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Full text of "Susquehanna - Student Newspaper (Vol. 53; Nos. 1-14)"

THE 
SUSQUEHANNA 



Oct. 1944 

to 
Apr. 1945 



PAGE FOUR 



THE SUSQUEHANNA, SELINSGROVE, PENNSYLVANIA 



TUESDAY, MAY 23, 1944 



Dr. Gilbert Entertains 
Classes at His Home 



DOUBLE FEATURE GIVEN 
BY BtJ THEATRE GUILD 

(Continued from Page 1) 
The first play, "Indian Summer," 
Once again the Gorman and public I directed by Gloria QasparoU, Involved 
speaking students enjoyed the pleasant ' the inevitable triangle. Larry Grant, 
tradition of visiting at the home of Dr. I played by Danny Reitz, finds himself 



successful season of the Theatre Guild. 
! Mr. Walter Kelly, director of the Guild, 
j is responsible in great part for the suc- 
cess of the organization. 



and Mrs. Russell Gilbert. 

This year, as in the past, some of the 
students visited the Gilberts on Tues- 
day evening, May eleventh, while the 
remaining classes were entertained the 
following evening. 

The evenings were spent converging 
about various topics of interest to every- 
one Much discussed were the several 
men who are to receive their Doctor's 
Degree from Susquehanna University 
on May twenty-six. Conrad Richter, 
one of these men, has written several 
books about; the Susquehanna Valley. 
Dr. Gilbert also told some of the inter- 



in love with two women and vice-versa. 
Nan Myers, as Sheila, and Dotty Ster- 
nat, as Mrs. Grant, played the parts 
of the two women capably. Ross Johns, 
a newcomer to the Susquehanna stage, 
turned in a commendable performance 
as Ken Manners. 

Mary Lib Bnsehoar directed the sec- 
ond play, "Phoebe Louise." Although 
Ada Jayne Romig said little, she did 

much in the action of the play. As a 
cousin of the Burke family, suppo edly, 
she visited them only to vanish with 
the penny-pinching family's bank roll. 
A feather in the caps of the mem- 



esting highlights of the life of George bers of tne cast committees, and th< 



Catlin the artist. He too was interested 
m the Susquehanna Valley, and has 
painted the picture which Dr. Frederick 
Brush is presenting to the University. 

The evening was climaxed in each 
case with refreshments served by Mrs. 
Gilbert. 

It was generally agreed by the stu- 
dents that these visits are most enjoy- 
able, and that they proved a good 
opportunity for the professors and stu- 
dents to exchange ideas. 



SU Civilian College 
Ajrain as Cadets Leave 



All of the Cadets, except for the 
"Permanent Party," left Susquehanna 
University on May 11. They were lucky 
enough to get a delay enroute of about 
eleven days, starting Wednesday night. 
In this last group there were approxi- ] 
mately 40 follows who are still in the 
Air Corps. 

The "Permanent Party" men have 
been leaving by degrees. Lt. Peter | 
Kardsssakls was the first to leave SU. j 
with Lt, Johnson leaving a little later. 
The nun from the dispensary and the ] 
staff have gradually dwindled. Captain 
Green and Lt. Cowing, as commanding 
officers, will be the last to leave, as 
there are many details to be taken 
care of. 

Hassinger Hall has been cleaned out 
and will be ready for use as a girls 
dormitory. Since it has been unoccu- 
pied, Sgt. Lemaire has lived at the Bond 
and Key Fraternity House. 

The campus seems at least a little 
quieter and deserted since the Cadets 
have gone, and we wish them the best 
of luck! 



director for this production PJne Wm- 
ey, as the penny-pinching father, 
Rubye Myers, as his Wife, and Marian 
Willard i whose acting versatility is ex- 
cellent) as Lydia, their little girl, play- 
ed their parts commrndably. 

Members of me committees for "In- 
dian Summer" were: Properties, Adele 
Heithofl and Ruth Botdorf; Make-up, 
June Hoffman; Prompter, Pae Smith, 
and Stage, Bud Smith. 

The committees for "Phoebe Louise" 

were as follows: Properties, Morjoric 

Barton and Ruth Botdorf; Make-up, 

Jean Wheat, June Hoffman, and Carol 

i Joyce; and Prompter, Jane Malkames. 

These two plays climaxed another 



|SU TO CONFER DEGREES 
ON CARMER AND RICHTER 

(Continued from Page 1) 
; inent member of the Writer's War j 
I Board, inaugurated shortly after Pearl! 
j Harbor, and has received a citation I 
I from the OWI for the inspiration he 
: has given to the American Victory I 
! Front.. 

Conrad Richter was born in Pine 
Grove, Pennsylvania, on October 13,, 
j 1890. He is not a graduate of Susque- j 
I hanna University, but did attend prep- 
I school here. His early life was one of 
! many and varied occupations, but he 
was especially interested in newspapers, ! 
I and became a reporter for the Harris- 
burg paper for some time, and later 
became editor of other newspapers. The 
New York University Society of Library 
has awarded him a Gold Medal for 
distinguished writing; he is the author 
of a number of well-known and widely 
read books, his latest being The Free 
Man, a story of early Pennsylvania. 
During his interesting and active life, 
he lived for a time in Selinsgrove. He 
is a contributor to the Saturday Even- 
ing; Tost, and has worked with many 
of the big studios in Hollywood. Mr. 
Richter is also to receive an honorary 
Doctor of Letters Degree from Susque- 
hanna University at commencement 
exercises. 



SCHOOL AND OFFICE 
SUPPLIES 

JOS. L MENTZ 

26(1 Market St., Sunhury, I'a. 



SCHOOL FASHIONS 

ROSENBLUM'S 

SUNBURY, PA. 
SMART FEMININE APPAREL 



Ebert's 5c to $1.00 
Store 

Susquehanna Stationery 
SELINSGROVE 



Real French Cleaners, 

INC. 
FINEST DRY CLEANING 

Sunbury — 433 Market Street 
Selinsfrovc — Penny Specialty 

Shop 10 S. Market Street 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

J-P 

MANUFACTURING 
CORPORATION 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

THE 

SNYDER COUNTY 

TRUST CO. 



ESTHER HELEN JARRETT 

BEAUTY SHOP 

All Branches of Beauty Culture 

Open Tuesday, Thursday and 

Friday Evenings — Phone 69 W 

8 W. Pine Street, Selinsgrove, Pa. 



S. U. BOOK STORK 

SUSQUEHANNA 
NOTEBOOKS 
STATIONERY 



HACKETTS 

Hardware Stores 

?>1 r o Market St., 706 Market St. 
ALSO MIDDLEBURG, PA. 



When you think of Photography 
Think of 

Schindler Studio 

111 Market Street, Sunbury, Pa. 
Also Framing and Photo Finishing 



Yes 






Women Too . 


» • 


buy 


Retirement Income 


1'uh. i 


i;, iiom Lutheran 


Rrotherhood. Results 


are 1 


lilr Ol 


ttely gum .'in'' e4 


Nu 


other 


pltin uill li t¥f 


you 


tree irom can 


and 


WOIT) 


A guuiantct'd 


in- 


ron." 


>> i.i make llvtnf •> 


joy 


when retirement 


years 


are reached 





Luthe 



AUTOMATIC 
SERVICE 

WHOLESALE CONFECTIONS 

Selinsgrove, Pennsylvania 



CHILDREN'S SHOP 

MARY H. BURNS 
Clothe* for the College Girl 



Markley-Altvater 

BETTER STUDENTS CLOTHES 
SUNBURY. PA. 



THE LATEST GIFTS at 

Fry ling's Stationery 
Store 

411 Market St., Sunbury, Pa. 
WHY NOT GIVE A BOOK? 



VISIT THE 

REXALL 
DRUG STORE 

WILLIAM J. COTT. Druggist 



WATCH REPAIR 

Susquehanna Jewelry 
Fountain Pens and Pencil* 

W. M. VALSING 

JEWELER SELINSGROVE, PA. 



THE BON TON 

Personally Seleeted 

(OATS, DRESSES, HATS 

Sunbury, Pa. 



REICHLEVS 

WHERE STUDENTS 
MEET AND EAT 



TYDOL 



VEEDOL 



RENNER'S 

GAS STATION 

Walnut Street, Selinsgrove, Pa, 



STEFFEN'S 

FINE FOODS— STATIONERY 

Greeting Cards for Every Occasion 
SELINSGROVE, PA. 



ran 




Legal Reserve Life Insurance For Lutherans 
MINNEAPOLIS, :i. Herman J- Ekern, President 



MINNESOTA 



430 Market St. 



H. L. ROTHFUSS, Agent Williamiport, Pa. 



BUILD YOUR 
ESTATE NOW I 



YOUR FUTURE 
STARTS TODAY 



/ 



-4— . 



"*B#- 




2 OFFICE OF THE DEAN 
SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 
SELINSGROVE, PA. > 



FROSH— 

WELCOME 

TO SU 



n 



VJ 




PLEASANT 
N STUDYING 
TO YOU ALL 



Volume LIII 



SELINSGROVE, PENNSYLVANIA, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 3, 1944 



Number 1 



Students Reorganize 
Sunday School Class 
At Trinity Lutheran 

Under the leadership of Miss 
Unangst, dean of women, the Students' 
Sunday School class of Trinity Luth- 
eran Church has been completely re- 
organized. 

At the first meeting of the class on 
Sunday, September 17, the students 
decided to have their own opening de- 
votional service each Sunday morning. 
As a result, a committee of students 
will be appointed each month to plan 
the devotional services for each Sun- 
day or that particular month. An or- 
chestra composed of girls from the 
Conseravtory of Music from the college 
has been organized to play each Sun- 
day. 

The organization held an election of 
officers during the past week. The re- 
sults of the election were as follows: 
Vice President — Ruth Criswell 
Secretary — Jack Warner 
Asst. Secretary — Betty Reisch 
Treasurer — Marjorie Stapleton 
Asst. Treasurer— Fae Smith 

Because of a tie vote, a new election 
has to be held for the presidency. The 
representatives from each class are: 
Seniors — Ruth Botdorf, Louise Kresge; 
Juniors— Virginia Hallock, Jane Mal- 
kamess Sophomores— Carolyn Pfahler, 
Marie Talbot; Freshman— Hope Har- 
' ', ^beson^Betty 1 Jane Fisher. -"It is the 
duty 'bfv each . representative to urge 
.the^attendeChce of ." the student body | 
throughout the school. 



Numerous Changes 
Mark SU Faculty 



J Men'sStudentCouncil 
Organized;Freshmen 



The faculty of Susquehanna Univer- 
sity has undergone several major 
changes in personnel since the end of 
last semester. 

Mrs. Alice Oiauque, last year's dean 
of women, has resigned* as dean, and 
is at present an Instructor at the Con- 
servatory of Music on campus. Miss 
Miriam Unangst, S. U. '42, is the new 
resident dean at Seibert Hall. Miss 
Unangst previously taught high school 
classes in Nazareth, Pa. Mrs. Mary 
Koch is housemother at Hassinger 
Hall, the new girls' dormitory. 

Dr. Lois Boe of the Language De- 
partment has left Susquehanna for 
Skidmore College, New York. Miss 
Athalia Kline has taken Miss Boe's 
place as instructor of French and 
Spanish. v 

Dr. Harvey Heath of the commercial 
and business departments has joined 
the Army as a civilian worker. Mr. 
Grover C. T. Graham of Elmlra Col- 
lege has taken Dr. Heath's place. 

Professor Frederick: 0. Stevens of the 
Conservatory of Music has gone to 
Dickinson Junior College, Williamsport, 
and Mr. Elbert D. ^Hasklns of Albany 
is now Instructor in voice. 

Mr. Walter Ke%ofT;the English De- 
partment leftj < Busi^ie^anna to enroll 
as a student atltrmfrliverslty of Penn- 
sylvania where* he'ls working for his 
Ph.D. 

We, the students of Susquehanna, 
wish to extend to every newcomer on 
the faculty, a hearty welcome and the 
sincere wish that you have a long and 
enjoyable stay on our campus. 



SU Opens 87th Year 



87th SU Convocation 
Hears Rev. Honeycutt 

• ^ 

Conocation for the formal opening 
of the 87th year at Susquehanna Uni- 
versity was held Thursday, September 
21, in the chapel of Seibert Hall at 
9:00 a. m. 

The service was begun with «a very 
impressive processional of the entire 
college faculty in their caps and gowns. 

The service was opened with a hymn 
sung by the student body, followed by 
the scripture reading by President 
Smith. The Susquehanna Singers, un- 
der the direction of Mrs. Alice Oiauque, 
sang Noble Cain's "Holy Lord God." 

President Smith introduced the 
speaker, Rev. Carl A. Honeycutt, pas- 
tor of Zion Lutheran Church in Sun- 
bury, who gave an inspiring talk on 
the theme, "The World's Need of Cour- 
ageous Youth." In his remarks, Rev. 
Honeycutt strove to Impress upon the 
students the fact that we *re rapidly 
becoming what we are to be. He also 
strove to show the need for personal 
responsibility. He said, "You are here 
to be educated for responsible , living, 
not just living. Our democracy, in its 



Success Marks Frosh 
Orientation Program 

This year the girls who entered Sus- 
quehanna as freshmen experienced a 
new program which was Initiated for 
the first time on campus as the Fresh- 
man Orientation Program. On Satur- 
day, September 16 the program went 
into effect as the freshmen started ar- 
riving. It continued until Tuesday, 
September 19. 

During the summer Jean Klnzer, who 
was chairman of the program, and 
Marian Willard, her assistant, planned 
for the fall opening. • Upperclass girls 
were selected to be group leaders with 
assistant group leaders. The freshman 
girls were divided Into groups of ten 
with a group leader and assistant in 
charge. The leaders wrote letters to 
the girls in their group throughout the 
summer to get better acquainted. 

The group leaders reported on cam- 
pus a day earlier than the freshman 
arrival in order to become better or- 
ganized. The next morning, they were 
on hand to meet the girls in their 
groups, and help each one get situated. 
Also. upperclass girls met trains, buses 



essence is something deeper* t^^taTwWffgreetin ^ newg(r i 9as thoy 
erty— it is responsibility, u ^ni**. «vj » 



"V'- ,; 



learn that lesson, there isn't rri' 
I In learning ».ny ofher^Msbm ." 

Following the address, , Dr.- :t. > W; 
| Ki otschmann offered a prayerV v 'nean 
j Gait made several announcements, af- 
! te which another hymn was sunjf by 
I the students. 

The Convocation service was con- 
c'uded by a recessional. 



Orientation Begins I FROSH LIKES AND GRIPES 



At a meeting of SU men students 
after chapel on Friday, September 29, 
the following men students were elect- 
ed to the Men's Student Council for 
the present school year: William An- 
stead Hayes, Roswell James Johns, 
John Joseph v Kocsis, Celo Vincent 
Leltzel, Bernard Swiencki, Robert Wil- 
bur 8urplus, John Daniel Warner, and 
Rine Oraybill Wlney, Jr. (Frosh men 
will please note these names.) 

At an election on Friday afternoon 
Celo Leltzel was elected vice-president 
and Rine Winey, secretary-treasurer. 
Jack Warner and Bill Hayes were tied 
for the presidency, so it was decided 
that Hayes would be president for the 
first semester and Warner for the sec- 
ond. 

The primary purpose of the organ- 
ization of the council was to Inaugur- 
ate the Men's Orientation Program, 
which began on Tuesday morning, Oc- 
tober 3. The council will, howeer, func- 
tion throughout the year for discussing 
and aiding in any problems that might 
arise on the campus. Dr. Russell Gil- 
bert is advisor for theorganlzation. 

a 



SERVICEMEN ! 

When you receive this issue of 
"The Susquehanna", will you please 
check the address to see if it is 
correct. If not, please drop us a 
line immediately, and should there 
bs any changes in your address 
during the year, kindly let us know 
at your very earliest convenience. 



Dot Eilhardt— Campus: Small very 
nice. Food: Not lilce I'm used to. 
Profs: StifT but nice. Boys: Not bad. 
Studies: Darned hard! 

Edith Thomas — Campus: Beautiful! 
'Food: Utterly different. Profs: Very 
nice. Boys: What boys? Studies: 
Plenty of them and hard enough. 

Adele Taub — Campus: Gorgeous; 
Pood: Not like home, "New Jersey was 
never like this". Profs: Very good. 
Boys: I've never seen such handsome 
men in all my life. Studies: Hard, but 
I guess maybe I'll adjust myself. 

Cynthia Carmel — Campus : Loveliest 
I've ever seen. Pood: OK! Profs: All 
very good. Boys: The two I've talked 
to are very nice. Studies: Finding it 
• little difficult. 

Bobbie Racionzer — Campus: Very 

beautiful. Food: OK! Profs: Very 

| good, and friendly. Boys: Few and far 

between but nice. Studies: Not too 

hard. 

Gertrude Roberts — Campus: I like 
j it. Pood : Not bad ! Profs : Most of 
them are OK. Boys: Most of them 
| are cute. Studies: Not too bad. 

Gaynelle Wagner — Campus: Beauti- 
ful! Pood: I get plenty. Profs: I like 
all that I have. Boys: Hummmmrn! 
Studies: Not so bad so far, but later 
on I don't know. 

Red Neidlck — Campus: Too many 
lights. Food: Are you kidding? Profs: 
Very nice. Girls: Some are terrific and 
some are terrifically awful. Studies: 
They're almost a habit by now. 

Hilda Markey — Campus: Beautiful. 
Food : Could be better. Profs: I like 



ill of them. Boys: Don't know them 
too well yet. Studies: A lot but that's 
to be expected. 

Jeannette Kramer — I haven't been 
here very long but so far I like every- 
thing about Susquehanna — especially 
the campus and I like the way the 
teachers take a personal interest in 
everyone. 

Peggy Bathgate — Everyone is so 
friendly and the whole college is so 
cozy-like. Good looking boys, too! 

Roberta Gaetz— I like the traditions 
of S. U. Ever since I've been here the 
upperclassmen made me feel right at 

home. 

Ray Moule — Surely pleased, Uncanny 
sociability, Swell Profs, Quiet Frat. 
I Houses, ' Undying spirit, Education, 
j Heavenly campus, Attractive girls, Nu- 
j tritious food, Never a dull moment, 
[.Another three years. 

Gloria Walmer— I think S. U. is tops. 
It enables you to express yourself re- 
ligiously, scholastically, and socially. 

Ann Malkames — Everything is won- 
derful! 

Ellen Hcllman— It would be nice If 
there were more boys like the ones 
already here. 

Ellen Stein— A Utopia, if there was 
less studying. 

Hope Peters — S. U. is even more 
beautiful than I expected. I'm lure 
glad I came. 

Marfle Johns: I like the idea of all 
the sports, but I wish we had more 
competition in sports. S. U. Is the 
school. 

(Concluded on Page 4) 



eTed.cajmpus. , At the same* time,' the* 
^^ttyTON6ivited A to^stay on; 
ut the dormitory! for the orien- 
tation. 

The outline f or-the -program-mclud^ 
ed a meeting of the groups at which 
time Miss Unangst, dean of women; 
Miss Heln, assistant dean; Miss Kline, 
faculty resident in Hassinger Hall, and 
Mrs. Koch, housemother In Hassinger 
Hall, were introduced. Seven meetings 
were held when the rules and regula- 
tions of the dormitories, information 
concerning the college, and other Im- 
portant material were read to the 
freshmen. All this material was found 
in the handbook. Explanations were 
carried out to better familiarize the 
students with these things that are 
important to their success in college. 
(Concluded on Page 4) 



Sally Mitke, '47; Skip 
Keller, '46, Join Waves 

Two more Susquehannans have an- 
swered the call of the "navy blue". Our 
former classmates of last year, Sara 
"Sally" Mitke and Geneva "Skip" Kel- 
ler, have met the requirements and 
have been accepted in the Waves. Up- 
on receipt of official notification they 
will report to Hunter College, where 
they will receive training for what- 
ever position they are best qualified. 

Sally, a member of the freshman 
class, was enrolled in the Liberal Arts- 
course. She was active in class ac- 
tivities which included freshman rep- 
resentative in the Student Council, a 
member of the Blemic Society and O. 
D. S. sorority. She will report to the 
WAVES on October 5. 

Skip, a member of the sophomore 
class, took a keen interest in athletics 
and in addition to participating on the 
various class teams, was a member of 
j the W. A. A. She was likewise a Lib- 
eral Arts student, and a member of O. 
D. 8. sorority. She expects to report 
on November 2. 

To you, Sally and Skip, we wish the 
best of luck in your new undertaking. 



PAGE TWO 



THE SUSQUEHANNA, SELINSGROVE, PENNSYLVANIA 



TUESDAY, OCTOBER 3, 1944 



'fe 




n 




zMm 




Established 1891 

Rine G. Winey, Jr., '46 - Editor 

Jean C. Geicer, '46 Associate Editor 

Gloria Gasparoli, '46 Managing Editor 

Arthur J. Gelnett, '49 Sports Editor 

Reporters: Mary Elizabeth Basehoar, '45; Ruth Botdorf, '45, proofreader; Cor- 
inne Kahn, '45; Laverne Kohn, '45; Louise Kresge, '45; Gloria Machmer, 
'45; Frances Bittingcr, '45; June Hoffman, '46; Jayne Troutman, '46; Norma 
Hazen, '46; Ruth Cochrane, '46; Emily Botdorf, '46; Marie Klick, '46; Vir- 
ginia Hallock, '46; Carmen Beckwith, '46; Jackie Braveman, '47; Joe Taylor, 
'47; Jane Gundrum, '47; Dorothy Wagner, '47; Paye Smith, '47; Caroline 
Pfahler, '47; Doris Williamson, '47; Marian Walker, '47;- Gayle Clark, '47; 
Martha Garard, '48; Helen Zahn. '48; Betty Smith, '48; Caroline Marks, 
'48; Betty Frank, '48; Gloria Walmer, '48; Ruth Criswell, '48; Roberta 
Gaetz, '48; Ed Madden, '48; Sara Lee Smith, '48; Margaret Johns, '48; 
Joan Smith, *48; Harriet Gould, '48. 

Corinne Kahn, '45 Business Manager 

Helen Eby, '47 Advertising Manager 

Jean Kinzer, '46 Circulation Manager 

Business Assistants: Roswell Johns, '46; Ed Madden, "48; Russell Brown, "48; 
Betty Prank, '48; Cynthia Carmel, '48. 



CAMPUSOLOGY 



EDITORIALS 

Hello freshman! It's really great 
having you with us. Individually we 
have tried to give each of you a hearty 
welcome to S. U., and now we will do 
so collectively. The class of '48 com- j 
prises the largest part of the student 
body, and we not only warmly accept 
you into our group, but we look to you 
for the future of Susquehanna. A 
large class, such as yours, adds new 



LOST & FOUND 



WANTED— Golf balls by Coach Stagg. 
LOST — Many girls' hearts to a certain 
9 'froth fella. 
WANTED— A way to study for Dr. 

Russ's courses in Jess than three 

hours. 

FOUND— A way— ask Bob Surplus. 

WANTED— A certain street-light re- 
moved from in front of Hassinger 
Hall. 

LOST— Too much time studying 



The super -sleuths are on the loose 
again, and unlike the proverbial mon- 
keys, we see all, hear all, and tell all— 
so beware ! Your private life is our 
chop-suey! 

The campus is chock full of new 
frosh a la rogues' gallery, bedecked 
with those lovely orange bows and that 
new backto-nature make-up. Ah, yes! 
The sophs are really on the ball this 
year! 

"In the Spring a young man's fancy 
lightly turns ..." Well, it's fall, but 
Dan Cupid dressed nice and warm, is 
, out to make plenty of news for us—. 
I Have you seen these charming two- 
i somes emerging on the campus al- 
i ready? Larry arid Bobbie; Ray and 
j Jeanne; Russ and Gayle. 

We've all been wondering why Scotty 
Small doesn't make up his mind be- 
tween what Seibert and Hassinger have 
j to offer. But then, it's nicer to give 
i everyone a break. 

Did you see that perfectly gorgeous 
man in Navy Blue (a native of Sun- 
bury, by the way) who paid a most 
welcome visit to Betty Frank last 
weekend? As the song puts It — "The 
Navy gets the gravy." 

Gus's latest appearance on campus 
was outshined only by that sparkling 
stone he had placed on Beckie's third 
fiturer, left hand. Congratulations, 
Kids! We've been awaiting the good 
news. 
Corinne Kahn is one lucky and 



vitality and spark to our campus. This WANTED — The grass cut on the happy little gal. Her Clyde has a fur 



is your school now too, and we are 
sincerely glad to share it with you. 

Although Susquehanna has been af- 
fected : by the war, you will probably 
be" able to experience college during 
both war and peace time. There ia a 
lot' you have to look forward to. Col- 
lege during war is a test of character 
and will power to those who attend. 
Perhaps, as many do, some want to 
leave school to get high paying de- 
fense Jobs. It takes perseverance and 
thoughts of the fture to resist temp- 
tations such as the one I mentioned. 



athletic field so that so many golf 
balls would not be lost. 
WANTED— A muffler to silence that 
"job" of Frankie's. 

FOUND— Some lipstick, I paint, and 
powder, Ity every frosh firls,"" Coin- 
cidence? 

WANTED — More moonlight nites like 
September 30, with more ll:10's. - 

TO RENT— My mailbox — No mail for 
a week. 

WANTED— Bicycles for the girls going 
to senior high to practice teach. 

WANTED— More men. 

FOUND — One beautiful gym floor. 

WANTED by certain frosh — "My 
mama" or boyfriend. 



louRh and he plans to spend it with 
her! He should be here any day now 
—and she can hardly wait! 

Roses are Red 

Violets are blue 

Red hair is tweet' 

and Red knew* wh#! 
Mary Lib's interest in life 
a sudden rise by the telegram she re- 



Foxy, "Pookie",.Ben Herr, Lou, Beckie, 
3111 Hayes and Ruth Williams, Marian 
with Pete, and some others traveled via 
bus or Pete's car to enjoy the revel" 
of a Saturday at the county fair. 
Speaking of Pete he's leaving again 
Monday, and so Marian will be rather 
a lonesome lass shortly— Is the expres- 
sion war-widow? Anyway, she's been 
kept very busy by his undivided atten- 
tions in the recent past — and it was 
fun! 

The very first weekend anyone in- 
vaded S. U.'s campus who was here 
but Eve Zlock to see our Gloria. And 
then he pops up this weekend again 
too. See, frosh, how the x- students 
love the campus (?) 

"Gigger's" summer job resulted in a 
visit this weekend from Mel, her good- 
looking chemist, who seems to be quite 
interested in Jeanie. (Say, I might 
charge Dr. Fisher for advertising his 
chemistry courses as a way to get a 
man!) 

It's too bad Rolling Green's dance 
hall Is closed for the season. Now what 
will those wolves, Warner, Wlney and 
Gelnett do with their Saturday nltes? 
They were the beaux of the ball and 
kept all the gals on their toes (or vice- 
versa). Art escorted Gay Wagner on 
Saturday last, so mayhaps he'll be out 
of the wolf class ere long. 

We haven't seen too much of Johnny 
Koscis this year, Why? He's North- 
umberland's football coach. He, it is 
rumored, has also adopted another 
profession, that of singing. He often 
serenades Dotty with a chorus or two 
or "A Bicycle Built for Two." 

Both "Skip" and Sally came up to 
the "kid** for a filial farewell be- 1 
fore Joining the Navy, the WAVES* 
rrWffl number lb*m In ttw4r* 

jgmmmat, saitbrtt 

it seems a certain Frat House was 



cetved from her man Burnell last Sun- ' overcrowded a few days ago, but they 
day. Thrilled? Well, that's an under- I did something about it— they left one 
statement, but you get the idea. 
Dale is full of ideas about what little 



Freshman, you are going to have the j WANTED— A golf pro for a full time 



valuable experience of attending col- 
lege during war, and, we sincerely 
pray, that you will know Susquehanna 
during days of peace We are leaving 
it up to you, and we know that you 
will make the most of S. U. regardless 
of worldly stress. 

Once again let us say— it's great hav- 
ing you with us. 

S 



job — teaching. 
WANTED — a person to do a better job 
of writing this column than I am— 
any applicants— or suggestions? 



-S- 



Beckwith and Tietbohl 
Announce Engagement 



Miss Carmen Marie Beckwith and 
Augustus V. Tietbohl have joined the 
ranks of S. U. couples who intend to 
make a way in life together. Better 
known to us as "Beckie" and "Gus", 



We who are in charge of this year's 
publication of "The Susquehanna" vow they met nere Jn tne fall of 1942 whe n 
to you that we are going to carry on in both entered Susquehanna 
the best way possible. We will un 



gals like. Have you seen that latest 
addition to Mary Moyer's collection of 
gifts — the cutest little cactus plant — 
but genuine! 

Bloomsburg's fair seems to have had 
a great deal of attraction for a num- 
ber of our students this weekend. 



of the members behind Will Hayes' 
trunk. It is also rumored that Tony 
Payne has been trying hard to make 
Ray a charter member of his Night- 
Owl Club. 

Well, that clears up the dirt In our 
back-yard for this week, but never 
fear, more will collect. We'll be "see- 
ing" you! 



-<*. 



as fresh- 
men. Both have taken an active part 
in extra-curricular activities. 
Miss Beckwith is a member of S.A.I, 
ably hava.successes, and <n either case Sorority w A A Susqueh anna Orches- 



doubtedly make mistakes and prob- 



we will welcome your criticism or com 
pliment. 

We are in war— our paper will not be 
as large or elaborate as in pre-war 
days. We will be unable to carry all 
the news and features in this small 



tra, Susquehanna Singers, is a reporter 
for the "Susquehanna", The Theater 
Guild. S.C.A., and a member of the 
Women's Judiciary Committee. She is 
taking the Music Supervisor's course. 
Mr. Tietbohl, now serving in the TJ. 



S. Army, is a member of Theta Chi 
paper as formerly, but what we pub- Fraternity, Alpha Psi Omega, the Band, 
iirti. you may feel certain, will be our MA and the Theater Gulld^ After 

the war, he plans to return to S. U. 
best. Need more be said. t) tftkp the ^-e.^eoiogicni course. 

S The couple became engaged while 

MY LIFE THIS SUMMER i Gus was enjoying a 15 day furlough at I job with all of the frosh. 

Marjorie Barton— Switchboard oper- his home in Willlamsport. Miss Beck- : Monday. September 



Diary of a Frosh 



GLORIA J. WALMER 
Saturday, September 16th 

Arrived on campus 11:00 A. M. Gee, 
what a beautiful place! Pine trees, 
row on row, beautiful buildings, and 
Seibert— just like a southern mansion. 

My what greetings — just like your 
own sisters. 

Room Seibert, Third Floor— really 
neat with lovely view from window. 

Group meetings — they really "laid 
down the laws" to us, but that is only 
a part of what makes S. U. what It is 
today. 

Gee, I wonder who that cute fellow 
is? 

Oodles of fun at the Pajama Party. 
Sunday, September 17th 

Attended Sunday School and Church, 
Trinity Lutheran. Excellent sermon by 
Prpsident Smith. 

Sunday P. M.— first S. C. A. Vesper 
Program. Wonderful group religiously 
and socially. 

House Meeting— Introduced to Stu- 
l dent Council Association. Doing a fine 



ator and general office work at Lowry with, from Oakmont, Pittsburgh, spent 

Electric in Williamsport . . Joan a week at his home in Willlamsport. 

Smith— Did some modeling for Black- Gus is now back at Camp Crowder, 

box Studios in N. Y. C. . . . Ed Madden Missouri. 

—Worked at print shop in N. Y. C. and S. U.'s heartiest congratulations to 

came to summer school, 2d semester, both Beckie and Gus. 



I am beginning to like this place. 
Beginning of Placement Tests. 
Tuesday, September 19th 

Registration Day. 

Motion pictures — slant on campus 
life. Very cute. 



Wednesday, September 20th 

S. C A. Party— plenty of fun with 
punch and cookies for everyone. 
Thursday, September 21st 

Convocation— very timely address by 
Rev. Carl A. Honeycutt. 

Faculty reception— introduced to all 
the profs. (Don't know whether this 
is good or bad.) 

This place is beginning to "grow on 
me". 
Saturday, September 23rd 

Washed my hair in preparation, for 
Frosh Initiation Week. 
Monday, September 25th 

Beginning Frosh Initiation Week. 
Ouch! 

They include (darn it): 

1. Wear orange halrbows 2" x 8" 
until Thanksgiving. 

2. Wear 4" x 8" name tags with 
name in red for two weeks. 

3. Do not put up your hair for one 
week. » 

4. Do not wear any makeup for 
one week. (Palefaces). 

Tuesday, September 26th 

Social dancing in basement of Sei- 
bert. Sweet tunes and swing tunes! 
Wednesday, September 27th 

Studied as usual. 
Thursday, September 28th 

W. A. ,A. Meeting— Important to all 
future sportswomen. 
Friday, September 29th 

Saw that cute fellow again today. 
Future — Hazing Day! 

This is where I came In. 






TUESDAY, OCTOBER 3, 1944 



THE SUSQUEHANNA, SELINSGROVE, PENNSYLVANIA 



OUR FROSH 



Joan Apple with her contagious 
laugh Is one of our Commercial Edu- 
cation students. She is 5' 4 Ms", with 
brown hair and laughing brown eyes. 
Joan, who is, by the way, from Sun- 
bury, Pa., thinks Dennis Morgan is 
s'mply wonderful. As for the musical 
side of things, she goes for Andre Kos 
telanetz and Harry James 




PAGE THREE 



Sigma Alpha Iota 

Sigma Alpha Iota held its first meet- 
ing of the year last Wednesday after- 
noon. Louise Kresge, the president, 
presided. 

Improvements in the appearance 

of SAI Sorority room this year in- 

It seems ! eludes new draperies over the door and 



Brown with spots of paint on their 
noses, you'll understand when you see 
the results of their labor. 



W. A. A. 

The first meeting of the Women's 
Athletic Association was held on 



and Army Air Corps, with a preference , the floor. 



i ! Thursday afternoon, September 28 
her heart is divided between the Navy .-window, and a new coat of varnish on I President Prances B ttinger presiding 

anrt Armv Air finrns with p <■!,« «„„.. B ' ytcoiuiiig. 

All new freshmen were invited to this 
meeting, and it was explained to them 
how they could become members of 
the organization by earning the requir- 
ed number of points throughout the 



for the Navy as her favorite branch of 
the services. Joan hopes to be some- 
body's secretary some day, and will 
certainly make a cute one. 

Frosta (Jack Frost) Arsinicu hails 
from Lewistown, Pa. She's a "Con" 



More news about S.A.I, next week. 
So-long! 



Kappa Delta Phi 

Kappa Delta Phi has held two meet- j year 

At the end of the business meeting, 
refreshments were served. 



The organization looks very promis- 
ing for the coming year. Membership 
will undoubtedly be larger, and many 
activities have been planned for the 



I ings this week, the first on Monday, 
student and would like to teach music ! o or . tom u or «,- ' „ . u „ . . ,„ . 
, , , . _. „ i September 25, and the second on Wed- 

or P ta y £ * famous .band. The Navy nesd plans were dlgcussed « 

rates with Frosty as well as Harry | Homecoming and Pounder's Day cele- 

James, tennis, bowling and coin col- : Dr ation 

lectin* She has light brown hair and ! Durln tne we€k 

blue-gray eyes and a very nice per- ; ,, n ,. nrtt „ hQ „ Q Koo „ u „ u , . .***T i — — ««"»c WCC u 

mm*,, in regard to lessons she Z. ItSPtSmSSSSl -SK! h"* """" "^ 
violin but Frosta rto likes hot dogs varnlsh ' a y „ d yggj V*£ 

wnen extra curricuiar activities are a general housecleanlng in anticipa 
concerned tion of some fl u 

Cora Arthur is another of our Fresh- 
men who is taking Music Education 
with the ambition of teaching after 
graduation, She is 18 years old, 5' 3" 
tall, with brown hair and brown eyes. 
She hails from Muncy, Pa., and sticks 
to Pennsylvania in her taste of music 
—she takes to Fred Waring. In her 
spare time she likes reading, dancing, 
and sports — especially basketball. Her 
military preference Is the U. S. Navy. 

Maxine Asch belongs to the Liberal 
Arts department of S. U. and Is inter- 
ested in child welfare. Three years 



Pi Gamma Mu 

Pi Gamma Mu presented a sound 
motion picture, "18th Century Life in 
Williamsburg, Virginia," on Monday 
evening, October 2, in Steele Science 
Hall. The movie was open to Sus- 
quehanna students and the general 
public. 

Future programs have been prepar- 
ed to allow variety of subject and type. 
Two will be in charge of students and 
faculty members will conduct an equal 
ago she moved from Montreal, Quebec, i "T b ? r ' Outside speakers will par- 
to Scarsdale, N. Y., and from there tici P at e °n two occasions and one oth- 
she came to S. U. Max Is always in a T motlon P lctu re w11 1 * show n. 
hurry" for 'something'. She goes for the ' v ~ - 

R. A. F. In a big way. Tommy Dor- j Vespers 

sey has top place on her musical list. Hymns, how they came to be writ- 
She plans to get quite some studying I ten and thelr authors, was the topic 
done this year, but by no means is ! of the vesper service held in the chapel 
she the bookworm type. Max has the | on _ September 24 
ability to make anyone laugh. She 



HACKETTS 

Hardware Stores 

325 Market St, 706 Market St. 
ALSO MIDDLEBURG, PA. 



F. A. BRILL CO. 



Floor Coverings— Awnings— Shade* 
Draperies 



419 Market St. Phone 2180 Sunbury 



WHITMER-STEELE 
COMPANY 

LUMBER MANUFACTURES 
NORTHUMBERLAND, PA. 



MILLER'S 

Where Ed's and Co-Ed's Meet 
For Many Good Things to Eat 

Corner Pine and Orange Streets 
3 Blocks from Campus 



George B. Rine FLORIST 



HOUSE R-Y 
STORE 145- Y 



really has a great sense of humor. 

Peggy Bathgate from State College 
is taking the Medical Secretary course 
in the Business Department. Peggy 



Louise Kresge read the scripture. 
Features of the evening were a trio 
and a solo by conservatory students. 

Charlotte Smith, Ruth Cochrane, 
Jean Strausser, and Hope Spicer pre- 



The First National Bank of Selins Grove 

WELCOMES STUDENTS' ACCOUrTTS 



... ...v. uu.11111 jo utjiaiuiii ill.. 1 IBB/ ' *" ■»»■»"■ f~ 

is 18 and has brown hair and green ; sented short backgrounds of different 
eyes. Peggy isn't playing favorite with familiar hymns. Each account was 
any fellow yet though she does like flowed by the singing of that hymn. 
Lon McAllister. Maybe that's why she I Some of these hymns were sung by the 
likes to go to the movies so much, j entlre Kroup in the chapel and others 
Also on the top of her list are Glenn j were sun & bv a group of conservatory 
Miller's orchestra, bike-riding, dancing ! students. All singing was accompanied 
and, in sports— basketball. She likes I b >' Marjorie Stapleton 



shorthand class best of all, but she 
wishes that more fellows were med- 
secretaries. 

Nancy Lou (don't forget the Lou!) 
Bicking is another swell girl from 
Hazleton. Her brown eyes, brown hair 
and her smile have made her many 
friends already. Nancy Lou thinks the 
Marines are swell and likes Harry 
James and Tom Drake, too. Nan is 17 
and 5' 6%" tall. She likes dancing a 
lot, and In the line of sports she likes 
to horseback ride 



As special music, "My Faith Looks 
Up to Thee." was sung by a trio, Jean 
Strausser, Virginia Hallock. and Hope 
Spicer. Gloria Machmer sang "Ave 
Maria" as a solo. 

The benediction was pronounced by 
Dr. T. W. Kretschmann. 



Fine Job Printing 
THE SELINSGROVE TIMES 



department claims Nan, but 
she has no definite ambition. 
S 



Did You Notice? 

Seibert Hall had its "face lifted" and 

now looks splc and span. The social 

rooms and kitchen in the basement 

The Liberal Arts were painted a light shade of of green, 



Quality Only the Finest 

NATIONAL RESTAURANT 

Hotel and Dining Service 

Sellnsgrove, Pa, 



29 N. Market St. 




as 



MY LIFE THIS SUMMER 

Harold Snyder — Inventory dept. at 
Middletown Air Depot . . . Marie Klick 
—Worked in woolen factory and gave 
piano lessons . . . Marjorie Mengel— 
Nitecraft mill in Sunbury . . . Jane 
Gundrum— Measles, and German ones 
at that . . . Faye Smith— Worked on 
dad's farm . . . Laverne Kohn— Recep- 
tionist at R.C.A. in Camden . . . Myra 
Epstein— Worked in my father's drug 
store . . . Audrey Havice— Went to SU 
summer school . . . Caroline Marks- 
Worked in my grandfather's clothing 
store in Danville . . . Bob Surplus- 
Production Control Department of 
Murry Corp. of America, Scranton. 



yet .which gives the rooms a more cheerful 
' atmosphere. Then too, we have ac- 
quired a game room which is under 
'the same regulations as the social 
1 rooms. Also the north and south wings 
Ion the third floor have been carpeted. 
Hassinger Hall was reconverted as a 
j woman's dormitory. If you want to 
see a shiny building, Just take a look. 
The girls' day student room is now lo- 
cated in the basement of Hassinger 
and is much cozier. 

I guess most of you have seen the 
gym. The floors were sanded, new | 
lines drawn, and then the floor was 
reflnished. 

The Business Department wasn't to 
be outdone, and so they decided to fix 
up their rooms in O. A. If you hap- 
pened to see Ross Johns and Russ 



For School News Read 

SUNBURY DAILY ITEM 



For 
education 



SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

SELINSGROVE, PENNSYLVANIA 
Co- educational— Accredited 

more than eishty-slx years in the service of Christian 



higher 



Curricula: 



LIBERAL ARTS BUSINESS 

COMMERCIAL EDUCATION 



MUSIC 



For Catalog write 

O. Morris Smith, D.D., LL.D., Pros. 
Russell Gait, Ph.D., Dean 



V 



PAGE FOUR 



THE SUSQUEHANNA, SELINSGROVE. PENNSYLVANIA 



TUESDAY, OCTOBER 3, 1944 



SUMMER NUPTIALS 
OF SU STUDENTS 

The marriage of Miss Doris Hag- 
garty to Mr. George Bass was solemn- 
ized Saturday, August 19, 1944, In St. 
Paul's Eangelical Lutheran Church, 

Hawley, Pa. The Rev. Dr. Morris work un t too difflcu t as yet, but so 

Gortner, Lansdowne, performed the far ' J v f e f ^d Parity to keep me busy 
ceremony, and Miss Helen Hocker pre-; m ° st ° f JJJ " me - . „ „ 

sided at the organ. I ■■}* ,■?■£** ""£ ^ S 

The bride was given in marriage by in Hassinger than Seibert I ve met 

her father, and Mrs. Clyde Sechler, a grand group of girls and have found 

the former Louise McWilliams, was the the upperclassmen helpful, except the 

matron of honor. The bridesmaids sophs, of course. I can t say too much 

were the Misses Jean Bufflngton, Doris ^ et about the P r ° fs an o d *" work - but 



FROSH LIKES AND GRIPES 

(Continued from Page 1) 
Dawn Ebert— I like most of my sub- 
jects and hope the sophs won't be too 
hard on us. I'm glad I'm a day stu- 
dent, because who likes restrictions? 
Jerry Moore— The girls are very so- 
ciable; upperclassmen are helpful and 
ivery accommodating. As for the profs 
—I can't say a word about them. The 



I'm not sorry I chose S. U 

Joyce Burkhard — S. U.? It's wonder- 
ful! I love it! My only gripe is that 
everything is so smooth that I have 
nothing to gripe about, and that really 
comes from the bottom of my heart. 

Nedia Polanchyck — All the teachers 
are nice — so far. The food is good and 

I much prefer Hassinger to Seibert. 
bride of William Janson, Jr., on Aug- Haven , t had much tJme for sQclal Mf 

ust 26. 1944, in the Messiah Lutheran as y >cause tlci in tne Con 

Church, York, Pa. The double ring 



Welch, Mary Gilpin, and Mary Cum- 
mings. Bryan Dowd served as best 
man, and Herman Steumpfle and 
Frank McSheen were the ushers. 

The bridegroom is a student at Get- 
tysburg Theological Seminary. 

Miss Margaret Gemmill became th? 



ceremony was performed by the Rev. 
William Janson, father of the bride- 
groom. 
A half hour recital preceded the 



keeps me busy. All in all, S. U. is 

really swell. 
Naomi Garman — For the first time 

in my life I'm enjoying algebra. Think 

that means anything? The kids are 
wedding and Mrs. William Janson, all swe n and the profs are really help- 
mother of the bridegroom, presided as , ful co . operatlve> and humorous . Tne 
organist. ; food is wonder f ul> and so i ong as z 

The bride was given in marriage by get my seC ond helping, I'm happy. 
her father, with Miss Janet Hoke as Cora Mae Arthur— I like S. U. a lot, 
her maid of honor. The Misses Jean but I'll be glad when these first four 
Gemmill, Doris Janson, Elizabeth wee ks are over and I can go home. 
Mann, and Jane Smiley were the ..^^ mmm ^^ mmmmm _^_^_ - ___ 
bridesmaids. The bridegroom's best 
man was Francis Bell; the ushers were 
Herman Stumpfle, William Miller, Jr., 
Roswell Johns, and Joseph Taylor. 

The bridegroom is a student at the 
theological seminary at Gettysburg. 
The couple are now residing at 141 
Baltimore Street, Gettysburg. 



Dorm life is swell. Upperclassmen are 
friendly and social life is O. K., as 
much as Ive seen of It. 

Anna Sheets — I looked for a college 
which is small, where I could really 
study and make friendly contacts with 
my classmates. After visiting several 
colleges, I found that Susquehanna 
came up to my every expectation. I 
like the friendly attitude of both the 
students and the teachers. 

Caroline Graybill— Dorm life is dif- 
ferent, but lots of fun. Upperclassmen 
are all right, excluding the sophs. The 
food here is swell, but I could eat 
three times as much of everything. 
The men are O. K„ but they're few 
and far between. My classes are in- 
teresting, the work Is hard, but it's 
worth it. 

— S 

SUCCESS MARKS FROSH 
ORIENTATION PROGRAM 

(Continued from Page 1) 
Informal gatherings such as a tour 
of the campus September 16, and a 
pa jama party the evening of the same 
day were held. Monday, September 18, 
the S. C. A. welcomed the new stu- 
dents at 7:00 p. m. Tuesday evening, 
Pete Lamon showed movies of the 
campus after which several upperclass 
girls presented a mock wedding in the 
chapel. A party was held by the S. C. 
A. in the Social Rooms of Seibert for 
the freshmen Wednesday evening. 
This period of orientation ended when 
convocation exercises that were held 
Thursday morning and classes official- 
ly started at 10 o'clock. 



The girls who were group leaders 
are as follows: Mary Moyer, Jane 
Malkames, Marie Klick, Marjorie 
Stapleton, Jean Geiger, Dorothy Ster- 
nat, Marian Willard, and Ruth Coch- 
rane. The assistant group leaders 
were: Anna Miller, Lou Kresge, Char- 
lotte Smith, Virginia Hallock, Gloria 
Gasparoli, Corinne Kahn, Hope Splcer, 
and La Verne Kohn. 



MILLER BROS. 
SHOE STORE 

SUNBURY, PA. 



STONER'S 
CREDIT JEWELERS 

SUNBURY, PA. 



Miss Jacqueline Jacques became the 
bride of Cpl. Joseph P. Driscoll on 
August 30, 1944, in a ceremony solemn- 
ized in the St. Mary's Church of Nor- 
wich, Conn. 

The couple's only attendants were 
the bridegroom's twin brother and his 
sister. 

The bridegroom is now stationed at 
an air base at Springfield, Mass., and 
the bride is living with her mother on 
High Street, Selinsgrove. 



FEHR'S 

THE STORE THAT LEADS 

IN BETTER MERCHANDISE 

"' "■'» ' \ 



HOTEL GOVERNOR 
SNYDER 

GOOD HOME COOKING 



B.K.W. COACH LINE 

Tries to give the College Students 
the best service, especially the Sun- 
bury Students. Why TRAVEL with 
an individual? The Coach Line In- 
sures every person. THINK THAT 
OVER. 



CHILDREN'S SHOP 

MARY II. BURNS 
Clothes for the College Girl 



Markley-Altvater 

BETTER STUDENTS CLOTHES 
SUNBURY, PA. 



Eg i & 



j£> 



SNA VELY'S 

COLLEGE FURNISHINGS 
AND SHOES 



VISIT THE 

REXALL 
DRUG STORE 

WTtLIAM t. CdTT, 



— . 



1 



X&JP- * ' 



-8- 



MY LIFE THIS SUMMER 

Carmen Beckwith — Slept in morning, 
read in afternoon, and went to the 
movies in evening . . . Emily Botdorf 
—Waitress in snack bar in Pennsyl- 
vania Railroad Station in Harrisburg 
. . . Rhoda Klemons — A counselor at 
Camp Raleigh, N. Y. . . . Pauline 8010- 
mon—Teacher at nursery on Long Is- 
land . . Ruth Ulrich— Worked at the 
Good Shepherd Home in Allentown . . . 
Jean Wheat— #as a clerk at Standard 
Vacuum Oil Co. in N. Y. C. . . . Marty 
Sharwarko— Laboratory work in a hos- 
pital . . . Mary Llzzio — Secretary to 
my father at his store . . Dot Ell- 
hardt — Waitress at Castle Restaurant 
in Scranton. 



CRYSTAL PURE ICE 

CHARLES W. KELLER 
Manufacturer and Wholesaler 



Ebert's 5c to $1.00 
Store 

8usquehanna Stationery 
SELINSGROVE 



S. U. BOOK STORE 

SUSQUEHANNA 
NOTEBOOKS 
STATIONERY 



SCHOOL FASHIONS 

ROSENBLUM'S 

SUNBURY, PA. 
SMART FEMININE APPAREL 



\J 



WATCH REPAIR ' 
Susquehanna Jewelry 
Fountain Pens and Pencils 

W. M. VALSING 

JEWELER SELINSGROVE, PA. 



-Stf 



V 



THE BON TON 

Personally Selected 

COATS, DRESSES, HATS 

Sunbury, Pa. 



When you think of Photography 
Think of 

Schindler Studio 

515 Market Street, Sunbury, Pa. 
Also Framing and Photo Finishing 



REICHLEY'S 

WHERE STUDENTS 
MEET AND EAT 



FINE FOODS— STATIONERY 

Greeting Cards for Every Occasion 

SELINSGROVE, PA. 



LOW 

NET COST .... 

life Insurance Ik Issued 
to Lutheran Men, Wom- 
en, and Children ages 
from birth to 66. The 
members of Lutheran 
Brotherhood oion the 
society, and they alone 
receive the earnings. 
There are no stockhold- 
ers. 



Lutheran Brotherhood 



Legal Reserve Life Insurance For Lutherans 
MINNEAPOLIS. 2, Herman L. Ekern. President 



MINNESOTA 



430 Market St. 



H. L. ROTHFUSS, A gent Williamsport, Pa. 



BUILD YOUR 
ESTATE NOW! 



YOUR FUTURE 
STARTS TODAY 



f. 



SUSQUEHAW1* UNIVERSItl 
SELlNSQROVEv PA. 



FLASH— 

Send for your ice skates. 
It was below 32 degrees 
yesterday morning. 



n 



U 




elMia 



PREDICTION— 

Many persons will- be 
homeward bound this 
weekend. 



Volume LIII 



SELINSGROVE, PENNSYLVANIA, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 17, 1944 



' 



I 



Class of 1944 

Prom the immortal halls of Susque- 
hanna advance scholars of renown. 
Not to be surpassed is the class of 1944. 

For further information let us linger 
awhile and think about those of yes- 
teryear. 

Norma Prank is a music supervisor 
in Lehigh county. 

Olive Atherton is teaching in the 
commercial department at Reedsvllle. 
, Ethel Wilson teaches music at Nur- 
emburg. 

Lois Kramer has a position in the 
consolidated school in Turbotville, while 
Helen Hocker teaches music at Muncy 

Phyllis Wolfe teaches instrumental 
music at the Polk State School. 

Janet Sechrist is employed as assist- 
ant director of music at Wildwood, New 
Jersey. 

Jane Stitt also is on the music fac- 
ulty at Elizabeth ville. 

Ada Jayne Romig, who attended, 
Susquehanna this summer and receiv- 
ed her permanent certification, is 
teaching in the junior high school at 
Wormleysburg. 

Jean Harris holds a position in the 
Highspire commercial department. 

Our librarian of the summer, Cath- 
erine Byrod, is employed in the Middle- 1 
burg High School. Along with her | 
(Concluded on Page 2) 



Number % 



Alumni and Parents 
Enjoy SU Homecoming 



Parents Hear Shobert 



Geiger and Kinzer 
To Head "Lanthorn" 



Miss Jean C. Oeiger, from Williams- 
port, and prominent member of the 
Junior class was elected by faculty and 
student representatives of the Junior 
class, as editor-in-chief of this year's 
Lanthorn, the yearbook of SU. Also 
elected at the same time as business 
manager of the college annual was 
Miss Jean Kinzer of Newport, another 
active member of the class. 

As yet neither the editorial or busi- 
ness staffs have been appointed, but 
both these staffs will be selected in the 
near future. 

The duties of the editor of the Lan- 
thorn are to decide the theme of the 
book, and have complete charge with 
the editorial management of the book, 
while the business manager has as her 
duties the financing of the book. 

Arrangements are now being made 
for photographing the individual stu- 
dents. 



The annual celebration of Homecom- 
ing, Pounder's Day, and Parents' Day 
October 14, 1944, was officially begun 
with a Convocation in the chapel at 
11 a. m. with Dr. Q. Morris Smith, 
president of Susquehanna, presiding. 
The devotional portion of the program 
consisted in the singing of the hymn, 
"God of Our Fathers," and the read- 
ing of a scripture. The Susquehanna 
Singers, under the direction of Mrs. 
Giauque, supplied the music; a special 
arrangement of "Still as the Night." 
President Smith welcomed the Alumni 
and Parents, and invited them to re- 
lax and take a holiday from the cares 
of every-day living. 

Mr. Earl Shobert, an alumnus of 
Susquehanna University, was intro- 
duced by Dr. Smith. Mr. Shobert was 
graduated from S. U. in 1935, and was 
then sent, on an exchange scholar- 
ship, to study in Germany for a year. 
He spent more than a year at Prince- 
ton University and later became Re- 
search Engineer with the Stackpole 
Carbon Company, St. Mary's, Penn- 
sylvania. It is from there "By the 
Grace of God and St. Mary's ration 
board" that Mr. Shobert came to 
speak. "Life as I found it in Germany 
in 1935" was the general theme, in 
which Mr. Shobert gave the listeners a 
brief glance at the friendliness of the 
Germans to foreigners, such as he; and 
at the political, social, educational, and 
economic situation at that time. He 
concluded by pointing out the lack of 
encouragement the students in Ger- 
many received to participate in extra- 
curricular activities, and emphasizing 
the importance of that phase of college 
life in building fine character and in- 
telligent, alert citizens. 

The Convocation came to a close 
with the singing of "Now Thank We 
All Our God" and Dr. Smith pro- 
nounced the benediction. 

S 



Dance Theme "Autumn" 

Those colorful autumn decorations 
blended with the smooth music of Ivan 
Faux and his orchestra created a most 
pleasant atmosphere to the 150 couples 
who attended the annual Homecoming 
l Dance held in the Alumni Gymnasium 
on Saturday evening at 8 p. m. 

Since Saturday was Parents* Day, 
Founder's Day, and Homecoming, the 
scene of the dance was well represent- 
ed by parents who were enjoying the 
gaiety of their children, alumni who 
were very happy to be back on campus, 
and the servicemen who represented 
the various branches of the service. 
The Navy and Marines outnumbered 
the oi her servicemen, as they had been 
imported from the Navy V-12 program 
at Bucknell. 

Among those, returning Susquehan- 
nans seen at the dance were "Action" 
Rogers and Blanche Forney, Glenn 
Schueler and Helen Hocker, Jane 
Hutchinson, Kay Byrod, Jean Renfer, 
Ada Jayne Romig, Jean Harris, War- 
ren Pine, Dave Rlshell, Charlie Ague, 
Ruth McCorkill, Emanell Whitenight 
and many others. Our campus couples 
included such twosomes as Jack Warn- 
er and Nancy Lou Bicking, Bill Hays 
and EdiHi Thomas, Don Wholsen and 
Lea Cryder, Larry Weller and Bobbie 
Kain, "Howdy" Paine and Toby Sweed- 
ler, Johr Kocsis and Hilda Markey, 
Russ Biown and Gayle Clark, Rine 
Winey i,nd Hope Spicer, Art Oelnett 
and Edith Kemp, Bob Surplus and 
Ruth Cochrane, "Scotty" Small and 
Marie Stout, "Red" Deidich and Peggy 
Mlnier, Dave Bomboy and Harriet 
Gould, Ros Johns and Caroline Pfahl- 
er, Frank Wolfe and Jewel MacNam- 
ara, Bernie Swlencki and Ellse Thomp- 
son, Joe Taylor and Jean Wentling, 
Jerry Moore and Annie Miller, Ira 
Wasserburg and Sara Lee Smith, Dex- 
ter Weikel and Dot Eilhardt, and Aldo 
(Concluded on Page 4) 



Brown, Weller, Wolfe, 
Hays Chosen to Lead 
Classes for 1944-1945 



Did You Know? 

Tuesday, October 17— Paper collec- 
tion day at SU. 

Wednesday, October 18 — Campus 
Club meets in Seibert Parlors 
from 3 to 5. 

Thursday, October 19— Inter-Soror- 
ity hike for sorority members and 
frosh girls from 5 to 7:30 p. m. 

Friday, October 20— Student Recital 
in the chapel at 4:15 p. m. 

Monday, October 23— Faculty Re- 
cital in Seibert Chapel at 8:15 
p. m. 

Friday, October 27— High school stu- 
dents of Snyder County meet at 
Susquehanna at 2 p. m. to honor 
the 300th anniversary of the 
founding of the state of Penn- 
sylvania. Dr. Dunkelberger will 
be the speaker. 



Elections of the class officers for the 
school year of 1944-45 have been com- 
pleted except for the Sophomore class, 
and the results are as follows: 
Senior 

President— William Hays 

Vice President— John Warner 

Secretary— Corinne Kahn 

Treasurer— La Verne Kohn 
Junior 

President— Franklin Wolfe 

Vice President— Rine G. Winey, Jr. 

Secretary— Jean Kinzer 

Treasurer— Marjorie Barton 
Sophomore 

President — Lawrence Weller 

Vice President — Helen Eby 
Freshmen 

President — Russell Brown 

Vice President— Dexter Weikel 

Secretary— Edith Kemp 

Treasurer— Harriet Gould 

The remaining officers will be elect- 
ed on a nearby date. 



18 Students on Dean's 
List of Last Semester 

Dean Russell Gait annouced in chap- 
el on Tuesday, October 10, that the 
following students comprised the 
Dean's list for the second semester of 
the 1943-1944 term: 

Catherine Fox, '47 
Jean Geiger, '46 
Virginia Hallock, '46 
Marianna Hazen, '47 
Norma Hazen, '46 
David Helm, '44 
Florence Houtz, '44 
Corinne Kahn, '45 
Jean Kinzer, '46 
LaVerne Kohn, '45 
Celo Leitzel, '45 
Nancy Myers, '47 
Daniel I. Reitz, Jr. • 
Janet Sechrist, '44 
Elinor Jane Stitt, '44 
Margaret Walter, '45 
Rine Winey, Jr., '46 
Marian Wlllard, '45. 
* Army Air Corps. 



LT. JAY BILLMAN 
KILLED IN FRANCE 



Graduate of SU '40, Third 
Man to Die in Present World 
War 



First Lieutenant Jay Donald Bill- 
man, '40, serving with the artillery, 
was killed in action in Prance, Sep- 
tember 27, according to word received 
by his parents, Mr. and Mrs. J. D. 
Billman, of Front Street, Herndon. *Lt. 
Billman was the third graduate of 
Susquehanna to give his life In this 
war. The others were Lt. Vincent 
Fratelli and Lt. Donald Wert. 

Lt. Billman had been wounded on 
June 1, on the Italian front, but after 
a short period of hospitalization he re- 
turned to duty. 

He was a teacher of Latin and Eng- 
lish at SonestoWn High School prior to 
entering the service two years ago. He 
received his basic training at Fort 
Bragg, N. C, and took his officer's 
training at Port SU1, Okla. 

A member of Bond and Key, Lt. Bill- 
man was an active student on campus. 
He was a Liberal Arts student, active 
in music work, being in the Motet 
Choir for hjfl four years of college; In 
the choral society; the operetta, and 
the Theater Guild. In his senior year 
he was president of Pi Gamma Mu 
and on the Lanthorn Business Staff. 

His brother, First Lieutenant Fred- 
erick Billman, "36, entered the service 
at the same time and throughout their 
army life were always near one an- 
other. They went abroad In March, 
1943, and saw service In North Africa, 
Sicily, and Italy. 

He is also survived by one other 
brother, Robert, who lives in Herndon. 
His father is Justice of the peace at 
that place. 



SU Seniors Practice 
Teach in Selinsgrove 
Public School System 

No doubt everyone has seen at some 
time or the other members of the sen- 
ior class hurrying from one class or 
leaving the dormitory early at noon in 
order to reach the high school or the 
grade school building in Selinsgrove. 

Yes, they are the practice teachers. 
The commercial department has two 
of its members practice teaching. They 
are Corinne Kahn and Marian Willard. 
Corinne teaches Vocational English, 
Commercial English, and Typing; Mar- 
Ian teaches Law, Commercial Mathe- 
matics, and Shorthand. 

The Conservatory has quite a few of 
its members trying their skill In teach- 
ing music in the Pine Street Grade 
School. , Among these are Louise 
Kresge, teaching in the first and sec- 
ond grades; Jack Warner, third and 
fifth; Margaret Walters, first and sec- 
ond; Robert Surplus, fourth and fifth; 
Tony Payne, third and fifth; and Mir- 
iam Garth, fourth and sixth. 

In the Liberal Arts department of 
our college we find that Mary Lib 
Basehoar is teaching eighth grade Eng- 
lish. Mary Moyer has the senior class 
in Algebra, II. Patricia Snyder has 
the seventh grade in Anciet History, 
while LaVerne Kohn is teaching the 
sophomores World History. 



f AGS TWO 



THE SUSQUEHANNA. SELINSGROVE. PENNSYLVANIA 



TUESDAY, OCTOBER 17, 1944 




n 




souetonnu 




Rine G. Winey, Jr. 
Jean C. Geiger, 



Established 1891 

•46 Editor 

'46 ... Associate Editor 

Gloria Gasparoli, '46 Managing Editor 

Arthur J. Gelnett, '47 Sports Editor 

Reporters: Mary Elizabeth Basehoar, '45; Ruth Botdorf, '45, proofreader; Cor- 
inne Kahn, '45; Laverne Kohn, '45; Louise Kresge, '45; Gloria Machmer, 
'45; Frances Bittinger, '45; June Hoffman, '46; Jayne Troutman, '46; Norma 
Hazen, '46; Ruth Cochrane, '46; Emily Botdorf, '46; Marie Klick, '46; Vir- 
ginia Hallock, '46; Carmen Beckwith, '46; Jackie Braveman, '47; Joe Taylor, 
'47; Jane Gundrum, '47; Dorothy Wagner, '47; Faye Smith, '47; Caroline 
Pfahler, '47; Doris Williamson, '47; Marian Walker, '47; Gayle Clark, '47; 
Martha Garard, '48; Helen Zahn, '48; Betty Smith, '48; Caroline Marks, 
'48; Betty Frank, '48; Gloria Walmer, '48; Ruth Criswell, '48; Roberta 
Gaetz, '48; Ed Madden, '48; Sara Lee Smith, '48; Margaret Johns, '48; 
Joan Smith, '48; Harriet Gould, '48. 

Corinne Kahn, '45 Business Manager 

Helen Eby, '47 Advertising Manager 

Jean Kinzer, '46 Circulation Manager 

Business Assistants: Roswell Johns, '46; Ed Madden, *48; Russell Brown, '48; 
Betty Frank, '48; Cynthia Carmel, '48; Jean Wheat, Barbara Kain, Hilda 
Markey. 




EDITORIALS 

Did you know that the "Crusaders" 
was the appellation given to Susque- 
hanna football teams in 1924? They 
were given this name because of the 
fact that this is a Lutheran College 
and this links the players on these 
teams with "the idea of early Chris- 
tian Crusaders." Deeply embedded in 
this thought is honesty in fighting for 
a cause, loyalty, consideration for oth- 
ers, disapproval of wrong, courteous- 
ness, or in just one word, sportsman- 
ship. These former football players 
were honest and fair in their playing, 
considerate when others were injured, 
disapproving of rough play on their 
own team and abusive remarks from 
the sideline, and always loyal and do- 
ing their best for their alma mater. 

Now that intramural sports are be- 
ginning to take place at S. U., should 
we forget these principles practiced by 
those who have gone before us? Or 
can we show them that we are true 
Susquehannans, true Crusaders, too? 
Let us also be fair in our playing, dis- 
approve of rough play, accept the de- 
cisions of officials without question, 
and recognize and applaud any display 
of fine play or good sportsmanship on 
the opposing team as well as our own. 
As you know, this idea of good sports- 
manship applies not only to sports but 
carries over into our own lives. Now, 
while we are here at college laying the 
foundations of our characters, let us 
incorporate into ourselves for all time 
good sportsmanship. Let's start in on 
games tomorrow. 

S 



form of respect. Respect is something 
we all must have for authority and 
older people. In Susquehanna this re- 
spect that we must acquire to get along 
in life, is symbolized by the insistence 
that freshmen play by the rules. 

Some day you will be upper classmen 
too, frosh, and then you can see more 
clearly what we mean, but for now 
let's cooperate and have the Class of 
'48 uphold S. U.'s traditions as well and 
better than other classes have done in 
the past. 

S 



The biggest news of course is our big 
week-end ending in that super duper 
event— The Homecoming Dance— And 
what an affair it was! • With every 
branch of the service represented (the- 
Navy in fullest force) the place was 
very much like a U.S.O.— only better. 
And "Elmer" said, "That thar was the 
bestest shindig evah throwd in these 
hyar parts." Just about all the co- 
eds went and so we can't mention you 
all, but we did notice you and we're 
sure you all had a grand time— we did! 
I'll bet that was the first time men 
were handed out wholesale! Just a 
few highlights: Peggy Bathgate es- 
corted Dr. Russ' nephew, Will Hayes in 
his "tails", the Harvest moon, parents 
on the side-lines, the Intermission. All 
in all it was perfect, and the only com- 
plaint I've heard is that it didn't last 
long enough! 

The Merchant Marine can be mighty 
proud of its personnel if we may Judge 
by the specimen around here— our own 
Warren Pirie. And "Foxy" has been 
the choice to spend almost every min- 
ute of his brief stay here with him! 
They were a knockout at the dance 
(Fox plus an orchid — wow, what a 
combination!) And then this Sunday 
afternoon found them picnicking 
along the river. And, speaking of the 
latter gala event, Tony and Toby, Lea 
and Yonkers, Scotty and Jean, were 



We all agree Russ Brown is quite a 
lady-killer— but it seems he's trying to 
confuse us by bringing twins on cam- 
pus (after all, Russ, one at a time, 
please, or how are we to know which 
is the one?) 

Is life worth living? Jeanette Kram- 
er's answer would be, "and how!" No 
need to add that her boy was home 
last week, is there? 

Some people are happy all year 

Some are Just for a day, 

But Gelnett will ne'er shed a tear 

When he can be near his Gay. 

Extra! Extra! Special Excursion to 
New York City: 

Time of departure: Friday, October 
20. 

Ship: S. S. Katy Pox. 

Captain: Ray Mould. 

No reservations! 

Not only did we celebrate Homeom- 
Ing, but also Parents' Day, and there 
were loads of kids lucky enough to have 
the real McCoy here to help, such as 
Lou Kresge, Helen Eby, The Mal- 
kames's, Lee Cross, Benn JJerr, Frances 
Leisenring, Dot Ellhart, Myra Epstein, 
LaVern Kohn, Marian Wlllard, and 
many others. It was swell to see them 

All. 

IT's RUMORED: that "Skip" Mad- 
don is having trouble finding the right 
gal; that Dave K ember ling is about to 
start charging fare for the nightly ex- 



LOST & FOUND 



LOST: Ability to think. Please return 
to Psychology class if found any- 
where on the Campus. 

FOUND: One gorgeous piano in Has- 

singer Basement. 
LOST: All of the orange and green 

ribbon from the stores downtown. 

I'll bet that the Freshmen could 

easily supply this little item. 

WANTED: An automatic leaf -raker- 
upper. (It would save a lot of stif- 
fened backs.) 

WANTED: Plastic hockey sticks. That 
way, fewer shins will be bruised. 
Thank goodness, eyes don't come in- 
to play in this case. 

WANTED: More "hep-cats" to Join in 
the dancing during Social Dancing 
hours. Get hep, but watch your 
step!!!! 

LOST: Red hot dogs. 

FOUND: Green ones. 

WANTED: A patched-up fence around 
the tennis courts. There are more 
Invisible holes in the fence than 
there are in a million doughnuts. 

FOUND: Some luscious ping-pong 
tables at Hasslnger and Seibert HalLs. 

WANTED: A coke machine for Has- 
slnger Hall. Gee! One certainly 
does get thirsty at night while study- 
ing, and, of course, that's one way 
of getting those peanut butter sand- 
wiches to glide down your throat. 



also among those present. Guess this I cursions to Sunbury the Bond and Key 



"The freshmen are a fine group, but 
I wish they would keep up the regular 

frosh traditions like they are supposed FO tjnd : Beautiful green and maroon 
to." "dinks" by the Freshman fellows 

Many upper-classmen have passed J They surely do remind one of little 

comment such as the one above. Per- 1 »«>* J****"* they are mlnus 

, . , „ the Eton collars, 

haps the reason why the freshmen fail! WANTED: More hearty singing of the 

Alma Mater by the Frosh fellows. 
WANTED: The 6:45 bell, silenced. 
TO RENT: Don Juan lipstick. 



to observe the little courtesies that go 1 

into being a frosh is because they can't 

visualize the significance of these cour- 



must be Indian Summer all right! 

The latest couple on campus is the 
Koscls-Markey duo that seems to be 
in perfect harmony— witness that huge 
Phi Mu ring on Hilda's finger and that 
everpresent inspiration (A picture I 
mean). Those Frosh keep getting bet- 
ter and better each year, eh, Johnny? 

Jerry Moore seems to find a perfect 
partner in Annie Miller but we do wish 
he'd spread his charm among a few of 
the doting gals around. 

There are dates and there are dates, 
but the best I've heard in quite a while 
Is a breakfast date for 8 a. m. on the 
morning of a holiday. Could it be that 
Helen and Ross really crave Wheaties? 

Frank Wolfe is doing a mighty good 

job of deception— when we're sure it's 

Fae, up steps Jewel, and vice versa— 

Frankie, how about clearing up this 

I dilemma? 

Corinne hasn't been going around in 
! the clouds for nothing. Coming back 
after that perfect weekend at home 
with Clyde wasn't easy— but classes 
have proved to be more fun than ever 
with him always waiting outside. Why 
doesn't the Army do more of that sort 
of thing? A whole week— Ah, Bliss! 

Mary Lizzio very seldom reveals that 
her letters (which are very frequents) 
from Brania, the man in her life, are 
as exciting as a Wild-West thriller. 
What a loyal morale-builder Joe's got 
himself there! 

Danny Reitz, last year's campus Ro- 
meo, hasn't left us completely— not 
with those dally letters to Evelyn Wil- 
hour! 

Many of us can boast a Bucknell 
sailor here, but few can boast a dance 
there (as yet). Norma Hazen's got us 
beat there for she tripped the light 
fantastic with that darling gob, Cecil 
Baker, at Bucknell's formal Oct. 7. 
Corinne Frey and Rubye Meyers Jour- 
neyed to see the football game in the 
p. in and from all Indications must 
have had a wonderful time! 



boys take; that a charity fund is be- 
ing organized to raise enough money 
to pay for a haircut for Ray Mould; 
that Bernie and Ellie are looking ser- 
ious again; that Red Neidlch can give 
any inside info on the operation of the 
Student Council; that the frosh ain't 
crazy about the hazing; that Bond and 
Key is taking up a collection to buy 
binoculars; that Harriet Gould Is to 
be made the official Alma Mater girl; 
that Harry Welliver's theme song is 
"I Won't Dance, Don't Ask Me"; that 
Ruth Cochrane and Surplus have tak- 
en up where they left off last year; 
that when a gal goes out with Was- 
serburg she has to remember the old 
song, "I Can't give You Anything But 
Love, Baby"; 'nun* said. 

