-liter side of things; 
but there come times when we are obliged to investigate the 
darker side as well. It has been said that the greatest sin 
which can befall any man is to be conscious of none. Is it 
not also true that the greatest danger that can befall our 
country is to be conscious of none? But, whence come the 
dangers, from without or from within? All will admit that 
we have few serious dangers from without. But just as the 
strongest and most destructive foes to be overcome by individ- 
ual man arise from within his own bosom so the fiercest and 
most deadly foes to be faced by us as a nation spring from 
within our own boundaries. We go into our Southern States 
and we are confronted with the rankling Negro problem. 
Along the Pacific coast we have to do with the Chinese. In 
our large and densely populated cities with their millions we 
behold the rottenness of municipal government. In the hands 
of the great money kings we see the mighty sway of trusts 
and corporations. Still more, we know too well the wide- 
spread influence and destructive power of the drink habit; 
and we also observe the too general desecration of the Holy 
Sabbath Day. But going out into the West Central part of 
our land, within the regions of the Rockies and the Cascades 
we there too find a nauseating disease which strikes deep 
down at the very root principles of our government, — namely 
the accursed system of Mormonism. 

It was in 1831, in the town of Manchester, Payette Co., 
New York that this system was founded by one Joseph Smith. 



418 The Susquehanna. 

He a .iff and ignorant man claimed to have received a divine 
" . ••. .ition written upon g-olden plates by the hand of a prophet 
Mormon who was said to have lived in America some time 
Iter Chrisr lived in Palestine. From the above mentioned 
tace, Smith with some following- moved to Kirkland. Ohio. 
tnce r . Missouri. Coming back again to Xavoo. DL, they, 
flef Log from there, because of restraint and persecution, finally 
wound their way over the plains and across the Rookies, and 
are in what was then a wilderness they founded what is 
now Salt Lake City, the Mecca of their nefarious svstem. 
lit-. s:~ce the year 1S47 they have lived and spread. Just as 
::. ?.'. manj headed mythical monster, called the '"Sevlla.'of 
' : :'i Homer speaks in the Odessy. had the power of stretch- 
\r :;r:h her long snakey necks, o: wir.cir.^r a '-.■•our. •;:' crush- 
ing :■.-■ :. : f carrying away six of the unsuspecting companions 
rfUljsses to destruction, so Mormonism has been. !•: these 
years, thrusting forth her long slimy arms •:: grasp- 
ing within her grimy clutches thousands of the ignorant 
•.■■:;•;'-; ;:' our own United States: until today her h'.i^hf.n^. 
:last:niT. influence is strongly felt not onlv in Utah but in 
Idaho. Arizona. Montana, Wyoming. New Mexico. Lira:: 
. . Washington* — having a following of over 310,000 souls. 
Do we need to investigate this matter, and seek an adequate 
remedy? 

But what oi its teachings and beliefs: The reasons res: 
known to them there are hard to ascertain. Xa rural Iv "hen 
we think of Monnonism we think of polygamy. 1 : .:r r.rst 
consider a few Others oi their pernicious doctrines. it 

v which we place above every other book Bamei 

Bible, they place OB I par with their u Booi ;: .: V;n:::u*' 

: ' Kook oi Doctrine and Covenants;" ar. -..; : 

> "T-ecv'ssarv to acceptance with iioii and fellowship wit 

Him." They claim that their church is : '•; m . : e . 

that ..".1 other churches since Apostolic tunes of whatever 

Von "are not only apostate tiom the faith but propogu t - Its 

error and false doc trine/' They teach ft -e priests are 



The Susquehanna. 419 

the only medium between God and man, i. e., individual man 
can not approach his God in prayer. They teach that God is 
an exalted man "who was once as we are now;" that is once 
dwelt upon earth; that "God has a body of flesh and bones as 
tangible as man's;" that Christ a mere prophet, was a polyga- 
mist; that God himself is the actual, "natural father of all 
intelligent creatures of heaven, earth and hell;" and that 
"God became God by practice of plural celestial marriage." 
Thus we see the prominent place which polygamy holds in 
the Mormon system. In 1852 polygamy was proclaimed by 
the leader of the system to be a virtue and a means of grace. 
And although made light of by some who say that laws forbid 
it etc., yet facts tell us that polygamy is practiced today. 

The effects of such teachings, are no doubt evident to 
you all. Shall we permit such teachings to be sown broadcast 
in owx free land? Place the Bible under such debris and rub- 
bish, and our church doors may as well be closed. Breakdown 
the divine institution of marriage, and home will not be 
home. And with no home and no church our government 
must fall. Is this speculation? Study the facts and see. 

The aim of Mormonism is to increase in numbers and 
power until one day they can encircle the globe. That they 
are positively seeking this end is shown (first) by their mis- 
sionary activities. Whether true or not they boast that they 
have at least two missiouaries in every county of the U. S. 
Nor are they limited to the U. S. but during past few years 
they have reached Japan and the islands of the sea. Further- 
more just recently the Prussian government has banished the 
Mormon missionaries from their land. They not only in Mis- 
sionary lines are seeking this end but (second) in political 
matters as well; and their boldness and audacity has been 
forcibly exhibited during recent years by their attempts to 
seat two Mormon Representatives in our Congressional Hall. 
But what shall we do? Is there a solution to the prob- 
lem, or are our hands tied? We frankly confess, it is a diffi- 
cult problem indeed. Something must be done, — what shall 



