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Full text of "TheCompleteMemoirsOfGeorgeSherston"

defence and liberation, has now become a war of aggression
and conquest. I believe that the purposes for which I and my
fellow soldiers entered upon this War should have been so clearly
stated as to have made it impossible to change them, and that,
had this been done, the objects which actuated us would now
be attainable by negotiation. I have seen and endured the
sufferings of the troops, and I can no longer be a parly to pro-
long these sufferings for ends which I believe to be evil and
unjust. I am not protesting against the conduct of the War,
but against the political errors and insincerities for which the
fighting men are being sacrificed. On behalf of those who are
suffering now I make this protest against the deception which
is being practised on them; also I believe that I may help to
destroy the callous complacency with which the majority of
those at home regard the continuance of agonies which they do
not share, and which they have not sufficient imagination to
realize" It certainly sounds a bit pompous, I thought,
and God only knows what the Colonel will think of it.

Thus ended a most miserable morning's work. After
lunch I walked down the hill to the pillar-box and
posted my letters with a feeling of stupefied finality.
I then realized that I had a headache and Captain
Huxtable was coming to tea. Lying on my bed with
the window curtains drawn, I compared the prospect
of being in a prison cell with the prosy serenity of
this buzzing summer afternoon. I could hear the
cooing of the white pigeons and the soft clatter of
their \viftgs as they fluttered down to the little bird-
bath on the lawn. My sense of the life-learned house
and garden enveloped me as though all the summers
I had ever known were returning in a single thought.
I had felt the same a year ago, but going back to the
War next day hadn't been as bad as this.

Theoretically, to-day's tea-party would have made
excellent material for a domestic day-dream when I

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