And now for the $64 question. — 
Where were Winey and Warner when 
they were paged in the movies the 
other nite? 

That's all Folks! 

S 



WANTED: A way to know which side 



tesies As strange as it may seem,| Qf ^ dorm ^^ wm gUck tQ 

freshman rules and hazing have their i pouND: Many socks— could It be haz- 

place In th» preparation for our lives; mg day? 

after we leave college. Seating an WANTED: An elevator to reach 3rd 

upper-classman, allowing him to pre- JJ* Q£ m ^ ^ ^ 

cede you through a door-way, and the ^ RuM> clajg8 

other freshman practices are all a! WANTED: At least luke warm eggs. 



LOST: One first aid victim— scared? 

WANTED: Comfortable chairs behind 
Steele Science. 

FOUND: My Science Survey book- 
darn it! 

WANTED: An automatic homework 
do-er. 

TO RENT: The seat on the wrong side 
of Judiciary. 



CLASS OF 1944 

(Continued from Page 1) 
teaching schedule she is the school lib- 
rarian. 

Janet Hoke is on the commercial 
faculty at New Oxford. 

William Janson and Roy Gutshall 
are students at the Gettysburg Theo- 
logical Seminary while Morris Smith 
is attending Mt. Airy Seminary at 
Philadelphia. 

Henry Hopkins entered Drew Semi- 
nary, and David Helm is attending the 
Colgate Rochester Divinity School. 

Geraldine Bemlller and Jean Ren- 
fer ar* chemists for E. I. duPont de 
Nemours, Inc., at Wilmington, Dela- 
ware. 

Fred Lower was employed at Sales- 
ky's Hat Factory in Sunbury during the 
summer, and Is now an Instructor at 
Carson Long Institute, New Bloomfleld. 

Ka Aucker and Sue Goyne have no 
definite plans for the fall. 

Roy Leader is now serving In the 
United States Army. 

Richard Lepley is working on his 
father's farm awaiting his call to Uncle 
Sam's services. 

Margie Gemmlll and Doris Haggarty 
became brides during the summer. 

Last but not least is Florence Houtz, 
who will enter the University of Penn- 
sylvania In November to do graduate 
work. 



TUESDAY, OCTOBER 17, 1944 



THE SUSQUEHANNA, SELINSGROVE. PENNSYLVANIA 



OUR FROSH 



Aria Bilger from Kreamer, Pr„ grad- 
uated from Selinsgrove High. From 
there she went to Washington, and 
after an eight months stay she came 
to S. U. to take the business course. 
She intends to become a secretary. 
Aria is 19 years old, 5' 7" tall, and has 
blue-grey eyes and brown hair. Of 
all the services the Army rates high- 
est along with Fred Waring's band and 
Cary Grant. Her hobby is collecting 
odd perfume bottles, of which, at the 
present, she has over a hundred. She 
likes slow dancing, but would like to 
learn to jitterbug. (Hepcats, take no- 
tice!) 

Florian Bilger, is one of the tallest 
girls on campus; she stands 5' 8%". 
She comes to us from McClure High 
School, McClure, Pa. Floss has brown 
hair and brown eyes to match. The 
business department has another fu- 
ture office worker in its midst where 
Floss is concerned, but business isn't 
Florian's only interest, by any means. 
She likes Harry James' music, English 
class, the Army Air Corps, and danc- 
ing. For something to do ,she likes to 
plaster her room with pictures, pen- 
ants, etc. Basketball comes in, too, 
for its share of her attention. 

David Bomboy is one of the Fresh- 
man fellows staying at Phi Mu. He's 
18, about 5' 10", with brown hair and 
brown eyes. Dave is from Blooms- 
burg (from the fair of the same name), 
Pa., and is taking Pre-Theolog here at 
S. U. He likes the Navy, baseball, and 
naturally— girls. Another loyal Penn- 
sylvanian, his favorite band is Fred 
Waring. His ambition at present Is to 
be a success, and he is bound to be 
one. 

Ronald Boyer (no relation to 
Charles) is a quiet fellow from Bond 
and Key. He graduated from Eliza- 
bethville High and lives in Pillow, Pa. 
Don is 18, reaches 5' 11". His hair and 
eyes are brown. His preference in 
bands is Sammy Kaye. Also on his list 
are baseball, basketball and dancing. 
He likes the Army best of the services, 
but he's not talking when it comes to 
the subject of girls. Ron is a Liberal 
Arts student, and success is his am- 
bition. 

Russell Brown, who is at Phi Mu, 
too, is from Roaring Springs, Pa. He 
is 17, is 5' 6" tall, and has brown eyes 
and dark blond hair. He is in the 
business department, where he's study- 
ing to be an accountant. Russ likes 
the Navy and likes to "swing and sway 
with Sammy Kaye". A red head nam- 
ed Marion seems to rate with Russ. 
He likes to follow the football, base- 
ball, and basketball games, and also 
likes to putt around the golf course. 

Anita Burk is 17, 5' 6" with blue eyes 
and red wavy hair. She comes from 
Manhattan, New York, and graduated 
from Hunter College High School. She 
has a boyfriend in the Army, which 
prejudices her in favor of that branch 
of service. She seems to like zoology 
and German classes here on campus 
and would like to do something in con- 
nection with child psychology. In her 
spare time she likes to knit, and likes 
square dancing and folk dancing. She 
al3o likes baseball and hiking. Nina 
is a student in the Liberal Arts depart- 
ment. 



PAGE THREE 



NEWS ON OUR CAMPUS 



Kappa Delta Phi 

Friday evening, October 6, saw all 
the K. D. P.ers hiking down to the 
Isle of Que. The occasion? A picnic 
supper at the Luther Redcays. Every- 
one had her fill of hot dogs, baked 
beans, tomato and lettuce, potato 
chips, pickles, and onions, topped off 
with individual pies, milk, and popped 
corn. 



Sigma Alpha Iota 

The regular meeting of S. A. I. was 
held on Wednesday of this last week 
in the sorority room. In order to make 
the Alumni feel more at home, it was 
decided to have candy and nuts in the 
room on Saturday, October 14th. On 
Thursday of this past week, Dorothy 
Jupina was formally Initiated into the 
sorority. 

Many of our Alumni were back for 
Homecoming. They included Jane 
Stitt, Helen Hocker, Lois Kramer, Jan- 
et Sechrist, Phyllis Wolfe, Jessie Wal- 
ton Schmitthenner, Emanell White - 
knight, June Hendricks Hoke, and Jean 
Warner Wardelich. 



Theatre Guild 

The first meeting of the Susquehanna 

Theatre Guild was held October 3, at 

7:30. Gloria Gasparoli was elected 

president and she explained the aims 

of the Theatre Guild and some of the 

I projects planned for this year. All new 

(members were asked to fill in papers 

I stating any former dramatic or theat- 

| rical experience. A play, to be chosen 

and supervised by Alpha Psl Omega, 

the honorary dramatic fraternity of 

Theatre Guild, will be presented by 

the members of Theatre Guild some 

time in December. Try-outs for this 

play will be held in the near future. 

S 

Business Society 

The Business Society, the organiza- 
tion representing the Business Depart- 
ment of Susquehanna, held its first 
meeting of the year on Thursday even- 
ing, Oct. 12. 

Rine Wlney presided at the business 
^meeting. 

The aim of the Business Society is 
to do something that will benefit Sus- 
quehanna. Plans were discussed for 
activities to be carried out during the 
year. For this purpose all the mem- 
bers of the organization were divided 
into committees so that each group 
could work towards a certain goal. 

Conforming to custom, the business 
meeting was followed by a social pro- 
gram. Games were played and re- 
freshments were served. 

Last year the Business Society was 
responsible for a successful scrap -paper 
drive and also for War Bond subscrip- 
tions, the credit to be given to Sus- 
quehanna University. 

Membership of the organization 
promises to be very large this year as 
shown by the tnarjced Interest of the 
Freshmen as well as the upperclass- 
men. 



-S- 



Dr. Dallas Baer Makes 
Gift to Bus. Ed. Dept. 

A stand to hold an unabridged 'dic- 
tionary was presented to the Business 
Education Department of 8usquehanna 
in September, by Dr. Dallas C. Baer. 
Dr. Baer was former pastor of Trinity 
Lutheran Church- in Selinsgrove, but 
is now located in Norwood, Pennsyl- 
vania, where he has accepted a charge. 



Vespers, October 15 

On Sunday evening, October 15, Ves- 
per services were held in the chapel in 
Seibert Hall. This service was a spe- 
cial occasion for the Student Christian 
Association, for Mr. Grant Yerger had 
constructed a beautiful wooden cross 
for the organization, and graciously 
presented it to the S. C. A. Dr. O. F. 
Dunkelberger formally presented the 
cross on Sunday evening at this Ves- 
per service. His theme for the even- 
ing was "The Significance of the 
Cross." Special music was presented. 



We of Susquehanna deeply appreciate 
this contribution and give our sincere 
thanks to Dr. Baer. 



Vesper services are held each Sunday 
evening in the Chapel. Everyone is 
cordially invited to attend these pro- 
grams. 

S 

Vespers, October 8 

"Friends, the Joy of having them, 
and the requirements of a good friend," 
was the theme of the Sunday evelng 
vesper service on October 8. The hymn, 
"What a Friend We Have in Jesus," 
which was used, was conducive to this 
thought. 

La Verne Kohn read two poems: "Un- 
known Friends" and "Obligations of 
Friendship." The first of these poems, 
as the title suggests, showed that one 
does not know all one's friends and 
that unknown friends are often the 
truest. The second poem revealed 
friendship as being a business set up 
wherein each one has his duties and 
obligations. » 

Not only earthly, transient friends 
and friendships but also the great ever- 
lasting Friend and our relationship to 
Him was brought to light. 

The scripture was read by Pemrv 
Bathgate. By 

Sunday School Class 

The newly elected president of the 
Students Sunday School Class at Trin- 
ity Lutheran Church, Mary Moyer, has 
already started the class on its way to 
a very pleasant year of fellowship and 
worship. it is the goal of the class 
to have sixty-five students present each 
Sunday, it is only a small part in 



furthering the Christian way of. life 
for each student to come to Sunday 
School and help attain that goal. 

Beginning Sunday, October 15th, Ro- 
berta Gaetz, Charlotte Smith, and 
Jean Strausser will have charge of the 
devotional period. This committee, ap- 
pointed by the president, will even- 
tually enable every student to partici- 
pate in the class worship. 

Through the courtesy of Miss TJn- 
angst, our Dean, we hav> been having 
very timely and Interesting lessons of 
study. 



Omega Delta Sigma 

The girls of Omega Delta Sigma held 
their weekly meeting on Wednesday, 
October 11 in the sorority room. Invi- 
tations were issued to the other soror- 
ities to come to the ODS Hallowe'en 
party, which will be held Tuesday, Oc- 
tober 31 in the social rooms. The 
guests are to come in costume. 

Sunday night, October 15, the girls 
held an Informal get together in the 
sorority room at 10:0Q. Refreshments 
were served and everyone had an en- 
joyable time. 

On Homecoming Day the Omega 
Delta Sigma girls were easily recog- 
nizable for each one wore a large yel- 
low chrysanthemum, which is the flow- 
er of the sorority. 



MILLER'S 

Where Ed's and Co-Ed's Meet 
For Many Good Thing* to Eat 

Corner Pine and Orange Streets 
3 Blocks from Campos 



George B. Rine FLORIST 



HOUSE M-Y 
STORE 145-T 



The First National Bank of Selins Grove 

WELCOMES STUDENTS' ACCOUNTS 



Fine Job Printing 
THE SELINSGROVE TIMES 



Quality Only the Finest 

NATIONAL RESTAURANT 

Hotel and Dining Service 



29 N. Market St. 



SeUnsgrore, Pa, 




For School News Read 

SUNBURY DAILY ITEM 



SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

SELINSGROVE, PENNSYLVANIA 
Co-educational— Accredited 

eclucaUo°n. *"* *** el?hty - slx years ,n the ^ce of Christian higher 



Curricula': 

LIBERAL ARTS BUSINESS 

COMMERCIAL EDUCATION 

f 

For Catalog write 



MUSIC 



Q Morris Smith, D.D., LLJD., Pres. 
Russell Gait, Ph.D., Dean 



PAGE FOUR 



THE SUSQUEHANNA, SELINSGROVE. PENNSYLVANIA 



TUESDAY, OCTOBER 17, 1944 



-Sports- 

Crusader Squad Begins 
Basketball Practice; 
SU to Play 14 Games 

On Monday, October 16, the Susque- 
hanna dribblers will start their official 
basketball practice for the opening of 
the season sometime in December. 
Coach Amos A. Stagg Jr., this year 
will have to build a team from four 
lettermen and a squad of freshmen. 

Heading these lettermen is Bernard 
"Bernle" Swienckl, ace shot from Glen 
Lion, Penna. Swienckl is a junior who 
last year proved to be one of the four 
outstanding basketball handlers in 
Susquehanna's history. The other 
three were Wazllewski, captain of the 
Crusaders in '35, Don Ford, and Phil 
Templln. All of them ranging in high 
scores of 40 to 45 points in one game. 

The other veterans from last year's 
five are Captain John Kocsls, guard; 
Joseph Taylor and Rine Wlney, both 
guards Also returning this year from 
the Army is Arthur Gelnett, veteran 
from the Jayvees in '43. 

Some of the newcomers to Coach 
Stagg's squad are: Jerry Moore, regu- 
lar forward from Sunbury High 
School; Donald Wholsen from Yonk- 
ers, New York; "Scottie" Small from 
Passaic, N. J., and Edward Madden, 
from New York City. 

At present the Crusaders have a 
fourteen game schedule. Among the 
teams which they will meet are Penn 
State, Elizabethtown, Juniata, Gettys- 
burg Theological Seminary, Dickinson, 
Mt. Airy Seminary, and perhaps Lafay- 
ette. 

S 

— Patronize Susquehanna advertisers. 



School to Buy Golf 
Clubs; 9 Men Remain 
In Golf Tournament 



The Boys' Tournament recently 
started with twenty-two contestants 
seeking the golf championship of S. 
U. Twelve holes are being played. 

At the present, there are nine who 
are reaching the final stage of the 
game. These include Joe Taylor, 
Scotty Small, Jerry Moore, Rine Win- 
ey, Prank Wolfe, Dick Neidlck, Aldo 
Pescarmona, Ira Wasserburg, and 
Harry Welliver. 

A Consultation Tournament is also 
being played to give the losers of one 
game another opportunity to display 
their skill. 

In the near future, Catherine Pox 
will play eighteen holes to determine 
her par strokes on this course. After 
Kay has completed this, tfee boys will 
have a goal to strive for. 

Coach Stagg has stated that twenty 
new clubs are being purchased because 
of the large number of boys and girls 
who are showing a keen interest in 
learning and playing golf. 
8 



DANCE THEME "AUTUMN" 

(Continued from Page 1) 
Pescarmona and Gloria Reichl§y. 

Intermission was held in the gym 
with refreshments of sandwiches, cook- 
ies, and punch being served. The 
members of the three sororities sang 
their songs at this time. Coach Stagg 
added his bit to the fun of the even- 
ing. 

Guests at the affair included Presi- 
dent Smith, Miss Betty Smith, Miss 
Unangst, Miss Kline, Dr. and Mrs. 
Sheldon, Dr. and Mrs. Gait, and Miss 
Allison. The chaperons for the even- 
ing were Professor and Mrs. Percy M. 
Linebaugh, Mr. and Mrs. Russell C. 
Hatz, Dr. and Mrs. Arthur Wilson, Pro- 
fessor and Mrs. Amos A. Stagg, Jr., and 
Dr. and Mrs. George Robison. 

Special thanks should be given to 
the committees whose fine work made 
this holiday such a success. To Lou 
Kresge and LaVerne Kohn for ar- 



Stagg and Shure Plan 
Sat. Sports Program 

Coach A. A. Stagg, Jr., director of 
men's physical education, and Miss 
Irene Shure, women's director, have 
planned an "all around" sport pro- 
gram for every Saturday afternoon 
from 1 P. M. to 5 P. M. on the Uni- 
versity field. 



WHITMER-STEELE 
COMPANY 

LUMBER MANUFACTURES 
NORTHUMBERLAND, PA. 



FEHR'S 

THE STORE THAT LEADS 
IN BETTER MERCHANDISE 



F. A. BRILL CO. 

Floor Coverings— Awnings— Shades 
Draperies 

419 Market St. Phone 2180 Sunbury 



HOTEL GOVERNOR 
SNYDER 

GOOD HOME COOKING 



B.K.W. COACH LINE 

Tries to give the College Students 
the best service, especially the Sun- 
bury Students. Why TRAVEL with 
an individual? The Coach Line In- 
sures every person. THINK THAT 
OVER. 



HACKETTS 

Hardware Stores 

325 Market St, 706 Market St. 
ALSO MTDDLEBURG, PA. 



CRYSTAL PURE ICE 

CHARLES W. KELLER 

Manufacturer and Wholesaler 



S. U. BOOK STORE 

SUSQUEHANNA 
NOTEBOOKS 
STATIONERY 



SNAVELY'S 

COLLEGE FURNISHINGS 
AND SHOES 



Ebert's 5c to $1.00 
Store 

Susquehanna Stationery 
SELINSGROVE 



SCHOOL FASHIONS 

ROSENBLUM'S 

SUNBURY, PA. 
SMART FEMININE APPAREL 



When you think of Photography 
Think of 

Schindler Studio 

515 Market Street, Sunbury, Pa. 
Also Framing and Photo Finishing 



ranging the blind dates; to Mary Moy- 
er and the Property Committee, to 
LaVerne, Jack Warner, and Bill Hayes 
for the decorations, to Mary Lib Base- 
hoar and her aides for the refresh- 
ments, to Ross Johns and the boys for 
the lighting, and to the presidents of 
the sororities and fraternities, and to 
all who ' aided in the success of this 
gala event. 



MILLER BROS. 
SHOE STORE 

SUNBURY, PA. 



STONER'S 
CREDIT JEWELERS 



SUNBURY, PA. 



CHILDREN'S SHOP 

MARY H. BURNS 

Clothes for the College Girl 



Markley-Altvater 

BETTER STUDENTS CLOTHES 
SUNBURY, PA. 



VISIT THE * 

REXALL 
DRUG STORE 

WILLIAM J. COTT. Druggist 



WATCH REPAIR 

Susquehanna Jewelry 

Fountain Pem and Pencfla 

W. M. VALSING 

JEWELER SELINSGROVE, PA- 



THE BON TON 

Personally Selected 

COATS, DRESSES, HATS 

Sunbury, Pa. 



REICHLEY'S 

WHERE STUDENTS 
MEET AND EAT 



STEFFEN'S 

FINE FOODS— STATIONERY 

Greeting Cards for Every Occasion 

SELINSGROVE, PA. 



LOW 

NET COST 

life Insurance is Issued 
to Lutheran Men Wom- 
en, and Children ages 
from birth to 65. The 
members of Lutheran 
Brotherhood own the 
society, and they alone 
receive the earnings. 
There are no stockhold- 
ers. 
I 



Lutheran Brotherhood 

Legal Reserve Life Insurance For Lutherans 
MINNEAPOLIS, 2, Herman L. Ekern, President MINNESOTA 



430 Market St. 



H. L. ROTHFUSS, Agent Williamsport, Pa. 



BUILD YOUR 
ESTATE NOW! 



YOUR FUTURE 
STARTS TODAY 






ONIONS TO— 

Those persons who have 
not yet learned to follow 
Instructions. See editorial. 



Volume LIII 




uefMia 



ORCHIDS TO— 

Kohn, Leltzel, and Wal- 
ters; the victorious Cru- 
saderettes hockey team. 



SEUNSGROVE, PENNSYLVANIA, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 31, 1944 



DUNKELBERGER ADDRESSES STUDENTS 
AT PENN'S 300th ANNIVERSARY EVENT 

Star Course of SU 
To Present Maxine 
Stellman, Soprano 



High School Students 
Present Pageant; 100 
Piece Band Plays 



A program to honor the Tercenten- 
ary Anniversary of the birth of Wil- 
liam Penn, sponsored by the Snyder 
County Historical Society and the 
Snyder County Public Schools, was 
held on October 27, 1944, on the ath- 
letic field of Susquehanna University. 

The program opened with the "Unit- 
ed Nations March", played by the com- 
bined high school band, and the sing- 
ing of the National Anthem. Dr. G. 
Morris Smith gave the invocation. 

Following this, Dr. George P. Dunk- 
elberger, of the Department of Educa- 
tion, Susquehanna University, gave an 
address on the life of William Penn, 
in which he included a record of the 
several trips Penn made from England 
to Pennsylvania, and also the Infor- 
mation that Penn ended his life a 
mental defective in poverty on July 30, 
1718. In conclusion, Dr. Dunkelberger 
said that If we should study Penn's 
relation to our native state, we would 
go home better citizens than before 
looking into his life. 

A pageant, "William Penn — The 
Founder of Pennsylvania", was then 
presented by representatives from the 
five Snyder County High Schools. Pre- 
sented by the Mlddleburg High School, 
the first scene told of Penn's trial in 
England for his religious views. Free- 
burg High School dramatized the por- 
tion of Penn's life in which he received 
his grant of land from the King. 
Penn's landing in America and his ex- 
planation of the plan of government 
to the people were presented by the 
McClure High School and the Beaver 
Vocational High School, respectively. 
The concluding scene, Penn making a 
peace treaty with the Indians, was giv- 
en by the Selinsgrove High School. 

After a stirring singing of "Penn- 
sylvania" by all those present, Mr. 
Harold W. Follmer, principal of the 
Selinsgrove High School, spoke a few 
words In conclusion of the program. 
(Concluded on Page 4) 



Maxine Stellman, soprano of the 
Metropolitan Opera Association, who 
sings here at Seibert Chapel, Thursday 
November 9, 1944, at 8:15 p. m., was 
born in Vermont, a descendant of 
Miles Standish of the historic Plymouth 
Colony. She studied at the Institute 
of Musical Art in New York, and after 
winning the Breen Memorial Prize and 
the Morris Loeb Prize, she went on to 
study with the late Marcella Sem- 
brich at the Jullliard Graduate School. 

She joined the Metropolitan Opera 
as a winner df the Metropolitan Au- 
ditions of the Air, and was chosen to 
sing Mary Rutkdge, the feminine lead 
in Water Damrosch's opera "Man 
Without a Country." Since then she 
has sung many roles with .the com- 
pany, in New York and on the road 
tours, a notable performance being her 
appearance in the role of Elsa In "Lo 
hengrin" in Boston. Other opera af- 
filiations for Miss Stellman include the 
Montreal Opera Festival, the Chau- 
tauqua Operas, and Charles L. Wag- 
ner's Opera, with Which 3ne was re- 
cently engaged to sing Marguerite in 
"Faust" on an nationwide tour. 

In concert she has been soloist with 
the Worcester Festival (twice), the 
Hartford Oratorio Society, the Syra- 
cuse University Chorus and other 
prominent organizations. Recital tours 
have taken her to many States. 
-S- 



Number 3 



KOHN, LEITZEL, WALTERS ELECTED TO 
" WOTS WHO IN AM ERICAN COLLEGES" 

SU Elects Dewey, 2-1 
Over Roosevelt in 
Campus Straw Vote 



Mrs. Helen E .Houtz 
Died After Illness 



Arthur Gelnett, Jr., '47, 
Pledge of Theta Chi 

On Wednesday evening, October 25, 
Arthur J. Gelnett, Jr., became a pledge 
of the Beta Omega Chapter of Theta 
Chi Fraternity at a formal meeting 
of the members and faculty advisors. 



Did You Know? 

Saturday, November 4 — Women's 

Auxiliary meeting in Seibert Hall 

at 2:30. 
Thursday, November 9 — Star Course 

—Maxine Stellman, Metropolitan 

upera soprano— Seibert Hall at 

8:15 
Tuesday, November 14 — Business 

Society meeting— 7 p. m. 

S.A.I, party at 8:15 
Wednesday, November 15 — Rural 

Life Conference— 10 a. m. to 5 

p. m. 

Campus Club meeting from 3 to 

5 in Seibert Parlors. 



Mrs. Helen E. Houtz, wife of Dr. 
John Jacob Houtz, a member of the 
Susquehanna University faculty, died 
at her home on October 18. 

Mrs. Houtz was a member of the 
Trinity Lutheran Church of Selins- 
grove. She was a past matron of the 
Lafayette Chapter Order of the East- 
ern Star, an honorary member of 
Omega Delta Sigma Sorority of Sus- 
quehanna University, a member of the 
Woman's Club of Selinsgrove, and the 
Women's Auxiliary of Susquehanna. 

Immediate survivors of Mrs. Houtz 
are her husband, Dr. J. J. Houtz; one 
son, Charles Calvin; a daughter, 
Joanne, and a grandson, John Hugh 
Houtz. 

Dr. O. Morris Smith, president of 
Susquehanna University, conducted 
the funeral rites from the Houtz resi- 
dence on Saturday, October 20. 
S 



In a straw vote conducted In chapel 
on October 27, of both faculty and stu- 
dents, Republican Candidate Thomas 
E Dewey of New York soundly defeat- 
ed President Franklin D. Roosevelt by. 
nearly a 2-1 vote; the actual count be- 
ing 109 votes for Mr. Dewey and 56 
for Mr. Roosevelt. 
Female: 

• Dewey Roosevelt 

Under 21 76 44 

Over 21 5 2 

Total 81 46 

Male: 

Under 21 15 <j 

Over 21 9 3 

Total 24 9 

Ballots Incorrectly 
marked as to age 
and sex groups 4 1 

Grand Total 109 56 

l write-in vote for Norman M. Thomas 

1 vote— "doesn't matter" 

2 failed to vote for candidate 



Selected for Scholarship, 
Leadership, and Future 
Usefulness 



Fraternity Party to be 
Held in Gym on Nov 18 

The three fraternities, Theta Chi, 
Bond and Key, arM Phi Mu Delta, will 
sponsor an informal party to be held 
in the Alumni Gymnasium, November 
18. Everyone is invited to purchase an 
individual ticket and enjoy the party 
which will be held from 8:30-11:30 p. 
m. on the 18th. 



Crusaderettes Hockey 
Team Wins First Game 
Over Lebanon Valley 

The Crusaderettes have opened up 
their hockey season successfully. On 
Saturday they traveled to Lebanon Val- 
ley College where they won their first 
game by a 3 to 1 score. 

The game was the main feature of 
Lebanon Valleys Homecoming Day 
celebration. A large audience attended 
the game and the college band played 
between halves. The goal posts were 
decorated with Susquehanna's orange 
and maroon and the blue and white of 
Lebanon Valley. 

Susquehanna was welcomed royally 
at Lebanon Valley. Before the game, 
dinner was served the team in the col- 
lege dining hall and after dinner open 
house was held in all the buildings. 

The game was fast and furious. The 
stickwork of S. U.'s forward line was 
superb, while the backfleld did an ex- 
cellent job of keeping the play away 
from the goal. Special mention should 
be given to Gayle Clark, center for- 
ward, who made two of the goals, and 
"Pank" Bittlnger, right inner, who 
made one. 
The line up .was as follows: 
Center forward— Gayle Clark 
Right inner— "Pank" Bittinger 
Left inner— Selena Lehman 
Right wing— Betty J. Hen- 
Left wing— Mary Lib Basehoar 
Center half back— Marian Williard 
Right half back— Adah Wolfe 
Left half back — Jean Klnzer 
Right full back— Dottle Wagner 
Left full back — Joyce Burkhard 
Goalie— Naomi Day. 
Substitutes: Carmen Beckwith— L. 
half, Maisie Leiby— L. half, Mary Llz- 
zlo— L. inner. 

(Concluded on Page 3) 



LaVerne Kohn, Celo Leitzel, and 
Margaret Walters are the members of 
the senior class who have been select- 
ed by the members of SU faculty for 
nomination for Inclusion in the 1944- 
1945 volume of "Who's Who Among 
Students In American Universities and 
Colleges." The qualities for which 
these students were chosen were char- 
acter, scholarship, leadership, and ex- 
tra-curricular actlvties, and possibili- 
ties of future usefulness. 

LAVERNE KOHN, of Merchantviile, 
N. J., has taken the accelerated pro- 
gram and will graduate In three years. 
A very active student on the campus 
she is majoring in Social Science 
teaching. She is a member of Kappa 
Delta Phi, Theater Guild, Alpha Psi 
Omega, Debating Society, Susquehanna 
Staff, Lanthorn Editorial Staff, Stu- 
dent Christian Association, Woman's 
Athletic Association, Phi Gamma Mu, 
on the Vice President Council, Treas-' 
urer of junior class, and active in In- 
termural sports. 

CELO LEITZEL is a day 'student, 
from Richfield, Pa., and entered SU in 
January of 1943. He Is a Pre-Theolog- 
ical student and Vice-President of the 
Men's Student Council, is on the Stu- 
dent Christian Association Cabinet, 
and in the Pre-Theologlcal Club, Phi 
Gamma Mu, and Debating Society. 

MARGARET WALTERS, of Milton, 
Pa., is a day student who resides in 
Selinsgrove. She is a member of Sigma 
Alpha Iota Sorority and will graduate 
with a Music Education degree. Prom- 
inent in music activities she is a mem- 
ber of the Symphony Orchestra, Dance 
Orchestra, Patroness Secretary of SAI, 
and is Symphonic Concertmaster. 

All three students have been con- 
sistently on the Dean's List of the col- 
lege. 



Conservatory Faculty 
Recital Presented on 
Monday, October 23 

Members of the faculty of the Con- 
servatory of Music presented a recital 
Monday, October 23, at 8:15 p. m. in 
Seibert Chapel in the presence of a 
large and appreciative audience of stu- 
dents, faculty, and townspeople. 

The program was as fololws: "Trum- 
pet Tune and Air" by Purcell, Percy 
Mathias Linebaugh, organist; "Con- 
certo No. XI in G Major (1st move- 
ment)" by Spohr, Russell Condran 
Hatz, violinist, and Nancy Bowman 
Hatz, accompanist; Choral Prelude 
"Come Sweetest Death" by J. S. Bach, 
Mrs. Linebaugh. 

"Lamento Provencal" by Paladllhe, 
"Clair de Lune" by Szulc, "Les Petites 
Communlantes" by Fourdraln, "A des 
Oiseaux" by Hue, Mr. Hasklns. 

"Menuet and Trio" by Mozart, "Lul- 
laby" by Stoessel, Mr. Hatz. 

"The Time for Making Songs Has 
Come" by Rogers, "Farewell" by La 
Rue (Dedicated to Mr. Haskins), "The 
Crying of Water" by Campbell-Tipton, 
"When Children Pray" by Penner, 
"Hills" by La Forge, Mr. Haskins. 



?AGB TWO 



THE SUSQUEHANNA, 8ELINSGROVE, PENNSYLVANIA 



TUESDAY, OCTOBER 31, 1944 




n 



e Susauen^nne, 




Established 1891 

Rura O. Winey, Jr., '46 Editor 

Jean C. Geicer, '46 -. Associate Editor 

Gloria Gasparoli, '46 Managing Editor 

Arthur J. Gelnett, '47 --- Sports Editor 

Reporters: Mary Elizabeth Basehoar, '45; Ruth Botdorf, '45, proofreader; Cor- 
lnne Kahn, '45; Laverne Kohn, '45; Louise Kresge, '45; Gloria Machmer, 
'45; Prances Blttlnger, '45; June Hoffman, '46; Jayne Troutman, '46; Norma 
Ha'zen, '46; Ruth Cochrane, '46; Emily Botdorf, '46; Marie Kllck, '46; Vir- 
ginia Hallock, '46; Carmen Beckwlth, '46; Jackie Braveman, '47; Joe Taylor, 
•47- Jane Gundrum, '47; Dorothy Wagner, '47; Paye Smith, '47; Caroline 
Pfahler '47; Doris Williamson, *47; Marian Walker, '47; Gayle Clark, '47; 
Martha Garard, '48; Helen Zahn, '48; Betty Smith, '48; Caroline Marks, 
'48- Betty Frank, '48; Gloria Walmer, '48; Ruth Criswell, '48; Roberta 
" Ga'etz, '48; Ed Madden, '48; Sara Lee Smith, '48; Margaret Johns, '48; 
Joan Smith, '48; Harriet Gould, '48. 

Corinne Kahn, '45 Business Manager 

Helen Eby, '47 Advertising Manager 

Jean Kinzer, '46 Circulation Manager 

Business Assistants: Roswell Johns, '46; Ed Madden, '48; Russell Brown, '48; 
Betty Prank, '48; Cynthia Carmel, '48; Jean Wheat, Barbara Kain, Hilda 
Markey. 

Entered as Second Class Mail Matter at Selinsgrove, Pa. 



CAMPUSOLOGY 



Editorials 

A poll was taken in chapel last Fri- 
day on the forthcoming Dewey-Roose- 
velt election. Students were given a 
ballot and were asked to check a blank 
if they were male or female; unc)er 21 
years, or over 21 years; and then to 
make their choice between the two 
candidates. Only that simple proced- 
ure and yet 8 ballots out of 165 were 
incorrectly marked— a percentage of 
nearly 5% incorrectly marked votes. 
If this were to have taken place in a 
national election of 50 million voters 
and- 5% were incorrectly marked, a 
total of two and one-half million votes 
would have been cast out— far more 
than enough to elect a president for 
our country. 

Whether those mistakes that were 
made — two forgot to vote for a 
candidate, three forgot to mark their 
sex, three forgot to mark their age 
group — were realized by the person or 
not, it is still a sad commentary on 
college students. 

College students should be able to 
understand such simple instructions. 
The future will hold far more compli- 
cated Instructions for us, so let's be 
more careful! 

S 



J Wonder Why 



. . . Art Gelnett makes so many trips 
past Hasslnger Hall. Could it be that 
he has a special interest in some one 
in Room 20? 

. . . Willie Hayes likes to play in the 
leaves. He seems to get quite a thrill 
out of pushing a certain Prosh in 
them. 

. . . Edy Thomas is looking so glum 
lately. What's Penn State got that 
Susquehanna hasn't? 

. . . Janie Gundrum has to measure 
a certain green sweater against the 
brown of Bernie 8wiencki. Maybe 
Bernle and Brownie are the same build 
. . . (Except that Brownie is 6* 1" tall.) 

. . . Dot Eilhardt always plows her 
way into the phone booth every Thurs- 
day night. Could it be that she ex- 
pects a long distance phone call from 



Here site the writer of this "racy" 
column trying to get enough dirt to 
fill this space allotted, but It's awfully 
hard when no one does much of any- 
thing, and 9/10 of the frosh class moves 
home In a body over a weekend! Well, 
let's see now, what's been going on?. 

Peggy Bathgate's charms have been 
stealing into the heart of our Warner 
over a period of weeks — and from what 
we can gather, they enjoy each others 
company more each day. 

Do we envy Jean Kinzer with that 
Marine who was here the other day— 
and here's a little inside dope: he's 
not going to be very far from here 
from now on, so maybe we'll get a sec- 
ond view— we hope (Jeanie does too!) 
And speaking of visiting men, who 
else was a very, very happy little girl 
one day last week? You're right- 
Marie Stout sure knows how to pick 
'em (we could also put that in vice- 
versa). 

We have a modern counterpart of 
the three men In the fiery furnace- 
only in this case it's one man in a 
cold stove! Frankie's escapade Into 
the dark unknown of that stubborn 
grate evidently produced no good ef- 
fects except laughs 'cause there still 
ain't no heat at B. & K. 

Just a sneak preview at some pos- 
sible future permanent combination- 
watch B. J. Fisher and Roy (bashful) 
Stahl! 

We always thought Lou was true to 
the Navy per Larry, but George Shaff- 
ron A/S, who spent the Saturday night 
of his furlough down here with her, 
is keeping it in the family t ree or 
rather the branch — I guess!! ' But 
where does Ray come In? 

Before I forget, Jackie wants me to 
tell you that she and Aldo have but a 
platonic friendship that is useful only 
at our social dances — remember that I 

At our outdoor picnic there were 2 
gals noticeably among the missing — 
but Helen and Rubye were among the 



Scran ton? 

. . . Harry Welliver always anxiously * present at Bucknell's Thursday night 
waits for his mail at Phi Mu. Maybe open-post to be escorted by those sail- 
it's because he's 'expecting an answer : ors from up there who w.ere down here. 
from Jean concerning the letter she j Q h, to be sure I'm in on time— well 
received from three sophomore girls. J corinne Frey's and Kate Pox's prayers 

. . . Ray Stahl stands around with \ were answe red, and they are now the 
that fiendish look. Is he really a wolf | thrilled owners of brand new wrist 
at heart? watches, the latter's being a birthday 

. . . Everybody calls Jane Malkames gift from John D., no less! 
"Bathtub Jane." i s that a spark we see burning— and 

. . . Annie Miller Is playing up to will it develop into a flame 'ere long? 



One of the most encouraging sights 
seen on our campus this year was the 
grand audience that attended the Facl 
ulty Recital last Monday evening in 
Seibert Chapel— not only was the 
audience large, but appreciative as 
well. 

When an artiste enters the stage, 
'and sees such a fine crowd, he will na- 
turally give a far better performance 
than if only a few dozen persons were 
present. It is terribly discouraging to 
the speaker or musician, and embar- 
assing to the administration to have 
only a handful of students on hand 
when a prominent person is with us. 

Let's keep up this fine spirit that was 
displayed the other evening and make 
it our resolution to attend every lec- 
ture or music program that we shall 
have presented at SU during the com- 
ing school year— it all leads to a cul- 
tured and well rounded college life. 



all of the Phi Mu boys. 

. . . Roswell Johns changes his af- 
fections between Hassinger and Sei- 
bert Halls. 

. . . Ginny Doss receives so many 
birthday presents after her birthday 
has already come and gone. 

. . . Joyce Burkhardt's favorite song 
is "Anchors Away." 

. . . Dexter Weikel hates to see the 
leaves fall. 

. . Betty Smith has so many files 
in her room. Could it be that they're 
attracted to her coconut cake? 



Ask Hayes about Anna to find out 



Harry Welliver has a gold-mine in 
the person of his love-life at Kutztown 
S.T.C.— each and every letter from her 
contains one whole cigarette— practic- 
ally a full weeks' supply free for noth- 
ing! 

Why was Marian Walker screaming 
"Gunny" so fiendishly in the gym Sat- 
urday p. m. Surely you ain't scared 
of all those South Wmsport men(?) are 
you? 

Edie Thomas got the urge to trek 
that long way to Johnstown' again this 
weekend— that Alvie must be some 
dish! 

When asked why she bid and bid for 
that clock at the big event in town— 
the auction— Ellie declared it was for, 
and I quote, "the future Swiencki 
homestead!" She is evidently practic- 
ing up on her house-wifely duties by 
taking real good care of the needs of 
her sick man, Bernle! 

This Saturday saw Koscis and Hilda, 
Marie and Joe, and Ann Gibson with 
the star of Norry's football team out 
on a pleasure-filled excursion to the 
game, a Republican Rally and a dance I 
This is just put in to prove to all you 
other girls that "life can be beautiful" 
—even in Selinsgrove over a weekend! 
ITS RUMORED: That Bill Hayes, 
at table-list time, gets all his spending 
money from the boys by seeing to it 
that their love-interests are taken care 
of; that Jackie will now roll her own 
with the tobacco leaf fresh from the 
field a la Mel; that Red will soon need 
to buy a new lipstick for Naomi, see- 
ing that their new theme song is 
"Neidich and Day, You are the One"; 
that we often forget very important 
incidents in the lives of our students- 
remember Marty's brother's visit?; that 
Wohlson just ain't going to get him- 
self tied up with nobody; that Pirie 
will leave any day now — maybe; that 
Marian and La Verne will soon organ- 
ize a "Learn to Dance" class for all 
those Interested In dislocated Joints; 
that where there's Rlne there should 
be Hope; that Gayle Is definitely the 
one — Russ severed his connections at 
home — ; that to Eby, Ross and Rose 
are synonymous after Sunday! that 
Eve Zlock may soon move here per- 
manently — or so It seems or so 
Gloria hopes; that "Skip" Madden Is 
eating his heart out for Adah and 
would like a little cooperation; that 
Naomi Garman should be enrolled In 
Selinsgrove High School; that It is 
enough stuff for today. 



of Colonel. He took part In the Euro- 
pean Theater of War and was on a 
special mission with General Harold 
Clark. He is also credited with play- 
ing an important part in the air-borne 
invasion of Africa, Sicily, Prance, and 
Holland. We salute you Colonel Ober- 
dorf. 

Recently several former students 
have dropped around to pay us a visit. 
Among these were Cpl. Charles Ague, 
x'44, who has since reported toMc- 



( Which by the way, is aU gone now.) [Cook. Nebraska, where he finds it very 
1 ' ' ' , * _ . Imuch to his liking. * • • Ensign War- 

. . . Room No. 7 down at the Con at- 
tracts so many bees. It's lucky that 
they (meaning the bees, of course) 
aren't too ferocious. 

. . . Doctor Russ doesn't like to have 
his picture taken. 



-S- 



Stars and Stripes 



ren Pirie, x'45, of the Merchant Ma- 
rines has been frequently seen on the 
campus. * • • Sgt. Laird Gemberllng, 
'35, has been spending a furlough 
here at home. * * * 1st Lt. Martha 
Laudenslager, '31, is spending some 
time here in Selinsgrove. 

We also learn that Alton J. Gar- 
man, 531, anti-tank company, Is lo- 
cated somewhere in Prance. * • * Pvt. 



appreciate your informing us. Please 
report such news to Gayle Clark, c/o 
Susquehanna University. 

LOST & FOUND 



-s- 



— Patronize Susquehanna advertisers. 



Today there are Susquehannans | Daniel Reltz, x'47^ Is attending^ Gun 
serving in all parts of the world, mak- 
ing names for themselves and bringing 
fame and credit to their Alma Mater. 
Many are receiving promotions for 
their leadership and valor. 

Perhaps one of the most recent pro- 
motions was that of John W. Oberdorf, 
'34, who has advanced to the position 



nery School at Fort Myers, Florida. 
* * * Pvt. Arnold Ml* x'45, is training 
as radio operator at George Field, Illi- 
nois. 

I'm sure we are all Interested In 
hearing about our former classmates; 
so if you hear of any news, promotions, 
or any interesting incidents, we would 



WANTED— Less rain and more of that 
Pennsylvania sunshine. 

WANTED— A table tennis net, ball and 
paddles. 

LOST— A political argument. 

LOST— One furnace, anyone who finds 
lt return to Bond and Key— they're 

cold! 

WANTED— Taxi service to Reich's. 

LOST— One arm trying to get .my 
mail. 

WANTED— A fur coat for science sur- 
vey field trips. 

TO RENT— All green and orange bows 
— apply at any Frosh room. 

WANTED— A longer Thanksgiving Va- 
cation. 

WANTED— More of those formals In- 
cluding those "fellers" from Bucknell! 

WANTED— Classes from 12:00 to 2:00 
with two hours out for lunch. 

WANTED— Time for ourselves. 

FOUND— Truck loads of homework. 

TO RENT— One alarm clock— too ef- 
ficient! 

WANTED — Breakfast In bed. 



TUESDAY, OCTOBER 31, 1944 



THE SUSQUEHANNA, SELINSOROVE. PENNSYLVANIA 



FAQB 



OUR FROSH 



Joyce Burkhardt Is one of the 
few girls in the Pre-Physical Therapy 
course and accordingly picks science 
for her favorite subject. Joyce is 18, 
5' 5" and has light brown hair and 
blue eyes. She's from Freeport, L. I. 
The Navy (named Steve), Harry 
James, and Greer Garson are her fav- 
orites, but knitting, music, hockey, 
basketball, table tennis, and dancing 
rate with Joyce too. 

Angelo Campo is another New 
York girl — New York City to be exact 
—and she graduated from Washington 
Irving High School there. Angle is 18 
and has black hair and brown eyes; 
she's 5' 6". She's got a boyfriend, Mike, 
and she likes Harry James and Glenn 
Miller. Her favorite movie star is 
Cary Grant. Angle is Liberal Arts and 
wants to be a Spanish teacher. She 
likes to knit a- lot and loves to dance. 

Cynthia Carmel from Brooklyn, 
N. Y., is a Liberal Arts student. She's 
16, 5' 5W, with brown hair and blue 
eyes. Cynthia graduated from Eras- 
mus Hall High School. She goes for 
the Navy in the form of a Lieutenant 
(J.g.). Vaughan Munroe and his band 
and Bette Davis are her favorite en- 
tertainers. Another favorite of Cyn- 
thia's is horseback riding; she really 
goes for it. Cynthia is a Liberal Arts 
student, but has no particular goal as 
yet. I 

Ruth Criswell, from Philadel- 
phia, is one of our freshmen who came 
to us after working for a few years. 
She's 20, 5* 6%", and has red hair and 
brown eyes. Ruth graduated from 
John Bartr,am, and is taking a Lib- 
eral Arts course here. It seems as if 
her heart belongs to the Army/ She 
also likes football, Tommy Dorsey and 
Duke Ellington, but she doesn't stick 
to popular music, as the classics are 
tops too. 

La May Cross is our blue-eyed 
, blonde from Upper Darby, Penna. The 
old saying abou gentlemen and blondes 
seems to hold as Lee has 5 favorites. 
She will say that the Marines rate 
first, though, and so does Van John- 
son. Her hobby is collecting stuffed 
animals. The Liberal Arts dept. claims 
Lee, and she'll probably be a teacher. 
Another favorite of hers is dancing; 
she loves it. 

Lois Dauberman, from Nemacol- 
in, Penna., is 18, 5' 5", and has brown 
hair and hazel eyes. She likes Paul 
Whiteman's music, George Murphy's 
acting, and the Navy (Bucknell sailors 
in particular). Dobbie is taking Lib- 
eral Arts and wants to teach. Some 
of "TJoub's other interests are hockey, 
football, dancing, . and the piano. 
Dobbie's real interest, though, is sleep- 
ing late in the mornings. 
S 



NEWS ON OUR CAMPUS 



Sigma Alpha Iota 

The regular meeting of S.A.I, was 
held last Wednesday afternoon In the 
sorority room. Miss Kathleen Davi- 
son, the National President of S.A.I. 
will visit Susquehanna's chapter some 
time this year. Each year Mrs. Sulli- 
van, the Province President, visits, 
but this year the sorority is going to 
have the additional honor of being hos- 
tess to Miss Davison. 



Kappa Delta Phi 

Kappa Delta Phi held its regular 
meeting after the inter-sorority hike 
on October 19 in the sorority room. 
Routine business was discussed after 
which the new records which have 
been purchased recently by the sorority 
were played and enjoyed. 

At 7:00 on Thursday, October 26, 
another meeting was held at which 
time the president read the Inter-Sor- 
ority Council constitution in compli- 
ance with the rules of that organiza- 
tion. Plans were discussed for future 
activities and regular business was 
carried out. 



Theta Chi 

On this past weekend, Jack Warner 
and Art Gelnett represented the Beta 
Omega Chapter at a regional confer- 
ence of Theta Chi National Fraternity. 
The conference was held at the huge 
chapter home at Lehigh University in 
Bethlehem, Pa. 

Representatives of the Theta Chi 
Chapters at Penn, Dickinson, Penn 
State, Delaware, Lafayette, Rutgers, 
Washington, Drexel, Lehigh, and Sus- 
quehanna were there. These chapters 
comprise the third region, one of the 
ten regions of Theta Chi in the United 
States. 

The conference started at 9:30 a. m. 
Saturday morning with a discussion of 
present problems and general sugges- 
tions for the future. The noon dinner 
was served at the Beta Sigma Chap- 
ter home followed by another informal 
meeting. Then the representatives at- 
tended the Lehigh-Drexel football 
game which Drexel won, 13-6. After 
the jg&me, there was a tour of Lehigh 
University's campus and then another 
discussion took place at the chapter 
home. 



Vespers 

In place of the regular Vespers of 
October 22 there was held an informal 
hymn sing for which everyone was 
seated in the form of a circle in the 
parlors of Seibert Hall. 

The hymn sing was opened with the 
singing of "Beautiful Savior", after 
which a prayer was offered. Then 
everyone picked his favorite hymn, and 
It was sung by the group. After a most 
pleasant meeting, the service was clos- 
ed by Dr. T. W. Kretschmann who 
pronounced the benediction. 

Vesper services Sunday evening, Oc- 
tober 29, were conducted by Carmen 
Beckwlth. The theme of the service 
was religion as a guide to sportsman- 
ship, in which emphasis was placed on 
fair play. 

The vesper service next week is go- 
ing to be presented in the form of a 
radio broadcast, telling the story of 
Ruth and Boaz. The program is en- 
titled "Ruth." For such a highlight as 
this, we'd like to see the entire stu- 
dent body attend the service. Won't 
you please come out next Sunday even- 
ing? 



Further plans for the production will 
be discussed after the Christmas vaca- 
tion. 



Alpha Psi Omega 

A meeting of Alpha Psi Omega was 
held on Friday, October 27. "320 Col- 
lege Avenue" was chosen as the play 
to be produced by the Theatre Guild 
this year. The date for the play has 
not been definitely decided, but it will 
be presented in March some time. 



Religious Interlude 

Led by the Dean of Women, Miss 
Unangst, a spiritual Interlude was held 
between 10 p. m. and 10:30 p. m. In 
Seibert Parlor Thursday, October 26, 
1944. Choosing the theme "Prayer," 
Miss Unangst read a few passages of 
Scripture and gave a brief talk. Sing- 
ing of hymns started and concluded 
the short, informal gathering. 

This meeting inaugurated similar 
weekly sessions to be held every Wed- 
nesday night, same time, same place. 
All girls who feel the need of a quiet, 
spiritual "pause" are welcome to at- 
tend. 

S 

CRUSADERETTES HOCKEY 



(Continued from Page 1) 
Assistant Manager — Ruth Botdorf, 
Time keeper— Grace Lemon. 

After the game, tea was served to 
members of both hockey teams in the 
parlors of the girls' dormitory. 

The main event of the day came 
when the members of 8. U.'s hockey 
team stopped at Hershey on the way 
home and attended an ice hockey game 
In the Hershey Arena between Hershey 
and Buffalo. 



MILLER'S 

Where Ed's and Co-Ed's Meet 
For Many Good Things to Eat 

Corner Pine and Orange Streets 
3 Blocks from Campos 



News About Notes 



According to very reliable reports, 
the HIT PARADE is still tops in good 
listening. So to give you the best of 
the week, this column will present 
some of the HIT PARADE songs In- 
cluding the BIG THREE and those 
that are climbing to popularity. 

First on the HIT PARADE this week 
was I'll Walk Alone, the sentimental 
song for lovers who are parted by miles 
but enjoy the thought of being lonely 
for each other. Featured by Dinah 
8hore in "Follow the Boys," the lyric 
is written by Sammy Cohn and the 
music by Jule Styne. 

Second in popularity this week was 
Dance With the Dolly. The listening 
public proves its love of novelty by 
elevating this tune, much like Buffalo 
Gals, to a place with the TOP THREE. 
(Concluded on Page 4) 



Inter-Sorority Hike 

The three sororities of Susquehanna 
University, KDP, SAI, and ODS, spon- 
sored an inter-sorority hike for all the 
girls of SU on October 19. The girls 
left Seibert Hall at 5 p. m. and hiked 
to the beach on the Isle of Que. Miss 
Unangst, Miss Allison. Miss Shure, and 
Mrs. Koch accompanied the girls on 
their hike. Hot dogs, elder, apples, po- 
tato chips, doughnuts, and ice cream 
were awaiting the hikers, and soon dis- 
appeared. 

The girls gathered around the bon- 
fire and each sorority sang Its sorority 
song for the freshmen. All the girls 
then joined in singing popular songs. 
At seven o'clock the girls began the 
hike back to the campus, 



Student Recital 

The first afternoon recital class of 
the term was held at 4:15 p. m. Friday, 
October 20, 1944, in Seibert Chapel. 
The program opened with the election 
of officers: President — Howard Payne, 
Vice-Presidentr— Dorothy Sternat, Sec- 
retary — Hope Spicer, Monitor — Roy 
Stahl. 

Thereafter, the following persons 
rendered selections: Carmen Beckwlth, 
Jane Clark, Arlan Gilbert, Frances 
Lelsenring, Emily Botdorf, Jean Hill, 
Dorothy Juplna, Anna Miller, Virginia 
l Hallock, Hope Spicer, Janet Rohrbach. 



George B. Rine FLORIST 



HOUSE n-Y 
8TOEB lil-Y 



The First National Bank of Selins Grove 

WELCOMES STUDENTS' ACCOUNTS 



Fine Job Printing 
THE SELINSGROVE TIMES 



Quality Only the Finest 

NATIONAL RESTAURANT 

Hotel and Dining Service 



29 N. Market St 



Sellntfrova, Pa. 




For School News Read 

SUNBURY DAILY ITEM 



SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

SELINSGROVE, PENNSYLVANIA 

Co- educational— Accredit**! 

For more than eighty-six years in the service of Christian higher 
education. 



Curricula.: 

LIBERAL ARTS BUSINESS 

COMMERCIAL EDUCATION 

For Catalog write 



MUSIC 



O. Morris Smith, D.D., LL.D., Pres. 
Russell Gait, Ph.D., Dean 



PAGE FOUR 



THE SUSQUEHANNA, SELINSGROVE. PENNSYLVANIA 



TUESDAY, OCTOBER 31, 1944 



I'd Vote For--- 

Reporters of The Susquehanna re- 
cently asked students on campus who 
they would vote for as President of the 
United States, and why they would 
vote for him. 

Here are the answers: 

Evelyn Wllhour— I want Dewey. I 
don't know anything about politics, but 
my father says Dewey; and so do I. 

Marjorie Barton— I want Dewey. I 
don't believe in more than two terms. 
Dewey is a young man, and is capable 
of the presidency. 

Betty Jane Herr— I'm a stiff Repub- 
lican, but I am for Roosevelt because 
he knows the problems of the country 
better than a new man would. 

Jean Geigrer— Roosevelt. For our 
president we want a man who knows 
the business, and who is capable of 
doing a good job. Roosevelt is the 
man we want and need. 

Russel Brown— The best man, na- 
turally— Dewey. 

Frank Wolfe — It is inevitable that 
Congress will be Republican, and we 
need and want unanimity between con- 
gress and the executive. My choice is, 
therefore, Dewey. 

Lenore Garman— Roosevelt. To in- 
sure a lasting peace there should be a 
continuation of democratic policies. 
The New Deal is doing very well at 
present. Past experience assures the 
nation a bright future. 

Jewel MacNamara — Roosevelt. Why? 
Because my boyfriend in Hawaii voted 
for him. 

Ronald Boyer— I don't care very 
much, but I'd vote for Dewey. 

Jerry Moore— I would not cast a vote. 
I am not a person of a political mind. 
Politics are too confusing. 

Gsyle Clark— Roosevelt. He has done 
a fine Job so far, allow him to continue 
for the benefit of the country. 



Betty Frank— Roosevelt, because the 
best man always wins. 

Cynhia Carmel — Roosevelt. Mr. 
Roosevelt has been able -to retain the 
Presidency on his own merits rather 
than by emphasizing his opponent's 
weak points. 

Gloria Machamer: Roosevelt. I don't 
believe in changing horses in mid- 
stream. 

Mary Lib Basehoar: Aje you kidding? 



NEWS ABOUT NOTES 



(Continued from Page 3) 

Another novelty number, much more 

cleverly done and easier to listen to is 

The Trolley Song, a moving little ditty 
about a trolley romance that is amus- 
ing from the first ding to the last 
chug. This jumped up to third place 
this week and promises to keep mov- 



Dewey, of course. My grandfather is a j jng to the top. 

Republican, my father is a Republican, I Tne other ^^ numbers were largely 

and so I am a Republican! Dewey is a | songs of sentim€nt and rom ance. Al- 



good man; we definitely need a change. 

Emily Botdorf — Dewey. He is the 
best man for the Job. 

Jane Malkames — If the war continues 
Mr. Roosevelt is the man for the job, 
but if it doesn't, Mr. Dewey is defin- 
itely my choice. 



ways and Together are two excellent 
examples. Always, a Berlin creation, 
is at present being used in twelve mo- 
tion pictures and is perhaps the most 
popular revival of today. A new num- 
ber, Let Me Love You Tonight, enter- 
ed in ninth place and should go places 



DUNKELBERGER ADDRESSES 

(Continued from Page 1) 
He said that these principles of Perm 
shown In the pageant shall not per- 
ish. His closing words contained the 
thought that now, while Pennsylvania's 
ideals are in danger, we should "rally 
to her defense" so that the . "prin- 
ciples of liberty and democratic gov- 
ernment . . . shall not die." 



Doris Williamson— Norman Thomas— especially when sung by Frank Sinatra, 
Because I think he is the man for the | whose voice is well suited for this type 
office. |of song. 

Maisie Leiby— Thomas Dewey— -Be- 
cause my father is Republican. 

Ruth Williams — Thomas Dewey — I'm 
Republican and I thinlc that no presi- 
dent should have more than two terms. 
Marion Walker — Thomas Dewey — I 
think he's most capable. Three terms 
are too many. 

Harriet Gould — Thomas Dewey — 
Dewey definitely will do It. 

Carmen Beckwith— D>ewey, of course. 
I think it is time to change horses even 
though it is in the middle of the 
stream. 

S 

LOST— Half of a freshman class dur- 
ing weekends. 
FOUND— Back in class on Monday. 



WHITMER-STEELE 
COMPANY 

LUMBER MANUFACTURES 
NORTHUMBERLAND, PA. 



FEHR'S 

THE STORE THAT LEADS 
IN BETTER MERCHANDISE 



F. A. BRILL CO. 

Floor Covering*— Awnings— Shades 
Draperies 

419 Market St. Phone 2180 Sunbury 



HACKETTS 

Hardware Stores 

325 Market St, 706 Market St. 
ALSO MIDDLEBURG, PA. 



HOTEL GOVERNOR 

SNYDER 

GOOD HOME COOKING 



CRYSTAL PURE ICE 

CHARLES W. KELLER 
Manufacturer and Wholesaler 



B.K.W. COACH LINE 

Tries to give the College Students 
the best service, especially the Sun- 
bury Students. Why TRAVEL with 
an individual? The Coach Line In- 
sures every person. THINK THAT 
OVER. 



SNAVELY'S 

COLLEGE FURNISHINGS 
AND SHOES 



S. U. BOOK STORE 

SUSQUEHANNA 
NOTEBOOKS 
STATIONERY 



Eberfs 5c to $1.(10 
Store 

Susquehanna Stationery 
SELINSGROVE 



SCHOOL FASHIONS 

ROSENBLUM'S 

SUNBURY, PA- 
SMART FEMININE APPAREL 



When you think of Photography 
Think of 

Schindler Studio 

515 Market Street, Sunbury, Pa. 
Also Framlnf and Photo Finishing 



MILLER BROS. 
SHOE STORE 

SUNBURY, PA. 



STONER'S 
CREDIT JEWELERS 



SUNBURY, PA. 



CHILDREN'S SHOP 

MARY H. BURNS 
Clothes for the College Girl 



Markley-Altvater 

BETTER STUDENTS CLOTHES 
SUNBURY, PA. 



VISIT THE 

REXALL 
DRUG STORE 

WTLLIAM J. COTT, Drufgfat 



WATCH REPAIR 

Susquehanna Jewelry 

Fountain Pens and Pencils 

W. M. VALSING 

JEWELER SELINSGROVE, PA. 



THE BON TON 

Personally Selected 

COATS, DRESSES, HATS 

Sunbury, Pa 



REICHLEY'S 

WHERE STUDENTS 
MEET AND EAT 



STEFFEN'S 

FINE FOODS— STATIONERY 

Greeting Cards for Every Occasion 

SELINSGROVE, PA 



LOW 

NET COST . . . . 

life Insurance Is Issued 
to Lutheran Men, Wom- 
an, and Children ages 
from birth to 65. The 
members of Lutheran 
Brotherhood own the 
society, and they alone 
receive the earnings. 
There are no stockhold- 
ers. 



Lutheran Brotherhood 



Legal Reserve Life Insurance For Lutherans 
MINNEAPOLIS, 2, Herman L. Ekern, President 



MINNESOTA 



430 Market St. 



K. L. ROTHFUSS, Agent Williamsport, Pa. 



BUILD YOUR 
ESTATE NOW! 



YOUR FUTURE 
STARTS TODAY 



IF 






OFFICE OF THE DEAN 

SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 
SELINSGROVE, PA. 



give- 
to the World Student 
Service Fund. 



n 



U 




etonna 



TAKE— 

That election defeat with 
a smile. 



Volume LIII 



SELINSGROVE, PENNSYLVANIA, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 14, 1944 



Number 4 



SU Enjoys Maxine Stellman, Met Opera Star 



SCA CONDUCTS WSSF DRIVE ON CAMPUS 

— : j ♦ 

StuddltS and FaCUlty I Marian Willard Heads Drive; 
/-«• ™ i Ti i Goal— $2 from Each Student 

Give to Blood Bank 



The World Student Service Fund has 
opened its 1944-1945 campaign In or- 

Ten Susquehanna students and sev- der to obtain $150,000 in funds which 
eral of the members of the faculty and will be used in aiding students all over 
administration donated blood to the j the world to proceed with their edu- 
Blood Bank held at Trinity Lutheran cation which has been interrupted as 
Church on Wednesday, November 1. a result of the present war. 

Virginia Hallock, a junior, was the j On our own campus, led by Chair- 
first Susquehanna University student I man Marian Willard, the WSSF Drive 
to donate for the fourth time. Others is being conducted this week by the 
donating were: June Hoffman, Ruth Student Christian Association. 
Cochrane, Helen Kahn, Joseph Taylor, j Hoping to surpass last year's goal of 
Marjorie Barton, Carmen Beckwith, ' $i8o, the SCA is asking each student 
Marie Kllck, Will Hayes, and Jane I on campus to donate $2 to this most | 
Malkames. j worthy cause that is aiding our fellow 

Dr. and Mrs. William A. Russ, Miss students in war torn countries who 
Audrey North, Miss Ruth McCorklll, hope to continue their education, and 




and Mrs. Helen P. Ulrich of the ad- 
ministration also gave blood for this 
drive. 

Miss Bertha M. Hein, registered 
nurse and assistant dean of women, 
served as one of the nurses for the 
blood donors service. 

The blood plasma, collected by such 
Blood Banks all over the nation, is 
sent overseas to our fighting forces. 

The Blood Bank of Snyder county 
was conducted by the mobile unit from 

nafrtSDUrg. - - -■-- ■ — 

8 

Norma Jane Hazen, '46, 
To Wed Mr. Cecil Baker 



lvuSd MAXINE STELLMAN 



SCA OBSERVES 58th 



to our own American prisoners of war i \rj^ \ i > DT'T'mcXTrr'O 
who are located in prison camps In I liliAlvJ oiUDEiWlo 
our enemies land T Q HEAR REINARTZj 

To create a lively interest in the| 

campaign, two teams have been chosen j The 58th annlV ersary of the Student 
to see which can raise the larger ; christian Association will be commem- 
amount. All the boys on campus and : orated this CO ming Thursday evening, 
the girls of Hassinger Hall are on the November 15th, with a special banquet 
•"Hassinger" team, and the girls re- f or tne ca binet members. Following 
siding in Seibert Hall are members of the banquet a meeting will be held in 



(Concluded on Page 3) 

SU Sixth In l^nlrollment 
Of Lutheran Colleges 



the chapel at-7:00 o'clock to which all 
students are Invited. This Is the first 
anniversary celebration ever held by the 

Association. 

Dr. Eppling Reinartz, Promotional 
Secretary of the United Lutheran 
Listed !n order of enrollment, the Church of America, from Philadelphia, 
complete hst of the United Lutheran ' will be guest speaker at the meeting. 
Rev. and Mrs. C. E. Hazen, of 319 ' Church colleges is as follows: Lenoir Dr. Reinartz, who is a prominent 
Catawissa Avenue, Sunbury, announce Rhyne 392; Wlttenbergi 362: o e ttys- i speaker, will also give a talk In chapel 
the engagement of their daughter, L^ ^ una**, MV, Wagner ,228; on Friday morning. You are urged to 
Norma Jane, to Cecil E. Baker, of 
son of Mr. and Mrs. Clay Baker, of 
London, Ohio. 

Norma Jane is a prominent student 
on our campus, being a member of the 
Junior class, having transferred from 
Dickinson Junior College, Willlamsport, 
Pennsylvania, her sophomore year. 

While at Dickinson, she was very ac- 
tive In all school activities, and has 
continued her fine work here at Sus- 
(Concluded on Page 4) 



Susquehanna, 181; Midland. 165; ! attend this observance on Thursday 
Carthage, 150; Newberry, 146; Thlel, evening as his topic will be both time- 
133; Muhlenberg and Hartwick, 115 llf ar »d interesting, 
each; Marion, a Junior College, 80; ' Music will be provided by the con- 

and Waterloo, 66. iservatory students. 

, <$_ _____ 

Some Statistical Facts About the 
Student Body of Susquehanna 



Did You Know? 

Tuesday, November 14 — Business 
Society— 7 p. m. in game room of 
Seibert Hall 

* SAI party at 8:15 in Seibert So- 
cial Room 

Wednesday, November 15 — Rural 
Life Conference — 10 a. m. to 5 
p. m. 

Campus Club meeting from 3 to 
5 in Seibert Parlors 

Thursday, November 16 — S.C.A. An- 
niversary— Dr. Eppling Reinartz. 
speaker — 7 o'clock in Seibert 
Chapel 

Friday, November 17— Recital Class 
— 4:15 p. m. 

Sunday, November 19— SU Sunday 
School Class — Trinity Lutheran 
Church, 9:30 a. m. 
SCA "Thank Offering Service" In 
Trinity Lutheran Church, 7 p. m., 
Celo Leitzel, speaker 

Tuesday, November 21 — Students' 
Evening Recital, 8:15 p. m. 



The 181 students of Susquehanna ] Chemist .. l 

University have some very interesting j Dentist l 

Housewife 



facts about their lives. The SU stu 
dents present a broad religious picture: 

Denomination Men Women Total 



Methodist 5 

Lutheran - 15 

Episcopal 

Presbyterian 2 

Evangelical 

Jewish 2 



28 
49 

8 
14 

7 
23 

9 



28 

64 

8 

16 

7 



Reformed 1 

Roman Catholic 3 9 

Baptist 2 

Russian Orthodox .. 1 

United Brethren ... 2 1 

Mennonite 1 

Jehovah's Witness .. 1 

Greek Orthodox ... 2 

Congregational 1 

Looking into the 
show that the S. U. student is prepar 
ing for these vocations: 
Field 
Accountant 



Journalism 

Librarian 

Lab. Technician ... 
Lawyer l 

Medical Secretary .. 

Merchandising 

Musician 1 

25 Nursing 

10 Personnel Man. 1 

12 Physical Therapy .. 

2 Physician 6 

I Psychologist 

3 Secretary 

I I Social Worker 

1 (Teaching 8 

2 Theology „ 5 

1 '; Undecided 2 



1 

2 

2 

9 

2 

5 

1 
2 
3 

3 
2 
1 

13 
3 

72 

24 



Well Received Program 
Presented by Soprano 

Maxine Stellman, charming Vermont 
soprano and six-year veteran of the 
Metropolitan Opera Association, open- 
ed the Susquehanna Star Course season 
I last Thursday night, November 9, 1944, 
in Seibert Chapel, with a concert which 
was well attended and thoroughly en- 
Joyed by students, faculty, and towns- 
people. 

Miss Stellman attended the Institute 
of Musical Art in New York, won the 
Breen Memorial Prize and the Morris 
Loeb Prize, and studied further with 
the late Marcella Sembrlch at the Jull- 
Uard Graduate School. She Joined the 
Metropolitan Opera as an Auditions of 
the Air winner. 

Dressed in a lovely gown of black lace 
over black satin, Miss Stellman opened 
the program by Joining with the audi- 
ence for the national anthem. The 
rest of her recital, with the changes 
she made because she felt they would 
appeal more to the audience, consisted 
of the following: 

Her Program 

"Per pieta," from "II Florido" by 
Stradella, Recitative and Aria from 
"Iphigenie en Tauride" by Cluck, 
"Kennst du das Land" by Hugo Wolf, 
"Die drei Zigeuner" by Liszt, "Hat dich 
die Liebe beruhrt" by Marx, and a 
Brahm's FOlk Song < . . Miss Stellman. 

"Exaltation" by Schumann, "Etude 
In A flat" and "Etude in O flat" by 
Chopin ... Mr. Meyer. 

"Apres un reve" by Faure, "Attributs" 
by Poulenc, "Chanson Triste" by Du- 
parc, "Hymnal Soleil" by Georges, "Tire 
Unforseen" by Scott, "The Pasture" by 
Naglnskl, "Lass from the Low Coun- 
tree" by Nile* and "The Sleigh" by 
Kountz . . . Miss Stellman. 

When continued clapping brought 
Miss Stellman back for an encore, she 
repeated "The Sleigh" at the sugges- 
tion of her accompanist, Mr. Meyer, 
then explained, "Now well do what I 
said we'd do" and sang "Annie Laurie." 
Inasmuch as the enthusiastic audience 
still would not let her go, she sang, as 
a final encore, "Homing" by Del Riego. 
Reception for Miss Stellman 

Finally making her way through a 
crowd of autograph seekers after the 
recital, Miss Stellman, an honorary 
member of Sigma Alpha Iota's Theta 
Chapter (North Texas State Teachers 
9 College of Denton, Texas), attended 
the Conservatory reception held by her 
local fraternity sisters in their room In 
Seibert basement, where she signed 
still more autographs and proved to be 
as charming a person as singer. 

Also signing autographs was Mr. Paul 

Meyer, her accompanist and a fine 

soloist in his own right, who was Just 

(Concluded on Page 4) 

S- 



3 

5 
1 
3 
3 

1 
3 
8 
1 

13 
3 

80 
5 

26 



future, statistics 



Theta Chi Frat Pledges 
Celo Leitzel, '45, Nov. 6 

Celo Vincent Leitzel, '45, became a 



This is the way the classes line up: pledge of the Beta Omega Chapter of 
Class Men Women Total i Theta Chi National Fraternity 



Freshmen 13 

Men Women Total Sophomores 4 

1 1! Juniors 5 



Advertising 1 

Banking 1 1 

Business 2 



Seniors 8 



30 



85 


98 


34 


38 


19 


24 


13 


21 



151 



on 
Monday evening, November 6, 1944. 
The formal meeting was attended by 
all student members and faculty ad- 
visors at the home of Dr. Dunkelberg- 
er. President Jack Warner presided 
181 1 over the installation of Mr. Leitzel. 



fAGE TWO 



THE SUSQUEHANNA, SELINSGROVE, PENNSYLVANIA 



TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 14, 1944 




n 





CAMPUSOLOGY 



Hi, Kids! All ready for some Juicy 
news of the antics of our students(7). 
Well, here goes . . . 

Seen in town, on the Sunbury bus, 
and in Swinefords with a lobster din- 
ner (no less), Ruth Botdorf and a cute 
little sailor (from Bucknell, Ruth?). 
Looked like fun from where we sat! 

It seems a very snappy, happy four 



Established 1891 

Rine G. Winey, Jr., '46 - Editor 

Jean C. Geicer, '46 Associate Editor 

Gloria Gasparoli, '46 - Managing Editor 

Arthur J. Gelnett, '47 Sports Editor 

Reporters: Mary Elizabeth Basehoar, '45; Ruth Botdorf, '45, proofreader; Cor- 
inne Kahn, '45; Laverne Kohn, '45; Louise Kresge, '45; Gloria Machmer, 

'45- Frances Bittinger, '45; June Hoffman, '46; Jayne Troutman, '46; Norma some left Selinsgrove for the big city 
Ha'zen, '46; Ruth Cochrane, '46; Emily Botdorf, '4G; Marie Klick, '46; Vir-| of Hazleton last weekend— "Yonkers" 
ginla Hallock, '46; Carmen Beckwith, '46; Jackie Braveman, '47; Joe Taylor, 
'47- Jane Gundrum, '47; Dorothy Wagner, '47; Faye Smith, '47; Caroline 
Pfahler, '47; Doris Williamson, '47; Marian Walker, '47; Gayle Clark, '47; 
Martha' Garard, '48; Helen Zahn, '48; Betty Smith, '48; Caroline Marks, 
'48- Betty Frank, '48; Gloria Walmer, "48; Ruth Criswell, '48; Roberta 
Gaetz '48; Ed Madden, '48; Sara Lee Smith, '48; Margaret Johns, '48; 
Jean Smith, '48; Harriet Gould, '49; John Warner, '47; Aldo Pescarmona, 
'47; Caroline Graybill, '48. 