420 The Susquehanna. 

it be? Shall we adopt the let-alone-policy? No, never! for 
corruption begun ceases not if left alone. Do you plead edu- 
cation? This has been carried on for over 70 years, and has 
been of service, but will no longer do for the reason that 
through the free public schools the Mormon children are 
being educated into instead of out of the system. Do you say 
legislate? ■ The Edmunds law of 1882, did make polygamy in 
all U. S. Territories punishable with $5.00 fine and imprison- 
ment up to five years. A few years after through party poli- 
tics our government made the law a dead letter by admitting 
Utah as a state. Alas! for this mistepon the part of our gov- 
ernment. Education and legislation can do something — and 
ought to be doing more than they are — but another condition 
confronts us. The fact is that the masses of the people are, 
and have been led by corrupt leaders until now they really be- 
lieve in this wretched, loathsome system. Because of such 
beliefs the battle is at bottom a religious one. The question 
is, Will Christian truth be overmatched by Mormon error? It 
need not be done. "Will it be done? 

But what is our relation to this growing evil? It is ours 
to awake to the facts as they exist. Ignorance is not inno- 
cence. Let the great and also the youthful minds of our 
country give attention and study to this question; and with 
the aid of omnipotent power seek an adequate remedy. If 
priestly rule and prejudice forbid the ordinary church work 
let us, in the name of our risen God, go forth with unchurchly, 
unclerical methods into their very homes and carry the balm 
that shall open their blinded eyes to the true, pure light. To 
get the bad out we must put the good in. May the God of 
Nations, the God of History, who rules over all, assist us to 
blot out this abominable curse from beneath the banner of 
our own beloved land. 



"It is better to know much of few things than a little of 
many things." 



The Susquehanna. 42i 

ABRAHAM UINCOLN. 

"Lives of great men all remind us 
We can make our lives sublime, 
And, departing, leave behind us 
Footprints on the sands of time." 

AS years roll on, new stars appear in the constellation of il- 
lustrious men, which shine with wondrous lustre. But 
here and there the lucid sky is dotted with great fixed stars 
whose steady lights are venerated by the fondest love of man. 

Greece had her Solon, Rome her Caesar, England her 
Cromwell and America her Washington. The deeds of these 
great men will ever be cherished by all generations. Truly, 
Washington has left his footsteps plainly imprinted on the 
sands of time. He won the esteem of nations by his love of 
freedom and good government. This we infer when we read 
how crape enshrouded the standards of France and how the 
flags upon the victorious ships of England's navy fell flutter- 
ing to half-mast at the tidings of the death of one who was 
"First in war, first in peace and first in the hearts of his 
countrymen." 

Among- other great men whose names shine resplendent 
in the annals of our government is the man who safely guided 
the ship of state over the might} 7 billows of a four years war, 
and succeeded in breading the shackles of over four millions 
of slaves. 

Abraham Lincoln was born in Kentucky on the 12th day 
of February, 1809. Lincoln was not born great but he w 7 as 
gifted with certain majestic talents which, when developed, 
proved to be the source of his greatness. He did not live in 
a palace, surrounded by enlightenment, but in a dingy log 
cabin hid from the light of day by the towering giants of the 
forest. Similar places, from the snowy hillsides of Maine to 
the sunny vales of Georgia, mark the birth-places of great 
men, who, under adverse circumstances, fought bravely the 
battle of life and succeeded, by constant efforts, in reaching 
the pinnacle of fame. Abraham fnincoln did not have great- 



420 The Susquehanna. 

it be? Shall we adopt the let-alone-policy? No, never! for 
corruption begun ceases not if left alone. Do you plead edu- 
cation? This has been carried on for over 70 years, and has 
been of service, but will no longer do for the reason that 
through the free public schools the Mormon children are 
being educated into instead of out of the system. Do you say 
legislate?- The Edmunds law of 1882, did make polygamy in 
all U. S. Territories punishable with $5.00 fine and imprison- 
ment up to five years. A few years after through party poli- 
tics our government made the law a dead letter by admitting 
Utah as a state. Alas! for this mistep on the part of our gov- 
ernment. Education and legislation can do something — and 
ought to be doing more than they are — but another condition 
confronts us. The fact is that the masses of the people are, 
and have been led by corrupt leaders until now they really be- 
lieve in this wretched, loathsome system. Because of such 
beliefs the battle is at bottom a religious one. The question 
y$>, Will Christian truth be overmatched by Mormon error? It 
need not be done. Will it be done? 

But what is our relation to this growing evil? It is ours 
to awake to the facts as they exist. Ignorance is not inno- 
cence. Let the great and also the youthful minds of our 
country give attention and study to this question; and with 
the aid of omnipotent power seek an adequate remedy. If 
priestly rule and prejudice forbid the ordinary church work 
let us, in the name of our risen God, go forth with unchurchly, 
unclerical methods into their very homes and carry the balm 
that shall open their blinded eyes to the true, pure light. To 
get the bad out we must put the good in. May the God of 
Nations, the God of History, who rules over all, assist us to 
blot out this abominable curse from beneath the banner of 
our own beloved land. 



"It is better to know much of few things than a little of 
many things." 



The Susquehanna. 42x 

ABRAHAM LINCOLN. 

"Lives of great men all remind us 
We can make our lives sublime, 
And, departing, leave behind us 
Footprints on the sands of time." 

AS years roll on, new stars appear in the constellation of il- 
lustrious men, which shine with wondrous lustre. But 
here and there the lucid sky is dotted with great fixed stars 
whose steady lights are venerated by the fondest love of man. 

