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Full text of "TheCompleteMemoirsOfGeorgeSherston"

and one soon forgets the bad times; it's probably
something to do with being in the open air so much
and getting such a lot of exercise. . . . It's only when
one gets away from it that one begins to realize how
stupid and wasteful it all is. What I feel now is that if
it's got to go on there ought to be a jolly sound reason
for it, and I can't help thinking that the troops are
being done in the eye by the people in control." I
qualified these temperate remarks by explaining that
I was only telling him how it had affected me person-
ally; I had been comparatively lucky, and could now
see the War as it affected infantry soldiers who were
having an infinitely worse time than I'd ever hadó
particularly the privates.

When I enquired whether any peace negotiations
were being attempted, Markington said that England
had been asked by the new Russian Government, in
April, to state definitely her War Aims and to publish
the secret treaties made between England and Russia
early in the War. We had refused to state our terms or
publish the treaties. "How damned rotten of us!" I
exclaimed, and I am afraid that my instinctive reac-
tion was a savage desire to hit (was it Mr. Lloyd
George?) very hard on the nose. Markington was
bitter against the military caste in all countries. He
said that all the administrative departments in
Whitehall were trying to get the better of one another,
which resulted in muddle and waste on an unprece-
dented scale. He told me that I should find the same
sort of things described in Tolstoi's War and Peace,
adding that if once the common soldier became articu-
late the War couldn't last a month. Soon afterwards
he sighed and said he must be getting back to the
office; he had his article to write and the paper went
to press that evening. When we parted in Pall Mall

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