Corinnk Kahn, '45 Business Manager 

Helen Eby, '47 - Advertising Manager 

Jean Kinzer, *46 Circulation Manager 

Business Assistants: Roswell Johns, '46; Ed Madden, '48; Russell Brown, '48; 
Batty Frank, '48; Cynthia Carmel, '48; Jean Wheat, Barbara Kain, Hilda 
Markey. 



Entered as Second Class Mail Matter at Selinsgrove, Pa. 



CONGRATULATIONS FROSH! THE EDITORIALS 



You have Indeed begun your life at 
Susquehanna in a great manner. Al- 
ready you are being looked upon as 
being the bulwarks of SU next year. 
You have enter€d into such extra-cur- 
ricular activities as sports, dramatics, 



It is not our purpose in writing this 
editorial to ask you to read the edi- 
torials of our school paper — for if you 
are interested in the betterment of 
school life at SU, you will do so. 
Why does nearly everyone at SU 
newspaper writing, religious activities, first turn to "Campusology?" For the 
and in each and every organization on simple reason that we are more inter- 
the campus. ' ested in the social whirl than in the 

We upperclassmen, who are outnum- j more serious side of life — and per- 
bered by you, are coming to depend haps justified in so doing, 
more and more upon you to carry your ' But you may be sure that the edi- 
heavy share of the responsibilities. torials published are not Just written 
All we can say is, "Nice going, frosh." | to take up space in our paper, but be- 
You already have taken your places | cause we realize there are certain prob- 
with the upperclassmen here at Sus- 1 lems and situations that do and will 



and Nancy Lou, "Scotty" and Jean 
Wortley! Oh, and while we think of 
it, did you girls all know that you are 
out of luck entirely now? That foot- 
loose and fancy-free Scotty has decid- 
ed to settle down — Jennie has his ring, 
but have you agreed to that "going 
steady" proposition yet, Jean? 

Trying to meet a train can prove to 
be very nerve-wracking, especially if 
you don't leave on time — Carolyn 
Pfahler can ditto that sentiment. That 
riding back and forth to Sunbury to 
meet little Johnny Moore was a prob- 
lem—but worth it! Foot note: His 
heart does not belong to Daddy I 

The Navy seems to be rapidly be- 
coming the favorite on campus— we are 
judging by Dotty Jupina and Fae Smith 
who were well' taken care of by a duo 
of gobs, Saturday night 

At last Raymond's little family ar- 
rived, waving their coonskin caps from 
the back of that Conestoga wagon that 
plowed its way valiantly over the 
mountains— all that just to see little 
Raymond in his great big school! 

Isn't Jack Warner ever going to 
make up his mind? It's nice to keep 
us guessing (also provides news) and is 
more fun for Peggy, Jean, and Caro- 
lyn, to say nothing of all the others. 

Ruth Criswell is a lucky girl to have 
her mother visit so often to say noth 



Next time any new man arrives on 
campus will someone please make sure 
that HarriEt is the first to meet him? 
She almost got into trouble with Dr. 
Sheldon in her enthusiasm over see- 
ing Flight Officer Gene Gradollni (in- 
cidmtally, it was good seeing him on 
campus again) from upstairs in the 
Con! 

Little Ann Malkames has been teased 
unmercifully about her little BuckneU 
I sailor, so why are we mentioning It 
here? 

Added: One huge diamond to the 
third fing-r, hft hand. Whose? Why, 
haven't you heard, Cecil Baker and 
Norma Jane Hazen have dood it! 

Eisenhower and MacArthur have 
nothing on Hilda and Johnny— they 
have every weekend planned for the 
next million years! 

Mel and Jackie have started a hope 
chest. Contents: one toy airplane and 
one toy jeep! Necessities you know! 

Would that furloughs were as easy to 
get as gigs— but Johnny Meerbach got 
one and came straight up to see Dottle 
Wagner— he misses S. U. for more than 
one reason! 

Ellen Hellman's love-life made his 
appearance on campus recently and 
changed her apprarance to one of 
radiance — she looks pretty elated at 
those daily telegrams from him, too! 

Peggy Bathgate's uncle threw a big 
shindig in Hazleton Saturday and 
Peggy left us to take part in It — we 
wish we could have been there! "Doc" 
finally got to go home! And Marian 
and "Roomie" went to visit Ben In 
Hazleton (that town gets all the Mi!) 

Football games are just too muqh fun 
— depending upon whom one, goes with! 
If you ask Fox, she'll tell you about 
the game— but more about Warren 



quehanna. But don't forget, you have; exist on our campus, and it is through 
four years of work ahead of you — don't! the means of the editorial column that j unavoidably postponed, but she doesn't 
slow up in those later years. we hope"to aid in the bettering of them. ; fed TOO bad since that phone caU of 

. Friday and that lovely corsage of Sat- 

, urday — what a man! 

THE man on campus is undoubtedly 
Wasserburg— why he has so many de- 
voted females that he has to work in 
shifts; Bobbie, Corinne, Sara Lee, etc., 



ing of that very charming girl friend tf"* 1 ^ * n< l ^ you ask LaVerne, you'll 
who spent this past weekend .at 8. U. *~ 
Becky's expected trip to see Gus was 



-6- 



RIBBONS & RAZZES 



Stars and Stripes 



RIBBONS to the State College pho- 
tographer for taking such perfectly 

wonderful pictures of the students at 

8. U. 

RIBBONS to all students who attend- 
ed the concert given by Maxlne Stell- 

man. It really was a grand evening of 

song. 

RAZZES to the Sophomore hockey 
team for losing the hockey game to 

the Frosh team. (The score, incident- 
ally, was 6-2.) 

RIBBONS to the Inter-Sorority-Fra- 
ternlty for the swell Christmas dance 

they're planning for the student body 

on December 16th. 

RAZZES to the girls at BuckneU for 
coming back to college. Now the 8. 

U. coeds won't see as much of the 

sailors as they previously have.— But, 

then, one never knows, does one??? 

RIBBONS to all men students who 
went to the hockey games and of- 
fered their support by cheering the 

various teams on to victory. You 

know, those cheers certainly help a 

lot. 

RAZZES to students who talk con- 
sistently during Chapel exercises. 

RIBBONS to Roy Stahl for raising and 
lowering the piano tops on the night 

of Maxlne Stellman's performace. 

RIBBONS to Joe Taylor's tandem. It 
certainly does get around. 

don't mean perhaps!!! 



Several of Susquehanna's men have 
recently received promotions. It is now 
Lieut, (jg) John Zuback '43, having 
been promoted from the rank of an 
Ensign. Lieutenant Zuback is station- ; 
ed on the Admiralty Islands in the 
South Pacific. . . . Howard Hugus, x'46, 
formerly stationed at Camp 8helby, 
Mississippi, and now with an A.P.O., 
has been made a sergeant. 

Word has been received from Court- i 
land, Alabama, that Capt. John M. 
Reichard, of Wllkinsburg, Pa., has been 
assigned to the A.A.F. four-engine 
pilot school at Courtland as naviga- 
tion instructor. 

Ray Schramm, x'44, is now attend- 
ing Harvard University. . . . Lt. Fran- 
cis R. Gelnett, USNR, former Signal 
Officer for the Port of Marseilles, is 
now in North Africa. . . . Cpl. Thomas 
Bittinger recently arrived in England 
and has been assigned to Bomber 
Squadron where he is a radio operator 
on a flying fortress. 

Pfc. James Pearce is now convalesc- 
ing at the Percy Jones Hospital in 
Battle Creek, Michigan, from wounds 
received in action on July 3. 
■ Private Pearce, who went over from 
England when the Allied Armies in- 
vaded France, was in action twenty- 
eight days before he sustained serious 
And we injuries, including the loss of his left 
leg, below the knee-cap. We wish him 



have 
charms! 

We have a very loyal hockey fan, 
Girls — a real rooter and constant spec- 
tator. Who? Jerry Moore, of course! 



hear all about Lt. Dick Shaffer! Yup^. 
football is a wonderful invention! ; . 
Have you seen those super movies of 
the campus and Its inhabitants that 
Anna has? If not, don't fall to be on 
hand when she shows them next— '* 
wunnerful! 

At last sight, Margie Barton was 
anxiously awaiting the arrival of a 
friend from home— Did he get here? 



all fallen before his irresistible Corner her and then let me In on ltl 



That's all I know right now— but if 
you hear anything Interesting Just go 
around and tell it! (That's what we 
do!) 



-<$>- 



At the Stanley 

Monday and Tuesday, November 13 

and 14 — "Show Business," including 
Eddie Cantor, Constance Moore, George 
Murphy, and Joan Davis. A history 
of stage people vividly portrayed by 
George and Constant. Full of fun and 
dancing. If you have more than one 10 
the s V ock"remain7 unso*wn7this"novelty °' c l°f k for ?• week and like musicals, 



News About Notes 

Since the students of Susquehanna 
are busy doing other things on Satur- 
day nights, your tipster will give you 
the down beat on this week's top- 
notch tunes. First on this week's Hit 
Parade, taking the place of I'll Walk 
Alone was Dance With the Dolly. If 



tune has a good chance of remaining 
In first place for a while. 

Coining down a step In the popu- 
larity ladder was I'll Walk Alone, a song 



it'll be worth your 30c. 

Wednesday, November 15 — "Make 
Your Own Bed," starring Jack Carson 
and Jane Wyman. Disguised as maid 
and butler, Jane and Jack play de- 



which seems to go with the events of t£Ctlve in s ' ome rath , r serlous busln „ ss . 
today while all sweethearts are away 



at war. 

Running third was the Trolley Song. 
It has been racing at top speed, and 
with Finnkie singing the lyrics, the 
tune is definitely among the tops with 
the American listeners. 

Among the remaining seven songs, 
Always rated fourth place. The song 



Can you roast a chie'een? Well, Janie 
couldn't! A "must" if you've no tests 
on Thursday. 

Thurfday and Friday, November 16 
anl7— "Grypsy Wildcat" with Jon Hall 
and Maria Montrz. The title is enough! 
What do the college coeds say about 
it? — "It's a scream!" 

Saturday, November 18 — "Seven Days 



RAZZES to people who go on diets, a speedy recovery. 

It simply can't be done around here. Flight Officer Eugene Grandollni, 
RAZZES to students who push and x'45, recently spent several days on 

shove while getting their mail In Sel- | campus. F.O. Grandollni is a bom- 



has a tune that when once heard, keeps Ashore," showing Wally Brown and Al- 

you humming it over and aver again, len Carvey. A group of sailors back 

A newcomer which cracked the Hit from sea-traveling. A day for the boys 

Parade last Saturday was Strange I to celebrate. Plenty of sailors! At 

Music. It has a tune different from least It's a change from the regular 

any that the Hit Parade has had and Saturday night westerns, 
still favorite enough to rate seventh Plan to see th's coming flicker at 



insgrove Hall. Please remember that bardier and will report to a B-29 school ; place was It Had to be You, sung by the Stanley: Red Skelton and Esther 
the Hall isn't the athletic field. in Nebraska. i Oeorge Murphy in "Show Business." I Williams in "Bathing Beauty." 



TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 14, 1944 



THE SUSQUEHANNA, 8ELIN8GBOVE, PENNSYLVANIA 



PAGE THRE1 



OUR FKOSH 



VIRGINIA DOSS— blonde, vivacious, 
amiable — comes from Cranford, N. J., 
and is taking the Medical Secretarial 
course. She's 5' 4V6" tall and especial- 
ly likes dill pickles and maroon con- 
vertibles. Her special interest (Louis) 
is in the Merchant Marines, and her 
pet hate is her temper. She likes all 
sports and collects identification brace- 
lets. 

DOROTHY EILHARDT is from Dal- j 
ton, Pa., and Is one of those lucky per- 
sons who possesses those "cool and 
limpid green eyes". She's interested 
in all sports, especially bicycle riding, 
and spends her spare time sewing. 
Her favorite food is French fries, but 
she insists only the Castle Restaurant 
can make them. Every Thursday night 



NEWS ON OUR CAMPUS 



Susquehanna Girls' Band 

The Susquehanna Girls' Dance Band, 
formed last fall and reorganized again 



Omega Delta Sigma 

On Hallowe'en evening, October 31, 
Omega Delta Sigma entertained KDP 



this year under its leader, Mrs. Russell . and SAI at a Hallowe'en costume party. 
Hatz, was dissolved Thursday, Novem- Everyone came in costume, and many 
ber 2, to provide practice time for the | characters appeared; a ballet dancer, 
newly-organized Girls' Band. As ex- i an old colored couple (who turned out 
plained by Dr. Sheldon, the change to be our two deans in disguise), a 
has been made in order to provide: j threesome of SAI triplets who appear- 

1. A nucleus for the Susquehanna ed te P° nk bonnets and triangular pin- 
Concert Band, which will be formed U 1 )S and many others. Games were 
at some later date, ! P^yed and refreshments were served. 

2. An organization with which the |The whole evening was enJ °y ed * a11 



student conductors (Conservatory Jun- 
iors) may work for experience, 

3. An instrumental group which in- 



cludes a greater percentage of the Con- 
finds her standing by for that 'phone j servatory students than the more ex- 



could understand ,and so proved In- 
teresting to all. 

Since the meeting was adjourned 
early at 7:25, due to other events sched- 
uled for the same evening, the election 
of officers, with the exception of presi- 
dent, was postponed until the Decem- 
ber meeting. 

S 

Theta Chi 

On Saturday evening, November 4, 
Dr. and Mrs. Gilbert, Jack Warner, 
Robert Surplus, and Arthur Gelnet 
represented the Beta Omega Chapter 
at a Theta Chi banquet held in the 
Orange and Blue Room of the Hotel 
Lewlsburger at Lewisburg, Penna. The 

The Omega Delta Sigma' alumnae bammet was held f °r Beta Kappa 

alumni of Bucknell University in prep- 
aration for starting a Theta Chi chap- 
ter at Bucknell after the war. 

After a delicious steak dinner, Phil- 



call from home, but aside from that 
she likes to listen to Glenn Miller 
and collect miniature cups and sauc- 
ers. 

DAWN EBERT, one of the frosh who 
is usually seen but not heard, comes 
from Shamokin Dam. She is 5" 6" tall 
ana is taking the Commercial Educa- 
tion course. Ice cream and cherry pie 



clusivf Dance Band. 



have presented the sorority with a 
check which will be used to buy new 
furnishings for the sorority room. 

Next Sunday evening the girls will 
hold a get-together in the sorority *P Campbell, deputy regional advisor, 



room. A meeting of this sort Is held 
once a month, as the girls enjoy meet- 
ing occasloally with all their sorority 
sisters informally. 

S 



introduced Dr. Russel Gilbert and 
Francis Ede (National Secretary of 
Theta Chi), both of whom gave short 
speeches on the general organization 
of Theta Chi National Fraternity. 

After these talks, an informal dis- 
cussion took place on the prospects of 



Sunday School Class 

Mary Moyer, president of the Stu 
dents' Sunday School Class, has an- 1 
nounced that a party will be held for j Biemic Society 
the members of the class on December The first meeting of the Biemic So- 
il at Trinity Lutheran Church. ' city was held in Room 100 of Steele organizing an alumni chapter of Theta 

The new program committee has Science Hall at 7:00 o'clock Thursday Chi in central Pennsylvania which 
are her favorite foods, and her hobby been assigned to Jean Kinzer, Peggy , evening, November 9. All students who would Include Susquehanna, Bucknell, 
is coll cting pictures of Ronald Reag- Bathgate, and Dexter Weikel. This j have taken o rare taking a science or Penn State, etc. However, it was de- 
committee, which was effective on mathematics course were Invited to 
November 12, will have charge of the | come, as well as Dr. John Houtz, Dr 
program for four weeks. 

All students are urged to participate 
in the Sunday school services. If the 
attendance goal of sixty-five members 
is to be attained, each student must 



an. She loves to read and go to the 
movies, but she simply detests wash- 
ing dishes. (Males: take notice.) 
Swimming ranks first on her list of 
sports, and the Navy is her favorite 
b.anch of the service. 

MYRA EPSTEIN is Lyndhurst, New 
J.rsiy's contribution to the class of 
'48. She's a Liberal Arts student, ma- 
joring in psychology. She likes to 
swim, thinks Harry James is "tops", 
and is interested in dramatics. In her 
leisure time — when she has any— she 
goes to the movies in Sunbury. She 
says she could practically live on 
stea ks, and wouldn't complain at all 
if she" had nothing to do but dance 
and write letters to; "The One" In the 
Navy. 

BETTY JANE FISHER, only five feet 
tall and blonde, comes from Allentown, 
Pa. Her ambition is two-fold: to be 
a good secretary and to own a con- 
vertible. She likes tennis, bicycle rid- 
ing, and spaghetti with meat balls. 
Just one peep into her room will let 
you know that she collects snap shots 
and magazine pictures galore. Her pet 
hate is getting up early, but on the 
oth:r hand, she loves to write letters- 
most of which find their way to West 
Point. 

BETTY FRANK is another Liberal 
Arts student, whose home is in Great 
Neck, Long Island. She is especially 
fond of thick, Juicy steaks and places 
basketball first on her list of sports. 
Her ambition is to own a one-floor 
house with a special room set apart 
to display all the souvenirs which 6he 
has collected in her travels. She dis- 
likes conceited people and, to date, 
can't make up her mind between the 
Navy and the Army Air Corps. 

S 

Conservatory Recital 

The afternoon recital class of the 
Conservatory will be held Friday, No- 
vember 18, 1944, at 4:15 p. m. in Sei- 
bert Chapel. The following students 
will participate: 

Piano solos: Emily Botdorf, Helen 
R-edcay, Velma Shook, Marjorie Men- 
pel, Hope Spicer, Marie Talbot, Wil- 
liam Rohrbach, Roy Stahl, Marie Kllck, 
Ma - caret Walter. 

Vocal solos: June Hoffman, Janet 
Rohrbach, Jcanette Kramer, Harriet 
Gould, Carmen Beckwith. 

Violin solo: Frosta Arseniu. 

String trio: Margaret Walter (violin), 
Virginia Fallock ('cello), Janet Rohr- 
oach (piano). 

48 

—Patronize Susquehanna advertisers. 



elded to postpone any definite decision 
on the matter until a later date after 
another session of the chapters In- 
volved. 

S 



| accept his personal responsibility to 
I attend regularly. A loyal Christian 
j should be willing to give one hour a 
I week for the study of the lesson. 



Fiske Scudder, Dr. George Fisher, and 
Dr. George Robison. 

After the meeting had been called' 
to order by the president, Nancy My- SCA CONDUCTS 
ers, an animated film, "What Is Elec- j . (Continued from Page 1) 

tricity", was shown. This film explain- the "Seibert" team. Members of 8CA 
ed the fundamentals of electricity in | are this week contacting individually 
such simple language that everyone the students and faculty members. 



Theater Guild 

The monthly meeting of the Theater 
Guild was held Tuesday, October 21, 1 
in the chapel at 7 o'clock. 

Marian Willard was elected to serve 
as secretary-treasurer of the organ- 
ization for the year. 

After the business meeting, Mr. Has- 
ans, who is the faculty advisor of 
Theater Guild, spoke to the group as 
a whole. He gave the alms for the 
year and told about the work of Theat- 
er Guild. 

Rubye Meyers will direct a one-act 
play November 28. The Guild plans 
to have a play for each month with 
a student director. 

A make-up class has been started by 
June Hoffman with people who are 
Interested in make-up coming to class 
once a week. The first class was held 
yesterday afternoon. 

S 

Pi Gamma Mu 

The Pennsylvania Gamma Chapter 
of the National Pi Gamma Mu met 
Monday evening, November 6, at the 
home of Dr. and Mrs. William A. Russ, 
Jr. The regular business meeting was 
conducted by the president, Rine 
Win:y, during which time the mem- 
bers discussed plans for future pro- 
grams. 

La Verne Kohn introduced the speak- 
ers of the evening, Rine Winey and 
Celo Leltzel, who In turn presented 
their views on the topic: Shall we ad- 
vocate compulsory military training 
for civilians after the war? A general 
round-table discussion followed this 
brief presentation of the problem. 
Opinions on the election to be held 
I the following day were exchanged. 



George B. Rine FLORIST 



house n-Y 
STORK ltt-Y 



The First National Bank of Selins Grove 

WELCOMES STUDENTS' ACCOUNTS 



Fine Job Printing 
THE SELINSGROVE TIMES 



Quality Only the Finest 

NATIONAL RESTAURANT 

Hotel and Dining Service 

Sellnscrove, Pa. 



29 N. Market St. 




For School News Read 

SUNBURY DAILY ITEM 



-8- 



Danee Decorations 

Inasmuch as a moon is needed so 
often when Dance Decoration Com- 
mittees prepare for a "formal", Mr. 
Grant Yerger has kindly offered to 
construct a halfmoon, to be kept by 
Slpma Alpha Iota for the benefit of 
any and all organizations needing a 
half moon to decorate the gym. 



SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

SELINSGROVE, PENNSYLVANIA 
Co -educational— AccredittTd 

For more than eighty-six years in the service of Christian higher 

education. 



Curricula: 

LIBERAL ARTS BUSINESS 

COMMERCIAL EDUCATION 



MUSIC 



For Catalog write 

Q. Morris Smith, D.D., LL.D., Pres. 
Russell Gait, Ph.D., Dean 



PAGE FOUR 



THE SUSQUEHANNA, SELINSGROVE. PENNSYLVANIA 



TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 14, 1944 



Who are the Budges' and Sarazens' of Susquey? 



Who is the Don Budge of Susque- 
hanna University? Shall Ed Madden 
or Ira Wasserburg wear the crown of 
glory? Bets are being made all over 
campus as to who will be S. U.'s ten- 
nis champion. 

In the first round of the tournament 
Dave Bomboy, Bloomsburg's pride and 
joy, beat Russ Brown with the score 
of 6 to 4. Don Herrold, a local boy, 
lost to Don Wohlsen 4 to 6. Ed Mad- 
den won his match with Deck Weikel 
with a 6 to 1 score. Prank Wolfe tri- 
umphed over Scotty Small with a score 
of 6 to 2, and Ray Mould beat Jerry 
Moore 6 to 1. Ira Wasserburg beat 
Dick Neidich, the red-headed blitz- 
kreig with a racquet, with the score 
6 to 1. Larry Weller licked New York's 
own Aldo Pescarmona 6 to 1, and 
Harry Welliver beat Roy Stahl 6 to 0. 

In the second round of the tourna- 
ment Dave Bomboy defeated Don 
Wohlsen 6 to 4, and Ed Madden won 
the match with Prank Wolfe, 6 to 2. 

Frosh and Sophs to 
Play Hockey Finals 



Ira Wasserburg defeated Ray Mould, 
7 to 5, and Larry Weller beat Harry 
Welliver 6 to 3. 

While everyone held their respective 
breaths, Dave Bomboy, Ed Madden, 
Ira Wasserburg, and Larry Weller 
fought a terrific battle, with Ed beat- 
ing Dave 7 to 5, and Ira beating Larry 
6 to 1. 

The "Battle of the Boroughs", star- 
ring Ed Madden for Manhattan and 
Ira Wasserburg for Brooklyn, will be 
enacted soon. The winner of this 
match will be our tennis champion for 
1944. 



He received his naval training at 
Pensacola, Norfolk, Naval Academy 
Preparatory Bchool, and the V-12 
course at Bucknell University. 

No definite date has been set for the 
wedding since Norma Jane and Cecil 
both expect to finish their college edu- 
cation, she at Susquehanna University, 
and he at Ohio State University. 
S 

SU ENJOYS MAXINE STELLMAN, 
MET. OPERA STAR 



NORMA JANE HAZEN, '46 
TO WED MR, CECIL BAKER 

(Continued from Page 1) 
quehanna. She is on the Susquehanna 
staff, a member of Kappa Delta Phi 
Sorority, and a newly elected member 
of Pi Gamma Mu Fraternity. Her 
name has consistently appeared on the 
Dean's list. 
Her fiance has recently received an 

' honorary medical discharge from the 
Navy. Before entering the navy in 
September, 1942, he attended the Ohio 
State University and was enrolled in 

I the pre-medical course. 



(Continued from Page 1) 
recovering from a bad cold. 
Veteran of many operas and concert 

: tours, Miss Stellman had been signed 
up to tour for the first two weeks with 
the same opera company whose presen- 
tation of "Carmen," in English, was 

| attended in Sunbury Saturday night, 
November 4, 1944, by many Susque- 
hannans. However, illness prevented 
her from making the tour. 



Susquehanna was the last of a series 
of concert tours for Miss Stellman and 
Mr. Meyer, who went directly back to 
New York, where Miss Stellman start- 
ed In yesterday rehearsing at the "Met" 
for the forthcoming season. She ex- 
tended a most cordial invitation to her 
sorority sisters to come to see her If 
they were ever in New York. 



MILLER BROS. 
SHOE STORE, 

STJNBURY, PA. 



The Round Robin in intramural 
hockey started on Tuesday and ended 
on Thursday with the freshmen and 
sophomores tying for first place. Each 
of these teams won two of the three 
games which* they played. 

The final playoff will take place next 
week. The two teams, the sophomores 
and the freshmen, are very evenly 
matched and the game should be a 
very good one. The sophomores are 
possessed with smooth, excellent team- 
work while the freshman team is strong | 
and hard-hitting. 



MILLER'S 

Where Ed's 1 and Co-Ed's Meet 
For Many Good Things to Eat 

Corner Pine and Orange Streets 
3 Blocks from Campus 



WHITMER-STEELE 
COMPANY 

LUMBER MANUFACTURES 
NORTHUMBERLAND, PA. 



FEHR'S 

THE STORE THAT LEADS 
IN BETTER MERCHANDISE 



F. A. BRILL CO. 

Floor Covering*— Awnings— Shades 
Draperies 

419 Market St. Phone 21$) Sunbury 



STONER'S 
CREDIT JEWELERS 



SUNBURY, PA. 



HOTEL GOVERNOR 
SNYDER 

GOOD HOME COOKING 



HACKETTS 

Hardware Stores 

325 Market St., 706 Market St. 
ALSO MIDDLEBURG, PA 



CRYSTAL PURE ICE 

CHARLES W KELLER 
Manufacturer and Wholesaler 



B.K.W. COACH LINE 

Tries to give the College Students 
the best service, especially the Sun- 
bury Students. Why TRAVEL with 
an individual? The Coach Line In- 
sures every person. THINK THAT 
OVER. 



SNAVELY'S 

COLLEGE FURNISHINGS 
AND SHOES 



CHILDREN'S SHOP 

MARY H. -BURNS 
Clothes for the College Girl 



Markley-Altvater 

BETTER STUDENTS CLOTHES 
SUNBURY, PA. 



VISIT THE 

REXALL 
DRUG STORE 

WILLIAM J. COTT. Druggist 



S. U. BOOK STORE 

SUSQUEHANNA 
NOTEBOOKS 
STATIONERY 



Eberfs 5c to $1.00 
Store 

Susquehanna Stationery 
SELINSGROVE 



WATCH REPAIR 

Susquehanna Jewelry 
Fountain Pens and Pencils 

W. M. VALSING 

JEWELER SELINSGROVE, PA. 



SCHOOL FASHIONS 

ROSENBLUM'S 

SUNBURY, PA. 
SMART FEMININE APPAREL 



When you think of Photography 
Think of 

Schindler Studio 

515 Market Street, Sunbury, Pa. 
Also Framing and Photo Finishing 



THE BON TON 

Personally Selected 

COATS, DRESSES, HATS 

Sunbury, Pa. 



REICHLEY'S 

WHERE STUDENTS 
MEET AND EAT 



STEFFEN'S 

FINE FOODS— STATIONERY 

Greeting Cards for Every Occasion 

SELINSGROVE, PA 



LOW 

NET COST 



• . . . 



life insurance Is Issued 
to Lutheran Men, Wom- 
en, and Children ages 
from birth to 65. The 
memberi of Lutheran 
Brotherhood own the 
•oclety, and they alone 
receive the earnings. 
There are no stockhold- 
er!. 



Lutheran Brotherhood 



Legal Reserve Life Insurance For Lutherans 
MINNEAPOLIS, 2, Herman L. Ekcrn, President 



MINNESOTA 



430 Market St. 



H. L. ROTHFUSS, Agent Williamsport, Pa. 



BUILD YOUR 
ESTATE NOW I 



YOUR FUTURE 
STARTS TODAY 



SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 
8BJNSGR0VE, PA. 



DO— 






Enjoy Thanksgiving Day 


with 


your parents, 


rela- 


tives, 


or friends. 





Volume LIII 




DON'T— 

Forget classes will be re- 
sumed on Friday morn- 
ing. 



SELJNSGROVE, PENNSYLVANIA, TUESDAY. NOVEMBER 21, 1944 



Number 5 



SU HOST TO RURAL 
LIFE CONFERENCE 



A conference on Rural Life was held 
on November 15, beginning at ten 
o'clock In the morning when opening 
exercises were held in Seibert Chapel. 
Dr. Dunkelberger acted as chairman 
of the conference which is held an- 
nually for ministers, laymen, and com- 
munity leaders of Central Pennsyl- 
vania About 25 ministers, teachers, 
and community leaders were asked to 
attend, but due to transportation dif- 
ficulties, the attendance was consider- I 
erably smaller. Registration of the [ 
delegates took place between 9:30 and 
10:00 a. m. 

Prof. Oliver Baker, of the Unlversay 
of Maryland, was the first authority 
on rural work to speak. His address, 
"The Drift from Dependence on the 
Family to Dependence on the State," 
proved to be full of enlightening sta- 
tistics. Prof. J. K. Stern, Pennsylvania 
State College, spoke on "The Value of 
the Cooperative Movement"; the Rev. 
Talbun D. Hewlett, Stewartstown, spoke j 
on "Rural Evangelism", by Dr. Harvey 
D. Hoover, Gettysburg Theological i 
Seminary, spoke on "Some Post War 
Problems". Each speaker led a dis- ! 
cussion after his address. 

After the general session of the af- i 
ternoon, seminar groups dealt with I 
different ways to develop responsible 
family life, the practical ways to meet 
community problems, and the part of 
each individual citizen in the post-war l 
would play. 

S 

Miss North, Librarian 
Awarded A.M. Degree 

Miss Audrey North, librarian at Sus- 
quehanna, was granted her Master of 
Arts degree by the Regents of the Uni- 
versity of Michigan last Friday. Miss 
North, who returned to the campus on 
November 1, earned her degree at that 
school by taking summer work. 8he 
had previously received her A. B. de- j 
gree at Rockford College and her j 
Bachelor of Science degree at the Uni- 
versity of Buffalo. 

S 

Students Conduct Thank; 
Offering at Trinity Sun. 

On Sunday evening, November 19, 1 
the Student Christian Association con- 
ducted the Vesper service in Trinity ! 
Lutheran Church. This service took 
the place of the weekly Vesper Service t 
held each Sunday evening in the chap- ! 
el of Seibert Hall. 

The service was a Thank-offering I 
program entirely under the leadership 
Of students of Susquehanna. Mr. Celo i 
Leltzel, a pre-theologlcal student, de- 
livered the message of the evening, and 
David Bomboy, another pre-theological 
student, assisted with the service. Dor- 
othy Sternat was the student organist 
for the evening. The special music of 
the evening was given by the Susque- 
hanna Singers. The group sang the 
"Thanksgiving Prayer" by Baker. 

Immediately following the service, a 
social hour was held in the basement 
of the church. This gathering was 
sponsored by the Women's Missionary 
Society of Trinity to take the place of 
the church reception for the students 
which was formerly held each year. 



Thanksgiving Day — 1944 

This Thanksgiving of 1944, our third In this great war, brings us 
blessings, but also it holds many heartaches. We can thank God that 
this Thanksgiving has brought us much closer our prayed for victory, 
but we also realize that more and more of our friends and loved ones 
have left us, some never to return, to aid in bringing that victory to us. 
This Thanksgiving is not only one in which we can give our thanks for 
another bountiful crop, one like we have never before known; but that 
our forces are fighting and winning our Inevitable victory throughout the 
world. 

On November 23, 1944. as we sit down to a Thanksgiving table in a 
free America, where we still have the rights of free speech, unmolested 
religion, and public assembly, let us utter a fervent hope to God that in 
another year our country shall be victorious, and then that forever the 
peoples of the world, seeing their mistakes, shall lay down their arms 
and return to their peaceful pursuits. As in that first Thanksgiving of 
the Pilgrims, we are again faced with grim realities. Let us vow that 
we shall put forth every effort to the task that still remains before us, 
praying that until we observe another Thanksgiving Day the virtues 
of Peace shall have swept over our land. 



Mrs. Ulnch Resigns British Student Taken 

4 „ - . . -f To Hospital After One 
As Admissions Secy.i Day Stay on Campus 



Mrs. Helen P. Ulrich, admissions 
secretary, offered her resignation to 
the college this week in order to ac- 
cept a position on the visiting staff of 
the Snyder County Board of Assistance 
on December 1. 

Mrs. UUlrlch, who qualified under 
Civil Service for war duration appoint- 
ment to the assistance board post, fills 
the vacancy caused by the resignation 
of Mrs. Barbara Spigelmyer, of Pax- 
tonvllle. 

The university regrets the departure 
of Mrs. Ulrich, admission secretary 
since September, 1939. 

S 



Clark Led Crusaderettes, 
ToVictoryOverS.S.T.C. 



A new pre-medical student, Ongkar 
Narayan, of British Guana, arrived on 
campus last Thursday afternoon, and 
the following day was removed to the 
Evangelical Hospital in Lewlsburg, 
with a very serious case of grippe. 

Mr. Narayan, staying at Phi Mu. Is 
a confirmed Lutheran and holds the 
certificate given by Cambridge Univer- 
sity, England, indicating the comple- 
tion of the British Secondary course 
of education. 

The wishes of SU are extented you 
Ongkar for a speedy recovery and a 
pleasant stay at Susquehanna. 
S 



The Susquehanna "Crusaderettes" 
hockey team once again proved them- 
selves victors, this time over Shippena- 
burg State Teachers College to win 
their second straight game. 

The team traveled to Shippensburg, 
leaving Susquehanna at 8:00 A. M. 
The chauffeurs were Mr. Brungart, 
Miss Betty Smith, and Miss Irene 
Shure 

The team arrived at Shippensubrg, 
donned their tunics and won the game, 
the final score being 7-0. 

The lineup for Susquehanna's team 
was as follows: 

Oayle Clark, center forward 
"Pank" Bittinger, right inner 
Selena Lehman, left Inner 
"Ben" Herr, right wing 
Faye Smith, left wing 
Marian Wlllard, center halfback 
Lee Cryder, right halfback 
Nancy Myers, left halfback 
"Dottle" Wagner, right fullback 
"Ginnle" Doss, left fullback 
Naomi Day, goalie 
Substitutions were made by Mary 
Lib Baaehoar, Jean Wortley, and "Bob- 
ble" Kaln. 

Honorable mention should be given 

to Oayle Clark, who made six goals, 

"Bobbie" Kain, who made one goal, 

and Naomi Day, the goalie who play- 

( Concluded on Page 4) 



REINARTZ SPEAKS 
TO SU STUDENTS 



"Avoid the attitude that you are only 
a drop In the bucket in this world of 
ours," Dr. T. Eppling Reinartz told a 
large gathering of students and fac- 
ulty in Seibert Hall Chapel on Wed- 
nesday evening, November 15. Dr. 
Reinartz's address was part of the 
celebration that marked the occasion 
of the 58th anniversary of the found- 
ing of the Student Christian Associa- 
tion on SU's campus. Before Dr. Rein- 
artz's talk, a delicious meal was served 
In Horton dining hall in honor of the 
speaker, members of the present cabi- 
net of the SCA: Franklin Wolfe, Marie 
Klick, Marjorie Stapleton, Mary Lib 
Basehoar, Jane Malkames, Pae Smith, 
Celo Leitzel, Mary Moyer, Jean Kin- 
der, Rlne Winey, Marian Willard, Dor- 
othy Sternat, and Jean Oeiger, and the 
Advisory Committee: Dr. G. Morris 
Smith, Miss Heln, Miss Unangst, and 
Dr. Scudder. 

Dr. Reinartz, who is promotional sec- 
retary of the United Lutheran Church 
of America, centered his interesting 
talk around the theme of some insights 
into Christian missions. 

Jan? Malkames read the scripture 
and Introduced the speaker, and Jean 
Strausser sang a solo, "O Lamb of 
God." The meeting was closed with 
the benediction by Dr. Kretschmann, 



&UGRAD KILLED IN 
FALL FROM PLANE 

1st Lt. Kenneth Klinger, '43, 
Dies After 200 Foot Plunge 

Word was received on the campus 
Monday evening, November 20, that 
1st Lt. Kenneth H. Klinger, '43, of the 
United States Air Corps, died at 7 a. 
m. that day, in a hospital at Lawrence- 
vllle, Illinois, after sustaining severe 
head injuries Friday afternoon when 
he fell 200 feet from the airplane he 
was piloting over George Field. Lt. 
Klinger was unconscious when taken 
to, the hospital and never recovered 
consciousness before his death. 

The circumstances of the accident 
are as yet, and shall probably remain, 
unknown, except that after the plane 
was about 200 feet in the air, Lt. Kling- 
er was seen hurtling to earth, and a 
moment late the plane crashed killing 
instantly the other occupant of the 
ship. 

Lt. Klinger, or "Kenny," as he was 
known on the campus, graduated from 
SU in January, 1943, under the accel- 
erated program, with a B. 8. degree in 
Business Administration. A member 
of Theta Chi Fraternity, he was active 
in baseball, being co-captain of the 
SU team his last year. He also played 
football his senior year 

He enlisted in the Air Corps Re- 
serves while on campus, and was called 
for training in February of 1943. A 
month previous he was married to Miss 
June Pecker, of Sunbury. They were 
the parents of a son, Kenneth Lee. 

Lt. Klinger is the fourth man and 
officer of Susquehanna known to have 
perished in this war. The others, all 
killed in action were Lt. Vincent Frat- 
elli, Lt. Don Wert, and Lt. Jay Bill- 
man. 

Rev. John Ritter to 
Speak at Services 
Thanksgiving Morn 

As is the custom at SU, the annual 
Student Christian Association Thanks- 
giving Service will be held in the chap- 
el on Thanksgiving morning at 10:30. 

The Rev. John Ritter, pastor of the 
Lutheran Church in Kratzerville, will 
deliver the address, and Miss Gloria 
Machamer will sing a solo. Rine Win- 
ey, Jr.. is in charge of the service. 

All students remaining on campus, 
faculty members, and townspeople are 
welcomed to this program giving thanks 
to God for a bountiful harvest. 
a 



Conservatory Students 
Present Recital Tonight 

Tonight, Tuesday, November 21, 1944, 
the students of the Conservatory of 
Music will present an evening recital t 
at 8:15 p. m. in Seibert Chapel. The 
varied program consists of the follow- 
ing: 

"Poem" by Taylor, Dorothy Juplna, 
(piano); "Mazurka" by Liszt, Louise 
Kresge (piano); "When Celia Sings" 
by Mohr, Jean Strausser (song); "A 
Song" by MacDowell, (string trio) 
Margaret Walter (violin), Virginia Hal- 
lock ( 'cello), and Janet Rohrbach 
(piano). 

(Concluded on Page 2) 



PAGE TWO 



THE SUS<JUEHANNA, SELINSGROVE. PENNSYLVANIA 



TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 1944 




n 




5M 




Established 1891 

RINK G. Winev, JR., '46 Editor 

Jean C. GnoER, '46 Associate Editor 

Gloria GAsparoli. '46 — - Managing Editor 

Arvuur J. Gelnett, '47 Sports Editor 

Rmnrters- Marv Elizabeth Basehoar, '45; Ruth Botdorf, '45, proofreader; Cor- 
^?nle Kahn '45; Laverne Kohn, '45; Louise Kresge, '45; Gloria Machmer, 
•45- Prances Bittinger, '45; June Hoffman, '46; Jayne Troutman, 46; Norma 
Ha'zen '40 ■ Ruth Cochrane, '46; Emily Botdorf, '46; Marie Klick, '46; Vir- 
ginia Hallock, '46; Carmen Beckwith, '46; Jackie Braveman, '47; Joe Taylor, 
•47- Jane Gundrum, '47; Dorothy Wagner, '47; Faye Smith, '47; Caroline 
Pfahler '47' Doris Williamson, '47; Marian Walker, '47;. Gayle Clark, *47; 
Martha' Garaid, '48; Helen Zahn, '48; Betty Smith, '48; Caroline Marks. 
■48 • Betty Frank '48; Gloria Walmer, '48; Ruth Criswell, '48; Roberta 
Qaetz '48- Ed Madden, '48; Sara Lee Smith, *48; Margaret Johns, *48; 
Joan Smith, '48; Harriet Gould, 48; John Warner, '45; Aldo Pescarmona, 
'47- Caroline Graybill, '48. 

Couinne Kahn. '45 - - Business Manager 

Helen Eby, '47 :.--. Advertising Manager 

Jean Kinzer, '46 .". Circulation Manager 

Business Assistants: Roswell Johns, 46; Ed Madden, '48; Russell Brown '48; 
Betty Frank. '48; Cynthia Carmel. '48; Jean Wheat, Barbara Kain, Hilda 
Markey. 



HELPFUL BIBLE PASSAGES 
FOR DAILY READING 



Published semi-monthly throughout the school year at a subscription rate of 

$2.00 a year. 
Entered as second class mail matter at Selinsgrove, Pa. 

! Juliet" by Gounod, Gloria Machamer 1 
j(aria); "Carollion" by Delomarter, 
| Dorothy Sternat (organ); "Serenade 
'du Tslgane" by Valdez-Kreisler, Mar- 
garet Walter (violin). 

"Prom a Railway Carriage" by Had- 
ley, and "Dance a Cachucha" by Sul- 
livan, Susquehanna Singers, directed 
by Mrs. Alice Giauque. 
■S 



Thanksgiving, Nov. 23 Psalm 103 

Friday - John JJ 

Saturday - ---- Psalm 23 

Sunday, November 26 Psalm 1 

Monday --- Matthew 5 

Tuesday - Romans 8 

Wednesday I Corinthians 13 

Thursday - P^ 1 ™ 91 

Friday Matthew 6 

Saturday - John 3 

Sunday, December 3 Isaiah 40 

Monday — ----- Psalm 46 

8 

Stars and Stripes 

Information has been received re- 
garding the honor which has been be- 
stowed upon Lieut. Donald Shafer. 
x'44, formerly of Selinsgrove. Lieut. 
Shafer has been awarded a second Oak 
Leaf Cluster to the Air Medal for "mer- 
itorlus achievement while participating 
in aerial flight". He Is a pilot of a 
Fifteenth Air Force Flying Fortress. He 
also earned the European-African, 
Middle-East Theatre Ribbon. 

Sally Mitke, '47, has completed her 
basic training at Hunter College and 
has been sent to Yeoman School in 
Iowa for further training: 

George Stowe '46, paratrooper, is be- 
ing sent across according to word re- 
ceived recently. Robert Wohlsen "46, oi 
the Navy, is row in Washington, D. C 
Oeneva "Skip" Keller '46, now sta- 
tioned at Hunter College, finds the life 
of a Wave very interesting. 

Two' of our former classmates were 
back with us this past week, Ensign 
Ray Hochstahl, '43, who has just re- 
turned from the shores of France 
where he was on duty with an LST, 
and Wllmer Grimm x'44, who Is a Lieu- 
tenant in the United States Army Air 
Corps. 

CONSERVATORY STUDENTS 
PRESENT RECITAL TONIGHT 



The heartfelt sympathy of the stu 
dent body and faculty Is extended Mr. 
Jerry Moore upon the passing of his 
mother. 




What Did You Give? 



Northumberland. Pa 
November 17, 1944 
Dear Mr. Wlney: 

On Thursday we received "The Sus- 
quehanna" and today Mrs. Gross for- 
warded it to our son, David. Before 
sending it I noticed an article that 
each student was requested to contrib- 
ute to the World Student Service Fund. 

Well, we consider David as still one 
of the student body of Susquehanna, 
only away on leave, and since he Is send- 
ing money home to enable him to go 
back to school again we feel that he 
would like to be numbered among those 
who have contributed. We did not 



And here, Ladies ad Gentlemen, we 
have the side-show of this hyar paper 
—the collection of freaks and antics, 
the spice of S. U.'s life- 
Ross and Helen were Newport bound 
on last sight and since no news Is good 
news, I guess they arrived O.K. Noth- 
ing like a week-end with the^ "Folks." 
Poor Ira's got it bad and (as the say- 
ing goes) that ain't good! But how 
could he help lmprqvlng 100% after 
the delegation— Corlnne, Rubye, Sara 
Lee, Bobbie, Larry, Aldo, and Red-- 
arrive? We're all pullin' for ya, Boy! 
The mystery of mysteries has reared 
its head on our peaceful campus — Who 
is the unknown female who phones 
that klller-diller Aldo every nite ? ? ? 
"Call for Sherlock Holmes." 

Life's little Ironies can best be Illus- 
trated by the sad story of Elaine Lake's 
week-end! She strangely preferred S, 
U. to home when she discovered that 
both her brother and a handsome man 
picked that time to come here to visit 
her ! ! Ah, this cold, cruel world! 

The Spotlight was on Tommy Tuck- 
er's band, but our spotlight searched 
the crowd and found Janie Malkames 
and Leah Cryder having a wonderful 
time in spite of the fact that they 
were sharing the sailor In the party! ! ! 
"We did It! ! We did it! ! WE did 
it! ! Beat Shlppensburg"— signed, The 
Girbi Hockey Team Congrats, Gals! ! 
That's super— and what a score! ! 7-0. 
Before I forget, two frosh told me 
they would enjoy seeing their names In 
the paper. Here you are, Girls— Cyn- 
thia Carmel and Betty Leiderman. 

Jean Wentzel formed a one woman 
cheering section for the Navy at the 
game Saturday afternoon— but with 
Jean In that capacity they didn't need 
any other! ! ! And speaking of that 
game— did you see the way the girls 
were drooling over those gorgeous men! 
Bet you gals didn't know they were 
all going steady and had dates (darn 
It! !) Carolyn Pfahler knew the one- 
chummy, huh? 

This weekend seemed to be open 
house— at least visitors were here by 
the score. . . Jean Gelger w$s seen 



And Sunday afternoon saw two little 
sailors expressed from Bloomsburg to 
see Jean Wortley— Bobble got the other 
one— not Johnny! ! ! But what a- 
bout Scotty? ? and Larry? ? 

Welllver's fancy seems to have turn- 
ed Lenore Garman's way. Anyway, 
Friday night saw them on the tandem 
taking turns with Harriet and Dexter 
W. 

B. J. Fisher's interests have changed 
again (I think). Could Dave Bomboy 
be the lucky one this time? ? 

Long-distance calls come in fast and 
furious around here, but there was 
only one that meant anything to Adele 
Taub 'cause Boris was on the other 
end of that one! ! ! 

Frankle Wolfe has at last sold his 
car! ! His dates from now on will 
have to be secured on a strictly "man" 
basis. # 

Come back again and we'll have a 
new show rigged up for youse ! ! 



THE FORUM 



As women nhave taken over nearly 
every Job that men can do, several stu- 
dents on campus voiced their opinion 
when this question -Jvas asked them, 
"Do you think a woman will ever run 
for President of the* United States?" 
Here are their answers. • 

JANIE GUNDRUM— Yes, I think 
that in another generation a woman 
will run for the presidency, but I 
don't think that women are capable of 
handling the office. I don't think she 
would be elected If she ran against a 
man, but if she were, it would only be 
for one term. 

CAROLYN PFAHLER— In about half 
a century I believe a woman will try 
to run for president. I think- women 
are capable of being in the office, but 
she probably wouldn't be elected, and 
if she were, it would be for one term. 
MARY LIZZIO— I feel that In a cen- 
tury a woman will be put up for the 



. office of president, but I doubt the ca 
pointing out the interesting spots to! Polity of women in such a position, 
two charming girl friends; Janie I Prejudice would probably prevent her 
Gundrum's sister from Harrisburg was 1 from attaining the presidency, but If 
here too Dotty Croft came back fori she won she'd only last one term If 
seconds on something (did she get it??) I f hat long 



At the Stanley 

Monday and Tuesday, Nov. 20, 21 
Seventh Cross starring Spencer Tra- 
notice who were the chairman or so- I J* Tracy in a new kind of roto-*e 
lienors of the different teams but hope ** ^SEtTSE ''vIm^v 
you will see that the proper person re- 
ceives this check for $5.00. 
Thanking you for this service, I am, 
Yours very truly, 

WILLIAM S. GROSS. 
(Ed. Note: Lt. David Gross, x'44, was 
a pre-law student at SU, and is now a 
pilot of a B-25, in the 5th Air Force 
in the Southwest Pacific.) 



-S- 



New$ About Notes 



(Continued from Page 1) 
"Ballade" by Debussy, Marjorle 
Stapleton (piano); "Barcarolle" by 
Dethler, -Marie Klick (organ) ; "Rev- 
erie" by Schutt, Louise Schlick (piano) ; 

••Orlentale" by Albanizt Janet Rohr- jed up again as number two song of the 
bach (piano); Mlcaela's Air from "Car- I week. Together hit the "top three" !n 



First on the Hit Parade this week 
was that speedy little Trolley Song, 
which has been aiming for the top for 
several weeks. Last week's winner, 
Dance With the Dolly, dropped to 
fourth place and I'll Walk Alone climb 



rrcn" by Bizet, Hope Spicer (aria); 
"Gavotte Caprice" by de Bueris, Len- 
ore Garman (clarinet). 

"Legende No. 1" by Campbell-Tipton, 
Wells Gemberllng (piano); "Concerto 
in G Minor" (first movement) by Men- 
delssohn, Mrs. Margaret Witmer 
(piano), and Professor P. M. Linebaugh 
(organ); Waltz Song from "Romeo and 



third place. 

Let Me Love You Tonight entered 
the Hit Parade in sixth place. As sung 
by Sinatra it should be a coming top 
tune. Aother new son, I'm Making 
Believe, seventh in listening pleasure, 
received a large applause and a few 
weeks should see it among the top 
three. 



man concentration camp. You'll live 
every moment of those hours with 
Tracy as he wanders around sought by 
to turn for help. A movie well worth 
the Gestapo and at a loss as to whom 
your evening. . . A war movie— yes. 
but one that more Americans should 
see and take to heart. 
Wednesday. Nov. 22 

The CantervtUe Ghost featuring Mar- 
garet O'Brien. This three hundred 
year old ghost was the terror of the 
house until under tiny Margaret O- 
,'Brien's influence, he Is found to be a 
i big "scaredy cat." Don't sit In an end 
'.seat or you'll be rolling In the aisles. 
Thursday, Nov. 23. 

Take It Big with Jack Haley, Harriet 
iHilliard, and Mary Beth Hughes. A 
rollicking movie that starts when the 
^addlc end of the horse (Jack, in dis- 
guise) inherits a ranch and makes 
"good." 
Friday and Saturday, Nov. 24, 25 

Bathing Beauty featuring Red Skel- 
ton and Esther Williams and In tech- 
nicolor too. It's a. riot. Red Is the 
only male In an all girls' school. You 
can Imagine the rest. For further de- 
tails ask anyone who has seen lt. 



JEAN KELLY— It is my belief that a 
woman will try to run for president 
in approximately forty years. As far 
as capability goes, I think she would 
be capable intellectually, but not emo- 
tionally. Sha might be elected, but 
only for one term. I think Clare Booth 
Luce aspires to the position, but I per- 
r cnally don't think she Is capable. 

HARRY WELLIVER— Yes, I believe 
\ woman will run for president in a 
-jeneration or so, but I don't think 
women are capable of such an office. 
I definitely do not think she will be 
elected because men wouldn't want it 
and the women would probably be 
jealous. 

BETTY RAMER— Women do every- 
thing else. so they'll probably run for 
president too. I don't know whether 
they're capable or not, but lt will be a 
century anyway before she's nomin- 
ated. I think she'll be elected by the 
rnen, and will probably be In office for 
one term. I think Mrs. MacArthur 
would be capable. 

DEXTER WEIKEL — Yea, I think 
that within twenty years a woman will 
run for president, but I don't think any 
are capable and I don't think she 
would be elected If she were to run. 
She'd only last one term If she did get 
elected. 

ART GELNETT— Probably in fifty 
years a woman will run for president 
but she wouldn't be elected if she were 
to run. I definitely think women are 
not capable of the Job. 



TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 1944 



THE SUSQUEHANNA, SELINSGROVE, PENNSYLVANIA 



PAGE THREE 



OUR FROSH 



ROBERTA OAETZ is Mt. Carmel's 
contribution to our freshman class. 
She's 5' 4 Mi" tall and is taking the Lib- 
eral Arts course. She likes classical 
music, roast veal, and ping pong. She 
is partial to the Air Corps, as those 
frequent letters from Texas show. Her 




Debating Society 

The Debating Society under the able 
guidance of Dr. Russell Gilbert, has 
begun work on the topic of this seas- 
on's debate: "Resolved that the Fed- 



eral Government should enact Leglsla- 

pethate is people who brag and she 1 1 ion requiring the settlement of all 

collects foreign dolls. i labor disputes by compulsory arbitra- 

MARTHA GIRARD comes from j tion when voluntary means of settle- 

Lewisburg and is enrolled in the Lib- | ment have failed, constitutionality con- 



eral Arts course. She plans to major 
in Journalism and is helping to further 
her career by writing for the Lewis- 
burg Saturday News. Her favorite food 
is steak with mushrooms and her pet 
hate is dieting. Swimming ranks first 
on her list of sports and her favorite 
orchestra leader is Fred Waring. 

NAOMI GARMAN is enrolled in the 
pre-medlcal course and comes from 
Richfield. She says she Just "loves" to 
bowl and play basketball. She spends 
all her spare time writing letters, 
which, incidentally, find their way all 
over the world. In line with that, her 
hobby is collecting foreign money. She 
likes all food in general-end the more 
the merrier. Her pet hate is people 
who take her seriously. 



ceded." 

The debators are planning on several 
trips during the year. They plan to 



Thanksgiving Dinner 

The annual Thanksgiving turkey 
banquet for the students and faculty 
of, Susquehanna University was held 
on Monday evening, November 20, at 6 
o'clock in the Horton dining hall. The 
affair, one of the annual epic events 
on the SU campus, was marked by 
formal attire. 

As the annual Thanksgiving vaca- 
tion has been reduced to one day, 
Thanksgiving Day itself, this occasion 
will be the best substitute that can be slx w6eks of the academlc year 



Student Council 

Representatives 

Eleanor Steele and Catherine Pox 
have been elected as representatives of 
the- freshman and sophomore classes 
respectively in the Student Council. 
They will attend the meetings of the 
council, but will have no vote. It is 
their responsibility to present matters 
of their respective classes to the coun- 
cil. 

Freshmen and sophomore represen- 
tatives of good scholastic standing are 
nominated by the Student Council and 
are elected by the women of the re- 
spective classes at the close of the first 



attend the State Debators' Convention offend those students who will not be 
at Pennsylvania State College in the ! fortunate enough to travel home for 
spring and a debate tournament at the holiday festivities. 
Shippensburg State Teachers' College, i a « 



Radio debates are also being planned. 
An incentive for the debators to do 
their best is Tau Kappa Alpha, an hon- 
orary debating fraternity on campus. 

Members of the Debating Society are 
Celo Leitzel, Aldo Pescarmona. Gloria 
Gasparoli, Cynthia Carmel, Lillian 
Werner, Jean Wentzel, Naomi Gar- 
men, Arthur Gelnett, La Verne Kohn, 
Ruth Botdorf, Alma Williamson, and 
Pauline Solomon. All students inter- 
ested In debating are cordially invited 



Business Society 

The monthly meeting of the business 
society was held Tuesday evening at 
7:00 p. m. in the recreation room of 
Seibert Hall. 

Plans were discussed for having a 
hay ride, but nothing definite' has been 
formulated as yet. 

The ways and means committee gave 
reports on various ways of raising 
money for the society. The most sue 



HARRIET GARNER, whose home i to attend the next meeting of the so- j cestui drive in this line has been the 



town is Hazleton, is a music student. clety W hich will be held Thursday 

She is especially fond of spaghetti and j 4 m G A . 300. 

meat balls and her favorite sport is J g 

badminton. In her leisure time she| 

reads magazines and also collects sou- Mgma /llp&a iota 

venirs She hates to have people teU | On Tuesday evening, November 



her that she can't do this or that be 
cause she is a P.K. (Preacher's Kid, 
to you.) 

ANN GIBSON is another pre-medi- 
cal student whose home is in Lewis- 
town. She's 5' 5" tall and loves to 
dance. She collects Glenn Miller's rec- 
ords and places spaghetti first on her 
menu. ' She's partial to civilians and 
her pet peeve is getting up early in 
the- morning; When asked what she 
does in her leisure time, her only re- 
ply was, "What leisure time?" 

HARRIET GOULD comes from 
Johnstown and is a music student. 
She likes stuffed pork chops, but would 
much rather dance than eat— and 
that's golngg some, believe me! She 



14, 
S. A. I. held an "EVENING IN PARIS" 
for the other sororities. Miss Virginia 
Hallock was the head-waiter in the 
"Paree Night Club". The entertain- 
ment was imported, and of a very high 
degree. Marie Klick, Elise Thompson, 
June Hoffman, and Lotfise Schllck were 
the Can-Can dancers, as well as per- 
forming their duties as cigarette girls. 
A ballet dance was offered by Hope 
Spicer. Dottie Sternat and Virginia 
Hallock were Apache Dancers. Of 
course no night club would be com- 
plete without its Torch Singer. Car- 
men (Hildegarde) Beckwith, the not- 
ed(?) singer, handled this part of the 
program. The petite French artist, 
Jean Strausser, was one of the noted 



at j collection of scrap paper here on cam' 
pus. The members also proposed hav- 
ing a booth at the auxiliary bazaar to 
be held December 2nd. 

Rine Winey tendered his resignation 
as president of the business society, 
and Betty Jayne Herr was elected, to 
All this office for the* remainder of the 
year. 



Vespers, December 3 

On Sunday, December 3, at 5:45 p. 
m. the Student Christian Association 
will present a Bible drama at its week- 
ly Vesper service. The drama, entitled 
"Ruth," will be presented in the form 
of a radio broadcast. Those taking 
part are as follows: 

Ruth— Marie Klick 

Naomi— Marjorie Stapleton 

Boaz — Rine Winey 

Servant— David Bomboy 

Announcer— La Verne Kohn 

Hope Spicer will have charge of the 

sound effects and Dorothy Sternat will 

be the organist. 



MILLER'S 

Where Ed's and Co-Ed's Meet 
For Many Good Things to Eat 

Corner Pine and Orange Street* 
3 Blocks from Campos 



George B. Rine FLORIST 



HOUSE St-Y 
STORE 145-T 



guests at the Club. The music was 
also likes .swimming and Ml"^ '^_^ furnished by France's noted Girls' Or- 
chestra. For refreshments Champagne 
(Ginger Ale), ice cream, pretzels, and 
sandwiches were served. An enjoyable 
evening was had by all. 
«- 



her ambition is to lead a large choral 
group. Her pet peeve: conceited people. 

1 Wonder Why 



The First National Bank of Selins Grove 

1.1 

WELCOMES STUDENTS' ACCOUNTS 



. . . Mary Ellsn Wood is so crazy about 
the night watchman? 
. . . Skip Madden enjoys "nipping" 
the girls around while they're jitter- 
bugging with him? 
. . . Rine Winey likes onions? 
. . . There were so many "ah's" and 
"oh's" at the women's house meeting 
last Thursday evening? Could it have 
been the mention of various foods that 
brought out these exclamations of pure 
joy? 

... All of the coeds are so anxious to 
meet the new male on campus? 
. . . Celo Leitzel dislikes having people 
address him as "cello?" (Pronounced 
"chello.") 

. . . Adele Taub has been getting so 
many lovely gifts lately? Come on, 
Adele, who is he???? 
. . . Cora Mae Arthur writes on flower 
ed stationery? 



Hospitalized Students 

Last week Dawn Ebert, '48, day stu- 
dent from Shamokln Dam, had her 
tonsils removed at the Sunbury Com- 
munity Hospital. 

Ira Wasserburg, '45, entered the 
Evangelical Hospital last Saturday 
evening after being confined to his 
room at Bond and Key for several days 
with a severe case of grippe. 

Our wishes for the complete and 
speedy recovery of these two members 
of our student body. 



Fine Job Printing 
THE SELINSGROVE TIMES 



Quality Only the Finest 

NATIONAL RESTAURANT 

Hotel and Dining: Service 

Sellnsgrove, Pa. 



29 N. Market St. 




the arrival of a petit package which 
can mean only one thing? 
. . . Naomie Oarman can't stand people 
who are constantly moving furniture 
around in their rooms? 
. . . Carl Herman Is so quiet? 
... Joe Taylor likes to'wear red draw- 
ers while playing basketball? - Maybe 
Could it be that the I they remind horn if "rushing.'' (Red 
unique paper does something to i Russians.) 

''him?" • • • Mary Lib Basehoar asks her stu- ' 

I . . Marian Willard is always sewing I dents at the High School to kindly 
buttons on her jackets? Maybe it's I wait until after class to tell Jokes? A 
so she'll have something to wear. i joke's a Joke any time, though. 

. . . Ann Malkames is so lonely lately? j . . . Don Wholsen didn't have any ex- 
We certainly wish that LaMay Crass tra pictures made of himself? Surely 
hadn't left S. U. We're all going to | they couldn't have been that badl! 
miss her. and so does Ann. I . . . There is so much secrecy about 

. . . Ellen 8tein can hardly wait until the play which is going to be presented 
Christmas comes? Is she expecting | sometime in the future? 



For School News Read 

SUNBURY DAILY ITEM 



SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

SELINSGROVE, PENNSYLVANIA 

Co-educational — Accredited 

i 

For more than eighty-six years in the service of Christian higher 
education. 



Curricula: 

LIBERAL ARTS BUSINESS 

COMMERCIAL EDUCATION 

For Catalog write 



MUSIC 



Q. Morris Smith, D.D., LL.D., Pres. 
Russell Gait, Ph.D., Dean 






PAGE FOUR 



THE SUSQUEHANNA, SELINSGROVE, PENNSYLVANIA 



TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 1944 



Sophs Win Over Frosh 
To Gain Hockey Crown 

The hockey Round Robin has come 
to a close and the sophomores are the 
winners of a hard earned title. The 
final game in the contest was played 
last week at which time the sophomores 
fought their way to a 3 to 1 victory 
over the freshmen. 

The game was closely contested from 
beginning to end with neither team 
having a decided advantage over the 
other. 

The sophomores scored first with a 
goal by Gayle Clark in ths first half. 
The frosh retaliated with a goal before 
the end of the half. The second half 
was a brilliant display of defensive 
.power by the sophomore team as they 
"held the frosh scoreless and at the 
same time put across two more goals. 

With this game went the champion- 
ship of the girls' intramural hockey 
league. 

The line-up for the game was as fol- 
lows: 

Sophomores Position Freshmen - 

Clark Center Kain 

Lizzio R. Inner Relmer 

Lehman L. Iner Frank 

Herr R. Wing Oglensky 

Wllhour L. Wing Steele 

Wolfe C. Halfback ... Wortley 

Cryder R. Halfback ... Burkhart 

Myers L. Halfback Kemp 

Wagner R. Fullback Doss 

Leiby L. Fullback Wentzel 

Day Goalie - Gould 



SU Cagers Prepare 
For Opener Nov. 30 



B.K.W. COACH LINE 

Tries to give the College Students 
the best service, especially the Sun- 
bury Students. Why TRAVEL with 
an individual? The Coach Line In- 
sures every person. THINK THAT 
OVER. 



Coach A. A. Stagg, Jr., and his eleven 
dribblers are diligently preparing for 
the opening of the coming basketball 
season, which begins on the Susque- 
hanna hardwoods on November 30, 
with the Milton Y. M. C. A. cagers. 
At present, the team is working out 
every Monday, Wednesday, and Fri- 
day from three until five. 

This year Coach Stagg must build 
a team around four lettermen; Cap- 
tain John Koscis; Bernard Swienckl 
last year high scoring forward for the 
Crusaders; Joseph Taylor and Rine 
Wlney, Jr. Along with these four on 
the prospective list are: Donald Her- 
rold, an upperclassman, and "Scottle" 
Small, Don Wohlsen, and Jerry Moore, 
freshman candidates. There is also a 
possibility that Celo Leitzel may re- 
port for the team since he is the 
keenest shot of the men in the school 
! excluding Swienckl. 

Of the possible combinations for 
starting line-up there is Koscis and 
Taylor at guard, Swienckl at center 
and perhaps Moore and Herrold at 
forward. The other men who are 
working hard for starting positions are 
j Winey, Wholsen, and Small. The oth- 
i er men who are candidates for the 
I team this year are Ros Johns, "Skip" 
Madden, and Carl Herman. Art Gel- 
nett reported for the team but is defin- 
itely out for the season because of a 
heart murmur. . 



At the present time the Stagg men 
are looking for scrimmage games with 
local high schools and organizations 
in order to shape up for their four- 
teen game schedule. In addition to 
their present schedule they anticipate 
an alumni game with all former Sus- 
quehannans who can be present for 
the game. Bud Smith will head the 
squad along with Eugene Smith, Wil- 
liam Janson, Herman 3tuempfle, 
George Bass, Robert Fisher, Tom Val- 
unas, and numerous others. 
Practice Games 

Last Thursday evening the SU five, 
in a practice game, soundly trounced a 
civilian five from Bucknell, 51 to 32. 

However, on the following Saturday 
afternoon a Bucknell Sailor quintet re- 
versed the proceedings with a 61 to 28 
win over several members of the SU 
squad. 

S 

CLARK LED CRUSADERETTES • 

(Continued from Page 1) 
ed a splendid game, not allowing the 
opponents to score one point. 

The entire team played a splendid 
game, and the cooperation of the play- 
ers was thrilling to observe. 

After the game a delicious dinner 
was served to both teams. Entertain- 
ment was provided by several of the 



coeds- from Shippensburg. 

Next on the program was a swim- 
ming party in the beautiful pool in 
Shippensburg's gymnasium. This was 
greatly enjoyed by all who participat- 
ed. 

Following the swim every one was 
served hot chocolate and sandwiches. 

The team then started on its return 
home, tired but happy. 



WHITMER-STEELE 
COMPANY 

LUMBER MANUFACTURES 
NORTHUMBERLAND. PA. 



FEHR'S 

THE STORE THAT LEADS 
IN BETTER MERCHANDISE 



F. A. BRILL CO. 

Floor Coverings— Awnings— Shades 
Draperies 

419 Market St Phone 2180 Sunbury 



HOTEL GOVERNOR 
SNYDER 

GOOD HOME COOKING 



SNAVELY'S 

COLLEGE FURNISHINGS 
AND SHOES 



HACKETTS 

Hardware Stores 

325 Market St, 706 Market St. 
ALSO MIDDLEBURG, PA. 



CRYSTAL PURE ICE 

CHARLES W. KELLER 
Manufacturer and Wholesaler 



Ebert's 5c to $1.00 
Store 

Susquehanna Stationery 
SELINSGROVE 



S. U. BOOK STORE 

SUSQUEHANNA 
NOTEBOOKS 
STATIONERY 



SCHOOL FASHIONS 

ROSENBLUM'S 

SUNBURY. PA. 
SMART FEMININE APPAREL 



When you think of Photography 
Think of 

Schindler Studio 

515 Market Street, Snnbury, Pa. 
Also Framing and Photo Finishing 



MILLER BROS. 
SHOE STORE 

SUNBURY, PA. 



' STONER'S 
CREDIT JEWELERS 



SUNBURY, PA. 



CHILDREN'S SHOP 

MARY H. BURNS 

Clothes for the College Girl 



Markley-Altvater 

BETTER STUDENTS CLOTHES 
SUNBURY, PA. 



VISIT THE 

REXALL 
DRUG STORE 

WILLIAM J. COTT. Druggist 



WATCH REPAIR 

Susquehanna Jewelry 
Fountain Pens and Pencils 

W. M. VALSING 

JEWELER SELINSGROVE, PA. 



THE BON TON 

Personally Selected 

COATS, DRESSES, HATS 

Sunbury, Pa. 



REICHLEY'S 

WHERE STUDENTS 
MEET AND EAT 



STEFFEN'S 

FINE FOODS— STATIONERY 

Greeting Cards for Every Occasion 

SELINSGROVE, PA. 



LOW 

NET COST . . . . 

life insurance Is Issued 
to Lutheran Men, Worn- 
•n, and Children ages 
from birth to 88. The 
member* of Lutheran 
Brotherhood own the 
society, and they alone 
receive the earnlnga. 
There are no stockhold- 
er!. 



Lutheran Brotherhood 



Legal Reserve Life Insurance For Lutherans 
MINNEAPOLIS, 2, Herman L. Ekern, President 



MINNESOTA 



430 Market St. 



H. L. ROTHFUSS, Agent Williamsport, Pa. 



BUILD YOUR 
ESTATE NOW! 



YOUR FUTURE 
STARTS TODAY 



GIRLS— 

Don't forget to find a 
snapshot of yourself. See 
the story on page 3. 



n 



u 




«tem 



BOYS— 

Sorority rushing makes 
the evenings this week 
seem rather dull, huh? 



Volume Mil 



SELINSGROVE, PENNSYLVANIA, TUESDAY, DECEMBER 5, 1944 



Number 6 



- A Play Review - 



•"Death Comes to My Friends" 



This h My story . ! STRINGFELLOW BARR SPEAKS TOMGHT 

ON "TOWARD A NEW WORLD ORDER" 



"Curtain going up". Excuse me, me- 
chanics were a little wrong, but after 
some struggle the curtain finally part- 
ed on the Theatre Guild's first play, 
"Death Comes to My Friends," reveal- 
ing Prince Alecti of Scotland with a 
group of his most intimate friends in 
the dining room aboard the S. Y. 
"Clerlans". 

The principal character, Prince Alec- 
ti, was dramatically portrayed by Rine 
Winey, who emphatically declared to 
Cynthia one day at practice, that 
"nossing" should ever separate them. 
(Jackson probably gave him too much 
champagne.) 

Cynthia, Alecti's lady love, was play- 
ed by Bobbie Kane, for her purpose 
the port hole was constructed. You 
know — to see the full moon — Ahhh! 
Oh yes — the port hole — that was Ruthie 
Ulrich's and Martie Shawarko's work. 
Pretty nice, we thought. 

Speaking of the port hole — weren't 
those sound effects rare? Everyone 
actually shuddered when Harriet 
"made the thunder and rain." 

Then of course, you remember Leah 
Cryder with her gray hair, who was 
"Fill-er-up-to-tho-top" Lady Lenster. 
(Or don't you remember that line? 
But, of course, you do.) 

Completing the cast were Bobbie 
Gaetz as Alecti's sister, Mariachi, (re- 
member her, with those ear-piercing 
shrieks at the end of the play), and 
Dave (yes, sir) Bomboy as Jackson, the 
ship steward. 

How did you like that ending? Dra- 
matic, wasn't it? Someone remarked, 
"You just can't kill a good man like 
Winey". True, but wasn't it too bad 
about the rest? 

Well, anyway, orchids to Rubye Mey- 
ers for her skillful direction and to 
Mr. Hasklns for his grand assistance. 
Let's have more Theatre Guild plays 
like this one. 

P. S. Onions to anyone who laughed 
at this serious drama. 



By Ongkar Narayan 

as told to Jackie Braveman 

and Dottie Wagner 



Ongkar Narayan arrived on Susque- 
hanna's campus November 17th and 
was welcomed by Dean Gait. It was 
five days since he had left his home 
in Georgetown, British New Guiana, 
and started the trip north. Ongkar's 
trip was far from uneventful. His 
plane stopped at Porto Rico 



1 — ' — ,-- -.., 

Sorority Rushing Begins 

KDP22,ODS26 f SA112 



Star Course Number Presents 
Pres. of St. John's College 



At 8:15 tonight, December 

Sorority rushing period was formally ' Stringfellow Barr, president 



5, 1944. 
of St. 



opened yesterday when the Inter-Sor- 
ority Council hejd a tea in the Seibert 
Parlors from 4 to 6 o'clock for the up- 
Haiti, I pn'class girls and the freshmen. 



and was delayed at Cuba because of i 
i engine trouble. At Miami, Ongkar \ 

boarded a train which took him to 1 
; Washington, and then Sunoury, where 

he completed his Journey on one of • 
| the familiar BKW buses. He was '■ 
' accompanied as far as Washington by 

I friend who went on to Thiel College. 
Unfortunately Ongkar became ill j 

and was forced to go to the Evan- 1 

gelical Hospital in Lewisburg, where! 
, he remained in bed for a week. While i 

in the hospital, Ongkar saw his first; 

snow and had turkey on Thanksgiving, 

which helped to make things pleas- 

anter. 