Greece had her Solon, Rome her Ccesar, England her 
Cromwell and America her Washington. The deeds of these 
great men will ever be cherished by all generations. Truly, 
Washington has left his footsteps plainly imprinted on the 
sands of time. He won the esteem of nations by his love of 
freedom and good government. This we infer when we read 
how crape enshrouded the standards of France and how the 
flags upon the victorious ships of England's navy fell flutter- 
ing to half-mast at the tidings of the death of one who was 
"First in war, first in peace and first in the hearts of his 
countrymen." 

Among other great men whose names shine resplendent 
in the annals of our government is the man who safely guided 
the ship of state over the mighty billows of a four years war, 
and succeeded in breading the shackles of over four millions 
of slaves. 

Abraham Lincoln was born in Kentucky on the 12th day 
of February, 1809. Lincoln was not born great but he was 
gfifted with certain majestic talents which, when developed, 
proved to be the source of his greatness. He did not live in 
a palace, surrounded by enlightenment, but in a dingy log 
cabin hid from the light of day by the towering giants of the 
forest. Similar places, from the snowy hillsides of Maine to 
the sunny vales of Georgia, mark the birth-places of great 
men, who, under adverse circumstances, fought bravely the 
battle of life and succeeded, by constant efforts, in reaching 
the pinnacle of fame. Abraham ^-nncoln did not have great- 



422 The Susquehanna. 

ness thrust upon him, for such greatness is only apparent; his 
ability was clearly proved by the many dangers which were 
impending during his presidency. In every instance he dis- 
played such calmness and wisdom as must be admired by all 
liberty-loving people. 

After distinguishing himself in military life, Lincoln be- 
gan his great civic career by practicing law. It was to his 
good common sense — the most potent factor of success — more 
than anything else, that he owed his supremacy. The dis- 
playing of this great factor won for him a place in the legis- 
lature and later the Presidency of the United States. 

In 1834, he was elected to the legislature by an over- 
whelming majority and he represented his people in such an 
acceptable manner that he was reelected several times. His 
good judgment was admired by all, and everyone joined in 
sanctioning the products of his fertile mind. 

People foresaw that the existing enmity between the two 
sections of the Union was sure to culminate in war, and a wise 
decision was necessary to get the right man in the right place. 
They had to decide on a man who had the welfare of the 
Union at heart; one who could maintain a calm and resolute 
mind in time of danger; and one who could master the situ- 
ation. 

At this juncture the "Rail-splitter" seemed to be the one 
man, who could hold together his party and save that Union 
in the founding of which so much precieus blood was shed. 
The fondest expectations of the people were realized as soon 
as he entered the Presidential chair. He labored constanly 
to perpetuate the Union; he wanted peace, and he finally for- 
feited his life in behalf of the slave. 

The best of men have enemies. Lincoln had his and he 
was sent to a martyr's grave by the bloody hand of an assas- 
sin. The 14th day of April, 1865, dawned with brightness 
but before it had passed away, that nefarious deed hung over 
the American people like a dark cloud. The sad intelligence 
was spread throughout the country like a flash and a grateful 



The Susquehanna. 423 

people put on mourning- for their beloved President. After 
several hours of suffering, he passed away to a realm where 
pain is unknown. 

Lincoln like many other prominent men, became great 
through his own efforts. He loved his country and his coun- 
try loved him; his noble deeds are cherished by all; and his 
name will be venerated so long- as this g-overnment remains 
free and men love liberty rather than slavery. 

L. V. W. '07. 

Societies. 



CLIONIAIN. 

THE annual reception of our society was held in the Music 
Hall, on Monday evening-, June 15th. The hall was 
beautifully decorated in the colors of the society — blue and 
gold — and with palms and evergreens. Everything was ar- 
ranged to contribute to the pleasure and comfort of our guests 
At nine o'clock the guests began to gather and after the 
formality of receiving was over the chairman announced the 
program for the evening. Those who took part on our pro- 
gram this year were indeed artists. The solos of Mr. Yetter 
and Miss Kline were greeted with the applause of the highly 
delighted audience. Mr. Wendell who rendered several num- 
bers on the Cello, gave us a rare treat and also greatly ap- 
preciated. Miss Moyer of Freeburg, gave us a performance 
on the piano which proved her artistic skill in that capacity. 
The entire program was highly appreciated by every one 
present. The society is indebted to MissKrall, our music in- 
structor, who kindly rendered her services in her usua/ able 
manner as accompanist on that occasion. We wish to say 
that her services were not only appreciated but would also 
add that we feel very grateful to her for her kindness in ren- 
dering her assistance. Our own Clio orchestra are to be con- 



424 The Susquehanna. 

gratulated for the manner in which they handled their part 
on the program. We are glad that we can have our own 
members take such interest in society affairs and give time 
for such preparation as their rendering- of the music showed. 

The refreshments were served in an up-to-date style, and 
the whole reception we believe was the most successful, both 
to the number present and the program rendered ever held. 

The Society has been doing good work along all lines dur- 
ing the past year and we hope to greet many of the old faces 
when the work next Fall is renewed. We are sorry to loose 
some of our faithful members who have graduated this year, 
some from the Seminary and some from the College. To 
these we would say Clio bears you her good wishes and hopes 
for your success in the various callings to which she sends 
you. XXX. 

Btbleto, 



SUSQUEHANNA MEET. 

ON June 5. Susquehanna waged her first track meet of the 
year with Juniata. College at Huntingdon. The men 
showed up nicely on the Juniata track, proving, even though 
they have been forced to train on unlevel and loose grounds, 

that they knew what to do on a good foundation. Susque- 
hanna has never had a track, though much it has been needed 
and desired, but we hope that ere next year ends we may be 
able to boast concerning our track. 