Ongkar is tall, good looking, and 

; eight. en years old. His birthday is 

February 20th Even after such a short 

j while Ongkar has come to be famous 

OH campus for his gorgeous dazzling 

smile. He is East Indian by birth and 

has lived all his life in British Guiana, 

He graduated from public school in 

six years instead of the regular eight 

and then attended high school for two 

years, He then passed Junior and 

Senior exams at Cambridge University 

which has a branch In British Guiana. 

: While waiting to be notified of his 

grades Ongkar taught in the high 

(Concluded on Page 4) 



The period of rushing will last until 
1:00 a. m. Sunday. Dec. 10, when quiet 
i period shall be observed. The quiet 
\ period will end Monday noon, Decem- 
i ber 11, when the rushees bid the sor- 
i ority they desire. 

It has been decided as a war-time 
emergency that the number of mem- 
i bers. active and pledges, shall not ex- 
I ceed forty-five. The number of girls 
| that may be pledged this year by each 
| sorority are : Sigma Alpha Iota, twelve; 
I Kappa Delta Phi, twenty-two; and 
i Omega Delta Sigma, twenty-six. 

Each sorority has a big party as a 
high light of rushin ;. Also each sor- 
ority has three other parties that last 
| from 9:30 to 10:30 p. m. At the pres- 
| ent, these parties are being held for the 
rushees. 

S 

, Dance 

An inter-soronty fraternity dance 
will be held on December 16 in the 
Alumni gym. The theme of the dance 
will be Christmas. 

The chaperons, who will act as 
judges, will choose a Christmas Queen 



John's College, Annapolis, Md., and 
second number in the Susquehanna 
Star Course series, will speak in Sei- 
bert Chanel. 




from the girls attending the dance. 
Ivan Faux will 



STRINGFELLOW BARR 
Since 1937, when Dr. Barr became its 
president, St. John's, third oldest col- 
lege in the United States, has merited 
the title, "Most Discussed Educational 



mission is $2.10 per couple. 



Crusader Five Defeats Alumni and 
Milton YMCA; Loses to Gallaudet 



4th SU Grad Killed 




Susquehanna 42, Alumni 41 

Susquehanna's cagers opened their 
1944-45 season by squeezing out a 42- 
41 win over a strong and fighting alum- 
ni team on the Susquehanna floor Fri- 
day, November 24. The first quarter 
was a nip-and-tuck battle ending with Swiencki, c 
the Crusaders leading 9-8. However, Kocsis, g ... 



Totals 16 

Susquehanna 

Field 

Herrold, f 3 

Wohlsen, f 1 

Moore, I 3 

6 

1 



9x14 41 



Totals 15 



at the end of the half the count was Taylor, g 1 

22-14 with the home lads out ahead. Winey, g 

The second half proved to be a thriller — 

with the alumni hot on the trail of 
the S, U. dribblers. With only 30 sec- 
onds remaining in the fourth quarter 
the Crusaders were leading 42-41, when 
Gutshall of the alumni had two free 
throws. He missed both and the game 
ended with the Stagg men as the vic- 
tors. 



Foul 
2x 4 
Ox 
2x 4 
8x10 
Ox 2 
Ox 2 
Ox 

12x22 



Total 
8 
2 
8 
•20 
2 
2 


42 



Bernard Swiencki 
with 2 points while 



led the Crusaders 



1st LT. KENNETH H. KLINGER 
Who died of injuries received after 
his plane crashed at George Field, 
Illinois, on November 20 



Janson were high men for the alumni 
with 11 and 9 points. Herrold and 
Moore, forwards for Susquehanna, were 
second with 8 points each. 
Alumni 

Field Foul Total 

Zlock 3 Ox 

Smith . 4 3x 4 11 

WhiUley 0x0 

JaiMon 3 3x 3 

t Gutshall _..2 1x3 

Stuempfle _.. 2 2x3 

'Baker. __. 1 0x1 

Valiums 1 Ox 2 



provide the "make i institution in America." For the past 
The ad- I flve yea rs St. John's, acting in the be- 
__ - ^_ - i lief that the elective system was a 
failure, abolished this system and cen- 
tered its curriculum around the study 
of one hundred Great Books, ranging 
in authors from Homer to Marx, with 
science and math include*! all four 
years Purpose? To give average 
American boys proper mental discip- 
line to serve them throughout life. 
Student "rags" and a system whereby 
the professors, called "tutors," have 
no specialties, but teach different sub- 
jects each year, are additional high- 
lights of the course. 

The latest step which brings St. 
John's to public attention is the estab- 
lishment of entrance requirements which 
enable fifteen-year-olds to enter the 
college at the end of the sophomore 
year in high school, giving these boys 
the opportunity, through the acceler- 
ated four-years-in-three program, to 
complete this liberal education before 
draft age. This innovation calls at- 
tention to the fact that Robert M. 
Hutchins, president of the revolution- 
ary University of Chicago, is on the 
St. John's Board of Directors. 

Born in Suffolk, Va., President Ban- 
received 'the B. A. and M. A. degrees 
from the University of Virginia and 
won a Rhodes Scholarship from Vir- 
ginia. Following two years of Army 
service in the first World War, he en- 
rolled at Balllol College, Oxford, where 
he won the B. A. degree in Honours 
School of Modern History, later re- 
ceiving the M. A and going on to 
further study at tire Sorbonne in Paris 
and the Uiverslty of Ghent. At the 
University of Virginia, where he taught 
modern history from 1924 to 1937, he 
also edited THE VIRGINIA QUAR- 
TERLY REVIEW. 



Referees, Shadle 
Scorer, Mould 
Score by periods: 

Susquehanna 9 

Alumni 8 



Kimmerer. 



13 
6 



11 
11 



9—42 
16—41 



SuMiurhutina 61, 

Susquehanna's 



Milton YMCA 39 

passers vanquished 



"Bud" Smith and th° Milton Y. M. C. A. five 61-39 in the 



Alumni Gymnasium on Wednesday, 
November 29. The Crusaders took the 
lead early in the game and were in 
front the whole way. S.' U. piled up a 
convincing lead in the first quarter by 
a margin of 21-6. As the whistle 
sounded for the half the home team 
was hading 33-17. Throughout the 
second half the Crusaders lead the Y. 
9 M. C A team and the game ended 
5| Gl-39. 

6 1 Swiencki again led the Crusaders 
2 ! with 28 points. Don Herrold, an amaz- 
2 (Concluded on Page 4) 






PAGE TWO 



THE SUSQUEHANNA. SELINSOROVE. PENNSYLVANIA 



TUESDAY, DECEMBER 5, 1944 






n 



Established 1891 
Rine G. Winey, Jr., '46 .- - Editor 

Jean C. Geiger, '46 Associate Editor 

Gloria Gasparoli, '46 .._ Managing Editor 

Arthur J. Gelnett, '47 Sports Editor 

Reporters: Mary Elizabeth Basehoar, '45; Ruth Botdorf, '45, proofreader; Cor- 
inne Kahn, '45; Laverne Kohn, '45; Louise Kresge, '45; Gloria Machmer, 
'45; Frances Bittinger, '45; June Hoffman, '46; Jayne Troutman, '46; Norma 
Hazen, '46; Ruth Cochrane, '46; Emily Botdorf, '46; Marie Kllck, '46; Vir- 
ginia Hallock, '46; Carmen Beckwith, '46; Jackie Braveman, '47; Joe Taylor, 
'47; Jane Gundrum, '47; Dorothy Wagner, '47; Faye Smith, *47; Caroline 
Pfahler, '47; Doris Williamson, '47; Marian Walker, '47; Gayle Clark, '47; 
Martha Garard, '48; Helen Zahn, '48; Betty Smith, '48; Caroline Marks, 
'48; Betty Frank, '48; Gloria Walmer, '48; Ruth Criswell, '48; Roberta 
Ga'etz, '48; Ed Madden, '48; Sara Lee Smith, '48; Margaret Johns, '48; 
Joan Smith, '48; Harriet Gould, '48; John Warner, '45; Aldo Pescarmona, 
'47; Caroline Graybill, '48. 

Oorinne Kahn, '45 _. ._ Businets Manager 

Helen Eby, '47 _. - Advertising Manager 

Jean Kinzer, '46 Circulation Manager 

Business Assistants: Roswell Johns, '46; Ed Madden, '48; Russell Brown, '48; 
Betty Frank, '48; Cynthia Carmel, '48; Jean Wheat, Barbara Kain, Hilda 
Markey. 

Published semi-monthly throughout the school year at a subscription rate of 

$2.00 a year. 
Entered as second class mail matter at Selinsgrove, Pa. 



CAMPUSOLOGY 



Personally I think the most popular 
fellow on campus a while ago was our 
yearly visitor, Mr. Turkey, from the 
dressing of the same name. And what 
a reception he did get! Formal dress 
and candle light made a perfectly love- 
ly dinner which will always be a high- 
light of the year. Say, boys, didn't 
all the gals look cute? Now don't tell 
me you didn't notice? 

Speaking of Thanksgiving and tur- 
keys and such, I do hope Mrs. Kain 
had ( I say had 'cause I'm sure there 
wasn't any left) a giant bird— she had 
to feed Ray and Larry besides Jean 
and Bobble. 

By now you should all be able to 



HELPFUL BIBLE PASSAGES 

Tuesday Romans 12 

Wednesday Hebrews 11 

Thursday -- Matthew 7 

Friday - John 15 

Saturday Psalm 27 

Sunday, December 10 Isaiah 55 

Monday - Psalm 121 

Tuesday Philipplans 4 

Wednesday Revelation 21 

S 

Netv Books at Library 

The Christ of the American Road by 

E. Stanley Jones is a challenge to cast 
off our un-American and un-Christian 
hesitations and walk boldly the Ameri- 
can Road with Christ. Mr. Jones 
probes contemporary American life and 
points out its failings to practice the 
principles It professes. 

Incredible Era by Samuel Hopkins 
Adams discusses the Great Speakeasy 
Age and its leader. It takes readers 
back to the early twenties when War- 
ren G. Harding was the easy-going 
leader of the country characterized in 
that era by the riotous living. 

Frederick Bodmer's The Loom of 
Language, similar to the popular Ma- 
thematics for the Million, portrays how 
human needs have shaped language. 
This book presents the linguistic ori- 
gins, its growth, and its present use. 
Through interestingly written basic vo- 
cabularies, family resemblances of lan- 
guages, and translation tricks, the sim- 
ultaneous mastery of several languages 
is made comparatively easy. 

Fading Trails, prepared by a commit- 



swers the reporter received. 

Marie Stout — I think it's a pretty 
good paper, a lot better than our high 
school paper. I think a cute idea would 
be a column where you link the name 
of a person with a song title. 

Betty Ramer — I think it's really in- 
teresting — it tells what everybody does 
and not just a few individuals. I'd 
like to see a column that tells why 
different people chose to come to S. U. 

Carolyn Pfahler— I think the paper 
is better than it was last year except 
the gossip column. Not enough people 
are mentioned. 

Elite Thompson— I think the paper 
this year is good. 

Bernie Swiencki— I think the paper 
is pretty good. I like it the way it is. 

Reenee Riemer— I think it is very 
interesting. ^ 

Charlotte Oglensky — I think the pap- 
er is very good because it covers every- 
thing. Why don't they put Sunbury's 



At the Stanley 

Monday and Tuesday, Dec. 4, 5 

"Greenwich Village" In technicolor, 
starring Don Ameche. Critics say it's 
one of the best ond so do I. Don't 
miss it. 
Wednesday, Dec. 6 

"Henry Aldrlch's Little Secret" with 
Jimmy Lydon. Henry learns the woes 
of a mother and finds he Isn't fit to 
be a father. Preview snaps of Henry 
and Dizzy taking care of a baby show 
good prospects of a riotous show. 
Thursday, Dec. 7 

"Marine Raiders," featuring Pat 
O'Brien and Ruth Hussey. The girls 
are seeing this one twice. Must be the 
Marines! 

Friday and Saturday, Dec. 8, 9 
"RotthV Tootin' Rhythm" with Gene 
Autry. This one is self-explanatory. 
Monday and Tuesday, Dec. 11, 12 

"Up in Mabel's Room," presenting 
Marjorie Reynolds and Dennis O'Keefe. 
It's worth a ten o'clock. 
Wednesday, Dec. 13 

"It Happened Tomorrow," featuring 
Dick Powell and Linda Darnell. Would 
you like to know today what Is going 
to happen tomorrow? After seeing this 
movie you should be glad you can't 
foretell the future. 
Thursday, Dec. 14 

"Mask of Demetrios," starring Syd- 
ney Greenstreet. A thriller! A mys- 



movies in too? 

Adele Taub— I think the paper is a I '£L b uV "agood one 
very good college paper. We ought to ' 
have more humor in it though. 



Friday and Saturday, Dec. 15, 16 
'The Impatient Years," presenting 



Maxine Acsh— I think the paper Jean Arthur Ever y one is so familiar 
should have more about the faculty; | witn these » irn p a tient years" that it 

would be drastic to miss this one. 
S 



they never seem to enter into every 
thing. I think the paper is pretty good, 
but I also thing that they ought to 
have an exchange column. 

Myra Epstein— I think It is very nice. 
I like it a lot. I'd like to see it come 
out weekly if it's possible. 

Jean Wentzel— I think the paper is 
good but it should leave out some of 
jthe gossip. 

Fae Smith— I think it's just OK. We 



News About Notes 



tee of the United States Department of | ought toh ave a column of campus 

the Interior, presents the dramatic j f ac j s . 

story of American wildlife. It pictures | Joyce Burkhard— It should be a more 



generalized, not of such a personal na- 
ture. 

Ben Herr— I think the paper Is very 
good. How about a joke column? 

Carmen Beckwith — I think it's better 



primitive America as a vast storehouse 
of natural resources and tells the tragic 
story of the gradual disappearance of 
many of the birds, mammals, fish, and 
reptiles. 

Robert Goffln, in his book Jazz, takes | tnls year t h an it's ever been. This 
the attitude that whether you like it |Vear |f, organized. I think a joke 
or not, jazz is here to stay. This book \ co iumn would be good. 

Dot Eilhardt— I think it's nice and 
I enjoy reading it. We used to have a 
crossword puzzle on school activities 
in our high school paper. 

Ginny Doss — I think it's a pretty 



traces this new music's origins, the im- 
pact its emergence had on Europe, and 
tells of various men and bands impor- 
tant in -he world of this music of de- 
mocracy. 



Step right up ladies and gentlemen! 
Last chance to win a prize and show 
how smart you are! Yes indeed, here 
is your chance. All you have to do Is 
look into the future and predict what 
the top three numbers will be on the 
Hit Parade the week of Dec. 16. Here 
are the simple contest rules. 

1. The top three tunes are to be 
guessed in order. 

2. Your name, class, and dates must 
be on the paper you hand in. 

3. Your guesses or deductions must 
be in the box in the vestibule of G. A. 
before noon, Friday, December 15, in 
order to collect and tabulate them. 

4. Prizes will be awarded according 
to accuracy and neatness. 

Now for the interesting music of the 
week: Still rolling along at top speed 
is the Trolley Song In first place. 
Dance with the Dolly has jumped up 



good paper 

Jean Kelly— It should have more I to second place and a new and very 
news. The editorials could be better, pleasing number, I'm Making Believe, 
There should be less gossip. ! hns come In as third this week, after 

Mary Lizzio— I find the Susquehanna j entering the parade last week in sev- 
- very newsy and amusing. I think a ; enth position. 

The question for this week's Forum | joke column would be good. A number to watch— Don't Fence Me 

column was, "What I think of THE I Louise Schlick— I think it's got the In. 



THE FORUM 



One of those typically American 
SUSQUEHANNA this year; its points I right amount of variety in the articles. I songs that gets to be first in the hearts 
of merit and my suggestions for con- | It would be swell to have pictures if of many people because of the words 
structive criticism Here are the an- ! it were possible. ns well as the easy moving music. 



recognize Don Price, better known as 
"Junior"— the little boy with the big 
car— who spends the best part of his 
weekends on campus with Margie. By 
the way, this little romance developed 
this summer (just another advantage 
of summer school, Goils!) 

Some people are lucky though, and 
have men around like Johnnyn who , 
throws kisses to the love-of-his-llfe on 
his way up and down the basketball 
floor— when Hilda returns them, it's a 
sure basket (—but for which side?) 

Toby's Happy Birthday was com- 
plete when those two huge orchids ar- 
rived—courtesy the man, who incident- 
ally Is now overseas. Presents are just 
presents, but the sentiment, uhm m m ! 

Here's a little item of personal in- 
terest that came along a little to late 
for last issue, and might be old news 
to us, but to Ellen Stein, the visit of 
her one and only was the best news 
ever and we can hardly blame her. 
Did you see him? They tell me he was 
definitely O.K.— pipe and all! 

You've all heard vague rumors about 
our boys marrying the girls from over- 
seas, but here's one fact I'll bet you 
didn't know— Marian Willard's brother 
is engaged to a charming little Aus- 
tralian girl. What do they have that 
we don't have? Nothing— but they 
have it there! 

The weather last Wednesday night 
might have been stormy, but Bobbie 
Gaetz didn't even notice it — she had 
her love (or Is he just a love) to keep 
her warm! Anyway, she did seem to 
be having fun with that cute soldier 
from home. 

Dottie Wagner went to visit a man 
this weekend— her grandfather! Bet- 
ter old than none at all, as Shakes- 
peare would say. (My apologies to the 
old bard.) 

That Art-Gay romance Is still going 
strong, but it seems to me Art could do 
a little more to uphold the name of 
man— after all when Gay's bowling 
score is highest in every game it no 
longer is coincidence!! 

Old Man Winter arrived, too, and 
how!!! Let's take little Marie Talbot 
for example. The wind blew, and the 
snow fell, and the winds blew some 
more. And while she was pouring over 
her psychology, she noticed her feet 
were slowly freezing and her hands 
were a beautiful shade of blue tinted 
with purple. "Where shall I go? What 
shall I do?" she wailed. Who— er 
What came to the rescue? Nan's bed! 
Yes, Nan's bed provided a haven— or 
else Marie would have been an icicle. 
Oh these outside rooms!!! 

Those boys who traveled to Wash- 
ington were the lucky boys — some even 
got to the Army-Navy game (incident- 
ally Johnny sat next 4 to Ruthe Gar- 
man there) and from the reports on 
the rest of the weekend It must have 
been fun!! 

But one of the little boys was anx- 
ious to get back — you'll never guess 
who. Jerry Moore, and the reason is 
very simple. Carolyn Pfahler was oc- 
cupying his thoughts, and that little 
romance is blossoming out rapidly. 
They even went to church together. 

Gunny's "Brownie" was home for 
Thanksgiving and left a trace of his 
visit in that darling locket. It fits 
well— how about the knitting she's do- 
ing for him? Can we say the same?? 
Bucknell gets the limelight as much 
as S. U. in this column so it seems! 
This week we have Ruth Williams 
making the trip for a weekend visit!!! 
A little plea — If you know any news 
that should be printed in this hyar 
column, please let me know about it! ! ! 
Just write it down or tell it to me 
personally and I'll see that the school 
hears about It. Bye for now. 

LaVerne 



TUESDAY, DECEMBER 5, 1944 



THE SUSQUEHANNA, SELINSGROVE, PENNSYLVANIA 



PAGE THREE 



OUR FROSH 



CAROLYN GRAYBILL claims Rich- 
field, as. her home and is taking the 
Liberal Arts course. Her favorite foods 
are pot pie, fried country ham, and 
celery. She likes tables tennis, but her 
specialty is taking long hikes in the 
woods. To be a teacher and share an 
apartment is her two fold ambition. 
She spends all Jier spare time em- 
broidering, and her pet peeve is D's in 
history. 

ELRO HACKER is a music student, 
and her hobby is collecting different 
kinds of sheet music. She likes lemon ; 
meringue pie and juicy steaks and U| 
partial to the Merchant Marines. 
" 'cause that's where 'he' is." Her pet 
hate is nosey people, her favorite or- 
chestra leader is Benny Goodman, and I 
her ambition is to become a music i 
teacher. 

HOPE HARBESON is a music stu- I 
dent from Milroy. She's 5' 5" tall, ! 
never gets up for breakfast, and would j 
rather eat chicken and filling than 
anything else. Her hobby is collect- 
ing photographs, and her heart be- 
longs to that certain radio man in the 
Army Air Corps. Her ambition is to 
teach music— until the war is over, ! 
perhaps? 

AUDREY HAVICE comes from Lew- 
istown. She's taking the pre-med 
course and hopes to be a Navy nurse 
some day. She likes all winter sports,; 
especially skiing and ice skating, but 
spends her week-ends studying. Her 
hobby is collecting snapshots, she's 
partial to civilians, and claims she just 
couldn't live without her coffee. 

ELLEN HERLLMAN is enrolled In 
the Liberal Arts course and comes from 
New York City. Her favorite sport is 
riding, and mail-less (male-less?) days 
are her pet peeve. She's partial to the 
Army Air Corps (You should see that 
handsome man!) and her ambition is 
to get married. Her favorite food is 
spaghetti, her pet hate, sausages. 

CARL HERMAN is a day student 
who lives eight miles north of Selins- 
grove. He's taking the pre-med course 
and wants to be a surgean. His fav- 
orite food is beef steak and basketball 
ranks first on his list of sports. He 
spends his leisure time working on his 
father's farm and his pet peeve is 
driving back and forth to school each 
day. 

MARGARET JOHNS — Ross* little 
sister— comes from Honesdale, is 5' 
3%" tall and is majoring in languages. 
She likes swimming and soccer, when 
she doesn't get bumped around. Jon 
Hall Is her favorite actor, and she es- 
pecially enjoys musical comedies. She 
hates homework, but likes to get mail 
from Honesdale and Lewistown. Her 
ambition is to be a success. 

BARBARA KAIN comes from our 
capital city— Harrisburg. She likes 
chocolate cake, ice cream, and grapes, 
and she just loves to rehearse those, 
"special" scenes for the Theater Guild's 
plays. Her ambition is to be an or- 
chestra singer, and, by the way, she 
used to sing with an orchestra in Har- 
risburg. She is an ardent disciple of 
The Voice and spends her leisure time 
eating, singing, and eating. 
S 




Article by Dr. Russ 

An article entitled "The Origin of | 
the Ban on Special Legislation in the 
Constitution of 1873," by Dr. William 
A. Russ, Jr., appeared in the October, 
1944, issue of PENNSYLVANIA HIS- 
TORY Magazine. 

In the article, Dr. Russ stated that 
the early Pennsylvania Legislature was 
noted for its corruptness. He defines 
"special legislation" as applied to in- 
dividuals; "local legislation" when ap- 
plied to a county, city or town, and 
"general legislation" when applied to 
everyone in a gTOup, class, or state. 
Special legislation was banned because 
of the many evils, among which were: 
the passing of franchises without pro- 
tection for future generations, the pur- 
chase and sale of special privileges to 
one company or person by lobbyists, 
local laws deemed necessary by the 
members fearing they would not be re- 
elected without them, and time spent 
dealing with special measures for in- 
dividuals and separate companies rath- 
er than for the general welfare of the 
people. 



. . . Ronnie Boyer doesn't pay any at- 
tention to the girls on campus. Gee, 
who could find a better selection? 
. . . Harriet Gould forgot to pull the 
curtain after the final scene of "Death 
Comes to My Friends." Could she 
have been too Interested in "making 
rain" behind the scene? 

. . . There is such a small turn-out of 
students at the Evening Student Re- 
citals. They're really well worth your 
while. 

. . . Bobbie Gaetz has been looking sort 
of starry-eyed these past few days. 
Maybe "he's" a military secret, hum- 
m-m?? 

. . . La Verne Kohn enjoys entertaining 
her "aunt" for dinner. I'm sure that 
we've never seen an "aunt" wearing a 
naval uniform . . . and so well, too. 
How about that, LaVerne??? 
. . . Ruth Ulrich has put up a lot of 
Esquire girls on her walls In her room. 
Could they be a substitute for wall- 
paper??? Not a bad idea at that, 
though. 



Sigma Alpha Iota 

S. A. I. held its regular meeting on 
Thursday, November 30. Sigma Alpha 
Iota's party for the freshman music 
students will be held on Wednesday 
night, Dec. 6. Recently S. A. I. has 
had the honor .of having Miss Kline, 
instructor in French, as a patroness of 
S. A. I. She has transferred her pat- 
roness membership from Alpha Gam- 
ma chapter at Muskingum College, to 
Sigma Omega chapter here at S. U. 
We are honored to have Miss Kline as 
our patroness and shall do everything 
to make her feel that this is her home 
chapter. • 

S 

Margaret Walter Teaches 

December will be a busy month for 
Margaret Walter, Conservatory senior, 
because she has been" signed up as 
substitute supervisor of music of the 
Middleburg grade and high schools 
from December 4 to December 29, with 
only December 25 and 26 for Christ- 
mas vacation. (This shortened vaca- 
tion is due to the loss of school days 
at other times during the year.) Miss 
Walter temporarily replaces Mrs. Hel- 
en Dieffenderfer, who was granted a 
month's leave of absence during her 
husband's furlough. 

Commuting daily to Middleburg and 
endeavoring to keep up with college 
homework as well, Miss Walter antici- 
pates a full schedule. Besides teach- 
I ing regular music classes for all twelve 
grades (appreciation classes in the 
high school, she will direct five chor- 
1 uses, the band and the orchestra, and 



supervise the Christmas assembly. 
S 

Theta Chi 

Arthur J. Gelnett, '47, and Celo V. 
Leitzel, '45, became active members of 
the Beta Omega Chapter of Theta Chi 
National Fraternity at a meeting of 
the chapter on Tuesday evening, No- 
vember 21, 1944. All student members 
and faculty advisors were at the meet- 
ing. 

After the formal initiation of the two 
new members, the business affairs were 
discussed and then refreshments were 
served. Mr. Gelnett was elected to the 
position of guard of the Chapter, and 
Mr. Leitzel received the office of the 
chaplain. 



WHITMER-STEELE 
COMPANY 

LUMBER MANUFACTURES 
NORTHUMBERLAND, PA. 



MILLER'S 

Where Ed's and Co-Ed's Meet 
For Many Good Things to Eat 

Corner Pine and Orange Streets 
3 Blocks from Campus 



Pin-Up Girls Wanted! 



George B. Rine FLORIST 5SS?iS5 



The First National Bank of Selins Grove 

WELCOMES STUDENTS' ACCOUNTS 



7 Wonder Why 



. . . Jack Warner's affections have turn- 
ed from Seibert to Hassinger. 
. . . There was so much commotion 
from 10 to 10:30 last Thursday. Could 
it have been the birthday party that 
the girls had for Mrs Koch? Incident- 
ally, they gave her a beautiful new 
umbrella. 

. . , Carolyn Pfahler likes the name 
"Moore."— Need we say 'more?" 
. . . Paula Moskawitz enjoys dancing 
with Ross Johns so much. 



The following letter was received by 
! the editor last week from a soldier in 
; Greensboro, North Carolina. 
Dear Sir: 

This request of mine may be a 
bit unusual, but would it be ask- 
ing too much if you could send 
me the back copies of your school 
newspaper from the time classes 
began in September. 

If you do not have a paper at 
your school than pamphlets or 
or magazines pertaining towards 
your school will do. Especially with 
the pictures of your girl students. 
I thank you, 

Pfc. Peter Nieminski. 
Editor's Note: Copies of the Sus- 
quehanna will be sent to Pfc. Nie- 
minski, but the editorial staff is short 
on pictures of our girl students, there- 
for will every girl on campus please 
give to the editor a snapshot of her- 
self that they may be forwarded to 
Pfc. Nieminski to show him the pul- 
chritude of SU. Just observe these 
rules, please: 

1, All pictures must be handed to 
the editor not later than Sunday, De- 
cember 10. 

2. Write your name and school ad- 
dress, with any message you wish to 
make, on the back of the pictures. 

Let's make this a Merry Christmas 
for Pfc. Nieminski. Give him the gift 
every soldier wishes — a picture of a 
girl— especially an SU girl. 



Fine Job Printing 
THE SELINSGROVE TIMES 



Quality Only the Finest 

NATIONAL RESTAURANT 

Hotel and Dining Service 



29 N. Market St. 



Selinsgrove, Pa, 




For School News Read 

SUNBURY DAILY ITEM 



SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

SELINSGROVE, PENNSYLVANIA 

Co-educatkmal— Accredited 

For more than eighty-six years in the service of Christian higher 
education. 



Curricula: 

LIBERAL ARTS BUSINESS 

COMMERCIAL EDUCATION 



MUSIC 



For Catalog write 

O. Morris Smith, D.D., LL.D., Pres. 
Russell Gait, Ph.D., Dean 



PAGE FOUR 



THE SUSQUEHANNA, SELINSGROVE, PENNSYLVANIA 



TUESDAY, DECEMBER 5, 1944 



CRUSADER FIVE DEFEATS 
ALUMNI AND MILTON YMCA 

(Continued from Page 1) 



the game by scoring nineteen of their 
points. Swiencki made seven field 
goals and five fouls, ten of his points 
being made in the last quarter, when it 
looked as if S. U. might come out vic- 
ing spark on the team this year, was \ torious 
second with 14 points. Robinson led | GaUaudet 
the Y boys with 22 points. G 

Milton Y. M. C, A. Holcomb, f 10 

Field Foul Total Ammon, f 



Robinson, f 9 

B. Miller, f 1 

Ritter, c 

Heyman, g 1 

K. Miller, g 1 

Simon, g ._ 2 

Moore, g -- 1 

Totals 15 

Susquehanna 

Field 

Herrold, f - 7 

Madden, f u 

Wohlsen, f 

Moore, f 6 

Swiencki, c 10 

Kocsis, g .- 3 

Winey, g 

Taylor, g .-. 

Johns, c 

Small, g 



4x 8 
lx 1 
lx 2 
Ox 
Ox 
Ox 1 
3x 5 



22 ;Witczak, f 3 

3 'Cuscaden, f 2 



Schleifl, c 

Padden, g 1 

Fishier, g 2 

Massey, g 2 



20 



9x17 39 Susquehanna 



Foul Total 

_ „ .. Moore, f 

Ox 2 14 

Ox 

?x3 111' 

8x 9 28 

Ox 3 6 

Ox 

Ox 2 

Ox 

Ox 



Totals -26 

Score by periods: 

Milton Y. M. C. A. -.6 
Susquehanna 21 

Officials: Shadle, Valunas 

Scorer: Thompson. 



11 

12 



9x19 

9 

19 



Herrold, f 2 

1 

Wohlsen, f 1 

Swiencki, c 7 



Kocsis, g t 3 

Small, g 

Winey, g 



FG 



1 
2 

2 

1 



FG 
2 

1 

5 
1 






T 

20 

7 
6 

4 
4 
5 

46 

T 
6 
3 
2 

19 
1 
6 





14 



9 27 



61 



13—39 



Referee: Jot Mitchell. 
Umpire: Dave Keppel. 
S 



THIS IS MY STORY 



The average temperature of British 
Guiana, at least around Georgetown, 
is 94 degrees so we can't blame Ongkar 
for turning up his coat collar against 
the cold wind. But in spite of the 
weather he plans to spend two happy 
years with us. 

Ongkar has seven brothers and two 
sisters. His parents are both Indian. 
The turban which Ongkar shall wear 
when it is a little warmer, is worn out 
of respect and appreciation of his par- 
ents and ancestors. Aside from head- 
gear, Ongkar says that there is not 
much difference in wearing apparel 
between the two nations except of 
course, their clothing is so much light- 
er than the clothing worn in the Unit- 
ed States. The food, though, is very 
much different, according to Ongkar. 
He enjoys our food nevertheless, es- 
pecially desserts and delicacies. 

Ongkar is staying at Phi Mu Delta 
which he likes very much. He thinks 
the house is lovely, his room nice, and 
the downstairs of the house unbeliev- 
ably wonderful, because of the many 
amusements it offers, including the* 
ping pong table. His favorite sport is 
cricket and he has won many honors 
playing the game. (No girls, he doesn't 
dance.) 

Life, according to Ongkar, is very 



different here from British Guiana. 
Living is much slower there and the 
people do not seem to continually en- 
Joy themselves as Americans do. 
"Here," said Ongkar, "people really 
live." He is truly grateful to the fac- 
ulty and student body for being so 
kind to him, and also to the boys at 
Phi Mu for keeping the house so nice 
and warm, among other things. 



Gallaudet 46, S. U. 3? 



(Continued from Page 1) 
9—61 school for two months, which also en- 
! abled him to keep up with his studies. 
I Ongkah was sent to Susquehanna by 
the Lutheran Church and hopes to 
enter medical school. He will not ac- 
celerate but will work during the sum- 



FEHR'S 

THE STORE THAT LEADS 
IN BETTER MERCHANDISE 



The Crusaders lost their first game mers he spends here 
in three starts on Friday evening, De- 
cember 1, to the Blue Bisons of Gal- 
laudet at a game played at the Roose- 
velt High School gym in Washington, 
D. C. The Bisons took the lead from 
the opening of the game and held it 
throughout the game. It was the 
sharpshooting of Roy Holcomb of the 
Bisons that kept them well out in 
front. Holcomb had ten field goals for 
a grand total of twenty points. He 
has been a star athlete of Gallaudet's 
for the past three seasons. 

Bernie Swiencki, high scorer of last 
year's season, kept the Crusaders in 



F. A. BRILL CO. 

Floor Coverings — Awnings — Shades 
Draperies 

419 Market St. Phone 2180 Sunbury 



HOTEL GOVERNOR 
SNYDER 

GOOD HOME COOKING 



B.K.W. COACH LINE 

Tries to give the College Students 
the best service, especially the Sun- 
bury Students. Why TRAVEL with 
an individual? The Coach Line In- 
sures every person. THINK THAT 
OVER. 



HACKETTS 

Hardware Stores 

325 Market St., 70G Market St. 
ALSO MIDDLEBURG, PA. 



CRYSTAL PURE ICE 

CHARLES W. KELLER 

Manufacturer and Wholesaler 



SNAVELY'S 

COLLEGE FURNISHINGS 
AND SHOES 



S. U. BOOK STORE 

SUSQUEHANNA 
NOTEBOOKS 
STATIONERY 



Eberfs 5c to $1.00 
Store 

Susquehanna Stationery 
SELINSGROVE 



SCHOOL FASHIONS 

ROSENBLUM'S 

SUNBURY, PA. 
SMART FEMININE APPAREL 



When you think of Photography 
Think of 

Schindler Studio 

515 Market Street, Sunbury, Pa. 
Also Framing and Photo Finishing 



MILLER BROS. 
SHOE STORE 

SUNBURY, PA. 



STONER'S 
CREDIT JEWELERS 



SUNBURY, PA. 



CHILDREN'S SHOP 

MARY H. BURNS 

Clothes for the College Girl 



Markley-Altyater 

BETTER STUDENTS CLOTHES 
SUNBURY, PA. 



VISIT THE 



REXALL 
DRUG STORE 

WILLIAM J. COTT. Druggist 



WATCH REPAIR 

Susquehanna Jewelry 
Fountain Pens and Pencils 



W. M. VALSING 

JEWELER SELINSGROVE, PA. 



THE BON TON 

Personally Selected 

COATS, DRESSES, HATS 

Sunbury, Pa. 



REICHLEY'S 

WHERE STUDENTS 
MEET AND EAT 



STEFFENS 

FINE FOOD 8— STATIONERY 

Greeting Cards for Every Occasion 

SELINSGROVE, PA. 



EVERY YEAR .... 

since Its first year, Luth- 
eran Brotherhood has 
shown a steady and con- 
sistent growth It has 
always operated on the 
sound foundation of the 
time-tested legal reserve 
plan, based on the 
American Exp e r 1 e n c e 
Table of Mortality. 
Lutheran Brotherhood Is 
purely mutual — it be- 
IMP wholly to Its policy | 
ownen. 



Lutheran Brotherhood 



Legal Reserve Life Insurance For Lutherans 
MINNEAPOLIS. 2. Herman L. Ekern, President 



BUILD YOUR 
ESTATE NOW! 






MINNESOTA 



430 Market St. 



H. L. ROTHFUSS, Agent Williamsport, Pa. 



YOUR FUTURE 
STARTS TODAY 



% 



C'/FICE OF THE DEAN 

SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

SELINSGROVE, PA. 



A 

MERRY 

CHRISTMAS 



n 



O 




A 

HAPPY 
NEW YEAR 



Volume LIU 



SELINSGROVE, PENNSYLVANIA, TUESDAY, DECEMBER 19, 1944 



Number 7 



Christmas Queen Chosen at Holiday Dance 

— • : <8> : * 



SU GRAD, '40 MISSING 
YEAR, REPORTED 
DEAD IN BELGIUM 



KDP PLEDGES 13; ODS, 20; SAI, 12; PHI 
MU, 6; THETA CHI, 2 AS RUSHING ENDS 



Lt. William A. Troutman, an alum- 
nus of Susquehanna University, from 
Millersburg, Pennsylvania, has been of- 
ficially declared dead by the War De- 
partment. 

Lt. Troutman has been missing since 
October 20, 1943, when the B-17 on 
which he was a navigator, was lost in 
a mission over Wallchern, a German 
fortification near Antwerp, No trace 
has been found of him in this twelve 
months period, and therefore he has 
been listed as a fatality. 




Phi Mu 

On Pridpv, December 15, 1944, at 
12:05 a. m. six freshmen that are now 
attending Susquehanna University 
were pledged into the Mu Alpha Chap- 
ter of Phi Mu Delta Fraternity. Presi- 
dent John J. Kocsis presided over the 
ritual, assisted by Roswell J. Johns and 
Joseph Taylor, other officers in the, 
fraternity. 

The freshmen pledged were: Russell 
Franklin Brown, Jerry Donald Moore, 
George Kenneth Small, Roy Edward 
Stahl, Dexter Neil Welkel, and Donald 
Fisher Wohlson. 

The ceremony was followed by a 
party given by the three members to 

the pledges. 

The following evening the pledge 
group conducted a meeting of their 
own in which the following officers of 
the group were elected: Dexter N. 
Weikel, president; George K. Small, 
vice president; Roy E. Stahl, secre- 
tary; Russell F. Brown, treasurer; Don- 
ald F. Wohlson, sergeant-at-arms; and 
Jerry D. Moore, chaplain. 
Theta Chi 

Early Friday morning at 12:30 A. M., i 
David Edward Bomboy and Carl Lind- i 
berg Herman became pledges of the j 
Beta Omega Chapter of Theta Chi ! 



Sorority Hushing 

Sunday, December 3. at midnight 
started the period of intense rushing. 
At that time the invitations were dis- 
tributed ami informal room parties 
were held. 

Monday afternoon rushing was for- 
mally opened with an Inter-Sorority 
Tea. Monday night the Omega Delta 
Sigma girls gave a Pln-Up party in 
their sorority room, where the rushees 
brought their boy friends pictures and 
the best looking was chosen. The 
same night the Kappa Delta Phi girls 
gave a Gipsy party with a fortune 
teller as the main attraction. The 
Sigma Alpha Iota girls had a soda 
party. 

On Tuesday night SAI had a room 
party and the other girls were asked 
out by the other two sororities. 

Wednesday night found the ODS 
girls giving a Wishing Well party and 
Uie KDP girls giving their Scavoda 
party. SAI held their big Indian party 
in the Social Rooms. 

Thursday night KDP held their big 
ship party in the social room. The 
ODS girls took the girls out to din- 
ner. 

Friday ODS had their traditional 
"Old Heidelberg Inn" open for the 



LT. WILLIAM TROUTMAN 

Lt. Troutman had received the Dis- 
tinguished Flying Cross for efficient \ 
administration of first aid to a crew 
man during one of. his score of mis- 
sions. An Air Medal with three Oak 
Leaf Clusters was received by his moth- 
er as a posthumous award. He entered 
the Ait Corps from Snyder County in ' 
August, 1941. 

William Troutman was a graduate 
from Susquehanna in 1940. He was 
graduated in pre-legal course with an 
A.B. in Education and was listed in 
"Who's Who in American Colleges and 
Universities." He was active in soccer 
and was captain of the team his sopho- 
more and junior years, and was co- 
captain of the track team his senior 
year. He was a member of the Phi 
Mu Delta Fraternity and the Susque- 
hanna Players. 

While attending Susquehanna he 
worked at the Governor Snyder Hotel 
to help finance his education. 
8 

Lt. Fred Lower, '44 Weds 
Miss Shirley Bowman 

In a ceremony marked by military 
tradition, Miss Shirley A. Bowman, of 
Sunbury, became the bride of Lieuten- 
ant Fred L. Lower, also of Sunbury. 

The double ring ceremony took place 
on Sunday, December 10, at 4 o'clock 
in the Centennial Building on the 
campus of Carson Long Military In- 
stitute, New Bloomfleld, where Lieu- 
tenant Lower is an instructor. The 
marriage was performed by Rev. Park 
(Concluded on Page 4) 



Fraternity. The installation of these \ evening 
freshmen took place at the chapter chicken 
home in a very impressive service un- 
der the direction of the active under- 
graduate members, who are Jack War- 
ner, Robert Surplus, Celo Leitzel, and 
Arthur Gelnett. 

After the meeting, refreshments, and 
informal discussions were enjoyed by 
the active members and newly-Initiat- 
ed pledges. This meeting concluded the 
rushing season of one week which last- 
ed from 6 P. M. on December 7 to 
midnight last Thursday, December 14. 
The pledges were given Theta Chi 
pledge buttons in order to allow their 
pledgeship to be known. 



After entertainment and the 
dinner, the Heidelberg was 
closed for another year. Lenore Gar- 
ma i\ held a dinner at her home for 
the SAI girls. 

Saturday night ODS served a buffet 
supper in the sorority room and KDP 
took the girls out and had a party af- 
terwards. 

Monday between 9 and noon voting 
(Concluded on Page 4) 

Mrs. ft.TReitz Dies 
Following Operation 



Dinner, Pageant, 
Caroling* Mark 
SU's Christmas 



On Monday evening, December 18, 
Susquehanna enjoyed her annual 
Christmas celebration. The formal 
dinner was held from 6 to 7 with the 
traditional turkey and all the trim- 
mings. At 7:30 a Christmas pageant 
was presented by the S. C. A. The 
1 olio wing persons took part: Norma 
Hazen, Corinne Kahn, Nancy Myers, 
Naomi Garman, Lou Kresge, Marian 



Willard, Marjorie Stapleton, Lenore 

Garman, Jean Strausser, Celo Leitzel, i at Selinsgrove High School 



Mrs. D. I. Reitz, wife of Prof. Reitz, 
instructor of business subjects at Sus- 
quehanna, died in the Geisinger Hos- 
pital, Danville, on Sunday evening, De- 
cember 10, following an operation sev- 
eral days previously. She had rallied 
following the operation, but on Sun- 
day afternoon her condition changed 
for the worse and she sank rapidly un- 
til her demise. 

She is survived by her husband and 
three children, Miss Florence Reitz, an 
alumna of SU and now teaching at 
Paxtang; Pvt. Daniel Reitz, with the 
AAF in Florida, and a student of SU 
last year; and John R. Reitz, a senior 

Also sur- 



Joyce Burkhardt, Gloria Walmer, 
Eleanor Steele, Lillian Werner, Dexter 
Weikel, Rlne Winey, John Smith, Jerry 
Moore, Roy Stahl, Art Gelnett, Joe 
Taylor, Dave Bomboy. 

Special music was furnished by 
Velma Shook on the marimba and The 
Susquehanna Singers. Dorothy Ster- 
nat was organist for the program. 

The annual Christmas caroling 
throughout the town by students be- 
gan at 8:45 and following this a Christ- 
mas Party was held In the Social 
Rooms of Seibert Hall. 



viving are three brothers and six sis- 
ters. 

The daughter of John and Nevada 
Lietz Hamm, of Berks county, Mrs. 
Reitz taught school for seven years in 
Palmerton, Lehigh county. 

She was an active person in civic af- 
fairs and a highly respected member 
of Trinity Lutheran Church. Funeral 
services were conducted on Thursday, 
Dec 14, with The Rev. Phares Reitz, 
nephew of Prof. Reitz, conducting the 
services. Burial took place at Weath- 
erly, Pa. 



Hope Spicer Selected; 
60 Couples Enjoy Dance 

The second Inter-Fraternity-Inter- 
Sorority dance of the school year, A 
Holiday Season Dance, was greatly en- 
joyed by sixty couples on Saturday 
evening, December 16, in the Alumni 
Gymnasium, with Ivan Faux and his 
orchestra furnishing that "makes you 
want to dance music." 



CHRISTMAS QUEEN 



€ 








- X 




.*&&■**. 




i&fc 


W35&Li 




1 



MISS HOPE SPICER 



Upon entering the gym floor, one 
passed through an arch way that was 
covered with Christmas green and the 
traditional mlstle-toe. After passing 
through the receiving line of the presi- 
dents of the different sororities and 
their escorts one noticed the false 
ceiling consisted of red and green 
streamers converging in the middle of" 
the gym, with a Beautiful Christmas 
tree on the center of the floor, covered 
with icicles that glistened under the 
beam of the "spots." Further decor- 
ations of holly and other Christmas 
trimmings added greatly to the beau- 
tiful effect of the dance. 

Following the Grand March, at which 
time the chaperons chose a Christmas 
Queen; and the singing of the soror- 
ity songs, the event of the evening was 
the crowning of the Christmas Queen, 
Miss Hope Spicer, Junior Conservatory 
student from New Providence, N. J. 
Dr. Russell Gilbert presented the Queen 
with a crown of one dozen red roses. 

Another highlight of the dance was 
Virginia "Santa Claus" Hallock, who 
not only brought cheer to the crowd, 
but the delicious punch as well. 

Chaperons for the dance were Dr. 
and Mrs. Russell W. Gilbert, Dr. and 
Mrs. William A. Russ, Dr. and Mrs. 
Flsk W. S. Scudder, Prof, and Mrs. 
Amos Alonzo Stagg, Jr., Mrs. Alice H. 
Giauque, and Mr. Elbert Haskins. 

Among the campus couples present 
were Willard and Hays, Markey and 
Kocsis, Johns and Warner, Myers and 
Weller, Smith and Wolf, Bicking and 
Wholsen, Eby and Johns, Stout and 
Taylor, Spicer and Wiey, Eilhart and 
Weikel, Minler and Madden, Campo 
and Bomboy, Cochrane and Surplus, 
Wagner and Gelnett, Clark and Brown, 
Pfahler and Moore, and Wortley and 
Small. 

Former Susquehanans, now in the 
Service, and back for the dance were 
Bob Wholsen who escorted Leah Cry- 
der, Frank Zeidler and Dottie Croft, 
Frank Zerbe and Harriet Gould, and 
Danny Reitz and Evelyn Wllhour. 

Carmen Beckwith, Mary Jane Zane 
and Mary Ellen Wood had their broth- 
ers as escorts, while the Misses Staple- 
ton, Peters, Harbeson, Leisenring, Day, 
Gibson, Roberts, Ramer, Shook, Wil- 
liams, Fisher, Havice, and Smith all 
(Concluded on Page 4) 



PAGE TWO 



THE SU8QUEHANNA, 8ELIN8GROVE. PENNSYLVANIA 



TUESDAY, DECEMBER 19, 1944 




e MiuefM)& 




CAMPUSOLOGY 



Established 1891 

Rnrc G. Winey, Jr., '46 Editor 

Jean C. Geiger, '46 Associate Editor 

Gloria Gasparoli, '46 Managing Editor 

Arthur J. Gelnett, '47 Sports Editor 

Reporters: Mary Elizabeth Basehear, *45; Ruth Botdorf, '45, proofreader; Cor- 
inne Kahn, '45; Laverne Kohn, '45; Louise Kresge, '45; Gloria Machmer, 
'45- Prances Bittinger, '45; June Hoffman, '46; Jayne Troutman, '46; Norma 
Ha'zen, '46; Ruth Cochrane, '46; Emily Botdorf, '46; Marie Klick, '46; Vir- 
ginia Hallock, '46; Carmen Beckwith, '46; Jackie Braveman, '47; Joe Taylor, 
'47; Jane Gundrum, '47; Dorothy Wagner, '47; Faye Smith, *47; Caroline 
Pfahler, '47; Doris Williamson, '47; Marian Walker, '47; Gayle Clark, '47; 
Martha' Garard, '48; Helen Zahn, '48; Betty Smith, '48; Caroline Marks, 
•48; Betty Frank, '48; Gloria Walmer, '48; Ruth Criswell, '48; Roberta 
Ga'etz, '48; Ed Madden, '48; Sara Lee Smith, '48; Margaret Johns, '48; 
Joan Smith, '48; Harriet Gould, '48; John Warner, '45; Aldo Pescarmona, 
'47; Caroline Graybill, '48. 

Corinne Kahn, '45 Business Manager 

Helen Eby, "47 Advertising Manager 

Jean Kinzer, '46 Circulation Manager 

Business Assistants: Roswell Johns, '46; Ed Madden, '48; Russell Brown, '48; 
Betty Frank, '48; Cynthia Carmel, '48; Jean Wheat, Barbara Kain, Hilda 
Mar key. 

Published semi-monthly throughout the school year, with the exception of 
Thanksgiving, Christmas and Semester holidays, at a subscription rate of 

$2.00 a year. 

Entered as second class mail matter at Selinsgrove, Pa. 



Where Credit is Due 

THE DANCE 

The second Inter-Sorority, Inter- 
Fraternity Dance was a complete suc- 
cess. Those few words could very aptly 
describe the dance that was held in the 
gym on Saturday night. The decor- 
ations were lovely, the music "solid," 
and the crowd in a jovial spirit. Con- 
gratulations to everyone that in any- 
way contributed to the success of that 
dance'. It certainly proved that with 
a little effort something can really be 
made a success on our campus. 
S 

GRANT YERGER 

Here is one of the custodians of Sus- 
quehanna that is really doing an ex- 
ceptional job in aiding all the organ- 
izations with his woodworking ability. 
That fireplace in Hassinger Hall that 
he made from a discarded piano can 
be called a masterpiece. The "moon" 
that he made for dances certainly has 
the appearance of the "man in the 
moon," and the cross that he made 
for the SCA is a fine piece of work— 
and these are only a few of the many 
things he has made or repaired.— Hats 
off to Grant Yerger. 

S 

THE CHRISTMAS DINNER 

Another feather in the hat of Mrs. 
Humphreys, her help, and the wait- 
resses. We, who just sit down to a 
meal, cannot realize the tremendous 
amount of work that is involved in the 
preparing of such a meal as that 
Christmas Dinner. To have everything 
ready to serve 200 persons in about 45 
minutes is a task that cannot be easily 
imagined. 

Not only the food, but the pleasant 
Christmas atmosphere, the girls in 
gowns, the soft Christmas music, the 
singing of carols, all blended to make 
it a Christmas Dinner that will long 
be remembered at SU. 

S 

THE BASKETBALL GAMES 

The last home game played on the 
floor of the Alumni Gym was one with 
fight from start to finish. It ended 
in the fifth period with Juniata win- 



ning 45-41, but the loyal support that 
the student body gave the team help- 
ed to compensate for the loss. It is 
not easy for a team to show spirit and 
zip when it does not have the backing 
of the school. Let's keep up that grand 
spirit. 

S 



Greetings, Mr. and Miss Co-ed, let's 
go to press! ! Now for the latest gos- 
sip around campus ... A lot of our 
glamour girls and goon-boys have de- 
cided that a 14-day vacation was much 
too long to be away from each other 
without each having some token of 
friendship (?) to carry back home with 
them. Ross has given Helen his Frat 
pin which has given Helen a glowing 
radiance about her, Helen is retaliat- 
ing with a beautiful ring. ... so it is 
rumored. Johnny and Hilda have both 
displayed a wonderful Christmas spirit 
what with Johnny giving Hilda a gor- 
geous set of Tweed perfume and co- 
logne and Hilda giving Johnny not 
one, not two, but eight Christmas pres- 
ents. Ask John for the particulars. 
They're too numerous to list. Then, 
we have the Frankie-Fay duo. Ask 
Fay to show you that gold cross with 
the diamond sparkling in the center. 
It's really worth noticing. To make 
sure that Carolyn wouldn't let her af- 
fections wander while at home, Jerry 
put his "ball and chain" (in other 
words identification bracelet) around 
her wrist. 

Now for some strangle two- so roes: 



THE FORUM 



The reporter has been out on a spe- 
cial assignment for Santa Claus this 
past week and has unearthed the se- 
cret desires of some of the good boys 
and girls on campus. Santa will surely 
read this and do his best to make 
everyone happy. 

Marty Sharwarko: A sailor on a ten 
day leave. 

Marian Willard: Lots of sleep and 
pleasant dreams (of George). 
Donald Wohlsen: A deferment. 
La Verne Kohn: "Do they dehydrate 
Naval officers?" 
Ellen Stein: An engagement ring. 
Margy Johns: A longer vacation, a 
reducing machine, and a few more 
cuts. 

Dr. Wilson: A Frequency Modulation 
and Television set. 

Elaine Laks: A "C" in Science Sur- 
vey. 
Jane Malkames: Her brother. 
Jeannette Kramer: "A Fellow on a 
Furlough." 
Sara Lee Smith: Too darn much. 
Scotty Small: I want "to Dance With 
a Dolly, etc." 

Ellen Hellman: A handsome man 
named Lee. 

Corinne Frey: That strapping he- 
man doctor, Phillip. 
Dot Eilhardt: A White Christmas. 
Gloria Walmer: To meet Harry, the 



/ Wonder Why 



. . . A certain group of people at the 
Sunday School party were called 
"windbags." Could it have been be- 
cause they had more strength and vi- 
tality in blowing a paper cup along a 
string to win a game??? 
. . . Jeanette Kramer had a headache 
in Dictation class the other day. Per- 
haps it was caused by her not being 
able to read Maynard's letter before 
the class started. What do you think, 
Jenny?? 

. . . The road in back of Steele Science 
Hall is called "Lover's Lane." Need 
more be said? 

. . . "Prexy" Smith was bombarded 
jwith snowballs as he calmly walked 
|out of the Dining room last Friday. 
Oh, yes, it was just a little friendly 
snowball battle in which Johnny 
Smith was participating, too. It's all 
right, no one was seriously hurt. 
. . . There is so much mistletoe around 
the parlors at Hassinger and Seibert. 
We agree, tho, it does come in mighty 
handy . . . hum-m-m-m . . . mighty 
handy! 

. . . The freshmen con students are 
looking forward so eagerly to taking 
instructions on the trombone next 
semester. It couldn't be because they 
all want to be second Glenn Miller's, 
could it? 

... Dr. Sheldon is so anxious to find 
the owner of the five cent coin that 
was found in one of the practice rooms 
the other day. (P. S. If anyone has 
lost it, go to the Conservatory office 
and the same will be returned, provid- 
ing that you can prove your ownership 
—that's the catch.) 
. . . The theme song of all the girls on 
campus is: "Have you a problem, a 



Who would ever have thought that 
Red Neidick and Jane Malkames could 
have found something in common. 'Tis 
rumored that that reddish glow on 
Red's face was lipstick! Then, there's 
that Campo-Bomboy affair. It's about 
time that they started holding hands 
in public. After all, why should they 
keep it a secret, we're all one big happy 
family. 

What is Skip Madden doing with his 
time while Peggy Minier meets Larry 
on the sly??? I imagine that Gloria 
Reichley finds time dragging, too. And 
now, Nan Myers and Larry have us 
more confused than ever before. 

Roy and Harriet celebrated both . 
their birthdays (whkh, incidentally; 
do fall on the same day, Feb. 6) a little * 
prematurely. One of Roy's shirts must 
have been looking for romance as it 
was found in one of the girls' laundry 
down at Hassinger. Harriet dressed It 
up in a beautiful package and pre- 
sented it to Roy at dinner, and Roy, 
blushing furiously, opened it to the 
strains of "Happy Birthday." Not to 
be outdone, Roy rewrapped the pack- 
age again and sent it back to Harriet. 
To the same tune, she opened it, and 
a half eaten piece of meat fell into 
her lap!!! 

What is this Christmas card that 
everybody's whispering about? Does 
it have anything to do with the dirty 
looks some of the boys have been re- 
ceiving lately? We've been hearing 
some "horse-y" stories about it. 

Marie Klick is still writing to Dave 
Gross. We're still wondering whether 
or not his Frat pin will come back 
C. O. D. 

We heard a remark from Rine to the 
effect that he would like the Job of 
interviewing the Christmas Queen 
himself. Could he have known it 
would be his date, Hope Spicer??? 

Gloria Gasparoli had a little trouble 
via the phone over her "dates" for the 
dance. Corinne had a call from Clyde 
this week, and Jackie heard from Mel 
that-a-way, too. Adele's Ted called 
her four nights in a row, and she was 
never in the dorm. Just to show that 
her heart was in the right place, Adeie 
called him up to hear what he had to 
say. 

I guess when we come back from 
vacation Joan Smith will have a beau- 
tiful Florida tan as will Hilda Markey. 
Joan went down to Join her parents, 
and Hilda is joining someone who isn't 
quite a relative. Incidentally, Hilda 
named her baby fish, "Kappa." 

Kay Fox has left S. U. to winter in 
Florida and practice golf. We know 
that everybody's going to miss Kay, and 
we wish her the best of luck. 

Why didn't Gloria Machamer take 
her soldier date to the dance Satur- 
day night? What had Sunbury that 
the Christmas dance hadn't? 

Mary Lib can't be too homesick 
with "the boy next door" here at school 
"It must be love" because they both 
look so swell. — Reminds me of a song, 
and the words could be applied in this 
case. 
Have you heard about the big blow- 



sender of lovely gifts. 
Eleanor Steele: A raspberry-colored won't say any more. 



money problem?" All right, so Christ- 
mas is right around the corner. We out party that's being planned for De- 



The song title 



mutt like Smitty's. 

Miss Kline: A car, a portable radio, 
and a portable typewriter. 

Ira Wasserburg: The girls on campus 
to start swooning again. 

Nancy Myers: A pair of brown figure 
skates. 

Harriet Gould: The men back home 
again. 

Pank Bittinger: An electric phono- 
graph and her brother home to play it. 

Gayle Clark: "Just to be back in 
Philadelphia is enough for me." 

Dot Wagner: Something from Hol- 
land—not tulip bulbs either. 

Marion Walker: Just "Charlie." 



speaks for itself 
. . . Norma Jane Hazen is so excited 
about her Christmas vacation in Lon- 
don, Ohio. Perhaps it's because she's 
going to see the "Baker" for eleven 
days. 

. . . Roy Stahl has been so sleepy late- 
ly. Too much night life, Roy??? 
. . . Hilda Markey has been buying so 
many fish wafers lately. Could it be 
that she has a tiny baby fish in her 
room that she received for a Christ- 
mas present? 

. . . Everybody is planning on a peace- 
ful and happy Christmas. I know- 
no studies! 



cember 30th in New York? If you're 
going to be in the vicinity that day, 
by all means, get the details from "one 
of the natives." I guess the kids can't 
bear to be separated from one an- 
other even during a vacation. 

Donald Wohlsen and Lenore (Lennie) 
Garman seem to really have it bad. 
They hold hands while eating and don't 
even bother to keep them under the 
table She must save fallen for the 
cute way that Don looks cross-eyed at 
her. Will it be for "Always?" 

Well, Chicks and Hicks— er-r-r-r— 
we mean fellows, have a very Merry, 
Merry Christmas and a happier New 
Year. 



TUESDAY, DECEMBER 19, 1944 



THE SUSQUEHANNA. SELINSGROVE, PENNSYLVANIA 



PAGE THREE 






OUR FROSH 



EDITH KEMP is a day student who 
commutes each day from Sunbury. In- 
cidentally, her pet peeve is walking 
down to the bus from her home "up 
in the country" these cold, dark morn- 
ings. She's enrolled in the Business 
Education course, and from what we 
hear. She makes a neat little secretary. 
Her favorite pastimes are eating pretz- 
els and pickles— and writing to Lee, 
who was recently wounded in Ger- 
many. Her pet hate is people who gos- 
sip. 

PHYLLIS KNISS is another day stu- 
dent whose home is in Shamokin Dam. 
She's taking the Liberal Arts course 
and plans to major in English. Her 
favorite foods are ham and cherry pie 
and the Saturday Evening; Post is her 
favorite magazine. She hates cold 
weather and her hobby is collecting 
snapshots. She spends all her leisure 
time ringing up sales in the Weis store 



NEWS ON OUR CAMPUS 



Formal Christmas Dinner 

The annual formal Christmas ban- 
quet for students and faculty of Sus- 
quehanna University was held in Hor- 
ton Dining Hall on Monday evening, 
December 8, at 6 o'clock. 

The menu included Tomato Juice, 
Cranberry Sauce, Celery, Roast Turkey, 
Pilling, Gravy, Mashed Potatoes, But- 
tered Brussel Sprouts, Candied Apple 
Salad, Ice Cream, Cake, and Tanger- 
ines. 

The effect of this affair, one of the 
annual events on the SU campus, was 
heightened by candlelight and Christ- 
mas music. 

S 

Sunday School Class Party 

Provided with a program of varied 
entertainment and a well-filled re- 
freshment table, sixty Susquehannans 



made a "merry" Christmas party last 
in Sunbury, and writing letters to her j Thursday evening in the social rooms 
hero in the Army Air Corps. ! of Trinity Lutheran Church. The 

BERNADINE KOONS is one of Mt. | party was given for the SU Sunday I cation. 



Missing Nouns; the last-named in- 
cluding stunt penalties. Two contests 
completed the list: a yacht race in- 
volving the blowing of a paper cup 
across a string, and a ring-passing race 
in which rings were passed along each 
line on toothpicks held in the mouth. 
Refreshments of hot coffee, assorted 
sandwiches and cookies, and pickles 
were served toward the end of the- 
evening. The party closed with music 
including "Rise Up Shepherds and Pol- 
low," sung by a trio: Virginia Hallock; 
Hope Spicer, and Jean Strausser. 

Miss DuFrain Receives Ph.D. 

Miss Viola DuFrain, a former in- 
structor in commercial subjects at Sus- 
quehanna University, will receive her 
Ph.D. degree from the School of Busi- 
ness of the University of Chicago at 
the December convocation. This is the 
first time such a degree is to be award- 
ed by the Department of Business Edu- 



Recital Class 

The December Recital Class, pre- 
sented by students of the Conservatory, 
was held in Seibert Chapel at 4:15 
p. m., Friday, December 15, 1944. 

Students playing piano solos were 
Dorothy Sternat, Marian Attinger, 
Jean Hill, Jean Attinger, Mary Ellen 
Wood, Elise Thompson, Robert Surplus, 
and Lenore Garman. 

Vocal solos were rendered by Nedia 
Polanchyck, Lenore Garman, Marie 
Klick, Marjorie Stapleton, Janet Rohr- 
bach, and Virginia Hallock. 

Roy Stahl played an organ solo, and 
Virginia Hallock a 'cello solo. 

The class concluded with a brief 
talk on "Organs and Their Builders" 
by Professor P. M. Linebaugh. 



Carmel's representatives at S. U. andj School Class by the church led by 
is enrolled in the pre-med course. Her ! Sunday School Superintendent, Mr. 
ambition is to become a heart special- 1 Clayton Leach. Refreshments were 
ist, but she admits she can never make j contributed and served by women of 
decisions. In her leisure time she | the church. 

reads Reader's Digest, embroiders, and! The program, planned by entertain- Delta Phi Sorority, 
collects poems. Her favorite sports are j ment committee, Virginia Hallock, 
volley ball and basketball, and her pet j Ruth Hallock, Ruth Botdorf , Hope 
hate is cramming for tests. Candy | Harbeson, and Carolyn Pfahler, began 
and ice cream are her favorite foods, j with carol singing. A series of hilar- 
ious games and contests followed. 
There were two circle games, Zip and 



Miss DuFrain has recently been 
elected president of the Chicago Area 
Business Educators Association. 

While on S. U.'s campus, Miss Du- 
Frain was made an honorary of Kappa 



JEANETTE KRAMER, whose heart 
belongs to Maynard, lives in Sunbury 
and is a Con. student. Her pet hatoe 
is mothers who take their crying babies 
to the movies. Her favorite magazine 
is Good Housekeeping and in her leis- 
ure time she writes letters and scrubs 
room 12. (Quite domestic, isn't she?) 
Her hobby is collecting(?) ash trays 
and her ambition is to be a concert 
singer— she says. 

ELAINE LAKS comes from Kings- 
ton, Pa„ and is taking the Liberal Arts 
course. She's interested in social work 
and wants to be a child psychologist. 
Ice cream and candy are her failings 
and her pet peeve is conceited people. 
She doesn't favor any branch of the 
service-*he likes 'em all! Her hobby 
is sports, of which swimming ranks 
first. She likes S. U. very much, 
" 'cause everyone is so friendly and so 
willing to help you." 

FRANCES LEISENRING 
Bear Gap and is 

course. She's especially fond of semi- 
classical music. Her favorite food is 
beef steak and roller skating is her 



tell me that her eyes were gray, but 
could very easily change to a green 
(with envy) or blue (as the sky). 

It seems as though that picture "Two 
Girls and a Sailor," put our Queen 
overboard for that current rage of the 
country— Van Johnson. Her dorm 
room (Seibert second) is just plastered 
wih his pictures— and also with the pic- 
tures of our canine friends. 

I guess you probably know that our 
Queen hails from New Providence, N. 
J. She graduated from Summit High 
School in '42, and so that would make 
her a junior here at SU— at the Con. 
Hearing her sing those Christmas car- 
ols assures me that they are teaching 
those students in the Con more than 
we realized. Her father is a high school 
teacher, and she has two brothers, one 
in the Navy in South America, and a 

taking^ the" music marri€d broth ^, »Ji *» IUlnjis, who 
by the way, will add to her Christmas 
enjoyment, for he's visiting at home 
over the holidays. She's not expecting 



B.K.W. COACH LINE 

Tries to give the College Students 
the best service, especially the Sun- 
bury Students. Why TRAVEL with 
an individual? The Coach Line In- 
sures every person. THINK THAT 
OVER. 



WHITMER-STEELE 
COMPANY 

LUMBER MANUFACTURES 
NORTHUMBERLAND, PA. 



MILLER'S 

Where Ed's and Co-Ed's Meet 
For Many Good Things to Eat 

Corner Pine and Orange Street* 
3 Blocks from Campus 



George B. Rine FLORIST 



HOUSE »-T 
STORE 145- Y 



The First National Bank of Selins Grove 

WELCOMES STUDENTS' ACCOUNTS 



favorite sport. She collects stamps and ™ich [? Christ mas, but is anxious to 
plays the piano in her leisure time, know what that 
Her favorite magazine is Life; she fav- 



ors the Navy; and she hates people who 
try to be too dignified. Her ambition 
is to be a music teacher. 
S 



er sent from South America. 

By this time we began talking about 
sports. She likes tennis and swim- 
ming but would like to improve in both 
and naturally one of her biggest mo- 
ments was when she was chosen 
Queen. 

And as we reached the dorm, 
wouldn't it be natural that one would 
I can assure you it is a pleasure to j think of food, with those refreshments 
interview a Queen— but there could j awaiting us in the social rooms. Well, 
have been better places and more op- j I learned that she likes most any food 
portune moments to interview SU's i at any time, but that butterscotch sun- 
Queen of Christmas, Hope Spicer, than | daes are something a little special, 
on the night when the "Susquehanna^ Well, after ruining one good? voice, 



The Queen 



Singers" banded into a large group 
and went caroling over the snow cov- 
ered streets of Selinsgrove. But as a 
deadline of a paper approaches one is 
not particular where the interview 
takes place as long the news is gotten. 
So between the wind, the snowflakes, 
and caroling, I obtained a few facts 
about our Queen. Sure, I'll share them. 
It seems as though she just missed 
voting for Roosevelt? Dewey? (We 
left politics out of the picture) for she 
won't be 21 until next July. One could 

easily see that she was a comely blond, pean History Books 
about 5 feet 8Vj inches tall, and would WANTED— Some ways and means to 
weigh about 122 pounds, but I left her understand them. 



trying to sing carols, and injuring sev- 
eral part of the anatomy resulting 
from falls, these are the things I learn- 
ed about our Christmas Queen, Hope 
Spicer. Gee, what a person won't do 
for "The Susquehanna." 

LOST & FOUND 

WANTED— Ear muffs and fur coats 
for the walk to breakfast from Has- 
singer. 
FOUND— Those horrid Western Euro- 



Fine Job Printing 
THE SELINSGROVE TIMES 



Quality Only the Finest 

NATIONAL RESTAURANT 

Hotel and Dining: Service 

Selinsgrove, Pa. 



29 N. Market St. 




For School News Read 

SUNBURY DAILY ITEM 



SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

SELINSGROVE, PENNSYLVANIA 

Oo-educatkmal— Accredited 

For more than eighty-six years in the service of Christian higher 
education. 



LIBERAL ARTS 



Curricula: 

BUSINESS 



COMMERCIAL EDUCATION 

For Catalog write 



MUSIC 



O. Morris Smith, D.D., LL.D., Pres. 
Russell Gait, Ph.D., Dean 



PAGE FOUR 



THE SUSQUEHANNA, SELINSOROVE. PENNSYLVANIA 



TUESDAY, DECEMBER 19, 1944 



Juniata and Penn 
State Subdue SU 
Quintet 45-41; 53-12 



Juniata, 45; SU, 41 

A gallant Susquehanna five suffered 
a defeat of 45-41 to a strong Juniata 
team in the Alumni Gymnasium on 
Wednesday, December 6. All students 
and fans witnessed a game packed 
with thrills from the beginning to the 
end. 

The Indians went on the warpath 
in the first period to take a lead of 8-3, 
but when half time came, the Crusad- 
ers showed that "purging ahead spirit" 
and the score stood 14-14. 

In the last half, the teams took turns 
holding the lead. With only six sec- 
onds remaining, the Stagg men were 
ahead 39-38. However, Rupert, guard 
from Juniata, was given one free foul 
shot and "wisked the net" with one 
point to tie the score as the horn 
sounded for the end of the game. 

After a two minute time-out, the 
courtmen again resumed the fight for 
the "survival of the fittest." After five 
minutes of "nip and tuck", the Indians 
held a slight lead of four points chalk- 
ing the final score as 45-41. 

"Bernie" Swiencki again showed his 
skill by leading the S. U. five with 12 
points. Next in line came Kocsis and 
Don Herrold with 10 and 9 points re- 
spectively. Wareham, lanky center for 
the "Indians", led the scoring for the 
five with 16 points. 
Susquehanna 

Goals Fouls Total ; 

Herrold, f 4 lx 3 9 | 

Wohlsen, f 2x 2 2 

Moore, f 1 4x 6 6 

Swiencki, c 5 2x3 12 

Kocsis, g 4 2x4 10 

Winey, g '. lx 1 1 

Taylor, g lx 3 1 

Totals 14 13x22 41 

Juniata 

Goals Fouls Total 

Weiner, f lx 2 1 

Ford, f 2 Ox 4 

Restuccia, f 2 lx 1 5 

Sell, f Ox 

Wareham, c 5 6x8 18 

Kaylor, g 6 Ox 4 12 

Rupert, g 1 3x 4 5 

King, g 1 Ox 2 

Totals 17 11x19 45 

Susquehanna ... 3 11 13 12 2-41 

Juniata - 8 6 14 11 6—45 

Officials: Shadle, Herman. 

Scorer: Wentael. 
Penn State 53, SU 12 

On Wednesday, December 13, 1944, 



a valiant quintet from Susquehanna 
University journeyed to State College 
to meet a strong State team, composed 
mostly of Navy V-12 trainees. State's 
overwhelming advantage of height 
proved the downfall of the small civ- 
ilian quintet of the Crusaders. 

State, using men freely, scored easi- 
ly on the Crusaders. At the end of the 
first period the score was 10-2, and at 
the half 37-4. The final score of 53-12 
found Wilson of State leading the par- 
ade of scorers with eight points. 
Swiencki of the Crusaders was high 
with five tallies with Herrold, Moore, 
and Taylor tallying two each. Cap- 
tain Kocsis added a foul for a sum 
total of twelve points. 

> S 



LT. FRED LOWER, "44, WEDS 
MISS SHIRLEY BOWMAN 



KDP PLEDGES 12; ODS, 20; SAI, 12; 
PHI MU, 6; THETA CHI, 2 



(Continued from Page 1) 
took place and the girls pledged the 
following sororities: Omega Delta Sig- 
ma—Ruth Ulrich, Bobble Kaln, Marty 
Sharwarko, Nancy Lou Blcklng, Angle 
Campo, Bobble Raclonzcr, Betty Smith, 
Ann Malkames, Peggy Mlnler, Gloria 
Reichley, Peggy Bathgate, Lillian Wer- 
ner, Lois Dauberman, Helen Zahn, 
Marie Stout, Ruth Criswell, Betty 
Reich, Joan Apple, Joyce Burkhart, 
Helen Lepley; Kappa Delta Phi — 
Gloria Walmer, Eleanor Steele, Margie 
Johns, Bobble Gaetz, Hilda Markey, 
Ann Gibson, Gertrude Roberts, Gay- 
nelle Wagoner, Maxlne Asch, Adele 
Taub, Glnnie Doss, Dotty Ellhardt, 
and Dawn Ebert; Sigma Alpha Iota— 
Frosta Arsenu, Mary Ellen Wood, Hope 
Harbeson, Hope Peters, Jeanette Kram- 
er, Harriet Gould, Elro Hacker, and 
Cora Mae Arthur. 