This was the second track dual Susquehanna ever com- 
peted in, and the men have proven that are they given equal 
footing they need not be alarmed. The endurance they showed 
is largely due to the thorough training, under the best possi- 
ble circumstances, directed by M. H. Fischer for which he is 
to be commended. Four records were broken: the 100 and 
220 yards dash by Gearhart, the pole vault by Whitmer, and 
the hammer throw by Bingaman. Latsha, Pearson, Fleck, 
Smith and Price did fine sprinting. Gearhart was unable to 
locate the take-off block and thereby lost the broad jump. 



The Susquehanna. 425 

The treatment received at Juniata was royal, no decision 
could have been fairer, and no congratulations more hearty. 
Susquehanna won by a score of 60 to 41. The summaries: 

ioo-yard dash — Gearhart, Susquehanna, io| seconds; Zook, Juniata. 

Shot put — Bingaman, Susquehanna, 39 feet 2 inches; Peoples, Juniata, 
38 feet 11 inches; Bowser, Juniata, 37 feet 5 inches. 

Mile run — Zook, 5 minutes 41$ seconds; Smith, second. 

High jump — Gearhart, 5 feet; Peoples, 4 feet 11 inches. 

220-yard dash — Gearhart, 252 seconds; Peoples, second. 

Half mile — Latsha, Susquehanna, 2 minutes 22i seconds; Smith and 
Price, Susquehanna, second and third. 

Broad jump — Peoples, 18 feet 11 inches; Whitmer, Susquehanna, 18 
feet 4 inches; Gearhart, 18 feet 2 inches. 

440-yard dash — Pearson, Susquehanna, 57 seconds; Zook, second; Guyer, 
Juniata, third. 

Pole vault — Whitmer, 9 feet 2 inches; Manner, Juniata, 9 feet 1 inch. 

Hammer throw— Bowser, 121 feet 1 inch; Peoples, 117 feet. 

Low hurdle, 100 yards — Gearhart, 13 seconds; Pearson, 13$ seconds; 
Bowser, 13* seconds. 



COMMERCIAL DEPARTMENT. 

THE first Commencement of the Commercial Department 
was held in the College Church Thursday evening, June 
11, 1903. Geo. B. Reimensnyder, Esq., of Sunbury, Pa., 
delivered the address to the class, which was an able one and 
appreciated very highly by the class and audience. Mr. 
Reimensnyder gave us some good advice, and some very en- 
couraging remarks for the progress which has been made in 
the last year. 

The Commercial Department has been in successful oper- 
ation for two years. In the last year, fifty-two students have 
availed themselves of the opportunities offered in this direc- 
tion and very commendable progress has been made by them. 
All the Commercial branches are taught and the most up-to- 
date and approved methods are used, making a Standard 
Commercial Course. 

Class of 1903. 

Motte, "Uncompromising Thoroughness." 
Class Roll. 

BUSINESS COURSE. 

Wilson D. Brown, Geo. W. Mease, 

Martha Dimm, Geo. S. Schoch, A. B., 

H. E. Fetteroff, Ada V. Snyder, 

Elizabeth Fisher, Jennie L. Snyder, 

Grace Machette, Winifred Stevens. 

STENOGRAPHY. 

Ada V. Snyder, Winifred Stevens, 

Jennie L. Snyder. Sadie Whitmer. 

A. B. C. 



The Susquehanna... 

Selinsgrove, June, 1903. 



(Entered at the Selinsgrove Postoffice as Second Class matter.) 
Terms— 75 cents, strictly in advance. Single copies 10 cents. 

0. 0. Frank, '03, Editor-in-Chief. E. M. Gearhart, '03, Bus. Mgr. 

Clay Whitmoyer, '05, Locals and Personals. 

Levi P. Young, '01, '04, Alumni. 

John C. Showers, '05; Exchange. 

Fred. W. Berry, '04, Mg. Editor. O. E.Sunday, '06, { A W t R n « m er 

Minnie L. KIine/04. / B 

The Susquehann a is published each, month of the college year toy the Students 
Publishing Association of SusQuehanna University. 

The editors solicit contributions and items of interest to the college from students 
and alumni. 

All business matters and correspondence should be addressed to The Susque- 
hanna, Selinsgrove, Pa. Exchanges should be sent to the same address. 

The journal will be issued about the 12th of each month. All matters for publi- 
cation must reach the managing editor on or before the first of each month. 

Any subscriber not receiving the journal, or changing address, should notify the 
manager at once. 

Subscribers are considered permanent until notice of discontinuance is received 
and all arrearages paid. 



EDITORIAL 

ANOTHER cycle of college life has just rolled into the eter- 
nal past; coincident with its passing- is also the expira- 
tion of our duties as editors of the Susquehanna. We shall 
take this, our last opportunity, to express our heartfelt appre- 
ciation and thanks to all who have so nobly responded to 
make our college journal a success. Through your efforts 
and labors we have been enabled to make our publication 
what it is. And upon everyone who shall next year return 
to our beloved institution I would urge the great necessity of 
taking the advantages offered by a college journal to develop 
and educate the literary possibilities in you. Make strong 
efforts to contribute at least one article that will raise the 
standard of your Alma Mater's prestige among the literary 
institutions. Do not hesitate to try because you are weak 
along that line. You will only learn to do by doing. Besides 
the editorial staff needs the hearty cooperation of each in- 

426 



The Susquehanna. 427 

dividual. But much as they need your help, so much the 
moredojou, yourself, need the benefit derived by an active 
participation in the contest to make the Susquehanna the 
best possible. 