(Continued from Page 1) 
L. Wagenbach, of Grace Lutheran 
Church, Sunbury. 

Leaving the altar, the newly mar- 
ried couple passed through the tra- 
ditional archway of crossed swords, 
and with attendants and invited guests, 
proceeded to a wedding reception held 
in the Centennial Building. After a 
short honeymoon, the couple will re- 
side in New Bloomfleld on the Insti- 
tute campus. 

Mrs. Lower is a graduate of Sunbury 
High School in the 1944 class. Lt. 
Lower was graduated from Sunbury 
High School In 1940, and received his 
bachelor of arts degree at Susquehanna 
University commencement exercises 
this spring. He was a member of Bond 
and Key and has been social science 
instructor and assistant coach at Car- 
son Long since September. 
S 

CHRISTMAS QUEEN CHOSEN 
AT HOLIDAY DANCE 



Myers, Ebert, Bilger, Botdorf, Dauber- 
man, Marks, Sweedler, and Moskowitz. 

And last but not least were Ira Was- 
serburg who dated Rubye Myers' cous- 
in, and Dick Neidich, who escorted Ira's 
sister. 

The success of this dance was made 
possible only through the help of all 
the committees who functioned so well. 



(Continued from Page 1) 
had civilian dates. 

Service men were the dates for the 
following girls: Kresge, Miller, Kramer 
Basehoar, Malkames, Kane, Ulrich, 



FEHR'S 

THE STORE THAT LEADS 
IN BETTER MERCHANDISE 



HOTEL GOVERNOR 
SNYDER 

GOOD HOME COOKING 



F. A. BRILL CO. 

Floor Coverings— Awnings— Shades 
Draperies 

419 Market St. Phone 2180 Sunbury 



HACKETTS 

Hardware Stores 

325 Market St., 706 Market St. 
ALSO MIDDLEBURG, PA. 



CRYSTAL PURE ICE 

CHARLES W. KELLER 

Manufacturer and Wholesaler 



S. U. BOOK STORE 

SUSQUEHANNA 
NOTEBOOKS 
STATIONERY 



SNAVELY'S 

COLLEGE FURNISHINGS 
AND SHOES 



Ebert's 5c to $1.00 
Store 

Susquehanna Stationery 
8EUN8GROYE 



SCHOOL FASHIONS 

ROSENBLUM'S 

SUNBURY. FA. 
SMART FEMININE APPAREL 



When you think of Photography 
Think of 

Schindler Studio 

515 Market Street, Sunbury, Pa. 
Also Framlar and Photo Finlahhif 



MILLER BROS. 
SHOE STORE 

SUNBURY, PA. 



STONER'S 
CREDIT JEWELERS 



SUNBURY, PA. 



CHILDREN'S SHOP 

MARY H. BURNS 
Clothes for the College Girl 



Markley-Altvater 



BETTER STUDENTS CLOTHES 



SUNBURY, PA. 



VISIT THE 

REXALL 
DRUG STORE 

WILLIAM J. COTT, Druggist 



WATCH REPAIR 

Susquehanna Jewelry 

Fountain Pens and Pencils 

W. M. VALSING 

JEWELER SELINSGROVE, PA. 



THE BON TON 

Personally Selected 

COATS, DRESSES, HATS 

Sunbury, Pa. 



REICHLEY'S 

WHERE STUDENTS 
MEET AND EAT 



STEFFEN'S 

FTNE FOODS— STATIONERY 

Greetinc Cards for Every Occasion 
SELINSGROVE, PA. 



EVERY YEAR 

since Its first year, Luth- 
eran Brotherhood has 
shown a steady and con- 
sistent growth. It has 
always operated on the 
sound foundation of the 
time-tested legal reserve 
plan, baaed on the 
American Experience 
Table of Mortality. 
Lutheran Brotherhood Is 
purely mutual — It be- 
longa wholly to Its policy 
owners 



Lutheran Brotherhood 

Legal Reserve Life Insurance For Lutherans 
MINNEAPOLIS, 2, Herman L. Ekem, President MINNESOTA 



430 Market St. 



H. L. ROTHFUSS, Agent Williamsport, Pa. 



BUILD YOUR 
ESTATE NOW! 



YOUR FUTURE 
STARTS TODAY 



OFFICE OF THE DEAN 
SUSQUEHANM UNIVERSITY 
SELINSGROVE, PA. • 



RESOLUTIONS 


FOR— 




YOU 


will be 


found 


on 


page 2, 


column 


2. 





n 



u 




sauefanift 



CONGRATULATIONS TO 
Will Hays upon his grad- 
uation from SU. 



Volume LIII 



SELINSGROVE, PENNSYLVANIA, TUESDAY, JANUARY 16. 1945 



Phi Mil Entertains j "Headwater" Hays Bids 
At Open House Party! AdieM to Susquehanna I 



Number 8 



Following the basketball game on 
Saturday evening, January 13, Phi Mu 
Delta Fraternity held the first Open 
House of the year. 

Upon enterinng from the cold out- 
side, the cheery atmosphere and the 
bright blaze from the fireplace, gave 
one a warm welcome. Colorful decor- 
ations added more beauty to the scene. 

Soft music filled the air as couples 
danced to the unes of well know or- 
chestras. 

In the basement there was ping pong 
for those who were weary of dancing. 
This proved great fun, and the com- 
petition between various couples was 
keen. 

Refreshments were served in the din- 
ing room at tables displaying colorful 
valentines. The food included sand- 
wiches, cocoa, soft drinks, and potato 
chips. 

Dr. and Mrs. Arthur Wilson and 
Professor and Mrs. Russell Hatz were 
chaperons of the evening. Among the 
couples present were: John Kocsis - 
Hilda Markey; Joe Taylor - Anne Mil- 
ler; Ross Johns - Ben Herr; Bernle 
Swiencki - Elise Thompson; Don 
Wohlsen - Leah Cryder; Dexter Weik- 
el - Dot Eilhardt; Roy Stahl - Harriet 
Gould; Russ Brown - Gayle Clark; 
Harry Welliver - Dotty Jupina; Scotty 
Small - Edith Kemp; Jerry Moore - 
Nancy - Myers; Bob Surplus - Ruth 
Cochrane; Dave Bomboy - Angela 
Campo; Art Gelnett - Gaynelle Wag- 
oner; Larry Weller - Peggy Minier; 
Rine Winey - Hope Spicer; Tony Payne 
- Rubye Myers; Ray Mould - Gloria 
Gasparoli; Dick Neidich - Jane Mal- 
kames; Frank Wolfe - Fay Smith; 
Aldo Pescarmona - Emily Botdorf; Ed 
Madden - Adah Wolfe. 

S 



SU CONTRIBUTES 
$242.50 TO WSSF 



William Anstead Hays, better known 
as "Bill" or "Will," halls from Johns- 
town, Pa., and is one of the most fa- 
miliar and active figures on S. U.'s 
campus. 

Bill is leaving us at semesters and 
intends to take a position with West- 
inghouse in Pittsburgh in the field of 
Personnel Management. He will live 
! in Wilkinsburg. In addition to his job, 
| Bill will do graduate work at the Uni- 
versity of Pittsburgh for his M.A. de- 
|gree 

Since Bill is the only senior who will 
j graduate this January, he hopes to 
I come back for Graduation Exercises in 

| May. 

Bill's activities are numerous and 
varied. He is probably best known for 
jhis position as head-waiter which he 
j described as "a lot of fun." We'll all 
imiss those "no social dancing" or "a 
I hockey captain will be elected" an- 
I nouncements. For the past two years 
jhe has been president of Bond and 
1 Key fraternity. "I'll never forget work- 
ing with the girls in the dining hall 
j and with the children at the fraternity 
house," he says. Bill Is also Senior 
Class President and President of the 
; Men's Student Council. He took part 
I in the Theater Guild play, "'Magnifl- 
| cent Obsession," is a member of S. 
I C. A. and the Business Society and 
j served on the Civilian Defense Council 
I during blackouts. 

Although Bill Is Indebted to the en- 
tire faculty and dean, he particularly 
I expressed gratitude to Dr. Dunkel- 
berger, who has influenced him more 
(Concluded on Page 3) 
S 

SHS Girls Tangle With 
SU Coeds—in Basketball 



GOVERNMENT ORDER, "WORK OR FIGHT" 
MAY EFFECT 13 MALE STUDENTS OF SU 



Braveman, Walmer, 
Gould Editors of 
Next "Susquehanna" 

It has usually been the custom at 
Susquehanna that one issue of the 
school paper should be edited and man- 
aged by the members of the freshman 
[class. However, as last year there was 
I no freshman issue, this year's paper 
t will be the Soph-Frosh issue. 

Miss Jackie Braveman, sophomore 
Liberal Arts student from New York 
City; Miss Gloria Walmer, freshman 
Commercial Education student from 
Penbrook; and Miss Harriet Gould, 
freshman music student from Johns- 
town, will be the co-editors of the 
issue. 

The entire paper will be edited by 
these students who will appoint their 
own staffs and have complete charge 
of the issue. They have already begun 
work on it and they promise it to be 
a colorful issue. 

Because of semester holidays, the 
next paper will be published on Tues- 
day, February 6. 



The World Student Service Fund at 
Susquehanna University ended last 
week with $242.50 received. According 
to Miss Marian Willard, general chair- 
man, not all students have paid their 
pledge. It is anticipated that $250.00 j 
will be the final total when all obliga- \ 
tions have been met. 

To increase competition and stimu- | 
late interest for the drive, the school | 
was divided into teams. The Hassinger ; 
Hall team contributed $109.00 and Sol- ; 
bert Hall, 103.50. 



Did You Know? 



Wednesday, January 17 — Campus 
Club, 3-5 p. m. 

Basketball— SU and Dickinson at ! 
Carlisle 

Thursday, January 18 — Alphi Psi | 
Omega, 7 p. m. 

Friday, January 19 — Conservatory 
Recital Class, Seibert Chapel at 
4:15 p. m. 

Saturday, January 20— Basketball— 
SU and Bucknell Junior College 
in Alumni Gym at 8 p. m. 

Thursday, January 25 — SCA meet- 
ing in the Social Rooms at 7 p. m. 

Friday, January 26 — Semester ends 

Saturday and Monday, ,January 27 
and 29 — Semester Vacation 

Tuesday, January 30 — Registration 
for second semester in the Library 

Wednesday, January 31— Classes re- 
sumed. 



On Thursday, January 4th, the girls' 
basketball teams from Selinsgrove 
High School visited the campus of 
Susquehanna. The occasion of the 
visit was practice games between the 
high school girls and the freshmen 
and sophomore co-eds. 

High scorer on S. U.'s freshman 
team was Jeanne Wortley while Adah 
Wolfe gained top honors for the Sophs. 

Susquehanna's line-up: 
Freshmen 

Forwards— JJ. Wortley, J. Burkhard, 
R. Ulrich, R. Relmer. 

Guards— V. Doss, G. Reichley, N. 
Garman, E. Kemp. 
Sophomores 

Forwards— A. Wolfe, E. Leiby, E. 
Thompson, D. Wagner, F. Smith. 

Guards — N. Myers, G. Clark, L. 
Cryder. 



^S- 



Wave Sally Mitke, x'48 
On Leave, Visits Campus 

Our own Sally Mltke is back to 
visit us in her Navy blue Wave uni- 
form. Sally started her boot training 
at Hunter College last October. After 
six weeks of training she was trans- 
ferred to Cedar Falls, Iowa, where she I 
attended Yeoman School. Now Sally 
is on a ten day leave after which she| 
will be sent to Washington, D. C. Al- 
though she is not in the recruiting 
branch of the Waves, Sally's enthusi- 
asm for the service Is obvious and 
seems to say. "Won't you Join, too?" 



SU Five Wins Two 
More Over Milton 
And Westinghouse 

Susquehanna 50; Milton YMCA 32 

The Crusader courtmen captured 
their fourth win of the '44-'45 season 
on Saturday, Jan. 6, 1945 from the 
Milton YMCA five, by a score of 50 
to 32. From beginning to end the S. 
U. boys were out in front. At hall 
time they held a strong marginal lead 
of 24 to 12. 

Again, as in previous games this 
season, Swiencki led the Crusaders with 
seven goals and four foul shots or a 
total of 18 points. Moore was next in 
line with 12. The opponents were led 
by Robinson, who chalked 15 points. 
Milton Y.M.C.A. Field Fouls Total 

Neitz, f 6 Ox 

Robinson, f 6 3x 4 15 

Ritter, c 1 Ox 2 

I. Miller, g 1 Ox 2 

Heyman, g 1 Ox 2 

K. Miller, g 1 lx 2 3 

Moore, g 3 2x 3 8 

Totals 13 6x 9 32 

Susquehanna Field Fouls Total 

Herrold, f 3 lx 2 7 

Moore, f 5 2x2 12 

Swiencki, c 6 6x 6 18 

Wohlsen, f 1 Ox 2 

Kocsis, g 2 lx 1 5 

Taylor, g 1 2x 2 4 

Winey, g 1 Ox 2 



Totals 19 12x13 50 

Milton YMCA 5 7 12 8—32 

Susquehanna 15 9 16 10 — 50 

Officials: Shadle, Valunas. 



Susquehanna 41; Westinghouse 36 

Stamping out Its fifth win of the 
season the Susquehann cagers defeat- 
ed a strong Westinghouse five by a 
score of 41 to 36 on Saturday, January 
13. 

Susquehanna, playing poor ball, 
found itself trailing at the end of the 
first quarter, 12-10, but a counter-of- 
fensive that lasted through the next 
(Concluded on Page 4) 



Men Rejected Jor Military 
Service Face Possible Draft 
Into Industry or Service 

* 

The trend of national affairs at the 
present time is to draft all able bodied 
men into the armed forces or into some 
type of defense industry. In order to 
accomplish this, all males over the age 
of eighteen will be reclassified. It is 
obvious and inevitable that the male 
student body at Susquehanna will be 
affected by this so-called "new order." 

The present classification of the 
masculine student body on Susque- 
hanna's campus is as follows: 

13— physically unfit for service. 

5— honorably discharged. 

2— pre-theologs. 

5— seventeen years of age. 

5 — liable to immediate Induction. 

1— foreign student. 

These are the opinions of the men 
on our campus who will come under 
the proposed "work or fight" order of 
the government. 

Dexter Weikel— I am willing to do 
whatever the government asks, but I 
would prefer going into the army rath- 
er than into industry. 

Harold Snyder— I am speaking as a 
4F, and I know there is a definite need 
for this new trend. So many able, bod- 
ted boys' are fighting, and I would be 
willing to be of any service to my 
country; not Into the army, but into 
industry. 

Rine Winey— Naturally I would like 
to get into the service. I do not know 
if the necessity is great enough to war- 
rant the drafting of every male, but 
if the needs be, I shall be glad to 
comply to either of the government's 
requests whether it be "work or fight." 
Until that time, however, I shall re- 
main in school, but I do not think any 
discrimination should be shown to col- 
lege and non-college men. 

Jerry Moore— I am not very well 
versed in national affairs, but the little 
bit I do know about them makes me 
come to the conclusion that there Is a 
need for a larger armed service, but no 
necessity to increase the labor supply. 
Too many people in industry now are 
earning wages higher than they ever 
did before, and they are loafing on the 
Job. There is a laxity in industry due 
to inefficiency of the laborer, not lack 
of labor supply. If the government 
decides to call me to service, I would 
do so willingly, but I should like to 
finish my college education because 
(Concluded on Page 4) 

Don Herrold, '46 Leaves 
For Service January 24 

Donald Herrold, junior day student 
from Por* Trevorton, was accepted for 
duty with the armed forces on Decem- 
ber 27, and has been ordered to report 
for duty on' January 24. 

Herrold, one of the starting five on 
SU's basketball squad, was taking the 
Liberal Arts course, and was planning 
to enter the teaching field. 

He Is a graduate of Selinsgrove High 
School in 1942 and is a member of 
Bond and Key. 

The sincerest wishes of SU go with 
you, Don, as you enter your country's 
service. 



PAGE TWO 



THE SUSQUEHANNA, SELINSGROVE. PENNSYLVANIA 



TUESDAY, JANUARY 16, 1945 




n 





Rine G. Winey, Jr. 
Jean C. Geiger, 



Established 1891 
, '46 Editor 

'46 Associate Editor 

Gloria Gasparoli, '46 Managing Editor 

Arthur J. Gelnett, '47 Sports Editor 

Reporters: Mary Elizabeth Basehoar, '45; Ruth Botdorf, '45, proofreader; Cor- 
inne Kahn, '45; Laverne Kohn, '45; Louise Kresge, '45; Gloria Machmer, 
'45; Frances Bittinger, '45; June Hoffman, '46; Jayne Troutman, '46; Norma 
Hazen, '46; Ruth Cochrane, '46; Emily Botdorf, '46; Marie Klick, '46; Vir- 
ginia Hallock, '46; Carmen Beckwith, '46; Jackie Braveman, '47; Joe Taylor, 
'47; Jane Gundrum, '47; Dorothy Wagner, '47; Faye Smith, '47; Caroline 
Pfahler, '47; Doris Williamson, '47; Marian Walker, '47; Gayle Clark, '47; 
Martha Garard, '48; Helen Zahn, '48; Betty Smith, '48; Caroline Marks, 
'48; Betty Frank, '48; Gloria Walmer, '48; Ruth Criswell, '48; Roberta 
Gaetz, '48; Ed Madden, '48; Sara Lee Smith, '48; Margaret Johns, '48; 
Joan Smith, '48; Harriet Gould. '48; John Warner, '45; Aldo Pescarmona, 
'47; Caroline Graybill, '48. 

Corinne Kahn, '45 Business Manager 

Helen Eby, '47 Advertising Manager 

Jean Kinzer, '46 Circulation Manager 

Business Assistants: Roswell Johns, '46; Ed Madden, '48; Russell Brown, '48; 
Betty Frank 
Markey. 



CAMPUSOLOGY 



48; Cynthia Carmel, '48; Jean Wheat, Barbara Kain, Hilda] at either. 

IT'S RUMORED: that Eve Zlock's 



Published semi-monthly throughout the school year, with the exception of ! new nickname Is "bad penny" 'cause he 



Thanksgiving, Christmas and Semester holidays 
$2.00 a year. 

Entered as second class mail matter at Sellnsgrove 



at a subscription rate of 
Pa. 



EDITORIALS 

During the summer an unfortunate 

event occurred in the Theatre Guild 
room in G. A. In some manner, the 
steam valves of the radiator leaked, 
releasing into the room steam, which 
condensed into vapor and fell on the 
various properties. Not only were the 
metal objects, such as hammers, lights, 
and make-up kits badly rusted, but 
curtains and costumes were damp and 
mouldy. A scene of great damage and 
chaos greeted us when we returned to 
campus In the fall. We were all dumb- 
struck, and decided to pitch in and 
get rid of the mess in doublequick time. 
But did we? Are the lights in any bet- 
ter working condition, or have the cur- 
tains been shaken and brushed? Has 
anything been done? What would Mr. 
Kelly think? These things are not our 
personal property which we can ruin as 
we please. They belong to the Theatre 
Guild— to those who have gone before 
us and taken care of the things, to us, 
and to those who come after us. The 
responsibility for repairing this dam- 



We are entering upon a new calendar 
year here at Susquehanna. During the 
past year certain problems have arisen 
among us that demand a New Year's 
resolution on the part of all of us. 

1. Let's resolve to put an end to this 
petty bickering among the respective 
sororities and fraternities. At a time 
when the number of us here at school 
is so small, there are still some persons 
who insist on "calling names" and 
"pulling petty animosities." Let's 
men and women enough to respect all; 
the students as members of Susque- ' 
hanna rather than of any particular 
sorority or fraternity. 

2. Let's resolve to stop our eternal 
griping— especially about the nature of 
some of the meals. It may be that 



Must take time out from my study- next semester; that Annie Miller and 

Joe Taylor have found each other at 
last; kthat "Lil" Werner will be back 
soon— no foolin' 'cause Phil will have to 
have answered Uncle Sam's call again; 
that in the after-Christmas rush Jerry 
overlooked Carolyn— could a trip to 
West Point have had anything to do 
with it?; that Norma Hazen's trip to 
Ohio was poif ect— what with Cecil there 
awaitin'; that the future Mr. Ruth 
Criswell made bright the dull life at 
S. U. with his recent visit to that 
happy young lady; that Don Wohlsen, 
"Yonkers" to youse, ain't so sure now 
what with Lt. Joe Shusta whisking 
Nancy Lou right from under his nose; 
that Larry and Peggy Minier make the 
cutest couple and is this a case!; that 
I'd better not add any more. 

LOST: about 4 hours in New York 
two Saturday nights ago. If found, 
please return to "Skip" Madden. 

Helen Eby is one of those lucky, 
lucky girls who never lacks a man- 
witness Johnny, Bucknell's cutest sail- 
or, her date last night, and Bob Leslie, 
who mounted all obstacles to visit our 
Helen at Christmas. Oh, to have "It"!! 

No one was happier to see Hilda back 
than Johnny who was like a fish out 
of water without her— even that bag 
of Florida oranges didn't help. 

One nite Ray Mould called 9087R12 
and asked for one of our little gals. 
Frosh: She's taking a bath." He: 
"Sorry, wrong number." 

Which only goes to prove that corn 
grows even in January. 



ing: (it's the end of the semester you 
know) and let you in on some sly 
droolings from here and there — mostly 
here!!! 

Now it can be told— that is officially. 
All you have to do Is gaze at that rock 
on Ellen Stein's third finger left hand 
to know whereof I speak. The occasion 
of the return home this week-end was 
the engagement party at which many 
famous people were present, including 
her roommate, Ellen (the name must be 
contagious) Hellman. 

Speaking of rings, Santa visited both 
Corinne and Bobby Gaetz with the 
same kind of gift via Clyde and Bob 
respectively— only lest you all become 
unduly excited, these are not engage- 
ment rings but are beauties just the 
same. And Marion's real pearl ear- 
rings from George ain't to be sneezed 



turns up so often; that the latest 
"Book-of-the-Month" bears the in- 
triguing title of '"Old Spice and New 
Wine"— or is that the latest couple of 
the month?; that there will soon be a 
little house in front of the big house- 
namely Theta Chi— for Ruth to use 
these cold winter nights while wait- 
ing for Bob; that Sally Mitke makes 
,a simply gorgeous Wave; that Elaine 
i Laks' conversation is just full of her 
I new man; that Adele Heitoff was one 
one of the most welcome sights S. U. 
has seen in many a day — incidentally 
boys, she's to be a permanent fixture 



LaVeme 



*|I Wonder Why 

. . . Harry Welliver likes the idea of 
"moonlight and roses, and tobacco 
road." Could be he's nothing but a 
romanticist??? 

. . .Dr. Sheldon was so pleased with 
his New Year's present that he receiv- 
ed recently at the S.A.I, party, Jan- 
uary 10th. Perhaps he was anxious 
sometimes the food here at school is I to put the puzzle together as it was a 
not just to our satisfaction, but would pin-up girl, you know! 
you rather exchange places with our L . . Certain people in the Freshman 

men who are fighting throughout the ! En gUsh class have been using bobby 

pins to clip their newspaper articles to 



world and living on K-rations and 
sometimes going many long hours with- 
out any food. The next time you want 
to gripe about the food — just remember 



age rests with our elected officers, i that it is no easy task to prepare three 
whose duty it is to appoint commit- i meals a day for 150 students, 
tees and to supervise the work. Let's j 3. Let's resolve to back the school 
have action instead of promises for a j projects and activities. On November 
change! 

S 



their outlines. Don't they realize that 
there's a metal shortage??? 

. . . The time seemed to fly so quickly 
at the Phi Mu Open House the other 
night. I guess everybody was having 
such a wonderful time that it was over 
much too soon. 

. . . Everybody's so anxious for the 
semester vacation to roll around. Ru- 



28, a play was given by the Theatre I mors have it that practically all of S. 
Guild in GA300. Today, nearly two I U.'s student body is going to New York 



During war-time we are supposed to months later, you will find that not a ! t0 spend a "Q ulckl€ " W*» dav S- 



become hardened to good-byes, but it curtain, which were used as a setting, 
seems that each time we must say has been taken down. Even the nails 
good-bye it is more difficult. We've; and tools still remain back stage just 
said farewell to the first group of Sus- M they were left that evening. Where 
quehanna men who left for the Army | is the stage committee that was ap 



. . . Ice skating is so appealing. Yes, 
indeed, "crack the whip" is a very 
interesting game, a very interesting 
j>ame! ! 

. . . Social dancing was so successful 
last Monday night. Could it have been 



in February of '43, to those who left pointed? Some persons are very glad ibecaus f e the ™ Muptalgea decided to 

iconic far a change?? 
for the Navy in May, and to those who to say they will help, but where are I 



enlisted in the Air Corps, Merchant they when the work is to be done? 
Marine, and Marines. Now we are go- ! There was a basketball game on 
ing to lose some more of the men of , Saturday evening with Westinghouse. 
S. U. to the service. We want you who Perhaps Susquehanna doesn't have a 
are leaving to know how much we will great team, and maybe the game wasn't 



miss you and just how happy we were 
that you were able to be with us as 
long as you have been. You are going 
to make it possible for not only your 



one of top billing, but still, more than 
25 students should have been there to 
back the team. The cheerleaders were 
on hand and did a splendid job — but 



own speedy return, but for the return I they could have done much better with 
of all those who have had to leave their | a larger crowd. Let's get behind the 
homes and colleges to serve their coun- 1 organizations and activities of the 
try. We wish you Godspeed and all I school and really do some work Instead 



the luck in the world, fellas! 



of a lot of talking. 



I . . . Mary Moyer and Marie Klick were 
comparing letters the other day. Could 

iit have concerned their men? 
. . . ""Pank" Bittinger has become so 

'interested in French lately. Urn, men 

|— "l'amour toujours l'amour. 
. . . Donald Herrold never gives the 
(•iris an even break. After all the 

i ratio is 5 to 1. 

i . . . * Dottie Sternat was so nervous 

; the other Sunday. Could it have been 
because she was to play the organ at 
the First Lutheran Church. 
. . . Jackie Braveman (with all due 
apologies to Melvin) had such a won- 
derful time with Ensign Jimmy over 
the last vacation. For further infor- 
mation just visit Jackie's room and 



At the Stanley 

Monday and Tuesday, January 16 and 
16— "Marriage Is a Private Affair*— 

Lana Turner, John Hodlak, and 

James Craig. 

Lana, the doubting bride, decides to 
go out and have some fun. As you've 
probably guessed, she goes back to John 
more than ever. Guaranteed to cure 
your blues. 

Wednesday, January 17— "Take It or 

Leave It"— Phil Baker's progrom now 

on the screen. On the air it's a riot, 

on the screen it's terrific. 
Thusrday, and Friday, January 18 and 

19— "Kismet"— Marlene Dietrich and 

Ronald Colman. 

This old fairy tale has been given 
the works. The technicolor is especially 
good. 
Saturday, January 20— "Cowboy of the 

Clouds"— Need more be said. 
Monday and Tuesday, January 22 and 

23— "The Very Thought of You"— 

Dennis Morgan, Eleanor Parker, and 

Dane Clark. 

Two war workers find their romance 
on the street car. Here's a picture 
everyone's talking about. You'll come 
out reeling. A must. 
Wednesday, January 24— "The Mask of 

Demetrios"— Sydney Greenstreet and 

Peter Lorre. 

Characteristic of these two actors. 
A high class criminal operating in the 
Balkan capitals before World War II. 
Thursday and Friday, January 25 and 

26— "When Irish Eyes Are Smiling" 

—Dick Haymes and June Haver. 

As Irish as shamrocks. Full of 
chorus girls and color. Be gorry and 
It's an emerald from yhr Emerald Isle. 
Sure and you're missing a lot of fun if 
you miss this flicker. 

Coming to the Strand in Sunbury 
this week: 
Monday and Tuesday, January 14 and 

15— "Laura;" 
Saturday, January 20 — "Casanova 

Brown." 



you'll see her three treasured pictures 
"of him" in full view. 



i%; 



TUESDAY, JANUARY 16, 1945 



THE SUSQUEHANNA, SELINSGROVE, PENNSYLVANIA 



OUR FROSH 



RHODA KLEMONS, who is 5' 6" tall, 
likes t8 play tennis very much — in 
fact, she taught it this past summer 
at a camp. Rhoda is taking the Lib- 
eral Arts Course, and leans toward be- 
coming a lab technician. Her favorite 
orchestra leader is Glenn Miller, and 
her favorite song is "White Christ- 
mas." She is partial to redheads, es- 
pecially the Forest Hills, Long Island, 
type. 

BETTY LIEDERMAN, who originally 
came from Chicago, and now lives In 
New York City, is 5' 7" tall and has 
hazel eyes. Her hobby is knitting. In 
food she likes steaks; in sports, swim- 
ming; and In magazines, "Coronet." 
Betty has a wonderful sense of humor. 
Although she is taking the Liberal Arts 
Course, she wants to major in MRS. 
The Army Air Corps has her heart. 

EDWARD MADDEN, who is better 
known as "Skip," also hails from the 
big city of New York. He would like 
to enter advertising work after grad- 
uation, but expects to be taken by 
Uncle Sam in the near future. "Skip" 
likes basketball, baseball, football, and 
skiing. He enjoys the music of Benny j 
Goodman and the strains of the song, | 
"I Don't Want to Leave You." 

ANN MALKAMES, the tiny girl from j 
Hazleton, likes the music of Fred War- ' 
ing and Harry James. She finds 
"Mademoiselle" magazine interesting 
reading and enjoys Greer Garson'is 
movies. Ann is taking the Liberal Arts 
Course, and expects to teach. As a 
hobby she collects perfume and ear- 
rings. She is an ardent sports fan, 
and after a game likes to go to Reich's 
for a hot fudge sundae. 

HILDA MARKEY, that striking 
blond from Hassinger, hails from York. 
She_ keeps a diary in her spare time 
while listening to the tunes of Glenn 
Miller or Charlie Spivak. She is tak- 
ing the Commercial Education Course 
and expects to teach. Dancing, swim- 
ming, and football are her favorite 
sports. A certain somebody in Hilda's 
life adds much to her stay at S. U. 
She also enjoys fashion magazines, 
candy, ice cream, traveling, and big 
cities. 

CAROLINE MARKS, of Danville,' 
likes the Navy. Writing letters is her 
hobby. She likes swimming, football, ' 
and steak smothered in onions. Caro- 
line is majoring in history with an | 
English minor, and expects to follow in : 
her brothers' footsteps and teach. The | 
orchestra of Harry James and the 
books of William Saroyan rank high 
with her. Her dog "Bingo" is her fav- 
orite pet. 

PEGGY MINIER, S. U.'s cute red- 



PAGE THREE 



'NEWS ON OUR CAMPUS 



Conservatory Recital 

Students of the Conservatory will 
present an afternoon recital in Seibert 
Chapel at 4:15 p. m., Friday, January 
19, 1945. The following students will 
participate: 

Piano solos— Elro Hacker, Earl Le- 
May, William Rohrbach, Madge Fors- 
ter, Jean Hill, Velma Shook, and Vir- 
ginia Hallock. 

Vocal solos— Howard Payne, Harriet 
Gould, and Rubye Meyers. 

Trombone solo — Howard Payne. 

Organ solo— Louise Kresge. 

Clarinet solo — Lenore Garma. 

The program will be concluded by 
an instrumental quiz conducted by 
Prof. R. C. Hatz. 

S 



Discussion Group 

All the students interested in current 
events and post-war problems will be 
glad to learn about the discussion 
group that meets in the Library base- 
ment on Friday evenings. These in- 
formal meetings are held at 7:30 p. m. 
and usually adjourn by 9 o'clock. The 
discussion group was started by the 
students and will continue as long as 
the students are interested. 

The first meeting was a discussion 
of the Star Course lecture by Dr. 
Stringfellow Barr. In the second meet- 
ing held January l, the discussion cen- 
tered on the Dumbarton Oaks Confer- 
ence. The next discussion group will 
be held the first Friday of the new- 
semester and the topic for discussion 
will be "What shall we do with Ger- 



Pi Gamma Mu 

The Pennsylvania Gamma Chapter many economically after the war?" 
of the Pi Gamma Mu met in the social 
rooms of Seibert Hall Monday evening, 
January 7th. The Rev. Dean, pastor 
of the Freeburg parish, was the speak- 
er of the evening and he presented the 
problems of Europe as he himself had i 
witnessed them. Following his most '\ Sigma Alpha Iota 
interesting address, the members pres- I S.A.I, started the New Year with a 
ent engaged in a discussion of the war | P art y held for the Conservatory fac- 
and post-war world. Miss Corinne | ulfc y Wednesday evening, January io, 
Kahn and Miss Norma Hazen were the 



The meetings are open to everyone. 
Anyone may join in the discussion and 
ask questions. Any problems that 
anyone would like discussed may be 
brought up in the future. 



hostesses of 



the evening. 
S 



S. C. A. Meeting 

The regular meeting of the S. C. A 
was held in the social rooms of Sei- 
bert Hall on Thursday evening, Jan- 
uary 11. 

Harold Snyder, a senior pre-theolog- 1 
ical student at S. U., was the leader of \ 
the program, and was assisted by 
Franklin Wolfe. Mr. Snyder delivered 
an inspiring meditation on the theme j 
"The Foundation of Life." 

The meeting was closed by everyone 
pronouncing together the Mizpah bene- 
diction. 

-S- 



B.K.W. COACH LINE 

Tries to give the College Students 
the best service, especlaHy the Sun- 
bury Students. Why TRAVEL with 
an individual? The Coach Line In- 
sures every person. THINK THAT 
OVER. 



when all of the faculty of the "Con" 
waded through the snow and came to 
the sorority room. After playing some 
interesting games, each member of the 
faculty and their wives received a 
humorous gift. Refreshments were 
served buffet style. Besides the regu- 
lar members of S.A.I., those present 
Included: Dr. and Mrs. Sheldon, Mr. 
and Mrs. Hatz, Mrs. Giauque, Miss 
Pottelgex, Prof, and Mrs. Linebaugh, 
Mr. Haskins, and Miss Kline. 

During semester vacation the soror- 
ity will take a trip to New York City. 
Some of the girls will stay in private 
homes, and the rest will stay in a hotel. 
On Saturday afternoon the girls plan 
to go to the Metropolitan Opera House 
to see the opera, and on Sunday af- 
ternoon will attend a concert at Car- 
negie Hall. Sunday evening they will 
visit another concert at the National 
Broadcasting Company. 

The pledges of SAI had their first 
meeting last week and the following 
officers were elected: President, Hope 
Peters, vice president, Harriet Gould; 
secretary, Elro Hacker; and treasurer, 
H6pe Harbeson. 

S 

KDP PLEDGE OFFICERS 

Pledge members of KDP Sorority re- 
cently elected their officers. Hilda 
Markey was chosen as president with 
Ginny Doss as Vice-president. Ger- 
trude Roberts is secretary-treasurer. 



MILLER'S 

Where Ed's and Co-Ed's Meet 
For Many Good Thins?* to Eat 

Corner Pine and Orange Streets 
3 Blocks from Campus 



George B. Rine FLORIST 



HOUSE K-Y 
STORE 143-T 



Omega Delta Sigma 

At a recent meeting of the pledges 
of Omega Delta Sigma the following 
girls were elected as officers: President, 
Joan Apple; Vice Presidet, Marie Stout; 
Secretary, Ann Malkames; Treasurer, 
Gloria Reichley. 

S 



The First National Bank of Selins Grove 

WELCOMES STUDENTS' ACCOUNTS 



head from Millersburg, enjoys swim- 
ming and tennis. She is taking the 
Commercial Education Course and 
wants to be either a teacher or a sec- 
retary. Her tastes in music are class- 
ical and semi-classical especially when 
played by Fred Waring or Harry 
James. She likes cocker spaniel dogs 
for pets. 

S 



"HEADWAITER" HAYS BIDS 
I ADIEU TO SUSQUEHANNA 

(Continued from Page 1) 
I than any one person In his life. 

Bill says, "The happiest days of my 
life thus- far have been spent at Sus- 
quehanna. I'm going to miss the kids, 
and I'm looking forward to getting 
back." The feeling's mutual, Anstead. 




This week the reporter of this col- 
umn was asked to question a cross 
section of the student body with re- 
gard to the particular New Year's 
resolution that he made — and will try 
to keep. Here are the resolutions that 
were given: 

Dexter Welkel— Not to make more 
than one trip a day to Reich's. 

Phyllis Kniss— To write at least once 
a week to all the fellows I know who 
are overseas. 

Mary Lib Baschoar— Resolved: Never 
to indulge. 



Gloria Gasparoli — To go to bed early. 

Dawn Ebert— To write loads of let- 
ters and not fight with my mother. 

Bobby Gaetz— To get up every morn- 
ing for breakfast. 

Russ Brown — To have only one wom- 
an at a time. 

Corinne Kahn— To be true to him 
until he comes home. 

Jayne Troutman — To control my 
temper and to be tolerant. 

Naomi Garman — To get to bed nights 
and to pass one algebra test next sem- 
ester. 

Carolyn Marks — To get to bed at 
least by 2 a. m. before Dr. Russ' ex- 
ams. 

Art Gelnett — Not to make any more 
New Year's resolutions so I won't have 
to break any. 

June Hoffman — To participate in 
only one bull session a week. 

Helen Lepley— to write to "Kenny" 
every day. 

Gayle Clark — To answer all my let- 
ters on time. 

"Pank" Bittincer — To treat everybody 
like a human being. 



Fine Job' Printing 
THE SELINSGROVE TIMES 



Quality Only the Finest 

NATIONAL RESTAURANT 

Hotel and Dining Service 

8elinsffrove, Pa. 



29 N. Market St. 




For School ;News Read 

SUNBURY DAILY ITEM 



SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

SELINSGROVE, PENNSYLVANIA 



For more than eighty-six years 
education. 



Co-edueat tonal— Accredited 

in the service of Christian higher 



LIBERAL ARTS 



Curricula: 

BUSINESS 



MUSIC 



COMMERCIAL EDUCATION 

For Catalog write 

G. Morris Smith, D.D., LL.D., Pres, 
Russell Oalt, Ph.D., Dean 



PAGE FOUR 



THE SUSQUEHANNA, SELINSGROVE, PENNSYLVANIA 



TUESDAY, JANUARY 16, 1945 



GOVERNMENT ORDER, 
"WORK OR FIGHT" 

(Continued from Page 1) 
some people will be more useful in the 
field of education than in the field of 
militarism. 

Jack Warner— For people who are 
just "sitting around," I feel that the 
recent Congressional bill is very de- 
sirable. However, if the schools are 
not considered essential, I believe that 
the entire educational system of Amer- 
ica will be jeopardized. I wouldn't like 
to have to leave school, especially since 
I'm so near to finishing. 

Howard Payne— If it becomes neces- 
sary to either '"work or fight," I'd leave 
school, but I wouldn't especially like it 
since I'm so near finishing. 

William Hays— I think it's a good 
thing, but I'm not in favor of men be- 
ing pulled out of college. If the nation 
is to have good future leaders I think 
that the fellows should be allowed to 
finish school. 

Harry Welliver— I expect to be called 
for a re-examination and naturally I 
hope I will be accepted, but if I 
shouldn't, I'd much rather go to work 
in a war plant than be put in a labor 
battalion. I certainly would like to at 
least finish my year here at school, but 
I know lots of fellows were inducted 
and they never had the chance to go to 
college, so I shall be only too glad to 
go whenever or do whatever the gov- 
ernment asks. 

Frank Wolfe— If I would be called, 
I would be delighted to serve in either 
capacity. I would like very much to 
get in the Navy. 

Roswell Johns — My deferment will 
last until the beginning of February 
when I hope to enter the Maritime 
Service. Because of my three years of 
college. I have a chance for a commis- 
sion. 

Aldo Pescamona and Larry Weller— 
We would rather finish our education, 
but if we were called, we would enter 
- the service, rather than work in a 
war plant. Should we be drafted, we 
would like to continue our pre-med 
course in the Navy, if possible. 

S 

SU FIVE WINS TWO MORE OVER 
MILTON AND WESTINGHOUSE 

(Continued from Page l) 
two quarters, gave Susquehanna peat 
enough lead to win the game. 

Swiencki, center for the SU five, led 
the scoring chart with 14 points, fol- 
lowed by Moore with 8. Mclntyre led 
the visitors with a total of 15. 

This is the second time this year 
Coach Stagg's lads have defeated the 
Westinghouse team. 



On Wednesday, January 16, SU will 
journey to Carlisle to meet Dickinson 
College. Line-up: 
Susquehanna Goals Fouls Total 

Moore, f 3 2x 4 8 

JHerrold, f 1 3x 3 5 

Swiencki, c 5 4x7 14 

iKocsis, g 2 lx 2 5 

JTaylor, g 2 lx 2 5 

:Wohlsen, c 2 Ox 1 4 



Totals 15 11x19 41 

Westinghouse Goals Fouls Total 

Bright 1 Ox 2 

iBenner 4 Ox 5 8 

Culp 1 Ox 2 

Mclntyre _.. 5 5x8 15 

Abrams 2 Ox 1 4 

5 Malinowski 2x 3 2 

Umholtz 1 lx 1 3 

Totals 14 8x18 36 

Westinghouse 12 9 6 11—36 

I Susquehanna 10 14 12 5—41 

S 

—Patronize Susquehanna advertisers. 



WHITMER-STEELE 
COMPANY 

LUMBER MANUFACTURES 
NORTHUMBERLAND, PA. 



In The Susquehanna' 

ONE YEAR AGO: 

Susquehanna started a drive to raise 
$75,000 in war bonds so that a pursuit 
plane could be named after the school. 

Jean Kinzer was elected secretary of 
KDP to replace Margaret Gemmill, 
who will graduate from SU at Semes- 
ters. 

23 members of the faculty and stu- 
dents gave blood to the Red Cross Blood 
Donor Service. 

SU's basketball team defeated Eliza- 
bethtown 41-40 and Milton YMCA 59- 
26. 

Miss Sonia Grodke addressed the 
I student body about the World Student 
: Service Fund. 

Norma Frank, Mary Lib Basehoar, 
Marjorie Barton, and Gloria Gasparoli 
were initiated into Alpha Psi Omega. 

TWO YEARS AGO: 

Six seniors, William Curry, John 

iGalski, Kenneth Klinger, Keith Lozo, 

| Richard Matthews, and John Zuback 

were graduated at semesters, January 

15. 

Lanthorn group pictures were taken 
on January 13 and 14. 

Classes for the second semester be- 
gan on January 20. 



Susquehanna was being considered 
as a school for army trainees. 

"Are Husbands Necessary," "Black 
Swan," and "Somewhere I'll Find 
You" were playing at the Stanley. 

The Crusader, five was defeased by 
Drexel, 32-26 and Bucknell 39-25. 

S . 

—Patronize Susquehanna advertisers. 



FEHR'S 

THE STORE THAT LEADS 
IN BETTER MERCHANDISE 



HACKETTS 

Hardware Stores 

325 Market St., 706 Market St. 
ALSO MIDDLEBURG, PA. 



HOTEL GOVERNOR 
SNYDER 

GOOD HOME COOKING 



F. A. BRILL CO. 

Floor Coverings— Awnings — Shades 
Draperies 

419 Market St. Phone 2180 Sunbury 



CRYSTAL PURE ICE 

CHARLES W. KELLER 

Manufacturer and Wholesaler 



S. U. BOOK STORE 

SUSQUEHANNA 
NOTEBOOKS 
STATIONERY 



SNAVELY'S 

COLLEGE FURNISHINGS 
AND SHOES 



Ebert's 5c to $1.00 
Store 

Susquehanna Stationery 
SELINSGROVE 



SCHOOL FASHIONS 

ROSENBLUM'S 

SUNBURY, PA. 
SMART FEMININE APPAREL 



When you think of Photography 
Think of 

Schindler Studio 

515 Market Street, Sunbury, Pa. 
ALso Framing and Photo Finishing 



MILLER BROS. 
SHOE STORE 

SUNBURY, PA. 



STONER'S 
CREDIT JEWELERS 



SUNBURY, PA. 



CHILDREN'S SHOP 

MARY H. BURNS 
Clothes for the College Girl 



Markley-Altvater 



BETTER STUDENTS CLOTHES 



SUNBURY, PA. 



VISIT THE 

REXALL 
DRUG STORE 

WILLIAM J. COTT, Druggist 



I 



WATCH REPAIR 

Susquehanna Jewelry 
Fountain Pens and Pencils 

W. M. VALSING 

JEWELER SELINSGROVE, PA. 



THE BON TON 

Personally Selected 

COATS, DRESSES, HATS 

Sunbury, Pa. 



REICHLEY'S 

WHERE STUDENTS 
MEET AND EAT 



STEFFEN'S 

FINE FOODS— STATIONERY 

Greeting Cards for Every Occasion 

SELINSGROVE, PA. 



EVERY YEAR . . . . 

since Us first year. Luth- 
eran Brotherhood has 
shown a steady and con- 
sistent growth. It has 
always operated on the 
sound foundation of the 
time-tested legal reserve 
plan. based on the 
American Experience 
Table of Mortality. 
Lutheran Brotherhood Is 
purely mutual- it l>e- 
longs wholly to its policy 
owners. 



Lutheran Brotherhood 



Legal Reserve Life Insurance For Lutherans 
MINNEAPOLIS, 2, Herman L. Ekern, President 



MINNESOTA 



430 Market St. 



H. L. ROTHFUSS, Agent Williamsport, Pa. 



BUILD" YOUR 
ESTATE NOW! 



YOUR FUTURE 
STARTS TODAY 



-•»«-»••-- 



n 



U 







Volume LIII 



SELINSGROVE, PENNSYLVANIA, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 1945 



Number 9 



STAR COURSE PRESENTS THE HART HOUSE STRING QUARTET FEBRUARY 12 




CAST CHOSEN FOR BIG SPRING PLAY OUR STAFF 




Theatre Guild Presents ! Cupid on the Loose 

Letters to Lucerne 

Once again we catch a glimpse of 

It is Saturday afternoon at one j <? u P id as he & lides int0 Seibert on two 
o'clock. I join the other nervous young ! wln 8 s and a b°w, Thursday afternoon, 
flopefub in room 300 at O. A. It is; Februar y 8th. He's hea ded for the 
'tJmt&mt® Tthe^T&afft. Guild's i WW*W®MmmW room* Wise 



-Itvrtfcc 




faculty ad- 




bers «: 
tendants, 



Kls loyal at- 
Mrs. Olauque, Miss North, 



Mary Gohl Improves 



visor and coach, in cooperation with 

Gloria Gasparoli and La Verne Kohn, Miss Hein - and Mlss Shure, provide a 

co-directors of the play, put the as- S reat welcome and entertainment for 

piring thespians through their paces. alL Yes - we even flnd the facult y lost 
All of those present get an oppor- : ln th? enchanting robes Of Saint Val- 

tunity to display their dramatic abil- entine - The members of the Campus 

ity by reading passages of the various Club als0 nave received invitations for 

characters. Numerous interpretations this festivit y- 
were portrayed. 

The theme of the play, written by 
Fritz Rotter and Allan Vincent which 
was presented on a New York stage a 
few seasons ago, provides a colorful 

background for the action The play Friends here at Susquehanna will be 

opens near Lucerne, late in the sum- glad to know that Mary Gohl, who has 

mer of 1939. The girls are just re- been confined to the infirmary with 

turning to school after the recess. Un- pneumonia since early last week, is 

der the protection of a wise and pleas- much better. Girls from both Halls 

ant schoolmistress, they are living an who have visited Mary recently, re- 
idyllic life apart from the hatreds of ; port that she is almost back to nor- 

the world. It is her hope to keep the mal. We all hope to see her up and 

school isolated when the war breaks around the campus in a short time 

out, but the girls' letters from home, S 

TernTssT "* ^ **"* "* "* Ka PP a De,ta Phi 

I know, after seeing the ^ry-oute, The annual pledge dance of Kappa 

that the completed production of "Let- Dstta Phi will take place on Wednes- 

ters to Lucerne" will be well worth day, February 7, 1945, when the active 

waiting for. members and pledges will meet to dine 

The cast is as follows: Olga Kirinski, at the Colonial Tea Room. Miss Mir- 

Nan Meyers; Gustave, Art Gelnett; iam Unangst, Mrs. William Russ, and 

Erna Scmidt, Rubye Meyers; Gretchen Miss Bertha Hein have been invited to 

Linder, Maxine Asch; Hans Schmidt, attend this dinner as guests of the 

Rine Winey; Margarethe, Jean Wentz- sorority. 

el; Mrs. Hunter, Harriet Gould; Bingo 

Hill, Helen Eby; Felice Renoir, Bobby 

Kaln; Sally Jackson, Bobby Gaetz; 

Marion Curwood, Marian Willard; 

Koppler, Frank Wolfe; the part of 

Francois will be announced later. 
S 



This issue of the Susquehanna is the 
Frosh-Sophomore Issue. The entire 
staff of reporters and editors was made 
up of members of these two classes. 

The staff was as follows: Editors, 
Jackie Braveman, Harriet Gould, 
Gloria Walmer; Business Manager,. 
Gayle Clark; Sports Editor. Joe- Tay- 
lor; Reporter^ JaJie^gtodiwi* Mftrtan 
Walker-, 

Margaret Johns, Robert* Gaetz, 
lyn Graybill, Betty Smith, and Martha 
Garard. 

We, the Editors, extend our heartiest 
thanks to the reporters who have co- 
operated so wholeheartedly in making 
this Frosh-Soph. Issue of the Susque- 
hanna a success. 

S 



The Hart House String Quartet has 
long sine: taken its place .among the 
leading ensembles of the world. It has 
visited every province of Canada many 
Limes, leading cities of the United 
States from Boston to San Francisco, 
and the major music centers of Eu- 
rope Since its inception, the Quartet 
has given more than 1,000 public con- 
certs and has crossed the North Amer- 
ican Continent more than a dozen 
times. 

Jam-is Levy, first violin, was already 
a familiar figure in the chamber music 
world when he joined the Hart House 
group in 1935, having been leader of 
the famous London String Quartet for 
twelve years touring both Europe and 
America every season with this popu- 
lar organization. 

Henry Milligan, second violin, gifted 
Canadian musician, was born in Lon- 
don, Ontario, studying under the dis- 
tinguished violin pedagogues, Dr. Luigi 
von Kunits, late conductor of the Tor- 
onto Symphony Orchestra, and Geza 
de Kresz, former leader of the Hart 
House Quartet. 

Cyril Glyde, the gifted English viol- 
ist, is a licentiate of the London Royal 
Academy of Music, with extensive 
quartet-ensemble concert and radio ex- 
perience on both sides of the Atlantic. 

Boris Hambourg, concert 'cellist of 
international reputation, and member 
ied musical family of 
tod Toronto, has been asso- 
ciated with the quartet ever since its 
inception in 1924, and is noted for his 
musicianship, knowledge and style, es- 
pecially in the field of chamber music. 



ID 



Party at Theta Chi 



Ex-S. U. Student Killed 



Word has been received from over- 
l >ai concerning the death of Lt. Robert 
Chalot on January 11, 1945. Lt. Chalot 
v as a bomber-pilot in the United 



RECEPTION FOR REV. HELLER 

A reception for Rev. and Mrs. Heller States Air Force. Bob was a member 
was held Friday evening, February 2, of the class of '46. While at Susque- 
1945, at Trinity Lutheran Church. A hanna he played end on the varsity 
short program preceded the" light lunch football team and center on the bas- 
that was served. ketball team. He was a member of 

After the entertainment, Dr. Gilbert Phi Mu Delta Fraternity. Lt. Chalot's 
offered a short speech of welcome, af- last letter contained very vivid descrip- 
ter which Rev. Heller acknowledged the i tions of more than 30 bombing missions 
hearty welcome. [il» which he participated,. 



On Saturday evening, February 3, 
Theta Chi held a house party from 
8:30 to 11:30. The following couples 
were present: Bob Surplus - Ruthie 
Cochrane; Art Gelnett - Gay Wagner; 
Dave Bomboy - Angie Campo; and 
Jack Warner - G. G. Roberts. The 
chaperones were: Dr. and Mrs. "Russell 
Gilbert; Prof. Irvin Reitz; Rev. and 
Mrs. John Heller, and the Rev. Mr. 
Heller's sister, Miss Knapp; Jack Shipe 
and Ellen Bennage, alumni; and Mr. 
and Mrs. James Charles. 

Immediately following, the arrival of 
the couples, a red carnation, which is 
the fraternity flower, was given to each 
person. During the course of the even- 
ing, ping pong, pool, darts, and danc- 
ing were enjoyed. 

One high-light of the evening was 
the performance of the well-known 
Surplus-Warner duet, "Pistol Packin' 
Mamma'' with its many variations. 
Another musical rendition was "Ave 
rHarift" played by Bob Surplus on his 
'ctumpet. 

A delicious lunch was served, follow- 
ed by an informal round table discus- 
sion. Dancing brought the evening to 
a close. 

S 

BUSINESS SOCIETY 

The Business Society would like all 
students to collect their waste paper and 
have it in a convenient place by Thurs- 
day afternoon of this week. Ray Mould 
is the conductor of -this project and 
requests that everyone cooperate with 
him and his committee. 



-S- 



Dr. Sheldon Injured 



Dr. E. E. Sheldon, of the Conserva- 
tory of Music, fractured his leg last 
Monday morning, January 29. When 
this reporter asked Mrs. Sheldon if 
Dr. Sheldon had any remarks to make, 
Mrs. Sheldon replied, "Yes, he made 
some remarks!!" 

Dr. Sheldon will be back at his regu- 
ler duties this week with the ad of 
crutches. 



-S- 



Did You Know? 



February 8, Thursday S. C. A. meet- 
ing — Social Room, 7 p. m. 

Campus Club Party, 7:30 p. m. 

February 10, Saturday Basketball— 
Elizabethtown and S. U. at Eliza- 
bethtown 

February 12, Monday Star Course- 
Hart House String Quartet, Chapel, 
8:15 p. m. 

February 13, Tuesaay Alpha Psi 
Omega Fraternity, 5 p. m. 
Business Society, Social Room, 7 
p. m. 

February 14, Wednesday Basketball- 
Dickinson and S. U. at S. U. 

February 16, Friday Recital Class- 
Chapel, 4:15 p. m. 

February 20, Tuesday Students Even- 
ing Recital— Chapel, 8:15 p. m. 

February 21, Wednesday Basketball— 
Elizabethtown and S. U. at 8. TJ., 
8 p. m 

February 22, Thursday S. C. A. Meet- 
ing — Social Room, 7 p. m. 

February 27, Tuesday Alpha Psi 
Omega, 5 p. m. 
Theatre Guild— G. A. 300, 7:30 p. m. 

February 23 Variety Show rehearsal. 



i"" 



PAGE TWO 



THE SUSQUEHANNA, SELINSGROVE. PENNSYLVANIA 



TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 1945 




n 



u 




u 



wMm 




CAMPUSOLOGY 



Established 1891 
Rine G. Winey, Jr., '46 - Editor 

Jean C. Geige*. '46 Associate Editor 

Gloria Gaspaholi, '40 Managing Editor 

Arthur J. Gelnett. '47 .' Sports Editor 

Reporters: Mary Elizabeth Basehoar, '45; Ruth Botdorf, '45, proofreader; Cor- 
inne Kahn, '45; Laverne Kohn, '45; Louise Kresge, '45; Gloria Machmer, 
'45; Frances Bittinger, '45; June Hoffman, '46; Jayne Troutman, '46; Norma 
Hazen, '46; Ruth Cochrane, '46; Emily Botdorf, '46; Marie Klick, '46; Vir- 
ginia Hallock, '46; Carmen Beckwith, '46; Jackie Braveman, '47; Joe Taylor, 



It dees one's heart good to see so 
many faces that heretofore wore frowns 
beaming so happily. Why? Why, they 
belong to the lucky people who don't 
have to attend study hall anymore. 

Did you notice that the girls who 
stayed in school over the weekend of 
semerteri looked slightly bald? The 
dorms were so quiet that they were 
tearing their hair out. 

When Bill Hays left at semesters, he 
got up before-the sun to get an early 



'47; Jane Gundrum, '47, Dorothy Wagner, '47; Faye Smith, '47; Caroline train— and missed it!! Undaunted, Bill 



Pfahler, '47; Doris Williamson, '47; Marian Walker, '47; Gayle Clark, '47; 
Martha Garard, '48; Helen Zahn, '48; Betty Smith, '48; Caroline Marks, 
'48; Betty Frank, '48; Gloria Walmer, '48; Ruth Criswell, '48; Roberta 
Ga'etz, '48; Ed Madden, '48; Sara Lee Smith, '48; Margaret Johns, '48; 
Joan Smith, '48; Harriet Gould, '48; John Warner, '45; Aldo Pescarmona, 
'47; Caroline Graybill, '48. 

Corinne Kahn, '45 Business Manager 

Helen Eby, '47 --- Advertising Manager 

Jean Kinzer, '46 Circulation Manager 

Business Assistants: Roswell Johns, '46; Ed Madden, '48; Russell Brown, '48; 
Betty Frank, '48; Cynthia Carmel, '48; Jean Wheat, Barbara Kain, Hilda 
Markey. 



Published semi-monthly throughout the school year 

Thanksgiving, Christmas and Semester holidays, at a subscription rate of 

$2.00 a year. 

Entered as second class mail matter at Selinsgrove, Pa. 



To the New Frosh 



called up Seibert and asked Margy 
Johns for an early date. I hear that 
they had a lovely morning in Sunbury 
together, buying records and strolling 
around. 

It seems as though everyone talks 
to servicemen on trains these days. At 
least, everyone going to New York does. 
Jeanette Kramer is the only one we 
know to date who received a proposal 
en route. 

Audrey Havice is wearing Bill's class 
with the exception of ring. Did you know about that? 

Will someone please tell poor inno- 
cent me what's behind the lines— "Be 
hind these doors—" 

Lucky Dot Foulk spent this last week- 
end at Juniata. So did our basketball 
team, but that's a different story, isn't 
it? 

For twenty four hours, we dug 



The Blood Bank will not come to Sel- 
insgrove as frequently thus year as in 
the past; therefore, there is a greater 



You may be a little confused and necessity for vo i U nteers when it does 
perhaps even slightly homesick after cQme Announceme nt of the next date ! through snow banks and scoured the 



for donations will be made in the col- 
lege chapel. 



your first week on Susquehanna's 

campus. You may feel out of place 

and very, very green. You may even 

regret that you left home and ventured i _ ., n " 

out into a new world that is icy under- SO lAHlg JKOyS 

foot and where stars shine down on | 

you as you slide along to your eight 

o'clock class. There is one thing that 

is true, no matter what trepidations 

you feel now, within a month, or a 

week, or a day, you will learn to love 

Susquehanna as a "home" away from 

home. 
Everyone is glad to see you on cam 



to 
of 
of 



Susquehanna points with pride 
you who have answered the call 
Uncle Sam and joined his ranks 
fighting men. 

Your absence from the -rumpus will 
be felt by all, but the prayers of our 
hearts go with you wherever you may 
be. Yes, our thoughts will be with 
> be jeach one of you-Donald Herrold, Ron- 
here Any upperclassman or second >ld Boyer, Scotty Small, Ed Madden, 
semester freshman will be more than «* Don Wohlsen. Reciprocation with 
willing to help you or give you advice ' letters would be appreciated, 
if you should need it. Regulations may On each one of you rests our coun- 
seem tough and classes even tougher, .try's future, and .after the conflict is 
but we know you will come through over your home here will be waiting, 
with flying colors. The rules aren't' You may also be sure that the home- 
hard to keep, and the faculty members | front folks will be working for you and 
are kind and understanding, and so doing their part to speed your return. 

j us t May you be so inspired as to do 



highways looking for Alvin Glanzberg. 
Now that we've found him, it seems he 
was just last, not lost. 

Everyone is glad to see Dottie Ster- 
nat well again, and from now on, Dot, 
stay away from splintery wood. 

Why is Anna Sheetz walking around 
in such a haze? By the way, and this 
has no connection with the last state- 
ment, Bill Hays M keeping 
with s. UV^rlth«»aa or 
pondents in Seibert alone. 

We understand that B. J. Fisher's 
heart is divided up into four big pieces. 
One for the Army, one for the Navy, 
and she can't forget the Marines or 
Coast Guard either. A lot of our co- 
eds feel the same way, but they're not 
fickle, fellahs, honest. They just love 
'cm all. 

Something new has been added to 



do you?? 

Our three Brooklyn Caballeros 
(whoops!!. Now there are four) are 
sure a welcome sight on campus. Do 
the rest of you miss Scotty, Yonkers, 
and Skip, too? If I weren't majoring 
In English, I'd say, "It ain't fair!" 

Carolyn Marks heard from not one, 
not two, but five boys stationed at Cita- 
del College in North Carolina. Why 
doesn't that happen to me?? 

Margie Stapleton is being "smilier" 
than usual. We're glad she got that 
cablegram from Paul. 

You've heard of the Rockettes, but 
have you seen the Susquehannettes do 
their stuff? Their shuffle- shuffle-tap- 
tap to the tune of "Three Blind Mice" 
is really out of this world. Just drop 
into the Gym any Tuesday or Thurs- 
day at 2 or 3 to see them go to town. 

In case you're wondering who that 
strange sailor was on campus the oth- 
er day, it was Marian Willard's date. 

Toby and Bobbie were the lucky girls 
selected by two of the new Freshmen 
fellows to show them Saturday night 
life in Sunbury. 

Harriet Gould, Betty Frank, Jean- 
ette Kramer, and Ann Gibson were to 
New York over semesters and met some 
of the cast of the "Hats Off to Ice" 
show after the performance. The girls 
also saw Count Basie at the Blue Room 
at the Edison Hotel. Some stuff!! 

Did you hear about the two dizzy co- 
eds who, to do something new and dif- 
ferent, went to Northumberland Sat- 
urday to see the same movie that was 
playing in Selinsgrove? Anything for 
excitement! 

Surprise! Johnny Smith has a girl 
up in Seibert. 

. Elaine Laks' and Joan Smith are 
making glorious plana for a week-end 
n. The plans Include 
dance, and v a sleigh ride. 
Sounds* wonderful, doesn't It?? 

Congratulations to Eleanor Steele's 
Captain on his recent promotion. 

What is the question, and more im- 
portant what will be the answer, that 
Ben has to ask Gayle? 

It is now a known fact that Dave 
Bomboy has to be chased out of Sei- 
bert parlors every night. Angle you 





don't let anyone frighten you. 
smooth those wrinkles out of your 
foreheads, sharpen your pencils and, 
to borrow a phrase from the Chinese, 
"Gung Ho"— to success. 
S 

Want Blood Donors 



your best for God and country. 



At the Stanley 



Jane Malkames. It's a lovely glow, and ; should train Dave better than that. 
: we hear it's because George is now Ruthie Williams and Dave K ember - 
stationed within reach of Hazleton. Hng are quite a steady twosome these 

Helen Eby sounds just a little excit- days. 
ed over her proposed trip to see the | For this and other exclusive infor- 
man of the hour. I don't blame her, | mation, see this column next week. 



LOST AND FOUND 



Susquehanna University is still as 
sisting in keeping up the excellent rec 
ord which Snyder County has set in the other girl. Sounds rather interest 

blood donations to the Red Cross. On in 8 ! 



Monday, Tuesday, February 5, 6 — 

"And Now Tomorrow" (Para.) Alan , Lost— a science survey book. Will find- 
Ladd's first since his release from the i e r destroy it, and say nothing more. 
Army teams him with Loretta Young j ^^^ joke book Reward: FinAer 
in Rachel Field's best seller about a 
tangled romance. Susan Hayward is j 



Alumni News 



the last donation day, the following 
members of the college community co- 
operated with the Red Cross. Those 
donating blood were: the Misses Aud- 
rey North, Corinne Frey. Joan Reyner, 
Dorothy Jupina, Jean Kinzer, Louise 
Kresge, 
Eilhardt 



Wednesday, February 7 — "Kansas 
City Kitty" (Col.) Promises to be quite 
I treat. But remember, Dr. Russ will 
be after us the following morning! 

Thursday, Friday, February 8. 9— 



may read it 

Found— some sour notes. Will owner 
please call for them at the conserva- 
tory. 

Lost— a howl by Mr. Wolf. Will all 
fellow wolves be on the lookout for it. 

Lost— One gallon ice cream. Will find- 
it 



Frenchmen's Creek'' <Para.) Joan 
Carmen Beckwith, Dorothy Fontaireand her pirate produce quite Found— One carton 
Virginia Hallock, Ruth Coch- , romantic melodrama in Daphne du 



Did you know who has been back on 
campus lately to pay us a visit? Well, 
to elucidate. First there's Walter Meek 
back from the Aleutians. Walter grad- 
uated in the class of '41. 

Kenneth King, '40, was also here. 
He is now stationed at Panama City, 
Florida. 

John Wolfe, a graduate of '43, was 
here to inform us that he Is now sta- 
and I tioned at the Navy Yard In Charles- 
I ton, South Carolina. 

And last, but not least, Chaplain 



er phase keep from eating 
return it immediately. 

of Camels. If 
owner does not claim them, we will John Gentzel. Chaplain Gentzel gave 
me, June Hoffman, Jane Malkames, haulier's story of a French raider. b? forced to give them to whoever de- us all a very inspiring talk in chapel 
Marjorie Stapleton, and Leah Cryder. staged lavishly in technicolor with no sir 's them. [last week. Not only was his talk ln- 

In the administration of the Blood An \\ moments guaranteed. Found— a man fitting the description forrriative and interesting, but also 

Bank, Miss Bertha Hein acts as nurse Saturday, February 10— "Oh Susan- of Van Johnson. Sorry, he's already ' Quit* humorous. Incidentaly, his wife, 



and Mrs. Russell Gait is receptionist j na " ( R ep .) a mystery to me! You'll been claimed. 
A change in the method of soliciting jhave to see it to find out what it's all 

blood donors now makes it necessary ; about 

for all those who wish to give to as- : Monday. Tuesday, February 12, 13— 

f.ume the initiative. Instead of being ["Doughgirls" (W. B.) Starring Ann 

solicited as in the past, all those who j Sheridan and Alexis Smith. This sounds 

like plenty of show with plenty of fel- 
lows, we hope! A current favorite. 

Wednesday, February 14— "Conspirat- 
ors" (W. B.) Features the beauteous 
Hedy Lamarr and the expert Sydney 

Greenstreet. A fast moving picture drama, typical of Lisbon 
filled with treachery and spy melo 



desire to donate must send in their 
names in advance to the Blood Bank 
and secure a definite appointment. 
Those under twenty-one years of age 
should secure a blank form from the 
college office and have it signed by 
their parents. 



Lost— Dick Tracy Comic Book. Return 
immediately to the library as there 

is a lung waiting list. 

F und -A way to become a success af- 
ter leaving college. Get in touch 

with I. Emma Failure. 

Lost— Several males between semes- 
ters. Oh where, oh where, could 

they be??? 



your alley, don't miss it! 



If It's up 



the former Audrey Dodge, Is attending 
Susquehanna. 

In concluding his talk, Chaplain 
Gentzel said, "We should never lose 
faith and hope in the flowing river of 
life." We, the students of Susque- 
hanna, wish Chaplain John Gentzel 
the very best of good luck in his mis- 
sion of guiding the Navy men while 
they are overseas. 

S 

—Remember soldiem abroad with fre- 
quent V Mall letters. 



TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 1945 



THE SUSQUEHANNA, SELINSGROVE. PENNSYLVANIA 



OUR NEW FROSH 



HERBERT DANKMAN is very tall, 
in fact, 6' 2" tall. Herbert comes from 
Brooklyn (which he said very proudly), 
and likes to putter with radios. He is 
taking the Pre-med Course. His fav- 
orite song is "Ballad for America" and 
he enjoys reading the "Hobo News". A 
dog which answers to the name of 
"King" is his favorite pet. Quoting 
Herbert, "There is something about a 
woman," so the Waves is his favorite 
branch of service. 

ALVIN GLANZBERG also hails from 
Brooklyn and Is 5' 11 W tall. His hobby 
is music, and his favorite sport is foot- 
ball. Alvin is taking the Pre-med 
Course and expects to go to graduate 
medical school when he leaves S. U. 
He also likes: steaks — 2 inches thick 
and a foot square, Jennifer Jones, and 
prefers the Navy. When asked what 
he thought about S. U., he said 
"Swell!" 

JACQUELINE F. GRING comes from 
New Bloomfield and is 5' 3" tall. In 
her spare time she likes to collect 
poetry or read a good historical fiction 
book. Jacqueline is majoring in Com- 
mercial Education and will be a private 
secretary. Among her other interests 
she likes field hockey, Liberty maga- 
zine, French fries and hamburgers, her 
pet dog, Glenn Miller or Harry James, 
and "My Devotion." A certain some- 
body in the Army Air Corps has her 
heart. She thinks S. U. is a very nice 
school and has very nice students. 

JEAN C KELTON, who is 5' 2" tall, 
comes from New York. Her favorite 
sports are roller skating, bowling, and 
baseball. She likes to read a good fic- 
tion book while listening to the music 
of Vaughn Monroe. In her spare time 
she writes letters. She also likes all 
kinds of food, Esquire Magazine, Rob- 
ert, Walker, and "Holiday /for Strings." 
She Is undecided as to her major sub- 
ject, but believes it will be sociology. 
Jean prefers the Navy because "there's 
something about a sailor," and likes 
S. U. "lots so far." 

EDITH McCONNELL is a 5' 6" tall 
Philadelphia^. She plays the piano for 
a hobby and in her spare time reads 
the Saturday Evening Post. Edith is 
majoring in Physical Therapy and ex- 
pects to attend the U. of P. upon leav- 
ing S. U. In sports she likes hockey; 
in food, chocolate ice box cake; in 
books, anything by> Richard Halliburt- 
on; in actors, Tom Drake and Greer 
Garson; in orchestra leaders, Glenn 
Miller, and in songs, "Embraceable 
You." Her pet is Annie Malkames, and 
she prefers the Navy as that branch 
claims two of her sisters, two brothers- 
in-law and friends. "S. U. is pretty 
swell." 

JACK C. LARSEN comes from 
Brooklyn ajy} is 5' 9" tall. He likes 
lacrosse, any kind of meat, Laralne 
Day, and Glenn Miller. He is taking the 
Business Administration Course ar^d 
expects to continue school after leav- 
ing S. U. Jack collects records for a 
hobby. His favorite reading material 
is the Reader's Digest, Esquire, or "The 
Human Comedy." "Moonlight Sere- 
nade" is his favorite song, and Jack 
thinks S. U. is "Okay." 

CHARLIE MITCHELL comes from 
Brooklyn and is 5' 9" tall. He likes to 
play football and his hobby is music. 
Charlie is taking the Business Admin- 
istration Course and expects to con- 
tinue school upon his graduation from 
S. U. The Air Corps is his favorite 
branch of service because "you can be 
alone." He also likes meatballs and 
spaghetti, Saturday Evening Post and 
Collier's, Cary Grant and Theresa 
Wright, and Jimmy Dorsey. His fav- 
orite book is "All Night Long" and his 
favorite song "Star Eyes." 
S 

— Mail is the greatest morale builder 
—write to your soldier friends. 



PAGE THREE 



NEWS ON OUR CAMPUS 



DIARY OF AN S A I GIRL 

Fri. Dear Diary: 

Such hustling and bustling to get 
ready for our New York trip. It hardly 
seems possible that the day is finally 
here. I'm so glad the 12:16 was on 
time, but gosh was I tired by the time 
we arrived in the city. The hotel room 
seemed like a" haven. 
Sat. Dear Diary: 

Started out bright and early to see 
all the famous sights of old New York. 
I'll never forget the thrill I had when 
I walked into the Metropolitan Opera 
House for the first time. Rise Stevens 
and James Melton sang the leading 
roles but I really think Ezio Pinza 
"stole the show." 
Sun Dear Diary: 

I found myself among hundreds at 
the beautiful morning service at St. 
John* the Divine. Finished dinner just 
in time to make it to Carnegie Hall for 
the N. Y. Philharmonic. Oh, to be 
able to conduct like Leonard Bern- 
stein—with heart and soul. 

The tour of the N. B. C. Broadcast- 
ing studios was very interesting. Who 
would ever think that almost all sound 
effects are only fakes? 
Mon. Dear Diary: 

Did some last minute sight seeing, 
and then to the stores for bargain 
hunting. About 8:30 we were headed 
for Madison Square Garden to see 
Sonja Henie and her 1945 Ice Capades. 
The costumes were gorgeous, and the 
skating— gosh, it looked so easy. 

At midnight we were at Penn sta- 
tion all ready for S. U. Glad there 
aren't any classes, so that I can catch 
up on my sleep. It has been a perfect 
week-end! 
Dear Diary: ' 

The next thing w© 8. A. I. girls are 
planning on, is a radio broadcast of our 
own over W. K. O. K. sometime in the 
spring. 

S 

Omega Delta Sigma 

On January 17, 1945, the O. D. S. 
actives and pledges attended the 
Pledge dinner at the Colonial Tea 
Room. Miss Miriam Unangst and Miss 
Bertha Hein helped to make the din- 
ner a very pleasant affair. The din- 
ner was held in place of the regular 
weekly meeting. 

Lee Cryder was taken in as a pledge 
of O. D. S. on February 2. Lee, being 
a transfer student from Elmira and a 
sophomore, could be taken in at this 
time. 



Brothers Kocsls, Johns, and Taylor 
officiated at this formal ceremony. 
Two days after becoming active broth- 
ers, Small and Wholsen reported to 
their respective branch of the service 
|for immediate induction. 



\ Advice to the Lovelorn 

Dear Cora Cix: 

I am a beautiful teacher, fifty years 

old, but with my new store teeth and 

I my gorgeous blond hair (dyed by my 

own hands), I don't look a day over 

twenty. 

In my algebra class is a tall, good- 
! looking senior with whom I have fall- 
en madly in love. I have already flunk- 
ed him twice so that he wouldn't grad- 
uate and leave me with a bleak fu- 
ture. 

My problem is a very serious one and 
lias been causing me many sleepless 
nights. How can I be sure of his love? 

Ima Maid. 
Dear Ima Maid: 

Your problem is not unusual. Since 
you are a beautiful teacher, other stu- 
dents probably are attracted to your 
charms, and I suggest that you flirt 



with them and make the first senior 
jealous. Then maybe he will wake up 
to the fact he is also in love with you. 
I am sure this method will work. 

Cora Cix. 
Dear Cora Cix: 

I am a gorgeous freshman. All the 
boys are crazy over me, but the one I 
really like. I am getting so tired of 
answering the phone calls of my num- 
erous suitors, but of course, I can't 
help that I am so beautiful. What am 
I to do to chase these fellows away, 
and acquire the friendship of the" cne 
I really like? 

Lov Lee. 
Dear Lov Lee: 

My advice to you would be to. stick 

to your numerous admirers because 

with such conceit as yours, you will 

probably never gain the friendship of 

I this wise fellow. 

If conceit were consumption, you 
would have been dead long ago. 

Cora Cix. 
8 

—Be safe and sure— use V-mail in 
I corresponding with service men. 



MILLER BROS. 
SHOE STORE 

SUNBURY, PA. 



B.K.W. COACH LINE 

Tries to give the College Students 
the best service, especially the Sun- 
bury Students. Why TRAVEL with 
an individual? The Coach Line In- 
sures every person. THINK THAT 



MILLER'S 

Where Ed's and Co-Ed's Meet 
For Many Good Things to Eat 

Corner Pine and Orange Streets 
3 Blocks from Campus 



George B. Rine FLORIST SSEtSZ 



The First National Bank of Selins Grove 

WELCOMES STUDENTS' ACCOUNTS 



FRATERNITY NEWS 

The members of Bond and Key will 
hold an election in the near future to 
elect a House President. Bill Hays, 
who graduated in January, previously 
held this position. 

On the night of January 24, 1945, the 
Phi Mu Delta Fraternity, Mu Alpha 
Chapter, was honored to take into its 
brotherhood the following men: Roy 
Stahl, Dexter Weikel, Russell Brown, 
Jerry Moore, George Small, and Don- 
ald Wholsen. 



Fine Job Printing 
THE SELINSGROVE TIMES 



Quality Only the Finest 

NATIONAL RESTAURANT 

Hotel and Dining Service 



29 N. Market St. 



SeUnsgrove, Pa. 




For School News Read 

SUNBURY DAILY ITEM 



WHITMER-STEELE 
COMPANY 

LUMBER MANUFACTURES 
NORTHUMBERLAND, PA. 



SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

SELINSGROVE, PENNSYLVANIA 

Co-educational— Accredited 

For more than eighty-six years in the service of Christian higher 
education. 

Curricula: 

LIBERAL ARTS BUSINESS MUSIC 

COMMERCIAL EDUCATION 

For Catalog write 

G. Morris Smith, D.D., LL.D., Pres. 
Russell Gait, Ph.D., Dean 



PAGE FOUR 



THE SUSQUEHANNA, SELINSGROVE, PENNSYLVANIA 



TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 1945 



SUSQUEHANNA VICTORIOUS 3 TIMES 



Susquehanna 46, Gettysburg Sem. 39 ation of Bernie Swiencki and Jerry 
On Thursday evening, February 1, Moore accounting for 26 points to really 
1945 the Crusaders of Susquehanna . sew up the game. Swiencki led the 
University defeated the Gettysburg j scoring parade with a grand total of 
seminary to the tune of 46-39. This 1 28 points and he alone outscored the 
made the sixth consecutive victory and | Carlisle ^fU/e. Je: 
eighth win in eleven starts. 



The Crusaders took a narrow 6-4 
margin in the first period, but Sem. 
came back to tie things up at 14-14 at 
halftims. The third frame saw Sus- 
quehanna seal the contest while scor- 
ing 22 points to the visitors' eight. 
S*m came back to outscore the win- 
ners 17-10 in the finale but couldn't 
overcome the lead. 

The big star was Swiencki of the 

Crusaders who dropped in 11 field goals ; Sm " al i g " 

and 3 of 7 fouls for a total of 25 points, _ 

while Moore, a former Sunbury High Totals __ _ 2 1 

boy, netted 10 points. Dickinson , Field 

Two former Susquehannans kept the Marine, f __ i 

Seminary in the game by their topnotch Cosbyi f i 

performance. Janson, last year's Cru- .Hoffman, c 2 

saders captain, scoring 11 points and Swoyei . c 3 

Elkis, g .- 2 



points while Joe Taylor netted 6. Cap- 
tain John Kocsis played his usual fine 
defensive game. Captain Gus Hoffman 
led the Carlisle team with 8 points. 
Susquehanna Field Foul Total 

Moore, f 8 

Herrold, f 

Winey, f 

Swiencki, c 12 

Kocsis, g 

Taylor, g - 2 



2 


16 


2 


2 








4 


28 








2 


6 









Stusmpfle collecting 12 points 
Gettysburg Sem. Field Fou 

Wentz, f 3 

Zumbrum, f - 4 

Stuempfle, c 4 

Moreland, g - * 



Janson, g 



Ox 
Ox 
4x 5 
Ox 1 
3X 6 



Ludwig, g 1 

Spoole, g 1 

Totals 11 

Dickinson 1 3 

Susquehanna 12 12 



10 

Foul 


4 

1 





10 
16 



52 
Total 
2 
2 
8 
6 
5 
2 
2 

27 

7—27 

12—52 



gym. 

Swiencki looped in 28 points with 10 
field goals and 8 out of 9 foul attempts, 
while Moore had eight bakets from the 
field. Junior College scoring was top- 
ped by Shoemaker and Markoski with 
12 and 11 points, respectively. 

This was the last game this season 
for four of the men of Susquehanna's 
team. Don Herrold, varsity forward, 
has joined the United States Navy and 
is now in active service. Don will really 
bs missed for the remainder of the 
season. "Scotty" Small, Don Wohlsen, 
and "Skip" Madden have departed at 
semesters and will all join Uncle Sam's 
forces in the near future. Thsse men 
were very valuable reserves who will 
also be missed a great deal in the re- 
maining games. 

Susquehanna Field Foul Total 



Bucknell Jr. Col 



Field Foul Total 



Shoemaker, f . 4 4x7 12 

Markoski, f 4 3x4 11 

Gorski, f Ox 

Kochuca, c 2 2x 2 6 

Cappelline, c __ 2 Ox 1 4 

Staclubis, g 3 , lx 2 7 

Janeiski, g o Ox 

Totals 15 10x16 40 

Score by periods: 

Susquehanna 7 13 16 16—52 

B. Jr. College 11 7 7 15—40 

Referee :Shadle; umpire, Herman. 
S 

—Patronize Susquehanna advertis-rs. 



Herrold, f . 
Moore, f .. 
Wolhsen, f 
Swiencki, c 
Taylor, g .. 
Kocsis, g . 
Small, | ... 



Totals 



. 1 
. 8 
. 
.10 
. 1 
. 2 
. 

.22 



Ox 
Ox 
Ox 
8x 9 
Ox 
Ox 
Ox 



16 
16 

28 
2 
4 




8x 9 52 



STONER'S 
CREDIT JEWELERS 



SUNBURY, PA. 



CHILDREN'S SHOP 

MARY H. BURNS 
Clothes for the College Girl 



— Feferee, Steckbeck, umpire, Franckle. 



Totals 16 7x12 39 

Susquehanna Field 

Moore, f 5 

Winey, f 3 

Swiencki, c U 

Taylor, g --- ° 

Kocsis, g 2 



Ox 1 
Ox 
3x 7 
Ox 
lx 1 



10 
6 

25 

5 



S. U. 53, Bucknell Jr. College 40 

Behind the heavy scoring of Swiencki 
KUi Moore, Susquehanna University j 
ran up a 53-40 triumph over Bucknell | 
Junior College of Wilkes-Barre on Sat- \ 
urday evening, January 20th at S. U.'s 



Totals 21 4x 9 46 

Score by periods: 

Gettysburg 4 10 6 17-39 

Susquehanna 6 8 22 10 — 46 

Referee, Valunas; umpire, Shadel. 



Susquehanna 52, Dickinson 27 

In a fast moving game played at 
Carlisle on Wednesday, January 27, the 
Crusaders routed the Dickinson Col- 
lege Indians by a score of 52 to 27. The 
Indians took the lead in the opening 
minutes of the game by scoring six 
points, but the determined Crusaders 
came back with Moore, Swiencki, and 
Taylor dumping them in from all 
angles to take the lead 12 to 7 at the 
end of the first quarter. 

The second quarter proved to be very 
fruitful for the Crusaders as they in- 
creased their lead to the tune of 24-10. 
In the third and fourth periods, they 
turned on the steam with a combin- 



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SNAVELY'S 

COLLEGE FURNISHINGS 
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Markley-Altvater 

BETTER STUDENTS CLOTHES 
SUNBURY, PA. 



" 



VISIT THE 

REXALL 
DRUGSTORE, 

WILLIAM J. COTT, Drnnfet 



Ebert's 5c to $1.00 
Store 

Susquehanna Stationery 
SELINSGROVE 



S. U. BOOK STORE 

SUSQUEHANNA 
NOTEBOOKS 
STATIONERY 



SCHOOL FASHIONS 

ROSENBLUM'S 

SUNBURY, PA. 
SMART FEMININE APPAREL 



WATCH REPAIR 

Susquehanna Jewelry 

Fountain Pens and Pencils 

W. M. VALSING 

JEWELER SELINSGROVE, PA. 



THE BON TON 

Personally Selected 

COATS, DRESSES, HATS 

Sunbury, Pa. 



When you think of Photography 
Think of 

Schindler Studio 

515 Market Street, Sunbury, Pa. 
Also Framing and Photo Finishing 



REICHLEY'S 

WHERE STUDENTB 
MEET AND^AT 



STEFFEN'S 

FINE FOODS— STATIONERY 

Greeting Cards for Every Occasion 

SELINSGROVE, PA. 



Yes- 
Women To ... . 

buy Retirement In- 
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from care and worry. 
A guaranteed income 
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Lutheran Brotherhood 



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BUILD YOUR 
ESTATE NOW! 



YOUR FUTURE 
STARTS TODAY 



OFFICE OF THE D€AN 

SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

SELINSGftOVE, PA. 



FOUND— 

One of SU's greatest all- 
time basketball players. 
See page 1. 



n 



U 




WANTED— 

More music like the EN- 
CORES of the Hart House 
Quartet. See Ed. 



Volume LIII 



SELINSGROVE, PENNSYLVANIA, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 1945 



Number 10 



LT. JOHN E. HUGUS |Hart House Quartet 
KILLED IN ACTION; Acclaimed by SU On 
7th SU MAN TO DIE Star Course Program 



Lt. John E. Hugus, Jr., 24-year-old 
officer of a Tank Destroyer Artillery 
unit, was killed in action in Belgium 
on January 19, according to an official 
statement received by his parents, Dr. 
and Mrs. John E. Hugus, of West Wal- 
nut street, Selinsgrove, Pa. 




An appreciative audience attended 
the Star Course concert given by the 
Hart House String Quartet last Mon- 
day, February 12, at 8:40 p. m. In Sei- 
bert Chapel. 

This exceptionally fine quartet, which 
has toured Canada and the major mus- 
ic centers of Europe, found winter trav- 
el In our own United States on this 
tour to be rather undependable, Inas- 
much as their bus broke down for an 
hour and a half in Middleburg on this 
end of a long hop from their last con- 
cert in Saline, Kansas. Consequently, 
they readied Seibert Chapel twenty 
minutes after the concert was sched- 
uled to start. The quality of their play- 
ing more than compensated for the de- 
lay. 

James Levey, first violin, who Joined 
th8 Hart House group in 1935, was for- 
merly leader of the London String 
Quartet for twelve years. 

(Concluded on Page 4) 
S 



SCA Board Members 
Attend Convention of 
Lutherans at KSTC 



LT. JOHN E. HUGUS 

Lt. Hugus enrolled at Susquehanna 
University in 1939, but upon passing 
his Civilian Military Training Corps 
examination in Harrisburg, February, 
1942, he withdrew from college upon 
receipt of his commission as a Second 
Lieutenant. He reported for duty at 
Fort Bragg, North Carolina, and was 
later transferred to Camp Hood, Texas, 
after which he was detailed to Camp 
Claiborne, Louisiana, where he was ad- 
vanced to First Lieutenant. After a 
year's training there he embarked for 
overseas service. 

Lt. Hugust prepared for his com- 
mission by attending CMTC school at 
Camp Meade in 1938 and at Fort Hoyle 
the summers of 1939 and 1940. He 
completed his studies by correspon- 
dence course that fall while enrolled 
at Susquehanna University. 

He was exceptionally active in civic 
and athletic activities during his civ- 
ilian life. He was a member of Beta 
Kappa Fraternity and was treasurer 
(Concluded on Page 4) 



Pvt. Wilfred J. Sheetz 
Missing In Germany 

Pvt. Wilfred J. Sheetz, '46, son of 
Mr. and Mrs. Corbett L. Sheetz, East 
Pine street, Selinsgrove, Is listed as 
missing in action since December 20th 
in the fighting around the Belgian 
Bulge. His parents were informed by 
the War Department last week that he 
was missing. 

He was graduated from the Selins- 
grove High School, and studied one 
(Concluded on Page 3) 



Af 4:00 Friday afternoon, we noticed 
a few of our students heading for parts 
unknown. Upon questioning, we dis- 
covered that several members of the 
Student Christian Association were go- 
ing to attend the 25th Annual Confer- 
ence of the North Atlantic Region of 
the Lutheran Student Association of 
America, held at Kutztown State 
Teachers' College. Herm Stuempfle, a 
graduate of Susquehanna, Is president 
of the North Atlantic Region, and 
Franklin Wolfe is president of the Sus- 
quehanna area. 

The theme of the conference was 
"And This is the Victory." The stu- 
dents were divided into groups and the 
different conference panels discussed 
the topic of "Our Faith Victorious." 
Many noted speakers addressed those 
in attendance at the conference. 

Along with the various discussion 
groups, there were many recreational 
(Concluded on Page 2) 
S 



Harry Culp, Ex-Marine, 
Enters S. U. as Pre- Vet 

Harry C. Culp, Jr., son of Mr. and 
Mrs. Harry C. Culp, Sunbury, Penna., 
has enrolled as a freshman at 8. U. 
in the pre -veterinary course. 

Culp served in the U. S. M. C. until 
recently, when he was discharged for 
injuries sustained while in a South 
Pacific Naval battle. He wears the 
Purple Heart and holds a Presidential 
citation received by his Marine squad- 
ron. 



Siviencki Sets School Record As SU 
Five Defeats E'town and Dickinson 



Dean's List 



FRANCES BITTINGER 

RUTH BOTDORF 

RUTH CRISWELL 

JEAN GEIGER 

VIRGINIA HALLOCK 

MARIANNA HAZEN 

NORMA HAZEN 

CORINNE KAHN 

JEAN KELLY 

LA VERNE KOHN 

CELO LEITZEL 

HILDA MARKEY 

MARY MOYER 

BETTY SMITH 

ROY STAHL 

MARIE STOUT 

ROBERT SURPLUS 

LILLIAN WERNER 



S. U. 62, Ellzabethtown 55 

In a fast moving basketball game on 
Saturday, February 10, the Susque- 
hanna Crusaders upheld their victor- 
ious trend over Ellzabethtown on the 
E-town court. The S. U. cagers won 
62-55. This was the ninth win out of 
13 games for the Crusaders this seas- j 
on. 

Buch, six foot forward for the E-town 
cagers, was the high scorer for the 
evening with a total -of 42 points. 
"Bernie" Swiencki, center for the 
Stagg Men, played his usual role of 
high scorer with 30 points. Harry Culp, 
a newcomer to the S. U. line-up, chalk- 
ed up 12 points in his first game of 
the season. 
Susquehanna Field Foul Total 

Culp, f .- 5 2x2 12 

Moore, f 6 2x6 14 

Sviencki, c 12 6x 8 30 

Kocsis, g 2 2x 3 6 

Tiylor, g --- Ox 




Totals 25 12x19 62 

Flizabethtown Field Foul Total 

Buch, f 14 14x21 42 

Myers, f Ox 

Whitacre, c 2 Ox 2 4 

Bueher, g 2x 2 2 

Hcrthey, g 3 lx 2 7 

Totals 19 17x27 55 

Score by periods: 

Susquehanna 11 16 21 14—62 

Ellzabethtown 14 11 14 16—55 

(Concluded on Page 4) 



BERNIE SWIENCKI 



I was sitting 
on the edge of 
my seat In 
Alumni Gym 
at 9:34 p. m. 
on Wednesday, 
February 1 4 . 
SU was lead- 
fng Dickinson 
89-w wren 30 
f econds left to 
play. Just 
then I saw a 
weaving figure 
moving up the 
floor with the 
ball; he shot, 
and it was 
good— thank gosh! But Bernie, "why 
did you try a shot like that with so 
little time to play and the score so 
close." But then I remembered. Bernie 
needed 18 points to break the scoring 
record of 298 points set by Phil Tem- 
plin in 1941— and that was the 17th 
and 18th! 

Bernie, who puts his 170 pounds In 
a 6' 1" frame, is a product of Glen 
Lion. He played basketball through all 
his years at Newport Township High 
School. And then in January of 1943, 
Bernie entered SU. He immediately 
made the J-V squad and ended up 
the year as a starter on that team. 

Then last year Bern went places on 
the varsity He scored 198 points and 
(Concluded on Page 2) 



SU HEARS DR. KOCH 
SPEAK ON SUBJECT 
OF SOCIAL MISSIONS 



Dr. c. Franklin Koch, Secretary of 
the Board of Social Missions of the 
United Lutheran Church, stressed in a 
speech before students, faculty, and 
townspeople in the social rooms of 
Seibert Hall last evening, February 19, 
that the need of social workers in the 
Lutheran Church is desperate. 

A banquet was tendered the speaker 
by the students and advisors of the 
Cabinet of the Student Christian As- 
sociation in the Horton Dining Hall 
preceding his talk in the social rooms. 

Dr. Koch, who has done outstanding 
work in the service of Social Missions, 
has traveled extensively throughout 
the. country visiting institutions and 
aiding in the work for their rehabili- 
tation. 

The speaker pointed out that the 
need for social workers in the field of 
returning veterans and war workers 
following the war would be great. He 
further told how scholarships are avail- 
able by the church for advanced study 
in this type of work. 

Following his Interesting address, a 
number of the audience questioned Dr. 
Koch on subjects pertaining to the 
work. This was followed by individual 
discussion with the speaker. 

This morning in chapel services, Dr. 
Koch addressed the student body in a 
general talk about social missions. 

"Red" NddlciTto Enlist 
In United States Navy 

Dick Neidich, one of Susquehanna's 
freshman boys, was forced to leave 
school at semesters because of the ne- 
cessity of entering the Armed Services 
in the near future. At present Dick 
is at home studying for tests that will 
enable him to enter Naval Radar 
School when he is called. Dick was 
living at the Bond and Key House 
while at school. 

Edward Madden of the class of '48/ 
was also a resident at Bond and Key. 
"Skip," as Ed was known to all his 
friends, is now a private in the Army, 
stationed at Fort Dix, but expects to 
be «.°nt to another camp OOWTl SOUtn 
for his basic training. 

Don Wohlson, *48, and Kenneth 
Small,, '8, both members of Phi Mu 
Delta, are at home waiting to be called 
into the service. 

Pvt. Donald Herrold is now stationed 
at Camp Blanding, Florida. 

'Since You Went Away* 

One week ago today was February 
13; a day that most students on the 
campus of Susquehanna connected no 
significance, but the handful of stu- 
dents that still remain on campus who 
were here on that day— Saturday, Feb- 
ruary 13, 1943, well remembered the 
meaning of that date, for on that day 
Susquehanna really went to war. That 
was the day when 30 happy and care- 
free youths took up the soldier brown 
In place of the college plaid. That was 
the day when 30 men left Susquehanna 
for war. 

That day still lingers in our minds, 
we who were there. Remember, the 
(Concluded on Page 4) 



PAGE TWO 



THE SUSQUEHANNA, SELINSGROVE, PENNSYLVANIA 



TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 1945 






n 



Established 1891 

Rine G. Winey, Jr., '46 Editor 

Jean C. Geiger, '46 Associate Editor 

Gloria Gasparoli, '46 Managing Editor 

Arthur J. Gelnett, j 41 _... Sports Editor 

Reporters: Mary Elizabeth Basehoar, '45; Ruth Botdorf, '45, proofreader; Cor- 
inne Kahn, '45; Laverne Kohn, '45; Louise Kresge, '45; Gloria Maohmer, 
'45; Prances Bittinger, '45; June Hoffman, '46; Jayne Troutman, '46; Norma 
Ha'zen, '46; Ruth Cochrane, '46; Emily Botdorf, '46; Marie Klick, '46; Vir- 
ginia Hallock, '46; Carmen Beckwith, '46; Jackie Braveman, '47; Joe Taylor, 
•47; Jane Gundrum, '47; Dorothy Wagner, '47; Faye Smith, '47; Caroline 
Pfahler, '47; Doris Williamson, '47; Marian Walker, '47; Gayle Clark, '47; 
Martha Garard, '48; Helen Zahn, '48; Betty Smith, '48; Caroline Marks, 
'48; Betty Frank, '48; Gloria Walmer, '48; Ruth Criswell, '48; Roberta 
Gaetz, '48; Ed Madden, '48; Sara Lee Smith, '48; Margaret Johns, '48; 
Joan Smith, '48; Harriet Gould, '48; John Warner, *45; Aldo Pescarmona, 
'47; Caroline Graybill, '48. 

Corinne Kahn, '45 Business Manager 

Helen Eby, '47 Advertising Manager 

Jean Kinzer, '46 Circulation Manager 

Business Assistants: Roswell Johns, "46; Ed Madden, '48; Russell Brown, '48; 
Betty Frank, '48; Cynthia Carmel, '48; Jean Wheat, Barbara Kain, Hilda 
Markey. 



CAMPUSOLOGY 



NOTES OF A WOMAN 
ABOUT TOWN: 

Seen in the smart places — like 
Reich's: That new but steady twosome, 
Ruth and Ross, who seem to have fun 
just being together— that's all; Peggy 
and "Doc" with two of the cutest G. 
I.'s to invade these hills who traveled 
all the way from Penn State for the 
occasion; Jane Malkames and that 
home-town representative to the Naval 
Reserve whose way of looking at her 
was just darling; Nan Myers and 
Jerry, a case that's on and oft and 
definitely unpredictable; then there's 
Nancy Lou and Frank Wolfe— another 
?; Annie and Joe to whom all rights 
on the title of "the couple of the 
month" are reserved; those two lone- 
wolves, Herbie and Al, who, it is hoped, 
will soon And their way around (the 
girls) ; a "different" foursome— Ray and 
Bobbie Kain closely followed by that 
latest addition, Harry, with Peggy 



Published semi-monthly throughout the school year, with the exception of 
Thanksgiving, Christmas and Semester holidays, at a subscription rate of 

$2.00 a year. 

Entered as second class mail matter at Selinsgrove, Pa. 



EDITORIALS 



Our chapel service is supposed to be 
a period of devotion in our busy day. 
It hardly is treated as such, Before 
chapel starts the student body talks 
loudly, opens letters, and carries on in 
a very irreverent manner. It is com- 
mon courtesy 



CAMPUS FADS 



HI Fals and Fellows!! Let's take a 
look around the campus and see what's 
cookin' on the clothes line. 

Say fellows, here's a tip for you. 

Have you noticed the pennies that the 

to speak, if you must I girls are wearing in their shoes?? Well 



speak, in a hushed tone when you en- 
ter a place of worship. The chapel is 
our place of worship, and a few min- 
utes a day devoted to prayer is not too 
much to ask of anyone. It is even 
worse when this discourteous behavior 
continues throughout the service. We 
are college students, and we are sup- 
posed to show the results of good breed- 
ing. Our chapel service is a good place 
to start practicing what we have learn- 
ed about etiquette. 

S 

By the size of the student turnout 
at the recent concert given by the Hart 
House String Quartet, we students were 
looking forward to something we would 
enjoy. Some of us found them excel- 
lent and enjoyed ourselves to the ut- 
most. Others of us found them ex- 
cellent, but we did not enjoy ourselves. 
Of course we realized that the quartet 
was perfect in precision, balance, and 
harmony, and gave superb renditions. 

We felt that their selections were 
very effective and put over well as far 
as dynamic goes. However, we found 
these selections too much alike; there 
was not enough variation for anyone 
hut ««udenta of. musir. and even some 
of them found a bit of the sameness 
about the evening. 

The choice of encores pleased us, 
and we only wish that instead of pieces 
containing movements they had chosen 
more like the encores. To be sure, all 
of this is spoken purely from a stu- 
dent's standpoint, but after all isn't it 
the students the Quartet came to play 
before? 

S 

SCA BOARD MEMBERS ATTEND 
CONVENTION OF LUTHERANS 

(Continued from Page 1) 
activities open to everyone, and a 
birthday party was held Saturday even- 
ing. 

The highlight of the weekend was 
communion on Sunday morning, with 
students from all the colleges repre- 
sented, partaking. 

Students from Pennsylvania, New 
Jersey, New York, Washington, D. C, 



here is the lowdown on what they 
mean: Two copper pennies means that 
she is on the loose, so, here's your 
chance; a copper penny and a platinum 
penny mean that she Just doesn't care, 
and last, but not least, for those lovey- 
dovey couples; two platinum pennies 
mean that she is going "steady." So 
much for the feet. 

Let's travel to another part of the 
anatomy now. These "straight-haired" 
belles have really started something. 
Now everyone is running around with 
straight hair. Have no fear, they'll 
look cute for special occasions. 

Keep your shirts on fellows. If you 
don't the girls will. We are all out for 
plaid shirts and even the plain ones. 
This style is worn with the "tail" out. 
Rather sloppy, but, oh how we love 
them!! 

Jingle-Jangle-Jingle!! Silver brace- 
lets are here again from wrist to el- 
bows—Charm bracelets, Identification 
bracelets, and those with school and 
sorority seals on them. Some are Just 
plain chains, but, the more we have 
the happier we are. Maybe we should 
start a contest to see who has the 
most. It's hard to tell who would win, 
since some girls even w«ar them around 
their ankles. • 

Well that's all for now. See you 
later for the newest "togs" and Jew- 
elry. 

Little Clothes Horse????? 



At the Stanley 



Mon., Tu.es.,— Feb. 19, 20— "Casanova 
Brown" (RKO) with Gary Cooper, 
Teresa Wright and Frank Morgan. 
When a man gets mixed up with 
three girls something is bound to 
happen and it does! It's quite time- 
ly. Fellows, you'd better not miss it! 

Wed., Feb. 21— ,"San Diego I Love You" 
(Univ.) featuring Jon Hall, Louise 
Allbritton, and Edward Everett Hor- 
ton. If you want to see a wild shoot- 
ing, "ip roaring western, see "San 
Diego." It has everything, as usual! 

Thurs., Fri., Feb. 22, 23— "Till We Meet 
Again." (Para) showing Ray Mill- 
and, Barbara Britton, and Walter 
Slezark. Definitely a modern war 
picture. 

Sat., Feb. 24— "Going to Town" (RKO) 

featuring "Lum 'n' Abner," Herbert 
Rawlinson and Florence Lake. Every- 
one knows "Lum 'n' Abner." If 
you're interested, don't miss this one, 
it's O. K! 
Mon., to Thurs., Feb. 26 to Mar 1— 
"Since You Went Away" (U. A.) in- 
cluding Shirley Temple, Claudette 
Colbert, and Joseph Cotton. This 
is one you can't afford to miss. Ask 
anyone who has seen it. 



At the Strand— Sunbury 

Mon.. Tues., Feb. 19, 20— "Our Hearts 

Were Young and Gay" with Gail 

Russel and Dianna Lynn. 
Wed., to Mon., Feb. 21 to 26— "Meet M* 

In St. Louis" starring Judy Garland 

and Margaret O'brien. 
Feb. 27, 28— "Ministry of Fear." 
Mar. 1, 2, 3— "Can't Halp Bitttlug." 



SWIENCKI SETS SCHOOL 
RECORD 



broke 



(Continued from Page 1) 
two school records — scoring 



41 



stand up as some of the best indi- 
vidual scoring in the East. His best 
night this year was against Westing- 
house when he netted 31 points. 
Against E'town he scored 30 and in 
throe other games he had 28 points per 
game. His foul shooting Is also excep- 
tional, for in this season he has made 
63 out of 87 shots, for a 72.4 percentage. 
Very seldom does anything phase 
Bern when he is on the floor. He has 
only been fouled out of one game, and 



points in a single game, and making ( that was the only time he left the floor 

, 20 field goals in that same game, be- during the entire season, and so he 

sides being a sparkplug on the team, has been making better than one point 

There is a reason why Bernie has j in every two minutes of play. 
1 been the high scorer in every one of ! Though Bernard Swiencki is study- 
SU's 14 games. Nearly every afternoon ing to become a doctor, we at SU shall 
you find him in the gym taking shots always remember him for his great- 
from any place on the floor. ness as a basketball player. I think 

To watch "Gunner" dribble on the these words of Coach Stagg are a fine 
court is a spectacle. The perfect co- j tribute, "Bernie is a phenomenal play- 
ordination between his mind and er 



New England, and Maryland attended ; muscles makes him one of the smooth 

the conference. Those from our 8. C. | est players in years at SU. 

A. cabinet who went were : Mary Moyer, | Though Bernie has received no pub 



With one game yet to play, we have 
every reason to believe that this mark 
hung up by Bernie Swiencki will be a 



Marie Klick, MarJorie Stapleton, and licity outside of school, his little better | school record that will remain unchal- 
Rine Winey. i than 21 points a game will undoubtedly! lenged for many years. 



Bathgate— jealous???; but the cutest 
couple of all — Aldo and Carolyn Gray- 
bill "sippin' cokes through a straw." 

Valentine's Day has come and gone, 
but it looks like those deadly arrows of 
our little friend cupid who reigned 
supreme last Feb. 14, hit their mark— 
at least those aimed at Jack Warner 
(could be 'cause he's quite a target) 
did. He's been hit with more than 
one, and the latest objects of his affec- 
tion have been "G. G." and Edie Kemp 
—which all goes to prove what I said 
before, Jack is an all-around man. 

Something hit Ruth and Bob too, 
but it must have been something other 
than cupid's arrows, 'cause they were 
both "indisposed" at the same time and 
that's more than coincidence. I don't 
know how the food affected Bob's sail- 
or brother, but I do know that Lenore 
(who had the pleasant Job of keeping 
him happy during his brief visit) was 
also adversely affected— by the food, I 
mean. ' 

And while we are on the subject, St. 
V.'s Day didn't go without some of the 
S. U. gals, for example Gloria Mach- 
mer, receiving the usual heart box of 
chocolates and some, like Corinne, re- 
ceiving a thrilling long distance. But 
then, they are the lucky ones. 

Nothing could .have made Hilda's 
birthday more perfect than Johnny's 
orchid. But to top it all off, two other 
luscious female members of the Mark- 
ey family came up to make the week- 
end more fun! 

And when Harriet celebrated the 
addition of another year, up stepped 
"Sir Galahad" Stahl and escorted her 
to dinner and a movie besides. Now 
there is a right neighborly attitude 
(which reminds me of that old proverb 
"love is blind but the neighbors ain't"). 

Did you hear about Ben Herr's birth- 
day card— only six months late. What 
those birthday dinners won't produce!! 

News Flash: Lou's Larry is now a 
Lt. (J.g.)!!!! In case you wondered 
why all the excitement on third floor 
Seibert a while back, here's the story: 
"Gigger" had gone home to see Mel, 
and when she didn't arrive on schedule, 
some old gossip started the rumor that 
she had taken the fatal step — she didn't 
—and it was probably all because of a 
piston ring not a wedding ring that 
she came back late— still on the loose!! 
Slips That Pass in the Night: 

Seems like slips mean falls and falls 
mean broken this's and that's — a regu- 
lar epidemic of busted stuff like 
Audrey's rib, Angle's arm, Hilda's el- 
bow, and last but not least, Charlie's 
teeth. Don't you know there's a short- 
age of M. D.'s?? Or is it possible you 
want the pre-meds around here to get 
a little practice?? 
The Hit Parade: 

S. U. has a Hit Parade of its own, 
and the song that is currently carrying 
off top honors is none other than that 
nostalgic ditty, "I Want to Get Mar- 
ried." Why that should be so popular 
I don't know unless it's the paucity of 
those essential men or perhaps the un- 
conscious propaganda Audrey Gensel 
just radiates for the cause. But what- 
ever it is, my vote goes for lt, too. 

Another big hit is our new cheer 
leader, Harry "Hungarian Cheer" Wel- 
llver! U! Don't fail to come to the 
next basketball game if you want a 
glimpse of that notorious flip-flop yell 
that's all the rage with the smart 
cheerers these days. 

Before I sign off this week, I'd like 
to congratulate the writers of this col- 
umn of the past few weeks for the 
super sleuthing job they did as well 
as the way they wrote up the latest 
gossip— what I liked best was that it 
gave me a rest, but now the "rest" is 
all. 






LaVerne 



TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 1945 



THE SUSQUEHANNA. SELINSGROVE. PENNSYLVANIA 



PAGE THREE 



OUR FROSH 



JEWEL McNAMARA is another stu- 
dent from the neighboring town of 
Sunbury, and incidentally, she ha.s liv- 
ed in about sixteen different places, 
but still prefers Sunbury. Jewel is 
taking the Liberal Arts Course and is 
majoring in .sociology. In sports she 
likes golf, dancing, and Is an ardent 
football fan. Her favorite pastime is 
writing letters to a certain Lieutenant 
In Hawaii. Jewel likes Dim; Crosby's 
music and Italian spaghetti. The one 
tinny she would like to know is wheth- 
er there is anyone who knows how to 
get to Hawaii cheap. 

AUDREY GEN8EL, who is 5' 5Vi M 
tall, comes from Washington, D. C. 
She Is majoring m English, Audrey 
prefers the Navy— Johnny's branch. 
Other than hockey and swimming, she 
enjoys fried chicken, and "All the 
Things You Are" by Andre Kostelanet/.. 
In h r spare time she also enjoys the 
Reader's Digest or a book by Lloyd C. 
Douglas. Hearing s rinons is her hob- 
by. When asked how she likes S. U., 
she said, "Fine." 

MARJORIE MENOEL has a hobby 
of reading and writing letters and col- 
lecting snapshots of people, This Con 
Student, who hails from FVi--burg, likes 
to play basketball. Glenn Miller's or- 
chestra or Robert Walker movies make 
her sigh. Her favorite song is "I Dream 
of You," and probably has something 
to do with her preference for the Army 
Air Corps. Marjorie likes to read the 
Look Magazine or eat a dish of Italian 
spaghetti and meatballs. 
S 



The Life oj a Waitress 

A Waitress — 



NEWS ON OUR CAMPUS 



Kccital Class 

College and town students of the 
Conservatory presented a recital class 
in Seibert Chapel at 4:15 p. m„ Friday, 
February 16, 1945. 

Piano soloists Included Elizabeth 
Rcdcay, Barbara Stagg, Velma Shook, 
Hope Spicer, and Joyce Gilbert. 

Vocal solos were given by Nedia 
Polanchyk. Carmen Beckwith, and 
Rubye Meyers. 

Emily Botdorf played a trumpet solo, 
and Sally Deppen, a flute solo. 

The Girls Band played three num- 
bers under the direction of Mrs. Hat/.. 

The' program was concluded by a 
questionnaire involving the sixteen 
SAI sisters who visited New York over 
si m< ster vacation. 



Br-r-r-lng! What? 8:44 already? 

Maybe th:- alarm's set wrong. No such 
luck! Oh, well-think I'll sleep until 
(1:30 anyway. So 1 yawn and roll over— 
i ttle myself, shut one eye; then, "pop" 
it hits me— my week to wail tables. 
II Iter hurry as I have only fifteen min- 
utes. So I drag myself downstairs, 
".uiick like a bunny rabbit", set up my 
tables and then wail for "your" arrival 
Into the dining hall, 

It's my morning to take two drmk 
orders— what will tiny be please? One 
says two cofTee, on< tea and five milk 
th other, three tea. one coffee, and 
four milk. Let's see, that's five coffee— 
no four— three coffee; and three tea, 
no four tea— and oh well, I'll just hope 
I get it right. Don't they know milk's 
healthy? 

Now for the cereal order, and then 
I'll eat tin first installment of my 
breakfast. So I settle myself at the 
table and have my spoon half way to 
my mouth, and I tlM? "pssst"— "More 
milk for the cereal please." —Sun, 
sure, right away Might as w 11 take 
til toast in, too. This done. 1 settle 

mys:if again— eat five spoonsful and 

"Pssst— seconds please " 

While I'm up, I'll clear the cereal 
bowls. So at the same time I start to 
el ar the bowls. Everyone bans his or 
h-r elbows on the table Beteha if it 
could, the bowl would King, Don't 
tenet me m." t Pleas- — can't Vha, 
WOn't'cha, move your elboWS when we 

clear?) 

Qee whiz, 7:45, and I have an 8:00 
o'clock. Wish they'd .'top the gossip 
and g:l out oj here don't they know 
I have to si i op 'he tabli yet ? So they 
talk some lnoi - and finally, decide to 
leave 

So i run lure and there— clear 
'crape "Anybody have two extra 
forks'.' and so on. Quess I 11 have to 
do without bn akfast after all. 

H:02 and I'm finished Only live min- 
ute:, late lor eia: < >!. Well nexl V 
I .1- p. 

P. B. Break) at Is niilil dinner is, 
Hi' "picnic." i 



Business Society 

The Business Society held its month- 
ly business meeting on Tuesday even- 
ing, February 13, the newly-elected 
president, Betty Jayne Herr, presiding. 

At the close of the meeting the fu- 
ture secretaries and business executives 
danced to the fine music of "Mary 
I.i/./io and her recording machine." 

At !):30 the punch bowl was the cen- 
ter of attraction, and refreshments 
conforming to the theme of Valentine's 
Day were served. 

This informal party took place in the 
social room, which had been trans- 
furmi d by decorative hearts and cuplds. 

Gusts of the organization for the 
evening were Miss Unangst, Miss Hein, 
Miss Eva Leiby. and the commercial 
students from Selinsgrove High School. 
Also present were Miss Allison and 
Prof Reitz, faculty advisors of the 
Business Society. 

S 

Sunday School Class 

Will the American Airlines put 
through better service to Pittsburgh 
than the Transcontinental? Not post- 
war planning— this is just a phase of 
Hi" new membership drive recently 
launched by the student's class at Trin- 
ity Sunday School. The class has been 
divided into two teams. One is called 
American Airlines; the other, Trans- 
continental. For each person on the 
team present the team gets one point. 
Visitors are counted as half point; how- 
ever, if a visitor comes for three Sun- 
day... his name goes on roll of that 
team. The plane route is New York to 
Pittsburgh to St. Louis to Salt Lake 
City to San Francisco. Each inter- 
I'iiy trip costs 35 points. If a team is 
to reach San Francisco by the last 
and fifth week, every member must 
attend every Sunday. At the close of 
the contest, the losing team will treat 
tiie winning team. 



Sunday night, February 18, all the 
O. D. S. actives and pledges gathered 
in the sorority room from 9:30 until 
10:30 for the monthly Sunday night 
get-together. The main attractions at 
these parties are sitting around, talk- 
ing, dancing, and mostly eating. 

On Friday night at seven o'clock, 
February 23, Betty Smith, who is the 
president of the O. D. S. honoraries, 
will have a dessert at Pinelawn. 

S 

S.C.A. Program Planned 

The S. C. A. program for this Thurs- 
day evening promises to be something 
very specfcl according to reports from 
the cabinet meeting last Wednesday. 
The evening will include a devotional 
service featuring a talk by Pastor John 
Helh r. of Trinity, and an informal re- 
ception for the Pastor in the Social 
Rooms of Seibert Hall following the 
talk. 

Tiie committees for the program, re- 
cently announced by Miss Unangst, 
dean of women, are as follows: Enter- 
tainment, Marjorie Stapleton and Faye 
Smith; Refreshment, Jean Kinzer and 
Mary Mover; Publicity, Dottie Sternat 
and Jean Geiger. Faculty members 
and students are invited to attend. 



PVT. WILFRED J. SHEETZ 

(Continued from Page D 
year at Susquehanna. He entered mili- 
tary service February 13. 1943, when 
quit? a number of our fellows left th? 
campus for service. He received his 
basic training at Camp Croft, South 
Carolina, and further instruction at 
Camp Pickett, Virginia. From here he 
went to New England and was then 
sent overseas. 

Pvt Sheets land.d in England in Oc- 
tober, 1943. In civilian life Private 
Sheetz was interested in marksman- 
ship, and he improved his talents along 
those lines under Army instruction. He 
became an expert infantryman in the 
British Isles. 

Pvt. Sheetz, wearer of the expert in- 
fantryman's medal, was a member of 
a division that has been in combat from 
the time they went into France in July, 
until the present, with the exception 
of a short rest in Wiltz, Luxembourg 
He was with the first division to march 
through Paris, and they advanced 
through Fiance, Belgium, and Luxem- 
bourg into Germany. 



MILLER BROS. 
SHOE STORE 

SUNBURY, PA. 



B.K.W. COACH LINE 

Tries to give the College Students 
the best service, especially the Sun- 
bury Students. Why TRAVEL with 
an individual? The Coach Line In- 
sures every person THINK THAT 



MILLER'S 

Where Ed's and Co-Ed's Meet 
For Many Good Things to Eat 

Corner Pine and Orange Streets 
3 Blocks from Campus 



George B. Rine FLORIST 



nousK 32-Y 
STORE 145-Y 



The First National Bank of Selins Grove 

WELCOMES STUDENTS' ACCOUNTS 



Omega Delta Sigma 

Ou Wednesday night, February 14, 
Leah Cryd r was formally -taken into 
Om ga Delta Sigma. As is the cus- 
tom, Lee was presented with a corsage 
Following tiie initiation, the regular 
weekly meeting was held. It was de- 
clcl d that wallets for commencement 
favors would be ordered. 



Fine Job Printing 
THE SELINSGROVE TIMES 



Quality Only the Finest 

NATIONAL RESTAURANT 

Hotel and Dining Service 

29 N. Market St. Selinsgrove, Pa. 




For School News Read 

SUNBURY DAILY ITEM 



WHITMER-STEELE 
COMPANY 

1.1 VOMER MANUFACTURES 
NORTHUMBERLAND, PA, 



SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

SELINSGROVE, PENNSYLVANIA 

Co- educational — Accredited 

For more than eighty-six years in the service of Christian higher 
education. 



Curricula: 

LIBERAL ARTS BUSINESS 

COMMERCIAL EDUCATION 



MUSIC 



For Catalog write 

G. Morris Smith, D.D., LL.D., Pres. 
Russell Gait. Ph.D., Dean 



PAGE FOUR 



THE SUSQUEHANNA, SELINSGROVE, PENNSYLVANIA 



TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 1945 



LT. JOHN E. HUGUS 

(Continued from Pago 1> 
of that organization in 1943. He was 
also a member of the Men's Student 
Council his junior year. On Susque- 
hanna's campus, he excelled in track 
and soccer, being a member of both 
teams. 

Lt. Hugus is the older of the Hugus 
sons. His brother, Sgt. Howard H. Hug- 
us, when last heard from was stationed 
In England with an Anti-Tank Unit. 
He, too, was a former student at Sus- 
quehanna University. Both boys vol- 
unteered for military service. 

Dr. John E. Hugus, the father of the 
boys, is a veteran of the last World 
War, and Mrs. Hugus is affiliated with 
the Auxiliary of the American Legion 
and the local chapter of War Mothers 
of America. 

S 

SINCE YOU WENT AWAY 1 

(Continued from Page 1) 
weather was just like this February 
13th. The ground was covered with a 
blanket of snow and a few flakes wen- 
still fluttering down from the grey 
heavens. And then, at 11:30 we went 
down to the Con, and saw those 30 
fellows climb aboard a BKW bus. There 
were good-byes, tears, and promises, 
and then they were gone. 

That was two years ago. 
not seen most of you since 
but our thoughts are still 



Yes, we're carrying on in the way 
we hope you want us to. No matter 
how long we shall have to wait for 
your return, we shall do our best to 
have SU just as it was when you left 
so that when you come back you can 
say, "Gosh, it's the same old place." 

Please think of us as we think of 
you. We think of you Bowman, going 
through 180 days of hell on the front 
lines. We think of you, Bergstresser, 
on the lines in France. We think of 
you Sheetz and of the nights you spent 
in the Huertgen Forest. Yes, our 
wishes and prayers are with you. 

We know our sacrifices have been 
meager, our letters few. but remember 
this — our thoughts and hopes always 
go with you and we will say, "Though 
we shall soon be gone we can assure 
you that there will always be a Sus- 
quehanna for you to come back to." 

S 

8WIENCKI SETS SCHOOL 
RKCORD 

'Continued from Page 1) 
S. I'. ;:4. Dickinson 29 

The S. U. cagers were in their form 
Wednesday night in the Alumni Gym- 
nasium When they handed Dickinson a 
defeat of 34-29. Coach Stagg's live 
j led the visitors at half time with a 



Susquehanna 

Culp, f 

Moore, f 

Swiencki. c . 
Kocsis, g _.. 
Tnylor, e .. 



Field Foul Total 



1 

4 

8 

2 





Ox 3 

lx 2 

2x 5 

lx 2 

Ox 



2 
9 
18 
5 




Totals 


15 


4x12 34 


Dickinson 


Field 


Foul Total 


Marine, f ... 


- 3 


Ox 6 


Cosby, i ... 





lx 1 1 


Hull man, c 


4 


lx 3 9 


Elks, g 


3 


lx 4 7 


Ludwig, g 


3 


Ox 2 6 



Totals 13 3x10 29 

Susquehanna 14 3 7 10 — 34 

Dickinson 6 7 12 4—29 

Officials: Shadle, Hatton. 

Wednesday night, February 21, the 
Susquehanna cagers play their last 
game of the season with Elizabethtown 
in the Alumni Gymnasium at 8:30 
P. M 



Cyril Clyde, violist and "baby" of the 
i quartet, having joined it only last year, 
studied at the London Royal Academy 
1 of Music. 

Boris Hambourg, 'cellist of the quar- 
tet since its inception in 1924, is of the 
distinguished musical Hambourg fam- 
ily of London and Ontario. 

The program presented by this ex- 
cellent ensemble was as follows: 

Quartet in B Flat, Opus 18, No. 6, 
by Beethoven; Quartet in G Minor, by 
Vaughn Williams; and Quartet in F 
Major, Op. 9G, No. 6 (American), by- 
Dvorak. Encores: Andante Cantible 
by Tschaikowsky, and Minuet by Boch- 
erini. 



slight margin of 17-13. In the final 
We have quarter the home team showed its 
that day, | strength again by taking the five point 
with you. I lead which won the game. 
Many of you bravely faced the bap- ; Swiencki led the Crusaders scoring 
tism of fir? and have withstood it for \ chart with 18 points. These 18 points 
many long days. You have suffered I broke Susquehanna's individual scor- 
hardships that we back here cannot mg record. Thus far Swiencki has 
imagine, but yet we know that you | scored 299 points in 14 games or an 



HART HOUSE QUARTET 
ACCLAIMED BY SU 

(Continued from Page 1) 
Henry Milhgan, second violin, stud- 
ied under Dr. Luigi von Kunits, late 
conductor of the Toronto Symphony 
and Qesa de Kresz, former leader of 
the Hart House Quartet. 



have, are, and will continue to show 
that same spirit and be the same fel- 
lows we knew, only more mature and 
resolute, than when you left our cam- 
pus. 

We can be grateful that God has 
been with you men through these two 
long years of bitter struggle and that 
in that time onlv one, Pvt. Wilfred 
Sheetz, may have made the supreme 
sacrifice. 

We cannot say that we have made 
great sacrifices back here, but we are 
glad to say that our promise, "We will 
carry on at SU till you come back" is 
still true, and Susquehanna is here and 
better than ever. 

I know that you still think of those 
familiar scenes— running for the mail. 
We still do it, anxiously waiting to hear 
from fellows like you. We still like to 
say good-night on the porch of Sei- 
bert. We still like to have those bull 
sessions. We still cheer for SU at the 
basketball games and we still come in 
late to chapel 



average of 21.3 points per game. HofT- 
tnan led the visitors with nine points. 



HACKETTS 

Hardware Stores 

325 Market St.. 706 Market St. 
ALSO MIDDLF.BURG. PA. 



FEHR'S 



THE STORE THAT LEADS 
IN BETTER MERCHANDISE 



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Floor Coverings — Awnings — Shade9 
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419 Market St. Phone 2180 Sunbury 



HOTEL GOVERNOR 
SNYDER 

GOOD HOME COOKING 



SNAVELY'S 

COLLEGE FURNISHINGS 
AND SHOES 



CRYSTAL PURE ICE 

CHARLES W. KELLER 
Manufacturer and Wholesaler 



Ebert's 5c to $1.00 
Store 

Susquehanna Stationery 
SELINSGROVE 



S. U. BOOK STORE 

SUSQUEHANNA 
NOTEBOOKS 
STATIONERY 



SCHOOL FASHIONS 

ROSENBLUM'S 

SUNBURY, PA. 
SMART FEMININE APPAREL 



Wiien you think of Photography 
Think of 

Schindler Studio 

515 Market Street, Sunbury, Pa. 
Also Framing: and Photo Finishing 



STONER'S 
CREDIT JEWELERS 



SUNBURY, PA. 



CHILDREN'S SHOP 

MARY H. BURNS 
Clothes for the College Girl 



Markley-Altvater 

BETTER STUDENTS CLOTHES 
SUNBURY, PA. 



VISIT THE 

REXALL 
DRUG STORE 

WILLIAM J. COTT. Druggist 



WATCH REPAIR 

Susquehanna Jewelry 
Fountain Pens and Pencils 

W. M. VALSING 

JEWELER SELINSGROVE, PA 



THE BON TON 

Personally Selected 

COATS, DRESSES, HATS 

Sunbury, Pa. 



REICHLEY'S 

WHERE STUDENTS 
MEET AND EAT 



STEFFEN'S 

FINE FOODS— STATIONERY 

Greeting Cards for Every Occasion 
SELINSGROVE, PA. 



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Women To ... . 

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Herman L. Bkern, President 



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BUILD YOUR 
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YOUR FUTURE 
STARTS TODAY 



1 /' 



********* ii rt »i »«i ii w«f Mfl | *t ; iflCT «*wyiyM«i 



TAKE— 

Your Change in 
. WAR STAMPS 



n 



u 




\~A 



efwra 



give- 
to THE AMERICAN 
RED CROSS 



Volume LIII 



SELINSGROVE, PENNSYLVANIA, TUESDAY, MARCH 6, 1945 



Number 11 



WAR STAMP DRIVE OPENS ON CAMPUS 



Fitzroy Davis Speaks on "Theatre" on Star 
Course Number; Honored at APO Reception 

♦ \ 

Fitzroy Davis, actor, director, stage I MJ qq HiirHpr ^n**Qkc 
manager, dramatic critic, and author, iT110 ° AAcUUCl OJJCalYa 

was the lecturer on the Susquehanna ! m n-wr a i t 

To SU About Japan 




FITZROY DAVIS 

Star Course on Monday, March 5, 1945, 

(Concluded on Page 4) 



Klick, Stern at Elected 
To Positions in LSAA 

Dottie Sternat and Marie Klick, both 
of the S. C. A, Cabinet, have been 
elected to positions in the Susquehanna 
Area, Middle Atlantic Region of the 
Lutheran Student Association of Amer- 
ica, according to an announcement of 
February 26. 

Marie Klick, Girls' President of the 
S. C. A., has been chosen editor of 
"North Atlantian," paper of this region 
of the association; other members of 
the S. C. A. Cabinet at Susquehanna 
will comprise the editorial staff. 

Dottie Sternat has been elected vice 
president of the Susquehanna Area of 
the Association. 

S 

Ex-Students Recent 
Visitors on SU Campus 



Four Week Drive to Continue Till March 28; 
Seek 100% Faculty, Student Participation 



On Monday, February 26, Miss Hard- 
er, a former missionary to Japan, ad- 
dressed the student' body in the daily 
Chapel exercises. 

Miss Harder spent some years In 
Japan as a missionary of the United 
Lutheran Church After Pearl Harbor 
all the missionaries were forced to 
leave Japan, and so Miss Harder and 
many other missionaries returned to 
America. Miss Harder is now work- 
ing for the Board Of Foreign Missions 
of the U. L C. A. She is going to 
the various churches throughout the 
country and is telling of the mission- 
ary work, not merely that of Japan, 
but of the field as a whole. Miss 
Harder spoke in Zion Lutheran Church, 
Sunbury, this past week-end. It was 
through the efforts of Miss Mildred 
Winston, who was also visiting the 
campus, that Miss Harder came to our 
campus to speak to us. 

Miss Harder wants to go back to for- 
eign service after the war is over. She 
said she felt certain that, in spite of 
war and present conditions in Japan, 
Christianity will survive. "Once the 
seeds of Christianity have been plant- 
ed," she said, "they will never die." 
She cited several striking examples of 
consecrated Japanese ministers, who, 
in spite of opposition, are carrying on 
the work of the departed missionaries. 

Miss Harder's fine Christian spirit 
and hope for the future were indeed a 
challenge to all who met her. 



-S- 



Virginia Walker Enters 
SU; Transfer from State 

Miss Virginia Walker, of Beavertown, 
Pennsylvania, enrolled as a student at 
Susquehanna last Monday, February 
26, in the Music Education Course. She 
had taken first semester work in the 



DEBATE TONIGHT; 
SU TEAM ENTERS 
CONTEST AT SSTC 

This evening at 8:00 in Steele Science 
100, two Susquehanna teams will de- 
bate the question of "Compulsory Ar- 
bitration of Industrial Disputes." The 
affirmative speakers are: Norma Hazen, 
Naomi Garman, and Celo Leitzel; the 
negative speakers are: Gloria Gaspa- 
roli, and Arthur Oelnett. Jean Wcntzel 
is also a member of the team. This 
debate will be the Oregon, or cross 
question type and will last about an 
hour. Everyone is cordially invited as 
this is the only home debate this year. 
It would be well worth all students' in- 
terest and time to attend this meeting. 

Susquehanna will participate in the 
seventh annual debate tournament to 
be held at Shippensburg State Teach- 
ers College on March 10. Among other 
colleges participating in this debate are 
John Hopkins, Gettysburg, Dickinson, 
and Penn State, in this tournament 
each team will debate six times and 
each will participate in three rounds 
of debating. They will debate upon*he 
same topic, "Compulsory Arbitration of 
Labor Disputes" at that time. 



-S- 



A number of former students of S. U 
have returned recently to the campus. | music course at Pennsylvania State 

On the civilian side, there was Fran College. Miss Walker, who is residing 
Day Kevelson and Claire Holcombe. j in Hassinger Hall, is a graduate of 
Fran came from Brooklyn to see us i Beaver Vocational High School In the P«W W the program 



SAI Broadcasts Over 
Station WKOK Tonight 

This evening, March 6, from 7:00 to 
7:15 p. m. the Sigma Omega Chapter 
of Sigma Alpha Iota will present a 
program over radio station WKOK in 
Sunbury. 

After opening with the theme, the 
Sigma Alpha Iota whistle song, the fol- 
lowing program will be presented: 

Violin solo, "Czardas," by V. Monti, 
Margaret Walter; Soprano solo, "Annie 
Laurie," arranged by Liza Lehman, 
Gloria Machamer; Piano solo, "Soar- 
ing," by Robert Schumann, Louise 
Kresge; Sigma Alpha Iota "Chorale," 
the active members. 

Janet Rohrbach will be the accom- 



and Claire from Rosedale. Claire is 
working in Hillside, New Jersey, for the 
Cooper Alloy Company, 

Now for the military. "Scotty" Small 
came back to visit us, with his new 
hair-do — a la army, before being in- 
ducted into the Army at Fort Dix. 

Ensign Dave Rishell was back to give 
us a glimpse of what a Merchant Ma- 
rie uniform can do for a man! 

These week-end visits of Gus have 
made Beckie happy and us too. Who 
can forget that laugh? 

"Skip" Keller paid us a flying visit 



class of 1944. This program is part of a projected 

Her father is Director of the Bureau suggested by the National Executive 
of Vehicles at Harrisburg. Office of Sigma Alpha Iota. 



t 



"Letters to Lucerne Premiere, March 20 



The main project of Theatre Guild 
and Alpha Psi Omega this year will be 
the spring production, "Letters to Lu- 
cerne." a human and moving drama of 
the present war. The play Is under the 
faculty supervision of Mr. Elbert Has- 
kins and Gloria Gasparoll and La Verne 



Kohn are the co-student directors. The 
just long enough to make us want to I play, written by Fritz Rotter and Allan 
join the Waves. Good luck to both I Vincent and presented In New York 
you and Sally in Washington! ! several years ago, Is a story of a girls' 

Pfc. Danny Reitz has been making i school near Lucerne and its humor and 
classes seem like old times by his visits. I laughter mixed with its moments of 



Danny will soon be leaving for Lin- 
coln, Nebraska, where he will train 
on a B-29. 

We of Susquehanna wish that your 
future visits may tff oftener and longer. 



tragedy will undoubtedly make a play 
long remembered on our campus. 

Rehearsals are being held several 
nights a week in O. A. 300. The cast 



Nancy Myers; Erna Schmidt, Rubye 
Meyers; Gustave, Jerry Moore; Gretch- 
en Under, Lear Crydor; Hans 8chmldt, 
Rlne Winey; Margarethe, Jean Wentz- 
el; Mrs. Hunter, Harriet Gould; Bingo 
Hill, Helen Eby; Felice Renoir, Bobbie 
Kain; Sally Jackson, Bobble Gaetz; 
Marlon Curwood, Marian Willard; 
Koppler, Frank Wolfe. 

The following committee chairmen 
have been appointed to prepare for the 
production which is scheduled for 
March 20; Publicity, Jane Malkames; 
House, Marjorie Stapleton; Costumes, 
Marjorie Barton; Scenery, Rine Winey; 
Lighting, Ross Johns; Property, Jean 
Gelger; Make-up, June Hoffman; and 



of characters include: Olga Kirinski, Tickets, Mary Lib Basehoar 



We did it before— we can do it again? 
What? 

Last year we sold enough war bonds 
and stamps to name a pursuit ship af- 
ter Susquehaana University. This year 
our goal is 100% student and faculty 
participation in the purchase of war 
stamps and bonds. We of course are 
interested in the amount you give, but 
more in the fact that each and every 
student is buying his way to victory. 

What sacrifice are you making now? 
Certainly you can afford to buy a stamp 
each week and form a habit which will 
pay you dividends. Three bonds today 
are worth four ten years from now. 

Our war bond drive which officially 
opened yesterday, will continue 
throughout the semester, but we're put- 
ting forth our greatest drive during the 
month of March. So do your share and 
buy a war stamp when you are ap- 
proached by one of your fellow stu- 
dents. 

Would you like some idea of what 
your defense stamp will purchase? If 
eight students buy a ten cent stamp, 
one soldier will be provided with K 
rations for one day; seven ten cent 
stamps will buy C rations for a day. 
Then if six of you purchase ten cent 
stamps, one serviceman in the U. S. 
can be fed for a day, or nine stamps 
will feed a serviceman overseas. Think 
what 180 students could do! 

The general chairman of the drive 
is Rlne Winey, whose responsibility it 
is to see that everyone cooperates to 
make our drive a success. Corinne 
Kahn is the general treasurer who 
takes care of ail stamps and money 
turned in. Marian Willard is the gen- 
eral sales manager and she is in charge 
of the captains of the various teams. 
You've probably admired several post- 
ters advertising our drive. The credit 
all goes to Mary Lizzio, who is also tak- 
(Concluded on Page 3) 
8 

Dr. Smith Honors Coach 
Stagg, Cagers at Dinner 



This evening at six o'clock President 
G. Morris Smith will honor Coach 
Amos Alonzo Stagg, Jr., Susquehanna's 
1944-1945 basketball team, and the 
managerial staff of the squad at a din- 
ner in Horton Dining Hall. 

The Crusader squad, which was vic- 
torious in eleven of fifteen games this 
season, was composed of the following 
men: Captain John Kocsis, senior, New 
River, N. J.; Celo Leitzel, senior, Rich- 
field; Frank Wolfe, senior, Pottsville; 
Bernle Swiencki, Junior, Glen Lyon; 
Rine Winey, junior, Selinsgrove; Ross 
Johns, Junior, Honesdale; Don Her- 
rold, Junior, Port Trevorton; Joe Tay- 
lor, sophomore, Wlldwood, N. J.; Art 
Oelnett, sophomore, Selinsgrove; Jerry 
Moore, frosh, Sunbury; Harry Culp, 
frosh, Sunbury; Don Wholsen, frosh, 
Yonkers, N. Y.; Scotty Small, frosh, 
Passaic, N. J.; Skip Madden, frosh, New 
York City. Herrold, Small, Wholsen, 
and Madden left the squad at semes- 
ters to enter the service. Ray Mould, 
frosh, Bronxville, N. Y., was manager 
of the team. 



PAGE TWO 



THE SUSQUEHANNA, SELINSGROVE. PENNSYLVANIA 



TUESDAY, MARCH 6, 1945 




e Susduetwrna 




CAMPUSOLOGY 



Established 1891 

Rine G. Winey, Jr., '46 - - - Editor 

Jean C. Geiger, '46 Associate Editor 

Gloria Gasparoli, '46 Managing Editor 

Arthur J. Gelnett, '47 - Sports Editor 

Reporters- Mary Elizabeth Basehoar, '45; Ruth Botdorf, '45, proofreader; Cor- 
inne kahn, '45; Laverne Kohn, '45; Louise Kresge, '45; Gloria Machmer, 
•45- Prances Bittinger, '45; June Hoffman, '46; Jayne Troutman, '46; Norma 
Ha'zen '46; Ruth Cochrane, '46; Emily Botdorf, '46; Marie Klick, '46; Vir- 
ginia Hallock '46; Carmen Beckwith, '46; Jackie Braveman, '47; Joe Taylor, 
•47 • Jane Gundrum, '47; Dorothy Wagner, '47; Faye Smith, '47; Caroline 
Pfahler '47- Doris Williamson, '47; Marian Walker, '47; Gayle Clark, *47; 
Martha' Garard, '48; Helen Zahn, '48; Betty Smith, '48; Caroline Marks, 
•48- Betty Frank, '48; Gloria Walmer, '48; Ruth Criswell, '48; Roberta 
Gaetz '48- Ed Madden, '48; Sara Lee Smith, '48; Margaret Johns, '48; 
Joan Smith, '48; Harriet Gould, '48; John Warner, '45; Aldo Pescarmona, 
*47; Caroline Graybill, '48. 

Corinne Kahn, '45 Business Manager 

Helen Eby, '47 Advertising Manager 

Jean KiNZERr'46 - Circulation Manager 

Business Assistants: Roswell Johns, 46; Ed Madden, '48; Russell Brown, *48; 
Betty Frank, '48; Cynthia Carmel, '48; Jean Wheat, Barbara Kain, Hilda 
Markey. 

Published slmMnonthly throughout the school year, with the exception of 
Thanksgiving, Christmas and Semester holidays, at a subscription rate of 

$2.00 a year. „ _ 

Entered as second class mail matter at Selinsgrove, Pa. 



EDITORIALS 



"We Can, We Will, We Must" 

You will be approached a number of 
times in these next four weeks by stu- 
dent who are selling War Stamps. The 
object is essentially the same as that 
drive now going on at the Western 
front. Here at Susquehanna we only 
give money towards victory, but the 
First Army is giving their all, and then 
some. Any military endeavor requires 
full cooperation and coordination to 
succeed. That is what we are striving 
for in helping the war effort— 100% 
participation from everyone. It's rath- 
er ridiculous when you compare our 
meager contribution towards peace and 
victory with the tremendous sacrifices 
the men on the fighting fronts are mak- 
ing. Our help, regardless of how insig- 
nificant it may seem, is all part of the 
United Nations' Army forever marching 
forward. Take your place along side of 
a soldier in Germany, and, make our 
War Stamp drive a "mission complet- 
ed." 

S 

It's Courtesy 

It's common courtesy to greet our 
classmates and friends our own age 
with a cheery "Hi" or "Mornin'." It's 
customary to reply to a request of one 



BEST WISHES 

The best wishes of the college faculty 
and administration and the student 
body to you, Dr. Kretschmann, for your 
continued and speedy recovery, and 
may the time not be distant that you 
may take up your duties again as In- 
structor. 

S 



At the Stanley 



Mon., Tues., Mar. 5, 6— "Merry Mona- 
han"— (Univ.) A jig saw involving 
Jack Oakie, Donald O'Connor, and 
Peggy Ryan with quite a problem- 
how to keep Oakie sober! 
Wed., Mar. 7— "In the Meantime Dar- 
ling" (Pox) Sounds O. K. You'll j 
have to find out for yourself. But 
then, Wednesday nites, the movie 
really doesn't matter. 
Thurs., Fri., Mar. 8, 9— "Princess and 
the Pirate" (RKO) (Technicolor) 
Here Bob Hope is tops in a rip-roar- 
ing pirate story with Hope as "Syl- 
vester Crosby", the pirate. Virginia 
Mayo is O. K. too. Don't miss the 
ending! 
Eat., Mar. 10— "Heavenly Days" (RKO) 
A thoroughly harmless comic strip 
about Fibber and Molly's trip to 
Washington. A bit of propaganda 
included. Let's take a night oft! 
Mon., Tues., Mar. 12, 13— "Thin Man 
Goes Home" (Metro) That famous 
couple and super sleuths, Mr. and 
Mrs. Nick Charles— Myrna Loy and 
William Powell, are back together 
again ad on the loose with fun! 



NEWS REPORT TO THE NATION: 
Latest Communiques from the "Love" 
Front : 

Gus and Beckle are together again. 
Did you ever hear of anyone glad to 
have car trouble? Beckie's little heart 
sang for joy when the old Ford sput- 
tered to a stop 'cause it kept Gus here 
one day longer. (P. S. She saw him 
the next weekend too.) 

Looks like "the thing" between our 
Fae and Harry— but then I heard from 
a very reliable source where Harry 
plans to divide up his time, so it ain't 
a lost cause yet. 

It's very obvious where Ray's affec- 
tions lie— and this time it's the real 
thing in the person of Edle Kemp. 

Every time I sign my name to the 
column and push it in the box, I re- 
member something I forgot to mention, 
and it's most always that thriving little 
affair between Ira and Corinne— but 
now I remembered. 

A report on Jeanie Klnzer closely re- 
sembles the "Second Front" story. For 
the past two weeks she's been in a 
rush to get home to be with her Marine, 
Don, and yet the latest addition to her 
heart-throb collection is a luscious pic- 
ture of the pride of the Air Corps, Jeff. 
Well, all's fair in love and war. 
Civilian Travel Speeds Up: 

The railroad line between New York 
and Sunbury was busy carrying Joan 
Smith's Arthur along and then carry- 
ing the two of them back for a perfect- 
ly heavenly holiday together. Some 
people who heard the "excitement" 
when he called were not sure she'd be 
in fit condition to greet him, though. 

Now two sailors came in from some- 
where to spend the weekend with Peggy 
and "Doc"— those two get more breaks! 
I think these were the ones met en 
route to S. U. some time ago, right? 
(Now don't all the rest of you gals 



of our fellow students with such an- 

~, .. .. e ... „„h "Rp with 'Wed., Mar. 14 — "Our Hearts Were 
swers as "Okey," "Sure, and Be with Promises 



you in a moment." But because we 
use such literal language to friends our 
own age Is no excuse that we should 
use such language to members of our 
faculty or superiors. 

Our faculty and superiors are deserv- 
ing of more than the "Hi" or "Okey" 
that we give our classmates. They are 
our elders and should be granted every 
courtesy we possibly give them. 

The habits we develop in our life 
here at school will be carried over into 
our later life It can not be expected 
that our employers in the future will 
welcome such phrases as "Sure" or 
"Mornin'." 

Let us cultivate a spirit of more re- 
spect and courtesy to our superiors 
with such salutation as "Good morn- 
ing, sir" or "Pleasant morning, doctor." 



Young and Gay" (Para) Promises! 
to be well worth an evening. We're 
looking forward to it. 

Thurs., Fri., Mar. 15, 16— "Can't Help 
Singing" (Univ.) (Technicolor) New 
music by Jerome Kern is sung by 
Deanna Durbin including romantic 
interest in the person of Robert 
Paige and a lightweight story of 1850 
pioneer days. 

Sat.. Mar. 17-"My Pal Wolf "-(RKO) 
Why did I have to end up with this? 

AT THE STRAND 

Mon., Tues.. Mar. 5, 6— "An American 
Romance" with Brian Donlevy and 
Ann Richards. 

Wed., to Sat., Mar. 7, 8, 9, 10— "Here 
Comes the Waves" starring Bing 
Crosby. 

Mon., Tues., Mar. 12, 13— "The Climax- 
featuring Boris Karloff and Susanna 
Foster. 

Wed. to Sat., Mar. 14, 15, 16, 17— "Hol- 
lywood Canteen" presenting Joan 
Leslie. 



On the Editor's Desk 

Susquehanna University, 

March 3, 1945 
Dear Editor: 

Several weeks ago we students (yes, 
we "college" students) were privileged 
to hear the Hart House String Quartet. 
Yet some of us had the nerve to accuse 
these musicians of the lack of a variety 
in their program. Beethoven (a Clas- 
sicist), Dvorak (a Romanticist), and 
Williams (a Modernist) represented 
three different schools of music in ad- 
dition to their own nationality; isn't 
this a variety? Instead we "gloried" 
in their presentation of Tschaikowsky's 
"Andante Cantabile." Why? Because 
in the realm of our past experiences, 
we knew the theme was taken to make 
the popular song "Isle of May." 

We in America pride ourselves as be- 
ing the best educated people in the 
However, can we consider our 



dash away in hopes!!!) 

Then Danny Reitz dashed in to set 
"Roomie's" heart a-flutter with that 
telephone call that meant a date. 

After a slew of phone calls from 
Clyde at Camp Meade, Corlnne's plans 
were finally set and off she went to be 
with him for a day or two before he'd 
be off again — where being a military 
secret. It was a short but wonderful 
trip, 'tis said. 

And "Scotty" arrived amidst the hor- 
rified - screams that accompanied any 
one's first glimpse of that haircut that 
gives him the look of some Dick Tracy 
character, was it "Flat Top?" Carolyn 
Pfahler had a date with Dave Kem- 
berling so she wasn't there when those 
many phone calls he put in to lias- 
singer in an attempt to get her came 
in. Nuts! ! ! ! 

The other nite I ansewered the phone 
in the library and the nicest voice ask- 
ed for Rhoda Klemons— I overheard 
her say she had a date, but I could'nt 
be nosey and ask her who it was, so 
supposin* you ask her and then tell me. 
After all, If I tell you all I know, I 
think the rest of you "students" should 
reciprocate in like manner. 