We furthermore, wish to extend our congratulations and 
best wishes to the oncoming- staff. May the Susquehanna 
prosper while in your hands as it never has before. We com- 
mit our trust to you with the full assurance that it shall be 
well cared for. May your incumbency be one of the highest 
success and prevalent with happiness to you and honor to the 
institution. We, the staff of 1903, hereby bid you farewell 
and a God-speed in your difficult task. 



^The Horace Partridge Co.^ 



supply the best 



ATHLETIC GOODS 



at most reasonable prices. 



Color, Quality and Durability 

Guaranteed. 



When in need of Supplies consult the Physical Director. 



428 Patronize Our Advertisers. 

^ The Greatest Place in Pennsylvania to Buy*- 

...CUOTHIINQ... 

BROSIOUS BROTHERS, 

jMj^SUNBURY, PA. 

m " " ' — HI ■ ■ ■ — ■!■ .■ 1.1 !■■ -,. - ,, ■ I I — — — I M^— ■ I ■ I I — ■ .1 — , II ■ — * 

Sunbury Steam Dyeing, Scouring and 

dt&Tky Qeaning Works, 

MARKET STREET, SUNBURY, PA. 

All kinds of Ladies' and Gents' Wearing Apparel cleaned or dyed and 
neatly pressed on the shortest notice. 
Telephone 2402. WALTER GLENON, Proprietor. 



Rensselaer \ 
/o>Polytech n ie¥% 
%&- Institute, 

V Troy, N.Y. 

Local exanimat luiiB provided for. Send for a Gatalogua 



H. L. PHILLIPS, 

The College Tailor, 

One Door North of Post Office. 



RIPPEL'S STUDIO, 

356 Market St., Sunbury, 

For all the latest Photographs. 
An endless variety of Pic- 
tures and Frames. 



Shoes and Hardware. 

Queen Quality, Walk-Over, Packard and the Freed Bro/s Shoes 

a Specialty at 

M. S. SHROYER'S K l S§poT e> 

H.H. LIVINGSTON, 
All Furniture at Lowest Prices. 

SPECIAL DISCOUNTS TO STUDENTS. 
UNDERTAKING AND EMBALMING A SPECIALTY. 



'atronize Our Advertisers. 



429 



±D • V V C I <5 9 n] 



:eadquarters for 

DRY GOODS, CARPETS, OIL CLOTHS, WINDOW 
SHADES, GENTS' FURNISHING GOODS, Etc. 



QO TO 

C E, LUTZ'S 

TONSORIAL PARLORS 

FOR A 

First-Class Shave or Hair Cut 
Opposite the Keystone Hotel, 

SELINSGROVE. 



A. R. POTTEIGER, V. S. 

PROPRIETOR OF 

Potteiger's Livery* 

Special Rates toTraveling Men 
Telephone No. 272. Selinsgrove, Pa. 



COVERT'S 

Fashion Livery, 

Board, Sale and Exchange Stable, 

Safe Horses, 

Good Buggies. 

Careful Drivers, 

Charges Moderate 
Rear of Keystone, Selinsgrove. 



Peter Klingler,Ph.D. 

DRUGGIST, 

Student's Headquarters 

At the old Ulsh Stand. 



PERFUMES, 
TOILET and 

FANCY ARTICLES 
CIGARS, Etc. 

Selinsgrove, Pa» 



IRWIN B. ROMIG, 

GRAYING and HACKS^e 

All Kinds of Work Done. 
SUPERIOR FACILITIES. LOWEST PRICES 



Don't 



INSURE until you Have Rates & Estimates from 

H. HARVEY SCHOCH, 

Special Ag-ent, Selinsgrove, Penna., 

The Fidelity Mutual Life Company, Philadelphia, Pa« 

" Prove all things; Hold fast that which is good." 



428 Patronize Our Advertisers. 



a^The Greatest Place in Pennsylvania to Buys^ 

...CLOTHING... 

BROSIOUS BROTHERS, 

jtjtjt^tSUNBURY, PA. 

Sunbury Steam Dyeings Scouring and 

«£^Dry Cleaning Works, 

MARKET STREET, SUNBURY, PA. 
All kinds of Ladies' and Gents' Wearing Apparel cleaned or dyed and 
neatly pressed on the shortest notice. 
Telephone 2402. WALTER GLENON, Proprietor. 



Rensselaer \, 
$&, 'Institute, 



/^Polytechn ic$P% 



% Troy, N.Y. 

Local examinations provided for. Seud for a Catalogue 



H. L. PHILLIPS, 

The College Tailor, 

One Door North of Post Office. 



RIPPEL'S STUDIO, 

356 Market St., Sunbury, 

For all the latest Photographs. 
An endless variety of Pic- 
tures and Frames. 



Shoes and Hardware. 

Queen Quality, Walk-Over, Packard and the Freed Bro.'s Shoes 

a Specialty at 

M. S. SHROYER'S K l Se r pS t t 0RE ' 



H.H. LIVINGSTON, 
AH Furniture at Lowest Prices. 

SPECIAL DISCOUNTS TO STUDENTS. 

UNDERTAKING AND EMBALMING A SPECIALTY. 



'atronaze Our Advertisers. 



429 



S. WEIS, 



HEADQUARTERS FOR 



DRY GOODS, CARPETS, OIL CLOTHS, WINDOW 
SPIADES, GENTS' FURNISHING GOODS, Etc. 



Peter Klmgler, PhJD. 



QO TO 

G E, LUTZ'S 

TONSORIAL PARLORS 

First-ClassShavVor Hair Cut- ! f)RI J(1{tIST\ 

Opposite the Keystone Hotel, ^^^VJVJiu J. f 

SELINSGROVE. 