Not always are train trips the signal 
for a perfect future. There are times 
when departing trains bring such sweet 
-sorrow as for example the lonely 
Johnny Hilda left behind last weekend, 
and the dejected Bernie who did noth- 
ing but think of Ellie up in Reading 
with Marie Talbot and Louise Schlick. 
Life can be crueL 
The Fleet's In: 

On his way to Cornell Sunday, one 
little gob stopped in to see Ann Gibson 
and left a definite mark of his visit in 
that lovely corsage she was sporting. 
Some people really rate, I guess. - 

George, Lou's date from Bucknell for 
that dance last fall, spent one nite of 
his last leave before shaking the dust 
of Bucknell from his feet forever down 
here saying good bye. Oh, did you 
know that Lou's Larry and Ann's Bill 
have met somewhere in the CENSOR- 
ED — well, they almost met. 

At one of the dances In the social 
room, I looked once and saw Paula 
alone— I looked again, and there she 
was dancing with a sailor. By Inquiries 
I discover it's her cousin — and here I 
thought I had a big news story about 
the boyfriend! 

Little Dots and Dashes from 
Here and There: 

Ben and Helen spent a delightful 
evening with Ben's future brother-in- 
law in Sunbury last Tuesday. They 
attended the cinema and saw a picture 
they'd all seen before- — that goes to 
show how much of a choice there is of 
things to do around this place. 

Art Gelnett set the record for the 
number of dates a guy can have In one 
evening. I saw him with at least five 
different gals in two hours. But last 



P 



world. .Mr*..—., o -•• 

selves truly educated if we lack a ' Saturday he came back to normal and 
knowledge or an appreciation of good i devoted all his time to "Doc." 
music? When one considers that the And here's a real bit of news: Harry 
average person in European countries Welliver decided it was time to do 
understands and appreciates fine music, something before he was a marked 
he is very skeptical about the American | woman-hater, so he dated Dotty Ju- 



viewpoint on this form of culture 

Can we be able only to appreciate se- 
lections which we know and like? Don't 
we ever desire to learn new things? 
Can't we appreciate things for what 
they are worth in spite of the fact that 
we don't understand them and there- 
fore do not like them? 

The- primary aim of the Star Course 

Series is to bring to the students and 

faculty of Susquehanna a high form of 

culture not experienced in our everyday 

; life. Therefore, let's find out who these 

i fellows Beethoven, Dvorak,, and Wil- 

| Hams are before we offer any criticism 

I or comments on their music. 

Sincerely, 
; A STUDENT 



pina. My worries over him are relieved 
for a while. 



S- 



LaVerne 



Dr. Sheldon Returns 

For the first time since he fell and 
broke his ankle, January 29, 1945, Dr. 
Sheldon was out at the Conservatory 
Tuesday morning and all day Wednes- 
day of last week to take over his duties 
there. During the month that he was 
kept at home by the slippery pave- 
ments, his classes and piano students 
went to his house for classes and les- 
sons. 

S 

-V Mail is fastest to soldiers abroad 



TUESDAY, MARCH 6, 1945 



THE SUSQUEHANNA. SELINSOROVE. PENNSYLVANIA 



PAGE THREE 



SU Cagers End Season With 11 Wins, 4 Losses 



The Susquehanna basketball players 
ended their successful 1944-45 season 
on Wednesday, Feb. 21, by defeating a 
strong Elizabethtown five. This season 
has been one of the most successful 
season for the Crusaders in many years. 
With an all civilian team, the S. U. 
boys were able to establish the re- 
markable record of 11 victories and 
only four defeats. Here is a brief 
resume of the season: 

SU opened her cage season against 
the Alumni and edged out an exciting 
42-41 victory in the last half minute of 
play. The cagers then had little diffi- 
culty in overcoming a Milton YMCA 
team, 61-39. Traveling to Washington 
on December 1, SU met her initial de- 
feat at the hands of a smooth passing 
Gallaudet College team in a hard 
fought game by the tune of 46-37. Play- 
ing on her home court, SU lost her most 
heartbreaking game of the season, 45- 
41, in an extra period to her traditional 
rival, Juniata College. 

Bounding back from Juniata's loss, 
SU went on a scoring spree against 
Westinghouse Electric and swamped 
them 70-37. However, the Lions of 
Penn State had too much power for 
our collegians and SU was badly maul- 
ed from opening to closing gun on the 
Penn State floor and ended upon the 
end of a 53-12 score. Then SU went 
on to win again from Milton, 50-32, 
and in a poorly played game eked out 
a 41-36 win over Westinghouse. 

Reversing her playing of the last 
game, the Crusaders played their best 
game of the season when in brilliant 
passing attacks, coupled with super 
shooting, trounced Dickinson College 
at Carlisle, 52-27. 

. Herrold, Small, Wholsen, and Mad- 
din played their last ball for SU for 
the duration and it was a fitting trib- 
ute to them as SU won a 52-40 victory 
from a strong Bucknell Junior College 
team. 

SU hung up her fifth straight and 
eighth win of the season when in a 
strong third quarter push, she scored 
enough to beat out a 46-39 win over 
Gettysburg Sem. Again Juniata proved 
the jinx for SU and defeated the Cru- 
saders 47-41. SU started out well, but 
a powerful Indian team soon complete- 
ly outclassed SU. 

Even E'town's Buch's 42 points were 
not enough to stop the Crusaders from 
winning in a rough and tough tussel at 
E'town, 62-55. Again proving her su- 
periority, SU played hard and man- 
aged to win a close 34-29 win from an 
improved Dickinson team. SU closed 
her season on her own hardwoods by 
stopping Buch and Elizabethtown and 
came out victorious, 42-34 for the 11th 
game of the season. 

This year Coach Stagg loses two sen- 
ior members from the team. They are, 
Captain John Kocsls, guard, and Celo 
Leitzel, also guard. Bernie Swiencki, 
lanky center for the Crusaders will 
remain on next year's squad until Jan- 
uary 19, 1946. Swiencki has set an 
all time scoring record for S. U. this 
year by scoring 324 points in 15 games 
or an average of 21.6 points per game 

S 

THEATRE GUILD ENJOYS 
MONOLOGUES BY STUDENTS 

The regular meeting of the Theatre 
Guild of SU was held in Seibert Chapel 
on Thursday evening, March 1, at 7 
p. m. Gloria Gasparoli, president of 
the organization, was in charge of the 
meeting. Among the things discussed 
was the reception to be held for Pitz- 
roy Davis on Monday evening. Follow- 
ing the close of the business meeting, 
Lillian Werner, B. J. Herr, and Lois 
Dauberman each presented a very 
humorous monologue which was thor- 
oughly enjoyed by the members of the 
group. 




Kappa Delta Phi 

An informal party was held in the 
sorority rooms at 9:30 p. m. on Monday, 
February 26. Refreshments were serv- 
ed, and an enjoyable time was had by 
all. 

On March 15, Kappa Delta Phi will 
have a tea for the honorary members 
in the sorority rooms. 

In the near future the active mem- 
bers of the sorority will give a theater 
party for the pledges. A date has not 
as yet been set. 

S 

Theta Chi 

David Lloyd Bomboy and Carl Lind- 
berg Herman became active members 
of the Beta Omega Chapter of Theta 
Chi Fraternity on Thursday evening, 
Feb. 22, 1945. The meeting was at- 
tended by all undergraduate and fac- 
ulty members. Mr. Bomboy was elected 
assistant guard and Mr. Herman re- 
ceived the position of librarian. 

S 

S. C. A. 

George Washington's Birthday was 
the occasion for quite a bit of S. C. A. 
festivity— the regular meeting plus an 
entertainment program in Seibert So- 
cial Parlors In honor of Pastor Heller. 

Dottie Sternat was in charge of the 
program for the regular meeting. Main 
event was a talk about George Wash- 
ington by Pastor Heller. Jean Straus- 
ser gave a solo, Cesar Franck's "Heav- 
enly Manna" accompanied by Marie 
Klick. 

Two marimba solos by Velma Shook 
started off the reception program di- 
rected by Marjorie Stapleton. A comic 
interpretation in pantomime of society 
in George Washington's age followed. 
The skit was acted out by about fifteen 
students with Corinne Kahn as reader. 
At the end of the program, an Informal 
talk was given by President Smith. 
Daniel Reitz, Army air cadet, home on 
a furlough, also extended his greetings. 
Refreshments included cookies and 
cocoa. 

At the next S. C. A. meeting, March 
8, Ongkar Narayan, our student from 
British Guiana, will talk on his ex- 
periences. 

8 



Conservatory Recital 

Students of the Conservatory will 
present an evening recital at 8:15 p. m. 
Monday, March 12, 1945, in Seibert 
Chapel. All students are invited. 

S 

WAR STAMP DRIVE 

(Continued from Page 1) 
ing care of the thermometer on which 
all sales will be recorded. There is a 
booth located in the parlors of Seibert 
Hall, where stamps will be sold after 
supper, Marge Barton is in charge of 
this booth. 

The student body and faculty mem- 
bers have been divided into teams 
whose leaders are: La Verne Kohn, 
Jean Wheat, Nancy Myers, Russ Brown, 
and Jane Malkames. Other members 
of the student body who are participat- 
ing to make our drive a success are: 
Ruth Botdorf, Ross Johns, Norma Haz- 
en, Gloria Gasparoli, June Hoffman, 
Evelyn Wilhour, Jane Gundrum, Joe 
Taylor, Ben Herr, Pauline Solomon, 
j Hilda Markey, Joan Apple, Edie Kemp, 
Dawn Ebert, Marie Stout, G. G. Rob- 
erts, Dave Bomboy, Lois Dauberman, 
Ann Malkames, Eleanor Steele, Bobbie 
Gaetz, Bobbie Kain, and Harold Sny- 
der. 

If every student and faculty member 
will participate in this drive, we may 
proudly fly the United States Treasury 
flag. So let's all jump on the band 
wagon and ride to victory. 



Individual Scoring Records 

Games Field Fouls Total 

Moore 15 60 22x37 142 

Herrold 10 26 11x20 63 

Swiencki 15 127 7ux95 324 

Kocsis 15 35 9x27 79 

Taylor 15 9 9x22 27 

Winey 12 5 2x 2 12 

Culp 3 11 4x 8 26 

Wholsen 8 4 2x 3 10 

Gelnett 4 Ox 1 

Small 6 Ox 

Johns 7 Ox 

Leitzel 2 Ox 

Madden 3 Ox 

Totals .277 129x211 683 

Averages Per Game 

Field Goals 18.46 

Fouls _ 8.6 

Points 45.54 

Susquehanna 42, S. U. Alumni 41. 
Susquehanna 61, Milton Y.M.C.A. 39. 
Susquehanna 37, Gallaudet 46. 
Susquehanna 41, Juniata, 45. 

70, Westinghouse 37. 

12, Penn State 53. 

50, Milton Y.M.C.A. 32. 

41, Westinghouse 36. 

52, Dickinson 27. 

52, Bucknell Jr. Col- 



Susquehanna 
Susquehanna 
Susquehanna 
Susquehanna 
Susquehanna 
Susquehanna 

lege 40. 
Susquehanna 

nary 39. 
Susquehanna 
Susquehanna 



46, Gettysburg Semi- 



41, Juniata 57. 

62, Elizabethtown 55. 
Susquehanna, 34, Dickinson, 29. 
Susquehanna 42, Elizabethtown 34. 
Total points scored in season: 

Susquehanna 683 

Opponents 610 



George B. Rine FLORIST 



HOUSE St-Y 
STORE 145-T 



The First National Bank of Selins Grove 

WELCOMES STUDENTS' ACCOUNTS 



Omega Delta Sigma 

The regular weekly meeting of Omega 
Delta Sigma was held on Wednesday 
evening at 6:45. 

A buffet supper was planned for 
March 17 for the honoraries. The 
theme will be patterned after St. Pat- 
nek's Day. It will be held in the social 
room from 5:00 till 8:30 and will be 
attended by honoraries, actives, and 
pledges. 

In the absence of Corinne Kahn, the 
sorority president, Mary Lib Basehoar 
conducted the meeting. 

8 

—Remember soldiery abroad with fre- 
quent V Mall letters. 



Fine Job Printing 
THE SELINSGROVE TIMES 



Quality Only the Finest 

NATIONAL RESTAURANT 

Hotel and Dining: Service 



29 N. Market St 



Selinsgrove, Pa. 




WHITMER-STEELE 
COMPANY 

LUMBER MANUFACTURERS 
NORTHUMBERLAND, PA. 



For School News Read 

SUNBURY DAILY ITEM 



SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

SELINSGROVE, PENNSYLVANIA 

Co- educational— Accredited 

For more than eighty-six years in the service of Christian higher 
education. 



Curricula: 



LIBERAL ARTS 



BUSINESS 



MUSIC 



COMMERCIAL EDUCATION 

For Catalog write 



G. Morris Smith, D.D., LL.D., Pres. 
Russell Gait, Ph.D., Dean 



PAGE POUR 



THE SUSQUEHANNA, SELINSGROVE, PENNSYLVANIA 



TUESDAY, MARCH 6, 1945 



OUR FKOSH 



PAULA MOSKOWITZ claims Passaic 
as her home town. She is 5' t%" tall 
and enjoys tennis and skiing. Harry 
James is her favorite orchestra leader 
and "Lost in Love" her favorite song. 
Paula likes to read the Cosmopolitan 
or American Magazine and the book 
"Rebecca." John Payne and the U. S. 
Army rank high with her too. She is 
undecided about her major, but after 
leaving S. U. hopes to get married. In 
food she likes steak and chocolate cake, 
and in pets she likes dogs. 

CHARLOTTE OGLENSKY is maj- 
oring in the Pre-law Course expecting 
to enter graduate school when she 
leaves here. This 5' 6" tall lass claims 
Freehold as her hometown. She pre- 
fers the Army Air Corps because of 
two brothers and many friends. Char- 
lotte enjoys reading biographies, novels, 
or the Ladies Home Journal. Van John- 
son and Harry James rank high on her 
list of favorites. She also likes the 
song "Rum and Coke," hamburgers 
smothered with onions, and any kind 
of sport. Knitting is her hobby. 

JERRY MOORE, who is 5' 9" tall, 
also comes from Sunbury. He is a pre- 
theological student majoring in Greek 
and his ambition is to be in the Navy 
chaplaincy. Jerry likes every sport, 
but especially baseball. For a hobby 
he studies athletic records and statis- 
tics. He also likes the music of Kay 
Kyer, the song "My Hero," Joyce Rey- 
nolds' and James Stewart's movies, 
and baked ham, corn custard, and ice 
cream. In reading material he likes 
the Bible, sports books, and the Read- 
er's Digest. 

LUCILLE MITTLEMAN comes from 
Washington, D. C, and is 5' 4" tall. 
Her hobby is any kinds of sports, piano 
playing, and saving pictures. Van 
Johnson is heT favorite movie star; 



Benny Goodman her favorite orches- 
tra leader; Journal, McCall's and 
Good Housekeeping her favorite maga- 
zines; and "Every Time We Say Good- 
bye" her favorite song. Lou is major- 
ing in merchandising and has a pref- 
erence for the Army. She also likes 
steak and chocolate Ice cream. 

RAYMOND MOULD, better known 
as Ray, comes from Bronxvllle, N. Y., 
and Is 5' 7" tall. He is taking the Busi- 
ness Administration Course and is ma- 
joring in advertising. Ray enjoys a 
good game of golf or tennis, but for a 
hobby likes hunting and fishing. Fried 
chicken satisfies his appetite. His fav- 
orite song is Glenn Miller's "Moonlight 
Serenade," and his favorite actress Is 
I Gale Storm. The Reader's Digest, New 
J Yorker, or "Les Miserabks" provide 
i him interesting reading. 

HOPE PETERS, who hails from 
Reedsville, is 5' 5" tall. She is major- 
ing in Music Education and expects to 
teach when she leaves S. U. Fo lis- 
tening pleasure, she likes Dave Rose's 
orchestra or the song "Tonight We 
live." Hope also collects popular music 
for a hobby. Softball is her favorite 
sport, ice cream her favorite food, and 
Life he favorite magazine. Among her 
other interests are the Navy, Greer 
Garson, fiction books, and a cocker 
spaniel dog. 



them being Tyrone Power, Celeste 
Holm, Mae West, Robert Taylor, Con- 
stance Bennett, and Director Gregory 

Ratoff. 

Following the enjoyable lecture num- 
erous questions were asked Mr. Davis 
on a number of personalities connected 
with the theatre. Mrs. Davis was in- 
troduced by Mr. Haskins, faculty ad- 
visor for SU's Theatre Guild. 

Alpha Psi Omega, national honor 
dramatic fraternity on our campus, 
honored Mr. Davis with a reception in 
the social rooms. Gloria Gasparoli and 
La Verne Kohn were hostesses. It was 
during this time that a number of the 
students personally met and question- 
ed Mr. Davis. 

Mr. Davis has a wide variety of ex- 
perience upon which to base his lecture. 
Coming from Evanston, Illinois, he 
studied the theatre In Russia, Sweden, 
Germany, Czechoslovakia, France and 
England. He began his dramatic ca- 
reer by working on the road with Kath- 
erine Cornell in "Romeo and Juliet," 
with Alfred Lunt and Lynn Fontaine in 
"Idiots' Delight," and in Orson Welles' 
modern revival of "Julius Caesar." Fol- 
lowing this he acted on Broadway, di- 
rected a summer theatre, and made 
sketches of actors and actresses on the 
side. 



Mr. Davis' interest in the entertain- 
ment world next took him to Holly- 
wood, where he wrote dialogues and 
scenarios for producer-director Gregory 
Ratoff, by whom he was assigned to 
such films as "The Deal is On," starring 
Mae West, the new Robert Taylor film, 
"Song of Russia," "The Band Wagon," 
etc. 



B.K.W. COACH LINE 

Tries to give the College Students 
the best service, especially the Sun- 
bury Students. Why TRAVEL with 
an individual? The Coach Line In- 
sures every person. THINK THAT 
OVER. 



STONER'S 
CREDIT JEWELERS 



SUNBURY, PA. 



FITZROY DAVIS SPEAKS 
ON THEATRE 

(Continued from Page 1) ' 

at 8:15 p. m. 

Mr. Davis gave a very amusing and 
personal talk on behlng the scene life 
of a number of the famous Hollywood 
stars with whom he has worked, among 



MILLER BROS. 
SHOE STORE 

SUNBURY, PA. 



MILLER'S 

Where Ed's and Co- Ed's Meet 
For Many Good Things to Eat 

Corner Pine and Orange Street* 
3 Blocks from Campus 



HACKETTS 

Hardware Stores 

325 Market St, 706 Market St. 
ALSO MIDDLEBURG, PA 



FEHR'S 

THE STORE THAT LEADS 
IN BETTER MERCHANDISE 



F. A. BRILL CO. 

Floor Covering*— Awnings— Shades 
Draperies 

419 Market St. Phone 2180 Sunbury 



HOTEL GOVERNOR 
SNYDER 

GOOD HOME COOKING 



CRYSTAL PURE ICE 

CHARLES W. KELLER 

Manufacturer and Wholesaler 



S. U. BOOK STORE 

SUSQUEHANNA 
NOTEBOOKS 
STATIONERY 



SNAVELY'S 

COLLEGE FURNISHINGS 
AND SHOES 



Ebert's 5c to $1.00 
Store 

Susquehanna Stationery 
SELINSGROVE 



SCHOOL FASHIONS 

ROSENBLUM'S 

SUNBURY, PA- 
SMART FEMININE APPAREL 



CHILDREN'S SHOP 

MARY H. BURNS 
Clothes for the College Girl 



Markley-Altvater 

BETTER STUDENTS CLOTHES 
8UNBURY, PA. 



VISIT THE 

REXALL 
DRUG STORE 

WILLIAM J. COTT. Druggist 



WATCH REPAIR 

Susquehanna Jewelry 
Fountain Pens and Pencils 

W. M. VALSING 

JEWELER SELINSGROVE, PA. 



THE BON TON 

Personally Selected 

COATS, DRESSES, HATS 

Sunbury, Pa. 



When you think of Photography 
Think of 

Schindler Studio 

515 Market Street, Sunbury, Pa. 
Also Framing and Photo Finishing 



REICHLEY'S 

WHERE STUDENTS 
MEET AND EAT 




FINE FOODS— STATIONERY 

Greeting Cards for Every Ooowrion 

SELINSGROVE, PA. 



Yes- 
Women To ... . 

buy Retirement In- 
come Policies from 
Lutheran Brother- 
hood. Results are 
absolutely guaran- 
teed. No other plan 
will leave you as free 
from care and worry. 
A guaranteed income 
will make living a 
Joy when retirement 
years pre reached. 



Lutheran Brotherhood 



Legal Reserve Life Insurance For Lutherans 
MINNEAPOLIS, 2, Herman L. Ekern, President 



MINNESOTA 



430 Market St. 



H. L. ROTHFUSS, Agent Williamsport, Pa. 



BUILD YOUR 
ESTATE NOW! 



YOUR FUTURE 
STARTS TODAY 



- 



SIRJNSGflOVE, PA. 



SEE— 

"Letters to Lucerne" to- 
night at 8:15 in Seibert 
Auditorium. 



n 



U 




\~A 



etoira 



CONGRATULATIONS— 

Susquehanna can feel 
proud of her War Stamp 
Drive. 



Volume LHI 



SELINSGROVE, PENNSYLVANIA, TUESDAY, MARCH 20, 1945 



Number 12 



LOUISE KRESGE CHOSEN MAY QUEEN 

' — ' ♦ ' — ~® * 



DEBATE TEAM TIES 
FOR THIRD PLACE IN 
CONTEST AT SSTC 

The seventh Annual Tournament of 
Debating colleges was held at Shlp- 
pensburg State Teachers College March 
10, 1945. The Susquehanna team left 
Friday afternoon as the first round was 
held early the next morning, and there 
were two that same afternoon. Dr. 
Russell W. Gilbert accompanied the 
team and assisted as judge at the de- 
bates. Each team had three debates. 
Out of six debates, Susquehanna won 
four, tleing us for third place with 
the Pennsylvania State College Wom- 
en's Team. Mt. Mercy (Pittsburgh) won 
five debates, taking second place; and 
the Perm State Men's Team took first 
place, winning five. 

Susquehanna defeated the American 
University, Dickinson, Gettysburg, and 
Shippensburg; and lost to Penn State 
Women's Team and Mt. Mercy. 

In this tournament were all Oregon 
(cross-examination) debates. The topic 
was "Compulsory Arbitration of Indus- 
trial Disputes." The s. U. affirmative 
(Concluded on Page 4) 



To be Crowned 1945' May Queen 




MISS LOUISE KRESGE, '45 



SUSQUEHANNA REACHES 99% AND 97% 
WAR STAMP DRIVE; ELIGIBLE TO FLY U. 

" — <S> : <* 

Theatre Guild, Alpha Psi Omega 
Give "Letters to Lucerne" Tonight 



Joyce Jenkins Weds 
Ens. William McClure 

The marriage of Miss Joyce Jenkins 
to Ensign William Horting McClure was 
solemnized Saturday, March 10, 1945, at 
4 p. m., In the Elm Park Lutheran 
Church, Scranton, Pa. 

The Rev. John Marvin, pastor of the 
Lewistown Presbyterian Church, and 
the Rev. Dr. Harold C. Chase, Elm Park 
pastor, performed the ceremony. 

The bride was given in marriage by 
her father, and her maid-of-honor was 
Miss Margaret McClure, sister of the 
bridegroom. The Misses Margaret 
Seigle, Scranton; Margie Shields, Lang- 
horne; Betty Polk, Lewistown; and 
Jean Geiger, Wllllamsport, were the 
bridesmaids. Miss Barbara Wurz and 
Miss Nancy Morgan were Junior brides- 
maids, and the flower girl was Miss 
Nancy Kramer. 

William A. Hayes, Johnstown, a grad 
of S. U. in January, was best man for 
Ensign McClure, and C. Plnkney Jones, 
Merton H. Wheeler, Conald J. Pulton, 
and Donald D. Arnold were ushers. 

A reception followed at the Century 
Club. 

The couple later left for New York 
and New England on a wedding trip 
and appeared on campus for the first 
time as Mr. and Mrs. last Friday. 

The former Miss Jenkins attended 
Susquehanna and is now a cadet nurse 
at Lewistown Hospital. Ensign McClure 
also attended S. U., and was recently 
commissioned at Midshipman School, 
University of Notre Dame. 



> Did you receive any letters today? If 
not, you will enjoy the letters that are 
received by school girls in the play en- 
titled "Letters to Lucerne" being pre- 
sented in Seibert Auditorium tonight at 
8:15. The play, written by Fritz Rotter 
and Allan Vincent, was presented on 
the New York stage several years ago. 
It is being presented by the Susque- 
hanna University Theatre Guild and 
Alpha Psi Omega, under the faculty 
supervision of Mr. Elbert Haskins, and 
student direction of Gloria Gasparoll 
and La Verne Kohn. 

It is difficult to determine who is the 
heroine in this human drama, but Olga 
Klrinski who is being played by Nancy 
Myers, and Rubye Meyers, who is Erna 
Schmidt, both have very important 
roles. Rine Wlney is the hero as Hans. 

When the play opens near Lucerne, 
(Continued on Page 2) 
8 

Marian Willard Teaches 
In Northumberland JHS 



PARTICIPATION IN 
S. TREASURY FLAG 



Over $400 In War Stamps and 
Bonds Sold; Last Week of Drive 



Miss Marian Willard has been substi- 
tute teaching in the Northumberland 
Junior High School for the past two 
weeks, having ended her teaching 
March 16. 

She taught two classes of seventh 
grade English and three of ninth grade 
Junior Business training. Marian en- 
joyed her work and felt that it had 
given her much valuable training. 

Marian is a senior Commercial Edu- 
cation student and will graduate this 
summer, as she has been taking the 
accelerated course for the past two 
summers. 



Last week's sales of over $300 In war 
bonds and stamps brings the Susque- 
hanna drive to a total of approximate- 
ly $455 with a faculty and student co- 
operation well above the 90% margin 
required for the Mlnutesman's flag. 
This week, the last week in the March 
drive, should see a 100% co-operation 
total! 

Interclass and faculty-student riv- 
alry, promoted by a variety of charts, 
has played a large part in the drive. 
The first week saw student predomin- 
ance with a total of $116.90 and an 
average of about 100% co-operation 
against a faculty $34.10 "of purchases 
and 80% co-operation. The sopho 
mores, juniors, and seniors "hit the 
bell" with 100% participation while the 
large freshman class missed it by a 
narrow margin of only 2%. Total sales 
for that week were $151.00. 

The irecond week of the drive the 
faculty bought a large number of bonds, 
bringing their weekly total to $243.00. 
The students purchased a total of $61.52 
in stamps and bonds. Combined co- 
operation was 97% compared to the 
first week's 99% 

The drive began with a patriotic pep 
talk given by the general chairman, 
Rtne Winey. During the first week, 
enthusiasm ran high— students anx- 
iously viewed thermometers and charts 
recording class and student-faculty co- 
operation which were posted In the 

; Auditorium and In Seibert hallway; 
chapel and dining room announce - 

I ments were frequent, and team cap- 

I tains were seen rushing from person 
to person between classes and in the 

| dormitories. 

This last week, the general treasurer, 
(Concluded on Page 4) 



Kinzer Lady in Waiting; 
Six Others Form Court 

In a vote In chapel on Tuesday, 
March 14, Miss Louise Kresge, a senior 
conservatory student, was chosen by 
the student body to be Queen of May 
at the traditional May Day exercises 
on May 12 on the campus. Miss Jean 
Kinzer, of Newport, was selected as 
Lady In Waiting, and Jean Geiger, 
Mary Moyer, Patricia Snyder, Corlnne 
Kahn, Marian Willard, and Margaret 
Walters comprise the remainder of the 
court. 

For many years prior to the present 
war, It had been the tradition to pre- 
sent the May Queen and her court as 
the novel attraction on Subfreshman 
Day which Is the day prospective stu- 
dents visit our campus. 

This year this old time tradition or 
custom has again been adopted, and 
the May Queen and her court will reign 
on Subfreshman Day, May 12. 

Scenes from the operetta which will 
be produced by the conservatory stu- 
dents will be given at this time also. 
The traditional May Pole Dance and 
other dances will likewise, be present- 
ed. 

On the evening of this festive occas- 
ion, the annual prom, sponsored by the 
Junior class, will be held. 

The Queen of the court is Miss Louisa 
Kresge, a conservatory student from 
Ocean Grove, N. J. Louise is a very 
popular and active student on our cam- 
pus, being a member of Sigma Alpha 
Iota Sorority, the Women's Student 
Council, the Women's Athletic Associa- 
tion, the Theater Guild, the Susque- 
hanna Staff, the Intersorority Council, 
the Student Christian Association, and 
the Girls' Swing Band. 

The Lady-in- Waiting is Miss Jean 
Kinzer, from Newport, Pa., who is a 
commercial educational student. Jean 
accelerated her program and will re- 
ceive her degree this summer. She Is 
a member of Kappa Delta Phi Sorority, 
the Women's Athletic Association, the 
Business Society, and the Business 
staff of the Susquehanna. 

The members of the court are as fol- 
(Concluded on Page 4) 

Pvt. Wilfred Sheetz x'48, 
Prisoner in Germany 

Pvt Wilfred Sheetz, who has been 
reported missing in action since De- 
cember 20, has now been declared a 
prisoner of war in Germany. His par- 
ents, Mr. and Mrs. Corbett L. Sheetz, 
of East Pine street, Sellnsgrove, were 
advised of this by the War Department 
March 15. More Information would be 
sent on later, they were told. Pvt. 
Sheetz was reported missing in Feb- 
ruary, t 

Having been in continuous action 
since landing with a combat force in 
France In July, the group was given a 
short rest at Wiltz, Luxembourg. He 
was in the First United Nations di- 
vision to march through Paris. His 
division was recalled from Luxembourg 
when the Germans made their pre- 
holiday drive west. 

Pvt. Sheetz attended S. U. during 
the school year of 1942-1943, and left 
February, 1943, when many of 8. U.'s 
boys entered the service. 



» *■ v *' •■■ * J 



PAGE TWO 



THE SUSQUEHANNA, SELINSGROVE, PENNSYLVANIA 



TUESDAY, MARCH 20, 1945 




n 






ne iusauen&nna 




• • CAMPUSOLOGY 



• ' • 



Established 1891 

Rine G. Winey, Jr., '46 Editor 

Jean C. Geicer, '46 Associate Editor 

Gloria Gasparoli, '46 — - Managing Editor 

- Arthur J. Gelnett, '47 Sports Editor 

Reporters: Mary Elizabeth Basehoar, '45; Ruth Botdorf, '45, proofreader; Cor- 
inne Kahn, '45; Laverne Kohn, '45; Louise Kresge, '45; Gloria Machmer, 
*45; Frances Bittinger, '45; June Hoffman, '46; Jayne Troutman, '46; Norma 
Hazen, '46; Ruth Cochrane, '46; Emily Botdorf, "46; Marie Klick, '46; Vir- 
ginia Hallock. '46; Carmen Beckwith, '46; Jackie Braveman, '47; Joe Taylor, 
•47; Jane Gundrum, '47; Dorothy Wagner, '47; Faye Smith, '47; Caroline 
Pfahler, '47; Doris Williamson, '47; Marian Walker, '47; Gayle, Clark, '47; 
Martha Garard, '48; Helen Zahn, '48; Betty Smith, '48; Caroline Marks, 
•48; Betty Frank, '48; Gloria Walmer, '48; Ruth Crlswell, '48; Roberta 
Gaetz, '48; Ed Madden, '48; Sara Lee Smith, '48; Margaret Johns, *48; 
Joan Smith, '48; Harriet Gould, '48; John Warner, '45; Aldo Pescarmona, 
'47; Caroline Graybill, '48. 

Corinne Kahn, '45 - Business Manager 

Helen Eby, '47 Advertising Manager 

Jean Kinzer, '46 Circulation Manager 

Business Assistants: Roswell Johns, "46; Ed Madden, '48; Russell Brown, '48; 
Betty Frank, '48; Cynthia Carmel, '48; Jean Wheat, Barbara Kain, Hilda 
Markey. 



Big Town Talk: 

Think I've discovered who the "nice 
voice" over the phone was— Al!! At 
least this weekend Al and Rhoda were 
together, so putting two-and-two to- 
gether—but then, I'm just guessing 

Had the census-taker been around 
Scranton last weekend, he would have 
been shocked at the inaccuracy of his 
report, courtesy S. U. Not only did 
"Roomie," Lou, "Gigger," "Beckle," 
Marian, Glnnie, and Dot weigh Will 
Hayes' car down to the ground on the 
way to Bill and Joyce's wedding, but 
Sara Lee and Elaine picked this same 
time to take Lucille, Toby, Rhoda and 
a few others up for a gay time at home. 
Say, what does Scranton have that Sel- 



Published semi-monthly throughout the school year, with the exception of 
Thanksgiving, Christmas and Semester holidays, at a subscription rate of 

$2.00 a year. 

Entered as second class mail matter at Selinsgrove, Pa. 



Spring ! 

Spring! It seems here to stay. Did 

you ever notice the magic transforma- 
tions that take place on campus at this 
time of year? The trees burst out in 
buds and delicate shades of tiny green 
leaves, and the birds and squirrels work 
busily until sundown. Some times it 
seems too good to be true— well, it al- 
most is too good to be true. We are 
most fortunate to be here at S. U. The 
amazing thing is that we are at Sus- 
quehanna, not just another college. 
Susquehanna, located in the center of 
one of the most beautiful, picturesque 
sections of Pennsylvania. It is a really 
great feeling, knowing that you have 
shared some of your most memorable 
years at a place such as this. 

Yours truly isn't exempt from the list 
of gripers found on campusr on any 
campus for that matter, but Spring 
seems to bring about the realization of 
how much more we have to enjoy and 
be thankful for than we have to com- 
plain about. Instead of grumbling on 
your way to your eight o'clock tomor- 
row—look around you and see If you 
don't find yourself saying, "It's good 
to be alive, it's good to be in the midst 
of growing things and beauty, it's good 
to know you're safe— it's great to be 

at S. U." 

S 

Elections 

Last Wednesday the student body 

elected a May Court And where was 
this election conducted? In the chapel 
during our devotion period. Not only 
is this an intrusion upon our religious 
service, but also it prevented many per- 
sons who were not required to attend 
chapel on Wednesday from voting for 
the Court. 

Most colleges select all their student 
officers by elections, elections that are 
held on the same principal as regular 
elections. 

Why can't we do this here at Susque- 
hanna? Many of the students are soon 
of voting age, and many undoubtedly 
have never filled out a ballot, so why 
couldn't they be given that experience, 
by holding regular student elections on 
the campus. Perhaps the class in Gov- 
ernment could do this as a project. If 
an election is required again on cam- 
pus, let's do it the democratic way, by 
allowing everyone to have the privilege 
as a voter. 



STARS & STRIPES 



S. U. was glad to welcome back to 
the campus Mr. and Mrs. William Mc- 
Clure, who were recently married. Mrs. 
McClure is the former Joyce Jenkins. 
. . . Danny Reitz again surprised us by 
showing up in Selinsgrove. . . . Ensign 
jDave Rishell and Lt. Donald Shafer 
I are also back home. . . . Bruce Shoe- 
I maker x'46, came back to his Alma 
: Mater and - Informed us that he is ex- 
pecting to go overseas again. . i . Bob 
! Fisher x'46, has Just been made a ser- 
! geant, Congratulations! . . . Donald 
I Wohlsen is in the Merchant Marine. 
j . . . Dick Neidick is in the Navy at 
; Great Lakes. . . . Skip Madden is en- 
! joying Army life at Camp Gordon, 
! Georgia. ... We were sorry to hear 
| that George Stow, x'46, is in a hospital 
in England suffering from injuries re- 
ceived in action while in Belgium. . . . 
also Robert Dornslfe, x'45, is some- 
where, in Italy recuperating. 

A very impressive service was held in 
Trinity Lutheran Church, Selinsgrove, 
on March 18, to honor the memory of 
Lt. John E. Hugus, Jr., x'43, who was 
killed in action in Belgium on January 
19, 1945. 



At the Stanley 

Mon., Tues., Mar. 19, 20— "Ministry of 
Fear" (Para) 

The Fuehrer's flatfoots are again at 
their work; this time in England with 
Ray Miland. By the way, layer cakes 
can have many uses! Fritz Land leads 
in melodrama with help from Marjorie 
Reynolds. 

Wed., Mar. 21— "Are These Our Par- 
ents" (Monogram) 

Sounds like a new slant on things! 
Might be worthwhile. It's up to you. 
Thurs., Fri., Sat., Mar. 22, 23, 24— "Meet 
Me in St. Louis" (Metro) 
Technicolor. A story of family life 
and young love in the St. Louis of 1903 
with Judy Garland typical musical. 
Margaret O'Brien is her mischievous 
little sister. 

Mon., Tues., Mar. 26, 27— "The Climax" 
(Univ.) Technicolor 
Starring Boris Karloff and Susanna 
Foster. The sweetness of Susanna's 
voice helps make one forget Karloff, in 
his usual sinister role. 
Wed., Mar. 28— "Man From Frisco" 
(Rep.) 

"At least there's a man In it," ex- 
claimed Doc. Girls, here's a chance! 
I Thur., Fri., Mar. 29, 30— "An American 
Romance" (Metro) Technicolor 
King Vidor's new film about an im- 
i migrant's , (Brian Donlevy) rise to 
I riches, accompanied by Ann Richards. 
| Sat., Mar. 31— "Sundown Valley" (Co- 
lumbia) 

Your guess is as good as mine, but 
what does the title suggest? 



On the Editor's Desk 



Editor's Note— The policy of "The 
Susquehanna" is to welcome letters of 
criticism or praise In regard to any- 
thing -elating to our school or of your 

'opinion of any matter of interest to 
the students or faculty; however, we 
must remind you that any publication 
that you submit must bear your slgna- 

! tare, not necessarily for publication, 
but to affirm your good faith in the 
subject you present. If you do not wish 

Syour name published to the article as 

lit appears in "The Susquehanna," it 
will be withheld, but you must have 
your signature on any publication you 
submit to the editor. 

THEATRE GtTILD, ALPI1I PSI 
OMEGA GIVE "LETTERS 
TO LUCERNE" TONITE 



AT THE STRAND 

Mon. & Tues., Mar. 21, 21— "Three's a 

Family" 
| Thurs., Fri., & Sat, Mar. 22, 23, 24— 

"To Have and Have Not" 
Mon., Wed., Mar. 26, 28— "Lost in a 

Harem" 
Thurs., Sat, Mar. 29-31— "Tall In the 
Saddle" 



(Continued from Page 1) 
Switzerland, late in the summer of 1939, 
the girls are just returning to the girls' 
school after the recess. The other girls, 
besides Erna and Olga; are Bingo Hill, 
a typical American girl played by Hel- 
en Eby; Felice Renoir, a French girl, 
Bobbie Kain; Marion Curwood, an Eng- 
lish girls. Marian Willard; and Sally 
Jackson; American, Bobbie Gaetz. 
Under the protection of a wise and 



pleasant schoolmistress, Caroline Hunt- 
er, Harriet Gould, they are living an 
idyllic life apart from the hatreds of 
'.the world. In their dormitory at night 
|it is their custom to read aloud their 
I letters from home. When the war 
breaks out, Mrs. Hunter hopes to keep 
I the school isolated from the terrible 
things that are happening outside, but 
: the letters carry the bitterness in. The 
letters the German girl, Erna, receives 
from home pack the school against her. 
Some of the news, especially from Pol- 
and, that Olga receives, is devastating. 
Although the German girl is not re- 
sponsible for it, she is charged with 
the blame. ■ 

Ultimately the authors manage to 
1 absolve her completely in a concluding 
letter that is beautifully written. 

We can't exclude Gustave, a French 

servant, Jerry Moore; Miss Under, a 

! German teacher who has trouble get- 

i ting English papers, Leah Cryder; Mar- 

igarethe, the maid, Jean Wentzel; and 

(Concluded on Page 4) 



insgrove doesn't have? Don't answer 
that question!!! 

Anna Sheetz did not heed Miss Hein's 
warning about not sitting under the 
apple tree with anyone else (incident- 
ally, who was the somebody else?), 
'cause that horrible (believe me, I 
know) stuff, poison ivy got the best of 
her. Let that be a lesson to the rest 
of youse. 

Will some one please explain 'why 
every time I'm coming up from town I 
see Florence Strause going down— but 
she'll never admit she's going in tlje 
wrong direction. Frankly, I'm more 
than curious — 

"Did you see Henry?" "Yah, ain't 
he the cutest thing?" "Did you see 
Henry?" "—see Henry?" "—Henry!" 
"—Henry!" He was the talk of the 
campus for days after he dashed in to 
see Marty. Doggone it all, I didn't see 
him— but she did and that's all that 
matters. 

Speaking of men home from the 
wars, some people have all the luck. 
Jeanette's Maynard was home again — 
couldn't help knowing without even be- 
ing told what with that radiant glow 
so evident And along the same line, 
saw Carolyn Marks with a sailor the 
other nite — which one Mjas he?? 

Play rehearsal had to limp along 
without Miss Linder the other night 
when Leah dashed off to Sunbury to 
say a fond farewell to the boyfriend in 
the station'— that was short but sweet. 
"Pank" can claim a little different 
kind of service man — Rozie but not 
"the Riveter." This one is Rozie 
Jacques- Jeannes of the. French Air 
Corps. Get her to read you one of his 
letters (written in French by the way) 
sometime — they're good!!!! AAd did 
you know that she hears from Johnny 
Zuback a whole lot?? C|a| *,; r - 

"In the spring a young man's fancy 
— " you know the rest, but Just te prive 
that spring is here, here's the latest 
communique from the love front: The 
report shows Nancy Lou and Frankie 
winning a great victory and carrying 
off top honors; G. G. and, Jerry are 
another promising little twosome; and 
Ross and Ann Gibson will bear your 
watching, too; Rine is still keeping 
Hope busy, and Angle is still the ob- 
ject of Dave Bom boy's affections; Harry 
Welllver's latest date was Margie Johns; 
shall I add Joan Reyner and Ira? On 
second thought I don't think I shall. 
IT'S RUMORED: that someone will 
soon eat his or her Way through the 
candy stored in the spacious ballroom 
at Reich's if Fred doesn't move it — but 
soon!!!; that R. R. no longer stand* 
for Ruth and Ross, but just plain 
railroad again; that Adele Taub is so 
crazy about her room, she doesn't even 
care to go out in the luscious weather; 
that if you want a ride on the tandem, 
you've got to sign the waiting list— or 
better yet see Annie that Belgium 
means more to Aria Bilger than it ever 
did before; could it be that one of 
Uncle Sam's lads has caused the in- 
terest? Definitely; that Peggy should 
stay here weekends judging by that lost 
look Larry carries around; that Edith 
McConnell has had a crush on all the 
men around here— the latest being 
Johnny Smith; that Her Die is getting 
the basic fundamentals of the two-step 
from' "Charlie" Walker; that the wed- 
ding cake the gals have been sleeping 
on may someday produce the desired 
results; that Eve is a perfect darling 
if we may take the orchid Gloria was 
wearing as proof; that* Jack wishes that 
draft board would make up its mind — 
he's off again at their request; that 
birthday telegrams can't be sent any- 
more — but leave it to Burnell to get 
around that, eh Mary Lib?; that Let- 
ters to Lucerne is a piperoo and that 
anyone who misses it is— well you'd 
better be there, 'nuff said!!!! 



TUESDAY, MARCH 20, 1945 



THE SUSQUEHANNA, SELINBGBOVB. PENNSYLVANIA 



PAGE THREE 



OUR FROSH 



NEWS ON OUR CAMPUS 



HARRY CULP, who comes from Sun- 
bury, likes basketball, baseball, foot- 
ball, and wrestling. He is 5' 10%" tall. 
Ham and eggs, Ingrid Bergman, Kay 
Kyser, and "Moonlight Serenade" are 
also favorites with him. Harry enjoys 
reading the National Geographic Maga- 
zine, and his hobby is the breeding of 
pedigreed cocker spaniel dogs; in fact, 
he is majoring in veterinary medicine 
and expects to enter the School of 
Veterinary Medicine at the . U. of P. 
upon the completion of his work at S. 
U. This former Marine has been to 
the South Pacific and is the wearer of 
the Purple Heart and the Presidential 
Unit Citation. 

NEDIA POLANCHYCK, who is 5' 2" 
tall, comes from Prackville, Pa. She is 
majoring in Voice and would like to be 
a concert singer when she leaves S. U. 
Postal card collecting is her hobby. 
Nedia enjoys a good fiction story, Good 
Housekeeping Magazine, and any Rus- 
sian dish. In music she likes Deanna | 
Durbin, Sammy Kaye, and the song, 
"You'll Never Know." She prefers the 
Marines. Hiking is her favorite sport. 
ROBERTA RACIONZER, better 
known as "Bobby," hails from Valley 
Stream, N. Y., and is 5' 5%" tall. She 
enjoys swimming, horseback riding, 
mystery books, and the Saturday Even- 
ing Post. Lobster is her favorite food. 
The Army ranks first with her as her 
boyfriend is a Lieutenant in the In- 
fantry. Harry James, Tom Drake, 
Gregory Peck, and Ingrid Bergman also 
rank high with her. Bobby is majoring 
in Psychology expecting to be a social 
worker. She has traveled in Cuba and 
Canada. 

BETTY RAMER is majoring in the 
Secretarial Course and would like to 
be a hostess aboard ship. This York, 
Pa., lass is 5' 5%" tall. Betty likes ten- 
nis, golf, chocolate ice cream, Bette 
Davis, Sammy Kaye, and a sweet pup 
named Jubul. "There I Said It Again" 
is her favorite song and Life her fav- 
orite magazine. She prefers the Navy 
because of an Uncle who is a com- 
mander in that branch. 

GLORIA REICHLEY comes to S. U. 
via Dover, Pa., and is 5* $%* tall. She 
likes basketball in winter and bicycling 
in summer. Gloria Is taking the Medi- 
cal Secretary Course and would like to 
be a secretary to a very handsome ma- 
jor surgeon. She also likes James 
Craig, Harry James, Scotty 'dogs, and 
"My Dreams Are Getting Better All the 
Time." Her hobby is»writing letters, 
but she enjoys reading Seventeen, Life, 
medical books, detective stories, and 
war stories. Branch— Army Air Corps. 
BETTY REISCH is taking the Lib- 
eral Arts Course and expects to become 
a laboratory technician. This S. U. 
miss, who is 5' 5" tall, comes from Ash- 
land, Pa. Betty enjoys swimming, 
chicken and waffles, and good mystery 
books. Van Johnson, Laraine Day, 
Harry James, "All the Things You Are," 
and "Night and Day" also rank high 
with her. For reading pleasure— Made- 
moiselle, McCall's, and Ladies Home 
Journal. Another Navy rooter. 

GERTRUDE ROBERTS, who we 
known as "G. G." plays the clarinet for 
a hobby. • She is majoring in Business 
and when asked what she expected to 
do when she left S. U., the reply was 
"Go back to Jersey " New Monmouth 
is the hometown of this 5' 2" lass. O. 
G. likes swimming, Alan Ladd, Vaughn 
Monroe, and "There I Said It Again." 
Crab salad is her favorite dish. Quot- 
ing her, "The Spring weather here is 
rrally all right." 

JOAN REYNER, who measures up to 
5' 7", claims Atlantic City as her home- 
town. Collecting records is her hobby. 
She wpuld like to become a medical 
secretary. Joan prefers the Navy as the 
best fellow she knows comes from that 
branch. She likes steak, ice cream, 



Biemic Society 

The regular meeting of the Biemic 
Society was held in Steele Science Hall, 
Thursday evening at seven o'clock. In 
the absence of the president, Roswell 
Johns, the vice-president conducted the 
meeting. After the regular business 
was discussed Dr. Houtz gave a talk on 
war gases. Dr. Houtz described the 
uses and effects made by the various 
gases and passed around imitations of 
the gases to the audience so that they 
could smell what the different gases 
were like. Dr. Houtz also described the 
gas mask and exhibited one taken from 
a German soldier. 



-S- 



Omega Delta Sigma 

The regular weekly meeting of Omega 
Delta Sigma was held Wednesday 
night, at 6:45 In the sorority room. 
Plans were discussed concerning the 
buffet dinner which was to be held. 

On Saturday evening, March 17, at 
five o'clock, the active members of 
Omega Delta Sigma Sorority entertain- 
ed their honorary members at a buf- 
fet supper given in their sorority room. 
Both groups were well represented and 
two pleasant hours went by very swift- 
ly. The menu consisted of a tasty 
chicken salad prepared by some of the 
members which was followed by choco- 
late layer cake and coffee. 



Kappa Delta Phi 

A theater party was held for the 
pledges on Wednesday, March 14. All 
met in Seibert's parlors and proceeded 
to the Stanley, where they spent an 
enjoyable evening watching Cornelia 
Otis Skinner and Emily Kimbrough get 
into and out of more trouble in the 
motion picture "Our Hearts Were 
Young and Gay." 

The tea for the honorary members of 
K.D.P. took place in the sorority rooms 
on Thursday, March 15. The honorary 
members present were Mrs. James Ma- 
gee, Mrs. Max Valsing, Mrs. James 
Charles, Miss Lenora Allison, Mrs. 
Ralph Witmer, Mrs. William Russ, 
Mi's. Marvin Groce, and Mrs. John Hel- 
ler. At this time Mrs. James Charles 
was initiated and taken in as an hon- 
orary member. Refreshments were 
served and a lovely time was had by 
all. 



separate ones. Carmen Beckwith and 
June Hoffman are co-chairmen for this 
party. 

S.A.I, has decided to purchase a War 
Bond during this present drive. Each 
year the sorority purchases one, and in 
view of the fact that the school is hav- 
ing a drive, it was decided to get It 
during this campaign. 

Pi Gamma Mil 

The Pennsylvania Gamma Chapter 
of Susquehanna University of the Na- 
tional Pi Gamma Mu met Monday 
evening, March 12th, In the social 
rooms of Seibert Hall. 

The regular business meeting was 
conducted by the president, RIne Win- 
ey, and plans were discussed for hav- 
ing a dinner meeting in May at the Co- 
lonial Tea Room. Several new mem- 
bers were welcomed into the society at 
this time: Jean Geiger, Mary Moyer, 
and Margaret Walters. 

Miss Miriam Garth had charge of 
the program for the evening. Miss 
Garth and Ruth Botdorf discussed ar- 
ticles on postwar economic conditions. 
A general round table discussion fol- 
lowed the presentation of this prob- 
lem. Refreshments were then served. 

S 

Student Recital 

Students of the Conservatory will 
hold a recital class in Seibert Chapel 
at 4:15 p. m., Friday, March 23, 1945. 
Selections will be presented by the fol- 
lowing: 

Piano— Hope Peters, William Rohr- 
bach, Harriet Gould, Marian Attinger, 



Flora Hacker, Hope Harbeson, Cora 
Mae Arthur, Jean Attinger. 

Vocal — Velma Shook, Harry Welliver, 
Dorothy Jupina, Nedia Polanchyck, 
Margaret Walter, John Warner, Louise 
Kresge. 

Violin — Jacqueline Heckert, Prosta 
Arseniu. 

Piano-Organ— Marie Klick, and Dor- 
othy Sternat. Their duet, "Traumerel," 
was composed by Prof. P. M. Linebaugh 
of the Conservatory faculty. 



-S- 



Student Christian Association 

On Thursday evening, March 8, the 
regular meeting of the S. C. A. was held 
in the Social Rooms of Seibert Hall. 

The devotional program was con- 
ducted by Marie Klick. During the 
service Lois Dauberman and Bobby 
Gaetz presented musical selections in 
the form of piano duets. 

Onkyar Narayan, our student from 
South America, spoke to the group. He 
related much about his home, -British 
Guiana. He told us of the recent fire 
in Georgetown, of the people, their 
customs, the manner of dress, the re- 
ligions, the schools, and the like. Much 
to the amusement of those present, 
Onkyar told the group that the young 
people of his homeland dress and look 
much like we do, only the girl's don't 
wear as much make-up as the girls In 
the United States do! 

Onkyar told us that he likes the 
United States very much, because, he 
said, "The people have shown so many 
kindnesses to me." We are indeed glad 
that you like it here, Onkyar, and, con- 
fidentially ( we like you, too! 



—Remember soldiers abroad with fre- 
quent V Mall letters. 



Sigma Alpha Iota 

On Tuesday evening, March 6. at 
7:00, S. A. I. held a broadcast over sta- 
tion WKOK in Sunbury. The program 
opened with the "Whistle Song." Peggy 
Walter played a violin solo, Gloria 
Machamer sang a solo, and Louise 
Kresge played a piano solo. After the 
national Chorale, the program closed 
with the Whistle Song. 

On Friday evening, March 23, SAI is 
combining with the Patronesses for a 
party. Because of the shortage of 
time, it has been decided to combine 
the parties this year instead of giving 



chocolate cake, Robert Hutton, Prank 
Sinatra, Harry James, "I Remember 
April," Life, and a pet canary. Swim- 
ming is her favorite sport. 



WHITMER-STEELE 
COMPANY 

LUMBER MANUFACTURERS 
NORTHUMBERLAND, PA. 



George B. Rine FLORIST 



HOUSE S2-T 
STORK 145- Y 



The First National Bank of Selins Grove 

WELCOMES STUDENTS' ACCOUNTS 



Fine Job Printing 
THE SELINSGROVE TIMES 



Quality Only the Finest 

NATIONAL RESTAURANT 

Hotel and Dining Service 



29 N. Market St. 



SellnflffTore, Pa. 




For School News Read 

SUNBURY DAILY ITEM 



SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

SELINSGROVE, PENNSYLVANIA 

Co-educational— Accredited 

For more than eighty-six years in the service of Christian higher 
education. 



Curricula: 

LIBERAL ARTS BUSINESS 

COMMERCIAL EDUCATION 

For Catalog write 



MUSIC 



O. Morris Smith, D.D., LL.D., Pres. 
Russell Oalt, Ph.D., Dean 



PAGE FOUR 



THE SUSQUEHANNA, SELINSGROVE, PENNSYLVANIA 



TUESDAY, MARCH 20, 1945 



THEATRE GUILD, ALPHI PSI 
OMEGA GIVE "LETTERS 
TO LUCERNE" TONITE 

(Continued from Page 2) 
Koppler, a German policeman, Frank 
Wolfe. 

The committee chairman cannot be 
forgotten: Publicity, Jane Malkames; 
House, Marjorie Stapleton; Costumes, 
Marjorie Barton; Scenery, Rine Winey; 
Lighting, Frank Wolfe; Property, Jean 
Geigsr; Make-up, June Hoffman; and 
Tickets, Mary Lib Basehoar. 

Do not miss your opportunity to see 
this play given by a well-selected cast 
—it will be one that you will not for- 
get very soon. 

' s 

SUSQUEHANNA REACHES 99% 
AND 97% PARTICIPATION IN 
WAR STAMP DRIVE 

(Continued from Page 1) 
Corinne Kahn, was kept busy with 
money from s,ales which doubled the 
first week's. Computations after a 
meeting of captains, etc., on Friday 
night produced the results given above. 

Plans have been made to stage a war 
bond drive each month. If the high 
level of participation continues Susque- 
hanna will be able to retain the re- 
cently ordered Minute Man's flag. 

One big factor in the success of the 
drive thus far has been its constant 
presence in the minds of students and 
faculty members caused by reminders 
like the poster charts made and main- 
tained by Mary Lizzio. Another thing 
is organization. General sales manager 
is Marian Willard. Marge Barton is 
head of the booth selling stamps at Sei- 
bert Hall. Under Marian Willard are 
a large group of team captains: La- 
Verne Kohn, Jean Wheat, Nancy My- 
ers, Russ Brown, and Jane Malkames. 
Other students active in the selling of 
stamps and bonds are Ruth Botdorf, 
Ross Johns, Norma Hazen, Gloria Gas- 
paroli, June Hoffman, Evelyn Wilhour, 
Jane Gundrum, Joe Taylor, Ben Herr, 



Pauline Solomon, Hilda Markey, Joan 
Apple, Edie Kemp, Dawn Ebert, Marie 
Stout, G. G. Roberts, Dave Bomboy, 
Lois Dauberman, Ann Malkames, Elea- 
nor Steelee, Bobbie Gaetz, Bobbie Kain, 
and Harold Snyder. 

Let's do Justice to Our Cause, Our 
Country and Our College with 100% 
participation this week and every 
week! 

S 

DEBATE TEAM TIES FOR THIRD 
PLACE IN CONTEST AT SSTC 



(Continued from Page 1) 
team was composed of Naomi Garman, 
who presented the case, and Celo 
Leitzel, who did the cross-examination I 
and rebuttal. Gloria Gasparoll present- j 
ed the case and Arthur Gelnett did the I 
cross-examination and rebuttal for the j 
negative team. 

The Tenth Annual Student Congress j 
or the Pennsylvania State Debators 
Convention will be held at State Col- 
lege on March 23-24. The two questions 
which will be debated are "Youth Serv- 
ice After the War," and "Compulsory 
Arbitration of Industrial Disputes." 
Each participating school has been as- 
signed a subject and S. U.'s Is "Com- 
pulsory Arbitration of Industrial Dis- 
putes." 



-S- 



LOUISE KRESGE CHOSEN 



(Continued from Page 1) 
lows : 

Miss Jean Geigcr, an accelerated stu- 
dent from Williamsport, Pa., Is a 
liberal arts student. Jean is a member 
of Kappa Delta Phi Sorority, the 
Theater Guild, the Biemic Society, Pi 
Gamma Mu,, the editor of this year's 



Lanthorn, and a member of the Wom- 
en's Athletic Association, and The 
Women's Student Council. 

Miss Corinne Kahn, a commercial 
educational student, resides in Bloom- 
field, N. J. Corinne Is an active student 
and president of Omega Delta Sigma 
Sorority. She is also affiliated with the 
Women's Athletic Association, the Stu- 
dent Christian Association, the Busi- 
ness Society, the Women's Student 
Council, the Susquehanna Staff, and 
Pi Gamma Mu. During her junior year 
she was the Business Manager of the 
Lanthorn. 

Miss Mary Mover, a liberal arts stu- 
dent from Middleburg, Pa., who is a 
member of Kappa Delta Phi Sorority, 
the Student Christian Association, the 
Biemic Society, the Women's Athletic 
Association, and was a member of the 
Lanthorn Business Staff her junior 
year. 

Miss Marian Willard, another accel- 
erated student, lives in Coatesville, Pa., 
and is a commercial educational stu- 
dent. She is President of Kappa Delta 
Phi Sorority, and a member of the 
Women's Athletic Association, Inter- 
sorority Council, the Theater Guild, 
and the Business Society. 

Miss Margaret Walters, a conserva- 
tory student from Milton, Pa. . Mar- 



garet is a member of Sigma Alpha Iota 
Sorority, and the Symphony, being also 
the Symphony Concertmaster. 

Miss Patricia Snyder is a day stu- 
dent whose residence is Sunbury, Pa. 
Patricia Is a liberal arts student and 
is a member of Omega Delta Sigma 
Sorority, and the Women's Athletic As- 
sociation. 



MILLER BROS. 
SHOE STORE 

SUNBURY, PA. 



FEHR'S 

THE STORE THAT LEADS 
IN BETTER MERCHANDISE 



MILLER'S 

Where Ed's and Co-Ed's Meet 
For Many Good Things to Eat 

Corner Pine and Orange Streets 
3 Blocks from Campus 



HACKETTS 

Hardware Stores 

325 Market St., 706 Market St. 

s 

ALSO MIDDLEBURG, PA. 



HOTEL GOVERNOR 
SNYDER 

GOOD HOME COOKING 



CRYSTAL PURE ICE 

CHARLES W. KELLER 

Manufacturer and Wholesaler 



S. U. BOOK STORE 

SUSQUEHANNA 
NOTEBOOKS 
STATIONERY 



B.K.W. COACH LINE 

Tries to give the College Students 
the best service, especially the Son- 
bury Students. Why TRAVEL with 
an individual? The Coach Line In- 
sures every person. THINK THAT 
OVER. 



STONER'S 
CREDIT JEWELERS 



SUNBURY, PA. 



F. A. BRILL CO. 

Floor Coverings— Awnings— Shades 
Draperies 

* 

419 Market St. Phone 2180 Sunbury 



SNAVELY'S 

COLLEGE FURNISHINGS 
AND SHOES 



CHILDREN'S SHOP 

MARY H. BURNS 
Clothes for the College Girl 



Markley-Altvater 

BETTER STUDENTS CLOTHES 
SUNBURY, PA. 



VISIT THE 

REXALL 
DRUG STORE 

WILLIAM J. COTT, Dmggfat 



Ebert's 5c to $1.00 
Store 

Susquehanna Stationery 
SELINSGROVE 



SCHOOL FASHIONS 

ROSENBLUM'S 

SUNBURY. PA. 
SMART FEMININE APPAREL 



WATCH REPAIR 

Sosqnehanna Jewelry 

Fountain Peas and Pencils 

W. M. VALSING 

JEWELER SELINSGROVE. PA 



THE BON TON 

Personally Selected 

COATS, DRESSES, HATE 

Sunbury, Pa. 



When you think of Photography 
Think of 

Schindler Studio 

515 Market Street, Banbury, Pa. 
Also Framing and Photo Finishing 



REICHLEY'S 

WHERE STUDENTS 
MEET AND g AT 



/ 



STEFFEN'S 

FINE FOODS— STATIONERY 
Greeting Cards for Every Oocssft 
SELINSGROVE, PA 



Yes- 
Women To ... . 

buy Retirement In- 
come Policies from 
Lutheran Brother- 
hood. Results are 
absolutely guaran- 
teed. No other plan 
will leave you as free 
from care and worry. 
A guaranteed income 
will make living a 
Joy when retirement 
years are reached. 



Lutheran Brotherhood 



Legal Reserve Life Insurance For Lutherans 
MINNEAPOLIS, 2, Herman L. Ekern, President 



MINNESOTA 



430 Market St. 



H. L. ROTHFUSS, Agent Williamsport, Pa. 



BUILD YOUR 
ESTATE NOW! 



YOUR FUTURE 
STARTS TODAY 



READ— 

What former Air Student 
of SU has to say. See. 
page 4. „ 




REMEMBER— 

Our April War Stamp 
Drive open April 16. 



Volume LIII 



SELINSGROVE. PENNSYLVANIA, TUESDAY. APRIL 10, 1945 



MARCH STAMP DRIVE GREAT SUCCESS; 
THIS MONTH'S DRIVE TO OPEN APRIL 16 

SU Debaters Attend 
Convention at Penn 
State; To Broadcast 



Number 13 



99'r Student, 89' ; Faculty 
Participation; to Fly Flag 



The March war bond drive here at 
Susquehanna ended before Easter re- 
cess with a bang-up total of more than 
$925 in sales and participation about 
99%. Official confirmation of the 
drive's success will come In the near 
future with the presentation of the 
Treasury Department flag. In the 
meantime plans are being made for a 
week-long April drive to be staged dur- 
ing the week of April 16th. 

This month's driv? will be regulated 
a little differently from last month's. 
First of all money will be collected from 



MEN'S STUDENT COUNCIL BEAUTIFIES 
CAMPUS WITH MEMORIAL EVERGREENS 



The Tenth Annual Pensylvania State 
Debaters' Convention met Friday, 
March 23, 1945, at the Pennsylvania 
State Teachers College, State College, 
Pennsylvania. 

The Susquehanna debating team, 
comprised of Arthur Gelnett, Gloria 
Gasparoli, Celo Leitzel, and Naomi 



Garman, departed for its destination 
participators before the Stamps" 'etc" j J*"**** mornin &- u P° n arr ival the 



are distributed. Secondly, a booth sell 



team debated with the Penn State 



ing stamps will be open twice weekly W °™ el V" the parlors of Atherton Hall, 
in the Seibert Parlors for the benefit '. . Th f followin 8 morning registration 
of students wishing to make regular ' for „ th J conventl °rt took place at 9:00, 
purchases. This booth will be tended ; an ? th . e conve »«°n convened at 10:00. 



by Margie Barton. 

Despite the pre-Easter recess activ- 
ity the sales total of the last week's 
drive exceeded the totals of the pre- 
vious weeks combined by a margin of I ports" were" formed 



At 11:00 the first session met and at 
this time Susquehanna met with the 
committee on labor disputes. 

At the following session from 2:00 
to 4:30, the majority and minority re- 



about $20 and the student participa- 
( Concluded on Page 4) 

S 



In the evening a banquet was held 
at the State College Hotel. Each can- 
vention had chosen a speaker to speak 



Dates Enjoy Open House 



Tlieta Chi Members and ! ■* the banquet, and Arthur Gelnett wSs 

chosen to give a "Toast to the Fu- 
ture." 

The last session of the dav met at 

On Saturday evening, April 7, the 8:30. The debaters decided on which 

Beta Omega Chapter of Theta Chi Fra- plan to adopt of the compulsory mili- 

ternity held its second house party of tary training. The majority decided on 

this current semester from the hours ' the voluntary. 

of 8:00 to 11:00 p. m. Throughout the j The next morning the last session of 
course of the evening ping pong, pool, | the convention met at 9:30, and it 
darts, and dancing were enjoyed by 
those persons present. Towards the 
close of the party, a light lunch was 
served during which time a general 
an informal conversation took place. 
Dr. and Mrs. Russel Gilbert, Mr. El- 
bert Haskins, and Mr. and Mrs. James 
Charles were the chaperons. The fol- 
lowing couples were present: Ruth 
Cochrane and Bob Surplus, Marjorie 
Barton and Art Gelnett, Lenora Gar- 
man and Dave Bomboy, and Jean Geig- 
er and Jack Warner. 

S/Sgt TomBittinger 
Reported Missing 



(Concluded on Page 3) 
S 

Spring Sports Program 
Planned by Coach Stagg 



With the coming of Spring to the 
campus, Coach Stagg has launched 
plans for a complete Spring Sports 
Program which will get underway this 
Wednesday afternoon on the Univer- 
sity diamond when the Crusader nine 
will meet Freeburg High School. 

Coach Stagg is building his team 

around four veterans. These are: Harry 

Culp, Joseph Taylor, Frank Wolfe, and 

John Kocsis. Also on this year's team 

(Concluded on Page 2) 



Operetta, "The Ghosts 
of Hilo" to be Given 
by SU Girls April 20 

"The Ghosts of Hllo," an operetta, 
will be presented by the senior class 
members of the Conservatory, April 20, 
in the Chapel. 

The story of "The Ghosts of Hllo" 
takes place in Hawaii near Hilo. The 
plot revolves around a little girl who 
was found lost near Hllo during a fes- 
tival The girl is taken care of by the 
princess of Hilo and her people. The 
action takes place during a similar fes- 
tival at which the child's identity is 
discovered. 

The Princess Leilanl is played by 
Jean Strausser; Kuulei, Marjorie 
Stapleton; Maile, Carmen Beckwlth; 
and the little girl, Keblaha, by Jean- 
ette Kramer. 

Included in the cast are: Harriet 
Gould, Jean Kelton, Florence Strouse, 
Frances Leisenring, Cora Mae Arthur, 
Frosts Arsenue, Mary Ellen Wood, Dor- 
othy Jupina, Dorothy Wagner, Eleanor 
Steele, Marian Walker, Gloria Waimer, 
Betty Jane Herr, Ruth Williams, Ruth 
Cochrane, June Hoffman, Hope Splcer, 
Elise Thompson, Emily Botdorf, Ruth 
Botdorf, Adah Wolfe, Marie Talbot, 
Anna Miller, Louise Schlick, Lenore 
Garman, Gayle Clark, Carolyn Pfahler, 
Marie Klick, Virginia Hallock, Dorothy 
Sternat, Hope Peters, Hope Harbeson, 
Elro Hacker, and Velma Shook. 

Mrs. Alice H. Giauque is General 
Chairman and Robert Surplus is Con- 
ductor. 



•# 



"Susquehanna" Staff to 
be Elected on Friday 

Election of the new staff of The 
Susquehanna will take place on Fri- 
day, April' 13. Candidates for the elec- 
tion will be selected by the official elec- 
toral committee provided by the con- 
stitution of the Susquehanna Publish- 
ing Association. The members of this 
committeee are: President, Jean Geig- 
er; editor -in-chief, Rine Winey, Jr.; 
business manager, Corinne Kahn; 
business advisor, Professor D. I. Reitz; 
(Concluded on Page 2) 



Trees Memorial to World War 
II Dead, Victorious SU Teams 



About four years ago the student body 
of Susquehanna gave liberal contribu- 
tions for a monument in memory of the 
1940 undefeated football team. How- 
ever, nothing had ever been done with 
this money which was placed in the 
hands of the Men's Student Council. 
Probably one of the reasons for this 
was the fact that the Council had been 
relatively Inactive for two years. 

This year a marvelous opportunity 
arose when it was found that evergreen 
trees could be purchased at a very low 
price per individual tree. When the 
Student Council approached Mr. A. D. 
Gougler, of Middleburg, who owned 
the trees, he stated that he would help 
this worthy cause by donating two 
trees for every three that the Council 
purchased. This proposal was accepted 
and 63 trees were bought to which Mr. 
Gougler added 42 as his personal gift, 
making a grand total of 105 trees. 

The trees were placed at various 
places on the campus. One section 
runs from the lower part of the athletic 
field along the railroad bank up to th§. 
grandstand. Another starts at "lbs 
heating plant and continues alortg the 
railroad bank up to the southwest cor- 
ner of the tirte' tennis courts. Another 
(Concluded on Page 4) 



Staff Sergeant Thomas D.Bittlnger. 'if ay p ft ftn fT nfrno . p J 

'44, of Shamokin Dam, who wears the ,Ya J' x UA > A <* I , .EjIlgdgCU 

decorated twice to Wed Lt. Gordon Park 



X 

Air Medal and was 
with the Oak Leaf Cluster, has been 
reported missing in action over Ger- 
many since February 24 



Mr. and Mrs. Jack Fox, of Bloom- 
He was a field. N. J., announced the engagement 
member of the Eighth Air Force, the of t h3ir daughter Catherine Mary to 
9.th Bomber Group, and the 410th j L j eu t. <j, gi) Gordon S. Park, U.SrN.R 
Bomber Squadron, located somewhere | son of Mr and Mrs Stanley Park, of 

Glen Ridge. N. J. 



in England. 

Staff Ptrgtant Bittinger received his 
basic training in Florida; his college 
training at Fenn College, Cleveland, 



Miss Fox, a former student at Sus- 
quehanna and popular member of the 
sophomore class, was a member of 



Ohio; radio training at Sioux Falls, Kappa Delta Phi Sorority. Sh? was 
South Dakota; and gunnery training at an active member of the Business So- 
Yuma, Arizona. He was sent overseas i ciety and of Theater Guild. Catherine 



in November, 1944. 
While at Susquehanna, Staff Ser- 



also participated in inter-class sports. 
Miss Fox is a well-known golfer, and 



geant Bittinger was enrolled in the | in 1943. sh? won the Marion Mlley 
Business Administration course and Memorial Trophy at Chicago. 



waS a member of the football team. 
He is a brother of Miss Frances Bit- 
tinger, a senior at Susquehanna. 



Lieut. Park was graduated from Rid- 
ley College in Ontario and attended 
New York University. 



Marian Willard, Senior 
Com. Student, Engaged 

Announcement has be«n made of the 
engagement of Miss Marian Willard, a 

| senior at Susquehanna, to 2/c P. O. 

j G:oirp Dowlin, now stationed at Pen- 
sacola, Florida. The young couple are 

' both from Coatesville, Pennsylvania, 
and became engaged during the Easter 

j vacation. 

Miss Willard, who is a Commercial 
Education student, has participated in 
many extra-curricular activities on 
campus. She is president of Kappa 
Delta Phi sorority, and a member of 
the Woman's Athletic Association, the 
Theater Guild, Alpha Psi Omega, the 
Business Society, the Inter-Sorority 
Council, Student Council, and the S. 
C. A. Cabinet. 

S. U wishes both of you the best that 
life has to offer. 



Phi Mu Delta Pledges 
Mitchell, Culp, Mould 

On Tuesday afternoon, April 3, 1945, 
Harry Welllver was formally initiated 
into the Mu Alpha Chapter of the Phi 
Mu Delta Fraternity. This was follow- 
ed on Saturday, April 7, by a pledging 
ceremony, during which time Charles 
W. Mitchell, Raymond D. Mould, and 
Harry F. Culp were pledged by the 
Alpha Chapter, with Brothers Weikel, 
Stahl, and Kocsis presiding. 

Although this group is not large it 
has been decided that a pledge master 
is needed to govern them and Roswell 
J. Johns was chosen to fill this post. 



DR. R. H. RIVENBURG, 
DR. HOH, SPEAKERS 
AT COMMENCEMENT 

The Commencement plans for the 
87th graduating class of Susquehanna 
University have been made public by 
President G. Morris Smith. 