A. R. POTTEIGER, V. S. student's Headquarter 



PROPRIETOR OF 



Potteiger's Livery* 

Special Rates toTraveling- Men 
Telephone No. 272. Selinsgrove, Pa. 

COVERT'S 

Fashion Livery, 

Board, Sale and Exchange Stable, 

Safe Horses, 

Good Buggies. 

Careful Drivers, 

Charges Moderate 
Rear of Keystone, Selinsgrove. 



At the old Ulsh Stand. 

PERFUMES, 
TOILET and 

FANCY ARTICLES 
CIGARS, Etc. 

Selinsgrove, Pa. 



IRWIN B. ROMIG, 

GRAYING and HACKS^e 

All Kinds of Work Done. 
SUPERIOR FACILITIES. LOWEST PRICES 



Don't 



INSURE until you Have Rates & Estimates from 

H. HARVEY SCHOCH, 

Special Agent, SelinsgTove, Penna., 

The Fidelity Mutual Life Company, Philadelphia, Pa< 



" Prove all things; Hold fast that which is good." 



430 



Patronize Our Advertisers. 



The Book Emporium 

Headquarters for 
Newspapers, Periodicals, 
Bibles, Books, Stationery and 
a variety of Fancy Goods. 

LA BENSON. 



H. E. MILLER, 

Dealer in 

General Merchandise, 

CONFECTIONS and 
STATIONERY. 

26 North Market Street. 



J. G. STAUFFER, 

SHOEMAKER. 

First-class Work. Repairing 
a specialty. 

Students will save money by calling. 



F. E. DOEBLER, 

PROPRIETOR OF 

The People's Restaurant 

Ice Cream, 
Hot and Cold Lunches served. 

NO. 6 MARKET STREET, 

SELINSGROVE. PA. 



A*GSPANGLER,D.US, 



u PRICES ALWAYS RIGHT" 



The Lutheran 

PUBLICATION HOUSE, 

No. 1424 Arch St., Philadelphia. 
Acknowledged Headquarters for 

Anything: and Everything in 

the way of 
BOOKS FOR CHURCHES 
AND FAMILIES, and 
LITERATURE FOR 
SUNDAY SCHOOLS. 

PLEASE REMEMBER 

That by sending your orders to us you 
help ouild up and develop one of the 
Church's institutions, with pecuniary 
advantage to yourself. 
Address orders to 

HENRY S. BONER, Supt. 
No. 1424 Arch St., Philadelphia. 



Dentist, 



SELINSGROVE, PENNA. 



R. L. ULRICH, 

Photographer 

SELINSGROVE. Pa. 

General Photographer and frame 
store. Everything in the picture line. 
Amateur supplies always on hand. 
Developing and printing neatly and 
cleanly done. 



Geo* G Wagenseller, 

DRUGS,.** 

CHEniCALS, 

MEDICINES, 

Fancy | Toilet Articles. 

Sponges, Brushes, Perfumery, Etc. 
Physicians' Prescriptions carefully 
compounded, and orders answered 
with care and dispatch. 

Manufacturer of all grades of 

Roller Flour, and dealer in 

COAL, GRAIN, 
SEEDS, FEED, 
SALT, Etc. 

SELINSGROVE, PENNA. 



Patronize Our Advertisers. 



431 



F. J. WAGENSELLER, M.D. 

PHYSICIAN AND 
SURGEON.^ 

Eyes Treated and Glasses Adjusted. 
SOUTH MARKET STREET, SELINSGROVE. 



N 



EW FIRM, 
EW GOODS 




LATEST STYLES, 
OWEST PRICES. 



FOR MEN AND 
BOYS 



CLOTHING 



Gents' Furnishing 
Goods in General. ; 



Keeley Block, 



Keeley «& Son, 



SELINSGROVE, Pa 



Patronized «£ 

City Restaurant, 

Students' Headquarters. Popular Lunches at Popular Prices 
Ice Cream, Oysters and Hot Lunches all hours : : : : : 

J. F. BUCHER, Proprietor. 

A W. PONTIUS, 

Vk h ulesale and Retail Dealer in 

ICE CREAMand CONFECTIONERY 

231 Market Street, Sunbury, Pa. 



No* *6S. Market St., 

O.R.HENDRICKS&SON 

Dealers in 
Hardware, Glass, Oils, Paints 
Farming Implements, 
Sporting- Goods. . . 
News Depot Attached. 
Telephone Connection. Lowesi prices 
Sole Agents for Spalding's Sport- 
ing Goods. 



PAY YOUR SUBSCRIPTION 

PROMPTLY ] 
AND HELP THE MANAGER 
MAKE ENDS MEET. 



B.F.WAGENSELLER,M.D. 

PHYSICIAN and 
SURGEON . . 

Office opposite First National Bank, 
SELL\ T SGROVE, PA. 



J. • W. DAUGHERTY, 

The Popular 

Photographer* 

Photographic work of all kinds. 
Finishing for Amatures. 

East Market St., Sunbury, Pa. 



432 



Patronize Our Advertisers. 



Do You Want to Make Money? 




DO YOU WANT TO 
MAKE IT QUICKLY 
AND EASILY? 

DO YOU WANT VERY 
PROFITABLE WORK 
FOR A SHORT TIME? 

DO YOU WANT PER- 
MANENT AND PRO- 
FITABLE EMPLOY- 
MENT? 



NO CAPITAL REQUIR- 
ED, NO RISK TO 
RUN. 