Dr. Paul J. Hoh will preach the bac- 
calaureate sermon on Friday, May 25, 
at 7:30 p. m. in Trinity Lutheran 
Church. Dr. Hoh is the newly elected 
president of the Lutheran Theological 
Seminary at Philadelphia. He is a 
graduate of the University of Penn- 
sylvania and Philadelphia Seminary 
and for a number of years has been 
professor of Practical Theology at the 
Philadelphia Seminary. 

On Saturday morning, May 26, at 
10:00 p. m. the Commencement Exer- 
cises will be held in Seibert Chapel 
with Dr. R. H. Rivenburg, Dean and 
Vice President of Bucknell University, 
delivering the commencement address. 
Dr. Rivenburg is a graduate of Buck- 
nell, was honored by John B. Stetson 
(Concluded on Page 4) 



v >: . 



: €:- : 



PAGE TWO 



THE SUSQUEHANNA, SELINSGROVE. PENNSYLVANIA 



TUESDAY, APRIL 10, 1945 




n 



u 




<^ 



eh&nna 




CAMPUSOLOGY 



RlNE G. Winey, Jr., 
Jean C. Geicer, 



Establislied 1891 < 

'4G Editor 

'46 Associate Editor 

Gloria Gasparom, '46 Managing Editor 

Arthur J. Gelnett, '47 Sports Editor 

Reporters: Mary Elizabeth Basehoar, '45; Ruth Botdorf, '45, proofreader; Cor- 



The Hit Parade of songs for this week 
shows The Easter Parade to be tops 
with all of S. U. parading home or to 
some other metropolitan area— New 
York, Philly, and Llttlestown heading 
the list. Sara Lee Smith did "the" 
town with Joan Smith, while Radio 
City was the drawing card for Gayle, 
who visited Ruthie Williams, and for 
"Charlie" Walker. Jean Wheat met 
Dottie Macarow up there, and Ira's 
house .was full of Larry for the dur- 
ation of the vacation. "Ricky" went 
! home with Edith McConnel, and Philly 



OIUll.Il, tO, V^UIUUIIC iVlUltt.b, ' , . ,. _. Tn-«l««n ZXnllnnlr 

Ruth Criswell, '48; Roberta | caught a glimpse of Virginia Hallock 
h, '48; Margaret Johns, '48; ! too before she headed home. Didn t I 



inne Kahn, '45; Lavernc Kohn, '45; Louise Kresge, '45; Gloria Machmer, 

'45; Frances Bittinger, '45;. June Hoffman, '46; Jayne Troutman, '46; Norma 

Ha'zen, '46; Ruth Cochrane, '46; Emily Botdorf, '46; Marie Klick, '46; Vir- 
ginia Hallock, '46; Carmen Beck with, '46; Jackie Braveman, '47; Joe Taylor, 

'47; Jane Gundrum, '47; Dorothy Wagner, '47; Faye Smith, '47; Caroline 

Pfahler, '47; Doris Williamson, '47; Marian Walker, '47; Gayle Clark, '47; 

Martha Garard, '48; Helen Zahn, '48; Betty Smith, '48; Caroline Marks, 

'48; Bettv Frank, '48; Gioria Walmer, "48 

Gaetz, '48; Ed Madden, '48; Sara Lee Smith, 

Joan Smith, '48 • Harriet Gould, 48; John Warner, '45; Aldo Pescarmona, say something about another.big city/ 

•47- Caroline Graybill, '48. Oh, yes, Llttlestown was the place and 

Corinne Kahn, '45 Business Manager j that's where Corinne stayed with Mary 

Lib. Guess that about winds up the 
wanderings— for the rest of us it was 
| 'Home Sweet Home"!!! 

It's Lohengrin for our Kay who will 
tie the well-known knot two weeks 
hence, the 20th to be exact. The lucky 
Published semi-monthly throughout the school year, with the exception of I groom W ill be Lt. Gordon Park of the 

Thanksgiving, Christmas and Semester holidays, at a subscription rate of j Navy Air corps. The wedding bells 

$2.00 a year. 

Entered as second class mail matter at Selinsgrove, Pa 



Helen Eby, '47 -*- Advertising Manager 

Jean Kinzer. '46 Circulation Manager 

Business Assistants: Roswell Johns, 46; Ed Madden, '48; Russell Brown, '48; 
Betty Frank, '48; Cynthia Camel, '48; Jean Wheat, Barbara Kain, Hilda 
Mar key. 



Undoubtedly all of us have, at some j 
time in the past few weeks, noticed the 
men of the college in their most an- I 
cient shirts and patched trousers, ener- 
getically planting trees along the side 
Of the campus toward the railroad. 
There, under the direction of 
Stagg, the men have completed a pro- 



THE FORUM 



peeled for a couple of former S. U. 
kids— Helen Hocker and Glenn Schuler, 
Saturday, and that's where "Ben" and 
Lou went — Lou to be the Maid of Hon- 
or. And did you know Janie Laubach 
married that doctor of hers. 



Within the past several weeks the 
war in Europe has with lightning speed 
Coach approached its climax, and the popu- 
lar question of the day is, "When will 
the war with Germany close?" This 
ject which will greatly enhance the fjUEStion was asksd a nurn ber of stu- 

beauty of Susquehanna in the years to ^ets on ca mpus and here are the an- 
%ome. The spirit shown by the fellows | swers they they gave: 
in their willingness to help and in their | Norma Hazen— June 7. 



cooperation with Coach certainly ex- 
emplifies an interest in the improve- 
ment of the campus and a certain 
amount of pride in their alma mater. 
The group is to be commended, and in 
behalf of the student body and faculty, 
we say, "Thanks a lot fellows. You did 
a grand job;" J. C. G. 

' S 

In 'The Susquehanna' 

One Year Ago 

Business Society held an Open House. 

Students to present the operetta, 
"The Lost Necklace" April 25. 

The Ouija Board is telling all the 
answers such as Helen Eby will have 
to wait four years before she can get 
married, and Tony Payne will become 
rich just before he dies. 

Theatre Guild presented a one-act 
play, "Bird on Nellie's Hat." 

Who is THE MAN referred to in the 
Campusology column? 

There was a Sunday afternoon Open 
House at Phi Mu. 
Two Years Ago 

The Theatre Guild presented "Gas- 
light Theatre." 

The WSSF Drive opened on campus. 

The Soldier Show, "Barracks Var- 
ieties," was presented in Seibert Hall 
by the 35th C.T.D. 

Easter vacation begins Wednesday, 
April 21. 

Lois Kramer was elected SAI's new 
president for the forthcoming year. 

Herm Stuempfle was elected Prexy 
of the Junior class to replace Ralph 
Brown, who left for the service. 

Theta Chi moved back into their 



7 Wonder Why 

. . . Gloria Gasparoli was so excited 
about a certain sailor's being here on 
Campus this past weekend. Yes, we'll 
admit, Eve's getting better looking 
every time we see him. 
. . . Harry Welliver gets into so many 
people's dreams. Not that we can 
blame them. 

... Jean Wentzel is always talking 
about a certain person by the name of 
"My Bill." Yes, from all reports, we 
unri' rstand that she consistently 
dreams about him. 

. . . G. G. Roberts is wearing a Sunbury 
High School ring. Of course, that goes 
vice versa for the other party concern- 

1 ed, too. How about it, Jerry??? 

1 . . . Woodpeckers are the favorite birds 
of S. U.'s student body. 
... Tony Payne likes Saturday after- 
noon dates down at Reich's. Ditto for 
Saturday evenings, too. 
. . . Toby and Paula are so enthralled 
with their new tap dancing routine. 
But we'll all get to see lt the night of 
the Operetta. It's strictly "all-reet" 
from what we've seen of it so far. 
... So few student attend the S. C. A. 
meetings. You're really missing some- 
thing very worth while, you know. 
. . . There was so much excitement 
Saturday afternoon down at Hassinger. 
Could it have been Jean Wentley and 
her fiancee, Ralph, who caused it??? 
. . Caroline and Gay had so much 
fun Willi their sailor dates last Satur- 
day night. You're pretty good sports, 
kids. 

. . Louise Schlick makes such funny 
faces when sh? plays the violin. It 
must be the expression she wants to 
gel into the music or else it's a hang- 
over from the S. A. I. party, "An Even- 
inn in Paris." 

. . . Russ Brown has been looking so 
(Continued from Page 1) brlght and cneerfu i these past few 

air jerry Moore, Ray Mould and Harry j weeks. He mustn't have a care in the 

world. 

. . . Everybody is doing their best to 
summer jobs. It's a good sign. 



Joe Taylor— September 15. 
Naomi Garman— March 22, 1946 
Mr. Stauffer— June 10. 
Evelyn Wilhour— June 28. 
Franklin Wolfe— July 2. 
Jackie Braveman— April 24. 
Mary Ellen Wood— Feb. 26, 1946. 
Lenora Garman — June 15. 
Jean Kelly— June 20. 
Jean Kelton — June 15. 
Dottie Jupina— December 20. 
Aria Bilger— May 15. 
Mary Lizzio — October 15. 
Jack Warner — May 15. 
Ann Malkames — June 14. 
Pat Snyder— June 15. 
John Kocsis — August 21. 
Miss Unangst — April 30. 
Ruth Williams— July 15. 
Jayne Troutman — July 20. 
Ros Johns— July 16. 
Mary Lib Basehoar— May 
On vie Clark— May 31. 
Helen Lepley— July 22. 
Dot Eilhardt— September 1. 
Rubye Meyers— September 2. 
Harry Culp — July 1. 
Selent Lehman— September 3. 
Carmen Beckwith— August 10. 
Peggy Bathgate— September 1. 
Gloria Reichley— November 11. 
Rhodn Klemens— May 20. 
Dawn Ebert— July 30. 
Harriet Gould— May 13. 
S 



26. 



SPRING SPORTS PROGRAM 
PLANNED BY COACH STAGG 



And then there are those others sing- , 
ing "I Love You" and Just to prove it 
take a look at that ring on Marian's 
finger. You all saw George, the Sea- 
Bee, who forms the other half of that 
happy pair when he was here, didn't 
you? If you didn't, you're missing 
something!!! And for those of you 
who remember Jean Wentling, she's 
done it too and Ralph, the 1 man Fae 
Smith introduced her to last year Is 
the one to whom she is attached. It's 
fun being an old maid though— 

From Californ-i-a came a huge pack- 
age addressed to Miss Gayle Clark the 
other day, and my only regret is that 
I wasn't around to share some of the 
luscious California fruit therein. Who 
sent it? All I know is that he's a 
sailor. 

Poor Al's song as he plowed through 
the cards In Seibert Hall was Some 
Day I'll Find You. He wouldn't tell 
who his search hoped to reveal 'cause 
I might tell, but we fooled him, didn't 
we? 

Was' that Dig Down Deep we heard 
the ll'l boys singing as they excavated 
the terrain on the athletic field to pre- 
pare a place for the little trees that 
were just aching to be planted? 
Now I Know just how things stand be- 
tween Jerry and G. G. and Ann and 
Ross — it's Another One of Them 
Things. 

Now I'm All for Love but when it 
comes to playing Cupid and carrying 
notes from my eighth grade boys to 
Edith McC. I begin to draw the line. 
It seems she made quite a hit with 
them at the play and they haven't been 
able to settle down to history since. 

Aldo is one of those boys whose sing- 
ing of I'll Walk Alone is one of the' 
reasons why the gals around here have 
to spend their own money Saturday 
nights— and Boyer can be included 
here, too. And while we're on the sub- 
ject, how about the rest of you lone 
wolves giving the gals a break now and 
then? 

The Very Thought of You and all the 
boys give orders to Uncle Sam and 
come dashing up to see the object of 
their thoughts— Eve Is here again, and 
Dottie Jupina's boyfriend managed to 
get in for a few hours Sunday morn- 
ing. Then Carolyn Pfahler's friend — 
now of the Navy helped her to forget 
that Saturday Night is the loneliest 
night in the week. 

Florien Bilger made a very desperate 
attempt to make me think her trip 
home this weekend was made to see 
her parents, but after all the Easter 
vacation being so close behind sort of 
makes me think she had other plans — 
could it be her Silent Love? 

You're So Easy to Dance With very 
accurately describes just how Tony 
f sels about Paula, and that's very ob- 
vious, too. 

Both Rine and Hope are singing I'm 
a Little on the Lonely Side and to help 
matters along, Rine has been sending 
her letters by special delivery, no less 
(I wonder if he pays his sister any- 
thing?) 

There, I've Said It Again for another 
issue, so 'bye till I can get together 
some ,more Stuff Like That There. 

LaVerne 



WelUvtr, and several other freshmen. 
In addition to baseball, Coach Stagg 
expects to start a golf tournament Ap- 
ril 18th in which all male students of 
chapter home that was damaged by the campus are eligible for entrance, 
fire in December. < Oiu week following this the tennis 

Marian Willard's George brightened tournaments will start and continue 
h: r life with his presence last week- throughout this term. As soon as 
rncl w athfr permits the athletic staff of: 

3 the university expects to hold a sport 

—Be safe and sure— use V-mail in j period every Saturday afternoon from 
corresponding with service men | two to five. 



"SUSQUEHANNA" STAFF TO 
BE ELECTED ON FRIDAY 



get 

Gee 1 But this year has gone quickly, 
but I guess, the summer months will 
fly by just as quickly. 



(Contiued from Page 1) 
editorial advisor, Dr. Arthur H. Wilson. 
The new staff members will begin 
their activities by preparing the first 



Jack Larsen always blushes when ■ issue of The Susquehanna in May. The 
the girls smile at him. I offices to be filled are: Editor-in-Chief, 

Joe and Annie seem lost when \ Managing Editor, News Editor, Busi- 
they're out together. ' 1 ness Manager, Circulation Manager, 

. . . Betty Frank likes blue convertibles. Advertising Manager, Reporters, and 
But then, don't we all' ! Business Assistants. 



TUESDAY, APRIL 10, 1945 



THE SUSQUEHANNA, SELINSGROVE. PENNSYLVANIA 



PAGE THREE 



OUR FROSH 



MARTHA SHARWAKO, better 
known as "Marty," comes from Hazle- 
ton. Her hobby is writing to "Hen" 
and at the same time, her favorite 
branch of service is the Navy. Marty 
wants to be a lab technician doing hos- 
pital work when she leaves S. U. This 
small 5' 2" lass likes swimming, steak 
(barbecued), and a stuffed duck called 
"Myrtle." For reading she likes "Sev- 
enteen," "Mademoiselle," and "Rebec- 
ca." In the musical and movie world 
her favorites are Ronald Reagan, 
Vaughn Monroe, "Moonlight Serenade," 
and "I'll Remember April." 

ANNA SHEETZ, 5' 3", from Nazareth, 
likes basketball, softball, and hiking. 
She enjoys reading the "Popular 
Science Monthly," "The Robe," "Men 
Against Death," and "Arrowsmith." 
Anna is majoring in the pre-med 
course and expects to enter medical 
school after leaving here. Her hobby 
is blue-printing. She also likes Tom 
Drake,, Rita Haywarth, "Confessing," 
"Racing With the Moon," and bulldogs. 
In foods she likes chocolate pudding, 
lemon meringue pie, French fried po- 
tatoes, and steak. 

VELMA SHOOK, who hails from Pen 
Argyl, is 5' 6" tall. She is majoring in 
music and likes Tommy Dorsey and 
"How Many Times Do I Have to Tell 
You." She enjoys a football game, but 
for an active sport likes horseback rid- 
ing with her horse "Lady." The Army 
is her favorite branch as her brother 
is u part of it. The "Saturday Evening 
Post" and "Those" are her favorite 
reading material. She also likes any- 
thing chocolate and Van Johnson. 

BETTY SMITH is 5' 6 'I'" tall and is 
majoring in Mathematics. She claims 
Woodsboro, Md., as her hometown. 
Swimming is her favorite sport, but 
reading is her hobby. "Seventeen" and 
"Those" by Pearl Buck are favorites. 
Her special liked dish is baked maca- 
roni with cheese. In actors she likes 
John Hodiak and in bands, Tommy 
Dorsey. Betty expects to teach after 
college. She has visited Canada as far 
as the Canadian National Exhibition. 

JOAN SMITH, 5' 3" from Woods- 
mere, Long Island, likes tennis and 
horseback riding. She is majoring in 
Journalism and expects to take a post 
graduate course at Columbia. Her 
branch is the Air Corps due to the 
boyfriend. She likes the "Ladies Home 
Journal" and books by Jack London 
and Somerset Maugham. In food she 
likes ice cream and sea foods. Other 
favorites are Spencer Tracy, Bette 
Davis, Glenn Miller, "I'll Remember 
April," and a cocker spaniel dog. Trav- 
els included Cuba and Canada. 

SARA LEE SMITH, known as 
"Smitty," is 5" 6" tall, coming from 
Scranton. She is majoring in Psychol- 
ogy and wants to be a housewife. Her 
branch is also the Army Air Corps. 
Collecting foreign dolls is her hobby. 
She enjoys reading "Good Housekeep- 
ing" and "Gone With the Wind." Bob 
Walker, Glenn Miller, and "I Dream 
of You" rank high with her. Other 
favorites include swimming, steak, 
cherry pie, chocolate cake, and a pet 
dog. 

PAULINE SOLOMON, who comes 
from Cedarhurst, Long Island, is 5' IMi M 
tall. Her favorite branch is the Army 
Air Corps too. She is majoring in the 
Commercial Course Canoeing is her 
favorite sport. She likes any books 
by Cronin and "Better Homes and Gar- 
dens." Huge Juicy steaks sound very 
ii poetizing to her. Her favorite singer 
is Marilyn Myles. 



NEWS ON OUR CAMPUS 



Student Christian Association 

On Thursday evening, April 5, the 
regular meeting of the S. C. A. was 
held in the Social Rooms of Seibert 
Hall. 

Jean Geiger was in charge of the 
program for the evening. Harriet 
Gould sang "Ave Maria," and she was 
accompanied by Marie Klick. The mes- 
sage for the evening was delivered by 
Art Gelnett. He emphasized the fact 
that religion should be of prime im- 
portance in our lives. We must never 
be too busy for God. He reminded us 
that the door of life is ever gradually 
closing, and that we must not wait 
until the end of our lives to accept 
Christ. 

Pastor Heller announced that Sun- 
day, April 8, would be Young People's 
Sunday in Trinity Lutheran Church, 
and he invited all students to attend 
the service. 

Pastor Heller closed the meeting by 
pronouncing the bendiction. 



-S- 



— Obtain V Mail forms free rrom youj 
postmaster for fastest letters to sol 
lurs abroad. 



—Buy War Bonds and Stamps. 



Sigma Alpha Iota 

The newly elected officers of SAI for 
next year are: President, Dorothy Ster- 
na t; vice president, Elise Thompson; 
secretary, Janet Rohrbach; treasurer, 
Dorothy Jupina; chaplain, Marie Klick; 
editor, Anne Miller; and sergeant-at- 
arms, Emily Botdorf. The end of Ap- 
ril a visit from the Province President, 

[Mrs, Sue Sullivan, is expected. 

The party with the patronesses was 

j very successful. The old program of 
"An Evening in Paris," was presented 

| by th? request of the patronesses. A 

I very enjoyable evening was had by all, 

At the Stanley 

Mon., Tues., April 9, 10, "Lost In a 
Harem," (Met) Abbot and Costello 
are at it again. 

Wed., April 11, "Three's a Family," (U. 
A.) Sol Lesser gets all mixed up with 
twins in a New York apartment at 
that. Plenty of babies! 

Thurs.- Sat., April 12-14, "Thirty Sec- 
onds Over Tokyo," (Met) The drama, 
pathos, and tragedy of Jimmy Doo- 
little's (Spencer Tracy) trail-blazing 
bombing in 1942 faithfully told. The 
story tells of hero Ted Lawson (Van 
Johnson) one of the actual pilots, and 
Phyllis Thaxter as his wife. A thrill- 
er, I'd say! 

Mon., Tues., April 16, 17, "Tall in the 
Saddle," (RKO), John Wayne in the 
saddle again in a typical Westerner 
in the best sagebrush tradition. Bet- 
ter than usual. 

Wed., Thurs., April 18, 19, "Sunday Din- 
ner for a Soldier," (Pox) When a 
lone soldier (John Hodiak) spends 
the day with a family including a 
marriageable girl (Anne Baxter) 
Well! the rest is up to you. 
Also "Fighting: Lady," (color) an air- 
craft carrier's career, not likely to be 
beaten. 

Pri., Sat., April 20, 21, "Hollywood Can- 
teen," <WB) including Joan Leslie, 
Robert Hutton, Bette Davis, etc., with 
Roy Rogers singing the well known 
"Don't Fence Me In." For a collec- 
tion of stars, don't miss it! 

AT THE STRAND 
fMon.-Wed.. April 9-11, "Sunday Din- 
ner for a Soldier," also "Fighting 
Lady." 

Thurs.-Sat., April 12-14 "Bring on the 
Girls," including Eddie Bracken, Ver- 1 
onica Lake, and Sonny Tufts. 

Mon., Tues., April 16, 17, "Practically; 
Yours," with Claudette Colbert and! 
Fred MacMurray. , 

Wed.-Sat., April 18-21, "National Vel- 1 
vet," featuring Elizabeth Taylor, j 
Mickey Rooney, Donald Crisp, and ! 
Anne Revere. 



and the sorority wishes to thank the 
patronesses for making possible such a 
pleasant party, 

S 

Kappa Delta Phi 

On Tuesday evening, April 3, at 8:00 
an April Fool's party was given to the 
active members of Sigma Alpha Iota 
and Omega Delta Sigma by the active 
members of Kappa Delta Phi. Many 
were fooled when they proceeded to 
the sorority room only to find that 
the party was to be held in the social 
rooms. Here everyone had refresh- 
ments and were entertained by mem- 
bers of K. D. P. 

A buffet supper for the active mem- 
bers will be held on Thursday, April 12. 

— S 

Pi Gamma Mu 

The Pennsylvania Gamma Chapter 
of Susquehanna Uiversity of the Na- 
tional Pi Gamma Mu met last night 
at the home of Dr. Theodore Kretsch- 
mann. 

The regular business meeting was 
conducted by the president, Rine Win- 
ey. Final plans were made to have a 
dinner meeting in May at the Colonial 
Tea Room. 

Mr. Harold Bolig, principal of the 
Pine Street School, gave a very inter- 
esting talk about his activities with the 
Red Cross in Italy. A general round 
table discussion followed and many 
points were stressed about the activi- 
ties of the Red Cross. Refreshments 
were then served. 



jSU DEBATERS AT CONVENTION 

(Continued from Page 1) 
adopted the majority report on volun- 
tary means of solving labor disputes. 
Susquehanna was on the majority. 

Before the convention was dismissed, 
officers were elected for the convention 
next year. On Tuesday evening, April 
10, at 8:00 p. m. the debating team will 
broadcast a fifteen minute program 
oyer station WKOK, Sunbury. 



WHITMER-STEELE 
COMPANY 

LUMBER MANUFACTURERS 
NORTHUMBERLAND, PA. 



MILLER'S 

Where Ed's and Co-Ed's Meet 
For Many Good Things to Eat 

Corner Pine and Orange Streets 
3 Blocks from Campus 



—Buy War Bonds and Stamps. 



MILLER BROS. 
SHOE STORE 

SUNBURY, PA. 



George B. Rine FLORIST 



nouss 32-Y 
STORK 145-T 



The First National Bank of Selins Grove 

WELCOMES STUDENTS' ACCOUNTS 



Fine Job Printing 
THE SELINSGROVE TIMES 




Quality Only the Finest 

NATIONAL RESTAURANT 

Hotel and Dining Service 



5:9 N. Market St. 



Sellnsgrove, Pa. 




For School News Read 

SUNBURY DAILY ITEM 



SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

SELINSGROVE, PENNSYLVANIA 

Co-educational— Accredited 

For more than elghty-slx years In the service of Christian higher 
education. 



Curricula: 

LIBERAL ARTS BUSINESS 

COMMERCIAL EDUCATION 



MUSIC 



For Catalog write 

Q. Morris Smith, D.D., LL.D., Pres. 
Russell Gait, Ph.D., Dean 



PAGE FOUR 



THE SU8QUEHANNA, SELINSGROVE. PENNSYLVANIA 



A Former SU Air 
Student Speaks 



Fight Officer Frederick E. Machmer 
brought back to SPlinsgrove this week 
one of the kind of stories our people 
like to hear. • 

F/O Machmer rrlated that at Chil- 
dress Army Air Field he and a casual 
acquaintance were walking along the 
runway to their planes, when their 
conversation turned to a paying of re- 
spects to that arid section of Texas. 
Remarked his companion: 

"Of all the places I have been in 
this war, I found a little town in Penn- 
sylvania the most to my liking. I 
passed several months there as an 
aviation student in a CTD at a small 
university." 

"Where was that?' - inquired F/O 
Machmer. 

"Susquehanna University, Selins- 
grove," was the reply. 

"We'll shake on that," exclaimed our 
townsman, "that's my home." 

In the hustle of the loading the. men 
were separated at that instant, but they 
met at twilight and engaged in a pleas- 
ant review of reviews of this part of 
the Susquehanna Valley. 

"I hope to return to Selinsgrove to 
complete my college education," de- 
clared the praiser of these parts. "That 
beautiful sector is my idea of God's 
country. The people of the town were 
so cordial I will never forget their 
kindnesses. Needless to say, I was most 
favorably impressed with the Univer- 
sity too." 

He was F'O Jeremiah S. Mann, of 
Palbermarle, North Carolina. 

—Reprinted from The Selinsgrove 
Times-Tribune. 

S 

MARCH STAMP DRIVE 
GREAT SUCCESS 



two weeks and a little below 95% for 
one week. The large freshman class 
finished the final weeks with about the 
same percentage as the first week 
(98%), making 93% the'second week. 

Last month's success should make the 
chive in April much easier. Remember 
the goal is 1007c participation. Perhaps 
your stamp— and yours— and yours will 
go toward that jeep for the final push 
Oil Berlin! 

-S- 



MEN'S STUDENT COUNCIL 
REAUTIFIES CAMPUS 



(Continued from Page 1) 
tion average of 96% was only 1'; be- 
low that of the previous week. 

Student body participation during 
the four weeks of the drive stayed above 
95% , the faculty participation, which 
began at 80'", almost hit the 90% line 
the last two weeks. Total faculty sulcs 
for all three weeks wore $59430; total 
student sales, $331.87. 

The junior class had the highest 
participation in the student body. It 
had 100% participation for each of the 
three weeks. Following on the heels of 
the juniors were the sophomore and 
senior classes, both averaging 100''; for 



FEHR'S 



THE STORE THAT LEADS 
IN BETTER MERCHANDISE 



HOTEL GOVERNOR 
SNYDER 



GOOD HOME COOKING 



CRYSTAL PURE ICE 

CHARLES W. KELLER 

Manufacturer and Wholesaler 



HACKETTS 

Hardware Stores 

325 Market St., 706 Market St. 
ALSO MIDDLEHURG, PA. 



i IL BOOK STORE 

SUSQUEHANNA 
NOTEBOOKS 
STATIONERY 



TUESDAY, APRIL 10, 1945 



The Council wishes to "thank Coach 
Stagg, who has given freely of his time 
and efforts to assist in the planting of 
thess trees as well as Mr. A. D. Goug- 
ler who gave a large number of the 
trees and to all the men students on 
campus who aided in the work. Fin- 
ally it should be remembered that these 
trets were placed in memory of the 
1940 football team of Susquehanna 
University. 

s 

DR. R. H. RIVENBURG, DR. HOH 
SPEAKERS AT COMMENCEMENT 



ception on the lawn of the Presidents* 
home. At the evening meal the class 
will be inducted into the SU Alumni 
Association. 

Following Commencement Exercises 
on Saturday, at 12:10 the Trustees' 
Dinner will be held in Horton Dining 
Hall for the class, parents, frieds, and 
faculty. 



(Continued from Page 1) 
line of trees was placed around the low- 
er part of the girls' hockey field while 
; right other trees were used to outline 
I the form of the triangle formed by the 
I fork of the road between the gymnas- 
jium and the hockey field. This tri- 
angle is to honor those men of Sus- 
; quehanna who have given their lives 
I in the present conflict. Other trees 
were placed individually around the 
campus, such as the one at the en- 
trance to the day students room in 
Hassinger Hall. 

Already the trees have added to the 
beauty of Susquehanna's campus and 
when they reach heights of ten and 
twelve feet they will greatly enhance 
the pictorial beauty of our campus. 

The members of the Men's Student; 
Council in charge of the planting of 
these trees were: Jack Warner, presi- 
dent; Celo Leitzel, vice president; Rine 
Winey, secretary-treasurer; and John 
Kocsis, Robert Surplus, Frank Wolfe, 
Roswcll Johns, and Bernard Swiencki. 
Dr. Russel Gilbert is the faculty advis- 
or. 



(Continued from Page 1) 
, University in 1928 with the LL.D., de- 
gree. In 1923 he was appointed dean 
. at Bucknell. Besides his work at Buck- 
nell he has been very prominent in j 
I higher education in Pennsylvania and i 
1 has held a number of important po- j 
sitions in the academic world. 

On Thursday evening, May 24, there 
may be a Commencement Party in the 
gymnasium by the graduating class, 
but it is not as yet definite. 

On Friday, at 12:30 p. m., President I 
Smith will have his annual Luncheon! 
for the seniors at which time the class 
will announce its gift to the school. At 
5:00 p. m. the class, with parents, 
friends, and Alumni will meet for a re- 



B.K.W. COACH LINE 

Tries to give the College Students 
the best service, especially the Sun- 
bury Students. Why TRAVEL with 
an individual? The Coach Line In- 
sures every person. THINK THAT 
OVER. 



STONER'S 
CREDIT JEWELERS 



SUNBURY, PA. 



F. A. BRILL CO. 

Floor Coverings-— Awnings — Shades 
Draperies 

419 Market St. Phone 2180 Sunbury 



SNAVELY'S 

COLLEGE FURNISHINGS 
AND SHOES 



Ebert's 5c to $1.00 
Store 

Susquehanna Stationery 
SELINSGROVE 



SCHOOL FASHIONS 

ROSENBLUM'S 

SUNBURY. PA- 
SMART FEMININE APPAREL 



CHILDREN'S SHOP 

MARY IL BURNS 
Clothes for the College Girl 



Markley-Altvater 

BETTER STUDENTS CLOTHES 
SUNBURY, PA. 



VISIT THE 

REXALL 
DRUG STORE 

WILLIAM J. COTT. Druggist 



WATCH REPAIR 

Susquehanna Jewelry 
Fountain Pens and Pencils 

W.M.VALSING 

JEWELER SELINSGROVE, PA. 



THE BON TON 

Personally Selected 

COATS, DRESSES, HATS 

Sunbury, Pa. 



When you think of Photography 
Think of 

Schindler Studio 

515 Market Street, Sunbury, Pa. 
Also Framing and Photo Finishing 



REICHLEY'S 

WHERE STUDENTS 
MEET AND EAT 



STEFFEN'S 

FINE FOODS— STATIONERY 

Greetinc Cards for Every Oooaaion 

SELINSGROVE, PA. 



Yes- 
Women To ... . 

buy Retirement In- 
come Policies from 
Lutheran Brother- 
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absolutely guaran- 
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will leave you as free 
from care and worry. 
A guaranteed income 
will make living a 
Joy when retirement 
years are reached. 



Lutheran Brotherhood 



MINNEAPOLIS, 2, 



430 Market St. 



Legal Reserve Life Insurance For Lutherans 
Herman L. Ekern, President 



MINNESOTA 



H. L. ROTHFUSS, Agent Willi amsport, Pa. 



BUILD YOUR 
ESTATE NOW I 



YOUR FUTURE 
STARTS TODAY 



u 



RIBBONS TO— 

Sigma Alpha Iota and 
Theta Chi upon winning 
the Scholastic Recognition 
Cups. 



n 



U 




RAZZES TO— 

Those persons who have 
as yet not purchased their 
April War Stamps. 



Volume Lin 



SELINSGROVE, PENNSYLVANIA, TUESDAY, APRIL 24, 1945 



Number 14 



All Soldier Orchestra to Present Concert 

6peretta/"Ghosts of URT GELNETT TO HETdIUSQUEHANNA^ 



Hilo," Dances Score 
Great Success at SU 



"Ah — what a lovely princess!" "What 
horrible ghosts!" No, these aren't ex- 
cerpts from some fairy tales, but in- 
stead they are remarks that could be 
heard amongst the members of the ap- 



MARIE KLIGK ELECTED WSC PRESIDENT 



Marj Barton Business Mgr. 



The 1945-46 Susquehanna Staff was 
elected Friday, April 21, by the Sus- 
quehanna Publishing Association. The 
new Staff shall assume their duties 

preciative audience that enjoyed the I with the next issue of the Susquehanna. 

performance of "The Ghosts of Hilo," j The Editor for next year is Arthur 



an operetta by Paul Bliss, on Friday 
evening, April 20, at 8:15. 

The story of "The Ghosts of Hilo," 
takes place in a glen near Hilo, a town 
on one of the Hawaiian Islands. The 
superstitious residents of Hilo are cele- 
brating the Feast of Laka, as they do 
each year. It was at such a celebration 
a few years before that a little girl had 
been found in the glen. The Princess 
of Hilo took the child and brought her 
up as her own sister. The "Little Sis- 
ter," as the child is called, and her 
governess, Maile, *a sorceress, don't get 
along very well together, and their con- 
stant bickering creates many amusing 
sequences for the inhabitants of Hilo. 
(Concluded on Page 4) 



J. Gelnett, a junior day student from 
Selinsgrove. Mr. Gelnett is also a 
prominent member of Theta Chi Fra- 
ternity, the Debater's Club, the Stu- 
dent Christian Association, and the 
Biemic Society. He is an ex-service 
man. 

Jacqueline Braveman, a sophomore, 
of New York City, is Managing Editor. 
Jean Kelly, also of the sophomore class, 
of Goshen, New York, is the News Edi- 
tor. 

Miss Marjorie Barton, a Junior from 
Williamsport, is the Business Manager 
of the paper. Miss Barton is a mem- 
ber of Omega Delta Sigma, the Busi- 



Stapleton Judiciary Head 



Elections for student council mem- 
bers for 1945-1946 were held from 8:30 
to 12:00 noon on Thursday, April 12. 
The results were as follows: president, 
Marie Klick; judiciary chairman, Mar- 
jorie Stapleton; house president, Betty 
Jane Herr; social chairman, Helen Eby; 
and publicity chairman, Jean Wheat. 
The day student representative is Nor- 
ma Jane Hazen. 

Miss Klick. junior conservatory stu- 
dent from Wind Gap, is very active in 
religious groups on campus and in the 
Susquehanna Area. She is also promi- 
nent in other campus activities. 

Miss Stapleton, also a conservatory 
student, is from Williamsport, and a 
member of the cabinet of S. C. A., 
Theatre Guild, and Alpha Psi Omega, 
and the concert orchestra. 

Both Miss Herr, of Hazleton, and 
Miss Eby, of Newport, are sophomore 



ness Society, Theatre Guild, Alpha Psi j Commercial Education students, while 
(Concluded on Page 4) (Concluded on Page 4) 

<S>~ — • 



Bob Cox , x'46 } Arnold Meszaros, x'46, Killed; 
Jack Boyer Cited for Gallantry; Sheetz Liberated 

■ — — — — ■ < 

DEBATE TEAM OF 
PENN STATE VISITS 
SU; TO DEBATE FRI. 



<S>Sgt. Robert Cox 

Sgt. Robert Cox, x'46, of Newport, 
Pa., has been listed among the Susque- 
hana men who have given their lives 
for their country. A telegram was re- 
ceived by his parents on April 12, stat- 
ing that Bob was killed in action on 
March 31st somewhere in Germany. 

Bob graduated from Newport Union 
High School in 1942 and entered Sus- 



On Friday, April 27 at 8 o'clock the hanna that fall He took the LJb 
Susquehanna University debate team ^ ^ course and had planned to 



will be host to the Penn State Women's 
debate team. There will be two de- 
bates, both held in Steele Science. In 
one, our affirmative will refute their 
negative, and in the other our negative 
will refute their affirmative. 

Our affirmative team consists of Celo 
Leitzel and Naomi Garman and our 
negative of Gloria Gasparoli and Ar- 
thur Gelnett. The question to be de- 
( Concluded on Page 3) 
S 

Bond & Key Pledges 2; 
Narayan An Honorary 

On Monday evening, April 2, 1945, 
at 8 p. m. Jack C Larsen and Ronald 
H. Boyer were made pledges of Bond 
and Key at investure ceremonies at 
the club home. 

Larsen is a first semester freshman, 
having entered SU the beginning of this 
semester. His home is in New York 
City and he is taking the Business Ad- 
ministration course. 

Boyer is a sophomore whose home 
is in Pillow, Pa. He is a Liberal Arts 
student. 

On Monday evening, April 16, Ongkar 
Narayan became an Honorary of Bond 
and Key. Frank Wolfe presided at the 
meeting. Ongkar is a native of British 
Guiana and is taking the pre-med 
course at SU. He is residing at the 
Governor Snyder Hotel. 



major in chemistry. Bob was a mem- 
ber of Theta Chi Fraternity. 

Sgt. Cox became a member of the 
Army Reserve and left Susquehanna 
with a contingent of S. U. fellows in 
February, 1943. His basic training was 



Huertjen Forest battle as a volunteer 
in wiping out an enemy machine gun 
emplacement. He was hospitalized in 
Britain, returning to the front line on 
February 28, 1945, and was killed March 
3, 1945. While he was in Britain he 
met a former SU classmate, Sgt. Rob- 
ert Fisher, of Selinsgrove. 

When Arnold was on campus, he was 
guard on the 1942 football team. He 
was a member of Phi Mu Delta fra- 
ternity and was enrolled in the Liberal 
Arts course. 

Private Meszaros was a graduate of 
Irvington High School, Irvington-on- 
Hudson, N. Y., and is the eighth Sus- 
quehanna man to be killed in the pres- 
ent conflict. 



received at Camp Seibert, Ala., Ala- j sgt. Jack Boyer 



bama Polytechnic Institute, and Geor- 
gia University. Bob left for overseas 
August 8, 1944. 
Pvt. Arnold Meszaros 

Pvt. Arnold Meszaros who attended 
Susquehanna during the school year of 
1942-1943, and left February, 1943, when 
the Army Reserve was called, is listed 
among those giving his life for his 
country. 

He was wounded Nov. 18, 1944 in the 



Word has been received by Mr. and 
Mrs. Levi Boyer of Sunbury that their 
son, Jack, x'46, has been awarded a 
citation for gallantry in action. Sgt. 
Boyer is a member of the Parachute 
Engineers and was given the citation 
for the efficiency, and coolness with 
which he led his men while under 
heavy fire by the enemy. 

Jack graduated from Sunbury High 
(Concluded on Page 3) 



. $ 

Business Society Holds Open House at Phi Mu 



On Saturday evening, April 21, from 
8 to 11:30 p. m. the Business Society 
of SU held its second annual spring 
party at Phi Mu Delta Fraternity 
House. 

Dancing in the parlors to the tunes 
of many of the name bands was the 
highlight of the evening for many, 
while others found the ping-pong table 
to be equally entertaining. Then too, 
what party on campus would be com 



During the entire party punch was 
served, and then later in the evening 
delicious refreshments of sandwishes, 
pickles, punch, cookies, and mints were 
served In the dining room on decorated 
tables. 

In addition to the large number of 
business students and guests attending 
were the chaperons, Miss Allison and 
Professor Reitz. 

Much credit should be extended to 



Concert in Conjunction 
With War Loan Rally 

Will Present Treasury Flag 



On Friday evening, April 27, at 8 p. 
m„ In Seibert Chapel, Susquehanna, as 
well as the residents of Selinsgrove will 
have the opportunity of hearing "The 
Infantry Concert Group," an all sol- 
dier orchestra consisting of 17 enlisted 
men. 

This concert, which Is in recognition 
of the participation that Snyder Coun- 
ty has given In the past six War Loan 
Drives, will also feature a short ad- 
dress by a Lieutenant of the United 
States Army who has only shortly re- 
turned from overseas. The Snyder 
County Chairman of the War Finance 
Committee, Mr. J. G. Thompson, Jr., 
of Middleburg, emphasized the fact 
that there will be no bonds sold or 
pledges taken at the rally, but pointed 
(Concluded on Page 3) 



APRIL WAR STAMP 
DRIVE NETS $116.95, 
87%PARTICIPATI0N 



About $117 in war bonds and stamps 
were purchased during the April drive 
which was conducted last week with a 
student participation of 87%. The Jun- 
ior class, tops in the March competi- 
tion, clinched the title again with 100% 
participation; the sophomores had 88%, 
the seniors 85% and the freshmen 80%. 
Beginning this week, a booth operated 
by Margie Barton, will be open one 
night a week after supper for those 
persons who have not as yet bought 
their stamp for the month of April. 

The Business Society is responsible 
for the purchase of the Treasury De- 
partment flag now hanging in the rear 
of Seibert Auditorium. It has not been 
placed on the flag pole because of the 
thirty day observance and national 
mourning for the late President Roose- 
velt. 

Plans are already being formulated 
for the May Drive which will be held 
near the beginning of the month. Be 
sure and fill up your book by buying a 
stamp every week at the booth; give 
your money promptly to the collector 
next month. Keep faith with your> 
country's future and buy bonds! 



plete without the ouija board telling all the men at Phi Mu for their hospltal- 
the answers, and judging from some \ ity. and to all who worked hard to 
of the howls of laughter the ouija board make the party such an enjoyable suc- 
was telling all. cess. 



SAI, Theta Chi Receive 
Scholastic Award Cups 

In Academic Recognition Day Exer- 
cises in chapel on Monday, April 23, 
Dean Gait presented the sorority and 
fraternity scholastic cups. 

SAI's president, Dorothy Sternat ac- 
cepted the cup for her sorority which 
had a scholastic average of 1.87. In 
second place was KDP and then ODS. 
KDP had won the cup last year. 

Theta Chi took permanent possession 
of the fraternity cup this year by win- 
I nlng it three successive years. Their 
president, Jack Warner, accepted the 
cup. Theta Chi had a 2.11 average, 
while Bond and Key was second fol- 
lowed by Phi Mu Delta. 



PAGE TWO 



THE SUSQUEHANNA, SEUNSOROVE. PENNSYLVANIA 



TUESDAY, APRIL 24, 1945 




n 




souetonnu 




CAMPUSOLOGY 



Established 1891 
Rine G. Winey, Jr., '46 -- Editor 

Jean C. Geicer, '46 Associate Editor 

Gloria Gasparoli, '46 Managing Editor 

Arthur J. Gelnett, '47 Sports Editor 

Reporters: Mary Elizabeth Basehoar, '45; Ruth Botdorf, '45, proofreader; Cor- 
inne Kahn, '45; Laverne Kohn, '45; Louise Kresge, '45; Gloria Machmer, 
'45; Frances Bittinger, '45; June Hoffman, '46; Jayne Troutman, '46; Norma 
Hazen, '46; Ruth Cochrane, '46; Emily Botdorf, '46; Marie Klick, '46; Vir- 
ginia Hallock, '46; Carmen Beckwith, '46; Jackie Braveman, '47; Joe Taylor, 
'47; Jane Gundrum, '47; Dorothy Wagner, '47; Faye Smith, '47; Caroline 
Pfahler, '47; Doris Williamson, '47; Marian Walker, '47; Gayle Clark, '47; 
Martha Garard, '48; Helen Zahn, '48; Betty Smith, '48; Caroline Marks, 
'48; Betty Frank, '48; Gloria Walmer, '48; Ruth Criswell, '48; Roberta 
Gaetz, '48; Ed Madden, '48; Sara Lee Smith, '48; Margaret Johns, '48; 
Joan Smith, '48; Harriet Gould, '48; John Warner, '45; Aldo Pescarmona, 
'47; Caroline Graybill, '48. 

Corinne Kahn, '45 - Business Manager 

Helen Eby, '47 Advertising Manager 

Jean Kinzer, '46 Circulation Manager 

Business Assistants: Roswell Johns, '46; Ed Madden, '48; Russell Brown, '48; 
Betty Frank, '48; Cynthia Carmel, '48; Jean Wheat, Barbara Kain, Hilda 
Markey. 



Published semi-monthly throughout the school year, with the exception of 
Thanksgiving, Christmas and Semester holidays, at a subscription rate of 
$2.00 a year. 

Entered as second class mail matter at Selinsgrove, Pa. 



THE MASTHEAD CHANGES 

With this issue of "The Susque- 
hanna," the 53rd chapter has been com- 
pleted in the existance of our school 
paper. Yes, through three wars, times 
of prosperity and depression The Sus- 
quehanna has continued to go to press 
and reported the news of our school. 

Many times that news has been 
cheerful and good and made us happy, 
but within the past several years we 
have had to read stories that have 
brought sadness to us— stories that we 
wish would not need to be published 
or read, for they have carried the news 
of our classmates and friends who have 
paid the supreme sacrifice. 

Our school paper this year has not 
been as large, nor has it been published 
as frequently as it used to be but 
nevertheless we feel proud and humble 
of our task. We have made mistakes, 
received criticism; had successes, and 
received praises, but our only hope is 
that the enjoyment you received in 
reading the paper was as much as the 
pleasure we had in editing it. 

Our most sincere thanks go to all 
who have worked hard in making the 
success of the paper possible— to every 
reporter and every business assistant. 
And then, to our new editor and the 
other members of the new staff, may 
we extend our best wishes that the 
forthcoming issues of "The Susque- 
hanna" will be better than any in the 
past. R- W. 
S 

FRANKLIN D. ROOSEVELT 

On April 12, 1945 at 6:00 p. m., small 



) did when he was living. We shall never 
i forget and fail to feel proud of having 
lived in these United States under such 
fine leadership. Now we must turn our 
eyes on the new President, and devote 
our full cooperation and loyalty to him. 
At this time no Job could be as difficult 
as the one President Truman now faces. 
Let us all, as Americans, realize our 
loss, but at the same time look to the 
future with hope and faith in our 
hearts. G. G. 



Well, stoodents, this is the last time 
I'll be hanging over the back fence and 
gossiping about this and that — hope 
you've enjoyed it as much as I have. 
But before I go, there are a few things 
I'd like to tell you. 

Seems to me like I ought to suggest 
you keep your eyes on a new couple 
arising on the S. U. horizon— Marge 
Barton and Art Gelnett. It started 
with that Theta Chi Open House and 
has been blossoming ever since. '(Edi- 
tor's Note) And then there's that 
couple you haven't been hearing much 
about in Campusology lately. Maybe 
LaVerne is too modest to mention it, 
but everyone knows that Charlie and 
she are getting along verr-rry well. 

And while I'm on the subject of blos- 
soms, did you know that every time 
Hilda goes home, Johnny presents her 
with a corsage to make sure she doesn't 
forget that he's back here, better than 
a string around the finger, I'd say!!/ 
And say, what a cute little number that 
sister of John's is' Hope you girls 
all put a ball and chain around your 
men! 

May I be so bold as to ask right out 
in public whether there is a lipstick 
shortage too? Or is it the style to go 
around without it so upon occasions it 
won't be conspicuous by its absence? 
Couldst tell me, Max and Adele? 

What gives with Angle and Dave? 



1 Wonder Why 

. . . Mary Lib and Corinne had such a 
swell time Sunday afternoon. Yes, 
we'll agree, the Navy blue sure is tops. 
. . . Smith and Walker are fooling 
around with "peach fuzz." 

. . . Peggy Bathgate was "blooming" 
Saturday night at the Phi Mu Busi- 
ness Society Openhouse. Yes, we do 
believe in that time-honored proverb, 
Say it with flowers." 
. . . Alvin Glanzberg is so handy at 
phony Hall in New York with Jose j climbing through windows to aid ladles 
Iturbi conducting, Jimmy Durante sup- 
plying the fun. A little girl (Margar 



-S- 



At the Stanley 



April 23 - 25, Mon. - Wed., "Music for 
Millions" (Met) Backstage at Sym- 



in distress 

Jack Larsen looked so glum this 
et O'Brien) looking for her sister (June 1 weekend. Could it have been because 



Allyson). Really, it's a picture you 
can't miss. 

April 26 - 27, Thurs - Fri— "Keys of 
the Kingdom" (Fox) A heartwarm- 
ing story of the life of a priest (Greg- 
ory Peckl with all his trials of life as 
a Chinese missionary. The best movie 
in months. 



Helen was at Kings Point, New York?? 
. . . Scrubbing and buffing was so In- 
tense after the operetta Friday night. 
They tell me that the make up was 
rather difficult to remove. In case 
you're interested as to what the, "Ha- 
waiian girls" used on their arms and 
legs, it was leg paint. 



April 28, Sat., "Melody Trail" (Rep.) ... Harriet. Betty, Carolyn, and Gay 



Sounds like some good old-fashioned 

western tunes. We'll have to go find 

out. 

April 30, May 1, "Practically Yours" 

(Para) A Navy hero's "last words" 
can prove quite embarrassing when he 
turns up alive, but Fred MacMurray 
and Claudette Colbert straighten that 
all out! 

May 2, Wed., "Paris After Dark" (Fox) 
What could this movie be all about? 
You'll have to see for yourself. 
May 3, .4, .Thurs., Fri., "Bring on the 

Girls" (P&ra) (Color) When Eddie 
Bracken inherits two hundred million, 



had such a good time at their picnic 
last Sunday evening. Yes, food does 
taste extremely delicious cooked out 
over an open fire. 

. . . Ira can't make up his mind be- 
tween Corinne Prey and Joan Reyner. 
. . . Toby and Paula didn't have an 
encore for us Friday night. Kids, your 
dance was a riot »! 

... All the girls are crazy about pinch- 
ing Dave's cheeks. Go ahead, girls, try 
it Dave won't mind in the least! 
. . . Jean Wentzel was so glad to see 
her brother, David, this past Sunday 
afternoon. Motorcycles certainly are 



groups of students could be seen on | wUh % gold . dlgger like veronica Lake j handy things for traveling these days, 
Susquehanna's campus talking in hush- i on nis tra u something is bound to hap- aren't they?? 



ed voices. Some of the students wept 

silently, others muttered mute prayers, 

and all of them felt the heaviness 

within their hearts. They were all 

mourning the death of the President of I you Just can't miss this latest sensa 

the United States, Franklin D. Roose-I tion! But it's up to you. 



pen. The appearance of Marjorie Rey- 1 . . . Marie Stout was so excited the 
nolds settles things. Doesn't sound j other day after looking in her mail box 
bad! ana " finding a post card. Oh, yes, seems 

May 5, Sat., "Sing Me a Song of Tex- i to me that the post card was signed 
as (Col.) For a lively Saturday night "Love, Bruce." Enuf said!! 



velt. We here at Susquehanna are just 
a few of the millions of people all over 
the world who felt the great loss that 
has befallen us. 

Perhaps now after the President's 
death, so unfortunate to mankind, we 
realize his worth even more than we 



AT THE STRAND 

April 23-25, Mon. - Wed. "Together 
Again" 

April 26-28, Thurs. - Sat., "For Whom 
the Belts Toll" 

April 30 - May 1. Mon., Tues. "Be- 
tween Two Women" 

May 2. 3, Wed., Thurs., "None But the 
Lonely Heart" 



. . . Betty Reisch's favorite song is "I 
Love to Whistle." 

. . . Bobby Kain enjoys playing Gin 
Rummy. She's so wild about the game 
that she'll even make her own deck to 
play with. 

. . . Ruthie Cochrane was so embar- 
rassed during the Daldans Friday 
night. Well, Bob, you needn't have sat 
there in the front row roaring with 
laughter. 



Reminds me a little of a stop and go 
light — off and on— till I can't figure 
out what the score is! Dave seems to 
be rapidly developing into a play-boy 
giving all the girls a break/! And 
Angle isn't doing so badly either what 
with that Sunbury soldier taking her 
for a spin to enjoy the fine Spring 
breeze!!!! 

The party at Phi Mu brought out 
some of those hibernating wolves like 
Dex who took care of Gloria Walmer, 
and Roy Stahl with B. J. Fisher. Saw 
Edie and Ray there too — glad to see 
that little affair is back on the ball 
again. Jack Larsen. dropped Into show 
everybody his sad and lost look—it was 
obvious that Helen had gone away for 
the weekend. "Doc" and Al were trip- 
ping the light fantastic too while Peggy 
and Harry were planning their future 
by the Ouija board. Dave Kemberling 
came in alone but left with Ruthie. 

I'm still looking for a beautiful blond 
about so high who conies from the 
same town as one of the two sailors 
that came from Bucknell to Investigate 
conditions at S. U. two Saturdays ago. 
That was the description he gave me 
anyway, but we couldn't And her so 
they just spent the evening in Seibert's 
parlors and at Reich's keeping all th» 
girls happy. If any of you females 
think you fit the specifications, just 
get in touch with Bob! Oh, how about 
those two that came down to see Mary 
Lib and Corinne? You'll see them 
again at the dance — pretty snazzy blind 
dates, agree??? 

I've heard rumors to the effect that 
Herbie and Pauline were getting quite 
friendly these days, and also some 
about Rhoda's mysterious admirer who 
takes up a lot of her time — these ru- 
mors | ! ! ! 

Jack Warner doesn't believe in put- 
ting all his eggs in one basket — the 
newest addition to his affections is 
Jean Kelton — let's see, how many does 
that make now? 

At first I thought I'd have a sure- 
fire news Item with Carolyn Graybill 
and Aldo until I saw that young man 
out with Emily Botdorf the other night. 
But then he's back with Carolyn again 
so it's O.K. to add them to your list 
of prospective steadies, and I think now 
we can put down Ira and Joan Reyner 
too, and Fae Smith and one of those 
boys I used to teach history to— Jack 
Trease of Selinsgrove. 

Marty's boyfriend was here again- 
only this time I got to see him for my- 
self— yummy!!! ! Ben's mother and 
June Hoffman's mother were here too 
— and that takes care of the Hazleton 
news for this week. 

Mary Jane Zane's twin brother sure 
does look sharp in that uniform— from 
what I hear this was a surprise visit, 
but what a surprise! ill Velma Shook's 
mother came to see her daughter and 
S. U. too. 

Couldn't tell the difference between 
the front porch of Seibert Hall and a 
5th Avenue, N. Y., fashion show two 
Saturdays ago when the gang gathered 
there— Elaine, Smitty, Bobbie, Joan, 
Toby, Paula, Lucille, and whom I took 
to be Luc i lie's sister and another friend 
— really caught the eye!!! 

Wish I were a little mouse so I could 
be there for the reunion Jean Kinzer 
and a boy that she hasn't seen in four 
years (who's home on a furlough)! 
Talk about exciting events j "Bubbles" 
is having a reunion to— ^wlth a man 
who's been away for two years. How 
long Rubye Meyers' Ensign Jimmy has 
been absent I don't know, but she's 
home to see him nevertheless. 

And now it's time to say Bye, kids! 
Here's to bigger and better gossiping 
in the future. 



LaVerne 



TUESDAY, APRIL 24, 1945 



THE SUSQUEHANNA, SELIN8GB.0VE, PENNSYLVANIA 



PAGE THREE 



OURFROSH NEWS ON OUR CAMPUS 



ROY STAHL who towers 6' comes 
from Pittston. He is majoring In the 
Music Education Course and would 
like to go to graduate school when he 
leaves S. U. For reading pleasure he 
enjoys the Etude Magazine or "Grapes 
of Wrath." Joseph Cotton is his fav- 
orite actor, Fred Waring his favorite 
orchestra leader, and "I'm Confessing" 
his favorite song. Along the food lines 
Roy prefers a nice big steak. Here's 
another Navy rooter. 

ELEANOR STEELE, who comes from 
the capitol city of Harrisburg, is 5' C" 
tall. Hockey and baseball are her fav- ] 
orite sports. She is majoring in Eng- 
lish. Her favorite orchestra is that of 
Charlie Splvak, and her favorite song : 
is "My Heart Sings." The "Reader's 
Digest" and mystery books provide 
Eleanor with interesting reading ma- 
terial. Among other favorites are 
cherry pie a la mode, Greer Garson, 
Van Johnson, and a fox terrier, "Tim- 
my." Service preference — Army Air ! 
Force Intelligence. 

ELLEN STEIN is 5' 3" tall and comes ; 
from South Orange, N. J. She is also 
majoring in English and expects to 
marry when she leaves S. U. You can 
always hear her talking of "my Bill." 
"Everything I Love" is her favorite 
song. She enjoys the books of Oscar 
Wilde and A. J. Cronin and the "Cos- 
mopolitan." Horseback riding Ls her 
favorite sport. Ice cream, Greer Gar- 
son, and Charlie Spivak aLso rank high 
with Ellen. 

MARIE STOUT claiming Neptune, 
N. Y, as her hometown is 5' 3" tall. 
Her hobby is collecting records. This 
wee lass prefers the Navy "because my 
ideal is in it." Marie is majoring in 
the Commercial Education Course and 
would like to be an accountant. "Our 
Hearts Were Young and Gay" is her 
favorite book, but she also enjoys the 
"Reader's Digest." Among other fav- 
orites are swimming, steak, dogs, Joan 
Fontaine, Tommy Dorsey, and "Senti- 
mental Journey." 

RITA SWEEDLER better known as 
"Toby," is 5' 2V tall and comes from 
Larchmont, N. Y. "Toby" is taking the 
two year Business Course and expects 
to work then get married. Ice skating 
and tennis are her favorite sports. She 
prefers the Army Air Corps. Tommy 
Dorsey is her favorite orchestra leader 
and "Always" her favorite song. "Toby" 
enjoys romantic and mystery books and 
the "American" magazine. Chocolate 
cuke, cats, Gregory Peck, and tap danc- 
ing also rank high with her Hobby- 
collecting pictures of Walt. 



Kappa Delta Phi 

Tuesday, April 10, a buffet supper 
was given to the active members by 
the honorary members. The supper 
Was delicious and enjoyed by every- j 
one. 

A bowling party was held on Friday, 
April 13. All members, actives and 
pledges, attended. They met in Sei- 
bert and then left for Sunbury, where 
tin y competed for top score. 

The ni'vv officers elected for next year 
are: President, Betty Jane Heir; vice 
president, Helen Eby; secretary, Gayle 
Clark; financial secretary, Ruth Wil- 
liams; treasurer, Mary LiZZlo. 



Omega Delta Sigma 

On Friday, April 13, at four o'clock, 
the active members of the sorority for- 
mally initiated three new honorary 
members into the sorority. They were: 
Mrs. Garfield Phillips, Mrs. Joseph Ing- 
ham, and Mrs. Mark Bogar. 

The actives and pledges are having 
their regular monthly "get-together" 
on Sunday night, April 22, in the sor- 
ority room at nine-thirty 
S 

Biemic Society 

Dr. George Robinson was guest 
speaker at the regular monthly meet- 
ing of the Biemic Society which was 
held OH April 12. The subject of his 
speech wa.s the different phases of 
geometry. Members of the society were 
reminded to pay their dues at this 
meeting which was held in Steele 100 
and which was presided over by the 
president. Nancy Myers. 



Sigma Alpha Iota 

On Thursday, April 12, S. A. I. held 
Its Farewell Service for the seniors, and 
the installation service for the new offi- 
cers. On Monday, April 23, Mrs. Sue 
Sullivan, the Province President, visited | 
the S.A.I, chapter on campus. Each of j 
the officers had a private conference 
with her, as well as Dr. Sheldon, Mrs. j 
Sheldon, and Miss Unangst. The regu- 
lar sorority meeting was held at five 
o'clock Monday afternoon, followed by 
a banquet in Horton Dining Hall. Af- 
ter the banquet the sorority members 
and pledges attended the local theater, 
to see "Music for Millions." Each year 
Mrs. Sullivan visits all of the chapters 
in her province, supervising the work 
that has been done, and helping with 
the program for the following year. 
S 

Student Recital 

Students of the Conservatory will 
present a recital at 4:15 p. m. Friday, 
April 27, in Seibert Chapel. The class 
will open with three selections by the 
freshman trombone class. Other stu- 
dents participating will be as follows: 
Piano solos— Nedia Polanchyck, Jean 
! Strausser, Nancy Bolig, Jean Kelton, 
; Frosta Arseniu, Virginia Walker, and 
< Marie Klick. 

Vocal solos— Marjorie Mengel, Robert 
Surplus, Elro Hacker, Elise Thompson, 
Anna Miller. Florence Strouse, Hope 
i Harl> son. 

Organ solo— Dexter Weikel. 
Flute solo— Mina Sarba. 



DEBATE TEAM 

(Continued from Page 1) 

bated at this time is the compulsory 
arbitration of labor disputes. This par- 
ticular debate will be one of the cross 
question type in which a ten minute 
period of cross questioning is held. 

Dr. Russell Gilbert hopes that every- 
one will show support of the team and 
courtesy to the Penn State Women's 
team by attending this debate. 



WHITMER-STEELE 
COMPANY 

LUMBER MANUFACTURERS 
NORTHUMBERLAND, PA. 



MILLER'S 

Where Eds and Co- Ed's Meet 
For Many Good Things to Eat 

Corner Pine and Orange Streets 
3 Block* from Campus 



-Buy War Bonds and Stamps. 



MILLER BROS. 
SHOE STORE 

SUNBURY, PA. 



Dr. Win. Russ to Teach 
At State This Summer 



George B. Rine FLORIST 



HOUSE St- 
STORE 145 



T 
Y 



Dr. William A. Russ, Jr.. head of the 
department Of history and political 
.science at Susquehanna University, will 
be numbered among the visiting fac- 
ulty members at the Penn State Sum- 
mer Sessions. 

Dr. Russ will teach a scries of courses 
in American history. 

Frederick C. Stevens, director of the 
department of music in Dickinson 
Seminary, Williamsport, will substitute 
for Dr. Russ during Susquehanna's 
Summer School. 



The First National Bank of Selins Grove 



WELCOMES STUDENTS' ACCOUNTS 



us 
buv 



BOB COX, x'46, ARNOLD 
MESZAROS, x'4C, KILLED; 

(Continued from Page 1) 
School in 1942 and was enrolled in the 
Business Administration course here at 
Susquehanna. He was an active mem- 
ber Of the bushv !H society and also a 
member Of Phi Mu Delta Fraternity. 

Sgt. Buyer enlisted May 31. 1943, and 
was sent overseas in May, 1944 and has 
seen action in Italy, France, Belgium, 
and Germany. 
Pvt. Wilfrid J 

Pvt. Wilfred 
insgrove, was 
prison camp April 5 
hospital in England, 



to 
State 



Sheetz 

J. Sheetz, x'4G, of Sel- 
freed irom a German 
and is now in a 
where he is un- 
dergoing a checkup. He wa.s in a 
prison camp 35 miles from Frankfurt 
and had been reported missing in ac- 
tion December 20, 1944, and later he 
was revealed to have been captured by 
the Germans. Sheetz had been in com- 
bat since July and had fought through 
the battles of Aachen and the RUTtfen 
Forest without injury. Just before his 
capture he had been in a rest camp m 
Luxembourg. He was one of the 30 
men of Susquehanna who left with the 
Army Reserve on Feb. 13, 1943 



ALL SOLDIER ORCHESTRA 
TO PRESENT CONCERT 

i Continued from Page 1> 
out that the meeting is to make 
aware of our continued duty 
stamps and bonds. 

Also on this program, the U. S. Treas- 
ury Flag, which the students of Sus- 
quehanna have earned the right to fly 
by having over 90"; student partici- 
pation will be officially presented 
the school by a member of the 
War Finance Committee 

••The Infantry Concert Group" is an 
organisation Of enlisted men who are 
permanently stationed at Camp Gor- 
don, Georgia. Most of the men have 
appeared in the symphony orchestras 
of Philadelphia, Pittsburgh, Chicago, or 
over the n.b.c. and c.B.s. concert or- 
chestral. The program, which will fea- 
ture light classics and symphonic ex- 
cerpts will consist of waltWB and tan- 
gos. The orchestra will play a num- 
ber ol pieces by Dave Rose, Jerome 
Kern, and Hoagy Carmichael such as 
•Star Dust," "Holiday for Strings" and 
"Tile Plight Of the Bumble Bee." 

Also Pic. Alvin Rudnitsky will play 
"Introduction and Tarentella" on a 
$4f>,000 violin. 

In the afternoon this same orchestra 
will give a concert in the western part 
of the county. Susquehanna can feel 
proud that she has been chosen the 
site for this line program 



Fine fob Printing 
THE SELINSGROVE TIMES 



Quality Only the Finest 

NATIONAL RESTAURANT 

Hotel and Dining Service 



29 N. Market St. 



Selinsgrove, p&. 




For School News Rend 

SUNBURY DAILY ITEM 



For 

education. 



SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

SELINSGROVE, PENNSYLVANIA 

Co-educational — Accredited 

more than eighty-six years in the service of Christian higher 



Curricula: 



LIBERAL ARTS BUSINESS 

COMMERCIAL EDUCATION 

For Catalog write 



MUSIC 



Q. Morris Smith, D.D., LL.D., Pres. 
Russell Gait, Ph.D., Dean 



PAGE FOUR 



THE SUSQUEHANNA, SELINSGROVE, PENNSYLVANIA 



TUESDAY, APRIL 24, 1945 



SUSQUEHANNA NINE 
OPENS SEASON WITH 
5 - 1 WIN OVER FHS 



On Wednesday ufternoon, April li. 
the Susquehanna University baseball 
nine defeated it.- flrsl foe, Freebui'H 
High School, by a score oi 5-1, I'his 
year baseball is conducted in an in- 
formal manner at S U. because oi the 
wartime college curriculum, No defin- 
ite schedule has been compiled; how- 
ever, Coach Stagy expects to have ,i 
game each Wednesday afternoon at 4 
P. M. on the University diamond 

The chief highlights oi last week 
game were the excellent pitching 
displayed by senior hurler Ceio LrHzcl 
and junior pitcher "Bernie" Swiencki I Con« 
Leitzel's record against his high ehoo] 
alma mater in tour innings was: '.! hi!.-. 
runs, walks, and 3 strike-outs, while 
Swiencki's record in the remaining 
three innings was: 2 hits. 1 run, 'A 
walks, and 5 strike-outs. Susque- j Warnei 



ministration student. Miss Hazen is a 
junlur from Sunbury in the Liberal 
Arts course. 



maugh, Pa., is Advertising Manager 
and Leah Cryder, a sophomore from 
Woolrich, Pa., is Circulation Manager. 



illation of the new members will i Wednesday morning in the Chapel, 
lace on May 3, after which the a Public election for the offices of the 



Scotland, .June Hoffman and Nan My- 
ers gaVs a very splendid interpretation 
of the Highland Fling. 

F illnwing this Virginia Halloclc, Ruth 
Cochi :. ■ Hop* Spicer, Peggy Bath- 

\a\ Virginia Doss, and Marie Stout members ol the old and new council I Susquehanna Publishing Association 

gavi a Swedish Dal Dance and a Rus- will go in the Colonial for its annual , wil1 De ,ield - The candidates are: Presi- 

-ian Cabin Dance dinner All girls of the student body !dent> GHorla Gasparoli, Marie Klick; 

i b; Sw dler and Paula Moskio- must attend the installation service. Secretary, Jean Wheat, Jane Malkames, 
wilz, as Negroes, did a specialty tap : The members ol t lie retiring council 
dance number. jar: as follows: president, Mary Eliza- 

And Lh n four "sailors," Peggy Min- beth Basehoar; Judiciary chairman, 

ier. Bobbie Kain, Marjorie Johns and La Verne Kohn; house president, Coi- 

Hilda Murkey, did another tap dance. »»ne Kahn; social chairman, Jane 



1 1. Ghosts of Hilo" was presented 
unci direct d by the senior class of the 
Conservator} ol Music. 'Flic following 
were in charge of the production: Oen- 



Milkaines: publicity chairman. Jean 
< ii'ii'ci'. inter-sorority representative, 
1 ,■ HU.M Kl csge 



i.il Chairman— Mrs, Alice Giauque; 



secretary -treasurer, 
darn Klick; Women's Athletic Asso- 
ciation and day student representative, 
l •■: mc-fs Hit linger, sophomore repre- 
Miriam Gurth; Stage Manager ,,,llillivt '. Nancy Myers, and freshman 
Loui e Kresge; Properties and Seen- reprcsenitttlve, Eleanor Steele, 
try- Howard Payne; Make-up— -Mar- 



B.K.W. COACH LINE 

Tries to give the College Students 
the best service, especially the Sun- 
bury Students. Why TRAVEL with 
an individual? The Coach Line In- 
sures every person. THINK THAT 
OVER. 



aret Waiters 



Costumes 



Gloria 



ART GELNETT TO HEAD 



Machaiuer: Business Manager -- Jack "SUSQUEHANNA" 



STONER'S 
CREDIT JEWELERS 

SUNBURY, PA. 



hanna's lineup was as follows: 
Susquehanna 

Mould, catcher 
Leitzel, pitcher 
Boyer, first base 
Moore, second base 
Culp, shortstop 
Kocsis, third base 
Wolf, left field 
Taylor, center held 
Wasserburg. right field 
Swiencki, pitcher 

— __-S 

OPERETTA, "GHOSTS or HILO," 
DANCES SCORE GREAT SUCCESS 



Following the operetta a social hour 
wa; held In the social Rooms of Sel- 

.' Hall. [I was indeed a strange sight 
to see Hawaiians" jitterbuging or 
hungrily devouring the refreshments 
provided there. 

Although the performance itsell is 

now a thing of the past, we know that 
Tlu Ghosts of Hilo" will long be re- 
membered al S. U.' 

— a 

MARIE KLICK ELECTED 
\VS( PRESIDENT 

i Continued from Page l * 

Mil Wh il i a junior Business Ad- 



i Continued from Page 1) 
Omega and Women's Judiciary Com- 
mittec Other offices held by Miss Bar- 
ton are Secretary of the Women's Ath- 
letic Association and Treasurer of the 
junior class. 

Mar) l,r/./io. a sophomore from Cone- 



i Continued from Page l < 

During the rite; I lh li bi fi i 

Mails breaks the drum of the "Little 
Sister," and finds a note hidden within 
it. The note reveals that the child I 
a real princess. Everyone Is overjoyed 
with this marvelous news, so the fes- 
tivities are resumed, and the Peasl ol 
Laka progresses with great gaity 

The leading characters oi the oper- 
etta were portrayed ■•-■ follow* Prin 
cess of Hilo— Jean Strausser; Maiie 
Carmen Beckwith; "Little Sister" 
Jeanette Kramer; Kuulel, favorite i>l 
the Princess— Marjorie Staple! on. 

Following the operetta a number ol 
Dance routines ware presented by Mi. 
shure which received very favorable 
comment. 

The first dar.ee was a Walt/ With 
Ann Gibson. Jewel MacNonutrru, and 
Bobby Racion/.er. 

And then in the eu luines ul nativi 



FEHR'S 

I HI STOKE THAT LEADS 
IN BETTER MERCHANDISE 



P. A. BRILL CO, 

I lour ( overlltft — Awnings — Shades 
Draperies 

419 Market St. Phone 2180 Sunburv 



HOTEL GOVERNOR 

SNYDER 

GOOD HOME COOKING 



SNAYELY'S 

( OI.I.EGE El'RNISHINGS 
AND SHOES 



CHILDREN'S SHOP 

MARY II. BURNS 

Clothes for the College Girl 



Markley-AItvater 

BETTER STUDENTS CLOTHES 
SUNBURY, PA. 



VISIT THE 

REXALL 
DRUG STORE 

WILLIAM J. COTT, Druggist 



CRYSTAL PURE ICE 

CHARLES W. KELLER 

Manufacturer and Wholesaler 



Kbert's 5c to $1.00 
Store 

Susquehanna Stationery 
SELINSGROVE 



HACKETTS 

Hardware Stores 



:t'J. r i Market St., 70C Market St 



ALSO \iiinii i ill i;«. pa. 



S. U. BOOK STORE 

SUSQUEHANNA 

NOTEBOOKS 
STATIONERY 



SCHOOL FASHIONS 

ROSENBLUM'S 

SUNBURY. PA. 
KMART FEMININE APPAREL 



WATCH REPAIR 

Susquehanna Jewelry 
Fountain Pens and Pencils 

W. M. VALSING 

JEWELER SELINSGROVE, PA. 



THE BON TON 

Personally Selected 

COATS, DRESSES, HATS 

Sunbury, I's, 



REICHLEY'S 

WHERE STUDENTS 
MEET AND EAT 



When you think of Photography 
Think or 

Sehindler Studio 

515 Market Street, Sunbury, Ps. 
ALso Framing and Photo Finishing 



STEFFEN'S 

FINE FOODS— STATIONERY 

Greeting Cards for Every Occasion 

SELINSGROVE, PA. 



VOIR 

INSURANCE 

lines dobule duty for 

you! Pro v i (I e s a 

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MINNEAPOLIS, 2, Herman L. Ekern, President 



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