You can make your vacation 
worth $25 to $35 per week, 

WRITE US FOR FULL INFORMATION. 

PARIS PERFUHE CO., Jersey City, N. J. 



Patronize Our Advertisers. 433 

tX^ AYSI Shoesat"EconomicalChestnut" 

. SUNBURY. 

You can get the very latest, swellest, down to the minute styles in foot- 
wear. High grade and all at low cash cut prices. '' Walk-over," "Wawk-well," 
men's and ladies Shoes equal to any $5.00 shoe made, cost #3.50 at "Econom- 
ical," Sunbury. 

J. G. CHESTNUT, M'g'r. 

We take pleasure to announce 

That we are able to furnish any Fraternity Pin or 
Charm made. 

We are Specialists 

For Lenses for the eyes — Free examination. 



The Leading Jeweler and Optician, Sunbury, Pa. 



PHOTOGRAPHS. 



1 n'Mii*ifcr 



OF ALL KINDS: CRAYONS 

WATER COLORS AND PASTELS, 

GUARANTEED TO GIVE 

SATISFACTION. 
OUR MOTTO j*jM 

Beauty of Pose and Excellence of Finish* 

R B. LUCE, 

ARTIST AND PHOTOGRAPHER. 

429 Market Street, Sunbury, Pa. 

Enlarging- from Small Pictures a Specialty. 



ED. L HEFFELFINGER, 

Merchant 
Tailors 

Selinsgrove, Pa., 

Opposite Postoffice. 

Workmanship Guaranteed. 



Arthur D* Carey, 

Fine Groceries, Provisions, 
Tobaccoes and Cig-ars. . . . 

Fruits and Confectionery 
a Specialty 

Selinsgrove, Pa. 



434 



Patronize Our Advertisers. 



A* Q. Spalding & Bros. 

LARGEST MANUFACTURERS IN 
THE WORLD OF OFFICIAL 
ATHLETIC SUPPLIES 



Base Ball 
Lawn Tennis 

Golf 

Field Hockey 

of ficial Athletic 

1 1 wir— i — u— — 

Implements 




Spalding's Catalogue of all Athletic Sports Mailed Free to any Address 



A. G. SPALDING & BROS. 



New York. 



Chicago 



Denver 



Buffalo 



Baltimore 



AUSTIN WILVERTj* 

Fine^6 



Commercial Printing 



257 Market Street, 
9 South Third Street, 

SUNBURY, 



50 YEARS' 
EXPERIENCE 



PENNA 




Subscribe for** 

THE^e 



Trade Marks 
Designs 
Copyrights Ac. 

Anyone sending a sketch and description may 
quickly ascertain our opinion free whether an 
invention is probably patentable. Communica- 
tions strictly confidential. Handbook on Patents 
sent free. Oldest agency for securing patents. 

Patents taken through Munn & Co. receive 
special notice, without c harg e, in the 

Scientific American. 

A handsomely illustrated weekly. Largest cir- 
culation of any scientific journal. Terms, $3 a 
year ; four months, $L Sold by all newsdealers. 



SUSQUEHANNA MUNN &Co »♦•—». New Yort 

^C »**-.* ^ * ^* *i Branch Office, 626 F St.. Washington, D. a 



Patronize Our Advertisers. 435 




By GELETT BURGESS and WILL IRWIN 

SHOULD BE READ BY 

EVERY COLLEGE MAN 

This is honestly, one of the smoothest and richest things that ever happened. It 
is a gingery, " coast " story and quite strong enough to make you forget many things 
you don't want to remember. Full of excitement, change of scene, and clever 
reminiscence. It is sad and sweet, wild and adventurous, and filled with a keen show 
of humor that is entirely irresistible. Lend it your eye. 

The story or series of stories runs for twelve months, altho' you may read any 
one story of the series and feel that all is completed ; but better begin at the begin- 
ning and we will trust you to get the entire thing before you are thro'. 

AN INTERNATIONAL SPY 

gives a series of most astounding revelations of modern times. He shows up the 
inner workings of The Telegram Which Began the Boer War, The Blowing Vfiot 
The Maine, The Mystery of Captain Dreyitu, etc., etc., etc. These articles are of 
such a serious nature that it is not possible to make known the name of the author 
and thus expose bim to grave danger at the hands of foreign governments whose 
secret crookedness he has so vividly revealed. 

SIR HENRY MORGAN 

THE LAST OF THE BUCCANEERS 
By CYRUS TOWNSEND BRADY 

This is a masterpiece, showing as it does the most skillful handling of characters 
engaged in the blackest of black and cruel deeds and leading the reader ere he is 
aware, in to an atmosphere of love and pathos, the effect of which is a most fascinating 
harmony. READ THESE IN 

PEARSON'S 

10 CENTS ALL NEWSDEALERS 

ONE DOLLAR, will give you a year's subscription to PEARSON'S in which 
during the coming year will be presented some of the best literature ever published. 
There are in course of preparation one or two very sensational articles based upon 
certain existing evils. These will be most thrilling in their fearless treatment of the 
men concerned in the scandals exposed. 



l LARSON PVB. CO., 19 ASTOB PL~C£. NEW YORK 



436 Patronize Our Advertisers. 



I —— — — — !amTairxi*-*iim, . zr:z. «s. jsjazn^jsammaa 



..FRANK GASKINS.. 

Practical Jeweler and Optician 

"Watches, Clocks Jewelry, Diamonds, 

Silverware, Novelties, Cut Glass, "Etc. 

All repairing done carefully and prices moderate. 

249 Market Square, near Court House, SUNBURY, PA* 



WANTED— FAITHFUL PERSON TO, TRAVEL for well 
established house in a few counties, calling- on retail 
merchants and agents. Local territory. Salary $1024 a year 
and expenses, payable $19.70 a week in cash and expenses ad- 
vanced. Position permanent if desired, or for summer season. 
Business successful and rushing. Standard House, Educa- 
tional Department, Caxton Bldg., Chicago. 



Alumni! Students! Friends! 

Do you want something to bring back your pleas- 
ant times at College ? Do you want something by 
which to remember your Alma Mater? Buy 

"The Lanthorn," 

published by class of '04. Price One Dollar ($1.00.) 

CALVIN P. SWANK, Bus. Mgr. 



Patronize Our Advertisers. 



437 



299 Pianos. 

The "New England Conservatory of 
Music, Boston, whose premiership 
among institutions of its class is a 
matter of common knowledge, when in 
the market for pianos twenty years ago, 
after exhaustive trials of the then cele- 
brated makes, decided upon the 

Ivers & Pond 

and ordered 50. That the decision was 
wise would be implied from their sub- 
sequent purchases of this make, until 
lately 26S had been bought. Now, when 
moving into its beautiful new building, 
the Conservatory looks over the piano 
market again, and finding its choice still 
that of twenty years ago, orders 31 Ivers 
& Pond Pianos, making a total of 259 as 
follows : 




1882 . 


. 50 


Pianos. 


1895 . . 20 


Pianos. 


1884 . 


. 6 


< < 


1896 . . 15 


< < 


1886 . 


• 17 


< i 


1897 . . 12 


1 1 


1887 . 


. 2 


< < 


1898 . . 12 


n 


1888 . 


. 6 


< 1 


1899 . . 12 


1 < 


1889 . 


. 12 


< < 


1900 . . 15 


< > 


1890 . 


. 72 


(i 


1901 . . 2 


« 1 


1894 . 


• 15 


1 < 


1902 . . 31 
Total 299 


1 • 
Pianos. 



Can more conclusive evidence of con- , 
tinuity in sustaining and advancing an 
artistic standard be given than the 
above remarkable record? Ivers & Pond 
Pianos, embodying half a century's ex- 
perience in scientific piano-building, 
were never so perfect as to-day. As 
exclusive representatives for their sale 
in this locality we invite your inspec- 
tion of these remarkable instruments. 

C. C. SEEBOLD, 

34 North Third St., Sunbury, Pa. 
Near P. R. R. Depot. 



Your Subscriptions 

S^^is Due 



Hinds &* Noble, Publishers, 3r W, '15th St., 
N. Y. City, will send you any 0/ these books sub- 
ject to approval. Enclose this advertiscvient. 



Songs of A II the Colleges • 
Songs of the Eastern Colleges 
Songs of the Western College* 
New Songs for Olee Clubs • • , 
New Songs for Male Quartette* • 
New Songs for Church Quartettes 
Pieces That Have Taken Prizes • 
New Pieces That Witt Take Prizes 
Pieces for Evert/ Occasion • 
S Minute Declamations for College Men 
S-Minute Readings for College Girls 
IIow to Attract and Hold an Audiencn 
Palmer' a New Parliamentary Manual 
Pros and Cons, (Complete Debates) 
Commencement Parts (Orations, Essays, etc 
Gunnison's Now Dialogues and Plays 




$1.50 

1.25 

1.25 

.50 

.60 

.25 

1.25 

1.25 

1.25 

1.00 

l.OO 

1.00 

.75 

1.50 

) 1.50 

1.50 



i 



i 



nunnimim 



«ii 






We buy 
school-books 









And we send free to any applicant our 
"Books Wanted" Catalogue f over 2,000 
school-books, with the prices at which 
wc accept second-hand as well us ntw 
book St 

We pay cash 

For all marketable adiool-bocks, or if 
desired, wo credit consignment! on ac- 
count, to be paid by us in other school* 
books from time to time an needed, 

HINDS & NOBLE 
4 Cooper Institute New York City 

Mention (his ad. 











438 Patronize Our Advertisers. 



SUSQUEHANNA^ 



UNIVERSITY, 



Prks. GEO. W. ENDERS, D. D., 

OFFERS excellent facilities for a splendid education under 
wholesome influences and at very low terms. 
The institution has the following departments: 

L THEOLOGICAL, with a full three years' course* 
II. COLLEGIATE, Classical and Scientific Courses. 

III. LADIES COURSE, leading to a degree. 

IV. MUSIC, Vocal and Instrumental, full course lead- 

ing' to a degree. 

V. ELOCUTION, a fully arranged course leading to 

graduation and a degree. 
VI. TEACHERS' COURSE leading to graduation. 
VII. PREPARATORY of three years. 

VIII. BOOK-KEEPING, Type- Writing and Short-Hand. 

IX. QVIL ENGINEERING, 

The curriculum of each course is comprehensive and up to 
date. The instruction is thorough. The instructors take 
the deepest personal interest in the students. The location 
is healthful, the buildings comfortable, and the terms very 
low. 

For Catalogue and further particulars write to 

JOHN I. WOODRUFF, A. M., Dean, 

Selinsgrove, Pa., 

or to Rev, A. N. Warner, Registrar. 

Notk. — There is also a six weeks Summer Term, 
offering- work in the various departments. 



Patronize Our Advertisers. 439 



THE KEYSTONE 
HOTEL, 



J. BUCK, Proprietor. 



Commencement Week Rates $1.00 per day. 
All the modern conveniences. 



GotoT.S. HILBISH, 

For Fine Groceries and Confections, 

And to try the New Soda Fountain.